Wavelet Toolbox User's Guide

Wavelet Toolbox User's Guide
Wavelet Toolbox™ 4
User’s Guide
Michel Misiti
Yves Misiti
Georges Oppenheim
Jean-Michel Poggi
Revision History
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Wavelet Toolbox™ User’s Guide
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Acknowledgments
The authors wish to express their gratitude to all the colleagues who directly
or indirectly contributed to the making of the Wavelet Toolbox™ software.
Specifically
• For the wavelet questions to Pierre-Gilles Lemarié-Rieusset (Evry) and Yves
Meyer (ENS Cachan)
• For the statistical questions to Lucien Birgé (Paris 6), Pascal Massart
(Paris 11) and Marc Lavielle (Paris 5)
• To David Donoho (Stanford) and to Anestis Antoniadis (Grenoble), who give
generously so many valuable ideas
Colleagues and friends who have helped us steadily are Patrice Abry (ENS
Lyon), Samir Akkouche (Ecole Centrale de Lyon), Mark Asch (Paris 11),
Patrice Assouad (Paris 11), Roger Astier (Paris 11), Jean Coursol (Paris 11),
Didier Dacunha-Castelle (Paris 11), Claude Deniau (Marseille), Patrick
Flandrin (Ecole Normale de Lyon), Eric Galin (Ecole Centrale de Lyon),
Christine Graffigne (Paris 5), Anatoli Juditsky (Grenoble), Gérard
Kerkyacharian (Paris 10), Gérard Malgouyres (Paris 11), Olivier Nowak (Ecole
Centrale de Lyon), Dominique Picard (Paris 7), and Franck Tarpin-Bernard
(Ecole Centrale de Lyon).
Several student groups have tested preliminary versions.
One of our first opportunities to apply the ideas of wavelets connected with
signal analysis and its modeling occurred during a close and pleasant
cooperation with the team “Analysis and Forecast of the Electrical
Consumption” of Electricité de France (Clamart-Paris) directed first by
Jean-Pierre Desbrosses, and then by Hervé Laffaye, and which included Xavier
Brossat, Yves Deville, and Marie-Madeleine Martin.
Many thanks to those who tested and helped to refine the software and the
printed matter and at last to The MathWorks group and specially to Roy Lurie,
Jim Tung, Bruce Sesnovich, Jad Succari, Jane Carmody, and Paul Costa.
And finally, apologies to those we may have omitted.
About the Authors
Michel Misiti, Georges Oppenheim, and Jean-Michel Poggi are mathematics
professors at Ecole Centrale de Lyon, University of Marne-La-Vallée and
Paris 5 University. Yves Misiti is a research engineer specializing in Computer
Sciences at Paris 11 University.
The authors are members of the “Laboratoire de Mathématique” at
Orsay-Paris 11 University France. Their fields of interest are statistical signal
processing, stochastic processes, adaptive control, and wavelets. The authors’
group, established more than 15 years ago, has published numerous theoretical
papers and carried out applications in close collaboration with industrial
teams. For instance:
• Robustness of the piloting law for a civilian space launcher for which an
expert system was developed
• Forecasting of the electricity consumption by nonlinear methods
• Forecasting of air pollution
Notes by Yves Meyer
The history of wavelets is not very old, at most 10 to 15 years. The field
experienced a fast and impressive start, characterized by a close-knit
international community of researchers who freely circulated scientific
information and were driven by the researchers’ youthful enthusiasm. Even as
the commercial rewards promised to be significant, the ideas were shared, the
trials were pooled together, and the successes were shared by the community.
There are lots of successes for the community to share. Why? Probably because
the time is ripe. Fourier techniques were liberated by the appearance of
windowed Fourier methods that operate locally on a time-frequency approach.
In another direction, Burt-Adelson’s pyramidal algorithms, the quadrature
mirror filters, and filter banks and subband coding are available. The
mathematics underlying those algorithms existed earlier, but new computing
techniques enabled researchers to try out new ideas rapidly. The numerical
image and signal processing areas are blooming.
The wavelets bring their own strong benefits to that environment: a local
outlook, a multiscaled outlook, cooperation between scales, and a time-scale
analysis. They demonstrate that sines and cosines are not the only useful
functions and that other bases made of weird functions serve to look at new
foreign signals, as strange as most fractals or some transient signals.
Recently, wavelets were determined to be the best way to compress a huge
library of fingerprints. This is not only a milestone that highlights the practical
value of wavelets, but it has also proven to be an instructive process for the
researchers involved in the project. Our initial intuition generally was that the
proper way to tackle this problem of interweaving lines and textures was to use
wavelet packets, a flexible technique endowed with quite a subtle sharpness of
analysis and a substantial compression capability. However, it was a
biorthogonal wavelet that emerged victorious and at this time represents the
best method in terms of cost as well as speed. Our intuitions led one way, but
implementing the methods settled the issue by pointing us in the right
direction.
For wavelets, the period of growth and intuition is becoming a time of
consolidation and implementation. In this context, a toolbox is not only
possible, but valuable. It provides a working environment that permits
experimentation and enables implementation.
Since the field still grows, it has to be vast and open. The Wavelet Toolbox
product addresses this need, offering an array of tools that can be organized
according to several criteria:
• Synthesis and analysis tools
• Wavelet and wavelet packets approaches
• Signal and image processing
• Discrete and continuous analyses
• Orthogonal and redundant approaches
• Coding, de-noising and compression approaches
What can we anticipate for the future, at least in the short term? It is difficult
to make an accurate forecast. Nonetheless, it is reasonable to think that the
pace of development and experimentation will carry on in many different fields.
Numerical analysis constantly uses new bases of functions to encode its
operators or to simplify its calculations to solve partial differential equations.
The analysis and synthesis of complex transient signals touches musical
instruments by studying the striking up, when the bow meets the cello string.
The analysis and synthesis of multifractal signals, whose regularity (or rather
irregularity) varies with time, localizes information of interest at its
geographic location. Compression is a booming field, and coding and de-noising
are promising.
For each of these areas, the Wavelet Toolbox software provides a way to
introduce, learn, and apply the methods, regardless of the user’s experience. It
includes a command-line mode and a graphical user interface mode, each very
capable and complementing to the other. The user interfaces help the novice to
get started and the expert to implement trials. The command line provides an
open environment for experimentation and addition to the graphical interface.
In the journey to the heart of a signal’s meaning, the toolbox gives the traveler
both guidance and freedom: going from one point to the other, wandering from
a tree structure to a superimposed mode, jumping from low to high scale, and
skipping a breakdown point to spot a quadratic chirp. The time-scale graphs of
continuous analysis are often breathtaking and more often than not
enlightening as to the structure of the signal.
Here are the tools, waiting to be used.
Yves Meyer
Professor, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan and Institut de France
Notes by Ingrid Daubechies
Wavelet transforms, in their different guises, have come to be accepted as a set
of tools useful for various applications. Wavelet transforms are good to have at
one’s fingertips, along with many other mostly more traditional tools.
Wavelet Toolbox software is a great way to work with wavelets. The toolbox,
together with the power of MATLAB® software, really allows one to write
complex and powerful applications, in a very short amount of time. The
Graphic User Interface is both user-friendly and intuitive. It provides an
excellent interface to explore the various aspects and applications of wavelets;
it takes away the tedium of typing and remembering the various function calls.
Ingrid C. Daubechies
Professor, Princeton University, Department of Mathematics and Program in
Applied and Computational Mathematics
1
Product Overview
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Product Overview
Everywhere around us are signals that can be analyzed. For example, there are
seismic tremors, human speech, engine vibrations, medical images, financial
data, music, and many other types of signals. Wavelet analysis is a new and
promising set of tools and techniques for analyzing these signals.
Wavelet Toolbox™ software is a collection of functions built on the MATLAB®
technical computing environment. It provides tools for the analysis and
synthesis of signals and images, and tools for statistical applications, using
wavelets and wavelet packets within the framework of MATLAB.
The MathWorks™ provides several products that are relevant to the kinds of
tasks you can perform with the toolbox. For more information about any of
these products, see the products section of The MathWorks Web site.
Wavelet Toolbox software provides two categories of tools:
The second category of tools is a collection of graphical interface tools that
afford access to extensive functionality. Access these tools from the command
line by typing
wavemenu
Note The examples in this guide are generated using Wavelet Toolbox
software with the DWT extension mode set to 'zpd' (for zero padding), except
when it is explicitly mentioned. So if you want to obtain exactly the same
numerical results, type dwtmode('zpd'), before to execute the example code.
In most of the command-line examples, figures are displayed. To clarify the
presentation, the plotting commands are partially or completely omitted. To
reproduce the displayed figures exactly, you would need to insert some
graphical commands in the example code.
• Command-line functions
• Graphical interactive tools
The first category of tools is made up of functions that you can call directly from
the command line or from your own applications. Most of these functions are
M-files, series of statements that implement specialized wavelet analysis or
synthesis algorithms. You can view the code for these functions using the
following statement:
type function_name
You can view the header of the function, the help part, using the statement
help function_name
A summary list of the Wavelet Toolbox functions is available to you by typing
help wavelet
You can change the way any toolbox function works by copying and renaming
the M-file, then modifying your copy. You can also extend the toolbox by adding
your own M-files.
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1
Installing Wavelet Toolbox™ Software
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Background Reading
Wavelet Toolbox™ software provides a complete introduction to wavelets and
assumes no previous knowledge of the area. The toolbox allows you to use
wavelet techniques on your own data immediately and develop new insights.
It is our hope that, through the use of these practical tools, you may want to
explore the beautiful underlying mathematics and theory.
Excellent supplementary texts provide complementary treatments of wavelet
theory and practice (see “References” on page 6-155). For instance:
• Burke-Hubbard [Bur96] is an historical and up-to-date text presenting the
concepts using everyday words.
• Daubechies [Dau92] is a classic for the mathematics.
• Kaiser [Kai94] is a mathematical tutorial, and a physics-oriented book.
• Mallat [Mal98] is a 1998 book, which includes recent developments, and
consequently is one of the most complete.
• Meyer [Mey93] is the “father” of the wavelet books.
• Strang-Nguyen [StrN96] is especially useful for signal processing engineers.
It offers a clear and easy-to-understand introduction to two central ideas:
filter banks for discrete signals, and for wavelets. It fully explains the
connection between the two. Many exercises in the book are drawn from
Wavelet Toolbox software.
The Wavelet Digest Internet site (http://www.wavelet.org/) provides much
useful and practical information.
Installing Wavelet Toolbox™ Software
To install this toolbox on your computer, see the appropriate platform-specific
MATLAB® installation guide. To determine if the Wavelet Toolbox™ software
is already installed on your system, check for a subdirectory named wavelet
within the main toolbox directory or folder.
Wavelet Toolbox software can perform signal or image analysis. For indexed
images or truecolor images (represented by m-by-n-by-3 arrays of uint8), all
wavelet functions use floating-point operations. To avoid Out of Memory errors,
be sure to allocate enough memory to process various image sizes.
The memory can be real RAM or can be a combination of RAM and virtual
memory. See your operating system documentation for how to configure virtual
memory.
System Recommendations
While not a requirement, we recommend you obtain Signal Processing
Toolbox™ and Image Processing Toolbox™ software to use in conjunction with
the Wavelet Toolbox software. These toolboxes provide complementary
functionality that give you maximum flexibility in analyzing and processing
signals and images.
This manual makes no assumption that your computer is running any other
MATLAB toolboxes.
Platform-Specific Details
Some details of the use of the Wavelet Toolbox software may depend on your
hardware or operating system.
Windows Fonts
We recommend you set your operating system to use “Small Fonts.” Set this
option by clicking the Display icon in your desktop’s Control Panel (accessible
through the SettingsŸControl Panel submenu). Select the Configuration option,
and then use the Font Size menu to change to Small Fonts. You’ll have to restart
Windows® for this change to take effect.
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1
Wavelet Applications
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Wavelet Applications
Fonts for Non-Windows Platforms
We recommend you set your operating system to use standard default fonts.
However, for all platforms, if you prefer to use large fonts, some of the labels in
the GUI figures may be illegible when using the default display mode of the
toolbox. To change the default mode to accept large fonts, use the wtbxmngr
function. (For more information, see either the wtbxmngr help or its reference
page.)
Mouse Compatibility
Wavelet Toolbox software was designed for three distinct types of mouse
control.
Left Mouse Button
Middle Mouse Button
Right Mouse Button
Make selections.
Activate controls.
Display cross-hairs to
show position-dependent
information.
Translate plots up and
down, and left and
right.
Wavelets have scale aspects and time aspects, consequently every application
has scale and time aspects. To clarify them we try to untangle the aspects
somewhat arbitrarily.
For scale aspects, we present one idea around the notion of local regularity. For
time aspects, we present a list of domains. When the decomposition is taken as
a whole, the de-noising and compression processes are center points.
Scale Aspects
As a complement to the spectral signal analysis, new signal forms appear. They
are less regular signals than the usual ones.
r
The cusp signal presents a very quick local variation. Its equation is t with t
close to 0 and 0 < r < 1. The lower r the sharper the signal.
To illustrate this notion physically, imagine you take a piece of aluminum foil;
The surface is very smooth, very regular. You first crush it into a ball, and then
you spread it out so that it looks like a surface. The asperities are clearly
visible. Each one represents a two-dimension cusp and analog of the one
dimensional cusp. If you crush again the foil, more tightly, in a more compact
ball, when you spread it out, the roughness increases and the regularity
decreases.
Several domains use the wavelet techniques of regularity study:
Shift +
Option +
• Biology for cell membrane recognition, to distinguish the normal from the
pathological membranes
• Metallurgy for the characterization of rough surfaces
Note The functionality of the middle mouse button and the right mouse
button can be inverted depending on the platform.
• Finance (which is more surprising), for detecting the properties of quick
variation of values
• In Internet traffic description, for designing the services size
For more information, see “Using the Mouse” on page A-4.
Time Aspects
Let’s switch to time aspects. The main goals are:
• Rupture and edges detection
• Study of short-time phenomena as transient processes
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1
Fourier Analysis
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
As domain applications, we get:
• Industrial supervision of gear-wheel
• Checking undue noises in craned or dented wheels, and more generally in
nondestructive control quality processes
• Detection of short pathological events as epileptic crises or normal ones as
evoked potentials in EEG (medicine)
Fourier Analysis
Signal analysts already have at their disposal an impressive arsenal of tools.
Perhaps the most well known of these is Fourier analysis, which breaks down
a signal into constituent sinusoids of different frequencies. Another way to
think of Fourier analysis is as a mathematical technique for transforming our
view of the signal from time-based to frequency-based.
• Intermittence in physics
Wavelet Decomposition as a Whole
Many applications use the wavelet decomposition taken as a whole. The
common goals concern the signal or image clearance and simplification, which
are parts of de-noising or compression.
We find many published papers in oceanography and earth studies.
One of the most popular successes of the wavelets is the compression of FBI
fingerprints.
When trying to classify the applications by domain, it is almost impossible to
sum up several thousand papers written within the last 15 years. Moreover, it
is difficult to get information on real-world industrial applications from
companies. They understandably protect their own information.
Some domains are very productive. Medicine is one of them. We can find
studies on micro-potential extraction in EKGs, on time localization of His
bundle electrical heart activity, in ECG noise removal. In EEGs, a quick
transitory signal is drowned in the usual one. The wavelets are able to
determine if a quick signal exists, and if so, can localize it. There are attempts
to enhance mammograms to discriminate tumors from calcifications.
F
Time
Fourier
Transform
Amplitude
• Automatic target recognition
Amplitude
• SAR imagery
Frequency
For many signals, Fourier analysis is extremely useful because the signal’s
frequency content is of great importance. So why do we need other techniques,
like wavelet analysis?
Fourier analysis has a serious drawback. In transforming to the frequency
domain, time information is lost. When looking at a Fourier transform of a
signal, it is impossible to tell when a particular event took place.
If the signal properties do not change much over time — that is, if it is what is
called a stationary signal — this drawback isn’t very important. However, most
interesting signals contain numerous nonstationary or transitory
characteristics: drift, trends, abrupt changes, and beginnings and ends of
events. These characteristics are often the most important part of the signal,
and Fourier analysis is not suited to detecting them.
Another prototypical application is a classification of Magnetic Resonance
Spectra. The study concerns the influence of the fat we eat on our body fat. The
type of feeding is the basic information and the study is intended to avoid
taking a sample of the body fat. Each Fourier spectrum is encoded by some of
its wavelet coefficients. A few of them are enough to code the most interesting
features of the spectrum. The classification is performed on the coded vectors.
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1-9
Wavelet Analysis
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Wavelet Analysis
Time
Fourier
W
Wavelet
Transform
Time
Time
Wavelet Analysis
Transform
While the STFT compromise between time and frequency information can be
useful, the drawback is that once you choose a particular size for the time
window, that window is the same for all frequencies. Many signals require a
more flexible approach — one where we can vary the window size to determine
more accurately either time or frequency.
Frequency
The STFT represents a sort of compromise between the time- and
frequency-based views of a signal. It provides some information about both
when and at what frequencies a signal event occurs. However, you can only
obtain this information with limited precision, and that precision is determined
by the size of the window.
Here’s what this looks like in contrast with the time-based, frequency-based,
and STFT views of a signal:
Time
Time Domain (Shannon)
Amplitude
Frequency Domain (Fourier)
Scale
Time
Amplitude
Time
Frequency
Amplitude
window
Short
Wavelet analysis represents the next logical step: a windowing technique with
variable-sized regions. Wavelet analysis allows the use of long time intervals
where we want more precise low-frequency information, and shorter regions
where we want high-frequency information.
Amplitude
In an effort to correct this deficiency, Dennis Gabor (1946) adapted the Fourier
transform to analyze only a small section of the signal at a time — a technique
called windowing the signal. Gabor’s adaptation, called the Short-Time Fourier
Transform (STFT), maps a signal into a two-dimensional function of time and
frequency.
Scale
Short-Time Fourier Analysis
Frequency
1
Time
STFT (Gabor)
Time
Wavelet Analysis
You may have noticed that wavelet analysis does not use a time-frequency
region, but rather a time-scale region. For more information about the concept
of scale and the link between scale and frequency, see “How to Connect Scale
to Frequency?” on page 6-66.
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1
Wavelet Analysis
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
What Can Wavelet Analysis Do?
One major advantage afforded by wavelets is the ability to perform local
analysis — that is, to analyze a localized area of a larger signal.
Indeed, in their brief history within the signal processing field, wavelets have
already proven themselves to be an indispensable addition to the analyst’s
collection of tools and continue to enjoy a burgeoning popularity today.
Consider a sinusoidal signal with a small discontinuity — one so tiny as to be
barely visible. Such a signal easily could be generated in the real world,
perhaps by a power fluctuation or a noisy switch.
Sinusoid with a small discontinuity
A plot of the Fourier coefficients (as provided by the fft command) of this
signal shows nothing particularly interesting: a flat spectrum with two peaks
representing a single frequency. However, a plot of wavelet coefficients clearly
shows the exact location in time of the discontinuity.
Fourier Coefficients
Wavelet Coefficients
Wavelet analysis is capable of revealing aspects of data that other signal
analysis techniques miss, aspects like trends, breakdown points,
discontinuities in higher derivatives, and self-similarity. Furthermore,
because it affords a different view of data than those presented by traditional
techniques, wavelet analysis can often compress or de-noise a signal without
appreciable degradation.
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1
Continuous Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Continuous Wavelet Transform
What Is Wavelet Analysis?
Now that we know some situations when wavelet analysis is useful, it is
worthwhile asking “What is wavelet analysis?” and even more fundamentally,
“What is a wavelet?”
A wavelet is a waveform of effectively limited duration that has an average
value of zero.
Compare wavelets with sine waves, which are the basis of Fourier analysis.
Sinusoids do not have limited duration — they extend from minus to plus
infinity. And where sinusoids are smooth and predictable, wavelets tend to be
irregular and asymmetric.
...
Mathematically, the process of Fourier analysis is represented by the Fourier
transform:
∞
F(ω) =
³ f ( t )e
–∞
– jωt
dt
which is the sum over all time of the signal f(t) multiplied by a complex
exponential. (Recall that a complex exponential can be broken down into real
and imaginary sinusoidal components.)
The results of the transform are the Fourier coefficients F ( ω ) , which when
multiplied by a sinusoid of frequency ω yield the constituent sinusoidal
components of the original signal. Graphically, the process looks like
...
Fourier
...
Sine Wave
Wavelet (db10)
Transform
Fourier analysis consists of breaking up a signal into sine waves of various
frequencies. Similarly, wavelet analysis is the breaking up of a signal into
shifted and scaled versions of the original (or mother) wavelet.
Just looking at pictures of wavelets and sine waves, you can see intuitively that
signals with sharp changes might be better analyzed with an irregular wavelet
than with a smooth sinusoid, just as some foods are better handled with a fork
than a spoon.
It also makes sense that local features can be described better with wavelets
that have local extent.
Number of Dimensions
Thus far, we’ve discussed only one-dimensional data, which encompasses most
ordinary signals. However, wavelet analysis can be applied to two-dimensional
data (images) and, in principle, to higher dimensional data.
Signal
Constituent sinusoids of different frequencies
Similarly, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is defined as the sum over
all time of the signal multiplied by scaled, shifted versions of the wavelet
function ψ :
∞
C ( scale, position ) =
³ f ( t )ψ ( scale, position, t ) dt
–∞
The results of the CWT are many wavelet coefficients C, which are a function of
scale and position.
This toolbox uses only one- and two-dimensional analysis techniques.
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1
Continuous Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Multiplying each coefficient by the appropriately scaled and shifted wavelet
yields the constituent wavelets of the original signal.
The scale factor works exactly the same with wavelets. The smaller the scale
factor, the more “compressed” the wavelet.
Wavelet
f(t) = ψ(t)
;
a = 1
f ( t ) = ψ ( 2t ) ;
1
a = --2
f ( t ) = ψ ( 4t ) ;
1
a = --4
...
Transform
Signal
Constituent wavelets of different scales and positions
Scaling
We’ve already alluded to the fact that wavelet analysis produces a time-scale
view of a signal, and now we’re talking about scaling and shifting wavelets.
What exactly do we mean by scale in this context?
Scaling a wavelet simply means stretching (or compressing) it.
To go beyond colloquial descriptions such as “stretching,” we introduce the
scale factor, often denoted by the letter a. If we’re talking about sinusoids, for
example, the effect of the scale factor is very easy to see.
f ( t ) = sin ( t ) ;
It is clear from the diagrams that, for a sinusoid sin ( ωt ) , the scale factor a is
related (inversely) to the radian frequency ω . Similarly, with wavelet analysis,
the scale is related to the frequency of the signal. We’ll return to this topic later.
Shifting
Shifting a wavelet simply means delaying (or hastening) its onset.
Mathematically, delaying a function f ( t ) by k is represented by f ( t – k ) :
a = 1
0
0
1
f ( t ) = sin ( 2t ) ; a = --2
1
f ( t ) = sin ( 4t ) ; a = --4
1-16
Wavelet function
ψ(t)
Shifted wavelet function
ψ (t – k)
Five Easy Steps to a Continuous Wavelet Transform
The continuous wavelet transform is the sum over all time of the signal
multiplied by scaled, shifted versions of the wavelet. This process produces
wavelet coefficients that are a function of scale and position.
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Continuous Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
It’s really a very simple process. In fact, here are the five steps of an easy recipe
for creating a CWT:
Signal
1 Take a wavelet and compare it to a section at the start of the original signal.
Wavelet
2 Calculate a number, C, that represents how closely correlated the wavelet is
with this section of the signal. The higher C is, the more the similarity. More
precisely, if the signal energy and the wavelet energy are equal to one, C may
be interpreted as a correlation coefficient.
C = 0.2247
5 Repeat steps 1 through 4 for all scales.
Note that the results will depend on the shape of the wavelet you choose.
When you’re done, you’ll have the coefficients produced at different scales by
different sections of the signal. The coefficients constitute the results of a
regression of the original signal performed on the wavelets.
Signal
How to make sense of all these coefficients? You could make a plot on which the
x-axis represents position along the signal (time), the y-axis represents scale,
and the color at each x-y point represents the magnitude of the wavelet
coefficient C. These are the coefficient plots generated by the graphical tools.
Wavelet
C = 0.0102
Large
Coefficients
3 Shift the wavelet to the right and repeat steps 1 and 2 until you’ve covered
Signal
Scale
the whole signal.
Wavelet
4 Scale (stretch) the wavelet and repeat steps 1 through 3.
Time
1-18
Small
Coefficients
1-19
1
Continuous Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
These coefficient plots resemble a bumpy surface viewed from above. If you
could look at the same surface from the side, you might see something like this:
• High scale a Ÿ Stretched wavelet Ÿ Slowly changing, coarse features Ÿ Low
frequency ω .
Scale of Nature
Scal
e
Coefs
It’s important to understand that the fact that wavelet analysis does not
produce a time-frequency view of a signal is not a weakness, but a strength of
the technique.
Not only is time-scale a different way to view data, it is a very natural way to
view data deriving from a great number of natural phenomena.
Consider a lunar landscape, whose ragged surface (simulated below) is a result
of centuries of bombardment by meteorites whose sizes range from gigantic
boulders to dust specks.
Time
The continuous wavelet transform coefficient plots are precisely the time-scale
view of the signal we referred to earlier. It is a different view of signal data from
the time-frequency Fourier view, but it is not unrelated.
If we think of this surface in cross section as a one-dimensional signal, then it
is reasonable to think of the signal as having components of different scales —
large features carved by the impacts of large meteorites, and finer features
abraded by small meteorites.
Scale and Frequency
Notice that the scales in the coefficients plot (shown as y-axis labels) run from
1 to 31. Recall that the higher scales correspond to the most “stretched”
wavelets. The more stretched the wavelet, the longer the portion of the signal
with which it is being compared, and thus the coarser the signal features being
measured by the wavelet coefficients.
Signal
Wavelet
Low scale
High scale
Thus, there is a correspondence between wavelet scales and frequency as
revealed by wavelet analysis:
• Low scale a Ÿ Compressed wavelet Ÿ Rapidly changing details Ÿ High
frequency ω .
1-20
1-21
1
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Here is a case where thinking in terms of scale makes much more sense than
thinking in terms of frequency. Inspection of the CWT coefficients plot for this
signal reveals patterns among scales and shows the signal’s possibly fractal
nature.
Continuous Wavelet Transform
The CWT is also continuous in terms of shifting: during computation, the
analyzing wavelet is shifted smoothly over the full domain of the analyzed
function.
Even though this signal is artificial, many natural phenomena — from the
intricate branching of blood vessels and trees, to the jagged surfaces of
mountains and fractured metals — lend themselves to an analysis of scale.
What’s Continuous About the Continuous Wavelet
Transform?
Any signal processing performed on a computer using real-world data must be
performed on a discrete signal — that is, on a signal that has been measured
at discrete time. So what exactly is “continuous” about it?
What’s “continuous” about the CWT, and what distinguishes it from the
discrete wavelet transform (to be discussed in the following section), is the set
of scales and positions at which it operates.
Unlike the discrete wavelet transform, the CWT can operate at every scale,
from that of the original signal up to some maximum scale that you determine
by trading off your need for detailed analysis with available computational
horsepower.
1-22
1-23
1
Discrete Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Discrete Wavelet Transform
S
Calculating wavelet coefficients at every possible scale is a fair amount of work,
and it generates an awful lot of data. What if we choose only a subset of scales
and positions at which to make our calculations?
It turns out, rather remarkably, that if we choose scales and positions based on
powers of two — so-called dyadic scales and positions — then our analysis will
be much more efficient and just as accurate. We obtain such an analysis from
the discrete wavelet transform (DWT). For more information on DWT, see
“Algorithms” on page 6-23.
An efficient way to implement this scheme using filters was developed in 1988
by Mallat (see [Mal89] in “References” on page 6-155). The Mallat algorithm is
in fact a classical scheme known in the signal processing community as a
two-channel subband coder (see page 1 of the book Wavelets and Filter Banks,
by Strang and Nguyen [StrN96]).
This very practical filtering algorithm yields a fast wavelet transform — a box
into which a signal passes, and out of which wavelet coefficients quickly
emerge. Let’s examine this in more depth.
One-Stage Filtering: Approximations and Details
For many signals, the low-frequency content is the most important part. It is
what gives the signal its identity. The high-frequency content, on the other
hand, imparts flavor or nuance. Consider the human voice. If you remove the
high-frequency components, the voice sounds different, but you can still tell
what’s being said. However, if you remove enough of the low-frequency
components, you hear gibberish.
In wavelet analysis, we often speak of approximations and details. The
approximations are the high-scale, low-frequency components of the signal.
The details are the low-scale, high-frequency components.
The filtering process, at its most basic level, looks like this.
Filters
low-pass
A
high-pass
D
The original signal, S, passes through two complementary filters and emerges
as two signals.
Unfortunately, if we actually perform this operation on a real digital signal, we
wind up with twice as much data as we started with. Suppose, for instance,
that the original signal S consists of 1000 samples of data. Then the resulting
signals will each have 1000 samples, for a total of 2000.
These signals A and D are interesting, but we get 2000 values instead of the
1000 we had. There exists a more subtle way to perform the decomposition
using wavelets. By looking carefully at the computation, we may keep only one
point out of two in each of the two 2000-length samples to get the complete
information. This is the notion of downsampling. We produce two sequences
called cA and cD.
D
S
~1000 samples
1000 samples
A
S
~1000 samples
cD
~500 coefs
cA
~500 coefs
1000 samples
The process on the right, which includes downsampling, produces DWT
coefficients.
To gain a better appreciation of this process, let’s perform a one-stage discrete
wavelet transform of a signal. Our signal will be a pure sinusoid with
high-frequency noise added to it.
1-24
1-25
1
Discrete Wavelet Transform
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Here is our schematic diagram with real signals inserted into it.
cD High Frequency
Multiple-Level Decomposition
The decomposition process can be iterated, with successive approximations
being decomposed in turn, so that one signal is broken down into many lower
resolution components. This is called the wavelet decomposition tree.
S
S
~500 DWT coefficients
cA1
cA2
1000 data points
cD1
cD2
cA Low Frequency
cA3
~500 DWT coefficients
cD3
Looking at a signal’s wavelet decomposition tree can yield valuable
information.
The MATLAB® code needed to generate s, cD, and cA is
s = sin(20.*linspace(0,pi,1000)) + 0.5.*rand(1,1000);
[cA,cD] = dwt(s,'db2');
S
where db2 is the name of the wavelet we want to use for the analysis.
Notice that the detail coefficients cD are small and consist mainly of a
high-frequency noise, while the approximation coefficients cA contain much
less noise than does the original signal.
cD1
cA1
[length(cA) length(cD)]
ans =
501
cA2
501
You may observe that the actual lengths of the detail and approximation
coefficient vectors are slightly more than half the length of the original signal.
This has to do with the filtering process, which is implemented by convolving
the signal with a filter. The convolution “smears” the signal, introducing
several extra samples into the result.
cA3
cD2
cD3
Number of Levels
Since the analysis process is iterative, in theory it can be continued
indefinitely. In reality, the decomposition can proceed only until the individual
1-26
1-27
1
Wavelet Reconstruction
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
details consist of a single sample or pixel. In practice, you’ll select a suitable
number of levels based on the nature of the signal, or on a suitable criterion
such as entropy (see “Choosing the Optimal Decomposition” on page 6-147).
Wavelet Reconstruction
We’ve learned how the discrete wavelet transform can be used to analyze, or
decompose, signals and images. This process is called decomposition or
analysis. The other half of the story is how those components can be assembled
back into the original signal without loss of information. This process is called
reconstruction, or synthesis. The mathematical manipulation that effects
synthesis is called the inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT).
To synthesize a signal using Wavelet Toolbox™ software, we reconstruct it
from the wavelet coefficients.
H'
H'
S
L'
L'
Where wavelet analysis involves filtering and downsampling, the wavelet
reconstruction process consists of upsampling and filtering. Upsampling is the
process of lengthening a signal component by inserting zeros between samples.
1
2
3
4
Signal component
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10
Upsampled signal component
The toolbox includes commands, like idwt and waverec, that perform
single-level or multilevel reconstruction, respectively, on the components of
one-dimensional signals. These commands have their two-dimensional
analogs, idwt2 and waverec2.
1-28
1-29
1
Wavelet Reconstruction
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Reconstruction Filters
The filtering part of the reconstruction process also bears some discussion,
because it is the choice of filters that is crucial in achieving perfect
reconstruction of the original signal.
The downsampling of the signal components performed during the
decomposition phase introduces a distortion called aliasing. It turns out that
by carefully choosing filters for the decomposition and reconstruction phases
that are closely related (but not identical), we can “cancel out” the effects of
aliasing.
A technical discussion of how to design these filters is available on page 347 of
the book Wavelets and Filter Banks, by Strang and Nguyen. The low- and
high-pass decomposition filters (L and H), together with their associated
reconstruction filters (L' and H'), form a system of what is called quadrature
mirror filters:
cD
cD
S
S
cA
We pass the coefficient vector cA1 through the same process we used to
reconstruct the original signal. However, instead of combining it with the
level-one detail cD1, we feed in a vector of zeros in place of the detail coefficients
vector:
H'
0
~500 zeros
A1
1000 samples
cA1
~500 coefs
L'
The process yields a reconstructed approximation A1, which has the same
length as the original signal S and which is a real approximation of it.
H'
H
It is also possible to reconstruct the approximations and details themselves
from their coefficient vectors. As an example, let’s consider how we would
reconstruct the first-level approximation A1 from the coefficient vector cA1.
Similarly, we can reconstruct the first-level detail D1, using the analogous
process:
cA
L'
L
Decomposition
Reconstruction
H'
cD1
~500 coefs
D1
Reconstructing Approximations and Details
We have seen that it is possible to reconstruct our original signal from the
coefficients of the approximations and details.
1000 samples
0
~500 zeros
L'
The reconstructed details and approximations are true constituents of the
original signal. In fact, we find when we combine them that
H'
cD
~500 coefs
S
cA
~500 coefs
1-30
L'
1000 samples
A1 + D1 = S
Note that the coefficient vectors cA1 and cD1 — because they were produced by
downsampling and are only half the length of the original signal — cannot
directly be combined to reproduce the signal. It is necessary to reconstruct the
approximations and details before combining them.
1-31
1
Wavelet Reconstruction
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Extending this technique to the components of a multilevel analysis, we find
that similar relationships hold for all the reconstructed signal constituents.
That is, there are several ways to reassemble the original signal:
A1
A2
D1
D2
A3
0.5915
S = A1 + D1
= A2 + D2 + D1
= A3 + D3 + D2 + D1
D3
Relationship of Filters to Wavelet Shapes
In the section “Reconstruction Filters” on page 1-30, we spoke of the
importance of choosing the right filters. In fact, the choice of filters not only
determines whether perfect reconstruction is possible, it also determines the
shape of the wavelet we use to perform the analysis.
0.1585
0.0915
If we reverse the order of this vector (see wrev), and then multiply every even
sample by –1, we obtain the high-pass filter H':
Hprime =
0.0915
S
Reconstructed
Signal
Components
Lprime =
0.3415
0.1585
0.5915
0.3415
Next, upsample Hprime by two (see dyadup), inserting zeros in alternate
positions:
HU =
0.0915
0
0.1585
0
0.5915
0
0.3415
Finally, convolve the upsampled vector with the original low-pass
filter:
H2 = conv(HU,Lprime);
plot(H2)
0.3
0.2
To construct a wavelet of some practical utility, you seldom start by drawing a
waveform. Instead, it usually makes more sense to design the appropriate
quadrature mirror filters, and then use them to create the waveform. Let’s see
how this is done by focusing on an example.
0.1
0
−0.1
−0.2
Consider the low-pass reconstruction filter (L') for the db2 wavelet.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
If we iterate this process several more times, repeatedly upsampling and
convolving the resultant vector with the four-element filter vector Lprime, a
pattern begins to emerge.
1
db2 wavelet
0
−1
0
1
2
3
The filter coefficients can be obtained from the dbaux command:
Lprime = dbaux(2)
1-32
1-33
1
Wavelet Reconstruction
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Multistep Decomposition and Reconstruction
Second Iteration
A multistep analysis-synthesis process can be represented as
Third Iteration
0.1
0.15
0.1
0.05
0
−0.05
−0.1
0.05
H
H'
~500
0
H
−0.05
S
5
10
15
Fourth Iteration
20
10
0.04
0.02
0.02
0.01
0
0
−0.02
−0.01
20
30
Fifth Iteration
20
40
60
80
H'
~250
40
1000 S
...
...
L'
~250
L
L'
L
−0.02
−0.04
1000
50
100
150
The curve begins to look progressively more like the db2 wavelet. This means
that the wavelet’s shape is determined entirely by the coefficients of the
reconstruction filters.
This relationship has profound implications. It means that you cannot choose
just any shape, call it a wavelet, and perform an analysis. At least, you can’t
choose an arbitrary wavelet waveform if you want to be able to reconstruct the
original signal accurately. You are compelled to choose a shape determined by
quadrature mirror decomposition filters.
Scaling Function
We’ve seen the interrelation of wavelets and quadrature mirror filters. The
wavelet function ψ is determined by the high-pass filter, which also produces
the details of the wavelet decomposition.
Analysis
Decomposition
DWT
Wavelet
Coefficients
Synthesis
Reconstruction
IDWT
This process involves two aspects: breaking up a signal to obtain the wavelet
coefficients, and reassembling the signal from the coefficients.
We’ve already discussed decomposition and reconstruction at some length. Of
course, there is no point breaking up a signal merely to have the satisfaction of
immediately reconstructing it. We may modify the wavelet coefficients before
performing the reconstruction step. We perform wavelet analysis because the
coefficients thus obtained have many known uses, de-noising and compression
being foremost among them.
But wavelet analysis is still a new and emerging field. No doubt, many
uncharted uses of the wavelet coefficients lie in wait. The toolbox can be a
means of exploring possible uses and hitherto unknown applications of wavelet
analysis. Explore the toolbox functions and see what you discover.
There is an additional function associated with some, but not all, wavelets.
This is the so-called scaling function, φ . The scaling function is very similar to
the wavelet function. It is determined by the low-pass quadrature mirror
filters, and thus is associated with the approximations of the wavelet
decomposition.
In the same way that iteratively upsampling and convolving the high-pass
filter produces a shape approximating the wavelet function, iteratively
upsampling and convolving the low-pass filter produces a shape approximating
the scaling function.
1-34
1-35
1
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
History of Wavelets
From an historical point of view, wavelet analysis is a new method, though its
mathematical underpinnings date back to the work of Joseph Fourier in the
nineteenth century. Fourier laid the foundations with his theories of frequency
analysis, which proved to be enormously important and influential.
The attention of researchers gradually turned from frequency-based analysis
to scale-based analysis when it started to become clear that an approach
measuring average fluctuations at different scales might prove less sensitive to
noise.
The first recorded mention of what we now call a “wavelet” seems to be in 1909,
in a thesis by Alfred Haar.
The concept of wavelets in its present theoretical form was first proposed by
Jean Morlet and the team at the Marseille Theoretical Physics Center working
under Alex Grossmann in France.
The methods of wavelet analysis have been developed mainly by Y. Meyer and
his colleagues, who have ensured the methods’ dissemination. The main
algorithm dates back to the work of Stephane Mallat in 1988. Since then,
research on wavelets has become international. Such research is particularly
active in the United States, where it is spearheaded by the work of scientists
such as Ingrid Daubechies, Ronald Coifman, and Victor Wickerhauser.
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Several families of wavelets that have proven to be especially useful are
included in this toolbox. What follows is an introduction to some wavelet
families.
• “Haar” on page 1-41
• “Daubechies” on page 1-42
• “Biorthogonal” on page 1-43
• “Coiflets” on page 1-45
• “Symlets” on page 1-45
• “Morlet” on page 1-46
• “Mexican Hat” on page 1-46
• “Meyer” on page 1-47
• “Other Real Wavelets” on page 1-47
• “Complex Wavelets” on page 1-47
To explore all wavelet families on your own, check out the Wavelet Display
tool:
1 Type wavemenu at the MATLAB® command line. The Wavelet Toolbox
Main Menu appears.
Barbara Burke Hubbard describes the birth, the history, and the seminal
concepts in a very clear text. See The World According to Wavelets, A.K. Peters,
Wellesley, 1996.
The wavelet domain is growing up very quickly. A lot of mathematical papers
and practical trials are published every month.
1-38
1-39
1
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Haar
Any discussion of wavelets begins with Haar wavelet, the first and simplest.
Haar wavelet is discontinuous, and resembles a step function. It represents the
same wavelet as Daubechies db1. See “Haar” on page 6-73 for more detail.
1
Wavelet function psi
0
−1
0
0.5
1
2 Click the Wavelet Display menu item. The Wavelet Display tool appears.
3 Select a family from the Wavelet menu at the top right of the tool.
4 Click the Display button. Pictures of the wavelets and their associated
filters appear.
5 Obtain more information by clicking the information buttons located at the
right.
1-40
1-41
1
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Biorthogonal
Daubechies
Ingrid Daubechies, one of the brightest stars in the world of wavelet research,
invented what are called compactly supported orthonormal wavelets — thus
making discrete wavelet analysis practicable.
This family of wavelets exhibits the property of linear phase, which is needed
for signal and image reconstruction. By using two wavelets, one for
decomposition (on the left side) and the other for reconstruction (on the right
side) instead of the same single one, interesting properties are derived.
The names of the Daubechies family wavelets are written dbN, where N is the
order, and db the “surname” of the wavelet. The db1 wavelet, as mentioned
above, is the same as Haar wavelet. Here are the wavelet functions psi of the
next nine members of the family:
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
−1
−1
0
1
2
3
db2
2
4
−1
−1
−1
0
0
2
db3
4
6
0
2
db4
4
6
8
1
1
0
0
0
0
−1
−1
−1
−1
5
db7
10
0
5
db8
10
15
5
10
db6
1
0
0
db5
1
0
5
10
db9
15
0
5
10
15
db10
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
waveinfo('db') from the MATLAB command line. See “Daubechies Wavelets:
dbN” on page 6-72 for more detail.
1-42
1-43
1
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Coiflets
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
−1
−1
−1
0
1
2
3
4
−1
0
1
2
3
4
0
2
4
6
8
bior1.3
0
2
4
4
6
8
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
−2
2
bior1.5
Built by I. Daubechies at the request of R. Coifman. The wavelet function has
2N moments equal to 0 and the scaling function has 2N-1 moments equal to 0.
The two functions have a support of length 6N-1. You can obtain a survey of the
main properties of this family by typing waveinfo('coif') from the MATLAB
command line. See “Coiflet Wavelets: coifN” on page 6-75 for more detail.
1
1
1
1
−1
1
−4
0
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
0
2
4
6
8
0
2
4
6
8
0
bior2.4
bior2.2
−1
0
1
1
2
1
1
0
0
0
−1
−1
−1
0
5
10
0
coif2
coif1
0
0
5
10
15
0
5
coif3
10
15
20
0
5
coif4
10
15
20
25
coif5
0
0
−1
4
0
−1
−1
0
5
10
0
5
10
0
5
10
15
bior2.6
100
1
50
0
bior2.8
5
10
15
1
4
The symlets are nearly symmetrical wavelets proposed by Daubechies as
modifications to the db family. The properties of the two wavelet families are
similar. Here are the wavelet functions psi.
2
0
0
0
0
−2
−50
−1
−100
0
1
2
−4
0
1
2
−1
0
2
4
6
bior3.1
0
bior3.3
2
4
6
1
1
1
2
Symlets
1
2
1
0.5
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
−1
−0.5
0
0
−1
−2
5
10
−1
−2
−1
0
−1
−1
0
5
10
0
5
10
0
bior3.5
5
−1
10
bior3.7
0
1
2
3
0
2
sym2
2
1
0.5
0
0
0
sym3
2
4
6
0
sym4
2
4
6
8
sym5
1
1
1
0
−1
4
1
1
0
−0.5
−2
0
−1
0
5
10
15
0
5
10
15
0
2
4
6
8
bior3.9
0
2
4
6
8
0
0
bior4.4
−1
−1
−1
1
0
1
1
5
10
0
5
10
0
5
10
15
1
0
0
0
−0.5
−1
0
5
10
0
−1
0
bior5.5
sym6
5
10
0
5
10
15
0
5
10
bior6.8
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
waveinfo('bior') from the MATLAB command line. See “Biorthogonal
Wavelet Pairs: biorNr.Nd” on page 6-76 for more detail.
1-44
15
sym7
sym8
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
waveinfo('sym') from the MATLAB command line. See “Symlet Wavelets:
symN” on page 6-74 for more detail.
1-45
1
Introduction to the Wavelet Families
Wavelets: A New Tool for Signal Analysis
Meyer
Morlet
This wavelet has no scaling function, but is explicit.
The Meyer wavelet and scaling function are defined in the frequency domain.
1
0.5
0.5
Wavelet function psi
0
0
−0.5
−0.5
−8 −6 −4 −2
0
2
4
6
8
Wavelet function psi
−5
0
5
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
waveinfo('morl') from the MATLAB command line. See “Morlet Wavelet:
morl” on page 6-81 for more detail.
waveinfo('meyer') from the MATLAB command line. See “Meyer Wavelet:
Mexican Hat
Other Real Wavelets
This wavelet has no scaling function and is derived from a function that is
proportional to the second derivative function of the Gaussian probability
density function.
Some other real wavelets are available in the toolbox:
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
meyr” on page 6-78 for more detail.
• Reverse Biorthogonal
• Gaussian derivatives family
0.8
• FIR based approximation of the Meyer wavelet
0.6
See “Additional Real Wavelets” on page 6-82 for more information.
0.4
Wavelet function psi
0.2
Complex Wavelets
Some complex wavelet families are available in the toolbox:
0
• Gaussian derivatives
−0.2
• Morlet
−8 −6 −4 −2
0
2
4
6
8
You can obtain a survey of the main properties of this family by typing
waveinfo('mexh') from the MATLAB command line. See “Mexican Hat
Wavelet: mexh” on page 6-80 for more information.
1-46
• Frequency B-Spline
• Shannon
See “Complex Wavelets” on page 6-84 for more information.
1-47
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Continuous Analysis Using the Command Line
This example involves a noisy sinusoidal signal.
This section takes you through the features of continuous wavelet analysis
using Wavelet Toolbox™ software.
The toolbox requires only one function for continuous wavelet analysis: cwt.
You’ll find full information about this function in its reference page.
In this section, you’ll learn how to
• Load a signal
• Perform a continuous wavelet transform of a signal
1
0.5
0
−0.5
• Produce a plot of the coefficients
• Produce a plot of coefficients at a given scale
−1
• Produce a plot of local maxima of coefficients across scales
100
• Select the displayed plots
• Switch from scale to pseudo-frequency information
• Zoom in on detail
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
1 Load a signal.
• Display coefficients in normal or absolute mode
From the MATLAB® prompt, type
• Choose the scales at which analysis is performed
load noissin;
Since you can perform analyses either from the command line or using the
graphical interface tools, this section has subsections covering each method.
You now have the signal noissin in your workspace:
The final subsection discusses how to exchange signal and coefficient
information between the disk and the graphical tools.
whos
Name
Size
Bytes
Class
noissin
1x1000
8000
double array
2 Perform a Continuous Wavelet Transform.
Use the cwt command. Type
c = cwt(noissin,1:48,'db4');
2-4
2-5
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
4 Choose scales for the analysis.
The arguments to cwt specify the signal to be analyzed, the scales of the
analysis, and the wavelet to be used. The returned argument c contains the
coefficients at various scales. In this case, c is a 48-by-1000 matrix with each
row corresponding to a single scale.
3 Plot the coefficients.
The second argument to cwt gives you fine control over the scale levels on
which the continuous analysis is performed. In the previous example, we
used all scales from 1 to 48, but you can construct any scale vector subject to
these constraints:
- All scales must be real positive numbers.
The cwt command accepts a fourth argument. This is a flag that, when
present, causes cwt to produce a plot of the absolute values of the continuous
wavelet transform coefficients.
The cwt command can accept more arguments to define the different
characteristics of the produced plot. For more information, see the cwt
reference page.
c = cwt(noissin,1:48,'db4','plot');
- The scale increment must be positive.
- The highest scale cannot exceed a maximum value depending on the
signal.
Let’s repeat the analysis using every other scale from 2 to 128. Type
c = cwt(noissin,2:2:128,'db4','plot');
A new plot appears:
A plot appears.
Absolute Values of Ca,b Coefficients for a = 2 4 6 8 10 ...
122
Absolute Values of Ca,b Coefficients for a = 1 2 3 4 5 ...
114
46
106
43
98
40
90
37
82
scales a
34
scales a
31
28
25
74
66
58
50
22
42
19
34
16
26
13
18
10
10
7
2
4
100
1
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
time (or space) b
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
time (or space) b
Of course, coefficient plots generated from the command line can be
manipulated using ordinary MATLAB graphics commands.
2-6
This plot gives a clearer picture of what’s happening with the signal,
highlighting the periodicity.
2-7
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Continuous Analysis Using the Graphical Interface
We now use the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool to analyze the same noisy
sinusoidal signal we examined earlier using the command line interface in
“Continuous Analysis Using the Command Line” on page 2-5.
Click the Continuous Wavelet 1-D menu item.
The continuous wavelet analysis tool for one-dimensional signal data
appears.
1 Start the Continuous Wavelet 1-D Tool. From the MATLAB prompt, type
wavemenu
The Wavelet Toolbox Main Menu appears.
2-8
2-9
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
4 Click the Analyze button.
2 Load a signal.
After a pause for computation, the tool displays the coefficients plot, the
coefficients line plot corresponding to the scale a = 24, and the local maxima
plot, which displays the chaining across scales (from a = 48 down to a = 1) of
the coefficients local maxima.
Choose the File > Load Signal menu option.
When the Load Signal dialog box appears, select the demo MAT-file
noissin.mat, which should reside in the MATLAB directory
toolbox/wavelet/wavedemo. Click the OK button.
.
The noisy sinusoidal signal is loaded into the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool.
The default value for the sampling period is equal to 1 (second).
3 Perform a Continuous Wavelet Transform.
To start our analysis, let’s perform an analysis using the db4 wavelet at
scales 1 through 48, just as we did using command line functions in the
previous section.
In the upper right portion of the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool, select the
db4 wavelet and scales 1–48.
Select db4
5 View Wavelet Coefficients Line.
Select scales 1 to 48 in steps of 1
Select another scale a = 40 by clicking in the coefficients plot with the right
mouse button. See step 9 to know, more precisely, how to select the desired
scale.
Click the New Coefficients Line button. The tool updates the plot.
2-10
2-11
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
6 View Maxima Line.
Click the Refresh Maxima Line button. The local maxima plot displays the
chaining across scales of the coefficients local maxima from a = 40 down to
a = 1.
Hold down the right mouse button over the coefficients plot. The position of
the mouse is given by the Info frame (located at the bottom of the screen) in
terms of location (X) and scale (Sca).
7 Switch from scale to Pseudo-Frequency Information.
Using the option button on the right part of the screen, select Frequencies
instead of Scales. Again hold down the right mouse button over the
coefficients plot, the position of the mouse is given in terms of location (X)
and frequency (Frq) in Hertz.
2-12
2-13
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
.
9 Zoom in on detail.
Drag a rubber band box (by holding down the left mouse button) over the
portion of the signal you want to magnify.
This facility allows you to interpret scale in terms of an associated
pseudo-frequency, which depends on the wavelet and the sampling period.
For more information on the connection between scale and frequency, see
“How to Connect Scale to Frequency?” on page 6-66.
.
8 Deselect the last two plots using the check boxes in the Selected Axes
frame.
10 Click the X+ button (located at the bottom of the screen) to zoom horizontally
only.
2-14
2-15
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool enlarges the displayed signal and
coefficients plot (for more information on zooming, see “Connection of Plots” on
page A-3).
Choose either one of the absolute modes or normal modes from the
Coloration Mode menu. In normal modes, the colors are scaled between the
minimum and maximum of the coefficients. In absolute modes, the colors are
scaled between zero and the maximum absolute value of the coefficients.
The coefficients plot is redisplayed in the mode you select.
Absolute Mode
Normal Mode
Importing and Exporting Information from the
Graphical Interface
The Continuous Wavelet 1-D graphical interface tool lets you import
information from and export information to disk.
You can
As with the command line analysis on the preceding pages, you can change
the scales or the analyzing wavelet and repeat the analysis. To do this, just
edit the necessary fields and click the Analyze button.
11 View normal or absolute coefficients.
The Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool allows you to plot either the absolute
values of the wavelet coefficients, or the coefficients themselves.
More generally, the coefficients coloration can be done in several different
ways. For more details on the Coloration Mode, see “Controlling the
Coloration Mode” on page A-7.
2-16
• Load signals from disk into the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool.
• Save wavelet coefficients from the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool to disk.
Loading Signals into the Continuous Wavelet 1-D Tool
To load a signal you’ve constructed in your MATLAB workspace into the
Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool, save the signal in a MAT-file (with extension
mat or other).
For instance, suppose you’ve designed a signal called warma and want to
analyze it in the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool.
save warma warma
2-17
2
One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The workspace variable warma must be a vector.
sizwarma = size(warma)
After saving the continuous wavelet coefficients to the file cantor.wc1, load the
variables into your workspace:
load cantor.wc1 -mat
whos
sizwarma =
1
1000
To load this signal into the Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool, use the menu option
File > Load Signal. A dialog box appears that lets you select the appropriate
MAT-file to be loaded.
Note The first one-dimensional variable encountered in the file is considered
the signal. Variables are inspected in alphabetical order.
Saving Wavelet Coefficients
Name
Size
Bytes
Class
coeff
64x2188
1120256
double array
scales
1x64
512
double array
wname
1x4
8
char array
Variables coefs and scales contain the continuous wavelet coefficients and
the associated scales. More precisely, in the above example, coefs is a
64-by-2188 matrix, one row for each scale; and scales is the 1-by-64 vector
1:64. Variable wname contains the wavelet name.
The Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool lets you save wavelet coefficients to disk. The
toolbox creates a MAT-file in the current directory with the extension wc1 and
a name you give it.
To save the continuous wavelet coefficients from the present analysis, use the
menu option File > Save > Coefficients.
A dialog box appears that lets you specify a directory and filename for storing
the coefficients.
Consider the example analysis:
File > Example Analysis > with haar at scales [1:1:64] −−> Cantor curve.
2-18
2-19
2
One-Dimensional Complex Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
One-Dimensional Complex Continuous Wavelet Analysis
This section takes you through the features of complex continuous wavelet
analysis using the Wavelet Toolbox™ software and focuses on the differences
between the real and complex continuous analysis.
You can refer to the section “One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis”
on page 2-4 if you want to learn how to
• Zoom in on detail
• Display coefficients in normal or absolute mode
Complex Continuous Analysis Using the Command
Line
This example involves a cusp signal.
2.5
2
1.5
1
• Choose the scales at which the analysis is performed
• Switch from scale to pseudo-frequency information
• Exchange signal and coefficient information between the disk and the
graphical tools
Wavelet Toolbox software requires only one function for complex continuous
wavelet analysis of a real valued signal: cwt. You’ll find full information about
this function in its reference page.
0.5
0
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1 Load a signal.
From the MATLAB® prompt, type
In this section, you’ll learn how to
load cuspamax;
• Load a signal
You now have the signal cuspamax in your workspace:
• Perform a complex continuous wavelet transform of a signal
• Produce plots of the coefficients
Since you can perform analyses either from the command line or using the
graphical interface tools, this section has subsections covering each method.
whos
Name
Size
Bytes
Class
caption
1x71
142
char array
cuspamax
1x1024
8192
double array
caption
caption =
x = linspace(0,1,1024);
y = exp(-128*((x-0.3).^2))-3*(abs(x-0.7).^0.4);
caption is a string that contains the signal definition.
2-20
2-21
2
One-Dimensional Complex Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
A plot appears:
2 Perform a Continuous Wavelet Transform.
Real part of Ca,b for a = 1 3 5 7 9 ...
- Modulus and angle
The cwt command can accept more arguments to define the different
characteristics of the produced plots. For more information, see the cwt
reference page.
Type
c = cwt(cuspamax,1:2:64,'cgau4','plot');
200 400 600 800 1000
time (or space) b
Modulus of Ca,b for a = 1 3 5 7 9 ...
scales a
- Real and imaginary parts
61
57
53
49
45
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
1
200 400 600 800 1000
time (or space) b
3 Plot the coefficients.
The cwt command accepts a fourth argument. This is a flag that, when
present, causes cwt to produce four plots related to the complex continuous
wavelet transform coefficients:
Imaginary part of Ca,b for a = 1 3 5 7 9 ...
61
57
53
49
45
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
1
Angle of Ca,b for a = 1 3 5 7 9 ...
scales a
The arguments to cwt specify the signal to be analyzed, the scales of the
analysis, and the wavelet to be used. The returned argument c contains the
coefficients at various scales. In this case, c is a complex 32-by-1024 matrix,
each row of which corresponds to a single scale.
scales a
c = cwt(cuspamax,1:2:64,'cgau4');
61
57
53
49
45
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
1
scales a
Use the cwt command. Type
200 400 600 800 1000
time (or space) b
61
57
53
49
45
41
37
33
29
25
21
17
13
9
5
1
200 400 600 800 1000
time (or space) b
Of course, coefficient plots generated from the command line can be
manipulated using ordinary MATLAB graphics commands.
Complex Continuous Analysis Using the Graphical
Interface
We now use the Complex Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool to analyze the same
cusp signal we examined using the command line interface in the previous
section.
1 Start the Complex Continuous Wavelet 1-D Tool.
From the MATLAB prompt, type
wavemenu
The Wavelet Toolbox Main Menu appears.
2-22
2-23
2
One-Dimensional Complex Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The continuous wavelet analysis tool for one-dimensional signal data
appears.
2 Load a signal.
Choose the File > Load Signal menu option.
When the Load Signal dialog box appears, select the demo MAT-file
cuspamax.mat, which should reside in the MATLAB directory
toolbox/wavelet/wavedemo. Click the OK button.
The cusp signal is loaded into the Complex Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool.
The default value for the sampling period is equal to 1 (second).
Click the Complex Continuous Wavelet 1-D menu item.
3 Perform a Complex Continuous Wavelet Transform
To start our analysis, let’s perform an analysis using the cgau4 wavelet at
scales 1 through 64 in steps of 2, just as we did using command-line
2-24
2-25
2
One-Dimensional Complex Continuous Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
functions in “Complex Continuous Analysis Using the Command Line” on
page 2-21.
In the upper-right portion of the Complex Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool,
select the cgau4 wavelet and scales 1–64 in steps of 2.
Select cgau4
Select scales from 1 to 64 in steps of 2
Click the Analyze button.
After a pause for computation, the tool displays the usual plots associated to
the modulus of the coefficients on the left side, and the angle of the
coefficients on the right side.
2-26
Each side has exactly the same representation that we found in “Continuous
Analysis Using the Graphical Interface” on page 2-8.
Select the plots related to the modulus of the coefficients using the Modulus
option button in the Selected Axes frame.
2-27
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
This section takes you through the features of one-dimensional discrete
wavelet analysis using the Wavelet Toolbox™ software.
The toolbox provides these functions for one-dimensional signal analysis. For
more information, see the reference pages.
Analysis-Decomposition Functions
Function Name
Purpose
dwt
Single-level decomposition
wavedec
Decomposition
wmaxlev
Maximum wavelet decomposition level
Synthesis-Reconstruction Functions
The figure now looks like the one in the real Continuous Wavelet 1-D tool.
Importing and Exporting Information from the
Graphical Interface
To know how to import and export information from the Complex Continuous
Wavelet Graphical Interface, see the corresponding paragraph in
“One-Dimensional Continuous Wavelet Analysis” on page 2-4.
The only difference is that the variable coefs is a complex matrix (see “Saving
Wavelet Coefficients” on page 2-18).
2-28
Function Name
Purpose
idwt
Single-level reconstruction
waverec
Full reconstruction
wrcoef
Selective reconstruction
upcoef
Single reconstruction
Decomposition Structure Utilities
Function Name
Purpose
detcoef
Extraction of detail coefficients
appcoef
Extraction of approximation coefficients
upwlev
Recomposition of decomposition structure
2-29
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
De-noising and Compression
The final subsection discusses how to exchange signal and coefficient
information between the disk and the graphical tools.
Function Name
Purpose
One-Dimensional Analysis Using the Command Line
ddencmp
Provide default values for de-noising and compression
wbmpen
Penalized threshold for wavelet 1-D or 2-D de-noising
wdcbm
Thresholds for wavelet 1-D using BirgЩ-Massart
strategy
This example involves a real-world signal — electrical consumption measured
over the course of 3 days. This signal is particularly interesting because of noise
introduced when a defect developed in the monitoring equipment as the
measurements were being made. Wavelet analysis effectively removes the
noise.
wdencmp
Wavelet de-noising and compression
wden
Automatic wavelet de-noising
wthrmngr
Threshold settings manager
In this section, you’ll learn how to
• Load a signal
• Perform a single-level wavelet decomposition of a signal
• Construct approximations and details from the coefficients
• Display the approximation and detail
1 Load a signal.
From the MATLAB® prompt, type
load leleccum;
• Regenerate a signal by inverse wavelet transform
Set the variables. Type
• Perform a multilevel wavelet decomposition of a signal
s = leleccum(1:3920);
l_s = length(s);
• Extract approximation and detail coefficients
• Reconstruct the level 3 approximation
• Reconstruct the level 1, 2, and 3 details
• Display the results of a multilevel decomposition
• Reconstruct the original signal from the level 3 decomposition
• Remove noise from a signal
• Refine an analysis
• Compress a signal
2 Perform a single-level wavelet decomposition of a signal.
Perform a single-level decomposition of the signal using the db1 wavelet.
Type
[cA1,cD1] = dwt(s,'db1');
This generates the coefficients of the level 1 approximation (cA1) and detail
(cD1).
• Show a signal’s statistics and histograms
Since you can perform analyses either from the command line or using the
graphical interface tools, this section has subsections covering each method.
2-30
2-31
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
3 Construct approximations and details from the coefficients.
To construct the level 1 approximation and detail (A1 and D1) from the
coefficients cA1 and cD1, type
err =
2.2737e-013
6 Perform a multilevel wavelet decomposition of a signal.
To perform a level 3 decomposition of the signal (again using the db1
wavelet), type
A1 = upcoef('a',cA1,'db1',1,l_s);
D1 = upcoef('d',cD1,'db1',1,l_s);
[C,L] = wavedec(s,3,'db1');
or
The coefficients of all the components of a third-level decomposition (that is,
the third-level approximation and the first three levels of detail) are
returned concatenated into one vector, C. Vector L gives the lengths of each
component.
A1 = idwt(cA1,[],'db1',l_s);
D1 = idwt([],cD1,'db1',l_s);
4 Display the approximation and detail.
To display the results of the level-one decomposition, type
S
subplot(1,2,1); plot(A1); title('Approximation A1')
subplot(1,2,2); plot(D1); title('Detail D1')
Approximation A1
cA1
cA2
Detail D1
550
25
500
20
cA3
cD1
C
cD2
cD3
cA3 cD3
cD2
cD1
15
450
7 Extract approximation and detail coefficients.
10
400
5
To extract the level 3 approximation coefficients from C, type
0
cA3 = appcoef(C,L,'db1',3);
350
300
−5
250
To extract the levels 3, 2, and 1 detail coefficients from C, type
−10
200
cD3 = detcoef(C,L,3);
cD2 = detcoef(C,L,2);
cD1 = detcoef(C,L,1);
−15
150
−20
100
−25
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
or
5 Regenerate a signal by using the Inverse Wavelet Transform.
[cD1,cD2,cD3] = detcoef(C,L,[1,2,3]);
To find the inverse transform, type
A0 = idwt(cA1,cD1,'db1',l_s);
err = max(abs(s-A0))
2-32
2-33
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
9 Display the results of a multilevel decomposition.
Results are displayed in the figure below, which contains the signal s, the
approximation coefficients at level 3 (cA3), and the details coefficients from
level 3 to 1 (cD3, cD2 and cD1) from the top to the bottom.
Original signal s and coefficients.
1000
500
0
0
2000
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
1000
0
0
100
To display the results of the level 3 decomposition, type
subplot(2,2,1); plot(A3);
title('Approximation A3')
subplot(2,2,2); plot(D1);
title('Detail D1')
subplot(2,2,3); plot(D2);
title('Detail D2')
subplot(2,2,4); plot(D3);
title('Detail D3')
500
Approximation A3
Detail D1
600
40
500
0
20
400
−100
0
50
0
500
300
−20
200
0
100
−40
0
−50
0
50
500
1000
500
1000
2000
3000
4000
0
1000
Detail D2
0
−50
0
1000
1500
2000
3000
4000
3000
4000
Detail D3
40
40
20
20
0
0
−20
−20
2000
8 Reconstruct the Level 3 approximation and the Level 1, 2, and 3 details.
−40
−40
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
0
1000
2000
To reconstruct the level 3 approximation from C, type
A3 = wrcoef('a',C,L,'db1',3);
To reconstruct the details at levels 1, 2, and 3, from C, type
D1 = wrcoef('d',C,L,'db1',1);
D2 = wrcoef('d',C,L,'db1',2);
D3 = wrcoef('d',C,L,'db1',3);
10 Reconstruct the original signal from the Level 3 decomposition.
To reconstruct the original signal from the wavelet decomposition structure,
type
A0 = waverec(C,L,'db1');
err = max(abs(s-A0))
err =
4.5475e-013
2-34
2-35
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
11 Crude de-noising of a signal.
Original
Using wavelets to remove noise from a signal requires identifying which
component or components contain the noise, and then reconstructing the
signal without those components.
In this example, we note that successive approximations become less and
less noisy as more and more high-frequency information is filtered out of the
signal.
Level 3 Approximation
The level 3 approximation, A3, is quite clean as a comparison between it and
the original signal.
To compare the approximation to the original signal, type
subplot(2,1,1);plot(s);title('Original'); axis off
subplot(2,1,2);plot(A3);title('Level 3 Approximation');
axis off
Of course, in discarding all the high-frequency information, we’ve also lost
many of the original signal’s sharpest features.
Optimal de-noising requires a more subtle approach called thresholding.
This involves discarding only the portion of the details that exceeds a certain
limit.
12 Remove noise by thresholding.
Let’s look again at the details of our level 3 analysis.
To display the details D1, D2, and D3, type
subplot(3,1,1); plot(D1); title('Detail Level 1'); axis off
subplot(3,1,2); plot(D2); title('Detail Level 2'); axis off
subplot(3,1,3); plot(D3); title('Detail Level 3'); axis off
2-36
2-37
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Detail Level 1
Setting a
threshold
Detail Level 2
Note that wdencmp uses the results of the decomposition (C and L) that we
calculated in step 6 on page 2-33. We also specify that we used the db1
wavelet to perform the original analysis, and we specify the global
thresholding option 'gbl'. See ddencmp and wdencmp in the reference pages
for more information about the use of these commands.
To display both the original and denoised signals, type
subplot(2,1,1); plot(s(2000:3920)); title('Original')
subplot(2,1,2); plot(clean(2000:3920)); title('De-noised')
Detail Level 3
Original
500
400
Most of the noise occurs in the latter part of the signal, where the details
show their greatest activity. What if we limited the strength of the details
by restricting their maximum values? This would have the effect of cutting
back the noise while leaving the details unaffected through most of their
durations. But there’s a better way.
Note that cD1, cD2, and cD3 are just MATLAB vectors, so we could directly
manipulate each vector, setting each element to some fraction of the vectors’
peak or average value. Then we could reconstruct new detail signals D1, D2,
and D3 from the thresholded coefficients.
To denoise the signal, use the ddencmp command to calculate the default
parameters and the wdencmp command to perform the actual de-noising,
type
[thr,sorh,keepapp] = ddencmp('den','wv',s);
clean = wdencmp('gbl',C,L,'db1',3,thr,sorh,keepapp);
300
200
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
1200
1400
1600
1800
De−noised
500
400
300
200
200
400
600
800
1000
We’ve plotted here only the noisy latter part of the signal. Notice how we’ve
removed the noise without compromising the sharp detail of the original
signal. This is a strength of wavelet analysis.
While using command line functions to remove the noise from a signal can
be cumbersome, the software’s graphical interface tools include an
easy-to-use de-noising feature that includes automatic thresholding.
2-38
2-39
2
One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The Wavelet Toolbox Main Menu appears.
More information on the de-noising process can be found in the following
sections:
- “Remove noise from a signal.” on page 2-49
- “De-Noising” on page 6-97
- “One-Dimensional Variance Adaptive Thresholding of Wavelet
Coefficients” on page 2-158
- “One-Dimensional Variance Adaptive Thresholding of Wavelet
Coefficients” on page 6-107
One-Dimensional Analysis Using the Graphical
Interface
In this section, we explore the same electrical consumption signal as in the
previous section, but we use the graphical interface tools to analyze the signal.
1 Start the 1-D Wavelet Analysis Tool.
From the MATLAB prompt, type
wavemenu
2 Click the Wavelet 1-D menu item.
The discrete wavelet analysis tool for one-dimensional signal data appears.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The electrical consumption signal is loaded into the Wavelet 1-D tool.
4 Perform a single-level wavelet decomposition.
3 Load a signal.
From the File menu, choose the Load > Signal option.
When the Load Signal dialog box appears, select the demo MAT-file
leleccum.mat, which should reside in the MATLAB directory
toolbox/wavelet/wavedemo. Click the OK button.
To start our analysis, let’s perform a single-level decomposition using the
db1 wavelet, just as we did using the command-line functions in
“One-Dimensional Analysis Using the Command Line” on page 2-31.
In the upper right portion of the Wavelet 1-D tool, select the db1 wavelet and
single-level decomposition.
Click the Analyze button.
After a pause for computation, the tool displays the decomposition.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Click the X+ button (located at the bottom of the screen) to zoom
horizontally.
The Wavelet 1-D tool zooms all the displayed signals.
5 Zoom in on relevant detail.
One advantage of using the graphical interface tools is that you can zoom in
easily on any part of the signal and examine it in greater detail.
Drag a rubber band box (by holding down the left mouse button) over the
portion of the signal you want to magnify. Here, we’ve selected the noisy part
of the original signal.
The other zoom controls do more or less what you’d expect them to. The
X- button, for example, zooms out horizontally. The history function keeps
track of all your views of the signal. Return to a previous zoom level by
clicking the left arrow button.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Selecting Different Views of the Decomposition
6 Perform a multilevel decomposition.
Again, we’ll use the graphical tools to emulate what we did in the previous
section using command line functions. To perform a level 3 decomposition of
the signal using the db1 wavelet:
Select 3 from the Level menu at the upper right, and then click the Analyze
button again.
The Display mode menu (middle right) lets you choose different views of the
wavelet decomposition.
The default display mode is called “Full Decomposition Mode.” Other
alternatives include:
- “Separate Mode,” which shows the details and the approximations in
separate columns.
- “Superimpose Mode,” which shows the details on a single plot
superimposed in different colors. The approximations are plotted
similarly.
- “Tree Mode,” which shows the decomposition tree, the original signal, and
one additional component of your choice. Click on the decomposition tree
to select the signal component you’d like to view.
After the decomposition is performed, you’ll see a new analysis appear in the
Wavelet 1-D tool.
- “Show and Scroll Mode,” which displays three windows. The first shows
the original signal superimposed on an approximation you select. The
second window shows a detail you select. The third window shows the
wavelet coefficients.
- “Show and Scroll Mode (Stem Cfs)” is very similar to the “Show and Scroll
Mode” except that it displays, in the third window, the wavelet coefficients
as stem plots instead of colored blocks.
Select a view
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Separate Mode
Superimpose Mode
Tree Mode
These options include the ability to suppress the display of various
components, and to choose whether or not to display the original signal
along with the details and approximations.
7 Remove noise from a signal.
The graphical interface tools feature a de-noising option with a predefined
thresholding strategy. This makes it very easy to remove noise from a signal.
Bring up the de-noising tool: click the De-noise button, located in the middle
right of the window, underneath the Analyze button.
Show & Scroll Mode
Show & Scroll Mode (Stem Cfs)
You can change the default display mode on a per-session basis. Select the
desired mode from the View > Default Display Mode submenu.
Note The Compression and De-noising windows opened from the Wavelet
1-D tool will inherit the current coefficient visualization attribute (stems or
colored blocks).
Depending on which display mode you select, you may have access to
additional display options through the More Display Options button (for
more information, see “More Display Options” on page A-19).
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The Wavelet 1-D De-noising window appears.
Zoom in on the plot of the original and de-noised signals for a closer look.
While a number of options are available for fine-tuning the de-noising
algorithm, we’ll accept the defaults of soft fixed form thresholding and
unscaled white noise.
Drag a rubber band box around the pertinent area, and then click the XY+
button.
The De-noise window magnifies your view. By default, the original signal is
shown in red, and the de-noised signal in yellow.
Continue by clicking the De-noise button.
The de-noised signal appears superimposed on the original. The tool also
plots the wavelet coefficients of both signals.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Bring up the Compression window: click the Compress button, located in
the middle right of the window, underneath the Analyze button.
Dismiss the Wavelet 1-D De-noising window: click the Close button.
The Compression window appears.
You cannot have the De-noise and Compression windows open
simultaneously, so close the Wavelet 1-D De-noising window to continue.
When the Update Synthesized Signal dialog box appears, click No. If you
click Yes, the Synthesized Signal is then available in the Wavelet 1-D main
window.
8 Refine the analysis.
The graphical tools make it easy to refine an analysis any time you want to.
Up to now, we’ve looked at a level 3 analysis using db1. Let’s refine our
analysis of the electrical consumption signal using the db3 wavelet at level 5.
Select 5 from the Level menu at the upper right, and select the db3 from the
Wavelet menu. Click the Analyze button.
Thresholding method menus
Threshold slider
Compress button
9 Compress the signal.
The graphical interface tools feature a compression option with automatic or
manual thresholding.
While you always have the option of choosing by level thresholding, here
we’ll take advantage of the global thresholding feature for quick and easy
compression.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
Note If you want to experiment with manual thresholding, choose the By
Level thresholding option from the menu located at the top right of the
Wavelet 1-D Compression window. The sliders located below this menu then
control the level-dependent thresholds, indicated by yellow dotted lines
running horizontally through the graphs on the left of the window. The yellow
dotted lines can also be dragged directly using the left mouse button.
Click the Compress button, located at the center right.
After a pause for computation, the electrical consumption signal is
redisplayed in red with the compressed version superimposed in yellow.
Below, we’ve zoomed in to get a closer look at the noisy part of the signal.
Displayed statistics include measures of tendency (mean, mode, median)
and dispersion (range, standard deviation). In addition, the tool provides
frequency-distribution diagrams (histograms and cumulative histograms),
as well as time-series diagrams: autocorrelation function and spectrum. The
same feature exists for the Wavelet 1-D De-noising tool.
You can see that the compression process removed most of the noise, but
preserved 99.74% of the energy of the signal. The automatic thresholding
was very efficient, zeroing out all but 3.2% of the wavelet coefficients.
10 Show the residuals.
From the Wavelet 1-D Compression tool, click the Residuals button. The
More on Residuals for Wavelet 1-D Compression window appears.
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Dismiss the Wavelet 1-D Compression window: click the Close button.
When the Update Synthesized Signal dialog box appears, click No.
11 Show statistics.
You can view a variety of statistics about your signal and its components.
From the Wavelet 1-D tool, click the Statistics button.
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One-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Analysis
Using Wavelets
The Wavelet 1-D Statistics window appears displaying by default statistics
on the original signal.
Displayed statistics include measures of tendency (mean, mode, median)
and dispersion (range, standard deviation).
In addition, the tool provides frequency-distribution diagrams (histograms
and cumulative histograms). You can plot these histograms separately using
the Histograms button from the Wavelets 1-D window.
Click the Approximation option button. A menu appears from which you
choose the level of the approximation you want to examine.
Select the synthesized signal or signal component whose statistics you want
to examine. Click the appropriate option button, and then click the Show
Statistics button. Here, we’ve chosen to examine the compressed signal
using more 100 bins instead of 30, which is the default:
Select Level 1 and again click the Show Statistics button. Statistics appear
for the level 1 approximation.
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