SB-210+ SB-210+ SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR

SB-210+ SB-210+ SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR
Maintenance Manual
SB-210+
SB-230
RR
Additional text information
and
SB-330 RR
to be placed here
Ingersoll Rand’s Climate Solutions sector delivers energy-efficient HVACR solutions for
customers globally. Its world class brands include Thermo King, the leader in transport
temperature control and Trane, a provider of energy efficient heating, ventilating and air
conditioning systems, building and contracting services, parts support and advanced controls
for commercial buildings and homes.
Distributed by:
Thermo King Corporate
314 West 90th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55420
Direct
TK 54910-5-MM
©2011 Ingersoll Rand Company
Printed in U.S.A.
(952) 887-2200
TK 54910-5-MM (Rev. 3, 12/14)
TK 5XXXX-X-PL
SB-230 RR
and SB-330 RR
TK 54910-5-MM (Rev. 3, 12/14)
Copyright© 2011 Thermo King Corp., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. Printed in
U.S.A.
The maintenance information in this manual covers unit models:
System SB-230 30 (901704)
SB-230 30 DRC RR Package (069082)
SB-230 30 TOFC RR Package (069083)
System SB-330 30 (901706)
SB-330 30 DRC RR Package (069084)
SB-330 30 TOFC RR Package (069085)
SB-330 30 RBC RR Package (069087)
For further information, refer to:
SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR Operator’s Manual
TK 54733
SB-230 Parts Manual
TK 54899
SB-330 Parts Manual
TK 54900
SR-3 Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic Manual
TK 54842
SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR Single Temperature Systems Installation Manual
TK 54932
OptiSet Plus User’s Guide
TK 54045
Radio Expansion Board (REB) Diagnostic Manual
TK 55065
TK482 and TK486 Engine Overhaul Manual
TK 50136
X214, X418, X426 and X430 Compressor Overhaul Manual
TK 6875
Diagnosing TK Refrigeration System
TK 5984
Tool Catalog
TK 5955
Evacuation Station Operation and Field Application
TK 40612
ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD) Training Guide
TK 40282
The information in this manual is provided to assist owners, operators and service people in the proper upkeep
and maintenance of Thermo King units.
Revision History
Rev. 2 – TK 54910-2-MM (Rev. 2, 07/14) Update for compressor pressurized seal cavity,
internal oil filter, and other general updates.
Rev. 3 – TK 54910-2-MM (Rev. 3, 12/14) Update engine oil viscosity specifications.
This manual is published for informational purposes only and the information so provided should
not be considered as all-inclusive or covering all contingencies. If further information is required,
Thermo King Corporation should be consulted.
Sale of product shown in this manual is subject to Thermo King’s terms and conditions
including, but not limited to, the Thermo King Limited Express Warranty. Such terms and
conditions are available upon request. Thermo King’s warranty will not apply to any
equipment which has been “so repaired or altered outside the manufacturer’s plants as,
in the manufacturer’s judgment, to effect its stability.”
2
No warranties, express or implied, including warranties of fitness for a particular
purpose or merchantability, or warranties arising from course of dealing or usage of
trade, are made regarding the information, recommendations, and descriptions
contained herein. Manufacturer is not responsible and will not be held liable in contract
or in tort (including negligence) for any special, indirect or consequential damages,
including injury or damage caused to vehicles, contents or persons, by reason of the
installation of any Thermo King product or its mechanical failure.
Recover Refrigerant
At Thermo King, we recognize the need to preserve the environment
and limit the potential harm to the ozone layer that can result from
allowing refrigerant to escape into the atmosphere.
We strictly adhere to a policy that promotes the recovery and limits
the loss of refrigerant into the atmosphere.
In addition, service personnel must be aware of Federal regulations
concerning the use of refrigerants and the certification of technicians.
For additional information on regulations and technician certification
programs, contact your local Thermo King dealer.
3
CHANGES, COMMENTS and SUGGESTIONS
You are invited to comment on this manual so it can be updated and improved to better meet you
needs. Any corrections, comments or suggestions are welcome. Please complete the following
information:
Manual Form Number _____________________________________________________
Section and Page # _______________________________________________________
Your Name ______________________________________________________________
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Phone Number ___________________________________________________________
Corrections, Comments and Suggestions _____________________________________
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Return to:
4
NORTH AMERICA
EUROPEAN SERVED AREA
THERMO KING CORPORATION
314 West 90th Street
Mail Stop 38
Minneapolis, MN 55420
Attn: Service Department
THERMO KING CORPORATION
Ingersoll Rand Climate Control Technologies
Monivea Road
Mervue, Galway, Ireland
Attn: Service Department
Table of Contents
Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
General Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Battery Installation and Cable Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Battery Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Refrigerant Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Refrigerant Oil Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Electrical Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Low Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Microprocessor Service Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Welding Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
First Aid, Refrigerant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
First Aid, Refrigerant Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
First Aid, Engine Coolant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Belt Tension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Refrigeration System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Electrical Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Electrical Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Electric Fuel Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Maintenance Inspection Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Unit Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Unit Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Design Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Diesel Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Thermo King X430L Reciprocating Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Electronic Throttling Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Data Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
CargoLink™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
OptiSet Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
FreshSet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Sequence of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Opening the Front Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Opening the Secondary Door Latch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Closing the Front Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Engine Compartment Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Unit Protection Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Serial Number Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Operating Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) Control System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Microprocessor On/Off Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
HMI Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Unit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Manual Pretrip Inspection (Before Starting Unit) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Turning Unit On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Turning Unit Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Standard Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Standard Display Variations when OptiSet Plus is in Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Temperature Watch Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Alarm Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Starting the Diesel Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
After Start Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
5
Table of Contents
Changing the Setpoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Selection of Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Selecting CYCLE-SENTRY or Continuous Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Initiating a Manual Defrost Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Terminating a Defrost Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Viewing Gauge Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Viewing Sensor Readings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Navigating the Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Language Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Return to English at Any Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Alarms Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Datalogger Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Hourmeters Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Mode Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Pretrip Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Adjust Brightness Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Time Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
OptiSet Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Loading Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Post Load Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Post Trip Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Electrical Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Alternator Charging System Diagnostic Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Alternator Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Base Controller Fuse F4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Test Equipment for Checking Voltage and Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Alternator Load Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
General Diagnostic and Warranty Evaluation Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Field Current Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Battery Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Fuses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Base Controller LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Smart FETs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) Microprocessor Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
REB (Radio Expansion Board) Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Fuse Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Air Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Unit Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Wire Harness Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Ultrasonic Fuel Level Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Important USFLS Replacement Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Resistive Fuel Level Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Electric Fuel Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Fresh Air Exchange Solenoid (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Engine Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
EMI 3000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Engine Lubrication System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Engine Oil Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Oil Filter Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Low Oil Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Engine Cooling System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
ELC (Extended Life Coolant) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Antifreeze Maintenance Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Bleeding Air from the Cooling System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
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Table of Contents
Engine Thermostat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Coolant Level Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Engine Fuel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Fuel Line Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Fuel Return Line Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Bleeding the Fuel System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Draining Water from Fuel Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Fuel Filter/Water Separator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Draining Water from Fuel Filter/Water Separator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Fuel Filter/Water Separator Filter Element Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Fuel Filter/Water Separator Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Engine Speed Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Injection Pump Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Injection Pump Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Injection Pump Reinstallation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Fuel Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Trochoid Feed Pump . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Cold Start Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Electric Fuel Heater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Engine Valve Clearance Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Crankcase Breather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
EMI 3000 Air Cleaner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Air Restriction Indicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Belts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Belt Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Fan Belt Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Refrigeration Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Refrigerant Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Testing The Refrigerant Charge With An Empty Cargo Compartment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Testing the Refrigerant Charge with a Loaded Cargo Compartment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Testing for an Overcharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Moisture Indicating Sight Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Refrigerant Leaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Oil Collection Container . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Checking Compressor Oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
High Pressure Cutout Switch (HPCO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Three-Way Valve Condenser Pressure Bypass Check Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Pressure Transducers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
Hot Gas Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Refrigeration Service Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Compressor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Compressor Coupling Removal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Compressor Coupling Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Compressors with Pressurized Seal Cavity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Hex Drive Compressor Seal Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Condenser Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Discharge Vibrasorber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
In-Line Condenser Check Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Condenser Check Valve Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Bypass Check Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Receiver Tank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Filter Drier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Expansion Valve Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Evaporator Coil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Accumulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
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Table of Contents
Three-Way Valve Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Removal/Disassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
End Cap Checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Assembly/Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Three-Way Valve Condenser Pressure Bypass Check Valve Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Pilot Solenoid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Suction Vibrasorber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
High Pressure Cutout Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
High Pressure Relief Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Discharge Pressure Transducer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Suction Pressure Transducer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Hot Gas Solenoid Valve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Compressor Oil Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Compressors with Internal Oil Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Internal Oil Filter Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Checking Compressor Oil Pressure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Priming New Compressor Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Structural Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Unit and Engine Mounting Bolts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Unit Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Condenser, Evaporator, and Radiator Coils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Micro-Channel Coil Cleaning Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Defrost Drains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Unit Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Defrost Damper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Condenser and Evaporator Fan Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Condenser Fan Blower Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Evaporator Fan Blower Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Evaporator Fan Blower Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Fan Shaft Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Fan Shaft Assembly Overhaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Idler Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Idler Assembly Overhaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Mechanical Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Refrigeration Diagnosis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Refrigeration Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Cool Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Heat/Defrost Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Diagram Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8
Safety Precautions
Thermo King recommends that all service be
performed by a Thermo King dealer. However,
you should be aware of several general safety
practices:
The
symbol appears next to a point that is
particularly important
DANGER: Denotes the possibility of
serious injury or death.
WARNING: Denotes the possibility of
serious equipment damage or serious
personal injury.
CAUTION: Denotes the possibility of
minor to severe equipment damage or
personal injury.
General Practices
DANGER: Avoid engine operation in
confined spaces and areas or
circumstances where fumes from the
engine could become trapped and cause
serious injury or death.
WARNING: Make sure your gauge
manifold hoses are in good condition
before using them. Never let them come in
contact with moving belts, fans, pulleys or
hot surfaces. Defective gauge equipment
can damage components or cause serious
injury.
WARNING: Always wear goggles or safety
glasses when working on a unit.
Refrigerant liquid, oil and battery acid can
permanently damage your eyes. See “First
Aid” on page 12.
DANGER: Do not operate the compressor
with the discharge service valve closed.
This condition increases internal pressure,
which can cause an explosion.
WARNING: Use extreme caution when
drilling holes in a unit. Holes might
weaken structural components. Holes
drilled into electrical wiring can cause a
fire or explosion.
DANGER: Never apply heat to a sealed
refrigeration system or container. Heat
increases internal pressure, which might
cause an explosion.
WARNING: Exposed coil fins can cause
lacerations. Service work on the
evaporator or condenser coils is best left to
a certified Thermo King technician.
DANGER: Refrigerant in the presence of
an open flame, spark or electrical short
produces toxic gases that are severe
respiratory irritants.
WARNING: Do not apply heat to a closed
cooling system. Before applying heat to a
cooling system, drain it. Then flush it with
water and drain the water. Antifreeze
contains water and ethylene glycol. The
ethylene glycol is flammable and can
ignite if the antifreeze is heated enough to
boil off the water.
DANGER: Keep your hands, clothing and
tools clear of fans when working on a unit
that is running. Loose clothing might
entangle moving pulleys or belts, causing
serious injury or possible death.
DANGER: Do not inhale refrigerant. Use
caution when working with refrigerant or
a refrigeration system in any confined
area with a limited air supply, such as a
cargo area or garage. Refrigerant
displaces air and can cause oxygen
depletion, resulting in suffocation and
possible death.
WARNING: Be careful when using
ladders or scaffolding to install or service
a unit. Observe the manufacture’s safety
labels and warnings.
CAUTION: Make sure all mounting bolts
are tight and are the correct length for
their applications. Improper torque and
incorrect bolt lengths can damage
equipment.
9
Safety Precautions
NOTE: In the USA, EPA Section 608
Certification is required to work on refrigeration
systems.
Battery Installation and Cable
Routing
WARNING: Improperly installed battery
could result in a fire or explosion! A
Thermo King approved battery must be
installed and properly secured to the
battery tray.
WARNING: Improperly installed battery
cables could result in fire or explosion!
Battery cables must be installed, routed
and secured properly to prevent them from
rubbing, chaffing or making contact with
hot, sharp or rotating components.
WARNING: Do not attach fuel lines or
any additional wiring harnesses to the
battery cables as this could cause an
electrical fire!
CAUTION: Do not connect other
manufacturer’s equipment or accessories
to the Thermo King unit. This could result
in severe damage to equipment and void
the warranty!
CAUTION: Set all unit electrical controls
to the OFF position before connecting
battery cables to the battery to prevent unit
from starting unexpectedly and causing
personal injury.
CAUTION: Always wear protective
clothing, gloves and eye wear when
handling and installing batteries. Battery
acid can cause serious burns when
exposed to eyes or skin. If battery acid
contacts skin or clothing, wash
immediately with soap and water. If acid
enters your eye, immediately flood it with
running cold water for at least twenty
minutes and get medical attention
immediately.
10
CAUTION: Always cover battery
terminals to prevent them from making
contact with metal components during
battery installation. Battery terminals
grounding against metal could cause the
battery to explode.
Battery Removal
DANGER: Disconnect the negative
battery terminal (-) first when removing a
battery. Connect the positive terminal (+)
first when installing a battery.
This order is important because the frame is
grounded to the negative battery terminal. If the
negative terminal is still connected, a complete
circuit exists from the positive terminal of the
battery to the frame. Metal objects contacting the
positive side and the frame simultaneously will
cause sparks or arcing. If there are sufficient
hydrogen gases emitted from the battery, an
explosion might occur, causing equipment
damage, serious injury, even death.
Refrigerant Hazards
DANGER: Do not use a Halide torch.
When a flame comes in contact with
refrigerant, toxic gases are produced.
These gases can cause suffocation, even
death.
DANGER: Store refrigerant in proper
containers, out of direct sunlight and away
from intense heat. Heat increases pressure
inside storage containers, which can cause
them to burst.
DANGER: Do not use oxygen (O2 ) or
compressed air for leak testing. Oxygen
mixed with refrigerant is combustible.
WARNING: Wear butyl lined gloves when
handling refrigerant to help prevent
frostbite.
Safety Precautions
CAUTION: Refrigerant in a liquid state
evaporates rapidly when exposed to the
atmosphere, freezing anything it contacts.
Be careful when handling refrigerant to
protect your skin from frostbite.
Electrical Hazards
Low Voltage
WARNING: Control circuits used in
refrigeration units are low voltage (12 to
24 volts dc). This voltage is not dangerous,
but the large amount of amperage
available from the alternator can cause
severe burns if accidentally shorted to
ground with metal objects, such as tools.
CAUTION: When being transferred,
refrigerant must be in liquid state to avoid
possible equipment damage.
CAUTION: When transferring
refrigerant, use a process that prevents or
greatly restricts refrigerant from escaping
into the atmosphere. Refrigerant damages
the earth’s upper ozone layer.
WARNING: Do not wear jewelry, watches
or rings because they increase the risk of
shorting out electrical circuits and
damaging equipment or causing severe
burns.
Refrigerant Oil Hazards
WARNING: Protect your eyes from
contact with refrigerant oil. The oil can
cause serious eye injuries. Avoid
prolonged or repeated contact with
refrigerant oil. To prevent irritation, wash
your hands and clothing thoroughly after
handling the oil.
CAUTION: Use the correct oil in Thermo
King systems to avoid damaging
equipment and invalidating its warranty.
CAUTION: Do not mix refrigerant oils
because that can cause system damage.
CAUTION: Use dedicated equipment to
prevent contaminating systems with the
wrong type of oil.
CAUTION: Store refrigerant oil in an
approved sealed container to avoid
moisture contamination.
CAUTION: Do not expose the refrigerant
oil to the air any longer than necessary.
The oil will absorb moisture, which results
in much longer evacuation times and
possible system contamination.
Microprocessor Service
Precautions
Take precautions to prevent electrostatic
discharge when servicing the microprocessor and
its related components. Even tiny amounts of
current can severely damage or destroy electronic
components.
Observe the following precautions when servicing
a microprocessor control system to avoid
damaging electronic components. Refer to the
appropriate microprocessor diagnosis manual and
the Electrostatic Discharge Training Guide (TK
40282) for more information.
•
If the microprocessor has a power switch, turn
it OFF before connecting or disconnecting the
battery.
•
Disconnect power to the unit.
•
Avoid wearing clothing that generates static
electricity (wool, nylon, polyester, etc.).
•
Wear a wrist strap (P/N 204-622 or its
equivalent) with the lead end connected to the
microprocessor’s ground terminal. These
straps are available from most electronic
equipment distributors. DO NOT wear these
straps with power applied to the unit.
CAUTION: Wipe up spills immediately.
Refrigerant oil can damage paints and
rubber materials.
11
Safety Precautions
•
Avoid unnecessary contact with the electronic
components.
First Aid
•
Store and ship electronic components in
antistatic bags and protective packaging.
First Aid, Refrigerant
•
•
•
Leave electronic components in their antistatic
packing materials until you’re ready to use
them.
After servicing any electronic components,
check the wiring for possible errors before
restoring power to the unit.
Never use a battery and a light bulb to test
circuits on any microprocessor-based
equipment.
Welding Precautions
Take precautions before electrically welding any
portion of the unit or the vehicle to which it is
attached. Ensure that welding currents are not
allowed to flow through the unit’s electronic
circuits.
Observe the following precautions when welding
to avoid damaging electronic components.
•
If the microprocessor has a power switch, turn
it OFF before connecting or disconnecting the
battery.
In the event of frostbite, protect the frozen area
from further injury, warm the area rapidly and
maintain respiration.
EYES : For contact with liquid, immediately flush
eyes with large amounts of water. CALL A
PHYSICIAN.
SKIN: Flush area with large amounts of warm
water. Do not apply heat. Remove contaminated
clothing and shoes. Wrap burns with dry, sterile,
bulky dressing to protect from infection. CALL A
PHYSICIAN. Wash contaminated clothing before
reuse.
INHALATION: Move victim to fresh air and use
CPR (cardio pulmonary resuscitation) or
mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to restore breathing,
if necessary. Stay with victim until emergency
personnel arrive.
First Aid, Refrigerant Oil
EYES : Immediately
flush with water for at least
15 minutes. CALL A PHYSICIAN. Wash skin
with soap and water.
•
Disconnect power to the unit.
induce vomiting.
Immediately contact local poison control center or
physician.
•
Disconnect all wire harnesses from the
microprocessor.
First Aid, Engine Coolant
•
If there are any electrical circuit breakers in
the control box, switch them OFF.
•
Close the control box.
•
Components that could be damaged by
welding sparks should be removed from the
unit.
•
Use normal welding procedures, but keep the
ground return electrode as close to the area
being welded as practical. This will reduce the
likelihood of stray welding currents passing
through any electronic circuits.
12
INGESTION: Do not
EYES : Immediately
flush with water for at least
15 minutes. CALL A PHYSICIAN. Wash skin
with soap and water.
INGESTION: Do not
induce vomiting.
Immediately contact local poison control center or
physician.
Specifications
Engine
Model:
SB-230 RR
SB-330 RR
TK486V (Interim Tier 4)
TK486VH (Interim Tier 4)
Number of Cylinders
4
Cylinder Arrangement
In-line vertical, number 1 on flywheel end
Firing Order
1-3-4-2
Direction of Rotation
Counterclockwise viewed from flywheel end
Fuel Type
No. 2 diesel fuel under normal conditions
No. 1 diesel fuel is acceptable cold weather fuel
Oil Capacity
13 quarts (12.3 liters) crankcase and oil filter
Fill to full mark on dipstick
Oil Type
API Classification CI-4 or better
(ACEA Rating E3 or better for Europe)
Oil Viscosity
14 F to 122 F (-10 C to 50 C): SAE 15W-40 (Synthetic)
5 to 104 F (-15 to 40 C): SAE 15W-40
5 to 104 F (-15 to 40 C): SAE 10W-30 (Synthetic or
Synthetic Blend)
-13 to 104 F (-25 to 40 C): SAE 10W-40
-13 to 86 F (-25 to 30 C): SAE 10W-30
-22 to 122 F (-30 to 50 C): SAE 5W-40 (Synthetic)
Below -22 F (-30 C): SAE 0W-30 (Synthetic)
Engine rpm:
SB-230 RR Low Speed Operation
SB-230 RR High Speed Operation
1450 ± 25 rpm
2200 ± 25 rpm
SB-330 RR Low Speed Operation
1450 ± 25 rpm
(1720 ± 25 rpm with High Capacity Fresh Option)
2600 ± 25 rpm
SB-330 RR High Speed Operation
Engine Oil Pressure
18 psi (127 kPa) minimum in low speed
45 to 57 psi (310 to 390 kPa) in high speed
Intake Valve Clearance
0.006 to 0.010 in. (0.15 to 0.25 mm)
Exhaust Valve Clearance
0.006 to 0.010 in. (0.15 to 0.25 mm)
Valve Setting Temperature
70 F (21 C)
Fuel Injection Timing:
See “Injection Pump Timing” on page 106.
Fuel Injection Nozzle Opening Pressure:
2,800-3,000 psi (19,300 to 20,700 kPa)
Low Oil Pressure Switch (Normally Closed)
17 ± 3 psi (117 ± 21 kPa)
Engine Coolant Thermostat
160 F (71 C)
13
Specifications
Engine (Continued)
Engine Coolant Type
ELC (Extended Life Coolant), which is “RED”
Use a 50/50 concentration of any of the following
equivalents:
Chevron Dex-Cool
Texaco ELC
Havoline Dex-Cool®
Havoline XLC for Europe
Shell Dexcool®
Shell Rotella
Saturn/General Motors Dex-Cool®
Caterpillar ELC
Detroit Diesel POWERCOOL® Plus
CAUTION: Do not add “GREEN” or “BLUE-GREEN”
conventional coolant to cooling systems using “RED”
Extended Life Coolant, except in an emergency. If
conventional coolant is added to Extended Life
Coolant, the coolant must be changed after 2 years
instead of 5 years.
Coolant System Capacity
7.5 quarts (7.1 liters)
Radiator Cap Pressure
7 psi (48 kPa)
Drive
Direct to compressor; belts to fans, alternator, and water
pump
Belt Tension
Tension No. on TK Gauge P/N 204-427
Model 30
New Belt
Field Reset
Alternator Belt:
SB-230 RR
SB-330 RR
75
74
72
71
Lower Fan Belt (Engine to Idler):
SB-230 RR
SB-330 RR
88
87
84
84
88
85
Upper Fan Belt (Fan to Idler)
Refrigeration System
Compressor
Thermo King X430LSC5
Refrigerant Charge—Type:
SB-230 RR
SB-230 RR with Micro-Channel
Condenser Coil (starting 12/11)
SB-330 RR
SB-330 RR with Micro-Channel
Condenser Coil (starting 05/12)
13 lb (5.9 kg)—R404A
Compressor Oil Charge
4.3 qt (4.1 liters)*
Compressor Oil Type
Polyol Ester type P/N 203-513
Heat/Defrost Method
Hot gas
High Pressure Cutout
470 +7/-35 psi (3241 + 48/-241 kPa)
Automatic reset @ 375 ± 38 psi (2586 ± 262 kPa)
11.5 lb (5.2 kg)—R404A
16 lb (7.3 kg)—R404A
12.5 lb (5.7 kg)—R404A
* When the compressor is removed from the unit, oil level should be noted or the oil removed from the
compressor should be measured so that the same amount of oil can be added before placing the
replacement compressor in the unit.
14
Specifications
Electrical Control System
Voltage
12.5 Vdc
Battery
One, group C31, 12 volt, (950 CCA recommended for
operation below -15 F [-26 C])
Fuses
See “Fuses” on page 77.
Battery Charging
12 volt, 65 amp, brush type, Thermo King Alternator
Voltage Regulator Setting
13.95 to 14.35 volts @ 77 F (25 C)
NOTE: Fuse F4 (Bypass resistor for Prestolite Alternator) must be removed for the Thermo King
Alternator. Thermo King Alternators are painted black (see Figure 82 on page 73).
Electrical Components
NOTE: Disconnect components from unit circuit to check resistance.
Component
Current Draw (Amps)
at 12.5 Vdc
Resistance—Cold
(Ohms)
35 to 45
0.5
0.2 to 0.3
24 to 29
Damper Solenoid
5.7
2.2
High Speed (Throttle) Solenoid
2.9
4.3
Air Heater
89
0.14
Pilot Solenoid
0.7
17.0
Electronic Throttling Valve:
Coil A (Red [EVA] and Blue [EVB] Wires)
Coil B (Black [EVC] and White [EVD] Wires)
—
—
20 to 35
20 to 35
Hot Gas Bypass Valve
1.1
11.1
Fresh Air Exchange Solenoid (Optional)
5.7
2.2
Fuel Solenoid:
Pull-in Coil
Hold-in Coil
Starter Motor
350-475*
* On-the-engine cranking check. Bench test is approximately 140 amps.
Electric Fuel Heater
Electric Fuel Heater:
0.8 to 1.1 ohms
11.4 to 15.5 amps
44 F (7 C)
62 F (17 C)
W Fuse
3 amps
2A/2FH Circuit Breaker
20 amps, manual reset
Resistance
Current Draw at 12.5 Vdc
Internal Thermostat Minimum Closing Temp.
Internal Thermostat Maximum Opening Temp.
15
Maintenance Inspection Schedule
Pretrip
Every
1,500
Hours
Every
3,000
Hours*
Annual/ Inspect/Service These Items
4,500
Hours
Microprocessor
•
Run Pretrip Test (see “Pretrip Tests” on page 60).
Engine
•
Check fuel supply.
•
Check engine oil level.
•
Drain water from fuel filter/water separator.
•
•
•
•
Inspect belts for condition and proper tension (belt tension tool
No. 204-427).
•
•
•
•
Check engine oil pressure hot, on high speed (should display “OK”).
•
•
•
•
Listen for unusual noises, vibrations, etc.
•
•
•
•
Check engine coolant level and antifreeze protection (-30 F [-40 C]).
•
Check air cleaner restriction indicator if so equipped (change filter when
indicator reaches 25 in.). Replace EMI 3000 air cleaner element (see
“EMI 3000 Air Cleaner” on page 118) at 3,000 hours or two years
(whichever occurs first) if indicator has not reached 25 in.
•
•
Check fuel level visible through the clear cover on fuel filter/water
separator. Replace filter element when fuel level rises to the top of filter
element.
•
•
•
Drain water from fuel tank and check vent.
•
•
•
Inspect/clean fuel transfer pump inlet strainer.
•
•
•
Check and adjust engine speeds (high and low speed).
•
•
•
Check condition of drive coupling bushings per Service Bulletin T&T 171.
•
Check engine mounts for wear.
•
Change engine oil and oil filter (hot). Requires oil with API Rating CI-4 or
better (ACEA Rating E3 for Europe).
—
•
Change ELC (red) engine coolant every 5 years or 12,000 hours. Units
equipped with ELC have an ELC nameplate on the expansion tank (see
page 92).
Test fuel injection nozzles at least every 3,000 hours. **
—
Replace fuel return lines between fuel injection nozzles every 10,000
hours.
Electrical
•
•
•
•
Inspect battery terminals and electrolyte level.
•
•
•
Inspect wire harness for damaged wires or connections.
•
•
•
Check operation of damper door (closes on defrost initiation and opens
on defrost termination).
•
Inspect alternator wire connections for tightness.
*3,000 hours or two years, whichever occurs first.
** Based on EPA 40 CFR Part 89.
16
Maintenance Inspection Schedule
Pretrip
Every
1,500
Hours
Every
3,000
Hours*
Annual/ Inspect/Service These Items
4,500
Hours
Refrigeration
•
•
•
•
Check refrigerant level.
•
•
•
Check for proper suction pressure.
•
•
•
Check compressor oil level and condition.
•
Check compressor efficiency and pump down refrigeration system.
•
Empty oil collection container mounted on compressor.
—
Replace dehydrator and check discharge and suction pressure every two
(2) years.
Structural
•
•
•
•
Visually inspect unit for fluid leaks.
•
•
•
•
Visually inspect unit for damaged, loose or broken parts (includes air
ducts and bulkheads).
•
•
•
Inspect tapered roller bearing fanshaft and idlers for leakage and bearing
wear (noise).
•
•
•
Clean entire unit including condenser and evaporator coils and defrost
drains.
•
•
•
Check all unit and fuel tank mounting bolts, brackets, lines, hoses, etc.
•
•
•
Check evaporator damper door adjustment and operation.
*3,000 hours or two years, whichever occurs first.
** Based on EPA 40 CFR Part 89.
17
Unit Description
Unit Overview
The Thermo King SB-230 RR, and SB-330 RR
are one piece, self-contained, diesel powered, air
cooling/heating units operating under the control
of the SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) programmable
microprocessor controller. The unit mounts on the
front of the trailer, container, or rail box car with
the evaporator extending through an opening in
the front wall.
The units feature cooling and heating using a quiet
running engine from the Thermo King TK486
engine family.
SB-230 RR units are available in the following
models:
•
DRC (Domestic Refrigerated Container)
•
TOFC (Trailer on Flat Car)
SB-330 RR units are high capacity units designed
for engine operation at a high speed of 2600 rpm.
They are available in the following models:
•
DRC (Domestic Refrigerated Container)
•
TOFC (Trailer on Flat Car)
•
RBC (Rail Box Car)
18
Figure 1: Front View
Unit Description
Design Features
The following chart lists key design features and
options.
ˆ Standard Features
❍ Option/Factory Installed
❑ Option/Dealer Installed
DRC
SB-230 RR
SB-330 RR
TOFC
SB-230 RR
SB-330 RR
RBC
SB-330 RR
SMART REEFER SR-3 Controller
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
OptiSet Plus™ with FreshSet™ Programmable Modes
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
ETV (Electronic Throttling Valve)
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
ServiceWatch™ Data Logger
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
FreshSet™ Programmable Modes
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
CargoWatch™ Data Logger
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
• Door Switches
❍/❑
❍/❑
❍/❑
• Temperature Sensor Kits
❍/❑
❍/❑
❍/❑
CargoLink™ Wireless Sensors
❍/❑
❍/❑
❍/❑
EMI-3000
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
High-Capacity Condenser Coil
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Whisper Quiet Technology
Easy-access door design
❍
ˆ
❍
ˆ
❍
ˆ
Composite Exterior Panels
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Long-Life Coolant/Silicone Hoses
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
❍/❑
❍/❑
❍/❑
Remote Status Display with Fuel Level
❑
❑
❑
Remote Status Display with Fuel Level and Temperature
❑
❑
❑
Dual Remote Status Displays with Digital Thermometer
Standard Unit Color White
❑
ˆ
❑
ˆ
❑
ˆ
Standard Grille Color Black
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Directional Air Delivery
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Vibration Isolation System
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Fuel Level Sensor
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Fuel Filter/Water Separator with Electric Fuel Heater
ˆ
ˆ
ˆ
Key Features & Options
CargoWatch™ Accessories:
Remote Status Display
Fresh Air Exchange
❍
❍
ˆ
Rail Evaporator Back Panel
❍
❍
ˆ
Frost Plug Heater
Alternator, 65 Amp, 12V dc
❍
ˆ
❍
ˆ
❍
ˆ
Special Color Grills
❍
❍
❍
❍
❍
❍
❍/❑
❍/❑
❍/❑
PrimAir™ bulkhead and duct system
❑
❑
❑
Rear Remote Control
❑
❑
❑
Humidity Sensor
❑
❑
❑
Megatech Battery, 12 Volt, Wet Cell
❑
❑
❑
EON Battery, 12 Volt, Dry Cell
❑
❑
❑
REB Wireless Communication Platform
i-Box™ Interface
19
Unit Description
Diesel Engine
Electronic Throttling Valve
The Thermo King TK486 family of engines are
4-cylinder, water cooled, direct injection diesel
engines.The engine is coupled directly to the
compressor. Belts transmit power to the unit fans,
alternator, and water pump.
The Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) is standard
on these units.
The SB-230 RR uses a TK486V (Interim Tier 4),
which is designed to run with a high speed of
2200 rpm.
The SB-330 RR uses a TK486VH (Interim
Tier 4), which is designed to run with a high speed
of 2600 rpm.
The Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) is a
variable position valve operated by a stepper
motor. The ETV is located in the suction line
between the evaporator and the heat exchanger.
Discharge and suction pressure transducers supply
pressure information to the microprocessor
control system. The microprocessor controls the
electronic throttling valve directly. The ETV
replaces both the throttling valve and the
modulation valve used in other units. The ETV
system also uses a hot gas bypass valve like the
one used with the modulation valve in other units.
The ETV system provides enhanced control of the
refrigeration system as follows:
Suction Pressure Control: The suction
pressure
control algorithm is the primary control used to
obtain maximum capacity. This allows the
refrigeration system to fully utilize the power
capabilities of the engine under varying
conditions.
Figure 2: TK486V (TK486VH is Similar)
Thermo King X430L Reciprocating
Compressor
These units are equipped with a Thermo King
X430L reciprocating compressor with 30.0 cu. in.
(492 cm3) displacement.
Discharge Pressure Protection: This protection
algorithm provides an additional measure of
protection against high discharge pressures and
possible compressor damage. It will prevent
shutdowns in high ambient temperatures by
allowing continued operation of the unit at a
temporarily reduced refrigeration capacity.
Engine Coolant Temperature Protection: This
protection algorithm protects the engine from high
coolant temperature shutdowns and possible
engine damage. It will reduce the load on the
engine by temporarily reducing refrigeration
capacity. This lowers the engine temperature
while still allowing continued unit operation.
Modulation Control: The ETV system replaces the
modulation valve. The modulation control
algorithm operates much the same as modulation
on other units.
20
Unit Description
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) Control
System
WARNING: Do not operate the unit until
you are completely familiar with the
location and function of each control.
The SR-3 is a microprocessor control system
designed for a transport refrigeration system. The
SR-3 integrates the following functions:
•
Changing setpoint and operating mode
•
Viewing gauge, sensor and hourmeter
readings
•
Initiating Defrost cycles
•
Viewing and clearing alarms.
The microprocessor components are located
inside the control box, which is located inside the
lower roadside service door. The microprocessor
is connected to an HMI (Human Machine
Interface) Control Panel. It is used to operate the
unit. The HMI control panel is mounted on the
face of the control box. It is clearly visible
through an opening in the lower roadside service
door.
See the Operating Instructions Chapter for more
information about the SR-3 controller.
CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop Controls
The CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop fuel saving
system provides optimum operating economy.
WARNING: The unit can start at any time
without warning. Press the OFF key on the
HMI control panel and place the
microprocessor On/Off switch in the Off
position before inspecting or servicing any
part of the unit.
NOTE: The SR-3 controller provides a wide
range of control and programming flexibility.
However, pre-programming of the unit
controller may prohibit operation in certain
temperature ranges within some modes and may
also prohibit certain modes of operation. Refer
to TK 54842 the SR-3 Microprocessor Control
System Diagnostic Manual for information
about controller programming.
The system automatically monitors and maintains
the compartment temperature, engine block
temperature, and battery charge levels at a
condition where quick, easy starts are possible.
If the block temperature falls below 30 F (-1 C),
the engine will start and run until the block
temperature is above 90 F (32 C). If the battery
voltage falls to the programmed limit selected by
CYCLE-SENTRY Battery Voltage (typically 12.2
volts) and Diesel CYCLE-SENTRY mode is
selected, the engine will start and run until the
charge rate falls below that programmed by
CYCLE-SENTRY Amps (typically 5 amperes).
Features of the CYCLE-SENTRY system are:
•
Offers either CYCLE-SENTRY or
Continuous Run operation.
•
Controller regulated all season temperature
control.
•
Maintains minimum engine temperature in
low ambient conditions.
•
Battery Sentry keeps batteries fully charged
during unit operation.
•
Variable preheat time.
•
Preheat indicator buzzer.
The CYCLE-SENTRY system automatically
starts the unit on microprocessor demand, and
shuts down the unit after those conditions are
satisfied.
21
Unit Description
Data Logging
There are two separate data loggers. The data is
downloaded through the data ports on the front of
the control box using an IBM® PC compatible
laptop or desktop computer and Thermo King
WinTrac 5.1 (or higher) software.
2
1
3
CargoWatch™: CargoWatch™ data logging
requires the installation of optional sensors. Up to
six temperature sensor/probes and four door
switches can be installed. CargoWatch also logs
the setpoint. Use the CargoWatch Port to
downloaded the CargoWatch data. If optional
temperature sensors are installed, their readings
are displayed as Datalogger Sensor (1-6)
Temperature in the sensor readings. See “Viewing
Sensor Readings” on page 43.
A printer can also be used to print a report of the
optional sensor readings. See “Printing a Trip
Report” on page 51.
USB Port: Standard USB
drives that have been
programmed with Wintrac can be used. Use of a
USB drive eliminates the need for an on-site
computer and does not require cables.
The USB port can be used to:
AMA1322
1.
CargoWatch Port
2.
USB Port
3.
ServiceWatch Port
Figure 3: HMI Controller and Data Ports
ServiceWatch™: ServiceWatch™
is standard
equipment. It records operating events, alarm
codes and compartment temperatures as they
occur and at preset intervals. This information is
typically used to analyze unit performance. Use
the ServiceWatch Port to downloaded the
ServiceWatch data.
IMPORTANT: A ServiceWatch download can be
helpful when diagnosing a problem in a unit
with an SR-3 Controller. Therefore, it is
recommended that a ServiceWatch download be
preformed to help diagnose a problem. A
ServiceWatch download must be preformed
before contacting the Thermo King Service
Department for assistance in diagnosing a
problem. Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor
Control System Diagnostic Manual TK 54842
for information about downloading the
ServiceWatch Data Logger and viewing the data.
22
•
Upload and download OptiSet™ Plus files.
•
Download the CargoWatch and ServiceWatch
Data Loggers.
•
Flashload the Base Controller and HMI
Control Panel.
Refer to TK 54842 the SR-3 Microprocessor
Control System Diagnostic Manual and for
information about using the USB port.
CargoLink™
CargoLink™ is a wireless sensor system. The
main components are the coordinator module,
interconnect harness, antenna, and wireless
sensors. The coordinator module receives
information from the wireless sensors through the
antenna, and communicates with the controller
through the interconnect harness. Currently, only
wireless door switches are available. Other
wireless sensors will be available in the future.
Refer to TK 55151 the Truck and Trailer Edition
CargoLink Installation Manual for information
about installing the CargoLink system and
sensors, and troubleshooting problems with the
system.
Unit Description
OptiSet Plus
•
High Speed Cool
OptiSet Plus™ is a group of programmable
functions that control how the unit will operate
with specific setpoints or named products. This
assures that when a particular setpoint named
product is selected, the unit will always operate
the same way. This allows an entire fleet to be
configured to match customers’ needs. Refer to
TK 54842 the SR-3 Microprocessor Control
System Diagnostic Manual and TK 54045 the
OptiSet Plus User’s Guide for configuration
instructions.
•
Low Speed Cool
•
Low Speed Modulated Cool
•
Null (CYCLE-SENTRY operation only)
•
Low Speed Modulated Heat
•
Low Speed Heat
•
High Speed Heat
•
Defrost
Defrost
FreshSet
FreshSet™ is included in OptiSet Plus. FreshSet
is a demand base temperature control for fresh
products. FreshSet modifies and adjusts unit
airflow operation to control temperature and to
maximize protection of cargo, while keeping
operating costs to a minimum. TK 54842 the SR-3
Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic
Manual for configuration instructions.
Sequence of Operation
When the Microprocessor On/Off switch is turned
on and Controller ON key is pressed, the LCD
display is illuminated and shows the setpoint and
the return air temperature. If the
CYCLE-SENTRY mode has been selected, the
unit will start and stop automatically. If the
Continuous mode has been selected, the unit will
start and run automatically.
Operating Modes
The microprocessor uses a complex program to
determine which operating mode the unit should
be in. Therefore, it is difficult to predict which
operating mode the unit should be in by
comparing the setpoint to the box temperature.
The diesel engine operates at either low speed or
high speed as determined by the microprocessor.
The unit will Cool or Heat in either high or low
speed. The unit will Defrost in low speed only.
Heat and Defrost consists of hot gas delivered to
the evaporator coil distributor.
The microprocessor will select the operating
mode from the following:
Frost gradually builds-up on evaporator coils as a
result of normal operation. The unit uses hot
refrigerant to defrost the evaporator coils. Hot
refrigerant gas passes through the evaporator coil
and melts the frost. The water flows through
collection drain tubes onto the ground. The
methods of Defrost initiation are Automatic, and
Manual.
Automatic Defrost: The controller is programmed
to automatically initiate timed or demand defrost
cycles. The controller can be programmed to
initiate timed defrost cycles at intervals of 2, 4, 6,
8, or 12 hours. Demand defrost cycles occur if the
differences between the return air temperature,
discharge air temperature, and coil temperature
exceed certain limits. The unit can enter defrost
cycles as often as every 30 minutes if required.
Manual Defrost: In Manual Defrost Mode, the
operator initiates a defrost cycle. See “Initiating a
Manual Defrost Cycle” on page 40.
NOTE: The unit will not perform a Manual
Defrost cycle unless the unit has been turned on
with the ON key, the unit is running in
Continuous or CYCLE-SENTRY mode (or shut
down in CYCLE-SENTRY Null mode), and the
coil temperature is below 45 F (7 C).
The evaporator coil temperature must be below
45 F (7 C) to allow defrost.
The following four defrost timers are used. These
timers can be set for intervals of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 12
hours.
•
Defrost Interval In Range with Fresh Setpoint
(standard setting 6 hours)
23
Unit Description
•
Defrost Interval Not In Range with Fresh
Setpoint (standard setting 4 hours)
•
Defrost Interval In Range with Frozen
Setpoint (standard setting 6 hours)
•
Defrost Interval Not In Range with Frozen
Setpoint (standard setting is 6 hours)
This feature allows a shorter Defrost interval to be
used when the unit is out of range during a
pull-down and more frequent Defrost cycles may
be beneficial.
Opening the Secondary Door Latch
Later model units are equipped with a secondary
door latch. These units also have a secondary door
latch nameplate located below the front doors.
After opening the door latch, reach between the
front doors and lift the spring latch over the spring
catch while opening the door.
1
Normally, longer defrost timer intervals are used
for colder loads. The defrost interval may need to
be changed if the unit will not hold the
compartment temperature at setpoint.
2
Use a longer defrost interval if defrost is not being
initiated on demand.
Use a shorter defrost interval if defrost is
frequently being initiated on demand.
If the unit is in CYCLE-SENTRY Null mode, the
engine will start when defrost is initiated. The unit
will stay in defrost until the evaporator coil
temperature rises to 58 F (14 C).
Opening the Front Doors
Pull the door latch handle to open the doors and
access the engine compartment. Slam the door to
close it. Do not push the door closed while
holding the door latch handle open or the door
will not close properly.
1
2
1.
Door Latch
2.
Secondary Door Latch Nameplate
Figure 4: Door Latch Location
24
1.
Spring Latch
2.
Spring Catch
Figure 5: Opening Secondary Door Latch
Closing the Front Doors
Slam the door to close it. Do not push the door
closed while holding the door latch handle open
or the door will not close properly.
Unit Description
Engine Compartment
Components
The following maintenance items can be checked
visually.
WARNING: The unit can start at any time
without warning. Press the Off key on the
HMI control panel and place the
microprocessor On/Off switch in the Off
position before inspecting any part of the
unit.
Air Filter Restriction Indicator: The
air filter
restriction indicator is attached to the engine
intake manifold. When the diaphragm indicates
25, service the air filter. Press the button on the
bottom of the restriction indicator to reset after
servicing the air cleaner.
Compressor Oil Sight Glass: Use this sight glass
to check the compressor oil level. See the
Refrigeration Maintenance Chapter for the correct
procedure.
Engine Oil Dipstick: Use the engine oil dipstick to
check the engine oil level.
CAUTION: Make sure the engine is
turned off before attempting to check the
engine oil.
Receiver Tank Sight Glass: Use this sight glass
to
check the level of refrigerant in the receiver tank.
See the Refrigeration Maintenance Chapter for the
correct procedure.
9
1
10
2
11
3
12
4
5
6
13
7
14
15
8
16
1.
Air Filter Restriction Indicator
9.
Alternator
2.
Suction Service Valve
10.
Three-Way Valve
3.
Discharge Service Valve
11.
Throttle Solenoid
4.
Engine Starter Motor
12.
Receiver Tank Sight Glass
5.
Engine RPM Sensor
13.
Hand Primer Pump
6.
Compressor Sight Glass
14.
Low Engine Oil Pressure Switch
7.
Compressor Oil Filter
15.
Engine Oil Dipstick
8.
Engine Oil Filter
16.
Battery Tray
Figure 6: Engine Compartment Components
25
Unit Description
Unit Protection Devices
Coolant Level Switch: The
coolant level switch
closes if the coolant level drops below an
acceptable level. If it stays closed for a specified
time, the microprocessor records alarm code 37.
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor: The
microprocessor uses the engine coolant
temperature sensor to monitor the engine coolant
temperature. If the engine coolant temperature
rises above an acceptable level, the
microprocessor records alarm code 41 and
possibly 18. The the microprocessor might also
shut the unit down.
Fuse Link (Current Limiter): The fuse link is
located in the positive battery cable. The fuse link
protects the electric system from a short. If the
fuse link burns out, replace it by replacing the
positive battery cable.
Fuses: Various fuses are located on the base
controller to protect circuits and components. See
“Fuses” on page 77 for more information.
Smart FETs: Smart FETs in the base controller
protect circuits and components. See “Smart
FETs” on page 78 for more information.
High Pressure Cutout Switch: The
high pressure
cutout switch is located on the compressor
discharge manifold. If the compressor discharge
pressure becomes excessive, the switch opens the
circuit to the run relay to stop the unit. The
microprocessor will record Alarm Code 10.
High Pressure Relief Valve: This valve is designed
to relieve excessive pressure in the refrigeration
system. It is located on the receiver tank. The
valve is a spring-loaded piston that lifts off its seat
when refrigerant pressure exceeds 500 psi (3447
kPa). The valve will reseat when the pressure
drops to 400 psi (2758 kPa). The valve could
possibly leak refrigerant after it has relieved
excess pressure. Tapping the valve lightly may
help the valve reseat and seal properly. The valve
is non-repairable and requires no adjustment. If
the valve fails to reseat properly, recover the
refrigerant charge and replace the valve.
Low Oil Level Switch: The low oil level switch
closes if the oil drops below an acceptable level. If
it stays closed for a specified time, the
microprocessor shuts the unit down and records
alarm code 66.
26
Low Oil Pressure Switch: The low
oil pressure
switch closes if the oil pressure drops below an
acceptable level. If it stays closed for a specified
time, the microprocessor shuts the unit down and
records alarm code 19.
Preheat Buzzer: The preheat
buzzer sounds when
the controller energizes the preheat relay. This
warns anyone near the unit that the controller is
about to start the engine.
Unit Description
Serial Number Locations
Unit: Nameplates
on the bulkhead above the
compressor inside the curbside door, and on the
roadside of the evaporator.
1
Engine: See the engine identification plate located
on the engine valve cover.
Compressor: Stamped between the cylinders on
the front end above the oil pump.
1
1
1.
Serial Number Location
Figure 9: Unit Serial Number Locations
1
2
3
4
1.
Serial Number Location
Figure 7: Compressor Serial Number Location
1
ARA793
1.
2.
3.
4.
Unit Serial Number
Bill of Material Number
Unit Model
Unit ID
Figure 10: Laminated Serial Number Plate
(Located Where Shown Above)
1.
Serial Number Location
Figure 8: Engine Serial Number Location
27
Unit Description
1
2
3
1.
Defrost Damper
2.
X430L Compressor
3.
TK486V/VH Engine
Figure 11: Back View
28
Operating Instructions
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3)
Control System
HMI Control Panel
The microprocessor components are located
inside the control box, which is located inside the
lower roadside service door. The microprocessor
is connected to an HMI (Human Machine
Interface) Control Panel. It is used to operate the
unit. The CargoWatch, USB, and ServiceWatch
ports are used to retrieve data from the data
logging system.
1
2
Use the HMI control panel to operate the unit.
Refer to the SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR
Operator’s Manual TK 54733 and the SR-3
Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic
Manual TK 54842 for more information.
The HMI control panel has a display and eight
touch sensitive keys. The display is capable of
showing both text and graphics. The four keys on
the left and right sides of the display are dedicated
keys. The four keys under the display are “soft”
keys. The function of “soft” keys change
depending on the operation being performed. If a
soft key is active, its function will be shown in the
display directly above the key.
5
3
6
4
AMA1326
1.
Control Box
4.
HMI Control Panel
2.
Microprocessor
On/Off Switch
5.
USB Port
3.
CargoWatch Port
6.
ServiceWatch Port
Figure 12: Control Box With Service Door Open
AMA1321
Figure 13: SR-3 HMI Control Panel
Microprocessor On/Off Switch
This switch supplies or removes electrical power
to the microprocessor. It is located on the left side
of the control box.
CAUTION: The unit can start at any time
without warning. Press the OFF key on the
HMI control panel and place the
microprocessor On/Off switch in the Off
position before inspecting or servicing any
part of the unit.
29
Operating Instructions
Control Panel Display
The display is used to supply unit information to
the operator. This information includes setpoint,
current box temperature operating information,
unit gauge readings, system temperatures and
other information as selected by the operator.
The default display is called the Standard Display.
It is shown in Figure 14 and is described in detail
later in this chapter.
3
Defrost Key: Press this key to initiate
4
1
5
6
Manual Defrost cycle.
forth between the CYCLE-SENTRY
mode and the Continuous Run mode. If
OptiSet Plus is in use, it may not be
possible to change the Mode.
The four “soft” keys under the display
are multi-purpose keys (see Figure 14).
Their function changes depending on
the operation being performed. If a soft
key is active, it’s function will be
shown in the display directly above the
key.
1.
Off Key (Dedicated Key)
2.
On Key (Dedicated Key)
3.
Display
4.
Defrost Key (Dedicated Key)
Typical soft key applications:
5.
CYCLE-SENTRY/Continuous Mode Key
(Dedicated Key)
• Setpoint
6.
Soft Keys
• Gauges
Figure 14: Dedicated and Soft Keys
Control Panel Keys
The four keys on the left and right sides of the
display screen are “dedicated keys” (see Figure
14). Their functions are listed below.
On Key: This
a
CYCLE-SENTRY/Continuous Mode
Key: Press this key to switch back and
2
key is used to turn the
unit on. First the display will briefly
show the Thermo King Logo and then
the statement “Configuring System Please Wait”. When the power-up
sequence is complete the display
shows the Standard Display of box
temperature and setpoint.
30
Off Key: This key is used to turn the
unit off. First the display will briefly
show “System is Powering Down Please Wait. Press On to Resume” and
then “Off” will appear momentarily.
When the power-down sequence is
complete the display will be blank.
• Sensors
• Menu
• Next/Back
• Yes/No
• +/–
• Select/Exit
• Clear/Help
• Hourmeters
Operating Instructions
Unit Operation
Turning Unit On
Manual Pretrip Inspection (Before
Starting Unit)
The following Manual Pretrip Inspection should
be completed before starting the unit and loading
the cargo compartment. While the pretrip
inspection is not a substitute for regularly
scheduled maintenance inspections, it is an
important part of the preventive maintenance
program designed to head off operating problems
and breakdowns before they happen.
Fuel: The diesel
fuel supply must be adequate to
guarantee engine operation to the next check
point.
Engine Oil: The engine oil level should be at the
FULL mark with the dipstick turned (threaded)
into oil pan. Never overfill.
Coolant: The
engine coolant must have antifreeze
protection to -30 F (-34 C). Alarm Code 37
indicates low coolant. Add coolant in the
expansion tank.
CAUTION: Do not remove expansion
tank cap while coolant is hot.
CAUTION: Do not add “GREEN” or
“BLUE-GREEN” conventional coolant to
cooling systems using “RED” Extended
Life Coolant, except in an emergency. If
conventional coolant is added to Extended
Life Coolant, the coolant must be changed
after 2 years instead of 5 years.
Battery: The
Complete the following steps to turn on the unit:
1. Press the ON key.
2
1
1.
On Key
2.
Display
Figure 15: Press On Key
2. The display briefly shows a Thermo King
Logo.
IMPORTANT: The ON key must be held down
until the Thermo King Logo appears. If the ON
key is not held down long enough
(approximately 1/2 second), the display may
flicker but the unit will not start up. If this
occurs, hold the ON key down until the Thermo
King logo appears.
NOTE: With extremely cold ambient
temperatures it may take up to 15 seconds for the
first display to appear.
terminals must be clean and tight.
Belts: The belts must be in good
condition and
adjusted to the proper tensions.
Electrical: The electrical connections should be
securely fastened. The wires and terminals should
be free of corrosion, cracks or moisture.
Structural: Visually inspect the unit for leaks,
loose or broken parts and other damage. The
condenser and evaporator coils should be clean
and free of debris. Check the defrost drain hoses
and fittings to make sure they are open. Make sure
all the doors are latched securely.
31
Operating Instructions
More Than One Language Enabled
If more than one language has been enabled, a
prompt will appear to allow the desired language
to be chosen. Only languages enabled from the
Guarded Access Menu are available. Press YES to
select the language displayed. If a different
language is desired, press the NO key as shown in
Figure 17.
IMPORTANT: The engine start is not delayed by
the language prompt as shown in Figure 17. The
prompt will appear for 10 seconds and then the
engine will start. After the engine is started the
display will return to the prompt shown in
Figure 17.
Figure 17: NO Key
Figure 16: Turning Unit On Screen Sequence,
One Language Enabled
3. The “Configuring System” Screen briefly
appears while communications are established
and the unit prepares for operation. See Figure
16.
NOTE: If more than one language has been
enabled, a prompt will appear at this point to
allow the desired language to be chosen. If
this occurs, go to “More Than One
Language Enabled” on page 32. If this does
not occur, only one language is enabled and
you can continue with the unit start up Step 4
below.
4. The Standard Display showing box
temperature and setpoint briefly appears. See
“Figure 16: Turning Unit On Screen
Sequence, One Language Enabled”.
The Language menu will appear as shown in
Figure 18. Press the + or - keys to select the
desired language. When the desired language is
shown press the YES key to confirm the choice.
Figure 18: Language Menu
The display will briefly show PROGRAMMING
LANGUAGE - PLEASE WAIT in the new
language as shown in Figure 19.
5. The “Diesel Engine Starting” Screen briefly
appears as the engine preheats and starts.
6. The Standard Display showing box
temperature and setpoint reappears when the
unit is running. (See Figure 16)
32
Figure 19: New Language
Operating Instructions
The new language is confirmed, and then the
Standard Display will appear in the new language
as shown in Figure 20. The unit is now ready to
run.
Turning Unit Off
Complete the following steps to turn unit off:
1. Press the OFF key.
2
1
Figure 20: Standard Display
The “Diesel Engine Starting” Screen will briefly
appear as the engine preheats and starts.
The Standard Display showing box temperature
and setpoint will reappear (as shown in Figure 20)
when the unit is running.
1.
Off Key
2.
Display
Figure 21: Press Off Key
2. The engine will immediately shut off.
3. The “System is Powering Down” Screen will
briefly appear.
Figure 22: Turning Unit Off Screen Sequence
4. The Off Screen will briefly appear.
5. The screen goes blank when the unit power is
off. To start the unit again, press the ON Key.
33
Operating Instructions
Standard Display
The Standard Display is the default display. It
appears if no other display function is selected.
The Standard Display shows the box temperature
and setpoint. The box temperature is measured by
the controlling sensor. The return air sensor is the
controlling sensor except when the controller is
programmed to use the discharge air sensor as the
controlling sensor during modulation. The box
temperature shown below in Figure 23 is 35.5 F.
The setpoint shown is 35 F. The CYCLESENTRY Icon in the upper right corner shows the
unit is operating in the CYCLE-SENTRY mode.
The arrow pointing down indicates the unit is
cooling.
NOTE: The CYCLE-SENTRY Icon will appears
when the unit is operating in CYCLE-SENTRY
mode as shown below. If the CYCLE-SENTRY
Icon is not present the unit is operating in
Continuous mode.
1
3
4
2
Standard Display Variations when
OptiSet Plus is in Use
The Standard Display has variations. A display
showing any of the following variations is still
considered a Standard Display (see Figure 24).
The top of the display may show a named product
if the controller has been programmed with
OptiSet Plus temperature profiles. The far left soft
key may display PRODUCT or PRODUCT/SETPOINT if
the controller has been programmed with OptiSet
Plus temperature profiles. See “OptiSet Plus” on
page 65 for information about selecting or
changing the named product or the setpoint if the
controller has been programmed with OptiSet
Plus temperature profiles. Refer to TK 54045 the
OptiSet Plus User’s Guide and TK 54842 the
SR-3 Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic
Manual for information about programming the
controller with OptiSet Plus temperature profiles.
The temperature can be displayed in degrees
Fahrenheit (F) or degrees Celsius (C). An arrow
pointing upwards indicates the unit is heating. An
arrow pointing downwards indicates the unit is
cooling.
1
4
2
1.
Box Temperature
3.
CYCLE-SENTRY
Icon
2.
Cooling
4.
Setpoint
3
5
Figure 23: Standard Display
6
1.
Named Product
2.
Heating
3.
PRODUCT or PRODUCT/SETPOINT Soft Key
4.
Degrees Celsius
5.
Cooling
6.
Degrees Fahrenheit
Figure 24: Standard Display Variations
34
Operating Instructions
Temperature Watch Display
Alarm Display
The Standard Display defaults to the Temperature
Watch Display after about 2-1/2 minutes of
non-use (when no keys are pressed) and no check,
prevent or shutdown alarms are present. The
Temperature Watch Display shows the same box
temperature and setpoint but in larger fonts. This
creates easy operator viewing from a distance. To
return to the Standard Display press the MENU soft
key (or any of the other three soft keys that are not
assigned).
If a unit alarm condition occurs the large Alarm
Icon will appear on the Standard Display as
shown below in Figure 26.
NOTE: A named product may appear above the
temperature reading if the controller has been
programmed with OptiSet Plus temperature
profiles and a named product has been selected.
NOTE: The CYCLE-SENTRY Icon will appear
in the Temperature Watch display when the unit
is operating in CYCLE-SENTRY mode as shown
below. If the CYCLE-SENTRY Icon is not
present the unit is operating in Continuous
mode.
2
1
NOTE: A shutdown alarm will also cause the
display and backlight to flash on and off, and the
display will switch from normal video to reverse
video and back to normal video (light areas
become dark and dark areas become light).
See “Alarms Menu” on page 48 for information
about displaying and clearing alarms.
1
2
1.
Alarm Icon
2.
Named Product (If Selected)
Figure 26: Alarm Display
3
1.
Named Product (If Selected)
2.
CYCLE-SENTRY Icon
3.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 25: Temperature Watch Display
35
Operating Instructions
Starting the Diesel Engine
After Start Inspection
Diesel engine preheats and starts automatically in
both Continuous Mode and CYCLE-SENTRY
mode. The engine will preheat and start if
necessary when the unit is turned on. The engine
preheat and start will be delayed in
CYCLE-SENTRY mode if there is no current
need for the engine to run. If a key or sequence of
keys are pressed on the HMI Control Panel before
the engine starts, the engine will preheat and start
approximately 10 seconds after pressing the last
key.
After the unit is running, check the following
items to confirm that the unit is running properly.
See “Turning Unit On” on page 31.
CAUTION: The engine may start
automatically any time the unit is turned
on.
WARNING: Never use starting fluid.
Oil Pressure: Check the engine oil pressure by
pressing the GAUGES soft key. See “Viewing Gauge
Readings” on page 41. The Engine Oil Pressure
Display should indicate OK not LOW.
Ammeter: Check the ammeter reading by pressing
the GAUGES soft key. See “Viewing Gauge
Readings” on page 41. The Amps Display should
indicate a positive charge amperage rate to the
battery. A negative (-) number indicates a
discharge condition.
Compressor Oil: The compressor oil level should
be visible in the compressor sight glass after 15
minutes of operation. If not, check the compressor
oil level using the procedure in the Refrigeration
Maintenance Chapter.
Pre-Cooling: Make
NOTE: Run a pretrip test if the unit has not been
used recently. See “Pretrip Tests” on page 60.
Unit Fails To Start
If the engine does not start and the Alarm Icon
appears on the display, take the following steps.
1. Check for and correct any alarm conditions.
See “Viewing and Clearing Alarms Screen
Sequence” on page 49.
2. Clear all alarms. See “Viewing and Clearing
Alarms Screen Sequence” on page 49.
3. Press the OFF key to turn the unit off.
sure that the setpoint is at the
desired temperature. See “Changing the Setpoint”
on page 36. Allow the unit to run for a minimum
of 30 minutes (longer if possible) before loading
the cargo compartment.
This provides a good test of the refrigeration
system while removing residual heat and the
moisture from the cargo compartment interior to
prepare it for a refrigerated load.
Defrost: When the
unit has finished pre-cooling
the cargo compartment interior, manually initiate
a Defrost cycle. See “Initiating a Manual Defrost
Cycle” on page 40. This will remove the frost that
builds up while running the unit to pre-cool the
cargo compartment.
4. Press the ON key to turn the unit on.
5. The controller will go through the start up
screens and then after a 10 second delay the
unit will start automatically.
6. If the engine will still not start, turn the unit
off. Determine and correct the cause for not
starting.
7. Repeat the procedure.
Changing the Setpoint
To change the setpoint complete the following
steps.
NOTE: If the SETPOINT soft key (far left) displays
PRODUCT or PRODUCT/SETPOINT, the controller has
been programmed with OptiSet Plus temperature
profiles. See “OptiSet Plus” on page 65 for
information about selecting or changing the
named product or the setpoint.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
36
Operating Instructions
2. Press the SETPOINT soft key on the Standard
Display. See Figure 27. The “Setpoint” Screen
briefly appears, then the “Current Setpoint”
Screen appears. See Figure 28.
1
2
1.
Standard Display
2.
Setpoint Soft Key
Figure 27: Changing Setpoint
3. Press the + or - soft keys to change the setpoint
reading. See Figure 28.
NOTE: If the setpoint is changed using the
“+” or “-” keys, the change must be
confirmed or rejected by pressing the YES or
NO soft key within 10 seconds of changing
the setpoint. A warning beep will sound for 5
seconds as a reminder.
•
If the NO key is pressed the setpoint change
made with the “+” or “-” soft keys will not be
accepted, the setpoint will not be changed and
the display will return to the Standard Display.
•
If the YES soft key is pressed, the setpoint
change made with the “+” or “-” soft keys will
be accepted, and the display screens will
appear as shown in Figure 28.
•
If the YES or NO key is not pressed within 10
seconds of making a change with the “+” or
“-” key, the setpoint is not changed and the
display returns to the Setpoint Display. The
display briefly shows [SETPOINT NOT
CHANGED] and Alarm Code 127 Setpoint
Not Entered is set, to indicate that the setpoint
change was started but not completed.
5. The “Programming New Setpoint” Screen will
appear. See Figure 28.
6. The “New Setpoint Is XX” Screen briefly
appears. See Figure 28.
7. The Standard Display appears with setpoint
changed to the new setpoint. See Figure 28.
4. Press the YES OR NO soft key accordingly as
described below. See Figure 28.
If YES Key was pressed
If NO Key was pressed
SETPOINT Key
+ or – Key
YES or NO Key
Figure 28: Changing the Setpoint Screen Sequence
37
Operating Instructions
Selection of Operating Modes
The Thermo King CYCLE-SENTRY system is
designed to save refrigeration fuel costs. The
savings vary with the commodity, ambient
temperatures and cargo compartment insulation.
However, not all temperature controlled products
can be properly transported using
CYCLE-SENTRY operation. Certain highly
sensitive products normally require continuous air
circulation.Use the following guidelines to select
the proper operating mode to protect the
commodity you are transporting.
Examples of products normally acceptable for
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation:
•
Frozen foods (in adequately insulated
cargo compartments)
•
Boxed or processed meats Poultry
•
Fish
•
Dairy products
•
Candy
•
Chemicals
•
Film
•
All non-edible products.
Examples of products normally requiring
Continuous Run Operation for air flow:
•
Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially
asparagus, bananas, broccoli, carrots,
citrus, green peas, lettuce, peaches,
spinach, strawberries, sweet corn, etc.
•
Non-processed meat products (unless
pre-cooled to recommended temperature).
•
Fresh flowers and foliage.
The above listings are not all inclusive. Consult
your grower or shipper if you have any questions
about the operating mode selection of your type of
load.
IMPORTANT: If OptiSet Plus is in use, it may
not be possible to change the Mode.
38
Operating Instructions
Selecting CYCLE-SENTRY or
Continuous Mode
When CYCLE-SENTRY Mode is selected the
unit will start and stop automatically to maintain
the setpoint, keep the engine warm, and the
battery charged. When Continuous mode is
selected, the unit will start automatically and run
continuously to maintain setpoint and provide
constant airflow.
5. Press the CYCLE-SENTRY/CONTINUOUS MODE
key again to change the unit back to the
previous mode.
IMPORTANT: If the unit is in CYCLE-SENTRY
Null and the mode is switched to Continuous
Mode, the unit will start automatically.
NOTE: CYCLE-SENTRY or Continuous Mode
may be disabled by OptiSet Plus.
If the unit is operating in CYCLE-SENTRY
Mode, the CYCLE-SENTRY Icon will be present
in the upper right corner of the display as shown
in Figure 29. If the CYCLE-SENTRY Icon is not
present the unit is operating in Continuous Mode.
IMPORTANT: If OptiSet Plus is in use, it may
not be possible to change the Mode.
Complete the following steps to change modes:
NOTE: The mode can also be changed using the
Mode Menu Screen in the Main Menu. See
“Turning CYCLE-SENTRY On or Off” on page
55.
1. Press the CYCLE-SENTRY/CONTINUOUS MODE
key. See Figure 29.
1
2
1.
CYCLE-SENTRY Icon Shows Mode Selected
Displayed for CYCLE-SENTRY Mode
Not Displayed for Continuous Mode
2.
CYCLE-SENTRY/Continuous Mode Key
Figure 30: Screen Sequence for Changing from
CYCLE-SENTRY Mode to Continuous Mode
Figure 29: Changing Mode
2. The “Programming Continuous Mode” or
“Programming CYCLE-SENTRY Mode”
Screen briefly appears. See Figure 30 and
Figure 31.
3. The “New System Mode is Continuous”
Screen or the “New System Mode
CYCLE-SENTRY” Screen briefly appears.
See Figure 30 and Figure 31.
4. The Standard Display appears showing the
new mode. See Figure 30 and Figure 31.
Figure 31: Screen Sequence for Changing from
Continuous Mode to CYCLE-SENTRY Mode
39
Operating Instructions
Initiating a Manual Defrost Cycle
Defrost cycles are usually initiated automatically
based on time or temperature. Manual Defrost is
also available if the unit is running and the coil
temperature is less than 45 F (7 C).
Other features such as door switch settings may
not allow Manual Defrost to be initiated.
The unit may be prevented from going into a
Manual Defrost. For example, this can occur if
the coil temperature is more than 45 F (7 C). If
defrost is not available, the “Defrost
Unavailable” message will briefly appear and
the display will return to the Standard Display.
See Figure 33.
Use the following steps to initiate a Manual
Defrost:
1. Press the DEFROST key. See Figure 32.
1
2
or
1.
Standard Display
2.
Defrost Key
Figure 32: Initiating a Manual Defrost Cycle
2. The “Defrost” Screen briefly appears. See
Figure 33.
3. The “Programming Defrost” Screen briefly
appears. See Figure 33.
4. The “Defrost Started” Screen briefly appears.
See Figure 33.
5. A modified Standard Display appears. The bar
indicator will fill in showing time remaining
to complete the Defrost cycle. The bar
indicator in the figure shows that the Defrost
cycle is 50% complete. When the Defrost
cycle is complete the display returns to the
Standard Display. See Figure 33.
Figure 33: Initiating Manual Defrost Screen
Sequence
Terminating a Defrost Cycle
The Defrost cycle will terminate automatically
when the coil temperature reaches 58 F (14 C) or
when the defrost timer expires. The defrost timer
is normally set for 45 minutes, but can be set for
30 minutes. Defrost can also be terminated by
turning the unit off.
NOTE: If the defrost timer consistently
terminates Defrost because the evaporator coil
temperature fails to reach 58 F (14 C), check the
unit to see if it is working properly.
NOTE: If Rail Alternate is set YES the defrost
cycle terminates at 70 F (21 C) or if the defrost
timer expires.
40
Operating Instructions
Viewing Gauge Readings
Use the following steps to view the gauge
readings:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the GAUGES soft key to enter the Gauges
Menu. See Figure 34.
Suction Pressure: Displays the unit suction
pressure (ETV units only).
ETV Position: Displays
the current position of
the ETV valve (ETV units only).
Fresh Air Exchange (Optional): Displays the
current position of the fresh air exchange door
on units equipped with this option.
I/O (Input/Output State): Displays the current
state of the input/output devices listed below.
•
High Speed Relay/Electric Heat as On
or Off
•
Run Relay
•
Run Relay Feedback
•
Alternator Excite Output
•
Defrost Damper
•
Heat Output
•
Alternator Frequency
•
Fresh Air Exchange Output (Optional)
•
Diesel/Electric Relay (Model 50 units
only)
•
Electric Ready Input (Model 50 units
only)
•
Electric Overload (Model 50 units
only)
•
Hot Gas Bypass (ETV units only)
1
2
1.
Standard Display Screen
2.
Gauges Soft Key
Figure 34: Viewing Gauges
3. Press BACK or NEXT soft keys to scroll through
available gauges:
Gauges Available
Coolant Temperature: Displays the
temperature of the engine coolant.
Coolant Level: Displays the
coolant level in
the overflow tank.
Oil Pressure: Displays
the engine oil pressure
as OK or LOW.
Oil Level: Displays
the engine oil level as OK
or LOW.
Amps: Displays the
current flow in amps
flowing to or from the unit battery.
Battery Voltage: Displays
the voltage of the
unit battery.
Engine RPM: Displays
the engine speed in
RPMs.
Fuel Level Sensor: Displays the fuel level if a
fuel level sensor is installed.
Discharge Pressure: Displays the unit
discharge pressure (ETV units only).
Selecting I/O enters a group of screens that
show the status (On or Off if applicable) of the
devices listed above. See Figure 35. If no keys
are pressed within 30 seconds, the screen will
return to the standard display.
NOTE: Units without an Electronic
Throttling Valve (ETV) will not display the
Discharge Pressure, Suction Pressure, and
ETV Position. See “Electronic Throttling
Valve” on page 20 for more information
about the ETV and how to tell if the unit has
an ETV.
4. Press the LOCK soft key to display any Gauge
Screen for an indefinite period. Press the key
again to unlock the screen.
5. Press the EXIT soft key to return to the Standard
Display.
41
Operating Instructions
BACK Key
BACK Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
(Device Screens Not Shown)
Figure 35: Viewing Gauges Screen Sequence
42
Operating Instructions
Viewing Sensor Readings
Use the following steps to view the sensor
readings.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the SENSOR soft key to enter the Sensor
Menu. See Figure 36.
1
Ambient Air Temperature - Displays the
temperature of the ambient air sensor.
Spare 1 Temperature - Displays the
temperature of the spare 1 temperature sensor.
Optional Datalogger Sensor 1-6 Temperatures
- Display the temperatures of the CargoWatch
Data Logger temperature sensors. The
Datalogger Sensor Temperature screens
display dashes (– – –) unless optional sensors
are installed.
Board Temperature Sensor - Displays the
internal temperature of the HMI Control Panel
PC board. The controller will turn the HMI
display heater on if this temperature goes
below a certain point in extremely cold
ambient temperatures.
2
1.
Standard Display
2.
Sensors Soft Key
See Figure 37 and Figure 38. If no keys are
pressed within 30 seconds, the screen will
return to the Standard Display.
Figure 36: Viewing Sensors
3. Press the BACK or NEXT soft keys to scroll
through the sensor screens. Pressing the
LOCK key will lock the current sensor on the
display (Figure 37).
Sensors Available
Control Return Air Temperature - Displays the
temperature of the control return air sensor.
Display Return Air Temperature - Displays
the temperature of the display return air
sensor.
Control Discharge Air Temperature - Displays
the temperature of the control discharge air
sensor.
Display Discharge Air Temperature - Displays
the temperature of the display discharge air
sensor.
1
2
3
4
1.
Exit Soft Key
3.
Back Soft Key
2.
Lock Soft Key
4.
Next Soft Key
Figure 37: Soft Keys
4. Press the LOCK soft key to display any sensor
screen for an indefinite period. Press the key
again to unlock the screen.
5. Press the EXIT soft key to return to the Standard
Display.
Temperature Differential - Displays the
calculated difference between the Control
Return Air Temperature and the Control
Discharge Air Temperature.
Evaporator Coil Temperature - Displays the
temperature of the evaporator coil sensor.
43
Operating Instructions
BACK Key
SENSORS Key
BACK Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
Figure 38: Viewing Sensors Screen Sequence
44
Operating Instructions
Navigating the Main Menu
LANGUAGE
The Main Menu contains several additional
submenus that allow the operator to view
information and modify unit operation. Use the
following steps to access these menu areas:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
Does not appear unless more than
one language activated.
ALARMS
DATALOGGER
HOURMETERS
MODE
PRETRIP
2. Press the MENU soft key. See Figure 39.
3. Press NEXT and BACK soft keys to scroll up or
down through the main menu areas. See
Figure 39 and Figure 40.
ADJUST BRIGHTNESS
TIME
4. Press the SELECT soft key to access a specific
menu area when shown on the display screen.
See Figure 39.
Main Menu Choices
5. Press the EXIT soft key. To return to the
Standard Display. The Main Menu choices are
shown in Figure 40. For detailed information
on each menu area, see the individual
explanations of each menu item on the
following pages of this manual.
1. Language Menu: This menu only appears if the
controller is programmed to activate more than
one language. It allows the operator to select
which language is used. All other subsequent
displays are shown in the selected language.
English is the default language. See page 46.
Figure 40: Main Menu Choices
2. Alarms Menu: Shows any
active alarms and
allows alarms to be cleared. See page 48.
3. Datalogger Menu: Allows the operator
to view
the datalogger displays. See page 50.
1
4. Hourmeters Menu: If enabled, allows the
operator to view the hourmeter displays. See
page 53.
5. Mode Menu: Allows the operator to change unit
operating modes between CYCLE-SENTRY
mode and Continuous Run mode, select Keypad
Lockout, and start Sleep mode. See page 54.
6. Pretrip: Allows the operator to run a Pretrip.
See page 60.
5
4
3
2
1.
Menu Soft Key
4.
Select Soft Key
2.
Next Soft Key
5.
Exit Soft Key
3.
Back Soft Key
Figure 39: Accessing Main Menu
7. Adjust Brightness: Allows the operator to
adjust the display intensity as required by
conditions. See page 63.
8. Time: Allows the operator to view the Time and
Date. The Time is displayed in 24 hour military
time. See page 64.
45
Operating Instructions
Language Menu
To select an alternate language:
If the Language feature is enabled in the controller
programming, an alternate language can be
selected from the Language Menu. After a new
language is chosen all displays will appear in that
language. If the language feature is not enabled
this menu does not appear.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
The default language is English. Only languages
that have been enabled in the controller
programming will appear on this menu. Refer to
the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for information
about programming the controller.
NOTE: Exercise care when changing
languages, as once changed all HMI Control
panel displays will be in the new language. If the
user is not familiar with the new language,
problems may be experienced returning to the
default language.
The languages available are dependant on the
HMI control panel software revision.
•
•
Software revision 65xx/75xx supports
English, Spanish, French, German, Italian,
Dutch, Portuguese, Greek, Turkish, Arabic
and Hebrew.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 41: Standard Display
3. If more than one language is enabled, the
Language Menu is the first Main Menu item
to appear. Press the SELECT soft key to choose
the Language Menu Screen. See Figure 42.
4. The “NEW LANGUAGE WILL BE” Screen
will appear. See Figure 42.
5. Press the + or - soft keys to select the desired
language. Only languages enabled from the
Guarded Access Menu are available. German
is shown in Figure 42.
Software revision 66xx/76xx supports
English, Danish, Russian, Norwegian,
Swedish, Finnish, Polish, Hungarian,
Romanian, Bulgarian, and Czech.
6. When the desired language is shown, press the
YES soft key to confirm the choice.
•
Software revision 67xx/77xx supports
English, Japanese and Chinese.
7. The “PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE
PLEASE WAIT” Screen briefly appears.
•
Software Revision 68xx/78xx supports
English and Spanish, or allows any 5
languages from Software Revision 65xx and
Software Revision 66xx to be selected. Note
that Japanese and Chinese are not available for
use with this feature.
8. The “LANGUAGE SELECTED IS XXX”
Screen briefly appears.
Other than languages supported, software
revisions 65xx/75xx, 66xx/76xx, 67xx/77xx, and
68xx/78xx are identical except that 75xx, 76xx,
77xx, and 78xx are not backwards compatible
with HMI-1 or HMI-2 Control Panels with only 4
MB memory.
46
9. The display will then return to the Language
Menu, but will show the new language.
German is shown in Figure 42.
NOTE: Exercise care when changing
languages, as once changed all HMI Control
panel displays will be in the new language. If
the user is not familiar with the new
language, problems may be experienced
returning to the default language.
Operating Instructions
10. Repeat the process to select a different
language. Press the NEXT soft key to select a
different main menu item. Press the EXIT soft
key to return to the Standard Display.
SELECT Key
HAUPTMENU
SPRACHE
BEENDEN
AUSWHAL
WEITER
ARA820
+ or - Key
NEW LANGUAGE WILL BE
DEUTSCH
YES Key
USE +/- TO CHANGE
-
+
OK?
YES
NO
ARA819
Figure 42: Change Language Screen Sequence
Return to English at Any Time
IMPORTANT: If necessary, English and all
other languages in the software version may be
accessed from the Standard Display.
After 5 seconds the Language Menu will appear in
the current language as shown in Figure 44. Press
the + or - Keys to select the desired language.
When the desired language is shown press the
YES Key to confirm the choice.
When the Standard Display is shown press and
hold the first and last soft key for 5 seconds as
shown below in Figure 43. This example is
Deutsch (German).
2
1
1.
1
1.
Press These Soft Keys
Figure 43: Standard Display
+ or - Keys
2.
YES Key
Figure 44: + or - Keys, YES Key
NOTE: All languages in the installed software
can be selected using this method.
47
Operating Instructions
Alarms Menu
If an alarm condition occurs the large Alarm Icon
will appear on the Standard Display. See “Alarm
Display” on page 35.
Alarms are viewed and cleared using the Alarm
Menu as follows:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
IMPORTANT: Always record any Alarm Codes
that occur - in the order that they occur - as well
as any other pertinent information. This
information is extremely valuable to service
personnel.
7. After the alarm situation is resolved press the
CLEAR key to clear the alarm. To display the
next alarm, press the NEXT key (see Figure 46).
NOTE: For additional information
regarding the alarm shown on the display
press the HELP soft key. A help message will
appear.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
Important Alarm Notes
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 45: Standard Display
3. The Language Menu or Alarm Menu will
appear. If the Language Menu appears, press
the NEXT soft key until the Alarm Menu
appears.
4. Press the SELECT soft key. The Alarm Display
will appear. See Figure 46.
5. If no alarms are present, the “No Alarm”
Screen is shown. Press the EXIT soft key to
return to the Standard Display.
6. If alarms are present, the quantity of alarms (if
more than one), the alarm code number and
alarm description will be shown on the
display. In the example below (see Figure 46),
there are two alarms present. The most recent
is Alarm Code 6. This alarm code indicates a
problem with the coolant temperature sensor.
NOTE: If a serious alarm occurs, the unit
will be shut down to prevent damage to the
unit or the load. If this occurs, the display
will show that the unit is shut down and
display the alarm code that caused the
shutdown.
48
•
If an alarm will not clear, it may still exist. If
the alarm is not corrected, it will not clear.
•
If an alarm cannot be cleared from the Main
menu, the CLEAR key will not appear. These
alarms must be cleared from the Guarded
Access Menus.
•
All alarms must be viewed before any of the
alarms can be cleared.
•
If the optional Fuel Level Sensor is installed,
Check Alarm Code 96 (Low Fuel Level) is set
when the fuel level falls below 15% of tank
capacity. The controller can be programmed to
set a shutdown Alarm Code 44 (Check Fuel
System) when the fuel level falls to 5%.
Shutdown Alarm Code 44 can be manually
cleared with the CLEAR key. In that case it
becomes a check alarm and the unit will
continue to run until it runs out of fuel (if it is
not refilled). Alarm Code 96 and Alarm Code
44 are both automatically reset when the fuel
tank is refilled above 25%.
NOTE: Shutdown Alarm Code 44 reappears
when it is manually cleared from the Alarms
Menu. However, it changes to a check alarm
so the unit will now start after you exit the
Alarms Menu.
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for more
information about alarm codes and their
diagnosis.
Operating Instructions
ALARM 6
2 OF 2 ALARMS
COOLANT TEMP SENSOR
EXIT
CLEAR
HELP
NEXT
ARA823
NEXT Key
MENU Key
ALARM 5
1 OF 2 ALARMS
AMBIENT TEMP SENSOR
SELECT Key
EXIT
CLEAR
HELP
NEXT
ARA824
SELECT Key
CLEAR Key
Figure 46: Viewing and Clearing Alarms Screen Sequence
49
Operating Instructions
Datalogger Menu
Initiating a Start of Trip
A “Start Of Trip” places a marker in the
datalogger memory. It is typically initiated when
the cargo is being loaded. The Start Of Trip
marker then shows when the trip started in the
data that is downloaded or printed from the
datalogger. A Start Of Trip can be initiated
through the use of WinTrac datalogging software,
or manually in the field. The following procedure
covers manual initiation. For more information on
datalogging, see the WinTrac User Manual
included with the WinTrac software.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display. See Figure 47.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 47: Standard Display
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Datalogger
Menu appears. See Figure 48.
4. Press the SELECT soft key on the Datalogger
Menu. The “Start Trip” Screen will appear.
5. Press the SELECT soft key. The “Start Of Trip”
Screen will appear.
6. Press the SELECT soft key to initiate a start of
trip.
7. A Start Of Trip Marker has been inserted into
the datalogger memory.
NOTE: The start of trip marker is sent to both
the CargoWatch and ServiceWatch data loggers.
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
Figure 48: Start of Trip Screen Sequence
50
Operating Instructions
Printing a Trip Report
This procedure prints the CargoWatch datalogger
record directly to a handheld printer. The printed
record shows things such as the unit and Base
Controller identification numbers, dates and
times, the setpoint, and data from the optional
sensors connected to the CargoWatch data logger.
If no sensors are connected, the printed record
shows the same things without the sensor data.
1
4. Press the NEXT soft key until the Datalogger
Menu appears. See Figure 51.
5. Press the SELECT soft key on the Datalogger
Menu. The “Start Trip” Screen will appear.
6. Press the NEXT soft key. The “Print/View”
Screen will appear.
7. Press the SELECT soft key. The “Delivery
Ticket” Screen will appear. Press the SELECT
soft key to print a Delivery Ticket. The
Delivery Ticket is a short ticket that shows
delivery specific details including the current
temperature. See Figure 52.
8. Press the NEXT soft key to go to the “Trip
Ticket” Screen. Press the SELECT soft key to
print a Trip Ticket. The Trip Ticket is a long
ticket that shows details for the current trip
including a temperature history. The Trip
Ticket is also called a Journey Ticket. See
Figure 53.
2
1.
CargoWatch Port
2.
Printer Port
AMA1320
9. Pressing the EXIT key returns the display to
the Main Menu.
For additional information concerning the
CargoWatch Data Logger see Service Procedure
A49A in the SR-3 Microprocessor Control
System Diagnostic Manual TK 54842.
Figure 49: Printer Port Location
1. Connect the printer to the 6-pin printer port
located inside the control box.
NOTE: The printer port can be mounted so it
is accessible without opening the control box.
2. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display. See Figure 50.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 50: Standard Display
3. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
51
Operating Instructions
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
SELECT Key
Figure 51: Print Report Screen Sequence
UNIT SERIAL NUMBER:
xxxxxxxxxx
CONTROLLER SERIAL NUMBER: A00021506190T3
TRAILER ID:
xxxxxxxxxx
CONTROLLER VERSION NUMBER:
B007
CONTROLLER TYPE:
SR2
DATALOGGER VERSION NUMBER:
6512
TEMPERATURE UNITS:
FAHRENHEIT
START:
FINISH:
SENSORS:
SETPOINT:
05/30/08 09:50:08
05/30/08 13:07:33
1
32.0
30 - MAY - 2008
1305
35.0
AMA1299
Figure 52: Sample Delivery Ticket
1250
35.2
1235
35.1
1220
35.2
1205
35.1
30 - MAY - 2008
1150
35.0
1135
1120
1105
1050
1035
1020
1005
35.0
35.0
34.9
35.0
35.0
35.0
35.1
0950
35.1
SENSOR #1:
SENSOR #2:
LOG SENSOR 1
LOG SENSOR 2
AMA1301
Figure 53: Sample Trip Ticket
52
Operating Instructions
Hourmeters Menu
The Hourmeters are programmable to be visible
or hidden in Guarded Access. Hourmeters that are
visible are displayed. Hourmeters that are hidden
are not displayed, but they do count hours. The
default setting for Model 30 units is to display
only the Engine Hours. The default setting for
Model 50 units is to display Total Run Time
Hours, Engine Hours, and Electric Run Hours.
The Hourmeters Menu will not appear if all
hourmeters are hidden. Refer to the SR-3
Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic
Manual TK 54842 for information about
programming the controller.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 54: Standard Display
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Hourmeters
Menu appears. See Figure 55.
Hourmeters can be viewed in the Hourmeters
Menu as follows:
4. Press the SELECT soft key to enter the
Hourmeters Menu.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
5. Press the NEXT and BACK soft keys to view the
hourmeter displays. Press the EXIT soft key to
return to the Standard Display.
BACK Key
BACK Key
SELECT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
BACK Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
NEXT Key
Figure 55: Viewing Hourmeters Screen Sequence
53
Operating Instructions
Mode Menu
Various operating modes can be selected using the
Mode menu. Not all modes may be available,
depending on OptiSet Plus usage and settings of
other programmable features. The following
modes may be available.
Turn CYCLE-SENTRY On or Off
The CYCLE-SENTRY Mode can be turned On or
Off. If CYCLE-SENTRY is turned off the unit
runs in Continuous mode. See “Turning
CYCLE-SENTRY On or Off” on page 55.
NOTE: OptiSet Plus may prevent selecting
CYCLE-SENTRY or Continuous. If this
happens, the display will advise that the selection
is not available.
Select Temperature Units
If this feature enabled in Guarded Access / Main
Menu Configuration, the operator can select
temperature units to be displayed as either degrees
Fahrenheit or degrees Celsius.
Fresh Air Exchange
An optional Fresh Air Exchange Feature is
available. The fresh air exchange option allows
fresh outside air to be drawn into the trailer and
the interior air to be exhausted by opening the
fresh air exchange door. This feature is beneficial
when hauling loads that release gas as they ripen,
such as potatoes. The fresh air exchange feature
should be used exactly as specified by the
customer.
If the fresh air exchange option is installed and
enabled in Guarded Access / Unit Configuration,
the operator can either open or close the fresh air
exchange door as required by the load and
customer requirements. The fresh air exchange
door can also be opened and closed remotely
through an iBox on units so equipped.
Note that the fresh air exchange door will only be
open when the unit engine is running, as it is held
open by the fresh air exchange solenoid. The door
will close when the engine shuts down to preserve
unit battery life. The setting of the fresh air
exchange door will survive power off/power on
54
cycles - if the door is set opened by the operator it
will continue to open any time the engine is
running until it is set closed by the operator.
IMPORTANT: The Fresh Air Exchange feature
should be used exactly as specified by the
customer and with fresh loads only. The fresh air
exchange feature is only available with setpoints
above 32°F (0°C). The feature is disabled with
setpoints of 32°F (0°C) and below. Be sure the
fresh air exchange door is properly set for each
load as required by the customer's policy.
Keypad Lockout
If enabled in Guarded Access, the keypad can be
locked to prevent unauthorized use. If the keypad
is locked only the On and Off keys function. The
keypad will remain locked even if the unit is
turned off and back on. If Keypad Lockout is
active, press and hold any soft key for 5 seconds
to deactivate the feature. See “Selecting Keypad
Lockout” on page 57.
Start Sleep Mode
If this feature is enabled in Guarded Access /
Main Menu Configuration, the operator can select
and set Sleep Mode from the Mode Menu. Sleep
Mode is used to keep the engine warm and the
battery charged when the unit is not in use. When
the unit is in Sleep Mode the display will show
“SLEEP” and the current time. See “Selecting
Sleep Mode” on page 58.
•
Program Wakeup Time: This feature allows a
wakeup time to be specified. When the
selected time is reached the unit will start and
resume normal operation.
If Wakeup Time is selected:
•
Day to Wake Up: The day the unit is to
wake up can be specified.
•
Hour to Wake Up: The hour the unit is to
wake up can be specified.
•
Minute to Wake Up: The minute the unit is
to wake up can be specified.
•
Run Pretrip on Wake Up: A Pretrip Test
can be automatically run when the unit
wakes up.
Operating Instructions
Turning CYCLE-SENTRY On or Off
The easiest way to switch between
CYCLE-SENTRY and Continuous Run is to press
the Mode key (see page 39). But, you can also
switch modes in the Mode Menu as follows:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
1
2
3
1.
CYCLE-SENTRY Icon Shows Current Mode
Displayed for CYCLE-SENTRY Mode
Not Displayed for Continuous Mode
2.
Mode Key
3.
Menu Soft Key
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Mode Menu
appears.
4. Press SELECT soft key to enter the Mode Menu.
See Figure 57.
5. Press the SELECT soft key, to switch between
modes.
6. The new mode is then confirmed for 10
seconds.
7. The display then returns to the Mode Menu.
Press the SELECT soft key again to change the
mode again.
CAUTION: If the unit is in
CYCLE-SENTRY null and the mode is
switched to Continuous mode, the unit will
start automatically.
IMPORTANT: If OptiSet Plus is in use, it may
not be possible to change the Mode.
Figure 56: Standard Display
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
SELECT Key
Figure 57: Selecting Mode Screen Sequence
55
Operating Instructions
Fresh Air Exchange Open or Close
This feature must be enabled in Guarded Access
to be available. See “Fresh Air Exchange” on
page 54 for more information about fresh air
exchange. Use the following steps to open or
close the fresh air exchange:
6. Press the SELECT soft key to open (or close) the
fresh air exchange door.
CHANGE MODE
ON
OPEN FRESH AIR EXCH
OFF
EXIT
1
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press any soft key to return to the Standard
Display.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
BACK
NEXT
ARA1802
1.
Press Select Soft Key
Figure 60: Fresh Air Exchange Display (Open)
7. A confirmation screens will appear briefly,
and the fresh air exchange door will open (or
close).
1
1.
SELECT
8. The display then returns to the Fresh Air
Exchange Display. Press the SELECT soft key
again to close (or open) the fresh air exchange
door.
Press Menu Soft Key
CHANGE MODE
ON
Figure 58: Standard Display
CLOSE FRESH AIR EXCH
OFF
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Mode Menu
appears.
4. Press the SELECT soft key to enter the Mode
Menu. The Turn CYCLE-SENTRY On/Off
Screen will appear.
EXIT
1
SELECT
BACK
NEXT
ARA1803
1.
Press Select Soft Key
Figure 61: Fresh Air Exchange Display (Close)
9. Press the Exit soft key to return to the
Standard Display. If no keys are pressed
within 30 seconds, the screen will return to the
Standard Display.
MAIN MENU
ON
MODE
OFF
EXIT
1
SELECT
BACK
NEXT
ARA832
1.
Press Select Soft Key
Figure 59: Mode Menu Display
5. Press the NEXT soft key until the Fresh Air
Exchange Display appears. “OPEN FRESH
AIR EXCH” will appear if the door is
currently closed. “CLOSE FRESH AIR
EXCH” will appear if the door is currently
open.
56
IMPORTANT: The Fresh Air Exchange door
will only be open when the unit engine is
running. The door will close when the engine
shuts down to preserve unit battery life. The
setting of the Fresh Air Exchange door will
survive power off/power on cycles - if the door is
set to “Open” by the operator it will continue to
open any time the engine is running until it is set
to “Close” by the operator.
Operating Instructions
Selecting Keypad Lockout
This feature must be enabled in Guarded Access
to be available. See “Keypad Lockout” on page 54
for more information about Keypad Lockout. Use
the following steps to select Keypad Lockout:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press any soft key to return to the Standard
Display.
5. Press the NEXT soft key until the Keypad
Lockout Display appears.
6. Press the SELECT soft key to select Keypad
Lockout.
CHANGE MODE
ON
KEYPAD LOCKOUT
OFF
EXIT
1
SELECT
BACK
NEXT
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
ARA834
1.
Press Select Soft Key
Figure 64: Keypad Lockout Display
1
7. The new mode is then confirmed for 10
seconds.
8. The display then returns to the Mode Menu.
1.
Press Menu Soft Key
Figure 62: Standard Display
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Mode Menu
appears.
4. Press the SELECT soft key to enter the Mode
Menu. The Turn CYCLE-SENTRY On/Off
Screen will appear.
9. Press the Exit soft key to return to the
Standard Display. If no keys are pressed
within 30 seconds, the screen will return to the
Standard Display.
NOTE: If Keypad Lockout is active, press and
hold any soft key for 5 seconds to deactivate the
feature.
MAIN MENU
ON
MODE
OFF
EXIT
1
SELECT
BACK
NEXT
ARA832
1.
Press Select Soft Key
Figure 63: Mode Menu Display
57
Operating Instructions
Selecting Sleep Mode
This feature must be enabled in Guarded Access
to be available. Sleep mode starts and stops the
unit as required to keep the unit battery in a
charged condition and keep the unit engine warm
in cold ambient conditions. Sleep mode does not
maintain setpoint, it keeps the compartment
temperature near the ambient temperature when
the unit is running. This is useful in extremely
cold weather or when the unit is to be out of
service for an extended time.
The following features are available in Sleep
Mode.
Program Wakeup Time: This feature allows a
wakeup time to be specified. When the selected
time is reached the unit will start and resume
normal operation.
If a Wakeup Time is selected the following
features are available:
Day to Wake Up: The
day the unit is to wake up
can be specified.
Hour to Wake Up: The
hour the unit is to wake up
can be specified.
Minute to Wake Up: The minute the unit is to wake
up can be specified.
Run Pretrip on Wakeup: A Pretrip Test can be
automatically run when the unit wakes up.
Sleep mode operates in both Diesel mode and
Electric mode. In Diesel mode the unit will start
and stop as required to maintain engine
temperature and battery charge. In Electric mode
the unit starts and stops as necessary to maintain
battery charge only.
When Sleep mode is entered, the operator can
program an automatic Wake-up Time up to a week
away. Using this feature, the unit will
automatically restart and run normally at the
determined time. If a Wake-up Time is
programmed, the operator can also program an
automatic Pretrip Test when the unit restarts.
Select Sleep Mode as follows:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
58
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 65: Standard Display
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Mode Menu
appears. See Figure 66.
4. Press SELECT soft key to enter the Mode Menu.
5. Press the NEXT soft key as required to display
the Sleep Mode Screen.
6. Press the SELECT soft key to start the Sleep
mode.
7. You now choose to program a Sleep mode
Wake-up Time or simply enter Sleep mode
immediately. Press the NO soft key to
immediately enter Sleep mode.
a. The display will show “SLEEP” and the
unit will start and stop as required to keep
engine warm and/or the battery charged.
Sleep mode does not maintain the
compartment temperature.
b. Press the EXIT soft key to exit Sleep mode
or turn the unit off and back on. The unit
will resume normal operation and control
to setpoint.
8. To enter a Wake-up Time verify that the unit
clock is set properly (see “Time Display” on
page 64). Then press the YES soft key at the
“Program A Wake-Up Time?” Screen.
9. Press the + or - soft keys to select the day the
unit is to restart in normal operation. In this
example Monday has been chosen. Press the
YES soft key to confirm the day.
10. The display will now prompt you for the hour
the unit is to restart in normal operation. In
this example 18:00 hours has been chosen.
Note that 24 hour “military time” is used.
Press the YES soft key to confirm the hour.
Operating Instructions
11. The display will now prompt you for the
minute the unit is to restart in normal
operation. In this example 18:37 hours has
been chosen. Press the YES soft key to confirm
the minute.
12. The display will now prompt you to “Run A
Pretrip On Wake-Up?” Press YES soft key or
the NO soft key accordingly and the display
will show the unit is programming the Sleep
mode.
14. The unit will restart at the programmed time
(in this example 18:37 hours) and perform a
Pretrip (if selected). After the Pretrip is
complete the test results will be displayed and
the unit will resume normal operation and
control to setpoint.
15. To exit Sleep mode before the selected
Wake-up time press the EXIT soft key or turn
the unit off and back on. The unit will resume
normal operation and control to setpoint.
13. The display will show “SLEEP” and the unit
will start and stop as required to keep the
engine warm and/or the battery charged. Sleep
mode does not maintain setpoint.
SELECT Key then NEXT Key
YES Key
SELECT Key
YES Key
YES Key
YES Key or NO Key
YES Key
Figure 66: Selecting Sleep Mode Screen Sequence
59
Operating Instructions
Pretrip Tests
A Pretrip test verifies unit operation. This display
allows a Pretrip Test to be selected and initiated
by the operator. If the Pretrip Test is entered with
the unit shut down a Full Pretrip Test with device
amp checks will be performed. If the Pretrip Test
is entered with the unit running in either diesel or
electric mode a Running Pretrip Test is
performed. Test results are reported as PASS,
CHECK or FAIL when the Pretrip Test is
completed.
Pretrip Test Conditions
•
Current unit settings are saved and restored at
the end of the Pretrip Test or if the unit is
turned off and back on.
•
Pretrip Test can be run in either Diesel or
Electric Mode.
•
The unit will auto switch from Diesel Mode to
Electric Mode or from Electric Mode to Diesel
Mode during a Pretrip Test if these features
are enabled and the auto switch conditions
occur.
Conditions where Pretrip Tests are not
allowed
•
If any shutdown alarms are present. Pretrip
tests are allowed with some Check and Log
alarms.
•
The unit is in Sleep mode.
•
Unit is in Service Test Mode, Interface Board
Test Mode, or Evacuation Mode.
CAUTION: Monitor the return air
temperature when performing a Pretrip
Test on a loaded cargo compartment. The
controller may not maintain setpoint
during the Pretrip Test.
Full Pretrip
A Full Pretrip occurs when Pretrip is initiated
before the engine or electric motor starts running.
The Full Pretrip test proceeds in the order shown
below:
•
60
Amp Checks – Each electrical control
component is energized and the current drawn
is confirmed to be within specification.
•
Engine or Electric Motor Start – The engine or
electric motor will start automatically.
•
Defrost – If the coil temperature is below 45 F
(7 C), a Defrost cycle is initiated.
•
Cool Check – The ability of the unit to cool in
low speed is checked.
•
RPM Check (Diesel Mode only) – If the unit
is running in the Diesel Mode, the engine
RPM in high and low speed is checked during
the Cool Check.
•
Heat Check - The ability of the unit to heat in
low speed is checked.
•
Report Test Results – The test results are
reported as “PASS”, “CHECK” or “FAILED”
when the Pretrip is completed. If test results
are Check or Failed, alarm codes will exist to
direct the technician to the source of the
problem.
Running Pretrip
A Running Pretrip occurs when Pretrip is initiated
after the engine or electric motor is running. The
Running Pretrip test proceeds in the order shown
below:
•
Defrost – If the coil temperature is below 45 F
(7 C), a Defrost cycle is initiated.
•
Cool Check – The ability of the unit to cool in
low speed is checked.
•
RPM Check (Diesel Mode only) – If the unit
is running in the Diesel Mode, the engine
RPM in high and low speed is checked during
the Cool Check.
•
Heat Check - The ability of the unit to heat in
low speed is checked.
•
Report Test Results – The test results are
reported as “PASS”, “CHECK” or “FAILED”
when the Pretrip is completed. If test results
are Check or Failed, alarm codes will exist to
direct the technician to the source of the
problem.
Operating Instructions
Pretrip Test Issues
When performing a Pretrip Test, the following
issues should be considered.
•
Whenever possible, run pretrip tests on empty,
dry cargo compartments with the doors
closed.
•
If running a Pretrip Test on a cargo
compartment loaded with dry cargo, insure
that proper airflow can occur around the load.
If the load restricts airflow, false test results
may occur. Also, SR-3 units have high
refrigeration capacity which results in rapid
temperature changes. Sensitive dry cargo may
be damaged as a result.
•
If running a Pretrip Test on a cargo
compartment that has just been washed down,
the extremely high humidity inside the cargo
compartment may result in false test results.
•
If running a Pretrip Test on a cargo
compartment loaded with sensitive cargo,
monitor the load temperature during the test as
normal temperature control is suspended
during pre-trip operation.
•
Always perform Pretrip Tests with the cargo
compartment cargo doors closed to prevent
false test failures.
Initiating a Pretrip Test
Before initiating a Pretrip Test, clear all alarm
codes.
To stop a Pretrip Test at any time, turn the unit off.
Use the following procedure to initiate a Full
Pretrip or a Running Pretrip. A Running Pretrip
can also be initiated by starting at step 3 with the
unit running.
1. If the unit is running, press the OFF key to stop
the unit.
2. Press the ON key to turn the unit on.
3. To initiate a Full Pretrip press the MENU soft
key as soon as the Standard Display appears
and before the unit starts.
To initiate a Running Pretrip let the unit start
before pressing the MENU soft key on the
Standard Display.
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 67: Standard Display
4. Press the NEXT soft key until the Pretrip Screen
appears. See Figure 69.
5. Press the SELECT soft key to start a Pretrip.
NOTE: If all alarms were not cleared, a
prompt appears as shown below. Press the
EXIT key to exit the Pretrip Test, clear all
alarms and repeat the Pretrip Test.
ON
NO PRETRIP -- ALARM ACTIVE
OFF
EXIT
1
ARA835
1.
Press Exit Soft Key
Figure 68: No Pretrip Alarm Active Display
6. The Pretrip display appears. See Figure 69.
•
The top line of the display indicates which
test the unit is performing.
•
The second line shows Test 1 of 49 is
being performed. Note that the tests may
not be performed in numerical order.
•
The soft keys may be used during the
Pretrip Test to select the Hourmeter,
Gauge or Sensor menus.
In a Full Pretrip, when the non-running tests
are complete the unit will start automatically
and continue with the running tests.
7. When all tests are complete, the results are
reported as “PASS”, “CHECK” or “FAILED”.
If “FAILED” appears, the unit will shut down.
If the results are Check or Failed, the
accompanying alarm codes will direct the
technician to the cause of the problem.
61
Operating Instructions
8. If the Pretrip Test results are Check or Failed,
the problem should be diagnosed and
corrected and the Pretrip Test repeated and
passed before the unit is released for service.
The Pretrip Test result screen will exit to the
Main Menu Alarm Submenu for convenient
access to any alarms generated during the
Pretrip Test.
Stopping a Pretrip Test
Turn the unit off to stop a Pretrip Test at any time.
This will generate Alarm Code 28–Pretrip Abort.
Other alarm codes may also be generated. This is
normal when the Pretrip test is stopped before
completion.
SELECT Key
Figure 69: Pretrip Test Screen Sequence
62
Operating Instructions
Adjust Brightness Menu
The brightness of the HMI Control Panel display
backlight can be adjusted to allow for changing
ambient light conditions. The choices available to
the operator are HIGH, MEDIUM, LOW, and
OFF. OFF actually results in a very dim backlight
suitable for low light conditions.
IMPORTANT: Before replacing an HMI
Control Panel with no backlight, check the
Adjust Backlight feature to be sure the backlight
is turned on.
10. Press the Exit soft key to return to the
Standard Display. If no keys are pressed
within 30 seconds, the screen will return to the
Standard Display.
SELECT Key
Adjust the display brightness as follows:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
+ Key
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
YES Key
1
1.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 70: Standard Display
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Adjust
Brightness Menu appears. See Figure 71.
4. Press the SELECT soft key to enter the Adjust
Brightness Menu. See Figure 71.
5. Press the + or - soft keys to select the desired
brightness. See Figure 71. This example
shows changing screen brightness from low to
medium.
6. Press the YES soft key to enter the new
brightness level.
Figure 71: Adjusting Display Brightness
Screen Sequence
7. The “ADJUSTING BRIGHTNESS - PLEASE
WAIT” Screen briefly appears.
8. The selected level appears on the screen.
9. The Adjust Brightness Main Menu Screen
reappears and if no keys are pressed the
Standard Display appears.
63
Operating Instructions
Time Display
The time and date held by the HMI Control Panel
real time clock can be checked. Time and Date
cannot be changed from the Main Menu. The time
and date are changed by programming the HMI
Control Panel. Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor
Control System Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for
information about programming the HMI Control
Panel.
View the time and date as follows:
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the MENU soft key on the Standard
Display.
3. Press the NEXT soft key until the Time Display
appears.
4. Press the SELECT soft key to view the time and
date.
1
2
MENU Key then NEXT Key
SELECT Key
1.
Standard Display
2.
Menu Soft Key
Figure 72: Time and Date Screens
64
Operating Instructions
OptiSet Plus
The controller can be programmed with OptiSet
Plus temperature profiles that allow the user to
select named products. Refer to TK 54045 the
OptiSet Plus User’s Guide and TK 54842 the
SR-3 Microprocessor Control System Diagnostic
Manual for information about programming the
controller with OptiSet Plus temperature profiles.
•
Named products can have a single setpoint, or
they can have a setpoint range that allows the
user to select a setpoint within that range.
•
The controller can be programmed to allow
only named products to be selected. In which
case the far left soft key will display PRODUCT.
See Figure 73.
•
The controller can be programmed to allow
named products or numeric setpoints to be
selected. In which case the far left soft key
will display PRODUCT/SETPOINT. See Figure 74.
1
1.
Product Soft Key
Figure 73: Standard Display with Product Soft Key
1
1.
Product/Setpoint Soft Key
Figure 74: Standard Display with
Product/Setpoint Soft Key
NOTE: In OptiSet Plus the terms “numeric
setpoint” and “setpoint” mean the same
thing and are displayed as numbers. The
terms “named product” and “product” mean
the same thing and are displayed as words.
See “Selecting a Named Product” on page 66 for
information about selecting or changing the
named product.
See “Changing the Setpoint for a Named Product”
on page 69 for information about changing the
setpoint for a named product.
See “Selecting a Setpoint” on page 71 for
information about selecting or changing the
setpoint.
65
Operating Instructions
Selecting a Named Product
To select or change a named product complete the
following steps. This example shows the Standard
Display with the PRODUCT/SETPOINT soft key. Using
the Standard Display with the PRODUCT soft key is
basically the same but some of the screens differ
slightly.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the PRODUCT/SETPOINT (or PRODUCT) soft
key on the Standard Display. See Figure 75.
1
•
If the NO key is pressed the named product
change made with the “+” or “-” soft keys will
not be accepted, the named product will not be
changed and the display will return to the
Standard Display.
•
If the YES soft key is pressed, the named
product change made with the “+” or “-” soft
keys will be accepted, and the following
screens will appear.
NOTE: Alarm Code 127 may be generated if
the + or - soft keys are used to change the
named product, but the YES or NO soft keys
are not used to accept or decline the new
named product.
8. The “Programming Named Product” Screen
will briefly appear. See Figure 76.
2
1.
Standard Display
2.
Product/Setpoint Soft Key
Figure 75: Selecting Named Product
3. The “Named Product / Numeric Setpoint?” (or
Named Product) Screen briefly appears, then
the “Named Product or Numeric Setpoint?”
(or Named Product) Screen will appear. See
Figure 76.
4. Press the NAMED soft key. See Figure 76.
5. The “Product” Screen briefly appears, then the
“Current Product Is” Screen will appear. See
Figure 76.
6. Press the + or - soft keys to change the named
product. See Figure 76.
66
7. Press the YES or NO soft key accordingly as
described below. See Figure 76.
NOTE: If the “Change Setpoint for
XXXXX” Screen appears, the named product
has been programmed with a setpoint range.
See “Selecting the Setpoint for a Named
Product” on page 68.
9. The “New Named Product Is XXXXX”
Screen briefly appears. See Figure 76.
10. The Standard Display appears with the new
named product. See Figure 76.
NOTE: Pressing the EXIT soft key at any point
will return to the Standard Display.
NOTE: If no keys are pressed for 30 seconds
while in the Named Product Changer Screens,
the HMI Control Panel will return to the
Standard Display.
Operating Instructions
NOTE: If “Change Setpoint
for XXXXX” Screen appears
instead, see “Selecting the
Setpoint for a Named
Product” on page 68
PRODUCT/SETPOINT Key
+ or – Key
NAMED Key
YES Key
Figure 76: Selecting or Changing Named Product Screen Sequence
67
Operating Instructions
Selecting the Setpoint for a Named Product
If the “Change Setpoint for XXXXX” Screen
appears after pressing the YES soft key to select a
named product, the named product has been
programmed with a setpoint range. Complete the
following steps to select a setpoint for the named
product.
1. The “Change Setpoint for XXXXX” Screen
briefly appears, then the “Current Setpoint of
XXXXX & Setpoint Range Is XX to XX”
Screen will appear. See Figure 77.
2. Press the + /- or EXIT soft keys accordingly as
described below. See Figure 77.
•
•
Press the + or - soft keys to change the current
setpoint for the named product and then go to
step 3.
Press the EXIT soft key to accept the current
setpoint for the named product. The Standard
Display will appear with the named product
and setpoint. See Figure 77.
+ or – Key
3. If the + or - soft keys were pressed to change
the current setpoint for the named product, the
“New Setpoint for XXXXX Will Be” Screen
will appear. See Figure 77.
4. Press the YES soft key to accept the new
setpoint for the named product.
NOTE: If the NO key is pressed, the setpoint
will not be changed and the display will
return to the Standard Display.
5. The “Programming New Setpoint for
XXXXX” Screen will briefly appear. See
Figure 77.
6. The “New Setpoint Is XX” Screen briefly
appears. See Figure 77.
7. The Standard Display appears with the named
product and new setpoint. See Figure 77.
NOTE: Pressing the EXIT soft key at any point
will return to the Standard Display.
NOTE: If no keys are pressed for 30 seconds
while in the Named Product Changer Screens,
the HMI Control Panel will return to the
Standard Display.
EXIT Key
YES Key
Figure 77: Selecting Setpoint for Named Product Screen Sequence
68
Operating Instructions
Changing the Setpoint for a Named
Product
7. Press the YES or NO soft keys accordingly as
described below. See Figure 79.
If the named product has been programmed with a
setpoint range, the setpoint for the named product
can be changed. Complete the following steps to
change the setpoint for a named product. This
example shows the Standard Display with the
PRODUCT/SETPOINT soft key. Using the Standard
Display with the PRODUCT soft key is basically the
same but some of the screens differ slightly.
•
If the NO key is pressed the named product
setpoint change made with the “+” or “-” soft
keys will not be accepted, the named product
setpoint will not be changed and the display
will return to the Standard Display.
•
If the YES soft key is pressed, the named
product setpoint change made with the “+” or
“-” soft keys will be accepted, and the
following screens will appear.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the PRODUCT/SETPOINT (or PRODUCT) soft
key on the Standard Display. See Figure 78.
1
8. The “Programming New Setpoint for
XXXXX” Screen will briefly appear. See
Figure 79.
9. The “New Setpoint Is XX” Screen briefly
appears. See Figure 79.
10. The Standard Display appears with the new
setpoint. See Figure 77.
NOTE: Pressing the EXIT soft key at any point
will return to the Standard Display.
2
1.
Standard Display
2.
Product/Setpoint Soft Key
NOTE: If no keys are pressed for 30 seconds
while in the Named Product Changer Screens,
the HMI Control Panel will return to the
Standard Display.
Figure 78: Changing Setpoint for Named Product
3. The “Named Product, Numeric Setpoint or
Change Setpoint?” (or Named Product or
Change Setpoint?) Screen will appear. See
Figure 79.
4. Press the CHANGE SP soft key. See Figure 79.
5. The “Change Setpoint for XXXXX” Screen
briefly appears, then the “Current Setpoint for
XXXXX & Setpoint Range Is XX to XX”
Screen will appear. See Figure 79.
6. Press the + or - soft keys to change the setpoint
reading. See Figure 79.
69
Operating Instructions
PRODUCT/SETPOINT Key
CHANGE SP Key
+ or – Key
YES Key
Figure 79: Changing Setpoint for Named Product Screen Sequence
70
Operating Instructions
Selecting a Setpoint
6. Press the + or - soft keys to change the
setpoint. See Figure 81.
To select or change a setpoint complete the
following steps.
1. Begin at the Standard Display.
If the Temperature Watch Display is showing,
press the MENU soft key once to return to the
Standard Display.
2. Press the PRODUCT/SETPOINT soft key on the
Standard Display. See Figure 80.
1
7. Press the YES or NO soft key accordingly as
described below. See Figure 81.
•
If the NO key is pressed the setpoint change
made with the “+” or “-” soft keys will not be
accepted, the setpoint will not be changed and
the display will return to the Standard Display.
•
If the YES soft key is pressed, the setpoint
change made with the “+” or “-” soft keys will
be accepted, and the following screens will
appear.
8. The “Programming New Setpoint” Screen will
appear. See Figure 81.
2
9. The “New Setpoint Is XX” Screen briefly
appears. See Figure 81.
1.
Standard Display
2.
Product/Setpoint Soft Key
10. The Standard Display appears with setpoint
changed to the new setpoint. See Figure 81.
Figure 80: Selecting or Changing Setpoint
3. The “Named Product / Numeric Setpoint?”
Screen briefly appears, then the “Named
Product or Numeric Setpoint?” Screen will
appear. See Figure 81.
4. Press the NUMERIC soft key. See Figure 81.
NOTE: Pressing the EXIT soft key at any point
will return to the Standard Display.
NOTE: If no keys are pressed for 30 seconds
while in the Named Product Changer Screens,
the HMI Control Panel will return to the
Standard Display.
5. The “Setpoint” Screen briefly appears, then
the “Current Setpoint Is” Screen will appear.
See Figure 81.
PRODUCT/SETPOINT Key
+ or – Key
NUMERIC Key
YES Key
Figure 81: Selecting or Changing Numeric Setpoint Screen Sequence
71
Operating Instructions
Loading Procedure
1. Make sure the unit is turned off before
opening the doors to minimize frost
accumulation on the evaporator coil and heat
gain in the cargo compartment. (Unit may be
running when loading the cargo compartment
from a warehouse with door seals.)
2. Spot check and record load temperature while
loading. Especially note any off-temperature
product.
3. Load the product so that there is adequate
space for air circulation completely around the
load. DO NOT block the evaporator inlet or
outlet.
4. Products should be pre-cooled before loading.
Thermo King transport refrigeration units are
designed to maintain loads at the temperature
at which they were loaded. Transport
refrigeration units are not designed to pull hot
loads down to temperature.
Post Load Procedure
1. Make sure all the doors are closed and locked.
2. Start the unit if it was shut off to load (see
“Turning Unit On”).
3. Make sure the setpoint is at the desired setting.
4. One-half hour after loading, manually initiate
a Defrost cycle. If the evaporator coil sensor
temperature is below 45 F (7 C), the unit will
Defrost. The microprocessor will terminate
Defrost automatically when the evaporator
coil temperature reaches 58 F (14 C) or the
unit has been in the Defrost mode for 30 or 45
minutes (depending on setting).
Post Trip Checks
1. Wash the unit.
2. Check for leaks.
3. Check for loose or missing hardware.
4. Check for physical damage to the unit.
72
Electrical Maintenance
Alternator Charging System
Diagnostic Procedures
•
The alternator charging output will be low if
the alternator belt or pulleys are defective or
the belt is not properly adjusted. Be sure the
belt is not loose or cracked and the pulleys are
the correct size and in good condition.
•
The excitation circuit (EXC circuit) must
supply voltage to the excite terminal of the
alternator.
•
The sense circuit (2 circuit) must supply
voltage to the sense terminal of the alternator.
•
The alternator must be properly grounded.
•
The unit control circuits or installed
accessories may be drawing excessive current.
•
An overcharged battery is usually caused by a
defective voltage regulator.
General Information
Poor charging performance may not be caused by
a bad alternator. The following conditions can
cause improper battery charging, even with a
good alternator. (See Service Bulletin T&T 388
for more information.)
•
•
A problem may exist in the 2A output circuit
from the alternator to the battery. Check for an
open 2A circuit, loose connections, defective
battery cables or dirty battery terminals.
The battery must be in good condition and
capable of accepting a charge. Check for a
damaged battery, correct electrolyte level, and
loose or corroded connections.
Alternator Identification
•
These units use Thermo King Alternators (see
Figure 82), which are painted black.
1
2
3
4
5
7
6
1.
B+ Terminal (Positive Output - 2A Wire)
5.
F2 Terminal (Do Not Ground)
2.
B- Terminal (Negative Ground - CH Wire)
6.
Voltage Regulator and Brush Assembly
3.
S Terminal (Regulator Sense - 2 Wire)
7.
W Terminal (AC Output)
4.
L Terminal (Regulator Excite - 7K Wire)
Figure 82: Thermo King Alternator Terminal and Component Locations
73
Electrical Maintenance
Base Controller Fuse F4
The base controller has a 300 ohm resistor and a
resistor bypass fuse (F4) in the alternator
excitation circuit. The fuse and resistor are
connected in parallel and are located on the base
controller. Removing the resistor bypass fuse
places the 300 ohm resistor in the excitation
circuit as required for Thermo King alternators
(and Australian Bosch alternators). Installing the
resistor bypass fuse removes the 300 ohm resistor
from the excitation circuit as required for
Prestolite alternators. See the specific unit wiring
diagram for exact details.
NOTE: The F4 fuse must be removed from the
base controller on units equipped with Thermo
King alternators. The voltage regulator on the
Thermo King alternators will be damaged if the
unit is turned On with the F4 fuse in place on
the base controller.
Test Equipment for Checking
Voltage and Current
Always use accurate test equipment such as the
Fluke 23 Digital Multi-Meter and the Fluke
Clamp-On Ammeter accessory when checking
alternator circuit voltage and amperage. See the
table below for Thermo King service parts
numbers. Be sure voltages are measured from the
designated terminal to the alternator chassis
ground. All voltages are DC voltages unless
otherwise noted.
Meter
Service
Part
Number
Fluke 23 Digital Multi-Meter
204-1079
Clamp-On Ammeter for above Meter
204-947
Alternator Load Test
Thermo King no longer recommends a full field
test for determining the alternator current output.
Full fielding an alternator can cause increases in
alternator output voltage that may damage internal
alternator or unit components. This damage may
not be readily apparent.
To test the alternator under load, Thermo King
recommends the use of a clamp-on ammeter to
monitor output current, both on initial startup and
74
under full unit load conditions. For example, on
multi-temp units, all remote evaporators should be
turned on.
General Diagnostic and Warranty
Evaluation Procedure
Complete the following diagnostic procedures
before replacing an alternator or the voltage
regulator.
1. When testing an alternator, use accurate
equipment such as a Thermo King P/N
204-1079 digital multimeter and a Thermo
King P/N 204-947 amp clamp or an
equivalent.
2. Make sure the drive belts and pulleys of the
charging system are in good condition and are
adjusted properly before testing the alternator.
Be sure the pulleys are the correct size. Worn
belts, loose belts and worn or improperly sized
pulleys will lower the output of the alternator.
3. The battery must be charged and in good
condition, the battery cable connections must
be clean and tight, and the 2A, 2 (sense), and
EXC (excitation) circuits must be connected
properly. All charging circuit connections
must be clean and secure. If the unit battery is
questionable, a known good jumper battery
should be substituted for alternator testing.
NOTE: If the unit battery is questionable, a
known good jumper battery should be
substituted for alternator testing.
NOTE: Do not perform this test with a
battery charger connected to the unit battery.
NOTE: All voltage readings should be taken
between the chassis ground on the alternator
and the terminals indicated, unless stated
otherwise.
4. Check that the resistor bypass fuse (F4) has
been removed. Units with Thermo King
alternators must have the resistor bypass fuse
(F4) removed.
CAUTION: Energizing the circuit with
the resistor bypass fuse installed will
damage Thermo King alternators. Be sure
the resistor bypass fuse is removed for
Thermo King alternators.
Electrical Maintenance
5. Check and note the battery voltage at the
battery with the unit turned off.
6. With the unit off, check the voltage at the B+
terminal on the alternator. Battery voltage
must be present. If not, check the 2A circuit.
7. Disconnect the alternator harness from the
voltage regulator. On Thermo King
alternators, carefully push on the spring clip to
release the plug lock.
8. Turn the unit on, enter the Interface Board
Test Mode, and energize the Alternator Excite
Output. Refer to the appropriate Diagnostic
Manual for information about the Interface
Board Test Mode.
9. Check the voltage at the sense circuit (2
circuit). Battery voltage should be present. If
not, check the sense circuit (2 circuit) in the
alternator harness and in the main wire
harness.
10. Check the voltage at the excitation circuit
(EXC circuit). 10 Vdc or more should be
present. If not, check the excitation circuit
(EXC circuit) in the alternator harness and in
the main wire harness.
should fall to normal unit load plus charge
current to the unit battery (typically 5-10
amps).
A reading on the clamp-on ammeter at or near
0 amps indicates the alternator is not charging.
Checking the unit ammeter will show a
discharge condition. The alternator is
defective if there are no problems in the
wiring. Recheck the wiring before assuming
the alternator is defective.
15. Check the voltage at the B+ terminal. The
voltage should increase until it reaches the
anticipated voltage regulator setting as shown
in the table below. Record the voltage.
The voltage regulator setting varies inversely
with the temperature as shown below.
Regulator voltage can vary from
approximately 15.2 Vdc at -40 F (-40 C) to
approximately 13.2 Vdc at 176 F (80 C).
Temperature
Anticipated Regulator Voltage
-40 F (-40 C)
From 15.2 Vdc to 14.0 Vdc
77 F (25 C)
From 14.4 Vdc to 13.6 Vdc
176 F (80 C)
From 14.2 Vdc to 13.2 Vdc
NOTE: LED 18 lights up when the EXC
circuit is energized. The EXC circuit is
operated by a Smart FET so during normal
operation the unit must be running for the
EXC circuit to be energized.
If the voltage does not increase to the
anticipated voltage regulator setting, the
alternator is defective if there are no problems
in the wiring. Recheck the wiring before
replacing the alternator.
11. Turn the unit off and reconnect the alternator
harness.
16. If the voltage does increase until it reaches the
anticipated voltage regulator setting, compare
the voltage at the B+ terminal to the voltage
between the battery terminals. The voltage at
the B+ terminal should be no more than 1.0
Vdc higher than the voltage between the
battery terminals.
12. Attach a clamp-on ammeter around the 2A
wire connected to the B+ terminal on the
alternator. All wires connected to the B+
terminal must pass through the clamp-on
ammeter.
13. Connect a digital multi-meter between the B+
terminal at the alternator and chassis ground.
14. Turn the unit on and allow it to start. Using the
clamp-on ammeter, check the current flow in
the 2A wire.
A positive reading indicates the alternator is
charging. On unit startup, the current flow
should momentarily increase to allow for
battery current used during preheat and
cranking. Within a short time the current
If the voltage at the B+ terminal is no more
than 1.0 Vdc higher than the voltage between
the battery terminals, continue with Step 17.
If the voltage at the B+ (POS) terminal is
more than 1.0 Vdc higher than the voltage
between the battery terminals, clean and check
the wires and connections in the 2A and 2
circuits and repeat this check.
75
Electrical Maintenance
17. Increase the charging system load as much as
possible by running the unit in high speed or
defrost.
18. Monitor the alternator output voltage.
With the increased load, the alternator output
voltage should decrease no more than 0.5 Vdc.
The voltage may increase as much as 1.0 Vdc.
If the alternator output voltage decreases no
more than 0.5 Vdc the alternator is good.
If the alternator output voltage decreases more
than 0.5 Vdc, the alternator is defective if
there are no problems in the wiring. Recheck
the wiring before replacing the alternator.
•
High field current indicates a short in the
field circuit. Replace the rotor or the
alternator.
Battery
Inspect/clean the battery terminals and check the
electrolyte level during scheduled maintenance
inspections. A dead or low battery can be the
cause of an ammeter indicating discharge due to
lack of initial excitation of the alternator even
after the unit has been boosted for starting. The
minimum specific gravity should be 1.235. Add
distilled water as necessary to maintain the proper
water level.
Alternator Diode Quick Check:
This check confirms proper diode function.
Battery Cables
19. With the unit still running, set the digital
multi-meter connected from the alternator B+
output to chassis ground for AC volts. No
more than 1.0 Vac should be present. A
reading of more than 1.0 Vac indicates
damaged alternator diodes.
Units with Interim Tier 4 engines use 0-gauge
battery cables to ensure reliable starting in
extremely cold weather. Make sure to use the
0-gauge battery cables when replacing the battery
cables for a Interim Tier 4 engine. Refer to the
unit Parts Manual for the correct part numbers.
20. Turn the unit off.
Field Current Test
Use this test to determine if the alternator can be
repaired. Perform this test with the unit turned off.
1. Attach a clamp-on ammeter to the 2A wire
near the B+ terminal on the alternator.
2. Energize the field on the Thermo King
alternator by connecting a jumper wire
between the F2 terminal and the B+ terminal.
Do not connect the F2 terminal to ground or
the alternator will be damaged.
3. Note the ammeter reading. The ammeter
reading indicates the field current, which
should be 2.0 to 6.0 amps at 12 volts.
•
76
No field current or a low field current
indicates an open circuit or excessive
resistance in the field circuit. Remove the
voltage regulator and brush assembly and
inspect the slip rings. If the slip rings and
are acceptable, install a new voltage
regulator and brush assembly and repeat
the test. If the brushes are not the problem,
replace the alternator.
Electrical Maintenance
Fuses
Fuses (Continued)
A number of fuses, located on the base controller,
protect various circuits and components. The base
controller is located inside the control box. Refer
to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for a complete list
of the size and function of the fuses.
Fuses
Fuse
Size
Function
F2
15A
Power to On/Off Switch
40A
Fuel Sol Pull-In/Starter Circuit
F3
F4
None No Fuse - All Bosch and Thermo
King Alternators
2A 2A Fuse - All Prestolite Alternators
F5
60A
Preheat Circuit
F6
15A
Damper and High Speed Circuits
F7
2A
8XP Circuit - Controller On Feedback
to HMI
F8
5A
2A Power to CAN Connector J12
F9
5A
2A Power to CAN Connector J14
F10
10A
8X Power (Install fuse in right
position)
F11
10A
Fresh Air Exchange Solenoid Circuit
F12
5A
2A Power to CAN Connector J13
F13
2A
8FC Circuit (Remote Status
Light/Optional Power)
F15
P/S
On/Off Relay
F20
2A
Alternator Sense
F25
7.5A
F26
5A
F10 There are three in-line fuse clips that allow for
two configurations of the F10 fuse. The right position
is the normal position. This position has a white bar
below it on the circuit board. When fuse F10 is
installed in the right position, control power is routed
to the K9 On/Off Relay contacts. The On/Off keys on
the HMI Control Panel energize and de-energize the
K9 On/Off Relay. When the K9 On/Off Relay is
energized power is supplied through the normally
open K9 contacts to turn the unit on.
When fuse F10 is installed in the left position, power
bypasses the K9 On/Off relay contacts and the unit
will start and run without the HMI Control Panel
connected. Do not operate the unit with the F10 fuse
installed in the left position unless absolutely
necessary.
IMPORTANT: If fuse F10 is installed in the left
position the unit may start and run. If the HMI Control
Panel is connected the On and Off keys will still
function. The Off key will turn the unit off if Fuse F10
is in the left position, but the Base Controller will
remain powered up.
F15 The device identified as F15 is a poly switch.
These over-current devices reset automatically and
are not replaceable.
HPCO Switch Circuit
Power to CAN Connector J98
F4 Fuse F4 must be removed for Bosch and Thermo
King alternators. Fuse F4 fuse must be in place for
Prestolite alternators to charge.
F5 The F5 preheat fuse is a “slow blow” type fuse. It
is designed for use with the Yanmar trailer engine air
pre-heater. Always replace the fuse with the TK
specified fuse.
Figure 83: Base Controller
77
Electrical Maintenance
Base Controller LEDs
Smart FETs
The base controller has LEDs that indicate which
outputs are energized. The LED is illuminated
when the associated circuit output is energized.
A Smart FET (Field Effect Transistor) is a self
protecting output device used for the functions
shown in the table below. If an over-current
condition occurs, the Smart FET will turn off until
the over-current condition no longer exists. It will
then resume normal operation. A fuse is not
required. Smart FETs are not field repairable.
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for more
information about the Smart FETs.
Base Controller LED Functions
LED #
Function
LED 3
K2 Preheat Circuit
LED 4
K4 Damper Circuit
LED 5
K3 High Speed Circuit
LED 6
K1 Run Relay Circuit
LED 7
K5 Diesel/Electric Relay
LED 8
Pilot Solenoid Circuit
LED 9
Liquid Line Solenoid Circuit (Not Used)
LED 10
Hot Gas Bypass Valve Circuit
LED 11
Purge Valve Solenoid Circuit (Not Used)
LED 17
Loader Valve 1 (Not Used)
LED 18
Alternator Excite
LED 19
Liquid Injection Valve Circuit (Not Used)
LED 20
Loader Valve 3 (Not Used)
LED 21
Status – Flashes once per second when
the base controller is powered and
operating normally. Flashes several times
per second when flash loading. Is on
without flashing during reboot and when
Base Controller under test. Flashes twice
within 1 second followed by 1 second off if
a CAN communication error is present.
LED 22
K8 Fresh Air Exchange Solenoid Circuit
LED 23
K9 On/Off Circuit
LED 24
K6 Fuel Solenoid Pull-In Circuit
LED 25
K7 Starter Circuit
LED 27
ETV – D*
LED 28
ETV – B*
LED 29
ETV – A*
LED 30
ETV – C*
* Illuminated when the respective ETV output is
energized. On applications without an ETV the ETV
LED's may be illuminated even though there is no
ETV present.
78
Not all Smart FETs shown below are used on
single temperature units.
Base Controller Outputs With Smart FETs
Output
Function
EVA, EVB, EVC, EVD
ETV Outputs
HG
Hot Gas Bypass Solenoid
LV1
Not Currently Used
EXC
Alternator Excite
LV3
Not Currently Used
LQIP
Liquid Injection Valve
LLSP
Liquid Line Solenoid
26
Pilot Solenoid
PV
Purge Valve
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3)
Microprocessor Controller
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for complete
service information about the Microprocessor
Controller and the related components.
IMPORTANT: A ServiceWatch download can be
helpful when diagnosing a problem in a unit
with an SR-3 Controller. Therefore, it is
recommended that a ServiceWatch download be
preformed to help diagnose a problem. A
ServiceWatch download must be preformed
before contacting the Thermo King Service
Department for assistance in diagnosing a
problem. Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor
Control System Diagnostic Manual TK 54842
for information about downloading the
ServiceWatch Data Logger and viewing the data.
Electrical Maintenance
REB (Radio Expansion Board)
Option
1
2
The REB (Radio Expansion Board) option is a
wireless communication platform that offers fleet
owners the ability to monitor their refrigerated
trailers. Cellular, GPS, and Wi-Fi capabilities
communicate with Thermo King’s web-based
TracKing application. A third party interface
(using iBox protocol) offers a gateway for
telematics providers to communicate with the
Thermo King unit.
Currently, REBs with the following capabilities
are available. Some combinations of these
capabilities are also available.
•
REB with Cellular and GPS capabilities for
use with the TracKing application.
•
REB with Wi-Fi and GPS capabilities for use
with the TracKing application.
•
REB with iBox protocol for use with third
party telematics systems.
NOTE: REBs that have iBox and Cellular
capabilities can be configured to either use the
iBox protocol, or communicate with TracKing.
They cannot be configured to do both.
The REB is a “daughter board” that mounts on the
upper right corner of the base controller as shown
below. The REB communicates with the base
controller through the CAN connector J98 on the
base controller. Refer to the Radio Expansion
Board (REB) Diagnostic Manual TK 55065 for
complete service information about the REB.
Refer to the iBox Diagnostic Manual TK 53242
for complete service information about the REB
iBox II.
REBs with cellular capabilities also have a battery
mounted on the bottom of the frame panel above
the control box. The REB battery is used to
provide back-up power for at least 24 hours if the
main battery power is lost or interrupted. The
REB only transmits its location during this
back-up mode. The REB contains an intelligent
battery charger that keeps the REB battery
charged during normal unit operation.
1.
REB Fuse (3 Amp)
2.
REB (Radio Expansion Board)
Figure 84: REB Mounted on Base Controller
Fuse Link
The fuse link is located in the positive battery
cable. The fuse link protects the electric system
from a short in the 2 circuit. If the fuse link burns
out, check for a grounded 2 wire before replacing
the fuse link. Replace the fuse link by replacing
the positive battery cable.
Air Heater
The air heater is mounted on the open end of the
intake manifold. It heats the intake air to help the
engine start in cold weather. The air heater is
energized by the microprocessor during preheat,
just before the engine is started.
The heater is probably defective if the resistance
is more than 0.2 ohms and the current draw is less
than 60 amps, or if the current draw is more than
100 amps.
79
Electrical Maintenance
Check the resistance of the air intake heater with
an ohmmeter between the M6 terminal on the
front of the heater and the screw on the back of
the heater (or the heater case). The resistance
should be 0.14 ± 0.02 ohms.
1
2
Check the current draw of the heater with a
clamp-on ammeter at the H1 wire near the M6
terminal on the front of the heater. During preheat
the current draw should be approximately 70
amps.
1.
Wire Harness In Front Of Starter
2.
Harness Routing Bracket
Figure 86: Wire Harness Routing
1
AEA693
1.
M6 Terminal
Figure 85: Air Heater
Unit Wiring
Inspect the unit wiring and the wire harnesses
during scheduled maintenance inspections for
loose, chaffed or broken wires to protect against
unit malfunctions due to open or short circuits.
Wire Harness Routing
The wire harness is routed in front of the starter
on the TK486V/VH (Interim Tier 4) engine. The
wire harness is attached to a harness routing
bracket, which is attached to the starter.
80
Electrical Maintenance
Ultrasonic Fuel Level Sensor
The ultrasonic fuel level sensor (if used) is
mounted to a flange on top of the fuel tank. The
ultrasonic fuel level sensor consists of a sensor, a
sensor tube (or focus tube), and two gaskets. The
sensor is a transducer that emits ultrasonic sound
waves. The sound waves reflect off the fuel in the
sensor tube and return to the transducer. The
transducer senses the reflected sound waves and
determines the fuel level in the sensor tube.
Ultrasonic fuel level sensors are calibrated for use
with fuel tanks of particular size and shape. Refer
to the appropriate unit Parts Manual for the
correct part numbers.
1
4
2
agree closely is at 50% or 1/2 full. The readings at
other fuel levels may not agree as closely. If you
think the ultrasonic fuel level sensor is not
working correctly, the best thing to do is to check
the output voltage as shown in step 4 below. The
output voltage should be between approximately
1.0 Vdc for an empty tank to 4.0 Vdc for a full
tank.
Check the operation of the fuel level sensor as
follows:
1. Use the GAUGES soft key to display the Fuel
Level Sensor reading and compare it to the
reading of the fuel gauge on the end of the fuel
tank. The Fuel Level Sensor reading should be
approximately 50% when the fuel gauge reads
1/2 full.
2. Check to make sure that the Fuel Sensor Type
is set to Solid State in Unit Configuration in
the Guarded Access Menu.
3
3. Turn the unit on and check the for battery
voltage (12 Vdc) between the 2PL (J3-12 pin)
and FUELN (J3-35 pin) wires in the sensor
harness at the J3 connector on the base
controller. This is the input voltage. If battery
voltage is not present, check the
microprocessor.
4. If battery voltage is present, check the output
voltage between the FLL (J3-23 pin) and
FUELN (J3-35 pin) wires in the sensor
harness at the J3 connector on the base
controller. The voltage should be between 1
and 4 Vdc depending on the fuel level as
shown the following table.
Fuel Level
Output Voltage
1.
Ultrasonic Fuel Level Sensor
Empty
Approximately 1.0 Vdc
2.
Gaskets
1/2 Full
Approximately 2.5 Vdc
3.
Sensor Tube
Full
Approximately 4.0 Vdc
4.
Sensor Cable
Figure 87: Fuel Level Sensor
The ultrasonic fuel level sensor and the fuel gauge
on the end of the fuel tank measure the fuel level
differently. The ultrasonic fuel level sensor
measures the actual volume of fuel in the tank.
The fuel gauge measures the height of the fuel in
the tank. Therefore, the fuel level at which fuel
level sensor reading and the fuel gauge reading
NOTE: The output voltages listed above are
for the ultrasonic fuel level sensor designed
to be used with the SR-2 and SR-3
Controllers. Other systems such as third
party telematics systems may use sensors
with slightly different output voltages. Refer
to the sensor specifications for those sensors.
81
Electrical Maintenance
5. If the output voltage is incorrect, check the
continuity of the wires that go from the J3
connector on the base controller to the sensor
as shown in the following table and make sure
the connections are clean and tight.
NOTE: The sensor cable (or interconnect
harness) wires are connected to the sensor
wires with solder connections and heat
shrink tubing during installation. See the
SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR Installation
Manual TK 54932 for more information.
Sensor
J3 Con- Sensor Sensor
Sensor
Harness Cable Con- Cable
nector
Wire
nector Pin Wire
Wire
Pin
12
2PL
A
Green
Red
23
FLL
C
White
Yellow
35
FUELN
B
Black
Black
1. Remove and discard the sensor and its gasket.
DO NOT reuse the gasket.
2. Check the gasket between the sensor tube and
the tank to make sure it is in good condition.
Replace it if necessary.
3. Confirm the gasket surface areas on the tank
flange and the sensor tube are clean.
Pre-Assembly
The mounting holes of the sensor, sensor tube,
gaskets, and the fuel tank flange are not
symmetrical. The holes align only in one position.
The distance between the two mounting holes
next to the notch (see Figure 88) are further apart
than the others. These two holes will be used as a
reference point to correctly align the components.
6. If the wires have good continuity and the
connections are clean and tight, replace the
sensor.
Important USFLS Replacement
Information
1
NOTE: This procedure covers replacing the
sensor. For information about installing the
USFLS Kit on a unit that does not already have
a USFLS, see the SB-230 RR and SB-330 RR
Installation Manual TK 54932 for more
information.
•
DO NOT connect power to the UFLS until it
has been installed into the fuel tank.
•
DO NOT use thread locking compounds as
they can cause stress cracking of the plastic
sensor.
•
DO NOT apply any type of gasket sealer.
•
USE ONLY new gaskets. Make sure to order
new gaskets when ordering the replacement
sensor.
•
•
82
DO NOT use power tools to tighten the
mounting hardware or damage to the plastic
sensor will result.
DO NOT overtighten the mounting hardware
or damage to the plastic sensor will result.
2
4
3
2
1.
Sensor
2.
Pin Holes
3.
Mounting Hole Reference
4.
Notch
Figure 88: USFLS Components
Electrical Maintenance
4. The UFLS assembly should be pre-assembled
before installing it into the fuel tank.
a. Slide a gasket up the sensor tube to the
flange, making sure the pin hole in the
gasket is centered between the two
mounting holes next to the notch as shown
in Figure 88.
b. While holding the lower gasket in place,
place the upper gasket onto the sensor tube
flange, again making sure the pin hole in
the gasket is positioned between the two
mounting holes next to the notch as shown
in Figure 88.
c. Place the sensor on top of the upper gasket
with the harness pointing towards the
notch on the sensor tube flange. All holes
should now be aligned.
IMPORTANT: DO NOT burn the heat
shrink. If the heat shrink is burnt, charred,
or has bubbles from overheating, the wire
connections must be removed and redone
correctly.
Resistive Fuel Level Sensor
The resistive (float) fuel level sensor (if used) is
mounted in the end of the fuel tank.
Check the operation of the fuel level sensor as
follows:
1. Disconnect the three pin connector that
connects the harness from the fuel level sensor
to the sensor harness from the J3 connector on
the base controller. This three pin connector is
located either in the control box or under the
unit near the control box.
d. Install the 10-32 screws, lock washers and
flat washers onto the sensor and through
the gasket holes to hold the assembly
together.
1
Installation In Tank
5. Insert assembly into fuel tank making sure the
notch on the sensor tube is aligned with the
notch on the tank flange. When installed
correctly, the sensor harness will be pointed
towards the fuel fill on the end of the tank.
Hand tighten the five mounting screws in a
criss-cross pattern and torque them to 10-15
in-lbs (1.1-1.7 N•m).
DO NOT overtighten the mounting hardware
or damage to the plastic sensor will result.
The fuel tank is now ready to be reinstalled.
Wire Connections
2
6. Cut the sensor cable wires (or old sensor
wires) to the appropriate length and splice
them to the new sensor wires using solder
connectors (P/N 41-5210) and heat shrink
tubing (P/N 92-846) as follows:
Sensor Cable Wire
Sensor Wire
Green
Red
White
Yellow
Black
Black
1.
Float in Full Position
2.
Float in Empty Position
Figure 89: Fuel Level Sensor
2. Check the resistance between the two wires
that go to the fuel level sensor. The resistance
should be approximately 30 ohms with the
float in the full position. The resistance should
be approximately 240 ohms with the float in
the empty position.
83
Electrical Maintenance
NOTE: If the resistance of the fuel level
sensor is incorrect, check the continuity of
the wires between the three pin connector
and the fuel level sensor before assuming the
fuel level sensor is bad.
3. If the resistance of the fuel level sensor is
acceptable, turn the unit on and check the
voltage between the FLL and FUELN wires in
the sensor harness going to the base controller.
The voltage between the FLL and FUELN
wires should be approximately 7.4 Vdc with
the fuel level sensor disconnected.
4. If the voltage is incorrect, check the continuity
of the FLL and FUELN wires in the sensor
harness going to the base controller. The FLL
wire goes to the J3-23 pin. The FUELN wire
goes to J3-35 pin.
5. If the FLL and FUELN wires have good
continuity, check the microprocessor.
Electric Fuel Heater
An electric fuel heater is standard equipment on
these units.
Operation
Figure 90: Electric Fuel Heater Schematic
Components
The main components of the electric fuel heater
option are listed below.
•
Electric Fuel Heater (mounted in base of fuel
filter/water separator)
•
Fuel Heater Harness (includes the following)
•
W Fuse (3 amp)
•
Electric (Power) Filter
•
Unit Run Relay
•
2A/2FH Circuit Breaker (20 amp manual
reset)
The electric fuel heater is mounted in base of fuel
filter/water separator as shown in Figure 91.
The electric fuel heater has an internal thermostat
that closes at 44 F (7 C) minimum, and opens at
62 F (17 C) maximum.
After the unit is turned On and the engine starts
running, the alternator will output AC power to
the W/WF circuit. The electric (power) filter
converts this to DC power, which energizes the
Unit Run Relay and closes its contacts.
With the relay contacts closed, the 2A circuit
provides power to the fuel heater, which will heat
up if its internal thermostat is closed. The current
through the fuel heater is 11.4 to 15.5 amps at 12.5
Vdc.
NOTE: The electric fuel heater does not
function when the unit is in the Null Mode, or
during the non-running portion of the Pretrip
Test.
84
1
1.
Electric Fuel Heater
Figure 91: Fuel Filter/Water Separator
Electrical Maintenance
NOTE: The end of the WF wire that is
attached to the W terminal is a red wire about
8 in. (203 mm) long with yellow fuse holder
in the middle. This red wire with the fuse
holder is connected with a splice to the WF
wire.
The relay, fuse, electric (power) filter, and circuit
breaker are mounted inside the control box as
shown in Figure 92 and Figure 93.
•
The 2A wire is attached to the 2A screw
terminal on the base controller.
•
The CH wires are connected to the CH ground
plate behind the battery.
1
2
1
ARA1758
1.
Electrical Connection to Base Controller
2.
Electrical Components In Control Box
ARA1759
Figure 92: Control Box
1.
1
2A Wire Attached to 2A Screw Terminal,
which is also marked J25
Figure 94: Wire Connection to Base Controller
Diagnosis
2
3
Use the following procedure to diagnose the
electric fuel heater.
1. Disconnect the electric fuel heater from the
fuel heater harness at the 2-pin connector
located near the electric fuel heater.
2. Check the resistance of the electric fuel heater
by checking the resistance between the two
terminals in the 2-pin connector on the wires
to the electric fuel heater. The resistance
should be 0.8 to 1.1 ohms.
1.
Unit Run Relay
2.
Electric (Power) Filter
3.
2A/2FH Circuit Breaker
Figure 93: Electrical Components In Control Box
The wires in the fuel heater harness are connected
to the unit as follows.
•
The WF wire is attached to the W terminal
(AC output) on the alternator.
NOTE: The temperature of the electric fuel
heater must be below 44 F (7 C) to verify the
internal thermostat closes.
•
If the resistance is acceptable, go to Step 3.
•
If the resistance is very high, indicating an
open circuit, check the temperature of the
electric fuel heater using a non-contact
thermometer. The temperature of the
electric fuel heater must be below 44 F
85
Electrical Maintenance
(7 C) to close the internal thermostat. If
the temperature of the electric fuel heater
is below 44 F (7 C) and high resistance
indicates an open circuit, the electric fuel
heater is probably defective and should be
replaced.
•
2
1
3
If the resistance is significantly less than
0.8 ohms, the heating element is probably
defective and the electric fuel heater
should be replaced.
NOTE: The unit must be turned on and running
for the rest of the procedure.
3. If the resistance of the electric fuel heater is
acceptable, turn the unit on and let the engine
start. Check the voltage between the 2HP and
CH wires in the fuel heater harness at the
2-pin connector that was disconnected from
the electric fuel heater in Step 1. Battery
voltage should be present between the 2HP
and CH wires.
1.
WF Wire Connected to Screw Terminal
(Marked 8 on Side)
2.
Black Wire Spliced to CH Wire
3.
Red Wire Spliced to 7R2 Wire
Figure 95: Electric (Power) Filter Top View
4. If battery voltage is not present, check for AC
voltage at the W terminal on the alternator. At
least 8 Vac should be present at the W
terminal on the alternator. If not, check the
alternator.
5. If the AC voltage at the W terminal is
acceptable, check for AC voltage at the WF
wire where it connects to the screw (8)
terminal on the electric (power) filter in the
control box. At least 8 Vac should be present
on the WF wire at electric (power) filter. If
not, check the W fuse and the continuity of the
WF wire. The W fuse holder is located in the
Red wire that is spliced to the end of the WF
wire and attached to the W terminal on the
alternator.
1
3
2
1.
WF Wire Connected to Screw Terminal
(Marked 8 on Side)
2.
Black Wire Spliced to CH Wire
3.
Red Wire Spliced to 7R2 Wire
Figure 96: Electric (Power) Filter Side View
86
Electrical Maintenance
1
2
3
1
1.
Red Wire
2.
Fuse Holder
3.
WF Wire
Figure 97: Fuse Holder
6. If the AC voltage on the WF wire at electric
(power) filter is acceptable, check for DC
voltage on the 7R2 wire (pin 85) at the Unit
Run Relay in the control box. At least 8 Vdc
should be present on the 7R2 wire (pin 85) at
the Unit Run Relay. If not, check the
continuity between the 7R2 wire (pin 85) at
the Unit Run Relay and the Red wire at the
electric (power) filter. Also check the
continuity between the Black wire at the
electric (power) filter and the CH wire where
it attaches to the CH ground plate. If these
wires have good continuity, replace electric
(power) filter.
7. If the voltage on the 7R2 wire (pin 85) at the
Unit Run Relay is acceptable, check for
continuity on the CH wire between the Unit
Run Relay (pin 86) and the CH ground plate.
8. Check for battery voltage on the 2A wire
where it is attached to the 2A screw terminal
on the base controller. If battery voltage is not
present, check to make sure the 2A wire
connection is clean and tight.
9. If battery voltage is present on the 2A wire at
the 2A terminal, check for battery voltage on
the 2FH wire (pin 30) at the Unit Run Relay. If
battery voltage is not present, press the reset
button on the side of the 2A/2FH circuit
breaker and check the continuity of the 2A and
2FH wires.
1.
Reset Button, Press to Reset
Figure 98: 2A/2FH Circuit Breaker
10. If battery voltage is present on the 2FH wire
(pin 30) at the Unit Run Relay, check for
battery voltage on the 2HP wire at the 2-pin
connector that was disconnected from the
electric fuel heater in Step 1. If battery voltage
is not present, check the continuity of the 2HP
wire and check for a defective Unit Run
Relay.
11. If battery voltage is present on the 2HP wire at
the 2-pin connector, check for continuity on
the CH wire between the 2-pin connector and
the CH ground plate.
Fresh Air Exchange Solenoid
(Optional)
An optional Fresh Air Exchange Feature is
available. The fresh air exchange door is opened
and closed through the Mode Menu. See “Fresh
Air Exchange” on page 54 for more information
about fresh air exchange. The fresh air exchange
door can also be opened and closed remotely
through an iBox on units so equipped.
Note that the fresh air exchange door will only be
open when the unit engine is running, as it is held
open by the fresh air exchange solenoid. The door
will close when the engine shuts down to preserve
unit battery life. The setting of the fresh air
exchange door will survive power off / power on
cycles - if the door is set opened by the operator it
will continue to open any time the engine is
running until it is set closed by the operator.
A solenoid is used to open and close the fresh air
exchange door. The fresh air exchange door,
solenoid, and other components are contained in
the fresh air exchange assembly, which is located
behind the curbside grille near the fuel filter.
87
Electrical Maintenance
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
5
5
4
1.
Fresh Air Intake Opening (Door Closed)
2.
Fresh Air Exchange Assembly
3.
Flexible Hoses
1.
4.
Auto Fresh Air Solenoid
2.
Fresh Air Exchange Door
5.
Interior Air Exhaust Opening (Door Closed)
3.
Return Spring
4.
Linkage
5.
Auto Fresh Air Solenoid
Figure 99: Fresh Air Exchange Location
The auto fresh air solenoid (AFAS) is connected
to the fresh air exchange door through a
mechanical linkage. When the solenoid is
energized, it opens the door by pulling it down.
When the solenoid is de-energized, the return
spring closes the door by pulling it up.
The auto fresh air reed switch (AFARS) is a
magnetic switch that is located at the top of the
fresh air exchange door. The switch should be
open when the door is open, and closed when the
door is closed.
The operation of the fresh air exchange circuit and
door can be checked using Interface Board Test
Mode. Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control
System Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for
information about the Interface Board Test Mode.
88
Auto Fresh Air Reed Switch Connector
Figure 100: Fresh Air Exchange Assembly
(Back View)
The controller will set Alarm Code 252 (Check
Fresh Air Exchange Circuit) if it detects certain
problems with the Fresh Air Exchange. Refer to
the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for information
about diagnosing this alarm code.
NOTE: Inspect the fresh air exchange
mechanical components for binding or ice
before assuming it is an electrical problem.
Electrical Maintenance
1
2
3
4
5
1.
Auto Fresh Air Reed Switch
2.
Fresh Air Exchange Door
3.
Return Spring
4.
Linkage
5.
Auto Fresh Air Solenoid
Figure 101: Fresh Air Exchange Assembly
(Back Angle View)
89
Engine Maintenance
EMI 3000
Oil Filter Change
EMI 3000 is an extended maintenance interval
package. The EMI 3000 package consists of the
following key components:
The oil filter should be changed along with the
engine oil. Use a genuine Thermo King extended
maintenance oil filter.
•
1. Remove the filter.
EMI 3000-Hour Cyclonic Air Cleaner
Assembly and Air Cleaner Element
•
EMI 3000-Hour Dual Element Oil Filter
(black with gold lettering)
•
API Rating CI-4 Mineral Oil (ACEA Rating
E3 for Europe)
•
Five Year or 12,000 Hour ELC (Extended Life
Coolant).
The EMI package allows standard maintenance
intervals to be extended to 3,000 hours, or 2 years,
whichever occurs first.
NOTE: Units equipped with the EMI 3000
package do require regular inspection in
accordance with Thermo King's maintenance
recommendations.
Engine Lubrication System
The TK486 family of engines use a pressure
lubrication system. Refer to the TK482 and
TK486 Engine Overhaul Manual TK 50136 for a
detailed description of the engine lubrication
system.
Engine Oil Change
The engine oil should be changed according to the
Maintenance Inspection Schedule. Drain the oil
only when the engine is hot to ensure that all the
oil drains out. When changing oil, keep unit and
cargo compartment level so all the oil can flow
from the oil pan. It is important to get as much of
the oil out as possible because most of the dirt
particles are contained in the last few quarts of oil
that drain out of the pan. Refill the pan with 13
quarts (12.3 liters) and check the dipstick level.
Run the unit, and then recheck the oil level. The
engine oil level should be at the FULL mark with
the dipstick turned (threaded) into the oil pan.
Never overfill. See Specifications Chapter for
correct type of oil.
90
2. Apply oil to the rubber ring of the new filter
and install the filter.
3. Tighten the filter until the rubber ring makes
contact, then tighten 1/2 turn more.
4. Start the unit and check for leaks.
Low Oil Pressure
Oil pressure is affected by oil temperature, oil
viscosity, and engine speed. Low oil pressure can
usually be traced to the lack of oil, a faulty oil
pressure regulating valve, or worn bearings. Low
oil pressure is not normally caused by a faulty oil
pump. Use the “Low Oil Pressure Flow Chart” on
the following page to help diagnose low oil
pressure.
Engine Maintenance
Low Oil Pressure Flow Chart
Low Oil Pressure
Check for oil dilution.
Is it just thin or does it
smell like fuel?
Thin
Diluted
with Fuel
See
EDP08
Fuel in Oil
Full
Check Oil Level
Low
Add oil until full.
Re-check oil pressure in
low and high speed.
OK
Verify the unit switch,
sensor, or gauge
accuracy using a test
gauge.
Not
Accurate
Repair and
re-check oil pressure in
low and high speed.
Accurate
Check for excessive
radial end play at the
flywheel with a dial
indicator. Maximum;
0.007 in. 4-cylinder.
Excessive
OK
Drain oil through a
clean coffee filter and
check for wear metal
contamination.
Wear Metal
Present
Repair or
replace engine.
No Wear
Metal
Change oil and filter.
Re-check oil pressure
in low and high speed.
OK
Low
Check oil pressure regulator
or oil pressure control valve
and repair or replace as
necessary. Re-check oil
pressure in
low and high speed. If oil
pressure is still low, repair or
replace engine.
ARA1368
91
Engine Maintenance
Engine Cooling System
The engine employs a closed, circulating type,
pressurized cooling system. Correct engine
temperatures are controlled and maintained by a
radiator, fan and thermostat. The coolant is
circulated through the system by a belt driven
centrifugal pump. The pump draws the coolant
from the side of the radiator, circulates it through
the cylinder block and head and returns it to the
radiator. A thermostat mounted in the coolant
outlet line from the cylinder head to the radiator
automatically maintains coolant temperature
within the specified temperature range.
All water cooled engines are shipped from the
factory with a 50 percent permanent type
antifreeze concentrate and 50 percent water
mixture in the engine cooling system.
This provides the following:
1. Prevents freezing down to -30 F (-34 C).
2. Retards rust and mineral scale that can cause
engine overheating.
AJA1947
Figure 102: ELC Nameplate
Located Above Expansion Tank
The following are the Extended Life Coolants
currently approved by Thermo King for use in
ELC units for five years or 12,000 hours:
•
Chevron Dex-Cool
3. Retards corrosion (acid) that can attack
accumulator tanks, water tubes, radiators and
core plugs.
•
Texaco ELC (nitrite free)
•
Havoline Dex-Cool (with nitrates)
4. Provides lubrication for the water pump seal.
•
Havoline Dex-Cool (nitrite free)
•
Shell Dexcool
•
Shell Rotella
•
Havoline XLC (Europe)
•
Saturn/General Motors Dex-Cool
•
Caterpillar ELC
•
Detroit Diesel POWERCOOL Plus.
ELC (Extended Life Coolant)
ELC has been phased into all units equipped with
engines from the TK486 engine family. A
nameplate above the coolant expansion tank
identifies units with ELC.
NOTE: The new engine coolant, Texaco
Extended Life Coolant, is RED in color instead
of the current GREEN or BLUE-GREEN
colored coolants.
92
CAUTION: Do not add “GREEN” or
“BLUE-GREEN” conventional coolant to
cooling systems using “RED” Extended
Life Coolant, except in an emergency. If
conventional coolant is added to Extended
Life Coolant, the coolant must be changed
after 2 years instead of 5 years.
Engine Maintenance
NOTE: The use of 50/50 percent pre-mixed
Extended Life Coolant (ELC) is recommended to
assure that de-ionized water is being used. If 100
percent full strength concentrate is used,
de-ionized or distilled water is recommended
over tap water to insure the integrity of the
cooling system is maintained.
changing the antifreeze. Change ELC (red) engine
coolant every five years or 12,000 hours
(whichever occurs first).
Antifreeze Maintenance Procedure
The factory recommends the use of a 50/50
antifreeze mixture in all units even if they are not
exposed to freezing temperatures. This antifreeze
mixture will provide the required corrosion
protection and lubrication for the water pump.
Do not mix green or blue-green engine coolant
with ELC (red) engine coolant. See “ELC
(Extended Life Coolant)” on page 92 for more
information about ELC.
As with all equipment containing antifreeze,
periodic inspection on a regular basis is required
to verify the condition of the antifreeze. Inhibitors
become worn out and must be replaced by
1
2
4
3
8
6
7
5
1.
Expansion Tank
5.
Water Pump
2.
Expansion Tank Cap
6.
Coolant Hoses to Cold Start Device on Injection Pump
3.
Coolant Level Switch
7.
Thermostat
4.
Radiator
8.
Thermostat Housing
Figure 103: Engine Cooling System
93
Engine Maintenance
Checking the Antifreeze
Check the solution concentration by using a
temperature compensated antifreeze hydrometer
or a refractometer (P/N 204-754) designed for
testing antifreeze. Maintain a minimum of
50 percent permanent type antifreeze concentrate
and 50 percent water solution to provide
protection to -30 F (-34 C). Do not mix antifreeze
stronger than 68 percent permanent type coolant
concentrate and 32 percent water for use in
extreme temperatures.
Changing the Antifreeze
1. Run the engine until it is up to its normal
operating temperature. Stop the unit.
2. Open the engine block drain (located behind
the starter) and completely drain the coolant.
Observe the coolant color. If the coolant is
dirty, proceed with a, b, and c. Otherwise go
to 3.
CAUTION: Avoid direct contact with hot
coolant.
a. Run clear water into the radiator and allow
it to drain out of the block until it is clear.
b. Close the block drain and install a
commercially available radiator and block
flushing agent, and operate the unit in
accordance with instructions of the
flushing agent manufacturer.
c. Open the engine block drain to drain the
water and flushing solution.
CAUTION: Avoid direct contact with hot
coolant.
3. Run clear water into the radiator, and allow it
to drain out of the block until it is clear.
4. Inspect all hoses for deterioration and hose
clamp tightness. Replace if necessary.
5. Loosen the water pump belt. Check the water
pump bearing for looseness.
6. Inspect the radiator cap. Replace the cap if the
gasket shows any signs of deterioration.
94
7. If using ELC concentrate, mix one gallon of
ELC concentrate and one gallon of de-ionized
or distilled water in a container to make a
50/50 mixture. (Do not add antifreeze and
then add water to the unit. This procedure may
not give a true 50/50 mixture because the
exact cooling system capacity may not always
be known.)
8. Refill the radiator with the 50/50 antifreeze
mixture and make sure to bleed the air from
the cooling system as needed.
Bleeding Air from the Cooling
System
Jiggle pin thermostats are original equipment on
units that have engines from the TK486 engine
family. Jiggle pin thermostats make it unnecessary
to bleed the air out of the engine block because
they keep air from being trapped in the engine
block. Normally, all but about 1.5 qt (1.4 liters) of
coolant drain out of the cooling system when it is
drained. If approximately half of the Cooling
System Capacity (see Specifications Chapter)
seems to fill the cooling system after it has been
drained, air has been trapped in the block. Bleed
the air out of the block using the following
procedure:
CAUTION: Do not start the engine
without bleeding the air out of the block.
NOTE: If an engine runs with air trapped in the
block, the engine may be damaged. The high
water temperature switch may not protect an
engine that has air trapped in the block, because
the high water temperature switch is designed to
protect an engine from overheating due to
failures in the cooling system.
1. Remove the plug from the front end of the
water pump below the thermostat housing as
shown in Figure 104.
2. Slowly pour the coolant into the system until
you see coolant at the plug fitting.
3. Reinstall the plug.
Engine Maintenance
Coolant Level Switch
1
1.
The plastic expansion tank uses a reed type
coolant level switch. The coolant level switch
senses the position of the magnetic float inside the
expansion tank. When the coolant level is above
the switch, the float is in the upper position and
the switch is closed. When the coolant level is
below the switch, the float is in the lower position
and the switch is open.
Plug
Figure 104: Remove Plug from Water Pump
4. Pour coolant into the system until it appears to
be full.
5. Make sure that the amount of coolant that
goes back into the system is approximately
equal to the amount of coolant that came out
of the system.
6. Start the engine. Monitor the coolant
temperature with the unit engine coolant
temperature gauge, or by using a non-contact
thermometer pointed at the thermostat housing
in the location of the high water temperature
switch or sensor. When the temperature
reaches 150 F (66 C), shut the engine off for 2
minutes. This allows time for the thermostat to
heat soak and open fully, ensuring that any
remaining air will be purged out of the engine
block when the engine is restarted.
1
2
1.
Coolant Level Switch
2.
Float
Figure 105: Plastic Expansion Tank
7. Restart the engine and run it in low speed.
Remove the cap from the expansion tank and
slowly pour coolant into expansion tank until
it is full, then reinstall the expansion tank cap.
NOTE: Figure 105 shows the expansion tank in
two pieces. The two pieces are bonded together
when the tank is assembled, so it cannot be
disassembled, but the coolant level switch can be
replaced.
8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 until the coolant level
stabilizes.
Testing the Coolant Level Switch
Engine Thermostat
For the best engine operation, use a 160 F (71 C)
thermostat year-round.
You can test the switch in the unit by adjusting the
coolant level. You can also remove the expansion
tank from the unit and test the switch by flipping
the expansion tank upside down and right side up.
1. Remove the wire harness connector from the
coolant level switch.
95
Engine Maintenance
2. Use an ohmmeter to check the continuity of
the switch at the connection pins.
3. Make sure the coolant level is above the
switch and check the continuity of the switch.
The switch should be closed. If you removed
the tank from the unit, do this check with the
tank upside down.
4. Drain coolant from the expansion tank until
the coolant level is well below the switch and
check continuity of the switch. The switch
should be open. If you removed the tank from
the unit, do this check with the tank right side
up.
2. Use a wide, flat screwdriver to pry the switch
out of the expansion tank.
1
2
5. Replace the switch if it is does not closed in
step 3 and does not open in step 4.
Checking the Float
The float is made of polypropylene foam. It is
unlikely that the float would fail unless it sticks
inside the tank so it cannot move.
1. Make sure the coolant level is above the float.
2. Slowly drain coolant from the expansion tank
and watch the float. The float should drop
with the coolant level.
3. If the float did not drop with the coolant level,
remove the expansion tank from the unit.
1.
Warm Here
2.
Pry Here
Figure 106: Removing Coolant Level Switch
3. Look at the new coolant level switch. Notice
that the switch has a raised ring around it. This
ring snaps into a grove in the expansion tank.
Also, notice that there is a slot in the top of the
switch. This slot fits around a tab in the
expansion tank.
1
2
4. Flip the expansion tank upside down and right
side up to see if the float moves inside the
expansion tank. Replace the expansion tank
with a new one if the float is stuck or does not
move with the coolant level.
Replacing the Coolant Level Switch
It makes it easier to remove and install the switch
if you use a blow drier or heat gun to warm the
expansion tank in the area around the switch. Do
not overheat the expansion tank. Warm it to about
the temperature of hot bath water.
1. Warm the area around the coolant level
switch, but do not overheat it.
96
1.
Raised Ring
2.
Slot
Figure 107: Coolant Level Switch
Engine Maintenance
4. Look at the hole in the expansion tank from
which the coolant level switch was removed.
Notice that there is a tab in the top of the hole.
The slot in the switch must fit around this tab
when the switch is installed.
7. Press the coolant level switch into the
expansion tank. It should click when it snaps
into place. It may be helpful to use a wide
bladed screwdriver to press on the switch
where shown in the following photograph.
1
1
1.
Tab
Figure 108: Expansion Tank
1.
Tab
Figure 109: Expansion Tank
5. Warm the expansion tank in the area around
the hole for the coolant level switch, but do
not overheat it.
8. Refill the expansion tank with coolant (after
installing the expansion tank if it was
removed).
6. Place the coolant level switch in the expansion
tank. Make sure that the slot in the switch is
aligned with the tab in the expansion tank.
9. Connect the wire harness connector to the
coolant level switch.
97
Engine Maintenance
Engine Fuel System
TK486V/VH engines use a mono-plunger and
distributor injection pump.
The components of the fuel system are:
•
Fuel tank
•
Fuel filter/water separator
•
Inlet strainer (in fuel transfer pump)
•
Priming pump
•
Fuel transfer pump
•
Air/fuel separator (sometimes called Pro
Check)
•
Injection pump
•
Trochoid feed pump
•
Injection nozzles
The priming pump is used to manually draw fuel
from the tank up to the fuel pump if the unit
should run out of fuel.
The fuel transfer pump delivers fuel to the air/fuel
separator. The air/fuel separator prevents any air
in the system from entering the injection pump by
returning the air back to the fuel tank.
The air/fuel separator does this by first separating
any air in the fuel using gravity. After fuel enters
the “IN” port, air bubbles float to the top of the
cylinder while the fuel sinks to the bottom of the
cylinder.
Next it provides a path of least resistance for the
air to return to the fuel tank through the
“RETURN FUEL” port. Any excess fuel also
returns to the fuel tank through this port, which
contains a small orifice that restricts fuel flow to
maintain fuel pressure.
This ensures that the “OUT” port always has
air-free fuel to push into the injection pump and
that any air in the system gets returned to the fuel
tank rather than passed to the injection pump.
2
Operation
Fuel is drawn from the fuel tank through the fuel
filter/water separator and the inlet strainer by the
fuel transfer pump.
The inlet side of the fuel transfer pump can be
thought of as the “suction” side because the fuel
transfer pump can create a vacuum of up to
approximately 10 in. Hg (-34 kPa) to draw fuel
into its inlet. The components on the “suction”
side of the fuel transfer pump are the inlet line
from the fuel tank to the filter/water separator, the
filter/water separator, and the fuel line from the
filter/water separator to the inlet of the fuel
transfer pump.
The outlet side of the fuel transfer pump can be
thought of as the “pressurized” side because the
fuel transfer pump can create a pressure of
approximately 7 psi (48 kPa) at its outlet. The
components on the “pressurized” side of the fuel
transfer pump are the line from the fuel transfer
pump to the air/fuel separator, the air/fuel
separator, and the fuel line from the air/fuel
separator to the inlet of the injection pump.
98
3
4
1
5
1.
IN Port - Fuel from Fuel Transfer Pump
2.
Air
3.
Fuel
4.
OUT Port - Fuel to Injection Pump
5.
RETURN FUEL Port - Air and Excess Fuel to
Fuel Tank
Figure 110: Air/Fuel Separator
Engine Maintenance
Fuel passes through a line from the outlet fitting
on the “OUT” port of the air/fuel separator to the
injection pump.
the injection nozzles. The injection nozzles
atomize the fuel as it is injected directly into the
combustion chambers.
At the injection pump the trochoid feed pump
boosts the fuel pressure. Then the injection pump
forces the fuel, at a very high pressure, through
Injection pump leakage, injection nozzle
overflow, air and excess fuel from the air/fuel
separator are then all sent back to the fuel tank in
the return line.
2
1
4
3
5
8
6
7
10
ARA1646
9
1.
Air/Fuel Separator (On Pressurized Side of Transfer Pump)
6.
Fuel Transfer Pump
2.
Vent Cap
7.
Priming Pump
3.
Fuel Filter/Water Separator (On Suction Side of Transfer Pump) 8.
Drain Valve
4.
Bleed Screw
9.
Inlet Line (From Fuel Tank)
5.
Injection Pump
10.
Return Line (To Fuel Tank)
Figure 111: Fuel System
99
Engine Maintenance
Fuel Line Routing
The fuel lines inside the unit are installed and
routed at the factory. On some units the fuel lines
from the fuel tank connect to the fittings on the
bottom of the unit frame. Do not change the
factory routing of the fuel lines inside the unit.
See the fuel line routing diagrams in the
Diagrams Chapter.
The following procedures can be done under field
conditions:
1. Bleeding air from the fuel system.
2. Fuel tank and filter system maintenance.
3. Priming pump (hand) replacement or repair.
4. Fuel transfer pump replacement or repair.
5. Injection line replacement.
Maintenance
6. Engine speed adjustments.
The injection pump and fuel transfer pump are
relatively trouble-free and if properly maintained
will usually not require major service repairs
between engine overhauls.
7. Injection pump timing.
Contamination is the most common cause of fuel
system problems. Therefore, to ensure best
operating results, the fuel must be clean and fuel
tanks must be free of contaminants. Regularly
drain the water, change the filter element, and
clean the inlet strainer on the inlet side of the fuel
transfer pump.
NOTE: The injection nozzles must be tested (and
repaired if necessary) at least every 3,000 hours
in accordance with EPA 40 CFR Part 89.
Normal conditions are considered to be the use
of clean high quality fuel, no used oil blending,
and regular maintenance of the fuel system
according to the Maintenance Inspection
Schedule. Refer to the TK482 and TK486
Overhaul Manual TK 50136 for injection nozzle
testing and repair procedures.
Whenever the fuel system is opened, take the
following precautions to prevent dirt from
entering the system:
1. Cap all fuel lines.
2. Work in a relatively clean area whenever
possible.
3. Complete the work in the shortest possible
time.
Any major injection pump or nozzle repairs
should be done by a quality diesel injection
service shop. The necessary service equipment
and facilities are not found in most engine rebuild
shops because of the large investment required.
100
8. Nozzle spray pattern testing and adjustment.
9. Injection nozzle testing, adjustment, and
minor repair.
10. Trochoid feed pump replacement.
Fuel Return Line Replacement
The fuel return lines (hoses) and end cap on the
fuel injection nozzles should be changed every
10,000 engine operating hours. The return line kit
(P/N 10-373) contains new return lines, clamps,
an end cap, and a decal like the one shown below.
The decal is located near the unit serial plate. The
date and engine hours must be entered on the
decal when the fuel return lines are changed.
Figure 112: Fuel Return Line Replacement Decal
Use the following procedure to replace the fuel
return lines and end cap.
1. Remove the clamps, the end cap, the short fuel
return lines between the injection nozzles, and
the long fuel return line from the injection
nozzle to the banjo fitting on the injection
pump.
Engine Maintenance
1
2
1
3
2
3
5
4
4
aea751
3
5
1.
Stand Pipes
4.
2.
Anti-Siphon Screen (Optional) 5.
3.
Fuel Gauge
3
Drain Plug
Vent
Figure 114: Typical Fuel Tank
3
To bleed air from the fuel system:
1.
End Cap
4.
Short Fuel Return Lines
2.
Larger Clamp
5.
Long Fuel Return Lines
3.
Smaller Clamps
Figure 113: Fuel Return Line Replacement
2. Discard the old clamps, end cap, and fuel
return lines.
1. Remove the vent cap from the top of the clear
cover on the fuel filter/water separator (see
Figure 119). Fill the fuel filter with clean fuel.
Reinstall the vent cap and tighten by hand
only.
2. Loosen the bleed screw about one turn.
3. Install the end cap and clamp. Note that the
end cap has a larger OD than the other hoses
and requires the larger clamp.
1
4. Install the fuel return lines and clamps. It may
be necessary to adjust the banjo fitting slightly
to obtain the straightest routing for the long
return line.
5. Be sure all the fittings are tight and check for
leaks.
6. Write the date and engine hours on the decal.
Bleeding the Fuel System
If the engine runs out of fuel, repairs are made to
the fuel system, or if air gets into the system for
any other reason, the air must be bled out of the
fuel system.
NOTE: MAKE SURE the fuel tank vent is kept
open. If the vent becomes clogged, a partial
vacuum develops in the tank, and this increases
the tendency for air to enter the system.
2
1.
Bleed Screw
2.
Priming Pump
Figure 115: Injection Pump
3. Unscrew the priming pump handle and
manually prime the fuel system until air
bubbles are no longer visible in the fuel
coming out of the bleed screw.
4. Tighten the bleed screw and screw the priming
pump handle back in.
101
Engine Maintenance
5. Loosen the injection lines at the injection
nozzles.
6. Crank the engine until fuel appears at the
nozzles.
7. Tighten the injection lines.
8. Start the engine and observe the engine run for
a few minutes. If the engine fails to start, or
starts but stops in a few minutes, repeat the
procedure.
9. After the engine runs well for a few minutes,
loosen the vent cap on top of the fuel
filter/water separator until the fuel level drops
to the middle of the clear cover. Then tighten
the vent cap by hand only.
1
ARA1647
1.
Fuel Level
Figure 116: Low Fuel Level - New Filter Element
As contaminants collect on the filter element, the
fuel level rises to a non-contaminated section of
the filter element, providing optimal filtration
while maintaining lowest restriction.
Draining Water from Fuel Tank
Water run through the system may damage the
injection pump or nozzles. Damage to the fuel
system will subsequently cause more expensive
damage to the engine. A large accumulation of
water in the bottom of the fuel tank will stop a
diesel engine. Water should be drained off during
scheduled maintenance inspections to prevent
breakdowns. Drain the water off after the fuel
tank and unit have remained idle for an hour.
1. Place a container under the fuel tank to catch
the draining water and fuel.
2. Remove the drain plug from the bottom of the
fuel tank.
NOTE: Some fuel tanks have a check valve in
the drain plug fitting. Push the check valve open
with a small screw driver to drain the tank.
1
ARA1648
1.
Fuel Level
Figure 117: Intermediate Fuel Level
The fuel level continues to rise until it completely
covers the filter element. At this point, all of the
surface area on the filter element is used.
Restriction is increasing and the filter element
should be changed at the next scheduled
maintenance interval.
3. Let the water and fuel drain into the container
until no water is visible in the fuel draining
from the tank. If the water and fuel do not
drain freely, the vent may be plugged. If so,
clean or replace the vent.
1
4. Install the drain plug.
ARA1649
Fuel Filter/Water Separator
The fuel filter/water separator removes
contaminants and water from the fuel as it is
drawn from the fuel tank by the transfer pump.
When the filter element is new the fuel level
visible through the clear cover will be very low.
102
1.
Fuel Level
Figure 118: High Fuel Level Replace Filter Element
Engine Maintenance
Draining Water from Fuel
Filter/Water Separator
1
Drain the water from the fuel filter/water
separator during the pretrip inspection.
2
3
1. Open the vent cap.
2. Place a suitable eight ounce, plastic or metal
container under the drain valve at the base of
the fuel filter/water separator and open the
drain valve.
4
5
6
3. Water will flow into the container. When fuel
begins to flow out the drain, close the drain
valve. Drain the least amount of fuel as
possible.
4. Hand-tighten the vent cap.
7
5. Start the engine. Raise the RPM for one
minute to purge the air from the system.
Fuel Filter/Water Separator Filter
Element Replacement
8
Replace the filter element in the fuel filter/water
separator at intervals according to the
Maintenance Inspection Schedule, or when the
fuel level rises to near the top of the filter element
as shown in Figure 118.
9
10
ARA1650
1. Remove the vent cap.
2. Open the drain valve and drain the fuel to a
level below the collar.
3. Remove the collar using a collar wrench
(P/N 204-1932) and then remove the clear
cover.
4. Remove the filter element, and the O-rings for
the clear cover and vent cap.
5. Use a clean shop rag to clean the clear cover,
collar, and threads on the filter body.
6. Install a new filter element, and new O-rings
for the clear cover and vent cap.
7. Reinstall the clear cover and collar. Hand
tighten the collar.
8. Prime the filter by filling the clear cover
through the opening for the vent cap with
clean diesel fuel until it reaches the top of the
filter element.
11
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Collar
Vent Cap
O-Ring
Clear Cover
O-Ring
Spring
7.
8.
9.
10
11.
Filter Element
Check Valve Assembly
Filter Body
Electric Fuel Heater
Drain Valve
Figure 119: Fuel Filter/Water
Separator Components
9. Unscrew the priming pump handle and pump
it by hand until the fuel level drops to the
bottom of the clear cover.
10. Fill the clear cover with clean diesel fuel again
and pump the priming pump by hand until the
the fuel level drops to the bottom of the clear
cover. Tighten the priming pump handle back
in.
11. Fill the clear cover with clean diesel fuel again
and install the vent cap. Hand tighten only.
103
Engine Maintenance
12. Start the engine, run it for at least one minute
and check for leaks.
13. Slowly open the vent cap and allow the fuel
level to drop to just above the collar.
NOTE: Make sure that the fuel level is
lowered to just above the collar before
releasing the unit back into service
operation.
b. Hand tighten the collar.
c. If the drain valve is suspected, install a
plug in place of the drain valve (for test
purposes only).
4. If air bubbles continue to persist, test as
follows:
a. Remove the fuel filter/water separator
from the chassis.
14. Close the vent cap. Hand tighten only. It is
normal for the fuel level to vary after the
initial start-up and during engine operation.
Filter performance is not affected.
b. Plug the fuel outlet port. Do not remove
filter, cover/collar, vent cap, drain valve,
or electric fuel heater.
Fuel Filter/Water Separator
Troubleshooting
c. Apply 5 psig (34 kPa) of air pressure at the
fuel inlet. Immerse the fuel filter/water
separator in a tank of water and look for
air bubbles.
Most field issues associated with leaks are related
to loose fittings. These leaks are easily eliminated
by checking and torquing the fuel fittings in the
area of the leak. Some fittings may also require
the application of sealer.
NOTE: All suction side fuel filters experience
bubbles. It is normal to see champagne size
bubbles in the fuel filter/water separator outlet
or at the transfer pump.
Air Leaks
Air bubbles will be visible in the clear cover of
the fuel filter/water separator if the leak originates
from the fuel tank up to the fuel filter/water
separator. The following is a quick test to isolate
the air leak source.
Bubbles Visible: Remove
the fuel filter/water
separator inlet hose.
1. Install a jumper hose from the fuel filter/water
separator to the fuel tank (through the fill cap)
or to a container of fuel.
2. Start the engine. If this eliminates the air
bubbles, the air source is at the fuel tank
fittings or hose connections.
a. Tighten all fittings and connectors
b. Retest.
3. If air bubbles persist, the air source is on the
fuel filter/water separator side of the system:
a. Tighten all fittings on the fuel filter/water
separator.
104
d. Correct the source of the air leak and
retest.
Bubbles Not Visible: If there are symptoms of
sucking air (indicated by engine loping/rough
running performance/power loss, etc.)and there
are no bubbles in the clear cover, the air leak is
either at the fuel filter/water separator outlet
fitting, vent cap o-ring, the transfer pump inlet
connection, or the fuel hose/connections to the
transfer pump. Inspect and tighten fittings as
needed.
Excessive Restriction
If the fuel level is at the top of the filter element,
replace the fuel filter. The fuel filter/water
separator will not cause excess system restriction
if the fuel level is below the top of the filter
element. The only exception is if the grommet is
not installed in the bottom of the filter element.
Loss of Prime
When air is introduced into the fuel system,
(i.e.draining water from the fuel filter/water
separator or when replacing the filter element) the
check valve assembly keeps the fuel inlet line
primed from the fuel filter/water separator back to
the fuel tank.
Engine Maintenance
1. To test for proper check valve operation,
remove the fuel inlet hose and open the vent
cap. Fuel should not flow out of the fuel
filter/water separator, although a slight
seepage of fuel is normal.
2. If fuel drains back to the fuel tank, remove the
check valve assembly from the filter body.
Disassemble the check valve assembly. Clean
and inspect. Replace the assembly if any cuts,
grooves or nicks are evident in the ball or
body seat. Reinstall the check valve assembly.
Engine Speed Adjustments
When the diesel engine fails to maintain the
correct engine speed, check the following before
adjusting the speed:
NOTE: If the correct speed cannot be set close
enough with half turns of the eye bolt, use the
Allen wrench to turn the plunger in smaller
increments.
Low Speed
1. Loosen the jam nut on the low speed
adjustment screw (see Figure 120).
2. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
low speed. Adjust the screw to obtain the
correct speed. It should be 1450 ± 25 rpm
(1720 ± 25 rpm for SB-330 RR units with
High Capacity Fresh).
3. Tighten the jam nut and recheck the speed.
1
2
3
4
5
1. Check the fuel inlet screen. Check the speed.
2. Bleed the air out of the fuel system. Check the
speed.
3. Bleed the air out of the nozzles. Check the
speed.
Make the engine speed adjustments with the
engine fully warmed up.
High Speed
1. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
high speed and check the high speed rpm. It
should be 2200 ± 25 rpm for the SB-230 RR,
and 2600 ± 25 rpm for the SB-330 RR.
1.
High Speed Solenoid
2.
Boot
3.
Ball Joint
2. Shut the unit off.
4.
Speed Control Rod
3. Remove the ball joint from the eye bolt in the
high speed solenoid (see Figure 120).
5.
Low Speed Adjustment Screw
Figure 120: Engine Speed Adjustments
4. Remove the boot from the high speed
solenoid.
5. Pull the plunger out of the solenoid enough to
loosen the jam nut. An Allen wrench placed in
the hex opening in the face of the plunger will
keep the plunger from turning. Turn the
plunger eye bolt clockwise to increase the
speed and counterclockwise to decrease the
speed.
6. Replace the ball joint, start the unit and check
the speed. When the speed is correct, tighten
the jam nut and replace the solenoid boot.
105
Engine Maintenance
Injection Pump Timing
Use this timing procedure when installing a new
injection pump. It is not necessary to use this
timing procedure when removing and reinstalling
the original injection pump. In that case, align the
index marks on the injection pump and the gear
case as they were before removing the injection
pump.
1. Before removing the old injection pump, note
the alignment of the index marks on the
injection pump and the gear case. The index
mark on the injection pump is usually aligned
with the index mark on the gear case. If not,
make a mark on gear case in line with the
index mark on the injection pump (see Figure
123).
2
1
3
1.
Index Mark on Injection Pump
2.
Existing Index Mark on Gear Case
3.
Make New Mark on Gear Case If Needed
Figure 123: Marking Gear Case
2. Clean the area with brake cleaner or
something similar. Place an injection angle
sticker on the gear case so the center line on
the sticker is aligned with the index mark on
the injection pump. An injection angle sticker
is provided with the new injection pump.
1
2
1
1.
Index Marks
1.
Index Mark on Injection Pump
2.
Injection Angle Sticker
Figure 121: Index Mark Location
Figure 124: Place Injection
Angle Sticker on Gear Case
0.5 Degrees
1
2
3
1
2
1.
–1.0 Degrees Mark
1.
Index Mark on Injection Pump
2.
Center Line (0 Degrees Mark)
2.
Index Mark on Gear Case
3.
+1.0 Degrees Mark
Figure 122: Index Mark Alignment
106
Figure 125: Injection Angle Sticker
Engine Maintenance
3. Remove the old injection pump. Use the
injection pump gear tool P/N 204-1011 to
remove the injection pump gear without
removing the timing gear cover (see “Injection
Pump Removal” on page 109).
NOTE: Remove the injection pump gear by
removing the nut and lock washer that
secure the injection pump gear assembly to
the injection pump shaft. The injection pump
gear assembly is made of three pieces; the
flange, the gear, and the transfer pump cam.
Do not loosen or remove the four bolts that
fasten the gear to the flange because that
changes the factory-set timing. The EPA
certification is based on the factory-set
timing. If the factory-set timing is changed,
the EPA certification is void.
1
1.
Injection Angle Mark
Figure 127: Injection Angle Mark Location
1
1
2
1
1
1
1.
Injection Angle Mark
Figure 128: Injection Angle Mark
1.
Do Not Loosen or Remove These Four Bolts
2.
Remove Nut and Lock Washer
Figure 126: Removing Injection Pump Gear
4. Record the injection angle marked on the old
injection pump (see the following
photographs). The injection angle mark is
located on the side of the pump facing the
engine. The injection angle mark on the pump
does not use a decimal point. Add a decimal
point before the last digit of the injection
angle mark to get the injection angle. The
injection angle mark in the following
photographs is 67. That equals an injection
angle of 6.7 degrees.
NOTE: If you cannot read the injection angle
mark, contact the Thermo King Service
Department with the injection pump serial
number or the engine serial number and they
will provide the injection angle. The injection
pump serial number is located on the bottom of
the sticker on the injection pump.
1
Examples
Injection Angle Mark
Injection Angle
67
6.7 Degrees
85
8.5 Degrees
1.
Injection Pump Serial Number
Figure 129: Injection Pump Serial Number Location
107
Engine Maintenance
5. Record the injection angle marked on the side
of the new injection pump.
3
1
2
6. Calculate the injection angle difference by
subtracting the injection angle of the old
injection pump from the injection angle of the
new injection pump.
Examples
Injection Angle of New
Injection Pump (Degrees)
8.5
6.1
– Injection Angle of Old
Injection Pump (Degrees)
– 6.7
– 6.7
= Injection Angle Difference
= +1.8
(Degrees)
4
= –0.6
7. Install the new injection pump on the gear
case and position it so the index mark on the
injection pump is aligned with the mark equal
to the injection angle difference on the
injection angle sticker (see the following
examples). Tighten the injection pump
mounting nuts when the index mark is aligned
as necessary with the injection angle sticker.
1
1.
Fuel Injection Pump Gear
2.
Idler Gear
3.
Camshaft Gear
4.
Crankshaft Gear
Figure 131: Timing Mark Alignment
NOTE: The oil pump is located in the timing
gear cover on TK486V/VH engines. The inner
rotor of the oil pump fits around the crankshaft
gear. Make sure that the flat sides of the inner
rotor are aligned with the flat sides on the
crankshaft gear when installing the timing gear
cover.
1
2
5
3
4
2
1.
Injection Pump Index Mark at –0.6 Degrees
2.
Injection Pump Index Mark at +1.8 Degrees
7
6
Figure 130: Examples of Injection Pump Index
Mark Alignment with Injection Angle Sticker
8. Install the injection pump gear, lock washer,
and nut. Torque the nut to 58 to 65 ft-lb (78 to
88 N•m).
1.
Crankshaft Gear
2.
Oil Pump Cover
3.
Outer Rotor
NOTE: If the timing gear cover was removed to
remove the injection pump gear, make sure the
timing marks on the timing gears are aligned as
shown below. It helps to install the idler gear last
when aligning the timing marks.
4.
Inner Rotor
5.
Timing Gear Cover
6.
Flat Sides on Inner Rotor
7.
Flat Side on Crankshaft Gear
108
Figure 132: Align Flat Sides of Crankshaft Gear
with Flat Sides of Inner Rotor in Timing Gear Cover
Engine Maintenance
Injection Pump Removal
The injection pump drive gear will not fit through
the gear housing when removing the pump, the
gear must be separated from the pump. Using tool
P/N 204-1011, it will not be necessary to remove
the belts, fuel pump, crankshaft pulley, crankshaft
seal or front plate. See Figure 135 “Injection
Pump Gear Tool” on page 110.
1. Note the alignment of the index marks on the
injection pump and the gear case. The index
mark on the injection pump is usually aligned
with the single index mark on the gear case. If
not, mark it so the injection pump can be
returned to the same position when it is
reinstalled.
2. Remove the starter for clearance, remove
throttle linkage, fuel lines, harness and
mounting hardware from injection pump.
3. Remove the cover plate from the gear case.
Remove the nut and lock washer which secure
the gear to the injection pump shaft. Use a
shop rag to prevent the lock washer or nut
from falling into the gear case.
NOTE: The injection pump gear assembly is
made of three pieces; the flange, the gear,
and the transfer pump cam. Do not loosen or
remove the four bolts that fasten the gear to
the flange because that changes the timing.
4. Use the hardware from the cover plate to
attach the tool plate (with the marked side
pointing up and out) to the gear case.
5. Align the threaded holes in the injection pump
gear with the two holes in the tool plate by
rotating the engine crankshaft. Attach the gear
to the tool plate with the screws provided with
the tool plate.
1
1.
Index Marks
Figure 133: Index Mark Location
6. Thread the long screw supplied with the tool
plate into the small end of the adapter, also
supplied with the tool plate. Insert the adapter
into the tool plate and rotate to provide a solid
position to force the injection pump shaft from
the gear. Caution should be made to align the
screw over the center of the injection pump
shaft.
7. Remove the screw and adapter leaving the tool
plate in place. This holds the gear in proper
tooth alignment until the injection pump is
re-installed.
Injection Pump Reinstallation
1. Position injection pump shaft into gear,
rotating shaft to mate key with keyway in
gear. Take care to make sure the key mates
with the keyway.
1
2
1.
Index Mark on Injection Pump
2.
Index Mark on Gear Case
Figure 134: Index Mark Alignment
2. Secure injection pump to gear case with
previously removed hardware. Make sure to
align the index marks on the injection pump
and the gear case like they were in step 1 of
“Injection Pump Removal”.
NOTE: If a different injection pump is being
installed, see “Injection Pump Timing” on
page 106 to set the timing.
109
Engine Maintenance
5. Fasten cover plate to gear case and reinstall all
components removed previously to facilitate
injection pump removal.
3. Remove hardware holding gear to tool plate,
then remove tool plate.
4. Secure the gear to the injection pump shaft
with the lock washer and nut. Use a shop rag,
as before, to prevent the lock washer or nut
from falling into the gear case. Torque the nut
to 58 to 65 ft-lb (78 to 88 N•m).
1
2
3
4
5
8
1.
Injection Pump
5.
Adapter (Tool)
2.
Gear Case
6.
Tool Long Screw (Tool)
3.
Cover Plate
7.
Tool Short Screw (Tool)
4.
Cover Plate Bolt
8.
Tool Plate (Tool)
Figure 135: Injection Pump Gear Tool
110
7
6
Engine Maintenance
Fuel Solenoid
The fuel solenoid is located on the end of the
injection pump. It contains two coils: the pull-in
coil, and the hold-in coil. The pull-in coil draws
approximately 35 to 45 amps at 12 volts. The
hold-in coil draws approximately 0.5 amps at
12 volts.
The pull-in coil must be energized to move the
injection pump governor linkage to the fuel on
position. Once the injection pump governor
linkage has been moved to the fuel on position,
the hold-in coil will keep it in fuel on position
until the 8D circuit is de-energized. The pull-in
coil must be de-energized after a few seconds to
keep it from being damaged. The pull-in coil is
controlled by the microprocessor through the fuel
solenoid pull in relay (K6).
2. Energize the run relay with the Interface
Board Test Mode. The fuel solenoid relay is
momentarily energized when the run relay is
energized with the Interface Board Test Mode.
This energizes the fuel solenoid, which makes
a definite click when energized.
3. De-energize the run relay with the Interface
Board Test Mode. This de-energizes the fuel
solenoid, which makes a definite click when
de-energized.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 a few times to check the
operation of the fuel solenoid.
NOTE: The fuel solenoid may be removed
from the injection pump to visually check its
operation. The fuel solenoid must be
energized when it is re-installed in the
injection pump. If it is not, the plunger and
the linkage may not line up correctly and the
fuel solenoid will not function properly.
5. If the fuel solenoid is not operating properly,
check the run relay (K1), the fuel solenoid pull
in relay (K6), their fuses, and the associated
circuits. If the relays, fuses and circuits are
acceptable, use steps 6 through 9 to isolate and
check the fuel solenoid.
6. Disconnect the fuel solenoid wire connector
from the main wire harness.
1
1.
Fuel Solenoid
Figure 136: Fuel Solenoid Location
Testing the Fuel Solenoid
NOTE: The fuel solenoid pull-in coil will
require 35 to 45 amps to turn on the fuel. The
unit’s battery must be in good condition. If the
battery has enough power to crank the engine
over, it has enough power to energize the fuel
solenoid pull-in coil.
If you suspect that the engine does not run
because the fuel solenoid is not operating
correctly, use the following procedure:
1. Use the microprocessor keypad to enter the
Interface Board Test Mode. Refer to the
appropriate Microprocessor Diagnostic
Manual for specific information about the
Interface Board Test Mode.
AEA633
1.
Red (8D)
2.
White (8DP)
3.
Black (CH)
Figure 137: Fuel Solenoid
Connector Pin Identification
7. Place a jumper wire between the black wire
(CH—pin C) in the fuel solenoid connector
and a good chassis ground.
8. Test the pull-in coil by momentarily placing a
jumper between the white wire (8DP—pin B)
in the fuel solenoid connector and the positive
111
Engine Maintenance
battery terminal. The fuel solenoid should
make a definite click when the pull-in coil is
energized and should click again when the
pull-in coil is de-energized.
NOTE: The pull-in coil will draw 35 to 45
amps so do not leave the jumper connected to
the white wire (8DP—pin B) for more than a
few seconds.
a. If the pull-in coil does not energize, check
the resistance of the pull-in coil by placing
an ohmmeter between the white wire
(8DP—pin B) and the black wire (CH—
pin C) in the fuel solenoid connector. The
resistance of the pull-in coil should be 0.2
to 0.3 ohms. If the resistance of the pull-in
coil is not in this range, replace the fuel
solenoid.
b. If the pull-in coil does energize, go to
step 9.
9. Test the hold-in coil.
a. Energize the hold-in coil by placing a
jumper between the red wire (8D—pin A)
in the fuel solenoid connector and the
positive battery terminal.
Fuel Solenoid Replacement
1. Disconnect the fuel solenoid wire connector
from the main wire harness and remove the
old fuel solenoid.
2. Connect the new fuel solenoid wire connector
to the main wire harness.
3. Press the ON key to turn the unit on.
4. Use the microprocessor keypad to enter the
Interface Board Test Mode. Refer to the
appropriate Microprocessor Diagnostic
Manual for specific information about the
Relay Test Mode.
5. Energize the fuel solenoid by energizing the
run relay with the Interface Board Test Mode.
NOTE: The fuel solenoid must be energized
when it is installed. If not, the plunger and
the linkage may not line up correctly and the
fuel solenoid will not function properly.
6. Place the O-ring in the groove in the end of
the fuel injection pump. Make sure that the
O-ring is positioned correctly during
installation to avoid damage and leaks.
b. Momentarily energize the pull-in coil by
placing a jumper between the white wire
(8DP—pin B) in the fuel solenoid
connector and the positive battery
terminal. The fuel solenoid should make a
definite click when the pull-in coil is
energized, but should not click when the
pull-in coil is de-energized.
c. De-energize the hold-in coil by removing
the jumper from the red wire (8D—pin A)
and the positive battery terminal. The fuel
solenoid should make a definite click
when the hold-in coil is de-energized.
d. If the hold-in coil does not function
properly, check the resistance of the
hold-in coil by placing an ohmmeter
between the red wire (8D—pin A) and the
black wire (CH—pin C) in the fuel
solenoid connector. The resistance of the
hold-in coil should be 24 to 29 ohms. If
the resistance of the hold-in coil is not in
this range, replace the fuel solenoid.
112
AEA635
1.
Fuel Solenoid
2.
O-ring
3.
Groove in Fuel Injection Pump
Figure 138: Fuel Solenoid Components
7. Install the new fuel solenoid.
8. Press the OFF key to turn the unit off after
installing the fuel solenoid.
Engine Maintenance
Trochoid Feed Pump
Trochoid Feed Pump Replacement
The TK486V/VH engine has a trochoid feed
pump on the fuel injection pump. The trochoid
feed pump supplies fuel to the injection pump at a
pressure of 65 to 87 psi (450 to 600 kPa). Check
the outlet pressure of the trochoid feed pump by
removing the plug and attaching a pressure gauge
to the port shown below. The plug has M12x1.25
threads. You will have to make an adaptor to
attach a pressure gauge. Replace the trochoid feed
pump if the outlet pressure is below the pressure
specifications in the following table.
Use the following procedure to replace the
trochoid feed pump.
1. Remove the four hex head screws that attach
the trochoid feed pump to the injection pump
(see Figure 140). Do not remove the two Allen
head screws.
Trochoid Feed Pump Outlet Pressure
Cranking
15-30 psi (103-206 kPa)
Low Speed
30-50 psi (206-345 kPa)
High Speed
65-87 psi (450-600 kPa)
1
1
2
2
1
1.
Allen Head Screws (Do Not Remove)
2.
Hex Head Screws
Figure 140: Trochoid Feed Pump Removal
2. Remove the trochoid feed pump from the
injection pump.
1.
Trochoid Feed Pump Outlet Pressure Port
2.
Trochoid Feed Pump
Figure 139: Trochoid Feed Pump Location
Trochoid Feed Pump Leaks
Internal – If the seal in the trochoid feed pump
fails, it could allow some fuel to leak into the
engine oil. A faulty injection nozzle or fuel
transfer pump can also dilute the engine oil with
fuel. Replace the trochoid feed pump if the engine
oil is being diluted with fuel and a faulty injection
nozzle or fuel transfer pump is not the cause.
NOTE: The gear on the trochoid feed pump
is lubricated with engine oil. Some engine oil
might leak out of the injection pump when
the trochoid feed pump is removed. The
trochoid feed pump does not need to be timed
when it is installed. Clean the area on the
injection pump from which the trochoid feed
pump was removed.
3. Clean the area on the injection pump from
which the trochoid feed pump was removed.
External – Replace the O-ring seal between the
trochoid feed pump and the injection pump if oil
is leaking. Torque the bolts to prevent leaks (6 to 7
ft-lb [8 to 10 N•m]).
Replace all O-rings if fuel is leaking. Torque the
Allen head screws and Hex head bolts to prevent
leaks (6 to 7 ft-lb [8 to 10 N•m]).
113
Engine Maintenance
4. Place new O-rings on the new trochoid feed
pump and make sure it is clean.
1
1.
Figure 142: Cold Start Device
1
1
1.
O-Rings
Figure 141: Trochoid Feed Pump
5. Place the new trochoid feed pump on the
injection pump.
6. Install and tighten four hex head screws that
attach the trochoid feed pump to the injection
pump. Torque the hex head screws to 6 to
7 ft-lb (8 to 10 N•m).
Cold Start Device
The TK486V/VH Interim Tier 4 engine has a cold
start device located on the fuel injection pump.
The cold start device has a plunger that retracts at
engine coolant temperatures below 41 F (5 C) to
advance the injection timing approximately 2
degrees. The plunger controls the position of a
piston in the injection pump to change the timing.
The plunger is extended and the injection timing
is normal at engine coolant temperatures above
41 F (5 C). Check the operation of the cold start
device if it is difficult to start the engine in cold
weather.
NOTE: Do not pull the plunger out of a cold
start device because that will damage it.
114
Plunger (Extended)
Checking Cold Start Device Operation
Use the following procedure to check the
operation of the cold start device. The engine
coolant temperature must be below 32 F (0 C) to
start the procedure.
1. Press the ON key to turn the unit on.
2. Press the GAUGES key before the engine starts
(to enter the Gauges Menu) and check the
coolant temperature to make sure it is below
32 F (0 C).
3. Let the engine start, then check the engine rpm
in the Gauges Menu. The engine rpm should
be approximately 100 rpm higher than normal
(see Specifications).
4. Let the engine run to warm up and use the
Gauges Menu to check the coolant
temperature and engine rpm. When the
coolant temperature rises above 41 F (5 C),
the engine rpm should drop back to normal.
Replace the cold start device if the engine rpm
does not drop approximately 100 rpm when
the engine warms up.
Engine Maintenance
Cold Start Device Replacement
4. Make sure the piston inside the injection
pump fitting is clean.
1. Drain the engine coolant.
2. Remove the banjo bolt that fastens the engine
coolant fitting to the cold start device. Use a
backup wrench on the cold start device if
necessary.
1
1
2
3
1.
Piston
Figure 145: Clean Piston
1.
Banjo Bolt
2.
Engine Coolant Fitting
3.
Coolant Hoses to Cold Start Device
5. Install the new cold start device with a new
O-ring in the injection pump fitting. Torque
the cold start device to 22 to 26 ft-lb (30 to 35
N•m).
6. Install the coolant fitting and banjo bolt on the
cold start device. Torque the banjo bolt to 16
to 18 ft-lb (22 to 25 N•m).
Figure 143: Remove Engine Coolant Fitting
3. Remove the cold start device from the
injection pump fitting. Use a backup wrench
on the injection pump fitting if necessary.
7. Refill the engine cooling system and make
sure to bleed the air from the cooling system.
Electric Fuel Heater
See “Electric Fuel Heater” on page 84 for
information about the electric fuel heater.
1
2
1.
Cold Start Device
2.
Injection Pump Fitting
Figure 144: Remove Cold Start Device
115
Engine Maintenance
Engine Valve Clearance
Adjustment
1. Remove the rocker arm cover.
2. Remove the round cover (plug) from the
timing mark access hole on the front of the
bell housing.
CAUTION: Loosen all of the injection
lines at the injection nozzles to prevent the
possibility of the engine firing while it is
being rotated.
3. Place the engine at top dead center of the
compression stroke for the number one
cylinder. See steps a through d.
1
2
4. Use a feeler gauge to check the valve
clearance on both valves for the number one
cylinder, the intake valve for the number two
cylinder, and the exhaust valve for the number
three cylinder. The valve clearance for both
the intake valve and the exhaust valve should
be 0.006 to 0.010 in. (0.15 to 0.25 mm).
NOTE: Check to make sure that the valve
stem cap is in good condition and is
positioned squarely on the top of the valve
stem. Replace the valve stem cap if it shows
significant wear.
5. Adjust the valves if necessary by loosening
the locknut and turning the adjustment screw
until the valve clearance is correct.
6. Hold the adjustment screw in place and
tighten the locknut.
AEA701
1.
Index Mark
2.
Top Dead Center Mark for 1 and 4
Figure 146: Top Dead Center One and Four
a. Rotate the engine in the normal direction
of rotation (clockwise viewed from the
water pump end) until the 1-4 timing mark
on the flywheel lines up with the index
mark in the timing mark access hole.
b. Check the rocker arms on the number one
cylinder to see if they are loose.
c. If the rocker arms are loose, the engine is
at top dead center of the compression
stroke for the number one cylinder.
d. If the rocker arms are tight, the engine is at
top dead center of the exhaust stroke for
the number one cylinder. Rotate the engine
360 degrees to place the engine at top dead
center of the compression stroke for the
number one cylinder.
116
AEA705
Figure 147: Adjusting the Valve Clearance
7. Recheck the valve clearance.
8. Rotate the engine one full turn (360 degrees)
in the normal direction of rotation (clockwise
viewed from the water pump end), and align
the 1-4 timing mark on the flywheel with the
index mark in the timing mark access hole.
This is top dead center of the compression
stroke for the number four cylinder.
9. Check and adjust the exhaust valve for the
number two cylinder, the intake valve for the
number three cylinder, and both valves for the
number four cylinder.
10. Replace the rocker arm cover, the cover for
the timing mark access hole, and tighten the
fuel injection lines when finished.
Engine Maintenance
Valve Adjustments and Cylinder Configurations
Rear
Flywheel End
Cylinder Number
Front
Pulley End
1
Valve arrangement
2
E
I
E
3
I
E
4
I
E
I
Piston in No. 1 cylinder is at
TDC on compression stroke
Piston in No. 4 cylinder is at
TDC on compression stroke
Crankcase Breather
Gases formed in the crankcase are directed to the
intake manifold. Harmful vapors that would
otherwise collect in the crankcase and
contaminate the oil, or escape to the outside, are
drawn back into the engine and burned.
The crankcase breather is located in the valve
cover. A restrictor is cast into the fitting for the
breather hose on the intake manifold. The
restrictor limits the flow of gases from the
crankcase to the intake manifold and keeps the
crankcase pressure from getting too low in
vacuum. A breather hose connects the crankcase
breather to the intake manifold.
3
The crankcase breather and the breather hose
should be inspected when the air cleaner element
is replaced to make sure they are not plugged or
damaged. Inspect the insulation to make sure it is
in place and undamaged. The insulation is used to
prevent freezing in cold weather.
4
The following items can effect the crankcase
pressure readings.
2
1
8
7
6
1.
Breather Hose
5.
Baffle Breather
2.
Insulation
6.
Baffle Plate
3.
Breather Cover
7.
Intake Manifold
4.
O-Ring
8.
Restrictor Location
Normal crankcase pressures with a new air
cleaner are 0 to 12 in. (0 to 300 mm) H2O of
vacuum. The vacuum will increase as the air
cleaner gets dirty and becomes more restrictive.
Check the air restriction indicator before checking
the crankcase pressure. Replace the air cleaner if
the reading on the air restriction indicator exceeds
20 in. (508 mm) H2O of vacuum. A dirty air
cleaner may cause excessive vacuum, leading to
oil carry over and high oil consumption.
Crankcase
Pressure
Effect
Typical Cause
Increase
Piston Rings Stuck or Worn
Increase
Breather Hose or Restrictor
Plugged with Dirt or Ice
Decrease
Air Cleaner Dirty or Plugged
5
Figure 148: Crankcase Breather
117
Engine Maintenance
EMI 3000 Air Cleaner
The EMI 3000 air cleaner is a dry element air
cleaner. Replace the EMI 3000 air cleaner element
when the air restriction indicator reads 25 in. of
vacuum, or at 3,000 hours or 2 years, whichever
occurs first. The EMI 3000 air cleaner element
has a nameplate that reads “EMI 3000.” It cannot
be interchanged with air cleaners used on previous
units, however it can be retrofit on previous units
by using the EMI 3000 Air Cleaner Assembly and
the related components.
1
2
3
ARA189
1
ARA190
Dust Ejector Must Point Down When Installed
Figure 150: EMI 3000 Air Filter Element
118
EMI 3000 Air Cleaner Assembly
2.
EMI 3000 Air Filter Element
3.
Air Restriction Indicator
Figure 151: EMI 3000 Air Cleaner System
Model 30 Shown Model 50 Similar
Figure 149: EMI 3000 Air Cleaner Assembly
1.
1.
Engine Maintenance
Air Restriction Indicator
Belts
Excessive restriction of the air intake system
reduces the flow of air to the engine affecting
horsepower output, fuel consumption and engine
life.
Belts should be regularly inspected during unit
pretrip inspections for wear, scuffing or cracking.
Belt tension should also be checked during
scheduled maintenance inspections. Belts that are
too loose will whip and belts that are too tight put
too much strain on the belt fibers and bearings.
An air restriction indicator is installed on the air
intake manifold. Visually inspect the restriction
indicator periodically to assure the air filter is not
restricted. Service the air filter when the yellow
diaphragm indicates 25 in. of vacuum. Press the
reset button on the top of the air restriction
indicator after servicing the air filter.
Using belt tension gauge, P/N 204-427, is the best
method of checking belts for tightness. Install the
belt gauge in the center of the longest belt span.
Press the plunger so the hook will engage the belt.
Make sure the hook is on the face of the belt, not
in a notch. Release the plunger with a quick
motion and without pulling on the belt. Then read
the dial. Use an average of three readings.
NOTE: Do not attempt to remove or install belts
without loosening adjustments. Belts that are
installed by prying over pulleys will fail
prematurely due to internal cord damage.
CAUTION: Do not attempt to adjust belts
with the unit running.
AEA710
Figure 152: Air Restriction Indicator
CAUTION: Turn the unit off before
performing maintenance or repair
procedures. When the unit is turned on, it
can start at any time without warning.
119
Engine Maintenance
Belt Adjustments
Upper and Lower Fan Belt Adjustment
See “Belt Tension” on page 14 in the
“Specifications” chapter for the correct upper and
lower fan belt tension settings.
Alternator Belt Adjustment
See “Belt Tension” on page 14 in the
“Specifications” chapter for the correct alternator
belt tension settings.
NOTE: Both the upper and lower fan belts are
adjusted at the same time in one procedure.
1. Loosen the alternator pivot bolt and the
adjusting arm bolt.
NOTE: If a fan belt is loose or damaged, replace
the belt (see “Fan Belt Replacement” on page
121).
2. Move the alternator on the adjusting arm slots
to adjust the belt to the correct belt tension
setting.
1. Loosen the idler assembly pivot bolts and the
idler adjusting arm bolts.
3. Tighten the adjusting arm bolt and alternator
pivot bolt.
2. Push in or pull out on the idler adjusting arm
to “center” the idler assembly between the
belts and balance the tension between the
upper and lower belts to the correct belt
tension settings.
2
3
4
1
13
5
6
7
12
8
9
9
11
10
1.
Upper Fan Belt
8.
Lower Fan Belt
2.
Condenser Fan Pulley
9.
Engine Pulley
3.
Condenser Fan
10.
Idler Adjusting Arm Bolt
4.
Condenser Inlet Ring
11.
Idler Adjusting Arm
5.
Idler Assembly Pivot Bolt
12.
Alternator Belt
6.
Idler Assembly
13
Idler Adjusting Arm Pivot Bolt
7.
Belt Guide
Figure 153: Belt Arrangement
120
Engine Maintenance
3. Tighten both idler adjusting arm bolts and
both idler assembly pivot bolts.
NOTE: If the idler assembly binds when
moving for belt adjustment, loosen the upper
idler support bracket mounting bolts to free
up the assembly. Check the main idler
retainer nut assembly for proper alignment
between the nut and the support bracket
slots.
Fan Belt Replacement
NOTE: Do not attempt to remove or install the
belts without loosening the adjustments. Belts
that are installed by prying over pulleys will fail
prematurely due to internal cord damage.
Lower Fan Belt
Removal
1. Loosen both idler adjusting arm bolts and both
idler pulley assembly bolts.
2. Push the idler adjusting arm IN. The lower fan
belt will come off the engine pulley. Move the
arm OUT far enough to clear the roadside
idler mounting bracket.
Installation
1. Slip the belt into the groove of the idler pulley.
2. Push the idler adjusting arm back in toward
the unit.
3. Slip the belt onto the pulley groove on the
engine.
4. Pull the idler adjusting arm back OUT and
adjust the belts to the proper tension.
5. Tighten the idler assembly pivot bolts and the
idler adjusting arm bolts.
Upper Fan Belt
Removal
1. Loosen the idler adjusting arm bolts and
remove the lower fan belt (see “Lower Fan
Belt” above).
2. Push the idler adjusting arm in and the idler
assembly up. The upper belt should become
slack and slip down out of the idler pulley
groove.
3. Pull the idler adjusting arm OUT. The upper
fan belt should slip off the idler pulley as the
idler pulley hub clears the curbside idler
mounting bracket.
4. Loosen the two condenser fan hub to the shaft
clamping bolts.
5. Tap the blower wheel with a soft hammer to
drive the blower wheel up the fan shaft to
provide 1/2 in. (13 mm) clearance between the
blower wheel and the inlet ring.
NOTE: If the condenser fan does not slide
on the fan shaft with light tapping, remove
the small access panel located on the
condenser coil header above the radiator
tank. Thread a 1/4-20 x 1 in. diameter bolt
into the end of the fan shaft. Tighten the bolt
and washer down on the condenser fan hub
to loosen the blower wheel. Drive the blower
wheel back to provide 1/2 in. (13 mm)
clearance between the blower wheel and
condenser fan inlet ring.
6. Lift the belt up over the condenser blower
wheel and remove it from the unit.
Installation
1. Slip the belt over the condenser blower wheel
and place it in the condenser fan pulley.
2. Drive the condenser blower wheel out toward
the condenser fan inlet ring using a soft
hammer.
3. Position the blower wheel so the edge of the
inlet ring lines up with the alignment mark on
the blower wheel.
4. Check the radial clearance between the blower
wheel and inlet ring with a gauge wire. Check
around the entire circumference to the inlet
ring and blower wheel (see “Condenser and
Evaporator Fan Location” on page 156).
5. Torque the blower hub clamping bolts to
18 ft-lb (24 N•m).
6. Seat the upper belt in the blower wheel pulley
groove.
7. Push inward on the idler adjusting arm and
slip the belt into the idler pulley groove.
121
Engine Maintenance
8. Pull the idler adjusting arm forward and install
the lower fan belt.
1
2
3
4
AEA749
1.
Blower Wheel
2.
Inlet Ring
3.
Alignment Mark
4.
Edge of Inlet Ring
Figure 154: Condenser Blower Alignment
122
Refrigeration Maintenance
NOTE: The following procedures involve
servicing the refrigeration system. Some of these
service procedures are regulated by Federal, and
in some cases, by State and Local laws.
In the USA all regulated refrigeration service
procedures must be performed by an EPA
certified technician, using approved equipment
and complying with all Federal, State and Local
laws.
Refrigerant Charge
Testing The Refrigerant Charge With
An Empty Cargo Compartment
If the unit has an insufficient charge of refrigerant,
the evaporator will be “starved” and the box
temperatures will rise even though the unit is
operating. The suction pressure will drop as the
refrigerant charge decreases. If the unit has an
overcharge of refrigerant, the unit may not cool
properly and the suction and discharge pressure
may be high. The charge may be determined by
inspection of the refrigerant through the receiver
tank sight glasses with the following conditions
established:
1. Place a test box over the evaporator.
2. Install a gauge manifold.
3. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
high speed cool. Refer to the appropriate
Diagnostic Manual for specific information
about the Service Test Mode.
4. Use the microprocessor thermometer to
monitor the return air temperature.
5. Run the unit on high speed cool until the air in
the box is at 0 F (-18 C). By allowing the box
to leak a small amount, you will be able to
maintain 0 F (-18 C).
8. Under these conditions, refrigerant should be
visible in the receiver tank sight glass. If
refrigerant is not visible in the receiver tank
sight glass, the unit is low on refrigerant.
Testing the Refrigerant Charge with
a Loaded Cargo Compartment
1. Install a gauge manifold.
2. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
high speed cool. Refer to the appropriate
Diagnostic Manual for specific information
about the Service Test Mode.
3. Build up and maintain 275 psi (1896 kPa) of
head pressure. If the pressure is below this, it
can be raised by covering the roadside
condenser grille with a piece of cardboard to
block condenser air flow.
4. Cool the compartment to the lowest
temperature required.
5. Check suction pressure. It should be 13 to 25
psi (90 to 165 kPa).
6. Under these conditions, refrigerant should be
visible in the receiver tank sight glass. If
refrigerant is not visible in the receiver tank
sight glass, the unit is low on refrigerant.
Testing for an Overcharge
Use the following procedure to identify a Thermo
King unit with an excessive refrigerant charge:
1. Install a calibrated gauge manifold on the
compressor.
2. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
high speed cool. Refer to the appropriate
Diagnostic Manual for specific information
about the Service Test Mode.
6. The suction pressure should be 13 to 18 psi
(90 to 124 kPa).
3. Operate the unit in high speed cool long
enough to stabilize system pressures and
reduce the box temperature to approximately
60 F (16 C) or colder.
7. The discharge pressure should be at least 275
sag (1896 kPa). If the pressure is below this, it
can be raised by covering a portion of the
condenser grille with a piece of cardboard to
block condenser airflow.
4. Observe discharge pressure and cover the
condenser to increase the discharge pressure
approximately 75 to 100 psi (500 to 690 kPa)
above observed pressure.
123
Refrigeration Maintenance
NOTE: If the liquid level in the receiver sight
glass drops during step 4, the unit is not
overcharged and it is not necessary to
complete the procedure.
5. Remove the condenser cover to rapidly reduce
discharge pressure.
6. Observe the receiver tank sight glass and the
unit discharge pressure.
7. By the time the discharge pressure drops
approximately 50 psi (345 kPa), the liquid
level in the receiver tank should drop.
a. When the discharge pressure stabilizes,
the liquid level will rise.
b. If the liquid level will not drop, the unit
most likely has an overcharge of
refrigerant. The refrigerant level should be
adjusted.
h. Close the hand valve on the refrigerant
tank when the liquid level approaches the
top of the receiver sight glass.
4. Repeat the overcharge test.
Moisture Indicating Sight Glass
The receiver tank is equipped with a moisture
indicating sight glass. The outer edge of the sight
glass has a colored ring approximately 0.1 in.
(2.5 mm) thick. The color of the ring indicates the
moisture content of the refrigerant, but it is not
completely reliable.
•
Green = Dry
•
Chartreuse = Caution
•
Yellow = Wet
1
To adjust the refrigerant level:
1. Stop the unit and remove some refrigerant
with an approved refrigerant recovery device.
2
2. Perform a refrigerant level check and repeat
the overcharge test.
3. If the liquid level is low, add refrigerant as
follows:
AEA672
1.
Floating Ball
2.
Colored Ring
Figure 155: Moisture Indicating Sight Glass
a. Connect a refrigerant tank to the gauge
manifold service line and purge the line.
b. Mid seat the compressor suction service
valve.
c. Set the refrigerant tank for liquid removal
and open the hand valve.
d. Operate the unit in high speed cool.
e. Observe the suction pressure and slowly
open the gauge manifold low pressure
hand valve to allow liquid refrigerant to
flow into the compressor suction service
valve.
f. Control the liquid flow so the suction
pressure increases approximately 20 psi
(138 kPa).
g. Maintain a discharge pressure of at least
275 psi (1896 kPa) while adding
refrigerant.
124
A system has to run for at least 15 minutes to
change the color of the indicator ring after the
moisture content of the system has been changed.
For example, evacuating a system to remove the
moisture will not change the color of the indicator
ring until the system has been recharged and then
operated for at least 15 minutes.
Refrigerant Leaks
Use a reliable leak detector that is suitable for
R-404A to leak test the refrigeration system.
Inspect for signs of oil leakage, which is the first
sign of a leak in the refrigeration system.
NOTE: It is normal for compressor shaft seals to
have a slightly oily film.
Refrigeration Maintenance
Oil Collection Container
The oil collection container collects the
compressor shaft seal seepage to keep the unit
clean. This seepage is normal and is necessary for
shaft seal durability.
NOTE: Compressors with the Pressurized Seal
Cavity do not use the check valve in the oil
collection container. See “Compressors with
Pressurized Seal Cavity” on page 145 for more
information about the Pressurized Seal Cavity.
1
The oil collection container is mounted on the
body of the compressor. A tube connects the oil
collection container to the compressor shaft seal
cover. The oil that seeps from the seal will travel
through the tube and collect in the container.
Empty the container once per year during oil
changes, or during annual services. The container
has a drain spout with a cap. Remove cap and
drain the oil into a cup (not provided) and discard
the oil properly. Retighten the cap snugly by hand.
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
1.
Tube to Compressor Shaft Seal Cover
2.
Compressor Mounting Flange
(Sectioned to Show Detail)
3.
Oil Collection Container
4.
Cap (Remove to Drain Oil)
Figure 156: Oil Collection Container Components
The check valve was added in the second quarter
of 2013 to improve the shaft seal reliability by
ensuring oil stays on the shaft seal when the
suction pressure is in a vacuum. It is made of
silicone rubber, a material that can be damaged
easily. The check valve is located on the end of
the tube inside the container. It is a very tight fit
between the check valve and the grommet in the
oil collection container.
1.
Seal Cover Drain Barb
2.
Tube from Seal Cover to Oil Collection
Container
3.
Grommet
4.
Check Valve (Starting in Second Quarter
of 2013)
5.
Oil Collection Container
Figure 157: Oil Collection Container
Showing Check Valve
If maintenance in the area requires removal of the
oil collection container or the tube, caution should
be observed to prevent damage to the check valve.
Although the check valve was glued to the tube at
production, pulling the check valve back through
the grommet may cause the Valve to fall off or be
damaged.
Several options are available:
1. If possible, disconnect the tube at the seal
cover drain barb and leave the tube in the oil
collection container.
2. The grommet can be pried off the bottle with
the tube still inserted, allowing the tube and
check valve to be easily removed from the
container.
125
Refrigeration Maintenance
3. If option 1 or 2 are not feasible and it is
necessary to pull the check valve back through
the grommet, gently twist as pulling back.
If the check valve does come off the tube, install a
new check valve from stock.
Checking Compressor Oil
The compressor oil should be checked when there
is evidence of oil loss (oil leaks) or when
components in the refrigeration system have been
removed for service or replacement.
If the box is empty, you can run the unit on the
heat cycle instead of the defrost cycle.
NOTE: Use refrigeration compressor oil ONLY.
Polyol Ester P/N 203-513 is required for
R-404A.
To add compressor oil pump down the compressor
and equalize the pressure to slightly positive.
Disconnect the compressor oil filter return line
from the top of the compressor and add the oil.
Reattach the oil filter return line to the
compressor. Evacuate the compressor before
opening the service valves.
High Pressure Cutout Switch
(HPCO)
1
1.
The HPCO is located on the compressor discharge
manifold. If the discharge pressure rises above
470 psi (3241 kPa), the HPCO opens the HPCO
circuit to the run relay and stops the unit. To test
the HPCO, rework a gauge manifold as shown in
Figure 159 “High Pressure Cutout Manifold” and
use the following procedure.
Sight Glass
Figure 158: Checking Compressor Oil
To check compressor oil level with an
ambient air temperature above 50 F (10 C):
Install a gauge manifold on the compressor.
Operate the unit on cool with a 20 psi (138 kPa)
minimum suction pressure and a 185 psi
(1275 kPa) minimum discharge pressure for 15
minutes or more.
After the unit has maintained the above conditions
for 15 minutes, observe the oil level. The oil
should be 1/4 to 1/2 up in the sight glass.
To check compressor oil level with an
ambient air temperature below 50 F (10 C):
Run the unit through a complete defrost cycle.
After completing the defrost cycle, run the unit on
cool for ten minutes. Observe the oil level. The oil
should be 1/4 to 1/2 up in the sight glass.
1.
Relief Valve (66-6543)
2.
O-Ring (33-1015)
3.
Adapter Tee Weather Head No. 552X3
Figure 159: High Pressure Cutout Manifold
126
Refrigeration Maintenance
1. Connect the gauge manifold to the compressor
discharge service valve with a heavy duty,
black jacketed thick wall #HCA 144 hose with
a 900 psi (6204 kPa) working pressure rating.
2. Use the Service Test Mode to run the unit in
high speed cool.
3. Raise the discharge pressure of the
compressor first by blocking the condenser
coil air flow by covering the condenser grille
with a piece of cardboard. If this does not raise
the discharge pressure to the cutout level of
the HPCO, increase the engine speed by
overriding the throttle solenoid. This should
increase the discharge pressure enough to
cause the HPCO to cut out.
end cap should be checked. See “End Cap
Checks” in the Refrigeration Service Operations
Chapter.
To check the operation of the condenser pressure
bypass check valve:
1. Remove the condenser pressure bypass check
valve cap from the three-way valve.
2. Using a screwdriver, gently turn the check
valve stem in until the valve is front seated.
3. Install a gauge manifold set on the
compressor.
4. Close (front seat) the receiver tank outlet
valve.
CAUTION: If the discharge pressure
reaches 477 psi (3289 kPa), shut the unit
off immediately. Do not allow the
discharge pressure to exceed 477 psi (3289
kPa).
4. If the HPCO does not open to de-energize the
run relay and stop the unit, it must be
replaced.
Three-Way Valve Condenser
Pressure Bypass Check Valve
A three-way valve condenser pressure bypass
check valve is used in this unit. This check valve
controls the bypass flow of refrigerant gas
between the condenser inlet line and the
compressor discharge line.
The check valve is closed when the unit is running
on cool, or whenever the discharge pressure is
higher than the condenser pressure.
When the unit is running on defrost or heat, if the
condenser pressure is higher than the discharge
pressure, the check valve opens and the condenser
pressure is bled off until it drops to the level of the
discharge pressure. The purpose of the valve is to
improve the three-way valve response time when
shifting from heat to cool.
If a three-way valve does not shift back to cool
immediately after the pilot solenoid closes, and
finally shifts to cool when the temperature rise
puts the unit into high speed, the three-way valve
1.
Check Valve
2.
Heating/Defrost Position
3.
Cooling Position
Figure 160: Three-way Valve Condenser
Pressure Bypass Check Valve
5. Operate the unit on cool and pump down the
low side to 20 in. Hg (-68 kPa) of vacuum.
6. Stop the unit. The condenser and suction
pressures should remain stable, indicating no
leaks.
127
Refrigeration Maintenance
7. Shift the three-way valve to the heat position.
The low side gauge will raise slightly. The
high side gauge will drop to approximately
zero. The gauges will equalize.
line. The microprocessor ignores the test results if
the box temperature or the ambient temperature is
below 10 F (-12 C). The ETV test can also be
performed using the Service Test Mode.
8. The gauges will remain in this position,
approximately zero, if the three-way valve
seals properly toward the condenser and the
condenser pressure bypass check valve seals
properly.
The GAUGES key allows observation of the ETV
position during the ETV test. The expected ETV
position observation is a decrease followed by an
increase. The suction pressure should decrease
when the valve position decreases and increase
when the valve position increases.
9. Back seat condenser pressure bypass check
valve stem against the snap ring. Both gauges
should rise indicating the condenser pressure
bypass check valve is properly releasing
condenser pressure into the discharge tube and
evaporator.
10. Replace the cap on the condenser pressure
bypass check valve.
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for complete
information about the testing and operation of the
ETV.
See “Electronic Throttling Valve” in the
Refrigeration Service Operations chapter of this
manual for removal and installation procedures.
NOTE: Valve stem MUST be back seated
during normal unit operation.
3
11. Open the receiver tank return outlet valve,
remove the gauges and return the unit to
normal operation.
2
1
Electronic Throttling Valve
(ETV)
The Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) is standard
on these units.
The Electronic Throttling Valve (ETV) is a
variable position valve operated by a stepper
motor. The ETV is located in the suction line
between the evaporator and the heat exchanger.
The ETV system also uses discharge and suction
pressure transducers, and a hot gas bypass valve.
The ETV has two internal coils. The
microprocessor operates the valve by energizing
the coils with a variable frequency ac signal. The
valve position can be monitored with the
GAUGES key. Zero (0) indicates the valve is fully
closed and 800 indicates the valve is fully open.
The microprocessor tests the ETV if required
when the unit is started. Alarm Code 89 indicates
the refrigeration system pressures did not respond
as expected during the test. This may be caused by
a malfunction of the ETV or by a refrigeration
system problem such as low refrigerant level, a
frozen expansion valve, or a restriction in suction
128
4
1.
Inlet
2.
Valve Body
3.
Stepper Motor
4.
Outlet
Figure 161: Electronic Throttling Valve
Pressure Transducers
The discharge pressure transducer and the suction
pressure transducer supply pressure information
to the microprocessor. These pressures can be
monitored with the GAUGES key. Check the
readings by comparing them to the readings on a
gauge manifold set attached to the compressor.
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for more
information about the testing and operation of the
pressure transducers.
Refrigeration Maintenance
Hot Gas Solenoid
The hot gas solenoid (or hot gas bypass valve) is
used in conjunction with the electronic throttling
valve to reduce the capacity of the unit during
modulation. This normally closed solenoid valve
is located in the refrigeration line that connects the
discharge line to the hot gas line. The hot gas
solenoid is energized (opened) at full modulation.
The hot gas solenoid is de-energized (closed)
when modulation is discontinued.
Refer to the SR-3 Microprocessor Control System
Diagnostic Manual TK 54842 for information
about testing the hot gas solenoid. See the
Refrigeration Service Operations chapter of this
manual for removal and installation procedures.
129
Refrigeration Service Operations
NOTE: The following procedures involve
servicing the refrigeration system. Some of these
service procedures are regulated by Federal, and
in some cases, by State and Local laws.
In the USA all regulated refrigeration service
procedures must be performed by an EPA
certified technician, using approved equipment
and complying with all Federal, State and Local
laws.
Compressor
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Front seat the discharge and suction service
valves.
3. Recover the refrigerant remaining in the
compressor.
Installation
1. Slide the compressor into the unit.
2. Place the compressor in position and install
the mounting bolts.
NOTE: The compressor drive coupling will
only slide onto the coupling pins in either of
two positions, which are 180 degrees apart.
3. Install the service valves using new gaskets
soaked in compressor oil. Connect the high
pressure cutout switch, the pilot solenoid
valve line, and install the compressor oil filter.
4. Pressurize the compressor and test for
refrigerant leaks.
5. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
compressor.
6. Back seat the suction and discharge service
valves.
4. Unbolt the discharge and suction service
valves from the compressor.
7. Operate the unit at least 30 minutes and then
inspect the oil level in the compressor. Add or
remove oil if necessary.
5. Disconnect the high pressure cutout switch,
the pilot solenoid line, and remove the
compressor oil filter.
8. Check the refrigerant charge and add
refrigerant if needed.
6. Support the compressor and remove the
compressor mounting bolts from the flywheel
housing.
Compressor Coupling Removal
7. Lift the service valves out of the way.
8. Slide the compressor to the left until the
coupling pins are clear.
9. Remove the compressor from the front of the
unit. Keep the compressor ports covered to
prevent dust, dirt, etc., from falling into the
compressor.
NOTE: When the compressor is removed
from the unit, the oil level should be noted,
or the oil removed from the compressor
should be measured so that the same amount
of oil can be added before placing the
replacement compressor in the unit.
1. After the compressor has been removed from
the unit, use the appropriate Allen tool
provided with removal tool P/N 204-991 to
loosen the center bolt which holds the
coupling to the compressor shaft.
2. Attach the tool to the coupling with the
provided socket head screws and spacers. Two
sets of spacers are provided with the tool, use
the short spacers with shallow compressor
mounting flanges and the longer set for deeper
flanges. The side with the countersunk holes
should be toward the coupling.
3. To prevent the tool and crankshaft from
rotating, use one of the compressor to engine
mounting screws to pin the tool to the flange.
If a nut is used to prevent the bolt from falling
out, the nut should not be tightened.
4. Use the appropriate Allen tool to loosen the
coupling mounting screw.
130
Refrigeration Service Operations
5. Once the center screw has been loosened,
back the head against the tool and it should
push the coupling off the crankshaft as you
continuing turning the center screw in a
counter-clockwise direction. Using this tool
will prevent the coupling from popping off
because the center bolt and flatwasher will
hold it in place.
The following procedure requires the key to be
fitted after the tapers are pulled together with
20 ft-lb (27 N•m) torque. This insures that the key
cannot hold the tapers apart when the final bolt
torque is applied.
Compressor Coupling Installation
1. Clean the compressor shaft taper and coupling
bore taper with a solvent that leaves no oily
residue (such as naphtha, lacquer thinner,
brake cleaner or the like).
Use the following procedure to install a
compressor coupling on the compressor
crankshaft.
In a tapered fit joint the entire twisting load
should be handled by the friction fit between the
two tapered parts. The key is only a backup and is
used to index the parts correctly. When a taper fit
is machined and assembled properly a key is not
needed. In fact, if the key is not installed correctly
it may be worse than no key at all! If the key does
not fit easily into the keyway, it will push the
tapered components apart and the reduced friction
could lead to slippage and premature failure.
2. Inspect both mating surfaces for burrs,
oxidation and other surface imperfections.
Dress with crocus cloth if necessary and
re-clean as required.
1
2
3
8
4
5
7
6
AGA1059
1.
Coupling
5.
10 mm Allen Tool (for large shaft compressor)
2.
Long Spacers (supplied with tool)
6.
5/16 Allen Tool (for small shaft compressors)
3.
Short Spacers (supplied with tool)
7.
Coupling Removal Tool (P/N 204-991)
4.
Socket Head Bolts (supplied with tool)
8.
Engine Mounting Flange
Figure 162: Compressor Coupling Removal Tool
131
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. Using no lubricants, set the coupling on the
crankshaft and align the keyways using the
Keyway Tool (P/N 204-972). Insert the
tapered end of the tool into the keyway and
gently move the coupling on the shaft while
pressing the tool into the keyway. This will
align the keyway in the crankshaft with the
keyway in the coupler.
8. Install the key in the keyway. As above, it
should fit with a light press fit requiring only a
minimum of light tapping. Do not install the
key into the keyway beyond the front face
of the coupling. If tapped in farther it may
cause the coupling to move off center on the
shaft.
1
2
3
AGA333
Figure 163: Keyway Tool P/N 204-972
CAUTION: If you are assembling a used
coupler or crankshaft and the tool does
not fit easily there is a problem with one of
the keyways! Do not remove the coupler
and place the key in the crankshaft
keyway and then drop the coupler on. If
the tool does not fit, the key will not fit,
and it will hold the taper in the coupler off
the taper on the shaft. Check both keyways
for burrs or corrosion. A key can be
coated with fine lapping compound and
used as a lapping tool to clean the
keyways.
4. Remove the Keyway Tool and check the fit of
the key (P/N 55-9024). It should fit into the
keyway with a light press fit requiring only a
minimum of light tapping. If the key does not
fit properly, remove the coupler and inspect
the keyways and key for burrs or other
problems. Recheck the fit as shown above.
5. When the key fits properly, remove the
coupling and key from the shaft.
6. Re-install the coupling and align the keyways
with the Keyway Tool.
7. Do not install the key at this time. Install the
flat washer and bolt and pre-torque to 20 ft-lb
(27 N•m). Remove the bolt and washer.
132
5
AGA1254
4
1.
Compressor Coupling or Clutch
2.
Key tapped flush with outside face of coupling.
Do not tap key any farther into keyway.
3.
Torque bolt to 90 ft-lb (122 N•m)
4.
Washer
5.
Spray this area with corrosion inhibitor after
assembling.
Figure 164: Compressor Coupling Installation
9. Re-install the bolt and heavy flat washer and
snug the bolt down by hand. Torque the bolt to
90 ft-lb (122 N•m).
10. Spray a corrosion inhibitor (such as spray
paint) on the exposed part of the shaft and the
joint between the shaft and the coupling. This
prevents moisture from wicking into the joint
and causing corrosion.
Refrigeration Service Operations
Compressors with Pressurized
Seal Cavity
Hex Drive Compressor Seal
Replacement
Starting in the first quarter of 2014 the pressurized
seal cavity was phased into use on large shaft four
cylinder compressors. Compressors with a
pressurized seal cavity can be identified by the
“P” on the seal cover as shown in Figure 165. The
model number of the compressor has been
changed to X430P to signify the Pressurized Seal
Cavity as shown in Figure 166. The pressurized
seal cavity uses a new compressor seal with a hex
drive and a new crankshaft with a hex drive collar.
See “Hex Drive Compressor Seal Replacement”
below for the replacement procedure.
1. Remove the compressor from the unit.
2. Remove the six mounting flange bolts and
remove the mounting flange.
3. Remove the three seal plate bolts and use a
slide hammer to remove the seal plate.
NOTE: Use slide hammer P/N 204-638 and
adapter P/N 204-640 to obtain the 5/16-18
male thread needed to fit the seal plate.
4. Place the seal plate gasket side down on a
work bench and push the hard ring out of the
seal plate.
NOTE: Provide a clean soft surface for hard
ring to fall onto when pushed out of the seal
plate.
1
5. Remove the small lip seal from the seal plate,
but do not remove the larger, internal lip seal
unless it is damaged.
6. Remove the bellows assembly from the shaft
by prying evenly on each side with small pry
bar.
7. Save all old seal parts for warranty return if
required.
ARA2163
1.
“P” Indicates Pressurized Seal Cavity
Figure 165: Seal Cover for Compressor with
Pressurized Seal Cavity
1
8. Clean all parts thoroughly to remove all oil
and gaskets.
9. Polish the crankshaft with crocus cloth if it is
rusted or dirty. Do not allow abrasives to
contaminate the compressor.
10. Install the new lip seal in the seal plate with
the lip side facing out and the flat side facing
toward the compressor.
1
2
1.
“X430P” Indicates Pressurized Seal Cavity
Figure 166: Model Number for Compressor with
Pressurized Seal Cavity
ARC010
1.
Lip Side Facing Out
2.
Flat Side Toward Compressor
Figure 167: Lip Seal Installation
133
Refrigeration Service Operations
NOTE: Do not replace the internal lip seal
unless it is damaged. To replace it, pry the old
one out and press the new one into place with
the lip facing into the seal plate. Make sure
the lip seal is pressed all the way down into
the seal plate. Oil the lip seal with supplied
compressor oil.
1
2
1.
This Side Toward Seal Plate
2.
This Side Toward Compressor
Figure 169: Hard Ring Positions
CAUTION: DO NOT touch or damage the
polished seal face surfaces on the hard
ring. Keep the protective cap in position
on the bellows until final assembly.
1
1
2
3
4
ARA2172
5
1.
Lip Facing Into Seal Plate
Figure 168: Internal Lip Seal Installation
1.
Seal Plate
11. Apply clean compressor oil to the new O-ring
and install it in the seal plate. Apply clean
compressor oil to the new hard ring. Ensure
that the hard ring installation tool (P/N
204-953) is clean. Use the hard ring
installation tool to push the hard ring (with the
polished surface toward the installation tool)
fully into the seal plate. Do not pinch the
O-ring.
2.
O-ring
3.
Hard Ring—Install with Polished Surface
Toward Compressor
4.
Hard Ring Installation Tool P/N 204-953
5.
Internal Lip Seal
NOTE: If the installation tool is not
available, use the pad in the new seal
packaging to protect the polished surface of
the hard ring during assembly.
134
Figure 170: Hard Ring Installation
12. Apply clean compressor oil to the O-ring
inside the bellows. Slide the bellows on the
crankshaft, align the hex drive on the bellows
with the hex drive collar, and then push the
bellows firmly against the hex drive collar.
Leave the protective cap in place during
installation. If the hex drive does not slide on
easily, rotate the assembly 30 degrees.
Refrigeration Service Operations
CAUTION: Oil applied to the seal faces
must be absolutely clean.
1
2
14. Install the seal plate and gasket to the
compressor body. Do not bump the seal hard
ring on the end of the crankshaft during
assembly.
15. Install the seal plate mounting bolts and
washers. Torque the seal plate bolts to 28 ft-lb
(38 N•m) in two steps using a criss-cross
pattern.
1.
Hex Drive Collar
2.
Hex Drive
16. Install the mounting flange and torque the
bolts to 28 ft-lb (38 N•m) in two steps using a
criss-cross pattern.
17. Install the compressor in the unit.
Figure 171: Hex Drive Bellows Installation
(Shown Without Protective Cap)
1
Condenser Coil
2
Removal
3
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
4
5
2. Open the roadside condenser fan grille.
3. Drain engine coolant from the expansion tank.
Unbolt and remove the expansion tank from
the condenser coil frame.
6
ARA2166
1.
O-ring (Inside Bellows)
2.
Hex Drive
3.
Seal Faces
4.
Hard Ring
5.
O-ring (In Seal Plate)
6.
Bellows
Figure 172: Hex Drive Type Bellows Seal
13. Remove the yellow protective cap. Clean the
hard ring and the primary ring (bronze ring)
with the alcohol wipes found in package
labeled “1”. Then clean the polished mating
surfaces of both rings with the lint free dry
wipes from package number “2”. Apply clean
compressor oil to the polished surfaces of the
seal, the lip seals, and the seal plate gasket
from the package number “3” before
assembling.
4. Remove the condenser coil mounting bolts.
Remove the mounting clamps from the
condenser inlet line.
5. Unsolder the inlet line and liquid line
connections. On units with micro-channel
coils make sure to use a heat sink on the
copper stub tubes. Lift the coil from the unit.
IMPORTANT: Micro-channel condenser
coils are being phased into these units
starting in the fourth quarter of 2011.
Micro-channel coils are made of aluminum
but have copper stub tubes at the inlet and
outlet connections. Make sure to use a heat
sink on the copper stub tubes to prevent
damage to the heat shrink tubing and brazed
connections (and the aluminum) that attach
the copper stub tubes to the aluminum
micro-channel coil. The heat shrink tubing is
used to prevent corrosion between the copper
and aluminum.
135
Refrigeration Service Operations
Discharge Vibrasorber
1
2
3
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
ARA1972
1.
Copper Stub Tube
2.
Heat Shrink Tubing (Protects Brazed
Connection between Copper Stub Tube and
Aluminum Micro-Channel Condenser Coil)
3.
Aluminum Micro-Channel Condenser Coil
Figure 173: Top View of
Micro-Channel Condenser Coil
Installation
1. Clean the fittings for soldering.
2. Place the coil in the unit and install the
mounting bolts.
3. Solder the inlet line and liquid line
connections. On units with micro-channel
coils make sure to use a heat sink on the
copper stub tubes.
IMPORTANT: Micro-channel condenser
coils are being phased into these units
starting in the fourth quarter of 2011.
Micro-channel coils are made of aluminum
but have copper stub tubes at the inlet and
outlet connections. Make sure to use a heat
sink on the copper stub tubes to prevent
damage to the heat shrink tubing and brazed
connections (and the aluminum) that
attached the copper stub tubes to the
aluminum micro-channel coil. The heat
shrink tubing is used to prevent corrosion
between the copper and aluminum.
2. Heat the connections on the vibrasorber until
the vibrasorber can be removed.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink, P/N 204-584
or wrap the vibrasorber with wet rags to
prevent damaging the vibrasorber.
Installation
1. Prepare the vibrasorber and tubing fittings by
cleaning thoroughly.
2. Solder the vibrasorber connections.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink, P/N 204-584
or wrap the vibrasorber with wet rags to
prevent damaging the vibrasorber.
3. Pressurize the system and test for leaks. If no
leaks are found, evacuate the system.
4. Charge the unit with the proper refrigerant and
check the compressor oil level.
In-Line Condenser Check Valve
This unit uses an in-line condenser check valve.
The in-line check valve is not repairable and must
be replaced if it fails. A heat sink must be used on
the in-line check valve when it is being soldered
in place to prevent damage to the neoprene seal.
4. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
AEA648
5. Install the clamps on the condenser inlet line.
6. Install the engine coolant expansion tank and
refill half way with engine coolant.
1.
2.
Neoprene Seal
7. Close the roadside condenser fan grille.
3.
Valve Seat
4.
Spring
8. Recharge the unit with proper refrigerant and
check the compressor oil.
136
Valve
Figure 174: Cross Section of In-line
Condenser Check Valve
Refrigeration Service Operations
Condenser Check Valve
Replacement
2. Solder the bypass check valve line to the
bypass check valve. Use a heat sink on the
bypass check valve.
Removal
3. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no
leaks are found, evacuate the system.
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Place a heat sink on the check valve.
3. Unsolder the lines and remove the check
valve.
Installation
NOTE: A heat sink must be used on the in-line
check valve when it is being soldered in place to
prevent damage to the neoprene seal.
1. Clean the tubes for soldering.
2. Place the check valve in position. The arrow
on the valve body indicates the direction of
refrigerant flow through the valve.
3. Place a heat sink on the check valve.
4. Open the bypass service valve and place the
unit in operation.
Receiver Tank
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Unsolder the inlet, outlet, and bypass check
valve lines from the receiver tank. Use a heat
sink on the bypass check valve.
3. Unsolder and remove the bypass check valve
from the receiver tank. Use a heat sink on the
bypass check valve.
4. Solder the inlet and outlet connections.
4. Remove the high pressure relief valve from
the receiver tank.
5. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks.
5. Unbolt the mounting brackets and remove the
receiver tank from the unit.
6. If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
7. Recharge the unit with proper refrigerant and
check the compressor oil.
Bypass Check Valve
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Close the bypass service valve.
3. Unsolder the bypass check valve line from the
bypass check valve. Use a heat sink on the
bypass check valve.
4. Unsolder and remove the bypass check valve
from the receiver tank. Use a heat sink on the
bypass check valve.
Installation
1. Solder the bypass check valve onto the
receiver tank. Use a heat sink on the bypass
check valve.
Installation
1. Install the high pressure relief valve in the
receiver tank.
2. Solder the bypass check valve onto the
receiver tank. Use a heat sink on the bypass
check valve.
3. Place the receiver tank in the unit and install
the mounting bolts and nuts loosely. Position
the receiver tank so that the sight glass is
clearly visible through the viewing hole in the
mounting bracket.
4. Solder the inlet, outlet, and bypass check
valve lines to the receiver tank. Use a heat
sink on the bypass check valve.
5. Tighten the receiver tank mounting hardware
securely.
6. Pressurize the refrigeration system and check
for leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
7. Recharge the unit with proper refrigerant.
137
Refrigeration Service Operations
Filter Drier
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Disconnect the nuts at the ends of the drier.
3. Loosen the mounting hardware and remove
the drier.
3. Connect the equalizer line to the suction line.
4. Clean the suction line to a bright polished
condition. Install the feeler bulb clamps and
the feeler bulb on the side of the suction line
in its former position. The feeler bulb must
make good contact with the suction line or
operation will be faulty. Wrap with insulating
tape.
Installation
1. Place the new O-rings in the ORS fittings on
the ends of the drier.
2. Install the new drier and tighten the mounting
hardware.
3. Install and tighten the ORS nuts. Hold the
drier with a back-up wrench on the hex behind
the ORS fitting.
4. Pressurize the low side and inspect for leaks.
If no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
AEA713
5. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
1.
End View
2.
Side View
Figure 175: Location of Expansion Valve Bulb
Expansion Valve Assembly
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Remove the evaporator access panels.
3. Remove the feeler bulb from the clamp. Note
the position of the feeler bulb on the suction
line.
5. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no
leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
6. Replace the access panels.
7. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
8. Test the unit to see that the expansion valve is
properly installed.
Heat Exchanger
4. Disconnect the equalizer line from the suction
line.
Removal
5. Disconnect the inlet liquid line and unsolder
the distributor from the expansion valve.
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
6. Remove the expansion valve mounting bolt
and remove the expansion valve from the unit.
2. Remove the upper and lower evaporator
access panels.
Installation
3. Remove the mounting bolts that hold the heat
exchanger on the bulkhead.
1. Install and bolt the expansion valve assembly
in the unit.
2. Connect the inlet liquid line and solder the
distributor to the expansion valve.
138
4. Disconnect the equalizer line from the suction
line.
Refrigeration Service Operations
5. Disconnect the liquid outlet line from the
expansion valve.
10. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
6. Note the position of the feeler bulb on the side
of the suction line. Remove the expansion
valve feeler bulb from the suction tube.
Evaporator Coil
7. Unsolder the suction line at the evaporator coil
end.
8. Unsolder the remaining outlet suction line and
inlet liquid line connections from the
condenser side of the bulkhead. Remove any
putty from around the lines before unsoldering
the connections.
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Remove the upper and lower evaporator
access panels.
3. Remove the roadside and curbside evaporator
access panel mounting channels.
9. Slide the heat exchanger assembly out of the
evaporator housing.
4. Disconnect the sensors.
Installation
5. Remove the feeler bulb from the suction line
clamp. Note the position of the feeler bulb on
the suction line.
1. Clean the tubes for soldering.
2. Place the heat exchanger assembly in the
evaporator housing and install the mounting
hardware loosely.
3. Solder the liquid inlet and the suction outlet
line connections on the condenser side of the
bulkhead. Seal the openings through the
bulkhead with putty when the refrigerant lines
have cooled off.
6. Unsolder the distributor from the expansion
valve.
7. Unsolder the hot gas line and the suction line
from the evaporator coil.
8. Remove the mounting bolts, lift and slide the
coil from the housing.
Installation
4. Solder the suction line connection to the
evaporator coil.
1. Place the evaporator coil in the evaporator
housing and install the mounting bolts.
5. Connect the equalizer line to the suction line
and the liquid outlet line to the expansion
valve.
2. Solder the hot gas line and suction line
connections to the evaporator coil.
6. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no
leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
4. Replace and connect the sensors.
7. Tighten the heat exchanger mounting
hardware securely.
8. Clean the suction tube to a brightly polished
condition. Install the feeler bulb clamps and
the feeler bulb on the side of the suction line
in its former position. The feeler bulb must
make good contact with the suction line or the
operation will be faulty. Wrap with insulating
tape.
9. Replace the upper and lower evaporator
access panels.
3. Connect the distributor to the expansion valve.
5. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks. If no
leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
6. Clean the suction line to a bright polished
condition. Install the feeler bulb on the side of
the suction line in its former position. The
feeler bulb must make good contact with the
suction line or its operation will be faulty.
Wrap with insulating tape.
7. Replace the roadside and curbside evaporator
access panel mounting channels.
8. Replace the evaporator access panels.
139
Refrigeration Service Operations
9. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation. Check the refrigerant charge
and the compressor oil. Add as required.
Accumulator
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Unsolder the inlet and outlet suction lines
from the accumulator.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink or wrap
vibrasorber with wet rags to prevent
damaging the vibrasorber.
3. Disconnect the tee fitting from the
accumulator tank.
4. Unbolt and remove the accumulator from the
unit.
Installation
1. Place the accumulator in the unit and tighten
the mounting bolts and nuts.
2. Solder the inlet and outlet suction lines to the
accumulator.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink or wrap
vibrasorber with wet rags to prevent
damaging the vibrasorber.
3. Connect the tee fitting and lines to the
accumulator.
4. Pressurize the low side and test for refrigerant
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the low
side.
5. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation. Check the refrigerant charge
and the compressor oil. Add as required.
Three-Way Valve Repair
NOTE: The three-way valve can be repaired in
the unit if leakage or damage to the PTFE seals
should occur. There is usually enough give in
the copper tubing to separate the three sections
of the valve without unsoldering any tubes.
140
AEA714
1.
Cap
7.
Clip
2.
End Cap
8.
Seat
3.
Check Valve
9.
Gaskets
4.
Spring
10.
Stem Assembly
5.
Piston
11.
Screen
6.
Seal
12.
Bottom Cap
Figure 176: Three-Way Valve
Removal/Disassembly
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Clean the exterior surface of the valve.
3. Remove the line from the three-way valve to
the pilot solenoid.
Refrigeration Service Operations
4. Loosen the four 1/4 in. Allen head screws (DO
NOT REMOVE OR CAP MAY POP OFF);
use tool P/N 204-424 to break the gasket at
each side of the center section.
1
CAUTION: Do not force the tool into the
brass or against the bolts.
5
2
4
3
AGA1069
Figure 177: Gasket Tool P/N 204-424
5. Remove the four bolts from the valve.
6. Remove the end cap and spring.
7. Remove the spring clip which secures the
stem to the piston. Slide piston off the stem.
8. Remove the seat and stem assembly.
9. Inspect the following parts for wear or
damage:
a. Bottom cap, sealing and support area.
b. Seat, sealing surface.
c. End cap, sealing and support surface.
The following parts will be discarded:
a. Stem assembly.
b. All gaskets.
c. Piston seal.
10. Remove the screen. If any particles drop from
the screen into the discharge line, the
discharge line must be removed at the
compressor.
NOTE: The valve body cannot be
reconditioned. Seat positions change and
improper sealing will result.
1.
Seal Groove in Piston
2.
Connecting Notch in Piston
3.
Internal Spring in Seal
4.
Connecting Groove in Stem
5.
Retaining Clip
Figure 178: Piston and Stem Parts
End Cap Checks
All end caps, even new ones, should be checked
as follows. See Service Bulletin T&T 260 for
more information.
Check Valve Bleed Hole Diameter
1. Remove the condenser pressure bypass check
valve snap ring, stem, spring, and piston from
the end cap.
2. Use a number 43 (0.089 in. [2.26 mm]) drill
bit to check the size of the hole from the end
cap gasket face to the check valve piston bore
as shown.
3. If the drill does not go all the way into the
bore, drill the hole completely through.
4. Deburr the hole in the check valve piston bore.
A used drill bit can be modified to use as a
deburring tool.
141
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. With the piston pushed all the way back in its
bore, use a strong light to look down the
0.089 in. (2.26 mm) hole towards the back of
the piston and determine how much of the end
of the hole is covered by the piston. If the
piston covers more than three-quarters of the
hole replace the end cap.
1
NOTE: When front seating a condenser bypass
check valve DO NOT over-tighten the stem!
Excessive torque will deform the piston and the
deformed piston can increase the hole blockage.
1.
Number 43 Drill
Seat (Center Section) Orifice Check
Figure 179: Check Bleed Hole Diameter
Piston Bleed Orifice Check
1. Use a number 66 (0.033 in. [0.84 mm]) drill
bit to check the orifice in the bleed hole from
the gasket surface to the groove in the bottom
of the piston bore.
2. Carefully check to see that the drill projects
down into the groove and that there are no
burrs at the end of the hole in the groove. Do
not enlarge this hole.
1
2
1.
2.
There are three 0.033 in. (0.84 mm) holes located
in the three-way valve seat (center section). Only
one is used depending on how the valve is configured. If the hole is too large the valve will be slow
to shift from heat to cool when the condenser
pressure is higher than discharge pressure because
gas will flow to the discharge line instead of
behind the piston. If the hole is too small the valve
will be slow to shift from heat to cool when discharge pressure is higher than condenser pressure
because the flow is restricted. Do not enlarge this
hole larger than 0.033 in. (0.84 mm)! Whenever
you disassemble a three-way valve you should
check that all three of the holes are drilled cleanly.
Number 66 Drill
Check for Burr Here
1
Figure 180: Check Piston Bleed Orifice
Check Valve Piston Check
1. Reassemble the end cap using a new check
valve piston, spring, stem, and snap ring (Kit
P/N 60-163).
2. Leave the stem back seated against the snap
ring. Use a paper clip bent into a 90 degree
angle to push the check valve piston back in
its bore. Make sure you can feel the piston
working against the spring.
142
1.
Number 66 Drill
Figure 181: Check Seat Orifice
Assembly/Installation
After cleaning and inspecting all parts, reassemble
the valve.
1. Install the screen in the bottom cap.
2. Install the new stem in the bottom cap.
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. Install new gaskets on both sides of the seat.
Oil the gaskets in compressor oil before
installing.
4. Use the three-way valve seal installation tool
P/N 204-1008 to install a new seal on the
piston. This prevents the seal from being
stretched and damaged.
a. Place the tapered tool over the piston.
b. Lubricate the seal with refrigeration oil.
5. Install the piston on the stem. In SB trailer
units the three-way valve is mounted
horizontally. In these units the best practices
recommendation is to install the piston on the
stem with the slot in the piston facing up (12
O'clock) as shown below in Figure 183 and
Figure 185. The clip must also be installed on
the piston with the closed end of the clip
facing up (12 O'clock). Do not install the
piston on the stem with the slot in the piston
facing down (6 O'clock).
c. Slide the seal onto the tapered tool with
the spring side facing away from the
piston.
1
d. Use the pipe to hand press the seal onto
the piston.
1
2
1.
3
Closed End of Clip Must Face Up
Figure 183: Slot In Piston Must Face Up
4
5
ARA166
1.
Press by Hand
4.
Tapered Tool
2.
Pipe
5.
Piston
3.
Seal
Figure 184: Do Not Install Piston
With Slot Facing Down
Figure 182: Seal Installation with Tool P/N 204-1008
1
1.
Slot in Piston Must Face Up
Figure 185: Horizontal Three-Way Valve Reassembly
143
Refrigeration Service Operations
6. Install the spring and end cap.
5. Remove the spring and piston.
7. Line up the passageways in the cap and body.
Failure to line up the holes will result in
improper operation of the valve.
6. Inspect the check valve seat in the three-way
valve.
8. Install the bolts and tighten in rotating
sequence. Torque to 160 in-lb (18 N•m).
9. Install the pilot solenoid line and pressurize
the system with refrigerant to check for leaks.
10. If there are no leaks, evacuate the system and
recharge with the proper refrigerant.
11. Run the unit to check for proper three-way
valve operation.
Three-Way Valve Condenser
Pressure Bypass Check Valve
Repair
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Unscrew the condenser pressure bypass check
valve cap from the three-way valve.
3. Remove the snap ring.
7. If replacement parts are needed, a kit
P/N 60-163 must be used which includes the
piston, spring, O-ring, valve stem, and snap
ring.
Installation
1. Coat the O-ring with compressor oil and
install it on the check valve stem.
2. Insert the spring into the hole in the check
valve stem and then install the piston on the
other end of the spring with the hole in the
piston towards the spring.
3. Coat the entire assembly with compressor oil
and install the assembly into the check valve
seat in the three-way valve.
CAUTION: The piston must be inserted
with the flat side against the valve seat to
ensure proper sealing.
4. Screw the check valve stem into the three-way
valve until the snap ring can be installed.
5. Install the snap ring.
6. Unscrew (back seat) the check valve stem
against the snap ring.
NOTE: The valve stem must be back seated
during normal unit operation.
7. Coat the sealing area in the cap with
compressor oil, install and tighten the cap on
the three-way valve.
AEA715
1.
Piston
4.
Stem
2.
Snap Ring
5.
O-ring
8. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
3.
Cap
6.
Spring
9. Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant.
Figure 186: Check Valve Assembly
4. Unscrew the check valve stem by using a
screwdriver in the slot provided.
NOTE: The spring and piston are held in by
the stem. While removing the stem, use care
so the spring and piston are not lost.
144
Pilot Solenoid
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Disconnect the wires and remove the coil from
the valve.
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. Unsolder the refrigeration lines.
4. Remove the mounting bolts and remove the
valve.
Installation
1. Remove the coil from the valve.
2. Place the valve in the unit and install the
mounting bolts. The arrow on the valve
indicates the direction of flow through the
valve. Make sure that the arrow points in the
proper direction.
3. Solder the refrigeration lines to the valve.
4. Install the coil and connect the wires.
5. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
6. Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant
and check the compressor oil.
Suction Vibrasorber
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize pressure
to slightly positive.
2. Unsolder the suction vibrasorber from the
suction service valve. Unsolder the connection
to the accumulator and remove the vibrasorber
from the unit.
Installation
5. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
High Pressure Cutout Switch
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Front seat the discharge and suction service
valves. Recover the refrigerant remaining in
the compressor.
3. Disconnect the wires and remove the high
pressure cutout switch from the compressor
discharge manifold.
Installation
1. A new high pressure cutout switch does not
have a connector installed. Use the old
connector and just install new wire terminals,
or install a new connector and wire terminals.
See the appropriate Parts Manual for the
correct connector and terminal part numbers.
2. Place a new copper sealing washer on the high
pressure cutout switch.
3. Install the high pressure cutout switch and
torque it to 20 ± 2 ft-lb (27 ± 3 N•m).
4. Connect the wires.
5. Pressurize the compressor and test for leaks.
6. If no leaks are found, open the refrigeration
service valves and place the unit in operation.
1. Prepare the suction vibrasorber and tube
fittings for soldering by cleaning the
thoroughly.
High Pressure Relief Valve
2. Solder the vibrasorber to the suction service
valve.
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
CAUTION: Use a heat sink or wrap
vibrasorber with wet rags to prevent
damaging the vibrasorber.
3. Solder the suction vibrasorber connection to
the accumulator.
4. Pressurize the low side and check for leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
Removal
2. Unscrew and remove the high pressure relief
valve.
Installation
1. Apply a refrigerant oil to the O-ring of the
high pressure relief valve.
2. Install and tighten the high pressure relief
valve.
145
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
Electronic Throttling Valve
(ETV)
4. Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant
and check the compressor oil.
Removal
Discharge Pressure Transducer
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
2. Disconnect the wires and remove the
discharge pressure transducer.
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. The ETV must be open to remove the stepper
motor and piston assembly. Open the ETV by
placing the unit in the Evacuation Mode/Test,
and then turning the unit off. Refer to the
appropriate Microprocessor Diagnostic
Manual for information about the Evacuation
Mode/Test.
Installation
3. Remove the evaporator access panels.
1. Apply a refrigerant Loctite to the threads of
the discharge pressure transducer.
4. Disconnect the ETV harness from the four-pin
connector on the main wire harness.
2. Install and tighten the discharge pressure
transducer and reconnect the wires.
5. Unscrew the large nut that attaches the stepper
motor and piston assembly to the valve body.
The torque on the nut is approximately 118
ft-lb (160 N•m). Hold the valve body with
backup wrench to prevent damage to the
refrigeration tubing.
3. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks. If no leaks are found, evacuate the
system.
4. Recharge the unit with the proper refrigerant
and check the compressor oil.
Suction Pressure Transducer
Removal
1. Pump down the low side and equalize pressure
to slightly positive.
2. Disconnect the wires and remove the suction
pressure transducer.
Installation
1. Apply a refrigerant Loctite to the threads of
the suction pressure transducer.
2. Install and tighten the suction pressure
transducer and reconnect the wires.
3. Pressurize the low side and check for leaks. If
no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
4. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
146
CAUTION: Unscrew the large nut. Do not
unscrew the small hex on the stepper
motor.
WARNING: If the ETV is stuck in the
closed position, much of the refrigerant
charge may be trapped in the evaporator.
If you hear refrigerant begin to flow
through the valve when the stepper motor
and piston assembly are loosened,
unscrew the stepper motor and piston
assembly no more than four turns and
check the suction (low side) pressure on
the gauge manifold. If the suction
pressure has increased from the pressure
to which it was equalized after the low side
pump down, refrigerant is trapped and
must be recovered. Screw the stepper
motor and piston assembly back into the
valve body. Attach a refrigerant recovery
device to the service port on the receiver
tank outlet valve. Midseat the receiver tank
outlet valve, and recover the refrigerant
charge. The stepper motor and piston
assembly may then be removed.
Refrigeration Service Operations
Installation of Service Kit
NOTE: Do not connect the ETV harness to main
wire harness and turn the unit on before the
stepper motor and piston assembly is installed in
the valve body. The controller is programmed to
close the ETV when the unit is turned on. If the
unit is turned on with the ETV harness
connected to main wire harness, the controller
will attempt to close the ETV. This will cause the
piston to be turned (screwed) off the threaded
shaft of the stepper motor because the valve body
is not present to stop it. Further disassembly is
required to reassemble the piston and stepper
motor. See “Reassembly of Piston and Stepper
Motor”.
1
2
3
1.
Small Hex on Stepper Motor
2.
Large Nut
3.
Valve Body
Figure 187: Electronic Throttling Valve
1
1. The new stepper motor and piston assembly is
supplied with the piston in the open position.
In the open position the bottom edge of the
piston is 0.3 to 0.7 in. (8 to 18 mm) from the
bottom edge of the brass nut. The piston
retracts to open and extends to close.
2
1.
Unscrew Large Nut
2.
Backup Wrench
0.3 in.
(8 mm)
Figure 188: Removing Electronic Throttling Valve
6. If the complete ETV assembly is being
replaced, unsolder and remove the valve body.
It may be necessary to unsolder the tubes
above or below the valve body to obtain
enough clearance to remove the valve body.
Note the position of the valve body so the new
one will be placed in the same position. The
new ETV could interfere with the evaporator
access panel if it is not placed in the same
position as the old one.
1
2
1.
Bottom Edge of Brass Nut
2.
Bottom Edge of Piston
Figure 189: Stepper Motor and Piston Assembly
with Piston in Fully Open Position
147
Refrigeration Service Operations
2. Lubricate the piston and threads on the new
stepper motor and piston assembly with
refrigeration oil.
3. Screw the new stepper motor and piston
assembly into the valve body.
2. Insert the piston into the piston nut. You must
align the rectangular shaft on the piston with
the rectangular hole in the piston nut to allow
the piston to be inserted into the piston nut.
1
4. Torque the nut to approximately 118 ft-lb
(160 N•m). Hold the valve body with backup
wrench to prevent damage to the refrigeration
tubing.
5. Connect the ETV harness to the main wire
harness at the four-pin connector.
6. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks.
1.
7. If no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
8. Install the evaporator access panels.
9. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
Align Rectangular Shaft on Piston
with Rectangular Hole in Piston Nut
Figure 191: Insert Piston into Piston Nut
3. Push the piston into the piston nut until the
end of the rectangular shaft is about even with
the top of the piston nut.
Reassembly of Piston and Stepper Motor
1
Use the following procedure to reassemble the
piston and stepper motor if the piston has
accidentally been turned off of the threaded shaft
of the stepper motor.
1. Disassemble the stepper motor and piston
assembly by unscrewing the stepper motor
(small hex) from the piston nut (large nut).
1
2
3
4
5
6
1.
Position End of Rectangular Shaft
about Even with Top of Piston Nut
Figure 192: Push Piston into Piston Nut
1.
Piston
2.
Rectangular Shaft on Piston
3.
Piston Nut
4.
Copper Washer
5.
Threaded Shaft of Stepper Motor
6.
Stepper Motor
Figure 190: Stepper Motor and
Piston Assembly Components
148
4. Make sure the copper washer is in place in the
top of the piston nut.
5. Place the threaded shaft of the stepper motor
into the rectangular shaft of the piston and
turn the piston and piston nut onto the
threaded shaft of the stepper motor.
6. When the threads in the top of piston nut reach
the threads on the bottom of the stepper motor,
carefully continue to turn the piston and piston
nut onto the stepper motor. Make sure that the
copper washer is in place and take care to
avoid cross threading the fine threads on the
stepper motor and in the top of the piston nut.
Refrigeration Service Operations
7. Continue to turn the piston and piston nut onto
the stepper motor until they are tight. Torque
the piston nut and stepper motor to 37 ft-lb (50
N•m).
Hot Gas Solenoid Valve
Installation of Complete ETV Assembly
2. Disconnect the wires and remove the coil for
the valve.
1. Clean the tubes for soldering.
2. Place the new complete ETV assembly (and
any tubes that were removed) in the same
position from which the old one was removed.
The new ETV could interfere with other
components if it is not placed in the same
position as the old one. The ETV assembly
must be installed as shown below relative to
the direction of refrigerant flow from the
evaporator to the heat exchanger.
NOTE: Do not disassemble the new ETV to
solder it in place.
Removal
1. Recover the refrigerant charge.
3. Unsolder the lines and remove the valve.
Installation
1. Clean the tubes for soldering.
2. Remove the coil and place the valve in
position.
3. Solder the inlet and outlet connections. After
the valve cools, install the coil.
4. Pressurize the refrigeration system and test for
leaks.
5. If no leaks are found, evacuate the system.
6. Recharge the unit with proper refrigerant and
check the compressor oil.
2
1
1.
Use Heat Sink
2.
Direction of Refrigerant Flow
Figure 193: Installing Complete ETV Assembly
3. Use a heat sink or wrap the valve body with a
wet rag to prevent damage and solder the
tubing connections with 95-5 soft solder.
4. Connect the ETV harness to the main wire
harness at the four-pin connector.
5. Pressurize the low side and test for leaks.
6. If no leaks are found, evacuate the low side.
7. Install the components that were removed to
access the ETV.
8. Open the refrigeration valves and place the
unit in operation.
Compressor Oil Filter
This unit is equipped with a compressor oil filter.
The compressor oil filter should be changed when
the drier is replaced.
The outlet fitting is larger than the inlet fitting, so
the compressor oil filter cannot be put on
backwards. There are two fittings on the inlet end
of the compressor oil filter. The inlet fitting
contains a check valve that prevents reverse flow
through the compressor oil filter. The capped
fitting is called the oil pressure access port and is
used to check the compressor oil pressure (see
“Checking Compressor Oil Pressure”).
Use the following procedure to change the
compressor oil filter.
1. Pump down the low side and equalize the
pressure to slightly positive.
2. Front seat the discharge and suction service
valves. Recover the remaining refrigerant
from the compressor.
3. Disconnect the oil lines from the compressor
oil filter. Hold the oil filter with back-up
wrench on the hex behind the ORS fitting.
149
Refrigeration Service Operations
4. Remove the clamp and the compressor oil
filter.
Compressors with Internal Oil
Filter
5. Coat the new O-rings with clean compressor
oil and place them in the ORS fittings on the
ends of the new compressor oil filter.
In the first quarter of 2014 four cylinder
compressors with an internal oil filter are being
phased into truck and trailer units that typically
use compressors with external oil filters. The
internal oil filter is located in the compressor
sump near the oil pickup tube (see Figure 195).
6. Fasten the new compressor oil filter in place
with the clamp.
7. Attach and tighten the oil lines to the
compressor oil filter. Hold the oil filter with a
back-up wrench on the hex behind the ORS
fitting.
8. Evacuate the compressor and filter to a
maximum of 500 microns to remove trapped
air.
9. Open the service valves, operate the system,
and check the compressor oil filter for leaks.
NOTE: These units use compressors with oil
filters. If the compressor does not have an
external oil filter, it has an internal oil filter.
Internal Oil Filter Replacement
The internal oil filter should be replaced in the
same situations in which the external oil filter was
replaced, such as when the drier is replaced or the
compressor oil is changed.
1. Remove the compressor from the unit if
needed to access the oil sump.
2. Remove the oil sump.
1
2
3
4
1
3
5
1.
2
AEA718
1.
Oil Pressure Access Port
2.
Inlet Fitting
3.
Outlet Fitting
Figure 194: Compressor Oil Filter
150
6
Oil Discharge Tube
2.
O-Ring
3.
Internal Oil Filter
4.
Pressure Relief Valve
5.
Oil Pickup Tube
6.
Stud On Oil Pickup Tube Bracket
Figure 195: Internal Oil Filter
Refrigeration Service Operations
3. Remove the nut that fastens the internal oil
filter to the stud on the oil pickup tube bracket.
8. Install the compressor in the unit if it was
removed.
Checking Compressor Oil
Pressure
The oil pressure at the oil pressure access port
varies with the suction pressure in the compressor.
Therefore, we need to calculate the “net oil
pressure” to determine the actual compressor oil
pressure. The net oil pressure is the pressure at the
oil pressure access port minus the suction pressure
below the throttling valve. Use the following
procedure to check the compressor oil pressure.
1
1.
Stud On Oil Pickup Tube Bracket
Figure 196: Remove Nut from Stud
4. Remove the internal oil filter from the oil
discharge tube.
1. Attach a suitable oil pressure gauge to the oil
pressure access port on the compressor oil
filter, or to the oil pressure access port on the
oil pump cover.
2. Attach the low pressure gauge of a gauge
manifold to the fitting on the side of the
throttling valve (or suction valve adapter).
This fitting allows you to monitor the suction
pressure in the compressor below the
throttling valve.
3. Start the unit and note the pressure at the oil
pressure access port and the suction pressure
below the throttling valve.
1
2
1.
Internal Oil Filter
2.
Oil Discharge Tube
Figure 197: Remove Internal Oil Filter from Oil
Discharge Tube
5. Place the new internal oil filter on the oil
discharge tube and the stud on the oil pickup
tube bracket. Be careful to avoid damaging the
O-ring in the oil filter.
6. Install and tighten the nut that fastens the
internal oil filter to the stud on the oil pickup
tube bracket.
4. Subtract the suction pressure below the
throttling valve from the pressure at the oil
pressure access port to get the net oil pressure.
Pressure at Oil Pressure Access Port
– Suction Pressure Below Throttling Valve
= Net Oil Pressure
5. The net oil pressure should be at least 20 psi
(138 kPa). If the net oil pressure is low, first
check the compressor oil level, then check the
compressor oil pump and relief valve.
Priming New Compressor
Installations
Thermo King remanufactured compressors have
had a special break in process to assure that the oil
pump is primed, functioning, and broken in. The
following procedure is recommended, but not
required for factory-remanufactured compressors.
7. Install the oil sump.
151
Refrigeration Service Operations
This procedure must be followed to prevent
premature pump failure in any compressor that
has had an oil pump installed, especially a
compressor that has been stored for any length of
time.
7. Start unit and run the engine on low speed for
at least five minutes. If the net oil pressure is
above 20 psi (138 kPa) for this period, stop the
unit and re-connect the high speed solenoid
wires.
1. Attach a suitable oil pressure gauge to the oil
pressure access port on the compressor oil
filter.
8. Run the engine on high speed for at least five
more minutes. The compressor oil pump is
now primed and broken in.
2. Attach the low pressure gauge of a gauge
manifold to the fitting on the side of the
throttling valve (or suction valve adapter).
This fitting allows you to monitor the suction
pressure in the compressor below the
throttling valve.
3. Disconnect the wires to the fuel solenoid.
4. Disconnect the wires to the high speed
solenoid.
NOTE: The microprocessor will probably
record some alarm codes because the
solenoids are disconnected and the engine
does not start. Clear these alarm codes as
necessary.
5. Turn the unit on and let the engine crank (or
crank the engine) for 30 seconds, but do not
crank the engine for more than 30 seconds.
a. Note the pressure at the oil pressure access
port and the suction pressure below the
throttling valve while the engine is
cranking. Subtract the suction pressure
below the throttling valve from the
pressure at the oil pressure access port to
get the net oil pressure.
b. If the compressor does not develop at least
10 psi (96 kPa) of net oil pressure in the
first 30 seconds, allow the starter to cool
for a few minutes and the crank the engine
again for 30 seconds. If 10 psi (96 kPa) of
net oil pressure still does not develop, first
check the compressor oil level, then check
the compressor oil pump and relief valve.
6. As soon as the compressor develops 10 psi
(96 kPa) of net oil pressure, re-connected the
fuel solenoid wires, but do not re-connect the
high speed solenoid wires.
152
Structural Maintenance
Unit and Engine Mounting Bolts
Unit Inspection
Check and tighten all unit and engine mounting
bolts during scheduled maintenance inspections.
Torque the unit mounting bolts to 60 ft-lb
(81 N•m). Torque the engine mounting bolts to
150 ft-lb (203 N•m).
Inspect the unit during pretrip inspection and
scheduled maintenance inspections for loose or
broken wires or hardware, compressor oil leaks,
or other physical damage which might affect unit
performance and require repair or replacement of
parts.
Condenser, Evaporator, and
Radiator Coils
Clean the coils during scheduled maintenance
inspections. Remove any debris (e.g., leaves or
plastic wrap) that reduces the air flow. Clean dirty
coils with compressed air or a pressure washer. Be
careful not to bend the fins when cleaning a coil.
If possible, blow the air or water through the coil
in the direction opposite the normal airflow.
Repair bent fins and any other noticeable damage.
Micro-Channel Coil Cleaning
Recommendations
Cleaning Intervals
1
•
The coils should be cleaned a Minimum of
once a year.
•
It is recommended that any time the unit is in
for service or maintenance that the coils be
inspected and cleaned if needed.
•
The coil should be cleaned if there are visible
accumulations that obstruct the view of the
fins or tubes of the coil.
•
The coils should be cleaned if there is debris
imbedded in the tubes and fins
The area and conditions in which the unit operates
will dictate the cleaning intervals and method(s)
needed.
1.
Check Bolts for Tightness
Figure 198: Unit and Engine Mounting Bolts
Cleaning Methods (listed in order of
recommended method)
•
Take a cloth or towel and wipe the air side of
the coil going with the fins, across the tubes.
(Results shown in Figure 200.) The coil will
clean in a manner similar to the way lint
cleans from the lint trap of a household
clothes dryer.
153
Structural Maintenance
•
Use a soft bristled brush (DO NOT USE A
WIRE BRUSH) and brush the coil going with
the fins, across the tubes. The coil will clean
in a manner similar to the way lint cleans from
the lint trap of a household clothes dryer.
•
A vacuum with a soft attachment can be used
to suck the debris off the face as well as in the
fins and tubes from the air side of the coil.
•
Compressed air can be used and will work
best when blown thru the coil from the non-air
side when possible. Blowing thru from the
airside may imbed debris in the coil that was
only on the surface. It is recommended to start
with one of the first three options before using
compressed air if the non-air side is not
accessible. The angle at which the air should
be directed at the coil should not be less than
75 degrees (see Figure 201).
•
Power water sprayer may be used in pressures
under 600 psi. Water will work best when
blown thru the coil from the non-air side when
possible. Spraying thru from the airside may
imbed debris in the coil that was only on the
surface. It is recommended to start with one of
the first three options before using water if the
non-air side is not accessible. The angle at
which the water should be directed at the coil
should not be less than 75 degrees (see Figure
201).
Figure 199: Coil Before Cleaning
Chemicals to aid in cleaning WILL VOID
WARRANTY and are NOT RECOMMENDED.
In some instances in may take a combination of
two methods to result in a clean coil. Such as, first
wiping the coil to clean the surface and then using
a vacuum, water or compressed air to clean down
in the fins. This will depend on the type of debris
that needs to be cleaned from the coil.
Be sure not to contact the coil with any hard
vacuum nozzle, air nozzle, or any other tool. This
will damage the tubes of the coil.
Figure 200: Coil after Wiping
Right Hand Side with Cloth
154
Structural Maintenance
Unit Installation
All nuts that hold the unit to the cargo
compartment are accessible using an impact
wrench with a 10 in. extension, ball-type swivel
and a deep-well socket.
NOTE: The nuts for mounting the unit should
be elastic stop nuts (Nylock type).
Defrost Damper
Figure 201: Source Angle for
Cleaning with Air or Water
Defrost Drains
Check the damper during scheduled maintenance
inspections for shaft wear, end play, and the
ability to stop the air flow.
Clean the defrost drains during scheduled
maintenance inspections to be sure the lines
remain open.
Position the damper so that air flow is stopped on
the top and bottom edges with the solenoid
plunger bottomed out.
2
1
3
6
5
4
7
9
AEA719
8
1
1.
Stop
6.
Eye Bolt
2.
Mounting Bolts
7.
Round Stop
3.
Closed Position
8.
Distance A 2.75 in. (69.85 mm)
4.
Open Position
9.
Solenoid
5.
Damper Link
Figure 202: Defrost Damper Adjustment
155
Structural Maintenance
To adjust the damper:
Condenser Fan Blower Alignment
1. Remove the damper assembly from the
evaporator.
1. Loosen the condenser inlet ring (spinning) on
the condenser coil bulkhead.
2. Disconnect the damper link from the eye bolt.
2. Slide the blower towards the inlet ring until it
contacts the inlet ring. This centers the inlet
ring in the blower orifice.
3. Check Distance A, the distance from the
shoulder on the solenoid to the center of the
hole in the eye bolt. Distance A should be
2.75 in. (69.85 mm) with the solenoid
de-energized.
3. Tighten the inlet ring securely.
4. Slide the blower away from the inlet ring.
1
4. If necessary, adjust Distance A to the proper
dimension by loosening the locknut on the end
of the solenoid plunger and turning the eye
bolt. Tighten the locknut when Distance A is
correct.
2
3
5. Connect the damper link to the eye bolt.
6. Energize the solenoid (apply 12 volts dc) and
check the damper blade to make sure that both
edges contact the damper housing. If
necessary, adjust this by loosening the
solenoid mounting bolts and moving the
solenoid. Tighten the solenoid mounting bolts
when both edges of the damper blade contact
the damper housing.
7. Adjust the damper blade stops so they contact
the edges of the damper blade. This keeps the
damper from sticking closed.
8. De-energize and energize the damper several
times to make sure that the damper operates
correctly and seals properly.
9. Make sure the damper blade rests on the round
stops when the damper is open. Adjust the
round stops if necessary.
10. Install the damper assembly in the evaporator.
Condenser and Evaporator Fan
Location
When mounting the condenser or evaporator fan
and hub assembly on the fanshaft, the blowers and
inlet orifices must be properly aligned for proper
air flow and to prevent damage to the blower.
156
4
AEA749
1.
Blower Wheel
3.
Alignment Mark
2.
Inlet Ring
4.
Edge of Inlet Ring
Figure 203: Condenser Blower Alignment
5. Pass a gauge wire completely around the
blower orifice to check for uniform clearance.
6. Spin the blower by hand to check for blower
distortion.
7. Position the blower so the edge of the inlet
ring lines up with the alignment mark on the
blower.
8. Torque blower hub bolts to 18 ft-lb (24 N•m).
Structural Maintenance
Evaporator Fan Blower Changes
1
The evaporator blower was changed in production
units starting in June of 2011. The new blower is
narrower than the old blower and the following
parts are also new; blower hub, inlet rings
(orifices), and housing member (cutoff).
2
IMPORTANT: Do not mix old evaporator blower
parts with new evaporator blower parts. Both
inlet rings must be replaced with new ones if an
old blower is being replaced with a new blower.
The new evaporator blower supersedes the old
evaporator blower. Refer to the appropriate unit
Parts Manual for the correct part numbers.
The new blower is fastened to the new blower hub
with three 5/16-18 in. hex head screws and one
3/8-16 hex head screw.
The old blower is fastened to the old blower hub
with four 5/16-18 in. hex head screws.
3
1.
Evaporator Blower Assembly
2.
Inlet Ring (Orifice)
3.
Housing Member (Cutoff)
Figure 205: Old Evaporator Blower Components
1
2
The new evaporator blower has a notch in one of
its blades that allows a socket and extension to be
used to access the pinch bolts on the blower hub.
See the following photos.
1
3
1.
Evaporator Blower Assembly
2.
Inlet Ring (Orifice)
3.
Housing Member (Cutoff)
1.
Notch in Blade
Figure 206: New Evaporator Blower
Figure 204: New Evaporator Blower Components
Figure 207: Use Socket and Extension
to Access Pinch Bolts on Blower Hub
in New Evaporator Blower
157
Structural Maintenance
Evaporator Fan Blower Alignment
Fan Shaft Assembly
1. Loosen the inlet rings on the sides of the
blower housing.
The unit is equipped with a one-piece fan shaft
assembly that contains tapered roller bearings in a
sealed oil reservoir.
2. Center the blower wheel in the blower housing
with equal overlap on both inlet rings. The
overlap on each ring should be approximately
0.15 in. (3.8 mm) on the old style evaporator
blower, or approximately 0.60 in. (15.2 mm)
on the new style evaporator blower.
3. Tighten the hub pinch bolts that hold the
blower wheel on the fanshaft.
4. Center the inlet rings in the blower orifices.
Tighten the inlet rings securely.
5. Check the radial clearance by passing a wire
completely around the circumference of the
inlet rings and the blower wheel.
This assembly does not require any maintenance.
There is a level plug and a fill plug, but they are
not normally used except after removal and repair
of the fan shaft assembly. The condenser and
evaporator end oil seals should be checked during
the pretrip inspection for oil leakage. If there is
any sign of leakage, the fan shaft assembly should
be removed and repaired.
NOTE: The fan shaft assembly requires a
special lubricant, Thermo King P/N 203-278.
Fan Shaft Assembly Overhaul
Disassembly
6. Torque the blower hub bolts to 18 ft-lb
(24 N•m).
1. Remove the fan shaft assembly from the unit.
Remove both oil plugs and drain the oil from
the housing.
2. After draining the oil from the housing,
remove the four retaining bolts from the
condenser end of the assembly.
3. To remove the shaft from the assembly, tap the
opposite end of the shaft with a soft hammer.
After the shaft has been removed, clean all
parts in clean solvent.
AEA720
1.
Check Clearance with a Wire
2.
Blower Housing Sides
3.
Inlet Rings
4.
Evaporator Blower
5.
Radial Clearance
6.
Equalize Blower Inlet Overlap
Figure 208: Evaporator Fan Location
4. Using a punch, remove the oil seal from the
evaporator end of the assembly. With the seal
removed, clean the housing in clean solvent.
5. Check the condition of the vent. If it is loose
or damaged, it must be repaired or replaced.
6. After all the parts are cleaned, inspect the
bearings and bearing races for wear or
damage.
7. If necessary, remove the bearings by tapping
them off the shaft with a hammer and a punch.
Be careful not to damage the shaft with the
punch.
8. The bearing races can now be driven out with
a punch and replaced in the same manner.
158
Structural Maintenance
AEA721
1.
Cap and Shims
6.
Oil Seal
2.
Oil Plug Screw (Use Oil P/N 203-278)
7.
Shaft
3.
Breather Vent
8.
Sleeve
4.
Housing
9.
Pin
5.
Roller Bearing
10.
O-ring
Figure 209: Fan Shaft Assembly
Reassembly
1. Tap the new bearings on the shaft with a pipe.
2. Install new oil seals after replacing the bearing
races.
3. Replace the shaft in the housing. Install a new
seal in the retainer cap. Use the original shims
and replace the O-ring if needed.
4. Install the retainer cap assembly over the
shaft, then install the bolts.
5. Torque the bolts in a criss-cross pattern in
equal steps to 80 in-lb (9.04 N•m).
should be 0.002 to 0.006 in. (0.051 to 0.152
mm). If end-play is incorrect, use different
shims to obtain correct end-play.
IMPORTANT: The shaft must be rotated
back and forth while firmly being pushed
and pulled to get an accurate end-play
measurement.
Shims available from the Service Parts
Department
0.020 in. (0.500 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-4231
0.007 in. (0.177 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-2902
0.005 in. (0.127 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-2901
6. Lock the assembly in a vise and set up a dial
indicator to read end-play. To measure the
end-play, rotate the shaft back and forth while
firmly pushing in one direction (see Figure
210) and set the dial indicator to ‘0’. Now
rotate the shaft back and forth and firmly pull
in the opposite direction (see Figure 211)
while reading the dial indicator. End-play
159
Structural Maintenance
Idler Assembly
Push and Rotate
Figure 210: Measuring End-Play Push and Rotate Shaft
The unit is equipped with a one-piece idler
assembly that contains tapered roller bearings in a
sealed oil reservoir. This assembly does not
require any maintenance. There is a level plug and
a fill plug, but they are not normally used except
after removal and repair of the idler assembly. The
roadside end oil seal and the curbside end oil seal
should be checked during the pretrip inspection
for oil leakage. If there is any sign of leakage, the
idler assembly should be removed and repaired.
Idler Assembly Overhaul
Disassembly
1. Remove the idler assembly from the unit.
Remove both oil plugs and drain the oil from
the housing.
Pull and Rotate
Figure 211: Measuring End-Play Pull and Rotate Shaft
7. After correct end-play is obtained, add oil for
the bearings.
8. Lock the assembly in a vise with the vent
facing up. Pour the oil (P/N 203-278) through
the top plug until it runs out of the side hole.
The assembly holds approximately 2.5 oz
(74 ml). Check the condition of the O-ring
used on the plugs and replace if necessary.
Install the top and side plugs. Clean up any
spillage.
9. Place the assembly on the workbench with the
vent up. Rotate the shaft by hand. The shaft
should be free enough to rotate without having
to hold the housing.
CAUTION: When installing the fan shaft
assembly, make sure that the vent is
mounted facing up.
2. After draining the oil from the housing,
remove the four retaining bolts from the
curbside end of the assembly.
3. To remove the shaft from the assembly, tap the
opposite end of the shaft with a soft hammer.
After the shaft has been removed, clean all the
parts in clean solvent.
4. Using a punch, remove the oil seal from the
curbside end of the assembly. With the seal
removed, clean the housing in solvent.
5. Check the condition of the vent. If it is loose
or damaged, it must be repaired or replaced.
6. After all the parts are cleaned, inspect the
bearings and bearing races for wear or
damage.
7. To replace the bearings, first drive bearing off
shaft with a punch at notch in the base of the
shaft.
Reassembly
1. Install the new bearings on the shaft with a
pipe. Place the pipe over the shaft and drive
bearing down. Turn the shaft upside down,
and use the pipe to drive the other bearing
down.
2. Install a new oil seal on the curbside end of
the assembly after replacing the bearing race
and splash guard.
160
Structural Maintenance
AEA722
1.
Oil Seal
6.
Shaft
2.
Cap and Shims
7.
Housing
3.
O-ring
8.
Breather Vent
4.
Roller Bearing
9.
Oil Plug Screw (Use Oil P/N 203-278)
5.
Splash Guard Tube
Figure 212: Idler Assembly
3. Replace the shaft in the housing. Install a new
seal in the retainer cap. Use the original shims
and replace the O-ring if needed.
NOTE: Figures 210 and 211 show the
fanshaft, but measuring the end-play on the
idler is similar.
4. Install the retainer cap assembly over the
shaft, then install the bolts.
IMPORTANT: The shaft must be rotated
back and forth while firmly being pushed
and pulled to get an accurate end-play
measurement.
5. Torque the bolts in a criss-cross pattern in
equal steps to 80 in-lb (9.04 N•m).
6. Lock the assembly in a vise and set up a dial
indicator to read end-play. To measure the
end-play, rotate the shaft back and forth while
firmly pushing in one direction (see Figure
210) and set the dial indicator to ‘0’. Now
rotate the shaft back and forth and firmly pull
in the opposite direction (see Figure 211)
while reading the dial indicator. End-play
should be 0.002 to 0.006 in. (0.051 to 0.152
mm). If end-play is incorrect, use different
shims to obtain correct end-play.
Shims available from the Service Parts
Department
0.020 in. (0.500 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-7980
0.007 in. (0.177 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-7979
0.005 in. (0.127 mm) Thermo King P/N 99-7978
7. After the correct end-play is obtained, add
approximately 1.1 oz (33 ml) of oil
(P/N 203-278) for the bearings.
8. Lock the assembly in a vise with the vent
facing up. Pour the oil through the top plug
until it runs out of the side hole. Check the
161
Structural Maintenance
condition of the O-ring used on the plugs and
replace if necessary. Install the top and side
plugs. Clean up any spillage.
9. Place the assembly on the workbench with the
vent up. Rotate the shaft by hand. The shaft
should be free enough to rotate without having
to hold the housing.
CAUTION: Reinstall the assembly into
the unit, making sure the vent is mounted
facing up.
162
Mechanical Diagnosis
Condition
Possible Cause
Remedy
Engine will not crank
Electrical problem
Check and repair electrical system
Defective starter solenoid
Replace solenoid
Defective starter
Repair starter
Water in cylinders
Check for hydrostatic lock. Remove
injectors and turn engine slowly
Starter motor turns but engine
does not crank
Starter clutch defective
Replace
Engine cranks but fails to start
Fuel solenoid not energized
Check 8D and 8DP and CH circuits
and fuel solenoid pull-in relay.
Check that controller is configured
for Yanmar engine. Refer to
appropriate Microprocessor
Diagnostic Manual.
Fuel solenoid defective or stuck
Replace
Fuel injection pump defective
Replace pump
Air heater defective
Replace
No fuel or wrong fuel
Fill with proper fuel
Fuel transfer pump defective
Replace transfer pump
Air in fuel system
Bleed air
Compression low
Overhaul engine
Injection nozzles defective
Replace nozzles
Incorrect timing
Adjust timing
Air cleaner clogged
Replace air filter
Exhaust plugged
Clean exhaust
Air in injection pump
Bleed fuel system
Fuel filter obstructed
Replace filter element
High head pressure
Eliminate cause of high head
pressure
Vent of fuel tank obstructed
Unclog vent
Clogged fuel tank or fuel lines
Clean fuel tank and fuel lines
Engine stops after starting
163
Mechanical Diagnosis
Condition
Possible Cause
Remedy
Engine does not develop full
power
Air intake system clogged
Clean air intake system
Fuel tank vent clogged
Unclog vent
Clogged fuel tank or fuel lines
Clean fuel tank and fuel lines
Speed adjustment wrong
Adjust speed
Insufficient fuel volume leaving filter
Check for dirty filter or air in system
Air cleaner clogged
Replace air filter
Delivery of fuel pump insufficient
Repair pump
Injection pump timing off
Adjusting timing
Injection nozzles defective
Repair or replace nozzles
Compression low or unbalanced
Overhaul engine
Worn injection pump plungers,
delivery valve defective, injection
rate too low, gum formations
Repair or replace pump
Misadjusted high speed solenoid
Adjust high speed solenoid
Defective injection pump
Repair injection pump
Engine fails to stop when unit is
OFF
Fuel solenoid defective
Replace
Injection pump defective
Replace pump
Engine knocks heavily
Air in system
Bleed fuel system
Injection pump not timed
Retime injection pump
Wrong fuel
Change fuel
Compression too low
Overhaul engine
Injection nozzles fouled or opening
pressure too low
Clean, repair or replace injection
nozzles
Delivery valve spring broken
Replace spring or repair injection
pump
Valve out of adjustment
Adjust valves
Fuel return line plugged
Remove return line restriction
Rod or main bearing worn
Replace rod or main bearings
Engine speed too high
164
Mechanical Diagnosis
Condition
Possible Cause
Remedy
Engine runs hot
Dirty radiator
Wash radiator
Coolant level is low
Add coolant
Cooling system heavily scaled
Cleaning cooling system
Cylinder head gasket leaks
Replace cylinder head gasket. Use
correct gasket
Faulty thermostat
Check or replace thermostat
Loose or worn water pump belt
Replace belt
Insufficient oil in pan
Add oil
Faulty oil pressure switch
Check oil pressure switch. Replace
if necessary
Oil control valve defective
Check oil pressure control valve
Worn oil pump, camshaft, main or
connecting rod bearings, loose oil
gallery plug
Repair engine
Oil leakage
Check and eliminate possible
causes at rocker arm cover, oil lines,
oil filter, front timing cover or
crankshaft seals
Damaged valve seals
Replace seals on valve stem
Worn valve stem
Replace valves
Broken piston rings or cylinder bore
worn or scored
Have engine repaired and rebored.
Replace broken piston rings
Clogged air cleaner system
Unclog air cleaner
Oil pressure low
High oil consumption
165
Mechanical Diagnosis
Engine Emits Excessive Smoke
White Smoke
Black Smoke
Blue Smoke
Fuel is not burning
Excessive Fuel to Air Ratio
Oil Consumption
• Air or water in fuel
• Type of fuel used
• Poor compression
• Incorrect timing
• Cold engine
• Defective valve seals
• Poor compression
• Excessive load
• Faulty injectors
• Clogged air intake system
• Faulty nozzles
• Poor compression
• Restricted exhaust
• Faulty injection pump
166
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Overcharge of refrigerant
• Shortage of refrigerant
•
• No refrigerant
Air through condenser too hot (ambient)
•
•
Air flow through condenser restricted
Air through condenser too cold (ambient)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Evaporator needs defrosting
Compressor discharge valves leaking
•
•
•
Compressor suction valves leaking
•
•
•
•
•
•
Too much compressor oil in system
Faulty oil pump in compressor
•
•
Faulty compressor drive coupling
Compressor bearing loose or burned out
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Broken valve plate in compressor
Expansion valve power element lost its charge
•
Expansion valve feeler bulb improperly mounted
Expansion valve feeler bulb making poor contact
•
Expansion valve open too much
Expansion valve closed too much
•
Expansion valve needle eroded or leaking
Expansion valve partially closed by ice, dirt or wax
•
•
•
•
•
•
Liquid refrigerant entering compressor
Restricted line on the low side
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• Defrost damper stays open
Defrost damper stuck closed
•
Suction service valve back seated
• Faulty three-way valve
•
• Faulty pilot solenoid
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Air in refrigerant system
Condenser fan blades bent or broken
Air short cycling around evaporator coil
Air through evaporator restricted
•
•
•
Possible Causes
•
•
•
•
Symptom
Rapid cycling between cool and heat
Unit cools in heat and defrost cycle
Unit heats in refrigeration cycle
High head pressure
Low head pressure
High suction pressure
Low suction pressure
No suction pressure
Unit operating in a vacuum
Receiver sight glass empty
Suction line frosting back
Unable to pump down system
Unable to pull vacuum in low side
Unable to hold vacuum in low side
Noisy compressor
Unit not refrigerating
Unit not heating or defrosting
Refrigeration Diagnosis
•
•
•
Restricted line on the high side
Restricted drier
167
•
•
168
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Symptom
Rapid cycling between cool and heat
Unit cools in heat and defrost cycle
Unit heats in refrigeration cycle
High head pressure
Low head pressure
High suction pressure
Low suction pressure
No suction pressure
Unit operating in a vacuum
Receiver sight glass empty
Suction line frosting back
Unable to pump down system
Unable to pull vacuum in low side
Unable to hold vacuum in low side
Noisy compressor
Unit not refrigerating
Unit not heating or defrosting
Refrigeration Diagnosis
Possible Causes
• Loose or broken electrical connections
Sensor out of calibration
Compound pressure gauge out of calibration
Leaky receiver tank outlet valve
Leaky bypass check valve
• Leaky condenser check valve
• Faulty three-way condenser pressure bypass check valve
• Faulty ETV
• Hot gas bypass valve stuck open or leaking
Refrigeration Diagrams
Cool Cycle
1.
Compressor
2.
Discharge Service Valve
3.
Discharge Vibrasorber
4.
Discharge Line
5.
Three-way Valve
6.
Three-way Valve Bypass
Check Valve
7.
Condenser Coil
8.
Condenser Check Valve
9.
High Pressure Relief Valve
10.
Receiver Tank
11.
Sight Glass
12.
Receiver Outlet Valve
13.
Liquid Line
14.
Drier
15.
Heat Exchanger
16.
Expansion Valve
17.
Feeler Bulb
18.
Equalizer Line
19.
Distributor
20.
Evaporator Coil
21.
Suction Line
22.
Accumulator
23.
Suction Vibrasorber
24.
Suction Service Valve
25.
Hot Gas Bypass Valve
26.
Pilot Solenoid
27.
Hot Gas Line
28.
Defrost Pan Heater
29.
Bypass Check Valve
30.
Bypass Service Valve
31.
Electronic Throttling Valve
32.
Suction Transducer
33.
Discharge Transducer
ARA161
AEA724
169
Refrigeration Diagrams
Heat/Defrost Cycle
1.
Compressor
2.
Discharge Service Valve
3.
Discharge Vibrasorber
4.
Discharge Line
5.
Three-way Valve
6.
Three-way Valve Bypass
Check Valve
7.
Condenser Coil
8.
Condenser Check Valve
9.
High Pressure Relief Valve
10.
Receiver Tank
11.
Sight Glass
12.
Receiver Outlet Valve
13.
Liquid Line
14.
Drier
15.
Heat Exchanger
16.
Expansion Valve
17.
Feeler Bulb
18.
Equalizer Line
19.
Distributor
20.
Evaporator Coil
21.
Suction Line
22.
Accumulator
23.
Suction Vibrasorber
24.
Suction Service Valve
25.
Hot Gas Bypass Valve
26.
Pilot Solenoid
27.
Hot Gas Line
28.
Defrost Pan Heater
29.
Bypass Check Valve
30.
Bypass Service Valve
31.
Electronic Throttling Valve
32.
Suction Transducer
33.
Discharge Transducer
170
ARA162
aea725
Index
A
accumulator, replacement 140
adjust brightness menu 63
air cleaner, EMI 3000 118
air heater 79
air restriction indicator 25, 119
alarms menu 48
alternator 73
field current test 76
general diagnostic and warranty evaluation
procedure 74
identification 73
load test 74
antifreeze
changing 94
checking 94
maintenance procedure 93
B
base controller LEDs 78
battery 76
battery cables 76
belt adjustments 120
alternator belt 120
upper and lower fan belts 120
belt replacement
lower fan belt 121
upper fan belt 121
belt tension, specifications 14
belts 119
bypass check valve, replacement 137
C
CargoLink 22
charging system diagnostic procedures 73
cold start device 114
compressor
priming new compressor installations 151
compressor coupling
installation 131
removal 130
compressor oil
checking 126
compressor oil filter, replacement 149
compressor oil pressure, checking 151
compressor oil sight glass 25
compressor, replacement 130
compressors with internal oil filter 150
compressors with pressurized seal cavity 133
condenser check valve, replacement 137
condenser coil, replacement 135
continuous mode
selecting 39
control panel 29
display 30
keys 30
coolant level switch 26, 95
checking the float 96
replacing 96
testing 95
cooling system, engine 92
bleeding air from 94
crankcase breather 117
CYCLE-SENTRY
selecting 39
CYCLE-SENTRY Operation 21
CYCLE-SENTRY Start-Stop Controls 21
D
data logging 22, 27
datalogger menu 50
defrost 23, 27
defrost damper, adjustment 155
defrost drains 155
Defrost key 30
diagnosis, mechanical 163
diagnosis, refrigeration 167
diagrams
fuel line routing 174
refrigeration 169
wiring 174
discharge pressure transducer, replacement 146
discharge vibrasorber, replacement 136
E
ELC (Extended Life Coolant) 92
electric fuel heater 84
electrical components, specifications 15
electrical control system, specifications 15
electronic throttling valve (ETV) 20, 27, 128
replacement 146
EMI 3000 90
engine compartment components 25
engine coolant temperature sensor 26
engine speed adjustments 105
high speed 105
low speed 105
engine, specifications 13
evaporator blower changes 157
evaporator coil, replacement 139
expansion valve assembly, replacement 138
F
fan alignment
condenser blower 156
evaporator blower 158
fan shaft assembly 158
overhaul 158
filter drier, replacement 138
first aid 12
engine coolant 12
refrigerant 12
refrigerant oil 12
fresh air exchange 54, 56
FreshSet 23
171
Index
front doors
closing 24
opening 24
fuel filter/water separator 102
draining water 103
filter element replacement 103
troubleshooting 104
fuel level sensor, resistive 83
fuel level sensor, ultrasonic 81
fuel line routing 100
fuel return line replacement 100
fuel solenoid 111
replacement 112
testing 111
fuel system 98
bleeding 101
maintenance 100
fuel tank, draining water from 102
fuse link 26, 79
fuses 26, 77
G
M
main menu
choices 45
maintenance inspection schedule 16
manual defrost cycle, initiating 40
manual pretrip inspection 31
microprocessor On/Off switch 29
Mode key 30
mode menu 54
moisture indicating sight glass 124
mounting bolts, unit and engine 153
O
Off key 30
oil change, engine 90
oil collection container 125
oil filter change, engine 90
On key 30
operating modes 23
operator menu
navigating 45
OptiSet Plus 23, 65
gauge readings, viewing 41
P
H
heat exchanger, replacement 138
hex drive seal replacement 133
high pressure cutout switch (HPCO) 26, 126
replacement 145
high pressure relief valve 26
HMI control panel 29
hot gas solenoid valve 129
hot gas solenoid valve, replacement 149
hourmeters menu 53
I
idler assembly 160
overhaul 160
injection pump
reinstallation 109
removal 109
timing 106
in-line condenser check valve 136
inspection, unit 153
installation, unit 155
pilot solenoid, replacement 144
post trip checks 72
preheat buzzer 26
pretrip tests 60
priming new compressor installations 151
protection devices 25
R
REB (Radio Expansion Board) 0ption 79
receiver tank sight glass 25
receiver tank, replacement 137
refrigerant charge
testing for an overcharge 123
testing with a loaded trailer 123
testing with an empty trailer 123
refrigerant leaks 124
refrigeration system, specifications 14
routing
fuel line 100
wire harness 80
S
K
keypad lockout 54
selecting 57
L
language menu 46
leaks, refrigerant 124
loading procedure 72
low oil level switch 26
low oil pressure 90
low oil pressure switch 26
lubrication system, engine 90
172
safety precautions 9
battery installation and cable routing 10
battery removal 10
electrical hazards 11
general practices 9
microprocessor service precautions 11
refrigerant hazards 10
refrigerant oil hazards 11
welding precautions 12
selection of operating modes 38
sensor readings, viewing 43
serial number locations 27
setpoint, changing 36
Index
sight glass, moisture indicating 124
sleep mode 54
sleep mode, selecting 58
Smart FETs 26, 78
SMART REEFER 3 (SR-3) Control System 29
soft keys 30
specifications
electric fuel heater 15
SR-3 Control System 29
standard display 34
start of trip, initiating 50
suction pressure transducer, replacement 146
suction vibrasorber, replacement 145
T
temperature watch display 35
thermostat, engine 95
three-way valve condenser pressure bypass check
valve 127
three-way valve condenser pressure bypass check
valve, repair 144
three-way valve, repair 140
time display 64
transducers, pressure 128
trip report, printing 51
trochoid feed pump 113
U
unit description 18
unit wiring 80
V
valve clearance adjustment, engine 116
W
wire harness routing 80
X
X430L compressor 20
173
Diagram Index
174
Drawing No.
Drawing Title
Page
1E64645
Schematic Diagram
175-179
1E64644
Wiring Diagram
180-184
DRC Fuel Line Routing Diagram
185-188
TOFC and RBC Fuel Line Routing Diagram
189-191
Schematic Diagram - Page 1 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
175
Schematic Diagram - Page 2 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
176
Schematic Diagram - Page 3 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
177
Schematic Diagram - Page 4 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
178
Schematic Diagram - Page 5 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
179
Wiring Diagram - Page 1 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
Thermo King
180
Wiring Diagram - Page 2 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
Thermo King
181
Wiring Diagram - Page 3 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
Thermo King
182
Wiring Diagram - Page 4 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
Thermo King
183
Wiring Diagram - Page 5 of 5
RELEASED 08/May/2013
Thermo King
184
DRC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 1 of 4
1.
Screw 1/4-20 X 0.75 in. 55-145
2.
Flatwasher 1/4 in. (2) 55-411
3.
Nylock Nut 1/4 in. 55-4118
4.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-3026
5.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter (2) 56-2330
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248MAP1
185
SHEET 1 OF 4
DRC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 2 of 4
1.
Grommet 33-316
2.
Flatwasher M8 55-7069
3.
Lockwasher M8 55-7727
4.
Screw M8 X 110 55-5424
5.
Clamp 1.0 in. Diameter 55-3644
6.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter (3) 56-2330
7.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-3026
8.
Screw 1/4-20 X 0.75 in. 55-145
9.
Flatwasher 1/4 in. 55-411
10.
Lockwasher 1/4 in. 55-366
11.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-4203
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248MAP2
186
SHEET 2 OF 4
DRC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 3 of 4
1.
3/8 in. Line from Fuel Filter Outlet to Transfer Pump Inlet
8.
Nylock Nut 5/16 in. 55-4967
2.
3/8 in. Line from Transfer Pump Outlet to Pro Check Inlet
9.
Flatwasher 3/8 in. 55-402
3.
1/4 in. Line from Injector Pump Outlet to Pro Check “T”
10.
Nylock Nut 3/8 in. 55-5078
4.
1/4 in. Line from Pro Check Outlet to Injector Pump Inlet
11.
Filter Bracket Assembly
5.
3/8 in. Inlet Line from Fuel Tank
12.
Fuel Filter-Heater Assembly
6.
Pro Check (Air/Fuel Separator)
13.
1/4 in. Return Line to Fuel Tank
7.
Flatwasher 5/16 in. 55-371
14.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter 56-2330
187
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248MAP3
SHEET 3 OF 4
DRC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 4 of 4
1.
Screw 1/4-20 X 0.75 in. 55-145
2.
Flatwasher 1/4 in. 55-411
3.
Nylock Nut 1/4 in. 55-4118
4.
3/8 in. Inlet Line from Fuel Tank
5.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter (5) 56-2330
6.
1/4 in. Return Line to Fuel Tank
7.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-3026
8.
Cap for 1/4 in. Fuel Line
9.
Cap for 3/8 in. Fuel Line
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248MAP4
188
SHEET 4 OF 4
TOFC and RBC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 1 of 3
1.
Screw 1/4-20 X 0.75 in. 55-145
2.
Flatwasher 1/4 in. (2) 55-411
3.
Nylock Nut 1/4 in. 55-4118
4.
Clamp 1/2 in. Diameter 55-3065
5.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter (3) 56-2330
6.
3/8 in. Inlet Line from Fuel Tank
7.
1/4 in. Return Line to Fuel Tank
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248XAP1
189
SHEET 1 OF 3
TOFC and RBC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 2 of 3
1.
Grommet 33-316
2.
Flatwasher M8 55-7069
3.
Lockwasher M8 55-7727
4.
Screw M8 X 110 55-5424
5.
Clamp 1.0 in. Diameter 55-3644
6.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter (3) 56-2330
7.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-3026
8.
Screw 1/4-20 X 0.75 in. 55-145
9.
Flatwasher 1/4 in. 55-411
10.
Lockwasher 1/4 in. 55-366
11.
Clamp 5/8 in. Diameter 55-4203
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248XAP2
190
SHEET 2 OF 3
TOFC and RBC Fuel Line Routing Diagram - Page 3 of 3
1.
3/8 in. Line from Fuel Filter Outlet to Transfer Pump Inlet
8.
Nylock Nut 5/16 in. 55-4967
2.
3/8 in. Line from Transfer Pump Outlet to Pro Check Inlet
9.
Flatwasher 3/8 in. 55-402
3.
1/4 in. Line from Injector Pump Outlet to Pro Check “T”
10.
Nylock Nut 3/8 in. 55-5078
4.
1/4 in. Line from Pro Check Outlet to Injector Pump Inlet
11.
Filter Bracket Assembly
5.
3/8 in. Inlet Line from Fuel Tank
12.
Fuel Filter-Heater Assembly
6.
Pro Check (Air/Fuel Separator)
13.
1/4 in. Return Line to Fuel Tank
7.
Flatwasher 5/16 in. 55-371
14.
Band Wrap 1.75 Diameter 56-2330
191
FUEL LINE ROUTING DIAGRAM
1E63248XAP3
SHEET 3 OF 3
Maintenance Manual
SB-210+
SB-230
RR
Additional text information
and
SB-330 RR
to be placed here
Ingersoll Rand’s Climate Solutions sector delivers energy-efficient HVACR solutions for
customers globally. Its world class brands include Thermo King, the leader in transport
temperature control and Trane, a provider of energy efficient heating, ventilating and air
conditioning systems, building and contracting services, parts support and advanced controls
for commercial buildings and homes.
Distributed by:
Thermo King Corporate
314 West 90th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55420
Direct
TK 54910-5-MM
©2011 Ingersoll Rand Company
Printed in U.S.A.
(952) 887-2200
TK 54910-5-MM (Rev. 3, 12/14)
TK 5XXXX-X-PL
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