Terminator I/O DirectLogic Remote I/0 Base Controller User Manual

Terminator I/O DirectLogic Remote I/0 Base Controller User Manual
Terminator I/O
DirectLogic Remote I/0
Base Controller
User Manual
Manual Number T1K–RSSS–M
WARNING
Thank you for purchasing automation equipment from Automationdirect.com. We want your new DirectLOGIC
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the installation and operation of your equipment. These codes vary from area to area and usually change with time. It is
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At a minimum, you should follow all applicable sections of the National Fire Code, National Electrical Code, and the
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offices that can also help determine which codes and standards are necessary for safe installation and operation.
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information, please call us at 770–844–4200.
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1
Manual Revisions
If you contact us in reference to this manual, be sure to include the revision number.
Title: Terminator I/O DirectLogic Remote I/O Base Controller User Manual
Manual Number: T1K–RSSS–M
Issue
Original
Date
04/01
Description of Changes
original issue
1
Table of Contents
i
Chapter 1: Getting Started
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supplemental Manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What is Remote I/O? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
When Do You Need Remote I/O? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote I/O Communication Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Masters and Slaves Allowed (RM–NET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distance Between Slaves and Master, Baud Rates (RM–NET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Masters and Slaves Allowed (SM–NET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Distance Between Slaves and Master, Baud Rates (SM–NET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Choosing the Protocol Mode – RM–NET vs. SM–NET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How the CPU Updates Remote I/O Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Easy Steps for Setting Up Remote I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Design the Remote I/O System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Install the Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Write the Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Frequently Asked Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine the Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–2
1–3
1–3
1–4
1–4
1–5
1–6
1–6
1–7
1–7
1–8
1–9
1–10
1–10
1–10
1–10
1–11
1–11
Chapter 2: D2–RMSM / T1K– RSSS Remote I/O System
Remote Master (D2-RMSM) Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Auto Return to Network Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Slave (T1K-RSSS) Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Port Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Rotary Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the DIP Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine the System Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Determine I/O Needed and How Many Masters & Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Define the System Details By Using Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Channel Configuration Worksheet (top half) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Remote Slave Worksheet for Slave #1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Remote Slave Worksheet for Slave #2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Remote Slave Worksheet for Slave #3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completing the Channel Configuration Worksheet (bottom half) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Wiring Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cable Recommendation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabling Between the Master and Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Termination Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2–2
2–2
2–3
2–3
2–4
2–4
2–4
2–5
2–5
2–6
2–7
2–9
2–9
2–10
2–10
2–11
2–12
2–13
2–14
2–15
2–15
2–15
2–15
2–16
ii
Table of Contents
Chapter 3: D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Getting Started with the Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Writing the Remote I/O Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1: Decide How You Are Going to Call Your Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2: Write the Setup Logic for Each Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program Using Discrete I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1: Addressing using X and Y Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program Using Analog I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2: Addressing using V–Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shared Memory Table for D2–RMSM Remote Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Remote I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Quick Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communication Status Flags in V-memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Flags in V-memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D2–RMSM Memory for Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bus Scan Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Access Diagnostics Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1: Reading Diagnostic Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2: Writing Bus Scan Overlimit and Reading Bus Scan Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3–2
3–3
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–5
3–10
3–10
3–16
3–17
3–25
3–25
3–26
3–27
3–27
3–28
3–29
3–29
3–29
3–29
3–30
3–31
3–32
Chapter 4: DL250 / DL350 / DL450 CPU With T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port as Remote Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Slave (T1K-RSSS) Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the Bottom Port of the DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the T1K–RSSS Rotary Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the T1K–RSSS DIP Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program Using Discrete I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1: Using X and Y Addresses as the Remote I/O Memory Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example Program Using Analog I/O Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2: Using V Memory Addresses as the Remote I/O Memory Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory for Bottom Port as Remote Master . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DL250/DL350/DL450 V Memory Port Setup Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabling Between the D2–250 CPU Bottom Port and Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cabling Between the D3–350/D4–450 CPU Bottom Port and Slaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A: Remote I/O Worksheets
4–2
4–3
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
4–7
4–9
4–9
4–14
4–14
4–18
4–19
4–20
4–20
4–21
4–22
iii
Table of Contents
Appendix B: Terminator Analog I/O
Analog Input Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scaling the Input Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1: Scaling 4–20mA Input Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2: Scaling Unipolar and Bipolar Input Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Output Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Calculating the Digital Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Engineering Unit Conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–2
B–2
B–2
B–3
B–4
B–4
B–4
Appendix C: Determining I/O Update Time
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote I/O Update Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Scan Time Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D2–RMSM: Calculating Total Delay for the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total Delay Time Formulas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D2–RMSM Delay Time Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C–2
C–3
C–3
C–4
C–5
C–6
Appendix D: I/O Module Hot Swap
T1K–RSSS I/O Module Hot Swap Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check External 24VDC Wiring Before Hot Swapping! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hot Swap: I/O Module Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Outputs Enable / Disable Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–2
D–2
D–3
D–3
Getting Started
11
Ċ Introduction
Ċ What is Remote I/O?
Ċ How the CPU Updates Remote I/O Points
Ċ 3 Easy Steps for Setting Up Remote I/O
Ċ Frequently Asked Questions
1–2
Getting Started
Getting Started
Introduction
The Purpose of
this Manual
Thank you for purchasing the Terminator
Remote I/O system. This manual shows
you how to install, program, and maintain
the equipment. It also helps you
understand the system operation
characteristics.
This
manual
contains
important
information for personnel who will install
remote I/O, and for the PLC programmer.
If you understand PLC systems our
manuals will provide all the information
you need to get and keep your system up
and running.
Where to Begin
If you already understand the basics of remote I/O systems, you may only want to
skim this chapter. Be sure to keep this manual handy for reference when you run into
questions. If you are a new customer, we suggest you read this manual completely
so you can understand the remote modules, configurations, and procedures used.
We believe you will be pleasantly surprised with how much you can accomplish with
Automationdirect  products.
Supplemental
Manuals
Depending on the products you have purchased, there may be other manuals
necessary for your application. You will need to supplement this manual with the
manuals that are written for those products. You will need the User Manual for the
PLC sytem that you have chosen to use with the Terminator I/O.
Technical Support
We realize that even though we strive to be the best, we may have arranged our
information in such a way you cannot find what you are looking for. First, check these
resources for help in locating the information:
S
Table of Contents – chapter and section listing of contents, in the front
of this manual
S Quick Guide to Contents – chapter summary listing on the next page
S Appendices – reference material for key topics, near the end of this
manual
If you still need assistance, please call us at 770–844–4200 or visit our web site at
www.automationdirect.com. Our technical support group is glad to work with you
in answering your questions. They are available Monday through Friday from 9:00
A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Eastern Standard Time.
1–3
Getting Started
Chapters
The main contents of this manual are organized into the following four chapters:
2
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
shows you how to design your system by using worksheets
to keep track of system parameters and the address and
range assignments for remote I/O, needed for programming
and hardware setup. Includes switch settings and wiring
information.
3
D2–RMSM Setup
Programming and
Troubleshooting
shows you how to use DirectSoft to write the remote I/O
setup program when using the D2–RMSM. This chapter
takes the information developed from your worksheets and
helps you write a working setup program.
4
DL250 / DL350 / DL450
Remote I/O System,
Setup Programming
and Troubleshooting
1
Appendices
Additional reference information on remote I/O is in the following three appendices:
A
Remote I/O Worksheets
B
C
Terminator Analog I/O
D
shows you how to use DirectSoft to write the setup program
when using the DL250, DL350 or DL450 CPU bottom port as
a remote master. The examples take the information from
your worksheets and help you write a working setup
program. Includes switch settings and wiring information.
Determining I/O Update
Time
included are blank worksheets that you can copy and use to
design your system.
provides specific information on analog I/O module
resolution and includes scaling examples.
shows you how to calculate the amount of delay inherent
with the transfer of data back and forth between the master
and its remote slaves. Provides tables for all baud rates,
based on the protocol selected and number of I/O points
used.
explains the T1K–RSSS I/O module Hot Swap feature.
I/O Module Hot Swap
Getting Started
Getting Started
introduces the basic components of the remote I/O system,
an explanation of who needs such a system, and an
overview of the steps necessary to develop a working
system.
1–4
Getting Started
Getting Started
What is Remote I/O?
A remote I/O system allows you to locate I/O modules in bases at some remote
distance from the CPU base, but still under its control. These remote bases have no
CPU of their own, and are completely controlled by the CPU in the main base via a
special module called a remote master. Each remote base unit has a remote slave
that allows the exchange of data with the CPU in the main base via the master
module. The communications link between the master and its slaves is provided by
twisted-pair cable, with baud rates ranging between 19.2 to 614.4 kBaud, depending
on the configuration. For example, up to 2048 remote I/O points can be supported by
the DL205 Remote I/O Masters.
One Master in CPU Base (one channel)
205 Remote Master
Local Base
Twisted Pair Cable
Remote Bases
Terminator
Remote Slaves
When Do You Need The main advantage of Terminator Remote I/O is that it expands the I/O capability
beyond the local CPU base. Remote I/O can also offer tremendous savings on
Remote I/O?
wiring materials and labor costs for larger systems in which the field devices are in
clusters at various locations. With the CPU in a main control room or some other
central area, only the remote I/O cable is brought back to the CPU base. This avoids
the use of a large number of field wires over greatly separated distances to all the
various field devices. By locating the remote bases and their respective I/O modules
close to the field devices, wiring costs are reduced significantly.
Another inherent advantage of remote I/O is the ability to add or remove slave bases,
or temporarily take a base off line without disrupting the operation of the remaining
system.
1–5
Getting Started
The Remote I/O system supports two different remote I/O communications
protocols:
S The Remote Master protocol (RM–NET) is supported by the DL205 system
as well as the bottom ports on the DL250, DL350 and DL450 CPUs. This
means that the remote I/O slaves (set for RM–NET mode) connected to a
RM–NET master can be a combination of T1K–RSSS and D2–RSSS slave
modules up to the maximum allowed number of remote units and I/O points.
Remote communications baud rates of 19.2K and 38.4K are supported.
S The Slice Master protocol (SM–NET) is also supported by the DL205 system
( the CPU bottom ports do not support SM–NET). This means that the remote
I/O slaves (set for SM–NET mode) connected to a SM–NET master can be
a combination of T1K–RSSS and D2–RSSS and up to the maximum allowed
number of remote units and I/O points. Up to 614.4K baud rate is supported
by SM–NET. This protocol supports the built in RS–232 communications port
on the remote slave units.
Remote Master : The master
module(s) are mounted in the CPU
base.
The bottom port of the DL250, DL350
and DL450 can serve as a RM–NET
master.
Remote Slave – The T1K–RSSS
controllers are placed in each remote
slave location. Each slave has the I/O
circuitry required to be linked to the
master module via twisted pair cable.
NOTE: The Remote I/O Masters that support the T1K–RSSS are the D2–250,
D3–350, D4–450, D2–RMSM, D4–RM and D4–SM. The D4–RM and D4–SM will be
included in the next revision of this manual. The manuals for the D4–RM and
D4–SM accompanied by this manual will provide enough information to setup and
program the remote I/O system. The D4–RM and D4–SM are limited to 512 I/O
points per channel.
Getting Started
Remote I/O
Communication
Protocols
1–6
Getting Started
Getting Started
Number of Masters In its simplest form, you may want to use only one master in your CPU base and then
attach from one to seven remote slaves. However, in addition to the simple
and Slaves
Allowed (RM–NET) configuration, more than one master can be used in the CPU. You may use a
maximum of two (with DL240) and seven (with DL250) masters per CPU base, all of
which have to be the D2–RMSM module. Here is an example where we have used
two masters in the CPU base (one of which is the bottom port on the DL250 CPU)
and then attached a total of six remote I/O racks.
Two Masters in the Same Base (two channels, RM–NET)
Remote Masters
Maximum of:
CH 1
CH 2
Note: RM–NET. does not support the
serial communications port on the slaves.
205:
2 D2–RMSM per CPU base (DL240)
7 D2–RMSM per CPU base (DL250)
DL250 bottom port
305:
DL350 bottom port only
405:
DL450 bottom port only
3900ft
(1200m)
Max.
Remote Slaves
Maximum of
7 remote slaves
per channel
Allowable distance is from farthest slave to the remote master.
Distance Between
Slaves and Master,
Baud Rates
(RM–NET)
Each slave belonging to the same master is connected in a daisy chain using a
shielded twisted pair cable. The last slave unit in the daisy chain cannot be further
than 3900 feet from the CPU base. You must set rotary switches that designate the
slaves as No. 1, No. 2, etc. There is a DIP switch on each unit to set the baud rate for
communication. You have a choice of either 19.2 kB or 38.4 kB. The slaves and
master must be set to the same baud rate.
1–7
Getting Started
Two Masters in the Same Base (two channels, SM–NET)
CH 1
Remote Masters
Maximum of:
CH 2
Note: SM–NET. supports the serial
communications port on the slaves.
205:
2 D2–RMSM per CPU base (DL240)
7 D2–RMSM per CPU base (DL250)
Note: PLC bottom ports do not
support SM–NET.
3900ft
(1200m)
Max.
Remote Slaves
Maximum of:
31 remote units
per channel
Allowable distance is from farthest slave to the remote master.
Each slave belonging to the same master is connected together in a daisy chain
Distance Between
Slaves and Master, using a shielded twisted pair cable. At the lowest baud rate, the last slave unit in the
daisy chain cannot be farther than 3900 feet from the CPU base. You set rotary
Baud Rates
switches that designate the slaves as No. 1, No. 2, etc. There is a DIP switch on each
(SM–NET)
unit to set the baud rate for communication. You have a choice of 19.2 kB, 38.4
kB,153.6 kB, 307.2kB, or 614.4 kB. The slaves and master must be set to the same
baud rate. The T1K–RSSS serial communications port is active in SM–NET mode.
Getting Started
Number of Masters In the SM–NET mode, one master in your CPU base will allow you to attach from 1 to
31 remote I/O units. You may use a maximum of two (with DL240) and seven (with
and Slaves
Allowed (SM–NET) DL250) masters per CPU base, all of which have to be the D2–RMSM module.
Below is a SM–NET example where we have placed two masters in the CPU base
and then attached a total of six remote I/O units.
1–8
Getting Started
Getting Started
Choosing the
Protocol Mode –
RM–NET vs.
SM–NET
The two protocols, RM–NET and SM–NET, each have features which may be of
importance to your configuration. The system layout affects this choice, since there
is a difference in the number of slaves allowed, the possible baud rates, and the total
I/O link distance. First, let’s review the specifications for the two protocol modes:
Specification
RM–NET
SM–NET
Maximum # of Slaves (per channel)
7
31
Maximum # of I/O pts. per channel
(see note below)
2048* D2–RMSM
2048* D2–RMSM
2048* DL250 CPU port
2048* DL350 CPU port Note: CPU ports do
2048* DL450 CPU port not support SM–NET
Baud Rates
19.2K or 38.4K baud
19.2K, 38.4K, 153.6K,
307.2K, or 614.4K
baud
Transmission Distance
3900 ft (1.2Km)
3900 ft (1.2Km) @
19.2K or 38.4K baud
1968 ft (600m) @
153.6K baud
984 ft (300m) @
307.2K baud
328 ft (100m) @
614.4K baud
*Requires CPU firmware version: D2–250 version 1.51 or later, D3–350 version 1.30
or later, D4–450 version (SH)1.460 or (SH)2.460 or later and D2–RMSM version
1.55 or later. Earlier firmware version supports 512 I/O points per channel.
NOTE: Remote I/O Capacity – Total remote I/O available is actually limited by the total
references available.The DL250 CPU supports 512 X inputs and 512 Y outputs, so 1024
points is the limit for X and Y I/O references for local and remote I/O. It is possible to map
remote I/O into V memory to achieve more I/O points.
Based on system layout, there may be advantages in choosing one protocol over the
other. The comparison chart below lists these advantages in practical terms.
Reasons to Choose RM–NET vs SM–NET
RM–NET Advantages
SM–NET Advantages
Cost savings for system if first/only
channel is attached to CPU Port
Supplies high speed I/O expansion
Can use T1K–RSSS Remote Slave units
with DL450 for cost & space savings over
DL405 Remote I/O
When Remote I/O must be highly
distributed – need more slaves per
channel
Desire programming port or operator
interface port at remote slave
location(s)
1–9
Getting Started
How the CPU Updates Remote I/O Points
The CPU reads the
status of any input
points associated with
remote I/O and stores
the status in the input
image register.
CPU Scan
Remote Scan
Asynchronous to CPU scan
Read Inputs
Mapped into
memory using
your RLL.
The Remote Master obtains
the I/O status from the
Remote Slaves.
O000=40600 octal
O004=0008 bcd
Read Inputs from
Remote I/O
...
...
C2
C1
C0
ON OFF OFF
Input Image Register
Starting Address
00101100
Service Peripherals
CPU Bus Communication
Update clock, Special Relays
Solve the Application Program
C0
Y1
The status of the input image register
is used to solve the application
program.
Write Outputs
Write Outputs to Remote I/O
Diagnostics
Remote Master
Remote Master Buffer
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
0
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
C0
C1
Remote Slave #1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
In this example, we have 8 inputs
using the control relay C data type in
Slave #1.
Input Module
Getting Started
The CPU and remote master work together to update the remote I/O points. Below is
an example showing how scanning and updating takes place. Notice that there are
two independent scan cycles occuring at the same time, but asynchronously. The
CPU module is doing its scan which includes looking at the information that the
remote master is writing to its internal buffers.
During every CPU scan, the CPU examines the internal buffers of the remote
master, and updates input and output data from the remote I/O. It is very possible for
the CPU to be scanning faster than the remote master can do its scan. It is largely
dependent on the size of the application program, the baud rate you have selected
for the data transfer between the slaves and master, as well as the number of I/O
points being monitored. Therefore, if you have I/O points that must be monitored on
every CPU scan, it’s a good idea to place these critical I/O points in the local base.
1–10
Getting Started
Getting Started
3 Easy Steps for Setting Up Remote I/O
Figure out how much remote I/O you will need. This will, in turn, tell you which CPU
and the number of remote masters and slaves you will need. In the following
Design the Remote chapters, we will show you how to use worksheets to plan and keep track of your
data type assignments. We’ll also show you how to determine the correct addresses
I/O System
for reading and writing remote I/O data, as well as how to choose other remote I/O
system parameters. If analog remote I/O modules are used in the application, it
is recommended to use a DL250 CPU and V memory addressing for the remote
I/O. The analog modules consume either 256 and 512 discrete I/O points each.
The DL250 CPU supports “Bit–of–Word” instructions to access the bits in the
V memory data words.
1
Main Base with Master
C
16 16 16 16
P
U I I I O
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16 8
8
I O O
Slave 1
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16 16 16
I
I O
Slave 2
2
Install the
Components
3
Write the Setup
Program
Install the master(s) and the remote
slaves. Wire all of your I/O to match your
information in Step 1. Set the hardware
switches so that the CPU can identify the
master and slave units. This also will set
the baud rate for data transfer, protocol
selection, and other parameters.
Write the RLL setup program. Complete
programming examples are provided in
the following chapters.
SP0
LD
K48
Set up Input
and Output
Ranges
OUT
V2000
LD
K32
OUT
V2001
SP0
LD
K4
Store to
Shared
Memory
(partial
example)
LD
K4
LDA
O124
WT
V2000
1–11
Getting Started
Frequently Asked Questions
Q. What if I want to add remote I/O after I have programmed the system?
A. Your D2–RMSM setup program can allot unused I/O at the end of a slave, which
you can install at a later date. If the local base has blank slots, you can install a
D2–RMSM to add a new channel.
Q. Can I use a programmer or operator interface on the remote I/O link?
A. Yes, in the SM–NET protocol mode, the communications port on the T1K–RSSS
remote slave supports a handheld programmer, DirectSoft, or an operator interface.
Note that since the bottom port of the DL250, DL350 and DL450 CPUs support the
RM–NET mode only, you cannot use the serial communications port on slaves
which are attached to the CPU.
Q. What if my cable routing causes the channel communication cable to exceed the
maximum allowed distance?
A. You may need to reconsider the physical layout of your system. For example, you
could split one large channel into two channels whose individual cable lengths would
be acceptable. Or you could locate the local rack that contains the master modules in
the “center” of the system, and radiate multiple channel communications cables in
many directions.
Getting Started
Q. How much remote I/O can I have?
A. The physical limitation depends on the CPU and the protocol you select (i.e.
number of channels and number of slaves per channel). In terms of addressing the
remote I/O, you can use up to the maximum X input and Y output addresses allowed
for the CPU chosen (640 for the DL240, 1024 for the DL250) if you have no local I/O.
If you need more I/O points, you can define remote I/O to use the C (control relay)
memory type or V memory type, up to the maximum address available.
D2–RMSM/
T1K– RSSS
Remote I/O System
In This Chapter. . . .
Ċ D2-RMSM Features
Ċ T1K-RSSS Features
Ċ Setting the Rotary Switches
Ċ Setting the DIP Switches
Ċ Determine the System Layout
Ċ Connect the Wiring
12
2–2
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Remote Master (D2-RMSM) Features
RUN--Turns ON when the module
is operating correctly.
Remote Master
DIAG--Turns ON when there
is a hardware failure.
UNIT ADRS--Rotary switches for setting
the module to be the master – always set to 0
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
I/O--Turns ON when the
setup program is wrong
LINK--Turns ON when there is a
communications error.
T-–Terminating point that is connected
to point 1 with a jumper at the master
and final slave unit.
1--1st wire of twisted pair (+ Txd/Rxd)
DIP SWITCH--On rear of module
for setting baud rate and other
parameters.
Functional
# of Masters (channels) per CPU
Specifications
Channel Specifications:
I/O Points per Master (channel)
Maximum # of Slaves
Baud Rates
Transmission Distance
2--2nd wire of twisted pair (– Txd/Rxd)
3--Shield connection
2 max. for DL240, 7 + 1 max. for DL250 (built–in RM–
NET master feature in DL250 bottom port can be the
eighth master). The DL230 does not support Remote I/O.
RM–NET
SM–NET
2048 (requires firmware version 1.55 or later. Earlier firmware
versions support 512 I/O points per channel.
(see “Remote I/O Capacity” Note on following page)
7
Selectable
19.2K or 38.4K baud
3900 feet (1.2Km)
CPU Memory Type available for
Remote I/O
X Inputs
Y Outputs
Note: 8 channel analog modules Control Relays
consume 256 discrete I/O pts.
V Memory (words)
and 16 channel analog modules
consume 512 I/O pts. The DL250
CPU and V memory addressing
is recommended when using
analog I/O modules.
31
Selectable
19.2K, 38.4K, 153.6K,
307.2K, or 614.4Kbaud
3900 feet (1.2Km) @ 19.2K
or 38.4Kbaud
1968 feet (600m) @ 153.6Kbaud
984 feet (300m) @ 307.2Kbaud
328 feet (100m) @ 614.4Kbaud
DL240
320
320
256
1024
Module Type
Intelligent
Digital I/O Consumed
None
Communication Method
Asynchronous (half-duplex)
DL250
512
512
1024
7186
2–3
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
NOTE: Remote I/O Capacity – Total remote I/O available is actually limited by the total
references available.The DL250 CPU supports 512 X inputs and 512 Y outputs, so 1024 points is
the limit for X and Y I/O references for local/remote I/O. It is possible to map remote I/O into other
types of memory, such as control relays or V memory to achieve more I/O points.
The following specifications define the operating characteristics of the
D2–RMSM module.
Physical
Installation Requirements
Specifications
Internal Power Consumption
200 mA maximum
Communication Cabling
RS-485 twisted pair, Belden 9841 or equivalent
Operating Temperature
32 to 140° F (0 to 60_ C)
Storage Temperature
–4 to 158° F (–20 to 70_ C)
Relative Humidity
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
Environmental air
No corrosive gases permitted
Vibration
MIL STD 810C 514.2
Shock
MIL STD 810C 516.2
Noise Immunity
NEMA ICS3–304
The remote master queries the channel to detect which slaves are present in three
instances:
S on power up
S on transition from CPU Program Mode to Run Mode
S when user logic commands the remote master to log its parameters to
EEPROM
If an offline slave comes on after the master powers up, the master may never know
that a slave has returned to the network. If you select the Auto Return to Network
mode, the master can detect reinstated slaves at any time.
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Auto Return to
Network Option
CPU base only, any slot except adjacent to CPU
2–4
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Remote Slave (T1K-RSSS) Features
Top View
Bottom View
RUN--Turns ON when
communication is active.
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
DIAG--Turns ON when there
is a slave hardware failure.
I/OFast Blink: I/O error (250ms on/
off time)
Slow Blink: I/O configuration
error while outputs are enabled
(500ms on/off time)
Continous ON: I/O configuration
and I/O error at same time
Output Enable
Switch
-T
-1
-2
-3
Unit Address
Switches
LINK--Turns ON when there is a
communications error.
Remote I/O
Connector
Serial Port
T1K-RSSS
1 PULL TO UNLOCK
(Supported by
SM–NET only)
Remote I/O
Connector
Functional
Max. # of Slaves per channel
Specifications
RM–NET
7
SM–NET
31
Maximum I/O Modules per Slave
16 (be sure to check power budget)
Maximum Remote I/O Points per CPU
Note: 8 channel analog modules
consume 256 discrete I/O pts.
and 16 channel analog modules
consume 512 I/O pts. The DL250
CPU and V memory addressing is
recommended when using analog
I/O modules.
No remote I/O for DL230
DL240, DL250, support a maximum of 2048
points per channel. The actual I/O available is
limited by total available references. The DL240
has a total of 320 X inputs and 320 Y outputs
available to share between local and remote I/O.
The DL250 has a total of 512 X inputs and 512
Y outputs. Mapping remote I/O into control
relays or V memory of could allow more I/O
points for the DL240 or DL250.
Module Type
Non–intelligent slave
Digital I/O Consumed
Consumes remote I/O points at a rate equal to
the number of I/O points configured in each unit.
Communication Baud Rates
RM–NET
Selectable
19.2K or 38.4K baud
Communication Failure Response
Selectable to clear or hold last state of outputs
SM–NET
Selectable
19.2K, 38.4K,
153.6K, 307.2K,
or 614.4K baud
2–5
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
The following specifications define the operating characteristics of the T1K–RSSS
module.
Physical
Installation Requirements
Specifications
Base Power Requirement
250 mA maximum
Communication Cabling
for remote I/O, RS-485 twisted pair, Belden
9841 or equivalent
Slave Serial Communications Port
(active in SM–NET mode only)
RS232C (K–Sequence)
Dip switch selectable:
Baud rate: 4800–38400bps
Parity: odd (default), none
Fixed settings:
8 data bits, 1 start bit, 1 stop bit
Operating Temperature
32 to 131° F (0 to 55_ C)
Storage Temperature
–4 to 158° F (–20 to 70_ C)
Relative Humidity
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
Environmental air
No corrosive gases, pollution level = 2
(UL 840)
Vibration
MIL STD 810C 514.2
Shock
MIL STD 810C 516.2
Noise Immunity
NEMA ICS3–304
Impulse noise 1us, 1000V
FCC class A
RFI (144MHz, 430MHz, 10W, 10cm)
The port pinout is shown below: (The port is active in SM–NET only).
RJ12 plug on cable
RJ12 socket on T1K–RSSS
Port Pinout
1 2 3 4 5 6
Pin
1 2 3 4 5 6
Signal Definition
1
0V
2
5V
3
RS232C Data In
4
5
RS232C Data Out
5V
6
0V
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Serial Port
Pinout
mount to right of first power supply
2–6
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Setting the Rotary Switches
Both the remote master and slave have two small rotary switches to set the unit
address. They are on the face of the module, with the label “UNIT ADRS” beside it.
Adjust the switches by rotating them with a small flathead screwdriver.
Remote Slave
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Remote Master
Address
Selection
Switches
One switch is marked X1 and the other X10. Don’t confuse these with the
conventional data type labeling – these do not refer to inputs X1 and X10. Instead,
these set the address in decimal for each unit. X1 is the “one’s” position and X10 is
the “ten’s” position. For example, set address 13 by turning the X10 switch to 1 and
the X1 switch to 3 (10+3=13).
Align the arrows on the switches to 0 to use the module as a master (D2–RMSM
only). Set them to any number (1–7 for RM–NET mode or 1–31 for SM–NET mode) if
it will be a slave (T1K-RSSS). Two slaves cannot have the same number if they are
linked to the same master. Always use consecutive numbers for slaves, starting
with Address 1—don’t skip numbers.
2–7
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Setting the DIP Switches
The remote master (D2–RMSM) has an 8-position DIP switch labeled “SW3” that is
mounted toward the rear of the module on the PC board. The remote slave
(T1K–RSSS) also has an 8–position DIP switch labeled “SW1” that is located on the
side of the module under a hinged cover. Set these switches to configure the
protocol mode, the baud rate, the output response on communication failure and the
slave serial port settings. The word “ON” appears beside the switch to indicate the
ON position.
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Remote Master
(D2–RMSM)
Remote Slave
(T1K–RSSS)
DIP Switch located under
hinged cover
DIP
Switches
DIP Switch Settings
DIP Position
Module
1
Master
(RMSM)
Slave
(T1K–RSSS)
2,3,4
5
6
7
8
Mode
Baud Rate
Always OFF
OFF=SM–NET
Switch Position
ON=RM–NET Baud Rate
2 3 4
19.2K
O O O
38.4K
X O O
153.6K
O X O
307.2K
X X O
614.4K
O O X
where X=ON, O=OFFNote: Baud rates above
38.4K for SM–NET only
Always OFF
Always OFF Diagnostics
Mode
Baud Rate
Output Default
Same as Master
Same as Master
OFF=Clear
ON=Hold
Serial Port
Parity
OFF=Normal
ON=Diagnostic
OFF = Odd
ON = None
(Active in SM–NET
only)
Serial Port Baud Rate
(Active in SM–NET Only)
Baud Rate
4.8K
9.6K
19.2K
38.4K
where X=ON, O=OFF
DIP
position7 8
X O
O O
O X
X X
2–8
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Mode: DIP switch Position 1 on both the master and slave unit selects the protocol
mode for the remote I/O link. The Terminator remote I/O can use one of two
protocols, RM–NET or SM–NET. Chapters 1 and 2 discussed the features of these
protocols and the considerations for using each. Position 1 of the master and all
slaves linked to it must be set to the same setting in order to communicate. If there
are multiple masters in the system, each can use a different protocol if necessary.
Baud Rate: DIP switch Positions 2,3, and 4 on both the master and slave unit select
the baud rate for the remote I/O link. If you have selected the RM–NET protocol
mode, only Switch 2 selects the baud rate, either 19.2K or 38.4K baud. In this mode,
be sure to set switches 3 and 4 OFF. If you have selected the SM–NET protocol
mode, you set switches 2, 3, and 4 to select among five baud rates ranging from
19.2K to 614.4K baud. The higher the baud rate, the less distance is allowed
between the master and the end slave. See the D2–RMSM Functional
Specifications earlier in this chapter for the allowable distance at each baud rate. All
stations on a remote I/O link must have the same baud rate before the
communications will operate properly. If there are multiple masters in the system,
each can use a different baud rate if necessary.
Output Default: DIP switch Position 5 on the slave determines the outputs’
response to a communications failure. If DIP switch 5 is ON, the outputs in that slave
unit will hold their last state when a communication error occurs. If OFF, the outputs
in that slave unit will turn off in response to an error. The setting does not have to be
the same for all the slaves on an output channel.
The selection of the output default mode will depend on your application. You must
consider the consequences of turning off all the devices in one or all slaves at the
same time vs. letting the system run “steady state” while unresponsive to input
changes. For example, a conveyor system would typically suffer no harm if the
system were shut down all at once. In a way, it is the equivalent of an “E–STOP”. On
the other hand, for a continuous process such as waste water treatment, holding the
last state would allow the current state of the process to continue until the operator
can intervene manually.
WARNING: Selecting “HOLD LAST STATE” as the default mode means that
outputs in the remote bases will not be under program control in the event of a
communications failure. Consider the consequences to process operation
carefully before selecting this mode.
Diagnostics: DIP switch Position 8 on the master selects the factory diagnostic
mode, and should always be OFF. If the diagnostic mode is active, the module will
not operate correctly. Turning the diagnostic switch to the ON position and applying
power to the CPU base will clear the shared memory in the remote master module.
Be sure to remove the master module from the base and return the switch to the OFF
position for normal operation.
Slave Serial Port: DIP switch Positions 6, 7 and 8 on the slave select the parity and
baud rate for the slave’s serial communications port. The port is active only if the
remote I/O link is set for SM–NET protocol. Switch 6 selects the parity and switches 7
and 8 select the baud rate.
2–9
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Determine the System Layout
Determine I/O
Needed and How
Many Masters &
Slaves
Once you choose the hardware configuration you need, create a diagram of the
system I/O to help determine the amount and locations of remote bases. Below is a
drawing of a typical system with:
one master module in the main base.
S
main base has two input modules and two output modules, each with 16
points.
S
first remote base has two input and three output modules, each with 16
points.
S
second remote base has two 8-point input modules, two 8-point output
modules and one 16-point output module.
S
third remote base has three 16-point input modules, and two 16-point
output modules.
Main Base with Master
PS
CPU
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
Master
Module
Can go in any slot
except next to CPU
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
1st Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
O
Slave
Module
PS
2nd Remote
T1K–
RSSS
8
8
8
16
8
I
I
O
O
O
Slave
Module
PS
3rd Remote
T1K–
RSSS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
Slave
Module
This layout might be typical of a system which requires additional I/O at the CPU
location (beyond the local rack capacity), as well as a remote location or two.
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
S
2–10
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Define the System
Details By Using
Worksheets
Completing the
Channel
Configuration
Worksheet
(top half)
In Appendix A of this manual you will find worksheets for designing the remote I/O
system and defining its parameters. We suggest that you photocopy these sheets
and use them to map out the details of your system. Assuming this will be your
procedure, this chapter will walk you through the process using the example system.
The Channel Configuration Sheet defines the operating parameters for a channel.
The Remote Slave Worksheet records the amount and addresses of the I/O for each
slave. First, select the Channel Configuration Worksheet to determine the
characteristics for each channel (master) in the system.
The top half of the following Channel Configuration Worksheet shows the parameter
choices for the single master in our example system. This helps determine the
hardware settings and the setup program data. We chose RM–NET for illustration
purposes.
Main Base with Master
Slot 4
Channel Configuration Worksheet
PS
CPU
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
19.2
Operator Interface
1st Remote
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
153.6
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______ Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16
I
Slave
Module
PS
T1K–
RSSS
T1K–
RSSS
I
16
O
16
O
16
O
2nd Remote
8
8
8
16
8
I
I
O
O
O
Slave
Module
PS
16
3rd Remote
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Total Outputs ________
Slave
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs Station
N/A
N/A
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Slave
Module
NOTE: The slot number of the master is important because the setup program uses
it to address the master module.
Now that we have determined the hardware layout and the channel parameters, we
can fill in the details for the three remote units
2–11
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
We have filled in the following remote slave worksheet to match the first remote I/O
Completing the
base of the example system.
Remote Slave
Worksheet for
Slave #1
Main Base with Master
Remote Slave Worksheet
PS
CPU
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
1
Remote Unit Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
Slot
Number
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
T1K–
RSSS
16
I
16
I
16
O
16
O
16
O
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs
Output Address
No. of Outputs
16ND3
X40
16
16ND3
X60
16
2
16TD1
Y40
16
3
16TD1
Y60
16
4
16TD1
Y100
16
5
X40-X57 X60-X77 Y40-Y57 Y60-Y77 Y100-Y117
V40402 V40403 V40502 V40503 V40504
Slave
Module
6
7
2nd Remote
PS T1K–
RSSS
X040
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
40402
8
8
8
16
8
I
I
O
O
O
32
Total Input Points_____
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
Y040
40502
48
Total Output Points_____
Slave
Module
PS
T1K–
RSSS
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 port setup program
requires these addresses for each slave.
3rd Remote
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
Slave
Module
Starting Addresses From Appendix B = V40402
Input
V40502
Output
In this example, the CPU base has 64 points allocated to its input and output
modules, which the CPU automatically configures as points X0 thru X37 and Y0 thru
Y37. Thus, the starting address for the first remote base inputs can start at X40 (or
higher) and the starting address for outputs can be Y40 (or higher). The far
right-hand column of each of these charts shows the “bit start” address. For
example, for the bit start address for input X40, you look for X40 on the chart. There
you find the cross-referenced register address: 40402. On the output chart, you
cross-reference Y40 with 40502. Enter these numbers on the worksheet, as you will
use them later in your setup logic.
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
PS
INPUT
Input Address
1
0
1st Remote
Module
Name
2–12
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Now let’s do the same thing for the second remote I/O base.
We have filled in the following remote slave worksheet to match the second remote
I/O base of the example system.
Completing the
Remote Slave
Worksheet for
Slave #2
Main Base with Master
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
PS
CPU
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
Remote Slave Worksheet
2
Remote Unit Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
1st Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
INPUT
OUTPUT
Slot
Number
Module
Name
Input Address
0
08ND3
X100
8
1
08ND3
X110
8
No. of Inputs
Output Address
No. of Outputs
2
08TD1
Y120
8
16
16
16
16
16
3
16TD1
Y130
16
I
I
O
O
O
4
08TD1
Y150
8
5
X40-X57 X60-X77 Y40-Y57 Y60-Y77 Y100-Y117
V40402 V40403 V40502 V40503 V40504
Slave
Module
6
7
2nd Remote
40404
X100
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
PS
T1K–
RSSS
8
8
8
16
8
I
I
O
O
O
X100-X107 X110-X117 Y120-Y127 Y130-Y147 Y150–Y157
V40404
V40505
V40505 – V40506
Slave
Module
PS
T1K–
RSSS
3rd Remote
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
16
Total Input Points_____
40505
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
Y120
32
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
program requires these addresses for each slave.
Slave
Module
Based on the V-memory addresses we chose, the D2–RMSM allocated points X40
to X77 to Remote Slave #1’s inputs, and Y40 to Y117 to its outputs. This means the
starting address for the second remote base inputs is X100 (assigned automatically
by the remote master) and the starting address for outputs is Y120 (assigned
automatically).
2–13
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Now let’s do the same thing for the third remote I/O base.
We have filled in the following remote slave worksheet to match the third remote I/O
base of the example system.
Completing the
Remote Slave
Worksheet for
Slave #3
Remote Slave Worksheet
Main Base with Master
PS
CPU
16
16
I
16
O
Slot
Number
O
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
1st Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
O
Module
Name
INPUT
Input Address
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs
Output Address
No. of Outputs
0
16NA
X120
16
1
16NA
X140
16
2
16NA
X160
16
3
16TA
Y160
16
4
16TA
Y200
16
5
6
X40-X57 X60-X77 Y40-Y57 Y60-Y77 Y100-Y117
V40402 V40403 V40502 V40503 V40504
Slave
Module
PS
Slave
Module
40405
X120
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
2nd Remote
T1K–
RSSS
7
48
Total Input Points_____
8
8
8
16
8
40507
Y160
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
I
I
O
O
O
32
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
X100-X107 X110-X117 Y120-Y127 Y130-Y147 Y150–Y157 Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
V40404
V40505
V40505 – 40506
program requires these addresses for each slave.
3rd Remote
PS T1K–
RSSS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
X120-X137 X140-X157 X160-X177 Y160-Y177 Y200-Y217
V40405 V40406 V40407
V40507 V40510
Slave
Module
The D2–RMSM allocated X100 to X117 to Remote Slave #2’s inputs, and Y120 to
Y157 to its outputs. This means the starting address for the third base inputs is X120
(assigned automatically) and the starting address for outputs is Y160 (assigned
automatically).
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
I
16
3
Remote Unit Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
2–14
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Completing the
Channel
Configuration
Worksheet
(bottom half)
To complete the Channel Configuration Worksheet, we retrieve information from the
Remote Slave Worksheets. Transfer the V-memory addresses for the inputs and
outputs of Remote Slave # 1, and the input and output range for each slave to the
Channel Worksheet to prepare to write the setup program.
Remote Slave Worksheet
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
1
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
Remote Unit Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET) Slot
INPUT
OUTPUT
Module
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
19.2
Operator Interface
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
Number
153.6
40402 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
40502
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______
96
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
112
Total Outputs ________
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
Slave
Station
0
1
INPUT
Module
Name Input Address No. of Inputs
16NA
16NA
2
16NA
3
16TA
4
16TA
X120
X140
X160
Input Address No. of Inputs
Output Address No. of Outputs
16ND3
X40
16
1
16ND3
X60
16
2
16TD1
Y040
16
3
16TD1
Y060
16
4
16TD1
Y100
16
5
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
N/A
0
N/A
16
1
32
48
17
16
32
2
18
3
48
32
19
4
20
5
21
6
22
7
23
8
24
9
25
10
26
11
27
12
28
13
Remote Slave 29
Worksheet
14 Unit Address_________(Choose
3
Remote
1–730
for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
15
31
Slot
Number
Name
0
OUTPUT
Output Address No. of Outputs
16
16
16
Y160
Y200
16
16
6
7
X40
40402
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
32
Total Input Points_____
Y40
40502
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
48
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence
based on Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450
port setup program requires these addresses for each slave.
Remote Slave Worksheet
2
Remote Unit Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
Slot
Number
INPUT
Module
Name Input Address No. of Inputs
OUTPUT
Output Address No. of Outputs
0
08ND3
X100
8
1
08ND3
X110
8
2
08TD1
Y120
8
3
16TD1
Y130
16
4
08TD1
Y150
8
5
6
5
7
6
X100
40404
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
7
X120
40405
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
48
Total Input Points_____
Y160
40507
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
32
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence
based on Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 port
setup program requires these addresses for each slave.
16
Total Input Points_____
Y120
40505
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
32
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence
based on Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450
port setup program requires these addresses for each slave.
Add the input and output ranges for the slaves to find the total input and output
ranges for the channel. Enter the totals as shown on the Configuration Worksheet.
2–15
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Connecting the Wiring
General Wiring
Guidelines
Consider the following wiring guidelines when wiring the communication cabling in
your system:
Cable
Recommendation
The recommended cable for connecting the master and slaves is a single twisted
pair cable, Belden 9841 or equivalent. This cable meets the RS-485 standard for
communications. Its impedance specification is 120 ohms per thousand feet.
Cabling Between
the Master and
Slaves
The diagram shown below depicts the cabling between the D2-RMSM master and
its slaves. The two inner wires are connected to terminals 1 and 2 of each module.
The shield wire is connected to terminal 3. Make sure the the connections between
master and all slaves are always 1 to 1, 2 to 2 and 3 to 3.
Master
Slave 1
Slave 2
Slave 3
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
1. Always use a continuous length of cable. Do not combine cables to attain a
needed length.
2. Use the shortest possible cable length.
3. Where possible, use conduit for cable routing.
4. Avoid running cable near high energy wiring.
5. Where possible, avoid running communications cabling in close proximity
to AC wiring.
6. Avoid creating sharp bends in the cables.
7. Label all wires.
2–16
D2–RMSM/T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
With this configuration, you use the
internal resistor of the module to provide
all the terminating resistance necessary.
Place a jumper wire between the
terminating terminal and terminal 1.
Option 2:
Use Internal Resistor and Balance
Resistor
To better match the impedance of the
cabling, you can elect not use the internal
resistor; and instead, use a resistor of
your choice externally. Connect this
resistor between terminals 1 and 2. You
do not use the jumper wire in this case.
T
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
1
2
Jumper
Wire
3
Internal Wiring
D2–RMSM / T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
Option 1:
Use Internal Resistor Only
Internal Wiring
At each end of a master/slave system, it is necessary to have a termination resistor
to prevent signal reflections from interfering with the communications. Although the
modules have a 150 ohm resistor built in for this purpose, there are three options to
consider:
T
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
1
2
3
You add your own resistor,
using a resistor between
100 and 500 ohms.
Option 3:
External Resistor in Series
With this option, you use an external
resisor in series with the internal resistor.
The sum resistance should match the
cabling impedance.
Internal Wiring
Termination
Resistors
T
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
1
2
3
You use an external
resistor in series with
the internal resistor.
D2–RMSM Setup
Programming and
Troubleshooting
In This Chapter. . . .
13
Ċ Getting Started with the Programming
Ċ Writing the Remote I/O Setup
Ċ Example Program Using Discrete Modules
Ċ Example Program Using Analog Modules
Ċ Changing Configurations
Ċ Shared Memory Table for D2-RMSM
Ċ Troubleshooting Remote I/O
Ċ Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics
Ċ D2-RMSM Memory for Diagnostics
Ċ How to Access Diagnostic Information
3–2
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Getting Started with the Programming
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
You can write your program using either a handheld programmer or a PC loaded with
software such as DirectSOFT. The examples that follow will show you how to do it
using DirectSOFT.
To get started, enter DirectSOFT and carry out the normal DirectSOFT setup
procedures for communicating with your DL205 CPU. If you do not know how to do
this, refer to your DirectSOFT Manual. Your DL205 User’s Manual has a very good
coverage of the basic commands available and examples of using the commands to
write general ladder logic. We will be showing you in this chapter only those
commands that pertain to setting up your remote I/O initialization and its successful
utilization.
First open DirectSOFT from Windows and establish a link with your CPU. Then
enter the Edit Mode for programming. You should now be looking at a screen similar
to the one shown below:
The DirectSOFT window shown above depicts a program that has already been
written. Your window, of course, will be empty when you first enter it. The pages that
follow will show you how to write each part of your initialization program.
3–3
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Writing the Remote I/O Setup
Step 1:
Decide How You
Are Going to Call
Your Program
Is your setup logic going to be in the main program body or is it going to be in a
subroutine?
A subroutine for your remote I/O setup has an advantage over writing the code into
the program’s main body. Some remote I/O setup logic becomes quite lengthy. By
putting the setup in a subroutine, you don’t have to scroll through extra logic during
routine troubleshooting procedures. We advise you to use a subroutine for your
remote I/O initialization. Here’s how:
Using the GTS Command for the Setup Logic
Note: SP0 is a special relay contact which energizes
only on the first scan of the program
SP0
DirectSOFT Display
K1
GTS
Main program body goes here
SBR
K1
Subroutine will go down here
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
END
3–4
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
Step 2:
Write the Setup
Logic for Each
Channel
Whether you choose to write the remote I/O setup program as a subroutine or as a
part of the main program, the procedure is still the same. You have several things
you must do for each channel of remote I/O:
S Tell the remote master to initiate setup, and define the auto return to
network option.
S Tell the remote master the starting V-memory address for inputs and
outputs, and the total number of each for the channel. You do this with
address pointers and constant data.
S Tell the remote master how many input and output points are located in
each base.
S Tell the remote master to save the parameters in EEPROM (setup is
complete).
To write the setup logic, we use the CPU instructions described below. If you are not
familiar with these instructions, you may want to refer to the DL205 User Manual for
more details and examples.
The Load instruction is a 16-bit instruction that loads the value
(Aaaa), which is either a V-memory location or a 4-digit
constant, into the lower 16 bits of the accumulator. The upper
16 bits of the accumulator are set to 0.
LD
The Load Address instruction is a 16 bit instruction. It converts
any octal value or address to the HEX equivalent value and
loads the HEX value into the accumulator.
LDA
O aaa
The OUT instruction is a 16 bit instruction that copies the
values in the lower 16 bits of the accumulator to a specified
V-memory location (Aaaa).
OUT
A aaa
The WT instruction writes a block of data (1–128 bytes
max.) to an intelligent I/O module from a block of
V-memory in the CPU. The function parameters (module
base/slot address, number of bytes, and the intelligent I/O
module memory address) are loaded into the first and
second level of the accumulator stack, and the
accumulator by three additional instructions. In the WT
instruction, Aaaa specifies the starting V-memory address
where the data will be written from in the CPU.
A aaa
WT
A aaa
You use these instructions to set up the configuration data in a block of V-memory
which serves as a buffer. Use WT instructions to store the data to various shared
memory locations in the Remote Master module. Use your worksheets to assist you
in creating the setup logic.
3–5
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Example Program Using Discrete I/O Modules
Example 1:
Addressing using
X and Y Memory
To illustrate the setup program for a system using X’s as remote inputs and Y’s as
remote outputs, we will use the example system from Chapter 2, shown here with a
completed Channel Configuration Worksheet.
The first block of logic tells the remote master to initiate the setup, and to enable the
Auto Return to Network option. To find the D2–RMSM shared memory addresses
used in the setup program, refer to the Shared Memory Table at the end of this
chapter.
Write Configuration Byte
Channel Configuration Sheet
Main Base with Master
PS
CPU 16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
Operator Interface
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
16
16
16
16
I
O
O
O
Slave
Station
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
2nd Remote
8
8
8
16
8
I
I
O
O
O
X100-107 X110-117 Y120-127 Y130-147 Y150–Y157
V40404
V40505
V40506
3rd Remote
PS
T1K– 16
RSSS I
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
153.6
NO
NO
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
X120-137 X140-157X160-177Y160-177Y200-217
V40405 V40406 V40407 V40507 V40510
SP0
LD
K87
OUT
LD
K1
LDA
WT
No. Inputs
No. Outputs
N/A
N/A
32
16
48
32
48
32
No. Inputs
No. Outputs
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Bits 0,1,2 ON initiates the setup
Bit 7 defines Auto Return to Network (ON=Yes)
V2000 Choose a word of available V memory to use as a buffer
K04
LD
112
Total No. Outputs ________
Slave
Station
Master address: High byte is rack (0), low byte is slot (4)
Number of bytes to write to shared memory (1 byte)
O176 Shared memory address of configuration byte
V2000
Write value in lower byte of V2000 to Master memory
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
96
Total No. Inputs ________
X40-X57 X60-X77 Y40-Y57 Y60-Y77 Y100-Y117
V40402 V40403 V40502 V40503 V40504
PS T1K–
RSSS
38.4
40402 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _______
40502
Starting Input V Memory Address: V_______
1st Remote
16
PS T1K–
RSSS I
19.2
3–6
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
This block of logic tells the remote master the starting V-memory addresses for the
inputs and outputs, and the total number of each for the channel. Use the LD, LDA,
and OUT commands to load the starting addresses and point totals into temporary
memory, then write the values to the master’s shared memory. The Quick Reference
Table shows the correct shared memory addresses in octal.
The LDA instruction
uses octal numbers,
designated by the
capital O in front of
the number.
Write Input and Output Pointers, and
Input and Output Ranges for Channel
SP0
LDA
O40402 Input V–memory
OUT
V2001
V–memory buffer
LDA
O40502 Output V–memory
OUT
V2002
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
K04
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
LD
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
LDA
19.2
Operator Interface
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
153.6
40402 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
40502
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______
96
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
LD
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
SP0
O00
V2001
LD
K96
112
Total Outputs ________
Slave
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs Station
N/A
WT
K4
32
16
N/A
48
32
48
32
OUT
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
Number of bytes
Shared Memory address
Write Master memory
Input points total
K112 Output points total
OUT
LD
V2012 V–memory buffer
K04
LD
K4
LDA
WT
Master module address
V2011 V–memory buffer
LD
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
V–memory buffer
O124
V2011
Master module address
Number of bytes
Shared Memory address
Write Master memory
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
D2–RMSM
Setup Initiation Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
3–7
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
This block of logic tells the remote master how many input and output points are
located in each base. Each group of four instructions loads the I/O ranges for a slave
into temporary memory, the values for which are retrieved from the Remote Slave
Worksheets. The WT instruction stores the entire buffer area to the master’s shared
memory. The Quick Reference Table shows the correct shared memory addresses
in octal.
Write Input and Output Ranges for
each Slave
SP0
LD
K32
OUT
LD
LD
LD
V2004 V–memory buffer
V2005 V–memory buffer
K32 Slave 2 Output points
LD
V2006 V–memory buffer
K48
OUT
LD
Slave 3 Input points
V2007 V–memory buffer
32 Slave 3 Output points
OUT
LD
LD
LDA
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
19.2
Operator Interface
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
153.6
V2010 V–memory buffer
K04
Master module address
K12
Number of bytes
O04
Shared Memory address
V2003
96
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
N/A
32
16
N/A
48
32
48
32
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
Write Master memory
The last four instructions write the slaves’
range data to the Master’s shared memory.
Address 004 is the start of the slave data;
the byte length of 12 writes 6 consecutive
words of data.
112
Total Outputs ________
Slave
Station
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
OUT
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
40402 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
40502
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______
K16 Slave 2 Input points
OUT
WT
V2003 V–memory buffer
K48 Slave 1 Output points
OUT
SP0
Slave 1 Input points
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM
Configuration Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
3–8
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Write Setup Complete (store channel parameters to EEPROM)
SP0
LD
KC1
OUT
V2013
LD
LD
LDA
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
WT
K04
K1
Constant that commands master to
store parameters to EEPROM
V memory buffer
Master module address
Number of bytes
O177
Shared Memory address of Setup Complete Byte
V2013
Write Master memory
We can now complete the setup program.This last block of logic tells the remote
master to save the parameters in EEPROM (setup is complete). The setup complete
logic structure is the same for any channel using a D2–RMSM as a master.
The completed setup program for this example is shown on the next page.
3–9
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Completed Setup Program for X and Y Addressing
SP0
RLL Program
K1
GTS
Go to remote
I/O subroutine
Main Program Body
END
SBR K1
from bottom of previous column
Remote I/O Subroutine
Initiate Setup
K87
OUT
LD
K4
LD
K1
LDA
O176
WT
SP0
V2000
LD
OUT
V2011
LD
K112
OUT
V2012
LD
Store to
Shared
Memory
K4
LD
K4
LDA
O124
WT
SP0
V2011
LDA
O40402
Set up Input
and Output
Pointers
OUT
V2001
OUT
K4
LD
K4
LDA
O0
WT
V2001
LD
K32
Set up 1st
Remote Input
and Output
Ranges
to top of next column
Store in temporary memory
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table below
Write Address Config. data
total number of input points
Store in temporary memory
total number of output points
OUT
V2003
LD
K48
OUT
V2004
Set up 3rd
Remote Input
and Output
Ranges
SP0
OUT
Store in temporary memory
V2005
LD
K32
OUT
V2006
Store to
Shared
Memory
number of input points
Store in temporary memory
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
V2007
LD
K32
OUT
V2010
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
WT
V2003
LD
KC1
OUT
V2013
LD
K4
LD
K1
LDA
O177
WT
V2013
Write total range data
Store in temporary memory
LD
O4
Store to
Shared
Memory
number of output points
LD
LDA
Set up Complete Code
Store in temporary memory
OUT
K12
SP0
number of output points
LD
K4
Store in temporary memory
Address From Table Below
Write slave range data
C1 means store settings
Store in temporary memory
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Write Setup Complete Byte
RT
Starting input address (X040)
Store in temporary memory
LDA
V2002
SP0
Bits 0,1,2=7 initiates setup
Bit 7=1 sets Auto Return to Network
O40502 Starting output address (Y040)
LD
Store to
Shared
Memory
Set up 2nd
Remote Input
and Output
Ranges
Store in temporary memory
Note: Use K4 for 1 slave, K8 for 2 slaves
K12 for 3 slaves ...
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
D2–RMSM
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Write input and output pointers
Setup Initiation Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
number of input points
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
Store in temporary memory
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
number of output points
Store in temporary memory
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
K96
Set up Channel
Input and Output Ranges
number of input points
K48
LD
V2000
Store to
Shared
Memory
LD
K16
SP0
first scan relay
SP0
SP0
3–10
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Example Program Using Analog I/O Modules
Example 2:
Addressing using
V–Memory
The following example uses Terminator I/O discrete and analog I/O modules. It is
recommended to use V memory addressing when using analog modules
since each analog I/O channel uses a double (two) word each. Thus, an 8
channel analog I/O module uses 256 discrete points and a 16 channel analog I/O
module uses 512 discrete points. Analog output modules are configured using
the Module Control Byte located in the most significant byte of the most significant
word of channel 1 of the module. V memory addressing requires the use of
“Bit–of–Word” (DL250 only) instructions to address the I/O points.
The first block of logic tells the remote master to initiate the setup, and to enable the
Auto Return to Network option. To find the D2–RMSM shared memory addresses
used in the setup program, refer to the Shared Memory Table at the end of this
chapter.
Write Configuration Byte
Channel Configuration Sheet
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
Main Base with Master
PS
CPU 16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Operator Interface
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
Slave
Station
1st Remote
256
16
512
16
I
I
O
O
V3000 V3020 V3100
–V3017
–V3137
T1F–08AD–2
38.4
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
153.6
NO
NO
3000
v3100
Starting Input V Memory Address: V_______
Starting Output V Memory Address: V _______
272
528
Total No. Inputs ________
Total No. Outputs ________
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
PS
19.2
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
V3140
T1F–16DA–2
Use Bit–of–Word instructions to address the I/O
points when mapping the remote I/O to V memory.
SP0
LD
K87
OUT
LD
K1
LDA
WT
No. Outputs
N/A
N/A
272
528
Slave
Station
No. Inputs
No. Outputs
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Bits 0,1,2 ON initiates the setup
Bit 7 defines Auto Return to Network (ON=Yes)
V2000 Choose a word of available V memory to use as a buffer
K04
LD
No. Inputs
Master address: High byte is rack (0), low byte is slot (4)
Number of bytes to write to shared memory (1 byte)
O176 Shared memory address of configuration byte
V2000
Write value in lower byte of V2000 to Master memory
3–11
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
This block of logic tells the remote master the starting V-memory addresses for the
inputs and outputs, and the total number of each for the channel. Use the LD, LDA,
and OUT commands to load the starting addresses and point totals into temporary
memory, then write the values to the master’s shared memory. The Quick Reference
Table shows the correct shared memory addresses in octal.
The LDA instruction
uses octal numbers,
designated by the
capital O in front of
the number.
Write Input and Output Pointers, and
Input and Output Ranges for Channel
SP0
LDA
O3000 Input V–memory
OUT
V2001
LDA
O3100 Output V–memory
OUT
V2002
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
LD
K04
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
LD
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
LDA
19.2
Operator Interface
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
153.6
3000 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
3100
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______
Slave
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs Station
N/A
272
N/A
528
O00
V2001
LD
K272
OUT
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
Number of bytes
Shared Memory address
Write Master memory
Input points total
K528 Output points total
OUT
LD
V2012 V–memory buffer
K04
LD
K4
LDA
WT
Master module address
V2011 V–memory buffer
LD
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
V–memory buffer
O124
V2011
Master module address
Number of bytes
Shared Memory address
Write Master memory
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
D2–RMSM
Setup Initiation Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
SP0
K4
528
Total Outputs ________
272
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
WT
V–memory buffer
3–12
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
This block of logic tells the remote master how many input and output points are
located in each base. Each group of four instructions loads the I/O ranges for a slave
into temporary memory, the values for which are retrieved from the Remote Slave
Worksheets. The WT instruction stores the entire buffer area to the master’s shared
memory. The Quick Reference Table shows the correct shared memory addresses
in octal.
Write Input and Output Ranges for
each Slave
SP0
LD
OUT
LD
OUT
K272
Slave 1 Input points
V2003 V–memory buffer
K528 Slave 1 Output points
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
4 (1–7)_
Master Slot Address _____
Protocol Selected _________
RM–NET (RM–NET or SM–NET)
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
RM–NET
Configuration Parameter
SM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Operator Interface
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
LD
LD
LDA
WT
38.4
N/A
Auto Return to Network (either protocol)
YES
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2 614.4
YES
NO
YES
NO
153.6
3000 Starting Output V Memory Address: V _____
3100
Starting Input V Memory Address: V______
V2004 V–memory buffer
272
Total Inputs ________
Slave
Station
SP0
19.2
K04
Master module address
K4 Number of bytes
O04
Shared Memory address
V2003 Write Master memory
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
528
Total Outputs ________
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
N/A
N/A
528
272
The last four instructions write the slaves’
range data to the Master’s shared memory.
Address 004 is the start of the slave data;
the byte length of 4 writes 2 consecutive
words of data.
Slave
Station
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
D2–RMSM
Configuration Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
3–13
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Write Setup Complete (store channel parameters to EEPROM)
SP0
LD
KC1
OUT
V2013
LD
LD
LDA
WT
K04
K1
Constant that commands master to
store parameters to EEPROM
V memory buffer
Master module address
Number of bytes
O177
Shared Memory address of Setup Complete Byte
V2013
Write Master memory
The completed setup program for this example is shown on the next page.
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
We can now complete the setup program.This last block of logic tells the remote
master to save the parameters in EEPROM (setup is complete). The setup complete
logic structure is the same for any channel using a D2–RMSM as a master.
3–14
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Completed Setup Program for V–Memory Addressing
SP0
RLL Program
K1
GTS
Go to remote
I/O subroutine
SP0
LD
K4
Main Program Body
END
SBR K1
from bottom of previous column
Remote I/O Subroutine
LD
Store to
Shared
Memory
K4
LDA
O4
WT
V2003
first scan relay
SP0
Initiate Setup
LD
K87
OUT
V2000
Store to
Shared
Memory
LD
K4
LD
K1
LDA
O176
WT
SP0
V2000
LD
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
K272
Set up Channel
Input and Output Ranges
OUT
V2011
LD
K528
OUT
V2012
LD
Store to
Shared
Memory
K4
LD
K4
LDA
O124
WT
SP0
V2011
LDA
O3000
Set up Input
and Output
Pointers
OUT
V2001
LDA
O3100
OUT
V2002
LD
K4
Store to
Shared
Memory
SP0
LD
K4
LDA
O0
WT
V2001
LD
K272
Set up 1st
Remote Input
and Output
Ranges
to top of next column
OUT
V2003
LD
K528
OUT
V2004
Bits 0,1,2=7 initiates setup
Bit 7=1 sets Auto Return to Network
SP0
Store in temporary memory
Set up Complete Code
Rack/Slot Address of Master
LD
Write Address Config. data
V2013
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Write slave range data
Rack/Slot Address of Master
C1 means store settings
Store in temporary memory
LD
K4
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table below
KC1
OUT
Rack/Slot Address of Master
LD
K1
Store to
Shared
Memory
LDA
O177
WT
V2013
total number of input points
RT
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Write Setup Complete Byte
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Store in temporary memory
total number of output points
Store in temporary memory
Analog Programming example
continued on next page
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Write total range data
Starting input address (V3000.0)
Quick Reference Table
of Shared Memory Addresses
Store in temporary memory
D2–RMSM
Starting output address (V3100.0))
Setup Initiation Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
Store in temporary memory
Rack/Slot Address of Master
Number of bytes to write
Address From Table Below
Output Number of Number of
Slave Input
Address Address Input Pts Output Pts
ALL
000
002
124
126
1
N/A
N/A
004
006
Write input and output pointers
2
N/A
N/A
010
012
number of input points
3
N/A
N/A
014
016
4
N/A
N/A
020
022
5
N/A
N/A
024
026
6
N/A
N/A
030
032
7
N/A
N/A
034
036
Store in temporary memory
number of output points
Store in temporary memory
3–15
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Completed Setup Program for V–Memory Addressing (con’t)
Main Program Body
V3000
– Bipolar
– 0–5VDC
SP1
SP0
Set Analog
Output Module
Control Bits
SP1
LD
B3101.10
OUT
0= All module outputs OFF
1= All module outputs Enabled
B3101.11
SET
0= Unipolar
1=Bipolar
B3101.12
RST
BCD
OUT
V3500
V3000
>
_
K2000
LD
ADDB
K1FFF
OUT
V4000
C0
OUT
The BIN instruction converts the accumulator
data to binary (omit this step if the conversion
is done elsewhere.)
OUT
V3136
The INVERT and ADDB instructions
convert the incoming 2’s compliment
signal data to binary plus sign bit.
B3020.0
Mask channel sign bit
The OUT instructions stores the binary
data in a new register. Add a BCD instruction prior to this OUT instruction if i
is necessary to convert to BCD
Channel 1 data is negative when C0 is
ON
B3140.12
Example of discrete remote
OUT
I/O point addressing
The OUT instruction sends the data to
channel 16 of the analog output module
The Control Bits of an Analog Output module are located in the most significant byte of
the most significant word of the first output channel (channel 1).
Channel 1 Memory Map
of 8&16-Channel Analog Output Module
(T1F–08DA, T1F–016DA)
Decimal Bit
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Octal Bit
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Size
Analog Value Channel 1
Write Byte 1
Analog Value Channel 1
Write Byte 2
not used
Write Byte 3
Module Control Byte
Write Byte 4
Module Control Byte of 8&16-Channel Analog Output Module
(T1F–08DA, T1F–16DA)
Decimal Bit
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
Octal Bit
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
Read/Write
Bit 24
Outputs Enable
0 = All outputs OFF
1 = All outputs Enabled
Write
Bit 25
Unipolar / Bipolar
0 = Unipolar selected
1 = Bipolar selected
Write
Bit 26
5V / 10V Range
0 = 5V range
1 = 10V range
Write
Bit 27
0 – 20mA / 4–20mA Range
0 = 0 – 20mA range
1 = 4 – 20mA range
Write
Bit 28 – 31
Reserved for system use
–
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
The OUT instruction sends the data to
channel 1 of the analog output module
V3100
Loads analog input channel 1 data into
K1
ANDD
Analog output data register
OUT
The OUT instructions stores the BCD
data in a new register
INV
K2000 is used above
to monitor the channel
sign bit. It comes ON if
the signal is negative.
BIN
Use the BCD instruction to convert thebinary analog input data to BCD if
necessary to do math or other BCD
operations
V3000 the accumulator
Read Negative
Analog Input
Data
0= 5V Range
1=10V Range
V2100
Loads analog input channel 1 data into
V3000 the accumulator
Analog Output Module Control Bits
LD
Send Data to
Analog Output
Module
K2000
Read Positive
Analog Input
Data
Configure T1F–16DA–2 Analog Output Module:
Use X, C, etc. permissive
contact if needed
<
3–16
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Changing Configurations
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
If you have stored a configuration to the D2–RMSM via the setup program and need
to change it, follow these guidelines to ensure the module accepts the new
configuration:
1. Change the constants in the setup program that are affected by the new
system configuration. For example, if you add an I/O module to a remote
slave unit, you must change the input or output range for that slave, as well
as the range total for the channel. If the new range totals do not match the
sum of the individual slave ranges, the D2–RMSM will not accept the new
configuration. It will retain the old configuration, and give you an I/O error.
2. If you are removing a slave from the channel, you must change the logic of
the setup program to clear that slave’s range data in the D2–RMSM shared
memory. Otherwise it will still see the old data from the previous
configuration. For example, if you remove the third slave from our example
system, you would load a constant of zero into the slave’s input and output
range data, located at buffer memory addresses V2007 and V2010. If
removing I/O, remember to reduce the total I/O range values also.
3. After you have modified the setup program, cycle CPU power, or transition
from the STOP to RUN mode to execute the new setup logic. This is
necessary if the setup logic executes on the first CPU scan.
4. If you get an error after making the appropriate set up program
changes, it may be necessary to clear the shared memory in the
remote master module. To clear the shared memory in the master
module, you will need to:
1) Remove CPU base power and remove the remote master module from
the base.
2) Turn on Dip switch 8 on the master module and return it to the base.
3) Apply power to the CPU base noting that the master module LEDs cycle
through and then all come ON.
4) Remove CPU base power and remove the remote master module from
the base.
5) Turn off Dip switch 8 on the master module and return it to the base.
6) Apply power to the CPU base and check for proper remote I/O operation.
3–17
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Shared Memory Table for D2–RMSM Remote Master
OCTAL
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
(Slaves 1–15)
FUNCTION
(Slaves 16–31)
#
Bytes
For memory addresses 000 to 077, the user’s setup program must store the correct values into these locations.
Starting V–memory address for inputs on
the channel (in octal)
Number of input points for Slave 16
2
002
Starting V–memory address for outputs on
the channel (in octal)
Number of output points for Slave 16
2
004
Number of input points for Slave 1
Number of input points for Slave 17
2
006
Number of output points for Slave 1
Number of output points for Slave 17
2
010
Number of input points for Slave 2
Number of input points for Slave 18
2
012
Number of output points for Slave 2
Number of output points for Slave 18
2
014
Number of input points for Slave 3
Number of input points for Slave 19
2
016
Number of output points for Slave 3
Number of output points for Slave 19
2
020
Number of input points for Slave 4
Number of input points for Slave 20
2
022
Number of output points for Slave 4
Number of output points for Slave 20
2
024
Number of input points for Slave 5
Number of input points for Slave 21
2
026
Number of output points for Slave 5
Number of output points for Slave 21
2
030
Number of input points for Slave 6
Number of input points for Slave 22
2
032
Number of output points for Slave 6
Number of output points for Slave 22
2
034
Number of input points for Slave 7
Number of input points for Slave 23
2
036
Number of output points for Slave 7
Number of output points for Slave 23
2
040
Number of input points for Slave 8
Number of input points for Slave 24
2
042
Number of output points for Slave 8
Number of output points for Slave 24
2
044
Number of input points for Slave 9
Number of input points for Slave 25
2
046
Number of output points for Slave 9
Number of output points for Slave 25
2
050
Number of input points for Slave 10
Number of input points for Slave 26
2
052
Number of output points for Slave 10
Number of output points for Slave 26
2
054
Number of input points for Slave 11
Number of input points for Slave 27
2
056
Number of output points for Slave 11
Number of output points for Slave 27
2
060
Number of input points for Slave 12
Number of input points for Slave 28
2
062
Number of output points for Slave 12
Number of output points for Slave 28
2
064
Number of input points for Slave 13
Number of input points for Slave 29
2
066
Number of output points for Slave 13
Number of output points for Slave 29
2
070
Number of input points for Slave 14
Number of input points for Slave 30
2
072
Number of output points for Slave 14
Number of output points for Slave 30
2
074
Number of input points for Slave 15
Number of input points for Slave 31
2
076
Number of output points for Slave 15
Number of output points for Slave 31
2
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
000
3–18
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
OCTAL
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
DETAIL
#
Bytes
18
100 – 121
Reserved
122
Status of Rotary Switches on module –
Read Only
Data is 00 to 1F hex, representing the address of the module set by the rotary
switches.
1
123
Status of DIP Switches on module – Read
Only
Bit status represents the setting of each
switch on the module’s DIP Switch , which
sets configuration parameters. 0=OFF,
1=ON.
1
Bit 0
SW1 status
Bit 1
SW2 status
Bit 2
SW3 status
Bit 3
SW4 status
Bit 4
SW5 status
Bit 5
SW6 status
Bit 6
SW7 status
124
Number of input points committed to the
entire channel
Bit 7
SW8 status
User’s setup program stores the correct
BCD value to this memory location.
126
Number of output points committed to the
entire channel
User’s setup program stores the correct
BCD value to this memory location.
2
2
3–19
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
OCTAL
ADDRESS
130 – 131
FUNCTION
DETAIL
Communication stop mode selection (com- In communication stop mode, the master
munication stops when any specified slave stops updating the entire channel when a
fails)
communication error occurs with any specified slave station. To select this mode for
each slave, turn ON the corresponding bit
of the shared memory shown below.
Address 130
Bit 0
2
Address 131
Entire channel Slave 16
stops when any
slave fails
Slave 1
Slave 17
Slave 2
Slave 18
Slave 3
Slave 19
Slave 4
Slave 20
Slave 5
Slave 21
Slave 6
Slave 22
Slave 7
Slave 23
Slave 8
Slave 24
Slave 9
Slave 25
Slave 10
Slave 26
Slave 11
Slave 27
Slave 12
Slave 28
Slave 13
Slave 29
Slave 14
Slave 30
Slave 15
Slave 31
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
#
Bytes
3–20
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
OCTAL
ADDRESS
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
132 – 133
FUNCTION
Slave removal mode selection (communication stops to only the slave(s) with a
communication error)
DETAIL
#
Bytes
In slave removal mode, the master stops
updating only the slave(s) with a
communication error. It continues updating
the I/O for the other slaves on the channel.
To select this mode for each slave, turn
ON the corresponding bit of the shared
memory shown below.
2
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
Bit 3
Bit 4
Bit 5
Bit 6
Bit 7
Bit 8
Bit 9
Bit 10
Bit 11
Bit 12
Bit 13
Bit 14
Bit 15
134
Communication hold or resume mode
135 – 137
Reserved
140
Network Error Flags – Read Only
Address 132
Address 133
Not used
Slave 1
Slave 2
Slave 3
Slave 4
Slave 5
Slave 6
Slave 7
Slave 8
Slave 9
Slave 10
Slave 11
Slave 12
Slave 13
Slave 14
Slave 15
Slave 16
Slave 17
Slave 18
Slave 19
Slave 20
Slave 21
Slave 22
Slave 23
Slave 24
Slave 25
Slave 26
Slave 27
Slave 28
Slave 29
Slave 30
Slave 31
The program can cause the
communications on a channel to stop by
setting the first bit in this byte ON. After
communication stops, only a mode
transition of the CPU (from STOP to RUN)
will restart the communications. The bit is
not cleared automatically, so if using this
mode, the user program should clear this
byte on the first scan.
1
3
Bit status represents network errors
detected by the D2–RMSM. 0=OK,
1=ERROR
Bit 0
Configuration Error (see Address
142 for details)
Bit 1
Communication Error (see
Address 144 for details)
Bit 2
Diagnostics Error (see Address
150 for details)
2
3–21
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
OCTAL
ADDRESS
142
FUNCTION
Configuration Error Code – Read Only
DETAIL
Error code in BCD
20
Total inputs exceeds 512
21
Total outputs exceeds 512
24
I/O address out of I/O range
25
I/O address allocated to bad range
29
A slave has more than 512
points
70
Discrepancy between current
configuration and old one
71
A module is in the wrong slot
72
Slave configuration is different
from old one
73
Different slave is there
#
Bytes
1
Station Number of Configuration Error –
Read Only
Station number in BCD
1
144
Communication Error Code – Read Only
Error code in BCD
1
01
slave does not respond
02
wrong I/O information
03
I/O update error : CRC check error
145
Station Number of Communication Error
Code – Read Only
Station number in BCD
1
146
Communication Error Counter – Read
Only
Number of communication errors detected
since CPU went into RUN mode, in BCD
2
150
Diagnostics Error Code
Error code in BCD
2
152
Reserved
153
Station number of Diagnostics error –
Read Only
0201
Terminal block removed
0202
module not present
0203
Blown fuse
0206
Low battery voltage
0226
Power capacity exceeded
1
Station number in BCD
1
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
143
3–22
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
OCTAL
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
DETAIL
#
Bytes
4
154 – 157
Reserved
160
Current bus scan time – Read Only
BCD value of current bus scan, in msec
2
162
Bus scan time upper limit
User can store BCD value of bus scan
upper limit, in msec. Default is 100 msec.
2
164
Shortest bus scan time – Read Only
BCD value of shortest bus scan detected
since CPU went into RUN mode, in msec
2
166
Longest bus scan time – Read Only
BCD value of longest bus scan detected
since CPU went into RUN mode, in msec
2
170
Bus scan counter – Read Only
BCD value of number of bus scans detected since CPU went into RUN mode
2
172
Overlimit Bus scan counter – Read Only
BCD value of number of bus scans which
have exceeded the scan time upper limit
2
174 – 175
Reserved
176
Setup Initiation Byte (includes Auto Return
to Network)
2
User’s setup program stores the correct bit
pattern to this memory location to
configure the following modes:
1
Bits 0,1, and 2 must be ON to initiate setup
of remote slave addressing
Bit 7
177
Copy Configuration to EEPROM ( Setup
Complete)
ON=Specifies that offline
slaves can return to the
network without cycling CPU
User’s setup program stores a BCD value
to this location to log the parameters
stored by the setup program to the
Master’s EEPROM.
1
C1 – Signifies that setup is complete.
Hint: This should be the last function of
your setup program.
200 – 374
Reserved
125
3–23
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
OCTAL
ADDRESS
375
376 – 377
FUNCTION
Slave Page Selection
Reserved
DETAIL
#
Bytes
User’s setup program stores a BCD value
to this location to select the page of slave
parameters for setup programming:
1
81
Slaves 1–15
82
Slaves 16–31
2
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
3–24
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Quick Reference Table of Shared Memory Addresses
D2–RMSM
Setup Initiation Byte
176
Setup Complete Byte
177
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
Slave
Output Points
002
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
124
004
010
014
020
024
030
034
040
044
050
054
060
064
070
074
126
006
012
016
022
026
032
036
042
046
052
056
062
066
072
076
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
000
004
010
014
020
024
030
034
040
044
050
054
060
064
070
074
002
006
012
016
022
026
032
036
042
046
052
056
062
066
072
076
Output
Address
ALL
000
1
N/A
2
N/A
3
N/A
4
N/A
5
N/A
6
N/A
7
N/A
8
N/A
9
N/A
10
N/A
11
N/A
12
N/A
13
N/A
14
N/A
15
N/A
2nd page of slave range data
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Address
Number of
Input Points
Input
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of
3–25
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Remote I/O
Troubleshooting
Quick Steps
NOTE: If you need more in-depth troubleshooting, see the chart on the next page. It
provides several different indicator patterns that may help identify your exact
problem.
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
If the remote I/O channel does not seem to be working correctly, check the following
items. These items represent the problems found most often.
1. 1. Cable and connections. Incorrectly wired cables and loose terminations
cause the majority of problems. Verify you’ve selected the proper cable
configuration and check the cable, making sure it is wired correctly. Also
check the cable routing to ensure that the installation guidelines in Chapter
2 were followed.
1. 2. Incorrect Baud Rate. Make sure you’ve set all T1K–RSSS units to match
the communication parameters set on the master station.
1. 3. Incorrect protocol. Make sure you’ve set all T1K–RSSS units to match
the protocol setting on the master station.
1. 4. Setup program. Check the setup program for errors such as incorrect
pointers or constants, or writing to the wrong module address. Be sure that
the total inputs and outputs values match the sum of the individual slave
input and output ranges; otherwise, the D2–RMSM will not accept the
setup data. If program errors were corrected and the remote I/O channel
still does not seem to be working correctly, it may be necessary to clear the
shared memory in the remote master module. Refer to step 4 in the
Changing Configurations section earlier in this chapter.
3–26
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Chart The following chart identifies the indicator status, possible cause, and corrective
off
on
flash
action for a variety of commonly found problems.
Master Station
Indicators
RUN
RUN is off.
Slave Station
Indicators
RUN
DIAG
DIAG
I/O
I/O
LINK
LINK
RUN
RUN is on.
RUN
DIAG
DIAG
I/O
I/O
LINK
LINK
LINK is on.
Possible Cause
Corrective Action
1. Master PLC power is
disconnected.
1. Check the PLC power
source.
2. Remote Master is defective.
2. Replace the Remote
Master.
1. Switch setting on master or
slave station is incorrect.
1. Check the DIP switches on
Remote Master and slaves
to ensure their baud rate
and protocol settings
match.
2. Communications wiring is
incorrect.
2. Check the communications
wiring and termination
resistors.
RUN
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
DIAG
RUN is
flashing,
I/O is on.
I/O
I/O
LINK
RUN
LINK is on.
RUN
DIAG
I/O
I/O
LINK
LINK
RUN
DIAG
I/O
LINK
RUN
DIAG
Lights
blink in
sequence,
then all
lights turn
on.
RUN is on.
2. I/O totals do not match values
in D2–RMSM shared memory
124 and 126.
DIAG
LINK
DIAG
1. Setup program is not correct.
RUN
RUN
DIAG
I/O
LINK
RUN
DIAG
I/O
I/O
LINK
LINK
1. Check the setup program to
ensure pointer values and
configuration constants are
correct.
2. Check the I/O totals against
the sum of the individual
slave ranges in the setup
program.
I/O is
flashing
1. I/O module failure at slave.
2. Slave module is missing
24VDC power.
1. Check the I/O modules in
the slave unit for failures.
3. Slave base pwer budget
overloaded.
Lights
blink in
sequence,
then all
lights turn
on
1. Module’s Diagnostic DIP switch 1. Check the Diagnostic DIP
is ON.
switch on Master or slave
to ensure that it is off.
I/O is on.
1. Rotary switches’ setting for
slave ID exceeds valid address
for chosen protocol.
1. Check rotary switches on
slave for valid unit number:
must be 31 or less
for SM–NET,
must be 7 or less
for RM–NET
3–27
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics
Communication
Status Flags in
V-memory
This table provides a listing of the individual flags in V-memory for communication
status. The corresponding bit of V-memory turns ON when the slave is
communicating. Station 0 represents the master; its bit turns on when
communication begins with its slaves. You may use DirectSOFT or the application
program to monitor these flags. If there is a communications error, this memory may
not show the correct data.
Master in Slot No.:
Station
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
N/A
V7661
V7662
V7663
V7664
V7665
V7666
V7667
Bit 0
1
Bit 1
2
Bit 2
3
Bit 3
4
Bit 4
5
Bit 5
6
Bit 6
7
Bit 7
8
Bit 8
9
Bit 9
10
Bit 10
11
Bit 11
12
Bit 12
13
Bit 13
14
Bit 14
15
Bit 15
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
0
3–28
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Error Flags in
V-memory
This table provides a listing of the individual flags in V–memory for slave errors. The
corresponding bit of V-memory turns ON when the slave has an error. Station 0
represents the master; its bit turns on when an error occurs with any slave. You may
use DirectSOFT or the application program to monitor these flags. If there is a
communications error, this memory may not show the correct data.
Master in Slot No.:
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
Station
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
N/A
V7671
V7672
V7673
V7674
V7675
V7676
V7677
0
Bit 0
1
Bit 1
2
Bit 2
3
Bit 3
4
Bit 4
5
Bit 5
6
Bit 6
7
Bit 7
8
Bit 8
9
Bit 9
10
Bit 10
11
Bit 11
12
Bit 12
13
Bit 13
14
Bit 14
15
Bit 15
3–29
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
D2–RMSM Memory for Diagnostics
Status and error information about the D2–RMSM Remote Master module and its attached
remote I/O network are available in the Remote Master shared memory described earlier in
this chapter.
Hardware Status
Octal address status bytes 122 – 123 available in the D2–RMSM shared memory report the
hardware settings. You can implement logic to read these bytes to check your configuration
without having to remove the module.
Bus Scan Status
Octal address status bytes 160–172 available in the D2–RMSM shared memory provide
information on bus performance. You can implement logic to read these bytes to check your
configuration without having to remove the module.
Network Errors
Octal address status bytes 140 – 146 available in the D2–RMSM shared memory provide
information on network errors and their location. You can implement logic to read these bytes
to check your configuration without having to remove the module.
The next section provides specific examples on how to read status data from the Master
module.
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
3–30
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
How to Access Diagnostics Information
To access diagnostics information, we exchange data with the D2–RMSM module.
The remote master unit is an intelligent module, which means it operates
asyncronously from the CPU, and it has its own memory. We use the CPU
instructions described below to communicate with an intelligent module.
The WT instruction writes a block of data (1–128 bytes
max.) to an intelligent I/O module from a block of
V-memory in the CPU. The function parameters (module
base/slot address, number of bytes, and the intelligent I/O
module memory address) are loaded into the first and
second level of the accumulator stack, and the
accumulator by three additional instructions. In the WT
instruction, Aaaa specifies the starting V-memory address
where the data will be written from in the CPU. Listed
below are the steps to program the WT instruction:
SP0
LD
K04
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
LD
K2
LDA
WT
O162
V2015
LD
K04
LD
K2
LDA
RD
O122
V2020
A aaa
Load the base number (0) into the first byte and the slot number (1–7)
into the second byte of the second level of the accumulator stack.
Load the number of bytes to be transferred into the first level of the
accumulator stack.
Load the intelligent module address which will receive the data into
the accumulator. We use the LDA to convert the octal address into its
HEX equivalent.
Insert the WT instruction, which specifies the starting V–memory
location where the data will be written from in the CPU.
The RD instruction reads a block of data (1–128 bytes
max.) from an intelligent I/O module into the CPU’s
V–memory. The function parameters (module base/slot
address, number of bytes, and the intelligent I/O module
memory address) are loaded into the first and second
level of the accumulator stack, and the accumulator by
three additional instructions. In the RD instruction, Aaaa
specifies the starting V–memory address where the
intelligent module stores the data in the CPU. Listed
below are the steps to program the RD instruction:
SP0
WT
RD
A aaa
Load the base number (0) into the first byte and the slot number (1–7)
into the second byte of the second level of the accumulator stack.
Load the number of bytes to be transferred into the first level of the
accumulator stack.
Load the intelligent module address from which the data will be read
into the accumulator. The parameter must be a HEX value.
Insert the RD instruction, which specifies the starting V–memory location where the data will be stored.
3–31
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Example 1:
The diagnostic error information can assist you in locating errors on a remote I/O
Reading Diagnostic network, either during installation or for a previously operating system. During
installation, we might expect configuration errors caused by incorrect switch settings
Errors
or an invalid setup program. For a previously operating system, the diagnostics can
help locate such faults as a slave not responding, an I/O module not present, or a
loose terminal block.
In this example, we read the network error flags each scan, and if there is a
configuration error present, we read the error details.
Each scan, read the network error flags
SP1
LD
K04
LD
K2
LDA
RD
Load master address (rack=0, slot=4)
Load the number of bytes to read
Load the shared memory address location of the
O140 network errors
Read the network error flags from the master
V2020 into V–memory
Move the network error flags to C relays to use as flags for testing
SP1
V2020
OUTF
K8
Load the network error flags into accumulator
C100 Store the lower byte to C relays C100–107
If there is a configuration error (C100 is ON), read the configuration
error code
C100
LD
K04
LD
K1
LDA
RD
O142
V2021
Load master address (rack=0, slot=4)
Load the number of bytes to read
Load the location of the configuration error code
Read the configuration error code from the
master into V–memory
Read the station number where the configuration error occurred
C100
LD
K04
LD
K1
LDA
RD
O143
V2022
Load master address (rack=0, slot=4)
Load the number of bytes to read
Load the location of the configuration error station
number
Read the configuration error station number
from the master into V–memory
To read communication errors (C101 ON) and diagnostic errors (C102
ON), implement similar logic to check the flag and read the error
details.
You can then use the retrieved data in logic or display it in a Dataview
in DirectSOFT to determine the nature and location of the error. The
Network Error Table describes the error codes.
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
LD
3–32
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Example 2: Writing
Bus Scan Overlimit
and Reading Bus
Scan Status
In certain applications, the scan time of the remote I/O bus can be an important factor
in the response time of the system. Factors which affect the scan time include
number of slaves on the bus and the baud rate. Required bus performance may
dictate your system layout. For example, you may want to increase the number of
remote channels in the system to decrease the number of slaves on each channel.
Or you may need to choose SM–NET as the protocol to operate at a higher baud
rate.
Bus scan performance data includes current bus scan time, the longest and shortest
scans detected, a scan counter, and a scan overlimit counter. The overlimit counter
records the number of times the scan has exceeded the overlimit value. The
overlimit value, in msec, can be set by the user’s logic; the default is 100 msec.
In this example, we demonstrate how to set the bus scan overlimit parameter, and
then read the bus scan data to check performance.
On the first scan, load the desired bus scan overlimit parameter value
into V memory
SP0
LD
K75
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
OUT
Load the overlimit value, in msec, into Vmemory
V2030
Store the overlimit value to the D2–RMSM shared memory
SP0
LD
K04
LD
K2
LDA
WT
Load master address (rack=0, slot=4)
Load the number of bytes to read
Load the shared memory address location of the
O162 overlimit parameter
Write the overlimit value to the master from V-
V2030 memory
On every scan, read all bus scan diagnostic information from the
master into V-memory
SP1
LD
LD
LDA
RD
K04
Load master address (rack=0, slot=4)
K12
Load the number of bytes to read
O160 Load the starting location of the bus scan information
Read the bus scan information from the master
V2031 into V-memory
You can then use the retrieved data in logic or display it in a Dataview
in DirectSOFT (shown on the next page) to monitor bus performance.
The Bus Scan Status Table describes the definitions of the status
values.
3–33
D2–RMSM Setup Programming and Troubleshooting
Bus scan performance data displayed in a Dataview
D2–RMSM
Setup Programming
DL250 / DL350 / DL450
CPU With T1K–RSSS
Remote I/O System
In This Chapter. . . .
14
Ċ DL250/D350/DL450CPU Bottom Port as Remote Master
Ċ Remote Slave (T1K-RSSS) Features
Ċ Configuring the Bottom Port of the DL250/DL350/450 CPU
Ċ Setting the T1K-RSSS Rotary Switches
Ċ Setting the T1K-RSSS DIP Switches
Ċ Examples for Typical Configurations
Ċ DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory for Bottom Port
Ċ DL250/DL350/DL450 V Memory Port Setup Registers
Ċ Connecting the Wiring
Ċ Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics
4–2
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port as Remote Master
For the D2–250, D3–350 CPU or D4–450, the most cost-effective way to add remote
I/O is to use the bottom port of the CPU as a remote master. The restriction is that it
operates in the RM–NET protocol only, which means a maximum of seven slaves at
a maximum baud rate of 38.4 kBaud. Also, the slave serial communications port is
not active in RM–NET protocol.
This configuration requires some setup programming for the CPU. You can write
your program using either a handheld programmer or DirectSOFT Programming
Software. The examples that follow will show you how to do this using DirectSOFT.
To get started, launch DirectSOFT and carry out the normal DirectSOFT setup
procedures for communicating with your DL250, DL350 or DL450 CPU. If you do not
know how to do this, refer to your DirectSOFT User Manual. Your PLC User
Manuals have very good coverage of the basic commands available and examples
of using the commands to write general ladder logic. We will be showing you in this
chapter only those commands that pertain to setting up your remote I/O initialization.
Built In Remote I/O Master Port
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
DL450
DL350
DL250
RM–NET
Master
Port 2
RM–NET
Master
Remote I/O Master Functional Specifications
CPU built-in Remote I/O channels
Maximum I/O points supported by each channel
Maximum number of remote I/O slaves per channel
DL250
DL350
DL450
1
1
1
2048*
2048*
2048*
7
7
7
Transmission Distance (max.)
Communication Method
Port 3
3900 feet (1.2Km)
Asynchronous (half–duplex)
X Inputs available for Remote I/O
512
512
1024
Y Outputs available for Remote I/O
512
512
1024
Control Relays available for Remote I/O
1024
1024
2048
V Memory (words) available for Remote I/O
7168
7168
14848
*Requires CPU firmware version: D2–250 version 1.51 or later, D3–350 version 1.30
or later, and D4–450 version (SH)1.460 or (SH)2.460 or later. Earlier firmware
version supports 512 I/O points per channel.
4–3
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Remote Slave (T1K-RSSS) Features
Top View
Bottom View
RUN--Turns ON when
communication is active.
DIAG--Turns ON when there
is a slave hardware failure.
I/OFast Blink: I/O error (250ms on/off
time)
Slow Blink: I/O configuration
error while outputs are enabled
(500ms on/off time)
Continuous ON: I/O Configuration
and I/O error simultaneously
Output Enable
Switch
-T
-1
-2
-3
Unit Address
Switches
Remote I/O
Connector
LINK--Turns ON when there is a
communications error.
Serial Port
T1K-RSSS
1 PULL TO UNLOCK
(Supported by
SM–NET only)
Remote I/O
Connector
Functional
Max. # of Slaves per channel
Specifications
Maximum # of I/O Modules per Slave
RM–NET
7
16 (be sure to check power budget)
Module Type
Non–intelligent slave
Digital I/O Consumed
Consumes remote I/O points at a rate equal to
the number of I/O points configured in each unit.
Communication Baud Rates
RM–NET
Selectable:
19.2K baud
38.4k baud
Communication Failure Response
Selectable to clear or hold last state of outputs
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Maximum Remote I/O Points per CPU DL250, DL350 and DL450 support a maximum of
2048 points per channel. The actual I/O available
is limited by total available references. For examNote: 8 channel analog modules
ple, the DL250 has a total of 512 X inputs and
consume 256 discrete I/O pts.
512 Y outputs. Mapping remote I/O into control
and 16 channel analog modules
relays or V memory of could allow more I/O
consume 512 I/O pts.
points for the DL250.
V memory addressing is recommended when using analog I/O
modules.
4–4
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
The following specifications define the operating characteristics of the
T1K–RSSS module.
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Physical
Installation Requirements
Specifications
mount to right of first power supply
Base Power Requirement
250 mA maximum
Communication Cabling
for remote I/O, RS-485 twisted pair, Belden
9841 or equivalent
Slave Serial Communications Port
not active in RM–NET mode
Operating Temperature
32 to 131° F (0 to 55_ C)
Storage Temperature
–4 to 158° F (–20 to 70_ C)
Relative Humidity
5 to 95% (non-condensing)
Environmental air
No corrosive gases, pollution level = 2
(UL 840)
Vibration
MIL STD 810C 514.2
Shock
MIL STD 810C 516.2
Noise Immunity
NEMA ICS3–304
Impulse noise 1us, 1000V
FCC class A
RFI (144MHz, 430MHz, 10W, 10cm)
4–5
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Configuring the Bottom Port of the DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
To configure the port using the Handheld Programmer, use AUX 56 and follow the
prompts, making the same choices as indicated below on this page. To configure the
port in DirectSOFT, choose the PLC menu, then Setup, then Setup Secondary
Comm Port. The port can also be configured using ladder logic code.
S
S
Port: From the port number list box at the top, choose “Port 2” for the
DL250 and DL350. Choose “Port 3” for the DL450.
Protocol: Click the check box to the left of “Remote I/O” (called
“M–NET” on the HPP), and then you’ll see the dialog box shown below.
Setup Communication Ports
Port:
Protocol:
Memory Address:
Station Number:
Baud Rate:
S
S
K-sequence
DirectNET
MODBUS
Non-sequence
Remote I/O
V37700
0
Close
Help
ChoosePort 3 for
DL–450
38400
Memory Address: Choose a V-memory address to use as the starting
location of a Remote I/O configuration table (V37700 is the default). This
table is separate and independent from the table for any Remote
Master(s) in the system.
Station Number: Choose “0” as the station number, which makes the
DL250, DL350 or DL–450 the master. Station numbers 1–7 are reserved
for remote slaves.
Baud Rate: The baud rates 19200 and 38400 baud are available.
Choose 38400 initially as the remote I/O baud rate, and revert to 19200
baud if you experience data errors or noise problems on the link.
Important: You must configure the baud rate on the Remote Slaves (via
DIP switches) to match the baud rate selection for the CPU’s Port 2
(DL450 port 3).
Then click the button indicated to send the Port 2
or Port 3 configuration to the CPU, and click Close.
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
S
Port 2
4–6
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Setting the T1K–RSSS Rotary Switches
The slave has two small rotary switches to set the unit address. They are on the face
of the module, with the label “UNIT ADRS” beside it. Adjust the switches by rotating
them with a small flathead screwdriver.
Remote Slave
Remote Master
(DL250, 350 or 450)
Address
Selection
Switches
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Set Port 2
(Port 3 DL450)
Address to 0
using
DirectSoft or
ladder logic
code
One switch is marked X1 and the other X10. Don’t confuse these with the
conventional data type labeling – these do not refer to inputs X1 and X10. Instead,
these set the address in decimal for each unit. X1 is the “one’s” position and X10 is
the “ten’s” position. For example, set address 7 by turning the X10 switch to 0 and the
X1 switch to 7.
Set them to any number 1–7 for RM–NET. Two slaves cannot have the same number
if they are linked to the same master. Always use consecutive numbers for
slaves, starting with Address 1—don’t skip numbers.
4–7
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Setting the T1K–RSSS DIP Switches
The remote slave has an 8–position DIP switch labeled “SW1” that is located on the
side of the module under a hinged cover. Set these switches to configure the
protocol mode, the baud rate, the output response on communication failure. The
slave serial port is not active in RM–NET mode. The word “ON” appears beside the
switch to indicate the ON position.
Remote Slave
(T1K–RSSS)
DIP Switch located under
hinged cover
DIP
Switches
DIP Position
Module
1
Slave
2,3,4
5
Mode
Baud Rate
Output Default
OFF=SM–NET
Switch
Position
OFF=Clear
(T1K–RSSS)
ON=RM–NET Baud Rate
2 3 4
ON=Hold
19.2K
O O O
38.4K
X O O
Note: Higher baud rate are
not supported by RM–NET
6,7,8
Serial Port not active in
RM–NET mode
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
DIP Switch Settings
4–8
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Mode: DIP switch Position 1 on both the master and slave unit selects the protocol
mode for the remote I/O link. Since the CPU port only supports the RM–NET
protocol, Position 1 of the master and all slaves linked to it must be set to the ON
position in order to communicate.
Baud Rate: RM–NET protocol mode supports either 19.2K or 38.4K baud. In this
mode, only switch Position 2 is used to set the baud rate. Be sure to set switches 3
and 4 OFF. All stations on a remote I/O link must have the same baud rate before the
communications will operate properly.
Output Default: DIP switch Position 5 on the slave determines the outputs’
response to a communications failure. If DIP switch 5 is ON, the outputs in that slave
unit will hold their last state upon a communication error. If OFF, the outputs in that
slave unit will turn off in response to an error. The setting does not have to be the
same for all the slaves on an output channel.
The selection of the output default mode will depend on your application. You must
consider the consequences of turning off all the devices in one or all slaves at the
same time vs. letting the system run “steady state” while unresponsive to input
changes. For example, a conveyor system would typically suffer no harm if the
system were shut down all at once. In a way, it is the equivalent of an “E–STOP”. On
the other hand, for a continuous process such as waste water treatment, holding the
last state would allow the current state of the process to continue until the operator
can intervene manually .
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
WARNING: Selecting “HOLD LAST STATE” as the default mode means that
outputs in the remote bases will not be under program control in the event of a
communications failure. Consider the consequences to process operation
carefully before selecting this mode.
4–9
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Example Program Using Discrete I/O Modules
Example 1:
Using X and Y
Addresses as
the Remote I/O
Memory Types
A typical system uses X and Y memory types for the inputs and outputs on the
remote I/O channel.
To illustrate the setup program for this configuration, we will use the remote I/O
system below, shown with the completed Channel Configuration Worksheet.
The first block of logic tells the CPU the station number of the port, communication
V-memory address, and the baud rate setting. Define the constant value based on
these selections (see DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table at the end of
this chapter), and then write the value to the reserved V-memory address in the
CPU. You can also perform this function interactively with DirectSOFT (see
“Configuring the Bottom Port of the CPU“, earlier in this chapter).
Write Port Setup Word
DL350 CPU in Main Base (–1 base addressing)
DL250 CPU in Main Base
250
CPU
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
X0-X17 X20-X37 X40-X57 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40402 V40500 V40501
bottom
port of CPU
is remote
master
16
16
16
16
O
O
I
I
350
CPU
Y60–Y77 Y40–Y57 X20-X37 X0-X17
V40503 V40502 V40401 V40400
bottom port of
CPU is remote
master
to thoroughly understand addressing
conventions and restrictions for the
DL350, refer to the DL305 User
Manual
the setup program will be identical
for either a DL250 or DL350 CPU
Channel Configuration Worksheet
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
1st Remote
16
I
16
8
16
16
I
I
O
O
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Remote I/O Configuration table Starting address
19.2
38.4
37700
V__________
(V37700 is default)
X200–X217 X220-X237 X240-X247 Y200-Y217 Y220-Y237
V40410 V40411 V40412
V40510
V40511
2nd Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
Slave
Station
8
8
16
I
I
O
X260–X267 X270–X277 Y240–Y257
V40413
V40512
The port setup ladder code is optional.
The port can be setup using DirectSoft
SP0
LD
OUT
Kbfc0
Constant defines station as master,
V-memory table at V37700, and
baud rate of 38.4 kBaud
V7656 V-memory address of setup word
OUT V777 for DL450
See Port Setup Registers later in this
chapter for more information
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
INPUT
Input Address
V40410
V40413
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs Output Address No. of Outputs
48
16
V40510
V40512
32
16
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
PS
T1K–
RSSS
4–10
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
To calculate the input and output addresses and ranges, complete the Remote Slave
Worksheets and fill in the V-memory addresses for each slave, not just the first one.
You can transfer this data to the Channel Configuration Worksheet to condense it, or
fill in the Channel Worksheet directly if you choose not to use the Remote Slave
Worksheets.
Calculate input and output addresses
and ranges for each remote base
1st Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
16
16
I
8
I
16
I
Remote Slave Worksheet
1
Remote Base Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
16
O
O
X200–X217 X220-X237 X240-X247 Y200-Y217 Y220-Y237
V40410 V40411 V40412
V40510
V40511
2nd Remote
INPUT
OUTPUT
Slot
Number
Module
Name
0
16ND3
X200
1
16ND3
X220
16
2
08ND3
X240
16 (8 used)
3
4
Output Address
No. of Outputs
16TD1
Y200
16
16TD1
Y220
16
Input Address
No. of Inputs
16
5
PS
T1K–
RSSS
8
8
16
6
I
I
O
7
X260–X267 X270–X277 Y240–Y257
V40413
V40512
X200
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
40410
48
Total Input Points_____
Y200
40510
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
32
Total Output Points_____
Channel Configuration Worksheet
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Remote I/O Configuration table Starting address
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Slave
Station
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
INPUT
Input Address
V40410
V40413
19.2
38.4
Remote Slave Worksheet
37700
V__________
(V37700 is default)
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs Output Address No. of Outputs
48
16
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
program requires these addresses for each slave.
V40510
V40512
32
16
2
Remote Base Address_________(Choose 1–7 for RM–net or 1–31 for SM–NET)
INPUT
OUTPUT
Slot
Number
Module
Name
Input Address
0
08ND3
X260
8
1
08ND3
X270
8
2
16TD1
No. of Inputs
Output Address
No. of Outputs
Y240
16
3
4
5
6
7
X260
40413
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
16
Total Input Points_____
Y240
40512
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
16
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
program requires these addresses for each slave.
NOTE: Configuring remote I/O for the DL250, DL350 DL450 CPU port requires both
the starting addresses and the number of input and output points for each slave. The
starting addresses for each slave must be on a 16-point boundary. In this example,
this means that X250–X257 in Slave # 1 are unused.
4–11
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
The second block of logic tells the CPU, for each slave, the starting V-memory
addresses for the inputs and outputs, and the total number of each. The CPU has
reserved memory locations, called pointers, that accomplish this task. Use the
values from the Remote Slave Worksheets or the Channel Configuration Sheet and
the pointer addresses from the DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table to
complete this logic.
Write Input and Output Pointers and
Ranges for each remote base
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table
Port Setup Word
V7656
Setup Complete Flag
Channel Configuration Worksheet
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Remote I/O Configuration table Starting address
Slave
Station
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
INPUT
Input Address
V40410
V40413
19.2
38.4
37700
V__________
(V37700 is default)
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs Output Address No. of Outputs
48
16
V40510
V40512
32
16
Slave
Input
Address
Number of
Input Pts
C740
Output
Address
Number of
Output Pts
1
V37704 V37705 V37706 V37707
2
V37710 V37711 V37712 V37713
3
V37714 V37715 V37716 V37717
4
V37720 V37721 V37722 V37723
5
V37724 V37725 V37726 V37727
6
V37730 V37731 V37732 V37733
7
V37734 V37735 V37736 V37737
SP0
LDA
O40410
Remote #1
Input
V37704 reserved V–memory
LD
K48
V37705
LDA
O40510
Output address
V37707
LDA
O40413
total outputs
reserved V–memory
Input address
OUT
V37710 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37711
LDA
O40512
total inputs
reserved V–memory
Output address
OUT
V37712 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37713
total outputs
reserved V–memory
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
K32
Remote #2
Output
reserved V–memory
V37706 reserved V–memory
OUT
Remote #2
Input
total inputs
OUT
LD
SP0
Input address
OUT
OUT
Remote #1
Output
V777 for
DL450
4–12
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Once you have written all of the logic to map the starting addresses and point totals
for each remote base, you have to zero out all of the reserved memory locations you
are not going to use and then tell the CPU that you are finished with the setup. If you
don’t insert zeros in the unused areas, the CPU will assume that every pointer
address V37714 through V37736 is pointing to a read or write start address. This
could cause problems; you may have garbage in these locations. At the very least, it
will take up unnecessary scan time.
The most efficient method for zeroing out the unused memory is to use LDD and
OUTD instructions (load and store double) to clear two consecutive memory
locations at a time. The following logic shows how to finish the setup program for this
example.
First scan relay contact
SP0
There are 20
unused reserved
memory locations.
LDD
K0
OUTD
V37714
OUTD
V37716
Load 32 bit accumulator with “0”
Where the unused memory starts
Clear all unused V-memory locations, 2
locations at a time
OUTD
V37720
OUTD
V37722
OUTD
V37724
OUTD
V37726
OUTD
V37730
SP0
OUTD
V37732
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
OUTD
V37734
OUTD
V37736
C740
SET
Tell CPU that setup is completed
4–13
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Completed Setup Program for DL250/DL350/DL450 as Remote Master
using X and Y Memory Addressing
RLL Program
SP0
K1
GTS
Main Program Body
SP0
Go to remote
I/O subroutine
K0
from bottom of previous column
END
Clear Unused
Memory
first scan relay
SP0
Set port data
LD
Kbfc0
OUT
V7656
LD
port setup word
K8
OUTD
V37720
Constant defines port as master,
V-memory table at V37700, and
baud rate of 38.4 kBaud
LD
K500
OUT
V7657
SP0
LDA
O40410
Remote #1
Input
V37724
OUTD
Data selects Remote I/O
OUTD
V37726
LD
K48
LDA
O40510
K32
Clear Unused
Memory
OUTD
V37734
OUTD
V37736
Input address
C740
SET
Tell CPU that setup is
completed
total inputs
reserved V–memory
RT
LD
Output address
LDA
O40413
total outputs
reserved V–memory
Input address
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table
Port Setup Word
OUT
V37710 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37711
total inputs
reserved V–memory
V7656
Setup Complete Flag
Slave
Input
Address
Number of
Input Pts
C740
Output
Address
Number of
Output Pts
1
V37704 V37705 V37706 V37707
O40512 Output address
2
V37710 V37711 V37712 V37713
OUT
3
V37714 V37715 V37716 V37717
4
V37720 V37721 V37722 V37723
total outputs
5
V37724 V37725 V37726 V37727
reserved V–memory
6
V37730 V37731 V37732 V37733
7
V37734 V37735 V37736 V37737
LDA
V37712 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37713
V777 for
DL450
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
V37707
to top of next column
V37732
K5000 for DL450 (register setting
provided)
V767 for DL450
V37706 reserved V–memory
OUT
Remote #2
Output
OUTD
OUT
LD
Remote #2
Input
V37730
SP0
V776 for DL450
V37704 reserved V–memory
V37705
SP0
V37722
OUTD
OUT
OUT
Remote #1
Output
OUTD
V777 for DL450
OUT
V7655
OUTD
V37716
Remote I/O Subroutine
SBR K1
Load 32-bit accumulator
with “0”
OUTD
Clear all unused VV37714 memory locations
LDD
4–14
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Example Program Using Analog I/O Modules
Example 2:
Using V Memory
Addresses as the
Remote I/O
Memory Type
The following example uses Terminator discrete and analog I/O modules. It is
recommended to use V memory addressing when using analog modules
since each analog I/O channel uses a double (two) word each. Thus, an 8
channel analog I/O module uses 256 discrete points and a 16 channel analog I/O
module uses 512 discrete points. Analog output modules are configured using
the Module Control Byte located in the most significant byte of the most significant
word of channel 1 of the module. V memory addressing requires the use of
“Bit–of–Word” instructions to address the I/O points.
DL250 CPU in Main Base
Remote Slave Worksheet
250
CPU
bottom
port of CPU
is remote
master
PS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
I
O
O
1
Remote Slave Address_________(Choose
1–7 for RM–NET or 1–31 for SM–NET)
T1K–
RSSS
16
16
Input Address
No. Inputs
0
16ND3
V3000
16
1
16ND3
V3001
16
2
08AD2
V3002
256
16
3
08DA2
V3100
256
O
4
16TD1
V3120
16
I
I
V3000
V3001
T1F–08AD–2
256
I
256
O
OUTPUT
Module
Name
X0-X17 X20-X37 X40-X57 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40402 V40500 V40501
1st Remote
INPUT
Module
Number
Output Address
No.Outputs
5
V3002–
V3021
V3100– V3120
V3117
6
7
T1F–08DA–2
2nd Remote
PS
T1K–
RSSS
8
8
16
I
I
O
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
V3030
V3000.0
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
V3000
288
Total Input Points_____
V3100.0
V3100
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V______
272
Total Output Points_____
V3130
Channel Configuration Worksheet
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
program requires these addresses for each slave.
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
Remote Slave Worksheet
2
Remote Base Address_________(Choose 1–7 for RM–net or 1–31 for SM–NET)
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Remote I/O Configuration table Starting address
Slave
Station
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
19.2
38.4
V3000
V3030
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs Output Address No. of Outputs
288
16
V3100
V3130
272
16
OUTPUT
Module
Name
0
08ND3
V3030
8
1
08ND3
V3030.10
8
2
16TD1
37700
V__________
(V37700 is default)
INPUT
Input Address
INPUT
Slot
Number
Input Address
No. Inputs
Output Address
V3130
No.Outputs
16
3
4
5
6
7
V3030.0
V3030
Input Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
16
Total Input Points_____
V3130.0
V3130
Output Bit Start Address:________V-Memory
Address*:V_______
16
Total Output Points_____
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on
Slave # 1’s starting addresses. The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup
program requires these addresses for each slave.
4–15
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
This block of logic tells the CPU, for each slave, the starting V-memory addresses for
the inputs and outputs, and the total number of each. Use the values from the
Remote Slave Worksheets or Channel Configuration Worksheet and the pointer
addresses from the DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table to complete the
logic.
Write Input and Output Pointers and
Ranges for each remote base
DL250/DL350DL450 Reserved Memory Table
Port Setup Word
V7656
Setup Complete Flag
Slave
Channel Configuration Worksheet
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud), determined by required
distance to last slave
Remote I/O Configuration table Starting address
Slave
Station
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
19.2
38.4
37700
V__________
(V37700 is default)
INPUT
Input Address
V3000
V3030
Input
Address
Number of
Input Pts
V777 for
DL450
C740
Output
Address
Number of
Output Pts
1
V37704 V37705 V37706 V37707
2
V37710 V37711 V37712 V37713
3
V37714 V37715 V37716 V37717
4
V37720 V37721 V37722 V37723
5
V37724 V37725 V37726 V37727
6
V37730 V37731 V37732 V37733
7
V37734 V37735 V37736 V37737
OUTPUT
No. of Inputs Output Address No. of Outputs
288
16
V3100
V3130
272
16
SP0
LDA
O3000
Remote #1
Input
OUT
V37704 reserved V–memory
LD
K288
OUT
V37705
LDA
O3100
K272
V37707
LDA
O3030
total outputs
reserved V–memory
Input address
OUT
V37710 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37711
LDA
Remote #2
Output
Output address
V37706 reserved V–memory
OUT
Remote #2
Input
reserved V–memory
OUT
LD
SP0
total inputs
O3130
total inputs
reserved V–memory
Output address
OUT
V37712 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
V37713
total outputs
reserved V–memory
Since the rest of the logic is identical to Example 1, we will now show the completed
setup program.
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Remote #1
Output
Input address
4–16
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Completed Setup Program for DL250/DL350/DL450 as Remote Master
using V Memory Addressing
RLL Program
SP0
K1
GTS
SP0
Go to remote
I/O subroutine
Main Program Body
K0
from bottom of previous column
END
Clear Unused
Memory
first scan relay
SP0
LD
OUT
V7656
LD
K8
port setup word
OUT
V7655
LD
K500
OUT
V7657
SP0
LDA
O3000
Remote #1
Input
OUTD
V37720
Constant defines port as master,
V-memory table at V37700, and
baud rate of 38.4 kBaud
OUTD
V37722
OUTD
Kbfc0
Set port data
V37724
V777 for DL450
OUTD
Data selects remote I/O
OUTD
V37726
V37730
V776 for DL450
SP0
K5000 for DL450 (register setting
Provided)
V767 for DL450
Clear Unused
Memory
OUTD
V37732
V37734
OUTD
C740
SET
V37704 reserved V–memory
K288
OUTD
V37736
Input address
OUT
LD
OUTD
V37716
Remote I/O Subroutine
SBR K1
Load 32-bit accumulator
with “0”
OUTD
Clear all unused VV37714 memory locations
LDD
total inputs
Tell CPU that setup is
completed
RT
OUT
reserved V–memory
V37705
LDA
O3100
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Remote #1
Output
Output address
Analog Programming example
continued on next page
OUT
V37706 reserved V–memory
LD
K272
OUT
V37707
SP0
LDA
O3030
total outputs
reserved V–memory
Input address
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table
OUT
Remote #2
Input
LD
K16
OUT
V37711
LDA
O3130
Remote #2
Output
Output address
OUT
V37712 reserved V–memory
LD
K16
OUT
total outputs
V37713 reserved V–memory
to top of next column
Setup Complete Flag
total inputs
reserved V–memory
V7656
Port Setup Word
V37710 reserved V–memory
Slave
Input
Address
Number of
Input Pts
C740
Output
Address
Number of
Output Pts
1
V37704 V37705 V37706 V37707
2
V37710 V37711 V37712 V37713
3
V37714 V37715 V37716 V37717
4
V37720 V37721 V37722 V37723
5
V37724 V37725 V37726 V37727
6
V37730 V37731 V37732 V37733
7
V37734 V37735 V37736 V37737
V777 for
DL450
4–17
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Completed Setup Program for V–Memory Addressing (con’t)
Main Program Body
V3002
– Bipolar
– 0–5VDC
SP1
SP0
Set Analog
Output Module
Control Bits
SP1
LD
BCD
OUT
V3500
B3101.10
OUT
0= All module outputs OFF
1= All module outputs Enabled
B3101.11
SET
0= Unipolar
1=Bipolar
B3101.12
RST
V3002
>
_
K2000
LD
ADDB
OUT
V3100
K1FFF
OUT
V4000
Analog output data register
OUT
V3116
The OUT instruction sends the data to
channel 1 of the analog output module
C0
OUT
B3030.0
Loads analog input channel 1 data into
The INVERT and ADDB instructions
convert the incoming 2’s compliment
signal data to binary plus sign bit.
K1
ANDD
The BIN instruction converts the accumulator
data to binary (omit this step if the conversion
is done elsewhere.)
BIN
The OUT instructions stores the BCD
data in a new register
INV
Read Negative
Analog Input
Data
0= 5V Range
1=10V Range
Use the BCD instruction to convert thebinary analog input data to BCD if
necessary to do math or other BCD
operations
V3000 the accumulator
K2000 is used above
to monitor the channel
sign bit. It comes ON if
the signal is negative.
V2100
Loads analog input channel 1 data into
V3000 the accumulator
Analog Output Module Control Bits
LD
Send Data to
Analog Output
Module
K2000
Read Positive
Analog Input
Data
Configure T1K–08DA–2 Analog Output Module:
Use X, C, etc. permissive
contact if needed
<
Mask channel sign bit
The OUT instructions stores the binary
data in a new register. Add a BCD instruction prior to this OUT instruction if i
is necessary to convert to BCD
Channel 1 data is negative when C0 is
ON
B3130.12
Example of discrete remote
OUT
I/O point addressing
The OUT instruction sends the data to
channel 8 of the analog output module
The Control Bits of an Analog Output module are located in the most significant byte
of the most significant word of the first output channel (channel 1).
Channel 1 Memory Map
of 8&16-Channel Analog Output Module
(T1F–08DA, T1F–016DA)
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Octal Bit
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00
Size
Analog Value Channel 1
Write Byte 1
Analog Value Channel 1
Write Byte 2
not used
Write Byte 3
Module Control Byte
Write Byte 4
Module Control Byte of 8&16-Channel Analog Output Module
(T1F–08DA, T1F–16DA)
Decimal Bit
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
Octal Bit
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
Read/Write
Bit 24
Outputs Enable
0 = All outputs OFF
1 = All outputs Enabled
Write
Bit 25
Unipolar / Bipolar
0 = Unipolar selected
1 = Bipolar selected
Write
Bit 26
5V / 10V Range
0 = 5V range
1 = 10V range
Write
Bit 27
0 – 20mA / 4–20mA Range
0 = 0 – 20mA range
1 = 4 – 20mA range
Write
Bit 28 – 31
Reserved for system use
–
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Decimal Bit
4–18
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory for Bottom Port
as Remote Master
This table provides a listing of the reserved memory addresses in the DL250/ DL350/DL450 CPU to
program the pointer addresses and ranges for slaves attached to the bottom port of the CPU.
DL250/DL350/DL450 Reserved Memory Table
Port Setup Word
Setup Complete Flag
Number of
Slave
Input
Reserved
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
V7656
V777(DL450)
C740
Output
Number of
Address
Input Points
Address
Output Points
V37700
V37704
V37710
V37714
V37720
V37724
V37730
V37734
V37701
V37705
V37711
V37715
V37721
V37725
V37731
V37735
V37702
V37706
V37712
V37716
V37722
V37726
V37732
V37736
V37703
V37707
V37713
V37717
V37723
V37727
V37733
V37737
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
This table provides a listing of the control relay flags available for the setup and monitoring of remote I/O
attached to the bottom port of the DL250, DL350 and DL450 CPU.
Control Relays Used For Remote I/O
FLAG
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
C740
Setup Complete Flag
C741
Communications Error Response Flag
DETAIL
Set ON to command CPU to read and
check parameters loaded into setup
memory
This flag determines the CPU’s
response if there is a communications
error. Set ON to hold last state of
received inputs; set OFF to clear the
status of the received inputs.
4–19
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
DL250/DL350/DL450 V Memory Port Setup Registers
When configuring the bottom port of the DL250, DL350 or DL450 CPU via DirectSoft or the Handheld
Programmer, you are actually loading a reserved V-memory adddresses with configuration data. The
following diagrams define the meaning of the bits in the registers. The previous ladder logic examples
include logic in the setup program to set these parameters so they are not lost or accidentally changed.
Remote I/O Communication Port Settings:
DL250/DL350 (V7656); DL450 (V777)
15
8
7
0
LD Kbfc0 = V37700 as starting address pointer,
OR
38.4k baud and address 0
LD K3fc0 = V37700 as starting address pointer,
19.2k baud and address 0
OUT V7656 (V777 for DL450)
******* * ******* *
Station number setting
0 = Master station number
Communication V–memory address
(hex equivalent of octal adddress)
default 37700 is starting address of pointer table
Communication baud rate setting
0 = 19.2 kBaud
1 = 38.4 kBaud
Port 2 Protocol Setup: DL250/DL350 (V7655)
Port 3 Protocol Setup: DL450 (V776)
15
8
0 0 0 0
0
*0
0 0
LD K8 = Remote I/O
OUT V7655 (V776 for DL450)
1 = Selects Remote
not used for Remote I/O
Register Set Code: DL250/DL350 (V7657); DL450 (V767)
DL250/DL350:
15
8
** **** **
7
0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
LD K500 = Port settings provided by user program
OUT V7656
DL450:
LD K5000 = Port settings provided by user program
OUT V767
DL250/DL350 Port 2 register set code
0101(5) = register setting provided by user program
DL450 Port 2 register set code
0101(5) = register setting provided by user program
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7
4–20
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Connecting the Wiring
Cabling Between
the D2–250 CPU
Bottom Port and
Slaves
The standard remote I/O link is a 3-wire, half-duplex type. Since Port 2 of the DL250
CPU is a 5-wire full duplex-capable port, we must jumper its transmit and receive
lines together as shown below (converts it to 3-wire, half-duplex). The
recommended cabling for connecting the master and slaves is the single twisted pair
cable, Belden 9841 or equivalent. The diagram also depicts the port pinout for the
D2–250 CPU bottom port.
Port 2 Pin Descriptions (DL250 CPU)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
6
11
1
10
15
5
15-pin Female
D Connector
RXD– DL250 CPU Port 2
Remote I/O Master
0V
7
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
RXD+
5 VDC
Transmit Data (RS232C)
Receive Data (RS232C)
Ready to Send (RS–232C)
Clear to Send (RS–232C)
Receive Data – (RS–422)
Logic Ground
Logic Ground
Transmit Data + (RS–422)
Transmit Data – (RS–422)
Request to Send + (RS–422)
Request to Send – (RS–422)
Receive Data + (RS–422)
Clear to Send + (RS422)
Clear to Send – (RS–422)
Remote I/O Slave
(end of chain)
Remote I/O Slave
T
Termination
Resistor
5V
TXD
RXD
RTS
CTS
RXD2–
0V
0V
TXD2+
TXD2 –
RTS2 +
RTS2 –
RXD2 +
CTS2 +
CTS2 –
Jumper
T
TXD+ / RXD+
1
1
TXD– / RXD–
2
2
TXD+
TXD–
Signal GND
3
3
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
Connect shield
to signal ground
The twisted/shielded pair connects to the DL250’s Port 2 as shown. Be sure to
connect the cable shield wire to the signal ground connection. A termination resistor
must be added externally to the CPU, as close as possible to the connector pins. Its
purpose is to minimize electrical reflections that occur over long cables. Be sure to
add the jumper at the last slave to connect the required internal termination resistor.
Ideally, the two termination resistors at
T
Add series
the cable’s opposite ends and the
external
cable’s rated impedance will all three
resistor
1
Internal
match. For cable impedances greater
150 ohm
than 150 ohms, add a series resistor at the
resistor
2
last slave as shown to the right. If less than
150 ohms, parallel a matching resistance
across the slave’s pins 1 and 2 instead.
3
4–21
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Cabling Between
the D3–350/D4–450
CPU Bottom Port
and Slaves
The remote I/O link is a 3-wire, half-duplex type. Since Port 2 of the DL350 and Port 3
of the DL450 CPU is a 5-wire full duplex-capable port, we must jumper its transmit
and receive lines together as shown below (converts it to 3-wire, half-duplex). The
recommended cabling for connecting the master and slaves is the single twisted pair
cable, Belden 9841 or equivalent. The diagram depicts the port pinout for the
D3–350 and D4–450 CPU bottom port.
The location of Port 2 on the DL350 is on
the 25-pin connector , as pictured to the
right. The location of Port 3 on the DL450
is on the 25–pin connector, which is also
shared by Port 1.
0V
Signal GND
S Pin 7
S Pin 12
TXD+
25 Pin Connector
S Pin 13
TXD–
DL350 Port 2 TXD+
DL450 Port 3 TXD–
S Pin 24
RXD+
S Pin 25
RXD–
0V
DL350 CPU Port 2
DL450 CPU Port 3
Remote I/O Master
7
Remote I/O Slave
1
13
14
25
RXD+
RXD–
Remote I/O Slave
(end of chain)
T
Termination
Resistor
Jumper
T
TXD+ / RXD+
1
1
TXD– / RXD–
2
2
Signal GND
3
RXD+
TXD+
TXD–
13
25
RXD–
3
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
The twisted/shielded pair connects to the DL350/DL450’s Port as shown. Be sure to
connect the cable shield wire to the signal ground connection. A termination resistor
must be added externally to the CPU, as close as possible to the connector pins. Its
purpose is to minimize electrical reflections that occur over long cables. Be sure to
add the jumper at the last slave to connect the required internal termination resistor.
Ideally, the two termination resistors at
the cable’s opposite ends and the
cable’s rated impedance will all three
match. For cable impedances greater
than 150 ohms, add a series resistor at the
last slave as shown to the right. If less than
150 ohms, parallel a matching resistance
across the slave’s pins 1 and 2 instead.
Remember to size the termination resistor
at Port 2 (Port 3 DL450) to match the
cable’s rated impedance. The resistance
values should be between 100 and 500
ohms.
Add series
external
resistor
T
1
2
3
Internal
150 ohm
resistor
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
Connect shield
to signal ground
4–22
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU with T1K–RSSS Remote I/O System
Special CPU Memory for Diagnostics
This table provides a listing of the control relay flags available in the DL250/DL350/DL450 for remote I/O
troubleshooting.
Remote I/O System Control Relays
FLAG
ADDRESS
FUNCTION
Setup Error– The corresponding relay will be ON if the setup table contains
an error (C750 =master, C751 = slave 1.....C757 = slave 7)
C760 to C767 Communications Ready – – The corresponding relay will be ON if the setup table
is valid (C760 =master, C751 = slave 1.....C767 = slave 7)
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU
T1K–RSSS Remote I/O
C750 to C757
Appendix A
Remote I/O
Worksheets
1A
A–2
Remote I/O Worksheets
Remote Slave Worksheet
Remote Slave Address ___________ (Choose 1-7 for RM-NET or 1–31 for SM-NET)
Module
Number
Module
Name
INPUT
Input Address
No. of Inputs
OUTPUT
Output Address
No. of Outputs
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Input Bit Start Address: _____V-Memory Address*: V___________
Appendix A
I/O Worksheets
Total Input Points________
Output Bit Start Address: _____V-Memory Address*: V___________
Total Output Points________
* The D2–RMSM automatically assigns I/O addresses in sequence based on Slave #1’s starting addresses.
The DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU port setup program requires these addresses for each slave.
Remote I/O Worksheets
A–3
Channel Configuration Worksheet
D2–RMSM Remote Master Module
Master Slot Address _______ (1 – 7)
Protocol Selected __________ (RM–NET or SM–NET)
Circle one selection for each parameter (selections for each protocol are shown)
Configuration Parameter
RM–NET
Baud Rate (in KBaud, determined by required
distance to last slave)
19.2
Operator Interface
N/A
Auto Return to Network
YES
Starting Input V-Memory Address: V__________
Total Inputs __________
Slave
Station
NO
19.2
38.4
307.2
614.4
153.6
YES
NO
YES
NO
Starting Output V-Memory Address: V ___________
Total Outputs
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
38.4
SM–NET
Slave
Station
0
1
16
2
18
3
19
4
20
5
21
6
22
7
23
8
24
9
25
10
26
11
27
12
28
13
29
14
30
15
31
___________
No. of Inputs No. of Outputs
17
Appendix A
I/O Worksheets
A–4
Remote I/O Worksheets
Channel Configuration Worksheet
DL250/DL350/DL450 CPU Bottom Port
Circle one selection or fill in blank for each parameter
Configuration Parameter
SELECTION
Baud Rate (in KBaud, determined by required
distance to last slave)
19.2
Remote I/O configuration table starting address
V __________ (V37700 is default)
Slave
Station
1
2
3
4
5
6
Appendix A
I/O Worksheets
7
INPUT
Input Address
No. of Inputs
38.4
OUTPUT
Output Address
No. of Outputs
Appendix B
Analog I/O
Scaling Examples
Ċ Analog Input Module
Ċ Analog Output Module
1B
B–2
Terminator Analog I/O
Appendix B
Analog I/O
Analog Input Module
Scaling the
Input Data
Most applications usually require
measurements in engineering units,
which provide more meaningful data.
This is accomplished by using the
conversion formula shown.
You may have to make adjustments to
the formula depending on the scale you
choose for the engineering units.
Units + A H * L
8191
H = high limit of the Engineering
unit range
L = low limit of the Engineering
unit range
A = Analog value (0 – 8191)
For example, if you wanted to measure pressure (PSI) from 0.0 to 99.9 then you
would have to multiply the analog value by 10 in order to imply a decimal place when
you view the value with the programming software or a handheld programmer. Notice
how the calculations differ when you use the multiplier.
Analog Value of 4047, slightly less than half scale of 8191, should yield 49.4 PSI
Example without multiplier
Units + A H * L
8191
Example 1:
Scaling 4–20mA
Input Signal
Example with multiplier
Units + 10 A H * L
8191
Units + 4047 100 * 0
8191
Units + 40470 100 * 0
8191
Units + 49
Units + 494
Here’s how you would write the program to perform the engineering unit
conversion for a 4 – 20mA input signal. This example uses SP1 which is always
on. You could also use an X, C, etc. permissive contact.
SP1
LD
V3000
When C0 is on, channel 1 data is loaded into the accumulator.
BCD
Converts the binary analog data to BCD to perform math
operations. Omit this instruction if binary data is to be used
for binary math operations.
SUB
K1638
Subtracts 1638 from the incoming signal to adjust the 4mA offset.
MUL
K1000
Multiplies the accumulator data by 1000 (to start the conversion).
DIV
K6553
Divides the accumulator data by 6553. (8191 – 1638)
OUT
V2500
Stores the result in location V2500.
Terminator Analog I/O
Here’s how you would write the program to perform the engineering unit
conversion for a 0–5V, 0–10V, $5, $10, 0–20mA or $20mA input signal.
The example assumes the analog data is in V3000.
This rung executes if the channel data is positive
Use SP1, C or X
bits for unipolar
inputs
V3000 K2000
<
LD
V3000
Channel 1 data is loaded into the accumulator.
BCD
Converts the binary analog data to BCD to perform math
operations. Omit this instruction if binary data is to be used
for binary math operations.
MUL
K1000
Multiplies the accumulator data by 1000 (to start the conversion).
DIV
K8191
OUT
V2500
Divides the accumulator data by 8191. Divide by 4095 for
0–5V or $5V input signal ranges.
Stores the result in location V2500.
This rung executes if the channel data is negative. It can be
omitted for unipolar inputs.
V3000 K2000
>
–
LD
V3000
Channel 1 data is loaded into the accumulator.
INV
The INV and ADDB instructions convert the incoming
2’s complement analog data into binary
ADDB
K1
ANDD
K1FFF
Masks the channel sign bit
BCD
Converts the binary analog data to BCD to perform math
operations. Omit this instruction if binary data is to be used
for binary math operations.
MUL
K1000
Multiplies the accumulator data by 1000 (to start the conversion).
DIV
K8191
OUT
V2500
C0
OUT
Divides the accumulator data by 8191. Divide by 4095 for
0–5V or $5V input signal ranges.
Stores the result in location V2500.
C0 is ON when the input signal is negative
Appendix B
Analog I/O
Example 2:
Scaling Unipolar
and Bipolar
Input Signals
B–3
B–4
Terminator Analog I/O
Appendix B
Analog I/O
Analog Output Module
Calculating the
Digital Value
Your program has to calculate the
digital value to send to the analog
module. There are many ways to do
this, but most applications are
understood more easily if you use
measurements in engineering units.
This is accomplished by using the
conversion formula shown.
You may have to make adjustments
to the formula depending on the
scale you choose for the engineering
units.
A + U 4095
H*L
A = Analog value (0 – 4095)
U = Engineering units
H = High limit of the engineering
unit range
L = Low limit of the engineering
unit range
Consider the following example which controls pressure from 0.0 to 99.9 PSI. By
using the formula you can easily determine the digital value that should be sent to
the module. The example shows the conversion required to yield 49.4 PSI. Notice
the formula uses a multiplier of 10. This is because the decimal portion of 49.4
cannot be loaded, so you must adjust the formula to compensate for it.
A + 10U
Engineering Unit
Conversion
4095
10(H * L)
A + 494
4095
1000 * 0
A + 2023
The following example program shows how you would write the program to perform
the engineering unit conversion to output data formats 0–4095. This example
assumes you have calculated or loaded the engineering unit values in BCD format
and stored it in V2300. It is usually easier to perform any math calculations in BCD
and then convert the value to binary before you send the data to the module.
SP1
LD
V2300
The LD instruction loads the engineering units used with channel 1 into
the accumulator. This example assumes the numbers are BCD. Since
SP1 is used, this rung automatically executes on every scan. You could
also use an X, C, etc. permissive contact.
MUL
K4095
Multiply the accumulator by 4095 (to start the conversion).
DIV
K1000
Divide the accumulator by 1000 (because we used a multiplier of
10, we have to use 1000 instead of 100).
BIN
Convert the data to binary format before sending it to the module
OUT
V3100
Send the binary data to channel 1 of the module
Appendix C
Determining I/O
Update Time
Ċ Overview
Ċ Remote I/O Update Table
Ċ Calculating Total Delay for the System
1C
C–2
Determining I/O Update Time
Overview
Appendix C
Determining I/O Update
Since the Remote Master and the CPU operate asynchronously from one another,
it is possible that the remote I/O points may not be updated on every CPU scan.
Therefore, in some applications it may helpful to understand the amount of time
required to update the remote I/O points. Depending on the number of I/O points
used in your remote configuration and the baud rate you have selected for
communication, your update time requirements will vary. This appendix will show
you how to estimate the total delay time for your system.
NOTE: In most situations, this delay will be so small that either it makes no difference
to the particular application, or the mechanical speeds of the field devices are slower
than the delay itself.
If you have an application that requires a thorough understanding of the time delay,
you can use the following information in order to calculate the delay:
S Baud Rate — this is the communication baud rate that you selected
with the DIP switch settings on the remote master and remote slaves.
S CPU Scan Time — this is the total CPU scan time. The easiest way is
to use AUX53 from a DL205/DL405 Handheld Programmer, or use the
Diagnostics option under the PLC menu in our DirectSOFT
Programming Software. You can also use the PLC User Manual to
calculate the scan time, but this is often very time consuming. If you use
the User Manual, you will have to estimate this time, because it is
dependent on the main program length, and the number of I/O points in
the local base as well.
S Remote Master Scan — this is the time required for the Remote Master
to scan the individual Slave stations to update the status of the I/O
modules. Use the formula and table shown on the following page.
S Module ON to OFF, OFF to ON Response Time — this is the amount
of time that the module requires to see a transition in status. For
example, when a switch connected to an input module closes, it can
take a few milliseconds (1–12 typical) before the module actually makes
the transition from OFF to ON. The easiest way to find this information is
from the module specifications in the respective User Manuals. This
basic information is also available in the specifications of the Sales
Catalog.
S Total Delay Time — this is the total delay time that takes all of the
above factors into consideration. There are several formulas that you
can use to calculate this delay time. See the formulas on Page C5 of
this appendix. Once you have selected the formula applicable to your
system, you will use the information you have gathered for the above
items to calculate the total system delay time.
Since each application is different, we cannot possibly show all of the options for the
CPU scan time or the possible module response delays. You can easily find this
information in other publications. However, the next few pages will show you how to
calculate the delay time for the Remote Master Scan. Also, we show the total delay
time for our example system that was used earlier in this manual.
Determining I/O Update Time
C–3
Remote I/O Update Table
The table shown below shows you how much time is required for the Remote Master
Module to update its I/O data to its internal buffers. Remember from earlier reading in
this appendix that the remote I/O scan and CPU scan are asynchronous. The CPU
may be looking at the master module’s internal buffers several times before the
master actually has enough time to store new data. This chart shows the maximum
amount of delay based on the number of I/O points on the channel.
Update Time Required (in ms)
19.2 kB
38.4 kB
153.6 kB
307.2 kB
614.4 kB
3.64
1.82
.45
.23
.12
5.72
2.86
.72
.36
.18
9.88
4.94
1.24
.62
.31
18.20
9.10
2.28
1.14
.57
160
192
224
256
22.36
11.18
2.80
1.40
.70
26.52
13.26
3.32
1.66
.83
30.68
15.34
3.84
1.92
.96
34.84
17.42
4.36
2.18
1.09
288
320
352
384
39.00
19.50
4.88
2.44
1.22
43.16
21.58
5.40
2.70
1.35
47.32
23.66
5.92
2.96
1.48
51.48
25.74
6.44
3.22
1.61
416
448
480
512
55.64
27.82
6.96
3.48
1.74
59.80
29.90
7.48
3.74
1.87
63.96
31.98
8.00
4.00
2.00
68.12
34.06
8.52
4.26
2.13
16
32
64
128
Remote Scan Time Use the following formula to calculate the amount of time required for the remote I/O
Formula
scan update:
TRS = Time from Above Table + (2 ms x No. of Slaves)
Example: Given a 38.4 kB system with a total of 128 remote points and 3 slaves:
TRS = 9.10 ms + (2 ms x 3) = 15.10 ms
Appendix C
Determining I/O Update
# of Remote
I/O Points
C–4
Determining I/O Update Time
D2–RMSM: Calculating Total Delay for the System
Now that you have calculated the time required for the Remote Master to go through
its scan cycle and update its internal buffer area, we need to add this time to other
delay times inherent in the overall system. Below is an example of a remote input
changing a remote output.
Example of a Remote Input Changing a Remote Output
Appendix C
Determining I/O Update
This example can be simplified schematically to look like this:
Remote
Input CPU
Remote
Output
X110
Y123
The drawing below shows the details of the CPU and Remote Master
interaction .
CPU Scan
Inputs from slot 1 of 2nd
remote slave in CPU
Image Area
X110
X111
Part of program
that is executed
X110
Y123
Inputs from slot 1 of 2nd
remote slave in
Remote Master Buffer
read
X110
X111
X112
X112
X113
X114
X115
X116
X117
X113
X114
X115
X116
X117
Outputs for slot 2 of 2nd
remote slave in CPU
Image Area
read
Remote Scan
Remote Slave # 2
T1K–
PS RSSS
8
8
I
I O O
8
16
X110-X117
X110
INPUT
Outputs for slot 2 of 2nd
remote slave in Remote
Master Buffer
write
write
Y120
Y121
Y120
Y121
Y122
Y122
Y123
Y124
Y125
Y126
Y127
Y123
Y124
Y125
Y126
Y127
Remote Slave # 2
T1K–
PS RSSS
8
8
I
I O O
8
16
Y120-Y127
Y123
OUTPUT
The table on the adjacent page shows the formula for calculating the
overall system delay for this scenario. It also shows you formulas for
two other possible scenarios.
Determining I/O Update Time
Total Delay Time
Formulas
C–5
Remote Input to Remote Output
remote
Input
CPU
TRS v TCS
TRS u TCS
remote
output
TIN + 6(TCS) +TOUT
TIN + 4(TRS)+6(TCS) +TOUT
Local Input to Remote Output
local
Input
CPU
remote
output
Remote Input to Local Output
remote
Input
TIN + 4(TCS) +TOUT
TIN + 2(TRS)+4(TCS) +TOUT
local
CPU output
The following page will show you how to use one of the formulas to calculate the
delay time for our example system.
Appendix C
Determining I/O Update
The following table provides delay formulas for three different configuration
scenarios. Notice the two sets of formulas for each scenario. The formula chosen
depends on whether the CPU scan time is greater than or less than the Remote
Master scan time. There are several variables used in the formulas. The following
descriptions will help you understand them.
S TCS — CPU scan time. You can use DirectSOFT or a Handheld
Programmer to determine this time, or you can estimate the time
required by using the PLC User Manual.
S TRS — Remote Master scan time. Use the table and formula shown
previously to determine this time.
S TIN and TOUT — Module response delay time. You can find this
information from the module specifications tables which you will find in
the User Manual.
C–6
Determining I/O Update Time
D2–RMSM Delay
Time Example
The following example shows you how to calculate the total time required for reading
a remote input,solving the CPU logic, then changing an output at the remote base.
We have used the following configuration, which features 3 remote slaves, 1 master
and 208 remote I/O points, communicating at 38.4 kBaud.
EXAMPLE:
38.4 kBaud, D2-240, X110 causing a change in Y123.
Appendix C
Determining I/O Update
Main Base with Master
PS
CPU
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
D2–RMSM
Master
X0-X17 X20-X37 Y0-Y17 Y20-Y37
V40400 V40401 V40500 V40501
1st Remote
PS
16
16
16
16
16
I
I
O
O
O
80 I/O points
X40-X57 X60-X77 Y40-Y57 Y60-Y77 Y100-Y117
V40402 V40403 V40502 V40503 V40504
Slave
Module
2nd Remote
PS
8
8
8
16
(8)
I
I
O
O
O
48 I/O points
X100-X107 X110-X117 Y120-Y127 Y130-Y147
V40505 V40505+06
V40404
Slave
Module
3rd Remote
PS
Slave
Module
16
16
16
12
12
I
I
I
O
O
80 I/O points
X120-X137 X140-X157 X160-X177 Y160-Y177 Y200-Y217
V40405
V40406 V40407
V40507 V40510
Total = 208 remote I/O points
Given that the CPU scan (TCS) is estimated to be 25 ms,
the results of the calculations are:
TIN = Maximum response input module time (16ND3) = 8 ms
TOUT = Maximum response output module time (16TD1) = 10us
TRS = 15.34 ms + (2ms x3) = 21.34 ms t TCS
Total Delay for Configuration = TIN + 6(TCS) +TOUT
= 8 ms + 6(25 ms) + .01 ms
= 158.01 ms
Appendix D
I/O Module
Hot Swap
1D
In This Appendix. . . .
— T1K–RSSS I/O Module Hot Swap Feature
D–2
T1K–RSSS I/O Module Hot Swap Feature
The “Hot Swap” feature allows Terminator I/O modules to be replaced with
Terminator I/O system power ON. Be careful not to touch the terminals with your
hands or any conductive material to avoid the risk of personal injury or equipment
damaged. Always remove power if it is equally convenient to do so.
WARNING: Only authorized personnel fully familiar with all aspects of the
application should replace an I/O module with system power ON.
Appendix E
Special Relays
Appendix D
I/O Module Hot Swap
Appendix C
Special Relays
Appendix B
DL405 Error Codes
Appendix A
DL405 Error Codes
I/O Module Hot Swap
The following module types can be “Hot Swapped”.
Module
Check External
24VDC Wiring
Before Hot
Swapping!
Power Supply
No
Base Controller
No
I/O Modules (discrete / analog)
Yes
Before “Hot Swapping” an analog I/O module or a DC output module in a
Terminator I/O system, make sure that each of the analog I/O and DC output
module’s 24VDC and 0VDC base terminals are wired directly to the external
power supply individually (see diagram below). If the external 24VDC / 0VDC is
jumpered from base to base in a daisy chain fashion, and an analog I/O or DC output
module is removed from its base, the risk of disconnecting the external 24VDC to the
subsequent I/O modules exists.
Do not jumper
modules together
creating 24VDC
bus for Hot Swap.
Wire each analog I/O and DC
output module independently
to the external power supply.
D–3
Special Relays
1. Remove I/O module from base. (If necessary, refer to the Terminator I/O
Installation & I/O Manual for steps on removing an I/O module).
2. The T1K–RSSS I/O LED will begin to slow blink at 500ms on/off time. (I/O LED
status information is listed on the T1K–RSSS Data Sheet and in the T1K–RSSS
Features section in this manual).
3. Install a new I/O module with the exactly the same part number.
4. Verify that the T1K–RSSS Base Controller LEDs have returned to normal.
A feature that may be used in a non–continuous process application is the Outputs
Enable/Disble switch. The switch is located on the front of the T1K–RSSS base
controller. When the switch is in the Disable position all outputs are disabled (OFF),
although discrete and analog input data continues to be read. This option may be
used at a convenient time during the process application to replace an I/O module.
Appendix B
DL405 Error Codes
Outputs
Enable/Disable
Switch
The following steps explain how to “Hot Swap” an I/O module.
Appendix A
DL405 Error Codes
Hot Swap:
I/O Module
Replacement
Appendix C
Special Relays
Appendix D
Special Relays
Appendix E
Special Relays
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