null  null
Cat No. W10E-EN-01
Software
CX-Supervisor
Software Release 3.1
User Manual
Trademarks and copyrights
Notice
Notice
OMRON products are manufactured for use by a trained operator and only for
the purposes described in this manual.
The following conventions are used to classify and explain the precautions in
this manual. Always heed the information provided with them.
Note:
Indicates information of particular interest for efficient and convenient
operation of the product.
Caution:
Indicates information that, if not heeded, could possibly result in minor or
relatively serious injury, damage to the product, or faulty operation.
Warning:
Indicates information that, if not heeded, could possibly result in serious injury
or loss of life.
Trademarks and copyrights
MECHATROLINK is a registered trademark of Yaskawa Corporation.
Trajexia is a registered trademark of OMRON.
EtherCAT is a registered trademark of the EtherCAT Technology Group.
All other product names, company names, logos or other designations
mentioned herein are trademarks of their respective owners.
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 OMRON
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form, or by any means, mechanical,
electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written
permission of OMRON.
No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information
contained herein. Moreover, because OMRON is constantly striving to improve
its high-quality products, the information contained in this manual is subject to
change without notice. Every precaution has been taken in the preparation of
this manual. Nevertheless, OMRON assumes no responsibility for errors or
omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use
of the information contained in this publication.
1
Copyright
2
Notice
Table of Contents
Notice ................................................................................................1
Trademarks and copyrights.................................................................................................................. 1
Copyright.............................................................................................................................................. 1
SECTION 1
Graphics Editor ..............................................................................17
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-7
1-8
About the Graphics Editor .................................................................................................................. 17
Palette Bar ......................................................................................................................................... 17
1-2-1 Foreground Colour and Background Colour ......................................................................... 18
1-2-2 Custom Colours .................................................................................................................... 18
1-2-3 Line Style .............................................................................................................................. 19
1-2-4 Fill Pattern Palette................................................................................................................. 19
Graphic Object bar ............................................................................................................................. 19
Control Bar ......................................................................................................................................... 19
1-4-1 Object Identification .............................................................................................................. 20
1-4-2 Raise Up One ....................................................................................................................... 21
1-4-3 Lower Down One .................................................................................................................. 21
1-4-4 Rotate ................................................................................................................................... 21
1-4-5 Horizontal Mirror ................................................................................................................... 22
1-4-6 Vertical Mirror........................................................................................................................ 22
1-4-7 Transparency On/Off ............................................................................................................ 22
Status Bar .......................................................................................................................................... 23
Text Bar.............................................................................................................................................. 23
1-6-1 Font Name ............................................................................................................................ 24
1-6-2 Font Size............................................................................................................................... 24
1-6-3 Text Bold On/Off ................................................................................................................... 25
1-6-4 Text Italic On/Off ................................................................................................................... 25
1-6-5 Text Underline On/Off ........................................................................................................... 25
1-6-6 Text Left Aligned ................................................................................................................... 25
1-6-7 Text Centred ......................................................................................................................... 25
1-6-8 Text Right Aligned................................................................................................................. 25
Grid .................................................................................................................................................... 25
Tip of the Day ..................................................................................................................................... 25
SECTION 2
Pages...............................................................................................27
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
Creating a Page ................................................................................................................................. 27
Amending a Page............................................................................................................................... 27
Defining the Properties of a Page ...................................................................................................... 28
Printing a Page................................................................................................................................... 29
2-4-1 Print Setup ............................................................................................................................ 29
2-4-2 Print Preview......................................................................................................................... 30
2-4-3 Printing.................................................................................................................................. 30
Saving a Page to a Project................................................................................................................. 31
2-5-1 Save Page As ....................................................................................................................... 32
3
Table of Contents
2-6
2-5-2 Closing a Page ..................................................................................................................... 32
CX-Supervisor Preferences ............................................................................................................... 32
2-6-1 Startup Preferences.............................................................................................................. 32
2-6-2 Editing Preferences .............................................................................................................. 32
2-6-3 General Preferences ............................................................................................................ 33
SECTION 3
Points ..............................................................................................35
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-12
4
What is a Point?................................................................................................................................. 35
About the Point Editor ........................................................................................................................ 35
Viewing Points in the Point Editor ...................................................................................................... 35
3-3-1 Filtering the Points in the View by Group ............................................................................. 36
3-3-2 Filtering the Points in the View by Point Type ...................................................................... 36
3-3-3 Sorting the Points in the View by I/O Type ........................................................................... 36
3-3-4 Sorting the Points in the View............................................................................................... 36
3-3-5 Changing the Viewing Mode................................................................................................. 36
3-3-6 Summary of Point Information .............................................................................................. 36
3-3-7 Drag and Drop of Points onto Control Objects ..................................................................... 37
Creating a Point ................................................................................................................................. 38
3-4-1 General Attributes................................................................................................................. 38
3-4-2 Point Type ............................................................................................................................ 38
3-4-3 Point Attributes ..................................................................................................................... 38
3-4-4 I/O Type................................................................................................................................ 39
3-4-5 Memory Attributes ................................................................................................................ 40
3-4-6 I/O Update Rate.................................................................................................................... 40
3-4-7 I/O Attributes......................................................................................................................... 40
3-4-8 PLC Attributes ...................................................................................................................... 41
3-4-9 Data Transfer Actions When Opening a PLC....................................................................... 42
3-4-10 Conversion Attributes ........................................................................................................... 42
3-4-11 Advanced Point Settings ...................................................................................................... 42
Amending an Existing Point ............................................................................................................... 43
Deleting an Existing Point .................................................................................................................. 43
Quick creation of many points............................................................................................................ 44
Runtime Point Maintenance............................................................................................................... 45
Optimisation of PLC Communications ............................................................................................... 45
3-9-1 Creation of an "Array" Point.................................................................................................. 45
Point Import........................................................................................................................................ 46
System Points .................................................................................................................................... 46
3-11-1 Time Points........................................................................................................................... 46
3-11-2 Date Points ........................................................................................................................... 47
3-11-3 Internal Points....................................................................................................................... 47
3-11-4 Display Points....................................................................................................................... 48
3-11-5 Mouse Points........................................................................................................................ 48
3-11-6 Alarm Points ......................................................................................................................... 49
3-11-7 Error Logger Points .............................................................................................................. 49
3-11-8 PLC Communications Points ................................................................................................ 49
3-11-9 Security Points...................................................................................................................... 50
Printing Points.................................................................................................................................... 50
Table of Contents
3-13
3-12-1 Print Setup ............................................................................................................................ 50
3-12-2 Print Preview......................................................................................................................... 50
3-12-3 Printing.................................................................................................................................. 50
Embedding Point Values in Text ....................................................................................................... 50
3-13-1 Using Format specifiers ........................................................................................................ 51
SECTION 4
Objects ............................................................................................53
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
Objects ............................................................................................................................................... 53
Editing Objects ................................................................................................................................... 53
4-2-1 Re-sizing ............................................................................................................................... 53
4-2-2 Re-shaping............................................................................................................................ 53
4-2-3 Wizards ................................................................................................................................. 53
Creating and Editing Graphic Objects ................................................................................................ 54
4-3-1 Arc......................................................................................................................................... 54
4-3-2 Block Text ............................................................................................................................. 54
4-3-3 Ellipse ................................................................................................................................... 54
4-3-4 Line ....................................................................................................................................... 54
4-3-5 Polygon ................................................................................................................................. 54
4-3-6 Polyline ................................................................................................................................. 55
4-3-7 Rectangle.............................................................................................................................. 55
4-3-8 Round Rectangle .................................................................................................................. 55
4-3-9 Text ....................................................................................................................................... 55
Creating and Editing Control Objects ................................................................................................. 55
4-4-1 Alarm Object ......................................................................................................................... 55
4-4-2 Bar Chart............................................................................................................................... 57
4-4-3 Pictures ................................................................................................................................. 58
4-4-4 Linear Gauge ........................................................................................................................ 60
4-4-5 Pushbutton............................................................................................................................ 61
4-4-6 Rotary Gauge........................................................................................................................ 61
4-4-7 Scatter Graph........................................................................................................................ 62
4-4-8 Slider..................................................................................................................................... 64
4-4-9 Toggle Button........................................................................................................................ 65
4-4-10 Trend Graph.......................................................................................................................... 66
4-4-11 Web Browser Object ............................................................................................................. 68
Manipulating Objects.......................................................................................................................... 68
4-5-1 Select .................................................................................................................................... 68
4-5-2 Move ..................................................................................................................................... 69
4-5-3 Cut ........................................................................................................................................ 69
4-5-4 Copy ..................................................................................................................................... 69
4-5-5 Paste..................................................................................................................................... 69
4-5-6 Delete.................................................................................................................................... 69
4-5-7 Undo ..................................................................................................................................... 69
4-5-8 Mirror Image.......................................................................................................................... 70
4-5-9 Orientation ............................................................................................................................ 70
4-5-10 Transparency ........................................................................................................................ 70
4-5-11 Group .................................................................................................................................... 70
4-5-12 Raise and Lower ................................................................................................................... 70
5
Table of Contents
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-5-13 Alignment.............................................................................................................................. 70
4-5-14 Zoom .................................................................................................................................... 72
Point Substitution ............................................................................................................................... 72
4-6-1 Example................................................................................................................................ 72
Applying Tooltips................................................................................................................................ 73
Using the Floating Menu .................................................................................................................... 74
SECTION 5
ActiveX Objects..............................................................................75
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
Overview ............................................................................................................................................ 75
Inserting a new object ........................................................................................................................ 75
Editing Properties at Design Time ..................................................................................................... 75
Reading and Writing Properties at Runtime....................................................................................... 76
Calling Methods at Runtime............................................................................................................... 77
Responding to Events........................................................................................................................ 77
SECTION 6
Projects...........................................................................................79
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-11
6-12
6-13
6-14
6-15
6-16
6
Overview ............................................................................................................................................ 79
Runtime Editions................................................................................................................................ 79
Creating a Project .............................................................................................................................. 80
Amending a Project............................................................................................................................ 80
Saving a Project................................................................................................................................. 80
Printing a Project................................................................................................................................ 80
Device Configuration.......................................................................................................................... 81
6-7-1 Creating a PLC Connection .................................................................................................. 81
6-7-2 Modifying a PLC Connection ................................................................................................ 83
6-7-3 Removing a PLC Connection .............................................................................................. 83
6-7-4 Accessing PLC Connection in Runtime ................................................................................ 84
Fins Gateway Option ......................................................................................................................... 85
Trajexia Devices ................................................................................................................................ 86
Settings .............................................................................................................................................. 89
6-10-1 General Settings................................................................................................................... 89
6-10-2 Runtime Settings .................................................................................................................. 90
Runtime Security................................................................................................................................ 98
6-11-1 Configured Users.................................................................................................................. 98
6-11-2 Linking CX-Supervisor Users With Windows Users ........................................................... 100
6-11-3 Menu Option Access Levels ............................................................................................... 100
6-11-4 Exit Level ............................................................................................................................ 101
Compiling and Running a Project .................................................................................................... 101
6-12-1 Building a Project................................................................................................................ 101
6-12-2 Running a Project ............................................................................................................... 101
Running a Project with CX-Simulator............................................................................................... 102
6-13-1 Requirements and Limitations ............................................................................................ 102
Save Runtime As ............................................................................................................................. 102
Create Runtime Install Disk ............................................................................................................. 103
Project Information........................................................................................................................... 103
6-17
6-18
6-19
6-20
6-21
6-22
6-23
6-24
Alias Definitions................................................................................................................................ 104
Find .................................................................................................................................................. 104
Output Window................................................................................................................................. 105
Navigating Projects with the Workspace .......................................................................................... 105
Project Editor.................................................................................................................................... 106
6-21-1 About the Project Editor ...................................................................................................... 106
6-21-2 Viewing the Contents of a Project....................................................................................... 106
6-21-3 Opening a Page via the Project Editor................................................................................ 107
6-21-4 Adding Pages to a Project .................................................................................................. 107
6-21-5 Removing Pages From a Project ........................................................................................ 107
6-21-6 Linking Pages in a Project .................................................................................................. 107
6-21-7 Selecting Pages for Display on Run ................................................................................... 107
6-21-8 Changing the View Mode.................................................................................................... 107
6-21-9 Viewing Project Details ....................................................................................................... 107
6-21-10 Multiple Selection................................................................................................................ 108
Printing from the Project Editor ........................................................................................................ 108
6-22-1 Print Setup .......................................................................................................................... 108
6-22-2 Print Preview....................................................................................................................... 108
6-22-3 Printing................................................................................................................................ 108
Navigating Pages using Workbook mode ........................................................................................ 108
Using Full Screen mode ................................................................................................................... 108
SECTION 7
Graphics Library ..........................................................................109
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
Overview .......................................................................................................................................... 109
Graphics Library ............................................................................................................................... 109
7-2-1 Create Library ..................................................................................................................... 109
7-2-2 Opening a Library ............................................................................................................... 109
7-2-3 Modify Library .................................................................................................................... 110
7-2-4 Delete Library...................................................................................................................... 110
Manipulating Objects........................................................................................................................ 110
7-3-1 Add Object .......................................................................................................................... 110
7-3-2 Modify Library Element ....................................................................................................... 111
7-3-3 Delete Object ...................................................................................................................... 111
7-3-4 Using a Graphic Library Object in the Graphics Editor ....................................................... 111
7-3-5 Point Substitution ................................................................................................................ 112
7-3-6 Default Graphic Library Objects ......................................................................................... 112
7-3-7 Conversion to Individual Page Objects ............................................................................... 112
7-3-8 Sharing Graphic Libraries ................................................................................................... 112
Printing the Graphics Library............................................................................................................ 112
7-4-1 Print Preview....................................................................................................................... 112
7-4-2 Printing................................................................................................................................ 113
SECTION 8
Alarms ...........................................................................................115
8-1
8-2
What is an Alarm? ............................................................................................................................ 115
Alarm Settings .................................................................................................................................. 115
7
8-3
8-4
8-5
8-6
8-7
8-8
8-9
Viewing the Contents of the Alarm Database .................................................................................. 116
Creating a New Alarm...................................................................................................................... 117
8-4-1 Alarm Header Information .................................................................................................. 118
8-4-2 Alarm Type ......................................................................................................................... 119
Updating an Existing Alarm.............................................................................................................. 121
Copying an Existing Alarm Definition............................................................................................... 121
Deleting an Existing Alarm............................................................................................................... 122
Printing Alarms................................................................................................................................. 122
8-8-1 Print Setup.......................................................................................................................... 122
8-8-2 Print Preview ...................................................................................................................... 122
8-8-3 Printing ............................................................................................................................... 122
Alarm Reporting In Runtime............................................................................................................. 122
8-9-1 Alarm Acknowledge............................................................................................................ 123
8-9-2 Current Alarms ................................................................................................................... 123
8-9-3 Alarm History ...................................................................................................................... 124
SECTION 9
Animation .....................................................................................125
9-1
9-2
9-3
8
Associating Points with Actions and Events .................................................................................... 125
Animation Editor............................................................................................................................... 125
9-2-1 View Mode.......................................................................................................................... 127
9-2-2 Project ................................................................................................................................ 127
9-2-3 Page ................................................................................................................................... 127
9-2-4 Objects ............................................................................................................................... 128
9-2-5 Printing the Animation Editor .............................................................................................. 130
Runtime Actions............................................................................................................................... 130
9-3-1 Script .................................................................................................................................. 130
9-3-2 Aliases ................................................................................................................................ 132
9-3-3 Execution Attributes............................................................................................................ 132
9-3-4 Script Code......................................................................................................................... 133
9-3-5 Script Completion ............................................................................................................... 135
9-3-6 Horizontal Move.................................................................................................................. 135
9-3-7 Vertical Move...................................................................................................................... 136
9-3-8 Resize Width ...................................................................................................................... 136
9-3-9 Resize Height ..................................................................................................................... 137
9-3-10 Horizontal Percentage Fill .................................................................................................. 138
9-3-11 Vertical Percentage Fill....................................................................................................... 139
9-3-12 Display Page ...................................................................................................................... 139
9-3-13 Close Page ......................................................................................................................... 140
9-3-14 Blink.................................................................................................................................... 141
9-3-15 Colour Change (Analogue) ................................................................................................. 141
9-3-16 Colour Change (Digital) ...................................................................................................... 142
9-3-17 Enable/Disable ................................................................................................................... 143
9-3-18 Rotate ................................................................................................................................. 144
9-3-19 Visibility............................................................................................................................... 144
9-3-20 Display Value (Digital) ........................................................................................................ 145
9-3-21 Display Value (Analogue) ................................................................................................... 146
9-3-22 Display Value (Text) ........................................................................................................... 146
9-3-23
9-3-24
9-3-25
9-3-26
Edit Point Value (Digital) ..................................................................................................... 147
Edit Point Value (Analogue)................................................................................................ 148
Edit Point Value (Text) ........................................................................................................ 150
Common Colour Palette...................................................................................................... 151
SECTION 10
Recipes .........................................................................................153
10-1
10-2
10-3
10-4
What is a Recipe? ............................................................................................................................ 153
Recipe Components......................................................................................................................... 153
Viewing Recipes in the Recipe Editor .............................................................................................. 153
Creating a New Recipe .................................................................................................................... 154
10-4-1 Recipe Configuration Attributes .......................................................................................... 155
10-4-2 Recipe Ingredients .............................................................................................................. 155
10-4-3 Recipe Validation ................................................................................................................ 156
10-5 Updating an Existing Recipe ............................................................................................................ 157
10-6 Copying an Existing Recipe Definition ............................................................................................. 158
10-7 Deleting an Existing Recipe ............................................................................................................. 159
10-8 Recipe Security Levels..................................................................................................................... 159
10-9 Printing Recipes ............................................................................................................................... 159
10-9-1 Print Preview....................................................................................................................... 159
10-9-2 Printing................................................................................................................................ 159
10-10 Using Recipes in Runtime ................................................................................................................ 160
10-10-1 Recipe Viewer..................................................................................................................... 160
10-10-2 Downloading a Recipe ........................................................................................................ 162
10-10-3 Uploading a Recipe............................................................................................................. 163
SECTION 11
Data Logging ................................................................................165
11-1
11-2
11-3
11-4
11-5
11-6
What is Data Logging ....................................................................................................................... 165
Data Log Editor ................................................................................................................................ 165
11-2-1 Configuring Data Sets and Logging Settings ...................................................................... 165
11-2-2 Adding/Editing Data Set Properties .................................................................................... 166
11-2-3 Editing Item Properties........................................................................................................ 167
11-2-4 Editing Items ....................................................................................................................... 168
Data Logging at Runtime ................................................................................................................. 169
11-3-1 File Management ................................................................................................................ 169
11-3-2 Data Records ...................................................................................................................... 171
Data Log Viewer Component (v2.0 and v1.8) .................................................................................. 172
11-4-1 Invoking the Data Log Viewer ............................................................................................. 172
11-4-2 Viewing Logged Files.......................................................................................................... 172
11-4-3 Data Log Viewer 1.8 ........................................................................................................... 173
Remote Data Log Viewer ................................................................................................................. 175
Data Log Export Facilities ................................................................................................................ 175
11-6-1 Exporting Data via the Export Dialog .................................................................................. 175
11-6-2 Generation of Comma Separated (CSV) Files.................................................................... 175
11-6-3 Single Selections ................................................................................................................ 176
11-6-4 Multiple Selections .............................................................................................................. 176
9
11-7
11-6-5 Generation of Text Files ..................................................................................................... 177
Data Logging ................................................................................................................................... 177
11-7-1 Add Database Link Dialog .................................................................................................. 177
11-7-2 Add Field Link Dialog.......................................................................................................... 178
SECTION 12
Databases .....................................................................................181
12-1
12-2
Database Connection Editor ............................................................................................................ 181
Configuring a Connection ................................................................................................................ 182
12-2-1 Add/Modify Database connection dialog box .................................................................... 182
12-2-2 Testing Connections in the Development Environment...................................................... 183
12-2-3 Database Errors ................................................................................................................. 183
12-2-4 Database Connection String dialog box ............................................................................. 183
12-2-5 Creating a Data Source Name file ..................................................................................... 185
12-2-6 Creating a Read/Write connection to an Excel file ............................................................. 186
12-2-7 Creating a Read/Write connection to CSV/Text file............................................................ 187
12-3 Configuring Recordsets ................................................................................................................... 187
12-3-1 Name .................................................................................................................................. 187
12-3-2 Recordset Type .................................................................................................................. 187
12-3-3 Source ................................................................................................................................ 188
12-3-4 Lock .................................................................................................................................... 188
12-4 Configuring Field Associations......................................................................................................... 189
12-4-1 Name .................................................................................................................................. 189
12-4-2 Point ................................................................................................................................... 189
12-4-3 Field.................................................................................................................................... 189
12-4-4 Field Property ..................................................................................................................... 189
12-5 Configuring Parameter Associations................................................................................................ 190
12-5-1 Name .................................................................................................................................. 191
12-5-2 Index................................................................................................................................... 191
12-5-3 Data Type ........................................................................................................................... 191
12-5-4 Use point to hold parameter value...................................................................................... 191
12-5-5 Point ................................................................................................................................... 191
12-5-6 Value .................................................................................................................................. 191
12-6 Configuring Schemas....................................................................................................................... 192
12-6-1 Name .................................................................................................................................. 192
12-6-2 Point ................................................................................................................................... 192
12-6-3 Type.................................................................................................................................... 192
12-6-4 Criteria ................................................................................................................................ 192
12-6-5 Filter.................................................................................................................................... 192
12-6-6 Read on Connection ........................................................................................................... 192
12-6-7 Preview............................................................................................................................... 192
12-6-8 Database Schema Types ................................................................................................... 193
12-7 Using Transactions .......................................................................................................................... 195
12-7-1 Nested Transactions........................................................................................................... 196
12-8 Saving Recordsets as XML.............................................................................................................. 196
12-9 Datashaping..................................................................................................................................... 197
12-10 Examples ......................................................................................................................................... 198
12-10-1 Simple Relation Hierarchy example: .................................................................................. 198
10
12-10-2 Compound Relation Hierarchy example: ............................................................................ 198
12-10-3 Hierarchy with Aggregate example: .................................................................................... 198
12-10-4 Group Hierarchy example: ................................................................................................. 198
12-10-5 Group Hierarchy with Aggregate example: ........................................................................ 198
12-10-6 Multiple Groupings example: ............................................................................................. 199
12-10-7 Grand Total example: ......................................................................................................... 199
12-10-8 Grouped Parent Related to Grouped Child example: ........................................................ 199
SECTION 13
CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
13-1
13-2
13-3
13-4
13-5
13-6
13-7
13-8
........................................201
Overview .......................................................................................................................................... 201
Supported Databases ...................................................................................................................... 201
CX-Supervisor Runtime User and Audit Trail UserID ...................................................................... 201
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)............................................................... 202
13-4-1 CFR Test Application .......................................................................................................... 202
13-4-2 Configuring Points for Audit ................................................................................................ 203
13-4-3 Default Audit Trail Configuration ......................................................................................... 203
13-4-4 Default Connection String ................................................................................................... 204
13-4-5 Logged In User ................................................................................................................... 205
13-4-6 Starting and Stopping an Audit Trail ................................................................................... 205
13-4-7 Running the CFR Test Application and Logging to an Access Database........................... 205
13-4-8 Viewing the Audit Trail Database........................................................................................ 206
13-4-9 Audit Trail Configuration Settings – Alarms Errors and Events .......................................... 207
13-4-10 Configuring Alarms for Audit Trail Records......................................................................... 207
13-4-11 Generating Errors and Events in Audit Trail Records ......................................................... 209
13-4-12 Running the CFR Test Application to Generate Alarm Error and Event Records............... 209
13-4-13 Viewing the Alarm Error and Events Data Tables............................................................... 210
Logging Audit Trails to an SQL Database ........................................................................................ 210
13-5-1 SQL Server Database Prerequisites................................................................................... 211
13-5-2 Creating an SQL Server Test Project ................................................................................. 211
13-5-3 Connection String for an SQL Database............................................................................. 212
13-5-4 Running an SQL Server Test Project.................................................................................. 213
13-5-5 Viewing Audit Trail Records in an SQL Server Test Project ............................................... 213
Further Settings and Configuration .................................................................................................. 213
13-6-1 Database File Location ....................................................................................................... 214
13-6-2 Microsoft Access Database File Management.................................................................... 214
13-6-3 Audit Trail Notes ................................................................................................................. 215
13-6-4 SQL Statements.................................................................................................................. 216
How to Access Information from a CFR Database .......................................................................... 217
13-7-1 Using CX-Supervisor .......................................................................................................... 217
13-7-2 Using Microsoft Excel ......................................................................................................... 218
Limitations ........................................................................................................................................ 221
SECTION 14
Standard Web Pages ...................................................................223
14-1
14-2
Overview .......................................................................................................................................... 223
Access.............................................................................................................................................. 223
11
14-3
14-4
14-5
14-6
14-7
14-8
Pages............................................................................................................................................... 223
Configuration.................................................................................................................................... 224
Default Port ...................................................................................................................................... 224
DCOM Settings ................................................................................................................................ 224
Error Pages...................................................................................................................................... 224
Limitations........................................................................................................................................ 224
SECTION 15
Multilingual Features ..................................................................225
15-1
15-2
Development Features..................................................................................................................... 225
Runtime Language Features ........................................................................................................... 226
15-2-1 Setting the Default Language ............................................................................................. 226
15-3 Runtime Multilingual Features ......................................................................................................... 227
15-3-1 Changing Language at Runtime......................................................................................... 227
15-3-2 User Defined Text............................................................................................................... 228
15-4 Translating User Defined Text with the Translation Tool ................................................................. 228
15-5 Translating User Defined Text Manually.......................................................................................... 230
15-6 Configuring Windows for Language Support ................................................................................... 231
15-6-1 Windows XP ....................................................................................................................... 231
15-6-2 Windows 2000 .................................................................................................................... 231
15-6-3 Loading Old Projects .......................................................................................................... 232
15-7 Data Log Viewer .............................................................................................................................. 233
15-8 Standard Web Pages....................................................................................................................... 233
15-9 Adding Unsupported Runtime Languages ....................................................................................... 233
15-10 Popup Keyboard Layout .................................................................................................................. 234
SECTION 16
Application Analysis / Performance Monitor ............................235
16-1
16-2
Application Analysis ......................................................................................................................... 235
16-1-1 Data Analysed .................................................................................................................... 236
Performance Monitor ....................................................................................................................... 239
SECTION 17
Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client .....................................243
17-1
17-2
17-3
An Overview of OPC........................................................................................................................ 243
17-1-1 A Brief History of OPC Data Access................................................................................... 243
17-1-2 Other OPC Specifications................................................................................................... 244
17-1-3 Key Technologies used by OPC......................................................................................... 245
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers.......................................................................................... 247
Using with Omron's CX-Server OPC ............................................................................................... 251
SECTION 18
Connecting to a remote CX-Supervisor application.................253
18-1
18-2
18-3
12
Two Tier, Client - Server or Master - Slave...................................................................................... 253
Peer to Peer..................................................................................................................................... 253
Distributed Server ............................................................................................................................ 254
18-4
18-5
18-6
Redundant Server ............................................................................................................................ 254
Creating a CX-Supervisor Server application .................................................................................. 255
Creating a CX-Supervisor Client application .................................................................................... 255
SECTION 19
Connecting to Omron Industrial Components ..........................259
19-1
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter ............................................................................................. 259
SECTION 20
Best Practices ..............................................................................263
20-1
20-2
20-3
20-4
20-5
20-6
Design .............................................................................................................................................. 263
20-1-1 Design your page layouts and navigation flow.................................................................... 263
20-1-2 Use Logical Point names instead of physical addresses .................................................... 263
Performance..................................................................................................................................... 264
20-2-1 Organise the PLC memory properly ................................................................................... 264
Points ............................................................................................................................................... 266
Drawing ............................................................................................................................................ 267
Scripts .............................................................................................................................................. 268
Data Logging.................................................................................................................................... 269
Appendix A
Configuring a PC for Remote Connection .................................271
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
Configuring a Client PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2 ........................................................ 271
Configuring a Client PC running Windows XP ................................................................................. 271
Configuring a Client PC running Windows NT or 2000 .................................................................... 271
Configuring a Server PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2 ....................................................... 272
Configuring a Server PC running Windows XP ................................................................................ 272
Configuring a Server PC running Windows NT or 2000................................................................... 272
Appendix B
Frequently Asked Questions ......................................................275
Appendix C
Troubleshooting...........................................................................299
C.1
C.2
C.3
C.4
C.5
C.6
How to diagnose problems............................................................................................................... 299
Point Maintenance ........................................................................................................................... 299
PLC Data Monitor............................................................................................................................. 299
CX-Supervisor Performance monitor ............................................................................................... 299
C.4.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................. 300
C.4.2 Summary............................................................................................................................. 300
C.4.3 CPU Time ........................................................................................................................... 300
C.4.4 Network............................................................................................................................... 300
C.4.5 PLC ..................................................................................................................................... 300
Diagnostics dialog box ..................................................................................................................... 301
Scripting errors ................................................................................................................................. 302
13
C.7
C.8
C.9
C.10
C.6.1 VBScript Syntax errors ....................................................................................................... 302
C.6.2 CX-Supervisor Syntax errors .............................................................................................. 302
C.6.3 Runtime errors .................................................................................................................... 303
C.6.4 Design errors ...................................................................................................................... 303
PLC Maintenance dialog box ........................................................................................................... 303
Database errors ............................................................................................................................... 303
How to create steps to reproduce .................................................................................................... 303
Information necessary to send to Support ....................................................................................... 304
Appendix D
CX-Server Error Codes................................................................305
Appendix E
Using with the Omron DyaloX ....................................................307
E.1
General Use..................................................................................................................................... 307
E.1.1 Installing CX-Supervisor ..................................................................................................... 307
E.1.2 Communication Settings..................................................................................................... 308
Appendix F
Obsolete Features........................................................................309
F.1
F.2
F.3
F.4
F.5
F.6
F.7
Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT ........................................................................................ 309
Configuring a OPC/DCOM Client PC running Windows 98 or Me................................................... 309
Configuring a DCOM / OPC Server PC running Windows 98 or Me ............................................... 310
F.3.1 Windows 95 ........................................................................................................................ 310
F.3.2 System Points..................................................................................................................... 311
DDE ................................................................................................................................................. 311
F.4.1 DDE Client Points............................................................................................................... 311
F.4.2 DDE Server Points ............................................................................................................. 312
F.4.3 DDE Array Points ............................................................................................................... 313
OLE Automation............................................................................................................................... 317
OLE Overview.................................................................................................................................. 317
Object Packager .............................................................................................................................. 318
F.7.1 Creating an Object From New ............................................................................................ 318
F.7.2 Creating an Object From a File .......................................................................................... 320
F.7.3 Activating an Object............................................................................................................ 321
F.7.4 Converting a Package Object............................................................................................. 322
Appendix G
Glossary of Terms .......................................................................323
Revision history ...........................................................................331
14
15
16
About the Graphics Editor
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
SECTION 1
Graphics Editor
This chapter describes the Graphics Editor and the various tools and controls
available. It also provides instructions for using these tools and controls and is
supported with suitable screen displays.
1-1
About the Graphics Editor
The Graphics Editor enables a variety of objects to be created on a page.
Supported objects are:
•
Graphical objects.
•
Control objects.
•
ActiveX objects.
Graphical objects are geometric shapes, for example ellipses and polygons,
but also include Text objects. Control objects allow information to be displayed
and entered in clear way through the use of Wizards. Examples of control
objects include buttons and Trend Graphs. ActiveX objects or controls are
from sources external to CX-Supervisor.
Refer to chapter 4, Objects for further information regarding control objects
and bitmap objects. Refer to chapter 5 for further information on ActiveX
Objects.
The tools are contained on the Control Bar and the Palette Bar. The palettes
allow all similar types of tool to be kept together. The various tools and tool
bars are discussed in the following chapters. Status and help information is
presented in a Status Bar located at the bottom of the main CX-Supervisor
window.
1-2
Palette Bar
The Palette Bar contains the tools to apply colour and style options to the
graphic objects placed on CX-Supervisor pages.
The Palette can be removed or re-displayed at any time by selecting Palette
from the View menu.
A tick next to the name indicates the Palette is currently displayed. CXSupervisor saves the settings when it is exited and restores them when it is
next run.
Each of the buttons on the palette is discussed in more detail in the following
paragraphs.
17
Palette Bar
1-2-1
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Foreground Colour and Background Colour
To create an object in a particular colour: before selecting the object's tool from
the Graphic Object bar, first select the colour by clicking one of the colour
buttons to drop down the colour picker.
Note:
It is not strictly necessary to select a colour for an object before creating it,
however if no colour selection is made, the object retains the same colour as
the last object.
To apply a colour to a previously created object, select the object on the page
and select a colour using the same method as before.
Note:
1-2-2
Colour may only be applied to some graphic objects. It cannot be applied to
embedded objects or bitmap graphics.
Custom Colours
The colour picker displays 48 common colours along with a further 16 userdefined, custom colours. A colour can be chosen from the common colours or
the Other button can used to create a custom colour. Clicking OK on the
Custom Colour dialog box will apply the current colour to the selected Graphic
Object. Clicking Add to Custom Colours will add the current colour to the
custom colours list for easy re-use later.
An example of the Custom Colour dialog box is shown below:
18
Graphic Object bar
1-2-3
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Line Style
To create an object with a particular line style: before selecting the object from
the Tool Palette, first select the line style by clicking on line style button to drop
down the Line Style picker.
Note:
It is not strictly necessary to select a line style for an object before creating it,
however if no line style selection is made, the object retains the default style of
thin solid.
To apply a line style to a previously created object, select the object on the
page and click on the appropriate line in the Line Style Palette.
Note:
1-2-4
Line styles may only be applied to some graphic objects. They cannot be
applied to text, embedded objects, controls or bitmap graphics.
Fill Pattern Palette
To create an object with a particular fill pattern: before selecting the object's
tool from the Tool Palette, first select the fill pattern by clicking on Fill Pattern
button to drop down the Fill Pattern picker.
Note:
It is not strictly necessary to select a fill pattern for an object before creating it,
however if no fill pattern selection is made, the object retains the default of no
pattern.
To apply a fill pattern to a previously created object, select the object on the
page and click in the appropriate square in the Fill Pattern Palette.
Note:
1-3
Fill patterns may only be applied to solid graphic objects. They cannot be
applied to unfilled graphic objects, text objects, embedded objects, controls or
bitmap graphics.
Graphic Object bar
The Graphic Object bar contains the tools to create the graphic objects, which
can be placed on pages within CX-Supervisor.
In general terms, the operation of the Graphic Object bar is simple. With a
page active the Graphic Object bar is active, and operation involves merely
clicking on the desired tool to select it, and then clicking and dragging to the
appropriate point in the page. This is not the case with the text, polygon or
polyline tools, however the operation of these tools is fully discussed in
chapter 4, Objects.
Moving the mouse pointer over any of the tools causes CX-Supervisor to
display a tooltip to describe the tool.
By default, the cursor returns to Selection mode (an arrow) after drawing an
object. If you would prefer it to remain in its current state, clear the Return to
select mode checkbox in the Editing Preferences dialog box, which is found on
the CX-Supervisor file menu.
For further details concerning the tools contained within the Graphic Object
bar refer to chapter 4, Objects.
1-4
Control Bar
CX-Supervisor provides a Control Bar containing formatting and object
manipulation tools. The Control Bar can be activated or de activated from the
View menu. To activate the Control Bar, select Control Bar from the View
menu; CX-Supervisor places a check mark next to it signifying its active
19
Control Bar
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
status. To de activate it, repeat the procedure (the check mark is removed),
and the Control Bar is no longer displayed. The various tools on the control
bar allow the properties of objects to be modified.
A control may be activated with more than one object selected to change a
particular attribute of all of the selected objects, e.g. when all graphical objects
on a page are selected and the Rotate button is pushed in and the desired
angle specified, all selected objects are rotated.
An illustration of the Control Bar is as follows:
The Control Bar may vary slightly from this according to the display resolution
currently in use - the number of buttons displayed depends on the available
space - at higher resolutions more buttons are displayed.
The Control Bar can be removed from the display at any time by selecting
Control Bar from the View menu.
A tick next to the name indicates that it is currently displayed. CX-Supervisor
saves the settings when it is exited and restores them when it is next run.
The specific operation of the controls on the Control Bar is described in the
following paragraphs.
1-4-1
Object Identification
When an object is created, CX-Supervisor gives it a unique identifier. This
identifier consists of the object type and a sequential number (starting at 1).
For example, a text object could have an identifier of TEXT_1; a polygon
object could have an identifier of POLYGON_3 etc. The Object Identification
field displays a list of all current objects on a page.
The identification of an object can be changed by clicking on the entry in the
Object Identification control, typing over the entry and pressing <Return>. A
confirmation box is provided to double check the operation, click the OK
button to proceed with the name change or the Cancel button to abort the
operation.
It can at times be difficult to select a particular object if it is mostly obscured by
other graphic objects. The Object Identification control allows an object to be
selected by simply selecting its name from the presented list. click the arrow
button to display the list and select the desired object. On selection the object
is highlighted.
The following illustration shows the Object Identification control in de-selected
state:
The following illustration shows the Object Identification control in selected
state:
20
Control Bar
1-4-2
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Raise Up One
The
button allows an object which forms part of an overlapping group of
objects to be moved nearer the top of the group, one layer at a time. With an
object selected, clicking the button once moves the object up one layer. This
continues until the object is at the top. Clicking the button with the object at the
top of a group has no effect.
The following example illustrates the state of a group of two objects before and
after clicking the Raise Up One button with the black round rectangle selected:
1-4-3
Lower Down One
The
button allows an object which forms part of an overlapping group of
objects to be moved nearer the bottom of the group, one layer at a time. With
an object selected, clicking the button once moves the object down one layer.
This continues until the object is at the bottom. Clicking the button with the
object at the bottom of a group has no effect.
The following example illustrates the state of a group of two objects before and
after clicking the Lower Down One button with the grey polygon selected:
1-4-4
Rotate
The
button allows graphical and bitmap objects to be rotated. With an
object selected, clicking the button once opens the Rotate dialog box. Set the
desired angle and click the OK button to rotate the object.
The following example illustrates the state of an object before and after
clicking the Rotate button and defining a 10 rotation with the object selected:
21
Control Bar
1-4-5
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Horizontal Mirror
The
button allows graphical and bitmap objects to be mirrored in the
horizontal plane. With an object selected, clicking the button once "flips" the
object producing a vertical mirror image.
The following example illustrates the state of an object before and after
clicking the Mirror Horizontal button with the object selected:
1-4-6
Vertical Mirror
The
button allows graphical and bitmap objects to be mirrored in the
vertical plane. With an object selected, clicking the button once "flips" the
object producing a vertical mirror image.
The following example illustrates the state of an object before and after
clicking the Mirror Vertical button with the object selected:
1-4-7
Transparency On/Off
The
button changes an object from solid to outline and from outline to
solid. With an object selected, click the button and the object toggles from
solid to outline (or vice versa).
The following example illustrates the state of an object before and after
clicking the Transparency button with the object selected:
1-4-7-1
Set Transparent Colour
The
button allows the optional transparent colour of picture objects with
.bmp and .gif file types to be set.
By clicking the Set Transparent Colour button and then clicking on a colour on
the image you can select the colour that will appear transparent.
The following example illustrates the effect of using the transparency colour in
conjunction with the transparency mode to remove the unwanted parts of the
image:
22
Status Bar
1-5
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Status Bar
CX-Supervisor provides help and status information in a Status Bar located at
the bottom of the main window.
The Status Bar has two main active areas: the Help Message area, and the
Cursor Co ordinates area.
The Help Message area is used by CX-Supervisor to display helpful
information concerning menu selections and controls. It is located at the left
hand end of the Status Bar, and can display messages similar to the following:
The Cursor Co ordinates area provides position information for the current
location of the mouse pointer as it tracks around the active page within the CXSupervisor window. If an object on a page is selected, the status area displays
the co-ordinates of the location of that object. An example of the system status
area is shown below:
The first two display panels show the current x and y co ordinates of the
mouse pointer within the currently active page. As the mouse pointer leaves
the confines of a page and moves into the client area of the main CXSupervisor window, the last recorded co ordinates are held in these panels.
If an object is clicked on, all four panels are used by CX-Supervisor to display
the co-ordinates of that object, as follows:
x y Width Height
The first two panels contain the distance of the top left corner of the object
from the top left of the page in pixels. The second two panels show the extent
of the object in pixels.
1-6
Text Bar
An illustration of the CX-Supervisor Text Bar is as follows:
23
Text Bar
1-6-1
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Font Name
The Font Name field contains a list of fonts which are available on the host
version of Windows. The list is presented in alphabetical order, and only
details typeface families. This does not include bold or italic variants as this
attribute is set by using the appropriate button.
The following illustration shows the control in de-selected state:
The following illustration shows the control in selected state:
The Font Name field displays the current font attribute for the selected
object(s). To change the font for a block of text, highlight it and click either: the
down arrow adjacent to the edit part of the control, or into the edit part of the
control itself, for the Font Name field. The control then displays a list of
available fonts, from which the desired typeface may be selected.
If more than one block of text is selected with each having different font
attributes, the edit part of the control is empty. However, selecting a font from
the supplied list still sets the font attribute for all the selected group of text
blocks.
Fonts and font families are printer dependent, therefore changing the printer
within the Printer Setup dialog box (accessed from the File menu) changes the
fonts which are available within the Font Name field.
1-6-2
Font Size
The Font Size field contains a list of point sizes available on the host version of
Windows for the selected font. The list is presented in numerical order.
The following illustration shows the control in de-selected state:
The following illustration shows the control in selected state:
Either click the cursor into the editable area of the control and enter a new
point size, or click the down arrow and select a new point size from the
presented list.
24
Grid
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
The control displays the current point size for the selected block of text. If more
than one block of text is selected having different point sizes, the edit part of
the control is empty. However, selecting a font from the supplied list (or typing
in a new point size) still sets the point size for all the selected blocks of text.
1-6-3
Text Bold On/Off
The
button allows any selected text objects to be set to bold when the Text
Bold button is pushed in, or normal when the Text Bold button is released. Text
Bold only applies to text, block text, and to text on buttons, other controls and
graphics cannot be emboldened.
1-6-4
Text Italic On/Off
The
button allows any selected text object(s) to be set to italic when the
Text Italic button is pushed in, or normal when the Text Italic button is released.
Text Italic only applies to text, block text, and to text on buttons, other controls
and graphics cannot be italicised.
1-6-5
Text Underline On/Off
The
button allows any selected text object(s) to be set to underline when
the Text Underline button is pushed in, or normal when the Text Underline
button is released. Text Underline only applies to text, block text, and to text on
buttons, other controls and graphics cannot be underlined.
1-6-6
Text Left Aligned
The
Aligned button aligns any selected text object(s) to the left edge of the
bounding box. Text Left Justified only applies to text, block text, and to text
on buttons, other controls and graphics cannot be left justified.
1-6-7
Text Centred
The
button aligns any selected text object(s) to the centre of the bounding
box. Text Centre Justified only applies to text, block text, and to text on
buttons, other controls and graphics cannot be centre justified.
1-6-8
Text Right Aligned
The
button aligns any selected text object(s) to the right edge of the
bounding box. Text Right Justified only applies to text, block text, and to text
on buttons, other controls and graphics cannot be right justified.
1-7
Grid
The use of the grid may be helpful in drawing and aligning the objects on the
screen. Select the
button to enable the grid.
The grid settings are available by selecting Grid from the View menu. All the
available grid sizes are shown along with a Snap to Grid option which forces
graphical objects selected by the user to align according to the current grid
setting.
Note:
1-8
The buttons can be customised to remove or add favourite functions.
Tip of the Day
On startup, a Tip of the Day dialog box opens. All tips can be reviewed using
the Next and Previous buttons. This dialog box can be turned off, or turned
back on from the Help menu.
25
Tip of the Day
26
SECTION 1 Graphics Editor
Creating a Page
SECTION 2 Pages
SECTION 2
Pages
This chapter explains the concept of pages. The chapter covers creating,
amending, printing and saving pages.
2-1
Creating a Page
A project must consist of at least one page.
To create a new page, CX-Supervisor must currently have a project open. If no
project is currently open, either click the Open button to open a previously
saved project, or select New from the Project menu to create a new project.
Note:
When you first create a project, CX-Supervisor creates a new page for you
automatically. For more details concerning projects, refer to chapter 6,
Projects.
With a project open, click the
button to create a new blank page. An
example of a new blank page is shown as follows:
2-2
Amending a Page
To amend a page, it must first be open. If no pages are open click the
button. A standard File Open dialog box with the caption Open Page opens.
The layout and usage depends on your operating system so see your
Microsoft documentation for details.
1, 2, 3…
To amend a page:
1. Locate the drive and directory where the desired page is stored.
2. Select the desired page from the list presented.
3. Click the Open button to load the page.
Note:
Loading a page does not automatically make it part of a project. It is therefore
perfectly feasible to load and edit pages from other projects. Use the Project
Editor to attach a page to a project. For more details concerning projects, refer
to chapter 6, Projects.
The loaded page may now be edited as required using the CX-Supervisor
editing tools.
27
Defining the Properties of a Page
2-3
SECTION 2 Pages
Defining the Properties of a Page
A page has certain attributes, or properties. These properties may be viewed
and edited in two ways. The simplest way to access the properties of a page is
to double click with the left mouse button in the background area of the page.
This causes CX-Supervisor to display the following Page Properties dialog
box:
The Page Properties dialog box allows the viewing and editing of various
attributes.
1, 2, 3…
To set the Page Properties:
1. Enter a title for the page in the Page Title: field up to a maximum of 32
characters.
2. Add a description (if required) in the Page Description field.
3. Enter the co-ordinates for the top-left corner of the page in the Top and Left
field. This value must be in pixels, and must be a positive integer between
0 and 2000. Alternatively, click the Full Size button to fill the runtime
environment workspace.
4. Enter the height and width measurements for the page in the Height and
Width fields. These values must be in pixels, and must be a positive
integer between 0 and 2000. click the Centre button to centre the page to
the graphics workspace.
5. Select the border style for the page from the Border Style settings. The
default for this is Sizeable, as shown on the Page Properties dialog box.
Changing the selection will update the shown preview.
6. To prevent the title from being displayed, click the Display Title setting to
remove the check mark. The following change occurs in the dialog box:
28
Printing a Page
SECTION 2 Pages
7. To change the display mode, select Overlap, Replace or Popup in the
Display Mode setting. 'Popup' pages appear above all other page types,
'Overlap' pages can lie on top of other pages, and 'Replace' pages closes
any pages that overlap.
8. To alter the colour of the page, click in the Demo Page Window area or
click the Colour button. CX-Supervisor displays the Windows Colour
Palette dialog box:
9. Either select a colour from the palette area or define a custom colour.
When the desired colour opens, click the OK button to return to the Page
Properties dialog box.
10.Alternatively, to display an image or photograph as the background click
the Background button and select the desired file and note the Display
Background check box is automatically ticked.
2-4
Printing a Page
Before printing a page, ensure that the printer has been set up correctly.
2-4-1
Print Setup
To check the printer settings, select Print Setup from the File menu.
CX-Supervisor displays the Print Setup dialog box in response:
The current printer selection is defined in the Name: control box. To alter the
settings, proceed as follows:
29
Printing a Page
SECTION 2 Pages
1, 2, 3…
To change the current printer selection:
1. Click the Name: field and select from the list presented.
2. To change the page orientation from portrait to landscape click the
Landscape setting, (or vice-versa).
3. To change the paper size, click the Size: field, and select the desired
paper size from the list presented.
4. To change the paper source, click the Source: field, and select the desired
paper source from the list presented.
5. Click the OK button to exit from the Print Setup dialog box when the
settings are correct.
Note:
2-4-2
The Properties button gives access to advanced printer configuration functions
for the selected printer. For details of these functions, refer to the Windows
User Manual, On line Help, or the appropriate Manufacturer's handbook.
Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
This results in a screen display similar to the following:
1, 2, 3…
To print the page:
1. Click the
button, CX-Supervisor displays the Print dialog box.
2. To display the next page, click the Next Page button.
3. To display the previous page, click the Prev Page button.
4. To display the current page, side-by-side with the next page, click the Two
Page button. To return to a single page view click the same button again
which now carries the legend, One Page.
5. Click the Zoom In button. Click it a second time to zoom in to the second
level. This does not zoom into a specific area of the page.
6. To zoom out from a zoomed in view, click the Zoom Out button. Click a
second time to zoom right out.
7. To close the preview screen, click the Close button.
2-4-3
Printing
To print a page, click the Print Page button. The Print dialog box opens.
30
Saving a Page to a Project
1, 2, 3…
SECTION 2 Pages
To set the print range:
1. Clicking one of the settings in the Print range settings. The Selection
setting is only enabled when an item (or items) are selected on the page
prior to starting the print process. Click the Pages setting and enter a
range of pages in the from and to fields.
2. To change the number of copies to be printed, enter a new value in the
Copies field.
3. If multiple copies are selected, click the Collate setting to instruct the
printer to collate the copies as they are printed.
4. To print to file, click the Print to file setting.
5. Click the OK button to activate printing. While printing is in progress, a
dialog box opens showing the status of the print job. Clicking the Cancel
button at this point aborts the printing. When printed, the dialog box
disappears. The final printed version should be similar to that shown in the
Print Preview dialog box, with a header describing the project, and a footer
describing the page with a page number and date stamp.
Note:
2-5
The Properties button on the Print dialog box gives access to advanced printer
configuration functions for the selected printer. For details of these functions,
please consult the Windows User Manual, On-line Help, or the appropriate
Manufacturer's handbook.
Saving a Page to a Project
When a page has been created it is wise to save it to the project in which it is
planned to reside. It is good practice to ensure that pages are saved regularly,
for example to minimise the loss of work in the event of a power failure.
To save a page click the
button. If this is the first time the page has been
saved, the Save As dialog box opens. This is a standard Windows dialog box
and usage depends on your operating system. Please consult your Microsoft
documentation.
1, 2, 3…
To save a page to a project:
1. Move to the location where the page file is to be stored.
2. Ensure that the Save as Type: control is set to CX-Supervisor Pages
(*.PAG).
3. Enter a name in the File Name: field.
31
CX-Supervisor Preferences
SECTION 2 Pages
4. Click the Save button to save the file.
Subsequent saves do not cause the Save As dialog box to be displayed.
After clicking the Save button, if the page is currently not assigned to a project,
a confirmation dialog box opens. Alternatively, select Save Page from the File
menu (or use the short-cut key combination of <Ctrl>+S.
2-5-1
Save Page As
If a copy of a page be required, (for incorporation into another project
perhaps), select Save Page As… from the File menu.
CX-Supervisor displays the File Save As dialog box as described previously.
After entering a new name for the page, CX-Supervisor prompts to save the
different page into the current project as above.
2-5-2
Closing a Page
To close a page after editing select Close Page from the File menu.
Alternatively, either click the control box for the page, (located in the top left
corner of the page) and select Close from the Control menu, or simply
double-click the Control menu and the page closes.
If you attempt to close a page which has not been saved, CX-Supervisor
displays a confirmation dialog box. If you want to save the changes, click the
Yes button. Otherwise, click the No button, or click the Cancel button to abort
closing the page.
2-6
CX-Supervisor Preferences
CX-Supervisor allows a user to customise the working environment. To set or
amend the CX-Supervisor setup, select Preferences from the File menu,
followed by the preference to set up.
The types of customisation are described in the following paragraphs.
2-6-1
Startup Preferences
The Startup Preferences allows the project last accessed in the previous
session of CX-Supervisor to be automatically loaded in the next session. It is
accessible by selecting Startup from the Preferences menu. Click in the Load
last project on startup setting to switch this preference as desired. Click the
OK button to accept the change, or Cancel to abort.
2-6-2
Editing Preferences
The Editing Preferences dialog box provides a number of switches to
enhance the use of the Graphics Editor and CX-Supervisor animation. It is
accessed by selecting Editing from the Preferences menu. The number of
undo operations in the Graphics Editor can be set in the Number of
Available 'Undo' Operations: field. To make the Graphics Editor return to
Select Mode after every drawing operation, click in the Revert to 'Select
Mode' after Drawing Operations setting. The use of double-clicking on an
object can be defined: when a check mark is present in the Enter Edit Mode
field, a double-click on an object of that type causes it to enter Edit Mode.
When a check mark is present in a Display Animation Editor field, a doubleclick on an object of that type activates the Animation Editor. Click the OK
button to accept the changes, or the Cancel button to abort.
32
CX-Supervisor Preferences
2-6-3
SECTION 2 Pages
General Preferences
General Preferences allow the default script language to be chosen. When
new scripts are added, CX-Supervisor will default to saving scripts in the
select language.
33
CX-Supervisor Preferences
34
SECTION 2 Pages
What is a Point?
SECTION 3 Points
SECTION 3
Points
This chapter describes CX-Supervisor points and the procedures associated
with the creation, amendment and removal of points using the Points Editing
facility. The application of external sources to points is also described.
3-1
What is a Point?
A point is a variable used internally by CX-Supervisor. All points within CXSupervisor have a name, group and type associated with them.
CX-Supervisor provides a set of pre-defined System ($) Points, which are
detailed in chapter 3 Points.
3-2
About the Point Editor
The Point Editor allows the viewing, creating, modifying and removing of
points from the points database.
Note:
System Points cannot be modified.
To open the Point Editor dialog box, click the
button.
An example of the Point Editor dialog box is as follows:
The typeface of the editor can be amended by selecting Preferences from the
File menu. This is especially useful when printing.
3-3
Note:
To select a range of points, click on a point to mark the start of the range and
click again with the <Shift> key down to mark the end.
Note:
To individually select more than one point, click while holding the <Ctrl> key
down.
Note:
The short-cut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within the Point Editor. Highlight one or more points and type <Ctrl>+X to
cut or <Ctrl>+C to copy; use <Ctrl>+V to paste. Since the cut and copy
operations store the information in the Windows Clipboard, points may be
pasted to another CX-Supervisor application. See also Chapter 3 Quick
creation of many points.
Note:
If the I/O type ends with ' ' and a number, it is an array point with the shown
number of elements.
Viewing Points in the Point Editor
The Point Editor view of the points database can be tailored by filtering or
sorting the available points.
35
Viewing Points in the Point Editor
3-3-1
SECTION 3 Points
Filtering the Points in the View by Group
Points are separated into groups. To select a group, pick an entry from the
Group field.
All points can be displayed by selecting <All Groups> from this list.
3-3-2
Filtering the Points in the View by Point Type
A selection of points can be displayed based on the point type. Selection of the
All Points button displays points of all types.
The Boolean Points button only displays points of a Boolean type. The Integer
Points button, the Real Points button and Text Points button, once selected,
react in the same way.
3-3-3
Sorting the Points in the View by I/O Type
Points can also be filtered by I/O type. Respectively, these buttons display All
Points, Memory Points, Input Points, Output Points or Input/Output Points.
3-3-4
Sorting the Points in the View
Individual listed points are sorted, based on a designated field type: name,
type, input/output type or description. By clicking on the Name button, the
points are sorted alphanumerically by name.
The Type button, the I/O Type button, the Address button and Description
button, once selected, react in the same way. In the previous Point Editor
example the list is sorted by Name.
The widths of the point fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries:
A double click the text boundaries causes the column to autosize.
3-3-5
Changing the Viewing Mode
Click the
button to configure which columns of information are displayed in
the Point Editor.
Click the
button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with normal icons.
Click the
button to view details as a list.
Select the
button to view details as a list including name, type, I/O type,
address and description information. The details can be sorted in ascending
order by clicking once or in descending order by clicking twice, in the
appropriate field.
3-3-6
Summary of Point Information
A summary of point information is available by selecting the
button. The
resultant Point Information dialog box shows an overall summary, a
breakdown on the number of points per type and the input/output type. To exit
the dialog box, click the Close button. The Point Information dialog box is
shown as follows:
36
Viewing Points in the Point Editor
3-3-7
SECTION 3 Points
Drag and Drop of Points onto Control Objects
The Point Editor can be used to drag and drop points onto control objects.
For instance, Integer points can be dragged from the Point Editor onto a
Linear Gauge, Rotary Gauge, Trend Graph and Slider. Boolean points can
also be applied to a Toggle.
1, 2, 3…
To apply a point to a control object with the Point Editor:
1. Arrange the CX-Supervisor windows so that the point to drag and the
target control object are both visible.
2. Select the point to associate and drag it onto the page.
37
Creating a Point
SECTION 3 Points
3. Drop the point at the position of the target control object. An invalid "drop"
is denoted by the mouse pointer changing to a circular symbol.
For further information of the use of points with objects, refer to chapter 4,
Objects.
3-4
Creating a Point
To add a new point, select the
box being displayed:
button. This results in the Add Point dialog
When all the information has been provided for the new point, clicking the OK
button commits the new point to the points database, while the Cancel button
aborts the add operation.
3-4-1
General Attributes
The name of the point is entered in the Point Name: field. The point name can
be up to 20 alphanumeric characters, and must not begin with a digit or
include mathematical operators such as "+", or be identical to a script reserved
word such as "IF" or "cos". Any invalid characters (including spaces) generate
an audible error, or an "Invalid Point Name entered" message when the OK
button is clicked.
The group to which this point belongs is selected from the Group: field. A new
group can be entered by typing in the Group: field.
A points description, detailing the use of the current point, may be inserted in
the Description: field.
3-4-2
Point Type
The point type can be Boolean, Integer, Real or Text. The default type is
Boolean.
3-4-3
Point Attributes
The attributes for a point vary according to the point type.
For a Boolean point, the following attributes are displayed:
38
Creating a Point
SECTION 3 Points
The default state of the point is defined by selecting either the State 0: or State
1: setting. Associative text (such as 'OFF' or 'FALSE' for state 0) can be
applied in the related Default Text: fields. The default text is associated with
Toggle buttons and object animations such as Display Value and Edit Point
Value when they are configured to use the point.
For an Integer point, the following attributes are displayed:
The minimum threshold for the point is inserted into the Minimum Value: field.
The maximum threshold for the point is inserted into the Maximum Value: field.
The default value is inserted in the Default Value: field.
Note: Integer points are limited to -2,147,483,648 to 2147483647
For a Real point, the following attributes are displayed:
The minimum threshold for the point is inserted into the Minimum Value: field.
The maximum threshold for the point is inserted into the Maximum Value: field.
The default value is inserted in the Default Value: field.
Note: Real points are limited to 1.7E +/- 308 to a precision of 15 digits.
For a Text point, the following attribute opens:
Text is entered in the Text: field.
Note: Memory Text points can have 32768 characters but PLC I/O Text Points
are limited to 1024 characters.
3-4-4
I/O Type
The I/O type states the scope of the point, i.e. whether it is purely an internal
variable or whether it communicates with a PLC.
39
Creating a Point
3-4-5
SECTION 3 Points
•
A Memory Resident point is provided internally by CX-Supervisor.
•
An Input point receives data from an external device.
•
An Output point sends data to an external device.
•
An Input/Output point both sends data to and receives data from an
external device.
Memory Attributes
The Array Size field allows Memory Point arrays to be created. If an Array Size
of 1 is specified, a single point is created. Specifying any other value creates
an array of points of this type.
This option is only available to Memory Resident points.
3-4-6
I/O Update Rate
The I/O Update Rate specifies how and when communication with the PLC
takes place.
This option is not available to Memory Resident points.
The On Change option specifies that communication with the PLC occurs
automatically as a result of a value change.
The On Request option specifies that data updates with the PLC will be
manually requested using the scripting commands InputPoint and
OutputPoint. The point is updated internally but only communicates with the
PLC when requested to by the script commands.
The On Interval option specifies the frequency that communications occur
with the PLC. When this option is selected an list box appears allowing the
frequency to be entered.
3-4-7
I/O Attributes
The I/O Attributes option specifies the external source or destination for the
point.
This option is not available to Memory Resident points.
40
Creating a Point
SECTION 3 Points
The external source is defined by selecting the appropriate I/O Attributes:
setting. Further configuration of the external source can be applied by clicking
the Setup button.
On clicking the Setup button for a PLC external source, the PLC Attributes
dialog box opens.
The point type associated with the PLC Connection attributes is shown in the
title bar. The required PLC can be selected from the PLC: field. If no PLCs
exist in the PLC: field then one must be added. This is achieved by clicking the
Add PLC button and configuring one. A point cannot be configured to have a
PLC connection unless all the PLC connection attributes are correctly
configured. For more information on adding and configuring PLCs and devices
see chapter 6 Projects, Device Configuration.
3-4-8
PLC Attributes
The Data Location: field identifies the area of memory to which this address
applies and is dependent upon the type and configuration of the PLC.
The Data Type: field identifies the type of data held at this address. The type
determines how point values are converted from a computer format into a PLC
format. The field contains options applicable to the Data Location.
The Modifier: field indicates the command to be performed on the data at this
address. An example of a modifier is for a bit: a modifier might declare that a
bit is to be forced set and not to be written normally. The field contains options
applicable to the Data Location.
41
Creating a Point
SECTION 3 Points
The Array Size: field specifies the number of data values associated with the
point. A value greater than 1 allows the point to be treated as an array. For
more detail on array points and their uses see Optimisation of PLC
Communications.
The PLC Attributes dialog box takes on a slightly different appearance if the
point type is text, showing the number of characters which start at the
specified data location:
3-4-9
Data Transfer Actions When Opening a PLC
The type of data transfer action for the selected PLC can be specified by
selection of the appropriate setting. Options for Input and Input/Output points
are Always Update Point Value and Only Update Point Value When On
Display. Options for an Output point are Write Value, Read Value and No Data
Transfer.
3-4-10 Conversion Attributes
The minimum and maximum PLC value and the application of a conversion
factor is specified in the Conversion Attributes: fields (these fields are not
applicable for Boolean and text points).
Conversion Attributes can be used to convert in a linear fashion between a
value in a PLC and the point range. For example, if the possible range in the
PLC is 0 to 1000, and the point range is 0 to 100, then a PLC value of 500
would correspond to a point value of 50. The conversion would be performed
just before the data is sent to the PLC, or immediately upon receipt of it from
the PLC.
On completion of the PLC configuration connection, click the OK button to
continue, or the Cancel button to abort. Click the Add PLC button to create a
new PLC connection. Information relating to the selection of this button is
described in chapter 6 Projects, Device Configuration.
3-4-11 Advanced Point Settings
Advanced settings can be applied to a new point, by clicking the Advanced
button in the Add Point dialog box. This results in the Advanced Point
Settings dialog box being displayed.
In order to access a CX-Supervisor point value via OLE2 Automation, it must
be given OLE Read or OLE Write access. The scope of the access can be
defined by checking the appropriate setting in the OLE Access.
42
Amending an Existing Point
SECTION 3 Points
The point value which is stored to disk may be Volatile or Non-volatile by
selecting or deselecting the Non-Volatile check-box. A Non-volatile point
ensures the preservation of the point's value at regular intervals. If power is
lost, or CX-Supervisor is shut down for any reason, then when the application
is restarted the point is initialised to the last saved value. These values are
saved in a project file with .NVP extension. To prevent unexpected operation,
this file is automatically deleted if further point changes are made in the
Developer. In this case points revert to their Default value.
Select the Validate Point is Within Specified Range check-box. This option is
only available for Input or I/O points of type Integer or Real. When checked, an
error message opens in the error log if the data passed to CX-Supervisor is
outside of the specified Minimum and Maximum range.
Click the OK button to accept the advanced settings, or the Cancel button to
abort the operation.
3-5
Amending an Existing Point
To modify an existing point, highlight the point from the points list and click the
button.
This results in the View Point dialog box being displayed as shown below, a
dialog box based on the Add Point dialog box:
The selected point can be redefined as described in chapter 3, Creating a
Point.
Note: If a point is renamed then any animations or scripts that were using the
previous point name become invalid. Run the Analyse Application tool to
check for References to non-existent points.
3-6
Deleting an Existing Point
To remove an existing point, highlight the point from the points list and click
the
button. This results in a confirmation dialog box being displayed. Click
the Yes button to remove the point from the points database, or the No button
to abort the delete operation.
43
Quick creation of many points
Note:
SECTION 3 Points
It is possible to delete more than one point by either selecting points within a
range or by selecting individually several points.
To select a range click on a point to mark the start of the range and click again
with the <SHIFT> key down to mark the end.
To individually select more than one point click while holding the <CTRL> key
down.
Note:
3-7
If a point is deleted then any animations or scripts that were using the point
become invalid. Run the Analyse Application tool to check for References to
non-existent points.
Quick creation of many points
CX-Supervisor supports up to 8,000 points, which could take much time to
create. Within the Point Editor you can use Copy/Paste which helpfully
increments the point name automatically (BoilerTemp1 becomes
BoilerTemp2, BoilerTemp3 etc) but you still have to edit each point to
configure the PLC address and possibly other information. Using the Copy
and Paste functions, Point data can quickly be edited and created for example
in grid form using Excel. This can prove extremely quick when the design uses
contiguous addresses.
1, 2, 3…
1. Open the Point Editor.
2. Select the points to edit, or a single point to act as a template and Copy
to the Windows Clipboard
3. Start Excel.
4. Position the cursor in column A and paste the CX-Supervisor Points into
Excel. The worksheet should resemble the following:
Each row is a single point, and each column is a setting of that point.
Note:
Some settings may be hidden on the right. Use the scrollbar to view.
5. Edit the point details as required.
Note:
To quickly create new points with the same settings, select the whole row
by clicking the row number on the left. A range can now be drawn to be
filled by dragging the black square box on the bottom left of the range
selection:
Excel automatically increments any data ending in a number. This can be
very useful for Names and PLC Addresses (columns A and F) but take
care with other columns. If other columns are wrongly incremented, like
PLC Name, Array size and Data Range (columns E, G and K) these can
quickly be copied by selecting the correct value e.g. G1 then using the
square box to highlight the column of data to fill. To see the fill options hold
down the right mouse button before draging the square box. Repeat for
each column.
6. When editing is completed, select the row(s) to required and select Copy
44
Runtime Point Maintenance
SECTION 3 Points
7. Switch back to the Point Editor and select Paste.
Note:
If the pasted point names already exist, CX-Supervisor will automatically add
or increment a number on the end to prevent overwriting. If you wish to
overwrite to replace old point settings, simple delete (not Cut) the old points
from the Point Editor before pasting.
All pasted points will pasted into the group on view
3-8
Runtime Point Maintenance
It is possible to reconfigure points at runtime via the right mouse button
floating menu option Points Maintenance. The Point Maintenance dialog box
opens.
To monitor and change the value of a point in runtime, select a point from the
Point Name: field. The Filter Options: field and settings refines the points listed
in the Point Name: field. Select the Get Value button to retrieve the current
value of the selected point. Specify a new point value in the Point Value/Text:
field and click the Set Value button. The Diagnostics button shows details
including communications statistics, useful for diagnosing communication
problems. Note this button is only available when a user with 'Designer'
privileges is logged in. Select the Close button to complete the operation.
3-9
Optimisation of PLC Communications
PLC communication speeds can be increased by creating "array" points which
contain several elements of the same type, rather than creating a large
number of individual points. For instance, the time taken to update an array
point containing 50 elements are quicker than the time taken to update 50
individual points.
3-9-1
Creation of an "Array" Point
An "array" point can be created by specifying a value greater than 1 in the
Elements: field of the Setup PLC Connection dialog box. The Data Location
field specifies the memory address from which the array of data begins.
Note:Elements of an array point are located at consecutive addresses after
the address specified in the Data Location field.
Accessing Elements of an "Array" Point
Direct access to array points can be achieved by applying a subscript to the
pointname, e.g. pointname[index]. For more information refer to the CXSupervisor Script Language Reference Manual.
45
Point Import
3-10
SECTION 3 Points
Point Import
To import PLC points from other applications, click the
button. This results
in the Import PLC Points From Another CX-Server Project dialog box being
displayed.
The Point Import tool can be used to import point information into the CXSupervisor project that has already been configured. The symbol name,
symbol type and PLC address is imported from the CDM file generated by
other applications.
The CDM file can be generated from CX-Programmer by linking the project to
the CDM file. The CDM file can also be generated by exporting from a
SYSWIN project to a CDM file. Refer to the documentation supplied with the
package for information on how to export or link the data to the CDM file.
It is possible to import points from the CDM file of another CX-Supervisor
project but this is not recommended, as only the name, type and address are
imported. A better method is to copy the points from one application to the
clipboard, and paste them in the required application. This way all point
information is copied.
1, 2, 3…
Steps to import from another CDM file.
1. Open the Import PLC Points From Another CX-Server Project dialog
box.
2. Click the Open Project button and find the project to import from.
3. Select the tab depending upon the I/O type required.
4. Click the Add button and select the symbols required.
5. Add these to the CX-Supervisor project by clicking the Add button.
6. Press OK to return.
7. Repeat for other I/O types.
8. Press OK to finish.
3-11
System Points
System Points are those points that are pre-defined within CX-Supervisor.
They cannot be edited or deleted, but their attributes can be viewed. All
system points can be selected from the System Point dialog box.
System points are listed in the points list, and are denoted by a '$' symbol
preceding the point name. To view system points only, select System Points
from the Group: field. When listed, the Boolean Points, Integer Points, Real
Points, Text Points and All Points buttons on the toolbar are unavailable for
selection. To view other points, select All Groups from the Group: field.
3-11-1 Time Points
The following table describes system points for use with time based
operations. Provisions are given to both 12 hour and 24 hour time formats.
46
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$12Hour
Integer
0-12
Hours in 12-hour
format.
$AMPM
Text
-
AM/PM indicator
for 12-hour clock
form.
System Points
SECTION 3 Points
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$Hour
Integer
0-23
Hours in 24-hour
format.
$Millisecond
Integer
0-999
Number of
milliseconds.
$Minute
Integer
0-59
Minutes.
$Second
Integer
0-59
Seconds.
$Time
Text
-
Time (e.g. 09:46).
3-11-2 Date Points
The following table describes system points for use with date based
operations. Provisions are given for numerical and alphanumerical formats.
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$Date
Text
-
Date (e.g. 28/02/
95).
$DayOfMonth
Integer
1-31
Day of the month.
$DayOfYear
Integer
1-366
Day of the year.
$Month
Integer
1-12
Month ( 1 January, 12 Dec.).
$MonthName
Text
-
Month name (e.g.
February).
$ShortMonthName
Text
-
Abbreviated
month name (e.g.
Feb).
$ShortWeekDayName Text
-
Abbreviated
weekday name
(e.g. Wed).
$ShortYear
Integer
0-99
Abbreviated year
(e.g. 95).
$WeekDay
Integer
0-6
Day of the week (0
- Sun, 6 - Sat).
$WeekDayName
Text
-
Weekday name
(e.g. Wednesday).
$WeekOfYear
Integer
0-51
Week number for
the year.
$Year
Integer
1970-2038
Year (e.g. 1995).
3-11-3 Internal Points
The following table describes system points for use with interrogating current
system settings, such as memory and disk space restrictions and other
system resources.
47
System Points
SECTION 3 Points
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$AvailableMemory Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Amount of
available memory,
in bytes.
$DemoMode
Boolean
-
Indicates status of
communications
(0=active,
1=disabled).
$DiskSpace
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Amount of free
disk space
available, in bytes.
$PCName
Text
-
Computer name of
PC as seen in
Explorer
$ProjectName
Text
-
Name of project
file, without .SCS
extension
$ProjectPath
Text
-
Path to project on
disk, without
project name.
$SpoolCount
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of alarm
entries currently
spooled, awaiting
printing to page
printer.
$Version
Text
-
Version number of
CX-Supervisor
Runtime program
3-11-4 Display Points
The following table describes system points for use with the display mode.
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$ScreenSizeX
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Screen width.
$ScreenSizeY
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Screen height.
3-11-5 Mouse Points
The following table describes system points for use in mouse movement and
operation. They are updated on a left button click.
48
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$MouseX
Integer
0-65535
Mouse X coordinates.
$MouseY
Integer
0-65535
Mouse Y coordinates.
System Points
SECTION 3 Points
3-11-6 Alarm Points
The following table describes system points for use with CX-Supervisor
alarms.
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$ActiveAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
alarms.
$AlarmCount
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Total number of
alarms.
$HighestAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
highest priority
alarms
$HighAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
high priority
alarms
$MediumAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
medium priority
alarms
$LowAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
low priority alarms
$LowestAlarms
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of active
lowest priority
alarms
$Unacknowledged Integer
Alarms
0-2,147,483,647
Number of alarms
currently
unacknowledged
3-11-7 Error Logger Points
The following table describes system points for use with CX-Supervisor errors.
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$HighErrors
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of high
priority errors
logged.
$LowErrors
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of low
priority errors
logged.
$MediumErrors
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Number of
medium priority
errors logged.
3-11-8 PLC Communications Points
The following table describes system points for use in the communication
between CX-Supervisor and a PLC.
49
Printing Points
SECTION 3 Points
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$InputsActual
Real
-
Reports average
number of PLC
input points read
per second since
application
startup.
$PLCBusy
Boolean
-
Indicates if PLC
communications
are busy.
$PLCFailures
Integer
0-2,147,483,647
Total number of
PLC failures.
3-11-9 Security Points
The following table describes system points for use with user login, logout, and
user privileges in the runtime environment.
3-12
System point
Point type
Point range
Remarks
$SecurityLevel
Integer
0-4
Current user's
security level.
$SecurityName
Text
-
Current user's
security name.
$UserName
Text
-
User currently
logged on.
Printing Points
3-12-1 Print Setup
The Point Editor can be printed in the same way pages can. Before printing,
ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer settings,
refer to chapter 2, Pages.
3-12-2 Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print Preview display.
3-12-3 Printing
To print the contents of the Point Editor, click the
button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
3-13
Embedding Point Values in Text
As well as using point names in expressions, in many cases where text is
entered this can be made dynamic by replacing a placeholder in the text with
the value of a point. Part or all of the text may be a point name, enclosed in the
Point Substitution characters (double round brackets by default).
Examples of the way in which text is changed:
The shift foreman was ((ShiftForeman))
becomes:
50
Embedding Point Values in Text
SECTION 3 Points
The shift foreman was Fred Smith
and
The shift output was ((ShiftOutput)) litres
becomes:
The shift output was 5000 litres
3-13-1 Using Format specifiers
Format specifiers can be used, similar to the Format script command:
%s for text string points;
%d for integer points;
%f for real floating points.
Where 'MyTextpoint="Hello"':
The text of (("My text point is %s",Mypoint))
becomes:
The text of My text point is Hello
Where MyRealpoint=5467.7658:
To two decimal places the value of MyRealpoint is
(("%4.2f",MyRealpoint))
becomes:
To two decimal places the value of MyRealpoint is
5467.76
Combinations of format specifiers are possible:
((%s to two decimal places the value of MyRealpoint is
%4.2f",MyTextpoint,MyRealpoint))
becomes:
Hello to two decimal places the value of MyRealpoint
is 5467.76
The can be used in various fields, for example:
•
In Alarm Raised and Cleared Messages e.g.
Alarm Raised: "Boiler Temperature too high. Current
value is (("%.1d", BoilerTemp))"
•
As captions for popup edit box animations. This is useful as the captions
are then dynamically translated e.g.
•
As parameter to MessageBox. This is useful to help convert numbers to
strings e.g.
Caption: "((CaptionString))"
MessageBox("Error ((ErrorNum)) occurred")
•
As parameter to LogError or LogEvent. This too is useful to help convert
numbers to strings e.g.
•
Titles in Graphs and Charts (useful for translations again) e.g.
LogError("Error ((ErrorNum)) occurred", priority)
Title: "((TitleString))"
•
In Tooltips, for dynamic information
•
In Report templates. See Script Reference GenerateReport() for more
information.
Tooltip text: "((ToolTipString))"
51
Embedding Point Values in Text
SECTION 3 Points
See Chapter 6, Point Substitution Settings and FAQ - Creating Reports and
HTML Reports for related information
52
Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
SECTION 4
Objects
This chapter describes the various objects available within CX-Supervisor. It
also describes the processes for creating, editing and manipulating objects.
4-1
Objects
Pages created with CX-Supervisor are constructed from objects that are
inserted and linked together to form a coherent interface. CX-Supervisor
objects are divided into three groups: graphical, control and embedded.
Generally, the procedures for creating objects are identical. A button
representing the desired object is clicked on the Graphic Object bar. The
mouse pointer is then either clicked on the page (for a default sized object), or
clicked and dragged to the appropriate point on the page for a custom sized
object.
4-2
Editing Objects
Editing falls into three distinct categories:
4-2-1
•
Re-sizing an object.
•
Re-shaping an object.
•
Modifying an object using a Wizard.
Re-sizing
To re size an object, click on it with the left mouse button. This 'selects' it and
brings up green sizing grab handles. Click and drag the handles until the
object is of the desired size.
4-2-2
Re-shaping
Re-shaping procedures are similar for all graphical objects which can be
reshaped. Not all can. Control objects can only be reshaped using Wizards.
To change the shape of a graphical object, choose Edit Object from the Edit
menu to bring up the red editing grab handles. Click and drag the handles until
the object is of the desired shape.
The typeface of the editor can be amended by choosing Preferences from the
File menu. This is especially useful when printing.
CX-Supervisor preferences can be configured such that double-clicking on a
graphical object also brings up the red editing grab handles. Setting this
preference is achieved by selecting Preferences from the File menu. Refer to
chapter 2, Pages for further details on preferences and CX-Supervisor
configuration.
4-2-3
Wizards
Control objects cannot be re-shaped in the same way as a graphical object but
are edited using Wizards. Wizards customise control objects to display
information in an easy to understand manner.
To edit a control object and activate a Wizard, double click the object.
53
Creating and Editing Graphic Objects
Note:
4-3
SECTION 4 Objects
The shortcut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within Wizards. Highlight part or all of a field and type <Ctrl>+X to cut the
text or <Ctrl>+C to copy the text; move the cursor to the desired field and type
<Ctrl>+V to paste the text. Since the cut and copy operations store the
information in the Windows Clipboard, they may be pasted to another Wizard,
dialog box or application.
Creating and Editing Graphic Objects
For details on re-sizing the graphic objects described in the following
paragraphs, refer to chapter 3, Editing Objects.
4-3-1
Arc
Arcs may be transparent or filled with a colour or pattern. To insert an Arc,
select the
button from the Graphic Object bar. Click or click and drag on
the page.
To edit the arc, obtain the red grab handles. Click and drag to change the
angle subtended by the arc. To finish editing, click elsewhere on the page or
press <Esc>.
4-3-2
Block Text
To insert block text, click the
button, and then click the page. Stretch the
text object to resize it. Standard text tools and the keyboard (e.g. bold, italic,
left-justify) can be used, and their effect applies to the whole content of the
object.
To edit block text, double click on it. A Text-Editing dialog box opens. The text
can then be changed, as can the word-wrap and border options. Standard
Windows cut, copy and paste facilities can be used.
4-3-3
Ellipse
Ellipses may be transparent or filled with a colour or pattern. To create a filled
ellipse, click the
button.
To create a transparent ellipse, click the
ellipse and click the Transparency.
button. Alternatively, select a filled
Either click the page to create a circle, or click and drag to create an ellipse.
Ellipses cannot be edited but can be re-sized.
4-3-4
Line
To insert a line, click the
of the required length.
button. Click and drag on the page to draw a line
To edit the line, obtain the red grab handles. Click and drag to change the line.
To finish editing click elsewhere on the page or press <Esc>.
4-3-5
Polygon
Polygons may be transparent or filled with a colour or pattern. To create a
polygon, click the
button. click the page to draw vertices. To finish creating
the polygon either click the right mouse button, press <Esc> or double click
the left mouse button.
To edit the polygon obtain the red grab handles. Click on an edge to add a
vertex or click and drag a vertex to move it.
To finish editing, either click elsewhere on the page or press <Esc>.
54
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
To split a straight line into two, click at the point on the line where the split is
required then drag the mouse. CX-Supervisor creates a new handle which
may be moved to the desired point. To remove a red handle and the vertex on
which it rests, click on it with the delete key held down on the keyboard.
4-3-6
Polyline
To create a polyline, click the
button. click the page to draw vertices. To
finish creating the polyline, click the right mouse button.
To edit a polyline, obtain the red grab handles. Click on an edge to add a
vertex. Press the <Delete> key whilst moving a vertex to delete it.
To finish editing, click elsewhere on the page.
4-3-7
Rectangle
Rectangles can be transparent or filled with a colour or pattern. To create a
filled rectangle, click the
button.
To create a rectangle frame, click the
button. Alternatively, select a filled
rectangle and click the Transparency button.
click the page to draw a square, or click and drag to create a rectangle of the
required size. Once created, rectangles can be edited exactly like polygons.
To finish editing, click elsewhere on the page.
4-3-8
Round Rectangle
Rounded rectangles can be transparent or filled with a colour or pattern. To
create a filled rounded rectangle, click the
button from the Tool Bar.
To create a rounded rectangle frame, click the
button. Alternatively, select a
filled round rectangle and click the Transparency button from the Control Bar.
click the page to draw a rounded square, or click and drag to create a rounded
rectangle of the required size.
To edit the rounded rectangle, obtain the red grab handles. The radius of
curvature of the rounding can be adjusted by clicking on the single red grab
handle and dragging it:
4-3-9
Text
To insert text, click the
button. click the page and type inside the red edit
box. The cursor is moved round the text using the arrow keys. Standard text
editing tools and the keyboard can be used, and their effect applies to the
whole content of the object.
To edit text, double click on it. A box opens round the text.
Press <Return> to finish editing and create a new text object on the line below.
To finish editing, click elsewhere on the page.
4-4
Creating and Editing Control Objects
4-4-1
Alarm Object
Click the
object.
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert the alarm
55
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
The Alarm object displays alarm messages in runtime. These messages may
be optionally filtered by an alarm group and can be formatted to include the
date, time and status of the alarm. If there are more alarms to view than the
space provided then you can scroll the alarm view.
To edit an Alarm object, double click on it. The Alarm Wizard dialog box opens:
Alarms are defined using the Alarm Editor; refer to chapter 8, Alarms for
information on using the Alarm Editor.
The Alarm Wizard allows entry of the alarm group filter, alarm status colour
codes and various style attributes. The Alarm Wizard presents a preview of
the alarm object, which immediately updates to show the user selections as
they are made.
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the name of the alarm group by which alarm messages are to be
filtered using the Group field to display the list of available groups. The
default selection is <All Groups>, which displays all alarm messages.
To display more than one group use the * wildcard character e.g. Group1*
will include all groups starting Group1.
2. From the Acknowledge On Click options select the level of security that
is required for acknowledgement. The default is All Users.
3. From the Display Alarms from Selected Priorities, options select the
range of alarms that are to be displayed. The default selections are from
the Lowest to the Highest.
Note that the range 'From' must be the same or lower than the range 'To'.
Use the check box 'Highest Priority at Top' to reverse the alarm order.
4. In Alarm Status Colours, the colour codes for each of the three alarm
states and blinking colours may be specified by clicking the appropriate
colour box and selecting a new colour from the resultant Colour dialog
box.
56
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
5. The Alarm Window Colours options allow you to select the colours for
the Alarms Windows Background, Title text and the Frame.
6. Select the font used by the alarm object using the Font button.
7. In Style Attributes, set the following options as desired:
Display Date:
shows the date of the alarm.
Display Time:
shows the time of the alarm.
Display Alarm Status:
shows the status of the alarm.
Display Column Titles:
shows the column headings.
3-D Frame:
displays object with 3-D border.
Highest Priority at Top:
shows highest priority at top.
Display Group:
shows the groups of the alarm.
Display Priority:
shows the priority of the alarm.
Date Width:
number of characters in date field.
Time Width:
number of characters in time field.
Group Width:
number of characters in priority field
Status:
number of characters in status field.
8. Exit the Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new alarm object
attributes or click the Cancel button to leave the alarm object unchanged.
4-4-2
Bar Chart
Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert the Chart.
To edit a Bar Chart, double click on it. The Chart Wizard dialog box opens:
The Chart Wizard allows entry of configuration attributes and assignment of
expressions.
1, 2, 3…
1. Enter a title for the chart in the Chart Title: field.
2. Select the chart style from the Chart Style: field.
3. Select the colour of the chart background.
57
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
4. Toggle the Project Colours, 3-D Frame and Auto Fit Bars fields as
desired. The Project Colours option allows the user to change the colour
of the axis using the toolbox. The 3-D Frame option enables the chart to
appear with a 3-D frame. The Auto Fit Bars option forces the configured
bars to resize themselves to occupy all of the available chart area.
5. Change the fonts used for the chart via the Font button. The font size used
for the chart can be automatically calculated by selecting the Auto Size
Font option.
6. Enter an arithmetic trace expression for each point or select one by
clicking on a Browse button. An existing point can also be associated with
the Wizard by dragging a point directly from the Point Editor. Refer to
chapter 3, Points regarding adding a new point and dragging from the
Point Editor.
7. Exit the Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new chart
attributes, or click the Cancel button to leave the chart unchanged.
To select the chart scaling, click the Scaling button; the Axis Scaling dialog box
opens:
The Configuration Attributes fields can be altered by typing over the existing
entries. The Style Attributes fields can be amended by clicking on the settings.
Exit the Axis Scaling dialog box by clicking the OK button to accept the scaling
attributes, or click the Cancel button to leave them unchanged.
4-4-3
Pictures
Pictures and graphics can be inserted on a page in the form of bitmaps (.bmp),
Windows metafiles (.wmf), Enhanced metafiles (.emf), JPEG (.jpeg, .jpg) and
GIF files (.gif) Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to
insert a picture placeholder.
To insert a picture, double click the placeholder. The Picture Wizard dialog box
opens:
58
Creating and Editing Control Objects
1, 2, 3…
SECTION 4 Objects
1. Locate the drive and directory where the desired picture is stored using
the Directories: and Drives: controls.
2. Select the file type and then the picture from the list presented.
3. Use the Display picture at original size setting to specify whether the
picture is to be displayed at original size or scaled.
4. Click the OK button to load the page.
Note:If the PC installation of CX-Supervisor is on a networked machine, a
Network button is added to the dialog box. For further information on the
function of the Network dialog box, refer to the Microsoft Windows User Guide.
An image can be selected and resized just like many other graphical objects.
4-4-3-1
Transparency
Picture objects with .gif and .bmp file types support optional transparency. By
clicking the Set Transparent Colour button on the Control toolbar and then
clicking on a colour on the image you can select the colour that will appear
transparent. The Transparency button on the same toolbar toggles
transparency on and off.
4-4-3-2
Resampling
The Resample Pictures options available from the Edit menu can be used to
reduce the file size of the CX-Supervisor project and pages by intelligently resaving picture objects. It is most efficient when a large source image has been
resized on the page to be much smaller than the original.
Note:
4-4-3-3
Resizing a previously resampled picture to much larger dimensions may cause
the image to become 'blocky'. In this case it is recommended to reload the
original image file, and then resize / resample as required
Metafile Conversion to CX-Supervisor Objects
Picture objects with metafiles can be converted into CX-Supervisor page
objects. This allows you to break apart the image and animate its sub-parts.
Both Windows Metafiles (*.wmf) and Enhanced Metafiles (*.emf) can be
loaded into a picture object and then converted to CX-Supervisor objects.
To start the conversion, select a picture object containing a metafile image and
choose Convert to CX-Supervisor Objects from the Edit menu. The picture
object will then be replaced with the corresponding CX-Supervisor objects.
Note:
For more complex metafiles this may take a few moments.
59
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
Limitations
Metafiles contain a number of types of records, for example, Poly and Line.
Some of the less common metafiles, or those that simply have no suitable
representation in CX-Supervisor, are skipped during the conversion. The
result of this is that the CX-Supervisor object group created may not look
identical to the source metafile image.
4-4-4
Linear Gauge
A Gauge provides a display of operational values. Click the
click or click and drag on the page to insert the gauge.
button, then
To edit a Linear Gauge object, double click on it. The Gauge Wizard dialog box
opens:
The Gauge Wizard dialog box allows entry of the Gauge Style:, Configuration
Attributes:, Style Attributes: and Style Specific Attributes: fields.
To select a style, click on an option from the appropriate field. To select an
Expression Attribute, click the Browse button and select a point from the
displayed list. The Select Required Item dialog box opens; click the OK
button to accept the point or click the Cancel button to leave the point
unselected. Clicking the Add Point button allows a new point to be created
prior to association with the Gauge Wizard. An existing point can also be
60
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
associated with the Gauge Wizard by dragging a point directly from the Point
Editor. Refer to chapter 3, Points regarding adding a new point and dragging
from the Point Editor.
To enter gauge values or display units, type over the existing field entries.
The Gauge can be displayed in linear or rotary format, either with or without
ticks.
The text font used for the gauge title can be changed via the Title Font button.
The text font used for the gauge scale can be changed via the Scale Font
button. The font size used by the gauge can be automatically calculated for
the user by selecting the Auto Size Fonts field.
Exit the Gauge Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new gauge
attributes or click the Cancel button to leave the gauge unchanged.
4-4-5
Pushbutton
Pushbuttons provide a simple means to start a set of actions. Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert a button.
To edit the button, double click on it. The Push Button Wizard dialog box
opens:
The Wizard allows a button to be assigned a style or text or both to signify its
purpose. To select a style, click on an option in the Button Style field. To enter
button text, type in the Button Text field (the Style Attributes: dialog box is
automatically updated). The text font can be changed via the Font button.
Click the OK button to accept the new button attributes, or click the Cancel
button to leave the button unchanged. Examples of the different styles of
button are shown below:
The colour of the coloured button is red by default, but can be changed by
using the Palette.
4-4-6
Rotary Gauge
A Gauge provides a means of displaying the value of an operation or the value
of a point. Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert
a gauge.
To edit the Rotary Gauge, double click on it. The Gauge Wizard dialog box
opens:
61
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
The Wizard allows entry in the Gauge Style:, Configuration Attributes:, Style
Attributes: and Style Specific Attributes: fields.
To select a style, click on an entry in the Gauge Style field. To select an
Expression Attribute, click the Browse button and select a point from the
displayed list. The Select Required Item dialog box opens; click the OK button
to accept the point or click the Cancel button to leave the point unselected.
Clicking the Add Point button allows a new point to be created prior to
association with the Wizard. An existing point can also be associated with the
Wizard by dragging a point directly from the Point Editor. Refer to chapter 3,
Points regarding adding a new point and dragging from the Point Editor.
To enter gauge values or display units, type over the existing field entries.
Enter display angles by typing over the existing field entries.
Check the boxes to choose the required style attributes. The Gauge can be
displayed in linear or rotary format, either with or without ticks.
The text font used for the gauge title can be changed via the Title Font button.
The text font used for the gauge scale can be changed via the Scale Font
button. The font size used by the gauge can be automatically calculated for
the user by selecting the Auto Font Size option.
Exit the Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new gauge attributes
or click the Cancel button to leave the gauge unchanged.
4-4-7
Scatter Graph
Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert a graph.
To edit the graph, double click on it. The Scatter Graph Wizard dialog box
opens:
62
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
The Wizard allows entry in the Configuration Attributes: and Expressions
fields.
1, 2, 3…
1. Enter the frequency of data sampling in the Sample Rate: field; in this
example the sample rate is every thirty seconds.
2. Enter the maximum number of samples to be displayed on the scatter
graph in the Max Samples: field.
3. Select the type of symbol to represent the data.
4. Select the colour of the symbol representing the data.
5. Select the colour of the scatter graph background.
6. Toggle the Project Colours and 3-D Frame settings as desired. If set, the
Project Colours field allows the colour of the axis to be changed using the
Palette. The 3-D Frame option enables the graph to appear with a 3-D
frame.
7. Either enter an arithmetic expression for the X and Y axis or select one
through the Browse button. An expression point can also be associated
with the Scatter Graph Wizard by dragging a point directly from the Point
Editor. Refer to chapter 3, Points regarding adding a new point and
dragging from the Point Editor.
8. Change the fonts used for the Scatter Graph via the Font button. The font
size used by the graph can be automatically calculated for the user by
selecting the Auto Size Font field.
9. Exit the Scatter Graph Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new
scatter graph attributes or click the Cancel button to leave the scatter
graph unchanged.
To configure the X axis, click the X-Axis button. To configure the Y-axis , click
the Y-Axis button. The Axis Scaling dialog box opens:
63
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
Configuration attributes can be altered by typing over the existing field entries.
The style attributes can be amended by clicking on the settings.
Exit the Axis Scaling dialog box by clicking the OK button to accept the
scaling attributes, or click the Cancel button to leave unchanged.
4-4-8
Slider
Sliders allow values associated with them to increase or decrease between
certain limits. They can also ensure that values do not exceed previously set
limits.
Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert a slider.
To edit the Slider, double click on it. The Slider Wizard dialog box opens:
The Wizard allows entry of in the Slider Style:, Style Attributes: and
Configuration Attributes: fields. To select a style, click on an option from the list
box. The Style Attributes: can be either Display Vertical or Display Horizontal.
To select a Boolean point, click the Browse button and select a point from the
displayed list. Click the OK button to accept the point or click the Cancel
button to leave the point unselected. Clicking the Add Point button allows a
new point to be created prior to association with the Wizard. An existing point
can also be associated with the Wizard by dragging a point directly from the
Point Editor. Refer to chapter 3, Points regarding adding a new point and
dragging from the Point Editor.
Enter the maximum and minimum slider values and check the box to display
the minimum value at the left or bottom of the page.
64
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
Exit the Wizard by clicking on the OK button to accept the new slider attributes
or click the Cancel button to leave the slider unchanged.
4-4-9
Toggle Button
Toggle buttons are used to control and display the current value of a digital
point. Click the
button, then click or click and drag on the page to insert a
button.
To edit the Toggle Button, double click on it. The Toggle Button Wizard dialog
box opens:
The Toggle Button Wizard allows a Toggle Button to be assigned a style, State
0 text and State 1 text to signify its purpose. It also allows selection of a
Boolean point. To select a style, click on an option from the list box. To enter
button text, type in the Text fields for States 0 and 1, or select ON and OFF
(the Style Attributes: dialog box is automatically updated). Some toggle
buttons can have an On/Off colour associated with them. The text font can be
changed via the Font button. To select a Boolean point, click the Browse
button and click on a point from the displayed list. The Select Required Item
dialog box opens:
65
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
Only viable points can be viewed from a Select Required Item dialog box. The
list of items in the Point Names: field can be refined by selecting an option
from the Group: field. Click the OK button to accept the new point or click the
Cancel button to leave the point unchanged. Clicking the Add Point button or
Add Alias button allows a new point or alias to be created prior to association
with the Wizard. An existing point can also be associated with the Wizard by
dragging a point directly from the Point Editor. Refer to chapter 3, Points
regarding adding a new point and dragging from the Point Editor.
Select the Toggle While Pressed field if the value should only be set while the
button is pressed (i.e. the mouse button is held down when the toggle button is
clicked). The value has its state toggled and then set back when the mouse
button is released.
The different styles of toggle button are the same as those for buttons.
Examples of some of the different styles of toggle button are shown below:
Switch
Blank
Toggle
Coloured
In/Out
Rotary
On/Off
The colour of the coloured button is red by default, but can be changed by
using the Palette.
Click the OK button to accept the new toggle button attributes or click the
Cancel button to leave the button unchanged.
4-4-10 Trend Graph
Trend graphs allow the display of data over time. Click the
click or click and drag on the page to insert the graph.
button, then
To edit the Trend Graph, double click on it. The Trend Graph Wizard dialog
box opens:
66
Creating and Editing Control Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
The Wizard allows entry of Configuration Attributes: and assignment of line
colours and expressions.
1, 2, 3…
1. Enter a title for the graph in the Trend Graph Title: field.
2. Enter the frequency of data sampling in the Sample Rate: field, in this
example it is every five seconds.
3. Enter the period displayed by the graph at any one time in the Visible Time
Span: field.
4. Enter the size of buffer for stored data of samples in the Total Time Span:
field.
5. Enter the number of samples on the X-axis in the Time Label Every: field.
6. Click the background colour and select the required colour from the
palette.
7. Toggle the Display Time Labels, Display Slider and Value Bar settings as
desired. Enabling the Value Bar allows the graph to be clicked during
runtime to display the data value at that point.
8. Enter an arithmetic trace expression for each point or select an expression
via a Browse button. An existing point can also be associated with the
Wizard by dragging the point directly from the Point Editor. See chapter 3,
Points regarding adding a new point and dragging from the Point Editor.
9. Change the fonts used for the Graph Title, Scale and Time axis via the
appropriate font button. Alternatively, font sizes can be automatically
calculated by selecting the Auto Font Size option.
10.Exit the Wizard by clicking the OK button to accept the new Trend Graph
attributes, or click Cancel to leave the Trend Graph unchanged.
The units of measurement of time are selected from the associated field.
To select graph scaling, click the Scaling button; the Trend Graph Scaling
dialog box opens:
67
Manipulating Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
Configuration Attributes: can be altered by typing over the existing entries. The
Style Attributes: can be amended by clicking on the settings.
Exit the Trend Graph Scaling dialog box by clicking the OK button to accept
the scaling attributes, or click the Cancel push button to leave unchanged.
An example of a trend graph is shown below:
4-4-11 Web Browser Object
The Web Browser object allows web files, like HTML JPG or AVI files
to be added to a CX-Supervisor page. These files may be stored
locally, on a File Server or be distributed from any Web Server. The
Web Browser object includes a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) allowing
execution of Java Script and Java Applets. Double click the object to show the
property page, and enter the file to be displayed either as a filename, or a fully
qualified URL, for example with http: prefix.
4-5
Manipulating Objects
Objects can be manipulated to give the required results. An object must be
selected before it can be manipulated.
4-5-1
Select
To select an object, either click on it with the left mouse button or select it from
the object identification control, (for further details on this control refer to
chapter 1, Graphics Editor). Eight "grab handles" are displayed around the
object.
To select several objects within a rectangular area, use a rubber band by
clicking the left mouse button and dragging over an area:
68
Manipulating Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
It is also possible to select all the objects a rubber band intersects by holding
down the <Ctrl> key whilst rubber banding a selection:
Multiple objects can be selected by holding the <Shift> key down and clicking
on each object in turn. Objects can also be de-selected in similar fashion.
Grab handles are displayed for each selected object.
The most recent object to be selected from the group is denoted by its green
grab handles, all other grab handles are cyan. The co-ordinates of the most
recent selection are displayed in the status bar.
All objects can be selected by clicking Select All from the Edit menu.
4-5-2
Move
To move an object or a number of objects, select them and click and hold the
left mouse button within the selection, the object(s) can now be 'dragged' to
their new location.
4-5-3
Cut
Where objects are to be moved between pages, it is often useful to cut them
without having to insert a new object. CX-Supervisor has the ability to cut and
paste objects. Objects which are cut and pasted retain the properties assigned
to them, for example animation or alarms.
To cut an object from the current page, select it and click the
button.
The object is removed from the page and is held on the "clipboard" until a new
object is cut or copied.
4-5-4
Copy
An object which is to appear on a number of pages can be copied from an
original. To copy an object, select it then click the
button.
A copy of the object is held on the clipboard, overwriting the previously copied
or cut object.
4-5-5
Paste
To paste an object which has been cut or copied to the clipboard, click the
button.
The object currently on the clipboard is pasted, either over the original if the
object is to remain on the same page, or positioned in a new page. Objects
can then be re-positioned by selecting and dragging using the mouse.
4-5-6
Delete
To delete an object or objects, select them and press the <Delete> key on the
keyboard.
4-5-7
Undo
The Undo button allows the most recent action (or actions) to be undone. To
undo the action, click the
button.
The number of undo operations stored by CX-Supervisor for retrieval can be
amended from the Preferences option on the File menu. This is especially
useful when constructing complex pages.
69
Manipulating Objects
4-5-8
SECTION 4 Objects
Mirror Image
There are various ways of mirroring objects:
•
Via the
buttons on the toolbar.
•
By selecting Mirror from the Edit menu and clicking on either Horizontal or
Vertical.
•
By clicking on a grab handle and dragging it across the opposite side
Some objects like Text and Control Objects cannot be mirrored. For further
details of mirroring objects refer to chapter 1, Graphics Editor.
4-5-9
Orientation
Lines, Rectangles, Polygons and Polylines can be rotated. To rotate an object,
click the
button.
The Rotate Object dialog box opens:
Enter the angle of rotation in degrees in the value entry box and click the OK
button.
4-5-10 Transparency
Solid shapes, polygons and text boxes can be filled with colours and
patterns from the tools palette. When they are created solid objects
are filled with the colour already selected on the palette. Further
details on transparency are contained in chapter 1, Graphics Editor.
4-5-11 Group
When there are a number of objects together they can be moved around in a
group, keeping their relative position.
To group a number of objects, select them, activate the Edit menu and click on
Group.
The selection is now regarded as one group with eight "grab handles" for the
group rather than eight for each object; the objects can now be moved
together.
When objects have been grouped they can be ungrouped by selecting the
object, activating the Edit menu and clicking on Ungroup.
4-5-12 Raise and Lower
Each new object inserted on a page is placed on top of the
previous one. Although they may appear to be on the same
level, objects can overlap, so it may be necessary to 'raise' an
object so that it appears over the top of another object. For
further details on raising and lowering objects refer to chapter 1, Graphics
Editor.
4-5-13 Alignment
Objects inserted on a page can look messy unless they are aligned relative to
each other. CX-Supervisor helps by allowing the contents of a page to align on
a grid. The grid can be turned on and off as required.
70
Manipulating Objects
SECTION 4 Objects
There are a number of different grid sizes available: 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 pixels.
The Snap To Grid function snaps to the nearest grid.
To align page objects and view a grid, select Grid from the View menu.
Select the required grid size or click on Snap to Grid to align the most recently
entered objects on the chosen grid. The grid can be turned off by selecting Off.
An example of the use of the grid is shown below:
In this example, the selected polyline is in the process of being moved down.
The presence of the grid governs the movement of the object in all directions.
As the object is moved, its position "snaps" an equal distance from the original
position of the object against the grid. Currently, the object has been moved
five grid steps down (shown by the bracket).
4-5-13-1 Alignment Toolbox
Objects on a page can be aligned in a variety of ways using the Alignment
toolbar.
It is possible to:
Centre objects on a page horizontally.
Centre objects on a page vertically.
Align objects along their left edge.
Align objects along their right edge.
Align objects along their top edge.
Align objects along their bottom edge.
Align objects on their horizontal centres.
Align objects on their vertical centres.
Make objects the same width
Make objects the same height.
Make objects the same width and height.
Align objects to the grid.
71
Point Substitution
SECTION 4 Objects
When performing alignment operations, the Master Object determines how the
other objects are aligned. The Master Object, i.e. the last object clicked on,
has green sizing handles.
1, 2, 3…
To align objects:
1. Select the objects to be aligned.
2. Ensure the correct master object is selected.
3. Choose the appropriate tool from the Alignment toolbar.
The alignment operations available at any one time vary according to the
number of objects selected.
4-5-14 Zoom
It is often useful to be able to view an object in more detail. The Zoom option
allows selected objects to be magnified up to four times their normal size.
To enlarge an area of the screen, choose the View menu and select Zoom.
Then select the required magnification factor: Off, 2 or 4.
A specific object can be zoomed in on by selecting that object and then
performing the procedures described above.
4-6
Point Substitution
This feature allows the points associated with one or more objects to be
changed 'en mass'. This can make reusing page objects, either by using copy
and paste or the Graphics Objects Library, simpler and quicker.
The Point Substitution dialog box is shown automatically after inserting a
library item, or on-demand by right clicking on an object or objects and
choosing 'Point Substitution', or from the Edit menu.
4-6-1
Example
In this example a button has been created which has a Colour Change
animation and a script. Both are linked to 'PointA'. After performing a copy and
past on the item the Point Substitution dialog box can be used to choose the
points that should be re-linked. Clicking the Browse button will allow a new
point to be selected. Clicking OK will now replace all instances of 'PointA' with
'PointB' and then recompile the button animations and scripts.
72
Applying Tooltips
4-7
SECTION 4 Objects
Applying Tooltips
In the runtime environment, it is possible to provide instant help for the object
currently selected by the cursor. This is achieved by tooltips that can be
applied to all objects.
1, 2, 3…
1. In the development environment, select the object to apply a tooltip.
2. Click on Tooltip Text from the Edit menu. The Tooltip Text opens.
3. Type the help text in the Tooltip text: field or select the Browse button to
apply the value of a point.
4. Click the OK button to accept the settings or the Cancel button to abort
the operation.
An example of a tooltip in the runtime environment is as follows:
73
Using the Floating Menu
4-8
SECTION 4 Objects
Using the Floating Menu
Clicking the right mouse button within CX-Supervisor brings up a contextsensitive menu known as the Floating menu. There are two such menus, one
in the development environment and one in the runtime environment. The
development environment Floating menu contains short-cuts for many
operations discussed in this chapter.
74
Overview
SECTION 5 ActiveX Objects
SECTION 5
ActiveX Objects
This chapter describes the process of using ActiveX objects within CXSupervisor applications.
5-1
Overview
The Microsoft Windows ActiveX technology allows objects called 'components'
to be developed, and are used by inserting them into an ActiveX container, like
CX-Supervisor. ActiveX components may perform many different functions,
which can be graphical or non-graphical, but they follow standard rules for
defining their Properties, Methods and Events. Properties are like settings, for
example a control's colour would be a property. Methods are like functions or
actions that can be called for example a control might support a Redraw
method. Events are actions the control may create, like OnLeftClick. Following
these standard rules allows any ActiveX control from any manufacturer to
work in any container.
5-2
Inserting a new object
A new ActiveX control may be inserted on the page as follows:
1, 2, 3…
1. Click the page in which the object is to be inserted.
2. Turn on the ActiveX toolbar from the View | Toolbars menu.
3. If the control you require already exists on the ActiveX toolbar:
a. Select the required control.
or if the required control is not on the toolbar:
b. Click
box:
button and select the required component from the dialog
4. Draw a rectangle in the desired position.
5-3
Editing Properties at Design Time
The properties of ActiveX objects can be edited during the design stage using
the following procedure:
1, 2, 3…
1. Open the ActiveX Property Browser by clicking the
button in the toolbar
or by selecting the ActiveX Property Browser option from the Utilities
menu.
75
Reading and Writing Properties at Runtime
SECTION 5 ActiveX Objects
2. With the ActiveX Property Browser displayed select the appropriate
ActiveX control. This will list the full range of property names available for
that control in the browser, and their values.
3. The Value of each Name can be changed as required by clicking in the
value box and entering the new value. Some options require you to enter
specific information, others provide a choice of entries from a drop down
menu.
4. To edit the values of other ActiveX controls simply click the control to
select it. The values of the previous object will be replaced with those of
the new selection.
In addition to editing properties with the Property Browser, many ActiveX
controls support their own custom Property Pages. These may be accessed in
design time by either double clicking the control, or right clicking the control
and selecting Properties from the Object's popup menu:
5-4
Reading and Writing Properties at Runtime
ActiveX properties can be read and written at runtime, for example to change
values or colours as required. This can be achieved using the CX-Supervisor
script functions GetProperty and PutProperty, or alternatively in VBScript
using the normal dot syntax for example
@VBSCRIPT
Display1.Value = 100
@ENDIF
For more details see the CX-Supervisor Script Language Reference Manual.
76
Calling Methods at Runtime
5-5
SECTION 5 ActiveX Objects
Calling Methods at Runtime
ActiveX methods can also be called at runtime. This is achieved by using the
Supervisor script function Execute or alternatively in VBScript using the
normal dot syntax for example
@VBSCRIPT
CommonDialog1.ShowOpen
@ENDIF
For more details see the CX-Supervisor Script Language Reference Manual.
5-6
Responding to Events
Some ActiveX components are written to generate events on certain
conditions, like mouse clicking or user input or error conditions. You can write
a script to execute whenever any event occurs. These scripts are defined as
subroutines in the page initialisation script as they may be called any time the
page is open. To easily add these subroutines, from the ActiveX property
browser, click the 'Events' tab. This shows all the event types for this control
and any parameters the event may pass, for example the code number of the
key pressed. Select the event name to add or edit the script for, and click the
square edit button.
Note:
In previous versions Event scripts could be added from the Animation Editor
but the method above provides more efficiency as all event scripts are loaded
just once on page initialisation.
77
Responding to Events
78
SECTION 5 ActiveX Objects
Overview
SECTION 6 Projects
SECTION 6
Projects
This chapter describes the concept of projects. It details procedures for
creating and amending projects, and the process of associating users with
projects. It also deals with the process of compiling a project.
6-1
Overview
A CX-Supervisor application consists of a number of pages linked together.
The pages may contain passive or active graphics, text or animations, and
may be grouped together logically to form a project. A project may consist of
many pages, or simply a single page. Projects may be built and tested within
the CX-Supervisor development environment, and run "stand-alone" under the
CX-Supervisor run-time environment.
Only one project at a time may be open for editing within the CX-Supervisor
development environment. An attempt to open a second project forces CXSupervisor to close the current project (prompting to save changes where
there is unsaved information), and open the second project.
6-2
Runtime Editions
The Development package can create applications for different Runtime
platforms. The target system uses the same CX-Supervisor 'Runtime' software
but needs a USB Dongle that matches the chosen target. The type of project is
either chosen on creation or changed from the Target Settings dialog box.
CX-Supervisor Machine Edition
For most HMI and visulisation projects. These projects only require a Machine
Edition USB dongle for the Runtime.
CX-Supervisor PLUS
Where features additional to the Machine Edition are required. These projects
require a PLUS USB dongle for the Runtime.
Feature
Machine Edition
PLUS
ActiveX
Yes
Yes
VBScript
Yes
Yes
Recipes
Yes
Yes
Alarms
300
5000
Animations
Yes
Yes
Max no. Devices (PLCs
etc.)
15
256
OPC Connections
Yes
Yes
Max user defined Points 500
8000
Max Regular Interval
Scripts
10
100
Max no. Pages
100
500
Supported Databases
MS Access
SQL, ODBC, MS
Access, MS Excel,
dBase, CSV
79
Creating a Project
Note:
SECTION 6 Projects
When the limits shown are reached, no more of those objects can be created.
Remember that although either target can be chosen easily, you must
purchase the correct USB Dongle in order to run
The CX-Supervisor Runtime no longer recognises Software Tokens, Hardlock
(parallel port) dongles or USB Dongles from older versions. Only USB Dongles
for this version will active the Runtime
6-3
Creating a Project
To create a new project within CX-Supervisor, select New followed by either
Machine Edition project or CX-Supervisor PLUS project. Choose a name and
location. Click OK to create the project.
6-4
Amending a Project
To amend an existing project it must first be opened (assuming it is not already
open). To open a project select Open from the Project menu. CX-Supervisor
displays the Open dialog box. This is a standard Windows dialog box and
usage depends on your operating system. Please consult your Microsoft
documentation
1, 2, 3…
1. Locate the drive and directory where the desired project is stored.
2. Select the desired project from the list presented.
3. Click the Open button to load the project.
When the project is loaded, the various editing tasks required may be carried
out (such as editing page or graphics formats), as described in the other
chapters of this manual.
6-5
Saving a Project
When a project has been created it is wise to save it. It is good practice to
ensure that projects are saved regularly, in case of an event such as a power
failure. To save a project, select Save from the Project menu.
If this is the first time the project has been saved, the Save As dialog box
opens.
1, 2, 3…
1. Move to the location where the project is to be stored.
2. Ensure that the Save as Type: field is set to CX-Supervisor Projects
(*.SCS).
3. Enter a name for the project. The name under which the project was
created is offered as a default.
4. Click the Save button to save the project.
Note:
6-6
Subsequent saves do not cause the Save Project As dialog box to be
displayed.
Printing a Project
All of the printable views of the project can be printed together, including page
layouts and all scripts. This can be useful as a development aid, for
maintenance and for project documentation.
1, 2, 3…
1. Start CX-Supervisor and load the project to be printed.
2. From the options dialog box, select the items to print and click OK.
3. Select the printer to print to and click OK.
80
Device Configuration
6-7
SECTION 6 Projects
Device Configuration
To amend the device configuration or create connections to a PLC or
temperature controller, click the
button. This results in the Setup Devices
dialog box being displayed.
6-7-1
Creating a PLC Connection
A new device can be added by clicking on the Add button on the Setup
Devices dialog box.
Note:
CX-Supervisor calls an external application to change PLC information. The
functions described in the following paragraphs may differ slightly depending
upon which application and version has been invoked.
A name can be assigned for the device in the PLC Name field.
Select the PLC from the Device Type: field. To add a temperature controller,
select a temperature controller from the Device Type: field, e.g. E5AF-AH.
See also Chapter 14 for details on other models.
Clicking the Setup button opens the Device Type Settings dialog box
allowing the device type of the PLC to be configured.
81
Device Configuration
Note:
SECTION 6 Projects
The possible settings for PLC configuration depend upon the type of PLC
selected (this applies also to the Read Only and Timer/Clock fields).
On completion, click the OK button to continue, or the Cancel button to abort
the operation. Values specified may be set as default by clicking the Make
Default button.
A network may be specified for the selected PLC, by selecting from the
Network: field. The networks available are dependent on the device type
selected.
To open the Network Settings dialog box, click the Setup button:
The Unit Number is the identifier for the network being configured.
The Destination Network Address and Destination Node Number identify
the connection point to the network.
A PLC can be selected to act as a gateway to the PLC being edited; this list is
restricted to the PLCs contained in the current project.
Selecting the Driver tab results in the Driver Configuration view being
displayed; this part of the Network Settings dialog box helps to ensure that
data is transmitted correctly over the network.
82
Device Configuration
SECTION 6 Projects
Note:
The possible settings for the Baud Rate, Parity, Data Bits, and Stop Bits fields
depend upon the port selected.
If a timeout occurs, the communication is not complete. Where necessary,
increase the Timeout Offset value (in milliseconds) to ensure that the device
does not cause a timeout.
Values specified may be set as default by clicking the Make Default button.
6-7-2
Modifying a PLC Connection
From the Setup Devices dialog box, a PLC name may be modified by
selecting the PLC name from the Device List on the Setup Devices dialog box,
and clicking the Modify button. This opens the Change PLC dialog box.
A new name can be entered in the PLC Name: field. If an invalid PLC name is
entered, an error message opens on clicking the OK button.
6-7-3
Removing a PLC Connection
From the Setup Devices dialog box, a PLC name may be removed from the
PLC Name: field by selecting the PLC name from the Device List on the Setup
Devices dialog box, and clicking the Delete button. This results in a
confirmation dialog box being displayed. Click the Yes button to remove the
PLC from the list, or the No button to abort the delete operation.
Note:
A PLC cannot be renamed, deleted or edited if it is currently open for
communications.
83
Device Configuration
6-7-4
SECTION 6 Projects
Accessing PLC Connection in Runtime
It is possible to reconfigure PLCs at runtime via the right mouse button floating
menu option PLC Maintenance List. The list of currently configured PLCs
opens via the PLCs in Project dialog box. On selection of a PLC, the PLC
Information dialog box opens, which allows the user to change the PLC
configuration dynamically during runtime.
The Open PLC option provides the capability to toggle the communications
status of the PLC.
The PLC Mode options switch the current mode of operation of the PLC
between Stop, Debug, Monitor and Run.
•
Stop mode halts the PLC program execution allowing the PLC to be
programmed.
•
Debug mode allows for the single stepping of program execution. This
mode is reserved for CV-series PLCs only.
•
Monitor mode operation allows normal PLC program execution and
modification of data.
•
Run mode operation allows normal PLC program execution. No data in
any of the PLC memory areas can be changed.
It is possible to individually enable / disable point communications from the
PLC Maintenance dialog box.
Selection of the Communication Settings option opens the Communication
Settings dialog box, showing the current settings for the PLC:
84
Fins Gateway Option
SECTION 6 Projects
It is possible to configure default settings for the runtime via the PLC Runtime
Default Settings fields in the Setup PLCs dialog box.
Communications to the PLC can be enabled on startup via the Open PLC
option.
6-8
Fins Gateway Option
CX-Supervisor normally uses the Omron CX-Server Communications
software for both device and point configuration, and also for runtime
communications (reading and writing values from a PLC).
Another Omron product, "Fins Gateway 2003", also provides communications
drivers that can be used for interfacing to Omron devices. Some users may
already have this software installed on their computers, and may prefer to use
it. In addition, a suitable Fins Gateway 2003 installer is supplied on the CXSupervisor CD.
The "Setup Devices" dialog box (shown below) contains the option for
configuring the system to use Fins Gateway instead of CX-Server. If the 'Use
Fins Gateway 2003' option is set, and Fins Gateway 2003 is present on a
computer, then the Fins Gateway drivers will automatically be used for runtime
communication to CS/CJ devices via Ethernet and Controller Link. CX-Server
will still be used for any non CS/CJ devices, and for any devices that don't use
either Ethernet or Controller Link. CX-Server is always used for configuring the
point data.
Note:
This is an advanced option. For most applications, communications via the
standard Omron CX-Server communications drivers is ideal, but in some
cases performance may be better or more consistent using the Omron Fins
Gateway 2003 drivers. This option allows the user to choose between the two
sets of drivers.
85
Trajexia Devices
SECTION 6 Projects
For further information about Fins Gateway, including instructions on
configuring Fins Gateway, refer to the online Help system that is installed with
Fins Gateway (Fins Gateway is provided on the CX-Supervisor CD).
6-9
Trajexia Devices
Trajexia devices are part of Omron's range of Motion Controllers. Points are
addressed in a similar fashion to points on a PLC. To read or write table
memory use the prefix "T" followed by the address. For example to access
address 1000 in table memory, use the data location "T1000". VR memory is
addressed in a similar fashion, but with the prefix "VR". For example to read
address 500, the format is "VR500". If a point in VR memory is configured as
type "IEEE float" then all values will be rounded to integers, since the
communication protocol doesn't currently support floating point addressing of
this memory area.
The following example describes how to read and write Trajexia (TJ1) data in
a CX-Supervisor application. It assumes that both CX-Supervisor and the TJ1
driver are already installed on a user's PC.
Preparation:
Connect a TJ1 motion
controller to an Ethernet
network.
Setting up the points
1. Start CX-Supervisor.
2. Either create a new CX-Supervisor project, or open an existing project.
3. Use the toolbar to select the "Device Setup" dialog box and press the
Add… button.
4. Select "TJ1 Device" as the device type and give the device an appropriate
name. A network of "Ethernet" should be automatically selected.
5. Click the Settings button next to "Device Type", and then select the model
of the device you will be using.
86
Trajexia Devices
SECTION 6 Projects
6. Click the "Settings" button next to "Network Type", and then configure the
communications settings for the TJ1. The "FINS Source Address" and
"FINS Destination Address" are not currently used for communication with
a TJ1, while the "Frame Length" and "Response Timeout(s)" can normally
be left at their default values.
7. On the second tab enter the IP address of the TJ1:
87
Trajexia Devices
SECTION 6 Projects
8. Click OK to close the "Device Type Settings" dialog box, and then OK to
close the "Add PLC" dialog box.
9. Open the point editor.
10.Press the "+" button to add a point and enter a point name.
11. Change the I/O type to Input/Output and then press "Setup".
12.Fill in the physical address using the format described above. We will
create a point for table memory 500, and select an internal data type of
IEEE float. The command modifier should be set to blank.
88
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
13.Click OK twice to close both dialog boxs. You should now be able to
access this point in a similar fashion to any other point in CX-Supervisor.
Refer to the actual Trajexia documentation for further details about Trajexia
devices, memory areas and limitations.
6-10
Settings
6-10-1 General Settings
Default Button Font
The Default Button Font option, which can also be selected from the General
Settings sub-menu of the Project menu, displays the standard font dialog box:
This dialog box is used to set the default font specification to be used for all
text displayed on push buttons created using the graphics editor. Any button
can also have its font changed from the default, using the relevant Wizard in
the graphics editor. See chapter 4, Objects.
89
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
6-10-2 Runtime Settings
The Runtime Settings option is selected from the Project menu.
The settings discussed in the following paragraphs help to configure runtime
environment applications and have no effect in the development environment.
Settings that affect the development environment are discussed in chapter 2,
Pages.
6-10-2-1 Startup Conditions
To open the Startup Conditions dialog box, select Startup Conditions from
the Runtime Settings menu.
Click the settings to enable/disable General Startup Conditions and
Communication Startup Conditions. Click the OK button to accept the
settings or the Cancel button to abort.
When Keyboard Control is enabled, a focus rectangle becomes visible around
the currently selected object. The cursor keys and <Tab> key can then be
used to navigate around the selectable objects on a page. When an object is
selected certain actions can then be applied, depending on the object's type.
The most common action is to simulate a left mouse button click.
The following list shows all the possible facilities with Keyboard Control
enabled.
•
Moving Around Selectable Objects Using Cursor Keys. The cursor keys
can be used to move around the objects in the respective direction.
•
With an object selected, if the right cursor key is pressed, then the closest
object is selected from within an area bounded by lines drawn diagonally
upwards and diagonally downwards (and to the right) from the centre of
the object. If no object is found then the current object remains selected.
A similar rule also applies when using the left cursor key, and the up and
down cursor keys.
Note:
Selectable items must have a left mouse button event defined or have a
default action.
•
90
Moving Around Selectable Objects Using <Tab> Key. The <Tab> key can
be used to move around all the objects in the order in which they are
drawn (this can be varied using the 'raise object' and 'lower object' editing
facilities). The <Shift>+<Tab> key can be used to move around the objects
in the reverse order.
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
•
To select items in a specific tab order: use the <Tab> key to move around
the page items in a specific order, using the 'move to top' feature. Start at
object number 1 and end with the last object, i.e. if obj1, obj2 and obj3 then
use 'move to top' on obj1 first, followed by obj2 and then by obj3; this gives
the tab order obj1, obj2, obj3.
•
Changing Between Pages. The <Ctrl>+<Tab> key can be used to change
between pages.
•
Simulating a Left Mouse Button Click. Objects that have scripts attached
(such as a button) or objects that perform a particular action when clicked
(such as toggle buttons) can be executed by using the <Enter> key.
•
Slider Operation. When a slider object is selected, the plus (+) and minus
(-) keys can be used to increment or decrement its value respectively. This
also applies to the sliders on trend graphs.
•
Obtaining the Runtime Floating Menu. To display the Runtime Floating
menu, use either the <Shift>+<F10> key combination or use the Windows
right mouse button key, which is next to the <Ctrl> key on the right hand
side of the keyboard.
•
Standard Windows Keys. Some standard Windows key combinations are
as follows:
<Alt>+<-> (hyphen)
Used to access the child window control box at the top left hand side
of the dialog box.
<Alt>+<Spacebar>
Used to access the main window control box at the top left hand side
of the dialog box.
<Alt>+<F4>
Used to close down the current application.
•
Using Runtime Alarm, Error and Recipe Viewer. These can be invoked
from the Runtime Floating menu (see above). To access their functionality
use the <Tab> key to move from button to button, and <Enter> to press a
button. The up and down cursor keys can be used to scroll the displayed
list. To close them (or to move or resize them) use the standard <Alt>+<> (hyphen) key combination to access their menus.
•
Other Notes. In Project level scripts, it is possible to define 'OnKeyPress'
scripts, which are attached to the cursor keys. If Keyboard Only operation
is set, then it is not possible to execute a script attached to one of the
cursor keys, since they are being used for navigating around the
selectable objects on the page. Alternative additional keys have been
added to compensate for this. They are the number pad cursor keys (i.e.
2, 4, 6, and 8). However, these can only be used when the <Num Lock>
key is on.
6-10-2-2 Target Settings
The project target can be changed between Machine Edition and PLUS with
this dialog box:
91
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
Any conversion problems are reported in the Notes at the bottom and
conversion is prevented if it is not allowed.
6-10-2-3 Non-Volatile Rate
The Non-Volatile rate specifies how often the value of points flagged as 'nonvolatile' are saved to disk, in seconds. The latest disk values are used to reinitialise the point values when CX-Supervisor is restarted. To adjust this value
select Runtime Settings from the Projects menu, and select Non Volatile
Rate from the sub-menu. CX-Supervisor displays the following dialog box:
Enter a new value for the Non-Volatile Rate in the Seconds field and click the
OK button.
6-10-2-4 Screen Size
To open the Screen Size dialog box, select Screen Size from the Runtime
Settings menu
Type valid values into the Screen Width and Screen Height fields. These
values are used to define the screen size of the runtime application, but do not
affect Maximise and Minimise dialog box states. By enabling the Rescale runtime to screen size option the screen rescales itself to take into account the
resolution of the runtime system. Click the OK button to accept the setting or
the Cancel button to abort.
92
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
6-10-2-5 Alarm Settings
To open the Alarm Settings dialog box select Alarm Settings from the Runtime
Settings menu.
In the On Alarm Automatically Display area set the Alarm Status Viewer
and Alarm History Viewer settings as required. When these options are set.
When an alarm occurs, the Current Alarms viewer or Alarm History viewer
(respectively) is automatically displayed in runtime.
Set the Maximum entries in Status Viewer and Maximum entries in History Log
fields to the desired values. The numbers specify how many messages are
displayed in the respective viewer dialog boxs in runtime. Select the Log
system start/stop messages setting to ON if required.
Note:
If more messages exist than are requested to be displayed, the most recent
messages are displayed in preference to older messages.
The values shown above are sensible defaults.
In the Alarm Status Messages area, if the User Defined Text option is set,
default messages for Raised Text, Cleared Text, Acknowledge Text, and Auto
Acknowledge Text can be applied. If the Use Language File Text option is set,
the alarm status messages default to the supplied language file.
The Alarm Sound button allows the selection of an audible warning which may
be played when an alarm occurs in runtime. The Open Waveform File dialog
box is shown below:
93
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
Note:
If the PC installation of CX-Supervisor is on a networked machine, a Network
button is added to the dialog box. For further information of the function of the
Network dialog box, refer to the Microsoft Windows User Guide.
6-10-2-6 Alarm/Message Printer Settings
To open the Alarm/Message Printer Settings dialog box select Alarm/
Message Printer Settings from the Runtime Settings menu
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the target printer in the Printer Name: field.
2. If the printer type is a Page Printer, ensure the Page Printer setting is set
'ON' and the appropriate number of lines per page are specified in the
Number of Lines Per Page: field.
3. Specify a Line Terminator: setting, either CR (Carriage Return), LF (Line
Feed) or CR + LF.
4. Click the OK button to accept the changes, or the Cancel button to abort.
6-10-2-7 Event/Error Messages
To open the Event/Error Settings dialog box select Event/Error Settings from
the Runtime Settings menu
94
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
Set the Maximum entries in Event/Error field and the Automatically Display
Event/Error Log on: options as desired. Click the OK button to accept the
changes, or the Cancel button to abort.
In the runtime environment, the Event/Error Log dialog box can be displayed
at any time.
The events can be sorted, based on a designated field type: date, time,
reported by, priority or associated message. By selecting the Date field, the
events are sorted alphanumerically by date. The Time, Reported by, Pri/Event
and Message fields react in the same way. The Event/Error Log display shows
the log listed in date order.
The widths of the alarm fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
There are a number of buttons that aid the use of the Event/Error Log.
The Disable Error Updates button, stops further events occurring in
the runtime environment being added to the log. The Event/Error Log
dialog box is still accessible to switch back subsequently.
The Enable Column Sorting button allows the format of the Error/
Event Log dialog box to be continually updated when subsequent
errors or events are added.
The Clear Event/Error Log button clears all entries from the log.
The Display All Errors/Events button lists all events and errors
irrespective of priority. The list is sorted according to the Date, Time,
Reported by, Pri/Event or Message field.
The Low Priority button lists all errors designated as a low priority
only. Other errors and events are not deleted from the log; they are
merely not visible.
The Medium Priority button lists all errors designated as a medium
priority only. Other errors and events are not deleted from the log;
they are merely not visible.
The High Priority button lists all errors designated as a high priority
only. Other errors and events are not deleted from the log; they are
merely not visible.
95
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
The Events button lists all events. Errors, of all priorities, are not
deleted from the log; they are merely not visible. Examples of events
are system startup, system shutdown and user security notices.
The Print button prints the current contents of the error and event log.
Ensure that the printer is correctly set up before printing.
The Display Result Code Converter launches the CX-Server error
code converter, and if a CX-Server error is currently selected,
displays further details about possible causes.
The Error Information Dialog button displays a summary of error
information, including a detailed count of errors and PLC
communication information. Click the Close button to remove this
dialog box.
6-10-2-8 Language Settings
The language for user-defined text can be set via the Language Settings
dialog box. Select Runtime Settings from the Projects menu, followed by
Language Settings.
Select a language from the Language for User-Defined Text: field. Click the
OK button to accept the settings, or the Cancel button to abort the operation.
96
Settings
SECTION 6 Projects
6-10-2-9 Point Substitution Settings
The enclosing characters associated with a report can be changed via the
Point Substitution Settings dialog box. When set, these characters must be
fixed for all reports generated by the project. Select Runtime Settings from
the Projects menu, followed by Point Substitution Settings, the Point
Substitution Settings dialog box opens.
Supply enclosing characters in the Opening Characters: field and Closing
Characters: field. Click the OK button to accept the settings, or the Cancel
button to abort the operation.
6-10-2-10Advanced Settings
To open the Advanced Settings dialog box select Advanced Settings from the
Runtime Settings menu:
Click the settings to enable/disable Internal Communication Optimisations and
Communication 'Packet' Optimisations.
Bad Quality values, and results of calculations using bad quality values can be
shown as '#' characters. This could indicate a communication failure, or Bad
Quality status in an OPC Server.
If you may need to option to edit the PLC settings in the runtime without
recompiling in the developer then untick the "Embed CX-Server Project within
CX-Supervisor .SR2 file" option. This is useful for example if it is possible the
97
Runtime Security
SECTION 6 Projects
COM port driver number may change, remote telephone number or network
node number or even the PLC CPU model. These settings can be edited by
double clicking the CDM file in Explorer to edit the PLC settings without
recompiling the software.
"Allow advanced script access to PLC via "CX-Server" control" adds a new
ActiveX control named CXServer (no hyphen) which can be accessed from
any script to perform advanced PLC functions. If you already have a graphical
object called CXServer then turn this option off.
Click the OK button to accept the settings or the Cancel button to abort.
6-11
Runtime Security
6-11-1 Configured Users
In a runtime application, it is possible to apply security measures in the
development environment so that only sufficiently privileged users of the
runtime application can access certain elements. It is also possible to
housekeep security information within the runtime environment, with privileged
users able to add, amend or remove users.
There are four levels of user privilege available in CX-Supervisor:
•
Operator level privilege.
•
Supervisor level privilege.
•
Manager level privilege.
•
Designer level privilege.
User configuration in the development environment is handled by the
Configured Users dialog box. Select Configured Users from the Runtime
Security menu.
The Configured Users dialog box opens:
98
Runtime Security
SECTION 6 Projects
By default, there are four previously defined users listed in the Configured
Users: field: Designer with designer-level privileges, Manager with managerlevel privileges, Operator with operator-level privileges and Supervisor with
supervisor-level privileges. 'Web access' is an additional privilege, it allows the
user to log on to the Standard Web Pages.
1, 2, 3…
To add a new user:
1. Click the Add button. The User Attributes: fields and buttons become
enabled, and the contents of all fields are cleared, ready for a new user to
be added.
2. Type the full name of the new user in the Full Name: field.
3. Type a login name in the Login Name: field.
4. Type a user password in the Password: field. The password must be at
least four characters in length.
5. Select a level of privilege from the Security Level: drop down list.
6. Click the Store button to add the new user to the Configured Users: list, or
the Cancel button to abort the operation.
1, 2, 3…
To modify an existing user:
1. Select a user from the Configured Users: list and click the Modify button.
The User Attributes: fields and buttons become enabled, with the contents
of all the fields filled with the attributes of the selected user.
2. Amend the full name, login name, password and level of privilege in the
same way as adding a new user.
3. Click the Store button to update the user in the Configured Users: list, or
the Cancel button to abort the operation.
1, 2, 3…
To remove a user from the Configured Users: list:
1. Select a user from the Configured Users: list and click the Delete button.
2. A confirmation dialog box opens. Click the Yes button to remove the
selected user or the No button to abort the operation.
When all user amendments are complete, click the Close button.
In the runtime application, to make use of the designated privilege, the user
must log in. Login can be accessed in a variety of ways, and so is dependent
on the setup of the runtime application. Some applications may require login
as soon as the application is run, others may allow login from a contextsensitive floating menu. Refer chapter 9, Animation for further information. The
Login User dialog box is as follows:
To log in, enter the login name (not the full name) in the Login Name: field and
the associated password in the Password: field. Any characters typed in the
Password: field are disguised by a '*' symbol for each character typed. Click
the OK button to log in or the Cancel button to abort.
For users without a keyboard to enter login details, select the Keyboard
button. The login name and password can be constructed from the
subsequent dialog box by clicking on each button in turn, followed by the
Enter button to complete.
99
Runtime Security
SECTION 6 Projects
A user can detach from specialised user privileges by logging out. Access is
again dependant on the application. There is no dialog box associated with
logout; once logout is activated privileges are immediately discontinued. While
one user is logged in, it is possible for a different user to log in, as prior to
login, the current user is automatically logged-out by CX-Supervisor.
A user with the designer privilege can further amend the user configuration in
the runtime environment using a similar dialog box to the development
environment's Configured Users dialog box. As well as typing a password,
verification of the password is required, and both fields are disguised by a '*'
symbol. This is so that a new user can apply their own password, and that only
they know the password. Verification is required to ensure the password was
typed correctly in the first instance.
6-11-2 Linking CX-Supervisor Users With Windows Users
In CX-Supervisor v3.1, a new feature was added to the Security System that
allows CX-Supervisor users to be linked with Windows users, using the ‘Use
Windows Login Credentials’ option shown in the ‘Configured Users’ dialog
above. This functionality is associated with the CFR functionality and provides
a greater level of security protection, including password expiration etc., by
making use of the Windows security features.
6-11-3 Menu Option Access Levels
To open the Menu Option Access Levels dialog box select Menu Option
Access Levels from the Runtime Security menu
As well as a context-sensitive floating menu for the development environment,
there is a floating menu for the runtime environment which is configurable in
the development environment. It is possible to select the operations to be on
the runtime floating menu, by clicking the relevant setting across the three tabs
General, Utilities and Communications. It is also possible to assign a level of
user privilege to the menu, so each level of user sees a different floating
menu. This is achieved by selecting a user privilege from the relative drop
down list. The Communications tab permits the activation of CX-Server
100
Compiling and Running a Project
SECTION 6 Projects
components such as the PLC Data Trace and PLC Memory Card components.
Refer to the CX-Server Reference Manual for further information on CXServer components.
On completion, click the OK button to accept changes or the Cancel button to
abort.
6-11-4 Exit Level
An additional security measure can be applied by selecting Exit Level from the
Runtime Security menu. The Exit Level dialog box opens:
The dialog box allows a specific privilege to be applied to exiting the runtime
application. Select a user privilege from the drop down list and click the OK
button to confirm the setting or the Cancel button to abort.
6-12
Compiling and Running a Project
When a project is running it cannot be edited. CX-Supervisor runs projects
under the CX-Supervisor runtime environment.
6-12-1 Building a Project
To create the CX-Supervisor runtime project click the
button. This compiles
the projects and pages into a CX-Supervisor runtime file (.sr2).
6-12-1-1 Rebuild All
The Rebuild All option on the Project menu causes the entire application to be
re-compiled. Together with the Analyse Application feature, this can be used to
validate your project.
CX-Supervisor checks application integrity whenever the application is
compiled or run and warns that a full rebuild may be necessary. When the
'Rebuild All' operation is carried out all errors and warnings will be reported in
the output window and double clicking on a specific error will usually take you
directly to the source of that error. During a full rebuild, all pages that are
successfully recompiled will optionally be saved automatically. All pages that
fail to recompile are not saved. This means that it will still be possible to build
and run the application after a 'Rebuild All' has been carried out if it was
possible to build it and run it before the 'Rebuild All' operation.
Note: the 'rebuild all recommended' warning message can be disabled via the
Editing Preferences dialog box.
Due to a change of syntax in a previous release of CX-Supervisor the 'Display'
and 'Close' script functions (CX-Supervisor Script) will NOT compile if they use
the old syntax (e.g. Display "Page"). They must be changed to the new syntax
(e.g. Display("Page")). If an application with these issues is not recompiled
then it will continue to run correctly in the Runtime.
6-12-2 Running a Project
To run the current project, click the
project if required.
button. This will automatically build the
101
Running a Project with CX-Simulator
SECTION 6 Projects
The CX-Supervisor runtime environment starts, and automatically runs the
project in a separate dialog box which is given the name of the project. It
allows examination of project alarm details and the run history.
6-13
Running a Project with CX-Simulator
The 'Run with Simulator' option enables you to test CX-Supervisor
applications without the need for the configured devices to be physically
connected.
How to use Integrated
Simulation
1. Click 'Run With Simulator' from the 'Project' menu.
2. Select the device to be simulated
3. Select the CX-Programmer project to be 'run'.
4. Close CX-Programmer to end integrated simulation.
6-13-1 Requirements and Limitations
Both CX-Programmer and CX-Simulator must be installed to enable integrated
simulation in CX-Supervisor. At the time of writing CX-Simulator is limited to
simulating a single CS or CJ series PLC. For CX-Programmer projects with
multiple devices, only the first device will be simulated.
NOTE: The One-Click simulation feature is designed to test the functionality of
your PLC program and CX-Supervisor application. It is not intended to
simulate communications or hardware performance and is likely to perform
slower than the actual hardware.
6-14
Save Runtime As
When the project has been compiled and run, the compiled version of the
project may be saved into another directory location or onto another disc for
issue to the target equipment. CX-Supervisor asks for a location and name for
the runtime project. This is a standard Windows dialog box and operation
depends on your operating system. Please consult your Microsoft
documentation for full details. The default file type is *.SR2.
102
Create Runtime Install Disk
6-15
SECTION 6 Projects
Create Runtime Install Disk
A CX-Supervisor application can be packaged safely for authorised
distribution by creating a runtime install disk. The process copies all required
files, plus files to install to the specific directory to be used to distribute the
runtime project. These files can be on a removable Memory Stick or later burnt
to a distribution CD or even to floppy disk if the project is small enough.
Click on Create Runtime Install Disc from the Project menu. The Save
Runtime As dialog box opens ready to create an installation to the desired
folder. Refer to chapter 6, Save Runtime As for further information regarding
the Save Runtime As dialog box.
Note:
The files are not compressed. This feature does not support large projects that
need to span multiple disks.
The Runtime environment itself is not copied and must still be installed from a
legitimate source
Any ActiveX components used are not copied and should be installed on the
target machine using the supplier's instructions.
Support files used by any ActiveX control cannot be detected and are not
copied. These will need to be added manually. This includes:
•
Omron OPC Client settings stored in .OPC file.
•
Omron Industrial Component communication settings, stored in .MSC file.
•
Any bitmaps when using Microsoft Image control.
•
Any file linked to by an OLE object (objects with embedded files should be
OK).
Existing databases or those specified by dynamic connections cannot be
detected and are therefore not copied. These will need to be added manually.
Report Templates used by script cannot be detected and are therefore not
copied. These will need to be added manually.
Any User Settings files used by script (e.g. .CSV or .TXT files) cannot be
detected and are therefore not copied. These will need to be added manually.
6-16
Project Information
Information may be stored concerning a project, by using the Project
Information dialog box. This dialog box may be accessed by selecting
Information from the Project menu.
CX-Supervisor displays the following dialog box:
Enter a title and any relevant details concerning the project in the Title: and
Description: fields, and click the OK button.
103
Alias Definitions
6-17
SECTION 6 Projects
Alias Definitions
An alias definition can be provided to replace strings in scripts and
expressions used throughout CX-Supervisor applications. An associated
string replaces the alias when used in a script or expression. Select Alias
Definitions from the Project menu.
The 3 columns are seperated by tabs and are the Alias text to be used, the
actual value to be used and an optional comment, (starting with ' character)
respectively.
6-18
Find
The project can be searched to find occurrences of text or a point name. It can
also be used to search for text within script e.g. to find where a text message
is generated from.
The areas which can be searched are:
•
The current page.
•
All pages.
•
Project scripts.
•
Alarms.
•
Recipes.
•
The project, which includes Project scripts, Alarms and Recipes.
By default, all areas are searched i.e. 'Project and Pages'. To perform a Find
operation:
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the
button or Find from the Edit menu.
2. Type the text to find in the Find What field, or select a previous entry from
the drop down list. The Browse button can be used to select an item.
3. Select the area to search; Project & Pages searches all areas.
4. Select the required options; Output to pane 2 results in pane 1 to be saved
for future use.
5. Press the Find button to start the search or the Cancel button to abort the
operation.
104
Output Window
SECTION 6 Projects
All occurrences of the text in the selected areas is shown in the Output
window
6-19
Output Window
The output window shows output from the Build and Find functions.
The window can be docked to any side of the screen or floated above other
windows. To enforce floating, press <Ctrl> while moving the window or rightclick the window title and uncheck Allow Docking.
Build results are shown automatically during building and remain on screen if
there are errors or warnings.
Find results show the location including page name, alarm name, recipe, script
name, object, line number and animation as relevant, followed by the
occurrence itself. Double clicking on any line opens the appropriate editor.
The output can be printed by selecting Print from the right mouse context
menu.
6-20
Navigating Projects with the Workspace
The Workspace is activated by clicking the
box opens:
button. The Workspace dialog
105
Project Editor
SECTION 6 Projects
Selecting the Pages, Alarms, Recipes, Data Logging or Databases tab
displays a list of the associated components that form part of the project.
The Workspace can be docked to any side of the screen or floated above
other windows. To enforce floating, press <Ctrl> while moving the window or
right-click the window title and uncheck Allow Docking.
6-21
Project Editor
The Project Editor is activated by clicking the
button.
When activated, the Project Editor may be displayed minimised at the bottom
of the main CX-Supervisor window. Double click to view the contents of the
Project Editor.
6-21-1 About the Project Editor
The Project Editor provides a window into the contents of a project. It lists all
the pages currently comprising a project, and allows for pages to be moved
into or out of projects. An example of the Project Editor dialog box is shown
as follows:
The Project Editor consists of a control bar and a display area. The control
bar includes controls to filter the pages to be displayed, add and remove
pages from a project, and open pages.
6-21-2 Viewing the Contents of a Project
The Project Editor is used to view the pages within a project.
Individual listed pages are sorted, based on the designated page name, page
path, project status, runtime display or load status. By selecting the Page
Name field, the pages are sorted alphanumerically by name. The Page Type,
Project Status, Runtime Display and Load Status fields, once selected, react in
the same way. The Project Editor display shows the projects listed in page
name order.
The widths of the editor fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
The typeface of the editor can be amended from the Preferences option in the
File menu. This is especially useful when printing.
106
Project Editor
SECTION 6 Projects
6-21-3 Opening a Page via the Project Editor
To open pages via the Project Editor, click the ‘Project Editor’
button.
6-21-4 Adding Pages to a Project
When a new page is created, it is automatically registered in the
Project Editor but its details are not saved. When the page is saved
as a .PAG file, a message opens requiring confirmation to add this
page to the project. Click the Yes button to add the page or the No
button to save the page without adding to the project. If the page was not
added to the project when saving, it can be added later by using the ‘Add Page
to Project’ button.
6-21-5 Removing Pages From a Project
To remove pages from a project, select the page by clicking its
description on the Project Editor and click the ‘Remove Page from
Project’ button. A message opens asking 'Do you want to remove
(name and path of page) from the project?'. Click the Yes button to
delete the page, or click the No or Cancel button to keep it and return to the
Project Editor.
6-21-6 Linking Pages in a Project
A number of pages may be linked together within a project. Linking allows a
main page containing active elements (e.g. buttons) to be loaded and
depending upon the actions performed (i.e. which buttons are clicked) allow
other pages to be loaded on demand. For further details of showing pages on
demand, refer to chapter 9, Animation.
6-21-7 Selecting Pages for Display on Run
When a project is run the first pages to be displayed can be selected. To
display a page when a project is run, open the Project Editor, select the page
by clicking on its description and click the
button.
To stop a page being displayed on run, click the
Editor toolbar.
button on the Project
6-21-8 Changing the View Mode
Click the
button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with normal icons.
Click the
button to view details as a list.
Click the
button to view details as a list including page name, page path,
project status, runtime display and load status information. The details can be
sorted in ascending order by clicking once or in descending order by clicking
twice, in the appropriate field.
6-21-9 Viewing Project Details
To open the Project Details dialog box and view the project name and
description, click the
button on the Project Editor toolbar.
107
Printing from the Project Editor
SECTION 6 Projects
6-21-10 Multiple Selection
Standard multiple-selection facilities can be used within the Project Editor. To
select an additional line hold the control key down while clicking; to select all
lines between the anchor line (the last line clicked on) and another line hold
the <Shift> key down while clicking. The buttons can then be used to apply to
all the selected lines at the same time.
6-22
Printing from the Project Editor
6-22-1 Print Setup
The Project Editor can be printed in the same way pages can. Before printing,
ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer settings,
refer to chapter 2, Pages.
6-22-2 Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, ensure that the Project Editor dialog box
opens and currently selected, and then select Print Preview from the File
menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print Preview display.
6-22-3 Printing
To print the contents of the Project Editor, select the
button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
6-23
Navigating Pages using Workbook mode
Open pages can be easily viewed with the page Workbook tabs shown at the
bottom of the Pages area. There is a tab for each page currently open, and a
single click shows the selected page. The Workbook mode can be turned off
and on from the View menu
6-24
Using Full Screen mode
With many windows docked there may be times when all graphics objects or
the screen layout of the whole application cannot be seen. Selecting Full
Screen from the View menu shows the Pages area using the full area of the
screen. The normal menu appears when the mouse is at the top of the screen,
or click the "Close Full Screen" to revert to normal editing.
108
Overview
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
SECTION 7
Graphics Library
This chapter describes the CX-Supervisor Graphics Library. The chapter
includes details of how the Graphics Library may be used for storing frequently
used objects for use with a number of applications.
7-1
Overview
The Graphics Library is a repository for objects that are often used in CXSupervisor pages. The Graphics Library Editor allows access to Libraries from
a drop-down list box. Objects are stored in the Library and can be removed or
copied, allowing quick addition of frequently used objects to pages or which
appear in a project a number of times. Libraries are not project dependant, so
objects can be copied from one project to another.
7-2
Graphics Library
To activate the Library, click the
button. If the Library is already open but
displayed as an icon, double click the Library icon.
An example of the Graphics Library Editor is shown below, but note that actual
library names and contents may differ from that shown in the following
chapters.
7-2-1
Create Library
Each Library has a unique name which is entered when the Library is created.
To create a library, click the
opens:
button. The Add New Library dialog box
Enter the name of the new Library file and click the OK button, or cancel the
addition of the Library by clicking on the Cancel button.
If an object is dragged into the Library without a Library file open, then the Add
New Library dialog box opens. Refer to chapter 7, Manipulating Objects, for
details on dragging objects into the Library.
7-2-2
Opening a Library
The Graphics Library Editor consists of a number of Libraries which are
selected from the drop down list box in the toolbar of the dialog box.
109
Manipulating Objects
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
click the Library name to display its contents in the dialog box. The dialog box
shows the objects in the selected Library. The content of each library is
provided for reference in chapter 7, Manipulating Objects.
7-2-3
Modify Library
The only element of the Library definition which is editable is the Library name.
To change the name of a Library, open the desired Library file and click the
button. The Modify Library dialog box opens, an example of which is
shown below:
Type over the current field entry with a new name and click the OK button, or
cancel the operation by clicking the Cancel button.
7-2-4
Delete Library
A Library may be deleted by selecting it from the drop down list, to open it, and
clicking the
button on the Graphics Library Editor toolbar. CX-Supervisor
displays a message box to confirm the deletion of the Library.
Click the Yes button to remove the Library or the No button to cancel the
operation and return to the Graphics Library. After clicking the Yes button, a
second message box opens to confirm deletion of the library.
Click the OK button to delete the Library, or the Cancel button to the leave the
Library unchanged.
7-3
Manipulating Objects
7-3-1
Add Object
Any object created on a CX-Supervisor page can be added to the Library. All
attributes assigned to an object that is copied to the Library are stored, for
example animation information.
To add an object, select it from a page and click the
button on the
Graphics Library Editor toolbar. The Add Object To Library dialog box opens:
The name of the object used by the Object Identification control is shown in
the Title: field. Type over this with a new name, if required (this is the name
used by the Library). Enter a text description in the Description: field and an
identifier for the object (this is used when it is inserted on a page) in the
Identifier: field. Click the OK button to add the object to the Library and place
the object in the dialog box. Click the Cancel button to abort the operation.
Further details on the Object Identification control are contained in chapter 1,
Graphics Editor.
110
Manipulating Objects
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
Alternatively, ensure that the Graphics Library Editor is open, click and hold
the mouse button on the page object and drag it from the page onto the
Graphics Library Editor, shown below:
When the mouse button is released the object is placed in the Library, and the
Add Object To Library dialog box opens.
Copying an object to a page from a Library is the reverse of the click and drag
procedure.
Objects can also be cut or copied and pasted into the Library, refer to chapter
4, Objects. When the object is pasted with the Graphics Library Editor open,
the Add Object To Library dialog box is shown.
7-3-2
Modify Library Element
To change the name of a Library object, click the object in the Library (the
object name is highlighted in the Graphics Library Editor), and click the
button. The Modify Library Element dialog box opens:
Enter the new object title, text description and identifier. Click the OK button to
add the new object description to the Library, or the Cancel button to cancel
the operation.
7-3-3
Delete Object
To delete an object from the Library, select the object, (the grab handles are
not shown; however, the object name is highlighted in the Graphics Library
Editor) and click the
button.
A message box opens with the associated object name to remove. click the
Yes button to delete the object or the No button to cancel the operation.
7-3-4
Using a Graphic Library Object in the Graphics Editor
A library object can be added to the Graphics Editor in the same way that the
Graphics Editor is used to build libraries, by dragging from one dialog box to
another. When a library object is added to the Graphics Editor, it can be further
modified since each library object is simply a group of objects.
As an example, a page can be enhanced by using one of the gauges provided
in the Gauges_1 default graphic library:
111
Printing the Graphics Library
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
The gauge object can be stretched to suit the needs of the page, and other
objects can be applied on top of, or in addition to the gauge. A library object
can also be ungrouped by selecting Ungroup from the Edit menu.
The
dragging.
7-3-5
buttons on the toolbar can be used as an alternative to
Point Substitution
If the library object includes animation actions the Point Substitution dialog box
will be automatically displayed. This allows the points associated with the
object to be quickly updated for use in the current project. For full details on
Point Substitution refer to Chapter 4 (Objects).
7-3-6
Default Graphic Library Objects
CX-Supervisor contains default, ready-to-use libraries. They cannot be added
to (this is denoted by the 'READ ONLY' statement at the bottom of the
Graphics Library Editor), although they can be applied to a page and tailored
in the usual way.
7-3-7
Conversion to Individual Page Objects
The majority of items in the default CX-Supervisor Graphics Libraries are
metafiles and so support conversion into CX-Supervisor objects. This allows
you to break apart the image and animate it's sub-parts.. See 'Metafile
Conversion to CX-Supervisor Objects' for further details.
7-3-8
Sharing Graphic Libraries
Graphic Libraries, including the default Graphic Libraries, can be shared by
other users at other PCs running CX-Supervisor. Each library has its own
*.MAT file (e.g. PANELS.MAT for the panels library). The *.MAT files reside in
the same directory as the CX-Supervisor application. Using file utilities on the
PC, it is possible to copy one or more *.MAT files onto a diskette or a network,
and transfer them to a CX-Supervisor directory on another PC. Consult the
Microsoft Windows User Guide for details on copying files.
7-4
Printing the Graphics Library
The Graphics Library can be printed in the same way pages can. Before
printing, ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer
settings, refer to chapter 2, Pages.
7-4-1
Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print Preview dialog box.
112
Printing the Graphics Library
7-4-2
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
Printing
To print the contents of the Graphics Library, select the
button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
113
Printing the Graphics Library
114
SECTION 7 Graphics Library
What is an Alarm?
SECTION 8 Alarms
SECTION 8
Alarms
This chapter describes CX-Supervisor alarms and the procedures associated
with the creation, amendment and removal of alarms using the Alarm Editing
facility. The use of alarms during the running of a project is also described.
8-1
What is an Alarm?
Alarms provide notification of a problem during the execution of an application
in runtime. Alarms are defined in the development environment and monitored
in the runtime environment. Alarms range from incidental to catastrophic in
nature.
In runtime, the occurrence of an alarm condition, and any subsequent change
of state, is recorded in a log file known as the Alarm History log.
An operator is alerted to an alarm condition by means of an Alarm
Acknowledge dialog box, which may also be accompanied by a warning
sound. A list of current alarms is also maintained.
Individual alarms are defined in the development environment using the Alarm
Editor. General alarm settings are controlled in the development environment
using the Alarm Settings dialog box.
The Alarm Object (refer to chapter 4, Objects) is a graphical object which can
be configured to display alarm messages for certain groups of alarms and thus
provides a convenient way of filtering alarm messages.
Alarm definitions are made and modified using the Alarm Editor. To use the
Alarm Editor, CX-Supervisor must currently have a project open. If no project
is currently open, either select Open Project from the Project menu to open a
previously saved project, or select New Project from the Project menu to
create a new project.
Facilities exist to add an alarm, modify an existing alarm, copy an alarm,
remove an existing alarm following confirmation, and display the alarm list in
name, type or description order.
8-2
Alarm Settings
To open the Alarm Settings dialog box, select the
Editor toolbar. The dialog box opens.
button from the Alarm
115
Viewing the Contents of the Alarm Database
SECTION 8 Alarms
In the On Alarm Automatically Display area, set the Alarm Status Viewer and
Alarm History Log settings as required. When these options are set, the
Current Alarms dialog box or Alarm History dialog box (respectively) displays
automatically in runtime when an alarm occurs.
Set the Maximum entries in Status and Maximum entries in History Log fields
to the desired values. The numbers specify how many messages are
displayed in the respective viewer dialog boxs in runtime. Select the Log
system start/stop messages setting to ON if required.
Note:
If more messages exist than are requested to be displayed, the most recent
messages are displayed in preference to older messages.
The Alarm Sound button allows the selection of an audible warning which are
heard when an alarm is raised. The Open Waveform File dialog box is shown
below:
Choosing a waveform file with this dialog box does not in itself cause the
warning sound to be heard when an alarm is raised. To hear the audible
warning for any alarm, the Play Sound setting in the alarm definition must be
ticked. Also, the PC on which CX-Supervisor is running must be equipped with
a suitable sound card and audio capability.
8-3
Viewing the Contents of the Alarm Database
To open the Alarm Editor dialog box, click the
Alarm Editor dialog box is as follows:
116
button. An example of the
Creating a New Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
Alarms may be segregated into groups. To select a group, pick an entry from
the Group field.
All alarm definitions can be displayed by selecting <All Groups> from this list.
Individual listed alarms are sorted, based on a designated field type: name,
type or description. By selecting the Name field, the alarms are sorted
alphanumerically by name. The Type and Description fields, once selected,
react in the same way. The Alarm Editor dialog box shows the alarms in name
order.
The widths of the alarm fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
The typeface of the editor can be amended by selecting Preferences from the
File menu. This is especially useful when printing.
The
button displays the Alarm Settings dialog box, which allows global
alarm settings to be modified. Refer to chapter 8, Alarm Header Information.
Click the
button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with normal icons.
Click the
button to view details as a list.
Select the
button to view details as a list including name, type, expression,
priority and description information. The details can be sorted in ascending
order by clicking once or in descending order by clicking twice, in the
appropriate field.
A summary of alarm information is available by selecting the
button. The
resultant dialog box shows an overall summary and a breakdown on the
number of alarms per type. To exit the dialog box, click the Close button. The
Alarm Information dialog box is shown as follows:
8-4
Creating a New Alarm
Open the Alarm Editor dialog box, as described in chapter 8, Viewing the
Contents of the Alarm Database. To add a new alarm, select the
button.
This results in the Add Alarm dialog box being displayed.
117
Creating a New Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
When all the information has been provided for the new alarm, selecting the
OK button commits the new alarm to the alarms database, while the Cancel
button aborts this add operation.
Note:
8-4-1
The short-cut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within the Add Alarm dialog box. Highlight part or all of a field and type
<Ctrl>+X to cut the text or <Ctrl>+C to copy the text. Insert the cursor at the
desired field and type <Ctrl>+V to paste the text. Since the cut and copy
operations store the information in the Windows Clipboard, it may be pasted to
another dialog box or application.
Alarm Header Information
The name of the alarm is entered in the Name: field. The alarm name can be
constructed of up to 20 alphanumeric characters. Any other characters,
including spaces, generate an audible error, or an Invalid Alarm Name entered
message. This field is visible from the Alarm Editor dialog box.
The group to which this alarm is added is selected from the Group: field. To
create a new group name, simply type the name of the new group in the
Group: field. The use of alarm groups allows filtering of alarm messages by
group name.
The priority assigned to the alarm is selected from the Priority: field.
The Display Alarm Acknowledge dialog box setting determines whether the
Acknowledge Alarm dialog box opens in runtime when the alarm occurs. The
dialog box notifies the operator of the alarm condition and allows the operator
to acknowledge the alarm. The default value is True.
Activating the Auto Acknowledge Alarm setting causes these messages to be
acknowledged without any operator action. Refer to chapter 8, Alarm
Acknowledge.
118
Creating a New Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
The Play Sound setting determines whether an audible warning is sounded
when the alarm occurs. The default value is False. Note that a waveform file
must also have been selected for the warning sound to be heard. The
waveform is selected by using the Alarm Sound button on the Alarm Settings
dialog box.
An alarm description, detailing the possibilities of how the current alarm would
be raised, is inserted in the Description: field. To move to a new line, press
<Ctrl>+<Return>. Any characters are valid, and up to 255 characters may be
entered in the text field. This field is visible from the Alarm Editor dialog box.
Activating the Print Alarm Messages setting causes alarms of this type to be
printed automatically when they occur.
8-4-2
Alarm Type
The alarm type can be Simple, Deadband or Rate of Change. Select the
desired type by clicking on the Simple, Deadband or Rate of Change settings.
This field is visible from the Alarm Editor dialog box.
8-4-2-1
Alarm Attributes
The attributes for an alarm are defined according to its type, as this defines
when an alarm reacts. Since Simple is the default type, the Simple alarm
attributes are initially visible.
For a Simple alarm, the following attributes are displayed:
An expression based on a point is entered in the Expression: field. The alarm
is raised once the point meets the expression. The alarm is cleared when the
point value subsequently fails to meet the expression.
For a Deadband alarm, the following attributes are displayed:
An expression based on a point is entered in the Expression: field. The alarm
is raised once the point meets the expression. The alarm is cleared when the
point value falls outside the expression value plus the specified deadband
percentage. For the example above an alarm is raised when the boiler's
temperature exceeds 100 and is cleared when the boiler temperature falls
below 95 (100 minus 5%).
For a Rate of Change alarm, the following attributes are displayed:
119
Creating a New Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
An expression based on a point is entered in the Expression: field. The alarm
is raised if the value exposed by the expression increases or decreases at the
speed based on the values of the ROC: field, the T/Base: field, and the
direction based on the Direction: field. The alarm is cleared when the rate-ofchange is less than the critical rate.
For the above example an alarm is raised when the boiler's temperature
increases by 5% or more per minute, and clears when the boiler's temperature
increases by less than 5% per minute.
A point may be inserted into any of the alarm types' Expression: field by either
typing in the point name or by selecting the Browse button, which results in the
Select Required Item dialog box being displayed, at the position where a point
should be inserted.
Only viable points can be viewed from a Select Required Item dialog box. The
list of items in the Point Names: field can be refined by selecting an option
from the Group: field. Click the OK button to accept the new point or click the
Cancel button to leave the point unchanged. Clicking the Add Point button or
Add Alias button allows a new point or alias to be created prior to association
with the expression. Points are discussed in chapter 3, Points, while
expression syntax is discussed in the CX-Supervisor Script Language
Reference Manual.
8-4-2-2
Alarm Messages
A message pertaining to a raised alarm is entered in the Raised: field. The
content of the field should be descriptive to provide the user with a reasonable
basis for an alarm solution.
The Alarm Editor provides a default raised message. The name of the alarm is
substituted for the # character in the message text when the OK button is
clicked. The raised message may be changed at any time simply by entering
the desired message in the text field.
A message associated with the alarm can also be entered in the Normal: field
in the same manner to that above; this message opens once an alarm
condition has been rectified and normal conditions have been resumed.
The Alarm Editor provides a default normal message. The name of the alarm
is substituted for the # character in the message text when the OK button is
clicked. The normal message may be changed at any time simply by entering
the desired message in the text field.
120
Updating an Existing Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
Both alarm messages can include embedded point names via the Browse
button, which is replaced at runtime with the value of the point:
Example
Boiler temp high: ((BoilerTemp))
shows the point value in the alarm message.
Example
Flow exceeded, Pressure = ((Press))
(("Temperature = %2.2f",temp)).
8-5
Updating an Existing Alarm
Open the Alarm Editor dialog box as described in chapter 8, Viewing the
Contents of the Alarm Database.
To modify an existing alarm, highlight the alarm entry from the alarm list and
select the
button.
This results in the Modify Alarm dialog box being displayed (a dialog box
based on the Add Alarm dialog box), as shown below:
The selected alarm can be redefined as described in chapter 8, Creating a
New Alarm. When all the information has been provided for the updated alarm,
clicking the OK button commits the alarm to the alarms database, while the
Cancel button aborts this modify operation.
8-6
Copying an Existing Alarm Definition
Open the Alarm Editor dialog box as described in chapter 8, Viewing the
Contents of the Alarm Database.
To copy an existing alarm, highlight the alarm from the alarm list and then type
<Ctrl>+C. This creates a copy of the alarm definition on the Windows
clipboard. To paste the alarm definition back in to the current project, type
<Ctrl>+V. The Alarm Editor ensures the name of the alarm is unique by
121
Deleting an Existing Alarm
SECTION 8 Alarms
appending a number to the name. For example, if the original alarm name was
"Alarm", the name of the pasted alarm is "Alarm1". All other properties of the
pasted alarm remain the same as the original alarm definition.
It is possible to copy many alarms at once by highlighting all the desired
alarms in the alarm list. Press and hold the <Ctrl> key and use the mouse to
select alarm definitions one by one, or press and hold the <Shift> key and use
the mouse to select blocks of alarm definitions. When the desired alarms have
been highlighted, the alarm definitions may be copied and pasted in the usual
way.
Alarm definitions may be pasted into a project other than the original. Care
should be exercised when attempting this procedure as the alarm expression
may contain references to point names which may have different meaning in
the new project.
8-7
Deleting an Existing Alarm
Open the Alarm Editor dialog box as described in chapter 8, Viewing the
Contents of the Alarm Database.
To remove an existing alarm, highlight the alarm from the alarm list and select
the
button. A confirmation dialog box opens. Click the Yes button to
remove the alarm from the alarms database, or No button to abort the delete
operation.
8-8
Printing Alarms
8-8-1
Print Setup
The Alarm Editor can be printed in the same way pages can. Before printing,
ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer settings,
refer to chapter 2, Pages.
8-8-2
Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print Preview display.
8-8-3
Printing
To print the contents of the Alarm Editor, click the Print button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
8-9
Alarm Reporting In Runtime
An alarm condition which occurs during runtime is brought to the attention of
the operator. There are a variety of options available in the way alarms are
reported. These options are configured in the development environment.
During runtime, there are essentially four ways of examining alarm messages:
the Alarm Acknowledge dialog box, the Current Alarm dialog box, the Alarm
History dialog box and the Alarm Object.
The Alarm Object is a graphical object which displays alarm messages in a
similar way to the alarm status viewer. Refer to chapter 4, Objects for an
explanation of how to configure an alarm object to filter alarm messages by
group name.
122
Alarm Reporting In Runtime
8-9-1
SECTION 8 Alarms
Alarm Acknowledge
Whenever an alarm is raised during a runtime application, a confirmation
dialog box is optionally displayed requesting acknowledgement of the alarm.
The dialog box shows the alarm message, priority, and the date and time the
alarm was raised. Click the Acknowledge button to close the dialog box.
Alarm messages are queued so that as each message is acknowledged, the
next in the queue becomes visible. If a new alarm occurs which has higher or
equal priority the details are updated to show this newer/more important alarm
first. The dialog box disappears when there are no further alarm messages to
be reported. Each acknowledgement is logged in the alarm history log with the
login name of the current user. An unacknowledged alarm does not affect a
runtime application.
8-9-2
Current Alarms
A list of current alarms can be viewed by accessing the Current Alarms
dialog box. (A "current" alarm is one which has been raised but is not yet
cleared and acknowledged.) The current alarm status viewer can be accessed
in a variety of ways, and is dependant on the setup of the runtime application.
Some applications may allow access to the dialog box via the contextsensitive floating menu, while others may allow access via a button. Refer to
chapter 6, Projects or chapter 9, Animation as appropriate. The Current
Alarms dialog box is as follows:
The Current Alarm dialog box always shows the alarm messages listed in
order with the highest priority at the top.
The widths of the alarm fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
The
button acknowledges the alarm which is currently highlighted in the
alarm status dialog box. This has no effect if the alarm has already been
acknowledged.
The
button unconditionally acknowledges all outstanding alarms. Any
unacknowledged alarms become acknowledged. This has no effect on alarms
that are already acknowledged.
The
button causes the messages in the alarm status dialog box to be
printed. Before printing, ensure that the printer has been set up correctly.
123
Alarm Reporting In Runtime
8-9-3
SECTION 8 Alarms
Alarm History
The occurrence of an alarm condition, and any subsequent change of state, is
recorded in the alarm history log. Alarm messages recorded in the log can be
displayed using the Alarm History dialog box. The Alarm History dialog box
can be accessed in a variety of ways, and is dependant on the setup of the
runtime application. Some applications may allow access to the dialog box via
the context-sensitive floating menu, while others may allow access via a
button. Refer to chapter 6, Projects or chapter 9, Animation as appropriate.
The Alarm History dialog box is as follows:
This dialog box always shows the log listed in date and time order.
The widths of the alarm fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
The
button causes the messages in the Alarm History dialog box to be
printed. Before printing, ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. The
alarm log itself is simply a text file (projectname.UAL) that may be examined or
printed using any of the usual utilities available under Windows, such as
Microsoft Notepad. When the alarm log becomes full it is copied to the alarm
backup (projectname.UAB) and a new alarm log file created. This switch over
system uses a quick 'append' function for every alarm and prevents intensive
write operations.
124
Associating Points with Actions and Events
SECTION 9 Animation
SECTION 9
Animation
This chapter describes CX-Supervisor animation and the procedures
associated with the creation of a project animation, page animation and object
animation, using the Animation Editing facility. The active use of points and
how points dictate animations is also described.
9-1
Associating Points with Actions and Events
CX-Supervisor provides a facility to greatly enhance the versatility of a runtime
application by the use of actions and animations to execute commands and
logical expressions based on specified criteria being met. This can take many
forms, for instance pressing a button, opening or closing a page or changes in
the positioning of objects on a page.
CX-Supervisor achieves this enhanced functionality in two ways: by assigning
an expression to a pre-defined action, or executing commands on a linear
basis as a basic programming language. In addition, such functionality can be
carried out on three levels: object, page, or project, with different objectives at
each level.
Animations are actioned using the values or states of one or more points. For
example, an integer point is assigned to an object, the colour of the object is
black when the value of the point is "0". The system causes the value of the
point to be changed to the value "5", which changes the colour of the object to
red.
To demonstrate, an object's colour can be changed in the runtime environment
from black to white. This can be achieved using actions and animations in the
two ways described, with the additional use of points. Firstly, using a predefined action, the object can be associated with the 'Change Colour' predefined action (runtime action). When a Boolean point's value is "0" the colour
is black, when the point's value is "1" the colour is white. The same result can
be achieved using the basic programming language (script). This time, a
single command can change the colour from black to white. Finally, either
instance can be initiated by the user in the runtime environment, e.g. the user
presses a button to change the object's colour.
This is a simple example, but underlines how quickly and smoothly a runtime
application can be built. This chapter elaborates on all forms of actions and
animations that can be applied to CX-Supervisor in the development
environment. Also refer to the CX-Supervisor Script Language Reference
Manual for further syntax details for the application of actions and animations.
9-2
Animation Editor
Actions and animations are created on a project, page or object basis using
the Animation Editor.
To use the Animation Editor, CX-Supervisor must currently have a project
open. If no project is currently open, select Open from the Project menu to
open a previously saved project, or select New from the Project menu to
create a new project.
To open the Animation Editor, click the
button.
125
Animation Editor
SECTION 9 Animation
The Animation Editor dialog box lists all possible animation actions in the
Runtime Actions column. Attributable objects for the Runtime Actions are
listed in the Trigger Event/Expression column.
Animations can be instigated on a Project, Page or Object basis by selecting
Object Actions, Page Actions or Project Actions from the Actions field.
When opening the Animation Editor while an object within a page is selected,
the Actions field defaults to Object Actions, and the selected object is shown
in the Animation Editor. When accessing the Animation Editor with a page
selected, this field defaults to Page Actions. When opening the Animation
Editor while no selection is made, the Actions field defaults to Project
Actions. The actions that may be applied to an object are dependant on the
type of object selected. Only one type of action, Execute Script, can be applied
to a Page or Project script.
The Users field allows selection of which users can use the selected page in
the Runtime environment. This is used in conjunction with allocating users and
allowing them permission to perform tasks; for further information on allocating
users refer to chapter 6, Projects.
If Object Actions is the current selection for the Actions field, an object
becomes active in the Object (left-most) field. An object within the current
page can be selected from the Object field. The Runtime Actions list is
dependant on the object selected from this box. The Object field is disabled for
Page or Project actions.
Individual listed Runtime Actions are sorted, based on a designated field type,
either Runtime Actions or Trigger Event/Expression. By clicking on the
Runtime Actions button, the points are sorted alphanumerically by Runtime
Actions. The Trigger Event/Expression button, once selected, reacts in the
same way. The Animation Editor dialog box shows the actions associated with
'Polygon_1' sorted in runtime action order.
The typeface of the editor can be amended by selecting Preferences from the
File menu. This is especially useful when printing.
The widths of the animation fields can be widened or narrowed as required
using the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
126
Animation Editor
SECTION 9 Animation
A new action can be added to the list of current actions by clicking the
button in the toolbar. An existing action can be removed from the
current actions by clicking the Delete Action button in the toolbar, whereupon a
confirmation dialog box opens. Click the OK button to delete the action, or
click the Cancel button to abort the delete operation. An existing action can be
modified from the current actions by clicking the Modify Action button in the
toolbar.
Note:
9-2-1
The short-cut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within the Animation Editor dialog boxs. Highlight part or all of a field and
type <Ctrl>+X to cut the text or <Ctrl>+C to copy the text; insert the cursor at
the desired dialog box field and type <Ctrl>+V to paste the text. Since the cut
and copy operations store the information in the Windows Clipboard, it may be
pasted to another dialog box or application.
View Mode
The list of runtime actions can be viewed in a number of ways, providing
simple or comprehensive details as follows:
Click the
button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with normal icons.
Click the
button to view details as a list.
Click the
button to view details as a list including name, type, expression,
priority and description information. The details can be sorted in ascending
order by clicking once or in descending order by clicking twice, in the
appropriate field.
9-2-2
Project
Graphical objects have no relevance at Project level as they cannot be
referenced. Scripts can be applied to a project to manipulate points. These
scripts are associated with events that occur throughout the operating session.
A script is made up of one or more simple statements that together make
script code.
Refer to the Script Language Manual for explicit details regarding the
construction and syntax of script code. Chapter 10, Runtime Actions describes
the creation of script code using the Script Editor.
The script is defined using the Execute Script entry in the Animation Editor list.
9-2-3
Page
Page scripts are concerned with manipulating points and graphical objects
that are used or included within that page. Actions cannot refer to graphical
objects that appear in other pages. In other words, page scripts are used to
drive a number of actions on the occurrence of a particular event. An example
of page script code is as follows:
REM ** move the car and transport **
IF start THEN
Position = position - speed
ENFIF
REM ** if the car is at the start then reset the **
REM ** position and reset the car colour **
IF position < 0THEN
position = 800
POLYGON_11.colour = dark_grey
127
Animation Editor
SECTION 9 Animation
ENDIF
REM setup the paint spray colour **
IF position < 300 || position > 400 && changepaint
THEN
IF paintblue THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = dark_blue
ENDIF
IF paint green THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = Dark_green
ENDIF
IF paintred THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = red
ENDIF
IF paintpurple THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = purple
ENDIF
IF paintyellow THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = yellow
ENDIF
IF paintwhite THEN
POLYGON_34.colour = white
ENDIF
ENDIF
Refer to the Script Language Manual for explicit details regarding the
construction and syntax of script code. 10.3 Runtime Actions describes the
creation of script code using the Script Editor.
The script is defined using the Execute Script entry in the Animation Editor list.
9-2-4
Objects
One object or a selection of objects defined as a group are animated in a
number of ways (refer to chapter 1, Graphics Editor for applicable objects):
•
An object can be seen to be blinking.
•
An object can be removed from the page.
•
An object can change colour.
•
A value associated with the object can be displayed.
•
Text associated with the object can be displayed.
•
An object can appear enabled for selection or disabled for selection.
•
An object can move horizontally or vertically.
•
An object can be flood-filled.
•
An object can change its size, horizontally or vertically.
•
An object can rotate.
•
An object can have associated user interaction.
•
An object can be displayed on the page.
However, it is not feasible for all the objects to be capable of all forms of
animation. For instance, a toggle object can only be animated so that it is
enabled or disabled, visible or invisible, while a text object can be resized,
moved, change its colour, blink, rotate, await user interaction, be made visible
or invisible, or display an associated value. A list of objects and their available
animations is as follows:
128
Animation Editor
SECTION 9 Animation
Blink
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Close page
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9
9 9
Colour Change (Analogue) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9
9 9 9 9
Colour Change (Digital)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9
9 9 9 9
Display page
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Display Value (Analog)
9
Display Value (Digital)
9
Display Value (Text)
9
9 9
Edit point value (Analogue) 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9
9
Edit point value (Digital)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9
9
Edit point value (Text)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9
9
Enable/Disable
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9
Execute script
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
9 9
Move (Horizontal)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Move (Vertical)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Percentage fill (Horizontal)
9 9 9
9 9
Resize (Height)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Resize (Width)
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
Rotate
Percentage fill (Vertical)
Visibility
9 9
9 9 9
9 9
9
9 9
9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
A group object possesses the animation functions common to all objects
within the group.
The ticks denote whether the animation function is available for the object.
The blank cells denote the animation function is not available for the object.
The icons within the table header denote the object created by that icon. Refer
to chapter 1, Graphics Editor for further details.
In addition, an object can be animated in the form of a script. A script is made
up of one or more statements. An example of object script code is as follows:
REM ** SET UP THE COLOUR FLAGS **
Paintblue = TRUE
paintgreen = FALSE
paintred = FALSE
paintpurple = FALSE
paintyellow = FALSE
paintwhite = FALSE
REM ** SET UP THE VALVE POSITION **
Bluevalve = TRUE
greenvalve = FALSE
redvalve = FALSE
Changepaint = TRUE
129
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
Refer to the Script Language Manual for full details regarding the
construction and syntax of script code. The script is created by selecting the
Execute Script entry in the Animation Editor list.
Chapter 10, Runtime Actions describes the application of object animations.
9-2-5
Printing the Animation Editor
The Animation Editor can be printed in the same way pages can. Before
printing, ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer
settings, refer to chapter 2, Pages.
9-2-5-1
Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print Preview display.
9-2-5-2
Printing
To print the contents of the Animation Editor, click the
button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
9-3
Runtime Actions
9-3-1
Script
A script, controlling the actions of an object, page or project can be created
and updated using the Script Editor dialog box.
The Script Editor allows script code to be created or amended which carries
out the mechanics of the animation operation. To access the Script Editor
dialog box to add an action, select Execute Script from the animation list and
click the Add Action button. To access the Script Editor to modify an action,
select Execute Script from the animation list and click the Modify Action
button. Refer to the Script Reference chapter 10, Objects, for a list of the
objects to which an Execute Script action is applicable. Page Animations and
Project Animations may have an Execute Script action.
On selection of the Execute Script action, the Script Editor dialog box opens:
130
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
The script editor is colour coded to help show correct syntax with keywords
and different object types are shown in different colours.
When creating the script choosing an action, function, etc. from the menu may
require further information. This subsequent information is provided using
some common dialog boxs: the Select Required Item dialog box, the Simple
Expression Entry dialog box and the Object Selection dialog box.
Use the Select Required Item dialog box to 'pick' a point to associate with the
current action. It is accessed by clicking the Browse button from the current
dialog box. This results in the Select Required Item dialog box being
displayed.
131
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
Only relevant points are listed in the Point Names: field. Select the desired
point from the Point Names: list, and click the OK button. Clicking the Cancel
button aborts the selection. To add a new point click the Add Point button; for
details on adding a point refer to chapter 3, Points.
Use the Simple Expression Entry dialog box to assign an expression to an
action. It is accessed from an entry in the script code. This results in the
Simple Expression Entry dialog box being displayed:
Enter the expression in the Expression: field. The Browse button can be used
to pick a valid point. Click the OK button to proceed, or the Cancel button to
abort.
Use the Select Required Object dialog box to assign an object to an action. It
is accessed from an entry in the script code. This results in the Select
Required Object dialog box being displayed:
Select an object from the Object Names: field. Click the OK button to proceed,
or the Cancel button to abort.
Note:
9-3-2
The short-cut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within the Script Editor. Highlight part or all of a field and type <Ctrl>+X to
cut the text or <Ctrl>+C to copy the text; insert the cursor at the desired field
and type <Ctrl>+V to paste the text. Since the cut and copy operations store
the information in the Windows Clipboard, it may be pasted to another dialog
box or application.
Aliases
An alias definition can be provided to replace strings in scripts and
expressions used throughout CX-Supervisor applications. An associated
string replaces the alias when used in a script or expression. Select the
Aliases button from the Script Editor dialog box. The Alias Definitions dialog
box opens. Refer to chapter 6, Projects for more details on alias definitions.
9-3-3
Execution Attributes
The animation reacts to an event. A script can be associated with an event,
depending on whether it is a project script, page script or object script.
132
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
For a project or page script, the following events trigger the execution of the
script:
•
On a condition, based on a regular expression.
•
At a regular interval defined by an interval time.
•
At the initialisation of the page or project.
•
At the termination of the page or project.
For an object script, the following events trigger the script:
•
Following the user clicking once on the left mouse button.
•
On a condition, based on a regular expression.
To specify a trigger for the script, select an option from the Trigger Event: field.
9-3-4
Note:
If On condition is specified, a valid relational expression is required in the
Expression: field. The script is executed every time a variable included in the
expression changes value and the result of the expression is 'TRUE'. For
example, the expression $Second executes every second except when
$Second is zero; whereas $Second >= 0 executes every second. If an invalid
expression is entered, an error message opens when the OK button is clicked.
Note:
If On Regular Interval is specified, a valid interval is required in the Interval
Time: field in units of milliseconds. The script is started at the interval specified
by this period. If an invalid time is entered, an error message opens when the
OK button is clicked.
Script Code
Script code is entered in the script code text field. To start a new line, press
<Return>.
Refer to the Script Language Manual for explicit details regarding the
construction and syntax of script code.
Expressions consist of operators and operands:
•
Operators are relational, arithmetic, logical and include many functions.
•
Operands are constants or point variables.
The script language can also contain Java and Visual Basic script. Refer to the
Script Language Manual for details.
Scripts can be generated either by typing directly into the script code text field
or by using the pull down menu commands. When using the pull down menu
commands the user is assisted in the completion of the parameters to the
command via a series of dialog boxs. The dialog boxs displayed vary
according to the type of command being entered.
133
Runtime Actions
9-3-4-1
SECTION 9 Animation
Points
A point may be inserted into the script code in a number of ways:
•
Clicking the Browse button, picking the point off the list and clicking the OK
button.
•
Typing the name of the point
System points form part of the points list.
9-3-4-2
Undo Last Action
The last edit performed can be undone, if required, in a number of ways:
9-3-4-3
•
Selecting Undo from the Edit menu.
•
Pressing <Ctrl>+Z in the script code text field.
Cut to Clipboard
An area of script code can be moved to the Microsoft Windows Clipboard in a
number of ways:
9-3-4-4
•
Selecting the script code to cut, followed by Cut from the Edit menu.
•
Selecting the script code to cut in the script code text field and pressing
<Ctrl>+X.
Copy to Clipboard
An area of script code can be copied to the Clipboard, if required, in a number
of ways:
9-3-4-5
•
Selecting the script code to copy, followed by Copy from the Edit menu.
•
Selecting the script code to copy from the script code text field and
pressing <Ctrl>+C.
Paste from Clipboard
An area of script code can be copied from the Clipboard, if required, in a
number of ways:
9-3-4-6
•
Placing the I-beam cursor at the desired point in the script code field,
followed by Paste from the Edit menu.
•
Placing the I-beam cursor at the desired point in the script code field and
then pressing <Ctrl>+V.
Insert Tab Code
A tab character can be inserted into the script code, if required, in a number of
ways:
9-3-4-7
•
Placing the I-beam cursor at the desired point in the script code field,
followed by Tab from the Edit menu.
•
Placing the I-beam cursor at the desired point in the script code field and
then pressing <Ctrl>+<Tab>.
Finding and Replacing Text
Text can be found and replaced within the current script as follows:
Select Find/Replace from the Edit menu and type appropriate text in the Find
what and Replace with fields. Click the Find button to initiate the search and
<Return> to execute text replacement.
9-3-4-8
Clear Script Code Field
The script code field can be cleared, if required:
Select Clear All from the Edit menu.
134
Runtime Actions
9-3-5
SECTION 9 Animation
Script Completion
When script entry or script modification is complete, click the OK button. To
abort the Script Editor prior to completing the task, click the Cancel button.
If there is an error in the script, the Compilation Error(s) dialog box opens.
In this example, the error is caused by a spurious 'ENDIF'.
This dialog box informs the user where an error has occurred and its type. If
necessary, use the scroll bars to see the whole error message. Click the OK
button to remove the Compilation Error(s) dialog box and return to the Script
Editor to fix the error.
9-3-6
Horizontal Move
Objects can be animated by moving either left or right. This is specified using
the Move (Horizontal) dialog box.
To access the Move (Horizontal) dialog box to add an action, select Move
(Horizontal) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access
the Move (Horizontal) dialog box to modify an action, select Move (Horizontal)
from the animation list and click the Modify Action button. Refer to the Script
Reference chapter 10, Objects, for a list of the objects to which this action is
applicable.
On selection of the Move (Horizontal) action, the Move (Horizontal) dialog box
opens:
To define the animation, an expression consisting of a number of operators
and operands (which may be based on the status of a point) must be entered
in the Expression: field. The boundaries in which the object moves are
inserted into the Active Expression Range/Required Position: fields. The
Maximum Offset specifies the number of pixels to the right (from its initial
position) that the object moves when the result of the expression reaches the
Maximum Value. The Minimum Offset specifies the number of pixels to the left
(from its initial position) that the object moves, when the result of the
135
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
expression reaches the Minimum Value. A value within the maximum and
minimum values results in a proportionate movement between the left and
right positions.
To abort the Horizontal Move definition, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-7
Vertical Move
Objects can be animated by moving either up or down. This can be specified
via the Move (Vertical) dialog box.
To access the Move (Vertical) dialog box to add an action, select Move
(Vertical) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the
Move (Vertical) dialog box to modify an action, select Move (Vertical) from the
animation list and click the Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects,
for a list of the objects to which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Move (Vertical) action, the Move (Vertical) dialog box
opens:
To define the animation, an expression based on the status of a point must be
entered in the Expression: field. The boundaries in which the object moves are
inserted into the Active Expression Range/Required Position: fields. The
Maximum Offset specifies the number of pixels upwards (from its initial
position) that the object moves, when the result of the expression reaches the
Maximum Value. The Minimum Offset specifies the number of pixels
downwards (from its initial position) that the object moves, when the result of
the expression reaches the Minimum Value. A value within the maximum and
minimum values results in a proportionate movement between the top and
bottom positions.
To abort the Vertical Move definition, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-8
Resize Width
Objects can be animated by shrinking or expanding horizontally. This can be
specified via the Resize (Width) dialog box.
To access the Resize (Width) dialog box to add an action, select Resize
(Width) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the
Resize (Width) dialog box to modify an action, select Resize (Width) from the
animation list and click the Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Object, for
a list of the objects to which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Resize (Width) action, the Resize (Width) dialog box
opens:
136
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To define the animation, an expression consisting of a number of operators
and operands (which may be based on the status of a point) must be entered
in the Expression: field.
The boundaries in which the object moves are inserted into the Active
Expression Range/Required Width: fields. The Maximum Width specifies the
required width in pixels of the object when the result of the expression reaches
the Maximum Value. The Minimum Width specifies the required width in pixels
of the object when the result of the expression reaches the Minimum Value. A
value within the maximum and minimum values results in a proportionate
width between the minimum and maximum widths. The resizing also requires
an anchor and direction in which to stretch or shrink. This can be specified as
the left of the object, right of the object or centrally to the object, by selecting
the appropriate Justification: setting.
To abort the Resize Width definition, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-9
Resize Height
Objects can be animated by shrinking or expanding vertically. This can be
specified via the Resize (Height) dialog box.
To access the Resize (Height) dialog box to add an action, select Resize
(Height) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the
Resize (Height) dialog box to modify an action, select Resize (Height) from the
animation list and click the Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects,
for a list of the objects to which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Resize (Height) action, the Resize (Height) dialog box
opens:
To define the animation, an expression consisting of a number of operators
and operands (which may be based on the status of a point) must be entered
in the Expression: field.
137
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
The boundaries in which the object moves are inserted into the Active
Expression Range/Required Height: fields. The Maximum Height specifies the
required height in pixels of the object when the result of the expression
reaches the Maximum Value. The Minimum Height specifies the required
height in pixels of the object when the result of the expression reaches the
Minimum Value. A value within the maximum and minimum values results in a
proportionate height between the minimum and maximum heights The
resizing also requires an anchor and direction in which to stretch or shrink.
This can be specified as the top of the object, bottom of the object or centrally
to the object, by selecting the appropriate Justification: setting.
To abort the Resize Height definition, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-10 Horizontal Percentage Fill
Closed objects can be flood-filled along a horizontal axis. This can be
specified via the Percentage Fill (Horizontal) dialog box.
To access the Percentage Fill (Horizontal) dialog box to add an action, select
Percentage Fill (Horizontal) from the animation list and click the Add Action
button. To access the Percentage Fill (Horizontal) dialog box to modify an
action, select Percentage Fill (Horizontal) from the animation list and click the
Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of the objects to
which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Percentage Fill (Horizontal) action, the Percentage Fill
(Horizontal) dialog box opens:
To define the animation, an expression consisting of a number of operators
and operands (which may be based on the status of a point) must be entered
in the Expression: field.
The boundaries associated with the percentage fill are inserted into the Active
Expression Range/Required Percentage Fill: fields. The % Filled fields specify
the percentage of the object to fill when the expression reaches its maximum
and minimum values. The flood-fill also requires a direction. This can be
specified as left to right or right to left, by selecting the appropriate Fill
Direction: setting.
To abort the Horizontal Percentage Fill definition, click the Cancel button. By
clicking the Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in
chapter 9, Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid
data has been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
138
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
9-3-11 Vertical Percentage Fill
Closed objects can be flood-filled along a vertical axis. This can be specified
via the Percentage Fill (Vertical) dialog box.
To access the Percentage Fill (Vertical) dialog box to add an action, select
Percentage Fill (Vertical) from the animation list and click the Add Action
button. To access the Percentage Fill (Vertical) dialog box to modify an action,
select Percentage Fill (Vertical) from the animation list and click the Modify
Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of the objects to which this
action is applicable.
On selection of the Percentage Fill (Vertical) action, the Percentage Fill
(Vertical) dialog box opens:
To define the animation, an expression consisting of a number of operators
and operands, which may be based on the status of a point, must be entered
in the Expression: field.
The boundaries in which the object moves are inserted into the Active
Expression Range/Required Percentage Fill: fields. The % Filled fields specify
the percentage of the object to fill when the expression reaches its maximum
and minimum values. The flood-fill also requires a direction. This can be
specified as top to bottom or bottom to top, by selecting the appropriate Fill
Direction: setting.
To abort the Vertical Percentage Fill definition, click the Cancel button. By
clicking the Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in
chapter 9, Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid
data has been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-12 Display Page
CX-Supervisor allows the specification of pages within a project for display.
This is set up using the Display Page dialog box.
To access the Display Page dialog box to add an action, select Display Page
from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the Display
Page dialog box to modify an action, select Display Page from the animation
list and click the Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of
the objects to which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Display Page action, the Display Page dialog box opens:
139
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To specify a page for display, select a page from the Available Pages: list and
click the Add button. The page entry now appears in the Pages to be
Displayed: list. More than one page can be selected for display. If a selected
page is no longer required, select the entry from the Pages to be Displayed:
list, and click the Remove button.
When completed, click the OK button. To abort the Display Page edit, click the
Cancel button.
9-3-13 Close Page
CX-Supervisor allows the specification of pages within a project to be removed
from the display. This is set up using the Close Page dialog box.
To access the Close Page dialog box, select Close Page from the animation
list and click the Add Action button. To access the Close Page dialog box to
modify an action, select Close Page from the animation list and click the
Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of the objects to
which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Close Page action, the Close Page dialog box opens:
To specify a page for removal, select a page from the Available Pages: list and
click the Add button. The page now appears in the Pages to be Closed: list.
Multiple pages can be selected for removal. If a selected page for removal is
no longer required for that purpose, select the page from the Pages to be
Closed: list, and click the Remove button.
When completed, click the OK button. To abort the Close Page edit, click the
Cancel button.
140
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
9-3-14 Blink
Objects can be animated so that they blink. This is achieved using the Blink
dialog box.
To access the Blink dialog box to add an action, select Blink from the
animation list and click the Add Action button. To access Blink dialog box to
modify an action, select Blink from the animation list and click the Modify
Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of the objects to which this
action is applicable.
On selection of the Blink action, the Blink dialog box opens:
Enter a Boolean expression in the Digital Expression: field. Arithmetic, logical
and relational expressions may also be entered as long as the result of the
expression is zero or non-zero, i.e. the result equates to 'TRUE' or 'FALSE'.
When the result of the expression is 'TRUE' the object(s) blinks.
To select a colour for the blink animation, click in the Blink Colour: field. The
Colour Palette dialog box opens so that a colour can be supplied to the object.
The object blinks between its current colour and the chosen blink colour. The
Colour Palette dialog box is described in chapter 9, Common Colour Palette.
When completed, click the OK button. To abort the Blink operation, click the
Cancel button. By clicking the Browse button, a point may be directly
specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime Actions.
9-3-15 Colour Change (Analogue)
Objects can be animated so they change between a variety of colours at a
variety of intervals. This is achieved using the Colour Change (Analogue)
dialog box.
To access the Colour Change (Analogue) dialog box to add an action, select
Colour Change (Analogue) from the animation list and click the Add Action
button. To access the Colour Change (Analogue) dialog box to modify an
action, select Colour Change (Analogue) from the animation list and click the
Modify Action button. Refer to chapter 9, Objects, for a list of the objects to
which this action is applicable.
On selection of the Colour Change (Analogue) action, the Colour Change
(Analogue) dialog box opens:
141
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
Enter an expression in the Analogue Expression: field which results in a real or
integer value. Only when the result of the expression reaches a value
identified as a threshold does the object change colour.
The object can have one of five colours depending on the value of the
expression. It changes between these colours at the thresholds. For example,
choose the colour blue for the first colour, and the value 20 for the first
threshold. The object then changes to blue until the value reaches 20, at which
point it changes to the second colour. To apply the change to the frame of the
object, select the Apply colour changes to object frame setting. To apply the
change to the object background, select the Apply colour changes to object
background setting.
On selection of a colour in the Colour Change (Analogue) dialog box, the
Colour Palette dialog box opens. The Colour Palette dialog box is described in
chapter 9, Common Colour Palette.
Click the Clear button to reset all colours and re-start. To abort the Colour
Change (Analogue) edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the Browse
button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime
Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has been
inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-16 Colour Change (Digital)
Objects can be animated so they change between two colours. This is
achieved using the Colour Change (Digital) dialog box.
To access the Colour Change (Digital) dialog box to add an action, select
Colour Change (Digital) from the animation list and click the Add Action button.
To access Colour Change (Digital) dialog box to modify an action, select
Colour Change (Digital) from the animation list and click the Modify Action
button. For a list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to
chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Colour Change (Digital) action, the Colour Change (Digital)
dialog box opens:
142
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To specify a change in an object's colour, enter a Boolean expression in the
Digital Expression: field. Non-Boolean expressions may be entered as long as
the result is 'TRUE' or 'FALSE'.
The colours are specified in the Colour Attributes: fields for Boolean State 0
and Boolean State 1. To apply the change to the frame of the object, select the
Apply colour changes to object frame setting. To apply the change to the
object background, select the Apply colour changes to object background
setting.
On selection of a colour in the Colour Change (Digital) dialog box, the Colour
Palette dialog box opens. The Colour Palette dialog box is described in
chapter 9, Common Colour Palette.
To abort the Colour Change (Digital) edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking
the Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter
9, Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-17 Enable/Disable
Objects can be enabled or disabled. This is achieved using the Enable/Disable
dialog box.
To access the Enable/Disable dialog box to add an action, select Enable/
Disable from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the
Enable/Disable dialog box to modify an action, select Enable/Disable from the
animation list and click the Modify Action button. For a list of the objects to
which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Enable/Disable action, the Enable/Disable dialog box
opens:
To specify a change in the enabled/disabled state of an object, enter a
Boolean expression in the Digital Expression: field. Non-Boolean expressions
may be entered as long as the result is 'TRUE' or 'FALSE'. Whether the object
is enabled or disabled when the expression is 'TRUE' is chosen with the
Enable/Disable State settings.
143
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
When completed, click the OK button. To abort the Enable/Disable operation,
click the Cancel button. If invalid data has been inserted into any field, a
descriptive error message opens. By clicking the Browse button, a point may
be directly specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime Actions.
9-3-18 Rotate
An object can be rotated about its centre. Specify this using the Rotate dialog
box.
To access the Rotate dialog box to add an action, select Rotate from the
animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the Rotate dialog box
to modify an action, select Rotate from the animation list and click the Modify
Action button. For a list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to
chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Rotate action, the Rotate dialog box opens:
Enter an arithmetic expression in the Expression: field. The constraints of the
rotation animation are specified in the Active Expression Range/Required
Rotation: fields. Rotation is clockwise and the angle is specified in degrees..
Enabling the Fix point on screen option ensures that the rotation point remains
at the same location even if the object moves.
To abort the Rotate edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the Browse
button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime
Actions. completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has been inserted into
any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-19 Visibility
Objects can be rendered visible or invisible. Specify this using the Visibility
dialog box.
To access the Visibility dialog box to add an action, select Visibility from the
animation list and click the Add Action button. To access the Visibility dialog
box to modify an action, select Visibility from the animation list and click the
Modify Action button. For a list of the objects to which this action is applicable
refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On execution of the Visibility action, the Visibility dialog box opens:
144
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To specify a change in an objects' visibility, enter a Boolean expression in the
Digital Expression: field. Non-Boolean expressions may be entered as long as
the result is 'TRUE' or 'FALSE'. Whether the object is rendered visible or
invisible when the expression is 'TRUE' is specified with the Visibility State
settings.
To abort the Visibility edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the Browse
button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime
Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has been
inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-20 Display Value (Digital)
The state of a Boolean point may be displayed using the Display Value
(Digital) dialog box.
To access the Display Value (Digital) dialog box to add an action, select
Display Status Text from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To
access the Display Value (Digital) dialog box to modify an action, select
Display Status Text from the animation list and click the Modify Action button.
For a list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9,
Objects.
On selection of the Display Value (Digital) action, the Display Value (Digital)
dialog box opens:
An expression based on Boolean point must be entered. This expression is
typed into the Digital Expression: field. A text string to coincide with the display
of a Boolean value can be entered in the Displayed Text: field. The position of
the displayed value within the text field is specified by entering a '#' character
into the Displayed Text: field.
Note:
To include a '#' character as part of the text, insert it as an escape character.
For example, to display 'Box # 1' type 'Box \# #'. Only hashes to be displayed
to the left of the # required for value display need escape characters, as the
first hash without a meta character is taken to be the point at which the value
should be displayed.
Text for Boolean State 0 and Boolean State 1 are entered in the State 0 Text:
field and State 1 Text: field.
145
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To abort the Display Status Text edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-21 Display Value (Analogue)
The state of a Real or Integer point may be displayed using the Display Value
(Analogue) dialog box.
To access the Display Value (Analogue) dialog box to add an action, select
Display Value from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To
access the Display Value (Analogue) dialog box to modify an action, select
Display Value from the animation list and click the Modify Action button. For a
list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Display Value action, the Display Value (Analogue) dialog
box opens:
An expression based on Real or Integer point must be entered. This
expression is typed into the Expression: field. A text string to coincide with the
display of a Real or Integer value can be entered in the Displayed Text field
(this field can be updated using the Graphics Editor). The position of the
displayed value within the text field is specified by entering a "#" character into
the Displayed Text: field. The value can be displayed in its decimal form, in
scientific notation, or in hexadecimal, by selecting a Format: settings.
The number of decimal places displayed can be specified by adding a "#"
character for each required place after a decimal point, e.g. #.## indicates 2
decimal places.
The text can also be left justified by setting the Left Justified setting.
Note:
To include a '#' character as part of the text, insert it as an escape character.
For example, to display 'Box # 1' type 'Box \# #'. Only hashes typed to the left
of the # required for value display need escape characters, since the first hash
without an escape character is taken to be the point at which the value should
be displayed.
To abort the Display Value edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the Browse
button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9, Runtime
Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has been
inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-22 Display Value (Text)
Text may be displayed using the Display Value (Text) dialog box.
146
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To access the Display Value (Text) dialog box to add an action, select Display
Text Point from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access
the Display Value (Text) dialog box to modify an action, select Display Text
Point from the animation list and click the Modify Action button. For a list of the
objects to which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Display Text Point action, the Display Value (Text) dialog
box opens:
An expression based on a text point must be entered. This expression is typed
into the Text Point: field. A text string to be displayed can be entered in the
Displayed Text: field (this field can be updated using the Graphics Editor). The
position of the displayed text within the text field is specified by entering a "#"
character into the Displayed Text: field.
Note:
To include a '#' character as part of the text, insert it as an escape character.
For example, to display 'Box # 1' type 'Box \# #'. Only hashes typed to the left
of the # required for value display need escape characters, since the first hash
without an escape character is taken to be the point at which the value should
be displayed.
To abort the Display Text Value edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
9-3-23 Edit Point Value (Digital)
The value of a Boolean point may be issued to the user for amendment during
runtime, defined using the User Input (Digital) dialog box.
To access the User Input (Digital) dialog box to add an action, select Edit Point
Value (Digital) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To
access the User Input (Digital) dialog box to modify an action, select Edit Point
Value (Digital) from the animation list and click the Modify Action button. For a
list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Edit Point Value (Digital) action, the dialog box opens:
147
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
A Boolean point must be entered. This is typed into the Boolean Point: field. A
text string to use as the caption of a user dialog box can be entered in the
Caption: field. The range of input for the value, and the representations of
Boolean State 0 and Boolean State 1 are specified in the State 0 Text: field and
State 1 Text: field. If In Place Edit is not checked a popup dialog box performs
the edit. If it is checked, the option is edited on the page with the options in a
dropdown listbox.
To abort the Edit Point Value (Digital) edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking
the Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter
9, Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
During runtime, selecting the user input object by clicking the left mouse
button results in the digital value being edit either with the runtime User Input
(Digital) dialog box being displayed or the in place listbox, based on the
contents of the development version.
The user is provided with an instruction, based on the Runtime Display
Attributes: field (in this example 'Select New State'), and On and Off settings,
based on the State 0 Text: and State 1 Text: fields. The user clicks the Cancel
button to abort the operation.
9-3-24 Edit Point Value (Analogue)
The value of a Real or Integer point may be issued to the user for amendment
during runtime, defined using the User Input (Analogue) dialog box.
To access the User Input (Analogue) dialog box to add an action, select Edit
Point Value (Analogue) from the animation list and click the Add Action button.
To access the User Input (Analogue) dialog box to modify an action, select
Edit Point Value (Analogue) from the animation list and click the Modify Action
button. For a list of the objects to which this action is applicable refer to
chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Edit Point Value (Analogue) action, the dialog box opens:
148
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
A Real or Integer point must be entered. This is typed into the Integer/Real
Point: field. A text string for the caption of a user dialog box can be entered in
the Runtime Display Attributes: field. The limits imposed on the user for the
value of the input are specified in the User Input Limits: fields.
The Display Numeric Keypad option is useful if the runtime system does not
have a keyboard, i.e. it is controlled by a touch screen or tracker ball. When a
value is edited, a Numeric Keypad dialog box opens which allows editing by
clicking on screen.
If the In Place Edit option is checked, instead of the popup editing dialog box,
the value can be edited on the page in a standard Windows edit box.
To abort the Edit Point Value (Analogue) edit, click the Cancel button. By
clicking the Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in
chapter 9, Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid
data has been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
During runtime, selecting the user input object by clicking the left mouse
button results in the in place edit box or runtime User Input (Analogue) dialog
box being displayed, based on the contents of the development version.
149
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
CX-Supervisor provides an instruction based on the Runtime Display
Attributes: field, the minimum and maximum values allowed, based on the
User Input Limits: fields, and a New Value: field, in which the user types the
desired Real or Integer value. Click the OK button to accept the value, or the
Cancel button to abort the operation. An invalid entry in the New Value field is
exposed as an error once the OK button has been clicked.
9-3-25 Edit Point Value (Text)
A text point may be issued to the user for amendment during runtime, defined
using the User Input (Text) dialog box.
To access the User Input (Text) dialog box to add an action, select Edit Point
Value (Text) from the animation list and click the Add Action button. To access
the User Input (Text) dialog box to modify an action, select Edit Point Value
(Text) from the animation list and click the Modify Action button. For a list of
the objects to which this action is applicable refer to chapter 9, Objects.
On selection of the Edit Point Value (Text) action, dialog box opens:
A text point must be entered. This is typed into the Text Point: field. A text
string to use as the caption of a user dialog box can be entered in the Caption:
field. Selecting the Echo Off setting ensures that text typed at runtime appears
hidden as asterisks.
The Display Keyboard option is useful if the runtime system does not have a
keyboard, i.e. it is controlled by a touch screen or tracker ball. When a value is
edited, a Keyboard dialog box opens which allows editing by clicking on
screen.
If the In Place Edit option is checked, instead of the popup editing dialog box,
the value can be edited on the page in a standard Windows edit box.
150
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
To abort the Edit Point Value (Text) edit, click the Cancel button. By clicking the
Browse button, a point may be directly specified, as described in chapter 9,
Runtime Actions. When completed, click the OK button. If invalid data has
been inserted into any field, a descriptive error message opens.
During runtime, selecting the user input object by clicking the left mouse
button results in the in place edit box or runtime User Input (Text) dialog box
being displayed, based on the contents of the development version.
The user is provided with an instruction based on the Runtime Display
Attributes: field, and a field in which the user enters the desired text. Click the
OK button to accept the value, or the Cancel button to abort the operation. An
invalid entry typed in the editable field is exposed as an error once the OK
button has been clicked.
9-3-26 Common Colour Palette
If an object or action has a colour associated with it, the colour can be
changed by clicking on the sample of the colour in the dialog box which
describes the object or action. The Colour Palette dialog box opens so that a
new colour can be specified.
151
Runtime Actions
SECTION 9 Animation
A colour can be selected by clicking on one of the palette colours. This
becomes the selected colour, and is denoted as such in the Selected Colour:
field. Alternatively, a colour can be selected by specifying a colour name or
number in the Colour Name: field. The selected colour within the palette can
be mixed by using the red, blue and green scroll bars to the right of the palette.
Each colour in the colour palette is numbered from 0 to 65, number 0 located
in the top-left position of the palette, with numbers reading consecutively
across, then down, with colour number 65 in the bottom-right position of the
palette. Additionally, colour numbers 0 to 19 are named - for instance, colour
number 0 is named "black".
Colours 0 to 15 inclusive are system colours and cannot be mixed. Although it
is possible to mix new colours using the scroll bars, it is not possible to save
such changes from this palette. To ensure new colours are saved, use General
Settings from the Project menu.
Note:
152
Using a 16 colour-based screen resolution (consult the Microsoft Windows
documentation for further information) colours 16 to 65 are dithered from the
sixteen base colours. Higher colour-based resolutions are not dithered.
What is a Recipe?
SECTION 10 Recipes
SECTION 10
Recipes
This chapter describes CX-Supervisor recipes and the procedures associated
with the creation, amendment and removal of recipes using the Recipe Editing
facility. The use of recipes during the running of a project is also described.
10-1
What is a Recipe?
A recipe is a means of preparing a sequence of steps which can be repeated
verbatim as and when required. A typical use for a recipe is to initialise some
point data values prior to the commencement of a particular operation under
the control of a CX-Supervisor project.
A CX-Supervisor recipe consists of one or more ingredients, each of which
relates to a point. Each ingredient assigns a value to a point by means of a
target value.
A suite of CX-Supervisor recipes may be created for any project. In runtime,
the recipes are a great time-saver that eliminate mistakes that may otherwise
be made were the repetitive tasks they perform left to human endeavour.
It is possible to achieve simple point initialisation using the CX-Supervisor
script language. This approach works perfectly well for relatively straightforward applications. However, further functionality is provided using the
recipe system, such as the ability to modify a recipe while the CX-Supervisor
project is being executed in runtime.
10-2
Recipe Components
Before proceeding any further with the description of recipes, some basic
recipe terminology must be introduced:
10-3
•
Recipe. A recipe is a set of pre-defined steps used to perform a particular
task. A CX-Supervisor project may contain none or many. Recipes are
defined in the development environment and executed, or downloaded, in
the runtime environment.
•
Ingredient. Each recipe consists of at least one ingredient. Each
ingredient must be related to an existing point.
•
Target Value. An ingredient must specify a target value for its related point.
This is the value to which the point is set in runtime when the recipe is
downloaded.
•
Validation Code. Recipe validation code is CX-Supervisor script code
which is used to check point values before downloading a recipe.
•
Download. A recipe is downloaded during runtime. This process involves
identifying the appropriate recipe and executing the validation code, if any
exists. The download is complete when each ingredient has set its point
to the target value.
Viewing Recipes in the Recipe Editor
The Recipe Editor allows the creation, editing, copying and deletion of recipe
definitions. To use the Recipe Editor, CX-Supervisor must currently have a
project open. If no project is currently open, select Open from the Project
menu to open a previously saved project, or select New from the Project menu
to create a new project.
To open the Recipe Editor dialog box, click the
button.
153
Creating a New Recipe
SECTION 10 Recipes
Display the Recipe Editor as described in the previous chapter. An example of
the Recipe Editor dialog box is shown below:
Recipes are displayed in three columns: Recipe, Access Level and Validation
Script. Recipes are usually listed in alphabetical order by recipe name,
although the ordering can be changed so that the entries are listed according
to any of the three column titles.
For example, to see the recipes listed alphabetically by security access level,
simply click the Access Level field.
The widths of the recipe fields can be widened or narrowed as required using
the mouse to drag the column boundaries.
Select the Large Icons button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with large icons.
Click the
button to view details with normal icons.
Click the
button to view details as a list.
Click the
button to view details as a list including name, type, expression,
priority and description information. The details can be sorted in ascending
order by clicking once or in descending order by clicking twice, in the
appropriate field.
A summary of recipe information is available by selecting the Recipe
Information button.
The resultant dialog box shows the overall number of recipes in the project. To
exit the dialog box click the Close button. The Recipe Information dialog box is
shown as follows:
10-4
Creating a New Recipe
Open the Recipe Editor as described in chapter 10, Viewing Recipes in the
Recipe Editor. To add a new recipe, click the
button, the Add Recipe
dialog box opens.
154
Creating a New Recipe
SECTION 10 Recipes
When all the information has been provided for the new recipe, selecting the
OK button adds the new recipe definition to the project, while the Cancel
button aborts this add operation.
Note:
The short-cut keyboard combinations for Cut, Copy and Paste operations are
valid within the Add Recipe dialog box. Highlight part or all of a field and type
<Ctrl>+X to cut the text or <Ctrl>+C to copy the text; insert the cursor at the
desired field and type <Ctrl>+V to paste the text. Since the cut and copy
operations store the information in the Windows Clipboard, they may be
pasted to another dialog box or application.
10-4-1 Recipe Configuration Attributes
The name of the recipe is entered in the Recipe Name: field. The recipe name
can be constructed using any alphanumeric characters. This field is visible
from the Recipe Editor dialog box.
A recipe description may be inserted in the Description: field. To start a new
line, press <Ctrl>+<Return>. Any characters are valid and up to 255
characters may be entered in the text field. This field is also visible from the
Recipe Editor dialog box.
10-4-2 Recipe Ingredients
The recipe ingredients are added using the Add Ingredient button in the Add
Recipe dialog box to display the Add Ingredient dialog box, as follows:
155
Creating a New Recipe
SECTION 10 Recipes
Enter a suitable ingredient name in the Ingredient Name: field. This name
should be unique and meaningful and identify the particular ingredient being
added to the recipe.
Enter the name of a point which is initialised by this ingredient in the Link to
Point: field. The adjacent Browse button may be used to display the Select
Required Item dialog box, which provides a list of points from which the
selection may be made. The Select Required Item dialog box also provides an
Add Point button which allows a new point to be added. See also chapter 3,
Points. The Quantity/Expression field is used to define the value which is
assigned to the point by this ingredient. This may be a fixed value, such as 50
as in the above expression, or it may be any valid CX-Supervisor script
language expression featuring one or more point names.
The Editable Value at Runtime setting determines whether the target
expression may be changed at runtime when the recipe is downloaded. Only
expressions featuring a fixed value may be edited in this way; expressions
featuring point names may not be edited at runtime.
Select the OK button to add the ingredient to the recipe, or the Cancel button
to abort this part of the operation.
10-4-3 Recipe Validation
Recipe validation is an optional safety check which may be made in runtime as
the recipe is about to be downloaded. If the validation fails, the recipe is not
downloaded.
If no validation is required, make sure the Validate Recipe Before Download
setting is set to 'OFF'.
If validation is required, check this box and then click the Validation Code
button to display the Script Editor dialog box:
156
Updating an Existing Recipe
SECTION 10 Recipes
Enter the recipe validation code using any standard CX-Supervisor script
language constructs. The validation code should check any possible invalid
point value or error condition. The point value being checked is the value of
the ingredient about to be downloaded, or the current point value if the point is
not an ingredient of the recipe being downloaded.
In the event of a failure, the script language should perform a premature
<Return>. This has the effect of failing the recipe validation check and abort
the attempt to download the recipe.
The recipe validation code should not contain any command which requires
user input (e.g. a Message command). This is because the validation script
would not have been completed (and appropriate action taken) at the time that
user input is requested. Instead, if a message box is required, then a point
should be used as an error status value, and set to an appropriate value. This
point can then be checked in an 'on condition' script and the appropriate
message displayed from there.
If the validation code exits normally, the recipe is downloaded in the normal
way.
10-5
Updating an Existing Recipe
Open the Recipe Editor dialog box as described in chapter 10, Viewing
Recipes in the Recipe Editor.
To modify an existing recipe, highlight the recipe entry from the recipe list and
click the
button.
This results in the Modify Recipe dialog box being displayed, a dialog box
based on the Add Recipe dialog box, as shown below:
157
Copying an Existing Recipe Definition
SECTION 10 Recipes
The selected recipe can be redefined as described in chapter 10, Creating a
New Recipe.
The Modify Ingredient and Delete Ingredient buttons on this dialog box
respectively allow the highlighted ingredient to be modified, or deleted
(following confirmation).
When all the information has been provided for the updated recipe, clicking
the OK button saves the recipe details, while the Cancel button aborts this
modify operation.
10-6
Copying an Existing Recipe Definition
Open the Recipe Editor dialog box, as described in chapter 10, Viewing
Recipes in the Recipe Editor.
To copy an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and then
type <Ctrl>+C. This creates a copy of the recipe definition on the clipboard. To
paste the recipe definition back in to the current project, type <Ctrl>+V. The
cut, copy and paste operations in the Edit menu may also be used. The
Recipe Editor ensures the name of the recipe is unique by appending a
number to the name. For example, if the original recipe name was "Recipe",
the name of the pasted recipe is "Recipe1". All other properties of the pasted
recipe remain the same as the original recipe definition.
It is possible to copy many recipes at once by highlighting all the desired
recipes in the recipe list. Press and hold the <Ctrl> key and use the mouse to
select recipe definitions one by one, or press and hold the <Shift> key and use
the mouse to select blocks of recipe definitions. When the desired recipes
have been highlighted, the recipe definitions may be copied and pasted in the
usual way.
158
Deleting an Existing Recipe
10-7
SECTION 10 Recipes
Deleting an Existing Recipe
Open the Recipe Editor dialog box, as described in chapter 10, Viewing
Recipes in the Recipe Editor.
To remove an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and click
the
button.
A confirmation dialog box opens. Click the Yes button to remove the definition,
or the No button to abort the delete operation.
10-8
Recipe Security Levels
A recipe may be assigned a security level governing which level of users are
allowed to download the recipe in runtime. The available security levels are
shown below in descending order:
•
Designer
•
Manager
•
Supervisor
•
Operator
•
All Users
To assign a security level to a recipe, display the Recipe Editor dialog box.
Then select the recipe to which the security level is applied. With the recipe
highlighted from the list, click the Security Level field on the toolbar.
Select the required security level from the list. The selected security level is
then applied to the recipe. To change the security level, click the Security
Level field again and choose a different security level from the list.
10-9
Printing Recipes
The Recipe Editor can be printed in the same way pages can. Before printing,
ensure that the printer has been set up correctly. To check the printer settings,
refer to chapter 2, Pages.
10-9-1 Print Preview
To preview the page before printing, select Print Preview from the File menu.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print preview display.
10-9-2 Printing
To print the contents of the Recipe Editor, select the Print button.
Refer to chapter 2, Pages regarding the use of the Print dialog box.
It is possible to print the details of a recipe including a list of all the ingredients,
points and expressions which comprise the recipe. To do this, display the
Recipe Editor dialog box as described earlier and then highlight the
appropriate recipe from the list of recipes. Click the Print Recipe button to
send a copy of the recipe to the printer. The recipe is formatted similar to the
following example:
159
Using Recipes in Runtime
SECTION 10 Recipes
Recipe: Coffee(British)
Description: Makes weak, washy, British style coffee.
Access Level: All Users
Ingredient
Point
Expression
Editable
milk(ml)
milk
50
Yes
coffee(g)
coffee
3
Yes
sugar
sugar
0
Yes
water(ml)
water
250
Yes
10-10 Using Recipes in Runtime
Recipes defined using the Recipe Editor in the development environment can
be accessed in runtime using the Recipe Viewer. Recipes may be downloaded
using the Recipe Viewer.
10-10-1 Recipe Viewer
The Recipe Viewer can be displayed in one of two ways in the runtime
environment. It may be displayed by any CX-Supervisor script code attached,
for example, to a button. The function call is simply 'DisplayRecipes()'.
The Recipe Viewer may also be displayed using the floating menu. The
floating menu needs to be configured to display the Recipes option. This is
done in the development environment and explained in chapter 6, Projects.
The Recipes dialog box opens:
The Recipe Viewer is similar to the Recipe Editor, however there are some
differences in functionality and appearance:
To remove an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and click
the
button. A confirmation dialog box opens. Click the Yes button to
remove the definition, or the No button to abort the delete operation. Note that
recipes created in the development environment may not be deleted in the
runtime environment. The delete operation only affects recipes copied and
saved in the runtime environment.
To modify an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and click
the
button. The Modify Recipe dialog box opens:
160
Using Recipes in Runtime
SECTION 10 Recipes
This runtime version of the dialog box is rather more limited in the power it
offers than the equivalent dialog box in the development environment; this is
so that recipes which have been painstakingly created in the development
environment cannot be accidentally overwritten or destroyed in the runtime
environment. The two buttons unique to the Runtime of the dialog box are
Modify Target and Save Recipe As.
With the appropriate ingredient selected from the list, clicking the Modify
Target button allows the target value to be modified by means of the Modify
Ingredient dialog box, shown below:
The target value for this ingredient may be changed by entering the new value
in the New Target: field. Selecting the OK button accepts the change, choosing
the Cancel button aborts the change.
Note:
The new target value is applied only to this recipe download. No permanent
change is made to the recipe definition itself.
The Save Recipe As button displays a simple dialog box prompting for a
name to use for the new recipe.
Clicking the OK button creates a new recipe with the name specified.
Choosing the Cancel button aborts the save operation. A recipe created using
this dialog box is added to the available list of entries displayed in the recipe
dialog box. The newly saved recipe is also available in the development
environment using the Recipe Editor.
161
Using Recipes in Runtime
SECTION 10 Recipes
Note that it is possible to change the name of an existing recipe in runtime
simply by typing a new name in the Recipe Name: field of the Modify Recipe
dialog box and then clicking the OK button. The re-named recipe appears in
the available list of entries displayed in the Recipes dialog box and is also
available in the development environment using the Recipe Editor.
To download an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and
click the
button. See chapter 10, Downloading a Recipe for more
information.
To upload an existing recipe, highlight the recipe from the recipe list and click
the
button. See chapter 10, Uploading a Recipe for more information.
Click the
button to send a copy of the recipe to the printer. See chapter 10,
Printing Recipes for a typical example of the formatted output.
A summary of recipe information is available by click the
button. The
Recipe Information dialog box opens (see chapter 10, Viewing Recipes in the
Recipe Editor for an example).
10-10-2 Downloading a Recipe
There are two ways of downloading a recipe definition in runtime. The first
method is to use a CX-Supervisor script function attached to a graphical object
on a page, such as a push button. The function call is:
DownLoadRecipe("<NameOfRecipe>")
The other way to download a recipe, is to display the Recipe Viewer as
described in the previous chapter. Highlight the desired recipe from the recipe
list and click the
button. The Download Recipe dialog box opens:
The Modify Target button allows the target value for an ingredient to be
modified by means of the Modify Ingredient dialog box (shown above). An
ingredient must already be selected from the list of ingredients for this recipe.
Any change to the target value is of a temporary nature and is not permanently
changed in the recipe definition. Any number of ingredients may be modified in
this way before the recipe is downloaded.
Selecting the OK button attempts to download the recipe. If for some reason
the recipe definition can't be found, the following error message appears:
"Unable to find recipe".
One recipe download must be completed before another recipe download is
started. If a recipe download is already in progress when another is started,
the following error message appears: "A recipe download is currently in
progress".
If any validation code has been entered for this recipe, the validation is
conducted first. If the validation is successful, the recipe is downloaded. If the
validation fails, the recipe is not downloaded and the following error message
appears: "Unable to download selected recipe".
162
Using Recipes in Runtime
SECTION 10 Recipes
If there is no validation code to execute, the recipe is downloaded anyway.
The download process consists of setting each ingredient to its specified
target value.
The download may fail at this stage if there are problems communicating with
a PLC. A communications failure results in the error message "Downloading
recipe failed". A delay in response from the PLC of more than one minute
results in the error message "Recipe transfer timed out".
When the recipe download is complete, all the ingredients are saved and the
CX-Supervisor runtime environment continues to run in the normal manner. An
event is logged stating that the recipe was successfully downloaded.
10-10-3 Uploading a Recipe
There are two ways of uploading a recipe definition in runtime. The first
method is to use a CX-Supervisor script function attached to a graphical object
on a page, such as a push button. The function call is:
UpLoadRecipe("<NameOfRecipe>")
The other way to upload a recipe, is to display the Recipe Viewer as described
in the previous chapter. Highlight the desired recipe from the recipe list and
click the
button. The Modify/Save Upload Recipe dialog box opens:
The Modify Target button allows the target value for an ingredient to be
modified by means of the Modify Ingredient dialog box. An ingredient must
already be selected from the list of ingredients for this recipe. Any change to
the target value is saved in the recipe definition. Any number of ingredients
may be modified in this way when the recipe is uploaded.
Selecting the OK button will upload the recipe. If for some reason the recipe
definition can't be found, the following error message appears: "The recipe
failed its validation checks. Upload aborted".
Each recipe upload must be completed before another can be started. If a
recipe upload is already in progress when another is started, the following
error message appears: "A recipe Upload or Download is currently in
progress".
The upload may fail at this stage if there are problems communicating with a
PLC. A communications failure results in the error message "Uploading recipe
failed". A delay in response from the PLC of more than one minute results in
the error message "Recipe transfer timed out".
163
Using Recipes in Runtime
SECTION 10 Recipes
When the recipe upload is complete, all the ingredients are saved and the CXSupervisor runtime environment continues to run in the normal manner. An
event is logged stating that the recipe was successfully uploaded.
164
What is Data Logging
SECTION 11 Data Logging
SECTION 11
Data Logging
This chapter describes the CX-Supervisor data logging facilities including how
to configure items to be logged, the logging of data and the viewing and
exporting of recorded data.
11-1
What is Data Logging
The concept of the Data Logger is the ability to define a number of points and
expressions during development which may be recorded while the CXSupervisor project is being executed in runtime. These events may be viewed
at runtime and recorded for future evaluation. They may also be exported to
other programs such as Microsoft Excel.
The recorded events are stored in one or more Data Sets, which can then be
viewed using the Data Log Viewer. The events to be recorded are defined by
the developer and any number of Data Sets may be used to record specific
areas or types of events either automatically at runtime or as specified by the
developer.
As an aid to viewing a number of particular events in isolation Data Sets can
be subdivided into data Groups. Specific areas of related data can then be
stored in these groups which can then be viewed either singly or with other
groups within a Data Set.
The main elements of the CX-Supervisor Data Logger are:
11-2
•
Data Logger Editor: used to configure items to be logged
•
Data Logging at Runtime: the actual logging of the data
•
Data Log Viewer: used to view the logged data
•
Remote Data Viewer: enables viewing separately from the runtime system
•
Data Log Export facility: enables export to other programs (e.g. MS Excel)
•
Script Functions: gives full control over the logging process
Data Log Editor
11-2-1 Configuring Data Sets and Logging Settings
The Data Sets, data Groups and Items to log are configured from the Logging
Tab at the bottom of the Development Workspace editor. Items are edited
using a right mouse-button context sensitive menu. The option available from
the menu are:
•
Edit: enable the parameters of the selected Data Set, Group or Item to be
edited.
•
Cut, Copy, and Paste: enables the selected Item to be cut or copied and
then pasted into a Data Set or Group.
•
Delete: will delete the selected entry.
•
Add DataSet, Add Group and Add Item: enables new Data Sets, Groups
and Items to be added to the selected entry.
165
Data Log Editor
SECTION 11 Data Logging
The functionality of the Items is determined by their expression. If the
expression is a single point name, the item is shown as the same type as the
point as configured in the point editor, i.e. memory, input, output or input/
output. If the expression contains calculations, constants and/or multiple point
names, the item is shown as a script calculation.
11-2-2 Adding/Editing Data Set Properties
The Add/Modify Data Set properties dialog box opens when either the Add
Data Set or the Edit (an existing Data Set) option is selected from the menu.
11-2-2-1 Data Set Properties
The Data Set Name field enables the Data Set to be referenced with a
meaningful description both in the Workspace view, and also from the script
language. It also forms the prefix for the file name. A maximum of 26
characters is allowed.
The Period fields allow a period to be entered in Hours, Days, or Months and
defines the period of data to be grouped into a single file. For example, if the
Period is set to 1 month, any data logged for the current month is saved to the
same data file, even when the system is stopped and restarted. When logging
spans a Month boundary the data file is closed, and a new file started and
given sequential file name. This allows easy archiving and backup of the
logged data. The start of a new data file is always synchronised to a natural
boundary, e.g. for months - the 1st of the month, for days - 24.00 hours and for
hours - on the hour.
The No. Of Files to Keep entry determines the maximum number of data files
that are to be kept. When the number of files kept has reached the value
entered, as each new file is created the oldest file is deleted. For example, to
166
Data Log Editor
SECTION 11 Data Logging
keep process data for 2 years, you could keep 24 files of 1 month period. The
file names are generated automatically based on the Data Set name, plus a
suffix which is incremented by one as each new file is generated.
If the Keep all Files option is checked the data files management is disabled
and no files will be deleted.
The Start Logging on Application Startup checkbox controls the logging of the
Data Set. When selected, all the Items in the Data Set start logging when the
system is started, and stop logging when the system is stopped. If this option
is not selected, then logging must be controlled by the Start/Stop logging script
functions as required by the developer.
11-2-3 Editing Item Properties
The Add/Modify Item properties dialog box is shown when adding a new
Item, or editing an existing one.
11-2-3-1 Item Properties
These options enable an items name and associated expression to be
entered. Its data type can be selected and if required a deadband value can be
applied to the measured value.
The Item Name field allows the Item to be given a meaningful name. The entry
should be kept short but also be logical for clarification. A maximum of 26
characters is allowed.
The Expression field defines the point name or expression that will be logged.
The Browse button allows easy point selection. For details on how
expressions or points are formulated Refer to chapter 3, Points.
The Data Type field determines the type of data to be logged. Select either
Boolean, Integer or Real. For points, this is automatically picked up from the
points database. For expressions, the required type must be selected.
The Deadband field enables a percentage limit or 'Deadband' to be applied to
the logging expression. This allows the value of the expression to change
within the percentage limit without being logged. This is particularly useful
when logging analogue values which are subject to noise. Each sample is
checked (when the value changes for 'On Change' sampling, or every log
period for 'On Interval') against the last logged value. While the value varies
167
Data Log Editor
SECTION 11 Data Logging
within the deadband, the values are ignored. Immediately the value exceeds
the deadband limits the new value will be logged. This may dramatically
reduce file size, and ease analysis.
Entering a value of 0%, i.e. no deadband, will cause every sample to be
logged.
11-2-3-2 Sample Rate
The sample rate options are used to determine how data will be recorded,
select either on change or on interval. The default is interval.
When the On Change option is selected data will be logged only when the
value actually changes. This ensures all transient information is logged - even
if changes occur faster than maximum sample rate, and also ensures periods
of inactivity do not generate duplicated data.
The On Interval sample rate option enables the data values to be logged at
regular intervals. Enter the interval as a number and from the pick list select
the form, e.g. '5 Second'. This method guarantees the value is checked and
recorded at every interval. However transients occurring between sample
periods are not recorded, which depending on the application may be a
benefit.
11-2-3-3 Scale
The scale fields enable the graph upper and lower limits to be set and a scale
label entered for the selected item.
Enter the Minimum value as the lower limit to be shown on the graph for this
item.
Enter the Maximum value as the upper limit to be shown on the graph for this
item.
Enter the Scale Label to be displayed. This is a text field the contents of which
are displayed by the Y scale of the graph. The entry should be kept short but
also be logical for clarification.
11-2-4 Editing Items
11-2-4-1 Copy, Cut, Paste Options
The Copy, Cut and Paste options follow the windows convention and enable a
selected Item to be copied or cut from one Data Set Group and then pasted
into another. As Item names within a Data Set must be unique, when a copied
Item is pasted back into the same Data Set the name is given a numerical
suffix.
New or existing Items can be renamed and have their parameters edited by
high lighting the Item and then selecting the Edit option from the popup menu.
When the Modify Item dialog box appears edit the appropriate parameters in
the normal way.
11-2-4-2 Adding/Renaming Groups
The adding or renaming of Data Set groups follows the windows convention.
New Groups are added by selecting the Data Set to which the group is to be
added and then selecting the Add Group option from the popup menu. The
new Group is automatically placed in the correct position in the Data Set and
given a default group number. New or existing Groups can be renamed by first
high lighting the current group name and then selecting the Edit option from
the popup menu. When the edit box opens the name can then be edited in the
normal way. A maximum of 26 characters is allowed.
168
Data Logging at Runtime
SECTION 11 Data Logging
Unwanted groups can only be Deleted, they can not be cut or pasted.
11-3
Data Logging at Runtime
All data logging is performed on Items, which are stored in a Data Set. The
System can contain many Data Sets and each Data Set can contain many
Items. Each Data Set will have its own set of files when the System is run (see
the chapter 11, File Management). The amount of data that is stored in a
single Data Set file is determined by the specified period when the Data Set is
created.
11-3-1 File Management
11-3-1-1 Data Logging Directory
All data log files are stored in the directory "Data Logging" separate from the
CX-Supervisor files. This directory is created automatically when the project
runs for the first time. A sub-directory is used as a safeguard against the
accidental deletion of important files by the automatic purge mechanism and
to prevent the project directory from becoming cluttered with data files.
For example, if the CX-Supervisor project is in a directory called C:\CXSupervisor\Project then, when the project runs for the first time a new directory
called C:\CX-Supervisor\Project\Data Logging will be created to hold the data
log files.
11-3-1-2 Data Logging Files
Each Data Set has its own set of files. The following conventions have been
adopted in order to identify the various files and add time and date information.
Data Log files are assigned the file extension .dlv "Data Log Values" and the
format of the filename is:
<Data Set Name><Time Stamp>.dlv
The Time Stamp is in the format: [YYYY MM DD HH]"
where:
YYYY = Year in the form 1999
MM = Month in the form 01 (January)
DD = Day of the month in the form 01 - 31
HH = Hours in the form 00 -23
Daylight time saving is automatic.
For example:
Data Set 1 Miller[1999012015].dlv
A new log file is automatically created when the preceding file has expired the
timestamp. The timestamp is also used to distinguish between files in the
same Data Set. The time period for each file is determined by the options
selected when the Data Set was created. The minimum time period for a Data
Set file is one hour commencing on the hour.
Note:
Do not rename any log files while they are in the Data Logging directory or the
File Management System will not work correctly. The File Management
System relies on the strict format of the Data Log files to determine which file
to open as Live and which file(s) to delete during purging and also for
performing 'previous/next' file searches in the Data Log Viewer.
Note:
Additional files should never be copied into the Data Logging directory as the
automatic purging mechanism may delete all the log files.
169
Data Logging at Runtime
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-3-1-3 Number of files in a Data Set
When a Data Set starts logging a file will be created to hold the logged items,
this file is known as a 'Live' or 'Active' log file (There is only one Live file in a
Data Set file set). When the time period for a Data Set log file expires a new
file is created with a more recent Timestamp, this file then becomes the 'Live'
file and the previous file is now known as a 'Dead' log file. Over a period of
time there can be many 'Dead' files in a Data Set but only one live one. If a
limit has been set on the number of dead files to be kept when this number is
reached the oldest file will be purged automatically as each new file is created.
The number of dead files to be kept for a particular Data Set is managed
automatically by specifying the 'Number of Files to Keep' from the Data Set
Properties Parameters when a Data Set is created. This field is only enabled
when the 'Keep all files' check box is 'unchecked'.
Note:
There will always be one Live file for each Data Set.
For example, if the number of files to keep is set to 24 then there the system
will keep 24 Dead files and one Live file, i.e. 25 files in total.
Caution:
No backups are taken when a file is purged. If you wish to keep any data you
must ensure that backups are taken before purging occurs.
If the Keep all files check box is checked no automatic purging will take place
and the System will store all the Dead files created until the disk is full.
Dead files can be copied, moved, deleted etc. as they will not be written to
again by the System.
Live files may be copied (i.e. backed up to another directory) while the Log file
is open but they cannot be moved or deleted as they are locked by the
System. In order to delete or move a live file it must first be closed. See
Opening and Closing Log Files.
11-3-1-4 Invalid Data Log Files
Data log files generated during one project sessions will continue to be used in
subsequent sessions, if they are still live. For example, if a system runs during
the day and is shut down at night, then a Data Set with a duration of 7 days will
use the same file for the whole 7 days.
If a session is halted and Data Set Items changed, deleted or new ones added
it is not valid to continue using the existing file. When the session is restarted
and Data Set file opened CX-Supervisor checks to see if there are any
differences between the current Data Set and the Data Set stored in the file. If
any differences are detected the System will mark the existing file as invalid by
altering the Timestamp brackets from "[ ]" to "{{ }}" and create a new file.
For example, if a file Batch1[2000032922].dlv is detected as being invalid it
will be renamed Batch1{{2000032922}}.dlv. A new Batch1[2000032922].dlv
file will then be created to log the new data.
If the file Batch1{{2000032922}}.dlv already exists then the current invalid file
will be renamed Batch1{{2000032922}}_1.dlv and so on.
This is most likely to occur during the development of an application when
Data items are continually being amended and tested.
Invalid files are not part of the Data Set files and can not be purged or found by
the File Management 'next' or 'previous' searches. The data recorded in these
files is not lost and can be viewed using the Data Log Viewer and exported
from them using Export Log. Invalid files can only be deleted using Windows
explorer.
170
Data Logging at Runtime
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-3-1-5 Data Set Period Examples
The following examples show how the specified period (Hour(s), Day(s),
Month(s)) is implemented while the System is running:
1. Data Set period = Hours
If a Data Set named CV500 starts logging at 12:30 on the 7th March 1999
with a period of 6 hours, the following files will be created:
CV500[1999030712].dlv
If the s7stem is left running the Data Logging directory will contain the
following files:
CV500[1999030712].dlv
CV500[1999030718].dlv
CV500[1999030800].dlv
CV500[1999030806].dlv
….
….
The first file will only contain 5.5 hours of Data because the minimum
resolution is one hour and the file was created on the half-hour, all
subsequent files will contain the full six hours of data.
2. Data Set period = Days
If a Data Set named Batch1 starts logging at 23:00 on the 29th December
1999 with a period of 1 Day, the following files will be created:
Batch1[1999122923].dlv
If the system is left running the Data Logging directory will contain the
following files:
Batch1[1999122923].dlv
Batch1[1999123000].dlv
Batch1[1999123100].dlv
Batch1[2000010100].dlv
….
….
The first file will only contain 1 hour of data, all subsequent files contain
the full 24 hours of data.
3. Data Set period = Months
If a Data Set named Shifts starts logging at 22:00 on 29th February 2000
with a period of 2 Months, the following file will created:
Shifts1[2000032922].dlv
If the system is left running the Data Logging directory will contain the
following files:
Shifts[2000050100].dlv
Shifts[2000070100].dlv
….
….
The first file will only contain 1 month and 2 hours of data, all subsequent files
contain the full 2 Months of data.
11-3-2 Data Records
There are two types of records that are stored in a Data Log file for each Item
logged these are Events (or breaks) and the Actual Data.
171
Data Log Viewer Component (v2.0 and v1.8)
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-3-2-1 Event/Break Records
Event records currently consist of the following fields:
Event, Date, Time
Event = Open | Close | Clear | Start | Stop
Events have no associated data
11-3-2-2 Data Records
Data records currently consist of the following fields:
Type, Date, Time, Milliseconds, Data
Type = Normal | Error
Data = Boolean | Integer | Real
11-4
Data Log Viewer Component (v2.0 and v1.8)
11-4-1 Invoking the Data Log Viewer
The Data Log Viewer can be invoked by
•
Selecting Data Log Viewer from the popup menu (if privileged) in the
runtime.
•
From script function 'OpenLogView' with the Data Set and Traces to show
as arguments, and also closed by 'CloseLogView' script function.
•
From an external program.
11-4-2 Viewing Logged Files
In CX-Supervisor 3.0 the Data Log Viewer was significantly enhanced with lots
of new features. For systems that do not support version 3.5 of the.NET
Framework, like Windows 2000, the old Data Log Viewer can continue to be
used.
11-4-2-1 Data Log Viewer 2.0
Version 2.0 of Data Log Viewer looks like this:
172
Data Log Viewer Component (v2.0 and v1.8)
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-4-2-2 New Features:
The basic functionality remains largely the same however the following
features are new to version 2.0 of the Data Log Viewer.
•
Modern User Interface - The user interface has a modern look and feel.
•
Better Zoom and Pan Control - Features include double click to zoom in
on a specific point on the graph, ability to zoom a specific area of the graph
and the ability to grab and move the graph around (i.e. left, right, up or
down).
•
Data Table View - A data table view allows instantaneous values to be
displayed based on a 'cursor' position on the graph.
•
Improved Cursors - Horizontal and Vertical cursors can be used to analyse
the data. Where a cursor intersects the data the value will be displayed in
the Data Table view.
•
Y Offset - Ability to quickly and easily scale data to make it easier to read.
•
X Offset - Ability to overlay data (i.e. overlay one week on another week).
•
Snapshot as JPEG - A screen shot of the Data log Viewer display,
including all visible trend data, can be saved as an image file (.JPG).
•
Support for Comma Separated Files - Ability to open and view data from
comma separated files (.CSV).
•
Support for Database Files - Ability to open and view data from database
files (.MDB).
•
Multiple File Support - Ability to view large amounts of data spanned
across multiple files (e.g. 1 year) on the same graph.
For more details refer to the Data Log Viewer online help.
11-4-3 Data Log Viewer 1.8
Data Log Viewer 1.8 looks like this:
173
Data Log Viewer Component (v2.0 and v1.8)
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-4-3-1 Features:
174
•
The Data Set viewed is the name passed as an argument with the script
function, or a user-selected Data Set.
•
On start-up, a dialog box allowing selection of traces to view from the Data
Set will be shown. Up to 10 analogue traces and 50 digital traces may be
shown at once. Alternatively, script parameters can be used to
automatically select the traces to show.
•
On display, the viewer displays:
•
the latest data file for this Data Set
•
the X axis set to the Data Set's period
•
Y Axis set to full scale for the first trace.
•
The selected analogue traces are shown overlaid.
•
Boolean points are displayed in a separate view
•
The X Axis shows true Date and Time, as the local time on the logging
system. Remote analysis within different time zones will show the same
dates and times. Logging of local time means adjustment of PC time and
daylight saving are handled.
•
Key shows trace colour, name, and value at the cursor. Selected trace has
a ">" before the name. Clicking on other trace details selects other traces.
•
Scale shows Minimum value, Maximum value and scale label of selected
trace, with intermediate scales.
•
A cursor allows data to be read off the graph. Pressing Ctrl and cursor
keys allows moving between logged data.
•
A Zoom In and Zoom Out facility (Time and Range), plus X & Y axis
scrolling, are available.
•
'Previous' ( ) and 'Next' (
next time period.
) buttons load data files for the previous and
•
The 'Refresh' button reloads the file from disk.
•
A 'Live' option is used to show the latest data, and keep it up to date.
•
Data can be exported to CSV files or to text.
•
The current screen can be printed, or print previewed, in colour.
Remote Data Log Viewer
SECTION 11 Data Logging
•
11-5
The traces shown using trace selection dialog box as shown initially can
be changed using the "Select item" facility.
Remote Data Log Viewer
Data log files are not restricted to a machine that has CX-Supervisor installed
on it. CX-Supervisor is supplied with a "Data Log Viewer" application that
enables all the View and Export facilities (with the exception of Live updates)
to be carried out on .dlv files that have been transferred to a stand alone
machine.
11-6
Data Log Export Facilities
11-6-1 Exporting Data via the Export Dialog
All the export facilities described in the ExportLog function can be carried out
from the Export dialog box, which can be invoked from the CX-Supervisor right
menu, script or the Data Log Viewer:
Options include the following:
USE GENERATED FILES
If this option is checked, then filenames will be automatically created,
otherwise a "Save File As" dialog box will be displayed.
EXPORT TYPE
Controls whether export should be as comma-separated values files or as
text.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION TO EXPORT
Controls whether breaks, date, time and milliseconds are exported.
11-6-2 Generation of Comma Separated (CSV) Files
Both the ExportLog script function and the Export Dialog use the following
conventions for automatically generating comma-separated values files for
export:
All generated CSV filenames will contain at least the <Data Set name> +
<timestamp> and a .CSV extension. CSV is a format that is recognised
directly by spreadsheet packages such as Excel and can therefore be opened
and viewed with this application.
e.g.MyData Set1999011214.csv
No [ ] characters are used in the timestamp. This is for two reasons:
175
Data Log Export Facilities
SECTION 11 Data Logging
A.Applications like Excel seem to complain about them being there.
B.Less likely to be confused will .dlv files during searches/purges
During the generation of files then obviously duplication of names can occur.
To avoid this the following convention is used:
"_nnn" will be appended to any duplicate filenames, to make them unique,
where nnn = 1 to 999. (If you run out numbers the export will fail, tidying up will
remedy the problem).
Generated names depend on whether a single item, or multiple items, are
selected for export:
11-6-3 Single Selections
If a single item is selected for export i.e. "Item3" in the root directory of
"MyData Set" then the following file will be generated:
MyData Set1999011214Item3.csv
11-6-4 Multiple Selections
On Interval Items
If a multiple selection of "on interval" items with the same interval is made then
the name of the parent directory will be used e.g. if the items live in "Group1"
the following file will be generated:
MyData Set1999011214Group1.csv
The file will contain a column for each item selected and they will share the
Date and Time fields.
Note:
The milliseconds field will only be valid for one of the Items, and should
therefore be filtered out for this type of grouping.
If a multiple selection of "on interval" items, with different intervals is made
then any items with the same interval will be grouped together in the same file.
The same convention will be used as above except using the duplicate
filenames rules described above. If an item does not share any interval with
any other Item then its name will be used in the filename.
For example:
If Items "I1", "I2", "I3", "I4", "I5", "I6" are selected from Group1 of Data Set
MyData Set and Items "I1", "I3" & "I6" share intervals and "I2" and "I5" share a
different interval then the following files will be generated.
MyData Set1999011210Group1.csv contains "I1", "I3" &
"I6"
MyData Set1999011210Group1_1.csvcontains "I2" & "I5"
MyData Set1999011210I4.csvcontains "I4"
11-6-4-1 On Change Items
All on change items will have their own filename generated regardless of any
multiple selections made, because it is not possible to determine any common
time interval with these type of Items.
If a multiple selection of 'On Interval' and 'On Change' Items is made then the
above conventions still apply.
176
Data Logging
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-6-5 Generation of Text Files
Whereas CSV files only contain limited information e.g. Breaks, Date, Time,
Milliseconds and Value, Text files contains all the information stored on
selected Items/Groups i.e. the expression, label, deadband etc. The multiple
selection rules apply as described in the previous paragraph, with the
exception that On Change items can be grouped together.
11-7
Data Logging
As well as the inbuilt datalogging features, it is also possible to log data
directly to an existing Database. This provides direct storage of data in third
party format, allowing for easy analysis using familiar tools, and there is no
need for scripts to export data. However slower speed means logging to a
database may be unsuitable for tasks with large data throughput or high
logging speed. Also, unlike the standard Datalog files, there is no standalone
viewer for instant viewing. The ADO interface used to access Data Sources
does not provide any mechanism for creating Databases or Tables, therefore,
it is not possible to automatically create a data source. Unpopulated data
sources for use in Database Logging, must first be created using the specific
software for your choice of data source e.g. "MS-Access".
To configure CX-Supervisor to log to a database:
•
Create an 'unpopulated' data source or 'template' for use in Database
logging.
•
Create a Database connection in the Workspace Database editor to the
database created above. Add a recordset with a read/write lock, and fields
with 'Field Property' configured as 'Add' so records can be added.
•
Create a Database Link in the Workspace Logging editor, by selecting
'Add Db Link…' from the popup menu to show the Add Database Link
dialog box.
•
Create Field Links for each field to log by selecting 'Add Db Field…' from
the popup menu to show the Add Field Link dialog box.
11-7-1 Add Database Link Dialog
The Add Database Link dialog box show below is show when the 'Add Db
Link…' menu option is selected from the Data Log editor, and the identical
Modify Database Link dialog box when the 'Edit' menu is selected.
11-7-1-1 Link Name
For convenience, a unique Database Link name is created automatically. This
can be changed to give a more meaningful description, if required.
177
Data Logging
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-7-1-2 Connection
Select the Database Connection to link to from the list showing configured
Database connections.
11-7-1-3 Recordset
Select the Recordset to create a link to from the list showing Recordsets
configured in the selected Connection.
11-7-1-4 Sample Rate
Select whether field links defined within this Database Link are logged when
their expression changes or on a regular interval, for example every 30
seconds.
11-7-1-5 Start Logging on Application Startup
When unchecked, logging must be started and stopped using script
commands. When checked, the logging of all associated fields starts
automatically when the application is started.
11-7-2 Add Field Link Dialog
The Add Field Link dialog box show below is show when the 'Add Field Link…'
menu option is selected from the Data Log editor, and the identical Modify
Field Link dialog box when the 'Edit' menu is selected.
11-7-2-1 Name
For convenience, a unique Field Link name is created automatically. This can
be changed to give a more meaningful description, if required.
11-7-2-2 Field Link
Select the Field to link to from the list showing fields configured in the chosen
Recordset.
11-7-2-3 Expression
Enter the point name or expression that will be logged. The Browse button
allows easy point selection.
11-7-2-4 Data Type
Set the type of the data to be stored. For a point, this is automatically set to the
same as the point type when selected using the Browse button. However, for
an expression this must be specified, for example, an expression $Second / 3
will create a Real value, but the required data may be just the integer part, so
the Data Type would be set to Integer.
178
Data Logging
SECTION 11 Data Logging
11-7-2-5 Deadband
This allows the value of the expression to change within the percentage limit
without being logged. This is particularly useful when logging analogue values
that are subject to noise. Each sample is checked (when the value changes for
'On Change' sampling, or every log period for 'On Interval') against the last
logged value. While the value varies within the deadband, the values are
ignored. When the value exceeds the deadband limits the new value will be
logged. This may dramatically reduce file size, and ease analysis.
Entering a value of 0%, i.e. no dead band, will cause every sample to be
logged.
11-7-2-6 Trigger on change of value
This option is only used when the Sample Rate is set to 'On Change'. When
unchecked, every time the expression changes a new record is written. If a
record consists of many fields that may be read or calculated at different times,
a new record is written every time any one field changes. However, the
desired action may be to change several fields, and then log the new values to
a single record. To achieve this action, the 'Trigger on change of value' should
be checked for all fields within a record that may be read or calculated at
different times. Only when all checked fields have been changed is the record
logged. If however, while waiting for remaining fields to change before writing,
a field is changed for a second time, the record is written with all current field
values including unchanged fields, before the field value is changed for a
second time.
Note:
There is a risk when using fields with 'Trigger on change of value' checked that
the new value of a field may not actually change its value i.e. the new value
happens to be the same as the old value. Because the field has not changed,
the record is not written until the value is changed again. This can produce
unexpected results as fields with 'Trigger on change of value' unchecked are
written with their current values at the time of writing, not the value at the time
of initial change. This may also occur when a Deadband is used.
179
Data Logging
180
SECTION 11 Data Logging
Database Connection Editor
SECTION 12 Databases
SECTION 12
Databases
CX-Supervisor Database facilities provide fast, transparent access to many
different data sources, via a database technology called ADO. Database
design is not covered here, as it is a large subject explained fully in any of the
many books available. It is assumed that developers using these database
facilities have a working knowledge of databases. Comprehensive Database
Script Functions allow complete database access.
The data sources which can be accessed depends on the Data Providers
installed, but may include:
12-1
•
MS-Access
•
MS-Excel
•
Visual FoxPro
•
dBase
•
ODBC for Oracle
•
Paradox
•
SQL Server
•
Text files (in TXT and CSV format)
Database Connection Editor
The Database connection editor in the Development Workspace, enables
users to create Connections, Recordsets, Field association, Parameter
association and Schema objects in a familiar Tree View (hierarchical) format,
using the popup menu.
This editor is unique in CX-Supervisor, in that actual database connections
can be tested online in the Development Environment. The ability to connect
online also has the added benefit of providing assistance in creating objects
lower down in the hierarchy. This editor has been designed to enable a large
proportion of the database functionality, to be performed automatically (i.e.
without the need for Script functions), although a comprehensive set of
Database Script functions are available.
181
Configuring a Connection
12-2
SECTION 12 Databases
Configuring a Connection
Connections to existing databases are added to the Workspace by using a
right mouse-button context sensitive menu option 'Add Connection…' which
invokes the Add/Modify Database connection dialog box. They can be
modified later by selecting the 'Edit…' option from the menu.
12-2-1 Add/Modify Database connection dialog box
The Add Connection dialog box show below is show when the 'Add
Connection…' menu option is selected from the Database connection editor,
and the identical Modify Connection dialog box when the 'Edit' menu is
selected.
12-2-1-1 Name
For convenience, a unique Connection name is created automatically. This
can be changed to give a more meaningful description of the connection, if
required.
12-2-1-2 Data Source
Enter the database file to be used as a Data Source, or locate using the
Browse button. The following data source file types are supported:
•
MS-Access Files (*.mdb)
•
MS-Excel Files (*.xls)
•
Text Files (*.txt, *.csv)
•
FoxPro Files (*.dbf)
•
Data Source Names (*.dsn)
A Data Source Name file stores information about a database connection in a
file. See Creating a Data Source Name file for more information.
182
Note:
Note: Connecting to CSV or Text files is slightly different from an actual
Database connection. Only the 'Directory' that contains the required files
should be supplied as a Data Source - if a file is selected, the connection will
fail. The actual file to be used is specified later when configuring the
Recordset. For example, if a collection of text or csv files are contained in the
directory C:\Text then a valid connection 'Data Source' is "C:\Text\".
Note:
Note: Connections to CSV or Text files using the Provider installed with ADO
version 2.0 are read only. Records can not be added or amended. To create a
read/write connection to a CSV or Text file see chapter 12, Creating a Read/
Write connection to CSV/Text file.
Note:
Note: Connections to Excel files using the Provider installed with ADO version
2.0 are read only. Records can not be added or amended. To create a read/
write connection to an Excel file see chapter 12, Creating a Read/Write
connection to an Excel file.
Configuring a Connection
SECTION 12 Databases
12-2-1-3 Connect on Application Start-up
The checkbox 'Connect on Application Start-up' provides the option of
automatically connecting to the Database when the Runtime application is
started.
12-2-1-4 Advanced
Shows the Connection String dialog box, allowing the automatically generated
connection string to be manually edited.
12-2-2 Testing Connections in the Development Environment
A connection to a Database can be made in the Development Environment by
selecting the required Connection in the Tree View and then selecting the
right-menu option 'Connect'. If a Connection contains Recordsets that are set
to auto open, these will also be opened by the 'Connect' option. If all goes well
and a valid connection is made, the Database Connection Icon will be adorned
with a 'lightning bolt'. If not, then this is probably due to an error in the
'Connection String'.
12-2-3 Database Errors
A detailed description of what type of error occurred (supplied by the
underlying Data Provider) can be viewed, by clicking that the right-menu
option 'Show Last Error'. Whenever an error is generated by a Data Provider a
description of the error and its source will be displayed in a Dialog. The 'Show
Last Error' option is specific to each Connection.
Example: The following error was generated by the 'Jet Database Engine'
(due to a typo in the Database name):
12-2-4 Database Connection String dialog box
Connection to a Database is performed by means of a 'Connection String'.
Because different Data Providers require different information to connect you
to a data store, these strings can be quite complex and cumbersome. For this
reason CX-Supervisor will automatically create a valid connection string for
your selected data source (if it's supported). This string can be viewed and
modified via the Connection String dialog box shown below, when 'Advanced'
is pressed on the Add/Modify Database Connection dialog box.
183
Configuring a Connection
SECTION 12 Databases
If your data source is not supported, or you have your own drivers for a
particular database, the 'Connection String' can be modified using this dialog
box (consult your database documentation for the required connection string).
12-2-4-1 User Id and Passwords
If a connection to a database requires a user id or password, this can be
supplied by means of the connection string, which can be modified via the
Advanced Dialog as follows:
If you make a mistake while editing the 'connection string', the original string
can be restored by selecting the 'Build Connection String' button. A new
connection string will also be built automatically each time a change of Data
Source is made.
12-2-4-2 Example Connection Strings
Listed below are some example connections strings for the listed providers:
Jet
"Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.3.5.1; Data
Source=c:\dbname.mdb"
SQL Server
"Provider=SQLOLEDB; Data Source=server_name; Initial
Catalog=dbname; User Id=user_id; Password=user_password"
Index Server "Provider=MSIDXS; Data Source=catalog_name"
DSN
"DSN=data_source_name"
FILEDSN
"FILEDSN=filename.dsn"
MSDASQL
"Driver={Microsoft Excel Driver (*.xls)};
DBQ=c:\Database\Invdb.xls"
12-2-4-3 Data providers installed with ADO V2.0
184
Type
Provider Name
Description
Jet 3.51
Microsoft.Jet.OLE For Microsoft Access databases
DB.3.51
Directory
Services
ADSDSOObject
For resource data stored, such as Active
Directory, this will become more important
when NT5.0 is available.
Configuring a Connection
SECTION 12 Databases
Type
Provider Name
Description
Index Server MSIDXS
For Microsoft Index Server.
ODBC
Drivers
MSDASQL
For existing ODBC Drivers, this ensures
that legacy data is not omitted.
Oracle
MSDAORA
Native Oracle driver simplifies access to
existing Oracle data stores.
SQL Server
SQLOLEDB
For Microsoft SQL Server.
Data Shape MSDataShape
For hierarchical recordsets, this allows the
creation of master/detail type recordsets,
which allow drilling down into detailed data.
Persisted
Records
MSPersist
For locally saved recordsets.
Simple
Provider
MSDAOSP
For creating your own providers for simple
text data.
The above is just the list of standard providers supplied by Microsoft. Other
vendors are actively creating their own.
12-2-5 Creating a Data Source Name file
A Data Source Name file (or DSN for short) stores information about a
database connection in a file. The file has the extension .DSN and by default is
stored in the "$\Program Files\Common Files\ODBC\Data Sources" directory.
This type of file can be viewed with a suitable text editor e.g. "Notepad". One
advantage of using a DSN file over specifying the full path of the database is
that the DSN file remains unchanged while its contents can be re-configured to
reflect any changes in directory or database file name etc.
12-2-5-1 Creating a New DSN
•
For Windows 98, ME and NT: From your Windows 'Control Panel', select
the ODBC Data Sources icon. This will show the ODBC Data Source
Administrator dialog box. For Windows 2000 and XP: From the 'Programs'
folder, select 'Administrative tools' and 'Data Sources (ODBC) icon (note
this is only available if the logged in user has administrative rights, and the
Taskbar properties "Display Administrative Tools' option is checked). This
will show the ODBC Data Source Administrator dialog box.
•
Click the 'File DSN' tab. Any Data Source Names already defined are
listed.
•
Click on 'Add' to create a new Data Source Name file. This will invoke the
Create New Data Source dialog box with a list of available drivers (only
drivers that are installed on your machine will be shown).
•
Choose the driver to access the data source and select 'Next >'.
•
You will then be prompted to name your Data Source. Type a suitable
name and select 'Next >'
•
Verify the information shown and select 'Finish' to complete this part of the
operation.
•
Depending on the driver selected, you may be prompted for details of the
database you wish to connect to.
•
A new DSN file will now exist which can be used by CX-Supervisor to
Create a Connection.
185
Configuring a Connection
SECTION 12 Databases
12-2-6 Creating a Read/Write connection to an Excel file
Connections to Excel files may result in the error "Operation must use an
updateable query". This is because the Provider installed with ADO version
2.0 is read only by default hence Records can not be added or amended. To
override this function you must manually change the Read Only property in the
Connection String. On the "Modify Connection" dialog box click "Advanced…"
and set the connection property as shown in the last line below:
Driver={Microsoft Excel Driver (*.xls)};
DBQ=C:\WorkBook.xls;
ReadOnly=False;
Excel files can also be updated by accessing the file via the ODBC DSN driver.
This is achieved by carrying out the following steps:
•
Create a File DSN for the required Excel file with the following options (see
Chapter 12, Creating a Data Source Name file)
•
Select the Microsoft Excel Driver (*.xls). If this option does not exist, you
will need to install the Microsoft ODBC driver for Excel from the Excel
setup.
•
Ensure that the "Read Only" check box is clear.
•
Load the Excel spreadsheet and create a table to access the data by
creating a Named Range as follows:
•
Highlight the row(s) and column(s) area where your data resides
(including the header row).
•
On the 'Insert' menu, point to 'Name', click 'Define' and enter a name for
your range.
•
Create a connection in the CX-Supervisor Workspace specifying the File
DSN as its source.
•
Add a Recordset to the connection and select the Named Range (which
will appear in the list of available tables, if the connection is live) as the
Table name. Records in this table can now be added or modified as with
any other database table (Note: If records are added to this type of table
the Named Range will increase in size accordingly automatically).
The example below demonstrates a valid range selection named:
"CustomerInvoice" (note the name displayed just above column A):
Note:
186
The first row of the range is assumed to contain the Column Headings.
Configuring Recordsets
SECTION 12 Databases
Note:
When updating files the column headings cannot contain numbers or spaces,
for example "Column1" or "Invoice Total" is invalid. Also some words are
reserved and can not be used, for example a column heading of "Number" will
cause an error. These restrictions do not apply when only reading these files.
Note:
Make sure that all the cells in a column are of the same data type. The Excel
ODBC driver cannot correctly interpret which data type the column should be if
a column is not of the same type, or you have types mixed between "text" and
"general".
Note:
This type of querying and updating information in an Excel Spreadsheet does
not support multi-user concurrent access.
12-2-7 Creating a Read/Write connection to CSV/Text file
Connections to CSV or Text files using the Provider installed with ADO version
2.0, like Excel files, are also read only hence Records can not be added or
amended. However, CSV and Text files can be updated by converting the data
into an Excel spreadsheet and accessing the file via the ODBC DSN driver.
This is achieved by carrying out the steps as above using the CSV/Text file
instead. Note the Excel provider is still used, and a named range in Excel must
still be created.
12-3
Configuring Recordsets
The Recordset is the heart of the Database facility, it contains all of the
columns and rows returned from a specific action. The Recordset is used to
navigate a collection of records, and update, add, delete or modify records.
When a Connection has been added to the Workspace, the right menu option
'Add Recordset…' will be enabled. Selecting this option will invoke the
following dialog box:
12-3-1 Name
A unique Recordset name will be automatically provided. This can be modified
to provide a more meaningful name if required.
12-3-2 Recordset Type
The Recordset can be 1 of 3 types:
Table Name
The Recordset is the name of an actual table in the
Database.
187
Configuring Recordsets
SECTION 12 Databases
Server Query
The Recordset is the results of a pre-defined Server
Query stored in the database.
SQL Text
The Recordset is the results of an SQL query executed
when the Recordset is opened.
Note:
It is more efficient to run a Server Query than an SQL query.
Note:
For Database connections all three of the above options are available, but for
Text or CSV connections only one option is available, namely 'SQL Text'. For
convenience, a facility is provided for automatically building the required SQL
Text for this type of connection. This facility is invoked from the 'Build SQL…'
button shown below:
This will bring up a dialog box with a list of all valid files in the 'Directory'
specified for the Connection. After choosing a file and exiting from the 'Build
SQL' dialog box the required SQL Text is built. In the above example, the file
'Tables.txt' was chosen, but this will be written as Tables#txt in the SQL Text as
most Providers do not accept the '.' character, because it is used as a
delimiter.
12-3-3 Source
The source field shows the Table name, Server Query or SQL text as selected
above which the Recordset is linked to.
12-3-3-1 Automatically open on connection
If this checkbox is ticked the Recordset will be automatically opened when the
Connection is opened. If this is unchecked, the Recordset must be open with a
script command.
12-3-4 Lock
The lock option enables the Recordset to be opened in either read only or
read/write modes, there are two type of read/write locks as defined below:
Read OnlyThe default lock is read only i.e. data cannot be changed.
188
Read Only
The default lock is read only i.e. data cannot be changed.
Pessimistic
Locks records when you start editing and releases the lock
when Update() (or Cancel()) is called, no need to worry about a
conflict with other users, but can cause records to be locked for
long periods of time preventing other users from accessing the
same records.
Configuring Field Associations
Optimistic
Note:
12-4
SECTION 12 Databases
Locked only when the Update() method is called, therefore
changes can be made to records without creating a lock,
conflicts have to be catered for because someone else might
have changed the record between the time you started editing
and the time you called Update().
If the Connection is open when a Recordset is added the Combo boxes for
'Table Name' and 'Server Query' will be automatically populated with valid
entries for the selected Database. When the 'Add Recordset…' dialog box is
closed an attempt will be made to open the newly configured Recordset.
Configuring Field Associations
Field associations provide a means of connecting CX-Supervisor Points with
fields (i.e. columns of data) in a Recordset, thus enabling data transfers to be
made between Points and Records. By creating a Field Association for each
field in a record, data can easily be read from a record in the database to its
associated points, and written from the points to the current record in the
database. When a Recordset has been added to a Connection in the
Workspace, the right menu option 'Add Field…' will be enabled. Selecting this
option will invoke the following dialog box:
12-4-1 Name
A unique Field name will be automatically provided. This can be modified to
provide a more meaningful name if required.
12-4-2 Point
The name of the point that will be used in data transfers. The Browse button
may be used to select a current point, or add a new one.
12-4-3 Field
The name of the Recordset field to be associated with the above point. If the
Recordset is open, this list will automatically show all available fields.
12-4-4 Field Property
The type of information from the field to be transferred, the following options
are available:
Value
default - the assigned value of the field
Name
the name of the field / column title
Type
the fields Data Type
189
Configuring Parameter Associations
SECTION 12 Databases
Size
the maximum width of the field
Add
used to add new fields to a record
Note:
The Name, Type and Size properties are fixed for all entries of the column,
whereas the field value depends on the current position of the Recordset.
Note:
The 'Add' property is specifically designed to enable fields to be added
together to create new records. They are not involved in any read operations,
as with the other field property types. For this reason, the 'Automatically read
on open' checkbox is disabled when this type is applied. When creating
configurations to add new records you will need to create a 'Add' association
for every field required to 'create' a valid record i.e. primary keys, non-null
values etc. need to be catered for. See DBAddNew() for more details.
12-4-4-1 Access field by index
When checked, a numeric index is used to identify a particular field instead of
its name. This is useful if you want to configure generic field associations.
Automatically read on open
When checked, the data is transferred from the Recordset field to the
associated point, when the Recordset is opened.
12-4-4-2 Field Paging
You can work with a single record at a time by associating points with the
required fields, and process the data one record at a time. However, if the
point specified is an Array point the whole array will be processed i.e. multiple
fields will be read, written or added. This concept is called Paging. Paging is
supported by the Database script functions, enabling you to manipulate and
navigate the database a page at a time. CX-Supervisor determines the page
size, by using the number of elements in the Array point used in Field
Associations, i.e. if an array point with 10 elements is used then a page size of
10 will be used. In order for paging to work sensibly, you should ensure that all
array points used in multiple field associations for a particular Recordset are of
the same size. If arrays, of differing length are used, the smallest array size
will be adopted as the page size.
12-5
Note:
Paging only operates on Field Associations that have the Property Type 'Value'
selected, this enables you to have Field Associations with a Property Type of
'Name' or 'Add' associated with single points in the same Recordset, without
effecting the page size determined by the array points.
Note:
Paging is designed to operate at the Recordset level (the concept of levels is
explained in the chapter on DB Script functions). If you perform a Read
operation on a recordset that has paging in force, then a 'page' of records will
be read into all the Field Associations connected to the Recordset. In contrast
to performing a read operation at the Field level which will override the page
size and use the individual fields length.
Configuring Parameter Associations
When a Recordset which is defined as a Server Query is opened, the query is
executed, and the set of records produced. The Server Query may be defined
in the database as requiring parameters to be passed which allow criteria to be
passed to the query. Recordsets defined in CX-Supervisor as Server Queries
may have Parameter Associations added to the recordset. Recordsets defined
as a Table Name or SQL Text do not use parameters, hence any Parameter
Associations are ignored.
190
Configuring Parameter Associations
SECTION 12 Databases
Parameter associations provide a means of supplying values to parameters
whenever a Server Query is run. Each required parameter defined within the
query is associated with a point or constant value. At the time the Query is run,
the current value of the point (or the constant value) is passed to the query.
Under the Development Environment the points default value is used.
Parameter Associations are added by right-clicking the Recordset and
selecting 'Add Parameter…' from the popup menu. The following dialog box is
shown:
12-5-1 Name
A unique Parameter Association name will be automatically provided. This can
be modified to provide a more meaningful name if required. By convention,
this is made the same as the name of the parameter defined within the
database but this is not essential.
12-5-2 Index
The index is used to determine which parameter in the Query to associate the
value with. The index is automatically incremented for each parameter that is
added to the Recordset.
12-5-3 Data Type
The Data Type list will be populated with a selection of available data types.
The correct data type for the parameter being configured must be selected,
otherwise the Recordset will fail to open.
12-5-4 Use point to hold parameter value
When unchecked, the constant Value specified is passed as the parameter to
the query. When checked, the current value of the point is passed as the
parameter.
12-5-5 Point
The name of the point to be used. The Browse button may be used to select a
current point, or add a new one.
12-5-6 Value
The constant value to be used.
191
Configuring Schemas
12-6
SECTION 12 Databases
Configuring Schemas
Schemas enable information about a Database to be obtained from a
Provider. There are a large number of Schema Types available. The most
useful feature of schemas is the ability to obtain Table and Query names from
the Database, in fact schemas are used by the Development Environment to
populate the Combo boxes when working with 'live' connections.
The information to be returned from the Provider is determined by specifying a
Schema Type and a Criteria. The Criteria argument is an array of values that
can be used to limit the results of a schema query. Each Schema type has a
different set of Criteria that it supports.
A Schema is configured by selecting the desired Connection and choosing the
right menu option 'Add Schema…' to invoke the following dialog box:
12-6-1 Name
A unique Schema name will be automatically provided. This can be modified
to provide a more meaningful name if required.
12-6-2 Point
The name of an array point which will hold the results of the schema request.
The Browse button may be used to select a current point, or add a new one.
12-6-3 Type
The Type list will be populated with a selection of available Schema Types.
12-6-4 Criteria
The Criteria list shows the available Criteria for the given Schema Type.
12-6-5 Filter
The Filter list is used with certain Schema types to reduce the information
returned.
12-6-6 Read on Connection
If checked, the Schema results are automatically obtained when successful
connection to the database is achieved.
12-6-7 Preview
If the Connection is live, then the Preview button will be enabled on the dialog
box, which allows you to view the results of the configured Schema.
The Schema 'Type', 'Criteria' and 'Filter' values can be modified at Runtime via
the DBSchema() function.
192
Configuring Schemas
SECTION 12 Databases
12-6-8 Database Schema Types
The Database Schema types supported in ADO are:
Schema Type values
Criteria Values
Schema Asserts
CONSTRAINT_CATALOG
CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA
CONSTRAINT_NAME
Schema Catalogs
CATALOG_NAME
Schema Character Sets
CHARACTER_SET_CATALOG
CHARACTER_SET_SCHEMA
CHARACTER_SET_NAME
Schema Check
Constraints
CONSTRAINT_CATALOG
CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA
CONSTRAINT_NAME
Schema Collations
COLLATION_CATALOG
COLLATION_SCHEMA
COLLATION_NAME
Schema Column Domain DOMAIN_CATALOG
Usage
DOMAIN_SCHEMA
DOMAIN_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
Schema Column
Privileges
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
GRANTOR
GRANTEE
Schema Columns
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
Schema Constraint
Column Usage
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
Schema Constraint Table TABLE_CATALOG
Usage
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
193
Configuring Schemas
SECTION 12 Databases
Schema Foreign Keys
PK_TABLE_CATALOG
PK_TABLE_SCHEMA
PK_TABLE_NAMEFK_TABLE_CATALOG
FK_TABLE_SCHEMA
FK_TABLE_NAME
Schema Indexes
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
INDEX_NAME
TYPE
TABLE_NAME
Schema Key Column
Usage
CONSTRAINT_CATALOG
CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA
CONSTRAINT_NAME
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
Schema Primary Keys
PK_TABLE_CATALOG
PK_TABLE_SCHEMA
PK_TABLE_NAME
Schema Procedure
Columns
PROCEDURE_CATALOG
PROCEDURE_SCHEMA
PROCEDURE_NAME
COLUMN_NAME
Schema Procedure
Parameters
PROCEDURE_CATALOG
PROCEDURE_SCHEMA
PROCEDURE_NAME
PARAMTER_NAME
Schema Procedures
PROCEDURE_CATALOG
PROCEDURE_SCHEMA
PROCEDURE_NAME
PROCEDURE_TYPE
Schema Provider Specific See Remarks
Schema Provider Types
DATA_TYPE
BEST_MATCH
Schema Referential
Constraints
CONSTRAINT_CATALOG
CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA
CONSTRAINT_NAME
Schema Schemata
CATALOG_NAME
SCHEMA_NAME
SCHEMA_OWNER
Schema SQL Languages <none>
194
Using Transactions
SECTION 12 Databases
Schema Table
Constraints
CONSTRAINT_CATALOG
CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA
CONSTRAINT_NAME
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
CONSTRAINT_TYPE
Schema Table Privileges TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
GRANTOR
GRANTEE
Schema Tables
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
TABLE_TYPE
Schema Translations
TRANSLATION_CATALOG
TRANSLATION_SCHEMA
TRANSLATION_NAME
Schema Usage Privileges OBJECT_CATALOG
OBJECT_SCHEMA
OBJECT_NAME
OBJECT_TYPE
GRANTOR
GRANTEE
Schema View Column
Usage
VIEW_CATALOG
VIEW_SCHEMA
VIEW_NAME
Schema View Table
Usage
VIEW_CATALOG
VIEW_SCHEMA
VIEW_NAME
Schema Views
TABLE_CATALOG
TABLE_SCHEMA
TABLE_NAME
Note:
12-7
The actual schemas are defined by the OLE DB specification and Providers
are not required to support all of the OLE DB standard schema queries.
Specifically, only 'Schema Tables', 'Schema Columns', and 'Schema Provider
Types' are required by the OLE DB specification. However, the provider is not
required to support the Criteria constraints listed above for those schema
queries.
Using Transactions
Modifications of data in the database i.e. adding, modifying and deleting
records, can be grouped so that all modifications take place at the same time.
This group of modifications is called a Transaction. A Transaction includes any
195
Saving Recordsets as XML
SECTION 12 Databases
modifications to data in a connection, regardless of the Recordset. A
transaction is started by calling DBExecute with the 'BeginTrans' command.
From that point, any request to add, modify or delete records are stored
instead of being immediately processed. The Transaction is completed either
by calling DBExecute with the 'CommitTrans' command, which processes all
the stored requests in one go, or by calling DBExecute with the
'RollbackTrans' command, which discards all the stored requests leaving the
database as it was when the Transaction started.
12-7-1 Nested Transactions
Transactions may be nested, that is a new transaction may be started before
the preceding transaction has been completed. In this case, any
'CommitTrans' or 'RollbackTrans' commands relate to the most recently
started transaction, and any further 'CommitTrans or 'RollbackTrans'
commands relate to the transaction begun before it.
12-8
Note:
Care should be taken to ensure that each 'BeginTrans' is matched with a
'CommitTrans' or 'RollbackTrans' to ensure that your work is saved or
discarded as required. If there are any pending transactions when a
connection is closed, the user will be prompted to either commit or rollback
these outstanding transactions. A DBExecute command 'TransCount' is
available which returns the number of pending transactions.
Note:
Not all Providers support use of Transactions.
Saving Recordsets as XML
Using the DBExecute() 'Save' command any Recordset may be saved as an
XML file, to be imported in to another application. XML resembles and
complements HTML. XML describes data, such as city name, temperature
and barometric pressure, and HTML defines tags that describe how the data
should be displayed, such as with a bulleted list or a table. XML, however,
allows developers to define an unlimited set of tags, bringing great flexibility to
authors, who can decide which data to use and determine its appropriate
standard or custom tags.
Example: XML is used to describe an Employees phone list:
<EmployeeList>
<Entry>
<Employee>John Jones</Employee>
<Phone>555-1213</Phone>
<Type>Mobile</Type>
</Entry>
<Entry>
<Employee>Sally Mae</Employee>
<Phone>555-1217</Phone>
<Type>Business Fax</Type>
</Entry>
</EmployeeList>
You can use an application with a built in XML parser, such as Microsoft®
Internet Explorer 5 to view XML documents in the browser just as you would
view HTML pages.
196
Datashaping
12-9
SECTION 12 Databases
Datashaping
The ADO SHAPE command can be used to produce hierarchical recordsets
i.e. where a value within the current record is used to access another
Recordset. For example, a record showing Customer Details might contain a
field for Customer ID. Every time the record position is changed, a child
Recordset showing Orders for that Customer ID could be recreated.
Hierarchical recordsets present an alternative to using JOIN syntax when
accessing parent-child data. Hierarchical recordsets differ from a JOIN in that
with a JOIN, both the parent table fields and child table fields are represented
in the same recordset. With a hierarchical recordset, the recordset contains
only fields from the parent table. In addition, the recordset contains an extra
field that represents the related child data, which you can assign to a second
recordset variable and traverse.
Hierarchical recordsets are made available via the MSDataShape provider,
which is implemented by the client cursor engine.
A new clause, SHAPE, is provided to relate SELECT statements in a
hierarchical fashion. The syntax is summarized below:
SHAPE {parent-command} [[AS] name]
APPEND ({child-command} [[AS] name]
field TO child-field)
[,({child2-command} …)]
RELATE
parent-
Note:
By default, the child recordsets in the parent recordset will be called Chapter 1,
Chapter 2, etc., unless you use the optional [[AS] name] clause to name the
child recordset.
Note:
You can nest the SHAPE command. The {parent-command} and/or {childcommand} can contain another SHAPE statement.
Note:
The {parent-command} and {child-command} do not have to be SQL SELECT
statements. They can use whatever syntax is supported by data provider.
Note:
A child recordset will be automatically opened/closed whenever its Parent
recordset is opened/closed. A child recordset is effectively a field of its parent
recordset therefore whenever a new record is selected in the parent a new
child recordset will be generated.
Creating a Datashape
connection.
1. Create DSN file specifying the required database as the Data Source
2. Configure a Connection to the DSN file. In the connection string type
Provider=MSDataShape;
FILEDSN=<your file name>.dsn
3. Configure a Recordset as SQL Text and enter the required shape
command as the Source. (See Datashape Source examples).
4. After successfully adding a Datashape Recordset it is now possible to add
a Child Recordset to the existing Recordset by selecting the right menu
option 'Add Recordset' which will now be enabled. If the Connection is
'Live' a list of valid child recordset names will be entered in the Source
ComboBox
5. Field associations can be added to Child recordsets in the normal manner.
Child recordsets can be accessed via Script command in a similar manner
to normal recordsets
bResult
=
DBState(
"DataShape.Customers.Orders.Details", "Open" )
Note:
Child recordsets are not supported in the Database function dialog box
197
Examples
SECTION 12 Databases
12-10 Examples
12-10-1 Simple Relation Hierarchy example:
SHAPE {select * from customers}
APPEND ({select * from orders} AS rsOrders
RELATE customerid TO customerid)
The parent recordset contains all fields from the Customers table and a field
called rsOrders. rsOrders provides a reference to the child recordset, and
contains all the fields from the Orders table. The other examples use a similar
notation.
12-10-2 Compound Relation Hierarchy example:
This sample illustrates a three-level hierarchy of customers, orders, and order
details:
SHAPE {SELECT * from customers}
APPEND ((SHAPE {select * from orders}
APPEND ({select * from [order details]}
rsDetails
RELATE orderid TO orderid)) AS rsOrders
RELATE customerid TO customerid)
AS
In addition to the Simple Relation Hierarchy example, the Order ID is now
used to create a recordset containing the order details for the shown order.
12-10-3 Hierarchy with Aggregate example:
SHAPE (select * from orders}
APPEND ({select od.orderid, od.UnitPrice * od.quantity
as ExtendedPrice
from [order details] As od}
RELATE orderid TO orderid) As rsDetails,
SUM(ExtendedPrice) AS OrderTotal
This example creates a Recordset of all the orders and their details, and adds
a field called ExtendedPrice to store the total order value for each record, and
sums all the ExtendedPrice values which is stored in Order Total.
12-10-4 Group Hierarchy example:
SHAPE
{select
customers.customerid
orders.*
from
customers
inner
join
customers.customerid =
orders.customerid} AS rsOrders
COMPUTE rsOrders BY cust_id
AS
cust_id,
orders
on
12-10-5 Group Hierarchy with Aggregate example:
SHAPE
SHAPE
{select
customers.*,
orders.orderid,
orders.orderdate fromc ustomers inner join orders
on customers.customerid = orders.customerid}
APPEND
({select
od.orderid,od.unitprice
*
od.quantity as ExtendedPrice from order details]as
od} AS rsDetails
RELATE orderid TO orderid),
SUM(rsDetails.ExtendedPrice) AS OrderTotal) AS
rsOrders
198
Examples
SECTION 12 Databases
COMPUTE rsOrders,
SUM(rsOrders.OrderTotal) AS CustTotal,
ANY(rsOrders.contactname) AS Contact
BY customerid
Note:
The inner SHAPE clause in this example is identical to the statement used in
the Hierarchy with Aggregate example.
12-10-6 Multiple Groupings example:
SHAPE
(SHAPE
{select
customers.*,
od.unitprice
*
od.quantity as ExtendedPrice from (customers inner
join
orders
on
customers.customerid
=
orders.customerid) inner join [order details] as
od on orders.orderid = od.orderid} AS rsDetail
COMPUTE
ANY(rsDetail.contactname)
AS
Contact,
ANY(rsDetail.region)
AS
Region,
SUM(rsDetail.ExtendedPrice) AS CustTotal, rsDetail
BY customerid) AS rsCustSummary
COMPUTE rsCustSummary
BY Region
12-10-7 Grand Total example:
SHAPE
(SHAPE
{select
customers.*,
od.unitprice
*
od.quantity as ExtendedPrice from (customers inner
join
orders
on
customers.customerid
=
orders.customerid) inner join [order details] as
od on orders.orderid = od.orderid} AS rsDetail
COMPUTE
ANY(rsDetail.contactname)
AS
Contact,
SUM(rsDetail.ExtendedPrice) AS CustTotal, rsDetail
BY customerid) AS rsCustSummary
COMPUTE SUM(rsCustSummary.CustTotal) As GrandTotal,
rsCustSummary
Note:
The missing BY clause in the outer summary. This defines the Grand Total
because the parent rowset contains a single record with the grand total and a
pointer to the child recordset.
12-10-8 Grouped Parent Related to Grouped Child example:
SHAPE
(SHAPE {select * from customers} APPEND ((SHAPE
{select orders.*, year(orderdate) as OrderYear,
month(orderdate) as OrderMonth from orders} AS
rsOrders
COMPUTE
rsOrders
BY
customerid,
OrderYear,
OrderMonth) RELATE customerid TO customerid) AS
rsOrdByMonth ) AS rsCustomers
COMPUTE rsCustomers BY region
199
Examples
200
SECTION 12 Databases
Overview
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
SECTION 13
CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
This chapter describes CX-Supervisor CFR functionality. Part 11 of Title 21 of
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) specifies guidelines for the keeping of
electronic records and the use of electronic signatures. CX-Supervisor
provides features that can assist customers to comply with the validation
requirements of Part 11 of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).
13-1
Overview
CX-Supervisor supports compliance with CFR requirements by allowing
generation of Audit Trail events, and reporting those selected events as
database records. A CX-Supervisor Audit Trail 'event' can be one of three
different types....
•
A CX-Supervisor Point. An Audit Trail event is triggered by a change in
value of a CX-Supervisor point.
•
A CX-Supervisor Alarm. An Audit Trail event is triggered by a change in
state of a CX-Supervisor alarm.
•
A CX-Supervisor Event or Error. An Audit Trail event is triggered by any
event\error that is reported into the CX-Supervisor Event\Error Log.
An Audit Trail project may be configured to record any of these 'events',
individually or in combination. When configured to generate an Audit Trail, CXSupervisor will automatically create an Audit Trail database file, including 4
database tables. (One table each for Points, Alarms, Events and Errors).
When configured to create Audit Trail records, CX-Supervisor runtime will add
a record into the Audit Trail database tables as each Audit Trail event
condition is triggered.
13-2
Supported Databases
CX-Supervisor supports two types of database for Audit Trails:
13-3
•
Microsoft Access (*.mdb) database files.
•
SQL Server.
CX-Supervisor Runtime User and Audit Trail UserID
Each record logged into the Audit Trail database tables includes a UserID
property. The UserID is always the currently logged in CX-Supervisor user in
runtime. CX-Supervisor does not normally force any user to be logged in at
runtime.
If no user is logged in when Audit Trail logging is active, then each data entry
reports "User Unknown" into the UserID field.
If the application requirements demand that current user must always be
identified for Audit Trail logging, then the application designer must ensure
that a runtime user is always logged in. For example by forcing a log-in at
runtime initialisation and then disabling logout in runtime.
201
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
To assist with the correct identification of users CX-Supervisor has the ability
to log-in to the runtime application with the same identity and password as a
Windows user, (refer to section 6.11 of the manual for details).
13-4
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
This section demonstrates the basic CFR functionality by describing how to
create a simple test project and then execute runtime to record Audit Trail
events. The processes described in this section are:
•
Creating and configuring a project with an Audit Trail. (At first to use just
one CX-Supervisor Point).
•
Executing runtime to generate a database and data tables.
•
Viewing the generated Audit Trail data.
•
Adding Alarms.
•
Adding Events and Errors.
13-4-1 CFR Test Application
The test application described in this section consists of one page with a
number of buttons used to execute scripting actions for the following
functions.:
•
Login (Designer).
•
Logout.
•
Start Audit Trail.
•
Stop Audit Trail.
•
Increment Point.
•
Generate Alarm.
•
Clear Alarm.
•
Generate Event.
•
Generate Error.
The screen shot below shows a test page with the buttons required to
demonstrate the basic functions.
To demonstrate the basic function of Audit trail logging for a point value, then
the following edits to the test project should be applied.
1. Create an Integer memory point iAudit.
2. Create a Real Array memory point (array size 3) called rAuditArray.
202
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
3. Add a left click script to the Increment Point button….
iAudit = iAudit + 1
rAuditArray(0) = rAuditArray(0) + 0.5
rAuditArray(1) = rAuditArray(1) + 1.0
rAuditArray(2) = rAuditArray(2) + 2.5
4. Add left click scripts to Login Designer and Logout to the buttons shown.
5. Add left click scripts to the Start and Stop Audit trail buttons….
StartAuditTrail() and StopAuditTrail|().
NOTE: The new scripting functions for StartAuditTrail() and StopAuditTrail()
can be found in the script editor menu under… Special\Datalogging.
13-4-2 Configuring Points for Audit
The advanced settings dialog for the point contains a check box…’Generate
Audit Trail’. Check this box for each point to be audited. For the test project
apply the setting for the points iAudit and rAuditArray:
IMPORTANT NOTE:
The use of CX-Supervisor I/O points is not recommended for audit trail logging
since unexpected or spurious results can be observed due to the
asynchronous input and output nature of these points.
13-4-3 Default Audit Trail Configuration
The Audit Trail Configuration dialog is launched from the developer menu
under ‘Project\Runtime Settings\Audit Trail Settings’. The screen shot below
shows the configuration dialog in its default state. The basic features defined
by the default state are:
•
The default connection is to an Access database file (*.mdb).
•
Point Auditing is always enabled.
•
By default, when no destination folder is specified, an ‘Audit Trail’ folder
will be created under the project folder.
203
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
•
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
Logging Alarms and Events\Errors are disabled by default.
No changes to the default state are required to enable the points Audit trail
logging function of the test project.
13-4-4 Default Connection String
Clicking the Setup button on the ‘Audit Trail Configuration’ dialog launches the
‘Audit Database Setup’ dialog. In this dialog the connection sting can be
viewed and edited. For the default Microsoft Access database a default
connection string is provided.
204
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
The Connection String may be modified as required; pressing the ‘Build
Connection String’ button will return the string to its default state. Press Ok to
save your modifications. For further information about connection strings refer
to the section, ‘Configuring the Connection String’ below.
13-4-5 Logged In User
Before starting an audit trail it is recommended that there is a user logged in.
The current CX-Supervisor user logged in has the user identity will be saved in
the audit trail records. If no user is logged in when a record is created, then
‘User Unknown’ is reported for the user identity.
13-4-6 Starting and Stopping an Audit Trail
The Audit Trail has to be started before any records are logged into the data
tables. The Audit Trail can be started and stopped at any time during runtime
execution by using the scripting commands. Each time the Audit Trail is
started any new records generated will either be…
a) appended to the existing database file, or
b) a new database file will be created.
This action is controlled by the checkbox setting on the ‘Audit Database Setup’
shown above. For further details of this function refer to the section ‘Microsoft
Access Database File Management’ below.
13-4-7 Running the CFR Test Application and Logging to an Access
Database
The project is now ready to generate an audit trail on the selected Points. The
default option will create a Microsoft Access database file in a subdirectory of
the project. Compile and run the project, the runtime will appear similar to the
screen shot shown below:
Execute the following actions to log records into the default Access database:
•
Press the Login Designer button.
•
Press the ‘Start Audit Trail’ button; This action will cause a new subfolder
to be created under the project folder called: ‘AuditTrail’.
NOTE: In this folder will be a file named
<Project
Name>_<ddmmyyyy>_1.mdb where <Project Name> is the name of the
CX-Supervisor project and <ddmmyyyy> is today’s date.
205
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
NOTE: There will also be a file with the same name but with extension
(.ldb) this is a temporary locking file which will be removed when
‘StopAuditTrail()’ is executed.
•
Press the ‘Increment Point’ button several times to log some audit point
events.
•
Then press ‘Stop Audit Trail’ button to stop the audit trail and close the
(.mdb) database file.
•
Exit Runtime.
13-4-8 Viewing the Audit Trail Database
Open the <Project Name>_<ddmmyyyy>_1.mdb file. When the database
opens a ‘Security Warning’ dialog may appear, press the ‘Open’ button and
you will be presented with a login dialog. Enter the username: ‘Guest’ (no
password is required) and then press the OK button. The Access database will
contain four tables named: Alarms, Errors, Events and Points as shown below.
Open the Points table to show the Audit Trail that was generated by pressing
the Increment Point button:
Notes:
1 The UserID field shows the currently logged in CX-Supervisor User.
2 The Index field shows the array index for the point.
206
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
13-4-9 Audit Trail Configuration Settings – Alarms Errors and Events
It is not necessary to invoke the Audit Trail Configuration dialog for auditing
points, but to generate an audit trail for alarms, errors and events the default
configuration state must be modified.
Launch the Audit Trail Configuration dialog.
Check the Log Alarm checkbox to allow logging of Alarms.
N.B. Logging of Alarms can be set to log ‘All Alarms’ or ‘Selected Alarms’. The
attribute to select any individual alarm is applied in the Alarms settings dialog
as described in the section below. ‘All Alarms’ when selected, overrides the
setting applied to individual alarms. ‘Selected Alarms’ setting will log to Audit
Trail only those Alarms with the ‘Generate Audit Trail’ attribute applied in the
Alarm Settings dialog.
Check the Log Errors/Events checkbox as shown below to allow Error and
Events to be logged into the Audit Trail.
Press OK to save these settings.
13-4-10 Configuring Alarms for Audit Trail Records
To demonstrate logging Alarms to the Audit Trail the CFR Test Project can be
modified as follows.
207
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
To generate an Alarm events take the following steps:
•
Create a Boolean memory point called ‘bSimpleAlarm’ which will be used
to trigger the Alarm condition.
•
Launch the Add Alarm dialog and create a simple alarm as follows:
NOTES:
1. The ‘Generate Audit Trail’ check box is shown enabled because the have
checked the ‘Log Alarm’ function in the Audit Trail configuration dialog.
2. ‘Generate Audit Trail’ option is shown checked for this alarm. When the ‘All
Alarms’ option in Audit Trail configuration is applied it is not necessary to
check the ‘Generate Audit Trail’ option for individual alarms to include them in
the Audit Trail.
3. Create a left click script for the ‘Generate Alarm’ button in the test
application
bSimpleAlarm = 1
4. Generate a left click script for the ‘Clear Alarm’ button in the test application
bSimpleAlarm = 0
208
Creating / Running a CFR Application (Microsoft Access)
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21
13-4-11 Generating Errors and Events in Audit Trail Records
By selecting the Log Errors\Events option in the Audit Trail Configuration
dialog, all Errors and Events will be logged as records in the Audit trail
database. The same Errors and Events as reported into the Event\Error log.
No further action is required.
For the purpose of demonstrating Event and Error logging the following
actions can be applied to the CFR Test Application
1 Add a left click script to the ‘Generate Event’ button in the test application
LogEvent("Event Message")
2 Add a left click script to the ‘Generate Error’ button in the test application
LogError "Error Message",1
13-4-12 Running the CFR Test Application to Generate Alarm Error and
Event Records
Build and run the modified project and carry out the following actions:
1. Press the Login Designer button.
2. Press the Start Audit Trail button.
3. Press the Generate Alarm button.
4. Acknowledge the Alarm.
5. Press the Clear Alarm button.
6. Press the Generate Event button.
7. Press the Generate Error button.
8. Press the Stop Audit trail Button.
9. Exit Runtime.
209
Logging Audit Trails to an SQL Database SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Function-
13-4-13 Viewing the Alarm Error and Events Data Tables
Notice that a new database file will have been created. This will be suffixed
with a number one greater than the previous database. (Refer to the section
Microsoft Access Database File Management below for an explanation of this
function).
Open the new Access database file, login as Guest (if required) and open the
Alarms table which will show a set of records similar to those shown below:
Opening the Events table will show a set of records similar to those shown
below:
Opening the Errors table will show a set of records similar to those shown
below:
13-5
Logging Audit Trails to an SQL Database
The same methods as described above for the Microsoft Access database can
be used to log to an SQL Server Database
To use an SQL Server Database the database must first be created and the
connection string must be configured. CX-Supervisor provides supports for
SQL Server database as detailed below.
The test project described in the section above could be converted to be used.
210
Logging Audit Trails to an SQL Database SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Function-
13-5-1 SQL Server Database Prerequisites
The following conditions need to apply before logging to an SQL Server
database can proceed:
1. Ensure you have access to an SQL Server.
2. The necessary security permissions are applied to update the database to
be used for audit logging.
3. A database is created to be used for the Audit Trail.
NOTE: Once the SQL Server database exists. CX-Supervisor will create the
required tables in the specified database (if they do not already exist) namely,
Points, Alarms, Events and Errors. The same tables as are created for the
Microsoft Access database.
4. The database name has been correctly specified in the Audit Trail
Configuration settings.
5. The connection string has been specified correctly.
13-5-2 Creating an SQL Server Test Project
To create a test application, convert the test project described in the sections
above,
Or
Create a test project as described in the sections ‘Creating and Running a
CFR Application (using Microsoft Access).
Then select the SQL Server option in the Audit trail Configuration settings
dialog.
211
Logging Audit Trails to an SQL Database SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Function-
13-5-3 Connection String for an SQL Database
Invoke the Audit Trail Configuration dialog, select the ‘SQL Server’ radio
button in the Database group and press the ‘Setup…’ button, this will display
the ‘Audit Database Setup’ dialog as shown below:
NOTE: The connection string will be empty initially.
In the Database text box type in the name of your chosen database (for the
test application we created a database called ‘Audit’) and then press the ‘Build
Connection String’ a default connection string will be built for you as shown
below:
NOTE: The default connection string assumes that the SQL Server is local, if
this is not the case for your system replace ‘(local)’ with your <server
address>.
When you have the required ‘connection string’, press the Ok button to save
the new settings. If an error message indicating that the connection string is
invalid is displayed, press ‘No’ to go back and correct the error. If the message
still appears, but you are happy that the connection string is valid for your
system, then press the ‘Yes’ button to save your connection string. Press Ok
on the Audit Configuration Dialog to complete the process and re-build the
project, after a successful build the project is now ready to log to SQL Server.
212
Further Settings and Configuration
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
13-5-4 Running an SQL Server Test Project
Build and run the modified project and carry out the following actions:
1. Press the Login Designer button.
2. Press the Start Audit Trail button.
3. Press the Increment Point button several times.
4. Press the Generate Alarm button.
5. Acknowledge the Alarm.
6. Press the Clear Alarm button.
7. Press the Generate Event button.
8. Press the Generate Error button.
9. Press the Stop Audit trail Button.
10. Exit Runtime.
13-5-5 Viewing Audit Trail Records in an SQL Server Test Project
Launch the SQL Server Management Studio and view the four new tables that
have been created and updated with Audit Trail information. The screen shot
below shows the SQL Server Points table as created using the test
application.
NOTE: Subsequent Audit Trail records will always be appended to the existing
tables. There is no option to create new database file on each StartAuditTrail
event . This option applies only when using the Microsoft Access database.
13-6
Further Settings and Configuration
Further Settings and Configuration for consideration include:
213
Further Settings and Configuration
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
•
Database File Location.
•
Microsoft Access Database File Management.
•
Audit Trail Notes.
•
SQL Statements.
13-6-1 Database File Location
It is possible to specify a different location for audit database files other than
the default ‘AuditTrail’ subfolder. To specify a new location open the Audit Trail
Configuration dialog:
And in the ‘Logging Options’ group-box, check the ‘Specify the destination
folder for the Audit Trail database files’ check-box and either browse for or
type in the desired location.
NOTE: If the directory does not already exist, then it will be automatically
created when the file is first created.
13-6-2 Microsoft Access Database File Management
By default CX-Supervisor will create a new access database file (with project
name, date and unique number) in the project subfolder ‘AuditTrail’, every time
the method StartAuditTrail() is called. This default functionality can be
modified as follows:
Appending Records
To append records to the same access database file each time
StartAuditTrail() is called; ensure the Microsoft Access (*.mdb) radio button is
214
Further Settings and Configuration
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
selected and invoke the Audit Database Setup dialog:
By un-checking the checkbox ‘Create new database when Audit Trail Logging
is started’, audit trail records will be appended to latest database, whenever
the StartAuditTrail() method is called.
File Size Limit
There is a 2GB files size limit on Microsoft Access database files. CXSupervisor will monitor the size of the current file as records are appended
and when the file size approaches 2GB (@1.9GB) a new database file will be
created automatically.
13-6-3 Audit Trail Notes
CX-Supervisor allows the user to add free format notes to each audit record,
this is achieved by associating two text points with the Audit Trail. To
associate text points with the audit trail, first add two text points called
‘tAuditId’ and ‘tAuditNote’ to the test project, invoke the Audit Configuration
215
Further Settings and Configuration
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
dialog and in the ‘Additional Information’ group box enter the names of the two
text points in the relevant edit boxes as shown below:
The following screen shot demonstrates a use of these notes.
13-6-4 SQL Statements
If you do not want to give CX-Supervisor the privileges to create tables in your
chosen database, you can create the tables in the required format using the
SQL statements provided below.
216
How to Access Information from a CFR Database
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11)
The following SQL statements create the tables required for Audit Trail
logging.
Points Table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Points]
( [PointId] int IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, [Date] varchar(15) NOT
NULL, [Time] varchar(10) NOT NULL, [Name] varchar(50) NOT NULL, [Index]
int NOT NULL, [PreviousValue] varchar(250) NOT NULL, [NewValue]
varchar(250) NOT NULL, [UserId] varchar(250) NOT NULL,
[AuditId] varchar(250) NULL, [AuditNote] varchar(250) NULL )
Alarms Table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Alarms]
( [AlarmId] int IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, [Date] varchar(15) NOT
NULL, [Time] varchar(10) NOT NULL, [Name] varchar(50) NOT NULL,
[Priority] varchar(15) NOT NULL, [PreviousState] varchar(20) NOT NULL,
[NewState] varchar(20) NOT NULL, [UserId] varchar(250) NOT NULL,
[AuditId] varchar(250) NULL, [AuditNote] varchar(250) NULL )
Events Table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Events]
( [EventId] int IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, [Date] varchar(15) NOT
NULL, [Time] varchar(10) NOT NULL, [Message] varchar(250) NOT NULL,
[UserId] varchar(250) NOT NULL, [AuditId] varchar(250) NULL, [AuditNote]
varchar(250) NULL )
Errors Table
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Errors]
( [ErrorId] int IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY, [Date] varchar(15) NOT
NULL, [Time] varchar(10) NOT NULL, [Priority] varchar(10) NOT NULL,
[Message] varchar(250) NOT NULL, [UserId] varchar(250) NOT NULL,
[AuditId] varchar(250) NULL, [AuditNote] varchar(250) NULL )
13-7
How to Access Information from a CFR Database
The following sections provide instructions on how to read the information
from a CFR database that was generated by CX-Supervisor.
13-7-1 Using CX-Supervisor
When configuring the ‘Data Source’ information in the ‘Add Connection’
dialog, the following ‘Connection String’ is required to connect to the password
protected CFR database files.
Connection String Format
Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};
DBQ=<project folder>\AuditTrail\<database filename(.mdb)>;
SystemDB=<project folder>\<system database(.mdw)>;
Uid=Guest;
The first two lines of the connection string are generated by default. The
following two lines must be added by the user. A path must be given to the
System Database file ‘CXSupervisorAudit.mdw’, which is located in the
217
How to Access Information from a CFR Database
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11)
application folder - this is where the ‘Guest’ user is stored and has ‘Read’
access to the CFR database tables. It should then be possible to connect to
the database.
Example Connection String
Driver={Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb)};
DBQ=C:\MyTestApps\Balloon\AuditTrail\BALLOON2_20101008_1.mdb;
SystemDB=C:\MyTestApps\Balloon\BALLOON2_Audit.mdw;
Uid=Guest;
13-7-2 Using Microsoft Excel
The following examples show how to access the CFR information using the
various versions of Excel.
Microsoft Excel 2003
218
•
From within Excel, select the ‘Data | Import External Data | Import Data...’
menu option. This will invoke the standard ‘Open File’ dialog. Select the
appropriate CFR database file and click ‘Open’.
•
The ‘Data Link Properties’ dialog will now be displayed with the selected
database file and user name ‘Admin’ shown in the ‘Connection’ tab.
Change the ‘User name’ to ‘Guest’ as shown below:
How to Access Information from a CFR Database
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11)
•
Select the ‘Advanced’ tab and ensure that the read checkbox is selected.
By default, the ‘Share Deny Write’ option may also be selected but other
options are not selected.
•
Select the ‘All’ tab and scroll down to the ‘Jet OLEDB:System database’
entry. Click the ‘Edit Value...’ button and enter the path of the
‘CXSupervisorAudit.mdw’ file as shown below. Click ‘OK’ to save this
value and exit the ‘Edit Property Value’ dialog.
•
Now click ‘OK’ back on the ‘Data Link Properties’ dialog. If all information
has been entered correctly then the following dialog will be displayed.
219
How to Access Information from a CFR Database
220
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11)
•
From this dialog, select the required table to be imported and click ‘OK’.
Another dialog will be displayed (shown below) asking where you would
like to put the data. Select the desired location and click ‘OK’.
•
The audit data from the selected table will now be imported into the Excel
spreadsheet as shown below.
Limitations
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
Microsoft Excel 2007 and 2010
13-8
•
Within Excel, select the ‘Data’ tab and then click the ‘Get External Data’
button.
•
From the drop-down options choose ‘From Access’, as highlighted below.
•
This will invoke the ‘Select Data Source’ dialog. Select the desired CFR
audit database file (.mdb) and click ‘Open’.
•
This will display the ‘Data Link Properties’ dialog, which can then be filled
in the same way as described in the Excel 2003 example.
Limitations
Microsoft Access
There is a 2GB files size limit on Microsoft Access database files. To avoid this
limitation, CX-Supervisor will monitor the number of records appended to a
database file and it reaches 5 million records then a new database file will be
created automatically.
SQL
When using SQL for audit trail logging, if the number of records accumulates
to a significantly large number then it can affect CX-Supervisor performance
when opening the database file (i.e. when the ‘StartAuditTrail’ script function is
executed). In the worst case it can even result in failure to open the database
file due to a timeout and therefore audit trail logging will not begin. It is
therefore recommended that SQL audit trail databases are managed in an
appropriate manner, based on the specifics of the CX-supervisor application.
Based on our own testing, performance degradation starts to become
221
Limitations
SECTION 13 CFR (Title 21 Part 11) Functionality
apparent when the database contains in excess of 1 million records, however,
the exact point at which performance degradation occurs will probably be
dependent on the exact PC specifications.
Maximum Length of Text Strings
When logging to audit trail databases, all text strings are limited to a maximum
of 250 characters. For example, when logging point values to an audit trail
database then the following items would be restricted to maximum 250
characters:
Previous Value (Text points)
New Value (Text points)
User ID
Audit ID
Audit ID Note
222
Overview
SECTION 14 Standard Web Pages
SECTION 14
Standard Web Pages
This chapter introduces CX-Supervisor's Standard Web Pages and explains
their function, configuration and limitations.
14-1
Overview
The standard web pages provide a web interface to a running CX-Supervisor
application, similar to that of a network router or office printer. The pages
provide the ability to monitor the state of the application and view current point
values, alarm state and history, event/error log and perform basic
maintenance operations.
14-2
Access
To access the standard web pages navigate to http://IPADDRESS:4140.
Where IPADDRESS is the IP address of the PC running the CX-Supervisor
runtime application. Example: http://10.0.0.1:4140
14-3
Pages
A number of pages are included in the standard set, see the table below for a
summary of their usage.
Page
Description
Home / Summary
Shows the number of active alarms and the status
of all configured devices
Points
Monitor and edit point values
Alarms
View and acknowledge current alarms
Alarm Log
View the alarm history
Event / Error Log
View the events and errors log
Application
Restart or replace the running CX-Supervisor
Application
Settings
Configure user preferences including page refresh
rates and user language
223
Configuration
14-4
SECTION 14 Standard Web Pages
Configuration
At least 1 of the users configured for a CX-Supervisor application must have
web access rights in order to 'log on' to the standard web pages. To configure
web access for a particular user, the 'Allow web access for this user' option
must be ticked within the 'Configure Users' dialog box. This user will then be
able to 'log on' to the web pages remotely using their login name and
password.
14-5
Default Port
The default port for the standard web pages is 4140. If this conflicts with
another application on your machine it can be changed by running the
Standard Web Page Configuration tool.
14-6
DCOM Settings
The CX-Supervisor runtime and the web server program use Windows DCOM
to communicate with each other. If there is a problem with the DCOM settings
the Standard Web Pages login page will show 'Unknown project' instead of the
project name.
To check the DCOM
settings follow the steps
below:
1. Click Start, Run, type dcomcnfg and then click OK.
2. Expand Component Services, Computers, DCOM Config.
3. Find the entry for scs.exe and open its properties dialog box.
4. On the Identity Tab select The Interactive User.
5. Select Customize on the Security Tab of the Launch and Activation
Permissions section.
6. Click Edit and then add the user PCNAME\everyone. Select Local
Launch and Local Activation and then click OK.
7. Select Customize on the Security Tab of the Access Permissions
section.
8. Click Edit and then add the user PCNAME\everyone. Select Local
Access and then click OK. Error Pages
14-7
Error Pages
The Standard Web Pages use a two-tier error reporting system. Remote
users, that is someone viewing the web pages from any other machine apart
from the one which is running the CX-Supervisor runtime, see the default error
page. If you are viewing the web pages on the local host, a full error page is
shown. This page is not shown to remote users for security reasons.
14-8
Limitations
The standard web pages require version 3.5 or later of the Microsoft .NET
Framework to be installed on the 'server' (the computer running the CXSupervisor runtime application). Requirements for the client are simply a
relatively modern browser with cookies and JavaScript enabled.
224
Development Features
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
SECTION 15
Multilingual Features
This chapter introduces CX-Supervisor's multilingual features to a new user,
and explains how to develop in, and create applications in languages other
than the default English, for example:
Note:
•
How a non-English designer can run the development tools in their native
language, even if they are creating an application in another language.
•
"How non-English runtime applications can be developed
•
How applications can be developed where the end users with different
nationalities can switch between 2 languages (i.e. Bilingual) or more i.e.
Multilingual
•
How applications can be developed for export, where the developers can
work in their native language and switch language before export, and
visiting maintenance engineers onsite can switch back to the development
language
Projects created in CX-Supervisor versions 1.25 and earlier use Microsoft's
Multi Byte Character Sets (known as MBCS, or sometimes DBCS for 'Double
Byte Character Sets') for multilingual features. The formatting of character
tables in MBCS is not the same as Unicode. However, old projects are
automatically converted to Unicode when they are loaded, and will then be
saved in Unicode. See the section Loading old projects for important
information before you start.
Multilingual issues can be very complex, but like most areas CX-Supervisor
provides this functionality in an easy to use way, with a few simple dialogs.
The CX-Supervisor Multilingual features can easily be divided into two clear
sections: Development and Runtime. Users of each section have different
needs and so these sections function completely separately. For example, it is
possible to develop an application in any language, but this does not affect
which language the user must use at runtime in any way.
15-1
Note:
The distinction between the development program and runtime program and
their respective target users is very important to understand, and will help you
understand the following sections.
Note:
CX-Supervisor is designed and tested for use with European versions of
Microsoft Windows. Every language permutation is not tested and no testing is
performed on other versions like Russian, Japanese or Chinese etc., as this is
simply standard Microsoft functionality. However you should ensure your
translated application can be correctly deployed before starting full
development, for example, by creating a small test application.
Note:
The formatting of character tables used by CX-Supervisor for multilingual
features is the worldwide standard Unicode format. This product therefore only
runs on Unicode compliant Operating Systems, i.e. Windows 2000, Windows
XP and later products.
Development Features
For the benefit of the application developer the CX-Supervisor Development
application may be run in any major European language i.e. English, Spanish,
Italian, German and French. This means all menus, dialogs and error
messages displayed by the Development program are shown in this language
which provides a more comfortable and more efficient development
experience.
225
Runtime Language Features
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
To choose between languages, at the beginning of the installation select the
required language. Note the installation program runs in your selected
language, and also the Development application resources are installed in this
language. In the unlikely event you ever need to change your language
selection, simply uninstall CX-Supervisor in the normal manner, and then
reinstall, selecting the desired language.
Of course the designer enters all application data, like page names, on screen
text, button captions etc, and these all form part of the runtime application.
Translation of the runtime application is covered in the next section.
Note:
15-2
Remember the choice of development language is entirely separate to the
language the end user will use and has absolutely no impact on the runtime
application.
Runtime Language Features
The developer will be required to create the runtime application to run in at
least 1 language. This is often English but does not have to be. It could be the
same language as the developer or even a completely different language for
the end user. All translations for all system text, like dialogs and menus, are
installed automatically. User defined text entered at development time is
normally entered in the target language (see Runtime Multilingual Features if
this is not suitable). The Default language can be set so that at runtime the
translated system text automatically loaded and displayed.
To support the diversity of end users, the Runtime features come translated in
16 languages (including English) and can easily be extended by the developer
(see Adding unsupported Runtime languages).
Note:
Remember that the choice of runtime language is in no way connected to the
language of the installed Developer application.
15-2-1 Setting the Default Language
The Runtime application first starts up in the preferred default language. Set
this language during development from the Language Settings dialog (select
menu Project|Runtime Settings…|Language Settings):
226
Runtime Multilingual Features
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
After setting, when the application is next run it will start in the selected
language
Note:
15-3
In this context for this dialog only, "<Default>" means no language file will be
loaded so the default text compiled in the executable, i.e. English, will be used.
This is the initial setting, and can be useful if no Language features are being
used.
Runtime Multilingual Features
Applications supporting more than one language can be very useful, for
example for general use in countries with more than one national language, or
where a plant has a specific mix of personnel. This can also prove valuable for
international installations when the developers and on-site maintenance
engineers native language is different to the end customers. The system can
be switched to a comfortable language during work, and easily switched back
to the customer's requirement prior to hand over.
All translations for all system text (like dialogs, menus and errors etc) are
installed automatically. User defined text entered at development time (like
button captions, static text like "Value =", graph titles etc.) can be exported to a
text file for easy translation into as many additional languages as required. At
runtime the user can then change languages dynamically i.e. without having to
exit and restart the application. The translated system text and user defined
text is automatically loaded and displayed.
15-3-1 Changing Language at Runtime
The user (if permitted by security settings) may change the language at
runtime. The user may right-click the application and select the "Language
Settings…" option (see Chapter 6 Projects Menu Option Access Levels for
details of the right-click menu and setting access permissions).
227
Translating User Defined Text with the Translation Tool SECTION 15 Multilingual Fea-
Note:
In this context, "<Default>" means the language selected as the Default startup
language during development, in the above case Español (Spanish).
In addition, the developer may call the "SetLanguage" script function (see the
CX-Supervisor Script Language Reference Manual for details), for example
behind a button to allow the user to automatically switch languages.
15-3-2 User Defined Text
While the Runtime system is shipped with full translations for all system text,
any "user defined text" added by the developer must be translated and these
translations incorporated into the application. Examples of user-defined text
are:
•
Button captions, like "Open Page”
•
Text in Text objects, like "Value ="
•
Default values of Text Points
•
Chart and Graph titles
The system always loads user defined text from files with the file name exactly
the same as the language selection, and extension ".UDT". The file names for
installed languages are: English, Czech, Danish, Deutsch, Español, Finnish,
French, Italiano, Nederlands (België), Norwegian, Polish, Português, Russian,
Slovenija, Srpski and Swedish.
15-4
Note:
IUser defined text is specific to each application, and therefore is located in the
application project directory i.e. in the same folder as the <project>.SCS file.
Note:
IIn CX-Supervisor version 1.25 and earlier the user defined text was stored in
files with a .USL extension. These files are in MBCS format. For backwards
compatibility, if these files still exist they will be loaded as MBCS and converted
to Unicode temporarily for the duration of the runtime. For this conversion to
succeed, the operating system must be configured to support displaying and
converting the original language. To permanently convert a USL translation file
to a Unicode format UDT file simply open the USL file in Notepad, select Save
As and choose Encoding "Unicode" and change the extension to UDT.
Note:
If both a UDT and old style USL file are present the Runtime will load and use
translations from the newer UDT file.
Translating User Defined Text with the Translation Tool
At any time during development, select Translation Tool from the Tools menu.
A dialog similar to below will be shown:
228
Translating User Defined Text with the Translation Tool SECTION 15 Multilingual Fea-
The Translation Tool can also be launched manually from the Start button, and
the "Default.UDT" for the required project loaded.
The Translation Tool can be distributed to translators licence free, and an
installation package can be found on the original CD in the folder "Translation
Tool"
The User Defined Text for the application is shown in the first column, sorted
alphabetically. A column is shown for each existing translated UDT file. To add
new translations, click the Add New Language toolbar button and select the
required language. Now simply select each cell and type the required
translation. Non translatable text (like numbers, product names or formatting
e.g. "1.0", "Microsoft Windows" or "###.###") can be left blank to use the
original translation, or Copy and Pasted from other columns.
When completed, exit the Translation Tool and save the changes. The User
Defined Text will now be loaded when you change languages at Runtime.
If some development text with translations is changed or corrected the
translations will be shown in Red as below, as if the Application text is missing.
Where there are translations for text that is not in the Application Text, the
whole row is shown in Red. To correct this problem either copy the old
translations to the correct row, or just delete the unwanted translation. When
all columns are corrected you can save and close the Translation Tool. When
reopened the highlighted rows have been deleted. Alternatively you can delete
an entire highlighted row by right clicking on the row header (with the row
number) and selecting Delete Selected Row.
Where older .USL files exist, they will be loaded if no corresponding UDT file
exists, and converted to Unicode. When saving, new Unicode UDT files are
always written.
229
Translating User Defined Text Manually
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
If you need translations for the same text in different contexts, Show the
Object ID column and select the Add new object ID string button. Select the
application text for the new translation and the object context for this special
case. This is in the format PageName followed by a dot followed by
ObjectName for example MyPage.Push_1
Any text that includes a quote " character cannot be stored so is automatically
converted to single quote ' character. Translations must also include single
quote characters.
To enter a 'newline' in the edit field hold the <Ctrl> key and press the Return
key.
15-5
Translating User Defined Text Manually
1, 2, 3…
To get the user defined text translated and incorporated follow these steps:
1. Develop your application completely. It is easier (and more effective) to
perform these steps just once. However if further development is required,
repeat these steps and use a development tool like WinGrep, Visual
Sourcesafe or other version control software which should easily show the
changes that have been made.
2. Export the user defined text by selecting menu Project|Create User
Language File. This will create a file in the project directory called
"default.udt".
3. Copy this file for as many translations as are required. Name each copy
<language>.udt using exactly the same text (particularly the accents), as
appears in the Language Settings dialog. If the filename prefix is not
exactly the same the file will not be loaded. The format of these files is:
"development text","translated text",optional object ID
The object ID (e.g. "Text_1") is optional but can be supplied if specific text
requires different translations for different objects. For example "Run" in
English could be used as a verb on a button, and as static text for a run
number. In this case different translations can be supplied depending on
the object.
4. Get these files translated. An editor like Notepad can be used to enter the
translated text in the second column i.e. in-between the quotes after the
first comma.
5. Copy the translated files back to the application directory. The runtime
should now automatically use these files.
230
Note:
Titles of pages cannot be translated. If necessary the page title can be hidden
in the Page Properties dialog, and custom title using a static text object added
which does support automatic translation.
Note:
Any text that includes a quote " character cannot be stored so is automatically
converted to single quote ' character. Translations must also include single
quote characters.
Note:
Any newline characters will be converted to "\n" so that each translation
always appears on one line in the file. Translations should also include the "\n"
characters and never include carriage returns part way through the translation.
Configuring Windows for Language Support
15-6
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
Configuring Windows for Language Support
15-6-1 Windows XP
Being the most modern operating system, language support provided by
Windows XP is the best. If you are considering a Multilingual application this
operating system offers the best solution. It is possible to install language
support for multiple languages, multiple character sets and fonts, multiple
keyboard layouts for input and to switch between them. To achieve this, follow
these steps:
1. Start Windows in the normal way
2. Open Control Panel and select Regional and Language options
3. The Regional Options tab settings do not affect the language support, but
can be set as required
4. On the Languages tab, click Details
5. Add all the Input Locales required and set the preferred default. These
affect how the keyboard is mapped for typing letters and can be changed as
CX-Supervisor is running by the box in the task bar
6. OK all dialogs and install new OS files from CD if requested. Reboot if
required
Note:
If some extended characters in standard Windows controls (like listboxes,
editboxes etc) appear as solid boxes it may be necessary to select the
required language on the Advanced tab for Language for non-Unicode
programs. Microsoft does not document the reason for this.
Note:
In some circumstances (like Russian or Greek support) it has been noted
"Install files for complex script" needs to be selected on the Languages tab.
Microsoft does not document the reason for this..
15-6-2 Windows 2000
Windows 2000 language support is reasonable. It is possible to install
language support for multiple languages, multiple character sets and fonts,
multiple keyboard layouts for input and to switch between them. To achieve
this, follow these steps:
1. Start Windows in the normal way.
2. Open Control Panel and select Regional Options.
3. The Numbers, Currency, Time and Date tabs settings do not affect the
language support, but can be set as required.
4. On the General tab, select ALL the languages that may be required in the
Language settings for the system section.
Note:
If some extended characters in standard Windows controls (like listboxes,
editboxes etc) appear as solid boxes it may be necessary to change the
default System Locale. Click the Set Default… button and select the required
language.
Note:
In some circumstances (like Russian or Greek support) it has been noted
"Thai" language also needs to be selected. Microsoft does not document the
reason for this.
5. Add all the required languages in the Input Locales tab and set the preferred
default. These affect how the keyboard is mapped for typing letters and can be
changed as CX-Supervisor is running by the box in the task bar.
6. OK all dialogs and install new OS files from CD if requested. Reboot if
required.
231
Configuring Windows for Language Support
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
15-6-3 Loading Old Projects
Projects and pages created in CX-Supervisor 1.25 and earlier use Microsoft's
Double Byte Character Sets (known as DBCS, or sometimes MBCS) for
multilingual features. The formatting of character tables in MBCS is not the
same as Unicode. However, old projects and pages are automatically
converted to Unicode when they are loaded, and will then be saved in
Unicode. This works without problem if the project is English, or contains no
extended characters. However there can be problems converting old MBCS
that use extended German, Spanish, Finnish and especially MBCS Russian
characters. Follow this section to load and convert these types of projects
properly.
Note:
As always, when updating the format of the project file to a new file version
always keep a copy of the old project for backup purposes.
Note:
For the conversion process to work properly, and all extended characters to be
correctly converted it is vital that the conversion takes place while the
computer is configured to correctly display these characters.
Failure to follow these steps will result in extended characters being
substituted for the nearest suitable character, which is likely to be incorrect
and cause errors. Once saved, the conversion error cannot be undone so any
occurrences will need to be edited manually. This can be time consuming and
should be avoided.
These settings are only required temporarily during the conversion process.
Once converted to Unicode the Operating System can be reconfigured and
the Unicode characters will be displayed correctly.
Windows XP
To configure Windows XP to correctly display extended characters, to allow
conversion to Unicode:
1. Open Control Panel and select Regional and Language options.
2. Click on the Advanced tab.
3. From the 'Language for non-Unicode programs' select the language that the
application was written for. Remember that CX-Supervisor 1.25 and earlier
was a non-Unicode program.
Note:
In some circumstances (like Russian or Greek support) it has been noted
"Install files for complex script" needs to be selected on the Languages tab.
Microsoft does not document the reason for this.
4. OK all dialogs and install new OS files from CD if requested. Reboot if
required.
Windows 2000
To configure Windows 2000 to correctly display extended characters, to allow
conversion to Unicode:
1. Open Control Panel and select Regional Options.
2. On the General tab, select the original application language in the
Language settings for the system section.
Note:
In some circumstances (like Russian or Greek support) it has been noted
"Thai" language also needs to be selected. Microsoft does not document the
reason for this.
3. Change the default System Locale to the original application language.
Click the Set Default… button and select the required language.
232
Data Log Viewer
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
4. OK all dialogs and install new OS files from CD if requested. Reboot if
required.
Once configured, follow these steps to convert the application:
1. It can be worth checking the language configuration, by running the old
application under the old CX-Supervisor version and confirming all characters
are correctly shown.
2. Install the new CX-Supervisor version and load the old project.
3. Open each page and select "File menu|Save Page" to force the pages to be
written in the new Unicode format.
4. Select "Project menu|Save" to force the project to be written in the new
Unicode format and then run the project to recompile the application.
5. Test the application fully in all supported languages, and by entering text
from different Locales.
15-7
Data Log Viewer
The Data Log Viewer also supports the 16 runtime languages defined above.
The selected language can be dynamically changed from the Data Log Viewer
options menu.
15-8
Standard Web Pages
The Standard Web Pages offer the choice of 5 languages (English, French,
German, Italian and Spanish). The selected language can be dynamically
changed from the Settings page (within the web browser).
15-9
Adding Unsupported Runtime Languages
Although an impressive number of runtime languages are supported, you may
require a language not listed. A developer can easily add support for further
languages to the CX-Supervisor runtime:
1, 2, 3…
To add additional runtime languages follow these steps:
1. Copy the file "English.lng" in the installed application folder (default is
"C:\Program Files\Omron\CX-Supervisor") and rename the copy with the
language name, e.g. "American.lng".
2. Translate the text between quotes. Note that formatting characters like %s
or %d indicate a position for inserted text or numbers so should be left in
the relevant place. Also the '&' character used in menus signifies the
keyboard shortcut for the item so select an appropriate character in the
translated language.
3. The Runtime will now automatically show any new files with .LNG
extension in the "Language Settings" dialog.
4. Repeat steps 1 and 2 above for the same file with the .LND extension.
This provides the translations for the Data Log Viewer.
5. Create a new language file for the user defined text as described in the
section User Defined Text above.
To deploy this language to a new machine, just install CX-Supervisor as
normal, and then copy the .LNG and .LND file to the installed application
folder. These languages will then be available for all applications run on this
machine. When copying the application files also include the newly translated
UDT files.
233
Popup Keyboard Layout
SECTION 15 Multilingual Features
15-10 Popup Keyboard Layout
The layout of characters shown on the Alphanumeric popup keyboard can be
set for existing or new languages. The layout is updated when a new language
is selected.
All keyboard layouts are saved in files with .KBD extension and have the same
name as the selected language.
Note:
1, 2, 3…
If there is no valid keyboard layout for the selected language then the default
layout in SCSDEFS.KBD is used. This already caters for all the western
languages supported.
To create a new keyboard layout:
1. Copy the file "scsdefs.kbd" in the installed application folder (default is
"C:\Program Files\Omron\CX-Supervisor") and rename the copy with the
language name, e.g. "American.kbd".
2. Follow the instructions at the top of the file to add each character for each
key.
3. Save the new keyboard layout.
4. The Runtime will now automatically update the layout when the new
language is selected.
234
Application Analysis
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
SECTION 16
Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
A visualisation application should always be designed in advance with special
care being taken to make best use of bandwidth. This design must be closely
linked with the PLC program design so the two processes complement each
other. Visualisation design should never be an after-thought
CX-Supervisor comes with two utilities to help you monitor how healthy your
application is while you are designing and testing it:
16-1
•
Application Analysis performs a validation of the application and checks
for communications performance (theoretical), error conditions such as
use of non-existent points, use of obsolete functions such as Sleep or
DDE and provides an overall summary of the application. In some cases,
it will also offer suggestions on how to resolve some of the problems
found.
•
Performance Monitor works during the runtime to check the actual
performance figures and provides analysis based on how your application
actually works with your network and PLC program.
Application Analysis
An application can be analysed using the 'Analyse Application…' option from
the main 'Project' menu in the Development package. After the application has
been analysed the following dialog box will be displayed.
235
Application Analysis
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Summary Tab
The 'Summary' tab provides an overview of the
application data including any warnings or errors found.
Warnings Tab
The 'Warnings' tab identifies specific problems found with
the application and may offer suggestions for resolving
the problems.
It many cases, it will also be possible to go straight to the
source of the problem by accessing the popup menu
associated with the item, allowing the problem to be
resolved directly from the 'Analyse Application' dialog
box.
Network Tab
The 'Network' tab provides information specific to the
selected network configuration. Where more than one
network is configured, each network can be selected
independently from a drop-down list.
PLC Tab
The 'PLC' tab provides information specific to the
selected PLC. Where more than one PLC is configured,
each PLC can be selected independently from a dropdown list.
Pages Tab
The 'Page' tab provides information specific to the
selected page. Where more than one page is configured,
each page can be selected independently from a dropdown list.
16-1-1 Data Analysed
This following information explains what data will be analysed when the
'Analyse Application' feature is run.
236
Always Updating
The total number of points that are always
updating whether they are on display or not - this
should be kept to a minimum to reduce bandwidth
use - only use this if the point value is required by
scripts or other actions on pages where this point
is not otherwise used.
Always Updating %
The percentage of points that are always updating
- this should be reduced in favour of update on
display
Always Updating Bytes/
Sec
This is a count of points that are set to Always
update at the specified rate. It is best to have a
small number of different update rates as this
helps CX-Server to optimise. Whilst good to have
a low number of different update rates it is also
worth remembering that the more updates per
second the more bandwidth is used.
Inputs On Request
The total number of inputs that are on request.
These are potentially less efficient than an 'on
interval' - a single point being requested is not
optimised by CX-Server when sending to a PLC
many points at the same interval can be sent in the
same message with negligible overheads.
Application Analysis
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Inputs/Outputs at X
(M)Sec
This list shows the total number of device points at
each update rate - these should be kept to a few
well chosen update rates - many points on very
few update rates that are not more frequent than
absolutely necessary
Invalid Points/ Invalid CX- These indicate that the cdm file has become
corrupted. CX-Supervisor auto generates the cdm
Server Point Keys
References to invalid CX- file so if this has become corrupted for some
reason, you can close all Omron software and
Server point keys
delete the file. When you re-open CX-Supervisor
developer the file will be re-generated.
Max Bandwith % Used
This is the percentage of the network used in the
worst case (Theoretical max bandwidth) scenario.
This is based on an assumption of bandwidth for
the particular network and does not take into
account network traffic or other variables.
Max Bytes/Sec
This is the theoretical maximum number of bytes
per second of updating points - this is a better
gauge of bandwidth use.
Max Points/Sec Max
Elements/Sec
This is the theoretical maximum number of points
that will update each second - the higher this
number the greater chance of comms problems this value is very dependent on data type though
so is not the best reflection on bandwidth use.
Some points are arrays so the element count
reflects the number of elements updated per
second. Again this is independent of data type but
when compared with Max Points/Sec can give an
idea of how many points are actually array points.
Outputs On Change
The total number of points that are output to the
device whenever the value has changed
Outputs On Request
The total number of points that are only output to
the device when request - this can be more
efficient if the value changes frequently but the
device doesn't need to be notified of this
frequently,
References to nonexistent points
This indicates a big problem - you are using a
point in a script or in some other action which
doesn't exist - this will fail if this script or action
ever runs.
Theoretical Max
(Bandwidth) Bytes/Sec
This is a measure of all the points updating all the
time and all points on display for the worst case
page in the project. This figure should be kept as
low as possible and within the bandwidth of your
network.
237
Application Analysis
238
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Total ActiveX Objects
This is a count of the total number of ActiveX
objects used in the project, this includes objects
which are used more than once. Using ActiveX is
a great way of adding advanced functionality to
your application but it carries the risk that the
component used may not be as reliable as
required.
Total Alarms
A count of the total defined alarms on the system this is limited in ME so this gives an idea of if the
limit is being approached. Many alarms also make
an application harder to manage and maintain so
keep this number as low as possible and avoid
unnecessary alarms.
Total DDE Points
DDE is an antiquated technology and is prone to
problems especially when used with non English
characters. Any DDE points should be removed
and an alternative used instead.
Total Graphical Objects
The total number of objects used on all the pages
in the project. The more objects that are in the
project the slower larger it is on disk and the longer
it may take to re-draw a page. This is especially
key when using an IPC where space and power
are at a premium.
Total Memory Points
The total number of points that are not on an
external device. These are the most efficient
points as they don't consume network bandwidth,
Total OPC/Other Points
The total number of points that are external to CXSupervisor using a comms interface such as OPC
or on another CX-Supervisor runtime.
Total Pages
This is the total number of pages in your project
(including pop up pages). This is limited in ME so
this gives an idea of when you are approaching
this limit. Too many pages can make a project hard
to maintain so this should be kept to a minimum.
Total PLC Points
The total number of points in the application that
are on a device
Total PLCs
The total number of PLCs in this project - Any
PLCs used on the same network will obviously
share bandwidth. If there are more PLCs here than
you expect, check the PLC configuration and
make sure you've not defined a duplicate PLC.
Total Points
The total number of points in the project.
Obviously for simplicity and performance this
should be kept to the minimum you require.
Total Regular Interval
Scripts
Regular interval scripts indicate poor design
decisions. Running a script on a regular interval
can be inefficient and cause a significant increase
on local CPU usage. If regular interval scripts also
update points on devices this can lead to
increased bandwidth use. Consider using an 'on
condition' script instead.
Performance Monitor
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Total Sleep commands
The sleep command has been shown to cause
problems with applications due to the necessity to
have the containing script in a separate thread. It
is highly recommended that this command is not
used and an alternative method is used such as
'On Condition' scripts which can be triggered when
something completes.
There is almost always a better, more efficient
alternative to a Sleep - see the User Manual FAQ
"How Does Sleep work?
Update on Display %
The percentage of points that only update when
you can see them.
Update on Display Bytes/ If a point value is not required unless you can see
Sec
it this is a more efficient way of getting its value
frequently. The same recommendations apply as
with 'Always Updating' but these points will only
update when you can see them (the page opens).
Updating When Displayed The total number of points on a device that are
only updated when on display - this could be 100%
if there is only one page.
16-2
Performance Monitor
The 'Performance Monitor' dialog box (shown below) can be accessed from
the 'Performance' menu on the Runtime popup menu.
239
Performance Monitor
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Actual CPS
The number of characters per second being used
on the network, if this is approaching the same
value as the theoretical CPS (60% or higher) then
network problems are likely.
This is how many points/elements are being
updated every second - if all points are at 1
Average Active Elements/ second interval, the calculation would be 1 and the
Average should be very close to this. If you have 2
Sec
points at 0.5 seconds, the calculation would be 2...
Calculated Max Points/
If the Average and Calculation differ considerably
Sec
then there is a problem with bandwidth use.
Calculated Max
Elements/Sec
Average Active Points/
Sec
PLC Average Latency
(ms)
The average time it takes the PLC to process its
own programs and any other requests of it before
responding to a particular request.
Processing Delay
(ms)Processing Time
(ms)
This is the time used by CX-Supervisor
applications, if these values are too high it would
indicate the processing required by your
application (e.g. scripts) is too much and you need
to think more about the design of your application.
Read Time (ms)
Max Write Time ms)
This is the time it takes CX-Supervisor to read or
write a point on the PLC, the lower this number the
better performance you are getting. If you are
overloading the network, this value will increase
and the heartbeat interval will also be too high
RX Bytes (CXSupervisor)
The number of bytes received by CX-Supervisor
from CX-Server
RX Bytes/Sec (CXSupervisor)
The number of bytes per second received by CXSupervisor from CX-Server, this should be well
below the bandwidth of the chosen networks
capacity. Also take into account other bandwidth
use such as received data and other unrelated
network traffic
RX Heartbeat Interval
(ms)
If you have an Input point at 1 second this is used
as a heartbeat. If there is no point at this rate there
will be no monitor of heartbeat interval. This is so
the measure doesn't actually affect the
performance.
Write Time (ms)
Max Read Time (ms)
RX Average Heartbeat
Interval (ms)
RX Average Heartbeat
Deviation (ms)
Theoretical Max CPS
240
The average heartbeat should be about 1000 with
the deviation as low as possible. If this number is
much more than 1000 then this would indicate a
communications problem. Even if you don't notice
in normal use, CX-Supervisor is communicating
faster than the network bandwidth or infrastructure
can cope with and performance is suffering.
An assumed maximum CPS possible for the
particular network, this is a rough calculation and
is only used as a guide. It does not take into
account other network traffic or differences
between throughput of different PC network cards.
Performance Monitor
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
Total Active Points
Total Active Elements
The number of active memory addresses on a
PLC - the Active points could be in arrays of many
elements so the Elements is a better guide to how
much memory on the PLC you are addressing.
This number should not be a 'surprise' - if this
number looks large you need to consider if you are
using and updating too many points at once and
affecting performance.
TX Bytes (CX-Server) RX The bytes transmitted or received to the PLC from
Bytes (CX-Server)
CX-Server.
TX Bytes (CX-Supervisor) The number of bytes transmitted from CXSupervisor to CX-Server
TX Bytes/Sec (CXSupervisor)
The current number of bytes per second being
transmitted from CX-Supervisor to CX-Server, this
should be kept well below the bandwidth capacity
of the network being used. Also take into account
other bandwidth use such as received data and
other unrelated network traffic.
241
Performance Monitor
242
SECTION 16 Application Analysis / Performance Monitor
An Overview of OPC
SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client
SECTION 17
Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client
This chapter introduces OPC Server to a new user, and explains how to use
CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client.
17-1
An Overview of OPC
OPC stands for OLE for Process Control, and is a standard published by the
OPC Foundation. The basic aim of the OPC standard is to allow hardware
vendors to produce software drivers (called OPC Servers) and for software
vendors to produce applications (called OPC Clients) which use a standard
method for data interchange. This allows software and hardware from different
vendors to be used together.
Based on Microsoft's OLE (now ActiveX), COM (component object model) and
DCOM (distributed component object model) technologies, OPC consists of a
standard set of interfaces, properties, and methods for use in process-control
and manufacturing-automation applications. The ActiveX/COM technologies
define how individual software components can interact and share data.
Backed by Microsoft's NT technology, OPC provides a common interface for
communicating with diverse process-control devices, regardless of the
controlling software or devices in the process. The goal of the standard is
Plug-and-Play, a concept developed by Microsoft and a number of other
companies a few years ago. By using a standard way of configuring computer
hardware (and software interfaces) automatically, a device will easily connect
to another and immediately work without the need for lengthy installation
procedures or complex configuration. Instead of having to learn how to use
100 or more custom toolkits, users will only have to learn one set of tools,
because all OPC drivers will work the same way. OPC's purpose is to compel
the automation industry suppliers to push all device drivers toward a standard
form. Essentially, OPC defines a common interface that permits interface
development work to be performed once and then easily reused. The OPC
standard requires hardware suppliers to provide front-line data collection and
distribution. They are the most familiar with how to access the device's internal
data efficiently. These devices then become OPC servers, providing data to
OPC client applications consistently. Application developers can then write
code in any language deemed appropriate.
The latest version of the OPC standard is version 2. This replaces the earlier
version 1 standard.
CX-Supervisor uses an OPC version 2 interface to connect to an OPC Server
which is version 2 compliant. Note that the OPC version 1 interface has been
superseded, and is not supported.
Users of CX-Supervisor may need some basic understanding of OPC. For
more information on OPC, see the OPC Foundation web site at
www.opcfoundation.org.
For instructions on configuring your DCOM settings for connection to remote
PCs, see Appendix A.
17-1-1 A Brief History of OPC Data Access
In the early 1990s a group of people from several important companies
involved in the creation of SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition)
systems began meeting at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond. Their
interests focused on the use of the Windows operating system within the
factory automation environment, in particular for the acquisition of real time
243
An Overview of OPC
SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client
data. Microsoft at the time were working on the development of OLE 2.0
(Object Linking and Embedding) and it was apparent that this new technology
would replace that of DDE (Dynamic Data Exchange) which up until that point
had been used extensively for data exchange within SCADA systems
designed for Windows. The new OLE technology was more flexible, robust
and efficient than DDE.
OLE provided an opportunity to create a standard interface between the
SCADA core and the device drivers responsible for reading and writing data to
various automation devices such as PLCs. Such a standard interface would
benefit both the SCADA vendors and equipment suppliers as the SCADA
vendors would not need to invest costly effort in developing software drivers,
while the equipment manufacturers could provide just one driver that would
work with all Windows software - in the same way that printer manufacturers
already could.
The first draft of the OPC (OLE for Process Control) specification v1.0 was
released in December 1995. The following year, the group of companies
involved in the definition of the standard decided that an independent body
must be set up to manage the OPC specification. This decision resulted in the
formation of the OPC Foundation that has continued to develop the philosophy
of standardised interfaces for SCADA.
In 1998 the Data Access 2.0 specification for OPC was released. This
addressed several deficiencies and ambiguities in the original standard and
included specifications for both the Automation interfaces (typically used by
VB programmers) and Custom interfaces (typically used by C++
programmers).
In 2000, using these DA 2.0 specifications Omron created the first version of
CX-Server OPC, which provides Client and Server software for the CXAutomation Suite software range.
The current version of Omron's CX-Server OPC is compliant with version 2.05
of the Data Access specification.
17-1-2 Other OPC Specifications
Since the first OPC Data Access specification was produced in 1995 the OPC
Foundation have addressed a number of additional areas of control and
automation normally associated with SCADA. The original specification for
Data Access is now just part of a whole series of specifications that include
such areas as Alarms/Events and Batch control, although the DA interface is
still far more commonly supported than the others.
The figure below shows some of the current areas covered by OPC Interface
Specifications:
244
An Overview of OPC
SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client
Figure 1: OPC Interface Specifications
17-1-3 Key Technologies used by OPC
This section provides, for convenience, a brief introduction to some key
technologies that are used by, or that form part of, OPC. Some of these are
described in more detail in the appendices; plentiful reference books are
available elsewhere describing all of them in any required level of detail.
17-1-3-1 A Brief Introduction to DCOM
Microsoft describes DCOM as:
"The Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) is a protocol that
enables software components to communicate directly over a network in
a reliable, secure, and efficient manner. Previously called "Network OLE,"
DCOM is designed for use across multiple network transports, including
Internet protocols such as HTTP. DCOM is based on the Open Software
Foundation's DCE-RPC spec and will work with both Java applets and
ActiveX® components through its use of the Component Object Model
(COM)."
In other words, DCOM is an object-programming model for the implementation
of distributed applications using a client server pattern. A client can use
several servers at the same time and a server can provide functionality to
multiple clients simultaneously.
Translating that into plainer English, COM basically allows software
components to be written in such a way that they can be used by all COMaware applications (e.g. C++, later versions of Visual Basic) without those
applications needing to know anything about the "internals" of the object.
DCOM is simply the distributed version of COM - i.e. the objects can be
spread across a network. It is a very powerful system, although some
machine-level and security configuration may be required to allow it to work
correctly and reliably.
Central to the capability of a DCOM object are its interfaces. All
communication with a DCOM object occurs through its interfaces - an
interface is said to provide a "contract" (a full and unchanging description) for
the functionality provided by that object. Each interface has a unique ID and
describes a group of related methods. The description of the interface defines
the syntax and the semantics of the services provided by that interface - the
internal implementation of those services doesn't matter to the calling
applications.
245
An Overview of OPC
SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Client
In the case of OPC these interfaces for each of the DCOM objects are defined
within the relevant specifications. This guide only deals with the OPC Data
Access specification Custom (used by C++) and Automation (used by script
languages and VB) interfaces.
17-1-3-2 What are the benefits of OPC?
Asking what the business benefits of OPC are is like asking what the benefits
of plug-and-play technology are to the computer industry. More choices, better
access to process data, ease of plug-and-play operation, and efficient
utilization of development resources are the main benefits of OPC technology.
OPC brings the value that comes with the use of standards, including reduced
training costs, reduced custom development costs, and lower long-term
maintenance costs. By design, OPC-compliant products work seamlessly with
one another. With this plug-and-play approach, off-the-shelf components can
be brought together efficiently to solve immediate requirements. In addition,
long-term maintenance and upgrading can be achieved by removing and
replacing individual components in a system without any work needed to "wire
up" the new pieces. To illustrate the savings, imagine the increase in cost if
every household appliance had its own type of wall plug. Eliminating
customisation drastically reduces the cost of an automation system by saving
money during acquisition, installation, and maintenance.
17-1-3-3 Freedom of choice
With the introduction of OPC-compliant manufacturing automation products,
users are provided their due right to select and implement systems comprised
of best-in-class components without the pain of custom interfaces. This user
benefit is sometimes referred to as "freedom of choice." For example, both
Netscape and Internet Explorer can browse the web equally well, but people
use the browser they like best. As a result of this freedom of choice, vendors
will need to become more competitive and offer superior products and
solutions to maintain their customers. Besides freedom of choice, the user
also has vendor independence, or "freedom from a proprietary lock." If the
implemented control system is comprised of modules with proprietary
interfaces, any customer who desires to upgrade any component function of
the integrated whole is entirely dependent on the vendor. With OPC
components, only the module of interest must be upgraded and not the entire
system. The requirement to use the original vendor is eliminated. High-priced
proprietary solutions (and their expensive after-sale support contracts) will
yield to lower cost OPC-enabled alternatives.
17-1-3-4 Time Reduction through Lower System Integration Costs
OPC eliminates the need for costly custom software integration. OPC provides
plug-and-play software and hardware components from a variety of
automation software, device, and system suppliers. Process and
manufacturing companies can easily integrate applications into corporatewide automation and business systems, something that has been virtually
unachievable in the past. OPC-compatible components greatly reduce system
integration costs because all software and hardware components adhere to a
single, standard interface that's being adopted around the world. Automation
suppliers are providing hardware devices with integrated OPC servers that are
replacing proprietary device-driver software. The driver connection between
hardware and software from different vendors has historically been the
number one headache in system integration. OPC offers the opportunity to
ease the pain and shorten the application development cycle. This gets
automation projects up faster, which saves time for new projects and brings
the benefit of automation to the process sooner.
246
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC
17-1-3-5 Who should care about OPC?
You should care about OPC if your applications are largely run in personal
computers and you are involved with solving plant integration problems. As a
critical mass of servers and OPC-enabled applications become available,
OPC is likely to become an important part of your plant integration tool set.
The OPC specification promises a future without proprietary interfaces that will
greatly benefit both manufacturing customers and automation suppliers.
17-1-3-6 How is OPC going to improve my bottom line?
From a business perspective, the use of OPC for connectivity promises to
reduce the cost of automation, control, and integration solutions. By using
OPC compliant products, significant savings can be achieved through shorter
development efforts and a wide choice of vendor hardware and software
solutions. For every automation system installed today, a significant amount of
time and money is spent ensuring that the system can share information with
other systems and devices. OPC will save the customer time and money by
eliminating a lot of the system integration problems caused by lack of open
standards that exist between automation devices, systems, and manufacturing
software. After an automation system is installed, OPC will not improve
business bottom line directly; however, OPC will provide a common method to
access real-time information. The real key to improving the bottom line is to
distribute and use the information throughout the business' value chain.
17-2
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers
The exact procedure for connecting CX-Supervisor to Third Party OPC
Servers will depend on the server being used. Consult your server
documentation for full details. However, the following is a basic overview:
1, 2, 3…
Start the OPC Server and configure any settings and workspace items as
described in the vendor's manual.
1. Start CX-Supervisor and open your application.
2. Open the Point Editor by selecting the Point Editor option from the
Utilities menu or by clicking the
button.
3. In the Point Editor dialog box click the
Add Point dialog box.
button in the toolbar to open the
4. In the Add Point dialog box move to the I/O Type: options and select the
Input, Output or Input / Output option as appropriate. Note that the I/O
Update Rate: and I/O Attributes: options and displayed.
5. In the I/O Attributes: options select OPC/Other and click the Setup button.
This will open the Communications Control Attributes dialog box.
6. In the Communications Control Attributes dialog box enter the appropriate
parameters as follows:
Communications Control Attributes
247
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC
Server: This shows the name of the communications object to connect to
the server i.e. OMRONCXOPCCommunicationsControl. If you wish to use
a different object make your selection from the drop down list. To Add,
Modify or Delete an object click the Info button. You will only need 1
communications object per OPC server but note you can connect to more
1 server at a time if desired using this setting.
This field is initially blank and an OPC control should be added. Select the
Add option, which will open the Communications Control dialog box. From
the list of control objects select the one to be added and click the OK
button.
Note:
On adding, the Communication Control Properties dialog box is
automatically shown as detailed below. To edit these properties later
select Modify from the Info menu.
Group: Select the Group containing the required item from the dropdown
list. To Add, Modify or Delete a Group click the Info button.
Items: The Items within the selected Group are listed. The Item Attributes
dialog box can be used to add or edit the items. To Add, Modify or Delete
an Item click the Info button. Selecting the Add or Modify option will open
the Items Attributes window from where the item details can be added or
updated.
Array Size: Enter the number of array elements in the CX-Supervisor
point that this item should have. If not an array, enter 1.
OPC COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL PROPERTIES
(A) SERVER TAB
The options in this window allow you to select the correct name of the
computer with the OPC Server and select the appropriate server.
248
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC
OPC Communication Control Settings
Name: - This is the name of the selected communications control. The
default
name
for
the
first
control
is
OMRONCXOPCCommunicationsControl. For each additional control
added the number increments by one.
Computer Name: - This shows the system name for the computer with
the OPC server. If the server is on the same computer as CX-Supervisor,
set to '(Local)'. If the OPC server is on a remote computer click the Show
All button and select the correct name from the list. If you cannot identify
the PC in the list contact your system administrator.
Server Name: - This shows the names of the OPC Version 2 compliant
servers installed on the specified computer. Make your selection from the
drop down list. Clicking the Info button opens the Server Status
Information dialog box for the selected server, check the information is
correct and click the OK button.
Note:
If the server is not shown in the drop down list, the server may not be fully
OPC version 2 compliant. Check the server documentation.
Project File: - This is the name of the current Project file which stores the
setup of the OPC items. If no name is shown or it is incorrect click the New
or Open button as appropriate.
Clicking the Open… button opens the Open Project dialog box from where
you can navigate to the project file you wish to open. If you want to create
a new file click the New… button to open the Create Project dialog box. In
the Create Project dialog box navigate to the directory in which you want
to create your new file and enter your File Name. Select the appropriate
file type (Save as type - i.e. File Name.opc) and click the Save button.
Note:
A Project File name can not be entered from the keyboard. File names
can only be entered by using the New or Open buttons.
(B) GROUPS TAB
The groups within the selected project file are listed. A Group is made up
of one or more items (data points) that share a common update, rate
enabling them to be controlled as a single entity. For example you could
create any number of groups each containing Items that have the same
update rate.
There is no limit to the number of groups you can have in a Project File
and each group can contain any number or type of Items (data points)
provided they have the same update rate.
249
Using CX-Supervisor with OPC Servers SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC
Note:
This dialog box cannot be opened until a valid project file exists in which
to create the groups.
Groups: - Use the Add, Edit and Delete buttons to show the Group
Attributes dialog box and update the list of groups. For identification
purposes groups should be given logical names. The defaults are Group1,
Group2 etc.
i) GROUP ATTRIBUTES
Name: - This is the name of the selected group. If you are editing an
existing group name or creating a new one the current or default name is
overwritten. The default name for new groups are Group1, Group2 etc.
Update Rate: - This is the rate at which the Items (data points) in the
group will be interrogated and new data entered if it is a readout, or read
from if it's a control. Enter the rate as a numerical value and select the
units from the drop down list. The minimum value is 100msec; the
maximum is 99999Sec i.e. over 27 hours.
Active On Startup: - Checking this option will make the Group active
when the OPC server is started. This means the items contained within
will be able to read and write data. The default is checked.
(C) ITEMS TAB
The Items within the selected group are listed. Items are data points of
information stored in the OPC Server. The Item Attributes dialog box can
be used to add or edit the items.
Note: This dialog box cannot be opened until at least one group is added.
i) ITEM ATTRIBUTES
The Item Attributes dialog box enables you to define the attributes of each
Item (data point) in the selected group.
Name: - This is the client name for an Item i.e. a point of data.
250
Using with Omron's CX-Server OPC SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC CliItem ID: - This is the OPC Server's name for the data. If the server
supports OPC item browsing facilities, click Browse to browse the OPC
Server to list the namespace groups and items to create the OPC Item ID.
Otherwise, type the OPC Item ID in the format specified in the server
documentation.
Access Path: - This is the full path name for the data point. Consult the
documentation for the server to determine the correct format.
Data Type: - From the drop down menu select the format used to record
the data point information.
Active On Startup: - Checking this option will ensure the Item is active
when the OPC server is started. The default is checked.
7. Having checked that all the parameters are correct bring control back to
the Point Editor window by closing any attributes window that may be
open.
8. To run the application, click the
button in the toolbar. The CXSupervisor Point will now be connected to the OPC Server and can be
used like all other CX-Supervisor points, i.e. to drive animations, in alarm
expressed, in recipes, for data logging etc.
17-3
Using with Omron's CX-Server OPC
1.Note that the Omron OPC server discussed is supplied as part of the CXServer OPC product.
2.Omron's OPC Server configuration is described in the CX-Server OPC
manual
3.While launched, the CX logo opens in the system tray.
4.For step 7-1-a-i, the correct Server Name is "Omron.OpenDataServer.1"
5.For step 7-1-c-i, the Item ID should be the name of the point in the CXServer project (.CDM) file configured in the server. The Access Path is not
used, and may be left blank.
6.During step 9, the Omron OPC Server logo opens momentarily as the server
starts.
251
Using with Omron's CX-Server OPC SECTION 17 Using CX-Supervisor as an OPC Cli-
252
Two Tier, Client - Server or Master - Slave SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX-Su-
SECTION 18
Connecting to a remote CX-Supervisor
application
This chapter explains how to connect multiple CX-Supervisor applications
together to form a distributed solution. Point data from one application can be
'shared' directly with other CX-Supervisor applications across the PC network.
Depending on the requirements, there are many reasons and topographies for
interconnecting CX-Supervisor applications.
18-1
Two Tier, Client - Server or Master - Slave
One application is configured as a Server application or Master. The Server is
often the main station, and is permanently switched on, and often used locally
for HMI for example but could have no graphical element, which is termed a
Blind Server. It has direct access to the Devices or Device network and is
responsible for collecting the data from the devices.
Other applications may connect to the Server to read and even control values
in the Server. These applications are called Client applications or Slaves.
Clients are often used remotely and therefore are often configured 'displayonly' applications, transferring the data from the Server using the corporate PC
network. The Clients do not talk directly to the devices, and often only connect
when required.
18-2
Peer to Peer
Several applications are written to share data with each other. Actually, an
application is written as a Server to connect directly to a device, but is also a
Client using other Servers to connect to other devices through the corporate
network.
253
Distributed Server
18-3
SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX-Supervisor application
Distributed Server
Several applications are configured as Servers for direct connection, so the
data for the system is 'distributed' across several machines. One or more
Client applications collect the data from the distributed servers. This can be
useful to help performance, by distributing the communication on the device
connections, and server processing. It can also provide different security for
different clients and offers limited protect against failures, as remaining
servers still function.
18-4
Redundant Server
Several applications are configured as Servers for direct connection to the
same Devices or Device network. The same data is collected by all Servers.
One or more clients can collect the data from any single Server, and in the
event of a Server failure, can be written to switch to data from an alternative
Server.
254
Creating a CX-Supervisor Server application SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX-
A distributed solution may be any of the above, or a combination of the ideas.
When your topography is defined, the steps to connect each Client or Server
are the same.
18-5
Creating a CX-Supervisor Server application
A Server application must collect device data, and allow clients to access it. It
may also have other elements like graphics, control or logging. To create your
application:
•
Create Device points for every data value required by the Server
application and any required by any client. See Chapter 3 - Points for more
details.
•
Configure DCOM on the server machine, to allow access from the client
machines. See Appendix A for further details.
•
Add any other elements required by the Server application e.g. Graphics,
Control, Logging, Alarms etc.
Be sure to note the computer name of the server machine.
Note:
18-6
A quick way to display the computer name is to right-click the 'Network
Neighbourhood' icon on the Windows Desktop and select 'Properties'.
Creating a CX-Supervisor Client application
The client must retrieve the data, and process it. To create your application:
1, 2, 3…
•
Add any elements required by the Client application e.g. Graphics,
Control, Logging, Alarms etc.
•
Configure DCOM on the client machine, to allow access from the server
machines. See Appendix A for further details.
•
Create points for every data value required by the Client application
following these steps:
1. Start CX-Supervisor Development and open your application, or start a
new application.
2. Open the Point Editor by selecting the Point Editor option from the Utilities
menu or by clicking the
button.
3. In the Point Editor dialog box click the
Add Point dialog box.
button in the toolbar to open the
255
Creating a CX-Supervisor Client application SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX4. In the Add Point dialog box move to the I/O Type: options and select the
Input, Output or Input / Output option as appropriate. Note that the I/O
Update Rate: and I/O Attributes: options and displayed.
5. In the I/O Attributes: options select OPC/Other and click the Setup button.
This will open the Communications Control Attributes dialog box.
6. In the Communications Control Attributes dialog box enter the appropriate
parameters as follows:
Communications Control Attributes
Server: This shows the name of the communications object to connect to
the server i.e. OMRONCXSupervisorCommunicationsControl. If you wish
to use a different object make your selection from the drop down list. To
Add, Modify or Delete an object click the Info button.
Selecting the Add option will open the Communications Control dialog
box. From the list of control objects select 'OMRON CX-Supervisor
Communications Control' and click the OK button.
Clicking the OK button in the Communications Controls dialog box will
open the Communications Control Properties dialog box from where the
server details can be added or updated. Click 'Show All' and select the
computer name of the server machine from the list. To edit these
properties later select Modify… from the Info menu.
Group: Select the Group containing the required item from the dropdown
list. To Add, Modify or Delete a Group click the Info button.
Items: The Items within the selected Group are listed. The Item Attributes
dialog box can be used to add or edit the items. To Add, Modify or Delete
an Item click the Info button. Selecting the Add or Modify option will open
the Items Attributes window from where the item details can be added or
updated.
Array Size: Enter the number of array elements in the CX-Supervisor
point that this item should have. If not an array, enter 1.
256
Creating a CX-Supervisor Client application SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX7. Having checked that all the parameters are correct return to the Point
Editor window by closing any attributes window that may be open.
To run the application, click the
button. The CX-Supervisor Point will
now be connected to Remote CX-Supervisor application and can be used
like all other CX-Supervisor points, i.e. to drive animations, in alarm
expressed, in recipes, for data logging etc.
257
Creating a CX-Supervisor Client application SECTION 18 Connecting to a remote CX-
258
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter
SECTION 19 Connecting to Omron Industrial
SECTION 19
Connecting to Omron Industrial Components
This chapter details connecting CX-Supervisor to Omron's Industrial
Components, like Temperature Controllers, Digital Panel Meters and Timer/
Counters. Any process value or parameter from these devices can be
monitored or written. See the device documentation for available parameters
and their description. This is achieved in CX-Supervisor by creating a point
and linking it to the required parameter. Device ranges supported are following
models that support communication (where '*' indicated a wildcard):
19-1
•
K3GN
•
E5*N
•
E5*J
•
E5ZE
•
E5*K
•
H8GN
•
K3N*
•
E5ZN
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter
1, 2, 3…
1. Start CX-Supervisor Development and open your project.
2. Open the Point Editor by selecting the Point Editor option from the Utilities
menu or by clicking the button.
3. In the Point Editor dialog box click the Add Point button in the toolbar to
open the Add Point dialog box.
4. In the Add Point dialog box move to the I/O Type: options and select the
Input, Output or Input / Output option as appropriate. Note that the I/O
Update Rate: and I/O Attributes: options and displayed.
5. In the I/O Attributes: options select OPC/Other and click the Setup button.
This will open the Communications Control Attributes dialog box.
6. In the Communications Control Attributes dialog box enter the appropriate
parameters as follows:
Communications Control Attributes
Server: This shows the name of the communications object to connect to
the server i.e. OMRONCXICCommunicationsControl. If you wish to use a
different object make your selection from the drop down list. To Add,
Modify or Delete an object click the Info button.
259
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter
SECTION 19 Connecting to Omron Industrial
Selecting the Add option will open the Communications Control dialog
box. From the list of control objects select the one to be added and click
the OK button.
Clicking the OK button in the Communications Controls dialog box will
open the Communications Control Properties dialog box from where the
details can be added or updated. To edit these properties later select
Modify from the Info menu.
CX IC COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL PROPERTIES
Name: - This is the name of the selected communications control. The
default name for the first control is:
OMRONCXICCommunicationsControl
For each additional control added the number increments by one.
Project File: - This is the name of the current Project file that stores the
setup of the items. If no name is shown or it is incorrect click the Info button
and select Create… or Open… as appropriate.
To open a project, click the
button. If you want to create a new file click
the Create… option to open the Create Project dialog box. In the Create
Project dialog box navigate to the directory in which you want to create
your new file and enter your File Name. Select the appropriate file type
(Save as type - i.e. File Name.msc) and click the Save button.
260
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter
SECTION 19 Connecting to Omron Industrial
Note that a Project File name can not be entered from the keyboard, files
names can only be entered by using the Create or Open options.
Device: Select the Device containing the required item from the dropdown
list. To Add, Modify or Delete a Device click the Info button.
Items: The Items within the selected Device are listed. The Item Attributes
dialog box can be used to add or edit the items. To Add, Modify or Delete
an Item click the Info button. Selecting the Add or Modify option will open
the Items Attributes window from where the item details can be added or
updated.
Array Size: Enter the number of array elements in the CX-Supervisor
point that this item should have. If not an array, enter 1.
7. Having checked that all the parameters are correct bring return to the
Point Editor window by closing any attributes window that may be open.
The CX-Supervisor Point will now be connected to Device parameter and
can be used like all other CX-Supervisor points, i.e. to drive animations, in
alarm expressions, in recipes, for data logging etc. The application can
now be run by clicking on the Run Project button in the toolbar.
261
Adding a Point Linked to a Parameter
262
SECTION 19 Connecting to Omron Industrial
Design
SECTION 20 Best Practices
SECTION 20
Best Practices
This chapter details the best practices to get the most from CX-Supervisor
including how to plan and design your application.
20-1
Design
This section covers some good design practices. There is no doubt, as with
everything in life that a good design is essential and creating a good CXSupervisor application is no different. Poorly designed applications may run
slower, provide slower user feedback, be difficult to maintain - increasing costs
and in some cases not fulfil all User Requirements resulting in the application
being rewritten. Never fall into the trap "code first, think later".
20-1-1 Design your page layouts and navigation flow
Traditional design works well for most applications. Providing an application
with a clear structure can make applications very easy to navigate even if they
have many pages.
•
Create a Main overview / navigation page. This can include basic
information like company logo and date/time. If the application will be
using security levels provide buttons to login.
•
Add links from the main page to detailed system areas with either buttons
or schematic diagram e.g. Process 1, Process 2.
•
Add links from the main page, if required, to pages dedicated to Alarms,
Diagnostics, Reports, Data Logging, Statistics etc
•
If the system has repeated functions e.g. 5 similar machines, instead of
creating 5 pages think about creating 1 page that can show data for any
machine. This can be achieved using indirection and/or keeping data in
arrays, and just setting the index to display the machine you require. Minor
differences (e.g. a button for Process 1 only) can be shown or hidden
depending on the index. This will speed up development and also help
when the application is maintained.
Organise the pages sensibly on screen. Make sure that only the pages that
are necessary are open. When a page is no longer needed close it. CXSupervisor will update all pages that are open, therefore if lots of pages are
open then it may be doing a lot of unnecessary work that will slow down the
application. For pages that are displayed in the same place, set the 'Display
Mode' property to 'Replace'. This allows pages to automatically be closed
when a new page is loaded.
20-1-2 Use Logical Point names instead of physical addresses
Logical point names (like 'Boiler_3_Pressure') provide more flexibility than
physical addresses (like 'D8319') allowing the PLC program and addresses to
be changed, without impacting the SCADA. They also make it much easier
read during development, and more importantly, during maintenance.
Note:
If the Logical symbols are created in CX-Programmer, it can link them to a CXServer file which CX-Supervisor can then 'Import' into the Points Editor. This is
a very quick method of creating all the required points.
•
Perform all data conversion in PLC ladder
Although today's PCs have excellent maths performance consider the
format of the PLC data and how it will be used. It can be temping to scale
a point value when read e.g. to change the units of measurement, or
263
Performance
SECTION 20 Best Practices
always perform a calculation e.g. calculate a running average or to format
it e.g. make "1700" become "17:00". Instead consider writing this
conversion as ladder in the PLC hardware rather than in CX-Supervisor
software. This is particularly true if this conversion has to occur on several
pages where the value is used or before data logging. This ensures the
converted value is always available, and results in a simplified solution.
•
Perform all timing functions and pulse generation from PLC ladder
The PLC hardware has far superior timing and accuracy than Windows
can provide. When timing a process or event always use the PLC. The
stored result can then be read by the SCADA at its leisure. If creating a
pulse of fixed duration never attempt to design the SCADA to set a bit,
wait, and clear the bit. Instead, allow the SCADA to set the bit but use the
PLC program to clear the bit after the required time.
•
Operation should continue if the SCADA is unplugged
In a well designed system normal operation can continue even if the
SCADA is unplugged. Some functions like data logging, batch control and
control obviously will not be available but the system should be able to
continue with its task until completion. That is, the process should not rely
on co-operation between the SCADA and PLC because of the possibility
of failure e.g. of the power supply, PC components or operating system.
•
Ensure the PLC has hardware failsafes
In situations where the system can cause damage e.g. to itself, the
materials or people it is essential to ensure the PLC has suitable
safeguards and failsafes to prevent such damage. Given the possibility of
SCADA failure it is not acceptable to implement such failsafes in software.
Care should also be paid to the design of software 'control' to allow and
cope with the possible refusal of operation from the PLC.
20-2
Performance
This section covers some good practices to ensure excellent performance.
20-2-1 Organise the PLC memory properly
This is probably the single most important practice to provide maximum
performance and the best responsiveness.
It is important to design the PLC program and SCADA application together.
This will naturally help create arrays of information, and optimise
communications allowing CX-Server to collect data in the most efficient
manner.
Consider the examples in the following 2 figures:
264
Performance
SECTION 20 Best Practices
Figure 2: Bad grouping example
In Figure 2 we see the PLC Programmer has arbitrarily chosen to group data
by its format: Integers, then BCD then Floats (or even worse not at all!). When
the SCADA is written, this data is used by different pages and different update
rates. The different colours are to indicate that each block must be read
individually, totalling 9 communication requests, which could be for as few as 9
memory addresses.
Figure 3: Good grouping example
However in Figure 3 we see the PLC Programmer and SCADA developer
have reorganised the memory now there are only 3 blocks, which would be the
same for up to 3000 memory addresses. This is clearly far better than just 9
memory addresses with 9 communication requests. To achieve this, design
your application using the following rules:
265
Points
SECTION 20 Best Practices
1. Group together points that will be configured as "Always Update" in
contiguous PLC memory addresses
2. Group together points that will be configured as "Update when On
Display", grouping for each page
3. Within groups from steps 1 & 2, create sub-groups for each required
update rate
4. Within update rate sub-groups, sort and group data by data format (BCD,
Float etc). These points can be defined as 1 or more arrays.
20-2-1-1 Use Fins event memory
If your communications is using a Fins driver (e.g. Controller Link) it is possible
to create a responsive application giving the impression of high performance
by linking the SCADA to the event memory, which the network updates
automatically. Of course reads and writes actually access the local cache very
quickly although this will lag behind actual device values.
20-2-1-2 Control communications
Use the 'On Request' update type to give you complete control over when the
value of a point is read from the PLC or written to the PLC. The 'InputPoint'
script function is used to input the value of a specified point and the
'OutputPoint' script function is used to output the value of a specified point.
20-3
Points
This section covers some good practices with the Points for quicker
development and smoother running.
•
Define as few points as possible
Keep the Points database as slim and manageable as possible by:
•
•
Using arrays where possible especially for PLC points
•
If memory points are defined for scripting try to reuse general
purpose points like 'nLoopCounter', 'bReturnValue', 'nTemp'
•
Use expressions in animations instead of calculating new values e.g.
using "TemperatureK + 273" rather than creating a new
"TemperatureCelsius" memory point.
•
For memory areas that are bit and word addressable, access as
words. If you want the bits use expressions with & and | operators
e.g. Display Digital animation expression 'MyW100 & 0x80' and
'MyW100 & 0x40' instead of 'MyW100bit8' etc.
Reduce the number of active points
Aim to reduce the number of active points, that are currently
communicating where possible:
•
•
Automatically by setting "Update when on Display" option
•
Manually using script (EnablePoint(), DisablePoint(), OpenPLC(),
ClosePLC() etc).
Have a minimum of Input/Output points
Double-check the use of all Input/Output points. Don't forget that 'Output'
points can actually have 'Data Transfer' set to input the value only once on
start up.
•
266
Use ‘Standard’ update rates
Drawing
SECTION 20 Best Practices
CX-Supervisor only allows update rates in standard groups, which allows
a greater chance for CX-Server to optimise reads together. Old projects
may still be using non-standard update rate and are best changed to the
standard rates.
•
Use few update rates
Even when using the standard update rates, use as few different update
rates as possible, ideally 5 or less different rates. Try to use the same
update rates for the same areas of PLC memory so optimisations can
occur.
•
Use sensible update rates
Aim to keep update rates low. 5 seconds or 1 second updates should
suffice. If faster than 1 second updates are needed always question
"Why?". If fast update rates are required pay special attention to consider
if they can be disabled when not required.
•
Use Copy/Paste to Excel for bulk editing
During development, the point editor supports Copying and Pasting in
textual format so Excel's powerful editing / formulas can be used to create
definitions for points. This can allow thousands of consecutive points to be
created in seconds.
•
Use <Shift> and <Ctrl> to select multiple points for editing
During development, using <Shift> and <Ctrl> while selecting can be
useful to apply the same changes to many points.
•
Use Hungarian notation
Improve readability and maintenance by defining and using a standard
naming convention. For example Hungarian notation where variable
names are prefixed by a type character e.g. bMyBooleanPoint,
nMyIntegerNumber, txtMyTextPoint or rMyReal.
•
Use default optimisations
Leave the default communications optimisations turned on. In nearly all
cases they really do provide the best solution. Seek advice if you are
considering turning them off.
•
Delete unused points
After a development phase and prior to deployment, delete any unused
points. These are listed in the Point Editor under the group "<Unused
Points>".
20-4
Drawing
This section covers some good practices when drawing the screens. These
can greatly speed up application development and help produce a
professional looking system.
•
Start new pages with ‘Snap to Grid’
During the creative phase of any page this helps ensure objects are
automatically aligned and sized, saving time tidying up later.
•
Use cursor keys for fine adjustments
The cursor keys move selected objects by 1 pixel, or snaps to grid if <Ctrl>
held, and vice-versa when 'Snap to grid' is active. This is a lot easier than
using the mouse.
•
Group objects
267
Scripts
SECTION 20 Best Practices
To make Workspace navigation of objects easy, reduce the number of top
level objects by collecting objects together into Groups. Grouped objects
can be nested on other groups in a natural hierarchy e.g. a machine has
several panels that have keypads that have buttons.
•
Create object libraries
Keep a common look and feel between pages and speed up development
by creating libraries of commonly used objects e.g. displays or buttons.
These can also be reused in later projects.
•
Use Copy and Paste
Making good use of Copy and Paste to duplicate similar objects can
reduce development time.
•
Use Alignment functions
Create professional looking applications by prevent unsightly errors
quickly using 'Align Top/Left' and 'Make Same Width/Height'.
•
Draw perfect circles
Quickly draw perfect circles by holding <Ctrl> while drawing an Ellipse.
•
Use meaningful object names
Instead of accepting the default object and group names rename them to
something more helpful e.g. Conveyor1, InstrumentPanel, StartButton etc
20-5
Scripts
This section covers some good practices for writing scripts.
•
Never use ‘On Regular Interval’ scripts
You should (almost!) never need to use 'On Regular Interval' scripts.
Always question:
•
•
If it is used for logging - use the logging facilities instead
•
If it is used for timing - use PLC ladder instead as this is much more
reliable.
•
When they start with (or contain) "IF <condition> THEN …" you
should probably be using an "On Condition" script using <condition>
from the IF statement.
•
When they perform calculations on PLC or memory points (e.g. "Z =
X * Y), use "On Condition" to recalculate when the source data
changes e.g. with a condition X || Y || TRUE (which forces execution
even if value changes to value 0). This will guarantee the calculated
is up to date with the latest source information, plus stress the
system much less while the value doesn't change.
Never use the Sleep() command
You should (almost!) never need to use the Sleep command. It can also
create confusing applications as it can create re-entrant scripts and
asynchronous PLC communications. Always question:
•
•
If it is used for timing - use PLC ladder instead as this is much more
reliable.
•
Consider if the code following the Sleep should in fact be executed
on an event e.g. after completion flag returned from PLC instruction
or new data value etc
Use Animations if possible
Always choose direct object animations in preference to page/object
scripts: blink, colour, disable, height, width, horizontal%fill, vertical%fill,
move, rotate, display and close. These are both quicker and clearer.
268
Data Logging
SECTION 20 Best Practices
•
Keep scripts short
Although the script editor can manage hundreds of lines this would
suggest a serious design problem. Consider 30 lines as a practical
maximum.
20-6
Data Logging
This section covers some data logging related good practices.
•
Utilise Data Logging performance
Always use the inbuilt Data Logging in preference to trend graphs or file I/
O functions, as the performance is far superior.
•
Always use ‘On Change’
Always log data ‘On Change’. There is no sampling error and CPU, disk
activity and storage required are almost certainly reduced.
•
Use deadband option
Consider using the deadband option, especially for noisy analogue
signals to reduce the actual logging and storage requirements.
•
Don’t ‘Keep all files’
The Dataset ‘Keep all files’ checkbox defaults 'On' for complete data
retention but this should be cleared to stop the Hard Disk filling up.
269
Data Logging
270
SECTION 20 Best Practices
Configuring a Client PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2 Appendix A Configuring
Appendix A
Configuring a PC for Remote Connection
The OPC interface and CX-Supervisor Communications Control use a
Microsoft technology called DCOM. This allows the Clients and Servers to be
seamlessly 'Distributed' over a PC network. The Server should be running on
the PC with direct connection to the Device or Device network. However, the
Client, or indeed multiple Clients, can be run on different networked PCs and
will automatically read and write data over the PC network. To do this, the PC
running the Server must be correctly configured. If necessary refer to your
OPC server documentation. For full details of DCOM configuration and
security issues see your Microsoft documentation. The following is a quick
guide:
Note:
Although DCOM connections can be achieved using Windows 98 and ME they
are more difficult to configure, and offer less functionality. For best results
always use Windows NT or Windows 2000.
A.1 Configuring a Client PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2
Windows XP Service Pack 2 includes a communications 'Firewall' to protect
your computer from malicious communications. By default, this firewall is
turned on, and so will block all OPC and DCOM communications.
1, 2, 3…
To allow OPC or DCOM communications through the firewall either:
•
Completely disable the firewall as follows. Note can leave your computer
vulnerable to attack so consult your computer documentation or IT
administrator if you are unsure:
a. Open Control Panel followed by Computers.
b. Right click My Computer and select Security Center.
c. Select Windows Firewall.
d. On the General tab choose option Off.
•
Alternatively, on the Exceptions tab you can configure specific programs
to permit communications
All other required settings are the same as for running standard Windows XP
as explained below.
A.2 Configuring a Client PC running Windows XP
1, 2, 3…
1. Start Component Services e.g. by running DCOMCNFG.EXE by selecting
RUN
from
the
start
button.
The
default
location
is
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
2. Select Component Services followed by Computers.
3. Right click My Computer and select Properties
4. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
A.3 Configuring a Client PC running Windows NT or 2000
1, 2, 3…
1. Start DCOMCNFG.EXE e.g. by selecting RUN from the start button. The
default location is C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
2. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
271
Configuring a Server PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2 Appendix A Configuring
A.4 Configuring a Server PC running Windows XP Service Pack 2
Windows XP Service Pack 2 includes a communications 'Firewall' to protect
your computer from malicious communications. By default, this firewall is
turned on, and so will block all OPC and DCOM communications.
1, 2, 3…
To allow OPC or DCOM communications through the firewall either:
•
Completely disable the firewall as follows. Note this can leave your
computer vulnerable to attack so consult your computer documentation or
IT administrator if you are unsure:
a. Open Control Panel followed by Computers.
b. Right click My Computer and select Security Center
c. Select Windows Firewall
d. On the General tab choose option Off
•
Alternatively, on the Exceptions tab you can configure specific programs
to permit communications
All other required settings are the same as for running standard Windows XP
as explained below.
A.5 Configuring a Server PC running Windows XP
1, 2, 3…
1. Start Component Services e.g. by running DCOMCNFG.EXE by selecting
RUN
from
the
start
button.
The
default
location
is
C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
2. Select Component Services followed by Computers.
3. Right click My Computer and select Properties.
4. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
5. From the Default Properties tab, configure the Default Authentication
Level to Connect and the Default Impersonation Level to Identify. Setup
the access permissions by either:
•
On the Default COM Security tab, adding the user to the Access,
Launch and Configuration lists by clicking the Edit Default… button
in each case. The user added should have Administrator rights on
the local PC. If not, it may be necessary to add user groups
'INTERACTIVE' and 'NETWORK' as well.
•
From the My Computer item in Component Services, select DCOM
Config and configure the properties for required applications e.g.
SCS, OpenDataServer and OpcEnum. On the Security tab, add the
required users to each of the Custom Permissions. The users added
should have Administrator rights on the local PC. If not, it may be
necessary to add user groups 'INTERACTIVE' and 'NETWORK' as
well.
A.6 Configuring a Server PC running Windows NT or 2000
1, 2, 3…
1. Start DCOMCNFG.EXE e.g. by selecting RUN from the Start button. The
default location is C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
2. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
272
Configuring a Server PC running Windows NT or 2000
Appendix A Configuring a PC
3. From the Default Properties tab, configure the Default Authentication
Level to Connect and the Default Impersonation Level to Identify. Setup
the access permissions by either:
•
On the Default Security tab, adding the user to the Access, Launch
and Configuration lists by clicking the Edit Default… button in each
case. The user added should have Administrator rights on the local
PC. If not, it may be necessary to add user groups 'INTERACTIVE'
and 'NETWORK' as well.
•
From the Applications tab, configure the properties for required
applications e.g. SCS, OpenDataServer and OpcEnum. On the
Security tab, add the required users to each of the Custom
Permissions. The users added should have Administrator rights on
the local PC. If not, it may be necessary to add user groups
'INTERACTIVE' and 'NETWORK' as well.
273
Configuring a Server PC running Windows NT or 2000
274
Appendix A Configuring a PC
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Appendix B
Frequently Asked Questions
This appendix lists some FAQs, and of course their answers
.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of points?
For Machine Edition projects it is possible to create an application with up
to 500 user defined points. In theory each of these could be an array of
1024 elements totalling 512,000 addresses. For PLUS edition there is a
limit of 8000 user defined points, totalling over 8 million addresses if using
arrays !!
In practice the communications medium, number of active points and their
frequency of updates determine the maximum limit.
See "What is the maximum limit of communication updates?"
•
What is the maximum limit of communication updates?
The charts below show the number of simultaneous reads per second
depending on each PLC and Network used. The maximum number of CXSupervisor points depends on the update rates and element sizes. For
example, 1000 reads per second could be 1000 points of 1 element, with
a 1 second update rate, or 200 array points with 5 elements with a 1
second update rate, or 20 array points with 5 elements with a 100
millisecond update rate, or any combination of variations.
The figures should be self-explanatory, but its worth noting that Toolbus is
better than twice as good as SYSMAC WAY at the same baud rate, and
depending on the PLC supports higher baud rates. This is a very cheap
way to improve performance.
Note 1: These figures assume best-case scenario, where data is in
contiguous addresses. Lesser performance will be achieved as memory
areas are fragmented.
Note 2: These tests stopped at 1000 updates so actual limits are beyond
this figure, except for CS1H Ethernet and Controller Link Networks, which
has been tested for 10,000 updates per second.
275
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
276
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
See -> "How does the Operating System affect performance?"
See -> "What is the maximum limit of number of points?"
277
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
See also Chapter 16 Best Practices, Performance and Chapter 16 Best
Practices, Points
•
How can I see if the communication network is overloaded?
Use "CX-Supervisor Performance Monitor Tool" to see if the network is
overloaded
This tool is available in the CX-Supervisor run-time by right clicking and
selecting Performance… ( if security privileges allow). It can be used to
see how much of the available bandwidth is in use. You can also see how
many points are waiting to be processed and the latency of actual
communications. To improve responsiveness try to reduce the bandwidth
used, the latency and the number of active messages.
Note that performance begins to reduce well before 100% saturation is
achieved. For example it is rare to achieve more than 70-80% for a serial
connection. This is analogous to a motorway where cars slow down long
before they are touching bumpers, and might only achieve a maximum of
50% capacity (i.e. each car has a car length space behind it).
•
How does the Operating System affect performance?
On the same specification machine Windows NT provides the best overall
performance. It is understandable that newer, larger Operating Systems
run slower on the same specification machine. This is not usually a
problem as newer operating systems are usually delivered on newer
specification machines.
FINS Gateway drivers for particular networks operate consistently across
all operating systems.
OMRON recommend Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional for
the following reasons:
- Better security
- Better stability
- Better multitasking
278
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
- Better DCOM configuration
•
How does upgrading
performance?
CX-Supervisor
affect
communications
The graphs below show that this does not have an impact itself, which is
not surprising as a communications functions, and therefore performance,
are governed by the communication middleware: CX-Server. The graphs
show:
"Upgrading CX-Supervisor does not affect the total number of
Subscription points that can be simultaneously read, which has remained
more than 1000.
"Performance of instantaneous read and write is not significantly affected
by the version of CX-Supervisor.
"Updating CX-Supervisor does not affect how performance degrades
when the system gets busy.
Note: CX-Supervisor 1.2 and later do include automatic optimisations for
writing array elements that can yield substantial results, particularly with
serial communications. These performance improvements have been
excluded from these results rather than distort the true figures.
279
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Note: lower write time indicates greater performance
See -> "How does upgrading CX-Server affect communications
performance?"
•
How does upgrading
performance?
CX-Server
affect
communications
The graphs below should show that this does not have a significant
impact. The graphs show:
"Time to perform instantaneous read and writes are slightly slower on
average, although this is in the order of a few milliseconds so is not
ordinarily visible.
"Maximum number of Subscription points remains the same across all
versions. This is confirmed with a variety of protocols
See -> "How does my PC specification affect communications
performance?"
280
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
See -> "What is the maximum number of communication updates?"
•
How does my PC specification affect communications performance?
The graphs below show that processor speed has a significant impact on
performance, especially for large systems with high quantities of On
Interval Subscription points. The graphs show:
"Upgrading from a 450Mhz system to a 2.4Ghz can quadruple the
maximum number of Subscriptions that can be processed
See -> "What is the maximum number of communication updates?"
"Read, Write times and performance under load improve with processor
speed
"CX-Server DI 2.2 performs in very similar manner to previous versions
and better on a mid spec machine.
281
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
•
Can I run CX-Supervisor Runtime as a restricted Windows User?
CX-Supervisor (and CX-Server) require Administrator rights to be
installed on a computer, but other users can then run the software. The
runtime will run without problems as a Standard User (member of Power
Users group) and will run as a Restricted User (member of Users Group)
although will show errors when trying to update the registry.
To avoid these errors specific registry access can be provided by an
Administrator to the following registry keys:
•
•
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{0002D780-0000-0000-C000000000000046}
•
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{0002D781-0000-0000-C000000000000046}
•
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CX-Supervisor.Application
•
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CX-Supervisor.Project
Can I use CX-Simulator with CX-Supervisor?
Integrated Simulation can be used to automatically launch and use CXSimulator. See 'Compiling and Running a Project' for more details.
Omron's CX-Simulator virtual PLC can also be manually configured for
use with CX-Supervisor. To achieve this follow these steps:
1.Start CX-Simulator from the windows Start menu.
2.Select 'Create New PLC'
3.Select the required PLC Type
4.No need to register I/O ---> Next
5.Keep default Virtual Comms Unit ---> Next
6.Keep default Comm Port ---> Next
282
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
7.Create the data folder ---> Finish
8.In the work CX-Simulator dialog box, connect to the virtual PLC.
9.Start the virtual PLC. It must be started first for CX-Supervisor to be able
to open the device.
10.In CX-Supervisor project, set the PLC type as per CX-Simulator or
FinsGateway.
11.Set the communication type as per CX-Simulator setup e.g. default is
Controller Link, Network 1 Node 10 Unit 0.
When the CX-Supervisor project is run, communication with the virtual
PLC will be established. All PLC aspects of CX-Supervisor will work with
CX-Simulator as if it were a real PLC.
•
Why do I get “Invalid Point” error?
If this occurs on startup of the developer, it can be due to a corrupt point
definition. Usually, editing the Point and pressing OK is enough to correct
the corruption. If there are too many points, select a large group and use
the 'Multiple Edit' function to assign some common attribute to them all
e.g. OLE Access is Read Only. This in effect edits each point, also
correcting the corruption.
If this error occurs in the Runtime is means the point has been deleted or
renamed but a script or animation is still using the Point. Run the Analyse
Application tool to highlight and fix References to non-existent points.
•
How do I access “CX-Supervisor Local Points” from Omron
Graphical components?
Omron ActiveX Graphical components, like the Thumbwheel shipped with
CX-Supervisor or those shipped with CX-Server Lite and CX-Server OPC
(7 Segment, Display, Knob Toggle etc) can be placed on CX-Supervisor
pages and linked directly to CX-Supervisor points by selecting a data
source of "CX-Supervisor Local Points".
However, note that the default setting for points is to allow reading, but to
protect against writing from external sources like these controls. If this is
attempted you will get the following error message "OLE Point
<pointname> has no write access".
Note however, that as a low priority message the default project
configuration will not cause the error log to automatically open and you will
have to manually view the error log viewer.
To prevent this error and to allow write access change the 'OLE Access'
to 'Read/Write' on the Advanced Point Settings dialog box.
Note: Copy Protection must be installed for this function.
•
Which OPC Servers have been tested with CX-Supervisor?
The following third party OPC Server products have been tested with CXSupervisor:
Vendor
Server Name
Product Version Result
4CE Industry
OPCSysDaig
1.0
Pass
4CE Industry
Modbus Server
2.0.4
Pass
283
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Vendor
Server Name
Product Version Result
Alstom
Technology
FBSOPC
1.30a
Pass (although
noted not OPC
compliant)
Amersham
Biosciences
UNICORN
Zappa build 313
Pass
AXEDA Systems
OPC DA Server
1.0.0.2
Pass
CimQuest
OPC Server for
Allen Bradley
2.25.00.01
(reported as 2.25
(1)
Pass
CimQuest
OPC Server for
Allen Bradley
2.25.00.01
Pass
Cyberlogic
MBX OPC Server 5.00.02
Technologies Inc.
Pass (although
noted not OPC
compliant)
KEPware
KEPServerEX
Pass
KW Software
GmbH
KW Software-Pro 2.0
ConOS OPC
Server
Pass
ICONICS Inc.
Modbus OPC
Server
3.07
Pass
ICONICS Inc.
DataStore OPC
Server 3.10
3.10
Pass
INAT GmbH
INAT OPC-Server 2.05.37
TCPIPH1 S5 and
S7
Pass
NAT GmbH
OPC-Server MPI/ 2.05.37
PPI
Pass
Invensys Systems DASS7
/ Wonderware
Matrikon
1.1
OPC Server for
1.1.3.230
Simulation & Test
Pass
Pass
National
Instruments
4.5.3 (beta)
Pass
Northern Dynamic OPC Server
Toolkit
2.01
Pass
OSI Software Inc. OPC Data Access 1.0.0.14
& Historical Data
Access Server for
the PI System
Pass (although
noted not OPC
compliant).
Phoenix Contact
GmbH & Co. KG
2.12
Pass
2.30.00 (beta)
Pass
Interbus OPC
Server
Rockwell Software RSLinx
SMAR
284
4.12.135
OPC & Conf.
3.3.0.0
Server for DFI302
Pass
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Vendor
Server Name
Product Version Result
SST
DH+OPC Server
1.6.16
Pass
SST
ControlNet OPC
Server
1.3.0
Pass
Siemens AG
WinCC
5.0
Pass
Siemens AG
Simatic WinCC
V6.0 SP2 Beta
Pass (although
noted not OPC
compliant).
Siemens Moore
APACS+OPC
Device Server
1.00 K (beta)
Pass
Triconex Corp.
TS1131
3.1
Pass
Wonderware
InControl
7.11.1614
Pass
Wonderware
Virtual PLC Server 1.0 (beta)
Pass
The following products have not passed:
Vendor
Server Name
Product Version Result
Klinkmann
Omron driver
?
Ignores 'Read
from Device'
option. Seen to
lose device
values, potential
control risk.
OPC Labs
Time Monitor
2.01
Fail. Group
inactive, item
active still results
in a callback
Rockwell Software RSView32
6.2
V1.0a Server only
- not supported
Siemens AG
4.1
V1.0a Server only
- not supported.
Contact Siemens
to upgrade to V5.0
Siemens Building MK8000 MP1.30
Technologies Inc.
MP1.30
Could not get the
simplest of
operations to
succeed
Softing
OPC Toolkit
?
Some support
issues reported.
USDATA Corp.
Factorylink
7.0.1 (beta)
Single test failed
to connect.
•
WinCC
What is the maximum limit of commands in a script?
285
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
There is no set limit, and some applications have had many hundreds of
lines. However it is not practical to have too many lines and a limit of 30
lines should be considered, not as a system limit but as a warning that the
application is not correct.
•
What is the maximum limit of ingredients in a recipe?
There is no limit other than the PC memory.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of entries in the Alarm Log?
The number of lines in the alarm log and the error log is set in the Project
/ Runtime Settings / Alarm and Event settings dialog boxs. The maximum
limit is currently 2000.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of Alarms?
Theoretically, the maximum number of alarm types that can be defined is
10,000.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of serial ports supported?
It is the maximum that the Windows OS supports, and are correctly
installed on the PC. We have successfully tested eight.
•
How do I create reports and HTML reports?
CX-Supervisor provides a simple yet powerful report generation facility.
Using the same 'Points Substitution' format, a text based template file may
be used to generate a report. Good formats are .TXT, .RTF and .HTML.
Binary formats like Word .DOC can be problematic although RTF can
usually be used in these cases.
These generated files may then be viewed, or distributed using a file
server or web server. Note that although information may be textual or
graphical in nature these reports are intended for non real-time output of
data only, and not for monitoring or control.
See documentation for "GenerateReport" script function for more
information, and the "Coffee Tutorial" Step 12 in the CX-Supervisor
Getting Started Manual.
See -> "How do I make an HTML report update and refresh
automatically?"
•
How do I make an HTML report update and refresh automatically?
CX-Supervisor supports the generation of dynamic text and HTML reports
from a static template - see "GenerateReport" script function for details.
However, Web Browsers views all pages as static pages. There is a very
simple HTML trick that will force the browser to reload or "Refresh" the
HTML report that would then show any updates, assuming
GenerateReport had been called again e.g. On Condition when the data
changes.
To an existing HTML page add the following line. This must be inserted
between the <head> and </head> markers:
<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="5; url=Report.htm">
This will force the page to be reloaded, every 5 seconds. The value after
the content= (e.g. "5") is the refresh rate in seconds. Be aware that 5
seconds may practically be the fastest update, as some pages may take
286
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
several seconds to download. Also the value after the url= is the name of
the page to refresh.
•
Can CX-Supervisor be used with Industrial Touchscreen PCs (IPCs)?
Absolutely. CX-Supervisor is designed for use with Omron's DyaloX
Touchscreen IPC but can be used with other manufacturers. It has special
features especially for Touchscreen PCs:
•
Edit animations have option to enter data from a popup keyboard to
allow typing direct on the screen.
•
CX-Supervisor Login dialog box has a popup keyboard.
•
Project setting for 'Large dialog boxs' to increase font size on high
resolution touchscreens giving a larger contact area.
Projects can be built on a development machine and deployed using
"Create Runtime Install Disk" to copy required files to a shared drive or
USB memory stick.
It is also commonplace to copy a shortcut to the SR2 application to the
'Startup' folder. If the keyboard is to be detached see also "How To Enable
Automatic Login in Windows"
•
How do you enable automatic login in Windows?
The initial Windows security screen can be bypassed which may be useful
on systems with no keyboards, or systems that should start automatically
on boot up. Information on how to achieve this is published by Microsoft
on its Web site - see Q253370 How to Enable Automatic Logon in
Windows 2000 and Q315231 How to Enable Automatic Logon in Windows
XP.
Please note the cautions included on registry editing and security.
•
What is the functionality of “On Condition” scripts?
ON CONDITION scripts will be executed whenever any of the points
mentioned in the expression change value (or are re-evaluated as a result
of being input) AND the result of the expression is TRUE.
For example, if the expression was $Second, then the script would be
executed 59 times a minute. The expression would be evaluated every
second when the value changes, but when $Second was 0, the result of
the expression would be FALSE.
•
What is the scan time of “On Condition” scripts?
There is no scan rate directly associated with the script processing itself.
In fact the execution is instant, as soon as the value has changed. The
script expression will be checked whenever any of the points are updated
(a value is input, or the value is changed in some way).
CX-Supervisor is an "event-driven, object-oriented" system meaning is
that it is actually the points changing that force the script code to reevaluate the expression. They do this whenever a point changes value, or
is re-evaluated (e.g. a value is received from the PLC at the point's usual
scan-rate). This removes any sampling error associated with polling and
also makes CX-Supervisor very efficient.
•
How do I display Real Numbers and Decimal Places?
287
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
In graphics editor select text tool from palette and type text e.g.
Temperature = ##.### C
The # after the decimal point indicate the precision of the real number
display, e.g. to 3 decimal places. Finally select animation editor and
animate with "Display Value (Analogue)" and assign the point name e.g.
TEMP.
•
Which Operating System should I use?
Windows XP Professional.
Windows NT, Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional all offer the
best stability, reliability, multitasking, security and DCOM support.
On the same spec machine, Windows NT is actually up to 10% faster,
probably as it has the least developed code although Windows 2000 and
XP are faster on their appropriate minimum specification machines.
Windows 95, Windows 98 and Windows ME are no longer supported.
•
How do I optimise the use of Files?
When closing a file using the 'CloseFile' script function, if TRUE is passed
as a parameter e.g. CloseFile(TRUE) then the blank spaces at the end of
each line will be removed, thus reducing the size of the file. Care should
be taken if the file is being used by multiple systems over a network drive.
•
What is the limit of points in a group?
There is no imposed limit but it is recommended to limit about 1000 points
per group. There are two main reasons for this:-
•
•
There is a physical limit on how many lines of text the actual list can
display. This is dependent on the height of the text. With large text
you may even find that 1000 is too many.
•
When a group is selected the point list is refreshed and re-sorted.
The sort algorithm takes longer if it has a large list to sort. This is
normally quick but if the list is large and the points are already in the
correctly sorted order in the database, then it can take a while
because of the way the sorting algorithm works.
Why does setting slider value result in erratic movement of slider
action?
The movement of the slider bar can appear to return to its previous setting
once it has been re-set. After setting the slider to a value, it will read the
actual value from the PLC, this value is then shown in the slider, resulting
in the slider moving from the re-set value to the old value, the slider then
starts to move towards the re-set value. This actually better reflects the
current value in the PLC, but can be undesirable.
In this case de-select the "Immediate update on slide move" option in the
slider wizard to prevent it.
•
How do I optimise my use of animations?
Animation actions (from the Animation Editor) can be applied directly to
the objects being animated. This means that you don't have to define lots
of memory points to hold intermediate values. Just link the appropriate
action to the object (using the Animation Editor) and enter the required
expression. For example using expression "TemperatureK + 273" rather
than creating a new "TemperatureCelsius" memory point.
288
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Boolean expressions can easily written to operate on bits within a word
e.g. nFlags & 0x02 will be TRUE if bit 2 is set or FALSE if it not. This
eliminates the need for additional memory points and processing.
•
Can I use token disks with USB Floppy drives or in high capacity
LS120 Disk Drives?
The token copy protection is no longer supported. The software tokens
have proven to be incompatible with some USB floppy drives and the high
capacity LS120 Disk Drives. If you need to remove a software token use
the network to conduct the token transfer, by sharing a floppy drive from
another machine.
•
Can I print accented characters on alarm printers?
There is a limitation with Windows, such that it is not possible to print
accented characters to a line printer a line at a time. The only alternatives
are:
•
•
To print using English only characters.
•
To set the printing to page mode, which will print a page when a
specified number of alarms have occurred. This can be set up under
Runtime settings, Alarm/Message printer settings.
Why do I get installation error - 115?
Error -115 during installation means the specified file could not be copied.
This is most often caused by the file already being in use or locked.
Reboot the machine, and attempt installing before running any Omron
software.
This error can also appear when attempting to install on a operating
system that does not support extended European characters, e.g.
Japanese or Chinese Windows. During installation, on the 'Select
Components' dialog box, select 'CX-Supervisor package' and click
'Change…'. Scroll to the bottom of the list of sub-components, and
deselect 'Language Files'. This will prevent language files, including those
using extended European characters being installed.
•
How do I address extended memory banks in PLCs?
In the point editor where you configure the PLC address, enter a hyphen
and the bank number for example:
E32000-3
Or (depending on PLC type)
EM32000-3
This will address memory location 32000 in bank 3.
•
Why can’t I see all my installed controls in the Insert Object dialog
box?
Under Windows 2000 and Windows XP the Insert Object dialog box is not
able to see all the controls installed on the PC. These include the MS
Forms 2.0 controls that are installed as part of MS Office.
289
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
This is by Microsoft's design for these operating systems, however it is
possible to force the old operation, depending on which controls you need
to expose for use in CX-Supervisor. Contact your supplier to receive
details of the required Registry changes.
•
How does Sleep() work?
The CX-Supervisor Sleep function is designed to create a short pause in
script execution. The parameter specifies the duration of the pause in
milliseconds. For example:
<statements A>
<statements B>
Sleep(100)
<statements C>
In this example 'statements B' will begin executing immediately when
'statements A' complete, though 'statements C' will not begin execution
until 100ms after 'statements B' have completed.
Note 1: In a well designed, truly event driven system use of the Sleep()
statement should never be required. Always consider if the statements
after the Sleep should be in their own script, executed when a Condition
occurs.
Note 2: The Granularity (or intervals) differs between Operating Systems.
In Windows NT (and 2000) expiration is checked every 10ms, so
'Sleep(100)' actually pauses for 100 to 109.99 milliseconds depending on
when it was started. For Windows 98 and ME the granularity is 55ms so
'Sleep(100)' actually pauses for 110 (2 times 55) to 164.99 milliseconds
(nearly 3 times 55). For this reason, Sleep statements can act differently
on different Operating Systems making the application OS dependant.
Note 3: Sleep should never be used as a delay for timing processes, for
the following reasons:
- The actual time delay depends on the OS
- There is always an error of 0 to 1 granularity, depending on when the
action is started.
- The frequency cannot be guaranteed as the OS may be busy, or
handling other processes.
Note 4: Because of Note 2 and Note 3 above, Sleep should not be used
for creating output or logic pulses e.g. setting a bit on, sleeping, then
setting the bit off. Instead, just use the PC to set the bit and allow the PLC
to clear the bit, either after a duration timed by the PLC real time clock or
when the triggered process is complete.
The requirement for Sleep is quite simple but the implementation is
actually very complex. In the example above, the application must
continue to run during the pause i.e. read PLC data, log data, check
alarms, animate graphics etc. For this reason, any script with a Sleep
statement must be executed in parallel with the system. This can result in
unexpected results when a Sleep is added, and previously functioning
script commands are now running in parallel. Redesign the script
considering parallel processing.
This can also result in unexpected behaviour when a Sleep is added to a
Project initialisation or Page initialisation script as some parts of the
system or objects may not be loaded at time of execution.
290
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Sleep can cause problems during shutdown of the runtime, if a sleeping
script is still running.
•
How do I use System points in Visual Basic ‘VBScript’?
Access CX-Supervisor points from Visual Basic style scripting called
VBScript couldn't be simpler - just use the point name normally, e.g.
MsgBox(MyPoint).
However note that '$' is a reserved character so System Points can be
accessed with 's_' prefix instead e.g. MsgBox(s_Second) for $Second
system point.
For up to date information and all help on scripting and the Windows
Scripting Host see http:\\www.microsoft.com/scripting.
•
What are the syntax differences between VBScript and CXSupervisor script?
VBScript has some minor syntax differences to CX-Supervisor script. The
most important are:
•
Boolean equality test == is only = in VBScript.
•
Boolean inequality test != is <> in VBScript.
•
Endif becomes End If in VBScript.
•
Array indexing using ( ) uses square brackets in VBScript [ ]
Note that CX-Supervisor interprets { and } characters as string delimiters,
even in VBScript so the following code does not work:
MsgBox("Press {Enter}")'does not work
Instead use the following to replace these characters:
MsgBox("Press " + chr(123) + "Enter" + chr(125))
•
Why are ActiveX events shown differently in the Animation Editor
and Property Browser?
New in CX-Supervisor version 1.2 the ActiveX Property Browser has an
Events Tab, which allows the object's events to be linked to scripts. These
scripts are defined as VBScript subroutines defined in the Page
Initialisation script.
It is more efficient to load these subroutines once during page
initialisation, than every time the event occurs as per previous versions
using the Animation Editor. However, this method is still supported to
allow editing of old projects. This difference is by design and is correct.
•
Why does CX-Supervisor show different ActiveX properties to Visual
Basic or Excel?
Properties of ActiveX controls shown in the CX-Supervisor "ActiveX
Property Browser" may differ from those seen in the Visual Basic or Excel
property browser. This can be for one or more of the following reasons:
•
Both Visual Basic and Excel show their own container properties in
this window, as well as the object properties. CX-Supervisor does
not show its container properties. Examples of VBA container
properties are:
291
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
- CausesValidation
- DataSource
- DragIcon
- DragMode
- Height
- HelpContextID
- Index
- Left
- TabIndex
- TabStop
- Tag
- ToolTipText
- Top
- Visible
- WhatsThisHelpID
- Width
•
•
CX-Supervisor only shows properties with data types it can edit for
example Boolean, Integer, Real, String, UserDefined, and Colours.
Other data types i.e. Font type cannot be edited so are not displayed.
Also properties with multiple parameters are not listed in CXSupervisor as they cannot be edited.
•
CX-Supervisor will show additional private object properties, which
Visual Basic and Excel choose not to display.
Is it possible to connect an external PLC to CX-Supervisor via a
modem?
Yes, you can connect from CX-Supervisor via CX-Server to a PLC via a
modem. In the PLC configuration 'Network Settings' dialog box, select the
'Modem' tab. CX-Server uses standard TAPI build into the OS. The
modem must be installed properly to be shown in the Modem list.
•
What is the CX-Supervisor and SYSMAC-SCS Tokens compatibility?
CX-Supervisor 2.0 and above does not operate with old software tokens
from older versions. You need to purchase a USB Dongle.
•
What is the
compatibility?
CX-Supervisor
and
SYSMAC-SCS
Dongles
CX-Supervisor 2.0 and above does not operate with USB Dongles from
version 1.3 or old parallel port dongles from older versions. You need to
purchase a USB Dongle.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of PLCs or Devices?
Machine edition projects are capable of communication with up to 15
devices through CX-Server, and the PLUS projects with up to 256
devices.
•
292
What is the maximum limit of size of array points?
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
Each array point may contain up to 1024 elements.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of pages?
Machine edition projects can configure up to 100 pages, and the PLUS
projects with up to 500.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of objects on a page?
There is no theoretical limit to the number of objects on a page, but 1,000
should be considered the limit for normal PC configurations. Since each
object consumes resources, Operating Systems like Windows NT,
Windows 2000 and Windows XP will support larger applications than
Win98 or ME.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of scripts on a page?
There is no theoretical limit to the number of scripts associated with a
page, but performance of the application will be reduced the more scripts
there are.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of recipes?
There is no theoretical limit to the number of recipes, except limits
imposed by the size of memory of the PC. In practice, no more than
10,000 should be created on a standard PC configuration.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of event/error log entries?
The maximum number of entries in the event/error log is 500.
•
What is the maximum limit of number of Users?
The maximum number of Users that can be configured is 500.
•
Why do I get the “Failed to Install MSVCRT.DLL: Access Denied”
error message?
During installation, the following error can occur:
Failed to install MSVCRT.DLL:
Access Denied
This file is locked by the system so must be configured to install on the
next reboot. However, the current user priviledges prevent access to the
system registry to do this. This problem has only been seen on Windows
NT
To correct this problem and allow full installation, you must log on to your
computer with administrator rights. Either log onto your network as the
network Administrator, or log on to your local domain as Administrator (or
user with local administrator privileges). See your Systems Administrator
for further details.
•
Why do I get the message “ODBC DriveError - : ‘The query is not
updateable because it contains no searchable columns to use as a
hopeful key”?
293
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
When attempting to pass information to an Excel spreadsheet, it the
following ODBC Driver Error can occur: 'The query is not updateable
because it contains no searchable columns to use as a hopeful key'. The
Excel ODBC driver cannot correctly interpret the data type of a column, if
the column in the spreadsheet contains both text and numbers.
If a spreadsheet has been set up with data directly inputted in Excel and
an attempting to write new data to the spreadsheet from CX-Supervisor
this error will occur. This is because the ODBC Driver sees different
formats in a column.
To overcome this set up the spreadsheet the data area definition to
contain only the column headings (Insert | Name | Define…).
Another problem in this area has been that the format of the data can
change from 'Number' to 'Text' (i.e. '333) formats in the cell of the
spreadsheet. The exact cause of this error is unknown, but can be
resolved by clearing the cell formats (Edit | Clear | Formats) of the
spreadsheet that will be receiving the data.
•
How does the PLC affect performance for my network type?
The charts below show how the network type affect the performance
depending on the PLC used.
294
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
295
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
296
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
297
Appendix B Frequently Asked Questions
298
How to diagnose problems
Appendix C Troubleshooting
Appendix C
Troubleshooting
The appendix is a guide to troubleshooting and resolving problems. Several
tools and techniques are discussed to assist troubleshooting, and in the case
of no success, the information required to request support.
C.1 How to diagnose problems
Here are some tips to help diagnose problems:
•
Where you think a problem exists try to create steps to reproduce it (see
below)
•
Be scientific:
•
•
Decide what the problem could be, and perform a test to prove or
disprove the theory.
•
Perform one test at a time.
Check the data values are correct in the PLC using the PLC Data Monitor,
and are correct in CX-Supervisor using the Point Maintenance tool
•
Prove that scripts are executed by popping up message boxes
•
For speed or responsiveness issues use the Performance Monitor to
check the system is not overloaded.
C.2 Point Maintenance
The Point Maintenance dialog box is very useful during troubleshooting for
displaying, and setting point values. Launch by right clicking the runtime and
selecting Point Maintenance, providing that you have sufficient security.
When an expected animation or script execution has not occurred, the Point
Maintenance can quickly show if the data is not the expected value. If the data
is the correct value then the fault must lay with the animation or script.
Note: You can not set the value of points defined as Input only. In this case use
the PLC Data Monitor.
C.3 PLC Data Monitor
The PLC Data Monitor is similar to the Point Maintenance dialog box, except
that it is a CX-Server tool that operates at a lower level on the PLC. It can be
used to read and write logical and physical addresses, and using a variety of
PLC data formats. It is launched by right clicking the runtime and selecting
Communication Utilities|PLC Data Monitor
Most useful is the Address monitor: select the Address tab and double click
Monitor. Any CX-Supervisor PLC 'Symbol' (point) can be selected and
monitored and set, including Input only points.
C.4 CX-Supervisor Performance monitor
The CX-Supervisor Performance Monitor tool displays application and
communication information and can be very helpful in diagnosing performance
problems. It is launched by right clicking the runtime and selecting
Performance… (if security privileges permit). There are statistics and a
performance trend for each PLC, each network, the CPU time and a Summary
and Overview page.
299
CX-Supervisor Performance monitor
Appendix C Troubleshooting
C.4.1 Overview
Shows an overview of the headline performance of all other components.
C.4.2 Summary
Provides a Summary view, totalising and averaging property values from all
PLCs on all networks.
C.4.3 CPU Time
Lists specific CPU and process information including processing times for all
scripts and all callbacks.
C.4.4 Network
Totalises properties for all PLCs on each network.
C.4.5 PLC
The 'PLC Average Latency (ms)' field shows the physical delay of the network
and PLC response time. Depending on the PLC, setup and network this
should be 9-30ms. If this is drastically higher it could be the cause of
performance problems. Try some of the following steps to reduce it:
The 'PLC Average Latency (ms)' field shows the physical delay of the network
and PLC response time. Depending on the PLC, setup and network this
should be 9-30ms. If this is drastically higher it could be the cause of
performance problems. Try some of the following steps to reduce it:
•
Test on a dedicated network, or if not possible with other nodes disabled.
This is to ensure it is not due to network loading or other external factors.
•
Try with the PLC in 'STOP' mode. If this has an impact double-check the
PLC settings. This can vary depending on PLC type, but some require a
longer scan rate, so more free CPU time is available to service the
communications, whereas some require a shorter scan rate so the
communications are service more frequently at the end of each scan.
Some other settings may also impact the CPUs ability to service
communications.
•
Try to reduce the number of active messages (see below)
•
Try to reduce to % usage (see below)
On the Performance tab, the quantity of 'Active Messages' is shown. Each
Active Message is a single communication request although the internal
optimisations mean that many continuously addressed points can be read in
one message. This depends on the frame size, which in turn depends on the
network type. This is why use of arrays and good memory layout are essential
to performance. To reduce the Active Messages see Chapter 16 Best
Practices, Performance and Chapter 16 Best Practices, Points.
On the Performance tab, the current and historic usage is shown. 100% usage
is rarely seen and the system may be running at capacity well before this. This
is analogous to a motorway where cars slow down long before they are
touching bumpers, and might only achieve 50% of capacity (each car has a
car length space behind it). In practical terms, for serial connections consider
70-80% the limit. For Ethernet packet collisions start occurring above 30% and
are automatically corrected, but 40-50% is the practical limit. For Controller
Link, which has a vast bandwidth, any value above 10% signals a
performance issue. To reduce the % usage see Chapter 16 Best Practices,
Performance and Chapter 16 Best Practices, Points.
300
Diagnostics dialog box
Appendix C Troubleshooting
C.5 Diagnostics dialog box
The Runtime has a communications diagnostics window. This will only
normally be used under guidance of Technical Support to assist diagnosing
specific communication issues.
To view the dialog box:
1. Log in as a user with 'Designer' privileges
2. Open the Point Maintenance dialog box and select the PLC point to
diagnose
3. Press 'Diagnostics…'. The following screen is shown:
The most useful readings on this screen are:
•
"Auto Update" refreshes the data twice a second.
•
Total Active Points: Number of CX-Server points (both input and output)
currently active.
•
Average Active Pts/Sec: Measured number of CX-Server Inputs per
second, since application started (or since "Clear" pressed). With 'Input
On Change' optimisation this can be very small. Also $InputsActual
System Point
•
Calculated Peak Pts/Sec: Calculated number of CX-Server Input points
currently active, multiplied by update rate.
301
Scripting errors
Appendix C Troubleshooting
•
'…Elements': Same as above except multiplied by number of array
elements per point. Ratio between Total Active Points and Total Active
Points Elements shows how well optimised (or badly like above) with use
of arrays.
•
Read Callbacks: Number of data postings from CX-Server.
•
MSecs since last callback: Milliseconds waited since last data.
•
Min, Max Average Callback interval: Calculation using above values.
•
Write …: Same as above but for the writing part of output (and I/O) points.
•
Data Changes: Number of inputs causing change of value.
C.6 Scripting errors
The scripting engines are very complex which provides many opportunities for
errors. This can be categorised as follows:
C.6.1 VBScript Syntax errors
These are seen during runtime as errors in the Error Log, often giving the line
and character of the error. Referring back to the original script should easily
display the problem. Note that if the @VBScript syntax is used within CXSupervisor script the line number reported refers just to the lines of VBScript,
with the @VBScript being line 1.
To troubleshoot further:
•
For specific help on VBScript language syntax see Microsoft's web site at
http://msdn.microsoft.com/scripting
•
Double check capitalisation, and objects names
•
See Appendix B FAQ, "What are the syntax differences between VBScript
and CX-Supervisor script?"
•
To confirm the line causing the problem, temporarily comment it out and
see if the syntax error is no longer reported
•
As a test, try to simplify complex script lines into 1 or more lines with single
instruction to identify which instruction is causing the error
•
As a test, simplify complex math formulae into several lines with single
operation to identify which operation is causing the error
•
As a test, use hardcoded values for parameters using known valid values
•
Display values using 'MsgBox' command or using the LogEvent command
•
Confirm path of execution using 'MsgBox' in all conditional branches
C.6.2 CX-Supervisor Syntax errors
These are seen during development when OK is pressed on the Script dialog
box when the script type is 'CX-Supervisor script'.
To troubleshoot further:
302
•
Refer to the comprehensive CX-Supervisor Script Reference manual or
on-line help for detailed information including examples on specific script
instructions
•
Double check capitalisation, and objects names
•
To confirm the line causing the problem, temporarily comment it out and
see if the syntax error is no longer reported
•
As a test, try to simplify complex script lines into 1 or more lines with single
instruction to identify which instruction is causing the error
•
As a test, simplify complex math formulae into several lines with single
operation to identify which operation is causing the error
PLC Maintenance dialog box
•
Appendix C Troubleshooting
As a test, use hardcoded values for parameters using known valid values
C.6.3 Runtime errors
If any script has correct syntax but generates an error at runtime e.g. trying to
open a file that does not exist, the error is recorded in the Error Log.
To troubleshoot further:
•
To confirm the line causing the problem, temporarily comment it out and
see if the error is no longer reported.
•
Display values using 'MsgBox'/'Message' command or using the
LogEvent command.
C.6.4 Design errors
The only remaining errors are when the script compiles and runs correctly, but
do not produce the expected results. These are typically errors in the design of
the script.
To troubleshoot further:
•
Confirm path of execution using 'MsgBox'/'Message' in all conditional
branches.
•
Display values using 'MsgBox'/'Message' command.
C.7 PLC Maintenance dialog box
The PLC Maintenance dialog box is launched by right clicking and selecting
PLC Maintenance. After choosing the PLC you can:
•
Open and close the PLC
•
See if there are errors
•
Change the PLC Mode
•
See the effect of optimisations as points are 'Disabled'
C.8 Database errors
The database connectivity can sometimes be problematic to configure
correctly. To troubleshoot CX-Supervisor database functionality:
•
Try viewing and writing the data from another data source, for example
Microsoft Access application for mdb files etc.
•
'Connect' to the database from the Developer to check Table and Field
names can be correctly read. Remember to disconnect before running if
the provider doesn't support multiuser connections (like the Excel
provider)
•
Note that every database function returns an error code to confirm if the
operation was successful. Always assign this to a temporary point and
after the call to check the value
•
When database errors occur, try calling DBGetLastError(). This will give a
textual description of the problem. As these errors are standard there is
often information about the cause of these errors available on the Internet
- just search for the exact text of the error
C.9 How to create steps to reproduce
The first step in troubleshooting is creating steps to reproduce the problem.
Not only does this help understand the problem but is a requirement so that
your potential fixes can be tested with confidence. Computers and software
are guaranteed to perform the same way with the given data and so there are
303
Information necessary to send to Support
Appendix C Troubleshooting
always steps to reproduce although sometimes these can be difficult to find. It
can be timing dependant ("you have to do this exactly 1.342 seconds later"!)
or just very difficult to see a pattern. However in most cases problems are
quite repeatable.
When a problem can be reproduced, the next step is to refine the steps to
determine the exact cause. The process should be repeated, attempting to
leave out one step at a time to confirm if that step is required. Where scripts
are executed, each line should be removed to determine just the required
steps to reproduce the problem.
C.10 Information necessary to send to Support
If all these diagnostic suggestions fail and it becomes necessary to contact
support please have the following information:
304
•
Your software licence key
•
The software version and build number e.g. 1.2 (12). Also state if the
project was upgraded from a previous version
•
The EXACT wording and spelling of any error message
•
If an application is being sent it should be possible to remove unnecessary
pages, objects, scripts, points, alarms, recipes, datalogging and database
connections
•
Clear description of the function that the Manual says the software should
provide
•
Clear, precise, repeatable steps to recreate the issue on a new application
Appendix D CX-Server Error Codes
Appendix D
CX-Server Error Codes
When errors occur in the communication package, CX-Server, an error code
may be displayed in the CX-Supervisor Error Log. To explain the cause of this
error:
•
In the CX-Supervisor Error log, press the "Display Code Converter" button
to launch the Error converter and show further details. See Chapter 6
Projects, Events / Error messages for more details.
•
Launch the Error Code converter from the Start menu, under the CXSupervisor menu and type in the code displayed.
Alternatively, the full list of causes is below.
Note:
The cause is only the last 2 digits of the error code for example, if the error
shown is "0x8a1b" then ignore the "8a" and just look up "0xnn1b":
Code
Cause
0xnn00
Normal Operation.
0xnn01
Cancel Button was pressed.
0xnn02
Normal Operation.
0xnn03
The executing function was stopped in the applications callback
handler.
0xnn04
The return specified buffer is not large enough to hold all the
data requested.
0xnn05
The specified name is not unique within the open project file.
0xnn06
An unspecified error occurred in CX-Server that is not handled
by any other error code.
0xnn07
CX-Server has not been initialised by the application.
0xnn08
The specified address is invalid for the selected or open device.
This error may be generated by the Communications Manager
during address validation, or the device during a read / write
request.
0xnn09
The CDMPLCCommand function executed is not supported on
the selected or open device.
0xnn0A
The File or filename specified is invalid or could be opened /
created.
0xnn0B
The device's operating mode is invalid for the requested
operation, or the device was opened in an mode not compatible
with the requested operation e.g attempt to execute
CDMGetData when the device was open in Read Only mode.
0xnn0C
The specified name is invalid, it name contains invalid
characters.
0xnn0D
One or more of the specified parameters are invalid.
0xnn0E
The open PLC handle specified is invalid.
0xnn0F
The open Project handle specified is invalid.
0xnn10
The open User handle specified is invalid.
0xnn11
The Key specified is invalid or cannot be found.
305
Appendix D CX-Server Error Codes
306
Code
Cause
0xnn12
The device or function is locked by another user or application.
0xnn13
The name specified does not exist or cannot be found.
0xnn14
The specified PLC name does not exist.
0xnn15
The specified Project cannot be found or created.
0xnn16
The operation cannot be performed as the correct access
permissions have not be obtained. This usually indicates
another host currently has the PLC access rights.
0xnn17
The function or CDMPLCCommand is not supported in this
version of CX-Server.
0xnn18
The PLC could not be opened or the operation failed because
the PLC is open for communications. Check the communication
settings and that another application is not currently using the
connection method e.g Mouse configured and using COM1
port.
0xnn19
The Point could not be opened or the operation failed because
the Point is open for communications.
0xnn1A
Attempt to delete a currently selected User.
0xnn1B
Communications to the device could not be established or the
connection has been broken. Check the communication
settings and connection method to the device.
0xnn1C
An executing command was aborted by the execution of
another command or action.
0xnn1D
CX-Server is currently processing the maximum number of
requests. This error indicates the application is thrashing the
maximum possible communications throughput of the device's
connection.
0xnn1E
CX-Server has reached the maximum limitation for the
specified function.
0xnn1F
Communications Error occurred because of a Network Routing
Table problem. Check the routing tables in all devices are
correctly configured. In Alpha C series PLC's ensure the 'Allow
Routing Table' flag is set.
0xnn20
The specified Point name or key is invalid.
0xnn21
Device setup information or settings configuration is incorrect.
0xnn22
Device configuration information or data is incorrect.
0xnn23
The Unit number specified is invalid or does not exist.
0xnn24
The data cannot be converted to BCD as it contains
Hexadecimal values between 0xA and 0xF
General Use
Appendix E Using with the Omron DyaloX
Appendix E
Using with the Omron DyaloX
The CX-Supervisor Runtime can be installed on an Omron DyaloX Industrial
PC which can also be purchased with the Runtime software preinstalled. The
preinstalled bundle will run "Machine Edition" projects without a USB Dongle,
but a PLUS dongle must be purchased to run PLUS projects.
If installing the Runtime manually, or other application software, make sure
there will be enough disk space. If not, the software can be installed on an
additional compact Flash drive within the IPC.
E.1 General Use
The DyaloX IPC is designed to be a run time, end user platform and is ideal for
running the "CX-Supervisor Runtime Only" package. Runtime applications can
be created on a workstation with the "CX-Supervisor Full Package" installed,
and then saved to a network drive, solid-state 'flash' disk, or USB key and
transferred to the IPC.
Note:
Right mouse clicks can be simulated using the "Event Selector" (mouse icon)
on the System Tray. When clicked, the next touch screen press is a right click.
This is sometimes required for accessing context menus.
Note:
Windows Explorer has 'Folder Options' to allow a single icon click to open the
item. This can enhance usability.
Note:
The touch screen confirmation sound can be controlled and turned off from the
Advanced tab on the 'Pointer Devices' settings in the Control Panel.
Note:
Running the "CX-Supervisor Runtime Only" package on the DyaloX IPC is
recommended. CX-Supervisor Developer Package can be run although some
features are easier to use with an external keyboard and mouse be fitted. The
Full developer package also requires more disk space.
E.1.1 Installing CX-Supervisor
To install CX-Supervisor Runtime only package manually:
1. First install CX-Server manually by launching Setup.exe from the CXServer folder on the installation CD. If required for space reasons, change
the install folder from the default e.g. to drive D.
2. Install CX-Supervisor Runtime Only package. If required for space
reasons, change the install folder from the default e.g. to drive D, and
choose NOT to install CX-Server as part of the installation as it has
already been done in step 1 above.
3. Install any ActiveX controls used by the application. This includes any use
of Microsoft Forms (FORMS20.DLL) which is not included on the DyaloX
IPC by default.
4. If you are running a "Machine Edition" project you will not need a USB
Dongle. However if you are running a PLUS project install the USB Dongle
copy protection.
5. Copy the desired runtime application.
Note:
Remember that drive C is for the operating system, and space may become
limited. Consider installing other software to other drives (like additional flash
cards or USB keys). However, note that typically, all software automatically
installs some files to Windows system folders, or Common folders on the C
drive even if the program is installed to another drive.
307
General Use
Appendix E Using with the Omron DyaloX
E.1.2 Communication Settings
The USB port can be used to communicate with compatible Omron hardware.
The CX-Server USB drivers for the USB PLC must be installed manually if
required, and can be found in the CX-Server installation directory.
Note:
308
At runtime, the DyaloX IPC can only use the COM ports that are configured in
the operating system. The Development platform therefore must have the
same COM ports available so they can be selected at development time, and
the same port available for use at runtime. If required, it is possible to
reconfigure the COM port for a configured device once the application is
compiled if the "Embed CX-Server Project within CX-Supervisor .SR2 file"
setting is turned off so the devices settings can be editing on the target
platform.
Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT
Appendix F Obsolete Features
Appendix F
Obsolete Features
This appendix provides a summary of features that are obsolete and have
been removed from the standard documentation. Details are included here to
assist maintaining old projects still using these features. These features
should not be used in development of new solutions as it is likely support for
the following features may and will be removed from the next or future
releases.
F.1 Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows NT
This product no longer installs on Windows 98, ME or NT. It is recommended
to upgrade to Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional.
F.2 Configuring a OPC/DCOM Client PC running Windows 98 or
Me
1, 2, 3…
1. Ensure File and Printer sharing is enabled by selecting Network from the
Control Panel. Add a service and click either "File and print sharing for
Microsoft Networks" or "File and print sharing for Netware Networks" as
appropriate.
2. Start DCOMCNFG.EXE e.g. by selecting RUN from the Start button. The
default location is C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
3. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
A CX-Supervisor Client running on Windows 98 or ME also requires the
Microsoft Remote Registry network service to be installed with the operating
system and correctly configured on both the server and client machine. To
check: start the Control Panel and view the Network settings. In the list of
network components, look for Microsoft Remote Registry. If it does not exist,
follow these steps to add it.
1, 2, 3…
1. In the Network settings, ensure User-level access control is selected on
the Access Control tab.
2. From the Configuration tab, click Add to add a Network component.
Choose Service from the type list and click Add.
3. Click Have Disk… and browse your Windows CD. Select the path
(\Admin\Nettods\remotReg)
for
Win95
CD
or
(\Tools\ResKit\NetAdmin\RemotReg) for Win98 and select regsrv.inf.
4. Follow the screen prompts to complete installation and reboot if
necessary.
5. On the server machine, select Passwords from the Control Panel.
6. Ensure the Enable remote administration of this server option is checked
7. Add all required user ids to the Administrators list by clicking Add…
Note:
Windows ME no longer includes the Microsoft Remote Registry network
service on the product CD but this can still be installed and used from any
Windows 95 or Windows 98 CD ROM using the above steps.
309
Configuring a DCOM / OPC Server PC running Windows 98 or MeAppendix F Obsolete
F.3 Configuring a DCOM / OPC Server PC running Windows 98 or
Me
1, 2, 3…
1. Ensure File and Printer sharing is enabled by selecting Network from the
Control Panel. Add a service and click either "File and print sharing for
Microsoft Networks" or "File and print sharing for Netware Networks" as
appropriate.
2. Start DCOMCNFG.EXE e.g. by selecting RUN from the Start button. The
default location is C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM.
3. View the Default Properties tab. Ensure that the Enable Distributed COM
on this computer is checked.
4. View the Default Security tab and check the Enable remote connection
check box.
5. From the Default Properties tab, configure the Default Authentication
Level to Connect and the Default Impersonation Level to Identify. Setup
the access permissions by either:
•
On the Default Security tab, adding the user to the Access list by
clicking the Edit Default… button in each case. The user added
should have Administrator rights on the local PC. If not, it may be
necessary to add user groups 'INTERACTIVE' and 'NETWORK' as
well.
•
From the Applications tab, configure the properties for OPC Server
and OPC ServerList Class. On the Security tab, add the required
users to each of the Custom Permissions. The users added should
have Administrator rights on the local PC. If not, it may be necessary
to add user groups 'INTERACTIVE' and 'NETWORK' as well.
Third party servers and clients running on Windows 98 or ME may require the
Microsoft Remote Registry network service to be installed with the operating
system and correctly configured on both the server and client machine. To
check: start the Control Panel and view the Network settings. In the list of
network components, look for Microsoft Remote Registry. If it does not exist,
follow these steps to add it.
1, 2, 3…
1. In the Network settings, ensure User-level access control is selected on
the Access Control tab.
2. From the Configuration tab, click Add to add a Network component.
Choose Service from the type list and click Add.
3. Click Have Disk… and browse your Windows CD. Select the path
(\Admin\Nettods\remotReg)
for
Win95
CD
or
(\Tools\ResKit\NetAdmin\RemotReg) for Win98 and select regsrv.inf.
4. Follow screen prompts to complete installation and reboot if necessary.
5. On the server machine, select Passwords from the Control Panel.
6. Ensure the Enable remote administration of this server option is checked.
7. Add all required user ids to the Administrators list by clicking Add….
Note:
Windows ME no longer includes the Microsoft Remote Registry network
service on the product CD but this can still be installed and used from any
Windows 95 or Windows 98 CD ROM using the above steps.
F.3.1 Windows 95
This product is no longer supports Windows 95. It is recommended to upgrade
to Windows 2000 or Windows XP Professional.
310
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
F.3.2 System Points
The following System Points are obsolete and are no longer updated. Scripts
and expressions will currently still compile, but their value at Runtime will
always be 0.
$GDIResources
Integer
0-100
Percentage of GDI resources free.
$SystemResources Integer
0-100
Percentage of system resources free.
$UserResources
0-100
Percentage of user resources free.
Integer
F.4 DDE
CX-Supervisor supports Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE), which is a method of
communication between Windows programs. DDE uses messages to
exchange data between applications and a protocol to synchronise the
passing of data. DDE applications fall into four categories client, server, client/
server and monitor. A client application requests data or services from a server
application. A server application responds to a client applications requests for
data or services. Monitor applications can intercept DDE messages but cannot
act on them, they are therefore useful for debugging purposes. CX-Supervisor
is a client/server application, which is both a client application and a server
application, thus requesting and providing information.
All CX-Supervisor DDE data transfers are carried out on points and are
asynchronous transfers. There are two types of DDE points that can be
created, namely 'DDE Client Points' and 'DDE Server Points'.
With 'DDE Client Points' all data transfers or conversations are initiated by CXSupervisor either sending data to or requesting data from external DDE Server
Application(s). For example, a CX-Supervisor point could be linked to update a
cell on a Microsoft Excel worksheet.
With 'DDE Server Points' all data transfers are initiated by external DDE Client
Application(s) either requesting or sending point values. For example, a value
could be entered into a cell in Microsoft Excel which would update a CXSupervisor point.
F.4.1 DDE Client Points
A DDE client point sends data to or requests data from an external server
application. This chapter explains how to create points that make use of the
CX-Supervisor DDE Client capabilities. In order for data to be transferred
between a point and a server application the point must uniquely identify the
application and the data that is to be used in the transfer. DDE applications
use a three-tiered identification system to distinguish themselves from other
DDE applications. An application name is at the top of the hierarchy, the
application name refers to a server application e.g. "EXCEL". A topic name
further defines a server application e.g. for Microsoft Excel the topic would
define the worksheet to be used e.g. "SHEET1.XLS", a server can support one
or more topics. Finally each topic can have one or more item names, which
uniquely identifies a data item within a topic, i.e. "R1C1" or a cell name
reference identifies a single cell within a Microsoft Excel worksheet.
Example
A DDE Client point named "DDE1" that connects to Microsoft Excel,
worksheet - "Sheet1.xls" and cell "R1C1", is created.
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the Add Point button from the Point Editor toolbar. The Add Point
dialog box opens.
311
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
2. Enter "DDE1" in the Point Name: field.
3. Set the I/O Attributes setting to DDE and click the Setup button. The DDE
attributes dialog box opens.
4. Enter "Excel" in the Server Name: field. This is the name of the external
DDE server application.
5. Enter "Sheet1.xls" in the Topic Name: field. This is the required topic, in
this case it is a Microsoft Excel worksheet named 'Sheet1.xls'. It is
possible to specify a specific topic: for instance, in Microsoft Excel, to
specify a sheet within a book a colon is used to delimit the information, e.g.
'Book1:sheet3.xls'.
6. Enter "R1C1" in the Item Name: field. This refers to the item name.
7. Enter "1" in the Array Size: field.
8. Click the OK button to accept the settings in both the DDE Attributes
dialog box and the Add Point dialog box.
Note:
It is not necessary to give 'DDE Client Points' DDE access via the Advanced
dialog box - this field is only used in the creation of 'DDE Server Points'. If the
DDE Access Read/Write setting is set 'ON', this point's value would then be
'exposed' to change by external DDE server application(s) which may not
always be desirable.
This process is repeated for any further DDE data transfers that are required.
F.4.2 DDE Server Points
A DDE server point receives data from or receives a request for data from an
external Client application. This chapter explains how to create "DDE Server
Points", these points are exposed to DDE Client applications either for "Read/
Only" or "Read/Write" access. In order for a point to take part in a conversation
with a DDE Client, it must be given 'DDE Access'. The following dialog box
demonstrates how to give a Real memory point, DDE Read/Write access:
A DDE Server point is created as follows:
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the Add Point button from the Point Editor toolbar. The Add Point
dialog box opens.
2. Enter a meaningful name for the DDE Server point in the Point Name:
field.
3. Click the Advanced button. The Advanced Point Settings dialog box
opens.
312
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
4. Ensure the DDE Access Read/Write setting is set to 'ON.
5. Click the OK button to accept the settings in both the Advanced Point
Settings dialog box and the Add Point dialog box.
Note:
The DDE Access group's Read/Write box in the Advanced Point Settings
dialog box is checked, this is the only action required to expose "DDESVR3" to
a DDE Client application for read/write access.
Note:
Any CX-Supervisor point can be given DDE Access, even DDE Client points.
F.4.3 DDE Array Points
CX-Supervisor supports arrays in DDE, for both 'Client' and 'Server'
transactions. DDE Client data transfers are initiated by CX-Supervisor, either
sending or requesting data from external DDE Applications (such as Microsoft
Excel). DDE Server data transfers are initiated by external DDE Applications
either sending or requesting data to or from CX-Supervisor.
Refer to the CX-Supervisor Script Language Reference Manual for further
details.
F.4.3.1 DDE Client Array Points
This chapter explains how to create DDE Client Array points. This is similar to
the way normal DDE Client points are created, except extra information is
required to specify the range of the array and also whether it is to be stored as
a row or column in the Server application.
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the Add Point button from the Point Editor toolbar. The Add Point
dialog box opens.
2. Enter a meaningful name in the Point Name: field.
3. Set the I/O Attributes setting to DDE and click the Setup button. The DDE
attributes dialog box opens.
4. Enter an application in the Server Name: field.
5. Enter a topic in the Topic Name: field.
6. Enter the item in the Item Name: field. It is also necessary to specify how
the array is to be transferred. For instance, in Microsoft Excel, this is either
as a '[row]' or '[column]', the default is as a row which can be omitted. The
following are valid array item names: "R1C1:R3C1[col]", "first:last[c]",
"R5C2:R5C5", "r1c1:r3c1[column]".
7. Enter the number of elements in the array in the Array Size: field. This
must match with the specified range in the Item Name field
In the CX-Supervisor Runtime environment, the above DDE Client array
transactions are initiated by means of script in the same way as single DDE
Client points. The CX-Supervisor script below gives examples of the facilities
available with DDE Client array points:
313
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
Example CX-Supervisor Script demonstrating client array points:
chan = DDEInitiate("Excel", "Book1.xls")
IF chan > 0 THEN
'Establish data transfers between point 'DDEArray'
and Excel
'the initial values of DDEArray is sent to Excel
DDEOpenLinks(chan)
'The array is initialised with the value 5 and
sent to Excel in one operation.
InitArray(DDEArray, 5)
'The contents of 'MemoryArray' are copied into
'DDEArray' and the
'array are sent to Excel in one operation.
MemoryArray[0] = 100
MemoryArray[1] = 34
MemoryArray[2] = 89 * 6
CopyArray(MemoryArray, DDEArray)
'Sets element 2 of the array to 6 and sends the
whole array to Excel
'Note: Use 'On Request' option and 'OutputPoint'
to send the array
'after 'setting several elements of a large array.
DDEArray[2] = 6
ENDIF
F.4.3.2 DDE Script Functions
The existing DDE Script functions DDEPoke() and DDERequest() can be used
with any array points as the following example CX-Supervisor Scripts show:
Example CX-Supervisor Script demonstrating DDEPoke() with arrays:
chan = DDEInitiate("Excel", "Book1:Sheet2")
IF chan > 0 THEN
'Send element 1 of 'RealArray' to Excel
DDEPoke(chan, "R16C1", RealArray[1])
'Send IntegerArray to Excel as a column (note:
range and column must 'be 'specified)
DDEPoke(chan, "R1C1:R3C1[column]", IntegerArray)
'Send TextArray to Excel as a row (default only
range required)
DDEPoke(chan, "R1C2:R1C4", TextArray)
ENDIF
Example CX-Supervisor Script demonstrating DDERequest() with arrays:
chan = DDEInitiate("Excel", "Book1:Sheet3")
IF chan > 0 THEN
'Request a row of cells from Excel and copy into
'Array1
Array1 = DDERequest(chan, "R1C1:R1C3")
314
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
'Request a column of cells from Excel and copy
into Array2, using
'the return 'flag
Array2
=
DDERequest(chan,
"R1C2:R3C2",
bReturnFlag)
'Request a cell value from Excel and copy into
element 2 of 'Array1'
Array1[2] = DDERequest(chan, "R3C2")
ENDIF
Note:
All the above points must have DDE Read/Write access set.
F.4.3.3 DDE Server Array Points
The value of an array point named 'ddearray' in a CX-Supervisor project called
'ddetest.srt' can be read from a Microsoft Excel worksheet by entering the
following formula format into a cell.
=<Server>|<Topic>!<item>.<index>
Example
=SCS|Point!ddearray.3
'Point' topic
'access
ddearray[3]
using
or
=SCS|ddetest.srt|ddearray.0 'access ddearray[0] using
'Project' topic
Note:
Microsoft Excel accepts the square brackets '[ ]' used in CX-Supervisor to
reference an array index in a formula; use '.' instead.
Note:
The index must always be specified if an individual array element is required.
Note:
CX-Supervisor supports 'Hot' DDE links, if Microsoft Excel has the link option
automatic set, then the value in Microsoft Excel are updated whenever
ddearray[index] changes.
The above example is the simplest way to access/read single elements of an
array from Microsoft Excel, to read/write whole arrays, it is necessary to use
macros (Microsoft Excel Visual Basic scripts).
The example scripts that follow have all been created using Microsoft Excel
and are working examples. They contain the minimum amount of information
required to demonstrate the particular facility being described; i.e. they do not
contain any error-checking code.
F.4.3.4 Sending Arrays to CX-Supervisor via DDEPoke()
In order to write to an CX-Supervisor array point using the DDEPoke()
function, it must first be given DDE Read/Write access, via the Advanced Point
Settings dialog box when adding or modifying the point. The following script
shows how to send arrays of values from Microsoft Excel to CX-Supervisor via
DDEPoke().
Example sending array values from Microsoft Excel to CX-Supervisor:
Sub SendArrayValues()
Dim chan As Integer
chan = DDEInitiate("SCS", "Point")
If chan <> 0 Then
'Send a row of data to an array point named
"Array1"
DDEPoke
chan,
"Array1",
Range(Cells(1,1),
Cells(1,3))
315
DDE
Appendix F Obsolete Features
'Send a column of data to an array point named
"Array2"
DDEPoke
chan,
"Array2",
Range(Cells(2,1),
Cells(4,1))
'Send individual array element values to
"Array3"
'The '[ ]' or '.' format can be used to delimit
the array index
DDEPoke chan, "Array3[0]", Cells(1,1)
DDEPoke chan, "Array3.1", Cells(1,2)
DDEPoke chan, "Array3[2]", Cells(1,3)
End If
End Sub
F.4.3.5 Requesting Arrays from CX-Supervisor via DDERequest()
Requesting arrays from CX-Supervisor and storing them in Microsoft Excel is
a little more complicated than sending, in that both CX-Supervisor and
Microsoft Excel need to know if the array is to be stored in rows or columns.
CX-Supervisor is informed of the row/col requirement by specifying either 'row'
or 'column' after the array points name. The default is 'row' if nothing is
specified. The following are all valid examples of specifying names for
"Array1" in a DDERequest():
"Array1", "Array1:Row", Array1:r" 'Valid ways to
specify a row
"Array1:Column", "Array1:col", Array1:C" 'Valid ways
to specify a
'column
Microsoft Excel is informed of the row/col requirement by specifying a Range
of cells in either row or column format. Both the Microsoft Excel and CXSupervisor specifications must match in order for the call to be successful. It is
not necessary to specify rows or columns if a single element of an array is
required.
Note:
DDE Requests are one-shot request, i.e. they are not part of a 'Hot' link.
Example requesting CX-Supervisor array values from Microsoft Excel
Sub RequestingArrayValues()
Dim chan As Integer
chan = DDEInitiate("SCS", "Point")
If chan <> 0 Then
'Request "Array1" from CX-Supervisor and store in
a row starting at R1C1
Range(Cells(1,1), Cells(1,3)) = DDERequest(chan,
"Array1")
'Request "Array2" from CX-Supervisor and store in
a column starting at R2C1
Range(Cells(2,1), Cells(4,1)) = DDERequest(chan,
"Array2:col")
'Request elements [2] and [3] from "Array2" and
store in R3C1 &
'R3C2
316
OLE Automation
Appendix F Obsolete Features
'The '[ ]' or '.' format can be used to delimit
the array index
Cells(3,1) = DDERequest(chan, "Array2[2]")
Cells(3,2) = DDERequest(chan, "Array2.3")
End If
End Sub
F.5 OLE Automation
OLE Automation provides a mechanism whereby one application can control
another. In order to access a CX-Supervisor points value via OLE Automation,
it must be given either OLE Read or OLE Write access. This can be achieved
by checking the appropriate box in the Advanced Point Settings dialog box
when the point is created or modified.
Note:
All CX-Supervisor System points are given OLE2 read access by default.
CX-Supervisor exposes the following Runtime functions via OLE2 Automation:
•
SetValue(stringPointName,Value). Enables any point with OLE Read/
Write access to be modified (value may be Boolean, integer, long or
string).
•
GetValue(stringPointName,&Value). Enables any point with OLE Read
access to be monitored (value may be Boolean, integer, long or string).
•
QueryCount(). Returns the total number of points in the CX-Supervisor
database.
•
QueryId(stringPointName), Returns the WORD id of a given point name.
The id is an integer in the range between 1 and the total number of points
in the CX-Supervisor database.
•
QueryOLE(wordID). Returns the Read/Write access rights of a point as an
integer. 0 represents no access type; 1 represents Read Only; 2
represents Read/Write; 3 represents an invalid access type.
•
QueryType(wordID). Returns the points data type as an integer from a
given id. 0 represents a void datatype; 1 represents a digital datatype; 2
represents an integer datatype; 3 represents a real datatype; 4 represents
a text datatype; 5 represents an invalid datatype.
•
QueryName(wordID). Returns the points name string from a given
identity. CX-Supervisor provides OLE Automation helper routines and
code examples in the OLE2AUTO subdirectory. Refer to the file
OLE2AUTO.WRI in that subdirectory for more information.
F.6 OLE Overview
The Microsoft Windows operating environment allows the transfer and sharing
of information between applications by using a technique known as Object
Linking & Embedding, or OLE (pronounced olé). Embedding allows drawings,
sounds or almost any objects to be created within an application, and then
inserted (embedded or linked) within another file or document. The embedded
object can then be edited (or activated) by merely double clicking on it. Linking
allows an object to be shared by several documents by forging links between
the destination documents and the source object, e.g. a company logo may
appear in several word processor documents by linking to a graphics object
rather than embedding.
Embedding and Linking Objects within the CX-Supervisor application can
either be achieved by using the Object Packager, or by embedding or linking
objects directly within a page.
317
Object Packager
Appendix F Obsolete Features
Note:
Packages may only be embedded or linked into CX-Supervisor pages if they
are created using OLE-compliant applications. This applies to objects either
directly linked or embedded within CX-Supervisor, and those inserted using
the Object Packager.
F.7 Object Packager
The Object Packager is a Windows application which enables objects to be
"wrapped" for insertion into documents. It can be used to either create a link to
a file held on disk or to embed an object into a page. When embedded or
linked, the object can be moved and positioned in a similar way to any other
object created within CX-Supervisor.
To use the Object Packager, select Package from the list of objects displayed
in the Insert Object dialog box shown later in this chapter. An example of a
typical Object Packager window is as follows:
For the remainder of this chapter only the direct insertion of objects using the
CX-Supervisor built-in functions are detailed. For further details of using the
Object Packager refer to the Windows User Guide, or the Object Packager
On-line Help.
Whether using the Windows Object Packager or embedding or linking objects
directly, proceed as follows:
1, 2, 3…
1. Click the page in which the object is to be inserted.
2. Click the
button. The Insert Object dialog box opens:
F.7.1 Creating an Object From New
To create an object from new, proceed as follows:
1, 2, 3…
318
1. Scroll through the list of object types presented in the list box until the
desired type is highlighted.
Object Packager
Appendix F Obsolete Features
2. Click the OK button to insert the object into the current page and display
it as it would look from within the application in which the object was
created.
To display the object as an icon, click the Display As Icon setting.
The icon displayed is the first one which is stored in the icon resource table for
the application which created the object (in the case of the example shown, a
Paintbrush icon). If another icon is required, clicking the Change Icon button
displays the following dialog box:
1, 2, 3…
1. Select either the current or default icon by clicking either the Current: or
Default: setting; and click the OK button to return to the Insert Object
dialog box. Should a different label be required to display beneath the
inserted icon, delete the contents of the Label: field and type in a new label
(the default label offered is the filename of the file containing the inserted
object).
2. Type the full path of the target application or DLL ending with the
application or DLL name, into the From File: field. To locate an existing file
name or a different path, click the Browse button to display the Browse
dialog box.
An example of the Browse dialog box is shown as follows:
Both programs (extension .EXE) or Dynamic Link Libraries (extension .DLL)
are listed in the Files of Type field.
The Browse dialog box functions identically to the File Open dialog box
described in chapter 6, Projects except the file list offered shows icons as
opposed to pages.
319
Object Packager
1, 2, 3…
Appendix F Obsolete Features
1. On return to the Change Icon dialog box, select the required icon from
those presented.
2. Change the icon's label (if required).
3. Click the Open button to return to the Insert Object dialog box.
4. On return to the Insert Object dialog box click the OK button to return to
the current page and embed the selected object into it at the current
insertion point.
F.7.2 Creating an Object From a File
Creating an object from a file allows linking or embedding of objects created at
sometime in the past. As before, select Insert New Object from the Edit menu,
and the Insert Object dialog box opens. Click the Create From File: setting and
the dialog box changes to a format similar to that of the following:
Type the full path of the file containing the object to be inserted, ending with
the full file name, into the Create from File: field. To locate an existing file
name or a different path, click the Browse button to display the Browse dialog
box.
A Browse dialog box similar to that used for changing an object's icon opens,
the difference being that the List Files of Type field has a single entry of All
Files (extension .*).
1, 2, 3…
1. Use the Look in: field to navigate to the appropriate location.
2. Select the file from the list offered and click the Open button to return to
the Insert Object dialog box.
3. On return to the Insert Object dialog box click the OK button to return to
the current page and embed the selected object into it at the current
insertion point.
To display the object as an icon, follow the procedure detailed in the previous
chapter and click the OK button to return to the current page and embed the
selected object, in icon form, into it at the current insertion point.
It is often more appropriate to link to an object rather than embedding it in the
current page. By linking to an object rather than embedding it CX-Supervisor
always has access to the most up-to-date copy of the object every time the
page containing it is opened.
Placing a check mark in the Link field forges a link between the page and the
file containing the object.
All other activities are carried out in an identical manner to those explained
previously.
320
Object Packager
Appendix F Obsolete Features
The following illustrates a Microsoft Excel Chart object which has been
inserted in a page:
F.7.3 Activating an Object
To activate an embedded or linked object, merely double click using the left
mouse button on the object's graphical representation on the page (either a
true representation of the object or an icon). If the object is a document or
image, Windows activates the application that created the object and places it,
ready to be edited.
In the following example, the bitmap image when activated launches the
Format Chart Area application to allow editing:
When editing is complete, select Update and Exit from the application's File
menu to return to CX-Supervisor.
Note:
The Update and Exit command varies from application to application.
321
Object Packager
Appendix F Obsolete Features
If the object is an animation or sound file, when activated it is played through
until it ends, at which point control is returned to CX-Supervisor.
Note:
If the application which created the object no longer be available, CXSupervisor reports an error.
F.7.4 Converting a Package Object
Certain types of object may be converted from one form to another. To initiate
conversion:
1, 2, 3…
1. Select the object on the page.
2. Activate the Edit menu and select Package Object (displayed as the last
item on the Edit menu).
3. Select Convert from the sub-menu displayed.
Note:
322
The menu item name varies from application to application but always
references the inserted object.
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Appendix G
Glossary of Terms
ADO
ADO stands for Active Data Objects and is data access
technology which uses OLE-DB to access data sources
in a uniform way e.g. MS-Access databases, MS-Excel
spreadsheets and Comma Separated Variable files.
AND
A logic operator used to interrogate Boolean type points.
AND returns 'TRUE' if all arguments are 'TRUE'. An
example of AND is that if a is a statement and b is a
statement, AND returns 'TRUE' if both a and b are
'TRUE'. If one or both statements return 'FALSE' then
AND returns 'FALSE'.
Application
A software program that accomplishes a specific task.
Examples of applications are CX-Supervisor, CX-Server
and Microsoft Excel. CX-Supervisor and its development
environment allows the creation and testing of new
applications through a Graphical User Interface (GUI).
Arguments
Words, phrases, or numbers that can be entered on the
same line as a command or statement to expand or
modify the command or statement within the CXSupervisor script language. The command acts on the
argument. In essence the command is a verb, and the
argument is the object of the verb. An example of an
argument in CX-Supervisor is
"DDETerminate(channel)" where DDETerminate is
a command within the script language, and channel is
the argument upon which the command will act.
ASCII
An old standard, defining a set of characters. Officially
using only 7 bits allows definitions for only 127
characters, and does not include any accented
characters.
Bitmap
The representation of an image stored in a computer's
memory. Each picture element (pixel) is represented by
bits stored in the memory. In CX-Supervisor a bitmap
image can be installed as a single object.
Boolean type
A type of point where the value of the point can be one of
two states. Essentially the two states are '0' and '1', but
these states can be assigned a meaningful designation.
Examples are:
State
COM
Example Example Example Example
0
OFF
FALSE
OUT
CLOSED
1
ON
TRUE
IN
OPEN
COM is a Microsoft technology that allows components
used to interact.
323
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Communications
Driver
The relevant communications management system for
OMRON PLCs in conjunction with Microsoft Windows,
providing facilities for other SYSMAC software to
maintain PLC device and address information and to
communicate with OMRON PLCs and their supported
network types.
Constant
Within CX-Supervisor, a constant is a point within the
script language that takes only one specific value.
Control Object
In CX-Supervisor, a control object is applied in the
development environment and can be a pushbutton, a
toggle button, a slider, a trend graph, a rotational gauge
or a linear gauge. Essentially a control object can be a
complex graphic object consisting of a number of
primitive graphic objects, which provides user interaction.
CX-Server
An advanced communications management system for
OMRON PLCs providing facilities for software to
maintain PLC device and address information and to
communicate with OMRON PLCs and their supported
network types. CX-Server supports CS-Series PLCs.
Database
connection
A Database connection (or Connection for short)
contains the details used to access a data source. This
can either be via Data Source Name (DSN), filename or
directory.
Database
Connection Level
A Database Connection Level is a string which
determines what level in the database tree hierarchy is to
be operated on. Some examples are listed below:
"Northwind"
Connectionlevel
"CSV.Result"
Recordset level
"Northwind.Order Details.OrderID" Field level
"Invoice.Data Types"
Database
Recordset
Schema level
A Database recordset (or Recordset for short) is a set of
records. This could either be an actual Table in the
database, or a table that has been generated as a
consequence of running a Query.
Database Schema A Database Schema (or Schema for short) obtains
database schema information from a Provider.
Database Server
Query
324
A Database Server Query (or Server Query for short) is a
query that is stored in the actual Database. They are
pre-defined and added by the database designer which
means they are 'fixed' for the duration of a project.
Server Queries may have pre-defined 'Parameters',
which allow criteria to be passed to the query at runtime
e.g. values to filter, allowing one query to be used to
produce different results. Each pre-defined parameter
must have a Parameter Association defined. Because
these queries are stored in a compiled and tested form
they are more efficient and therefore preferential to
running a SQL Query.
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Database SQL
Query
A Database SQL Query (or SQL Query for short) is
interpreted dynamically at runtime. The SQL Text can be
modified at runtime, enabling different Queries to be run
for varying situations however, the SQL Text has to be
compiled on the fly every time it is executed and
consequently is less efficient than a Server Query.
DBCS
DBCS stands for Double Byte Character Set and is a
Microsoft extension of ASCII which uses 2 bytes (16 bits)
to define character codes. With this larger range it can
include accented characters, extended ASCII characters,
Nordic characters and symbols.
DCOM
DCOM is a distributed version of COM that allows
components on different PCs to interact over a network.
DDE
Dynamic Data Exchange. A channel through which
correctly prepared programs can actively exchange data
and controls other applications within Microsoft
Windows. DDE technology was notoriously unstable and
was replaced with OLE technology.
See also Item, Server, server application and Topic.
Development
Environment
SCADA applications are created and tested using the
development environment within CX-Supervisor. On
completion, the finished application can be delivered as a
final customer application to be run by the run-time
environment.
DLL
Dynamic Link Library. A program file that although
cannot be run stand-alone as an executable, can be
utilised by one or more applications or programs as a
common service. DLL files have a *.DLL extension.
DLL's comprise a number of stand-alone functions. In
CX-Supervisor, a DLL containing icons can be accessed
to represent the display part of an OLE object. One such
DLL, 'MORICONS.DLL', is provided in the standard
Microsoft Windows installation.
Download
A recipe is downloaded during runtime. This process
involves identifying the appropriate recipe and executing
the validation code, if any exists. The download is
complete when each ingredient has set its point to the
target value.
Executable
A file that contains programs or commands of an
application that can be executed by a user or another
application. Executable files have a *.EXE file extension.
CX-Supervisor provides two executable files, one for the
development environment (CXSUPERVISORDEV.EXE),
and one for the run-time environment (SCS.EXE).
Expressions
In the CX-Supervisor script language, expressions are a
construct for computing a value from one or more
operands. For instance, in the example "lift =
height + rate", the expression is "height + rate"
where the result yielded from the expression is used for
the value of "lift".
325
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Outside of the script language, expressions consisting of
operators and operands can be used to control objects,
through actions.
Field association
A field association enables a link to be made between a
CX-Supervisor Point and a particular field (i.e. column)
within a recordset.
Graphic Object
In CX-Supervisor, a graphic object is created in the
development environment, and can be a line, an arc, a
polygon (including a square and rectangle), a round
rectangle, an ellipse (including a circle), or a polyline. A
complex object can exist as a combination of two or more
graphic objects.
GUI
Graphical User Interface. Part of a program that
interacts with the user and takes full advantage of the
graphics displays of computers. A GUI employs pulldown menus and dialog boxes for ease of use. Like all
Microsoft Windows based applications, CX-Supervisor
has a GUI.
I/O type
Input/Output type. An attribute of a point that defines the
origin and destination of the data for that point. The data
for a point can originate (be input from) and is destined
(is output to) to the internal computer memory or PLC.
Icon
Pictorial representations of computer resources and
functions. The CX-Supervisor development environment
and run-time environment are run from icons.
Ingredient
Each recipe consists of at least one ingredient. Each
ingredient must be related to an existing point.
Integer type
A type of point where the value of the point can only be a
whole positive or negative number.
Item
Within the CX-Supervisor script language, Item is a
generic term for a point, OPC item or Temperature
Controller item.
JScript
A Java style scripting language supported by Microsoft's
Windows Scripting Host.
JVM
Java Virtual Machine.
Microsoft Excel
A spreadsheet application.
Microsoft Windows A windowing environment that is noted for its GUI, and
for features such as multiple typefaces, desk accessories
(such as a clock, calculator, calendar and notepad), and
the capability of moving text and graphics from one
application to another via a clipboard.
CX-Supervisor will run only under Microsoft Windows.
DDE functions communicating with other applications
supported by CX-Supervisor use Microsoft Windows as a
basis.
Microsoft Word for A word processing application.
Windows
326
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Nesting
To incorporate one or more IF THEN ELSE/ELSEIF
ENDIF statements inside a structure of the same kind.
Network
1 - Part of the PLC configuration, based on the device
type. The number of Networks available is dependant on
the device type.
2 - A number of computers linked together with a central
processing point known as a Server which is accessible
to all computers. Networks affect CX-Supervisor in that
further Network associated options are available if the
computer is Network connected.
Non-Volatile
A point that is designated as 'non-volatile' is a point
whose value is saved on disk and automatically reloaded
when CX-Supervisor resumes execution.
NOT
A logic operator used to interrogate Boolean type points
which produces the Boolean inverse of the supplied
argument. An example of NOT is that if a is a statement
and is 'FALSE', then NOT returns 'TRUE'. If a is a
statement and is 'TRUE', then NOT returns 'FALSE'.
Object
In CX-Supervisor, an object can be text, graphics, a
control, a bitmap, or ActiveX object as created in the
development environment. A complex object can exist
as a combination of two or more objects of any of the
above types. Specifically, graphical objects can be
categorised as a line, an arc, a polygon (including a
square and rectangle), a round rectangle, an ellipse
(including a circle), or a polyline. A control is essentially
a complex graphic object and is specifically either a
pushbutton, a toggle button, a slider, a trend graph, a
rotational gauge or a linear gauge.
OLE-DB
OLE-DB is the underlying database technology, on which
ADO relies. OLE-BD is designed to be the successor to
ODBC.
Operand
The term used for constants or point variables.
Operator
A symbol used as a function, with infix syntax if it has two
arguments (e.g. "+") or prefix syntax if it has only one
argument (e.g. NOT). The CX-Supervisor script
language uses operators for built-in functions such as
arithmetic and logic.
OR
A logic operator used to interrogate Boolean type points.
OR returns 'TRUE' if any of the supplied arguments are
'TRUE'. An example of OR is that if a is a statement and
b is a statement, OR will return 'TRUE' if either a and b
are 'TRUE'. If both statements return 'FALSE' then OR
will return 'FALSE'.
Pages
The combination and manipulation of pages containing
objects within projects forms the basis of CX-Supervisor.
More than one page can exist for each project. The
pages in a project provide the visual aspect of CXSupervisor corresponding to a display with the objects
contained in each page providing a graphical
representation of the system being monitored.
327
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Parameter
Association
A Parameter Association enables values, either constant
or stored in a point, to be passed to a Server Query.
Pixel
A single displayable point on the screen from which a
displayed image is constructed. The screen resolution of
the computer's Visual Display Unit (VDU) is defined by
the number of pixels across and the number of pixels
down (e.g. 1024 x 768).
See also SVGA mode and VGA mode.
PLC
Programmable Logic Controller.
Point variable
A point within the CX-Supervisor script language that
stores a value or string assigned to that point.
Point
A point is used to hold a value of a predefined type Boolean, Integer, Text, etc. The contents of a point may
be controlled by an object or I/O mechanism such as
PLC communication. The contents of a point may
control the action or appearance of an object, or be used
for output via an I/O mechanism.
See also Boolean type, Integer type, point variable, Real
type and Text type.
Project
A CX-Supervisor application will consist of one or a
number of pages linked together. The pages may
contain passive or active graphics, text or animations,
and may be grouped together logically to form a project.
A project may consist of many pages, or simply a single
page. Projects may be built and tested within the CXSupervisor development environment, and run standalone under the CX-Supervisor run-time environment.
Only one project at a time may be open for editing within
the CX-Supervisor development environment.
Real type
A type of point where the value of the point can be any
number, including those containing a decimal point.
Recipe
A recipe is a set of pre-defined steps used to perform a
particular task. A CX-Supervisor project may contain
zero or more number of recipes. Recipes are defined in
the development environment and executed, or
downloaded, in the run-time environment.
Run-Time
Environment
SCADA applications are run using the run-time
environment of CX-Supervisor, following creation of the
application in the CX-Supervisor development
environment.
SCADA
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition.
Server
A Server is the central processing point of a Network that
is accessible to all computers. Networks affect CXSupervisor in that further associated options are
available if the computer Network is connected.
Server Application An application that can be used to view or interact with,
whilst currently within CX-Supervisor.
328
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Statement
Within the CX-Supervisor script language, a statement is
a command understood by the run-time environment.
Statements are constructed of commands and
arguments, which when combined, help to formulate a
finished application to be used in the run-time
environment.
String
The contents of a Text type point that can only contain
literal alphanumeric characters. A string starts following
an opening quotation mark, and ends before a closing
question mark; in the example "name = "spot"", the point
"name" holds the string spot.
SVGA mode
A mode of video display that provides 800 600 pixel
resolution (or higher) with 16 or more colours and is
supported on Super Video Graphics Adapter systems.
CX-Supervisor
A SCADA software application which creates and
maintains graphical user interfaces and communicates
with PLCs and other I/O mechanisms.
Target Value
An ingredient must specify a target value for its related
point. This is the value to which the point will be set in
runtime when the recipe is downloaded.
Taskbar
An integral part of Microsoft Windows which allows
Microsoft Windows based applications to be started. CXSupervisor is run from the Taskbar.
Text Object
In CX-Supervisor, a text object is a string on a page.
Attributes such as typeface, point size, embolden,
italicise, underline, left justify, flush right, and centre can
be applied to enhance its presentation.
Text Type
A type of point that holds a string.
Unicode
A Multi-Byte Character Set, which not only includes
European Characters like DBCS, but can also include
global support including for Japanese, Chinese and
Cyrillic fonts. However, Unicode is not supported on all
Windows platforms.
Validation Code
Recipe validation code is CX-Supervisor script language
which is used to check point values before downloading
a recipe.
VBScript
A Visual Basic style scripting language supported by
Microsoft's Windows Scripting Host.
VGA mode
A mode of video display that provides 640 480 pixel
resolution with 16 colours and is supported on Video
Graphics Adapter systems.
Windows Desktop
An integral part of Microsoft Windows which allows
Microsoft Windows based applications to be started from
icons and for all applications to be organised. CXSupervisor can be run from Windows Desktop.
Windows Scripting A scripting engine supplied by Microsoft to run VBScript
Host
or JScript. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/scripting
329
Appendix G Glossary of Terms
Wizard
330
Wizards are dialogs used by the CX-Supervisor
development environment to take the user through
complex operations in a simplified step-by-step process.
Revision history
Revision history
A manual revision code appears as a suffix to the catalog number on the front
cover of the manual.
Cat. No. W10E-EN-01
The following table lists the changes made to the manual during each revision.
The page numbers of a revision refer to the previous version.
Revision Date
code
Revised content
01
First version in the standard Omron format.
Sept. 2010
331
Revision history
332
Cat. No. I55E-EN-01
Cat. No. I55E-EN-01
Programmable Controller
SYSMAC CJ-series
CJ1W-MCH72
Motion Control Unit
CJ1W-MCH72 Programmable Controller SYSMAC CJ-series Motion Control Unit
OPERATION MANUAL
Authorized Distributor:
Cat. No. W10E-EN-01
Note: Specif cations subject to change without notice.
Printed in Europe
OPERATION MANUAL
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement