KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU

System Maintenance

Order Number EK-454AA-MG-001

Digital Equipment Corporation

Maynard. Massachusetts

First

Printing,

May 1992

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation.

Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any elTOl'S that may appear in this document.

The software, if any, descn"bed in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software or equipment that is not supplied by Digital Equipment

Corporation or its affiliated companies.

Restricted Rights: Use, duplication. or disclosure by the U.s. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(l)(ii) oftbe Rights in Technical Data and Computer

Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.

Copyright

e

Digital Equipment Corporation, 1992. All Rights Reserved.

The Reader's Comments form at the end of this document requests your critical evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.

The fonowing are trademarks of

Digital

Equipment Corporation: CompacTape,

DEC, DECconnect, DECctirect, DECnet,· DECscan, DECserlel',

DECUS. ex,

DDCMP,

DECwindows,

DELNI, DEMl'R, DESQA, DESTA, DSRVB. DSSI, IVAX, KDA, KLESI, MicroVAX. MSCP,

Q-bus, Q22-bus,

RA.

RQDX, RRD4O, SDI, TbinWire. TK, TMSCP, TQK5O, TQK70, TSV05.

TU, ULTRIX, UNIBUS, VAX. VAX. 4000, VAX. DOCUMENT, VAXcluster, VAXELN. VAXlab,

VAX.server, VAXsimPLUS, VMS, VT, and the

DIGITAL loge.

FCC NOTICE: The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency energy. The equipment has been type tested. and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device pursaant to Subpart to

J of Part 15 of FCC Rules, which are designed provide reasonable protection against such radio frequency interference when operated in a commercial environment. Operation of this equipment in a residential area may cause interference, in which case the user at his own expense may be required to take measures to correct the interference. '

MlrSl678

This dcc:u.ment was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 2.0.

Contents

Preface'

xv

Chapter 1 System Maintenance Strategy

1.1 Service Delivery Methodology ........................ 1-1

1.2 Product Service Tools and Utilities .................... 1-2

1.3 Information Services ............................... 1-4

1.4 Field Feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1~

Chapter 2 CPU System Overview

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

2.3.3

2.3.4

2.3.5

CPU Module Features ............................. .

MS690 Memory Modules ........................... .

BA440

Enclosure Components ....................... "

2-1

2-5

2-6

H3604 Console Module ........................... . 2-6

System Control Panel

(SCP) ...........•..•........

BA440

Backplane ............................... .

2-12

2-14

Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ............... .

System Airflow. . . . . ............................ .

2-15

2-17

Chapter 3 System Setup and Configuration

3.1

3.1.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.5.1

3.5.2

3.5.3

CPU and Memory Module Order ..................... .

Installing Add-On MS690 Memory Modules .......... .

General Module Order for Q-Bus Options .............. .

Recommended Module Order of Q-bus Options .......... .

Mass Storage Options (Internal) ..................... .

System Expansion ................................ .

Mass Storage Expanders ......................... .

Q-Bus Expanders ............................... .

Control Power Bus for Expanders .................. .

3-1

3-2

3-4

3-5

3-6

3-8

3-8

3-8

3-9 iii

3.5.4 Adding Options to the System Enclosure. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-10

3.6 DSSI VAXclusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13

3.6.1 DSSI VAXcluster Configuration Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-15

3.7 Finnware Commands and Utilities Used in System

Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-20

3.7.1 Examining System Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-20

3.7.2 Using the CONFIGURE Command to

Detennine CSR

Addresses for Q-Bus Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-22

3.7.3 Setting and Examining Parameters for DSSI Devices . . .. 3-24

3.7.3.1 DSSI Device Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3--24

3.7.3.2

3.7.3.3

How VMS Uses the DSSI Device Parameters ........ 3-25

Entering the DUP Driver Utility from Console Mode .. 3-31

3.7.3.4

3.7.3.5

3.7.3.6

3.7.3.7

3.7.3.8

3.7.3.9

3.7.4

3.7.4.1

3.7.4.2

3.7.5

3.7.5.1

3.7.5.2

3.7.5.3

Entering the DUP Driver Utility from VMS ......... 3-32

Setting Allocation Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-33

Setting Unit Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-34

Setting Node Name ........... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-37

Setting System ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3--37

Exiting the DUP Driver Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3--38

Write-Protecting an RF35 ISE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-40

Software Write-Protect for RF -Series ISEs. . . . . . . . . .. 3-40

Hardware Write-Protect For RF35 ISEs. . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-41

Setting System Parameters: Boot Defaults, Bootfiags, Halt and Restart Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 8-44

Setting the Boot Default ........................ 3-44

Setting Boot Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-46

Setting the Halt Action ......................... 3-47

Chapter

4

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing

(Normal Operation)

4.1

4.2

4.2.1

4.2.2

4.2.3

4.3

4.3.1

Basic Initialization Flow ........................... .

Power-On Self-Tests (POST) ......................... .

Power-Up Tests for Kernel ........................ .

Power-Up Tests for Q-Bus Options .................. .

Power-Up Tests for Mass Storage Devices ............ .

CPU ROM-Based Diagnostics ....................... .

Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-1

4-4

4-4

4-7

4-8

4-8

4-9

iv

4.3.2 Scripts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-10

4.4 Basic Acceptance Test Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-15

4.5 Machine State on PowereUp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-20

4.6 Main Memory Layout and State ...................... 4-20

4.6.1 Reserved Main Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-21

4.6.1.1 PFN Bitmap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-21

4.6.1.2 Scatter/Gather map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-22

4.6.1.3 Firmware "Scratch Memory" ..................... 4-22

4.6.2 Contents of Main Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-22

4.6.3 Memory Controller Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-23

4.6.4 On-Chip Cache. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-23

4.6.5 Translation Buffer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-23

4.6.6 Halt-Protected Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-23

4.7 Operating System Bootstrap ......................... 4-23

4.7.1 Preparing for the Bootstrap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-24

4.7.2 Primary Bootstrap Procedures

(VMB) .•••. '" • . . • . . . • ••

4-26

4.7.3 Device Dependent Secondary Bootstrap Procedures. . . . .. 4-30

4.7.3.1 Disk and Tape Bootstrap Procedure ........

~

. . . . . .. 4-30

4.7.3.2 PROM Bootstrap Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-31

4.7.3.3 MOP Ethernet Functions and Network Bootstrap

Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-32

4.7.3.4 Network "Listening" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-33

4.8 Operating System Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-39

4.8.1 Locating the RPB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-40

Chapter 5 System Troub!eshooting and Diagnostics

5.1 Basic Troubleshooting Flow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1

5.2 Product Fault Management and Symptom-Directed Diagnosis

5-4

5.2.1 General Exception and Interrupt Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4

5.2.2 VMS Error Handling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . &-5

5.2.3 VMS Error Logging and Event Log Entry Format. . . . . . . 5-7

5.2.4 VMS Event Record Translation. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-15

5.2.5 Interpreting CPU Faults Using ANALYZE/ERROR . . . . .. 5-16

5.2.6 Interpreting Memory Faults Using ANALYZE/ERROR ... 5-18

5.2.6.1 Un correctable ECC Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-19 v

5.2.6.2 Correctable ECC Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-22

5.2.7 Interpreting System Bus Faults Using ANALYZE/ERROR 5-27

5.2.8 Interpreting DMA <=> Host Transaction Faults Using

ANALYZEIERROR ............................... 5-29

5.2.9 VAXsimPLUS and System-Initiated Call Logging (SICL)

Support ............. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-31

5.2.9.1 Converting the SICL Service Request MEL File ...... 5-36

5.2.9.2 VAXsimPLUS Installation Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-37

5.2.9.3 VAXsimPLUS Post-Installation Tips. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-38

5.2.10 . Repair Data for Returning FRU s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-40

5.3 Interpreting Power-On Self Test (POST) and ROM-Based

Diagnostic

(RBD)

Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-40

5.3.1 FE Utility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-53

5.3.2 Overriding Halt Protection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-54

5.3.3 Isolating Memory Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-54

5.4 Testing DSSI Storage Devices ........................ 5-57

5.5 U sing MOP Ethernet Functions to

Isolate Failures . . . . . . .. 5-59

5.6 Interpreting User Environmental Test Package

(UETP)

VMS

Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-62

5.6.1 Interpreting UETP Output ........................

~2

5.6.1.1 UETP Log Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-62

5.6.1.2 Possible UETP Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-63

5.7 Using Loopback Tests to Isolate Failures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-64

5.7.1 Testing the Console Port ..........................

~6

5.7.2 Embedded nSSI Loopback Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-67

5.7.3 Embedded Ethernet Loopback Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-68

5.7.4 Q-Bus Option Loopback Testing .....................

~9

Chapter 6 FEPROM Firmware Update

6.1 Preparing the Processor for an FEPROM Update. . . . . . . . . 6-2

6.2 Updating Firmware Via Ethernet ..................... 6-3

6.3 Updating Firmware Via Tape. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6

6.4 FEPROM Update Error Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9 vi

Appendix A KA675/KA680/KA690 Firmware Commands

A.I

A.I.I

A. 1.2

Console I/O Mode Control Characters ................. .

Command Syntax ............................... .

Address Specifiers .............................. .

A. 1.3

Symbolic Addresses ............................. .

A-I

A-2

A-3

A-3

A.I.4 Console Numeric Expression Radix Specifiers. . . . . . . . .. A-6

A. 1.5 Console Command Qualifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-6

A.

1.6 Console Command Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-S

A.2 Console Commands ................................ A-9

A.2.1 BOOT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-IO

A.2.2 CONFIGURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-II

A.2.3 CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-13

A..2.4 DEPOSIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-IS

A2.5 EXAMINE ................ ~ .................... A-14

A.2.6 FIND. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-15

A.2.7 HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-16

A.2.8 HELP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-16

A.2.9 INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-18

A.2.I0 MOVE ........................................ A-19

A.2.I1

~

A.2.12 REPE.M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-22

A.2.13 SEARCH........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. A-22

A.2.14

SET.......................................... A-24

A.2.I5 SHOW ........................................ A-28

A.2.16 START........................................

A-32

A.2.I7 TEST......................................... A-82

A.2.18 UNJAM ....................................... A-83

A.2.19 X-Binary Load and Unload ....................... A-83

A.2.20 ! (Comment) .................................... A-85 vii

Appendix B Address Assignments

B.l KA6751KA.6801KA690 General Local Address Space Map B-1

B.2 KA6751KA.6801KA690 Detailed Local Address Space Map . .. B-2

B.3 External, Internal Processor Registers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-8

B.4 Global Q22-bus Address Space Map

0 0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

B-8

B.5 Processor Registers ......

0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

B-9

B.6

IPR

Address Space Decoding ......

0 • • • • • • • • • 0 • • • • • • • •

B-16

Appendix C ROM Partitioning

e.l Firmware

EPRO~1

Layout, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-::.

C.1.l System Identification Registers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C-3

C.l.l.l PR$_SID (IPR 62) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C-3

C.1.1.2 SIE (20040004) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C-4

C.1.2 Call-Back Entry Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-5

C.1.2.l CP$GETCHARJU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

C-5

C.1.2.2 CP$MSG_OUT_NOLF_R4 ....

0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

C-6

C.1.2.3 CP$READ_WTH_PRMPT_R4 ..

0.................

C-7

C.1.3 Boot Information Pointers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C-7

Appendix D Data Structures and Memory

Layout

Dol Halt Dispatch State Machine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. D-l

D.2 RPB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

D--5

D.3 VMB Argument List..... . . . .... . . . .. . .. ..... .. ... .. D-9

Appendix E Configurable Machine State

Appendix F NVRAM Partitioning

F.l SSC RAM Layout ..........

0 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

F-l

F.1.l Public Data Structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-l

F.1.2 Console Program MailBox (CPMBX) ................. F-2

F.l.3 Firmware Stack. ... .. .. . .... . . . . . . . ... . .. ... .. .. F-3

F.l.4 Diagnostic State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. F-3

F.l.5 USER Area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-4 viii

Appendix G MOP Counters

Appendix H Programming the KFQSA Adapter

Appendix

I

Error Messages

1.1 Machine Check Register Dump. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-I

1.2 Halt Code Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-I

1.3 VMB Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-3

1.4

Console Error Messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1-4

Appendix

J

Related Documents

Glossary

Index

Examples

3-1

3-2

3-3

3-4

SHOW DSSI Display (Embedded DSSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

3-30

SHOW UQSSP Display CKFQSA-Based DSSI) ............

3-31

Accessing the DUP Driver Utility From Console Mode

(Embedded DSSi). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3-32

Accessing the DUP Driver Utility From Console Mode

(KFQSA-Based DSSI). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

3-32

3-5 Accessing the DUP Driver Utility From VMS ............

3-33

3-6

Setting Allocation Class for a Specified Device ...........

3-34

3-7

3-8

3-9

3-10

3-11

3-12

Setting a Unit Number for a Specified Device . . . . . . . . . . ..

3-35

Changing a Node Name for a Specified Device ............ 3-37

Changing a System ID for a Specified Device ............

3-38

Exiting the DUP Driver Utility for a Specified Device. . . . ..

SHOW DSSI Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

3-39

SHOW UQSSP Display (KF'QSA-Based DSSI) . . . . . . . . . . ..

3-39

3-40 ix

3-13

3-14

4-1

4-2

4-3

4-4

5-1

5-2

5-3

Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through Firmware . . . .. 3-43

Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through VMS . . . . . . . .. 3-44

Language Selection Menu ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3

N onnal Diagnostic Countdown. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4

Successful Power-Up to List of Bootable Devices. . . . . . . . . . 4-7

Test 9E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-12

Error Log Entry Indicating CPU Error. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-17

SHOW ERROR Display Using VMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-18

Error Log Entry Indicating Uncorrectable ECC Error . . . . .. 5-20

5-4 SHOW MEMORY Display Under VMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21

5-5 U sing

.AJ.~ALYZE/SYSTE~1

to

Check the

Physical Address in

Memory for a Replaced Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-22

5-6 Error Log Entry Indicating Correctable ECC Error. . . . . . .. 5-25

5-7 Error Log Entry Indicating Q-Bus Error. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-28

5-8

Error Log Entry Indicating Polled Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-29

5-9 Device Attention Entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~1

5-10 SICL Service Request with Appended MEL File... . . . . . ..

~7

5-11 Sample Output with

Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-41

5-12 FE Utility Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-53

5-13 Running DRVTST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-58

5-14 Running DRVEXR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-59

6-1 FEPROM Update Via Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5

6-2 FEPROM Update Via Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6-8

Figures

2-1 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU Module Component Side . . . . . . . 2-2

2-2 KA6751KA6801KA690 Kernel System Functional Diagram .. 2-4

2-3 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU Module Block Diagram . . . . . . . . 2--5

2-4

Ratchet Handles for CPU and Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . 2-6

2-5 H3604 Console Module (Front). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7

2-6

H3604 Console Module (Back) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2-10

2-7 System Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12

2-8 BA440 Backplane. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2-14

2--9 Power Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2-15

2-10 Fans............................................ 2-18

2-11 Fan Speed Control (FSC) Jumper Location .............. 2-19 x

3-1

3-2

3-3

3-4

3-5

3-6

3-7

3-8

3-9

3-10

Memory Module Ratchet Handles .................... .

Storage Configuration Example ...................... .

Sample Power Bus Configuration ..................... .

VAX 4000 Model 500 Configuration Worksheet .......... .

DSSI Cabling for a Generic Two-System DSSI VAXcluster

Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

~o-System

DSSI VAXcluster ....................... .

Expanded 'l\vo-System DSSI VAXcluster ............... .

VMS Operating System Requires Unique Unit Numbers for

DSSI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sample DSSI Busses for an Expanded VAX 4000 Model 500

System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Attaching a MSCP Unit Number Label to the Device Front

Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4-1

4-2

4-3

4-4

4-5

4-6

5-1

Console Banner ........... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .

~Iemory

Layout After Power-Up Diagnostics ............ .

Memory Layout prior to VMB Entry .................. .

Memory Layout at VMB Exit ........................ .

Boot Block Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Locating the Restart Parameter Block ................. .

Event Log Entry Format ........................... .

3-3

3-7

3-9

3-11

3-14

3-18

3-19

3-27

3-28

3-36

4-5

4-21

4-26

4-29

4-31

4-40

5-9

5-2

5-3

Machine Check Stack. Frame Subpacket ............... .

Processor Register Subpacket ....................... .

5-10

5-11

Memory Subpack.et for ECC Memory Errors ............. .

5-12

5-4

5-5

5-6

Memory SBE Reduction Subpacket (Correctable Memory

Errors) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5-12

eRn

Entry Subpacket Header; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;;; 5-13

5-7 Correctable Read Data

(eRD)

Entry ...................

5-14

5-8

Trigger Flow for the VAXsi'mPLUS MOflitor. . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-33

5-9 Five-Level VAXsimPLUS Monitor Display ............... 5-85

5-10 H3604 Console Module Fuses ........................ 5-66

6-1 Firmware Update Utility Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2

6-2 W4 Jumper Setting for Updating Finnware. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3

C-l KA6751KA6801KA690 FE PROM Layout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. C-2

C-2 SIn: System Identification Register ................... C-3

C-3 SIE: System Identification Extension (20040004) . . . . . . . .. C-4

C-8 xi

F-l KA6751KA6801KA690

sse

NVRAM Layout...... .... .... F-l

F-2

NVRO

(20140400) : Console Program MailBoX (CPMBX) ... F-2

F-8

NVRI

(20140401) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-8

F-4 NVR2 (20140402) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F-8

Tables

2-1 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU Module Components.. . ....... 2-8

2-2 H3604 Console Module Controls and Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . 2-8 ....

2-3

H3604 Console Module (Back) ........................ 2-10

2-4

System Control Panel Controls and Indicators. . . . . . . . . . .. 2-13

~ Hfi~'14 Power Suppiy ~witches, Controls, and Indicators ......................................... 2-15

3-1 BA440 Module Order. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1

3-2 Power Requirements e , ' •

0 • • • • • • • • • , • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

3-12

3-3 Boot Devices Supported by the KA6751KA6801KA690 ...... 3-46

3-4

Virtual Memory Bootstrap (VMB) Boot Flags ............ 3-47

3-5

Actions Taken on a Halt ............................ 3-48

4-1 Language Inquiry on Power-Up or Reset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

4-2 LED Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6

4-3

Scripts Available to Customer Services ................. 4-14

4-4

Signature Field Values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4-17

4-5

4-6

Network Maintenance Operations Summary ............ , 4-35

Supported MOP Messages .......................... 4-36

4-7 MOP Multicast Addresses and Protocol Specifiers. . . . . . . .. 4-38

5-1 Console Terminal/Console Module Problems ............. 5-3

5-2 Power Supply Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3

5-3 VMS Error Handler Entry Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8

5-4

Conditions That Trigger VAXsimPLUS Notification and

Updating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-32

5-5

Five-Level VAXsimPLUS Monitor Screen Displays ........ 5-34

5-6 Machine Check Exception During Executive . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5-42

5-7 Exception During Executive with No Parameters .........

5-43

5-8

Other Exceptions with Parameters, No Machine Check. . . .. 5-43

5-9 KA6751KA6801KA690 Console Displays

As

Pointers to FRUs 5-45

5-10 H3604 Console Module Fuses ........................ 5-65

5-11 Loopback Connectors for Common Devices .............. 5-70 xii

A-I

A-2

Console Symbolic Addresses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .......... .

Symbolic Addresses Used in Any Address Space ......... .

Console Radix Specifiers ........................... .

A=3

A-6

A-3

A-4 Console Command Qualifiers ........................ .

A-5

Command Keywords by Type ........................ .

A-6.

Console Command Summary ........................ .

B-1

B-2

C-l

C-2

C-3

D-l

D-2

D-3

F-l

F-2

A-6

A-7

A-8

A-8

Processor Registers ............................... .

IPR Address Space Decoding ........................ .

System Identification Register ....................... .

System Identification Extension ...................... .

B-9

B-16

C-3

Call-Back Entry Points ............................ .

Firmware State Transition Table ..................... .

Restart Parameter Block Fields ...................... .

VMB Argument List ............................... .

C-4

C-5

D-2

D-5

D-9

F-2

F-3

F-3

0-1

H-l

F-3

MOP Counter Block. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 0-1

Preferred KFQSA Switch Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. B-1

1-1 HALT Messages ....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2

1-2 VMB Error Messages .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3

1-3 Console Error Messages ............................ 1-4 xiii

Preface

This guide describes the procedures and tests used ·to maintain and troubleshoot

VAX 4000

Model

400, 500, and

600 systems, which use the

KA675, KA6S0, and

KA690 kernel, respectively.

System

VAX 4000 Model 400

VAX 4000 Model 500

VAX 4000 Model 600

Kernel

KA675

KA680

KA690

Intended Audience

This guide is intended for use by Digital Equipment Corporation Service personnel and qualified self-maintenance customers.

Warnings, Cautions, Notes

Warnings, cautions, and notes appear throughout this guide. They have the following meanings:

WABNING

Provides information to prevent personal injury.

CAUTION

Provides information to prevent damage to equipment or software.

NOTE Provides general information about the current topic.

Conventions

A system prompt and a command in boldface, uppercase type, for example,

»>SHOW OSSI, shows that the user enters the command at the system prompt. xv

Chapter 1

System Maintenance Strategy

Any successful maintenance strategy is predicated on the proper understanding and use of information services, service tools, service support and escalation procedures, and field feedback. This chapter lists the various service tools, information services, and service delivery methods used in system maintenance.

1.1 Service Delivery Methodology

Before beginning any maintenance operation, you should be familiar with the following:

1. The site agreement

2. Your local and area geography support and escalation procedures

3. Your Digital Services product delivery plan

Service delivery methods are part of the service support and escalation procedure. When appropriate, remote services should be part of the initial system installation. Methods of service delivery include the following:

• Local support

• Remote call screening e

Remete diagnosis and syst.em initiated service requests (using

DSNLink, SICL, MDS01, modem, etc.)

The recommended system h~sta11ation includes:

1.

Hardware installation and acceptance testing. Acceptance testing

(Chapter

4) includes running ROM-based diagnostics and running

MDM to test Q-bus options.

2. Software installation and acceptance testing. For example, using VMS

Factory Installed Software (FIS), and then acceptance testing with

UETP.

3. Installation of the Symptom-Directed Diagnosis (SDD) toolkit

(V~.xsimPLUS a..'ld SPRA..R) and remot.e services tools and equipment

(this includes installing DSNlink, modems, etc., and enabling SICL).

System Maintenance Strategy 1-1

When the installation is complete, the system should be able to dial out using SICL, and the Digital Service Center should be able to call into the system. Refer to your remote service delivery strategy.

If your service delivery methodology is not followed, service expenses for any product could be excessive.

1.2 Product Service Tools and Utilities

This section lists the array of service tools and utilities available for acceptance testing, diagnosis, and overall serviceability; and it provides recommendations as for their use.

VMS Error HandlinglLogging

VMS provides recovery from errors, fault handling, and event logging. The Error Report Formatter (ERF) provides bit-to-text

. translation of the event logs for interpretation.

RECOMMENDED USE: Analysis of error logs is the primary method of diagnosis and fault isolation. If the system is up, or the customer allows the service engineer to bring the system up, this information should be looked at first. Refer to Section 5.2 for information on Product Fault Management and Symptom-Directed

Diagnosis.

Symptom-Directed Diagnostic (SDD) Tools (VAXsimPLUS)

SDD tools are used primarily for notification of the existence of errors that have reached a critical threshold. SDD tools must be installed during system installation or as soon as product support is provided.

snn

tools are not bundled with VMS.

RECOMMENDED USE: Used primarily for onsite notification to the user via mail or to a remote Digital support center via System

Initiated Call Logging (SICL). Refer to Section 5.2.9 for information on VAXsimPLUS and SICL.

ROM-Based Diagnostics

ROM-based diagnostics have significant advantages:

• Load time is virtually nonexistent.

• The boot path is more reliable.

• Diagnosis is done in a more primitive state.

1-2 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

RECOMMENDED USE: The CPU ROM-based diagnostic facility is the primary means of offiine testing and diagnosis of the

CPU, memory, Ethernet, and DSSI subsystems. The ROM-based diagnostics are used in the acceptance test procedures (Section 4.4) when installing a system, adding a memory module, or replacing the following: CPU module, memory module(s), backplane, nSSI device, or H3604 console module. Use the ROM-based diagnostic error messages in Table 5-9

to

isolate FRU s.

Firmware Console Commands

Several commands and utilities are needed in configuring a system and setting and examining system and device parameters. For example, the CONFIGURE command is used to determine the proper CSR addresses for modules; the SHOW MEMORY, SHOW

DSSI, and SHOW QBUS commands are used

to

examine the configuration and memory error status; and the SET HOST command is used parameters. to access the DUP driver to configure DSS!

RECOMMENDED USE: Use console commands

to

configure the system and

Refer in setting and examining device parameters. to

Section 3.7 for information on firmware commands and utilities. Appendix A provides information on all available console commands.

Option LEDs During Power-Up

Many options and modules have LEDs that display pass/fail selftest results.

RECOMMENDED USE: Monitor option and module LEDs during power-up to see if they pass their sen-tests. Refer to Sections 4.2.2 and 4.2.3 for infonnation on power-up tests for Q-bus and mass storage devices. For more information on individual options, refer

to

your

Microsystems Options

manual.

Operating System Exercisers

(VMS

UETP)

The User Environment Test Package

(UETP) is a VMS software package designed to test whether the VMS operating system is installed correctly.

RECOMMENDED USE: Use UETP as part of acceptance testing to ensure that VMS is correctly installed. UETP is also used to stress

System Maintenance Strategy 1-3

test the user's environment and configuration by simulating system operation under heavy loads.

MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor (MDM)

The loadable diagnostic MDM requires a mmlmum of Release

136 to support VAX 4000 Model

400/500/600

systems. Consult your MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor User~ Guide for instructions on running MDM.

RECOMMENDED USE: MDM is used primarily for testing Q-bus options.

Loopback Test-c::

Internal and externalloopback tests can be used to isolate a failure by testing segments of a particular control or data path. The loopback tests are a subset of the ROM-based diagnostics and MDM diagnostics.

RECOMMENDED USE: Loopback. tests can be used to isolate problems with the console port, nSS! adapters, Ethernet controller, and many common Q-bus options. Refer to Section 5.7 for instructions on performing loopback tests.

Crash Dumps

For fatal errors, VMS will save the contents of memory to a crash dump file, e.g. fatal bugchecks.

RECOMMENDED USE: Crash dump file analysis should be performed by support. Saving a crash dump file for analysis requires proper system settings. Refer to your VMS documentation for instructions.

1.3 Information Services

Digital Service engineers may access several information resources, including advanced database applications, online training courses, and remote diagnosis tools. A brief description of some of these resources follows.

Technical Information Management Architecture (TIMA)

TIMA is used by Digital Services to deliver technical and reference information to its service engineers. One of the main benefits of

TIMA is the pooling of worldwide knowledge and expertise. Both

1-4 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

service and customer documentation for VAX 4000 systems are available on TIMA.

Entry Systems Service Information Kits

Service documentation containing information on enclosures, CPUs, and options, makes up the Entry Systems Service Information

Kit.

The manual you are reading is part of the kit. Refer to your

Guide to Entry Systems Service Information Kits

(EK-276A*-MI) for more information.

Training

Computer Based Instruction (CBI) and lecture lab courses are available from the Digital training center:

• VAX 4000 Model 500 System Installation and Troubleshooting

(CBI course, EY-I089E-EO (applicable for VAX 4000 Model 400

1500/600 systems)). e

Micro

V~v:..

Installation and Troubleshooting (Lecture lab course,

EY-940BE-LO)

Digital Services Product Delivery Plan (Hardware or Software)

The Product Delivery Plan documents Digital Services delivery commitments. The plan is the communications vehicle used among the various groups responsible for ensuring consistency between Digital Services delivery strategies and engineering product strategies.

Blitzes

Technical updates are "blitzed" to the field using mail and TWA

Storage and Retrieval System (STARS)

Stars is a worldwide database for storing and retrieving technical information. The STARS databases, which contain more than

150,000 entries, are updated daily.

U sing STARS, a service specialist can quickly retrieve the most upto-date technical information via DSNlink or DSIN.

VAX Notes

VAX Notes is a worldwide notes file.

DSNlink

DSNlink software application lets the Digital Services Center communicate electronically with the customer site. DSNlink serves as the platform for the delivery of electronic services.

System Maintenance Strategy 1-5

1.4 Field Feedback

Providing the proper feedback to the corporation is essential in closing the loop on any service call. Consider the following when completing a service call:

• Repair tags should be filled out accurately and with as much symptom information as possible so that repair centers can fix a problem.

• Call closeout information for Labor Activity Reporting System (LARS) or Call-Handling and Management Planning (CHAMP) needs to be accurate.

• The site maintenance log, whether hardcopy or electronic, should

j:lA.

.:~~ ~

U Y ....

",.l....,.., __

\.4~ Q.. ...., • .a..,L

~Al",. w

".c

\01 ....

~,,~ 9'\~~".........-".:I w ..

~ j:Ji." ... ~V4

...... """.: .......

~'",.,""",.!l'\

~.\,or""".

1-6 KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU System Maintenance

Chapter 2

CPU System Overview

This chapter provides an overview of the components that make up KA675

/KA680/KA690-based systems. These components are listed below:

• CPU: KA675 (IAOO2-CA), KA680 (IA002-BA), or KA690 (IAOO2-AA)

• MS690 memory modules

• BA440 enclosure components

H3604 console module

System control panel (SCP)

BA440 backplanes

Power supply

Fans

CAUTION:

Static electricity can damage integrated circuits. Always use a grounded wrist strap (pN

2~11762-O0)

and grounded work surface when working with the internal parts of a computer system.

2.1 CPU Module Features

The KA6751KA6801KA690 CPUs are quad-height VAX processor modules that use the Q22-bus and DSS! bus. The CPU s are used in the following systems: .

System

VAX 4000 Model 400

VAX 4000 Model 500

VAX 4000 Model 600

CPU

KA67S

KA680

KA690

The CPU module is designed for use in high-speed, real-time applications and for multiuser, multitasking environments. The KA6751KA6891KA690 employ multiple levels of cache memory to maximize performance. See

Figure 2-1 for a view of the major chips, LEDs, and connectors. See

Figure 2-2 and Figure 2-3 for biock diagrams of the major functions.

CPU System Overview 2-1

The CPU module and MS690 memory modules combine to form the CPU

Imemory subsystem that uses DSSI busses to communicate with mass storage devices, the Q22-bus to communicate with I/O devices, and the

Ethernet to communicate across the network.

The CPU module.is configured as an arbiter CPU on the Q22-bus, where it arbitrates bus mastership and fields anyon-board interrupt requests.

Figure 2-1: KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU Module Component Side

Console Connector, J2

RUnLED~/

Diagnostic LEOs

OC541

SGEC

BCache

(Tag

Store)

OC246

NVAX

OC243

NCA

B-CACHE

(Data Store)

OC244

NMC

B

I

Obit RAMs

I

OC527

COBIC

IE-Net

ROM

I

Backplane Connector, J 1

-j-

MLo.oo7693

2-2 KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU System Maintenance

Table 2-1: KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU Module Components

Components Function

DC246 (NVAX) Central processor unit. Contains a 64-entry translation buffer integral floating.point unit, 2·KB virtual instruction stream cache (VIC),

8·KB physical instruction and data stream primary cache (P-cache), and backup cache control and error coITeCtion code (ECC)

Backup cache

RAMs

KA675: Central processor unit has 16·ns cycle time and the virtual instrnction stream cache is disabled

KA680: Central processor unit has l4·ns cycle time

KA690: Central processor unit has l2·ns cycle time

KA675, KASSO: 128-KB backup cache (B-cache)

KA690: 512·KB backup cache (B-cache)

DC243 (NCA)

DC244 (NMC)

DC527 (CQBIC)

NDAL to CDAL 110 bus interface chip

Main memory controller (also provides ECC protection)

Q22-bus interface

DC541 (SGEC) Ethernet interface

Ethernet Station Address

ROM

Provides unique hardware address

DC542 (SHAC) DSSI interface chips (2)

DC511 (SSC)

DC509 (CLK)

Firmware

ROMs

System support chip

Clock

Obit RAMs

Console connector

Backplane cc:cnec+..cr

Four resident firmware chips, each

FLASH programmable

128 K by

8 bits of

EPROMS for a total of 512 KB.

The ECC protected ownership-bit RAMs provide coherency between backup cache and memory. lOO·pin for connection to the H3604 console modUle (J2)

Run

LED

Diagnostic LEDs

270=pin for connection to backplane for Q22-bus, DSS! bus, and memory intermnnect (Jl)

This

LED indicates the

CPU module is receiving power.

A hexadecimal value displays on the four diagnostic LEDs.

The values correspond to the decimal value displayed on the H3604 console module LED.

CPU System Overview 2-3

Figure 2-2: KA675/KA680/KA690 Kernel System Functional Diagram

H3S04

Ribbon

Console Cable

Module o o

:::I

_CD

..... 0

~~

CPU

~ g

- : : : I n

~

Module

Backplane Interconnect

To Mass Storage

Slots

To Q22-bus Slots

MSS90 Memory Modules

(1 minimuml4 maximum)

MLO.oo7694

2-4 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 2-3: KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU Module Block Diagram

To Console Module

NVAX

CPU

IP-cache

I

~

To BA440

Disks

To Console

Module

To BA440

MLO-OO7262

2.2 MS690 Memory Modules

The MS690 memory module is a double-sided, quad-height memory board that uses a 150-pin, high-density connector to communicate to the CPU module. MS690 memory modules are ECC protected via the NMC chip on the CPU module.

The MS690 memories are available in three variations:

MS69~BA

• MS69O-CA (IAOO4-CA) 64 M.t:S memory

MS69~DA

128 MB memory

KA6751KA6801KA690-based systems allow for any combination of up to four

MS690 memory arrays providing a memory capacity from 32 Mbytes up to

512 Mbytes.

Figure 2-4 shows a sample memory module, which, like the CPU module, uses ejector handles designed to ensure proper seating of the modules in the backplane connectors.

CPU System Overview 2-5

Figure 2-4: Ratchet Handles for CPU and Memory Modules

Ejector

Handles

MLo-oo4227

2.3 BA440 Enclosure Components

KA6751KA680!KA690-based systems use the BA440 enclosure. A brief description of the components that make up the BA440 enclosure follows.

For information on

BA430

FRU

removal and replacement procedures refer

to

the

I

BA440 Enclosure Maintenance

manual.

2.3.1 H3604 Console Module

The H3604 console module covers the five slots dedicated to the CPU and memory modules (one slot for the KA6751KA.6801KA690, and four available slots for MS690 memory modules). Switches on the console module allow you

to

configure the kernel. The console module also provides

2-6 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

the connectors for a serial line console device, an external DSSI bus, and the Ethernet. See Figures

2-5

and

2-0.

Figure 2-5: H3604 Console Module (Front)

Console Module

Power-Up

Mode SWitch

Baud Rate

Select Switch

=r~

LED Display

...J...-.!.-'

I

I

-~ ~ ~[II

I

~

II

I

Console Jack

Break

Enablel

rnsable SYrltch l!!J

~

I

I iY

Bus Node

"--~'_.'~I

10 Plugs

-:::r-JI

Ethernet f~" =~r

Ethernet

Connector i ! - - - - ! . - ! . -

ThinWire

Ethernet

u=====::!6===.JU

Connector

The front of the console module has the components listed in Table 2-2.

CPU System

Overview

2-7

Table 2-2: H3604 Console Module Controls and Indicators

ControllIndicator Function

Power-Up Mode Switch This three-position rotary switch determines how the system responds at power-up.

Language Inquiry

Mode

(in the top position, indicated by a profile of a face) causes the system to display a language selection menu at power-up if the console terminal has multinational character set (MCS) support. Also, if a default boot device has not been selected, this mode causes the system to issue a list of bootable devices and prompts you to select a device from the list. Once a device is selected, the system autoboots from that device each time you tum it on.

Hun Mod.e (in the middie POSltlOn, mcilcate<i by an arrow) is the normal operating setting.

Loopback Test Mode

(in the bottom position, indicated by a T in a circle) causes the system to run loopback. tests on the console serial line at power-up.

Baud Rate Select switch

The Baud Rate Select switch is used to set the system's baud rate to match that of the console terminal. The factory setting is position 5 (9600).

Console serial MMJ mDllector

LED Display

Break EnablelDisable switch

This console terminal connector provides the RS-423 interface for the mnsole terminal.

The

LED displays the testing sequence during power-up.

When the switch is down (position

0), breaks are disabled.

When the switch is up (position

1), breaks are enabled.

When breaks are enabled, pressing

I

Break

I on the console terminal halts the processor and transfers control to the console program. Using the console mmmand

SET

CONTRO LP, you can specify the control character,

ICtrLIP L rather than

I

Break

I to initiate a break signal.

The Break EnableJDisable switch also mntrols what happens at power-up. When breaks are disabled (down, position 0), the system attempts to automatically boot software at power-up. When breaks are enabled (up, position 1), the system enters console mode (indicated by the »>prompt) at power-up.

Using the console mmmand,

SET HALT REBOOT or SET

HALT RESTART_REBOOT, you can set your system to automatically boot software after the system is halted due to pressing

I

Break

L

2-8 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Table 2-2 (Cont.): H3604 Console Module Controls and Indicators

ControllIndicator Function

Two nSSI bus node ID plugs KA6751KA6801KA690-based systems have two separate

Digital Storage Systems Interconnect (DSSD busses. Two

DBSI bus node

ID plugs, one for the internal nSS! bus,

Bus 0, and one for the external bus, Bus 1, identify the bus nodes of the

DSSI adapters, which are part of the CPU.

Two

DBS!

connectors for Bus

1

Two Wout nBS! connectors, labeled X and y, on the console module allow you to eApand the system by connecting additional mass storage devices to the second

DBSI bus. You can also share mass storage devices with another system by forming a nBS! VAXcluster configuration.

Ethernet port features The console module has two Ethernet connectors: a

BNe-type connector for

Thin

Wire Ethernet., and a 15pin mnnector for a standard Ethernet transceiver cable.

The Ethernet connector switch allows you to set the type of connection. To use the standard transceiver cable connection, set the switch to the up position. To use the

Thin WIre cable connection, set the switch to the down position. A green indicator light (LED) for each mnnector indicates which connection is active.

CPU System Overview 2-9

Figure 2-6: H3604 Console Module (Back) r--_--lA~t;;;;~mL---

Battery Backup Unit

J 1 = TOY Clock Battery

J5 = H3604 Power

J6 = CPU Interface

W2

=

Remote Boot Enable

W4

=

FEPROM Write Enable

F j

= ThinWire Ethernet ?ower. 0.5 A

PN = 12-09159-00

F2

=

-12V Power, 0.062 A

F3

PN = 90-09122-00

=

DSSI Terminator Power, 2.0 A

F4

PN = 12-10929-06

=

Standard Ethernet Power, 1.5 A

PN = 12-10929-08

M~1

The back of the console module has the components listed in Table 2-3.

Table 2-3: H3604 Console Module (Back)

Component Function

Battery Backup Unit Provides battery backup power to the sse

RAM.

TOY

Clock

Battery connector

(J

1) Provides the connection between the battery backup unit and the sse

RAM.

H3604 power connector

(J5)

CPU Interface connector

(J6)

Four-pin power connector to power harness module.

100-pin connector to the CPU module.

Thin

Wlre Ethernet Power Fuse (Fl)

-12 V Power Fuse

(F2)

Protects Thin WU'e

Ethernet.

Protects console serial line.

2-10

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Table 2-3 (Cont.): H3604 Console Module (Back)

Component Function

DSSI Terminator Power Fuse

(Fa)

Standard Ethernet Power Fuse

(F4)

Remote

Boot

Enable jumper

(W2)

FEPROM

Write

Enable jumper

(W4)

Protects against shorts from the accidental grounding of the

DSSI cable power pin.

Protects Standard Ethernet.

Not used

This jumper must be in the write enable position to update FEPROMs on the CPU module. Refer to Chapter 6 for procedures on updating ROMs.

-9 V DClAC converter

Ethernet serial transceiver chip (SlA)

TOY clock oscillator Time of year oscillator. Privides

TOY signal for the

TOY cock in the system support chip

(sse) on the CPU module.

CPU System Overview 2-11

2.3.2 System Control Panel (SCP)

The system control panel (SCP) (Figure 2-7) provides the controls to halt the processor (external halt type) and enter console mode, as well as to restart the system and return the processor state tests.

to

power-up and self

Figure 2-7: System Control Panel fil

~

1/

Over Temperature

A

Warning Indicator

~-I-

DC OK Indicator

~-I-

Halt Button

&1-

Restart Button

2-12 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

System Maintenance

MLo-oo8652

The SCP has the controls and indicators listed in Table

2-4.

Table 2-4: System Control Panel Controls and Indicators

ControllIndicator Function

Over Temperature Warning indicator

The red Over Temperature Warning indicator flashes to indicate that the system's internal temperature is approaching a level that may cause system components to overheat.

In addition to the Bashing Over Temperature

Warning indicator, an audible alarm also provides warning of a possible over temperature condition. Ii the components continue to heat, the system will automatically shut down to prevent components from being damaged.

DC OK indicator

The green

DC OK indicator shows that the power supply voltages are within the correct operating range.

Halt Button

Restart

Button

The Halt button is a two-position button. When you press the button. the system halts. A red indicator on the Halt button lights when the button is set to the in position.

Before you can enter console commands, press the Halt button again to retum it to the out position. When the Halt button is returned to the out position, the console mode prompt

»> is displayed on the console terminal screen.

Now you can enter console commands.

If you inadvertently press the Halt button, type

"c fRetum

r

to continue.

CAUTION:

Pressing the Halt button halts the system regardless of the setting of the Break

Enable

I

Disable switch on the console module.

The Restart button has a green indicator. When you press the

Restart button, the system retums to a plwerup condition and self-tests are run. If you have specified a device as the boot device and if the BreaklEnable Disable switch is set to disable, the system will reboot system software.

CPU System Overview 2-13

2.3.3 BA440 Backplane

KA6751KA6801KA690-based systems use the 54-19354-01 backplane, shown in Figure 2-8.

Figure 2-8: BA440 Backplane

Vterm Module n

J

I;j

=:~geL ~ rn m

w

I;j u n

~ ~ ~~SCP

~ m

Connecmr

Module

Connectors

1111111

0

~~:

1111111 m

0

I

~

1211109 8 7 6 5 / 4 3 2 1

\. v ) CPU

'--v-J

c:::::=.a

Q-bus Memory

Option Power

Board for H3604

Power Supply

Connectors

ML().OO7695

2-14 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

2.3.4 Power Supply

The BA440 enclosure uses the H7874 power supply (Figure 2-9). Table

2-5 describes the power supply components.

Figure 2-9: Power Supply

I---o-~<

Power Switch l

AC Present Indicator

0u

DC OK Indicator

Fan Failure

Indicator

1~~~~~~:a:Qj~F?;t

·

I

Condition

Ind~IO'

~powerBus

~:-=-Power Cable

Connector

ULo-oo4040

Table 2-5: H7874 Power Supply Switches, Controls, and Indicators

ControVlndicator

Function

AC Present indicator (orange) Lights when the Power switch is set to on

(1), and the ac voltage is present at the input of the power supply.

CPU System Overview 2-15

Table 2-5 (Cont.): H7874 Power Supply Switches, Controls, and Indicators

ControllIndicator Function

Power switch The Power switch is used to turn system power on and off. The off position is indicated by a

0; the on position is indicated by a

1.

The Power switch also functions as the system circuit breaker. In the event of a power surge, the breaker will trip causing the power switch to return to the off position

(0).

Taming on the system resets the circuit breaker.

If the circuit breaker trips, wait one minute before turning the system back on.

DC OK indicator (green)

Fan Failure indicator (amber)

When the DC OK indicator is lit, the voltages are within the conect operating range. An unlit

DC OK indicator shows a problem with the power supply.

The Fan Failure indicator lights if either of the two cooling fans stops working.

The power supply will automatically shut down the system as a precautionary measure when a fan rallure is detected.

Over 'Iemperature indicator The Over Temperature indicator lights if the system has

(amber) shut down due to an over temperature condition.

Power bus connectors

Three power bus connectors' allow you to configure a power bus for systems expanded with a system expander. The power bus allows you to tum power on and off for the system through one power supply designated as the main power supply: this way, one power switch. can control power for an expanded system.

MO

NOTE:

DSSI VAXcluster systems should

not

be configured with a power bus. Inadvertently shutting off a host system and bringing down the cluster defeats the added reliability of a

DSSI VAXcluster.

The main out connector sends the power control bus signal to the expander. One end of a power bus cable is connected here; the other end is connected to the 81 (secondary in) connector or the expander power supply.

2-16 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Table 2-5 (Cont.): H7874 Power Supply Switches, Controls, and Indicators

ControllIndicator Function

81

The secondary in connector receives the power bus control signal from the main power supply.

In a power bus with more than one expander, the power bus signal is passed along using the secondaly in and out connectors.

80 The secondary out connector sends the signal down the power bus for oonfigurations of more than one expander.

2.3.5 System Airflow

Two fans are located under the card cage (Figure 2-10). The power supply monitors the fans. If either fan stops working, the Fan Failure indicator on the power supply lights, and the system automatically shuts down as a precautionary measure.

CPU System Overview 2-17

Figure 2-10: Fans

ML().()()4220

Some system managers request that the fans ron at the maximum rate at all times to take advantage of a potential increase in system reliability.

The system environment must not exceed the limits described in the

Site

Preparation manual. Figure 2-11 shows the location of the fan speed control

(FSC) jumper on the bottom of the power supply. Setting the FSC jumper

to

disable causes the fans

to

run at the maximum rate.

2-18 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Figure 2-11: Fan Speed Control (FSC) Jumper Location

FSC

Enabled

(Factory

Setting)

FSC

Disabled

MLo-oo4204

CPU System Overview 2-19

Chapter 3

System Setup and Configuration

This chapter describes the guidelines for the configuration of a KA675

/KA680/KA690-based system. Configuration issues covered in this chapter include module order, mass storage configurations, system expansion, DSSI

VAXcluster configurations, and firmware commands and utilities used in system configuration.

3.1 CPU and Memory Module Order

The five rightmost BA440 backplane slots are dedicated to

CPU and memory modules. The seven slots to the left are for

Q-bus modules. See

Table 3-1.

Table 3-1: BA440 Module Order

Slot

Module

1 through 4

Reserved for up to four

MS690 memory modules.

MS690 modules are installed from lett to right with no gaps: first memory module in slot 4, second memory module in slot 3, and so on.

5

6 thmugh

12

NOTE:

Proper placement of memory modules

is

necessary for FRU isolation using error logs.

CPU module: KA67S (lAOO2-CA), KASSO

(UOO2-AA)

(lAOO2-BA).

KA690

~usoptions

A system can have up to four memory modules. Memory modules are available in

32 MB (MS690-BA), 64 MB (MS69O-CA), and 128 MB (MS690-

DA), and can be used in any combination. The firmware logically configures the memory modules at power-up.

System Setup and Configuration 3-1

3.1.1 Installing Add-On MS690 Memory Modules

Perform the following steps to install add-on MS690 memory module(s). You do not set any jumpers or switches on the memory module. The memory address for the memory module is mapped by the system.

CAUTION:

Thrn off the system before installing modules. Installing modules while this system

is

powered-up can damage the modules.

1. Two captive screws hold the console module (H3604) in place. To loosen, both screws should

be

turned counterclockwise. The console module is hinged on the left. Swing the assembly open.

NOTE: TIvo

cables connect to the H3601. cor..so!e mod::.!e:

C

:-:obo1:.

cable which connects to the CPU module; and a four-pin power harness

connects to

a

power harness module

(also

known

as

the power board

H3604) which plugs into the backplane. The power harness module is located directly to the right of the CPU module.

2. Install the module(s) starting with the first empty slot, which is located on the right side of the power harness module. The power harness module is located between the CPU module (slot 5) and the first memory module (slot 4).

The memory module(s) must be installed in adjacent slots with no empty slots between. Slots 12 through 6 are slots; slot 5 is the CPU slot; and slots 4 through 1 are the memory module slots.

3. Make sure the ratchet handles on the memory module on the right side of the module, and the 150-pin connector is facing to the system.

Wearing the antistatic wrist strap, install the memory module in the

:first available memory slot to the right of the CPU. Ensure that the memory module is vertically aligned. Push the memory module in until the ratchet bandIes engage with the enclosure frame. Push the ratchet handles inward toward the rear of the cabinet until the memory module is firmly seated in the backplane. When the memory module is firmly seated, the ratchet handles will lock the module in place.

NOTE:

The CPU and MS690 memory modules are equipped with

ratchet handles (Figure 3-1) which are shipped in a horizontal position.

The

ratchet

handles are designed

to

ensure that the modules are properly seated in the backplane connectors.

3-2

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Figure 3-1: Memory Module Ratchet Handles

Ejector

Handles

MLQ-008453

4. Close the H3604 console module and lock the 114-turn captive screws.

5. To identify the memory module, place the MS690 option iabei (supplied in the option kit) in the proper location on the H3604 panel. Indicate the revision number a..Y}d memory option (BA,CA, or DA).

6. Refer to Chapter 4 for information on initialization and acceptance testing.

System Setup and Configuration .3-3.

3.2 General Module Order for Q-Bus Options

The order of the supported Q-bus options in the backplane depends on four factors:

• Relative use of devices in the system

• Expected performance of each device relative to other devices

• The ability of a device to tolerate delays between bus requests and bus grants (called delay tolerance or interrupt latency)

• The tendency of a device to prevent other devices farther from the CPU from accessing the bus

'l'he supported options arranged by type are:

Communications

CXAI6-AAlAF: I6-line DEC-423 asynchronous controller

CXBI6-AAlAF: 16-line RS-422 asynchronous controller

CXY08-AAlAF: 8-line RS-232C asynchronous controller with modem

DEQRA-CA: Token Ring Network Controller

DESQA-SAlSF: Thin

DFAOl-AAlAF:

240011200

BPS modem

DIV32-SA1SF: Q-bus ISDN basic rate access interface

DPVll-SAlSF: Q-bus synchronous programmable interface

DRVIW-SAlSF: General purpose 16-bit parallel DMA interface

DRVlJ-SAlSF: Q-bus parallel interface

DSVI1-SAlSF: Q-bus 2-line synchronous

KMVlA-SAlSF: Single-line programmable controller with DMA

General

ADQ32-SAlSF: 32-channel ADC module

ADVll-SAlSF: I6-channel ADC module

AXVII-SAlSF: I6-channel ADC, 2-channel DAC module

DRQ3B-SAlSF: Q-bus parallel

110

interface

DTC05-SA: Digital encoded voice, multifu.ction

IBQOI--SAlSF: DECscanlBITBUS controller

IEQll-SA1SF: Dual-bit DMA serial Q-bus controller

KITHA-AA: Mira AS option

KWVI1-SAlSF: Programmable real-time clock

KXJI1-SA: Q-bus peripheral processor with s-box adapter kit

LPVll--SAlSF: Line printer controller

MRVll: Q-bus, universal socket, 32-Kbyte EPROM

VS30U-GAlG3/G4: Graphics option

3-4 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Mass Storage, Tape, Pedestal Expansions

RF35-AAlAF: 852-Mbyte half-height DSSI integrated storage element

RF73E-AAlAF:

2.0-Gbyte full-height DSSI integrated storage element

RF72E-AAlAF: l.O-Gbyte full-height DSSI integrated storage element

RF71E-AAlAF: 400-Mbyte full-height DSSI integrated storage element

RF3lE-AAlAF: 38l-Mbyte half-height DSSI integrated storage element

RF3lT-AAlAF: 38l-Mbyte full-height DSSI integrated storage element

TF85~A:

2.6-Gbyte DSSI integrated storage element with 5.25-inch cartridge

TLZ04-JAlJF/GA:

1.2-Gbyte cassette

(nAT) tape drive (requires

KZQSA storage adapter)

TK70E-AAlAFtrQK70-SAlSF: 5.25-inch cartridge, 296-Mbyte tape drive, tape controller

TK50E-AAIAFtrQK5O-SAlSF: 5.25-inch cartridge, 95-Mbyte tape drive, tape controller

KLESI-SA: Q-bus

to

LES! adapter

KFQSA-SElSG: DSSI Q-bus adapter

KZQSA-SAlSF: Storage adapter for TLZ04 tape drive and RRD42 compact disc drive

RA81182: Storage array (separate cabinets only)

RA90/92:

Storage array (separate cabinets only)

KDA5O-SE/SG:

SDI Q-bus adapter

KRQ50-SAlSF: Q-bus controller for RRD40-DC

TU8lE-SAlSB: Magnetic tape (requires KLESI controller)

TSV05-SElSFISHlSJ: Q-bus TS05 magnetic tape controller

B400X: Expansion box with 10

Q-bus slots and up to 4 ISEs

R400X-B9: Expansion box with up to 7 RF -series ISEs

RRD40: 600=Mbyte CDROM table-top drive (requires KRQ50 controller)

RRD42: 600-Mbyte tabletop compact disc drive (requires KZQSA storage adapter)

RSV20-A: WORM optical drive subsystem (requires KLESI controller)

RWZOl: 594-Mbyte Magneto-Optical Disc (requires KZQSA storage adapter)

ESE20: Electronic storage element (requires KDA50 controller)

3.3 Recommended Module Order of Q-bus Options

The recommended module order for placement of Q-bus options is provided in the following list:

MRVll (Placement not critical)

AAVll

ADVll

AXVll

System Setup and Configuration 3-5

KWVll

DRVIJ

KMVlA

DESQA

DPVl1

DIV32

VCB02

DFAOI

CXA16

CXY08

CXB16

LPVll

DRVIW

KRQ50

IEQll

ADQ32

DRQ3B

DSVll

KLESI

IBQOl

TSV05 (M7530 controller)

KDA5O-SE

KFQSA-SE

KZQSA

TQK50

TQK70

M9060-YA

3.4 Mass Storage Options (Internal)

The mass storage shelf of a BA440 enclosure provides four storage cavities for embedded mass storage options. The right-most storage cavity can contain a tape drive (TF85, TK-series, or TLZ04);

all

four storage cavities can contain an RF -series ISE.

Combinations of dual-disk, single-disk, or tape

ISEs can be used to gain the full complement of seven DSSI devices on the internal DSSI bus (Bus

0).

VAX 4000 Model 400/5001600 systems can support the following combinations of mass storage options embedded in the sYstem enclosure:

• One tape drive (TF85, TK-series, or TLZ04) and up to six RF -series

ISEs using the dual-disk RF35.

• No tape drive and up to seven RF'-series ISEs using.the dual-disk RF35.

3-0

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

NOTE:

The RF35, which

has dual-disk capability, can be ordered with a

single disk.

Figure 3-2 shows an example of a mass storage configuration consisting of a TF85 tape drive, two RF35s, and two RF73s.

Figure 3-2: Storage Configuration Example

ISE3 ISE2 ISE 1 and 0

Tape Drive

ML~7696

Rules for Numbering Storage Devices

Use the rules below for numbering (bus node ID and MSCP unit numbers) storage devices:

• For each DSSI bus, do not duplicate bus node ID numbers for your storage devices/adapter. For Bus 0, you can have only one storage device identified as bus node 0, one storage device as 1, and so on; for Bus 1, you can have only one storage device identified as bus node

0, one storage device as

1,

3-'ld so on.

• The previous rule also applies to DSSI VAXcluster configurations, all

DSSI bus node numbers for storage devices 8.a."'ld DSSI adapters must be unique in a shared nSSI bus.

• By convention, the RF -series ISEs are numbered in increasing order from right to left beginning with zero.

• nSSI adapters use the highest available bus nodes. The next highest available bus node (usually five) is reserved for the TF -series tape drive.

• When more than one nSSI bus is being used and the system is using a nonzero allocation class, you need to assign new MSCP unit numbers for devices on all but one of the DSSI busses since the unit numbers

System

Setup and Configuration

3-7

for all nSSI devices connected to a system's associated nSSI busses must be unique. Refer to Section 3.7.3 for more information on setting parameters for nSSI devices.

NOTE:

If you change the bus node ID plugs, power-down the system, change the plugs and then power-up the system.

3.5 System Expansion

The mass storage and Q-bus capacity of

VAX

4000 Model 500 systems can be increased using the following expanders.

• The R400X mass storage expander provides space for up to seven additional

RF

-series ISEs or up to six

RF

-series ISEs and a tape drive

(TF85 or TLZ04). Using R400X expanders, you can fill both nSSI busses for a total of 14 nSSI mass storage devices.

NOTE:

Using the dual-disk RF35, the R400X can accommodate up to

13ISEs.

• The R215F expander provides space for up to three RF -series ISEs.

NOTE:

Using the dual-disk RF35, you

can increase the number of

[SEs-up to seven [SEs per nSS[ bus.

• The SFl00 storage array pedestal provides space for a TF857 magazine tape subsystem and one SFxx storage array building block.

• The SF200 storage array subsystem provides space for up to two TF857 magazine tape subsystems and up to six SFxx storage array building blocks.

3.5.2 Q-Bus Expanders

• The B400X expander provides 10 additional usable Q-bus slots for a system total of 17 usable Q-bus slots. The B400X also has space for up to four additional RF -series ISEs or up to three ISEs and a tape drive

(TF85, TK70, or TLZ04).

NOTE:

Using the dual-disk RF35, the B400X can accommodate up to

seven [SEse

3-8

KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

• The B213F expander also provides 10 additional usable Q-bus slots and provides space for up to three

RF

-series ISEs or up to three ISEs and a TK-series tape drive.

NOTE:

Installing a B213F or R215F on a VAX 4000 system requires the

H401O-AA expander cable kit.

3.5.3 Control Power Bus for Expanders

The three power bus connectors on the H7874 power supply allow you to configure a power bus for systems expanded with R400X and B400X expanders. The power bus allows you to

tum

power on and off for" one or more expanders through the power supply designated as the main power supply (Figure 3-3).

NOTE:

nBSI VAXcluster

systems

should not be configured with

a

power bus. Inadvertently bringing down the cluster defeats the added reliability of a DSSI VAXcluster.

Figure 3-3: Sample Power Bus Configuration

System

Expander 1 Expander 2

1~lsl

II

11

III I

I~I

ML()'()04041

System Setup and Configuration 3-9

3.5.4 Adding Options to the System Enclosure

To determine what options you can add to the system enclosure, you must list the options currently installed and their power requirements on the

VAX. 4000 Model 500 Configuration Worksheet, provided in Figure 3-4.

The worksheet in Figure 3-4 is for the BA440 enclosure. All backplane slots and mass storage devices are powered by the H7874 power supply.

Use the worksheets as follows:

1. In the Module column, list all options and mass storage devices currently installed in your system. The CPU module has already been entered.

Use the label on the cover panel of each slot to identify the module installed in that slot.

2. List each embedded storage device.

3. List the options and mass storage devices you wish to add to your system.

4. the system includes

a

TK70 tape drive, list the TQK70 controller last.

5. Fill in the power requirements for each module and each mass storage device. The power requirements for the more common options are listed in Table 3-2.

6. Add each column and make sure the totals do not exceed the specified limit.

3-10

KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

-Figure

3-4:

VAX 4000 ModelSOO Configuration Worksheet

Slot

MEM 1

MEM2

MEM3

MEM4

CPU

2

Q-bus 1

Q-bus2

Q-bus3

Q-bus4

0-0055

Q-bus6

O-bus 7

Module

Current (Amps)

1

..s

Vdc +12 Vdc +3.3 Vdc 12 Vdc

Power

Bus Load

(Watts) AC DC

L4002-nA 3 4.8

1.6

3.2 0.0

53.8 4.0

1.0

Mass Storage:

1

2

3

4

Total these columns:

Mus ...... s .. casd.

I ~nn

I ~nA I

1

I

.0

I

584.0W

!

31 20

1. Total output power from +3.3 Vdc and +5 Vdc must not exceed 330 watts.

2. Power requirements in this line include CPU module, H3604 console module, and backplane terminator combined.

3. KA690(L4002-AA), KA680(L4002-BA), or KA675(L4002-CA)

ML().()05361

System

Setup and Configuration 3-11

Table 3-2: Power Requirements

Current (Amps)

Max

Power

Max

J!:~s

Option Module

+5V

+12 V

AAVll-sA

ADQ3Z-SA

ADVll-SA.

AXVll-8A

CXAl6-AA

CXBI6-AA

CX'Y08-M.

DESQA-SA

DEQRA-cA

DFA01-AA

D1V32-SA.

DPV11-SA.

DRQ3B-SA

DRV1J-SA.

DRVlW-sA

DSVll-SA.

DTC05-SA

H36041

IBQ01-SA

JEQll-&.

KA6'76-CA

~BA

KA&8O-AA

KDA5O-SE

AlOO9-PA

A030

AlOOS-PA

A~A

M3l18-YA

M3118-'YB

M3119-YA

M3127-PA

M7533-.\B

M3121-PA

M'7S7l-PA

M802O-PA

M1658-PA

M80(9-PA

M'7651-PA

M3108

M3136

KFQSA-&VSE

KLES1-SNSF

KRQ5O-SAJSF

KWVll-SA

XXJl1-sF

EZQSA-SA. .

LPVl1-SA.

M9404-PA

M9405-PA

MRVlI-D

M312S-PA

M8634-PA

L4OO2-CA

L4OO2-BA

IAOO2-AA

M'71M

M7165

M1'769

M7740-PA

M16S2

M4002-PA

M'7616

M5916

M808&-PA

M9404

M9405

MBS18

1.s02 lAlso include -12 Vdc @0.25A, 3 W.

2Value is for the unpopulated module only.

4.0

1.97

5.5

1.20

4.50

1.80

1.80

5.43

4.0

2.10

4.45

2.00

2.00

1.60

2.00 l.64

2.40

1.70

5.00

3.50

4080

4.10

4.80

6.93

6.51 s.so

4.00

2.70

2.20

6.0

5.4

2.80

0.395

0.22

1.0

0.04

0.00

0.30

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.20

0.00

0.00

0.69

0.0

o.so

0.30

0.00

0.00

0.013

0.4

0.0

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.60

1.60

1.60

0.00

0.03

0.00

0.00

Watts

AC DC

15.80

14.50

28.60

11.50

53.8

53.8

53.8

34.65

33.21

27.50

20.00

13.50

11.166

46.8

27.0

14.00

0.0

0.0

8.00

10.50

22.25

10.00

10.00

10.40

10.00

12.94

14.M

21.20

10.30

35.4

9.60

22.60

9.00

9.00

35.43

4.4

0.5

2.7

1.0

2.0

4.4

1.8

4.6

2.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

3.0

3.0

3.3

2.2

3.0

3.5

1.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

3.9

3.6

2.5

2.5

2.3

1.2

3.0

3.3

3.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.5

1.0

1.0

1.0

0.5

1.0

0.5

0.5

0.5

0.3

0.5

0.5

1.0

1.0

0.76

0.5

0.5

1.0

1.0

0.3

1.0

0.5

0.5

3-12 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Table 3-2 (Cont.): Power Requirements

Current (Amps)

Max

Power

Max

J!~s

Option

Module

MS690-BA

MS69O-CA

MS69O-DA

BF31E-AA1AF

BF3IF-AAJAF

BF31T-AAIAF

RF35E-AAIAF

RF3S2-AAlAF

RF71E-AAIAF

L4004-BA

L4004-CA

L4OO4-DA

IfF'12E-AAIAF

RF73E-AAIAF

TFSSE-J'AlJF

TKSOE-AA

TK70E-AAlAF

~

TQK70-S1JSF

TSVOS-SA

VCB02-A

VCB02-B

VCB02-C

M7S59

M7S3O

)(7615

K716i-OO

M7169

(2)

H'716&-OO

K7169

+5V +12 V

5.03

4.2

6.4

1.25

1.20

1.20

1.50

1.50

1.50

1.5

1.2

1.2

1.71

0.11

1.69

2.9

3.50

6.50

4.60

8.8S

5.10

1.64

1.15

1.75

2.40

2.40

2.40

2.4

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.10

0.41

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.21

2.21

0.85

2.29

12.0 0.41

Watts

AC

DC

26.5

21.0

32.0

32.52

32.52

13.7

31.1

33.0

25.93

27.00

2'7.00

36.30

36.30

36.30

36.3

14.5

17.50

32.50

24.2

49.89

NJA

NJA

NJA

NlA

NJA

NJA

NlA

NJA

NlA

NlA

NlA

NlA

2.8

4.3

1.5

3.5

3.S

NJA

NlA

NlA

NlA

NJA

NJA

NlA

NJA

NJA

NJA

NJA

NJA

0.5

0.5

1.0

1.0

1.0

66.64 3.5 1.0

3.6

DSSi VAXciusters

A nSS! VAXcluster configuration is one in which up to three systems can access the same nSSI devices. Some failures of

B..L"1Y system can be tolerated, in which case the remaining system(s) continues to access all available nSSI devices and assure continued processing.

System Setup and Configuration 3-13

Figure 3-5:

DSSI cabling for a Generic

Two-System DSSI

VAXcluster

Configuration

SYSO

RFxx RFxx RFxx

SYS1

RFxx RFxx RFxx

DSSI

MLO-003295

If one of the CPU modules fails, all satellite nodes booted through that

CPU module lose connections to the system disk. However, the DSSI

VAXcluster enables each satellite node to know that the system disk is still available through a different path-that of the functioning CPU module. A connection through that CPU is then established, and the satellite nodes are able to continue operation. The entire cluster will run slower, since one CPU is now serving the satellite nodes of both systems. Processing can continue, however, until Digital Services can repair the problem.

A DSSI VAXc1uster system cannot recover from the following conditions:

• System disk failure, which can be caused by such factors as a power supply failure in the enclosure containing the disk.

• DSSI cabling failure, which must be repaired to continue operation.

3-14 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

3.6.1 DSSI VAXcluster Configuration Rules

1. An Ethernet (NI)IFDDI is required on all CPU nodes.

2. A DECnet license is required (At least one full function license).

3. At least one common (primary) DSSI bus is required to connect with a system disk containing system critical files.

4.

VAXcluster and VMS license is required.

5. A maximum of eight nodes per DSS! bus: a. Each adapter or ISE (disk/tape) counts as one node. b. A DSSI bus is a collection of all

DSSI cable/path segments (inside and outside of cabinets) between two end terminators. c. Each node must have a unique bus node ID number (0-7).

6. A maximu..TD. of three CPU s1adapters per nSSI bus is supported.

7. The nSSI bus MUST be terminated at both ends.

8. The nSSI bus MUST have a common ground between all elements

(CPU, disks). The ground offset is a function of the total DSS! bus length (terminator to terminator).

Use a voltmeter to make sure the ground offset voltage between any two enclosures does not exceed one of the limits listed below.

Total Bus Length

Allowable Ground

Offset

Voltage

DC

Up to 20 meters (65 feet) 200 millivolts

20 to 25 meters (65 to

82 feet) 40 millivolts

(Computer room)

AC

(rms)

70 millivolts

14 millivolts

Total bus length includes all DSSI cable lenghts, internal and external.

Refer to the DSSI VAXcluster Installation and Troubleshooting manual for instructions on calculating internal cable lengths.

To measure the ground offset voltage, . connect the voltmeter leads to bare (unpainted) metal on each enclosure.

NOTE:

The ground offset voltage may vary over time, if equipment

is

added to the system or plugged into the power outlets. Therefore, this

System Setup and Configuration 3-15

measurement does not guarantee that the voltage will remain within acceptable limits.

9. Maximum single cable length is 15 m (50 ft) between connectors.

10. Disconnecting the DSSI cables is NOT allowed while bus is operational.

11. Number of nSSI busses per CPU:

CPU

KA640

KA660

KA670

KA675

KA680

KA690

KA6501KA655

KA630

6xxx

9000

DSSlBusses

1 Embedded DSSI Adapter (EDA), 2 KFQSA on Q-bus

1 Embedded DSSI Adapter (EDA), 2 KFQSA

011

Q-bus

2 Embedded DSSI Adapters (EDAs), 2 KFQSA on Q-bus

2 Embedded DSSI Adapters (EDAs), 2 KFQSA on Q-bus

2 Embedded DSSI Adapters (EDAs), 2 KFQSA on Q-bus

2 Embedded DSSI Adapters (EDAs), 2 KFQSA on Q-bus

2

KFQSAs

011

Q-bus

2 KFQSAs on Q-bus

6 KFMSAs per system

6 KFMSAs per

XMI

12

KFMSAs per system

12. The minimum VMS revision for DSSI VAXcluster of more than two nodes with: a. VAX 4000 Model 400 is VMS 5.5 b. VAX 4000 Model 500 is VMS 5.5 c. VAX 4000 Model 600 is VMS 5.5

13. These rules apply

to

Digital supplied hardware. Third party devices may not conform to nSSI electrical specification requirements.

Therefore, bus length, ground offset, basic noise margining, and warm swap characteristics are at risk when using third party devices.

14. Like adapters should be connected together whenever possible.

15. Like CPU s should be connected together whenever possible.

3-16 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

For more information on DSSI VAXcluster configurations, refer to the

nSSI VAXcluster InstaUation and Troubleshooting

manual. Figure 3-6 and

Figure 3-7 show two popular DSSI VAXcluster configurations using a VAX

4000 system.

System Setup and Configuration 3-17

Figure

3-6:

Two-System DSSI VAXcluster

System A Ststem B

_

DSSI Cables " - - - - - - - - - - - " ,

Shared DSSI Busses and

Devices

I

DSSI Terminator locations

DSSI

Adapter 1

System

A

KAnn

DSSI

Adapter 0

SHAC

Bus Node 6

......

--_

..

System B

KAnn

DSSI

Adapter 0

DSSI

Adapter1

SHAC

Bus

Node 7

m1

DSSI Bus Nodes for Storage Devices in System B o

OSSI Bus Nodes for Storage Devices in System A

ML00008312

3-18 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 3-7: Expanded Two-System DSSI VAXcluster

System A Expander

System B

I

DSSI Terminator Locations

~--~---r---T----~--~--~--~SHAC

Bus Node 7

System B

DSSI

AdapterO

""-..1

KAnn

~

SHAC

Bus Node 7

System B

System A

1m

DSSI Bus Nodes for Storage Devices in Expander o

DSSI Bus Nodes for Storage Devices in System A and B

MLO-OO8663

System Setup and Configuration 3-19

3.7 Firmware Commands and Utilities Used in

System Configuration

Several commands and utilities are needed to configure a system.. This section covers commands for examining and setting system parameters,

DSSI parameters, and module addresses. For a complete listing of firmware commands, refer to Appendix A

3.7.1 Examining System Configuration

Several variations of the SHOW command provide a display of options and key configuration information.

: SHOW DEV1CE - Lists devices

(il.lasS storage, Ethernet, and Q-bus) In the system. (The SHOW DEVICE command combines the information displayed using the SHOW command with nSSI, UQSSP, SCSI, and

Ethernet.)

• SHOW nSSI Lists all nSSI devices and their associated nSSI parameters for embedded nSSI adapters.

• SHOW ETHERNET Lists the hardware Ethernet address for each

Ethernet adapter.

• SHOW QBUS - Lists all Q-bus devices and their I/O addresses in hex, the address as it would appear in the Q-Bus 110 space in octal, and well as the word data read in hex.

• SHOW SCSI Lists all SCSI devices in the system.

• SHOW UQSSP Lists all nSS! devices for KFQSA-based nSSI adapters.

• SHOW MEMORY - Lists main memory configuration for each memory board.

Sample displays of each of the above commands are provided below.

»>SBON DEVICE

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (CLYDE)

-DIAO (RF73)

DSSI Bus

0

Node

1

(BONNIE)

-DIAl (RF73)

DSSI Bus

0

Node 5 (TFDR1)

-MIAS (TF85)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6 (*)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

(*)

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772lS0)

-DUA2 0 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 1 (760334)

3-20 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

-DUB21 (RF31)

OQSSP Disk Controller 2 (760340)

-DUC22 (RF31)

OQSSP Disk Controller 3 (760322)

-DOD2.3 (RF31)

OQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUAO (TK70)

SCSI Adaptor 0 (761400), SCSI ID 7

-MKAO (DEC TLZ04 1991(c)DEC)

Ethernet Adapter

-EZAO (08-00-2B-06-10-42)

»>SHOW DSSI

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0

-DIAO (RF73)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1

-DIAl (RF73)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 5

-MIAS (TF85)

DSSI Bus o

Node 6

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

»>

(CLYDE)

(BONNIE)

(TFDR1)

(* )

(* )

»>SHOW ETHERNET

Ethernet Adapter

-EZAO (08-00-2B-OB-29-14)

»>SHOW OQSSP

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772150)

-DOA20 (RF31)

OQSSP Disk Controller 1 (760334)

-DUB21 (RF31)

OQSSP Disk Controller 2 (760340)

-DOC22 (RF31)

OQSSP Disk Controller 3 (760322)

-DOD23 (RF31)

UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUAO (TK70)

»SROW gaus

Scan of Q-bus I/O Space

-20001920 (774440)

=

FF08 DELQA/DESQA

-20001922 (714442) - FFOO

-20001924 (714444) - FF2B

-20001926 (714446) - FF08

-20001928 (714450)

=

FFD7

-2000192A (774452)

=

FF41

-2000192C (774454) 0000

-2000192E (714456)

=

1030

-20001F40 (717500) 0020 IPCR

System Setup and Configuration 3-21

Scan of Q-bus Memory Space

»>SHOW SCSI

. SCSI Adapter 0 (761300), SCSI ID 7

-MKASOO (DEC TLZ04

1991 (c)

DEC)

»>SHOW MEMORY

Memory 0: 00000000 to 01FFFFFF, 32 Mbytes, 0 bad pages

Total of 32 Mbytes, 0 bad pages, 112 reserved pages

3.7.2 Using the CONFIGURE Command to Determine CSR

Addresses for Q-Bus Modules

Each Q-bus module in a system must use a uniaue device address and interrupt vector. The device' address is also known as the control and status register (CSR) address. Most modules have switches or jumpers for setting the

CSR address values. The value of a floating address depends on what other modules are housed in the system. The CONFIGURE command is used to determine what the proper CSR addresses should be for the given configuration. You can than configure the Q-bus modules according to this information.

NOTE:

These recommended values simplify the use of the MDM diagnostic package and are compatible with VMS device drivers. YOu can select nonstandard addresses, but they require

a special setup for use with VMS

drivers and MDM. See the Micro VAX Diagnostic Monitor User's Guide for information about the CONNECT and IGNORE commands, which are used to set up MDM for testing nonstandard configurations.

Determine CSR address values for a module as follows:

1.

Use the

SHOW

QBUS firmware command to get a listing of the Q-bus modules currently in the system.

2. Determine the correct values for the module using the CONFIGURE firmware command command. The CONFIG utility eliminates the need to boot the VMS operating system to determine CSRs and interrupt vectors. Enter the CONFIGURE command, then HELP for the list of supported devices. Enter the device and number of devices for all existing modules in the system, as well as for those devices you are adding.

»>CONFlGORE

Enter device configuration,

Device, Number? help

Devices:

HELP, or

EXIT

3-22 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Devices:

LPVl1

RLVl2

DMVl1

RRD50

RV20

CXA16

LNV2l

KWVllC

DRQ3B

IOVllO

DESNA

KWV32

Device, Number?

KXJ11

TSV05

DELQA

RQC25

KFQSA-TAPE

CXB16

QPSS

ADV1lD

VSV2l

IAV1lA

IGQ11

KZQSA

Numbers:

1 to 255, default is 1

Device,Nurnber? cxa16,1

Device,Number? desqa,1

Device,Nurnber? tqk70

Oevice,Number? qza

Oevice,Number? kfqsa-disk

Device,Number? exit

DLV11J

RXV21

DZQ11

DRV11W·

DEQNA DESQA

KFQSA-DISK TQK50

KMVl1

IEQl1

CXY08 VCBOl

DSVl1

AAVl10

IBQ01

IAVl1B

DIV32

M7577

ADV1lC

VCB02

IDV11A

MIRA

KIV32

LNV24

Address/Vector Assignments

-774440/120 DESQA

-772150/154 KFQSA-OISK

-774500/260 TQK70

-760440/300 CXA16

-761300/310 KZQSA

DZV11

DRV1lB

RQDX3

TQK70

DRQll

QVSS

AAVllC

QDSS

IDV1lB

ADQ32

OTCN5

M7576

NOTE:

Of the devices listed in the CONFIG display, not all are supported on the VAX 4000 Model 500

systems.

See Section

3.2 for

supported options.

The LPVll-SA has two sets of CSR address and interrupt vectors. To determine the correct values for an LPVll-SA, enter LPVll,2 at the

DEVICE prompt for one LPVll-SA or enter LPV11,4 for two LPVl1-SA modules.

3. See the Microsystems Options manual for switch and CSR and interrupt vector jumper settings for supported options.

NOTE:

The CSR address for KFQSA storage adapter is programmed

using firmware commands. Refer to the Appendix H for using the

SET I HOST I

UQSSP

I MAINT command to access the Diagnostic Utility

Program

(DUP) driver utility to configure the CSRs for the KFQSA module.

System Setup and Configuration 3-23

3.7.3 Setting and Examining Parameters for DSSI Devices

Two types of nSSI storage adapters are available for VAX 4000 systems: an embedded nSSI adapter, which is part of the CPU, and the KFQSA adapter.

The KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU has two embedded nSS! adapters: Bus 0 and Bus

1.

Each adapter provides a separate nSS! bus that can support up to eight nodes, where the adapter and each nSS! storage devices count as one node, hence each nSS! adapter can support up to seven nSS! storage devices (six

DSSI storage devices for a two-system nSSI VAXcluster; five DSSI storage devices for a three-system DSSI VAXcluster configuration). The adapters make a connection between the CPU and the requested device on their resnective nSSI bus.

Each

DSSI device has its own controller and

SeTVp.,. that contain the intelligence and logic necessary to control data transfers over the nSSI bus.

3.7.3.1 DSSI

Device

Parameters

Six principal parameters are associated with each DSSI device:

• Bus Node ID

• ALLCLASS

• UNITNUM

• FORCEUNI

• NODENAME

• SYSTEMID

NOTE:

Each of the above parameters, with the exception of the bus node

ID, are programmed and examined using the console-based Diagnostic and Utility Program (DUP) driver utility. The bus node

ID is physically

determined by the numbered bus node ID plug that inserts into the device's front panel.

A brief description of each parameter follows:

The bus node ID parameter is provided by the bus node ID plug on the device's front panel. Each DSSI bus can support up to eight nodes,

0-7. Each nSSI adapter and each device count as a node. Hence, in a single-system configuration, a nSSI bus can support up to seven devices, bus nodes 0-6 (with node 7 reserved for the adapter); in a twosystem DSSI VAX.cluster configuration, up to six devices, 0-5 (with nodes

6 and 7 reserved for the adapters); in a three-system DSSI VAXcluster

3-24

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

configuration, up to five devices,

0-4

(with nodes 5, 6, and 7 reserved for the adapters).

The ALLCLASS parameter determines the device allocation class. The allocation class is a numeric value from

0 to

255 that is used by the VMS operating system to derive a path-independent name for multiple access paths to the same device. The ALLCLASS firmware parameter corresponds

to

the

VMS SYSGEN parameter ALLOCLASS.

DSSI devices are shipped from the factory with a default allocation class of zero. Each device to be served to a cluster must have a nonzero allocation class that matches the allocation class of the

system.

Refer

to

the VMS VAXcluster manual for rules on specifying allocation class values.

The UNITNUM parameter determines the unit number of the device. By default, the device unit number is supplied by the bus node ID plug on the device's front panel.

Systems

with multiple

nSSI

busses, as described later in this section, require that the default values be replaced with unique unit numbers. To set unit numbers and override the default values, you use the console-based DUP driver utility

to

supply values

to

the UNITNUM parameter and

FORCEUNI.

to

set a value of zero to device parameter

The FORCEUNI parameter controls the use of UNITNUM to override the default device unit number supplied by the bus node ID plug. When

FORCEUNI is set to a value of 0, the operating system uses the value assigned to the UNITNUM parameter; when FORCEUNI is set to a value of 1, the operating system uses the value supplied by the bus node ID plug.

The NODENAME parameter allows each device to have an alphanumeric node name of up to eight characters. DSSI devices are shipped from the factory with a unique identifier, such as R7CZZC, R7 ALUC, and so on. You can provide your own node name.

The SYSTEMID parameter provides a number that uniquely identifies the device to the operating system. This parameter is modified when replacing a device using warmswapping procedures.

3.7.3.2 How VMS Uses the DSSI Device Parameters

This section describes how the operating system uses the parameters to form unique identifiers for each device. Configurations that require you

to

assign new unit numbers for devices are also described

With an allocation class of zero, the operating system can use the default parameter values to provide each device with a unique device name. The operating system uses the node name along with the device logical name in the following manner:

System Setup and Configuration 3-25

NODENAME$DlAu where:

NODENAME is a unique node name and

u

is the unit number.

With a nonzero allocation class, the operating system relies on unit number values to create a unique device name. The operating system uses the allocation class along with the device logical name in the following manner:

$ALLCLASS$DlAu where:

ALLCLASS is the allocation class for the system and devices, and

u

is a unique .unit number.

U sing mass storage expanders, you can fill multiple nSSI busses: busses 0 and 1 supplied by the CPU module, and a third and fourth nSS! bus using two KFQSA adapters. Each bus can have up to seven DSS! devices (bus nodes 0-6). When more than one bus is being used, and your system is using a nonzero allocation class, you need to assign new unit numbers for devices on all but one of the DSSI busses, since the unit numbers for all

DSSI storage devices connected to a system's associated DSSI busses must be unique.

Figure 3-8 illustrates the need to program unit numbers for a system using more than one nSSI bus and a nonzero allocation class. In the case of the nonzero allocation class, the operating system sees three of the ISEs as having duplicate device names, which is an error, as all unit numbers must be unique.

3-26 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure

3-8:

VMS Operating System Requires Unique Unit Numbers for

DSSI Devices

Allocation Class:O

Nonzero Allocation Class

(Example: ALLCLASS=l)

R7BUCC$OIAO

R7CZZC$OIA 1

R7ALUC$OIA2

R7EB3C$OIA3

TFOR1$MIA5

R7IDFC$DIAO

R7IBZC$OIA 1

R7IKJC$OIA2

R7I03C$DIA3

R7XA4C$OIA4

$1$DIAO ....

*oUPUcate 0 c ( - - - - ,

I

*

Duplicato 1

$1$OIA2

$1$OIA3

$1$MIA5

-

$1$D1AO

-

$1$OIA1 c

$1$OIA2

c:

-

I

$1$OIA4

R7QIYC$OIA5 $1$OIA5

R70A4C$D1A6

$1$OIA6

*

Nonzero allocation class examples with an asterisk Indicate duplicate device names.

For one of the 0551 busses. tho unit numbers need to be reprogrammed to avoid this error.

*

Dupl' icate 2

*

Duplicate 3

I

MLO-OO7176

NOTE:

Digital recommends configuring systems to have unique unit

numbers even for standalone systems using an allocation class of zero. This

practice wiU avoid problems with duplicate device names if the system is later configured in a cluster.

The following instructions describe how to change DSSI parameters, using the DUP driver utility. In the example procedures, the allocation class will be set to

1, the devices for Bus 0

(in the VAX. 4000) will be assigned new unit numbers

(to avoid the problem of duplicate unit numbers), and the system disk will be assigned a new node name. To examine DSSI parameters from the VMS operating system, refer to Section 3.7.3.4.

System Setup and Configuration 3-27

Figure 3-9 shows sample DSSI busses and bus node IDs for an expanded

VAX 4000 Model 500 system.

Figure 3-9: Sample DSSI Busses for an Expanded VAX 4000 Model 500

System

System Expander

_ B u s O DSSICabie

~Bus1

I

Dssi Terminator Locations

1.

Enter the console mode.

The procedure for programming parameters for nSSI devices from console mode requires that you issue commands

to

those devices at the console prompt (»». You may enter these commands in either uppercase or lowercase letters. Unless otherwise instructed, enter each command, then press Return.

Enter console mode as follows:

a.

Set the Break EnableIDisable switch on the system console module

to

the enable position (up, position

1). b. Set the Power switch for each unit (each system in

a

DSSI

VAXcluster configuration, and any expanders for expanded systems)

to

on (1).

3-28

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Wait for the system to display the console prompt

(»».

2. To display the DSS! devices on embedded DSSI busses, enter SHOW nSSI at the console prompt. To display the DSSI devices on KFQSAbased DSSI busses, enter SHOW UQSSP.

The firmware displays two lines of information for each device. For embedded DSSI, the firmware displays the following:

• The first line contains the bus number, node number, and node name.

• The second line contains the device name and Wlit number followed by the device type in parentheses.

For embedded DSSI, the device name consists of the letters DIAu or

DIBu (MIAu or Mmu for the TF85 tape drive)-devices on bus 0 are listed as DIA, devices on bus 1 are listed as DIB-and

u

is a unique unit number. The embedded DSSI adapter for each bus is identified by an asterisk

(*).

The embedded nSSI display for Example 3-1 shows a system with four

DSSI devices (unit numbers

0--8) and an R400X expander with seven nSS! devices (unit numbers

0--6).' ,

System Setup and Configuration

3-29

Example 3-1: SHOW DSSI Display (Embedded DSSI)

»>SHOK DSSl

OSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (R7ALOC)

-DIAO (RF3l)

OSSI Bus 0 Node

1

(R7EB3C)

-DIAl (RF3l)

OSSI Bus 0 Node 2 (R7EB22)

-OIA2 (RF3l)

OSSI Bus 0 Node 5 (TFDR1)

-MIAS (TF8S)

OSSI Bus 0 Node

6

(*)

OSSI Bus 1 Node 0 (SNEEZY)

-jjrEiJ

{:t\F3:i)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 1 (DOPEY)

-DIB1 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 2 (SLEEPY)

-OIB2 (RF3l)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 3 (GRUMPY)

-DIB3 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 4 (BASHFUL)

-DIB4 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node

5

(HAPPY)

-OIBS (RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 6 (DOC)

-DIB6 (RF3l)

OSSI Bus 1 Node 7

(*)

»>

For KFQSA-based DSSI, the firmware displays the following:

• The first line contains the UQSSP disk controller number and device node name.

• The second line contains the device name and unit number followed by the device type in parentheses.

For KFQSA-based DSSI, the device name consists of the letters DUcu, where c is the controller letter, and

u

is a unique unit number.

3-30

KA6751KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 3-2 shows a sample KFQSA-based DSSI bus.

Example 3-2: SHOW UQSSP Display (KFQSA-Based DSSI)

»>SBOW UQSSP

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (112150)

-DUAO (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 1 (160334)

-DUB1 (RF31) .

UQSSP Disk Controller 2 (160340)

-DUC2 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 3 (160322)

-DUD3 (RF31)

UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (714500)

-MUAO

(TK70)

For the examples in this section, each device will be assigned an allocation class of 1, and the system disk will be given a new node name. Also, devices DIAO, DIAl, and DIA2; and DUAO, DUB1, DUC2, and DUD3 will be assigned new unit numbers.

NOTE:

The DUP server examples throughout this section are for RF-series

[SESe The displays for the TF85 tape drive differ slightly from the RF-series displays.

3.7.3.3 Entering the DUP Driver Utility from Console Mode

To examine and change DSSI parameters, you must first activate the DUP driver utility by setting host to the specific device for which you want to modify or examine parameters.

Use the following command for embedded DSSI:

SET HOST/DOP /DSSI/BUS : <bus_number> <node_number> PARAMS where:

<bus_number> is the DSS! bus nnmber (0 or 1), and <node_number> is the bus node ID

(0-6) for the device on the bus.

Use the following command for KFQSA-based DSSI:

SET HOST/DUP/OQSSP/DISK <controller_number> PARAMS where:

<controller_number> is the controller number (provided by the SHOW

UQSSP display) for the device on the bus.

System Setup and Configuration 3-31

In Example 3-3,

SET HOST /DOP

lOSS

I /BOS: 1 0 PARAMS is entered to start the

DUP server for the ISE at node 0 of embedded DSSI bus 1. In Example 3-4,

SET HOST/DUP/OQSSP/DISK 0 PARAMS is entered to start the DUP server for the ISE at controller

0 of a KFQSA-based DSSI bus.

Example

3-3:

Accessing the DUP Driver Utility From Console Mode

(Embedded DSSI)

»>SET BOST/DOP/DSSI/BOS:l 0 PARAMS

Starting DUP server •••

Copyright (e) 1991 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>

Example 3-4: Accessing the DUP Driver Utility From Console Mode

(KFQSA-Based DSSI)

»>SET BOST/DOP/OQSSP/DISK 0 PARAMS

Starting CUP server •••

Copyright (e) 1991 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>

3.7.3A

Entering the DUP Driver Utility from VMS

To examine and change DSSI parameters, you must first access the DUP driver utility by setting host to the specific device for which you want to modify or examine parameters.

To access the DUP driver from VMS: a. Connect

to

the Diagnostic and Utility Program (DUP) and load its driver using the VMS System Generation Utility (SYSGEN) as shown below:

$ MeR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CORNECT/NOADAPTER FYAO

SYSGEN> EXIT

$ b. Access the DUP driver by setting host to the specific device you want to write protect. Use the following command:

SET HOST /DOP ISERVER-MSCP$DUP /TASK==PARAMS <node_name>

3-32

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

where:

<node_name> is the device node name (the node name, in parenthesis, is listed using the VMS

DeL command SHOW DEVICE Dl).

In Example 3-5,

SET HOST/DUP/SERVER-MSCP$DOP/TASK=PARAMS R35F3C is entered to start the DUP server for the ISE with a nodename of R35F3C.

Example 3-5: Accessing the CUP Driver Utility From VMS

$ HCR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CONNECT !NOADAPTER FYAO

SYSGEN> EXIT

$

SET HOST/DOP/SERVER=MSCP$DOP/TASK=PARAMS R35F3C

Starting DUP server •••

Copyright

(c)

1992

Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>

3.7.3.5 Setting Allocation Class

After entering the DUP driver utility for a specified device, you can examine and set the allocation class for the device as follows:

NOTE:

The ALLCLASS parameter should only be set through console mode.

Setting the ALLCLASS parameter from VMS

is

not recommended.

1.

At the

PARAMS> prompt, enter

SHOW ALLCLASS to check the allocation class of the ISE to which you are currently connected.

2. Enter

SET ALLCLASS 1

(or enter the allocation class you desire).

3. Enter

SHOW ALLCLASS to verify the new allocation class.

System Setup and Configuration 3-33

Example 3-6 shows the steps for examining and changing the allocation class for a specified device. In the example, the allocation class is changed from an allocation class of 0 to an allocation class of 1.

Example 3-6: Setting Allocation Class for a Specified Device

PARAMS>SBOW ALLCLASS

Parameter Current

ALLCLASS

PARAMS>SET ALLCLASS 1

PARAMS>SBOW ALLCLASS

Parameter Current

ALLCLASS o

Default o

Type

Byte

Radix

Dec B

1

Default o

Type

Byte

Radix

Dec B

3.7.3.6 Setting Unit Number

After entering the DUP driver utility for a specified device, you can examine and set the unit number for the device as follows:

1. At the

PARAMS> prompt, enter

SHOW UNITNOM to check the unit number of the ISE to which you are currently connected.

2. Enter

SET UNITNUM 10

(or enter the unit number you desire).

3. Enter

SET FORCEUNI 0 to override the default unit number value supplied by the bus node ID plug.

4. Enter

SHOW ONITNUM to verify the new unit number.

5. Enter

SHOW FORCEONI to verify that the current value for the

FORCEONI parameter is o.

Example 3-7 shows the steps for changing the unit number of a specified device from unit number 0 to unit number 10.

6. Label the device with its unit number, using the unit number labels shipped with your system. Figure 3-10 shows where to affix a unit number label on the device front panel.

3-34

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 3-7: Setting a Unit Number for a SpecHied Device

PARAMS>SHOW ONITNOM

Parameter

Current Default Type

-------

----------------

----------------

--------

UNITNUM 0

0

Word

Radix

Dec

U

PARAMS>SET ONITNOM 10

PARAMS>SET FORCEtJNI 0

PARAMS>SHOW ONITNOM

Parameter Current

Default

Type

--------

---------------- ----------------

--------

ONITNUM 10 0 Word

PARAMS>SHOW FORCEONI

Parameter

Current Default Type

--------- ---------------- ----------------

--------

FORCEUNI

0 1

Boolean

Radix

Dec

U

Radix

0/1

U

System Setup and Configuration 3-35

Figure 3-10: Attaching a

MSCP Unit Number Label to the Device Front

Panel

RF30170-Series ISE

RF351SE

Attach Unit

Number Label ----;...;--~)

TF85

Attach Unit

Number Labels

3-36 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

MLO~7178

3.7.3.7 Setting Node Name

After entering the DUP driver utility for a specified device, you can examine and set the node name for the device as follows:

1. At the

PARAMS> prompt, enter

SHOW NODENAME to check the node name of the ISE to which you are currently connected.

2. Enter

SET NODENAME SYSDSK

(or enter the desired alphanumeric node name of up to eight characters).

3. Enter

SHOW NODENAME to verify the new node name.

Example 3-8 shows the steps for changing the node name of a specified device from the factory-supplied name to SYSDSK

Example 3-8: Changing a Node Name for a Specified Device

PARAMS>SBOW HODENJUm

Parameter Current

NODENAME

R7CZZC

PARAMS>SET HODENAME SYSDSK

PARAMS>SBOW HODENJUm

Parameter Current

NODENAME SYSDSK

Default

RF31

Type Radix

String Ascii B

Default

RF31

Type Radix

String Ascii B

3.7.3.8 Setting System 10

NOTE:

This parameter

is

modified only when warm swapping a device.

All parameters for the replacement device should be programmed to match those of the original device. Refer to the nSS! Warm. Swapping Guide for

BA400-Senes Enclosures and KFQSA Adapters.

After entering the DUP driver utility

fOT

ill specified device, you can examine and set the system ID for the device as follows:

1.

At the

PARAMS> prompt, enter

SHOW SYSTEMID to check the system ID of the device to which you are currently connected.

2. Enter

SET SYSTEMID System ID

(enter the desired serial number-based system ID).

System Setup and Configuration 3-37

3. Enter

SHOW SYSTEMID to verify the new system ID.

Example 3-9 shows the steps for changing the system ID of a specified device from the factory-supplied system ID to

1402193310841

(the system

ID for the replacement device is programmed to match that of the origina}).

Example 3-9: Changing a System ID for a Specified Device

PARAMS>SBOW

SYSTEHID

Parameter Current

Default

--------- ---------------- ---------------_\

SYSTEMID

0402193310841 0000000000000

Type

-------

Quadword

Radix

Hex B

P~wlS>Si:4 S"'.i'~~&j j" ..

O"l;33l0&·n

PARAMS>SBOW

SYSTEMID

Parameter Current Default

--------- ---------------- ----------------

SYSTEMID

1402193310841 0000000000000

Type

--------

Radix

Quadword

Hex B

3.7.3.9 Exiting the DUP Driver

Utility

After you have completed setting and examining DSSI device parameters, enter the WRITE command at the

PARAMS> prompt to save the device parameters you have changed using the SET command. The changes are recorded

to

nonvolatile memory.

IT you have changed the allocation class or node name of a device, the DUP driver utility will ask. you

to

initialize the controller. Answer Yes

(Y) to allow the changes to be recorded and

to

exit the DUP driver utility.

IT you have not changed the allocation class or node name, enter the EXIT command at the

PARAMS> prompt to exit the DUP driver utility for the specified device. Example 3-10 shows the procedure for saving parameter changes. In the example, the controller is initialized.

3-38 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Example 3-10: ExHlng the DUP Driver UlilHy for a Specified Device

PARAMS>WRITE

Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N}] Y

Stopping DUP server •..

»>

NOTE:

You must repeat the procedures in this section for each device for which you want to change parameters.

Example 3-11 shows the DSSI busses for the embedded DSSI adapters after the unit numbers for the disk devices on bus 0 have been changed from 0,

1, and 2 to

10, 11, and 12

(by adding 10 to the bus node ID number, the unit number's least significant digit will still correspond to the number on the bus node ID plug). Note that the bus 0 device names are now DIA10,

DIA11, and DIA12.

Example 3-11: SHOW DSS! Display

»>SBOW DSSI

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (SYSDSK)

-DIA1O (RF3l)

DSSI Bus

0

Node 1 (R7EB3C)

-DIAll (RF3l)

DSSI Bus

0

Node 2 (R7EB22)

-DIA12 (RF3l)

DSSI Bus

0

Node 5 (TFDRl)

-MIAS

(TFS5)

DSSI Bus 0 Node

6 (*)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 0 (SNEEZY)

-DIBO (RF3l)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 1 (DOPEY)

-DIB1 (RF3l)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 2 (SLEEPY)

-DIB2

(RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 3 (GRUMPY)

-01B3 (RF3l)

DSS1 Bus 1 Node 4

(BASHFUL)

-01B4 (RF3l)

OSSI Bus 1 Node 5 (HAPPY)

-OIB5 (RF3l)

Example 3-11 (continued on next page)

System Setup and Configuration 3-39

Example 3-11 (Cont.): SHOW DSSI Display

DSSI Bus 1 Node 6 (DOC)

-DIB6 (RF31)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

(*)

»>

Example 3-12 shows the sample KFQSA-based DSSI bus after the unit numbers have been changed from 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 20, 21, 22, and 23. Note that the device names are now DUA20, DUB21, DUC22, and DUD23.

Example 3-12: SHOW UQSSP Display (KFQSA-Based DSSI)

.>.> .>SiiOii uQgSP

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772150)

-DUA2 0 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 1 (760334)

-DUB21 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 2 (760340)

-DUC22 (RF31)

UQSSP Disk Controller 3 (760322)

-DUD23 (RF31)

UQSSP Tape Controller 0 (774500)

-MUAO (TK70)

3.7.4 Write-Protecting an RF35 ISE

You may want to write-protect an ISE containing sensitive data you do not want changed or accidentally erased.

The system disk (the ISE containing system software) and ISEs containing work areas for users should be write-enabled, the normal operating setting.

For the RF35 ISE, which has no Write-Protect button, you set writeprotection through VMS commands or through finnware commands in console mode.

3.7.4.1 Software Write-Protect for RF-Series ISEs

Since the RF35 does not have a Write-Protect button, the software writeprotect is the primary method for write-protecting an RF35.

The software write-protect is available through VMS using the MOUNT utility with the INOWRITE qualifier.

To

software write-protect an ISE, enter the following DCL command from the VMS operating system.

3-40 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

MOUNT <device_name> <volume_label>/SYSTEM/NOWRlTE where:

<device_name> is the device name, as shown using the VMS DCL command

SHOW DEVICE DI, and <volume_label> is the volume label for the device.

For example,

$ HOUNT $l$OIAl OMEGA/SYSTEM/NOWRITE

will

software write-protect device

$l$DIAl.

Dismounting, and then remounting the device (without using the

INOWRITE qualifier), will write-enable the device.

Use the

VMS DeL command SHOW DEVICE DI to check the protection status of the drive.

A write-protected drive will show a device status of

"Mounted wrtlck". Refer to your VMS documentation for more information on using the MOUNT Utility.

CAUTION:

When you dismount tr"en mount the device again, it

will no

longer be write-protected.

3.7.4.2 Hardware Write-Protect For RF35 ISEs

The hardware write-protect provides a more permanent write-protection than the software write-protect in that, once you hardware write-protect an RF35, it remains write-protected, regardless of the availability of the operating system or if the system is powered-down.

In addition, a hardware write-protect cannot be removed using the MOUNT command.

The hardware write-protect simply provides the same degree of writeprotection available to

RF-series ISEs that have a Write-Protect button.

You should consider hardware write-protecting an RF35 in the following situations:

• If you want to write-protect an RF35 ISE when the VMS operating system is not available, such as before running the MicroVAX

Diagnostic Monitor

(MDM).

• If you want to ensure that an RF35 remains write-protected, since the hardware write-protect cannot be removed using the VMS command

MOUNT and will remain in effect even if the operating system is brought down.

You can hardware write-protect an RF35 from VMS or through firmware commands entered at the console prompt (»». Use the following instructions:

System Setup and Configuration 3-41

1. Access the Diagnostic and Utility Program (DUP) driver for the device you want

to

write-protect.

• To access the DUP driver from console mode: a.

Enter console mode by pressing the Halt Button or powering up the system with the Break EnablelDisable switch set to enable

(up, position 1).

CAUTION:

Haltl.ng your system without following the shutdown procedure described in your system software manuals may result in

loss

of data.

b. Access the DUP driver by setting host to the specific device you want to write protect.

Use the following command for embedded DSSI:

SET HOST/DOP /DSSI/BOS : <bus_number> <node_number> PARAMS where:

<bus_number> is the DSSI bus number (0 or 1), and <Ilode_ number> is the bus node ID

(0-6) for the device on the bus

(bus number and node number are listed in the SHOW DSSI display).

Use the following command for KFQSA-based DSSI:

SET HOST/DOP/OQSSP/DISK <controller_number> PARAMS where:

<controller_number> is the controller number Oisted in the

SHOW UQSSP display) for the device on the bus.

• To

access the DUP driver from VMS: a.

Connect to the Diagnostic and Utility Program (DUP) and load its driver using the VMS System Generation Utility (SYSGEN) as shown below:

$ HCR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CONNECT /N0ADAP'lER FYAO

SYSGEN> EXIT

$ b. Access the DUP driver by setting host to the specific device you want to write protect. Use the following command:

SET HOST /DOP / SERVER-MSCP$DOP /TASK=PARAMS <node_name>

3-42

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

where:

<node_name> is the device node name (the node name, in parenthesis, is listed in the SHOW DEVICE DI display).

2. At the

PARAMS> prompt, enter

SET WRT_PROT 1 to write-protect the ISE to which you are currently connected.

NOTE:

To verify that you have set host to the intended drive, you can enter the command LOCATE at the PARAMS> prompt. The LOCATE command causes the drive's Fault indicator to blink momentarily.

3.

Enter

SHOWWRT_PROT to verify the WRT_PROT parameter is set to

1.

4. After you have completed setting and examining the WRT_PROT device parameter, enter the WRITE command at the

PARAMS> prompt to save the device parameter. The change is recorded to nonvolatile memory.

5. Enter the EXIT command at the

PARAMS> prompt to exit the DUP driver utility for the specified device.

Example

3-13 provides an example of setting a hardware write-protect through firmware; Example 3-14 provides an example of setting a hardware write-protect through VMS.

Example 3-13: Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through Flnnware

»>SET EOST/DOP/DSSI/BOS:O 1 PARAMS

Starting DOP server •••

Copyright (c) 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>SET WRT_PROT 1

PARAMS>WRlTE

PARAMS>SBOW

WRT_PRO'l'

Parameter Current Default Type

1 o

Boolean

WRT PROT

PARA..~S>EX!T

Exiting ••.

Stopping DOP server ..•

»>

Radix

0/1

System Setup and Configuration 3-43

Example 3-14: Setting Hardware Write-Protection Through VMS

$

MCR SYSGEN

SYSGEN> CONNECT /NOADAPTER

FYAO

SYSGEN> EXIT

$ SET HOST/DW /SERVER=MSCP$DOP /TASX=PARltMS R35F3C

Starting DUP server •.•

Copyright (c) 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>SET 1mT PROT 1

PARAMS>WlUTE -

PARAMS>SHOW WR'.r_PROT

Parameter Current Default

Type Radix

WRT PROT

PARAMS>EXIT

Exiting ..•

Stopping DUP server •••

$ n'1

To remove the hardware write-protection, repeat the above procedure, only set the WRT_PROT value to O.

You can verify that the device is write-protected while running VMS-when you issue the VMS DCL command SHOW DEVICE DI, a write-protected drive will show a device status of "Mounted wrtlck". If you issue the VMS command SHOW DEVICFJFULL, a write-protected drive will be listed as

"software write-locked".

NOTE:

You cannot remove hardware write-protection using the VMS

MOUNT utility.

3.7.5 Setting System Parameters: Boot Defaults, Bootflags,

Halt and Restart Action

Several firmware commands are used to set and examine system parameters.

3.7.5.1 Setting the Boot DefauH

To direct the system to boot automatically from a specific device or to change the setting of the default boot device, put the system into console mode and at the

» > prompt, enter "SET BOOT device-name". For example,

»>SET BOOT EZAO sets the system default boot device to be the Ethernet controller.

Once you have selected a boot device, the system autoboots from that device each time you tum it on (provided the Break EnablelDisable switch is set to

3-44

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

disable or that a halt action of REBOOT or RESTART_REBOOT has been defined}.

U sing "SET BOOT deuice-name,deuice-name,deuice-name", you can also specify a string of default boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices separated by commas and no spaces) for which the system will check for boatable software. The system checks th e devices in the order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software. For example,

»>SET BOOT DUAO, DIAO , MIAS, EZAO directs the system to use

nUAO, DIAO, MIA5,

and

EZAO

as the default boot devices. When the system autoboots, or if the BOOT command is used without specifying a device, the system will boot from the first default boot device that contains bootable software.

NOTE:

If included in a string of boot deuices, the Ethernet deuice, EZAO, should only be placed as the last deuice of the string. The system will continuously attempt to boot from EZAO ..

Refer to Appendix A for examples.

Supported Boot Devices

Table 3-3 lists the boot devices supported by the CPU. The table correlates the boot device names expected"in a BOOT command with the corresponding supported devices. The device name used for the bootstrap operation is one of three:

• EZAO, if no default boot device has been specified

• The default boot device specified at initial power-up or through

SET

BOOT

8

Name explicitly specified in a BOOT command line

Boot device names consist of a device code of at least two letters (A through

Z) in length, followed by a single-character controller letter (A through Z), and ending in a device unit number

(0 through 16,383).

System Setup and Configuration

3-45

Table 3-3: Boot Devices Supported by the KA675/KA680IKA690

Boot Name Controller Type Device 1'ype(s)

Disk

[node$]DImu On-board DSSI

DUcu KFQSA DSSI

KDA50 MSCP

RDXS

MSCP

RF:xx

RF:xx

RAxx

RDxx

Compact Disc r_ ..

~ ~TnVA..

~_-"~""'IIiI"'~"';""'..iIroA"_

......... "'"" ......

~

..... """"' __

DUcu KRQ50 MSCP

P.P.!)~=:

RRD40

Tape

[node$]MImu On-board DSSI

MUcu TQK50MSCP

MKAu

TQK70MSCP

KLESI

KZQSASCSI

Network

EZAO

XQcu

PROM

PRAu

PRBO

On-board Ethernet

DESQA

MRVll

Customer EPROM space -

TF85

TK50

TK70

TU8lE

TLZ04

NOTE:

For diskless and tapeless systems that boot software over the network, select only the Ethernet adapter. All other boot devices are inappropriate.

3.7.5.2 Setting Boot Flags

The Virtual Memory Boot

(VMB) action is qualified by the value passed

to

it in R5. R5 contains boot flags that specify conditions of the bootstrap.

The firmware passes to VMB either the R5 value specified in the BOOT command or the default boot fiag value specified with a SET BFLG command. The VMB boot flags are listed in Table 34.

3-46 KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU System Maintenance

Refer

to

Appendix A for examples.

Table 3-4: Virtual Memory Bootstrap (VMB) Boot Flags

Bit Name Description o

1

2

3

4

5

6

9

RPB$V _CONY

RPB$V _DEBUG

Conversational boot. At various points in the system boot procedure, the bootstrap code solicits parameters and other input from the console terminal.

Debug.

If this flag is set,

VMS maps the code for the XDELTA debugger into the system page tables of the running system.

RPB$V

_INIBPT

Initial breakpoint. If RPB$V -DEBUG is set, the

VMS operating system executes a BPT instruction in module

INIT immediately after enabling mapping.

RPB$V _BBLDCK Secondalj' bootstrap from bootblock. When set, VMB reads logical block number 0 of the boot device and tests it for conformance with the bootblock format. in conformance, the block is executed to continue the bootstrap. No attempt is made to perform a Files-ll bootstrap.

RPB$V _DIAG Diagnostic bootstrap. When set, the load image requested is

[syso.sYSMAINT]DIAGBOOT.EXE.

RPB$V..BOOBPT

RPB$V JIEADER

31:28

RPB$V _TOPSYS

Bootstrap breakpoint. When set, a breakpoint instruction is executed in

VMB and control is transferred to XDELTA before booting. .

Image header. When set, VMB transfers control to the address specified by the file's image header. When not se~

VMB transfers control to the first location of the load image.

File name solicit. When set, VMB prompts the operator for the name of the application image file.

A maximum

39 character file specification is allocated at RPB$TJ'IIE. Only

16 characters are utilized in both tape boot and network MOP

V3 booting.

Halt before transfer. When se~

VMB halts before transfening control to the application image.

This field can be any value from 0 through F. This flag changes the top-level directozy name for system disks with multiple operating systems. For example. if TOPSYS is

1. the top-level directory name is

(SYSl...J.

This does not apply to network bootstraps.

3.7.5.3 Setting the Halt Action

The user-defined halt action feature allows users to determine what action should be taken on error halts and at power-up. The halt action is defined using the SET HALT command and overrides the setting of the Break

Enable1Disable switch.

Table 3-5 summarizes the action taken on all halt conditions (excluding external halts). The user-defined halt is used when the

OIS

Mailbox halt action field is 0 and on power-up ifbreaks are enabled. Refer to ADnendix A for an example of the

SET HALT

command. • -

System Setup and Configuration 3-47

For external halts caused by pressing the Halt button on the SCP or pressinglsREAKVCTRL-P (ifbreaks are enabled), the firmware enters console mode.

NOTE:

Using the console command

SET CONTROLP,

you can specify the control character,

ICtrvpL

rather than

ISreakl

to initiate a break signal.

Table 3-5: Actions Taken on a Halt

ResetJ Break

Power-Up Enable or Halt

Switch

'!'

T

T

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

F

1

1

0

1

0 x x x x x x x

User-

Defined

Halt ACtiOD

OIS

Mailbox

BaltAction

Action(s)

2,4x

0

0 x x x

1

2

3

4

0

0

0

0

..

x x

0

0

1

2

3

"Jj.;""~,,e"";~

............. af"\la

-"~-"'''''''':'''-:.I'''J ;.~

........ -..., ...

~

Diagnostics, if success boot, if either fail console

Diagnostics, if success boot, if either fail console

Console

Restart, if this fails boot, if that fails console

Restart, if it fails console

Boot, if

Console

Restart, if this fails boot, if that fails console

Restart, if it fails console

Boot, if it fails console

Console

"T" indicates that the condition is true.

"F" indicates that the condition is false.

"X," indicates that the condition is "don't care".

Halt Action 0

=

DEFAULT

Halt Amon 1

=

RESTART

Halt Action 2

=

REBOOT

Halt Action 3

=

HALT

Halt Action 4-

=

RESTART_REBOOT

3-48 KA675!KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Chapter 4

System Initialization and Acceptance

Testing (Normal Operation)

This chapter describes the system initialization, testing, and bootstrap processes that occur at power-up. In addition, the acceptance test procedure to be performed when installing a system or whenever adding or replacing

FRU s is described.

4.1 Basic Initialization Flow

On power-up, the firmware identifies the console device, optionally performs a language inquiry, and runs the diagnostics.

Power-up actions differ, depending on the state of the Power-Up Mode switch on the console module. The mode switch has three settings: loopback test, language inquiry, and run. The differences are described below.

The firmware waits for power to stabilize by monitoring SCR<15>(POK).

Once power is stable, the firmware verifies that the console battery backup RAM (BBU

RAM) is valid (backup battery is charged) by checking

SSCCR<31>{BLO). Ifit is invalid or zero (battery is discharged), BBU

RAM

is initialized.

After the battery check, the firmware tries to determine the type of terminal attached to the console seriallineo It uses this information to determine if multinational support is appropriate.

Power-Up Mode Switch Set to Test

Use the test position on the H3604 to verify a proper connection between the CPU and the console terminal. During the test, the firmware toggles between' the active and passive states. Refer to

Chapter 5 for instructions on performing loopback tests.

Power-Up Mode Switch Set to Language Inquiry

If the Power-Up Mode switch is set to language inquiry mode, or the firmware detects that the contents of BBU RAM are invalid, the firmware prompts you for the language to be used for displaying the following system messages

(if the console terminal supports the multinational character set).

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-1

Loading system software.

Failure.

Restarting system software.

Performing normal system tests.

Tests completed.

Normal operation not possible.

Bootfile.

Memory configuration error.

No default boot device has been specified.

Available devices.

Device?

Retrying network bootstrap.

The language selection menu appears under the conditions listed in

Table

4-1.

The oosition of the Break EnablelDisable switch has no effect on these conditions. The firmware will not prompt for a language if the console terminal, such as the VT100, does not support the multinational character set (MeS).

Table 4-1: Language Inquiry on Power·Up or Reset

Mode

Language Not

Previously Setl

Language

Previously Set

Language Inquiry

Run

Prompt2

Prompt

Prompt

No Prompt

1

Action if contents of BBU RAM invalid same as Language Not Previously

Set.

2Prompt

=

Language selection menu displayed.

The language selection menu is shown in Example 4-1. If no response is received within

30 seconds, the firmware defaults to English (5).

4-2 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Example 4-1: Language Selection Menu

KA6nn-A Vn.n VMB n.n

1) Dansk

2} Deutsch (Deutschland/Osterreich)

3} Deutsch (Schweiz)

4) English (United Kingdom)

5) English {United States/Canada}

6}

Espanol

7) Fran~ais (Canada)

8) Fran~ais

(France/Belgique)

9) Fran9ais (Suisse)

10) Italiano

11) Nederlands

12) Norsk

13)

14)

Portugues

Suomi

15) Svenska

(1 •• 15) :

NOTE:

The information contained within the parentheses indicates the specific keyboard variant.

In addition, the console may prompt you for a default boot device following a successful diagnostic countdown.

After the language inquiry, the firmware continues as if up.

Power-Up Mode Switch set to

Run

The console displays the language selection menu if the Power-Up Mode switch is set to run mode and the contents of BBU RAM are invalid or a language has not yet been selected. The next step in the power-up sequence is to execute the bulk of ROM-based diagnostics. In addition to message text, a countdown is displayed in Example 4-2.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-3

Example 4-2: Nannal Diagnostic Countdown

KA6nn-A Vn.n VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

66 .• 65 •. 64 •. 63 .• 62 •• 61 .. 60 •• 59 •. 58 •. 57 •• 56 •• 55 •. 54 •• 53 •• 52 •• 51 •.

50 •• 49 •• 48 •. 47 •• 46 •• 45 •. 44 •• 43 •• 42 •. 41 •• 40 •. 39 •• 38 •• 37 •. 36 •• 35 ••

34 •• 33 •. 32 .. 31. .30 .• 29 .• 28 .. 27 •. 26 .. 25 .. 24 .• 23 •• 22 .. 21. .20 •. 19 ••

18 .• 17 •. 16 .. 15 .• 14 .• 13 •. 12 .. 11 .• 10 •. 09 .• 08 .• 07 •• 06 •. 05 .. 04 .• 03 ..

Tests completed.

The console uses the saved console language if the mode switch is set to run mode and the contents of BBU RAM are valid.

4.2 power-On 5elf-lests

(POST)

Power-on self-tests provide core testing of the system kernel. The CPU, memory, DSSI bus, and Q-bus are tested, certain registers are flushed, and

data

structures are set up to initialize and set the system state for the operating system. . to a known

4.2.1 Power-Up Tests for Kernel

In a nonmanufacturing environment where the intended console device is the serial line unit (SLU), the console program perfonns the following actions at power-up:

1.

Checks for POK

2. Establishes SLU as console device.

3. Prints banner message.

The banner message contains the processor name, the version of the

firmware,

and the version of VMB. The letter code in the firmware version indicates if the firmware is pre-field test, field test, or official release. The first digit indicates the major release number and the trailing digit indicates the minor release number (Figure 4-1).

4-4

KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 4-1: Console Banner

KA6nn-A V n.n. VMS n.n

II : minor release of VMS

L

: major release of VMS minor release of firmware major release of firmware type of release: X - engineering release processor type

T - field test release

V - volume release

MLo-ooB459

4.

Displays language inquiry menu on consoie

It console supports multinational character set (MCS)

and any

of the following are true:

• Battery is dead.

• Power-Up Mode switch is set to language inquiry mode.

• Contents of SSC RAM are invalid.

5. Calls the diagnostic executive (DE) with Test Code

=

O. a. DE determines environment is nonmanufacturing from H3604. b. DE executes script

Al (Tests CPU, Floating Point Accelerator (FPA), and memory).

While the diagnostics are nmning: the LEDs on the H3604 display a hexadecimal test code ranging from F to 3 before booting the operating system, and 2 to 0 while booting the operating system.

A different countdown appears on the console terminal. Refer to

Table 5-9 for a complete explanation of the power-up test display.

Table 4-2 lists the LED codes and the associated actions performed at power-up. Example 4-3 shows a successful power-up to a list of bootable devices. c. DE passes control back to the console program.

6. Issues end message and

»> prompt.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-5

3

2

1 o

F

E

D

C

B

A

9

8

7

6

5

4

Table 4-2: LED Codes

LED

ValueActioDS

Initial state on power-up, no code has executed

Entered

ROM space, some instructions have executed

Waiting for power to stabilize

(POI{)

SSC

RAM,

SSC registers, and ROM checksum tests

O-bit memory, interval timer, and virtual mode tests

FPA tests

Backup cache, primary cache, and memory tests

NMC, NCA, memory, and

110 interaction tests

CQBIC (Q22-bus) tests

Console loopback tests

~CDSSlm~mtests

SGEC Ethernet mbsystem tests

"Console

110" mode

Control passed to VMB

Control passed to semndary bootstrap

"Program 110" mode, control passed to operating system

4-6

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 4-3: Successful Power-Up to List of Bootable Devices

KA6nn-A Vn.n VMB n.n

Performing normal system tests.

66 .• 65 .. 64 •. 63 •• 62 •• 61 •. 60 •• 59 .• 58 •• 57 •• 56 .. 55 •• 54 •• 53 •• 52 •• 51 ••

50. . 4 9. . 4 8. • 47. • 4 6. • 4 5. . 4 4 • • 4 3. • 42. • 41 • • 4 o. .

3 9. • 3 8 • • 37 . • 3 6. • 35. •

34 •• 33 •• 32 •• 31 .• 30 •• 29 •• 28 .• 27 •. 26 .• 25 .• 24 •• 23 •• 22 •• 21 .• 20 •• 19 ••

18 .. 17 •• 16 •• 15 .. 14 .• 13 •• 12 .• 11. .10 • • 09 .• 08 .• 07 •• 06 •• 05 •• 04 • • 03 ••

Tests completed.

Loading system software.

No default boot device has been specified.

Available devices.

-DIAO

(RF73)

-DIAl

(RF73)

-MIAS

(TF85)

-EZAO (08-00-2S-06-10-42)

Device? [EZAO]:

4.2.2 Power-Up Tests for

Q ...

Bus Options

Module self-tests run when you power up the system. A module self-test can detect hard or repeatable errors, but usually not intermittent errors.

Module LEDs display pass/fail test results:

• A pass by a module self-test does not guarantee that the module is good, because the test usually checks only the controller logic.

• A fan by a module self-test is accurate, because the test does not require any other part of the system to be working.

The following modules do not have LED self-test indicators:

DFAOI

DPVii

DRQ3B

KLESI

LPVll

TSV05

The following modules have one green LED, which indicates that the module is receiving +5 and + 12 V dc and has passed self-tests:

CXA16

CXB16

CXYOS

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-7

4.2.3

Power-Up Tests for Mass Storage Devices

An RF -series ISE may fail either during initial power-up or during normal operation. In both cases, the failure is indicated by the lighting of the red fault LED on the drive's front panel. The ISE also has a red fault LED, but it is not visible from the outside of the system enclosure. the drive is unable to execute the Power-On Self-Test

(POST) successfully, the red fault LED remains lit and the ready LED does not come on, or both

LEDs remain on.

POST is also used to handle two types of error conditions in the drive:

Controller errors are caused by the hardware associated with the

(;uii.ti"vlllC?:i- fWlCtiuu uf tbe \!rive ~cdu.l~ .

.;AJ. cc~t=cnar crrcr iz fc.~! to the operation of the drive, since the controller cannot establish a logical connection to the host. The red fault LED lights. this occurs, replace the drive module.

Drive errors are caused by the hardware associated with the drive control function of the drive module. These errors are not fatal to the drive, since the drive can establish a logical connection and report the error

to

the host. Both LEDs go out for about 1 second, then the red fault LED lights.

4.3 CPU ROM-Based Diagnostics

The KA6751KA6801KA690 ROM-based diagnostic facility is the primary diagnostic tool for troubleshooting and testing of the CPU, memory,

Ethernet, and DSSI subsystems. ROM-based diagnostics have significant advantages:

• Load time is virtually nonexistent.

• The boot path is more reliable.

• Diagnosis is done in a more primitive state.

The ROM-based diagnostics can detect failures in field-replaceable units

(FRU s) other than the CPU module. For example, they can isolate one of up to four· memory modules as FRU s. (Table 5-9 lists the FRUs indicated by ROM-based diagnostic error messages.)

The diagnostics run automatically on power-up_ While the diagnostics are running, the LED on the H3604 displays a hexadecimal number; while booting the operating system, 2 through 0 display.

The ROM-based diagnostics are a collection of individual tests with parameters that you can specify. A data structure called a script points

4-8 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

to the tests (see Section 4.3.2). There are several field and manufacturing scripts.

A program called the diagnostic executive determines which of the available scripts to invoke. The script sequence varies if the system is in the manufacturing environment. The diagnostic executive interprets the script to determine what tests

to

run, the correct order to run the tests, and the correct parameters to use for each test.

The diagnostic executive also controls tests so that errors can be detected and reported. It ensures that when the tests are run, the machine is left in a consistent and well-defined state.

4.3.1 Diagnostic Tests

Example

4-4 shows a list of the ROM-based tests and utilities. To get this listing, enter T 9E at the console prompt

(T is the abbreviation of TEST).

The column headings have the following meanings:

NOTE:

Base addresses shown in this document may not be the same as the addresses you see when you run T 9E. Run T 9E to get a list of actual addresses. See Example 4-4.

• Test is the test number or utility code.

• Address is the base address of where the test or utility starts in

ROM.

If a test fails, entering T FE displays diagnostic state to the console.

You can subtract the base address of the failing test from the last_ exception-pc to find the index into the failing test's diagnostic listing.

• Name is

a

brief description of the test or utility.

• Parameters shows the parameters for each diagnostic test or utility.

These parameters are encoded in ROM and are provided by the diagnostic executive. Tests accept up to 10 parameters. Tne asterisks

(*) represent parameters that are used by the tests but that you cannot specify individually. These parameters are displayed in error messages, each one preceded by identifiers PI through PIO.

Parameters that you can specify are written out, as shown in the following examples:

30 2005C33C Memory Init Bitmap

54 20055181

Virtual

Mod;

*** mark Hard SBEs

******

*********-

For example, the virtual mode test contains several parameters, but you cannot specify any that appear in the table as asterisks. To run this test individually, enter:

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) .4-9

»>T 54

The MEM_bitmap test, for example, accepts 10 parameters, but you can only specify mark_hard_SBEs because the rest are asterisks. To map out solid, single-bit ECC memory errors, type:

»>T 30 0 0 0 1

Even though you cannot change the first three parameters, you need to enter either zeros

(0) or ones

(1) as placeholders. Zeros are more common and are shown in this example. The zeros are placeholders for parameters

1 through 3, which allows the program to parse the command line correctly.

The diagnostic executive then provides the proper value for the test.

Vnn 0,"+0,.

1

~n,. "0;:1,.0;:1,",,0+0,.

A.

+n ;"1'1;,.0+0 t'ho;:l+ +'ho +oC!t C!'hn"ll'1

,,"on n"t cznl;1'1

6OOoW_ .., _ _ _ _ . . . . . . . . _ ... a r--~"'~-'"""'"

.....

''IIf "" ......

--=-"",'"" ""' ....

~.-..'"

..... """'" -" .... -"- -,"' ....... _.,'""""

,"'.~

..

'.~.'"

""

..w_"

-.. --'-~'1 single-bit as well as multi-bit ECC memory errors. You then terminate the command line by pressing

IRETURN

I.

You do not need

to

specify parameters 5 through 10; placeholders are needed only for parameters that precede the user-definable parameter.

For the most part tests and scripts can be run without any special setup. If a test or script is run interactively without an intervening power up, such as after a system crash or shutdown, enter the UNJAM and INIT commands before running the tests or script. This will ensure that the CPU is in a well known state. If the commands are not entered, misleading errors may occur.

Other considerations

to

be aware of when running individual

tests

or scripts interactively:

• When using the TEST or REPEAT TEST commands, you must specify a test number, test code or script number following the TEST command before pressing I

RElURN

I.

• The memory bitmap and Q-bus scatter-gather map are created in main memory and the memory tests are run with these data structures left intact. Therefore, the upper portion of memory should not be accessed to avoid corrup~g these data structures. The location of the maps are displayed using the SHOW MEMORYIFULL command.

4.3.2 Scripts

Most of the tests shown by utility 9E are arranged into scripts. A

script

is a data structure that points to various tests and defines the order in which they are run. Scripts should be thought of as diagnostic tablesthese tables do not contain the actual diagnostic tests themselves, instead scripts simply define what tests or scripts should be run, the order that the tests or scripts should be run, and any input parameters to be parsed by the Diagnostic Executive.

4-10 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Different scripts can run the same set of tests, but in a different order and

lor

with different parameters and flags. A script also contains the following information:

• The parameters and flags that need to be passed to the test.

• Where the tests can be run from. For example, certain tests can be run only from the FEPROM. Other tests are program-independent code, and can be run from FEPROM or main memory to enhance execution speed.

• What is to be shown, if anything, on the console.

• What is to be shown, if anything, in the LED display.

• What action to take on errors (halt, repeat, continue).

The power-up script runs every time the system is powered on. You can also invoke the power-up script at any time by entering T o.

Additional scripts are included in the ROMs for use in manufacturing and engineering environments. Customer Services personnel can run these scripts and tests individually, using the T command. When doing so, note that certain tests may be dependent upon a state set up from a previous test. For this reason, use the UNJAM and INITIALIZE commands before running an individual test. You do not need these commands on system power-up because the system power-up leaves the machine in a defined state.

Customer Services Engineers (CSE) with a detailed knowledge of the system hardware and firmware can also create their own scripts by using the 9F User Script Utility. Table 4-3 lists the scripts available to Customer

Services.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-11

Example

4-4:

Test 9E

»>'l

9E

Test

Address

20053EOO

20054E14

30 20063A20

31 200641BC

32

20064CBO

33 20064E4C

34 2005B730

35

200 67AEC

37 2006868C

3F 2006443C

40 20062608

41

20056S0C

42 200SA3CC

46 2006782C

47 20063F48

48 20061878

49 2006342C

4A 20063138

4B 20061EOC

4C 20062AC8

40 200616F8

4E 20061CEO

4F 20062814

Sl 200SA88C

52 200SABCC

53 200SAE9C

54 2005A4A2

55 200SB052

56 200SFF38

58

200607B4

59 2005F080

5C 2005FSE8

SF 2005E36C

60 20050067

63 2005B504

80 20065280

81 2005B236

82 2005B3FB

83 200 577FA

84

20058EB4

85 20056A34

86 20056EFO

87 200SAOF8

90 2005AB4A

91 2005AAEO

99

20065048

9A 20050080

9B 20064ECC

9C 200SB7FA

90 2005E138

9E 2005B208

Name Parameters

SCB

De executive

Memory Inlt BItmap ••• mark_Hard_SBEs ••••••

Memory-Setup CSRs ••••••••• *

NMC registers ••••••••• *

NMc:powerup

SSC ROM •

B Cache diag mode bypass_test_mask ••••• **.*

Cache_W:Memory bypass_test_mask •••••••••

Mem FOM Addr shorts ••• cont on err ••••••

Memory Count-pages First boaru Last bd Soft_errs_allowed ••• ***.

Board Reset -

Chk for Interrupts •••••

P CaChe-diag mode bypass test mask •••• *** ••

Memory Refresh

Memory - Addr short s start-add end add * cont - on err pat 2 pat3

Memory-roM start a end-lncr cont on err tlme seconds * •• **

••• cOnt on err *..... -

Memory-Eec SBEs start add end add add Incr cont_on_err ••••••

Memory-Byte Errors start-add end-add add-Incr cont_on_err

Memory-EcC Loglc start-add end-add add-incr cont_on_err

Memory-Address start-add end-add add-incr cont_on_err ••••••

Memory-Byte start-add end-add add-lncr cont_on_err

Memory:oata

FPA start:add end:add add:lncr cont_on_err

•••••••

SSC Prog timers

SSC-TOY Clock

Virtual-Mode which timer wait time us ••• repeat_test_2SOms_ea Tolerance

•••••••• *

Interval Timer

SHAC LPBCK

SHAC-RESET

••••

*

**** •• *. dssi bus port number time_secs

SGEC-LPBCK ASSIST time-secs·*-

SHACshac-number *** •• *.

SGEC

SSC Console SLU

QOSS any -

CQBle memory

Qbus MsCP

Qbus-OELQA

QZA lntlpbck1

QZA-Intlpbck2

QZA-memory

QZA-OMA

QZA-EXTLPBCK loopbaCk_type no_raIn_tests start BAUD end BAUD .***** lnput-csr self test rO self test r1 bypass test mask .**.*.... -

!~ csr-·*··*· device num addr **.* controller-number * ••••• ** controller-number ••••••• ** incr test pattern controller number *******

Controller number main mem buf .******* controller:number .* •• -

CQBlC registers

CQBIc:Powerup *.

Flush Ena Caches dis flush virtual dIs flush backup dls_flush_prlmary

INTERACTION pass_count disable_device ***.

Inlt memory 16MB *

LIst-CPU registers *

~t;~~~ra:nostlcs

:XPDd_err_msg get_mode inlt_LEOs clr-ps _cnt

Example 4-4 (continued on next page)

4-12 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 4-4 (Cont.): Test 9E

DO

02

DA

DB

DC

9F

Cl

C2 cs

C6

DO

DE

OF

20060D4C

200566£0

200568B6

2005E25A

20056624

20067400

200 65AlC

200684B4

200661BO

200643£0

2006691C

20066404

20065DFO

Create_AO_Script

SSC RAM Data

SSC-RAM-Data Addr

SSC -regIsters ssc-powerup

V Cache diaq mode

O-Bit dIaq mode

pa

Flush cache

Speed -

NO_Memory-present

B Cache Data debuq

S-cache-faq Debug

O:BIT_DEBUG-

******.*.*

* ....

*****

bypass test mask

********* bypass-test-mask

*********

********** -

print_speed

*********

fIr*****_*

start add end add add incr

******* start-add end-add add-incr

******* start:add end:add add:incr seq_incr

******

Scripts f

Description

AO User defined scripts

Al Powerup tests, Functional Verify, continue on error, numeric countdown

A3 Functional Verify, stop on error, test f announcements

A4 Loop on A3 Functional Verify

AS Address shorts test, run fastest way possible

A6 Memory tests, mark only multiple bit errors

Ai

Memory tests

A8 Memory acceptance tests, mark single and multi-bit errors, call A7

A9 Memory tests, stop on error

»>

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-13

Table

4-3:

Scripts Available to Customer Services

Script!

Enter with

TEST

Command Description

AO

Al

AS

A6

A7

AS

A9

AD

AE

AO

Al,O

AS

A6

A'j,AI:S

AS

A9

AD

AE,AD

Runs user-defined script. Enter T 9F to create.

Primary power-up script; builds memory bitmap; marks hard single-bit errors and multi-bit errors. Continues on error.

Runs address shorts test from RAM; invokes tests 3F and 48; runs test 48 the fastest way possible using fast mode and running cached from RAM.

Memory test script; initializes memory bitmap and marks only multiple bit errol'S.

I\'iemory teSt portion in voiteci by scrip~

A5.

Ael u..IJl:I i.L.~ W~~"J:J­ tests without rebuilding and reinitializing the bitmap.

Run script AS once before running script A 7 separately to allow mapping out of both single-bit and double-bit main memory

ECC errors.

Memory acceptance. Running script main memory more extensively.

AS with script

A7 tests

It enables hard single-bit and multibit main memory ECC errors to be marked bad in the bitmap. Invokes script A 7 when it has completed its tests.

Memory tests. Halts and reports the first error.

Does not reset the bitmap or busmap.

It is a quick way to specify which test caused a failure when a hard error is present.

Console program. Runs memory tests, marks bitmap, resets busmap, and resets caches. Calls script AE.

Console program.

Resets

:memory

CSRs and resets caches.

Also called by the

INn' command.

Console program. Resets busmap and resets eaches. AF AF lScripts AD, AE, and AF exist primarily for console program; error displays and progress messages are suppressed (not recommended for CSE use).

In most cases, the service engineer needs only the scripts shown below for effective troubleshooting and acceptance testing.

4-14 KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU System Maintenance

Scripts i

Description

AD

User defined scripts

Al Powerup tests, Functional Verify, continue on error, numeric countdown

A3 Functional Verify, stop on error, test i announcements

A4 Loop on A3 Functional Verify

AS Address shorts test, run fastest way possible

A6 Memory tests, mark only multiple bit errors

A7 Memory tests

AS Memory acceptance tests, mark single and multi-bit errors, call A7

A9 Memory tests, stop on error

»>

4.4 Basic Acceptance Test Procedure

Penorm the acceptance testing procedure listed below, after installing a system, or whenever adding or replacing the following:

CPU module

MS690 memory module

Backplane

DSSI device

H3604 console module

1. While monitoring the test display on the console terminal, run five error·free passes of the power·up scripts by entering the following command:

»>R T 0

If you can not monitor the console terminal during this step, use the following command.

»>T

A4

Script A4 "ill halt on an error so that the error message will not scroll off the screen.

Press

I

ClRLIC

I to terminate the scripts. Refer to Chapter

5 if failures occur.

2. Double·check the memory configuration, since test 31 can check for only a few invalid configurations. For example, test 31 cannot report that a memory board is missing from the configuration, since it has no way of knowing if the board should be there or not.

~ystem

Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-15

To check the memory configuration and to ensure there are no bad pages, enter the following command line:

»>SROW MEMORY

/FULL

Memory 0: 00000000 to 01FFFFFF, 32 Mbytes, 0 bad pages

Total of 32 Mbytes, 0 bad pages, 112 reserved pages

Memory Bitmap

-01FF2000 to 01FF3FFF, 16 pages

Console Scratch Area

-OlFF4000 to OlFF7FFF, 32 pages

Q-bus Map

-OlFF8000 to OlFFFFFF, 64 pages

Scan of Bad Pages

»>

Memories 0 through 3 are the MS690 memory modules. The Q22-bus map always spans the top 32 Kbytes of good memory. The memory bitmap always spans two pages (1 Kbyte) for each

4

Mbytes of memory configured Each bit within the memory bit map represents a page of memory.

Use utility 9C to examjne the contents of configuration registers

MEMCON 0-7 to verify the memory configuration:

SBR-07FB8000 SLR-00002021 SAVPC-20047FS8 SAVPSL-20047FS8 BCETSTS-OOOOoooo

SCBB-200S3EOO POBR-80000000 POLR-00100A80 P1BR-0080aooo BCETIDX-OOOOoooo

P1LR-00600000 SID-13000202 TODR-OOOOOooo ICCS-OOoooooo BCEDSTS-00000700

ECR-OOOOOOCA MAP£N-OOOOOooo BDMTR-20084 000 BOMKR-0000007C BCEDIDX-00000010

TCRO-OOOOooos TIRO-0112BD68 TNIRO-OOOOoooo TIVRO-00000078 BCEDECC-OOOooooo

TCRl-00000001 TIRI-0117BFA9 TNIRI-OOOOOOOF TIVRl-0000007C NEDATHI-OOOOOooo

RXCS-OOoooooo RXDB-OOOOOOOD TXCS-OOOooooo TXDB-00000030 NEDATLO-OOOOOooo

SCR-OOOODOOO DSER-OOOOOooo OBEAR-OOOOOOOF OEAR-OOOOOooo CESR-OOOOOooo

QBMBR-07FF8000 BDR-3CFD08AB DLEDR-OOOOOooc SSCCR-OOD5SS70 CMCDSR-0000CI08

CBTCR-00004000 IPCRO-OOOO CSEAR1-OOOOOooo CSEAR2-OOOOOoco CIOEAR1-OOOOOooo

PCSTS-FFFFF800 PCADR-FFFFFFF8 PCCTL-FFFFFE13 ICSR-OOOOOOOl CIOEAR2-00000300

CCTL-00000007 BC£TAG-OOCOOooo VMAR-000007EO CNEAR-OOOOOooo

NESTS-OOOOoooo CEFSTS-00019200 N£OADR-EOOSBFD8 NEOCMO-8000FF04 NEICMO-OOOOOooo

DSSI 1-03 (BUS 1)

-PSR 1-00000000

POBBR 1-03060022

PESR-I-OOOOOOOO

PMCSR 1-00000000

PFAR-I-OOOOOOOO

SSHMA 1-00008A20

PPR-I-OOOOOOOO

DSSI 2-02 (BUS 0)

-PSR 2-00000000

PQBBR-2-03060022

PESR-2-00000000

PMCSR-2-00000000

PFAR-2-00000000

SSHMA-2-0000CA20

PPR-2-D0000000

NICSRO-IFFF0003 3-000040304-00004050 S-8039FFOO 6-B3EOFOOO -7-00000000

NICSR9-04E204£2 10-00040000 11-00000000 12-00000000 13-00000000 lS-OOOOFFFF

NISA-08-00-2B-26-AS-S3 MEAR-184060l0 ADD-210l8040 MESR-00006000

MEMCON 0:3; 0-80000005, 1-84000005,

2-00000007~

3-00000007 MMCDSR-01111000

MEMCON:4:7; 4-00000007, 5-00000007, 6-00000007, 7-00000007 HOAMR-OOOOOOOO

»>

To identify registers and register bit fields, see the KA675/ KA680

/ KA690 CPU Technical Manual.

4-16

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Examine MEMCON 0-7 to verify the memory configuration. Each pair of MEMCON s maps one MS690 memory module as follows:

MEMCON0-1

MEMCON2-3

MEMCON4-5

MEMCON6-7

First MS690; slot 4, closest to

CPU

Second MS69O; slot

3

Third MS690; slot 2

Fourth MS690; slot 1, farthest from CPU

Verify the following:

• The bank enable bit «31» in both MEMCONs for each memory module is set to (8xxx xxxh), which indicates that the base address for the hanks contained on the module is valid.

• MEMCON bits <2:1> are the signature field and contain the following value, in relation to the size of the array.

00

01

10

11

Table

4-4:

Signature Field Values

MCSRO-15 Hex

<2:1>

EqurY' CGnfiguration

Unassigned

4

6

0

2

RAM size

1 Mbit

RAM size

4 Mbits

Bank no response

• MEMCON hits <28:24> indicate the base address for each memory bank. The first valid bank

starts

at o.

The memory subsystem can mix the different sized memory modules (32 MB, 64 MB, and 128

MB). The largest sized memory module will be configured first, no matter where it is in the system. A.4ter all modules of the largest size are configured, the next iargest size wili be configured.

• MEMCON s display 0000 0007 if no memory module is present; there should be no gaps in the memory configuration.

3. Check the Q22-bus and the Q22-bus logic in the KA6751KA6801KA690

CQBIC chip and the configuration of the Q22-bus, as follows:

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-17

»>SHOW QBOS

Scan of Q-bus I/O Space

-200000DC (760334)=0000 RQDX3/KDASO/RRDSO/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK

-200000DE (760336)=OAAO

-20001468 (772150)=0000 RQDX3/KDA50/RRD50/RQC25/KFQSA-DISK

-2000146A (772152)=OAAO

-20001920 (774440)=FF08 DESQA

-20001922 (774442)=FFOO

-20001924 (774444)=FF2B

-20001926 (774446)=FF09

-20001928 (774450)=FFA3

-2000192A (774452)=FF96

-2000192C (774454)-0050

-2000192E (774456)=1030

-20001942 (774502)=OBCO

-20001F40 (777500)=0020 IPCR

Scan of

Q-~us

Memory Space

»>

The columns are described below. The examples listed are from the last line of the example above.

First column

=

the VAX. 110 address of the eSR, in hex (20001F40).

Second column

= the Q22-bus address of the eSR, in octal (777500).

Third column

= the data, contained at the eSR address, in hex

(0020).

Fourth column

= the speculated device name (IPCR, the epu interprocessor communications register).

Additional lines for the device are displayed if more than one eSR exists.

The last line, Scan of Q-bus Memory Space, displays memory residing on the Q22-bus, if present. VAX memory mapped by the Q22-bus map is not displayed under SHOW QBUS, but is displayed using SHOW

MEMORYIFULL.

If the system contains

an

MSCP orTMSCP controller,

run

test 81. This test performs the following functions:

Performs step one of the UQ port initialization sequence

Performs the SA wraparound test

Checks the Q22-bus interrupt logic

If you do not specify the eSR address, the test searches for and runs on the first MSCP device by default. To test the first TMSCP device, you must specify the first parameter:

»>'1 81 20001940

4-18

KA67SIKA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

You can specify other addresses if devices. This action may be useful to isolate a problem with a controller, the CPU module, or the backplane. Use the VAX I/O address provided by the SHOW QBUS command to determine the CSR value. If you do not specify a value, the MSCP device at address 20001468 is tested by default.

4. Check that all UQSSP, MSCP, TMSCP, and Ethernet controllers and devices are visible by typing the following command line:

»>SHOW DEVICE

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (ALPHA)

-DIAO (RF72)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (BETA)

-DIAl (RF72)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 2 (GAMMA)

-DIA2 (RF72)

DSSI Bus 0 Node S (ZETA)

-MIAS (TFSS)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6

(*)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

(*)

Ethernet Adapter

-EZAO (OS-OO-2B-OS-ES-6E)

Ethernet Adapter 0 (774440)

-XQAO (OS-OO-2B-06-16-F2)

In the example, the console displays the node numbers of disk and tape

ISEs it recognizes. The line below each node name and number is the logical device name DIAO, DIAl, DIA2, and MlA5 in this case.

The two lines marked by an asterisk

(*) are for the embedded DSSI adapters. DSSI node names and node numbers must be unique.

The next two lines show the logical name and station address for the embedded Ethernet adapter. The last two lines refer to a DESQA

Ethernet controller, its Q22=bus CSR address, its logical name (XQAO), and its station address.

5. Run one pass of the DSSI internal drive tests (DRVTST and DRVEXR) using the Diagnostic Utility Protocol (DUP) driver as described in

Section 5.4.

6. If the above steps have completed successfully and you have time to test the Q-bus ootions. load MDM (minimum release of MDM 136 is required for VAX-4000 Model 500 systems). Run the system tests from

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-19

the Main Menu. If they run successfully, the system has gone through its basic checkout and the operating system software can be loaded.

7. Bring up the operating system.

8. Bringing up VMS completes the installation procedures. Run the VMS

User Environment Test Package (UETP) to test that VMS is correctly installed. Refer to the VAX 3520, 3540 VMS Installation and Operations

(ZKS166) manual for instructions on running UETP.

4.5 Machine State on Power-Up

This section describes the state of the kernel after a power-up halt.

The descriptions in this section assume the system has just powered-up and the power-up diagnostics have successfully completed. The state of the machine is not defined if individual diagnostics are run or for any other halts other than a power-up halt (SAVPSL<13:8>(RESTART_CODE)

=

3). Refer to Appendix E for a description of the normal

state

of CPU configurable bits following completion of power-up tests.

4.6 Main Memory Layout and State

Main memory is tested and initialized by the firmware on power-up.

Figure 4-2 is a diagram of how main memory is partitioned after diagnostics.

4-20

KA675/KA680!KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Figure 4-2: Memory Layout After Power-Up Diagnostics o

Available system memory

(pages potentially good or bad)

PFN bitmap

OMR base

Top of Memory

PFN bitmap

(always on page boundary and n pages size in pages n = (# of MB )/2)

Firmware ·scratch memory·

I

32 pages

(always 16 KB)

________________________

~

022-Bus Scatter/Gather Map

--1

64 pages

~I ~.~~i

Potential -bad· memory

4.6.1 Reserved Main

Memory

In order to build the scatter/gather map and the bitmap, the firmware attempts to find a physically contiguous page-aligned 176-KB block of memory at the highest possible address that has no multiple bit errors.

Single-bit errors are tolerated in this section.

Of the 176 KB, the upper 32 KB is dedicated to the Q22-bus scatter/gather map~ as shown in Figure

4-2.

Of the iower portion, up to 128 Kb at the bottom of the block is allocated to the Page Frame Number (PFN) bitmap.

The size of the PFN bitmap is dependent on the extent of physical memory, each bit in the bitmap maps one page (512 bytes) of memory. The remainder of the block between the bitmap and scatter/gather map (minimally 16 KB) is allocated for the firmware. .

4.6.1.1 PFN Bitmap

The PFN bitmap is a data structure that indicates which pages in memory are deemed usable by operating systems. The bitmap is built by the diagnostics as a side effect of the memory tests on power-up. The bitmap always starts on a page boundary. The bitmap requires 1 KB for every

4

MB of main memory, hence, a 8 MB system requires 2 KB, 16 MB requires

4 KB, 32 MB requires 8 KB, and a

64

MB requires 16 lUS.

The bitmap

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-21

does not map itself or anything above it. There may be memory above the bitmap which has both good and bad pages.

Each bit in the PFN bitmap corresponds

to

a page in main memory. There is a one to one correspondence between a page frame number (origin

0) and a bit index in the bitmap. A one in the bitmap indicates that the page is

"good" and can be used. A zero indicates that the page is "bad" and should not be used. By default, a page is flagged "bad", if a multiple bit error occurs when referencing the page. Single bit errors, regardless of frequency, will not cause a page to be flagged "bad".

The PFN bitmap is protected by a checksum stored in the NVRAM. The checksum is a simple byte wide, two's complement checksum. The sum of

~J1 hyt.p~ in t.'hp hitm~p ~nn thp hitmAp

~hP.ek~llm ~hollld result in zero.

4.6.1.2 Scatter/Gather map

On power-up, the scatter/gather map is initialized by the firmware to map to the first 4 MB of of main memory. Main memory pages will not be mapped, if there is a corresponding page in Q22-bus memory, or if the page is marked bad by the PFN bitmap.

On a processor halt other than power-up, the contents of the scatter/gather map is undefined, and is dependent on operating system usage.

Operating systems should not move the location of the scatter/gather map, and should access the map only on aligned longwords through the local space of

20088000

to

2008FFFC,

110

inclusive. The Q22-bus map base register,

(QMBR) is set up by the firmware to point to this area, and should not be changed by software.

4.6.1.3 Firmware "Scratch Memory"

This section of memory is reserved for the firmware. However, it is only used after successful execution of the memory diagnostics and initialization of the PFN bitmap and scatter/gather map. This memory is primarily used for diagnostic purposes.

4.6.2 Contents of Main Memory

The contents of main memory are undefined after the diagnostics have run.

Typically, nonzero test patterns will be left in memory.

The diagnostics will "scrub" all of main memory, so that no power-up induced errors remain in the memory system.

On the

KA6751KA680

/KA690 memory subsystem, the state of the ECC bits and the data bits are undefined on initial power-up. This can result in single and multiple bit errors if the locations are read before written, because the ECC bits are not in agreement with their corresponding data bits. An aligned 10ngword

4-22 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

System Maintenance

write to every location (done by diagnostics) eliminates all power-up induced errors.

4.6.3 Memory Controller Registers

The CPU firmware assigns bank numbers to the MEMCONn registers in ascending order, without attempting to disable physical banks that contain errors.

High order unused banks are set to zero. Error loggers should capture the following bits from each MEMCONn register:

MEMCONn <31> (bank enable bit).

As the firmware always assigns banks in ascending order, knowing which banks are enabled is sufficient information to derive the bank numbers. MEMCONn <1:0>

(bank usage).

This field determines the size of the banks on the particular memory board.

Additional information should be captured from the NMCDSR, MOAMR,

MSER, and

MEAR

as needed.

4.6.4 On-Chip cache

The CPU on-chip cache is tested during the power-up diagnostics, flushed, and then turned on. The cache is also turned on by the BOOT and the

INIT command.

4.6.5 Translation Buffer

The CPU translation buffer is tested by diagnostics on power-up, but not used by the firmware because it runs in physical mode. The translation buffer can be invalidated by using PR$_TBIA,

IPR 57.

4.6.6 Halt-Protected Space

On the KA6751KA6801KA690 halt-protected space spans the 512-KB

FEPROM from 20040000 to 2007FFFF.

The firmware always runs in halt-protected space. When passing control to the bootstrap, the firmware exits the halt-protected space, so ifhalts are enabled, and the halt line is asserted, the processor will then halt before booting.

4.7 Operating System Bootstrap

Bootstrapping is the process by which an operating system loads and assumes control of the system. The KA6751KA6801KA690 support bootstrap of the VAXNMS and VAXELN operating systems. Additionally, the KA675

1KA680JKA690 will boot MDM diagnostics and any user application image which conforms

to

the boot formats described herein;

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-23

On the KA6751KA6801KA690 a bootstrap occurs whenever a BOOT command is issued at the console or whenever the processor halts and the conditions specified in the Table

3-5 for automatic bootstrap are satisfied.

4.7.1 Preparing for the Bootstrap

Prior

to

dispatching to the primary bootstrap (VMB), the firmware initializes the system to a known state. The initialization sequence follows: l. Check the console program mailbox "bootstrap in progress" bit

(CPMBX<2>(BIP». If it is set, bootstrap fails.

2.

If softwm:-e." on the console terminal.

3. Set CPMBX<2>(BIP).

4. Validate the Page Frame Number (PFN) bitmap. If PFN bitmap checksum is invalid, then:

a.

.Perform an UNJAM. b. Perform an INIT . c. Retest memory and rebuild PFN bitmap.

5. Validate the boot device name. If none exists, supply a list of available devices and prompt user for a device. If no device is entered within 30 seconds, use

EZAO.

6. Write a form of this BOOT request including the active boot flags and boot device on the console, for example "(BOOTIR5:0 nUAO)".

7. Initialize the Q22-bus scatter/gather map.

a.

Set IPCR<8>(AUX_HLT). h. Clear IPCR<5>(LMEAE). c. Perform an UNJAM . d.

Perform an INIT . e. If an arbiter, map all vacant Q22-bus pages to the corresponding page in local memory and validate each entry if that page is "good". f. Set IPCR<5>(LMEAE).

8. Search for a 128 KB contiguous block of good memory as defined by the

PFN bitmap. If 128 KB can not be found, the bootstrap fails.

4-24 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

9. Initialize the general purpose registers as follows:

RO

R2

R3

R4

R5

RIO

R11

Address of descriptor of boot device name; 0 if none specified

Length of PFN bitmap in bytes

Address of

PFN bitmap

Time-of-day of bootstrap from PR$_TODR

Boot flags

Halt PC value

Halt PSL value (without halt code and map enable)

AP

SP

PC

Rl, R6, R7, RS, 0

R9,FP

Halt code

Base of 128-Kbyte good memory block + 512

Base of 128-Kbyte good memory block + 512

10. Copy the VMB image from FEPROM to local memory beginning at the base of the

128 KB good memory block +

512.

11. Exit from the firmware to memory resident VMB.

On entry to VMB the processor is running at IPL 31 on the interrupt stack with memory management disabled. Also, local memory is partitioned as shown in Figure 4-3.

SYStem Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-25

Figure

4-3:

Memory Layout prior to VMS

Entry o

Potential -bad· memory

Base

Base+S12(SP,PC)

Reserved for RPB, initial stack

1--------------....

VMBimage

256 pages for VMS

128 KB block of

·good· memory

, ...... "'". ... 1l", ... M,

-_·;:'"'--1

Balance of 128 KB block to be used for SCB, stack, and the secondary bootstrap.

PFN bitmap

QMR base

Unused memory

PFN

~itmap

(always on page boundary and size in pages n = (# of MB )/2)

Firmware ·scratch memory-

(always 16 KB)

Q22-Bus Scatter/Gather Map

(always on 32 KB boundary)

Potential -bad- memory n pages

-1

32 pages

-1

64 pages

I

Top of Memory

4.7.2 Primary Bootstrap Procedures (VMS)

Virtual Memory Boot

(VMB) is the primary bootstrap for booting VAX. processors. On the

KA6751KA6801KA690 module,

VMB is resident in the firmware and is copied into main memory before control is transferred it. VMB then loads the secondary bootstrap image and transfers control

to to

it.

4-26 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

In certain cases, such as VAXELN, VMB actually loads the operating system directly. However, for the purpose of this discussion "secondary bootstrap" refers

to

any VMB loadable image.

VMB inherits a well defined environment and is responsible for further initialization. The following summarizes the operation of VMB.

1. Initialize a two page 8CB on the first page boundary above VMB.

2. Allocate a three page stack above the SCB.

3. Initialize the Restart Parameter Block (RPB).

4. Initialize the secondary bootstrap argument list.

5. If not a PROM boot, locate a minimum of three consecutive valid QMRs.

6. Write "2" to the diagnostic LEDs and display 112 .. " on the console to huncate that VMB is searching for the device.

7. Optionally, solicit from the console a "Bootfile: tt name.

8.

Write the name of the bOot device from which VMB will attempt to boot on the console, for example, "_DUAOtl.

9. Copy the secondary bootstrap from the boot device into local memory above the stack. If this fails, the bootstrap fails.

10. Write "1'" to the diagnostic LEDs and display "1 .. " on the console to indicate that VMB has found the secondary bootstrap image on the boot device and has loaded the image into local memory.

11. Clear CPMBX<2>(BIP) and CPMBX<3>(RIP).

12. Write "0" to the diagnostic LEDs and display "0 .. " on the console to indicate that VMB is now transferring control to the loaded image.

13.

Tr~wo:lsfer contrel to the loaded image v.ith the follovr.Jlg register usage.

R5

RIO

R11

AP

SP

Transfer address in secondary bootstrap image

Base adcL~ss of secondary boots+

, p memo1"Y

Base address of RPB

Base address of secondary boot parameter block

Base address of secondary boot parameter block halting with a HALT instruction. VMB makes no assumptions about the location of Q22-bus memory. However, VMB searches through the Q22-bus

Map Registers

(QMRs) for the first QMR marked "valid", VMB requires minimally 3 and maximally 129 contiguous "valid" maps to complete a bootstrap operation. If the search exhausts all map registers or there are fewer than

~ the required number of Itvalid lt maps, a bootstrap cannot be

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-27

performed. It is recommended that a suitable block of Q22-bus memory address space be available (unmapped to other devices) for proper operation.

After a successful bootstrap operation, control is passed to the secondary bootstrap image with the memory layout as shown in

Figure 4-4.

4-28 KA6751KA6801KAS90 CPU System Maintenance

Figure

4-4:

Memory Layout at VMB

Exit o

Potential -bad- memory

Base

Base+512(SP ,PC)

Reserved for RPB. initial stack

VMBimage

Next page

Nextpage+1024

Next page+2560

SCB (2 pages)

Stack (3 pages)

I

Secondary bootstrap image

(potentially exceeds block)

-----------------

Unused memory

PFN bitmap

OMRbase

256 pages for VMS

128 KB block of

-good- memory

(page aligned)

.-J

PFN bitmap

(always on page boundary and n pages size in pages n

=

(# of MB )/2)

Firmware ·scratch memory-

----1

32 pages

(always 16 KB)

022-Bus Scatter/Gather Map

I

I ·

64~9~

(always on 32 KB boundary)

.----------------11 ......

1 - - - - "

Potential ·bad- memory

Top of Memory

In the event that an operating system has an extraordinarily large secondary bootstrap which overflows the 128 KB of "good" memory, VMB loads the remainder of the image in memory above the "good" block.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-29

However, if there are not enough contiguous "good" pages above the block to load the remainder of the image, the bootstrap fails.

4.7.3 Device Dependent Secondary Bootstrap Procedures

The following sections describe the various device dependent boot procedures.

4.7.3.1 Disk and Tape Bootstrap Procedure

The disk and tape bootstrap supports Files-11 lookup (supporting only the

ODS level 2 file structure) or the boot block mechanism (used in PROM boot also). Of the standard

DEC operating systems

VMS and

ELN use the

Files-11 bootstrap procedure and

Ultrix-32 uses the boot block mechanism.

VMB first attempts a Files-11 lookup, unless the RPB$V _BBLOCK boot flag is set. If VMB determines that the designated boot disk is a Files-11 volume, it searches the volume for the designated boot program, usually

[SYSO.SYSEXE]SYSBOOT.EXE. However, VMB can request

a

diagnostic image or prompt the user for an alternate file specification. If the boot image can't be found,

VMB fails.

If the volume is not a Files-11 volume or the RPB$V _BBLOCK boot flag was set, the boot block mechanism proceeds as follows:

1. Read logical block 0 of the selected boot device (this is the boot block).

2. Validate that the contents of the boot block conform to the boot block format (see below).

3. Use the boot block to find and read in the secondary bootstrap.

4. Transfer control to the secondary bootstrap image, just as for. a Files-11 boot.

The format of the boot block must confonn to that shown in

Figure 4-5.

4-30 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 4-5: Boot Block Format

BB-O:

31

1

24 23

I n low LBN

16 15 o any value high LBN

(The next segment is also used as a PROM ·signature block. -) o

CHK

I k

I

18 (Hex) any value, most likely 0 size in blocks of the image load offset offset into image to start sum of the previous three longwords

Where: 1) the 18 (hex) indicates this is a VAX instruction set

2) 18 (hex) + ak· = the one's complement if ·CHK-

ML~7

4.7.3.2 PROM Bootstrap Procedure

The PROM bootstrap uses a variant of the boot block mechanism. v~m searches for a valid PROM "signature block" , the second segment of the boot block defined in

Figure 4-5. IfPRAO is the selected "device l t

, then VMB searches through Q22-bus memory on 16 KB boundaries. If the selected

"device" is PRBO, VMB checks the top 4096 byte block of the FEPROM.

At each boundary, VMB :

1.

Validates the readability of that Q22-bus memory page.

2. If readable, check to see if

If verification passes, the PROM image will be copied into mam memory and VMB will transfer control to that image at the offset specified in the

PROM bootbiock. If not, the next page

win

be tested.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-31

Note that it is not necessary that the boot image actually reside in PROM.

Any boot image in Q22-bus memory space with a valid signature block on a 16 KB boundary is a candidate. Indeed, auxiliary bootstrap assumes that the image is in shared memory.

The PROM image is copied into main memory in 127 page "chunks" until the entire PROM is moved. All destination pages beyond the primary 128

KB block are verified to make sure they are marked good in the PFN bitmap.

The PROM must be copied contiguously and if all required pages cannot fit into the memory immediately following the VMB image, the boot fails.

4.7.3.3 MOP Ethernet Functions and Network Bootstrap Procedure

Whenever a network bootstrap is selected on KA6751KA6801KA690, the

\'1vIB code makes continuous ai.i:.empi.s l.o booi. from. t.he llei.wo.rk. use::) the DNA Maintenance Operations Protocol (MOP) as the transport protocol for network bootstraps and other network operations. Once a network boot has been invoked, VMB turns on the designated network link and repeats load attempt, until either a successful boot occurs, a fatal controller error occurs, or VMB is halted from the operator console.

The KA6751KA6801KA690 support the load of a standard operating system, a diagnostic image, or a user-designated program via network bootstraps.

The default image is the standard operating system, however, a user may select an alternate image by setting either the RPB$V _DIAG bit or in the

RPB$V _BOLICT bit in the boot ilag longword RS. Note that the RPB$V_

SOLICT bit has precedence over the RPB$V _DIAG bit. Hence, ifboth bits are set, then the solicited file is requested.

NOTE:

VMB accepts

a maximum

39

characters for

a file specification for

solicited boots. However, MOP V3 only supports a 16-character file name. If

the

network server is running VMS, the following defaults apply to the file

specification: the directory MOM$LOAD:, and

the

extension .SYS. Therefore,

the

file specification need only consist of the filename if

the

default directory and extension attributes are used.

The KA6751KA6801KA.690 VMB uses the MOP program load sequence for bootstrapping the module and the MOP "dumplload" protocol type for load related message exchanges. The types of MOP message used in the exchange are listed in Table 4-5 and Table 4-6.

VMB, the requester, starts by sending a

RE~PROGRAM to the

MOP 'dumplload' multicast address. It then waits for a response in the fonn of a VOLUNTEER message from another node on the network, the

MOP server. If a response is received, then the destination address is changed from the multicast address to the node address of the server and

4-32 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

the same RE(LPROGRAM message is retransmitted to the server as an

Acknowledge.

Next, VMB

begins sending

RE(LMEM_LOAD

messages to the server. The server responds with either:

• MEM_LOAD message, while there is still more

to

load.

• MEM_LOAD_w_XFER, nit is the end of the image.

• PARAM_LOAD_w_XFER, if it is·.the end of the image and operating system parameters are required.

The ''load number" field in the load messages is used

to

synchronize the load sequence. At the beginning of the exchange, both the requester and server initialize the load number. The requester only increments the load number if a load packet has been successfully received and loaded. This forms the

Acknowledge to each exchange. The server will resend a packet with a specific load number, until it sees the load number incremented. The final

Acknowledge is sent by the requester and has a load number equivalent to the load number of the appropriate

LOAD_w_XFER

message

+ l.

Because the request for load assistance is a MOP "must transact" operation, the network bootstrap continues indefinitely until a volunteer is found.

The RE(LPROGRAM message is sent out in bursts of eight at four second intervals, the first four in MOP Version four IEEE

802.3 format and the last four in MOP Version 3 Ethernet format. The backoff period between bursts doubles each cycle from an initial value of four seconds, to eight seconds,... up to a maximum of five minutes. However, to reduce the likelihood of many nodes posting requests in lock-step, a random "jitter" is applied to the backoff period. The actual back off time is computed as

(.75+('5*RND(x)))*BACKOFF, where O<=x<1.

4.7.3.4 Network "Listening"

Vlhile the CPU module is waiting for a load volunteer du..?"i..,ng bootstrap, it ''listens'' on the network for other maintenance messages directed to the node and periodically identifies itself at the end of each 8- to 12-minute interval before a bootstrap retry. In particular, this '1istener" supplements the Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP) functions of the VMB load requester typically found in bootstrap firmware and supports.

• A remote console server that generates COUNTERS messages in response to RE(LCOUNTERS messages, unsolicited SYSTEM_ID messages every 8 to 12 minutes, and solicited SYSTEM_ID messages in response to

REQUEST_ID messages, as well as recognition of BOOT messages.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation) 4-33

• A loopback server that responds to Ethernet loopback messages by echoing the message to the requester.

• An IEEE

802.2 responder that replies to both XID and TEST messages.

During network bootstrap operation, the KA6751KA6801KA690 complies with the requirements defined in the I'NI Node Architecture Specification" for a primitive node. The firmware listens only to MOP "LoadlDump",

MOP "Remote Console", Ethernet "Loopback Assistance", and IEEE

802.3

. XID/I'EST messages (listed in Table 4-7) directed to the Ethernet physical address of the node. All other Ethernet protocols are filtered by the network device driver.

The MOP functions and message types, which are supported by the KA675 iKAb8UlKA6~O, are summarized in :rabies 4-6

ana

4-/.

4-34

KA67S/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Table 4-5: Network Maintenance Operations Summary

Function Role Transmit

Receive

MOP Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 Messages l

Dump

Load

Requester

Server

Requester RE(LPROGRAM2 to solicit VOLUNTEER to solicit &

ACK MEM_LOAD or or

MEM_LOAD_w..XFER

P~LOAD_w_XFER

Server

Console Requester

Server COUNTERS

SYSTEM_ID3 in response to in response to

RE(LCOUNTERS

REQUEST_ID

BOOT

Loopback

Requester

Server LOOPED.J)ATA4 in response to

LOOP_DATA lAll unsolicited messages are sent in Ethernet (MOP V3) and IEEE 802.2 (MOP V4), until the MOP version of the server is known. All solicited messages are sent in the format used for the reqt..lest.

2The initial RE(LPROGRAM message is sent to the dumpload multicast address.

If an assistance VOLUNTEER message is received, then the responders address is used as the destination to repeat the RE'LPROGRA.'\! message and for all S'.lbseq'.lent

REQ..ME..'~LLOAD messages.

3SYSTEM_ID messages are sent out every 8 to 12 minutes to the remote console multicast address and, on receipt of a REQUEST_ID message, they are sent to the initiator.

4LOOPED_DATA messages are sent out in response to LOOP_DATA messages. These messages are actually in

Ethernet LOOP TEST format, not in MOP format, and when sent in

Ethernet frames, omit the additional length field (padding is disabled).

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-35

Table 4-5 (Cont.): Network Maintenance Operations Summary

Function Role Transmit

Receive

IEEE 802.3 MessagesS

ExchangeID

Requester

Server XID_RSP in response to

XID_CMD

Test

Requester

Server

TEST_RSP in response to

SIEEE 802.2 support ofXID and TEST is limited to

Class 1 operations.

TEST_CMD

Table

4-6:

Supported MOP Messages

Message Type Message Fields

DUMPILOAD

IlEM..LOAD_w,..XFER

Code

00

Load. •

DD

Load addr

. . . . . . . . . . .

Imqedata

NOlle

Xferaddr a .........

Code

02

Load •

DD

Load addr

. . . . . . . . . . .

Imapdata dd-_.

Code

08

Derice

2SLQA

49SGEC

Format

OlV3

04V4 O2S,. swm 3

C-l1 1

C-128 2

HCn]

>00 Leu

00 Nom

FFOS

FEMaint

1

MOP V3.0 only.

2Mop x4.0 only.

3Soft;ware ID field is load from the string stored in the 40 byte field, RPB$T.J'n..E, of the RPB on a solicited boot.

4-36

KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Table

4-6

(Cont.): Supported

MOP

Messages

Message Type Message Fields

DUMPJLOAD

Load' nn

Prmtyp

01

02

03

04

05

06

00 End

Prm len

1·16

1-06

1·16

1-06

OA

08

Prm val

Target name 1

Target addr 1

Host name/

Hostaddr

Hoattime

12

Hoattime

Xferaddr aa-aa-aa-aa

VOWNTEER

REQUEST_ID

Code

03

Code

05

Rsrvd xx

REMOTE CONSOLE

Recpt'

Im-nn

SYSTDcm

Code

07

Bsrvd xx

Becpt,

Info type

01-00 Ven:ion

Im-nD or

00-00

02-00 FwlctioDS

07-00 HW addr

64-00 Derice

90-01

DataliDk

91-01

BWr me

Info len

03

02

06

01

01

02

IDf'oYalue

()4..00.()()

QO..S9 ee ee ee ee

ee

!Ie

25 or 49

01

Q6.04

~COUNTERS Code

09

Becpt, nn-nn

COUNTERS Code oB

Becpt. nn·nn

Counter block

1MOP

VS.O only.

2MOP x4.0 only.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-37

Table 4-6 (Cont.): Supported MOP Messages

Message Type Message Fields

BOOT 4

Code

06

REMOTE CONSOLE

VerificatioD Procesr Control

.,.,,-.,.,,-TV·.,.,-.,.,·.,.,,·.,.,,·

00

Sys xx

.,."

DeY m

C·17 sw m

3

Script m

2

C·l28

(see

REQJ'ROGRAM)

LOOP..DATA

Skpcnt.

Skipped bytes bb-_

LOOPBACK

Funct.ion

QO..02

Forward data

Fortrard addr ee ee ee ee ee ee

Data dd.-•••

LOOPEDJ)ATA Skpcnt Skipped bytes bb-_.

IID-DD

XID_ClIDiRSP

Function

00-01 Reply

Form

81

Claaa

01

IEEE

802.2

!be window size (K)

00

Data dd. ••••

Optioaal clata.

2MOP x4.0 only.

3So~ware

m

field is load from the string stored in the

40 byte field,

RPB$T....FILE, of the

RPB on a solicited boot.

4.A BOOT message is not verified, because in this context, a boot is already in progress.

However, a received BOOT message will cause the boot backofT timer to be reset to it's minimum value.

Table 4-7: MOP Multicast Addresses and Protocol Specifiers

Function Address al

Protocol - Owner

DumJlt'Load ~2B Dilital

AB-CJO.OO-Ol-OO-OO

60-01

Dilital

Remote CoDlOle

AB-CJO.QO..02..QO.OO ~2B

CF~oo2

08-00-2B

60-02

Loopback

AImt.aDce

IMOP V4.0 only.

2Not used.

90-00

Dilital

4-38

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

4.8 Operating System Restart

An

operating' system restart is the process of bringing up the operating system from a known initialization state following a processor halt. This procedure is often called restart or warmstart, and should not be confused with a processor restart which results in firmware entry.

On the KA6751KA6801KA690 a restart occurs, if the conditions specified in

Table

3-5 are satisfied.

To restart a halted operating system, the firmware searches system memory for the Restart Parameter Block (RPB), a data structure constructed for this purpose by VMB. (Refer to Table D-2 in Appendix D for a detailed description of this data structure.) If a valid RPB is found, the firmware passes control to the operating system at an address specified in the RPB.

The firmware keeps a "restart in progress" (RIP) flag in CPMBX which it uses to avoid repeated attempts to restart a failing operating system. An additional "restart in progress" flag is maintained by the operating system in the

RPB.

The firmware uses the following algorithm to restart the operating system:

1.

Check CPMBX<3>(RIP). If it is set, restart fails.

2. Print the message "Restarting system software." on the console terminal.

3. Set CPMBX<3>(RIP).

4. Search for a valid RPB. If none is found, restart fails.

5. CheCk the operating system RPB$L_RSTRTFLG<O>(RIP) flag. If it is set, restart fails.

6. Write "0" on the diagnostic LEDs.

7. Dispatch to the restart address, RPB$L_RESTART, with :

SP

AP

PSL

PR$.-MAPEN

Physical address of the RPB plus 512

Halt mele

041FOOOO o

If restart fails, the firmware prints "Restart failure." on the system console.

System Initialization and Acceptance Testing (Normal Operation)

4-39

4.8.1 Locating the RPB

The RPB is a page-aligned control block which can be identified by the first three longwords. The format of the RPB "signature" is shown below: (Refer to Table D-2 in Appendix D for a complete description of the RPB.)

Figure 4-6: Locating the

Restan Parameter Block

RPB: +00

+08 physical address of the RPB physical address of the restart routine checksum of first 31 longwords of restart routine

ML~

The firmware uses the following algorithm to find a valid RPB:

1. Search for a page of memory that contains its address in the first longword. If none is found, the search for a valid RPB has failed.

2. Read the second longword in the page (the physical address of the restart routine). If it is not a valid physical address, or if it is zero, return to step

1. The check for zero is necessary to ensure that a page of zeros does not pass the test for a valid RPB.

3. Calculate the 32 bit twos-complement sum (ignoring overflows) of the first 31 longwords of the restart routine. If the sum does not match the third longword of the RPB, return

to

step 1.

4. A valid RPB has been found.

4-40

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Chapter 5

System. Troubleshooting and

Diagnostics

This chapter provides troubleshooting information for the two primary diagnostic methods: online, interpreting error logs to isolate the FRU; and offline, interpreting ROM-based diagnostic messages to isolate the FRU.

In addition, the chapter provides information on testing DSSI storage devices, using MOP Ethernet functions to isolate errors, and interpreting

UETP failures.

The chapter concludes with a section on running loopback tests to test the console port, embedded Ethernet ports, Embedded DSSI busses, and Q-bus modules.

5.1 Basic Troubleshooting Flow

Before troubleshooting any system problem, check the site maintenance log for the system's service history. Be sure to ask the system manager the following questions:

• Has the system been used before and did it work correctly?

• Have changes (changes to hardware, updates to firmware or software) been made to the system recently?

• What is the state of the system-is it online or offiine?

If the system is omine and you are not able to bring it up, use the ofiline diagnostic tools, such as RBDs,

MDM,

and LEDs.

If the system is online, use the online diagnostic tools, such as error logs, crash dumps,

UETp,

and other log files.

Four common problems occur when you make a change to the system:

1.

2.

Incorrect cabling

Module configuration errors (incorrect

CSR addresses and interrupt vectors)

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-1

3. Incorrect grant continuity

4.

Incorrect bus node ID plugs

In addition, check the following:

• If you have received error notification using V AXsimPLUS, check the mail messages and error logs as described in Section 5.2.

• If the operating system fails to boot (or appears to fai1), check. the console terminal screen for an error message. If the terminal displays an error message, see Section 5.3.

• Check the LEDs on the device you suspect is bad. If no errors are indicated by the device LEDs. run the ROM-based dirumostics described in this c h a p t e r . ' -

• If the system boots successfully, but a device seems to fail or an intermittent failure occurs, check the error log ([SYSERR]ERRLOG.SYS) as described in

Section 5.2.

• For fatal errors, check that the crash dump file exists for further analysis ([SYSEXE]SYSDUMP.DMP).

• Check other log files, such as OPERATOR.LOG, OPCOM.LOG,

SETH OST. LOG, etc. Many of these can be found in the [SYSMGR] account. SETHOST.LOG is useful in comparing the console output with event logs and crash dumps in order to see what the system was doing at the time of the error.

Use the following command to create SETHOST.LOG files, then log into the system account.

S sri' HOST/LOG

0

After logging out this file will reside in the [SYSMGR] account.

If the system is failing in the boot or start-up phase, it may be useful to include the command SET VERIFY in the front of various start-up

.COM files to obtain a trace of the start-up commands and procedures.

When troubleshooting, note the status of cables and connectors before you perform each step. Label cables before you disconnect them. This step saves you time and prevents you from introducing new problems.

Most communications modules use floating CSR addresses and interrupt vectors. If you remove a module from the system, you may have to change the addresses and vectors of other modules.

If you change the system configuration, run the CONFIGURE utility at the console

YO

prompt

(»» to determine the eSR addresses and interrupt

5-2

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

vectors recommended by Digital. These recommended values simplify the use of the MDM diagnostic package and are compatible with VMS device drivers. You can select nonstandard addresses, but they require a special setup for use with VMS drivers and MDM. See the

Micro VAX

Diagnostic Monitor User's Guide for information about the CONNECT and

IGNORE commands,

which

are used to set up MDM for testing nonstandard configurations.

In addition, see Table 5-1 and Table

5-2

for possible problems and power supply status indicators.

Table 5-1: Console Terminal/Console Module Problems

Problem First Steps

No Console Message

H3604 Display Off

H3604 Displays Error

Check the Power switch on both the console terminal and the system.

If it is lit.

Check the cabling to the console terminal.

Check the terminal setup.

Check the power supply status indicators. See Table 5-2.

Check fuse

F2 on the console model.

See

Section 5.7.

Check the CPU module LEDs and the H3604 cabling.

See

Table 5-9 to determine error status.

Table 5-2: Power Supply Status Indicators

AC Over

Present DC OK

1emp

Fan

Failure Probable Cause

Off

On

On

On

Off

Off

Off

Off

Off

Off

On

OtT

Off

Off

Off

On

System not plugged in.

Be source not present, or system circuit breaker tripped.

Ovel'CUITent or overwltage protection circuits activated.

Excessive ambient temp; air vents blocked

Failure of one or both system fans

On On

Off OtT Normal operation

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-3

5.2 Product Fault Management and

Symptom-Directed Diagnosis

This section describes how errors are handled by the microcode and software, how the errors are logged, and how, through the Symptom-

Directed Diagnosis (SDD) tool, VAXsimPLUS, errors are brought to the attention of the user. This section also provides the service theory used to interpret error logs to isolate the FRU. Interpreting error logs to isolate the

FRU is the primary method of diagnosis.

5.2.1 General Exception and Interrupt Handling

This section describes the first step of error notification: the errors are first handled by the microcode and then are dispatched to the "'!vIS error handler.

The kernel uses the NVAX core chipset: NVAX CPU, NVAX. Memory

Controller (NMC), and NDAL to

CDAL adapter (NCA).

Internal errors within the NVAX CPU result in machine check exceptions, through System Control Block (SCB) vector 004, or soft error interrupts at

Interrupt Priority Level (IPL) 1A, SCB vector 054 hex.

External errors to the NVAX CPU, which are detected by the NMC or NDAL to CDAL adapter (NCA), usually result in these chips posting an error condition to the NVAX CPU. The NVAX CPU will then generate a machine check exception through SCB vector 004, hard error interrupt, IPL ID, through SCB vector 060 (hex), or a soft error interrupt through SCB vector

054.

External errors to the NMC and NCA, which are detected by chips on the

CDAL busses for transactions which originated by the NVAX CPU, are typically signaled back to the NCA adapter. The NCA adapter will post an error signal back to the NVAX CPU which generates a machine check or high level interrupt.

In the case of Direct Memory Access (DMA) transactions where the NCA or

NMC detects the error, the errors are typically signaled back to the CDAL-

Bus device, but not posted

to

the NVAX CPU. In these cases the CDAL-

Bus device typically posts a device level interrupt to the NVAX. CPU via the NCA. In almost all cases, error state is latched by the NMC and NCA

Although these errors won't result in a machine check exception or high level interrupt (i.e. results in device level IPL 14-17 versus error level IPL l.A, lD), the VMS machine check handler has a polling routine which will search for this state at one second intervals. This will result in the host logging a polled error entry.

5-4

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

These conditions cover all of the cases which will eventually be handled by the VMS error handler. The VMS error handler will generate entries that correspond to the machine check exception, hard or soft error interrupt type, or polled error. .

5.2.2 VMS Error Handling

Upon detection of a machine check exception, hard error interrupt, soft error interrupt or polled error, VMS will perform the following actions:

• Snapshot the state of the kernel.

• In most entry points, disable the caches.

• If it is a machine check and if the machine check is recoverable, determine if

Instruction retry is possible if one of the following conditions is true:

1. If PCSTS <10>PTE_ER

=

0:

Check that (ISTATE2 <07> VR

=

1) or (PSL <27> FPD

=

1)

Otherwise crash the system or process depending on PSL <25:24>

Current Mode.

2. If

=

1:

Check that (ISTATE2 <07>VR

(PCSTS <09>P1'E_ER_

WR

=

0)

=

1) and (PSL <27>FPD

=

0) and

Otherwise crash the system.

ISTATE2 is a longword in the machine check stack frame at offset

(SP)+24; PSL is a longword in the machine check stack frame at offset

(SP)+32; VR is the VAX Restart flag; and FPD is the First Part Done flag.

• Check to see if the threshold has been exceeded for various errors

(typically the

L.~reshold is exceeded 3 errors occur within a 10 '""'j"ute interval).

• If the threshold has been exceeded for a particular type of cache error, mark a flag that will signify that this resource is to be disabled (the cache will be disabled in most, but not all, cases).

• Update the SYSTAT software register with results of errorlfault handling.

• For memory uncorrectable Error Correction Code (ECC) errors:

If machine check, mark page bad and attempt to replace p~e.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-5

Fill in MEMCON software register with memory configuration and error status for use in

FRU isolation.

• For memory single-bit correctable ECC errors:

Fill in Corrected Read Data (CRD) entry FOOTPRINT with set, bank, and syndrome information for use in FRU isolation.

Update the CRD entry for time, address range, and count; fill the MEMCON software register with memory configuration information.

Scrub memory location for first occurrence of error within a particular footprint. If second or more occurrence within a footprint, mark page bad in hopes that page

win

be replaced later. Disable soft error logging for 10 minutes if threshold is exceeded.

Signify that CRD buffer be logged for the following events: system shutdown (operator shutdown or crash), hard single-cell address within footprint, multiple addresses within footprint, memory uncorrectable ECC error, or CRD buffer full.

• For ownership memory correctable ECC error, scrub location.

• Log error.

• Crash process or system, dependent upon PSL (Current Mode) with a fatal bugcheck for the following situations:

Retry is not possible.

Memory page could not be replaced for uncorrectable ECC memory error.

Uncorrectable tag store ECC errors present in writeback cache.

Uncorrectable data store ECC errors present in writeback cache for locations marked

as

OWNED.

Most INT60 errors.

Threshold is exceeded (except for cache errors).

A few other errors of the sort considered nonrecoverable are present.

• Disable cache(s) permanently if error threshold is exceeded.

• Flush and re-enable those caches which have been marked as good.

• Clear the error flags.

5-6

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

• Perfonn Return from Exception or Interrupt (REI) to recover and restart or continue the instruction stream for the following situations:

Most INT54 errors.

Those INT60 and INT54 errors which result in bad ECC written to a memory location. (These errors can provide clues that the problem is not memory related.)

Machine check conditions where instruction retry is possible.

Memory uncorrectable ECC error where page replacement is possible and instruction retry is possible.

Threshold exceeded (for cache errors only).

Return from Subroutine (RSB) and return from all polled errors.

NOTE:

The results of the VMS error handler may be preserved within the

operating system session (for example

7 disabling a cache) but not across reboots.

A.lthough the system can .recover with cache disabled

7 the system performance will be degraded, since access time increases as available cache decreases.

5.2.3 VMS Error Logging and Event Log Entry Format

The VMS error handler for the kernel can generate six different entry types, as shown in

Table

5-3.

All error entry types with the exception of correctable ECC memory errors, are logged immediately.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-7

Table

5-3:

VMS Error Handler Entry Types

VMS Entry Type Code Description

EMB$C~C

(002.)

EMB$C_SE

EMB$C_INT54

EMB$C_INT60

(006.)

(026.)

(027.)

Machine Check Exception

SCB Vector 4, IPL 1F

Soft

Error Interrupt

Correctable ECC Memoty Error

SCB Vector 54, IPL 1A

Soft

Error Interrupt

SCB Vector 54, IPL 1A

Hard Error Interrupt 60 seB

Vector 60, IPL lD

EMBSC..,.POLLED (044.)

EMB$C_BUGCHECK

Polled Errors

No exception or intenu pt generated by hardware.

Fatal bugcheck

Bugcheck 'tYPes:

MACHINECHK

ASYNCWRTER

BADMCKCOD

INCONSTATE

UNXlNTEXC

Each entry consists of a VMS header, a packet header, and one or more subpackets (Figure

5-1).

Entries can be of variable length based on the number of subpackets within the entry. The FLAGS software register in the packet header shows which subpackets are included within a given entTy.

Refer to Section 5.2.4 for actual examples of the error and event logs described throughout this section.

!HI

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 5-1: Event Log Entry Format

31

Packet

Header

VMS Header

Packet Revision

SYSTAT

Subpacket Valid Flags

Subpacket 1

00

Subpacketn

MLO-OO7263

Machine check exception entries contain, at a minimum, a Machine Check

Stack Frame subpacket (Figure 5-2).

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-9

Figure &-2: Machine

Check Stack

Frame Subpacket

31 2423

16 15

I

0807

I I

00000018 (hex) byte count (not including this longword, PC or PSL)

AST

LVL xxxxxx CPUJD

Machine

Check Code xxxxxxxx

INT. SYS register

SAVEPC register

VA register a register

Mo-

RN xx de Opcode xx xx xx xx

V

R xxxxxxxx

00

PC

PSL o.

4.

I STATE 1

8.

12.

16.

20.

24.ISTATE2

28.

32.

MLO-OO7264

INT54, INT60, Polled, and some Machine Check entries contain a processor

Register subpacket (Figure

5-3), which consists of some 40 plus hardware registers.

5-10 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

System Maintenance

31

I

Figure

5-3:

Processor Register Subpacket

00

BPCR (IPRD4)

PAMOOE (IPRE7)

MMEPTE (IPRE9)

MMESTS (IPREA)

PCSCR (IPR7C)

ICSR (IPRo3)

ECR (IPR 70)

TBSTS

(IPR ED)

PCCTL (IPRF8)

PCSTS (IPR F4)

CCTL

(IPRAO)

BCEoSTS

(IPRA6)

12.

16.

BCETSTS (IPRA3)

MESR

(2101.8044)

MMCoSR

(2101.8048)

CESR (2102.0000)

48.

CMCoSR (2102.0004)

CEFSTS

(IPRAC)

NESTS

(IPRAE)

NEOCMO (IPRB2)

68.

72.

76.

NEICMO (IPRBa) SO.

....

D

, . . 1\1\

I

A\

I

IJ_S_E_n_ ,_CC8_·C004

CBreR (2014.0020)

1

B488A ••

52.

56.

60.

64.

20.

24.

2S.

32.

36.

40.

44.

O.

4.

S.

31 00

MMEAOR (IPRE8)

VMAR (IPR 00)

TBAOR (IPREC)

PCADR (IPRF2)

BCEDIOX (IPRA7)

BCEDECC (IPRA8)

BCETIOX (IPRA4)

BCETAG (IPRA5)

MEAR (2101.8040)

MOAMR

(2101.804C)

CSEAR1

(2102.0008)

CSEAR2 (2102.000c)

CIOEAR1 (2102.0010)

CIOEAR2 (2102.0014)

CNEAR (2102.0018)

CEFDAR (IPRAB)

NEOADR (IPR BO)

NEDATHI (IPR 84)

NEDATLO

(IPR 86)

QBEAR (2008.0008)

160.

164.

168.

DEAR

(2008.000c)

I. on

I~ is: n\

I

172.

112.

116.

120.

124.

128.

92.

96.

100.

104.

108.

132.

136.

140.

144.

148.

152.

156.

...

NOTE:

The byte count, although part of the stack frame,

is

not included in the error log entry itself.

Bugcheck entries generated by the VMS kernel error handler include the first 23 registers from the processor Register subpacket along with the Time of Day Register (TODR) and other software context state.

Un correctable ECC memory error entries include a Memory subpacket

(Figure 5-4). The memory subpacket consists of MEMCON, which is a

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-11

software register containing the memory configuration and error status used for FRU isolation, and MEMCONn, the hardware register that matched the error address in MEAR.

Figure 5-4: Memory Subpacket for ECC Memory Errors

31

MEMCON

MEMCONn (one longword from 2101.8000 - 2101.801C)

00 o.

4.

M~7266

Correctable Memory Error entries have a Memory (Single-Bit Error) SBE

Reduction subpacket (Figure 5-5). This subpacket, unlike all others, is of variable length. It consists solely of software registers from state maintained by the error handler, as well as hardware state transformed into a more usable format.

Figure

5-5:

Memory SBE Reduction Subpacket (Correctable Memory

Errors)

31

00

Memory SSE Reduction Subpacket

CRD Entry Subpacket Header

CRD Entry #1

CRD Entry #2

CRD Entry n

Max n = 16

MLOOO7267

The VMS error handler maintains a Correctable Read Data (CRD) buffer internally within memory that is flushed asynchronously for high-level events to the error log file. The CRD buffer and resultant error log entry are maintained and organized as follows.

5-12 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

• Each entry has a subpacket header (Figure

5-6) consisting of

LOGGING

REASON, PAGE MAPour CNT, MEMCON,. VALID ENTRY CNT, and CURRENT ENTRY. MEMCON contains memory configuration . information, but no error status as is done for the Memory subpacket.

Figure 5-6: eRD

Entry Subpacket Header

31

Logging Reason

Page Mapout CNT

MEMCON

Valid Entry CNT

Current Entry

00

8.

12.

16.

MLO-OO7268 o.

4.

• Following the subpacket header are 1 to 16 fixed-length Memory CRD

Entries (Figure 5-7). The number of Memory

eRD

entries is shown in

VALID ENTRY CNT. The entry which caused the report

to

be generated is in CURRENT ENTRY

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-13

Figure 5-7: Correctable Read Data (CRD)

Entry

31

Footprint

Status

CRO CNT

Pages Marked Bad CNT

First Event

Last Event

Lowest Address

Highest Address

Each Memory CRD Entry represents one unique DRAM within the memory subsystem. A unique set, bank, and syndrome are stored in footprint to construct a unique ID for the DRAM.

Rather than logging an error for each occurrence of a single symbol correctable ECC memory error, the VMS error handler maintains the

CRD buffer-it creates a Memory CRD Entry for new footprints and updates an existing Memory CRD Entry for errors that occur within the range specified by the ID in FOOTPRINT. This reduces the amount of data logged overall without losing important information~rrors are logged per unique failure mode rather than on a per error basis.

Each Memory CRD entry consists of a FOOTPRINT, STATUS, CRD

CNT, PAGE MAPOUT CNT, FIRST EVENT, LAST EVENT, LOWEST

ADDRESS and mGHEST ADDRESS.

FIRST EVENT, LAST EVENT, LOWEST ADDRESS and HIGHEST

ADDRESS are updated to show the range of time and addresses of errors which have occurred for a DRAM. CRD CNT is simply the total count per footprint. PAGE MAPOUT CNT is the number of pages that have been marked bad for a particular DRAM.

00

8.

12.

16. o.

4.

24.

32.

36.

5-14 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

· STATUS contains a record of the failure mode -status of a particular

DRAM over time. This in turn determines whether or not the CRD buffer is logged. For the first occurrence of an error within a particular .

DRAM, the memory location will be scrubbed (corrected read data is read, then written back

to

the memory location) and CRD CN'!' will be set

to

1.

Since most memory single-bit errors are transient due to alpha particles, logging of the eRD buffer will not be done immediately for the first occurrence of an error within a DRAM. The CRD buffer

will,

however, be logged at the time of system shutdown (operator or crash induced), or when a more severe memory subsystem error occurs.

If the FOOTPRINTIDRAM experiences another error (CRD CNT

>

1),

VMS will set HARD SINGLE ADDRESS or MULTIPLE ADDRESSES along with SCRUBBED in

STATUS. Scrubbing is no longer performed; instead, pages are marked bad. In this case, VMS will log the CRD buffer immediately. The CRD Buffer will also be logged immediately if

PAGE MAPOUT THRESHOLD EXCEEDED

is

set in SYSTAT

as a

result of pages being marked bad. The threshold is reached if more

than

one page per Mbyte of system memory

is marked

bad. .

NOTE:

CURRENT ENTRY will be zero in the Memory SBE Reduction subpacket header if the CRD buffer was logged, not

as

a result of

a

HARD SINGLE ADDRESS or MULTIPLE ADDRESSES error in

STATUS, but

as

a result of

a

memory unco"ectable ECC error shown as

RELATED ERROR, or

as a

result of CRD BUFFER FULL or SYSTEM

SHUTDOWN, all of which are shown under LOGGING REASON.

5.2.4 VMS Event Record Translation

The kernel error log entries are translated from binary to ASCII using the

ANALYZE/ERROR command. To invoke the error log utility, enter the DCL comma.lld ANALYZE/ERROR_LOG.

Format:

~~ALYZE_ERROR_LOG [!qu.alifier(s)] [file-spec] [,...]

Example:

$ ANALYmERROR_LOG/INCLUDE=(CPU,MEMORY>/SINCE=TODAY

The error log utility translates the entry

into

the traditional three-column format. The first column shows the register mnemonics, the second column depicts the data in hex, and the last column shows the actual English translations.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-15

As in the above example, the VMS error handler also provides support for the /INCLUDE qualifier, such that CPU and MEMORY error entries can

be

selectively translated.

Since most kernel errors are bounded to either the processor module/system board or memory modules, the individual error flags and fields are not covered by the service theory. Although these flags are generally not required to diagnose a system to the FRU (Field Replaceable Unit), this information can be useful for component isolation.

ERF bit to text translation highlights all error flags that are set, and other significant state-these are displayed in capital letters in the third column.

Otherwise, nothing is shown in the translation column. The translation rules also have qualifiers such that if the setting of an error flag causes other registers

For example,

to

be latched, the other registers will be translated as well. a memory ECC error occurs, the syndrome and error address fields will be latched as well. If such a field is valid, the translation will

be

shown (e.g. MEMORY ERROR ADDRESS); otherwise, no translation is provided.

5.2.5 Interpreting CPU Faults Using ANAL VZE/ERROR

If the following three conditions are satisfied, the most likely FRU is the

CPU module. Example 5-1 shows an abbreviated error log with numbers to highlight the key registers.

• No memory subpacket is listed in the third column of the FLAGS register.

• CESR register bit <09>, CP2 10 Error, is equal to zero in the KA675

1KA6801KA690

Register Subpacket.

6) DSER register bits <07>, Q22 Bus

NXM:,

<05>, Q22 Bus Device Parity

Error, or <02>, Q-22 Bus No Grant, are equal to zero in the KA675

1KA6801KA690

Register Subpacket.

The

FLAGS

register is located in the packet header, which immediately follows the system identification header; the CESR and DSER registers are listed under the KA6751KA6801KA690 Register Subpacket.

CPU errors will increment a VMS global counter, which can be viewed using the DCL command SHOW ERROR, as shown in Example 5-2.

To determine if any resources have been disabled, for example, if cache has been disabled for the duration of the VMS session, examine the flags for the SYSTAT register in the packet header.

In Example 5-1, a translation buffer data parity error latched in the TBSTS register caused a machine check exception error.

5-16 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Example 5-1: Error Log Entry Indicating CPU Error

VAX/VMS SYSTEM ERROR REPORT COMPILED 14-JAN-199Z 18:55:52

PAGE 1.

••• *.**************************

ENTRY

ERROR SEQUENCE 11.

DATE/TIME 27-SEP~1991 14:40:10.85

SYSTEM UPTIME: 0 DAYS 00:12:12

SCS NODE: OMEGAl

LOGGED ON:

MACHINE CHECK KA680-A CPU FW REV. 2. CONSOLE FW REV. 3.9

REVISION 00000000

SYSTAT 00000001

ATTEMPTING RECOVERY

FLAGS 00000003 machine check stack frame

KA680 subpacket . .

SID 13000202

SYS_TYPE 01390601

VAX/VMS V5. 5-1

STACK FRAME SUBPACKET

80050000

~ACHINE

CHECK FAULT CODE - OS(x)

Current AST level - 4

(X)

ASYNCHRONOUS HARDWARE ERROR

PSL 04140001 c-bit executing on interrupt stack

PSL previous mode - kernel

PSL current mode - kernel first part done set

KA680

REGISTER SUBPACKET

BPCR ECCB0024

TBSTS 80000103

LOCK SET

TRANSLATION BUFFER DATA PARITY ERROR em lat.ch invalid. s5-c~~nd - lO(X) valid Ibex specifier ref. error stored

00000000 •

CESR

DSER

IPCRO

00000000 •

00000020

LOCAL MEMORY EXTERNAL ACCESS ENABLED

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-17

NOTE:

Ownership (O-bit) memory correctable or fatal errors (MESR <04> or MESR <03> of the processor Register Subpacket set equal to

1)

are processor module errors, NOT memory errors.

Example 5-2: SHOW ERROR Display Using VMS

$

SHOW ERROR

Device

CPU

MEMORY

PABO:

PAAO:

PTAO:

RTA2:

$

Error Count

1

1

1

1

1

1

5.2.6 Interpreting Memory Faults USing ANALYZE/ERROR

If"memory subpacket" or "memory sbe reduction subpacket" is listed in the third column of the FLAGS register, there is a problem with one or more of the memory modules, CPU module, or backplane.

• The "memory subpacket" message indicates an uncorrectable ECC error. Refer to Section 5.2.6.1 for instructions in isolating uncorrectable

ECC error problems.

• The "memory she reduction subpacket" message indicates correctable

ECC errors. Refer to Section 5.2.6.2 for instructions in isolating correctable ECC error problems.

NOTE:

The memory fault interpretation procedures work only if the memory modules have been properly installed and configured. For example, memory modules should start in backplane slot

4

(next to the processor module in slot

5)

and proceed to slot

1

with no gaps.

NOTE:

Although the VMS error handler has built in features to aid Services in memory repair, good judgment

is

needed by the Service Engineer. It is essential to understand that in many, if not most cases, correctable ECC errors are transient in nature. No amount of repair will fix them,

as

generally there

is

nothing to be fixed.

Memory modules can represent a great expense to the Corporation when they are sent back to Repair with no errors. If one disagrees with the strategy

5-18 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

in this section or

has questions or suggestions, please contact Corporate

Support.

5.2.6.1 Uncorrectable ECC Errors

Refer to Example 5-3, which provides an abbreviated error log for uncorrectable ECC errors.

For uncorrectable ECC errors, a memory subpacket will be logged as indicated by "memory subpacket" listed in the third column of the FLAGS software register CO). Also, the hardware register MESR <11>

(f) of the processor Register Subpacket will be set equal to 1, and MEAR will latch the error address

(0).

Examine the MEMCON software register

(0) under the memory subpacket.

The MEMCON register provides memory configuration information and a

MEMORY ERROR STATUS buffer Ce) that points to the memory moduleCs) that is the most likely FRU.

Replace the indicated memory module. In Example 5-3 the most likely

FRU is indicated as memory module #2, slot 3.

The VMS error handler will mark each page bad and attempt page replacement, indicated in SYSTAT

(0).

The DCL command SHOW

MEMORY (Example

5-4) will also indicate the result of VMS page replacement.

Un correctable memory errors will increment the

VMS

global counter, which can be viewed using the DCL command SHOW ERROR.

NOTE:

If register MESR

<11> was set equal to 1, but MESR <19:12>

syndrome equals 07, no memory subpacket will be logged

as a result of

incorrect check bits written to memory because of an NDAL bus parity error detected by the NMC. In short, this indicates a problem with the CPU module, not memory. There should be a previous entry with MESR <22>,

NDAL Data Parity Error set equal to 1.

NOTE:

One type of uncorrectable ECC error, that due to a "disown write", will result in

a

eRD entry like those for correctable ECC errors. The

FOOTPRINT longword for this entry contains the message "Uncorrectable

ECC errors due to disown write". The failing module should be replaced for this error.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-19

Example 5-3: Error Log Entry-Indicating Uncorrectable ECC Error

VAX/VMS SYSTEM ERROR REPORT

*******************************

ERROR SEQUENCE 2.

ENTRY

DATE/TIME 4-OCT-1991 09:14:29.86

SYSTEM UPTIME: 0 DAYS 00:01:39

SCS NODE: OMEGAl

COMPILED 6-NOV-1991 10:16:49

PAGE 25.

13.

*******************************

LOGGED ON: SID 13000202

SYS_TYPE 01390601

INT54 ERROR KA680-A CPU FW REV. 2. CONSOLE FW REV. 3.9

REVISION 00000000

SYSTAT 00000601

ATTEMPTING RECOVERY

PAGE MARKED

BAD

PAGE REPLACED

Ct fLAGS 00000006 memory subpacket •

I<A680 subpacket

VAXIVMS V5. 5-1

KA680 REGISTER SUBPACKET

SPCR ECC80000

MESR 80006800

ONCORRECTABLE MEMORY

ERROR SUMMARY tcc

ERROR •

MEMORY ERROR SYNDROME - 06 (X)

MEAR

02FFDCOO main memory error address - OBFF7000 ndal commander 1d - OOlX)

Cit

nCRO 00000020

MEMORY SUBPACKET

MEMCON 0357E53F

LOCAL MEMORY EXTERNAL ACCESS ENABLED

MEMORY CONFIGURATION:

sets enabled - 00111111

Hs690-BA MEMORY MODULE • 1.32MB SLOT 4

MS690-BA MEMORY MODULE I 2. 32MB SLOT 3

MS690-DA MEMORY MODULE I 3. 128MB SLOT 2

_total memory - 192MB

Example

5-3

(continued on next page)

5-20

KA675/KA680!KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 5-3 (Cont.): Error Log Entry Indicating Uncorrectable ECC

Error

MEMCON3 88000003

MEMORY ERROR STATUS:

8

MEMORY MODULE 12 SLOT 3

Bank

=

00 (X)

Set .. 03

(X)

64 bit mode

Base address valid

RAM size

=

1MB base address OB(X)

Example 5-4: SHOW MEMORY Display Under VMS

$

SltON MEMOR%

System Memory Resources on 21-FEB-1992 05:58:52.58

Physical Memory Usage (pages):

Main Memory (128.00Mb)

Sad pages

Total

262144

Total

Free

224527

Dynamic

1

I/O

In Use

28759

Errors

0

Modified

8858

Slot Usage (slots):

Process Entry Slots

Balance Set Slots

'rotal

360

324

Free

347

313

Resident

13

11

Static

0

Swapped

0

0

Fixed-Size Pool Areas (packets) :

Small Packet (SRP) List

1/0

Request Packet (IRP) List

Large Packet (LRP) List

Dynamic Memory Usage (bytes):

Nonpaged DynamiC Memory

Paged Dynamic Memory

Total

3061

2263

87

Total

1037824

1468416

Paging File Usage (pages) :

DISKSVMSOS4-0:[SYSO.SYSEXE]PAGEFILE.SYS

Free

2724

2070

61

Free

. 503920

561584

In Use

343

193

26

Free Reservable

300000

In Use

533904

906832

266070

Size

128

176

1856

Largest

473184

560624

Total

300000

Of the physical pages in use, 24120 pages are permanently allocated to VMS.

$

Using the VMS command ANALYZE/SYSTEM, you can associate a page that had been replaced (Bad Pages in SHOW MEMORY display) with the physical address in memory.

In Example 5-5, 5ftb8 (under the Page Frame Number (PFN) column) is identified as the single page that has been replaced. The command EVAL

5ftb8

*

200 converts the PFN to a physical page address. The result is

Obft7000, which is the MEAR address translated in Example 5-3. (Bits

<8:0> of the addresses may differ since the page address from EVAL always shows bits <8:0> as o.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-21

Example 5-5:

Using ANALYZE/SYSTEM to

Check the

Physical Address

In Memory for a Replaced Page

S ADLTZE/SYS'r!:K

VAX/VMS System analyzer

SDA>

SHOW PFH

/B1t1)

Bad page list

Count:

Lolimlt:

High limit:

PFN

1

-1

1073741824

PTE ADDRESS BAK

OOOSFFB8 00000000 00000000

SDA> ~

Hex - OBFF7000

SDA> EXI:T

S

REFCNT FLINK

BLINK TYPE o

00000000 00000000 20

PROCESS

*

200

Decimal -

201289728

STATE

02 BADLIST

5.2.6.2 Correctable ECC Errors

Refer to Example 5-6, which provides an error log showing correctable ECC errors.

For correctable ECC errors, a Single-Bit Error (SBE) Memory Subpacket will be logged as indicated by "memory she reduction subpacket" listed in the third column of the FLAGS software register

(0).

The Memory SBE Reduction Subpacket header contains a CURRENT

ENTRY register

(0) that displays the number of the Memory CRD Entry that caused the error notification. If CURRENT ENTRY

>

0, examine which bits are set in the STATUS register

(0) for this entry-GENERATE

REPORT should be set.

NOTE:

If CURRENT ENTRY

=

0, then the entry was logged for something other than a single-bit memory correctable error Footprint. You will need to examine all of the Memory

CRD

Entries and Footprints to try to determine the likely FRU.

Check for the following:

• SCRUBBED (e)-If SCRUBBED is the only hit set in the STATUS register, memory modules should NOT generally be replaced.

The kernel performs memory scrubbing of DRAM memory cells that may flip due to transient alpha particles. Scrubbing simply reads the corrected

data

and writes it back to the memory location. Returning memory modules that only have SCRUBBED set in STATUS will cost

5-22 KA675!KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

the corporation money, since the repair centers will generally not find a problem. .

• HARD SINGLE ADDRESS

(e)-If the second occurrence of an error within a footprint is at the same address (LOWEST ADDRESS

HIGHEST ADDRESS

=

(0»,

then HARD SINGLE ADDRESS will be set in STATUS along with SCRUBBED. Scrubbing will not be tried after the first occurrence of any error within a particular footprint. The page will be marked bad by VMS.

Unlike uncorrectable ECC errors, the error handling code cannot indicate if the page has been replaced. To get some idea, use DCL command, SHOW MEMORY. If the page mapout threshold has not been reached ("PAGE MAPOUT THRESHOLD EXCEEDED" is not set in SYSTAT packet header register

(0»,

the system should be restarted at a convenient time to allow the power-up self-test and ROM-based diagnostics to map out these pages. This can be done by entering

TEST 0 at the console prompt, running an extended script TEST AS, or by powering down then powering up the system. In all cases, the diagnostic code will mark the page bad for hard single address errors, as well as any uncorrectable ECC error by default.

If there are many locations affected by hard single-cell errors, on the order of one or more pages per MB of system memory, the memory module should be replaced. The console command SHOW MEMORY will indicate the number of bad pages per module. For example, if the system contains 64 MB of main memory and there are 64 or more bad pages, the affected memory should be replaced.

NOTE:

Under VMS, the page mapout threshold

is calculated

automatically. If npAGE MAPOUT THRESHOLD EXCEEDED"

is

set in SYSTAT

(0),

the failing memory module should be replaced.

In cases of a new memory module used for rep~;r or as pa..~ of system installation, one may elect to replace the module rather than having diagnostics map them out, even if the threshold has not been reached for hard single-address errors.

• MULTIPLE ADDRESSES (O)-If the second occurrence of an error within a footprint is at a different address (LOWEST ADDRESS not equal to HIGHEST ADDRESS

(0),

MULTIPLE ADDRESSES will be set in STATUS along with SCRUBBED. Scrubbing will not be attempted for this situation. In most cases, the failing memory module should be replaced regardless of the page mapout threshold.

If CRD BUFFER FULL is set in LOGGING REASON

(e)

Oocated in the subpacket header) or PAGE MAPOUT THRESHOLD EXCEEDED is set in

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-23

SYSTAT

(8), the failing memory module should be replaced regardless of any thresholds.

For all cases (except when SCRUBBED is the only flag set in STATUS) isolate the offending memory by examining the translation in FOOTPRINT called MEMORY ERROR STATUS (.): The memory module is identified by its backplane position. In Example 5-6, memory module #3, slot 2, is identified as the failing module.

The Memory SBE Reduction Subpacket header translates the MEMCON register (.) for memory subsystem configuration information.

Unlike uncorrectable memory and CPU errors, the VMS global counter, as shown by the

DeL command SHOW ERROR, is not incremented for correctable ECC errors uniess it resuits in an error log entry for reasons other than system shutdown.

NOTE:

If footprints are being generated for more than one memory module, especiaUy if they all have the same bit in error, the processor module, backplane, or other component may be the cause.

NOTE:

One type of uncorrectable ECC error, that due to a "disown write", wiU result in a CRD entry like those for correctable ECC errors. The

FOOTPRINT longword for this entry contains the message 'Vncorrectable

ECC errors due to disown write". The failing module should be replaced for this

error.

5-24 KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example

5-6:

Error Log Entry Indicating Correctable ECC Error

VAX/VMS SYSTEM ERROR REPORT

*******************************

ENTRY

ERROR SEQUENCE 2.

DATE/TIME 27-SEP-1991 09:51:13.98

SYSTEM

UPTIME: 0

SCS NODE: OMEGA1

DAYS 00:05:06

COMPILED 21-NOV-1991 16:55:58

PAGE 1.

1.

***.*******;*******************

LOGGED ON: SID 13001401

SYS_TYPE 01390601

VAX/VMS

VS.

5-1

CORRECTABLE MEMORY ERROR KA680-A CPO

FW

REV. 1. CONSOLE

FW

REV. 3. 9

REVISION 00000000

SYSTAT

00000040 tt

MEMORY SOFT ERROR LOGGING DISABLED

FLAGS

00000008 o memory sbe reduction subpacket

MEMORY SBE REDUCTION SUBPACKET

LOGGING REASON 00000001

GD

PAGE MAPOUT CNT 00000003

0357E53:

NORMAL REPORT

MEMORY CONFIGURATION:

sets enabled 00111111

MS690-BA MEMORY MODOLE • 1.32MB SLOT 4

MS690-BA MEMORY MODOLE • 2. 32MB SLOT 3

MS690-0A MEMORY MODOLE • 3. 128MB SLOT 2

_total memory -

192MB

VALID ENTRY CNT 00000003

3.

CURRENT ENTRY 00000003

3 • •

MEMORY CRe ENTRY 1.

FOOTPRINT

000C0373

MEMORY ERROR STATUS:

MEMORY MODULE 12 SLOT 3

-set - 3.

-bank - O. icc

SYNDROME - 7l(X)

_CORRECTED DATA BIT - O.

STATUS 00000010 scrubbed •

CRe CNT 00000001

1.

PAGE MAPOUT CNT 00000000

O.

FIRST EVENT OD3£26EO

0094F438

27-SEP-1991 09:50:13.07

LAST EVENT OD3E26EO

0094F438

27-SEP-1991 09:50:13.07

LOWEST ADDRESS OBFF4000

HIGHEST ADDRESS OBFF4000

Example

5-6

(continued on next page)

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-25

Example 5-6

(Cont.): Error Log "Entry Indicating Correctable ECC Error

MEMORY CRD ENTRY 2.

FOOTPRINT 0000001C

STATOS 00000019

CRD CNT 00000002

PAGE KAPooT eNT 00000001

FIRST EVENT lAST

EVEN'!'

OFFFlBAO

0094F438

OFFFlBAO

0094F438

LOWEST ADDRESS 0057FD44.

HIGHEST ADDRES3 0057FD44

MEMORY CRD ENTRY 3.

FOOTPRINT 00000500

MEMORY ERROR STATUS:

MEMORY MODOLE 11 SLOT 4

-set -

O.

-bank o. icc

SYNDROME - IC

(X)

_CORRECTED DATA BIT -

4.

PAGE MARKED

BAD

HARD

SINGLE ADDRESS • scrubbed

2.

1.

27-SEP-1991 09:50:17.69

27-SEP-1991 09:50:17.69

STATOS 00000055

MEMORY ERROR STATUS: •

MEMORY MODOLE 13 SLOT

2

-set 5.

-bank o. icc

SYNDROME - 00

(X)

_CORRECTED DATA BIT 15.

PAGE MARKED

BAD

MULTIPLE ADDRESSES scrubbed

GENERATE REPORT . . ct

3.

2.

CRD CNT 00000003

PAGE MAPOOT CNT 00000002

FIRST EVENT lAST EVENT

122F1BOO

0094F438

122FIBOO

0094F438

LOWEST ADDRESS OeC72140 •

HIGHEST ADDRESS 08E43B28

ANAL/ERRIOUT-CRD CRD.ZPD

27-SEP-1991 09:50:21.36

27-SEP-1991 09:50:21.36

5-26

KA67S/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

NOTE:

Ownership (O-bit) memory correctable

or

fatal errors (MESR <04> or MESR <03> of the processor Register Subpacket set equal to

1)

are processor module errors, NOT

memory

errors.

5.2.7 Interpreting System Bus Faults Using

ANAL VZE/ERROR

If hardware register CESR <09>

(0) and/or CQBIC hardware register

DSER <07>, <05>, or <02>

(f) is set equal to 1, there may be a problem with the Q-bus or Q-bus option.

When CESR <09> is set equal to 1, examine the hardware register

CIOEAR2

(0) to determine the address of the offending option.

Example 5-7 provides an error log showing a faulty Q-bus option. The

CIOEAR2 error register indicates the first UQSSP controller as the offending address.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-27

Example 5-7: Error Log Entry -Indicating Q-Bus Error

VAX/VMS

SYSTEM ERROR REPORT

*******************************

ENTRY

ERROR SEQUENCE 1852.

DATE/TIME 20-NOV-1991 14:26:11.14

SYSTEM UPTIME: 12 DAYS 20:04:19

SCS NODE:

75.

COMPILED 20-NOV-1991 14:28:13

****._************.***** ••

LOGGED ON:

MACHINE CHECK KA680-A CPU FW REV' 2. CONSOLE

FW

REV. 4.1

REVISION 00000000

SYSTAT 00000001

ATTEMPTING RECOVERY

FLAGS 00000003 machine check stack frame

KA680 subpacket

PAGE 1.

SID 13000202

SYS_TYPE 01410601

VAXIVMS V5.S-1

STACK FRAME SUBPACKET

80060000

PSL 03COOOOO

PSL previous mode - user

PSL current mode - user first part done set

KA6BO REGISTER SUBPACKET

BPeR ECC80024

CESR 80000200

0

CP2 IO ERROR

ERROR SUMMARY

DSER

CIOEAR2

00000080

8

00001468

0-22 BUS NXM

.. ep2 IO error address - 20001468

NDAL commander 1d (cp2 transac) - O(X)

IPCRO 00000020

ANAL/ERR/OUT-QBOS QBUS.ZPD

LOCAL MEMORY EXTERNAL ACCESS ENABLED

5-28 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

5.2.8 Interpreting DMA

*>

Host Transaction Faults Using

ANAL VZE/ERROR

Some kernel errors may result in two or mor-e entries being logged. If the SHAC DSSI adapters or the SGEC Ethernet controller or other CDAL device (residing on the processor module) encounter host main memory uncorrectable ECC errors, main memory NXMs or CDAL parity errors or timeouts, more than one entry results. Usually there will be one Polled

Error entry logged by the host, and one or more Device Attention and other assorted entries logged by the device drivers.

In these cases the processor module or one of the four memory modules are the most likely cause of the errors. Therefore, it is essential to analyze

Polled Error entries, since a polled entry usually represents the source of the error versus other entries, which are simply aftereffects of the original error.

Example 5-8 provides an abbreviated error log for a polled error.

Example 5=9 provides an example of a device attention entry.

Example 5-8: Error Log Entry Indicating Polled Error

V A X / VMS SYSTEM ERROR REPORT

***********.*******************

ERROR SEQUENCE 15.

ENTRY

DATE/TIME 17-FEB-1992 05:22:00.90

SYSTEM UPTIME: 0 CAYS 00:27:48

SCS NOOE:

2.

COMPILED 17-FEB-1992 05:32:21

*******************************

LOGGED ON:

POLU:O tRROR

KA680-A CPO

FW REV. 2.

CONSOLE

FW REV.

4.3

REVISION

SYSTAT

00000000

00000001

ATTEMPTING RECOVERY

FLAGS 00000006 memory subpaclcet

KA6S0 subpaclcet

PAGE l .

SID 13000202

SYS_TYPE 01430701

VAX/VMS VS.S-1

KA680 REGISTER SUBPACKET

Example 5-8 (continued on next page)

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-29

Example

5-8

(Cont.):

Error Log Entry Indicating Polled Error

BPCR ECC80024

MESR 8001B800

UNCORRECTABLE MEMORY ECC ERROR

ERROR SUMMARY

MEMORY ERROR SYNDROME - 18 (Xl

MEAR 50000410 main memory error address - 00001040 ndal commander id - OS(X)

IPCRO

MEMORY SUBPACKET

MEMCON

00000020

OOS7ES3F

LOCAL

MEMORY EXTERNAL ACCESS ENABLED

MEMCONO 80000003

MEMORY CONFIGURATION: sets enabled - 00111111

MS690-BA MEMORY MODULE t

1.32MB SLOT 4

MS690-BA MEMORY MODULE f

2. 32MB SLOT 3

MS690-DA MEMORY MODULE t

3. 128MB SLOT 2

_total memory -

192MB

MEMORY ERROR STATUS:

MEMORY MODULE

13

SLOT

2

Bank - OO(X)

Set • 00

(X)

64 bit mode

Base address valid

RAM size • 1MB base address - OO(X)

ANALlERRIOUT-TBl TB1.ZPO

5-30

KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

System Maintenance

Example

5-9:

Device Attention Entry

VAX/VMS

SYSTEM ERROR REPORT

*******************************

ENTRY

ERROR SEQUENCE 15.

DATE/TIME 17-FEB-1992 05:22:00.90

SYSTEM UPTIME: 0 DAYS 00:27:48

SCS NODE:

COMPILED 17-FEB-1992 05:32:21

PAGE

1.

2.

***************** •• ************

LOGGED ON: SID 13000202

SYS_TYPE 01430701

DEVICE ATTENTION KA680-A CPU FW REV. 2. CONSOLE FW REV. 4.3

VAX/VMS VS. 5-1

OSSI SUB-SYSTEM, PABO: - PORT WILL BE RE-STARTED

PORT TIMEOUT, DRIVER RESETTING PORT

CNF 03060022

MAINTENANCE ID - 0022(X)

FIRMWARE REVISION - 06 (X)

HARDWARE REVISION - 03 (X)

PMCSR

PSR

00000000

80010000

MAINTENANCE ERROR

SHARED HOST MEMORY ERROR

PFA.~

40001044

APPROX HOST ADDR 40001044(X}

PESR 00010000

CPDAL BUS ERROR

PPR 00000000

NODE 10.

O. BYTE INTERNAL BUFFER

16. NODES MAXIMUM

OC450000

C01C

44. RETRIES REMAINING

SO.

RETRIES ALLOWABLE

SHARABLE

AVAILABLE

ERROR LOGGING

CAPABLE OF INPUT

CAPABLE OF OUTPUT

ONLINE

7. ERRORS THIS ONIT

5.2.9 VAXsimPLUS and System-Initiated Call Logging (SICl)

Support

Symptom-Directed Diagnostic (SDD) toolkit support for KA6751KA680

/KA690 kernels is provided in version 2.0 of the toolkit. If version 2.0 is not available, you should install the previous version, as it provides support for many existing options.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-31

VAX 4000 systems use Symptom .. Directed Diagnosis tools primarily for notification. The VAX System Integrity Monitor Plus (VAXsimPLUS) interactive reporting tool triggers notification for high-level events recorded in

SYSTAT and LOGGING REASON.

The VAXsimPLUS monitor simply parses for a handful of SYSTAT flags and LOGGING reason codes. The VAXsimPLUS monitor display is updated and triggering occurs if the threshold has been reached. Some flags have a threshold of one; for example, SYSTAT <08> ERROR THRESHOLD

EXCEEDED will trigger VAXsimPLUS upon the first occurrence, since at least three errors would have already occurred and been handled by VMS.

All lower level errors will ultimately set one of the conditions shown

Table in

5-4. VAXsimPLUS will examine the conditions within a 24-hour period-thresholds are typically one or two flags or logging reason codes within that period.

Table 5-4 lists the conditions that will trigger VAXsimPLUS notification and updating. Figure &-8 shows the flow for the VAXsimPLUS monitor trigger (for decision blocks with only one branch, the alternative is treated as an ignore condition). The entries ultimately are classified as either hard or soft. Errors that require corrective maintenance are classified as hard; while errors potentially requiring corrective maintenance are classified as soft.

Table 5-4: Conditions That Trigger VAXslmPLUS Notification and

Updating

Condition Description

SYSTAT

<00>

= 1

SYSTAT <00>

=

0

=

1

"Attempting recovery"

"Full recovery or retry not possible"

"Error threshold exceeded"

<09>

= 1 "Page marked bad for uncorrectable ECC error in main memory"

SYSTAT

<11>

=

1 "Page mapout threshold for single bit ECC errors in main memory exceeded"

LOGGING REASON <3:0>

=

1

"Memory

CRD buffer fulr

LOGGING REASON <3:0>

=

2 "Generate report as a result of hard single address or multiple address DRAM memory fault"

LOGGING REASON <3:0>

3,5-F

=

0,

'1llegal

LOGGING REASON"

KA6751KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Figure 5-8: Trigger Flow for the VAXsimPLUS Monitor y

N

MLo-oo8656

VAXsimPLUS triggering notifies the customer and Services using three message types: HARD, SOFl', and SICL Service Request. Each message contains the single STARS article theory number, as well as the SYSTAT or LOGGING REASON state. In addition, the SICL Service Request will have a Merged Error Log (MEL) datafile appended. Both hard and soft triggers will generate SICL Service Request messages. -

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-33

Figure 5-9 shows the five

VAXsim~LUS provides a brief explanation of the fiye levels of screen displays.

Table 5-5: Five-Level VAXslmPLUS Monitor Screen Displays

Level

Explanation

1. System

2. Subsystem

3. Unit

4. Error Class

5. Error Detail

The system level screen provides one box for each system analyzed (in Figure

~9 a being single system is being analyzed). As with each screen level, the number of reported errors is displayed in the box. The boxes blink when the hard error thresholds are reached; the boxes are highlighted when the soft error thresholds are reached.

The subsystem level screen provides separate boxes for the kernel and node information. Other boxes that may be displayed are bus, disk., tape, etc.

The unit level screen provides a box for the kernel. If the subsystem has more than one unit or device with errors, those will be displayed as well.

The error class level screen provides a box for both hard and soft errol'S.

Two error detail level screens (hard and soft) provide the number of reported errors along with a brief error description.

5-34

KA675lKASSO/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure ~9: Five-Level VAXsimPLUS Monitor .DJsplay

1

3

(Systems)

AB1X

3

I

1-

2

c:;:J i

I

Node Info

2-

AB1X

4

AB1X Kernel AB1X$Kemel (NVAX4000) AB1X Kernel

AB1 X$Kernel

3

1-

I

Soft

2

I

I

Hard

1

1-

2-

5

I

I

AB1X Kernel AB1X$Kemel (NVAX4000) Soft

I

I

Count: Explanation

I

I

2: Attempting Recovery

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-35

Once notification occurs, the service engineer should examine the error log file (after using the ANALYZE/ERROR command) or read the appended

Merged Error

Log

(MEL) file in the SICL service request message. (The

MEL file is encrypted, refer to Section 5.2.9.1 for instructions converting these files.) U sing the theory of interpretation provided in the previous sections, you can manually interpret the error logs .

. NOTE:

The interpretation theory provided in this manual is also a STARS article and can be accessed via the Decoder Kit. (Theory 30B01.xxx

reproduces in full, Section 5.2 of this manual).

In summary, a service engineer should use VAXsimPLUS notification as follows:

1. Make sure all four message types are sent to the Field and System accounts.

2. Log into the Field or System account.

3. Read mail Oook for the SICL service request message with its append~

MEL file).

4.

Convert the encrypted MEL file and use the theory provided in -this manual to interpret the error log file.

5.2.9.1 Convening the SICL Service Request MEL File

Use the following procedure

to

convert the encrypted MEL file that is appended to the SICL service request message (MEL files can be converted on site or at a support center). Example 5-10 shows a sample SICL service request message and appended MEL file.

1. Extract the SICL mail message from mail.

2. Edit the extracted file to obtain the appended MEL file. The MEL file is the encrypted code that appears between the rows of asterisks and includes the words ·SICL" and "end."

3. Convert the encrypted code to a binary file using the VAXsimPLUS decode command file as follows:

$

MCR SDD$EXE:FMGR$SICL_DECODE [MEL filename] [binary filename]

4. Use the ANALYZE/ERROR command to produce an error log entry.

$

ANALYZEfERROR [binary filename]

5-36

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example

5-10: SICL Service Request with Appended MEL File

From: AB1X::SDDSMANAGER

To: SYSTEM

·VAXsimELOS Message- lS-APR-1992 10:29:21.05

CC:

Subj: SOD T2.0 Service Request - Analysis: [30B01.200]

*****.*****************.*.******.*********************---**-*-*--*-*-*._._-.*---

VAXsimPLUS Notification Message

VAXsimPLUS has detected that the following device needs attention:

DEVICE:

NODE:

SYSTEM SERIAL NUMBER:

SYSTEM TnE:

AB1XSKERNEL (NVAX4000)

AB1X

I<Al36H1S20

VAX 4000-600

Attn:

Device:

Count:

Theory:

VAXslmPLOS Diagnosis Information

Field Service

AB1X$KE~~EL

1.

(30501.200]

(NVAX4000)

Evidence: Urgent action required - AB1X$KERNEL Hard error(s):

SYSTAT 9

&

1 - Page Marked Bad For Uncorrectable ECC Error In

Main Memory

*--.-._.*--*--*---*-*--*_.-.-_._-_.-....

_----* ...

_------_.*._*-.-.. -._--_._.-._.

" SDDSPROFILE is defined to be

*_ ••••• ___

* •••• _ •••

*.****. ___

._.** ______

*

SIC!.

134

M @(

$

0 O-t 0

M

@ 034N-2U-,2

7

AS24U)3S\@(

&0\

@ !P

M

!\F» -

M (H

M-A(

to

0-

\\

( ' I , U P

IS

SIX

-yp ---

\A

I RO R.P

\ @

G!: :G+Y*S

[email protected] 0

\\31!03

!P

@

-« o

'@[email protected] '

F 6

ICA-O

(PO

M

[email protected] end

(S+<]P

,12

P P

\

?YfP (%

S

,13

5.2.9.2 V AXslmPLUS

Installation

Tips

When installing VAXsimPLUS s the system will prompt you for infonnation.

You will need to know the serial number and system model number for the system on which you are installing VAXsimPLUS. The serial number is located on the front of the chassis at the bottom and to the left (the front door must be open). The system model number is attached to the outside of the door.

Also, if the· system does not have dialout capability, you should answer no when asked if you want to enable SICL-if you enter yes, the system will attempt to send mail via DSNLink resulting in error messages.

After VAXsimPLUS is installed you can activate SICL and customize the VAXsimPLUS mailing lists so that SlCL messages are sent to an

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics &-37

appropriate destination(s) on site~,

This way, SICL messages are received onsite without incurring error messages regarding remote link failures .

. 5.2.9.3 V AXslmPLUS Post-Installation Tips

Once VAXsimPLUS is installed, you can set up mailing lists to direct

VAXsimPLUS messages to the appropriate destinations. If the system has no dailout capability, SICL messages should be directed to the System and

lor

Field account-this is good practice for systems with dialout and service center support as well.

In the example that follows, the four types of mailing lists are displayed and System and Field accounts are added to all four mailing lists using

VAXSIMIFAULT_MANAGER commands.

NOTE:

The commands can be abbreviated.

DSN%SICL

appears under the

SICL

mailing list if

SICL

during installation.

5-38

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

$

VAXSIK/FAOL'l' SHOW MAIL

-- FSE mailing list --

FIELD

COSTOMER mailing list --

SYSTEM

-- MONITOR mailing list is empty --

SICL mailing list --

DSN%SICL

$

VAXSIM/FAUL'l' ADD SYS'l'EK ALL

$ VAXSIM/FAUL'l' ADD FIELD ALL

$

VAXSIM/FAtJL'l' SHOW MAIL

-- FSE mailing list --

FIELD

SYSTEM

CUSTOMER mailing list --

FIELD

SYSTEM

-- MONITOR mailing list --

FIELD

SYSTEM

SICL mailing list --

DSN%SICL

FIELD

SYSTEM

To activate SICL after installation, use the following command:

$ VAXSIMlFALlLT SET SICL ON

VAXsimPLUS customer notification messages should display a phone number for the customer to call in the event the system needs service. Use the following commands to examine and set the phone number parameter:

$ VAXSIM/FAtJLT SHOW PARAMETER

(SET parameter) (Parameter settings)

PHONE_NUMBER Customer Service Phone Number is unknown

COPY Automatic copying is OFF

SICL System Initiated Call Logging

is

ON

SYSTEM_INFO System info for AB1X

Serial n~~Der K-~136H1520

System type VAX 4000-600

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-39

$ VAXSIH/FAOLT SET PHONE l-aoO-DIGITAL

Finally, the VAXSIMPLUSIMERGE command is useful in examining how a device is functioning in a cluster. The merge command collects the messages that are being sent to the other CPU s in the cluster.

5.2.10 Repair Data for Returning FRUs

When sending back an FRU for repair, include as much of the error log information as possible. If one or more error flags are set in a particular entry, record the mnemonic(s) of the register(s), the hex data, and error flag translation(s) on the repair tag. If

an

error address is valid, include the mnemonic, hex data, and translation on the repair tag

as

well. For memory and cache errors, include the syndrome and corrected-bitlbitin-error information, along with the register mnemonic and hex data.

Other registers which should be recorded for any entry type are SYSTAT,

MEMCON and FOOTPRINT.

5.3 Interpreting Power-On Self Test (POST) and

ROM-Based Diagnostic (RBD) Failures

If any of the tests fail, the test code displays on the console LED and, if specified in the firmware script, a diagnostic console printout displays in the format shown in Example 5-11.

5-40

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 5-11: Sample Output with Errors

8888 " 0 .

?40 2 06 FF 0000 0010 00 ; SUBTEST_40_06,

Pi-OOOOOOOl P2-00000004 P3-FFFFFFFF P4-00000000 P5-00000004

P6-00010000 P7-00000004

PS~OOOOOOOO

P9-00000000 P10-00000000 rO a

01FF4000 rl-00000004 r2-00000003 r3=FFFFFFFF r4-00000070 rS-OOOOOOOO r6-0nOOOooo r7-00000000 rS-OOOOOOOO EPC-OOOOOOOO

SCBB-20053COO

SCR-OOOODOOO

QBHBR=OlFF8000

TODR-9FEBF5E9

DSER-OOOOOOOO

ECR-0000008A

QBtAR-OOOOOOO:

BDR-B9F80SAF SSCCR

3

00D55570

DEAR-OOOOOOOO

IPCRO-OOOO

CESR-OOOOOOOO CMCDSR-OOOOC308 CSEAR1-OOOOOOOO CSEAR2 a

OOOOOOOO

CIOEARl-OOOOOOOO

PCSTS-FFFFFSOO

CI0£AR2-10000000 CNEAR-OOOOOOOO

PCADR-FFFFFFF8 PCCTLEFFFFFEOO

MAPEN-OOOOOOOO

ICSR-OOOOOOOl VMAR-000007EO VTAG-0004008D

CCTL-00000007 BCETSTS-OOOOOOOO BCETIDX-OOOOOOOO

BCEDSTS-00000700 BCEDIDX-00000008 CEFSTS-00000200

CEFADR-00000008 NESTS-OOOOOOOO NEOADR-E005C9ES

VDATA-AC31024E

BCETAG-OOOOOOOO

BCEDECC-oOOOOOOO

NEOCMD-SOOOFF04

NEICMD-OOOOOOOO NtDATHI-OOOOOOOO NtDATLO-OOOOOOOO MOAMR-OOOOOOOO

MMCDSRaOllllOCO MEAR-08406010 ADO-2101B040

MEHCON 0:7; 0-80000003, i-810000~

MESR-00080000

2-00000007, 3-00000007, 4-00000007, 5-00000007, 6-00000007, 7.00000007

Normal operat1on not poss1ble.

»>

Several lines are printed in the error display. The first line has eight column headings:

• Test

identifies the diagnostic test, test 140 in Example

5-11.

Using

Table 5-9, you can use the test number to point to possible problems in field replaceable units (FRU s).

• Severity

is the severity level of a test failure,

as

dictated by the script..

Failure of a severity level 2 test causes the display of this error printout and halts an autoboot.

An error of severity level

1 causes a display of the first line of the error printout but does not interrupt an autoboot.

Most tests have a severity level of

2.

• Error

is two hex digits identifying, usually within

10 instructions, where in the diagnostic the error occurred. This field is also called the subtestlog. e

De_error

(diagnostic executive error) signals the diagnostic's state and any illegal behavior. This field indicates a condition that the diagnostic expects on detecting a failure. FE or EF in this field means that an unexpected exception or interrupt was detected. FF indicates an error as a result of normal testing, such as a miscompare. The possible codes are:

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-41

FF

FE

FD

Fe

FB

FA

EF

Error Code Description·' .

Normal error exit from diagnostic

Unanticipated interrupt

Interrupt in cleanup routine

Interrupt in interrupt handler

Script requirements not met

No such diagnostic

Unanticipated exception in executive

• vector

identifies the SCB vector through which the unexpected exception or interrupt trapped, when the de_error field detects an unexpected exception or interrupt (FE or EF).

• Count

is four hex digits. It shows the number of previous errors that have occurred (16 in

Example 5-11).

• Loop_8ubtest_log

is an additional log generated out of the current test specified by the current test number and subtestlog. Usually these logs occur in common subroutines called from a diagnostic test. e

ASCII messages contain unique symbols that are terminated by the comma in the ASCII field. These symbols identify the most recent subtestlog entry in the listing file. The characters

to

the right of the comma give the name of the listing file that contains the failed diagnostic.

Lines 2 and 3 of the error printout are parameters 1 through 10. When the diagnostics are running normally, these parameters are the same parameters listed in Example

4-4.

When an unexpected machine check exception or other type of exception occurs during the executive (de_error is EF), the stack is saved in the parameters on lines 2 and 3, as listed in Table

5-6,

Table 5-7, and

Table 5-8.

Table

5-6:

Machine Check exception During Executive

Parameter Value

PI

P2

Contents of stack pointer, points to vector in P2

Vector

=

004, machine check

5-42 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Table

5-6

(cant.): Machine Check Exception During executive

Parameter Value

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

PlO

Machine check code

Contents of

VA register

Contents of VIBA register

ICes register bit <6> and SISR <15:0>

Internal state information

Contents of shift. count (SC) register

PC

PSL

Table 5-7: Exception During Executive with No Parameters

Parameter Value

PI

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

PlO

Contents of stack pointer, points to vector in P2

Vector::: nnn (000-3FC). 200-3FC ::: Q-bus

PC

PSL

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Table 5-8: Other Exceptions with Parameters, No Machine Check

Parameter Value

PI

P2

Fa

P4

P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

PIO

Contents of~..ack pointer, points to vector in

P2

Vector

= lUlI1

(20, 24, 34, 40, 44, 48, 4C,

CB)

Optional paramete~ could be more than one LW (20, 24,

CB)

PC

PSL

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Contents of stack

Lines

4 and 5 of the error printout are General Purpose Registers (GPRs)

RO through R8 and the error program counter.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-43

In general, the machine check exeeptions can provide a clue to the cause of the problem. Machine check codes 01-05, 08-10, 13, OA, OB, OC, and

OD are probably due to CPU fault. Machine check codes 11 and 12 could be a memory problem or

a

CPU problem.

In

the case of exceptions with or without parameters (Table 5-7 and Table

5-8) the vector can provide a clue to the fault.

When returning a module for repair, record the first line of the error printout and the version of the ROMs on the module repair tag.

Table 5-9 lists the hex LED display, the default action on errors, and the most likely unit that needs replacing.

The Default on Error column refers to the action taken by the diagnostic executive under the following circumstances:

• The diagnostic executive detects

an

unexpected exception or interrupt.

• A test fails and that failure is reported to the diagnostic executive.

The Default on Error column does not refer to the action taken by the memory tests. The diagnostic executive either halts the script or continues execution at the next

test

in the script.

Most memory tests have a continue on error parameter Oabeled cont_ on_error). If you explicitly set cont_on_error, using parameter 4 in a memory test, the test marks bad pages in the bitmap and continues without notifying the diagnostic executive of the error.

In

this case, a halt on error does not occur even if you specify halt on error in the diagnostic executive (by answering Yes to

Stop script on error'? in Utility 9F), since the memory test does not notify the diagnostic executive that an error has occurred.

Table 5-9 shows the various LED values and console terminal displays as they point to problems in field-replaceable units (FRU s).

5-44

KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

63

62

61

60

59

58

57

56

55

54

53

52

51

50

49

48

47

46

45

None

None

None

66

65

64

44

43

9

8

8

B

B

B

F

E

D

C

B

B

9

B

6

7

9

9

9

7

C

B

8

8

Table 5-9: KA675/KA680/KA690 Console

~isplays

As Pointers to

FRUs

OnEr-

Normal Default Ac-

On

Error rorHex: Console tion on Er- Console Dis-

LED Display ror play Test Description

FROl

Power-Up Tests (Script AI)

C

C

?oo

?D2

?DF

?DC

?31

?30

?46

?35

?DE

?DD

?DA

154

160

?91

190

?C6

?52

?52

153

None

None

None

?9D

?42

?35

?33

?32

Loop

Loop

Loop

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Halt

Cont

Halt

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cant

Cont

Cont

Power up

Wait for power

Utility

Check for interrupts

B_Cache diag..mode

NMC_powerop

NMC_registers

V _Cache_diag..mode

O~bit_Dia&..mode

O-bit_debug

No_memory _present

Memory _setup_CSRs

Memory _InitJ3itmap

P _cache_diag..mode

B_cache_diag..mode

B_CaChe_tag..debug

B_Cache_data_debug

PB...Fl~cache

VirtuaLMode

SSC_Console_SLU

CQBIC_powerup

CQBIC_registers

SSC-POwerup

SSC_Prog..timers

SSC_Prog..timers

SSC_TOY _Clock

5.1

5.1

1

1.4

1

1

1.2

1

1

1

1,2.3

1.2.3

2.1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1.6

1.4.3

1,4.3

1,6 i

1

7,1

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1

=

KA6751KA6801KA690

2

3

=

MS690

=

Backplane

4

5

=

Q22~us device

=

System power supply

6

=

H3604 console module

7

=

Battery

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-45

Table 5-9 (COnt.):

KA67SIKA6801KA690

Console Displays

Pointers to FRUs

OnEr· Normal DefaultAc- On Error ror Hex Console tion on ErConsole Dis-

LED Display ror play Test Description

As

FRtJ1

Power-Up Tests (Script Al)

8

8

9

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

C

C

C

8

9

C

7

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cent

Cont

Cont

25

24

23

22

21

20

19

18

17

16

15

38

37

36

35

34

42

41

40

39

33

32

31

30

29

28

1:1

26

?4A

14C

13F

13F

148

148

148

?Cl

?84

?C5

?55

?49

?4F

?4E

?4B

148

148

148

?48

148

?48

140

?47

140

?4O

?31

?C2

?8O

SSC_RAMJ)ata

SSC_ROM

SSC_registers

IntervaLTimer

Memory..FJ)M

Memory_Data

Memory_Byte

Memory _Byte..Errors

MemoryJ:CC_SBEs

MemoryJ:CC_Logic

Mem...FD~address_shorts

Mem...FD~address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory_address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory_address_shorts

Memory _address_shorts

Memory_Adress

Memory_Refresh

Memory _count-P8ges

Memory_count_pages

Cache_W _memory

SSC_RAM..Data..Addr

CQBIC.-memory

1

1

1

1

1

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

1,2

1

1,2

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1 = KA6751KA68OIKA690

2 =MS690

3 = Backplane

4 = Q22-bus device

5 = System power supply

6 = H3604 console module

7 = Battery

5-46

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA6801KA690 COnsole Displays As

Pointers to FRUs

On ErNormal Default AcOn Error ror Hex Console tion on

LED

Display ror

ErConsole Display Test Description FRtJ1

Power-Up

Tests

(Script

AI)

9

A

4

5

5

8

7

7

7

7

B

C

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

Cant

Cont

Cant

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cont

Cant

Cont

?83

?84

185

?86

?DB

?41

?37

?51

?5F

?5C

?5C

?9A

Cache_w_memory

FPA

SGEe

BHAC (Bus 1)

BHAC (Bus 0)

INTERACTION

QZAJoopbackl

QZAJoopback2

QZAJIlemory

QZAJ)MA

Speed.

Board_Reset

1.2

1

1.6

1.3

4

4

1.6

1,6

4

4

1

1.4

Script AS

C

B

9

8

8

B

B

B

8

8

8

B

9D

42

35

33

32

DO

D2

DF

DC

31

30

46

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt.

Halt

Halt

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1

=

KA6751KA6801KA690

2=MS690

3 = Backplane

4=

Q22-bus device

5

=

System power supply

6

7

=

H3604 console module

=

Battery

19D

?42

?35

?33

?32

?oo

?D2

?DF

?DC

131

?30

?46

Utility

~rorJnterrupts

B_Cache_di~mode

NMC_powerop

NMC_registers

V

_Cache_di~mode

O-bit_DiagJnode

O_bit_debug

NO,Jnemory -presnt

MemuQ _5et"llp_CSRs

Memory _lnit-Bitmap p

_cache_di~mode

1

1.4

1

1

1.2

1

1

1

1,2,3

2,1

1

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-47

" Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA680IKA690 Console Displays

Pointers to

FRUs

OnErNormal Default Ac-"Ou Error rorHex Console tion on Er- Console Dis-

LED Display ror play Test Description

As

FRtJ1

Script AS

6

7

7

C

C

9

9

9

9

B

B

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

C

C

C

C

C

8

8

8

8

8

C1

34

C5

55

49

4F

4E o4B

4A

4C

3F

SF

48

48

48

48

91

90

C6

52

52

53

35

DE

DD

DA

54

60

?35

?DE

?DD

?DA

?54

?60

191

?90

?C6

?52

?52

?53

?C1

?34

?C5

?55

149

?4F'

?4E

?4B

?o4A

?4C

?SF

?3F

?48

148

?48

148

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

B_cache_di~mode

B_Cache_tag".debug

B_Cbace_data_debug

PB....Flush_cache

VutuaLMode

SSC_Console_SLU

CQBIC_powerup

CQBIC_registers

SSC-POwerup

SSC..ProLtimers

SSC...ProLtimers

SSC_TOY_Clock

SSC_RAMJ)ata sse_ROM

SSC..registers

IntervaCTimer

MemoryJ'DM

MemoryJ)ata

Memory~yte

Memory~yte..Errors

Memory..BCC_SBEs

Memory ..BCC_Logic

MemoryYDM".Addr_shorts

Memory_FDM...Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory ...Addr_shorts

Memory ...Addr_shorts

1

1

1

1

1

1,6

1,4,3

1,4,3

1,6

1

1

7,1

1

1

1

1

2,1,3

2,1, S

2,1, S

2.1. S

2.1, S

2,1. S

2,1, S

2,1, S

2,1, S

2,1. S

2,1, S

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1

=

KA6751KA68OIKA69O

2

S

=

MS690

=

Backplane

=

Q22-bus device 4

5

=

System power supply

6

=

H3604 console module

7

=

Battery

5-48 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA680IKA690 Console Displays As

Painters to FRUs

OnErNormal Default AcOn Error rorHex Console tion on Er- Console Dis-

LED Display ror play

Test Description FRlJl

ScriptA3

7

7

7

4

5

5

8

7

B

C

C

7

9

A

8

8

8

8

8

8

9

8

8

8

80

37

51

5F

5C

5C

9A

83

84-

85

86

DB

41

47

40

40

37

C2

48

48

48

48

48

4D

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

?4O

?37

1C2

180

137

151

15F

?5C

15C

?48

?48

148

?48

148

?4D

?47

?4O

?SA

183

?84-

?85

?86

?DB

?41

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory_Address

Memory_Refresh

Memory _count-pages

Memory _count-pages

Cacbe_W _memory

SSC_RAMJ)ata_Addr

CQBIC_memory

Cache_ w_memory

FPA

SGEC

SHAC

SHAC

INTERACl'ION

QZA..LPBCKI

QZAJ,.PBCK2

QZA..memory

QZA_DMA

Speed

Board_Reset

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2, I, 3

2,1,3

2,1,3

1,2

1

1,2

1,2

1

1,6

4

4

4

1,3

1,6

1,2,3,4

4

1

1,4

ScriptA4

1

Field.replaceable unit key:

1 = KA6751KA6801KA690

2=MS690

3 = Backplane

4 = Q22-bus device

5 = System power supply

6 = H3604 console module

7 = Battery

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-49

Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA680IKA690 Console Displays

As

Pointers to FRUs

On ErNormal DefaultAc- On Error ror Hex Console tion on Er- Console Dis-

LED Display ror play Test Description

FRtJ1

ScriptA4

Invoke script A3 (Loop on A3)

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

ScriptA5

SF

3F

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

Cont

Cont

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

?3F

?3F

?48

?48

?48

?48

?48

?48

?48

?48

MemJ'DM..Addr_Shorts

MemYDM....Addr_Shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

MemoIY..Addr_shorts

MemolY_Addr_shorts

MemolY _Addr_shorts

Memoty..Addr_shorts

Memoty_Addr_shorts

Memoty_Addr_shorts

Memoty_Addr_shorts

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2,

1,3

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

ScriptA6

30

4F

4E

4D

4C

4B

4A

3F

48

48

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1

= KA6751KA6801KA690

2 =MS690

3

=

Backplane

4

5

6

7

=

Q22-bus device

=

System power supply

=

H3604 console module

=

Battery

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

130

14F

?4E

?4D

?4C

?4B

?4A

?3F

?48

?48

MemoryJnit..Bitmap

Memory J)ata

Memory..Byte

Memory..Address

Memozy J;CC_Logic

Memory _Byte..,Errors

Memory_ECC_SBEs

MemJ'DM..,Addr_Shorts

Mem...Addr_Shorts

Mem-Addr_Shorts

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2, 1, 3

2,1,3

5-50 KA67SIKA680lKA690 CPU

System Maintenance

Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA680IKA690 COnsole Displays As

Pointers to FRUs

OnErNormal Default AcOn Error rorHex Console tion on

LED

Display ror

Er-

Console Display Test Description FRUl

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

ScriptA6

48

48

48

48

48

48

47

40

80

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

148

148

148

148

148

148

147

140

180

Mem_Addr_Shorts

Mem_Addr_Shorts

MeIILAddr_Shorts

Mem_Addr_Shorts

Mem_Addr_Shorts

Mem.-Addr_Shorts

Memory_Refresh

Memory _count-pages

CQBIC_memory

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

Script AS

8 31

8

8

30

49

Invoke script A 7.

Halt

Halt

Halt

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

ScriptA7

4F

4E

4D

4C

4B

4A

3F

48

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt.

Halt

Halt

Halt

IField-replaceable unit key:

1 = KA6751KA6801KA690

2=MS690

3 = Backplane

4 = Q22-bus device

5 = System power supply

6 = H3604 console module

7 = Battery

131

130

149

14F

?4E

14D

?4C

?4B

14A

?3F

?48

Memory_Setup_CSRs

Memory_InitJUtmap

Memory_FDM

Memory_Data

Memory_Byte

Memory_Address

MemoryJ:CC_Logic

Memory

_B".-..e..Errors

Memory _ECC_SBEs

Mem..FD~ddr_shorts

Memo!y _Addr_

~norts

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2.1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2~

1.3

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-51

Table 5-9 (Cont.): KA675/KA6801KA690 Console Displays As

Pointers to FRUs

OnEr-

Normal Default Ac- On Error rorHex Console tion on Er- Console Dis-

LED Display ror play Test Description FRtJ1

ScriptA7

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

C

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

47

40

80

41

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Cent

Cent

Halt

148

?48

?48

148

148

148

148

147

?40

?80

?41

Memory .-A,ddr_shorts

Memory .-A,ddr_shorts

Memory_Addr_shorts

Memory_Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory_Addr_shorts

Memory _Addr_shorts

Memory_Refresh

Memory _count-pages

CQBIC_memory

Boarc:l.Reset

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2,

1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2, 1,3

ScriptA9

8

8

8

8

8

4F

4E

4D

8

4A

Invoke script A5.

8

8

8

4C

4B

4D

47

40

C 41

End of script.

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Halt

Cent

Cont

1

Field-replaceable unit key:

1 = KA675iKA6801KA690

2=MS690

3 = Backplane

4 = Q22-bus device

5 = System power supply

6 = H3604 console module

7 = Battery

?4F

?4E

?4D

?4C

?4B

?4A

141)

?47

?40

?41

MemoryJ)ata

Memory~yte

Memory.-A,ddress

MemoryJCC_Logic

Memory..Byte-Errors

MemoryJCC_SBEs

Memory~ddress

Memory_Refresh

Memory _count..JNlges

Board_Reset

2, 1,3

2,

1,3

2,

1,3

2, 1,3

2, 1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

2,

1,3

2,1,3

2,1,3

5-52 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

5.3.1 FE Utility

In addition to the diagnostic console display

and'

the LED code, the FE utility dumps diagnostic state to the console (Example 5-12). This state indicates the major and minor test code of the test that failed, the 10 parameters associated with the test, and the hardware error summary register.

Running the FE utility is useful if the message

Normal operation not possible is displayed after the tests have completed and there is no other error indication, or if you need more information than what is provided in the error display. -

Example 5-12: FE Utility Example

»>'r

!"E

Bi~map-07FECOOO, Lenqch-00008000, Checksum-OOOO, Busmap-07FF8000

Tes~ number-OO, Subtest-OO, Loop Subtest-OO, Error type-OO

Error vector-OOOO. Severity-02. Last excep~ion

PC-OOOOOOOO

Total-error coun~-OOOO,

Led display-Og, Console display-9E, save mchk code-OO parameter 1=00000000 2-00000000 3-00000000 4=00000000 5-00000000parame~er-6-00000000

7-0001E9FC 8&0001£££5 9-0001£C72 10-00000000 previous error-OOOOOOOO, 00000000, 00000000, 00000000

Flags-FFFF COSO 443£ BCache_Disable-06 KA680, 128KB BC, 14.0 ns

Return_stack-201406A8, Subtest-pc-200SB22S, Timeout-00030D40

Interrupted test number - 48, Subtest1og-04, Loop_Subtestlog-OO, Error_type-FF

»>

The most useful fields displayed above are as follows:

• Error_vector, which is the SCB vector tbro1lgh which the unexpected intenupt or exception trapped if de_error equals FE or EF.

• Total_error_count. Four hex digits showing the number of previous ' errors that have occurred.

• Parameters 1 t.ltrough 10. Valid only if the test halts on e!"!'Or.

• Previous_error. Contains the history of the last four errors. Each long-word contains four bytes of h&formation. From left to right these are the de_error, subtest_log, test, and subtest number (OO=FF in the de_error).

• Save machine check code (save_mchk_code). Valid only if the test halts on error. This field has the same format as the hardware error summary register.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-53

5.3.2

Overriding Halt Protection

The ROM-based diagnostics ron in halt-protected space. When you want to halt diagnostic execution, if the diagnostic program hangs during execution or if the runtime of the diagnostic program is so long you want to suspend it, enter the following commands:

»>E 20140010 !Examine the SSCCR

P 20140010 00055570

»>D

*

00D05570

»>T 0

!Clear halt-protected space

!Tests can now be halted

This state is in effect only until the first break or a restart.

5.3.3

Isolating Memory Failures

This section describes procedures for isolating memory subsystem failures, particularly when the system contains more than one MS690 memory module.

1.

SHOW MEMORYIFULL

Use the SHOW MEMORYIFULL command to examine failures detected by the memory tests. Use this command test 40 fails, which indicates that pages have been marked bad in the bitmap.

You can also use SHOW MEMORYIFULL after terminating a script tha't is taking an unusually long time to run. After terminating the script, enter SHOW MEMORYIFULL to see if the tests have marked any pages bad up to that point. The following is an example using this command.

»>SHOW MEMORY/FOLL

Memory 0: 00000000 to 01FFFFFF, 32MB, 37 bad pages

Total of 32MB, 37 bad pages, 112 reserved pages

Memory Bitmap

-01FF2000 to 01FF3FFF, 16 pages

Console Scratch Area

-01FF4000 to 01FF7FFF, 32 pages

Qbus Map

-01FF8000 to 01FFFFFF, 64 pages

5-54 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Scan of Bad Pages

-OOOOCOOO to OOOOCFFF, 8 pages

-OOOOEOOO to OOOOEFFF, 8 pages

-00724200 to 007247FF, 3 pages

-00724AOO to 007251FF, 4 pages

-00725400 to 00725BFF, 4 pages

-00726400 to 00726DFF, 5 pages

-00727400 to 00727DFF, 5 pages

»>

2. T A9

»>T (mamoxy test) starting board number ending board number adr_incr - -

Script A9 runs only the memory tests and halts on the first error detected. Unlike the power-up script, it does not continue. Since the script does not rerun the test, it detects memory-related failures that are not hard errors. You should then run the individual test that failed on each memory module one MS690 module at a time. You can input parameters

1 and

2 of tests 40, 47, 48, and 4A through 4F as the starting and ending address for testing. It is easier, however, to input the memory module numbers 1-4. For example, if test 4F fails, test the second memory module as follows:

»>'1' 4F 2 2

You should run this test for each memory module; if on·

MS690 number 2, for example, and there are four memory modules in the system, continue testing the rest of the modules to isolate the

FRU using the process of elimination.

You can also specify the address increment. For example, to test the third memory module on each page boundary, type:

»>T 4F 3 3 200

By default, the memory tests increment by 1 Mbyte, testing one longword in each

1

Mbyte block. If an error is detected, the tests st~"'t testing on a page boundary. Test 48 (address shorts test) is an exception: it checks every location in memory since it can do so in a reasonable amount of time. Other tests, such as 4F (floating ones and zeros test), can take up to one hour, depending on the amount of memory, if each location were to be tested. If you do specify an address increment, do not input less than 200 (testing on a page boundary), since almost all hard memory failures span at least one page. For normal servicing, do not specify the address increment, since it adds unnecessary repair time; most memory subsystem failures can be found using the default nQ'PQTno+o,,"

1:' ................ """"" ...

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-55

All memory tests, except for 40, save the MMCDSR, MESR, MEAR in parameters 7, 8, and 9, respectively.

3. T 9C

The utility 9C is useful if test 31 or some other memory test failed because memory was not configured correctly. Refer

to

Section 4.4 to see an example of the test 9C output.

To help in isolating an FRU, examine registers MEMCON 0-7 by entering T 9C at the console I/O mode prompt.

4. T40

Although the SHOW MEMORYIFULL command displays pages that are marked bad by the memory test and is easier to interpret than test 40, there is one instance in which test 40 reports information that

SHOW MEMORYIFULL does not report. You can use test 40 as an alternative to running script A9 to detect soft memory errors. Specify the third parameter in test 40 (see Table 5-9) to be the threshold for soft errors. To allow zero errors, enter the following:

»>T 40 1 4 0

This command tests the memory on four memory modules. Use it after running memoty tests individually or within a script. If test 40 fails with subtestlog been detected.

=

6, examine R5-RS to determine how many errors have

.

Additional Troubleshooting SUggestions

If more than one memory module is failing, the CPU module, or backplane, as well as other MS690 modules may be the cause of failure.

Always check the seating of the module before replacing it. If the seating appears to be improper, rerun the tests.

If you are rotating MS690 modules to verify that a particular memory module is causing the failure, be aware that a module may fail in a different way when in a different slot. Be sure that you map out both solid singlebit and multibit ECC failures as shown in step 2 of acceptance testing

(Section 4.4), since in one slot a board may fail most frequently with multibit

ECC failures, and in another slot with single-bit ECC failures.

Be sure to put the modules back in their original positions when you are finished. .

If memory errors are found in the operating system error log, use the CPU

ROM-based diagnostics to verify if it is related

5-56 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

to the CPU or backplane. Follow steps 1-3 of Section 4.4 and step 4 above to aid in isolating the failure.

5.4 Testing DSSI Storage Devices

A DSSI storage device (ISE) may fail either during initial power-up or during normal operation. In both cases, the failure is indicated by the lighting of the red Fault indicator on the drive's front panel.

If the drive is unable to execute the Power-On Self Test (POST) successfully, the red Fault indicator remains lit and the RunlReady indicator does not come on, or both indicators remain on.

POST is also used to handle two types of error conditions in the drive:

Controller errors are caused by the hardware associated with the controller function of the drive module. A controller error is fatal to the operation of the drive, since the controller cannot establish a logical connection to the host. The red Fault indicator lights. If this occurs, replace the drive module.

• Drive errors are caused by the hardware associated with the drive control function of the drive module. These errors are not fatal to the drive, since the drive can establish a logical connection and report the error to the host. Both indicators go out for about 1 second, then the red Fault indicator lights. In this case, run either DRVTST, DRVEXR, or PARAMS (described in drive's service documentation) to determine the error code.

Three configuration errors also commonly occur:

• More than one node with the same bus node ID number

• Identical node names

~

Identical

~'ffSCP urJ.t numbers

The first error cannot be detected by software. Use the SHOW DSSI command to display the second and third types of errors. This command lists each device connected to the DSSI bus by node name and unit number. the ISE is connected to

~ts front panel, you must install a bus node ID plug in the corresponding

SOCKet on the front panel. If the ISE is not connected to its front panel, it reads the bus node ID from the three-switch DIP switch on the side of the drive. DSSI storage devices contain the following local programs:

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-57

DIRECT

DRVTST

DRVEXR

HISTRY

ERASE

VERIFY

DKUTIL

PARAMS

A directory, in DUP specified format, of available local programs

A comprehensive drive functionality verification test

A utility that exercises the ISE

A utility that saves information retained by the drive, including the internal elTOrlog

A utility that erases all user data from the disk

A utility that is used to determine the amount of "margin" remaining in ondisk structures.

A utility that displays disk structures and disk data.

A utility that allows you to look at or change drive status, history, parameters, and the internal error log

Use the SET HOSTIDUP command (described in Section 3.7.3.3) to access the local programs listed above. Example

5-13 provides an abbreviated example of running DRVTST for an ISE (Bus node

2 on Bus 0).

CAUTION:

=

When running internal drive tests, always use the default (0

No) in responding to the

-Write / read anywere on medium?- prompt.

Answering yes could destroy data.

Example 5-13: Running DRVTST

»>SZ'1'

IIOS'%/DOP/DSSI/BtJS:O 2 DRV'fS'f

S~arting oop server •••

Copyright (C) 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on medium? [l-Yes/ (O-No»)

!Returnl

5 minutes to complete.

GAMMA::MSCPSDUP 17-MAY-1991 12:51:20 ORVTST CPU0 00:00:09.29 PI-160

GAHMA::~~CPSOUP 17-MAY-1991 12:51:40 DRVTST cpo-

0 00:00:18.75 PI-332

GAMMA::MSCPSOUP 17-MAY-1991 12:52:00 ORVTST CPU0 00:00:28.40 PI-S03

GAHMA::MSCPSDUP 17-MAY-1991 12:55:42 ORVIS! CPU0 00:02:13.41 PI-2388

Test passed.

Stopping OUP server •.•

»>

Example 5-14 provides an abbreviated example of running DRVEXR for an

ISE (Bus node 2 on Bus 0).

CAUTION:

=

When running internal drive tests, always use the default (0

No) in responding to the «Write/read anywere on medium?" prompt.

Answering yes could destroy data.

5-58 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Example 5-14: Running DRVEXR

»>SE~ BOSf/DOP/DSSI/BUS:O 2 DRVEXR

Starting DUP server •••

Copyright eCl 1992 Digital Equipment Corporation

Write/read anywhere on medium? [1-Yes/(0-No)]

I~uml

Test time in minutes? [(10)-100]

I~uml

Number of sectors to transfer at a time? [0 - 50J 5

Compare after each transfer? [l-Yes/{O-NO)}:

IRswrnl

Test the DBN area? [2-DBN only/(l-DBN and LBN)/O-LBN only]:

10 minutes to complete.

Rerum

I

GAMMA::MSCPSDOP 17-MAY-1991 13:02:40 DRVEXR

CPU0 00:00 25.37 PI-liSS

GAMMA::MSCPSDOP 17-MAY-1991 13:03:00 DRVEXR CPU0 00:00 29.53 PI-2503

GAMMA::MSCPSDOP 17-MAY-1991 13:03:20 DRVEXR CPU0 00:00 33.89 PI-3835

GAHMA::MSCPSDUP 17-MAY-1991 13:12:24 DRVEXR CPU0 00:02:24.19 PI-40028

13332 operations completed.

33240

LBN blocks (512 bytes) read. o

LaN blocks (512 bytes) written.

33420 DBN blocks (512 bytes) read. o

CBN blocks (512 bytes) written. o bytes 1n error (soft). o uncorrectable tCC errors. complete.

Stopping CUP server •••

»>

Refer to the RF-Series Integrated Storage Element Service Guide for instructions on running these programs.

5,.5

USing MOP Ethernet Functions to Isolate

Failures

The console requester can receive LOOPED _DATA messages from the server by sending out a LOOP_DATA message using NCP to set this up.

An example follows.

Identify the Ethernet adapter address for the system under test (system 1) and attempt to boot over the network.

···system

1

(system under test)···

»>SBOW

E~

Ethernet Adapter

-£ZAO (OB-OO-2B-28-18-2C)

BDO

(BOOT/R5:2 EZAO)

2 ••

-£ZAO

Retrying network bootstrap.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-59

Unless the system is able to boot,

the

"Retrying network bootstrap" message will display every 8-12 minutes. - -..

Identify the system's Ethernet circuit and circuit state, enter the SHOW

KNOWN CIRCUITS command from the system conducting the test (system

2).

***system 2 (system conducting test)***

S ICCR. !fCP

. NCP>SBOW

Dam aRCOJ:~S

Known Circuit Volatile Summary as of l4-NOV-1991 16:01:53

Circuit State Loopback

Name

Adjacent

Routing Node

ISA-O on

2S .1023

(LAR2S)

NCP>S~ c:IllCU%~ %SA-O SEltV%CE EDBLED

NCP>SE'r cnC07~

%SA-O S'lATE OR

NCP>LOOP CIRCO%~ %SA-O PBDXCAL ADDRESS OS-00-2B-2S-1S-2C wrl'iI UltOES

%SA-O OFF

NCP>EXt'l

S

H the loopback message was received successfully, the NCP prompt will reappear with no messages.

The following two examples show how to perform the Loopback. Assist

Function using another node on the network as an assistant (system 3) and the system under test as the destination. Both assistant and system under test are attempting to boot from the network. We will also need the physical address of the assistant node.

***system .3 (loopback assistant)***

»>SBOIf~

Ethernet Adapter

-EZAO (08-00-28-1E-76-9E)

»>b ezaO

(BOOT/R5:2 EZAO)

2 ••

-EZAO

Retrying network bootstrap.

***system 2***

NCP>LOOl' cacor:

%SA-O PBD%aL ADDRESS OS-oo-2b-28-18-2C ASS%STAIIr.l' PJlYS%CAL

ADDIlESS 08-00-2&-11:-76-9& 1f%D MDCED ccmrr

20

LEHG'tII

200 JIZIolI I'ULL

NCP>

Instead of using the physical address, you could use the assistant node's area address. When using the area address, system 3 is running VMS.

_··system 3···

SJICll !lCP

NCP>SBOW ROOZ ~

5-60 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Node Volatile Summary as of 2i-FEB-1992 21:04:11

Executor node - 25.900 (KLATCH)

State

Ident ificat ion

Active links

- on

- DECnet-VAX V5.4-1,

VMS

V5.4-2 s

2

NCP>SBOW

Dam

LIliES ~S'UCS

Known Line Volatile Characteristics as of 2i-FEB-1992 11:20:50

Line - ISA-O

Receive buffers

Controller

Protocol

Service timer

Hardware address

Device buffer size

- 6

- normal

• Ethernet

- 4000

- 08-00-28-1E-76-9£

- 1498

NCP>Sft CIR.CtJrr lSA-O SDD OFF

NCP>Sft

NCl?>Sft cncun lSA-O

SERnCE EDBLED cncun lSA-O SDD OIl

NCP>EXI'f

$

***system 2***

$

XCR. lIa

NCP>LOOP ClRCUX'f %SA-O PBYS%CAL ADDRESS wrm

KIXED cotJ!I'f

20 I.EH'G'fB 200 HELP FtJI.L

08-00-28-2S-1S-2C

ASS%~

NCl?>EXI'f

$

NOTE:

The kernel's Ethernet buffer is 1024 bytes deep for the LOOP

{unctions and will not support the maximum 1500-byte transfer length.

In order to verify that the address is reaching this node, a remote node can examjne the status of the periodic SYSTEM_IDs sent by the KA6751KA680

!KA690 Ethernet server. The SYSTEM_ID is sent every 8-l2 minutes using

NCP as in the following example:

$ MeR. lIa

NCP>Sft KCDOIoE

COJIF%(;URA~Jl

ClRC'Ol:'f lSA-O scavEILUtIICZ EDBt.J:D

NCP>SBOW JiODU'LE COHF%G1nlA%OJl DOiDi CDlCO'Z'fS S'fUlJS '1'0 CJIEa. LIS

NCP>EXI:T

$

'mE ftBEJI.. LIS

Circuit name

Surveillance flaq

Elapsed time

Physical address

Time of last report

Maintenance version

Function list

Hardware address

Device type

- ISA-O

- enabled

- 00:09:37

- 08-00-2B-28-18-2C

- 21-Feb 11:50:34

- V4.0.0

- Loop, Multi-block loader, Boot, Data link counters

- 08-00-2B-2S-1S-2C

-ISA

Depending on your network, the file used to receive the output from the

SHOW

MODULE

CONFIGURATOR command may contain many entries,

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-61

most of which do not apply to tbe"system you are testing. It is helpful to use an editor to search the file fot-the Ethernet hardware address of the system under test. Existence of the hardware address verifies that you are able to receive the address from the system under test.

5.6 Interpreting User Environmental Test Package

(UETP) VMS Failures

When UETP encounters an error, it reacts like a user program.

It

either returns an error message and continues, or it reports a fatal error and terminates the image or phase. In either case, UETP assumes the hardware is operating properly and it does not attempt to diagnose the error.

If the cause of an error is not readily apparent, use the following methods to diagnose the error:

• VMS En-or

Log Utility-Run

the Error Log Utility to obtain a detailed report of hardware and system errors. Error log reports provide information about the state of the hardware device and 110 request at the time of each error. For information about running the Error

Log

Utility, refer to the

VMS Error

Log

Utility Manual and Section 5.2 of this manual.

• Diagnostic facilities-Use the diagnostic facilities to test exhaustively a device or medium to isolate the source of the error.

5.6.1 Interpreting UETP Output

You can monitor the progress ofUETP tests at the terminal from which they were started. This terminal always displays status information, such as messages that announce the beginning and end of each phase and messages that signal an error.

The tests send other types of output to various log files, depending on how you started the tests. The log files contain output generated by the test procedures. Even if at the terminal, it is good practice to check these log files for errors.

Furthermore, when errors are displayed at the terminal, check the log files for more information about their origin and nature.

5.6.1.1 U ETP Log Files

UETP stores all information generated by all UETP tests and phases from its current run in one or more UETP.LOG files, and it stores the information from the previous run in one or more OLDUETP.LOG files. If a run of UETP involves multiple passes, there will be one UETP.LOG or one

OLDUETP.LOG file for each pass.

5-62 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

At the beginning of a run, UETP deletes all OLDUETP.LOG files, and renames any UETP.LOG files

to

OLDUETP.LOG~

Then UETP creates a new UETP.LOG file and stores the information from the current pass in the new file. Subsequent passes of UETP create higher versions of UETP.LOG.

Thus, at the end of a run of UETP that involves multiple passes, there is one UETP.LOG file for each pass. In producing the files UETP.LOG and

OLDUETP.LOG, UETP provides the output from the two most recent runs.

If the run involves multiple passes, UETP.LOG contains information from all the passes. However, only information from the latest run is stored in this file. Information from the previous run is stored in a file named

OLDUETP.LOG. Using these two files, UETP provides the output from its tests and phases from the two most recent runs.

The cluster test creates a NETSERVER.LOG file in SYS$TEST for each pass on each system included in the run. If the test is unable to report errors (for example, if the connection

to

another node is lost), the

NETSERVER.LOG file on that node contains the result of the test

run

on that node. UETP does not purge or delete NETSERVER.LOG files; therefore, you must delete them occasionally

to

recover disk space. log files. Ordinarily these log files are concatenated and placed within

UETP.LOG. You can use any log files that appear on the system disk for error checking, but you must delete these log files before you run any new tests. You may delete these log files yourself or rerun the entire

UETp,

which checks for old UETP.LOG files and deletes them.

5.6.1.2 Possible UETP Errors

This section is intended to help you identify problems you might encounter running UETP.

The following are the most common failures encountered while running

UETP:

• Wrong quotas, privileges, or account

• UETINITOI failure

• Ethernet device allocated or in use by another application

• Insufficient disk space

• Incorrect VAXcluster setup

• Problems during the load test

• DECnet-VAX. error

• Lack of default access for the FAL object

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-03

• Errors logged but not displayed

• No PCB or swap slots

• Hangs

• Bug checks and machine checks

For more information refer to the

VAX 3520, 3540 VMS Installation and

Operations (ZKS166) manual.

5.7 Using Loopback Tests to Isolate Failures

You can use external loopback tests to isolate problems with the console port, DSSI adapters (SHAC chips), Ethernet controller (SGEC chip), and many common Q-bus options.

If one or more of these tests fail, check that the DC power and pica fuses on the H3604 are OK. There are four pico fuses located on the back. ofH3604 console module. One fuse (F3) is on the outside, the other three are on the component side.

If fuse is bad, replace the fuse-not the B3604.

Table 5-10 lists symptoms associated with faulty fuses. Figure 5-10 shows the location of the H3604 fuses.

5-64 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU System

Maintenance

Table 5-10: H3604 Console Module

Fuses_" __

Fuse

Part Number

Symptom

F1 (+12 V, 112 A) 12~9159-00

Ethernet external loopback test 5F fails if the

Ethernet connector switch is set to

Thin

Wire.

F2

(-12

V, 1116

A)

90-09122-00

F3 (+5

V,

2

A)

12-10929-06

No console display

LEDs on both DSSI terminators (Bus 1) on the H3604 console module

Bus 0 is lit. are not lit; the DSSI terminator for

SHOW

DSSI or

SHOW

DEVICE commands show

DSSI bus 0, but console displays message indicating that

DSSI functioning. bus

1 terminators are missing or not

DSSI SHAC (Bus 1) test 5C fails (oountdown number

11).

F4 (+12

V.

1.5

A)

12-10929-08

The LED on the loopback connector (12-22196-02) for standard Ethernet is not lit.

External loopback test 5F for the standard Ethernet passes, however.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-65

Figure 5-10: H3604 Console Module Fuses

IIL __

J 1

=

TOY Clock Battery

J5

=

H3604 Power

J6

=

CPU Interface

W2

=

Remote

Boot

Enable

W4

=

FEPROM Write Enable

F1

=

ThinWire Ethernet Power,

0.5

A

PN = 12-09159-00

F2

=

-12V Power, 0.062 A

F3

F4

PN =

90-09122-00

= essl Terminator Power, 2.0 A

PN

=

Standard Ethernet Power, 1.5 A

PN

=

12-10929-06

= 12-10929-08

..

ML0-006351

5.7.1 Testing the Console Port

10 test the console port at power-up, set the Power-Up Mode switch on the H3604 console module to the Loop Back Test Mode position (bottom) and install an H3l03 loopback connector into the MMJ of the H3604. The

H3l03 connects the console port transmit and receive lines. At power-up, the SLU_EXT_LOOPBACK test then runs a continuous loopback test.

While the test is running, the LED display on the H3604 console module should alternate between 6 and 3. A value of 6 latched in the display indicates a test failure. If the test fails, one of the following parts is faulty: the KA6751KA6801KA690, the H3604, or the cabling.

To

test out to the end of the console terminal cable:

1. Plug the :MM:J end of the console terminal cable into the H3604.

2. Disconnect the other end of the cable from the terminal.

3. Place an H8572 adapter into the disconnected end of the cable.

4. Connect the H3l03 to the H8572.

5-66 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

5. Cycle power and observe the LED.

5.7.2 Embedded DSSI Loopback Testing

NOTE:

Loopback tests do not test for termination power. Use the following procedure to check termination power:

Remove the erternal DSS] cable and terminate Busses 0

and 1. Check the

terminator LEDs to see if termination power

is present.

• No termination power at Bus

0 indicates a possible problem with the internal cable

(PN 17-02502-01) that connects DSS] Bus 0 from the backplane.

• No termination power at Bus

1

indicates a possible problem with the

Pico fuse

(F3, PN

12-1092~6) on the H3604 console module or the

power harness module (PN 54-19789-01) for the console module. Refer to Table 5-10 for symptoms of bad fuses.)

Power for

DSS] Bus 0

is supplied by the Vterm regulator module, which

plugs into the BA440 backplane. There are no

fuses

on this

module.

Test 56 tests both SHAC chips (the DSSI adapters). This test can be used to check both SHAC chips, the internal DSSI (Bus 0) connectivity, external

DSSI cables, and the H3604 DSSI bus interconnect. Complete the following procedures before running test 56.

1. Make sure the system is powered down, then connect DSSI Bus 0 to

DSSI Bus 1 with a standard external DSSI cable (BC2IM-09). Place a

DSSI terminator on the remaining DSSI connector for Bus 1.

It is not critical which Bus 1 connector is used in connecting the cable.

NOTE:

The DSS] bus must be terminated for the tests to execute successfully.

2. Remove all DSSI bus node ID plugs from storage devices on Bus O.

3. Install bus node ID plugs on the console module (H3604) so that Bus 0 and Bus 1 do not have the same bus node ID. For example, assign bus node ill

6 to Bus 0 and bus node ID 7 to Bus 1.

4.

Power up the system. Note that the red Fault indicator on the ISE front panels will remain lit. This is normal when the bus node ID plugs have been removed.

5. Run test 56. When tests have successfully completed, the . cons ole prompt is displayed.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics

5-67

»>T 56

»>

This loopback test is useful for isolating DSSI problems. A list of FRUs in order of probability follows:

1. The external BC2IM-09 cable

2. The Vterm dual regulator module (PN 54-20404-01)

3. The internal cable that connects DSSI Bus 0 from the backplane to the edge of the enclosure (PN 17-02502-01)

4. The internal cable that connects the CPU to the H3604 (PN 17-02353-

01)

5. The 2.0 A Pico fuse (F3) on the H3604 (PN 12-10929-06)

6. The KA6751KA6801KA690 module

Test 58 is a SHAC and ISE reset and can be used to verify that ISEs can be accessed on the DSSI storage bus. Test 58 causes data packets to be passed between the ISEs and the adapters, verifying that the ISEs are accessible.

Enter T 58 and specify DSSI bus (0 or 1) and the DSSI node ID of the ISE to be tested.

»>T 58 0 S

In the example above, Bus 0 node 5 was tested. (Each ISE has to be tested separately.)

5.7.3 Embedded Ethernet Loopback Testing

NOTE:

Before running Ethernet loopback

tests,

check that the problem

is

not due to a missing terminator on a Thin Wire T-connector. Also, refer to

Table 5-10 to check for symptoms of a bad fuse.

Test

SF is the intemalloopback test for SGEC (Ethernet controller).

»>T SF

For an external SGEC loopback, enter "1".

»>T SF 1

Before running test 5F on the Thin Wire

Ethe~et port, connect an H8223

T-connector with two H8225 terminators.

Before running test 5F on the standard Ethernet port, you must have a

12-2219fHl2Ioopback connector installed.

5-68 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

System Maintenance

NOTE:

Make sure the Ethernet Connector Switch

is

set for the correct

Ethernet port.

T 59 polls other nodes on Ethernet to verify SGEC functionality. The

Ethernet cable must be connected to a functioning Ethernet. A series of

MOP messages are generated; look for response messages from other nodes.

»>T 59

Reply received from node: AA-OO-04-00-FC-64

Total responses: 1

Reply received from node: AA-OO-04-00-47-i6

Total responses: 2

Reply received from node: 08-00-2B-15-48-70

Total responses: 3

Reply received from node: AA-OO-04-00-17-14

Total responses: 25

»>

5.7.4 Q-Bus Option Loopback Testing

Module self-tests run when you power up the system. A module self-test can detect hard or repeatable errors, but usually not intermittent errors.

A pass by a module self-test "does not guarantee that the module is good, because the test usually checks only the controller logic.

Table

5-11 lists loopback connectors for common devices. Refer to the

Microsystems Options manual for a description of specific module self-tests.

System Troubleshooting and Diagnostics 5-69

Table 5-11:

Device

Loopback

Conn~tors

for Common Devices

Module Loopback Cable Loopback

CXAl61CXB16

CXY08

DIV32

DPVll

DRQB3

DRV1W

DZQl1

Ethernet

2

IBQOl

IEQll

KA61lll1H3604

KFQSA

KMVlA

KZQSA

LPVll

H3l03

+

H8572

1

H3046 (SO-pin)

H3072

12-15336-10

or

H325

70-24767~1

12-15336-10 or

H325

IBQ01-TA

17-01988-01

H3103

DSSI terminators

H3255

12--30552--01

12-15336-11

H3l97 (25-pin)

H329 (12-27351-{)1)

17~148l-{)1

(from port 1 to port2)

H329 (12-27351--01)

H3l03

+

H8572

H3251

1

Use the appropriate cable to collJleCt transmit-to-receive lines. H3l0 1 and Hal03 are doubleended cable connectors.

2For

Thin W'ue, use H8223-00 plus two H8225-00 terminators. For standard

Etherne~ use

12-22196--02.

5-70 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Chapter 6

FEPROM Firmware Update

KA6751KA6801KA690 firmware is located on four chips, each

128 K by 8 bits of FLASH programmable EPROMs, for a total of 512 Kbytes of ROM.

(A FLASH

EPROM (FEPROM) is a programmable read-only memory that uses electrical

(bulk) erasure rather than ultraviolet erasure.)

FEPROMs provide nonvolatile storage of the CPU power-up diagnostics, console interface, and operating system primary bootstrap

(VMB).

An advantage of this technology is that the entire image in the FEPROMs may be erased, reprogrammed, and verified in place without removing the

CPU module or replacing components.

A slight disadvantage to the FEPROM technology is that the entire part must be erased before reprogramming. Hence, there is a small "window of vulnerability" when the CPU has inoperable firmware. Normally, this window is less than 30 seconds. Nonetheless, an update should be allowed to execute undisturbed.

Firmware updates are provided through a package called the Firmware

Update Utility. A Firmware Update Utility contains a bootable image, which can be booted from tape or Ethernet, that performs the FEPROM update. Firmware update packages, like software, are distributed through

Digital's

SSB.

Service engineers are notified of updates through a service blitz or Engineering Change Order (ECO)lField Change Order (FCO) notification.

NOTE:

The NVAX CPU

chip has

an area called the Patchable Control Store

(peS); which can be used

to

update the microcode for the

CPU chip.

Updates to the PCS require a new version of the firmware.

A

Firmware Update Utility· image, consists of two parts, the update program and the new firmware, as shown in

Figure

6-1.

The update program uniformly programs, erases, reprograms, and verifies the entire

FEPROM.

FEPROM Rrmware Update 6-1

Figure 6-1: Firmware Update Utility Layout

Update Program

New Firmware Image

MLC>OO7271

Once the update has completed successfully, normal operation of the system may continue. The operator may then either halt or reset the system and reboot the operating system.

6.1 Preparing the Processor for an FEPROM Update

Complete the following steps to prepare the processor for an FEPROM update:

1. The system manager should perform. operating system shutdown.

2. Enter console mode by pressing the Halt button twice-in to halt the system, and out to enter console mode (»». If the Break Enable

!Disable switch on the console module is set to enable (indicated by

1), you can halt the system by pressing the

IBreak I

key on the console terminal.

3.

In

order to update the firmware, jumper W4 on the inside of the

H3604 console module must be in the "write enable mode," as shown in

Figure 6-2. (Write enable is the factory setting.)

To

access the jumper you must open the H3604 console module by unlocking the two half-tum screws that hold it closed.

6-2 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Figure 6-2: W4 Jumper Setting for Updating Flnnware

M~7697

6.2 Updating Firmware Via Ethernet

To update firmware via the

EL~ernet, the "client" system (the t$l1"get system to be updated) and the "server" system (the system that serves boot requests) must be on the same Ethernet segment. The Maintenance

Operation Protocol (MOP) is the transport used to copy the network image.

Use the following procedure to update firmware via the Ethernet: .-

1. Be sure H3604 jumper W4 is in the correct ("write enable mode") position (Section 6.1).

2. Enable the server system's NCP circuit using the following VMS commands:

$ MeR NCP

NCP>SET CIRCUIT <<::ireuit> STATE OFF

FEPROM

Rrmware Update

6-3

NCP>SET CIRCUIT <circuit>, SERVICE ENABLED

NCP>SET CIRCUIT <circuit~-STATE ON

Where <circuit> is the system Ethernet circuit. Use the SHOW

KNOWN CIRCUITS command to find the name of the circuit.

NOTE:

The SET CIRCUIT STATE OFF command will bring down the system

~

network.

3. Copy the file containing the updated code to the MOM$LOAD area on the server (this procedure may require system privileges). Refer to the Firmware Update Utility Release Notes for the Ethernet bootable filename. Use the following command to copy the file:

$

COPY <filename>.SYS lvIOM$LOAD:*.*

Where <filename> is the Ethernet bootable filename provided in the release notes.

4. On the client system, enter the command BOOT/100 EZ at the console prompt (»».

The system then prompts you for the name of the file.

NOTE: Do

NOT type the ".SYS" suffi:x when entering the Ethernet

bootfile name. The MOP load protocol only supports 15 character

filenames.

5.

.After the FEPROM upgrade program is loaded, simply type "Y' at the prompt to start the FEPROM blast. Example

6-1 provides

a

console display of the FEPROM update program.

CAUTION:

Once you enter the bootfile name, do not interrupt the

FEPROM blasting program, as this can damage the

CPU module. The program takes several minutes to complete.

NOTE:

On systems with a VCB02 terminal, you wiU see an abbreviated form of the following example.

6-4

KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

Example

6-1: FEPROM Update Via Ethernet

*****

On Server System

*****

S XClt. lIICP

NCP>S~ CIRCCTr lSA-O OFF

NCP>SE'l' CIllCOU lSA-O SER.VICE

EDBLEJ)

NCP>S~ CIllCOU lSA-O Su.n OR

NCP>EXI~

S

S

COpy

D.680 V41 EZ. SYS

MCIC$LQI,I):

S -

* . *

*****

On Client System

»> ~/l00

(BOOT/R5:100 EZAO)

2 ••

Bootfile:

E680_V41_EZ

-£ZAO

1 .• 0 ••

FEPROM BLASTING PROGRAM blasting in V4.1 •••

--CAUTION---

EXECUTING THIS PROGRAM WILL CHANGE YOUR CURRENT ROM ---

Do you really want to continue [YIN] ? : Y

00 NOT ATTEMPT TO INTERRUPT PROGRAM EXECUTION!

DOING SO MAY RESULT IN LOSS OF OPERABLE STATE!

The program will take at most several minutes. starting uniform_program ••• byte 00070000 has been written with byte 00060000 has been written with byte 00050000 has been written with byte 00040000 has been written with byte 00030000 has been written with byte 00020000 has been written with

0001000(;: riGS baen writtan with byte 00000000 has been written with starting erase ••• o· s •••

0'5 •••

O·s •••

0'5 •••

0' 5 •••

O' s •..

O's •••

O's ••• byte 00070000 has been erased ••• byte 00060000 has been erased ••• byte 00050000 has been erased ••• byte 00040000 has been erased ••• byte 00030000 has been erased ••• byte 00020000 has been erased ••• byte 00010000 has been erased ••• byte 00000000 has been erased ••• starting program •••

Example

6-1

(continued on next page)

FEPROM Firmware Update 6-5

Example 6-1 (Cont.): FEPROM Update

VIa

Ethernet byte 00070000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00060000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00050000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00040000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00030000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00020000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00010000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00000000 has been reprogrammed •••

FEPROM Programming successful

»>

6. Press the Restart button on the SCP or enter "T 0" at the console prompt

(»».

7. If the customer requires, return jumper W 4 on the inside of the H3604 console module to the "write disable mode" setting and close and secure the console module by locking the half-turn screws.

6.3 Updating Firmware Via Tape

To update firmware via tape, the system must have a TF85, TK70, or TKSO tape drive.

If you need to make a bootable tape, copy the bootable image file to a tape as shown in following example. Refer to the release notes for the name of the file.

$ IRIT MIAS: "VOLOME NAME"

$

MOORT

/BLC)CK

SIZE ;; 512 mAS: "VOLUME NAME"

$

COPY/COBTIG-<file

Dama> mAS:<fil.

Dime>

$ DISMOtJR'l' MIAS -

$

Use the following procedure to update firmware via tape:

1. Be sure H3604 jumper W4 is in the correct ("write enable mode") position (Section 6.1).

2. At the console prompt (»», enter the BOOT/lOO command for the tape device, for example: BOOT/IOO MIAS.

Use the SHOW DEVICE command if you are not sure of the device name for the tape drive.

The system prompts you for the name of the file. Enter the bootfile

name.

6-6 KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU System Maintenance

3. After the FEPROM upgrade program is loaded, simply type "Y" at the prompt to start the FEPROM blast. Example-6-2 provides a console display of the FEPROM update program.

CAUTION:

Once you enter the bootfile name, do not interrupt the

FEPROM blasting program,

as

this can damage the CPU module. The program takes several minutes to complete.

NOTE:

On

systems

with

a

VCB02 terminal, you

will

see

an

abbreviated

form

(Example 6-2.

4.

Press the Restart button on the SCP or enter "T 0" at the console prompt

(»».

5. If the customer requires, return jumper W4 on the inside of the H3604 console module to the "write disable mode" setting and close and secure the console module by locking the half~turn screws.

FEPROM

Rrmware Update

6-7

Example 6-2: FEPROY Update

VIa

Tape

»>

BOOr/100 ~

(BOOI/RS:100 MIAS)

2 ••

Boo~!ile: X680_V4l_ZZ

-MIAS

1 •• 0 ••

FEPROM BLASTING PROGRAM blasting in V4.1 •••

--CAUTION---

EXECUTING THIS PROGRAM WILL CHANGE YOUR CURRENT ROM ---

DC' you red ly

..,ant t ¢ e¢~t i nl,!f,'> (Y IN'

1

?

!

T

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO INTERRUPT 'PROGRAM EXECUTION!

DOING SO MAY RESULT IN LOSS OF OPERABLE STATE!

The program will ~ake a~ mos~ several minu~es. s~artlng uniform-program ••• byte 00070000 has been wrl~~en wi~h byte 00060000 has been wri~ten wi~h

O's •••

0'5 ••• by~e 00050000 has been wrl~ten wi~h O's ••• byte 00040000 has been wrl~~en wi~h by~e

00030000 has been wri~ten with

0' s ••.

O's .•• by~e 00020000 has been wrl~~en wl~h byte 00010000 has been wri~ten with byte 00000000 has been wri t~en with

O's •••

0' 5 •••

O's ••• s~arting erase ••. by~e 00070000 has been erased ••• byte 00060000 has been erased ••• by~e 00050000 has been erased ••• byte 00040000 has been erased ••• byte 00030000 has been erased ••• byte 00020000 has been erased ••• by~e OQ010000 has been erased ••• byte 00000000 has been erased ••• starting program ••• byte 00070000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00060000 has been reprogrammed ••. byte 00050000 has been reprogrammed ••. byte 00040000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00030000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00020000 has been reprogrammed ••. byte 00010000 has been reprogrammed ••• byte 00000000 has been reprogrammed ••.

FEPROM Programming successful

»>

6-8 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU System Maintenance

6.4 FEPROM Update Error Messages

The following is a list of error messages generated by the FEPROM update program and actions to take if the errors occur.

MESSAGE:

update enable jumper is disconnected unable to blast ROMs ...

ACTION:

Reposition update enable jumper (Section 6.1).

MESSAGE:

ROM programming error-expected byte: xx actual byte: xx at address:

xxxxxxxx

AGrION:

Replace the CPU module.

MESSAGE:

ROM uniform pgming error-expected byte: 00 actual byte: xx at address: xxxxxxxx

ACTION:

Tum off the system, then tum it on. If you see the banner message as expected, re-enter console mode and try booting the update program again. module.

If you do not see the usual banner message, replace the CPU

.

MESSAGE:

ROM erase error-expected byte: ff actual byte: xx: at address: xxxxxxxx

ACTION:

Replace the CPU module.

Patchable Control Store (PCS) Loading Error Messages

The following is a list of error messages that may appear if there is a problem with the

pes.

The

pes

is loaded as part of the power-up stream

(before ROM-based diagnostics are executed).

MESSAGE:

CPU is not an NVAX

COMMENT:

CPU_TYPE as read in NVAX. SID is not

=

19 (decimal), as is should be for an NVAX processor.

FEPROM Firmware Update 6-9

MESSAGE:

Microcode patch/CPU rev mismatch

COMMENT:

Header in microcode patch does not match MICROCODE_REV as read in NVAX SID.

MESSAGE:

PCS Diagnostic failed

COMMENT:

Something is wrong with the PCS. Replace the

NVAX chip (or CPU module).

MESSAGE:

Unexpected SIE

COMMENT:

SYS_TYPE as read in the ROM 8IE does not reflect that an NVAX CPU is present.

6-10

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU System Maintenance

Appendix A

KA675/KA680/KA690 Firmware

Commands

This appendix provides information on console mode control characters and firware commands for the CPU module.

A.1 Console

1/0

Mode Control Characters

In console I/O mode, several characters have special meaning:

I

RETURN

I

I

RUBOUT

I

Also <CR>.

The carriage return ends a command line. No action is taken on a command until after it is terminated by a carriage return. A null line terminated by a carriage return is treated as a valid, null command.

No action is taken, and the console prompts for input. Carriage return is echoed as carriage return, line feed (<CR><LF».

When you press

fRUBOOil

the console deletes the previously typed character. The resulting display differs, depending on whether the console is a video or a hardcopy terminal.

For hardcopy terminals, the console echoes a backslash (\), followed by the deletion of the charac:ter.

If you press additional rubouts, the additional deleted characters are echoed.

If you type a nonrubout character, the console echoes another backslash, followed by the character typed. The result is to echo the characters deleted, surrounding them with backslashes. For example:

EXAMI;E

I

RUBOUT

I

RUBOUT

INE<CIb

The console echoes: EXAMI;E\ E;\NE<CR>

The console sees the command line:

EXAMINE<CR>

For video terminais, the previous character is erased and the cursor is restored to its previous position.

The console does not delete characters past the beginning of a command line. If you press mere rubouts than there are characters on the line, the extra rubouts are ignored. A rubout entered on a bla:ak line is ignored.

I

ClRUA

I and F14 Toggle insertioDloverstrike mode for command line editing.

By default, the console powers up to overstrike mode.

KA6751KA680/KA690

Firmware Commands A-1

ICTRVSI

or up_ arrow (or dow~ arrow)

I CTRUD

I and left arrow

Recalls previous command(s). Command recall is only operable if sufficient memory is available. This func::tion may then be enabled and disabled using the

SET

RECALL command.

Move cursor left one position.

I CTRUE I

Moves cursor to the end of the line.

I CTRUF

I and right Move cursor right one position. arrow

ICTRUHL

backspace, and

F12

ICTRUUI

ICTRUSI

ICTRlJOI

ICTRUR!

MoVe cursor to the beginning of the line.

Echoes

AU<CR> and deletes the entire line. Entered but otherwise ignored if typed on an empty line.

Stops output to the console terminal

untillcTRLIQ!

is typed. Not ec:boed.

Resumes output to the console terminal. Not echoed..

Echoes

<CR><LF>, followed by the current command line. Can be used to improve the readability of a command line that has been heavily edited.

IcTRLIC!

ICTRUOI

Echoes AC<CR> and aborts processing of a command. When entered as part of a command line, deletes the line.

Ignores transmissions to the console terminal until the next

ICTRUO

I is entered. Echoes

A() when disabling output, not echoed when it re-enables output. Output is re-enabled if the console prints an error message, or if it prompts for a command from the terminal Output is also enabled by entering console I/O mode, by pressing the IBREAKI key, and by pressing

ICTRLICL

A.1.1 Command Syntax

The console accepts commands up to 80 characters long. Longer commands produce error messages. The character count does not include rubouts, rubbed-out characters, or the IREllJRN I at the end of the command.

You can abbreviate a command by entering only as many characters as are required to make the command unique. Most commands can be recognized from their first character. See Table A-5.

The console treats two or more consecutive spaces and tabs as a single space. Leading and trailing spaces and tabs are ignored. You can place command qualifiers after the command keyword or after any symbol or number in the command.

All numbers (addresses, data, counts) are hexadecimal (hex), but symbolic register names contain decimal register numbers. The hex digits are 0 through 9 and A through F. You can use uppercase and lowercase letters in hex numbers (A through F) and commands.

The following symbols are qualifier and argument conventions:

A-2 KA675!KA6801KA690 CPU

[ ] An optional qualifier or argument

{ 1

A required qualifier or argument

A.1.2 Address Specifiers

Several commands take one or more addresses as arguments. An address defines the address space and the offset into that space. The console supports five address spaces:

Physical memory

VIrtual memory

General purpose registers (GPRs)

Internal processor registers (!PRs)

The PSL

The address space that the console references is inherited from the previous console reference, unless you explicitly specify another address space. The initial address space is physical memory.

A.1.3 Symbolic Addresses

The console supports symbolic references to addresses. A symbolic reference defines the address space and the offset into that space. Table A-llists symbolic references supported by the console, grouped according to address space. You do not have to use an address space qualifier when using a symbolic address.

Table A-1:

Console

Symbolic

Addresses

Symb

Addr

Symb

Addr

Symb

Addr

Symb

Addr ao

III

B2

B3

~

01

02

03

R4

RS ll6

R1

IG-General Purpose Registers

04

05

06

07

= os

R12~} oc

!t9

09

R13(FP) OD

RIO lUI

OA

OB

RI4

(sp)

RIS (PC)

OE

OF

1M-Processor Status Longword

PSI.

Note: All symbolic values in this table are in hexadecimal.

KA6751KA680/KA690 Firmware Commands A-3

Table A-1 (Cont.): Console S.Ymbolic Addresses

Symb

Addr

Symb

Addr Symb Addr Symb Adclr

II-Internal Processor Registers pr$.Pi» pr$_esp prS_1Sp pr$_U5p pr$_iap

00

01

02

03

04

05

06 prS..,PObr pr$.,lIOlr prS,.plbr prS,.pUr pr$_1br pr$_alr pr$_ea' pIS_Cd! pr$Jdecc

At

A2 pr$J)CIlt.lta A3 pr$J)CIltid:r. A4 pr$_bcetar

It5 pr$_bcedsta

A6 pr$_bc:edicbc

A7

OC

OD

OE

OF

7D

AD

07

08

09

OA.

OB pr$..bceGecc

ItS pr$_ceIiadr AB pr$_ceI'at.I pr$_DUt.I

AC

AE pr$..bctac

01000000 pr$.JICbb prS_scbb prSjpl prS_altly prS_lilT prS_1i1l' prSjCCl prSJJicr prSjcr pl'$_t.oclr pr$..neoactr

BO

Bl pr$,.aeocmcl B2 prS..nedathi

B3

Bl

BS pr$_aeclatlo

B6

B1 prS..neicmcl B8

B9

BA

SS pr$_bcftuah

01400000

18

19

1A

1B lC

1D

IE

IF

14

15

16

1'(

10

11

12

13 pr$_txCI prSJ,Edb prS_tzl:1 prS_tmb prS...mcesr prS_la'YpC pI$_laYpll

20

21

22

23

24

2S

2A

2B

2C

2D

2E

2F

26

Zl

28

29 pr$_tbil

35

36 pr$..ioreset

31 pr$.,.mapen 38 pr$_tbia 39

SA pr$_licl pr$_tbchk

3B

3C

3D

3E

SF

30

31

32

33

34 prS_'f1I:W' pr$_YIaC prS_yclata prS_icsr D3

D4

DS

D6 pr$..]:IUlOde E7 pr$_tbadr prS_tbsta prS,.pctar

DO

Dt

D2

E8

E9

EC

ED

01800000 pr$,.pc:adr pr$..,pcsta pr$,.pcctl pr$,.pcclap

FO

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

Fa

F9

FA

FB

01COOOOO qbio rom acr ipcrO

UC_raJD

200000OO

2004000O

2008000O

2OOOtr40

20140400

IP-Physica1 (VAX 110 Space) qbmem 300000OO clMr ipcrl

IK_Cf

2OO8OOCM

20001C42

20140010 qbmbr bcir qbear ipcr2 uc_cbtcr

20080010

20084004

20080008

20001144

20140020 dear ipcrS

2OO8OOOC

2OOOtr46

20140030

A-4

KA675/KA680IKA690

CPU

Table A-1 (Cont.): Console Symbolic AddreSses

Symb

Addr

Symb Addr Symb Addr Symb Addr lK_adOmat 20140130

1Ie_ta()

20140100

ISC_Lcrl

20140110

IP-Physical (VAX 110 Space) lIC_aciOmsk 20140134 lIIIC_tirO

20140104

S&C_tirl 20140114 lK_acilmaL

&8C_tnUO lSC_tnirl

20140140

20140108

20140118

AC_adlmsk 20140144 lK_tinO

201401Oc: lSC_tivrl

2014011c nicslO tUcar4

2000500O

~10 nicar12

2OOCS02O

20008030 agee_letup 2000800O apc_tba

~10

20008020

IFC_verhi

20008030 mcsrl mearS

20008004

20008014

Dicar9 mcsr13

20008024

20008034

1gec_tzpoll 20008004 sgec_ltatua

20008014 sgec_wdt

20008024 sgec-PZ'OC

20008034 mcar2

Dicar6

DicarlO mcsr14 spe.ftPOll agec..mocie

Igec..mCC spe-bpt

20008008

20008018

20008028

20008038

20008008

20008018

20008028

20008038 mcsr3

Dicar'7 mcsrll mcsr15 aaec..ma agec_lbr qec_'Yerlo qec_cmd

2OOO8OOC

2000801C

2OOO802C

2OOO803C

2OOO8OOC

2OOO801C

2OOO802C

2OOO803C lhac1_1SWC'

20004030

Ihacl..,PeSl' 20004050 lhac1J)CqOc:r 20004080

1hac1..,pdf'qcr

20004090 abacl~ 200040AO lhac1_uhma 20004044 ahac1-Pf&r

20004054

1hac1.J)Cqlcr 20004084 lhacl...,pmfqcr 20004094 lhacl.,picr 200<M0A4 shacl..,pqbbr 20004048 ahacl~ 20004058 ahac1-PCq2cr 20004088 ahac1..]1Ua' 2OOCM098 shac1,.pmtcr 2OOO4OAB abac1-PC'

Ibacl..J111:1C1r

2OOO404c

3)Q()406C

Ihacl.JXq3cr 2OOO408C

Ihacl.J1eC1' 2OOO409C lhacl.,Pmtecr 2OClO4OAC lhac2_uwcr 20004230 shac2,.Pe1r 20004250 shac2..,pcqOcr 20004280 lhac2,.pdiqcr 20004290 ahac2..,Pdcr

200042A0 lhac2_ubma

20004244

1hac2,J6r

20004254 lbac2.J)Cqlcr

3)()()4284

1hac2...,pmfqcr 20004294 lhac2.,picr 3)()()42A4 abac2..Pqbbr 20004248 shac2...PJ1l' 2OOO42S8 abac2,..pcq2cr 20004288 ahac2..,P1ra' 20004298 ahac2.,pmLcr

2OOO42A8

1hac2.,.par

2000424c abac2,.pmcsr

2OOO42fiC

1bac2.JXq3cr ~ abac2.J1eC1'

2OOCM29C abac2,.pmLecr 2OOO42AC

Ibac_uwer 20004230 shacJeR'

20004-250 lhacJCqOcr 20004280

Ihac..,pdf'qcr

20004290 lhaC_ahma 20004244

!mu..,pfar

20004254

Ihac.J)Cqlcr

20004284

Ihac.,pmf'qcr 20004294 lbac..Pqbbr 20004248 ahac-PF abae..PCCf2cr abac..,Plra'

20004258

2(iO(K288

20004298 sbac..,Plr 2OOO42k lhac-PZZIcsr

2OOO425C

1bac..JlCCl3cr

~-.-o42SC ahac.JleCl' 2OOO429C

IhacJldcr

200042A0 abac.,.picr

3)()()42A4

Ihac..,pmLcr 2OOO42A8 ahac.,Pmtecr 2OOO42AC amccwb memconO memc0n4 memai&8 me:Wa'12 mear cear cpioeal

21000110

21018000

21018010

21018020

21018030

21018040

21031000

210'JD0I0

me1llCOl11 memc0n5 memsig9 mezui,13 mser ncadsr cpi0u2

21018004

21018014 memC0D2 memC0D6

21018024 memsi,10

21018034 . memlig14

210180«

21020004 l2mCdsr aear1

21020014 Ddeu

21018008

21018018

21018028

21018038

21018048

21020008

21020018 memc0a3 memcoa7 memlign memli,15 mOflJDZ' caear2

2101800c

2101801c

2101802c

2101803c

2101804C

2102000c

KA6751KA680/KA690 Rrmware Commands A-5

Table A-2 lists symbolic addresses ,that you can use in any address space.

Table A-2: Symbolic Addresses Used in Any Address Space

Symbol Description

+

The location last referenced in an EXAMINE or DEPOSIT command.

The location immediately following the last location referenced in an EXAMINE or DEPOSIT command. For references to physical or virtual memory spaces, the location referenced is the last address, plus the size of the last reference

(1 for byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword, 8 for quadword). For other address spaces, the address is the last address referenced plus one.

The location immediately preceding the last location referenced in an EXAMINE or DEPOSIT command. For references to physical or virtual memory spaces, the location referenced is the last address minus the size of this

~feTent;'!P.

(l

for

byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword, 8 for quadword). For other address spaces, the address is the last address referenced minus one.

The location addressed by the last location referenced in an EXAMINE or

DEPOSIT command.

A.1.4 Console Numeric Expression Radix Specifiers

By default, the console treats any numeric expression used as an address or a datum as a hexadecimal integer. The user may override the default radix by using one of the specifiers listed in

Table A-3.

Table A-3: Console Radix Specifiers

Forml Form 2 BadU

~b

I\b

Binuy

~

%d

%x

1\0

I\d

Ax

Octal

Decimal

Hexadecimal, default

For instance, the value 19 is by default hexadecimal, but it may also be represented as %bll00l, %031, %d25, and %x19 (or in the alternate form as "'bll00l, "'031, "'d25, and "'xI9).

A .. 1.5 Console Command Qualifiers

You can enter console command qualifiers in any order on the command line after the command keyword. The three types of qualifiers are data control, address space control, and command specific. Table A-4 lists and

A-6 KA67SIKA6801KA690 CPU

describes the data control and address space control qualifiers. Command specific qualifiers are listed in the descriptions of inmvidual commands.

Table A-4: Console Command Qualifiers

Qualifier Description

Data Control

IB

IW

IL

IQ

1N:{count}

/STEP:

{size}

/WRONG

The data size is byte.

The data size is word.

The data size is longword.

The data size is quadword.

An unsigned hexadecimal integer that is evaluated into a longword. This qualifier determines the number of additional operations that are to take place on

EXAMINE, DEPOSIT. MOVE. and

SEARCH appears if the number overflows 32 bits. commands.

An error message

Step. Overrides the default increment of the console current reference.

Commands that manipulate memory. such as

EXAMINE. DEPOSIT, MOVE, and SEARCH. normally increment the console current reference by the size of the data being used.

Wrong. On writes, 3 is used as the value of the generates double bit errors. Ignores

ECC bits, which always

ECC errors on main memory reads.

Address Space Control

IG

II

N

IP

1M

IU

General purpose register

(GPR) address always longword. space,

RO-R15.

The data size is

Internal processor register

(IPR) address space. Accessible only by the MTPR and

MFPR instructions. The data size is always longword.

Vll'tual memory address space.

All access and protection checking occur.

If access to a program running with the current PSL is not allowed, the console issues an error message. Deposits to virtual space cause the PTE<M> bit to be set.

If ad~-esses.

Note is not enabled, virtual addresses are equal to physical that when you examine vi..~.!a! memory. the address space and address in the response is the physical address of the y"h-tuU adoL-ess.

Physical memory address space.

Processor status longword (PSL) address space. The data size is always longword.

Access to console private memory is allowed.

This qualifier also disables virtual address protection checks. On virtual address writes, the PrE<M> bit is not set if the IU qualifier is present. This qualifier is not inherited; must be respecifi.ed on each command. it

KA675!KA680/KA690 Firmware Commands A-7

A.1.6 Console Command Keywords

Table A-5 lists command keywords" by type. Table A-6 lists the parameters, qualifiers, and arguments for each console command. Parameters, used with the SET and SHOW commands only, are listed in the first column along with the command.

You should not use abbreviations in programs. Although it is possible to abbreviate by using the minimum number of characters required to

. uniquely identify a command or parameter, these abbreviations may become ambiguous at a later time if an updated version of the firmware contains new commands or parameters.

Tabie A-5: Command Keywords

by Type

Processor Control

Data Transfer Console Control

BOOT

CO:r-,~

HALT

INITlALIZE

NEXT

START

UNJAM

DEPOSIT

EXAMINE

MOVE

SEARCH

X

CONFIGURE

FIND

REPEAT

SET

SHOW

TEST

Table A-6:

Command

Console Command Summary

Quali1iers Argument

/RS:(boot..ftap}

It-US.,.}

((boo&_dn'ice}L{boot_deYice}]...)

BOOT

CONFICUBE

CONTINtJE

DEPOSIT

EXAKINE

IBIW ILIQ-IGII

IV

IPIMIU

{addzua}

1N:{coan1) 1STEP:{Ue) IWBONG

IBIW ILIQ-IGII

IV

IPIMIU

[{1IIidrea}]

1N:{coUDt}

1STEP:(Ue)

IWBONG

IINSTRUCTION

IJIEJIIBPB

FIND

HALT

HELP

INlTIALlZE

MOVE

NEXT

REPEAT

IBlWfLlQ-IVIPIU

1N:(coant.}

1Sl'EP:{1ize}

!WRONG

(Sl"C_addreu}

[(coant)]

{commaDd}

Other(s)

(data) [(data)]

(dest_add.rea)

A-8 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

Table

A~

Command Qualifiers Argument Other(s)

SEAIlCH

IBIWILIQ-NIPIU

/N;{count} lS"l'EP:{size} !WRONG

{Ital't_addzal}

/NOT

SETBFLAG

SET BOOT

SET CONTROLP

SET HALT

SET HOST

SET HOST

{bitmap}

[{boot_de¥ice}[,{boot_de¥iceJJ.-

{OIl}

!halt_action}

{node_number}

IOUP IDSSI JBUS:(OIl}

IDUP IUQSSP {IDISK ! trAPE } {controller_number}

IDUPIUQSSP {car_address}

{controller_number}

{car_address}

SET HOST

SETLANGUAGE

SETBECALL

SHOWBFLWG

SHOW BOOT

SHOW CONTROLP -

SHOWDSSI n.lAINTENANCE IUQSSP

ISERVICE

IMAlNTENANCE IUQSSP

{languap-type}

{OIl}

SHOW HALT

SHOW LANGUAGE -

SHOW MEMORY etJLL

SHOWQBUS

SHOW RECALL

SHOWRLV12

SHOW SCSI

SHOWTRANSLA·

TION

SHOWUQSSP

SHOWVEBSION

S"'aART

TEST

UNJAM

X

{pDys_addrea}

{~-==}

{test_number}

{address}

{pattern} [{mukl]

[{tukl]

[{taakl]

[{taakl]

[{parameters}]

{count}

A.2 Console Commands

This section describes the console I/O mode commands. Enter the commands at the console I/O mode prompt

(»».

KA675/KA680/KA690

Firmware Commands A-9

A.2.1 BOOT

The BOOT command initializes the processor and transfers execution to

VMB. VMB attempts to boot the operating system from the specified device or list of devices, or from the default boot device if none is specified. The console qualifies the bootstrap operation by passing a boot flags bitmap to

VMB in RS.

Format:

BOOT [qualifier-list] [(boot_device), {boot_device) , __ ]

If you do not enter either the qualifier or the device name, the default value is used. Explicitly stating the boot flags or the boot device overrides, but does not permanently change,

~'le corresponding default value.

When specifying a list of boot devices (up

to

32 characters, with devices separated by commas and no spaces), the system checks the devices in the order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.

NOTE:

If included in

a

string should be placed only of boot

devices~

the Ethernet

device~

EZAO,

as

the last device of the string. The system will continuously attempt to boot from EZAO.

Set the default boot device and boot flags with the SET BOOT and SET

BFLAG commands. If you do not set a default boot device, the processor times out after 30 seconds and attempts

to

boot from the Ethernet port,

EZAO.

Qualifiers:

Command specific:

lR5:lboot_flags} A 32-bit hex value passed to VMB in RS. The console does not interpret this value. Use the SET BFlAG command to specify a default boot ftags longword.

Use the SHOW BFLAG command to display the longword. Table 3-4 lists the supported

R5 boot ftags.

/{boot_flags} Same as 1R5:{boot_flags}

[device_name] A character string of up to 32 characters. Longer strings cause a VAL TOO

BIG error message. When specifying a list of boot devices, the device names should be separated by commas and

DO spaces. Apart from checking the length, the console does DOt interpret or validate the device name. The console converts the string to uppercase, then passes

VMB a string descriptor to this device name in

RO. Use the

SET BOOT command to specify a default boot device or list of devices. Use the SHOW BOOT command to display the default boot device. The factory default device is the Ethernet port,

EZAO.

Table

3-3 lists the boot devices supported by the KA6751KA6801KA690.

A-1Q KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU

Examples:

»>SHOW BOOT

DOAO

»>SHOW BFLAG

00000000

»>B !Boot using default boot flags and device.

(BOOT/R5:0 DUAO)

2 ••

-DOAO

»>80 XQAO !Boot using default boot flags and

(BOOT/R5:0 XQAO) !specified device.

2 •.

-XQAO

»>BOOT I/O !Boot using specified boot flags and

(BOOT/R5:10 DOAO) !default device.

2 ••

-DUAO

»>BOOT /RS:220

X~O

!Boot using specified boot

(BOOT/R5:220 XQAO)

! flags and device.

2 ••

-XQAO

A.2.2 CONFIGURE

The CONFIGURE command invokes an interactive mode that permits you to enter Q22-bus device names, then generates a table of Q22-bus

I/O page device CSR addresses and interrupt vectors. CONFIGURE is similar to the

VMS SYSGEN CONFIG utility. This command simplifies field configuration by providing information that is typically available only

"\\-ita't a r":"YL.'ling operati.llg system. Refer to the example below and use the

CONFIGURE command as follows:

1.

Enter CONFIGURE at the console I/O prompt.

2. Enter HELP at the

Device, Number? prompt to see a list of devices whose CSR addresses and interrupt vectors can be determined.

3. Enter the device names and number of devices.

4.

Enter EXIT to obtain the CSR address and interrupt vector assignments.

The devices listed in the HELP display are not necessarily supported by the CPU.

KA6751KA6801KA690 Firmware Commands A-11

Format:

CONFIGURE

Example:

»>COHFIGORE

Enter device configuration,

HELP,

Device,Number? help or EXIT

Devices:

LPVll

RLVl2

DMVll

RRD50

RV20

CXA16

LNV21

KWVllC

DRQ3B

IDVIID

DESNA

KWV32

Numbers:

KXJll

TSV05

DELQA

DLVllJ

RXV2l

DEQNA

DZQ1l

DRV1lW

DESQA

RQC25 KFQSA-DISK TQK50

KFQSA-TAPE

KMVll !EOll

CXB16

QPSS

ADVllD

VSV21

IAVllA

IGQll

KZQSA

1 to 255, default is 1

Device,Number? rqdx3,2

Device,Number? dhvll,2

Device,Number? deqna

CXY08

DSV1l

AAVllD

IBQOl

!AVllB

DIV32

VCBOl

ADV11C

VCB02

IOV11A

MIRA

KIV32

Device,Number? kfqsa-tape

Device, Number? cxy08

Device,Number? mira

Device,Number? tqk50

Device,Number? tqk10

Device,Number? dhq1l

Device,Number? Inv1l

Device, Number? exit

Address/Vector Assignments

-774440/120 DEQNA

-712150/154 RQDX3

-760334/300 RQDX3

-774500/260 KFQSA-TAPE

-760444/304 TQK50

-760450/310 TQK10

-760500/320 DHV11

-760520/330 DHV11

-760540/340 CXY08

-760560/350 DRQ11

-776200/360 LNV11

-761260/370 MIRA

»>

DZVll

DRVIlB

RQDX3

TQK10

DROll

QVSS

AAVllC

QDSS

IDV11B

ADQ32

DTCN5

DFAOl

DPVll

KDA50

T08lE

DHVll

LNV11

AXVllC

DRVllJ

IDVllC

DTC04

DTC05

A-12

KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

A.2.3 CONTINUE

The CONTINUE command causes the processor to begin instruction execution at the address currently contained in the PC. It does not perform a processor initialization. The console enters program I/O mode.

Format:

CONTINUE

Example:

»>CORrnroE

$

!VMS DCL prompt

A.2.4 DEPOSIT

The DEPOSIT command deposits data into the address specified. If you do not specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the last address space and data size used in a DEPOSIT, EXAMINE, MOVE, or SEARCH command. After processor initialization, the default address space is physical memory, the default data size is longword, and the default address is zero. If you specify conflicting address space or data sizes, the console ignores the command and issues an error message.

Format:

DEPOSIT [qualifier-list] (address)

(data} [data. •• ]

Qualifiers:

Data control:

IB, IW, IL, IQ, 1N:{count}, ISTEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: IG, II, 1M, IP, N,

/U

Arguments:

{address} A longword address that specifies the first location into which data

The address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. is deposited.

{data}

[{data}]

Examples:

The data to be deposited. If specified data is larger than the deposit data size, the firmware ignores the command and issues an error response. If the specified data is smaller than the deposit data size, it is extended on the left: with zeros.

Additional data to be deposited (as many as can fit on the command line).

»>O/P/B/N:1FF 0 0

Clear first

512 bytes of physical memory.

KA6751KA6801KA690 Firmware Commands A-13

»>DIV/L/N:3 1234 5

»>D/N:8

RO iiWliiii

»>D/L/P/N:l0/ST:200 0 8

»>D/N:200 - 0

- !,

Deposit 5 into four longwords

:-- starting at virtual memory address

! 1234.

Loads GPRs RO through R8 with -1.

Deposit

8 in the first lonqword of the first 17 pages in physical memory.

Starting at previous address, clear

513 lonqwords or

2052 bytes.

A.2.S EXAMINE

The EXAMINE command examines the contents of the memorv location

OT

register specified by the address. If no address is specified,

The display line consists of a single character address specifier, the physical address to be examined, and the examined data.

EXAMINE

uses the same qualifiers as

DEPOSIT.

However; the /WRONG qualifier causes EXAMINE to ignore ECC errors on reads from physical memory. The EXAMINE command also supports an /INSTRUCTION qualifier, which will disassemble the instructions at the current address.

Format:

EXAMINE [qualifier-list] [address]

Qualifiers:

Data control: IB, IW,

IL, IQ, IN:

{count} ,

ISTEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: IG, II, 1M, IP, N,

/U

Command

specific:

IlNSTRUCTION Disassembles and displays the VAX MACR0-32 instruction at the specified address.

Arguments:

[{address} ]

A longword address that specifies the first location to be examined. The address can be an actual or a symbolic address. If no address is specified,

+ is assumed.

A-14 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

Examples:

»>EX PC

G OOOOOOOF FFFFFFFC

»>EX SP

G OOOOOOOE 00000200

»>EX PSL

M 00000000 041FOOOO

»>E/M

M 00000000 041FOOOO

»>E

R4/H:5

G 00000004 00000000

G 00000005 00000000

G

00000006 00000000

G 00000007 00000000

G 00000008 00000000

G 00000009 801D9000

»>EX PR$ SCBB

I 00000011 2004AOOO

»>E/P

0

P 00000000 00000000

»>EX /IRS

20040000

P

20040000 11

BRa

»>EX /IRS!R:

5

P

20040019

P

20040024

P

2004002F

P

20040036

P

2004003D

P

20040044

20040019

DO MOVL

D2 MCOML

D2 MCOML

7D MOVQ

DO

MOVL

DB MFPR

»>E/mS

P

20040048 DB MFPR

»>

Examine the PC.

Examine the SP.

Examine the PSL.

Examine PSL another way.

Examine R4 through R9.

! Examine the SCBB, IPR 1 7

(decimal) .

Examine local memory o.

20040019

Examine 1st byte of ROM.

I

! Disassemble from branch.

Ai20140000,@i20140000

@i20140030,@i20140502

SAiOE,@i20140030

I

RO,@i201404B2

Ai201404B2,R1

SAi2A,BA44 (R1)

!

Look at next instruction.

S"'i2B,BA48 (R1)

A.2.6 FIND

The FIND command searches main memory, starting at address zero for a page-aligned 128-Kbyte segment of good memory, or a restart parameter block (RPB). If the command finds the segment or RPB, its address plus

512 is left in SP (R14). If it does not find the segment or RPB, the console issues an error message and preserves the contents of SP. If you do not specify a qualifier, IRPB is assumed.

Format:

FIND [qualifier-list]

KA675/KA680/KA690

Firmware Commands A-15

Qualifiers:

Command specific:

!.MEMORY Searches memory for a page-aligned block of good memory, 128 Kbytes in length.

The search looks only at memory that is deemed usable by the bitmap. This command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.

IRPB Searches all physical memory for an RPB. The search does not use the bitmap to qualify which pages are looked at. The command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.-

Examples:

»>EX SP

G OOOOOOOE 00000000

»>FIND

I!!EM

»>EX

SP

G OOOOOOOE 00000200

»>Fl:ND /RPB

?2C FND ERR 00C00004

»>

Check the SP.

Look for a valid 128 ~~~~es.

Note where it was found.

Check for valid RPB.

None to be found here.

A.2.7 HALT

The HALT command has no effect. other VAX consoles.

It

is included for compatibility with

Format:

HALT

Example:

»>BALT

»>

Pretend to halt.

A.2.B HELP

The HELP command provides information about command syntax and usage.

Format:

HELP

Example:

»>BELP

Following is a brief summary of all the commands supported by the console:

A-16

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

UPPERCASE

I

[]

<> denotes a keyword that you must type in denotes an OR condition denotes optional parameters denotes a field specifying a syntactically correct value denotes one of an inclusive range of integers denotes that the previous item may be repeated

Valid qualifiers:

/B /W /L /Q /INSTRUCTION

/G /I /V /P /M

/STEP: /N: /NOT

IWRONG /U

Valid commands:

BOOT [[/R5:]<boot_flags>] [<boot_device>]

CONFIGURE

CONTINUE

DEPOSIT [<qualifiers>] <address> <datum> [<datum> ..• ]

EXAMINE [<qualifiers>] [<address>]

FIND [ /MEMORY I /RPB]

HALT

HELP

INITIALIZE

MOVE [<qualifiers>] <address> <address>

NEXT [<count>]

REPEAT <command>

SEARCH [<qualifiers>] <address> <pattern> [<mask>]

SET BFLG <boot_flags>

SET BOOT <boot device>

SET CONTROLl? <0' •• 1 I DISABLED I ENABLED>

SET HALT <0 •. 4 I DEFAULT I RESTART I REBOOT I HALT I RESTART REBOOT>

SET HOST/DUP/DSSI/BUS:<O .• l> <node_number> [<task>]-

SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP </DISKI/TAPE> <controller number>[<task>]

SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP <physical CSR address> [<task>]

SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP/SERVICE <controller number>

SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP <physical CSR address>

SET LANGUAGE <1: :15>

=

=

SET RECALL <0 •• 1

I

DISABLED

I

ENABLED>

SHOW BFLG

SHOW BOOT

SHOW CONTROLP

SHOW DEVICE

SHOW DSSI

SHOW ETHERNET

SHOW HALT

SHOW LANGUAGE

SHOW MEMORY [/FOLL]

SHOW QBUS

SHOW RECALL

SHOW RLV12

SilOn SCSI

KA6751KA680/KA690 Rrmware Commands

A-17

»>

SHOW TRANSLATION <physical .address>

SHOW UQSSP -

SHOW VERSION

START <address>

TEST [<test code> [<parameters>]]

UNJAM -

X <address> <count>

A.2.9

INITIALIZE

The INITIALIZE command performs a processor initialization.

Format:

INITIALIZE

The following registers are initialized:

Register

State at Initialization

PSL

IPL

ASTLVL

SISR

ICes

RXCS

TXCS

MAPEN

Caches

Instruction buffer

Console previous reference

TODR

Main memory

General registers

Halt code

Bootstrap-in-progress flag

Internal restart-in-progress flag

041FOOOO

1F

4 o

Bits <6> and

<0> clear, the rest are unpredictable o

80 o

Flushed

Unaffected

Longword, physical, address 0

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

The firmware clears all error status bits and initializes the following:

CDAL bus timer

Address decode and match registers

Programmable timer interrupt vectors

SSCCR

A-18 KA67S/KA6801KA690 CPU

Example:

»>INIT

»>

A.2.10 MOVE

The MOVE command copies the block of memory starting at the source address to a block beginning at- the destination address. Typically, this command has an

IN

qualifier so that more than one datum is transferred.

The destination correctly reflects the contents of the source. regardless of the overlap between the source and the data.

The MOVE command actually performs byte, word, longword, and quadword reads and writes as needed in the process of moving the data.

Moves are supported only for the physical and virtual address spaces.

Format:

MOVE [qualifier-list] {src_addressl (dest_addressl

Qualifiers:

Data control: IB, IW,

IL, IQ, 1N:{count), ISTEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control:

IV,

fU,

IP

Arguments:

{src_address} A longword address that specifies the first location of the source data to be copied.

{deat_address} A longword address that specifies the destination of the first byte of data.

These addresses may be an actual address or a symbolic address.

If no address is specified, + is assumed.

KA6751KA680/KA690 Firmware Commands A-19

Examples:

»>EX/N:4 0

P 00000000 00000000

P 00000004 00000000

P 00000008 00000000

P OOOOOOOC 00000000

P 00000010 00000000

»>EX/N:4 200

P 00000200 58000520

P 00000204 585E04Cl

P 00000208 00FF8FBB

P 0000020C 5208A800

P 00000210 540CA80E

»>MOV/H:4

200 0

»>EX/N:4 0

P 00000000 58000520

P 00000004 585E04Cl

P 00000008 00FF8FBB

P OOOOOOOC 5208A800

P 00000010 540CA80E

»>

Observe destination.

Observe source data.

Move the data.

Observe moved data.

A.2.11 NEXT

The NEXT command executes the specified number of macro instructions.

If no count is specified, 1 is assumed.

After the last macro instruction is executed, the console reenters console

110

mode.

Format:

NEXT [count}

The console implements the NEXT command, using the trace trap enable and trace pending bits in the PSL and the trace pending vector in the SCB.

The console enters the "Spacebar Step Mode".

In this mode, subsequent spacebar strokes initiate single steps and a carriage return forces a return to the console prompt.

The following restrictions apply:

• If memory management is enabled, the NEXT command works only if the first page in SSC RAM is mapped in SO (system) space.

• Overhead associated with the NEXT command affects execution time of an instruction.

A-20 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

• The NEXT command elevates the IPL

(milliseconds) while single-stepping over

to

31· for long periods of time commands.

• Unpredictable results occur if the macro instruction being stepped over modifies either the SCBB or the trace trap entry. This means that you cannot use the NEXT command in conjunction with other debuggers.

Arguments:

{count}

A value representing the number of macro instructions to execute.

Examples:

»>DEP

1000 SOD6S004

»>DEP

1004 12S00S01

»>DEP

1008 00FE11F9

»>EX /INSTRUCTION IN:S

P 00001000 04 CLRL

P

00001002

D6 INCL

P 00001004 D1 CMPL

P

00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001009 11 BRB

1000

RO

RO

S"'iOS,RO

00001002

00001009

Create a simple program.

List i t .

P 0000100B 00 HALT

»>OEP PR$ SCBB

200

»>OEP PC

1000

»>

»>5

Set up a user SCBB •••

! Single step •••

••• and the

pc.

P 00001002 D6 INCL p

00001004 01 CMPL

P 00001007

12 BNEQ

P 00001002 06 INCL

»>N

5

P 00001004 01 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001002

06 INCL

P 00001004 01 CMPL l?

00001007

12 BNEQ

»>N 7

P 00001002

06 INCL

P

00001004

D1

CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001002 06 INCL

P 00001004 01 CMPL

P 00001007 12 BNEQ

P 00001009 11 BRB

»>N

P 00001009

11

»>

BRB

RO

S"'i05,RO

00001002

RO

SPACEBAR

SPACEBAR

SPACEBAR

CR

••• or multiple step the program.

S"'iOS,RO

00001002

RO

S"'fOS,RO

00001002

RO

S""i05,RO

00001002

RO

S"'f05,RO

00001002

00001009

00001009

KA675!KA680/KA690 Rrmware Commands A-21

A.2.12 REPEAT

The REPEAT command repeatedly displays and· executes the specified command. Press

IcTRLJC I

to stop the command. You can specify any valid console command except the REPEAT command.

Fonnat:

REPEAT (command)

Arguments:

{command} A valid console command other than REPEAT.

Examples:

»>REPEAT EX PR$ TODR ! Watch the clock.

I 0000001B 5AFE78CE

I 0000001B 5AFE78D1

I 0000001B 5AFE78FD

I 0000001B 5AFE7900

I 0000001B 5AFE7903

I 0000001B 5AFE7907

I 0000001B 5AFE790A

I 0000001B 5AFE790D

I 0000001B SAFE7910

I 0000001B 5AFE793C

I 0000001B SAFE793F

I 0000001B 5AFE7942

I 0000001B SAFE7946

I 0000001B SAFE7949

I 0000001B 5AFE794C

I 0000001B SAFE794F

I 0000001B SAC

»>

A.2..13 SEARCH

The SEARCH command finds all occurrences of a pattern and reports the addresses where the pattern was found. If the /NOT qualifier is present, the command reports all addresses in which the pattern did not match.

Format:

SEARCH

[qualifier-list]

(address}

(pattern)

[(mask)]

SEARCH accepts an optional mask that indicates bits to be ignored (don't

care

bits). For example, to ignore bit 0 in the comparison, specify a mask of 1. The mask, if not present, defaults to o.

A-22

KA6751KA680/KA690

CPU

A match occurs if

(pattern and not mask)

=

(data.and not mask), where:

Pattern is the target data

Mask is the optional don't care bitmask (which defaults to 0)

Data is the data at the current address

SEARCH reports the address under the following conditions:

!NOT Qualifier

Absent

Absent

Present

Present

Match Condition

'llue

False

'llue

False

Action

Report address

No report

No report

Report address

The address is advanced by the size of the pattern (byte, word, longword, or quadword), unless overridden by the

ISTEP

qualifier.

Qualifiers:

Data control: IB, IW,

IL, IQ, IN: {count} , ISTEP:{size}, !WRONG

Address space control:

/P,

N,

/U

Command specific:

!NOT Inverts the sense of the match.

Arguments:

(start_address) A longword address that specifies the first location subject to the search. This address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

{pattem}

[{mask}]

The target data.

A mask of the bits desired in the comparison.

Examples:

»>DEP /P/L/N:1000 0 0

»>

»>DEP 300 12345678

»>DEP 401 12345678

»>DEP 502 87654321

»>

»>SEARCB

1.:1000 IST:1

P 00000300 12345678

0 12345678

P 00000401 12345678

»>SEARCB

1.:1000

0 12345678

P 00000300 12345678

»>SEARCB /R:1000 IHOT 0 0

P 00000300 12345678

! Clear some memory.

! Deposit some search data.

Search for all occurrences of 12345678 on any byte boundary. Then try on longword boundaries.

Search for all non-zero longwords.

KA675/KA6801KA690

Rrmware Commands A-23

P 00000400 34567800

P

00000404 00000012

P

00000500 43210000

P

00000504 00008765

»>SEARCH /N:l000 /ST:l 0 1 iiiiiiiE

P

00000502 87654321

P

00000503 00876543

P

00000504 00008765

P

00000505 00000087

»>SEARCH /N:l000 /8 0 12

P 00000303 12

P 00000404 12

»>SEARCH /N:l000

IST:l

Iv

0 FEll

»>

»>

»>

Search for odd-numbered longwords on any boundary.

Search for all occurrences of the byte

12.

Search for all words that could be interpreted as a spin (10$: brb 10$).

Note that none were found.

A.2.14 SET

The SET command sets the parameter to the value you specify.

Format:

SET

(parameter) (value)

Parameters:

BFLAG

Sets the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hex number of up to eight digits. See Table 3-4 for a list of the boot flags.

BOOT

Sets the default boot device. The value must be a valid device name or list of device names as specified in the BOOT command description in

Section

A.2.1.

CON'I'ROLP

Sets Control-P as the console halt condition. instead of a BREAK.

Values of 1 or Enabled set

Control-P recognition. Values of 0 or Disabled set BREAK recognition. In either case, the setting of the Break Enable

!Disable switch.

HALT

Sets the user-defined halt action. Acceptable values are the keywords

"default", "restart", "reboot", "halt", "restart_reboot", or a number in the range 0 to 4 inclusive.

HOST

Connects to the DUP or MAINTENANCE driver on the selected node or device. The KA6751KA6801KA690 DUP driver supports only "send data immediate" messages and those devices that support the messages.

It does not support "send data" or "receive data" messages. Note the hierarchy of the SET HOST qualifiers below.

A-24 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU

IDUP-Uses the DUP driver to examine or modify parameters of a device on either the nSS! bus or on thtrQ22-bus.

IBUS:n-Selects the desired

DSS! bus. A value of 0 selects

DSSI bus

0

(internal backplane bus).

A value of 1 selects nSS! bus 1

(external console module bus).

IDSSI node-Selects the

DSSI node, where "node" is a number from Oto 7.

IUQSSP-Attacbes to the UQSSP device specified, using one of the following methods:

/DISK n-Specifies the disk controller number. where n is a number from 0 to 255. The resulting fixed address for n=O is

20001468 and the floating rank for n>O is 26. trAPE n-Specifies the tape controller number. where n is a number from 0 to 255. The resulting fixed address for n=O is

20001940 and the floating rank for n>O is 30. csr_address-Specifies the Q22-bus

110 page

CSR address for the device.

IMAINTENANCE-Examines and modifies the KFQSA EEPROM configuration values. Does not accept a task value.

IUQSSP-

ISERVICE n-Specifies service for KFQSA controller module n where n is a value from 0 to 3. (The resulting fixed address of a KFQSA controller module in maintenance mode is

20001910+4*n.)

Icsr_address--Specifies the Q22-bus

110 page

CSR address for the

KFQSA controller module.

LANGUAGE

Sets console language and keyboard type. If the current console terminal does not support the multinational character set

(MCS), then this command bas no effect and the console message appears in English.

Values are

1 through 15. Refer to Example 4-1 for the languages you can select.

RECALL

Sets command recall state to either &'iABLED (1) or DISABLED (0).

Qualifiers:

Listed in the parameter descriptions above.

KA67SIKA680/KA690

Firmware

Commands A-25

Examples:

»>

»>SET BFLAG 220

»>

»>SET

BOOT DOAO

»>

»>SET HOST/DOP/DSSI/BOS:O 0

Starting DOP server •••

DSSI Node 0 (SUSAN)

Copyright e

1990 Digital Equipment Corporation

DRVEXR Vl.0 0 5-JUL-1990 15:33:06

DRVTST V1.0 0 5-JUL-1990 15:33:06

HISTRY Vl.O D 5-JOL-1990 15:33:06

ERASE V1.0 0 5-JUL-1990 15:33:06

PARAMS Vl.0 0 5-JOL-1990 15:33:06

DIRECT·V1.0 0 5-JOL-1990 15:33:06

End of directory

Task Name?PARAMS

Copyright C 1990 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>STAT PATH

10 Path Block o

PB FF811ECC

6 PB FF811FDO

1 PB FF8120D4

4 PB FF8121D8

5 PB FF8122DC

2 PB FF8123EO

3 PB FF8124.E4

PARAMS>EXIT

Exiting •••

Remote Node

---------------

Internal Path

KFQSA

KFX

Vl.0

KAREN

RFX VlOl

RFX WILMA

BETTY

DSSII

3

RFX

VMS

VMS

VIOl

V10l

VS.O

BOOT

DGS_S DGS_R

------ -------

0 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

MSGS_S MSGS_R

- - - - - -

--------

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

14328

61

0

0

14328

61

Task Name?

Stopping DUP server •••

»>

»>SET

HOST/DOP/DSSI/BOS:O

0 PARAMS

Starting DUP server •••

DSSI Node 0 (SUSAN)

Copyright C 1990 Digital Equipment Corporation

PARAMS>SHOW NODE

Parameter Current Default Type Radix

NODENAME

SUSAN

RF71 String Ascii

B

A-26

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU

PARAMS>SHOW ALLCLASS

Parameter CUrrent Default

Type

Radix

ALLCLASS

PARAMS>EXI'r

Exiting ..•

1 o

Byte Dec

B

Stopping DOP server .•.

»>

»>SE'r HOST!NAINT/UgSSP 20001468

OQSSP Controller (772150)

Enter

Node o

1

4

5

SET, CLEAR, SHOW,

HELP ,

EXIT, or QUIT

CSR Address Model

772150

760334

760340

760344

21

21

21

21

7 ------ KFQSA ------

? help

Commands:

SET <node> /KFQSA

SET <node> <CSR address> <model>

CLEAR <node>

SHOW

HELP set KFQSA DSSI node number enable a DSSI device disable a DSSI device show current configuration print this text program the KFQSA don't program the KFQSA

EXIT

QUIT

Parameters:

?

<node>

<CSR_address>

<model> set

6

/kfqsa

? show

Node

CSR Address Model o

772150 21

1 760334 21

4

5

760340

760344

21

21 o to

7

760010

21 to 777774

(disk) or 22 (tape)

?

6 exit

------

KFQSA ------

Programming the KFgSA .••

»>

»>SE'r

LABGtJAGE

5

»>

»>SE'r

BAI.'r

RESTAR'r

»>

KA67SIKA680/KA690 Armware Commands A-27

A.2.1S

SHOW

The SHOW command displays the console parameter you specify.

Format:

SHOW

{parameter}

Parameters:

BFLAG

BOOT

CONTROLP

Displays the default R5 boot flags.

Displays the default boot device.

Shows the current state of Control-P halt recognition, either Enabled or Disabled.

DEVICE"

HALT

Displays all devices in the system.

Shows the user-defined halt action.

DSSI

ETHERNET

Shows the status of all nodes that can be found on the DSSI bus. For each node on the DSSI bus, the console displays the node number, the node name, and the boot name and type of the device, if available. The command does not indicate the "bootability" of the device.

The node that issues the command reports a node name of

"*".

The device information is obtained from the media type field of the

MSCP command GET UNIT STATUS.

In the case where the node is not running or is not capable of running an MSCP server, then no device information is displayed.

Displays hardware Ethernet address for all Ethernet adapters that can be found. Displays as blank if no Ethernet adapter is present.

LANGUAGE

MEMORY

Displays console language and keyboard type. Refer to the corresponding SET

LANGUAGE command for the meaning.

Displays main memory configuration board by board.

IFULL-Additionally, displays the normally inaccessible areas of memoty, such as the PFN bitmap pages. the console scratch memoty pages, the Q22-bus scatter-gather map pages. Also reports the addresses of bad pages, as defined by the bitmap.

A-28 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU

QBUS

Displays all Q22-bus I/O addresses that respond to an aligned word read, and speculative device name information. For each address, the console displays the address in the VAX. I/O space in hex, the address as it would appear in the Q22-bus

I/O space in octal, and the word data that was read in hex.

This command may take several minutes to complete. Press IcTRLIC I to terminate the command. During execution, the command disables the scatter·gather map.

RECALL

Shows the current state of command recall, either ENABLED or

DISABLED.

Displays all RLOI and RL02 disks that appear on the Q22-bus.

RLV12

UQSSP

SCSI

Displays the status of all disks and tapes that can be found on the

Q22-bus that support the UQSSP protocol. For each such disk or tape on the Q22-bus, the firmware displays the controller number, the controller CSR address, and the boot name and type of each device connected to the controller. The command does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.

This information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP command GET UNIT STATUS. The console does not display device information if a node is not running (or cannot ron) an MSCP server.

Shows any

SCSI devices in the system (TLZ04 or RRD4O-series.)

TRANSLATION Shows any virtual addresses that map to the specified physical address.

The firmware uses the cu.rrent values of page table base and length registers to perform its search; it is assumed that page tables have been properly built.

VERSION

Displays the current firmware version.

Qualifiers:

Listed in the parameter descriptions above.

Examples:

»>

»>SHOW ~

00000220

»>

»>SHOW BOOT

DOAO

»>SHOW CORTROLP

»>

»>SHOW DEVICE

KA680-A Vn.n VMBn.n

KA675/KA680IKA690

Rrmware Commands A-29

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (R7CZZC)

-DIAO (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (R7ALUC)

-DIAl (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node

2

(R7EB3C)

-DIA2 (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6

(*)

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

(* )

SCSI Adapter 0 (761300), SCSI ID 7

-DKA100 (DEC TLZ04)

Ethernet Adapter

-EZAO (08-00-2B-OB-29-14)

»>

»>SHOW DSSI

DSSI Bus 0 Node 0 (R7CZZC)

-DIAO (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1

-DIAl (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 2

-DIA2 (RF71)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 6

DSSI Bus 1 Node 7

»>

»>SBOW

E'l'BERRET

Ethernet Adapter

(R7ALUC)

(R7EB3C)

(* )

(* )

-EZAO (08-00-2B-OB-29-14)

»>

»>SBOW

HALT restart

»>

»>SBOW

LAlfGUAGE

English (United States/Canada)

»>

»>SHOW

MEMORY

Memory 0: 00000000 to 01EEEEEE, 32MB, 0 bad pages,

Memory 0: 02000000 to 03FFFFFF, 32MB, 0 bad pages

Total of 64MB, 0 bad pages, 128 reserved pages

»>

»>SHOW MEHORY/FOLL

Memory 0: 00000000 to 01FFFFFF, 32MB, 0 bad pages

Memory 0: 02000000 to 03EEEEEE, 32MB, 0 bad pages

Total of 64MB, 0 bad pages, 128 reserved pages

Memory Bitmap

-00FF3COO to OOFF3FFF, 8 pages

Console Scratch Area

-OOFF4000 to OOFF7FFF, 32 pages

A-30 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

Q-bus Map

-OFF8000 to OFFFFFF, 64 pages

Scan of Bad Pages

»>

»>SBOK gaos

Scan of Qbus I/O Space

-20001920 (774440)

=

FF08 DELQA/DESQA

-20001922 (774442)

-20001924 (774444)

=

FFOO

=

FF2B

-20001926 (774446)

=

FF08

-20001928 (774450)

=

FFD7

-2000192A (77(452)

=

FF41

-2000192C (774454)

=

0000

-2000192E (774456)

-20001F40 (777500)

=

1030

=

0020 IPCR

Scan of Qbus Memory Space

»>

»>SBOK

RLV12

»>

»>SBOW SCSI

SCSI Adapter 0 (761300), SCSI ID 7

-DKA100 (DEC TLZ04)

»>

»>SBOW TRANSLATION 1000

V 80001000

»>

»>SBOW ogSSP

UQSSP Disk Controller 0 (772150)

-DUAO (RF30)

UQSSP Disk Controller 1 (760334)

-DUB1 (RF30)

UQSSP Disk Controller 2 (760340)

-DOC4 (RF30)

UQSSP Disk Controller 3 (760344)

-DUDS (RF30)

»>

»>

»>SBOW VERSION

KA680-A Vn.n VMBn.n

»>

KA67SIKA680/KA690

Firmware Commands

A-31

A.2.16 START

The START command starts instruction execution at the address you specify. If no address is given, the current PC is used. If memory mapping is enabled, macro instructions are executed from virtual memory, and the address is treated as a virtual address. The START command is equivalent to a DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a CONTINUE. It does not perform a processor initialization.

Fonnat:

START [(address)]

Arguments:

[address] The address at which to begin execution. This address is loaded into the user's

PC.

Example:

»>STAR.T 1000

A.2.17

TEST

The TEST command invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test number. If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), all tests allowed to be executed from the console terminal are executed. The console accepts an optional

list

of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.

Refer to Chapter 5 for a detailed explanation of the diagnostics.

Format:

TEST [(test_number) [(test_arguments)]]

Arguments:

A two-digit hex number specifying the test to be executed.

Up to five additional test arguments. These arguments are accepted, but they have no meaning to the console.

Example:

»>'l'EST 0

66 •• 65 •. 64 •• 63 •• 62 •• 61 •• 60 .• 59 •• 58 •• 57 •. 56 .• 55 •. 54 •• 53 •• 52 •• 51 ••

50 .. 49 •• 48 •• 47 .• 46 •. 45 .• 44 •• 43 •. 42 •• 41 •• 40 •• 39 •• 38 •• 37 .• 36 •. 35 •.

34 •• 33 •• 32 •• 31 .• 30 •• 29 .• 28 .• 27 •• 26 •• 25 .• 24 .. 23 •• 22 •. 21 .• 20 •• 19 ••

18 •• 17 •. 16 •• 15 •• 14 •• 13 •• 12 .• 11 •• 10 •• 09 •• 08 •• 07 •• 06 •• 05 .• 04 •• 03 ••

A-32 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU

A.2.18 UNJAM

The UNJAM command performs an I/O bus reset, by writing a

1

(one) to

IPR 55 (decimal).

Format:

UNJAM

Example:

»>ONJ'AM

»>

A.2.19 X-Binary Load and Unload

The X command is for use by automatic systems communicating with the console.

The X command loads or unloads (that is, writes to memory, or reads from memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial line

(regardless of console type) starting at the specified address.

-Format:

X {address) {count} CR (line_checksum)

{data)

{data_checksum)

If bit 31 of the count is clear, data is received by the console and deposited into memory. If bit 31 is set, data is read from memory and sent by the console. The remaining bits in the count are a positive number indicating the number of bytes to load or unload.

The console accepts the command upon receiving the carriage return.

The next byte the console receives is the command checksum, which is not echoed. The command checksum is verified by adding all command characters, includin.g the checksum and separating space (but not including the terminating carriage return, rubouts, or cbaractei'S deleted by

,uhout), into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If no errors occur, the result is zero. If the command checksum is correct, the console responds with the input prompt and either sends data to the requester or prepares to receive

data.

If the command checksum is in error, the console responds with an error message. The intent is to prevent inadvertent operator entry into a mode where the console is accepting characters from the keyboard as data, with no escape mechanism possible. with the input prompt (»», then accepts the specified number of bytes of data for depositing to memory, and an additional byte of received data checksum. The data is verified by adding all data characters and the checksum character into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If the final

KA6751KA680/KA690 Rrmware Commands A-33

content of the register is nonzero, the data or checksum are in error, and the console responds with an error-message.

If the command is a binary unload (bit 31 of the count is set), the console responds with the input prompt (»», followed by the specified number of bytes of binary data. As each byte is sent, it is added to a checksum register initially set to zero. At the end of the transmission, the two's complement of the low byte of the register is sent. the data checksum is incorrect on a load, or memory or line errors occur during the transmission of data, the entire transmission is completed, then the console issues an error message. If an error occurs during loading, the contents of the memory being loaded are unpredictable.

The console represses echo while it is receiving the data string and checksums.

The console terminates all flow control when it receives the carriage return at the end of the command line in order to avoid treating flow control characters from the terminal as valid command line checksums.

You can control the console serial line during a binary unload using control characters

nCTRl..CI, ICTRUSI, ICTRlJOI,

and so on). You cannot control the console serial line during a binary load, since all received characters are valid binary data.

The console has the following timing requirements:

• It must receive data being loaded with a binary load command at a rate of at least one byte every 60 seconds.

• It must receive the command checksum that precedes the data within

60 seconds of the carriage return that terminates the command line.

• It must receive the data checksum within 60 seconds of the last

data

byte.

If any of these timing requirements are not met, then the console aborts the transmission by issuing an error message and returning to the console prompt.

The entire command, including the checksum, can be sent to the console as a single burst of characters at the specified character rate of the console serial line. The console is able to receive at least

4

Kbytes of data in a single X command.

A-34

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU

A.2.20

!

(Comment)

The comment character (an exclamation point)· is used to document command sequences. It can appear anywhere on the command line. All characters following the comment character are ignored.

Format:

!

Example:

»>!

The console ignores this line.

»>

KA67SIKA680/KA690

Firmware Commands

A-35

Appendix B

Address Assignments

B.1 KA675/KA680/KA690 General Local Address

Space Map

VAX Memory Space

Address Range

0000 0000 1FFF FFFF

VAX I/O Space

-------------

Addres s Range

-----------------

2000 0000

-

2000 1FFF

2000 2000

-

2003 FFFF

2008 0000

-

201F FFFF

2020 0000

2400 0000

2008 0000

2C08 0000

3000 0000

3040 0000

3400 0000

3800 0000

3COO 0000

E004 0000

-

23FF FFFF

-

27FF FFFF

-

2BFF FFFF

-

2FFF FFFF

-

303F FFFF

-

33FF FFFF

-

37FF FFFF

-

3BFF FFFF

-

3FFF FFFF

-

E007 FFFF

Contents

Local Memory Space (512MB)

Contents

Local Q22-Bus I/O Space (8KB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (248KB)

Local Register I/O Space (1.5MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (62.5MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Local Q22-Bus Memory Space (4MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (60MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Reserved Local I/O Space (64MB)

Local ROM Space

Address Assignments

B-1

B.2 KA675/KA680/KA690 Detailed Local Address

Space Map

Local Memory Space (up to 512MB)

Q22-bus Map - top 32KB of Main Memory

0000 0000 1FFF FFFF

VAX

I/O Space

-------------

Local Q22-bus I/O Space

Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Q22-bus Floating Address Space

User Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Interprocessor Comm Reg

Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Local Register I/O Space

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

SHACl SSWCR

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

SHAC1 SSHMA

SHACl PQBBR

SHACl PSR

SHACl PESR

SHAC1 PFAR

SHAC1 PPR

SHAC1 PMCSR

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

SHACl PCQOCR

SHAC1 PCQICR

SHAC1 PCQ2CR

SHAC1 PCQ3CR

SHAC1 PDFQCR

SHAC1 PMFQCR

SHAC1 PSRCR

SHAC1 PECR

SHAC1 PDCR

SHAC1 PICR

SHACl PMTCR

SHAC1 PMTECR

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

2000 0000 2000 1FFF

2000 0000 2000 0007

2000 0008 2000 07FF

2000 0800 2000 OFFF

2000 1000 2000 1F3F

2000 1F40

2000 IF44 2000 IFFF

2000 2000 2003 FFFF

2000 4000 2000 402F

2000 4030

2000 4034 2000 4043

2000 4044

2000 4048

2000 404C

2000 4050

2000 4054

2000 4058

2000 405C

2000 4060 2000 407F

2000 4080

2000 4084

2000 4088

2000 408C

2000 4090

2000 4094

2000 4098

2000 409C

2000 40AO

2000 40A4

2000 40A8

2000 40AC

2000 40BO -

2000 422F

B-2

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

KA675/KA680/KA690 DETAILED LOCAL ADDRESS SPACE MAP (Cont.)

SHAC2 SSWCR

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

SHAC2 SSBMA

SHAC2 PQBBR

SHAC2 PSR

SHAC2 PESR

SHAC2 PFAR

SHAC2 PPR

SHAC2 PMCSR

Reser~led Local Register

I/O

Space

SHAC2 PCQOCR

SHAC2 PCQ1CR

SHAC2 PCQ2CR

SHAC2 PCQ3CR

SHAC2 PDFQCR

SHAC2 PMFQCR

SHAC2 PSRCR

SHAC2 PECR

SHAC2 PDCR

SHAC2 PICR

SHAC2 PMTCR

SHAC2 PMTECR

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

·2000 4230

2000 4234 - 2000 4243

2000 4244

2000 4248

2000 424C

2000 4250

2000 4254

2000 4258

2000 425C

2000 4260 - 2000 427F

2000 4280

2000 4284

2000 4288

2000 428C

2000 4290

2000 4294

2000 4298

2000 429C

2000 42AO

2000 42A4

2000 42A8

2000 42AC

2000 42BO - 2000

7FFF

NICSRO - Vector Add, IPL, Sync/Async

NICSRl - Polling Demand Register

NICSR2 - Reserved

NICSR3 - Receiver List Address·

NICSR4 - Transmitter List Address

NICSRS - Status Register

NICSR6 - Command and Mode Register

NICSR7 - System Base Address

NICSR8 - Reserved

NICSR9 -

Wat~~dog

Timers

NICSRlO- Reserved

NICSRll- Rev Num & Missed Frame. Count

NICSR12- Reserved

NICSR13- Breakpoint Address

NICSR14- Reserved

NICSR15- Diagnostic Mode & Status

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

2000 8000

2000 8004

2000 8008

2000 800C

2000 8010

2000 8014

2000 8018

2000 801C

2000 8020*

2000 8024*

2000 8028*

2000 802C*

2000 8030*

2000 8034*

2000 8038*

2000 803C

2000 8040 - 2003 FFFF

Address Assignments B-3

Q-22 Bus Local Register I/O Space

DMA System Configuration Register

DMA System Error Register

DMA Master Error Address Register

DMA Slave Error Address Register

Q22-bus Map Base Register

Reserved Local Register

I/O

Space

2008 0000 - 201F FFFF

(SCR) 2008 0000

(DSER) 2008 0004

(QBEAR)2008 0008

(DEAR) 2008 OOOC

(QBMBR)2008 0010

2008 0014 - 2008 3FFF

Boot and Diagnostic Reg (32 Copies)

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

(BDR)2008 4000 - 2008 407C

2008 4080 - 2008 7FFF

B-4 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

KA675/KA680/KA690

DETAILED LOCAL ADDRESS SPACE MAP (Cont.)

Q22-bus Map Registers CQMRs) 2008 8000 - 2008 FFFF

Reserved Local Register

IIO

Space 2009 0000 - 2013 FFFF

SSC CSRs sse sse

Base Address Register

Configuration Register

(SSCBR) 2014 0000

(SSCCR) 2014 0010

CP Bus Timeout Control Register (CBTCR) 2014 0020

Diagnostic LED Register CDLEDR) 2014 0030

Reserved Local Register I/O Space 2014 0034

=

2014 006B

VAX IPRs implemented by NCA

Interval Clock Control Status Reg (ICCS) 2100 0060

Next Interval Count Register (NICR) 2100 0064

Interval Count Register (ICR) 2100 0068

NMC CSRs o-bit Data Registers (MOORs) 2101 0000 - 2101 7FFF

Main Memory Co~figuration Reg 0 (MEMCONO) 2101 8000

Main Memory Configuration Reg 1 2101 8004

Main Memory Configuration Reg 2

Main Memory Configuration Reg 3

2101 8008

2101 800C

Main Memory Configuration Reg 4

Main Memory Configuration Reg 5

2101 8010

2101 8014

Main Memory Configuration Reg 6

2101 8018

Main Memory Configuration Reg 7 (MEMCON7) 2101 801C

Main Memory Signature Register 0 (MEMSIGO) 2101 8020

Main Memory Signature Register 1

2101 8024

Main Memory Signature Register 2

Main Memory Signature Register 3

2101 8028

2101 S02e

Main Memory Signature Register 4

2101 8030

Main Memory Signature Register 5

Main Memory Signature Register 6

2101 8034

2101 8038

Main Memory Signature Register

7 (MEMSIG7) 2101 803C

Main Memory Error Address Register

(MEAR)

2101 8040

Main Memory Error Status Register (MESR)

2101 8044

Main Memory Mode Control and (MMCDSR) 2101 8048

Diagnostic Register

O-bit Address and Mode Register

(MOAMR) 2101 804C

Address Assignments

B-5

NCA CSRs

Error Status Register ("CESR) 2102 0000

Mode Control and Diagnostic Reg (CMCDSR) 2102 0004

CP1 Slave Error Address Register (CSEAR1) 2102 0008

CP2 Slave Error Address Register (CSEAR2) 2102 OOOC

CP1 IO Error Address Register (CIOEAR1) 2102 0010

CP2 IO Error Address Register (CIOEAR2) 2102 0014

NDAL Error Address Register (CNEAR) 2102 0018

Local UVROM Space

VAX System Type Register (In ROM)

Local UVROM (Halt Protected)

E004 0000 - E007 FFFF

E004 0004

E004 0000 - E007 FFFF

B-6 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

**********************************************************************

The following addresses allow those KA690

In~~rnal

Processor

Registers that are implemented in the SSC chip (External, Internal

Processor Registers) to be accessed via the local I/O page. These addresses are documented for diagnostic purposes only and should not be used by non-diagnostic programs.

Time Of Year Register 2014 006C

Console Storage Receiver Status

Console Storage Receiver Data

2014 0070*

2014 0074*

Console Storage Transmitter Status 2014 0078*

Console Storage Transmitter Data

2014

007C*

Console Receiver Control/Status

Console Receiver Data Buffer

2014 0080

2014 0084

Console Transmitter Control/Status

2014 0088

Console Transmitter Data Buffer 2014 008C

Reserved Local Register I/O Space 2014 0090 - 2014 OODB

I/O Bus Reset Register 2014 aODC

Reserved Local Register I/O Space 2014 OOEO

Reserved Local Register I/O Space 2014 OOFC - 2014 OOFF

* These registers are not fully implemented, accesses yield

UNPREDICTABLE results.

**********************************************************************

Local Register I/O Space (Cont.)

Timer 0 Control Register

Timer o

Interval Register

Timer

Timer a

Next Interval Register a

Interrupt Vector

Timer 1 Control Register

Timer

1

Interval Register

Timer

1

Next Interval Register

Timer 1 Interrupt Vector

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

2014 0100

2014 0104

2014 0108

2014 010C

2014 0110

2014 0114

2014 0118

2014 011C

2014 0120 - 2014 012F

BDR Address Decode Match Register

2014 0140

BDR Address Decode Mask Register 2014 0144

Reserved Local Register I/O Space 2014 0138 - 2014 03FF

Battery Backed-Up RAM 2014 0400 - 2014 07FF

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

2014 0800 - 201F FFFF

Reserved Local I/O Space 2020 0000 - 2FFF FFFF

Local Q22-bus Memory Space

Reserved Local Register I/O Space

3000 0000 - 303F FFFF

3040 0000 - 3FFF FFFF

Address

AsSignments

B-7

8.3 External, Internal P19cessor Registers

Several of the Internal Processor Registers (lPRs) on the KA690 are implemented in the NCA or SSC chip rather than the CPU chip. These registers are referred to as External Internal Processor Registers and are listed below.

IPR #

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

55

Register Name

===::a==========

Time of Year Register

Console Storage Receiver Status

Console Storage Receiver Data

Console Storage Transmitter Status

Console Storage Tra.."smitter Data

Console Receiver Control/Status

Console Receiver Data Buffer

Console Transmitter Control/Status

Console Transmitter

~ata

Buffer

I/O System Reset Register

Abbrev.

====

TOY

CSRS*

CSRD*

CSTS*

CSDB*

RXCS

RXDB

TXCS

TXDB

IORESET

* These registers are not fully implemented, accesses yield

UNPREDICTABLE results.

B.4 Global Q22-bus Address Space Map

Q22-bus Memory Space

Q22-bus Memory Space (Octal)

Q22-bus I/O Space (BBS7 ~sserted)

Q22-bus I/O Space (Octal)

Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Q22-bus Floating Address Space

User Reserved Q22-bus I/O Space

Reserved Q22-bus

IIO

Space

Interprocessor Comm Reg

Reserved Q22-bus

IIO

Space

0000 0000 - 1777 7777

1776 0000 - 1777 7777

1776 0000 - 1776 0007

1776 0010 - 1776 3777

1776 4000 - 1776 7777

1777 0000 - 1777 7477

1777 7500

1777 7502 - 1777 7777

B-8 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

B.5

Processor Registers

Table B-1: Processor Registers

Register Name

Number

Mnemonic(Dec) (Hex) Type Impl Cat

~d.

Kernel Stack

Pointer

Ezecutive Stack Pointer

SuperYiIor Stack Pointer

User Stack Pointer

Int.ernapt

Stack

Pointer

BeIerIed

PO Sue

Resister

PO

LeDstb

Bqiater

PI

Base Begis&er

PI LeDgU1 !leJiater s,atem Bale

Regm.er s,atem

LeDath

Bqilter

CPU

IdeDtUlcation

KSP

ESP

SSP

USP

ISP

BaerYed

Proceu

Ccmtz'Ol mock

Base

Syatca

Control Block Base

Interrupt Priority !.eYe}1

PCBB

SCBB

IPL

ASTLeYel1

ASn.VL

Software

Interrupt

Bequest Begi&ter SIBR

Software IntemJpt Summay

~

BaerYed

POBR

POLR

PIBR

P1LR

SBR

SLR

CPU1D

0

2

9

8

2

3

3

BW

NVAX 1-1

• •

RW

NVAX 1-1

~1

5

3

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

0

1

10

11

18

19

2)

12

13

14

21 15

~23

16

9

A

B

E

F

C

D

BW

BW

BW

RW

W

RW

RW

RW

RW

BW

RW

RW

RW

RW

BW

BW

NVAX 1-1

WAX

1-1

WAX

1-1

NVAX

1-2

NVAX

1-2

NVAX

1-2

WAX 1-2

WAX

1-2

NVAX 1-2

NVAX 2-1

3

NVAX

1-1

NVAX 1-1

NVAX 1-1

WAX 1-1

WAX

1-1

NVAX 1-1

3

ElOOOOl.

ElOOOO3C

ElOOOOS8 llnitialized on reset

Address Assignments B-9

Register Name

InterYal Coanter Cont:ollStatul

Next Interval Count

InIel'YBl Count

Time o!Year Bqi.ater

Conaole Storap

BeceiYer

Stat.us

Conaole Stonp

ReceiYer

Data

Storap TnInaIitter Status

Coaaole

Storqe

Transmit.ter Data

Couole BeI:eiftr

CoatrollStawa

CoIIMle

BeI:eiftr

Data

BuB'er

'l'nuIamitter Cont.ftlVStatUl

Console

'l'ranamitter Data Buffer

BaerYed

Resened

Machine Check

Error

Register

Reeerved

Resened

Reserved

Console

SaYed

PC

Console

SaYed

PSL

Reserved

I/O System Reset Rqiste.r

Table B-1 (Cont.):

Processor 1teglsters

Number

Mnemonic(J)ec) (Hex) Type Impl Cat

ICCS 24 18 RW NCA

2-7

El000060

NICR

25 19

RW

NCA

3-7

El000064

ICR

TODa

CSRS

CSRD

CSTS

CSTD

RXCS

RXDB

TXCS

TXDB

26

Z1

28

29

30

31

32

33

34 as lA

IB lC

1D

IE

IF

20

21

22

23

RW

RW

RW a

J1.W

W

J1.W a

RW

W

NCA

3-7 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3

El000068

ElOOOO6C

El000070

El000074

El000018

E100001C

El000080

El000084

El0000S8

El00008C

36

24 El000090

MCESR

37

38

39

2S

26

27

W

3

3

NVAX 2-1

S

El000094

ElOOOO9C

ElOOOOAO

SAVPC

SAVPSL

IORESET

40

41

28

29

42 2A

43

2B

44-01 2C

55

37

R

R

W

3

NVAX

3

2-1

NVAX

2·1

3 sse

2-3

El0000A4

El0000BO

ElOOOODC

8-10 KA675/KA680/KA690 CPU

Table B-1 (Cont.): Processor Registers

Number

Register Name

Memory Management Enahle

1t3

Mnemonic(Dec) (Hex) Type Impl Cat

MAPEN 56 38 RW NVAX

1-2

~d-

Trmalation Buffer Invalidate All3 TBIA 39 W NVAX 1-1

Trmalation Buffer Invalidate Sinsle3 TBIS

S1

58 3A

W NVAX 1-1

BuerYed

Belerved

Syatem ldentiication

Trmalation Buffer Check

IPL 14 Interrupt Acx.5

IPL 15

Interrupt

A~

IPL 16 Interrupt

A~

IPL 17 Interrupt

A~

Clear Write BufferS

Beaerved

Baerved for'VM

RearYedfor'VM

Be.erYed for' VM

ReIerYed

Interrupt

Syat.e

S&atua Register

FerfonuDce MoDitoriDl' Facility Co1mL

Patchable

CcIIltrol

Store

CcIIltrol

Register

Eboz CcIIltrol

Becia&er

MbaIt TB Tq FillS sm

TBCHK

IAIO."

IAIO.5

IAKl6

IAIO.7

CWB

INTS'lS

PMFCNT

PCSCR

Eell

KTBTAG

59

60

62

63

64:

65

66 fn

68

44

69-99 45

100 6(

122

123

124

125

126

101 6S

66

102

103-121 fn

'IA

1E

'lB

'IC

'7D

40

41

42

-i3

3B

3C

3E

SF

RW

RW

WO

RW

W

R

R

R

R

R

W

RW

3

3

NVAX 1-1

NVAX 1-1 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3 sse

2-3

3

3

NVAX 2-1

NVAX 2-1

NVAX 2-1

NVAX 2-1

NVAX 2-1

3

3

S

El0000EC

El0000FO

El000100

El000104

El000108

E100010C

El000110

El000114

E1000190

El000194

El000198

El00019C

1

Initialized on reset

3Change broadcast to vector unit if present

STestability and diaguQsti~ ~c;.e only; not fQr software

'!!!!e in normAl operat-in!l

Address Assignments 8-11

Table B-1 (Cont.):

Processc:ir.Reglsters

Number

Register Name

Mbax

TB PrE FillS

Mnemonic(l)ec) (Hex)

1YPe

Impl Cat

M.TBPTE 121

'TF

W NVAX 2-1 lfr° Ad ess

-

Cbox Control Begiater

ReaerYecl

Bcache Data ECC

Bcache

Error

Tag Statu.

Bcache Error Tag b2dex

Bcache

Error

Tag

Bcache

Error Data

Status

Bcache Error Data Index

Bcache Error

ECC

Raenecl

ReaerYecl

Fill Error Addreu

Fill Error Statu

ReaerYecl

NDAL Error Status

Raenecl

NDAL Error Output Address

ReaerYecl

NDAL Error Output Command

Besened

NDAL Error Data High

CCTL

BCDECC

BCETSTS

BCETIDX

BCETAG

BCEDSTS

BCEDmX

BCEDECC

CEFADR

CEFSTS

NESTS

NEOADR

NEOCMD

NEDA.TBI

173

114

175

116

169

170

111

172

160

161

162

163

164

165

166

167

168

111

118

119

180

AS

A1

ItS

AS

A3

A4

AS

AO

Al

A2

AA

AS

AC

AD

AE

Itl'

SO

Bl

B2

B3

B4

R

R

R

RW

W

RW

R

RW

R

RW

RW

R

R

R

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-6

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-6

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-6

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-5

5Testability and diagnostic use only; not for soaware use in normal operation

8-12

KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU

Table B-1 (Cont.):

Processor Registers

Number

Register Name

Reaerved

Mnemonic(1)ec) (Hex) Type

Impl Cat

181

B5 NVAX

2-6

~d.

NDAL Error Data

Low NEDATLO It 182

183

B6

B7

NVAX

2-5

NVAX 2-6

BeterYed

NDAL Error

Input Command NEICMD

184 B8

It

Reserved

NVAX 2-S

NVAX

2-6

VIC Memory Addraa Register

VIC

Tag

Register

VIC Data Register

V1dAR

VTAG

VDATA

!box ConUol aDd Status Begister ICSR

!box Branch Prediction Control

Regiat,erS

BPCR·

BeterYed

!box

BackDp peS

!box Backup PC with KLOG Un.;mS

BeIened

Kbaz PO Bale BepaurS

Kbaz PO Length

Regil~

Kbaz PI

Bale

Begisur5

Kbaz PI Length RegisurS

Kbaz

System

Sue

Regiar.er5

Kbaz

SJStem

!.eDIth

BesistezS

KbCIIt Memozylianqement

EnableS

Kbaz Phylical Addreu Mode

KbCIIt

MKE

Addn=a

BPC

BPCUNW

MPOBR

MPOLK

MPlBR

MPlLK

MSBIl

KSLR

IOW'EN

PAKODE

KKEADR

185-207 B9 ms

DO

2D9

210

211

212

213

Dl

227

?2S

229

230

231

214

224

D6

21S

D7

216-223

D8

EO

22S

El

226 E2

E3

E7

E4

E5

E6

D2

D3

D4

DS

232 ES

RW

RW

IN{

RW

RW

B

B

KW

KW

JlW

RW

RW

RW

JlW

RW

R

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-5

NVAX 2-S

NVAX

2-6

NVAX 2-S

NVAX 2-S

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-S

NVAX

NVAX

2-6

2-6

NVAX

2-S

NVAX 2-6

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

5tJ'estability and diagnostic use only; not for sobare use in normal operation

Address

As~ignments

8-13

Register Name

Mbalt MME PTE Address

MbGX!OIE Status

RaerTed

:MbaIt TB Parity Addresa

Mbcm TB Parity Status

ReIerw:d

Resened

Baened llaerftcl

MbGX PCIICbe Parity Add.nA

Rnened

MbGX Pcacbe

Statas

BeIened

ReIerw:d

Resened

MbGX Pcacbe Control

Reserved

Reeerved

ReterYeCi

ReterYed

Raerved.

ReserYeCi .

Raerved.

Table B-1 (Cont.): Processor- Registers

Number

Mnemomc(l)ee) <Hex} Type Impl Cat

MMEPTE 233 E9

R NVAX

2-5

MMESTS 234 EA R

TBADR

TBSTS

PCADR

PCSTS

PCCTL

235

Z36

237

238

239

243

241

245

246

240

241

242

247

248

249

2SO

251

252

2S3

2S4

2S5

EB

EC

FC

FD

FE

ED

EE

EF

PO

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

F7

F8

F9

FA

FB

FF

R

RW

It

RW

RW

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

.2-6

NVAX

2-5

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-6

NVAX 2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

NVAX

2-6

8-14 KA675/KA680/KA690

CPU

Table B-1 (Cont.): Processor Registers

Number

Register Name

Mnem.onic(Dec) (Hex) Type Impl Cat

110 Adaress

Unimplemented. 100-

OOFFFFFF

01000000-

FFfFIlliii

3

2

Type:

R

=

Read~nly register

RW

W

=

Read-write register

=

Write-only register

Impl(emented):

NVAX

= Implemented in the

NVAX CPU chip

System

=

Implemented in the system environment

Vector = Implemented in the optional vector unit or its

NDAL interface

Cat(egory),

class-subclass,

where: class is one of:

1

2

=

Implemented as per

DEC standard 032

=

NVAX-specific implementation which is unique or different from the DEC standard 032 implementation

3

=

Not implemented internally; converted to I/O space read or write and passed to system environment

subclass is one of:

1

2

3

=

Processed as appropriate by Ebox microcode

=

Converted to

Mbox IPR number and processed via internal IPR command

=

Processed by internal IPR command, then converted to

IIO

space read or write and passed to system environment

4-

=

If virtual machine option is implemented, processed as in 1, othenrise as in 3

5

6

=

Processed by internal IPR command

= May be block decoded; reference causes UNDEFINED behavior

7

=

Full interval timer may be implemented in the system environment. Subset ICes implemented in

NVAX

CPU chip is

8

=

Converted to MFVP MSYNC

Address Assignments 8-15

8.6 IPR Address Space __ Decoding

Table B-2: IPR Address Space Decoding

IPRGroup

IPRAddress Range

Mnemonic2 (hex) Contents

Normal

Bcache

Tag

BCTAG

OOOOOOOO .• OOOOOOFFI 256 individual

IPRs.

01000000 .. 011FFFEOl64k

Bcache tag

IPRs, each separated by

2O(hex) from the previous one.

Bache

Deallocate BCFLUSH

01400000 •. 015FFFEOl64k Bcaclie tag deallocate

IPRs, each separated by

20(hex) from the previous one.

Pcache Tag

Pcache Data Parity

PCTAG

PCDAP

01800000 •• 01SOlFE0

1

256 Pcache tag

IPRs,

128 for each

Pcache set, each separated by

2O(hex) from the previous one.

OlCOOOOO •• OICOIFF8

1

1024 Pcache data parity

512

1PRs, for each

Pcache set, each separated by 8(bex) from the previous one. lUnused fields in the IPR addresses for these groups should be zero. Neither hardware nor microcode detects and faults on an address in which these bits are non-zero.

Although noncontiguous address ranges are shown for these groups, the entire IPR address space maps into one of these groups. If fields are non-zero, the operation of the CPU is UNDEFINED.

2The mnemonic is for the first IPR in the block

Processor registers in all groups except the normal group are processed entirely by the NVAX CPU chip and will never appear on the NDAL. This is also true for a number of the IPRs in the normal group. IPRs in the normal group that are not processed by the NVAX CPU chip are converted into

IJO

space references and passed

to

the system environment via a read or write command on the NDAL.

Each of the 256 possible IPRs in the normal group are of longword length, so a 1-KB block of 110 space is required to convert each possible IPR to a unique 110 space longword. This block starts at address E1000000 (hex).

Conversion of an IPR address to an I/O space address in this block is done by shifting the IPR address left into bits <9:2>, filling bits <1:0> with zeros, and merging in the base address of the block. This can be expressed by the equation:

[0 ADDRESS

=

EIOOOOOO+

(IPR NUMBER

*

4)

8-16 KA67S/KA680/KA690 CPU

Appendix C

ROM Partitioning

This section describes ROM partitioning and subroutine entry points

that

are public and are guaranteed to be compatible over future versions of the firmware. An entry point is the address at which any subroutine or subprogram will start execution .

C.1 Firmware EPROM Layout

The

KA6751KA6801KA690 has

512

Kbytes of FEPROM. Unlike previous

Q22-bus based processors, there is no duplicate decoding of the FEPROM into halt-protected and halt-unprotected spaces. The entire FEPROM is halt-protected.

ROM Partitioning

C-1

Figure C-1: KA675IKA6801KA690 FEPROM Layout

20040000

20040006

20040008

2004000C

20040010

20040014

2004001c

2005F800

2005FFFC

Branch Instruction

System 10 Extension

PC$MSG_OUT_NOLF_R4

CP$READ_WITH_PRMPT_R4

Rsvd Mfg L200 Testing

Def Boot Dev Dscr Ptr

Def Boot Flags Ptr

Console, Diagnostic, and Boot Code

EPROM Checksum

Reserved for Digital

4 Pages Reserved for Customer Use

MLC>OO7698

The first instruction executed on halts is a branch around the System ID

Extension (SIE) and the callback entry points. This allows these public data structures to reside in fixed locations in the FEPROM.

The callback area entry points provide a simple interface to the currently defined console for VMB and secondary bootstraps. This is documented further in the next section.

The fixed area checksum is the sum of longwords from 20040000 to the checksum inclusive. This checksum is distinct from the checksum that the rest of the console uses.

The console, diagnostic and boot code constitute the bulk of the firmware.

This code is field upgradable. The console checksum is from 20044000 to the checksum inclusive.

The memory between the console checksum and the user area at the end of the FEPROM is reserved for Digital for future expansion of the firmware.

The contents of this area is set to FF.

C-2 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

The last 4096 bytes of FEPROM is reserved for customer use and is not included in the console checksum. During a PROM bootstrap with PRBO as the selected boot device, this block is the tested for a PROM "signature block".

C.1.1 System Identification Registers

The firmware and operating system software reference two registers to determine the processor on which they are running. The first, the System

Identification register (SID), is a NVAX internal processor register. The second, the System Identification Extension register (8IE), is a firmware register located in the FEPROM.

C.1.1.1 PR$_SID (IPR 62)

The SID longword can be read from IPR 62 using the MFPR instruction.

This longword value is processor specific, however, the layout of this register is shown in

Figure C-2. A desciption of each field is provided in Table C-l.

Figure C-2: SID: System identification Register

31

2423

Reserved

0807 00

Version

Ml.O-OO7699

Table C-1: System Identification Register

Field Name

RW

Description

31:24

CPU_TYPE

I'D

CPU type is the processor specific identification code.

OA:CVAX

OB:R1GEL

13:

NVAX

14:

SOC

24:8

7:0 reserved

VERSION

I'D

I'D

Reserved for future use.

Version of the microcode.

ROM Partitioning C-3

C.1.1.2 SIE (20040004)

The System Identification Extension register is an extention to the SID and is used to further differentiate between hardware configurations. The SID identifies which CPU and microcode is executing, and the SIE identifies what module and firmware revision are present. Note, the fields in this register are dependent on SID<31:24>(CPU_TYPE).

By convention, all VAX 4000 systems implement a longword at physical location 20040004 in the firmware FEPROM for the SIE. The layout of the SIE is shown in Figure

C-3. A description of each field is provided in

Table C-2.

Figure

0-3:

SIE: System IdentHicatlon Extension (20040004)

31 2423

Version

16 15

0807

00

Variant

ML().OO7700

Table

C-2:

System Identification Extension

Field Name RW Description

31:24 SYS_TYPE ro This field identifies the type of system for a specific processor.

01: Q22-bus single processor system.

23:16

15:8

VERSION ro This field indentifies the resident version of the firmware encoded as two hexadecimal digits. For example, if the banner displays

V5.0, then this field is 50 (hex).

SYS_SUB_TYPE ro This field indenti.6.es the particular system subtype.

01:KA650

02: KA640

03: KA655

04: KA670

05: KA660

06:KA.680

07:KA690

OC: KA675

7:0 VARIANT ro This field indentifies the particular system variant.

C-4

KA675/KA680iKA690

CPU

C.1.2 call-Back Entry Points

The firmware provides several entry points that facilitate I/O to the designated console device. Users of these entry points do not need to be aware of the console device type,

be

it a video terminal or workstation.

The primary intent of these routines is to provide a simple console device to VMB and· secondary bootstraps, before operating systems load their own terminal drivers.

These are JSB (subroutine as opposed to procedure) entry points located in fixed locations in the firwmare. These locations branch to code that in

tum

calls the appropriate routines.

All of the entry points are designed to run at IPL 31 on the interrupt stack in physcial mode. Virtual mode is not supported Due to internal finnware architectural restrictions, users are encouraged

to

only call into the haltprotected entry points. These entry points are listed in Table C-3.

Table C-3: call-Back

Entry

Points

20040008

CP$MSG_OUT..,NOLF

_&4 2004000C

CP$READ_

WTH..PRMPI'_

20040010

R4

C.1.2.1 CP$GETCHAR_R4

This routine returns the next character entered by the operator in

RO.

A timeout interval can be specified. If the timeout interval is zero, no timeout is generated. If a timeout is specified and if timeout occurs, a value of 18

(CAN) is returned instead of normal input.

Registers

RO,R1,R2,R3 and R4 are modified by this routine, aU others are preserved.

i

i---------------------------------------------------------------

Usage with timeout: movl jsb cmpb beql

i

ttimeout in tenths of second,rO

i

Specify timeout.

@iCP$GET:CHAR_R4 ; call routine. rO, '''xIS timeout handler

Input is in

RO.

; Check for timeout.

Branch if timeout.

i

i---------------------------------------------------------------

Usage without timeout:

ROM Partitioning

C-5

clrl rO jsb @ICP$GET CHAR R4--

; Input

is

in

RO~

Specify no timeout.

Call routine.

i---------------------------------------------------------------

C.1.2.2 CP$MSG_ OUT_NOLF _R4

This routine outputs a message to the console. The message is specified either by a message code or a string descriptor. The routine distinguishes between message codes and descriptors by requiring that any descriptor be located outside of the first page of memory. Hence, message codes are restricted to values between 0 and 51lo

Registers RO,Rl,R2,R3 and R4 are modified by this routine, all others are preserved.

i---------------------------------------------------------------

; Usage with message code: movzbl jsb tconsole message coderrO

@'CP$MSG:OOT_NOLF_R4

; Specify message code.

; Call routine.

;---------------------------------------------------------------

; Usage with a message descriptor (position dependent). movaq jsb

5$,rO

@tCP$MSG_OOT_NOLF_R4

Specify address of desc.

: call routine.

5$: .ascid /This is a message/ ; Message with descriptor.

i---------------------------------------------------------------

; Usage with a message descriptor (position independent) • pushab pushl movl jsb clrq

5$ t10$-5$ sp,rO

@tCP$MSG_OUT NOLF R4

(sp)+

Generate message desc. on stack.

Pass desc. addr. in RO.

Call routine.

Purge desc. from stack.

5$:

10$:

.ascii /This is a message/ ; Message.

;---------------------------------------------------------------

C-6 KA675/KA680!KA690 CPU

C.1.2.3 CP$READ_WTH_PRMPT_R4

This routine outputs a prompt message and then inputs a character string from the console. When the input is accepted, DELETE, CONTROL-U and

CONTROL-R functions are supported.

As with

CP$MSG_OUT_NOLF a string descriptor is passed in RO to specify the prompt string. A value of zero results in no prompt. A time-out value in 10-millisecond ticks may be passed in

RI.

If

RI

is zero, the prompt will not timeout.

A descriptor of the input string is returned in RO and Rl. RO contains the length of the string and

RI

contains the address. This routine inputs the string into the console program string buffer and therefore the caller need not provide an input buffer. Successive calls however destroy the previous contents of the input buffer.

Registers RO,RI are modified by this routine, all others are preserved.

;~~-~~-~~-~--------------------------------------------------

; Usage with a message descriptor (position independent). pushab pushl movl clrl jsb clrq

5$

110$-5$ sp,rO rl

@iCP$READ_WTH_PRMPT_R4

(sp)

+

Generate prompt desc. on stack.

Pass desc. addr. in RO.

Specify no time-out.

; Call routine.

Purge prompt desc.

Input desc in RO and R)

5$:

10$:

.ascii /Prompt> / ; Prompt string.

I

----------------------------------------------------------------

C.1.3 Boot Information Pointers

Two longwords located in FEPROM are used as pointers to the default boot device descriptor and the default boot flags (Figure C-4), because the actual location of this data may change in successive versions of the firmware. Any software that uses these pointers should reference them at the addresses in halt-protected space.

ROM Partitioning C-7

Figure C-4: Boot Information Pointers

20040018

I

Def Boot Dev Dscr Ptr

1

I

Class

I

Type

I

Oesc Length

Boot

Device String

Ptr

~

ASCIZ Dev Name String

I

2004001 c

I

Del Boot Flags Ptr

~---------I~NI

Boot Flags

(longword)

ML()'()o7701

The following macro defines the boot device descriptor format.

;-------------------------------------------------------------

; Default Boot Device Descriptor boot device descriptor::

base

= •

• = base

+ dsc$w length

.word nvr$s_bOOt_device

• - base

+ dsc$b dtype

• byte dsc$k_dtype_z

· = base

+ dsc$b class

. byte dsc$k_class_z

· - base

+ dsc$a-POinter

. long nvr_base

+ nvr$b_boot device

· - base

+ dsc$s_dscdefl

i-------------------------------------------------------------

C-8 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

Appendix D

Data Structures and Memory Layout

This appendix contains definitions of the key global data structures used by the CPU firmware.

D.1 Halt Dispatch State Machine

The CPU halt dispatcher determines what actions the firmware will take on halt entry based on the machine state. The dispatcher is implemented as a state machine, which uses a single bitmap control word and the transition

(see Table D-1) to process all halts. The transition table is sequentially searched for matches with the current state and control word If there is a match, a transition occurs to the next state.

The control word comprises the following information.

• BaIt

Type, used for resolving external halts. Valid only if Halt Code is 00.

000 : power-up state

001 : halt in progress

010: negation ofQ22-bus DCOK

011 : console

BREAK condition detected

100 : Q22-bus

BHALT

101 :

SGEC BOOT_L asserted (trigger boot)

~

Halt Code, compressed form ofSAVPSL<13:8>(RESTART_CODE).

00 : RESTART_CODE

=

2, external halt

01 :

RESTART_CODE

=

3, power-up/reset

10:

RESTART_CODE = 6, halt instruction

11 : RESTART_CODE

= any other, error halts

• Mailbox Action, passed by an operating system in CPMBX<l:O>(HALT_

ACTION).

00 : restart, boot, halt

01 : restart, halt

10 : boot, halt

11: halt

Data Structures and Memory Layout 0-1

• User Action, specified with the SET HALT console command.

000 : default

001 : restart, halt

010 : boot, halt

011 : halt

100 : restart, boot, halt

• HEN, Break (halt) EnablelDisable switch, BDR<07>

• ERR, error status

• TIP, trace in progress

• DIP, diagnostics in progress

• BIP,

bootstrap in progress CPMBX<2>

• RIP, restart in progress CPMBX<3>

A transition to a "next state" occurs if word and a "current state" entry in the table. The firmware does a linear search through the table for a match. Therefore, the order of the entries in the transition table is important. The control longword is reassembled before each transition from the current machine state. The state machine transitions are shown in Table D-1.

Table 0-1 : Firmware State Transition Table

Current

State

Nen

State

Balt Balt

Type

Mailbs

User HEN·ERR·TIP·DIP·

Code Action Action BIP·BIP

ENTRY

ENTRY

ENTRY

ENTRY

->RESET INIT

->BREAK INIT

Perform conditional initialization.

1 xxx

011

01

00 xx xx xxx xxx

->TRACE INIT xxx

->OTHER INIT xxx

10 xx xx xx xxx xxx

Perform common initialization.

2 x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-O-l-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x

RESET1NIT ->mIT xxx xx xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

1

Perform a unique initialization routine on entty.

In particular, power-ups,

BREAKs, and

TRACEs require special initialization.

Any other halt entry performs a default initialization.

2

After performmg conditional initialization, complete common initialization.

0-2

KA675/KA680!KA690

CPU

Table 0-1 (Cont.): Firmware State Transltlqra Table

Current

State

Next

State

BREAKINIT

->1NIT

Halt Halt

Type Code xxx xx

Mailbs

User HEN·ERR·TIP·DIP·

Action Action DIP·RIP xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

TRACEINIT

->lNIT xxx xx xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

OTHERINIT

->INIT xxx xx xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

Check for external halts.

3

INIT

INlT

INlT

INIT

TRACE

TRACE

INlT

INlT

INlT

INIT

->BOOTSTRAP

->BOOTSTRAP

->HALT

->TRACE

->EXlT

010

101 xxx

00 xx xxx

Check for pending

(NEXT) trace.

4 xxx xxx

00

00

10

10 xx

:xx xx xx xxx xxx xxx xxx

->HALT xxx xx xx xxx

Check for bootstrap conditions.

S

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

01

01

01

Ix xx xx xx

10 xxx

010

100 xxx

O-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-1-x-x-x x-0-1-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x

0-0-0-0-0-0

1-0-0-0-0-0

1-0-0·0-0-0 x-O-O-O-O-O

3

Halt

Gil all er..emal halts, except: if

DCOK (unlikely) and halts are disabled, bootstrap if remote trigger, bootstrap

" Unconditionally enter the

HALT instruction. From the

TRACE state, if the TIP flag is set and the halt was due to a

TRACE state the firmware exits, if TIP is set and

ERR is clear; otherwise it halts.

5

Bootstrap, if power-up and halts are disabled. if power-up and halts are enabled and user action is 2 or 4. if mailbox is

2. if not power-up and mailbox is 0 and user action is 2. if not power-up and restart failed and mailbox is 0 and user action is 0 or 4.

Data Structures and Memory Layout D-3

Table 0-1 (Cont.): Firmware State Transition Table

Current

Next

State State

INIT

Halt

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

Halt

Type Code Action Action DIP·RIP

Ix

M.aiIbx

00

User

010

BEN·ERR-TIP·DIP· x-O-O-O-O-O

INIT

INIT

INIT

RESTART

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

->BOOTSTRAP xxx

Ix

Ix

Ix

Ix

00

00

00

00

100

100

000

000 x-0-0-O-0-1 x-1-0-0-0-x

0-0-0-0-0-1

0-1-0-0-0-x

INIT

INIT

INIT

INIT

INIT

BOOT

REST

HALT

->RESTART

->RESTART

->RESTART

->RESTART

BOOTSTRAP ->EXIT

RESTART ->EXIT

HALT ->EXlT

->HALT

->HALT

->HALT

->HALT

Check for restart conditions.

6 xxx

Ix 01 xxx xxx

1x 00

001 x-O-O-O-O-O xxx Ix 00

100

000 xxx 1x 00

Perform common exit processing, if no errors.

7 x-O-O-O-O-O x-O-O-O-O-O

0-0-0-0-0-0

xxx xxx xx xx xx xxx xx xx xxx

Exception transitions, just halt.

8 xxx xxx xxx xxx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx xxx x-O-x-x-x-x x-O-x-x-x-x x-O-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x x-x-x-x-x-x

6

Restart the operating system if not power-up and, if mailbox is 1. if mailbox is

0 and user action is 1 or 4. if mailbox is 0 and user action is 0 and halts are disabled.

7

Exit after halts, bootstrap or restart. The exit state transitions to program 110 mode.

8

Guard block that catches all exception conditions. In all cases, just halt.

D-4 KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

Table 0-1 (Cont.): Firmware State Transition Table

Current Next

State State

TRACE

->HALT

Halt Halt

'JYpe Code xxx

:xx

Mailbx

User

BEN.ERR·TIP·DIP.

Action Action BIP·RIP xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

EXIT

->HALT xxx xx

"x" is used in this table to indicate a "don't care" field. xx xxx x-x-x-x-x-x

0.2

RPB

VMB typically utilizes the low portion of memory unless there are bad pages in the first 128Kbytes. The first page in its block is used for the RPB

(Restart Parameter Block), through which it commWlicates

to

the operating system. Usually, this is page O.

VMB will

Table D-2. initialize the Restart Parameter Block (RPB) as shown in

Table 0-2: Restart Parameter Block Fields

(Rll)+Field Name Description

00:

04:

08:

OC:

10:

10:

18:

RPB$L..BASE

RPB$L_RESTART

RPB$L_CHKSUM

RPB$L_RSTRTFLG

RPB$LJiALTPC

RPB$LJL\LTPSL

RPB$L_HALTCODE

Physical address of base of RPB.

Cleared.

-1

Cleared.

RIO on entry to VMB (HALT PC).

PR$_SAVPSL on entty to

VMB

<HALT

PSL).

AP on entty to

VMB (HALT CODE).

Data Strudures and Memory Layout 0-5

Table 0-2 (Cont.): Restart Parameter Block Fields

(Rll)+Field Name Description

IC:

RPB$L~OOTRO

RO on entry to

VMB.

NOTE:

The field RPB$W _ROUBVEC, which overlaps the high-order word of RPB$L_

BOOTRO, is set by the boot device drivers to the 8CB offset (in the second page of the 8CB) of the interrupt vector for the boot device.

20:

RPB$L~OOTRl

24:

28:

RPB$L..B00TR2

RPB$L_B00TR3

2C: RPB$L_B00TR4

VMB version number. The high-order word of the version is the major

ID and the low-order word is the minor

ID.

R2 on entry to

VMB.

R3 on entry to VMS.

R4 on entry to VMB.

NOTE:

The 48-bit booting node address

is

stored in RPB$L_BOOTR3 and RPB$L_

BOOTR4 for compatibility with ELN VI.I

(this field is only initialized this way when performing

a

network boot).

30:

34:

RPB$L_B00TR5

RPB$L_IOVEC

38: RPB$LJOVECSZ

3C: RPBSLJ'lLLBN

40: RPB$L_FILSIZ

R5 on entry to VMB.

Physical address of boot driver's YO vector of transfer addresses.

Size of BOOT QIO routine.

LBN of secondary bootstrap image.

Size of secondary bootstrap image in blocks.

D-6 KA675/KA680IKA690 CPU

(

Table 0-2 (Cont.): Restart Parameter Block_Fields

(lUl)+Field Name Description

44: RPB$QYFNMAP

50: RPB$L_SVASPr

54:

58:

RPB$L_CSRPHY

RPB$L_CSRVIR

5C: RPB$L_ADPPHY

64: RPB$W -'lJNIT

66:

RPB$B_DEVTYP

67: RPB$B_SLAv£

The PFN bitmap is a array of bits, where each bit has the value

"1" if the corresponding page of memol'Y is valid, or has the value "0" if the corresponding page of memory contains a memory error.

Through use of the

PFNMAP. the operating system can avoid memory errors by avoiding mown bad pages altogether. The memory bitmap is always page-aligned, and describes all the pages of memory from physical page ##0 to the high end of memory, but excluding the PFN bitmap itself and the Q-bus map registers.

If the high byte of the bitmap spans some pages available to the operating system and some pages of the

PFN bitmap itself, the pages corresponding to the bitmap itself will be marked as bad pages. The:first longword of the PFNMAP descriptor contains the Dumber of bytes in the

PFNMAP; the second longword contains the physical address of the bitmap.

Count of

"good" pages of physical memol'Y. but not including the pages allocated to the Q22-bus scatter

19ather map. the console scratch area, and the PFN bitmap at the top of memory. o.

Physical address of

CSR for boot device. o.

Physical address of

ADP.

(really the address of

Ax800 to look like a UBA adapter).

QMRs o.

Unit number of boot device.

Device type code of boot device.

Slave number of boot de ... i~.

Data Structures and Memory Layout 0-7

Table 0-2 (Cont.): Restart Parameter Block Fields

(Rll)+Field Name Description

68: RPB$TYILE Name of secondazy bootstrap image (defaults

[SYSO.8YSEXE]sySBOOT.EXE). to

This field (up to 40 bytes) is overwritten with the input string on a "solicit" boot.

NOTE: I : For VAX/VMS, the RPB$T_FILE

must

contain the

root

directory string "SYSn. " on a non-network bootstrap.

This

string is parsed by SYSBOOT (SYSBOOT

does

not

use

the high nibble of BOOTRS).

2:

The

RPB$T _FILE is overwritten to contain the boot node name for compatibility with ELN

VI.I (this field

is

only initialized this way when performing

a network boot).

AO:

RPB$BJaDRPGCNT

AI: RPB$W..BOOTNDT

80: RPB$L_SCBB

Be: RPB$L_MEMDSC co: RPB$LJdEMDSC+4

Array (16 bytes) of adapter types

(NDT$_

UBO • UNIBUS

).

Count of header pages.

Boot adapter nexus device type. Used by SYSBOOT and INIADP (OF SYSLOA) to configure the adapter of the boot device (changed from a byte

Version 12 of VMB). to a word field in

Physical address of

seB.

Count of pages in physical memory including both good and bad pages. The high 8 bits of this longword contain the TR #, which is always 0 for KA6751KA68OIKA690.

PFN of the first page of memolY. This field is always 0 for KA6751KA6801KA690, even if page #0 is a bad page.

NOTE:

used.

No

other memory descriptors

are

Count of "bad" pages of physical memolY.

D-8

KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU

Table D-2 (Cont.): Restart Parameter BlocJ< Fields

(Rll)+Field Name

Description nn:

Boot device controller number biased by

1.

In VAXNMS, this field is used by INIT (in SYS) to construct the boot device's controller letter. A 0 implies this field has not been initialized, else if initialized, A=I, B=2, etc. (this field was added in Version 13 of VMB).

The rest of the RPB is zeroed.

0.3 VMB Argument List

The VMB code will also initialize an argument list as shown in Table

D-a

(the address of the argument list is passed in the AP).

Table Eh1: VMS Argument List

(AP)+

Field Name Description

04:

VMB$L_FlLECACHE oc:

VMB$L_LOYFN

10:

14:

VMB$LJiIJ'FN

VMB$Q...PFNMAP lC: VMB$(LUCODE

24: VMB$B_SYSTEMID

2C: VMB$L_FLAGS

30: VMB$L-<!UlIPFN

Quadword filename.

PFN of first page of physical memory (always 0, regardless of where 128 Kbytes of "good" memozy starts).

PFN of last page of physical memory.

Descriptor ofPFN bitmap. First longword contains count of bytes in bitmap. Second longword contains physic:al address of bitmap. (Same rules as for RPB$Q...PFNMAP listed above.)

Quadword.

48-bit (actually a quadword is allocated) booting node address which is initialized when performing a network boot. This field is copied from the Target System Address parameter of the parameters message.

(The

DECnet

HIORD value is added if the field was two bytes.)

Set as needed.

Cluster interface high PFN.

Data Structures and Memory Layout 0-9

Table

D-3

(Cont.): VMB Argument List

<AP>+

Field Name Description

34: VMB$'LNODENAME

3C:

44: olC: VMBSQ...TOD

54:

58:

VMB$Q.jIOSTADDR

VMB$Q..BOSTNAME

VMB$LJPARAM

Boot node name which is initialized when performing a netwotk. boot. This field is copied from the Target System

Name parameter of the parameters message.

Host node address

(this value is only initialized when booting over the network). This field is copied from the Host System Address parameter of the parameters message.

Host node name

(this value is only initialized when performing a network boot). This field is copied from the Host System Name parameter of the parameters message.

Time of day (this value is only initialized when performing a network boot). The time of day is copied from the first eight bytes of the Host System Time parameter of the parameters message. (The time differential values are NOT copied.)

Pointer to data retrieved from request of the parameter file.

The rest of the argument list is zeroed.

0-10 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU

Appendix E

Configurable Machine State

The KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU module has many control registers that need

to

be configured for proper operation of the module. The following list shows the normal state of all configurable bits in the CPU module as they are left after the successful completion of power-up ROM diagnostics.

VAX 4000 Models 400,500,600

Configuration registers and writable bits: (* - power up reset state)

NCA;

CMCDSR: Mode

Control and Diagnostic Status Register (2102 0004)

15:14: CP2

MT

Timer Prescaler

11 - 144000 cycles* - needed for COBlC lOms No Grant timeout

13:12: CPl MT Timer Prescaler

00 -

144 cycles - minimum for passive releases, no cycle should take longer than this

11:10: NOAL Timeout Prescaler

00 - 3200 cycles* - this is longer than both NCA and

NMC transactions timeouts, preserves timeout order

9:

080S TRANS enable (formerly COBle PRESENT) o -

080S TRANS signal disabled* - this is to avoid

08US_TRANS deadlock

8:

102 IO enable

1 enableci

7: Force wrong CP2 bus parity o off* - diagnostic use only

6: Force wrong CPl bus parity o off* - diagnostic use only

5: Force wrong NOAL master parity o off* - diagnostic use only

4: Force wrong NOAL slave parity o off* - diagnostic use only

3: Enable prefetch

1 - enable CP bus prefetch on OMA reads

2: Force write buffer hit o off* - diagnostic use only

Configurable Machine State

E-1

1: Force CP2 bus owner o disabled - diagnostic use only

0: Force CP1 bus owner o disabled - diagnostic use only

ICCS: Interval Clock Control and Status Register (2100 0060)

NOTE:

VMS sets ICCS, NICR to proper values

6: Interrupt enable o disabled*

5: Single step o off*

4: Transfer o disabled*

0: Run - increment every l~s o do not increment*

NICR: Next Interval Count Register (2100 0064)

31:0 Initial count value for ICR (FFFF08FO* (10ms»

NMC:

MEMCON_0-7: Memory Configuration Registers (2101 8000 thru 2101 801C)

NOTE: Diagnostics set these registers based on available memory

31: Base Address Valid o not valid*

1 valid

28:24: Base Address

(0 on reset)

1MB RAM all address bits used

4MB RAM only <28:26> used

2:1

RAM size

00 - 1MB

RAM*

01 -

1MB

RAM

10 - 4MB

RAM

11 - non-existent bank

0: Mode

1 - 64-bit mode

MMCDSR: Mode Control and Diagnostic Status Register (2101 8048)

31: Fast Diagnostic Mode (FOM) o disabled* - diagnostic use only

30: FDM Second pass o disabled* - diagnostic use only

29: Diagnostic Checkbit mode o disabled* - diagnostic use only

28: QBus on 101 o -

OBus on I02*

27: Enable soft error log (NeAL & memory related) o

& disabled* - VMS enables this

E-2 KA675!KA6801KA690 CPU

26: Flush BCache o don't flush*

24:17: Memory diagnostic check bits o meaningful only in diagnostic check mode* (mayor may not be read as 0)

8:7: NDAL Timeout Scaler

00 - 2600 cycles* - maximum, to preserve timeout order

6: Disable memory error o memory errors deteted and corrected*

5: Refresh interval timer select o -

328 cycles* (Model 500,600)

1 - 244 cycles (Model 400)

4:2: Force wrong parity on NDAL transactions o off* - diagnostic use only

1: Disable memory refresh o memory refreshed*

0: Force refresh o normal refresh*

MOAMR: O-bit Address and Mode Register (2101 a04C)

16: Ignore o-bit mode o o-bits checked*

15: Disable O-bit error o o-bit errors detected*

14:6: o-bit segment address (0*) - meaningful only during

O-bit data register access

5:3: O-bit mask (0*) - meaningful only during .o-bit data register access

2:0: o-bit operation mode

000 - reconstruction mode* me~ningful only during o-bit data register access

MOOR: o-bit Data Registers (2101 0000 thru 2101 7FFF)

23:12: O-bit field 1 (0*) - used only during Fast Memory test

11:0: o-bit field 0 (0*) - used only during Fast o-bit test mode

NVAX:

CPUID: CPU ID Register (IPR E)

7:0: CPU identifcation - 0 (for single processor config.)

SID: System Identification Register (IPR 3E)

NOTE: this register may only be written by microcode

31:24: CPU type - 13hex (NVAX code)

13:8: ~a~cn revision

Configurable Machine State E-3

7:0: Microcode revision

ICSR: IBox Control and Status Register (IPR D3)

0: VIC enable o disabled* (Model 400)

1 - enabled (Models 500,600)

ECR: EBox Control Register (IPR 70)

13: FBox test enable o disabled* - diagnostic use only

7: Interval time mode

1 - full CPU implemented interval timer

5: S3 stall timeout o counts cycles

wi

timeout_enable asserted* (-3 sec)

3: FBox stage 4 bypass

1 - enabled - result from stage 3 passed directly to rBox output interface (improves rBox latency)

2: 53 external time base timeout o disabled* - use internal time base

1: FBox enable

1 - enabled

0: Vector present o no* - no vector option available at this time

MHAPEN: Memory Map Enable Register (IPR E6)

0: Memory map enable o disabled* - VMS enables this

PAMODE: Physical Address Mode Register (IPR E7)

0: Physical address mode o -

30-bit physical address space*

PCCTL: PCache Control Register (IPR FB)

8: PCache Electrical disable o •

PCache enabled*

7:5 MBox performance monitor mode o diagnostic use only·

4: PCache error enable

1 • enables PCache error detection

3: Bank select during force hit mode o • left bank selected if force hit mode enabled-

- diagnostic use only

2: Force hit o disabled· - diagnostic use only

1: I enable

1 ·-enable pcache for IREAD, INVAL, I_CF commands

E-4 KA675!KA680IKA690 CPU

0: D_enable

1 .. enable PCache for lNVAL, D-stream read/write/fUJ commands

CCTL: CBox Control Register (lPR AO)

30: Software ETM a disabled* - diagnostic use only

16: Force NDAL parity error o off* - diagnostic use only

15:11: Performance monitoring BCache access and hit type o - configures BCache for performance monitoring* meaningful only during performance monitoring

10: Disable CBox·write packer o write packer enabled* - improves write latency

9: Read timeout counter test o test disabled* - use external time base for read timeout counter

8: So ft ware ECC o use correct ECC*

7: Disable BCache errors a -

BCache errors detected*

6: Force Hit o disabled* - diagnostic use only

5:4: BCache size

00 - 128 KB* ~ode1s 400,500)

10 - 512 KB ~odel 600)

3:2: Data store speed

00 - 2 cycle read, 3 cycle write· (Model 600)

01 - 3 cycle read, 4 cycle write (Model 500)

10 - 4 cycle read, 5 cycle write (Model 400)

1: Tag store speed o -

3 cycle read, 3 cycle write* (Model 600)

1 - 4 cycle read, 4 cycle write (Models 400,500)

0: Enable Bcache

1 - enabled

COBlC:

SCR: System Configuration Register (2008 0000)

14: Halt enable

1 - BHALT to COBlC HALTIN pin to cause halts

12: Page prefetch disable

1 - map prefetch disabled - historical latency reasons

7: Restart enable a -

QBus restart causes ARB power-up reset*

3:1: lCR offset address select bits o no effect (ACX mode not supported) *

Configurable Machine State E-5

ICR: Interprocessor Communication Register (2000 1F40)

8: AOX Halt o no halt (AOX mode not supported)

6: ICR interrupt enable o interprocessor interrupts disabled - only uniprocessor eonfig. allowed

5: Local memory external access enable o external access disabled* - VMS will configure map

QBMBR: Q-Bus Map Base Address Regi$ter (2008 0010)

28:15: address where 8K QBus mapping registers are located

SHAC:

NOTE: all SHAC registers are subsequently configured by VMS driver

PQBBR: Port Queue Block Base Register (2000 4048)

20:0: upper bits of physical address of base of Port Queue block. Contains HW version, FW version, shared host memory version and CI port maintenance IC at power-up.

PPR: Port Parameter Register (2000 4058)

31:29: Cluster size. For SHAC value o.

28:16: Internal buffer length - 0* (For SHAC value - 1010 hex)

7:0: Port number. Same as SHAC's oSSI Io.

PMCSR: Port Maintenance Control and Status Register (2000 405C)

2: Interrupt enable o disabled*

1: Maintenance timer disable o enabled*

SGEC:

NOTE: all SGEC registers are susequently configured by VMS driver

NICSRO: Vector Address, IPL, Synch/Asynch Register (2000 BOOO)

31:30: Interrupt priority

00 - 14*

29: Synch/Asynch bus master operating mode o asynchronous*

15:0: Interrupt vector - 0003hex*

E-6

KA675!KA680IKA690 CPU

NICSR6: Command and Mode Register (2000 8018)

30: Interrupt enable o disabled*

28:25: Burst limit mode maximum number of longwords transferred in a single

DMA burst. 1*,2,4,8 when NICSR<l9>is clear;

1*,4 when set.

20: Boot message enable mode o disabled*

19: Single cycle enable mode o "" disabled*

11: Start/Stop transmission command o -

SGEC transmission process in stopped state*

10: Start/Stop reception command o -

SGEC reception process in stopped state*

9:8: Operating mode

00 a normal mode*

7: Disable data chaining mode o frames too long for current receive buffer will

De transferred to the next buffer(s) in receive list*

6: Force collision mode (internal loopback mode only) o no collision·

3: Pass bad frames mode o bad frames discarded-

2:1: Address filtering mode

00 - normal modeS

NICSR7: System Base Register (2000 SOlC)

-------------------

29:0: System base addr.ss - physical starting address of the VAX system page table (unpredictable after reset)

NICSR9: Watchdog T1mers Register (2000 8024)

31:16: Receive w~tChdo; ~!~eou~ o never timeout· defaUlt - 1250 • 2 ms range

3

72 ps (45) to 100 ms

15:0: Transmit watchdog timeout o never timeout· default - 1250 • 2 ms range - 72 ps (45) to 100 ms

SSC:

SSCBAR: SSC Base Address Register (2014 0000)

29:0 20140000 - Base address·

Configurable Machine State

E-7

SSCCR: SSC Configuration Register (2014 0010)

27: Interrupt vector disable o interrupt vector enabled*

25:24: IPL Level

00 - 14*

23: ROM access time o -

350 ns*

22:20: ROM size

101 - 256KB

18:16: Halt protected space

101 - 20040000 - 2007FFFF (historical)

15: Control P enable o -

20 spaces recognized as break*, not control-p

(historical)

14:12: Terminal UART baud rate

101 - 9600 (historical)

6: Programmable address strobe 1 ready enable (for BDR)

1 - ready asserted after address strobe

5:4: Programmable address strobe 1 enable (for BOR)

11 - read enabled, write enabled

2: Programmable address strobe 0 ready enable o no ready after address strobe* - not used

1:0: Programmable address strobe 0 enable

00 - read disabled, write disabled* - not used

RXCS: Console Receiver Control and Status Register (2014 0080)

6: Interrupt enable o disabled* - polled in console mode

TXCS: Console Transmitter Control and Status Register (2014 0088)

6: Interrupt enable o disabled*

2: Loopback enable o disabled* - diagnostic use only

0: Break transmit o • terminate SPACE condition*

SSCBT: SSC Bus Time OUt Register (2014 0020)

23:0: Bus timeout interval - 4000hex (16.384 ms) range - 1 to FFFFFF (1 ps to 16.77 sec)

ADSOHAT: Programmable Address Strobe 0 Match Register (2014 0130)

29:2: Match address o disabled* - not used

E-8 KA675/KA6801KA690

CPU

ADSOKAS: Programmable Address Strobe 0 Mask Register (2014 0134)

29:2: Mask address bits - not used

ADSlMAT: Programmable Address Strobe 1 Match Register (2014 0140)

29:2: Match address - 20084000 (for BDR)

ADS1KAS: Programmable Address Strobe

1

Mask Register (2014 0144)

29:2: Mask address bits - 7C (for BDR)

T1CR: Programmable Timer 0 Control Register (2014 0100)

6: Interrupt enable o disabled*

2: STP o run after overflow·

0: RON o counter not running* (historical)

T1CR: Programmable Timer 1 Control Register (2014 0110)

6: Interrupt enable o disabled·

2: STP o run after overflow·

0: RON

1 - counter incrementing every microsecond (historical)

TNIR: Programmable Timer Next Interval Registers (2014 0108,

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2014 0118)

31:0: Timer next interval count (use 2's complement) range - O· to 1.2 hours

TOIV: Programmable Timer 0 Interrupt Vector Register (2014 OlOC)

9:2: Tl:er interrupt vector -

78he-~

T1IV: Programmable Timer 1 Interrupt Vector Registers (2014 OllC)

9:2:

Timer interrupt vector - 7Chex

TOY: Time of Year Register (2014 OOSC)

31:0: Number of 10 ms intervals since written

DLEOR: Diagnostic LED Register (2014 0030)

3:0: Display bits o -

LEOs on* (historical)

Configurable Machine State E-9

Appendix F

NVRAM Partitioning

This appendiX describes how the CPU firmware partitions the battery-hacked-up (BBU) RAM.

sse

1 KB

F.1 sse

RAM Layout

The

KA6751KA6801KA690 firmware uses the

1KB of

NVRAM on the

sse

for storage of firmware specific data structures and other information that must be preserved across power cycles. This NVRAM resides in the

sse

chip starting at address 20140400. The NVRAM should not be used by the operating systems except as documented below. This NVRAM is not reflected in the bitmap built by the firmware.

Figure F-1: KA675/KA680IKA690 sse

NVRAM

Layout

20140400

201407FC

Public Data Structures

(CPMBX. etc.)

Service Vectors

Firmware Stack

Diagnosbc State

Rsvd for Customer Use

MLO-008655

F.1.1 Public Data Structures

The following is a list of the public data structures in NVRAM used by the console.

Fields that are designated as reserved andlor internal use should not be written. because there is no protection against such corruption.

NVRAM Partitioning F-1

F.1.2 Console Program

Mail~ox

(CPMBX)

The Console Program MailBoX (CPMBX) is a software data structure located at the beginning of NVRAM (20140400). The CPMBX is used to pass information between the CPU firmware and diagnostics, VMB, or an operating system. It consists of three bytes referred to here as NVRO,

NVR1, and NVR2.

Figure F-2: NVRO (20140400) : Console Program MailBoX (CPMBX)

NVRO

7

6 5

LANGUAGE

4 3 2 o

RIP BIP HLT_ACT

MLQ.008657

Table F-1:

Field Name

7:4 a

2

1:0

Description

LANGUAGE

This field specifies the current selected language for displaying halt and error messages on terminals which support MCS.

RlP

BlP

If set, a restart attempt is in progress. This flag must be cleared by the operating system, if the restart succeeds.

If set, a bootstrap attempt is in progress. This flag must be cleared by the operating system if the bootstrap succeeds.

HLT_AC'f Processor halt action - this field in conjunction with the conditions specified in Table 3-5 is used to c:cmtrol the automatic restart

/bootstrap procedure. HLT..AC'f is normally written by the Operate ing system. o

Restart; if that fails, reboot; if that fails, halt.

1 Restart; if that fails, halt.

2 Reboot; if that fails, halt. a

Halt.

F-2 KA675IKA680/KA690 CPU

Figure F-3: NVR1 (20140401)

7

6 5

4

3 2

NVR1

1 0

MLo.ooa653

Table F-2:

Field Name

2 MCS

1 CRT

Description

If set, indicates that the attached terminal supports Multinational

Character Set. If clear. MCS is not supported.

If set, indicates that the attached terminal is a CRT. If clear, indicates that the terminal is hardcopy.

Figure F-4: NVR2 (20140402)

NVR2

7

6

5 4 3

KEYBOARD

2 o

MLO~

Table F-3:

Field Name

7:0

Description

KEYBO~1ID

This field indicates the !l8.tional keybori variant in use.

F= 1 .. 3 Firmware Stack

This section contains the stack that is used by all of the firmware, with the exception of VMB, which has its own built in stack

F.1.4 Diagnostic State

This area is used by the firmware resident diagnostics. This section is not documented here.

NVRAM Partitioning F-3

F.1.5 USER Area

The KA6751KA6801KA690 console reserves the last longword (address

201407FC) of the NVRAM for customer use. This location is not tested by the console firmware. Its value is undefined.

F-4

KA675IKA680IKA690 CPU

Appendix G

MOP Counters

The following counters are kept for the Ethernet boot channel. All counters are unsigned integers. V 4 counters rollover on overflow. All V3 counters

'1atch" at their maximum value to indicate overflow. Unless otherwise stated, all counters include both normal and multicast traffic. Furthermore, they include information for all protocol types. Frames received and bytes received cOWlters do not include frames received with errors. Table

G-1

displayes the byte lengths and ordering' of all the counters in both MOP

Version 3.0 and 4.0.

Table G-1: MOP Counter Block va

V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len Description

00 16 Time since last zeroed.

The time which has eUapsed, since the counters were last zeroed. Provides a frame of reference for the other counters by indicating the amount of time they cover.

For

MOP V3, this time is the number of seconds. MOP V4 uses the UTe Binary

Relative 'lime format.

Rx.-BYTES 02 4 10 8 Br"received. The total number of user data bytes successfully received.

This does not include Ethernet data liDk headers. This number is the number of bytes in the Ethernet data field, which includes any padding or length fields when they are enabled. These are bytes from frames that passed hardware filtering. When the number of frames received is used to calculate protocol overhead, the overhead plus bytes received provides a measurement of the amount of Ethernet bandwidth (over time) consumed by frames addressed to the local system.

MOP

Counters

G-1

Table G-1 (COnt.): MOP Counter Block

V3 V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len Description

Tx..BYTES

06 4 18 8

Rx..MCAST.-BYTES

OA 4

OE 4

12 4

20 8

28 8

30 8

Bytes sent.

The total number of user data bytes successfully transmitted.

This does not include Ethernet data link headers or data link generated retransmissions.

This number is the number of bytes in the Ethernet data field, which includes any padding or length fields when they are enabled.

When the number of frames sent is used to calculate protocol overhead, the overhead plus bytes sent provides a measurement of the amount of Ethernet bandwidth (over time) consumed by frames sent by the local system.

Frames received. The total number of frames successfully received.

These are frames that passed hardware filtering. Provides a gross measurement of incoming Ethernet usage by the local system.

Provides information used to determine the ratio of the error counters to successful transmits.

Frames sem. The total number of frames successfully transmitted. This does not include data link generated retransmissions. Provides a gross measurement of outgoing Ethernet usage by the local system.

Provides information used to determine the ratio of the error counters to successful transmits.

Multicast bytes received. The total number of multicast data bytes successfully received. This does not include Ethemet data link headers. This number is the number of bytes in the

Ethernet data field.

In conjunction with total bytes received, provides a measurement of the percentage of this system's receive bandwidth (over time) that was consumed by multicast frames addressed to the local system.

G-2

KA675lKA680/KA690

CPU

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP Counter Block

V3 V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len Description

Rx.-MCASTJ'B,AMES

16 4

38 8

TxJNIT.J>EFFERED

1A4

40 8

1E 4

~TLCOLUSION

22 4

48 8

50 8

Multicast frames received. The total number of multicast frames successfully received.

In conjunction with total frames received, provides a gross percentage of the

Ethernet usage for multicast frames addressed to this system.

FmmHHm,lwWilly~fand

The total number of times that a frame transmission was deferred on its first transmission attempt. In conr.mction with total frames sent. measures Ethernet contention with no collisions.

Frames sem

I, siDgie collision. The total number of times that a frame was successfully transmitted on the second attempt after a normal collision on the first attempt.

In c:cnjunction with total frames sent. measures Ethernet contention at a level where there are collisions but the backofI algorithm still operates efficiently.

Frames sentI, m.u1tiple COllisiODS.

The total number of times that a frame was successfully transmitted on the third or later attempt after normal collisions on previous attempts. In conjunction with total frames sent, mesS"res Ethernet contention at a level where there are collisions and the backoff algorithm no longer operates efficiently.

NO SINGLE l!'B.AIm IS COL"NTBD

IN KOBE THAN ONE OF THE ABOVE '11IBEE comrnms.

10nly one of these three counters will be incremented for a given frame.

MOP

Counters G-3

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP Counter Block

V3 V4

Name

Off

Len

26 2

Off

Len Description

Send failure count.

S

The total number of times a transmit attempt failed. Each time the counter is incremented, a type of failure is recorded. When Read-counter function reads the counter, the list of failures is also read. When the counter is set to zero, the list of failures is cleared.

In conjunction with. total frames sent, provides a measure of significant transmit problems.

TxFAIL_BITMAP contains the possible reasons.

2C 2 Send fallure reason bitmap.

S

This bitmap lists the types of transmit failures that ocx:urred as summarized below. o •

Excessive collisions.

1 - Carrier detect failed.

2 Short c:imJit.

3 - Open circuit.

4 -

S -

Frame too long.

Remote failure to defer.

58 8

60 8

Send failure - Excessive collisions.

Exceeded the maximum number of retransmissions due to collisions. Indicates an overload condition on the Ethernet.

Send fanure Carrier check faRed.

The data link did not sense the receive signal that is required to accompany the transmission of a frame. Indicates a failure in either the transmitting or receiving hardware. Could be caused by either transceiver, transceiver cable, or a babbling controller that has been cut off.

2Va send/receive failures are collapsed into one counter with bitmap indicating which failures occurred.

G-4

KA67SIKA680/KA690 CPU

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP Counter Block

V3 V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len Description

68 8

Send failure - Short circuit.

S

There is a short somewhere in the local area network coaxial cable or the transceiver or controllerltransceiver cable has failed.

This indicates a problem either in local hardware or global network. The two can be distinguished by checking to see if other systems are reporting the same problem.

70 8

78 8

80 8

Send failure Open circuit.

3

There is a break somewhere in the local area ne..f-work comal cable. This indicates a problem either in local hardware

. or global network. The two can be distinguished by checking to see if systems are reporting the same problem.

S

Send failure - Frame too long.

The controller or transceiver cut off transmission at the maximum size.

This indicates a problem with the local system. Either it tried to send a frame that was too long or the hardware

CIltoft' transmission too soon.

SeDd failure Remote failure to defer.

S

A remote system began transmitting after the allowed window for collisions. This indicates either a problem with some other system's ca.Pfier sense or a weak tnms:m.itter.

SAlways zero.

MOP

Counters

G-5

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP Counter Block

va

V4

Name

Off

Len

2A 2

Off

Len Description

Receive failure

COlUlt. I

The total number of frames received with some data error. Includes only data frames that passed either physical or multicast address comparison.

This counter includes failure reasons in the same way as the send failure counter. In conjunction with total frames received, provides a measure of data related receive problems.

RxFAIL_BITMAP contains the possible reasons.

RxFAlLJnTMAP

2C 2

Receive fanure reason bitmap.

2

This bitmap lists the types of receive failures that occurred as summarized below. o -

Block check failure.

1 - Framing error.

2 -

Frame too long.

RxFAIL..FRAMING...ERR

88 8

90 8

98 8

Receive failure - Block check error

A frame failed the CRe check. This indicates several possible failures, such

EM!, late collisions, or improperly set hardware parameters.

Receive tanure -

Framing error. The frame did not contain an integral number of

8 bit bytes. This indicates several possible failures, such as,

EM!, late collisions, or improperly set hardware parameters.

Receive fanure • Frame too long.

I

The frame was discarded because it was outside the Ethernet maximum length and could not be received. This indicates that a remote system is sending invalid length frames.

!Va send/receive failures are collapsed into one counter with bitmap indicating which failures occurred.

3Always zero.

G-6 KA6751KA680/KA690 CPU

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP Counter Block

va

V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len

AO 8

Description

Um-ecognjzed frame destiDaiiolL

The number of times a frame was discarded because there was no portal with the protocol type or multicast address enabled. This includes frames received for the physic:al address, the broadcast ad-

.dress, or a multicast address.

D~OVERRUN

30 2

AS 8

Data overrun. The total number of times the hardware lost an incoming frame because it was unable to keep up with the data rate.

In conjunction with total frames received, provides a measare of hardware resource failuteS.

The problem re1lected in this counter is

. also captured as an event.

32 2

BO 8

34 2

B8 8

System buffer

1UI8vai1ab1e3 The total number of times no system buffer was available for an incoming frame.

In coDjunction with total frames received, provides a measnre of system buffer related receive problems. The problem reflected in this counter is also captured as an event. This can be any buffer between the hardware and the user buffers

(those supplied on Receive requests). Farther information as to potential clift"erent buffer pools is implementation speci1ic.

User baffer UDavailable.

S

The total !lU!!!her of times

DO user bu11'er was available for an incoming frame that passed all filtering. These are the buffers supplied by users on Receive requests.

In cxmjunction with total frames received, provides a measure of user butTer related receive problems.

The problem re1lected in this counter. is also captured as an event..

3

Always zero.

MOP

Counters

G-7

Table G-1 (Cont.): MOP COunter Block

V3 V4

Name

Off

Len

Off

Len

co

8

Description

Collision detect check failure.

'llle approximate number of times that collision detect was not sensed after a transmission.

If number roughly equal to the number of frames sent, either the collision detect c:ircaitry is not working correctly or the test signal is not implemented.

G-8.

KA675/KA6801KA690 CPU

Appendix H

Programming the KFQSA Adapter

The KFQSA emulates a UQssP controller for each ISE (Integrated Storage

Element) to which it is connected, and thus presents a separate eSR address for each emulated controller. The KFQSA must be programmed with a correct CSR for each ISE on the DSSI bus. Interrupt vectors for the

KFQSA are programmed automatically by the operating system.

Unlike most other Q-bus controllers, the KFQSA CSR addresses are not set with switches or jumpers. They are contained in nonvolatile memory on the KFQSA module, in the form of a configuration table. To access the configuration table, the KFQSA needs to have a valid address already in the table. This could be preprogrammed at the factory, but then you need to have an ISE installed on the DSSI bus with the proper bus node ID that has already been programmed. Another way to a get a valid address is to use the service switch (SWitch

1

ON

=

SERVICE mode) on the KFQSA.

Table H-l shows the addresses available. It is easier to do if the switches are set as shown for the range of addresses from 0774420 - 0774434 in the upper portion of the table.

Table H-1: Preferred KFQSA Switch Settings

Switch 1 Switch 2 SwitchS Switch 4

CSR Address (Octal) . on on. on on off off off oft' on on off off on off on off

0774420 (fixed)

0774424

(fixed)

0774430 (fixed)

0774434

(fixed)

Available Fixed and Floating Addresses on on on on oft' on on on on on off off on off on off

0760444 (secondary

TMSCP)

0774500

(primaty TMSCP)

0760334 (secondary

MSCP)

0772150

(primaty

MSCP)

The address that the CSR needs to have must be determined before programming the configuration table. To determine this address, the

Programming the KFQSA Adapter H-1

system configuration as a whole needs to be looked at, since some devices are assigned floating addresses;' while others use the fixed addresses.

Floating addresses vary with each type of module and the number of modules installed in the system. Because of this, any time a module is installed or removed from the system, the CSR addresses need to be checked.

To find recommended CSR address values, use the CONFIGURE Utility at the console prompt (»» as described in Section 3.7.2.

NOTE:

The configure command does not look at any of the devices actuaUy in the system.

This

means that one console can be' used to determine the addresses for different systems. All of the devices

in

the system must be listed in this utility, in case any of the devices present affect the address

that

is being calculated.

In the following example, the system has a TK70, three RF73s connected to a KFQSA, and a DESQA The utility responds with the CSR addresslvector assignments for all entered devices.

»>COBFIGtJRE

Enter device configuration,

HELP, or EXIT

Device, Number? help

Devices:

Devices:

LPV11

RLVl2

DMVl1

RRD50

RV20

CXAl6

RXJ11

TSVOS

DELQA

RQC25

KFQSA-TAPE

CXB16

QPSS LNV21

KWV11C

DRQ3B

IDV11D

DESNA

ADV11D

VSV21

!AV11A

IGQ11

KWV32

Device, Number?

KZQSA M7577

Numbers:

1 to 255, default is 1

Device, Number?

TgE70

Device, Number? KFQSA-DISK,3

Device, Number? DESQA

Device, Number? EXIT

DLV11J

1B001

DZQ11

RXV21

DEQNA

DRV11W

DESQA

KFQSA-DISK TQK50

KMV11

CXY08

DSVl1

AAV11D

IEQ11

VCB01

ADV11C

VCB02

IDV11A

IAV11B

DIV32

MIRA

KIV32

LNV24

DZV11

DRV11B

RQDX3

TQK70

DB011

QVSS

AAV11C

QDSS

IDV11B

ADQ32

DTCN5

M7576

DFAOl

DPV11

KOASO

T081E

DRY11

LNV11 rucY11C

DRV11J

IDV1lC

DTC04

DTCOS

DEQRA

H-2 KA67SIKA6801KA690 CPU

AddIess/Vector Assignments

-774440/120 DESQA

-772150/154 KFQSA-DISK

-760334/300 KFQSA-DISK

-760340/304 KFQSA-DISK

-774500/260 TQK70

»>

After the proper addresses have been determined, the CSR addresses need to be programmed.

To

do so, enter the following command at the console prompt

(»»:

SET HOSTIUQSSPIMAINTENANCEISERVICE n

Where:

The Iservice n parameter specifies the controller number of a KFQSA in

SERVICE mode

(in the case of multiple KFQSAs), and n is a number in the range 0 to 3 (from Table H-l): o is for address 0774420

1 is for address

0774424

2 is for address

0774430

3 is for address

0774434

Entering the

SETlHOSTIUQSSPIMAINTENANCElSERVICE n command displays the current contents of the

KFQSA configuration table. For example, suppose the first address is selected and the configuration table is currently blank:

»>

SET

BOST/UQSSP~/SERVXCE

OQSSP Controller (774420)

Enter SET, CLEAR, SHOW, HELP, EXIT, or QUIT

Node

'1

?

CSR

Address Model

- - - - XFgSA - - -

Type

HELP for a quick reference of the available commands.

? help

Commands:

SET

<node> \KFQSA

SET

<node>

<CSR

CLEAR <node> -

ADDRESS><MODEL>

SHOW

HELP

EXIT

QUIT set KFQSA DSSI node number enable a DSSI device disable a DSSI device show current configuration print this text program the KFQSA don' t proqram the KFQSA

Progral'TlrT1ng the KFQSA Adapter H-3

Parameters:

<node>

<CSR ADDRESS>

<MODEL> o to 7

760010 to 777774

21 (disk) or 22 (tape)

?

To add the three RF-series ISEs from the previous example, enter the following:

?

SET 0 772150 21

?

SEr

1 760334 21

?

SEr

2 760340 21

?

NOTE:

Be

sure to enter

the

addresses

in

the same order

they

were

listed by

the

configure utility.

Enter the SHOW command to display what has just been entered:

? SBOIf

Node o

1

2

7

?

CSR Address

772150

760334

760340

Model

21

21

21

, - - KFQSA - - - -

To delete an entry from the table, use the CLEAR command. For example, to delete the entry for node 2, enter CLEAR 2 at the prompt.

When finished, enter the EXIT command to write the entries to the configuration table.

?

EXI~ programming the RFQSA

»>

After programming the configuration table check that the bus node ID plugs on the drive

front

panels correspond to the numbers

that

have been programmed into the KFQSA.. switch 1 to

Set

the KFQSA

to

NORMAL mode by setting

off

(switches 2-4 have no effect when switch 1 is set

to om.

Enter SHOW QBUS to verify that the configuration is as desired. You may need

to

program DSSI parameters for the ISEs. Refer to Section 3.7.3.1 for instructions on setting DSSI parameters.

H-4 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

Appendix I

Error Messages

The error messages issued by the KA675JKA6801KA690 finnware fall into three categories: halt code messages, messages.

VMB error messages, and console

1.1 Machine Check Register Dump

Some error conditions, such as machine check., generate an error summary register dump preceding the error message. For example, examining a nonexistent memory location

results

in the following display.

>>>0

Ip/l

7fffffO

!

Examine non-exl~en~ memory.

MESR-SOIFFOOO

CESR-OOOOOooo

MEAR-11FFFFF9 HMCDSR-01111000 KOAMR-OOOOOooo

CMCCSR-OOOOC10S CSEARl-OOOOOooo CSEA!2-OOOOOooo

CIOEARI-OIOFCOOO CI0EAR2-000002CO CNEAR-OOOOOOoo

PCSTS-FFFFF800 PCACR-FFFFFFFS TBSTS-COOOOOEO

ICSR-OOOOOOOl

TBADR-OOOOOooo

NESTS-OOOOoooo NEOADR-E014066C NEOCMD-SOOOFOOS NEICKD-OOOOOooo

NEDATHI-OOOOOooo NED~LO-OOOOOOoo CEFSTS-0000022A CEFADR-07FFFFFO

BCETSTS-OOOOOooo BCETIOX-OOOOoooo

8CE~G-OOOOoooo B~-DSTS-OOOOO'oo

BCEDIDX-oOOOOoos BCEDEOC-OOOOoooo CBTCR-00004000 DSER-OOOOOooo

QBEAR-OOOOOOOF OEAR-OOOOOooo IPCRO-oOOO ECR-OOOOOCCA

,7.0

MACHINE CHECK 80060000 00000000 20047ECC 20047&80 20047&89 B0110080

»>

le2 Halt Code Messages

Except on power-up, which is not treated as an error condition, the following balt messages are issued by the firmware whenever the processor halts

(Table

1-1).

For example, if in kernel mode, the processor halts and the firmware displays the following before entering console

110

mode.

?06 HLT INST

PC

=

800050D3

The number preceding the halt message is the ilalt code. n

This number is obtained from SAVPSL<13:8><RESTART_CODE), IPR 43, which is saved on any processor restart operation.

Error Messages 1-1

Table 1-1: HALT Messages

Code Message

Description

?02 EXTHLT

?04

?OS

ISPERR

DBLERR

External halt, caused by either console

BREAK condition, Q22-bus BHALT_L, or DBR<AtJX....HLT> bit was set while enabled.

Power-up,

DO halt message is displayed.

However, the presence of the firmware banner and diagDOstic countdown indicates this halt reason.

In attempting to push state onto the interrupt stack during an interrupt or exception, the processor discovered that the interrupt stack was mapped NO

ACCESS or NOT VALID.

The processor attempted to report a machine to the operating system,

0CCI11'l'ed. and a second

. check mac:bine check

?06

?01

?OS

?OA

10B

10C

110

111

112

?13

BLTINST

SCBERR3

SCBERR2

CHMFRISTK

CHMTOISTK

SCBRDERR

MCBKAV

KSPAV

DBLERR2

DBLERR3

The proc:essor executed a mode.

HALT instruction in kernel

The SOB wc:tor had bits <1:0> equal to

3.

The

SOB wc:tor bad bits <1:0> equal to 2.

A c:baDge mode iDstrac:ticm was executed when

PSLdS> was set.

The SCB wc:tor for a change mode bad bit

<0> set.

A hard. memory error occu.rred while the processor was t!ying to read an exception or interrupt vector.

An access violation or an invalid translation oc:carred during machine c:hec:1.t e.u:eption processiDg.,

An access violation or tnmslation not valid occarred duriDg pTocessiDg of a kemel stack not valid exception.

Double machine check error. A machine check oc:mred wbile tr,yiDg to service a machine check.

Double machine check error. A machine check occured wbile trying to service a kernel stack not valid exception.

1-2 KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

Table 1-1

(Cont.):

HALT Messages

Code

?l9

Message

PSLEXC51

Description

PSL<26:24>

=

5 on interrupt or exception.

?1A

PSLEXCS1

?lB

?1D

PSLEXC71

PSLRE151

PSL<26:24>

=

6 on interrupt of exception.

PSL<26:24>

=

7 on interrupt or exception.

PSL<26:24>

=

5 on an REI instruction

?lE

?1F

?3F

PSLREI61

PSLREI71

PSL<26:24>

=

6 on an REI iDstructicm.

PSL<26:24>

=

7 an an REI instrnction.

MICROVERlFYFAILURE Mic:roc:od.e power-up self-test failed.

IFor the last six cases, the VAX an:hitecture does not allow execution on the interrupt stack while in a mode other than kernel

In the first three cases, an intemlpt is attempting to run on the interrupt stack while

DOt in kernel mode.. In the last three

~ instruction is attempting to return to a made other than kemel and still run on the interrupt stadt.

1.3 VMB Error Messages

VMB

issues the errors

listed in Table 1-2.

Table 1-2: VMB Error Messages

Code

Message Description

?4O

141

142

?43

144

?45

?46

?47

?48

?49

NOSUCHDEV

DEVASSIGN

NOSUCHFILE

FILESTRUcr

BADCHKStJM

BADFILEHDR

BADmECTORY

FlLNOTCNTG

ENDOFFILE

BADFILENAME

No boatable devices found.

Device is not present.

Program image net found.

Invalid. boot device file structure.

Bad ebecbum

Oil headeT file.

Bad file header.

Bad directory file.

Invalid program image format.

Premature end of file encountered.

Bad file name given.

Error Messages

~

Table 1-2

(Cont.):

VMB

ErroF-Messages

Code Message Description

?4A BUFFEROVF

?4B

?4C

CTRLERR

DEVINACT

?4D

DEVOFFLINE

14E . MEMERR

14F SCBINT

?50 .

SCB2NDJNT

?51

?52

?53

NOROM

NOSUCHNODE lNSFMAPREG

154

?55

?56

BETRY lVDEVNAM

DRVERR

Program image does not fit in available memory.

Boot device I/O error.

Failed to initialize boot device.

Device is ofliiDe.

Memory iDitialization error.

Unes:pected

sea

exception or machine check.

Unes:pected ezceptiDn after startiDg program imqe.

No valid ROM image founcL

No response from load server.

No devices bootable, retryiDg.

Invalid devh:e name.

Drive

elTOl'.

1.4 Console Error Messages

The error messages listed in Table 1-3 are issued in response command that bas error(s).

to

a console

Table

1-3:

Console Error Messages

Code

Message

Description

?61

162

?63

?64

CORRUPl'lON

ILLEGAL REFERENCE

ILLEGAL COMMAND

INVALID DIGIT

The console program database has been corrupted. mega! reference. The

~ested virtual memory protection, the address is not mapped, the reference is invalid in the spec:i1ied address space, or the value is invalid in the specifiecl destination.

The command string CSlmOt be parsed.

A number bas aD invalid digit.

1-4 KA67SJKA680/KA690 CPU

Table

1-3

(Cont.): Console Error Messages_

Code Message Description

?65

?66

?67

?68

?69

?6A

?6B

. ?6C

?6D

?6E

?6F

170

?71

172

173

174

175

?76

LINE TOO LONG

ILLEGAL ADRRESS

VALUE TOO LARGE

QUALIFIER CONFUCT

The command was too large far the console to buffer. .

. The message is issued only terminating carriage return. after receipt of the

The address specified falls outside the limits of the address space.

The value specified. does not fit in the destination.

Qualifier conflict, for example, two difi'erent data sizes are specified for an EXAMINE command.

UNKNOWN QUALIFIER The switch is unrecognized.

UNKNOWN SYMBOL

CHECKSUM

The symbolic address in an EXAMINE command is unrecognized. or

DEPOSIT

The command or data checksum of an X command is incorrect. message

If the data is issued, and is checksum not is incorrect, abbreviated to this

"D1egal command".

The operator entered a

HALT command. HALTED

FIND ERROR

TIME OUT

A FIND command failed either to find the RPB or 128

KB of good memory.

During an X command, data failed to arrive in the time expected

(60 seconds),

MEMORY EBROR

UNIMPLEMENTED

NO VALUE QUALIFIER

A machine check occorred with a code indicating a read or write memory error.

Unimplemented functio~

Qualifier does

DOt take a value.

AMBIGUOUS QUALIFIER There were not enough uniq"ole characters to de+~nnine the qualifier.

VALUE QUALIFIER QuaWier requiles a value.

TOO MANY QUALIFIERS Too many qualifiers supplied for this command

TOO MANY ARGUMENTS Too many arguments supplied for this command.

AMBIGUOUS COMMAND There were

DOt enough unique characters to determine the command.

Error Messages 1-5

Table

1-3

(Cont.): Console Error Messages

Code Message Description

?77

?78

179

?7A

?7B

?7C

?7D

TOO FEW ARGUMENTS l:asuflicient arguments supplied for this command.

TYPEAHEAD OVERFLOW The typeahead buffer overflowed.

FRAMING ERROR

OVERRUN ERROR

A framing error was detected on the console seria1line.

SOFl'ERROR

HARD ERROR

MACHINE CHECK

An overrun error was detected on the console serial line.

A soft error occu.rred.

A hard error occarred.

A machine check occurred.

1-6

KA6751KA6801KA690 CPU

Appendix

J

Related Documents

The following documents contain information relating to the lIlaintenance of systems that use the KA.6751KA6801KA690 CPU module.

Title Part Number!

Guide to

Entry Systems Service Information Kits

KA6751.KA6801KA690 CPU Technical Manual

VAX 4000 Site P!eparaticm Guide

EK-K27~

EK-KA~TM

EK-387A~

BA43OiBA440 Enclosure Maintenance EK-348A#-MG

BA400-Series Enclosures Storage Devices mstaDation Procedures EK-BA44A-IN

DSSI Warm Swapping Guide for BA4OO-Series Enclosures and EK-457AA-SG

KFQSA Adapters

EK-410AA-MG DSSI VAXcluster Installation and Troubleshooting

Mic:roSystems

OptioDS

Mk:roVAX Diagnostic Monitor User's Guide

KFQSA

Storage

Adapter

Installation and User Manual

RF.&ries

Integrated Storage Element User Guide

RF -Series Integrated

Storage

Element Serlice Guide

EK-192At-MG

AA-FM7A1-DN

~-KFQSA-lN

EK-RF72D-UG

EK-RF72D-SV

Related DoaJments J-1

Glossary

BFLAG

BBALT

BIP

Bugcbeclt

Cache memory

CSR

CQBIC

DCOK

DE

DNA

DMA

EPROM

ECC

Boot FLAG is the longword supplied in the

SET BFLAG and

BOOT

IRS: mynmsDds that qualify the bootstrap operation.

SHOW BFLAG displays the cunent value.

Q22-bus

Halt signal is usually tied to the front panel

Halt switch.

Boot In Progress flag in

CPMBX<2>

Software or hardware error fatal to

VMSprocessor or system. .

A small, bigh-speed memory placed between slower main memcny and the plOCeSSOr.

A processor speed. cache increases effective memory transfer rates and

Console Program

Mailbox is used to pass information between operating systems and the firmware.

Control and stata.s register. A device or exmtroller register that resides in the processar's I/O space. The CSR initiates device activity and records its status.

CVAX to

Q22-iras interface chip

Q22-bus signal mdicating de power is stable.

Restart switch on the System Control Panel.

This signal is tied to the

Diagnostic Execntive is a compcment of the ROM-based diagnostics

!'eSpo!!sible far set-up» execution. and clean-up of compon.ent diagnostic tests.

Digital Networlt Architectme

Direct Memoty Access.

Ac:cess to the memar,y by an I/O device that does not require processor intervention.

Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory is used on some products . to store firmware.

Commanly used synonyms are PROM or ROM.

Erasable by usiDg ultraviolet light.

Error Conect:ian Code. by perlbnnhlg

Code that carries out automatic error correction . an exclusive or operaticm on the transferred data and applyin.g a conection mask.

Glossary-1

Factory Installed

Software

(FlS)

FEPROM

Firmware

FRU

GPR

Operating system software that is loaded into a system disk duriDg manufacture. On site, -the FIS is bootstraped in the system, prompting a predefined menu of questions on the final con1igaration.

Flash Erasable Programmable

Read-Only

Memory (FEPROM) is used on four chips on the KA6751KA68O/KA690 module. FEPROMs use elect.rical (bulk) erasare rather than ultraviolet erasure.

Firmware in this document refers to VAX instruction code residing at physical address 2004000O all the

KA6751KA6801KA690.

Functionally it consists of diagnostics, bootstraps, console, and halt entry/exit code.

Field-Rep1acable

Unit. Any is able to replace on-site. system component that the field engineer

General Purpose Registers on the

KA6751KA68OIKA690 are the sixteen standard

VAX longword registers RO through

R15. The last four registers, R12 through R15, me also known by their unique mnemoDic:s

AP (Argument Pointer), FP

(Frame

Pointer), SP

(Stack

Painter), and

PC (Program Counter), respectively.

Imtia

1 jzation

IPL

IPR

The sequence of steps that prepare the system to start. Initialization oc::curs after a system has been powered up.

Interrupt

Priority

Level ranges from

0 to

31 (0 to

IF hex).

Internal Processor Registers on the

KA65IKA.68OIKA69O are those implemented by the processor chip set. These longword registers are cmly

Register) accessible with the instructions and MFPR

(Move

From

MTPR

Processor

(Move

Register)

To Processor and ~ kernel mode privileges. This document uses the prefix "PR$_"' when referencing these registers.

ISE Integrated storage element. An intelligent disk drive used em the

Digital

Storage Systems

Interccmnect.

KA6151KA68OJKA69O NVAX based

Q22-bus

CPU processor module with cmboard cache, two

DSSI ports, and Ethernet adapter.

LED

Light EmittiDg

Diode

Macbi.ue c:hec:k An operating system action trigered by certain system errors that ean be fatal to system operation. Once triggered, machine check handler software analyzes the error, comparing it to predetermined failure scenarios.

Three outcomes are possible: the system continues to run, the software program is halted, or the system crashes.

MOP Maintenance Operations Protocol specifies message protocol far network Joopback assistance, networlt bootstrap, and remote console fanctions.

Mass Stmage Control Protocol is used in Digital c:1isks and tapes.

Glossary-2

ms

NVRAM

PC

PCB

PFN

PR$_ICCS

PR$JPL

PR$.-MAPEN

PR$ycBB

PR$_RXCS

PR$_RXDB

PR$_SAVISP

P.R$_SAVPC

PR$_SAVPSL

PR$_SCBB

PR$_SISR

PR$_TODR

QDSS

Mjl1isecond

(l0e-3 seconds)

Nonvolatile

RAM, on the

KA6751KA68OIKA690 this is

1 Kb of battery backed-up

RAM on the sse.

Program

Counter or R15

Process

Control Block is a data stn1~ to by the PRSJ'CBB register and contains the c:nrrent precess' hardware context.

Page Frame Number is an index of a page (512 bytes) of local memory.

A PFN is derived from the bit field <23:09> of a physical address.

Interval

Clodt Control and Status, IPR 24

Interrupt

Priority Level, IPR 18

Memory Management Mapping Enable, IPR 56

Process

Control Block Base zegister, lPR 16

ReX)eceive CoDSOle Status,

IPR 32

R(X)eceive

Data Bafi'er, IPR 33

SAVed 1ntenupt

Stack

Pointer, IPR 41

SAVed Program

CounteJ;

IPR 42

SAVed Program Status IDDgWord, IPR 43

System Control Block Base register, IPR 17

Sohare Interrupt Summ&IY Register, IPR 21

Time Of Day Register,

JPR

Year register or TOY clock.

2:1, is commonly referred to as the

Time

Of

T(X)ransmit

Console Status, IPR 34

T(X)ransmit

Data BuJIer, IPR 35

Processor Status Longword is the VAX extension of the PSW

(Processor

Sta.tns Word). The PSW Gower word) contains instroction condition codes and is accessible by nonprivileged users; however, the upper . word contains system status information and is accessible by privileged users.

Q22-bus Map Base :Register found in the

CQBIC determines the base address in local memoIY for the scatterlgather registers.

Q22-bus video controller for workstations

GIossary-3

QMR

QNA

RAM

RIP

RPB

SCB

SGEC

SDn

SBAC

SP

Q22-bus

Map

~r

Q22-bus Ethernet contmller module

Random

AI:t:I!ss Memory

Restart In Progress flag in CPMBX<3>

Restart

Parameter a comm111lication

Block is a software data structure used as mecbanism between firmware and the operating system.

Information in this block is used by the firmware to attempt an operating system (warm) restart.

System Control Block is a data structure pointed to by

PR$_SCBB.

It contains a list of longword exCeption and interrupt vectors.

Second

Generation

Ethernet Chip

Symptom-Directed Diagnosis. Online analysis of nonfatal system errors in order to locate potential system fatal errors before they occur.

Single

Host

Adapter Chip

Stack Pointer or

R14

Standard

Reference Manual, as in

VAX SRM

System Support

Chip

SBM

sse

'JlS Microsecond (10e.6 seconds)

VAXclustercon1igaA bighly ration integrated a bigh-speed organization of VMS systems that coDllD11Dicate commUDications path. VAXc1uster mDJiguratioDS have all the fa.Dctions of single-node systems, plus the ability to share

CPU resources, queues, and disk storage. Like a singlenode system, the VAXc1uster canfiguration provides a siDgle security and management environment. Member nodes can operating environment or serve specialjzed needs. share the same

VD'tual Memory

Boot is the portion oftbe firmware dedicated to booting the operating system.

Glossary-4

A

Acceptance testing, 4-15 to

4-20

Algorithm to find a valid RPB, 4-40 to restart operating system,

4-39

ALLCLASS, 3-25 setting, 3-33 interpreting

CPU errors using,

5-16 interpreting DMA to host transaction faults using,

5-29 interpreting memory errors using,

5-18 interpreting system bus faults using, 5-27 .

ANAL'YZEISYSTEM, 5-21

B

Backplane description,

2-14

Binary load and unload command), A-33

ex

Bits

RPB$V _DIAG, 4-32

RPB$V _SOLICT:; 4-32

Boot flags,

3-47 supported devices, 3-46, H-l

Boot Block Format, 4-30

BOOT command, A-I0

Boot

Flags

RPBSV

_BBLOCK, 4-30

Bootstrap conditions, 4-23

Index

Bootstrap (cont'd) definition at:

4-23 disk and tape, 4-30 failure, 4-24 initialization, 4-24 memory layout, 4-25 memory layout after successful bootstrap, 4-28 network,

4-32 preparing for, 4-24 primary, 4-26

PROM, 4-31 secondary, 4-27 control passed to, 4-28

Break EnablelDisable switch,

2-8 c

9C utility, 4-16,5-56

Comment command

(!),

A-35

! (comment command), A-35

Configuration, 3-1 and module order, 3-1

CONFIGURE, 3-22

CONFIGURE command, 3-22, A-ll

Co-~le ::Q""!--g9)ds address space control qualifiers,

A-7 address specifiers, A-3 binary load and unload

00,

A-33

BOOT, A-lO

! (comment), A-3S

CONFIGURE,

A-U

CONTINUE, A-l3 data control qualifiers, A-7

DEPOSIT,

A-lS

EXAMINE,

A-l4

FIND, A-IS

Index-1

Console commands (cont'd)

HALT, A-16

HELP, A-16

INITIALIZE,

A-18 keywords, A-8 list of, A-8

MOVE, A-19

NEXT, A-20 quallfier and argument conventions, A-2 qualifiers, A-6

REPEAT, A-22

SEARCH, A-22

SET,

A-24

SHOW, A-28

START,

A-32 symbolic addresses, A-3 syntax, A-2

TEST, A-32

UNJAM,

A-33

X

(binary load and unload), A-33

Console error messages sample

~

Console I/O mode special c:baracters,

A-l

Console module desription, 2-6 to

2-11 fuses, 2-10

Console part, testing,

S-66

CONTINUE cmnmand, A-13

CPU features, 2-1 to

2-5 location, 3-1

D

DC OK Indicator function, 2-13 on System Control Panel, 2-13

DEPOSIT command, A-13

Device Dependent Bootstrap

Procedures, 4-30

Diagnostic executive, 4-9 error field, 5-41

Diagnostic tests list of,

4-9 parameters for, 4-9

Diagnostics relationship to UETP, 5-62

Diagnostics, DSS! storage devices,

5-57

Diagnostics, RF-series, 4-8

DNA Mamtenance Operations

Protocol (MOP), 4-32

Documents related,

J-l

DSSI parameters, 3-24

DSSI storage device elTOrs,

5-57 testing, 5-57

DSSI storage device local programs list of, 5-57

DSSI VAXcluster capability, 3-13 configuration rules, 3-15 examples

~

DUP driver utility, 3-24, 3-27 entering from console mode, 3-31 entering from

VMS,

3-32 exiting, 3-38

E

Entry Point definition of, C-l

Error during UETP, 5-63 diagnosing, 5-62

Error Log Utility relationsbip to UETP, 5-62

Error messages console, sample

~

EXAMINE command, A-I4

Expanders control power bus, 3-9 mass storage, 3-8

Q-bus,

3-8

IOOe:x-2

F

Fans

Fan Speed Control Disable (FSC),

2-18 location, 2-17

FE utility, 5-53

Fl1es-lllookup, 4-30

FIND command, A-15

Firmware commands and utilities, 3-20 power-up sequence, 4-1 updating, 6-1

Flags restart in progress, 4-39

FORCEUNI, 3-25

Fuses for H3604 console module,

5-64 troubleshooting, 5-04

G

General purpose registers (GPRs) in error display, 5-43 symbolic addresses for, A-3

H

H3l0S loopback connector, 5-66

H3604

YO

panel, 5-66

HSS12 loopback connector, 5-66

Halt dispatch,

D-1

HALT on bootstrap failure,

~27

Halt actions summary, 3-48

Halt Button location, 2-13

HALT command, A-16

Halt protection, override, 5-54

HELP command, A-16

I

INIT,

4-.2.4

Initial power-up test

See

IPR

Initialization following a processor hal~

"4-39 prior to bootstrap, 4-24

INITIALIZE command,

A-1S

IPL_31, 4-25 iSYS$TEST logical name,

5-62

L

Language selection menu conditions for display of, 4-2 example of,

4-2 messages, list of,

4-1

Local Memory

Partitioning, 4-25

Log file generated by UETP

OLDUETP.LOG, 5-63

Loopback connectors

H3l03, 5-66

H8572, 5-66 list ot:

5-69

Loopback tests, 5-64 console port, 5-66

DSSI, 5-67

Etherne~ ~8

Q-bus,

5-69

M

Maintenance strategy, 1-1 field f'eedbac~

1..0 information services,

14 service delivery, 1-1 service tools and utilities, 1-2

Mass storage configuration of,

~ rules for numbering, 3-7

Memory acceptance testing of,

4-16 isolating FRU, 4-17,5-54 modules, 2-5 testing,

5-54

Index.....s

Memory module desription, 2-5 installing, 3-2 order, 2-5

Module configuration, 3-5 order, in backplane, 3-1 self-tests, 4-7, 5-69

MOM$LOAD, 4-32

MOP functions, 4-35

MOP program load sequence, 4-32

MOp, functions, 5-59

MOVE command, A-19

N

Network listening, 4-33

NEXT command, A-20

NODENAME,

3-25 setting, 3-37

NVRAM

CPMBX, F-2 partitioning,

F-1 o

OLDUETP.LOG file,

5-62

Operating

System bool:stlap,

4-23 restarting a halted, 4-39

Operating System Restart definition

at:

4-39

Options adding to enclosure, 3-10 to 3-13

Over 'Dmlperature Warning indicator system, 2-13

p

Page Frame Number Bitmap, 4-32

Parameters for diagnosUc tests,

4-9 in error display, 5-42

Pa~leCon~lS~

Error messages, 6-9

PFN bitmap, 4-24

POST

See

Power-on self-tests errors handled by, 5-57

Power supply desription, 2-15 to

2-17 minimum load, 3-13

Power-on self test

See

POST

. Power-on self-tests description, 4-4 errors handled by,

4-8 kernel, 4-4 mass storage,

4-8

Q-bus,4-7 power-up machine state, 4-20 memory layout, 4-21

Power-up mode switch set to language inquiry, 4-1 set to run, 4-3 set to test, 4-1

Power-up sequence, 4-1

Power-up tests, 4-1

PRAO,4-31

Primary Bootstrap, 4-26

Q

Q-bus options, recommended order,

3-5

Q22-bus Memory and VMS, 4-28

R

Registers initializing the general purpose,

4-25

Q22-bus Map Registers, 4-28

Related documents, J-1

REPEAT command, A-22

REQ..PROGRAM, 4-33

Restart,

4-39

Index-4

Restart

Button location, 2-13

Restart parameter block (PRB),

3-47

Restart Parameter Block (RPB)

RIP flag, 4-39

RF -series ISE diagnostics, 4-8, 5-57 errors, 5-57

RF -series ISE local programs list of, 5-57

ROM-based diagnostics, 4--8 to

4-10 and memory testing, 5-55 console displays during, 5-40 isolating failures with, 5-44 list of, 4-9 parameters, 4-9 utilities, 4-9

RPB initialization, D-5 locating, 4-40

RPB Signature Fonnat, 4-40 s

Scripts, 4-10 to

4-11 list of, 4-13

SEARCH command, A-22

Secondary Bootstrap, 4-27

Self-test, for modules, 4-7, 5-69

SET BOOT device name command use of, 3-44

SET command, A-24

SET HOSTIDUP command, A-24

SHOW command, A-28

SHOW commands, 3-29

SICL messages,

~3 converting appended MEL files,

5-36

Signature Block

PROM, 4--31

START command, A-32

S~licadmre~,A-3 for any address space, A-6 for

GPRs, A-3

System c~qtrol panel, 2-12 to

2-13

System hang, 5-64

SYSTEMID, 3-25 setting, 3-37

T

Tape ISE diagnostics, 5-57 errors, 5-57

Tape ISE local programs list of, 5-57

Termination power, tests for, 5-6.7

TESTcommand,A-32

Tests, diagnostic list of, 4-9 parameters for, 4-9

Troubleshooting procedures, general, 5-2 suggestions, additional, 5-56

UETP,5-63 u

UETINIT01.EXE image, 5-63

UETP interpreting VMS failures with,

5-62

UETP.LOG file, 5-62

Unit number labels, 3-34

UNITNUM, 3-25 setting, 3-34

'UNJ~\1:,

4-24

UNJAM command, A-33

User Environment Test Package

(UETP) interpreting output of, 5-62 running multiple passes of, 5-62 typical failures reported by, 5-63

Utilities, diagnostic, 4-9 v

Valid Maps, 4-28

VAXELN and VMB, 4-27

Index-5

VAXsimPLUS, 5-4, 5-31

. customizing, 5-38 enabling SICL, 5-39 installing, 5-37

Virtual

Memory Boot

(VMB),

4-27 definition of, 4-26 primary bootstrap, 4-26 secondary bootstrap, 4-30

VMB boot flags, 3-47

VMS

error handling, 5-5 event record translation, 5-15 w

Wannstart, 4-39

Write-enabling a storage element, 3-40 an RF -series storage element,

3-40 to 3-44 .

Write-protecting a storage element, 3-40 an RF -series storage element,

3-40 to 3-44 an RF35 storage element, 3-40 to

3-44 x

X command (binary load and unload), A-33

Index-6

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System Maintenance

EK-454AA-MG-001

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BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

DIGITAL EQUIPMENT CORPORATION

CORPORATE USER INFORMAnON PRODUCTS

PK03-11D3O

MAYNARD, IIA 01754-9975

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Do Not Tear-Fold Bere aJldTape - -

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