city council meeting

city council meeting
CITY COUNCIL MEETING City Hall – 270 River Avenue October 16, 2013 AGENDA 5:30 PM Special City Council Meeting 5:35 PM Public Comments 5:40 PM Motion to enter Closed Door Session to Review Pending Litigation 5:50 PM* Motion to Close Special Meeting 5:55 PM* Pre‐Council Meeting (Council review of Agenda Items, No Action Taken) 7:00 PM Council Meeting (Action to be taken by Council on the following agenda items) * Approximate Times 1. 2. 3. 4. *5. *6. 7. 8. Deleted 9. 10. ROLL CALL Opening Prayer – Deputy City Clerk Perales Pledge of Allegiance Consent Agenda – All items listed with an asterisk (*) are considered to be routine and have previously been reviewed by Council, and will be enacted with one motion. There will be no separate discussion of these items unless a Council Member or a member of the audience so requests, in which event the item will be removed from the consent agenda and considered in its normal sequence: A. Announcement of above by the Mayor B. Summary of the Consent Agenda by the City Clerk C. Requests to remove items D. Motion to approve Consent Agenda Items – ROLL CALL. Approval of Minutes: Regular meeting held October 2, 2013 and October 9, 2013 study session. Absences Excused: Motion to excuse, if any. Special Presentations and Recognitions by the Mayor and / or Council Members. A. Holland In Bloom Awards. B. Pick‐Up‐Trash (PUT) Club Initiative. Special Order of the Day: Public Hearings A. Possible Revocation of Public Lodging License for the Economy Inn, 409 US 31 South. Move to 14E1.2* Report B. Downtown Parking Operations & Maintenance Assessment Roll. C. Downtown Principal Shopping District (PSD) Assessment Roll. D. Downtown Snowmelt Operations Assessment Roll. E. PA 198 Tax Abatement, Buhler Prince, 670 Windcrest Drive F. PA 198 Tax Abatement, Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East 40th Street. G. PA 198 Tax Abatement, Paramount Tool Co., Inc., 136 West 64th Street. (1) Report from Staff (2) Mayor Declares Public Hearing Open for Comment (3) Mayor Declares Public Hearing Closed (4) Motion to adopt resolution – (7) ROLL CALLS. Unfinished Business: A. Calendar Year 2014 Rental Housing Program Fee Adjustments (1) Motion to remove from table – ROLL CALL. (2) Motion to table above matter to October 23, 2013 Special Meeting – ROLL CALL. Adoption of Ordinances: A. Rezoning 51 & 61 Country Club Road from R‐1 One Family Residential District to PRD Planned Residential Development District. (1) Report from Staff (2) Mayor Declares Public Hearing Open for Comment (3) Mayor Declares Public Hearing Closed (4) Motion to adopt resolutions – ROLL CALL. (5) Motion to table above matter – ROLL CALL. *11. Deleted Written Petitions and Communications: A. Oaths of Office. B. Tax Abatement Application PA 198 for JMS of Holland, Inc., 1010 Productions Court – Refer to staff for study & report. 12. Communications from the Audience 13. Reports from Special Committees: None. 14. Reports from Boards and City Officers: A. Board of Public Works: *1. Estates of Olde Evergreen Water‐Wastewater Bill of Sale – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *2. Grant of Easement for 6226 144th Ave. – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL.
*3. Declaration of Surplus Material – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *4. Real Property Purchase ‐ Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *5. Advanced Metering Strategy and Procurement Services – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *6. Board Room Audio Video Systems Installation Services – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. B. Planning Commission: None. C. City Attorney: None. *1. Police Reserve Officers – Event Attendance Agreement for Groove Walk – October 19, 2013 ‐ Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. D. City Clerk: Deleted *1. Claims Filed Against the City ‐ Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *2. Declare Election Items as Surplus – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. E. City Manager: 1. Community & Neighborhood Services: *1.1 Establishment of the Pick‐Up‐Trash (PUT) Club Initiative – Every 3rd Sunday of Each Month – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *1.2 Public Lodging for the Economy Inn, 409 US 31 South – Schedule Public Hearing for November 6, 2013 – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. 2. Parks, Recreation and Transportation Services: None. 3. Fiscal Services & Purchasing: *3.1 Public Safety – Declare Items as Surplus – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *3.2 Technology Services – Bids for Council Chambers Audio and Lighting Upgrades ($41,633) ‐ Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. 4. Public Safety Services: None. 5. Management & Administrative Services: 5.1 Gifts – Motion to accept with appreciation – ROLL CALL. 5.2 Overnight On‐Street Parking – Place on First Reading an Ordinance to Allow a Pilot Program for the Summer 2014 – Final Reading Scheduled for November 6, 2013 ‐ Motion to adopt recommendation ‐ ROLL CALL. *5.3 Regional Prosperity Initiative Grant Application ‐ Resolution – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. *5.4 Tax Abatement – Schedule Public Hearing for November 6, 2013 on a PA 198 Abatement for JMS, 1010 Productions Court – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. New 5.5 Michigan Economic Development Grant for Restoration of the DeZwaan Windmill at Windmill Island Gardens – Motion to adopt recommendation – ROLL CALL. 6. Internal Services: None 15. Communications from the City Manager 16. Communications from the Mayor A. Performance Review of the City Manager. 17. Communications from Council Members 18. Motions and Resolutions by Council Members *19. First Reading of Ordinances: A. Overnight On‐Street Parking – Ordinance – Motion to accept for first reading. 20. Adjournment 



PLEASE NOTE AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION: In addition to addressing the Council during public hearings and under “Communications from the Audience”, members of the Audience may address the Council, on items under “Reports from Boards and City Officers”, after a motion is pending on a particular item (except for items on the Consent Agenda), by approaching the microphone and waiting to be recognized by the Mayor. Audience participation shall be five minutes or less per item. HEARING ASSIST DEVICES: Hearing assist devices are available upon request in the Control Room near the lighted display case. The City Council Chambers is equipped with the Induction Loop System. Please adjust your hearing aid to the T‐coil setting to enhance reception of the amplified sound. CELL PHONES: Please be courteous and turn cell phones off during the meeting. Habla Español, See Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk. Proposed Minutes
Holland City Council Meeting
Holland, Michigan, October 2, 2013
The City Council gathered at 5:00 p.m. in the Employee Lounge for supper and then met at 5:30 p.m. in the Training
Center of City Hall, 270 River Avenue, for a special meeting and reviewed items on the agenda for this meeting.
Members Present: Mayor Dykstra, Council Members De Boer, Trethewey, Peters, Burch, Vande Vusse, Hoekstra,
Whiteman and Klomparens
Members Absent: None
Staff Present: City Manager Cotton, Assistant City Manager Robinson, Deputy City Clerk Perales and City Attorney
Mulder
Others Present: City Planner Dye
13.532
nd
A motion was made by Council Member Hoekstra, 2 by Council Member De Boer,
To enter into closed session to review legal opinions
Upon ROLL CALL the motion carried unanimously
13.533
nd
A motion was made by Council Member Hoekstra, 2
to conclude the closed session.
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon VOICE VOTE, the motion carried.
13.534
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
to conclude the special meeting session.
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon VOICE VOTE, the motion carried.
The City Council gathered at 6:40 p.m. in the Employee Lounge for supper and then met at 5:30 p.m. in the Training
Center of City Hall, 270 River Avenue, for a study session and reviewed items on the agenda for this meeting.
The City Council met in regular session at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers of City Hall and the meeting was called to
order by Mayor Dykstra.
Assistant City Manager Robinson led in opening prayer.
13.535
Consent Agenda
nd
After review, a motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2 by Council Member De Boer,
To approve the consent agenda items which included the following Council Action numbers:
13.536 – 13.538, 13.540 – 13.550, 13.553 – 13.555, 13.557 – 13.559, 13.561
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.536
Minutes Approved
nd
Upon motion by Council Member Trethewey, 2 by Council Member De Boer,
The minutes of the September 18 regular meeting and September 24, 2013 study session were approved.
Written Petitions and Communications
13.537
Oaths of Office
The following executed oath of office were presented and filed:
Laurie Franklin
Filed.
Morna Hallsexten
13.538
th
Tax Abatement Applications (2) PA198 for Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East 40 Street, and
th
Paramount Tool Co., Inc., 136 West 64 Street
Council accepted for study and report two PA198 tax abatement applications for Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East
th
th
40 St., and Paramount Tool Co., Inc., 136 West 64 St.
Communications from the Audience
13.539
General Matters
th
Mary Whiteford, 7258 Beverly Dr., South Haven announced that she is running for the open 80 District State
Representative and reviewed her background and reasons for running for congress.
Reports from Boards and City Officers
13.540
th
Contract for Cathodic Protection System Repairs for 48 Street Power Plant
th
Board of Public Works report was presented advising that the cathodic protection system at our 48 Street location is
failing and not providing corrosion protection to our underground piping. Thirty one anodes will be replaced to improve
that protection. The existing galvanic cathodic protection system was installed during original construction in 1992. During
the annual survey of the voltage readings that are indicative of the level of protection, we are seeing the voltage levels
rising above the industry accepted criteria of -0.85 volts when measured with a copper-copper sulfate half-cell. Voltage
readings should be more negative than -0.85 volts. Since the anodes of a cathodic protection system are sacrificial in
nature this decline in protection is expected and the anodes will need periodic replacing. Our galvanic anodes have
lasted 21 years. The life of an anode is a function of the quality of coating on the pipe it is protecting, the length of pipe is
it protecting and any unrepaired damage from nearby construction activities. The contract with Corrpro Companies, Inc.
will provide material, labor and equipment to replace thirty one of the existing 60 anodes in our system. They will install
magnesium anodes into a vacuum excavated hole and tie the anode lead wire into the existing test station. Vacuum
excavation has been specified to eliminate unwanted damage to other underground facilities. A geotextile containment
barrier liner surrounding the fuel oil tanks will be penetrated to access the tank anodes. Included in Corrpro’s price below
is a $5000 allowance added to Corrpro’s base bid to subcontract the barrier liner repair to MPC Containment International,
the manufacture of the liner. Final in-service testing will also be performed to verify the protection level has been returned
to an acceptable level. Corrpro Companies, Inc. is the recommended contractor on this project based on evaluation of the
bids received from four contractors. Cost results are listed below.
Mears Group, Inc.
Corrpro Companies, Inc.
National Pipeline Services
Cathodic Protection Management
$88,581.38
$79,325.00
Declined to bid
Declined to bid
It was recommended to approve a contract with Corrpro Companies, Inc. in the amount of $79,325.00, with a 10%
contingency of $7,932.00, for a total of $87,257.00 pending approval as to form from the City Attorney.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.541
Service Contract with Siemens
Board of Public Works report was presented advising that the HBPW is required by the North American Electric Reliability
Corporation (NERC) to perform regular maintenance on breakers on the 138kV system. The breakers on the 138kV
system must be inspected, rebuilt, or replaced every 20 years. Maintenance work like this is performed every year
throughout our system, but this is the first time we are performing the work on three breakers simultaneously. Due to the
specialized nature of the equipment and its criticality, we have deemed this a sole source project and have the
manufacturer perform the work. We have not found another vendor that has an equivalent level of expertise or
equipment. It was recommended to approve the Service Contract with Siemens to perform maintenance on three
Siemens Type TCP Power Circuit Breakers for a total cost of $54,051.00, pending City Attorney approval of the terms and
conditions.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
2
13.542
Demolition of Atmospheric Processing Plant at 110 Fairbanks
Board of Public Works report was presented advising that demolition of the Atmospheric Processing plant at 110
Fairbanks needs to be accomplished prior to beginning construction of the new Energy Center. As there are numerous
environmental issues, regulations, and requirements that will need to be addressed when deconstructing this facility,
HBPW staff have concluded that having a firm such as ERM manage the demolition will provide the most cost effective
and risk adverse approach to dealing with this property. ERM has managed demolition projects on environmentally
impaired projects for over 20 years and will bring their experience and expertise to bear on this complex project. It was
recommended to enter into a professional services purchase order with Environmental Resources Management, for
$50,900, to provide demolition management services for the building and associated assets located at 110 Fairbanks
Avenue, Holland, Michigan.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.543
Unit 7 & Unit 8 Control System Replacement
Board of Public Works report was presented advising that Combustion Turbine Generating Units 7 & 8 were installed in
1992 and have been serving the HBPW in a peaking capacity since commissioning. General Electric, the OEM, has
discontinued support for both the turbine and generator controls and declared them obsolete. Third party repairs and
components are available for the generator controls; however they have not proven to be a reliable solution. Combustion
Turbine Units 7 & 8 were installed in 1992. They have the original control systems that were supplied with the units from
General Electric. The control systems have functioned well throughout their life but are at the end of their life cycle. The
reliability of the systems has been decreasing. The turbine control systems have experienced some failures during the
past few peaking seasons resulting in lengthy forced outages. Over the last 20 years, microprocessors and electronic
technology have advanced so much that the original manufacturers of the components that make parts for the General
Electric Speedtronic Mark IV control system no longer make or supply those parts. This has forced GE to discontinue
production of the Mark IV control system and made it nearly impossible for them to continue the parts support. Due to
General Electric’s lack of support for the existing control system, HBPW has been forced to seek out third party control
system card repair shops and vendors. These cards and repairs have proven to be unreliable as oftentimes rebuilt cards
do not work. Currently, HBPW does not stock every card or processor in the system; but HBPW researched the cost of
purchasing a set of used or new old stock (NOS) cards for inventory. Purchasing a partial set for inventory to reduce
downtime caused by card failures would cost approximately $110,000. By having inventory it would not reduce the
number of failures or trips, but would reduce the length of time the unit is out of service--from weeks to a day or two.
General Electric has provided a solution to customers, which includes upgrading all of the processing cards and
electronics to the latest SpeedTronic Mark Ve Control System and the latest EX2100e Generator Control system. This is
a viable option but has a significant cost. Due to the cost and proprietary nature of the system, other options have also
been evaluated. Siemens and Emerson Process Management were invited to provide proposals for a cost effective
turnkey control system replacement solution for both units. Siemens and Emerson both provided bids for a Distributed
Control System (DCS) that would control the turbine and Generator/Excitation control systems. Typically DCS-type
control systems are used in large, more complex systems such as coal fired power plants or combined cycle power
plants. These systems are medium-priced options that offer a good solution but are not a perfect fit. Emerson’s bid was
the lowest. The Emerson proposal did not include a historian, remote support capability, spare parts pricing, or training for
the excitation system. The estimated cost of adding these is significantly more than the next competitive bid provided by
TTS. The best option for the HBPW on cost, completeness, and technology is the proposal provided by Turbine
Technology Services Corporation (TTS). The processors are made by Allen Bradley and are utilized across numerous
process control and manufacturing industries. This means there is a large support network and replacement components
can be procured locally. The Generator Control TTS is proposing are still industry specific, however, Basler Electric’s
DECS400 system is a very popular aftermarket solution that has been proven on numerous generators in the industry,
including HBPW’s Unit 4, 5 & 6 generators. TTS was contracted to supply and install a new control system on Unit 6
combustion turbine generator in 2001. Replacing the aged control system will provide HBPW an opportunity to integrate
numerous system improvements and upgrades. Following is a brief overview of those upgrades and added functionality
that will increase reliability and work efficiency:
1. Sequence of Events / Historian
a. The new system will be purchased with a historian that records all of the critical values while the turbine is
online. When an issue occurs, the data can be recalled and studied to pinpoint issues and identify corrective
actions that may be needed. Currently this capacity is very limited and mostly non-existent.
2. Standard Industry Control Components and Programming Language
3
3.
4.
5.
6.
a. The new control system will utilize many common components and a programming language that is not
proprietary to one industry or piece of equipment but is instead common and found in numerous industries
where controls and automation are used. This will mean that support from local vendors, suppliers, and
technicians will be easier to procure and result in quicker, lower cost responses should an issue arise.
NERC Compliance
a. The new control system will be compliant with NERC CIP and PRC standards from the beginning. Upgrading
the relaying, excitation, and generator controls will allow for reduced maintenance frequencies and cost to
maintain compliance with NERC Standard PRC-005, Testing and Maintenance of Protective Systems. The
new control system will also be compliant with NERC Cyber Security Standards. Locating, understanding,
and reporting equipment malfunctions to NERC will be much more accurate and reduce HBPW’s noncompliance risk.
Digital Relaying and Excitation
a. TTS has included in their proposal Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories digital generator protective relaying.
These new relays will replace dozens of electro-mechanical relays with a couple of modules. The new relays
will be capable of trending sequences of events and recording what happened should a disturbance occur on
the electrical grid and cause a generator issue. This ability will increase the ease of NERC compliance.
Operator & Technician Training
a. This project has included training for operators, technicians and plant staff. The visual user interface of the
new turbine control system will improve operator’s and technician’s ease of operating and working on the
turbine generators.
Life Cycle Points of Note
a. The existing control system will have lasted 22 years at the time of the upgrade.
b. Unit 7 and Unit 8 Turbine Generators have an anticipated remaining life of 20+ years based on the life of
peaking Unit 6.
c. The new control system is anticipated to last 20+ years.
d. The original control system on Unit 6 lasted 26 years.
e. The TTS control system installed in Unit 6 is 12 years old now.
The bids were evaluated on contractor experience, equipment evaluation, proposal detail, completeness, and cost.
Table 1 outlines the evaluated bids that have been normalized to include all of the features and equipment the HBPW
requires. A complete tabular overview of the bid analysis is included with this recommendation as an attachment.
Table 1: Bid Result Summary
Contractor
Evaluated Bids
Siemens
General Electric
Emerson Process Management
Turbine Technology Services
$
$
$
$
1,477,248.28
2,085,774.00
1,279,283.00
1,335,020.58
Meets
Specifications
Final Assembly
Location
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Alpharetta, Georgia
Longmount, Colorado
Clifton Park, New York
Orlando, Florida
Turbine Technology Services’ proposal has been evaluated to be the best evaluated bid for this project. Table 2 shows
TTS’ detailed pricing. HBPW asked for pricing on various features within the RFP and has included with some pricing to
aid in evaluating. In addition to the contracted amount, $65,808.38 will be expensed utilizing a standard Purchase Order
for spare parts that will be put immediately into inventory.
Table 2: Detailed Pricing
Turbine Technology Services Detailed Pricing
Base Price
Selected Features
Remote Support Capability
Inlet Fogging Integration
Historian
Dual Redundant Processors
Contract Amount
Budget Amount
Difference
Requested Contingency
% Contingency of Total Contract
Spare Parts - To be Expensed
$/Both Units
$ 1,250,000.00
$/unit
$ 625,000.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,108.84
12,072.93
19,892.52
50,946.29
$ 1,335,020.58
$ 1,750,000.00
$
414,979.42
$
111,289.40
4
8.3%
$
65,808.38
1,054.42
6,036.47
9,946.26
25,473.15
$ 667,510.29
$ 875,000.00
$ 207,489.71
$ 55,644.70
8.3%
$ 32,904.19
It was recommended to approve a contract, pending City Attorney approval, with Turbine Technology Services
Corporation (TTS), the lowest evaluated bidder, to replace the turbine and generator control systems on Combustion
Turbine Generating Units 7 & 8 for an amount of $1,335,020.58 and approve a contract contingency in the amount of
$111,289.40 (8.3% of contract cost) for this project that was budgeted for this current Fiscal Year (FY2014) in the amount
of $1,750,000. Approve a Purchase Order in the amount of $65,808.38 to Turbine Technology Services for procurement
of spare parts inventory for the new Control System.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.544
Real Property Purchase
Board of Public Works report was presented advising that this recommendation is for the procurement of additional real
properties that will comprise the area identified as the home to the community’s newest electric generating resource.
While the Atmospheric Processing, Inc. property will provide a significant portion of the footprint needed for the power
plant project, additional properties are required to meet design requirements. Each Offer of Just Compensation (OJC)
was prepared by the City Attorney with appraisal services provided by Van Noord and Associates. Each residential
property that is owner occupied is provided an additional 25% compensation as required by statute. If a residential owner
was willing to commit to our offer within 30 days, an Offer of Compromise (OC) equal to 15% of the OJC was given as an
incentive. For commercial properties the OJC is the appraised value of the property and the OC equals 5% of the OJC.
Relocation expense reimbursement is provided as required by Michigan law. Please note that additional OJC’s will be
brought to the Board as they are executed by property owners. It was recommended to approve the included Offers of
Just Compensation, as prepared by the City Attorney, for several parcels of land. Additionally, provide authorization for
the Mayor and Deputy City Clerk to sign each Offer of Just Compensation.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
Planning Commission
13.545
Rezoning of 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the PRD
Planned Residential Development District with Final Reading to be held on October 16, 2013
Planning report was presented advising that Covenant Development LLC has requested that 51 and 61 Country Club
Road be rezoned from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District.
This property comprises the uplands area of the old Holland Country Club and is approximately 25 areas in size. The
applicant requests the rezoning of the subject properties to the PRD District in order to create a 68 unit zero-step
residential condominium community with clubhouse, pool and associated amenities. The applicant has also requested
and the Planning Commission has conditionally approved the Villas of Holland Development Plan through a Resolution
describing the plan as approved with a variety of conditions. However, said Plan approval by the Planning Commission is
only valid if City Council approves the requested rezoning. The Villas of Holland Development Plan is briefly described
and summarized with the following:
- Sixty-eight (68) single-family “zero step” attached dwelling units in the form of fifteen 4-unit buildings and four 2unit buildings.
- One clubhouse and outdoor pool and patio area.
- Overall proposed residential density of 2.73 dwelling units to the acre (gross), and 3.78 dwelling units per acre
(net, minus wooded ravine area).
- 6.9 acre private woodland preserve.
- Private street system that will align with Legion Park Drive at the Country Club Road intersection. It was
recommended that the intersection become a four-way STOP (requires subsequent traffic control order approval
from Council).
- Public sidewalk/trail access to the Ottawa County Macatawa Greenspace via a dedicated easement to the City.
On September 10, 2013 the Planning Commission held a public hearing to receive comments on the proposed rezoning.
There were six residents that spoke during the public hearing and four letters were received and entered into the public
record. Numerous questions were posed by area residents and Commissioners to the applicant and staff primarily
regarding drainage and water quality issues and soil geo-technical issues. The Planning Commission then tabled any
action on the proposed rezoning and development plan until the September 24 meeting to provide staff and the applicant
adequate time to provide answers to the various questions and to finish work on the Resolution that is meant to govern
5
the many aspects of the Plan. During the September 24 meeting, the applicant provided answers to several questions that
were posed from the previous meeting. Staff reviewed their reports and recommendations and reviewed a proposed
Resolution regarding the Villas of Holland development plan. The Commission then allowed additional public comment
regarding the proposed rezoning and development plan. Comments included making sure the developer provides
adequate landscaping and buffering around the site and its perimeter; encouraged use of stormwater best management
practices; questions regarding the impacts on area street and utility infrastructure and impacts on property values; a
statement that one resident had visited the developers’ Villas at Rivertown development and is supportive of this request;
and comments that PRD zoning should not be used for this development and it should not be approved. The Commission
also received several letters that were entered into the record. The Planning Commission then noted the detailed staff
report that recommends approval of the proposed rezoning. Following Commission discussion, the Planning Commission
voted unanimously (7-0) to recommend the rezoning to City Council. Their conditional approval of the Development Plan
followed their approval of the rezoning recommendation. It was recommended by the Planning Commission that City
Council accept and placed on first reading the proposed zoning ordinance amendment to rezone 51 and 61 Country Club
Road from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District with the final
reading to be held on October 16, 2013 Council regular meeting.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
City Clerk
13.546
Claims Filed Against the City of Holland
City Clerk report was presented advising that the following claims was filed against the City:
Darren VanOrder
It was recommended that the claims be referred to the City Attorney and City’s Insurance Carrier for consideration.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
City Manager
13.547
Downtown Parking Operations & Maintenance Assessment – Resolution to Schedule Public Hearing
on Assessment for October 16, 2013
City Manager report was presented advising that following is a report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City
Charter regarding the annual special assessments for operating and maintaining City-owned and leased off-street parking
facilities in the Downtown area. The parking assessment district includes properties within 400 feet of a public parking lot
th
th
and generally within the area bounded by 5 Street on the north, Columbia Avenue on the east, 11 Street on the south,
and Pine Avenue on the west. The parking assessment policy as amended in 2008 changes the base formula from a
building’s front footage to its square footage. 5% of the base assessment is then levied for each upper level that is vacant
or used for storage; 60% for upper levels used for offices; 100% for upper levels used for retail or restaurants; and 15%
for upper levels used for overnight sleeping rooms in a hotel or inn. Non-profit uses, unless otherwise exempted by the
policy, are assessed at a rate that is 50% of the typical assessment. Residential uses are exempt in the revised policy.
The policy provides a $100 credit against the assessable amount for each private parking space provided; up to 70% of
the total assessment. The amount assessed during FY2013 was $181,248.51 (base first floor square footage rate of
$.322) a 3% increase over the previous year. The assessment for FY2014 begins with a base first floor square footage
rate of $.330 and the total assessment is $188,182.79. The assessment will apply to 146 properties. The increased total
amount is due to an approximate 3% adjustment to revenue and adjustments to property uses changed within the past
year. This percentage increase has been the practice over the recent past in order to avoid large periodic increases. It
was recommended that City Council adopt a resolution scheduling a public hearing for October 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in
the City Council Chambers at City Hall to consider the final roll for Downtown Parking Operations and Maintenance
Assessment; and that the Deputy City Clerk be instructed to publish and mail the required notices.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
6
13.548
Downtown Principal Shopping District (PSD) Assessment – Resolution to Schedule Public Hearing on
Assessment for October 16, 2013
City Manager report was presented advising that following is the report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City
Charter regarding the annual special assessments for the Principal Shopping District (PSD). The PSD was created by
ordinance in 1998 with the purpose of providing a comprehensive, coordinated approach to promotional activities in the
downtown as well as a stable funding mechanism for these activities. The PSD assessment policy, as approved by City
Council, is based on building square footage and the assessment rates for FY 2014 are proposed to be the same as for
FY 2013. The FY 2013 assessment generated $181,080.19 in revenues and the FY 2014 assessment will generate
$179,733.20. This assessment will include 178 properties.
Assessment Per Square Foot
$.22
.22
.08
.14
.14
.08
Core first floor
Upper floor retail or restaurant
Upper floor other uses
Edge first floor
Upper floor retail or restaurant
Upper floor other uses
On September 18, 2013, the City Council held the public hearing of necessity and approved the necessity of this
assessment and directed the development of the final assessment roll. It was recommended that City Council adopt a
resolution scheduling a public hearing on the final roll for the Downtown Principal Shopping District Assessment for
Wednesday, October 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers at City Hall; and that the Deputy City Clerk be
instructed to publish and mail the required notices.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.549
Downtown Snowmelt Operations Assessment – Resolution to Schedule Public Hearing on
Assessment for October 16, 2013
City Manager report was presented advising that following is the report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City
Charter regarding the annual special assessments for operating and maintaining the downtown snowmelt system. In
accordance with the snowmelt policy, assessments are levied against any properties receiving direct or incremental
benefit from the system. The assessment area includes properties along both sides of 8th Street from Maple Avenue to
Columbia Avenues. In 2006, the area was expanded to include the properties along both sides of River Avenue between
7th and 12th Streets that have snowmelt beneath the adjacent sidewalk. Some of these River Avenue properties had new
snowmelt constructed as part of the River Avenue improvement project. Other properties had been linked to a private
boiler system and are now connected to the public system. During the spring of 2009, the snowmelt system was
expanded to 7th Street between College and Columbia Avenue and along College and Columbia between 7th and 8th
th
Street. This extension primarily serves the new Downtown Parking Deck, the sidewalk on the north side of 7 Street; and
th
the sidewalk that connects the 8 Street Plaza. The snowmelt assessments are all based on property front footage and
there are two (2) front footage rates that are applied within the assessment area. The first rate is for properties adjacent
to sidewalks and streets that have snowmelt beneath them. This applies primarily to properties along 8th Street. The
second rate is for properties adjacent to sidewalks that have snowmelt, but the adjacent street does not. These properties
th
th
th
are primarily along Pine, River, 7 Street and along the avenues between 7 and 9 Street. The snowmelt system also
serves a number of public spaces such as downtown parking lots and deck, the large circle area of the 8th Street Market
Place, the parking lots and parking deck behind the Police / Court Complex on 8th Street, and radiant floor heat in the
Police Complex. These areas are not special assessed, but are charged a lump sum annual fee based on a per square
foot cost. The proposed rate for FY 14 is $.2233 per square foot. This is 5% above the FY 13 rate. The FY 14 front
footage rate for snowmelt provided beneath sidewalks and streets is proposed to be $14.0514, a 5% increase from the FY
13 rate, primarily due to anticipated increased energy costs and the need bring fund revenues more in-line with expenses.
The FY 14 rate for snowmelt provided beneath only sidewalks is proposed to be $4.6799 which is about 1/3 of the base
rate. This is also a 5% increase above the FY 13 rate. The total assessed amount is $109,525.79. There are 135
properties in this special assessment district. On September 18, 2013, the City Council held the public hearing of
necessity and approved the necessity of this assessment and directed the development of the final assessment roll. It was
recommended that City Council adopt a resolution scheduling a public hearing on the Downtown Snowmelt Operations
Assessment Roll for Wednesday, October 16, 2013, at 7:00 p.m., in the City Council Chambers at City Hall; and that the
Deputy City Clerk be instructed to publish and mail the required notices.
7
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.550
2014 City Calendar – Printing Bid Approval
City Manager report was presented advising that on September 5, 2013, bids were solicited for printing and mailing
services of 10,000 City calendars (2014). Four (4) bids were received. Council approval of the low bid from Holland Litho
Services at a cost of $6,778.15 plus approximate postage costs of $2,720 for a total cost of $9,498.15 is requested.
Results are as follows:
Bidder
Holland Litho Serv.
Spartan Graphics
Grandville Printing
The Printery
Printing 10,000 units
$6,436
$7,050
$6,543
$8,258
Mailing Services
$342.15
$395.00
$643.00
$587.00
Total
$6,778.15
$7,445.00
$7,186.00
$8,845.00
The 2013 budget for the calendar was $9,000.00. $6,937.00 was spent, not including postage. The 2014 budget for the
calendar is $9,000.00. As noted above, $6,778.15 will be spent representing a decrease of $158.85. Postage will be an
additional cost. Based on the estimates for mailing 8,500 pieces, the cost of postage is anticipated to be in the range of $
.28 to $ .32 per piece. This totals between $2,380 and $2,720 for the actual postage, for a projected maximum grand total
of $9,498.15. Funds for the calendar are paid from the Solid Waste Fund. Our plan is to have the calendar at the printer
by no later than October 4, 2013. It was recommended that City Council approve the bid from Holland Litho Services for
the printing and mailing of 2014 City calendars at a cost of $6,778.15 plus estimated postage costs of $2,720 for a total
cost of $9,498.15 for a total cost to be paid from the Solid Waste Fund.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.551
Calendar Year 2014 Rental Housing Program Fee Schedule Adjustments
City Manager report was presented advising that Council is being requested to approve a new fee structure for the City’s
Rental Housing program. Typically all City Fees for Services are approved by City Council in one motion later in the
calendar year. However, this year, staff is asking City Council to address the Rental Fees as a separate motion to ensure
that staff has sufficient time to distribute the annual rental Invoices to the appropriate billing parties as well as address
ongoing issues with multiple re-inspections. This distribution normally occurs at the end of October. Included is the
proposed Rental Housing Schedule of Fees for calendar year 2014. Staff is requesting increases to several of the fees
associated with the City’s Rental program. These increases are needed to fully fund and staff the City’s Rental program,
including rental inspectors, support staff, prosecution and overhead costs as discussed at your September 25, 2013 Study
Session. Specifically, the following fees are proposed to be increased:
-
-
-
The Comprehensive Annual Rental Fee for the first dwelling unit will be increased to $150 and the fee for
additional dwelling units will be increased to $55 (units on one property). This means that the owner of a single
family rental will pay $150 a year to be in the rental business and the owner of a two family rental will pay $205 a
year to be in the rental business.
The re-Inspection fees are being doubled to $200 for the first re-inspection, $400.00 for the second re-inspection
and $600 for the third re-inspection. These increases are being implemented to better deal with landlords who
continually violate our housing codes and require more attention from City staff.
Staff is introducing a new administrative fee to cover the costs when we must engage the City Attorney on
repetitive problem properties. This fee is $600 and will work to cover the costs of the City Attorney.
It was recommended that City Council approve the proposed fee schedule for the Calendar Year 2014 Rental Housing
Program Fee Adjustments as discussed at the City Council study session on September 25, 2013.
nd
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2 by Council Member Vande Vusse
To recuse Council Member Hoekstra due to conflict of interest
Upon VOICE VOTE, the motion carried unanimously
nd
A motion was made by Council Member Vande Vusse, 2 by Council Member Burch,
To adopt the recommendation
8
Mayor Dykstra declared the public hearing open for comment.
David VanderSluis, Laketown resident is a landlord in the city and expressed opposition to the increased fees and feels it
is discrimination. He supports the rental inspection program as it is today. Len Prelesnik, 284 ½ Fairbanks also opposed
nd
the increased fees and agrees with the previous comments from Mr. VanderSluis. Eric Davis, 621 W. 32 Street
expressed opposition to the increased fees.
Mayor Dykstra declared the public hearing closed.
nd
A motion was made by Council Member Whiteman, 2 by Council Member Trethewey
To table the recommendation for discussion at the next scheduled study session and place on agenda for the next regular
council meeting October 16, 2013.
Upon VOICE VOTE, the motion carried as follows:
Ayes: Council Members De Boer, Trethewey, Peters, Burch, Vande Vusse, Whiteman and Klomparens
Nays: Mayor Dykstra
13.552
Windmill Island Gardens – Fundraising Report
City Manager report was presented advising that the City Council reviewed the following report at the pre-Council meeting
on September 18, 2013 and referred to the September 25, 2013 Study Session for review and discussion. On September
25, 2013, the following questions were discussed:
1. Does the City Council want to allocate some of the new Legacy Funds to the Windmill Island Strategic Plan
realization (a share of $600,000); and
2. What percentage of the above target should be the City of Holland’s responsibility and what portion should be
shared with Holland Charter Township?
The information below is intended to answer these questions for Council consideration. The Township Manager and
Township Supervisor concur with the cost share model as recommended in this report. The City Council approved a
Windmill Island Gardens Strategic Plan on February 20, 2013 inclusive of three (3) parts:
DeZwaan Windmill and Dutch Artifacts Restoration
Pathways to DeZwaan from South
Bridge and Paths across the Macatawa River
Total
$ 825,000
450,000
850,000
$2,125,000
City Council approved a consulting services agreement with John Nordstrom to assist with a Windmill Island Gardens
fundraising campaign on May 15, 2013. Activity has been robust. The State of Michigan is now preparing a grant. As of
September 18, 2013, the status of the fundraising campaign is as follows:
HZCF *
Cash
Pledges
State Appropriation (pending)
Others: Organ Donation
Others: Prince Bernhard Grant
Others: Carousel Donations
Total Funds
* Holland/Zeeland Community Foundation
City of
Holland
$39,675
$94,734
53,800
Anonymous
Donors
$200,000
25,000
5,660
Sub-total
Total
$134,409
253,800
375,000
25,000
7,000
5,660
$800,869
These donations are designated by the donors as follows:
Organ
$25,000
Carousel
6,060
Path(s)
16,900
Bridge to Holland Charter Township
1,250
Undesignated and Designated for Windmill Restoration *
751,659
Total
$800,869
* Undesignated funds are recommended to be used for the DeZwaan Windmill Restoration. This does not include funds
to purchase the temporary milling equipment ($9,900) and other appropriations.
9
More Fundraising Needed per Each Strategic Plan Element:
DeZwaan Windmill & Dutch Artifacts Restoration
Pathways to DeZwaan from South
Bridge and Paths across the Macatawa River
Sub-total
Funds Needed
3/1/2013
$825,000
450,000
850,000
$2,125,000
Secured
9/13/2013
$782,719
16,900
1,250
$800,869
Difference
9/13/2013
$42,281
433,100
848,750
$1,324,131
NA
NA
$1,324,131
Remainder Needed
Less Expected Municipal Capital Grants (7/1/2015)
Holland City and Holland Charter Township 6-Year Budgets
$600,000
Remainder Needed from Fundraising and Future Grants **
$724,131
** A Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund of $300,000 could be submitted in March 2014 for possible award in
December 2014. The bottom line remainder could therefore decline to $425,000, if the Trust Fund grant is
competitive.
The number highlighted in yellow above of $600,000 is the reason for this Study Session. We arrived at this number for
several reasons:
1.
2.
3.
4.
It is less than originally expected by each of the municipalities;
It recognizes that significant fund-raising already occurred;
It is within the means of both Holland Charter Township and the City of Holland;
It is thought that this use of Legacy Funds for a City of Holland icon like Windmill Island Gardens is appropriate
as per prior Council discussions about the use of Legacy Funds;
5. Cost sharing these generational improvements will be good for intergovernmental cooperation; these
improvements will figuratively and literally bring our communities closer together; and
6. This is a lower Legacy Fund amount than was once thought to be necessary.
I met with Don Komejan, Township Manager today and looked at three models to divide up the pro-rata shares of this
$600,000. Our conclusion is to recommend a model that has each community splitting the bridge costs to the north at
50% each and sharing 25% of the connecting pathway costs in the other’s community. The path work in the City that
would be cost shared would be the City’s southern entrance onto Windmill Island Gardens. The path work in Holland
Charter Township that would be cost shared includes the pathway from the Bridge to Scott’s Drive. The total percentage
to each than becomes a 59% to 41% split respectively -- based on the amount of work in each other’s community. This
breaks down into a possible City Share of $357,000 and a Holland Charter Township share of $243,000. (These numbers
assume fundraising will provide for another $725,000 and no Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund grant as noted more
above.)
Alternative Cost Share Models:
An alternative formula would have the City and Township to share 50% on the bridge and nothing else. This would lead
to a 62%/38% split of the total dollars needed to do this bridge and pathway project as per a spreadsheet to be provided
at the meeting. A final alternative is to share the bridge and connecting walkways 50% for both. This would lead to a
56%/44% cost share. You can see that the recommended share of 59% - 41% above is in-between the above two
approaches and is therefore recommended. (The total estimated Legacy Fund balance as of June 30, 2014 is currently
$1,143,435.) It was recommended that City Council accept the Windmill Island Gardens Fundraising report as information;
authorize a Six-Year Capital Budget Amendment for the City of Holland’s portion from the Legacy Funds to be shared with
Holland Charter Township according to a 59% to 41% model; support three-year pledges and other fundraising activities
to secure the remainder needed of $725,000; and direct staff to prepare a Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund grant
for submittal in March 2014 in the amount of $300,000.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To accept as information
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried as follows:
Ayes: Council Members Trethewey, Peters, Burch, Vande Vusse, Whiteman, Hoekstra, De Boer and Mayor Dykstra
Nays: Council Member Klomparens
13.553
Technology Services – Bids for Video Server
City Manager report was presented advising that bids have been requested for an Ultra Nexus video server and PEG
Vault video appliance as part of the Fiscal Year 2014 budget. This equipment will dramatically improve the workflow and
10
efficiency of the City’s public television broadcasting. This new server will allow staff to record video directly into the
broadcast system, pull real time content (weather, news, etc.) from the internet, and stream video back to the web. It will
also give staff the ability to better brand City channels with the logo on the screen and a lower graphic to display what is
playing. Most importantly, the system provides the ability to broadcast live video, making the system extremely portable.
One bid was received for this equipment and this was from BlueWater Technologies in the amount of $18,584.55. This
equipment will be funded through the public television fund. It was recommended that City Council accept the bid received
from BlueWater Technologies in the amount of $18,584.55 for the public television equipment described in this report; and
that this equipment be funded through the CATV Public Access TV Fund.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.554
City Hall – Bids for Parking Lot Improvements
City Manager report was presented advising that on September 26, 2013, the City of Holland’s Transportation Department
opened bids for the construction project referenced above. A total of two (2) bids were received. The engineer’s estimate
for the entire project was $82,043. The following is a summary of the bids:
Company
1. Black Gold Transport,
Inc.
2. Michigan Paving &
Materials
City Hall Lot
Herrick District
Library Lot
$45,097.85
$25,391.50
Bid Alternate #1
th
11 St. Driveway
Improvements
$7,550.00
$45,808.96
$33,660.31
$13,580.00
Work at the City Hall parking lot will include milling and resurfacing the HMA pavement within the lot, reconstruction of two
(2) of the catch basin inlets and restoration around these two (2) inlets with pervious concrete. Two (2) existing catch
basins will remain, as they appear to be in good condition and the two (2) new catch basins will be leaching type. Work
th
under bid alternate #1 includes some rework of the 11 Street driveway approach to improve drainage and the ride quality
of the approach. Work at the Herrick District Library parking Lot will include milling and resurfacing the HMA pavement
within the lot. There is one (1) area, near the drop box, where there appears to be some underlying distress in the
pavement. The work does include a provision to address that area. Both lots will be finished off with new pavement
markings. While more bidders for the project would have been welcome, staff believes the bids received were both fair
and competitive. HMA pricing can vary significantly depending on a number of factors including the price of oil and even
though we may have a more favorable bidding environment this coming spring, Interim Director of Transportation Services
Dept. Brian White recommends that the City proceeds with the project, including the bid alternate, this fall to avoid a
possible increase in HMA pricing this spring. Herrick District Library is in agreement with recommendation and City staff
plans to invoice them for their share of the project at completion. A budget for the project is included which includes the
Herrick District Library’s contribution as well as the contribution from the City. It was recommended that City Council
award the City Hall and Herrick District Library Parking Lot Resurfacing project to the low bidder Black Gold Transport,
Inc. in the amount of $78,039.35; that the Mayor and Deputy City Clerk be authorized to execute the necessary
documents on behalf of the City; that the included budget be approved; and the project be funded as indicated above.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.555
Finance – August Financials
City Manager report was presented advising that included are the monthly reports for the August 2013 financials as
prepared by the Finance Department and as reviewed by this office. This report represents 16.67% of the 2014 Fiscal
Year (July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014). The monthly financial reports include the following:
-
Summary of General Fund Revenues by Account Classification;
Summary of General Fund Revenues and Expenditures by Department;
Summary of All Funds Revenues and Expenditures (including Capital Projects);
Fund Equity Changes Report; and
Capital Projects Report.
11
It was recommended that the August 2013 Monthly Financial Reports be received and filed.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.556
Gifts
City Manager report was presented advising that the City Manager’s office is pleased to report the receipt of the following
gifts:
Public Safety Services Department:
$54.46 has been received from Exit 76 Corporation in support of the Community Kick Back Program.
Parks & Recreation:
Donations resulting from the 2013 Softball Tournament in support of the Sal Perez Scholarship Fund:
Matt Urban Concessions Close Out Cash
$343.75
Anonymous
$14.00
$250.00
Wings Nineteen, Inc.
In-Kind Donations:
Superior Sports – 2 Plaques valued at
$70.00
Buffalo Wild Wings – 2 Gift Certificates
$50.00
Net Proceeds to Sal Perez Scholarship Fund
$1,651.75
It was recommended that the donation be accepted with appreciation and the Finance Director be authorized to credit the
amount to the proper account.
Upon motion by Council Member Trethewey, 2
The recommendation was adopted.
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon VOICE VOTE, the recommendation was adopted.
13.557
Tax Abatement – PA198 Abatement for BuhlerPrince, Inc., 670 Windcrest Drive – Schedule Public
Hearing for October 16, 2013
City Manager report was presented advising that BuhlerPrince, Inc. at 670 Windcrest Drive has filed an application for tax
abatement that is currently under review by City staff. BuhlerPrince, Inc. produces highly customized die cast equipment
and offers one of the widest selections of high pressure die casting machines and systems in the world. This
manufactured equipment serves the automotive, consumer appliances, telecommunications, recreation, lawn and garden
and hand tools industries. The real estate portion of this project consists of building modifications for machine foundations
and floor preparation. The personal property improvements include a new boring mill and conveyor updates. The project
period is expected to be from April 1, 2013 until September 30, 2013. Their application is for:
Land and Building Improvements
Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures
TOTAL
$ 447,940
$4,675,363
$5,123,303
Three (3) new jobs are expected to be created at this site within two (2) years of project completion; two (2) machinists at
approximately $20-$24 per hour, and one (1) manufacturing technician at approximately $68,000 per year. It was
recommended that a public hearing on the requested PA 198 tax abatement for BuhlerPrince, Inc. at 670 Windcrest Drive
be scheduled for Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers in City Hall; and that the Deputy
City Clerk be instructed to mail the required notice.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.558
th
Tax Abatement – PA198 Abatement for Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East 40 Street - Schedule
Public Hearing for October 16, 2103
th
City Manager report was presented advising that Magna Mirrors of America, Inc. at 414 East 40 Street has filed an
application for PA 198 tax abatement that is currently under review by City staff. The principal business of Magna Mirrors
12
(formerly known as Donnelly Corporation and Magna Donnelly) is the design and manufacture of automotive mirrors,
th
mirror glass, rear vision components and related assemblies. This project is located at 414 East 40 Street and the
project period is expected to be from April 1, 2013 until December 31, 2014. The application is for:
Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures
Total
$5,987,111
$5,987,111
The project for which exemption is sought is the acquisition and installation of equipment necessary for the applicant to
expand production capacity and capabilities to remain competitive in the world market. 94 existing jobs are to be retained,
and 24 are expected to be created because of this project. The 24 new jobs have skill level ranges from moderate to
highly technical to supervisory level. Pay ranges will be from $10-$30 per hour depending on skill, education and
experience requirements. It was recommended that a public hearing on the requested PA 198 tax abatement for Magna
th
Mirrors of America, Inc. at 414 East 40 Street be scheduled for Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council
Chambers in City Hall; and that the Deputy City Clerk be instructed to mail the required notice.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
13.559
th
Tax Abatement – PA198 Abatement for Paramount Tool Co. Inc., 136 West 64 Street - Schedule
Public Hearing for October 16, 2013
th
City Manager report was presented advising that Paramount Tool at 136 West 64 Street has filed an application for tax
abatement that is currently under review by City staff. Paramount Tool recently relocated from the Saugatuck area to an
existing vacant building in the City. The applicant designs and builds machinery, special equipment and work tool holding
fixtures that meet a variety of manufacturing needs. In business since 1967, Paramount Tool serves a variety of industries
including automotive, food processing, marine, medical, die cast, office furniture, fuel injection, heavy trucks and more.
th
This project will be located at 136 W. 64 Street and the project period is expected to be from June 5, 2013 until June 5,
2015. Their application is for:
Land Improvements and Building Improvements
Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures
Total
$ 65,000
$896,987
$961,987
The project for which exemption is sought is the acquisition and installation of equipment necessary for the applicant to
expand production capacity and capabilities. 30 existing jobs are expected to be retained, and 15 new jobs are expected
to be created directly because of this project. The 15 new jobs would be mid to high skill levels in manufacturing and
engineering with a pay range of $45,000 to $80,000 annually. It was recommended that a public hearing on the requested
th
PA 198 tax abatement for Paramount Tool at 136 West 64 Street be scheduled for Wednesday, October 16, 2013 at
7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers in City Hall; and that the Deputy City Clerk be instructed to mail the required notice.
A motion was made by Council Member Trethewey, 2
To adopt the recommendation
nd
by Council Member De Boer,
Upon ROLL CALL, the motion carried unanimously.
Communications from the City Manager
General Matters
City Manager Cotton reported that there are a number of pending items scheduled for the next study session and he may
adjust some of these items scheduled to discuss the rental re-inspection fee. Mr. Cotton also announced that Halloween
will be scheduled Thursday, October 31 from 6 – 8 p.m.
Communications from the Mayor
General Matters
Mayor Dykstra encouraged residents to visit www.cityofholland.com for contact information and to share with council their
thoughts on various issues. Mayor also commented that the city is one week away, October 9, 1971 from the anniversary
of the Holland fire in which most of Holland burned.
13
13.560
Council Appointments, Reappointments and Resignations
Resignations:
Please accept the resignation of Derek Johnson from the Parks and Recreation Commission effective September 16,
2013
A motion was made by Council Member Whiteman, 2
To accept the resignation
nd
by Council Member Trethewey,
Upon VOICE VOTE, the motion carried unanimously.
Communications from Council Members
General Matters
Council Member Burch reported that Holland has 26 artists participating in Art Prize in Grand Rapids. Council Member
Trethewey invited citizens to attend the Fire truck Parade in connection with Fire Prevention Month. The parade takes
place in downtown Holland, and will end at the Civic Center on October 4 at 7 p.m. Mayor stated that City Manager Cotton
and Council Member Trethewey are parade marshals.
First Reading of Ordinances
13.561
Rezone 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned
Residential Development District
nd
Upon motion by Council Member Trethewey, 2 by Council Member De Boer,
Council accepted for First Reading of Ordinances an ordinance amendment to (fill in info)
13.562
Adjournment
Upon motion by Council Member Peters, 2
The Council adjourned at 8:45 p.m.
nd
by Council Member Trethewey,
Respectfully Submitted,
Greg Robinson
Assistant City Manager
14
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8A To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Public Hearing – Possible Revocation of Public Lodging License for the Economy Inn, 409 US 31 South. Summary: This report will be completed prior to Wednesday’s Council meeting to reflect a
recommendation.
Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments: Report prepared by: Proposed Minutes
Holland City Council Study Session, October 9, 2013
The City Council met in a study session at 5:30 p.m. in the Training Room, 2
Mayor Dykstra called the meeting to order.
nd
Floor of City Hall, 270 River Avenue, and
Council Members Present:
Mayor Dykstra, Council Members De Boer, Trethewey, Peters, Burch, Vande Vusse,
Whiteman, Hoekstra and Klomparens
Council Members Absent:
None
Others Present:
City Manager Cotton, Assistant City Manager Robinson, City Planning Director Meyer,
Assistant Director Community and Neighborhood Services Osman, City Planners Vander
Ploeg and Dye, Interim Transportation Director White, HBPW General Manager Koster
Item 1
Public Comments
nd
Eric Davis, 621 W. 32 Street, expressed opposition to the proposed increased rental fees and suggested alternatives
and provided documentation with additional comments.
Item 2
Review of the Proposed Pick Up Trash (PUP) Club Project
Assistant Community & Development Director Cindy Osman explained that citizen Jack Bradford suggested a program to
encourage people to pick-up any trash that may be noticed along the street. Promotional bracelets are being prepared
and additional trash bags will be offered to citizens. Council members expressed support for this effort.
Item 3
Review of the Rezoning of 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R-1 One Family Residential
District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District; and Review of the Site Plan of
Consideration of Drainage Plan
Mayor Dykstra abstained from the discussion on this item as his law firm represents the property owner. City Planner
Mark Vanderploeg reviewed the proposed residential development at the above-noted address. Mr. Vanderploeg
commented that this is a 68 unit development that is targeted to the senior community. The homes are single level
without any steps. Two similar developments by this developer are located in the Grand Rapids area. Mr. Vanderploeg
summarized the resolution approved by the City Planning Commission which will govern development on the site. He
also reviewed the proposed site plan. City Engineer Brian White addressed the storm water plan for the site which he
has approved. Peter Engels of Covenant Development explained this project, including the proposed designs for the
homes. The target demographics are empty-nesters, resulting in half of the people and traffic of a typical single family
development. The price points for the homes are between $200,000 and $300,000. He noted that he already has a
waiting list of 23 prospective home owners. The engineer for the developer explained the process for preparing the
stormwater plan and that the plan has support of the City Engineer, City Planning Commission and Ottawa County Parks
Department. The plan goes beyond the typical standards for stormwater removal and he feels that the Macatawa
Greenway Project Clarity standards have been met as well. Council members expressed comments about density, the
high quality of the project, storm drainage/Project Clarity, and whether this is the right site for this development. At the
October 2, 2013 regular meeting, City Council placed the rezoning ordinance change on first reading and it is expected
that this matter will be placed on the October 16, 2013 council agenda for action.
Item 4
Review of the Rental Registration Fee and Rental Inspection Costs, Inclusive of Rewards for High
Performing Landlords
City Manager Ryan Cotton commented on the percentage of rental units in the City as compared to other communities in
Ottawa County. Community & Neighborhood Services Director Phil Meyer reviewed the number of rental units in the City,
the percentage of units in compliance with the housing code, and the staffing level for rental inspections. The goal of staff
is 100% compliance with the housing code, but the City is only at 53% compliance at present. This is due primarily to
reduced staff and an increasing number of rental units. Staff is now recommending that the rental fees be increased to
$115 for the first unit and $30 for each additional unit. Re-inspection fees would be doubled from what they are today.
Marvin Martin, Co-chair of the Neighborhood Improvement Committee, expressed the Committee’s desire to see
increased rental compliance with the housing code. He also feels that rewarding good landlords is a good idea as is
penalizing poor landlords. Council will discuss this again at the next regular meeting.
Item 5
Review of the Ordinances Pertaining Raising Poultry in the City
Mark Vanderploeg reviewed the history of this item which was raised by a citizen that would like to have a pet chicken.
Another citizen has asked for the City to allow the raising of chickens. Mr. Vanderploeg has researched what other
communities have done in this regard and he suggested an ordinance revision that is similar to that of the City of
Muskegon. Muskegon permits one chicken according to certain conditions. Council discussed whether an ordinance
should be crafted to allow the raising of chickens up to a certain limit. There were also comments as to whether to limit
the number of cats per household. Staff will examine what other communities do to allow the raising of chickens.
Item 6
Review of the Holland Board of Public Works Advisory Board Performance Report
BPW General Manager Dave Koster made some opening comments about the BPW Board Evaluation that was
conducted recently by Dr. Paul Pearson. Dr. Pearson explained the Carver Governance Model which the BPW Board
uses to evaluate its governing behavior. His evaluation, conclusion and recommendations will be helpful to enhancing
the relationship between the BPW Board and City Council, as well as between the staffs of the Board and Council.
Council reacted positively to this evaluation and thanked Dr. Pearson for his good work.
Item 7
Status of the Holland Board of Public Works New Gas Generation Plant Site Planning
BPW General Manager Koster reviewed the timeline for the new gas generation plant and the numerous elements
involved with a project of this nature. The project involves property acquisition, the air permit, purchase of equipment,
bonding, building/site design and construction. The project elements at this time are on schedule. It is expected that the
MDEQ will have a decision on the air permit by the end of 2013.
Item 8
Letter of Endorsement – State of Michigan’s Regional Prosperity Initiative
Mr. Cotton explained that the Governor’s RPI is seeking community projects that could be funded with state grants. Mr.
Cotton is asking for Council’s support to join with 12 other West Michigan counties that will be represented by the Grand
Valley Metro Council (GVMC). The GVMC will then submit a grant application on behalf of these 13 counties for a project
that will be of mutual benefit such as non-motorized improvements.
Item 9
Other Business
Council member Hoekstra asked the status of the Home Energy Retrofit (HER) program in that he has had citizens ask
him about it. He requested that the City submit an update to those interested on the status of the HER.
Item 10
Adjournment of Study Session
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 8:50 p.m.
Respectively Submitted,
_______________________________
Greg Robinson
Assistant City Manager
2
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8B To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Public Hearing ‐ Downtown Parking Operations & Maintenance Assessment Roll. Summary: Following is a report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City Charter regarding the annual special assessments for operating and maintaining City‐owned and leased off‐street parking facilities in the Downtown area. The parking assessment district includes properties within 400 feet of a public parking lot and generally within the area bounded by 5th Street on the north, Columbia Avenue on the east, 11th Street on the south, and Pine Avenue on the west. The parking assessment policy as amended in 2008 changes the base formula from a building’s front footage to its square footage. 5% of the base assessment is then levied for each upper level that is vacant or used for storage; 60% for upper levels used for offices; 100% for upper levels used for retail or restaurants; and 15% for upper levels used for overnight sleeping rooms in a hotel or inn. Non‐profit uses, unless otherwise exempted by the policy, are assessed at a rate that is 50% of the typical assessment. Residential uses are exempt in the revised policy. The policy provides a $100 credit against the assessable amount for each private parking space provided; up to 70% of the total assessment. The amount assessed during FY2013 was $181,248.51 (base first floor square footage rate of $.322) a 3% increase over the previous year. The assessment for FY2014 begins with a base first floor square footage rate of $.330 and the total assessment is $188,182.79. The assessment will apply to 146 properties. The increased total amount is due to an approximate 3% adjustment to revenue and adjustments to property uses changed within the past year. This percentage increase has been the practice over the recent past in order to avoid large periodic increases. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council adopt a resolution approving the Downtown Parking Operations & Maintenance Final Assessment Roll. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton, City Manager Attachments: Resolution; Assessment table; Assessment map; Assessment policy Report prepared by: Phil Meyer, Director, Community and Neighborhood Services Department. Attachment to 8B
(R2013.60)
RESOLUTION APPROVING FINAL ASSESSMENT ROLL
Parking Operations Special Assessment – FY 2014
At a regular meeting of the Council of the City of Holland, Michigan, held at City Hall,
Holland, Michigan, on October 16, 2013 at 7:00 P.M.,
PRESENT:
ABSENT:
The following Resolution was offered by Council Member
Council Member
and supported by
.
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 15.6 of the Holland City Charter, the City Manager’s
office has submitted a report for the making of the Parking Operations Special Assessment for
FY 2014;
WHEREAS, the report of the City Manager describes the necessity of the improvement;
the nature of the improvement; prescribes the portion of the cost which shall be paid by special
assessment upon the property benefited; and designates the limits of the special assessment
district to be effected; designates the manner by which the benefits shall be derived by the
special assessment.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS:
1.
That the operation and maintenance of the Downtown Parking System (POM13)
as presented to this Council on October 3, 2013, by Council Action No. 13.547 be and the same
is hereby adopted and confirmed as heretofore presented by the Assessing Administrator and the
1
City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to certify on behalf of the Council said Assessment
Roll as being confirmed by the Council and to endorse thereon the date of confirmation.
2.
That said roll shall within 10 days be delivered by the City Clerk to the City
Treasurer who shall collect the sums assessed thereon in accordance with the City Charter and
the Ordinances and Resolutions of this Council.
3.
That the special assessments in said roll shall provide for one installment to be
collected during the current fiscal year 2013/2014.
4.
That any resolutions in conflict with this Resolution are rescinded.
5.
After discussion, the vote was:
AYES:
NAYS:
None
ABSENT:
Resolution declared adopted dated this 16th day of October, 2013.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By_________________________________
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
2
CERTIFICATE
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
)
)ss
)
I, the undersigned, the duly qualified Deputy City Clerk of the Holland City Council,
City of Holland, State of Michigan, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete
copy of proceedings taken at a regular City Council Meeting of the Council of the City of
Holland, held on the 16th day of October, 2013, insofar as the same relate to the Resolution of the
Holland City Council Approving Final Assessment Roll Regarding Parking Operations Special
Assessment – FY 2014, the original of which is on file in my office. Public notice of said
meeting was given pursuant to and in full compliance with Act 267, Public Act of 1976, as
amended.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my official signature this 16th day of
October, 2013.
__________________________________
Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk
3
POM 13 for 2013
Given:
Rate:
Square Foot Rate
$
Parking Credit
$
Upper Floor Disc:
Use Category Options:
0.3300
Bank
100.00
Hotel
% of 1st Fl Rate:
Attachments to 8B
Targeted Collection of POM 13 is a 3% increase from POM 12.
POM 12 = $181,248.51 x 1.03 = $186,685.96 Target Value for POM 13
Office
Office
60%
Residential
0%
Other
Residential
Storage/W-house
5%
Restaurant
Hotel Room Floors
Chronically Vacant
15%
0%
Retail
Storage/W-house
Chronically Vacant = 2 years + @ Final Roll Hearing date.
Vacant
2013 Final Roll Hearing is 10/16/13.
6,182
5,712.17
$
3,998.52
$
3,100.00
$
3,100.00
$
2,612.17
$
2,473.69
5.30%
POM12 Note - visited 7/31/12, est parking (no stripes) at 31 spaces. 1st - Factor Inc. 2nd - The B Group. 3rd - evolve
-
Other
4,764
1,572.12
$
1,100.48
$
1,300.00
$
1,100.48
$
471.64
$
460.20
2.43%
POM12 Note - visited 8/28/12. Front area is theater screening and rear is production studio. Added per use.
3
70-16-29-178-005
17 W 6th St
Mercantile Bank of MI
Grooters Productions
13
1
-
Office
3,871
1,277.43
$
894.20
$
1,300.00
$
894.20
$
383.23
$
373.94
2.42%
26 space credit received from parcel to north, 13 to each half of building (15 W 6th St and 17 W 6th St)
4
70-16-29-178-006
139 River Ave
Lakeshore Rescue MissionMission Car Lot
4
2
0.5
Off/Retail
1,006.90
$
704.83
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
606.90
$
136.64
77.49%
POM10 Note - New Parcel - 50% exempt, Haans Mulder. 6,000 sqft 1-story ofc, 4,848 sqft 2-story w-house/storage.
70-16-29-178-006
139 River Ave
Lakeshore Rescue MissionMission Car Lot
4
2
0.5
Storage
5
70-16-29-178-010
130 Central Ave
Lumir LLC
Holland Hosp/Twisthink
104
5
-
Office
10,657
9,555.81
$
6,689.07
$ 10,400.00
$
6,689.07
$
2,866.74
$
2,797.24
2.42%
6
70-16-29-179-015
13 W 7th St
Frank Vitale Holland LLC
Serafina's
18
1
-
Restaurant
6,580
2,171.40
$
1,519.98
$
1,800.00
$
1,519.98
$
651.42
$
635.63
2.42%
POM12 Note - Via Maria vacant Feb 2010, Serafina's opens August 2012.
7
70-16-29-179-016
9 W 7th St
150 Central Ave LLC
Bank of Holland
21
2
-
Bank
9,670
5,201.00
$
3,640.70
$
2,100.00
$
2,100.00
$
3,101.00
$
2,974.91
4.07%
POM11 Note - Parking lot rebuilt, from 19 to 21 spaces.
1,349.57
$
944.70
$
-
$
-
$
1,349.57
$
823.03
39.02%
POM11 Note - Was Pete Hoekstra's Ofc.
3,237.30
$
2,266.11
$
600.00
$
600.00
$
2,637.30
$
2,558.82
2.98%
POM12 Note - 2nd Fl changed from storage to offices for Lumir.
2,223.94
$
1,556.76
$
-
$
-
$
2,223.94
$
2,170.02
2.42%
Office
2,048
0.6
Office
Bank
10,657
10,151
0.6
Office
188 River Ave
Remington Prop LLC
The Blackbird
0
2
-
Retail
2,556
Office
2,556
0.6
190 River Ave
Lumir
Home & Company
6
3
-
Retail
4,950
Office
4,950
0.6 Office
10
70-16-29-180-043
182 River Ave
Remington Prop LLC
Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt
0
2
-
Retail
4,212
Office
4,212
0.6
Holland Police Dept.
89 W 8th St
City of Holland
57 W 8th St
Ottawa Co Bldg Authority County Court Bldg.
13
70-16-29-180-050
170 River Ave
Lumir LLC
14
70-16-29-180-051
178 River Ave
MPJF Holdings LLC
15
70-16-29-180-052
180 River Ave
Pioneer Club of Michigan Pioneer Club
16
70-16-29-181-012
17 W 8th St
Downtown Holdings LLC
Wt Hse Blk Mkt│Hom by Bench
17
70-16-29-181-013
19 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
Chico's #463
18
70-16-29-181-014
21 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
Threads on 8th
19
70-16-29-181-015
23 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
20
70-16-29-181-018
35 W 8th St
Elenbaas Holding LLC
21
70-16-29-181-021
29 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
0.6
Notes
POM 12 Charge (no excel math - hand
entered value from billed roll)
POM 13 Charge (Excel math grid used)
Calculated Credit ($100 per parking
space)
Total Assessment Before Credits
5th Fl SqFt
4th Fl SqFt
6182
10,657
0.6
Office
9186
0.6 Other
0.6
70-16-29-180-018
70-16-29-180-046
Office
POM13 1st FL Storage not assessed
Office
70-16-29-180-040
70-16-29-180-047
0.6
3,068
8
11
6,182
0.05
9
12
3rd Fl SqFt
2nd Fl SqFt
Property Owner of Record
Address
1st Fl SqFt
6,000 W-house
6,182
% Change From POM 12 to POM 13
Office
1
Credit Used (Lesser of Max Potential or
Calculated)
4
13
Maximum Potential Credit (70% of total
assessment is possible)
31
Grooters Productions
5th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Scrap Yd Rear Comm. 4 Fl.
Mercantile Bank of MI
4th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Bayside Land Co
15 W 6th St
3rd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Bldg Stories
148 River Ave
70-16-29-178-004
2nd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Parking Spaces (Includes Neighboring
Parcel By Same Owner)
70-16-29-176-725
2
1st Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Parcel #
1
Business Name | Tenant | Common
Name
#
*Receives 50% (0.50) Discount for NonProfit Use
PARCELS WITHIN 400' - ASSESSED:
3,150
0.6
58
2
0.5
Office
35,841
Office
8,317
0.6
6,737.15
$
4,716.00
$
5,800.00
$
4,716.00
$
2,021.15
$
1,972.15
2.42%
82
2
0.5
Office
21,449
Office
17,730
0.6
5,294.36
$
3,706.05
$
8,200.00
$
3,706.05
$
1,588.31
$
1,549.81
2.42%
Downtown Antiques│Cottage C
1
1
-
Retail
3,479
Fricano's
0
2
-
Restaurant
4,080
Office
3,672
0.6
0
2
0.5
Retail
1,400
Residential
1,280
-
0
2
-
Retail
6,270
Office
6,270
0.6
0
2
-
Retail
2,860
Residential
2,881
0
2
-
Retail
2,860
Residential
2,314
Talbot's
0
3
-
Retail
4,725
Office
4,725
0.6 Office
Model Drug
0
2
-
Retail
4,806
Office
4,806
0.6
Claremont Court
0
2
-
Retail
7,416
Office
7,632
0.6
1,148.07
$
803.65
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
1,048.07
$
1,020.24
2.66%
POM10 Note - New parcel came on 2010 asmt roll. POM09 Note - 8/27/09 - Reported vacant.
2,073.46
$
1,451.42
$
-
$
-
$
2,073.46
$
2,023.19
2.42%
POM10 Note - New parcel came on 2010 asmt roll.
POM10 Note - New parcel came on 2010 asmt roll. Shop Ctr Mixed.
231.00
$
161.70
$
-
$
-
$
231.00
$
225.40
2.42%
3,310.56
$
2,317.39
$
-
$
-
$
3,310.56
$
3,230.30
2.42%
-
943.80
$
660.66
$
-
$
-
$
943.80
$
920.92
-
943.80
$
660.66
$
-
$
-
$
943.80
$
1,367.98
3,430.35
$
2,401.25
$
-
$
-
$
3,430.35
$
3,347.19
2.42%
2,537.57
$
1,776.30
$
-
$
-
$
2,537.57
$
2,476.05
2.42%
3,958.42
$
2,770.89
$
-
$
-
$
3,958.42
$
3,862.45
2.42%
4,725
0.6
POM09 Note - 5th floor hand-reduced on POM08 (elevator), now calc. as normal.
2.42%
POM09 Note - 2nd Fl used to be office, now res.
-44.94% POM13 Note - changed all 2nd floor to residential.
Shop Ctr. Mixed.
22
70-16-29-181-022
14 W 7th St
Geenen DeKock Prop LLC Parking behind PNC
36
1
-
Bank
276
91.08
$
63.76
$
3,600.00
$
63.76
$
27.32
$
26.66
2.42%
POM09 Note - Majority of credits given to neighbor.
23
70-16-29-181-025
1 W 8th St
Geenen DeKock Prop LLC PNC Bank │Coldstone
41
2
-
Bank
6,109
Bank
6,109
0.6
3,225.55
$
2,257.89
$
4,100.00
$
2,257.89
$
967.66
$
944.21
2.42%
POM09 Note - Parking credits from neighbor. Mini-bank.
24
70-16-29-252-041
151 Central Ave
Central Ave Fin. Center
Spoelhof Bldg
34
2
-
Office
11,371
Office
11,737
0.6
6,076.36
$
4,253.45
$
3,400.00
$
3,400.00
$
2,676.36
$
2,529.05
5.50%
Hotel
11,253
25
70-16-29-252-044
61 E 7th St
CHI Hospitality Land Co
City Flats Hotel│CitySen Lounge
78
5
-
Retail
12,194
26
70-16-29-253-002
18 E 7th St
Mosher Richard
Good Earth
8
1
-
Restaurant
6,372
27
70-16-29-253-016
55 E 8th St
2 Out of 3 LLC
JP's Coffee and Espresso
2
1
-
Restaurant
4,200
28
70-16-29-253-019
45 E 8th St
Lumir
Subs-n-More
0
2
-
Restaurant
1,720
Residential
1,720
-
29
70-16-29-253-024
23 E 8th St
Steven Bearss
Jimmy Johns
4
2
-
Retail
2,130
Residential
1,575
30
70-16-29-253-025
21 E 8th St
Langejans Harold
8th St Salon / Bag Lady
1
2
-
Retail
2,161
Residential
2,161
31
70-16-29-253-026
17 E 8th St
VanNoord Arlene Trust
Karla's Place | VanNoord
5
2
-
Retail
3,036
Office
2,300
0.6
32
70-16-29-253-027
13 E 8th St
Watling James Trust
Harbor Wear
2
1
-
Retail
1,680
33
70-16-29-253-028
11 E 8th St
King Richards LLC
Crane's in the City
2
2
-
Restaurant
1,800
34
70-16-29-253-029
9 E 8th St
Resthaven Patrons Inc
Resthaven
15
-
-
Office
35
70-16-29-253-041
49 E 8th St
JJS East 8th LLC
Globe Design & Vision
4
1
-
Retail
0.15 Hotel
12,145
0.15 Hotel
12145
0.15 Restau
7,876.59
$
5,513.61
$
7,800.00
$
5,513.61
$
2,362.98
$
2,305.69
2.42%
2,102.76
$
1,471.93
$
800.00
$
800.00
$
1,302.76
$
1,251.78
3.91%
1,386.00
$
970.20
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
1,186.00
$
1,152.40
2.83%
567.60
$
397.32
$
-
$
-
$
567.60
$
553.84
2.42%
-
702.90
$
492.03
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
302.90
$
590.15
-94.83%
-
713.13
$
499.19
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
613.13
$
595.84
2.82%
1,457.28
$
1,020.10
$
500.00
$
500.00
$
957.28
$
921.95
3.69%
POM09 Note - 2nd Fl updated from res to office pricing.
554.40
$
388.08
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
354.40
$
340.96
3.79%
POM12 Note - Jim Watling passed away in 2011, but no transfer documents on real estate as of yet (Trust).
847.84
$
593.49
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
647.84
$
627.28
3.17%
2,650
874.50
$
612.15
$
1,500.00
$
612.15
$
262.35
$
255.99
2.42%
1,968
649.44
$
454.61
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
249.44
$
233.70
6.31%
2,928.82
$
2,050.17
$
-
$
-
$
2,928.82
$
2,857.81
2.42%
207.90
$
145.53
$
1,500.00
$
145.53
$
62.37
$
60.86
2.42%
4,617.56
$
3,232.29
$
700.00
$
700.00
$
3,917.56
$
3,805.62
2.86%
Office
Office
1,282
36
70-16-29-253-044
43 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Studio K | Seasoned Home
0
2
-
Retail
5,547
37
70-16-29-253-047
3 E 8th St
Resthaven Patrons Inc
Resthaven & 8th St Inter.
15
1
-
Retail
630
38
70-16-29-253-049
176 College Ave
Lumir LLC
Curtis Center
7
3
-
Office
6,303
39
70-16-29-253-053
25 E 8th St
Portico Properties LLC
Outpost
2
2
-
Retail
6,775
Office
40
70-16-29-253-055
51 E 8th St
Bergman Roger
Borr's Shoes and Accessories
1
2
-
Retail
3,360
Residential
41
70-16-29-253-058
37 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Premovation Audio
0
2
-
Retail
5,670
Residential
42
70-16-29-253-059
39 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Thomas A Davis Jewelers
0
2
-
Retail
5,611
Office
43
70-16-29-253-061
29 E 8th St
Portico Properties LLC
Outpost
1
2
-
Retail
3,765
44
70-16-29-253-702
31 E 8th St Unit 2
Off the Ground LLC
Image Group
0
1
-
45
70-16-29-253-703
31 E 8th St Unit 3
Off the Ground LLC
Brooks Capital Management
0
1
-
46
70-16-29-253-704
31 E 8th St Unit 1
Lokers Property
Lokers Shoes
3
1
-
Retail
47
70-16-29-279-007
152 E 6th St
Lumir LLC
vacant?? Quality gone '09
3
1
-
Office
1,200
48
70-16-29-279-012
86 E 6th St
East Sixth Street LLC
Elzinga & Volkers
61
2
-
Office
11,659
Office
11,659
0.6
Bank
7,717
0.6
Office
5,547
0.6
6,408
0.6
6343
1.0
POM09 Note - Parking credits from neighbor lot.
POM09 Note - Parking credits from neighbor lot.
POM09 Note - 30 spaces, split 15/15.
POM12 Note - Engedi space now 8th Street Interiors. POM09 Note - 30 spaces, split 15/15.
0.6 Office
6,408
0.6
2,354
0.6 Storage
6,901
0.05
2,815.71
$
1,971.00
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
2,615.71
$
2,547.45
2.61%
3,360
-
1,108.80
$
776.16
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
1,008.80
$
981.92
2.66%
3,780
-
1,871.10
$
1,309.77
$
-
$
-
$
1,871.10
$
1,825.74
2.42%
3,480
0.6
2,540.67
$
1,778.47
$
-
$
-
$
2,540.67
$
2,479.08
2.42%
POM09 Note - Lokker Rutgers gone.
Office
850
0.6
1,410.75
$
987.53
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
1,310.75
$
1,276.55
2.61%
POM09 Note - 2nd Fl is larger, but other part is res (0% rate).
Office
5,201
0.6
1,029.80
$
720.86
$
-
$
-
$
1,029.80
$
1,004.83
2.42%
POM09 Note - Gross sqft used, not net.
1,029.80
$
720.86
$
-
$
-
$
1,029.80
$
1,004.83
2.42%
POM09 Note - Gross sqft used, not net.
1,750.32
$
1,225.22
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
1,450.32
$
1,407.89
2.93%
POM09 Note - Gross sqft used, not net.
396.00
$
277.20
$
300.00
$
277.20
$
118.80
$
115.92
2.42%
POM09 Note - Total of 6,000 sqft. 4,800 of this is storage.
6,155.95
$
4,309.17
$
6,100.00
$
4,309.17
$
1,846.78
$
1,802.02
2.42%
4,074.58
$
2,852.20
$
3,400.00
$
2,852.20
$
1,222.38
$
1,192.74
2.42%
384.12
$
268.88
$
800.00
$
268.88
$
115.24
$
112.44
2.43%
POM09 Note - New tenant - Time to Unwind.
434.28
$
304.00
$
600.00
$
304.00
$
130.28
$
127.12
2.43%
POM11 Note - Edward Jones 1st Fl Tenant. POM09 Note - Vacant.
Office
5,304
5,201
0.6
POM09 Note - 2 Story w/ Mezz. Entire "3rd Fl" area priced as storage (ofc not fin.).
50
70-16-29-281-040
141 E 8th Street
Macatawa Bank
Macatawa Bank
34
2
-
Bank
7,717
51
70-16-29-281-045
64 E 7th St
Eighth Street Partners LLC Time to Unwind
8
1
-
Retail
1,164
49
70-16-29-281-046
177 College Ave
Eighth Street Partners LLC Edward Jones Investments
6
2
-
Office
1,316
52
70-16-29-282-026
181 Columbia Ave
E & D Properties LLC
Pizza Hut & lot
40
1
-
Restaurant
2,666
879.78
$
615.85
$
4,000.00
$
615.85
$
263.93
$
257.53
2.42%
53
70-16-29-287-701
69 E 8th St
Downtown Holland Prop
Curragh Irish Pub
2
1
-
Restaurant
1,940
640.20
$
448.14
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
440.20
$
424.68
3.53%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
54
70-16-29-287-702
73 E 8th St
Downtown Holland Prop
Curragh Irish Pub
2
1
-
Restaurant
2,013
664.29
$
465.00
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
464.29
$
448.19
3.47%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
55
70-16-29-287-703
77 E 8th St
Slikkers Thomas & Barb
Velo City Cycles
2
1
-
Retail
2,919
963.27
$
674.29
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
763.27
$
739.92
3.06%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
56
70-16-29-287-704
81 E 8th St
Comm Found of Holland/ZeComm Foundation of Holland/Z
4
1
0.5
Office
3,390
559.35
$
391.55
$
400.00
$
391.55
$
167.80
$
691.58
57
70-16-29-287-705
85 E 8th St Ste 160
Plaza Center Captrust Part Captrust Fin Advisors
6
1
-
Office
5,637
1,860.21
$
1,302.15
$
600.00
$
600.00
$
1,260.21
$
1,215.11
3.58%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
58
70-16-29-287-706
85 E 8th St Ste 150
Plaza Center Captrust Part Captrust Fin Advisors
5
1
-
Office
3,786
1,249.38
$
874.57
$
500.00
$
500.00
$
749.38
$
719.09
4.04%
POM11 Note - Captrust filled Haworth vacant space.
Residential
1,316
-
-312.15% POM12 Note - vacant as of summer(?) 2012. POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\POM13 MASTER 7-30-2013-ab
9/27/2013
1
6,129
0.6
1,213.54
$
849.48
$
1,300.00
$
849.48
$
364.06
$
355.24
2.42%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
Office
5,572
0.6
1,103.26
$
772.28
$
1,100.00
$
772.28
$
330.98
$
322.95
2.43%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
61
70-16-29-287-709
85 E 8th St Ste 210
Thallo LLC
GMB Architects Engineers
14
1
-
Office
6,539
0.6
1,294.72
$
906.31
$
1,400.00
$
906.31
$
388.41
$
379.00
2.42%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
62
70-16-29-287-710
85 E 8th St Ste 250
Thallo LLC
GMB Architects Engineers
9
1
-
Office
4,255
0.6
842.49
$
589.74
$
900.00
$
589.74
$
252.75
$
246.62
2.43%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
63
70-16-29-287-711
85 E 8th St Ste 310
Eighth Street Partners LLC Warner Norcross & Judd LLP
19
1
-
Office
11,319
0.6
2,241.16
$
1,568.81
$
1,900.00
$
1,568.81
$
672.35
$
656.05
2.42%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
64
70-16-29-287-714
85 E 8th St Ste 360
HL Partners LLC
Hilliard Lyons
2
1
-
Office
1,326
0.6
262.55
$
183.78
$
200.00
$
183.78
$
78.77
$
76.85
2.44%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
65
70-16-29-287-715
85 E 8th St Ste 350
HL Partners LLC
Hilliard Lyons
7
1
-
Office
6,565
0.6
1,299.87
$
909.91
$
700.00
$
700.00
$
599.87
$
568.36
5.25%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
66
70-16-29-288-704
99 E 8th St Ste 400
RJA Lakeshore Partners
Raymond James
6
1
-
1,945.15
$
1,361.61
$
600.00
$
600.00
$
1,345.15
$
1,298.00
3.51%
POM11 Note - from 3 credits to 6 per buy/sell agreement. POM09 New parcel.
67
70-16-29-288-706
99 E 8th St Ste 100
West Michigan Community W MI Comm Bank
5
1
-
2,147.31
$
1,503.12
$
500.00
$
500.00
$
1,647.31
$
1,595.25
3.16%
POM 12 Note - New to roll - new bank space, east 1/2 of 1st Fl. (main fl comm 1,722 sf + bank net 4,785 sf). 5 space
68
70-16-29-288-708
99 E 8th St Ste 320
Eighth Street Partners LLC Edward Jones Investments
1
1
-
POM 12 Note - new parcel. -703 replaced by -707, -708, & -709. (gross sqft used: 1,283 ofc + 1,978 common)
69
70-16-29-326-007
68 W 8th St
Marsilje Agency Inc
Marsilje Agency Inc
31
2
70
70-16-29-326-011
194 River Ave
194 River LLC
Reader's World
0
2
9824
0.6
Notes
POM 12 Charge (no excel math - hand
entered value from billed roll)
POM 13 Charge (Excel math grid used)
Calculated Credit ($100 per parking
space)
Total Assessment Before Credits
5th Fl SqFt
4th Fl SqFt
3rd Fl SqFt
2nd Fl SqFt
Property Owner of Record
Address
1st Fl SqFt
Office
% Change From POM 12 to POM 13
Office
-
Credit Used (Lesser of Max Potential or
Calculated)
-
1
Maximum Potential Credit (70% of total
assessment is possible)
1
11
5th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
13
GMB Architects Engineers
4th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
*Receives 50% (0.50) Discount for NonProfit Use
GMB Architects Engineers
Thallo LLC
3rd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Bldg Stories
Thallo LLC
85 E 8th St Ste 260
2nd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Parking Spaces (Includes Neighboring
Parcel By Same Owner)
85 E 8th St Ste 220
70-16-29-287-708
1st Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Parcel #
70-16-29-287-707
60
Business Name | Tenant | Common
Name
#
59
Bank
6,507
645.68
$
451.97
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
545.68
$
530.03
2.87%
-
Office
5,572
Office
5,826
0.6
2,992.31
$
2,094.62
$
3,100.00
$
2,094.62
$
897.69
$
875.93
2.42%
POM09 Note - Using gross sqft. Matches sqft used on PSD roll.
-
Retail
1,950
Office
1,950
0.6
1,029.60
$
720.72
$
-
$
-
$
1,029.60
$
1,004.64
2.42%
POM11 Note - 2nd Fl is Chris Hungerink (bldg owner) office - boat dealer.
Office
1,912
0.6
Office
3,261
0.6
71
70-16-29-326-012
196 River Ave
Disselkoen Family Prtnr
Employment Solutions
0
2
-
Office
1,912
1,009.54
$
706.68
$
-
$
-
$
1,009.54
$
985.06
2.42%
72
70-16-29-326-013
200 River Ave
Lumir LLC
Design Works
0
1
-
Retail
2,622
865.26
$
605.68
$
-
$
-
$
865.26
$
844.28
2.42%
73
70-16-29-326-014
202 River Ave
Vandepoel Mary Trust
Superior Sports Store
0
1
-
Retail
3,300
1,089.00
$
762.30
$
-
$
-
$
1,089.00
$
1,062.60
2.42%
74
70-16-29-326-015
206 River Ave
Walters Cinda
River Ave. Optical
0
1
-
Retail
1,811
597.63
$
418.34
$
-
$
-
$
597.63
$
583.14
2.42%
75
70-16-29-326-016
208 River Ave
Hulston Properties LLC
Innovations Designs in Hair
0
1
-
Retail
1,480
488.40
$
341.88
$
-
$
-
$
488.40
$
476.56
2.42%
76
70-16-29-326-017
210 River Ave
Vankolken Diana
Shaker Messenger Inc
1
2
-
Retail
1,564
516.12
$
361.28
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
416.12
$
403.61
3.01%
77
70-16-29-326-032
212 River Ave
NIAC LLC
Harbour Bay Funiture Co
12
1
-
Retail
3,403
78
70-16-29-326-033
54 W 8th St
Gatehouse Media MI HoldinHolland Sentinel
40
2
-
Office
19,570
79
70-16-29-326-035
86 W 8th St
Eighth Street Developers L Tulip Time Ofc
36
1
-
Office
10,291
80
70-16-29-327-002
30 W 8th St
Fris Mary Elizabeth Trust
Fris Hallmark
0
2
-
Retail
2,346
Office
81
70-16-29-327-003
28 W 8th St
McMurry Terry
Windmill Restaurant
0
2
-
Restaurant
2,016
Residential
1,620
-
82
70-16-29-327-006
20 W 8th St
Centre Investors
8th Street Grille
0
3
-
Restaurant
3,481
Residential
2,802
-
83
70-16-29-327-007
18 W 8th St
Western Theological Sem The Bridge
0
2
Retail
2,375
Residential
1,625
-
84
70-16-29-327-008
14 W 8th St
Downtown Holdings LLC
0
2
-
Retail
5,555
Office
5,555
85
70-16-29-327-009
12 W 8th St
Geenen DeKock Prop LLC Jos A Bank
0
2
-
Retail
3,178
Office
3,178
86
70-16-29-327-010
10 W 8th St
Geenen DeKock Prop LLC Engedi Salon
0
2
-
Retail
1,918
Office
87
70-16-29-327-011
8 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
Glik's
0
2
-
Retail
2,424
Residential
88
70-16-29-327-012
6 W 8th St
Peachwave 8th St LLC
Peachwave Frozen Yogurt
0
1
-
Retail
2,175
89
70-16-29-327-023
213 River Ave
Lumir LLC
Three Chairs Co
0
3
-
Retail
4,400
90
70-16-29-327-027
36 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
jb and me
15
2
-
Retail
9,137
Office
9,137
0.6
4,824.34
$
3,377.04
$
91
70-16-29-327-028
26 W 8th St
Lumir LLC
Gazelle Sports
0
2
-
Retail
4,341
Residential
3,895
-
1,432.53
$
1,002.77
$
92
70-16-29-327-029
211 River Ave
Lumir LLC
Flying Colorz Studio
9
1
-
Retail
2,705
892.65
$
624.86
$
-
$
-
$
892.65
$
871.01
2.42%
POM12 Note - Dimensions gone as of 5/2012. POM09 Note - 9 credits given to JB & Me.
93
70-16-29-327-030
25 W 9th St
Lumir LLC
Kelly's Marketplace | Spring Sw
0
2
-
Retail
6,917
Residential
5,560
-
2,282.61
$
1,597.83
$
-
$
-
$
2,282.61
$
2,227.27
2.42%
POM11 Note - Spring Sweet Ste 110. POM09 Note - Ste 120|Liz Austin. Kelly's Marketplace.
Office
4,226
0.6
2,253.11
$
1,577.18
$
-
$
-
$
2,253.11
$
2,198.49
2.42%
POM12 Note - was former Cobblestone Hobbies. Ronald Blue is 2nd Fl.
659.67
$
461.77
$
-
$
-
$
659.67
$
643.68
2.42%
Theater
2,064.48
$
1,445.14
$
1,500.00
$
1,445.14
$
619.34
$
604.33
2.42%
POM09 Note - New location of DDA.
891.00
$
623.70
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
691.00
$
669.40
3.13%
Barber.
$
1,171.91
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
1,374.16
$
1,333.57
2.95%
POM09 Note - Major 2nd Fl addition and remod.
POM12 Note - Tulip Time Ofc gone since 4/2012. 2nd Fl is Spin Dance.
Lake Effect Gallery
Residential
1,564
-
Office
6,924
0.6
Residential
POM09 Note - Updated sqft verified from bldg plans by TM.
1,122.99
$
786.09
$
1,200.00
$
786.09
$
336.90
$
328.73
2.43%
7,829.05
$
5,480.34
$
4,000.00
$
4,000.00
$
3,829.05
$
3,639.26
4.96%
Ofc & Manf on main floor.
3,396.03
$
2,377.22
$
3,600.00
$
2,377.22
$
1,018.81
$
994.11
2.42%
POM11 Note - Former Lighthouse Insurance.
-
833.38
$
583.37
$
-
$
-
$
833.38
$
813.18
2.42%
2nd Fl Mezz/Ofc.
-
665.28
$
465.70
$
-
$
-
$
665.28
$
649.15
2.42%
-
1,148.73
$
804.11
$
-
$
-
$
1,148.73
$
1,120.88
2.42%
783.75
$
548.63
$
-
$
-
$
783.75
$
764.75
2.42%
0.6
2,933.04
$
2,053.13
$
-
$
-
$
2,933.04
$
2,861.94
2.42%
0.6
1,677.98
$
1,174.59
$
-
$
-
$
1,677.98
$
1,637.31
2.42%
2,018
0.6
1,032.50
$
722.75
$
-
$
-
$
1,032.50
$
1,007.47
2.42%
POM11 Note - Former Smooch
2,424
-
799.92
$
559.94
$
-
$
-
$
799.92
$
780.53
2.42%
POM12 Note - Former Pathfinder's Travel, Glik's moving in (opens 11/8/12). 8/27/12 note.
717.75
$
502.43
$
-
$
-
$
717.75
$
700.35
2.42%
POM12 Note - was Post Jewelry, now TreeHuggers.
1,452.00
$
1,016.40
$
-
$
-
$
1,452.00
$
1,416.80
2.42%
299
4,400
0.6 Residential
-
Residential
Residential
2,346
2,802
4,400
-
1,500.00
-
$
$
1,500.00
-
$
3,324.34
$
3,207.38
3.52%
$
1,432.53
$
1,397.80
2.42%
POM09 Note - New tenant - Lake Effect Gallery.
POM09 Note - 9 credits rec'd from Dimensions.
94
70-16-29-327-032
208 Central Ave
Lumir
REMax Lakeshore
0
2
-
Retail
4,292
95
70-16-29-328-013
50 W 9th St
Holland Civic Theater
Holland Civic Theater
0
-
0.5
Other
3,998
96
70-16-29-328-014
224 River Ave
Baas Paula
Gary Baas Bldg
15
2
-
Retail
4,768
97
70-16-29-328-015
226 River Ave
Z & D Properties LLC
Salon Cheveux
2
1
-
Retail
2,700
98
70-16-29-328-020
240 River Ave
Lorence Investments LLC Lorence & Vander Zwart
3
1
-
Office
3,029
Office
3,407
0.6
1,674.16
Office
4,017
0.6
2,120.98
$
1,484.68
$
-
$
-
$
2,120.98
$
2,069.56
2.42%
925.65
$
647.96
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
625.65
$
603.21
3.59%
Bar.
1,903.94
$
1,332.75
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
1,803.94
$
1,757.78
2.56%
Gymnasium.
Office
2,480
0.6
99
70-16-29-328-030
238 River Ave
Lumir LLC
SpinDance
0
2
-
Office
4,017
100
70-16-29-328-031
230 River Ave
CBS West LLC
Parrot's Lounge
3
1
-
Restaurant
2,805
101
70-16-29-329-003
14 W 9th St
Holland Historical Trust
Holland Armory(gym)
1
-
0.5
Other
10,213
Office
2,210
0.6
Office
6,280
0.6 Office
102
70-16-29-329-009
13 W 10th St
Ameritech
Ameritech
3
-
-
Office
6,280
4,559.28
$
3,191.50
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
4,259.28
$
4,148.75
2.60%
POM09 Note - Leave in per DDA.
103
70-16-29-329-708
17 W 10th St Ste 110
Akershoek Family Trust
MCA - gone 10/31/08
0
1
-
Office
595
196.35
$
137.45
$
-
$
-
$
196.35
$
180.64
8.00%
POM09 Note - MCA gone 10/31/08.
104
70-16-29-329-711
17 W 10th St Ste 170
Dykema Timothy
(vacant as of Spring 2013)
0
1
Office
1,368
451.44
$
316.01
$
-
$
-
$
451.44
$
288.51
36.09%
POM12 Note - Per Personal Property canvass, "started business there in March of 2011."
105
70-16-29-329-712
17 W 10th St Ste 160
Centennial Partners
Tenth Street Salon
0
1
-
Retail
1,235
407.55
$
285.29
$
-
$
-
$
407.55
$
375.13
7.95%
POM09 Note - From net to gross sqft.
106
70-16-29-329-713
17 W 10th St Ste 140
Zajicek Edward & WieslawaPrudential
1
1
-
Office
834
275.22
$
192.65
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
175.22
$
153.09
12.63%
POM10 Note - Updated from former retail space (Dan Adams Salon), now used as office.
107
70-16-29-329-714
17 W 10th St Ste 120
DeWilde Properties LLC
0
1
-
Office
1,052
347.16
$
243.01
$
-
$
-
$
347.16
$
319.42
7.99%
POM09 Note - From net to gross sqft.
108
70-16-29-329-742
17 W 10th St Ste 130
Double Dog Properties LLCNine's Gallery
0
1
-
Retail
2,000
660.00
$
462.00
$
-
$
-
$
660.00
$
606.97
8.03%
POM09 Note - From net to gross sqft.
109
70-16-29-330-026
248 River Ave
Preservation Through Perf Park Theater
4
1
0.5
Other
4,567
110
70-16-29-330-027
254 River Ave
Vos Kenneth
26
2
-
Retail
10,488
111
70-16-29-330-701
246 River Ave Ste 100
Geenen DeKock Prop LLC River Prof. Bldg 1st Fl.
32
1
-
Office
6,820
112
70-16-29-330-702
246 River Ave Ste 200
DD Properties LLC
River Prof. Bldg 2nd Fl.
32
1
-
113
70-16-29-401-002
8 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Cotton Bay | Tikal
0
2
-
Retail
114
70-16-29-401-007
24 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Fustini's
0
2
-
115
70-16-29-401-008
26 E 8th St
Dekam Real Estate
Warner Vineyards
3
2
116
70-16-29-401-009
30 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Moynihan Gallery
0
2
117
70-16-29-401-014
46 E 8th St
Fabiano Paul & Esther
Holland Peanut Store
2
118
70-16-29-401-015
48 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Canterbury Cottage
2
119
70-16-29-401-016
50 E 8th St
Jewel-Tec LLC
Frances Jaye
120
70-16-29-401-017
54 E 8th St
Marsilje II Thomas Trust
121
70-16-29-401-018
56 E 8th St
122
70-16-29-401-036
12 E 8th St
123
70-16-29-401-039
124
70-16-29-401-042
Paragon
Reliable | Golden 8 Ball
6,280
0.6
753.56
$
527.49
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
353.56
$
335.29
5.17%
POM10 Note - Park Theater Foundation gone.
6,161.76
$
4,313.23
$
2,600.00
$
2,600.00
$
3,561.76
$
2,358.28
33.79%
POM09 Note - 26 spaces credit instead of 24 per a re-count.
2,250.60
$
1,575.42
$
3,200.00
$
1,575.42
$
675.18
$
658.81
2.42%
1,235.52
$
864.86
$
3,200.00
$
864.86
$
370.66
$
361.67
2.43%
-
815.10
$
570.57
$
-
$
-
$
815.10
$
795.34
2.42%
POM09 Note - Vacant. Lumir, Castle Park.
800
-
567.60
$
397.32
$
-
$
-
$
567.60
$
553.84
2.42%
POM10 Note - New Biz per DDA.
Residential
1,403
-
826.98
$
578.89
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
526.98
$
506.93
3.80%
POM09 Note - Former Elizabeth Austin.
Residential
3,198
-
1,220.34
$
854.24
$
-
$
-
$
1,220.34
$
1,190.76
2.42%
2,205
Residential
2,205
-
727.65
$
509.36
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
527.65
$
510.01
3.34%
2,250
Residential
1,800
-
742.50
$
519.75
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
542.50
$
524.50
3.32%
Retail
1,656
Retail
1,656
1.0
1,092.96
$
765.07
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
992.96
$
753.17
24.15%
POM12 Note - former DeVries Photo, now Frances Jaye.
-
Restaurant
3,760
Residential
3,040
-
1,240.80
$
868.56
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
1,040.80
$
1,010.72
2.89%
POM12 Note - former Lizzie Ann's, now Crust 54.
2
-
Retail
1,720
Retail
1,720
1.0
1,135.20
$
794.64
$
100.00
$
100.00
$
1,035.20
$
786.14
24.06%
2
-
Retail
4,410
Office
2,975
0.6
2,044.35
$
1,431.05
$
-
$
-
$
2,044.35
$
1,994.79
2.42%
19
2
-
Other
6,362
Storage
3,804
0.05
2,162.23
$
1,513.56
$
1,900.00
$
1,513.56
$
648.67
$
632.94
2.42%
10
2
-
Retail
6,128
Storage
576
0.05
2,031.74
$
1,422.22
$
1,000.00
$
1,000.00
$
1,031.74
$
982.49
4.77%
4,991.00
$
3,493.70
$
-
$
-
$
4,991.00
$
5,950.75
491.04
$
343.73
$
-
$
-
$
491.04
$
479.14
2.42%
5,286.86
$
3,700.80
$
5,900.00
$
3,700.80
$
1,586.06
$
1,547.61
2.42%
6,312.11
$
4,418.48
$
2,500.00
$
2,500.00
$
3,812.11
$
3,659.09
2,286.97
$
1,600.88
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
1,886.97
$
2,477.59
3,961.98
$
2,773.39
$
-
$
-
$
3,961.98
$
3,865.93
2.42%
POM11 New parcel replaces -001 (lot line adj.). Restaurant & Retail.
981.42
$
686.99
$
-
$
-
$
981.42
$
766.10
21.94%
POM11 New parcel replaces -001 (lot line adj.).
2,385.24
$
1,669.67
$
-
$
-
$
2,385.24
556.38
$
389.47
$
200.00
$
200.00
$
356.38
$
342.89
3.79%
Retail
8,184
1.0
Office
6,240
0.6
2,470
Residential
2,470
Retail
1,720
Residential
-
Retail
2,506
-
Retail
3,698
2
-
Retail
2
-
Retail
1
2
-
Crust 54 | City Delicatessen
2
2
Invest IV LLC
September's Bride
1
Audio Properties
Blu Veranda
0
29 E 9th St
Dykstra Land Co
Dykstra Funeral Home
206 College Ave
VanderVen Properties LLC Lemonjello's, Gregordog
125
70-16-29-401-043
20 E 8th St
Audio Properties
Teerman's
0
3
-
Retail
14,123
Hotel-Lmtd
4,729
126
70-16-29-401-044
32 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Muriel's Intimate Apparel
0
2
-
Retail
1,488
Residential
1,488
-
127
70-16-29-401-045
36 E 8th St
Fifth Third Bank
Fifth Third Bank
59
3
-
Bank
8,540
Bank
8,540
0.6 Mezz/Bank
3,928
0.6
128
70-16-29-401-046
44 E 8th St
Riverview '95 Assoc
Butch's and up
25
5
-
Restaurant
6,521
Office
6,521
0.6 Office
4,830
0.6 Office
129
70-16-29-401-050
60 E 8th St
Downtown Real Estate Hol Kilwin's | Tip Toe's
4
3
Retail
5,648
Office
2,137
0.6 Residential
3,344
-
130
70-16-29-401-051
4 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Alpenrose | Sandcastle
0
1
-
Retail
12,006
131
70-16-29-401-052
10 E 8th St
Lumir LLC
Tin Ceiling
0
2
-
Retail
1,487
Retail
1,487
1.0
132
70-16-29-401-054
215 Central Ave
Lumir LLC
West MI Bike & Fitness
0
2
Retail
7,228
Vacant
7,516
-
133
70-16-29-402-003
72 E 8th St
Lake Street II LLC
RIT Music
2
3
Retail
1,686
Residential
936
-
-
0.15 Hotel-Lmtd
Residential
1,946
936
0.15
-
4830
0.6 Office
4830
0.6
POM09 Note - New tenant - Canturbury Cottage.
Mortuary.
-19.23% POM13-upper floors changed from Office to Hotel
4.01%
-31.30% POM10 combination. 2nd Fl sqft listed is Ofc. (remeasured in Apex for POM11 per fin.).
POM13 1st floor No longer vacant
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\POM13 MASTER 7-30-2013-ab
9/27/2013
2
84 East | Froggy's | CVB
0
2
-
Restaurant
8,007
Residential
6,845
137
70-16-29-402-010
106 E 8th St
Smith B A III & JE Trusts
Ben Smith & Assoc.
6
2
-
Office
2,853
Office
2,853
138
70-16-29-402-047
86 E 8th St
Hope College
Knickerbocker Theatre
4
1
0.5
Other
5,962
Hope College
100 East 8th St
68
2
0.5
Office
12,585
70-16-29-402-048-TAX 100 E 8th St
2nd Fl SqFt
1st Fl SqFt
Address
139 70-16-29-402-048-EX 100 E 8th St
Notes
Hope College
% Change From POM 12 to POM 13
84 E 8th St
POM 12 Charge (no excel math - hand
entered value from billed roll)
70-16-29-402-006
POM 13 Charge (Excel math grid used)
136
Residential
Credit Used (Lesser of Max Potential or
Calculated)
0.6 Office
Calculated Credit ($100 per parking
space)
-
1,947
Maximum Potential Credit (70% of total
assessment is possible)
3,040
Office
Total Assessment Before Credits
Residential
1,926
5th Fl SqFt
3,040
Restaurant
5th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Retail
-
4th Fl SqFt
-
3
4th Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
3
3
3rd Fl SqFt
4
Our Brewing Co
3rd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
*Receives 50% (0.50) Discount for NonProfit Use
City Wide Cellular
JWH Properties LLC
2nd Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Bldg Stories
74 East 8th LLC
76 E 8th St
1st Fl Use (Priced in BS&A as)
Parking Spaces (Includes Neighboring
Parcel By Same Owner)
74 E 8th St
70-16-29-402-005
Business Name | Tenant | Common
Name
Parcel #
70-16-29-402-004
135
Property Owner of Record
#
134
3,040
-
1,003.20
$
702.24
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
603.20
$
578.88
1,947
0.6
1,406.59
$
984.61
$
300.00
$
300.00
$
1,106.59
$
1,072.49
3.08%
POM12 Note - former Convention Visitor's Bureau, now Our Brewing Company.
-
2,642.31
$
1,849.62
$
-
$
-
$
2,642.31
$
2,578.25
2.42%
POM12 Note - Convention & Visitor's Bureau moved in from next door to old Inigo space.
0.6
1,506.38
$
1,054.47
$
600.00
$
600.00
$
906.38
$
869.87
4.03%
983.73
$
688.61
$
400.00
$
400.00
$
583.73
$
559.88
6,800.00
$
3,846.10
$
1,648.33
$
2,710.65
-64.45% 7/21/10 - 68 credits confirmed at Board Meeting.
-
$
3,301.65
$
2,321.61
29.68%
2.42%
Office
16,881
0.6
5,494.43
$
3,846.10
$
$
-
Office
4,200
0.6
3,301.65
$
2,311.16
$
-
$
4.03%
4.09%
Theatre.
Hope College
Merit Bank portion of Bldg
0
2
Bank
5,293
140
70-16-29-402-050
66 E 8th St
Bigger Dog LLC
New Holland Brewery
0
2
-
Restaurant
7,485
141
70-16-29-403-005
24 E 9th St
Swaney Properties LLC
Meadowcroft Chiro
9
1
-
Office
1,754
578.82
$
405.17
$
900.00
$
405.17
$
173.65
$
169.44
142
70-16-29-403-006
30 E 9th St
Professional Real Estate
Swaney & Thomas PC
10
2
-
Office
2,072
Office
998
0.6
881.36
$
616.95
$
1,000.00
$
616.95
$
264.41
$
258.00
2.42%
POM09 Note - 10 spaces cred. Dick Swaney & PF.
143
70-16-29-403-017
235 Central Ave
Royal Property LLC
Eagle Company │Edify North
0
1
-
Office
3,432
Office
2,222
0.6
1,572.52
$
1,100.76
$
$
-
$
1,572.52
$
1,534.39
2.42%
2nd Fl Mezz/Ofc.
144
70-16-29-403-022
9 E 10th St
Hope College
Theil Research Ctr.
53
1
0.5
Other
3,948
651.42
$
455.99
$
$
455.99
$
195.43
$
190.69
2.43%
POM09 Note - Parking Lot & College Bldg. (educational facility)
145
70-16-29-403-025
12 E 9th St
Fifth Third Bank
Fifth Third ATMs
0
1
-
Bank
732
241.56
$
169.09
$
$
-
$
241.56
$
235.70
2.43%
146
70-16-29-404-029
103 E 10th St
Hope College Haworth Inn Haworth Conf Learn Ctr
75
3
-
Hotel
34,323
12,834.46
$
8,984.12
$
$
5,334.46
$
5,023.32
5.83%
1,504
678,770
Hotel
15,612
424,019
0.15 Hotel
14,850
128,489
0.15
42,167
11,173
290,772.62
203,540.93
5,300.00
7,500.00
149,100.00
POM 13 these calculations included above so that credits are not confused
$
7,500.00
102,589.89
188,182.79
181,248.51
POM 13
POM 12
Bar.
POM09 Note - Multiple nearby lots contribute to credits.
<prior totals are not column sums, they are taken from the billed roll each year (parcels retire,boundary changes, etc).
Color Coding Key:
*Orange = Parking Spaces Given to Neighbor (same owner)
*Blue = Parking Spaces Include a Neighbor (same owner)
~parking spaces from adjacent parcels with same ownership were given
as credit to the parcel that contains the building.
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\POM13 MASTER 7-30-2013-ab
9/27/2013
3
.
0
230
460
Legend
City of Holland
POM12
Parking Oper & Maint
920 Feet
2nd St
parkingbuffer08
Parcel
Charged
Not Charged
-0 01
-0 34
-0 23
-0 17
3rd St
-0 05
-7 01
-0 06
-7 02
4th St
-0 24
-7 00
4th St
-0 04
-7 11 -7 1 0
-7
1 3 -7 1 2
-7
15
14
-7
16
-0 44
-0 29
-0 12
-0 11
-0 10
-0 06
-0 07
-0 08
-0 41
-0 40
-0 43
-0 39
-0 48
-0 47
-0 10
-0 06
-0 01
-0 02
-0 07
-0 04
-0 04
-0 08
-0 05
-0 09
-0 08
-0 28
-0 23
-0 09
-0 46
-0 19
-0 31
-0 27
-0 06
-0 05
-0 17
-0 04
-0 16
-0 02
-0 01
-0 12
-0 42
-0 09
-0 10
-0 11
-0 18
12th St
-0 20
-0 21
-0 22
-0 11
-0 01
-0 30
-0 25
-0 27
-0 28
-0 15
-0 14
-0 08
-0 07
-0 05
-0 06
-0 04
-0 03
-0 02
-0 01
-0 03
-0 02
-0 01
-0 07
-0 03
-0 07
-0 26
-0 06
-0 25
-0 16
-0 17
-0 18
-0 19
-0 24
-0 05
-0 07
-0 06
-0 08
-0 09
-0 11
-0 10
-0 12
-0 13
-0 27
-0 25
-0 10
-0 28
-0 02
-0 23
-0 04
-0 05
-0 06
-0 08
-0 01
-0 23
-0 04
-0 14
Graves Pl
-0 27
-0 01
-0 02
-0 03
-0 08
-0 24
-0 15
-0 11
-0 04
-0 09
-0 01
-0 09
-0 16
-0 03
-0 01
-0 15
-0 17
-0 14
-0 02
-0 29
-0 22
-0 01
-0 16
-0 17
-0 02
-0 18
-0 19
-0 20
-0 21
-0 23
-0 22
11th St
-0 14
-0 14
-0 13
-0 08
-0 21
-0 13
-0 18
-0 30
-0 16
-0 01
-0 08
-0 01
-0 30
-0 28
10th St
-0 22
-0 17
-0 14
-0 26
-0 02
-0 09
-0 29
-0 13
-0 03
-0 19
-0 52
-0 24
-0 28
-0 05
-0 02
-0 27
-0 53
-0 31
-0 32
-0 01
-0 43
-0 13
-0 55
-0 23
-0 18
-0 16
-0 13
-0 54
-0 09
-0 48
-0 46
-0 23
-0 08
-0 25
-7 08 -7 09
-0 24
-0 19
-7 05 -7 06 -7 07
-0 07
-0 06
-0 23
-0 19
-0 51
-0 18
-0 33
-0 40
-7 04
-0 15
-7 15
-7 02
-0 10
-7 14
-0 47
-0 05
-7 11
-0 06
-0 03
-0 50
-0 18
-0 04
-0 15
-0 16
-0 44
-0 41
-0 19
-0 55
-0 17
-0 16
-0 15
-0 14
-0 44
-0 45
-0 50
-7 10
-0 07
-7 01
-0 26
-0 26
-0 43
-7 09
-0 10
-0 08
-71 2 -71 3 -73 2 -74 2
-0 24
-0 11
-70 6 -71 7-72 8 -73 8
-70 7 -71 6 -72 9 -73 9
-70 8 -71 5 -73 0 -74 0
-711 -71 4 -73 1 -74 1
-0 10
-0 11
-7 04
-7 03
-0 59
-0 61
-7 02
-0 11
-0 20
-0 02
-7 0 8
-7 0 2
-7 0 6
-7 0 4
-0 08
-0 09
-0 07
-0 43
-0 20
-0 42
-0 08
-0 25
-0 15
-7 00
84 '
-0 25
-0 05
-0 30
-70 4 -71 9-72 6 -73 6
-70 5 -71 8-72 7 -73 7
-0 07
-7 11
-7 1 2
-0 25
-0 26
-0 29
-0 02
-0 11
-0 12
-0 13
-0 14
-0 10
-0 09
-0 07
-0 28
-0 03
-0 06
-0 08
-0 12
-0 09
-0 30
-0 21
-0 25
-0 26
9th St
-0 39
-0 53
-0 05
-70 2 -72 1-72 4 -73 4
-70 3 -72 0-72 5 -73 5
-0 06
-0 37
-0 14
-70 1 -72 2-72 3 -73 3
-0 31
-0 28
8th St
-0 54
-0 04
-0 16
-0 02
-0 06
-0 28
-0 25
-0 24
-0 12
-0 13
-0 14
-0 15
-0 21
-0 01
-0 03
-0 13
-0 08
-0 04
-0 32
-7 02
-0 21
-0 12
-0 13
-0 23
-0 22
-0 24
-0 26
-0 25
-0 29
-0 02
-0 14
-0 05
-0 12
-0 17
-0 28
-0 02
-0 09
-0 10
-0 08
-0 07
-0 05
-0 01
-0 24
-0 06
-0 11
-0 16
-0 33
-0 23
-0 15
-0 03
-0 14
-0 01
-0 30
-0 15
-0 16
-0 17
-0 18
-0 19
-0 14
-0 15
-0 15
-0 13
-0 32
-0 29
-0 32
-0 27
-0 23
-0 13
-0 25
-0 17
-0 03
-0 29
-0 10
-0 11
-0 08
-0 09
-0 06
-0 05
-0 07
-0 04
-0 02
-0 01
-0 12
-0 11
-0 10
-0 12
-0 51
-0 20
-0 24
-0 15
-0 16
-0 14
32 .4 4 '
-0 14
-0 33
-0 13
-0 16
-0 27
-0 02
-0 13
-0 01
-0 09
-0 36
-0 49
-0 09
-7 08
-0 01
-0 12
-0 12
-0 07
-0 35
-0 04
-0 44
-7 02
-0 11
-0 01
-0 11
-0 03
-0 13
-7 01
-0 40
-0 10
-0 43
7
-7 0
-7 06
-7 05
-7 04
-7 03
-0 18
-0 18
-0 43
-0 48
-0 15
-0 62
-0 47
-0 52
-0 27
-0 03
-0 10
-0 58
-0 22
-0 02
-0 49
-0 21
-0 10
-0 09
-0 25
-0 14
-0 28
-0 19
-0 07
-0 22
-0 02
-7 2 7
-7 2 8
7th St
-0 16
-0 50
-0 47
-7 2 5
-0 42
-0 53
-0 14
-0 51
-7 2 3
-0 12
-0 41
-0 19
-0 11
-7 0 9
-7
-0 04
-0 15
-7 2 1
-7 2 4
-0 09
-0 27
-7 1 9
-7 2 2
6th St
-7 0 8
07
-7 1 0
-7
5th St
-0 29
-7 1 7
-7 2 0
-7 2 6
-0 24
-0 13
-0 17
-0 18
-0 27
-7 0 0
-7 0 0
-7 0 9
6
-7 0
-0 04
-0 05
-7 0 5
-0 27
-7 3 2 -7 3 1
-7 0 7 -7 0 6 -7 0 5 -7 0 4 -7 0 3 -7 0 2 -7 0 1
-7 3 3 -7 3 4
-7 3 6 -7 3 5
-7 0 8 -7 0 9 -7 1 0 -7 11 -7 1 2 -7 1 3 -7 1 4
-7 2 1 -7 2 0 -7 1 9 -7 1 8 -7 1 7 -7 1 6 -7 1 5
-7 2 2 -7 2 3 -7 2 6 -7 2 7 -7 2 8 -7 2 9 -7 3 0
-7 0 1
-7 0 3
-7 0 4
-0 06
-0 02
-7 1 8
-7 0 2
-7 0 0
-7 00
-7 0 7
-7 0 1
-0 03
-0 09
-7 25
-0 08
-7 0 5
-0 10
-0 08
-0 46
-0 09
-0 28
-7 0 3
-0 03
-0 07
-0 36
-0 17
-0 05
-0 06
-0 52
-0 03
Central Ave
-0 32
-0 04
-0 05
-0 11
-0 11
-0 12
River Ave
Pine Ave
-0 08
-0 10
-0 03
-7 03
-0 32
-0 01
1
Current Policy
Sept. 5, 2012
DOWNTOWN PARKING
ASSESSMENT POLICY
The purpose of this assessment policy is to provide a uniform and equitable means of replacing funds
and charging certain costs and expenses relating to the downtown parking system which provide a special
benefit to properties located in and around the C-3 Central Commercial Zone District. These costs and expenses
include, but are not limited to, the following: lease costs incurred for parking lots leased to the City of Holland;
maintenance of public parking lots and decks including snow plowing, resurfacing, striping, repair, and
replacement; lighting; capitalized improvement costs for lot construction, re-construction, and repair; and
administrative costs relating to the parking lots for proper operation, maintenance, and improvement. The
Council of the City of Holland finds that this assessment policy is necessary and desirable in order to provide
free off-street parking for customers, employees, and other users present in and around the C-3 Central
Commercial Zone, thereby conferring a special benefit to assessed properties.
Because these assessments are levied and adjusted annually, the assessment district shall include only
those parcels determined to have a direct or incremental benefit from the downtown parking system. Vacant
lots, existing parking lots, churches, all residential uses, principal storage uses (which are not accessory to the
principal use of the property or which are not part of an upper-story level), and industrial uses which are
principal uses of the parcel shall be exempt from annual parking assessments so long as such uses continue. The
determination of the exempt status of a parcel or property shall be determined based upon the use, occupancy,
and operation on the parcel or property on the date of the final roll hearing. “Vacant” space within buildings
will be considered vacant and exempt if it is chronically vacant (exceeding two years vacant at the time of the
date of final roll hearing).
The assessment district shall include those properties located within 400 feet of a public parking lot or
public parking deck. The application of the assessment policy shall be computed as follows:
1.
First floor (“Base Assessment”). Assessments for the first floor shall be levied on a per square
foot basis of the first floor.
2.
Second/third/or more floors - Additional assessments. Recognizing that additional floors of
buildings benefited by the parking system will receive a benefit based upon usable or occupied square footage,
and recognizing that upper-story uses create different parking requirements (i.e.: non-residential uses, including
office and commercial uses create customer visitations during business hours ), the following additional
assessment to the Base Assessment shall be computed and levied:
a.
5% of the amount of the Base Assessment shall be computed and levied against each
upper-story floor used for accessory storage purposes or which is vacant.
b.
60% of the amount of the Base Assessment shall be computed and levied against each
upper-story floor used for office purposes.
c.
100% of the amount of the Base Assessment shall be computed and levied against each
upper-story floor used for retail or restaurant purposes.
d.
15% of the amount of the base assessment shall be computed and levied against each
upper floor used as overnight sleeping rooms in a hotel or inn.
2
3.
Non-profit uses, except where otherwise exempted, shall be assessed at a rate of 50% of the
total assessment.
Each upper-story floor shall be assessed according to the formulas above when 50% or more of the
upper-story floor is used for storage, office, or other uses defined above.
For purposes of the application of this policy, a building shall be deemed to have a second, third, or
more floors if the building has improved or enclosed square footage above the ground floor which exceeds 50%
of the ground floor square footage.
It is recognized that paved off-street parking or improved customer lots privately operated in
conjunction with the specific businesses help meet the downtown parking demand. Thus, private property with
paved, improved off-street parking lots may receive a credit against their assessable amount at the rate of $100
for each usable off-street parking space, up to 70% of the total assessment for the parcel.
Where individuals or entities own multiple parcels, the credit may be extended to other parcels under
the same ownership where utilization of the off-street parking spaces is by occupants or customers of the subject
parcel’s building.
Downtown property owners have the responsibility of notifying the Assessor’s Office of parking space
credit changes or disagreements five (5) days prior to the final adoption of the special assessment roll by City
Council.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8C To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Public Heating ‐ Downtown Principal Shopping District (PSD) Assessment Roll. Summary: Following is the report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City Charter regarding the annual special assessments for the Principal Shopping District (PSD). The PSD was created by ordinance in 1998 with the purpose of providing a comprehensive, coordinated approach to promotional activities in the downtown as well as a stable funding mechanism for these activities. The PSD assessment policy, as approved by City Council, is based on building square footage and the assessment rates for FY 2014 are proposed to be the same as for FY 2013. The FY 2013 assessment generated $181,080.19 in revenues and the FY 2014 assessment will generate $179,733.20. This assessment will include 178 properties. Assessment Per Square Foot Core first floor $.22
Upper floor retail or restaurant .22
Upper floor other uses .08
Edge first floor .14
Upper floor retail or restaurant .14
Upper floor other uses .08
On September 18, 2013, the City Council held the public hearing of necessity and approved the necessity of this assessment and directed the development of the final assessment roll. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council adopt a resolution approving the Principal Shopping District (PSD) Final Assessment Roll. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton, City Manager Attachments: Resolution; Assessment table; Assessment map; Assessment policy Report prepared by: Phil Meyer, Director, Community and Neighborhood Services Department. Attachment to 8C
(R2013.61)
RESOLUTION APPROVING FINAL ASSESSMENT ROLL
Principal Shopping District Special Assessment – FY 2014
At a regular meeting of the Council of the City of Holland, Michigan, held at City Hall,
Holland, Michigan, on October 16, 2013 at 7:00 P.M.,
PRESENT:
ABSENT:
The following Resolution was offered by Council Member
Member
and supported by Council
.
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 15.6 of the Holland City Charter, the City Manager’s
office has submitted a report for the making of the Principal Shopping District Special
Assessment for FY 2014;
WHEREAS, the report of the City Manager describes the necessity of the improvement;
the nature of the improvement; prescribes the portion of the cost which shall be paid by special
assessment upon the property benefited; and designates the limits of the special assessment
district to be effected; designates the manner by which the benefits shall be derived by the
special assessment.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS:
1.
That the operation and maintenance of the Principal Shopping District (PSD13) as
presented to this Council on October 3, 2013, by Council Action No. 13.548 be and the same is
hereby adopted and confirmed as heretofore presented by the Assessing Administrator and the
1
City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to certify on behalf of the Council said Assessment
Roll as being confirmed by the Council and to endorse thereon the date of confirmation.
2.
That said roll shall within 10 days be delivered by the City Clerk to the City
Treasurer who shall collect the sums assessed thereon in accordance with the City Charter and
the Ordinances and Resolutions of this Council.
3.
That the special assessments in said roll shall provide for one installment to be
collected during the current fiscal year 2013/2014.
4.
That any resolutions in conflict with this Resolution are rescinded.
5.
After discussion, the vote was:
AYES:
NAYS:
None
ABSENT:
Resolution declared adopted dated this 16th day of October, 2013.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By_________________________________
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
2
CERTIFICATE
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
)
)ss
)
I, the undersigned, the duly qualified Deputy City Clerk of the Holland City Council,
City of Holland, State of Michigan, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete
copy of proceedings taken at a regular City Council Meeting of the Council of the City of
Holland, held on the 16th day of October, 2013, insofar as the same relate to the Resolution of the
Holland City Council Approving Final Assessment Roll Regarding Principal Shopping District
Special Assessment – FY 2014, the original of which is on file in my office. Public notice of
said meeting was given pursuant to and in full compliance with Act 267, Public Act of 1976, as
amended.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my official signature this 16th day of
October, 2013.
__________________________________
Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk
3
PSD 13 for 2013
Attachments to 8C
CORE
RATES:
CORE
1st Floor
Upper Fl - Retail or Restr
Upper Fl - Other
0.22
0.22
0.08
Bldg
Stories
1
1
4
1
1
2
5
Discount
0.60
-
Serafina's
1
-
Restaurant
6,580
9 W 7th St
Bank of Holland
2
-
Bank, Central
9,670 Bank, Central
70-16-29-180-018
188 River Ave
The Blackbird
2
-
Retail
2,556
70-16-29-180-040
190 River Ave
Home and Company
3
-
Retail
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Parcel #
70-16-29-176-008
70-16-29-176-009
70-16-29-176-725
70-16-29-178-004
70-16-29-178-005
70-16-29-178-006
70-16-29-178-010
Address
128 River Ave
140 River Ave
148 River Ave
15 W 6th St
17 W 6th St
139 River ave
130 Central Ave
Description
Great Lakes Spa | Seedlings
Wee Doll House│River Resale Room
Scrap Yard Rear Building Comm.
Grooters Productions
Grooters Productions
Lakeshore Resc Mission Car Lot
Holland Hospital | Twisthink
8
70-16-29-179-015
13 W 7th St
9
70-16-29-179-016
10
11
1st Fl Use
Retail
Retail
Office
Studio
Office
Auto Repair/ w
Office
1st Fl
SqFt
3,597
1,980
6,182
4,764
3,871
9,068
10,657
2nd Fl Use
2nd Fl
SqFt
3rd Fl Use
3rd Fl
SqFt
4th Fl Use
4th Fl
SqFt
Office
6,182
Office
6,182
Office
6,182
Storage
Office
2,048
10,657
Office
10,657
Office
9,186
5th Fl Use
Stair/Elev.
5th Fl
SqFt
Total 1st Flr Total 2nd Flr Total 3rd Flr Total 4th Flr Total 5th Flr
$
$
$
$
$
791.34
435.60
1,360.04
494.56
494.56
494.56
1,048.08
851.62
1,994.96
716
2,344.54
852.56
852.56
734.88
$1,447.60
$2,939.48
Office
2,556
$562.32
$204.48
$766.80
4,950
Office
4,950 Office
$1,089.00
$396.00
Office
4,212
$926.64
$336.96
12
70-16-29-180-043
182 River Ave
Newb's│Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt
2
-
Retail
4,212
70-16-29-180-050
170 River Ave
Cottage Corner | Downtown Antiques
1
-
Retail
3,479
14
70-16-29-180-051
178 River Ave
Fricano's
2
-
Restaurant
4,080
Restaurant
3,672
Bar
1,400
Residential
1,280
$308.00
Retail
6,270
Office
6,270
$1,379.40
15
70-16-29-180-052
180 River Ave
Pioneer Club
2
0.60
70-16-29-181-012
17 W 8th St
White House Black Mkt│Hom by Benchmark
2
-
$2,939.48
$812.08
$252.00
$765.38
$897.60
1,196.98
Total Charge
$791.34
$435.60
$2,843.72
$1,048.08
$851.62
$797.98
$4,784.54
$1,447.60
$2,127.40
3,150
Discount $
$1,447.60
10,151
13
16
Total All
Flrs
791.34
435.60
2,843.72
1,048.08
851.62
1,994.96
4,784.54
$766.80
$1,737.00
$1,737.00
$1,263.60
$1,263.60
$765.38
$807.84
$1,705.44
$501.60
$1,881.00
$308.00
$765.38
$1,705.44
$184.80
$123.20
$1,881.00
17
70-16-29-181-013
19 W 8th St
Chico's
2
-
Retail
2,860
Residential
2,881
$629.20
$629.20
$629.20
18
70-16-29-181-014
21 W 8th St
Threads on 8th
2
-
Retail
2,860
Residential
2,314
$629.20
$629.20
$629.20
19
70-16-29-181-015
23 W 8th St
Talbot's
3
-
Retail
4,725
Office
4,725 Office
$1,039.50
$378.00
$1,795.50
$1,795.50
20
70-16-29-181-018
35 W 8th St
Model Drug
2
-
Retail
4,806
Office
4,806
$1,057.32
$384.48
$1,441.80
$1,441.80
7,416
Office
7,632
$1,631.52
$610.56
$2,242.08
$2,242.08
21
70-16-29-181-021
29 W 8th St
Claremont Court
2
-
Retail
22
70-16-29-181-022
14 W 7th St
PNC Drive Thru
1
-
Bank - Mini
23
70-16-29-181-025
1 W 8th St
PNC Bank
2
-
Bank
4,725
276
$378.00
$60.72
6,109
Bank
6,109
$60.72
$1,343.98
$488.72
$2,501.62
$938.96
$60.72
$1,832.70
$1,832.70
24
70-16-29-252-041
151 Central Ave
Spoelhof Financial Center
2
-
Office
11,371
Office
11,737
25
70-16-29-252-044
61 E 7th St
CityFlats Hotel
5
-
Hotel Retail
12,194
Hotel
11,253 Hotel
26
70-16-29-253-002
18 E 7th St
Good Earth
1
-
Retail & Ware
6,372
$1,401.84
27
70-16-29-253-016
55 E 8th St
JP's Coffee and Espresso
1
-
Restaurant
4,200
$924.00
$924.00
$924.00
28
70-16-29-253-019
45 E 8th St
Subs-N-More
2
-
Retail
1,720
$378.40
$378.40
$378.40
Residential
12,145 Hotel
1,720
12,145 Restaurant
6,343
$2,682.68
$1,395.46
$3,440.58
$3,440.58
$4,078.14
$4,078.14
$1,401.84
$1,401.84
29
70-16-29-253-024
23 E 8th St
Jimmy Johns
2
-
Retail
2,130
Residential
1,575
$468.60
$468.60
$468.60
30
70-16-29-253-025
21 E 8th St
Eighth Street Salon│Bag Lady Purse Store
2
-
Retail
2,161
Residential
2,161
$475.42
$475.42
$475.42
Office
2,300
31
70-16-29-253-026
17 E 8th St
Karla's Place
2
-
Retail
3,036
32
70-16-29-253-027
13 E 8th St
Harborwear
1
-
Retail
1,680
33
70-16-29-253-028
11 E 8th St
Crane's In The City
2
-
Retail
1,800
34
70-16-29-253-029
9 E 8th St
Resthaven Offices
1
0.60
Office
2,650
35
70-16-29-253-041
49 E 8th St
Globe Design & Vision
1
-
Retail
1,968
36
70-16-29-253-044
43 E 8th St Ste 250
Studio K | Seasoned Home
2
-
Retail
5,547
37
70-16-29-253-047
3 E 8th St
Interiors on 8th
1
-
Retail
630
38
70-16-29-253-049
176 College Ave
Curtis Center
3
-
Office
6,303
$667.92
$184.00
$369.60
Office
1,282
$396.00
$102.56
$851.92
$369.60
$369.60
$498.56
$583.00
$583.00
$432.96
$1,220.34
$851.92
$432.96
$443.76
$1,664.10
$498.56
$349.80
$233.20
$432.96
Office
5,547
Office
6,408 Office
6,408
$1,386.66
$512.64
$512.64
$2,411.94
$2,411.94
2,354 Office
1,559
$1,490.50
$188.32
$124.72
$1,803.54
$1,803.54
$138.60
39
70-16-29-253-053
25 E 8th St
Outpost of Holland
2
-
Retail
6,775
Mezz/Ofc
40
70-16-29-253-055
51 E 8th St
Borr's Shoes & Accessories
2
-
Retail
3,360
Residential
3,360
$739.20
41
70-16-29-253-058
37 E 8th St
Premovation Audio
2
-
Retail
5,670
Residential
3,780
$1,247.40
$138.60
$739.20
$1,664.10
$138.60
$739.20
$1,247.40
$1,247.40
$1,512.82
42
70-16-29-253-059
39 E 8th St
Thomas A. Davis Jewelers
2
-
Retail
5,611
Office
3,480
$1,234.42
$278.40
$1,512.82
43
70-16-29-253-061
29 E 8th St
Outpost of Holland
1
-
Retail
3,765
Office
850
$828.30
$68.00
$896.30
$896.30
44
70-16-29-253-702
31 E 8th St Unit 2
Image Group
1
-
Office
5,201
$416.08
$416.08
$416.08
45
70-16-29-253-703
31 E 8th St Unit 3
Image Group
1
-
46
70-16-29-253-704
31 E 8th St Unit 1
Loker's Shoes
1
-
Office
Retail
5,304
47
70-16-29-281-037
64 E 7th St
Time to Unwind Massage Therapy
1
-
Office
1,164
70-16-29-281-040
141 East 8th Street
Macatawa Bank
2
-
Bank
7,717
Bank
7,717
Residential
1,316
49
70-16-29-281-046
177 College Ave
Edward Jones Investments
2
-
Office
1,316
70-16-29-282-026
181 Columbia Ave
Pizza Hut
1
-
Restaurant
2,666
$416.08
$1,166.88
48
51
5,201
$256.08
$1,697.74
$416.08
$1,166.88
$256.08
$617.36
$2,315.10
$416.08
$1,166.88
$256.08
$2,315.10
$289.52
$289.52
$289.52
$586.52
$586.52
$586.52
52
70-16-29-287-701
69 E 8th St
Curragh Irish Pub
1
-
Restaurant
1,940
$426.80
$426.80
$426.80
53
70-16-29-287-702
73 E 8th St
Curragh Irish Pub
1
-
Restaurant
2,013
$442.86
$442.86
$442.86
54
70-16-29-287-703
77 E 8th St
Velo City Cycles
1
-
Retail
2,919
$642.18
$642.18
$642.18
55
70-16-29-287-704
81 E 8th St
Community Foundation of Holland/Zeeland
1
0.6
Office
3,390
$745.80
$745.80
$745.80
56
70-16-29-287-705
85 E 8th St Ste 160
Captrust
1
-
Office
5,637
$1,240.14
57
70-16-29-287-706
85 E 8th St Ste 150
Captrust
1
-
Office
3,786
$832.92
58
70-16-29-287-707
85 E 8th St Ste 220
GMB Architects Engineers
1
-
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\PSD13 Master Revised 9-3-13 ab
Office
6,129
$1,240.14
$490.32
$1,240.14
$832.92
$832.92
$490.32
$490.32
9/27/2013
#
Parcel #
Bldg
Stories
Discount
59
70-16-29-287-708
85 E 8th St Ste 260
GMB Architects Engineers
1
-
Office
5,572
$445.76
$445.76
$445.76
60
70-16-29-287-709
85 E 8th St Ste 210
GMB Architects Engineers
1
-
Office
6,539
$523.12
$523.12
$523.12
Office
4,255
Address
Description
61
70-16-29-287-710
85 E 8th St Ste 250
GMB Architects Engineers
1
-
62
70-16-29-287-711
85 E 8th St Ste 310
Warner, Norcross & Judd
1
-
1st Fl Use
1st Fl
SqFt
2nd Fl Use
2nd Fl
SqFt
3rd Fl Use
3rd Fl
SqFt
4th Fl Use
4th Fl
SqFt
5th Fl Use
5th Fl
SqFt
Total 1st Flr Total 2nd Flr Total 3rd Flr Total 4th Flr Total 5th Flr
$
$
$
$
$
$340.40
Office
11,319
$905.52
Total All
Flrs
Discount $
Total Charge
$340.40
$340.40
$905.52
$905.52
63
70-16-29-287-714
85 E 8th St Ste 360
Hilliard Lyons
1
-
Office
1,326
$106.08
$106.08
$106.08
64
70-16-29-287-715
85 E 8th St Ste 350
Hilliard Lyons
1
-
Office
6,565
$525.20
$525.20
$525.20
65
70-16-29-288-702
99 E 8th St Ste 200
(vacant)
1
66
70-16-29-288-704
99 E 8th St Ste 400
Raymond James
1
Office
67
70-16-29-288-705
99 E 8th St Ste 120
Eighth Street Partners - vac
1
Office
5,182
Office
6,507
12,987
$1,038.96
Office
$1,038.96
9,824
$785.92
$1,038.96
$785.92
$1,140.04
$1,140.04
$1,431.54
$1,431.54
68
70-16-29-288-706
99 E 8th St Ste 100
West Michigan Community Bank
1
69
70-16-29-288-707
99 E 8th St Ste 330
Eighth Street Partners - vac
1
Office
2,965
$237.20
$237.20
$237.20
70
70-16-29-288-708
99 E 8th St Ste 320
Eighth St Partners - Ed Jones
1
Office
1,767
$141.36
$141.36
$141.36
Office
6,562
71
70-16-29-288-709
99 E 8th St Ste 300
Eighth Street Partners - vac
1
72
70-16-29-326-001
102 W. 8th St.
Holistic Nutrition│Staffing Inc│Kandu
1
-
Retail
$1,431.54
$785.92
$1,140.04
$524.96
4,224
$929.28
$524.96
$524.96
$929.28
$929.28
73
70-16-29-326-007
68 W 8th St
Marsilje Agency
2
-
Office
5,572
Office
5,826
$1,225.84
$466.08
$1,691.92
74
70-16-29-326-011
194 River Ave
Reader's World
2
-
Retail
1,950
Office
1,950
$429.00
$156.00
$585.00
$1,691.92
$585.00
75
70-16-29-326-012
196 River Ave
Employment Solutions
2
-
Office
1,912
Office
1,912
$420.64
$152.96
$573.60
$573.60
76
70-16-29-326-013
200 River Ave
Design Works
1
-
Retail
2,622
$576.84
$576.84
$576.84
77
70-16-29-326-014
202 River Ave
Superior Sport Store
1
-
Retail
3,300
$726.00
$726.00
$726.00
78
70-16-29-326-015
206 River Ave
River Avenue Optical
1
-
Retail
1,811
$398.42
$398.42
$398.42
79
70-16-29-326-016
208 River Ave
Innovations
1
-
Retail
1,480
$325.60
$325.60
$325.60
80
70-16-29-326-017
210 River Ave
Shaker Messenger
2
-
Retail
1,564
81
70-16-29-326-032
212 River Ave
Harbour Bay Furniture
1
-
Retail
3,403
82
70-16-29-326-033
54 W 8th St
Holland Sentinel
2
-
Office
19,570
83
70-16-29-326-035
86 W 8th St
Tulip Time Festival Inc
1
-
Office
10,291
Residential
Office
84
70-16-29-327-002
30 W 8th St
Fris Hallmark
2
-
Retail
2,346 Mezz/Ofc
70-16-29-327-003
28 W 8th St
Windmill Restaurant
2
-
Restaurant
2,016
86
70-16-29-327-006
20 W 8th St
8th Street Grille
3
-
70-16-29-327-007
18 W 8th St
The Bridge
2
0.60
6,924
Residential
299
Residential
3,481
Residential
2,802 Residential
2,375
Residential
1,625
88
70-16-29-327-008
16 W 8th St
Lake Effect Gallery
2
-
Retail
5,555
Office
5,555
89
70-16-29-327-009
12 W 8th St
Jos. A. Banks
2
-
Retail
3,178
Office
3,178 Office
90
70-16-29-327-010
10 W 8th St
Engedi Salon
2
-
Retail
1,918
Office
91
70-16-29-327-011
8 W 8th St
Glik's
2
-
Retail
2,424
70-16-29-327-012
6 W 8th St
Peachwave Frozen Yogurt
1
-
Retail
2,175
70-16-29-327-023
215 River Ave
Three Chairs Co
3
-
Retail
4,400
2,346
$344.08
$748.66
$516.12
1,620
Restaurant
92
$344.08
$748.66
$4,305.40
Retail
93
$344.08
$748.66
$553.92
$2,264.02
85
87
1,564
$23.92
$443.52
2,802
$2,264.02
$540.04
$540.04
$443.52
$443.52
$765.82
$765.82
$522.50
$444.40
$699.16
$254.24
2,017
$421.96
$161.36
Residential
2,424
Residential
4,400 Residential
4,400
$4,859.32
$2,264.02
$522.50
$1,222.10
308
$4,859.32
$765.82
$313.50
$1,666.50
$24.64
$209.00
$1,666.50
$978.04
$978.04
$583.32
$583.32
$533.28
$533.28
$533.28
$478.50
$478.50
$478.50
$968.00
$968.00
$968.00
94
70-16-29-327-027
36 W 8th St
jb and me
2
-
Retail
9,137
Office
9,137
$2,010.14
95
70-16-29-327-028
24 W 8th St
Gazelle Sports
2
-
Retail
4,341
Residential
3,895
$955.02
$955.02
$955.02
96
70-16-29-327-029
211 River Ave
Flying Colorz Studio
1
-
Retail
2,705
$595.10
$595.10
$595.10
97
70-16-29-327-030
21 W 9th St
Pathfinder's Travel | Kelly's Market Place |Spring Sweet
2
-
Retail
6,917
Residential
5,560
$1,521.74
98
70-16-29-327-032
208 Central Ave
ReMax Lakeshore
1
-
Office
4,292
Office
4,226
$944.24
Office
2,480
$1,048.96
99
70-16-29-328-013
50 W 9th St
Holland Civic Theatre
1
0.60
100
70-16-29-328-014
224 River Ave
Ambrose │City of Holland PSD/DDA office
2
-
Theater
3,998
Retail
4,768
101
70-16-29-328-015
226 River Ave
Salon Cheveux
1
-
Retail
2,700
70-16-29-328-020
240 River Ave
Lorence & Vander Zwart
2
-
Office
3,029
Office
3,407
Office
4,017
$1,521.74
$1,521.74
$1,282.32
$1,282.32
$198.40
$1,247.36
$594.00
$594.00
$666.38
$272.56
$938.94
$938.94
$883.74
$321.36
$1,205.10
70-16-29-328-030
238 River Ave
SpinDance
2
-
Office
4,017
70-16-29-328-031
230 River Ave
Parrot's Lounge
1
-
Bar
2,805
$617.10
105
70-16-29-330-026
248 River Ave
Park Theater
1
0.60
Theater
4,567
$1,004.74
Reliable Sport & Ski Haus
70-16-29-330-027
254 River Ave
246 River Ave Ste 100 River Professional Building
2
-
Retail
15,116
1
-
Office
6,820
Retail
2,470
108
70-16-29-330-702
246 River Ave Ste 200 River Professional Building
1
-
109
70-16-29-401-002
8 E 8th St
2
-
Tikal | Cotton Bay
$879.56
$594.00
103
70-16-29-330-701
Retail
8,184
$3,325.52
Office
6,240
2,470
$527.74
$1,004.74
$654.72
$499.20
$543.40
$351.82
$1,247.36
$1,205.10
$617.10
$617.10
$1,500.40
Residential
$2,741.10
$338.08
104
106
$2,741.10
$879.56
102
107
$730.96
$602.84
$401.90
$3,980.24
$3,980.24
$1,500.40
$1,500.40
$499.20
$499.20
$543.40
$543.40
110
70-16-29-401-007
24 E 8th St
Fustini's
2
-
Retail
1,720
Residential
800
$378.40
$378.40
$378.40
111
70-16-29-401-008
26 E 8th St
Warner Vineyards
2
-
Retail
2,506
Residential
1,403
$551.32
$551.32
$551.32
112
70-16-29-401-009
30 E 8th St
Moynihan Gallery
2
-
Retail
3,698
Residential
3,198
$813.56
$813.56
$813.56
113
70-16-29-401-014
46 E 8th St
Holland Peanut Store
2
-
Retail
2,205
Residential
2,205
$485.10
$485.10
$485.10
114
70-16-29-401-015
48 E 8th St
Canterbury Cottage
2
-
Retail
2,250
Residential
1,800
$495.00
115
70-16-29-401-016
50 E 8th St
Frances Jaye | JewelTec
2
-
Retail
1,656
Retail
1,656
$364.32
$495.00
$495.00
$364.32
$728.64
$728.64
116
70-16-29-401-017
52-54 E 8th St
Crust 54 | City Delicatessen
2
-
Retail
3,760
Residential
3,040
$827.20
$827.20
$827.20
117
70-16-29-401-018
56 E 8th St
September's Bride
2
-
Retail
1,720
Retail
1,720
$378.40
$137.60
$516.00
$516.00
118
70-16-29-401-036
12 E 8th St
Blu Veranda
2
-
Retail
4,410
Office
2,975
$970.20
$238.00
$1,208.20
$1,208.20
119
70-16-29-401-039
29 E 9th St
Dykstra Funeral Home
2
-
Mortuary
6,362
Office
3,804
$1,399.64
$304.32
$1,703.96
$1,703.96
120
70-16-29-401-042
206 College Ave
Lemonjello's | Gregordog│Full Circle│Holland Clock Co│Michigan T‐Shirt Co
2
-
Retail
6,128
Office
576
$1,348.16
$46.08
$1,394.24
$1,394.24
121
70-16-29-401-043
20 E 8th St
Teerman's
3
-
Retail
1,946
$3,104.64
$378.32
$155.68
$3,638.64
$3,638.64
$1,878.80
$683.20
$314.24
$2,876.24
$2,876.24
$1,434.62
$521.68
$386.40
$3,115.50
$3,115.50
14,112 Hotel-Limited
4,729 Hotel-Limited
122
70-16-29-401-044
32 E 8th St
Muriel's Intimate Apparel
2
-
Retail
1,488
Residential
123
70-16-29-401-045
36 E 8th St
Fifth Third Bank
3
-
Bank
8,540
Bank
8,540 Mezz/Bank
3,928
124
70-16-29-401-046
44 E 8th St
Butch's|Fairly Painless|Collective Idea|Focus
5
-
Restaurant
6,521
Office
6,521 Office
4,830 Office
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\PSD13 Master Revised 9-3-13 ab
1,488
$327.36
4,830 Office
4,830
$327.36
$386.40
$386.40
$327.36
9/27/2013
#
Parcel #
Bldg
Stories
Discount
125
70-16-29-401-050
60 E 8th St
Tip Toes & Kilwin's
3
-
Retail
126
70-16-29-401-051
4 E 8th St
Alpenrose Restaurant and Cafe | Sandcastle
1
-
Restr & Retail
Address
Description
1st Fl Use
1st Fl
SqFt
5,648
2nd Fl Use
Ofc & Res
2nd Fl
SqFt
3rd Fl Use
1,742 Residential
3rd Fl
SqFt
4th Fl Use
4th Fl
SqFt
5th Fl Use
5th Fl
SqFt
3,040
Total 1st Flr Total 2nd Flr Total 3rd Flr Total 4th Flr Total 5th Flr
$
$
$
$
$
$1,242.56
12,006
$139.36
$2,641.32
Total All
Flrs
Discount $
Total Charge
$1,381.92
$1,381.92
$2,641.32
$2,641.32
127
70-16-29-401-052
10 E 8th St
Tin Ceiling
2
-
Retail
1,487
Retail
1,487
$327.14
$118.96
$446.10
128
70-16-29-401-054
215 Central Ave
West Michigan Bike & Fitness
2
-
Retail
7,210
Office
7,210
$1,586.20
$576.80
$2,163.00
$446.10
$2,163.00
129
70-16-29-402-003
72 E 8th St
RIT Music | Skate Casa
3
-
Retail
1,686
Residential
936 Residential
936
$370.92
$370.92
$370.92
130
70-16-29-402-004
74 E 8th St
City Wide
3
-
Retail
3,040
Residential
3,040 Residential
3,040
$668.80
$668.80
$668.80
1,948 Office
1,948
131
70-16-29-402-005
76 E 8th St
Our Brewing Co. (was CVB)
3
-
Retail
1,926
Office
132
70-16-29-402-006
78/80/84 E 8th St
Holland Convention and Visitors Bureau│84 East | Froggy's
2
-
Retail
8,007
Residential
$423.72
6,845
$155.84
$155.84
$1,761.54
$735.40
133
70-16-29-402-010
106 E 8th St
Ben Smith & Associates
2
-
Office
2,853
Office
2,853
$627.66
134
135
136
70-16-29-402-013
70-16-29-402-015
70-16-29-402-016
136 E. 8th St.
152 E. 8th St.
154 E. 8th St.
Color House
Skile's Tavern
Skile's Tavern
2
2
2
-
Retail
Bar
Bar
4,095
1,817
1,600
Residential
Residential
Residential
1,147
946
1,100
$900.90
$399.74
$352.00
Office
16,704
$1,164.46
$0.00
$1,164.46
Office
4,200
$1,646.70
$336.00
$1,982.70
9,258
$1,220.12
$2,270.40
$740.64
$1,220.12
$3,011.04
137
70-16-29-402-047
86 E 8th St
Knickerbocker Theatre
1
0.60
Theater
138
70-16-29-402-048-EX
100 E 8th St
Hope College-Anderson-Workman Financial Center │HASP│Ready for 2
0.60
Office
12,585
5,962
139
70-16-29-402-048-TAX
100 E 8th St
Hope College (leased offices)
2
-
Bank
5,293
140
70-16-29-402-050
66 E 8th St
New Holland Brewing Co
2
-
Bar
7,485
141
142
70-16-29-402-054
70-16-29-402-055
124 E 8th St
144 E. 8th St.
Vacant
Holland Area Arts Council
1
2
0.60
143
144
145
70-16-29-404-029
70-16-29-426-001
70-16-29-426-002
103 E 10th St
162 E. 8th St
205 Columbia Ave.
Haworth Inn & Conference Center
Edward Jones | Adecco
Uptown Gallery
3
1
1
-
$228.24
$1,311.64
Warehouse, S
Office
5,546
10,320 Office
Hotel Main
Office
Retail
34,323
3,168
1,700
Hotel
$2,768.70
15,612 Hotel
14,850
$735.40
$1,761.54
$1,336.32
7,551.06
$696.96
$374.00
$1,761.54
$855.90
$855.90
$900.90
$399.74
$352.00
$900.90
$399.74
$352.00
$1,311.64
$786.98
$524.66
$4,105.02
$2,463.01
$2,806.47
$1,982.70
$1,806.62
7,551.06
$696.96
$374.00
$1,220.12
$1,204.42
$7,551.06
$696.96
$374.00
$163,454.83
TOTAL
EDGE
RATES:
1st Floor
Upper Fl - Retail or Restr
Upper Fl - Other
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
Parcel #
70-16-28-154-016
70-16-28-154-020
70-16-28-154-021
70-16-28-154-022
70-16-28-301-011
70-16-28-301-026
70-16-28-301-028
70-16-28-301-029
70-16-28-301-030
70-16-29-176-003
70-16-29-176-004
70-16-29-176-005
70-16-29-177-007
70-16-29-279-005
70-16-29-279-012
70-16-29-282-011
70-16-29-282-022
70-16-29-282-033
70-16-29-329-003
70-16-29-329-005
70-16-29-329-012
70-16-29-329-708
70-16-29-329-711
70-16-29-329-712
70-16-29-329-713
70-16-29-329-714
70-16-29-329-742
70-16-29-403-005
70-16-29-403-006
70-16-29-403-017
70-16-29-403-022
70-16-29-403-025
70-16-29-426-028
EDGE
0.14
0.14
0.08
Address
275 E 8th St
281 E. 8th St.
307 E. 8th St.
321 E. 8th St.
268 E. 8th St.
274 E. 8th St.
211 Lincoln Ave.
240 E. 8th St.
250 E. 8th St.
102 River Ave
98 River Ave
106 River Ave
109 River Ave.
124 E. 6th St.
86 E 6th St
192 E. 7th St.
203 E. 8th St.
209 E. 8th St.
14 W 9th St
224 Central Ave
234 Central Ave
17 W 10th St Ste 100
17 W 10th St Ste 170
17 W 10th St Ste 160
17 W 10th St Ste 140
17 W 10th St Ste 120
17 W 10th St Ste 130
24 E 9th St
30 E 9th St
235 Central Ave
9 E 10th St
12 E 9th St
214 E 8th St
Description
Long John Silvers
Field's Fabrics
Holland Imports
Mr. Kozak's II
Holland Quality Monument
West Coast Chamber of Commerce
Home Builder's Association
Michigan Commerce Bank
Priority Health
Vacant
Keppels Lock and Safe
Loyal Order of Moose
Fris Office Outfitters
Personal Energy Transportation
Elzinga & Volkers
(vacant)
Found
Vacant
Holland Armory
(vacant)
Vacant
Vacant
Vacant
10th Street Salon
Prudential
Paragon
Nine's Gallery
Meadowcroft Chiropractic
Swaney & Thomas PC
Eagle Building (Eagle Company│Edify North)
Theil Research Center
Fifth Third Bank Drive Thru
Good Time Donuts
Bldg
Stories
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Discount
0.60
0.60
0.60
0.60
0.60
0.60
-
1st Fl Use
Restaurant
Retail
Auto Repair
Restaurant
Retail
Office
Office
Office
Office
Retail
Auto Repair
Bar
Retail
Office/wareho
Office
Retail
Retail
Office
Mixed, B-ball,
Office/wareho
Office
Office
Office
Store, Retail
Store, Retail
Office
Store, Retail
Office
Office
Office
Education
Bank
Restaurant
1st Fl
SqFt
2nd Fl Use
1,776
10,795
751 storage
453
1,948
3,337
1,800
4,881 Office
5,299 Office
2,590
1,320
3,417
6,072 Office
4,608
11,659
Office
1,920 Residential
2,826 Residential
8,510
10,213
Office
4,902
3,255
595
1,368
1,235
834
1,052
2,000
1,754
2,072
Office
3,432 Office mezz
3,948
732
1,651
2nd Fl
SqFt
3rd Fl Use
3rd Fl
SqFt
3,600
4,881
5,299
3,168
11,659
1,920
1,206
2,210
998
2,222
Office
5,299
4th Fl Use
4th Fl
SqFt
5th Fl Use
5th Fl
SqFt
Total 1st Flr
$
$
248.64
$ 1,511.30
$
105.14
$
63.42
$
272.72
$
467.18
$
252.00
$
683.34
$
741.86
$
362.60
$
184.80
478.38
$
$
850.08
$
645.12
$ 1,632.26
$
268.80
$
395.64
$ 1,191.40
$ 1,429.82
$
686.28
$
455.70
$
83.30
$
191.52
$
172.90
$
116.76
$
147.28
$
280.00
$
245.56
$
290.08
$
480.48
$
552.72
$
102.48
$
231.14
Total 2nd Flr Total 3rd Flr Total 4th Flr Total 5th Flr
$
$
$
$
$
$
390.48
423.92
$
253.44
$
932.72
$
176.80
$
$
79.84
177.76
$
423.92
Total All
Flrs
$
248.64
$ 1,511.30
$
105.14
$
63.42
$
272.72
$
467.18
$
252.00
$ 1,073.82
$ 1,589.70
$
362.60
$
184.80
$
478.38
$ 1,103.52
$
645.12
$ 2,564.98
$
268.80
$
395.64
$ 1,191.40
$ 1,606.62
$
686.28
$
455.70
$
83.30
$
191.52
$
172.90
$
116.76
$
147.28
$
280.00
$
245.56
$
369.92
$
658.24
$
552.72
$
102.48
$
231.14
Discount $
$
$
280.31
151.20
$
287.03
$
387.07
$
963.97
$
331.63
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL FROM ALL AREAS
C:\Users\babinec\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\K3CR7DP5\PSD13 Master Revised 9-3-13 ab
Total Charge
$248.64
$1,511.30
$105.14
$63.42
$272.72
$186.87
$100.80
$1,073.82
$1,589.70
$362.60
$184.80
$191.35
$1,103.52
$258.05
$2,564.98
$268.80
$395.64
$1,191.40
$642.65
$686.28
$455.70
$83.30
$191.52
$172.90
$116.76
$147.28
$280.00
$245.56
$369.92
$658.24
$221.09
$102.48
$231.14
$
16,278.37
$179,733.20
9/27/2013
.
0
275
550
Legend
Parcel
City of Holland
PSD 12
Principal Shopping District
1,100 Feet
Core
Core - Exempt
Edge
Edge - Exempt
psd
-033
-001
-017
-016
1st St
-004
-001
-012
-001
-016
2nd St
-001
-034
-023
-017
3rd St
-005
-701
-006
-702
4th St
-024
-700
4th St
-004
-7 12
14
16
-7
15
-7
-7
13
-7
-011
-010
-011
-017
-021
-005
-022
-020
-021
-017
-019
-018
-016
-013
-015
-014
-011
-012
-010
-007
-006
-008
-024
-029
-030
-026
-028
-031
-032
-037
-035
-036
-038
-040
-041
-042
-045
-044
-019
-018
-017
-016
-015
-014
-013
-011
-010
-048
-006
-007
-047
-003
-004
-001
-002
-017
-012
-002
-005
-012
-004
-014
-008
-009
-028
-008
ve
-043
-045
-049
-050
-023
-022
-026
-027
-030
-028
-029
-031
-032
-034
-035
-036
-033
-010
-042
-037
1 3 2 .5 4 '
-009
-040
-016
3 2 .1 8 '
-041
-038
-010
-011
-013
-039
4 1 .4 3 '
-012
-021
-022
-017
-019
-023
-025
-027
-001
13th St
-009
-046
-043
-031
-023
-018
-008
-012
-039
-7 11
-7 10
-002
-020
-009
-007
-010
-016
-017
-018
-021
-019
-020
-022
-015
-011
-019
12th St
-020
-006
-005
-017
-016
-004
-001
-008
-010
-027
-027
-028
-014
-015
-007
-005
-004
-001
-003
-002
-003
-006
-005
-024
-009
-018
-001
-023
-007
-009
-007
-001
-030
-025
-007
-006
-026
-025
-016
-017
-018
-024
-007
-006
-008
-009
-011
-010
-012
-013
-002
-006
-025
-004
-008
-006
-010
-028
-002
-027
-016
-008
-001
-023
-004
-014
Graves Pl
-001
-003
-003
-006
-005
-001
-008
-022
-062
-004
-009
-027
-021
-014
-002
-009
-016
-022
-013
-016
-001
-021
-024
-017
-030
-010
-020
-026
-011
-030
-028
-008
-001
-014
-026
-009
-008
-007
Garretson Ave
-029
-029
-013
-002
-009
-024
-028
-011
-019
-052
-016
-012
-002
-027
-053
-032
-031
-023
-001
-043
-013
-055
-023
-018
-013
-054
-046
-051
-008
-025
-048
-024
-708 -709
10th St
-017
-002
-002
-007
-019
-007
-006
-042
-006
-018
-033
-040
-008
-047
-715
-044
-704
-003
-714
-702
-705 -706 -707
-010
-711
-006
-005
-004
-050
-017
-018
-016
-015
-003
-041
-015
-019
-016
-055
-044
-058
-059
-045
-014
-044
-009
-007
-008
-043
-050
-710
-015
-016
-7 10
-7 02
-7 06
-7 08
-7 04
-7 11
-704
-703
-061
-053
-025
-028
-002
-043
-709
-007
-701
-026
-026
-700
-010
-008
-022
7th St
-011
-009
-7 14 -7 31 -7 41
-023
-019
-009
-010
-024
-011
-7 15 -7 30 -7 40
-7 12 -7 13 -7 32 -7 42
-015
-013
-014
-037
-014
-702
-7 08
-7 11
-005
-030
-7 07 -7 16 -7 29 -7 39
-020
-016
84'
-020
-029
-022
-015
-002
-001
-014
-001
-016
-017
-018
-021
-020
-022
-019
-002
-014
-001
-009
-049
-039
-053
-025
-023
-019
-036
-013
-014
-012
-7 04 -7 19 -7 26 -7 36
-7 05 -7 18 -7 27 -7 37
-7 06 -7 17 -7 28 -7 38
-009
-007
-008
-008
-025
69'
-028
9th St
-054
-004
-006
-012
8th St
-005
-7 01 -7 22 -7 23 -7 33
-7 02 -7 21 -7 24 -7 34
-7 03 -7 20 -7 25 -7 35
-011
-009
-030
-021
-025
-003
-011
-012
-010
-009
-008
-003
-013
-008
-013
-022
-023
-026
-025
-024
-029
-030
-001
-002
-004
-027
-029
-001
-031
-702
-021
-033
-023
-015
-026
-010
-012
-029
-014
-032
-002
-015
-016
-009
-010
-008
-007
-006
-005
-001
11th St
-018
-023
-019
-014
-005
-012
-011
-013
-028
-032
-005
-013
-015
-017
-011
-009
-008
-006
-005
-007
-017
-018
-019
-014
-015
-015
-004
-002
-001
-012
-011
-010
-009
-008
-018
-017
-016
-014
-013
-024
-017
-018
-003
-013
-011
-016
-016
-012
-019
-016
-017
-018
-015
-023
-025
-032
3 2 .4 4 '
-051
-020
-017
-024
-015
-016
-013
-007
-014
-033
-014
-020
-027
-028
-013
-003
-036
-006
-012
-007
-035
-001
-002
-009
-008
-007
-006
-001
-011
-012
-013
-004
-013
-002
-006
-029
-025
-024
-012
-013
-014
-015
-021
-018
-011
-003
-044
-703
-702
-701
-040
-010
-043
-005
-003
-006
-708
-707
-706
-705
-704
-018
-015
-016
-002
-047
-043
-048
-008
-015
-062
-022
-052
-027
-003
-010
7th St
-024
-019
-007
-7 27
-7 28
-042
-027
-049
-010
-009
-021
-047
-046
-025
-014
-028
-7 26
-007
-022
-002
-7 23
-7 25
-7 24
-009
-027
-012
-016
-050
-051
5th St
-029
-7 19
-7 22
6th St
-041
-017
-019
-011
-7 07
-7 01
-004
-015
-014
-027
-7 21
-7 00
-7 09
07
-7
-7 08
-005
-004
-7 06
-026
-7 33-7 34
-7 36 -7 35
-7 32 -7 31
-7 21 -7 20-7 19 -7 18 -7 17 -7 16 -7 15
-7 22 -7 23 -7 26 -7 27 -7 28 -7 29 -7 30
-7 08 -7 09 -7 10 -7 11 -7 12 -7 13 -7 14
-7 07 -7 06 -7 05 -7 04 -7 03 -7 02 -7 01
-700
-7 20
-7 00
-7 04
-018
-7 17
-7 02
-7 05
-013
-002
-7 18
-7 03
-008
-006
-7 09
-7 01
-003
-009
-725
-008
-7 05
-010
-7 00
-020
-009
-028
-7 03
-003
-007
-052
-017
-7 12
River Ave
-006
-005
Central Ave
-004
-005
-011
-011
-012
-032
-003
Pine Ave
-008
-010
-003
-703
-032
-001
Current Policy
PRINCIPAL SHOPPING DISTRICT
ASSESSMENT POLICY
I.
Downtown Management Background
Holland’s Downtown Development Authority (DDA) was established in 1978. Downtown
Holland was designated as a Main Street community in 1984, and in 1989 the Main Street
committee and the DDA Board merged to form MainStreet/DDA, the organization that currently
manages Downtown Holland. Staff, various committees, and task forces set policy and make
recommendations on all Downtown issues.
DDA legislation was established by the State of Michigan in 1975. The broad purpose of the
legislation was to combat economic decline in urban areas. Some of these powers included
economic analysis, study, planning and implementation, construction of public facilities and
improvement and/or acquisition of land or property. DDA funds are received through a property
millage levy within the designated DDA district.
Based upon an opinion from the Attorney General for the State of Michigan, DDA funds may
only be used for “operations” of the DDA. These operations include many economic
development projects; however, such projects do not include conducting market research and
public relations campaigns, developing, coordinating, and conducting retail and institutional
promotions, and sponsoring special events and related activities.
II.
Purpose of Downtown Holland’s PSD
Principal Shopping Districts (PSD’s) were established by Michigan Public Act 120 of 1992
("Act"). PSD legislation allows for some similar powers as DDA’s, but also specifically allows
for operation and organization of a variety of marketing and promotional activities. In Holland’s
case, establishment of a PSD in 1998 enhance the physical improvement and operational duties
of the DDA by complimenting their work focusing on, as the ordinance notes, “conducting
market research and public relations campaigns, developing coordinating, and conducting retail
and institutional promotions, and sponsoring special events and related activities.” The PSD for
Downtown Holland provides a mechanism and organization for a more formal, efficient and
effective merchant/business organization.
1
III.
Downtown Holland PSD Policies
A.)
PSD Board Composition: An eleven (11) member PSD Board of Directors is
established to direct the programs, policies and budget for the PSD. The board shall be
appointed by the City Manager with concurrence of the City Council. Per PSD Act 120,
one city government representative and one residential representative will be part of the
board composition. The remaining nine (9) board members will be representatives of
Downtown’s retail and commercial community. The PSD board will be responsible for
appointing committee members for PSD committees and task forces as necessary.
B.)
PSD Board Terms: Of the members first appointed, an equal number of the members, as
near as is practicable, shall be appointed for one (1) year, two (2) years, three (3) years
and four (4) years. A member shall hold office until the member’s successor is appointed.
Thereafter, each member shall serve a term of four (4) years. An appointment to fill a
vacancy shall be made by the City Manager upon concurrence of the City Council for the
unexpired term only. Members of the board shall serve without compensation. The
chairperson of the board shall be elected by the board. The operation and activities of the
board shall comply with the provisions of Act 120 of the Public Acts of 1961, as
amended.
C.)
PSD Boundaries: The PSD district consists of all property within the existing corporate
limits of the City of Holland which is situated within the Downtown Development
Authority boundary, as shown on the attached “PSD Boundary Map”.
D.)
PSD Assessment Zones and Rates: The levy of assessments for benefited property is
authorized pursuant to Act 120 of the Public Acts of 1961, as amended (MCLA 125.981;
MSA 5.3533(1)). The City shall implement the statutory purposes of the Act and the
PSD Ordinance pursuant to the Master Plan for the Principal Shopping District, and
pursuant to the Downtown Holland Strategic Plan, dated December, 2007 and entitled
“Sharpening the Vision: A Strategic Plan for Downtown Holland, Michigan.” Special
assessments shall be implemented and levied against properties within the PSD District,
which are benefited by a Project. The administration of special assessments shall be
based upon the policy as hereinafter set forth.
The PSD Assessment District shall be divided into three areas, designated the “core”, the
“edge”, and “transition” areas. These areas shall consist of properties so designated on
the annually adopted PSD Assessment District Boundary Map accompanying this policy.
Properties within the PSD Boundary Area but not included within these PSD Assessment
Districts shall not be assessed.
“Transition” areas of limited duration as adjusted annually may be designated from time
to time when non-assessed properties or edge properties are adjusted (i.e. edge becoming
2
core area, or non-assessed becoming core area) in order to reduce an abrupt financial
impact on these properties. The transition zone rate increase will be stepped up over two
assessment periods becoming the full core rate in the second year of assessment in order
to lesson the impact of a substantial change to the PSD assessment for these properties.
As the transition rate becomes the full core rate, the Transition Zone becomes part of the
Core Zone and loses its Transition identity.
A special assessment shall be levied against all properties within the PSD District, except
to the extent that a parcel is exempt or is used for residential purposes. The amounts for
annual assessments for the core, edge, and “transition” areas of the PSD may be amended
from time to time by resolution of City Council. The current rate is shown in Exhibit B.
A special assessment shall be levied against benefited parcels in the PSD. To the extent
permitted by the Act, a lessor of a parcel subject to a special assessment may unilaterally
revise an existing lease to a business located on that parcel to recover from that business
all or part of the special assessment, as is proportionate considering the portion of the
parcel occupied by the business. Churches are determined to be exempt from the
assessment based upon the determination by the City that an assessment to promote
economic activity in the PSD for marketing, public relations campaigns, and advertising
will not benefit church properties. Property owned and used exclusively by non-profit
corporations for the corporate purposes of such non-profit corporation will be assessed
forty percent (40%) of the full assessment amount for their property. Property owned and
used for governmental uses shall be exempt. Property owned and used for storage or
industrial purposes as the principal use of the property or parcel and not as an accessory
use shall be exempt. Hotel guest rooms shall be exempt. The exempt status of a property
for the levy of the special assessment shall be determined based upon the uses and status
of the property on the date of the adoption of the special assessment roll by the City
Council.
PSD Associate Membership. It is recognized that organizations outside of the PSD
assessment district may benefit from the purposes, programs and functions of the PSD. The
PSD shall offer an associate membership program to these businesses. Membership will
require approval by the PSD Board of Directors and businesses must be located within 1,000
feet of the assessment boundary. Membership is based on square footage of the business
according to current edge rates up to $1,500. For businesses whose current assessment policy
edge rates total $1,500 or more dues are $1,500. Non-profit associate memberships are forty
percent (40%) of the full associate membership amount for their property.
Membership is good for one year and is renewable.
Adopted this 5th day of November, 2008 by C.A. # 08.627
Adopted this 15th day of September, 2010 C.A. # 10.524
3
Exhibit B
Properties within the designated zones shall pay the following amounts per square footage per
year.
Core
Transition
(Edge to Core)
Transition
Edge
(Non-Assessed
to Core)
________________________________________________________________________
First Floor
.22
.18
.14
.14
.14
.14
.08
.08
Upper Floors (retail and restaurant uses)
.22
.18
Upper Floors Other Uses (excluding hotel guest rooms)
.08
.08
4
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8D To: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. Date: October 16, 2013. Subject: Public Hearing ‐ Downtown Snowmelt Operations Assessment Roll. Summary: Following is the report required by Section 15.10 and 15.11 of the City Charter regarding the annual special assessments for operating and maintaining the downtown snowmelt system. In accordance with the snowmelt policy, assessments are levied against any properties receiving direct or incremental benefit from the system. The assessment area includes properties along both sides of 8th Street from Maple Avenue to Columbia Avenues. In 2006, the area was expanded to include the properties along both sides of River Avenue between 7th and 12th Streets that have snowmelt beneath the adjacent sidewalk. Some of these River Avenue properties had new snowmelt constructed as part of the River Avenue improvement project. Other properties had been linked to a private boiler system and are now connected to the public system. During the spring of 2009, the snowmelt system was expanded to 7th Street between College and Columbia Avenue and along College and Columbia between 7th and 8th Street. This extension primarily serves the new Downtown Parking Deck, the sidewalk on the north side of 7th Street; and the sidewalk that connects the 8th Street Plaza. The snowmelt assessments are all based on property front footage and there are two (2) front footage rates that are applied within the assessment area. The first rate is for properties adjacent to sidewalks and streets that have snowmelt beneath them. This applies primarily to properties along 8th Street. The second rate is for properties adjacent to sidewalks that have snowmelt, but the adjacent street does not. These properties are primarily along Pine, River, 7th Street and along the avenues between 7th and 9th Street. The snowmelt system also serves a number of public spaces such as downtown parking lots and deck, the large circle area of the 8th Street Market Place, the parking lots and parking deck behind the Police / Court Complex on 8th Street, and radiant floor heat in the Police Complex. These areas are not special assessed, but are charged a lump sum annual fee based on a per square foot cost. The proposed rate for FY 14 is $.2233 per square foot. This is 5% above the FY 13 rate. The FY 14 front footage rate for snowmelt provided beneath sidewalks and streets is proposed to be $14.0514, a 5% increase from the FY 13 rate, primarily due to anticipated increased energy costs and the need bring fund revenues more in‐line with expenses. The FY 14 rate for snowmelt provided beneath only sidewalks is proposed to be $4.6799 which is about 1/3 of the base rate. This is also a 5% increase above the FY 13 rate. The total assessed amount is $109,525.79. There are 135 properties in this special assessment district. On September 18, 2013, the City Council held the public hearing of necessity and approved the necessity of this assessment and directed the development of the final assessment roll. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council adopt a resolution approving the Downtown Snowmelt Operations Assessment Roll. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments: Resolution Assessment table Assessment map Assessment policy Report prepared by: Greg Robinson, Assistant City Manager. Attachment to 8D
(R2013.62)
RESOLUTION APPROVING FINAL ASSESSMENT ROLL
Downtown Snowmelt System Special Assessment – FY 2014
At a regular meeting of the Council of the City of Holland, Michigan, held at City Hall,
Holland, Michigan, on October 16, 2013 at 7:00 P.M.,
PRESENT:
ABSENT:
The following Resolution was offered by Council Member
Council Member
and supported by
.
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 15.6 of the Holland City Charter, the City Manager’s
office has submitted a report for the making of the Downtown Snowmelt System Special
Assessment for FY 2014;
WHEREAS, the report of the City Manager describes the necessity of the improvement;
the nature of the improvement; prescribes the portion of the cost which shall be paid by special
assessment upon the property benefited; and designates the limits of the special assessment
district to be effected; designates the manner by which the benefits shall be derived by the
special assessment.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED AS FOLLOWS:
1.
That the operation and maintenance of the Downtown Snowmelt System
(DSM13) as presented to this Council on October 3, 2013, by Council Action No. 13.549 be and
the same is hereby adopted and confirmed as heretofore presented by the Assessing
1
Administrator and the City Clerk is hereby authorized and directed to certify on behalf of the
Council said Assessment Roll as being confirmed by the Council and to endorse thereon the date
of confirmation.
2.
That said roll shall within 10 days be delivered by the City Clerk to the City
Treasurer who shall collect the sums assessed thereon in accordance with the City Charter and
the Ordinances and Resolutions of this Council.
3.
That the special assessments in said roll shall provide for one installment to be
collected during the current fiscal year 2013/2014.
4.
That any resolutions in conflict with this Resolution are rescinded.
5.
After discussion, the vote was:
AYES:
NAYS:
None
ABSENT:
Resolution declared adopted dated this 16th day of October, 2013
CITY OF HOLLAND
By_________________________________
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
2
CERTIFICATE
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
)
)ss
)
I, the undersigned, the duly qualified Deputy City Clerk of the Holland City Council,
City of Holland, State of Michigan, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete
copy of proceedings taken at a regular City Council Meeting of the Council of the City of
Holland, held on the 16th day of October, 2013, insofar as the same relate to the Resolution of the
Holland City Council Approving Final Assessment Roll Regarding Downtown Snowmelt
System Special Assessment – FY 2014, the original of which is on file in my office. Public
notice of said meeting was given pursuant to and in full compliance with Act 267, Public Act of
1976, as amended.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my official signature this 16th day of
October, 2013.
__________________________________
Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk
3
Attachments to 8D
DSM13 for 2013
#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
FF
PARCEL
FF Street Sidewalk
70-16-29-151-027
662.00
264.00
70-16-29-180-018
0.00
36.00
70-16-29-180-040
144.49
44.00
70-16-29-180-043
0.00
54.25
70-16-29-180-046
248.04
264.00
70-16-29-180-047
310.21
70-16-29-180-048
40.51
70-16-29-180-050
0.00
51.00
70-16-29-180-051
0.00
59.50
70-16-29-180-052
0.00
19.75
70-16-29-181-012
57.00
70-16-29-181-013
26.00
70-16-29-181-014
26.00
70-16-29-181-015
45.33
70-16-29-181-018
46.58
117.60
70-16-29-181-019
0.00
130.00
70-16-29-181-021
72.23
70-16-29-181-024
74.80
70-16-29-181-025
63.20
70-16-29-253-015
44.00
70-16-29-253-016
42.28
70-16-29-253-019
22.00
70-16-29-253-024
30.17
70-16-29-253-025
24.33
70-16-29-253-026
32.92
70-16-29-253-027
21.57
70-16-29-253-028
22.57
70-16-29-253-029
23.00
70-16-29-253-041
24.28
70-16-29-253-044
43.14
70-16-29-253-047
106.00
258.00
70-16-29-253-053
50.46
70-16-29-253-055
40.00
70-16-29-253-058
44.30
70-16-29-253-059
44.30
70-16-29-253-061
30.00
70-16-29-253-702
11.38
70-16-29-253-703
11.38
70-16-29-253-704
22.75
70-16-29-279-009
151.50
70-16-29-279-010
50.00
70-16-29-279-011
36.00
70-16-29-279-015
551.50
70-16-29-279-016
225.04
70-16-29-281-040
0.00
262.00
70-16-29-281-043
66.30
70-16-29-287-701
9.82
2.37
70-16-29-287-702
10.19
2.46
RATE/
Sidewalk
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
RATE
/Street
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
FF COST
Street
9,302.03
2,030.29
3,485.31
4,358.88
569.22
800.93
365.34
365.34
636.95
654.51
1,014.93
1,051.04
888.05
618.26
594.09
309.13
423.93
341.87
462.57
303.09
317.14
323.18
341.17
606.18
1,489.45
709.03
562.06
622.48
622.48
421.54
159.90
159.90
319.67
931.61
137.98
143.18
FF COSTS
Sidewalk
$ 1,235.49
$
168.48
$
205.92
$
253.88
$ 1,235.49
$
$
$
238.67
$
278.45
$
92.43
$
$
$
$
$
550.36
$
608.39
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 1,207.41
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
709.00
$
234.00
$
168.48
$ 2,580.96
$ 1,053.16
$ 1,226.13
$
$
11.09
$
11.51
Total Costs
$ 10,537.52
$
168.48
$ 2,236.21
$
253.88
$ 4,720.80
$ 4,358.88
$
569.22
$
238.67
$
278.45
$
92.43
$
800.93
$
365.34
$
365.34
$
636.95
$ 1,204.87
$
608.39
$ 1,014.93
$ 1,051.04
$
888.05
$
618.26
$
594.09
$
309.13
$
423.93
$
341.87
$
462.57
$
303.09
$
317.14
$
323.18
$
341.17
$
606.18
$ 2,696.86
$
709.03
$
562.06
$
622.48
$
622.48
$
421.54
$
159.90
$
159.90
$
319.67
$
709.00
$
234.00
$
168.48
$ 2,580.96
$ 1,053.16
$ 1,226.13
$
931.61
$
149.07
$
154.69
Additional Notes
City of Holland Eighth Street Marketplace
City of Holland Police Station
Ottawa County Courthouse
City of Holland 8th St Parking
City of Holland 7th St Parking
City of Holland Parking Deck
City of Holland Parking Deck
City of Holland Parking Deck
*sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ Plaza East Condo.
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
70-16-29-287-703
70-16-29-287-704
70-16-29-287-705
70-16-29-287-706
70-16-29-287-707
70-16-29-287-708
70-16-29-287-709
70-16-29-287-710
70-16-29-287-711
70-16-29-287-714
70-16-29-287-715
70-16-29-288-705
70-16-29-288-706
70-16-29-288-702
70-16-29-288-707
70-16-29-288-708
70-16-29-288-709
70-16-29-288-704
70-16-29-302-001
70-16-29-326-001
70-16-29-326-007
70-16-29-326-011
70-16-29-326-012
70-16-29-326-013
70-16-29-326-014
70-16-29-326-015
70-16-29-326-016
70-16-29-326-017
70-16-29-326-032
70-16-29-326-033
70-16-29-326-035
70-16-29-326-036
70-16-29-327-002
70-16-29-327-003
70-16-29-327-006
70-16-29-327-007
70-16-29-327-008
70-16-29-327-009
70-16-29-327-010
70-16-29-327-011
70-16-29-327-012
70-16-29-327-013
70-16-29-327-014
70-16-29-327-020
70-16-29-327-023
70-16-29-327-025
70-16-29-327-027
70-16-29-327-028
70-16-29-327-029
70-16-29-328-014
70-16-29-328-015
70-16-29-328-020
14.78
17.16
28.53
19.16
31.02
28.21
33.10
21.54
57.30
6.71
33.23
19.84
18.32
42.40
7.96
11.30
17.61
32.07
682.48
123.75
82.50
78.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
133.75
165.10
101.00
23.25
18.00
29.50
25.00
56.25
28.75
22.00
24.13
20.50
20.50
20.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
82.50
41.08
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.57
4.14
6.89
4.62
7.49
6.81
7.99
5.20
13.83
1.62
8.02
86.00
26.00
25.80
34.50
44.00
24.00
20.00
23.00
70.00
23.25
18.00
29.50
25.00
56.25
28.75
22.00
24.13
20.50
41.00
22.00
163.75
20.40
125.00
41.08
49.60
102.00
30.00
127.90
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
207.68
241.12
400.89
269.22
435.87
396.39
465.10
302.67
805.15
94.28
466.93
278.78
257.42
595.78
111.85
158.78
247.45
450.63
9,589.80
1,738.86
1,159.24
1,103.03
1,879.37
2,319.89
1,419.19
326.70
252.93
414.52
351.29
790.39
403.98
309.13
339.06
288.05
288.05
288.05
1,159.24
577.23
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
16.69
19.38
32.23
21.64
35.04
31.86
37.39
24.33
64.72
7.58
37.53
402.47
121.68
120.74
161.46
205.92
112.32
93.60
107.64
327.59
108.81
84.24
138.06
117.00
263.24
134.55
102.96
112.93
95.94
191.88
102.96
766.33
95.47
584.99
192.25
232.12
477.35
140.40
598.56
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
224.37
260.50 Community Foundation Holland/Zeeland
433.12
290.86
470.91
428.25
502.49
327.00
869.87
101.86
504.46
278.78 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
257.42 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
595.78 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
111.85 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
158.78 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
247.45 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
450.63 *sidewalk 1/2 rate split w/ 29-281-043. pro-rated by sqft.
9,992.27 City of Holland Civic Center
1,738.86
1,159.24
1,224.71
120.74
161.46
205.92
112.32
93.60
107.64
327.59
1,879.37
2,319.89
1,419.19 City of Holland 8th St Parking
435.51
337.17
552.58
468.29
1,053.63
538.53
412.09
451.99
383.99
479.93
288.05
102.96
766.33
95.47
1,744.23
769.48
232.12
477.35
140.40
598.56
70-16-29-328-030
70-16-29-328-031
103 70-16-29-329-001
104 70-16-29-329-011
105 70-16-29-330-026
106 70-16-29-330-027
107 70-16-29-330-701
108 70-16-29-330-702
109 70-16-29-332-023
110 70-16-29-376-025
111 70-16-29-401-002
112 70-16-29-401-007
113 70-16-29-401-008
114 70-16-29-401-009
115 70-16-29-401-014
116 70-16-29-401-015
117 70-16-29-401-016
118 70-16-29-401-017
119 70-16-29-401-018
120 70-16-29-401-036
121 70-16-29-401-043
122 70-16-29-401-044
123 70-16-29-401-045
124 70-16-29-401-046
125 70-16-29-401-050
126 70-16-29-401-051
127 70-16-29-401-052
128 70-16-29-402-003
129 70-16-29-402-004
130 70-16-29-402-005
131 70-16-29-402-006
132 70-16-29-402-010
133 70-16-29-402-047
134 70-16-29-402-048
135 70-16-29-402-050
TOTALS:
101
102
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
40.50
20.00
22.83
43.58
24.50
25.00
23.00
38.40
21.60
35.95
112.40
24.00
70.00
53.80
64.80
54.90
17.50
19.50
38.00
24.50
92.67
55.00
43.64
185.34
78.09
6042.31
5% Rate Increase for 2013:
DSM12 Sidewalk Rate of 4.4570 x 1.05 = 4.6799
36.00
49.91
132.00
132.00
48.00
164.00
26.00
26.00
264.00
278.95
132.00
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
4.6799
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
14.0514
5261.41
Sidewalk Rate
$
4.6799
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
569.08
$
281.03
$
320.79
$
612.36
$
344.26
$
351.29
$
323.18
$
539.57
$
303.51
$
505.15
$ 1,579.38
$
337.23
$
983.60
$
755.97
$
910.53
$
771.42
$
245.90
$
274.00
$
533.95
$
344.26
$ 1,302.14
$
772.83
$
613.20
$ 2,604.29
$ 1,097.27
$ 84,902.89
Street Rate
$ 14.0514
DSM12 Street Rate of 13.3823 x 1.03 = 14.0514
RETIRED:
REASON:
70-16-29-288-701
split - parent
70-16-29-288-703
split - parent
NEW:
REASON:
70-16-29-288-705
split - child
70-16-29-288-706
split - child
70-16-29-288-707
split - child
70-16-29-288-708
split - child
70-16-29-288-709
split - child
NEW PARCELS FOR DSM 12.
$
$
4.6799
14.0514
$
168.48
$
233.57
$
617.75
$
617.75
$
224.64
$
767.50
$
121.68
$
121.68
$ 1,235.49
$ 1,305.46
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
617.75
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$ 24,622.90
$
168.48
$
233.57
$
617.75 City of Holland 9th & River Parking
$
617.75 *Holland Museum - bill to City!
$
224.64
$
767.50
$
121.68
$
121.68
$ 1,235.49 City of Holland City Hall
$ 1,305.46 City of Holland Library
$
569.08
$
281.03
$
320.79
$
612.36
$
344.26
$
351.29
$
323.18
$
539.57
$
303.51
$
505.15
$ 1,579.38
$
337.23
$
983.60
$
755.97
$ 1,528.28
$
771.42
$
245.90
$
274.00
$
533.95
$
344.26
$ 1,302.14
$
772.83
$
613.20
$ 2,604.29
$ 1,097.27
$ 109,525.79
Legend
-012
-703 -720 -725 -735
-704 -719 -726 -736
-705 -718 -727 -737
-011
-706 -717 -728 -738
-707 -716 -729 -739
-008
-708 -715 -730 -740
-020
-711 -714 -731 -741
-712 -713 -732 -742
-701
-010
-011
-005
-714
-007
-025
-708 -709
-715
-006
-004
-050
-018
-017
-016
-003
-015
-016
-055
-044
-041
-019
-059
-014
-015
-704
-705 -706 -707
-711
-047
-704
-703
-061
-058
-045
-044
-007
-008
-009
-040
-048
-013
-055
-019
-053
-031
-023
-023
-019
-051
-001
-043
-002
-052
-007
-006
-005
-020
-042
-032
-046
-054
-015
-016
-711
-712
-026
-025
-028
-024
-025
-009
-029
10th St
-022
-021
-017
-002
-009
-018
-019
-017
-015
-016
-010
-014
-040
Ave
-010
-013
-014
-013
-011
-012
-011
-012
-010
-013
-009
-008
-021
-022
-007
-017
-018
-019
-004
-012
-003
-029
-030
ve
-010
13th St
-020
ve
-006
-009
-004
-010
-005
-020
-003
-001
-004
-009
e
-008
-007
-005
-006
-026
-004
-008
-011
-008
-023
-028
-006
-005
-004
-016
-017
-015
-009
-016
-017
-018
-019
-020
-007
-008
-025
-001
-010
-009
-008
-032
-031
-005
-004
-021
-022
-005
-003
-024
-002
-006
-023
-007
e
-015
-016
-017
-018
-033
-002
-001
-008
-009
-001
-025
12th St
-031
-027
-027
-028
-015
-014
-008
-007
-005
-006
-004
-003
-002
-001
-003
-002
-001
-023
-030
-020
-025
-007
-026
-025
-016
-017
-019
-018
-024
-005
-007
-006
-008
-009
-010
-011
-012
-013
-014
-028
-002
-027
-004
-001
-001
-023
-004
-016
Graves Pl
-008
-027
-001
-002
-003
-009
-016
-024
-017
-006
-015
-029
-022
-015
-003
-001
-014
-001
-016
-017
-002
-018
-019
-021
-020
-023
-022
11th St
-014
-019
-050
-702
-710
-044
-013
-018
-019
-026
-043
84'
9th St
-001
-026
-015
-700
-709
-702
-701 -722 -723 -733
-702 -721 -724 -734
-006
-037
-049
-039
-053
-005
-009
-030
-021
-025
-028
-036
-002
-013
-014
-011
-012
-009
-008
-007
-010
-004
-005
-016
-014
8th St
-054
-003
-013
-008
-004
-013
-023
-022
-024
-026
-025
-029
-002
-017
-001
-031
-702
-021
-012
-033
-023
-014
-032
-003
-009
-010
-008
-007
-006
-005
-001
-024
-032
-029
-015
-026
-001
-030
-014
-025
-016
-017
-032
-027
-028
-011
-016
-002
-010
-013
-029
-015
-016
-017
-011
-008
-009
-006
-007
-005
-018
-019
-014
-015
-015
-004
-002
-012
-011
-010
-001
-023
-013
-003
-051
-020
-015
-013
-012
32.4 4'
-014
-033
-014
-027
-006
-013
-003
-036
-002
-001
-012
-012
-007
-035
-030
-009
-001
-011
-028
-011
-010
-004
-013
-009
-002
-006
-029
-025
-024
-012
-013
-015
-014
-021
-040
-003
-044
8
-7 0
7
-7 0
6
-7 0
5
-7 0
4
-7 0
3
-7 0
2
-7 0
1
-7 0
-018
-018
-043
-048
-043
-062
-047
-052
-027
-710
-708
-022
-002
-049
-021
-010
-009
-025
-014
-028
-019
-051
-015
7th St
-016
-050
-011
-047
-003
-042
-053
-014
-046
-709
-041
-019
-027
-727
-012
-017
-018
-725
-728
-010
-015
6th St
-726
-002
-723
-724
-024
-013
-004
-721
-722
-700
07
-7
-043
-700
-706
-004
-005
-704
-705
-006
-720
-700
-027
-733-734
-721 -720 -719 -718 -717 -716 -715
-732-731
-736-735
-725
Sidewalk Only
-703
-009
-722 -723 -726 -727 -728 -729 -730
-011
8th Street (street & sidewalk)
-702
-003
-008
-700
8th Street & Add'l Sidewalk
-052
720 Feet
Central Ave
River Ave
360
-707 -706 -705 -704 -703 -702 -701
180
-708 -709 -710 -711 -712 -713 -714
0
Pine Ave
.
Parcel
City of Holland
DSM12
Downtown Snowmelt
-020
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8E To: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. Date: October 16, 2013. Subject: Public Hearing ‐ PA 198 Abatement, BuhlerPrince, Inc., 670 Windcrest Drive Summary: BuhlerPrince, Inc. at 670 Windcrest Drive has filed an application for tax abatement that has been reviewed by staff with no objections noted. BuhlerPrince, Inc. produces highly customized die cast equipment and offers one of the widest selections of high pressure die casting machines and systems in the world. This manufactured equipment serves the automotive, consumer appliances, telecommunications, recreation, lawn and garden and hand tools industries. The real estate portion of this project consists of building modifications for machine foundations and floor preparation. The personal property improvements include a new boring mill and conveyor updates. The project period is expected to be from April 1, 2013 until September 30, 2013. Their application is for: Land and Building Improvements $ 447,940 Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures $4,675,363 TOTAL $5,123,303 Three (3) new jobs are expected to be created at this site within two (2) years of project completion; two (2) machinists at approximately $20‐$24 per hour, and one (1) manufacturing technician at approximately $68,000 per year. Recommendation: The Deputy City Clerk has prepared a resolution approving an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate for BuhlerPrince, Inc., 670 Windcrest Drive, for twelve (12) years from the State Tax Commission approval date, and its adoption is recommended. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachment: Tax Abatement Estimated Calculations Report Prepared by: Assistant City Manager Greg Robinson Attachment to 8E
(R2013.63)
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the Council of the City of Holland established an Industrial Development District consisting
of property located at 670 Windcrest Drive in the City of Holland, pursuant to Michigan Public Act 198 of
1974, which district was established by a resolution adopted on May 1, 1996 and
WHEREAS, BuhlerPrince, Inc. has applied for an Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate on building
improvements, at the above location, and
WHEREAS, after due notice, a public hearing was held on this day and approved by the Holland City
Council on October 16, 2013, in accordance with said statute, and
WHEREAS, the application for the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate appears to meet with the
requirements of Section 9 of said Public Act 198, and
WHEREAS, the Company has executed a written agreement with the City of Holland in accordance
with the requirements of Act No. 334 of the Public Act of 1993, and
WHEREAS, the state equalized valuation of property to be exempt under the said application,
considered together with the aggregate state equalized valuation of property exempt under certificates
previously granted and currently in force in the City of Holland, exceed 5% of the current State
Equalized Valuation of the City of Holland, and
WHEREAS, the granting of the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate considered together with the
aggregate amount of Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates previously granted and currently in
force, will not have the effect of substantially impeding the operation of the City of Holland or impairing
the financial soundness of any affected taxing unit,
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Council hereby approves said application for a period of twelve years;
authorizes the signatures of the Mayor and City Clerk to the written agreement; and directs the Clerk to
forward the same to the Michigan State Tax Commission for consideration.
I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete copy of a resolution adopted by the
Council of the City of Holland at a regular meeting held on October 16, 2013.
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
PA 198--TAX ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
ASSUMING PROPOSED PERSONAL PROPERTY CHANGES WILL TAKE EFFECT
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
BuhlerPrince, Inc
Ottawa/Holland
September 30, 2013
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
$ 4,675,363
$ 4,675,363
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$ 447,940
$ 447,940
$ 5,123,303
2014
$ 2,103,913
$
223,970
$ 2,327,883
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
45.0370
58.7884
6.8757
25.5185
32.3942
2015
$ 1,823,392
$
223,970
$ 2,047,362
2016
$
$
$
2017
223,970
223,970
$
$
$
2018
223,970
223,970
$
$
$
25% of tx pd
2020
$
$
223,970
$
223,970
50% of tx pd
2021
$
$
223,970
$
223,970
75% of tx pd TD Ren Zone Exp
2022
2023
$
$
$
$
223,970 $
223,970 $
$
223,970 $
223,970 $
-
$
$
$
$
769.98
2,521.73
3,291.71
$
$
$
$
1,539.95
5,043.47
6,583.42
$
$
$
$
2,309.93
7,565.20
9,875.13
$
$
$
$
3,079.90
10,086.94
13,166.84
384.99
1,428.84
1,813.83
$
$
$
$
769.98
2,857.69
3,627.66
$
$
$
$
1,154.96
4,286.53
5,441.50
$
$
$
$
385
1,093
1,478
$
$
$
$
770
2,186
2,956
$
$
$
$
1,155
3,279
4,434
$
$
$
$
2019
223,970
223,970
$
$
$
223,970
223,970
Pers. Prop
13.7514
21.0370
34.7884
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
6.2695
10.5185
16.7880
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
2024
2025
223,970
223,970
$
$
$
223,970
223,970
$
$
$
$
3,079.90
10,086.94
13,166.84
$
$
$
$
3,079.90
10,086.94
13,166.84
$
$
$
$
13,859.55
45,391.22
59,250.77
1,539.95
5,715.38
7,255.33
$
$
$
$
1,539.95
5,715.38
7,255.33
$
$
$
$
1,539.95
5,715.38
7,255.33
$
$
$
$
6,929.78
25,719.20
32,648.98
1,540
4,372
5,912
$
$
$
$
1,540
4,372
5,912
$
$
$
$
1,540
4,372
5,912
$
$
$
$
6,930
19,672
26,602
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
PA 198--TAX ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
BuhlerPrince, Inc
Ottawa/Holland
September 30, 2013
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
$ 4,675,363
$ 4,675,363
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$ 447,940
$ 447,940
$ 5,123,303
2014
$ 2,103,913
$
223,970
$ 2,327,883
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
45.0370
58.7884
6.8757
25.5185
32.3942
2015
$ 1,823,392
$
223,970
$ 2,047,362
2016
$ 1,589,623
$
223,970
$ 1,813,593
$
$
$
2017
1,402,609
223,970
1,626,579
2018
$ 1,262,348
$
223,970
$ 1,486,318
2019
$ 1,122,087
$
223,970
$ 1,346,057
25% of tx pd
2020
$ 1,028,580
$
223,970
$ 1,252,550
50% of tx pd
2021
$
935,073
$
223,970
$ 1,159,043
75% of tx pd TD Ren Zone Exp
2022
2023
$
841,565 $
748,058 $
$
223,970 $
223,970 $
$
1,065,535 $
972,028 $
2024
701,304
223,970
925,274
$
$
$
2025
631,174
223,970
855,144
$
-
$
$
$
$
4,306.08
5,409.56
2,521.73
12,237.37
$
$
$
$
7,969.23
9,835.56
5,043.47
22,848.26
$
$
$
$
10,989.45
13,278.01
7,565.20
31,832.66
$
$
$
$
13,366.75
15,736.90
10,086.94
39,190.58
$
$
$
$
12,723.82
14,753.34
10,086.94
37,564.10
$
$
$
$
11,759.43
13,278.01
10,086.94
35,124.37
$
$
$
$
61,114.75
72,291.37
45,391.22
178,797.34
2,153.04
2,704.78
1,428.84
6,286.66
$
$
$
$
3,984.61
4,917.78
2,857.69
11,760.08
$
$
$
$
5,494.73
6,639.00
4,286.53
16,420.26
$
$
$
$
6,683.37
7,868.45
5,715.38
20,267.20
$
$
$
$
6,361.91
7,376.67
5,715.38
19,453.96
$
$
$
$
5,879.71
6,639.00
5,715.38
18,234.10
$
$
$
$
30,557.38
36,145.69
25,719.20
92,422.27
2,153
2,705
1,093
5,951
$
$
$
$
3,985
4,918
2,186
11,088
$
$
$
$
5,495
6,639
3,279
15,412
$
$
$
$
6,683
7,868
4,372
18,923
$
$
$
$
6,362
7,377
4,372
18,110
$
$
$
$
5,880
6,639
4,372
16,890
$
$
$
$
30,557
36,146
19,672
86,375
Pers. Prop
13.7514
21.0370
34.7884
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
6.2695
10.5185
16.7880
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
-
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8F To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Public Hearing ‐ PA 198 Abatement for Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East 40th Street Summary: Magna Mirrors of America, Inc. at 414 East 40th Street has filed an application for PA 198 tax abatement that has been reviewed by staff with no objections noted. The principal business of Magna Mirrors (formerly known as Donnelly Corporation and Magna Donnelly) is the design and manufacture of automotive mirrors, mirror glass, rear vision components and related assemblies. This project is located at 414 East 40th Street and the project period is expected to be from April 1, 2013 until December 31, 2014. The application is for: Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures $5,987,111 Total $5,987,111 The project for which exemption is sought is the acquisition and installation of equipment necessary for the applicant to expand production capacity and capabilities to remain competitive in the world market. 94 existing jobs are to be retained, and 24 are expected to be created because of this project. The 24 new jobs have skill level ranges from moderate to highly technical to supervisory level. Pay ranges will be from $10‐$30 per hour depending on skill, education and experience requirements. Recommendation: The Deputy City Clerk has prepared a resolution approving an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate for Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., 414 East 40th Street, for twelve (12) years from the State Tax Commission approval date, and its adoption is recommended. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachment: Tax Abatement Estimated Calculations Report Prepared by: Assistant City Manager Greg Robinson Attachment to 8F
(R2013.64)
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the Council of the City of Holland established an Industrial Development District consisting
of property located at 414 E. 40th Street in the City of Holland, pursuant to Michigan Public Act 198 of
1974, which district was established by a resolution adopted on December 3, 1976, and
WHEREAS, Magna Mirrors of America, Inc., has applied for an Industrial Facilities Exemption
Certificate on land and building improvements, machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures at the
above location, and
WHEREAS, after due notice, a public hearing was held on this day and approved by the Holland City
Council on October 16, 2013 in accordance with said statute, and
WHEREAS, the application for the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate appears to meet with the
requirements of Section 9 of said Public Act 198, and
WHEREAS, the Company has executed a written agreement with the City of Holland in accordance
with the requirements of Act No. 334 of the Public Act of 1993, and
WHEREAS, the state equalized valuation of property to be exempt under the said application,
considered together with the aggregate state equalized valuation of property exempt under certificates
previously granted and currently in force in the City of Holland, exceed 5% of the current State
Equalized Valuation of the City of Holland, and
WHEREAS, the granting of the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate considered together with the
aggregate amount of Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates previously granted and currently in
force, will not have the effect of substantially impeding the operation of the City of Holland or impairing
the financial soundness of any affected taxing unit,
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Council hereby approves said application for a period of twelve years;
authorizes the signatures of the Mayor and City Clerk to the written agreement; and directs the Clerk to
forward the same to the Michigan State Tax Commission for consideration.
I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete copy of a resolution adopted by the
Council of the City of Holland at a regular meeting held on October 16, 2013.
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
PA 198 ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
Magna Mirrors of America, Inc
Allegan/Holland
December 31, 2014
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
$ 1,896,920
$ 4,090,191
$ 5,987,111
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$
$ 5,987,111
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
46.5780
60.3294
6.8757
26.2890
33.1647
Pers. Prop
13.7514
22.5780
36.3294
6.8757
11.2890
18.1647
Year 1
$ 1,840,586
$
$ 1,840,586
Year 2
$ 2,448,788
$
$ 2,448,788
Year 3
$ 2,130,464
$
$ 2,130,464
$
$
$
Year 4
1,872,010
1,872,010
Year 5
$ 1,673,428
$
$ 1,673,428
Year 6
$ 1,493,814
$
$ 1,493,814
$
$
$
Year 7
1,355,103
1,355,103
$
$
$
Year 8
1,235,361
1,235,361
$
$
$
Year 9
1,115,618
1,115,618
$
$
$
Year 10
995,876
995,876
$
$
$
Year 11
917,036
917,036
$
$
$
Year 12
836,714
836,714
$ 25,310.63
$ 41,556.75
$
$ 66,867.38
$ 33,674.27
$ 55,288.75
$
$ 88,963.02
$ 29,296.86
$ 48,101.61
$
$ 77,398.47
$
$
$
$
25,742.76
42,266.24
68,009.00
$ 23,011.97
$ 37,782.65
$
$ 60,794.62
$ 20,542.04
$ 33,727.34
$
$ 54,269.38
$
$
$
$
18,634.56
30,595.51
49,230.07
$
$
$
$
16,987.94
27,891.97
44,879.91
$
$
$
$
15,341.31
25,188.43
40,529.75
$
$
$
$
13,694.69
22,484.89
36,179.58
$
$
$
$
12,610.53
20,704.84
33,315.36
$
$
$
$
11,505.99
18,891.32
30,397.31
$
$
$
$
246,353.55
404,480.30
650,833.85
$ 12,655.32
$ 20,778.37
$
$ 33,433.69
$ 16,837.14
$ 27,644.37
$
$ 44,481.51
$ 14,648.43
$ 24,050.81
$
$ 38,699.23
$
$
$
$
12,871.38
21,133.12
34,004.50
$ 11,505.99
$ 18,891.32
$
$ 30,397.31
$ 10,271.02
$ 16,863.67
$
$ 27,134.69
$
$
$
$
9,317.28
15,297.76
24,615.04
$
$
$
$
8,493.97
13,945.99
22,439.95
$
$
$
$
7,670.66
12,594.22
20,264.87
$
$
$
$
6,847.35
11,242.45
18,089.79
$
$
$
$
6,305.26
10,352.42
16,657.68
$
$
$
$
5,752.99
9,445.66
15,198.65
$
$
$
$
123,176.77
202,240.15
325,416.93
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
12,871
21,133
34,005
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
9,317
15,298
24,615
$
$
$
$
8,494
13,946
22,440
$
$
$
$
7,671
12,594
20,265
$
$
$
$
6,847
11,242
18,090
$
$
$
$
6,305
10,352
16,658
$
$
$
$
5,753
9,446
15,199
$
$
$
$
123,177
202,240
325,417
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
12,655
20,778
33,434
16,837
27,644
44,482
14,648
24,051
38,699
11,506
18,891
30,397
10,271
16,864
27,135
PA 198 ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
ASSUMING PROPOSED PERSONAL PROPERTY CHANGES WILL TAKE EFFECT
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
Magna Mirrors of America, Inc
Allegan/Holland
December 31, 2014
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
$ 1,896,920
$ 4,090,191
$ 5,987,111
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$
$ 5,987,111
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
46.5780
60.3294
6.8757
26.2890
33.1647
Pers. Prop
13.7514
22.5780
36.3294
6.8757
11.2890
18.1647
Year 1
$ 1,840,586
$
$ 1,840,586
Year 2
$ 2,448,788
$
$ 2,448,788
$
$
$
Year 3
-
$
$
$
Year 4
-
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Year 11
Year 12
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$
$
-
$ 25,310.63
$ 41,556.75
$
$ 66,867.38
$ 33,674.27
$ 55,288.75
$
$ 88,963.02
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
58,984.90
96,845.50
155,830.40
$ 12,655.32
$ 20,778.37
$
$ 33,433.69
$ 16,837.14
$ 27,644.37
$
$ 44,481.51
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
29,492.45
48,422.75
77,915.20
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
-
$
$
$
$
29,492
48,423
77,915
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
12,655
20,778
33,434
16,837
27,644
44,482
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 8G To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Public Hearing ‐ PA 198 Abatement, Paramount Tool, 136 West 64th Street ‐ Summary: Paramount Tool at 136 West 64th Street has filed an application for tax abatement that has been reviewed by staff with no objections noted. Paramount Tool recently relocated from the Saugatuck area to an existing vacant building in the City. The applicant designs and builds machinery, special equipment and work tool holding fixtures that meet a variety of manufacturing needs. In business since 1967, Paramount Tool serves a variety of industries including automotive, food processing, marine, medical, die cast, office furniture, fuel injection, heavy trucks and more. This project will be located at 136 W. 64th Street and the project period is expected to be from June 5, 2013 until June 5, 2015. Their application is for: Land Improvements and Building Improvements $ 65,000 Machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures $896,987 Total $961,987 The project for which exemption is sought is the acquisition and installation of equipment necessary for the applicant to expand production capacity and capabilities. 30 existing jobs are expected to be retained, and 15 new jobs are expected to be created directly because of this project. The 15 new jobs would be mid to high skill levels in manufacturing and engineering with a pay range of $45,000 to $80,000 annually. Recommendation: The Deputy City Clerk has prepared a resolution approving an Industrial Facilities Tax Exemption Certificate for Paramount Tool Co., 136 West 64th Street, for twelve (12) years from the State Tax Commission approval date, and its adoption is recommended. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachment: Tax Abatement Estimated Calculations Report Prepared by: Assistant City Manager Greg Robinson Attachment to 8G
(R2013.65)
RESOLUTION
WHEREAS, the Council of the City of Holland established an Industrial Development District consisting
of property located at 136 W. 64th Street in the City of Holland, pursuant to Michigan Public Act 198 of
1974, which district was established by a resolution adopted on May 18, 1988, and
WHEREAS, Paramount Tool Company, Inc., has applied for an Industrial Facilities Exemption
Certificate on land and building improvements, machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures at the
above location, and
WHEREAS, after due notice, a public hearing was held on this day and approved by the Holland City
Council on October 16, 2013 in accordance with said statute, and
WHEREAS, the application for the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate appears to meet with the
requirements of Section 9 of said Public Act 198, and
WHEREAS, the Company has executed a written agreement with the City of Holland in accordance
with the requirements of Act No. 334 of the Public Act of 1993, and
WHEREAS, the state equalized valuation of property to be exempt under the said application,
considered together with the aggregate state equalized valuation of property exempt under certificates
previously granted and currently in force in the City of Holland, exceed 5% of the current State
Equalized Valuation of the City of Holland, and
WHEREAS, the granting of the Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificate considered together with the
aggregate amount of Industrial Facilities Exemption Certificates previously granted and currently in
force, will not have the effect of substantially impeding the operation of the City of Holland or impairing
the financial soundness of any affected taxing unit,
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Council hereby approves said application for a period of twelve years;
authorizes the signatures of the Mayor and City Clerk to the written agreement; and directs the Clerk to
forward the same to the Michigan State Tax Commission for consideration.
I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete copy of a resolution adopted by the
Council of the City of Holland at a regular meeting held on October 16, 2013.
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
PA 198 ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
Paramount Tool
Allegan/Hamilton
June 5, 2015
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
$
$
$
$
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
160,000
50,000
686,987
896,987
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$
$
$
65,000
65,000
961,987
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
42.4880
56.2394
6.8757
24.2440
31.1197
$
$
$
Pers. Prop
13.7514
18.4880
32.2394
6.8757
9.2440
16.1197
Year 1
309,144
32,500
341,644
$
$
$
Year 2
290,425
32,500
322,925
$
$
$
Year 3
325,076
32,500
357,576
$
$
$
Year 4
285,496
32,500
317,996
$
$
$
Year 5
254,886
32,500
287,386
$
$
$
Year 6
226,377
32,500
258,877
$
$
$
Year 7
206,337
32,500
238,837
$
$
$
Year 8
186,797
32,500
219,297
$
$
$
Year 9
168,858
32,500
201,358
$
$
$
Year 10
150,918
32,500
183,418
$
$
$
Year 11
139,848
32,500
172,348
$
$
$
Year 12
125,843
32,500
158,343
$ 3,951.97
$ 4,712.34
$ 1,380.86
$ 10,045.17
$
$
$
$
3,559.92
4,185.26
1,380.86
9,126.04
$
$
$
$
3,284.35
3,814.76
1,380.86
8,479.97
$
$
$
$
3,015.65
3,453.51
1,380.86
7,850.02
$
$
$
$
2,768.95
3,121.84
1,380.86
7,271.65
$
$
$
$
2,522.25
2,790.17
1,380.86
6,693.28
$
$
$
$
2,370.03
2,585.51
1,380.86
6,336.40
$
$
$
$
2,177.44
2,326.59
1,380.86
5,884.89
$
$
$
$
42,079.36
49,363.06
16,570.32
108,012.74
$ 4,698.09
$ 5,715.46
$ 1,380.86
$ 11,794.40
$ 4,440.67
$ 5,369.38
$ 1,380.86
$ 11,190.91
$ 4,917.16
$ 6,010.00
$ 1,380.86
$ 12,308.02
$
$
$
$
4,372.89
5,278.25
1,380.86
11,032.00
$
$
$
$
2,349.04
2,857.73
787.93
5,994.70
$
$
$
$
2,220.33
2,684.69
787.93
5,692.95
$
$
$
$
2,458.58
3,005.00
787.93
6,251.51
$
$
$
$
2,186.45
2,639.13
787.93
5,613.50
$
$
$
$
1,975.98
2,356.17
787.93
5,120.08
$
$
$
$
1,779.96
2,092.63
787.93
4,660.52
$
$
$
$
1,642.17
1,907.38
787.93
4,337.48
$
$
$
$
1,507.82
1,726.76
787.93
4,022.51
$
$
$
$
1,384.47
1,560.92
787.93
3,733.33
$
$
$
$
1,261.13
1,395.09
787.93
3,444.14
$
$
$
$
1,185.01
1,292.76
787.93
3,265.70
$
$
$
$
1,088.72
1,163.29
787.93
3,039.95
$
$
$
$
21,039.68
24,681.53
9,455.16
55,176.37
$
$
$
$
2,349
2,858
593
5,800
$
$
$
$
2,220
2,685
593
5,498
$
$
$
$
2,459
3,005
593
6,057
$
$
$
$
2,186
2,639
593
5,419
$
$
$
$
1,976
2,356
593
4,925
$
$
$
$
1,780
2,093
593
4,466
$
$
$
$
1,642
1,907
593
4,142
$
$
$
$
1,508
1,727
593
3,828
$
$
$
$
1,384
1,561
593
3,538
$
$
$
$
1,261
1,395
593
3,249
$
$
$
$
1,185
1,293
593
3,071
$
$
$
$
1,089
1,163
593
2,845
$
$
$
$
21,040
24,682
7,115
52,836
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
PA 198 ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
ASSUMING PROPOSED PERSONAL PROPERTY CHANGES WILL TAKE EFFECT
Date:
September 24, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
Paramount Tool
Allegan/Hamilton
June 5, 2015
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
$
$
$
$
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
160,000
50,000
686,987
896,987
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$
$
$
65,000
65,000
961,987
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.7514
42.4880
56.2394
6.8757
24.2440
31.1197
Year 2
290,425
32,500
322,925
$
$
$
Year 3
32,500
32,500
$
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$
$
32,500
32,500
$ 4,698.09
$ 5,715.46
$ 1,380.86
$ 11,794.40
$ 4,440.67
$ 5,369.38
$ 1,380.86
$ 11,190.91
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
446.92
1,380.86
1,827.78
$
$
$
$
13,607.96
11,084.83
16,570.32
41,263.11
$
$
$
$
2,349.04
2,857.73
787.93
5,994.70
$
$
$
$
2,220.33
2,684.69
787.93
5,692.95
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
223.46
787.93
1,011.39
$
$
$
$
6,803.98
5,542.42
9,455.16
21,801.56
$
$
$
$
2,349
2,858
593
5,800
$
$
$
$
2,220
2,685
593
5,498
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
223
593
816
$
$
$
$
6,804
5,542
7,115
19,462
$
$
$
Pers. Prop
13.7514
18.4880
32.2394
6.8757
9.2440
16.1197
Year 1
309,144
32,500
341,644
$
$
$
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Year 11
Year 12
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 9A Rev To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Calendar Year 2014 Rental Housing Program Fee Adjustments: Alternate Fee Structure. Summary: The following chart reflects both our original proposal in increase the Annual Rental permit fees to $115 for the first rental unit while retaining the additional units at $30 per unit (Column 3), and an alternate to maintain the $75/$30 existing fees and charging fees as suggested for all re‐inspections. (Column 4) This approach would relieve the pressure on the compliant properties and place more of the burden of the costs for the program on properties where multiple visits are required to achieve compliance. The attached fee schedule shows the first re‐inspection at $50.00 per unit, with an increase of $50.00 for each subsequent inspection. Our projections for revenues and expenses are as follows: REVENUE PROJECTIONS WITH ANNUAL PERMIT INCREASE TO $115 AND EACH ADDITIONAL UNIT HOLDING AT $30 Annual fee Re‐inspection fee Late fee Uncollected fee Attorney fee Total Actual FY 13 $191,027 11,218 12,504 (3,000) ‐ $211,749 Projected FY 14
$223,000
6,500
9,000
(3,000)
‐
$235,500
Proposed
$298,120
20,000
Est. 9,000
Est. (3,000)
Est. 12,000
$336,120
Three
ALTERNATE REVENUE PROJECTIONS NO CHANGE TO ANNUAL FEES
CHARGE 1ST REINSPECTION AT $50, 2ND AT $100, 3RD AT $150, ETC. Proposed Alt*
$223,000
115,000
Estimated 9,000
Estimated (3,000)
Estimated 12,000
$356,000
Four
* Based on FY 13 re‐inspection volume with the full time equivalent staffing of one added dedicated inspector and part‐time clerical support (1.6 FTE). Admin. Staff Clerical Support Inspectors Overhead Prosecution Total Net PROJECTED COSTS Actual FY 13 Projected FY 14 Proposed $31,314
$31,314
$31,314
FTE .3 FTE .3
FTE .3
$27,756
$32,425
$49,671
FTE .5
FTE .7
FTE 1.0
$111,817
$90,058
$166,200
FTE 1.7
FTE 1.4
** FTE 2.5
$40,000
40,000
$50,000
$12,000
$210,887
$193,797
$309,185
$862
* $41,703
$26,935
(8% Contingency) Possible Alternative $31,314
FTE .3
$64,572
FTE 1.3
$166,200
** FTE 2.5
$50,000
$12,000
$324,086
$31914
(9% Contingency) FTE 2.5
FTE 2.4
** FTE 3.8
** FTE 4.1
* Difference in FY 14 is due to a retirement in February 2013 left vacant pending the Holland Advantage policy and administrative conclusions. ** The actual staff changes will depend on an Administrative Plan to be developed by the City Manager for Council’s consideration at a subsequent point following the fee outcomes. Conscientious Landlord Reward Under this alternative, the City would maintain the Comprehensive Annual Fee at the current $75/30 rates, but add an additional cost should the property/unit not be fully compliant at the time of inspection. That is, a unit would receive its’ annual inspection and, if there are no violations and no recent history of violations, would then receive a 6‐year certificate. If an initial re‐inspection would be required, this would be at additional expense ($50). (Currently, this initial re‐inspection is included within the annual fee.) It is intended that high performing landlords would be rewarded and encouraged by any recommended fee schedule changes. Recommendation: Either the initial fee proposal dated October 9, 2013 attached or the above Alternative would enable the City’s Rental Inspection program to return to being 100% current. (Please note that the Alternative above includes 0.3 FTE clerical for a total of 1.6 FTE due to the extra paperwork associated with billing for the anticipated first re‐inspections.) An Administrative Plan will be prepared to address the backlog in rental inspections for the remainder of the fiscal year starting January 1, 2014 and will be brought to Council in mid to late November. Note: Community & Neighborhood Services is still putting together the Revenues and Expenses going back to 2003 requested by Council Member Whiteman. We hope to present this information either at the meeting or in advance of the special meeting anticipated for Wednesday, October 23, 2013. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments:  Rental Inspection Fees, Rental Inspection Costs and Rewards, October 9, 2013  Rental Housing – Adm. & Inspections Schedule of Fees & Charges  Approximate Rental Inspection Times  Rental Inspection Checklist  Paperwork, Pre‐Work, Follow‐up for Routine Rental Inspections  Rental Properties – Communication from Council Member Klomparens  Comments provided by former CNS employee/current Neighborhood Improvement Committee member Eric Davis Report prepared by: Phil Meyer, Community & Neighborhood Serv. Director and Staff; Ryan Cotton, City Manager; and Tim Vagle, Finance Director
Attachment to 9A
RENTAL HOUSING - ADMINISTRATION AND INSPECTIONS
SCHEDULE OF FEES AND CHARGES
ADMINISTRATION: COMMUNITY & NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES ( INSPECTIONS DIVISION )
Subject Matter or Activity
CURRENT
PROPOSED
Effective Date
Effective Date
Unit Of
Charge
Accept
January 1, 2013
January 1, 2014
Measurement
Card
Per First Dwelling Unit
Yes
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL RENTAL FEE
FIRST DWELLING UNIT
75.00
115.00
ADDITIONAL DWELLING UNITS
30.00
30.00
Per Additional Dwelling Unit
Yes
ADDITIONAL SLEEPING ROOMS
17.00
17.00
Per Room
Yes
INSPECTION FEE FOR INCOMPLETE WORK AND/OR NON-COMPLIANCE (OCCUPIED OR VACANT)
SUBSTANTIATED COMPLAINT INSPECTION
N/A
200.00
Per Unit Inspected
Yes
FIRST RE-INSPECTION
100.00
200.00
Per Unit Inspected
Yes
SECOND RE-INSPECTION
200.00
400.00
Per Unit Inspected
Yes
THIRD OR SUBSEQUENT RE-INSPECTION
300.00
600.00
Per Unit Inspected
Yes
N/A
600.00
Per Incident
- ANNUAL PERMIT FEE
100%
100%
Of Original Billing
Yes
- INSPECTION FEE
100%
100%
Of Original Billing
Yes
- REINSPECTION FEE
100%
100%
Of Original Billing
Yes
200.00
200.00
Per Dwelling Unit
Yes
25.00
25.00
Per Dwelling Unit
Yes
ADMINISTRATIVE CHARGES
ATTORNEY WARNING LETTER
LATE CHARGE FOR UNPAID BILLINGS EXCEEDING 30 DAYS:
LATE CHARGE FOR RENTAL HOUSING REGISTRATION NOT IN
COMPLIANCE WITH REGISTRATION PROVISIONS OUTLINED IN THE
HOUSING ORDINANCE CODE :
- CURRENT LANDLORD, LLC, MANAGEMENT COMPANY
- NEW LANDLORD
RENTAL HOUSING - ADMINISTRATION AND INSPECTIONS
SCHEDULE OF FEES AND CHARGES
ADMINISTRATION: COMMUNITY & NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES ( INSPECTIONS DIVISION )
Subject Matter or Activity
CURRENT
PROPOSED
Effective Date
Effective Date
Unit Of
Charge
Accept
January 1, 2013
January 1, 2014
Measurement
Card
ADMINISTRATIVE CHARGES CONT.
FEE FOR UNFOUNDED COMPLAINT FILED WITHOUT FACTUAL BASE
50.00
50.00
Per Unfounded Complaint
Yes
50.00
50.00
Per Application
Yes
100.00
100.00
Per Application
Yes
100.00
100.00
Per Inspection
Yes
APPLICATION FEE FOR HEARING WITH HOUSING BOARD OF APPEALS
- RESIDENTIAL (Up To 4 Units )
- NON-RESIDENTIAL
ADMINISTRATION FEE FOR FAILING TO APPEAR AT SCHEDULED
INSPECTION OR REINSPECTION
ADDITIONAL
COMMENTS
COMMENT :
The COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL RENTAL FEE Includes :
- Annual Permit
- One Scheduled Cyclical Inspection
- One Final Re-Inspection for Certification
- Any Incidental Inspections Required While a Certificate is In Effect.
- Does not include complaint inspection.
AND
REFERENCES
Approximate rental inspection times (In Addition to Time Spent Scheduling)
These time calculations INCLUDE – travel time to the property, performing the
inspection (inside and outside), talking to landlord, talking to tenants, typing up letter or
certificate, adding code enforcements (if necessary), writing letter to tenants (if
necessary, for tenant created violations)
30 minutes
 Initial inspection, single family home, in EXCELLENT condition
 Initial inspection, condominium (Baker Lofts, Centennial Condos, Farrington, etc.)
 Initial inspection, small home (ranch or slab construction) in GOOD condition
 Re-inspection for a property in GOOD condition
 Complaint inspection
45 minutes
 Re-inspection for property in POOR condition
1 Hour
 Initial inspection, Single family home in GOOD condition
 Initial inspection, Duplex
 Initial inspection, Two-Family
 Initial inspection, 4 Unit Apartment building
1 ½ Hours
 Initial inspection, 5 – 8 unit apartment building
 Initial inspection, Single family home in POOR condition
EXCELLENT – no violations found, 6 year certificate issued
GOOD – there are some minor violations
POOR – the property needs significant repair work, permits are required, the property
may be placarded if immediate action is not taken
Checklist

All windows have latching hardware?
Outside:

All window putty in good condition?

All openable windows have screens? (No
rips, tears or holes.)

All window frames, sashes and sills in good
condition? (Weather proof & no peeling paint.)

Are the street numbers visible from the
road for each unit? (4" high minimum)

Is the siding and paint in good condition?

Is the garage in good condition?

Are the steps, decks and landings in good
condition and safe to use?

How about the handrails and guardrail?
Height at least 30-38 inches, spindles spaced at
6" or less?

Is garbage properly stored?
In the Basement:



Hand rail in place?
Is there an open side of stairs? It needs a
guardrail with spindles spaced so a 4 inch
sphere cannot pass through.
Check the water heater for a T&P valve and
metal drip leg.

Is the dryer vented outside with a metal or
aluminum vent hose?

Is the washer properly hooked up and
drained?

100 amp electrical service panel with
breakers.
All exterior doors have deadbolt locks?

All exterior doors tight against the weather?

Screen and storm doors in good condition,
with adequate hardware?

In a multi family - do the fire doors self
close and latch?

In an older home - Are the skeleton key
locks removed or disabled? (All doors
throughout the house.)
Surface coverings:

Are the walls and ceiling free from holes,
peeling paint and loose plaster?

Are the floor coverings in good condition
and easy to clean? Look for trip hazards.
Windows:
Any cracked or broken window panes?
If you do not have hardwired smoke
detectors you must have an electrician obtain a
permit to install hardwired, battery back up,
interconnected detectors, installed according to
the electric code.

At least two walls with outlets in the
bedroom.

At least one outlet on each wall in the living
room and dining room with two on walls over 14
feet in length.

Working GFCI outlet in the bathroom
adjacent to the sink?
Plumbing System:
Plumbing leaks at the faucet or trap?
Drains working properly?
Toilet(s) working properly?
Other:

Does each room have adequate heat? Kerosene
heaters are not permitted and portable electric
heaters cannot be used as a permanent source of
heat.

A licensed mechanical contractor must inspect
the heating system. A copy of this inspection
report (conducted within the past 12 months)
must be provided at or before the first inspection.
(Not required for electric heat pumps & other
approved electric heating units.)

Seven feet minimum ceiling heights?

Are there too many people in the unit? Look
for at least 50 square feet of bedroom area per
person (including children). Other restrictions
apply, but this is the most common problem.
Electrical System:

Are all cover plates for outlets, switches, and
junction boxes in place?

Update all pull chain lights to wall switch
controlled fixtures, if it is the only source of light
in the room.

Sleeping in the basement is prohibited!
Throughout the house:


Stair safety? Broken treads, loose runners,
equal sizes and heights?


Doors:


Closet light fixtures must have a globe or
approved cover. Incandescent fixtures should be
12 inches from any combustible material.
Fluorescent fixtures should be 6 inches from any
combustible material.
Are the smoke detectors working and have
new batteries? All smoke detectors must be
hardwired, interconnected, have a battery backup, located per the electric code.

Is the apartment clean?

Are there insect or rodent problems?

Is the bathroom ventilation adequate &
working? (Openable window or vent fan.)
City of Holland
Questions?
Additional Information
 An Inoperable Vehicle is any
vehicle that does not run, is dismantled or
does not have a current license plate. All
inoperable vehicles must be stored within a
completely enclosed garage or removed
from the City. Failure to remove an
inoperable vehicle could result in Civil
Infraction tickets and/or fines.
 Grass & Weeds must be maintained
at a height of 8 inches or less. Failure to
keep all grass and weeds mowed will result
in Civil Infraction tickets and/or fines.
 Garbage Cans & Recycle Bags
may be placed at the curb after 6:00pm the
day before your scheduled pick up. All
items shall be brought in off the curb by
midnight the day of your pick up. Garbage
pick up is delayed one day after the
following Holidays: New Year’s Day,
Memorial Day, July 4, Labor Day,
Thanksgiving and Christmas.
For assistance, or to obtain a copy of the
Housing-Property Maintenance Code, please
visit our website at www.cityofholland.com
or call Community and Neighborhood
Services at 616-355-1330.
If you need assistance with landlord and
tenant relationships, rights and
responsibilities, please call the Human
Relations Office at 616-355-1328.
Permits
Permits are required for many projects
including remodeling, roofing, fencing, new
furnace, new water heater and new plumbing
fixtures. For more information about
permits please call 616-355-1330 or visit our
website at www.cityofholland.com
This checklist should be used as a
guide to the City of Holland HousingProperty Maintenance Code.
Inspections are made for the following
reasons:






Rental Properties
Home Businesses
Foreclosed Homes
Complaints
Referrals
Requests
Permits for electrical, plumbing and
mechanical work in a rental property will
only be issued to a licensed contractor.
Important Note:
Created 1-10-00 Updated 2-28-02; 07-02-02; 10-31-02; 2-24-04;
7-15-05; 2-11-08;01-16-09; 4-12; 4-13; 5-13
Printed on recycled paper
This list contains commonly found violations. It is
not intended to be a comprehensive list of all
violations that could occur. If you have a question
about a specific situation please contact us at 616355-1330 or visit our website at
:www.cityofholland.com
Paperwork, prep work, follow‐up for ROUTINE rental inspections: Before: 1‐3 months – 1. Process list of expired, or high priority properties. 2. Confirm inspectors availability and vacation schedule for coming months 3. Data entry all inspections into BSA. 4. Send letters to the tenants, landlords and/or property managers assigning a date and time 5. Manage requests to reschedule inspection appointments from tenants and landlord 1‐2 days – 1. Review all old complaints, housing inspections, and permits. 2. Identify and note unresolved issues, permits, etc. After: Same day if possible 1. Process correction letter – spell check, confirm addresses, make sure data in computer matches correction letter. 2. Schedule re‐inspection, insert date and time into correction letter – make sure they match. 3. Load photos or other documentation such as a furnace inspection report 4. Mail report 5. Repeat as necessary 6. Process three year certificate. (2nd re‐inspection – create billing request for re‐inspection fees, follow through to collect fees, late fees etc.) If no violations 1 Process six year certificate – make sure all dates match, 2. Add reminder for furnace inspection notification after 3 years. Annual permit process: 1. Run import from assessing to assure latest ownership records. 2. Perform backup to data base 3. Process test run on all 5 types of rental classifications 4. Re‐calculate all rooming houses manually 5. Balance test run for Finance 6. Process final run (5) for all types. 7. Print about 1,990 invoices. 8. Scan to adobe for future reference. 9. Copy to yellow paper 10. Fold and stuff – scanning the whole time for errors or bad data 11. Run through postage and mail. 12. Take many phone calls about outdated or transfer of ownership processed after the import. 13. Work with finance on processing payments Questions from Councilman Klomparens. 10‐8‐13 1. What is a good mix of rental properties and owner‐occupied properties? There is no one right answer. It depends on each community’s density and character ‐‐ 30% is the target based on the Holland Advantage report this spring. Thirty (30) percent is also similar to Holland’s historical rental property percentages. Holland staff believes that 30% produces a good range of community vitality, housing choices, and expenditure choices as well. Staff suggests the 30% as an overall number; locations within the City and existing housing types may cause these numbers to vary in any one block. 2. How do we best inspect rental properties, fees, fines, etc.? We have been doing rental housing inspections under our current format essentially since 1986. It took some period of time to get our rental housing stock into compliance but we believe we have made a huge difference in the condition of rental units and our neighborhoods over these many years. We have been visited by many communities looking to us s a model for running this program. As staffing has fallen off, we have fallen behind in our compliance rate. Couple the reduced staff with a downturn in economy where rental properties have increased in number and the resources of owners has made repairs more difficult to achieve and we find ourselves behind. We do, however, have a priority order for addressing rental property issues which puts the following at the top of the list getting our attention: complaints, new rentals, owners with poor rental history, properties with many violations at last inspection, poor code enforcement history, and central city location. We believe we continue to address the most pressing concerns but want to reach a higher level of compliance on all properties. Other questions: a. What does the rental inspection include? See attached page. b. Who gets copies of the inspection reports? The owner and/or property manager receive copies. If requested, a copy is supplied to the tenant. All is public information. c. How long does it take to do an average inspection? Please see the attached identification of time as prepared by one of our inspectors. These are minimum times and can be impacted significantly by conversations with owners, property managers, and tenants during the course of inspections and follow‐ups, and does not include time spent scheduling and modifying schedules for inspections (changes due to scheduling conflicts at owner end or City end, owner/tenant no shows, etc.). d. What paperwork is involved in the process? See attached page listing steps in process. e. What other duties do rental inspectors have with the city? Do they do other types of inspections? Currently, we have 1.4 FTE inspectors in this program. One person is full time in this area of responsibility. Another person is .3 FTE in this area and is also runs our vacant and abandoned program, conducts property maintenance inspections (unregistered vehicles, trash in yards, tall grass), oversees our Dangerous Structures program, receives and directs all complaints and addresses many directly, and administers our sign ordinance. A third person spends about .1 FTE on this program while also handling property maintenance issues, tall grass, runs our Home Repair program, works with residents on our housing “enhancement” program, and assists with other CDBG activities and programs. f. How does the City truly justify collection of rental inspection fees when no inspection has taken place? Our annual comprehensive annual permit fee covers: 1) the permit; 2) the first inspection; 3) the first re‐inspection; and 4) any incidental inspections (neighborhood, or tenant complaint based, for example). g. Do we have any idea as to how many properties that are rentals, but not listed as rentals? No. If we discover a rental unit that has not been registered, we immediately follow up and get that property into this program. The number varies greatly, but we might “discover” 25 properties a year that have not registered. h. Can we think of another way to do inspections? Should all rental inspections pay the same rate? This is a policy good question. We can address this in more detail Wednesday. Phil Meyer, Director Community and Neighborhood Services Attachments to 9A
Hard copy delivered
to Ryan Cotton on 10.09.2013.
PLANNING COMMISSION CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN Planning Commission Report 10A To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Rezoning of 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R‐1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District with Final Reading to be held on October 16, 2013. Summary: Covenant Development LLC has requested that 51 and 61 Country Club Road be rezoned from the R‐1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District. This property comprises the uplands area of the old Holland Country Club and is approximately 25 areas in size. The applicant requests the rezoning of the subject properties to the PRD District in order to create a 68 unit zero‐step residential condominium community with clubhouse, pool and associated amenities. The applicant has also requested and the Planning Commission has conditionally approved the Villas of Holland Development Plan through a Resolution describing the plan as approved with a variety of conditions. However, said Plan approval by the Planning Commission is only valid if City Council approves the requested rezoning. The Villas of Holland Development Plan is briefly described and summarized with the following:  Sixty‐eight (68) single‐family “zero step” attached dwelling units in the form of fifteen 4‐
unit buildings and four 2‐unit buildings.  One clubhouse and outdoor pool and patio area.  Overall proposed residential density of 2.73 dwelling units to the acre (gross), and 3.78 dwelling units per acre (net, minus wooded ravine area).  6.9 acre private woodland preserve.  Private street system that will align with Legion Park Drive at the Country Club Road intersection. It is recommended that the intersection become a four‐way STOP (requires subsequent traffic control order approval from Council).  Public sidewalk/trail access to the Ottawa County Macatawa Greenspace via a dedicated easement to the City. On September 10, 2013 the Planning Commission held a public hearing to receive comments on the proposed rezoning. There were six residents that spoke during the public hearing and four letters were received and entered into the public record. Numerous questions were posed by area residents and Commissioners to the applicant and staff primarily regarding drainage and water quality issues and soil geo‐technical issues. The Planning Commission then tabled any action on the proposed rezoning and development plan until the September 24 meeting to provide staff and the applicant adequate time to provide answers to the various questions and to finish work on the Resolution that is meant to govern the many aspects of the Plan. During the September 24 meeting, the applicant provided answers to several questions that were posed from the previous meeting. Staff reviewed their reports and recommendations and reviewed a proposed Resolution regarding the Villas of Holland development plan. The Commission then allowed additional public comment regarding the proposed rezoning and development plan. Comments included making sure the developer provides adequate landscaping and buffering around the site and its perimeter; encouraged use of stormwater best management practices; questions regarding the impacts on area street and utility infrastructure and impacts on property values; a statement that one resident had visited the developers’ Villas at Rivertown development and is supportive of this request; and comments that PRD zoning should not be used for this development and it should not be approved. The Commission also received several letters that were entered into the record. The Planning Commission then noted the detailed staff report that recommends approval of the proposed rezoning. Following Commission discussion, the Planning Commission voted unanimously (7‐0) to recommend the rezoning to City Council. Their conditional approval of the Development Plan followed their approval of the rezoning recommendation. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council adopt the proposed zoning ordinance amendment rezoning 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R‐1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential Development District as recommended by the Planning Commission. Respectfully submitted, Phil Meyer Community & Neighborhood Services Director The following attachments have been labeled and placed in Dropbox for City Council review and in the City’s website www.cityofholland.com for public review: 2013.10.16 Attachments to CC Report 10A:  Rezoning map  Villas of Holland Narrative  Ordinance amendment  Report to Planning Commission (PC)  Resolution Approving Dev. Plan  Sept. 10 PC meeting minutes  Planning map  Letters & emails from area residents
 Site and building elevation plans Report prepared by: Mark Vanderploeg, Senior Planner
Attachments to 10A
CITY OF HOLLAND
Ordinance Summary
Ordinance Number ______
October 16, 2013 City of Holland Council Meeting
Public notice is hereby given that the following ordinance was adopted by the City Council of
the City of Holland on October 16, 2013 with an effective date of November 6, 2013. A
summary of the ordinance adopted by the Holland City Council is as follows:
Ordinance No. _____ would amend Section 39-5 of the Ordinance Code of the City of Holland
being the Zoning Map to change the zone district classification of approximately 25 acres of land
located at 51 and 61 Country Club Road from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the
PRD Planned Residential Development District.
All other provisions of Chapter 39 would remain in full force and effect.
The publication of this summary of the above-referenced ordinances is authorized under the
provisions of Act No. 182 of the Public Acts of 1991 of the State of Michigan. No further
publication of the text of these ordinances is required or contemplated by the City. A true and
complete copy of the Ordinances referenced above may be inspected or obtained at the office of
the City Clerk, City Hall, 270 River Avenue, Holland, Michigan during regular business hours.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
ORDINANCE NO. ______
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ORDINANCE CODE OF THE CITY OF
HOLLAND, BEING ORDINANCE NO.
OF THE CITY OF HOLLAND,
BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF THE CITY OF HOLLAND,
MICHIGAN, WHICH MAP IS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE IN
SECTION 39-5 OF SAID CODE.
THE CITY OF HOLLAND ORDAINS:
That the Zoning Map of the City of Holland, Michigan, incorporated by reference in
Section 39-5 of the Ordinance Code of the City of Holland be and the same is hereby
amended as follows:
The zone district classification of the following described property is hereby changed
from the R-1 One Family Residential District to the PRD Planned Residential
Development District:
Parcel A: Part of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 26, Town 5 North, Range 15 West, City of
Holland, Ottawa County, Michigan, described as: Commencing at the Northwest corner
of said Section; thence South 00 degrees 16' 10" West 249.19 feet along the West line of
the Northwest 1/4 of said Section; thence South 89 degrees 43' 50" East 33.00 feet;
thence South 00 degrees 16' 10" West 537.93 feet along the East right of way line of
Country Club Road extended to the Point of Beginning; thence North 89 degrees 56' 14"
East 567.56 feet; thence North 59 degrees 44' 35" East 59.20 feet; thence North 44
degrees 09' 09" East 460.51 feet; thence South 56 degrees 21' 55" East 71.75 feet; thence
South 43 degrees 48' 49" East 166.79 feet; thence South 10 degrees 07' 26" East 189.90
feet; thence South 69 degrees 17' 54" West 200.53 feet; thence South 30 degrees 00' 32"
East 217.34 feet; thence North 58 degrees 28' 49" East 254.03 feet; thence South 00
degrees 22' 58" West 174.09 feet along the West line of the Northeast 1/4 of the
Northwest 1/4 of said Section; thence North 88 degrees 47' 16" West 199.33 feet (deeded
as North 89 degrees 13' 30" West 200.00 feet); thence South 00 degrees 09' 23" West
30.22 feet (deeded as South 00 degrees 04' 00" West 30.00 feet); thence North 88
degrees 37' 21" West 49.98 feet (deeded as North 89 degrees 13' 30" West 50.00 feet);
thence South 00 degrees 24' 31" West 250.05 feet (deeded as South 00 degrees 04' 00"
West 250.00 feet); thence North 88 degrees 49' 37" West 639.21 feet along the South
line of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section to the Southeast corner of
Eagle Hill Subdivision; thence North 00 degrees 16' 10" East 478.76 feet to the
Northeast corner of Eagle Hill Subdivision; thence South 89 degrees 56' 14" West 396.95
feet; thence North 00 degrees 16' 10" East 70.00 feet along the East right of way line of
Country Club Road to the Point of Beginning.
Parcel B: Part of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 23 and part of the Northwest 1/4 of
Section 26, Town 5 North, Range 15 West, City of Holland, Ottawa County, Michigan,
described as: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Section 23; thence North 00
degrees 12' 26" East 89.38 feet along the West line of the Southwest 1/4 of said Section
23; thence South 76 degrees 47' 21" East 306.57 feet; thence South 56 degrees 21' 55"
East 804.70 feet; thence South 44 degrees 09' 09" West 460.51 feet; thence South 59
degrees 44' 35" West 59.20 feet; thence South 89 degrees 56' 14" West 567.56 feet;
thence North 00 degrees 16' 10" East 537.93 feet along the East right of way line of
Country Club Road; thence North 89 degrees 43' 50" West 33.00 feet; thence North 00
degrees 16' 10" East 249.19 feet along the West line of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section
26 to the Point of Beginning. 70-16-26-100-016, 70-16-23-350-007
(Commonly known as 51 and 61 Country Club Road)
The zone district classification of all other areas shall remain unchanged.
ORDINANCE ADOPTION DATE: _____________________________
ORDINANCE EFFECTIVE DATE: _____________________________
H:\Winword\AMEND\51 and 61 Country Club Rezoning September 2013 - Ordinance.doc
2
OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK
CITY HALL
HOLLAND, MICHIGAN
11B
City Clerk Report
To:
Date:
Subject:
New
Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council.
October 16, 2013
Industrial Facilities Exemption PA 198
Summary:
JMS of Holland, Inc. – PA 198
1010 Productions Court
Number of existing jobs retained at this site:
Number of new jobs at this site to be created:
58
5
Summary:
Founded in 1994, JMS evolved from a small tool and die facility to a high quality resource for
deep-drawn parts, progressive die components and assemblies. JMS offers value-added
processes such as heat-treating, plating, painting, sub-assembly and other secondary
operations. The Applicant serves a wide range of companies within the automotive, appliance,
and hardware industries.
Land and building improvements
Total Project Cost
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
Respectfully submitted,
Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
$ 2,000,000.00
$ 2,000,000.00
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14.A.1*
To: Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council Date: October 16, 2013 Subject: Estates of Olde Evergreen Water‐Wastewater Bill of Sale UTILITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT Introduction: This recommendation is for the approval of the Bill of Sale for the water/wastewater utilities installed at the Estates of Olde Evergreen residential development. The sale transfers ownership from the John D. Arnoldink / Jayne M. Arnoldink Declaration of Trust to the City of Holland. Recommendation: Accept and forward to City Council for acceptance the Bill of Sale with John D. Arnoldink / Jayne M. Arnoldink Declaration of Trust in the amount of less than $1, pending approval as to form from the City Attorney. Description: The Estates of Olde Evergreen development is east of Old Orchard Road between Heather Drive and 32nd Street. The development consists of 8 parcels which will be served by water, wastewater, and electric utilities. The Board of Directors approved the Grant of Public Utility Easement for the Olde Evergreen development at the June 10th board meeting. Review of the Bill of Sale by the City Attorney is pending. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Project #WM745/SS460 Attachments: 2013‐10‐07 Estates of Olde Evergreen Water/Wastewater Bill of Sale.pdf Report prepared by: Kevin Koning, PE, Water/Wastewater Services Civil Engineer
Attachment 14.A1
ACCEPTANCE OF BILL OF SALE
Pursuant to Council Action ____________, the Bill of Sale attached hereto has been accepted by
the City of Holland, a municipal corporation of Ottawa and Allegan Counties, Michigan.
Dated this _________ day of _________________________, 20___.
Signed in the Presence of:
CITY OF HOLLAND
_________________________________
By: ____________________________________
Kurt D. Dykstra, Mayor
_________________________________
By: ____________________________________
Anna Perales, Acting Deputy City Clerk
APPROVED AS TO FORM:
CITY OF HOLLAND
______________________________
Andrew J. Mulder, City Attorney
Date: ____________________
State of Michigan
ss.
County of Ottawa
The forgoing instrument was acknowledged before me in Ottawa County, Michigan, on this
______ day of ________________, 20___, by Kurt D. Dykstra and Anna Perales, the Mayor
and Acting Deputy City Clerk, respectively, of the City of Holland, a Michigan municipal
corporation, on behalf of the City of Holland.
_______________________________________
Notary Public, ___________ County, Michigan
Acting in the County of Ottawa, Michigan
My commission expires: ___________________
-3-
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN To: Date: Subject: 14.A.2*
Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council October 16, 2013 Grant of Easement for 6226 144th Avenue UTILITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT Introduction: The property owner of a parcel has granted an easement to allow the installation of underground electric lines. The easement is necessary for the installation and maintenance of underground cable and a pad mount transformer to supply HBPW electric service to a new residential dwelling. Recommendation: Accept a Grant of Easement for underground electric lines from Thomas and Marcy Achterhof, residing at 6226 144th Avenue, Holland, MI 49423 and forward to the City Council for approval. Description: The easement has been approved as to form by the City Attorney and has been signed by the property owners. Acceptance of the easement will allow the HBPW to utilize existing underground distribution lines located on the Achterhof parcel to serve a new dwelling that is being constructed on the adjacent parcel. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Strategic Objective: 2.03 Repair, replace and enhance infrastructure in a manner consistent with reliability and cost of service objectives. Attachments: Achterhof Grant of Easement for 6226 144th Ave, Holland, MI Report prepared by: Robert Kerbyson, Engineering Specialist Electric Distribution______
Attachment 14.A2
GRANT OF UTILITY EASEMENT
PARCEL NO. 03-11-014-004-10
4
-,,)^^*n
2013, by and between
THIS INDENTURE, made this
day of
THOMAS A. ACHTERHOF and MARCY L. ACHTERHOF, husband and wife, of 6226
144ú Avenue, Holland, Michigan, 49423 (hereinafter called "Grantor") and the CITY OF
HOLLAND, A MUNICIPAL CORPORATION OF OTTA\üA AND ALLEGAN
COUNTIES, MICHIGAN, o1270 South River Avenue, Holland, Michigan 49423 (hereinafter
called "Grantee").
V/HEREAS, Grantor desires to convey and Grantee desires to purchase a right-of-way
and easement for utilities on property hereinafter legally described.
1.
For the sum of One Dollar ($ 1.00), actual consideration, paid by Grantee to
Grantor, the receipt of which is acknowledged by Grantor, Grantor hereby grants, bargains,
conveys, and warrants to Grantee a right-of-way and utility perpetual easement for purposes
hereinafter described (the rEasement.), over, across, and under a portion of the property legally
described on Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference (hereinafter called
the rPremises.).
2.
The portion of the Premises subject to the Easement is legally described on
Exhibit B attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference (hereinafter called the "Easement
Premises").
3.
The grant of said Easement shall be for the following purpose or purposes:
(a)
To construct and establish electrical distribution equipment, including, but
not limited to, ducts, conduits, poles, wires, cables, transformers, switch
gear, and other facilities (hereinafter called the rFacilities.) through,
across, on, and under the Easement Premises;
(b)
To operate, inspect, and maintain the Facilities located across, on, and
under the Easement Premises; and
(c)
To repair, replace, relocate, or add any additional such Facilities within the
Easement Premises to fulfill the necessary and incidental purposes
hereunder.
4.
As incident to and in conjunction with the grant of this Easement, Grantor hereby
grants to Grantee the right of ingress and egress to and over the Premises for the purpose of doing
anything necessary useful or convenient for the enjoyment of the Easement and grants Grantee
permission to do anything necessary, useful or convenient within the Easement Premises which
may be necessary, useful or convenient for the full enjoyment of all rights granted herein.
5.
Any relocation, alteration, or modification of the Facilities requested by Grantor
shall be at the option of Grantee. Grantor will reimburse Grantee all costs incurred and grant
easements as required by said relocation, alteration, or modification of the Facilities.
6. Grantor shall not, nor allow anyone else to, erect any building, shed or other
structure other than driveways, parking lots, drainage basins or other such surface improvements
within the Easement Premises or plant trees or other vegetation other than crops, grass, or other
groundcover within the Easement Premises. Grantor herein authorizes Grantee to trim any
branches of the trees or other vegetation that grow into the air space within the Easement
Premises.
7.
Grantee shall restore the Easement Premises to its original condition, to the extent
reasonably practicable under the circumstances, following construction, maintenance or repair of
the Facilities within the Easement Premises. Grantee shall indemniôr and hold harmless Grantor
from any and all claims for any injury or property damage which occurs in the Easement
Premises as a result of the presence of the Facilities provided, however, that Grantor shall
indemnifr and hold harmless Grantee from any and all claims for any injury or property damage
which occurs on the Easement Premises other than in connection with the use of the Facilities.
8.
This Easement shall be binding on Grantor, its successors or assigns and shall run
with the land in perpetuity. Non-use or limited use of the Easement herein granted shall not
cause a termination of any of the rights granted hereunder.
This instrument is exempt from County Real Estate Transfer
Tax pursuant to MCL 207,505(a) and from State Real Estate
Transfer Tax pursuant to MCL 207.526(a).
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, Grantor has executed this Grant of Utility Easement on the
day and year first above written.
Signed in the Presence of:
Thomas A. Achterhof
\/\/
-2-
A4tt-,
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
)
)
)
ss.
The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me this
2013, by Thomas A. Achterhof and Marcy L. Achterhof.
day
) n nua,ry
of
Notary Public, Ottawa
My commission expires:
This Instrument Prepared By:
Andrew J. Mulder
Cunningham Dalman, P. C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Holland, MI 49422
(616) 3e2-r821
DIAl{A
l,lobry
W Commlgsþn
ln üc
SCHUTTE
StEto of Mlâlgnn
ol Ottara
17 201 7
EXHIBIT A
Parcel No. 03-11-014-004-10
Legal Description of Premises
CommencingílT feet west of the northeast corner of Section 14,
Thence south 0 degrees 20'eastparallel with the east section line
1329.54 feet, thence north 89 degrees 55' west 362.52 feet, thence
north 0 degrees 22' 50" west 660.15 feet; thence south 89 degrees
57' 03" east 197.96 feet; thence north 0 degrees 22' 50" west 668.07
feet; thence east on the north section line 165.65 feet to the Point of
Beginning, Section 14, Town 4 North, Range 16 West, Laketown
Township, Allegan Count¡ Michigan.
EXHIBIT B
Parcel No. 03-1 1-014-004-10
Legal Descrþtion of Easement Premises
Part of the northeast % of Section 14, Town 4 North, Range 16'West, Laketown
Township, Allegan County, Michigan, described as: Commencing at the northeast
corner of said Section 14; thence south 90 degrees 00' 00" west 980.61 feet along
the north line of the northeast Yq of said Section 14; thence south 00 degrees 22'
50" east 667.84 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence north 90 degrees 00' 00"
east 195.11 feet; thence south 00 degrees 00' 00" west 10,00 feet; thence south
90 degrees 00' 00" west 195;04 feet; thence north 00 degrees 22' 50" west
10.00 feet to the poini of Beginning. Containing 6,589 square feet (0.15 acres).
Subject to easements, restrictions, and rights-oÊway of record.
irfiOì
C)i
¿¡ ,j j';uÍlgîA
0r4AiJ0ùi
l0
YTtc
YJI,IflCiTAYTIC
STAO
ACCEPTAI\CE OF GRANT OF UTILITY EASEMENT
PARCEL NO.
03-1 1-014-004-10
Pursuant to Council Action No.
the Easement of Thomas Achterhof and
Marcy L. Achterhof which is attached hereto has been accepted by the City of Holland, a
municipal corporation of Ottawa and Allegan Counties, Michigan this
day of
_
2013.
Dated this
_
day
of
2013
CITY OF HOLLAND
Signed in the Presence of:
Kurt D. Dykstra, Mayor
Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
)
)
)
ss.
The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me this
day of
2013, by Kurt D. Dykstra and Anna Perales, to me personally known, who, being by me duly
sworn, did each for himself/herself say that they are, respectively the Mayor and the Deputy City
Clerk of the City of Holland, the corporation named in and which executed the within
instrument, and that said instrument was signed in behalf of said City of Holland by authority of
its City Council; and said Kurt D Dykstra and Anna Perales acknowledged said instrument to
be the free act and deed of the said City of Holland.
AS TO
Notary Public, Ottawa Co., MI
My commission expires
0/ 3
MORTGAGEE'S CONSENT TO EASEMENT
PARCEL NO. 03-11-014-004-10
The undersigned, being the assignee of the mortgagee of the property described on this
easement, by virtue of a mortgage recorded in Liber 3435,Page 434, Allegan County records and
assignment recorded in Liber 3466,Page298, Allegan County records, hereby consents to this
easement. The undersigned mortgagee agrees that even though the Mortgage is prior in time to
the interest of the Grantee established under this easement, it, and its successors and assigns,
shall recognize the rights of the Grantee under this easement grant as if it had j oined in the grant
as a grantor. No foreclosure of the mortgage or sale of the property described in this easement or
deed in lieu of foreclosure shall cut off or extinguish any of the Grantee's easement rights.
Mortgagee agrees that the easement consented to by this instrument does not trigger any due-onsale provision of the mortgage or otherwise constitute a default of any provision of the mortgage.
Dated:
Àoai.0\
Z-
.2013.
BANK OF AMERICA
B
e
n
Vel
iz
Its
STATE OF
MICHIGAN
)
)
ss.
COTINTY OF
Bank of
America}
was acknowledged before me this
day of
the
banking corporation, on behalf of the corporation.
\l e \\'z_
CARiIEN RAfrilREiz
ffi)lANY PUELIC. STATE OF MICHIOAN
OOUTflY OF VAN BUREN
Eptlr Aprit ag,
Mt Ootltrnrreon
æt0
Ail$ httroouîUoLCItAgJg_
Carmen Ra mirez, Nota ry
County
Acti
My
ng
ublic
of VanBuren, Mic h i gan
ln Ottawa Cou nty , Michìgan
sion expire s: A pri I 23, 201,9
comm is
of
HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 49423
OFFICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY
321 Settl6rs Rd.
Holland, Ml 49422-'1 7 67
Phone (616) 392-1A21
FAX (616) 392-4769
September 25,2013
CITY OF HOLLAND
ATTN: Anna Perales
Deputy City Clerk
270 S. River Avenue
Holland, MI 49423
RE:
City of Holland/Thomas A. Achterhof and Marcy L. Achterhof;
Project: Easement
Dear Anna:
Enclosed please find the original Grant of Utility Easement relating to Parcel No.
which has been signed by all parties except the City of Holland.
Please note that the Mortgagee's Consent to Easement has also been signed by Bank of
America. Please obtain Mayor Dykstra's signature on the Acceptance of Grant of Utility
Easement on page 6, and then sign the Easement as Deputy City Clerk. Please make sure
Mayor Dykstra's signature and your signature is notarized. When that has been done,
please send the original Grant of Utility Easement to the Allegan County Register of
Deeds for recordation. V/hen the recorded Easement comes back to you, please retain the
original for the City of Holland's records and send electronic copies to all interested
parties. Please send me an electronic copy of the completed Easement as well, so that my
files are complete. Please advise if you have any questions. Thank you.
03- I 1-014-004- 10,
yours,
J
City A
AJM/lc
Enclosures
pc:
Mike Buikema
Janet Lemson
(w/enc.) (via email)
WHERE IT'S TULIP TIME IN MAY
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14.A.3*
To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council October 16, 2013 Declaration of Surplus Material FINANCE DEPARTMENT Introduction: This recommendation is to approve lists of items declared surplus to be donated, auctioned off, or sold, since they no longer meet Holland Board of Public Works (HBPW) department needs. Recommendation: Approve, and forward to City Council for approval, the lists of items ready to be declared surplus. Description: The HBPW has identified materials and equipment which are no longer pertinent for use. The attached lists show items determined as excess, obsolete, or uneconomical to repair. First, we determine if the items are usable within the HBPW and other City departments. Secondly, in an attempt to recover as much as we can, we will try to sell items to companies specializing in inventory disposal. Our third course of action is to auction items the remaining items. The HBPW has the ability to conduct its own limited auction, open to the public. Items not sold or donated are recycled to the maximum extent. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Strategic Objective: 2.03 Repair, replace and enhance infrastructure in a manner consistent with reliability and cost of service objectives Attachments: 2013‐10‐07 Technology Department Surplus Equipment 2013‐10‐07 Wastewater Plant Surplus Materials 2013‐10‐07 Transmission and Distribution Department Surplus Equipment 2013‐10‐07 Facilities Department Surplus Items 2013‐10‐07 Materials Department Obsolete Inventory 2013‐10‐07 Materials Department Excess Transformers 2013‐10‐07 Water and Wastewater Services Surplus Report prepared by: Jim Theis, Materials and Facilities Manager___________________ Materials Department Excess Transformers
October 7, 2013
Attachment 14.A3 *
The following transformers have either been identified as obsolete or scrap. There are a
total of 18 transformers that will be sold per KVA.
Non-Inventory Transformers
QTY
2
3
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
1
KVA
10
25
37
75
37
50
75
150
225
300
TYPE
POLE
POLE
POLE
POLE
PAD
PAD
PAD
PAD
PAD
PAD
ITEM#
180-12-0010
180-12-0025
180-12-0037
180-12-0075
181-12-0037
181-12-0050
183-27-0075
183-27-0150
183-27-0225
183-27-0300
Non-Inventory Capacitors
QTY TYPE
Mfg.
3
Balteau
Potential Transformers
Materials Department Obsolete Inventory
October 7, 2013
QTY Description
Inventory
$ Value
1
MISC, LOW WATT 120 VAC - XFMR
170-50-2000
18.01
1
MISC, RELAY 24V FOR PULSE GEN
170-50-2050
13.57
1
MISC, RELAY SOCKET 8 PIN, 8501NR51B
170-50-2055
8.21
4
12" X 12"X 6" CONTINUOUS HINGE ENCLOSURE
170-50-3075
217.91
11
LAMPS - SEALED BEAM AUTO SPOT
140-15-4416
72.60
16
FUSES - PLUGS 15
110-00-1720
7.20
17
FUSES - PLUG TYPE (W) 20 AMP
110-00-1721
6.12
59
FUSES - PLUG TYPE (W) 30 AMP
110-00-1722
21.24
1080ft CERAMIC CORE TRANSMISSION WIRE
130-00-1850
0.00
3
150-19-0920
320.85
130ft CONDUIT - 4" GALV
160-00-0350
841.10
5
ELBOWS 4" GALV SWEEP
160-00-0540
262.40
22
SKIRTS FOR RAY CHEM 500/750 MCM
160-00-2822
414.70
3
TERMINATOR KITS 500 MCM KERITE
160-00-4110
762.18
CAPACITOR RACK FOR POLE
Total $2966.09
Technology Department Surplus Equipment
October 7, 2013
Manufacturer
Model
Description
SN
Quantity
Dell
Latitude D630
Latitude D810
OptiPlex 755
laptop computer
laptop computer
desktop computer
Docking stations
2
1
1
14
HP
DX2000MT
K5400tn
D2330
desktop computer
OfficeJet printer
DeskJet printer
1
1
1
Xerox
Phaser 3600N
Printer
1
Monitors
7
3Com
3Com
3Com
3Com
3Com
3Com
3Com
3C16971
3C16981A
3C16971
3C16981A
3CRNJ240
3CRNJ240
3CRNJ240
100Base-FX Dual Module
Switch 3300 12-port
100Base-FX Dual Module
Switch 3300 24-port
FXSCTAA-75
Intellijack
FXSCTAA-75
Intellijack
FXSCTAA-75
Intellijack
x5819
x7998
x4782
x6ff8
x24D7
x24F4
x24DE
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Worldwide Packets
Worldwide Packets
Worldwide Packets
Worldwide Packets
Worldwide Packets
LE-217
LE-217
LE-217
LE-410
LE-36
24 port fiber switch
24 port fiber switch
24 port fiber switch
16 port fiber backbone switch
cpe switch
xM0036
x90078
xM0009
x50005
x70461
1
1
1
1
1
Zetron
ZR340
telephone interface to Moto radios
2
Major Power MAJORSINE2000-125-2U power inverter
x4W0
1
Compaq
T2000
BTRY1048
UPS
ext battery module
x1066
1
1
Symbol
AP-3021-500-US
Spectrum24 Ethernet Access Point
2
Motorola
HT750
portable UHF radio
1
xG155
Transmission and Distribution Department Surplus Equipment
October 7, 2013
Tri-axle trailer # 39 with reel stands Model # P324D
VIN# 42EDP2434J1000695
Wastewater Plant Surplus Equipment
October 7, 2013
Item
No.
Item
1
Parts Washer (bad pump)
2
Toro Wheel Horse tractor 20 HP with mower deck and snow blower
3
4
Two Lightnin Tank mixers, model ND-4A with 48” shaft
HACH DR5000 spectrophotometer with SIPS sample collector (broken)
Water and Wastewater Services Surplus
October 7, 2013

















8 place water meter(5/8”) test bench
Power inverters (2)
o Airpax Dimensions: model ADI-12/1200N
o Tripp Lite : model PV2000FC
Tool box for hand tools
1” Mueller tap machine: model B-100
Pipe thawer
Sign stands
Ford meter box portable test tank
Honda motor GX 120
Reed socket kit for damaged nuts
Air compressor (3 gallon): model 95275
Mueller power tap machine wrench
2 light beacons
3” Homelite trash pump: model KF-17: serial #08833-3
2 Homelite 4800 watt Generators
o Serial# HP2150013
o Serial# HS 2320005
Stihl sewer tap machine with 6” X 4” cutter: BT 120C
Homelite gas blower: model 1118-18: serial # 93461286
Schonstedt Magnetic Locator: model GA-72Cd
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14.A.4*
To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council October 16, 2013 Real Property Purchase BUSINESS SERVICES DEPARTMENT Introduction: This recommendation is for the procurement of additional real properties that will comprise the area identified as the home to the community’s newest electric generating resource. Recommendation: Approve the attached Offers of Just Compensation, as prepared by the City Attorney, for several parcels of land. Additionally, provide authorization for the Mayor and Deputy City Clerk to sign each Offer of Just Compensation. Description: While the Atmospheric Processing, Inc. property will provide a significant portion of the footprint needed for the power plant project, additional properties are required to meet design requirements. Each Offer of Just Compensation (OJC) was prepared by the City Attorney with appraisal services provided by Van Noord and Associates. Each residential property that is owner occupied is provided an additional 25% compensation as required by statute. If a residential owner was willing to commit to our offer within 30 days, an Offer of Compromise (OC) equal to 15% of the OJC was given as an incentive. For commercial properties the OJC is the appraised value of the property and the OC equals 5% of the OJC. Relocation expense reimbursement is provided as required by Michigan law. Please note that additional OJC’s will be brought to the Board as they are executed by property owners. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Strategic Objective: 2.06 Strategically acquire properties for infrastructure improvement or expansion projects as they become available Attachments: Offers of Just Compensation to Acquire Real Property (provided at meeting) Report prepared by: Daniel E. Nally, Business Services Director Attachment 14.A4 *
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14.A.5*
To: Date: Subject:
Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council October 16, 2013 Advanced Metering Strategy and Procurement Services UTILITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT Introduction: Staff presented the Meter Technology Plan at the August 26, 2013, Study Session which outlined a recommendation to purchase and replace advanced meter communication and meter data management (MDM) systems, implement a customer portal, and replace all electric meters over the next five years. Current year tactical actions include 1) selecting new Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) technology and establish specifications for new electric meters 2) purchasing and begin implementing of a replacement MDM, and 3) implementing improvements to customer payment options. Staff solicited and received proposals for professional strategy and procurement services to guide the efforts of our tactical action teams and to assure that the resulting purchases and installations are properly aligned with BPW long‐term objectives. Recommendation: Approve a professional services contract with CTC Technology and Energy in an amount not to exceed $59,910 for strategy and procurement services, with an additional allowance of $10,000 for supplemental implementation support services at hourly rates specified in the proposal to assist with system acceptance testing and integration verification. Description: The BPW metering system is ready for renewal. Since 2003, technology has developed, customer expectations have changed, and the meters and AMR system installed in 2003‐2005 have deteriorated in their effectiveness and performance. We continue to have difficulties in interfacing the meter information from the AMR system into an MDM (Meter Data Management) system, which is necessary to make electrical and water usage available to customers online and make Time‐of‐Use and other dynamic pricing options available. As a result, customers do not have access to real‐time usage and billing information online. Many customers today expect HBPW to provide better access to billing and usage information and more convenient bill payment options. The present metering system is not able to meet these expectations. Professional services to assist in the final strategy and AMI procurements are recommended for several reasons. 1) Although BPW staff has studied AMI opportunities and developed objectives for the AMI over the past year, a final strategy review by a firm specializing in AMI will assure that all the elements and opportunities are considered prior to the development of procurement documents. The firm will assist with strategy which will include evaluating the return on investment for all features specified in procurement documents. The importance of the investment in AMI, considering its impact on the billing and payment options and the customer interface for many years, requires evaluation with expertise beyond capabilities of internal staff. The cost of omitting or under‐specifying any feature could be very expensive to correct. 2) The vendors providing AMI solutions vary substantially in the technology and strategies that they employ, approaches they use in structuring a solution, their strengths and weaknesses, and long term total costs of their products because of ongoing operational and maintenance support. In addition, the vendors have varying degrees of financial strength that will determine their longevity in the market. There are more than 15 AMI solution vendors now, but it is likely that many may not exist in the long term. Some vendors are actively developing new applications that will enhance their future offerings and value. Staff is not able to assess all of the aspects related to the vendors and their offerings without assistance from an independent professional firm specializing in the AMI business. Assistance is needed to assure the best vendor that will provide long term service and support. Four proposals from independent providers of AMI professional services were received. Each firm was interviewed by the Meter Technology Tactical Action Team. The costs associated with each proposal are summarized below: CTC Technology and Energy Not to exceed $59,910, including expenses Utiliworks $60,000 +/‐ 20%, depending on final scope of work ValuTech Solutions $53,100 ‐$69,900, depending on final scope of work Smart Utility Systems $84,000 labor, plus expenses  All firms except Utiliworks provided hourly rates for additional implementation support services. CTC hourly rates were competitive in comparison to the others. The recommendation of CTC Technology and Energy is based on the following considerations:  While the experience and expertise of all firms demonstrated that all are very capable, the team proposed by CTC Technology and Energy possesses an impressive portfolio of AMI and public sector communication technology design services. Staff believes the expertise of CTC is at least as good as the other proposers and their additional expertise in broadband will assure maximum leverage of existing BPW broadband assets and may provide synergy with efforts to develop BPW broadband services.  While the scope presented in each proposal resulted in bringing us to a point of selection of an AMI solution and vendor selection, emphasis between the strategy and planning phase and the specification and vendor evaluation and selection phase in each proposal varied. Staff felt that 

the CTC proposal presented the best overall balance of effort into the various project developmental phases. CTC Technology has and is currently providing similar services to other Michigan municipal electric utilities. References checks indicate that these utilities are very pleased with the services provided by CTC. The cost proposal submitted with the proposal is considered to be the lowest cost proposal considering it is a not to exceed amount, and presents completive hourly rates should the BPW choose to proceed with implementation support. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Strategic Objective: Resources, 2.03.13 Repair, replace and enhance infrastructure in a manner consistent with reliability and cost of service objectives Attachments: 2013‐10‐07 CTC AMI Professional Services Proposal 2013‐10‐07 CTC Contract Report prepared by: John Van Uffelen, Utility Services Director Attachment 14.5A
*
August 19, 2013
Via Electronic Mail
John Van Uffelen
Utility Services Director
Holland Board of Public Works
625 Hastings Avenue
Holland, MI 49423
Subject: Proposal to develop strategy and planning for advanced metering system
Dear Mr. Van Uffelen:
CTC Technology & Energy (CTC) is pleased to provide this proposal to develop a strategy for
developing Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) for the Holland Board of Public Works (BPW).
CTC offers extensive practical expertise in this area. We have almost three decades of experience
assisting local and state governments and municipal utilities with their telecommunications engineering
design and analysis needs, including with Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and Smart Grid
technology analysis, business planning development, design and engineering.
CTC has performed Smart Grid related projects for the cities of Sturgis and Hillsdale, Michigan, as well
as the Maryland Public Service Commission, Norwich Public Utilities, Seattle City Light, and Pulaski
Energy Services, among others. We have advised the Tennessee Municipal Electric Power Association
(TMEPA) on how to approach the federal grant programs, the Murfreesboro (TN) Electrical Department
on AMI network expansion, and prepared an AMI technology primer report for the Central Iowa Power
Cooperative.
CTC’s reputation rests on our track record of providing independent guidance. We are not affiliated with
equipment manufacturers, communications carriers, or cable operators; we have, as a policy, no financial
stake in the strategies you choose to adopt.
We propose to perform the work described in the proposal for a not to exceed cost of $59,910. Following
the RFP and vendor selection CTC is prepared to offer implementation support including System
Acceptance Testing (SAT), integration verification, assistance in addressing concerns raised by citizens,
and other activities.
Please do not hesitate to contact Tom Asp or me if you have any questions about our proposal or our
experience. We look forward to the opportunity to support the City of Holland on this important project.
Sincerely,
Andrew Afflerbach, Ph.D., P.E.
CEO/Director of Engineering
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 2
1. Proposed Scope of Work Provided below is the approach that CTC proposes to the Holland Board of Public Works (BPW)
for advanced metering strategy development and planning. Throughout any engagement the CTC
team stresses independence and objectivity.
The initial project goal is to provide a strategic “best fit” guidance plan for the BPW advanced
metering project given objectives and limitations. The process is designed to mitigate the risk of
selecting a “poor-fit” vendor, assuring vendor solutions are aligned with the objectives,
maximizing return on investment (ROI) and customer satisfaction potential, and avoiding pitfalls
early in the project.
Please note that the term Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) network includes the AMI
meters, communication system, AMI management system, Meter Data Management (MDM)
system, and related interfaces.
The proposed phases are:
•
•
•
Phase One – Building Foundation For Advanced Metering Project Success: clearly
defines and captures the overall vision of the proposed advanced metering project that
supports objectives.
Phase Two – Project Focus And Risk Mitigation: expands the vendor and fit analysis
through the development and distribution of a request-for-information (RFI).
Phase Three – Vendor Selection And Contracting: guides the advanced metering
vendor selection and assists in preparing for the implementation.
The above phases can be modified to align with specific BPU objectives and scheduling. For
example the RFI can be replaced with a more detailed vendor analysis based on CTC and BPU
experience. Replacing the RFI step would reduce the overall schedule by at least 6 weeks
(allowed time for vendors to respond to an RFI).
Following the RFP and vendor selection CTC is prepared to offer implementation support
including System Acceptance Testing (SAT), integration verification, assistance in addressing
concerns raised by citizens, and other activities.
Statement of Work We envision three phases in supporting the advanced metering strategy and planning. The
process follows a logical go/no-go decision process at the conclusion of each phase. As each
milestone is reached, a decision by the BPW leadership team will determine if further analysis is
desired or warranted or if changes in scope or process is warranted. Further each step is
interactive and leverages BPW resources. Vendors requested to respond to the RFI and RFP will
include advanced metering and meter data management vendors. Of particular importance is
having a single vendor take on a single point of responsibility for an integrated AMI and
application platform.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 3
Phase 1: Building Foundation for Advanced Metering Project Success Objective:
Phase one clearly defines and captures the overall vision of the proposed advanced metering
project and its supporting objectives bound by external conditions and internal resources. We
will work with the BPW to review the range of best-fit solutions1 and evaluate potential vendors
based on fit (matching the vendor’s vision to that of the BPW and the vendor’s ability to
execute). Given the selected potential solutions, BPW weaknesses, strengths, geography and
meter densities are explored that may impact vendor selection and successful execution. The
CTC team will prepare budgetary estimates based on the range of possibilities that align with the
stated vision, objectives and solutions. CTC will prepare and present a report of the findings.
Process:
1. Define and capture the BPU’s global advanced metering vision based on opportunities and
risks related to change in power supply, utility operations, and customer
services/deliverables. Short, mid-term, and long-term outlooks are considered in
development of the vision.
2. Define the overall objectives (and their benefit areas) that support the above vision. This will
assist in establishing clear global objectives and envisioned benefits related to service
improvements, reliability improvements, cost-reduction, risk mitigation, and other key
operational measurements.
3. Explore and identify existing and potential new solutions that meet the requirements of the
stated objectives.
4. Define how the identified solutions are envisioned to work including; Development of a
detailed explanation of what the solution will deliver and outlining overall performance
attributes of the envisioned solutions.
5. Explore and capture advanced metering applications required to support the envisioned
solutions. Review includes relevant existing, new, and envisioned applications supported by.
6. Explore and capture other applications/software required to support the above-envisioned
solutions.
7. Outline the desired data flow and information access for BPU staff and consumers.
8. Outline the interface and integration requirements for the meter data management (MDM)
system.
9. Outline the available communication assets including BPW fiber that can be leveraged in the
AMI implementation.
10. Understand and outline the migration path from the existing electric and water AMI system.
1
CTC uses the following definitions to maintain clarity throughout the advanced metering Evaluation Process: A
Solution is the resolution to a business problem, a Tool is a product, system or process that may serve as a standalone solution or as part of a solution, an Application is the means by which a tool in applied, an Advanced Metering
System is a tool, which varies in functionality and performance, an Advanced Metering Application is an advanced
metering tool as applied to a given solution.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 4
11. Evaluate prospective advanced metering and other technology/application vendors based on
their completeness of vision and their ability to execute. Expand analysis to consider the
BPW’s conditions and ability to execute. Summarize finding through development of a
SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis for each envisioned
solution.
12. Prepare budgetary cost estimates based on overall total cost of ownership (capital costs,
operating costs, maintenance costs, and operating lifetime).
13. Prepare an initial summary of potential benefit areas.
14. Outline potential objections to an advanced metering deployment from concerned citizens
and consumers and explore possible BPW responses. Typical concerns include health,
privacy, and system security.
15. Prepare and present report documenting the above steps.
Deliverables:
•
CTC will lead an on-site strategy session to review and explore the BPW’s objectives,
vision and value expectations for advanced metering including any potential constraints
or mitigating conditions.
•
CTC will provide a summary report detailing estimated budgetary implementation and
operating cost, advantages-disadvantages of various advanced metering and MDM
solutions, SWOT analysis, data flow requirements, and potential best-fit
recommendations.
Deliverable Schedule:
The summary report can be completed within 8 weeks of project initiation.
Phase 2: Project Focus and Risk Mitigation Objective:
Phase two builds on phase one exploring risk mitigation strategies and to refine vendor fit and
potential costs. During this phase, we will prepare RFI’s (Request-for-Information) that
articulate the vision, objectives and envisioned solutions. Analysis of vendor responses and
evaluation of internal risks will be used to refine potential solutions and overall advanced
metering strategy. Final evaluation of the advanced metering overall project will be conducted
using a range of measures designed to address needs and interests of a range of the BPW
stakeholders.
Process:
1. Prepare RFI’s to include vision, objectives, and envisioned solution (what information is
required, when is the information required, where is the information is needed, who will
access, and how access is accomplished). The RFI is structured to help ensure AMI and
MDM vendors provide a detailed explanation of system and application performance
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 5
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
limitations, detailed explanation of how proposed system will work, the vendor’s role within
the proposed solution, identified and required partners, cost estimates, and other key
attributes. A key goal of the RFI process is to permit the BPW the visibility required to
evaluate vendors on an apple-to-apple basis.
Distribute RFI to identified vendors. Upon receipt of responses evaluate based on
completeness of vision, fit, and ability to execute.
Refine evaluation of the BPW’s ability to execute and define mitigation strategies to
successfully deploy solutions. Base evaluation on internal weaknesses externalities and
threats.
Refine envisioned solutions as required based on new vendor data and utility weakness
mitigation analysis. Narrow final solution options and preferences.
Expand the benefit and cost analysis prepared in phase one.
Identify best-fit advanced metering and other vendors based on RFI responses based on the
responses and the revised cost-benefit analysis. Prepare final evaluation of overall project
and selected solutions based on value delivered, best-fit vendors, internal capabilities, ROI,
potential deployment strategies, and other attributes.
Update and revise findings and recommendations.
Deliverables:
•
•
•
CTC will develop and prepare and distribute an RFI to selected vendors, which outlines
and defines performance and reporting requirements.
Initial cost-benefit analysis of the proposed advanced metering project.
Updated report will include the RFI evaluation results, solution recommendations, and
updated SWOT analysis.
Deliverable Schedule:
Assuming vendors are given 6 weeks to respond to the RFI, this phase can be completed within
10 weeks of initiation of the phase.
Phase 3: Vendor Selection and Contracting Objective:
Update the procurement document prepared in previous steps based on the information gathered
and refined during the RFI process. The objective of this phase is to guide the advanced metering
and MDM vendor selection and assist in preparing for the advanced metering implementation.
Particular attention is paid to better understand the anticipated performance and total life-cycle
costs including procurement, installation, integration, and operation, and refinement of
anticipated benefits. Specific activities include:
Process:
1. Capture and incorporate data from previous phases.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 6
2. Prepare standard response templates for inclusion in RFP (Request-for-Proposal). Require
use of templates that provide a foundation for an apples-to-apples comparison of vendor
responses, outline contract requirements - including performance and acceptance
measurements, and prepare standard cost template for inclusion in RFP.
3. Prepare and distribute an RFP to the identified best-fit turnkey vendors. If desired by the
BPW include options for contract labor to conduct advanced metering installation and meter
change out.
4. Manage the RFP distribution and response process including responding to vendor questions.
5. Prepare RFP evaluation tools including pricing, performance, and compliance criteria.
6. Review and prepare recommendations and considerations based on RFP responses.
7. Update the cost and benefit analysis prepared in previous steps- expands to include operating
cost estimates based on RFP responses.
8. Assist in contract negotiations and contract execution (non-legal).
Deliverables:
•
•
•
•
•
Develop RFP for distribution to selected vendors, which outlines and defines
performance and reporting requirements.
Prepare evaluation tools for facilitation of CTC and the BPW RFP review.
Update cost-benefit analysis of the proposed advanced metering project.
Prepare flowchart of data flow and required interfaces.
Report updates including turnkey vendor and solution recommendations, and
implementation considerations.
Deliverable Schedule:
Assuming vendors are given 6 weeks to respond to the RFI, this phase can be completed within
10 weeks of initiation of the phase.
Project Costs CTC proposes to perform the tasks described above for a not-to-exceed cost of $59,910
including travel and expenses.
will bill our work (as well as any additional work requested by the Holland BPW) at the
following fully burdened hourly rates.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 7
CTC Labor Category
Director of Engineering
Principal Engineer/Analyst
Senior Engineer/Analyst
Staff Engineer/Analyst
Engineer/Communications Aide
Rate
$165
$155
$135
$125
$ 70
Because our clients are almost exclusively in the public sector, our rates are extremely
competitive relative to many competitors who do business planning, engineering, and other kinds
of strategic work on communications projects.
CTC’s rates are inclusive of all routine expenses including administrative, accounting, and
computer support, telephone calls, photocopying, and local travel. Long-distance traveled is
billed at our cost with no mark-up.
Please note that CTC reserves the right to reallocate funds among tasks and team members so
long as the total cost is not exceeded.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 8
2. Value Analysis Framework
This attachment provides valuation considerations and presents framework for evaluating the
benefits of advanced metering. This framework is used by CTC in development of the AMI
value analysis.
Valuation Considerations
The advanced metering system is a tool. The value of the tool is not in having it but in how it is
applied. The ultimate value is driven by procedural and organizational changes as it applies to
consumers, utility operations, and management of power supply. Additionally not all value is
directly measureable. Advanced metering, for instance, can increase consumer satisfaction,
empower consumer choices, and assist in consumer conservation and cost control. These indirect
benefits not only impact consumers but BPW staff as well. Empowerment of staff with current,
timely, and accurate information can resolve issues quicker with less conflict. This
empowerment increases the quality of work life.
The Regulatory Compact
The BPW is guaranteed a monopoly electric and water service area. Consumers do not have a
choice in electric or water suppliers. In return, the utility has an obligation to serve and the Board
regulates the services. In the past the transaction was simply selling and supplying electricity and
water. Today however, the obligation has expanded to include conservation. The utility now has
a responsibility to empower and manage consumer consumption and costs while providing
comfort and convenience. Advanced metering can assist in meeting new operating objectives and
driving consumer and utility value. The value of this however is indirect, and not directly
recorded in valuation estimates.
Valuation Outline
Value Components
Advanced metering value has three key value components:
• BPU: reduce or eliminate existing or future utility capital and operation costs
(distribution and power supply) and revenue recovery.
• Consumer: reduce or eliminate existing or future charges on energy/water bill
(consumption and demand).
• Societal: reduce impact of existing or future environmental and other societal costs.
Each component will have direct measurable benefits and indirect benefits. For the value
analysis, we concentrated on measurable benefits from four key functional areas.
• Asset Management
o Customer Premises
o Distribution System
• Automation and Reporting
o Customer Premises
o Distribution Automation (DA)
• Demand Management
o Distribution System (Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) and VAR control)
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 9
•
o Direct Load Control (DLC)
o Rates
Services
o External Services
o Services for support of retail customer
Benefit Categories
We then applied the above to benefit categories. The categories include:
• Economic
o Ancillary Revenue – New
o Asset optimization
§ Avoided generation capacity purchases
§ Optimized existing generation asset mix
§ Optimized sizing and loading of transformers
§ Reduced ancillary generation service costs
§ Reduced congestion cost
o Capital savings
§ Avoided distribution capital costs
§ Deferred distribution capacity and equipment investments
§ Deferred transmission capacity and equipment investments
§ Reduced distribution equipment failures
§ Reduced transmission equipment failures
o Electricity cost savings & energy efficiencies
§ Reduced demand charges
§ Reduced energy consumption and costs
o Operations & maintenance savings - distribution
§ Reduced distribution equipment maintenance cost
§ Reduced distribution system operations cost
§ Reduced customer service costs
§ Reduced meter reading and billing costs
o Unaccounted for losses
§ Reduced electric system losses
§ Reduced energy diversion
§ Reduced water system losses
§ Reduced water diversion
• Environmental
o Air emissions
§ Reduced CO2 and other emissions
• Reliability
o Power interruptions
§ Reduced sustained outages (greater than 5 minutes)
§ Reduced major outages (customer count dependent upon utility size)
§ Reduced service restoration costs and time
o Power quality
§ Reduced momentary outages
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 10
•
•
§ Reduced sags and swells
Safety
Security
o Energy security
§ Reduced oil usage
§ Reduced widespread blackouts
Draft Activities for the AMI Value Analysis As a starting point CTC will review the applicability of the following activities as it relates to the
BPU and BPU consumers. Of particular note since the BPU has an existing AMR system some
of the benefits have already been established and other benefits are enhanced or new.
• Environmental – Air Emissions
o Reduction of Emissions
• Economic
o Ancillary Revenue - New
§ Prepayment Program - Participation Fees
o Capital Savings
§ Eliminate Required Equipment Replacements – Electric
§ Eliminate Required Equipment Replacements – Water
§ Identify Equipment Failures, Operational Issues, and Settings Issues –
Electric
§ Identify Equipment Failures, Operational Issues, and Settings Issues –
Water
§ Reduction of Transformer Failures
o Consumption Cost Savings & Efficiencies
§ Capacitor Bank Monitor and Control
§ Increase Conservation – Water
§ Prepayment Program - Bad Debt Reduction
§ Prepayment Program - Energy Reduction
§ Rate Programs - Incentive/Behavioral Demand Side Management (DSM)
§ Conservation Voltage Reduction
o Operations & Maintenance Savings – Distribution
§ Conduct Load Survey and Rate Data Collection – Electric
§ Conduct Load Survey and Rate Data Collection – Water
§ Conservation and Restriction Monitoring – Water
§ Eliminate or Reduce Annual Maintenance Costs – Electric
§ Eliminate or Reduce Annual Maintenance Costs – Water
§ Estimated Billing – Electric
§ Estimated Billing – Water
§ Monthly Meter Reading – Electric
§ Monthly Meter Reading – Water
§ Move-in and Move-Out Reads – Electric
§ Move-in and Move-Out Reads – Water
§ Move-in and Move-Outs Settlement- Electric
§ Move-in and Move-Outs Settlement- Water
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 11
§ Respond to Billing Questions – Electric
§ Respond to Billing Questions – Water
§ Respond to Outage Questions and Complaints
§ Respond to Power Quality Questions and Complaints
§ Service Disconnect/Reconnect – Electric
§ Service Disconnect/Reconnect – Water
§ Special Reads (confirmation and re-reads) – Electric
§ Special Reads (confirmation and re-reads) – Water
§ Validation of System Repairs – Electric
§ Validation of System Repairs - Water
o Power or Service Interruptions
§ Broken Supply Detection (Utility and Consumer) – Water
§ Reduction of Outages and Failures – Electric
§ Reduction of Outages and Failures - Water
o Unaccounted for Losses
§ Identification and Reduction of System Losses – Electric
§ Identification and Reduction of System Losses – Water
§ Identify and Record Meter Tampering (Theft Investigation) – Electric
§ Identify and Record Meter Tampering (Theft Investigation) – Water
§ Improve Metering Accuracy – Electric
§ Improve Metering Accuracy – Water
§ Reduction of Losses due to Tampering/Diversion – Electric
§ Reduction of Losses due to Tampering/Diversion - Water
3. CTC Background Since 1983, CTC has served the public sector and the public interest—and performed a range of
strategic and business planning tasks and telecommunications strategies and analysis projects for
hundreds of jurisdictions and municipal utilities nationwide.
CTC offers incomparable expertise in the areas of independent business and engineering
assessment, feasibility analysis, and design for fiber and wireless broadband networks. Our firm
has conducted government/community broadband planning for a wide range of entities across the
United States. We also advise clients internationally regarding communications networking and
assisted the government of New Zealand with its national fiber-to-the-home plans.
Our tower team has processed more than 2,800 wireless antenna and tower applications for our
municipal clients, giving us insight into the many alternatives available to mitigate the impact of
new facilities on a community as well as an understanding of zoning standards that protect the
public interest yet permit deployment of new services to benefit residents.
Our project team’s collective experience and capabilities truly set CTC apart. Most of our staff
are engineers, analysts, scientists, or technicians. We offer a team with the experience and
analytical agility to engage virtually any strategic, technical, or business issue regarding
communications infrastructure. Such capability (grounded in both intellect and experience) is the
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 12
strongest credential any consultant can offer—because it enables us to adapt to and address your
particular needs rather than offering solutions in our comfort zone.
Further, CTC is independent and not beholden to any industry. As a matter of policy, we do not
work for the communications industry, do not sell or endorse equipment, and do not bid on
construction contracts.
CTC is a stable and established consulting firm. The projects summarized in this document
demonstrate our agility and analytical breadth—as well as the confidence our clients hold that
CTC can engage and conquer a wide range of issues and challenges. CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 13
Past Experience The following are just a few of the hundreds of client projects CTC has successfully completed
over the past 30 years.
Sturgis Electric Department
CTC has provided ongoing advisory services to this Michigan utility for several years. We have
advised on legislative actions and energy supply changes that may impact the applicability of
smart meter/Smart Grid technologies. Most recently we conducted a detailed advanced metering
infrastructure (AMI) implementation cost and benefit analysis. We are in the process of
preparing an RFI, which CTC will use the results to refine the implementation and benefit
analysis.
Hillsdale Board of Public Utilities
The Hillsdale BPU is moving forward to full implementation of an AMI system. CTC assisted
the Hillsdale BPU in the evaluation of the responses to the request for proposal and assisted in
development of contract terms. CTC is providing implementation support is to assist the
Hillsdale BPU in the evaluation and testing of the initial AMI implementation and to provide ongoing support through the deployment. Another objective of this step is to better understand the
nuances of the selected AMI solution to refine the anticipated performance and to update the
estimated total life-cycle costs (procurement, installation and operation).
Maryland Public Service Commission
CTC assisted the State of Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC) in evaluating evolving
Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) technologies proposed by the investor-owned utilities
in the state.
We assessed the claims of potential hardware vendors and technology roadmaps, and evaluated
the true areas of benefit and risk of the technology for the state’s ratepayers. We reviewed the
technology, cost estimates, scalability, and the likely lifecycle of the technology.
Our team provided PSC staff with confidential and non-confidential public testimony and a
range of clear, organized exhibits that addressed the relative merits and limitations of AMI
proposals filed with the PSC. We participated in rounds of data requests and discussions with the
PSC and the utilities.
Our analysis included forward-looking evaluation of the changing nature of energy use,
including distributed generation and the increased use of plug-in hybrid vehicles. We also
examined issues of consumer acceptance and adoption—knowing that those are key factors in
realizing the projected benefits of many AMI implementations. In addition, our vendor and
technology evaluations included an assessment of the physical characteristics of the architecture
used in each solution, as well as the impact of proprietary and standardized equipment on
network architecture and lifecycle costs.
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 14
Port Angeles, Washington
CTC prepared a needs assessment and strategic recommendation report for Port Angeles to
support the city’s efforts to evaluate its municipal network. CTC staff conducted interviews with
city personnel and performed on-site inspections of municipal facilities. We then discussed
existing and projected telecommunications and data network application requirements in the
context of the existing networking infrastructure’s ability to meet those needs. Special attention
was given to security and redundancy issues. The report concluded with recommendations and
cost estimates for technical enhancements to the City’s network.
In a subsequent phase of our engagement, CTC designed and oversaw the implementation of a
citywide broadband wireless network project that will provide integrated communications and
interoperability among all local public safety entities in the city. The high-capacity 4.9 GHz
broadband wireless network provides public safety staff in the field with full and timely access to
state, federal, and GIS databases, and will allow EMS responders to access medical databases
and support on-site telemetry of patient status. A commercial “open access” multi-provider
wireless access system was deployed as a public–private partnership with a local Internet service
provider (ISP); it provides citywide WiFi services in the 2.4 GHz band.
Palo Alto, California
CTC performed a fiber optic network design and feasibility analysis to support the City’s
municipal utility as it explores several fiber optic construction projects. The utility’s goal is to
expand its existing fiber optic network to further meet the needs of the City and surrounding
school districts, and to increase the footprint of its commercial fiber optic network.
Our project report included an assessment of how to leverage existing infrastructure to both
promote commercial wireless broadband deployment and improve municipal Smart Grid and
public safety technologies. We also prepared a framework for establishing a public-private
partnership to encourage greater wireline infrastructure construction. Specific engineering design
assistance and detailed cost estimates were provided for each of the wireless and wireline
development scenarios.
Murfreesboro (TN) Electric Department
CTC has supported MED on a range of strategic and analytical tasks, including fiber optic and
Smart Grid planning. We also developed a framework to help MED select a Meter Data
Management (MDM) system and assisted with the preparation of its American Public Power
Association—Reliable Public Power Provider (RP3) application.
Norwich (CT) Public Utilities
CTC conducted a comprehensive fiber feasibility study for NPU. The study led NPU to pursue a
model that served city facilities, utility assets, schools, and the medical community rather than FTTP.
We are assisting NPU with an ongoing Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) project.
State of Delaware
CTC has provided communications engineering consulting services to the State of Delaware
Department of Transportation for 15 years. Most recently, our business analysts and engineers
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 15
wrote the statewide master plan for deploying an integrated broadband fiber and microwave
network. CTC has also advised the state on its statewide 700 MHz mobile data network,
including a requirements analysis, propagation studies, and system design.
In a previous DelDOT engagement, CTC developed specifications for and oversaw the
implementation of a mobile traffic camera system utilizing standards-based 802.11b wireless
Ethernet transmission and MPEG-2 video encoding for flexible deployments in construction
zones and emergency situations.
CTC also supported DelDOT in the unprecedented implementation of a statewide Enhanced
Traffic Advisory Radio System (E-TARS). CTC assisted in negotiating the purchase of a
commercial AM broadcast license, then designed the studio and transmission systems for
WTMC, a class D, 520 Watt AM radio station that provides commercial-caliber traffic
broadcasts. CTC continues to provide technical support and maintenance for WTMC.
City and County of San Francisco, California
As longtime broadband consultants to the City and County of San Francisco, CTC was asked to
engineer and design a pilot fiber-to-the-home (FTTP) project for the southeastern portion of the
city. Our work involved a comprehensive survey of existing carrier networks and franchise
agreements; availability of existing conduit; and opportunities to collocate with the city’s
Internet backbone. We planned and designed hub facilities and pole mounting, created a typical
street-level design maps in GIS, and drove the entire route.
We began by outlining the advantages and disadvantages of potential locations and coverage
areas, based on engineering considerations such as the relative difficulty and cost of building in
particular areas or to certain sites. We then developed a detailed network design for the proposed
pilot locations, both to guide construction and to estimate construction costs.
We identified city resources and infrastructure that could be made available for the project; met
with Department of Public Works staff to determine permitting and design requirements; and
worked with city staff and utility owners in the right-of-way to identify ways to reduce costs and
speed construction.
Based on the design and resources information collected, we created a comprehensive scope of
work for a construction RFP, which clearly defined the scope of responsibility for the contractor,
including requirements for testing, maintenance and support, and documentation.
Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP)
CTC developed a technology and business plan for LADWP—the country’s largest municipal
water and power utility—to enable the Department to improve its ability to offer services to the
public and businesses over its fiber network. Our engagement included the development, too, of
business process refinement and improvement recommendations. Our team assessed existing
communications infrastructure and interviewed potential customers for networking services.
Based on these findings CTC discussed the potential benefits and risks associated with different
business models and deployment strategies. CTC prepared recommendations in a wide range of
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 16
areas such as marketing, pricing, customer service/care, operations, and scaling.
City of Seattle and Seattle City Light
From 2008 to the present, CTC has conducted a feasibility study, business case analysis, and
“off-the-balance-sheet” benefits analysis for the fiber-optic network proposed by the mayor.
The first study, FTTP Municipal Broadband Risks and Benefits Evaluation, included the
following elements:
• Internal needs analysis
• Market research of both residential and business
• Assessment of competing services and technologies
• Evaluation of the business case and business risks
Following on that report, CTC researched and wrote an FTTP Benefits Evaluation for the City,
which explored the benefits of FTTP beyond the traditional balance sheet, including cost
avoidance, monetary savings, and environmental impact.
Gastonia, North Carolina
CTC conducted a comprehensive FTTP feasibility study for Gastonia’s municipal electric utility
which included a technology assessment, market analysis, and a competitive assessment. One of
the project outcomes was assisting Gastonia in understanding the full range of opportunities and
risks of a new telecommunication venture, and the likelihood of the venture to require financial
support beyond subscriber revenues.
Jackson (TN) Energy Authority
CTC provided an independent evaluation of responses to JEA’s request for proposals for
wholesale voice service providers, and supported JEA throughout the vendor selection process.
With JEA staff input, CTC developed the evaluation system and scoring matrix; evaluated the
responses on the basis of criteria including strategic fit, operational fit, reliability, and overall
cost; and delivered a written report recommending two respondents as finalists for further
consideration by JEA. CTC then prepared a strategic and financial assessment of the finalists’
competing contract proposals, and assisted JEA in prolonged negotiations with the selected
vendor.
Richland, Washington
CTC prepared a fiber optic business plan to meet the needs of City facilities, the electric utility,
schools, hospitals, banks, and other institutions. Work included preparation of various business
models, review of operational requirements, and preparation of pro-forma financial statements.
Team Resumes We propose the following team to complete the tasks described in our scope of work. Resumes
for each team member are attached below.
Thomas J. Asp, MBA, Principal Engineer and Analyst
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 17
Eric Wirth, Senior Project Engineer
Richard T. Kent, Jr., P.E., Senior Engineer
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 18
Thomas J. Asp, MBA
CTC Principal Engineer and Analyst
EXPERIENCE SUMMARY
Mr. Asp specializes in evaluating connectivity (voice, video, and data) options and
recommending effective solutions for clients throughout the United States. He holds more than
25 years of experience as an engineer and analyst in communications and public power systems.
His experience includes electric and telecommunication system design, network feasibility,
evaluation of the financial impact of projects on operations, and provision of expert testimony.
Mr. Asp is recognized as an expert in evaluating and offering recommendations regarding
municipal broadband communications systems. He has been actively involved with
telecommunication market research and feasibility analysis for over a decade, both with CTC
and previously as a partner at the public accounting firm of Virchow Krause (Baker Tilley).
Mr. Asp also has significant experience in the communications industry, including as vice
president of client relations at Tantalus, an AMI/Smart Grid equipment vendor. He has worked in
the areas of cellular, cable TV, broadband, and mobile radio, including as a product manager in
the Cellular Mobile Telephone, Automatic Meter Reading, and Distribution Automation
industries.
Broadband Networks (Wired and Wireless)
Mr. Asp is regarded as one of the premier analysts in the United States regarding municipal
planning and deployment of broadband systems to meet economic development, digital
inclusion, and other needs. He has assisted numerous local governments, municipal utilities, and
municipal consortia to evaluate their communities’ communications needs and determine the
financial parameters and business case for meeting those needs.
In this area, Mr. Asp’s experience includes preparing connectivity feasibility studies for
municipal networks, including economic analysis, market assessment, technology review, vendor
analysis, and business plan development. He has assisted numerous communities with evaluating
the feasibility of advanced connectivity services alternatives including provider partnerships and
city-owned networks. He has reviewed options under cable franchise agreement for municipal
purchase and operation. Mr. Asp has reviewed offerings and operations of incumbent
telecommunications providers and assisted in negotiations with incumbent telecommunications
providers to enhance availability of existing services and to encourage new and innovative
offerings.
Some select examples of his projects include:
• Provided Jackson (Tennessee) Energy Authority an independent evaluation of responses
to JEA’s 2010 request for proposals (RFP) soliciting vendors to provide wholesale voice
services. With JEA staff input, he developed the evaluation system and scoring matrix to
ensure a balanced approach that best met JEA’s needs. Responses were evaluated on the
basis of strategic fit, operational fit, reliability, and overall cost; recommended two
respondents as finalists for further consideration by JEA; and assisted JEA in negotiating
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 19
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
with those finalists. CTC then presented to JEA management a written report
recommending the “best-fit” vendor.
Completed a business and technology plan for Los Angeles Department of Water and
Power (LADWP) to determine the feasibility of expanding the connectivity services
offered to the businesses and institutions over the Department’s fiber network. Included
in the analysis was a valuation of additional fiber routes that LADWP acquired from the
City of Los Angeles.
Served as a business consultant to the City and County of San Francisco. Investigated the
feasibility of the city building and operating a fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) network to
every home and business in San Francisco. The project included an analysis of multiple
business models and business recommendations customized for San Francisco’s unique
circumstances.
Developed a business case analysis for DC-Net, a District-owned and operated fiber optic
telecommunications network that provides voice and data services. The network consists
of resilient, interconnected fiber optic rings that connect more than 400 government
buildings in the District, including Police Department, Emergency Management Agency,
and Fire Department radio towers.
Conducted a feasibility study, a business case analysis, and an “off-the-balance-sheet”
benefits analysis for a fiber-optic network proposed by the mayor of the City of Seattle.
The first study, FTTP Municipal Broadband Risks and Benefits Evaluation, sponsored by
Seattle City Light, included the following elements:
• Internal needs analysis
• Market research of both residential and business
• Assessment of competing services and technologies
• Evaluation of the business case and business risks
Following on that report, Mr. Asp researched and wrote an FTTP Benefits Evaluation for
the City, which explored the benefits of FTTP beyond the traditional balance sheet,
including cost avoidance, monetary savings, and environmental impact.
Performed an expert assessment of a business and marketing plan for Utah
Telecommunication Open Infrastructure Agencies (UTOPIA’s) open access FTTP
network. The project included a strategy session with key stakeholders, collection of
relevant background material, an analysis of UTOPIA market research and marketing
models, and an independent evaluation of UTOPIA’s business plan. Mr. Asp’s work
focused on improving the participating UTOPIA communities’ ongoing cash flow and
increasing participation of households and businesses in those communities.
Prepared a fiber optic business plan for Richland Utilities, Washington to meet the needs
of city facilities, the electric utility, schools, hospitals, banks, and other institutions. Work
included preparation of various business models, review of operational requirements, and
preparation of pro-forma financial statements.
Provided extensive business planning assistance to the State of Maryland’s One
Maryland program, which lead to build an interconnected fiber-optic broadband network
that reaches every county and city in Maryland and will provide backbone and middlemile capacity for commercial carriers.
Managed project assisting Bountiful City, UT with the development of a business plan
for a citywide wireless network. This project included the review of a conceptual design,
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 20
•
•
•
•
reviewing proposed business relationships and staffing, and conducting a cost-benefit
analysis.
Project manager in assisting Ames, IA with the review of existing architecture,
development of a network design, and preparation of detailed cost estimates for the
acquisition and installation of WiFi hot spots and supporting infrastructure. This project
has now moved into implementation preparations.
Led consulting team in investigating several WiFi deployment models, development of a
business plan (including market research and financial analysis), and development of a
partnership RFP for St. Louis Park, MN. Mr. Asp assisted the city to pilot the network
and then prepared specifications and bid documents to identify both integrators and
operators for the network.
Assisted the City of Tucson, AZ with a wireless feasibility study that included market
research, competitive industry assessment, internal and external needs assessments,
financial analysis, and the development of a business plan.
Assistance in the implementation of an Institutional Fiber Network (I-Net) for Norwich
Public Utilities in Norwich, CT. Project included development of a plan and strategy for
the Fiber Optic Enterprise.
DA, AMR, SCADA
In the areas of Distribution Automation (DA), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
(SCADA), mobile radio, and Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), Mr. Asp has assisted
municipal utilities and public power cooperatives with extensive evaluative and design services.
Specifically, he has prepared evaluations and submitted recommendations on AMI alternatives
and benefits. He has assessed existing and evolving technologies and services to support AMI
and DA for electric utilities and has developed and directed demonstration plans to test
technologies to support distribution automation—including providing recommendations for
establishing vendor alliances, performing research and designs networks to combine multi-utility
communications, and outlining, evaluating, and recommending communication requirements and
options for electric utility DA, SCADA, mobile radio, and AMI.
TESTIMONY & VALUATION
In addition to assisting over 80 communities and counties in evaluating financial opportunities to
provide voice, data, and video services, Mr. Asp has provided financial and technical testimony
and expert advice. Some examples include:
• Conducted an exhaustive business case analysis and prepared expert witness testimony
on behalf of the City of Alameda in a federal court case involving the business practices,
business results, and ultimate sale of its fiber optic enterprise. The testimony included a
comparative analysis of business models employed by municipal fiber networks
nationwide and a review and valuation of several recent cable business transactions.
• Maryland Public Service Commission regarding Baltimore Gas & Electric’s application
for deployment of AMI and smart grid technologies. Written and sworn testimony
included an analysis of smart grid technologies, vendor development, and impact to rates.
• Pacific Gas & Electric regarding the financial and technical viability of the use of
Broadband over Power line (BPL) for Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) and support of
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 21
•
•
new business opportunities. Mr. Asp prepared a report in anticipation of being called to
testify before the California PUC
The City of Lebanon, OH in connection with a dispute over an Assessment of
Infrastructure Connectivity Fee with home-builders and Time Warner Cable. The
Assessment and disposition regarded the reasonableness of the connection fee assessed to
each new home by the municipal telecom department
The City of Marshal, MO in determination of the value of the incumbent cable television
system owned and operated by Time Warner.
EMPLOYMENT HISTORY
2013–Present
Principal Engineer and Analyst, CTC
2011–2013
Vice President of Client Relations, Tantalus
2005–2011
Principal Engineer and Analyst, CTC
2000–2005
Partner, Baker Tilly Virchow Krause
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, North Dakota State University, 1979
Master of Business Administration, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, 1989
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 22
Eric Wirth
CTC Senior Project Engineer
EXPERIENCE SUMMARY
Eric Wirth has more than eight years of communications engineering experience; he specializes
in evaluating broadband (video, voice, and data) telecommunications networks, analyzing
emerging broadband technologies, and designing broadband networks for institutional uses. In
addition, Mr. Wirth is conducting extensive and ongoing research on applications for Internet
Protocol (IP) technology, including video-over-IP (VoIP) for video transmission over wide area
networks, video conferencing, and other communication applications for wide area networks.
Utility and Public Safety Fiber Optic Networking
Mr. Wirth’s experience includes the design and implementation of a variety of fiber optic
communications network. Some select examples of his work include:
•
•
•
•
Design and pricing of fiber optic cable, electronics, and overall architecture of a
survivable emergency communications system for Tennessee Valley Public Power
Association (TVPPA) distributors. The design included MPLS and DWDM technology,
and leveraged TVPPA and distributor fiber.
Design and implementation of a fiber optic network for Norwich (Connecticut) Public
Utilities. The project consisted of developing detailed fiber optic route design and cost
estimates, network electronic design and cost estimates (including SCADA
transportation), and a request for proposals (RFP) for Norwich’s use in selecting a
contractor to complete the installation. In addition to serving the utility’s needs, the fiber
optic network was designed to serve city, schools, and hospital users.
Fiber optic network and electronics design, and RFP development, for the City of Dover,
Delaware Electric Department. Mr. Wirth developed a fiber optic network design to
provide additional redundancy and functionality for the existing city fiber optic network.
In addition, he developed a network electronics design to leverage the new fiber optic
communications links to increase the reliability of the city’s network.
Fiber optic network design and feasibility analysis for the City of Palo Alto, California.
The City is examining several fiber optic construction projects to expand its existing fiber
optic network to further meet the needs of the city and surrounding school districts, and
to increase the footprint of its commercial fiber optic network. As a municipal electric,
Palo Alto is exploring several options for fiber optic design.
Wireless Communications
Mr. Wirth has extensive experience working on numerous wireless networking projects, from
analysis and feasibility to design and implementation. These networks range in scope from small
hot spots to area-wide and regional networks. Some representative examples of his projects
include:
•
Designing and overseeing the implementation of a citywide broadband wireless network
project that will provide integrated communications and interoperability among all local
public safety entities in the City of Port Angeles, Washington. The high-capacity 4.9 GHz
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 23
•
•
broadband wireless network provides public safety staff in the field with full and timely
access to state, federal, and GIS databases, and will allow EMS responders to access
medical databases and support on-site telemetry of patient status. A commercial “open
access” multi-provider wireless access system was deployed as a public–private
partnership with a local Internet service provider (ISP); it provides citywide WiFi
services in the 2.4 GHz band. The city and the local ISP partner have developed a
subscription package that is attractive to a wide range of commercial, residential, and
public sector users.
Designing a cost-effective broadband wireless network for the City of Annapolis,
Maryland. This network serves as a backbone to provide connectivity for a video
surveillance system throughout downtown Annapolis. The network has the capacity to
meet all current needs, provide 99.999 percent availability, and have substantial reserve
capacity to support the addition of new video requirements, expanded IP-based voice and
data services, and support backhaul for a potential mobile wireless solution.
Acting as lead engineer for the design and implementation of a microwave network to
enable communications between public health agencies in Maryland and the District of
Columbia. The microwave project is designed to provide connectivity to area hospitals to
ensure reliable communications and data sharing in the event of problems with the public
communications infrastructure. In addition, the robust microwave connectivity allows for
day-to-day data sharing, voice communications, and interoperable communications. This
connectivity will provide the transport mechanism necessary for patient tracking and
other information sharing platforms.
Public Safety Networking
Some representative examples of Mr. Wirth’s projects include:
•
•
•
•
Designed, implemented and tested a backhaul network for the Arlington County, Virginia
public safety radio network. The backhaul network consists of SONET equipment over a
county-owned fiber optic network that increases the reliability and availability of the
public safety radio system.
Lead engineer for the design and implementation of a 19-jurisdiction regional fiber optic
public safety interconnection network in the National Capital Region (DC, MD, VA).
NCRnet provides an interoperable, robust, and reliable fiber infrastructure to augment the
communication capabilities of first responder communities in the NCR. These
communities include local and regional law enforcement, fire, emergency management,
transportation, and public health agencies.
Performed radio frequency (RF) coverage analysis and prepared design recommendations
for improving public safety radio coverage for Warren County, Pennsylvania. Included
analysis of the county’s existing public safety radio system and recommendations to
improve coverage for both the county’s public safety radio system and commercial
cellular.
Collaborated on the development of a master telecommunications plan for the Delaware
Department of Transportation. The plan acts as a guide for the department to consolidate
several disparate network environments into a unified communications network capable
of supporting current and future transportation and public safety applications. Part of the
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 24
plan involves developing a system-level design that incorporates fiber optics, microwave,
and land-mobile radio. The plan requires coordination among a variety of state agencies
to develop a network that meets the department’s critical public safety requirements.
Video and Broadcast Communications Engineering
Mr. Wirth’s experience includes the design and implementation of video, voice, and data
networks. Some select examples of his work include:
•
•
•
Designed and implemented a public, educational, and governmental (PEG) access and
monitoring network for Montgomery County, Maryland. The network uses IP-based
video encoders and the County’s state-of-the-art IT network to improve the quality and
functionality of video transport throughout the county.
Developed a design and integration solution for cablecast channels for Monterey County,
California. Analyzed the existing audio-visual and broadcast systems and developed
recommendations for future development. Designed an IP-based video server system
capable of recording and airing live meetings and scheduling cable/broadcasts.
Completed on-site integration, testing, and training on the video server system.
Designed and implemented state-of-the-art videoconferencing and teleconferencing tools
for the 19 jurisdictions in the National Capital Region Emergency Operations Centers
(EOCs) and Emergency Communications Centers (ECCs). CTC developed the systems’
designs and oversaw implementation to interconnect the EOCs and ECCs throughout the
region, under a grant from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Urban Areas
Security Initiative (UASI).
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering, University of Virginia, School of Engineering and
Applied Science, Charlottesville, Virginia, 2004.
PRIOR TO COMING TO CTC IN 2004
1998-2003, Technician, Schnabel Engineering, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 25
Richard T. Kent, Jr., P.E.
CTC Senior Engineer
EXPERIENCE SUMMARY
CTC Technology & Energy - Contractor
Consulting in Electrical Engineering
2013 – Present
Tanner Electric Cooperative
Manager of Operations & Engineering
2009 - 2013
- Responsible for planning, engineering design, construction, and maintenance of distribution
and transmission facilities.
- Responsible for modifications and maintenance 115/12kv substations. Responsible for
maintenance of 115kv transmission line.
- Responsible for the installation of an Advances Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system with
smart meters.
- Worked with customers to provide electric service and handle issues.
- Coordinated efforts and project manager of the installation of a 2.5-mile underwater electric
and fiber cable, a $7,000,000 project.
Hawaiian Electric Company
Lead Transmission Planning Engineer
2009
- Responsible for the transmission planning of the HELCO system (the large island of
Hawaii) using PSS/E.
- Worked with IPPs developing Interconnection Requirements Studies (IRS) to insure proper
transmission facilities are installed and paid by IPP.
- Analyzed proper interconnections for large-scale wind generators.
- Performed economic evaluations of alternatives.
- Trained others in transmission planning and arranged for formal training of PSS/E.
- Supervised operational analysis of transmission system.
Peninsula Light Company
Distribution Supervisor
- Supervised the engineering of all distribution facilities.
- Visited job sites to prepare and review work.
2008 – 2009
Seattle City Light
Engineering Division Director
2007 – 2008
- Lead an engineering organization consisting of 160 employees for an electric utility with
over 400,000 customers.
- Responsible for transmission and distribution planning activities and ARC flash studies.
- Directed transmission and distribution engineering design.
- Responsible for Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards (CIPs) compliance with WECC.
- Oversaw $170 million annual budget.
- Contracted with other utilities and commercial entities for joint use of facilities and other
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 26
-
applications.
Member of steering committees for various projects including Outage Management System,
Asset Management, Utility Footprint Solutions, GIS, and Alaska Way Viaduct.
Developed and revised processes both within and outside the Division.
Met with customers to discuss their needs and develops strategies to improve customer
service and efficiencies.
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Energy Policy Lead
2004 – 2007
- Team member of and provides electric utility guidance for the National SCADA Test Bed
(NSTB) effort including cyber intrusion.
- Performed various studies for and coordinates INL activities with the Federal Energy
Regulatory Commission (FERC).
- Developed supporting information for development of cyber Critical Infrastructure Protection
Standards (CIPs) for FERC.
- Contributed to an electric utility cyber (control systems) intrusion demonstration for the
Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
- Participated on various FERC task forces and committees on hydropower.
- Analyzed impact of the new energy bill on the behalf of the FERC.
- Developed strategy to improved electric utility grid reliability for DARPA.
- DOE Q level security clearance.
Ocala Electric Utility
Deputy Director
- Managed 175 employees in all aspects of the electric utility.
- Responsible for transmission, distribution, and power requirements planning.
- Oversaw System Operations.
- Developed and administered $120 million budget.
- Coordinated annual updates to emergency restoration plan.
- Developed strategic plan yearly and oversaw its implementation.
- Established and oversaw construction of fiber communications system.
- Board member of Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FRCC) of NERC.
- Executive Committee member of the Florida Coordinating Group (FCG).
- Active with the Florida Municipal Power Agency (FMPA).
- Active in benchmarking activities to improve utility performance.
- Member of the APPA Engineering and Operations Committee.
- Member of Information Technology (IT) Leadership Council.
1996 – 2004
Iowa Southern & IES (now Alliant Energy)
Manager, Generation, Transmission, & Substations
1989 – 1996
Engineering, System Planning, and Standards
- Directed efforts of the System Planning Department, Transmission & Substation Engineering
Department, Distribution Standards Group, and Power Plant Engineering Department.
- Performed integrated resource planning analyses.
- Supervised land acquisition, drafting, forecasting, contract negotiations, environmental
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 27
-
protection, construction budget, and system maintenance.
Testified before state commission in rate hearing.
Worked with FERC staff for approval of non-regulated facilities.
Chaired DRC & NSWG and active in EC & JSSR MAPP committees.
Active in the development of an RTG.
United Illuminating Company
Senior Planning Engineer
1986 – 1989
- Supervised a team of engineers in the planning of the transmission system for both expansion
and operations using PSS/E.
- Active in NEPOOL including the Transmission Task Force (TTF).
City of Tallahassee
Assistant Director of Electric Utility
- Managed administrative control, training, and safety.
- Installed new SCADA and AGS.
- Involved with FCG activities.
- Directed Utility in absence of Director.
- Worked with US Congressmen for DOE funds.
1983 – 1986
Southern Engineering Company
Consulting Engineer
1980 – 1983
- Consulted for municipal agencies.
- Consulted for G&T Cooperatives throughout the US.
- Performed generation, transmission, and distribution planning studies using various modeling
programs.
- Studied DC connections with Mexico.
- Consulted on Integrated Transmission Agreement for Oglethorpe Power.
Georgia Power Company
Senior Planning Engineer
1967 – 1980
- Performed transmission planning, fault studies, switching surge analyses, and stability
studies.
- Modeled and studied DC transmission
- Visited with operating divisions to discuss and plan facilities.
- Worked closely with municipals through MEAG in joint planning efforts.
- Worked with other utilities to jointly plan transmission interconnects.
Military Service
US Naval Air
Avionics Electrician, First Class (E-6)
- Repaired aircraft electronic equipment
PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS
1971 – 1977
CTC Proposal to Holland Board of Public Works
Page 28
-
Professional Electrical Engineer in seven states: Florida, Alaska, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa,
Louisiana, & Washington.
Senior Member of IEEE.
PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES
C, Fortran, Algol, Basic, & Python.
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, Minor in Digital Design
Georgia Institute of Technology, 1972
M.S., Electrical Engineering Power Systems, Minor in Economics
Georgia Institute of Technology, 1976
Modeling and Analysis of Modern Power Systems
University of Texas at Arlington, 1977
Postgraduate Electrical Engineering, Computer Programming & Robotics
Yale University, 1988
Public Utility Executive Program
University of Michigan, 1991
Certified Public Manager (CPM)
Florida State University, 2000
Staking Technician Certification Program (including NESC),
HiLine Engineering, LLC, 2012
PROFESSIONAL CONSULTING CONTRACT
This Agreement is made effective as of ___________ ___, 2013 by and between Columbia
Telecommunications Corporation, a Maryland corporation ("CTC") of 10613 Concord Street,
Kensington, Maryland 20895, and the City of Holland, acting by and through its Holland Board of
Public Works (BPW), of 625 Hastings Avenue , Holland, Michigan 49423.
IN CONSIDERATION of the terms and conditions herein set forth, and other good and
valuable consideration, the parties agree as follows:
1.
Relationship of Parties. It is understood by the parties that CTC is an independent
contractor with respect to the BPW, and not an employee, agent or servant of the
BPW and CTC will not hold itself out as an employee, agent or servant of the BPW.
The BPW will not provide fringe benefits, including health insurance benefits, paid
vacation, or any other employee benefit, for the benefit of CTC. CTC shall have no
authority to bind the BPW for the performance of any service or to otherwise obligate
the BPW in any manner. CTC's duties are specifically limited to those assigned
hereunder. The BPW does not reserve any direction or control with respect to the
activities of CTC; the manner, means and times by and during which CTC provides
services shall be determined by CTC within the guidelines of this Agreement.
Further, the parties acknowledge that the independent contractor relationship created
hereunder does not cause the BPW to be liable for any employment or withholding
taxes, it being understood that CTC is solely responsible for any and all federal, state
or local income, withholding or other taxes due as a result of compensation paid to
CTC hereunder.
2.
Description of Services. CTC will provide services per the Statement of Work
attached hereto as Appendix A.
3.
Performance of Services. CTC will work under its own direction and supervision.
CTC shall perform all tasks and assignments listed under Description of Services
hereunder to the best of its ability and to the satisfaction of the BPW; however, CTC
shall be responsible for its own conduct and the conduct of any employees, suppliers
or agents hired by CTC, while engaged in the performance of this Agreement. CTC
shall furnish all labor, materials, tools and equipment required for the performance of
services hereunder, except as specifically described herein. CTC agrees that all
materials and workmanship shall be in compliance with all applicable codes, industry
standards, and the requirements of any governmental agencies having jurisdiction.
CTC hereby acknowledges that it will abide by all safety regulations. All work
performed by CTC will be in accordance with any warranties arising under applicable
law.
4.
Payment. CTC will perform the tasks described in Appendix A for a not-to-exceed
cost of $59,910 including travel and expenses. CTC will provide to the BPW
monthly bills for work completed in the period and expenses incurred for travel.
CTC’s billing rates are inclusive of routine costs, profit, and overhead. CTC will bill
travel and non-routine expenses at direct cost with no mark-up.
For mutually agreed work outside of the scope listed in Appendix A BPW will pay
CTC for services rendered at the following hourly rates:
Director of Business Planning
Principal Analyst
Senior Project Analyst
Senior Analyst
Staff Analyst
Junior Analyst/Aide
$165
$155
$145
$135
$125
$ 70
Upon termination of this Agreement, payments under this section shall cease;
provided, however, that CTC shall be entitled to payments for periods or partial
periods that occurred prior to the date of termination and for which CTC has not yet
been paid.
5.
Costs and Materials. CTC agrees to obtain, at its cost, the necessary permits or
licenses required by any governmental or other authorities in connection with this
Agreement. CTC shall be fully responsible for the care and protection of all
materials necessary for the performance of this Agreement, whether such materials
are supplied by CTC or the BPW.
6.
Term/Termination. The term of the Agreement is two months beginning on the date
of execution of this Agreement. This Agreement may be terminated by either party at
any time upon five days written notice to the other party.
7.
Disclosure. CTC is required to disclose any outside activities or interest, including
ownership or participation in the development of prior inventions, that conflict or
may conflict with the best interests of the BPW.
8.
Insurance. CTC hereby represents that it maintains, and agrees to furnish to the
BPW, upon request, certificates of insurance for the following forms of insurance
with the following minimum coverage levels:
a.
b.
c.
d.
Workers compensation insurance: in accordance with applicable law
Motor vehicle liability insurance: $1,000,000
Public liability insurance and property damage insurance: $2,000,000
Professional liability insurance: $5,000,000 per occurrence/ $5,000,000
claims made
CTC shall file a certificate of insurance naming the City of Holland, the Holland
Board of Public Works, it officers, directors, and employees as additional insureds
for all coverage except Professional Liability. There shall be no waiver of
subrogation endorsement on the insurance.
All insurance is to be obtained from accredited insurance carriers reasonably
acceptable to the BPW. CTC acknowledges its obligation to obtain appropriate
insurance coverage for its own benefit and the benefit of the BPW.
9.
Disputes. Any disputes may be resolved by binding arbitration of a neutral arbitrator
if agreed to by both CTC and the BPW. The cost for the services to obtain a
resolution will be equally split between CTC and the BPW.
10.
Return of Records. Upon termination of this Agreement, CTC shall deliver all
records, notes, data, memoranda, models, and equipment of any nature that are in
CTC's possession or under CTC's control and that are the BPW property.
11.
Notices. All notices required or permitted under this Agreement shall be in writing
and shall be deemed delivered when delivered in person or deposited in the United
States mail, postage prepaid, addressed as follows:
If for CTC:
Joanne S. Hovis, President
Columbia Telecommunications Corporation
10613 Concord Street
Kensington, Maryland 20895
If for the BPW:
John Van Uffelen
Utility Services Director
Holland Board of Public Works
625 Hastings Avenue
Holland, MI 49423
Such address may be changed from time to time by either party by providing written
notice to the other in the manner set forth above.
12.
Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains the entire agreement of the parties and
there are no other promises or conditions in any other agreement whether oral or
written. This Agreement supersedes any prior written or oral agreements between the
parties.
13.
Amendment. This Agreement may be modified or amended if the amendment is
made in writing and is signed by both parties.
14.
Severability. If any provision of this Agreement shall be held to be invalid or
unenforceable for any reason by a court of competent jurisdiction or by appropriate
County or other governmental authorities, the remaining provisions shall continue to
be valid and enforceable. If a court finds that any provision of this Agreement is
invalid or unenforceable, but that by limiting such provision it would become valid
and enforceable, then such provision shall be deemed to be written, construed, and
enforced as so limited.
15.
Waiver of Contractual Right. The failure of either party to enforce any provision of
this Agreement shall not be construed as a waiver or limitation of that party's right to
subsequently enforce and compel strict compliance with every provision of this
Agreement.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have set their hands and seals as of the dates set forth
below.
WITNESS/ATTEST:
______________________________
Columbia Telecommunications Corporation
By:______________________________
Joanne Hovis, President
Date:_______________________
The City of Holland
______________________________
By:____________________________
Kurt Dykstra,
Mayor
Date:_______________________
By:____________________________
Anna Perales,
Deputy City Clerk
Date:_______________________
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14.A.6*
To: Mayor Dykstra and the Holland City Council Date: October 16, 2013 Subject:
Board Room Audio Video Systems Installation Services TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT Introduction: With the renovation project at the Service Center underway, the BPW has an opportunity to enhance the capabilities of the audio/video system equipment in the board room, conference rooms, and commons areas. There are four primary uses of the board room: public board meetings, general meetings typically including staff and vendors, emergency operations command center, and hands‐on training room. Technology solutions to fulfill the requirements for these uses continue to evolve and become more advanced. Staff solicited and received proposals for services to install equipment in the newly renovated Service Center that will meet the technology needs now and into the future. Recommendation: Approve and forward to City Council a Professional Services Contract with Parkway Electric & Communications, pending approval as to form by the City Attorney, in the amount not to exceed $141,461 for installation services, and a budget transfer of $156,300 for services and owner‐ furnished equipment. Description: Given the requirements of the uses of the board room, conference rooms, and common areas throughout the Service Center, a comprehensive technology solution is needed. It is important in a meeting scenario in a large room that all participants are able to see and hear what is being presented. In the case of publicBboard meetings, historically a member of the City technology staff would bring portable equipment to record the meeting so they could be viewed later by constituents that were unable to attend. The City Council meetings as well as the Board meetings held in City Council Chambers are recorded as well as broadcast over a live feed to Comcast for public viewing. The proposed system is the same as what is in place at City Hall. This is will allow for savings in training, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The staff member that will be running the system for board meetings already has the necessary knowledge because they operate the same system at City Hall. Listed below are the uses and benefits of the audio/video system being proposed for the new board room as well as other renovated areas: 
















Ability to see what is being presented on three screens in the Boardroom Ability to hear clearly with built‐in microphones and speakers Controls system that manages 16 inputs and outputs Two built‐in cameras for recording and live broadcasting Board meeting Video mixing system and encoder for live broadcasting Video equipment for teleconferencing between remote locations Digital signage in the lobby for communicating pertinent information to our customers Digital signage in the break area for communicating to employees Digital signage in the Customer Service area to provide better access to information Two conference rooms equipped with 55” LCD screens connected to control system Ability to pass presentations to individual devices such as laptops or iPads wirelessly Ability for any individual device to “share their screen” so the audience can view it Mobile cart with 55” LCD screen that can connect to any data port Compatible with nearly every kind of device Hearing aid loop Cable TV for Emergency Command Center Off‐Air TV for Emergency Command Center The audio/video equipment in the old Board Room has been repurposed and used to furnish a conference room that did not previously have computer equipment. Two proposals from companies in the local area were received. Each firm was asked to fill out a specific bid form that was created by an audio/video design engineer. The total not to exceed costs associated with each proposal is summarized below: Parkway Electric $141,461 Secant $174,307 The request for proposal specified the breakdown of a base system and four add‐on options. After evaluating all the options, staff recommends the installation of the entire system in order to provide sufficient options for meeting the technical needs going forward. Attached is a document outlining the estimated costs for the owner‐furnished equipment for this project. Respectfully submitted, David G. Koster General Manager Strategic Objective: 4.02 Evaluate and implement beneficial emerging technologies and to develop the knowledge and skills to support the innovations Attachments: 2013‐10‐07 Device Location Ceiling Plan 2013‐10‐07 Device Location Floor Plan 2013‐10‐07 Conference Rooms 2013‐10‐07 Board Room RFP 2013‐10‐07 Owner Furnished Costs 2013‐10‐07 Boad Room Proposal 2013‐10‐07 Board Room Services Contract Report prepared by: Becky Lehman, Technology Director Attachments to 14A6*
Attachment 14.A6
PROJECT:
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS
ADDRESS:
625 Hastings Ave
CITY/STATE/ZIP:
Holland, MI
49423
DATE:
AUGUST 12, 2013
Sheet Title:
CONFERENCE ROOM DEVICE
LOCATION PLAN
DRAWING NUMBER
AVP03
Holland Board of Public Works
Board Room Audio Video Systems
Request for Proposal
September 4, 2013
Introduction:
The Holland Board of Public Works (HBPW) is seeking proposals for a Board Room Audio Video System.
Our facility located at 625 Hastings Ave, Holland, MI. is currently being renovated with a new Board
Room under construction. As part of the renovation project we are upgrading the new Board Room to
include audio, video controls and display. The RFP is structured to include a base bid with optional add
on sections. There are several documents included in this packet:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Request for Proposal including technical specifications
Bid Form (Excel file)
Device Location Floor Plan
Device Location Ceiling Plan
Conference Room Device Location Plan
Standard Services Agreement
If you have received this packet from HBPW then you are invited to bid on the project as described
herein. Our schedule is relatively aggressive with the desire to have the Board Room ready for use
during a scheduled December 9, 2013 meeting. The timeline reflects that desired readiness and should
be viewed as the best foreseeable estimate. Vendors should supply an expected schedule of installation
based on the target timeline that is provided.
The vendor selected will be expected to coordinate their installation hours with the current General
Contractor – Lakewood Construction. The availability dates listed below are estimates and reflect
current knowledge of the renovation project schedule. Installation site will be available to the vendor
during the current construction schedule of Monday thru Friday – 7:00AM to 5:00PM. Exceptions to this
time schedule must be cleared with the Project Manager for this installation. The site is a construction
site and appropriate measures must be taken by all installation personnel. Any further questions or
concerns about access to the installation site will be covered during the pre-bid meetingor during the
Question/Answer period.
RFP timeline:
September 4
RFP Released
September 11
Optional Pre-bid meeting at 625 Hastings Ave (3:30 PM - Training Room)
September 20
Written question period ends (all questions routed to primary contact)
September 23
Bid Opening at 625 Hastings Ave (3:30 PM – Training Room)
September 24-26
Reserved for Bidder presentation if needed
October 7
BPW Board Meeting (approval of selected bidder)
October 9
City Council Meeting (approval of selected bidder)
October 18
Contract signed and PO issued (pending attorney approval)
Board Room Target Availability:
Current till October 21 - Room is unavailable due to temporary office location for
Customer Service Department
Beginning October 22 – Final Renovation of Board Room space
December 9 – First BPW Board Meeting in the New Board Room
Primary Contact Information:
Please direct all communication to the Project Manager
Mark Volkers
[email protected]
616-355-1663
Minimum Vendor Qualifications:
The HBPW intends to make award of these proposed Audio Visual (AV) upgrades to a single
firm capable of supplying the specified equipment, installation and support labor specified
herein. To qualify, a Vendor must meet the following minimum criteria:



Maintain a staffed local office within a reasonable two hour drive of the City of
Holland for a minimum of five (5) years. The local office shall have sufficient
facilities for normal day to day operations of a full service AV systems integrator.
Performed work of similar scope and dollar amount from the local office
consistently for a minimum of three (3) years.
o Each vendor must supply three (3) project references to support this
requirement. References should include a brief description of the project
as it relates to this proposed upgrade, along with primary contact
information. The HBPW reserves the right to investigate all references at
will in determining the appropriate vendor for this upgrade.
Maintain staffing levels to support all aspects of the project.
Keep on staff, through duration of the project, the following personnel, identified as
the Project Team, with the following minimum qualifications. A brief statement of
qualification for each designated member of the project team must be included in
the proposal. The HBPW understands that personnel may change during the project
timeline due to voluntary or involuntary termination; changes to the project team
must be made in writing to the HBPW within thirty (30) days, and these minimum
qualifications must always be met.


o Project Manager – Shall have previous experience in managing
commercial AV integration projects, or telecomm projects of similar size.
o Project Engineer – Shall have previous experience in the design,
operation or maintenance of public meeting spaces and facilities; shall
possess and maintain minimum InfoComm CTS certification; shall be
knowledgeable of industry best practices of design and installation
standards.
o Project Programmer – Must be a Qualified Crestron Programmer. To be
Qualified, the vendor can provide a Certified Crestron Programmer, (or)
they can be an Authorized Crestron Dealer with at least three (3) project
references to demonstrate their Crestron experience, (or) they can subcontract a Certified Crestron Programmer for the duration of the project.
o Lead Technician – Shall have a minimum of two (2) years of commercial
AV installation experience.
o Technician(s) – Shall have a minimum of one (1) year of commercial AV
installation experience.
Possess and maintain all equipment and tools necessary to properly support this
project.
Attendance at the pre-proposal meeting is optional. This is the opportunity to
see the space involved for the installation. The pre-proposal meeting will begin
at 3:30 PM on September 11, 2013 at 625 Hastings Ave.
Project Synopsis
The HBPW is seeking a qualified vendor to install and support pre-designed configuration of the
Control System, Video Displays and Microphones in the newly renovated Board of Public Works
office located at 625 Hastings Ave, Holland, MI. This system serves multiple purposes as a public
meeting room, staff training room, and emergency operations center.
Substitutions or alterations to equipment or functionality specified will generally not be
considered or accepted. There are two exceptions to this restriction, one is for end-of-life
equipment, and the other is for the Biamp audio digital signal processor. Equivalent equipment
may be substituted for this particular item, as long as it meets the same level of quality,
functionality and with the reservation of the owner to reject this substitution if HBPW deems it
to be of inferior quality.
The following Scope of Work (SOW) is intended to serve as an overview of general project
requirements. Specific details which may impact proposal preparation or pricing that are
omitted should be addressed in email only to the Project Manger between the pre-proposal
meeting and September 20, 2013. Answers to all questions will be distributed to all vendors as
they are submitted.
Vendors are required to submit Not-To-Exceed pricing for a complete installation as outlined in
the Bid Form.
Base Bid Scope of Work
The Base Bid and may be accepted in whole or part. The head end will be located in a closet
immediately adjacent to, and accessible from the Boardroom. In this space, a Middle Atlantic
ERK-4425, 44-space equipment rack on casters will house all equipment. The equipment rack
will be supplied with a Middle Atlantic UPS-2200R-8IP uninterruptible power supply. This UPS is
intended for short duration power interruptions, allowing time for the head-end equipment to
be properly shut down if in use. All unused rack spaces are to be filled with blanks and all
equipment is to be securely mounted. Two dedicated 20 amp AC circuits will be supplied for the
equipment rack by the owner.
The owner will furnish all data drops and switch capacity for this project. IP connections for AV
peripherals requiring communication with the control system processor will be placed on a
dedicated AV VLAN configured by the owner.
A Crestron CP3 control system processor will be installed within the equipment rack. The
processor will interpret control commands from user interfaces (UI) as described herein, and
route control signals to peripherals.
An owner furnished iPad (model TBD) will be provided for use as a wireless touch screen
controller using the free Crestron app. This device will be docked on an owner furnished
charger within the space. This UI will include all typical functions for the space (as defined by
the owner), along with a Utility page for advanced functions. An XPanel will be created for use
by staff in troubleshooting or wireless use within the space via a laptop or Windows tablet. The
bid should reflect the necessary labor to develop this interface and programming from scratch,
but graphics developed for use in the City Council Chambers will be made available for this
project with the desired outcome to maintain consistency across the City and potentially save
hours and dollars of effort.
A Crestron DM-MD16X16-RPS DigitalMedia matrix switcher chassis with redundant power
supply will be located within the equipment rack. The switcher will take in all input signals on
the appropriate cards, and route them to outputs. The programmer will work with the owner to
establish preset routing for typical room functions, and provide a matrix for custom routing on
the Utility control page. All DM cable runs are to terminate using DM best practices including a
patch panel within the equipment rack and jacks (by AVC) where necessary for transmitters and
receivers. Inputs and outputs will include:
INPUTS:



Cable TV – An owner furnished Comcast high-definition cable tuner will be located on a
shelf within the equipment rack. The CATV tuner will output HDMI to the DM switch on
DMC-HD-DSP input card and will be controlled via IR from the control processor.
Rack PC – An owner furnished PC will be located on a shelf within the equipment rack.
The PC will output HDMI to the DM switch on DMC-HD-DSP input card. An owner
furnished wireless keyboard and mouse combination will be used to control this PC –
USB HID extension may be necessary through DM using one of the two table DM
transmitters and should be anticipated for installation.
(2) Table Interfaces – Two Crestron DM-TX-201-C DigitalMedia transmitter will be
located beneath the table, each adjacent to an Extron Cable Cubby 200 (AVC supplied
and configured, GC cut-in). The AV vendor is to supply minimum six foot HDMI, VGA and
audio cables within the Cubby. The transmitter will output DM8G+ to the DM switch on
DMC-C-DSP input cards.
OUTPUTS (DMCO-5530):



Boardroom Projector – An Epson BrightLink 485Wi interactive short throw projector will
be located on the east wall, aligned to an Epson 96” diagonal dry-erase projection
screen/board. A Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C DigitalMedia receiver will be located at
the projector to accept the DM feed and provide HDMI video and RS232 control to the
projector. Scaling capability will be used to force all inputs to fill the screen with the
highest possible resolution. An icron USB 2.0 Ranger 2211 USB extender will connect the
projector to the Rack PC.
Boardroom Display – A Samsung ME75C, 75” LED display will be mounted to the north
wall. A Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C will be located behind the display to receive the DM
feed and provide HDMI video and RS232 control to the display.
A Samsung ME55C, 55” LED display will be located in the Break Area over-top an FSR
PWB-270 in-wall box housing a Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C; A BrightSign XD230 digital



signage player will also be located behind the display. The signage player will directly
feed the DisplayPort input of the display. The RMC will receive the DM switched feed
and provide HDMI video to the HDMI input of the display along with RS232 control. The
display’s integrated speakers will provide sound reinforcement within this space. There
will be no local UI for this space, control will be made by the iPad or Xpanel.
A Samsung ME46C, 46” LED display will be located in the Lobby over-top an FSR PWB270 in-wall box housing a Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C; A BrightSign XD230 digital
signage player will also be located behind the display. The signage player will directly
feed the DisplayPort input of the display. The RMC will receive the DM switched feed
and provide HDMI video to the HDMI input of the display along with RS232 control. The
display’s integrated speakers will provide sound reinforcement within this space. There
will be no local UI for this space, control will be made by the iPad or Xpanel.
A Samsung ME46C, 46” LED display will be located in the Customer Service area overtop an FSR PWB-270 in-wall box housing a Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C; A BrightSign
XD230 digital signage player will also be located behind the display. The signage player
will directly feed the DisplayPort input of the display. The RMC will receive the DM
switched feed and provide HDMI video to the HDMI input of the display along with
RS232 control. The display’s integrated speakers will provide sound reinforcement
within this space. There will be no local UI for this space, control will be made by the
iPad or Xpanel.
CATV Feed – An HDMI feed will supply content video for cable TV distribution (by
others).
A Crestron AMP-3210T, 3-channel amplifier will be located in the equipment rack to supply 70
volt speaker signal to two zones of ceiling speakers within the Boardroom. The third channel is
used in Add 1. Six Crestron Saros series 6.5” ceiling speakers will be distributed within the
Boardroom, zoned per the drawing for voice-lift capability described in Add 1. The Boardroom
amplifier channels will receive a feed directly from the Projector output which will provide level
control for the Base Bid system. Speakers will only playback audio from the source routed to
the projector.
Add 1 – Video Recording, Streaming & Broadcasting Option
This add requires infrastructure installed within the Base Bid and may be accepted in whole or
part.
A Crestron TSW-1050, 10” wired touch screen controller will be located on the technician desk
using a Crestron TSW-1050-TTK tabletop mount kit. This master UI will provide the video
technician all controls necessary to perform their work, along with a Utility page for all other
necessary controls for the room. A Crestron C2N-CAMIDJ digital joystick controller will be
located on the technician desk for control of the PTZ cameras.
Cards will be added to the DM switch to accommodate the following:
INPUTS


(2) PTZ Cameras – Located per the drawings, one camera will be used to capture Board
members, while the second will capture the audience and presenters. Vaddio WallVIEW
HD-22 DVI/HDMI camera systems will be used for this purpose. Cameras will be
controlled via RS232 from the control system processor and will feed DVI-D video to
Crestron DMC-HD-DSP cards. Preset camera positions will be established for triggering
via the UI’s. The video technician may control each camera independently via the
control joy stick. Camera feeds will be looped via HDMI to two of the rack-mounted
quad LCD monitors.
Recorder Loop – A loop of the recorder’s multi-window output will be fed to the DM
switch on DMC-HD-DSP card for routing to the technician monitor and CATV feed (Base
Bid).
OUTPUTS



(2) Recorder Feeds – A feed each for camera and content to the Crestron CAPTURE-HDPRO recorder. The camera feed will first pass through an Atlona AT-HD-3GSDI HDMI to
HD-SDI converter. Multiple control options for recording will be included on the UI’s for
camera-only, content-only and multi-window camera + content recording. All recordings
will be stored internally and later transferred to owner designated and configured
network storage.
(2) Monitor Feeds – A feed each for two of the rack-mounted quad LCD monitors. The
video technician may route any DM source to either of these monitors via the UI.
USB Encoder Feed – A feed to a Vaddio AV Bridge to allow for one camera to be
encoded for use with software based video conferencing via the Rack PC. The AV Bridge
will feed USB to the Rack PC.
A Marshall Electronics V-MD434 quad LCD rack-mounted monitor equipped with four MDHDIx2-B HDMI input cards will be located within a Middle Atlantic 2-10, 10 space desktop rack
atop the owner furnished technician desk.
A Biamp Tesira SERVER-IO audio digital signal processor (DSP) chassis will be added to the main
equipment rack and will be equipped with appropriate cards to accommodate the following
inputs and outputs. The DSP will also be equipped with an additional DSP-2 expansion card and
SVC-2, 2-line VoIP telephone interface card. The DSP will take in all audio signals, process them
and route them to appropriate outputs while providing level and mute control where
necessary.
INPUTS







Cable TV – Audio looped from the DM input card, mono-summed.
Rack PC – Audio looped from the DM input card, mono-summed.
(2) Table Interfaces – Audio looped from the DM input card, mono-summed.
(2) Wireless Microphones – A Shure ULXD124/SM58 combo dual digital wireless
microphone system will be rack mounted. This system includes a handheld transmitter
with SM58 microphone and bodypack transmitter with Shure WL185 lavalier
microphone and will occupy two AEC inputs on the DSP. Shure SB900 rechargeable
batteries will be installed and a Shure SBC200 dock/charging station will be provided.
Audio captured by these microphones will be routed to the overhead speaker system,
teleconference, AV recorder, booth monitor, press feed, ALS feed and DM switch if
needed. These microphones may be controlled for mute and level individually via the UI.
(4) Ceiling Microphones – ClearOne Ceiling Microphone Arrays will be distributed
throughout the space, hung to 8.5’ AFF. These tri-element microphones will occupy 12
AEC inputs on the DSP and will provide pickup for audience participation in meetings or
teleconferencing applications. Audio from these microphones may also be routed to the
AV recorder, booth monitor, press feed, ALS feed and DM switch if needed. Voice lift
will be used within the space allowing for audio captured by these microphones to be
routed back to the overhead speaker system. These microphones will utilize auto-level
control and may also be used for ambient noise level sensing within the space. They
may be muted globally by the UI.
(5) Table Microphones – Shure MX395B/C-LED boundary microphones with cardioid
elements and LED indicator rings will be located one for every two seats at the fixed
Board table. Audio captured by these microphones will be routed to the overhead
speaker system, teleconference, AV recorder, booth monitor, press feed, ALS feed and
DM switch if needed. These microphones may be muted globally via the UI.
Teleconference Receive – Integrated teleconferencing will allow for the microphones
and speakers to be used in making and receiving point-to-point telephone calls on one
or both of two phone lines. Multi-point calls must use a third-party phone bridge, not
included in this scope of work.
OUTPUTS


DM Feed – A mono-summed audio to both L/R channels of an input on the DM switch
for embedding audio into DM as needed.
(3) Amplifier Feeds – Comprised of two zones of program audio for overhead speaker
reinforcement within the Boardroom and one zone of program audio for overhead
speaker reinforcement within the Lobby. The Boardroom signal feeds replace the
projector audio feed in the Base Bid. Each zone may be individually or globally







controlled via the UI. Overflow may be turned ON/OFF as needed via the UI. The Lobby
will receive four Crestron Saros 6.5” series ceiling speakers.
USB Encoder Feed – A feed to a Vaddio AV Bridge to allow for mixed speech audio to be
encoded for use with software based video conferencing via the Rack PC. The AV Bridge
will feed USB to the Rack PC.
Recorder Speech – A mix of all microphones to the Speech audio input of the AV
recorder.
Recorder Content – A mono-summed audio to both L/R input channels of the AV
recorder for content.
Booth Monitor L & R – Selectable routing will be used for these outputs to allow the
video technician to select what they would like to hear in either or both sides of the rack
mounted Marshall Electronics AR-AM1 audio monitor with integrated speakers and
headphone output. Headphones are user supplied.
Press Feed – A mix of active microphones and content audio will be routed to a Press
connection plate.
CATV Feed – A mix of active microphones and content audio will be routed to cable
distribution equipment (by others).
Teleconference Transmit – A mix of active microphones and content audio routed to the
teleconference transmit.
Add 2 – Typical Conference Room, Qty 2
This add will provide AV equipment for two conference rooms. These conference rooms will be
independent of the Boardroom video system and will tie to the Boardroom control system
processor via IP for signal-sensing “autonomous” control. This description is for each room; the
bid form includes quantity for both rooms.
A Samsung ME55C, 55” LED display will be located on the wall over-top an FSR PWB-270 in-wall
box housing a Crestron DM-RMC-SCALER-C DigitalMedia receiver with scaling capability. The
RMC will receive a DM feed from a Crestron DM-TX-201-C DigitalMedia transmitter located
below the table adjacent to an Extron Cable Cubby 200. The RMC will also be connected to the
AV VLAN for communication with the Boardroom control system processor and will provide
HDMI video to the HDMI input of the display along with RS232 control. An owner furnished
ultra-small form factor PC will be located behind the display and will feed DisplayPort signal to
the DisplayPort input of the display. The display’s integrated speakers will provide sound
reinforcement within this space.
There will be no local UI for this space. The display will typically be set to the PC input and will
use signal-sensing from the PC’s sleep/wake functionality to turn the display ON and OFF.
Likewise, when a signal is connected to the DM transmitter the display will be turned ON to the
HDMI input. When signal is disconnected from the DM transmitter the display will return to the
PC input. For both inputs, volume will be set to a reasonable level, further volume control will
be made by the user device. It is understood this type of control may be experimental and
could require a UI should all devices not operate together as anticipated. The addition of a UI
and additional programming will be handled as a Change Order if necessary.
Add 3 – Additional Sources, Mobile Cart
This add will include a wireless video presentation system, additional input sources for the
Boardroom, and a mobile display cart with auxiliary connections within the Boardroom. This
Add may be accepted in whole or part.
A WOWVision MiniVEOS gateway will be installed in the equipment rack. The Server will output
HDMI to an additional Crestron DMC-HD-DSP HDMI input card on the DM switch. This device
will be controlled via the presenter’s laptop or mobile device and may display up to four
connected sources simultaneously. The Share My Screen option will be installed to allow for
screen sharing to connected devices.
An Apple TV device will be installed in the equipment rack. The Apple TV will output HDMI to an
additional Crestron DMC-HD-DSP HDMI input card on the DM switch. This device will be
controlled via IR from the control system processor with all typical controls available on the
UI’s.
A Contemporary Research 232-ATSC+1 off-air analog/digital TV tuner will be installed in the
equipment rack. The tuner will output HDMI to an additional Crestron DMC-HD-DSP HDMI
input card on the DM switch. This device will be controlled via RS232 from the control system
processor with all typical controls available on the UI’s.
A Samsung ME55C, 55” LED display will be installed on a Premier cart with shelf. A Crestron
DM-TX-201-C DigitalMedia transmitter will be installed behind the display to accept both HDMI
and VGA w/ audio feeds from user devices on supplied 12’ cables. The transmitter’s loop output
will feed the DisplayPort input on the display for stand-alone operation, controlled by buttons
on the display. The transmitter may also connect to multiple DM inputs within the Boardroom
to be used as an additional source for distribution via the DM switch. A Crestron DM-RMCSCALER-C DigitalMedia receiver will be installed behind the display to accept a DM feed from
the Boardroom DM switch via multiple auxiliary DM outputs. When connected, the display will
appear on the UI’s as a source and destination, and be controlled by the UI’s.
Three auxiliary DM inputs and outputs will be added to the Boardroom, one each in each of two
floor boxes and one wall connection point. Three Crestron DMC-C-DSP input cards will be
added to the DM switch, as will appropriate DMCO outputs to support these connection points.
Add 4 – Hearing Aid Loop
This add will include equipment and installation for a Listen Technologies system. This Add may
be accepted in whole or part.

ALS Feed - A mix of active microphones and content audio will be routed to a Listen
Technologies LT-800-072 assisted listening transmitter. Two LR-300-072 bodypack ALS
receivers will be supplied along with two LA-164 ear speakers and two LA-166 T-Coil
neck loops. Owner to furnish batteries.
Selected Vendor Deliverables:
The selected vendor shall provide the source code and documentation for any work product created as
part of this project. This includes but is not limited to the complete Crestron Code and graphics that are
used for the installation.
All as-built documentation, equipment information, pass-thru warranties will be included as part of the
final checkout.
Vendor will supply 2 hours of orientation and training to selected HBPW staff to both demonstrate
viability of the installation and to provide typical setup and configuration scenarios.
Vendor is responsible for all clean up and removal of materials, debris and installation by product as it
occurs.
Vendor will be responsible for any damage incurred to existing property.
Bond Requirements
Bid Bond
Each Proposal must be accompanied by a Bid Bond in the form attached (or one
acceptable to the Owner) or a certified check on a bank that is a member of the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation, payable to the order of the Owner, in an amount equal
to five percent (5%) of the maximum bid price. (AIA Document A310 or similar). Each
Bidder agrees that by filing its Proposal together with such Bid Bond or check in
consideration of the Owner’s receiving and considering such Proposals, said Proposal
shall be firm and binding upon each such Bidder and such Bid Bond or check shall be
held by the Owner until a Proposal is accepted and satisfactory Contractor’s Bonds are
furnished (where required) by the successful Bidder, or for a period not to exceed sixty
(60) days from the date set for the opening of Proposals, whichever period shall be the
shorter.
Contractor’s Bond
The successful Bidder will be required to execute additional counterparts of the
Proposal and to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond with sureties listed by
the United States Treasury Department as Acceptable Sureties, in an amount not less
than 100% of the estimated contract amount (AIA Document A312.) from an acceptable
security qualified to issue bonds in the State of Michigan.
HOLLAND BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS
SERVICE CONTRACT
This Contract is entered into this
day of
, 20
by and
between the City of Holland, a Michigan municipal corporation of Ottawa and Allegan Counties, Michigan, acting
by and through its Board of Public Works ("OWNER"), which has offices located at 625 Hastings Avenue, Holland,
Michigan 49423 and
Parkway Electric
a corporation ("CONTRACTOR"), which has offices located
at
11952 James St Holland, MI
.
In consideration of the promises below, the parties mutually agree as follows:
Article 1-Scope of Services / Statement of Work
The Contractor shall perform the following services (“Work”): Provide materials and installation of an
Audio/Video System to our newly renovated Board Room, as outlined in Request for Proposal.
Article 2- Compensation
2.1) Upon the Contractor’s final completion of the Work performed in accordance with Article 1 of this
Contract, and acceptance of said Work by the Owner, the Owner shall pay the Contractor the sum of $141,461.03.
The Contractor shall send an itemized bill to the Owner upon final completion of the work, or for the installment
period during which the Work is performed by the Contractor for the Owner, and the Owner shall make payment
within thirty (30) days of its acceptance of the Work.
2.2) No payments will be made to the Contractor until the certificates of Insurance have been received by
the Owner. If the insurance furnished by the Contractor expires or is cancelled during the term of the contract,
service and related payments will be suspended until insurance certificates evidencing renewal of coverage are
submitted and accepted by the Owner.
Article 3-Responsibility and Reporting of the Contractor
3.1) The Contractor is responsible to Mark Volkers of the Board of Public Works, and will cooperate and
confer with him as necessary to insure satisfactory Work progress.
3.2) All reports, estimates, memoranda and documents submitted by the Contractor must be dated and bear
the Contractor's name.
3.3) All reports made in connection with these services are subject to review and final approval of the
Owner.
3.4) The Owner may review and inspect the Contractor's activities during the term of the contract.
3.5) When applicable and requested by the Owner, the Contractor will submit a final written report.
Article 4- Term
The Work shall be completed and ready for final payment no later than
December 9, 2013
.
Article 5- Guarantee
The Contractor shall correct, re-perform, or re-do the Work as may be required to the satisfaction of the
Owner.
Article 6- Conditions of Performance
6.1) The Contractor shall provide the required manpower, services, material, and expertise to perform the
HBPW Standard Contract Page 1 of 6.
Work. The Contractor affirmatively represents to the Owner that it has the knowledge, skill and expertise to
perform the Work in accordance with this contract.
6.2) All Work shall comply with applicable laws, ordinances, rules, regulations, construction standards of
the Owner and its respective departments in effect on the date of this contract.
6.3) All Work shall comply with applicable laws, taxes, ordinances, rules, regulations and orders of any
public body having jurisdiction over the Work area, or subject matter as of the date of this contract.
6.4) Contractor acknowledges that it has made an independent investigation relative to the nature and
difficulties of the Work to be performed, and assumes all cost and risk in the performance of the Work during the
term of the Contract.
Article 7- Insurance and Indemnification
This Agreement is subject to the following provisions:
7.1) The Owner and the Contractor acknowledge that the Contractor is an independent contractor in all of
the Contractor’s activities and that in the course of such activities, at no time do the Contractor, its officers, directors
(trustees), members, employees, volunteers, or other persons acting on behalf of the Contractor become the agents of
the Owner for any purpose, and at no time shall the Owner become liable in any manner whatsoever for any of the
actions or activities of the Contractor, its officers, directors (trustees), members, employees, volunteers, or other
persons acting on behalf of the Contractor. In the event any person shall undertake to hold the Owner liable for any
conduct or activities of the Contractor, its officers, directors (trustees), members, employees, volunteers, or other
persons acting on behalf of the Contractor, the Contractor expressly agrees to hold the Owner harmless of and from
any such liability. The Contractor also agrees to save, indemnify, and hold harmless the Owner, its agents, officers,
and employees from any claim, action, or liability arising out of or connected with its performance under the terms,
conditions, and agreements of this Contract resulting in losses or injuries to persons (including death) or property. In
addition thereto, the Contractor agrees to purchase liability insurance, in any amounts that the Owner may
reasonably require, to insure the faithful performance of the Contractor’s promise herein contained to hold the
Owner harmless from any liability of any kind or nature that may arise in any manner, directly or indirectly, from
the activities of the Contractor, its officers, directors (trustees), members, employees, volunteers, or other persons
acting on behalf of the Contractor, during the terms of this Contract. This covenant of indemnification shall include
reasonable attorney’s fees and costs incurred by the Owner in defense of such claim, action or liability.
7.2) The Contractor shall, throughout the period of this Agreement, provide public liability and property
damage insurance covering all operations of the Contractor, its agents and employees, including but not limited to,
premises and automobiles, with minimum liability limits as set forth below; or, in the alternative, require that any
subcontractor comply fully with the provisions of this paragraph. The Contractor shall also procure and maintain,
throughout the period of this Agreement, Workers’ compensation insurance coverage for all of its employees
involved in the performance of this Contract and employers’ liability insurance. Copies of workers’ compensation
and employers’ liability insurance shall be provided to the Owner and shall be maintained to provide coverage as set
forth below. The City of Holland, Holland Board of Public Works and their directors, officers, agents and employees
shall be named as additional insureds of all applicable insurance policies. All insurance policies and certificates must
include an endorsement providing thirty (30) days prior written notice to the Owner of cancellation and/or reduction
of coverage. The Contractor shall cease operations on the occurrence of any such cancellation or reduction in
coverage, and it shall not resume operations until new insurance is in full force and effect. The Contractor shall also
maintain insurance on the inventory sufficient to reimburse for losses due to fire, theft or other perils. The
Contractor and any of its subcontractors shall require their insurance carriers, with respect to all insurance policies,
to waive all rights of subrogation against the Owner, its directors, officers, agents, and employees and against other
contractors and subcontractors.
7.3) The limits of liability for the insurance required by this Contract shall be for not less than the following
amounts or greater where required by Laws and Regulations:
HBPW Standard Contract Page 2 of 6.
7.3.1) Workers' Compensation
State Statutory
Employer's Liability: $100,000.00 each Accident/Occurrence
7.3.2) Comprehensive General Liability
Bodily Injury or Death (including completed operations and products liability):
$500,000.00 Each Person
$1,000,000.00 Each Occurrence
Property Damage:
$500,000.00 Each Occurrence
$1,000,000.00 Annual Aggregate
7.3.3) Comprehensive Automobile Liability:
This insurance coverage shall not be required unless the Contractor is required to use a
motor vehicle in the performance of the Work.
Bodily Injury and Death:
$500,000.00 Each Person
$1,000,000.00 Each Accident/Occurrence
Property Damage:
$500,000.00 Each Accident/Occurrence
$1,000,000.00 Aggregate
Policies shall be written on a comprehensive form to include hired and non-owned
vehicles.
7.3.4) Comprehensive Professional Liability:
Contractor shall maintain from the date of this Agreement through the term of this
Agreement, and for a period of three (3) years after, a standard form of errors and
omissions insurance with an insurance company reasonably satisfactory to the Owner.
The errors and omissions insurance shall provide a “per claim occurrence of not less than
One Million Dollars ($1,000,000) and an aggregate of not less than One Million Dollars
($1,000,000). In the event the Contractor shall change the insurer of its professional
liability insurance within the term of this contract or for a period of three (3) years
thereafter, the Contractor shall maintain a retroactive endorsement date for such
insurance which shall include the term of the contract with the Owner.
Article 8 - Successors and Assigns
This contract is binding on the Owner and the Contractor their successors and assigns. Neither the Owner
nor the Contractor shall assign or transfer its interest in the contract without written consent of the other.
Article 9 - Termination of Contract
The Owner may terminate this contract with or without cause by giving 30 days written notice to the
Contractor. In the event of termination by the Owner, the Contractor shall be paid for the portion of the Work it has
satisfactorily completed through the effective date of termination, as determined by the Owner.
HBPW Standard Contract Page 3 of 6.
Article 10 - Changes in Scope or Schedule of Services
The Owner may require changes in the scope or schedule of the Work of the Contractor. Changes that are
mutually agreed upon by the Owner and the Contractor, including any decrease or increase in the amount of the
Contractor's compensation, will be incorporated into this contract by written amendments.
Article 11 - Extent of Contract
11.1) This contract represents the entire agreement between the Owner and Contractor and supersedes all
prior representations, negotiations or agreements, whether written or oral.
11.2) The documents constituting the contract between the Contractor and the Owner shall include the
following:
11.2.1) This Contract pages 1 to 6.
11.2.2) Work Scope
11.2.3) Contractor’s Proposal dated
September 23, 2013.
11.2.4) Contractor’s Bid Bond
11.2.5) Contractor’s Payment Performance Bond (50% of Project Cost Required)
11.2.6) Contractor’s Insurance Certificate.
11.3) This contract is to be interpreted by the laws of Michigan.
Article 12 - Execution of Contract
12.1) Execution of this contract shall constitute a contract between the Contractor and the Owner.
12.2) This contract is executed on the date and year noted in the first paragraph of this contract document.
HBPW Standard Contract Page 4 of 6.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Contract.
OWNER:
CITY OF HOLLAND, acting by and through its
Board of Public Works
By ________________________________________
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its
Mayor
By________________________________________
Anna Perales
Its
STATE OF MICHIGAN
COUNTY OF OTTAWA
Acting Deputy City Clerk
)
)ss.
)
On this
day of
, 20
, before me, a Notary
Public in and for said County, appeared Kurt D. Dykstra and Anna Perales, to me personally known, who, being
by me duly sworn, did each for themselves say that they are, respectively, the Mayor and City Clerk of the City of
Holland, the corporation named in and which executed the within instrument, and that said instrument was signed
and sealed on behalf of the City of Holland by authority of its City Countil; and said Kurt D. Dykstra and Anna
Perales acknowledged said instrument to be the free act and deed of the said City of Holland.
______________________________________
Notary Public
______________County, Michigan
My Commission Expires:_________________
Acting in County of _______________, MI
HBPW Standard Contract Page 5 of 6.
CONTRACTOR:
Parkway Electric and Communications, LLC
By________________________________________
Its ________________________________
STATE OF _______________
)
)ss.
COUNTY OF _______________ )
On this
day of
, 20
, before me, a Notary
Public in and for said County, appeared ______________________________________, to me personally known,
who, being by me duly sworn, did say that he is the ___________________ of _______________________, a
Michigan Corporation named in and which executed the within instrument, and that the seal affixed to said
instrument is the corporate seal of said corporation; and that said instrument was signed and sealed on behalf of said
corporation by authority of its Board of Directors; and said _______________________acknowledged said
instrument to be the free act and deed of said corporation.
______________________________________
Notary Public
_______________County, ______________
My Commission Expires: _________________
Acting in County of ______________, ____
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF HOLLAND
By: _____________________________
Andrew J. Mulder
City Attorney
Dated: ___________________________
HBPW Standard Contract Page 6 of 6.
Board Room Audio Video Systems Project
Estimated costs of owner furnished equipment
Add two dedicated electrical circuits
Revise Board Room power and AV conduit
24 port Ethernet Switch
Board Room PC – rack mount
Display port to HDMI adapter
Wireless Keyboard and Mouse
Two Conference Room PCs
Two Display port to HDMI adapter
Two Wireless Keyboard and Mouse
iPad for use as wireless control panel
Apple TV
Digital TV Antenna
$1,700
$5,300
$3,075
$800
$30
$85
$1,600
$60
$170
$600
$75
$75
Total
$13,570
14C1*
Office of the Gity Attorney
321 Settlers Road
Holland, Michigan 49423
Phone: (616l.392-1821 FAX: (616) 392-4769
REPORT TO MAYOR AND MEMBERS OF HOLLAND CITY COUNCIL
TO:
Mayor and Members of Council
FROM:
Vincent L. Duckworth, Deputy City Attorney
RE:
Police Reserve Officers
DATE:
October 16,2013
-
Event Attendance Agreement for GrooveV/alk
Dear Mayor and Members of Council:
Submitted for your consideration are 11 draft Agreements for Event Attendance between
various businesses venues and the City of Holland in preparation for the Groove Walk event to
be held in the City later this month. By these agreements, each venue is agreeing to compensate
the City of Holland for placement of City Reserve Officers at each event venue for attendance
services during the Groove Walk. The form of these agreements is identical to our prior
agreements with similar venues in the past year.
The city's obligation under these agreements is limited to providing city Reserve Officers
for event attendance services only. Reserve officers will be authorized by these agreements to be
present at the event locations and observe crowds participating in the event while on the
premises of each property owner. The Reserve Offrcers, as employees of the city, will remain
under the supervision and control of the city. By these agreements, each property owner
promises to indemnify the city against all claims and demands arising out of or in connection
with the attendance services provided by the cify at their property and further agrees that nothing
by these agreements shall be considered a waiver by the city of governmental tort immunity
benefitting the City.
It is requested that the proposed agreements be authorizedby City Council for signature
by the Mayor.
Respectfully submitted,
?a¿æt¿¿
-4,, Ðtrhrantá
Vincent L. Duckworth
Deputy City Attorney
Attachments to 14C1*
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on
^v-4this V' day of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
49423 lhereinafter "City of
M[
'(*øo
and,
Hatzr
\P2,2-<
of
a GrooveWalk venue
(hereinafter "Venue").
I.
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
assign Reserve Police
Venue
to
City of Holland to replace
with another employee.
a removed
employee
c.
Consent to remain on premises. Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
Such consent shall remain effective
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
perform
a.
Non-interference with law enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
the Venue location.
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2. CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualifìed to perform the attendance services at
d.
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5. TERM; TERMINATION. The term of this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service. Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7. INDEMNIFICATION.
Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnif,, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits ofany person or entity.
llPage
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
All
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perfornance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
govemmental tort immunity benefÏting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
expenses
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL 691.1401et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
By
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
?
By
e
Name
Its:
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
Andrew J. Mulder
City A
Dated: / 0
O
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Ho lland, Michigan 49 423
(616) 392-182t
2lP age
Øl
,'Y
c
E
oo
zz
o
o
(¡)
UI
C.
C)
c
:]
o
C\¡
o)
0t
IL
L
0,
q)
IL
L
o
0-
L
l
o
o
c,
)o
OJ
ãSe
oo=
(It
Ò
o
o
o N
o -c
<ou
o
lrJ
U)
o
od)
F
lIJ
ul
0)
()
0)
F 6)
ó
z oct N
ul
Øwl ot
uI
À
I5lol
tA>Él
'uffiHl
O
ø, ull
rñ:l
TLI
ú.
ø,
UJ
Ú,U:
o
É
:l
ïÍñ
¡
'J- lL
oo<
4.aØ
ìztJ
1<=
=Øû
'HÉ
lrr¿#
ooõ
-lUË
dit
Àfiã
Íz
8ã
L
o
L
dt
o
5
o
(J
õ
uJ
zat,
u.t
)o
0)
voo
(ú
oL
fL
o
ô
ro
c.,
o
o
(.
c{
2
F
tu
ã
at)
o
õ
u.l
É
fL
I
t-
o
Irl
:¿
f¡.
o
6
u
o
J
oo
zz
c
o-
'{= fJ
ll)
d.)
ul
oo
zz
cc
od)
L!
ru
oJ
È(L
ft
oo
I:E
!L
o
ILÈ
LL
Ëà
(o\
õo
zo
oo o0ôJ
o|¡.
u'ì
<Þ$\
rô¡
oo
cq
co l'.
úi?
OL
z:I
õ
9.,
àúi
ri u H å
o-
ù
ooo
z
zz
ccç,
oo0)
ñ,1
oo0)
0-0.fL
lf:l
ooo
TIX
dro|l)
o- fL
hOo
(ú -í
ú[email protected]
or9
Xçr
(f)
Eä
t
o
à5
T
i
Ê
oo
zz
o
(o
3(It
o
(0
õc)
o
é
(,
t-
g.
)
¡o
x
o
:E
tì
Et)
dJ
(ú
È.
o
lr)
o
\o
U)
0)
U)
o)
q)
o)
(d
(L
d)
o
o)
o
a
=
E
o
:E
õ
o-
ó
r5
0-
c)
L
o
o
c
(ú
õt
=
o
th
0)
(ft
0)
q)
U'
=
ro
P,
E
u
ä
Ø'o
,z:l¡t?
; äa
9Pl
õ
õ el o
:*a
*ÍP
.à
ss
gK
o
f
T
Ë
$
E
Ë
2>.
gde
ÞH
öÉ
rLo
>o
iB,
ÈEI E Fg
] ül
9lós ofi
É3
6
ãá4
Hgl d
Ë çl 9
H2l1
8n üã f;ägl Ë
P
ãù
ãx
*-ffiRl
äl s
HU , ö Ë(!)
o'9 55
E
+É
=
É
s,
q
H
ã.
A
J
E
x
3
ú'
Ë
oitE>
oo
oo
(oF
oo
oo
(c)F
.H
Ë sl u
ugl
r iä 3
'äITd õl;**
Fil
28le
oo
zz
øø
Ooi
J5
o(r
o0,
ú. É.
LL
oo
(LfL
cók0)
i,s
ä,p
Eoroo
'e.ì
cÞ
E E ãä
aEs
o¡'È ã
ãÞ
ä.e
co^LC)
E;=o
oro o
E
=.8
'E,¿qõ
'È
sE
s
oi '= õ.
6È
UJ
t¡J
o
q
tL
Ø
J
J
U)
0-
uJ
tL
H
E
t<
F
U)
z
o
o
r¡l
o)
u
æ
o
o
o
o(J
0z
FO
tr*
trt
fi
a
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
CITY OF HOLLAND - D
This Agreement is entered into on this
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
day of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
"City of
c. Consent to remain on premises. Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
of
a GrooveWalk venue
enue").
I.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
assign Reserve Police
Venue
to
perform
d.
Non-interference with law enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2. CTTY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
a.
Generally. City
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
of Holland will
assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5.
of
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identi! the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specifìed time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that
if
any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby
covenants
and agrees to indemnifo, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
llPage
All expenses
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
of a governmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the performance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Govemmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL 691,1407 et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
Pryt
Name:
Its:
Z
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
J. Mulder
City A
Dated
a
il
ôß
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckwo¡th
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol I and, Michigan
49
423
(616) 392-1821
2lP a ge
I
i
6t
ØUlI
ul
ol
(J<l
äI
nt?
oløul#l
;IB
o
=0)L
E
0t
Jl
(Jl
IIJI
zl
Url
u.rl
FI
òl
,r'l
uJl
tL
L
q)
LL
(.)
o-
o
c)
cø
ã$e
oo
o(o=
zz
c,
o
N
)É
E
0)
o
o
g
f
tt
E
o
o -c ,'Y
<(Ju
E
[lJ
ot
ßt
0,
()
0)
IU
L
o
(l,
L
o
o d) o
[J ñ, C.l
U) o
0)
o
o(J
to (l)
o_
F-
z o
uI
ú.
É
:
ot
",1
il
C)
ml o <
<laui
ilz o
1l <
û
=
ä
=lØ
,AIfrR
a
ItL
äl
:l uJ E
it
Ë
Í,2 H
3,=
f,
I
9rF
il
]i
iil
ilt
il
il!
ï
fl
lt
(ú
vo(u
oL
OJ
CL
o
o
ro
c{
o
o
lt)
c{
el
Él
ãl
al
ol
Þl
(Jl
IIJI
Él
:l
lrlI
:<I
()I
<t
rLl
ol
zl
Øl
zl
rul
ol
Jl
oo
zz
c
o_
Lr.l
oo 7
7
cc
oo
Lg
ru
o-9
oo
ÀÈ
I!
oo
Àù
ßì
'cq
(ft \
õo
zo
LL
oo
0- o-
¡-.
oo
oo
olo
tO
FN
<ri+
oo
oo
cdñ(\
(DF
oÔ
qe
(or
st
Él
ÍlËl
31
Zt
:
Ël
x
öl
-e
fil
ooo
zz
ödr0)
'lñù
dJoo)
O-fLÈ
:flJ
ooo
ooo
o-(L0-
z
o-í P
ú.co
u?9
xEr
or9
t')x
ú,
tü
f
o
É
T
u?g I
&CD
Xçr
cJe
õ):e
.püt
I c\¡
->
L
o
E
Ë
g
oo
(ú
.o
t-
o
e
o
o)
([
(ú
À
o
g
o
É
ot
(!
u)
d)
(.)
f
r
IL
L
(t)
o
o
L
o)
(l
0)
U>
3(ú
o
(ú
!4t
o
o
(.)
x
f
U')
o
=o
lr)
so
û
aJ
o)
o
=
o
:E
.h
0)
qt
(õ
=
'tr
J
o
:c
J
0
2
øõ
Ed
ofi
fr3
Ë
ffis
Fö2 I
=õÉ*
9Pö
öeõ
Ènî
7 0ó
Ëü Þqe
gË+
F
r?
o
ä H H*i"
ü zü gúE Ë ää
Ël
FÉn þe
äËe
ãl s EË
=õ
3i H4=
+l't'
in
8lE ü= ??i,¿ 5u
fil
Ë E| Ët
oolf,ls:f
>.
õl õl
e
g
o-
oo
zz
tnø
o0)
:JJ
qt'
oo
É. too
o- fL
5Ë ÐË
Eooo
'ã.¿
oE
.ÉEE€.
EË
oõ a
tO'=
f
o)'E d
ãÈ
5Ë
E oro o
'8,¿q6
,E
E;=.
aPgã.
d'ã
ãÈ
IJJ
IJJ
u-
o
q
Ø
U'
Þ
J
0-
ut
ul
]L
UJ
É
E
U)
z,
o
o
uì
il
o)
6+
o
o
o
o
oO
0z
r--
&.v
trr
(Ì
a
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
This Agreement is entered into on
this q+h day of
Holla
v
and,
å
l¡.)
t+11
with another employee.
c.
Consent to remqin on premises. Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
of
a GrooveWalk venue
(hereinafter "Venue").
I.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
to
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
assign Reserve Police
Venue
RESERVE OFFICERS
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
49423 (hereinafter "City of
Avenue, Holland,
MI
-
perform
Non-interference with lqw enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
d.
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2. CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
a.
Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Vonue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
of
5.
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either parry or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identifo the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendañce services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby
covenants
and agrees to indemniff, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
llPage
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES. All expenses
in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
8.
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perforrnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Goveinmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMLINITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL
691 .1401 et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
By
tlpw
Pos+
årq+
Marlcrc Ga;la,
Name:
Its
Qrzsid ¿nf Ladtet A^K
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
Andrew J. Mulder
City
Dated
/0
/t
^o
13
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol land, Michigan
49
423
(6t6) 392-1821
2lPage
-ase
0)
(ú
o
0)
E
t|)
(o
o
E
c
o
N
-
N
l
o
L
o
E
0)
C.
8,8.4
<()u
(J
0)
o d)(I, o
tu o
N
(t
o
o_
f
o
UJ
É 0)ö
ú.
d)
cf E
À UJ
u, Gt
al o
u.t cjl
&ñ
J- llo<
6u)
zo
<=
fr3J
o.
I5l
>Él
d
url
wØl
ø
url
ú, ol F
; 8ãl
z
ul
É,
t¡l
Ø
T'J
fD
J
J
bã
-2.
lU ¡-J<
áÉ'ut
u
Øû
É uJ5
Hou
o
o
Ê
8ã
L
o
L
o)
It
o
oo
c)
cØ
0)
)o
L
0)
o-
o
L
c,
L!
q)
o,
L
TL
(ú
voo
0L
0)
0-
o
o
(o
C.l
o
o
lr)
N
el
Él
EI
øl
=l
ol
ol
Él
IUI
ut
:l
uJl
oo
zz
c
'go
Eà
(û\
õo
zo
oo
0-À
oo
oo
()r
oo
qc
(or
8l
ztl
lji
o-
c.cç
dto0)
0.)oo)
ùo-o:lla
ooo
:EIÏ
droo
o- fL
tco
P
g:
fr,
'dco
Xçr
si
sh
sÕl
E
o
T
ã
?
?
z
ø)
z
(ú
o
o
o
l--o
o
x
:r
o
C.
ñ
0-
c)
o
o
L
(ú
ot
d)
Ø
ô'
ñ
(L
0)
(-)
L
û)
(lt
o)
0)
o
o
E(û
o
ct
o)
IJ'
o)
õ
o
r.c)
o
àe
It
dJ
c')
(l,
3
o
E
:E
U>
o)
q)
(t
3
->
o
t'
f
o
frÈ
5Ë
oo
zz
6ø
o0)
:fJ
qt'
(I)0)
É. É.
oo
ùfL
EË
Eoroo
'õ.¿
qõ
.EEã€.
eEeoor'-
ãÈ
5Ë EË
E ã-A
E o¡o o
'-,¿cõ
,E
oõ
a
6=i
oi'F -ô
.E
ø,8
lrj
ITJ
o
q
(L
U)
Ø
f,
J
o-
l- ö2
tr1
oO
v)z
FO
&.*
o
ô
o
lt
@.
o)
ul
o
o
z
U)
F
t
E
IL
H
8
2
TU
nd=
Ëa8
Ëts
frZ
..Ë
ö 9 õ eo
g
-õ *
ù"nö
:.He
T
o
=c.,
à
Jú
X;T
(')P
ùùù
^ôôOOoo à.zz
22.
cc
o4)
d)
Ul
L!
oJ
uJ
3:f
LL
0-È
oo
xf
l.-
LL
o
rlt
ÀL
oo
cq
co
rôJ
Ólr)
rf¡ td+
rñl
ãl
Ël
fl
ël
2l
Ël :
gl
;
åd4 äc
Hl Ë
FsÊ
dã
* 35
FË Fq?,
gP
tr
ål
?r
F
Þ
#fr RP 2>.
i
ã3nË
l3
=*ó?
àtt sú
ffil
il P
trrrle+uaXüÏlgqi,ô
Rl õËfoE-()õtrlD).<
l{l
r¡rl
url
o-l
É H sgã
Elãt AõcL
El
ol
zl
Øl
zl
rul
ol
Jl
<t
\¿I
,r'l
()l
òl
FI
u.rl
tDl
zl
TIJI
(Jl
JI
(1
o
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on
this lO
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
day of
October,20l3, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
Holland
MI
"City
49423
and,
of
of
c.
(hereinafter
I.
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
assign Reserve Police
Venue
to
unless
perform
d.
Non-interference with løw enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
2. CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
Generally.
Venue
expressly revoked by Venue.
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
a.
to remain on premises.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Consent
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
a GrooveVy'alk venue
City of Holland will
assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualifïed to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5. TERM; TERMINATION. The term of this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Durqtion of attendance. Venue shall identifl the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby
covenants
and agrees to indemnifu, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
llPage
All
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
expenses
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perfornance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
II|I4CL 691.1401 et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date f,rrst
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
Name:
Its
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
Andrew J. Mulder
City A
Dated:
o /
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol I and, Michigan 49 423
(616) 392-1821
2lPage
i
I
I
i
rl
a'
il
't
,fl
il
ll
lnl
ol
Él
äl
url
Hl
I.IJ
o
0,
IIJ
c,
o
f
Ø
c
(ú
o
o
o
o
Él
õl
rl
+t
Él
url
OI
al
=l
ol
EI
el
N
lr)
tf)
c{
ù
0)
L
0-
voo
c
o^
(IJ\
oo
oo
lJ
çL
ccç,
ooJ0)
ñùù
d.)0)
f)=
oOo
(r)oQ)
ÀfLfL
f,f
Lll
uJ
LL
c, d)
L0L
o0ro
o.(!ohOo
o'l
tco
XÈr
d):E
pË,
I c\¡
_à
L
a
-o
¿
F
?
g.
)
o
x
f
o
0)
lf)
o
=o
lr)
so
a
õJ
c',
o
3
o
E
:E
th
d)
o)
(l
=
->
=
xo
o
õ
(,
l--
o
.o
o
o
4'
!
rO=o
tt
o)
0)
(ú
o
0)
I
o)
ô'
)
fL
-6
(h
ú)
a.P
Ó'F
rc
ô
oo
zz
lt
@
rq
o)
o
o
=
U)
E
tr
IU
]L
IU
UJ
fL
J
f
U)
Ø
c
o
IL
Lu
UJ
u, .^
o0)
Jã
q(r
(I)O'
É.t
o (t)
o- fL
cóç0)
5e
ä,p
Éo¡oo
:eècÞ
Eg6ä
OØa
r¡l'i
o)'- o-
ãÞ
5Ë EË
E,gag
o)
0-
o
o
L
o
(g
c.
ar 9.
>.É.
"ev
o
ô
o
ET
&.u
oC)
v)z
r-o
'E
E;a
e
r)
Ò
E
ã
ËÈ
o,E,
ã
ã
õ ,l f
HE
ãä4 ãs
ËgI
'nËl
F-
R
;oXç[email protected]
oro
u?.9
T
o
>ì
Ë
a
o9à<
s)
Ietr)
s(f)
I
oo
II
cto
o_ fL
ôJ
la)
F-
oo
ocl
cdñ
o
rf)
<ci+
rôl
üt
Él
Él
a
Él
;
3l
FI
fil q
I
e iË fiElä ög
4 üi fiï"gl E
¡l
îl t
8l
ãrflrFãli-rfiglË,ã=g
oÔ
oo
(oË
(l)F
ZO
OO
0- ô-
õo
$à
'i:
oooonÓooo99
0)
Ø
C,
C)
o
_)
L
(¡)
o-
ot
o
N
LL
N
q)
TL
L
o
o
l
o
c)
o
E
o,
ãSe
(J(oã
o)
(It
()
o
â
or,rl
<()u
o
ul
Ø
o
ut
É.
É
f
o
()
c)
z o(ú No
F
o-
d F0)
Øl TL
o
Øwl
fi
v\l
=
ff
'rl ø
ol
;lB
,l U:
9Ëfi
ol o {
û
?
il?g
=lØH
ml
ue
¡L¡.
äl
:l uJË
it r,z
ãÉ
8=
L
o
L
0t
F
(0
urt
ãl
fil ãlH
ul=l> Øl t
tDl
Él ñl É
,el 31 2
(c
o
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on this
M
day of
October, 20 13, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
49423
Avenue, Holland,
"City of
Holland"),
Mr
of
and,
+5
a GrooveWalk venue
I.
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
Officer(s),
its
c.
to remain on premises. Venue
to the City of Holland, Department of
Consent
consents
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
(hereinafter "Venue").
SERVICES. City of Holland
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
will
employees,
assign Reserve Police
to Venue to
perform
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2, CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
a.
Cenerally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
Such consent shall remain effective
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
Non-interference with law enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
d.
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or al any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5. TERM; TERMINATION. The term of this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
b. Durqtion of attendance. Venue shall identifo the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
inspect such time records after receipt
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that
if
any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
7. INDEMNIFICATION.
of invoice
and
Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnif,, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
llPage
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES. All expenses
in connection with the attendance
of a governmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perfoÍnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
of
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL 691.1407
et seq.
IN Iù/ITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
+
Bì
G^.'t{
frL
Name:
Its
Aslisln^'f hrl
\^èn¿a
J
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
J. Mulder
(3
City
Dated:
/o
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol land, Michigan
(616) 3e2-1821
49
423
2lP age
nl
öl
l
O
OJ
IJJ
,'Y
c
o)
E
(¡)
f,
al
((,
q)
o
c
l
ó
N
o
q
c
o
OJ
0)
IL
o,
LL
c.)
o
o.
=L
o
(t
c
.€o
Lt¡
22
çL
oc,
LL
r.lJ
l--
0,
od)
Èoãl
oo
T-
sà
dJ
fLù
o)
G\
õo
zo
o
o
c)d)
0- ô-
0,
o
o
ô,1
ôl
olo
rf)
l.(o .+
8l
zlI
EI
x
22 2
CÊC
d)0)d)
UJ t].J LU
ooo
o-ÀfL
ooo !
!
a
LLL
oor¡,
ùo-lL
#,"ñl
F
?
2
9.
o
2
iú
o
o
o
.o
t--
x
:E
c
0)
t
r
0-
o
L
o
o
C
(ú
d,
qt
tt
ö
õf
0
(.)
0)
t
(ú
o)
dJ
tt
O
=6o
o
{.t
ìõ
o
U'
o)
o)
(!
o
å
r¡)
o
\o
(n
0)
o,
o
3
o
àa
:E
q)
U'
0)
(It
=
o
T
Ò
ã
E
EE
Ë
Ëâ?,
ã;lË
ãs
ö9
gu
F^,8
q
ú.co
u?P
(0'í P
xFr
r9
t')x
Sú)
s(Ð
=
o
É
:E
h0)O
-16
dco
Xçr
o.l o
d)*
Jo ü,
9ôl
_à
!
=
o
T
Él
rl
-*
öl
fil q
al
x ÞË aEIä
Ii
n?slË
slU
Þ
Ft
u rPriËsä,Fl fi-äã i
EilElËiid u5lt
zolol
oo
qq
(oÍ
LL
fL
rco
ro
C.l
o
o
V>
C\¡
el
Él
=l
øl
Ðl
ol
ol
UJI
Él
:l
u.ll
:<I
(Jl
Íl
ol
zl
.hl
zl
ull
ql
Jl
oo
q9
oo
oo
(or
.v.
ãås
oo=
2 2 22
0)
I.IJ
F
o,
()
0)
â
(It
c)
o -c
<()u
o
ui
Ø
À
F
6t o
I'UI
t
ft
o ol ô_
ãl
uJl
E Øl
(Jl
.n url
;l I
J
o
U'
l!
ut
F
J-l z (ú
Él tL ol
ul o
lrl,lø ol ú
o
ú E()
.al Ë
i
?
ïlml t¡
il
-lø ¿
É
,ûl H IL
lll.
lrtl r,
t-
ú.
ol o o
t-.,1 '{
I
flã
z<n
o
o E
Ø
L
o
L
o)
lÉ
5l
(Jl
òl
TI
ul
Url
zl
uJl
(Jl
Jl
oo
zz
aø
ú.
o)
Oo,
:JJ (t
(t
LL
oc)
0- fL
o,
ú.
5Ë EË
E oro o
:sècE
E 8ãte'E s
oi'ê ã
ãÈ
ÐË
Eoroo
5Ë
'8,¿96
'EE;e
8.9 e
oi 'ã -o.
5È
UJ
o
q
tu
tL
f
U)
Ø
J
fL
IJJ
uJ
TL
uJ
F
x.
tU)
z
o
o
to
oi
I
@
o
o
o
oO
v>z
r-o
pu^
trt
(1
o.
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY _ RESERVE OFFICERS
a{!\
I
This Agreement is entered into on this
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
day of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
MI
Avenue, Holland,
49423 (hereinafter
"City
d"),
of
of
c.
Consent to remain on premises. Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
Walk venue
(hereinafter "Venue").
I.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
Venue
to
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
assign Reserve Police
perform
Non-interference with lqw enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking aftendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
d.
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2. CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
a.
Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualiflred to perform the attendance services at
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
the Venue location.
Venue premises.
b,
Employees on Assignmenl. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
of
5.
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service. Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby
covenants
and agrees to indemniff, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits ofany person or entity.
llPage
All expenses
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
of a governmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perforrnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
govemmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
I|'{CL 691.1401 et seq.
IN Iù/ITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
I
¿t''.s
Name: -\i."..,
'-þ,,"Þ
-s'
.'-l^ l.-,t
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
Andrew J. Mulder
City
(
Dated:
AO
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Holland, Michigan
49 423
(616) 392-182t
2lPage
U'
cJl
ã9,
o(ll
(ú
o
o)
o
(1)
0)
(\t
o
o,
0t
()
UJ
c
o)
E
o
=
U)
o
o
c
o
E
l
o
N
o N
o-c
<O
o
tU
U)
o
o_
C)
:l
ú
d.
Lrl
Í. h
À lrJ
6t o
Øwl
r.u
Iã
Ho.
IIJ D
^Ç,
z0
<=
Øû
J- llo<
frg
o.
xñ
É, ul
uØl
u,
ul
ú, ol F
; 8ãl
z
É.
1ll
Ø
tu
J
o
J
cÊ
IJJ
o B8
lLl Ë
J<
c åÉ
Â
w'Ø
î,2
3,=
o
L
0t
o
o
.v
o
(ú
0L
OJ
0-
o
o
IJì
N
o
o
ll)
N
el
Él
El
øl
(Jl
=l
ol
tluJl
:l
uJl
YI
(Jl
Íl
ol
ahl
=l
zl
utl
el
'.p
à
Ll
C
o^
-
(fJ\
LL
Ëo
z(J
od)
0-À
oo
oa
(or
oo
oo
Ol
(oË
u
uI
II
\-
uàl
F\l
ool
zol
8l
tzzzZz-z
çL
UJ
oo,
r.u
LL
l.-
O'
oo
0-o-
=5
oo
IL
C'
ÀL
oo
qq
co
ôJ
C\|
olo
q\
(o
.+
F
zlI
f;l
Ël
il
x
SI
:
ir
ol
.E
Ë
ó)
dt
IUUIU
oo0)
0-Àol:f:l
ooo
1:EÏ
droo
0- oúco
ú)
0-
urpo'Í I
Xçr
or9
t')*
É)
tu
5(r)
=
o
'É
:E
ã
?
?
g.
o
x
f
o
o
o)
(!
iú
o
o
o
t--
.o
c.
o
OJ
rõ
ñ
e
iú
o
o
o\
o
u)
(tt
0)
(J'
(,
0-
L
d)
(J
ç
(ú
o)
di
u,
õ)
(L
0)
L
0)
o
o)
U)
E
c')
o
=
=
o
T
0,
th
o)
(ft
=
'E
J
o
:Ê
'õ
a
ô
E
frËI
l- ö2
f
q+ +=
ÉH
4?d
ocL
Ëøä
HE
åd4 fc
nEä Ës
_X
_õ
*
PPö,,Ë
UI .E
Ñ-P
úco
Xçr
o.l o
s)S
sulr)
_à
L
ro
q?
E
Þ
p ÞË
Hl
il
¡l
El Ë Ë ?
p-
fil O-rrJL'
t-l
õl
oooo-9o99-999
zz
o
Ø
C
c)
o
J
L
o)
o-
o
o
U.
q)
o
L
tL
5l
(Jl
>t
(Jt
õrl
tDl
';l
zl
uJl
-r9l
Ë
b
oo
zz
anø
d)û)
LL
oo
JJ
cr('
o)c)
É.t
0- fL
5Ë EË
Eo¡oo
:e.È c E
E 8ãã.
o-
qEe
o)'.
gr&
5Ë EË
E oro o
'8,>Cõ
'EE;a
8.,2
o)'Ê 3o
5Ë
UJ
t¡J
c
o
tL
U)
Ø
f
J
o.
ul
IJJ
TL
UJ
E
E
k
U)
E
z
r]
o
uì
o)
@
il
o
o
o
oO
tnz
FO
pu-
trt
q
(i
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on this
2!
day of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
49423 (hereinafter "City of
"),
MI
of
and,
a GrooveWalk venue
(hereinafter "Venue")
I.
Officer(s),
its
c.
to remain on premises. Venue
to the City of Holland, Department of
Consent
consents
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
will
employees,
to
assign Reserve Police
Venue
to
Such consent shall remain effective
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
perform
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2. CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
a. Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
Non-interference with low enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
d.
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5. TERM; TERMINATION. The term of this
Agreement begins as of the date fìrst shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identify
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7. INDEMNIFICATION.
Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnifl, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits ofany person or entity.
llPage
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES. All expenses
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
8.
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perforrnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL 691.1407 et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
By
Name:
L
9"9 ç
Pco,.
¿,
uz-Ê
F--n>.+T,)
ß"rt>
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
J. Mulder
City
Dated:
&ô/3
o
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O.
Box 1767
Holland, Michi gan
49
423
(6t6) 392-t82t
2lP age
I
i{
il
i
I
I
I
Ø
;
ú,
ul
Ø
LrJ
J
fD
J
É
lJl
o
c
at1
c
o
f
o
o
o
f,
E
E
o
ã$e
o(o=
(It
o
o
(l}
TIJ
TJJ
0)
()
dt
N
o N
oc,'Y
<()u
o
trl
Ø
o
o
3
É
z (ú ó
r! o N
d 0t
t---
Gt o- 8
o
Øwl
t lt
ul
cjl o-
9ãl
É ØI
rill
lJ
ut
wl
ú(Jl
8ãl
fry
o.
iF
o<
6u)
zö
<=
Øû
uJ=
Uo-
lJ-
B6
lJ.l
É,
z.
'ut
J<F-
o -o
u
:E
Ê
f,=
L
o
L
0)
o
oooo
zz
o
q
o
(ü
o
.v
c
0)
o
5
OJ
o
o
o
o
it
Jl
(Jl
uJl
Øl
ol
zl
zl
o-l
<t
(Jl
YI
ut
Ét
lUl
(JI
=l
ol
=l
øl
Él
el
c!
tr)
N
ro
0-
L
(L
L
o
À
o
0.t
!
LL
0)
E
IL
5l
()l
>t
(Jl
FI
ul
anl
zl
lrJl
et
c
o_
'{= Ll
d)
ccc
ooú)
5la
oOo
L
I
o-
L
'É.co
Xç
s€
ËK
-à
::
o
I
Ël
È
?
3
z
î)
o
z
F
o
ã
o
o
c
.o
:E
x
o
(t
_d
-g
c,
E
o
IJ'
(ú
o)
d)
o
ã
lr)
ñ
o
U)
oo
zz
anØ
o0)
q('
q, q,
É.t
oofL
0-
5Ë EË
Eoroo
'õ.> q õ
'É86å
ñEe
o)'- è
€r&
5Ë þË
Eo¡oo
'8,>qõ
E;e
'E
UJ
]IJ
t-L
o
e
U)
Ø
f
J
'
trl
pu^
o
oO
Qz
FO
o
o
0
@
o)
o
(ì
c]
z
U)
F
kt-
C
IlJ
ut
IL
o.
8
uJ
6È
o
o
0-
ö
:J
r
A.P E
d'= ã.
Ë
o
o
ç
(ú
o)
u,
d)
(J
6
È
L
o)
o
q)
o)
0)
Ø
o)
(ú
o)
o
B
o
E
T
v,
0)
o)
(ú
3
o
:Ê
äËä
cL
Þ
E
frÊ
+
ö
..Ë
o Yto *aã
>
ãlç ea
-ñãl
gPl
F öt2
:.Hq
T
=
o
É
Jú
or9
t')x
ú)
bOo
(t 'í
Xç tco
óJoo
ôo-
odrc)
o-Àfr
È'lù
ñôooqOo
ZZz
22.
LL
0,
o-
cc
0)()
ru Lll
0J
0_
J:f
oo
TI
Sà
o\
õo
zo
íJ
ÀfL
LL
la)
o l.r.r)
(o$
oo
(]o
od)
LO-
Ël
2l
gl
3,
E
ãdd õa
fil Ë Ë:¿lïÊ2
cl; gË fifr|ä ËË
q
ül
fingE äã
fl
;A
5r
Íl
ël
ãl
rôl
cci ñ
rN
ul
zt5
oo
oo
(or
oó
oo
(oË
ul
url
pl n # Ë n Ë
ol
HqiîYl,
ñõl 1"
É ssld
EIP
Ël;t õl
(l
o
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY _ RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on this
Qt¿uv
or
"City
of
of
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
October,20l3, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
49423 (hereinafter
with another employee.
c.
"Venue").
I.
Officer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
assign Reserve Police
Venue
to
to remain on premises.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
SERVICES. City of Holland
Consent
Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
a GrooveWalk venue
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
perform
assign
Non-interference with low enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
d.
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2, CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
a.
Generally.
City of Holland will
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5.
of
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service. Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME iù/ORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnifl, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits ofany person or entity.
llPage
All
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
expenses
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the Cify.
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
of a governmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perforrnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
govemmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Govemmental Immunity Act,
discharge
MCL 691.1401
et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
Name:
Its
$"touuLorr'lt
U
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
D
By
J. Mulder
City
Dated:
f
o
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol land, Michigan
49
423
(616) 392-1821
2lPage
ol
u, Gt
wl
!{
rlãfil
ol(oul
ä:
ilBHl
"l
9iF
=
ol o {
<.lÀu,
ilz.)
1l < û
-lØ
qËe
äl a
:l u Ëe
il ËÉ
8ã
FË'e
c
E
c
f
o
o
o
J
Ø
o
OJ
8E.A
<()v
o o
ul (\t
Ø o
0)
o
fL '.=
()
o
t o
F
o- IU
oo
o
U'
c
0)
o
0)
.v,
o
o
o-
È
L
q,
È
=0)L
o
(.,
o
o
ri
N
C.I
ro
o
o
L
LL
o
o)
L
lL
oo
zz
c
o_
fJ
.i=
LL
Eà
ñ\
õo
zo
oo ô0oo
oo
(l)F
aÔ
oo
(oF
22
ul
êc
0)0)
tu
LL
oö
0- 0ãr
oo
Í:E
oo
ILL
l.-
oo
cc
co
rôl
o|r)¡.rf)
(li+
rôl
Yrr=,ruJOì9
8
ù
22 2
Ícç
dtod)
ù,1
(r)o0)
LÈ(L
ó0)o
ô-0-0-
Err
:#e
-ú.co
XÈ
or9
(f,
Eä
o
=
É
f
T
:*e
i
tu
o
()
2
9,
J
><
fo
u,
d)
o)
(o
o
ã,
ô\
o
lr)
2
(ú
o
l-'
o
o
.o
(ú
dJ
o
õ
3o
o
u,
0)
0.
0
r
o
o
L
o
c
(E
o)
t),
d)
ñ)
fL
0)
!
()
q)
o)
Ú)
aJ
(ú
o)
o
o
=
E
a
:E
o,
0)
U>
(It
=
=
o
:c
I
EÈ
uJ>
..oo
2 ""7 I
9
Eã ,.=ã
-" i9
HP'\
dñ
?
Þ
6
Ë rs gúE Ë ää
bvîEH3þHEH3"3
r{fr.?8ÉdbSF+4
H s\d
oo-
irå
2 f È
P
;1 >4
ü
3
Ë å2
r, "i
213ß d ög
Èq
Ë=ßn "8a
x
| 9Y. 99
"gOO!¿t¡
Æ
ådd ãd
-*
I
o
"ÍF
g:
gK
="1
ol
E Bl äl
ú. >l
(Jl
1!
lLÉI
)- Ol :ll
r¡Jl
ul
Øl
ol
Ét
>t
ol
lrJl
øl
TI
ol
:tl
ol
u¡l
lrJl
Øl
ol
ol
¡l
<t
úl
ol
ol
zl
tl
FI
<t
rul
zl
ol
F 0,
z ñt No
u.l o
d .Eo
É t)o,
úit
(Jl
,ii
ilt
f
el
ñl
ãl
øl
fl
ol
(JI
Él
uJf
il
uJt
YI
(Jl
<t
0.1
ol
zl
thl
zl
IJJI
el
tu
È
a
O lU
o
L
o
o
5l
C)t
()l
>t
FI
HI
zI
ull
ól
rl
5Ë
oo
zz
ott
q,
o,
ãÃ
J5
É.t
oo)
o- fL
EË
Éc¡oo
'ã.>
aã
'EEã€_
QU' 6
r¡ì'i
o)'- o-
ãÈ
5Ë
[Ë
Eoroo
'8,¿qõ
'ËE;=o
aEgo.
o)'Ë
ãE-
UJ
llJ
IL
o
c
U)
Ø
:f
J
0-
IL
tU
!J..t
tU
E
E
Ø
z
E
q
o
lt
uì
o)
@
o
o
ô
oO
Qz
FO
&.u
trt
cfi
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on this
9t
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
¿uv of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
49423 * (he¡einafter , "City of
MI
and, 1-evp , l)r^bl e SttrT
of
0u, \*uinrt ( oÃoonb,aGrooveWalkvenue
-
c.
Consent to remqin on premises. Venue
consents to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
H_ollaqd"),
(hereinaftei
I.
"{enue'\.7
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
-
SERVICES. City of Holland
Offrcer(s),
its
will
employees,
to
Venue
to
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
assign Reserve Police
perform
d.
Non-interference with law enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2, CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES
a. Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5.
of
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service. Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
fufther understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby
covenants
and agrees to indemnifo, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
llPage
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
All expenses
of a governmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perfornance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMLINITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
i|'fCL 691.1401 et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OFHOLLAND
By
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
By
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
Ò,^* B-.,,r;r^ C^uon v
Name
Its:
er^
r
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
By
J
C
Dated:
0
^ô
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY:
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol lan d, Michigan 49 423
(6t6) 392-1821
2lPage
.ttl
ØUll
u¡l
g'
o(o
-e
OE
<(J
UJ
c
0)
E
o
J
u)
o
c)
=(¡)L
o0)
OJ
IL
o
ot
L
IL
v()o
(ú
00)
0-
o
o
ro
N
o
o
|l)
c!
el
Él
ãl
=l
ol
(Jl
TIJI
Él
il
ul
el
ol
zl
.ht
zl
o-l
<t
ull
YI
(Jl
ôooo
zz
É
q
o
c)
o
-f
0)
c
f
N
o (I,d) o
UJ
N
Ø o
o 0) -r
o_
tu
o (l)ó
d E
c
(Ú
o_
É ()
:l d!
O
t- ot
z oñt No
ut
3j d 0,
Hl
ãl
9.r ol
.tY
tr
",1 ø
ol
fr
ilË3
_rl
íl Ë n
ol o {
:le3
1l <:i
û
=lØ
re
llr
'olüB
ül
il
äE
r,z
8ã
L
o
L
0)
lJ
o
5l
()l
>t
(Jt
fl
.Dl
zl
IrJl
et
c
o^
,{=
LJ
sà
(t\
Ëa
Z()
LL
oí)
0-À
oo
oo
@r
oo
oo
(oF
ul
rul
lll
EI EI
gl al
üit
(Jl
1l
ol
zl
uJl
EI
tl<t
C)l
crl
zl
<t
¡l
úl
ol
ol
tnl
IJJI
rul
22
cc.
oc)
uul
LL
oot
0- 0::f
oo
I.L
oo
o-0
oo
oo
cdñ
c.l
o tl)
u?\
(o .f
rC!
-'
*x
ú'
22 2
2
g.
T
o
CCç,
co
2
o
(ú
tl)
o
C
.o
U)
3(ú
o
o
OJ
o
õ
õ\
o
ll)
d)
tL
ö
r5
0-
o
L
o
d)
C
(ú
o)
d)
u>
(J
ñ)
fL
d)
o
L
q)
É
(ú
o)
(t>
tt
o
:Ê
3
(ú
0)
q)
ro
E
B
(ú
o)
(..1
o
ã
o
cft
x
U'
0)
odrd)
dó
(l)oo
0-[lL
T:ET
droc)
ô- o-ú.co
Xç
or9
t')x
$ó
a
o
Ë
:E
ul .9
Xç É.
s€
sö
9c!
-à
a
tó
P
ur.9 I
o-
ñùù
õ
ul
o
(J
I
co
.r'
ul>
..âo
r-ozO
Ë
V=.
fru3 ,
ñ"
Pö
Ê=nn ãE
ot
2 qó
Þq:
oõq
-u.r
t'Íì
olL
É
o
Þ
0g
ü È+ Ëiå -*n
ÉÉ
È 55 eþtr,¿
H4= 5g
fr
"3
+
E ffi
i
Eþ
F 4'.
H þ.
t!,iË5
p
Éó
ã32Ë
tP
cr
;Ë 3H eî +r5 #H g-r Iú qE fir',EE"
Afri
r
qiiSir;ð
R H sgd
ol
JI
ol =o¿
+l
al
EI
-""1
uJl
anl
ol
lul
(Jl
úl
EI
ãl
5Ë
oo
zz
o_
fL
ah6
oo)
:JJ
o(t
(I)c)
É. É.
oc)
E.Ë
Eo¡oo
'8.>
oã
.ËEã€.
oõ aj
(ì'o'E o6ãE
5Ë [Ë
Eooo
'E,>q6
'eE;-.
aEgô
Ó'F
rc
(âE
l.lj
u
IL
U)
o
q
a
:f
J
0TL
tu
lJJ
UJ
tr
É
U)
o
=
o
uì
ot
lt
q
o
o
o
ô
oO
Qz
r--
fl*
trt
a
(Ì
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - RESERVE OFFICERS
This Agreement is entered into on this
4Jg
City of Holland to replace
with another employee.
day of
October,20l3, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
"City
Avenue, Holland,
Holland"), and,
8q l-;--rt
of
of
c.
I.
Such consent shall remain effective
DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
Officer(s),
its
to remain on premises. Venue
to the City of Holland, Department of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
(hereinafter "Venue").
SERVICES. City of Holland
employee
Consent
consents
a GrooveWalk venue
a removed
will
employees,
to
Venue
to
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
assign Reserve Police
perform
Non-interference with low enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance services. Venue
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
d.
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
2, CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
a. Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
Venue premises.
b.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
5. TERM; TERMINATION. The term of this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either pafty or
the conclusion of the event for which attendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a, Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies
with all applicable safety and
health
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
b. Durqtion of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
inspect such time records after receipt
service.
Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
7.
of invoice
and
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnif,, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
llPage
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES.
All expenses
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue further agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the perforrnance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
governmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Govemmental Immunity Act,
discharge
incurred by Venue in connection with the attendance
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility of
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
GOVERNMENTAL IMMUNITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
MCL 691.1401
et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
By
Kurt D. Dykstra
Its Mayor
By
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
8( Er
Name
Its:
APPROVED AS
ßer"no
I
l/n,nntn,
J
r
FORM
CITY OF
By
City A
Dated:
/o
/
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C.
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Ho I land, Michigan 49 423
(616) 392-t821
2lP age
ãSe
LE .,t
<()u
c,
o.)
E
E
f,
!1
o
(¡)
o
ç
f
o
N
o N
(\,
0)
O
3
IIJ
o)
É ()
ú.
t- d)
ó
z o(ú N
E
d)
()
d)
o
o
ul
UJ
<
.r,
1)
û
=
e
ul
Ø
o
Øl À
o
Øwl
ul ol o-t
(J<l
o
r,lã ffil
ol ø, ull
.r,l
@l
;lBãl
u:
grñ
4l;lza
1l <
a
=lØ B
CÊIH
ItL
äl
:l
r-r.r
=
1l Ë #
î,2
3,=
L
o
L
(lt
o
o
o
o
o
o
q
Él
c
,PO
Sà
(ft\
Ëo
o o
cc
ôd)
d)
TIJ
LL
c,
UJ
À0rD
ol.-
fL
0,
l:l
oo
::trf.
ZO
LL
0ro
0-À
Ël
+1
ãl
õl
99I
c.cc
oo0)
ÈñÈ
o-
o-
ocro)
ooflf
ooo
I!!
LL!
ooo
ô- fL
P
P
u?P
Xç[email protected]
or9
ttJ *
.!ú ó
5(.)
=
o
Ë
T
U?"E
-rlco
Xçr
si
Sfo
s(.l
'c
5
o
I
F
?
I
9.
o
:E
x
ut
o)
(!
o)
o
ã
U)
so
U>
o)
o)
o
B
2
(ú
o
o
F
o
c
-o
o
s
o
-6
O
o
iú
tt
0)
o)
(I,
e
OJ
=
d)
ñ2
(L
th
o
:E
d)
q)
E
f,
IJ'
o
f
rÀ
o
o
o
c
ñ
(J
0)
q)
o
=
=
o
:c
fiÊ
8
f,z
qs
Ë
F ö2
ãäd
ø>o
z
ËrtË
_ñ _Z
*
\ar;
;
1!tOl
fl ë.
È8
EËë -.n
s 35
ËË H41
fr
5ed
_à.,
il
sl
f;| :
Ër
Êl
olr)
ul\
<D$
rô¡
oo
qq
oo
oo
(or
tsl
zt5
<t
co
rN
l1l
ãrflËHãËq',,gH,äåg
oo
oo
(oF
lJ-
ut
ô-l
d
F
o
ol
<t
(Jl
YI
uJl
¿l
rLl
Él
rul
(Jl
ol
=l
gl
ll.ll
el
N
lr)
N
lo
0-
OJ
o-
(ü
.v,
o
o o o
2zzzzzzz'z
OJ
UI
C)
o
3
ùo)
o
0)
L
IL
c)
ot
L
lL
5l
(Jl
òl
FI
zl
url
thl
=l
,91
ul
atl
zl
ull
(Jl
rl
oo
zz
tha
o0J
ãJ
(t
(t
0)o,
É.t
oo
0- fL
5Ë EË
Esce
'ÉEã€.
þ.Ë
oØ6
ro'=
r
o)'õ o-
5È
5Ë
ô.
e
E see
'E!;ã
3,2
o)'e
6È
u
]¡J
u-
o
q
f,
U)
@
J
0-
IL
UJ
TJJ
UJ
E
F
U)
z
o
o
1¡l
o)
@.
u
o
o
o
oO
0z
FO
fl.*
trt
(l
o
AGREEMENT FOR EVENT ATTENDANCE
CITY OF HOLLAND - DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY _ RESERVE OFFICERS
q-T1A
this I
This Agreement is entered into on
City of Holland to replace a removed employee
with another employee.
day of
October, 2013, between the City of Holland, of 270 S. River
Avenue, Holland,
of
c.
of
Public Safety employees' entry and remaining upon
the premises of Venue for the duration of the event.
enue").
Such consent shall remain effective
1. DESCRIPTION, LOCATION AND PRICING OF
will assign Reserve Police
Officer(s), its employees, to Venue to perform
attendance services at the Venue location(s) and for the
pricing as described in Exhibit A.
SERVICES. City of Holland
Non-interference with law enforcement
obligations. Venue understands and agrees that
City of Holland law enforcement employees
undertaking attendance services may report and
investigate any and all criminal law violations
occurring during such attendance seryices. Venue
d.
a.
Generally. City of Holland will assign
employees who, in City of Holland's judgment, are
best qualified to perform the attendance services at
the Venue location.
agrees not to interfere or otherwise restrict the City
of Holland or its law enforcement personnel from
undertaking law enforcement duties while upon
Venue premises.
b.
notice to Venue.
3. VENUE'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
unless
expressly revoked by Venue.
2, CITY OF HOLLAND'S RESPONSIBILITIES.
Employees on Assignment. The employees
assigned to Venue under this Agreement shall
remain employees of City of Holland throughout
assignment with Venue and such employees shall
remain under the supervision and control of the
City of Holland and shall not answer to or be
considered the employees or agents of Venue for
any purpose whatsoever. The City of Holland may
remove an employee assigned to Venue from the
Venue location at any time, with or without prior
to remqin on premises. Venue
to the City of Holland, Department of
Consent
consents
a GrooveWalk venue
4. PAYMENT FOR SERVICES. Venue will pay City
of Holland in accordance with the pricing set forth in
Exhibit A. City of Holland will invoice Venue at the
address set forth above or at any other address that
Venue designates. Payment will be due upon invoicing.
of
5.
TERM; TERMINATION. The term
this
Agreement begins as of the date first shown above and
will continue in effect until canceled by either party or
the conclusion of the event for which afiendance
services are requested. City of Holland reserves the
right, however, to terminate this Agreement
immediately for any reason whatsoever.
a. Generally. The Venue will provide the assigned
City of Holland employees with a suitable place at
which attendance services may be completed that
complies with all applicable safety and health
standards, statutes, and ordinances.
b. Duration of attendance. Venue shall identif, the
time and place of attendance requested sufficiently
in advance to allow the City of Holland to allocate
resources required to perform such attendance
service. Venue further understands that
notwithstanding any specified time period requested
for attendance services, the City of Holland does
not guarantee its employees will be available for
any or all of the time periods requested. Venue
further understands that if any City of Holland
employee assigned to Venue must be removed from
Venue for any reason whatsoever, that nothing in
this agreement shall be considered to require the
6. DOCUMENTATION OF TIME WORKED. The
City of Holland will keep and maintain time records
relative to time worked by its employees for event
attendance services at Venue. Venue shall be entitled to
inspect such time records after receipt of invoice and
upon reasonable notice to City of Holland.
7.
INDEMNIFICATION. Venue hereby covenants
and agrees to indemnif,, defend, and hold harmless the
City of Holland from any claims, demands, or suits by
any person or entity arising out of or connected with the
attendance services provided by the City of Holland.
This covenant of indemnification shall include any
attorney fees and costs incurred by the City in
connection with the defense of such claims, demands, or
suits of any person or entity.
llPage
8.
PAYMENT OF EXPENSES. All expenses
in connection with the attendance
incurred by Venue
services shall be the sole expense and responsibility
Venue without contribution by the City.
9.
of
GOVERNMENTAL IMML|NITY. The attendance
services contemplated under this agreement shall at all
times be considered the engagement in the exercise or
of a govemmental function by the City of
Holland. Venue fufher agrees that nothing in this
agreement, or the performance of attendance services
contemplated herein, shall be considered a waiver of
govemmental tort immunity benefiting the City of
Holland under provisions of Michigan law, including
but not limited to, the Governmental Immunity Act,
discharge
MCL 691.1401
et seq.
IN WITNESS THEREOF, the parties hereto have caused this Agreement to be executed on the date first
noted above.
CITY OF HOLLAND
Kurt D. Dykstra
lts Mayor
Anna Perales
Its Deputy City Clerk
VENUE
Its:
nqrr
APPROVED AS TO FORM
CITY OF
D
By
Andrew J. Mulder
City
Dated:
/
a
2
THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
Vincent L. Duckworth
Cunningham Dalman, P.C
321 Settlers Road
P.O. Box 1767
Hol land, Michigan 49 423
(616) 392-182t
2lP
a
ge
,îlol
f{
rtfrfrl
ilË3
*r
TIfr3J
il
ol o t¡i
<
,lza o
¿l
re
1l <
=
û
=lØ
ol
HÊ
llJ.
Ël
z.
itäE
T,
8E
c
(¡)
$à
0-
Lg
o-
c
eo
L
o\
6o
ZO
0)
oo
oo
(or
(l)o
È
oÕ
oa
(or
o
o
Él
El
el
ô.¡
tri
C.l
to
o
o
L
(d
o
v,
ooooooggoo9
zzzzZZzzzz'z
o
C
ut
o
E
0)
IL
L
ot
TL
o
o-
o
L
0)
:o
c>
ô¡
c.l
c
f
a)
o
o
L
l
q
E
oj
ã$e
(It
t.u
F
o)
(J
d)
o
o
8.8.e
<(Ju
o
IU
U)
o
oo
ú.
o_
F
UJ
o)
()
a)
0,
z o(ú No
ul
É
É
3
o
L
o
L
0)
o
øl
ol
Þl
ùil
zl
(Jl
<t
ol
zl
uJl
EI
ul
ól
ol
zl
<t
pl
ol
ol
tnl
t¡Jl
ull
ol
fl
ol
+l
øl
(Jl
(Jl
CCÇ
óo0)
ñ'lù
T
=
ï
or9
qà<
19t.)
5<")
'ú.co(0'í
Xç
o-
u?.9 I
=!h
ooo
XIT
OdJc)
o-[fL
d)o
d.l
d)oc)
oo-
l'.ôJ
r.u t!¡
LL
o
0-ù
Jf
oo
IL
LL
oo)
o_
0-
oo
qq
æ
.+
C\|
olo
u?\
(o
r
!
ul
=
o
(J
5
e
o
f
õ
o
l-o
o
-o
o
¿
o
õJ
À
o
Ê,
0)
o)
(!
th
d)
ö
6
(L
0)
o
0)
Ë
(tf
o)
0)
U>
O
o
iú
l!
OJ
E
c
x
o
tft
o)
o)
=o
ô\
o
t¡)
E
o)
o
3
L
à
a
o
:E
U>
0)
t')
(t
=
o
:c
PrL
tTJ
3
g
ËÊ
9,ü
ü5
äÚ
EÞ
z>.
Ë8Ë
HÉ
óZ 3s?
H
eþàÈ 8'*
b õ(-l
=çâ
iãE
Ëåç
!u<
d aå
..oo
, p&
u?.9
o- P
Xç [email protected]
oro
d:e
.Qü)
9ôl
E
5
o
:E
":
o
Æ
( iås
>d
F
fi ;i
f H ffi
i ÉHIgä
ü x tr
H ä
OÈ
Þ
E Bl ãl
úl
sEçãuÉ
ù9lBl ËËãgq1És\d
R F
uJl
ol
anl
rul
Ét
5l
lLtl
uJl
Él
ru
uot
tr
lLl
¿l
luJl
YI
(Jl
<t
5l
ol
(Jl
àl
Jl
ull
(Jl
zl
.hl
zl
ó_t
c0l
¿l
(Dl
zl
lrJl
3t
5Ë
oo
zz
U'O
(I)o)
JJ
o(t 0)
(I)
dt
LL
oí)fL
o_
EË
E oro o
'õ.>
eõ
.ËEE€.
9.E3
EË
o)'Ë o
øE
5Ë
Eoroo
'E,¿9õ
'EEã-o
3.9 E
d'E ã.
6È
UJ
o
q
trl
tL
U)
Ø
:f
J
fL
UJ
uJ
TL
uJ
E
E
U)
z
E
o
oi
,oto
I
@
o
o
o
oO
nz
l-o
fr.*
trt
fi
a
OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Clerk Report 14D2* To: Mayor Dykstra and Members of Holland City Council Date: October 16, 2013 Subject: Deputy City Clerk – Declare Election Items as Surplus Summary: The Election Division of the City Clerk Department has provided items no longer needed and requests Council declaration of these items as surplus. The Election Division of the City Clerk Department has retired voting booths in storage and is requesting to sell these units. The voting booths occupy a large space in storage and should be removed to make room for other items that require storage space outside of the City Clerk’s Office. There are around 60 voting booths that can be taken out of storage to be sold. It is suggested that these units be sold through an online mechanism such as Craigslist.com at a rate of $5 per unit. This profit will belong solely to the City of Holland. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council declare the described items as surplus and staff be authorized to dispose of all items as indicated. Respectfully submitted, Anna Perales Deputy City Clerk OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E1.1* To: Date: Subject: Summary: Mayor Dykstra and Members of Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Establishment of the Pick‐Up‐Trash (PUT) Club Initiative – Every 3rd Sunday of Each Month. On August 29, 2013, Ryan Cotton, Mike Trethewey and several staff members in City Hall attended a meeting requested by Mr. Jack Bradford with him and two friends. He presented his idea for a Pick Up Trash (PUT) Club. Anyone who picks up trash and never throws it down is automatically a member of the PUT Club. Mr. Bradford called the meeting to see what the City could do to assist him in promoting this concept. Several staff members in attendance offered some quick ideas and then committed to work on this and get back together with Mr. Bradford and his friends. The PUT Club was discussed – at length over two weeks and staff met again with Mr. Bradford on September 12 at which time he was advised of our ideas on this concept. It was agreed that staff could put this information on the City’s website and on the 2014 City Calendar and “talk it up” whenever we could. Staff also unveiled a “logo” for him to consider. In the meantime, Mr. Bradford and his group from Central Wesleyan Church and Hope College were to develop educational materials and presentations they would offer to schools and churches. Staff anticipates some expenses will be incurred if we continue to help in this project. For example, we looked at bracelets they could distribute to children as promotional items when they make educational presentations and seek volunteers to participate in their trash pick‐up program. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council approve the City’s continued, limited consultation with Mr. Bradford as well as limited participation in helping him promote this endeavor. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Report prepared by: Mary Ann Hensley, Recycle/Solid Waste Education Coordinator and Phil Meyer, Director, Community & Neighborhood Services.
Attachment to 14E1.1*
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E1.2* To: Mayor Dykstra and Members of Holland City Council. Date: October 16, 2013. Subject: Public Lodging License for the Economy Inn, 409 US 31 South – Schedule Public Hearing for November 6, 2013. Summary: The full report is included herein for Council’s background on this issue. A flaw in the noticing of the public hearing to consider the revocation of this license has been determined to necessitate that Council schedule a new Public Hearing on the revocation of the Public Lodging License for the November 6, 2013 meeting. On December 11, 2012, an inspection was conducted of the entire Economy Inn facility. On December 14, 2012, a 22 page violation letter was issued. Since then, progress on correcting the violations has been spotty at best. Plumbing permit 130051 for fixture replacement has expired without final inspection. Police calls continue, and the rooms remain deteriorated, filthy, and insect infested. Several follow‐up inspections have been conducted where some corrections have been made but full compliance has not been achieved. After review of the file regarding the licensing of the Economy Inn at 409 NB US 31 and the lack of progress on compliance with our ordinances, the Department of Community and Neighborhood Services came to the conclusion that there is no choice but to suspend the public lodging license for the Economy Inn at 409 NB US 31. Notice of this suspension (attached) was served to the owner on August 29, 2013. On September 18, 2013, City Council scheduled a public hearing for October 16 to hear public comments and to consider the revocation of the public lodging license. Another facility inspection conducted on October 9, 2013 revealed numerous violations and unsanitary conditions persist. A communication to the owner including a nine‐page list of outstanding violations is attached. In addition, during this period, police calls have persisted. A copy of the list of police calls is also attached. Section 17‐20 of the Holland City Ordinance describes the appeal process. This public hearing has been scheduled at the request of the property manager, to appeal the decision to suspend the license and avoid revocation of the license by City Council. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council schedule a public hearing on the revocation of the Public Lodging License for the Economy Inn at 409 NB US‐31 for November 6, 2013 and direct the Clerk to provide appropriate notice of said meeting. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager The following attachments have been labeled and placed in Dropbox for City Council review and in the City’s website www.cityofholland.com for public review: 2013.10.16 Attachments to CC Report 14E1.2*:  Appeal Letter‐ Hearing request from Perry Michaels.  Letter to Owner dated 8‐29‐13 including suspension.  City Ordinance sections 17‐18 to 17‐20.  August 29 FAX re: violations.  December 14, 2012 letter with 22‐page list of violations.  FAX Communication to Owner with 9‐page Updated List of Outstanding Violations dated 10‐10‐13.  Photos October 9, 2013.  Crime calls.  Complaints received. Report prepared by: Phil Meyer, Director, CNS and Tricia Dreier, Code Enforcement OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E3.1* To: Mayor Dykstra and Members of Holland City Council. Date: October 16, 2013. Subject: Public Safety – Declare Items as Surplus. Summary: The Police Division of Public Safety has provided listings of items no longer needed and/or to be disposed of and requests Council declaration of these items as surplus. Attached is a listing of bicycles and other items acquired by the Police Division to be disposed of. Most of the items are that will be donated to 70 X 7, a local not‐for‐profit group that will be repaired and distributed to needy recipients in the area. Some items including bicycles that are considered to be more valuable (more than $50) will be picked up by Propertyroom.com which will be placed on their website with profits to be split between the City of Holland and that organization. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council declare the described items as surplus and staff be authorized to dispose of all items as indicated. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachment: List from Department of Public Safety Report prepared by: Tim Vagle, Director of Finance Attachment to 14E3.1*
HOLLAND DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
SURPLUS ITEMS
10-03-13
DONATE to 70x7
COMPLAINT
MAKE
MODEL
13-05030029
13-05010008
13-05070027
13-05230014
13-05240030
13-06080047
13-06170011
13-06170011
13-06170011
13-06170011
13-06170011
13-06170011
13-06210048
13-07010008
13-07010011
13-07020012
13-07030044
Free Spirit
Roadmaster
Huffy
Next
Schwinn
Next
Free Spirit
Huffy
Next
Pacific
Schwinn
Schwinn
Trek
Miyata
Magna
Nashbar
Sainbraper
Classic
Mt Sport SX
Blades
Max
Brittany
Rival
Power Climber
Tucson
Clear Creek
Sidewinder
830
Six Fifteen
2000 ETS
Curb Winder
COLOR
SEX
grn/pur
blu/blk-yel
grn/whi
silver
blk
ong/silv
blue
gray
blu/sil
blu/whi
gray
red
blu/silv
brown
red
teal/whi
blk/pur
boys
boys
girls
boys
boys
girls
boys
boys
boys
boys
boys
girls
boys
boys
boys
SPEED SERIAL #
15
18
18
1
21
21
12
21
18
18
18
21
10
21
1
10
12
165869326613F3136
HH0780838
265159034521H4248
1WCE006413
J914550
H30202171
60837799
AL11L100337
78263166
SNFSD11C23149
SNMNG07C11251
license
license
license
WTU2120334N
97TD020750
W8911036
license
(17 bikes)
PROPERTYROOM.COM
COMPLAINT
MAKE
MODEL
13-05130037
13-05260041
13-05300039
13-06040054
13-06150022
13-06160042
13-06170011
13-06200023
13-06210029
13-06230044
Magna
Mongoose
Schwinn
Huffy
Huffy
Roadmaster
Mongoose
Chaos
Schwinn
Next
Mud Shark
Maxin
World Tour
Highland
MT Sport SX
Sycamore
FS20
Racer
Rocket
COLOR
SEX
red/blk/yel
green
blue
blue
blu/blk
sil/red
pur/blk
grn/silv
blk/whi
red
boys
boys
boys
girls
boys
boys
girls
boys
boys
boys
SPEED SERIAL #
1
21
21
5
1
21
1
3
1
03TD1150498
FSD10AAS
K65189173816H5516 license
537059082535W6275
GK52135805
P5AB05968 #7844
license
HS101108643
LWL041260
(10 bikes)
10/8/2013
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report To: Date: Subject: 14E3.2* Mayor Dykstra and Members of Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Technology Services – Bids for Council Chambers Audio and Lighting Upgrades ($41,633) Summary Over the past two fiscal years, the City has upgraded the visual and broadcasting technology in the City Council Chambers. These investments have significantly improved the usability of the room, the broadcast capabilities, and the equipment used by Council, staff and the public. The final phase has been budgeted to be completed this year, and will update the overall quality of the audio and lighting experience in the room, as well as improving control and flexibility. Only Parkway Electric submitted a bid and this was in the amount of $41,633. One other bidder attended a pre‐bid meeting and another received the information, but chose not to bid. This Parkway bid is over the budgeted amount of $36,000 for two primary reasons. First, the bid package included the addition of another camera in the room to get a quality shot of meetings held in the north alcove and a straight view of the Mayor’s seat. The second reason is that the bid request included the replacement of the T‐Coil hearing loop system for those with hearing aids. Staff has received complaints about this system over the past few months. These two additional bid items were not planned; however, these are important additions to the room. Parkway Electric did the work for the phase that was completed in Fiscal Year 2013 and staff has been pleased with their work. Recommendation It is recommended that City Council approve the bid submitted by Parkway Electric in the amount of $41,633 for the audio and lighting improvements to the Council Chambers; and that this cost be funded through the CATV Fund. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton, City Manager Attachment: Bid information Report prepared by: Technology Services Coordinator Matt VanDyken and Assistant City Manager Greg Robinson. Attachment to 14E3.2*
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E5.1 To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Gifts. Summary: The City Manager’s office is pleased to report receipt of the following gifts: Parks & Recreation – Sal Perez Scholarship Fund:  Cary Anderson $1.00 Parks & Recreation ‐ Windmill Island DeZwaan Repair Fund:  Kurt and Beverly Van Genderen $1,000.00  STM Manufacturing $10,000.00  Global Concepts Enterprise $5,000.00 Parks & Recreation ‐ Windmill Island Carrousel Fund:  Anonymous $20.00 Parks & Recreation – DeGraaf Nature Center:  Holland Horticulture Club $2,000.00  Sara Simmons $500.00 Recommendation: It is recommended that these donations be accepted with appreciation; credited to the appropriate accounts; and an expression of gratitude be forwarded to the donors. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E5.2 To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Overnight On‐Street Parking – Place on First Reading an Ordinance to Allow a Pilot Program for the Summer 2014. Summary: Since City Council gave the directive to move forward with an overnight on‐street parking program for the summer of 2014, discussions have been occurring with staff and others on the best way to implement this. Following is a summary of where we stand with the various elements of the pilot program. 1. Ordinance revisions: Attached is a proposed ordinance change that will allow certain vehicles to park on the street overnight from May 15 – September 30, 2104. a. May 15 will avoid potential conflicts with Tulip Time. The September date will create challenges for Hope College students who will be able to park on the street for 4 or 5 weeks of school and then not thereafter. b. Only licensed and operable passenger vehicles, motorcycles and trucks not exceeding 2 tons (consistent with zoning ordinance language) can park on the streets overnight. c. Since this is a pilot program, the ordinance terminates on September 30, 2014. 2. Signs: Also attached are the proposed signs that will be located at the 30 +/‐ entrances to the City and the between 15 and 20 signs defining the downtown no‐parking zone. These signs will be placed at entry points to the downtown. It is estimated that it will cost about $10,000 to make and install the signs. 3. Staff work: Assistant City Manager Greg Robinson has met with streets, planning and police staff to review their comments and what changes they may need to make in order to conduct their work. 4. Committees: Greg has also reviewed the overnight parking plans with the Downtown Development Authority (DDA), Neighborhood Improvement Committee (NIC) and City Planning Commission. The DDA is fine with the plans, provided that much of the downtown is excluded (map attached). There were mixed comments from the NIC, but they were asked only for comments, not to vote on the matter. The primary reasons for meeting with these groups were to be sure they are aware of the plans and to provide an opportunity to comment. 5. Timing: The intent is to have Council approve the ordinance revision in October/November 2013, so that it is effective by the end of 2013. This will provide staff the time to order the signs, install them and provide information to the public. 6. Public information: Staff has not defined the details of this yet, but an information campaign will need to be conducted in the spring and then again in fall 2014. 7. Evaluation Criteria: This is the most subjective element of the program. Some possible criteria could be – a. Comparison of the number of tickets issued. b. Police activity. c. Citizen comments. d. Staff comments. e. Hope College comments. f. Neighborhood Improvement Committee comments. g. Observations of the number of cars parked on the street and whether this is a positive or negative. Recommendation: It is recommended that City Council place on First Reading an ordinance that will allow a pilot overnight on‐street parking program from May 15, 2014 through September 30, 2014; provided that the described downtown area be excluded. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments: Proposed ordinance change. Downtown exclusion area. Proposed sign changes. Report prepared by: Greg Robinson, Assistant City Manager Attachment to 14E5.2
ORDINANCE NO._____
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE ORDINANCE CODE OF THE CITY OF
HOLLAND, BEING ORDINANCE NO. _____ OF THE CITY OF HOLLAND,
BY AMENDING SECTION 18-27 OF CHAPTER 14 OF SAID CODE.
THE CITY OF HOLLAND ORDAINS:
That the Ordinance Code of the City of Holland, Michigan, is hereby amended by amending
Section 18-27 of Chapter 18 to read as follows:
Sec. 18-27. - Prohibited in specified places or times.
(1) Except when necessary to avoid conflict with other traffic or in compliance with law or the
directions of a police officer or traffic-control device, a person shall not stop, stand or park a
vehicle in an of the following places:
(a) At any place where official signs prohibit stopping, standing or parking.
(b) In any place where the parked vehicle would significantly impede or obstruct United
States mail delivery, street cleaning, plowing, maintenance, waste removal, or similar
municipal functions.
(c) Between the sidewalk lines of any street between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. of
any day; except that this prohibition shall not apply to physicians, ambulance drivers or
undertakers on emergency calls.
(2) Notwithstanding subsection (1)(c), currently licensed and operable 1-12 passenger motor
vehicles, motorcycles and trucks not exceeding 2 tons in carrying capacity may park between
the sidewalk lines of any street between 2 a.m. and 5 a.m. on any day from May 15 through
September 30, 2014, provide that:
(a) There shall be no parking during such hours of trailers or non-motorized recreational
vehicles (whether or not attached to a passenger vehicle or truck) between the
sidewalk lines of any street;
(b) There shall be no parking during such hours between the sidewalk lines on the
following streets:
6th Street from River Ave. to Columbia Ave.;
7th and 8th Streets from Lincoln Ave. to Maple Ave.;
10th Street from Pine Ave. to Lincoln Ave.;
Pine and Lincoln Avenues from 7th to 10th Streets
River, Central, College and Columbia Avenues from 6th to 10th Streets; and
Maple Ave. from 7th to 9th Streets.
Formatted: Superscript
Formatted: Superscript
Formatted: Superscript
Formatted: Superscript
(c) There shall be no parking during such hours in a manner that impedes the flow of
traffic or where official signs prohibit stopping, standing or parking.
(d) There shall be no parking on sidewalks or between sidewalks and curbs.
All other provisions of Chapter 18 shall remain in full force and effect.
Adopted: __________________
Effective: __________________
Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.75", No bullets or
numbering
Attachment to 14E5.2
Office of the City Manager
Greg Robinson, Assistant City Manager
[email protected]
September19,2013
To: RyanCotton,CityManager.
From:
GregRobinson,AssistantCityManager.
Subject:
Statusofpilotprogramforovernighton‐streetparking.
SinceCityCouncilgavethedirectivetomoveforwardwithanovernighton‐streetparking
programforthesummerof2014,discussionshavebeenoccurringwithstaffandotherson
the best way to implement this. Following is a summary of where we stand with the
variouselementsofthepilotprogram.
1. Ordinance revisions: Attached is a proposed ordinance change that will allow
certainvehiclestoparkonthestreetovernightfromMay12–September30,2104.
a. May 16 will avoid potential conflicts with Tulip Time. The September date
willcreatechallengesforHopeCollegestudentswhowillbeabletoparkon
thestreetfor4or5weeksofschoolandthennotthereafter.
b. Only licensed and operable passenger vehicles, motorcycles and trucks not
exceeding 2 tons (consistent with zoning ordinance language) can park on
thestreetsovernight.
c. Since this is a pilot program, the ordinance terminates on September 30,
2014.
2. Signs: Also attached are the proposed signs that will be located at the 30 +/‐
entrancestotheCityandthebetween15and20signsdefiningthedowntownno‐
parking zone. These signs will be placed at entry points to the downtown. It is
estimatedthatitwillcostabout$10,000tomakeandinstallthesigns.
3. Staff work: I have met with streets, planning and police staff to review their
commentsandwhatchangestheymayneedtomakeinordertoconducttheirwork.
Theywillbeprepared.
4. Committees:I have reviewed the overnight parking plans with the DDA and
Neighborhood Improvement Committee (NIC). I will be doing the same with the
PlanningCommissionandDDAParkingCommitteepriortotheSeptember25,2013
Council study session. The DDA is fine with the plans, provided that much of the
downtownisexcluded(mapattached).ThereweremixedcommentsfromtheNIC,
270 South River Avenue * Holland, MI 49423
m 616.335.1310 * f 616.355.1490 *
* www.cityofholland.com * www.enjoyhollandmichigan.com
Office of the City Manager
Greg Robinson, Assistant City Manager
[email protected]
but they were asked only for comments, not to vote on the matter. The primary
reasons for meeting with these groups are to be sure they are aware of the plans
andtoprovideanopportunitytocomment.
5. Timing: The intent is to have Council approve the ordinance revision in
October/November2013,sothatitiseffectivebytheendof2013.Thiswillprovide
staffthetimetoorderthesigns,installthemandprovideinformationtothepublic.
6. Publicinformation:Wehavenotgivenmuchthoughttothisyet,butwewillneed
toconductthisinformationcampaigninthespringandthenagaininfall2014.
7. Criteria:Thisisthemostsubjectiveelementoftheprogram.Somepossiblecriteria
couldbe–
a. Comparisonofthenumberofticketsissued.
b. Policeactivity.
c. Citizencomments.
d. Staffcomments.
e. HopeCollegecomments.
f. NeighborhoodImprovementCommitteecomments.
g. Observationsofthenumberofcarsparkedonthestreetandwhetherthisisa
positiveornegative.
IfCouncilexpressedsupporton September25,2013forthedirectionwearetakingwith
thiseffort,wewillbereadytopresenttheordinancechangeinOctober2013.Thankyou,
Ryan.
Attachments:
Proposedordinancechange.
Downtownexclusionarea.
Proposedsignchanges.
270 South River Avenue * Holland, MI 49423
m 616.335.1310 * f 616.355.1490 *
* www.cityofholland.com * www.enjoyhollandmichigan.com
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 14E5.3*
Rev City Manager Report To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. State of Michigan’s Regional Prosperity Initiative (RPI) – Resolution. Summary: At the West Michigan Local Government Management Association (WMLGMA) September meeting, the Grand Valley Metro Council (GVMC) kindly requested all WMLGMA members for their endorsement to support a GVMC’s application to obtain grant funding for a new Governor Snyder’s initiative called “Michigan’s Regional Prosperity Initiative (RPI).” This effort is intended to follow‐up on the regional success of the West Michigan Strategic Alliance (WMSA) and the goal of establish stronger local and regional collaboration. It is a worthy endeavor that will help drive economic investment, lead to greater quality of place, and increase business and talent attraction. A total of $250,000 has been allocated per region. The ideas so far are to use it to create/market/emphasize Muskegon as a deep water port idea; or to establish uniform complete streets, non‐motorized infrastructure plans across the region; or some other allocation to be determined by the Macatawa Area Coordinating Council in this area. Steve Bulthuis from the Macatawa Area Coordination Council subsequently made the same request of its members. Recommendation: It is recommended that the City of Holland as a member of the Macatawa Area Coordination Council endorse and pass a Resolution of Endorsement for the grant application that is being submitted by the Grand Valley Metropolitan Council (GVCM) on behalf of the 13‐county region to obtain grant funding from the State of Michigan’s Regional Prosperity Initiative program. Sincerely, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachment: Letter of Endorsement Resolution Attachment to 14E5.3*
RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF HOLLAND IN SUPPORT OF GRAND VALLEY METROPOLITAN COUNCIL’S APPLICATION ON BEHALF OF THE WEST MICHIGAN PROSPERITY ALLIANCE At a regular meeting of the City Council for the City of Holland, Michigan, held at City Hall, 270 River Avenue, Holland, Michigan 49423, on the ____day of (month), (year) at 7:00 p.m. PRESENT: _________________________________________________________ ABSENT: __________________________________________________________ The following Resolution was offered by _____________________________ and supported by _______________________. Resolution WHEREAS, Governor Snyder and the Michigan Legislature have created the Regional Prosperity Initiative, and, WHEREAS, the Regional Prosperity Initiative is intended to foster greater communication and collaboration among organizations involved in economic development, education, work‐force development, regional planning and transportation agencies, local and state government, and private companies, and, WHEREAS, the West Michigan Regional Prosperity Initiative will serve a 13 county area which includes over 340 local governments, 5 higher education institutions, 6 Work Force Boards, 3 Metropolitan Planning Organizations, 2 Regional Planning Agencies, 3 Rural Transportation Task Forces, and many Economic Development and non‐profit organizations, and, WHEREAS, only the four existing metropolitan planning and regional planning agencies in our 13 county region are qualified to receive funding under the Regional Prosperity Initiative, and WHEREAS, The Macatawa Area Coordinating Council, the West Michigan Regional Planning Commission and The West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission have requested that Grand Valley Metropolitan Council be the sole applicant and fiduciary agency for the grant on behalf of the West Michigan Prosperity Alliance. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT, the City of Holland hereby endorses Grand Valley Metropolitan Council’s collaborative application for the Regional Prosperity Initiative on behalf of the West Michigan Prosperity Alliance. Approved on October 16, 2013 by __________________________ Adopted this 16th day of October 2013. Anna Perales, Deputy City Clerk Kurt D. Dykstra, Mayor OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E5.4* REV To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Tax Abatement – Schedule Hearing on a PA 198 Industrial Facilities Tax (IFT) Abatement JMS of Holland, Inc. 1010 Productions Court. Summary: JMS of Holland, Inc., 1010 Productions Court, has filed an application for tax abatement that is currently under review by staff. Founded in 1994, JMS evolved from a small tool and die facility to a high quality resource for deep‐drawn parts, progressive die components and assemblies. JMS offers value‐added processes such as heat‐treating, plating, painting, sub‐assembly and other secondary operations. JMS serves a wide range of companies within the automotive, appliance, and hardware industries. This project will be located at 1010 Productions Court. The project period is expected to be from November 1, 2013 until April 30, 2014. Their application is for: Land Improvements and Building Improvements $ 2,000,000 TOTAL $ 2,000,000 The project is for the construction of a steel‐framed, engineered building to be an addition of approximately 31,000 square feet to the existing facility. This addition will further enhance the growth and expansion of JMS’s metal‐stamping and manufacturing capacities. Five new jobs are expected to be created within 2 years of project completion; 85 existing jobs are expected to be retained. The applicant believes the project will not result in any significant additional traffic. The existing storm drainage system should be adequate. No additional impact on the water or sanitary sewer system is expected. A fire suppression system is currently in place. Project will have no impact on police or fire services. The facility meets all zoning and building code requirements. There will be no adverse environmental implications from the project. Recommendation: It is recommended that a public hearing on the requested tax abatement for JMS of Holland, Inc., 1010 Productions Court, be scheduled for Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers in City Hall, and that the Deputy City Clerk be instructed to publish and mail the required notice. Respectfully Submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments: IFT Application, Tax calculations Report prepared by: Tim Vagle Director of Finance. Attachments to 14E5.4*
PA 198 ABATEMENT ESTIMATED TAX CALCULATIONS
Date:
October 14, 2013
Company:
County and School District:
Total Project
Completion Date:
JMS of Holland, Inc
Allegan/Hamilton
March 25, 2014
REQUESTED IMPROVEMENT COSTS
Equipment/Furniture
2015 purchases
2014 purchases
2013 purchases
Total
Real Property
Land Improvements
Building Improvements
Total
Combined TOTAL
$
$
Taxes WITH Abatement (PA 198)
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
4
Personal Property
34.7884
Ottawa-Zeeland
57.6184
33.6184
Allegan-Holland
Allegan-Hamilton
60.3294
56.2394
36.3294
32.2394
The following assumptions are being accepted as true:
1. The current tax rates will remain constant for the years projected
2. The Real Estate value of the IFT property remains constant for the entire projection
3. The Personal Property depreciation factors being used are this year's State recommendations
4. An amendment to MCL 380.1211 (ref PA 37-40), in conjunction with MBT changes, reduced
-
Industrial Personal Property millages by 24 mills. The assumption is made that this reduction
will remain in effect for the duration of this abatement.
$ 2,000,000
$ 2,000,000
$ 2,000,000
Personal Property estimated Assessed Value
Real Property estimated Assessed Value
TOTAL ESTIMATED Assessed Value
Taxes WITHOUT Abatement
City Millage
Pers Prop Non-City Millage
Real Estate Non-City Millage
Total Millage
Industrial
Real Estate
58.7884
Total Tax Rates
Ottawa-Holland
Real Estate
13.6910
42.5484
56.2394
6.8455
24.2742
31.1197
Pers. Prop
13.6910
18.5484
32.2394
6.8455
9.2742
16.1197
2013
Year 1
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
2014
Year 2
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
2015
Year 3
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
2016
Year 4
2017
Year 5
1,000,000
1,000,000
2018
Year 6
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
$
$
$
1,000,000
1,000,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5,000.00
5,000.00
$
$
$
$
5,000.00
5,000.00
$
$
$
$
5,000.00
5,000.00
$
$
$
$
5,000.00
5,000.00
$
$
$
$
2,500.00
2,500.00
$
$
$
$
2,500.00
2,500.00
$
$
$
$
2,500.00
2,500.00
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
2,500
2,500
$
$
$
$
2,500
2,500
$
$
$
$
2,500
2,500
$
$
$
$
2019
Year 7
2020
Year 8
2021
Year 9
1,000,000
1,000,000
2022
Year 10
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
2023
Year 11
$
$ 1,000,000
$ 1,000,000
$
$
$
1,000,000
1,000,000
$
$
$
1,000,000
1,000,000
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
3,422.75
14,387.10
17,809.85
$ 6,845.50
$
$ 23,774.20
$ 30,619.70
$
$
$
$
10,268.25
33,161.30
43,429.55
$
$
$
$
13,691.00
42,548.40
56,239.40
2,500.00
2,500.00
$
$
$
$
1,711.38
7,193.55
8,904.93
$ 3,422.75
$
$ 11,887.10
$ 15,309.85
$
$
$
$
5,134.13
16,580.65
21,714.78
$
$
$
$
2,500
2,500
$
$
$
$
1,711
7,194
8,905
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
5,134
16,581
21,715
$
$
$
$
2024
Year 12
$
$
$
1,000,000
1,000,000
$
$
$
$
13,691.00
42,548.40
56,239.40
$
$
$
$
13,691.00
42,548.40
56,239.40
$
$
$
$
13,691.00
42,548.40
56,239.40
$
$
$
$
13,691.00
42,548.40
56,239.40
$
$
$
$
88,991.50
304,064.60
393,056.10
6,845.50
21,274.20
28,119.70
$
$
$
$
6,845.50
21,274.20
28,119.70
$
$
$
$
6,845.50
21,274.20
28,119.70
$
$
$
$
6,845.50
21,274.20
28,119.70
$
$
$
$
6,845.50
21,274.20
28,119.70
$
$
$
$
44,495.75
152,032.30
196,528.05
6,846
21,274
28,120
$
$
$
$
6,846
21,274
28,120
$
$
$
$
6,846
21,274
28,120
$
$
$
$
6,846
21,274
28,120
$
$
$
$
6,846
21,274
28,120
$
$
$
$
44,496
152,032
196,528
Total Tax Savings
City
PP Non-City
RE Non-City
Total
Totals may be slightly off due to rounding.
3,423
11,887
15,310
OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER CITY HALL HOLLAND, MICHIGAN City Manager Report 14E5.5 New To: Date: Subject: Mayor Dykstra and Members of the Holland City Council. October 16, 2013. Michigan Economic Development Grant for Restoration of the DeZwaan Windmill at Windmill Island Gardens Summary: The Windmill Island Gardens Fundraising Team is headed up by Mayor Dykstra. They worked on this project over the last year. Attached is a grant document in the amount of $375,000 from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation. This document will enable reimbursement for $375,000 of the possible $760,000 need to get the Windmill turning again. This funding will help pay for a 25‐
year overhaul. Given the expected use of $130,000 in Holland/Zeeland Community Foundation funds on‐hand, leftover from a prior project that did not proceed, this Windmill should be functional for at least the next fifty (50) years. Recommendation: It is recommended that Council authorize acceptance of this $375,000 grant and provide authorization to the Mayor and Deputy City Clerk to execute the agreement. This approval is subject to the document being approved as to form by the City Attorney. Respectfully submitted, Ryan Cotton City Manager Attachments: MEDC Grant Document Report prepared by: Ryan Cotton, City Manager Attachments to 14E5.5
Execution Copy
CASE - 61320
MICHIGAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
GRANT WITH
CITY OF HOLLAND
The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (the “MEDC”) enters into a binding
agreement (the “Agreement”) with the City of Holland (the “Grantee”). As used in this
Agreement, the MEDC and Grantee are sometimes individually referred to as a “Party” and
collectively as “Parties.”
Grantee:
City of Holland
270 South River Avenue
Holland, Michigan 49423
I.
NATURE OF SERVICES. The purpose of this Agreement is to provide funding to
the Grantee to repair and restore the DeZwaan Windmill (the “Grant Activities”).
II.
PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE.
Starting Date: October 1, 2013
Ending Date: December 31, 2013
The term of this Agreement (the “Term”) shall commence on the Starting Date and
shall continue until the occurrence of an event described in Section VIII of this
Agreement.
III.
IV.
PAYMENT SCHEDULE INFORMATION.
A.
The MEDC agrees to pay the Grantee a sum not to exceed $375,000 (the
“Grant”).
B.
Payment under this Agreement shall be made by the MEDC to Grantee within
30 days of the execution of this Agreement by both Parties.
C.
This Agreement does not commit the MEDC to approve requests for
additional funds during or beyond this Grant period.
D.
Public Act 533 of 2004 requires that payments under this Agreement be
processed by electronic funds transfer (EFT). Grantee is required to register
to receive payments by EFT at the Contract & Grant Payment Express
website (www.cpexpress.state.mi.us).
MEDC GRANT ADMINISTRATOR. The Grantee must communicate with the
MEDC representative named below or his or her designee regarding this
Agreement. The Grant Administrator may be changed, at any time, at the discretion
of the MEDC.
1
Execution Copy
Katharine Czarnecki (the “Grant Administrator”)
Michigan Economic Development Corporation
300 North Washington Square
Lansing, Michigan 48913
[email protected]
V.
GRANTEE DUTIES. The Grantee agrees to undertake, perform, and complete the
services fully described in Exhibit A.
VI.
RELATIONSHIP OF THE PARTIES.
A.
Due to the nature of the services described herein and the need for
specialized skill and knowledge of Grantee, the MEDC is entering into this
Agreement with Grantee. As a result, neither Grantee nor any of its
employees or agents is or shall become an employee of the MEDC due to this
Agreement.
B.
Grantee will provide the services and achieve the results specified, if any, in
this Agreement free from the direction or control of the MEDC as to means
and methods of performance.
C.
The MEDC is not responsible for any insurance or other fringe benefits,
including, but not limited to, Social Security, Worker's Compensation, income
tax withholdings, retirement or leave benefits, for Grantee or its employees.
Grantee assumes full responsibility for the provision of all such insurance
coverage and fringe benefits for its employees.
D.
All tools, supplies, materials, equipment and office space necessary to carry
out the services described in this Agreement are the sole responsibility of
Grantee unless otherwise specified herein.
E.
Grantee shall retain all control of its employees and staffing decisions
independent of the direction and control of the MEDC.
VII.
ACCESS TO RECORDS. During the Term, and for three years after the Ending
Date, the Grantee shall maintain reasonable records, including evidence that the
services actually were performed and the identity of all individuals paid for such
services, and shall allow access to those records by the MEDC or their authorized
representative at any time during this period.
VIII.
TERMINATION. This Agreement shall terminate upon the earlier of the following:
A.
The Ending Date.
B.
Termination by the MEDC, by giving Thirty calendar days prior written notice
to the Grantee. In the event that the Legislature of the State of Michigan (the
2
Execution Copy
“State”), the State Government, or any State official, commission, authority,
body, or employee or the federal government (a) takes any legislative or
administrative action which fails to provide, terminates or reduces the funding
necessary for this Agreement, or (b) takes any legislative or administrative
action, which is unrelated to the source of funding for the Grant, but which
affects the MEDC’s ability to fund and administer this Agreement and other
MEDC programs, provided, however, that in the event such action results in
an immediate absence or termination of funding, cancellation may be made
effective immediately upon delivery of notice to the Grantee.
IX.
MEDC EMPLOYEES. The Grantee will not hire any employee of the MEDC to
perform any services covered by this agreement without prior written approval from
the Chief Executive Officer of the MEDC.
X.
PUBLICATIONS. Except for Confidential Information, the MEDC hereby agrees
that researchers funded with the Grant shall be permitted to present at symposia,
national, or regional professional meetings, and to publish in journals, theses or
dissertations, or otherwise of their own choosing, the methods and results of their
research. Grantee shall at its sole discretion and at its sole cost and expense, prior
to publication, seek intellectual property protection for any Inventions (as described
in Section XI) if commercially warranted. Grantee shall submit to the MEDC a listing
of articles that Grantee has submitted for publication resulting from work performed
hereunder in its quarterly report to the MEDC. Grantee shall acknowledge the
financial support received from the MEDC, as appropriate, in any such publication.
XI.
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS. Grantee shall retain ownership to the entire
right, title, and interest in any new inventions, improvements, or discoveries
developed or produced under this Grant, including, but not limited to, concepts
know-how, software, materials, methods, and devices (“Inventions”) and shall have
the right to enter into license agreements with industry covering Inventions.
XII.
CONFLICT OF INTEREST. Except as has been disclosed to the MEDC, Grantee
affirms that neither the Grantee, nor its Affiliates or their employees has, shall have,
or shall acquire any contractual, financial business or other interest, direct or
indirect, that would conflict in any manner with Grantee’s performance of its
obligations under this Agreement or otherwise create the appearance of impropriety
with respect to this Agreement.
Grantee further affirms that neither Grantee nor any affiliates or their employees has
accepted or shall accept anything of value based on an understanding that the
actions of the Grantee or its affiliates or either’s employees on behalf of the MEDC
would be influenced. Grantee shall not attempt to influence any MEDC employee
by the direct or indirect offer of anything of value. Grantee also affirms that neither
Grantee, nor its Affiliates or their employees has paid or agreed to pay any person,
other than bona fide employees and consultants working solely for Grantee or its
Affiliate, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift or any other
3
Execution Copy
consideration contingent upon or resulting from the execution of this Agreement.
In the event of change in either the interests or services under this Agreement,
Grantee will inform the MEDC regarding possible conflicts of interest which may
arise as a result of such change. Grantee agrees that conflicts of interest shall be
resolved to the MEDC’s satisfaction or the MEDC may terminate this Agreement.
As used in this Paragraph, “conflict of interest” shall include, but not be limited to,
conflicts of interest that are defined under the laws of the State of Michigan.
XIII.
TOTAL AGREEMENT. This Agreement, including the exhibits incorporated herein,
is the entire agreement between the Parties superseding any prior or concurrent
agreements as to the services being provided, and no oral or written terms or
conditions which are not contained in this Agreement shall be binding. This
Agreement may not be changed except by mutual agreement of the Parties reduced
to writing and signed.
XIV.
ASSIGNMENT/TRANSFER/SUBCONTRACTING. Except as contemplated by this
Agreement, the Grantee shall not assign, transfer, convey, subcontract, or
otherwise dispose of any duties or rights under this Agreement without the prior
specific written consent of the MEDC. Any future successors of the Grantee will be
bound by the provisions of this Agreement unless the MEDC otherwise agrees in a
specific written consent. The MEDC reserves the right to approve subcontractors
for this Agreement and to require the Grantee to replace subcontractors who are
found to be unacceptable.
XV.
COMPLIANCE WITH LAWS. The Grantee is not and will not during the Term be in
violation of any laws, ordinances, regulations, rules, orders, judgments, decrees or
other requirements imposed by any governmental authority to which it is subject,
and will not fail to obtain any licenses, permits or other governmental authorizations
necessary to carry out its duties under this Agreement.
XVI.
NOTICES. Any notice, approval, request, authorization, direction or other
communication under this Agreement shall be given in writing and shall be deemed
to have been delivered and given for all purposes: (a) on the delivery date if
delivered by electronic mail or by confirmed facsimile; (b) on the delivery date if
delivered personally to the Party to whom the same is directed; (c) One business
day after deposit with a commercial overnight carrier, with written verification of
receipt; or (d) Three business days after the mailing date, whether or not actually
received, if sent by U.S. mail, return receipt requested, postage and charges
prepaid, or any other means of rapid mail delivery for which a receipt is available.
The notice address for the Parties shall be the address as set forth in this
Agreement, with the other relevant notice information, including the recipient for
notice and, as applicable, such recipient’s fax number or e-mail address, to be as
reasonably identified by notifying Party. The MEDC and Grantee may, by notice
given hereunder, designate any further or different addresses to which subsequent
notices shall be sent.
4
Execution Copy
XVII. AMENDMENT. This Agreement may not be modified or amended except pursuant
to a written instrument signed by the Parties.
XVIII. GOVERNING LAW. This Agreement is made and entered into in the State of
Michigan and shall in all respects be interpreted, enforced and governed under the
laws of the State of Michigan without regard to the doctrines of conflict of laws. The
terms of this provision shall survive the termination or cancellation of the Agreement
XIX.
COUNTERPARTS AND COPIES. The Parties hereby agree that the faxed
signatures of the Parties to this Agreement shall be as binding and enforceable as
original signatures; and that this Agreement may be executed in multiple
counterparts with the counterparts together being deemed to constitute the
complete agreement of the Parties. Copies (whether photostatic, facsimile or
otherwise) of this Agreement may be made and relied upon to the same extent as
though such copy was an original.
XX.
JURISDICTION. In connection with any dispute between the Parties under this
Agreement, the Parties hereby irrevocably submit to jurisdiction and venue of the
Michigan circuit courts of the State of Michigan located in Ingham County. Each
Party hereby waives and agrees not to assert, by way of motion as a defense or
otherwise in any such action any claim (a) that it is not subject to the jurisdiction of
such court, (b) that the action is brought in an inconvenient forum, (c) that the venue
of the suit, action or other proceeding is improper or (d) that this Agreement or the
subject matter of this Agreement may not be enforced in or by such court.
XXI.
SURVIVAL. The terms and conditions of sections VII, VIII, XIV, XVIII and XX shall
survive termination of this Agreement.
The signatories below warrant that they are empowered to enter into this Agreement.
GRANTEE ACCEPTANCE:
City of Holland
Dated: _____________
__________________________________
Ryan Cotton
City Manager
MEDC ACCEPTANCE:
Michigan Economic Development Corporation
Dated: _____________
__________________________________
Michael A. Finney
Chief Executive Officer
5
Execution Copy
EXHIBIT A
GRANTEE’S SCOPE OF WORK
Grantee shall provide documentation to the satisfaction of the Grant Administrator
evidencing that the Grant was used to repair and restore the DeZwaan Windmill as
detailed below.
A-1
Execution Copy
A-2
Execution Copy
A-3
Execution Copy
A-4
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Languages