JANUARY 1~63 • 50c - Ceramic Arts Daily

JANUARY 1~63 • 50c - Ceramic Arts Daily
JANUARY
.
/
1~63
•
50c
JUST PUBLISHED
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CRA FT S DES IG N by
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MOSELEY. JOHNSON
and KOENIG
This exciting book, written by accompli shed well-l-:nown artists, is a wonderfu l introductio n to crafts design. The rich andvarie d substance of this book will show you
the art and technique of creating through crafts. Rarely has the fine art of crafts
been presented so complete ly and simply.
Over 1,000 illustratio ns with simplifie d and detailed, step-by-s tep instructio ns
show the reader the processes used in potter)', mosaics, enamelin g, decorated papers,
weaving, bookbind ing, decorativ e fabrics, paper sculpture , and paper-nla ch& Each
craft is introduce d with detailed discussions of color, line, shape and texture.
The material in this handsom e book is well organized enabling the beginner to
follow the step-by-s tep direction s with ease and understan ding Many outstandi ng examples of traditiona l art are included as well as examples of contempo rary craft and
children's art. Every craft center and school should have a cop)' of this new book! IndMduals looking for an outstandi ng text on the crafts will want CRAFTS DESIGN
for their library. Over 1,000 illustratio ns, 436 pages, hard binding. Price: $13.00.
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CERAMICS MONTHLY BOOK DEPT., 4175 N. High St., Columbus, Ohio
Please send me: - -
copies
of
CRAFTS DESIGN @ $13.00
per
copy.
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
ZN
STATE
Ohio Residents: add 3% Sales Tax. CM pays postage. I enclose
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M E M P H I S BRAN D
OS
Cone
White
Packed in 121/2 Pound Plastic Bags - -
2.5 LBS.
Four Bags to a Shipping Carton
$
.08
m LB.
50
LBS.
.07
Pee LB.
100
LBS.
.06
PER LB.
500
LBS.
.05
PER LB.
1000
LBS.
.04
PER LB.
2000
LBS.
$75.OO
De-Aired
P'*e TON.
All Prices Plus 5% Packing Charge
HOUSEOFCERAMI I
2481 Matthews, Memphis 8, Tenn.
FA4..18o6- 3-4267
I
/anuary 1963 3
Brilliant,
jewel-like
A m a c o Metal E n a m e l s in 36 colors are available in the
t h r e e low c o s t sets. Each a t t r a c t i v e l y b o x e d set consists of 12 a c i d - r e s i s t a n t , 8 0 - m e s h ,
o p a q u e and t r a n s p a r e n t c o l o r s in c l e a r vials f o r $ 2 . 5 0 . In a single s e t t h e r e is s u f f i c i e n t
e n a m e l to d e c o r a t e several d o z e n small pieces o f gold, silver o r c o p p e r metal. Firing in a
p r e - h e a t e d kiln f r o m 2 to 3 m i n u t e s at 1 3 5 0 - 1 4 5 0 ° Fahr. f u s e s t h e e n a m e l p e r m a n e n t l y to
t h e m e t a l surface. A m a c o Metal E n a m e l s are available also in 1-oz., 2-oz., 8-oz. and l - l b .
Send for illustrated direction Booklet N o 7 with catalog s e c t i o n
NEW MATERIALS
FOR FUSED GLASSG L A S S - C O A T . . . the ideal undercoating
for one-stroke or detail techniques. Eliminates spreading of water-base pigments;
burns out in firing. The perfect adhesive for
copper enamel lamination . . . . 60c per jar.
OPAQUE GLASS ENAMELS . .
concerltrated liquid enamels for surface decoration at bending temperatures. WHITE,
JET, LEAF GREEN, BLUE GREEN, TURQUOISE, DEEP BLUE, SUN YELLOW,
LIME, PINK, ROSE and BROWN... 45c.
FLAME RED . . . 60c.
INTRODUCTORY O F F E R - ALL 12 only $5.00 pp., at retail only.
KAY KINNEY
728 Broadway
m
CONTOURED GLASS
Lagalm Ikmek
¢cdif~nla
TEACHERS .
H A P P Y RES
Ever wonder why Reward glazes and colors
are used in more schools and craft centers
than any other brand? The reason is PRETESTING of every batch at the factory before It leaves Maryland. To make results
more certain, colors and finishes are
checked for ease-of-application and foolproof firing characteristics. If you want to
encourage ceramics In your classes or comreunify, insist upon the REWARD brand.
Over 400 colors and textures to suit every
teaching and student requirement.
Reward glazes and colors fire at "standard temperatures" (Cone 06-04) in regular
school and Institution kilns. Available In 2
az & 4 az jars or economical pint, quart and
gallon sizes. Wrlto for prices and free
literature.
REWARD
CERAMIC
COLOR MFRS., INC.
6811 Washington Blvd., Elkridge 27, Md.
4 Ceramics MontMy
DRAKENFELD
CLAYSand GLAZES
GOTOGETHER!
M O N T H L Y
Volume 11, N u m b e r 1
J a n u a r y 1963
Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
Suggestions from Our Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Answers to Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11
Sculpture: The Human Head by Edris Eckhardt . . . . . . . . .
12
Bottles from Bowls by Jean Garrett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
C e l a d o n Glazes (Part 2) by F. Carlton Ball . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
Glass Frame for a Mirror by Kay Kinney. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
DRAKENFELDclays and glazes are made for each
o t h e r - a r e the right combination for better ware.
Here are a few suggestions. Give them a trial and
convince yourself.
CLAYS
CONE 06
• • . just add water and adjust to proper
consistency. The slip improves with age.
CONE 06
The Slab Sculpture of Betty Feves by Hal Riegger . . . . . . 9.9.
Films on Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
Show Time: Ceramic League of Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
33
Itinerary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
CeramAetivit ies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
White Plastic Clay 68204
• . . comes in moist form, ready to use for
modeling or throwing on a wheel.
GLAZES
Decorating with Glazes demonstrated by Marc Bellaire__30
Counter Enameling by Kathe Berl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
White Casting Clay 68203
Cone 06-04 Glaze (Majolica)
Cone 06-02 Vellum Matt
Cone 06-02 Matt
Cone 07-02 Crystalline
Cone 07-02 Crackle
Cone 07-02 Fancy Art
These glazes produce sparkling results-are available
in a wide variety of colors• All are specially designed
for Cone 06 fire-danger of crazing, shivering, blistering, pinholing, and crawling is greatly minimized•
30 BRILLIANT CERAMIC COLORS
- ............
Ready for instant use! No ~
On Our Cover
The pottery' head on this month's cover is Mexican, of the
classic Vera Cruz style, and was made sometime before the
twelfth century. The expressive face is flanked by circular ear
plugs and framed by stylized hair and by a strap which holds
an elaborate headdress with animal motifs. This sculpture is an
important piece in the new Pre-Columbian Gallery E of the
Cleveland Museum of Art.
This ceramic head also serves to introduce the first in an
exciting new series of articles, "The Human Head," by the
internationally -famous sculptor, Edris Eckhardt. The article
starts on page 12 of this issue•
fussr No muss! Each set
has 15 liquid colors, 2
multi-purpose brushes and
instructions. The strong,
deep colors are easy to mix
for intermediate shades or
w,th whir° forpaste,s The
Underglaze Colors can be
used for Engobes or Slip
Stains. Use on raw or
bisque ware. 1 oz. per jar.
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Editor: THOMAS SELLERS
Art Director: ROBEaT L. CREAOEa
Business Manager: SPENCER L. DAVZS
postage. The Overglaze
Colors make china painting
. i'"
a real pleasure. Three
~!J.~iiii!!_i~
~
costly colors included:
Pink A-1644; Maroon A- t
1645; Purple A-1649 (contains gold compounds).
1/10-1b. per jar. $11.00. plus postage.
Circulation Manager: MARYRUSHLEY
WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG.
Advisers and Special Contributors: F. Carlton Ball; Marc Bellaire; Kathe Berl; Edris Eckhardt; John Kenny; Kay Kinney;
Zena Holst; Karl Martz; Ken Smith; Don Wood.
~;
Here is complete information on clay bodies, prepared glazes, overglaze and underglaze colors,
pyrometric cones, banding wheels, and potter's
wheels• Prices included for every item•
Western Advertising Representative : Joseph Mervish Assoc, 5000
Lankershim Blvd.• North Hollywood, Calif. TRiangle 7-7556
Copyright 1963 Professional Publications, Inc.
' "Drol
•
CERAMICS MONTHLY, 3 a n u a r y 1968, Vol. l l - - N o . I. Published
monthly except July & August by Professional Publications, I n c . - S. L. Davis, Pres., P.S. Emery, Sec•; at 4175 N. High Street, COlumbus
14. Ohio. Entered as second class mutter a t the post office at Athens,
Ohio. U.S.A. Subscriptions: One year $5" Two Years $9; Three Years
$12. Copyright 1968. All rights reserved.
enfe/d
4s PAt*: PEACE, NEW YORK 7, NEW YORK
~!~:.factoryandResearch Center: Washington, Pennsylvania
]anuary 1963
5
!!i{i-.}:..•..-:
-.":.::~"::~'::': " " : : " : " : " : : :
..: ..- •
">
"
.
BIS Q-WAX ~o~a,~
Ilth ANNUAL
EASTERN
(C R II m l(
llom
Sponsored by CERAMIC LEAGUES, INC.
MA Y 1 6 - 1 9 , 1 9 6 3
CONVENTION HALL, ASBURY PARK
NEW JERSEY
Bisq-Wax is an e a s y - t o - u s e C l c a r \VaxS~alcr to be appliedovc r
c e r a m i c bisque, fired opaque and t r a n s l u c e n t underglazes . It d i m inates the need ol a second glaze, f i r i n g as it s e a l s and protects with
a s e m i - p e r m a n e n t finish. The soft finish of B i s q - W a x w i l l be p r e t e r r e d in many d e c o r a t i n g techniques o v e r that of a fired, g l o s s
finish. Apply l - t h i n coat and let dr!:. l f a soft sheen is d e s i r e d , btlff
when thoroughly drv.
*) . 7 .
|nr
50¢
For Better
M o r e Con sist ent
Res ults
O RT O N
Standard Pyrometric
MAKE SUREYOUR FIRM
IS REPRESENTED
(WRITE FOR INFORMATION TODAY)
CONES
Orton cones are your guide to more uniform ly
fired ware. Here is a leaf f r o m industry 's book
t h a t you can use. For complet e details on this
economi cal control m e t h o d see your dealer or
write direct.
Request :tout ]r~e copy o~ "'Propertiu and Usei oJ Py~,omctric Cones'"
The Edward Orton, Jr. Ceramic Foundat ion
144S Summit Street
6
Ceramics Monthly
Columbus I, Ohio
LETTERS
Share your thoughts with other CM readers--be they quip, query, comment or adz'ice. All letters must be signed, but names
will be withheld on request. Address: The
Editor, Ceramics Monthly, 4175 North
High St., Columbus 14, Ohio.
THE INTERESTING DETAILS
In regard to Tom Marsh's article, " T h e
Folk Potters of Mashiko" and the photographs of H a m a d a (October 1962 C M ) ,
thanks and congratulations ! Having recently read Bernard Leach's "A Potter in
Japan," I appreciated the article even
more.
Let's have more of such--pottery and
ceramics from Denmark, Sweden, Canada,
England and some of the primitive nations
reviving their culture through craft organizations. Other magazines tease us with
an occasional picture but few give the
Sarah Washington
interesting details.
Jackson, Ala.
OUIETER
PRESENTATION
I find that this is the type of pot I most
admire, also. I welcomed the review type
of material that began in September, too.
It seems to me that this kind of material
could be presented at least every three
years without repeating any previous articles exactly.
There is a great deal of "meat" in the
article by Mary Blakley in the October
issue ("Variations on a T h e m e " ) . The
ideas not only can be tried as presented but
I find that they lead my thoughts into
other channels in which the same methods
could be used. This, I think, is the real
value of each individual article. W h a t a
good idea it was to present the Martz
glaze along with the Blakley article! I
immediately tried her ideas on oxides with
this glaze. Incidentally, I have had nothing
but luck with the Martz glazes.
Martha S. Hodges
Williamsport, Penna.
Iroo MUCH EXUBERANCE
When I opened the September issue of
CM it impressed me as being quieter and
more dignified in manner of presentation.
The subtle type of thing always has appealed to me and seems to accomplish
so much more than the "blowing of horns."
I have seldom received an issue of CM
that didn't contain at least one helpful
suggestion. I especially want to commend
the article and pictures by Tom Marsh in
the October 1962 issue. The group of
potters I work with pounced on this issue
and I had a very hard time hanging on
to it. To my mind it is far and away the
best thing that has appeared in the magazine in the year I have been receiving it,
and I certainly would like to see more
articles along this line. How about an
article on Bernard Leach, or some pictures
of old Chinese, Korean and Japanese pots?
I think American exuberance is too much
with us in much of the contemporary
pottery and we cannot be over-exposed to
the old and beautiful to help in achieving
Diane Lehman
greater discipline.
McLean, Va.
LETTER TO CM READERS
There is some hope for a summer craft
school, with particular emphasis on ceramics, to be established by a board of trustees
especially interested in the crafts. So far
the idea has met with real enthusiasm and
a definite plan is beginning to take shape.
However, a great deal of help is needed,
both financially and in organizational advice. Information from anyone who has
had experience in the craft field, especially
in teaching or administration, will be
Kenneth W. Vogt
gratefully welcomed.
Mountain Road
Deerfield, Mass.
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See Your Nearest Mayco Distributor or Write Us
T e a c h e r s a n d s t u d e n t s get b e t t e r results w i t h
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and GLAZES because they're
COLORS
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MAYCO
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10645 CHANDLER BLVD., NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.
]anua~y 1963
7
20
SELECT
TITLES
from the
CM BookDepartment
A WORLD OF PATTERN
by Gwen White
This volume offers the beginner
a wealth of ideas and information on design and color.
A sound approach to the art
of decoration. Color and line
illustrations.
$3.75
CERAMICS
by Glenn C. Nelson
An important addition to the
list of books for both student
and teacher. Many step-bystep photographs of clay-torming and decorating techniques.
Review of studio equipment.
CLAY AND GLAZES FOR
THE POTTER
by Daniel Rhodes
Two complete books in one!
Fundamental details on both
CLAY and GLAZES make this
book a "must" for every
hobby - craftsman, student,
teacher and potter. Illustrated.
DECORATIVE DESIGNS
FOR CRAFT AND HOBBY
by Frances Johnson
The author, a designer and
potter, presents 350 designs,
many in full size, wlth suggestions for proper colors.
Many Pennsylvania Dutch designs included. 72 pages,
paper-bound.
$3.00
DESIGN MOTIFS OF
ANCIENT MEXICO
by Jorge Enciso
A compilation of 766 examples
divldedinto geometric, natural
and artificial forms. Includes
designs based on flowers,
birds, fish, human figures and
many others. 170 pages. $1.85
CERAMICS BOOK
by Herbert Sanders
This excellent introductory book
describes methods and materials for hand forming, wheelthrowing and casting. Covers
ceramic jewelry, decoration
and firing. 96 pages. $1.95
DESIGN FOR ARTISTS
AND CRAFTSMEN
by Louis Wolchonok
One of the best books on design, it will prove to be invaluable to pottery and sculpture enthusiasts as well as
decorators. Geometric, flower,
bird and animal forms in
detail.
$4.95
CERAMICS AND HOW
TO DECORATE THEM
by Joan B. Priolo
Mrs. Prlolo gives detailed descriptlons and illustrations of
dozens of decorating techniques and shows exactly how
to go about using them. Starts
where other books leave off.
THE ART OF MAKING
MOSAICS
by Jenkins and Mills
This fascinating book shows the
beginner how to make unusual
and beautiful mosaic pieces
in home or workshop. $5.95
FREE BRUSH DESIGNING
by Egbert and Barnet
The authors' exciting approach
to painting and designing develops confidence in the new
art;st. Extremely well adapted
to ceramic decoration. $3.95
CERAMIC SCULPTURE
by John B. Kenny
Contains over 1000 photos and
sketches covering all phases
of the sculptor's art. A valuable aid for all craftsmen.
Large format (7" x 10"). 302
pages.
$7.50
THE COMPLETE BOOK
OF POTTERY MAKING
by John B. Kenny
The "best seller" in the
ceramic fieldl Step-by-step
photo lessons cover all of the
pottery - making techniques.
Clays, glazes, firing, plaster,
etc. 242 pages.
$7.50
CERAMICS FOR THE
ARTIST POTTER
by F. H. Norton
The most complete book on
the subject, from choosing the
proper clay to putting the
final touches on a piece, an
clearly explained. Ceramics at
its bestl 320 pages.
$7.50
CERAMIC GLAZES
by Cullen W. Parmelee
This invaluable reference book
completely covers glaze making. Includes formulas and
batch recipes for glazes. 314
pages of technical iniormatien, handsomely bound. $8.00
GLASS CRAFT
by Kay Kinney
The complete book on fusing,
laminating and bending glass.
Basic techniques, step-by-step
projects and a "Glass Clinic"
to help solve problems. Hard
covers, 200 pages.
$7.50
DESIGNS AND HOW
TO USE THEM
by Joan B. Priolo
Top-notch decorating can be
achieved by followlng the
simple motifs which may be
enlarged or transferred. A
complete list of subiects: birds,
fish, etc.
$5.95
A POTTERY SKETCHBOOK
by Aaron Bohrod
Sohrod, one of America's d;stinguished painters, ;s well
known in the pottery field for
his decoration of pottery
thrown by Carlton Ball. Thousands of sketches, photos. $7.50
HANDBOOK OF DESIGNS
AND DEVICES
by Clarence Hornung
Over 1800 sketches of basic
designs and variations including the circle, llne, scroll, fret,
shield, snow crystals and many
more useful symbols. 240
pages.
$1.90
MOSAIC, HOBBY AND ART
by Edwin Hendrickson
This profusely-illustrated handbook for the beginner and
advanced hobbyist includes
step-by-step instruction on 12
basic projects. II1 pages.
$3.50
$7.s0
ENAMELING ON METAL
by Oppi Untracht
Step-by-step photos are used
to describe fundamentals on
through to newly developed
experimental styles. This complete guide is a major contribution to Enameling. $7.50
Order any of these select titles
on CERAMICS MONTHLY'S Money-Back Guarantee
I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ii
--1
BOOK DEPAR TMENT
4175 N. High St., Columbus 14, Ohio
I
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P l e a s e send me the f o l l o w i n g
[] Kinney--GlassCraft ST.S0 [ ] Parmelee--GlazesS8.O0
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
Ilohrad--SketchbookS7.SO [ ] Prlolo--Designsss.gs
Hornung--DesignsS1.90 [ ] Rhodes~Clay & GlazesS7.S0
Hendrlckson--MosaicS3.SOFI Sanders--CeramicsBook S1.9S
KennymSculptureS7.50
[ ] Uetrachf---EnamelingST.SO
Kenn~Poftery $7.S0
[ ] White--World of Pattern S3.75
Norto~Artist Potter S7.50~ Johns~Designs S3.O0
J
I enclose
N
book(s):
a
[ ] check
m
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
[]
Wolchonok--Designs$4.9S
Jenkins & Mills--Mosaics $S.95
Nelson~Ceramics$5.95
Encis~Deslgn S1.8S
Priolo~CeramlcsSS.9S
Egbert & Barnef~Brush$3.95
[ ] money order
e
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J
Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Ohio residents add 3% Sales Tax.
8 Ceramics Monthly
Zn. . . . . . . . .
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WE PAY POSTAGE
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$B.9S
SUGGESTIONS
from our readers
SPONGE-ON.STICK SUBSTITUTE
Instead of using a sffck with a piece of sponge tied to its
end for removing moisture from the inside bottom of a tall vase
or bottle, use a " n u t and bolt retriever." This clever tool has
spring-steel "fingers" at one end that tightly clasp the sponge.
One of these tools can be purchased at an auto supply store
for a very low price.
I have found that this tool is useful also for removing
scraps of trimming clay from the bottoms of tall pieces with
--Cal Cubberley, Silver Springs, Md.
narrow necks.
TEST TILES
W vvv V
l
I
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t | J l i I I
..2_.L..~_A--J~I
I
I
mmmmmmmmmen m
mMmmmmmmm~m m
When making test tiles for
glaze samples, brush an
often-used slip, engobe or undeglaze on half of the tiles
and then sgraffito a few lines
through the slip. Proceed as
usual to bisque fire and glaze.
This kind of test gives a complete picture on one tile of the
effect of a particular glaze on
the plain clay body, over slip
and over sgraffitoed slip.
--Eleanor Sheiko,
Detroit, Mich.
PLASTER DISPOSAL
Here is a suggestion for use in working with plaster that
solves the problem of disposing of left-over plaster. I line my
mixing bowl with a large plastic bag or a sheet of plastic materlal before mixing the plaster in it. Any unused plaster may
be left in the plastic and discarded or it may be poured out
onto newspaper and the plastic rinsed off for use again later.
--Phyllis M. Stier, Campbell, Calif.
We've put this ingredient
in THOM PSON ENAME LS
since 1890
No m a t t e r which of the many Thompson
enamels you choose, you'll find one thing the
same about each one of t h e m . . , the exceptional quality that results in better finished pieces
for amateurs and professional s alike.
Perhaps that's the main reason Thompson has
been the world's largest supplier of art enamel
colors for more than 70 years.
The new Thompson catalog puts the widest
selection of these top quality enamel colors
available anywhere right at your fingertips
• . . plus everything you need in the way of
materials, tools and supplies.
COPPER WiRE DECORATION
A delightfully different decoration can be made by using
copper wire and glaze on a bisqued pot. I choose a shape around
which I can wrap a fine copper wire (about 24 gauge) and
fasten it securely by looping the ends together. Next, I spray
a glaze over the wire decoration and pot. I like a white or
cream color gloss or semi-gloss glaze for this. After firing to cone
04, the wire melts and blends with the glaze to produce a
textured green decoration against a light glaze background.
TT
Send the coupon
today
for your free
--Phyllis B. Morley, Trenton, N.J.
personal copy.
TO CONSERVE GLAZE
T h e use of a stiff-bristled toothbrush can save the potter
quite a bit of glaze that otherwise would be wasted. After
glazing a number of pots, I wait until the glaze on the cans,
tumblers and other equipment I have used is powder dry.
T h e n I brush off this glaze powder with the toothbrush and thus
accumulate a nice heap of glaze that will be ever so welcome
for the next glazing session. Sometimes this extra bit of glaze
can mean the difference between a success or flop, particularly
for the dipping process. This simple studio practice also is a
good one when one is dissatisfied with the glazing of a pot and
wishes to do the job over.
THOMAS C. THOMPSON CO. - - Dept. CM
1539 Deerfield Road, Highland Park, IlL
Please rush my FREE catalog of complete enameling and nraft
supplies.
--Anya Saretzky, Port Washington, N. Y.
NAME
PLASTIC FOR ROLLING SLABS
If you are bothered by the clay sticking to the roller
when rolling out slabs, try using a piece of ordinary plastic
ADDRESS
CITY
7ONE
STATE
Continued on Page 32
January 1963
9
SCHOOLS-CRAFT CENTERS-INSTITUTIONS
have you tried
Westwood's
stoneware
cone 5 glozes?
)color m a y be added)
W 501 LIDO SATIN (mottled beige)
W 502 SEMI-CLEARMATT
W 503 MOONMIST (opaque white)
W 504 ITALIAN STRAW (mottled beic
W 505 POLAR BEAR (eggshell white)
W 506 HORIZON (opaque white glos
16 TRANSPARENT
- - - and
our
Stoneware
Bodies
SCMO - 10 BROWN (reduction) (cone 10)
SCRH BROWN (reduction) (cone 10)
WC-33-10 BROWN (reduction) (cone 6-10)
WC-33 BUFF (cone 6-10)
WC-8 White (cone 6-10)
WC-40 BROWN (cone 5)
SCMO BUFF (cone 10)
WC-5 RED (cone 5)
WESTWOOD Stoneware is used by leading potters and
ceramic schools everywhere .
PRICES ON REQUEST
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Ceramics Monthly
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Answers to
QUESTIONS
C o n d u c t e d by the C M T e c h n i c a l Star[
I have trouble seeing whether or not my pyrometric cones
have bent when my kiln is glowing bright inside. Is there
any technique or practice that would help me with this
problem?--H.H.W., Weymouth, Mass.
Some potters solve this problem by clearing the atmosphere
inside the kiln with a short, soft breath of air through the
peep hole. Usually this will work for a low temperature firing.
It may be necessary to procure a small square of cobalt blue
glass and hold this up to the peep hole in order to see the
cones.
Glaziltg ha~ been giving me a lot o/ trouble lately. When 1
apply a .~econd coating o[ glaze over the [irst one, the glaze
[orms quite large blisters and sometimes even peels up and falls
o[[. I have added gum to the glaze but this doesn't seem to help.
Can you give me any help on how to solve this problem?--Mrs.
M.M., Boise, Idaho.
NATURA LLY/
It would be impossible to advise you accurately without
having more information. From the description, it does sound
as if you are allowing the first glaze coating to dry completely
before applying the second layer. This causes the first layer to
expand and pull away from the body. You should apply the
second layer of glaze before the first layer dries.
Can reduction [irin.g be done in an electric kiln without
tnlury to the elements?--[.C.N., Topeka, Kan.
It generally is believed that atmospheric reduction firings
are harmful to electric kiln elements because of the build-up of
carbon inside the firing chamber. Why not try local reduction?
A reducing agent can be introduced into the glaze and be fired
in a normal oxidizing atmosphere. Local reduction has been
detailed in two articles in CM: December 1953 ("Local Reduction Copper Reds") and February 1958 ("Celadons at Cone
04").
I seem to be having considerable trouble in obtaining a
satisfactory majolica decoration on bisqued ware. On a recent
piece glazed in a white matt and with a black underglaze decoration on top o/ this, the black had a bubbled, spattered appearance when it came [rom the kiln. Hat, e you any suggestions?
- - M . M . , London, Ont.
9
From the description it would appear that you are using
too thick a concentration of underglaze on the glaze. Try adding
some of the glaze or a small amount of frit to the underglaze to
cut down its strength. Also, thin down the mixture with
enough water to make it brush very easily.
We haee been having [allures with our glazes and I [eel
that this may be blamed on inaccurate [iring rather than our
materials. Before a [iring, should the pyrometer needle rest at
zero or should it register room temperature?--Sr. E.M., Montreal, Que.
9
The pyrometer needle should register room temperature.
Our pyrometer, which is periodically checked with cones, registers about 70 ° . If your pyrometer registers at zero, this very
well could account for your glaze failures. The pyrometer can
be easily reset to register room temperature.
All subscriber inquiries are given individual attention at C M ;
and, out o[ the many received, those o[ general interest are
selected [or answer in this column. Direct your inquiries to
the (~uestions Editor, CM, 4175 N. High St., Columbus 14,
Ohio. Please enclose a stamped, sell-addressed envelope.
C E R A M I C H R O M E is designed for all clay
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GARDENA, CALIFORNIA
January 1963
11
First in a series of
three articles by an
internationally-known
artist and teacher.
~i~i!i!iiiii~i~ii¸
l. Edris Eckhardt starts a
head with two basic clay
[orms, an egg shape [or
the head and a column
for the neck. Working
table ts elevated ior an
"eye-to-eye" view o[ the
sculpture.
CERAMIC SCULPTURE: THE HUMAN HEAD
by EDRIS ECKHARDT
FORMS ARE TO T H E S C U L P T O R what words a r e t o the
writer. They are a means of expressing his inner vision
and his outer perception in such a manner that this
experience is communicated to others. Without this,
anatomy and basic proportions would only succeed in
producing a lifeless image and not a work of art.
The most complex work in sculpture is found in
the head. Not only is this a complex anatomical area,
but it is a very complex mirror of the states of mind
that humans undergo. I n effect, the sculptor tells not
only the story of a model on a clay face, but he also
tells a great deal about his own life story in the face
he sees and projects.
Unfortunately, this deep awareness does not develop
out of strict observation of anatomy. Since some of the
most vital information must come from the artist's own
heart, he must develop a perceptive eye if he is to create
a human head worthy of the clay with which he works.
T h e sculptor must know what makes a head look
old and sad or young and happy. Drooping, sagging
lines and planes and deeply furrowed forms are seen
on old faces. The planes and lines move up and out
and the forms are firm and tight on young and happy
faces. What shows anger, fear or agony? Compression
of the features, a drawing together of the planes and
12
Ceramics Monthly
lines into a central knottiness. Try acting out these emotions in front of a mirror and watch the planes move
down and out for sorrow or age, up and out for joy,
surprise and youthful inquiry.
This kind of observation not only clarifies your
thinking and helps you to organize your thoughts, but
it also helps you to exaggerate or simplify, as the occasion demands, so that you can present to the world the
face you see with your mind's eye.
First of all, however, we must have a working
knowledge of the basic proportions and planes of the
human head. We must be mindful of the subtle change
of proportions from babyhood to old age and be aware
of the different basic plane structures in the male and
female heads. And, of course, we must develop good
working practices with our materials and equipment.
I prefer to use a red-firing clay that is lightly
grogged. If the details are to be fine, I select a finer
size of grog particles. I use from 10 to 25% grog, depending on the size of the head and the details involved.
I also add about 1 ~ bentonite to make the clay more
plastic. This clay does not sag easily and it stands a lot
of manipulation without losing its shape. I t also retains
moisture for a long time, is quite plastic and dries without much shrinking or cracking. It fires without distor-
~'i~ii!i ¸¸¸¸,¸~ i~~,..i
'2. Important form retatzonslzzp zs tlze acute angle of the
axis of the neck in relation to the axis of the egg shape.
Drawn-in lines help establish this relation correctly.
3 The wrong angle of the same egg shape on the column
pToduces an ape-like head. Most serious errors in form
relationship occur at this stage of creating a human head
in clay.
•iI
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4. Egg and column /orms are integrated by firmly slapping the head on the neck and then attaching the two
forms by bringing clay up and down from one form to
a n o t h ~ and smoothing it.
5. Proportions for a child are drawn in on the left side
of the head, for an adult on the right side. Eyes, mouth
and hair line are lower in child than they are in the
adult head.
january 1963
13
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6. Horizontal lines [or [acial [eatures must be made at
an exact right angle to the vertical line that divides the
two halves o[ the head i[ balanced result is to be achieved.
7. Child's head divides into thirds: [rom hair line to
eyebrows, eyebrows to tip o[ nose, and [rom tip o[ nose
to chin. The mouth is two-thirds o[ distance up between
chin and nose.
tion and any undue shrinkage and produces a relatively
hard body at cone 02.
The working position also is of great importance
when modeling a head. The clay model's eyes should be
directly opposite the sculptor's eyes. Use an adjustable
modeling stand or prop your work up on a box to have
it the proper height for working. Use something that can
be easily rotated so that views from the front, back and
sides can be checked from moment to moment.
The head is basically an egg shape set on a column.
The first photograph shows an egg shape appropriate for
making the head of a young child and a column that is
oversize to allow for some settling of the clay. The tall
column boosts the head up high enough for convenient
working; it is also easier to cut down a base form than
it is to build one up. Notice the working tools, which
consist of a knife, pencil and broad-end wire modeling
tool.
The egg shape is wide on top and narrows toward
the chin, as seen from both the front and profile views.
The top of the column must be cut at an angle to avoid
the appearance of a pumpkin on a post. The important
form relationship between the egg and the column is
the acute angle of the neck in relation to the axis of
the egg shape (Photo 2).
Almost all serious errors in form relationship occur
when the student uses the correct column and the proper
egg form but places the egg at a less-acute angle on the
neck. Photo 3 shows such an error, which might very
well do for a sculpture of an ape or a very primitive
man. But you would have to search for a long time to
find a human head like this one!
The next step in making the head is the incorporating of these two masses of clay. The egg is placed on
the cylinder with a sharp slap that solidly wedges them
together. The state of the clay at this point is firm, but
not hard and certainly not tacky or sticky. The thumb
and index fingers bring some of the clay from the egg
form down into the column and some of the column
clay up into the egg shape. When this is done the area
of incorporating is smoothed (Photo 4).
The first step in the charting of the basic areas of
the human head is to draw a vertical line right down
the front of the head, from the top of the skull to the
chin, dividing the head into right and left sides. I n diagramming the head there is, of course, a difference between that of the child and that of the adult. The child's
eyes appear to be placed lower in the head, the reason
for this being that the jaw structure is not yet developed.
Since nature is an economist, she has left the jaw relatively undeveloped during this early part of the child's
life when he neither chews nor talks.
I n Photo 5 I have diagrammed the two sides of the
face differently. On the left is the placement of the
features for a child, while on the right is a preliminary
drawing for the features of an adult. While this makes
the drawing look more than a little odd, it does effectively show the difference that I want to point out. The
eye placement for the child is made by drawing a horizontal line at an exact right angle to the established
14
Ceramics Monthly
i
,,!i i
8. law position is diagrammed by drawing a line [rom
top o[ head to the chin and another line [tom hair line
to the base o[ the skull. Jaw starts where these two
lines meet.
9. Ear starts behind the jaw line. Its length is the distance
[rom eyebrow to tip o[ nose and its shape is approximately hall o[ a heart .form. Diagramming o[ the head
now is complete.
vertical line. This line is drawn at one-half the distance
from the top of the head to the chin. For an adult
head, the lower lid would be placed on this line, as is
shown on the right side of this practice drawing.
I cannot stress too much the importance of placing
this eye line at an exact right angle to the vertical line.
If this line is crooked, the head never will be balanced
and will look wrong (Photo 6). Balance can be upset
by light, too. When modeling a head, try to have equal
lighting on both sides if possible. Front light is best. If
the light is stronger on one side, there will be a tendency
to make the shadows deeper on one side, and this will
upset the balance when the piece is viewed in equal
lighting.
Since I am doing a child's head here, I will use
the center division line for the eyes. The width of a
child's face is five eyes wide, incidentally. This is only
an average proportion, but it is something to start with.
The hair line must be decided and it can be drawn in
at any reasonable place. But a normal forehead results
when the hair line is placed about where the head starts
to turn from top to face. These measurements are relative, but the differences give a head character and interest. The mouth opening is two-thirds of the distance
up between the chin and nose.
The face is thus divided roughly into thirds. It is
one-third from the hair line to the eyebrows, another
third from the eyebrows to the tip of the nose, and still
another third from the tip of the nose to the chin
(Photo 7).
Diagramming to find a place for the ears and jaws
is a mystery to most beginning students since they can't
seem to find a place for the face to end. Most beginners
forget about the back of the head and pull the ears
forward to a point where they grow out of the cheekbones.
T o diagram this correctly, draw a curving line from
the top of the head to the chin. Draw another curving,
swooping line from the hair line to the base of the skull.
Where these two lines meet at the side of the head, drop
a line that slants gently toward the face. This is the line
for the jaw; it also indicates where the ear is to be placed
(Photo 8).
While the ear seems complicated to draw, it is
basically just the shape of half of a heart. The top of
the ear is formed by drawing a line from the eyebrow
right around the back of the head to the other eyebrow
(Photo 9).
The length of the ear is fixed by drawing a line
from the tip of the nose, around the head, and back to
the nose. In other words, the length of the ear is usually
the distance from eyebrow to tip of nose. A child's ear,
by the way, is not very large.
Our finished diagram shows the jaw line to the top
of the head, and the hair line to the base of the skull.
Where those lines converge is the end of the face, and
from here on back is skull and hair.
With the diagramming now complete, in our next
demonstration I shall continue with the finding of planes
and the developing of the features and expression.
,/anuary 1963
15
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BOTTLES FROM BOWLS
by JEAN GARRm'T
AN ALMOST LIMITLESS variety of bottle shapes can be
made by joining together two press-mold bowl shapes.
Large bottles with tall spouts, short bottles with beveled
openings, and round bottles with short spouts are just a
few of the forms that can be constructed from basic
shapes made in bowls that are used as press molds.
A fired but unglazed bowl made by any of the potter's techniques--casting, hand building or throwing-makes an ideal press mold in which to make the two
halves of the bottle form. These are then joined edgeto-edge with slip to create a basic hollow shape. If a
shallow bowl is used as the press mold, the basic shape
will be quite flat and narrow; a half-round bowl will
produce a nearly-spherical basic shape. Plastic or glazed
bowls can be used as the press-mold form in place of a
bisque bowl, but a dampened cloth or piece of plastic
material may be necessary as a lining to prevent the clay
from sticking to the bowl. Whatever the source for the
press mold, it should not have an undercut or turned-in
edge that might create difficulties in removing the clay
without distorting or destroying its form.
For use in shallow forms, the clay may be rolled out
on a slightly damp cloth, using quarter-inch spacers to
regulate the thickness. This slab of clay is then carefully
pressed into the mold and the clay trimmed level with
the top of the mold.
Another method is necessary if deep bowls are used
for this press-mold type of construction. Flattened pieces
of clay are pressed into the mold, the edges are flattened,
and the pieces of clay are overlapped as they are added
ii
1. Flattened pieces o[ clay arc pressed zltto an unglazed
bisque bowl which serves as a makeshi[t mold [or producing the halves o[ bottle.
to insure a smooth outer surface when the form is removed from the mold (Figure 1). Clay is added to stand
above the level of the rim, then the inside surface is
scraped smooth with a metal or rubber scraper (Figure
2). Wall thickness can be checked with a needle or pin,
and clay can be added to thin spots or scraped away
where it is too thick. After the rim has been trimmed
level with the top of the mold, it may be necessary to add
small coils of clay to any parts that are too thin. After
this, the inside is scraped again and the edge trimmed if
necessary.
This first half is removed from the mold by placing
a board or bat on top of the bowl and turning them over
(Figure 3). If there are no undercuts and if the mold is
dry, the clay form should come out easily. A wait of a
few minutes may be necessary if the clay and mold do not
separate immediately. The first half is set aside to stiffen
while the second half is made. This duplicate form is
made in the same way, but it is not removed from the
mold.
The edges of both halves are scored and a generous
layer of slip is applied to the edge of that section still in
the mold. The edges or rims of the two halves axe joined
immediately, before the slip has a chance to stiffen, and
they are carefully pressed together (Figure 4). If too
much pressure is used, there is a chance that the unprotected upper half will deform.
While one half of the shape still is in the mold, the
upper section can be smoothed and small bits of clay can
Text Continues on Page 32
Photos Continue on Next Page
•
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2. T h e inside sur]ace o] the clay-lined bowl is smoothed
with a metal or rubber scraper and the rim is trimmed
level with the top o[ the bowl-mold.
January 1963
17
BOTTLES FROM BOWLS continued
3. T h e [irst casting is r e m o v e d / t o m the mold by placing
a bat on top o[ the mold and turning it over. T h e clay
i s released when the bowl is li#ed.
4. A second ca.~ting i~ madr in lhr .~ame manner but is
le[t in the mold. Slip is applied to the rims of both bowls
and then they are pressed together.
5. T h e bowl-mold cal~ be removed [rom the hollow shape
when its support no longer is needed and the piece can
be handled easily and sa/el),.
6. It may be m'ce.~ary io add ~la) t~ t/~, ~,am a'/~ih
the sur/ace is being smoothed. A small hole should be
made in the [orm to allow air to escape.
•
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7. T h e shape can be altrrc~d, i/ d,'~i~cd, by care[ul paddling and the base can be [lattened and made concave
to prevent a bulging, rocking bottom.
18
Ceramics Monthly
8. Spouts or holes may be added in limith's.~ z,aricty.
Short spouts / t o m a single coil or tall coil-built ones
will change the basic shape o[ the bottle.
Celadon Glazes for the Stoneware Potter
PART TWO
by F. CARLTON BALL
GOOD CELADONGLAZE colors are easier
to achieve titan copper reds or any
other reduction glaze colors. For this
reason I think celadons are an excellent point of departure for anyone
learning to fire in a reduction atntosphere.
If celadon glazes are fired in an
oxidation kiln atntosphere, pale amber
colors usually result. These are weak
and uninteresting. When the same
glazes are fired in a reduction atmosphere the color should be some
variation of green. Even if the kiln is
not reduced heavily, there should be
quite a contrast between the results
in oxidation and reduction firings.
T h e color of the clay body plays
an important part in the production
of celadon colors. Since most celadon
glazes are transparent or translucent,
their color is affected by the color of
the clay body under the glaze. If a
colorless transparent glaze is applied
over a porcelain body and fired to
cone 10, the resuh should be a cool
white: but if there is any iron in the
clay or glaze, the reduction fMng will
produce a blue or green color.
If you wish to make some tests
for color, start with a white stoneware
or porcelain clay that fires to cone 10
and a rich dark red stoneware that
can be fired to the same temperature.
By wedging, add some of the red clay
to the porcelain or white stoneware
in increasing amounts, then make test
tiles of these different clay mixtures.
T h e glaze tests consist of using over
these a colorless transparent glaze
and the same glaze with the addition
of 2% of iron oxide. I think you will
find the resuhs to be well worth the
effort. There is one particular mixture of a small amount of red clay
mixed with the porcelain that produces a very beautiful celadon that
usually is referred to as "'Korean Porcelain."
If the test piece is not completely
covered with glaze, you will find it
most interesting to compare the color
of the unglazed clay with the clay
under the glazed portion. You will
find on the test pieces that as the
amount of iron is increased, the body
color changes and becomes grayer in
the reduction firing. During the firing
of the kiln, the reduction atmosphere
changes the color of the clay; during
the cooling of the kiln, the clay is
subjected to an oxidizing atmosphere
and this changes the color once again.
T h e result can best be observed by
breaking one of the tests with a red
clay addition and comparing the color
of the surface with the color of the
clay inside. You will note that the
inner clay is a nmch darker gray than
the surface color. O n the other hand,
the glazed area of the body does not
change color during the cooling; the
fused glaze keeps the oxidizing atmosphere from changing the body
color beneath.
T h e potter who wants to study celadon glazes thoroughly should make
tests for variations in the reduction
firing procedures. An intense reduction
might be achieved by making a sagger that would completely enclose the
celadon-glazed pot, and then filling
the bottom of the sagger with silicon
carbide so that almost no oxygen can
affect the celadon glaze.
Another approach would be to test
a single glaze with the addition of 2%
iron oxide and apply this to the body.
W h a t would be the result if the kiln
were reduced only from cone 4 to 5?
W h a t would result if the reduction
were from cone 5 to 10, or from 04
to 4? You can see that there are many
fascinating approaches to testing celadon glazes.
Since celadon glazes are transparent or translucent, the glaze thickness
is very important. A thin coating of a
transparent celadon glaze over a porcelain body would result in very little
color: a medium thickness would give
a satisfactory color: and a heavy glaze
layer would undoubtedly result in
fine color, texture and over-all "feeling" in the eeladon-glazed pot. There
is one precaution that I must mention in relation to glaze thickness. If
the glaze thickness is greater than the
clay thickness (and it can be!), the
pot will shatter.
T h e range of colors in celadons
varies greatly according to the amount
of iron introduced. A celadon glaze
with 1/C/c of iron oxide, applied thinly
to a porcelain piece, results in a beautiful delicate blue or green color. If
2 % of iron is used, the color is stronger. Increasing the iron content to 4 %
results in the introduction of some
brown, and SOlnetinms produces an
olive green. The addition of 8 % iron
almost always gives brown, but the
quality of the brown will vary according to the glaze composition.
Sometimes a rich molasses brown is
the result, and sometimes a lnedium
brown opaque may be produced.
A glaze called a "saturated iron"
is produced when 10% of iron is added. W h e n this glaze is molten all of
the iron dissolves, but during the cooling some of the iron crystallizes. These
crystals are very small and needle-like
and the general effect is quite beautiful. T h e glaze itself might vary from
a light tan to a dark brown and it can
be a gloss or a matt. With the proper
kind of glaze, and with a thin application. the result may be an iron red
that is n e a r h as bright as a copper
red. With a heavv application, this
salne glaze ma,v give a glorious plum
color.
Here are some celadon glaze recipes
that react very favorably with higher
percentages of iron. You might also
wish to try some of the recipes listed
last month with these higher iron
percentages. I would like to warn,
however, that as much as 15% of
iron gives a most unpleasant glaze
result.
CELADON GLAZE RT-13
(Cones 8--12)
Feldspar
1666 grams
Kaolin
93
Flint
3
Colemanite
268
Whiting
135
Red Iron Oxide
216
This glaze gives an iron-brown, a
brilliant iron red or a rich plum,
Continued on Page 36
]a~luary 196,2
19
Kiln-[ormed
Glass
GLASS FRAME FOR A MIRROR
by K.,,v KINNEY
A .~.HRROR must necessarily reflect anything within the
area of its placement; thus it can be harsh by dav or
dim at twilight. Too often it is bound or framed unimaginatively with metal or wood, thus emphasizing
those two extremes. Considerable experimentation with
various other materials resulted in the selection of glass
for this month's project: a border of rondelles and leaves
to serve as a mirror frame. These sturdy and decorative
glass shapes are reflected in the mirror, and the double
images serve to soften the stark outline of the unframed
mirror.
Since it is impossible to fire mirror glass without
losing the reflective backing, the frame units must be
fused separately and then be bonded to the mirror after
firing. T h e leaves are cut from glass and fused; the
rondelles are created by the collapsing of small glass
jars fired in an upright position.
T h e rondelles are made by using small glass jars
of a height that equals, or is less than, their diameter.
Taller containers tend to fold over. rather than sag
straight down. T h e jars are thoroughly cleaned and any
labels removed, then a transparent glass glaze is applied
to the interiors with a brush. T o presela-e the illusion of
delicacy, the color coating should be extremely thin. The
color used here is a flaxen-yellow. (To avoid anv confusion, it should be stated that the labeled jar in Photo
1 contains the colorant and is not part of the project.)
T h e rondelles could be fired on a kiln shelf, but
the fired effect would be quite flat. In order to lift the
outer edges and permit leaves to be placed behind the
rondelles, the jars are fired in a mold. Photo 2 shows a
mold with four "wells" that can be used for this purpose;
unfired jars occupy the wells at the rear and two fired
rondelles are in the front cavities. The separate rondelles
at the left indicate the actual shape of the fired pieces.
Although the wells control the roundness of the
rondelles, the vertical collapse of the jar rims depends
on the placement of the mold in the kiln. If one side
1. Rondelles arc made by sagging in the kiln .~omc ~maIl
glass jars that hate been brushed with color.
2. Rondelles are .fired in "u'ells" in a mold in order t ,
retain some height at the outer edges and not appear [lat.
5. Leaves are cemented together and the top o/ each unit
is given a wash o[ sea-green glass o,Iazc be[ore it is fired.
6. Leaves are [ired in a mold in order to achieve a curz'cd,
three-dimensional appearance consistent with rondelles.
20
Ceramics M o n t h l y
of the mold is quite near the elements, the sides of the
jars close to the heat will soften earlier, causing the rims
to fire a little off-center. This is not considered a defect,
but rather an effect of perspective. These jars required
1525 ° F. in a small enameling kiln which bends glass at
1500 ° F., the slight increase in heat being necessary to
completely collapse the rims.
A pattern for the leaves is sketched in three sizes,
and a series of each size cut (Photo 3). T o achieve a
"bubbled" effect for sparkle, two shapes for each leaf
are cut fi'om single strength window glass, although
single pieces of thicker glass might be used if the added
sparkle is not essential. (Cutting instructions were fully
covered in the Sept. 1962 issue of CM.) T h e n u m b e r
of rondelles and leaves depends on the size of the mirror
selected.
The bottom shape for each leaf is lightly oiled,
and uncalcined mica flakes sifted through a m e d i u m
mesh strainer (Photo 4). T h e mica flakes swell during
the fMng, lifting the upper, or covering glass slightly
and fonning tiny bubbles of trapped air. T o p shapes
are fastened to the lower sections with a bit of rubber
cement at both ends. R u b b e r cement burns away without ash or residue. Finally, a thin wash of sea green glass
glaze is applied to each leaf unit (Photo 5).
A mold is used, this time to give the leaves a curved.
three-dimensional look (Photo 6). R u b b e r cement is
applied to the tip and curve of each leaf in the mold.
Although the mold is designed for three leaf sizes in
proportion, for this project the leaves were scaled down
for the rondelle measurements, and retained approximateh- the same curves (it is usually possible to fire
smaller glass shapes on a larger mold). Like the rondelles, the leaves received a 1525°F. firing, which intensified the bubbled texture to a true approximation
of Venetian glass. Both molds were previously coated
to prevent the glass from fusing to the clay naolds.
T h e fired glass is arranged on the mirror before
actual bonding (Photo 7). When a satisfactory arrangement has been achieved, the separate leaves and rondelles
are epoxy-ed to the mirror at points of contact, as described in the November 1962 issue of CM. As the entire
frame is fairly heavy, a m i n i m u m of 48 hours should be
allowed for drying the epoxy glue.
The completed mirror was photographed at an
angle to avoid camera reflection. It is really a round
mirror, although it appears to be oval in shape.
This type of framing is also suitable for delicate
watercolor or pastel portraits. Smaller groupings can
be used for glass or metal box lids, lamp bases or other
decorating accessories. Single rondelles have been epoxyed to concave metal drawer-pulls quite successfullv.
2..
:.
ii
3. Leaves are cut from single-strength glass in three .,izc,~
to be used back o.[ the rondelles on the mirror.
[
4. Uncalcincd mica [lakes silted on glass will be lami7Lated between tu'o layers o[ glass for bubbled e[[ect.
s~
5L
7. Rondelles and leaves arc /ast~m'd Io mi~r(n a'ith
epoxy. Completed mirror is pictured at the right.
January 1963
21
THE SLAB SCULPTURE OF BETT Y FEVES
by HAL RIEGGER
:'Figure Group, 1962" is the title of this complex slab
sculpture by Betty Feves. Construction of this piece is
discussed in the text.
T H e SCULPTURE of Betty Feves is forceful and direct and
its techniques are simple, yet I find that it is difficult
to write about. Perhaps this is because tile simplicity parallels a maturity that has evolved out of a complex of
thought, emotion, study and self-understan ding. ' T i n a
sculptor, not a potter," Betty Feves says, "and making
a sculpture is like setting up a two-way conversation with
yourself. After a while the sculpture speaks back to you.
It helps you to grow as a person and to understand yourself. Because of what is embodied within the sculpture,
the rational mind can come back to understand itself."
This statement was prompted by a particular piece
of Mrs. Feves' sculpture. Mrs. Feves had felt great delight in working through all stages of this piece, yet when
it was complete it didn't seem to "do anything" for the
artist. For some two months it remained unheeded in the
basement until one day she decided to bring it upstairs
into the light and have another look at it. To her surprise she discovered that she now liked it and concluded
that it sometimes takes time for the rational mind to catch
up with what one does intuitively.
22
Ceramics Monthly
The mechanics of her sculpture are no barrier to her
imagination. She has exhibited rare wisdom in sticking
with a few simple techniques and learning them well. " T o
feel thoroughly at holne and to feel thoroughly free with a
material, you have to know it so well you don't have to
think about it any more," she observes. "I feel I ' m at a
point now where the technical problems--th e problems of
clay, glaze and firing--are not serious problelns that require a lot of thinking about and I can reserve all Iny
energy and time to simply trying to express something."
Working with mechanically -limited ways of handling clay,
hut exploring their full design potentials is one of the
most important things to be learned from this sculptor.
There are three distinct ways in which Mrs. Feves
builds with slabs, each one more complex mechanically
than the former. Yet all of them are architecturall y and
structurally strong and direct.
One type is exemplified in the use of long slab strips
organized into vertical, open sculptures. Another is illustrated by square, hollow forms, while the third type
is a more-elabora te complex assembly of square and rectangular forms. Each of these involves different techniques of slab construction.
Watching Betty Feves do a sculpture such as the
"Figure Group, 1962" is to see something so apparently
easy that one wonders what there is to comment about.
But a wealth of experience, combined with considerable
preparation, precedes such sculptures. "'I spend a morning
mixing clay. I sometimes wonder why anyone in his right
mind would do this dirty, messy work, but after that
thick mud is spread around a bit to dry, it's a pleasant
feeling. I just plain like the feel of clay in any stage from
dry flour to fired surface."
The slabs are m a d e - - m a n y of t h e m - - b y pounding
the clay and cutting various sizes "until there are slabs all
over the place. I usually build several forms and let them
dry a bit more if necessary before putting them together.
There really is no way to say 'now do this. now do that'
since so much depends upon the clay itself and the conditions of work; you nmst just know when to continue a
project by the condition of the clay. By the same token,
you must know when to quit so the clay can stiffen up.
Each individual nmst experience his own clay, set his own
rhythm of working and create his own time schedule."
Like many mature artists, Betty Feves is an intuitive
worker. It is true that many ideas are evolved and clarified through the many sketches she is ahvays making.
When she approaches her work of building up a sculpture
with slabs of clay easily and surely, there seems to be
no apparent plan, yet a beautifully organized form emerges. Structurally simple sculptures of the first type
take shape quickly. Two slabs are joined in much the
same fashion as coils of the early American Indian pots,
finger prints showing and becoming a decorative part of
the sculpture. More slabs are added in the same manner
until the basic form of the group is completed. Mrs.
Feves usually sees "personages" in her abstract forms.
Finger dents left by joining the slabs may or may not
be changed, depending upon the total design requirements of the piece. One thing is certain with her sculptures: techniques used in the construction of a piece are
not hidden or disguised. The work is dynamic and honest.
"I treat the surface as the demands of the piece suggest.
In other words, there is no set way," she explains. "Sometimes I use the textures of the construction process, sometimes I add textures."
For the second type of sculpture, Betty Feves makes
preparations in a similar but slightly more involved way
that requires more time. Speaking of a piece like "Rock
Forms with Faces," she says: "After pounding out and
cutting a variety of slab sizes, I let them dry for twenty
four hours or so, depending on conditions. Since the slabs
are stiff, I use slip for joining them after scoring the
edges, then I work them together well. Often I beat the
seams with a paddle or board; this also helps to shape the
piece. Pieces made in this fashion need several days to
set so that the extra moisture in the seams has a chance
to even out with the rest of the piece before it is allowed
to dry. It usually takes me two or three working sessions
B e t t y F e v e s is Oictured at w o r k in h e r s t u d i o in P c n d l c t o n ,
to put a fairly large piece together. This does not count
the time necessary to prepare clay and make the slabs."
Simple hollow forms are represented by branch
pots and sculptures. One of her most recent pieces, a
32-inch-high sculpture called "Personage," was included among the contemporary American ceramics at
the Prague International . "With these box forms," she
explains, "it is sometimes necessary, especially with the
large flat ones, to blow them full of air so that the air
supports the top slab while it is stiffening. This is also
a good trick with round forms. These can be built in one
session and be supported with air. A glass tube and lung
capacity are all that is needed." (This technique was
described in the November 1962 issue.)
Certain precautions must be observed in the drying
of sculptures and each type of construction makes its own
demands. Closed single forms, such as branch bottles, are
the simplest because drying naturally tends to be even.
Open forms like the "Figure Group, 1962," built up of
several vertical strips, require slower, more careful drying.
Extremities of a piece like this will tend to dry first and,
becoming rigid, will not allow the inner portions of the
structure to dry and shrink freely. Thus, by loosely covering the piece with a cloth or piece of plastic, the sculp-
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ture will be made to dry evenly. "Complex slab pieces
must be dried slowly and evenly or they will crack. This
should be an obvious conclusion," Mrs. Feves says, "once
you understand that clay shrinks while drying. It pulls
into itself, so to speak. Extensions that are attached at
one end only can be allowed to dry faster than the main
body of the piece, but if a piece is attached at both ends
then the entire piece must be dried evenly or trouble
is bound to occur."
"Figure with Sticks" is one of the most complex
of Betty Feves' sculptures. This was made of box-like
forms that had been inade one day and allowed to harden
a bit before being assembled the next day. Building a
sculpture of hollow forms arranged in vertical fashion
poses an entirely new structural problem. Especially in
a case like this, it is necessary to think ahead to the firing
and to what happens with clay when it is intensely hot.
Though we usually are not aware of it, clay softens as
it reaches maturity in the kiln. (Softening is not to be
confused with warping.) You will be quite aware of this
if you have ever made wide-rimmed flat plates and had
them sag out of shape during firing.
A sculpture such as this may weigh as much as a
hundred pounds. The center forms of "Figure with
Sticks," having large and horizontal surfaces that must
support weight, must be reinforced with internal members. The construction of this sculpture is illustrated in
the accompanyin g drawing. However, Betty Feves uses
interior supports only when it is necessary to assure continuous vertical support for the weight of the clay. "A
horizontal slab will not support any additional weight,
sometimes not even itself. For most horizontal forms that
have weight on top of them, it is necessary to devise
some kind of interior wall support," she has learned.
A logical mind experienced in the nature of clay
will eventually figure out all of the information presented here. But many of us are apt to miss these points
because such problems stare us so squarely in the face
that we cannot see them. It is all too true that the most
obvious things often are the ones we miss.
This artist's attitude about sculpture reveals a similar
fundamental quality. Several years ago at the conference
of a national craft organization held on the West Coast,
Betty Feves in essence said, "I do these things because
I like to." A refreshing remark, it seemed to me, while
many other craftsmen at the meeting were quoting all
manner of theories of design, function, commerce and
utility to justify what they were doing.
Talking about her own sculptures Betty says, for
example, "The medium one chooses, if he finally does
choose a medium, is dependent on one's personality,
background, how at home one feels with a given material.
Some people prefer to work in many media--feelin g that
it's a bad thing to limit expression. Maybe they are right,
but personally I would prefer rather to explore in depth
one thing than to play around with many different things.
Again this is a personal preference."
"Let's talk about clay. The structure is a fundainental consideration . How a piece is built--by coils, slabs
or whatever--gr eatly determines the final outcome. But
the dividing line between the structure of a given piece
and the content, which influences the development more,
is hard to determine. I guess you could go back further
and say the type of clay you use is a determining factor
too."
"The current fads in the art world have some interest
for me as an observer. Some of the so-called 'far-out'
things arouse my curiosity in that I ' m concerned with
the motives behind such things. Some of them I find
have fine, often fragmentary, messages. Others are revolting. I can honestly say that I have learned much from
some avant-garde things but I insist on using what I learn
for my own purposes, and in my own way."
Continued on Page 32
"Rock F , , m a itll Va~,'" a a, mad, /~,m a :ati, l) "l
slabs joined together with slip and shaped with a paddle
or board. Pieces made in this manner require several days
to set because o[ the extra moisture in the seams.
Drawing above illustrates construction o[ the sculpture
"Figure with Sticks." T h e large horizontal sur[aces are
rein[orced to support weight o[ other box-like [orms.
Finished sculpture is pictured on [acing page.
24
Ceramics Monthly
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.[anuar), 1963
25
FILMS ON CERAMICS
An up-to-date list of instructive films, film-strips
and slides on ceramics that may be rented or purchased.
SIMPLE SLAB METHODS
T H E MOTION PICTURE is a n invaluable
aid to students, teachers, recreation
leaders and all ceramic enthusiasts.
CERAMICS MONTHLY, recognizing t h e
value of films that show the making
of molds, different methods of decoration, glaze application and good
craftsmanship, has compiled an upto-date list of films, filmstrips and
slides for its readers.
These teaching aids m a y be borrowed, rented or purchased. Your
library is a convenient source if it has
a film division. It also is a thrifty
source, as there is little or no charge
for a 24-hour period. Another source
might be a local museum, university
or public school system. These often
loan or rent their films or slides to
interested outside groups.
If none of these institutions is able
to fill your requirements, you may
turn to a commercial film rental service. These are listed under "Motion
Picture Film Libraries" or a similar
heading in the classified telephone
directory. If the films are not available from a nearby audio-visual
agency, the distributor will help direct you to the proper agency. Distributors suggest that reservations be
made at least four weeks in advance.
Below we have compiled a complete and up-to-date list of such fihns
- - a s far as our researching has been
able to d e t e r m i n e - - w i t h a brief descriptive paragraph about each.
Unless otherwise noted, each film
is 16 mm., black-and-white, sound.
T h e borrower pays transportation
charges both ways.
AMERICAN CRAFTSMEN'S COUNCIL
Research Service
29 West 53rd St.
New York 19, N. Y.
YOUR PORTABLE MUSEUM
Mr. Martz takes the viewer through
the steps of forming a candle holder
directly from a lump of clay, rolling a slab
for a simple tile, and constructing a flower container from several pieces of clay.
Correct use of basic tools is emphasized.
10 minutes; in color; $3 [or five days;
$100 purchase.
STACKING AND FIRING
Shows the correct stacking of both green
and glazed pottery in a small kiln and
each step of the firing process. Spectator
is shown the use of stilts and plate pins
to support the pieces, placement of the
ware in the kiln, the use of pyrometric
cones, and the necessity for firing and
cooling pieces carefully. I0 mbnutes; in
color; $3 [or five days; $I00 purchase.
THROWING
;toneware Covered Jar by Charles Lako/sky, from the slide collection, "Your Portable Museum." The American Craftsmen's
Council.
Indiana University
Bloomington, Ind.
DECORATION
This and the following five films make
up the "Craftsmanship in Clay" series released by Indiana University. Each is
demonstrated by Karl Martz, well-known
Director of Ceramic Arts at Indiana.
In "Decoration" he demonstrates the
use of three basic materials for applying
decoration on a clay surface---clay, glaze,
and slip. Mr. Martz also explains the
mishima, sgraffito, and wax-resist methods.
Summary includes representative pieces
done by using the three materials. 10
minutes; in color; $3 [or five days; $I00
purchase.
GLAZE APPLICATION
Presents four methods~dipping, pouring, brushing and spraying--and points
out the advantages of each. Demonstrations include special techniques, proper
preparation of a piece of clay for glazing,
and precise finishing before firing, with
stress on good craftsmanship. 10 minutes;
in color; $3 [or five days; $I00 purchase.
Mr. Martz demonstrates how a piece is
made from a mold by the slip casting,
draping and pressing methods. 10 min-
Portable Museum," which includes a /ull
description of the kits and rental fees.
utes; in color; $3 [or five days; $100
purchase.
Ceramics Monthly
color; $3 /or five days; $100 purchase.
A U D I O - V I s u A L CENTER s
Over 4500 color slides arranged in kits
are available to art schools, university art
departments, museums and craft organizations. Write [or the brochure. "'Your
26
Illustrates the forming of pieces on the
wheel, removing from the wheel, trimming the base, forming a foot rim, and
using special throwing techniques in shaping a plate and pitcher. 10 minutes; in
SIMPLE MOLDS
AV-ED
7934 Santa Monica Blvd.
Hollywood 46, Calif.
THE POTTER'S WHEEL
Richard Petterson of Scripps College
demonstrates how to throw pitchers. A
review of fine examples of thrown ware
is given. I0 minutes; black-and-white
rental $3 a day, $6 a week; $50 purchase.
Color rental $6 a day, $12 a week; $100
purchase.
SIMPLE CERAMICS
Mr. Petterson shows how to use simple
household utensils for decorating a clay
slab which is later slung in a hammock
mold to make a bowl. I0 minutes; rental
and purchase same as above.
MAKING A MOSAIC
The making of a mosaic from the
original sketch to completion is demonstrated by Ada Korsakaite. She also
shows the making of handmade ceramic
tile rolled and cut from common clay.
Another sequence pictures a 10-year-old
making a checkerboard from uniform
squares of commercial tesserae. 10 minutes;
rental and purchase same as above.
CERAMIC GLAZES
The mixing of an opaque m a t t and a
stone glaze, both showing wide firing
latitude and high color receptivity, are
demonstrated by Richard Petterson. Glaze
application by various methods plus kiln
interiors during firing are shown. 10
minutes; rental and purchase same as
above.
PRESS MOLD CERAMICS
Using simple tools, Ada Korsakaite
carves a group of figures in plaster of
Paris and then presses clay into the carving to form a plaque. Demonstrating the
simplicity of the method, a 10-year-old
carves and presses several medallions. 10
minutes; rental and purchase same as
above.
SCULPTURE FROM LIFE
Creation of a life-sized head, working
from a posed model. Starting with the
armature, the clay is added, the head
is constructed and details of the face
and hair are formed. 10 minutes; rental
and purchase same as above.
BAILEY FILMS, INC.
6509 DeLongpre Ave.
Hollywood 28, Calif.
MOSAICS FOR SCHOOLS
Ways of making simple mosaics are explained and demonstrated, and a mosaic
mural is created by children in an elementary school. The film emphasizes the
importance of planning and organization
before work begins and stresses the individual and his contribution to a group
project. Produced at Central Washington
College of Education. 10 minutes; color;
$6 rental; $120 purchase.
pose in an industrial society. The viewer
is taken on a review of crafts across Canada, crafts as we find them in shops and
at exhibitions, and we see craftsmen at
w o r k - - a potter, a weaver, a woodcarver
and a metal sculptor. 27 minutes; color;
may be obtained without charge by request.
CONTEMPORARY FILMS, INC.
267 West 25 St.
New York 1, N. Y.
CLAY POTTERY
The process of creating pottery, from
the digging of the clay to the finished
product, is shown. Produced in cooperation with the Universal School of Handicrafts, New York. 10 minutes; $3.50 a day;
The world has known only too well the
origin of porcelain, commonly called "china." Yet the full range of the accomplishments of the Chinese potter and the
meaning of the interdependence of various
cultures for their nourishment and growth,
can only be understood by viewing the
evolution of Chinese ceramics from Neolithic earthenware down to pure porcelain.
This film is designed to offer such a panoramic view. 20 minutes; color; rental
PAUl. HOEFLER PRODUCTIONS,
1122 Kline St.
La Jolla, Calif.
MEXICAN POTTERS
Pottery making is depicted as part of
the art of living in Mexico. The audience
learns how the native Indian, the
Spanish-Colonial, and the Modern Internar.ional cultures influence the Mexican
arts and crafts. 11 minutes; color; no
rental; $II0 purchase, including reel, can
shipping.
ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA FILMS, INC.
1150 Wilmette Ave.
Wilmette, Ill.
INTERNATIONAL FILM BUREAU, INC.
332 S. Michigan Ave.
Chicago 4, Ill.
CLAY IN ACTION
How to sculpture a portrait in clay is
demonstrated by Arturo B. Fallico, of
Chicago Teachers College. Such essentials
as basic measurements, principal planes,
tools, and interpretation are discussed. 12
minutes; $2.50 ]or one to three days;
$60 purchase.
This is the story of modern English commercial pottery. The clay is shown as it's
worked at the potter's wheel, and at the
turner's lathe. Afterwards, the pottery is
decorated, glazed, and fired. The film
exemplifies the successful combination of
art principles with modern technological
methods. 12 minutes; in color; $4 for one
to three days; $120 purchase.
ANCIENT GRECIAN IMAGES
Examples of Greek art in the Louvre
(principally the Tanagra e x c a v a t i o n s ) primitive clay and terra cotta figurines,
Cretan gods and goddesses, Greek art on
the eve of the Roman conquest. 10 min-
ABC OF POTTERY MAKING
A demonstration of the coil method of
pottery making. This film shows the use
of template pattern, hand tools and the
potter's wheel. Adapted to beginning students in high school and adult art classes.
9 minutes; rental $3; $50 purchase.
ARTS AND CRAFTS OF MEXICO
Native craftsmen are shown in their
home workshops. Basket weaving, glass
blowing and the techniques for making
pottery are treated. The film concludes
with a display of Guadalajara pottery and
a cliscussion of its unique characteristics.
1l minutes, $2.50 rental.
CHINA CLAY
Many phases of the industry are shown
- - h o w china clay is obtained from pits in
Cornwall, how it is processed and finally
becomes Great Britain's third largest
export of raw material. II minutes; rental
$2; $40 purchase.
CRAFTS OF FIRE
This film depicts the part fire plays in
the making of enamels, glassware, por10
celain, pottery, and dinnerware.
utes; $5 rental; $45 purchase.
POLISH MANUAL ARTS
minutes; re.ntal $3.
Documentary, narrated in English, based on American Federation of Arts'-sponPolish handicraft.
exhibit of
sored
Examples of traditional craftsmanship in
sculpture, ceramics, glass paintings. 11
ENAMELING ART
This film traces the historical development of the enameling art by showing
museum examples of 15th and 16th century Champleve, Cloisonne and Limoges
work. Classroom scenes are shown of students engaged in actual work. This is
recommended for junior and senior high
schools. 12 minutes; in color; rental $6;
minutes; color; $5 rental; $120 purchase.
CANADIAN CONSULATE, GENERAL
111 N. Wabash St.
Chicago, Ill.
T h e film shows how arts and crafts are
now belng restored to serve a useful pur-
days; $50 purchase.
$10 1st day, $5 following; $185 purchase.
$50 purchase.
CRAFTSMEN OF CANADA
The film describes each step in the making of pottery by four different methods.
A vase is formed on a potter's wheel, an
Indian bowl is fashioned with coils of
clay, a vase is made in a plaster mold,
and a table piece is assembled from patterned slab pieces. Explains how each object is dried, bisqued, glazed, and glazefired, l i minutes; $2.50 for one to three
CHINESE CERAMICS THRU THE AGES
COLOUR IN CLAY
BRANDON FILMS, INC.
200 W. 57th St.
New York 19, N. Y.
POTTERY MAKING
$125 purchase.
Mexican Potter at work on the wheel,
from t.he film, "'Mexican Potters." Paul
Itoefler Productions.
MOSAIC EXPERIMENTS
This
is not
merely
a
"how-to-do-it"
Continued on Page 34
January 1963
27
SHOW TIME
Top o[ page: "'Then There Were Six," stoneware sculpture by ]uanita May, repeats the attenuated human
[orm in both positive and negative aspects. The work is
emphasized by heavy, unre[ined texture and by light
sgraffito detail.
28
Ceramics Monthly
Bclou': "'Did You H,'a~.'", :call plaqu~ by Ma~y Blaklc).
measures 12 by 22 inches. The flat clay figures are set
in a colored, textured cement background. Textured and
lustre glazes in red, turquoise, blue, yellow, tan and black
were used.
THE MEMBERSHIP EXHIBITION Of the
Ceramic League of
The Ceramic League of Miami
Miami opened the art season at the University of Miami's
Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery on September 25. Over
70 pieces of work by 23 craftsmen were selected from
262 entries for this year's event. Chairman of the exhibition was Marie Furman. She was assisted by Marion
Tarpley and Natalie B. Lindner.
The jury for the show included Edris Eckhardt,
distinguished sculptor from Cleveland; A1 Hurwitz, Supervisor of Art Education for Dade County, Florida:
and Philip A. Ward, assistant professor of art at the
University of Florida.
Five awards of equal merit were originally planned.
but the jut T found so many good pieces that the merit
awards finally were awarded to ten exhibitors: Mary
Blakley, Marcelle Dulac, Lynn Gladstein, Mary Grabill.
Juanita May, Vanita Neubuehler, Christine Ralston,
Virginia Stemples, Marion Tarpley and Regina Yanich.
Some of the prize-winning pieces are pictured here.
Gina Roehner, publicity chairman for the event,
remarked that much of the great variety of subject
matter and technique evident in the work in this show
undoubtedly is due to the series of seminars the Ceramic
League has sponsored. Some of the nationally-known
potters who have worked with this group are Val Cushing, Teruko Hara, Frank Colson, Franz Wildenhain, Edris
Eckhardt and Hal Riegger.
Above: Wheel-Thrown Stoneware Bowl, by Christine
Ralston, was decorated with oxides in a [ree-brush design. The piece is seven inches high. The artist is wellknown in the Miami area [or her orchid pots and other
[unctional potter), pieces.
Above right: Unglazed Stoneware Lantern, by Lynn
Glatstein, is nine inches high. The cylinder was thrown
on the wheel, sections were cut away and slabs were attached. Projections and cut-outs produce striking shadow
e[[ects on the dark brown lantern.
Right: Terra Cotta Portrait Head, by Virginia Stemples,
was made [rom a [ire piece press mold. Miss Stemples
studied sculpture and portraiture in Chicago be[ore moving to AIiami in 1958. This is the third year she has had
work exhibited in the Member's Show.
]anuary 1963
29
DECORATING WITH GLAZES
demonstrated by MARC BELLAIRE
MARC BELLAIRE turns to a realistic design treatment for
this month's project of a flowering willow pattern on a
vase. The techniques he chooses are the printing and
brush techniques that he introduced in the strawflower
(September) and holiday tree (December) projects, but
the highly stylized design treatment he used for them
is here replaced by a traditional design.
Here again, glaze is used instead of underglaze for
tile decoration. The reason for this is to achieve more
brilliant coloration on the piece than would be possible
by the use of underglaze. This glaze decoration is applied
over a bisqued pot that has been glazed but not glaze
fired. The unfired glaze acts as a background for the
glaze decoration and gives a completely covered surface
when the decoration is fired.
In preparation for decorating, the vase shape is
bisque fired, glazed on the inside and then glazed on
the outside. The outside is given three coats of an
opaque white matt to serve as the covering coat and to
present a suitable surface for the application of the
gloss glaze decoration. When the white glaze is dry
enough so that the piece can be handled safely, decoration
is started. On large pieces such as this one, Mr. Bellaire
works on the banding wheel as much as possible so that
the base glaze won't be rubbed off by handling it. However, it may be necessary to hold the piece horizontally
during the application of the glaze dots if the color has
a tendency to flow and run.
The first step in this decoration is the marking out
of areas on the shape for the clusters of flowers. These
places are marked with a pencil. The dots are made
from a pencil eraser dipped into red gloss glaze poured
into a bottle cap. The glaze is put in this container so
that the depth will be constant and the amount of glaze
applied to the eraser will be the same for each dot.
Mr. Bellaire recommends some special steps in the
preparation of the glaze. As usual, the color should be
stirred or shaken in the jar. If it is too thick for use,
take out about half of the contents and put this aside.
Add a small amount of water to the remainder in the
jar and shake or stir this until it is of a thick cream
consistency. I f it still seems too thick, it may be necessary
30
Ceramics Monthly
to add more water and repeat the complete process.
The red glaze is dotted onto the design in groups
of five around each pencil marking. If enough glaze isn't
being built up by the dotting process, it may be necessary
to repeat the application. The glaze must stand up above
the surface if it is to develop a good strong color. If it
is desired, tangerine or orange glaze can be used for
some of the flower dots.
A yellow matt glaze is selected for the centers of the
flowers, and this glaze is dotted in from the pencil
eraser. Mr. Bellaire stresses the use of a matt glaze for the
yellow since yellow gloss glaze may run in the firing.
The pencil is used again, but this time for more
drawing on the glaze surface. The leaves are sketched
in and each leaf is divided in half. (Remember to use
a soft lead pencil so you don't mark into the glaze. Pencil
lines burn out in the firing.) The liner brush is used
to apply blue-green matt glaze at the top of the leaf in a
single stroke. The stroke starts at the top of the leaf and
moves downward. This single stroke keeps the brush
work fresh. Three coats of glaze are not required for the
seml-transparent effect of the leaves.
The bottom-half sections of the leaves are brushed
in with a light blue-green matt glaze; the technique is
the same as for the top. The leaf combination could be
done with light and dark greens or with blue-green and
teal.
The next step involves the use of black one-stroke
color. This time the brush used is a spatter brush, and
the black color is stippled on for the center of each
flower. A small amount of the black color is poured
into a jar lid, the spatter brush is dipped in it and tested
for the proper texture before it is applied to the vase.
The last part of the decoration makes use of the
liner brush to make the stems and to accent the leaves
with the black one-stroke. Marc Bellaire advises not to
outline the leaves as this has a confining effect and
makes a heavy edge. The liner brush is also used to make
a series of hat-pin strokes for use as stems and seeds.
These are very light in character. The tendrils, also put
in with black, tie the design together and give a feeling
of airiness and lightness to this traditional design.
I. A p~m'il ~rawr is u.wd l~, dol I~(1
and orange colored gloss glazes on the
un[ircd white background gla:e.
2. Matt glaze z~ u.~cd Io dol ~ m IM'
yellow centers [or the traditional design being used here by Mr. BcIlaire.
3. A lin,~ b~u~h i~ ulili:cd to appl)
the blue-green matt glaze on the upper hah'cs o[ the penciled-iT, leaves.
4. Black one-stroke colo7 i~ ,~tilJplcd in
[or the centers o[ the [lowers. The
spatter brush is used [or this technique.
5. Liner brush i~ used to accent ltte
leaves with one-stroke black and to
make hat-pin strokes [or detail.
6. Finished cant has brilliant red and
orange blossoms and so[t blue-green
leaves against the white matt glaze.
January 1963
31
BOTTLES FROM
BOWLS
Continued [rom Page 17
be added to any cracks or hollows in the form. When
this is done, the mold can be slipped off the remaining
half and replaced on the already-smoo thed portion. Then
that exposed section can be smoothed (Figure 5).
As soon as the clay form is stiff enough so that it
will not deform when handled, the mold is removed and
the seam is smoothed over. Clay can be added to the
seam if necessary (Figure 6).
If the shape needs any rounding out or if the form
is to be altered, this can be done by careful paddling
with a flat stick (Figure 7). Since the air inside the form
will be compressed as the clay shrinks, a small hole should
be made in the hollow form at this time to prevent any
possible rupture of the wall. This hole can be filled in
later on. The base of the pot should be flattened at this
time - - before the clay stiffens too much - - and made
concave by paddling with a large, heavy spoon. This
is necessary to counteract any bulging as the form dries.
The final step in the construction of a bottle from
two bowl shapes is the making of an opening, spout or
neck. A single coil for a short neck can be rolled out and
attached to the form with slip (Figure 8) and then the
opening can be cut in the form. Tall spouts can be coilbuilt or wheel-thrown and then attached with slip. Perhaps several spouts may be desired.
By this simple hand-building technique, and with
the use of a single improvised mold, dozens of unique
and fascinating shapes can be made without duplicating
any of them.
THROWING
ON
THE
POTTER'S
WHEEL
HANDBOOKS
ElY THOMASSELLERS
UNDERGLAZEDECORATION
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THROWING ON THE POTTER'SWHEEL
This complete manual on the use of the potter's
wheel includes basic steps, from wedging clay to the maklng of
specific shapes. Clearly described and illustrated. By Thomas
Sellers. 80 pages. $4.00
B E T T Y FEVES
Continued ]tom Page 24
Used by teachers everywhere. Ideal for
hobby groups, schools, art and craft centers. Three-color covers; profusely illustrated step-by-step photo technique.
I
Certainly a great many potters and ceramic sculptors
are concentrating their attention on clay alone. Much
of the current work is devoid of glaze. Our attention is
drawn to the quality of the clay itself as potters are endeavoring to express themselves by the many ways in
which they handle clay. Although it is doubtful whether
there has ever been a time when clay has been handled
in such a variety of ways, at the same time many of us
are disturbed over the "content" of much of the current
ceramic sculpture. Certainly there is ample self-expression here, but much of its seems negative. Still, this has
its place in time, and out of a seemingly-ch aotic period
will emerge an integrated, more disciplined expression in
ceramic sculpture.
i
Continued from Page 9
DEALERS INQUIRIES INVITED
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~m
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SUGGESTIONS
material on top of the clay. In addition to keeping your rolling
device clean and the clay free of any unwanted texture, the
plastic also allows you to "see through" and cheek the progress
of the slab as you work.
--M.M. Lethbrldge,
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COUN TER
ENAM ELIN G
by KATI-IE BERL
A DECISION that all enamelers must
make is whether or not to counter
enamel their work. Counter enameling is the practice of covering the
reverse side of an enameled piece
with enamel, whether it is visible (as
on a bowl) or hidden (as on a
plaque). If the enamel on the reverse
side isn't exposed to view, it would
not seem necessary to have it covered.
Why, then, is it of any importance?
The answer is in the word "stress."
Almost from our kindergarten days
all of us have had experience with
the effects of stress in our art work.
Can you remember pasting a piece
of paper on cardboard that was absolutely straight, then seeing the cardhoard curl into a cradle shape? T o
straighten out our cardboard and our
troubles, all we had to do was to
paste some paper on the back side.
Why did this happen? T h e base material that was covered only on one
side was bein~ subjected to a stress
from just one side and it took a
counter stress to even out that pull
of force.
Another example you may have had
experience with is the varnishing of a
thin board on just one side and seeing
it warp. It obligingly straightened o u t
when the reverse side was varnished.
So we see that some materials, in
order to keep their shape, must be
sandwiched between two equal layers
of fusing coverings to equalize the
stress. This applies to the fusing of
enamel to metal, of course, and the
thinner the metal, the more obvious
the warping if only one side is enameled. A dramatic example of this is
seen if only one side of a piece of
copper foil is enameled. W h e n it is
taken from the kiln you can watch
the flat piece curl almost into a tube
as it cools. This does not happen if
a piece is counter enameled. The
heavier the metal, the less dramatic
the warping, but even minute warping can sometimes be a tragedy. In
shaped pieces the stresses within tile
metal result in milder warping, but
even these pieces should be counter
enameled.
Another defect that occurs from
the practice of enameling on just one
side of the metal is the cracking and
even the dislodging of fired enamel
after it cools.
Since the enameler works with both
transparent and opaque enamels, he
sometimes has trouble if he counter
enamels with opaque and uses transparent on the face side. Minute cracks
appear in the transparent, and although these can be "cured" by refiring, the cracks will reappear when
the piece cools. Only a coating of
transparent on the back will even out
the stress and prevent the cracking.
There is available on the market a
counter enamel that works ve~' well
with both transparent and opaque
enamels, but it is not especially attractive to look at. This backing enamel
is a mixture of transparent and opaque
enamels and this is the reason it works
so well. This also accounts for the
greyish-speck led effect when fired.
T h e craftsman can make this mixture
himself by collecting his scrap enamels
of opaque and transparent granules
and mixing them together in one container to use as counter enamel.
This counter enamel can be used
effectivelv for any object on which the
back side is not exposed to the view.
O n such objects as bowls, where the
backs are exposed, I use the counter
enamel as a first coating, then apply
another coating of the transparent or
opaque color that was used on the
inside. This gives an effect on the
back that is consistent with the decorated side.
Sunanaing up, the enameler can
avoid trouble by using the special
counter enamel or by counter enameling an opaque piece with opaque
backing and a transparent one with
transparent backing.
W e Make It Possible For
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January 1963
33
FILMS
ON
CERAMICS
Continued [rom Page 27
film but deals with the techniques and
elements of smahi, tesserae and blenko
glass. It explores the creative aspects of
youngsters, college students and adults.
In addition to the structural devices employed in mosaic making the film shows
how texture and design are an integral
part of the medium and how rare mosaic
sculpture is made. 20 minutes; in color;
A R T C R A F T SUPPLIES, I N C .
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Paragon - - Duncan - - Drakenfeld
- - Bergen Brush - - S y m p h o n y Jacquelyn's Stains - -
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T W O N E W 1963 C A T A L O G U E S
NEW ENLARGED GENERAL CATALOGUE with
fnlI color charts. Complete line of ceramics,
mosaics and copper enameling.
MOLD CATALOGUE contains mold pictures
from many leading mold manufacturers, plus
many originals by us. SEND S0c FOR BOTH
CATALOGUES. Free to instructors.
--SEELEY'S
CERAMIC
SERVICE9 River Street
Oneonta, New York
rental $12.50; $195 purchase.
MOSAICS FOR ALL
A series of three filmstrips produced
at the Immaculate Heart College, Los
Angeles. This film shows easy and inexpensive means of mosaic making; creating richness through variety in tesserae
and cements; and new experiments with
melted bottle glass. Rental $6 per film-
cat, and snowman. For use in elementary
school art education. I I minutes; rental;
$60 purchase.
LET'S PLAY WITH CLAY: BOWLS
The film begins with rolling a piece of
clay between the hands to make a ball,
then shows how to form this into a variety
of useful shapes--a teacup, saucer, cream
pitcher, sugar bowl, and several decorative
bowls. For elementary school art education. II minutes; rental; $60 purchase.
•° ~ "
- :L~,
,
strip; $18 per set. In color.
THE POTTER
A University of Southern California
production featuring Otto Heino, famed
potter. This film is useful for art and craft
groups on the secondary, college and adult
levels. 13 minutes; in color; rental $6;
$100 purchase.
POTTERY MAKING
Your complete source of materia]~ &
Fully illustrated
# 6 INSTRUCTIVE C A T A L O G
equipment.
F R E E if requested on school letterhead
by staff, others 50c.
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Nearly 1,000 Illustrations of Items in our
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DEPT. CM
Ceramics M o n t h l y
SALEM, MASS.
A potter shows how a bowl is constructed by the ancient coil method. Use of a
plaster cast in the molding of duplicate
pieces is demonstrated, and a method for
making angular pottery shown. Various
techniques for applying glazes are treated.
I1 minutes; $3 re.ntal.
POTTERY ON THE GOLD COAST
A government training center set up at
Alajo to teach Africans methods developed
by potters in other countries is portrayed.
You see the complete techniques of pottery making from the raw clay to the
finished article. 9 minutes; $2 a day;
$40 purchase.
PUEBLO ARTS
In this film are many fine "shots" of
Maria of San Ildefonso, the well-known
Indian potter. I0 minutes; in color; rental
$4.50; $120 purchase.
Mosaic Sculpture by Joan Gabriel, [rum
the film, "Mosaic Experiments." International Film Bureau.
DR. KONRAD PROTHMANN
2787 Milburn Ave.
Baldwin, Long Island, N. Y.
AMERICAN DESIGNER-CRAFTSMEN
Color slides of objects in ceramics and
other crafts selected for the "DesignerCraftsmen U.S.A. 1953" exhibition include 17 examples of pottery, sculpture
and mosaics. Rental $6.60 ]or lull set;
$1.10 and $1.40 per slide purchase.
STORY OF PETER & THE POTTER
CERAMIC INTERNATIONAL EXHIBIT
The story of a young boy meeting a
family of clay craftsmen and watching
them carry out the various stages of
molding, shaping, painting, firing and
glazing a bowl. (Elementary and up.)
Sixty color slides made from prize winners, entries and installations of the First
International Exhibition of Ceramics at
Syracuse. Emphasis on work by leading
ceramists from the U. S., Canada, Hawaii
and the countries of Western Europe.
21 minutes; in color; rental $7.50; $190
purchase.
McGRAw-HILL BOOK COMPANY, INC.
Text-Film Department
330 W. 42nd St.
New York 36, N. Y.
LET'S PLAY WITH CLAY: ANIMALS
Only the hands are used to make such
simple forms as a bird, pig, rabbit, fish,
$7.50 rental [or 10 days; purchase $1.10
and $1.40 per slide. List on request.
CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CERAMICS
Color slides of prize winners and entries
from Ceramic National exhibitions (194652, 1954, 1956 and 1960) include ceramics, sculpture, enamel and glass. Slides
available in glass or ready mounts. Pur-
chase $t.10 attd $l.40 each slide.
the complete
SCHO OL
SUPPLY
HOUSE
ITINERARY
Send your show announcements early:
"Where to Show," three months ahead
o[ entry date; "Where to Go," at least
stx zveeks be[ore the opening.
WHERE TO SHOW
CALIFORNIA, SACRAMENTO
March 16-April 28 California Crafts
III, sponsored by the Creative Arts League
at the E. B. Crocker Art Gallery, is open
to California residents. All crafts media;
Jury; Awards. Entry card and fee due by
Feb. 16. Out of town work due Feb. 1623; deliveries by hand due Feb. 22-23. For
complete information and entry forms,
write: Creative Arts League, E. B. Crocker
Art Gallery, 216 "O" St., Sacramento 14.
FLORIDA, WINTER PARK
March 8-9 Fourth Annual Sidewalk
Arts Festival of Central Florida is open
to all artists and craftsmen who bring
their own exhibits and remain with them
during show hours. Exhibition space must
be reserved in advance. Entry fee; Jury;
Cash awards. No commission is deducted
on work sold. Information may be obtained by writing to the Sidewalk Arts
Festival, 333 North Park Ave., Winter
Park.
MICHIGAN, DETROIT
February I2-March 3 Michigan ArtistCraftsmen Exhibition is open to Michigan
residents. All crafts media; Jury; Cash
awards. Work due January 12. For information, write: Detroit Institute of Arts,
5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit 2.
NEw YORK, NEW YORK
February 15-March 7 Annual Juried
Show presented by the Society of ArtistCraftsmen of New York. The competition
is open to members only. In addition to
the competition and exhibition, there will
be demonstrations and gallery talks. At
the Cooper Union Museum. For information, contact Roxa Wright, Publicity Chairman, 330 Fort Lee Road, Leonia, N.J.
NEW YORK, PLATTSBURGH
April 16-May 7 "Jewelry International '63," second annual competition sponsored by the State University of New
York College, is open to craftsmen working
in all jewelry media. Jury; Awards; Entry
fee. Entry card and work due by March
31. Write: William Benson, Department
of Fine Arts, State University College,
Plattsburgh.
QUEBEC, MONTREAL
March "Canadian Ceramics of 1963"
is a national exhibition open to Canadian
ceramists. Regional jurying will be set up
and final jurying will be done in Montreal
in January. Prizes. The exhibit will be
shown in Toronto in May, 1963. Information and entry forms may be had by writing: Mrs. Helen Copeland, 574 St. Clement Ave., Toronto 12, Ontario.
TENNESSEEj MEMPHIS
May 4-31 Mississippi River Craft Show,
sponsored by the Memphis Branch, American Association of University Women,
will be held at Brooks Memorial Art
Gallery. Open to craftsmen residing in
states touching the Mississippi River.
Media: Ceramics, textiles, metals, enam-
els, glass, mosaics, wood, plastic
leather. Purchase prizes; Jury; Entry
Deadline for entry is April 1, 1963.
information, write: Brooks Memorial
Gallery, Overton Park, Memphis 12.
and
fee.
For
Art
/or all
SPECIAL FOR HOBBYISTS
.'N'EW YORK, BUFFALO
Annual Exhibit of the
January 2-18
New York State Ceramic Association will
include exhibits and demonstrations. At
the Erie County Bank.
OHIO, DAYTON
Fifth Annual Midwest CeApril 6-7
ramic Show, sponsored by the Midwest
Ceramic Association, will be held at
Wampler's Ball-Arena. For information,
write: Midwest Ceramic Show, P. O. Box
52, Station A, Dayton 3.
OREGON, PORTLAND
The Oregon Ceramic
March 15-17
Association Show will be held in Memorial
Coliseum. For information, write: Dorothy Seely, Box 15, Wilsonville, Ore.
RHODE ISLAND, CRANSTON
April 4-6 Second Annual Rhode Island
Ceramic Show will feature competitive
exhibits, demonstrations and lectures. For
information, write: John M. Carpenter,
Route 102, Victory Highway, Coventry,
R.I.
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DENVER 23, COLORADO
WHERE TO GO
ILLINOIS, CHICAGO
through February 10 Ceramics by Roy
O. Burke, at the Art Institute.
IOWA, IOWA CITY
through January 8 Invitational Ceramic Show, sponsored by the Department of
Art, includes the work of over 40 individual potters. At the University of Iowa
Department of Art.
MASSACHUSETTS, BOSTON
"Tutankhamun TreasFebruary 1-28
ures," Smithsonian Institution Traveling
Exhibition, at the Museum of Fine Arts.
MICHIGAN, MIDLAND
"Japan: Design
through February 15
Today," Smithsonian Institution Traveling
Exhibition, at the Midland Art Assn.
MISSOURI, KANSAS CITY
January 30-February 28 "Artlst-Craftsmen of Western Europe," circulated by
the American Federation of Arts, at the
William Rockhill Nelson Gallery of Art.
NEW YORK, BUFFALO
Annual Exhibition of
February 3-27
the work of the Ceramic Section of the
Science Museum features hand-buih ceramics and demonstrations. At the Science
Museum, Humboldt Park.
NEW YORK, NEW YORK
"Craftsmen of
through January 13
the Central States" at the Museum of
Contemporary Crafts.
NEw YORK, NEW YORK
Exhibition of the work
January 7-19
of five potters and sculptors, at Greenwich
House, 16 Jones St.
Continued on Page 36
Illustrated Instruction Book
"WORKING WITH GLASS". . . . . . . . S2.S0 Ppd.
10 Ppd.
CATALOG of Supplies. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TRIAL COLOR SET - - 8 Colors, Medias°
Rogers Inst. Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SS.S0 Ppd.
COLORS
GLASS
NARDCO
3002 Huldy, Houston 6, Texas
CREEK -TURN
GI.AZE S- MOLDS
Catalog $1.00
BE A DEALER
Rt. 38, HAINESPORT, N.J.
MOSAICS
COPPERENAMELING
~r Huge Stocks
Fast Service
9uality Merchandise
WrHe new for FREE IHerature
LLINI CERAMICSERVICE
"Quality Ceramic Supplies"
439 N. Wells, Chicago 10, IlL
Phone MI 2-3367
January 1963
35
NEW 1963 CATALOG!
m
,
Over 100 Pages of the Finest Quality
SETTINGS
JEWELRY
ITINERARY
M a n y new ideas to show you
How to Make Real Money
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE[
BIG DISCOUNTS!
Send S0c for your copy
NATIONAL ARTCRAFT SUPPLY CO.
12213 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio
JEAN LEONARD CERAMICS
96-24
Corona Ave.
Corona, L. 1., N. Y.
MAGIC GREENWARE RELEASE (8 oz.)..SI.2S
Save yourselt aggravation. Releases green.
ware in hall the time, will not stick.
KILN SURFACE BRICK HARDENER
(16 oz.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
S1.7S
Will harden and prolong the life of your
kiln. Stops the kiln brick from shedding and
flaking.
YORK, NEw YORK
opening January 18
"22nd Ceramic
National Exhibition," sponsored by the
Everson Museum, at the Museum of Contemporary Crafts.
NEw
"New Dimensions
in an Ancient Art," enamels in architecture by Edward and Thelma Winter,
at Suffolk Museum, Stony Brook, L. I.
NORTH
ramies and Posters," circulated by t h e
American Federation of Arts, at the ACEland Art Center.
AKRON
January 4-February 10
Exhibition of
the work of Mary Ellen McDermott, at
the Akron Art Institute.
OHIO,
)our clay. Eliminate drudgery...
save time for creative effort and
instruction. Designed and manufactured by the makers of the Walker
~._~ P,~:tor'- \~, ]!,'c]
et
CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILL
January 22-February 12 "Picasso: Ce-
OHIO,
r
YORK, STONY BROOK
through January 27
//...for
/ .choot
~gix
Continued from Page 35
NEw
/
MODELTE X
Moist
Clay
Red or white. For throwing on wheel, mold
making, delicate sculpture or largest pieces.
200 l b . . 0 7 / I b ; 300 l b . . 0 6 / i b ; 1000 lb..051/2/
Ib; 2000 l b . . 0 S / l b . F.O.B. Mamaroneck, N.Y.
Specify color when orderin ~.
GARE CERAMIC SUPPLlr CO.
165 ROSEMONT ST., HAVERHILL, MASS.
CLEVELAND
through January 13
"Tutankhamun
Treasures," Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition, at the Cleveland Museum
of Art.
OHIO,
YOUNGSTOWN
January 1-February 24
Fifteenth Annual Ceramic and Sculpture Show, at the
Butler Institute of American Art.
O K L A H O M A j NORMAN
January 4-25 "The Arts of Southern
California: XI - - Designer-Crafts," circulated by the Western Association of Art
Museums, at the University of Oklahoma.
Patronize CM Advertisers I
The Famous
KLOPFENS TEIN
POTTER'S WHEEL
RFD. # 2
NEW
Dept. A
Cresfiine, Ohio
MIDWEST
WAREHOUSE
Distributor of MAYCO COLORS - JACQUELYN
STAINS - HAEGER SLIP - BUTCHER CLAY and
CERAMIC SUPPLIES for hobbyist, dealer, schools,
institutions.
Central Ceramic Art Supply
Batavia Rd., East of Rt. S9 (just north of I~. 59
exit of EW Tollway), Warrenville, IlL
EXbrook 3 . 0 1 7 1
WHOLESALE-RETAIL
1962 REVISION
6 000
representing
35 c o m p a n i e s
IN ONE CATALOG . . . . . . . . . . . .
A real freight saver
New!
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MIDWEST CENTER
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722 Soutbwesl Blvd.
36
$1.00
Ceramics
Kansas City, Missouri
Ceramics Monthly
' L :
'
::
paid
, - , f:* t.. t
in
U. S. A.)
!',~,T;:tr~
]
1962
February 4-28 "Shaker Craftsmanship,"
Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition, at Wilson College.
GLAZES
Continued from Page 19
H. B. KLOPFENS TEIN & SONS
(post
50¢
50¢
50¢
PENNSLYVANIA j C H A M B E R S B U R G
CELADON
Write for FREE information
Mold
Catalog
Decal
Catalog
Supply
Catalog
depending on how it is used.
H. I. GLAZE (Cone 10)
Kingman Feldspar
1263 grams
Flint
816
Kaolin
300
Whiting
531
Red Iron Oxide
285
BROWN-BLA CK GLAZE
(Cone 10)
Kingman Feldspar
1647 grams
Whiting
620
Zinc Oxide
81
Kaolin
387
Flint
828
Red Iron Oxide
350
This glaze gives a shiny rich brownblack with iron blue in it on a heavy
application.
KC--NST GLAZE (Cone I0)
Feldspar
1839 grams
Whiting
225
Kaolin
147
Flint
744
Red Iron Oxide
300
T h e iron in this glaze crystallizes a n d
has "sparkles" in it. It is opaque a n d
of a rich iron red-brown color.
ILLUSTRA TED CATALOG
of Molds and Patterns. IncJudod at no oxtra
cost - - many pages of How-to-do-it Ideas.
Send $1.00 todeyl
BEE B A S C H D E S I G N S , I N C .
70 Pine & First Sts., Englewood, Fla.
-FRANCOI SE CERAMIC S-Distributor for
DUNCAN PRODUCTS - Delta Brushes
A.B.C. Glazes - Star Stilts
Atlantic - Holland - Arnel
and Ludwig Schmid Molds
Marc Belloire Brushes - Paragon Kilns
[
I
[
J
|
|
Art Books - Cloy - Slip • Greenware I
113 49th St., So.
St. petersburg 7, Florida |
Write for information and catalogue CM
Manufacturers, World's Most
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/~ ~ d d ~ / ~
ORegon 9.7474
KEMPERTOOLS
R e c o m m e n d e d and designed f o r
utility, quality, durability
CERAM-ACTIVITIES
KEMPER CLEAN-UP TOOL N.S. (for new style)
RETAIL PRICE 75c Each
people, places and things
TOLEDO POTTER EXHIBITS
Forty pieces of stoneware pottery by
Toledo artist Joe Ann. Cousino were exhibited at the Frank Ryan Gallery in Chicago in March. Pictured are three of the
decorative pieces included in the exhibit.
Cleveland.
The
workshop,
held
at
the
John Herron Art School and Museum,
also featured a talk by Mr. Bates on the
topic "Old Techniques and Problems--New
Techniques." This session was open to
the public and included the showing of
slides and examples of metal enameling.
Lois Culver Long is the president of the
Indiana group: Carl ]ensen is vice president.
CALIFORNIA GROUP ELECTS
KEMFER CLEAN-UP TOOL (OS|
RETAIL PRICE 85c Each
KEMPER TRIMMER KNIFE
RETAIL PRICE S0c Each
KEMPER LACE TOOL
RETAIL PRICE 75c Each
KEMPER ZiG-ZAG SAW . .Retail Price S0c ea.
New officers for Ceramic Hobbycra/t
Associates, Inc. were selected at a recent
meeting of this California group. The new
president is Doug Miles and lack Kemper
is the vice-president. Others include Esther
Greenstreet, recording secretary; Alberta
Gaskell, corresponding secretary; and
Mary Davis, treasurer. The board of directors is made up of Frank Baddetey, ]. ].
Cress, Alice Hill, Alvin Neal, Lois Porter
The two pieces on the left were coil-built;
the spouted pot on the right was wheel
thrown. Mrs. Cousino studied ceramics
under F. Carlton Ball and Harvey Littleton and has won more than 25 awards in
over 50 national shows. Her work has
been included in invitational exhibits at
Cincinnati, Akron, Canton, St. Louis and
the University of Michigan. She is currently the Ohio delegate to the American
Craftsmen's Council.
SEMINAR iN MIAMI
Write for FREE catalogue to:
The Badger Ceramic Association held
its sixth annual Ceramic Art Exposition
on Sept. 22-23 at the new War Memorial
Building, Milwaukee. Shirley Ackerman,
seereatary for the group, writes: " O u r exhibition was extremely successful, with
good hobby, children's and professional
competition. We had continuous technique
demonstration by Wisconsin ceramic artists." Pictured is the winning piece in the
KEMPER MANUFACTURINGCO.
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Norwest Novelty Co.
32480 Northwestern Highway
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Hours: 9 to S
OPEN SUNDAY
Closed Monday
Phone M A y f a i r 6 - 6 0 0 3
Patronize CM Advertisers
ANDERSON CERAMICS COMPANY
BURKE EXHIBIT IN CHICAGO
The Indiana Artist-Craftsmen group
sponsored a one-day enamel workshop in
December with Kenneth F. Bates, internatlonally-known artist and author from
TOOLS:
BADGER NEWS
nounced that it is sponsoring a seminar
by Hal Riegger on "Glazes and Glaze
Theory" from January 29 through February 8. The meetings will take place at the
studio of member Fran Williams. Work by
members of the League is featured in
Show Time in this issue of CM.
ENAMEL WORKSHOP HELD
KEMPER
Ask your dealer for these Kemper Toels.
and Anne Teel.
The Ceramic League o/ Miami has an-
Ceramics by Roy O. Burke are on display in the Decorative Arts galleries of the
Art Institute o/ Chicago. Burke, who is
an associate professor of art at Northern
Illinois University, received his ceramic
training at Ohio State, Florida State and
Al[red University. The current exhibit of
his stoneware includes both decorative and
functional pieces. "I like soft matte surfaces," he says, "but find that bright glazes
can be combined with these for purposes
of accent." Salt glazes have been used on
several of the larger pieces in the exhibit;
others feature heavy dark iron glazes. The
exhibit will be on display through February 10.
OTHER
Kempcr Finger Tool . . . . . Retail Price 75c ea.
Kcmpcr Incising Tool . . . . Retail Price 75c ea.
Kcmper Twin-Line Sgraffito Tool . . . . . . 7Sc ea.
Spring return plunger equipped flower cutters. various sizes and patterns. Flower tools
and other popular ceramic utility tools.
608 N. McDuffie St., Anderson, S.C.
Complete CeramicSupplies
Adult Hobby Division. It was made by
Mrs. Audrey Troller, Whitefish Bay, Wisc.
New officers for the Badger group were
chosen in a recent election. Robert Smith
is the new president and Sally Mann is
the vice-president. Other officers are
Shirley Ackerman, secretary; Rose Radke,
treasurer; and Lori Partl, historian.
Send $1.00 for our
and supply catalog.
Molds
and
new plctured
mold
Procelain
"The China Decorator"
RICHLAND SCHOOL WINNERS
The Columbia Museum o/ Art, Columbia, S. C., has announced that the list
of winners at the State Fair included
several students at its Richland Art School.
In the division of amateur ceramics,
awards went to Sally Berry, Connie Gibbs
and Myrtis Mungo. Betty Flinsch was a
winner in the youth ceramics division.
Molds
and
Procelain
407 E. Florence Ave.
Inglewood, Calif.
Continued on Page 38
/a~zualy 1963
37
AV-ED
Advertisers
FILMS
January 1963
m A bright new name in
Educational Pictures.
Fifty.one titles including films on Arts and
Crafts, Architecture, Sciences, Social Studies,
Driver Education and Americana.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE.
AV-ED
FILMS
7934 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif.
OLdfield 4-8197
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 37
NEW NCA OFFICERS
T h e new officers of the National Ceramic Association for 1 9 6 2 - - 1 9 6 3 are pict u r e d : ( S t a n d i n g , left to right) Olevia
Higgs of R e w a r d C e r a m i c Color Co.,
FOR S A L S A
going, live-in POTTERY SHOP in
proximity of New York area, on main route near
a Craft Center. Completely equipped with duplicate facilities for students. Large inventory of
clays and glazes. Complete potter's file of glaze
formulae and firing temperatures. Attractive
house, garage, salesrooms and storage barn.
For details write DONYA POTTERY, Brookfleld,
Connecticut.
MINNESOTA
CLAY
CO.
1832 E. 35 St., Minneapolis 7, Minn.
STONEWARE T H R O W I N G CLAY . . . . cane 5-10
RED T H R O W I N G CLAY . . . . . . . . . . . .
cone 06.04
SCULPTURE CLAY (red or white)..cane 06.10
CASTING CLAYS (red or w h i t e ) . . . c o n e 06.04
~
K~NGSPIN 11 .'| I ~ [ . ] I I
b i :IE
i d g l : l,"il Ir,_~ :t 11 ;11
MODEL T 12 $6.95
~ F ~ I L ~
A t2-inch wheel for the price of an S-
inch. Made of KINOLITE-Iotost sinktop
~1 material used in newest homes. Heavy Kinalloy
[e~
j ~
round base.Just the thing to use on those lace
~
dolls. SEEYOURDEALERORDISTRIBUTOR--ORWRITE
GILMOUR
CAMPBELL
14258 MALDEN
DETROIT 13, MICHIGAN
CRAFT
STUDENTS
LEAGU E
YWCA
840 8th Ave.
at S1st, N . Y .
Circle 6.3700
Applied Design, Bookbinding, Ceramics, Jewelry &
Enameling,
Lapidary,
Painting, Sculpture, Silk
Screen,
Siiversmithing,
Tapesh'y, Weaving, Wood
Sculpture, Woodworking.
Catalog C. Men & Wornen. Day, evening. Glass
Fusing Workshop Jan. 28
thru Feb. 6.
I WILL BUY HAND-THROWN POTTERY for my
retail stare. Need bowls, sets, cups, tea pots,
p ales, bottles, lamps, etc. I am a potter myself, selective and particular, and will not sell
anything but the best high.fired stoneware, pottery or porcelain. W e also sell paintings and
sculpture. Write or phone (Mondays - personta.person} or visit us. Send pictures if you wish,
but please do not send samples of your work.
Hal Maloney/THE STUDIO'S STORE/124 W . South
Street K A L A M A Z O O , M I C H I G A N / F I r e s i d e 3.4089
®@®
[]
OF
HAND
THE
MADE
MANY
TOOLS
TO CHOOSE FROM IN OUR CATALOG
Available at your Focal suppliers.
Write for our latest FREE catalog.
38
Ceramics Monthly
Index
S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r ; J. J. Darby of Paragon Industries, First Vice P r e s i d e n t ;
(Seated, left to right) Bee Basch of Bee
Basch Designs, Second Vice President;
a n d F. Gertrude Cakes of C a k e s C e r a m i c
Studio a n d Supplies, President. Executive
Secretary for the group is Leonard I.
Smith.
C A N A D I A N GALLERY OPENS
The Canadian Guild o/ Potters, in an
effort to help p r o m o t e pottery sales a n d
to introduce the public to some of the
better work being p r o d u c e d in C a n a d a ,
h a s p u t into operation its o w n shop-gallery
in Toronto. T h i s is the first of its kind
in C a n a d a . I n addition to p r o v i d i n g a n
outlet for sales, the gallery has space for
a series of o n e - m a n a n d group shows in
ceramics. T h e address of the shop is 100
A v e n u e Road. Mrs. Hele,n E. Duncan is
president of the sponsoring Guild.
SIDEWALK ARTS FESTIVAL
The Sidewalk Arts Festival Association
o[ Central Florida has a n n o u n c e d t h a t its
f o u r t h a n n u a l event will be held M a r c h
8-9 in W i n t e r Park. Details are given in
the I t i n e r a r y c o l u m n s of this issue. I n its
brief history, t h e Festival has grown phen o m i n a l l y in size a n d quality, according to
Charles Gerhardt, publicity director for
the g r o u p . I n the first Festival, 91 artists
a n d c r a f t s m e n participated. I n last year's
event there were 360, a n d it was estimated
t h a t 30,000 people viewed the exhibit
along p i c t u r e s q u e Park A v e n u e . Don Sill
is the president of the Festival Association.
Send news, and photos i[ available, about
"'People--Places--Things" you think will
be o[ ceramic interest. We will be happy
to co.nsider them [or use in this column.
A m e r i c a n Art Clay C o m p a n y . . . . . . . . .
4
A n d e r s o n Ceramics Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
A r t - C r a f t Supplies, I n c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
Av-Ed Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Basch, Bee, Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Bergen Arts & Crafts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
Buffalo C e r a m i c & A r t Supply C e n t e r . . 3 4
Campbell, G i l m o u r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Central Ceramic Art Supply ..........
36
C e r a m i c Expositions, Inc . . . . . . . . . .
6
Ceramichrome ................
11
C r a f t S t u d e n t s L e a g u e Y W C A . . . . . . . 38
Creek-Turn .....................
35
D o n y a Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
D o u b l e B Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
D r a k e n f e l d & Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
D u n c a n ' s C e r a m i c Products . . . . . . . . . .
6
Francoise Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
G a t e C e r a m i c S u p p l y Co . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Glass-art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
H o u s e of Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
Illini C e r a m i c Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
K e m p e r Mfg. Go . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Kinney, K a y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
Klopfenstein, H. B. & Sons
.......
36
L & L Mfg. Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cover 4
Leonard, J e a n , Ceramics . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Mayco Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
Midwest Ceramic Center ............
36
M i n n e s o t a Clay Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
Minx .............................
10
N a r d c o Glass Colors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
N a t i o n a l Artcraft S u p p l y Go . . . . . . . .
36
Norwest Novelty Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
O h i o C e r a m i c Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Orton Ceramic Foundation ...........
6
Pottery by Dot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
Reward ...........................
4
Sculpture House ....................
36
Seeley's C e r a m i c Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
S k u t t & Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cover 3
Studio's Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
38
T e p p i n g Studio S u p p l y Co . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
T h o m p s o n , T h o m a s G., Co . . . . . . . . . . .
9
T r i n i t y C e r a m i c Supply . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
V a n H o w e C e r a m i c Supply . . . . . . . . . . .
35
W a l k e r J a m a r Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Westwood C e r a m i c Supply . . . . . . . . . .
10
W i l l o u g h b y Molds a n d Porcelain . . . . . . 37
Back Issues
The [ollowing back issues o[ Ceramics
Monthly are still available at sixty cents
per copy (Ohio residents pay 3% sales
tax). We pay postage.
1953 J a n u a r y , M a r c h , July, A u g u s t , December
1954 M a r c h , July, August, D e c e m b e r
1955 A u g u s t , D e c e m b e r
1956 M a y , August, O c t o b e r
1957 April, May, J u n e , July, A u g u s t ,
September, D e c e m b e r
1958 April, May, J u n e , September, November
1959 N o v e m b e r
1960 J u n e , N o v e m b e r , D e c e m b e r
1961 J a n u a r y , February, M a r c h , April,
J u n e , October, N o v e m b e r , D e c e m b e r
1962 J a n u a r y (9-year I n d e x issue), February, April, M a y , J u n e , September.
October, N o v e m b e r , D e c e m b e r
Please send remittance (check or money
order), with list o] issues desired.
CERAMICS M O N T H L Y
4175 N. H i g h St.
C o l u m b u s 14, O h i o
Send the moving men home!
The sections of your Skutt Ceramic Kiln are
lightweight and easy to disassemble. This means
you can move )'our kiln fi'om one spot
to another in a jiffy'. The easy disassembly
makes maintenance a snap, too!
~
.~
J~,.~
0
Please write for more information.
CERAMIC
KILNS
•
2618
s. E.STEELE STREET
•
PORTLAND 2, OREGON
January 1963 39
UL A P P R O V E D
FOR Y O U R
PROTECTION
Ask your local Electric Company or Fire Insurance Company
about the importance of UL approval on any electric appliance.
Others claim that wire and switches are UL approved, but their kilns are not!
TOP
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...2
peep h o l e s . . , pilot l i g h t s . . , and they are
MODEL
designed w i t h your safety in mind.
A complete line of
bench and floor
models available.
"W
r
H-8800
HIGH TEMPERATURE
FURNACES
TO 3000 ° F
. . . using silicon carbide
heating elements.
oooo
MODEl.
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Price includes Pyrometer,
Input Control Switch, Gravity Door,
Pilot Light, and Patented Dyna-Glow
Porcelain Element Holders.
Attractive ... Plugs m anywherel
HOLDING
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Can A l s o Do C e r a m i c s !
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All steel welded case.., gravity door...
$~i~
Patented Dyna-Glow element holders... Plugs in
drm IIIF O0
anywhere.., attains enameling temperatures
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nOchamberCrati
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ngsize:
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L " 1"11
• Pyrometer available at $20.00 e x t r a
WRITE
MANUFACTURING
FOR
LITERATURE
COMPANY
CHESTER
DEALER
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11,
PA.
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