shooting drills
20_008_010 .qxd
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FIBA EUROPE
COACHES - FUNDAMENTALS AND YOUTH BASKETBALL
by Francis Denis
SHOOTING
DRILLS
After a twenty-year career as a player, Francis
Denis started coaching in 1975 with the
Abidjan (Ivory Coast), then with the Ivory Coast
National team, where he won the gold medal
at African Championship in 1985. In 1986 he
came back to France, coaching Grenoble for
two years. In 1991 he became coach of the
French Women's national team A, winning the
silver medal at the 1993 FIBA European
Championships. From 1997 to 2002 he coached
the French Women's Under 16 national team,
winning the bronze medal at the 1999 FIBA
European Championship and the gold medal at
the 2001 FIBA European Championship. He is
the current head coach of the French women's
Under 20 national team, which won the gold
medal at the 2005 FIBA European
Championship.
The preparation for a competition such as the
FIBA Youth European Championships requires
perfect organization and precise rules. The preparation was extended over a period of six
weeks before the beginning of the competition,
and was made up of different practice sessions,
followed by internal friendly games and exhibition games in different tournaments. The teams
played one game a day as a way to prepare for
the mental and physical challenge of the FIBA
European Championships.
We dedicated a good amount of time to individual skills improvement, with drills based on the
spot of the floor, the roles of the players and the
game strategies we decided to adopt. These drills, along with goals to achieve, were used as an
evaluation index both for the coach and for the
players. Described below are some of the many
examples of drills we used during the summer of
2004, before the FIBA European Championships
played in France, where our national team won a
silver medal. They were also used in the 2005
FIBA Under 18 European Championship, where
we won the gold medal.
DRILLS
LAY-UP DRILLS
Straight lay-up: 6 running lay-ups, 3 from the
right, 3 from the left side (diagr. 1).
Finish the drill with 10 free throws for each
player.
Reverse lay-up: The same move, but this time it
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must end with a reverse lay-up. It's necessary
to make sure the move is made by changing
hands (diagr. 2).
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
JUMP SHOT DRILLS
One count stop. If a passer is available, 8 jump
shots are taken at a 45° angle to the basket
after receiving the ball, 4 from the right, 4 from
the left side. If there is not a passer, jump shots
are made off the dribble. 8 jump shots off the
dribble are taken from inside the three-second
lane (diagr. 3). For this drill, the coach must take
care of these technical details:
▼ When finishing the dribble, the legs must be
flexed, lowering the center of gravity.
▼ The heels must first touch the floor to make a
good stop and help maintain body balance.
▼ The body must immediately spring up to
reach the ideal height needed to execute
the shot.
▼ The technical sequence must be repeated
with a good base and proper flow.
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
Change of direction and flare on a back pick. 8
shots, 4 from the right and 4 from the left side
(diagr. 4). Again, the coach must take care of
these technical details:
▼ When finishing the dribble, the legs must be
flexed, lowering the center of gravity.
▼ The heels must first touch the floor to
make a good stop and help maintain body
balance.
▼ The body must immediately spring up to
reach the ideal height needed to execute
the shot.
▼ The technical sequence must be repeated
with a good base and proper flow.
▼ For making a good stop on the left side, the
heel of the left foot touches the floor first,
followed by the heel of the right foot (the
sequence is reversed, when the player is
on the on the right side of the floor).
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
Change of pace. 16 shots, 4 from the right and 4
from the left side of the floor, for each of these
two different situations (diagr. 5):
▼ After a pass from inside to outside, the
player comes out on the short corner (preferable situation).
▼ After a pass from inside to outside, the
player comes out vertically, after using a
screen, faking the different defensive situations and making a curl or flaring out.
It would be preferable to change the order of
the shots and situations during this drill.
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
D.1
D.2
GUARDS AND FORWARDS
20 three-point shots (10 from the right and 10
from the left side), after coming out of horizontal and vertical stagger screens (with the chance to come out on the left or on the right side),
always paying attentions to foot position and
movement (diagr. 6).
▼ On the horizontal stagger screen (with the
exit on the right or on the left side of the
court): the player must make a two-count
stop.
▼ On the vertical stagger screen (with the exit
on the left or the right side of the court): the
player must make curl around the screen
and make a count stop.
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
For versatile guards and forwards to develop
post-up skills. 10 shots (5 from the right and 5
from the left side) in the following situations
(diagr. 7):
▼ After taking position in the low post (taking
and reading the physical contact);
▼ After going up to the high post (to play different situations);
▼ After a back-door cut in the low post (cutting along the baseline), an action that
begins with a teammate's drive to the
basket on the same side of the court (to
clear out an area of the court).
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
D.3
D.4
D.5
CENTERS
10 three-point shots (5 from the right side and
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FIBA EUROPE
COACHES - FUNDAMENTALS AND YOUTH BASKETBALL
5 from the left side), after the following situations (diagr. 8):
▼ A screen under the basket.
▼ Taking position in the low post.
▼ To shoot after a normal exit to the threepoint line, or after a fake, or after a fake
and dribble.
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
For versatile centers. 20 shots (10 from the
right and 10 from the left side), after the following situations (diagr. 9):
▼ After taking position in the low post (taking
and reading the physical contact).
▼ After going to the high post (to play different situations).
▼ After a back-door cut in the low post
(cutting along the baseline), an action
that begins with a teammate's drive to
the basket on the same side of the court
(to clear out an area of the court).
Finish the drill with 10 free-throws for each
player.
CONCLUSIONS
These drills can also be used with players
with different levels of skills. To obtain the
best results, it's better for a coach to check
out the execution of the technical moves,
insisting on technical corrections where it's
needed (one or two counts stops before
shooting, the right flow to shoot, etc.). The
coach should also evaluate the success of
every single drill. After completing all the drills, a player will have taken a total of 124 shots
(including 60 free-throws), but it's possible to
modify the quantity of shots for every practice, as well as changing the number of shots
from each spot on the court. With our national team, once the players learned the order
of the drills, the number of shots increased to
174, and then to 214. Considering the eventual
high shooting percentages of our players in
the championships, my advice is to increase
the number of shots in the practice sessions.
This is especially true for the inside players,
who must be particularly efficient for this part
of the game.
D.6
D.7
D.8
D.9
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