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DOCTOR FRANKLIN PERKINS SCHOOL
EDUCATION MANUAL
2015-2016
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INDEX OF CONTENTS:
INTRODUCTION
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School Mission Statement
Our Values
Our Philosophy
Goals and Objectives
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6
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ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
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Education Organizational Chart
Education/School Contact Numbers
Program Contacts and Numbers
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INSTRUCTION
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School Calendar
Doctor Franklin Perkins School Professional Standards for Teaching
Curriculum and Instruction
Collins School-wide Writing Program
School-wide Graphic Organizers/Templates/Rubrics
Role of Assistant Teacher
Differentiated Instruction
Blooms Taxonomy Sample Questions
Academic Instructional Resources
Lesson Plans and Curriculum Mapping
Academic Expectations for Student Learning
Social Skills, Communication, and Character Counts
Social Expectations for Students
Grading Structure
Grading Policy
Honor Roll
Academic Software “Doctor Franklin Perkins School Learning Lab”
Classroom Observations
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MCAS
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MCAS Calendar
MCAS Accommodations
MCAS Accommodations Master List
EPP Plan Template
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STUDENT REPORTING
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Student Report Cards
Student Profile Outline
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IEP Progress Reports and Meetings
Student Assessments
Treatment Conference Reports
Medical Review Reports
Attendance and Lunch sample
Daily Log correspondence
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COMMITTEES
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Curriculum Review Committee
Curriculum Cycle Review Council
Diversity Committee
History Council
Literacy Team Committee
Math Curriculum Council
Parents Advisory Council
Professional Development and Scheduling Committee
Science Curriculum Council
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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES (Student and Staff)
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Anti-Bullying Policy
Anti-Hazing Policy
Civil Rights and Grievance Policy
Student Anti-Bullying/Hazing and Grievance Form
Confidentiality Policy
Code 10 Emergency Procedure Student and Staff
Communicable Disease and Infection Control Student and Staff
Emergency Evacuation Routes
Emergency Power Program
Emergency Transportation
English Language Leaner and Braille Services
Fire/Evacuation –Drill Policy and Procedure
Runaway Procedure
Snow Emergency Van Ban Policy
Student Illnesses
Student Attendance Policy
Student Abuse or Neglect Reporting Policy and Procedure
Staff Attendance and Call Out Procedures
Technology Policy and Procedure Guide Staff
Technology Policy and Procedure Guide Student
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FORMS, LISTS, AND SAMPLES
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School Professional Standards for Teaching
Teacher Evaluation Form
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Collins School-wide Writing Program – Focused Correction Areas
School-wide Graphic Organizers/Templates/Rubrics
Academic Instructional Resource list
Curriculum Duplication format
Curriculum Mapping Points overview
Curriculum Map monthly format
Student Profile Outline
IEP Toolbox Checklist
IEP Note Sheet for Teachers
Residential Quarterly Treatment Conference Report format
Sample Treatment Conference Report
Medication Review format
Sample Attendance and Lunch format
School Sample of Email Etiquette
SCHOOL PROGRAM OF STUDIES
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Blue Section
Elementary and Middle School
High School
BESTT
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Yellow section
PERKINS EMPLOYEE PERSONNEL MANUAL
Green section
STUDENT INTERVENTION RESPONSE HANDBOOK
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INTRODUCTION
EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School is to provide our students with an enriched
learning experience that is student centered, collaborative and academically challenging. We
strive to unlock the potential of each individual by empowering students to advocate for their
own needs, and to take risks academically, socially and emotionally.
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DOCTOR FRANKLIN PERKINS SCHOOL
OUR VALUES
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To serve, enable and empower students, adolescents, and adults to lead productive and
rewarding lives and reach their fullest potential.
To promote activities and treatment models that support integration and inclusion and to
serve as a resource to the community at large.
To create and implement new and better modes of service and educational treatment for
students.
To provide services and outreach for families and students at risk.
To investigate emerging needs within our target populations and to engage in best
practices that will advance knowledge in the field and aid in the development of service
programs capable of meeting identified needs.
To sustain a stable, nurturing environment that promotes a sense of security and quality
of life for all students.
To recruit and retain highly qualified staff by encouraging professional growth, and to
provide an educational environment of respect and consideration, high standards,
integrity and openness for everyone involved with Doctor Franklin Perkins School.
To measure, evaluate and assure quality in all Doctor Franklin Perkins School programs.
OUR PHILOSOPHY
Doctor Franklin Perkins School approaches work with students and adolescents from a
philosophy of trauma informed care based on five core principles of: safety; trustworthiness;
choice; collaboration; and empowerment. Our belief in fostering a treatment environment based
on the principles of trauma-informed care as well as our aggressive organizational efforts to
eliminate restraint and time out and reinforce a treatment culture sensitive to the needs of our
students and students. Doctor Franklin Perkins School has a strong commitment to consistent
application of recognized evidence based practices that have demonstrated success in the areas of
social and emotional development, and academic instruction.
Our services are based on a developmental perspective that recognizes the importance of the
whole individual physically, socially, emotionally, and intellectually. Our developmental
approach supports a strength-based, age-referenced perspective in the development of character
and social competencies. In our work we seek to identify strengths, provide for missed
developmental experiences, and encourage students to develop values and beliefs that can act as
a “moral compass” to guide their behaviors and choices.
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Through our strength-based treatment approach we empower students, youth and their families
by building on personal strengths and resources. Our treatment model focuses on the
development of skills and competencies that promote:
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A sense of personal accomplishment
Contribute to healthy relationships with family members, peers, and adults
Enhance one’s ability to effectively deal with adversity and stress
Promote personal, social, and academic advancement
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
Educational, clinical, and students services seek to assist students in healing from past abuse,
neglect, and trauma, promote a sense of confidence and accomplishment, teach healthy problem
solving, and improve lagging skills in the areas of executive functioning, language processing,
emotion regulation, cognitive flexibility, and social skills. The goals of the education division are
as follows:
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Provide a school setting consistent with the principles of trauma informed care.
Improve reading, language, and math skills.
Provide speech and language evaluation and services as well as classroom consultation.
Conduct educational testing and assessment to determine academic skills.
When appropriate conduct neuropsychological testing to assess cognitive and
neurological functioning and the extent to which such disabilities may contribute to the
student’s current learning problems.
Using differentiated instruction methods, provide small group instruction at grade level in
the content areas of English, reading, writing, language, math, science, and history.
Provide school to career programs for grades 9-12.
Insure that curriculum areas required by local public school committees are addressed
and documented on transcripts in order for students to obtain credit upon returning to
public school.
Produce quarterly report cards to document student progress.
Provide preparation and accommodation for MCAS testing; evaluate test results in order
to provide additional tutoring to assist specific students.
Utilize collaborative problem solving model to develop plans that assist the student in
developing better self-regulation.
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ORGANIZATION CHARTS
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EDUCATION DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHART
INSERT
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SCHOOL CONTACTS
Director of Education –
Administrative Assistant – Tracy Tallman
Assistant Director – Sharon Lowry
IEP Coordinator – Deb Stephenson
IEP Coordinator IEP Administrative Assistant – TBD
Director of Career Development and OT –
Lisa Beneche
Director of Curriculum & Instruction –
Cindy Wing
Speech – Colleen McNaught
Speech – Kendra Johnson
Speech – Alison Eichmann
Speech – Jennifer Erickson
OT- Rosanna Casavecchia
OT – Denise Lynch
Teachers
Amanda Mungo (2-3)
Erin Anderson (4)
Kimberly Lewis (4-5)
Colleen Leary (5)
Liz Tambling (6)
Tammy O’Connor (6)
Jen How (7)
Kaitlin Krupski (8)
Sylvia Andersen (8)
Michelle Archibald (8)
Dan Eppel – Health/Fitness/Pool
Kim Nadeau (9)
Rick Cande (9)
Michelle Sparkes (9/10 BESTT)
Nancy Johnson (10)
Ryan Haimila (10)
Sara Christiansen (11)
Terri Crowley (11)
Tanya Gurge (11/12 BESTT)
Phil Borghi (11)
Erin Baron (12)
Stacey Gaudet - Art
Scott Calhoun - Computers
Dylan Boucher - History
Dawn Whynot – Math
Wendy Rock – Math
Bill Carrier – Music
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978-368-6419
978-368-6418
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TBD – Reading
Katie Antalek – Literacy Specialist
Bonnie Walker – Science
Joe Mahoney – BESTT
Jessica Marois - BESTT
978-368-4905
978-368-6517
978-368-3814
978-368-6548
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Assistant Director – Sharon Lowry
Administrative Assistant – Colleen Sharland
Clinical Nurse Specialist – TBD
Nurses
Ellen Serafin
Tiffany Abrams
Director of Student Services – Jessica Roy
Supervisors –
Paul Doucette
Melissa Largey
Clinical Coordinator – Amy Melanson
Clinical Coordinator – Bridget Matte
Clinicians and Case Managers
Erin Chetwynd
Kara Nelson
Joel Ferat
Jill Randall
Kara Dembowski
Alisha Vargo-Wood
978-368-6533
978-365-4715
978-368-6556
978-368-6521
978-368-4836
978-368-6550
978-368-4822
978-368-6592
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RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS
Assistant Executive Director for Programs
– Tim Hammond
Clinical Director – Terri Philbrick
Director of Health Care – Meg MacDonald
Psychiatrist – Will Pilette M.D.
CURTIS and DUPLEX
Program Director – Joe Mantha
Curtis Program Coordinator – Amanda Saunders
Duplex Program Coordinator – Stephanie Bailey
Program Nurse – Carol Demchak
Curtis Day Staff:
Maria Burdekin (Assistant Supervisor)
Curtis Evening Staff:
Kale Palmer (Supervisor)
Koffi LaPierre (Assistant Supervisor)
Duplex Day Staff:
Ashley McKinnon (Supervisor)
Duplex Evening Staff:
Kaiya Herbert (Supervisor)
Brittany White (Back up Supervisor)
MANOR and PAPPAS
Program Director – Karyn Breton
Program Coordinator – Blayne Murray
Program Nurse – Sue Lasky
Day Staff:
Emily Lupien (Supervisor)
Evening Staff:
Adam Thibault (Supervisor)
Jessica Simpson (Supervisor)
Nick Novello (Supervisor)
WHITE HALL
Program Director – Tim O’Day
Program Coordinator – Joe Howell
Program Nurse –
Day Staff:
Steve Booth (Supervisor)
Evening Staff:
Will St. Hilaire (Supervisor)
Kyle Berk (Supervisor)
978-368-6545
978-368-6496
978-368-6438
978-368-6480
978-368- 4900
978-368- 4823
978-368-6535
978-368- 6534
978-368- 6518
Curtis 978-368-6551
Duplex 978-368- 6535
978-368- 6430
978-368- 6549
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978-368-6424/6430
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INSTRUCTION
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School calendar
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DOCTOR FRANKLIN PERKINS SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS
FOR TEACHING
In accordance with our states protocol for professional standards outlined for all teachers, we
measure academic preparation and quality in accordance with 603 CMR 7.08 regulations for
educator licensure:
A. Plans Curriculum and Instruction
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
C. Manages Classroom Climate and Operations
D. Promotes Equity and an Appreciation of Diversity
E. Meets Professional Responsibilities
All lessons are aligned to the above teaching standards to insure student learning is at an optimal
level of excellence. (See Doctor Franklin Perkins School Professional Standards for Teaching
outline in the Forms Section)
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
Our academic program is in operation 12 months a year. The curriculum for grades K-12 is
aligned with the Common Core. Academic instruction integrates technology, diverse curriculum,
and differentiated instruction. Student centered goals and objectives are based on each student’s
individual ability and learning style. Accommodations are implemented in individual, small
group, and full class instruction.
Academic instruction is valued and teachers are expected to offer well-designed lessons that
encourage student curiosity and exploration. As such teachers are required to:
 Provide instruction that is student centered and sensitive to the diversity of student learning
styles.
 Utilize a variety of support services to accommodate the needs of the students.
 Prepare and carry out all lesson plans that ensure lessons and content align with the
frameworks. Our focus, school wide, for curriculum preparation is based on the
understanding by Design format which focuses on identified goals for learning, determining
the acceptable evidence towards stated goals, and creating a plan for learning experiences
through instruction and activities.
 Regularly submit curriculum maps to the Director of Education for review.
 Attend bi-weekly staff meetings to discuss their lesson plans, students learning styles and
challenges, and ideas for future lessons.
COLLINS SCHOOL-WIDE WRITING PROGRAM
Through the support of the Literacy Committee, a formal writing program is utilized school
wide. The Collins Writing Program is a nationally known program that is based on a
fundamental process that promotes students success in developing comprehensive writing skills
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in a step-by-step process. The Collins Writing Program is designed to improve students' thinking
and writing skills simultaneously. It is based on three essential principles:
1. Thinking and writing skills develop with frequent, meaningful practice.
2. Most students develop writing and thinking skills incrementally through a variety of
informal and formal writing experiences.
3. Each of the Five Types of Writing serves a distinct instructional purpose that is easily
adapted to student needs and differences between subject areas.
The program provides a unified K−12 program that can be used in all classrooms and in all
subject areas. The Collins Writing Program offers students the Five Types of Writing assignment
which develops essential writing and thinking skills in the context of their everyday classroom
learning. The Five Types of Writing framework can be used strategically with all kinds of
writing experiences, which includes:
 informal and routine, or more formal
 short or long
 research-based or experienced-based
 critical or creative
 informative, argumentative, or narrative
Focused Correction Areas are developed school wide to promote a step-by-step process to
support skill building. School-wide FCA is outlined in the “FORMS, LISTS AND SAMPLES”
section of this handbook.
SCHOOL-WIDE GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS, TEMPLATES, and RUBRICS
The Literacy and Math Committees created, through the input of all teachers and teaching
assistants, school-wide graphic organizers and templates to support student’s ability to successful
maneuver from grade to grade with consistency in form format. The following forms were
completed and disseminated school wide: Cause and Effect; Compare and Contrast; Expository;
Keys to Literacy Top-Down Web; Keys to Literacy Two-Column Notes, Math Problem with
Axis; Math Problem without Axis; Narrative; Open Response Note Plan; Persuasive; Sentence
Organizer, Story Sequencing; Assignment Organizer/Rubric; and, Writing Organizer/Rubric.
(See Sample of each in Forms Section)
ROLE OF ASSISTANT TEACHERS IN THE CLASSROOM
As part of the academic team, assistant teachers play a critical role in delivering instruction in the
classroom. In their work with students they provide the following supports and services:
 Assist students in the areas of self and social awareness, interpersonal skills, and responsible
decision making skills.
 Provide support and encouragement for academic engagement.
 Encourage students to interact during group activities.
 Assist students in developing positive behaviors and skills that promote study habits and
engagement in class instruction.
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As a partner with teachers, teacher aides provide the following:
 Support the delivery of individual and small group instruction.
 Assistance in implementing the daily classroom schedule.
 Individual attention to students who require additional help in completing assignments
DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION
Differentiated Instruction provides varied avenues or pathways for students to acquire content,
to develop ideas through activities, and to develop long-term products and project
assignments. Differentiated Instruction focuses on student differences and use of “best practices”
for student achievement and learning. The intent of differentiated instruction is to maximize
student learning by offering varied opportunities for acquiring knowledge and mastery in each
subject area. In a differentiated classroom, commonalities and differences are acknowledged and
built upon; student strengths are key elements considered when preparing teaching and learning
strategies. The teacher in a differentiated classroom plans proactively in response to student
differences in readiness, interest, and learning needs or profiles. The format of “Understanding
by Design” complements and enhances the concepts of differentiating lessons within the
classroom.
BLOOM’S TAXONOMY: Using Questions to Expand Learning
Teachers tend to ask questions in the knowledge category 80-90% of the time. These questions
are not bad but they are not always “higher level” questions which ask the student to use more
brain-power to provide more elaborate answers. Students need to be provided with every
opportunity to increase their level of evaluation and synthesis of information versus reiterating
information. By providing these opportunities students gain the capacity to think, analyze, and
solve on their own. Below are six components of Bloom’s Taxonomy, each striving to reach a
higher level of brain power:
Knowledge
 Remembering
 Memorizing
 Recognizing
 Recalling (identification and information)
 The who, what when, where, how…?
Comprehension
 Interpreting
 Translating from one medium to another
 Describing in one’s own words
 Organization and selection of facts and ideas
 The “re-telling” of the information
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Application
 Problem solving
 Applying information to produce some result
 Use of facts, rules, principles
 The: “How is … an example of …?”
“How is … an related to …?”
“Why is … significant?”
Analysis
 Subdividing something to show how it is put together
 Finding the underlying structure of a communication
 Identifying motives
 Separation of a whole into component parts
 The: “What are the parts or features of …?”
“Classify … according to …”
“Outline/diagram …”
“How does … compare/contrast with …?”
“What evidence can you list for …?”
Synthesis
 Creating a unique, original product that may be in verbal form or may be a physical
object
 Combination of ideas to form a new whole
 The: “What would you predict/infer from …?”
“What ideas can you add to …?”
“How would you create/design a new …?”
“What might happen if you combined …?”
“What solutions would you suggest for …?”
Evaluation
 Making value decisions about issues
 Resolving controversies or differences of opinion
 Development of opinions, judgments, or decisions
 The: “Do you agree…?”
“What do you think about …?”
“What is the most important …?”
“Place the following in order of priority …”
“How would you decide about …?”
“What criteria would you use to assess …?”
ACADEMIC INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES
As a resource and starting point for teachers, this list of available texts for each grade level and
subject area has been developed. Teachers utilize these texts and expand with many other
resources and tools to develop differentiated lessons for student growth and development. (See
Academic Instructional Resource list in the Forms Section)
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LESSON PLANS AND CURRICULUM MAPPING
Teachers map out their academic studies in a monthly format providing key points of instruction
to include: unit name or theme; MCF standards; essential questions for student engagement,
materials or tools incorporated, differentiated strategies, assessment products; and a reflection of
students ability to grasp as well as teacher reflection of unit. Daily activities are maintained on
the individual teacher’s daily planner. Lesson plans/Curriculum Maps are due to supervisors
prior to the beginning of each monthly unit and are discussed during all supervision meetings.
(See sample Curriculum Map form and Mapping Points in the Forms Section)
ACADEMIC EXPECTATONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING
All students will explore and experience opportunities to:
 Read, write and communicate effectively
 Acquire, incorporate and apply fundamental knowledge
 Study and work successfully
 Describe, evaluate and solve complex problems
SOCIAL SKILLS, COMMUNICATION, AND CHARACTER COUNTS
Emotional Competence is the ability to take one’s own knowledge and skills in the area of
emotions and apply it to their relationships with others. It is the ability to negotiate one’s way
through interpersonal exchanges and regulate emotional experiences.
Defining Emotional Competence
 Awareness of one’s emotional state and experiencing multiple emotions.
 Ability to discern others’ emotions based on situation and expressive cues; understanding
what may be causing the emotions.
 Capacity for empathetic and sympathetic responses to others emotional experiences.
 Ability to realize that an inner emotional state may not correspond to what we portray on the
outside. An understanding that one’s emotional expression may impact another and take this
into account to makes emotions.
 Capacity to deal with aversive or distressing emotions through the use of healthy coping
mechanisms. Awareness that the quality of the communication of emotions defines the level
of a relationship.
 Capacity for emotional efficacy- the individual views him/herself as feeling overall the way
they want to feel.
Social Skill Instruction
Social skill instruction, through the Character Counts Program, teaches students appropriate
interpersonal communication skills, self-discipline, and problem solving strategies. It combines
a number of tactics that look to replace problem behaviors with better social skills. Many of the
students we work with have significantly impaired social skills.
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Social skills training is important because it provides students with the opportunity to learn and
build upon previously learned skills.
Improving Student Social Skills
 Implement Character Counts program within the classroom to establish a positive learning
environment for students and teachers.
 Integrate Character Counts curriculum as a social skills training opportunity into all aspects
of daily classroom instruction. Take advantage of all informal teaching opportunities to teach
social skills.
 Social skill competence should be judged on the degree to which the student can demonstrate
the skill consistently; the degree to which the new skill allows better interpersonal connection
with others; and the degree to which the skill enhances effective problem solving.
SOCIAL EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENTS
All students will experience and develop strategies to:
 Be respectful to self and others.
 Understand and appreciate the uniqueness of different cultures, values, beliefs and opinions.
 Understand the importance of ones role in creating a mutually beneficial and supportive
member in society.
 Cultivate and continually develop positive peer interactions that support a community of
minimal conflicts and mutual collaboration towards success.
GRADING STRUCTURE
Teachers are responsible for documenting student progress throughout each quarter. If a student
is having difficulty with a specific subject area, the teacher will inform the parent/guardian and
discuss the situation with the school supervisor. Teachers are expected to communicate with
parents/guardians by midterm if the student is in danger of failing a subject. Parents and teachers
are encouraged to schedule conferences to discuss academic concerns.
There are five marking periods throughout the academic school year. Report cards are mailed to
the parent/guardian and to the sending school district. A letter grade system is used for recording
student progress.
Letter Grade
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
% Value
100-97
96-93
92-90
89-87
86-83
82-80
79-77
76-73
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CD+
D
DF
70-72
69-67
66-63
62-60
Failing
GRADING POLICY
Students are expected to attend all classes on a regular basis and be engaged in all coursework.
Teachers are expected to provide students with written, constructive feedback for all assignments
and assessments within one week of when the assignment or assessment was given.
The following breakdown will show how course grades will be calculated:
Tests, Quizzes, and Projects
Classroom Participation*
Homework
50%
40%
10%
*If students are absent from class for therapeutic services, the Classroom Participation grade
will not be impacted. If students are absent from school for an extended period of time for
excused medical reasons, tutoring will be arranged and Classroom Participation grades will not
be impacted. All efforts will be made by clinicians and therapists to avoid student removals from
core academic subject periods.
HONOR ROLL
Each term, students earning an A- (90 to 92) or above and full credit in all of their classes, and
who have a full-time schedule, earn the distinction of “High Honors.” Students earning a B (83
to 86) and above in all of their classes and meet the other criteria earn “Honors.” Honor and high
honor roll students will be recognized each quarter.
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ACADEMIC INTERVENTION AND “DOCTOR FRANKLIN PERKINS
SCHOOL LEARNING LAB”
Academic Intervention incorporates 30-minute blocks at the end of each day and are considered
time-on learning blocks to support student learning. This class time is individualized for each
student and incorporates various educational supports and assessments specific to his or her
needs. Students will receive individualized instruction in organizational skills, literacy or math
skills development, and/or science. These blocks are also devoted to benchmarking for tracking
student progress in reading literacy as needed.
Students in specific grades are scheduled in the “Doctor Franklin Perkins School Computer
Learning Lab” for at least one block each week. The Learning Lab for grades one through eight
is located downstairs in the Hermann building. Grades nine through twelve are scheduled as
needed in the computer room located in Janeway. The software programs include: Symphony
Math, which is devoted to enhancing students’ ability to understand math concepts; Lexia, which
supports students’ increased phonics, decoding, word attack strategies, and application skills;
Read Naturally, which is a reading program specifically focused on comprehension and fluency;
and Kidspiration/Inspiration, which is focused on providing students with a strong foundation in
creating graphic organizers and mind maps. These programs are also available on each student
computer in each classroom school wide.
CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS
Classroom observations are used for the purpose of sharing and developing teaching techniques
amongst all teaching staff. Points of observation include:
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








Positive learning environment reflecting mutual respect
Communication of learning goals, benchmarks, Framework Standards,
and essential questions
Connecting concepts to student’s prior knowledge
Differentiated instruction and material usage
Use of technology throughout lesson
Use of class discussions for enhanced learning and assessment
Productive time on task for learning
Positive student feedback
Appropriate and varied use of assessment tools
Student support and engagement
Staff’s (teacher and teaching assistant) positive engagement with students
Upon completion of observations, discussions are held to communicate valuable and constructive
feedback with teachers. Teachers are formally observed bi-annually as part of the evaluation
process. Informal observations are carried out regularly throughout the school year to provide
constant feedback to teachers.
23
MCAS
24
2015–2016 Statewide Testing Schedule
MCAS
March 2016 MCAS ELA and Mathematics Retests
Date/Time
1
November 2015 MCAS ELA and Mathematics Retests
Test Administration
ELA Composition Sessions A and B
November 4
ELA Reading Comprehension Sessions 1 and 2
November 5
ELA Reading Comprehension Session 3
November 6
Mathematics Session 1
November 9
Mathematics Session 2
November 10
Last date for make-up testing
November 132
February 2016 MCAS High School Biology Test
Test Administration
Test Administration
Biology Session 1
February 1
Biology Session 2
February 2
Last date for make-up testing
February 44
ELA Composition Sessions A and B
February 29
ELA Reading Comprehension Sessions 1 and 2
March 1
ELA Reading Comprehension Session 3
March 2
Mathematics Session 1
March 3
Mathematics Session 2
March 4
Last date for make-up testing
March 76
March–April 2016 MCAS Tests (Grades 3–8 and 10 English Language Arts)
Test Administration
ELA Composition Sessions A and B
(grades 4, 7, and 10 only)
March 22
ELA Composition Make-Up Sessions A and B
(grades 4, 7, and 10 only)
March 31
ELA Reading Comprehension test sessions
March 21–April 5 (grades 3, 5, 6, 8)
March 23–April 5 (grades 4 and 7)
ELA Reading Comprehension Sessions 1 and 2
March 23 (grade 10)
ELA Reading Comprehension Session 3
March 24 (grade 10)
Last date for make-up testing
April 58
May 2016 MCAS Tests (Grades 3–8 Mathematics and Science and Technology/Engineering)
Test Administration
Mathematics test sessions
May 9–24
Science and Technology/Engineering (STE) test sessions
May 10–24 (grades 5 and 8)
Last date for make-up testing
May 249
May 2016 MCAS Tests (Grade 10 Mathematics)
Test Administration
Mathematics Session 1
May 1711
Mathematics Session 2
May 1811
Last day for make-up testing
May 2412
June 2016 High School STE MCAS Tests
Test Administration
STE Session 1
(Biology, Chemistry, Introductory Physics, Technology/Engineering)
June 1
STE Session 2
June 2
Last day for make-up testing
June 613
25
MCAS ACCOMMODATIONS
All students, including students with disabilities, are required to participate in MCAS tests
scheduled for their grade. Students with significant disabilities who are unable to take the
standard MCAS tests, even with accommodations, must take the MCAS Alternate Assessment
(MCAS-Alt).
ELIGIBLE: Students with disabilities served by an IEP or 504 plan
The rights of a student with a disability to receive accommodations on MCAS and MEPA tests
are protected by both federal and state laws. The student’s IEP or 504 plan must specify
precisely which test accommodation(s) he or she will receive. In cases where an IEP is under
development, the IEP team, including the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s), must have met and
agreed upon which MCAS accommodations are necessary before a student may be provided the
accommodations.
The use of accommodations is based on the individual needs of a student with a disability and
may only be provided when all of the following conditions have been met:
1)
The student has a documented disability (non-disabled students may not use test
accommodations) that is documented in an IEP or 504 plan.
AND
2)
The student uses the accommodation routinely during classroom instruction and
assessment in the subject, both before and after the test is administered (with rare
exceptions).
AND
3) The student requires the accommodation in order to participate in statewide testing.
AND
4)
The accommodation is listed in parts I or J of this section (or, prior to testing, the
district has consulted with the Department and received permission to use an
accommodation not included in this document).
AND
10 If a nonstandard accommodation will be provided, the student meets all of the
eligibility criteria for that accommodation listed in Part J of this section.
26
INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Standard Test Accommodations for MCAS Tests
Following is a list of standard test accommodations commonly used by students with disabilities on MCAS tests:
Changes in timing or scheduling of the test:
(1) Frequent Breaks: The test is administered in short periods with frequent breaks.
(2) Time of Day: The test is administered at a time of day that takes into account the student’s
medical or learning needs (IEP or 504 plan must specify time of day).
Changes in test setting:
(3) Small Group: The test is administered in a small group setting (no more than 10 students). Note:
If students will also receive the accommodation of having the test read aloud or signed, no more
than 5 students may be in the small group.
(4) Separate Setting: The test is administered in a room other than the one used by the rest of the class.
(5) Individual: The test is administered to the student individually.
(6) Specified Area: The test is administered with the student seated at the front or other specified area of the
room, in a study carrel, or in another other enclosed area (IEP or 504 plan must specify location).
Changes in test presentation:
(7) Familiar Test Administrator: The test is administered by a test administrator familiar to the
student.
(8) Noise Buffers: The student wears noise buffers, after test administration instructions have been
read (music may not be played on headphones worn during MCAS testing).
(9) Magnification or Overlays: The student uses magnifying equipment, enlargement devices,
colored visual overlays, or specially tinted lenses (IEP or 504 plan must specify which).
(10) Test Directions: The test administrator clarifies general administration instructions. No
portion of the test items or reading selections (including the introduction to reading selections)
may be read or signed.
(11) Large Print: The student uses a large-print (18-point font) edition of the test. All answers must be
transcribed verbatim from the large-print answer booklet to the student's standard answer booklet.
(12) Braille: The student uses a Braille edition of the test. All answers must be either scribed or
transcribed verbatim into the student's answer booklet, unless the student also has accommodation
23 (typed response) in his or her IEP.
Note: Under secure conditions and supervised, the Braille test administrator may review Braille
test materials up to four days prior to test administration. Test materials may not be removed from
the school.
27
(13) Place Marker: The student uses a place marker.
(14) Track Test Items: The test administrator assists the student in tracking test items (e.g., moving
from one test question to the next) or by redirecting the student’s attention to the test.
(15) Amplification: The student uses sound amplification equipment.
(16) Test Administrator Reads Test Aloud (except ELA Reading Comprehension test, which is
nonstandard accommodation 26): The test administrator reads the ELA Composition, Mathematics,
and/or Science and Technology/Engineering test(s) aloud to the student.

Test session(s) must be read word-for-word, exactly as written. The test administrator may
not provide assistance to the student regarding the meanings of words, intent of any test item,
or responses to test items. The test administrator must read in a neutral tone, with no
emphasis given to any terms, passages, or response options, and with no detectable changes
in inflection. The test can be read aloud in one of the following ways, which must be
specified in the IEP or 504 plan:
o
o
Test administrator reads entire test session word-for-word exactly as written.
OR
Test administrator reads selected words, phrases, and/or sentences as directed by the
student. The student points to the word, phrase, or sentence that he or she needs read
aloud.

Test must be administered in a separate setting (accommodation 4), either individually
(accommodation 5) or to a small group (2–5 students) (accommodation 3). For reading
aloud to a small group, follow the procedures outlined in Appendix A of this document.

No portion of the ELA Reading Comprehension test may be read aloud unless accommodation
26 is listed in the student’s IEP.
(17) Test Administrator Signs Test (except ELA Reading Comprehension test, which is nonstandard
accommodation 27): The test administrator signs the ELA Composition, Mathematics, and/or
Science and Technology/Engineering test(s) to the student who is deaf or hard of hearing.

Test sessions(s) must be signed exactly as written, except in cases when doing so would reveal an
answer to a test question. When use of a sign would visually define the concept being tested (e.g.,
using the sign for parallel lines that demonstrates this concept visually), the term or concept must
be finger-spelled. Interpreters may not provide assistance to the student regarding the meanings of
words, intent of any test question, or responses to test items.

The test must be administered in a separate setting (accommodation 4), either individually
(accommodation 5) or to a small group (2-5 students) (accommodation 3). For signing the test
to a small group, follow the procedures outlined in the appendix.
Notes:
 Under secure conditions that are supervised, sign interpreters may review test materials up to four
days prior to test administration. Test materials may not be removed from the school.

American Sign Language DVDs of the grade 10 Mathematics test are available.
28
Changes in how the student responds to test questions:
(18) Electronic Text Reader (except ELA Reading Comprehension test, which is
nonstandard accommodation 28): The student uses an electronic text reader for
the ELA Composition, Mathematics, and/or Science and Technology/Engineering
test(s).
All MCAS tests are available on a CD in the Kurzweil 3000 format. Responses to all
test questions must be submitted in the student’s standard answer booklet for students
using this accommodation.
(19) Scribe Test or Use Speech-to-Text Conversion Device (except ELA Composition,
which is nonstandard accommodation 29): The student dictates or signs responses to a
scribe or uses a speech-to-text conversion device to record responses.
Special Instructions
 The test must be administered individually (accommodation 5) in a separate setting
(accommodation 4).

The scribe must record the student's words exactly as dictated into the student’s answer
booklet and may not edit or alter the student’s responses in any way.

The scribe must allow the student to review and edit what has been scribed.

When a student uses an electronic speech-to-text conversion device, the test administrator must
follow the instructions for submitting typed responses described in the Principal’s
Administration Manual.

Scribes must handwrite student responses.
(20) Organizer, Checklist, Reference Sheet, or Abacus: The student uses a graphic organizer or
checklist to answer open-response items or to respond to a writing prompt; an individualized
mathematics reference sheet; or an abacus on the Mathematics tests.
(21) Student Signs or Reads Test Aloud: The student may
 read the test aloud to him- or herself;
 read the test and record answers on an audio recording device and then write responses to test
items while playing back the recorded segment(s) (including the ELA Composition);
 type responses and then use text-to-speech software to play back and review the typed
responses (student must also have accommodation 23 on his or her IEP or 504 plan); or
 sign test items/responses onto video and then write answers while playing back the video (for
a student who is deaf or hard of hearing).
Notes:



The test must be administered individually (accommodation 5) in a separate setting
(accommodation 4).
All video and audio CDs, DVDs, and tapes must be returned with other nonscorable
materials. No copies may be retained.
Text-to-speech software may not be used to listen to test items or passages.
29
(22) Monitor Placement of Responses: The test administrator monitors placement of student responses in
the student’s answer booklet.
(23) Typed Responses: The student uses a word processing program or an Alpha-Smart (or similar
electronic keyboard) to type the ELA Composition, answers to open-response questions, or
answers to short-answer questions on any MCAS test.
Notes:
 The test administrator is responsible for ensuring that a student using this accommodation
does not access the Internet or other files on the computer during testing.
 When typing responses to any MCAS test, students may only use the spell- or grammarchecking functions if they have nonstandard accommodation 31 listed in their IEP or 504
plan. Test administrators are responsible for ensuring that students do not use spell- or
grammar-checking functions except in cases where the student receives accommodation 31.
 The test administrator must follow the instructions for submitting typed responses described
in the Test Administrator’s Manual and the Principal’s Administration Manual.
(24) Answers Recorded in Test Booklet: The student records answers directly in the test booklet or
uses special paper for drafts or computation (e.g., lined or graph paper).
Note: Student responses must be transcribed verbatim into the student’s standard answer booklet.
If the student transcribes his or her own responses, the transcription must be done during the test
session and completed on the day in which the test session begins.
(25) Other Standard Accommodation: The student uses another accommodation during routine
instruction that the IEP or 504 team identifies as being necessary for the student to participate in
MCAS tests.
The accommodation must meet the criteria described in the General Requirements for Use of Test
Accommodations in section C of this chapter. The principal or designee must request written permission
from the Department at least two weeks prior to test administration in order to provide a standard
accommodation not on the preceding list to a student during MCAS testing. The student’s IEP or 504 plan
team must reconvene in order to document any changes to accommodations listed in the plan, and if the
student is on an IEP, the plan must be signed by the parent before the accommodation may be used.
Please call 781-338-3625, email [email protected], or fax requests to 781-338-3630.
Non Standard Test Accommodations for MCAS Tests
(26)Test Administrator Reads Aloud the ELA Reading Comprehension Test
Note:
Reading aloud the ELA Composition writing prompt, the Mathematics, and/or the Science and
Technology/ Engineering tests is standard accommodation 16. The decision to use
nonstandard accommodation 26 must be made separately from the decision to use standard
accommodation 16.
Special Instructions
 All passages and test items must be read word-for-word, exactly as written. The test
administrator may not provide assistance to the student regarding the meanings of words,
intent of any test item, or responses to test items. The test administrator must read in a neutral
30
tone, without emphasis on any terms, passages, or response options, and with no detectable
changes in inflection.

If the test is read aloud, it must be administered in a separate setting (accommodation 4),
either individually (accommodation 5) or to a small group (2-5 students) (accommodation
3). When reading aloud to a small group of students, follow the procedures outlined in
Appendix A.
(27) Test Administrator Signs ELA Reading Comprehension Test for a Student Who Is
Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Note:
Signing the ELA Composition writing prompt, the Mathematics test, and/or the Science and
Technology/Engineering test is standard accommodation 17. The decision to use
accommodation 27 must be made separately from the decision to use standard accommodation
17.
Special Instructions:

All passages and test items must be signed exactly as written, except in cases when doing so
would reveal an answer to a test question. When use of a sign would visually define the
concept being tested, the term or concept must be finger-spelled. Interpreters may not provide
assistance to the student regarding the meanings of words, intent of any test question, or
responses to test items.

If the test is signed, it must be administered in a separate setting (accommodation 4), either
individually (accommodation 5) or to a small group (2–5 students) (accommodation 3).
When signing a test to a small group of students, follow the procedures outlined in Appendix
A.

Under secure conditions supervised by the principal, sign interpreters may review test
materials up to four days prior to test administration. Test materials may not be removed from
the school.
(28) Electronic Text Reader for the ELA Reading Comprehension Test:
The student uses an electronic text reader (i.e., Kurzweil 3000) for the ELA Reading
Comprehension test.
Note:
Using an electronic text reader for the ELA Composition writing prompt, the Mathematics test,
and/or the Science and Technology/Engineering test is standard accommodation 18.
The decision to use accommodation 28 must be made separately from the decision to use
standard accommodation18.
Special Instructions:
Kurzweil edition MCAS tests are read only. All answers must be submitted in the
student’s answer booklet.
(29) Scribe the ELA Composition:
The student dictates the ELA Composition to a scribe or uses a speech-to-text conversion
device to record the ELA Composition.
31
The Department encourages IEP teams to consider alternatives to the use of a scribe for
students who are deaf and taking the ELA Composition test. One such alternative is
accommodation 21, which would permit a deaf student to sign his or her draft composition
onto video and then transcribe the signed composition into written English while viewing
the video.
Special Instructions:

The test must be administered individually (accommodation 5) in a separate setting
(accommodation 4).

Clarification on the role of a scribe for the ELA Composition:

During session A, the scribe must write exactly what the student dictates into the student’s test
booklet. The scribe may not edit or alter the student’s dictation in any way. When scribing
the draft composition, the scribe may assume that each sentence begins with a capital letter and
ends with a period. All other capitalization, punctuation, and paragraph breaks are the
responsibility of the student.

After the student has finished dictating his or her draft composition, the scribe must ask the
student to do the following:
-
Spell key words. Key words include proper nouns, multi-syllable words, and other words
pertinent to the composition.
-
Review the draft composition and make any necessary edits, including edits to capital
letters, punctuation, and paragraph breaks. The student may make edits independently or
may direct the scribe to make the edits. The scribe must not assist the student in making
decisions during the editing process.
During session B, the scribe copies the final draft, including the student’s edits, into the student’s
answer booklet.
When a student uses an electronic speech-to-text conversion device, the test administrator must
follow the instructions for submitting typed responses described in the Principal’s Administration
Manual.
(30) Calculation Devices:
The student uses a calculator, arithmetic table (including addition/subtraction and
multiplication/division charts), or manipulatives (IEP or 504 plan must specify which) on the
non-calculator session of the Mathematics and/or the grades 5 and 8 Science and
Technology/Engineering tests. Calculators are allowed for all students on the high school STE
tests.
(31) Spell- or Grammar-Checking Function on Word Processor, Spell-Checking Device,
or Word Prediction Software for the ELA Composition:
The student uses a spell- or grammar-checking function, spell-checking device (including handheld electronic spellers), or word prediction software (IEP or 504 plan must specify which
function or device) for the ELA Composition.
Special Instructions:
• When word prediction software is used, the “predict-ahead” and “predict online” software
functions must be turned off.
• Students with accommodation 31 listed in their IEPs or 504 plans can use spell- or grammarchecking functions or devices on all MCAS tests, if required.
32
(32)Other Nonstandard Accommodation: The student uses another nonstandard
accommodation during routine instruction that the IEP or 504 team identifies as being
necessary for the student to participate in MCAS tests.
The accommodation must meet the Requirements for Use of Test Accommodations in section C
of this chapter.
33
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
EDUCATIONAL PROFICIENCY PLAN A
― For students who score between 220 and 238 on Grade 10 MCAS Test ―
Student:
SASID:
Current Grade Level:
School:
10___ 11___ 12___
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Date:
Graduation Class: ______________________
Part I. Background Information
A. EPP for:
English Language Arts
IEP ________
Mathematics
MCAS Scaled Scores, 10, 11, 12:
ELA
Primary Strength and Primary Challenge Indicated by Test Data
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Strengths in ELA, as evidenced by MCAS Tests:
Challenges in ELA, as evidenced by MCAS Tests:
MATH
Primary Strength and Primary Challenge Indicated by Test Data
Grade 10
34
Grade 11
Grade 12
Strengths in MATH, as evidenced by MCAS Tests:
Challenges in MATH, as evidenced by MCAS Tests:
B. Completed Coursework & End-of-Course Grade for English and/or Math
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
English
Mathematics
Science
History/SS
Electives
Other
C. Student Input
My Strengths in ENGLISH:
My Challenges in ENGLISH:
My Strengths in MATH:
My Challenges in MATH:
35
D. Teacher Input
Student's Strengths and Challenges in ENGLISH:
Student's Strengths and Challenges in MATH:
Part II. Educational Proficiency Plan
A. Grade Appropriate Courses to help this student achieve or move toward Proficiency
Junior
English Language Arts
Recommended Course
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-1
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time)
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
times)
Y
Y
Y
Y
|
|
|
|
N
N
N
N
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-2
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-3
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-4
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-5
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
36
Comments:
A. Grade Appropriate Courses to help this student achieve or move toward Proficiency
Junior
Math Recommended Course
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-1
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time)
Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-2
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-3
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-4
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-5
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Comments:
A. Grade Appropriate Courses to help this student achieve or move toward Proficiency
37
Senior
English Language Arts
Recommended Course
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-1
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time)
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
times)
Y
Y
Y
Y
|
|
|
|
N
N
N
N
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-2
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-3
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-4
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-5
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Comments:
A. Grade Appropriate Courses to help this student achieve or move toward Proficiency
Senior
Math Recommended Course
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-1
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time)
Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
38
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-2
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-3
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-4
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Assessments to Measure Progress Q-5
Grade (Must get a C or better)
Y | N
Attendance (In class at least 90% of time) Y | N
Homework Completion (90% or more)
Y | N
Classroom Behavior (Acceptable at all
Y | N
times)
Comments:
B. Other Assessments
FORM OF ELA
ASSESSMENT
Mid – Term
GOAL
RESULT
GOAL
RESULT
Final
Junior/Senior
FORM OF ALGEBRA II
ASSESSMENT
Final Exam in Junior
Year
Mid-Term in Senior Year
39
Part III. Parent/Guardian Contact
Parents/guardians will receive communication from the school about the supports this student
will receive to reach or be moving toward Proficiency.
To be completed when Spring MCAS Test results are made available in September:
● Informational letter to parent/guardian which explains EPP and why the student is a participant.
● Student's EPP sent to parent to be signed and returned.
To be completed at end of Semesters 1 and 2 in junior year, and Semester 1 and Quarter 3 in
senior year:
● EPP Progress Reports to be mailed to parents/schools
Part IV. Signatures
Student Signature: _______________________________________
Director of Education’s Signature: _____________________________________
School Contact Name:
Phone:
E-mail:
Part V. EPP Completion, Competency Verification

This student has fulfilled all EPP requirements. The data and other results in his/her plan show
he/she has achieved Proficiency.

This student has fulfilled all EPP requirements. The data and other results in his/her plan show
he/she is moving toward Proficiency.

This student has NOT fulfilled all EPP requirements and therefore did neither achieve nor show
evidence that he/she was moving toward Proficiency.
Supervisor’s Signature: ______________________Date: _______________
40
STUDENT REPORTING
41
STUDENT REPORT CARDS
Student report cards are completed at the end the summer program and each quarter of the
academic school year. Progress reports are also sent throughout the grading period for any
student in jeopardy of failing. Each student’s report card is maintained on the “F” drive under the
current school year. Once reviewed by administration report cards are mailed to families.
STUDENT PROFILE OUTLINE
Student profiles offer insight about each student’s strengths within the classroom, interests in
learning or extra-curricular activities, academic challenges they face and what has been
successful methods of self-esteem building in that particular subject area, and supports that have
been successful in assisting their overall achievement. At year end, teachers provide an outline
for each student as an informational assessment to guide the new classroom teacher in the
coming year. These profiles provide a great deal of support for staff within the entire school as
well; they remain on file in the solution areas to support students should they need to spend time
out of class. (See Student Profile Outline in Forms Section)
IEP PROGRESS REPORTS
Quarterly progress reports are completed by educational staff to document the steps taken to
meet the annual goals in the student’s IEP as outlined by Federal Regulations. Student progress
reports are maintained in the student’s record.
The IEP Coordinator insures the progress reports are reviewed and signed by the teacher and
supervisor and then mailed to the student’s public school district, parents, and any other outside
agencies approved to receive education information as documented on the student’s contact
sheet. The IEP Coordinator shall maintain a tracking sheet indicating when and to whom
progress reports are mailed.
The student’s progress report must answer the following two questions for each goal.
1. What is the students’ progress toward the annual goal?
2. Is the progress sufficient to enable the student to achieve the goal by the end of the IEP
period?
All teachers and educational specialists use the following steps as guidelines in writing IEP
progress reports.
a. Specify what the student has been working on.
b. List what the student has achieved.
c. Indicate any stumbling blocks to progress.
d. Project whether the student will reach the annual goal if progress continues at its
current pace.
When attending IEP meetings, teachers use the IEP Toolbox checklist as a guide to prepare for
the meeting. Teachers utilize the IEP Teachers Note Sheet to present information and data at the
IEP meeting. (See IEP Toolbox and Teachers Note Sheet in the Forms Section)
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STUDENT ASSESSMENTS OVERVIEW
In addition to state mandated and curricular summative and cumulative assessments, students are
also assessed to support a comprehensive understanding of their ability to prepare for transitions,
college and career readiness. The following outline identifies the current assessments:
Year-round Assessments for Grades 1st-8th:
Brigance Math Assessment – month of July
Brigance Vocabulary and Writing Assessment – month of July
Wilson vocabulary assessments TOSWRF, WIST and Dolche
DIBELS Next comprehension and fluency
Read Live comprehension and fluency
Lexia literacy building
Symphony Math
Summer Assessment for Grades 9-12:
 Brigance Math Assessments – month of July
 Brigance Vocabulary and Writing Assessment – month of July
 Brigance Transitional Assessments outline through Careers Programming
 Transitional Planning Inventory (grades 9-12)
 Enderle-Severson Transition Rating Scale (grades 11/12)
School-wide Assessments:
NWEA/Maps Assessment in reading and math completed in September and May.
Transitional Preparation Assessments
9th Grade Assessments:
 Assessment of in school/class work tasks (copying, sharpening pencils, cleaning desks,
taking out trash) by teaching staff. Track this independence/level of required prompts
(can the student complete with a check list, need 1:1 staff assistance, ability to work
cooperatively/appropriately with peer)
 RIASEC Career Interest Inventory
 Career Exploration by student based on interest inventory findings
10th Grade Assessments:
 Assessment of in school/class work tasks (copying, sharpening pencils, cleaning desks,
taking out trash) by teaching staff. Track this independence/level of required prompts
(can the student complete with a check list, need 1:1 staff assistance, ability to work
cooperatively/appropriately with peer)
 Harrington O’Shea
 Work Personality Profile, WPP
 Brigance Assessments (F-7; G-2 & 13; I-1-5 & I-9-11; L-1, 2, 5, 6-7, 9-10)
43
11th Grade
 Transitional Behavior Scale
 Either OASIS (Interest Scale) or ASVAB (Aptitude Ability Scale)
 Job Survival and Success Scale
 Brigance Assessments (F-2, 4, 5; G1; ; I-1-5 & I-9-11; K-1, 2; L-1, 2, 5, 6-7, 9; N-2, 7;
O-5-6)
12th Grade
 Barriers to Employment Success Inventory
 Becker Work Adjustment Profile
 Transitional Behavior Scale
 Brigance Assessments (F-2, 4, 5, 6; G-6, 7; I-1-5 & I-9-11; L-1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9; O-5-6)
BESTT Adult:
 Teacher evaluation of preforming outlined expectations
 Becker – work performance evaluation by students work supervisor
TREATMENT CONFERENCE REPORTS
(Residential Students)
Treatment conferences are held at the conclusion of the student’s first six weeks in treatment and then
quarterly thereafter. At the initial treatment conference meeting, a summary of the student’s history,
interventions, behaviors, strengths and challenges are reviewed. The initial treatment conference provides
the opportunity for family, guardian, placement agency, student, and the Doctor Franklin Perkins School
treatment team to formulate short and long term goals.
Subsequent quarterly treatment conferences provide review of student progress and areas of opportunity.
Attendance at treatment conferences from the Doctor Franklin Perkins School include: program director,
clinician, nurse, psychiatrist, and teacher. Each professional team member is responsible for writing their
section. Teachers should submit their treatment conference draft to their supervisor two weeks before the
conference for review. (See Treatment Conference Report template in Forms Section)
MEDICATION REVIEW REPORTS
All residential students who receive psychiatric medication are reviewed in the treatment team
with the prescribing psychiatrist monthly. Teachers contribute to this process by completing the
monthly Medication Review on their student. This information assists the psychiatrist in
evaluating the effects of medication during the academic day. (See Medication Review outline
in Forms Section)
ATTENDANCE AND LUNCH DOCUMENTATION
Classroom teachers maintain student attendance daily, including when students are tardy to
school. Lunch counts must also be maintained daily identifying each student who eats lunch in
the cafeteria for state reporting purposes. Forms are emailed monthly to classroom teachers who
44
in turn report the appropriate data to the Janeway main office administrative assistant. (See
sample Attendance and Lunch outline in the Forms Section)
DAILY LOG (EMAIL and LOG BOOK) OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Classroom teachers report via email on the student’s overall mood, daily activity,
accomplishments, areas of struggle, and important changes to appetite, alertness, high risk
behaviors, or noted side effects from medications. These comments inform each program and
clinician of what changes have occurred throughout the day for each student. Medical Reviews
will not be required for day students when daily reports are comprehensive enough. The daily
emailed reports identify student name, clinician, OT, Speech, and day or residential status along
with daily information. The emailed report communicates to all pertinent staff associated with
the student within the classroom. Please refer to the Email Etiquette Tip sheet in the Forms
Section of this manual as it outlines numerous points to remember when sending electronic
correspondences. A Daily Log for all day students is also kept by the classroom teacher, with
similar information, and sent home each day. jlkajfklajflkjalkfjlkajflkajflkajklfjalk
45
COMMITTEES
46
Curriculum Review Committee
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School is committed to aligning all core content to the Common
Core. This committee meets to review curriculum, identify areas that need updates, and ensures
curricular alignment school wide. Each grade level builds and maintains a Curriculum Binder
for each core content area. Grade level teams work together to develop a syllabus and all related
materials that support each class. The binders are updated each year and reviewed by the
Director of Curriculum and Instruction. (See page 126 for Curriculum Binder outline)
Curriculum Review Cycle
Each Year
Review
“How does
what we are
doing now
correlate with
the research?”
Develop
Appropriate
Materials &
Instruction
“What are we
going to do,
how are we
going to do it,
and how will
we know that
we
accomplished
it?”
Implement
Implement,
Monitor, &
Adjust
“What does it
look like in
the
classroom?”
“How well is
it working
and how can
we make it
better?”
Assessment
and
Evaluation of
Improvements
“Is what we set
out to do
happening?
Are students
learning?”
Program Review:
 Review updated curriculum framework/Common Core and current curriculum to
determine alignment pathways.
 Study content-related literature and research based recommendation practices.
 Assemble content-specific curriculum task forces.
 Form building-based (Wyman, Hermann and Janeway) study groups.
 Review accomplishments or areas of progress that support our goals.
 Using specific criteria, review materials and select resources to be piloted.
 Assemble a team of volunteer teachers to pilot and evaluate program/materials.
Program Development:
 Create revised, coordinated curriculum including big ideas, essential questions, and
benchmark outcomes.
 Identify and develop common assessments school-wide.
 Identify professional development needs/training to support new program implementation
 Project budgetary implications.
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Implementation:
 Share program overview and goals with appropriate stakeholders.
 Provide consistent, sustained professional development/consultation to support
implementation.
 Discuss implementation with study groups, grade level teams, and support specialists to
identify and share best practices.
 Provide opportunities for lesson modeling, coaching, and mentoring.
 Design student research projects and interdisciplinary units to reinforce and enrich the
content.
Implement, Monitor, and Adjust:
 Collect data and benchmark assessments.
 Share and discuss data based on predetermined criteria (job-alike).
 Survey students, parents, and teachers to gauge program impact.
Program Evaluation:
 Review evaluation results.
 Promote successes
 Identify areas in need of revision.
DIVERSITY COMMITTEE
The mission of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School Diversity Committee is to ensure an
inclusive, diverse environment for all students, parents, staff and community outreach
participants. Through the philosophy and methodology included in the daily academic
environment of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School, students are exposed to a variety of diverse
experiences in culture, social emotional well-being and perspective taking.
HISTORY COUNCIL
The History Council is made up of all educators teaching history. The purpose of this council is
to ensure our curricular coursework aligns with the Common Core. Members of the council
meet regularly to discuss topic coverage school wide and ensure our academic programming
remains comprehensive and consistent across all grades levels.
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LITERACY TEAM COMMITTEE
SCHOOL WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT TEAM
Goals
Professional
Development
Leadership
Assessment
Goal:
Instruction
A. Ensure children’s rights to read and write are met.
A. Build a comprehensive Literacy Team that will drive our success in developing an
Response to Intervention literacy initiative within our school.
Task Force: Assistant Director, Speech, Occupational Therapy, Reading, Classroom Teachers
(Wyman, Herman, Janeway), and Director of Curriculum and Instruction.
Definition of RtI: As defined by the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities – “an
assessment and intervention process for systematically monitoring students’ progress and making
decisions about the need for instructional modifications or increasingly intensified services using
progress monitoring data.”
Key Features of RtI:






Universal Screening
Progress Monitoring
Data Based Decision Making (with baseline information)
Collaboration of all Stake Holders
Ongoing Professional development
Scientific, Research-Based Assessments and Curricula
Stages of Infrastructure Created Yearly:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Identify each Team
Problem-solving process of implementation
Evaluation of assessments to create Data Collection System
Policies and procedures outlining process (Tier 1, 2 and 3)
Review schedule of accommodations
Implementation preparation for assessments, data collection and analysis, and strategic planning
for support services
49
Immediate Needs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Meetings with teachers to discuss strategies of support for students
Assessment of teacher’s tools
Identify tools for administrators and teachers to collect student data
RtI resource books for administrators and teachers
Professional Development aligned with areas of need
Important Points:





NWEA/MAP Web-based assessment implementation
Hermann Lab – learning software usage (Symphony, Lexia, and Read Live)
Keys to Literacy, Comprehension, and Vocabulary implementation
Collins Writing Program implementation
Manipulatives for teachers to support multi-modal learning approach
BUILDING LITERACY
School-Wide Vision
Our goal is to present opportunities for students to access content through a strategically
developed grouping structure that provides a successful and empowering environment. Through
this process students can build literacy skills, close gaps, and improve student outcomes towards
success.
School-Wide Objectives
 Collaboration between teachers and assistant teachers to build powerful learning
experiences in each grouping for every student.
 Creating small groups based on available data to maximize the effectiveness of an
instructional technique geared towards each group’s ability.
 Allowing groups to be fluid throughout the year based on each student’s progress.
 Differentiating instruction in a manner that will provide similar content, scaffolds prior
knowledge, and build on ability development.
 Creating opportunities for support services in the Math/Reading Lab.
Process
Each student is monitored at the beginning and completion of each year. As the year progresses,
the following steps should occur:
1. NWEA/MAP assessments are conducted in September and May.
2. Baseline spelling assessments are conducted in September along with NWEA/MAP.
3. Tier I students are identified through NWEA/MAP results and receive our core reading
program.
4. Tier II students are identified through NWEA/MAP results and receive our core reading
program, additional small-group supplemental instruction, and scheduled blocks of time
in the Math/Reading Lab. Benchmark assessments are completed as progress is made.
5. Tier III students are identified through NWEA/MAP results and receive additional
intensive customized small-group instruction in addition to Tier I and II. Benchmark
assessments are completed as progress is made.
50
6. Students with IEP goals incorporating reading will also receive small-group instruction
with our Reading Specialist as outlined in each students IEP.
Benchmark Testing Tools
 Grades 1-5 have benchmark testing materials associated with Scott Foresman Reading
Street curriculum.
 Grades 1-12 will have access to Dibels Next assessment materials in each building. The
master binders will be kept in each building.
 Grade 1-12 have access to the Hermann Math/Reading Lab, which provide progress data.
 The Reading and Literacy Specialists have additional testing materials that will be used
on a formalized request basis.
Additional Support Services
 NWEA/MAP pre- and post- assessments are completed each year.
 Baseline spelling assessment completed at the beginning of each year.
 Brigance Math, Reading and Writing assessments.
 Benchmark and progress monitoring through Dibels binders provided to each school by
our Reading Specialist.
 Reading and Math Lab in Janeway and Herman buildings with LEXIA, Symphony Math,
Read Naturally software.
 Keys to Literacy, Comprehension, and Vocabulary materials provided each teacher.
 Collins Writing Program school wide.
 Project Read materials for Phonology, Framing Your Thoughts, Report Form, Story
Form, and Linguistics located in Reading Specialist office.
 Links Graphic Organizers System provided each teacher by Reading Specialist.
 Linking Routine Vocabulary Strategies binders provided each teacher by Reading
Specialist.
 Kidspiration/Inspiration graphic organizing system available to all students and staff on
the network.
 Words Their Way, The Vocabulary Teachers Book of Lists, The Writing Teachers Book
of Lists, and Write Outloud books available in Reading Specialist office.
Reading Specialist materials available through formal evaluation requirement requests:
 Wilson Reading Program
 CTOPP
 GORT5
 TOWRE2
 TOWL4
 QRI-5
 TOSWRF
 LiPS
51
MATH CURRICULUM COUNCIL
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School promotes an integrated math program school wide. This
council is comprised of key individuals that support math across all grades. Members will meet
regularly and build a comprehensive math program throughout each grade level, which will
ensure content is effectively established in a comprehensive, cohesive manner at all grade levels.
PARENTAL INVOLEVMENT AND PARENTS’ ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School supports parent involvement in all aspects of the student’s
education and treatment. The agency supports three major initiatives for this involvement which
includes Family Night, Parent Advisory Committee, and Open House.
Family Nights are regularly scheduled throughout the year in each program. The Day Treatment
Program also hosts family nights as well. Such events include dinner, activities, and a chance for
staff and families to know each other better. These events are well attended and receive very
positive feedback.
An Open House and Parent Conferences are scheduled each year. These events are provided as
an opportunity for families and guardians to meet the student’s teacher(s), see the classroom, and
become more familiar with the student’s academic work. Teachers and specialists are available
to talk with families and answer questions.
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School Parent Advisory Committee meets four times per year at the
Janeway Educational Center. A calendar of meeting dates and topics is provided to all parents
and guardians and reminder notices of upcoming meetings are sent ahead of time and are posted
on the website. The Committee is invited to provide recommendations on agency policies and
procedures, review licensing reports, and review current educational and program initiatives.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND SCHEDULING COMMITTEE
This group of teachers and administrators meet bi-monthly to analyze the progress of the current
professional development plan and make recommendations for topics and trainings needed for
the following school year. Analysis of the master school schedule to meet instructional needs is
also a responsibility of this committee.
SCIENCE CURRICULUM COUNCIL
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School promotes an integrated science program school wide. This
council is comprised of key individuals that support an engaging, hands-on science program
across all grades. Members meet regularly to review and build a comprehensive, cohesive
science program at all grade levels.
52
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
53
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
BULLYING PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION PLAN
Priority Statement
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School expects that all members of the school and
residential community will treat each other in a civil manner and with respect for
differences.
The school and residential communities are committed to providing all students with a
safe learning and living environment that is free from bullying, retaliation, and cyberbullying. This commitment is an integral part of our comprehensive efforts to promote
learning, and to prevent and eliminate all forms of bullying and other harmful and
disruptive behavior that can impede the learning process.
We recognize that certain students may be more vulnerable to become targets of bullying,
harassment, or teasing based on actual or perceived characteristics including race, color,
religion, ancestry, national origin, sex, socioeconomic status, homelessness, academic
status, gender identity or expression, physical appearance, or disability, or by association
with a person who has or is perceived to have one or more of these characteristics. The
Doctor Franklin Perkins School and residential communities will identify specific steps it
will take to create a safe, supportive environment for vulnerable populations in the school
community, and provide all students with the skills, knowledge, and strategies to prevent
or respond to bullying, harassment, or teasing.
We will not tolerate any unlawful or disruptive behavior, including any form of bullying,
cyber-bullying, or retaliation, in our school buildings, on school grounds, at schoolrelated activities or in our residences. We will investigate promptly all reports and
complaints of bullying, cyber-bullying, and retaliation, and take prompt action to end that
behavior and restore the target’s sense of safety. We will support this commitment in all
aspects of our Perkins community, including curricula, instructional programs, staff
development, extracurricular activities, and parent/guardian involvement.
The Bullying Prevention and Intervention Plan is a comprehensive approach to
addressing bullying, retaliation and cyber-bullying, and the Doctor Franklin Perkins
School community’s commitment to working with students, staff, families, law
enforcement agencies, and the community to prevent issues of violence. This plan
affords all students the same protection regardless of their status under the law. In
consultation with these constituencies, we have established this Plan for preventing,
54
intervening, and responding to incidents of bullying, cyber-bullying, and retaliation. The
Director of Education and the Assistant Executive Director of Programs are responsible
for the implementation and oversight of the Plan.
Upon receipt of any complaint of bullying, cyber-bullying, and retaliation, the Director of
Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will inform the Executive
Director. The Director of Education and Assistant Executive Director of Programs will
insure that all relevant mandated reporting requirements as they relate to each specific
incident including the filing of a 51A with the Department of Children and Families,
notification of the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), and the
Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) are properly notified. The Director of
Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs shall keep the Executive Director
informed of the course of the investigation as well as the recommended interventions.
At least once every four years beginning with the 2015 – 2016 school year, the Doctor
Franklin Perkins School will administer a student survey, developed by the Department
of Elementary and Secondary Education, to assess school climate and the prevalence,
nature, and severity of bulling in our school. Additionally the Doctor Franklin Perkins
School will annually report bullying incident data to the Department of Elementary and
Secondary Education. A similar survey will be administered to school staff and
parent/guardians to assist in determining school climate needs.
PROHIBITION AGAINST BULLYING AND RETALIATION
Acts of bullying, which include cyber-bullying, are prohibited:
1. on campus grounds and property immediately adjacent to campus grounds, at a Perkinssponsored or campus-related activity, function, or program whether on or off campus
grounds, on a school bus or other vehicle owned, leased, or used by Perkins; or through
the use of technology or an electronic device owned, leased, or used by Perkins, and
2. at a location, activity, function, or program that is not Perkins-related through the use of
technology or an electronic device that is not owned, leased, or used by Perkins, if
the acts create a hostile environment at school, on campus, or in the residence, for
the target or witnesses, infringe on their rights at school, or materially and substantially
disrupt the education process or the orderly operation of the campus.
Retaliation against a person who reports bullying, provides information during an investigation
of bullying, or witnesses or has reliable information about bullying is strictly prohibited.
55
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR REPORTING AND RESPONDING TO
BULLYING AND RETALIATION
Reporting Bullying or Retaliation
Reports of bullying or retaliation may be made by staff, students, parents or guardians, or others,
and may be oral or written. Oral reports made by or to a staff member shall be recorded in
writing. All Perkins staff members are required to report immediately to the Director of
Education or the Assistant Executive Director of Programs any instance of bullying or retaliation
the staff member becomes aware of or witnesses. Reports made by students, parents or
guardians, or other individuals who are not Perkins staff members, may be made anonymously.
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School will make a variety of reporting resources available to our
entire campus community including an Incident Reporting Form, a voicemail box, and an email
address.
Use of an Incident Reporting Form is not required as a condition of making a report. However,
Perkins will:
1. include a copy of the Incident Reporting Form in the beginning of the year packets for
students and parents or guardians;
2. make a copy of the Incident Reporting Form available in the school’s main office,
reception, and the residential units; and
3. on the school’s website.
The Incident Reporting Form will be made available in the first language of the student and
parent/guardian.
At the beginning of each school year, the Doctor Franklin Perkins School will provide the
campus community, including administrators, staff, students, and parents or guardians, with
written notice of its policies for reporting acts of bullying and retaliation. A description of the
reporting procedures and resources, including the name and contact information of the Director
of Education, will be incorporated in student and staff handbooks, on the Perkins website, and in
information about the Plan that is made available to parents or guardians.
Reports by Staff
All bullying or retaliation incidents will be reported immediately orally and/or in writing to the
Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs, on the day the incident
occurred or the day the incident was reported. If the incident occurs during non-school hours, the
supervisor must report it to the Administrator on Call. Additionally, the staff will report the
incident to a designated voicemail number that will include the Director of Education and the
Assistant Executive Director of Programs. The Incident Report Form system will serve as written
notification for Perkins staff and is required.
Reports by Students, Parents/Guardians, and Others
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School expects students, parents/guardians, or other individuals
who witness or become aware of an instance of bullying or retaliation involving a student to
report it to a staff. Reports may be made anonymously, but no disciplinary action will be taken
56
against an alleged aggressor solely on the basis of an anonymous report. Students,
parents/guardians, and others may request assistance from a staff member to complete a written
report. Students will be provided practical, safe, private, and age appropriate ways to report and
discuss an incident of bullying with a staff member, or with the Director of Education or
Assistant Executive Director of Programs. Reporting forms will be available on line, at all
reception offices, residential units, and all school buildings.
Upon receiving notice, the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs
will notify the appropriate teacher, Program Director, and clinician that a bullying or retaliation
incident has occurred. This notification will serve as an alert that there has been a complaint.
An initial safety assessment will be made and the aggressor and the target will be placed on
“elevated risk status.”
Based on the initial report, a fact-finding investigation will be conducted. The Director of
Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will coordinate this investigation. This
will help form the initial response.
Notice to Parents or Guardians
When appropriate, the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will
coordinate notification to the aggressor and target’s parent or guardian, school system, that a
bullying or retaliation complaint has been made.
Upon determining that bullying or retaliation has occurred, the Director of Education or
Assistant Executive Director of Programs will promptly coordinate the notification to the
parents/guardians and agency of the target and the aggressor. The procedure for responding to
the bullying incident will be communicated. There may be circumstances in which the
parents/guardians are contacted prior to any investigation.
The Director of Education or designee shall inform the parent/guardian of the target about the
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s problem resolution system and the
process for accessing that system, regardless of the outcome of the bullying determination.
Notice to Another School or District
The Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will coordinate
notification to the Out of District coordinator promptly by telephone or e-mail within 24 hours so
that the school district may take appropriate action.
Notice to Law Enforcement
At any point after receiving a report of bullying or retaliation, including after an investigation, if
there is a reasonable basis to believe that criminal charges may be pursued against the aggressor,
the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will coordinate the
notification of the local law enforcement agency. Also, if an incident occurs on campus grounds
and involves a former student under the age of 21, who is no longer enrolled in school, the
Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs shall contact the local law
enforcement agency if he or she has a reasonable basis to believe that criminal charges may be
pursued against the aggressor. In cases involving physical harm, the police will also be notified.
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Investigation
The Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will promptly coordinate
the investigation of all reports of bullying or retaliation and, in doing so, will consider all
available information known, including the nature of the allegation(s) and the ages of the
students involved.
The investigation will include, among other things, interviewing students, staff, witnesses, and
parents/guardians or others as necessary. The investigator will remind the alleged aggressor,
target, and witnesses that retaliation is strictly prohibited and will result in disciplinary action.
Interviews may be conducted by a designee as determined by the aforementioned parties. To the
extent practical, and given his/her obligation to investigate and address the matter, the
investigator will maintain confidentiality during the investigative process. The investigator will
maintain a written record of the investigation. A copy will go to the Executive Director, Director
of Education, and Assistant Executive Director of Programs.
Procedures for investigating reports of bullying and retaliation will be consistent with Perkins
policies and procedures for investigations. If necessary, the Doctor Franklin Perkins School will
consult with legal counsel about the investigation.
Determinations
The investigator will make a determination based upon all of the facts and circumstances. If,
after investigation, bullying or retaliation is substantiated, the Director of Education or Assistant
Executive Director of Programs will take reasonably calculated steps to prevent recurrence and
to ensure that the target is not restricted in participating in school or in benefiting from campus
activities. The findings will:
1.
2.
determine what remedial action is required, if any, and
determine what responsive actions and/or disciplinary action is necessary.
Depending upon the circumstances, the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of
Programs may choose to consult with the student’s teacher(s), Program Director, program staff,
and/or clinician, and the target’s or aggressor’s parents/guardians, to identify any underlying
social or emotional issue(s) that may have contributed to the bullying behavior and to assess the
level of need for additional social skills development.
The Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will promptly coordinate
the notification to the parents/guardians of the target and the aggressor about the results of the
investigation and, if bullying or retaliation is found, what action is being taken to prevent further
acts of bullying or retaliation. All notices to parents must comply with applicable state and
federal privacy laws and regulations. Because of the legal requirements regarding the
confidentiality of student records, specific information cannot be reported to the target’s parent
or guardian about the disciplinary action taken unless it involves a “stay away” order or other
directive that the target must be aware of in order to report violations.
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Responding to a Report of Bullying or Retaliation
Safety
Before fully investigating the allegations of bullying or retaliation, the Director of Education or
Assistant Executive Director of Programs will take steps to assess the need to restore a sense of
safety to the alleged target and/or to protect the alleged target from possible further incidents.
Responses to promote safety may include, but not be limited to, creating a personal safety plan;
pre-determining seating arrangements for the target and/or the aggressor in the classroom, at
lunch, or at the residence; identifying a staff member who will act as a “safe person” for the
target; and altering the aggressor’s schedule and access to the target. The Director of Education
or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will take additional steps to promote safety during
the course of and after the investigation, as necessary.
The Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will implement
appropriate strategies for protecting from bullying or retaliation of a student who has reported
bullying or retaliation, a student who has witnessed bullying or retaliation, a student who
provides information during an investigation, or a student who has reliable information about a
reported act of bullying or retaliation.
Collecting and Analyzing Data (individual and program wide)
The initial staff receiving the bullying or retaliation report will write an Incident Report detailing
the incident or incidences on Perkins’ electronic incident reporting system QSTATIM. Upon
filing these reports an email version is immediately distributed to the Education Director and
Assistant Executive Director of Programs.
School and residential climate surveys will be conducted biannually. Students, school faculty,
residential staff, clinical staff, Perkins leadership, and parents/guardians will have access to the
survey. Results will be collected and analyzed through the programs Senior Treatment Team.
Dissemination of the results will occur at various program meetings and through the Bullying
Prevention skills groups in school.
Individual instances of bullying behavior will be tracked through the Incident Reporting System
(QSTATIM) and individual student data will be analyzed by the Administrative team during
monthly Quality Assurance (QA) meetings.
Supporting the Needs of Targets and Aggressors
Individual Plans -Target:
When appropriate, an individual plan will be developed by the treatment team, including the
student, and parents/guardian to support the target.
Individual Plans - Aggressor:
When appropriate, the team will write an individual plan that informs the treatment team and
education team of the aggressor.
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The strategies developed in response to the bullying complaint may range from, but not be
limited to; mediation between the target and the aggressor and support of both, re-education of
the aggressor, restoration or repairs to the target, additional clinical time to deal with the issue,
physical separation, or police involvement.
Responses to Bullying
Teaching Appropriate Behavior Through Skills-Building
Upon determining that bullying or retaliation has occurred, the following skill building
approaches may be considered:
▪
▪
▪
▪
▪
▪
▪
offering individualized skill-building sessions based on the school’s anti-bullying
curricula;
providing relevant educational activities for individual students or groups of students, in
consultation with clinicians and other appropriate clinical personnel;
implementing a range of academic and nonacademic positive behavioral supports to help
students understand pro-social ways to achieve their goals;
meeting with parents and guardians to engage parental support and to reinforce the antibullying curricula and social skills building activities at home;
adopting behavioral plans to include a focus on developing specific social skills;
Reevaluating medication
Peer mediation
Taking Disciplinary Action
If the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs decides that
disciplinary action is appropriate, the disciplinary action will be determined on the basis of facts
found in the initial investigation, including the nature of the conduct, the age of the student(s)
involved, and the need to balance accountability with the teaching of appropriate behavior.
Discipline will be consistent with the Plan and with the school’s treatment philosophy.
Disciplinary action may range from responding based on the treatment philosophy and
intervention guidelines up to an in-school suspension and meeting with the funding school
district. Other responses could include mediation, restoration and repair, mandatory skill building
groups, detention, and alternative programming.
If the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs determines that a
student knowingly made a false allegation of bullying or retaliation, that student may be subject
to disciplinary action. This will include at minimum a restorative task related to the person
accused, and an educational task related to the consequences of making false allegations, both
legal and social.
Promoting Safety for the Target and Others
The Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs will consider what
adjustments, if any, are needed in the school or residential environment to enhance the target's
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sense of safety and that of others as well. The target will be included on the list for “morning
check-ins”, a system currently in place to support students for at least one week after the
occurrence of a bullying incident. If the target reports to be struggling, a team meeting that will
include the Director of Education, Assistant Director of Education, Director of Student Services,
Program Director, teacher, and the student’s clinician will be held to develop a plan to support
the student. This may include additional clinical support, incentive plans, coping skill plans, or
additional check in plans. One strategy that the Director of Education or Assistant Executive
Director of Programs may use is to increase adult supervision at transition times and in locations
where bullying is known to have occurred or is likely to occur.
Within a reasonable period of time following the determination and the ordering of restorative
and/or disciplinary action, the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs
will contact the target to determine whether there has been a recurrence of the prohibited conduct
and whether additional supportive measures are needed. If so, the Director of Education or
Assistant Executive Director of Programs will work with appropriate staff to implement them
immediately.
COLLABORATION WITH FAMILIES
Parent Education and Resources
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School will offer education programs for parents and guardians that
are focused on the parental components of the anti-bullying curricula and any social competency
curricula used by the school. The curriculum will include the following topics: bullying
dynamics, online safety and cyber bullying, as well as skills for reinforcing it at home. The
programs will be offered in collaboration with the Parent Advisory Council, or similar forums.
Notification Requirements
Each year the Doctor Franklin Perkins School will inform parents or guardians of enrolled
students about the anti-bullying curricula that are being used. This notice will include
information about the dynamics of bullying, including cyber-bullying and online safety. Perkins
will send parents written notice each year about the student-related sections of the Plan and the
school's Internet safety policy. All notices and information made available to parents or
guardians will be in hard copy and electronic formats, and will be available in the language(s)
most prevalent among parents/guardians. Perkins will post the Plan and related information on its
website.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Annual Staff Training on the Plan
Annual training for all school and residential staff will include staff duties under the Plan, an
overview of the steps that the Director of Education or Assistant Executive Director of Programs
will follow upon receipt of a report of bullying or retaliation, and an overview of the bullying
prevention curricula to be offered at all grades throughout the school. Staff members will
participate in a Bullying Prevention Plan training during orientation. All staff will also receive
annual refreshers on the Plan.
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Ongoing Professional Development
The goal of professional development is to establish a common language and understanding of
tools necessary for staff to create a school climate that promotes safety, civil communication, and
respect for differences. Professional development will build the skills of staff members to
prevent, identify, and respond to bullying. The content of Perkins’s campus wide professional
development will be informed by research and will include information on:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Developmentally appropriate strategies to prevent bullying or retaliation;
Developmentally appropriate strategies for immediate, effective interventions to
stop bullying or retaliation incidents;
Information regarding the complex interaction and power differential that can take
place between and among an aggressor, target, and witnesses to the bullying or
retaliation;
Research findings on bullying or retaliation, including information about specific
categories of students who have been shown to be particularly at risk for bullying
or retaliation in the school environment;
Information on the incidence and nature of cyber bullying; and
Internet safety issues as they relate to cyber-bullying.
Professional development will also address ways to prevent and respond to bullying or retaliation
for students with disabilities that must be considered when developing students’ Individualized
Education Programs (IEPs). This will include a particular focus on the needs of students with
autism or students whose disability affects social skills development. All students with above
stated diagnosis will have social skills goals related to identifying and recognizing bullying.
Additional areas identified by Perkins for professional development include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
promoting and modeling the use of respectful, positive language;
fostering an understanding of respect for diversity and difference;
building relationships and communicating with families;
constructively managing classroom and residential behaviors;
using positive behavioral intervention strategies;
applying constructive, instructional techniques through Collaborative Problem Solving
(CPS), and “Character Counts” Education
teaching students skills including positive communication, anger management, and
empathy;
engaging students in school or residential unit planning and decision-making;
maintaining a safe and caring environment for all students; and
instructing students and staff on peer mediation
Written Notice to Staff
Perkins will provide all staff with an annual written notice of the Plan by publishing information
about it, including sections related to staff duties, in Perkins’s employee handbook and the
Perkins’s website will update the plan accordingly for parents.
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THE CURRICULUM
The Director of Education and Assistant Executive Director of Programs will periodically
research appropriate bullying or retaliation curricula and programs to present to staff, students,
and parents/guardians. These curricula will be developmentally appropriate for all level of
student participation.
Specific Bullying Prevention Approaches
Bullying prevention curricula will be informed by current research which, among other things,
emphasizes the following approaches:
• using scripts and role plays to develop skills;
• empowering students to take action by knowing what to do when they witness other
students engaged in acts of bullying or retaliation, including seeking adult assistance;
• helping students understand the dynamics of bullying and cyber-bullying, including
the underlying power imbalance;
• emphasizing cyber-safety, including safe and appropriate use of electronic
communication technologies;
• enhancing students’ skills for engaging in healthy relationships and respectful
communications; and
• engaging students in a safe, supportive school environment that is respectful of
diversity and difference.
• teaching students about the student-related sections of the Bullying Prevention and
Intervention Plan.
General Teaching Approaches that Support Bullying Prevention Efforts
• setting clear expectations for students and establishing school and classroom routines;
• creating safe school and classroom environments for all students, including for students
with disabilities, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender students, and homeless students;
• using appropriate and positive responses and reinforcement, even when students require
discipline;
• using positive behavioral supports;
• encouraging adults to develop positive relationships with students;
• modeling, teaching, and rewarding pro-social, healthy, and respectful behaviors;
• using positive approaches to behavioral health, including collaborative problem-solving,
conflict resolution training, teamwork, and positive behavioral supports that aid in social
and emotional development;
• using the Internet safely; and
• supporting students’ interest and participation in non-academic and extracurricular
activities, particularly in their areas of strength.
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
A Bullying Prevention Committee, led by the Director of Education and Assistant Executive
Director of Programs consisting of school and residential staff, students, parents, and
administrators will review and revise the current policies and protocols twice a year. Perkins’s
IT Department will consult with the committee on issues of Internet safety. School and
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residential supervisors will be responsible for implementation of all anti-bullying or retaliation
policies and protocols and for making these policies and protocols part of their supervision with
staff.
The Bullying Prevention Committee will recommend changes to the student and staff handbooks
as well as to the treatment program. The student handbook and description of the treatment
program is given to students upon admission. Staff will receive training in both during
orientation and annually.
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School will biannually:
1. survey students, staff, parents/guardians on school climate and school safety issues;
2. collect and analyze school-specific data on the prevalence and characteristics of bullying;
and
3. identify patterns of behaviors and areas of concern that will inform decision-making for
prevention strategies including, but not limited to, adult supervision, professional
development, age-appropriate curricula, and Perkins support services.
ACCESS TO RESOURCES AND SERVICES
Resources
Our overarching treatment philosophy utilizes a trauma informed, relational approach framework
that includes use of strength-based approaches, such as:
1. Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS),
2. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment (CBT)
3. Character Counts Program
Our program model targets an array of supportive and evidence-based treatment approaches
including Collaborative Problem Solving, Trauma Informed Care and Positive Behavior Support.
A thorough initial assessment of a student’s abilities and treatment needs is conducted by a
multi-disciplinary team following admission. This assessment provides the information
necessary to develop an individualized treatment and behavior support plan.
1. Students are also taught the necessary skills to form positive family and peer
relationships using modified standard adult Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). While
this DBT has demonstrated effectiveness for reducing emotion dysregulation and
accompanying incidents of self-harming behaviors
2. Problematic behaviors are dealt with by integrating psycho-education, Collaborative
Problem Solving, and cognitive-behavioral therapy, in the service of developing a
repertoire of healthier replacement behaviors.
3. Utilizing a trauma-informed framework, the therapeutic milieu of the school and
residences use a relational, cognitive-behavioral and positive behavior support
approaches to decrease safety-interfering behaviors and to foster the development of
effective communication and coping strategies. The program’s motivational system
reinforces these concepts through its focus on validation, skill coaching, reparation and
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restitution assignments, and natural consequences to address problematic behaviors.
4. Throughout the continuum of care, students are exposed to numerous milieu-based, skillenhancing groups, such dialectical behavior therapy, aggression replacement training,
adventure-based counseling, PAYA (Massachusetts’ ‘Preparing Adolescents for Young
Adulthood’ curriculum), sexual health and education, and substance-abuse education.
Counseling and other Services
Each student at Perkins has regular counseling sessions and access to a clinician when needed.
Clinical On-Call supports students in crisis. Anti-bullying skills groups are ongoing in school.
Other skills groups occur regularly on the residential shift. Our Day School Clinical Team and
Residential Clinical Team assist the school and residence in developing safety plans for students
who have been targets of bullying or retaliation, providing social skills programs to prevent
bullying, and offering education and/or intervention services for students exhibiting bullying
behaviors. Tools include, but are not limited to, behavioral intervention plans, social skills
groups, and individually focused curricula.
Referral to Outside Services
If and when the Doctor Franklin Perkins School determines that referral for outside services is
required to support the student and family, a services meeting will be held, including any outside
agencies to discuss and provide recommendations for treatment.
DEFINITIONS
Aggressor is a student who engages in bullying, cyber-bullying, or retaliation.
Bullying is the repeated use by one or more students of a written, verbal, or electronic expression
or a physical act or gesture or any combination thereof, directed at a target that:
1. causes physical or emotional harm to the target or damage to the target’s property;
2. places the target in reasonable fear of harm to himself or herself or of damage to his
or her property;
3. creates a hostile environment at school or in the residence for the target;
4. infringes on the rights of the target at school or in the residence; or
5. materially and substantially disrupts the education process, the individual’s treatment,
or the orderly operation of the campus.
Cyber-bullying is bullying through the use of technology or electronic devices such as
telephones, cell phones, computers, and the Internet. It includes, but is not limited to, email,
instant messages, text messages, and Internet postings.
Hostile Environment is a situation in which bullying causes the environment to be permeated
with intimidation, ridicule, or insult that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions
of a student’s education or living conditions.
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Retaliation is any form of intimidation, reprisal, or harassment directed against a student who
reports bullying, provides information during an investigation of bullying, or witnesses or has
reliable information about bullying.
Staff includes, but is not limited to, educators, administrators, clinicians, nurses, cafeteria
workers, custodians, bus drivers, athletic coaches, advisors to extracurricular activities, support
staff, or paraprofessionals.
Target is a student against whom bullying, cyber-bullying, or retaliation has been perpetrated.
RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LAWS
Consistent with state and federal laws, and the policies of the school, no person shall be
discriminated against in admission to the Doctor Franklin Perkins School or in obtaining the
advantages, privilege and courses of study of this school on account of race, color, sex, religion,
national origin, or sexual orientation. Nothing in the Plan prevents Perkins from taking action to
remediate discrimination or harassment based on a person’s membership in a legally protected
category under local, state, or federal law, or school or district policies.
In addition, nothing in the Plan is designed or intended to limit the authority of the school to take
disciplinary action or other action under M.G.L. c. 71, §§ 37H or 37H½, other applicable laws,
or Perkins policies in response to violent, harmful, or disruptive behavior, regardless of whether
the Plan covers the behavior.
PROBLEM RESOLUTION SYSTEM
Any parent wishing to file a claim/concern or seeking assistance outside of the Doctor Franklin
Perkins School may do so with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Program
Resolution System (PRS). That information can be found at: http://www.doe.mass.edu/pqa,
emails can be sent to [email protected] or individuals can call 781-338-3700. Hard
copies of this information are also available at the Doctor Franklin Perkin School’s general office
located in the Janeway Education Center.
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BULLYING PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION INCIDENT REPORTING FORM
1. Name of Reporter/Person Filing the Report: __________________________________________________________
(Note: Reports may be made anonymously, but no disciplinary action will be taken against an alleged aggressor solely on the basis
of an anonymous report.)
2. Check whether you are the:
□ Target of the behavior
□ Reporter (not the target)
3. Check whether you are a:
□ Student
□ Staff member (specify role)
___________________________________
□ Parent
□ Administrator
□ Other (specify) _______________________
Your contact information/telephone number:
________________________________________________________________
4. If student, state class Team: ___________ Grade: _____________
5. If staff member, state your department: ______________________________________________________
6. Information about the Incident:
Name of Target (of behavior): ___________________________________________________________________
Name of Aggressor (Person who engaged in the behavior): ____________________________________________
Date(s) of Incident(s): _________________________________________________________________________
Time When Incident(s) Occurred: _______________________________________________________________
Location of Incident(s) (Be as specific as possible): __________________________________________________
7. Witnesses (List people who saw the incident or have information about it):
Name: _________________________________________
 Student  Staff  Other _____________________
Name: _________________________________________
 Student  Staff  Other _____________________
Name: _________________________________________
 Student  Staff  Other _____________________
8. Describe the details of the incident (including names of people involved, what occurred, and what each person did
and said, including specific words used). Please use additional space on back if necessary.
FOR ADMINISTRATIVE USE ONLY
9. Signature of Person Filing this Report: ___________________________________________ Date: ___________
(Note: Reports may be filed anonymously.
10: Form given to: __________________________ Position: __________________Date: _________
Signature: _____________________________________________ Date Received: _________________
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II. INVESTIGATION
1. Investigator(s):__________________________________________Position(s):________________________
2. Interviews:
□ Interviewed aggressor Name: ___________________________________
Date: _____________
□ Interviewed target
Name: ___________________________________
Date: _____________
□ Interviewed witnesses Name: ___________________________________
Date: _____________
Name: ___________________________________
Date: _____________
□ Yes
□ No
If yes, have incidents involved target or target group previously?
□ Yes
□ No
Any previous incidents with findings of BULLYING, RETALIATION
□ Yes
□ No
3. Any prior documented Incidents by the aggressor?
Summary of Investigation:
4. Follow-up:
Alleged Target’s parent/guardian notified by _______________________
Date: ______________
Alleged Aggressor’s parent/guardian notified by _______________________ Date: ______________
On this date ____________ the parent/guardian of the target has been informed about the Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education’s Problem resolution system and the process for accessing that
system (see below), regardless of the outcome of the bullying determination.
Program Quality Assurance Services
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
75 Pleasant Street, Malden, MA 02148-4906
Telephone: 781-338-3700
TTY: N.E.T. Relay: 1-800-439-2370
Email: [email protected]
FAX: 781-338-3710
Web: http://www.doe.mass.edu/pqa
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(Please use additional paper and attach to this document as needed)
III. CONCLUSIONS FROM THE INVESTIGATION
1. Finding of bullying or retaliation:
□ YES
□ NO
□ Bullying
□ Incident documented as _____________________
□ Retaliation
□ Discipline referral only_______________________
2. Contacts:
□ Target’s parent/guardian
Date: ______________
□ Aggressor’s parent/guardian
Date: ______________
□ School District
Date: ______________
□ Law Enforcement
Date: ______________
3. Action Taken:
□ Loss of Privileges
□ Detention
□ Suspension
□ Community Service □ Education □ Other _______________________________
4. Describe Safety Planning:
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Follow-up with Target: scheduled for __________________ Initial and date when completed: ____________
Follow-up with Aggressor: scheduled for _______________ Initial and date when completed: _____________
Title
Date Forwarded
Signature
Director of Education
Assistant Executive
Director of Programs
Executive Director
Signature and Title: ______________________________________
Date: _________________
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
ANTI-HAZING POLICY
Introduction
It is the policy of Doctor Franklin Perkins School to provide and maintain a therapeutic
environment that is free of any behaviors related to hazing. Under no circumstances does Doctor
Franklin Perkins School approve of such behaviors as part of any school-sponsored on or off
campus, or a community sponsored activity using Doctor Franklin Perkins School property.
Definition
The term “hazing” shall refer to any conduct or method of initiation into any Doctor Franklin
Perkins School student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or
recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct
shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced
consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other brutal treatment
or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any
such student or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental
stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation. Consent shall not be
available as a defense to any prosecution under this action.
Issuance of Policy
Each student, group, team, or organization, whether public or private, who uses the agency
facilities, shall receive a copy of this policy for distribution to each of its members or applicants
for membership. At the time of each student’s admission and annually in September, students
and parents/guardians receive a copy of this policy. A signed confirmation of receipt is
maintained in each student’s file. Annually any outside group using Doctor Franklin Perkins
School facilities will receive a copy of this policy.
Reporting of Hazing
Any person who believes he or she has been the victim of hazing, or any person with knowledge
or belief of conduct which may constitute hazing, shall report the alleged acts immediately to one
of the following: Executive Director, Director of Education, Director of Day Treatment, Director
of Programs, Director of Student Services, or Program Director. Submission of a good faith
complaint or report of hazing will not affect the complainant’s or reporter’s future employment,
grades, work assignments or activity participation.
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Investigating Reports of Hazing
When a complaint of hazing is brought to the attention of the Executive Director, Chief
Operating Officer or a Division Director, an assessment is made as to whether any initial steps
need to be taken to protect the well-being of students while the investigation is being conducted.
Doctor Franklin Perkins School will notify the parents/guardians of any student who is an
alleged target of hazing as well as the parents of any student who may have been accused of
engaging in such behavior promptly after a complaint has been made.
Once a complaint is received the following steps are taken. An impartial investigation of the
complaint is conducted by the agency Human Rights Officer. The investigation will include but
not be limited to: interviews with the person who made the complaint; with the student who was
the target of the hazing, and with any students, faculty, staff, or other persons who witnessed or
who may otherwise have relevant information about the alleged incident. The Human Rights
Officer shall submit a report to the Executive.
Resolution, Notification, and Follow-up
Following interviews and any other investigation undertaken, the Executive Director will
determine whether and to what extend the allegation of hazing has been substantiated. If it is
determined that this policy has been violated, the Executive Director in consultation with the
appropriate Division Head will determine what disciplinary action and/or other remedial action is
appropriate and how it will be implemented.
In appropriate circumstances, such as when a crime may have been committed or a child may
have been subject to abuse or neglect of the type that is reportable under Section 51A of the
Massachusetts laws, law enforcement or another appropriate government agency may be
notified.
Upon completion of the investigation the Executive Director direct the Human Rights Officer,
along with the appropriate Division Head, to meet individually with the student or students who
were the target of the alleged incident and their parents, with the student or students and their
parents against whom the complaint was made, to report the results of the investigation and,
where disciplinary or other corrective action is determined and appropriate, to inform the parties
of the steps that will be taken to address the situation. The amount of information provided in
these meetings may be limited by confidentiality laws protecting student records.
Failure to Report Hazing
Under State law, organizers or participants in hazing shall be punished by a fine of not more than
three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of corrections for not more than one year,
or both. Failure to report such crime shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand
dollars. Suspension or discharge may be imposed at the discretion of the Executive Director.
Student offenders may be removed from any athletic team or extra-curricular school activity.
The Executive Director may also notify law enforcement personnel of the violation for possible
criminal prosecution.
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School personnel who fail to report incidents of hazing to the proper administrator will face
disciplinary action.
Filing With Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.
Annually, the Doctor Franklin Perkins School shall file a report with DESE certifying that it has
complied with its responsibility to inform student groups, teams or organizations and to notify
each full time student enrolled regarding the policy.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
YOUR RIGHT TO REGISTER COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCES
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School does not discriminate in admission to, access to, treatment
in, or employment in its services, programs and activities, on the basis of race, color or national
origin, on the basis of sex, on the basis of disability, or on the basis of age, or on the basis of
sexual orientation or religion. Student discrimination shall be defined as and include:





RACIAL OR ETHNIC DISCRIMINATION/HARASSMENT OF STUDENTS
SEXUAL HARASSMENT AGAINST STUDENTS/INCLUDING PEER HARASSMENT
SEXUAL ASSAULT
PROTECTION OF STUDENTS AGAINST DISCRIMINATION BASED ON SEXUAL
ORIENTATION
NON-DISCRIMINATION AGAINST STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
FILING A COMPLAINT
If you believe your rights have been violated at any time, you have the right to contact the
agency Human Rights Officer. You may also contact the Executive Director, Director of
Education, Director of Day Treatment, Director of Student Services, or the Director of Programs
if you believe your situation warrants a higher level of intervention. Students also may request a
“Student Care Complaint Form” which you may fill out any time you feel your rights have been
violated, a therapeutic hold was improperly done, or that your treatment is inadequate.
Complaint forms are reviewed by the appropriate director. Immediate action is taken on all
complaints which can include: arranging a meeting with the parties involved, reporting suspected
abuse of neglect to the appropriate State agencies (DEEC, DCF, DMH), assigning the
investigation to the Human Rights Officer, and/or convening a treatment team meeting to review
care. It is our practice to inform families, regulatory agencies, and referral sources of the status
of the outcome of our investigation and the action taken. During an investigation, we make every
effort to protect the confidentiality of all involved until a finding has been made.
It is the responsibility of the Human Rights Officer to open a file each time a complaint is made.
Files may contain: a description of the complaint, supporting information, internal investigation,
external agency reports, and plans of compliance and correction.
COMPLAINT REVIEW PROCESS AND TIMELINES
When you file a complaint you may do so verbally or in writing. You can submit the complaint
to: Human Rights Officer, Program Director, Director of Education, Director of Day Treatment,
Director of Student Services, or Director of Programs. Any of these individuals must then notify
the Chief Operating Officer regarding your complaint.
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Your complaint must be reviewed within 24 hours. An independent investigation may be
requested as well as notification to appropriate state and placement agencies as defined in the
Student Abuse Policy.
Within 7 days of receiving the complaint, the Director of Programs, Director of Education,
Director of Day Treatment, or Director of Student Services will conduct a review of the concerns
and provide a written response to you. If you are not satisfied with the finding, you may request
a meeting within 7 days of receiving the written response. Such request can be made verbally or
in writing.
Should you not be satisfied with those finding, you may request a meeting, verbally or in writing
with the Executive Director within 7 days of receiving the findings. The Executive Director will
have 7 days to set up a meeting. The decision of the Executive Director is final and will be
provided in writing within 7 days after the grievance meeting.
You may also file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil
Rights, JW McCormack POCH, Boston, Massachusetts 02109-4557, telephone (617)2239662, TTY (617)223-9695.
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STUDENT ANTI-BULLYING/HAZING, AND GRIEVANCE FORM
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Student Notifications
Please review the following with students and have them sign the acknowledgement form to
indicate they have received the information.
Complaints or Grievances
Discrimination is defined as follows:





RACIAL OR ETHNIC DISCRIMINATION/HARASSMENT OF STUDENTS
SEXUAL HARASSMENT AGAINST STUDENTS/INCLUDING PEER HARASSMENT
SEXUAL ASSAULT
PROTECTION OF STUDENTS AGAINST DISCRIMINATION BASED ON SEXUAL ORIENTATION
NON-DISCRIMINATION AGAINST STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
You have the right to file a student care complaint form and always have the right to speak to the
Human Rights Officer at any time if you think something is not fair. You can also speak to a
school administrator – Supervisor, Education or Day Treatment Director or Student Services
Coordinator. We take all complaints seriously and will protect the confidentiality of you as a
student.
Anti-Hazing Policy
Hazing is defined as any conduct that engages a student into an act of initiation into an
organization that willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or
person.
It is your responsibility to report all incidents of hazing to a teacher, clinician, or administrator –
Supervisor, Education or Day Treatment Director, or Director of Student Services.
It is the responsibility of Doctor Franklin Perkins School to inform all students about what
hazing is and to report acts of hazing to the local law enforcement. Legal action is taken by local
law enforcement agencies.
Bullying
Bullying is defined as:
The repeated use of one or more student’s written, verbal, electronic expression, or physical act
that:
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Causes physical or emotional harm to the targeted student or damage to the targeted student’s
property.
Places the targeted student in reasonable fear of harm to himself or herself or of damage to his/her
property.
Creates a hostile environment at school for the targeted student.
Infringes on the rights of the targeted student at school.
Materially and substantially disrupts the educational process or the orderly operation of the school.
Retaliation of threats or actions directed towards a student who reports bullying. Provides information
during an investigation or bullying, or witnesses or has reliable information about bullying will not be
tolerated and treated with similar consequences.
An investigation of the complaint is conducted by the Human Rights Officer through interviews with the
person who made the complaint, students who was the target, person against whom the complaint was
made, and any students or staff who witnessed the alleged incidents.
In appropriate circumstances local law enforcement agencies may be notified. Legal action is taken by
local law enforcement agencies.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Student Name: __________________
Grade: ______________
Date: _________
I have received a copy of and understand our School’s policies regarding:
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Registering Student Complaints and Grievances
Anti-Hazing Policy
Bullying Prevention and Intervention Plan
_________________________________
Student Signature
_________________________________
Teacher Signature
CC: Student Record
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CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY
CONFIDENTIALITY
409.1
POLICY:
It is the policy of Doctor Franklin Perkins School that affairs of students and residents of the
Agency and other business matters related to the operation of the Agency should be discussed
with no one outside the Agency except when required in carrying out assigned responsibilities.
COMMENT:
1. Disclosure of records or other personally identifiable information to anyone other than
parents or designated representatives is strictly prohibited.
2. Only those employees with direct responsibility for planning and implementation of
treatment or educational programs are authorized to examine the permanent records of
students and residents. Direct care staff has access to permanent records only with the
permission and under the supervision of the social worker or director.
3. All persons with authorization to review records must indicate having done so with the Client
Records Coordinator. A list is maintained including the name and title of person reviewing
the records, the date access was given and the purpose for which the records were reviewed.
4. Written authorization from parents or guardians is necessary prior to disclosure of records or
records or other individually identifiable information to any individual other than parents,
parents’ designated representatives, sending school/agency system, or representatives of state
and federal regulating agencies. Unauthorized disclosure of such information is strictly
prohibited. Questions relating to Agency records should be addressed to the COO or CFO.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
LOCKDOWN PROCEDURES
A LOCKDOWN is considered a potential emergency inside or outside of any of the Schools
(Elementary, Middle and High School). The primary purpose of LOCKDOWN is to keep
students, visitors, and staff safe until help can arrive by using a simple lock down procedure. The
Lancaster Police Department encourages any person who witnesses a potential emergency to
call; 978-365-6308 and/or 911. If unsure about the severity of an issue, call the main office at
extension 6461 and state the potential need for a lock down. If you are unable to reach the main
office, contact the Lancaster Police Department immediately and follow their directions. If a
LOCK DOWN is called, use the Director of Education’s office at ext. 6522 for further
communication. If neither extension is available, an announcement will be made identifying the
Command Center.
LOCKDOWN INTERNAL (announced 3 times)
1. Is used when there is a potential emergency inside a school.
A. For example:
i.
Intruder
ii.
Bomb scare
iii.
Suspicious package
2. Lock down procedure:
A. Quickly look out in the hallway to direct any student or staff member into your
room immediately
B. Lock all doors to the classroom and offices
C. Shut off all lights
D. Have iPad available for communication (or phone)
E. Move student away from doors and move away from the line of sight from
windows
F. Close blinds if possible
G. Stay as quiet as possible
H. Advise students that there is some type of emergency but you are not certain
what it is. Project a calm attitude to help students remain calm. Remain quiet as
possible and reassure students that they are safe
I. Take Attendance
J. Wait for instructions to be sent over intercom or via electronic mail
K. Never open doors during a lock down, even in the event of a fire alarm
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LOCK DOWN EXTERNAL (announced 3 times)
1. Is used when there is a potential emergency outside a school.
A. For example:
i. Gas leak
ii. Suspicious person on property
iii. Police emergency
2. Lock down procedure:
A. Lock all doors to the classroom and offices
B. Take attendance
i. Contact the office if:
- A student is missing or member of the faculty directly witnessed
emergency outside
C. Business as usual in the classroom
D. Wait for instructions
the
ALL CLEAR (announced three times)
IN THE EVENT THAT THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION’S OFFICE CANNOT BE
USED AS A COMMAND CENTER, AN ANNOUNCEMENT WILL BE MADE
IDENTIFYING THE NEW LOCATION AND EXTENSION NUMBER. AN EMAIL
WILL ALSO BE SENT TO ALL STAFF WITH THE LOCATION AND EXTENSION
NUMBER.
STAY IN PLACE
STAY IN PLACE is used for an environmental situation or weather related situation, where it is
necessary to keep all occupants within the school. This procedure may also be used for a
medical emergency or serious student issue. In this situation, the school continues to function
normally, with the classroom until the situation is resolved.
1. Stay in place procedure:
A. Remain in your classroom, do not allow transitions outside of the classroom
B. Individuals in the hallway should enter the nearest classroom/area and remain
there until directed otherwise
C. Advise students that there is some type of emergency that requires everyone to
remain in the classroom, but learning will continue within the room
D. Close window and door blinds
E. Continue learning within the classroom
F. Wait for instructions to conclude the procedure
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COMMAND CENTER
LOCKDOWN RESPONSIBILITIES
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The Director of Education or assigned designee will make the LOCK DOWN Internal and/or
External announcement over the PA system. The LOCK DOWN announcement will be
repeated three times.
Following the announcement an email message will be sent to all staff announcing the
Internal and/or External lock down.
Following the announcement, the Administrative Assistant or designee will place a sign on
the main office window (facing the Janeway entrance) “Our campus is in a lockdown. Please
return to your vehicle until further notice.”
The Administrative Assistant or designee will close all window shades in the main office,
lock the main office door, and report to the Director of Education’s office or identified
location. The administrative assistant in the Memorial Building will notify the BESTT
Program (both locations) that the campus is in lockdown. Director of Education or assigned
designee will contact the Lancaster Police Department at 978-365-6308 and 911.
The Director of Education’s office is the Command Center (ext. 6522). If the Director of
Education’s office is not available, staff will be notified via intercom and email of the new
command center location.
The Director of Education, or his/her designee will contact the following:
A. Kitchen staff at: ext. 6402
B. Director of Facilities at: 774-287-7434
C. Executive Director’s Administrative Assistant at: ext. 6401
 The Manor Receptionist will be called at: ext. 3889 if the Administrative
Assistant cannot be reached.
 Pappas Hall at: ext. 4860
 Bowman Hall (Snack Shack) at: ext.
The Executive Director’s Administrative Assistant, Manor Receptionist or designee will:
A. Lock the exterior doors to the Manor
B. Notify the following of the lock down and to follow the School LOCK
DOWN procedures until further notice:
 Residential Programs
 The Behavioral Health Clinic at: 978-368-6442
 Davis Manor at: 978-368-4816
 The Barn at: 978-368-4805
 The CDC at: 978-368-6468
 Russell O’Connell Center at: 978-368-1658/6451
 Barlow at: 978-368-6472
 1030 Main Street at: 978-368-4890
 Weymouth Hall at: 978-368-6511
The Executive Director’s Assistant, Manor Receptionist or designee will gather the names of
any students all students who are off campus at the facilities listed in #7 and contact the
Director of Education at ext. 6522 with the information. These names will be forwarded to
the Lancaster Police Department.
All Perkins staff personnel should remain off the Main Campus until further notice.
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The Administrative Assistant or designee working with the Director of Education, designee,
will scribe the procedures/actions that take place from the announcement of the LOCK
DOWN command to the ALL CLEAR announcement.
The Lancaster Police Department will determine if there is no longer an emergency situation,
and will inform the Director of Education, or designee. The ALL CLEAR announcement
will be made three times.
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE AND INFECTION CONTROL
The goal of the Infection Control Program is to minimize the risk and to prevent the occurrence
of infection in either students or staff, and to further limit the spread of an
infection/communicable disease if one occurs. All new students and staff are screened for
exposure to Tuberculosis. All students are admitted with a completed immunization history and
evaluated for exposure/immunity to Hepatitis A, B, C, Varicella, Measles, Mumps, and Rubella.
All students and staff are offered an annual influenza immunization at no cost. The Director of
Health Care Services organizes multiple influenza immunization clinics for staff and maintains
an ongoing effort to increase participation each year.
The Director of HCS serves as the Exposure Control Officer for the organization. All employees
must demonstrate understanding of the blood-borne pathogens information at the time of
orientation and annually thereafter. The greatest risk for infection is through exposure to bodily
fluids. The use of Universal Precautions is taught in orientation and outlined in detail the
Exposure Control Plan. All employees are educated regarding the location of personal protective
equipment throughout the campus. Communicable diseases and infections are reported as
mandated to the Department of Public Health as required by the MGL C111 S111.
Parents/guardians are notified in writing by the Director of Health Care Services when a
reportable communicable disease is diagnosed at the agency.
If a student or staff member is diagnosed with a communicable disease, the Program Nurse is
responsible for consulting with the physician on procedures to be implemented to reduce risk of
further exposure. This may include such practices as: isolating the student from other students,
advising the staff member remain at home until not contagious, utilizing housekeeping
interventions, utilizing sterile procedures, etc. The Program Nurse will provide information to
staff that regularly interact with the infected student or staff member, about the disease
symptoms.
An infected staff member may return to work if he/she has a doctor’s note stating that the
infectious period is past and the staff member is not contagious. It is the responsibility of the
Program Directors to ensure that the staff member does not return without the proper clearance.
These documents are maintained by Human Resources in the staff’s HR file.
EMERGENCY EVACUATION ROUTES
All buildings on campus have a detailed floor plan and Emergency Evacuation roots posted as
well as illuminated exit signs.
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EMERGENCY POWER PROGRAM
It is the policy of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School to manage emergency power through
several programs.
 Each program has emergency lighting installed which comes on at the instant of a general
power los. The emergency lights provide light to emergency fire exits for a limited period of
time, enabling students to be safely evacuated from the building.
 There are currently generators in service for Davis Manor, Barlow, Duplex, Friends, Manor,
Pappas, Curtis Hall, Weymouth, and White Hall. The generators are propane powered and
run continuously during any power outage. They each employ automatic tripping devices
and start up immediately upon loss of power and are tested monthly for functionality.
 Each building is supplied with an ample supply of flashlights and backup batteries for staff
use during a power failure.
 The emergency relocation program encompasses procedures for the relocation of students
during extended power losses whereby a building is rendered unusable.
 Each building has emergency generator backup services.
EMERGENCY TRANSPORTATION
Transportation in an emergency shall be by ambulance. If a student requires medical attention,
but it is not an emergency, the supervisor can determine to bring the student in a school vehicle.
The student’s best interest will be the deciding factor. The student’s medical record should
accompany him/her to the doctor/hospital to provide insurance information, medical history,
medication information, etc.
Police, Ambulance, Fire (Lancaster and Clinton)
911
PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS AND SUPPORT SERVICES FOR
ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER STUDENTS AND/OR BRAILLE
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School is committed to serving English Language Learner and/or
Braille students and accepts such students into its programs. ELL and Braille students are
identified by the sending district (ELL state law, G.L.c. 71A) prior to admissions to the Doctor
Franklin Perkins School. Doctor Franklin Perkins School will collaborate with the school district
to develop a plan of instruction and assign a specifically trained staff/ qualified teacher will
oversee services for such a student. ELL or Braille students are afforded the same opportunity to
access and participate in the program’s services, activities, and other benefits as all other students
Unless the student’s IEP specifies otherwise, the student will received sheltered content
instruction from a trained and qualified teacher and English as second language by a certified
ELL or Braille teacher.
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FIRE/EVACUATION DRILL POLICY AND PROCEDURES
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School is committed to insuring that all students and staff are
adequately trained in how to safely evacuate their building in the event of an emergency. To that
end, the following procedures will be followed:
1. All new employees and students will be oriented to the program’s Fire/Evacuation Drill
procedures within forty eight hours of beginning employment or admission to the program.
2. Regular Fire/Evacuation Drills will occur in each building. These drills will be scheduled
each calendar year by the Quality Assurance Specialist. There will be at least one drill per
month in each building. The drills will be scheduled such that first, second and third shifts
each experience the Fire/Evacuation Drill procedures on a regular basis.
3. A member of the Operations Department is responsible for activating the building alarm
system for the scheduled drill. The Operations representative will record the results of the
drill on the appropriate Fire/Evacuation Drill Form.
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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
In regularly scheduled Fire Drills the Operations representative will inform the Director
and confirm that the drill will occur unless extenuating circumstances regarding student
behavior or weather exist that would make the drill unsafe. If the decision is that it is
unsafe, the Operations representative will inform his/her supervisor and reschedule the
drill. The conditions leading to the decision to not evacuate a student will be clearly
documented on the Fire Drill Report and will be carefully reviewed by the Director.
 In unannounced Fire Drills, and on all occasions when the alarm sounds unexpectedly, all
students will need to be evacuated, using whatever measures are necessary to escort even
agitated students in as safe a manner as possible.
Upon completion of the Fire/Evacuation Drill Form, the Operations representative will
forward the Form to his/her Program Director for review, who will then submit the form to
the Quality Assurance Specialist. The Quality Assurance Specialist will insure that the data
is properly recorded and will determine if any follow-up action is required.
In addition to the above, regularly scheduled Fire/Evacuation Drills, the Safety Committee
will periodically conduct unannounced Fire/Evacuation Drills in each program. Results of
these unannounced drills will also be recorded and submitted to the Quality Assurance
Specialist.
Quarterly summaries of regularly scheduled and unannounced Fire/Evacuation Drills will be
compiled by the Quality Assurance Specialist and submitted to the Clinical Director, the
Program Director, the Education Director, the Safety Committee and the Executive
Committee for review and comment.
The supervisor shall officially end the drill and direct students and staff back into the
building. In the event of a real emergency, the supervisor would direct staff and students to
the nearest residence for shelter.
In the event of a real fire or emergency the supervisor shall notify the fire department of the
fire, including the following information:
 Name of informant
 Name and location at the Doctor Franklin Perkins School
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Description of the building in which the fire is located; area of the building in which fire
or other hazard is located.
 If any students or staff are unaccounted for
9. After notification of the fire department the supervisor will immediately notify the Executive
Director. The supervisor shall be given instructions on where to re-locate staff and students
as well as next steps regarding any staff or students who are missing.
10. Once fire and emergency personnel have arrived the supervisor shall direct his/her attention
to the re-location of staff and students.
11. In the event of severe weather conditions or the need to evacuate the education buildings, all
students and adults will return to their respective residences with staff.
RUN AWAY/MISSING STUDENT /SEARCH PROCEDURE
A student is considered a “runaway” when that person’s whereabouts is unknown. No student is
to be unaccounted for at any time.
Prior to implementing the search, the supervisor will establish that the student is missing. This is
accomplished by searching the immediate area where the student was last seen and speaking with
any individuals who are in the area and might know the student’s whereabouts. If within two
minutes, the exact location of a student has not been determined, the following shall occur:
 The supervisor notifies the program director that the student is missing and the location and
time the student was last seen.
 The supervisor will become the “Search Coordinator” and organize the search efforts. All
staff assigned to search will report to and monitor progress through the Search Coordinator.
 The Search Coordinator will assign each available staff person to search a specific area of the
school’s grounds and buildings. Staff searching will be provided with a cell phone.
 While the search is in progress, the following staff is to be notified: Executive Director,
Director of Programs and/or Director of Education, On-Call Administrator.
 If the student is found, the search will cease; the incident will be documented and become
part of the student's permanent record.
If the student is not found, and 30 minutes (or less depending on the student and his/her clinical
profile and age) has elapsed, the following steps are taken:
 The local police are notified of the missing student. Information provided will include: a
description of the student, last location, response to search efforts, and self-preservation
skills.
 The student’s parents/guardian, referral agency, and LEA are notified.
 The role of Search Coordinator will transfer from the Supervisor to the program
administrator.
Once the student is found and returned, the following steps shall be taken:
 Notification to administrators, parents, police and referral source.
 Medical assessment of student’s condition.
 Clinical assessment of student’s condition.
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Provision of food and bathing, if appropriate.
Implementation of Risk Protocol
Special Notification
 The Program Liaison of the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education shall be
notified by e-mail or telephone within 24 hours and by use of a Form 2.
 The Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC) shall also be notified.
 If the student is in the custody of the Department of Children and Families, (DCF) will be
notified immediately and on their 24-hour hot line if the incident occurs after hours.
SNOW EMERGENCY/VAN POLICY
During serious inclement weather the Agency will evaluate the safety of driving conditions and
may choose to issue a Vehicle Ban. During a Vehicle Ban, no Agency vehicles may be
transporting students to activities. During the school day, the Vehicle Ban is determined by the
Director of Education.
In situations when the School Program needs to be closed, announcements will be made on the
following media stations: www.dfps.org, WBZ 4 and TV 38; WCVB/Channel 5; NBC Channel
7 and 56.
STUDENT ILLNESS
Sick Student Assessment – Residential
Residential students that complain of new onset of illness or injury are reported by program supervisor to
on call nurse. The nurse will make an assessment based on the information given by staff. The nurse will
recommend the treatment necessary or will recommend that the student be evaluated further by a
physician. The use of basic first aid administered by the staff is appropriate for many of these
incidents/injuries.
In the event that a student in a student’s program presents with fever over 100F, active vomiting or
diarrhea, or other signs of contagious illness, the program supervisor will determine if the student should
remain back from school. A program nurse will later evaluate any student held back from school and
make recommendations for further treatment/evaluation.
Sick Student Assessment – Day
In the case of a day treatment student presenting new onset of symptoms during the school day, the
student will be evaluated by the school nurse to determine:
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fever greater than 100.4f,
vomiting, diarrhea
other signs of contagious illness
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If the student presents with these symptoms the parent/guardian will be contacted and asked to pick the
student up from school as soon as possible. The student will remain in an area away from other students
that can ensure proper supervision until the proper guardian is able to pick them up.
STUDENT ATTENDANCE POLICY
Attendance Policy
Under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: “Every child between the ages of 6 and
16 is compelled to attend school.” Except in cases of illness or other extenuating circumstances,
students are expected to be present when school is in session. Family vacations and trips, which
are scheduled when school is in session, are not considered valid reasons for absence. Although
teachers will allow students to make up missed assignments, tests, and quizzes, they are not
required to prepare work in advance for a vacation related absence. In addition, teachers are not
required to re-teach or tutor students when they return from a vacation. Furthermore, the
classroom teacher will establish the appropriate timeframe for making up the work.
A student is allowed up to 14 unexcused absences total for a year- long course (5 block
hours) and 7 unexcused absences for a semester course (2.5 block hours). Attendance will be
reviewed quarterly and each semester and noted on progress reports and report cards. Missing
more than half of the class period due to unexcused tardiness will be counted as an absence for
the class period.
Absence Note (Day Students)
A student is required to submit an absence note to the main office within two days of his/ her
return to school. Notes do not eliminate/excuse absences, tardiness, or dismissals; they indicate
parent awareness of the absence.
Excusable Absences (Formal Documentation Required)
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Death in the family (parent, sibling, grandparent, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, cousin.)
Heath Professional appointment – formally documented note needed from Physician, Dentist,
Optometrist, etc.
Doctor Franklin Perkins School sponsored activities: field trips, class meetings, in-school or
external suspension
Religious Holiday Observance
Legal/Court appointments- Court note required upon return to school
Credit Courses and Grades (9-12)
A student is allowed up to 14 unexcused absences total for a year- long course (5 block
hours) and 7 unexcused absences for a semester course (2.5 block hours). Attendance will be
reviewed quarterly and each semester and noted on progress reports and report cards. Missing
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more than half of the class period due to unexcused tardiness will be counted as an absence for
the class period.
STUDENT ABUSE OR NEGLECT REPORTING POLICY AND
PROCEDURE
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School is committed to professional, humane, and ethical treatment
of students serviced by our program. To this end, student abuse is considered a serious legal and
treatment issue. Student abuse is defined in four categories. These are physical abuse,
emotional/verbal abuse, sexual abuse, and human rights abuse.
Physical Abuse
Physical abuse is defined as pushing, grabbing, slapping, spanking, pinching, shaking, or
physically restraining, as a punitive response and/or with the specific intent to hurt or cause pain
to the student.
Emotional/Verbal Abuse
Emotional and verbal abuse is defined as the use of statements and/or actions whose intent it is to
humiliate, scapegoat, poke fun at, or belittle. In addition, verbal abuse shall include yelling and
swearing at students.
Sexual Abuse
Sexual abuse is defined as the attempted or direct contact between a staff person and student
(with or without mutual consent) which shall include; vaginal or anal intercourse, oral sex,
fondling, or exposing. Statements of a sexually provocative nature or those that disclose to the
student a staff person’s own sexual issues shall be included in this category.
Human Rights Abuse
Human Rights abuse is defined as the removal of a student’s rights to privacy, personal
possessions, clothing, adequate supervision, telephone privileges, guardian, family, legal or
clergy contact, shelter, food, or toileting, as a punishment. Such removal may occur only as part
of a specific treatment plan under strict Clinical Team guidelines and authorizations.
Any staff member who observes abuse of a student or suspect’s abuse of a student is required to
report such concerns to their immediate supervisor. The report should be verbal as well as in
writing, and must be submitted prior to the end of that shift. It is the responsibility of the
supervisor to assess the immediate risk to students and to notify the Director of Education, who
shall inform the Executive Director.
The Director of Education together with the Executive Director performs the following
responsibilities:
 Ensure removal and/or suspension of staff member(s), if necessary.
 Inform the Executive Director of the report.
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Notify the police, if allegation is of a criminal nature (sexual abuse).
Make formal referral to the Human Rights Officer for a full investigation.
Ensure immediate medical attention and/or clinical intervention to student, if necessary.
Contact the Department of Social Services and file a 51A, if appropriate (always for
sexual abuse and physical abuse). Contact the Disabled Person Protective Commission
(DPPC) if the student is 18 or older to file a report.
Notify the Department of Education, the Office for Children, and/or any other appropriate
agency (DMH, etc.) involved with the student.
Contact the student’s family, if appropriate.
It is a priority that the staff person filing the complaint as well as the staff alleged in the
complaint must be available in person and by telephone during internal investigation.
An internal investigation shall be conducted by the Human Rights Officer within 24 hours of
receipt of the complaint. A typed report with findings and recommendations shall be submitted
to the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall be responsible for acting on those
recommendations.
INTERNAL INVESTIGATIONS
The Doctor Franklin Perkins School is required by regulation to conduct an independent internal
investigation regarding student care when the following occur:
 A student registers a complaint about a staff member.
 A family registers a complaint about care.
 A student registers a complaint about another student (i.e. sexually inappropriate,
harassing, theft).
 A staff member registers a complaint regarding care.
 A student is injured in a restraint or other form of behavioral intervention.
 A student is given the wrong medication.
Such investigations are in addition to other actions that may need to be taken such as the filing of
a 51A, notification to the Office for Child Care Services, reporting to Department of Social
Services, etc.
An internal investigation is completed by the Human Rights Officer and a report submitted to the
Executive Director. Actions based on that report are documented. Such reports are required to
be made available to the Office for Child Care Services upon completion.
REPORTING SUSPECTED ABUSE AND NEGLECT
YOUR RESPONSIBILITY AS MANDATED REPORTERS
51A Reporting
It is the policy of the Agency to report any witnessed, suspected, or reported abuse or neglect of
a student. All professional staff that works directly with students are mandated reported and in
accordance with the law must file a report with the Department of Children and Families.
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Any time a person suspects or witnesses abuse or neglect, they must report that immediately to
their supervisor. If their supervisor is not available, then the person should report to the Director
of Education or designee.
Within 24 hours of receipt of allegations, the Director of Education or designee will file a 51A.
Clinicians providing individual and group therapy are required to inform their students of their
51A reporting mandate. Any disclosures of abuse of neglect within therapy are to be brought to
the immediate attention of the clinical social worker and a 51A filed.
Any mandated reporter may file a 51A in addition to the program administrative staff. Doctor
Franklin Perkins School files with the Leominster DCF office located at 215 Hamilton Street,
Leominster MA; telephone number 978-466-5960.
The Human Rights Officer will also file the 51A on behalf of the student by telephone with DCF
and shall send a follow up written report. If the case is active with the Department of Children
and Families, Human Rights Officer will send a follow up letter to the DCF worker documenting
the telephone call in which the allegation was reported and the steps that we have taken since.
In cases of receiving an allegation that has already been reported on, the Human Rights Officer
will send a follow up letter to the DCF worker stating that the incident and documenting that the
allegation is one that has already been reported.
Any time a 51A is filed we make all effort to inform the family, especially if the allegation is
about parental abuse or neglect. It is important that the therapist discuss the potential impact of
the allegation on the family and devise strategies to manage
All documentation regarding 51A’s must be sent to the student record.
Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC)
We are required to report all instances of institutional abuse and neglect to our licensing agency
which is the Department of Early Education and Care (DEEC).
DPPC REPORTING
The Disabled Persons Protection Commission is an independent state Agency created to protect
disabled adults from abuse. The Commission works with other agencies involved in providing
care and treatment for disabled persons.
Any suspected abuse, neglect, or violation of student rights for students 18 and over who are
disabled is to be reported to The Disabled Persons Protective Commission. It is the policy of the
Agency that all professional staff are considered mandated reporters and if they have reason to
believe that abuse has occurred are required to report that to DPPC, their supervisor, and if
necessary ,the Human Rights Officer.
Any mandated reporter may file directly in addition to the program administrative staff. Doctor
Franklin Perkins School files with DPPC at 1-800-426-9009.
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STAFF ATTENDANCE AND CALL OUT PROCEDURES
To insure proper staffing and instruction at the school, all staff are expected to report to work on
time. However, we do understand that illness, traffic delays, or unexpected emergencies can
arise.
If you are ill, you are responsible to call Director of Student Services (978-368-6550), the main
office (978-368-6461), and your supervisor as early as possible – but no later than 7AM – and
leave a message on their voice mail that you are calling out sick.
If you are going to arrive late to work due to an unforeseen emergency situation follow the same
procedure and contact your supervisor as soon as possible. Leave a clear message as to when
you expect to report to work.
If you need to request time off to attend to business outside of work please check with your
supervisor prior to submitting an ADI request. Your supervisor will confirm the time
availability, through the Time-Off Calendar maintained by the Administrative Assistant, prior to
verifying your time request. Once you receive confirmation of probable approval from your
supervisor, submit an ADI leave request at least two weeks in advance of the requested date. The
Administrative Assistant manages all time off requests so as to insure proper staffing in the
building.
In the circumstance of an emergency and time off is requested, either to arrive late, leave early,
or take the day off, this should be discussed directly with your supervisor for approval.
Staff is responsible for maintaining the ADI data base signing in and out if hourly and submitting
leave requests for any time off.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
TECHNOLOGY GUIDE STAFF
EMAIL USAGE AND RETENTION POLICY
The purpose of this policy is to ensure the proper use of Doctor Franklin Perkins School
email system and make users aware of what Doctor Franklin Perkins School deems as
acceptable and unacceptable use of its email system. Doctor Franklin Perkins School
reserves the right to amend this policy at its discretion. In case of amendments, users will be
informed appropriately.
LEGAL RISKS
Email is a business communication tool and users are obliged to use this tool in a
responsible, effective and lawful manner. Although by its nature email seems to be less
formal than other written communication, the same laws apply. Therefore, it is important
that users are aware of the legal risks of email:
 If you send emails with any libelous, defamatory, offensive, racist or obscene remarks,
you and Doctor Franklin Perkins School can be held liable.
 If you forward emails with any libelous, defamatory, offensive, racist or obscene
remarks, you and Doctor Franklin Perkins School can be held liable.
 If you unlawfully forward confidential information, you and Doctor Franklin Perkins
School can be held liable.
 If you unlawfully forward or copy messages without permission, you and Doctor
Franklin Perkins School can be held liable for copyright infringement.
 If you send an attachment that contains a virus, you and Doctor Franklin Perkins School
can be held liable.
 By following the guidelines in this policy, the email user can minimize the legal risks
involved in the use of email. If any user disregards the rules set out in this Email Policy,
the user will be fully liable and Doctor Franklin Perkins School will disassociate itself
from the user as far as legally possible.
LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
The following rules are required by law and are to be strictly adhered to. It is prohibited to:
 Send or forward emails containing libelous, defamatory, offensive, racist or obscene
remarks. If you receive an email of this nature, you must promptly notify your
supervisor.
 Forward a message without acquiring permission from the sender first.
 Send unsolicited email messages.
 Forge or attempt to forge email messages.
 Disguise or attempting to disguise your identity when sending mail.
 Send email messages using another person’s email account.
 Copy a message or attachment belonging to another user without permission of the
originator.
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BEST PRACTICES
Doctor Franklin Perkins School considers email as an important means of communication
and recognizes the importance of proper email content and speedy replies in conveying a
professional image and delivering good customer service. Users should take the same care
in drafting an email as they would for any other communication.
Therefore Doctor Franklin Perkins School wishes users to adhere to the following
guidelines:
Writing emails:
 Write well-structured emails and use short, descriptive subjects.
 Doctor Franklin Perkins School’s email style is informal. This means that sentences can
be short and to the point. You can start your email with ‘Hi’, or ‘Dear’, and the name of
the person. Messages can be ended with ‘Best Regards’. The use of Internet
abbreviations and characters such as smileys however, is not encouraged.
 Permanent documents should not be created in mail, but rather in word or excel and
attached to the e-mail message. Documents can then be saved to a permanent folder and
the e-mail deleted.
 Users must spell check all mails prior to transmission.
 Do not send unnecessary attachments.
 Do not write emails in capitals.
 Do not use cc: or bcc: fields unless the cc: or bcc: recipient is aware that you will be
copying a mail to him/her and knows what action, if any, to take.
 If you forward mails, state clearly what action you expect the recipient to take.
 Only mark emails as important if they really are important.
Replying to emails:
 Emails should be answered within at least 8 working hours, but users must endeavor to
answer priority emails within 4 hours.
 Staff is encouraged to delete any email messages that you do not need to have a copy of,
and set your email client to automatically empty your ‘deleted items’ on closing.
Please refer to the Email Etiquette Tips outline in the Forms Section of this manual.
PERSONAL USE
 It is strictly forbidden to use the Doctor Franklin Perkins School email system for
anything other than legitimate business purposes. Therefore, the sending of personal
emails, chain letters, junk mail, jokes and executables is prohibited. All messages
distributed via the company’s email system are Doctor Franklin Perkins School’s
property.
CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION
 Never send any confidential information via email. If you are in doubt as to whether to
send certain information via email, check this with your supervisor first.
PASSWORDS
 All passwords must be kept confidential. Users may have an expectation of privacy in
the use of their personal folders. However, all other folders in the system do not provide
a similar level of privacy.
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ENCRYPTION
 Users may not encrypt any emails without obtaining written permission from the Chief
Technology Officer. If approved, the encryption key(s) must be made known to and
approved by the Doctor Franklin Perkins School School.
EMAIL RETENTION
 All emails will be automatically deleted after 60 days.
 Staff who terminate employment with the Perkins School will have all access deleted.
 Any user who violates the Doctor Franklin Perkins School’s Proper Use Policy is
subject to account lockout or deletion. This includes using another person’s
name/password, letting others use your name/password, or any other abuse of the
email system. Unless special arrangements have been made in advance, Email
accounts not used for 60 days will be deactivated and deleted.
 Email is not to be archived to prevent deletion at the end of sixty days.
SYSTEM MONITORING
 Users expressly waive any right of privacy in anything they create, store, send or receive
on the company’s computer system. Doctor Franklin Perkins School can, but is not
obliged to, monitor emails without prior notification. If there is evidence that you are not
adhering to the guidelines set out in this policy, the Doctor Franklin Perkins School
reserves the right to take disciplinary action, including termination and/or legal action.
DISCLAIMER
 The following disclaimer will be added to each outgoing email:
“This e-mail and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended
solely for the use of the individual or entity to which they are addressed. If
you have received this e-mail in error, this message and any attachment(s)
should be immediately checked for the presence of viruses and deleted from
your system. The Doctor Franklin Perkins School accepts no liability for
any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email”
QUESTIONS
 If you have any questions or comments about this Email Policy, please contact Peter
Carlson, Chief Technology Officer, at extension 6415. If you do not have any questions,
Doctor Franklin Perkins School presumes that you understand and are aware of the rules
and guidelines in this Email Policy and will adhere to them.
Please refer to the Email Etiquette Tips outline in the Forms Section of this manual.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
TECHNOLOGY GUIDE STUDENTS
Children’s Technology and Internet Usage Policy
INTRODUCTION:
To ensure that students receive a quality education, it is the policy of the Doctor Franklin Perkins
School to provide all students with access to a variety of technological resources.
The creation of a large and varied technological environment demands that technology usage be
conducted in legally and ethically appropriate ways, consistent with the instructional goals of the
Doctor Franklin Perkins School.
Thus, it is the intention of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School that all technology resources will
be used in accordance with any and all school policies and procedures as well as local, state, and
federal laws and/or guidelines governing the usage of technology and its component parts.
Additionally, it is implied that all students will use the provided technology resources so as not
to waste them, abuse them, interfere with or cause harm to other individuals, institutions, or
companies.
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


The Chief Technology Officer will be responsible for establishing specific practices to
enforce this policy.
This policy will be available for review or a copy obtained from the Chief Technology
Officer.
All Doctor Franklin Perkins School technology resources, regardless of purchase date,
location, or fund, are subject to this policy.
Any questions about this policy, its interpretation, or specific circumstances shall be directed
to the Chief Technology Officer before proceeding.
POLICY STATEMENT:
The primary goal of the technology environment is to support the educational and instructional
endeavors of students of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School. Use of any and all technology
resources is a privilege and not a right.
I. ACCESS:
A. The use of all Doctor Franklin Perkins School’s technology resources is a privilege, not a
right, and inappropriate or suspected inappropriate use will result in a cancellation of
those privileges.
B. Students may use only accounts, files, software, and technology resources that are
assigned to him/her.
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C. Individuals may not attempt to log in to the network by using another person's account
and/or password or allow someone to use his/her password to access the training network,
or the Internet.
D. Individuals must take all reasonable precautions to prevent unauthorized access to
accounts and data and any other unauthorized usage within the Doctor Franklin Perkins
School.
E. Students identified as a security risk may be denied access.
F. Any use of technology resources that reduces the efficiency of use for others will be
considered a violation of this policy.
G. Students must not attempt to disrupt any computer services or data by spreading viruses
or by any other means.
H. Students must not attempt to modify technology resources, utilities, and configurations,
or change the restrictions associated with his/her accounts, or attempts to breach any
technology resources security system, either with or without malicious intent.
I. The Chief Technology Officer will determine when inappropriate use has occurred and
will seek authorization to deny, revoke, or suspend specific student accounts.
II. PRIVACY:
A. To maintain network integrity and to insure that the network is being used responsibly,
the Chief Technology Officer reserves the right to review files and network
communications.
B. Students should not expect that files stored on the Doctor Franklin Perkins School'
network will always be private.
C. Because communications on the Internet are, often, public in nature, all students should
be careful to maintain appropriate and responsible communications.
D. The Doctor Franklin Perkins School cannot guarantee the privacy, security, or
confidentiality of any information sent or received via the Internet.
E. Students should be aware that the Chief Technology Officer routinely monitors and
performs maintenance on file servers, workstations, and the Internet and user accounts.
During these procedures, it may be necessary to review files stored on the network.
F. The Chief Technology Officer does perform routine backups. However, all users are
responsible for storage of any critical files and/or data.
III. COPYRIGHT:
A. Illegal copies of software may not be created or used on school equipment.
B. Any questions about copyright provisions should be directed to the Chief Technology
Officer.
C. Duplication of any copyrighted software is prohibited unless specifically allowed for in
the license agreement and then, should occur only under the supervision and direction of
the Technology department.
D. A backup copy of all purchased software programs will be made by the Technology
department and, thus, become the working copy.
E. All original copies of software programs, including those purchased with departmental
funds will be stored in a secure place.
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F. For security and insurance purposes, the Chief Technology Officer will be the only
person with access to original software disks at the Doctor Franklin Perkins School, with
the exception of educational CD-ROMs. System-wide software originals will be housed
at the Chief Technology Officer's office.
G. If a single copy of given software package is purchased, it may only be used on one
computer at a time. Multiple loading or "loading the contents of one disk onto multiple
computers is NOT allowed.
H. If more than one copy of a software package is needed, a site license or network version
must be purchased. The Chief Technology Officer and the person requesting the software
will be responsible for determining how many copies should be purchased.
I. The Executive Director, Chief Financial Officer or Chief Technology Officer is
authorized to sign software license agreements for the Doctor Franklin Perkins School.
J. The Chief Technology Officer is responsible for installation of all software for use on the
local area network and/or individual workstations within the Doctor Franklin Perkins
School.
IV. INTERNET:
A. The intent of the Doctor Franklin Perkins School is to provide access to resources
available via the Internet with the understanding that staff and students will access and
use information that is appropriate for his/her various curricula.
B. All school rules and guidelines for appropriate technology usage shall apply to usage of
the Internet.
C. Teachers will screen all Internet resources that will be used in the classroom prior to their
introduction.
D. Students will gain access to the Internet by agreeing to conduct themselves in a
considerate and responsible manner and by providing written permission from their
parents.
E. Students will be allowed to conduct independent research on the Internet upon the receipt
of the appropriate permission forms.
F. Permission is not transferable, and therefore, may not be shared.
G. Students that are allowed independent access to the Internet will have the capability of
accessing material that has not been screened.
V. INTERNET CONTENT FILTERING:
A. Internet access for all students is filtered, through St. Bernard’s Iprism appliance/software
located within the Technology Department. Maintenance and updates of the filtering
software is the responsibility of the Technology Department.
B. Access to the Internet may be filtered by URL, IP address, category, keyword or access
rules as appropriate.
C. URLs, IP addresses, categories or filtering rules may be added or deleted from the filtered
list at any time by the Technology department.
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FORMS, LISTS, AND SAMPLES
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Professional Teacher Standards
A. Plans Curriculum and Instruction
Standard
Draws on content of the relevant curriculum Frameworks to plan activities addressing standards
that will advance students’ level of content knowledge.
Plans sequential units of study that make learning cumulative, connect learning across
disciplines, and are based on the learning standards within the Frameworks.
Draws on results of formal and informal assessments and knowledge of human development to
plan learning activities appropriate for the range of students within a classroom.
Descriptor/Indicator
Knows content of relevant Curriculum Frameworks.
Relates classroom activities to specific Framework provisions.
Plans a hierarchy of lessons and units that demonstrate the sequence and relativity of all
activities and their relationship to the appropriate Framework.
Identifies prerequisite skills, concepts and vocabulary that students need to know in order to be
successful.
Understands the use of assessment in the planning of future and remedial work.
Demonstrates formal knowledge of the stages and indicators of human development.
Understands the relationship between human development and the ability of students to learn and
retain material.
Examples of Evidence
Lesson plans identify standards to be learned based on Frameworks.
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Teacher can produce written evidence of planning that shows sequence and a progressive
building toward learning objectives within the Frameworks.
Students can articulate the relationship between current and previous learning activities and the
overall goals of the unit.
Pre and post assessment tools show relevance to the subject matter and to the range of students
within the classroom.
Several different types of assessments are included in lesson plans.
Lessons demonstrate alternative approaches for diverse learners.
Teacher can express theory of human development and its application in lesson delivery.
A. Plans Curriculum and Instruction
Standard
Plans lessons with clear objectives and measurable outcomes.
Plans the pedagogy appropriate to the specific discipline and to the age and cognitive level of the
students in the classroom.
Seeks resources from colleagues, families, and the community to enhance learning.
Descriptor/Indicator
Formulates objectives base on previous student outcomes.
Formulates and refines a clear learning objective or objectives for each lesson. Selects learning
activities appropriate to the age, level, and performance of students. Relates conclusion of the
lesson to the objectives of the lesson.
Understands the capabilities of students in classroom.
Is aware of varied teaching techniques such as direct instruction, practice, discussion, problemsolving, research projects and the appropriate use of each.
Uses community resources to supplement and enhance learning activities.
Consults with colleagues, formally and informally, to increase learning opportunities.
Uses families as resources to support classroom instruction.
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Examples of Evidence
Lesson plans identify objectives and expected outcomes.
Plans include varied instructional strategies to achieve the objectives and outcomes. Students
can identify the objectives and expected outcomes of the lesson.
Articulates relationship between the age and cognitive level of students and the planned
pedagogical approach.
Plans show multiple pedagogical approaches to achieve desired objective.
Students have opportunities leagues, to interact with a variety of people from the community.
Plans and lesson delivery demonstrate the relationship between the use of the community
resource and the lesson objectives.
Administration is aware of occasions when community and staff resources are being used.
A. Plans Curriculum and Instruction
Standard
Integrates technology and media in the management of the work of teaching and in student
learning.
Uses information in Individual Education Plans (IEPs) to plan strategies and meet learning goals
and objectives.
Descriptor/Indicator
Is aware of and competent in all available technology.
Understands the use of technology as a teaching and learning tool to increase the quality of
instruction.
Understands the use of technology in planning, communicating, and record keeping.
Understands components of IEPs and teaching and learning strategies for students with special
needs that are compatible with regular classroom operations.
Examples of Evidence
Plans show opportunities for students to use multi-media platforms within learning activities.
Teacher uses available technology.
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Teacher collaborates with school-based specialists, resource personnel, and administrators to
meet the special learning needs of all students.
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Standard
Sets high standards and expectations.
Descriptor/Indicator
Is aware of school and agency expectations.
Identifies specific and challenging performance expectations for student learning.
Judges student work against the standards and expectations.
Informs parents about the standards and expectations and enlists their help in achieving them.
Examples of Evidence
Teachers, students, and parents can articulate performance standards and expectations.
Feedback to students is related to the standards.
Standards and high expectations are overtly explained in class work and in student and parent
communication.
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Standard
Clarifies learning objectives and gives students models of quality work to illustrate expectations.
Provides regular and frequent feedback to students on their progress.
Descriptor/Indicator
States or otherwise communicates the objectives of the lesson to students, preferably at the outset
of the lesson.
Explains relevance of new unit and connects it with previous work and future units.
Provides exemplars of student work to show quality and level of performance expected.
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Believes that students can achieve high standards and builds that belief within students.
Adheres to school policy on student conferences, grading, and return of student work, including
homework.
Is available to students after school and during unassigned times.
At the elementary level, he or she informs parents about progress and performance.
At the middle and high school level, maintains a system where students are aware of their
grade(s) between formal reporting periods.
Examples of Evidence
Students understand the objective of each lesson.
A well thought-out introductory lesson is used to start a new unit.
Students understand and can defend their grade(s) by referencing known performance
expectations.
Records of student conferences and meetings with parents are available for review.
Students receive frequent assessment and specific feedback, both verbally and in writing, on
individual pieces of work that allows students to correct and improve performance.
Appropriate examples of feedback are available for students and parents to review.
Trends in a student’s performance are noted early and parents and the student are informed in a
timely manner.
Students can explain their performance level between formal reporting periods.
Provides re-teaching opportunities for students who require it.
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Standard
Models clear writing and speaking in communication with students and families.
Employs multiple teaching and learning strategies.
Uses a variety of teaching techniques and provides many and varied opportunities for diverse
learners to achieve competence.
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Descriptor/Indicator
Uses correct language at all times in speaking to or with students.
Writes in a legible and grammatically correct manner.
Selects language that communicates effectively and respectfully with parents and students.
Expects clear and civil communication from all students.
Employs a variety of teaching techniques such as direct instruction, practice, discussion,
problem-solving, and research projects.
Demonstrates the training, talent, willingness, and intent of utilize numerous instructional
strategies.
Knows which techniques are likely to be most effective for a given lesson objective and group of
students.
Uses homework to reinforce lesson objectives and checks it for understanding.
Is skilled in using questioning to stimulate thinking and does not abandon a student who offers
an incorrect answer. Knows how to prompt correct answers and encourages student to respond.
Regularly checks for understanding. Regularly summarizes key concepts.
Examples of Evidence
Information written by teacher in class is grammatically correct, well planned, and age
appropriate.
Students’ oral and written communication errors are corrected in a supportive and calm manner.
Evidence of multiple strategies can be seen in plan book, classroom observation, and grading
system.
Notes in plan book about the use of and the success or failure of strategy demonstrate teacher
reflection on strategy.
Information gathered from checking for understanding and from formal and informal
assessments is used to modify instruction or re-teach objective.
Students feel supported in responding to questions.
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Teacher demonstrates flexibility in switching to another instructional strategy if the one planned
is not succeeding.
Evidence is available to show that teacher varied strategies for type(s) of learners within
classroom. Students actively summarized their learning through a variety of strategies.
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Standard
Integrates reading and writing across disciplines to meet the learning objectives.
Builds on students’ prior knowledge and experience.
Uses a variety of formal and informal assessments to accurately measure student progress
toward, and achievement of, the learning objectives, to plan or modify further instruction.
Descriptor/Indicator
Teaches and reinforces reading and writing strategies as appropriate for the discipline within the
context of assignments.
Uses reading and writing assignments to further the learning objectives.
Seeks opportunities to collaborate with colleagues to develop, assign, and assess reading and
writing assignments that promote interdisciplinary learning.
Incorporates previous learning into new units of study.
Selects appropriate review work in preparation for introduction of new concepts and units.
Shows connection between current topics and previous learning.
Confers with previous teacher and previous grade level performance indicators.
Regularly uses a variety of informal and formal assessments of student progress for instructional
revisions and decision-making.
Develops and uses authentic assessment which describes a student’s learning process as well as
his/her learning achievements.
Examples of Evidence
Students are using reading and writing strategies and assignments to further their learning.
Reading and writing assignments are linked to learning objectives.
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Students can explain the purpose of reading and writing assignments and their application across
content areas.
Builds cumulative review into assessment of current work.
Students’ grasp of previous knowledge is reinforced by formal and informal assessments.
Students can reference previous work and its application in current lesson or unit.
Records and information that may be helpful to a receiving teacher are shared.
Use of a variety of assessment opportunities can be found in plan books and student records.
Analyses of student work and new or modified lessons for individuals or for the group based on
that analyses are evident.
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Standard
Translates evaluation of student work into records that accurately convey the level of student
achievement.
Descriptor/Indicator
Maintains accurate record keeping in accordance with school policies and grade level
expectations.
Reports progress of student against the standards, not only to previous work.
Examples of Evidence
Can explain results from tests and other assessment instruments in language understandable to
students and parents.
Report cards are complete and accurately reflect student progress toward or mastery of the
learning standards.
C. Manages Classroom Climate and Operations
Standard
Creates an environment that is safe and conducive to learning.
Creates a physical environment appropriate to a range of learning activities.
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Descriptor/Indicator
Promotes confidence and perseverance in all students.
Maximizes and recognizes progress made through effort.
Understands that getting a student to internalize confidence and a belief in hard work can be a
long, gradual process.
Communicates the components of effective effort to students and families.
Communicates to students why specific student, classroom, or school expectations are made and
affords students the opportunity to discuss issues one-on-one with the teacher if students have
concerns with the expectations.
Is able to create a classroom environment that is conducive to learning through the use of decor,
student participation, and purposeful use of time.
Examples of Evidence
Students’ attempts to solve problems and exert effort are constantly reinforced.
Positive expectations of overall class competence are used to motivate individuals within the
group.
Teachers use perseverance and positive attributions when students make errors.
Students can express their teacher’s belief in them.
Various assessment instruments are used at the right time to reinforce the student’s belief in
his/her own capacity to learn.
The classroom is an inviting, stimulating place to the eye.
C. Manages Classroom Climate and Operations
Standard
Maintains appropriate standards of behavior, mutual respect, and safety.
Manages classroom routines and procedures without loss of significant instructional time.
Promotes climate of community, inclusion, and mutual support among students.
Creates an environment that promotes the philosophy and methods of Collaborative Problem
Solving
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Descriptor/Indicator
Sets expectations and conveys those expectations to students.
Takes action in disciplinary situations appropriate to the behavior and age level.
Seeks advice and assistance from support personnel as needed and keeps them informed about
potential problem areas.
Understands the importance of an orderly classroom in furthering the learning.
Carries out routine tasks without disruption.
Uses grade level and age-appropriate assignments to get routine tasks completed.
Understands how to build alliances and support mechanisms among students.
Communicates to students why specific student, classroom, or school expectations are made and
affords students the opportunity to discuss issues one-on-one with the teacher if students have
concerns with the expectations.
Understands how to give students ownership of classroom goals and activities.
Examples of Evidence
Students understand classroom and school expectations.
All safety procedures are implemented in the classroom or activity setting.
Individual problems are dealt with as they arise with minimum disruption of other students.
Daily routines are well organized and carried out by students and teacher without the need for
detailed instruction.
There is a quick and well-planned beginning to student participation in the class.
Teacher can respond to distractions and individual student needs while preserving the focus and
flow of the class.
Students ask for and get help from one another.
Students develop instructional materials such as questions, projects, and assessments.
Students participate in a discussion without fear of mistake; errors are honored.
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Students and teachers engage in “Plan B” discussions if disagreements regarding expectations
occur.
Students take intellectual risk.
D. Promotes Equity and an Appreciation of Diversity
Standard
Acts on the belief that all students can master a challenging curriculum and includes all students
in the range of academic opportunities and in higher order thinking.
Assesses the significance of student differences in performance levels, learning styles, cultural
heritage, language, socio-economic backgrounds, and physical and emotional disabilities and
adapts classroom activities appropriately.
Descriptor/Indicator
Demonstrates belief that students can achieve high standards and expresses this belief to
students.
Modifies instruction to meet the diverse needs of students within the classroom.
Tries a variety of strategies to engage diverse learners in order to stimulate their interest in the
lesson.
Continually assesses success of instructional strategy and changes approach if warranted.
Identifies students who are not meeting expectations and develops a plan that designates student
and teacher responsibilities.
Provides opportunities for extra help as needed.
Demonstrates appreciation for and sensitivity to the differences in students.
Knows background and culture of students in the classroom and community.
Varies instruction to accommodate learning styles and needs.
Seeks out and collaborates with colleagues and/or support personnel to meet the special learning
needs of all students.
Identifies need for remedial or special services and advocates for services to be provided.
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Examples of Evidence
Instruction is modified or lesson re-taught based upon outcomes of formal and informal
assessments.
Modifications to instruction are noted in plan book.
Students are confident in taking risks with new material and feel supported in trying challenging
academic work.
Accurate records of student performance, consultation with resource personnel, and special
service needs are maintained.
Curriculum materials and classroom artifacts reflect the students’ background and culture.
Accurate records of student performance, consultation with resource personnel, and special
service needs are maintained.
Cultural or language barriers are taken into consideration and accommodations made when
working with families.
E. Meets Professional Responsibilities
Standard
Understands his or her legal responsibilities.
Conveys knowledge of/and enthusiasm for his/her academic discipline to students.
Maintains interest in current research and development in the academic discipline and applies
knowledge in classroom practice.
Participates in building a professional community by collaborating with colleagues to
continuously improve instruction, assessment, and student achievement.
Descriptor/Indicator
Abides by Doctor Franklin Perkins School policies and applicable laws governing teacher
conduct and school operation.
Is well versed in the background, history, and application of the subject being taught.
Conveys anecdotes about the subject to stimulate student interest.
Reads timely material about the academic discipline through publications such as professional
journals, professional association newsletters, and research papers or articles.
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Maintains familiarity with the range of pedagogical research.
Shares information about research and development in the field with students.
Participates in grade level, content area and school-based or agency-wide planning meetings.
Assists in evaluating and redesigning curriculum and instruction to improve student
achievement.
Examples of Evidence
Participates in training programs offered by Doctor Franklin Perkins School.
Consults with and informs appropriate personnel when legal question arises.
Enthusiasm for content area is evident.
Students can express the value and application of the lesson within the content area.
Adjusts instruction, as warranted, based upon research and development.
Students express knowledge of recent developments within content area.
Productive contributions to an atmosphere of collaboration, rather than blame, on behalf of
student achievement is evident in meetings.
Supportable facts, rather than hearsay or innuendo, are the discussion points in conversation.
E. Meets Professional Responsibilities
Standard
Works actively to involve parents in their child’s academic performance.
Reflects critically upon his/her teaching and identifies areas for further professional development
as part of a professional development plan that is linked to grade level, school, and agency goals.
Descriptor/Indicator
Informs parents about grade level or content area expectations for semester/year.
Provides opportunities for parents to interact with student and teacher about the student’s
classroom performance.
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Seeks information from parents about the student that can influence performance and shares
information about student progress.
Understands school goals and plans his/her professional development in accordance with those
goals.
Can self-identify areas for improvement and reflects upon suggestions from evaluators in
developing personal growth plan.
Examples of Evidence
Parents can express understanding about their child’s academic work.
Parents notices, notes, memos, records of meetings with parents.
Classroom practices are adjusted based upon advanced training.
Continued professional development is consistent with short- and long-term goals of the teacher
and school.
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Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Teacher Professional Evaluation
Teacher: ______________________
Date: _______________________
Supervisor: _____________________
Anniversary Date: ___________
Probationary Evaluation: _______
Annual Evaluation: __________
A. Plans Curriculum and Instruction
Exceeds the
Standards
Meets the
Standards
Does Not
Meet the
Standards
Draws on content of the relevant Curriculum
Frameworks to plan activities addressing
standards that will advance students’ level of
content knowledge.
Plans sequential units of study that make learning
cumulative, connect learning across disciplines,
and are based on the learning standards within the
Frameworks.
Draws on results of formal and informal
assessments and knowledge of human
development to plan learning activities
appropriate for the range of students within a
classroom.
Plans lessons with clear objectives and measurable
outcomes.
Plans the pedagogy appropriate to the specific
discipline and to the age and cognitive level of the
students in the classroom.
Integrates technology and media in the
management of the work of teaching and in
student learning.
Uses information in Individual Education Program
(IEPs) to plan instructional strategies to meet
learning goals and objectives.
113
B. Delivers Effective Instruction
Exceeds the
Standards
Meets the
Standards
Does Not
Meet the
Standards
Sets high standards and expectations.
Clarifies learning objectives and gives the
students models of quality work to illustrate
expectations.
Provides regular and frequent feedback to
students on their progress.
Models clear writing and speaking in
communication with students and families.
Employs multiple teaching and learning
strategies.
Uses a variety of teaching techniques and
provides many and varied opportunities for
diverse learners to achieve competence.
Integrates reading and writing across disciplines
to meet the learning objectives.
Builds on students’ prior knowledge and
experience.
Uses a variety of formal and informal
assessments to accurately measure student
progress toward, and achievement of, the
learning objectives, to plan or modify further
instruction.
Translates evaluation of student work into
records that accurately convey the level of
student achievement.
114
C. Manages Classroom Climate and Operations
Exceeds the
Standards
Meets the
Standards
Does Not
Meet the
Standards
Creates an environment that is safe and
conducive to learning.
Creates a physical environment appropriate to
a range of learning activities.
Maintains appropriate standards of behavior,
mutual respect, and safety.
Manages classroom routines and procedures
without loss of significant instructional time.
Promotes climate of community, inclusion, and
mutual support among students.
Creates an environment that promotes the
philosophy and methods of Collaborative
Problem Solving.
D. Promotes Equity and an Appreciation of Diversity
Exceeds the
Standards
Meets the
Standards
Does Not
Meet the
Standards
Acts on the belief that all students can master a
challenging curriculum and includes all students in
the range of academic opportunities and in higher
order thinking.
Assesses the significance of student differences in
performance levels, learning styles, cultural
heritage, language, socio-economic backgrounds,
and physical and emotional disabilities and adapts
classroom activities appropriately.
115
E. Meets the Professional Responsibilities
Exceeds the
Standards
Meets the
Standards
Does Not
Meet the
Standards
Understands his or her legal responsibilities.
Conveys knowledge of/and enthusiasm for his/her
academic discipline to students.
Maintains interest in current research and
development in the academic discipline and
applies knowledge in classroom practice.
Participates in building a professional community
by collaborating with colleagues to continuously
improve instruction, assessment, and student
achievement.
Works actively to involve parents in their child’s
academic performance.
Reflects critically upon his/her teaching and
identifies areas for further professional
development as part of a professional development
plan that is linked to grade level, school, and
agency goals.
Commendations:
(Supervisor comments must include indicators that the teacher is aware of the specific standards and provide
specific examples in how the standards are being addressed.)
Recommendations:
(Supervisor comments must include areas for growth that is related to the teacher standards.)
COMPENSATION
__________________________
Teacher
________________________
Date
__________________________
Supervisor
________________________
Date
CC: Personnel File
116
School-wide Collins Writing Program - Focused Correction
Areas
Wyman Grade 1-5; Hermann Grade 6-8; Janeway Grade 9-12
117
Wyman Focused Correction Areas 2015
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Capitalization:
-First word in a
sentence
-Names of people
-The pronoun “I”
Capitalization:
-All of Grade 2
-Days of the week
-Months of the year
-Holidays
-Places: street names,
cities, states
Capitalization:
-All of Grade 2 and 3
-Places: countries,
planets, bodies of water
-Organizations
-Titles: books, movies,
poems
Punctuation:
-Period at end of
sentence
Punctuation:
-All of Grade 2
-Question mark at end
of sentence that asks a
question
-Exclamation point
when sentence shows
excitement
Capitalization:
-All of Grade 2, 3 and 4
-Places: specific places,
abbreviations
-Titles: newspapers,
magazines, journals, art,
songs, plays
-Religions, races, ethnicities,
languages, nationalities
Punctuation:
Punctuation:
-All of Grade 2 and 3
-All of Grade 2, 3 and 4
-Comma between day and -Comma after greeting and
year
closing of friendly letter
-Comma between city and -Comma to separate dates,
state
addresses
-Commas in a series
-Quotation marks for “exact
words”
Complete
Sentences:
-Noun and verb in
every sentence
Complete Sentences:
-All of Grade 2
-Complete thought that
makes sense in every
sentence
-Word choice variety
Complete Sentences:
-All of Grade 2 and 3
-Word choice variety
(first word)
-Sentence length variety
-Conjunctions
Complete Sentences:
-All of Grade 2, 3 and 4
-Subject/verb agreement
-Parallel structure
Content:
-Clear topic
sentence that
restates the
prompt
-Two or more
supporting details
Content:
-All of Grade 2
-Two well-developed
paragraphs
-Closing sentence
-Opinions/facts
Content:
-All of Grades 2 and 3
-Three + well-developed
paragraphs
-Uses logical order or
ideas
-Similarities/differences
Content:
-All of Grades 2, 3 and 4
-Minimum of 5 welldeveloped paragraphs
-Uses a concluding paragraph
-Use of compare/contrast
- Identify cited evidence
All Grades 2-5
Format: name, date, FCAs, skipping lines
Correct spelling of Dolch words
Content vocabulary
Best/neat/legible handwriting
118
Herman Focused Correction Areas 2015
Including Capitalization, Punctuation, Complete Sentences
and Content from grades 2 through 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
Style:
- Sentence variety in a
complete paragraph
and/or essay
- Vivid and figurative
language
Style:
-Topic sentences that
captures interest and
sentence variety in a
complete paragraph
and/or
essay
- Word choice
appropriate to reader
along with vivid and
figurative language
Conventions:
Conventions:
-Use apostrophes in a
-Use apostrophes to show
contraction
possession
-Use quotation marks to -Use a comma to set off a
enclose a direct quote
quote from extra
-Use commas to
information about the
separate items in a
quote -Singular and
series
Plural Subject-Verb
- Capitalization of
agreement
nationalities, races,
-Avoid Run-ons
religions, languages
and organizations
-Avoid sentence
fragments
Organization:
Organization:
-Strong topic sentence
-Strong topic sentence
and concluding
and concluding sentence
sentence in paragraphs or transitional sentence
-Topic developed
-Topic supported with
through fact and
sufficient and relevant
personal opinion
detail or personal opinion
-Clear sequence of
-Clear sequence of detail
detail
and/or step by step
organization
Content:
-Use of content
vocabulary with correct
spelling
Content:
-Use of content
vocabulary and words
appropriate to audience
with correct spelling
Format: name, date, FCAs, skipping lines
Grade 8
Style :
-Attention getting opening
(quote, anecdote, and
analogy) and sentence variety
using quotes correctly
in a complete paragraph
and/or essay
- Word choice appropriate to
reader along with vivid and
figurative language
Conventions:
-Correct capitalization and
punctuation
-Use a comma to separate
compound sentences
-Avoid Comma Splices
-Compound subject-verb
agreement
Organization:
-Strong topic sentence/thesis
statement and concluding or
transitional sentence
-Topic supported with
sufficient, relevant, and rich
detail or personal opinion
- Clear sequence of detail, step
by step organization, or ideas
developed in proportion to
importance
Content:
-Use of content/technical
vocabulary with correct
spelling,
words appropriate to audience
119
Janeway Focused Correction Areas 2015
Including all other FCAs from grades 2-8
Grade 9
Style:
-All of Grades 7 & 8
-Beginning and ending
that establishes focus
and purpose
-Clear sequence of
detail or information
-Sophisticated language
Conventions:
-All of Grades 7 & 8
-Correct use of
modifiers
-Correct and consistent
use of verb tenses
-Correct use of
punctuation marks
including commas in
series, independence
clauses, introductory
elements
-Correct use of
parentheses
Organization:
-All of Grades 7 & 8
-Transitions for clarity
-New paragraph for
each new major idea
-Correct expository
essay format
Content:
-All of Grades 7 & 8
-Words appropriate to
audience
-Use of
comparison/contrast
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Style:
-All of Grades 8 & 9
-Beginning that
captivates interest
-Transitions for clarity
-Word choice that is
appropriate to purpose
and
audience
Conventions:
-All of Grades 8 & 9
-Sentence variety and
Complexity
-Proper use of internal
Punctuation
-Final draft in correct
form
Style :
-All of Grades 9 & 10
-Proper use of internal
punctuation (, : ;)
-Correct reference form
Grade 12
-All of Grades 9, 10 &
11
-Avoidance of clichés
-Figurative language
-Quote and cite
information
from text
Conventions:
-All of Grades 9 & 10
-Subject-verb agreement
-Correct MLA format
-Consistent verb tense
and
subject-verb agreement
Conventions:
-All of Grades 9, 10 &
11
-Final draft in correct
form
-Correct use of quotation
marks in references
-Dialogue punctuated
correctly
Organization:
-All of Grades 8 & 9
-Clearly stated thesis
-Conclusion that
reinforces, summarizes
or challenges
Organization:
-All of Grades 9 & 10
-Correct resume format
-Ideas developed in
proportion to their
importance
Organization:
-All of Grades 9, 10 &
11
-Controlling sentence
Content:
-All of Grades 8 & 9
-Richness of detail
-Topics developed
through facts and
personal opinion
Content:
-All of Grades 9 & 10
-Relevance of events to
plot or purpose
-Use of primary and
secondary resources
Content:
-All of Grades 9, 10 and
11
-References current and
reflect major resources
Format: name, date, FCAs, skipping lines
Correct spelling of grade level words
Correct spelling of content area vocabulary
Best/neat/legible handwriting
120
School-Wide Samples of Graphic Organizers, Rubrics and
Templates:
Cause and Effect; Compare and Contrast; Expository; Keys to Literacy Top-Down
Web; Keys to Literacy Two-Column Notes, Math Problem with Axis; Math Problem
without Axis; Narrative (2); Open Response Note Plan; Persuasive; Sentence Organizer
(2); Story Sequencing (2); Assignment Organizer/Rubric; and, Writing
Organizer/Rubric
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
Academic Instructional Resource List
Reading and Writing is combined:
Grade K-5: Scott Foresman – Reading Street - Pearson
Literature
Grades 6-8: Common Core Literature, Prentice Hall – Pearson
Grades 9-10: Language of Literature – McDougal Littell
Grade 11: Language of Literature - American Literature – McDougal Littell
Grade 12: Language of Literature - World Literature McDougal Littell
ELA/Writing:
Grades 9-12: Language of Literature ELA book – McDougal Littell
Grades 9-12: Corresponding Language of Literature ELA book – McDougal Littell
Mathematics:
Grade K-2: Envision – Pearson
Grade 3-4: Envision - Pearson
Grade 5: Envision – Pearson
Grade 6: Common Core Course 1 and Envision – Pearson
Grade 7: Common Core Course 2 – Pearson
Grade 8: Common Core Course 1 – Pearson
Grade 9: Algebra I – Foundations Pearson
Grade10: Geometry – Foundations Pearson
Grade11: Algebra II –Foundations – Pearson
Grade12: Integrated Mathematics - Pearson
Science
Grade K-5: Interactive Science – Pearson
Grade 6: Interactive Science - Pearson
Grade 7: Interactive Science - Pearson
Grade 8: Interactive Science - Pearson
Grade 9: Biology I Miller-Levine – Prentice Hall
Chapters 1-6, 19, 35-40 nature of life, ecology, bacteria & viruses and human body
Grade10: Biology II - Miller-Levine – Prentice Hall
Chapters 7-18 Cells, Genetics, Evolution
Grade11: Physical Science – McDougal Littell
Grade12: Integrated Science – Pearson and Conceptual Physics – Pearson
140
Social Studies/History:
Grade K-2: Massachusetts Our Home – Gibb Smith
My World - Pearson
Grade 3-5: My World - Pearson
Grade 6: My World Geography - Pearson
Grade 7: Journey Across Time – Glencoe, Ancient History to 500
Grade 8: Journey Across Time – Glencoe, World History I 500-1800
Grade 9: Pacemaker – Globe Fearon/Pearson, 1800-2001 World History (Chapters 14, 17-19, 26-30,
32, 33)
World History Patterns of Interaction McDougal Little (Chapters 23.15,
21.5, 23, 25-28, 30-34)
Grade10: Creating America, the History of the US – McDougal Littell, 1763-1877
American History, Beginning through Construction – McDougla Littell
1763-1877
Grade11: American History, Beginning through Reconstruction – McDougal Littell
The Americans – Reconstruction to 21st Century – McDougal Littell
1877-2001
Grade12: Justice and Law - Street Law – Glencoe
Government in America - Pearson
Economics Today & Tomorrow - Glencoe
Additional Support Services
 iPads
 NWEA/MAP assessments
 Benchmark and progress monitoring through Dibels binders provided to each school by our Reading
Specialist.
 Reading and Math Lab in Janeway and Herman buildings with LEXIA, Symphony Math, Read
Naturally software.
 Keys to Literacy, Comprehension, and Vocabulary materials provided to each teacher.
 Project Read materials for Phonology, Framing Your Thoughts, Report Form, Story Form, and
Linguistics located in Reading Specialist office.
 Links Graphic Organizers System provided each teacher by Reading Specialist.
 Lincing Routine Vocabulary Strategies binders provided each teacher by Reading Specialist.
 Kidspiration/Inspiration graphic organizing system available to all students and staff on the network.
 Words Their Way, The Vocabulary Teachers Book of Lists, The Writing Teachers Book of Lists, and
Write Outloud books available in Reading Specialist office.
Assessment Tools
NWEA/MAPs
Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills Next, Assessment Program
Lexia, Reading Program
Read Livw, Reading Comprehension Program
Symphony Math Program
Brigance Transitional Assessments
RIASEC Interest Inventory
Transitional Planning Inventory rating from student, teacher, home
Enderle-Severson Transitional Rating Scale to identify skills
Harrington O’Shea occupation interest inventory
Work Personality Profile
141
Transitional Behavior Scale
OASIS occupation interest inventory
ASVAB occupation interest inventory
Job Survival and Success Scale
Barriers to Employment Scale Inventory
Becker work adjustment profile
142
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
CURRICULUM DUPLICATION
OBJECTIVE: To consolidate and duplicate programs in each content area. Teachers in
each grade will work with colleagues in same content area to:
1. Develop one course syllabus and expectations
2. Identify units that are covered throughout each term via a curriculum map
3. Provide essential questions, lesson activity options, skills or concepts, and
materials used for each unit
4. Identify frameworks applied
5. Provide assessment tools (i.e. tests, quizzes, projects, etc. and rubrics)
Please follow the outline below as you build your curriculum binders.
II.
III.
III.
Course Syllabus and Expectations (See attached outline)
A. Provide general course description of the units and topics
B. Provide expected learning outcomes
C. Identify frameworks, materials, and sources used throughout the course
D. Provide information about how students will be assessed and include grading policy
E. Provide communication guides for parents and students (i.e. website, email, telephone,
meeting, and the appropriate use for each)
(Add Divider)
Term I
A. Units and topics covered
1. Curriculum Maps and the corresponding frameworks
(Add Divider)
2. Possible assessment tools for each unit and rubrics
(Add Divider)
3. Term I Common Assessment (cumulative)
(Add Divider)
Term II
A. Units and topics covered
1. Curriculum Maps and the corresponding frameworks
(Add Divider)
2. Possible assessment tools for each unit and rubrics
(Add Divider)
3. Term II Common Assessment (cumulative)
(Add Divider)
143
IV.
Terms III and IV
Follow Terms I and II guidelines.
A. Identify Curriculum Gaps – What learning objectives (from the MA frameworks)
should we be covering in each content area that we are not getting to?
NOTE: This exercise is expected to be a timely one. We have designated a number of training and staff
meeting hours over the course of the year in addition to the 45 minutes of common planning time built
into your schedule. In the end, you should have one course syllabus per subject in each grade that includes
identical assessment and grading rubrics and policies. The completed binder needs to ensure that teaches
for all teams cover the same units. Completed binders should be submitted to the Director of Curriculum
and Instructions in May. “Checkpoint” meetings will be held throughout the year as well.
144
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Curriculum Duplication Template
Course Syllabus
Course Title and Grade:
Educator:
Timeframe:
Description:
Narrative summarizing the following:
 Core Curriculum
 Units or themes of study
 Methods of student engagements
 Main methods of assessments
Objectives (learning outcomes):
Standards:
Materials:
Assessments:
Communications:
145
Curriculum Mapping
The primary mission of our school is to develop and deepen understanding and its corresponding habits of
mind so that our students are able to transfer learning to new and important life situations, which leads to
their ability to genuinely achieve success as a contributing member of society and future personal
achievement. With this goal in mind, we need to construct lessons and assessments that assist this
realization. Critical thinking and effective real-world transfer are key components of this mission.
Curriculum within and across subject areas must focus on critical thinking and transfer of learning as the
central focal point of what is developed, presented, and assessed. The bottom line is that all program
areas, course goals, and content material are to be framed in a manner that embodies a broader
understanding and transfer of knowledge and skills of critical thinking and connection of concepts.
Ten Curriculum Components:
1. Mission or underlying beliefs about learning the curriculum must embody.
2. Essential questions pose the “big questions” we use to anchor the curriculum. Big ideas are framed in
words that pose a question and understood by students. All of the material and resources used assist
in developing an understanding of the big questions. The more specific facts, skills, and concepts are
taught in context of exploring and applying the larger ideas.
3. Mapping the curriculum reflects how the mission, essential questions, and assessments spiral through
the content and leads towards intellectual coherence.
4. Assessments reflect evidence for the transfer of knowledge. Assessments, formative and summative,
reflect key performance goals and the student’s ability to acquire an understanding of the big ideas.
Students need to understand, through the assessments assigned, what they are being asked to learn,
understand, and transfer into their knowledge base.
5. Analytic rubrics that provide an understanding of what measurement criteria is used to assess a
students work.
6. Anchor work samples provide students with examples of what is expected as outcome of the work
being completed.
7. Learning activities, teaching strategies, and resources are the pieces that lead to developing and
transferring a successful unit into evidence of learning.
8. Pre-assessing student knowledge, readiness, and ability is critical in gauging successful
dissemination, engagement, and transfer of thinking skills.
9. Differentiation of material and assessments are a key component in meeting the needs and learning
modalities of each student.
10. Reflecting and trouble-shooting pinpoint areas for improvement and identified successes.
We will develop this process overtime and together. This will be a learning experience for us all and
requires your commitment, comments, and feedback to achieve success.
Wiggins, Grant, Jay McTighe, Carol Ann Tomlinson (2005-7). Schooling by Design, Understanding by Design, and Integrating Differentiated
Instruction. ASCD: Alexandria, VA.
146
Teacher &
Student
Reflection
Primary
Sources or
Materials
Differentiat
ed
Formative
&
Summative
Assessmen
ts
Skills or
Concepts to
master
Standards
Essential
Questions
Unit Name
or Theme
CURRICULUM MAP
TEACHER:
COURSE:
MONTH:
Subject:
147
Teacher &
Student
Reflection
Primary
Sources or
Materials
Differentiated
Formative &
Summative
Assessments
Skills or
Concepts to
master
Standards
Essential
Questions
Unit
Name or
Theme
TEACHER:
COURSE:
MONTH:
Subject:
148
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Student Profiles
Student Name:
Date of Birth:
IEP Dates:
Diagnoses:
Strengths:
Interests:
Challenges:
Supports:
Teacher preparing report: _______________________ Date: _________
149
IEP TOOLBOX
150
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
IEP Meeting Documentation
Student: _______________________________ IEP Meeting Date: ____________________
Academic Performance
Points of Success:
Areas of Challenge:
Strategies Implemented/Response:
Recent Assessments: (MCAS and MAP strength or concerns, current Lexia, Symphony, Read
Live, DIEBLES, Brigance and transitional assessment data)
Social/Emotional Performance
Positive Improvements:
Areas of Challenge:
Additional Information
Time Out of Class Data: Comparative over the last few months
Restraint/Time Out Data:
Attendance Data:
Current overall grade average:
Recent Work Samples for Review
Notes from Meeting:
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
151
Residential Quarterly Treatment Conference
Student:
Date:
Teacher:
I. Introduction to classroom and classroom makeup
II. Each academic area
Include what student is working on
Areas of strength and opportunity
Ability to work in small group and independently
Ability to follow directives (writing, oral)
Response to peers
Response to staff
Please write for the student not that the class is working on……
English Language Arts
Reading/Literature
Math
History
Science
Music
Computers
Art
Performing Arts
Health/Fitness
Career Development
Communications/Social Skills
III. Social/Behavioral information
Include individual treatment conference goals.
152
Sample ITC/QTC Final Report:
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
INTEROFFICE MEMORANDUM
TO:
Distribution
RE:
TREATMENT CONFERENCE —Sally Smith
DATE:
July 30, 2010
Attached is a copy of the Treatment Conference for Sally Smith, which was held
at Doctor Franklin Perkins School on July 15, 2010.
Distribution
Terri Philbrick
EDUCATION OFFICE
PROGRAM LOG
CLIENT RECORD
External Distribution
153
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
TREATMENT CONFERENCE REPORT
Name: Sally Smith
Date of Birth: 3/25/99
Date of Admission: 5/4/09
Date of Initial Conference:
Projected Discharge Date: To Be Determined
Program: Duplex
Funding Source(s)/LEA: Cambridge Public
Schools
TREATMENT CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS
July 15, 2010
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
154
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Name: Sally Smith
Date of Birth: 3/25/99
Program: Duplex
Date of Admission: 5/4/09
Date of Initial Conference: 6/23/09
Projected Discharge Date: To Be Determined
Funding Source(s)/LEA: Cambridge Public
Schools
Sally ’ Treatment Conference was held on July 15, 2010.
Reason for Referral:
Future Vision for Child and Family
Sally’s great aunt and guardian, Betty Smith, and her great uncle Bill Smith, would like to
see Sally continue to work on managing her emotions by continuing her work on her early
traumas, as they interfere with her healthy functioning. They would like Sally to feel safe
and secure in all areas. They would like to see Sally make friends and learn how to play and
get along with other children. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are also interested in Sally learning how
to play on her own and keep herself occupied during unstructured time at the program and at
home.
Collaborative Short-Term Goals:
1. Sally will demonstrate effective communication skills.
2. Sally will utilize sensory coping strategies to help manage her emotions.
3. Sally will demonstrate age appropriate living skills.
Goal 1: Sally will demonstrate effective communication skills.
 Sally will able to identify her likes and dislikes, needs and wants, strengths and
challenges.
 Sally will be able to identify her family, peer, school and community strengths.
 Sally will meet with a member of her treatment team once a week to review her goals
and her progress.
Goal 2: Sally will demonstrate techniques to manage her emotions.
 Sally will utilize her identified coping strategies during times of high stress with
verbal prompts from staff.
 Sally will be able to take her daily shower with decreased anxiety.
 Sally will be able to stay in her room during room time for one hour with decreased
fear.
 Sally will be able to transition to bed with an increase in self-confidence and emotion
regulation.
Goal 3: Sally will demonstrate age appropriate living skills.
 Sally will be able to get up on time and complete her morning routines with verbal
cues from staff.
 Sally will accept responsibility to participate in house chores.
 Sally will actively advocate for her needs to her treatment team
Clinical Director
CHILD REFLECTION: Sally Smith
I would describe myself as a nice person who sometimes can be rude. I feel that others
view me as a nice and sensitive person. This quarter was difficult for me to concentrate
on my goals due to my emotions and things bothering me. Because of this I don’t think I
have made any changes or utilized any strengths this quarter. I appreciate my own efforts
of trying very hard to work on my goals. I also appreciate when others take the extra time
to help me and show support.
When I was my best self this quarter I seemed happy and enjoying things around me. I
was pulled away from being my best self when I started getting mad about things and
then making negative decisions. I think my emotions got it the way when I tried to
improve and this has affected me because I do not want to be this way and wish to
change. My hopes for next quarter are to work towards and earn more independence at
the program.
FAMILY’S REFLECTION: Name, Clinician, LMHC, LCAT
RESIDENTIAL REPORT: Name, Program Director
Goal 1: Sally will demonstrate effective communication skills.
Over the last quarter, Sally has for the most part been able to identify what is troubling
her and will seek out her family and staff supports when feeling overwhelmed. She has
had difficulty this past quarter identifying some of her personal strengths and in fact has
put herself down on many occasions. Recently Sally has been able to talk about some of
the challenges she faces in the program as well as school and seems more willing to talk
156
about such things in the last few days. In the last half of the quarter Sally has seemed
more dysregulated and not as forthcoming with her concerns. She is able to process with
staff; however, this is when staff seeks her out after noticing negative or odd behavior.
Sally has only been able to process her emotions and concerns with members of the team
that she has formed positive relationships with. This has made it difficult for Sally to
work through her feelings and thoughts especially when a particular staff member is
unavailable. Sally has been able to show empathy towards others that she has affected
and often initiates the process for repairing her relationships with them.
Goal 2: Sally will demonstrate techniques to manage her emotions.
Over the last quarter Sally has had many opportunities to manage her emotions in the
program. She has experienced highs of excitement and lows of sadness. She has at times
appeared overwhelmed with her emotions and been unable to appropriately express
herself during these times. Sally is able to process an incident and is able to learn from
the decisions she has made however it takes an extended period of time to do this. She is
improving in her ability to come to staff when a conflict arises in order to solve it before
it gets overwhelming. Sally is learning the skills of being able to look at a situation and
then see where a better decision could be made. Over the next quarter staff will work
with Sally to continue making this a strength in her treatment.
At the beginning of the quarter Sally began using sensory items in the program that
included a weighted blanket, rice and beans box, thera-putty and a sensory story. In the
beginning Sally was very excited about these supports and was able to use them multiple
times a day. Recently Sally has to be encouraged by staff to use her plan. Although she is
still receiving benefit from the use of the weighted blanket and sensory box, it is rarely
self-initiated. If staff were to ask Sally if she wishes to utilize these tools she often
becomes more agitated and chooses not to. Sally has benefited from such sensory tools
when a staff has given her the tools while utilizing non-verbal cues.
Goal 3: Sally will demonstrate age appropriate living skills.
Sally has made several gains in this area of treatment as well as experienced some set
backs. Over the past quarter her ability to wake and begin routines with little prompting
from staff has improved greatly. When it comes to house chores Sally has shown a
decrease in her motivation to do this. She is always willing to do at least one each night
and will pick up extra chores whenever possible. Sally has begun the process of
completing her own laundry here within the program. At times Sally will leave her clean
clothes in her hamper, rather than put them away. Sometimes dirty clothes get mixed in
and then she is overwhelmed when it is her laundry day. Another area of opportunity for
Sally would be keeping her living space clean and organized. This is an area that has
shown improvement recently and a goal that Sally could easily achieve. It has been
visibly apparent that Sally’s low self-esteem this quarter has caused an affect on her
hygiene, the way she dresses and the cleanliness of her room. Sally has had less
motivation and self-awareness when it comes to such daily tasks as a result of her
emotional state.
157
Over the past several weeks Sally has demonstrated a prolonged period of deregulation.
We have seen an increase in physical aggression and environmental aggression. The
antecedents to these behaviors range from concerns and emotions surrounding her family
and her peer relationships.
Over the next quarter Doctor Franklin Perkins School will to work closely with Sally and
her family around identifying internal healthy coping skills along with making safe and
appropriate decisions. Staff will continue to support Sally in her character development
focusing on respect, trustworthiness, responsibility, caring, fairness, and citizenship. The
program will continue to provide program instruction and feedback along with
conducting a pathways inventory to identify lagging skills in the areas of executive
functioning, language processing, social skills, cognitive flexibility and emotion
regulation. This assessment will help us better understand Sally’s needs and allow us to
work collaboratively with her to solve problems, teach skills, restore communication, and
improve her relationships.
CLINICAL REPORT: Name, Clinician, LMHC, LCAT
Case Management
Sally is referred to Doctor Franklin Perkins School by the Department of NAME and
NAME Public Schools. Her DMH worker is NAME. Her IEP coordinator is NAME.
Visits
Sally was home over the following dates this quarter: April 23 – 25; April 30, May 5 –9;
May 22; June 11 – 13; June 18 – 20; July 2 – 3.
Group Therapy
Sally participated in a stress management group this quarter, and was actively involved in
hands on activities, such as showing the group how to make stress balls. She did not like
the worksheets as much as the hands on activities.
Clinical Report
Sally has had a very difficult quarter, with some episodes of dissociation, flashbacks, and
dysregulation. We as a program have tried to understand the reasons for her difficulties,
as she herself is having a difficult time putting it into words. There have been a few
lengthy dissociations at home, which included head banging and flashbacks.
One dissociation took place after a long weekend home where she was enjoying the
company of her brother and his children. When the visit ended earlier than she had
158
expected, she became very angry and distraught. She had a dissociative experience which
she could not process until I met wither a few days later. She told me that she felt her
aunt was “mean” for being happy that the family was leaving earlier than planned. She
was disappointed as she’d been enjoying their company and building a connection with
them. When her aunt explained in family therapy that the visit had lasted a week and it
was good for them to go home so that they could have more space, she began to slowly
comprehend, but it was hard for her. She interpreted her aunt’s action as rejecting of the
children and she identified with it, from her own experience of abandonment. We spoke
about this in family therapy but Sally struggled to make the connections to her life. She
struggled to express how vulnerable she was and how much she needed from her aunt,
but was able to meet with her privately and have some good conversations about family
and where she belonged.
Another dissociation was much longer and involved. Sally has been able to identify
precipitating events that took place, at least from her experience. According to her aunt,
she had been on edge much of the weekend, and by Sunday, when they were about to
bake, Sally became upset with her aunt’s answer when she said she wanted to bake for
her teacher’s aide. Sally took it as rejection of her and a sign that her aunt did not love
her. That is the last thing she remembered, except that she heard her father’s voice, and
maybe some other voices that she could not identify. According to her aunt, Sally was in
a dissociative state for over two hours, and when she and Bill tried to comfort her and
support her, she did not know who they were, and she would not let them help her into a
more comfortable position. Sally finally remembered who they were and who she was
when her aunt was able to engage her in a foot game that only they had played together.
Sally returned to Doctor Franklin Perkins School shortly after this, upset that she had to
return, and exhausted. Sally could not really process the experience over the next few
weeks beyond the above details, which she told me about. One contributing factor I
believe is that Sally’s teacher had left the Wednesday before this event and she was very
sad about this. I believe it represented a deep loss for Sally, who had grown close to her
teacher and developed so much with her over this past year. I believe this created a great
deal of insecurity for Sally, as well as rekindling the feelings of other big losses and
insecurities in her life. Sally has not been able to talk about this connection, but she and I
called her teacher this week, although we have been unsuccessful in reaching her. Her
teacher called back and we will try to connect next week.
Since this episode, which took place on June 28, Sally has had a hard time re-stabilizing.
She tried to run from the program two times. Sally gave a few reasons why she may have
done this. She was upset with two peers at the program, one who she felt scared of. She
also said that she might be copying some of the newer girls in a negative way. A third
reason is that she felt sad that her mentor was not paying as much attention to her
anymore due to having her own issues, and I speculate there was some attention seeking
going on. In therapy, Sally has expressed anger at a peer at her program who she feels
has “taken her boyfriend away.” She has a hard time being near this peer and has acted
impulsively around her.
159
Sally’s dissociations this quarter seem to be triggered by deep feelings of loss and
abandonment. I have tried to work on this in therapy and family therapy, with Bill and
Blanca. Sally is very tentative about exploring these issues as opposed to previous
quarters where she was more forthcoming. There is more guardedness when she meets
with me and if I try to engage her in the topic, she resists and looks for more secure topics
to talk about. However, Sally continues to participate in both family and individual
therapy, and these conversations will continue to be a part of our talks as she finds her
way back to more stability.
PSYCHIATRY TREATMENT: NAME, M.D., Consulting Psychiatrist
Sally Smith as was admitted to the doctor when Doctor Franklin Perkins School 4 May
2009 on transfer from the Franciscan CBAT program where she had been stepped down
from the Cambridge Hospital child assessment unit. She was originally admitted to the
Cambridge CAU in October 2008.
She has a long history of early traumatic events which are difficult to verify directly but
are reported in old records to have included physical and perhaps sexual abuse, frequent
chaotic changes of caregivers, witnessing domestic violence, and having a mother who
reportedly has a major mental illness which may in fact include catatonic episodes
suggesting schizophrenia and may include substance abuse as well.
Risperidone was stopped 28 June and this was not followed by any major issues. Since
her antipsychotic was stopped, she lost a little weight and appetite was lower but trauma
symptoms and possible paranoia increased.
At the end of August 2009, Sally reported more sexual abuse by her father than
previously known and remained very frightened about showers.
Gabatril was stopped and no behavioral changes observed at that time.
She was taking only Clonidine at night by the beginning of September, and had not
reported any major incidents or agitated behavior.
In October 2009, Sally told her therapist she “wanted to hurt herself” every day but had
not tried to do this. She was discussing her mother’s illness and her own parentified and
neglectful experience. She recalled taking care of her mother and being afraid after
school a man would come and harm her.
Sally was able to get through Thanksgiving 2009 [for the first time, since her mother was
Jehovah’s Witness and did not celebrate the holiday]. She did well over the Christmas
holidays as well.
160
Sally had one aggressive act at the beginning of January 2010, when she destroyed
furniture in the program after a difficult home visit. She was reported to dissociate on the
visit and not recognize her aunt at times and tried to hit herself in the head.
She also reported “hearing voices in her head” when she is asked later. These voices are
reported to tell her to kill her aunt or therapist. Aunt has requested psych testing and a
behavior plan to address shower routines that can trigger traumatic memories.
In February, Sally was talking in family therapy about her father’s brothers 2 sons
sexually abusing her. She also reported witnessing very inappropriate sexual encounters
between her mother and father.
Sally was seen in her program 11 March and was very verbal and open. She has done
better at home with fewer episodes but is now worried over a phone call to her mother
Sally had requested for her birthday. She worried M will “find me” and so caller ID will
be blocked.
Sally was asking in April to hug an older female peer in the mornings and is unclear if
this has to do with anxiety over the older peer’s recent hospital stay or may have a more
sexual basis.
She also talked about “seeing ghosts” of deceased relatives and this may be increasing or
she may be more willing to disclose these symptoms. She reported in therapy in the
cafeteria that she saw ghosts at that time and that they might wish to communicate with
her.
She has been off antipsychotic medications for almost 12 months and it is not clear if
these symptoms are culturally consistent or more psychotic or dissociative in nature but
they will be followed closely.
Sally had a very unusual reaction 13 June when she yelled in her room and asked to go
the foyer of the house where she threw toys and stood on furniture. She attempted to
leave and was aggressive trying to push the door onto staff. She did not acknowledge the
supervisor for several minutes but was eventually able to say she was upset with her
teacher for “rolling her eyes.” She was able to settle with an older peer’s help.
Sally was upset in June with her teacher’s plan to take the summer off but also complains
of the teacher “rolling her eyes” in a displeased manner. She was able to stay in class
longer but did have an episode at home hitting herself due to “voices” she has recently
reported.
Sally has required holds in July for running from the program [and getting as far as the
highway] and also trying to run on another occasion.
161
She also reportedly had a 2-hour long “dissociation” at aunt’s house the last weekend of
June. She banged her head on the floor and also complained of “hearing [her]..…
Father’s voice” and she is very afraid of him.
She will have DMH case management in the home and a recent OT evaluation is still
pending. If she continues to have behavioral issue and to report “voices” will discuss
with aunt re-starting antipsychotics, but trauma may be the major issue here.
admission
Clonidine
Risperidone
0.05 mg am
0.1 mg hs
1.5 mg hs
30 June 09
11 Aug 09
1 Dec 09
Current GAF
Fluoxetine
Gabatril
2m hs
10 mg am
stop
stop
0.1 mg hs
only
50
DIAGNOSIS
AXIS I
995.52
296.90
309.81
Victim of abuse/neglect
Mood Disorder NOS
PTSD c Dissociative sx
Dissociative DO NOS
799.9
Deferred or pending
AXIS II
No diagnosis
Severe psychosocial stress,
moving hx abuse
AXIS III
AXIS IV
AXIS V
35
admission
HEALTH SERVICES SUMMARY: Karla Pewtherer,
Program Nurse
HEALTH SERVICES
Weight
Height
Treatment Conference July 15, 2010
Wt. lbs
60 inches
162
General Health
Medication Compliance
Last Physical
Good Health, BMI = 25.4 > 95th percentile
Excellent
5/8/09 - Admission Physical with Dr. Geibel.
Guardians now provide health care
Immunizations
Up to date with primary care physician
Last Dental
Great
Last Vision
9/14//09 – passed vision screening without glasses
Last Hearing
Injuries
9/14/09 - passed hearing screening no further services
warranted
N/A.
Illnesses
N/A
Emergency Room Visits
Doctor Visits
N/A
Guardians now provide Sally medical care
With PCP Dr. Terry Brooks of Cambridge Pediatrics
Specialist Consults
Medication Changes This
Quarter
Guardians provide medical care
Current Medications:
Clonidine 0.1 mg @ bedtime
Prozac (fluoxetine) 10 mg in AM
Zyrtec 10 mg daily
probiotic capsule in am before eating with a glass of
water
Multivitamin daily
Mupirocin 2% ointment apply to affected area(s) twice
daily prn, check daily to see if needed
N/A
NATURAL TEARS EYE MOISTENING SOLUTION DAILY
AS NEEDED FOR DRY EYES
Rogers Order Status
N/A
163
EDUCATIONAL: Courtney Cann, Classroom Teacher
Sally is one of 8 students in a self-contained classroom, with a teacher and support staff.
She receives instruction from the 4th grade curriculum frameworks with accommodations
and modifications.
Academically:
Sally continues to be an engaged and active participant in our classroom. She completes
all class work and enjoys helping others in the classroom. Sally is able to work
appropriately with peers. During math she is able to ask questions easily when she is
confused. During writing, her lack of self-advocacy has mildly resurfaced. This was
most noted when she was asked to write a poem. There were times in the quarter when
Sally did refuse to come to school, but these refusals were not based on her academics, as
she would complete assignments out of class.
English/Language Arts: Sally continues to receive daily phonologic instruction to
improve her reading abilities. Sally has completed units on poetry in which she showed a
great depth interest and was very successful in determining metaphorical meanings in the
poems. When asked to write poetry, Sally struggled to format her ideas and thoughts, by
using the suggestion of following the rhythm of a song she enjoyed; Sally was able to
complete the task successfully. Sally completed a unit on biography. In this unit he
created a power point presentation about Rosa Parks. Sally did a fantastic job organizing
information into categories, creating an appropriate sequence and finding images that
matched her facts. Sally did need some support when transferring the text into her own
words, but was able to accept feedback and edit her work. She was very proud of her
project. . When doing formal writing, Sally has enjoyed using technology to edit her
work. By using technology the drafting and edit process have become more manageable
for Sally and has improved her self-confidence with her writing.
Math: In mathematics Sally is reviewed the use of money and she is working on making
various amounts of change. Sally is able to count all coins, add them together and make
change as demonstrated in both pencil to paper tasks and while using manipulatives.
Currently Sally is studying geometry. Sally enjoys the multi-modal geometric activities
and the tools associated with them. Sally’s visual sense is aided by these manipulatives.
Sally enjoys determining the ways shapes will change due to a slide, flip, or turn. Sally
will continue to work on angles, ordered pairs, patterns, symmetry and congruence.
Sally will finish her summer with a review of the regrouping in addition and subtraction
and multiplication.
Social Studies: Sally is currently learning about the 50 states and North American
geography. Sally enjoys these lessons and does well finding specific facts on his study
sheet to transfer to his USA fact file. Sally is working on locating and naming the
Western states and their capitals. Sally has enjoyed participating in activities derived
164
from learning about the states, such as square dancing, singing, trying different foods or
learning about a state’s dinosaur or other wildlife. As part of our summer program, Sally
is traveling through time with her classmates. Studying different aspects of the 50’s
through present day. Sally will be able to go on invention scavenger hunts in the 70s and
the 90s, study Apollo 11’s moon landing and participate in a readers’ theater, in class
presentation on the moon landing. Sally will learn various dances from the decades and
play name that tune. Sally will finish the summer by creating an autobiography for the
2000’s decade.
Science: In Science Sally is learning about the properties of matter. We have studied the
metric system in this unit and Sally enjoyed a fun measurement activity where she was
able to study her arm span versus her height. She was able to measure this using any
classroom item other than a ruler or measuring tape. She enjoyed discovering how many
flip flops tall she was. Sally has a strong understanding of what matter is and its physical
properties. We will continue to study the chemical properties of matter and what can
make matter change, elements and compounds and what the formulas are for everyday
items.
Behavioral:
During the majority of this quarter Sally continued to be a strong behavioral model in the
classroom. She demonstrated the ability to compromise, work with all peers, empathy,
and move on from incidents with peers. Sally did have some instances of refusals this
quarter stemming from negative comments toward peers. When Sally was redirected she
became defiant and refused to attend class. When addressed with staff, Sally, with
support was able to discuss what was bothering her and process her feelings. At that
point she was able to regroup and remain positive in the classroom.
165
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Medication Review – School Report
Student’s Name
Teacher’s Name:
CHANGES IN RED
Date Form Completed:
Please take a moment to reflect on these topics since the last medication review. Please be as
specific as possible. Thank you for your time.
Schoolwork:
Student’s feelings about schoolwork:
Anxious
__ Passive
Enthusiastic
No expression
Bored
Rebellious
Other: Engaged
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
Eager
Fearful
Student’s approach towards schoolwork:
Organized
Industrious
Responsible
___ Interested
Self-directed
No initiative
Refuses
Sloppy
Disorganized
___ Cooperative
___ Doesn’t complete assignments
Does only what is expected
___ Other:
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain. No.
Relationships with Others:
Please describe the student’s relationship with Teacher:
Please describe the student’s relationship with Teacher Aide:
Please describe the student’s relationship with Peers:
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
Sleep:
Are there periods of the day when this student is lethargic? __ Yes ___ No.
If yes, what time of day does this occur? _________________________
If yes, do you consider this related to medications? ___ Yes ___ No
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
166
Mood:
How would you typically describe this student’s mood: ___ Stable ___Variable ___Irritable
Are there periods of the school day when the student’s mood is brighter or more engaging?
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
Appetite:
How would you typically describe this student’s appetite: ___ Poor ___ Average __ Substantial
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
___________________________________________________________________________________
Attention Span:
How long can the student focus on a given task? ___ minutes
*Is this a change from the last medication review? If yes, please explain.
____________________________________________________________________________________
Implementation of Supports:
Required a personal support plan? ___Yes ___ No
Required support center time? ___Yes ___ No
Required a therapeutic hold? ___Yes ___ No
Required a cool down? ___Yes ___ No
Required attention from the school nurse? ___Yes ___ No
*If any of the above were yes, please explain.
Common Side Effects:
Please check off any that were observed since last medication review.
___ Tic behaviors (movement/vocalization)
___Dry Mouth/Excessive Thirst
___ Fever
___ Complaints of metallic taste in mouth
___ Headaches
___ Slurred speech
___ Nausea
___ Gastrointestinal issues
___ Vomiting
___ Sedation
*If any of the above were checked, please explain.
Please list any other information you feel is important for others to know. Thanks!
167
Sample Attendance and Lunch insert
168
Sample Attendance and Lunch insert
169
Doctor Franklin Perkins School
Email Etiquette
1. All email is agency property; there should be no expectation that it is private. Never put
something in writing that you wouldn’t want your supervisor reading.
2. Respond to email in a timely manner – 24hrs.
3. Know your audience – the recipient is the most important aspect of your email.
4. Be careful to request action from more than one person. Multiple efforts for the same
task or no effort thinking the other person(s) will do it.
5. Think before you send. Read over, be concise, focused, get to the point.
6. Urgent messages never send via email.
7. Avoid long emails. If a long email is necessary your conclusion should summarize –
review the main point and identify the specific request.
8. Keep email to one subject.
9. Avoid changing fonts, colors,  and using emoticons – they come through differently
with different operating systems.
10. Be clear on who you are making a request of or asking action from.
a. CC – keep supervisor, colleagues informed.
b. BCC – use cautiously.
11. Check distribution lists. Review distribution list before sending.
12. Acknowledge receipt of an email.
13. Reply all – use is cautiously. It should be an exception not a common practice.
14. Don’t use email to avoid personal communication. Phone call, face to face
communication is the most valuable/helpful.
15. Remember tone cannot be read in an email. Sarcasm and jokes are difficult over email.
16. Subject header should match what you are writing about. Helps the recipient prioritize
what to read first.
17. Never email when angry.
18. Signature – especially important when emailing people outside of the school. Always
include in your signature: Doctor Franklin Perkins School.
19. When writing a tough or difficult email ask “Would this be better said in person?”
20. Read through a thread, before responding. The initial distribution list shouldn’t change.
21. Know when to back out of email exchanges. “Please see me if you would like to discuss
further.”
22. Email is a legal document. Communications with parent and collaterals need to be
copied to a student’s perm file.
23. Use your office assistant wisely, be specific.
24. Re-read your email before you send it.
25. Don’t overuse the high priority flag.
170
PROGRAM OF STUDIES
171
STUDENT HANDBOOK
172
PERKINS EMPLOYEE
PERSONNEL MANUAL
173
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