Operational and Care Service Standards for Private Nursing Homes

Operational and Care Service Standards for Private Nursing Homes
OPERATIONAL AND CARE SERVICE STANDARDS
for
PRIVATE NURSING HOMES
Department of Health and Wellness
July 1, 2011
Table of Contents
1.0
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2.0
Management and Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
3.0
Licensing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3.1
3.2
4.0
Mission Statement, Goals, Objectives and Organizational Structure. . . . 2
Compliance with Federal, Provincial, Municipal Legislation and
Regulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Financial Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Nursing Service Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Insurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Contingency Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Notification of Significant Events.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Incident Reporting.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
General.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Resident Related Incident. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Staff Related Incident. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application for Initial License. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application for Renewal of License. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Provisional License.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renovation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initial License. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Renewal of License. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Follow-up Inspections.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Complaint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smoke-Free Places. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18
18
19
19
20
21
21
21
22
22
22
Resident Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
Resident Admission or Moving In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Assessment and Plan of Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ongoing Resident Monitoring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nursing and Personal Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eating. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bathing, Grooming, Dressing, Toileting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mobility, Transfer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Vision, Hearing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cognition, Orientation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i
23
26
29
31
31
31
32
33
33
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
5.0
Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sleep, Rest.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Social/Emotional/Spiritual/Cultural Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Care of the Resident at End-of-Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Care of the Resident with Cognitive Impairment. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Health Record. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dietary Service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Food Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meal Service.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nutritional Support and Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medication Management.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Narcotic and Controlled Drugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency Use Medications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standing Medication Orders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ordering and Receiving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage and Handling.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Administration and Recording of Medication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Leave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Staff Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Infection Prevention and Control.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Communicable Disease Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Discharge and Transfer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Death. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
33
34
34
35
35
38
41
41
42
42
44
46
46
47
47
48
48
49
49
50
50
51
55
58
60
Physical Environment and Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
Comfortable Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Services.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Housekeeping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Laundry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Safety and Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire and Evacuation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Missing Resident. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abuse and Neglect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medical Emergencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
External Disaster or Loss of Essential Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Smoking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ii
61
63
63
63
64
65
67
67
67
68
68
69
69
69
71
6.0
Social Environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
7.0
72
74
76
77
79
Human Resource Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
7.1
7.2
7.3
8.0
Social Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spiritual and Religious Practice.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appointments and Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resident Concerns or Complaints.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Involvement of Family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Orientation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Staffing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Staff Development and Training. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Appendices.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
8.1
List of Related Legislation and Regulations (Prince Edward Island
and Government of Canada).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
8.2
Direct Care Hours for Private Nursing Homes.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
8.3
Department of Health [and Wellness] Policy: Comfort Allowance
and Trust Accounts: Nursing Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
8.4
Acknowledgments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
iii
1.0
INTRODUCTION
The Operational and Care Service Standards for Private Nursing Homes in Prince Edward
Island have been developed in accordance with the Community Care Facilities and Nursing
Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations. They have been approved by the Minister of
Health and Wellness on the recommendation of the Community Care Facilities and
Nursing Homes Board (the Board).
The purpose of these Standards is to assist the facility management and staff, the Board,
inspectors and the Department of Health and Wellness to promote, create and maintain
a comfortable, safe and secure home environment for residents based on a person
[resident]-centred care philosophy. These Standards support the integration and practice
of this philosophy throughout the facility operational and care services. Inherent in these
Standards is the expectation that care planning, coordination and delivery of facility
services is centred on the person [resident] and her/his individual needs, choices and
preferences. Residents are treated with dignity and respect and encouraged to function
at their optimum level of wellness.
The Standards and Criteria in this document are intended to identify the minimum
requirement for provision of licensed nursing home service. Each facility management
and staff will develop specific policies, procedures and practices to meet and maintain
these Standards on an ongoing basis.
The Standards are organized into six categories. Each Standard includes the Principle
on which the Standard is based, the Criteria by which the Standard is met, References
which relate to the Standard and Compliance Measures as a means to determine if the
Standard has been met. This format is intended to assist management, staff, inspectors
and the Board to assess the facility’s achievement in meeting the Standards.
Private Nursing Home Service includes:
•
24 hour nursing and personal care under the direction and supervision of a
registered nurse, including regular assessment, monitoring and care planning;
•
medical service through the house physician or resident’s personal physician;
•
pharmacy service;
•
personal care services including assistance with activities of daily living such as
bathing, grooming, dressing, eating, mobility, transfer, bowel and bladder
management;
•
medication management and administration;
•
food and nutrition services;
•
physical, recreational, spiritual and social activities;
•
housekeeping;
•
laundry/linen;
•
room accommodation;
•
basic resident trust account service; and,
•
provision for resident privacy and independence.
1
2.0
2.1
MANAGEMENT and ADMINISTRATION
MISSION STATEMENT, GOALS, OBJECTIVES and ORGANIZATIONAL
STRUCTURE
STANDARD 2.1
The management of the facility is under the leadership of an operator and guided by
a mission statement, goals and objectives, organizational structure and human
resource management practices to support the care of residents.
Principle
For purposes of this Standard, “operator” is the individual or organization responsible for
the management and operation of the facility, including an administrator.
The operator holds responsibility and accountability for the operation of the facility and
must ensure delegated authority, responsibility and channels of communication are clearly
understood by the staff.
The management practices in a facility are the foundation for effective delivery of services
to residents and are essential for the coordination and cooperation of all staff.
Criteria
2.1.1
There is a clearly defined mission statement which reflects the philosophy of
the facility.
2.1.2
Goals and objectives are written and kept current to support the mission
statement.
2.1.3
There is a current written and dated organizational chart, available to all staff,
which clearly identifies the relationships between departments and the lines
of authority. The chart is revised as organizational changes are made.
2.1.4
The facility has in place a resident’s rights policy.
2.1.5
General administrative policies and procedures guiding the operation of the
facility are approved by management, communicated and accessible to staff.
These are developed and revised as required and reviewed on a regular
basis, e.g., annually. These policies include and are not limited to:
2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2.1.6
resident’s rights and responsibilities
assessing resident level of care
abuse or neglect of residents
administrative procedures
contingency plans
human resource management
occupational health and safety
incident reporting and management
notification of significant events
confidentiality
concerns or complaints
medication management
transfer of residents due to:
•
resident choice: or,
•
resident care need requirement (e.g., safety/special care unit)
trust accounts (comfort allowance, other)
The operator ensures continuous coverage of the facility in her/his absence
by designating a staff in-charge to assume responsibility for the operations
and care services of the facility for the duration of the absence.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act (ss. 1[l]), and Nursing Home
Regulations (ss. 22, 23, 24, 25, 34)
•
Long-Term Care Subsidization Act Regulations (ss. 1 [b], 12, 13)
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act
Compliance Measures
•
Review of administrative policies and procedures.
•
Review of resident care policies and procedures
•
Review of mission, goals, objectives
•
Review of organizational chart
•
Review of Residents Rights Policy
•
Operator interview
•
DON interview
3
2.2
COMPLIANCE WITH FEDERAL, PROVINCIAL, MUNICIPAL LEGISLATION
AND REGULATION
STANDARD 2.2
The operator of the private nursing home ensures the facility is operated and
maintained in compliance with federal, provincial and municipal legislation and
regulation.
Principle
A properly operated and maintained facility which meets legislative and regulatory
requirements is essential for the comfort, safety and security of the residents, staff, and
visitors.
Criteria
2.2.1
The operator of a new or renovated facility has certificates or reports of
inspections to demonstrate there is compliance with applicable legislation,
codes and standards. Action has been taken to comply with any corrective
orders which have been issued. The applicable legislation, codes and
standards include and are not limited to:
•
Building
•
Electrical
•
Fire Safety
•
Elevator and Lifting Devices
•
Boiler and Pressure Vessels
•
Environmental Health
•
Resident Care Service
•
Dietary Service
2.2.2
Prior to license renewal by the Board, the operator has certificates or reports
of inspections to demonstrate there is continuing compliance with applicable
legislation, codes and standards and action has been taken to comply with
any corrective orders issued.
2.2.3
When planning a new facility or expansion or structural renovation of an
existing facility, the operator;
•
submitted the plans to the Board for its approval with respect to
appropriateness for the purposes of nursing home services proposed,
prior to commencement of construction; and,
•
ensured that the new construction complied with all building
standards, codes (e.g., National Building Code of Canada) and
4
legislation, including Environmental Health requirements if related to
food service.
2.2.4
The facility license is displayed prominently in the building main entrance
or in another location open to the public.
2.2.5
The license number is cited in any facility advertisement along with the
statement of any conditions placed on the license by the Board.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
•
Provincial Building Code Act
•
Barrier-free Design Regulations
•
National Building Code of Canada
•
Applicable federal, provincial & municipal legislation and regulation.
•
Public Health Act
•
Eating Establishments and Licensed Premises Regulations
•
Notifiable and Communicable Diseases Regulations
•
Rental Accommodations Regulations
•
Fire Prevention Act and Codes and Standards Order
•
Smoke-free Places Act and General Regulations
Compliance Measures
•
Review of reports of inspections and required certificates
•
Monitor facility submissions to the Board regarding new construction or renovation
•
Current numbered license displayed in a public place
•
Monitor facility advertisements, e.g., newspaper, TV, brochures
5
2.3
FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION
STANDARD 2.3
The operator ensures that a) the written accounts and records of the facility
operations outlining its revenues and expenditures are maintained in such a manner
as to demonstrate the calculation of rates charged to residents, and b) current
accounts are kept on any financial transactions made with or on behalf of a resident.
Principle
The operator is responsible for the financial administration of the facility. The operator may
also be responsible for managing resident trust accounts, e.g., comfort allowance, others.
Criteria
2.3.1
The operator provided a detailed business plan as part of the application
process for initial licensure.
2.3.2
The operator maintains accounts of all financial transactions (including
receipts) for each resident whose personal finances are managed by the
facility operator, where there is no Public Trustee or appointed committee
with designated authority to do so. This record is part of the resident
financial record and shall be provided at any reasonable time to the resident
or authorized representative.
2.3.3
The operator manages the comfort allowance held in trust for each resident
in accordance with the Long-Term Care Subsidization Act and Regulations,
and Department of Health [and Wellness] Policy: Comfort Allowance and
Trust Accounts: Nursing Home (see Appendix 8.3) and the PNH Service
Agreement.
2.3.4
The operator keeps proper accounts and records to support invoices to the
Government for Basic Health Care Services for each resident, including
related invoices, receipts and vouchers. These records and documents are
open to audit by authorized Government staff.
2.3.5
The operator adheres to the principles, procedures and responsibilities for
managing personal finances of residents as established in policy by the
Board and/or Department of Health and Wellness.
6
2.3.6
The operator keeps current written financial accounts of the operation of the
nursing home outlining revenues and expenses.
2.3.7
The operator maintains financial records, accounts, invoices and vouchers
for at least seven years.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
34, 36)
•
Long-Term Care Subsidization Act and Regulations (ss. 12, 13)
•
Department of Health [and Wellness] Policy: Comfort Allowance and Trust
Accounts: Nursing Home
•
Private Nursing Home Service Agreement
Compliance Measures
•
Review of facility financial accounts upon request of the Board
•
Review of resident financial accounts on annual inspection
•
Periodic audit of facility and resident accounts, related to health care and
accommodation charges and comfort allowance, by authorized Health PEI
personnel.
7
2.4
NURSING SERVICE ADMINISTRATION
STANDARD 2.4
There is an organized program of nursing service, led by a Director of Nursing or
Resident Care (or equivalent), for the provision of nursing and personal care to
residents.
Principles
The facility nursing service promotes quality of life and provides person-centred care to
residents based on individual care needs and preferences in accordance with: professional
practice legislation; professional practice guidelines and standards; codes of ethics;
Ministerial and Board directives; and, facility standards, policies and procedures.
The service is based on interdisciplinary and collaborative practice to ensure
comprehensive assessment, care planning and evaluation of resident needs is conducted
as a continuous process, with resident participation to the greatest extent possible.
Criteria
2.4.1
There is a designated Director of Nursing or Director of Resident Care who
is a registered nurse (RN).
2.4.2
The Director holds a current license to practice with the Association of
Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island.
2.4.3
The Director’s responsibilities include and are not limited to:
•
planning and organizing nursing and personal care service delivery;
•
providing direction to the operator regarding nursing service;
•
evaluating nursing and personal care service provided;
•
providing direction for infection prevention control and communicable
disease management measures;
•
identifying necessary changes to or gaps in service;
•
staffing with qualified nursing and personal care staff;
•
designing staff patterns which ensure required number, distribution
and qualifications of staff for 24 hours a day, seven days a week;
•
ensuring nursing care provided is in accordance with professional
codes of ethics, professional practice standards and guidelines,
legislative and Board requirements;
8
•
•
•
•
developing nursing service policies, procedures and clinical standards
reflective of evidence-based practice;
ensuring incidents and complaints are managed in accordance with
these Standards and facility policies and procedures, e.g., injury, error,
abuse, neglect;
assessing staff performance, development and education needs; and,
coordinating and/or facilitating staff education and in-service sessions.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
32)
•
Registered Nurses Act and Professional Conduct Review Regulations, Registration
and Licensing of Nurses Regulations
•
Licensed Practical Nurses Act and Regulations
•
Direct Care Hours for Private Nursing Homes (Appendix 8.2)
•
Association of Registered Nurses of Prince Edward Island, Licensed Practical
Nurses Association of Prince Edward Island and Prince Edward Island Health Sector
Council ( 2009). Exemplary Care: Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses
Working Together
•
Canadian Nurses Association (2009). CNA Position Statement: Nursing
Leadership. Ottawa.
•
Canadian Nurses Association (2003). CNA Position Statement: Staffing Decisions
for the Delivery of Safe Nursing Care. Ottawa.
Compliance Measures
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff interviews
•
Operator interviews
•
Review of policy and procedure manuals
•
Review of staff schedule and direct care hours
9
2.5
INSURANCE
STANDARD 2.5
The facility, without limiting its obligations or liabilities, provides and maintains
policies of insurance satisfactory to the Department of Health and Wellness and in
accordance with the minimum requirements as determined by the Risk Management
and Insurance Section, Department of Finance and Municipal Affairs.
Principle
The facility has current and adequate insurance coverage relative to the services provided
and the property owned and/or operated.
Criteria
2.5.1
The facility maintains, as a minimum, commercial general liability insurance
providing not less than Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) coverage and adds
the Government as an additional insured and provided whatever information
the Government may have required on the insurance that was available.
The policy includes, but is not limited to, bodily and personal injury, property
damage, non-owned automobile liability, cross liability, blanket contractual
liability and 30 day’s notice of cancellation to the insured and the
Government.
2.5.2
The facility purchased and maintained Medical Malpractice Insurance with
limits of at least Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000).
2.5.3
If the facility owns any automobiles licensed to travel on a highway, the Home
purchased and maintained Automobile Liability Insurance with combined
Bodily Injury / Property Damage limits of at least Two Million Dollars
($2,000,000).
2.5.4
The facility carries a Comprehensive Dishonesty, Disappearance and
Destruction policy in an amount not less than Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000)
to cover the property of residents in the event of dishonest acts committed by
the Home or the Home’s employees.
2.5.5
The policies are in a form, and with insurers, satisfactory to the Government.
The foregoing insurances are primary and do not require the sharing of any
loss by any insurer of the Government, nor any loss by the province’s Self10
Insurance and Risk Management Fund. A “certificate of insurance” was
delivered to the Government prior to the execution of the current Service
Agreement.
References
•
Self Insurance and Risk Management Section, Department of Finance and
Municipal Affairs
•
Private Nursing Home Service Agreement
Compliance Measure
•
Confirm copy of current “certificate of insurance” on file
11
2.6
CONTINGENCY PLAN
STANDARD 2.6
There is a written contingency plan in place, accepted by the Board, to ensure
continuity of operation in case of death of the operator or other comparable
disruption which will/may have a significant impact on the facility’s ability and
capacity to provide care to its residents.
Principle
Continuation of service is imperative for the residents and staff of the facility. Therefore,
operators must prepare for unexpected events which would threaten the operator’s ability
to operate by adopting a plan for implementation if and when such an unexpected event
may occur.
Criteria
2.6.1
A contingency plan is developed by the operator, is communicated to key staff
and is in place.
2.6.2
The operator has designated a person(s) (staff, other) to initiate the plan
if/when required.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.6
ss.4)
•
Private Nursing Home Service Agreement
Compliance Measures
•
Review of written contingency plan
•
Operator interview
•
Staff interview
12
2.7
NOTIFICATION OF SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
STANDARD 2.7
The operator provides notice to the Department of Health and Wellness and to the
Board, through the Department Director responsible for the inspection function and
Board operations, of any significant event or circumstance which may effect the
safety of residents, staff and/or others of the facility. Notice is given as soon as
possible and no later than 24 hours after the incident.
Principle
The Department of Health and Wellness and the Board have the legislated responsibility
to monitor the operation of private nursing homes to ensure that operational, nursing and
personal care services provided are safe, of good quality and appropriate to the assessed
needs of the resident. When significant events occur, the Department of Health and
Wellness and the Board should know the nature of the event and know what measures
have been implemented by the facility in response to the event, to assist in determining any
level of support which may be required.
Criteria
2.7.1
There is a policy in place for handling significant events including the
requirement to notify the Department of Health and Wellness and the Board.
2.7.2
Current Department of Health and Wellness and Board contact information
is accessible to the operator or designate (e.g., name, phone number, e-mail
address) and updated as required.
2.7.3
Significant events for notification would include and not be limited to:
•
a potentially life threatening accident or injury to staff, resident or
visitor;
•
a missing resident;
•
a death that requires reporting in accordance with the Coroners Act;
•
any harm or suspected harm suffered by a vulnerable resident as a
result of unlawful conduct, improper treatment or care, harassment or
neglect on the part of any person;
•
any incident involving a resident that has been reported to law
enforcement officers;
•
a fire;
•
a prolonged disruption of:
13
•
•
•
•
supply of electrical power, heat or water;
provision of food;
provision of any other basic service of the facility which
interferes with the ability to provide adequate nursing and
personal care to residents; and/or
a critical situation due to inadequate 24 hour staff coverage.
2.7.4
If such an event occurred, the facility has a written summary report as a
facility record including:
•
description of the event;
•
the response taken by the facility;
•
results of the response;
•
notification to the Department of Health and Wellness and the Board;
and if warranted,
•
follow-up by Departmental inspectors or Adult Protection Services.
2.7.5
The resident’s family or resident’s representative is notified immediately when
a significant event occurs involving a resident, including accident/injury,
unexpected death, resident missing from facility or resident abuse.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
35)
•
Adult Protection Act
•
Coroners Act and Regulations
•
Private Nursing Home Service Agreement
Compliance Measures
•
Review facility policy
•
Review process with operator
•
Review documentation of significant events, if occurred.
•
Notification of the Dept. of Health & Wellness and CCFNH Board
14
2.8
INCIDENT REPORTING
STANDARD 2.8
There is a process in place to identify, investigate, report and follow-up as an incident, any
event, accident or unusual situation which is inconsistent with the routine operation of the
facility, provision of health service or the routine care of the resident, including abuse and
neglect. The incident is documented on an Incident Report Form, satisfactory to the Board
and retained as a facility record.
Principle
All staff who witness, participate in or discover such an incident are responsible for reporting
the incident to her/his supervisor and writing an accurate and complete account of the
incident. Collection and review of incident reports is an important risk management
measure to minimize or prevent future occurrences and to improve quality of resident care
and facility service.
Criteria
General
2.8.1
There is a written policy and procedure in place to ensure all incidents are
reported following an approved process and recorded on a standardized
Incident Report Form, satisfactory to the Board.
2.8.2
Incidents are reported by staff to the immediate supervisor and Incident
Report Forms are completed before the end of shift.
2.8.3
Serious incidents are reported immediately to the management, e.g.,
operator, Director of Nursing.
2.8.4
The operator or designate notifies the Department of Health and Wellness
and the Board of any significant event described in and in accordance with
Standard 2.7.
2.8.5
The operator and/or Director of Nursing:
•
reviews all incident reports;
•
participates in investigation, as required;
•
ensures recommended action taken;
•
ensures appropriate follow-up;
•
monitors outcomes of action taken; and,
•
analyses and monitors incident trends.
15
2.8.6
The operator and/or Director of Nursing retains, as facility records, all Incident
Report Forms.
2.8.7
There is a facility policy related to the management and retention of Incident
Report Forms.
Resident Related Incident
2.8.8
The incident is recorded in the Nursing Notes/Interdisciplinary Notes of the
resident health record, including resident response and follow-up action
taken.
2.8.9
The resident’s physician is notified of any incident which involves resident
injury or treatment error. The Director of Nursing and resident physician(s)
identifies the specific types of incidents for which the physician would be
notified, when an incident occurs.
2.8.10
The physician reviews and signs resident-related Incident Report Forms when
in the facility.
2.8.11
The resident’s family or representative is notified of incidents involving
resident injury, within the shift.
Staff Related Incident
2.8.12
A facility Incident Report Form is completed for any injury to staff and retained
by the facility.
2.8.13
A Workers Compensation Board (WCB) form is completed for any incident
involving injury to staff.
2.8.14
The incident is reported to the on-site Occupational Health and Safety
committee or representative.
2.8.15
The WCB is notified immediately of any serious staff injury, as described in
the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Completion and submission of WCB
forms are carried out in accordance with facility policy.
16
References
•
Health Services Act (s. 26 [b])
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
25 [e], Form #3)
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act (ss. 25, 26, 36)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of Incident Report Forms, with particular attention to trends
•
Operator interview
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff interview
•
Review of resident health records
17
3.0
3.1
LICENSING
APPLICATION PROCESS
STANDARD 3.1
The facility operator applies to the Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes
Board (the Board) for an initial license or renewal of existing license in a prescribed
manner and meets the requirements for licensure as determined by the Board.
Principle
The Board, reporting to the Minster of Health and Wellness, is an incorporated body with
legislative authority to license private nursing homes to ensure operational, nursing and
personal care services in facilities are safe, of good quality and appropriate to the needs of
residents. Licensing requires the applicant to comply with all the established rules as
governed by legislation, regulation, Board policy and standards prior to opening and
operating a facility and prior to renewing an existing license. The aim of licensing is to
ensure the provision of quality care and to protect the resident through risk reduction.
Criteria
Application for Initial License
3.1.1
The facility operator submitted the completed Application for License form
and application fee and all additional information required for initial licensure
to the Board for review, including:
•
proof of ownership/lease of facility;
•
a facility floor plan;
•
a business plan;
•
copy of current “certificate of insurance” for required coverage;
•
prescribed inspection reports; and,
•
recent criminal record check for the applicant and operator.
3.1.2
The facility is deemed compliant with all licensure requirements in accordance
with legislation, regulation, standards, codes and practices recognized by the
Board and has a current numbered certificate of license issued by the Board,
indicating the number of licensed beds and the dates of the licensure period
(usually one year), prior to opening.
3.1.3
The facility license is displayed prominently in the building main entrance or
in another location open to the public.
18
Application for Renewal of License
3.1.4
The facility operator submitted the completed Application for Renewal of
License form and renewal application fee to the Board at least sixty (60) days
prior to expiry. Included was information on any alteration/up-grades to the
facility which occurred since the last license was issued.
3.1.5
The operator ensures the inspections are completed in advance of the
expiration of the facility license in order for the Board to have all necessary
inspection reports in hand, with the Application for Renewal of License, at the
time of their review.
3.1.6
The operator provides a copy of current “certificate of insurance” for required
coverage.
3.1.7
The facility is deemed compliant with all licensure requirements in accordance
with legislation, regulation, standards, codes and practices recognized by the
Board and has a numbered certificate of license issued by the Board
indicating the number of licensed beds and the dates of the renewed
licensure period.
3.1.8
The facility license is displayed prominently in the building main entrance or
in another location open to the public.
Provisional License
3.1.9
If the facility received a provisional license including a summary of concerns
and/or conditions from the Board, the facility operator provided to the Board,
within ten (10) days of receipt, written documentation of how these concerns
were to be met.
3.1.10
The operator is aware of Board policy whereby failure to complete
requirements of the conditions placed on a provisional license by the Board
may result in an admission freeze after 30 days or a Board refusal to relicense after 60 days.
3.1.11
The facility operator satisfied the Board the conditions stated on the
provisional license were met within the time allotted by the Board, supported
by any required inspection reports, Environmental Health approval for
conditions related to food service, and a full license was subsequently issued.
3.1.12
The “provisional” facility license is displayed prominently in the building main
entrance or in another location open to the public.
3.1.13
The license number is cited in any facility advertisement along with the
statement of any conditions placed on the license by the Board.
19
Renovation
3.1.14
If the facility planned structural renovation, the operator:
•
had the plans approved by the Board for appropriateness for the
purpose of nursing home services, before commencement of
construction; and,
•
received confirmation through inspection reports that the new
construction complied with all provincial building standards and
National Building Code of Canada.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act (s. 9) and Nursing Home
Regulations
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Board Policy #3 - Provisional
License
•
Fire Prevention Act and Codes and Standards Order
•
Provincial Building Code Act
•
Barrier-free Design Regulations
•
National Building Code of Canada
Compliance Measures
•
Current numbered license displayed in a public place
•
Review inspection reports
•
Review conditions for Provisional License, if in place
•
Confirm copy of current “certificate of insurance” is on file
•
Monitor facility advertisements, e.g., newspapers, T.V., brochures
20
3.2
INSPECTION
STANDARD 3.2
The facility is inspected to ensure compliance with the Community Care Facilities and
Nursing Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations: prior to licencing of a new or
expanded facility; annually for renewal of a licence; as follow-up or partial inspection
to determine compliance with Board recommendations; and/or, for partial or full
inspection as determined by the nature of a complaint.
Principle
Inspection provides a systematic and objective review of the operation and service provision
of a private nursing home to ensure the facility is in compliance with licensing requirements.
Criteria
Initial License
3.2.1
For an initial license, the applicant operator provided evidence to the Board
of compliance with standards prescribed by various authorities including
inspection reports for:
•
Building Construction
•
Electrical Safety
•
Fire Safety
•
Elevator and Lifting Devices (if applicable)
•
Boiler and Pressure Vessels
•
Environmental Health
•
Resident Care Service
•
Dietary Service
Renewal of License
3.2.2
For renewal of license, the operator (licensee) kept required annual
inspections up to date with evidence supplied to the Board through inspection
reports for:
•
Building Construction
•
Electrical Safety
•
Fire Safety
•
Elevator and Lifting Devices (if applicable)
•
Boiler and Pressure Vessels
•
Environmental Health
•
Resident Care Service
•
Dietary Service
Other inspections may be considered necessary at renewal time.
21
Follow-up Inspections
3.2.3
If the Board made recommendations or placed conditions on the license, the
operator provided evidence of compliance during a follow-up inspection.
Complaint
3.2.4
The operator was informed of any complaint received by the Board and/or the
DHW, the nature of the complaint and worked with the inspector to attempt
a resolution. If warranted, further investigation and inspection was conducted.
3.2.5
The facility acted on any corrective action required by the Board.
Smoke-Free Places
3.2.6
The operator cooperated with the inspection process as a result of a concern
or complaint ( if any) and complied with any order received as a result of
inspection findings.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act (s.11) and Nursing Home
Regulations (ss. 2, 4, 5, 9, 11, 18)
•
Adult Protection Act
•
Mental Health Act and Regulations
•
Fire Prevention Act and Codes and Standards Order
•
Provincial Building Codes Act
•
Barrier-free Design Regulations
•
National Building Code of Canada
•
Smoke-free Places Act (ss. 13, 14, 15, 16) and General Regulations (s. 9)
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act
Compliance Measures
•
Review of inspection report(s)
•
Review of Board recommendation(s)
•
Review of complaint reports (if applicable)
•
Operator interview
22
4.0
4.1
RESIDENT CARE
RESIDENT ADMISSION OR MOVING IN
STANDARD 4.1
The admission or “moving in” process of the facility is planned to meet the
individual/personal needs of the resident.
Principle
Admission or “moving in” to a nursing home can be a difficult and stressful experience for
a resident and family. The process used should be well organized, coordinated and
welcoming, with the focus on getting to know the resident through assisting and supporting
her/him in making the facility their “home.”
Acceptance of a resident for admission by the facility is based on the expectation that the
services provided by the facility can meet the assessed care needs of the resident.
Criteria
4.1.1
There are written policies and procedures in place regarding the “moving in”
process.
4.1.2
Residents approved to move in to the facility are appropriate to the level of
care and service provided by the facility and assessed as level 4 or 5
according to the Seniors Assessment Screening Tool (SAST).
4.1.3
Residents who move into the facility have been approved for admission by the
local Admissions Committee. In the case of dual facilities, residents have
been approved by the Admissions Committee, for transfer/admission to a
nursing bed from a community care bed within the facility,
4.1.4
The facility collected all information necessary for admission [moving in] by
a resident prior to moving in, including:
•
a copy of the SAST;
•
current medical history, including a completed medical data form;
•
nursing care and treatment requirements;
•
medical treatment and medication orders signed by the physician;
•
diet history and food preferences questionnaire (including food
allergies):
•
personal care needs;
23
•
•
initiation of resident social/life history (e.g., life experiences, personal
preferences, daily routines); and,
relevant financial information.
4.1.5
Upon admission [moving in], required resident information is confirmed and
any additional information required is collected and documented, including the
resident’s health care directive, if in place. This would include continuation
of the resident’s social or life history for staff to get to know the resident as a
person through their life experiences, family structure, routines, goals, social
interests and cultural practices.
4.1.6
The admission [moving in] process includes an orientation plan for residents,
resident representatives or families (if the resident chooses) which includes
and is not limited to:
•
a review of the philosophy of care;
•
familiarization with the facility physical and social environment, key
personnel, and other residents (i.e., room mates);
•
a review of the services, mission and goals of the facility;
•
a review of ways resident, family or representative may participate in
decision-making regarding nursing and personal care, including
advanced health care directives;
•
a review of the supplies and services, as defined in the PNH Service
Agreement, which are the responsibility of the:
•
resident;
•
facility; and,
•
government;
•
a review of billing procedures and personal/resident charges;
•
a review of availability and/or access to services, e.g., clergy, church
services, hair styling/barber, telephone, cable TV, newspaper;
•
familiarization with facility policies, e.g., confidentiality and access to
information, safety and security procedures, smoking policies;
•
information on resident rights and the means for addressing questions
and concerns of the resident/family;
•
trust accounts and financial administration support, if required;
•
a tour of the facility if not done prior to admission;
•
information regarding resident choice for a transfer to another nursing
home; and,
•
information regarding potential need for transfer to another facility
should there be a change in the resident’s care needs which cannot be
met at the facility (e.g., special care/safety unit).
4.1.7
Information included in the resident health and/or financial record, if in place,
is:
•
the contact information for a substitute decision-maker or proxy;
•
list of next of kin and contact information;
•
the resident’s health care directive;
24
•
•
name and contact information of Power of Attorney, Public Trustee,
Public Guardian, if appointed; and,
completed funeral arrangements.
4.1.8
There is a consent for treatment (e.g., medications, treatments) in the health
record signed by the resident or substitute decision-maker on admission.
There may be other signed consents in the record relative to additional or
more specific treatments or medical procedures.
4.1.9
There is documented evidence, in the resident’s health record or on an
orientation check list, that the admission policies and procedures and the
orientation plan is adhered to.
4.1.10
When a resident, because of a mental and/or physical health condition, is
unable to participate fully in the admission [moving in] process, there is
documentation in the resident record which includes an explanation of any
alternative provided, i.e., resident representative was informed of policies.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
(ss. 25, 34)
•
Long-Term Care Subsidization Act Regulations (ss. 12, 13)
•
Consent to Treatment and Health Care Directives Act (ss. 13, 14, 15, Part 111)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of admission [moving in] policies and procedures
•
Review of orientation check list (if used by facility)
•
Review of resident records pertaining to admission [moving in] procedures
•
Resident interviews
•
Staff interviews
•
Copy of consent(s) to treatment in resident health record
•
Copy of Health Care Directive (if made)
25
4.2
RESIDENT ASSESSMENT AND PLAN OF CARE
STANDARD 4.2
The care of residents is based on a comprehensive assessment of her/his total needs
and preferences, which provides the basis for the individualized resident care plan
and includes resident goals, actions, and expected outcomes to promote quality of
life.
Principle
Resident care is designed to ensure there is a process in place to assess, plan, implement
and evaluate care and services provided to meet the identified needs and preferences of
residents. The assessment process is resident centred utilizing an interdisciplinary and
collaborative approach which must include input from the resident, resident representative
or family (if the resident chooses). The care plan reflects resident strengths, retained
abilities, interests and goals.
Criteria
4.2.1
There are written policies and procedures in place regarding resident
assessment, care review and care plan development.
4.2.2
The individual needs and preferences of the resident are identified by nursing
care staff with input from the resident, resident representative or family and
attending physician. Where available, other disciplines are included, e.g.,
dietitian, recreation/activities staff, pharmacist, occupational therapist and
physiotherapist.
4.2.3
The initial plan of care is based upon information collected prior to moving in
and the observations and information gathered during the moving in and
orientation process of the resident and family which includes:
•
pre-admission information on nursing and personal care requirements,
dietary restrictions, medical information/reports, medication
requirements, psychosocial needs, cultural needs and language use,
the availability of family support and the identification of any safety or
risk issues; and,
•
admission information, gathered during the orientation/admission
[moving in] assessment period, including a thorough nursing
assessment:
•
to identify nursing care needs and personal preferences for
activities of daily living, social activity and religious or spiritual
practices; and,
•
to get to know the resident as a person through their life history,
as in 4.1.5.
26
4.2.4
The initial plan of care is developed within 24 hours after moving in and
includes sufficient information to provide safe, effective and skilled care.
4.2.5
The more comprehensive plan of care is developed within 4-6 weeks after
moving in and includes input from resident, staff, and family or resident
representative. The plan is made known to and used by the staff providing
nursing and personal care to the resident, through an interdisciplinary team
conference format which includes the resident and family member(s).
4.2.6
The plan of care gives clear direction to staff on how to approach the
resident’s identified needs and personal preferences for:
•
activities of daily living and degree of resident independence,
assistance or supervision required;
•
mobility;
•
pain management;
•
falls risk, general safety;
•
diet and nutrition;
•
mental, physical and recreational activation/stimulation;
•
social activities (within and outside the facility);
•
religious or spiritual activities;
•
treatment of health conditions (e.g., nursing, medical, physiotherapy);
•
medication regimen;
•
end-of-life wishes (e.g., health care directives, Do-Not-Resuscitate
order); and
•
any special or unusual care requirements.
4.2.7
Resident goals are identified, reflected in the care plan, honoured through
care and service provision and evaluated through feedback from the resident,
resident representative and/or family.
4.2.8
There is a process to communicate changes in the plan of care to all, i.e.,
resident, resident representative or family, facility staff and resident’s
physician.
4.2.9
Where a resident is unable to participate in his/her own care planning, there
is documentation of alternate action, i.e., involvement by resident’s
representative.
4.2.10
All resident care plans have documented evidence of review:
•
four-six weeks following moving in by the interdisciplinary care team;
•
as resident care needs change, by the nursing staff; and
•
at least annually, by the interdisciplinary team.
The resident, resident family or representative is invited to participate in care
planning at each or any of these reviews.
27
4.2.11
Nursing assessment of resident needs, care and services provided and
outcomes achieved are documented in the resident’s health record.
4.2.12
Resident care plans are part of the permanent resident record.
Reference
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
24, 25, 28)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of facility policies and procedures
•
Examination of care planning records, i.e., review of care plans, meetings with
families
•
Review of resident record
•
Resident interviews
•
Staff interviews
•
Review of food history and food preferences for new residents
28
4.3
ONGOING RESIDENT MONITORING
STANDARD 4.3
There is on-going monitoring and evaluation of each resident’s nursing and personal
care, care outcomes and quality of life.
Principle
Comprehensive care depends on regular monitoring of the well-being of the resident, the
adequacy of the services provided and contribution the service makes to resident quality
of life. Monitoring includes reassessment at regular intervals and/or at times of major
change in the health of the residents, with an appropriate adjustment in the care plan and
coordination of services.
Criteria
4.3.1
Residents are assessed for their response to care, on an ongoing basis.
4.3.2
Residents are continuously assessed for their knowledge and understanding
of their health condition. Staff provide information and explanation
appropriate to the resident’s learning need and comprehension.
4.3.3
If there is a change in the resident’s condition, a reassessment of care needs
is completed by nursing staff. Changes in the resident’s condition are
documented in the resident health record and the care plan adjusted
accordingly.
4.3.4
Dietary services are notified of resident dietary changes.
4.3.5
Allied health consultation or service is arranged for the resident if her/his
condition warrants and is unavailable within the facility. This would include
access to a physiotherapist, occupational therapist, pharmacist, dietitian,
speech language pathologist, dentist, psychiatrist, Community Mental Health
service or Provincial Geriatric Services. As the resident may be required to
cover the cost of some of these services, resident agreement to arrange and
pay for the service would be required in advance.
4.3.6
Residents who have a change in their condition and whose care needs can
no longer be met at the facility make application for transfer to another facility
where care needs can be met, e.g., safety/special care unit.
4.3.7
Medication orders are reviewed by the physician at least quarterly.
29
4.3.8
Resident weight and vital signs (TPR and B/P) are recorded monthly and as
otherwise indicated by the resident health condition.
4.3.9
Laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging procedures are conducted as the
resident’s health condition warrants.
4.3.10
Functional assessment as to level of care (SAST) is conducted and recorded
at least every four months.
Reference:
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
22, 24)
Compliance Measures:
•
Review of resident record
•
Review of care plan
•
Staff interviews
•
Director of Nursing interview
30
4.4
NURSING AND PERSONAL CARE
STANDARD 4.4
Each resident receives individualized nursing and personal care, as well as
supportive services as outlined in her/his plan of care.
Principle
Nursing staff coordinates the assessment, planning, and delivery of nursing and personal
care in collaboration with the resident, resident representative, family (if the resident
chooses), other facility staff and external allied health professionals. The independence of
the resident is supported and encouraged by enabling the use of her/his abilities in every
activity of daily living. The level of supervision and assistance required is identified through
this process.
Criteria
Eating
4.4.1
The resident’s ability to manage eating is assessed and the level of
supervision and assistance (including eating aides) required for eating is
provided to promote optimal resident function and nutritional status.
4.4.2
The resident is encouraged to eat in the dining room for meals to promote
and enhance their eating experience, nutritional intake, social activity, sense
of inclusion and adoption of the facility as their “home.”
4.4.3
Tube Feedings (Enteral Feedings) - A resident may require tube feeding as
the means to obtain nutritional intake. Nursing staff are competent to manage
resident care including care of the tube, handling and administration of the
nutritional products and monitoring and evaluating the resident response in
accordance with facility policy and procedures.
Bathing, Grooming, Dressing, Toileting
4.4.4
Hygiene and grooming practices are considerate of each resident’s
preferences and ability to participate in the activity.
4.4.5
The resident’s personal care and bathing routines are identified and include:
the degree of assistance required; and, preference for bath type, time,
frequency and duration. Assessment of the skin and nails is an essential
element of care.
31
4.4.6
A resident with potential for altered skin integrity has a plan in place to
prevent deterioration and to ensure appropriate skin care and wound
management is conducted as required. This includes promoting healing,
optimizing nutritional intake, preventing infection and minimizing pain and
discomfort.
4.4.7
The resident is assessed for foot care needs and basic or advanced foot care
is provided by a health professional with foot care training, on an as required
basis.
4.4.8
The plan of care includes and promotes the enhancement of the resident’s
appearance, e.g., hair, clothing, shaving.
4.4.9
Assistive devices for activities of daily living are available to residents to
support independence and retention of abilities, e.g., dressing aides, raised
toilet seats and grab bars.
4.4.10
Oral hygiene of each resident is assessed and monitored as part of daily
resident care to maintain the integrity of the oral tissue and to prevent
consequential and potentially serious health problems.
Individualized mouth care is provided when warranted and arrangements are
made for dental assessment and treatment/service on an as needed basis.
4.4.11
The teeth and/or dentures of each resident are cleaned at least twice daily,
and more frequently as required. Both dentures and denture containers are
labelled, if possible.
4.4.12
Normal bowel and bladder function of the resident is promoted by care staff.
Staff provide support and assistance to the resident to maintain or strengthen
continence and to minimize incontinence, as directed in the resident care
plan. Residents who are incontinent have an individualized program of care
including promotion of comfort and skin integrity.
Mobility, Transfer
4.4.13
Each resident receives supervision, assistance and service which promotes
and/or maintains optimal functioning, mobility and independence.
4.4.14
Residents are instructed and supported in the use of assistive devices, e.g.,
canes and walkers. Devices are maintained in safe working order.
4.4.15
Resident transfer, lift and repositioning is conducted in accordance with
techniques learned through training courses designed to reduce the risk of
injury to both residents and nursing and personal care staff.
32
Vision, Hearing
4.4.16
Referrals for assessments of hearing and vision are made on an as required
basis.
4.4.17
Eye glasses and hearing aids are cared for, cleaned and are accessible to the
resident. If possible, these are labelled with the resident’s name. If repairs
are required, the cost of repairs is the responsibility of the resident.
Cognition, Orientation
4.4.18
The care planning and the physical environment promotes and maintains the
resident’s orientation to time, place, and person through the availability of
references such as clocks and calendars.
4.4.19
The resident has opportunities to learn and to keep current with events
through the availability of resources such as newspapers, books, radio and
television.
4.4.20
The resident has opportunities for mental stimulation through the programs
and care provided by the facility and or community activity (i.e., group and
individual activity).
Safety
4.4.21
Staff of the facility is sufficient in number and has the skill and experience to
meet resident safety, security and care needs twenty four hours a day.
4.4.22
The environment of residents is maintained to minimize safety and security
risks.
4.4.23
Prompt attention is taken to protect residents from conditions that have been
identified as potentially hazardous.
4.4.24
Each resident is assessed by the nursing staff to determine risks to health
and safety (e.g., risk of falling, wandering). The assessment is documented
in the resident health record with preventive measures taken as necessary.
4.4.25
The measures taken to respond to individual risks consider the autonomy,
dignity and rights of the residents.
4.4.26
The facility has a least restraint policy, supported by written procedures,
directing restraint use when the risk of resident self-injury or to others is
significant. Restraints are used only as a last resort and are a temporary
measure when all other means to prevent or reduce the risk prove
unsuccessful.
33
Sleep, Rest
4.4.27
The resident’s environment and care routines promote comfort and rest.
Disruptions to sleep are minimized to the extent possible.
4.4.28
Measures are provided to manage discomfort and pain and documented in
the resident record.
4.4.29
Positioning aids are available to meet comfort needs of residents.
4.4.30
A resident’s desired bedtime routines are promoted and encouraged to the
extent possible in keeping with rights of other residents (room mates).
Social/Emotional/Spiritual/Cultural Support
4.4.31
The social, emotional, spiritual and cultural needs of the resident are
identified and staff is available to provide support on an ongoing basis. (See
Standard 6.2 Spiritual and Religious Practices)
4.4.32
Each resident is assisted in maintaining social involvement with family,
friends, and the community, as well as in developing new relationships.
4.4.33
Each resident is supported in maintaining cultural practices and links with
their cultural community. If a resident is unable to converse in English due to
a health condition or is unilingual in another language, means are found to
provide interpretation, e.g., family, friend, local interpretation service.
4.4.34
The response of the resident to life events/situations is acknowledged and
support is arranged when stressful circumstances indicate (e.g., counselling).
This is documented in the resident health record.
4.4.35
The staff respects and supports resident choices such as choice of clothing,
activity involvement, food preference and room decor.
4.4.36
The well-being of each resident is supported with facility philosophy and
policies which include and are not limited to:
•
enhancement of the resident’s rights for dignity, respect and courtesy,
privacy and confidentiality;
•
promotion of independence and autonomy;
•
prevention of physical, mental, emotional, sexual, and financial abuse;
and,
•
a person-centred approach to living.
34
Care of the Resident at End-of Life
The following criteria apply to those residents who are dying:
4.4.37
There are policies and procedures in place to direct the care of the dying
resident.
4.4.38
Resident care is in accordance with his/her signed health care directive, which
is part of the resident’s health record, if such a directive is in place.
4.4.39
Nursing and personal care staff have an understanding of the resident’s
cultural and religious values and beliefs as they relate to death and dying.
4.4.40
The resident and/or his/her representative is involved in decisions regarding
the type of care and treatment provided.
4.4.41
Each resident receives care designed to manage symptoms, promote comfort
and support a peaceful death.
4.4.42
Referrals are made to allied health professionals as required.
4.4.43
There is accommodation made for family to remain with the resident twenty
four hours, if needed, e.g., couch, folding cot, comfortable chair.
4.4.44
Each resident is assisted in arranging for counselling and bereavement
support, according to their needs and preferences.
4.4.45
Each resident is assisted in arranging for spiritual and religious support
according to their needs and preferences.
4.4.46
Opportunity is provided for other residents and staff to celebrate the life and
grieve the passing of a fellow resident, e.g., facility memorial service, funeral
home visitation, funeral attendance.
Care of the Resident with Cognitive Impairment
4.4.47
Staff have contemporary knowledge and skill to provide appropriate care and
support to residents with cognitive impairment including an understanding of
the challenges for communication, rest, safety, nutritional status and activities.
4.4.48
Staff practice effective communication skills which are sensitive and specific
to each resident living with cognitive impairment.
4.4.49
Potential triggers (e.g., fatigue, stress, inconsistent staff, infection,
discomfort, delirium, depression) for altered behaviours are observed,
assessed, documented and monitored over time. Social and environmental
35
interventions/responses, to reduce the emotional/physical distress which may
trigger the behaviour change, are the first level approaches initiated by staff.
Pharmaceutical and/or least restraint are initiated only when other measures
are ineffective.
4.4.50
A process is in place to access appropriate levels of internal and external
expertise for assessment and response to the needs of residents with altered
behaviour.
4.4.51
Assistive technology and equipment is used to promote a safe environment,
while optimizing function and independence, e.g., door alarms, hip protectors,
enclosed/secure outdoor space.
4.4.52
Consistency is recognized by management and staff as a key element in care
of residents living with cognitive impairment and is demonstrated by having
consistency in various aspects of facility service, e.g., staffing, mealtimes and
approaches to care.
4.4.53
Nutritional intake is supported through reduction of mealtime noise and
distractions, sufficient allotment of time for eating, offering of food one course
at a time, frequent offering of additional fluids and promoting a homelike
environment in the dining room.
4.4.54
Activities are designed to reflect resident preferences, life interests and
retained abilities, including those which relate to past and present interests,
hobbies and routines. Personal care is recognized as an activity.
36
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
22)
•
Adult Protection Act
•
Canadian Nurse Association (2010). CNA position statement: Spirituality, Health and
Nursing Practice. Ottawa.
•
Canadian Nurses Association (2008). CNA position statement: Providing Care at the
End of Life. Ottawa.
Compliance Measures
•
Staff training records
•
Review of nursing and personal care practices
•
Review of resident record
•
Review of facility policy and procedures
•
Philosophy of care
•
Resident care procedures
•
Resident’s rights
•
Prevention of abuse
•
Safety measures
•
Least Restraint
•
Staff interviews
•
Resident interviews
37
4.5
RESIDENT HEALTH RECORD
STANDARD 4.5
The facility maintains a resident health record system which ensures that resident
information is recorded accurately and completely in an organized format. Resident
privacy and confidentiality is protected by proper storage of the records and access
allowed to only those authorized to do so.
Principle
The resident health record contains all significant information pertaining to the resident’s
health status as well as the care and service provided, from admission to discharge or
death. Proper documentation is a method to ensure accuracy of the record and restricted
access by only designated facility staff is a means to protect confidentiality of the record.
Documentation in the health record is a means of communication for health care providers
and legal proof of health care provided.
Criteria
4.5.1
The facility has written policies and procedures regarding:
•
confidentiality of resident health records;
•
personnel authorized to access resident health records;
•
supervised access to health record information by resident or
representative;
•
documentation in the health record;
•
organization of information in the health record;
•
the maintenance of the active resident health record;
•
storage of a resident health record once inactive, e.g., upon discharge
or death; and,
•
retention of resident health records for seven years.
4.5.2
The health care and service provided to each resident is documented in the
resident’s health record.
4.5.3
The health records contain revised plans of care as evidence of monitoring,
evaluating and adjusting plans based on care outcomes and resident
response.
4.5.4
A registered nurse (RN) or licensed practical nurse (LPN) makes at least
monthly notes in the resident health record regarding the resident’s health
status, e.g., treatments, outcomes of care, dietary intake, physical and mental
38
health changes. In addition, notes are made at any other time when there is
a change in her/his health status or noting events such as new treatment
measures, unusual behaviour, incidents, physician visits and hospitalizations.
4.5.5
All documentation (notation) is:
•
current, clear, factual, objective, and concise;
•
legibly written, dated (day/month/year) and signed by the person who
provided, observed or supervised the resident’s care or treatment;
•
written in chronological order and as close to the time of the event as
possible;
•
using only approved abbreviations;
•
permanently recorded in blue or black ink, with no erasures or white
outs, with the exception of red ink to document allergies; and,
•
signed with initial, surname and professional designation of the person
documenting the entry.
4.5.6
The resident health record is organized in the same way for each resident.
An example of document order is:
•
Health care directive, if in place.
•
Physician Orders
•
Physician Progress Notes
•
Consult referrals and reports
•
Resident care plan
•
Graphs (anticoagulation, pain assessment, vital signs, I/O, BG, weight)
•
Flow Sheets
•
Nursing Notes/ Interdisciplinary Notes
•
Treatment Sheets
•
Medication Administration Records (MAR)
•
Laboratory reports / Diagnostic Imaging reports
•
Miscellaneous Assessments (e.g., O.T., P.T., mental health)
•
Miscellaneous forms (e.g., consent form[s], immunization)
•
Admission records (nursing data, medical data, hospital liaison record,
application for admission, SAST, dietary history and food preferences)
•
Transfer Record
•
History and Physical (hospital discharge summary, hospital chart
information).
4.5.7
A facility which utilizes electronic health records maintains these records in
accordance with Board Policy #7 - Storage of Electronic Health Records in
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes.
39
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
(s.25)
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Board Policy #7 - Storage of
Electronic Health Records in Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes
•
Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (2000, c.5) Dept. of
Justice, Government of Canada.
Compliance Measures
•
Staff training records
•
Review of resident record
•
Review of nursing home policies and procedures
•
Staff interviews
40
4.6
DIETARY SERVICE
STANDARD 4.6
There is an organized program of dietary service: to respond to residents’ nutritional,
therapeutic, social and cultural needs and preferences; and, to provide safe,
personally acceptable, nutritious food to residents.
Principle
Dietary and nursing staff coordinate the assessment planning and delivery of nutritious
meals based on personal choice and ensures all therapeutic diets comply with physician
orders. Operators ensure that meals are prepared, stored and served in a manner
acceptable to prescribed Public Health standards.
Criteria
Menu Planning
4.6.1
Meals and nourishments are planned at least one week in advance according
to the recommendations of Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide (Food
Guide). Menus may be prepared in multi-week cycles and are reviewed and
approved annually by the Dietetic Services Consultant, Department of Health
and Wellness. The Consultant is notified of any permanent modifications
made to menus throughout the year.
4.6.2
Meals fulfill nutrient, fluid, and caloric requirements, as indicated by current
Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) as they relate to residents’ age, sex, weight,
physical activity, physiological function and therapeutic needs.
4.6.3
Menus are developed in consultation with residents, their families and staff
considering individual food preferences, restrictions due to health conditions
(e.g., food allergies, food/drug interactions, celiac disease, diabetes), cultural
or religious practices and meal satisfaction. Meal alternatives are planned in
advance of the meal and have comparable nutritional value.
4.6.4
Menu records for inspection include:
•
dated menus;
•
cyclic menus;
•
menu changes; and,
•
records of foods purchased
4.6.5
Adequate food supplies are available to follow the menu which is in place.
4.6.6
Each day the resident is provided with a variety of foods, based on the Food
Guide. The recommended number of Food Guide servings are based on
41
individual gender and age requirements, unless otherwise indicated in the
residents care plan.
Food Production
4.6.7
All food is handled, stored and maintained in a manner that:
C
prevents contamination or spoilage;
C
prevents food-borne illness; and,
C
retains maximum nutritional value and food quality.
4.6.8
Food is prepared and served following standardized food service practices
(Food Retail and Food Services Code) in a manner that:
C
retains maximum nutritional value, flavour, colour, texture;
appearance, and palatability;
C
prevents contamination or spoilage; and,
C
prevents food-borne illness.
4.6.9
All staff involved in food preparation are trained in a food service safety
course approved by the Department of Health and Wellness, which includes
safe food handling, preparation, storage and food service.
4.6.10
There are sufficient cleaning and sanitizing supplies available for effective
cleaning.
4.6.11
For facility staff who are required to work in dual functions (e.g. dietary and
direct care), dietary duties are performed before care services. If/when
designated food services staff are required to perform other non-dietary
duties, staff:
•
always follow Routine Practices for infection prevention and control in
accordance with Standard 4.9; and,
•
wear protective clothing; or,
•
shower and change uniform.
Meal Service
4.6.12
The daily meal pattern includes three meals and two nutritious snacks daily,
with one of the snacks provided in the evening. The meals are reasonably
spaced, with not more than 15 hours between a substantial supper and
breakfast unless otherwise indicated in the care plan. Flexibility is provided
in consideration of resident preferences and therapeutic diet
recommendations.
4.6.13
Meals are served at appropriate times and at a safe temperature.
42
4.6.14
In addition to water, other beverages are offered to all residents at meals,
between meals, and at bedtime, unless contraindicated in individual resident’s
care plan.
4.6.15
To provide a pleasurable dining experience, meals are served in an unhurried
manner in comfortable dining areas equipped to meet the meal service
requirements of residents.
4.6.16
There is a policy or established practice in place to accommodate family
members for joining a resident for occasional meals.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations
(s. 28)
•
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide
•
Public Health Act and Eating Establishments and Licensed Premises Regulations
•
Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI)
•
Food Retail and Food Services Code www.cfis.agr.ca
Compliance Measures
•
Inspection report
•
Chart Audit
•
Menu Audit
•
Nutrient Analysis Audit
•
Dietary history and food preferences
•
Observation/interview of residents/staff
•
Availability of specialty products
•
Audit of milk units
•
Review of resident weight records
43
4.7
NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT AND ASSISTANCE
STANDARD 4.7
Each resident receives nutritional support and assistance to maintain optimum
nutritional intake suitable to his/her health condition and personal preferences.
Principle
As food is a basic necessity of life, operators ensure meals are nutritionally adequate and
supportive service is provided as needed for improvement and/or maintenance of the
resident’s health.
Criteria
4.7.1
Upon admission or “moving in,” each resident is assessed by nursing staff
and a dietitian (where available) to determine appropriate nutritional support
(e.g., ability to feed self, therapeutic diet, texture modification, tube feedings,
assistive devices). This information is documented in an appropriate manner
in accordance with facilities’ policies.
4.7.2
Resident’s meals and snacks reflect their food choices and preferences.
4.7.3
The food and fluid intake of each resident who is identified at nutritional risk
is assessed and monitored by the nursing staff. Nutrition intervention and
expected outcome is documented in the resident health record.
4.7.4
Therapeutic diets as ordered by the physician are implemented.
4.7.5
Each resident’s weight is recorded on admission and monthly thereafter.
Significant changes (gain or loss > 5% in 1 month, > 7.5 % in 3 months, >
10% in 6 months) are recorded on the resident record and reported to the
nursing supervisor for assessment, intervention and monitoring. Each
resident’s height is recorded on admission.
4.7.6
Commercial and/or homemade nutritional supplements are provided to those
residents who have lost a significant amount of weight “unintentionally” in a
short period of time, and/or have exhibited a decrease in appetite or a change
in eating habits or food intake.
4.7.7
Each resident is provided sufficient fluids to maintain proper hydration.
44
4.7.8
Therapeutic diets or texture modification is provided as required. Texture modified foods are not stirred together, unless requested by the resident or
deemed necessary by the nutrition care plan.
4.7.9
Each resident who requires assistance or supervision with meals is served at
suitable times and safe serving temperature. The resident is positioned to
promote safety, comfort and socialization while eating. Assistive devices are
available to the resident for self-feeding. Feeding assistance by staff is
provided as required.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
28)
•
Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of weight measurements
•
Residents/staff Interviews
•
Observation of food service activities
•
Use of specialty products available
•
Chart audit
•
Review of care plan and progress notes
•
Menu audit
•
Review of admission diet history and food preferences
45
4.8
MEDICATION MANAGEMENT
STANDARD 4.8
The facility maintains a safe, secure resident care based medication [drug]
management system which includes ordering, receiving, storage, handling, control,
administration, recording and outcomes monitoring.
Principle
Establishment of a safe and secure system for managing all aspects of medication
utilization in a facility is an important means to promote resident and staff safety as well as
to ensure appropriate treatment of resident health conditions. This system is based on
written policies and procedures in accordance with current legislation and nursing, medical
and pharmacy education and professional practice.
Medications are drugs or drug products administered to facility residents by various means,
including oral (e.g., tablets, capsules, liquids), parenteral (e.g., sub-cutaneous,
intramuscular, intradermal, IV), topical (e.g., transdermal patches, ointments, creams,
drops), vaginal (e.g., tablets, suppositories, foams, creams), rectal (e.g., enemas,
suppositories, ointments) or inhalation (e.g., inhaler, mask).
Criteria
General
4.8.1
The facility has a contract for specific pharmacy services with a retail
pharmacy in accordance with the PNH Drug Program.
4.8.2
All medications are prescribed in writing by the attending resident physician
or other health professional authorized to do so by provincial legislation.
4.8.3
There is a process in place to ensure the identity of residents prior to
administration of medication, e.g., resident photograph with the medication
administration record (MAR).
4.8.4
Medications are administered, recorded and monitored by a registered nurse.
4.8.5
Current practice for all aspects of medication management is in accordance
with written facility policies and procedures, including:
•
obtaining initial (new) or renewal of medication orders;
•
administration and recording of medications;
•
safe and appropriate storage and disposal of medications;
46
•
•
•
•
•
4.8.6
facility stock medication;
standing medication orders;
emergency medications, e.g., Adrenalin (epinephrine);
use of non-prescription medications: and,
staff orientation and ongoing continuing education.
Medications are reviewed upon admission and at specified intervals by:
•
a physician, at least quarterly as per Nursing Home Regulations; and,
•
a pharmacist, at least quarterly as per the PNH Drug Program.
Narcotic and Controlled Drugs
4.8.7
The facility has a policy and process regarding the recording of narcotic and
controlled drug use (e.g., administration, waste) on an approved control
record which is separate from the MAR. The information is documented on
the record at the time of use. These control records are retained as part of
the facility records.
4.8.8
The facility has a policy and process regarding counting and co-signing of
narcotic and controlled drugs by registered nurses from each shift at the
change of shift. This information is documented on an approved shift count
record. These records are retained with facility records.
4.8.9
Narcotic and controlled medications are stored in a double locked separate
compartment within the medication cabinet or medication cart. Keys to
access these medications are in the possession of the RN(s) responsible for
medication administration on each shift.
4.8.10
Missing resident narcotic or controlled medication(s) is handled as an incident
in accordance with Standard 2.8. If, through the facility incident investigation,
the missing medication(s) occurrence can not be satisfactorily explained or
resolved, the local police/law enforcement body is notified.
Emergency Use Medications
4.8.11
The facility has a list of medications approved by a physician, to be kept on
hand for use in an emergency situation.
4.8.12
The emergency medications are kept in a dedicated location and checked on
a regular basis to ensure the supply is as listed (e.g., medication, type,
strength, quantity), the dates of each medication are within the expiry period
and they are stored under the required conditions.
47
Standing Medication Orders
4.8.13
Standing medication orders are: written by the physician or other authorized
to prescribe (see 4.8.2); are specific to the individual resident; and, are part
of the resident health record.
4.8.14
Utilization of resident standing orders are monitored by the registered nurse.
Physicians are consulted if frequency of use and resident response may be
such that a regular order may be warranted.
4.8.15
Resident standing orders are included in all medication reviews.
Ordering and Receiving
4.8.16
Upon admission, all resident medications are newly prescribed by the
attending physician or other authorized to prescribe (see 4.8.2) (prescription
and non-prescription [over the counter] ) and obtained from pharmacy in the
packaging and labelling format required for use in the facility.
Residents, resident representative or family are advised to return all
medications, used by the resident prior to admission, to the dispensing
pharmacy.
4.8.17
New resident medications or dosage changes are ordered from the pharmacy
by forwarding a copy of the order sheet or signed prescription of the attending
physician or other authorized to prescribe (see 4.8.2). Refilled medications
are automatically forwarded to the facility by the pharmacy.
4.8.18
Resident medications are received from the pharmacy accompanied by a new
medication administration record (MAR).
4.8.19
Upon receipt by the facility, nursing staff confirm medication ordered is
medication received and labels reflect accurate resident information.
4.8.20
Medication orders are automatically discontinued as soon as a resident is
admitted to hospital. New prescriptions, medications and MARs are required
from the physician or other authorized to prescribe (see 4.8.2) and pharmacy
when the resident returns to the facility.
48
Storage and Handling
4.8.21
All medications are stored in locked cabinets or locked medication carts to
assure security. Access to medication cabinets or carts is limited to
registered nurses.
4.8.22
Provisions are made to ensure locked storage of medications when special
environmental conditions are required (e.g., refrigerated, away from light).
4.8.23
Medication preparations for external use (e.g., creams, ointments,
suppositories, eye drops, ear drops) are stored separately from those for
internal use.
4.8.24
Medications are not left or stored in resident rooms.
4.8.25
Unused, discontinued or expired (out of date) medications are stored safely
and separately from other medications until they can be sent to the pharmacy
for disposal.
Administration and Recording of Medication
4.8.26
Products administered by non-registered nurses are recorded in an
acceptable format, e.g., treatment record or form. Such products include
topical creams and ointments, suppositories, enemas or eye/ear drops.
4.8.27
Medication is only administered from the original pharmacy dispensed
medication container with affixed pharmacy label stating resident name,
medication name, strength and directions for administration.
4.8.28
Resident’s response to medication (‘regular’ order, PRN, Standing Order) is
monitored and evaluated by nursing staff. Changes are made as required
and documented in the resident health record.
4.8.29
There is a pharmacy prepared MAR for all medication prescribed for a
resident, issued at least monthly. The record is initialled by the registered
nurse administering the medication immediately following administration.
4.8.30
The MAR also reflects documentation of unusual circumstances such as
refusals, non-administered medications and resident on leave.
4.8.31
Medication errors are recorded on the approved Incident Report Form and
filed in accordance with Standard 2.8.
49
Resident Leave
4.8.32
The facility has policy and procedures directing the provision of medications
to residents on short term leave from the facility, i.e., part of a day, week-end,
holiday.
Staff Training
4.8.33
The Director of Nursing monitors the learning needs of nursing staff and
facilitates in-service training regarding medication management including
administration, review, documentation, handling and storage of new and
existing medications.
4.8.34
The Director of Nursing’s review of medication incident reports and trends (see
Standard 2.8) informs and supports the identification of staff education needs.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
22 (3)(4), 24)
•
Registered Nurses Act and Nurse Practitioner Regulations
•
Association of Registered Nurses of PEI Standards of Practice for Nurse Practitioners
(March 2007)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of medication administration records (MARs)
•
Review of policies and procedures for medication administration, storage and
handling
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff Interviews
•
Review of Medication Incident Report Forms
•
Review of Narcotic and Controlled Drug control records and count records
•
Review of resident records
•
Medication storage review (carts, fridge, locked cupboards)
50
4.9
INFECTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL
STANDARD 4.9
There are measures taken within the facility to prevent and control infections in
accordance with federal and provincial policies and guidelines for long term care
facilities.
Principles
Residents of long term care facilities are vulnerable to and can experience serious illness,
or death, from infectious/communicable diseases.
Infection prevention and control measures are designed to protect the residents, staff and
visitors of the facility through identification, treatment and control of the spread of infectious
diseases. These measures can reduce the risk of transmission of infections in the facility.
Routine Practices should be used at all times within the facility with Additional Precautions
implemented depending on the suspected or known microorganisms present in the facility.
Criteria
4.9.1
The Director of Nursing or designate registered nurse provides direction for
infection prevention and control and communicable disease management in
the facility.
4.9.2
As part of the placement process, admission [moving in] screening is
conducted for the antimicrobial resistant organisms (AROs), e.g., MRSA and
VRE.
4.9.3
Infection prevention and control measures are in place regarding:
•
Routine Practices (for routine care of all residents including precautions
against bloodborne pathogens);
•
staff education on Routine Practices is provided through inservices and provision of education resource material;
•
staff following Routine Practices with all residents at all times to
reduce exposure to blood and body fluids such as urine, feces,
wound drainage and sputum.
•
Additional Precautions in addition to Routine Practices in care of
residents with specific organisms transmissible by air, droplet, direct or
indirect contact;
•
staff education on Additional Precautions for long term care
51
•
through in-services and provision of education resource material;
and,
staff following Additional Practices with those residents
suspected or confirmed as having a specific transmissible
pathogen as in 4.9.6.
4.9.4
Routine practices are followed in each of the four required areas:
a.
hand hygiene (see 4.9.5);
b.
risk assessment of residents for signs or symptoms of infection, e.g.,
infectious diseases, fever, cough, sneezing, rash, diarrhea, excretions
and secretions;
c.
risk reduction measures for reducing the risk of transmission including
use of personal protective equipment (PPE), cleaning of environment,
laundry; disinfection and sterilization of equipment; waste management,
safe sharps handling; screening and immunization of residents and
staff in accordance with Standard 4.10; and,
d.
education of staff, residents and families/visitors.
4.9.5
Hand Hygiene, as a key requirement for Routine Practice, is followed as:
•
staff recognize hand hygiene is the single most important measure to
prevent transmission of infection and do practice proper hand washing;
•
the facility has appropriate hand washing and hand drying facilities for
residents and staff;
•
staff wash hands with soap and running water when visibly soiled and
dry hands using paper towels (turning taps off with paper towel);
•
staff clean hands with an alcohol-based hand rub when hands not
visibly soiled; and,
•
staff perform hand hygiene:
•
before and after providing personal care to a resident;
•
between dirty and clean activities;
•
before and after preparing, handling, serving or eating food;
•
before putting on and after taking off protective gloves;
•
after personal body functions, e.g., using the toilet, blowing
nose; and,
•
when hands come in contact with secretions, excretions, blood
and body fluids.
4.9.6
Additional precautions are based on a risk assessment and laboratory test
results. These precautions involve:
•
resident’s room placement;
•
level of resident participation in activities;
•
visitation;
•
use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and,
•
environmental cleaning.
52
4.9.7
All equipment used by more than one resident is cleaned and disinfected
between residents. Resident’s on Additional Precautions have dedicated
equipment and, if this is not possible, equipment is disinfected with the
appropriate disinfectant wipe before used by another resident.
4.9.8
Personal care supplies used by residents are labelled with the resident’s
name, stored in the resident’s room, kept clean and not shared with others.
This would include creams, lotions, soaps, razors, nail clippers, nail file, hair
comb/brush, denture cup, toothbrush and toothpaste.
4.9.9
Soiled linen and waste is handled carefully to prevent personal contamination
and transfer to other residents. Waste disposal is in accordance with Island
Waste Management requirements.
4.9.10
Needles are not recapped and sharps are placed in sharp containers and
disposed of as for 4.9.9.
4.9.11
Facility staff adhere to the following provincial policies and guidelines as
recommended and updated by the Chief Health Officer and/or the Department
of Health & Wellness, including:
•
Provincial Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines distributed by the
Department of Health and Wellness (DHW), e.g., MRSA Guideline
(May 2009), VRE Guideline (December 2009);
•
DHW Guidelines for the Management of Persons Exposed to
Bloodborne Pathogens in an Occupational or Community Setting and
Postexposure Prophylaxis after Sexual or Injection-Drug Use or
Community Cutaneous Injury (January 2006);
•
DHW Guidelines for Influenza Control in Long Term Care Facilities
(March 2010); and
•
DHW Policy for Tuberculosis Screening of Health Care Workers and
Residents in Long-Term Care Facilities (September 2005).
53
References
•
Infection Prevention and Control Best Practices for Long Term Care, Home and
Community Care including Health Care Offices and Ambulatory Clinics (Canadian
Committee on Antibiotic Resistance June 2007)
www.ccar-ccra.com/english/pdfs/IPC-BestPractices-June2007.pdf
•
Infection Control Guidelines (Supplement); Routine Practices and Additional
Precautions for Preventing the Transmission of Infection in Health Care (Canada
Communicable Disease Report, July 1999)
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/99vol25/25s4/index.html
•
Department of Health and Wellness Guidelines listed in 4.9.11
Compliance measures
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff interview
•
Resident interview
•
Review of resident health records
•
Review of staff immunization records
•
Confirm Provincial Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines binder current
•
Review of policies and procedures.
54
4.10
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE MANAGEMENT
STANDARD 4.10
There are measures taken to: a) prevent communicable diseases and, b) identify and
control the spread of communicable/infectious diseases, when they exist within the
facility. (See also Standard 4.9)
Principle
Residents of long term care facilities are vulnerable to, and can experience, serious illness
or death from communicable/infectious diseases. Communicable disease prevention and
control measures are designed to protect the residents, staff and visitors of the facility.
Failure to protect against communicable disease could be an occupational risk to health care
workers.
Criteria
4.10.1
There are measures in place for prevention of communicable diseases within
the facility including:
•
cleanliness of the facility;
•
screening in accordance with DHW Guidelines and facility policy:
•
new residents upon admission [moving in] for tuberculosis;
•
new staff upon employment for tuberculosis; and,
•
new residents with antimicrobial resistant organisms (AROs)
based on the provincial long term care risk assessment
screening tool;
•
immunization in accordance with DHW Guidelines and facility policy for:
•
provision of the annual immunization of residents with the
influenza vaccine;
•
provision of other immunizations as recommended for residents,
e.g., pneumococcal vaccine;
•
provision of annual immunization of staff with the influenza
vaccine; and,
•
other immunizations as recommended for staff of long term care
facilities, e.g., Hepatitis B, Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR),
Chickenpox and Whooping Cough.
4.10.2
There are measures in place to identify and control the spread of
communicable diseases including:
•
registered nurse assessment, detection, intervention and follow up of
residents suspected of having a notifiable communicable disease;
55
•
•
•
•
•
registered nurse notification of the attending physician in the event of
signs and symptoms of an infectious disease in any resident, e.g.,
fever, cough, diarrhea;
registered nurse notification of the Chief Health Officer (CHO) office of
an unusual occurrence, e.g., any incidence of potential disease above
the facility normal levels or which may appear to be a cluster or
outbreak that is not managed;
registered nurse makes call to the CHO office nurse-on-call for
situations considered an emergency during weekdays, or by pager
during weekends/evenings;
cooperation with Public Health if a notifiable communicable disease
requires follow-up; and,
carrying out recommendations of the physician or Public Health to treat
and control the spread of the communicable disease.
4.10.3
Current contact information for the Chief Health Officer office and nurse-on-call
is accessible to the Director of Nursing or designate (e.g., name[s], phone
number) and updated as required.
4.10.4
The staff are educated in and adhere to these communicable disease
prevention and control measures to minimize risk to residents, staff and
visitors.
4.10.5
Staff are educated in and practice healthy behaviors for when to stay home
due to health conditions such as febrile respiratory illness, dermatitis on hands,
cold sores or shingles, diarrhea, initial days of respiratory illness or untreated
eye infections.
56
References
•
Public Health Act and Notifiable and Communicable Diseases Regulations
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations
(s. 21)
•
Infection Prevention and Control Best Practices for Long Term Care, Home and
Community Care including Health Care Offices and Ambulatory Clinics (Canadian
Committee on Antibiotic Resistance June 2007)
www.ccar-ccra.com/english/pdfs/IPC-BestPractices-June2007.pdf
•
Infection Control Guidelines (Supplement); Routine Practices and Additional
Precautions for Preventing the Transmission of Infection in Health Care (Canada
Communicable Disease Report, July 1999)
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/99vol25/25s4/index.html
•
Guidelines for Influenza Control in Long Term Care Facilities (Department of Health
and Wellness, March 2010)
•
Provincial Infection Prevention and Control Guidelines binder (Department of Health
and Wellness)
•
Canadian Immunization Guide
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/cig-gci/pdf/cig-gic-2006_e.pdf
•
Canada Communicable Disease Report (current). Statement on Seasonal Trivalent
Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (TIV)
www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/index-eng.php
Compliance measures
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff interviews
•
Review of resident record
•
Review of staff immunization records
•
Review of policies and procedures
57
4.11
RESIDENT DISCHARGE AND TRANSFER
STANDARD 4.11
The resident, resident representative or family (if resident chooses) is assisted by staff
in moving out of the facility through a discharge to home or transfer to another
location (e.g., home, hospital, community care facility, private nursing home, manor).
Principle
A resident, resident representative and/or family may request a transfer to a different facility
or may be required to transfer to another facility as a result of change in her/his health
condition. The transfer should be completed in as timely a manner as possible, ensuring
continuity of care and effective communication of resident care needs and preferences. In
addition, the resident may choose to return home if adequate home supports are in place.
Criteria
4.11.1
If the resident is discharged to home, the facility ensures all the resident’s
belongings are collected and available to resident/family when leaving the
facility.
4.11.2
If the resident is transferred to hospital, a completed Transfer Record, copies
of the MAR and medical history are sent with the resident. If the resident has
a health care directive, a copy of the directive is also sent.
4.11.3
If the resident is transferred to another nursing home/manor or a community
care facility, a completed Transfer Record, medications, copies of the MAR
and medical history are sent with resident. If the resident has a health care
directive, a copy of the directive is also sent.
4.11.4
All resident transfers are documented in the resident’s record and if the
resident is not returning, e.g., from hospital, the record is signed off and
closed. Resident records are retained for seven years.
58
Reference
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.23,
24, 25, 31)
Compliance Measures
•
Review transfer process with Director of Nursing
•
Staff interviews
•
Review resident records
•
Review of Transfer Record(s)
59
4.12
RESIDENT DEATH
STANDARD 4.12
The facility has an established process to follow on the death of a resident whether
expected or sudden and unexpected.
Principle
The death of a resident may be ‘expected’ or ‘sudden and unexpected.’ Regardless, the
facility has responsibility for making contact to the appropriate health officials and to the
resident’s family, if they are not in attendance. The resident is not sent to hospital for
pronouncement of death.
Criteria
4.12.1
The nursing staff immediately contacts, for direction, the:
•
resident’s attending physician; or,
•
physician on-call for the attending physician.
4.12.2
The nursing staff notifies the next of kin or representative and allows them an
opportunity to visit the deceased resident, if desired, prior to removal of the
remains from the facility.
4.12.3
Following physician contact and direction received, as per 4.12.1, the funeral
home of choice (may be noted in resident record) is contacted.
4.12.4
Section 1 of the Registration of Death form (e.g., surname, given name,
personal health number) is completed at the time of death and given to the
funeral home director when he/she removes the remains from the facility.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
35)
•
Coroners Act
•
Vital Statistics Act (s. 19,20) and Regulations (Form 8)
Compliance Measures
•
Review process with Director of Nursing and staff
•
Review of resident record (if readily accessible)
60
5.0
5.1
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AND SECURITY
COMFORTABLE ENVIRONMENT
STANDARD 5.1
The residents are provided with a comfortable home-like environment suitable to their
needs which enables them to maintain optimal well-being and quality of life.
Principle
A pleasant, comfortable environment, where a home-like atmosphere is promoted, enhances
the sense of well-being of the residents and their visitors. Resident rights, care needs,
abilities and preferences are taken into account with regard to accessibility and adaptations
to the structure of the facility.
Criteria
5.1.1
Bedrooms accommodate no more than two persons.
5.1.2
The facility has a policy which encourages and supports residents to
personalize their space (i.e., pictures, chairs, books, mementos, etc.).
5.1.3
Bedroom space and furnishings allocated for each resident meets nursing
home regulatory requirements.
5.1.4
Toilet and bathing facilities meet nursing home regulatory requirements.
5.1.5
The resident has access to common lounge and dining space that meets the
nursing home regulatory requirements for space and furnishings.
5.1.6
There are adaptations to the structure and furnishings of the facility to meet
safety and security needs of residents including:
•
exits;
•
grab bars (bathrooms);
•
signalling devices and emergency access door-lock systems
(bathroom);
•
hand rails (corridors, stairways, ramps); and,
•
non-slip surfaces (tubs, showers, floors, stairways).
61
5.1.7
There is wheelchair access to the building entrance and exits and to its
facilities, i.e., lounge, dining room, bathroom, bedroom and outdoor patios.
5.1.8
The operator complies with any direction given by the inspectors for repair or
changes identified during inspection of a facility in use or intended for use as
a nursing home.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
10, 12, 13, 14, 15)
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Board Policy #1 - Bathing Facilities
•
Smoke-free Places Act and General Regulations
•
Provincial Building Codes Act Barrier-free Design Regulations
Compliance Measures
•
Initial Inspections
•
Annual Inspections
•
Review of conditions placed on license (if any)
62
5.2
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
STANDARD 5.2
Environmental Services, i.e., housekeeping, laundry, and maintenance,
are planned, coordinated and provided to meet the needs of the residents.
Principle
An appropriate clean, warm, comfortable and well maintained environment is basic to
promoting quality of life and quality of care.
Criteria
Management
5.2.1
There is an individual (or individuals) identified with authority and responsibility
for the management of environmental services who:
•
develops and implements policies and procedures;
•
ensures the staffing plan is adequate for full operation of the
environmental services;
•
assigns responsibility for various functions to appropriate staff; and,
•
ensures there is safe storage and sufficient supplies and equipment to
maintain the services.
Housekeeping
5.2.2
The facility, including furnishings and equipment, is kept clean through a
program of routine and preventive housekeeping practice including
identification of the cleaning frequency and use of washable, smooth and nonabsorbent surfaces.
5.2.3
The cleaning routine includes and is not limited to:
•
all resident bedrooms, including walls, floors, furnishings, door knobs
and grab bars;
•
all resident/public/staff washrooms and resident bathing facilities,
including wall, floors, toilets, sinks, tubs, showers; grab bars and
resident-designated commodes (all surfaces);
•
all common areas (lounges, dining), including floors, walls, and
furnishings;
•
whirlpool units, routine cleaning and disinfection of the tub and all
recirculating lines and jets between use by residents and end of day;
•
germicidal disinfection of all tubs, chair lifts, shower chairs and
common-use commodes between use by residents;
63
•
all service areas, i.e., kitchen, laundry, utility and storage rooms,
corridors/entrances, and stairways.
5.2.4
All cleaning supplies and chemicals are stored in a manner that ensures
inaccessibility to residents or the public.
5.2.5
Staff who provide housekeeping services are trained in infection prevention
and control practices, e.g., hand washing, care of equipment and supplies and
in verifying appropriate strength of disinfectants.
Laundry
5.2.6
Laundry services are organized to meet the linen needs of the facility and to
care for the personal clothing of residents.
5.2.7
Work routines, schedules, and frequencies are established and followed for
collection, sorting, processing, and delivery of linen and residents’ personal
clothing.
5.2.8
Staff who handle soiled linen are trained in infection prevention and control
procedures, e.g., hand washing and use of protective clothing. Hand washing
always occurs after removal of gloves and handling soiled laundry.
5.2.9
An effective flow of laundering is in place which prevents the contamination of
freshly laundered materials by soiled laundry.
5.2.10
Clean and soiled linen is kept separate at all times, with soiled linen placed in
laundry bags, carts or baskets at the source.
5.2.11
Provisions are made to identify, transport, and launder separately linens which
require infection prevention and control procedures.
5.2.12
Laundry is not transported through food preparation or food service areas.
5.2.13
There is a supply of clean linens sufficient to meet the residents’ needs
including:
•
bed linen changed at least weekly and more frequently as required;
•
towels and face cloths; and,
•
an additional supply of all linens for emergencies or unusual
circumstances.
5.2.14
There is a system to collect soiled washable personal clothing of residents and
return articles in a timely fashion.
5.2.15
Provisions are made to ensure each resident’s clothing is labelled and in a
manner respectful of resident dignity.
64
5.2.16
Provisions are made to inform the representatives of residents of the need for
purchase, repairs, replacement or dry cleaning of clothing.
5.2.17
There is a procedure in place to follow up on reports of lost clothing.
5.2.18
Provisions are made to ensure residents do not have unsupervised access to
laundry areas, supplies, and equipment.
Maintenance
5.2.19
The maintenance services of the facility provides for a structure and equipment
that is hazard free for residents, staff, and visitors.
5.2.20
The facility has a written plan in place to ensure all equipment is maintained
in safe working order, including regular inspection, repair and maintenance.
5.2.21
The heating system is capable of maintaining the space occupied by residents
at 22EC.
5.2.22
Requirements, as set by the National Building Code of Canada and
Environmental Health (Dept. of Health and Wellness), for exhaust ventilation
in washrooms, tub rooms, kitchen and if applicable, designated smoking
rooms, are met.
5.2.23
The facility has policies and procedures governing the use of electrical
appliances, including those in the personal use of residents.
5.2.24
Fire equipment is kept in good operating order.
5.2.25
All entrances, exits, walkways, corridors, and stairwells are kept clear and
unobstructed.
5.2.26
Flooring and carpets are maintained in good repair, free of breaks, open
seams, tears, or buckling.
5.2.27
All grab bars, hand rails, and side rails (beds) are fastened securely.
5.2.28
There is an organized program for the disposal of all waste that meets Waste
Watch program requirements including daily, or as needed, removal of sharp
containers, garbage and regular cleaning/disinfection of garbage containers.
5.2.29
There is a supply of water at sufficient pressure to serve all areas of the
building.
5.2.30
Where there is a private water supply, the drinking water quality is suitable to
the Chief Health Officer.
65
5.2.31
Residents are protected from scalding incidents by ensuring water supply
temperature does not exceed 49EC from sources to which residents would
have access e.g., taps in sinks, tubs and showers.
5.2.32
For resident safety, residents are not given access to utility rooms or kitchens
where the water temperature is set for higher temperatures for cleaning
purposes or for use of high temperature dishwashers, which require a
minimum of 82E C .
5.2.33
Provisions are made to store all chemicals and dangerous equipment in a
manner that ensures inaccessibility to residents.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
(ss.11, 17)
•
Public Health Act and Rental Accommodations Regulations
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Board Policy #1- Bathing Facilities
•
Smoke-free Places Act (ss. 1, 9) and General Regulations (s. 6)
•
Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality
Compliance Measures
•
Environmental Health inspection
•
Environmental Audit - furnishings, equipment
•
Electrical inspection
•
Boiler and Pressure Vessel inspection
•
Review of equipment maintenance plan
•
Review of staff training records
•
Staff interviews
•
Resident interviews
•
Review of related incident reports
66
5.3
SAFETY AND SECURITY
STANDARD 5.3
There is a coordinated program to reduce and control the risks to safety, security,
health and well being of the individuals in the facility and to the safety and security of
the facility.
Principle
The security of the residents is dependent not only on the structure, but also on the actions,
programs and activities of management and staff which promote safety, enhance personal
comfort and prevent exposure to unsafe situations. In addition, the Board considers the
potential of harm to the safety, welfare or care quality of any resident, by any member of
management or staff who has been convicted of a related offence, in making its decision on
licensure.
Criteria
General
5.3.1
There is an identified staff member designated to be in charge in the facility at
all times who is capable of providing necessary emergency assistance and to
be responsible for protection of the residents.
5.3.2
A registered nurse will be scheduled and present for each shift, twenty-four
hours a day, seven days a week (24/7).
5.3.3
The operator ensures the facility is staffed, twenty four hours a day, with the
number and skill level of staff to provide for resident safety and security, as
well as resident care and comfort, appropriate to residents’ state of health and
level of activity.
5.3.4
Staff is informed of whom to notify in case of an emergency. Emergency
contacts and telephone numbers, including fire, police, hospital, ambulance,
Chief Health Office/nurse-on-call and physician are kept current and are
posted at each telephone used for the administration of the facility.
5.3.5
Proper notification of significant events and incident reporting is carried out in
accordance with Standards 2.7 and 2.8.
Fire and Evacuation
5.3.6
There is a written emergency evacuation plan in place, approved by a fire
inspector, in the event of a fire which provides for the protection of residents,
67
staff, and visitors. The plan includes evacuation procedure to an alternate
location, if necessary. The emergency evacuation plan is posted in a
conspicuous location(s).
5.3.7
The operator maintains a current register of residents and staff which is kept
available for immediate removal and reference in the event of fire or other
emergency requiring evacuation. The register includes resident medical
information and information vital to their care, e.g., care plans.
5.3.8
There is a system to identify residents in the event of evacuation, e.g., resident
register, MAR sheets with resident photos.
5.3.9
Monthly fire drills are held, recorded and evaluated. Staff attendance is
documented and monitored.
5.3.10
All staff are instructed in fire safety procedures and the use of equipment on
an annual basis, e.g., activation of alarms and use of fire extinguishers.
5.3.11
There is a fan-out system to recall staff in the event of an emergency which is
updated whenever there are staffing changes.
Missing Resident
5.3.12
The facility has a written plan to respond to the potential for a missing resident
which includes;
•
a search procedure;
•
the ongoing identification of residents with the potential to wander; and,
•
a recent photo for identification
5.3.13
Where measures are in place to control exits, provisions are made to permit
prompt and unobstructed evacuation in the event of a fire.
Abuse and Neglect
5.3.14
There are written policies and procedures to direct staff to manage all aspects
of a suspected or confirmed report of resident abuse and neglect including
receipt of report, investigation, follow-up, documentation and any remedial
action.
5.3.15
The staff understands the types of abuse considered in 5.3.14, i.e.,
psychological/emotional abuse, financial/material abuse, physical abuse,
sexual abuse, neglect and self-neglect.
5.3.16
The facility delivers or provides access to in-service education for staff
regarding the protection of vulnerable adults from abuse and neglect, as noted
in Standard 7.3.
68
5.3.17
Allegations of abuse and neglect are reported to the nursing supervisor or
Director of Nursing immediately.
5.3.18
Alleged abuse and neglect are incidents to be reported in accordance with
Standard 2.8.
Medical Emergencies
5.3.19
The Registered Nurse, considered ‘in charge’ of nursing services on each shift,
is designated to take charge in a medical emergency.
5.3.20
The facility has policies and procedures to respond to medical emergencies,
e.g., accident/injury to resident or staff or sudden change in a resident’s
condition.
5.3.21
All food service and nursing and personal care staff are certified (initial and
annual re-certification) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which includes
relief from choking.
5.3.22
The facility has basic emergency medical equipment (e.g., oxygen, suction)
and supplies as may be recommended by the Board which are kept
replenished, in working order and readily accessible to staff at all times.
External Disaster or Loss of Essential Services
5.3.23
There is a contingency/emergency plan to respond to external disaster or loss
of essential services. These plans address the response to such events as
power failure, failure of heating system, isolation due to weather conditions
and emergency staffing plans. This plan includes the means to ensure;
•
provision of dietary service by having an emergency menu and one
week supply of food on hand at all times; and,
•
provision of resident medications by having at least a 3 day (72 hours)
supply on hand at all times.
Smoking
5.3.24
The facility complies with legislative requirements for designated smoking
rooms including location, structure, ventilation, utilization, access and signage.
5.3.25
There is a policy in place regarding designated smoking rooms in relation to
residents and staff.
69
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Regulations (s. 32)
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
19, 20, 26, 27, Form C)
•
Smoke-free Places Act (ss. 1, 9, 11, 12) and General Regulations (ss. 6, 8, 9)
•
Adult Protection Act
•
PEI Office of Public Safety, Emergency Measures Organization : Manor/Nursing
Home Emergency Plan (Guide). Version 2010
Compliance Measures
•
Review of policies & procedures
•
Review of fire drill reports
•
Review of emergency evacuation plan
•
Inspection of emergency equipment & supplies
•
Review of staff schedules
•
Review of staff training records
•
Review of contingency plans (loss of essential services, staff availability)
•
Review of resident and staff ‘registers’
70
5.4
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
STANDARD 5.4
There is a coordinated program designed to promote sanitation and reduce or control
the risks of infection in all departments of the facility, including ongoing review of
policies and procedures to address emerging issues in infection prevention and
control and communicable disease management. (Standard 4.9, Standard 4.10)
Principle
Individuals who live and work in close proximity to one another are at increased risk from the
transmission of communicable/infectious diseases. The frail elderly are particularly
vulnerable and facility practices to reduce this risk are essential on an ongoing basis.
Criteria
5.4.1
The facility has policies and procedures which promote the prevention and
control of infection and are outlined for all departments and services, i.e.,
resident care service, dietary service, laundry and housekeeping service. (See
also Standards: 4.0 Resident Care, 5.0 Physical Environment and Security)
5.4.2
Sanitation practices in each department are based on the principle of
preventing the transmission of infection, and include:
•
hand washing procedure;
•
care and cleaning of equipment;
•
application of cleaning procedures in housekeeping;
•disinfection of all tubs, lift chairs, shower chairs between use by each
resident;
•
care and handling of laundry;
•
safe handling and storage of food;
•
following Routine Practices and Additional Precautions;
•
the disposal of biomedical waste (e.g., soiled dressings, needles,
syringes); and,
•
the management of all facility waste.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations
(s.11,14,16, 17, )
•
Public Health Act and Eating Establishment and Licensed Premises Regulations
•
The Food Retail and Food Services Code www.cfis.agr.ca
Compliance measures
•
Review of Policies and Procedures
•
Review of staff training records
•
Staff interviews
71
6.0
6.1
SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT
SOCIAL ACTIVITY
STANDARD 6.1
There are opportunities for residents to contribute to and participate in the social life
of the facility and community through scheduled or unscheduled social activities. The
activities, offered on an individual or group basis, provide for a variety of recreational
and social interests, abilities, and preferences of the residents.
Principle
Residents benefit from the opportunity to choose whether to participate in activities they
enjoy, to maintain former relationships and to develop new relationships with other residents,
staff, and visitors. Activities are planned to support and provide opportunities for residents
to contribute to the life of the facility and the community, based on resident needs, goals and
preferences. Activities could include active exercise programs, pursuit of specific individual
hobbies or interests, educational programs and/or community outings. Residents also
appreciate the contributions that volunteers and community groups can bring to the facility.
Criteria
6.1.1
The recreational and social needs of the resident are assessed as a part of the
resident care planning process upon admission and throughout the resident’s
stay.
6.1.2
Activities are planned to enhance the resident’s enjoyment and quality of life,
and include social, mental, and physical stimulation.
6.1.3
Residents are encouraged, not required, to participate in leisure activities of
personal preference and interest.
6.1.4
Where group activities are not accessible or acceptable to a resident, efforts
are made to provide activities on an individual basis.
6.1.5
The responsibility for recreation/leisure activities is assigned to either a regular
employee of the facility, to a designated activity staff member or to a recreation
committee.
6.1.6
Documentation of resident activities is the responsibility of assigned nursing
and/or activity staff.
72
Reference
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.23)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of schedule and/or records of activities
•
Resident interviews
•
Staff interviews
73
6.2
SPIRITUAL AND RELIGIOUS PRACTICE
STANDARD 6.2
The resident is supported and assisted in maintaining his/her preferred spiritual and
religious observances and practices. Spiritual/ religious needs can be met by pastoral
care staff, clergy of choice, community ministerial groups and/or facility staff.
Principle
Resident spirituality and religious beliefs and practices are integral to initial and ongoing
comprehensive resident assessment, care planning and service delivery.
Residents should not feel a loss of or disconnection from spiritual or religious practices and
observances upon ‘moving in’ or while residing in the facility.
.
Criteria
6.2.1
The spiritual needs and preferences of the resident are assessed as a part of
the resident care planning process upon admission and throughout the
resident’s stay.
6.2.2
The resident/family is informed of the pastoral care services available in or to
the facility.
6.2.3
Support and assistance is available as needed to assist each resident to
attend spiritual and religious activities of his/her choice.
6.2.4
Support is given to the resident for maintaining personal spiritual practices,
e.g., prayers, quiet meditation, reflective discussion.
6.2.5
Religious observances or practices related to food service are honoured.
6.2.6
The resident is assisted in arranging contact with clergy of his/her choice on
an individual basis.
74
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.23)
•
Canadian Nurses Association (2010). CNA position statement Spirituality, Health and
Nursing Practice. Ottawa:
Compliance Measures
•
Review resident record
•
Resident’s rights policy
•
Review facility practices for resident support and assistance
•
Resident interview
•
Staff interviews
75
6.3
APPOINTMENTS AND TRANSPORTATION
STANDARD 6.3
Residents are given assistance to arrange appointments and transportation for healthcare services requested or required by the resident.
Principle
The resident will require access to health services outside the facility on an as required basis
such as diagnostic tests, physician/specialist appointments, dental appointments and eye
sight and hearing testing.
Criteria
6.3.1
The nursing staff identifies and monitors health care needs requiring
assessment and/or treatment by a health care professional which can only be
accessed outside the facility.
6.3.2
The nursing staff provides assistance to make appointments and arrange
transport for appointments if family support is unavailable.
6.3.3
If the facility provides transportation for the resident, the operator ensures that
vehicles owned or leased by the facility and used to transport residents have
valid/current registration, insurance and inspection and are operated by
licensed, qualified drivers.
6.3.4
The resident or resident representative understands his/her responsibilities for
payment of costs for non-emergency transport.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act and Nursing Home Regulations
(s. 30, 31)
•
Private Nursing Home Service Agreement
Compliance Measures
•
Review of resident record
•
Resident interview
•
Staff interview
76
6.4
RESIDENT CONCERNS OR COMPLAINTS
STANDARD 6.4
Residents, resident representative and/or family are given the opportunity to express
a concern or to make a complaint about the operation and/or care service delivery of
the facility and are encouraged to be involved in the management of the concern or
complaint.
Principle
Resident feedback is encouraged and treated with respect and privacy. Every resident,
resident representative and/or family can express a concern or make a complaint to the
operator and/or staff without interference, fear of reprisal or discrimination. This feedback/
expression of concern is recognized by the facility operator and staff as potential means of
improving the quality of facility service.
A concern is, considered here, as a matter of importance or interest for a resident which may
cause worry or anxiety and can be resolved by the resident and staff as part of ongoing care
provision. A complaint is an expression of dissatisfaction made verbally or in writing and is
subject to a complaints management process.
Criteria
6.4.1
Concerns expressed by residents are respectfully heard. Efforts are made to
resolve or allay the concern jointly with the resident on an ongoing basis.
6.4.2
The facility has a written policy and complaint management process for
hearing verbal or written complaints, which includes:
•
recording of the resident/representative/family complaint;
•
notifying facility owner of the complaint;
•
investigating the complaint thoroughly and objectively;
•
consulting others as part of the investigation as necessary;
•
reviewing the outcome of the investigation with the resident,
representative and/or family;
•
recording the outcome of the investigation; and,
•
following up with all affected parties of the complaint.
6.4.3
If the complaint is considered a significant event as referred to in Standard 2.7,
the Department of Health and Wellness is notified, in accordance with that
Standard.
6.4.4
Documentation related to expressed complaints, including any related
investigation which may be conducted, are kept confidential to those directly
involved, the operator or the Director of Nursing.
77
6.4.5
The facility handles investigation of complaints in a timely manner.
6.4.6
The operator ensures recommended actions arising from investigation of any
complaint is communicated to appropriate staff and implemented.
6.4.7
The operator monitors and evaluates response to, and types of, resident
complaints and incorporates changes into facility operations and services
where considered necessary.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.23
(d))
•
Smoke-free Places Act and General Regulations (s. 9)
Compliance Measures
•
Operator interview
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Review of resident records
•
Review of Resident’s Rights policy
•
Resident interviews
•
Staff interviews
78
6.5
INVOLVEMENT OF FAMILY
STANDARD 6.5
The resident’s family (if available) and/or resident representative is encouraged to visit
and be involved in the resident’s activities as well as in the initial and ongoing plans
of care if and to the extent the resident chooses.
Principle
Where the resident has family and/or a representative, it is important for them to be included
throughout the resident’s stay in the facility if the resident wishes them to be included.
Family can provide valuable insight into the needs and preferences of the resident and can
offer assistance and/or suggestions as to the resident’s individualized approach to care.
Criteria
6.5.1
The family and/or representative is orientated to the facility upon the resident’s
moving in [admission].
6.5.2
The family and/or representative is included in the development of the initial
plan of care.
6.5.3
The family and/or representative is invited to participate in the annual review
of the care plan and at any other time the care plan is reviewed.
6.5.4
The family and/or representative is encouraged to attend social events with the
resident
6.5.5
The next of kin or resident representative is notified immediately if the resident
suffers an injury, any significant change in health condition or dies.
Reference
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (ss.
35)
Compliance Measures
•
Review of resident record
•
Resident interview
•
Staff interview
79
7.0
7.1
Human Resource Management
ORIENTATION
STANDARD 7.1
There is a facility orientation program for the introduction and training of new staff
members regarding the operation of the facility, philosophy of care, facility programs
and services, daily routines, staff roles and responsibilities and the residents and their
special needs.
Principle
A comprehensive and well structured orientation for new staff members to the facility,
residents and services contributes to the quality of care to residents and to a positive work
experience for all staff.
Criteria
7.1.1
The facility has a written staff orientation program in place.
7.1.2
The facility provides an orientation, upon hiring, with all new staff members in
accordance with the facility orientation program.
7.1.3
Each new staff member is given orientation training appropriate to their role
and work responsibilities as well as orientation training for general facility
requirements including fire prevention/safety, emergency procedures and
evacuation plans.
7.1.4
No new staff member will carry a full work assignment until she/he has
received all the necessary orientation training and the operator or Director of
Nursing is satisfied she/he is able to perform the work duties required.
7.1.5
The facility orientation program includes and is not limited to introduction to:
•
facility philosophy of care;
•
resident’s rights;
•
facility mission statement, goals and objectives;
•
facility policies and procedures relevant to the new staff member
responsibilities;
•
general roles and responsibilities of other staff members;
•
general functions of each facility service;
•
Operational and Care Service Standards for Private Nursing Homes
80
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
expectation of confidentiality;
incident reporting;
fire prevention, safety;
environmental health practices;
emergency and evacuation procedures;
infection prevention and control practices;
communicable disease management practices; and,
relevant acts and regulations (e.g., new operators, DON, others as
considered necessary).
Reference
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
Compliance Measures
•
Review of orientation records
•
Review of staff training records
•
Operator interview
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Staff interview
81
7.2
STAFFING
STANDARD 7.2
The facility is staffed, twenty four hours a day, with the number and skill level of staff
to ensure services are delivered in accordance with these standards and the
philosophy and objectives of the facility. This includes provision for resident safety
and security, medical, nursing and personal care and support services appropriate for
resident care needs.
Principle
The facility operates in a manner that is person [resident]-centred and responsive to
resident needs. The physical structure and functionality of the facility, as well as individual
resident care needs, are significant considerations for staff design and can have an impact
on the quantity, distribution and skill requirements of staff.
Quality of care is affected by factors which affect staff quality of work life. Such factors are
quality of supervision and mentoring, role clarity, skill match to job, team collaboration,
continuing education, job satisfaction, communication, decision-making participation and
personal safety.
Criteria
7.2.1
The facility has a Director of Nursing or Resident Care in accordance with
Standard 2.4.
7.2.2
There is a registered nurse scheduled and present for each shift, twenty-four
hours a day, seven days a week (24/7).
7.2.3
There is a physician designated as a facility medical consultant or house
physician.
7.2.4
The operator has sufficient staff positions, which are filled with staff who have
the appropriate skill set to meet the total operational demand of the facility.
7.2.5
The operator and Director of Nursing maintain a staff work schedule which
ensures adequate staff coverage for all facility services, e.g., administration,
nursing, housekeeping, laundry, dietary service and maintenance.
7.2.6
The nursing and personal care staff requirement is calculated and scheduled
based on the Board requirements for direct care hours, spanning each twentyfour hour period. (See Appendix 8.2)
7.2.7
There is sufficient staff available in the facility at all times to provide for an
evacuation or assistance in a crisis or emergency.
82
7.2.8
The facility has human resource policies and procedures which are readily
accessible to employees.
7.2.9
The facility has a list of staff positions (including operator).
7.2.10
The facility has a current job description for each staff position including
position qualifications (e.g., education, training, professional registration and
licensing, work experience) and responsibilities.
7.2.11
Where credentials are required by provincial laws covering professional
practice or any other service-based requirement, the facility will maintain
current records of the qualifications of employees and evidence of:
•
current/annual license to practice (RN, LPN);
•
certification (initial and annual re-certification) in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR), which includes relief from choking.
(nursing/personal care and food service staff)
7.2.12
All staff sign an agreement to protect the confidentiality of the resident’s
personal information.
7.2.13
The operator ensures occupational health and safety of staff is protected
through reasonable precautions and practices related to:
•
supervision, instruction, training;
•
purchase, use and maintenance of equipment; and
•
use of materials and devices.
7.2.14
The facility maintains a record/file for each staff member, which includes:
•
qualifications
•
evidence of current/annual license to practice (RN, LPN)
•
evidence of completion of an [PEI] approved program (RCW)
•
evidence of certification(s) for required training
•
immunization record
•
evidence of in-service training
•
orientation checklist
•
performance appraisals/reviews
•
criminal record checks
•
signed confidentiality agreement
7.2.15
There is a contingency plan in place which provides for continuation of
essential services in the event of a reduction of available staff due to a labourmanagement dispute.
83
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations
(s.26, 27, 29, 32)
•
Direct Care Hours for Private Nursing Homes (Appendix 8.2)
•
Registered Nurses Act and Registration and Licensing of Nurses Regulations
•
Licensed Practical Nurses Act and Regulations
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act and Workplace Hazardous Materials Information
System Regulations
Compliance Measures
•
Review of job descriptions
•
Verify staff records/files set-up
•
Verify staff qualifications
•
Review of staff work schedule
•
Review of staff direct care hours
•
Operator interview
•
Director of Nursing interview
•
Confidentiality agreements on file
84
7.3
STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING
STANDARD 7.3
The facility has a program which includes identification of staff education needs,
delivery or access to the required education/training and records for documenting
staff participation and/or certification.
Principle
Residents benefit from skilled and competent staff. Safe, appropriate and effective resident
care is supported by staff education programs which are relevant to the care needs of the
residents and the learning needs of the staff members.
Criteria
7.3.1
In-service education includes and is not limited to:
•
training in fire prevention and safety measures (all staff);
•
evacuation and resident transfer procedures (all staff);
•
certification (initial and annual re-certification) in cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR), which includes relief from choking
(nursing/personal care and food service staff);
•
current topics in the care of the elderly (e.g., U-First, Gentle
Persuasion);
•
care assessment (nursing and personal care staff);
•
medication handling, storage, administration (RN staff);
•
developing care plans (nursing and personal care staff);
•
food service safety course, certification (food preparation staff );
•
therapeutic and special diets (nursing/ personal care and dietary staff);
•
protection of vulnerable adults (various topics, e.g., abuse, neglect) (all
staff);
•
infection prevention and control (Hand Hygiene, Routine Practices,
Additional Precautions) (all staff);
•
annual seasonal influenza immunization (all staff);
•
vaccine administration (influenza and pneumococcal vaccines)
(RN staff);
•
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS);
•
End-of Life, Palliative Care;
•
Injury prevention for occupational health & safety, for example:
•
Transfer, Lift and Repositioning (TLR) (nursing and personal
care staff);
•
Safe Moving and Repositioning Techniques (SMART)
(dietary. maintenance, laundry, housekeeping staff); and
85
•
7.3.2
equipment use (e.g., oxygen concentrators, lifts, adjustable
beds, floor cleaners/polishers).
Records of all education programs are maintained and include the type and
length of program and the names of participants. Notes verifying certification
and attendance for in-service education and training sessions are included in
staff personnel record/file.
References
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act Nursing Home Regulations (s.
26, 33)
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act and Workplace Hazardous Materials Information
System Regulations
Compliance Measures
•
Review of staff qualifications
•
Review of in-service education/training records
•
Staff interviews
•
Operator interview
•
Director of Nursing interview
86
8.0
APPENDICES
Appendices reflect operational policies and processes which may change on an as
required basis and do not require the approval of the Minister.
8.1
List of Related Legislation and Regulations (Prince Edward Island and
Government of Canada)
8.2
Direct Care Hours for Private Nursing Homes
8.3
Department of Health [and Wellness] Policy - Comfort Allowance and Trust
Accounts: Nursing Home
8.4
Acknowledgments
87
APPENDIX 8.1
List of Related Legislation and Regulations
(Prince Edward Island & Government of Canada)
Prince Edward Island
•
Adult Protection Act
•
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Act
•
Regulations
•
Nursing Home Regulations
•
Consent to Treatment and Health Care Directives Act
•
Regulations
•
Coroners Act
•
Regulations
•
Fire Prevention Act
•
Codes and Standards Order
•
Health Services Act
•
Licensed Practical Nurses Act
•
Regulations
•
Long-Term Care Subsidization Act
•
Regulations
•
Mental Health Act
•
Regulations
•
Occupational Health and Safety Act
•
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System Regulations
•
Provincial Building Code Act
•
Barrier-free Design Regulations
•
Public Health Act
•
Eating Establishments and Licensed Premises Regulations
•
Notifiable and Communicable Diseases Regulations
•
Rental Accommodation Regulations
•
Public Trustee Act
•
Registered Nurses Act
•
Professional Conduct Review Regulations
•
Registration and Licensing of Nurses Regulations
•
Nurse Practitioner Regulations
88
•
•
•
Smoke-free Places Act
•
General Regulations
Social Assistance Act
•
Regulations
Vital Statistics Act
•
Regulations
GOVERNMENT OF CANADA
•
Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (2000, c.5)
89
APPENDIX 8.2
DIRECT CARE HOURS
FOR
PRIVATE NURSING HOMES
DEFINITIONS
1.
WORKED HOURS are defined as regular scheduled hours, overtime, call back, coffee
breaks and worked statutory holiday hours. Staff meal hours are excluded from “worked
hours” unless the staff person was unable to be covered for meal time.
2.
DIRECT CARE HOURS are defined as worked hours by direct care staff to provide care
to residents through assessments, care planning (identifying goals and interventions), care
delivery, assistance and support with activities of daily living (ADLs and IADLs), ongoing
resident monitoring and evaluation of care outcomes. This includes the development,
ongoing monitoring and revision of individualized resident care plans as well as arranging
external professional health services.
Time spent performing administrative, dietary, housekeeping, laundry, transportation,
shopping or financial management functions are not considered direct care hours.
DIRECT CARE HOURS
Each resident is assessed using the Seniors Assessment Screening Tool (SAST) to determine a
level of care (LOC) rating - 0 through 5. Nursing Homes are licensed to care for residents in Levels
4 and 5. Direct care hours required for these levels are shown below.
The number of direct care hours [worked hours], for each level of care, has been approved by the
Community Care Facilities and Nursing Homes Board and is used to calculate the direct care staff
schedule, to ensure adequate coverage throughout the 24 hour period.
The Board considers the minimum standard to be that actual scheduled hours equal
the required direct care hours. Adjustments in the scheduled hours may be necessary to
accommodate changes in the resident census and/or the assessed care needs of residents.
# Direct Care Hours by Care Level/ 24
Hour Period/ Resident
Level 4
3.0
Level 5
3.8
90
Step #1 - CALCULATION OF REQUIRED DIRECT CARE HOURS [W0RKED HOURS]/ 24
HOUR PERIOD
Example:
Assessed
LOC
Number of Residents
x
Required
Care Hours/Res.
= Total Care Hours
Level 4
Level 5
44 residents
16 residents
x
x
3.0 hours
3.8 hours
=
=
Required Daily Direct Care Hours [Worked Hours]
Total # Residents:
Total # Licensed Beds:
132.0
60.8
192.8
60
60
Step #2 - CALCULATION OF SCHEDULED DIRECT CARE HOURS
The same facility’s scheduled direct care hours for a 24 hour period is calculated and must be
equal to or greater than the required direct care hours [worked hours] in order to ensure
compliance for licensure.
Example:
Staff
Calculation of Scheduled Direct Care Hours for 24 Hour Period
Days
Evenings
Nights
Average Care
Hours
R.N.
2 x 8.0
1 x 8.0
1 x 8.0
32
L.P.N.
1 x 7.5
1 x 7.5
1 x 7.5
22.5
Caregivers
9 x 7.5
6 x 7.5
1 x 6.0
2 x 7.5
133.5
0
0
1 x 7.5 x 5 days/week
5.4
7.5 every 2 weeks
0.5
Physiotherapy/Occupational
Therapy
Activity Director
Foot care
Average Scheduled Direct Care Hours
193.9
In comparing the examples noted above, the “scheduled” daily direct care hours is compliant
with the “required” daily direct care hours.
December 21, 2010
91
APPENDIX 8.3
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH [AND WELLNESS] POLICY
Comfort Allowance and Trust Accounts: Nursing Home
1.0
PURPOSE
1.1
2.0
3.0
Residents in nursing homes who qualify for subsidization are eligible for a
monthly comfort allowance as determined by policy under the Long-Term Care
Subsidization Act and Regulations.
PRINCIPLES
2.1
Nursing home refers to government manors and private nursing homes.
2.2
Comfort Allowance is for the use of the resident to purchase items for his/her
personal use, comfort and recreation. The allowance may also be used to
purchase special needs items such as glasses, hearing aids, dentures or
customized wheelchairs.
2.3
The comfort allowance is not to be transferred to others. Only the resident
may benefit from this allowance.
2.4
A comfort allowance may be held in trust by the nursing home administrator on
behalf of an applicant, who shall deposit the allowance to the credit of the
applicant in a comfort allowance “trust account” (Regulations. s.12).
2.5
If the comfort allowance is used for the purchase of special needs items, the
resident’s account should not be depleted to the extent the resident could not
pay for normal items of personal use, comfort and recreation.
POLICIES
3.1
Comfort Allowance Trust Account
3.1.1 The balance in a resident’s comfort allowance trust account will
accumulate at the rate of $103/month and may be obtained by the
nursing home administrator on behalf of the resident.
3.2
Disbursements From a Comfort Allowance Trust Account
3.2.1 Cash disbursements made to a resident require a receipt that is dated,
signed or initialed by the resident.
92
3.2.2 Third parties who make legitimate purchases for a resident may receive
reimbursement from the resident’s comfort allowance account if they:
I)
have obtained prior approval from the designated authority in the
nursing home; and,
ii)
present a receipt along with the purchased article(s) to nursing
home administrative or supervisory personnel.
Staff on the unit should be notified of the purchase by the administrative or
supervisory personnel receiving the receipt of purchased articles(s) to ensure
articles are properly identified for the resident.
4.0
PROCEDURES
4.1
All disbursements from individual resident comfort allowance trust accounts or
from interest income must be documented in a manner that would satisfy the
requirements of an external audit.
4.2
The designated authority within the nursing home is responsible for establishing
a means of periodically informing residents or representatives of the
disbursements from, and the status of, the comfort allowance account.
4.3
Overpayments are not permitted from any individual comfort allowance trust
account without the prior approval of the Department of Health employee
designated with responsibility for administering the Comfort Allowance and Trust
Accounts: Nursing Home Policy.
4.4
Where there is disagreement over, or concerns about the manner in which the
comfort allowance is disbursed, the matter may be referred to the Administrator
of Community Hospitals and Continuing Care responsible for long term care in
the area where the nursing home is located.
4.5
Money in Trust
4.5.1 When a resident has been declared incompetent, the court appointed
committee or the Public Trustee is responsible for the management of
the resident’s funds and may delegate responsibility for the comfort
allowance to administration of the nursing home.
4.5.2 If a resident is not competent to manage his/her own affairs, and no
trustee or guardian has been legally appointed, the designated authority
in the nursing home will manage the comfort allowance in trust on behalf
of the resident. This should be kept in a joint trust account or deposit
receipt on behalf of the resident.
4.5.3 Interest earned from the trust accounts or deposit receipts is not returned
to individual residents. Interest earned will be retained by the nursing
home for the common good of all residents.
93
4.6
Discharge/Transfer/Death
4.6.1 A resident who is discharged receives the balance in his/her comfort
allowance trust account.
4.6.2 A resident who is transferred between facilities will have the balance of
comfort allowance trust account transferred to the designated authority of
the admitting nursing home.
4.6.3 Where an applicant who resides in a nursing home dies, leaving a
positive balance in a comfort allowance trust account, the administrator
shall credit that balance toward the nursing home fees payable by the
applicant (Regulations. s.12 [7]).
5.0
REFERENCE
5.1
Long-Term Care Subsidization Act and Regulations
Effective: January 1, 2007
Revised: October 17, 2007
94
APPENDIX 8.4
Acknowledgments
•
Government of Alberta:
•
Long-Term Care Accommodation Standards (April 2010)
•
Long-Term Care Accommodation Standards Checklist (April 2010)
•
Continuing Care Health Service Standards (July 2008)
•
Government of British Columbia:
•
Model Standards for Continuing Care and Extended Care Services (April
1999)
•
Government of Manitoba:
•
The Health Services Insurance Act and Personal Care Homes Standards
Regulation
•
Personal Care Homes Standards Visit Package: Standards for Personal
Care Homes
•
Government of Ontario:
•
Long Term Care Homes Act, 2007 and General Regulations
•
Long-Term Care Homes Program Manual (Revision November 2007)
•
Government of Newfoundland and Labrador:
•
Long Term Care Facilities in Newfoundland and Labrador Operational
Standards (November 2005)
•
Government of Prince Edward Island, Department of Health and Social Services,
Standards of Care for Nursing Homes in Prince Edward Island: unadopted
(March 1997)
•
Government of Saskatchewan:
•
The Regional Health Services Act and Facility Designation Regulations
•
The Housing and Special-care Homes Act and Regulations
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