How to use the Adobe Media Encoder

How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
Project 3 guide
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
The Adobe Media Encoder converts sequences and clips into media suited for distribution on the web or on DVDs,
iPods, cell phones, and other mobile devices. Here is an overview of the Adobe Media Encoder formats:
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Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF): An audio file container format developed by Apple Computer, which is
the standard audio file format used for storing sound data for Apple Macintosh and other electronic audio
devices.
•
Microsoft AVI (AVI): Audio Video Interleave is a multimedia file format developed by Microsoft. AVI files can
contain both audio and video data in a container that allows synchronous playback. AVI files are easily played
back on personal computers with Windows operating systems by using the Windows Media Player.
•
Windows Bitmap (BMP): The BMP file format, sometimes called bitmap or DIB file format (for deviceindependent bitmap), is an image file format used to store bitmap digital images, especially on Microsoft
Windows and OS/2 operating systems. The simplicity of the BMP file format and its widespread familiarity in
Windows makes it a very common format for graphics programs that operating systems can read and write.
•
GIF: Graphics Interchange Format is a graphic image file format suitable for sharp-edged line art (such as
logos) with a limited number of colors. This takes advantage of the format's lossless compression which
preserves very sharp edges (in contrast to JPEG).
•
Animated GIF: A small animation based on successively displayed GIF images. Animated GIFs are the simplest
form of animation and are supported natively by most browsers. Looping and minimal timing information can
be set in an animated GIF, but complex animation is beyond this format's capabilities.
•
MP3: MPEG1 Audio Layer 3 is an audio file compression format with CD quality. MP3 is a standard file
format on the Internet and many portable digital audio players.
•
P2 Movie: DVCPRO P2 (P2 is short form for "Professional Plug-In") is a professional digital video storage
media format introduced by Panasonic. P2 is basically a professional video file format used for storing media on
a data card for compatible tapeless recording devices.
•
QuickTime (MOV): QuickTime is a format developed by Apple Computer and is used for storing digital video,
media clips, sound, text, animation, and music. QuickTime is the Apple multimedia architecture for HDTV and
for web delivery as streaming media or for download.
•
Targa: TGA File Format, often referred to as TARGA File Format, is a raster graphics file format. The Targa
format is used to create images in some video game programs. TARGA and VISTA boards were the first
graphic cards for IBM-compatible PCs to support high color/true color display. This family of graphic cards
was intended for professional computer image synthesis and video editing with PCs. For this reason, usual
resolutions of TGA image files match those of the NTSC and PAL video formats.
•
TIFF: Tagged Image File Format is a file format for storing images, including photographs and line art. It is
now under the control of Adobe Systems. Originally created by the company Aldus for use with what was then
called "desktop publishing", the TIFF format is widely supported by image-manipulation applications, by
publishing and page layout applications, by scanning, faxing, word processing, optical character recognition and
other applications.
•
Uncompressed Microsoft AVI: See Microsoft AVI above. Exporting as uncompressed AVI will export the clip
or sequence without applying additional compression to the output file.
•
Windows Waveform (WAV): WAV (or WAVE), short for Waveform audio format, is a Microsoft and IBM
audio file format standard. Uncompressed WAV files are quite large in size, so, as file sharing over the Internet
has become popular, the WAV format has declined in popularity. However, it is still a commonly used,
relatively “pure”, i.e. lossless, file type, suitable for retaining “first generation” archived files of high quality, or
use on a system where high fidelity sound is required and disk space is not restricted.
•
Audio Only (AAC): Compression for digital audio compatible with Apple iPod technology, designed to be the
successor of the MP3 format. AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3.
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
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Project 3 guide
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
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FLV | H4V (H.264): Adobe Flash Video, the format for delivering audio and video over the web and other
networks. Adobe Flash Video will play on any computer with a Flash-enabled browser.
•
H.264: An MPEG-4-based standard for encoding for web delivery specifically and for a variety of devices,
including HD video, 3GPP cell phones, video iPods, and PlayStation Portable (PSP) devices. The Adobe Media
Encoder has H.264 format presets specifically for Google Video, MySpace, Yahoo! Video, and YouTube.
•
H.264 Blu-ray: An MPEG-4-based standard for encoding in HDTV for Blu-ray disc media.
•
MPEG1 and MPEG1-VCD (Windows only): A set of standards defined by the Motion Picture Experts Group
(MPEG) designed to deliver video and associated audio at bit rates of about .5 to 1.5 Mbps (megabits per
second). Video Compact Disc (VCD) videos play only on CDs. MPEG1 movies play on CDs and as
progressively downloadable files on the web.
•
MPEG2: Delivers high-quality, full-screen, full-motion video at bit rates around 15 Mbps or about 10–30 times
the data rate of MPEG1 or MPEG1-VCD.
•
MPEG2 Blu-ray: A subset of the MPEG-2 standard designed for encoding for high-definition (HD) Blu-ray
Disc media.
•
MPEG2-DVD: A subset of the MPEG-2 standard designed for DVDs with a data rate up to 9 Mbps. An
MPEG2-DVD file can be encoded directly onto a DVD to create a movie that plays automatically (known as an
autoplay disc), or it can be used in an authoring program (such as Adobe Encore) to create a disc with
navigational menus and other features.
•
MPEG2-SVCD: A variant of the MPEG-2 standard designed for the Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD)
format. Up to an hour of relatively high-quality video can fit on a single CD. SVCDs can play on most set-top
DVD players.
•
MPEG4: MPEG-4 absorbs many of the features of MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 and other related standards, adding
new features such as extended support for 3D rendering, object-oriented composite files (including audio, video
and VRML objects), support for externally-specified Digital Rights Management and various types of
interactivity.
•
Windows Media (Windows only): A Microsoft multimedia architecture for HDTV, web delivery, and Palm
devices.
Each of these formats has many presets, so most editors will not need to adjust any parameters. However, there are
numerous customizable options.
For example, you may want to encode video for playback on mobile devices running Flash Lite. To do this you
should first understand the specifications of the mobile device for which you are encoding the video. You can begin
with a preset that most closely matches your specifications. You can then apply the necessary custom settings by
opening the Export Settings dialog box and selecting custom settings on the Video and Audio tabs. Once you define
the custom settings for a specific device, save these settings as a custom preset. For Flash Lite, a good format to
begin with is MPEG-4 3GP video and specify screen dimension to match the target devices, such as 240x240.
You can also output video for Flash Lite on mobile devices from Adobe After Effects CS4 opening the composition,
selecting File > Export > 3G… and selecting 3GPP (Mobile MP4) as the file format.
To explain each format’s unique characteristics would go well beyond the scope of this guide. Instead, this guide
shows you how to access the formats. The first task, “Overview of the Adobe Media Encoder,” has you select
several different formats and then explains some concepts common to most of them. (For detailed explanations on
each encoder, Adobe recommends that you visit the respective company’s website.) Then the guide gives a rundown
of the specific steps you need to follow to use the Adobe Media Encoder to export a clip or sequence.
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How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
Project 3 guide
Figure 1 Export Settings dialog box
Overview of the Adobe Media Encoder
1.
Start Adobe Premiere Pro and open a project with a
sequence or clip you want to export.
2.
Select the sequence or clip in the Project panel, and then
select File > Export > Media.
After a few seconds, the Adobe Media Encoder starts
and the Export Settings dialog box appears.
Note: If the Adobe Media Encoder window is in front,
bring the Export Settings dialog box to the foreground.
The export settings include a preview display on the left
and tabs containing export settings on the right
(Figure 1). The tabs display the settings that were used
most recently.
3.
In the Export Settings area, select H.264 in the Format
menu (Figure 2).
4.
Click the Output tab in the upper-left corner of the
dialog box.
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Figure 2 Export Settings area menus
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
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Project 3 guide
5.
6.
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
In the Preset menu, select 3GPP 176 x 144 15fps.
•
The image quality in the Output preview screen
becomes blurry due to the small frame size of this
preset.
•
The estimated file size is shown at the bottom of the
dialog box (Figure 3). You will compare it to the
file size of another format in the next step.
Figure 3 Estimated File Size
In the Format menu, select MPEG2-DVD.
Note: The output image quality becomes very sharp and
the estimated file size jumps to about 15 times the size
of the low-resolution H.264 format.
7.
In the Format menu, select FLV | F4V (H.264).
8.
Open the Preset menu and look at the 20+ presets.
Figure 4 shows a few of those presets.
9.
Select FLV (Same As Source) Flash 9.2 And Higher.
10. In the Export Settings area, view the Summary
information (Figure 5).
Figure 4 Adobe Flash Video Preset menu
(segment)
This lists frame size and frame rate as well as audio and
video encoder information.
11. In the Format menu, select QuickTime.
12. Click the Video tab, open the Video Codec menu, and
select H.264 (Figure 6).
Note: H.264 is one of the formats in the Adobe Media
Encoder. H.264 delivers video more efficiently than
previous standards such as MPEG-2, and it’s built into
the Apple QuickTime 7 multimedia architecture.
Figure 5 Export Settings Summary area
Figure 6 Video tab Video Codec menu
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How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
Project 3 guide
Note: Macintosh users, skip to step 15.
13. In the Format menu, select Windows Media and verify
that NTSC Source To Download 512kbps is the selected
preset.
14. Click the Video tab and view the basic video settings
(Figure 7).
Note: Windows Media offers several encoding options:
one or two passes, constant or variable bit rates, frame
size, frame rate, and pixel aspect ratio. You can use
these options to fine-tune the output.
15. In the Format menu, select MPEG2-DVD and change
the Preset to NTSC High Quality.
Figure 7 Windows Media Basic Video Settings
16. In the Video panel, note the Quality slider (Figure 8).
Note: A high quality setting means the MPEG encoder
will take longer to analyze the video before converting it
to an MPEG-2 file. It does not affect the file size.
17. Use the Video tab scroll bar to view the Bitrate Settings
area. Increase the Target Bitrate setting and note that the
estimated file size increases (Figure 9).
Figure 8 MPEG2-DVD Quality setting
Note: Doubling the bit rate generally increases the
MPEG-2 file size by about 50%.
18. Click the Audio tab.
19. In the Audio Format menu, select MPEG.
Note: PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) is the standard
audio format for the Adobe Media Encoder MPEG2DVD format. It is a lossless format—it retains full audio
quality. Dolby Digital compresses the audio but very
little quality is lost in the process. After three trial uses,
you need to pay to use the Dolby Digital encoder.
MPEG also compresses the audio and yields highquality results.
20. Scroll down to the Bitrate Settings area and select
128 Kbps from the Bitrate menu (Figure 10).
Figure 9 MPEG2-DVD Bitrate Settings
Figure 10 MPEG2 Audio Bitrate Settings area
The estimated file size drops considerably. Using MPEG
audio encoding can lead to a slight audio quality loss,
but you can increase the video bit-rate setting without
exceeding the storage capacity of a DVD or the 9 Mbps
DVD playback limit.
21. To save a customized preset, click the Save Preset
button located next to the Preset menu (Figure 11).
Figure 11 Save Preset button
22. Click Cancel to close the dialog box without saving the
custom preset.
23. Click the Output Name link to set a name and location
for the output file (Figure 12).
Figure 12 Output Name link
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
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Project 3 guide
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
The Save As dialog box appears (Figure 13).
24. Navigate to a file folder, name the file, and click Save.
25. Click OK in the Export Settings dialog box.
26. Bring the Adobe Media Encoder window to the
foreground.
Notice, the encoding process (Figure 14). When you
first export the file, it begins in the waiting mode. It then
moves on to the encoding step, and a green check mark
indicates when the encoding process is complete.
27. When the encoding is complete, close the Adobe Media
Encoder.
Figure 13 Save As dialog box
Figure 14 Adobe Media Encoder progress
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How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
Project 3 guide
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder to export a sequence or clip
You can use the Adobe Media Encoder to export a sequence, a sequence segment, a clip, or a portion of a clip. Refer
to the “How to create standard image, movie, and audio files” guide for an explanation of how to prepare a portion
of a clip or a sequence segment for export.
1.
Start Adobe Premiere Pro and open a project with a
sequence or clip you want to export.
2.
Select the clip, clip segment, sequence, or sequence
segment you want to export.
3.
Select File > Export > Media.
4.
In the Export Settings dialog box, specify the following
options:
5.
•
Format: Specify the media file format to be used by
your intended audience.
•
Preset: Choose the option that most closely matches
the specifications for the media to be viewed by
your intended audience. As explained in the
previous task, you can customize the settings by
clicking on one of the tabs below the Export
Settings area and changing the parameters there.
•
Export Video: Select this option to include video in
the exported file; deselect this option to exclude
video from the exported file.
•
Export Audio: Select this option to include audio in
the exported file; deselect this option to exclude
audio from the exported file.
Click the Output Name link.
The Save File dialog box appears.
6.
Navigate to a file folder, name the file, and click Save.
7.
Click OK in the Export Settings dialog box.
8.
Bring the Adobe Media Encoder window to the
foreground.
Notice, the file encoding progress. When you first
export the file, it begins in the waiting mode. It then
moves on to the encoding step, and a green check mark
indicates when the encoding process is complete.
9.
When the encoding is complete, close the Adobe Media
Encoder.
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
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Project 3 guide
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder to batch process media
You can use the Adobe Media Encoder to encode multiple files at the same time. For example, you may be
producing a series of short video or audio clips for use in a multimedia program. Instead of processing each file
separately, you can add several files to the Adobe Media Encoder, select your settings once, and then process the
entire batch of files.
1.
Start Adobe Media Encoder.
The Adobe Media Encoder window opens (Figure 15).
2.
Click the Add button
The Open dialog box appears.
3.
Navigate to the files you want to process. Select them,
and click Open (Figure 16).
To select more than one file, hold down Ctrl (Windows)
or Command (Mac OS) as you select the files.
Note: You can also drag files from an open window
directly into the Adobe Media Encoder window.
Notice that the files you added are shown in the Adobe
Media Encoder window (Figure 17).
Figure 15 Adobe Media Encoder window
Figure 16 Open dialog box
Figure 17 A batch of files ready to process
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How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
Adobe Premiere Pro CS4
4.
Project 3 guide
Open the Format menu for the first file in the list and
select a format to use for encoding (Figure 18).
The format you select is applied to the entire batch of
files.
5.
Open the Preset menu for the first file and select a
preset.
The same preset is applied to the entire batch of files
(Figure 19).
Note: You can customize the settings by selecting Edit
Export Settings on the Preset menu.
By default, the exported files will be placed in the same
folders as the source file. You can change this location
or rename the output files by clicking the links in the
Output File column.
6.
Figure 18 Format menu
Click Start Queue in the Adobe Media Encoder window.
The encoding process begins. The status column informs
you when the encoding is complete by placing a green
check mark beside each file. As the encoding occurs, the
Media Encoder displays a progress indicator and shows
a preview of the encoded file (Figure 20).
7.
When the files are encoded, close the Adobe Media
Encoder.
Figure 19 Format and preset applied to the batch
Figure 20 Batch Encoding progress
© 2008 Adobe Systems Incorporated
How to use the Adobe Media Encoder
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