Math 129 – Pre-Calculus
Math 129 – Pre-Calculus
(4 Credits)
Course Co-Coordinators:
Office:
Telephone:
E-Mail:
Instructors:
Office:
Telephone:
E-Mail:
Office Hours:
Laura Pyzdrowski
Armstrong 411C
(304) 293 - 8755
[email protected]
Matthew R. Schraeder (Lead Inst)
Armstrong 305E
(304) 293-5322
[email protected] or
[email protected]
MT 12:30 – 2:30
Rick Hopkins
Armstrong 307H
(304) 293-7069
[email protected]
MT 1:30 – 2:20
WR 9:30 – 10:20
Note: When sending an e-mail, include “Math 129” in the subject.
Lecture Section/Time/Room:
Lecture Section/Time/Room:
129-402
129-001
129-002
129-004
129-006
129-404
David Miller
Armstrong 408G
(304) 293-5924
[email protected]
Clark Metz
Armstrong 408A
(304) 293-8521
[email protected]
MW 10:30 – 2:45
ESB 211
HOD 252
BKH 125
STA 46A
HOD 301
ESB 411
Schraeder
Hopkins
Hopkins
Hopkins
Schraeder
Metz
129-008
129-009
MTWR 8:00 – 8:50
MTWR 8:30 – 9:20
MTWR 10:30 – 11:20
MTWR 11:30 – 12:20
MTWR 11:30 – 12:20
MW 12:00 – 12:50
TR 12:30 – 1:20
MTWR 2:30 – 3:20
MTWR 2:30 – 3:20
HOD 301
HOD 302
Hopkins
Schraeder
129-403
129-003
129-005
129-007
129-405
129-011
F 8:30 – 9:20
F 10:30 – 11:20
F 11:30 – 12:20
F 11:30 – 12:20
F 11:30 – 12:20
F 2:30 – 3:20
ARM 421
ARM 421
ARM 421
ARM 421
ARM 421
ARM 421
Textbook: 1) Sullivan, College Algebra and Trigonometry: Enhanced with Graphing Utilities, WVU
Edition (5th Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice-Hall. (ISBN: 126919884X)
2) Pyzdrowski, Interactive Computer Laboratories for College Algebra and Precalculus,
Pearson.
3) MyLabsPlus (Recommended) (ISBN: 1269199978)
Pre-Requisites: Two units of algebra and one unit of geometry, and satisfactory performance on the
departmental placement test (QRA). Not open to students who have credit for the
equivalent of either Math 126 or Math 128.
Technology: Either a scientific or graphing calculator is required for this course. Only those calculators
permitted for use on the ACT test are permitted. Please see your instructor if you have any
questions.
This course is part of WVU’s General Education Curriculum and focuses on Basic Mathematics and has
been certified as part of WVU’s Liberal Studies Program, Math and Natural Sciences (Cluster C). The
course will focus, in part, on developing your ability to communicate effectively, understand alternative
views and cultures, and use quantitative and scientific knowledge accurately.
Course Objectives: The general goals of this course are common to all courses in the Institute for Math
Learning at WVU:
 Conceptual Understanding: rather than just rote memorization of algorithms
 Multiple Approaches: To examine problems from analytical, geometric, and numerical
perspectives, to make judgments about the appropriateness of the choice of formal or
approximate methods of solution.
 Technology as a Tool: Use technology as an integral part of the process of formulation,
solution, and communication, to gain experience in selecting the proper tool for a given
problem.
 Active Student Learning: To engage in the exploration and discovery of concepts and to
learn to work cooperatively to solve problems.
 Communication of Ideas: To demonstrate understanding, by explaining in written or oral
form, the meanings and applications of concepts.
 Applications: Use math to model and solve real-world problems.
 Problem Solving: Gain experience as a problem solver, to analyze problems in an organized
manner.
The specific goals of the Math 129 will be to stress an algebraic, graphic, and numeric approach to the
study of:
 Understanding and using the concept of functions
 Mathematical application problems
 Solving equations and inequalities in one variable using multiple representations
 Graphing equations and functions
 Lines, parabolas, and circles
 Higher order polynomial, rational, radical, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic
functions
 Systems of equations and matrices
 Right triangle and unit circle approaches to trigonometry
 Trigonometric identities and equations
To accomplish course goals, the class incorporates interactive laboratories which use technology and
student activities that emphasize writing and student collaboration. Students will work in pairs or triads on
the laboratories and in-class exercises in order to develop mathematical communication skills. The
development of your communication skills is an integral part of this course.
Academic Dishonesty: Failure to comply with any written rules or regulations set forth in the course will
result in a zero on that activity and may result in reporting the action to the Dean of Arts and Sciences.
Social Justice and Disability: West Virginia University is committed to social justice. I concur with that
commitment and expect to maintain a positive learning environment based upon open communication,
mutual respect, and non-discrimination. Our University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex,
age, disability, veteran status, religion, sexual orientation, color or national origin. Any suggestions as to
how to further such a positive and open environment in this class will be appreciated and given serious
consideration. If you are a person with a disability and anticipate needing any type of accommodation in
order to participate in this class, please advise me and make appropriate arrangements with Disability
Services (304-293-6700).
Grade Disputes: All extreme-case situations are reviewed and decided upon by the Math 129 instructional
team during Finals week. Such cases require written documentation from the student outlining the request
and circumstances surrounding the request. Committee Forms are due to your instructor by the last day of
class and within 2 weeks of the posting of the grade to be reviewed. Each student is to fill out his/her own
Committee Form in the event of a group circumstance. Please contact your instructor for more
information.
2
Evaluation: Multiple forms of assessment will be used to measure your understanding of algebra and
trigonometry concepts and problem solving. The distribution of these assessments is:
Assessment
Number
Points
Percent of Grade
1 Participation
74
100
10%
2 Quizzes
10
100
10%
3 Labs
10
200
20%
4 Tests
4
400
40%
5 Comprehensive Final
1
200
20%
TOTAL
1000
100%
Grading Scale:
Course
Points
900,  
800,900
700,800
600,700
0,600 
Percent
Letter Grade
90% – 100%
A
80% – 89%
B
70% – 79%
C
60% – 69%
D
0% – 59%
F
1.
Participation and Attendance: Attending and participating is expected from every student during
every class. Your instructor may take attendance in any way he/she may choose, including
participation activities. Participation activities cannot be made up later. If you miss class for any
reason, then you lose attendance points for that day. Attendance will be taken for all class and Lab
sessions. The 100 points for Participation are calculated from accumulated total points from Class and
Lab Participation. ALL missed classes will be treated the same, REGARDLESS of the reason. If you
leave early, then you will not receive any points for that day. Students are permitted to miss up to 5
classes without affecting their attendance grade. These days are intended to allow for any Days of
Special Concern, University-sponsored activities, or any unforeseen circumstances that may arise.
2.
Quizzes: The Quizzes are taken on E-Campus and assess mastery of skills and concepts. These
Quizzes are taken outside of class and Lab time and can be taken on any computer connected to the
Internet. You MUST get a perfect score on the Quiz Release (by the listed Due Date) before any of
the Quizzes will be available to you. (The Quiz Release does NOT count towards your grade.) If you
submit at least one attempt of a Quiz by 8:00 AM on the scheduled due-date (and score at least 1
point), then you will be given 2 more attempts for that Quiz (that can be taken until the Quizzes
close). If you do NOT submit an attempt before the scheduled due-date, then you will ONLY get
one attempt for that Quiz (that can be taken until the Quizzes close). The highest score on a Quiz
will count as part of your grade. You must complete the Quizzes in ORDER. (Quiz 1, then Quiz 2,
then Quiz 3, etc.) You may seek help from others (not from your instructor during class). You must
submit your own work. The Quiz portion of the course will be “turned off” at 5:00 PM on Tuesday,
December 10.
3.
Laboratories: Labs will be one hour in length and attendance will be recorded. Computer Labs are
held on Fridays in Armstrong 421. There will be 10 computer laboratory assignments. The laboratory
scores will be averaged. You will be awarded Laboratory Points that are 2 times your Laboratory
Average. Laboratory assignments should be done groups of 2-3 in the Lab during the scheduled Lab
time. Laboratory points are awarded for the ability to do and communicate about mathematics, as well
as for your ability to manage your time, follow directions, and follow a schedule. Any laboratories not
submitted as a team effort, will not be awarded communication points. An E-Campus component (Lab
Check-In) that is available only in the Lab must be completed. If you do NOT complete the ECampus component (Lab Check-In), then you will NOT receive points for the laboratory. (The
Lab Check-In does not count towards your grade, but it acts as a “release” for your actual Lab Grade.)
3
No late Labs will be accepted. They must be turned in by the Monday following the assignment, and
ONLY during class time.
 You must attend the Laboratory Section that you are registered for and you must work with a
laboratory partners from your lecture section in order to receive Participation Points on a Lab.
 Labs must be turned in only to YOUR instructor and are due IN YOUR CLASS on the Monday
following the Lab day. As a courtesy to students, Labs will be accepted on Tuesday IN YOUR
CLASS with no penalty. After that, NO LATE LABS WILL BE ACCEPTED. Only Labs turned
in to your instructor during regularly scheduled class time will be accepted. If you must miss
class, then make plans to get your Lab turned in.
 Each student should complete his/her own copy of the Lab Report. Be prepared to turn in your
copy of the Lab if your partner is absent the day that it is due. NO EXCUSES will be accepted for
a Lab not turned in because the Lab partner did not do it.
 Only one Lab per team (2 – 3 students) will be graded; if more than one Lab is turned in, then
only one will be graded and returned.
 Each Lab Report MUST have the Lecture time AND Lecture Room in the upper, right-hand
corner of the front page. If this information is missing, or if the Lab Report is turned in with the
wrong group, then a penalty of 5 points will be assessed.
4.
Tests: Tests will be given in the IML Computer Center during your assigned Lab time. They will be
completed on both the computer and on paper. Any outside assistance on the Tests is considered
cheating and will result in a 0 for that Test, if not worse. As per IML policy, you must present you
WVU ID on Test days. If you do not have your WVU ID, then you will NOT be allowed to take the
Test. The Final Exam will be given on Thursday, December 12 in Armstrong 421 (Sign up you’re
your instructor).
Make-Up Test: If a student contacts the instructor prior to the Test, a make-up Test tentatively
scheduled to be given during Lab in Armstrong 421 on the date on your schedule. Missed Tests WILL
affect Mid-Term grades. Instructors reserve the right to refuse Make-Up Tests.
ACT Quiz: There will be two ACT Quizzes given, which can allow you to earn bonus course points:
Number Correct
Bonus Awarded
Number Correct
Bonus Awarded
1 – 21
1 point
40 – 41
6 points
22 – 28
2 points
42 – 44
7 points
29 – 31
3 points
45 – 47
8 points
32 – 34
4 points
48 – 49
9 points
35 – 39
5 points
50 – 60
10 points
Homework: Homework problems are listed for each section and students are strongly recommended to try
them. However, homework problems will NOT be collected. They are for the benefit of the student only.
Practice is essential to master the material, and the homework problems are an excellent way to get that
practice. The answers to the odd problems are in the back of the book, so students can check their answers.
Students can also try the problems at the end of each chapter as a Review for Tests and Exams. The
homework problems can also be worked on-line by using MyLabsPlus (https://secure.ecollege.com/wvu).
MyLabsPlus Log-In Info:
Username: YourMixID
Password: YourMixID2013
Help: On an average, you should expect to spend 2-3 hours outside of class for each hour in class. (That
means, for this course, it is expected for you to spend approximately 8 – 12 hours per week outside of class
working on this course.) If you are spending more, then you may need to seek help. There are several
excellent sources. Seek help from classmates; often they can explain a problem since they’ve been
working on it, too. Seek help from the Math Learning Center in Armstrong 301 or the Institute for Math
Learning (IML) Computer Lab located in Armstrong 215. Additionally, seek help from your instructor
during Office Hours, a commonly under-utilized resource.
4
Section
R.1
R.2
R.3
R.4
R.5
R.6
R.7
R.8
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.7
2.1
2.2
2.3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
4.3
4.4
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.5
5.6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.7
8.8
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
10.1
10.2
10.4
10.5
12.1
12.2
Homework Assignments for Pre-Calculus
Name
Problems
Real Numbers
1, 21 – 27 odd, 33, 35, 39, 41, 45, 51, 57, 59, 65, 69, 75, 81, 87, 91, 93
Algebra Essentials
4, 11, 15, 23, 24, 31, 37, 41, 45 – 49 odd, 57 – 61 odd, 65, 73 – 77, 87, 89, 91, 93
Geometry Essentials
11, 21, 25 – 31 odd, 37, 39
Polynomials
7, 9, 17, 21, 29, 31, 34, 39, 47, 55, 69, 93, 97
Factoring Polynomials
5, 13, 17, 25, 33, 39, 45, 51, 57, 61, 65, 85, 91, 95, 105, 107, 121
Synthetic Division
5, 9, 17
Rational Expressions
5, 13, 19, 25, 31, 47, 53, 63, 73
nth Roots; Rational Exponents
1, 2, 7, 15, 17, 21, 23, 31, 43, 47, 55, 63, 71, 75
Rectangular Coordinates; Graphing Utilities
5 – 9 odd, 13, 33, 39, 49, 57, 64, 75 – 79 odd, 83, 95, 105
Solving Equations Using Graphing Utilities
41 – 45 odd, 51 – 55 odd, 61, 71, 77, 89, 95, 99, 101, 105, 107, 109
Quadratic Equations
5, 6, 13 – 17 odd, 23, 25, 37 – 41 odd, 45, 49, 51, 63, 67, 79, 85, 97, 99, 105
Complex Numbers
9, 13, 19, 26, 27, 31 – 35 odd, 49 – 53 odd, 59, 73, 79
Radical Equations
11, 15, 23, 25, 31, 35, 51, 57, 61, 67, 69, 86, 89, 116
Solving Inequalities
11, 12, 14, 23, 27, 31, 35, 47, 49, 59, 64, 69, 71, 73, 77, 79, 83, 107, 109
Symmetry; Graph Key Equations
13, 21, 27, 31, 39, 41, 45, 51, 69, 71
Lines
13, 17, 27, 29, 31, 41 – 45 odd, 59, 65, 77, 83, 85, 97, 121, 127, 128
Circles
6, 9, 11, 17, 23, 27, 31, 32, 37, 39, 43
Functions
15, 19, 27, 33, 39, 41, 53 – 57 odd, 61, 65, 73, 75, 89, 98
The Graph of a Function
9, 13, 15, 23, 25, 37
Properties of Functions
11 – 21 odd, 29, 33, 53, 63, 64
Library of Function; Piecewise
9 – 16, 25, 29, 35, 41, 43
Graphing Techniques: Transformations
7 – 19 odd, 27, 31, 41, 59, 65
Mathematical Models
3, 7 – 9, 11, 13 – 15, 29, 31
Quadratic Functions and Their Properties
11 – 17 odd, 27, 45, 51, 53, 59, 71, 79, 81, 85
Building Quadratic Models
3, 7 – 9, 11, 15
Polynomial Functions and Models
11, 15, 23, 25, 32, 37, 43, 55, 61, 69, 71 79, 91
Properties of Rational Functions
13, 23, 25, 31, 41, 45, 51
Graph of Rational Function
7, 15, 27, 33, 35, 51, 61
Real Zeroes of Polynomial Function
11, 13, 21, 27, 39, 43, 63, 73
Complex Zeroes
7, 9, 17, 23, 33
Composite Functions
7 – 11 odd, 19, 47, 53, 65, 71
One-to-One Functions; Inverse Functions
11, 15, 19, 21, 35, 43, 50, 63, 65, 90
Exponential Functions
15, 21 – 23, 25 – 35 odd, 38, 49, 59, 63, 77, 81, 97, 121
Logarithmic Functions
13, 15, 19, 23, 31, 37, 57, 63, 70, 73, 79, 81, 87, 97
Properties of Logarithms
2, 13, 15, 23, 27, 41, 49, 51, 53, 61 – 65 odd, 69, 75, 76, 83
Logarithmic and Exponential Functions
11, 15, 25, 37, 43, 47, 51, 81
Financial Models
7, 15, 29, 35, 41, 45, 54
Exponential Growth and Decay
1, 3, 7 – 11 odd
Angles and Their Measure
11 – 21 odd, 35 – 51 odd, 55
Right Angle Trigonometry
11– 41 odd
Compute Values of Trig Functions of Acute Angles
5 – 45 odd
Trig Functions of General Angles
11, 13, 23, 25, 29, 33 – 75 odd, 89 – 101 odd, 107 – 113 odd
The Unit Circle: Properties of Trig Functions
5, 13, 59 – 63 odd, 67 – 71 odd, 79, 81
Graphs of Sine and Cosine Functions
11 – 17 odd, 27, 31 – 37 odd, 41, 43, 47, 51, 55, 57, 67 – 71 odd, 75, 77, 81
Graphs of Tan, Cot, Csc, and Sec Functions
7 – 39 odd, 49
Phase Shift; Sinusoidal Curve Fitting
3, 11 – 17 odd, 27, 33 – 37 odd
Inverse Sin, Cos, Tan
13 – 27 odd, 37 – 49 odd, 61 – 67 odd
More Inverse Trig Functions
29, 31, 35, 41, 47, 51, 59, 65, 67
Trig Identities
9 – 31 odd, 37 – 49 odd, 69, 71
Sum and Difference Formulas
9 – 33 odd, 37, 45, 71 – 75 odd, 83
Double-Angle and Half-Angle Formulas
7, 9, 15, 19 – 29 odd, 33, 35, 49 – 53 odd, 69 – 77 odd, 95
Trigonometric Equations I
7 – 17 odd, 21, 27 – 45 odd
Trigonometric Equations II
5 – 15 odd, 25, 29 – 33 odd, 47 – 53 odd, 57
Solving Right Triangles
9 – 27 odd, 35
Law of Sines
9 – 13 odd, 21, 25 – 43 odd, 47, 51
Law of Cosines
9 – 17 odd, 25, 33, 37, 43, 51
Area of a Triangle
5 – 15 odd, 19, 35, 37, 41
Polar Coordinates
11, 15, 19 – 23 odd, 27 – 33 odd, 37, 41 – 45 odd, 59, 61, 67, 73, 75, 79
Polar Equations and Graphs
13 – 19 odd, 23, 61
Vectors
7 – 49 odd, 55 – 63 odd
The Dot Product
7 – 17 odd, 29 – 37 odd
Systems of Linear Equations
7, 11, 19, 23, 25, 29, 41, 55
Systems of Linear Equations: Matrices
5, 11, 17, 39, 41, 51
5
Week 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Date 8/19 8/20 8/21 8/22 8/23 8/26 8/27 8/28 8/29 8/30 Day M T W R F M T W R F Text Sections Syllabus, R.1‐R.5 R.7,R.8 1.1‐1.2 1.3 Extra Credit 1.5 1.7, 2.1 2.1‐2.2 2.3, 3.1 Lab 2 9/3 9/4 9/5 9/6 9/9 9/10 9/11 9/12 9/13 9/16 9/17 9/18 9/19 9/20 9/23 9/24 9/25 9/26 9/27 9/30 10/1 10/2 10/3 10/4 10/7 10/8 10/9 10/10 10/11 T W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F 3.1‐3.2 3.3 3.4 Lab 3 3.5 6.1, 4.4 3.6, 4.3, 1.4 Review 10/16 10/17 10/18 10/21 10/22 10/23 10/24 10/25 10/28 10/29 10/30 10/31 11/1 11/4 11/5 11/6 11/7 11/8 11/11 11/12 11/13 11/14 11/15 11/18 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F M T W R F 7.5 7.6 Lab 8 7.7‐7.8 7.8 Catch‐up Review 12/2 12/3 12/4 12/5 12/6 12/9 12/10 M T W R F M T 5.1, R.6 5.5 5.6 5.2‐5.3 Lab 5 5.3 6.2 6.3‐6.4 6.5 Lab 6 6.6‐6.7 6.8 Catch‐up Review 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Lab 7 8.1‐8.2 8.3 8.3 8.4 Lab 9 8.5 8.7 8.8 9.1 Lab 10 9.2 9.3 9.4 Review 10.1 10.2 10.2 10.4 Lab 4 10.5 11.1‐11.4 12.1 12.2 Extra Credit Review Review Tentative Schedule
Topic(s) Review Sections
Review Sections
Graphing and Solving Equations
Quadratic Equations
ACT Quiz 1 Radical, Absolute Value, and Factorable Equations
Solving Inequalities and Graphing Key Equations
Lines Circles and Functions
Graphing Techniques Lab
Labor Day
Functions and Graphs
Properties of Functions
Library of Functions and Piece‐wise Functions
The Box Lab Transformations
Composite Functions and Quadratic Models
Math Models, Quadratic Functions, Complex Numbers
Test 1
Polynomials and Synthetic Division
Real Zeros of a Polynomial
Complex Zeros and the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
Rational Functions
Polynomial Functions Lab
Rational Functions (cont'd)
Inverses Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
Properties of logarithms
Rational Functions Lab
Exponential and Logarithmic Models
Exponential Growth and Decay
Test 2
Angles and Measures
Right Triangles Trigonometry
Trig Values of Acute Angles
Trigonometric Functions of General Angles
Exponential Functions Lab
Fall Recess
The Unit Circle and Trig Functions
Graphs of Sine and Cosine
Logarithmic Functions Lab
Graphs of Reciprocal Functions and Phase Shifts
Phase Shifts Test 3
Inverse Trigonometric Functions
Inverse Trigonometric Functions (cont'd)
Inverse Trigonometric Functions (cont'd)
Sum and Difference Formulas
Trigonometric Functions Lab
Double and Half Angle Formulas
Trigonometric Equations (I)
Trigonometric Equations (II)
Applications of Right Triangles
Trigonometric Graphs Lab
Law of Sines Law of Cosines
Area of Triangles
Test 4
Polar Coordinates
Polar Equations and Graphs
Polar Equations and Graphs (cont'd)
Vectors Quadratics Lab
Thanksgiving Recess
Dot Products
Conics, Parabolas, Ellipses, Hyperbolas
Systems of Linear Equations
Matrices ACT Quiz 2/Make‐Up Test
6
Assignments Due
Attitude Assessment and Survey (11:59 PM)
Quiz Release & Quiz 1 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 1 Due (Intro. to Basic Graphs)
Quiz 2 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 2 Due (Graphing Techniques)
Lab 3 Due (The Box Lab)
Quiz 3 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 5 Due (Polynomials)
Quiz 4 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 6 Due (Rationals)
Quiz 5 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 7 Due (Exponentials)
Quiz 6 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 8 Due (Logarithms)
Quiz 7 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 9 Due (Trig Functions)
Quiz 8 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 10 Due (Trig Graphs)
Quiz 9 Due (8:00 AM)
Lab 4 Due (Quadratics)
Quiz 10 Due (8:00 AM)
7
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