9 CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary

9 CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary
CANopen IO-C12
System Manual
Edition April 2004
A company of the PHYTEC Technologie Holding AG
CANopen IO-C12
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entirely reliable. However, SYS TEC electronic GmbH assumes no responsibility
for any inaccuracies. SYS TEC electronic GmbH neither gives any guarantee nor
accepts any liability whatsoever for consequential damages resulting from the use
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right to alter the information contained herein without prior notification and
accepts no responsibility for any damages which might result.
Additionally, SYS TEC electronic GmbH offers no guarantee nor accepts any
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the hardware or software. SYS TEC electronic GmbH further reserves the right to
alter the layout and/or design of the hardware without prior notification and
accepts no liability for doing so.
SYS TEC electronic GmbH. rights – including those of
 Copyright 2004
translation, reprint, broadcast, photomechanical or similar reproduction and
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1st Edition April 2004
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
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Table of Contents
1
2
3
4
5
6
Preface ..................................................................................................1
Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12...............................................3
2.1 Technical Highlights.....................................................................3
2.2 Pinout of the device ......................................................................4
2.3 Connector description...................................................................5
2.4 Pin assignment ..............................................................................5
2.5 Board Configuration .....................................................................8
2.5.1 DIP-Switch S1 .................................................................8
2.5.2 HEX-encoding Switch.....................................................9
2.6 CAN Interface.............................................................................10
2.7 Technical Specification ..............................................................11
Configuration of the CANopen IO-C12 ..........................................13
3.1 Power Supply..............................................................................13
3.2 CAN Interface.............................................................................13
QuickStart ..........................................................................................15
4.1 Start-Up of the CANopen IO-C12..............................................15
4.2 Shut-Down of the CANopen IO-C12 .........................................15
4.3 CAN Message and Identifier ......................................................16
4.4 PDO Mapping for I/O’s ..............................................................16
4.5 Board Reset.................................................................................17
4.6 Node-Guarding ...........................................................................17
Controller Area Network – CAN .....................................................19
5.1 Communication with CANopen .................................................19
5.2 CAN Application Layer..............................................................21
5.3 CANopen – Open Industrial Communication ............................22
CANopen Communication................................................................25
6.1 CANopen Fundamentals.............................................................25
6.2 CANopen Device Profiles ..........................................................26
6.3 Communication Profile...............................................................26
6.4 Service Data Objects...................................................................27
6.5 Process Data Objects ..................................................................28
6.6 PDO-Mapping.............................................................................30
6.7 Error Handling ............................................................................33
6.8 Network Services........................................................................33
6.8.1 Life-Guarding ................................................................33
6.8.2 Heartbeat........................................................................34
6.8.3 Heardbeat Producer .......................................................34
6.8.4 Heartbeat Consumer ......................................................35
6.9 Network Boot-Up .......................................................................35
6.10 Object Dictionary Entries ...........................................................38
6.11 Input/Output Assignment to Object Dictionary Entries .............38
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CANopen IO-C12
7
CANopen IO-C12 Operation ........................................................... 41
7.1 CANopen State Transitions........................................................ 41
7.2 Power On .................................................................................... 42
7.3 PRE-OPERATIONAL ............................................................... 42
7.4 OPERATIONAL ........................................................................ 42
7.5 STOPPED................................................................................... 42
7.6 Restart Following Reset / Power-On.......................................... 42
7.7 Functions of the digital Inputs.................................................... 44
7.7.1 Interrupt Mask rising and falling edge - 6006H............ 44
7.7.2 Interrupt Mask rising edge - 6007H .............................. 44
7.7.3 Interrupt Mask falling edge - 6008H............................. 45
7.8 Analog Input Operation.............................................................. 45
7.8.1 Handling Analog Values ............................................... 45
7.8.2 Formula for Calculating the Analog Input Value.......... 46
7.8.3 Selecting the Interrupt Trigger ...................................... 46
7.8.4 Interrupt Source............................................................. 47
7.8.5 Interupt Enable .............................................................. 47
7.8.6 Interrupt Upper and Lower Limit.................................. 47
7.8.7 Delta Function ............................................................... 48
7.9 Emergency Message ................................................................... 48
7.9.1 Error Code ..................................................................... 49
7.9.2 Error Register ................................................................ 49
7.10 Status LEDs ................................................................................ 49
7.10.1 RUN LED...................................................................... 50
7.10.2 ERROR Led .................................................................. 50
Operations in the Event of Errors............................................................ 53
7.11 State of the CANopen IO-C12 in the Event of Errors................ 53
7.12 Output Handling in the Event of Errors ..................................... 53
7.13 Changing from Error State to Normal Operation ....................... 54
8
CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary .............................................. 55
Revision History of this Document........................................................... 57
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
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Index of Figures and Tables
Figure 1: Device pinout......................................................................... 4
Figure 2: Pinout for two rowed connectors .......................................... 5
Figure 3: Pinout for the RJ-11 connector ............................................. 5
Figure 4: DIP-switch S202.................................................................... 8
Figure 5: HEX-encoding Switch S200 and S201 ................................. 9
Figure 6: Example for node address 0x62h .......................................... 9
Figure 7: State Diagram of a CANopen Device...............................37
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CANopen IO-C12
Table 1: Pin assignment for all connectors 7
Table 2: Configuration of CAN Bit Rate ..............................................8
Table 3: Maximum cable length depending on cable profile and
number of connected nodes ..............................................10
Table 4: Environmental Parameters ....................................................11
Table 5: IO configuration....................................................................12
Table 6: Comminication Interfaces.....................................................12
Table 7: CAN ID for Different PDO Types......................................16
Table 8: PDO Mapping for I/O‘s ......................................................17
Table 9: COB-Identifier (Communication Target Object Identifier)29
Table 10: PDO Mapping Example ....................................................32
Table 11: Emergency-Message Contents..........................................33
Table 12: Heartbeat Message Structure ............................................34
Table 13: Structure of a Consumer Heartbeat Time Entry ...............35
Table 14: Calculation of the COB-Identifier from the Node
Addresses ..........................................................................36
Table 15: Base Identifier ...................................................................36
Table 16: Description of State Flow Diagram Symbols ...................37
Table 17: Object Dictionary Input/Output Entries ...........................39
Table 18: NMT-Master Messages for Status Control.......................41
Table 19: Storage of Analog Values .................................................45
Table 20: Interrupt Trigger Bits ........................................................46
Table 21: Emergency Message..........................................................49
Table 22: States of the RUN LED.......................................................50
Table 23: States of the ERROR LED..................................................51
Table 24: Example for Error Handling .............................................54
Table 25 : Object Dictionary of the CANopen IO-C12 module.........56
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
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Preface
1 Preface
This manual describes only the functions and technical specifications
of the CANopen IO-C12 module. The microcontroller MB90F543 is
not described herein. Additional controller- and board-level
information as well as technical descriptions can be found in
appropriate microcontroller Data Sheets and User's Manuals.
In this hardware manual and in the attached schematics, low active
signals are denoted by a "/" in front of the signal name (i.e.: /RD). A
"0" indicates a logic-zero or low-level signal, while a "1" represents a
logic-one or a high-level signal.
Declaration of the Electro Magnetic Conformity for the
CANopen IO-C12
The CANopen IO-C12 (henceforth product) is designed for
installation in electrical appliances or as dedicated Evaluation Boards
(i.e.: for use as a test and prototype platform for hardware/software
development) in laboratory environments.
Note:
It is necessary that only appropriately trained personnel (such as
electricians, technicians and engineers) handle and/or operate these
products.
SYS TEC products fulfill the norms of the European Union’s
Directive for Electro Magnetic Conformity only in accordance to the
descriptions and rules of usage indicated in this hardware manual
(particularly in respect to the connectors, power connector and serial
interface).
Implementation of SYS TEC products into target applications, as well
as user modifications and extensions of SYS TEC products, is subject
to renewed establishment of conformity to, and certification of,
Electro Magnetic Directives. Users should ensure conformance
following any modifications to the products as well as implementation
of the products into target systems.
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1
CANopen IO-C12
2
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Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
2 Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
The CANopen IO-C12 module was desined to provide an easy way to
access and configure digital and analog IOs remotely, using the
standardized CANopen protocol. The protocol and all communication
tasks are handled by the integrated firmware.
The firmware implemented in the CANopen IO-C12 has the complete
functionality of a CANopen Slave device and has been certified by
CiA (CAN in Automation e.V.). The present version of the
CANopen IO-C12 supports 11-Bit identifier (CAN 2.0B passive). The
firmware supports the standard Device Profile according to CiA
DSP401 ,the Communication Profile according to CiA DS301 V4.01
and the Indicator specification according to CiA DR303-3 V1.0.
The CANopen IO-C12 module comes with the following basic
components:
− Fujitsu MB90F543 with integrated Full-CAN controller
− internal Flash for code (firmware) and internal SRAM for data
storage
− E²PROM for nonvolatile storage of configuration data
2.1
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Technical Highlights
Certificated CANopen device
Microcontroller with integrated FULL CAN Controller
E²PROM to store configuration data
CAN bus driver allows for connecting up to 100 CAN nodes to one
single CAN bus
DIP-Switch to configure the CAN bitrate
HEX-encoding switches to configure the CAN node address
24 digital inputs, 24VDC, seperated in groups of 4 inputs each,
each group galvanic isolated to another
3 digital inputs, 24VDC, galvanic isolated
4 Relay outputs 250VAC/ 2A
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CANopen IO-C12
• 16 transistor buffered outputs 24VDC/ 0,5A, pluse switching,
protected against short-circuit
• 4 analog inputs, 10-bit resolution, 0...10 V
• 2 analog outputs, 8 Bit resolution, 0-10 V
• 1 galvanic isolated CAN Bus interface
• 1 RS232 interface, used for firmware update
• Internal power supply, 24 VDC/0,5A ±20%
2.2 Pinout of the device
Relay REL1..3
Analog In/Out
AIN0..3/AOUT0..1
IN 24..26
X600
X301
X500
Digital Output
OUT0..15
X400
X402
VIO
X401
+ Power
Relay
0
Digital Input 0
Run
Digital Input
Error
Analog Output
0
4
8
12
12
16
20
Digital Output 0
4
8
24
CANopen IO-C12
+ X101
X100
X1
RS-232
ASC0
CAN0
VCPU
X200
X201
X300
Digital Input IN0 .. 23
Figure 1: Device pinout
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Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
2.3 Connector description
On every connector pin 1 is marked with a circle or inclined egde.
For two rowed connectors the pinout is defined as following:
B
A
1
2
3
4
5
Figure 2: Pinout for two rowed connectors
For the RJ-11 connector the pinout is defined as following:
6
1
Figure 3: Pinout for the RJ-11 connector
2.4 Pin assignment
Interface
RS-232 for software
update
CAN0
Process Name
TxD, RS232
GND
RxD, RS232
CAN5V Output
CAN0_H
N.C.
N.C.
CAN0_L
N.C.
CAN_GND Output
power supply VCPU
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+24VDC
GND_VCPU
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
Pin
X101.2
X101.3
X101.4
X100.5A
X100.5B
X100.4A
X100.4B
X100.3A
X100.3B
X100.2A
X100.2B
X100.1A
X100.1B
X1.1
X1.2
5
CANopen IO-C12
digital input IN0..7
GND_IN0_3
DIN0
DIN1
DIN2
DIN3
GND_IN4_7
DIN4
DIN5
DIN6
DIN7
digital input IN8..15
GND_IN8_11
DIN8
DIN9
DIN10
DIN11
GND_IN12_15
DIN12
DIN13
DIN14
DIN15
digital input IN16..23
GND_IN16_19
DIN16
DIN17
DIN18
DIN19
GND_IN20_23
DIN20
DIN21
DIN22
DIN23
digital output OUT0..7 DOUT0
DOUT1
DOUT2
DOUT3
DOUT4
DOUT5
DOUT6
DOUT7
GND_VIO
GND_VIO
digital output OUT8..15 DOUT8
DOUT9
6
X200.1A
X200.2A
X200.3A
X200.4A
X200.5A
X200.1B
X200.2B
X200.3B
X200.4B
X200.5B
X201.1A
X201.2A
X201.3A
X201.4A
X201.5A
X201.1B
X201.2B
X201.3B
X201.4B
X201.5B
X300.1A
X300.2A
X300.3A
X300.4A
X300.5A
X300.1B
X300.2B
X300.3B
X300.4B
X300.5B
X400.1A
X400.1B
X400.2A
X400.2B
X400.3A
X400.3B
X400.4A
X400.4B
X400.5A
X400.5B
X402.1A
X402.1B
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Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
DOUT10
DOUT11
DOUT12
DOUT13
DOUT14
DOUT15
GND_VIO
GND_VIO
power supply VIO
+24VDC
GND_VIO
digital input IN24..26
DIN24
GND_IN24
DIN25
GND_IN25
DIN26
GND_IN26
Analog input IN0..3
AIN0
AGND
AIN1
AGND
AIN2
AGND
AIN3
AGND
Analog output OUT0..1 AOUT0
AGND
AOUT1
AGND
Relay output
REL1_1
REL1_2
REL1_3
REL2_1
REL2_2
REL2_3
REL3_1
REL3_2
REL3_3
REL4_1
REL4_2
REL4_3
X402.2A
X402.2B
X402.3A
X402.3B
X402.4A
X402.4B
X402.5A
X402.5B
X401.1
X401.2
X301.3A
X301.3B
X301.4A
X301.4B
X301.5A
X301.5B
X600.1A
X600.1B
X600.2A
X600.2B
X600.3A
X600.3B
X600.4A
X600.4B
X600.5A
X600.5B
X600.6A
X600.6B
X500.1
X500.2
X500.3
X500.4
X500.5
X500.6
X500.7
X500.8
X500.9
X500.10
X500.11
X500.12
Table 1: Pin assignment for all connectors
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CANopen IO-C12
2.5 Board Configuration
There are at least tho following input units available to configure the
CANopen IO-C12 module.
− 8-position DIP-Switch
− HEX-encoding Switches
Their usage for configuring the module is described in the following
sections.
2.5.1 DIP-Switch S202
The 8-position DIP-switch (S202) is located on the topside of the
CANopen IO-C12 module. Four of these switches enable
configuration of the CAN bitrate. The valid CAN bitrate is stored in
the E²PROM.
O
1
N
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Figure 4: DIP-switch S202
The following table gives an overview of the possible configurations
for bitrate:
1
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
2
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
3
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
OFF
DIP-switch
4
5
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
OFF OFF
ON OFF
6
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
7
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
8
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
Bitrate
kBit/s
1000
800
500
250
125
100
50
20
10
Table 2: Configuration of CAN Bit Rate
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Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
All bitrates shown in Table 2 are defined in the CiA standard
DSP-305 V1.01. Only the listed bitrates are supported.
2.5.2 HEX-encoding Switch
The CANopen IO-C12 module is equipped with two HEX-encoding
switches marked S200 (MSB) and S201 (LSB). The two HEXencoding switches are intended for configuration purposes prior to
operation.
These switches are used for setting up the node address when
integrating the CANopen IO-C12 into a CANopen network. This
network type requires a unique node number for each individual
control unit connected to the CANopen system. Assigning the same
node number to two different devices will result in functional
problems. Please note that the node numbers 00H and ≥80H are
reserved and must not be used. The node address is stored in the
E²PROM.
Figure 5 shows the assignment of MSB and LSB to the single
switches.
3 4 5 6
3 4 5 6
78 9 A
B C D
78 9 A
0 1 2
E F
L S B
B C D
0 1 2
E F
M S B
Figure 5: HEX-encoding Switch S200 and S201
Figure 6 shows the positions of the single HEX-encoding switches for
assigning node address 0x62hex or 98dez.
3 4 5 6
3 4 5 6
78 9 A
B C D
78 9 A
0 1 2
E F
L S B
B C D
0 1 2
E F
M S B
Figure 6: Example for node address 0x62h
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CANopen IO-C12
ATTENTION! :
When number 0xFFhex is selected the node address and bitrate stored
in the E²PROM become marked as invalid.
2.6 CAN Interface
The MB90F543 microcontroller features an internal FULL CAN
controller. The corresponding CAN Bus transceiver is galvanic
isolated from the CPU. The transceiver is suplied from the on-board
DC/DC converter.
CAN Bus Cable
It is recommended to use a twisted pair CAN bus cable, terminated
with a resistor of 120 Ohm between CAN_H and CAN_L at both
ends. According to CiA recommendation DRP 303-1 the CAN ground
line should be included and connected.
Please refer to the corresponding CiA standards for further
information.
Recommended cable profiles according to the CiA standard
CiA DRP 303-1:
Cable profile Specific
resistance
0.25 mm²
0.5 mm²
0.75 mm²
70 mΩ/m
< 40 mΩ/m
< 26 mΩ/m
max. length in m
(safety margin 0.2)
n=32
n=64 n=100
200
170
150
360
310
270
550
470
410
max. length in m
(safety margin 0.1)
n=32 n=64 n=100
230
200
170
420
360
320
640
550
480
Table 3: Maximum cable length depending on cable profile and number of
connected nodes
If the number of nodes grows above 64 or the cable length is longer
than 250m, the pecision of the supplied voltage for the CAN
tranceiver PCA82C251 need to be better then 5%.
The connector’s contact resistance should be 2.5 .. 10 mΩ
[CiA DRP 303-1].
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Introduction to the CANopen IO-C12
2.7 Technical Specification
Environmental Parameters
power supply
VCPU
VIO
Current consumption ICPU
(inactive IOs)
IIO
Temperature Range Storage temperature
Operating temperature
Protection class
Housing
Weight
without any cable and packing
Dimensions
Width
Height
Depth
Connector type
Spring type connector
Typical
24VDC
24VDC
80mA
80mA
Maximum
-15%, +20%
-15%, +20%
-20..+70°C
0..+50°C
IP20
450g
160mm
75mm
90mm
Table 4: Environmental Parameters
I/O-configuration
Digital Output DOUT0 .. 15
24VDC Output
UOH at IOH = 500 mA
(High Side Switch)
UOL at IOL = 0 mA
Current limitation IOH_max
Max. current
IOL(off)
toff at IOH = 500 mA
ton at IOH = 500 mA
Digital Outputs Rel0 .. 3
Relay output
Switching Voltage
(changer)
Switching Current
Durability (mech.)
ton
toff
Isolation
Digital Inputs DIN0 .. 23
24VDC-Inputs,
UIH
pulse switching
UIL
IIH
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© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
VIO-0,16V < UOH <VIO
0.5V
625mA
tbd
10µA
115µs
190µs
75µs
125µs
250AC
6A
1x105
5ms
2,5ms
4kV
15V
-3V
3mA
30V
5V
8,5mA
11
CANopen IO-C12
Analog Inputs AIN0 .. 3
0 .. +10V
Measurement range UI
Destructive voltage UI_max
Input resistance RI
Reference voltage UREF
Resolution
Analog Outputs AOUT 0 .. 1
0 .. +10V
Voltage Range UO
Output current IO
Output capacity
Reference voltage UREF
Resolution
Slew Rate
0 - +10V
>30V
115,18kΩ ±0.1%
4,096V
± 0.6%
10Bit
0 – +10V
4.096V
30mA
10nF
±0,6V
8 Bit
tbd
Table 5: IO configuration
Communication Interfaces
Min.
Max.
CAN-Bus
CAN0
Bitrate
10kBaud
1Mbaud
Max. number of nodes
64
Transceiver
PCA82C251
CAN-H, CAN-L short-circuit-proof towards 24V
RS-232
ASC0
Baudrate
1200Baud
38400Baud
Table 6: Comminication Interfaces
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Configuration of the CANopen IO-C12
3 Configuration of the CANopen IO-C12
3.1 Power Supply
The CANopen IO-C12 needs an operating voltage of +24VDC for the
CPU core board and the IO board. Power has to be connected to X1
und X401 (see Figure 1).
3.2 CAN Interface
The CANopen IO-C12 module features a MB90F543 microcontroller
with integrated FULL CAN interface.
The CAN interface is galvanic decoupled and brought out to
connector X100.
The pinout for the X100 connector is assigned as following:
Æ X100.4A
CAN_HIGH
Æ X100.2A
CAN_LOW
Æ X100.1A
CAN_GND
Using a SUB-D9 plug the signals have to be connected as following:
(according to CiA)
connector pin
X100.4A
X100.2A
X100.1A
Signal
ÆCAN_HIGH
ÆCAN_LOW
ÆCAN_GND
SUB-D9 pin
Æ PIN 7
Æ PIN 2
Æ PIN 6 and/or PIN 3
(according to CiA standard DS 301 for Communication Profile)
At this point the CANopen IO-C12 is ready for communication.
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CANopen IO-C12
14
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QuickStart
4 QuickStart
This section describes basic start-up of the CANopen IO-C12. It
assumes basic knowledge of CANopen networks. It also requires, that
the CANopen IO-C12 is properly connected to the CAN bus and
power is supplied to the CANopen IO-C12. Please refer to sections 5
and 6 for basic description of CAN and CANopen.
4.1 Start-Up of the CANopen IO-C12
All values in the Object Dictionary (OD) are pre-configured with
default-values. Hence, start-up configuration of the CANopen IO-C12
is not necessary. The CANopen IO-C12 supports the CANopen
Minimum Boot-Up. Following reset and internal initialization, the
board is in PRE-OPERATIONAL state (refer to section 7.3 PREUpon
receipt
of
a
single
message
OPERATIONAL).
(Start_Remote_Node) the board switches to OPERATIONAL state
(refer to section 7.4 OPERATIONAL).
11-bit CAN Identifier
0
2 Byte Data
0x01h
Node_ID
The first data byte contains the Start command, while the second byte
contains the node address (Node_ID). If you specify the value 00h
then all nodes in the network (Broadcast) are started.
4.2 Shut-Down of the CANopen IO-C12
All node activity can be stopped by receipt of the
Enter_Pre_Operational_State message. This message consists of the
following:
11-bit CAN Identifier
0
2 Byte Status Data
0x80h
Node_ID
The Node-ID identifies the node-addresses. Node-ID = 00h addresses
all devices on a network (Broadcast).
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When in “PRE-OPERATIONAL“ state, SDO-Transfer is still
possible. All configuration parameters are then captured and “frozen”
as they were in their most recent active state.
Note:
CANopen configuration tools, such as CANsetter or
ProCANopen from Vector always use SDO-Transfer
when accessing a CANopen node. Due to this fact, these
tools also work in “PRE-OPERATIONAL“ state.
4.3 CAN Message and Identifier
According to CiA Draft Standard 301, a specific CAN identifier is
assigned to each CAN message containing process data (ProcessData-Object - PDO). The CAN identifier for input and output data is
derived from the node address.
CAN-Identifier (hex)
180H + node id
280H + node id
380H + node id
200H + node id
300H + node id
400H + node id
Table 7:
Data type
1. Tx PDO
2. Tx PDO
3. Tx PDO
1. Rx PDO
2. Rx PDO
3. Rx PDO
CAN ID for Different PDO Types
4.4 PDO Mapping for I/O’s
The PDO mapping of the available I/O's depends on the selected I/O
configuration. In the default mapping, the 3th Tx PDO and the 3th Rx
PDO are invalid. This results in the following arrangement of I/Os
and PDOs:
Byte number
0
1
2
3
4
16
1. Tx PDO
DI 0..7
DI 8..15
DI 16..23
DI 24..26
invalid
2. Tx PDO
AI 0
AI 1
AI 2
1. Rx PDO
DO 0..7
DO 8..15
REL 0..4
invalid
invalid
2. Rx PDO
AO 0
AO 1
invalid
invalid
invalid
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5
6
7
Table 8:
invalid
invalid
invalid
AI 3
invalid
invalid
invalid
invalid
invalid
invalid
PDO Mapping for I/O‘s
The CANopen IO-C12 also supports variable PDO mapping. This
allows for free mapping of inputs to Tx PDOs and Rx PDOs to output
lines. Such free mapping settings can be saved in the on-board
EEPROM by writing to index 0x1010.
4.5 Board Reset
Following each board reset, the CANopen IO-C12 transmits an
Bootup message without data content. Temporary suspension of
CANopen IO-C12 activity and subsequent restart can be recognized
without Nodeguarding (refer to section 4.6 Node Guarding). The
transmitter of this message will be detected by the CAN identifier.
11-bit CAN Identifier
700h+ Node_ID
1 Byte Data
00h
4.6 Node-Guarding
Nodeguarding and Lifeguarding functions monitor operation of the
CANopen network. Distributed peripheral CAN devices are
monitored via Nodeguarding, while the Lifeguarding function
supervises the guarding Master. To realize Nodeguarding, the Master
requests a cyclic status message from the slave nodes. This status
request is initiated with a Remote frame message that contains only
the status data. The RTR-Bit (Remote Transmit Request Bit) is set
for this reason.
11-bit CAN Identifier
700h + Node_ID
1 Byte Data
Node-Guarding
Following transmission of the Remote-Frame message, the Slavenodes responds with a status message consisting of 1 byte of service
data.
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11-bit CAN Identifier
700h + Node_ID
1 Byte Data
X
The data bytes within status message further contain a toggle bit that
is supposed to change after each message. Should the status and
toggle bits not correspond to the message pattern expected by the
Master, or should no response to a message follow, the Master
assumes a Slave malfunction. If the Master requests cyclic guard
messages, a Slave node can recognize shut-down of the Master. This
is the case if the Slave does not receive a message request from the
Master within the pre-configured Life Time. The Slave then assumes
failure of the Master, sets its inputs into Error state, transmits an
Emergency message and switches into Pre-Operational state.
The Life Time Factor is configured within the Object [100D] and is
multiplied by the Guard Time [100C]. This results in the Life Time of
the "Nodeguard Protocol". The time base of these cycles is 1 ms. The
Guard Time specifies how much time must elapse between two NodeGuarding messages. The Life Time Factor indicates how many times
the Guard Time can elapse before an error is generated.
Default Values:
Life Time Factor 0
Guard Time
0 ms.
Life Time
0 sec.
Example Values:
Life Time Factor 3
Guard Time
1000 ms.
Life Time
3 sec.
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5 Controller Area Network – CAN
5.1 Communication with CANopen
The Controller Area Network (the CAN bus) is a serial data
communications bus for real-time applications. CAN was originally
developed by the German company Robert Bosch for use in the
automotive industry. It is a two-wire bus system that provides a costeffective communication bus alternative to expensive and
cumbersome harness wiring. CAN operates at data rates of up to
1 Mbit per second and has excellent error detection and confinement
capabilities. On account of its proven reliability and robustness, CAN
is being used in many other automation and industrial applications.
CAN is now an international standard and is documented in ISO
11898 (for high-speed applications) and ISO 11519 (for lower-speed
applications) documents.
CANopen is a higher-layer network protocol based on the CAN serial
bus system, specifically, it is a software-level protocol standard for
industrial communication between automated devices. CANopen is
authorized by the User and Manufacturers’ Group “CAN in
Automation e.V.” (CiA) and adheres to ISO/OSI standards.
CANopen unleashes the full power of CAN by allowing direct peer to
peer data exchange between nodes in an organized, heirarchical
manner. The network management functions specified in CANopen
simplify project design, implementation and diagnosis by providing
standard mechanisms for network start-up and error management.
CANopen supports both cyclic and event-driven communication. This
makes it possible to reduce the bus load to a minimum, while still
maintaining extremely short reaction times. High communication
performance can be achieved at relatively low baud rates, thus
reducing EMC problems and minimizing cable costs. CANopen is the
ideal networking system for all types of automated machinery. One of
the distinguishing features of CANopen is its support for data
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exchange at the supervisory control level as well as accommodating
the integration of very small sensors and actuators on the same
physical network. This avoids the unnecessary expense of gateways
linking sensor/actuator bus systems with higher communication
networks and makes CANopen particularly attractive to original
equipment manufacturers.
CANopen Advantages
• Vendor-independent open-source structure
• Universal standards
• Supports inter-operability of different devices
• High speed real-time capability
• Modular - covers simple to complex devices
• User-friendly - wide variety of support tools available
• Real-Time-capable communication for process data without
protocol overhead;
• a modular, configurable structure that can be tailored to the
needs of the user and his or her networked application
• Interbus-S, Profibus and MMS oriented-profiles
CANopen Features
• Auto configuration of the network
• Easy access to all device parameters
• Device synchronization
• Cyclic and event-driven data transfer
• Synchronous reading or setting of inputs, outputs or parameters
In addition to its designation as a physical CAN layer standard,
CANopen is a “layer-7 protocol” implementation of CAL and is
defined by the CANopen Communications Profile in CiA DS-301.
CAL, in turn, is based on an existing and proven protocol originally
developed by Philips Medical Systems. CAL is an applicationindependent application layer that has been specified and is also
maintained by the CAN in Automation (CiA) user group.
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5.2 CAN Application Layer
The CAN Application Layer (CAL) supports various applications and
the integration of CAN hardware from different vendors. A CAL
implementation consists of four blocks, each of which can operate as
network Master and Slave.
CAN Message Specification (CMS)
CMS defines the communication objects, such as multiplexed
variables, Events and Domains.
• Variables:
serve data exchange of basic messages
• Events:
handle the activity of specifically defined events,
such as switches and transmission of asynchronous
messages
• Domains:
support transmission of data packages larger than
the maximum eight bytes of a standard CAN
message
CMS further regulates the communication structure between the
object targets.
Network Management (NMT)
NMT implements network management functions for NMT-Master
and NMT-Slave. These functions support start-up and expansion of a
network, as well as Error supervision (Lifeguarding) and prevention
of bus overload.
Distributor (DBT)
DBT supports the use of CAN nodes from various vendors through its
automatic assigning of message identifiers. The DBT-Master/Slave
functions enable administration of a global data basis for
communication objects (COBs) of varying priority classes.
Layer Management (LMT)
LMT assigns parameters to the lower layers of data communication,
such as timing parameters of CAN nodes or management of a
manufacturer code by node name designation.
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5.3 CANopen – Open Industrial Communication
The following Special Interest and Working Groups have developed
the CAL-based CANopen communication profile:
-
SIG Distributed I/O – Chairmanship Selectron
SIG Motion Control - Chairmanship port
and the Working Group (WG)
-
WG Higher Layer Protocols
The CiA DS 301 CANopen standard derived from the results of the
ASPIC ESPRIT project. The communication profile describes in
detail how data are exchanged over the CAN bus based on the
functions provided by CAL. This data can be sorted into two main
types:
•
•
Process data
Service data
Process data is real-time data generated by a networked device. This
data is transmitted via a Process Data Object (PDO). The CANopen
communication profile determines how a PDO functions within CAL
communication objects, as well as which protocol is used for
transmission of data. PDOs can be used simultaneously by multiple
networked devices, hence enabling broadcast operations.
Service data are used to configure and establish parameters for
networked devices. Service data directly communicate to the Object
Dictionary of each device and are transmitted using Service Data
Objects (SDO).
The CANopen communication profile also determines how these
objects are connected and which CAL functions and services can be
used. An SDO can only be used between two networked devices,
typically a configuration Master and another device that is to be
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configured. The SDO-Transfer is also capable of confirmation of
message receipt.
Each individual networked device provides several PDOs and SDOs.
This enables configuration of multi-master networks, in addition to
typical single Master / multiple Slave networks.
In addition to data classes, CANopen defines the communication
classes that describe:
•
•
•
Synchronized communication
Event processing
Communication initialization
CANopen also defines device profiles that describe the basic
functions of networked devices. These device profiles consist of the
following two primary components:
•
•
Functional Description
Operational Description
The Functional Description of a device is represented by functional
blocks and data flows. Descriptive parameters are stored in the Object
Dictionary. Each Object Dictionary has a pre-defined structure.
Hence, parameters for networked devices of a certain type (for
instance I/O modules or drives) are always located in the same place
within an Object Dictionary. Parameters can be classified as
mandatory, optional and manufacturer-specific.
The Operational Description of a device is described by state flow
diagram (refer to Figure 7 in Section 6.9).
Device Profiles are standardized for:
• Generic I/O Modules
CiA DS 401
digital I/O's
analog I/O's
• Drives and Motion Control CiA DSP 402
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•
•
•
•
Servo drivers,
Step motors and
Frequency transformers
Measurement Devices and
Closed Loop Controllers CiA DSP 404
IEC61131-3 Programmable
Devices
CiA DSP 405
Encoder
CiA DSP 406
Inclinometer
CiA DSP 410
Please refer to the CAN in Automation homepage www.can-cia.org
for up-to-date information of available device profiles. All device
profiles correspond to the DRIVECOM Profile with CAN-specific
modifications to enable multi-master capability.
Software for CANopen Slave functions is based on services for data
exchange and network management as defined in CAL standards. In
particular only certain parts of CAL have been implemented in
CANopen, such as standards for Multiplexed-Domain-Transfer for
SDOs and Stored Event-Transfer for transmission of PDOs.
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6 CANopen Communication
6.1 CANopen Fundamentals
Open fieldbus systems enable design of distributed network systems
by connecting components from multiple vendors while minimizing
the effort required for interfacing. To achieve an open networking
system, it is necessary to standardize the various layers of
communication used.
CANopen uses the international CAN standard, ISO 11898 as the
basis for communication. This standard covers the lower two layers of
communication specified by the OSI model. Based on this, the
CANopen profile family specifies standardized communication
mechanisms and device functionality for CAN-based systems. The
profile family, which is available and maintained by CAN in
Automation e.V. (CiA) consists of the Application layer and
communication profile (DS 301), various frameworks and
recommendations (CiA DS-30x) and various device profiles (CiA DS40x).
The network management functions specified in CANopen simplify
project design, implementation and diagnosis by providing standard
mechanisms for network start-up and error management.
CANopen is the ideal networking system for all types of automated
machinery. One of the distinguishing features of CANopen is its
support for data exchange at the supervisory control level as well as
accommodating the integration of very small sensors and actuators on
the same physical network. This avoids the unnecessary expense of
gateways linking sensor/actuator bus systems with higher
communication networks and makes CANopen particularly attractive
to original equipment manufacturers.
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6.2 CANopen Device Profiles
CANopen profiles are defined for communication in CiA Draft
Standard 301, for I/O Modules in CiA Draft Standard 401, for Drives
and Motion Control in CiA Draft Standard 402 and for Encoder in
CiA Draft Standard 406. Other profiles are in preparation.
The profiles of a CANopen device are stored in the Object Dictionary
(OD) in a defined manner. The Object Dictionary manages the objects
using a 16-bit index. This index can be further subdivided with an 8bit sub-index. All entries are summarized within groups.
For example, the Communication profile is located at index 1000h to
1FFFh.
Certain types of object entries are mandatory; others are optional or
manufacturer-specific. The following types of objects are available:
•
•
•
•
•
Domain
Deftyp
Defstruct
Var
Array
• Record
a variable number of data
a definition entry, such as unsigned16
record type, such as PDO mapping
an individual variable
a multiple data field, whereby each individual data
field is a simple variable of the same type
a multiple data field, whereby the data fields are any
combination of simple variables
With structured entries, subindex 0 indicates the number of following
subindices.
6.3 Communication Profile
The interface between application and CANopen device is clearly
defined by a uniform communication profile based on CAL. The
CANopen communication protocol defines several methods for
transmission and receipt of messages over the CAN bus, including
transfer of synchronous and asynchronous messages. Coordinated
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data exchange across an entire network is possible by means of
synchronous message transmission. Synchronous data transfer allows
network wide coordinated data exchange. Pre-defined communication
objects, i.e. SYNC Objects transmitted on a cyclic time period and
Time Stamp objects support synchronous transfers. Asynchronous or
event messages may be transmitted at any time and allow a device to
immediately notify another device without having to wait for the next
synchronous data transfer cycle.
6.4 Service Data Objects
Network management controls communication and device profiles of
all networked devices. For this type of access service data objects
(SDO) are used. In CANopen devices, all parameters and variables
that are accessible via CAN are clearly arranged in the Object
Dictionary.
All objects in the Object Dictionary can be read and/or written via
SDOs. SDO represent a peer-to-peer communication between
networked nodes. This access occurs according to the Multiplexed
Domain protocol, whereby the index and subindex of the addressed
objects are used as a multiplexor. This protocol is based on
handshaking.
Individual parameters are addressed using a 16-bit index and an 8-bit
subindex addressing mechanism. In this mode data packages may be
larger than 8 bytes using multiple CAN messages. Messages smaller
than 5 bytes can be transferred with a transmission acknowledgement.
The owner of the Object Dictionary is the server of the domain. Read
and write accesses via SDOs are supervised by the CANopen server
and are checked for validity.
A variety of access restrictions must be taken into account, such as;
Read only, Write only and No PDO mapping. Error messages provide
detailed information on any access conflicts. Service Data Objects
(SDOs) are normally used for device configuration such as setting
device parameters. They are also used to define the type and format of
information communicated using the Process Data Objects.
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6.5 Process Data Objects
A Process Data Object (PDO) is a CAN message whose data contents,
identifier, inhibit time, transmission type and CMS priority are
configurable via entries in the Object Dictionary. PDO format and
data content of the message may be fixed or dynamically configured
using SDO data transfers. PDOs do not contain any explicit protocol
overhead, hence enabling very fast and flexible exchange of data
between applications running on each node. Hence, PDO transfers
are typically used for high speed, high priority data exchange. Data
size in a PDO message is limited to 8 bytes or less. PDO‘s can be
transmitted directly from any device on the network simultaneously to
any number of other devices. Data exchange across a CANopen
network does not require a bus Master. This multicast capability is
one of the unique features of CAN and is fully exploited in CANopen.
PDO entries start at index 1400h for receipt objects and at 1800h for
transmission objects. CANopen permits cyclic and event-controlled
communication. The type of transfer indicates the manner of the
reaction to the SYNC message; while the inhibit time is the minimum
time that must elapse between two transmissions of the PDO. PDOs
reduce the bus load to a minimum, achieve a high information flowrate and can be accessed via remote frames.
A simple CANopen device usually supports four PDOs. These are
initialized with preset identifiers. Additional PDOs can be designated,
yet to avoid message collison they may be set invalid (deactivated).
This deactivation is configured by setting the MSB (bit 31) in the
identifier of the PDO.
The message identifier can be found in the Object Dictionary under
the entry for communication parameter in subindex 1. Bit 30 indicates
if remote request for this PDO is enabled (bit 30 = 0) or not. Bit 29
configures the CAN frame format, bit 29 = 0 indicates 11-bit
identifier.
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Bit
31
11-bit-ID 0/1
30
0/1
29
0
29-bit-ID 0/1
0/1
1
Table 9:
28 – 11
000000000000
000000
29-bit Identifier
10 - 0
11-bit
Identifier
COB-Identifier (Communication Target Object Identifier)
The transmission types in subindex 2 can be configured within a
range of 0 to 255. The values 0 to 240 define that the transfer of the
PDO is in relation to the SYNC message. The value 0 indicates that
current input values are only transmitted upon arrival of a SYNC
message and if the requested input value has changed. Values
between 1 and 240 indicate that the PDO is transmitted upon arrival
of a corresponding number of SYNC messages. The values 241 to 251
are reserved. The values 252 and 253 are intended only for remote
objects. For value 252, data is updated but not transmitted upon
receipt of the SYNC message. The value 253 updates data upon
receipt of the remote request. Values 254 and 255 are used for
asynchronous PDOs. The release of these asynchronous PDOs is
manufacturer or Device Profile-specific.
The inhibit time is stored in multiples of 100 µs as unsigned16-values
at subindex 3.
At subindex 4, the priority group for this particular PDO is defined.
The priority group is only effective in case DBT services
(communication object identifier distribution services) are executed.
Depending on the supported subindices, subindex 0 must be set to the
applicable value.
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PDO settings must correspond to the I/O profile rules:
• the first transmit and receipt PDO is used for exchange of digital
data;
• the second transmit and receipt PDO is used for exchange of
analog data.
If a CANopen device does not support digital inputs or outputs, it is
recommended that the first transmit and receipt PDO remains unused.
If a CANopen device does not support analog signals, it is
recommended that the second transmit and receipt PDO remains
unused.
6.6 PDO-Mapping
A unique mapping entry exists for each communication parameter
entry of a PDO. This mapping entry is located in the Object
Dictionary 200h above the corresponding communication parameter
entry for this PDO. This mapping table corresponds to PDO data
contents. The requirement for PDO mapping is the presence of
variables in the Object Dictionary that are capable of mapping. For
example, digital outputs at index 6200h and digital inputs at index
6000h can be mapped. These values can also be set and read out via
SDO. However, in order to use the benefits of the CAN bus, the
variables of a CANopen device are put in PDOs.
The mapping of variables is organized as follows:
All mapping entries are 4 bytes in size. The number of objects to be
mapped is written to subindex 0. Each following subindex contains a
reference to the index and subindex of variables and their length
stored in “Bit“. For example:
60000108h
• reference to index 6000
• subindex 1
• length 8 bits
In this example the value of the digital input is indicated by the first
byte of a transmit PDO. For most CANopen devices, mapping occurs
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with a granularity of eight (8). This means that a maximum of eight
entries per byte is possible for a mapping table.
In special cases mapping of bit objects can be supported. It is also
advisable to sometimes exclude areas from mapping. For example, a
CANopen device might evaluate only the fifth byte of a PDO. In this
case, 2 unsigned16 dummy objects are inserted in the mapping
identity, if supported by the CANopen device. A mapping table can
be used to appropriately configure communication parameters to
encode a PDO for transmission or to decode a received PDO.
PDO Mapping Example
All network variables can be transferred by PDOs, which can transmit
a maximum of 8 bytes of information. The allocation of variables to
PDOs is defined by mapping tables. These variables are addressable
via the Object Dictionary. Reading and writing of entries to the
Object Dictionary occurs by means of Service Data Objects (SDO),
which are used to configure the network by means of a special
configuration tool.
This process is illustrated below in Table 10. Inputs 2 and 3 of device
A are to be transferred to the outputs 1 and 3 of device B. Both
devices support complete mapping.
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Device A:
1000H
......
6000H,1
6000H,2
6000H,3
....
Device Type
Input 1, 8 Bit
Input 2, 8 Bit
Input 3, 8 Bit
Transmit PDO Mapping Parameter
1A00H,0
1A00H,1
1A00H,2
# of Entries
1.Map Object
2.Map Object
2
60000208H
60000308H
Transmit PDO Communication Parameter:
1800H,0
1800H,1
1800H,2
....
# of Entries
COB-ID
Trans.Type
2
501
255
Resulting PDO:
COB-ID
501
Table 10:
DATA
Output 1
Output 3
PDO Mapping Example
Transmit and receive PDOs utilize the same CAN identifier 501. Thus
device B automatically receives the PDO transmitted by device A.
The recipient, device B, interprets the data in accordance with its
mapping scheme; it passes the first byte at output 1 and the second
byte at output 3. These correspond to inputs 2 and 3, respectively of
the transmitting device A.
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6.7 Error Handling
Each node in the network is able to signal error states as far as they
are detected by the hardware and software. Error Handling is enabled
by Emergency Objects. Internal fatal error states are encoded in error
codes and sent only once to the other nodes. If other errors occur, the
node remains in error state and transmits a new Emergency Object. If
the error is recovered, the node then transmits an error message with
the code No error. The Emergency message consists of 8 bytes,
whereby the first and second bytes contain additional information that
is found in the device profiles. The third byte contains the contents of
the error register; while the remaining five bytes contain
manufacturer-specific information. The Emergency Error code is
stored in object [1003h], the Pre-Defined Error Field. This creates an
error log that chronologically sorts errors. The oldest error is situated
at the highest subindex.
Byte
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Content Emergency Error Register, Manufacturer Specific Error
Error Code Object [1001] Field
Table 11:
Emergency-Message Contents
6.8 Network Services
In addition to services enabling configuration and data exchange,
various CAN network services also support monitoring of networked
devices. NMT (network management) services require a node in the
network that assumes the functions of the NMT-Masters. The NMTMaster services include initialization of NMT-Slaves, distribution of
the identifiers, the node monitoring and network booting.
6.8.1 Life-Guarding
Optional node monitoring is achieved by “Life-Guarding”. The NMTMaster periodically transmits a Lifeguard message to the Slave. The
Slave responds to the Lifeguard message with a return message
indicating its present status and a bit that toggles between two
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messages. Should the Slave not respond or indicate an unexpected
status, the NMT-Master application is informed by means of a status
message. Moreover, the Slave can detect failure of the Master. LifeGuarding is started with the transmission of the initial message from
the Master.
6.8.2 Heartbeat
Similar to Lifeguarding, the Heartbeat function is an additional
network supervisory service. But unlike the Lifeguarding, the
Heartbeat does not require a NMT-Master. Only CANopen Slaves are
able to function as Heartbeat Producer and Consumer because they
provide an Object Dictionary in order to store the Heartbeat times.
6.8.3 Heardbeat Producer
The Heartbeat Producer cyclically sends a Heartbeat message. The
configured Producer Heartbeat time (16-bit – value in ms), located at
index 1017h, will be used as an interval time. If this interval time
expires, a message with the following contents will be sent:
Byte
0
1...7
Content Producer State reserved
Table 12:
Heartbeat Message Structure
The COB-ID that is used is 0700h + the node number.
The Hearbeat Producer gives its status, which can be any of the
following values, in the first byte of the message:
00h
04h
05h
7Fh
BOOTUP
STOPPED
OPERATIONAL
PRE-OPERATIONAL
The Heartbeat Producer is deactivated when the producer Heartbeat
time is set to 0.
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6.8.4 Heartbeat Consumer
The Heartbeat Consumer analyzes Heartbeat messages sent from the
producer. In order to monitor the Producer, the Consumer requires
every producers’ node number, as well as the consumer Heartbeat
time.
For every monitored Producer, there is a corresponding sub-entry that
has the following contents:
Bit
Value
Table 13:
MSB
31-24
00h
23-16
Node-ID
LSB
15-0
Consumer Heartbeat Time
Structure of a Consumer Heartbeat Time Entry
The Consumer is activated when a Heartbeat message has been
received and a corresponding entry is configured in the OD. If one of
the activated Heartbeat times expires during an active Heartbeat
consumer without receipt of a corresponding Heartbeat message, then
the consumer for this producer is deactivated.
The Heartbeat consumer is completely deactivated when the
consumer Heartbeat time is given a value of 0.
6.9 Network Boot-Up
The NMT-Master is responsible for booting of the network. The boot
procedure takes place over several steps. According to the type of
networked CANopen device, the identifier defaults to pre-defined
values (for minimum CANopen devices) or is configured via DBT
services. The pre-defined configuration for the identifier values
include Emergency Objects, PDOs and SDOs. These are calculated
according to node addresses, which can be located between 1 and 128
and are added to a base identifier that determines the function of an
object.
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Bit
COB-Identifier
10
7
6
0
Function Code Device-ID
Table 14:
Calculation of the COB-Identifier from the Node Addresses
This base identifier is determined as follows:
Object
Resulting COB-ID Resulting
[hex]
COB-ID
[decimal]
EMERGENCY 80h + Device-ID 129 – 255
PDO1 (tx)
180h + Device-ID 385 – 511
PDO1 (rx)
200h + Device-ID 513 – 639
PDO2 (tx)
280h + Device-ID 641 – 767
PDO2 (rx)
300h + Device-ID 769 – 895
PDO3 (tx)
380h + Device-ID 896 – 1022
PDO4 (tx)
480h + Device-ID 1152 – 1278
SDO (tx)
580h + Device-ID 1409 – 1535
SDO (rx)
600h + Device-ID 1537 – 1663
Nodeguard
700h + Device-ID 1793 – 1919
Table 15:
Communication
Parameter at
Index
1800h
1400h
1801h
1401h
1802h
1803h
(100Eh)
Base Identifier
Configuration data can be loaded on Slave devices via the pre-defined
SDO. PDOs can be transmitted after nodes are set from
Pre_Operational to Operational state by the NMT service
Start_Remote_Node. Minimum CANopen devices also support the
Stop_Remote_Node, Enter_Pre-Operational_State, Reset_Node,
Reset_Communication services. As indicated in Figure 3, networked
nodes automatically enter Pre_Operational following boot-up and
initialization. The Reset_Node service completely resets target nodes.
Reset_Communication resets communication parameters.
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CANopen Communication
Power On or Hardware Reset
(1)
Initialization
(2)
(14)
(11)
(13)
(10)
Pre-Operational
(12)
(9)
(4)
(7)
(5)
Stopped
(3)
(6)
(8)
Operational
Figure 7:
State Diagram of a CANopen Device
State transition Action required
(1)
following "Power On", automatically switches into
"Initialization" state
(2)
"Initialization" finished, automatically switches into
"Pre-Operational" state
(3),(6)
NMT service "Start_Remote_Node"
(4),(7)
NMT service "Enter_Pre-Operational_State"
(5),(8)
NMT service "Stop_Remote_Node"
(9),(10),(11)
NMT service "Reset_Node"
(12),(13),(14) NMT service "Reset_Communication"
Table 16:
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Description of State Flow Diagram Symbols
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CANopen IO-C12
For networked devices operating in a network with or without DBT
capabilities, it is necessary to reserve the identifier for “minimum
devices“ in the database of the DBT-Master.
Extended Boot-up is based on CAL specifications. The device states
Pre-Operational and Initializing have been implemented in addition.
6.10 Object Dictionary Entries
Beside the parameters for the PDOs, a number of additional entries in
the Object Dictionary belong to the data that specify a CANopen
device. The communication profile contains such information as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
the device type at index [1000];
the error register at index [1001];
the Pre-Defined Error Field at [1003];
the identifier of the SYNC message at [1005];
the device name at [1008],
the hardware and software version of the manufacturer at [1009]
and [100A];
• the node address at [100B];
• the parameter Guard-Time at [100C] and
• the parameter Life-Time-Factor at [100D].
In the device type, information about the implemented device profile
and the capabilities of the device is encoded. The error register gives
information about internal errors of the device; the pre-defined error
field provides an error log.
In case the Guard-Time and
Life-Time-Factor are unequal to Zero, the multipied values result in
the Life Time of the CANopen device for the node monitoring
protocol.
6.11 Input/Output Assignment to Object Dictionary Entries
The CANopen IO-C12 allows an easy configuration for a specific
CANopen application. The fixed number of inputs and outputs on the
CANopen IO-C12 makes easy configuration of Process Data Objects
(PDOs) possible. Both digital and analog inputs, as well as the digital
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CANopen Communication
and analog outputs, are configured in accordance with CiA standards.
Configuration of Object Dictionary Input/Output entries for the
CANopen IO-C12, according to data type, is shown in Table 17.
Data Type
Digital Input
DI0 ... DI7
DI8 ... DI15
DI16 ... DI23
DI24 ... DI26
Digital Output
DO0 ... DO7
DO8 ... DO15
REL0 ... REL3
Analog Input
AI0
AI1
AI2
AI3
Analog Output
AO0
AO1
Index / Subindex
Size
6000H / 1
6000H / 2
6000H / 3
6000H / 4
BYTE
BYTE
BYTE
BYTE
6200H / 1
6200H / 2
6200H / 3
BYTE
BYTE
BYTE
6401H / 1
6401H / 2
6401H / 3
6401H / 4
WORD
WORD
WORD
WORD
6410H / 1
6410H / 2
BYTE
BYTE
Table 17:
Object Dictionary Input/Output Entries
Note:
After boot-up of the CANopen IO-C12, objects can be
accessed via SDOs. If the node is in Operational state,
objects can be accessed via PDOs. The default mapping
parameters applies for Object Dictionary Input/Output
entries. Any modification of mapping parameters can be
done via SDO with the help of a network configuration
tool.
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7 CANopen IO-C12 Operation
7.1 CANopen State Transitions
The structure of messages that changes the state of a CANopen node
is as follows:
11-bit CAN Identifier
0
Node_ID
cs
2 Byte Data
cs
Node address;
(Broadcast)
Command
NODE_ID
Node_ID = 0 to address all devices
Table 18 summarizes all NMT-Master messages used for status
control:
Command Description
(cs)
1 (01h)
Start_Remote_
Node
2 (02h)
128 (80h)
129 (81h)
130 (82h)
Table 18:
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Stop_Remote_
Node
Enter_Pre_
Operational_
State
Reset_Node
Function
Starts the CANopen device
and PDO transmission,
activates outputs
Stops PDO transmission,
renders outputs in error state
Stops PDO transmission, SDO
remains active
Executes a system Reset;
Initial Start-up, resets all
settings to default values
Reset_
Resets all communication
Communication parameters to deault values
State after
Execution
OPERATIONAL
STOPPED or
PREPARED
PREOPERATIONAL
PREOPERATIONAL
PREOPERATIONAL
NMT-Master Messages for Status Control
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CANopen IO-C12
7.2 Power On
After “Power-On”, the CANopen IO-C12 executes required
initialization routines and switches into Pre_Operational state.
7.3 PRE-OPERATIONAL
Process Data Objects (PDOs) are not active in Pre_Operational state.
The default identifier for Service Data Objects (SDOs) is available
and all necessary network configurations can be executed via SDO.
At the end of the configuration process, the CANopen device can be
rendered into Operational state. This can be done by the network
Master or by the user with the help of a network configuration tool.
7.4 OPERATIONAL
All Process Data Objects (PDOs) can be exchanged in Operational
state. Access via SDO is also possible.
7.5 STOPPED
Network communication is suspended in state STOPPED. This does
not affect the Node-Guarding and the “Heartbeat“, if this was enabled
before. This state can be used to render the application into a “Safety
State“. In STOPPED state PDO, SDO, SYNC and Emergency
communication are NOT functioning. Leaving this state is only
possible with a NMT message.
7.6 Restart Following Reset / Power-On
Each Reset of the CANopen IO-C12 transmits an Emergency message
without data contents. Temporary operational failure of the
CANopen IO-C12 and subsequent power-up of the device are
detected without Node Guarding (refer to Section 4.6 NodeGuarding), as the sending device can be determined by the message
identifier.
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The CANopen IO-C12 distinguishs between “Load”_Start and
“Save”_ Start. “Load”_Start is necessary:
• for initial operation of the CANopen IO-C12 after its delivery
• if the device parameters (Object Dictionary entries in RAM)
should be overwritten by default values
With “Load”_Start, all default CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary
entries are copied to RAM after Reset/Power On (manufacturer
default values).
The string “save” must be written to object [1010] at subindex 1 in
order to carry out the “Save”_ Start routine. With “Save”_ Start all
Object Dictionary entries are copied from E2PROM to RAM after a
Reset/Power-On using the saved user-specific values. If the bus
Master or the user, by means of a network configuration tool,
modifies Object Dictionary entries, then the modifications are only
active as of the next RESTART if “Save” is written to object [1010]
in subindex 1. This means that only the stored values are valid after
the Reset/Power-On of the CANopen IO-C12. These values are stored
then in the E2PROM and, in the event of power-down, are not lost.
A“Save”_ Start can take up to 1.5 seconds, because the entire OD is
read from the E2PROM and written into RAM.
All device parameters can be stored in the E2PROM using object
[1010] in subindex 1. In order to prevent unintended storage of
parameters in the E2PROM device, a special “Save” signature must
be written to subindex 1. This 32-bit signature (in hex format) appears
as follows:
MSB
‘e’
65h
LSB
‘v’
76h
‘a’
61h
‘s’
73h
All device parameters can be reset to manufacturer default values
according to DS301 or DS401 standards via the object [1011] in
subindex 1. In order to prevent an unintended reset following a store
instruction with the “Save” signature, the “Load” signature must be
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CANopen IO-C12
written to subindex 1. This 32-bit signature (in hex format) appears as
follows:
MSB
‘d’
64h
LSB
‘a’
61h
‘o’
6fh
‘l’
6ch
In order to set the default values, a Reset/Power-On must be
subsequently executed.
ATTENTION!
This is not valid for bitrate and node address set via LSS. To reset the
node address and bitrate the HEX-encoding switches S200 and S201
have to be set to 0xFFh and the device has to be rebooted.
(refer to section 2.5.2)
7.7 Functions of the digital Inputs
There are multiple trigger conditions selectable for the digital outputs.
These are defined in the Object Dictionary at Index 6006H, 6007H
and 6008H.
It is within the userd responsibility to make sure only one trigger
condition is activated per input.
7.7.1 Interrupt Mask rising and falling edge - 6006H
This is the default setting for digital outputs. The state of the input is
transmitted over CAN at every change.
The default value for all digital inputs is 1.
7.7.2 Interrupt Mask rising edge - 6007H
This is an optional setting for digital inputs. The state of the input is
transmitted over CAN at a change from "0" to "1” only.
If an input is configured for this mask no other input must be
activated in Index 6006H or 6008H.
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The default value for all digital inputs is 0.
7.7.3 Interrupt Mask falling edge - 6008H
This is an optional setting for digital inputs. The state of the input is
transmitted over CAN at a change from "1" to "0” only.
If an input is configured for this mask no other input must be
activated in Index 6006H or 6007H.
The default value for all digital inputs is 0.
7.8 Analog Input Operation
7.8.1 Handling Analog Values
This section provides general information on data storage of analog
values in a CANopen frame.
The CANopen Standard DS401 defines that all analog values have to
be stored as 32-bit value aligned left with a sign bit. On the
CANopen IO-C12 all A/D-conversion values are stored with 10-bit
data. Consequently, for each analog channel, two data bytes must be
transmitted.
These data bytes are stored and transmitted on the CAN bus as shown
in Table 19.
Byte 2
Sign
+/-
Byte 1
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
Bit 9 Bit 8 Bit 7 Bit 6 Bit 5 Bit 4 Bit 3 Bit 2 Bit 1 Bit 0
Table 19:
4
0
3
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
Storage of Analog Values
On the CAN bus, first byte 1 and then byte 2, is transmitted.
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CANopen IO-C12
7.8.2 Formula for Calculating the Analog Input Value
The formula listed below is used to calculate a voltage value of an
analog input from the A/D-conversion result:
AIn/ V =
result A / D conversion/ hex • voltage range/ V
2 resolution ADC
The following example will explain the use of this formula in more
detail:
result A/D-conversion: = 72 hex
voltage range
= 4.096V (standard supply on pins VAREF
and VAGND)
resolution ADC
= 10 Bit
analog input value (AIn) = ?
AIn = (0x72 • 4.096V) / 210 = (114 • 4.096V) / 1024 = 0.456V
7.8.3 Selecting the Interrupt Trigger
This object entry determines which event can release an interrupt. For
this purpose the object [6421] "Interrupt_Trigger_Selection" is
available. If the "Global_Interrupt_Enable" [6423] is activated, the
release of an interrupt transmits the TX-PDO for analog inputs. A
specific subindex is available for each analog input channel. This
allows precise configuration of the interrupt event for each channel.
The following values are available:
Bit Number
0
1
2
3
4
5 to 7
Table 20:
46
Interrupt Trigger
Upper limiting value exceeded
Lower limiting value exceeded
Input value fluctuates more than DELTA [6426]
Not supported!
Not supported!
Reserved
Interrupt Trigger Bits
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Example:
6421,1 = 04h means: the first analog input must fluctuate by more
than DELTA in order to send the PDO.
Note:
The default values for all analog inputs are set to 07h.
7.8.4 Interrupt Source
This object entry stores which analog input caused the interrupt. The
object [6422] "Analog_Input_Interrupt_Source" is available for this
purpose. Every single bit refers to the corresponding analog input
channel. These bits will be reset automatically if the entry has been
read by a SDO or the object entry was transmitted with a PDO.
The following convention is used:
"1" : Channel caused an interrupt,
"0" : Channel caused no interrupt.
Example:
6422,1 = 01h means: analog input channel 0 caused an interrupt.
7.8.5 Interupt Enable
All interrupts can be enabled or disabled using the object entry [6423]
"Analog_Input_Global_Interrupt_Enable". The default value is "0",
indicating interrupt execution is disabled. To enable the interrupt
execution, the value "1" must be written to the object entry (also refer
to section 7.8.3).
7.8.6 Interrupt Upper and Lower Limit
An interrupt is released, if the analog input value is higher or lower
than the specified limiting value in the applicable subindex. The
upper limit is sepcified in object [6424], the lower limit in [6425]. To
release an interrupt, the OD entry [6423] must be set to "1".
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CANopen IO-C12
Each analog input value will be transmitted as long the trigger
condition is given. This assumes that no other trigger condition, such
as the Delta Function, is enabled. The limit values must be specified
as 32-bit value aligned left.
For this purpose, the objects:
• [6424] "Analog_Input_Interrupt_Upper_Limit_Integer" and
• [6425] "Analog_Input_Interrupt_Lower_Limit_Integer"
are available.
Note:
The default value in both entries for all analog inputs is "0".
Example:
6423 = 1h, 6421,1 = 05h and 6424,1 = 2000 0000h:
The analog input #1 releases an interrupt if the value exceeds the limit
of 2000h, and then the value fluctuates by more than specified in the
Delta function (see following section).
7.8.7 Delta Function
The delta function allows configuration of the extent to which an
analog input value can fluctuate since the most recent transmission.
Only if the fluctuation on the analog input exceeds the value specified
in the delta function transmission of the corresponding PDO on the
CAN bus is initiated. This configuration can be done using the object
[6426] Analog_Input_Interrupt_Delta. Entries specify the number of
digits in the conversion result that are allowed to fluctuate. The
default value for all four analog inputs is 5. This means that the A/Dconversion result may change by up to 5 digits before a PDO is
transmitted. The value must be specified as aligned left and assumes
10-bit resolution.
7.9 Emergency Message
In the event of an error, the status of the CANopen IO-C12 is
transmitted via a high-priority Emergency Message. These messages
consist of 8 data bytes and contain error information. The Emergency
Message is transferred as soon as one of the specified errors occurs. A
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specific Error Message is only transmitted once, even if the recent
error is not resolved for a longer period of time. If all error causes are
eliminated, then an Error Message with contents “0“ (error
eliminated) is transmitted. The structure of the 8-byte Emergency
Message is depicted below:
BYTE 0 BYTE 1 BYTE 2 BYTE 3 BYTE 4 BYTE 5 BYTE 6 BYTE 7
Error Code
Table 21:
ErrorManufacturer-specific Error Code
Register
[1001]
Emergency Message
7.9.1 Error Code
The Error Code (byte field 0+1, LSB, MSB) indicates whether an
error is present or whether the error has already been eliminated (no
error). The following error codes are valid:
• 0000h: no error
• 1000h: global error
• 8130h: Lifeguard or Heartbeat Error
In case of a Heartbeat Consumer error, the node ID of the
failing node is transmitted in the manufacturer-specific
error code field.
7.9.2 Error Register
The Error Register (byte field 2) can contain the following values:
• 81h:
Occurrence of a manufacturer-specific error
• 01h:
Occurrence of a common error
• 00h:
Error has been eliminated - error reset
7.10 Status LEDs
The present state of the CANopen IO-C12 module is displayed
through the both status LEDs RUN and ERROR at runtime.
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CANopen IO-C12
The function of the LEDs are defined according to the CiA standard
DR303-3 V1.0. Please refer to the standard to get further information.
7.10.1 RUN LED
The green RUN LED indicates the general state of the module
(according to the CANopen network state-diagram).
Table 22 describes the possible LED modes and their meaning.
RUN Led
Alternate blinking
with the ERROR
LED
Single Flash
Blinking
On
Synchronous fast
blinking cycle
togeter with the
ERROR Led
State
LSS Access
Description
There is a LSS Service running.
STOPPED
PREOPERATIONAL
OPERATIONAL
The module is in state STOPPED
The module is in state
PRE-OPERATIONAL
The module is in state Zustand
OPERATIONAL
There is an invalid configuration
selected on the DIP-Switch.
Configuration error1
Table 22: States of the RUN LED
7.10.2 ERROR Led
The red Error LED indicates the error states of the CANopen IO-C12
unit with the following possible modes:
ERROR Led
OFF
Single Flash
Alternate
blinking with
RUN Led
1
State
No error
Description
The module operates within nominal
parameters.
Warning Limit reached The CAN controller internal warning
limit was reached. (to many errorframes on CAN bus).
LSS Access
There is a LSS Service running.
This state is a SYS TEC specific Add-On and not defined in the DR303-3 standard
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Double Flash
Error Control Event
ON
Bus Off
Synchronous
Configuration error 1
short blinking
cycle with RUN
Led
An error in Lifeguard, Nodeguard or
Heartbeat was detected.
The CAN controller is in state "Bus
Off".
There is an invalid configuration
selected on the DIP-Switch.
Table 23: States of the ERROR LED
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Operations in the Event of Errors
8 Operations in the Event of Errors
8.1 State of the CANopen IO-C12 in the Event of Errors
The object dictionary entry "Error Behaviour" at index [1029] can be
used to define which state the CANopen IO-C12 should transfer to in
case of an error.
The following entries at index 1029 subindex 1 (communication
error) are possible:
0:
1:
2:
change state to PRE-OPERATIONAL
do not change state
change state to STOPPED
These settings over all possible error sources described in sections
7.9.1 . The entries Output Error (subindex 2) and Input Error
(subindex 3) are not supported.
8.2 Output Handling in the Event of Errors
The user can determine how each output is supposed to behave in the
event of an error. On digital outputs, error handling can be predefined via the objects:
[6206H] (“Error_Mode_Output_8-Bit“) and
[6207H] ("Error_Value_Output_8-Bit").
On analog outputs, error handling can be pre-defined via the objects :
[6443H] ("Analogue Error Output Mode") and
[6444H] ("Analogue Output Error Value Integer")
These entries can be configured by means of a network configuration
tool. In the default configuration, the outputs do not change their
states in the event of an error.
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CANopen IO-C12
A "1" at the Bitposition of the corresponding output in objekt
[6206H] and [6443H] causes a write operation of the values in object
[6207H] and [6444H] to the corresponding outputs.
Example for digital outputs:
Index Subindex
6206 1
6207 1
Table 24:
DO 3
0
X
DO 2
0
X
DO 1
1
0
DO 0
1
1
Description
Error Mode Output 8-bit
Error Value Output 8-b
Example for Error Handling
In the event of an error, the digital output DO 0 is set to 1 while DO 1
is set to 0. The status of the outputs OUT2 and OUT3 remain
unchanged.
8.3 Changing from Error State to Normal Operation
In the event of an error, the outputs retain their active values until
overwritten (by means of PDO/SDO) by new output values. This
requires that the error, such as “Bus Off” or “Life-Guarding” error, is
eliminated and the CANopen IO-C12 be switched into Operational
state by a Master “Start_Remote_Node” message.
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CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary
9 CANopen IO-C12 Object Dictionary
Index
[hex]
1000
1001
1003
1005
1007
1008
1009
100A
100C
100D
1010
1011
1014
1016
1017
1018
1029
1400
1401
1402
1600
1601
1602
1800
1801
1802
1A00
1A01
1A02
6000
6005
6006
6007
6008
6200
6206
6207
6401
6410
6421
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Objekt
Name
Data Type
Var
Var
Array
Var
Var
Var
Var
Var
Var
Var
Array
Array
Var
Array
Var
Record
Array
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Record
Array
Var
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Array
Device typ
Error register
Pre-defined erroro field
Identifier SYNC
SYNC window length
Manufacturer device name
Manufacturer Hardware Version
Manufacturer Software Version
Guard Time
Life Time Factor
Store parameter
Restore parameter
Identifier Emergency
Consumer heartbeat time
Producer heartbeat time
Identity object
Error behaviour
Receive PDO 0 Communication Parameter
Receive PDO 1 Communication Parameter
Receive PDO 2 Communication Parameter
Receive PDO 0 Mapping Parameter
Receive PDO 1 Mapping Parameter
Receive PDO 2 Mapping Parameter
Transmit PDO 0 Communication Parameter
Transmit PDO 1 Communication Parameter
Transmit PDO 2 Communication Parameter
Transmit PDO 0 Mapping Parameter
Transmit PDO 1 Mapping Parameter
Transmit PDO 2 Mapping Parameter
Read input 8 bit
Globaler Interrupt Enable Digital 8 Bit
Interrupt Mask Any Change 8 Bit
Interrupt Mask Low-to-High 8 Bit
Interrupt Mask High-to-Low 8 Bit
Write Output 8 Bit
Error Mode Output 8 Bit
Error Value Output 8 Bit
Read Analogue Input 16 Bit
Write Analogue Output 8 Bit
Analogue Input Interrupt Trigger Selection
Unsigned32
Unsigned8
Unsigned32
Unsigned32
Unsigned32
String
String
String
Unsigned16
Unsigned8
Unsigned32
Unsigned32
Unsigned32
Unsigned32
Unsigned16
Identity
Unsigned8
PDOComPar
PDOComPar
PDOComPar
PDOMapping
PDOMapping
PDOMapping
PDOComPar
PDOComPar
PDOComPar
PDOMapping
PDOMapping
PDOMapping
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Unsigned8
Integer16
Integer8
Unsigned8
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CANopen IO-C12
6422
6423
6424
Array
Var
Array
6425
Array
6426
6443
6444
Array
Array
Array
Analogue Input Interrupt Source
Analogue Input Global Interrupt Enable
Analogue Input Interrupt Upper Limit
Integer
Analogue Input Interrupt Lower Limit
Integer
Analogue Input Interrupt Delta Unsigned
Analogue Output Error Mode
Analogue Output Error Value Integer
Unsigned32
Unsigned8
Integer32
Integer32
Unsigned32
Unsigned8
Integer32
Table 25 : Object Dictionary of the CANopen IO-C12 module
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Revision History of this Document
Revision History of this Document
German Manual
Date
Manual Version
Changes
04/22/2004
Handbuch L-1046d_1 Initial manual
English Manual
Date
Manual Version
Changes
04/23/2004
Manual L-1046e_1
Initial translation based on L-1046d_1
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Index
Index
1000...........................................47
1001...........................................47
1003.....................................42, 47
1005...........................................47
1008...........................................47
1009...........................................47
100A ..........................................47
100B ..........................................47
100C ..........................................47
100D ..........................................47
1029...........................................65
1400h.........................................36
1800h.........................................36
6000h.........................................39
6200h.........................................39
6206...........................................65
6207...........................................65
6421...........................................57
6422...........................................58
6423...........................................58
6424...........................................58
6425...........................................58
6426...........................................59
Array..........................................34
Base Identifier ...........................45
Board Configuration ...............14
Bus Off ......................................66
CAL...........................................29
CAN Application Layer ............29
CAN Bitrate ..............................14
CAN Bus Cable........................16
CAN Identifier ..........................22
CAN in Automation e.V......27, 33
CAN Interface....................16, 19
CAN Message ...........................22
CANopen Advantages...............28
CANopen Features ....................28
CiA DS 401 ...............................32
CiA DSP 402.............................32
L-1046e_1
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
CiA DSP 404 .............................32
CiA DSP 405 .............................32
CiA DSP 406 .............................32
CiA DSP 410 .............................32
CMS...........................................29
COB...........................................29
Communication Profile ...........34
Connector description.............11
DBT ...........................................29
DBT-Master...............................47
Defstruct ....................................34
Deftyp ........................................34
Delta Function ...........................59
Device Name .............................47
Device Profiles..........................34
Device Type...............................47
DIP-Switch ...............................14
Domain ......................................34
Domains.....................................29
Dummy16 ..................................40
E2PROM....................................53
EEPROM.....................................9
EMC ............................................7
Emergency.................................42
Emergency Message..................59
Emergency Object .....................42
Enter_Pre_Operational_State ....21
Error Code .................................60
Error Handling ........................42
ERROR Led.............................61
Error Message............................42
Error Register ............................60
Events ........................................29
FUJITSU MB90F543 ..................9
FULL CAN Controller ................9
Guard-Time ...............................47
Handshaking..............................35
Hardware Version......................47
Heardbeat Producer................43
CANopen IO-C12
Heartbeat ................................. 43
Heartbeat Consumer .............. 44
Heartbeat Message .................... 43
HEX-encoding Switch............. 15
Index ......................................... 39
Inhibit Time ........................ 36, 38
Interrupt Enable ........................ 58
Interrupt Trigger........................ 57
Interrupt_Lower_Limit ............. 59
Interrupt_Source ....................... 58
Interrupt_Upper_Limit.............. 59
Introduction............................... 9
ISO 11898 ................................. 33
Lifeguarding.............................. 23
Life-Guarding ..................... 42, 66
Life-Time-Factor....................... 47
LMT .......................................... 30
Load_Start................................. 53
Lower Limit .............................. 58
Mapping Entry .......................... 39
Message Identifier..................... 36
Microcontroller ........................... 9
Minimum Boot-Up.................... 21
Multiplexed Domain Protocol... 35
Network Management............... 42
NMT.................................... 29, 42
NMT-Master ....................... 29, 42
NMT-Slave ............................... 29
Node Address.......... 15, 22, 44, 47
Nodeguarding............................ 23
Node-Guarding ......................... 52
Object Dictionary................ 30, 47
OD............................................. 30
Open Networking System ......... 33
Operational.......................... 45, 52
PDO............................... 30, 36, 39
PDO Mapping.......................... 22
PDO Mapping Tables ............... 40
PDO-Mapping ......................... 39
Pin assignment......................... 11
pinout ....................................... 10
Power Supply........................... 19
Power-On ............................ 52, 54
Pre_Operational .................. 45, 52
Pre-Defined Error Field ............ 47
Pre-defined Identifier ................ 44
Priority Group ........................... 38
Process Data Object .................. 30
Process Data Objects ........ 36, 48
QuickStart................................ 21
Receipt Objects ......................... 36
Record ....................................... 34
Reset ......................................... 23
Reset_Communication .............. 46
RESTART ................................. 53
RTR-Bit..................................... 23
RUN Led ................................... 61
S1 .............................................. 14
Save_ Start ................................ 53
SDO............................... 30, 35, 39
Service Data Objects ........... 30, 35
Shut-Down ............................... 21
Software Version....................... 47
Start_Remote_Node ............ 21, 45
Start-Up.................................... 21
Status LEDs............................... 61
Stop_Remote_Node .................. 46
STOPPED ................................. 52
Subindex.................................... 39
Technical Highlights ................. 9
Technical Specification ........... 17
Transmission Objects ................ 36
Transmission Types................... 38
Upper Limit............................... 58
Var............................................. 34
Variables ................................... 29
© SYS TEC electronic GmbH 2004
L-1046e_1
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CANopen IO-C12
Document number: L-1046e_1, Edition April 2004
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