Waterloo rules - Treefrog Games

Waterloo rules - Treefrog Games
‘Waterloo’ is a two player wargame recreating the famous battle of the
18th June 1815. One player will control the French army while the
other will control the allies, made up of British, Germans, Dutch, and
Prussians. The game should take three to four hours to complete.
This is by far the most complicated rule book that I have had to write,
even more involved than ‘Brass’. I apologise now for any minor errors
or unusual situations that are not covered. I like to write an overview of
play to help give an idea of the flow of the game, however, in this case
space does not allow me to do so. About ninety percent of the rules are
contained on the Player Aid card. It’s worth studying that to gain an
understanding of the game. If you have any difficulties you can contact
me at [email protected] or check the Warfrog website,
www.warfroggames.com for a faq. Hopefully those that persist with the
rules will actually find that the game is not actually that complicated,
just a bit different from the normal wargame.
Martin Wallace
Components
As well as one rule book, two identical Player Aid Cards, a cloth bag, and a playing board you should also have the following wooden pieces:
17 French infantry
pieces
6 French Imperial
Guard pieces
14 French
cavalry
pieces
4 French
leader
pieces
8 British
infantry pieces
6 Prussian
Landwehr
infantry pieces
6 British
cavalry
pieces
2 German
cavalry
pieces
2 Dutch
cavalry
pieces
4 Prussian
artillery
pieces
2 British
leader
pieces
2 Prussian
leader
pieces
6 British
artillery
pieces
1 turn marker
4 dice
9 German infantry
pieces
40 French
damage cubes
16 green
action discs
8 numbered tiles
Numbered 2 to 5, with
two of each number
1
2 French
Imperial guard
cavalry pieces
3 Dutch infantry
pieces
25 Allied damage
cubes
9 French
artillery pieces
4 Prussian line
infantry pieces
4 Prussian
cavalry
pieces
15 Prussian
damage cubes
8 red action
discs
4 purple action
discs
6 Allied
square
markers
4 French
square
markers
The Board
French player
keeps track of
action discs here.
Unit symbols
indicate which
forces will start
in the area.
French player keeps
track of the number
of times he has used
the Grand Battery by
removing cubes from
this box.
Turn track.
Entry areas.
The entry of Prussian
units can be delayed
by placing them in
this box.
Indicates which entry
areas the units to the
right can enter via.
Prussian units should be placed as
indicated, e.g. one leader is placed
in the first box, two cavalry units in
the second box, two infantry units
in the next, and so on.
Allied player keeps
track of action
discs here.
Starting the game
The players should agree which side they will play and take a set of
units. There is one set of French pieces and one set of Allied pieces.
Note that within each set there are a variety of coloured units, i.e. the
Allied set consists of red British, green German, orange Dutch, and
black and grey Prussian units. Although Prussian units are controlled
by the Allied player they are still an independent force and have their
own damage cubes. It is also the case that Prussian casualties do not
count towards the Allied total for determining whether the French
player has achieved his victory conditions.
Units, including leaders, should be placed on the board as indicated
by the unit symbols marked in the areas.
All French units should be placed upright. All Allied infantry units
should be placed on their sides, while the remaining cavalry, artillery,
and leader units should be placed upright. All Prussian units should be
placed on the Prussian display.
The French player should place six blue damage cubes in the Grand
Battery box. These cubes are used to keep track of how many times
Grand Battery fire is used.
Action discs, dice and cubes should be placed by the side of the board.
Place the turn marker on the 12 noon space of the Turn Track.
Place the eight numbered tiles into the cloth bag.
EXAMPLE: The Allied player would place
one British infantry, one Dutch infantry,
one artillery, and one leader in this area.
The infantry units will start on their sides.
2
Playing the Game
The game ‘Waterloo’ is played over nine turns. Each turn represents
one hour of time. A single turn consists of a number of phases, as
described below:
1. Take action discs
2. Prussians
3. Skirmish fire
4. Player action rounds
5. Formation changes
6. Check victory conditions
7. End of turn
These phases will now be explained in more detail.
Phase one: Take action discs
The French player places eight green, four red, and two purple action
discs in his ‘Available Actions’ box. During the first four turns the Allied
player places five green and two red action discs in his ‘Available
Actions’ box. From 4pm onwards this number is increased to eight
green, four red, and two purple action discs. Unused action discs
from previous turns are not carried over.
Phase two: Prussians
From 3pm onwards a random number of Prussian units will enter the
board. The Allied player rolls one die. He then takes a number of units
equal to the die roll from those on the Prussian display and places them
in the entry areas indicated. If a ‘1’ is rolled then it should be changed
to a ‘2’. A full explanation of these rules is given later.
Phase three: Skirmish fire
All infantry units, both French and Allied, can fire at enemy units in
adjacent areas. The Allied player resolves skirmish fire first. Each
infantry unit can fire once and the effect of each fire must be resolved
one unit at a time. Units in the same area can choose to fire into
different adjacent areas. The controlling player must state which
adjacent area the infantry unit is firing into. Roll one die for the firing
unit. A hit is scored on a roll of ‘6’. No modifiers are applied for terrain
or damage cubes. If there are one or more infantry units in the target
area then place one damage cube for each hit inflicted.
If there are no infantry units but there are cavalry then for each hit
inflicted the player controlling the cavalry must decide whether to
retreat a cavalry unit or place it on its side, thus becoming tired. If all
of the cavalry units in the area are tired then a hit will force one of
them to retreat. If all of the cavalry units in an area retreat from it then
any further hits are scored against any artillery in the area. If there are
no artillery units in the area then any further hits are wasted. Any
cavalry units that perform a retreat must obey the rules on retreat
detailed later in these rules.
If the only units in the area are artillery units then each hit will inflict
one damage cube. The number of damage cubes in the area cannot
exceed the number of artillery units, any further hits are wasted.
After the Allied player has resolved all of his skirmish fire the French
player resolves his skirmish fire.
3
SKIRMISH FIRE EXAMPLE
On the very first turn units will be positioned as shown above. In this
section three Allied units can fire. The German in La Haye Sainte can fire
at the area containing the two French artillery units. He rolls a ‘5’, which
misses. The German and British units in Hougoumont have a choice of
areas to fire at. The player decides to fire at one of the areas containing
infantry units. He rolls a ‘6’ and a ‘2’ which is one hit. A French damage
cube is placed in the area. The French player now fires with his infantry
units. The six infantry units adjacent to Hougoumont can only fire into that
area. The French player rolls six dice, one of which is a ‘6’. An Allied
damage cube is placed in Hougoumont.
Phase four: Player action rounds
This is the core of each turn and as such has to be dealt with in much
more detail, which occurs later on in these rules.
Phase five: Formation changes
The Allied player can now decide whether he wishes to change the
formation of any of his infantry and artillery units. After the Allied player
has made any formation changes the French player then has the
opportunity to change the status of any of his infantry and artillery
units. There is no upper limit to the number of units that can change
formation. These formation changes do not cost any action discs.
Phase six: Check victory conditions
Both players should check to see if they have achieved their victory
conditions explained in detail at the end of the rule book. If one player
has achieved his victory conditions then the game ends immediately.
Otherwise the game continues, unless it is the final turn, in which case
the game ends.
Phase seven: End of turn
Move the turn marker one space along the Turn Track. Make sure all
action discs are removed from the board.
Useful stuff to know – part one
Unit formations
Each unit can be standing upright or on its side. Which position it is
in represents the unit’s formation. What this formation represents
depends on the type of unit.
An upright infantry unit is in a mobile formation and is able to move
and assault. An infantry unit on its side is in a defensive formation and
it not allowed to move or assault. However, it will automatically switch
to square formation if charged by enemy cavalry. To indicate that an
infantry unit is in square formation a square piece should be placed
under it.
An upright artillery unit is deployed and ready to fire. If an artillery unit
moves then it is placed on its side after movement. An artillery unit on
its side cannot fire if activated by the Fire Artillery action. It can still fire
defensively. An artillery unit on its side can still move.
An upright cavalry unit is a fresh unit. A cavalry unit on its side is tired.
A tired cavalry unit can never become fresh again. A fresh cavalry unit
will become tired if a hit is scored against it by an artillery or infantry
unit or when it is defeated by an enemy cavalry unit. If a tired unit
suffers any of the above then it is usually eliminated.
An upright leader is one who is available for activation. If a player
uses an action to activate him he becomes used and should be placed
on his side. He will become available for use again in the next round
of actions.
Infantry and artillery formations can be changed at a number of points
in the game. At the start of a player’s round he has the opportunity to
change the formation of as many units as he wishes. Both sides can
change the formation of units in phase five, after each player has
completed all of their actions. Players can also use an action disc to
change the formation of units in an area.
Player action rounds
This is the heart of the game, and as such will take up the bulk of these
rules. This phase will consist of a variable number of action rounds.
The player with the initiative will be the active player first.
Initiative – Until 7pm the French player holds the initiative, which
means he will be the active player first. If at the start of the 7pm turn
the French player holds all three strong points, (Hougoumont, La Haye
Sainte, Papelotte & Smohain), then he will remain the first player,
otherwise the Allied player gains the initiative and becomes the active
player first in the 7pm and 8pm turns. There is no marker to show who
has initiative, you just have to remember who has it. Once initiative
has switched to the Allied player it will not switch back.
Action Round Sequence – An action round consists of the following
sub-phases:
Draw tile
Formation changes
Perform actions
Move action discs
Switch roles
The above sequence is then repeated with player roles reversed. The
phase only ends when it comes to a player’s turn to start his action
round and he has no green actions discs available to use. At this point
play proceeds to phase five.
Draw tile – The non-active player draws one numbered tile from the
bag. He keeps its value secret from the active player.
Formation changes – The active player can change the formation of
as many infantry and artillery units as he wishes. This is a good time
to take units out of square formation. These changes do not cost any
action discs. All leaders should be returned to their upright position.
Perform actions – The active player now carries out his actions. Each
single action requires the expenditure of one action disc. An action
must be completed before the next action can be taken. The active
player must move the expended action disc from the ‘Available Actions’
box to the ‘Actions Used this Round’ box. He must make it clear to the
non-active player what action he has performed.
The actions that a player will be able to perform are explained in more
detail in the section on Actions.
player when he has used his allocation of actions. The active player
can only perform a number of actions equal to the value on the
numbered tile drawn by the non-active player, or until he expends
all of his action discs.
Move action discs – The active player must move all action discs
from the ‘Actions used this round’ box to the ‘Actions used in previous
rounds’ box. The numbered tile should be placed back in the bag.
Switch roles – The non-active player becomes the active player and
the active player becomes the non-active player. If the new active player
has one or more green action discs available then repeat the above
stages, (with the exception of Initiative). If the new active player has
no green action discs available then this phase ends immediately and
play proceeds to phase five. Note that the other player may still have
unused green action discs. He will not be able to use them, nor do
they carry over to the next turn.
EXAMPLE OF A PLAYER ACTION ROUND
The French player has the initiative in the first turn, he will be the active
player first. The Allied player draws a tile from the bag. It is a ‘3’. He does
not show the tile to
the French player.
The French player
performs three
actions, one at a time.
As he performs each
action he moves a disc
from the bottom to
the middle box. After
completing the third
action the Allied
player informs him
that he has had his
allocation of actions.
The French player
then moves the three
action discs to the
top box.
The non-active player has the responsibility of informing the active
4
More on Perform Actions
Terrain Effects on Movement
Each player starts the turn with a certain number of green, red and
purple action discs in their respective ‘Available Actions’ boxes.
Terrain is handled in more detail later on in these rules. Cavalry is the
only unit whose movement is affected by terrain. Cavalry must stop as
soon as it enters a wood, town or river area.
When a player is the active player he will be able to expend between
two and five of these action discs, depending on the numbered tile
drawn by the non-active player.
Wood
Town
River
One action disc can be expended to activate one area. All of the units in
that area can then carry out the same action. It may be that only some
units wish, or are able, to perform that action. This is fine, as long as all
of the units that do perform an action perform the same action.
A unit can be activated more than once in an action round. Only leaders
have a limit on the number of times that their leadership can be used in
an action round, which is once per action round.
An action disc can also be used to activate a leader, who in turn can
activate two areas, or the same area twice. See the section on Leaders
for more details.
If a green action disc is expended then some or all of the units in the
activated area can perform any of the actions described below. If a red
action disc is expended then only the Assault action can be performed
by units in the area. If a purple action disc is expended then only
Reserve Movement can be performed by units in the area.
CLOSE CONTACT MOVEMENT EXAMPLE
The French player
is active.
Here we can see the
initial positions of the
French units.
ACTIONS
The actions that can be performed are:
Close contact movement
Reserve movement
Fire artillery
Assault
Change formation
Reinforce
Do nothing
ACTION Close contact movement
The expenditure of one green disc allows a player to move some or all
of the units in one area. The activated units can move up to their full
movement allowance. They cannot enter enemy occupied areas. They
may enter areas adjacent to enemy occupied areas. If more than one
unit is moved they do not have to move to the same area.
An infantry unit can move one area. Only upright infantry units can
move, i.e. those in mobile formation.
Artillery can move one area. After moving the unit should be placed on
its side. A unit already on its side can still be moved. Artillery units that
are un-manned cannot move. An artillery unit is un-manned if there are
no infantry units in the area and it has a damage cube assigned to it.
A cavalry unit can move up to two areas. The status, (formation), of
the unit has no effect on its movement rate. A cavalry unit must stop
moving if it enters a wood, town, or river area.
A leader can be moved up to three areas. He cannot end up in an area
containing another leader. He can move whether he has already been
activated this turn or not. His ‘formation’ remains unchanged.
If a player wishes to move an infantry unit from an area containing
damage cubes then that unit may have to take some or all of them
with it. If it is the only infantry unit in the area then it takes all of the
damage cubes with it when it moves. If there is more than one infantry
unit in the area then before moving the controlling player must assign
damage cubes to infantry units. After assigning damage cubes the
active player can move the infantry unit, moving any cubes assigned to
it along with it. See below for more details on assigning damage cubes.
5
The French player
activates his leader,
using one green action
disc. This allowed him
to activate two areas.
He chooses to activate
the area the leader is in
and an adjacent one.
He moves the units as
shown to the right.
As the leader has been
used he is placed on his
side. Note that the player has exceeded the area limit in one of the areas he
has moved into. This is legal and no penalty will be imposed as long as this
situation changes before the end of his action round.
The French player is
lucky and is able to
continue to perform
another action. He
activates one area with
one green action disc
and moves the units as
shown. Note that the
leader cannot be used
again in this action
round.
Useful stuff to know – part two
Area unit limits
An area can contain up to three combat units, (infantry, cavalry, and
artillery are all combat units), and one leader, without any penalties
being incurred.
up the deficit. If there are only artillery units in the area then for
each unit over the area limit one damage cube should be placed in
the area.
This limit can be broken during an action round. A player can have
as many units in an area as he wishes but if at the end of his action
round he has exceeded the area limit then he will suffer a penalty.
If there are infantry units in the area then one damage cube per
additional, over-the-limit unit is placed in the area. If there are no
infantry units in the area but there are one or more cavalry units then
for each combat unit over the limit a cavalry unit must become tired,
or if already tired, eliminated. If it is not possible to tire/eliminate the
correct number of units then place damage cubes in the area to make
British, Dutch, German, and Prussian units can exist in the same area.
ACTION Reserve movement
The expenditure of one green or one purple action disc allows a player
to move some or all of the units in one area. Those units that do move
may move up to twice their normal movement rate, (infantry and
artillery would be able to move up to two areas, cavalry up to four
areas, and leaders up to six areas). However, no moving unit can move
into an area adjacent to an enemy occupied area. Units that start
adjacent to an enemy occupied area cannot perform Reserve
Movement. Note that an area containing only un-manned enemy
artillery units still counts as an enemy occupied area.
EXAMPLE: If there were three infantry and two cavalry units in an area
then two damage cubes would be placed in the area. If there was one
cavalry unit and four artillery units in an area then the cavalry unit would
first become tired and then be eliminated. If the cavalry unit was already
tired then it would be eliminated and one damage cube would be
placed in the area.
ACTION Fire artillery
The expenditure of one green disc allows a player to fire with all of the
upright artillery units in one area. An artillery unit may fire more than
once in an action round.
An artillery unit can fire at enemy units up to three areas away. If more
than one artillery unit is firing then they can fire at different areas. The
controlling player must state which areas are to be fired at before
rolling for hits.
Artillery line of sight
When a player selects an area to fire at he must trace a line of sight
that uses the shortest distance, measured in areas. Artillery cannot fire
through an area that contains woods, a town, a strong point, or one
or more combat units. A leader does not block line of sight. If there is
more than one possible line of sight then the firing player chooses
which he wishes to use.
A ridge line may block line of sight. If the firing artillery is in an area
that a ridge line borders then its line of sight is not blocked by the ridge
line. If the artillery is in an area not bordered by the ridge line it wishes
to fire across then it can only fire into areas that ridge line borders.
Any units or strong point in a low ground area do not block the line
of sight of artillery units firing from an open ground area. Artillery
may fire out of a low ground area but line of sight will be blocked by
combat units or terrain in either low or open ground areas. Un-manned
artillery cannot fire.
Terrain effects on ranged artillery fire
Open ground: no effect.
EXAMPLE: Initial positions are shown in top image. The active player
expends one purple action disc and activates the area shown. The artillery
unit is placed on its side as it has moved. It can still be moved in later
actions but cannot fire until set upright again. The leader remains upright
as he was not used to activate the area. He will be available to use in the
same action round to allow two areas to be activated. No unit moved
adjacent to Hougoumont, which would not be allowed with reserve
movement as it is an enemy occupied area.
Low ground: units or terrain in low ground
do not block the line of sight of artillery in
non-low ground.
Strong Point: Blocks line of sight. -2 modifier
if all target infantry units in the area have the
benefit of the strong point.
6
Woods: Blocks line of sight. -2 modifier.
✓
✓
Town: Blocks line of sight. -2 modifier.
✓
✗
✗
✓
✓
River: -1 modifier, ground is regarded as
muddy, which stops the cannonballs from
bouncing.
✓
LINE OF SIGHT EXAMPLE TWO
In this example the artillery unit has a clear line of sight to Hougoumont
and the British unit between Hougoumont and La Haye Sainte. The reason
for this is that a number of shortest pathways can be traced to each area,
and as long as one of them is not blocked there is a clear line of sight.
The line of sight to the British unit beyond La Haye Saint is blocked by the
strong point. Note that the artillery unit now has a clear line of sight to the
Dutch unit near Mont St. Jean, as the artillery unit is in an area bordered
by the ridge line that was blocking it in example one.
Ridge Line: Blocks line of sight to units that
are not in the area adjacent to the ridge line,
i.e. those units that are further back.
-2 modifier.
Sunken Road: -1 modifier if line of sight
crosses the boundary marked by the sunken
road and the target is in the area bordered
by the road.
Artillery versus infantry fire
Target preference
Artillery must always fire at infantry if it is present in the target area.
If there are no infantry units in the area then it must fire at any cavalry
units present in the area. If there are no cavalry units present then it
must fire at any artillery units in the area. Artillery can never fire at
a leader.
The Artillery vs Infantry Fire Table is used to determine the result of
artillery fire against infantry units.
The range to the target determines which column should be used.
The firing player rolls one die. The number rolled should be modified
depending on the circumstances.
Add one if the target is in square formation.
Subtract one if the target is in a river area.
Subtract two if the target is in a wood or town area.
✓
✓
✗
✓
✓
✗
✓
Subtract one if the firing unit is British artillery, (red).
Subtract two if all infantry have the benefit of a strong point.
Subtract two if the target is in an area that borders a ridge line
and the firing artillery is not in an adjacent area to the target.
✗
LINE OF SIGHT EXAMPLE ONE
The French artillery unit has a clear line of sight to all targets marked with
a tick. It does not have a clear line of sight to targets marked with a cross.
Line of sight to the Dutch unit in the woods is blocked by the French
infantry unit. Line of sight to the other Dutch unit, close to Mont St Jean,
is blocked by the ridge line. The line of sight to the British infantry unit
beyond Hougoumont is blocked by the wood in Hougoumont and the
other British unit.
Note that the German unit in La Haye Sainte or the French unit in the area
to its left do not block the line of sight of the artillery unit as the artillery is
in open ground while these two units are in low ground.
7
Subtract one if the target is in an area that the sunken road
runs through.
All modifiers are cumulative.
Cross reference the final value with the correct range column.The
resulting box indicates how many damage cubes should be placed
in the area.
An unmodified die roll of ‘6’ always results in at least one damage
cube being inflicted, i.e. a ‘6’ is always a hit, no matter what the
modifiers are.
Artillery versus cavalry fire
Artillery vs Infantry Fire Table
Range
0
1
2
3
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
–
Modified d6 roll
0
3
4
–
5
Die Modifiers
+1 if target in square formation
-1 if target in river area
-1 if target behind sunken road
-1 if the artillery is British
-2 if target in woods or town
-2 if target behind ridge line
-2 if target in strong point and
in defensive formation
A ‘6’ always inflicts at least one
point of damage. Modifiers are
cumulative.
6+
EXAMPLES OF RANGED ARTILLERY FIRE
The numbers required to hit each potential target are shown on the right.
Note that the artillery unit still has a 1 in 6 chance of hitting the unit in
Hougoumont, even though the combined modifiers would mean more
than a ‘6’ was required, ‘6’ is always a hit.
6
3
5
6
6
6
If there are no infantry units in the target area then artillery fire must be
directed against any cavalry units in the area. Do not use the Artillery vs
Infantry Fire Table. Roll one die for each firing artillery unit. A roll of ‘5’
or ‘6’ results in a hit. No modifiers are applied to this die roll. If a hit is
scored then the defending player must choose whether he tires a fresh
cavalry or retreats. A tired unit must retreat if hit. The defending player
decides how any hits should be applied to cavalry units in the area.
If surplus hits are scored then they will register against any artillery in
the area. Otherwise they have no effect.
Artillery versus artillery fire
Artillery can only fire against artillery if there are no infantry or cavalry in
the area. Do not use the Artillery vs Infantry Fire Table. Roll one die for
each firing artillery unit. A roll of a ‘6’ results in a hit. No modifiers are
applied to this die roll. Each hit will result in a damage cube being
placed in the area. Each defending artillery unit can only receive one
damage cube. This represents the guns becoming unmanned. If surplus
hits are scored against the area then the additional hits have no effect.
Artillery can never eliminate an artillery unit.
French Grand Battery fire
If the French player chooses the Fire Artillery action then he can also
choose to use Grand Battery fire. This does not cost an extra action.
Each artillery unit fires twice instead of once. A unit must direct both
of its fires against the same area. When the French player selects this
option he must remove one of his damage cubes from the Grand
Battery box. This option can only be taken six times in the entire game.
Once there are no more cubes in the Grand Battery box then the French
player cannot perform Grand Battery fire. Grand Battery fire may be
used more than once in the same action round.
ACTION Assault
One green or red disc can be expended to allow some or all of the
units in one area to assault. This is the only time that a red disc can
be expended to activate an area. Each assaulting unit can move its
full movement rate, (Close Contact Movement rate), but must end its
movement in an area containing enemy units. Only infantry and cavalry
may assault. Artillery can never take part in an attack, nor can it be
moved in the same action.
Cavalry units must stop and assault in the first enemy occupied areas
they enter.
4
5
3
4
Once all assaulting units have finished moving assault combat must be
resolved in each area that it will occur. If there is more than one assault
then the active player determines the order in which assaults are
resolved.
The units that move into the area will be termed the assaulting units.
The units that started in the area will be termed the defending units.
Although this sounds obvious it may occur that the player who has
performed the assault could end up defending against a cavalry
counter-charge.
Assaults are resolved within areas that contain opposing units. The
assault process consists of seven separate steps. Each step must be
completed before the next step. Some steps will be skipped if the
situation in question does not apply. Once a step has been completed
you never return to it in the same assault. Once all seven steps have
been completed play proceeds with the next area where assault
combat requires resolution. Continue in this manner until all assaults
have been resolved.
8
EXAMPLE Here the
French player uses a
leader to activate two
areas containing
French infantry units,
who all assault into
the same area. All
units complete their
move before assault
If the losing cavalry unit was fresh then it becomes tired and
retreats to an adjacent area, (see rules on retreating).
If the losing unit was tired then it is eliminated.
Repeat the above procedure until only cavalry units belonging to
one player remain in the area. A unit can be selected repeatedly to
charge/counter-charge during this step.
Step three – infantry vs infantry combat
If the assaulting and defending forces both contain infantry units then
infantry vs infantry combat will occur.
These will now be explained in more detail. Examples of assault combat
are then given.
Step one – defending artillery fire
All defending artillery units fire once. Artillery units that are not upright
can still fire. The only potential targets are those enemy units which are
assaulting.
If there are one or more assaulting infantry units then defending artillery
fires against them using the zero range column of the Artillery versus
Infantry Fire table. No terrain modifiers are applied. The only modifier
that may apply is the -1 modifier for British artillery.
If there are only cavalry units in the assaulting force then each
defending artillery unit fires once. A roll of 5 or 6 results in a hit. A hit
will tire a fresh unit or eliminate a tired unit. The assaulting player
decides how any hits should be allocated. Note that a cavalry unit
cannot retreat/withdraw to avoid such a hit, as would be possible with
skirmish fire or ranged artillery fire.
The French player can never use Grand Battery fire in defence.
Step two – cavalry vs cavalry combat
If the assaulting force contains one or more cavalry units and there are
one or more defending cavalry units then all cavalry units will engage
each other in combat.
The assaulting player selects one of his cavalry units to charge with.
The defending player selects one of his cavalry units to counter-charge
with. Each player rolls one die. The result of a player’s die roll may be
modified, as follows:
Add one if the cavalry unit is an Imperial Guard unit, (dark blue).
Subtract one if the cavalry unit is tired.
Subtract one if the cavalry is Dutch, (orange).
Subtract one if cavalry assaulted from an adjacent area that is a
town, woods, or river.
The player with the highest result wins the engagement. In the case
of a tie both players roll again, and will continue to do so until there
is a result.
9
Infantry vs Infantry Fire Table
0
–
1
–
2 M
3
4
5
6+
Morale check for targets
Step 1 – Defending Artillery fire
Step 2 – Cavalry vs Cavalry combat
Step 3 – Infantry vs Infantry combat
Step 4 – Cavalry vs Infantry combat
Step 5 – Cavalry vs Artillery combat
Step 6 – Infantry vs Artillery combat
Step 7 – Cavalry Control Checks
Before each round of firing the firing player must decide how to assign
any damage cubes present in the area between his units.
Modified d6 roll
There are seven steps in assault combat. Each step must be completed
before the next step is resolved. In most cases a number of steps will
not apply and can be skipped. The steps are:
All defending infantry units fire once, using the Infantry vs Infantry
Fire table.
Die Modifiers
+1 if target in square formation
+1 if firing infantry is British
-1 for every 2 damage cubes
-1 if firer in square formation
-1 if target in strong point and in
defensive formation
An unmodified ‘6’ always inflicts at least
one point of damage.
The Infantry vs Infantry Fire table only has one column. When a unit fires
the controlling player rolls one die. The number on it may be modified,
as follows:
Add one if one or more of the target units is in square formation.
Add one if the firing unit is a British infantry unit, (red).
Subtract one for every two damage cubes assigned to the firing unit.
Subtract one if the firing unit is in square formation.
Subtract one if all of the target units are within a strong point and in
defensive formation.
Modifiers are cumulative.
An un-modified roll of ‘6’ always results in at least one damage
cube being inflicted.
All non-firing infantry units must make a morale check if the result of
the infantry fire was an ‘M’ or one or more damage cubes. A morale
check should also be made even if no such result was achieved but
damage cubes were inflicted by artillery fire in the first step of the
assault. See below for more details on morale checks.
If one or more assaulting infantry unit/s remain in the area then they
fire on the defending infantry units, in the same manner as described
above. If one or more hits are inflicted then all defending infantry units
must make a morale check.
If one or more defending infantry units remain in the area then repeat
the above procedure again, with defending units firing at assaulting
units, followed by a possible morale check, followed by remaining
assaulting units firing at defending units, and then any morale checks
that need to be made.
If after two rounds of infantry vs infantry combat there are one or more
defending infantry units in the area then all assaulting infantry units
must withdraw to the area, or areas, they assaulted from, (the
controlling player decides where surviving units will withdraw to). Note
that this is not the same as the units suffering a retreat. Withdrawing
units are not affected by defending cavalry. Units that withdraw will
end up in mobile formation.
If the unit does not continue charging then it remains in the area. If it
was meant to continue charging and there were no enemy occupied
adjacent areas then it remains in the area, it does not continue
charging.
Step four – cavalry vs infantry combat
It is possible for a unit to continue charging more than once.
If there are any cavalry units in the area then they must charge against
any opposing infantry units. However, if the combat is taking place
in a wood, town or river area then all of the cavalry must retreat
immediately.
ASSAULT COMBAT EXAMPLES
Any infantry units in a defensive formation will automatically form
square formation. Place a square marker under the unit.
If earlier in the assault combat there were defending cavalry units in
the area then any defending infantry not in defensive formation must
now change to defensive formation and then to square formation.
This does not apply to assaulting infantry.
All defending infantry units fire once. A hit is scored on a roll of ‘6’.
Each hit will tire a fresh unit or eliminate a tired unit. The controlling
player decides how hits will be allocated to his cavalry units. Note that
the controlling player cannot choose to retreat rather than take a hit.
If one or more cavalry units remain in the area then all remaining
infantry units must make a morale check.
If one or more infantry units remain in the area after making morale
checks then all remaining cavalry must withdraw to the area, or areas,
they assaulted from. All remaining infantry units switch to defensive
formation and have a square placed under them, even those that
started the assault in mobile formation.
Step five – cavalry vs artillery combat
If any defending artillery units are left in an area that only contains
enemy cavalry units then one damage cube is placed in the area for
each artillery unit in the area. This represents the cavalry eliminating
the artillery crews. Cavalry cannot eliminate artillery. The number of
damage cubes in an area containing just artillery units can never
exceed the total number of artillery units in the area.
Step six – infantry vs artillery combat
If any defending artillery units are left in an area that contains enemy
infantry units then all artillery units are eliminated. Any damage cubes
associated with the artillery units should also be removed.
If the defending artillery units were not accompanied by any infantry or
cavalry then all assaulting infantry units should make a morale check if
they suffered any hits when the artillery fired defensively.
Step seven – cavalry control checks
All cavalry units in the area that the assault combat occurred in must
now roll to see if they continue charging. Even cavalry units that were
originally defending must make a Cavalry Control check.
Check each unit individually. Roll one die for each cavalry unit and
consult the Cavalry Control Check table. Cross reference the colour of
the unit with the Continue Charge row. If the die roll is equal to or
higher than the value in the box then the unit must move and assault
into an adjacent area. The controlling player decides which area he
will assault into.
Cavalry Control Table
Continue charge if d6 roll is
The French player has
activated one area
containing two French
infantry units. These two
units are now assaulting
the Allied line, as shown
on the right. Note that
the French player could
have used a red action
disc to activate the area
as both activated units
are assaulting.
In Step One the
defending British artillery
unit fires once. A roll of ‘5’ results in one damage cube being inflicted,
(British artillery suffers a -1 die roll modifier).
Step Two is skipped as
there are no cavalry
units in both the
assaulting force and the
defending force.
Step Three does apply
as it is infantry versus
infantry combat. The
defending player must
assign damage cubes to
his infantry units. He
assigns one to the Dutch
unit and two to the
British unit. He then fires
once with each unit. He rolls a ‘4’ with the Dutch unit and a ‘2’ with
the British unit. The British unit suffers a -1 penalty for having two
damage cubes but gains a +1 modifier for being British infantry. One
damage cube is inflicted on the French. The attacking player must now
assign damage cubes to
units. He decides to
assign all three cubes to
one unit. He must now
make a morale check
roll. Both units suffer a
shift of one column to
the right due to being
unsupported by friendly
infantry. The unit with
three damage cubes
rolls a ‘4’ which is an ‘R’
result. It must retreat,
which will be back to
the area it assaulted from. It takes all cubes assigned to it with it. The
other unit rolls a ‘4’ which is a pass. Note that the French player would
have had to have made a morale check even if both infantry units had
missed as one damage cube had been inflicted by the artillery unit.
5+ 5+ 3+ 4+ 6 5+
10
The surviving
attacking infantry
unit now fires and
rolls a ‘6’, which
inflicts two damage
cubes on the
defenders. The
defender must now
make a morale
check. He must first
assign cubes to
units. He assigns
three cubes to the
Dutch unit and two
cubes to the British
unit. The Dutch gains a shift to the left for being in the same area as
artillery. The British unit gains one shift for the artillery and another for
being a British unit. The Dutch unit rolls a ‘1’ which is an ‘R’ result. It is
retreated to an adjacent area along with the damage cubes assigned to
it. The British unit rolls a ‘5’.
The single surviving
British unit now fires.
It rolls a ‘1’ which
inflicts no damage.
The attacking unit
does not have to
make a morale check
as no damage cubes
were inflicted against
it. The French player
rolls a ‘4’, which
inflicts one damage
cube against the
defender. The
defender makes a
morale check and rolls a ‘6’, which is a pass. As this is the second
round of infantry combat and there is still a surviving defending unit in
the area the attacking unit must withdraw.
All the remaining
steps are skipped as
they do not apply.
Assault combat has
now been resolved.
11
In this example a French
cavalry unit and a French
infantry unit assault
together.
Step One, the British artillery fires once at the French infantry. It inflicts
one damage cube against the attacking infantry.
Step Two, the French and British cavalry units engage in combat with
each other. Both players roll one die. The British player rolls a ‘4’ while
the French player rolls a ‘6’. The British cavalry unit becomes tired and
retreats to an adjacent area, towards Mont St. Jean.
Step Three, the French infantry engages in combat with the British
infantry. The British infantry will suffer a one column shift to the right
as it is being attacked by a combined force. However, it also gains two
shifts to the left for being with an artillery unit and being a British unit.
In the ensuing infantry combat the French unit is forced to retreat.
Step Four, as there is a French cavalry unit in the area it must charge
the British infantry. The infantry unit fires once at the cavalry unit. It
rolls a ‘6’ which tires the unit. However, the cavalry will still charge
home. The infantry unit changes to square formation. Even if it had
been mobile at the start of the assault it would be able to do this as
there was friendly cavalry in the area. The infantry makes a morale
check and rolls an ‘R’ result. As it is being assaulted by cavalry this
converts to an ‘E’ result and the unit is eliminated, along with any
damage cubes in the area.
In Step Five the French cavalry unit will chase off the artillery men
servicing the guns, which means one damage cube is placed in the area.
Step six is skipped.
The French cavalry unit is still in the area and has no more units to
attack. The French player must first roll to see if the unit continues to
charge. He rolls a ‘2’ which means the unit does not continue charging.
It remains in the area.
In this example a French
cavalry unit charges into
an area containing two
British cavalry units, one
of which is tired. The only
step involved is cavalry
versus cavalry. The French
player must engage his
single unit. The British
player decides to countercharge with his fresh unit.
Both players roll one die. The French player rolls the highest value and the
British unit becomes tired and retreats. The French cavalry unit now
engages with the remaining tired British cavalry unit. Although the British
unit suffers a -1 die modifier for being tired it rolls a higher total than the
French cavalry unit. The French unit becomes tired and must retreat to the
area it advanced from. The British cavalry unit must now check to see if it
continues charging. It rolls a ‘6’ which means it must charge into an enemy
occupied adjacent area. It decides to charge after the French cavalry unit.
This will result in further cavalry versus cavalry combat.
Morale checks
Only infantry units have to check for morale. Morale checks will be
made when infantry is involved in assault combat. An infantry unit may
be forced to retreat or be eliminated as a result of its morale check.
Whenever a morale check is required one die must be rolled for each
infantry unit in the area belonging to the side that is required to make
the check. No more than one check is made for each unit, even if
damage was inflicted both by artillery fire and infantry fire.
Before any die rolls are made the player who is making the morale
check must first assign damage cubes to infantry units.
Landwehr – If the unit is Landwehr, (light grey), then shift one column
to the right.
In woods or town – If the unit is in woods or a town then shift one
column to the right. Note that this modifier will affect both defender
and attacker. This modifier does not apply to defending units that have
the benefit of a strong point.
Assaulted by Imperial Guard – If one or more of the opposing units
is Imperial Guard infantry, and they are part of the assaulting force, then
shift one column to the right.
The number of cubes that are assigned to a unit will determine which
column of the Morale Check table is used. However, this may be
modified by circumstances. The column to be used will be shifted to
the left or right depending on the modifiers below. Note that these
modifiers apply to the column used, not the die roll. A unit that has
no damage cubes assigned to it must still make a morale check.
Opposed by combined force and not in strong point – If the
opposing force consists of infantry and cavalry then shift one column
to the right. This modifier only applies if the cavalry could physically
charge the defending infantry, i.e. infantry in a strong point do not
suffer this negative modifier.
The furthest column that you can shift to the right is the ‘6’ column.
Any further shifts to the right are not applied.
Morale Check Shifts to the Left
The furthest column that you can shift to the left is the ‘0’ column.
Any further shifts to the left are not applied.
Morale Check Shifts to the Right
Attacked by cavalry – If a unit is making a morale check due to an
assault by cavalry alone then it will suffer a three column shift to the
right. This shift is not applied if the unit is opposed by both cavalry and
infantry.
Unsupported – If the unit does not have friendly infantry units in two
different, adjacent areas, then it is regarded as being unsupported and
suffers a one column shift to the right. If a unit is in an area that is on
the edge of the board then it only has to be adjacent to one area
containing friendly infantry units to be supported.
Square vs Cavalry – If the unit is in square formation and is being
charged by cavalry then shift six columns to the left. Note that this
modifier is made in addition to the right shift made for cavalry charging
infantry, resulting in a net shift of three columns to the left. This shift
only applies if the infantry unit is being assaulted by cavalry alone.
British or Imperial Guard – All British, (red), and French Imperial
Guard, (dark blue), units shift one column to the left, whether they are
the assaulting force or the defending one.
With Artillery – If there are one or more artillery units in the area then
the defender gains a one column shift to the left. Note that the
assaulting force can never benefit from this modifier.
In Strong Point and in defensive formation – If the defending unit
has the advantage of a strong point then it will benefit from a shift to
the left of between one and three columns, depending on the modifier
indicated in the area. A defending unit only gains the benefit of the
strong point if it is in defensive formation.
EXAMPLE: The Dutch unit is supported, it has a German unit in one
adjacent area and is in an area on the edge of the board. The German unit
is supported as it has two friendly units in adjacent areas. The British unit
is unsupported.
12
Morale check results
Roll one die for each unit and cross reference with the correct
column.
An empty box means no effect.
enemy cavalry are present in the area. If the unit is defending a
strong point then any ‘R’ result is converted into the unit suffering
one damage cube, i.e. it will never retreat.
An ‘R’ means retreat. The unit must retreat immediately. See below
for rules on retreating. An ‘R’ result will become an ‘E’ result if
An ‘E’ means eliminated. The unit is eliminated and should be
remove from the board immediately.
Infantry Morale Check Table
Damage points
Shift to the right for each of these:
<0 1
2
3
4
5 6>
R
R
E
E
E
E
6
Square vs Cavalry
R
R
E
E
E
1
British or Imperial Guard
R
E
E
E
1
Defending with artillery in area
R
E
E
X
In strong point and in defensive formation
3
1
Unsupported
1
2
Landwehr
1
3
In woods or town*
1
Assaulted by Imperial Guard infantry
1
5
E
E
Opposed by combined force and not in strong point
1
6
R
E
d6 roll
Assaulted by cavalry
R
4
R = retreat
* infantry defending in strong point do not
suffer negative modifier for woods.
Shift to the left for each of these:
X = value in Strong Point box
E = eliminated
R becomes E if enemy cavalry in area
R becomes 1 damage cube if unit in strong point
Useful stuff to know – part three
Damage cubes
The amount of damage inflicted on infantry units is recorded with
damage cubes.
The French player uses the blue damage cubes. The Allied player uses
the red damage cubes for non-Prussian Allied units and the black
cubes for Prussian units.
At certain points in the game a player will need to assign damage
cubes to infantry units in the same area. He will need to do this when
infantry units move from the area, when infantry units fire in assault
combat, and when infantry units have to make a morale check. It is
up to the controlling player how he decides to assign damage cubes
between infantry units at each required time. The manner in which
they are assigned at one point in time has no effect on how they can
be assigned at a different point in time, i.e. just because you assigned
two damage cubes to an infantry unit at one time does not mean at a
later time that you could not assign those damage cubes to a different
infantry unit.
In all cases the manner in which damage cubes are assigned to
infantry units is the same. The controlling player can assign up to
five damage cubes to an infantry unit. All damage cubes must be
assigned to infantry units.
Six damage cubes will eliminate one infantry unit. If the total number
of damage cubes in an area would make it impossible to assign five
or less cubes to each unit then one infantry unit should be eliminated
and six damage cubes removed from the area. Now attempt to assign
damage cubes again. Note that it is possible for a unit to be
eliminated by skirmish fire or ranged artillery fire if sufficient damage
cubes are in its area, i.e. you do not have to wait for one of the
damage cube assignment points to eliminate a unit.
13
Damage cubes can never be assigned to artillery units if there are
infantry units in the area. Damage cubes can never be assigned to
cavalry units or leaders.
Damage cubes can be moved using the Reinforce action.
If when a player has to place damage cubes he finds that he does
not have enough available in his stock then he must eliminate a unit
from the board. He assigns cubes in the area that the unit will be
eliminated from. He then removes the unit and the cubes. The
damage cubes will then go back in the available stock, where they
can be placed back on the board.
The French player
wishes to move one of
the two infantry units
shown here. The area
contains three damage
cubes. He can assign all
of them to one unit or
split them, assigning
two to one unit and one
to the other unit. He
decides to assign all
three to the unit that is
moving. He moves the
unit and the three
damage cubes along
with it.
None of the damage cubes can be assigned to the artillery unit in
the area.
Retreats and withdrawals
Leaders
If an assaulting unit has to withdraw then it must do so to the area it
advanced from to assault. If multiple units assaulted from two different
areas then the controlling player decides which of the two areas the
units will withdraw to. A cavalry unit would retreat/withdraw to the
adjacent area that it assaulted from, not the area that it started in.
Each side has a certain number of leader units. The French start the
battle with four leaders. The Allies start the battle with two Allied
leaders. Two extra Prussian leaders will enter the board as part of
the Prussian forces.
If a defending French unit has to retreat then it must retreat towards
Rossomme. If a defending non-Prussian Allied has to retreat then it
must retreat towards Mont St. Jean. A defending Prussian unit would
have to retreat towards one of the three entry areas. If there is more
than one possible area that can be retreated into then it is up to the
controlling player to choose which area to retreat to.
A unit cannot retreat into an enemy occupied area. A unit cannot
retreat off of the edge of the board. A unit can retreat from an entry
area to the Delayed box, but only if it is not a French unit. If a unit
cannot retreat then it is eliminated.
A unit can retreat and break the area limit. A retreating infantry unit
will take with it the damage cubes assigned to it when it failed its
morale check, you cannot suddenly assign more cubes to it simply to
remove them from the area.
A leader can choose to accompany any retreating/withdrawing unit,
even a cavalry unit.
ACTION Change formation
One green disc allows one change formation action to be performed by
each infantry and artillery unit in the activated area. Cavalry and leader
units never change formation.
ACTION Reinforce
One green action disc allows a player to move one damage cube from
an area to an adjacent area containing at least one friendly infantry
unit. A French damage cube, (blue), must be moved to an area
containing a French infantry unit, which could be an Imperial Guard
unit. A red damage cube must be moved to an area containing a
non-Prussian Allied infantry unit, which could be a British, German,
or Dutch unit. A black damage cube must be moved to an area
containing a Prussian unit, which could either be line or Landwehr.
The area that the cube is moved from does not have to contain infantry
units, i.e. it could be removed from an area containing artillery.
ACTION Do nothing
A player can choose to do nothing but he must still expend a green
action disc. If he does not have any green action discs left then he can
expend a red or purple disc and choose to do nothing.
A leader allows a player to double the effect of an action disc. If an
action disc is used to activate a leader then that leader can activate
units in two areas. He can activate the area he is in and/or any adjacent
area. A leader can also activate the same area twice. Although a leader
can activate an area containing another leader, which may allow that
other leader to move/assault, a leader can never directly activate
another leader to then activate further areas, i.e. the maximum number
of areas that can be activated by an action disc is two.
If a green disc is used to activate a leader then each of the areas
activated can carry out different actions.
If a red action disc is used to activate a leader then that leader can only
carry out assault actions with the units in the activated areas.
If a purple action disc is used to activate a leader then the only action
that can be carried out in the activated areas are reserve movement
actions.
If a leader activates two areas that both perform assault actions then
all movement by all assaulting units must be completed before assaults
are resolved. Similarly, if an area is activated twice any non-assault
action must be completed before any assault action can take place.
It is not possible to activate an area to perform an assault, to then see
the result of that assault, and then activate the area again to perform
another assault.
After a leader has been activated he is placed on his side. A leader can
be activated once during a player’s action round. As there is more than
one action round per turn it is possible for a leader to be used more
than once in a turn.
A leader can always move/assault along with units that move from the
same area, even if the leader himself was not activated to move those
units. A leader can choose to retreat/withdraw along with friendly units,
including cavalry.
A leader can never end its move in the same area as another leader of
the same colour.
A leader does not count towards the number of units in an area for the
purposes of imposing any penalties for exceeding the area unit limit.
If a leader ends up in an area that contains only enemy units then it is
eliminated. If a leader was in an area containing friendly artillery units
that were assaulted and defeated he would be able to retreat to an
adjacent area. Leader units never return to the board once eliminated.
At the start of each new player action round all leaders are placed
upright.
A British leader can activate British, Dutch, and German units. It cannot
activate Prussian units.
A Prussian leader can activate Prussian units, including Landwehr. It
cannot activate British, Dutch, and German units.
If a French leader is used to carry out Grand Battery fire in two areas
then this still only counts as one use, i.e. only one cube is removed
from the Grand Battery box. However, if a leader is used to activate the
same area twice, and uses Grand Battery fire in each activation, then
this would count as two uses.
14
Terrain effects
There are eight different types of terrain, each of which may have an
effect on movement, combat, and line of sight.
Open ground
Open ground has no effect on movement or
combat.
Low ground
Low ground has no effect on movement or
combat. It does have an effect on line of sight.
A unit in a low ground area will not block the
line of sight of an artillery unit firing from a
non-low ground area.
EXAMPLE: The above leader can be used in a variety of ways. He could
be used to activate both areas containing just artillery, which could then
fire. It would only require the use of one Grand Battery cube to allow both
sets of artillery to double the number of dice they roll.
He could also be used to move the two infantry units towards the enemy
positions as one activation, and then activate them again, as this would be
two areas activated.
Strong points
There are three strong points, indicated by a
thick black border. These three are,
Hougoumont, La Haye Sainte, and Papelotte &
Smohain. Each strong point contains a box
which indicates the maximum number of
infantry units that can benefit from the strong point and the number of
column shifts to the left to be made in the case of a morale check being
made by the defenders.
It probably helps to think of a strong point as an area within an area.
An infantry unit can only benefit from a strong point if it is in a
defensive formation. Artillery and cavalry can never benefit from a
strong point. If an infantry unit is in mobile formation then it does not
receive any of the benefits of the strong point.
If the number of defending infantry units in a strong point exceeds the
capacity of that strong point then the controlling player must clearly
indicate which units can benefit from the strong point.
If artillery is present in a strong point area and an assault is launched
into the area then the defending player must declare whether any
infantry units are willing to forego the benefits of the strong point to
protect the artillery. If no infantry unit protects the artillery then after the
first round of infantry vs infantry combat if any assaulting units remain
in the area they will eliminate all artillery units.
Infantry that have the benefit of the strong point cannot be charged by
cavalry, nor do they suffer a negative morale check shift for being faced
by a combined force. Cavalry can still assault infantry in the area that
do not have the benefit of the strong point. If they defeat any such
infantry they would then have to withdraw as they could not defeat the
infantry within the strong point. The infantry within the strong point
would still be able to fire at the cavalry.
A strong point may also contain terrain, such as woods or a river. All
Artillery Fire modifiers are cumulative, e.g. artillery firing at infantry in
Hougoumont will suffer a -2 modifier for the strong point and -2 for the
woods. The modifier for the strong point would only apply if all
defending infantry had the benefit of the strong point. The same rule
applies in infantry vs infantry fire, all defending infantry would have to
be within the strong point to receive the defensive modifier.
Infantry vs infantry fire modifiers are cumulative as the only terrain
modifier is that for the strong point.
Morale shift modifiers are not cumulative for infantry units. If an infantry
unit has the benefit of the strong point modifier then it does not apply
any shifts for terrain, such as woods. The assaulting units would still
suffer negative column shifts for woods. A strong point will block line
of sight.
15
Woods
All infantry units, (defending or assaulting),
engaged in assault combat in a wooded area
suffer a one column shift to the right for
morale checks.
Woods will block line of sight for artillery fire.
Artillery can still fire into a wooded area, but will suffer a -2 die roll
modifier.
A cavalry unit must stop moving as soon as it enters a wooded area.
Cavalry cannot assault into a wooded area. Cavalry assaulting directly
from a wooded area, i.e. they are assaulting into an adjacent area,
suffer a -1 die roll modifier if they engage in combat with enemy
cavalry. If infantry assault cavalry in a wooded area then the cavalry
must withdraw.
Town
All infantry suffer a shift of one column to the
right on morale checks, whether they are
defending or assaulting.
Artillery fire suffers a -2 die roll modifier for
firing into a town. A town blocks line of sight,
although artillery can still fire into it. Artillery firing from a town is
unaffected by the town.
A cavalry unit must stop moving as soon as it enters a town area.
Cavalry cannot assault into a town. If cavalry assault from a town area
into an adjacent area then they suffer a -1 die roll modifier in any
combat with enemy cavalry. If infantry assault cavalry in a town then
the cavalry must withdraw.
River
An area containing a river is presumed to
be marshy.
Artillery suffers a -1 die roll modifier when
firing into an area containing a river. Artillery
cannot fire from a river area.
A cavalry unit must stop moving as soon as it enters a river area.
Cavalry cannot assault into a river area. Cavalry assaulting directly
from a river area, i.e. they are assaulting into an adjacent area, suffer
a -1 die roll modifier if they engage in combat with enemy cavalry. If
infantry assault cavalry in a river area then the cavalry must withdraw.
Ridge lines
There are two ridge lines on the map. The
most important is the one running along the
front of the Allied line.
Ridge lines have an effect on line of sight for
artillery fire. If the artillery unit is in the same
area as that bordered by the ridge line then it is not affected by it. It
does not suffer the -2 die roll modifier, nor is its line of sight blocked.
If the artillery unit is firing across a ridge line and it is not in an area
that is bordered by that ridge line then it will suffer a -2 die roll modifier
for firing into the area bordered by the ridge line. It cannot fire into
areas further beyond the ridge line.
Sunken road
There is one sunken road, which runs along
the front of the Allied lines. Although the road
runs along the ridge line between areas it is
regarded as being towards the Allied side of
the ridge line.
The sunken road only affects artillery fire. If artillery is firing into an area
containing part of the sunken road at infantry then it will suffer a -1 die
roll modifier. This modifier only applies if the line of sight crosses the
side of the area bordered by the sunken road.
The Prussians
The Prussian army will start to appear on the battlefield from 3pm
onwards. At the start of each turn from 3pm onwards the Allied player
rolls one die to see how many Prussian units can enter. A die roll of ‘1’
is always adjusted to a result of ‘2’, so that the range of possible results
lie between ‘2’ and ‘6’.
The Prussian units should be arranged in order on the Prussian display.
The Allied player starts by taking the units furthest to the left. He will
take a number of Prussian units, going from left to right, equal to the
value of the die roll.
There are three entry areas, two are marked ‘A’, and one is marked ‘B’.
The first series of Prussians have an ‘A’ at the start of the line. This
means they have to be placed in either of the entry areas marked ‘A’.
The final set of Prussians have a ‘B’ to their left, which means they have
to be placed in the entry area marked ‘B’.
The Prussians can exceed the area unit limit in their entry areas. Only
when it is the end of the Allied player’s first action round will he suffer
any penalties for exceeding this limit.
The Allied player can choose not to bring a unit on and place it in the
Delayed box. Any units in here can be placed in any entry area in
subsequent turns, depending on when the controlling player wishes
to bring them on. These units can be brought on in addition to those
brought on with the die roll. It is also possible to move units from the
Delayed box using a movement action. Such units can be moved to any
of the entry areas.
Units in the Delayed box can assault into an entry area that is occupied
by French units. This requires an action disc, the same as a standard
assault action. If a Prussian unit has to retreat from an entry area then
it will retreat to the Delayed box.
Units in the Delayed box can also use skirmish fire to fire at French units
in the entry areas. Artillery fire cannot take place as it is too heavily
wooded an area to allow a clear line of sight.
Prussian units are allowed to retreat/withdraw to the Delayed box.
French units can never enter the Delayed box. French infantry can fire
into the Delayed box during the Skirmish Fire phase.
Victory conditions
At the end of each turn both players should check to see if they have
achieved their victory conditions. In some cases each side has to
calculate its casualties. A casualty total consists of all eliminated
infantry, artillery, and leader units. Eliminated cavalry units never count
towards a casualty total. One eliminated unit counts as one casualty,
with the exception of a French Guard infantry unit, which counts as
two casualties.
The French player is declared victorious if one or more French infantry
units are in the town of Mont St. Jean, OR he has inflicted thirteen or
more casualties on the Allied forces, (do not include Prussian
casualties).
The Allied player is declared victorious if one or more Allied infantry
units, (including Prussian), are in the area marked Rossomme, OR he
has inflicted sixteen or more casualties on the French player.
If both sides achieve their victory condition at the same time then
the side that has inflicted the most casualties on the other side is
the winner.
The game will end automatically at the end of the 8pm turn. If neither
side has achieved its victory conditions then the Allied player is declared
the victor.
16
Player aid sheet
Turn Sequence
1. Take Action Discs
French player
Allied player
8
5
+3
4
2
+2
2
0
+2
4. Player Action Rounds Sequence of Play
Initiative: French
player has the
initiative until 7pm.
The Allied player will
take the initiative if
the French player does
not control one of the
three strong points.
Non-active player
draws one tile from
the bag and keeps
it secret. This
determines how
many actions the
active player will be
able to perform.
Active player can
change the formation
of his infantry and
artillery units.
Actions
Allied player takes extra discs
from 4pm onwards.
2. Prussians
Skip this phase in the first
three turns. From 3pm
onwards roll 1d6 to see how
many Prussian units arrive.
Minimum result is ‘2’. Place
in entry areas indicated, either
‘A’ or ‘B’.
3. Skirmish Fire
Allies fire first, then French.
Roll 1d6 for each infantry unit
that can fire at an adjacent
enemy unit. Hit on ‘6’. Target
preference and result is:
infantry: 1 damage cube
cavalry: tired or retreat
artillery: 1 damage cube
4. Player Action
Rounds
See Action Display to
the right.
5. Formation Changes
Allied player, then French
player, can change the
formation of his infantry
and artillery units.
6. Check Victory
Conditions
Allied player wins if he has
one or more Infantry units in
Rossomme or he has inflicted
sixteen or more casualties on
the French player. French
player wins if he has one or
more infantry units in Mont
St. Jean or he has inflicted
thirteen or more casualties
on the non-Prussian part of
the Allied army.
7. End of Turn
Move turn marker on one
space. Remove all Action
discs from Order boxes and
start a new turn.
Game will end at the end of
the 8pm turn. The side that
has inflicted the most
casualties will win, although
the French player has to
have inflicted at least thirteen
casualties on the non-Prussian
Allied forces.
One action disc activates all units in one area. All units in the
activated area must perform the same action. All actions can be
performed by the expenditure of a green order disc. A red disc
only allows an assault to be carried out. A purple disc only
allows a reserve movement to be carried out. Activating a leader
allows you to activate two areas. The disc used to activate a
leader will also restrict the actions that can be carried out by
both activated areas.
Close Contact Movement
You may move some or all of the units in the activated
area. Infantry and artillery can move one area. Cavalry
can move one or two areas. A leader can move up to
three areas, (can move whether upright or not and the
movement does not change his status). Leader cannot
end movement in the same area as another leader. If an
artillery unit moves then place it on its side at the end
of movement. An artillery unit on its side can still move,
but it cannot fire offensively. You can exceed area unit
limits during movement, (three units plus one leader).
You cannot enter an enemy occupied area.
Reserve Movement
You can move some or all of the units in the activated
area. All moving units can move at double their normal
movement rate, (see above). At no point in the movement
can a moving unit be adjacent to an enemy unit, including
the area it moves from. All other movement rules from
above apply.
Fire Artillery
You may fire all artillery units in one area. Artillery has
range of three areas. The French player can use Grand
Battery fire. This allows each unit to roll 2d6 instead of
1d6. You can only use Grand Battery fire six times during
the game, (remove a cube from Grand Battery box to
indicate use).
Assault
You may move some or all of the activated infantry and
cavalry units their full movement allowance. They must
end their movement in an enemy occupied area, where
assault combat will occur. Artillery cannot assault. A leader
may accompany assaulting units.
Change Formation
You may change the formation of some or all of the units
in the activated area. Infantry units can change from
mobile formation, (upright), to defensive formation, (on its
side), or vice versa. Artillery units can be placed upright,
allowing them to fire offensively. Cavalry units are never
returned to their upright status.
Reinforce
You may move one damage cube from one area to an
adjacent area containing an infantry unit. A French
damage cube can be moved to any area containing any
French infantry unit. An Allied red cube can be moved to
any area containing a non-Prussian Allied infantry unit.
A black damage cube can be moved to any area
containing a Prussian infantry unit.
Do nothing
Do nothing, but you must still expend a green action disc,
or a red/purple disc if all green discs have been expended.
Active player
performs actions
until told to stop
by the non-active
player or he has
no more Action
discs remaining.
Move Action discs
from ‘Actions used
this round’ box to
‘Actions used in
previous rounds’
box. Return tile
to bag.
Switch roles:
non-active player
becomes active
player if he has
green Action discs
remaining, otherwise
this phase ends.
Terrain Effects
Open ground – no effect on movement
or line of sight.
Low ground – no effect on movement
but may affect line of sight. Artillery
firing from non-low ground will not be
blocked by units or terrain occupying
intervening low ground. Units in low
ground will still have line of sight
blocked by units or terrain also in
low ground.
Strong point. There are three strong
points, Hougoumont, La Haye Sainte,
and Papelotte & Smohain. The box in
the area indicates how many infantry
units can benefit from the strong point.
An infantry unit has to be in defensive
formation to benefit. Artillery suffers -2
modifier, assaulting infantry suffers a -1
modifier. Defending infantry gain morale
shift modifier as indicated in the box,
(from one to three columns).
Woods. Infantry suffer negative morale
modifier, -1. Blocks line of sight. Artillery
suffer -2 firing into woods. Cavalry
cannot assault into woods. Cavalry must
stop in first area. Suffer -1 if assaulting
directly from area. Cavalry must retreat
if assaulted by infantry.
Town. Infantry suffer negative morale
modifier, -1. Blocks line of sight. Artillery
suffer -2 firing into town. Cavalry cannot
assault into towns. Cavalry must stop in
first area. Suffer -1 if assaulting directly
from area. Cavalry must retreat if
assaulted by infantry. Note that roads
have no effect on movement or combat.
River. Artillery suffer -1 firing into river
area. Cannot fire from river area. Cavalry
cannot assault into a river area. Cavalry
must stop in first river area they enter.
Suffer -1 modifier if assaulting directly
from area. Cavalry must retreat if
assaulted by infantry.
Ridge Line. May block line of sight if
firing unit not in adjacent area and firing
at unit that is one area beyond ridge
line. Artillery suffer -2 for firing across
ridge line unless in adjacent area. There
are two ridge lines, one runs along the
Allied front, going behind Hougoumont,
La Haye Sainte, and Papelotte, the other
runs through the main French positions.
Sunken Road. Artillery suffer -1 when
firing into sunken road area across the
edge bordered by the road. There is only
one sunken road which runs along part
of the Allied ridge behind Hougoumont.
Assault Combat Steps
1 Defending artillery fires
Each unit fires once, even if not upright. Use table below when firing against infantry. If only target is cavalry then hit on 5 or 6, which will
tire a fresh unit or eliminate a tired unit. Hits scored in this step will force a moral check in step three.
2 Cavalry vs cavalry
Attacker selects unit to charge with, defender selects unit to counter-charge. Roll 1d6
each, higher total wins. Loser becomes tired and retreats, or eliminated if already tired.
Re-roll ties. Repeat until there are only cavalry units from one side remaining in the area.
Units can be selected more than once to charge.
3 Infantry vs infantry
Defender fires using table below, which may result in the attacker having to make morale checks. All surviving attacking units then fire,
which may result in the defender having to make morale checks. Repeat this procedure a second time. If there are still defending units in
the area then all attacking infantry units must withdraw to area/s from which the assault was launched from, (this is not the same as a
retreat and units are not affected by defending cavalry).
Die modifiers
-1 if tired
-1 if Dutch cavalry
+1 if Imperial Guard cavalary
-1 if assaulting from woods, town or river
All infantry in defensive formation must change to square formation. If there were friendly cavalry in the area earlier in the assault then
all defending infantry will change to defensive formation and then to square. All infantry units fire once against cavalry, hitting on ‘6’,
(fresh – tired – eliminated). If one or more cavalry units remain then all defending infantry must make morale check. If any infantry units
survive then all cavalry units must withdraw to the area/s that the assault was launched from. If combat taking place in wood, town or river
then all cavalry units retreat immediately.
4 Cavalry vs infantry
5 Cavalry vs artillery
If artillery in the same area as enemy cavalry then place one damage cube per artillery unit in the area. This represents the elimination
of the artillery crews. The artillery itself is not destroyed.
6 Infantry vs artillery
If artillery in the same area as enemy infantry then all artillery is eliminated. If there was only artillery in the area before the assault then
the infantry must make a morale check if hit in step one.
7 Cavalry control check
All remaining cavalry units in the area (that either assaulted or defended) must roll to see if they continue charging. See rules about
continuing charges. Units that fail to continue charging or do not have adjacent enemies will remain where they are.
Artillery vs Infantry Fire Table
Fire Artillery Action
Range
2
3
–
–
–
–
1
–
–
–
2
–
–
–
–
–
3
4
–
5
Die Modifiers
+1 if target in square formation
-1 if target in river area
-1 if target behind sunken road
-1 if the artillery is British
-2 if target in woods or town
-2 if target behind ridge line
-2 if target in strong point and in
defensive formation
Modified d6 roll
Cavalry Control Table
Continue charge if d6 roll is
Infantry
Effect of hit
Use Artillery vs Infantry Fire table
Cavalry
5+
Artillery
6
Tired
Eliminated or retreat
Can retreat if ranged or skimish fire.
1 damage cube
Infantry vs Infantry Fire Table
A ‘6’ always inflicts at least one point of
damage. Modifiers are cumulative.
6+
d6
0
–
1
–
2 M
Morale check for targets
1
Preference
0
0
Modified d6 roll
Target
3
4
5
5+ 5+ 3+ 4+ 6 5+
6+
Die Modifiers
+1 if target in square formation
+1 if firing infantry is British
-1 for every 2 damage cubes
-1 if firer in square formation
-1 if target in strong point and in
defensive formation
An unmodified ‘6’ always inflicts at least one point
of damage.
Infantry Morale Check Table
Damage points
Shift to the right for each of these:
<0 1
2
3
4
5 6>
R
R
E
E
E
E
6
Square vs Cavalry
R
R
E
E
E
1
British or Imperial Guard
R
E
E
E
1
Defending with artillery in area
R
E
E
X
In strong point and in defensive formation
3
1
Unsupported
1
2
Landwehr
1
3
In woods or town*
1
Assaulted by Imperial Guard infantry
1
5
E
E
Opposed by combined force and not in strong point
1
6
R
E
d6 roll
Assaulted by cavalry
R
4
R = retreat
* infantry defending in strong point do not
suffer negative modifier for woods.
E = eliminated
R becomes E if enemy cavalry in area
R becomes 1 damage cube if unit in strong point
Shift to the left for each of these:
X = value in Strong Point box
Designer Notes
This is my first published two-player wargame. Although I am generally
known for designing multi-player games I spent most of my youth
playing SPI and Avalon Hill wargames.
The idea for Waterloo came to me while walking in the rain up a hill
next to Derwent water reservoir, (where the Dambusters used to
practise). I had this picture in my head of a wargame with pretty
wooden pieces. After that the hard work of design began. As much
as possible the rules within this game are designed to create situations
that occurred on the battlefield. Not knowing exactly how many actions
you will be able to perform creates the right level of uncertainty. I also
wanted to treat each of the three different service arms, infantry,
cavalry, and artillery, in a way that reflected their actual use, rather
than having cavalry acting as speedy infantry.
This game is not intended to be an accurate simulation of the battle.
In most cases I have gone for design for effect rather than being tied
to OBs and ground scales. Each piece does not represent a particular
unit. The infantry units do not represent brigades or regiments. I tried
going down that road and ended up with too many pieces. However,
the overall ratio of units reflects the composition of forces that fought
on the day. Other liberties have been taken as well, such as British
artillery. Rather than reflect actual numbers I have placed one unit in
each front-line area, premised on the fact that Wellington spread his
artillery out to support his infantry. This is why British artillery suffers
a -1 modifier. The area covered by the map is based on what I could
fit onto my standard map size. The Area unit limit is based on what
seemed a good number rather than any statistical analysis of how
many regiments could fit into an area. All I wish to do is give a flavour
of the momentous battle, only time will tell if I have succeeded in that.
I have resisted the urge to give specific strategy tips, I would rather you
work out yourself the best way to play the game.
I would like to take this opportunity to especially thank one of my
playtesters, Andy Ogden. He has put more hours into testing this
game than anybody else, and all he asked for in return was a
cheese sandwich.
Martin Wallace
Credits
Game designed by Martin Wallace
Artwork by Peter Dennis
Graphics by Solid Colour
Playtested by Andy Ogden, Simon Bracegirdle, Alan Montgomery, Don Oddy,
Alan McClennahan, Paulo Inácio, Hélio Andrade Stephen Buonocore,
Chad Mekash, Alan Paull, Jonathan Garnett and Andy Unwin.
Thanks to: Julia Bryan
You can check out the latest Warfrog games at: www.warfroggames.com
You can contact Warfrog at: [email protected]
The rules to ‘Waterloo’ are © Martin Wallace 2008. All artwork © Warfrog 2009.
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