Symantec Ghost Implementation Guide

Symantec Ghost Implementation Guide
Symantec Ghost
Implementation Guide
Symantec Ghost Implementation Guide
The software described in this book is furnished under a license agreement and may be used
only in accordance with the terms of the agreement.
Documentation version 11.0
Legal Notice
Copyright © 2006 Symantec Corporation.
All rights reserved.
Federal acquisitions: Commercial Software - Government Users Subject to Standard License
Terms and Conditions.
Symantec, the Symantec Logo, Symantec Ghost, Ghost Walker, Ghost Explorer, GDisk,
GhostCast, OmniFS, and Disk Doctor are trademarks or registered trademarks of Symantec
Corporation or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. Other names may be trademarks
of their respective owners.
Microsoft, MS-DOS, Windows, Windows Vista, and Windows NT are registered trademarks
of Microsoft Corporation. IBM and PC-DOS are registered trademarks of International
Business Machines Corporation. 3Com and EtherLink are registered trademarks of 3Com
Corporation. Compaq is a registered trademark of Compaq Corporation. SuperDisk is a
trademark of Imation Enterprises Corporation. ZIP and JAZ are registered trademarks of
Iomega Corporation. FireWire, Apple, and Mac are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.,
registered in the U.S. and other countries. Maxtor is a registered trademark of Maxtor
Corporation. Quantum is a registered trademark of Quantum Corporation. DirectParallel is
a registered trademark of Parallel Technologies, Inc.
The product described in this document is distributed under licenses restricting its use,
copying, distribution, and decompilation/reverse engineering. No part of this document
may be reproduced in any form by any means without prior written authorization of
Symantec Corporation and its licensors, if any.
THE DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED CONDITIONS,
REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES, INCLUDING ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF
MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR NON-INFRINGEMENT,
ARE DISCLAIMED, EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THAT SUCH DISCLAIMERS ARE HELD TO
BE LEGALLY INVALID. SYMANTEC CORPORATION SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR INCIDENTAL
OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES IN CONNECTION WITH THE FURNISHING PERFORMANCE,
OR USE OF THIS DOCUMENTATION. THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS
DOCUMENTATION IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.
The Licensed Software and Documentation are deemed to be "commercial computer software"
and "commercial computer software documentation" as defined in FAR Sections 12.212 and
DFARS Section 227.7202.
Symantec Corporation
20330 Stevens Creek Blvd.
Cupertino, CA 95014 USA
http://www.symantec.com
Technical Support
Symantec Technical Support maintains support centers globally. Technical
Support’s primary role is to respond to specific queries about product feature and
function, installation, and configuration. The Technical Support group also authors
content for our online Knowledge Base. The Technical Support group works
collaboratively with the other functional areas within Symantec to answer your
questions in a timely fashion. For example, the Technical Support group works
with Product Engineering and Symantec Security Response to provide alerting
services and virus definition updates.
Symantec’s maintenance offerings include the following:
■
A range of support options that give you the flexibility to select the right
amount of service for any size organization
■
A telephone and web-based support that provides rapid response and
up-to-the-minute information
■
Upgrade insurance that delivers automatic software upgrade protection
■
Global support that is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week worldwide.
Support is provided in a variety of languages for those customers that are
enrolled in the Platinum Support program
■
Advanced features, including Technical Account Management
For information about Symantec’s Maintenance Programs, you can visit our Web
site at the following URL:
www.symantec.com/techsupp/ent/enterprise.html
Select your country or language under Global Support. The specific features that
are available may vary based on the level of maintenance that was purchased and
the specific product that you are using.
Contacting Technical Support
Customers with a current maintenance agreement may access Technical Support
information at the following URL:
www.symantec.com/techsupp/ent/enterprise.html
Select your region or language under Global Support.
Before contacting Technical Support, make sure you have satisfied the system
requirements that are listed in your product documentation. Also, you should be
at the computer on which the problem occurred, in case it is necessary to recreate
the problem.
When you contact Technical Support, please have the following information
available:
■
Product release level
■
Hardware information
■
Available memory, disk space, and NIC information
■
Operating system
■
Version and patch level
■
Network topology
■
Router, gateway, and IP address information
■
Problem description:
■
Error messages and log files
■
Troubleshooting that was performed before contacting Symantec
■
Recent software configuration changes and network changes
Licensing and registration
If your Symantec product requires registration or a license key, access our technical
support Web page at the following URL:
www.symantec.com/techsupp/ent/enterprise.html
Select your region or language under Global Support, and then select the Licensing
and Registration page.
Customer service
Customer service information is available at the following URL:
www.symantec.com/techsupp/ent/enterprise.html
Select your country or language under Global Support.
Customer Service is available to assist with the following types of issues:
■
Questions regarding product licensing or serialization
■
Product registration updates such as address or name changes
■
General product information (features, language availability, local dealers)
■
Latest information about product updates and upgrades
■
Information about upgrade insurance and maintenance contracts
■
Information about the Symantec Value License Program
■
Advice about Symantec's technical support options
■
Nontechnical presales questions
■
Issues that are related to CD-ROMs or manuals
Maintenance agreement resources
If you want to contact Symantec regarding an existing maintenance agreement,
please contact the maintenance agreement administration team for your region
as follows:
■
Asia-Pacific and Japan: [email protected]
■
Europe, Middle-East, and Africa: [email protected]
■
North America and Latin America: [email protected]
Additional Enterprise services
Symantec offers a comprehensive set of services that allow you to maximize your
investment in Symantec products and to develop your knowledge, expertise, and
global insight, which enable you to manage your business risks proactively.
Enterprise services that are available include the following:
Symantec Early Warning Solutions These solutions provide early warning of cyber
attacks, comprehensive threat analysis, and
countermeasures to prevent attacks before they occur.
Managed Security Services
These services remove the burden of managing and
monitoring security devices and events, ensuring
rapid response to real threats.
Consulting Services
Symantec Consulting Services provide on-site
technical expertise from Symantec and its trusted
partners. Symantec Consulting Services offer a variety
of prepackaged and customizable options that include
assessment, design, implementation, monitoring and
management capabilities, each focused on establishing
and maintaining the integrity and availability of your
IT resources.
Educational Services
Educational Services provide a full array of technical
training, security education, security certification,
and awareness communication programs.
To access more information about Enterprise services, please visit our Web site
at the following URL:
www.symantec.com
Select your country or language from the site index.
Symantec Software License Agreement
Symantec Ghost Solution Suite
SYMANTEC CORPORATION AND/OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES
(“SYMANTEC”) IS WILLING TO LICENSE THE
SOFTWARE TO YOU AS AN INDIVIDUAL, THE
COMPANY, OR THE LEGAL ENTITY THAT WILL BE
UTILIZING THE SOFTWARE (REFERENCED BELOW AS
“YOU” OR “YOUR”) ONLY ON THE CONDITION THAT
YOU ACCEPT ALL OF THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE
AGREEMENT. READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF
THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT CAREFULLY BEFORE
USING THE SOFTWARE. THIS IS A LEGAL AND
ENFORCEABLE CONTRACT BETWEEN YOU AND THE
LICENSOR. BY OPENING THIS PACKAGE, BREAKING
THE SEAL, CLICKING THE “AGREE” OR “YES” BUTTON
OR OTHERWISE INDICATING ASSENT
ELECTRONICALLY, OR LOADING THE SOFTWARE, YOU
AGREE TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS
AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THESE TERMS
AND CONDITIONS, CLICK THE “I DO NOT AGREE” OR
“NO” BUTTON OR OTHERWISE INDICATE REFUSAL
AND MAKE NO FURTHER USE OF THE SOFTWARE.
1. License:
The software and documentation that accompanies this
license (collectively the “Software”) is the proprietary
property of Symantec or its licensors and is protected
by copyright law. While Symantec continues to own the
Software, You will have certain rights to use the Software
after Your acceptance of this license. This license
governs any releases, revisions, or enhancements to the
Software that the Licensor may furnish to You. Except
as may be modified by an applicable Symantec license
certificate, license coupon, or license key (each a “License
Module”) that accompanies, precedes, or follows this
license, and as may be further defined in the user
documentation accompanying the Software, Your rights
and obligations with respect to the use of this Software
are as follows.
If You are using the Software as an end user,
as indicated by your license certificate, You
may:
A. use the Software for the number of Devices as have
been licensed to You by Symantec under a License
Module. “Device” is defined as a single computer, storage
drive or other device including virtual devices running
any of the supported operating systems (i) on which
Licensee can install and use the Software, or (ii) from
which License accesses and uses the Software installed
on the network, or (iii) a physical connection point that
links together two separate devices. For devices running
multiple operating systems (e.g., multiple boot systems
or virtual machine servers) each instance of new
operating systems constitutes a new “device” from which
the licensee access and uses the Software. Each “device”
requires a unique license of the Software. If the Software
is part of a suite containing multiple Software titles, the
number of copies You may use may not exceed the
aggregate number of copies indicated in the License
Module, as calculated by any combination of licensed
Software titles. Your License Module shall constitute
proof of Your right to make such copies. If no License
Module accompanies, precedes, or follows this license,
You may make one copy of the Software that You are
authorized to use on a single computer;
B. make one copy of the Software for archival purposes,
or copy the Software onto the hard disk of Your computer
and retain the original for archival purposes;
C. use the Software on a network, provided that You have
a licensed copy of the Software for each computer that
can access the Software over that network;
D. use the Software in accordance with any written
agreement between You and Symantec; and
E. after written consent from Symantec, transfer the
Software on a permanent basis to another person or
entity, provided that You retain no copies of the Software
and the transferee agrees in writing to the terms of this
license.
If you are using the Software as a
value-added reseller, as indicated by your
license certificate, You may:
A. use the Software to deploy a single image on the
number of Devices as have been licensed to You by
Symantec under a License Module. If more than one
image is applied to a Device, you are required to purchase
a license for every additional image that is applied to
that Device. For the purposes of clarity, if “n” images
are applied to a single Device, then You are required to
purchase “n” licenses.
B. include a disaster recovery image file created by the
Software for disaster recovery purposes with any hard
drive originally imaged by the Software and transferred
to a third party solely for the purpose of allowing You
to provide disaster recovery support to such third party.
The number of image files transferred to third parties
may not exceed the number of licenses held by You, and
such use shall not be construed so as to increase the
number of licenses granted under this agreement; and
C. provide a copy of a special Ghost executable or
PQIDeploy executable that has been modified by
Symantec for the purposes of allowing the customer to
redeploy the disaster recovery image file onto the hard
drive as specified in B above. The special Ghost or
PQIDeploy executable has been modified so that it can
read images for deployment, but cannot create a new
hard drive image; and
D. make one copy of the Software for archival purposes,
or copy the Software onto the hard disk of Your computer
and retain the original for archival purposes.
You may not:
A. copy the printed documentation that accompanies
the Software;
B. sublicense, rent, or lease any portion of the Software;
reverse engineer, decompile, disassemble, modify,
translate, make any attempt to discover the source code
of the Software, or create derivative works from the
Software;
C. use the Software as part of a facility management,
timesharing, service provider, or service bureau
arrangement;
D. use a previous version or copy of the Software after
You have received and installed a disk replacement set
or an upgraded version. Upon upgrading the Software,
all copies of the prior version must be destroyed;
E. use a later version of the Software than is provided
herewith unless You have purchased corresponding
maintenance and/or upgrade insurance or have
otherwise separately acquired the right to use such later
version;
F. use, if You received the software distributed on media
containing multiple Symantec products, any Symantec
software on the media for which You have not received
permission in a License Module;
G. ship, bundle, or provide to any third party any version
of the Software or transfer any of Your rights to the
Software without the prior written consent of Symantec;
or
H. use the Software in any manner not authorized by
this license.
2. Content Updates:
Certain Software utilize content that is updated from
time to time (including but not limited to the following
Software: antivirus software utilize updated virus
definitions; content filtering software utilize updated
URL lists; some firewall software utilize updated firewall
rules; and vulnerability assessment products utilize
updated vulnerability data; these updates are collectively
referred to as “Content Updates”). You shall have the
right to obtain Content Updates for any period for which
You have purchased maintenance, except for those
Content Updates that Symantec elects to make available
by separate paid subscription, or for any period for which
You have otherwise separately acquired the right to
obtain Content Updates. Symantec reserves the right to
designate specified Content Updates as requiring
purchase of a separate subscription at any time and
without notice to You; provided, however, that if You
purchase maintenance hereunder that includes
particular Content Updates on the date of purchase, You
will not have to pay an additional fee to continue
receiving such Content Updates through the term of
such maintenance even if Symantec designates such
Content Updates as requiring separate purchase. This
License does not otherwise permit the licensee to obtain
and use Content Updates.
3. Limited Warranty:
Symantec warrants that the media on which the Software
is distributed will be free from defects for a period of
thirty (30) days from the date of delivery of the Software
to You. Your sole remedy in the event of a breach of this
warranty will be that Symantec will, at its option, replace
any defective media returned to Symantec within the
warranty period or refund the money You paid for the
Software. Symantec does not warrant that the Software
will meet Your requirements or that operation of the
Software will be uninterrupted or that the Software will
be error-free.
TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY
APPLICABLE LAW, THE ABOVE WARRANTY IS
EXCLUSIVE AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES,
WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, AND
NONINFRINGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
RIGHTS. THIS WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL
RIGHTS. YOU MAY HAVE OTHER RIGHTS, WHICH
VARY FROM STATE TO STATE AND COUNTRY TO
COUNTRY.
4. Disclaimer of Damages:
SOME STATES AND COUNTRIES, INCLUDING MEMBER
COUNTRIES OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AREA, DO
NOT ALLOW THE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION OF
LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES, SO THE BELOW LIMITATION OR
EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY
APPLICABLE LAW AND REGARDLESS OF WHETHER
ANY REMEDY SET FORTH HEREIN FAILS OF ITS
ESSENTIAL PURPOSE, IN NO EVENT WILL SYMANTEC
BE LIABLE TO YOU FOR ANY SPECIAL,
CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, OR SIMILAR DAMAGES,
INCLUDING ANY LOST PROFITS OR LOST DATA
ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE
SOFTWARE EVEN IF SYMANTEC HAS BEEN ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
IN NO CASE SHALL SYMANTEC’S LIABILITY EXCEED
THE PURCHASE PRICE FOR THE SOFTWARE. The
disclaimers and limitations set forth above will apply
regardless of whether or not You accept the Software.
5. U.S. Government Restricted Rights:
RESTRICTED RIGHTS LEGEND. All Symantec products
and documentation are commercial in nature. The
software and software documentation are “Commercial
Items,” as that term is defined in 48 C.F.R. section 2.101,
consisting of “Commercial Computer Software” and
“Commercial Computer Software Documentation,” as
such terms are defined in 48 C.F.R. section
252.227-7014(a)(5) and 48 C.F.R. section
252.227-7014(a)(1), and used in 48 C.F.R. section 12.212
and 48 C.F.R. section 227.7202, as applicable. Consistent
with 48 C.F.R. section 12.212, 48 C.F.R. section
252.227-7015, 48 C.F.R. section 227.7202 through
227.7202-4, 48 C.F.R. section 52.227-14, and other
relevant sections of the Code of Federal Regulations, as
applicable, Symantec’s computer software and computer
software documentation are licensed to United States
Government end users with only those rights as granted
to all other end users, according to the terms and
conditions contained in this license agreement.
Manufacturer is Symantec Corporation, 20330 Stevens
Creek Blvd., Cupertino, CA 95014, United States of
America.
shall terminate upon Your breach of any term contained
herein and You shall cease use of and destroy all copies
of the Software. The disclaimers of warranties and
damages and limitations on liability shall survive
termination. Software and documentation is delivered
Ex Works California, U.S.A. or Dublin, Ireland
respectively (ICC INCOTERMS 2000). This Agreement
may only be modified by a License Module that
accompanies this license or by a written document that
has been signed by both You and Symantec. Should You
have any questions concerning this Agreement, or if You
desire to contact Symantec for any reason, please write
to: (i) Symantec Customer Service, 555 International
Way, Springfield, OR 97477, U.S.A., (ii) Symantec
Customer Service Center, PO BOX 5689, Dublin 15,
Ireland , or (iii) Symantec Customer Service, 1 Julius Ave,
North Ryde, NSW 2113, Australia.
6. Export Regulation:
Notwithstanding any of the terms and conditions
contained in this Symantec Software License Agreement,
the following additional terms apply to the Software you
have purchased:
Certain Symantec products are subject to export controls
by the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), under the
Export Administration Regulations (EAR) (see
www.bxa.doc.gov). Violation of U.S. law is strictly
prohibited. You agree to comply with the requirements
of the EAR and all applicable international, national,
state, regional and local laws, and regulations, including
any applicable import and use restrictions. Symantec
products are currently prohibited for export or re-export
to Cuba, North Korea, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Syria and Sudan
or to any country subject to applicable trade sanctions.
You agree not to export, or re-export, directly or
indirectly, any product to any country outlined in the
EAR, nor to any person or entity on the DOC Denied
Persons, Entities and Unverified Lists, the U.S.
Department of State’s Debarred List, or on the U.S.
Department of Treasury's lists of Specially Designated
Nationals, Specially Designated Narcotics Traffickers,
or Specially Designated Terrorists. Furthermore, You
agree not to export, or re-export, Symantec products to
any military entity not approved under the EAR, or to
any other entity for any military purpose, nor will You
sell any Symantec product for use in connection with
chemical, biological, or nuclear weapons or missiles
capable of delivering such weapons.
7. General:
If You are located in North America or Latin America,
this Agreement will be governed by the laws of the State
of California, United States of America. Otherwise, this
Agreement will be governed by the laws of England and
Wales. This Agreement and any related License Module
is the entire agreement between You and Symantec
relating to the Software and: (i) supersedes all prior or
contemporaneous oral or written communications,
proposals, and representations with respect to its subject
matter; and (ii) prevails over any conflicting or additional
terms of any quote, order, acknowledgment, or similar
communications between the parties. This Agreement
8. Additional Uses and Restrictions:
A. If You are an end user, as indicated on your license
certificate, the following uses and restrictions apply:
1. The Software may contain multiple components. For
each copy of the Software, such components, whether
used individually or collectively, may be used on only
one Device.
2. You may:
(i) use the Software only in accordance with its
documentation;
(ii) use the Software on one Device to create or deploy
an image of a hard drive on that Device, or to another
hard drive on the same Device. If a License Module
accompanies, precedes, or follows this license, You may
make and use the number of copies of the Software set
forth in Your License Module on an equal number of
individual Devices pursuant to the terms of this License
Agreement. Your License Module shall constitute proof
of Your right to make and use such copies;
(iii) use the Software on a single Device to create an
image file of a hard drive on that Device and store the
image file on removable media for disaster recovery
purposes;
(iv) use the Software to create a boot disk as described
in the documentation for reapplying the hard drive
image that was created for disaster recovery purposes
to the hard drive on the original Device; or
(v) use the Software to clone a hard drive from a Device
to a replacement Device in the manner described in the
software documentation, and to use the Software on the
replacement Device provided that the Software has been
removed from the original Device and the original Device
has been Permanently Decommissioned.
(vi) Redeploy the license for the Software from one
Device to a new Device, where the original Device is
Permanently Decommissioned. Permanently
Decommissioned is defined as physically deleting all
software, including all operating systems, from the hard
drive(s) of the Device.
3. Scripting Documentation:
Any scripting documentation provided in conjunction
with the Software may be used only in conjunction with
the Software. You may not copy, distribute, license or
sublicense the scripting documentation.
4. If your Software includes the Symantec User
Migration, the following uses and restrictions apply to
the Software:
(i) You may use a single copy of the Software to copy and
deploy data and settings on a single Device. Such copy
may be used an unlimited number of times for such
single Device;
(ii) You may use a single copy of the Software to copy
and transfer data and settings from one Device to a
replacement Device, provided that the original Device
is permanently decommissioned or destroyed; and
(iii) In order to deploy data and settings to multiple
Devices, You must have a copy of the Software for each
Device that is the recipient of such data and settings.
B. If You are a value-added reseller, as indicated on your
license certificate, and Your Software includes the
Symantec User Migration, You may use a single copy of
the Software to copy and deploy data and settings on a
single Device. Once the data and settings have been
deployed to that single Device, one license has been
consumed. If You deploy a different set of data and
settings to that Device, an additional license is required.
Contents
Technical Support
Section 1
Getting Started
Chapter 1
Introducing Symantec Ghost
About Symantec Ghost ..................................................................
What’s new in Symantec Ghost .......................................................
Components of Symantec Ghost ......................................................
Symantec Ghost Console .........................................................
Symantec Ghost Console client .................................................
Symantec GhostCast Server .....................................................
Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard ...................................................
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall .....................................................
Symantec Ghost executable program .........................................
Symantec Ghost User Migration Wizard .....................................
GhConfig tool ........................................................................
Ghost Walker .........................................................................
Ghost Explorer ......................................................................
GDisk ...................................................................................
GhRegEdit ............................................................................
OmniFS ................................................................................
Chapter 2
Understanding Symantec Ghost
The Symantec Ghost partition ........................................................
Using the virtual partition to connect to the Console .....................
Client staging area ..................................................................
Choosing a method to create an image file .........................................
Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost .................................
Where to find more information ......................................................
Chapter 3
35
37
38
38
38
39
39
40
40
41
42
42
43
43
44
44
45
46
47
47
48
49
Installing Symantec Ghost
About installing Symantec Ghost .................................................... 51
Before you install ......................................................................... 51
System requirements .................................................................... 52
14
Contents
Symantec Ghost Console and Standard Tools ...............................
Ghost executable ....................................................................
Symantec Ghost Console client and Configuration client ...............
Symantec User Migration Wizard ..............................................
Supported backup media .........................................................
File systems supported for back up, restore, and cloning
tasks ..............................................................................
Support for GPT disks .............................................................
Support for RAID disks ............................................................
Installing Symantec Ghost Console ..................................................
Installing the Console client ...........................................................
Preparing a Windows Vista/XP client for remote installation ..........
Remotely installing the Console client ........................................
Manually installing the Console client ........................................
Installing the Configuration Client Stand-alone .................................
Installing the User Migration Wizard ...............................................
Installing 3Com Boot Services ........................................................
Post-installation tasks ...................................................................
About activating Symantec Ghost ..............................................
Updating Symantec Ghost .......................................................
About upgrading Symantec Ghost .............................................
Uninstalling Symantec Ghost ...................................................
Creating Console Service accounts .............................................
Section 2
Managing computers from the Console
Chapter 4
Managing computers and configuration resources
About the Symantec Ghost Console .................................................
Starting the Symantec Ghost Console ..............................................
Setting properties from the Console ...........................................
About Symantec Ghost Console resources .........................................
Configuration Resources ..........................................................
Inventory resources ................................................................
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources ....................................
Setting the resource folder view mode ........................................
Creating new folders ...............................................................
Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources .................................
Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources .............................
Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources ................................
Viewing Symantec Ghost Console resource properties ...................
Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers ..........................
Setting up computer groups ...........................................................
52
53
54
55
55
56
56
57
57
58
58
61
62
62
63
64
64
64
67
68
68
69
75
76
76
77
79
80
80
81
81
82
83
83
84
85
87
Contents
Creating computer groups ........................................................ 87
About adding computers to groups ............................................ 88
About renaming a computer ..................................................... 88
Removing a computer from a computer group .............................. 89
Setting default client and data transfer properties .............................. 89
Setting the default client heartbeat interval ................................ 90
Setting the default data transfer properties ................................. 90
Setting properties for a subnet ........................................................ 92
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties ................ 93
Setting the client computer heartbeat interval ............................ 96
Maintaining the default client configuration settings ................... 96
About setting up the virtual partition ............................................... 98
Setting the virtual partition size ............................................... 99
Setting the default DOS version ................................................ 99
Editing files in the virtual partition .......................................... 100
Setting the DOS network driver template .................................. 100
Setting the DOS version for a client computer ............................ 102
Removing the Symantec Ghost boot partition from a client
computer ...................................................................... 102
Setting up configuration sets ........................................................ 103
Creating a new configuration set ............................................. 104
Viewing or modifying configuration sets .................................. 105
Chapter 5
Creating tasks
About tasks ...............................................................................
Creating and executing a Ghost Console task .............................
About template tasks .............................................................
Local deployment of Console resources .....................................
Creating an image of a computer ...................................................
Creating a model computer .....................................................
About image definitions .........................................................
Creating image definitions .....................................................
Managing image definitions ...................................................
Viewing image details ............................................................
Creating an image create task .......................................................
Setting general image create task properties ..............................
Setting network properties .....................................................
Setting up tasks ..........................................................................
Creating a task .....................................................................
Setting Clone properties ........................................................
Setting Configuration properties .............................................
Setting File Transfer properties ...............................................
115
116
116
117
117
118
118
119
121
121
122
123
126
128
129
131
137
139
15
16
Contents
Adding Commands ................................................................
Deploying AutoInstall packages .....................................................
Storing AI packages ..............................................................
Creating AI package definitions ...............................................
Managing AI package definitions .............................................
Viewing AI package details .....................................................
Setting up a Deploy AI Package task .........................................
Viewing task details ....................................................................
Chapter 6
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks ..........................................................................
Executing a task from the Symantec Ghost Console .....................
Executing a recovery task .......................................................
Canceling a task that is executing ............................................
Initiating a task from a client computer ....................................
Initiating a task from the command line ....................................
Scheduling tasks ........................................................................
Setting the schedule task properties .........................................
Specifying schedule details .....................................................
Viewing or modifying a schedule .............................................
Chapter 7
153
154
157
157
158
159
163
164
165
167
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
About incremental backups and backup regimes ...............................
Setting the location for backup images ...........................................
Setting up backup regimes ............................................................
Setting backup regime properties ............................................
Viewing or modifying backup regimes ......................................
Creating a backup manually ..........................................................
Viewing computer backups ...........................................................
Restoring a computer ..................................................................
Chapter 8
142
143
144
144
146
146
147
150
169
170
170
171
173
174
174
175
User Migration
About migrating users .................................................................
About migration packages ......................................................
How you set up a user migration task .......................................
Creating user migration templates .................................................
Creating a migration template .................................................
Specifying the registry entries to capture ..................................
About managing migration templates .......................................
Viewing or modifying a migration template ...............................
Exporting a migration template ...............................................
177
178
178
179
179
187
188
188
189
Contents
Capturing user data ....................................................................
Setting the name of the user package .......................................
Restoring user data .....................................................................
Managing user packages ..............................................................
Setting the storage location for user packages ............................
Viewing information about a user package ................................
Chapter 9
189
193
194
196
197
197
Using Client Inventory
About the Client Inventory feature .................................................
Installing WMI Core 1.5 to client computers ..............................
Client Inventory resources .....................................................
Using the Client Inventory .....................................................
Managing Inventory resources ................................................
Managing collected data sets ........................................................
About collected data sets ........................................................
Showing the Collected Data folder ...........................................
Setting up collected data sets ..................................................
Creating a new collected data set .............................................
Populating the Inventory database ...........................................
Setting up collected data set properties .....................................
About managing collected data sets .........................................
Viewing inventory information .....................................................
Creating views .....................................................................
Viewing or modifying views ....................................................
About managing views ..........................................................
Setting the common Inventory view for computer groups .............
Setting the default Inventory views for new client computers ........
Viewing inventory information for client computers ...................
Creating and maintaining filters ....................................................
Creating filters .....................................................................
Setting up filter conditions .....................................................
Grouping filter conditions ......................................................
Viewing or modifying filters ...................................................
About managing filters ..........................................................
Creating and running reports ........................................................
Creating reports ...................................................................
Viewing or modifying reports .................................................
About managing reports ........................................................
Running a report ..................................................................
Setting up dynamic machine groups ...............................................
Creating dynamic machine groups ...........................................
Viewing or modifying dynamic machine groups .........................
201
201
203
204
206
206
206
207
207
208
210
211
213
214
214
216
217
217
219
219
221
222
223
226
229
230
230
231
232
233
233
235
236
237
17
18
Contents
About managing dynamic machine groups ................................ 237
Chapter 10
Additional Console options
Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity ...................................
Launching the Configuration Server ...............................................
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options ........................................
Symantec Ghost Console security ..................................................
Updating the client certificates ...............................................
Generating new certificates ....................................................
Changing the Symantec Ghost database account and password ...........
Using a script file to manage your database credentials ................
Section 3
Creating boot disks, exploring image files
and Symantec Ghost support
Chapter 11
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard ..........................................
About Ghost boot packages ...........................................................
How to use a Ghost boot package ...................................................
Files included in a Ghost package ...................................................
When to include a network card driver .....................................
When to include MS-DOS in a boot package ...............................
Opening the Ghost Boot Wizard ....................................................
Selecting which boot package to create ...........................................
Creating boot packages ................................................................
Standard boot packages .........................................................
Boot packages with network support ........................................
Creating a boot package that supports mapped network
drives ...........................................................................
Boot packages with CD and DVD support ..................................
Creating a boot image containing the Console boot partition .........
Boot packages that support Remote Installation Service (RIS) .......
Starting client computers in Ghost.exe from the network .............
Starting client computers from the network to connect with the
Symantec Ghost Console ..................................................
Selecting and adding a network driver ............................................
Selecting a template ....................................................................
Creating a multicard template .......................................................
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard .............................
Adding packet drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard .........................
Adding NDIS2 drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard .........................
239
242
242
248
248
248
249
249
254
254
254
255
255
256
256
257
259
259
264
265
268
269
271
273
274
276
277
278
279
279
280
Contents
Customizing the template ......................................................
Adding command-line parameters to a boot package .........................
Providing MS-DOS ......................................................................
Installing MS-DOS Client files .......................................................
Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards ............
Creating a DOS boot disk manually ................................................
Setting up packet drivers ........................................................
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets ............................
Chapter 12
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Image files and CD/DVD writers ....................................................
Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive ................................
Saving an image file to a supported CD/DVD ....................................
Create the Ghost boot disks ....................................................
Create and save the image file .................................................
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive .......................
Splitting an image file during a backup .....................................
Chapter 13
295
297
297
298
298
298
299
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
About Symantec Ghost image files .................................................
Image files and compression .........................................................
Performance on a network ......................................................
Image files and CRC32 .................................................................
Image files and volume spanning ...................................................
Limitations on the image file size ............................................
Size-limited image files ..........................................................
Spanned image files ..............................................................
Spanning across multiple volumes and limiting span sizes ...........
Restoring from a spanned image ..............................................
Image files and tape drives ...........................................................
Drives with BitLocker Drive Encryption ..........................................
Dynamic disks in Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000 ...............................
Support for Disk Drive Overlays (DDO) ...........................................
Hibernation and swap files ...........................................................
Backing up or migrating a server ...................................................
Resolving SID and configuration issues .....................................
Chapter 14
281
282
284
285
286
288
289
292
301
302
302
303
303
304
304
304
305
306
306
307
308
309
309
310
310
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Using Ghost Explorer .................................................................. 313
Viewing image files and their properties ......................................... 314
Launching a file ......................................................................... 315
19
20
Contents
Extracting a file or directory from an image file ................................
Modifying image files ..................................................................
Listing the contents of an image file ...............................................
About image file spans ................................................................
Setting the default split options ....................................................
Compiling an image file ...............................................................
Using Ghost Explorer from the command line ..................................
Using Ghost Explorer with long file names ................................
Section 4
Using Symantec Ghost locally
Chapter 15
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
About Ghost.exe .........................................................................
Using Ghost.exe on a stand-alone computer ....................................
Starting Ghost.exe ......................................................................
Using Ghost.exe with a mapped network drive .................................
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe ......................
About splitting images in a peer-to-peer operation ......................
Creating a backup image file .........................................................
Backing up a hard disk to an image file .....................................
Backing up a partition to an image file ......................................
Restoring from an image file .........................................................
Restoring a hard disk from an image file ...................................
Restoring a partition from an image file ....................................
Cloning disks and partitions .........................................................
Cloning disk to disk ...............................................................
Cloning partition to partition ..................................................
Verifying integrity ......................................................................
Adding switches to your Ghost.exe operation ...................................
Running Ghost32.exe in Windows ..................................................
Compatibility with Ghost.exe ..................................................
Chapter 16
315
315
316
317
317
318
318
319
323
324
325
325
326
329
329
330
332
334
334
336
338
338
339
341
342
343
344
Post-clone configuration (stand-alone)
About performing applying post-clone configuration changes from
the command-line ................................................................
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line ..............
Creating a configuration data file .............................................
Applying the configuration data file .........................................
345
346
346
348
Contents
Section 5
GhostCasting image files
Chapter 17
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
About GhostCasting ....................................................................
Splitting images in a GhostCast operation .................................
Preparing for GhostCasting ..........................................................
About creating the model computer .........................................
Creating a GhostCast Server .........................................................
Starting a GhostCast session .........................................................
Creating an image file ..................................................................
Connecting a computer to a session ..........................................
Restoring an image file onto client computers ..................................
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server ............................
Setting Auto Start parameters .......................................................
Setting the data transfer mode ......................................................
Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used ..........................
Viewing and changing GhostCast Server session options ....................
Running Ghost.exe on a client computer .........................................
Chapter 18
GhostCasting from the command line
About running GhostCast Server from the command line ...................
Starting the GhostCast session ......................................................
GhostCast Server command-line options .........................................
Command-line option examples using GhostCast Server ..............
Chapter 19
351
352
352
353
353
354
355
355
356
358
361
361
363
364
365
367
368
368
369
GhostCasting and IP addresses
About IP addresses for GhostCasting ..............................................
Locally specified IP addresses .......................................................
Examples of Wattcp.cfg client configuration files ........................
About using BOOTP/DHCP to assign IP addresses .............................
BOOTP/DHCP automatically defined IP address ..........................
Section 6
Creating executables to roll out
applications
Chapter 20
Getting started with AutoInstall
373
373
374
374
374
How AutoInstall works ................................................................. 377
Hardware and software restrictions .......................................... 378
Using AutoInstall ....................................................................... 378
21
22
Contents
Installing AI Snapshot and AI Builder on the model
computer ......................................................................
About setting up target computers ...........................................
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall .......................
About installing Microsoft service packs ...................................
About letting the model computer restart ..................................
About adding uninstall commands ...........................................
Using AutoInstall to install Office XP .......................................
Replicating Office XP .............................................................
Chapter 21
Creating AI packages
Creating an installation script for a software installation ...................
Capturing existing system information .....................................
Installing the software that you would like to package .................
Capturing system information again to determine changes ...........
About customizing and building AI packages ...................................
An example of variables and commands in AutoInstall ................
Customizing installation scripts ..............................................
Building AI packages .............................................................
Modifying installation scripts and AI packages ...........................
About executing and rolling out AI packages ....................................
Section 7
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and
computer names
Chapter 22
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer
names
About making SID changes with Sysprep and Ghost Walker on
NT-based clients ..................................................................
Symantec Ghost Walker capabilities .........................................
SID changing limitations .......................................................
About losing access to external data objects .....................................
About identifying user names and passwords across workstations .......
Using Ghost Walker ....................................................................
Running Ghost Walker from the command line ..........................
Chapter 23
379
380
380
380
380
381
381
381
385
385
386
388
389
390
391
394
395
395
399
400
401
402
402
402
404
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
About Sysprep ........................................................................... 411
Setting up Sysprep ...................................................................... 413
Adding a Sysprep configuration ............................................... 413
Contents
Updating a Sysprep configuration ............................................
Deleting a Sysprep configuration .............................................
How Sysprep works with cloning and the Console post-configuration
process ...............................................................................
Image create task ..................................................................
Image restore task ................................................................
Cloning with Sysprep ..................................................................
About using Sysprep switches .................................................
Configuring the unattended files ...................................................
Editing, restoring, or reloading the unattended files ....................
Section 8
Symantec Ghost utilities
Chapter 24
Managing partitions using GDisk
About GDisk ..............................................................................
Running GDisk .....................................................................
Overview of the main command-line switches ..................................
Online Help for command-line switches ....................................
Switches common to all GDisk commands .................................
Creating a partition .....................................................................
Reinitializing the Master Boot Record .............................................
Reinitializing GPT disks ...............................................................
Showing information about disks ..................................................
Performing multiple GDisk operations using batch mode ...................
Deleting and wiping your disk .......................................................
Wiping Host Protected Areas (HPA)/PARTIES .............................
Confirming a disk wipe ..........................................................
Activating or deactivating a partition .............................................
Hiding or unhiding a partition ......................................................
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu ..............................
Specifying the boot.ini path and file name .................................
Displaying the list of current boot entries .................................
Adding an entry to boot.ini .....................................................
Removing an entry from boot.ini .............................................
Setting the default boot option and timeout ...............................
About FAT16 partitions in Windows NT ..........................................
Support for large hard-disks .........................................................
Chapter 25
414
414
415
415
415
416
417
418
419
423
424
425
426
426
428
430
431
432
432
434
436
437
437
438
439
439
439
440
442
442
443
443
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
About OmniFS ........................................................................... 445
What OmniFS does ............................................................... 446
23
24
Contents
OmniFS operating environments ...................................................
Using OmniFS ............................................................................
Access method switches .........................................................
Accessing files and folders with names that contain spaces ..........
Listing drive identifiers .........................................................
OmniFS operations .....................................................................
Setting the attribute for a file ..................................................
Copying files and directories ...................................................
Renaming files and folders .....................................................
Deleting a file ......................................................................
Deleting a folder ...................................................................
Listing a folder .....................................................................
Listing all volumes on a computer ............................................
Listing the commands ...........................................................
Displaying the OmniFS version and copyright ............................
Creating a directory ..............................................................
Using OmniFS to recover files .......................................................
Using a script file .......................................................................
OmniFS scenarios .......................................................................
Using OmniFS from the command line .....................................
Using OmniFS with a script file ...............................................
Using OmniFS with a batch file ...............................................
OmniFS error handling ................................................................
Correcting the date and time .........................................................
Chapter 26
446
446
447
449
449
450
450
451
451
452
452
452
453
453
453
453
454
455
456
456
456
457
457
457
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
About GhRegEdit ........................................................................ 459
Using GhRegEdit ........................................................................ 459
Section 9
Appendixes
Appendix A
Command-line switches
About Symantec Ghost switches ....................................................
Command-line switches ...............................................................
Accessing files ...........................................................................
Using the clone switch .................................................................
Defining the type of clone command ........................................
Setting a source for the clone switch ........................................
Setting a destination for the clone switch ..................................
Setting a destination size for the clone switch ............................
Examples of clone switch usage ...............................................
467
468
485
485
486
488
489
490
491
Contents
Batch file example ................................................................
Using the -CRC32 switch ..............................................................
Examples of -CRC32 usage ......................................................
Files not checked with CRC .....................................................
About numbering the Virtual Partition ...........................................
Appendix B
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
AutoInstall AI Builder menus ........................................................
Commands ................................................................................
Base Installation ..................................................................
Appearance .........................................................................
Messages & Inputs ................................................................
System changes ....................................................................
If Conditions ........................................................................
Defaults and Calls .................................................................
Using variables in commands and assigning values .....................
Appendix C
497
497
498
502
503
507
512
521
524
Transfer methods and hardware setup
Transfer and hardware requirements ..............................................
Peer-to-peer connections .............................................................
LPT or USB connections .........................................................
TCP/IP connections ...............................................................
SCSI tape drives .........................................................................
GhostCast transfers ....................................................................
Removable media .......................................................................
CD/DVD usage ...........................................................................
Mapped network volume ..............................................................
Internal drives ...........................................................................
USB devices ...............................................................................
FireWire devices .........................................................................
Third-party device ......................................................................
Appendix D
492
493
494
495
496
531
532
532
532
533
533
533
533
533
534
534
534
535
USB and DirectParallel cables
Parallel Technologies cables ......................................................... 537
Other USB cables ........................................................................ 538
Appendix E
Wattcp.cfg network configuration file
About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file ........................................... 539
Wattcp.cfg keywords ................................................................... 539
25
26
Contents
Appendix F
Cloning with Linux
Supported configurations .............................................................
Boot configuration ......................................................................
Support for advanced Linux features ..............................................
Symantec Ghost utility support .....................................................
Appendix G
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
About GDisk disk-wipe specifications .............................................
Clearing, sanitizing, and viewing hard disks ....................................
About completeness of coverage ....................................................
Determining disk size ..................................................................
Appendix H
555
555
556
558
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
About installation interface types ..................................................
Full interface mode ...............................................................
Basic interface mode .............................................................
Silent interface mode ............................................................
About installation modes .............................................................
Installing from the command line ..................................................
Uninstalling from the command line ..............................................
Appendix K
551
551
553
553
553
554
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
About adding DOS drivers ............................................................
Downloading the driver from the manufacturer's Web site .................
Making a driver template .............................................................
Getting the PCI information .........................................................
Appendix J
545
545
547
549
Customizing Symantec Ghost functionality
About customization ...................................................................
Limiting functionality from the environment file ..............................
Examples of customized functionality ............................................
Image file restoration only .....................................................
Backup tool only ...................................................................
OEM version of Symantec Ghost ....................................................
Appendix I
541
542
543
543
561
561
562
562
562
563
566
Installing the boot partition
About boot partitions .................................................................. 567
Installing a boot partition on a client computer ................................ 567
Contents
Appendix L
Configuring firewalls
Symantec Ghost port configuration ............................................... 569
Appendix M
Troubleshooting
Ghost.exe errors messages ...........................................................
Universal Network Driver errors ..............................................
Ghost.exe problems .....................................................................
Writing to USB CD/DVD .........................................................
Booting from a 3Com PXE image ..............................................
Starting from a PXE image on a Dell Dimension 8100
computer ......................................................................
USB and FireWire support ......................................................
Phoenix-Award BIOS computers ..............................................
Vista volume containing system restore points ...........................
Resolving interrupt conflicts ..................................................
Symantec Ghost Console errors .....................................................
About using Ghost with NTFS files ..........................................
Symantec GhostCast errors ..........................................................
Symantec Ghost and legacy network cards ......................................
About command-line or scheduled tasks .........................................
Problems running Symantec Ghost ................................................
Cloning Windows 2000/XP computers ......................................
Vista partition restore ...........................................................
AutoInstall limitations ..........................................................
Executing a clone and configuration change task ........................
Installing a client remotely ....................................................
Transferring files to clients with Firewalls installed ....................
Wake on LAN (WOL) ..............................................................
Joining client computers to Active Directory Domains .................
Network card not found/Card not installed ................................
Cannot start from drive A .......................................................
Windows blue screen .............................................................
Missing hibernation file .........................................................
Getting out of the virtual partition ...........................................
About cancelling a Ghost.exe operation ....................................
Installing and uninstalling Symantec Ghost ..............................
About connecting using USB peer-to-peer .................................
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD .................
Supported CD-R/RW and DVD drives .......................................
Inaccessible CD-ROM drive .....................................................
CD-R/RW disc ......................................................................
Loading Ghost.exe from the floppy disk drive ............................
573
575
575
575
576
576
576
576
577
577
578
580
582
584
584
585
585
585
585
586
586
586
587
587
587
588
588
588
589
589
589
590
590
590
590
591
592
27
28
Contents
Outdated computer BIOS .......................................................
Outdated CD-R/RW drive BIOS ................................................
About PC-DOS or MS-DOS ......................................................
High compression .................................................................
Using third-party software to write to the CD-R/RW disc ..............
About restoring from an image spanned over multiple
CD/DVDs ......................................................................
Appendix N
593
Diagnostics
Hard-drive detection and diagnostic information ..............................
View Log .............................................................................
Abort error file (Ghosterr.txt) ..................................................
Creating a full diagnostic statistics dump summary ....................
Elementary network testing techniques ..........................................
Testing TCP/IP functionality .........................................................
Pinging another computer ......................................................
Generating a GhostCast log file ...............................................
Appendix O
592
592
592
592
593
595
595
595
596
596
596
597
597
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications .......................................................
Adobe Acrobat Reader ...........................................................
Adobe Illustrator ..................................................................
Adobe Photoshop ..................................................................
AOL Instant Messenger ................................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 3.0 .....................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 4.3 .....................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7 .....................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 4.8 .....................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1 .....................................................
AOL Instant Messenger 5.2 .....................................................
BackupExec System Recovery .......................................................
Cisco VPN Client .........................................................................
Cisco VPN Client 3.6.3 ...........................................................
Cisco VPN Client 4.0.2 ...........................................................
LiveState Recovery Desktop ..........................................................
Lotus Notes ...............................................................................
Lotus Notes 4.6 ....................................................................
Lotus Notes 5.0 ....................................................................
Lotus Notes 6.0 ....................................................................
Lotus Organizer ..........................................................................
McAfee VirusScan ......................................................................
McAfee VirusScan 6.0 ............................................................
600
600
606
608
611
612
612
612
614
615
617
618
619
619
620
620
621
621
622
622
623
623
623
Contents
McAfee VirusScan 7.0 ............................................................
Microsoft Access ........................................................................
Microsoft Access 97 ..............................................................
Microsoft Access 2000 ...........................................................
Microsoft Access XP ..............................................................
Microsoft Access 2003 ...........................................................
Microsoft Access 2007 ...........................................................
Microsoft Excel ..........................................................................
Microsoft Excel 97 ................................................................
Microsoft Excel 2000 .............................................................
Microsoft Excel XP ................................................................
Microsoft Excel 2003 .............................................................
Microsoft Excel 2007 .............................................................
Microsoft Internet Explorer ..........................................................
Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 ...............................................
Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and 5.5 .....................................
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 ...............................................
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 ...............................................
Microsoft OneNote ......................................................................
Microsoft OneNote 2003 ........................................................
Microsoft OneNote 2007 ........................................................
Microsoft Outlook .......................................................................
Microsoft Outlook 97 .............................................................
Microsoft Outlook 98 .............................................................
Microsoft Outlook 2000 .........................................................
Microsoft Outlook XP ............................................................
Microsoft Outlook 2003 .........................................................
Microsoft Outlook Caveats ......................................................
Microsoft Outlook Express ...........................................................
Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0 .................................................
Microsoft Outlook Express 5.0 and 6.0 ......................................
Microsoft PowerPoint ..................................................................
Microsoft PowerPoint 97 ........................................................
Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 .....................................................
Microsoft PowerPoint XP ........................................................
Microsoft PowerPoint 2003 .....................................................
Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 .....................................................
Microsoft Project ........................................................................
Microsoft Project 98 ..............................................................
Microsoft Project 2000 ...........................................................
Microsoft Project 2002 ...........................................................
Microsoft Project 2003 ...........................................................
Microsoft Project 2007 ...........................................................
624
625
625
626
627
627
628
629
629
630
631
632
633
634
634
635
635
636
637
637
638
638
639
639
640
641
642
643
647
647
648
648
649
649
650
651
652
652
653
653
654
655
655
29
30
Contents
Microsoft Visio ...........................................................................
Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro ...........................................
Microsoft Visio 2000 .............................................................
Microsoft Visio 2002 .............................................................
Microsoft Visio 2003 .............................................................
Microsoft Visio 2007 .............................................................
Microsoft Word ..........................................................................
Microsoft Word 97 ................................................................
Microsoft Word 2000 .............................................................
Microsoft Word XP ................................................................
Microsoft Word 2003 .............................................................
Microsoft Word 2007 .............................................................
MSN Messenger .........................................................................
MSN Messenger 3.5 ...............................................................
MSN Messenger 4.6 ...............................................................
MSN Messenger 5.0 ...............................................................
MSN Messenger 6.0 ...............................................................
MSN Messenger 7.0 and 7.5 ....................................................
MSN Messenger 8.0 ...............................................................
NetMeeting ...............................................................................
NetMeeting 2.11 ...................................................................
NetMeeting 3.01 ...................................................................
Palm Desktop .............................................................................
Palm Desktop 3.0 ..................................................................
Palm Desktop 4.0.1 ...............................................................
Palm Desktop 4.1 ..................................................................
Symantec Norton AntiVirus ..........................................................
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 7.5 and 7.6 ....................................
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1 ...............................................
Symantec pcAnywhere ................................................................
Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0 .....................................................
Symantec pcAnywhere 9.2 .....................................................
Symantec pcAnywhere 10.0 and 10.5 ........................................
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.0 ....................................................
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.5 and 12.0 ........................................
Windows Desktop Display ............................................................
Windows Desktop Display 95 ..................................................
Windows Desktop Display 98 ..................................................
Windows Desktop Display NT .................................................
Windows Desktop Display 2000 ...............................................
Windows Desktop Display XP ..................................................
Windows Explorer ......................................................................
Windows Explorer 95 and 98 ...................................................
656
656
657
657
658
658
659
659
660
661
661
662
663
664
664
664
665
665
666
667
667
667
668
668
668
669
670
670
670
671
671
672
672
673
674
674
674
675
675
676
676
677
677
Contents
Windows Explorer NT ............................................................
Windows Explorer 2000 .........................................................
Windows Explorer XP ............................................................
Windows Accessibility Settings .....................................................
Windows 95 Accessibility Settings ...........................................
Windows 98 Accessibility Settings ...........................................
Windows NT Accessibility Settings ..........................................
Windows 2000 Accessibility Settings ........................................
Windows XP Accessibility Settings ...........................................
Windows Vista Accessibility Settings ........................................
Windows Mouse Settings .............................................................
Windows 95 and NT Mouse Settings .........................................
Windows 98 Mouse Settings ...................................................
Windows 2000 Mouse Settings ................................................
Windows XP Mouse Settings ...................................................
Windows Vista Mouse Settings ................................................
Windows Regional Settings ..........................................................
Windows 95 Regional Settings ................................................
Windows 98 Regional Settings ................................................
Windows NT Regional Settings ................................................
Windows 2000 Regional Settings .............................................
Windows XP Regional Settings ................................................
Windows Vista Regional Settings .............................................
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings ........................................
Windows 95 Sound and Multimedia Settings ..............................
Windows 98 Sound and Multimedia Settings ..............................
Windows NT Sound and Multimedia Settings .............................
Windows 2000 Sound and Multimedia Settings ..........................
Windows XP Sound and Multimedia Settings .............................
Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings ..........................
Windows Taskbar and Start Menu ..................................................
Windows 95, 98, and NT Taskbar and Start Menu .......................
Windows 2000 Taskbar and Start Menu ....................................
Windows XP Taskbar and Start Menu .......................................
WinZip .....................................................................................
Yahoo Messenger ........................................................................
Glossary
Index
677
678
678
679
679
679
680
680
680
681
681
682
682
682
683
683
684
684
685
686
686
687
688
689
690
690
690
691
691
692
693
693
693
694
694
695
31
32
Contents
Section
Getting Started
■
Introducing Symantec Ghost
■
Understanding Symantec Ghost
■
Installing Symantec Ghost
1
34
Chapter
1
Introducing Symantec
Ghost
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Symantec Ghost
■
What’s new in Symantec Ghost
■
Components of Symantec Ghost
About Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost reduces costs and overhead associated with installing software
applications and operating systems.
It makes PC management and deployment issues easier and more cost effective.
Functionality, including computer configuration management, computer and user
migration, and incremental backup, defines Symantec Ghost as the solution for
PC management.
Symantec Ghost can make complete backups of disks and partitions. It copies
system files that other backup utilities miss, making it a useful tool for disaster
recovery operations.
Symantec Ghost includes the following features:
Create image files of
Use Symantec Ghost to create image files of and restore
and restore computers computers. Computers can be backed up to a network or to a wide
range of hard drives and removable media, including CD/DVD
drives, FireWire and USB hard drives, ZIP, and JAZ drives.
36
Introducing Symantec Ghost
About Symantec Ghost
Hardware and
software inventory
Manage hardware and software inventory from the centralized
Console.
Create detailed reports from fully customizable filters and views.
Create dynamic folders to manage a group of target computers
based upon hardware or software attributes to streamline
operating system migration.
Client staging area
Use a directory on a client computer as a repository for Symantec
Ghost image files, application packages, user profiles, or other
files.
Preserve the contents of a selected directory during a restore,
keeping a local backup and recovery image file.
Manage computers
Remotely manage all client computers from a central Console and
execute tasks on client computers from the Console or from the
client.
Multicast file transfer Transfer all files, including installation packages, using the
multicasting functionality from the Console. Reduce network
traffic by sending an individual file to multiple recipients
simultaneously. Flexible file transfer lets you specify where a file
transfer goes.
Retire disks
Wipe disks to U.S. Department of Defense standards using GDisk.
Transfer user data
Capture user files, application settings, and operating system
settings from a computer and transfer them onto another
computer or onto a reimaged computer.
Ghostcasting
Use the GhostCasting feature to clone computers efficiently and
to help minimize the impact on network traffic.
AutoInstall
Create executable programs that install software packages.
File system support
Back up, restore, or clone FAT, FAT32, NTFS, and Linux Ext2/3
file systems.
Image file editing
Edit FAT, FAT32, NTFS, and Linux image files by using Ghost
Explorer.
Restore individual files Restore individual files from an image file by using Ghost Explorer.
SID-changing
capability
Change SIDs using the Symantec Ghost utility Ghost Walker.
Symantec Ghost also supports Microsoft Sysprep.
Stand-alone post-clone Apply configuration settings to a computer directly. The
configuration client
stand-alone post-clone configuration lets you run a post-clone
configuration without the Console.
Introducing Symantec Ghost
What’s new in Symantec Ghost
Disk and partition
management
Run GDisk from DOS or from a command shell in Windows to
manage partitions and disks.
OmniFS utility
Manipulate files and directories in a locally attached NTFS or FAT
file system.
GhRegEdit utility
Edit the Windows registry from DOS or WinPE by using the
executable programs GhRegEdt and GhRegEdit32.
Tutorials
View the set of tutorials that are included in Symantec Ghost to
provide a demonstration of the most commonly used features.
What’s new in Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost 11 includes the following features:
Windows Vista support Adds full support for imaging and computer management in
Windows Vista.
NTFS file editing
Lets you modify NTFS images with new and updated content.
Updated inventory
filters and reports
Adds new inventory filters to let you group computers that are
Vista-compatible.
GPT support
Includes support for GPT disk structures within Ghost.
Integration of
Symantec Client
Migration
Lets you migrate user desktop settings and application settings,
files, and registry settings from the Console. Symantec Client
Migration is integrated into the Ghost Console as the User
Migration feature. The User Migration feature replaces the Move
the User feature and is backward-compatible with the Move the
User feature.
User Migration Wizard Lets you migrate user desktop settings and applications settings,
files, and registry settings directly from computer-to-computer
or to and from a migration package.
Increased RAID
support
Updates Ghost32 to increase support for preconfigured RAID
arrays.
Multiple Network Card Updates the Console client to add support for multiple NIC cards.
(NIC) support
Template tasks
Lets you create template tasks. You can save a task that has
incomplete data, and then run it from the command line.
37
38
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
Increased support for
mapped network
drives
Includes support for mapped network drives for peer-to-peer and
GhostCast operations.
GhostWalker32
Lets you assign unique security identifiers (SIDs) from Windows
PE by using GhostWalker32.
GDisk support for
NTFS
Lets you format NTFS partitions through GDisk.
Increased functionality Lets you run GDisk operations that were previously available only
for GDisk32
in DOS.
Components of Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost includes a number of products and utilities that you can install.
Install components that are required on your server and client computers.
Symantec Ghost Console
The Symantec Ghost Console is a Windows server-based application for remote
management of computers.
Using the Symantec Ghost Console, IT managers can group targeted computers
for a task and initiate the process from the Console.
Symantec Ghost Console client
The Symantec Ghost Console client enables remote control from the Symantec
Ghost Console. The Console client includes a Windows agent and a Ghost partition.
You can install the client on Windows Vista/XP/2000/Me/NT/98 computers. The
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
Windows agent lets the computer start from the Ghost partition when necessary,
and it coordinates the tasks that you start from the Console.
Symantec GhostCast Server
The GhostCast Server lets you deliver an image file to multiple computers
simultaneously through a single, IP multicast transmission. A multicast
transmission can minimize the impact on network traffic. The GhostCast Server
sends and receives images to or from one or more computers. This method of
delivery usually is faster than accessing a mapped network drive.
Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard
You use the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard to create boot packages. A boot package
can be a boot disk, a Ghost image file, an ISO image, or a Preboot eXecution
Environment (PXE) image. You use boot packages for cloning operations. For
example, you can create a boot disk for GhostCasting or create a boot image for
use with PXE applications or the Microsoft Remote Installation Service. The
Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard helps you locate the drivers that you need to create
a boot package.
39
40
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall has two components, AI Builder and AI Snapshot,
that let you create and customize an application image, which you can deploy to
your target workstation or workstations.
Symantec Ghost executable program
The Symantec Ghost executable program (Ghost.exe) lets you back up, restore,
and clone computers. The Ghost.exe executable program has a small footprint
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
with minimal conventional memory requirements. You can run it from a boot-disk
set or from a hard drive. Symantec Ghost can restore a computer from an image
file that contains Windows XP and a full installation of Microsoft Office in less
than one minute.
Note: The performance tests were performed on P4, 7,200 RPM hard drive.
The Ghost executable program includes the following versions:
Ghost.exe
Runs in DOS.
Ghost32.exe
Runs in Microsoft Windows Vista/XP/PE/2000/NT/98.
You can use Ghost32.exe to reate image files on hard drives that
are accessible from these operating systems or that can make a
connection with the GhostCast Server.
Note: To create an image file of the boot drive with Ghost32, you
run Ghost32 in Windows PE.
Symantec Ghost User Migration Wizard
The Symantec User Migration Wizard is an application that lets you migrate the
settings and files from one computer to another. The process of upgrading
hardware or operating systems can be a time-consuming task. You must transfer
files and folders and then reset applications with mandatory settings and custom
41
42
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
options. Symantec User Migration helps facilitate this process by letting you copy
files, folders, and settings from a source computer to a destination computer. You
can run the wizard in a direct, computer-to-computer operation, or you can save
the settings and files in a package.
GhConfig tool
The GhConfig tool lets you apply configuration settings directly to a computer.
You can use this feature to apply post-clone configuration settings without using
the Symantec Ghost Console.
Ghost Walker
Ghost Walker lets you assign unique security identifiers (SIDs) to restored and
cloned Microsoft Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT workstations. The SID is an
important part of the Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT security architecture. It provides
a unique identifier for the computers that are attached to your network.
Ghost Walker includes the following versions:
Ghost Walker
Runs in DOS
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
Ghost Walker 32
Runs from the command line in a WinPE
operating system
Ghost Explorer
Ghost Explorer lists all of the files and directories that are within an image file.
You can add, recover, and delete individual directories and files to or from an
image file.
GDisk
GDisk is a complete replacement for the FDISK and FORMAT utilities that allows
the following:
■
FAT and NTFS file system formatting
■
Batch mode operation
■
Hiding and unhiding of partitions
■
Secure disk wiping to U.S. DoD requirements
■
Extensive partition reporting
Unlike FDISK, which uses interactive menus and prompts, GDisk is command-line
driven and offers faster configuration of a disk’s partitions.
Table 1-1 lists the GDisk versions that are available.
Table 1-1
GDisk versions
Version
Description
GDisk
Runs in DOS
43
44
Introducing Symantec Ghost
Components of Symantec Ghost
Table 1-1
GDisk versions (continued)
Version
Description
GDisk32
Runs from the command line in a Windows operating system
GhRegEdit
GhRegEdit is a utility for editing the Windows registry.
Table 1-2 lists the GhRegEdit versions that are available.
Table 1-2
GhRegEdit versions
Version
Description
GhRegEdt
Runs in DOS
GhRegEdit32
Runs from the command line in a Windows operating system.
OmniFS
OmniFS is a general-purpose utility for manipulating files and directories in a
locally attached NTFS or FAT file system (including FAT hidden partitions).
Table 1-3 lists the OmniFS versions that are available.
Table 1-3
OmniFS versions
Version
Description
OmniFS
Runs in DOS
OmniFS32
Runs from the command line in a Windows operating system
Chapter
2
Understanding Symantec
Ghost
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
The Symantec Ghost partition
■
Choosing a method to create an image file
■
Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost
■
Where to find more information
The Symantec Ghost partition
For the Symantec Ghost Console to execute tasks on client computers, you must
have a Ghost partition on the client. There are two types of partitions that you
can create on client computers. A client computer requires one of the following:
Virtual partition
Once you install the Console client remotely or from the CD, Symantec
Ghost creates the virtual partition automatically when a task that
requires a computer to restart in DOS is executed.
46
Understanding Symantec Ghost
The Symantec Ghost partition
Ghost boot
partition
Installing the Ghost boot partition is more complicated and time
consuming than creating the virtual partition. It involves creating a
boot package and then an image file to restore onto the client
computer.
The Ghost boot partition is used on client computers that have one of
the following:
A version previous to 7.5 of the Console client for Symantec Ghost
installed.
■ No operating system installed. You can create a Ghost boot
partition that contains the Console client, which then connects to
the Console.
■
Note: You can also connect to a computer that has no operating
system installed by using a PXE Server.
See “Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost” on page 48.
See “About boot partitions” on page 567.
You can check the Ghost partition settings for each client computer. You can also
set the virtual partition parameters globally from the Symantec Ghost Console.
See “About setting up the virtual partition” on page 98.
Using the virtual partition to connect to the Console
The virtual partition is created on client computers that have an operating system
installed but do not have the Ghost boot partition installed.
The operating system on the client computer creates a nonfragmented, contiguous
file that is formatted as a FAT 16 partition. The DOS network drivers and the DOS
operating system are copied to the file. The Master Boot Record (MBR) and the
partition table point to the file and see it as an active partition. When the task
ends, the MBR is reassigned to point back to the host's operating system.
Note: A free primary slot in the partition table is required.
The partition table in the MBR shows if a disk is partitioned into up to four primary
partitions or three primary partitions and one extended partition. If four primary
partitions already exist, the virtual partition cannot be created.
If a client computer uses static IP, the same static IP address is used in the virtual
partition.
The support for virtual partitions has the following limitations:
■
Compressed drives on Windows 98 computers are not supported.
Understanding Symantec Ghost
Choosing a method to create an image file
■
Compressed NTFS drives on Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT are not supported.
■
The support of dynamic disks is limited to simple dynamic disks.
■
Spanned, striped, and RAID-5 volumes are not supported.
■
GPT disks are not supported.
Client staging area
The client staging area is a scenario that brings together Symantec Ghost features
to let you do the following:
■
Store Ghost images, application packages, user profiles, and other files locally
on a client computer.
You can remotely create a directory on a client computer and transfer files
from the Console by using multicasting technology.
See “Setting File Transfer properties” on page 139.
See “Local deployment of Console resources” on page 117.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
■
Restore a computer or migrate a computer to Windows Vista by using the files
stored locally in the client staging area, reducing network traffic.
See “Local deployment of Console resources” on page 117.
■
Preserve user data and settings.
You can create a user-migration package to preserve the files that are on a
client computer when you perform a restore operation from an image file. The
package and the image file are preserved in the client staging area.
See “Preserving files and folders on client computers” on page 134.
Choosing a method to create an image file
There are several ways to create an image and restore it onto a computer. Which
of the following methods you choose depends on how many computers you are
restoring, the operating system installed, and the functions required:
47
48
Understanding Symantec Ghost
Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost
Stand-alone
computer
You can use the Symantec Ghost executable to back up one drive or
partition to an image file on another drive or partition. You can create
an image file on a computer or between computers through an
LPT/USB, mapped network drive or a network connection. This process
is fast and efficient. It requires only a boot package that includes
Ghost.exe and the relevant drivers.
In a peer-to-peer operation, the Symantec Ghost executable is run on
each computer from a boot package. You use the Symantec Ghost Boot
Wizard to create the boot package.
Over a network by You can use the GhostCast Server on a server computer and run the
using GhostCast
Symantec Ghost executable on the client computers to create an image
file. You can then restore a number of computers simultaneously.
The Symantec Ghost executable is used on each client computer from
a boot package created with the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard.
Console task
The Console draws on the functionality of Ghost.exe and GhostCasting
but offers many more functions. A task is created that can be run
concurrently with other tasks. After the task is complete, you can
apply configuration settings to the computer.
Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost
The Symantec Ghost OEM version of 3Com Boot Services is included with Symantec
Ghost. This lets you install a PXE server.
The PXE server is useful for the following:
■
Connecting a client computer with no operating system installed to the Console
Server or the GhostCast Server.
You can perform Console or GhostCast operations, including installing the
Console client on the client computer.
■
Disaster recovery.
The 3Com Boot Services functionality is not detailed in the Symantec Ghost
documentation.
For more information, see the 3Com Boot Services documentation, which is
included on the product CD.
See “Starting client computers in Ghost.exe from the network” on page 273.
See “Starting client computers from the network to connect with the Symantec
Ghost Console” on page 274.
You can also find more information about using 3Com Boot Services with Symantec
Ghost by going to the Symantec Knowledge Base article at the following URL:
Understanding Symantec Ghost
Where to find more information
http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/docid/2000103113200725
Where to find more information
Each application includes guides and online help.
Note: The guides are also available on the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD.
Symantec Ghost documentation includes the following guides in PDF format:
Symantec Ghost Implementation Guide
Symantec User Migration Implementation Guide
You can also find more information about Symantec Ghost on the Symantec Ghost
user forums at the following URL:
http://forums.symantec.com/discussions/forum.jspa?forumID=109
49
50
Understanding Symantec Ghost
Where to find more information
Chapter
3
Installing Symantec Ghost
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About installing Symantec Ghost
■
Before you install
■
System requirements
■
Installing Symantec Ghost Console
■
Installing the Console client
■
Installing the Configuration Client Stand-alone
■
Installing the User Migration Wizard
■
Installing 3Com Boot Services
■
Post-installation tasks
About installing Symantec Ghost
There are a number of ways to install Symantec Ghost depending on how you
want to use it and the setup of the computer on which it is being installed.
How to install Symantec Ghost AutoInstall is covered separately.
See “Using AutoInstall” on page 378.
Before you install
Symantec Ghost includes a number of software packages. They are listed as follows
with details of what you need to install and where you need to install it:
52
Installing Symantec Ghost
System requirements
Symantec Ghost
Console
Install on the server computer from which you plan to remotely back
up, restore, clone, and configure other workstations. Installs all
components of Symantec Ghost on the server except for the Console
client, AI Snapshot, and the Symantec User Migration Wizard.
Symantec Ghost
Console client
Install on your workstations to enable communication between your
workstations and the Symantec Ghost Console. You can install the
client from either the CD or from the Console.
Symantec Ghost
Install on a workstation that is not to be managed by the Symantec
Configuration
Ghost Console. Install this client to apply configuration settings after
Client (Standalone) a restore or clone using Ghost.exe if you are joining the computer to
a domain.
See “About performing applying post-clone configuration changes
from the command-line” on page 345.
Symantec Ghost
Standard Tools
Install when the Console is not required. Install all components of
Symantec Ghost except for the Console server and client, and the
Symantec User Migration Wizard.
Symantec User
Migration Wizard
Install on a client computer on which you want to create a migration
package or run a peer-to-peer migration operation.
AutoInstall
Install on the computer on which you want to create packages to install
applications.
See “Using AutoInstall” on page 378.
The Symantec Ghost Solution Suite Getting Started guide includes common scenarios
for using Symantec Ghost and details which components must be installed for
each scenario.
System requirements
The minimum hardware and software requirements to run Symantec Ghost vary
according to the components you install.
Symantec Ghost Console and Standard Tools
The minimum requirements for running the Symantec Ghost Console are as
follows:
■
Pentium processor
■
VGA monitor, 800 x 600 screen resolution
■
One of the following:
Installing Symantec Ghost
System requirements
■
Windows Vista Business/Enterprise/Ultimate
■
Windows 2000 Professional/Server SP3
■
Windows XP Professional SP2
■
Windows Server 2003 Standard/Enterprise SP1
■
Windows Server 2003 R2 Standard/Enterprise
Note: Symantec Ghost has been tested with the service packs listed above. We
recommend that you install the latest service packs available from Microsoft.
Ghost executable
You can run Ghost.exe on a computer with the following minimum requirements:
■
IBM PC computer or 100% compatible
■
Pentium processor
■
16 MB RAM
■
VGA monitor
■
Microsoft-compatible mouse recommended
■
One of the following:
■
PC DOS as included with Symantec Ghost
■
MS DOS
You can run Ghost32.exe on a computer with one of the following operating system
requirements:
■
Windows Vista(Business/Enterprise/Ultimate)/XP/Server 2003/2000
Professional
■
Windows Preinstallation Environment (WinPE)
You can run Ghost32 on all 64-bit Windows operating systems except for WinPE
64-bit. Ghost32 does not support WinPE 64-bit because WinPE 64-bit does not
include WOW64.
Symantec Ghost supports Ghost32 on the following WinPE versions:
Windows XP SP2
Version 2004
Windows 2003 SP1 Version 2005
Windows Vista
Version 2.0
53
54
Installing Symantec Ghost
System requirements
Symantec Ghost Console client and Configuration client
The minimum requirements for running the Symantec Ghost Console client or
the Configuration client are as follows:
■
Networked computer with Windows
Vista(Business/Enterprise/Ultimate)/XP/Server 2003/2000 Professional or
Windows NT 4.0 Workstation SP6
You can also install the Console client on Windows 98.
■
Single boot system
Symantec Ghost does not support dual-boot computers. You cannot install the
Console client or the Configuration client on Apple Mac computers.
■
Can have more than one physical disk, but backup functionality supports the
first physical disk only
■
DOS drivers for network card
See “Selecting which boot package to create” on page 257.
AutoInstall and Incremental Backups have the following support limitations:
■
Windows 98/NT platforms are not supported.
■
On x64 platforms, you can only capture 32-bit applications.
■
You cannot capture 64-bit applications.
The minimum requirements for executing the user migration feature are as follows:
■
Computer with Windows Vista(Business/Enterprise/Ultimate)/XP
Professional/2000/NT 4.0/98
Client Inventory
To use the Symantec Ghost Client Inventory feature, you must have Windows
Management Instrumentation (WMI) Core 1.5 installed on each client computer.
WMI is included in Windows Vista/XP/2000. It is not included in Windows 98/NT.
Earlier versions of WMI Core let you use the Client Inventory, but these versions
might not contain some of the classes and properties that are included in version
1.5.
You can install WMI Core 1.5 manually or by setting up a task in the Ghost Console.
See “Installing WMI Core 1.5 to client computers” on page 201.
The minimum requirements for running WMI Core 1.5 on client computers are
as follows:
Installing Symantec Ghost
System requirements
Software:
Hardware:
■
Microsoft® Internet Explorer version 5 or later
■
Windows 98/98SE/NT4SP4
■
Pentium-class computer
■
32 MB RAM
■
30 MB of available hard disk space
Video graphics card support for 256 colors at an 800 by 600
resolution
■ Network card
■
Symantec User Migration Wizard
The minimum requirements for running Symantec User Migration Wizard are as
follows:
■
Computer with Windows Vista(Business/Enterprise/Ultimate)/XP
Professional/2000/NT 4.0/98
Symantec User Migration does not support server platforms.
Supported backup media
In addition to saving a backup to a secondary partition or an internal hard disk,
Symantec Ghost can also save a backup to the following external media devices:
■
CD-R/RW
■
DVD+RW/-RW/+R/-R
■
USB 1.1/2.0 hard drive and CD/DVD recordable devices
■
FireWire (IEEE) 1394 hard drive and CD/DVD recordable devices
■
Atapi tape (QIC157) devices
■
SCSI tape
■
A second computer using a peer-to-peer connection
■
Mapped network drive
■
ZIP drive
■
JAZ drive
CD and DVD writing
To write to a CD/DVD you must have a CD or DVD writer supported by Symantec
Ghost.
55
56
Installing Symantec Ghost
System requirements
For more information, see the list of supported devices on the Symantec Support
Web site at the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/cddvddriver
File systems supported for back up, restore, and cloning tasks
File systems supported for back up, restore, and cloning tasks are as follows:
■
All FAT
■
All NTFS
■
EXT2/3
See “Supported configurations” on page 541.
Ghost lets you backup. restore, and clone Windows 64-bit operating systems. You
can back up, restore, and clone disks that have AMD 64-bit processors or that
have Intel EM64T processors.
Support for GPT disks
The GUID partition table (GPT) is a standard for formatting a partition on a disk.
It replaces the master boot record (MBR) disk format. GPT is part of the Extensible
Firmware Interface (EFI) standard, which is intended to replace PC BIOS.
GPT uses logical block addressing and has the following features:
■
It allows up to 128 primary partitions and, therefore, does not support extended
partitions.
■
It allows a volume size that is greater than 2 TB.
■
It can be used as a storage volume on an x64-based platform
Symantec Ghost supports GPT-formatted disks using the following executable
programs:
■
Ghost
■
Ghost32
■
GDisk
■
GDisk32
■
Ghost Walker
■
Ghost Walker 32
■
GhConfig
■
GhConfig32
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing Symantec Ghost Console
■
GhRegEdit
■
GhRegEdit32
■
OmniFS
■
OmniFS32
Support for RAID disks
Symantec Ghost supports all imaging operations for RAID disks using Ghost32
if the RAID disk complies with all of the following conditions:
■
The source or destination disk is a hardware RAID array disk.
■
The disk is accessible from the host operating system.
The pre-OS must be Windows Preinstallation Environment (WinPE).
RAID software-level drives are not supported. The ability to successfully back up
other types of RAID-array configurations depends on the specific computer model,
driver controller, hard drive, and RAID implementation.
Installing Symantec Ghost Console
You must have administrator privileges on the Console computer to install
Symantec Ghost Console. When you install Symantec Ghost Console, the Standard
Tools are automatically installed.
To install the Symantec Ghost Console
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install
Symantec Ghost.
3
Click Install Ghost Console and Ghost Standard Tools.
4
In the Symantec Ghost Server 11.0 - InstallShield Wizard dialog box, click
Next.
5
Accept the terms of the license agreement, then click Next.
6
Read the licensing information, check I have read and understood the above
information, then click Next.
7
In the User Information window, verify that the user and organization names
are correct.
8
Click Next.
9
In the Destination Folder dialog box, do one of the following:
57
58
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the Console client
■
Confirm the installation location.
■
To select a different installation location, click Change.
10 Click Next.
11 In the Custom Setup window, click Next.
12 Click Install.
See “Post-installation tasks” on page 64.
Installing the Console client
You can install the Console client in either of the following ways:
■
Install the Console client remotely from the Symantec Ghost Console.
You can install the Console client on computers that run Windows
Vista/XP/2000/NT. You cannot remotely install the Console client on Windows
XP Home or 98 computers.
■
Manually install the Console client on a workstation from the Symantec Ghost
CD.
You can also use 3Com DynamicAccess Boot Services to run the Console client
from the network.
See “Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost” on page 48.
Once you have installed the Console client, confirm that the client appears in the
Symantec Ghost Console.
See “Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers” on page 85.
Preparing a Windows Vista/XP client for remote installation
Before you remotely install the Console client on Windows Vista/XP computers
you must verify that the following conditions are set:
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the Console client
Windows XP SP2
computers
When you install the Console client on a Windows XP SP2 computer,
verify the following settings:
If the Windows Firewall is turned on, then you must verify that
File and Printer Sharing is added to the Firewall Exceptions list.
See “To add File and Printer Sharing to the Exceptions List on a
Windows XP SP2 computer” on page 60.
■ If a firewall other than Windows Firewall is turned on, then you
might need to allow the following ports:
For UDP: 137 and 138
For TCP: 139 and 445
■ The administrator user account on the client computer must have
a password.
■ You must ensure that simple file sharing is turned off.
See “To alter the client computer's security settings on a Windows
XP SP2 computer ” on page 59.
■
Windows Vista
computers
When you install the Console client on a Windows Vista computer,
verify the following settings:
If the Windows Firewall is turned on, then you must verify that
File and Printer Sharing is added to the Firewall Exceptions list.
See “To add File and Printer Sharing to the Exceptions List on a
Windows Vista computer” on page 60.
■ If a firewall other than Windows Firewall is turned on, then you
might need to allow the following ports:
For UDP: 137 and 138
For TCP: 139 and 445
■ The administrator user account on the client computer must have
a password.
■ If the client computer belongs to a workgroup, you must either
turn on the built-in Administrator account, or turn off the User
Account Control.
See “To turn on the built-in Adminstrator account ” on page 60.
See “To disable the User Account Control ” on page 60.
■
To alter the client computer's security settings on a Windows XP SP2 computer
1
On the client computer, on the Windows taskbar, click Start > All Programs
> Accessories > Windows Explorer.
2
In Windows Explorer, on the Tools menu, click Folder Options.
3
On the View tab, under Advanced Settings, uncheck Use simple file sharing.
4
Click OK.
59
60
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the Console client
To add File and Printer Sharing to the Exceptions List on a Windows XP SP2 computer
1
On the client computer, click Start > Run.
2
In the Run dialog box, type Firewall.cpl.
3
Click OK.
4
On the Windows Firewall dialog box, on the Exceptions tab, verify that File
and Printer Sharing is checked.
5
Click OK.
To add File and Printer Sharing to the Exceptions List on a Windows Vista computer
1
On the client computer, click Start.
2
In the Start Search field, type Firewall.cpl.
3
On the Windows Firewall dialog box, click Change settings.
4
On the Exceptions tab, verify that File and Printer Sharing is checked.
5
Click OK.
To turn on the built-in Adminstrator account
1
On the client computer, log on as an user that has adminstrator rights.
2
On the Control Panel, click Classic View.
3
Click Adminstrative Tools.
4
Click Computer Management.
5
Click System Tools > Local Users and Groups > Users.
6
Double-click the Administrator user.
7
Uncheck Account is disabled .
8
Click OK.
9
Right-click Adminstrator and click Set Password.
10 Set a password for the Administrator account and click OK.
To disable the User Account Control
1
On the client computer, log on as an user that has administrator rights.
2
On the Control Panel, click User Accounts.
3
Click Turn User Account Control on or off.
4
Uncheck Use User Account Control (UAC) to help protect your computer.
5
Click OK.
6
Restart the computer.
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the Console client
Remotely installing the Console client
Once you have installed the Symantec Ghost Console, you can perform remote
client installations.
If the Ghost Console is running on a Windows Vista computer and you are having
problems installing the Console client to clients, then verify that the LAN Manager
authentication level setting on the Console computer is the same setting as the
setting on your client computers. The Console computer setting might be
incompatible with the setting on your client computers. The default level in
Windows Vista is Send NTLMv2 response only.
Note: On the client computer, the share C$ must be shared for administrative
purposes to allow remote client installation.
To remotely install the Console client
1
On the Console server, on the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >
Symantec Ghost > Ghost Console.
2
On the Tools menu, click Remote Client Install.
3
In the Remote Client install dialog box, do one of the following:
4
5
■
Select the computers to include in the client installation, then click Add
>>.
You can select multiple computers under different domains.
■
Click Add..., then type the computer domain or workgroup and name.
You can add a group of computers in a workgroup that have the same
administrative credentials. If you have computers with different
administrative credentials for a workgroup, then each computer or group
of computers must be added separately.
In the Enter client domain and machine name dialog box, in the User name
field, do one of the following:
■
Type the administrator name for the domain.
■
Type the user name for a computer under the workgroup.
If you are adding a single computer then you can type the fully qualified
user name, for example, machinename\username.
This account must have administrator rights for the computer that you
selected.
In the Password field, type the password for the account.
61
62
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the Configuration Client Stand-alone
6
Click OK.
7
Click Install.
Manually installing the Console client
You can install the Console client directly on a client computer from the
installation CD.
To install the Console client manually
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive of the
client computer.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install
Symantec Ghost.
3
Click Install Ghost Console Client.
4
In the Symantec Ghost Managed Console Client 11.0 - InstallShield Wizard
window, click Next.
5
Accept the terms of the license agreement, then click Next.
6
In the Connect to server window, type the computer name of the Ghost Console
server.
If you leave this field empty, then the client connects to the first Ghost Console
that it finds.
7
Click Next.
8
In the Destination Folder dialog box, do one of the following:
9
■
Confirm the installation location.
■
To select a different installation location, click Change.
Click Next.
10 Click Install to start the installation process.
Installing the Configuration Client Stand-alone
You should install the Configuration Client Standalone on a client computer only
if you do not plan to use the Console to manage the computer, and you only intend
to perform post-clone configuration tasks on the computer.
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing the User Migration Wizard
To install the Configuration Client (stand-alone)
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install
Symantec Ghost.
3
Click Install Ghost Configuration Client (Standalone).
4
In the Symantec Ghost Configuration Client (Standalone) 11.0 - InstallShield
Wizard window, click Next.
5
Accept the terms of the license agreement, then click Next.
6
In the Destination Folder window, do one of the following:
■
Confirm the installation location.
■
To select a different installation location, click Change.
7
Click Next.
8
Click Install to start the installation process.
Installing the User Migration Wizard
Install the User Migration Wizard on a client computer to transfer user files and
application settings.
To install Symantec Ghost User Migration Wizard
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install Tools
and Utilities.
3
Click Install Peer-to-Peer User Migration Wizard.
4
Click Next.
5
Accept the terms of the license agreement, then click Next.
6
Do one of the following:
■
Confirm the installation location.
■
To select a different location for the installed files, click Change.
7
Click Next.
8
Click Install to start the installation.
63
64
Installing Symantec Ghost
Installing 3Com Boot Services
Installing 3Com Boot Services
The Symantec Ghost version of 3Com Boot Services was developed before Microsoft
released Windows Vista. Therefore, Symantec Ghost does not support 3Com Boot
Services on Windows Vista.
To install 3Com Boot Services
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install Tools
and Utilities.
3
Click Install 3Com Boot Services PXE Server.
4
In the 3Com Boot Services for Symantec Ghost Corporate Edition dialog box,
follow the on-screen prompts to complete the installation.
Post-installation tasks
After installing the Symantec Ghost Console you must register Symantec Ghost.
Other post-installation tasks that you may want to do include the following:
■
About activating Symantec Ghost
■
Updating Symantec Ghost
■
About upgrading Symantec Ghost
■
Uninstalling Symantec Ghost
■
Creating Console Service accounts
About activating Symantec Ghost
You activate Symantec Ghost Console by a license. Until you activate your license
for Symantec Ghost, your use of the Console is restricted as follows:
■
You can run tasks on the Console for no more than 30 days after installation.
■
You can attach a maximum of 10 clients.
After you activate your license, Symantec Ghost tracks the number of client
computers that are attached to the Console. It alerts you when you have installed
90 percent of your licensed clients.
Previous versions of Symantec Ghost used a legacy registration system. If you
have a validation key from a previous version, then you can continue to use the
legacy registration system to activate Symantec Ghost.
See “Licensing Symantec Ghost with the legacy system” on page 66.
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
If you have purchased new licenses for Symantec Ghost 11.0, then you must use
the current licensing system to activate Symantec Ghost.
See “Activating Symantec Ghost” on page 65.
Activating Symantec Ghost
Before you can activate Symantec Ghost, you need the following materials:
License certificate
The license certificate includes the serial number for your
license. You must register your serial number online to
obtain a license file and to register your maintenance
agreement.
License file
The license file includes the license key that is required to
activate the product.
For more information, see the instructions on your license
certificate.
Obtaining a license file
To obtain a license file, you must have the serial number that is printed on your
license certificate. The format of the serial number is a letter that is followed by
10 digits.
For example:
F8573329133
Symantec sends you the file by email as a .zip file attachment. You should ensure
that your email program is configured to allow incoming .zip file attachments.
Note: License files are digitally signed. You should not attempt to modify the
license file.
65
66
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
To obtain a license file
1
On the Internet, go to the following URL:
https://licensing.symantec.com
Your Web browser must support 128-bit encryption to view the site.
2
Follow the on-screen instructions to complete the registration process.
3
When you receive the email message from Symantec that contains the license
file, save the license file to a location that is easily accessible.
The file is delivered as a .zip file attachment. You must extract the file contents
from the .zip file. The license file has a .slf extension.
Importing a license file
You must add your license file to activate Symantec Ghost. If you purchase
additional licenses, you receive an additional license file.
To add a license file
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Help menu, click Register Console >
Add Symantec License File.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Registration Screen window, click Browse.
3
In the Open dialog, select the license file (.slf) that you want to import, and
then click Open.
4
Click OK.
Licensing Symantec Ghost with the legacy system
You can use the legacy licensing system if you have validation keys from a version
of Symantec Ghost before 11.0. If you reinstall Symantec Ghost and want to
activate Symantec Ghost with legacy validation keys then you must use the legacy
licensing system.
You must use the same information that you used to register your previous version,
as follows:
■
User name
■
Email address
■
Serial number
■
Validation key
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
To license Symantec Ghost with a legacy license
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Help menu, click Register Console >
Add Legacy License.
2
In the Name box, type the name to which Symantec Ghost is registered.
3
In the Email address box, type the email address to which the validation key
was originally sent.
4
In the Serial number box, type the serial number.
The serial number is a 10-digit number. This number should be printed on
the certificate that you received from Symantec to confirm your software
purchase.
5
In the Validation Key field, type the validation key.
If you purchased an earlier version of Symantec Ghost, you received a
validation key from Symantec.
6
Click OK.
Updating Symantec Ghost
LiveUpdate provides Symantec Ghost with updates. It connects to Symantec sites
for the following:
■
Provide free updates to fix defects and provide additional features to the
Symantec Ghost program. LiveUpdate connects to Symantec by the Internet
to see if updates are available for Symantec Ghost.
■
Update the Symantec Ghost Console if there is a new version. When you update
the Symantec Ghost Console you receive the updated client version of the
software. The client automatically updates when a task is run.
Symantec may provide updates for Symantec Ghost. Symantec does not charge
for these updates. However, your normal Internet access fees apply.
To update Symantec Ghost using LiveUpdate
1
On the Console server, do one of the following:
■
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >Symantec Ghost >
Ghost Console.
■
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >Symantec Ghost >
Ghost Explorer.
2
On the Help menu, click LiveUpdate.
3
Follow the on-screen instructions.
67
68
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
About upgrading Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost can be upgraded from Symantec Ghost 8.0 or later.
When the Symantec Ghost Console is upgraded or updated, the Console client is
updated automatically when a task is run for the client computers.
Note: Due to design changes in the Symantec Ghost Console, Windows
Vista/XP/2000 client computers appear as NT4 computers when you first open
the Configuration settings window. If you refresh the configuration details from
the Symantec Ghost Console, the operating system information displays correctly.
See “Setting Configuration properties” on page 137.
Uninstalling Symantec Ghost
Before remotely uninstalling a client computer, note the following:
■
If a client computer is part of a task or a Console resource, the Console does
not remove the computer record. After you uninstall the client, you should
remove the client computer from any Console task or resource, and then delete
it.
■
In case configuration details on a client computer have changed since the
client was installed, refresh the configuration details from the Symantec Ghost
Console.
See “Setting Configuration properties” on page 137.
■
If the Symantec Ghost Console server is on a Windows XP computer, you must
alter the server’s computer security settings.
See “Preparing a Windows Vista/XP client for remote installation” on page 58.
You can also uninstall the Console client on the client computer. On Windows 98
computers, the client must be uninstalled locally from the Control Panel.
To remotely uninstall a client computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Open the folder containing the computer for which you want to uninstall the
client.
3
Select the computer.
4
On the Tools menu, click Client Uninstall.
5
Click Yes.
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
To uninstall the Console client on the client computer
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
In the Control Panel window, double-click Add or Remove Programs.
3
Click Symantec Ghost Console Client.
4
Click Remove.
To uninstall Symantec Ghost Console
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
In the Control Panel window, double-click Add or Remove Programs.
3
Click Symantec Ghost Console and Standard Tools.
4
Click Remove.
Creating Console Service accounts
During installation, a service is installed called the Configuration Server. This
service is responsible for task execution and client communication. One of its
roles is to create and remove computer accounts in Windows domains if computers
are added to domains during the execution of a task. The Configuration Server is
also required when you are changing a computer name or taking an image of a
computer that belongs to a domain. To perform this role, a Console Service user
account must be created in the domain.
The Configuration Server logs on as this user. The user does not have interactive
logon rights and does have the rights to create computer accounts in the domain.
When a Console Service account is created on the domain, the domain is now
supported for Configuration Server operations.
You can either create a Console Service account from the Symantec Ghost Console
or create a Console Service account manually.
Note: You must set some rights for the account. The user of the Console Service
account must have the authority to create an account in the domain.
To create Console Service accounts from the Symantec Ghost Console
1
On the Console server, on the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >
Symantec Ghost > Ghost Console.
2
Do one of the following:
■
On the Tools menu, click Supported Domains List.
■
In the First Time Run window, click Domains.
69
70
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
This option is available only when you run the Console for the first time.
3
Click Add.
4
Do one of the following to add a domain to the list of supported domains:
5
6
■
In the Domain field, type a domain name.
■
Click Browse to select a domain.
Do one of the following:
■
Check Create account in the domain, then type a user name and password
to create a Console Service account on the domain.
■
Uncheck Create account in the domain.
You must have previously created a user account on the domain.
Click OK.
Editing the Console Service account
To increase security, you might want to use the administration tools in Windows
to change the password for this the Console Service user account. You must then
edit the Console Service account password through the Ghost Console. If you
change the user name, you must remove from the supported domains list any
domains that have previously been added with this user. You then must add the
domains to the new Console Service account.
To edit the Console Service account
1
On the Console server, on the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >
Symantec Ghost > Ghost Console.
2
On the Tools menu, click Supported Domains List.
3
In the Domain Administration dialog box, click Edit.
4
In the User Name field, type the Console Service account name.
5
In the Password field, type the Console Service password.
6
Click OK.
7
Click Close.
Removing a domain account
Removing a domain from the Symantec Ghost Console does not remove an account
from the domain, only from the Symantec Ghost Console database.
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
To remove a domain account from the Symantec Ghost Console database
1
On the Console server, on the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs >
Symantec Ghost > Ghost Console.
2
On the Tools menu, click Supported Domains list.
3
In the Domain Administration dialog box, select the domain to remove.
4
Click Remove.
71
72
Installing Symantec Ghost
Post-installation tasks
Section
2
Managing computers from
the Console
■
Managing computers and configuration resources
■
Creating tasks
■
Executing and scheduling tasks
■
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
■
User Migration
■
Using Client Inventory
■
Additional Console options
74
Chapter
4
Managing computers and
configuration resources
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About the Symantec Ghost Console
■
Starting the Symantec Ghost Console
■
About Symantec Ghost Console resources
■
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
■
Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers
■
Setting up computer groups
■
Setting default client and data transfer properties
■
Setting properties for a subnet
■
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
■
About setting up the virtual partition
■
Setting up configuration sets
About the Symantec Ghost Console
The Symantec Ghost Console lets you do the following:
■
Define and execute tasks that automate the restoration of computers from
image files
■
Create backups
76
Managing computers and configuration resources
Starting the Symantec Ghost Console
■
Save user data
■
Transfer files to client computers
■
Execute commands on client computers
■
Deploy AutoInstall (AI) packages
■
Alter the configuration settings on a Console client computer, or a group of
Console client computers
■
Obtain and view hardware and software inventory data for Client computers
■
Migrate user settings
■
Run the Microsoft Sysprep application
■
Organize and manage your client computers, image files, configuration sets,
and other resources required to complete these tasks
Starting the Symantec Ghost Console
The Symantec Ghost Console lets you organize and manage your client computers.
You can set up and maintain the image files, configuration sets, and other resources
you require. You can also perform tasks such as creating image files, restoring
computers, cloning from image files, and configuration updates.
The Console might lose its connection with the database when the Console
computer comes back from Windows Standby. If the Console loses its connection
with the database, you might need to restart the Console computer. To avoid this
issue, you can deactivate Windows Standby on the Console computer.
Note: The Symantec Ghost Console runs in Windows Vista/XP/2000 only.
To open the Symantec Ghost Console
■
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost > Ghost
Console.
Setting properties from the Console
Table 4-1 describes the four groups of properties that you can set globally from
the Symantec Ghost Console.
Managing computers and configuration resources
About Symantec Ghost Console resources
Table 4-1
Global properties
Properties
Description
Console
preferences
Settings for the Console, including showing and hiding panes and user
messages, and setting the location on the Console server to store
backup images and user packages.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console options” on page 242.
See “Setting the location for backup images” on page 170.
See “Setting the storage location for user packages” on page 197.
Client properties
Default settings for Client computers. Some of these settings, such as
client heartbeat and virtual partition DOS type, can be overridden at
the client level. Other settings, such as client warning, client user
interface, and virtual partition size, can only be set globally on the
Console.
See “Setting the default client heartbeat interval” on page 90.
See “Setting the default DOS version” on page 99.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console options” on page 242.
Data Transfer
properties
Default settings for data transfer to and from the Console, and the
transfer mode. These can be overridden by each subnet, and again by
each task.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
Inventory
properties
Default inventory settings. You can show or hide the collected data
sets in the Inventory folder, and can specify the default inventory
views that apply to a computer when it is detected by the Console.
See “Showing the Collected Data folder” on page 207.
See “Setting the default Inventory views for new client computers”
on page 219.
About Symantec Ghost Console resources
The Symantec Ghost Console contains all the resources that are available for you
to use with Symantec Ghost. These include the client computers that you are
managing, the tasks you can execute, and the data that is used by the tasks. You
can add and remove Symantec Ghost Console resources, and can organize them
to suit your requirements.
Table 4-2 describes the Symantec Ghost Console resources.
77
78
Managing computers and configuration resources
About Symantec Ghost Console resources
Table 4-2
Symantec Ghost Console resources
Resource folder Description
name
Machine Groups
This folder contains all the client computers detected by the Console.
These resources contain information on each computer’s configuration
and setup. You can set up groups of computers and you can apply a
task to all the computers in the group at the same time.
See “Setting up computer groups” on page 87.
Dynamic Machine This folder contains the dynamic machine groups that you have set
Groups
up. A dynamic machine group is the result of a filter applied to a
computer group, and contains the computers in the target group that
match the filter conditions. Each dynamic machine group is treated
as a virtual computer group, and can be used as the target of a task.
See “Setting up dynamic machine groups” on page 235.
Network
This folder contains all the client computers detected by the Console,
grouped by subnet. You can set the network properties for each subnet,
to suit your requirements and deal with any network limitations.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
Tasks
This folder contains the definitions of tasks that you can run on the
client computers. You can create new tasks and modify existing ones.
For each task you can define the task steps (such as restore from an
image file, or update configuration settings) and the target computer
group.
See “About tasks” on page 115.
Executed Template This folder contains tasks that have been executed without being
tasks
saved. The executed template task can be executed again but non of
the settings can be modified.
See “About template tasks” on page 116.
Configuration
Resources
This folder contains the image definitions and other resources that
tasks require. These include computer configuration settings, AI
packages, migration templates, and migration packages.
See “Configuration Resources” on page 79.
Managing computers and configuration resources
About Symantec Ghost Console resources
Table 4-2
Symantec Ghost Console resources (continued)
Resource folder Description
name
Backup Regimes
This folder contains the definitions of the backups you are making
for each client computer. Each computer has its own backup regime,
which specifies the backup parameters and whether the backup is
scheduled or initiated manually. If the backups are scheduled, the
backup regime includes the task and schedule details.
See “About incremental backups and backup regimes” on page 169.
Inventory
This folder contains the resources that are used for collecting and
displaying inventory information for client computers. These include
filters, views, reports, and collected data sets.
See “Inventory resources” on page 80.
Configuration Resources
Table 4-3 describes the resources stored in the Configuration Resources folders.
Table 4-3
Configuration Resources folders
Folder name
Description
AI Packages
Stores definitions of AutoInstall (AI) packages. These
AI packages are executable files stored in a location
that is accessible from the Console server.
See “Deploying AutoInstall packages” on page 143.
Configurations
Stores sets of registry parameters. These may be
configuration sets for individual computers, or
configuration templates for computer groups.
See “Setting up configuration sets” on page 103.
Images
Stores information about the image files that are
available for cloning tasks. These image files are stored
in a location that is accessible from the Console server.
See “About image definitions” on page 118.
User Migration Templates
Stores the migration templates that are available for
User Migration tasks.
See “Creating user migration templates” on page 179.
79
80
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
Table 4-3
Configuration Resources folders (continued)
Folder name
Description
User Migration Packages
Stores the migration packages that you save on the
Console in a User Migration task. Symantec Ghost
stores the migration packages on either the Console
server or on the client computer. Only the migration
packages that are stored on the Console server are
shown in this folder. Migration packages are used in
User Migration Restore tasks.
See “Managing user packages” on page 196.
Inventory resources
Table 4-4 describes the resources stored in the Inventory folders.
Table 4-4
Inventory folders
Folder name
Description
Collected Data
Stores collected data sets. Each data set defines the Windows
Management Interface (WMI) class and properties that are collected
from client computers and stored in the inventory database.
This folder is hidden by default.
See “Managing collected data sets” on page 206.
Filter
Stores the filters that are used in reports and dynamic machine groups.
See “Creating and maintaining filters” on page 221.
Report
Stores report definitions. You can create and run reports to extract
data from the inventory database.
See “Creating and running reports” on page 230.
View
Stores view definitions. You can use views to display selected
properties for each client computer, or to display property values in
a report.
See “Viewing inventory information” on page 214.
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
The Symantec Ghost Console resource folders contain the image file definitions,
task definitions, configuration sets, and other resources that are available for you
to use. You can organize and manage these resources as you want, using a standard
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
set of console options. These options are the same for all resource folders. You
can set up the folder structure and move resources within them. You can also
view details of Symantec Ghost Console resources, rename them, and delete any
that are not part of any task definition.
These procedures are common to most resources. Any exceptions are identified
in the appropriate sections.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Viewing Symantec Ghost Console resource properties” on page 84.
Setting the resource folder view mode
You can set the view mode for each resource folder. The view modes are the same
as those available in Microsoft Windows Explorer, and the view names are
self-explanatory.
To set the resource folder view mode
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, select the folder for which
you want to set the view mode.
2
In the right pane, do one of the following:
■
Right-click, click View, then click the appropriate option.
■
On the View menu, click the appropriate option.
The selected view mode is applied to all subfolders in the Symantec Ghost
Console resource folder.
Creating new folders
You can set up the sub-folder structure within each Symantec Ghost Console
resource folder, by creating the new folders that you require.
The exceptions to this rule are Dynamic Machine Groups, Network, and Executed
Template Tasks. All dynamic machine groups and subnets are stored in the root
folder, and you cannot create any subfolders.
81
82
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
To create a new folder
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, select the folder in which
you want to create a new subfolder.
2
In the right pane, do one of the following:
3
■
Right-click, then click New Folder.
■
On the File menu, click New > Folder.
Type the new folder name.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 80 characters, but
it cannot be the same as another folder at the same level.
4
Press Enter or click anywhere in the Symantec Ghost Console, to confirm the
new folder name.
Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources
You can move resources within your folder structure, and organize them to suit
your requirements. You move resources by copying or cutting them from one
folder, and then pasting them into another folder.
When you move a folder, all resources and subfolders it contains are also moved.
The following restrictions apply to organizing some Symantec Ghost Console
resources:
■
Network resources (client computers) cannot be moved. The subnet groups
are read from your network, and cannot be modified via the Symantec Ghost
Console.
■
Machine Groups may contain only one copy of a client computer in each
top-level group. A top-level group is a folder directly under the Machine Groups
folder, and includes all its subfolders.
■
Backup Regimes and Dynamic Machine Groups cannot be copied. These folders
may contain only one instance of each resource.
To move Symantec Ghost Console resources
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the folder that
contains the resources or folders that you want to move.
2
Do one of the following:
■
Right-click the resource or folder, then click Copy or Cut.
■
Select the resources or folders that you want to move then, on the Edit
menu, click Copy or Cut.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
Copy creates a new instance of the selected item, leaving the original intact.
Cut moves the selected item, removing it from the original location.
3
Open the folder to which you want to move the selected resources or folders.
4
Do one of the following:
■
Right-click, then click Paste.
■
On the Edit menu, click Paste.
The selected resources or folders are moved immediately.
You can also use the keyboard shortcuts Ctrl+X, Ctrl+C, and Ctrl+V.
Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources
You can rename Symantec Ghost Console resources and folders if necessary. You
may use any names you want, but you cannot use the same name for two items
in the same folder. Folder names must be unique at each level of the folder
structure. There are two exceptions: Computers and Collected Data Sets must
have unique names. You cannot use the same name for two different computers,
or for two collected data sets, anywhere in the Console.
If the resource is a pointer to an external object, such as a client computer or an
image file, renaming it simply changes the name in the Symantec Ghost Console.
If there are two or more instances of the resource, all instances are renamed. The
name of the external object is not affected.
To rename Symantec Ghost Console resources
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the folder that
contains the resources or folder that you want to rename.
2
Do one of the following:
3
■
Right-click the resource or folder, then click Rename.
■
Select the resource or folder that you want to rename then, on the File
menu, click Rename.
Type the new name.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 80 characters.
4
Press Enter or click anywhere in the Symantec Ghost Console, to confirm the
new name.
Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources
You can delete any folders or Symantec Ghost Console resources that you are no
longer using. When you delete a folder, everything inside that folder is also deleted.
83
84
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources
You cannot delete anything that is being used by another Symantec Ghost Console
resource. For example, you cannot delete a data template that is being used by a
user profile, or a computer group that is being used by a task.
If the Symantec Ghost Console resource is a pointer to an external object, such
as a client computer or an image file, deleting it simply removes it from the
Symantec Ghost Console. The external object is not affected. There is one exception
to this rule: when you delete a user package, the external user package file is also
deleted.
Client computers are different from other Console resources. When you delete a
client computer from the Console, its backup regime is deleted automatically.
However, if the computer is still running the Console Client software and is still
on the network, the Console detects it and automatically restores it to the Default
computer group folder.
Note: When you delete Symantec Ghost Console resources, you cannot restore
them again.
To delete Symantec Ghost Console resources
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the folder that
contains the resources or folder that you want to delete.
2
Do one of the following:
3
■
Right-click the resource or folder, then click Delete.
■
Select the resources or folder that you want to delete, then on the File
menu, click Delete.
■
Press Delete
Click Yes to confirm the deletion.
The selected resources or folder are deleted immediately.
Viewing Symantec Ghost Console resource properties
You can open a Symantec Ghost Console resource to view its properties. The
properties may be descriptive details of the resource, such as an image definition,
or they may be the complete set of resource data, such as a data template.
If necessary, you can make changes to specific resource properties. Each resource
has a different set of procedures, so they are not described here. For more
information, refer to the section that describes the resource that you want to
modify.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers
Note: You cannot modify a resource if it is being used by an active task.
To view Symantec Ghost Console resource properties
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the folder that
contains the resource for which you want to view properties.
2
In the right pane, do one of the following:
3
■
Double-click the resource.
■
Right-click the resource, then click Properties.
■
Select the resource, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties window, view the properties of the resource.
If necessary, you can make changes to the properties.
4
Click OK.
Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers
The Symantec Ghost Console stores a record for every client computer that it
detects. A client computer is detected by the Symantec Ghost Console once the
Console client software is installed and set up to connect to that particular
Symantec Ghost Console. If there are two or more Symantec Ghost Consoles on
the network, each detects its own client computers and ignores the others.
The new client computer automatically appears in the Machine Groups Default
folder and in the Network folder, under the subnet on which the client was
detected. The default computer name is a combination of the computer name and
the last logged-on user name. If DOS is the only operating system that is installed
on the client computer, the computer name matches the adapter address of the
computer.
The software version and status of each client computer is represented pictorially.
The top half of the Symantec Ghost Console client icon provides client software
version information:
A yellow screen
The client computer has the current software version installed.
An exclamation mark
in the screen
The client computer does not have the current software version
installed.
The bottom half of the Console client icon provides client status information:
85
86
Managing computers and configuration resources
Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers
A solid cable
The client computer is online.
No cable
The client computer is offline or unavailable.
A question mark to the The client heartbeat has been set to zero, so the client computer
right of the cable
status is unknown.
Table 4-5 displays the Console client computer icons.
Table 4-5
Console client computer icons
Current software version
Old software version
Online
Offline or
unavailable
Status is unknown
You can organize the Symantec Ghost Console client computers into groups. This
lets you maximize efficiency by running a task on all the computers in a group at
the same time.
See “Setting up computer groups” on page 87.
You can set up the Symantec Ghost Console client computers to suit your
requirements. There are several levels at which you can set client computer
properties:
Global defaults
These are set in the Symantec Ghost Console, and apply automatically
to all clients, unless overridden by network or individual client
property settings.
These include properties such as client heartbeat interval, data
throughput limits, and virtual partition DOS type.
See “Setting default client and data transfer properties” on page 89.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up computer groups
Network defaults
These are set for each subnet, and apply automatically to all client
computers on the subnet, unless overridden by individual client
property settings or at the task level. These include properties such
as client heartbeat interval, and data throughput limits.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
Individual client
properties
These are set for each Console client computer.
These include client configuration parameters, virtual partition
settings, backup regimes, and inventory settings.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties ”
on page 93.
Setting up computer groups
Grouping computers lets you distinguish among computers with different user
requirements. For example, you could create a group of Console client computers
for students and a group for teachers. You could then run a task to restore the
appropriate image file onto the student computers, and then run another task to
restore another image file onto the teacher computers.
Computer group information is stored in folders under the top-level Machine
Groups folder in the Symantec Ghost Console. You can have a hierarchy of
subgroups under the main groups so that a subgroup can be selected for a task,
or you can apply a task to a main group that includes the subgroups.
For example, you might have an Administration folder, and beneath that, an HR
folder and a Payroll folder. A computer can be added to any one of these three
groups. A task can be applied to either the HR group or the Payroll group. To
execute the task for both HR and Payroll, select the Administration folder. The
task executes for both the HR group and the Payroll group as well as any computers
that are grouped in the Administration folder.
Creating computer groups
The Symantec Ghost Console detects its client computers on the network and
automatically adds them to the Default group in the Machine Groups folder. You
can use this group if you want, or you can create new computer groups to suit
your requirements.
87
88
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up computer groups
To create a computer group
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group folder in which you want to place the new
computer group.
3
Do one of the following:
■
In the Machine Groups pane, right-click, then click New Folder.
■
On the File menu, click New > Folder.
4
Type a name for the new computer group.
5
Press Enter or click anywhere in the Symantec Ghost Console to confirm the
name.
The new group is added to the computer group hierarchy. You can now add
computers to this group.
About adding computers to groups
All the client computers must belong to a computer group. By default, all computers
are added to the Default group. You can copy or move the computers into other
groups as appropriate. A computer may belong to two or more different groups.
There are some restrictions for adding computers to a group as follows:
■
You cannot copy or move a computer into the Machine Groups folder. This
folder is not a computer group, instead it is a container for your computer
groups.
■
A computer group may contain only one copy of a computer. Each computer
group includes all its subfolders. Therefore each computer may appear only
once under each main folder. (A main folder is a folder immediately below the
Machine Groups folder.)
To move computers to groups, use the Cut, Copy and Paste options.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
About renaming a computer
You can rename a computer for easy identification. The name changes in the
Symantec Ghost Console only. The name of the computer is not affected anywhere
else. You cannot rename a computer using the same name as another computer
in the same folder.
To rename computers, use the Rename option.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting default client and data transfer properties
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Removing a computer from a computer group
You can remove a computer from a computer group when it is no longer needed.
If you have two copies of the same computer in different groups, removing one
copy does not remove the other.
To remove a computer from a group, use the Delete option.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Remember that the Console automatically detects all client computers on the
network. You can remove a computer from all computer groups but, if the computer
still exists as a client on the network, the Symantec Ghost Console will detect it
and add it back to the Default computer group.
If you want to remove a computer from the Symantec Ghost Console, you need to
remove the client software, and the Symantec Ghost boot partition (if it exists),
before removing the computer from the last group.
To remove a computer from the Symantec Ghost Console
1
Uninstall the client software from the computer.
2
If the client computer is using the Ghost boot partition rather than the virtual
partition, remove the boot partition.
See “Removing the Symantec Ghost boot partition from a client computer”
on page 102.
3
Remove the computer from the computer groups in the Symantec Ghost
Console.
Setting default client and data transfer properties
You can set default client and data transfer properties in the Console. These
settings apply automatically to all client computers and subnets detected by the
Symantec Ghost Console. They are used unless you set the subnet, individual
computer, or task properties to override them.
You can set the following default client and data transfer properties:
■
Client heartbeat interval
See “Setting the default client heartbeat interval” on page 90.
■
Data transfer mode and data throughput limits
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
89
90
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting default client and data transfer properties
Setting the default client heartbeat interval
The client heartbeat interval determines the frequency with which update
messages are sent by each client computer to the Symantec Ghost Console. You
can change the frequency to reduce network traffic. This can be useful if computers
are networked over a WAN.
The default interval set in the Symantec Ghost Console is used for all client
computers, unless specifically overridden by the settings for subnet or client.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
See “Setting the client computer heartbeat interval ” on page 96.
To set the default client heartbeat interval
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
In the Options window, click the Client tab.
3
Under Client Heartbeat, in the Interval field, type the number of seconds
between client update messages.
4
Click Apply.
Setting the default data transfer properties
The default data transfer properties determine the data throughput limits and
data transfer mode for the entire network. These defaults apply to all subnets and
all tasks, unless specifically overridden by the settings for a subnet or a task.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
You can set the following default data transfer properties:
Data throughput
limits
You can control how much network bandwidth is used when
transferring image files (in a Clone task) and data files (in a Transfer
Files task) across the network. By using this functionality, you avoid
overloading the network with GhostCasting traffic.
You can set data throughput limits for each subnet, and for each task.
The lowest limit is used in each case.
See “Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used” on page 363.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting default client and data transfer properties
Data transfer
mode
You can set the data transfer mode depending on your network
hardware setup. Used in conjunction with the network bandwidth
limits, you can optimize the way in which image files, data files, and
AI packages are transferred over your network.
You can set the data transfer mode for each subnet and for each task.
The subnet setting overrides the default, and the task setting overrides
both the subnet and default.
Table 4-6 lists the data transfer modes that you can select.
Table 4-6
Data transfer modes
Transfer mode
Description
Unicast
Deployment to a single client
Multicast
Simultaneous deployment of an image file or data files to many
computers
Direct broadcast
Selective deployment based on direct broadcast for subnet
See “Setting the data transfer mode” on page 361.
To set the default data transfer parameters
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
In the Options window, click the Data Transfer tab.
3
To set the maximum data transfer rate for transferring files or backing up a
computer to an image file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, check
Create, then type the number of megabytes per minute.
4
To set the maximum data transfer rate for transferring files or restoring a
computer from an image file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, check
Restore, then type the number of megabytes per minute.
5
To set the default data transfer mode, under Data Transfer Mode, select the
appropriate option:
6
■
Multicast
■
Directed
■
Broadcast
■
Unicast
Click Apply.
91
92
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting properties for a subnet
Setting properties for a subnet
The Network folder contains all the client computers detected by the Symantec
Ghost Console, grouped by subnet. If necessary, you can set the properties for
each subnet. You may want to do this to work around the limitations of a particular
subnet.
By default, all client computers in each subnet use the default properties set in
the Symantec Ghost Console. The settings you make for a subnet override the
default values but, in turn, may be overridden by the settings for a particular
client computer or task.
You can set the following properties for each subnet:
Client heartbeat
interval
This overrides the default client heartbeat interval, but is overridden
by the setting for individual client computers.
See “Setting the default client heartbeat interval” on page 90.
See “Setting the client computer heartbeat interval ” on page 96.
Data throughput
limits
You can set default data throughput limits, and set limits for each
task. If the limits are set in two or more places, the lowest limit is used.
Data transfer
mode
You can set the default data transfer rate and mode for each task.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
See “Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used” on page 363.
To set properties for a subnet
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Network folder.
2
In the Network pane, do one of the following:
■
Right-click the subnet for which you want to set properties, then click
Properties.
■
Click the subnet for which you want to set properties then, on the File
menu, click Properties.
The global default values set via the Console are not reflected in the Properties
for <Subnet name> window. The values that you see are hardcoded, and may
not be the current default settings.
3
In the Properties for <Subnet name> window, to set the time interval between
client update messages, check Client Heartbeat Interval, then type the
number of seconds.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
4
To set the maximum data transfer rate for restoring a computer from an
image file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, check Transmit Limit, then
type the number of megabytes per minute.
5
To set the maximum data transfer rate for backing up a computer to an image
file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, check Receive Limit, then type
the number of megabytes per minute.
6
To set the data transfer mode for the subnet, under Data Transfer Mode,
select the appropriate option from the following list:
7
■
Multicast
■
Directed Broadcast
■
Unicast
Click OK.
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer
properties
You can view and change the properties for each Symantec Ghost Console client
computer.
Table 4-7 lists and describes the client properties.
Table 4-7
Client computer properties
Client computer property
Description
Last image file used to restore
the computer
The image file used to restore the computer, if one was
used.
Default configuration settings This is the last known configuration for the client
for the client computer
computer. The actual configuration may have changed
since the client was detected or last updated. You can
modify the default configuration if necessary, by editing
the settings or copying them from another computer.
See “Maintaining the default client configuration settings
” on page 96.
93
94
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
Table 4-7
Client computer properties (continued)
Client computer property
Description
Heartbeat interval
The client heartbeat interval determines the frequency
with which update messages are sent by the client
computer to the Symantec Ghost Console. This setting
overrides both the global default (set in the Symantec
Ghost Console) and the subnet setting.
See “Setting the client computer heartbeat interval ”
on page 96.
Whether or not the Symantec
Ghost boot partition is
installed
If the Symantec Ghost boot partition is detected, it is used.
Otherwise, the virtual partition is used.
The template to use for
creating the virtual partition
A network driver template is required for a virtual
partition. Symantec Ghost usually automatically selects
a default template that is based on the client hardware.
If there is no net.drv template for the network card that
is installed on the client, then Symantec Ghost selects the
Universal Packet Driver as the template. You can change
the selection if necessary. For example, if you have an
unusual hardware configuration, you can create and use
your own custom template.
For DOS/NT clients, you must manually select a template.
See “Setting the DOS network driver template” on page 100.
The DOS version installed on
the virtual partition
This version of DOS is used for any operation that runs
under DOS when a task is executed on the client computer.
See “Setting the DOS version for a client computer”
on page 102.
Version of the Symantec Ghost If the product version is older than the client, both the
Console client software on the client and product version numbers are shown. This can
computer
occur when an upgrade is only partially completed.
Details of the backups created The name of the backup regime to which the computer
for this computer
belongs, and the list of backups currently stored on the
Symantec Ghost Console server. Each backup is identified
by date and time, and whether it is a baseline or
incremental backup.
See “Viewing computer backups” on page 174.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
Table 4-7
Client computer properties (continued)
Client computer property
Description
Hardware and software
The Inventory information is a list of computer properties
inventory information for this and their values. You can set up the list to include any
computer
properties that you want.
See “Viewing inventory information for client computers”
on page 219.
To view Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
view.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, view the properties for the
client computer.
The Properties for <Computer name> window has several tabs:
General
This tab contains the client computer name, adapter address,
the name of the image file used to install the client software, and
the default configuration information.
Client
This tab contains the client heartbeat interval, whether or not
the client has the Symantec Ghost Boot Partition installed, and
the software version information. If the client is using the virtual
partition, the DOS version and the template used for creating
the virtual partition are shown.
Backups
This tab contains details of the incremental and baseline backups
created for this computer.
Inventory
This tab contains hardware and software inventory information
for this computer.
95
96
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
Setting the client computer heartbeat interval
The client heartbeat interval determines the frequency with which update
messages are sent by the client computer to the Symantec Ghost Console. The
interval you set here overrides both the default set in the Symantec Ghost Console,
and the setting for the client’s subnet.
If you set the client heartbeat to 0, the client computer has no heartbeat. No update
messages are sent by the client computer, and its status is indicated on the
Symantec Ghost Console as Unavailable. An unavailable client is still a valid target
for a task.
See “Setting the default client heartbeat interval” on page 90.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
To set the client computer heartbeat interval
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
change.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the Client tab.
The global default values set via the Console, or the subnet values set in the
Network Properties window, are not reflected in the Properties for <Computer
name> window. The values you can see are hardcoded, and may not be the
current default settings.
5
Check Heartbeat interval to set the heartbeat interval for this computer.
6
Specify the heartbeat interval, by typing the appropriate number of seconds.
7
Click OK.
Maintaining the default client configuration settings
The Symantec Ghost Console reads the client configuration settings when the
client is first detected. These settings are stored in the Symantec Ghost Console.
They are not updated automatically if the client computer configuration is changed.
This lets you restore the original client configuration settings if required.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting Symantec Ghost Console client computer properties
To restore the default configuration settings to a client, you need to execute a
Configuration task on the client computer. When you set up the Configuration
step of the task, select the Default setting.
See “Setting Configuration properties” on page 137.
You can edit the default settings, or copy them to match those on another
computer.
When you apply new configuration settings to a computer, the last known
configuration shown in the computer’s Properties window is not automatically
updated. You need to execute a Configuration Refresh task to read the new
configuration from the computer.
See “Setting up tasks” on page 128.
To view or edit the default configuration settings
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
change.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the General tab.
The Last known machine configuration panel shows the configuration that
was read from the client computer when the Console first detected it, or when
the last Configuration Refresh task was run on it. It is not necessarily the
same as the default configuration.
5
To change or view the configuration, click Edit.
In the Properties for <Computer name> Default Configuration window, you
can change settings as needed.
See “Setting up configuration sets” on page 103.
6
Click OK.
7
Click OK.
97
98
Managing computers and configuration resources
About setting up the virtual partition
To copy default configuration settings from another computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
change.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
4
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the General tab.
5
To copy the default configuration from another computer, click Copy.
In the Select Source window, select the computer from which you want to
copy the configuration.
6
Click OK.
7
Click OK.
About setting up the virtual partition
Each client computer uses a Symantec Ghost boot partition or a virtual partition.
To see the type of partition used on each computer, open the computer’s Properties
window and, on the Client tab, look under DOS Client Settings.
If any Symantec Ghost Console clients are using a virtual partition, you can set
up the virtual partition to suit your requirements. You can specify the partition
size and default DOS version to use, and add or edit files as appropriate. The same
settings are used for all client computers.
See “Setting the virtual partition size” on page 99.
See “Setting the default DOS version” on page 99.
See “Editing files in the virtual partition” on page 100.
You can set the driver template and DOS version for each client computer. The
DOS version setting at the client level overrides the default set on the Console.
See “Setting the DOS network driver template” on page 100.
See “Setting the DOS version for a client computer” on page 102.
Managing computers and configuration resources
About setting up the virtual partition
Setting the virtual partition size
You can alter the size of the virtual partition if you require. For example, if you
need to transfer a large executable to the virtual partition.
To set the virtual partition size
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
In the Options window, on the Client tab, in the Virtual Partition Size field,
type the size in megabytes.
The maximum size of the virtual partition is 50 MB.
3
Click Apply.
Setting the default DOS version
You can choose the default DOS version to use in the virtual partition. This version
of DOS is written to the virtual partition of each client computer as part of a task,
and used for rebooting the client computer when required.
The default is usually PC-DOS, which is supplied with Symantec Ghost. If your
computers don’t run under PC-DOS, you need to use MS-DOS instead.
Note: MS-DOS is not supplied with Symantec Ghost. You need to obtain an MS-DOS
licence, and use the Ghost Boot Wizard to load it before you can use it.
The DOS version you specify here is the default version for all clients. You can
choose a different DOS version for individual clients, by changing the client
property settings.
See “Setting the DOS version for a client computer” on page 102.
To set the default DOS version
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
In the Options window, on the Client tab, under Virtual Partition default DOS
type, select the DOS version that you want to use:
■
PC-DOS
■
MS-DOS
The MS-DOS option is available only if MS-DOS is available on the Symantec
Ghost Console server.
3
Click Apply.
99
100
Managing computers and configuration resources
About setting up the virtual partition
Editing files in the virtual partition
The virtual partition can be configured to use a different file or a different setting
for a parameter. For example, the IP address or receive mode.
The following settings can be configured from the Symantec Ghost Console:
■
Maximum size of the virtual boot partition
■
MS-DOS or PC-DOS
■
NIC driver
To change other parameters you must add files to the virtual partition or edit the
appropriate files, for example, one of the following:
■
Wattcp.cfg
■
Config.sys
■
Autoexec.bat
For more information, see the Knowledge Base article How to change files or settings
in the Ghost Virtual Boot Partition at:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/ghostvbp
Setting the DOS network driver template
When the client computer starts in the virtual partition, it uses a template that
contains the DOS network drivers that match the client computer’s hardware.
This template is usually selected automatically by Symantec Ghost when the
Symantec Ghost Console first detects the client computer. There are some cases
where no template is automatically selected:
■
The client computer appears in the Console with the MAC address (adapter
address).
■
The client computer is running Windows NT4.
If no template is selected, you must make the selection manually before you include
the client computer in a task. If a computer with no template is included in a task,
the task may fail.
If necessary, you can change the setting for computer groups, or individual client
computers.
Managing computers and configuration resources
About setting up the virtual partition
To set the DOS network driver template for a computer group
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
In the Machine Groups pane, right-click the computer group, then click Set
DOS Template.
3
In the Browse for template dialog box, select the one that you want.
The list displays all of the templates that are included with the Symantec
Ghost Boot Wizard. You can add and modify a template if necessary.
4
Click OK.
To set the DOS network driver template for a client computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
change.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
4
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the Client tab.
5
In the Network Settings when using Virtual Partition field, specify one of the
following options:
6
■
If you want to use the default chosen by the Console, click Use Suggested
Template and select a template from the drop-down list. The drop-down
list displays the templates that are suggested by the Symantec Ghost
Console as it connects with the client. If there are no suggested templates,
then you must select a template manually.
■
If you want to use a different template, click Use Manually Selected
Template, then click Browse.
The Browse for template dialog box displays all of the templates that are
included with the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard. You can select one of
these templates, or add and modify a template.
Click OK.
101
102
Managing computers and configuration resources
About setting up the virtual partition
Setting the DOS version for a client computer
You can select the version of DOS to install when the virtual partition is created
on the client computer. The setting you make here overrides the default setting
in the Symantec Ghost Console.
To set the DOS version for a client computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the computer that you want to
change.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the computer.
■
Right-click the computer, then click Properties.
■
Select the computer, then on the File menu, click Properties.
4
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the Client tab.
5
In the Virtual Partition DOS Version field, select the version that you want
to use from the following choices:
6
■
Default
Use the DOS version that is specified as the default in the Symantec Ghost
Console.
See “Setting the default DOS version” on page 99.
■
PC-DOS
■
MS-DOS
This option is available only if MS-DOS is available on the Symantec Ghost
Console server.
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
Click OK.
Removing the Symantec Ghost boot partition from a client computer
Once the Symantec Ghost boot partition is installed, it remains on the client
computer until you remove it. It is not affected by removing the client software,
or most cloning tasks.
If you want to remove the Ghost boot partition, you need to run a cloning task
that overwrites it on the client.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
To remove the Symantec Ghost boot partition from a computer
1
Create a task that includes a cloning step.
See “Setting up tasks” on page 128.
2
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Clone tab, click Advanced.
3
In the Advanced Ghost Options window, check Overwrite Ghost Boot
Partition.
4
Click OK.
5
Execute the task on the client computer.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
Setting up configuration sets
A configuration set is a group of registry settings that is saved and stored in the
Symantec Ghost Console. These settings can be applied to client computers after
an image restore task or as a separate configuration task.
There are several types of configuration sets as follows:
Default
configuration set
These configuration sets are read directly from the client computers,
and are stored on the Symantec Ghost Console server. Each default
configuration set applies only to the computer from which it was read,
so they are not shown in the Configurations folder, and cannot be
applied to any other computers. You can view and change the default
configuration set for each computer, by using the Edit option in the
computer’s Properties window.
Custom
configuration set
These configuration sets are stored in the Configurations folder, and
must be applied to individual client computers. You can create new
custom configuration sets, and modify them to suit your requirements.
Each configuration set contains the settings for a single computer.
Template
configuration set
These configuration sets are stored in the Configurations folder, and
must be applied to groups of computers. They are very similar to
custom configuration sets, but have the Allow Template Settings
option checked. You need to specify extra settings, such as an IP
address range rather than a single IP address, and use wildcard
characters in computer-specific properties such as computer names.
When you apply a custom or template configuration set, the settings it contains
are applied to the target computer or computer group. Any gaps in the
configuration set (where you have disabled the settings) are filled using either
103
104
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
the default configuration set for each target computer, or the settings currently
on the target computer, whichever you specify in the configuration task.
Note: If you want to preserve any settings on the target computers, you must
disable the corresponding settings in the custom or template configuration set
that you are using. Specifying a null setting, such as a blank description, is usually
treated as a valid setting, and is applied to the target computers.
You must also ensure the default configuration is up to date by running a
configuration refresh task before the configuration task.
Creating a new configuration set
You can create as many new custom and template configuration sets as you want.
To create a new configuration set
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the Configurations folder, then select the folder in which to store
the new configuration set.
3
In the Configurations pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Right-click, then click New Configuration.
■
On the File menu, click New > Configuration.
In the Properties For New Configuration Set window, type the name for the
new configuration set.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 50 characters, but
it must not be the same as another in the same folder.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
5
6
In the Target OS field, select the operating system that this configuration
applies to from the following:
■
Windows 9x/Me
■
Windows NT4
■
Windows 2000/XP/Vista
If you want to create a configuration set template, check Allow template
settings.
Leave this unchecked if you want to create a custom configuration set.
A template can be applied to a group of computers, but a custom configuration
set can be applied to individual computers only.
7
If you want to export settings, click Export, select the location in which you
want to save the file, type a file name, and then click Save.
You can export the configuration settings of a computer to a text file, which
you can then use when you apply configuration changes with the Ghconfig
tool. This option is enabled only if the configuration set is not a template.
See “Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line” on page 346.
8
Set the configuration properties.
The properties are listed in the left pane. Click a property to open the
corresponding window, and make the appropriate changes.
See “Viewing or modifying configuration sets ” on page 105.
9
When you have set all the configuration properties you require, click OK.
Viewing or modifying configuration sets
You can open a configuration set to view at any time. For example, you may want
to check the content of a configuration set before you use it in a Configuration
task. You can modify configuration sets to suit your requirements.
Some characters are not allowed in computer names, domain names, and
workgroup names in Windows. Although the Ghost Console lets you enter these
characters, you should verify that the characters are allowed by the target
operating system. The following characters might not be allowed:
!#@%&()-.^_{}~
105
106
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
To view or modify a configuration set
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the Configurations folder, then select the folder that contains the
configuration set that you want to view.
3
In the Configurations pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the configuration set.
■
Right-click the configuration set, then click Properties.
■
Select the configuration set, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, view the configuration
properties, then make any appropriate changes.
The configuration properties that you can modify are as follows:
5
User Name
See “Specifying a user name” on page 106.
Computer Name
See “Specifying the computer name” on page 107.
Workgroup/Domain
membership
See “Specifying the computer workgroup or domain”
on page 108.
TCP/IP Settings
See “Applying IP addresses” on page 109.
Default Gateway
See “Setting the default gateway” on page 110.
DNS Configuration
See “Setting the DNS Configuration” on page 111.
WINS Configuration
See “Setting the WINS server address” on page 111.
Novell NetWare Client
See “Applying Novell NetWare client configuration details”
on page 112.
Click OK.
Specifying a user name
You can specify a user name to apply to the target computer. If you specify a user
name in a template, every computer in the target group will have the same name.
In this case, you may want to specify a name that is clearly a default or placeholder.
Note: You cannot log on as the specified user unless a user account with that name
has been created on the client computer. Applying a user name to a client computer
does not create an account for that name.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
To specify the user name
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
User Name.
2
If you want the user name to be applied as part of the configuration, check
Apply User Name.
If this option is not checked, the user name is read from either the default
configuration set for each target computer, or the settings currently on the
target computer, whichever you specify in the Configuration task.
3
In the space provided, type the user name.
Specifying the computer name
You can specify a computer name and description to apply to the target computer.
If you specify a computer name in a configuration set template, you must include
at least one asterisk (*) wildcard character. When the configuration set template
is applied to a computer group, the wildcard characters are replaced with a number
that is unique to each computer. For example, if you create computers for the
Administration department, you may set this field to Admin *****.
Note: The number of asterisk (*) wildcard characters specifies the number of digits.
You must include sufficient digits for the number of computers in the target group.
For example, if there are 10 computers, you must include at least two asterisk (*)
wildcard characters.
To specify the computer name
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
Computer Name.
2
If you want the computer name to be applied as part of the configuration,
check Apply Computer name.
3
In the space provided, type the computer name.
If the configuration set is a template, the computer name must contain at
least one asterisk (*) wildcard character.
4
If you are setting up a Windows Vista/XP/2000 configuration, and you want
the NetBIOS computer name to be applied as part of the configuration, check
Apply NetBIOS Computer name.
By default, this name is the same as the computer name.
107
108
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
5
If you want to use a different name, check Override name, then in the space
provided, type the NetBIOS computer name.
If the configuration set is a template, the NetBIOS computer name must
contain at least one asterisk (*) wildcard character.
6
If you want the computer description to be applied as part of the configuration,
check Apply Computer description.
7
In the space provided, type the computer description.
Specifying the computer workgroup or domain
You can specify a workgroup or domain to apply to the target computers.
You can set validation registry settings for logging on to Windows 98 or Me
computers.
To specify the computer workgroup or domain for Windows 98 or Me computers
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
Workgroup/Domain Membership.
2
If you want the computer to be added to a workgroup, check Apply
Workgroup, then type the workgroup name.
3
If you want the computer logon to be validated by a domain server, check
Apply Logon Validation, then select the domain name from the drop-down
list.
If the domain you want isn’t in the list, type it in the box.
4
If you want the computer to log on to the specified domain, check Log on to
Windows NT/2000/2003 Domain.
To specify the computer workgroup or domain for Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT
computers
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
Workgroup/Domain Membership.
2
If you want the computer to be added to a workgroup or domain as part of
the configuration, check Apply Member of.
3
To add the computer to a workgroup, select Workgroup, then type the
workgroup name.
To add the computer to a domain, select Domain, then complete the following
steps.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
4
Click the drop-down list, then select the appropriate domain.
If the domain you want isn’t in the list, you can add it.
See “To add a new domain to the list” on page 109.
5
If you want to add the computer to an Active Directory container in the
domain, check Add to Active Directory Container.
The Console must be a member of the domain.
6
7
Specify the Active Directory container by doing one of the following:
■
Type the path to the container, relative to the domain.
■
Click Browse, then select the container from the list of those available on
the domain.
You must be logged on to the domain to be able to browse for a container.
If you want to preserve any computers that are already in a container, uncheck
Move computers that are currently in a container.
If you leave this checked, all computers are placed in the specified container.
To add a new domain to the list
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the
Workgroup/Domain Membership page, click Domains.
2
In the Add Domain window, click Browse, then select the domain you want
to add.
3
If the Symantec Ghost Console does not have an account in the selected
domain, check Create Console Service Account in the domain, then in the
Name and Password boxes, type the appropriate name and password.
4
Click OK.
The Symantec Ghost Console service account is validated on the selected
domain and then the new domain is added to the list in the Domain field.
Applying IP addresses
You can specify the IP addresses to apply to the target computers. If you are setting
up a configuration set template, you can specify a range of IP addresses. The
computers in the target group are assigned consecutive addresses starting from
the beginning of the range.
You can use DHCP to assign a dynamic IP address, or you can assign a static IP
address. On NT/98 computers, you can only apply a dynamic IP address to a client
computer that is already configured to use DHCP.
109
110
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
Note: You must ensure that the address range for a template is consistent with
the number of computers in the target computer group. If the range is too small,
the configuration task fails.
To apply IP addresses
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
TCP/IP Settings.
2
Specify whether the target computers use dynamic or static IP addresses:
■
To use dynamic IP addresses, select Target machine uses DHCP server
to obtain the IP Address.
■
To use static IP addresses, select Target machine has static IP address.
If you are using static IP addresses, follow the next three steps to specify
the address information.
3
If you want to assign new IP addresses to the target computers, check Apply
IP Address.
4
If you are setting up a configuration for a single computer, type the IP address.
If you are setting up a configuration template, in the From and To boxes, type
the IP address range for a computer group.
5
In the Subnet Mask box, type the subnet mask.
Setting the default gateway
You can set the default gateway address.
To specify default gateway information
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
Default Gateway.
2
Check Apply Default Gateway.
3
If you need to add a new address, click Add.
4
In the Default Gateway IP Address dialog box, type the address.
5
Click OK.
The new address is added to the list.
6
If you want to change any address on the list, select it, then click Edit, and
make the appropriate changes.
7
If you want to remove an address from the list, select it, then click Delete.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
Setting the DNS Configuration
You can set the DNS configuration.
Note: If you are applying any DNS settings to a Windows 98 or Me computer or
image, the computer or image must have DNS enabled in order for the settings
to take effect.
To specify DNS configuration information
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
DNS Configuration.
2
If the configuration is for Windows 98, Me, or NT4 computers, check Apply
DNS Host Name.
3
In the adjacent box, type the host name. If you are setting up a configuration
template, you must include at least one asterisk (*) wildcard character.
4
Check Apply DNS Domain, then type the domain name.
5
Check Apply DNS Server Addresses.
6
If you need to add a new address, click Add.
7
In the DNS Server IP Address dialog box, type the address.
8
Click OK.
The new address is added to the list.
9
If you want to change any address on the list, select it, then click Edit, and
make the appropriate changes.
10 If you want to remove an address from the list, select it, then click Delete.
11 If necessary, rearrange the list by clicking Move Up or Move Down to move
the selected address by one place.
Setting the WINS server address
You can set the Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS) server address.
Note: If you are applying any WINS settings to a Windows 98 or Me computer or
image, the computer or image must have WINS enabled in order for the settings
to take effect.
111
112
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
To set the WINS server address
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
WINS Configuration.
2
Check Apply WINS Server.
3
If you need to add a new address, click Add.
4
In the WINS Server IP Address dialog box, type the address.
5
Click OK.
The new address is added to the list.
6
If you want to change any address on the list, select it, then click Edit, and
make the appropriate changes.
7
If you want to remove an address from the list, select it, then click Delete.
8
If necessary, rearrange the list by clicking Move Up or Move Down to move
the selected address by one place.
Applying Novell NetWare client configuration details
You can specify the default Novell NetWare logon information to apply to target
computers.
You can set the client computer’s default Novell NetWare logon information.
Novell NetWare client information can only be applied to client computers that
are running the Novell NetWare client.
Table 4-8 shows the versions of Novell NetWare clients supported by Symantec
Ghost.
Table 4-8
Supported versions of Novell NetWare clients
Client OS
Novell NetWare version
Windows 98
Novell NetWare clients version 3.2 and later.
Windows
NT/2000/XP
Novell NetWare clients version 4.7 and later.
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
Note: There must be a successful logon to a Novell server from the client or from
the model computer before you can apply the configuration details.
The Novell client must be installed before the Ghost client is installed.
When executing tasks on a Windows 2000/NT client computer, the client will be
unable to reboot if it is in the Novell NetWare logon window. It must be logged on
or in the Windows Ctrl+Alt+Del logon window.
To specify Novell NetWare client information
1
In the Properties for <Configuration set name> window, in the left pane, click
Novell NetWare Client.
2
Check Apply Novell NetWare Client Settings.
3
In the NetWare Tree box, type the NetWare tree.
4
In the NetWare Context box, type the NetWare context.
5
In the Preferred Server box, type the Novell NetWare preferred server.
6
In the Novell Username box, type the Novell user name.
113
114
Managing computers and configuration resources
Setting up configuration sets
Chapter
5
Creating tasks
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About tasks
■
Creating an image of a computer
■
Creating an image create task
■
Setting up tasks
■
Deploying AutoInstall packages
■
Viewing task details
About tasks
A task is a set of instructions that are carried out by the Symantec Ghost Console.
You can create a task to perform any of the following actions on a client computer:
■
Create an image file
■
Restore an image file
■
Apply configuration settings
■
Capture and restore user files, application settings, and registry settings
■
Load AutoInstall packages
■
Transfer files
■
Run commands
You can initiate a task from the Ghost Console server or from a client computer.
116
Creating tasks
About tasks
Creating and executing a Ghost Console task
The Ghost Console lets you manage all of your cloning tasks. There are a number
of steps involved in creating and executing such tasks.
To create and execute a Console task
1
Install the Console client software on all client computers.
See “Installing the Console client” on page 58.
2
Group the Console client computers to create a specific set of target computers
to receive the task.
See “Setting up computer groups” on page 87.
3
Create the task and set up the appropriate task steps.
See “Setting up tasks” on page 128.
4
Execute the task for a computer or group of computers.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
5
Review the Task Log to check the status of executed tasks.
See “To view the Task Log” on page 240.
About template tasks
You can create and save a task that does not have all of the required information,
which you can use as follows:
■
When you create a template task, you can complete most of the fields and then
save the task. The minimum requirement for a template task is a task name.
You can run the task later after you add the required information.
■
You can run a template task from the command line or from a batch file with
flexible parameters.
Information that is required but not completed is marked by the following icon:
Before you can run the task, you must add the required information. If you run
the task from the command line, then you can include the required information
in the command line. Information that is marked by an icon indicates that the
task tab is incomplete. You cannot start a template task from the client computer
or schedule a template task.
You can run a template task without saving it. If you run a template task without
saving it, then the task is automatically saved in the Executed Template Tasks
Creating tasks
Creating an image of a computer
folder. The Executed Template Tasks folder is emptied on a schedule that is set
in the Ghost Console options.
Local deployment of Console resources
The Ghost Console resources are normally stored on the Symantec Ghost Console
server, and they are transferred to the client computers when they are used in a
task. However, you can store image files, migration packages, and AI packages
locally on your client computers. These resources are usually large files. You can
store these files on the client computers and run them locally to reduce the load
on the network. For example, if you run a clone task to load an image file to a
group of computers, it is more efficient to store the image file locally on each
computer. If you store the image file on the Console server, the image file must
be transferred over the network to every computer in the group when you run
the task.
When you create an image file or a migration package, you can choose to store
the file locally on the client computer or in the default location on the Console
server.
Note: If you store a migration package locally on a client computer, the package
does not appear in the Symantec Ghost Console, and you cannot access it from
the Console. You must know the name of the migration package and its location
on the client computer to use the migration package in a task.
When you restore settings and files from a local migration package, the migration
package is automatically preserved on each client computer. If you want to remove
it, you must delete it manually.
When you restore a client computer from an image file, you have the option of
preserving selected files. By default all files on the client computer are overwritten.
You can choose the files to preserve, and specify which partition they are to be
stored in. You may need to do this to preserve a migration package or other
resources that are stored on the client computer.
Creating an image of a computer
An image create task lets the Symantec Ghost Console create an image file of a
client computer. Image create tasks can be created, copied, changed, and reused
as required.
117
118
Creating tasks
Creating an image of a computer
To create an image of a computer
1
Set up the model computer.
See “Creating a model computer” on page 118.
2
Create the image definition.
See “Creating image definitions” on page 119.
3
Create the image create task.
See “Creating an image create task” on page 122.
4
Execute the image create task.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
Creating a model computer
A model computer is used as a template for client computers. This is the first step
in creating a Symantec Ghost model image. Set up a computer with the Windows
version and all of its drivers installed and configured as you want all of your
computers configured. If the computers are to be controlled from the Symantec
Ghost Console, install the Console client executable on the model computer.
If you are creating a model computer for Windows NT, 2000, or XP computers,
see the Knowledge Base article Introduction to cloning a Windows NT, Windows
2000, or Windows XP computer at the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/ghostcloneintro
You may need to create a model computer for each unique hardware setup. For
example, if you have some computers with different network or video cards, you
must have separate images for them. However, on Windows 2000/XP computers,
Microsoft Sysprep can help you create a generic template image for different
hardware setups.
About image definitions
Image definitions contain details of image files created by Symantec Ghost. Each
image definition is a pointer to an image file stored on the Symantec Ghost Console
server or on a client machine. The image definition lets you access and manage
the image file via the Symantec Ghost Console and use it in a clone task.
You need to provide an image definition for each image create task. You can do
this before creating the task, by creating an image definition with no associated
image file, or as part of the task creation process. The image create task creates
a new image file, and stores it as specified in the image definition.
Creating tasks
Creating an image of a computer
You can also create new image definitions for existing image files. For example,
you may have some image files that were created elsewhere and manually loaded
on to the Symantec Ghost Console server. To add these image files to the Console
resources, and make them available for use in restore tasks, you must create image
definitions for them.
When an image definition is associated with an image file, it contains the following
information:
■
Name and location of the image file
■
Image file status
■
Details of the image file as follows:
■
■
Partition number
■
Type
■
Original size of the partitions
■
Size of data
Description of the image file
When an image definition does not have an image file associated with it, or the
image file is stored on a client computer, it contains only the name and location
of the image file. This is the location to which the image file is saved when the
image definition is used in an image create task.
Creating image definitions
You can create image definitions for new images, before the image file itself has
been created. You need to do this before you can execute an image create task.
You can also create image definitions for image files that already exist on the
Symantec Ghost Console server. For example, you may have some image files that
were created elsewhere and manually loaded on to the Symantec Ghost Console
server.
To create a new image definition
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the Images folder, then select the folder in which to store the new
image definition.
3
In the Images pane, do one of the following:
■
Right-click, then click New Image.
■
On the File menu, click New > Image.
119
120
Creating tasks
Creating an image of a computer
4
In the Properties For New Image window, in the Name box, type the name for
the new image.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 50 characters, but
it must not be the same as another image definition in the same folder.
5
If you want to save the image file on the client computer, check Image is
located on the Client Machine, then specify the image file location.
See “To set the image file location on a client computer” on page 120.
If you want to save the image file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, or
you are creating a definition for an image file that is already stored on the
Symantec Ghost Console server, leave this option unchecked, then specify
the image file location.
See “To set the image file location on the Symantec Ghost Console server”
on page 120.
6
Click OK.
The new image definition is added to the Images folder.
To set the image file location on a client computer
1
In the Properties For New Image window, under Location, click Edit.
2
In the Path to Image File on Client window, under Volume Identifier, select
one of the following:
3
■
Drive letter: Type the drive letter.
■
Volume label: Type the volume label.
In the Path box, type the path and name of the image file.
You do not need to include the .gho file extension. It is automatically appended
to the file name when you save the image definition.
4
Click OK.
If you use this image definition in an image create task, a new image file is created
and stored with the specified name and location on the client computer.
If you use this image definition in a clone task, the task looks for an image file at
the specified location and name on each client computer. The Symantec Ghost
Console does not validate the path when you create an image definition, so you
must ensure that the image file name and location you type are correct.
To set the image file location on the Symantec Ghost Console server
1
In the Properties For New Image window, under Location, click Browse, then
do one of the following:
Creating tasks
Creating an image of a computer
2
■
If you are creating a definition for a new image file, select the folder in
which you want to store the image file, then type the file name.
You do not need to include the .gho file extension. It is automatically
appended to the file name when you save the image definition.
■
If you are creating a definition for an image file that is already stored on
the Symantec Ghost Console server, select the image file.
The file information appears in the Properties for New Image window.
If you selected an image file on the Symantec Ghost Console server, you can
change the image file description. You cannot change any other details.
Managing image definitions
The Images folder contains the image definitions that you have created and are
available for you to use in Recover tasks. The Console provides standard options
to help you organize these image definitions as you wish. These options allow you
to set up the folder structure, and move items within it as appropriate. You can
also rename items, and delete any items that you don’t need.
See “Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 80.
Note: An image definition cannot be deleted if it is part of a task definition.
If you delete an image definition, you are only removing it from the Console. The
image file is not affected.
Viewing image details
You can view details of the image associated with each image definition.
To view image details
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the Images folder, then select the folder that contains the image
definition that you want to view.
3
In the Images pane, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the image definition.
■
Right-click the image definition, then click Properties.
■
Select the image definition then, on the File menu, click Properties.
121
122
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
4
In the Properties for <Image name> window, view the image properties.
These include image status, and the type and size of each partition.
5
If you want to view full details of the image file, click Launch Ghost Explorer.
See “Using Ghost Explorer” on page 313.
Creating an image create task
An image create task is applied to the model computer, and includes the definition
of the image file to be created. When you create an image create task, you must
select the computer from which to take the image, specify the image definition
that is to be associated with it, and optionally set the network and Sysprep
parameters.
You can generate an image file without saving the image create task in the
Symantec Ghost Console. The procedure is the same as for creating an image
create task, but you execute the task immediately to generate the image file from
the target computer.
To create an image create task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Tasks folder.
2
Expand the folder in which to store the new image create task.
3
In the Tasks pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Right-click, then click New Image Create Task.
■
On the File menu, click New > Image Create Task.
In Properties for New Task dialog box, in the Name box, type the name for
the new image create task.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 50 characters, but
it must not be the same as another task in the same folder. This step is not
relevant if you are not saving the image create task.
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
5
Set the following image create properties on each tab:
General
Specifies the general properties such as the task name, and the
drive and partition on the source computer.
See “Setting general image create task properties” on page 123.
Network
Sets the data transfer mode and data throughput limits to
optimize the way image files are transferred over your network.
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
Sysprep
Facilitates restoring of image files on computers that have
different hardware configurations.
See “Cloning with Sysprep” on page 416.
6
Do one of the following:
■
To save the task, click Save.
The new task is added to the Tasks folder.
■
To run the task, click Execute.
The task runs immediately and is saved in the Executed Template Tasks
folder. The lower pane of the Console shows the progress of the task.
Setting general image create task properties
The general image create task properties include the task name, and the drive
and partition on the source computer. You can change any of these properties
later if necessary.
123
124
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
To set general image create task properties
1
In the Properties for <Task Name> window, on the General tab, in the Name
box, type a name for the task.
The name of the task must be unique and can use up to a maximum of 50
characters.
2
Under Source machine, click Browse, then from the hierarchy of client
computers, select the computer from which you want to take the image, then
click OK.
You can select only one computer for an image create task.
3
In the Source drive box, type a drive number, if required.
4
If you want to extract the image of a particular partition on the target
computer, check Partition operation, then in the Source partition box, type
the source partition number.
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
5
Under Image, In the Name box, click Browse, then from the hierarchy of
image definitions, select the image definition that you want to use, then click
OK.
If the image definition does not yet exist, you can create it now. To do this,
select the Images folder, then click New to open the Properties for New Image
window.
See “Creating image definitions” on page 119.
6
Under Compression, select the compression level that you want to use from
the following list:
■
None
■
Fast
■
High
The default is fast compression.
See “Image files and compression” on page 302.
7
If you want the ability to execute the task from the client computer, check
Allow Client Initiation.
8
Set the authorization password that the client must type in order to execute
the task. To do this, click Set Password, then type a suitable password.
The client computer users are prompted to type this password when they try
to execute the task.
See “Initiating a task from a client computer” on page 158.
9
If necessary, check Remove machine from Domain before taking an image.
You must remove the computer from its domain if you are going to roll out
the image file to a number of computers. This is not necessary if you are using
Sysprep, as Sysprep does this automatically.
10 If you want to add any options to the image create task using the command
line, click Advanced.
In the Advanced Ghost Options window, add the following information:
■
In the Additional Options for Ghost Command Line box, type the command
line switches that you want to use.
■
If you want to include the Ghost Boot partition in the image, check Include
Ghost Boot Partition.
This is not recommended, and you should do it only when necessary.
See “To add Advanced features for cloning” on page 137.
125
126
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
Setting network properties
You can set the data transfer mode and data throughput limits to suit your
requirements. You can change these settings globally, for a multicast session, and
for a task.
See “Optimizing data transfer over the network” on page 126.
You can choose to include target computers that are shut down when the task is
executed. This only applies to computers that support Wake on LAN (WOL).
See “Enabling Wake on Lan (WOL)” on page 127.
Optimizing data transfer over the network
You can set the data transfer mode to optimize the use of your network hardware
setup. Used in conjunction with the network bandwidth limits, you can optimize
the way image files are transferred over your network. The settings you make for
a task override the Symantec Ghost Console default settings and the subnet default
settings.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
Creating tasks
Creating an image create task
To set data transfer mode and network bandwidth limits
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, click the Network tab.
2
To set the data transfer mode for the task, check Data transfer mode, then
select one of the following options:
3
■
Multicast
■
Directed broadcast
■
Unicast
To set the maximum data transfer rate between the client computer and the
Console server, check Data throughput limit, then type the number of
megabytes per minute.
Enabling Wake on Lan (WOL)
You can enable Wake on Lan (WOL) to include computers that are shut down when
the task is executed. This only applies to computers that support WOL.
Computers must meet the following specifications:
■
The motherboard must support WOL.
127
128
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
■
The NIC must support WOL.
■
There must be a wire connecting the motherboard WOL port to the NIC WOL
port.
■
The WOL feature must be enabled in BIOS Power Management.
■
The connection light on the back of the NIC must be lit when the computer is
turned off.
To enable Wake on Lan
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, in the Network tab, check Use
WOL when executing a task.
2
If you want to turn off the computers that were started, once the task is
executed, check Shut down machines when task is finished.
Setting up tasks
A task is a set of instructions carried out by the Symantec Ghost Console, applied
to one or more client computers. A task may contain one or more steps.
Table 5-1 lists the available task steps.
Table 5-1
Task steps
Task step
Description
Clone
Restores a specified image file onto a client computer, or group of
computers.
See “Setting Clone properties” on page 131.
Configuration
Applies the specified configuration settings to the client computers.
See “Setting Configuration properties” on page 137.
Refresh
Configuration
Reads the configuration from client computers and updates their
default configuration settings in the Console.
There are no properties to set.
Refresh Inventory Gathers inventory information from client computers and updates
the Inventory database on the Console server.
There are no properties to set.
User Migration:
Capture
Captures user files, application settings, and registry settings from
client computers and stores them in user packages.
See “Capturing user data” on page 189.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
Table 5-1
Task steps (continued)
Task step
Description
User Migration:
Restore
Restores user files, application settings, and registry settings from
user packages to client computers.
See “Restoring user data” on page 194.
Deploy AI
packages
Lists the AutoInstall packages to be installed or uninstalled on client
computers, and lets you set the action to take if a deployment fails.
See “Setting up a Deploy AI Package task” on page 147.
Transfer Files
Lists the files to be copied onto the client computers and lets you setup
the files to execute on the client computers.
See “Setting File Transfer properties” on page 139.
Execute Command Executes the specified command on the client computers.
See “Adding Commands” on page 142.
Creating a task
You can create new tasks and set them up to suit your requirements. Task
definitions are stored in the Symantec Ghost Console, and can be managed in the
same way as other Console resources.
A task always includes the following components:
General properties, that specify
the task name, the steps to
include and the target
computers.
The target of the task may be a single computer, a machine
group, or a dynamic machine group (which is a group of
computers that have specified properties, such as a certain
amount of available disk space).
See “Setting up computer groups” on page 87.
See “Setting up dynamic machine groups” on page 235.
See “To create a task” on page 130.
Network properties, that
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
specify the data transfer mode
and data throughput limits for
the task.
The other task steps are optional. You can choose the steps that you want to
perform for each task, and set them up to suit your requirements.
129
130
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
If the target of the task is a dynamic machine group, the task icon has a small
triangle on the upper left side. If the task is a template task, the task icon is marked
as follows:
To create a task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Tasks folder.
2
Expand the folder in which to store the new task.
3
In the Tasks pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Right-click, then click New Task.
■
On the File menu, click New > Task.
In the Properties For New Task window, on the General tab, in the Name box,
type the name for the new task.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 50 characters, but
it must not be the same as another task in the same folder.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
5
Under Task Steps, check the task steps that you want to include in this task.
You must include at least one step in a task.
When you uncheck a step, the corresponding tab is hidden. Only the tabs
relevant to the selected steps are shown.
6
Under Refresh Steps, check the refresh steps that you want to include in this
task.
These steps have no tab associated with them, as you do not need to set any
properties.
7
Under Target Machine Group/Machine, click Browse, then select the
computer, machine group, or dynamic machine group to which you want to
apply the task, then click OK.
8
If you want the ability to execute the task from the client computer, under
Client Initiated Task, check Allow Client Initiation.
You must complete all of the required information in the task before this
option is available.
9
Click Set password, and then, in the Client Initiation dialog box, type the
authorization password that the client user must provide to run the task.
You must retype the password in the box below to confirm the password. The
client users are prompted to type this password when they try to run the task.
See “Initiating a task from a client computer” on page 158.
10 If you want to override the default network properties for this task, on the
Network tab, make the appropriate settings.
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
11 On each of the remaining tabs, set the properties for each step that you have
included in the task.
For a list of tabs, and references to where you can find complete descriptions,
see Table 5-1.
12 Do one of the following:
■
To save the task, click Save.
The new task is added to the Tasks folder and is available for use.
■
To run the task, click Execute.
Setting Clone properties
The Clone step lets you restore image files to client computers. You can restore
an image file to a single computer, or restore the same image to all the computers
131
132
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
in a computer group. If you have saved an image file locally on each of the target
computers using the same name and location, you can restore them all in a single
task.
See “Local deployment of Console resources” on page 117.
Note: When you restore the same image on two or more computers, they all have
the same name, which is the name of the model computer from which the image
was created. To correct this, you need to include a configuration step in the task
to change the name of each computer. You use a template configuration set for
this.
To set Clone properties
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, click the Clone tab.
2
In the Destination drive box, type a drive number, if required.
3
If you want to restore a single partition in the image file to a particular
partition on the target computers, check Partition restore, then type a
destination partition number.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
4
Under Image, click Browse, then select the image that you want to restore,
then click OK.
If the image definition does not yet exist, you can create it now. To do this,
click the Images folder, then click New to open the Properties for New Image
window.
See “Creating image definitions” on page 119.
5
If you want to restore a single partition in the image file, under Source
partition, select the appropriate partition from the drop-down list.
If the image file does not yet exist, no partitions are defined. You can type a
Source Partition number instead.
6
To change the SID on each target computer, check Use Ghost Walker to
perform a SID Change on the target machine. This option is applicable only
if you cloning a Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT operating system.
See “Using Ghost Walker” on page 402.
7
If you want to preserve certain files on the target computers, set the file
preservation options.
See “Preserving files and folders on client computers” on page 134.
8
If you want to add more advanced features to the task using the command
line, set the advanced feature options.
See “Adding Advanced features for cloning” on page 136.
Determining the hard-disk order
If you have multiple types of hard disks on a computer, the BIOS can order them
differently than Windows does. The BIOS also orders the disk based on which
type of device was used to start the computer. Ghost uses the hard-disk number
that is assigned by BIOS. If you have multiple types of hard disks on a computer,
you can run Ghost.exe to determine the order of the disks.
Warning: Windows Vista does not order the hard disks on a computer consistently
after the computer is restarted or in alignment with the BIOS order. Therefore,
the disk order on a Windows Vista computer might vary when the computer is
restarted.
133
134
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
To determine the hard-disk order
1
On the client computer, at the command prompt, type the following command
to start the client in the boot partition:
ngctw32 -recovery
2
In the boot partition, type Ctrl+X to exit the DOS client.
3
Run Ghost.
See “Starting Ghost.exe” on page 325.
4
In Ghost, click Quit to exit.
After you exit Ghost, you can use Ghreboot to restart the computer to
Windows.
5
At the command prompt, type the following command to exit the virtual
partition:
ngctdos -hide
Preserving files and folders on client computers
By default, restoring from an image file overwrites every file on the destination
partition of the client computer, except the image file if it is stored locally.
During a restore task you can choose to overwrite the image file, or preserve files
and folders that you want to keep on the destination partition of the client
computer.
Table 5-2 shows some examples of the way in which you can use this feature.
Table 5-2
File preservation examples
Method
Description
Preserve client
computer data
files and folders.
You can select data files and folders from any of the partitions that
are overwritten by the restore operation, but all files are preserved
on a single partition. If necessary, to avoid name collisions when
preserving files and folders from different partitions, specify the
destination name and path for each file or folder.
Save the image file If you are performing a Clone operation from an image file stored
locally.
locally, you can preserve the image file.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
Table 5-2
File preservation examples (continued)
Method
Description
Create and restore
a migration
package in a single
task.
You can combine a User Migration Capture operation, a Clone
operation, and a User Migration Restore operation in one task. If you
plan to store the package locally, you must preserve the package during
the clone operation. You preserve the package in the same way that
you preserve other data files on the client computer. You must specify
the path and name of the migration package that you want to preserve.
When you run the task, the migration package is created and saved
on the client computer. The task then preserves the migration package
when the client is restored with an image file. Then the User Migration
settings are restored on the client.
Any files that are restored from the image with the same name and location as
the preserved files are overwritten by the preserved files. To prevent this you can
rename files when you select them to preserve.
You can also run file preservation using command-line switches.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
To set file preservation options
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Clone tab, click Preserve.
2
If you are restoring from a locally deployed image file, it is preserved by
default. If you want to overwrite it, uncheck Preserve Image File.
If you want to move or rename the image file you must add the image file to
the list of files to preserve.
See “To add a file to the list” on page 136.
3
Specify the files and folders that you want to preserve by adding them to the
list.
See “To add a file to the list” on page 136.
4
If you need to remove a file or folder from the list, select it, then click Delete.
5
In the File Preservation Options window, in the Preservation Partition box,
type the number of the partition in which you want the specified files and
folders to be stored.
The preserved files and folders are stored in the partition chosen after the
restore operation.
6
Click OK.
135
136
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
To add a file to the list
1
In the File Preservation Options window, click Add.
2
In the Add File To Preserve window, under Volume Identifier, select one of
the following:
■
Drive letter: Type the drive letter.
■
Volume label: Type the volume label.
3
In the Path box, type the full path and name of the file or folder that you want
to preserve.
4
Specify what action you want to take if the selected file does not exist in the
specified location on the client computer.
5
■
To halt the task, check Fail if path doesn’t exist.
You may want to select this option for important files, to ensure that the
task does not run unless they are preserved.
■
To ignore the missing file and continue, leave the option unchecked.
Any missing files that are ignored are not preserved.
If you want to store the file in a different location, or under a different name,
in the Rename To box, type the appropriate path and file name.
If you are preserving files from more than one source partition, you can
change the name and path for each file. You may need to do this to avoid
collisions or prevent overwriting files that were restored from the image.
If you leave this box empty, the file is preserved with its original name and
location.
6
Click OK.
The file name and path details are added to the list.
Adding Advanced features for cloning
You can set more options for the cloning task using the command-line switches.
You can also choose to overwrite the Ghost boot partition, if one exists on the
client computer, and you no longer need it.
The command-line switches that you can use for file preservation are as follows:
-preserve
Duplicates the functionality of the File
Preservation Options window.
-preserveifexists
Duplicates the functionality of the File
Preservation Options window.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
-preservedest
Duplicates the functionality of the File
Preservation Options window.
-preservedimagedeleteafterclone
Duplicates the functionality of the File
Preservation Options window.
-unpreserveimage
-recover
-rfile
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Warning: The syntax of your command is not checked when the task runs.
Therefore, review these instructions carefully to avoid crashing or errors. The
consequences of an error could be serious.
To add Advanced features for cloning
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Clone tab, click Advanced.
2
In the Advanced Ghost Options window, in the Additional Options for Ghost
Command Line box, type the extra commands.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
3
If you want to overwrite the Symantec Ghost DOS boot partition on the client
computer, check Overwrite Ghost Boot Partition.
If the image that you are restoring contains a Symantec Ghost DOS boot
partition, this option is always checked. The partition in the image must
overwrite the corresponding partition in the client computer.
If the image does not contain a Symantec Ghost DOS boot partition, you can
select this option to remove the Ghost boot partition from the client computer.
4
Click OK.
Setting Configuration properties
The Configuration step lets you apply configuration settings to client computers.
There are several ways to do this as follows:
137
138
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
Default configurations The default configuration settings are read from each computer
can be applied to each when it first connects to the Symantec Ghost Console. You can
computer.
view and edit these settings in the computer’s Properties window.
See “Maintaining the default client configuration settings ”
on page 96.
A template
configuration set can
be applied to each
computer in a group.
This applies the same configuration settings to each computer in
the target group. Any computer-specific settings, such as the
computer name or IP address, are adjusted automatically to ensure
they are unique.
Custom configuration
sets can be applied to
each computer.
This applies a configuration set to each computer in the target
group. You can choose which configuration set to apply to each
computer.
If the target of the task is a dynamic machine group, the target
computers are not identified until the task is run, so you cannot
assign custom configuration sets. You must apply a template or
the default configuration settings.
Custom and template configuration sets may not contain all the settings required.
You can fill any gaps from the default configuration set for each computer, or you
can preserve the configuration settings that are currently on each computer.
Note: If you use the default configuration set to fill gaps in a custom or template
configuration set, you must run a configuration refresh task to update the default
configuration for each computer before you run the configuration task.
To check the Configuration settings before running the task, view the task scenario.
See “Viewing task details” on page 150.
To apply default configurations to target computers
◆
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Configuration tab, select
Default.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
To apply a configuration template to target computers
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Configuration tab, select
Template.
2
Click Browse, then in the Select Configuration window, select the template
that you want, then click OK.
If you want to view the settings in a template before selecting it, double-click
the name to open its Properties window.
3
If you want to fill any gaps in the template with the default configuration
settings for each computer, check Use default settings.
If you leave this option unchecked, any gaps in the template configuration
set are filled with the settings currently on each computer.
To apply a custom configuration to target computers
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, on the Configuration tab, select
Custom.
2
Click Customize to open the Custom Configuration window.
The target computer or computer group folder appears in the left pane, and
the Configuration Resources folder appears in the right pane.
3
For each computer to which you want to apply custom configuration settings,
in the Configuration Resources folder, select the configuration set and drag
it onto the computer.
If you want to view the settings in a custom configuration set before selecting
it, double-click the name to open its Properties window.
The icon for the configuration set appears below the computer to which it is
assigned.
4
If you want to remove a custom configuration set and leave the computer
without one assigned, right click the configuration set name, then click Delete.
5
Click OK to close the Custom Configuration window.
6
If you want to fill any gaps in the custom configuration sets with the default
configuration settings for each computer, check Use default settings.
If you leave this option unchecked, any gaps are filled with the settings
currently on each computer.
Setting File Transfer properties
You can transfer files from the Symantec Ghost Console server to the operating
system or the Ghost partition of the client computer. The target is selected on a
139
140
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
file-by-file basis. If you transfer the files to the virtual partition, then the files
remain there only while the task is being executed.
You need to select each file that you want to transfer, and specify where to transfer
it. There are three possible destinations: the Ghost Incoming directory, the boot
partition, or a specified path.
You can add execution instructions and parameters to the files. The files and
instructions are added to the Command list on the Execute Command tab.
If you transfer files by multicast, you might encounter the following issues:
■
When you transfer files to multiple clients by multicast, there is a 20-second
delay between each file transfer. Therefore, the task might take longer to run
than expected.
■
The Ghost Console supports only one multicast file transfer at a time. Multicast
file transfers do not run simultaneously.
Warning: Do not attempt to transfer files to the My Documents folder on the client
computer in a file transfer task. If you want to move any files to the My Documents
folder, use the User Migration feature. User Migration automatically handles the
directory mapping required.
See “About migrating users” on page 177.
Note: You may want to hide the folders that contain transferred files on the client
computers to prevent the computer users from accessing them. To hide a folder,
you need to add the following command to the Command tab in the file transfer
task:
“attrib” +h [pathname]
where [pathname] is the full path and name of the folder that you want to hide,
and the target of the command is the Target OS of the client computer.
To set up the list of files to transfer to the client computers
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, click the Transfer Files tab.
The list of files to transfer shows the full path and file name of each file, and
its destination path on the client computer.
2
To add a group of files to the list of files to transfer, click Add.
3
In the browser, go to the folder containing the files that you want to include
in the group, select the files, then click Open.
The selected files are added to the list in the Source window.
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
4
For each folder from which you want to select files for this group, click Add,
then repeat step 3.
5
If you want to remove files from the list, select the appropriate files, then
click Delete.
6
Click Next.
7
In the Destination window, specify the destination for all the files in the group
by selecting one of the following:
Ghost “Incoming” The destination is the Ghost installation directory. By default,
Directory
this is C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Incoming. If you
installed Symantec Ghost to another location, the files will be
transferred to that location instead.
Ghost Partition
The destination is the Ghost boot partition. If the client is using
a virtual partition, the files will remain there only while the task
is being executed.
Specified Path
The destination is the path specified in the box below. You can
specify any path you want.
See “To set the destination path for a group of files” on page 141.
8
Click Finish.
The group of files is added to the list of files to transfer.
9
Repeat steps 2 through 8 for each group of files that you want to transfer.
10 If you want to remove files from the list, select the appropriate files, then
click Delete.
To set the destination path for a group of files
1
In the Destination window, under Specified Path, click Edit.
2
In the Path on Client Machines window, under Volume Identifier, select one
of the following:
■
Drive letter: Type the drive letter.
■
Volume label: Type the volume label.
3
In the Path box, type the destination path for the group of files.
4
Click OK.
The path is added to the Specified Path box.
141
142
Creating tasks
Setting up tasks
To add execution instructions to the transferred file
1
On the Transfer Files tab, click Execute.
2
In the Execute Command dialog box, in the Arguments box, type the command
arguments, separated by commas.
3
Click OK.
The command is added to the Command List on the Execute Command tab.
Adding Commands
Commands are executed in the operating system or the Symantec Ghost partition.
The target is selected on a command-by-command basis.
Commands can also be added to a file during a file transfer step.
See “Setting File Transfer properties” on page 139.
Note: Using GDisk in the Command step lets you alter partitions during a task.
See “About GDisk” on page 423.
To set up the list of commands
1
In the Properties for <Task name> window, click the Execute Command tab.
The Commands List shows details of all the commands that are currently set
up.
2
If you want to add a command to the list, select the target of the command.
In Target
Execute a command in the operating system.
Operating System
You must include the full path for the command. The path is as
follows:
C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Incoming
In Ghost Partition Execute a command in the Ghost partition.
You must include the full path for the command. The path is as
follows:
C:\Ghost\Incoming
3
In the Command box, type the command syntax.
You must include the full path of the command.
4
In the Arguments box, type the command arguments, separated by commas.
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
5
Click OK.
The command is added to the Command List.
6
Repeat steps 2 through 5 for each command that you want to add to the list.
7
If you want to remove any commands, select them in the Command List, then
click Delete.
8
If you want to modify a command, select it in the Command List, then click
Update. Repeat steps 2 through 5.
Deploying AutoInstall packages
AutoInstall (AI) packages let you automate the process of installing and
uninstalling applications on client computers. You create the AI packages with
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall.
You deploy AI packages to the client computers by running a Deploy AI Package
task from the Symantec Ghost Console. When you set up the task, you select which
AI packages to install and uninstall.
Note: When you create an AI package, you have the option to include an Uninstall
command. If you want to be able to uninstall a package from the Symantec Ghost
Console in a Deploy AI Package task, you must include the Uninstall command
when you create it.
To deploy AI packages
1
Create the AI packages you require.
See “How AutoInstall works” on page 377.
2
Store the AI package files in the appropriate places.
You can store AI package files on the Console server, a shared network drive,
an HTTP location, or on the client computer.
If you want to minimize the use of network bandwidth, you can store a copy
of each file on every client computer.
See “Storing AI packages” on page 144.
3
Create AI package definitions for the AI package files that you want to use.
See “Creating AI package definitions” on page 144.
143
144
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
4
Create the Deploy AI Package task, add the appropriate definitions, and set
the failure options.
See “Setting up a Deploy AI Package task” on page 147.
5
Execute the task.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
Storing AI packages
AI packages can be stored on the Symantec Ghost Console server, at an HTTP
location, on a network share, or locally on each client computer.
See “Local deployment of Console resources” on page 117.
Packages located on a non-UNC (Universal Naming Convention) path are
transferred and installed from the client. Packages located on a UNC path are
accessed over the network. However, should this fail, these packages are
transferred to the client.
The client uses HTTP protocols to access the packages stored at HTTP locations.
If packages are stored on Windows NT and Windows 2000 network shares, other
computers cannot access the packages. To enable access, edit the registry on the
computer on which the share exists, adding the name of the share to the following
registry location:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanManServer\
Parameters\NullSessionShares
Client computers can then access this share.
Warning: This workaround creates an open share, which does not require a
username or password to connect. This is a potential security threat.
Creating AI package definitions
AI packages may be stored on the Symantec Ghost Console server, at an HTTP
location, on a network share, or locally on each client computer. To make an AI
package available for deployment, you need to create an AI package definition for
it. To deploy an AI package, you add the appropriate AI package definition to a
Deploy AI Package task.
Each AI package definition contains the name and location of an AI package and,
if the package is stored on the Symantec Ghost Console server, it also contains
the GUID. The available AI package definitions are stored in the AI Packages folder
in the Symantec Ghost Console.
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
145
To create a new AI package definition
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the AI Packages folder, then expand the folder in which to store the
new AI package definition.
3
In the AI Packages pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Right-click, then click New AI Package.
■
On the File menu, click New > AI Package.
In the Properties For New AI Package window, in the Name box, type the
name for the new AI package definition.
The name can be anything you want, up to a maximum of 50 characters, but
it must not be the same as another AI package definition in the same folder.
5
If the AI package file is stored on the client computer, check Package is located
on the Client Machine, then specify the AI package file location.
See “To specify the AI package file location on a client computer” on page 145.
If the AI package file is stored on the Console server, a network share, or an
HTTP location, leave this option unchecked, then specify the AI package file
location.
See “To specify the AI package file location on the Console server” on page 146.
6
If the package is located on an HTTP path, click Validate to verify that the
package is a valid AI Package.
If the package is a valid AI Package, then the Package GUID appears.
7
Click Launch AI Builder to start AI Builder and verify the package, if
appropriate.
8
Click OK.
The new AI package definition is added to the AI Packages folder.
To specify the AI package file location on a client computer
1
In the Properties For AI Package window, under Location, click Edit.
2
In the Path to AI Package on Client window, under Volume Identifier, select
one of the following:
■
Drive letter: Type the drive letter.
■
Volume label: Type the volume label.
146
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
3
In the Path box, type the full path and name of the AI package file.
4
Click OK.
The AI package file name and location are added to the Location box.
Note: When you use this AI package definition in a Deploy AI Package task, the
task looks for an AI package file at the specified location and name on each client
computer. The Symantec Ghost Console does not validate the path for each client
computer when you create an AI package definition. It is up to you to ensure that
the package file exists on each client computer in the correct location.
To specify the AI package file location on the Console server
1
In the Properties For AI Package window, under Location, click Browse.
2
In the browser, select the AI package file on the Console server.
3
Click Open.
The AI package file name and location are added to the Location box, and the
package GUID is shown.
Managing AI package definitions
The AI Packages folder contains the AI package definitions that you have created
and are available for you to use in Deploy AI Package tasks. The Symantec Ghost
Console provides standard options to help you organize AI package definitions.
These options allow you to set up the folder structure, and move definitions within
it as appropriate. You can also rename definitions, and delete any definitions that
you don’t need.
See “Managing Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 80.
Note: An AI package definition cannot be deleted if it is part of a task definition.
If you delete an AI package definition, you are only removing it from the Console.
The AI package file is not affected.
Viewing AI package details
You can view details of the AI package associated with each AI package definition.
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
To view AI package details
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the AI Packages folder, then expand the folder that contains the AI
package definition that you want to view.
3
In the AI Packages pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the package definition.
■
Right-click the package definition, then click Properties.
■
Select the package definition, then on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <AI package name> window, you can view details such
as the package location and GUID.
The name and location of the package appears. The package can be stored on
the Symantec Ghost Console server, on the client computer, on a network
share, or at an HTTP location.
5
If you want to view full details of the AI package, click Launch AI Builder.
See “About executing and rolling out AI packages” on page 395.
Setting up a Deploy AI Package task
You deploy AI packages to client computers by running a Deploy AI Package task
from the Symantec Ghost Console. When you set up the task, you select the target
computers, and specify which AI packages to install and uninstall.
You may not be able to uninstall all the AI packages that you have installed. In
the following cases you cannot uninstall an AI package:
The package does not
include an Uninstall
command.
When each package is built, you have the option to include an
Uninstall command. If you do not include this command, you
cannot uninstall the package in a Deploy AI Package task. If you
want to check whether or not a package includes an Uninstall
command, open the package with AI Builder and view its contents.
The package has been
rebuilt with a new
identifying number
(GUID).
The new package cannot uninstall any software that was installed
with the package prior to the rebuild. The application checks the
GUID to ensure that the same package is used to uninstall software
as the one used to install it.
If an AI package does not include an Uninstall command, or if the package has
been rebuilt with a new GUID, you must use some other means to uninstall the
software from the client computers.
147
148
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
The connection from a client to the Ghost Console might be slow if you use an
HTTP connection. You should confirm that the HTTP connection has been
successful before you start a second HTTP task.
To set up a Deploy AI Package task
1
Create a task, then select the Deploy AI Package step.
See “Creating a task” on page 129.
2
In the Properties for <Task name> window, click the Deploy AI Package tab.
3
Under Install Packages, click Browse.
Creating tasks
Deploying AutoInstall packages
4
In the Select AI Packages window, select the install packages that you want
to include in the task.
The list contains all the AI package definitions currently available in the
Symantec Ghost Console. You may select any number of install packages.
If you need to create a new definition, click New.
If you want to view details of a definition, double-click it to open the Properties
window.
See “Creating AI package definitions” on page 144.
See “Viewing AI package details” on page 146.
5
Click OK.
The selected AI packages are shown in the Install Packages list.
6
Under Remove Packages, click Browse.
7
In the Select AI Packages window, select the uninstall packages that you want
to include in the task.
The list contains all the AI package definitions currently available in the
Console. Some packages may not contain uninstall commands and the
Symantec Ghost Console does not check for them. Make sure to select the
correct packages.
You may select any number of uninstall packages.
8
Click OK.
The selected AI packages are shown in the Uninstall Packages list.
149
150
Creating tasks
Viewing task details
9
Under Deploy options, specify the action to take if an AI package fails to
deploy by selecting one of the following:
Continue task
Ignore any failures, and continue to deploy all the uninstall
execution if any of the and install packages on the target computer.
packages fails to
deploy
Skip install packages if If an uninstall package fails to deploy, continue to deploy
remove package fails any remaining uninstall packages, but do not deploy any
install packages.
Skip remaining
packages if remove
package fails
If an uninstall package fails to deploy, do not deploy any
further packages. This ends the Deploy AI Packages step of
the task, but lets any other task steps continue.
Stop task execution if
any of the packages
fails to deploy
If any package fails to deploy, stop the task immediately.
The specified action is taken only on a computer that has a deployment failure.
A failure on one computer does not affect the task running on any other
computers.
10 Do one of the following:
■
To save the task, click Save.
The new task is added to the Tasks folder and is available for use.
■
To run the task, click Execute.
The task runs immediately and is saved in the Executed Template Tasks
folder. The lower pane of the Console shows the progress of the task.
Viewing task details
You can check the details of a task before you execute it, by viewing a Task
Scenario. When you view a task scenario, the Symantec Ghost Console validates
the properties and settings of the selected task and displays full details of each
step, including any possible reasons for failure.
The Task Scenario includes the following information:
■
The steps in the task, and the order in which they are performed
■
The number of computers in the target group
■
The name of each computer in the target group
■
The network settings for data transfer mode and data throughput limit
Creating tasks
Viewing task details
■
Details of each step in the task
This is essentially the information that has been set on each tab of the Properties
for <Task name> window. The settings for each step are validated and, if any
possible reasons for failure are found, a warning message is displayed.
To view task details
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Tasks folder.
2
In the Tasks pane, do one of the following:
■
Select the task that you want to view, then on the View menu, click Task
Scenario.
■
Right-click the task, then click Task Scenario.
The Symantec Ghost Console validates the properties and settings of the
selected task. This may take a few moments.
When the validation is complete, the Task Scenario window appears.
3
In the Task Scenario window, view the details of the task.
4
Click Close.
If the Console finds an obvious reason why the task would fail, such as having
no computers in the target group, or no image file for a restore step, it stops
the validation immediately. The task scenario shows the task information up
to the point of failure, where a warning message is shown. No further
information is shown. You must modify the task to correct the problem, and
generate the task scenario again.
151
152
Creating tasks
Viewing task details
Chapter
6
Executing and scheduling
tasks
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Executing tasks
■
Scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Once defined, tasks can be executed at any time. You can execute tasks on a
scheduled basis, from the Symantec Ghost Console or from the client.
See “Executing a task from the Symantec Ghost Console” on page 154.
See “Executing a recovery task” on page 157.
See “Initiating a task from a client computer” on page 158.
See “Initiating a task from the command line” on page 159.
You can view tasks that are currently executing in the bottom pane of the Symantec
Ghost Console.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console options” on page 242.
All tasks are logged. If any problems occur, you can access the logs from the
Console.
See “Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity” on page 239.
A task may fail to execute if the correct network drivers are not found. If the task
log indicates a failure for this reason, amend the computer properties to use the
correct template.
See “Managing Symantec Ghost Console client computers” on page 85.
154
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Executing a task from the Symantec Ghost Console
You can execute a task manually at any time from the Symantec Ghost Console.
You can run tasks concurrently.
Before tasks are executed, the following information is checked:
■
The validity of an image file to be restored.
■
Whether or not a target computer is included in more than one task.
If you run two tasks that have the same target computer, the first task executes
for that computer. The second task does not start.
Table 6-1 lists the task execution modes available from the Symantec Ghost
Console.
Table 6-1
Task execution modes
Mode
Description
Execute
You can use this mode for any task. The task is executed immediately,
and uses the network settings in the task definition.
See “Executing a task manually” on page 154.
Advanced Execute You can use this mode only for cloning tasks.
This mode lets you override the data-transfer mode and the
data-throughput limit that are defined in the task. The network
settings apply only for this instance, and they do not change the task
definition.
You can also use this mode to set the logging parameters for the
GhostCastChange SIDs using the Symantec Ghost utility Ghost Walker.
Symantec Ghost also supports Microsoft Sysprep. server. You can set
the logging parameters on the GhostCast server. You can use the
GhostCast server's logs to diagnose problems if the data transfer is
slow.
See “Executing a Clone task manually” on page 155.
Execute as
Recovery Task
You can use this mode to recover from a failed task.
See “Executing a recovery task” on page 157.
Executing a task manually
You can execute a task manually. You can execute a saved task from the Tasks
folder or from the Executed Template Tasks folder. You also can execute a saved
task or an unsaved task from the task's Properties dialog box.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
After you run a template task it is saved in the Executed Template Tasks folder.
Any task information that you had to add is also saved in the task. The original
template task is left unchanged in the Tasks folder. If you try to execute a template
task that has incomplete information then the Properties dialog box opens and
you are prompted to complete the missing information first.
To execute a task manually from a task folder
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand one of the following:
■
The Tasks folder
■
The Executed Template Tasks folder
2
Expand the folder that contains the task that you want to execute.
3
Right-click the task, then click Execute Task.
4
In the confirmation dialog box, click Yes.
To execute a task manually from the task's Properties dialog box
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand one of the following:
■
The Tasks folder
■
The Executed Template Tasks folder
2
Expand the folder that contains the task that you want to execute.
3
Double-click the task.
4
In the Properties dialog box, click Execute.
If they are enabled in the Console, start task and end task confirmation messages
are displayed. These are for your information only, and do not control the task
execution.
The Active Task pane (the bottom pane of the Symantec Ghost Console) shows
the progress of the task as it executes.
If you want to enable or disable the confirmation messages, or hide the Active
Task pane, you can do so in the Ghost Console options.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console options” on page 242.
Executing a Clone task manually
You can override the network settings in the task definition, and can set the
logging parameters for the GhostCast server. The network settings apply only for
this execution, and do not change the task definition. The logging parameters are
set on the GhostCast server. You may want to use the GhostCast server logs to
diagnose problems if the data transfer is very slow.
155
156
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
See “About GhostCasting” on page 351.
To execute a clone task manually
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand one of the following:
■
The Tasks folder.
■
The Executed Template Tasks folder.
2
Expand the folder that contains the clone task that you want to execute.
3
Do one of the following:
■
Right-click the task, then click Advanced Execute.
■
Select the task, then on the File menu, click Advanced Execute.
4
In the Task Execution Options window, if you want to log the task, check Log
Data Transfer Information.
5
If you are logging the task, specify the logging properties:
6
7
■
Under Log Level, in the drop-down list, select the event level that you
want to log.
■
In the Log File box, type the full path and name of the log file to use, or
click Browse to select it.
If you want to set the data transfer mode for the task, check Data Transfer
Mode, then select one of the following:
■
Multicast
■
Directed Broadcast
■
Unicast
To set the maximum data transfer rate between the Console server and the
client computer, check Data throughput limit, then type the number of
megabytes per minute.
The data transfer settings replace the corresponding settings on the Network
tab in the task definition.
8
Click OK.
9
In the confirmation dialog, click Yes.
The Active Task pane (the bottom pane of the Symantec Ghost Console) shows
the progress of the task as it executes.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Executing a recovery task
If a clone task that includes preserved files fails and the client is left in the Ghost
partition unable to start in Windows, you can execute a recovery task that is a
simplified version of the failed task. A recovery task attempts to restore those
clients on which the original task failed and recover the preserved files that were
specified in the original task. It does not attempt any steps previous to the clone
step.
To execute a recovery task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand one of the following:
■
The Tasks folder.
■
The Executed Template Tasks folder.
2
Expand the folder that contains the clone task that you want to execute.
3
Do one of the following:
4
■
Right-click the task, then click Execute as Recovery Task.
■
Select the task, then on the File menu, click Execute as Recovery Task.
In the Properties for Recovery Task window, make any necessary changes.
If the recovery task is in the Executed Template Task folder, then you cannot
change the task.
5
Click OK.
The task starts immediately. There is no confirmation message. The Active
Task pane shows the progress of the task as it executes.
Canceling a task that is executing
You can cancel a task that is currently executing. In order to do this, you need to
have the Active Task pane of the Console displayed. If necessary, enable the Active
Task pane in the Console by clicking View > Active Task Pane.
When you cancel a task, Symantec Ghost does not stop the task immediately. It
continues executing the task until it can hand over control to the client computer.
This ensures that all the client computers are left in a stable state.
Note: Any in-progress file transfer must be completed before the task can stop.
This may take a few minutes for large files such as images or AI packages.
157
158
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
To cancel a task that is executing
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the Active Task pane, right-click the task
that you want to cancel.
2
Click Cancel.
3
In the confirmation dialog, click Yes.
4
In the message dialog, click OK.
The process may take a few minutes.
Initiating a task from a client computer
A task can be initiated from the client computer if Allow Client Initiation is checked
in the task definition and Enable Client User Interface is checked in the Console
Options window on the Client tab. All the resources that are used by a
client-initiated task must reside on either the client computer or on the Console
computer.
If a task is set up to run from a client, then you can initiate the execution of the
task from the client computer. End users can execute tasks, or administrators can
execute tasks immediately from the client without having to return to the Console
server.
Both global and task settings must allow for client-initiated tasks.
See “Creating a task” on page 129.
See “Setting Symantec Ghost Console options” on page 242.
Note: You cannot initiate a template task or a task that targets a computer in a
Dynamic Machine Group from the client computer.
Warning: Unless a password is required to execute the task, there is no confirmation
required. The task executes immediately.
To initiate a task from a client computer
1
On the client computer, click the Symantec Ghost Client icon.
2
On the pop-up menu, select the task to execute.
3
In the Password box, type the password for the task.
If no password was set in the Symantec Ghost Console task window, then this
window does not appear.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Initiating a task from the command line
You can initiate a task from the command line in the Console server or from the
command line in a client computer. You cannot initiate a template task from a
client computer.
To initiate a task from the Console server command line
◆
In the Console server command line, type:
ngcons.exe /e taskname
To initiate a task from the client command line or a batch file
◆
In the client command line or batch file, type:
ngctw32.exe -initiate <taskname> [password]
You must include the task name in this command and the password, if
required. There is no notification if the task has succeeded or failed.
Console command-line switches
You can run a task from the command line by using command-line switches. Each
switch corresponds to a Ghost Console object. Any parameters that you type in
the command line override the parameters that are saved in the task definition.
For example, you can use a command-line switch to run a task on a different target
computer than the one that is specified in the task definition.
Every task that you run from the command line is saved in the Executed Template
Tasks folder. Any errors or warnings that occur as the task runs are logged in the
ConsoleLog.txt file. You can use this file to help diagnose any problems that
occurred. The ConsoleLog.txt file is saved in the installation directory.
If a resource is stored in a folder, you must include the full path to the resource
in the command line, for example: "My Configurations\Win2k\config".
Table 6-2 lists the switches that you can use with a template task.
159
160
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Table 6-2
Task command-line switches
Switch
Task type
Description
/t target_name
All task types
The target computer or machine
group. You must type the
computer name or machine
group name exactly as it
appears in the Ghost Console.
You can specify a dynamic
machine group. You must
specify the full path to the
computer or machine group, for
example:
AKSITE\SALES\SMITH_A, but
you do not need to include the
_username section of the
computer name.
/dd 1
Clone
The destination drive. The
default value is drive one. This
switch corresponds to the
Destination Drive setting in a
Clone task.
/dp 1
Clone
The destination partition. This
switch is used only for partition
operations. This switch
corresponds to the Destination
Partition setting in a Clone task.
/sp 1
Clone
The source partition. This
switch is used only for partition
operations. This switch
corresponds to the Source
Partition setting in a Clone task.
/img image_name
Clone
The image definition name. This
name corresponds to the Image
Name setting in a Clone task.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Table 6-2
Task command-line switches (continued)
Switch
Task type
Description
/conf 1|2:template_name
Configuration
The configuration set. The
parameters for this command
are as follows:
1: The default configuration
set. This switch corresponds
to the default configuration
setting in a Configuration
task.
■ 2: The template
configuration set. this
switch corresponds to the
template configuration
setting in a Configuration
task.
■ template_name: The name
of the configuration set
resource.
■
You cannot apply custom
configuration sets from the
command line.
/tfd 1|2|3:c:\folder_path
Transfer files
The directory to which the files
are transferred. The parameters
are as follows:
1: The Ghost incoming
directory.
■ 2: The Ghost partition.
■
■
3: A specified path.
This switch must be used with
the /tfs switch. You can use
multiple pairs of the /tfs switch
and the /tfd switch.
/tfs c:\source_path
Transfer files
The source directory for the
files in a file transfer task.
This switch must be used with
the /tfd switch. You can use
multiple pairs of the /tfs switch
and the /tfd switch.
161
162
Executing and scheduling tasks
Executing tasks
Table 6-2
Task command-line switches (continued)
Switch
Task type
Description
/cmd 1:c:\command.exe
Execute Command
The command that you want to
execute. The parameters are as
follows:
2:\c:\command.exe
1: Runs the command in the
target operating system.
■ 2: Runs the command in the
Ghost partition.
■
/cmdarg "/batchfile 1"
Execute Command
A batch file that contains the
command arguments that you
want to use with the /cmd
switch. You can use multiple
pairs of /cmd and /cmdarg.
/ai 1:ai_package
Deploy AI Package
Deploys an AutoInstall package.
The parameters are as follows:
2:ai_package2
Ai_package: The name of the
AutoInstall package
resource name.
■ 1: Installs the package.
■
■
2: Removes a package.
You can use this switch multiple
times.
/mcn package_name
User Migration: Capture
The name of the user-migration
package that you want to create.
This name corresponds to the
package name that is specified
in the User Migration: Restore
task.
/mt template_name
User Migration: Capture
The name of the user-migration
template. This switch
corresponds to the Migration
Template setting in the User
Migration: Capture task. You
can use this switch multiple
times.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
Table 6-2
Task command-line switches (continued)
Switch
Task type
Description
/mrn package_name
User Migration: Restore
The name of the migration
package that you want to
restore. This name corresponds
to the package name that is
specified in the User Migration:
Capture task.
/s script.txt
The path name and file name of
the script that you want to run.
The script should include the
commands and switches that
you want to use.
You must type each command
on a separate line. Use # at the
beginning of the line to signify
a comment.
For example, the following
script runs a task named Test
on the Default machine group
and applies the my_template
configuration set.
/e test
/t Default
/conf 2:my_template
Scheduling tasks
You can schedule tasks to run automatically from the Symantec Ghost Console.
Backup regimes may include scheduled backup tasks. Backup task schedules are
very similar to scheduled tasks.
You can set up a schedule for a task at any time. A task may have two or more
schedules, but each schedule may contain only one task.
The procedure for setting up a backup schedule is identical to that for a task. The
only difference is that there is no Scheduler window in which to view the entire
list of backup task schedules.
163
164
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
Note: You cannot schedule a template task.
To create a schedule for a task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Scheduler.
2
In the Symantec Console Scheduler, on the Task menu, click New Task.
3
In the Select Task window, select the task that you want to schedule, then
click OK.
4
In the Ghost Console Scheduled Tasks window, on the Task tab, set the
schedule task properties.
See “Setting the schedule task properties” on page 164.
5
In the Ghost Console Scheduled Tasks window, on the Schedule tab, specify
the schedule details.
See “Specifying schedule details” on page 165.
6
Click OK.
The new task is added to the list in the Scheduler.
Setting the schedule task properties
You can specify the properties for the task that is being scheduled.
To set the schedule task properties
1
In the Ghost Console Scheduled Tasks window, on the Task tab, in the Run
box, view the schedule task executable name.
2
In the Comments box, type any appropriate comments for the scheduled task.
For example, you can identify each backup regime.
3
In the Run as box, type the user name of the person who is running the task.
The default is the logged on user.
4
Click Set Password.
5
In the Password box, type your password.
6
In the Confirm Password box, type your password again to confirm that it is
entered correctly.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
7
Click OK.
A password must be set for scheduled tasks to execute. The password is
validated when the task runs.
8
If you need to enable the schedule, check Enabled.
This option lets you enable or disable the schedule without deleting it or
losing any of the schedule details. If you don’t want the scheduled task to
run, uncheck Enabled. When you want the scheduled task to run again, check
Enabled to restore it.
A disabled scheduled task is indicated on the schedule list as Next Run Time
= never. All the enabled tasks show the next run time, as set in the schedule.
Specifying schedule details
There are a number of different schedule types. You need to select the schedule
type that you want, and then specify the appropriate details.
You can have multiple schedule types for the same scheduled task. Details of all
schedules are shown on the Schedule tab, and you can add or delete them as
required. Multiple schedule tasks are only one entry on the Scheduler list.
Table 6-3 describes the available schedule types
Table 6-3
Schedule types
Type
Description
Daily
The scheduled task is run at a specified time each day. You need to
specify the time.
Weekly
The scheduled task is run at a specified time on particular days of
each week. You need to specify the time and the days of the week.
Monthly
The scheduled task is run at a specified time on particular days of
each selected month. You need to specify the time and the days of the
month, and select the appropriate calendar months.
Once
The scheduled task is run at a specified date and time. You need to
specify the date and time.
At System Startup These schedule types are not relevant to client computers. Do not use
them.
At Logon
When Idle
165
166
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
To specify the schedule details
1
In the Ghost Console Scheduled Tasks window, click the Schedule tab.
2
Under Schedule Task, select the schedule type from the following list, then
set the appropriate details:
Daily
See “To set up a daily schedule” on page 166.
Weekly
See “To set up a weekly schedule” on page 166.
Monthly
See “To set up a monthly schedule” on page 166.
Once
See “To set up a once-only schedule” on page 167.
3
If you want to set up two or more schedules for the same task, check Show
Multiple Schedules.
4
Click New to add each new schedule, then specify the appropriate details.
Repeat step 2 for each new schedule.
5
If you want to delete a schedule, select it in the list, then click Delete.
To set up a daily schedule
1
In the Start Time box, type the time at which the task should start.
2
If you don’t want to run the task every day, but at regular intervals of two or
more days, in the Every X days box, type the number of days.
To set up a weekly schedule
1
In the Start Time box, type the time at which the task should start.
2
If you don’t want to run the task every week, but at regular intervals of two
or more weeks, in the Every X weeks box, type the number of weeks.
3
Under Schedule Task Weekly, select the days of the week on which the task
should run.
To set up a monthly schedule
1
In the Start Time box, type the time at which the task should start.
2
Under Schedule Task Monthly, specify the day of the month on which the
task should run. You can set either of the following:
3
■
The number of the day, such as the 17th or 23rd.
■
The number of a particular weekday, such as the second Monday.
Click Select Months, then select the calendar months on which the task should
run.
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
To set up a once-only schedule
1
In the Start Time box, type the time at which the task should start.
2
In the Run On box, select the date on which to run.
Viewing or modifying a schedule
You can view details of scheduled tasks and make any necessary changes to the
schedule.
To view or modify a schedule
1
2
In the Symantec Console Scheduler, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the task that you want to change.
■
Right-click the task, then click Properties.
■
Select the task, then on the Task menu, click Properties.
In the Properties window, make the changes.
See “Scheduling tasks” on page 163.
167
168
Executing and scheduling tasks
Scheduling tasks
Chapter
7
Incremental backup
regimes and rollbacks
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About incremental backups and backup regimes
■
Setting the location for backup images
■
Setting up backup regimes
■
Creating a backup manually
■
Viewing computer backups
■
Restoring a computer
About incremental backups and backup regimes
Incremental backups ensure that personal or company information that is stored
on client computers is retrievable. The Symantec Ghost Console lets you schedule
incremental backups, create them manually, and roll them back as required.
The backup regime contains a number of settings that determine how and when
a backup is completed. This allows for the regular scheduling of a backup.
The first backup of a client computer is stored as the baseline image. Each
subsequent backup is an incremental image. Only the changes made since the last
backup are stored. However, if the changes are too large to be stored as an
incremental image, a new baseline image is created and stored.
A full baseline image is automatically created when the size of an incremental
backup image is equal to or greater than 2 gigabytes. A baseline is also
automatically created when fundamental changes such as the following examples
are made:
170
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Setting the location for backup images
■
Installation of service packs
■
Installation of Microsoft applications
■
Installation of drivers
■
Changes to files that are protected by the operating system
You should create a new baseline image after every five incremental images. You
can specify a maximum time between the creation of baseline images.
Symantec Ghost saves the incremental backups as AI Snapshot.exe files. You
should not manually run an incremental backup.
Setting the location for backup images
You can specify the location in which to store the backup images. You might need
to change this location to ensure there is enough disk space available for the
images. The default location is as follows:
C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Symantec\Ghost\Backups\
To set the location for backup images
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, under Backup Regime, specify the location in which
you want to store the backup images.
You can type the full directory path, or click Browse to select it from the file
system.
3
Click Apply.
Setting up backup regimes
Each backup regime contains a number of settings that determine how and when
a backup image is completed. You can create a backup regime for each client
computer and may modify them at any time.
Backup images are stored in the directory specified in the Console Options dialog
box. You can set the location of this directory to suit your requirements.
See “Setting the location for backup images” on page 170.
To create a new backup regime
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Backup Regimes
folder.
2
Select the parent folder in which to place the new backup regime.
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Setting up backup regimes
3
4
Do one of the following:
■
In the Backup Regimes pane, right-click, then click New Backup Regime.
■
On the File menu, click New > Backup Regime.
In the Properties for New Backup Regime window, on the Properties tab,
specify the properties.
See “Setting backup regime properties” on page 171.
Steps 5 and 6 apply only if you are scheduling the backup. If you don’t set up
a schedule, you must execute the backup manually.
5
On the Task tab, type the schedule task details.
You must set the user name and password that authorizes the backup task
to run on the Console server.
See “Setting the schedule task properties” on page 164.
6
On the Schedule tab, type the schedule details.
The client becomes temporarily unavailable to the end-user when you take
a backup image. You should consider scheduling the backup regime to occur
during off-peak times.
See “Specifying schedule details” on page 165.
7
Click OK.
Setting backup regime properties
The backup regime properties include the name of the computer being backed up,
the minimum number of days to keep backups, and whether or not the backups
are scheduled.
Incremental and baseline images are deleted as a set, so a particular backup image
may not be deleted immediately after the minimum number of days to keep it has
expired. A backup image is not deleted until all dependent images are deleted.
If you have a baseline image and several incremental images that rely on the
baseline, nothing is deleted until the most recent incremental backup is older
than the specified minimum number of days to keep backups. Once the most
recent incremental backup passes the minimum number of days, the entire set
of backups (baseline image and all dependent incremental images) is deleted.
171
172
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Setting up backup regimes
To set backup regime properties
1
In the Properties for <Backup Regime name> window, on the Properties tab,
in the Name box, type a name for the backup.
2
Click Browse to select the computer to be included in the backup regime.
Each computer can only be placed in one backup regime.
3
Under Rollback History, in the Minimum number of days to keep backups
box, type the required number of days to set a time before which backup
information cannot be deleted.
If you set this to 0, then the backups are never removed.
4
In the Number of days between baseline images box, type the number of days
after which to create a new baseline image.
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Setting up backup regimes
5
Under Automatic Backups, check Schedule Automatic Backups to create or
edit the schedule for automatic backups.
When this option is checked, the Task and Schedule tabs become available,
letting you set up the schedule to suit your requirements.
See “Setting the schedule task properties” on page 164.
See “Specifying schedule details” on page 165.
6
Under Advanced, in the Additional backup/restore options for Ghost command
line box, type any additional command-line options.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Warning: The syntax of your command is not checked when the task runs.
Therefore, review these instructions carefully to avoid crashing or errors. The
consequences of an error could be serious and you could lose data.
Viewing or modifying backup regimes
A backup regime is a set of properties associated with a particular computer that
specify how backups for the computer are created and maintained. These
properties include how long the backup information is saved, whether automatic
backups are scheduled, and any additional command-line options.
You can view details of each backup regime and make any necessary changes.
To view or modify a backup regime
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Backup Regimes
folder.
2
In the Backup Regimes pane, do one of the following:
3
■
Double-click the backup regime that you want to modify.
■
Right-click the backup regime that you want to modify, then click
Properties.
■
Select the backup regime that you want to modify, then on the File menu,
click Properties.
In the Properties for <Backup Regime name> window, view the backup regime
properties, then make any appropriate changes.
See “Setting backup regime properties” on page 171.
4
Click OK.
173
174
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Creating a backup manually
Creating a backup manually
Backup regimes are usually scheduled to create backups at regular intervals.
However, once you have created a backup regime for a computer, you can create
a backup at any time. You may want to create a manual backup to ensure a new
baseline image is created for a computer at a particular time.
Note: The maximum size of a backup image is 2 gigabytes. If you attempt to create
an incremental backup larger than this, a baseline backup is created instead.
To create a backup manually
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Backup Regimes
folder.
2
In the Backup Regimes pane, do one of the following:
3
■
Right-click the backup regime for the computer that you want to back up,
then click Backup Now.
■
Select the backup regime for the computer that you want to back up, then
on the File menu, click Backup Now.
If you want to create a new baseline image, in the Backup Now dialog, check
Force new baseline image.
If this option is not checked, the backup is performed as defined on the
Properties tab of the backup regime.
4
In the Comments box, type any notes that you want to accompany the backup.
Notes are stored in the Properties window for the computer on the Backup
tab.
5
Click OK.
Viewing computer backups
You can view details of all the backups that have been created for a computer.
To view computer backups
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Open the machine group that contains the client computer for which you
want to view backups.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Restoring a computer
4
■
Double-click the computer for which you want to view backup details.
■
Right-click the computer for which you want to view backup details, then
click Properties.
■
Select the computer for which you want to view backup details, then on
the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, on the Backups tab, view
the backup details for the computer.
The details include whether the backup is a baseline or incremental image,
the time at which it was created, the backup status, and any comments that
may have been entered.
Restoring a computer
Client computers can be rolled back to a successful baseline or incremental image
backup at any time.
Note: You cannot cancel or undo a restore once it has started.
To restore a computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Backup Regimes
folder.
2
In the Backup Regimes pane, right-click the backup regime for the computer
that you want to receive the rollback, then click Restore.
3
In the list of backups, select the one to roll back.
The status of each backup is indicated as follows:
4
■
Success: The computer in this backup was successfully backed up.
■
Failed: The computer in this backup failed to back up.
In the bottom pane, you can view the status of the backup.
The status for the computer is as follows:
■
OK: This computer was successfully backed up.
■
Unfinished: This computer did not complete the back up or is currently
running the back up.
175
176
Incremental backup regimes and rollbacks
Restoring a computer
5
Click Safe Mode restore (non-system files only) to restore user files only.
The operating system files and registry files are not restored.
6
Click OK.
Chapter
8
User Migration
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About migrating users
■
Creating user migration templates
■
Capturing user data
■
Restoring user data
■
Managing user packages
About migrating users
You can capture a user’s personal files and settings from a computer, save them
to a migration package, and restore the package to the same computer or to another
computer. During a user migration you can perform tasks that preserve a user’s
personal setup and reset applications with mandatory or personal configurations.
You can use migration tasks to quickly move a user from one computer to another.
If you installed an updated version of an application that Ghost supports, the
restore task updates the user settings.
You can capture and restore the following user information:
User settings
You can capture desktop and application settings. For example, you
can capture the following settings:
■
The default printer that is selected in Microsoft Word
■
A user's screen saver or desktop wallpaper settings
■
A user's Internet settings
See “About supported applications” on page 600.
178
User Migration
About migrating users
Folders and files
You can capture entire folders or individual files from any
Windows-accessible partition on the computer. For example, the My
Documents folder.
Registry entries
You can capture individual registry entries, keys, or user hives.
About migration packages
A package contains data that is collected from a client computer. The package
consists of application settings, user files and folders, and registry entries. A
package is based on a migration template that is you create in the Console. You
use the migration package after you update a user's computer to restore the user's
application settings and personal data files.
Note: A package contains only the settings that are associated with a software
application. It does not include the application.
How you set up a user migration task
The steps for creating a user migration task are as follows:
Create a User Migration:
Capture task
The capture task captures the user settings and data folders
that are specified in a selected template or templates and
stores them in a migration package.
You must select a migration template or create one. A user
migration template specifies the application settings and
files, user files and folders, and custom registry entries that
are captured and restored in a user migration task.
Create a User Migration:
Restore task
The restore task restores application settings and files, user
files and folders, and custom registry entries from a
migration package to a destination computer.
If you installed an updated version of an application that
Ghost supports, the restore task updates the user settings.
You can configure this task to run immediately or at another
time.
You can create a user migration task that includes capture and restore steps. For
example, you could set up one task that includes the following actions:
■
Capture a user's settings and files and save them in a package on the Ghost
Console Server or on the client computer.
See “Capturing user data” on page 189.
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
■
Restore the client computer from an image file to provision a computer with
an operating system and applications.
See “Setting Clone properties” on page 131.
■
Restore the settings and files from the migration package that you created to
the client computer.
See “Restoring user data” on page 194.
Creating user migration templates
You specify the user information that you want to capture by setting up migration
templates. When you set up a migration template, you specify the set of files,
application settings, and registry keys that you want to capture from a computer.
You can create new migration templates at any time, and can modify existing
templates to suit your requirements.
Table 8-1 describes the components of a migration template.
Table 8-1
Components of a migration template
Component
Description
Application settings
The applications for which you want to capture user settings. The
list contains all the applications that Symantec Ghost supports.
Specified user files and A specified set of user files and folders to include or to exclude.
folders to include or
Each set contains a directory path and file definition and may
exclude
include variables and wildcard characters. You can specify whether
to include or exclude particular sets of files. You can select files
based on creation or modification dates and file size.
You can specify a destination path and replacement options for
the files that you want to include.
Specified registry keys The specified set of registry entries to capture or exclude.
to capture or exclude
Each set contains a registry path and may include wildcard
characters.
You can specify a destination path and replacement options can
be specified for registry keys that you want to include.
Creating a migration template
You can create new templates directly in the Configuration Resources folder or
as you set up a User Migration: Capture task. Each template must contain at least
one item to include or exclude, or it must contain an application setting.
179
180
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
To create a migration template in the Configuration Resources folder
1
On the Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration Resources
folder.
2
Expand the User Migration Templates folder, and then select the parent
folder in which to place the new migration template.
3
In the folder, right-click, and then select New Migration Template to set the
properties for the migration template.
To set properties for the migration template
1
In the Properties for New Migration Template window, on the Applications
tab, in the Migration Template Name box, type a name for your new migration
template.
2
In the Supported Applications list, select the applications for which you want
to capture user settings and files.
The list contains all the applications that Symantec User Migration supports.
To select an application, click the checkbox next to the application name.
If the application is not installed on the source computer, then no settings
are captured.
3
If you want to include additional files and folders in the template, on the Files
and Folders tab, under Included Files and Folders, click Add.
See “Specifying the user files to include or exclude in the template” on page 180.
4
If you want to set options to exclude files and folders in the template, on the
Files and Folders tab, under Excluded Files and Folders, click Add.
5
If you want to remove a restriction from the template, select the restriction,
and then click Delete.
6
If you want to capture specific registry keys, on the Registry Keys tab, under
Included Registry Keys, click Add.
See “Specifying the registry entries to capture” on page 187.
7
If you want to exclude registry keys from the template, on the Registry Keys
tab, under Excluded Registry Keys, click Add.
8
Click OK to save the migration template.
The new migration template is added to the User Migration Templates folder
and is available for inclusion in a capture task.
Specifying the user files to include or exclude in the template
You specify the user files that you want to capture in a template.
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
Table 8-2 describes the restrictions that you can apply to the files that you select.
Table 8-2
File restrictions
Component
Description
Source path
The source path specifies a folder, a group of files, or a particular
file.
You can specify an absolute path of a file or folder, or you can use
a variable that specifies a system-defined path.
Ghost evaluates these variables to determine which path is used.
For example, user files that are stored in one operating system
might be stored elsewhere on another operating system. By using
system-defined paths, the two paths are automatically associated,
and the files from one path are upgraded to the other. You can
use a variable as a complete path to collect all files and subfolders
that are on that path. You can also use a variable as a partial path
and append a subfolder.
For example, to collect files from the C:\Documents and
settings\<user name>\My documents folder for each user, you
can use the variable $MyDocuments$ to set the path.
You can use wildcard characters to specify the group of files. For
example, you can use * to select all files and subfolders or *.ext to
select all files with the specified extension.
By default, if you do not specify a subset of files, then all files and
folders are included.
Size restrictions
These settings are optional. You can select the files that are greater
than or less than a specified size.
For example, you might want to select all files smaller than 100
KB and ignore any larger files.
If you want to select files between a minimum and maximum size,
you must include all files less than the maximum size and exclude
all files less than the minimum size.
181
182
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
Table 8-2
File restrictions (continued)
Component
Description
Date restrictions
These settings are optional. By default, all files that are specified
in the directory path and file definition are selected. You can filter
the selected files by creation date, modification date, or date last
accessed. You can specify a particular date range to select all files
in the range. You can select all files that are created, modified, or
accessed during the previous days by specifying the number of
days.
For example, you might want to select just the files that have been
accessed by the user in the previous month. Any other files are
ignored.
Destination options
These options let you restore files to a path that is different from
the source path. You can also choose how the existing files should
be replaced.
If you have not specified a system-defined path, then, by default,
all data files and registry entries are restored to the location from
which they were collected. If you want to restore the data files
and registry entries to a different location on the destination
computer, you must specify the appropriate paths to the directory.
You can also select to save a backup copy of files that are replaced
with files that are restored from the package.
These options are available only when you include files in a capture
task.
Note: If the complete source path is not resolved, nothing is
collected. If the target path does not exist, it is created as part of
the restore process.
To specify the files to include or exclude in the template
1
In the File or Folder dialog box, in the Source Path drop-down list, do one of
the following:
■
Type a path to a file or folder.
■
Select a system-defined path from the drop-down list.
See “User migration variables” on page 184.
You can use a combination of a system-defined path and type a direct path.
2
If you want to include the subfolders of the specified path, check Include
Subfolders.
The specified file selection applies to all the subfolders.
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
3
If you want to include folders that have no files in them, check Include Empty
Folders.
4
To set additional restrictions on the selected files, then select one or more of
the following options:
5
Set date restrictions
See “To set date restrictions on files to
include in the template” on page 183.
Set size restrictions
See “To set size restrictions on files to
include in the template” on page 184.
Set destination options
See “To set a destination path” on page 184.
Click OK.
To set date restrictions on files to include in the template
1
In the File or Folder dialog box, under Date, check Apply to files.
2
In the drop-down list, select one of the following options:
3
Modified
Selects the files that were modified in the specified date range.
Created
Selects the files that were created in the specified date range.
Last Accessed
Selects the files that were last accessed in the specified date
range.
Set the date criteria by selecting one of the following options:
Between
Set the start and end dates of the range by clicking each box and
selecting the date from the calendar.
During the
previous
Set the number of days by typing the appropriate number or by
clicking the arrow buttons to change the current value.
Days are counted from the current time to the same time on the
appropriate day, not the complete day.
183
184
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
To set size restrictions on files to include in the template
1
In the File or Folder dialog box, under Size, if you want to include only those
files that are less than a specified size, check Less than, and then in the KB
box, specify the file size in kilobytes.
You can specify the size by typing the appropriate number or by clicking the
arrow buttons to change the current value.
2
If you want to include only those files that are greater than a specified size,
check Greater than, and then in the KB box, specify the file size in kilobytes.
To set a destination path
1
2
In the Include Files or Folders dialog box, in the Replace drop-down list, select
one of the following options:
Never
Existing files are not replaced.
Always
Existing files are always replaced.
Date is newer
Replace the existing file only if the one in the package
is newer (for example, the date is more recent).
Version is newer
Replace the existing file only if the one in the package
is a newer version (for example, the version number is
higher). This option applies only to executable
programs.
Date and version are newer
Replace the existing file only if the one in the package
is both newer and a newer version. This option applies
only to executable programs.
If you want to keep a backup of the replaced files, then check Backup replaced
files.
The backups are stored in the same location as the existing files.
3
If you want to restore the files to a path other than the source path, then
check Specify destination path, and type the path to which you want the
source files to be restored.
You can type the entire path or use variables as building blocks where
appropriate, in the same way that you set the source path.
See “User migration variables” on page 184.
User migration variables
You can use variables as building blocks to specify part or all of the directory path.
This use of variables lets you specify a directory that is set up by the operating
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
system. For example, to collect files from the C:\Documents and Settings\<user
name>\My Documents folder for each user on Windows 2000 and XP computers,
you can use the $MyDocuments$ variable.
Table 8-3 lists the variables that represent folder locations that the operating
system determines.
You can only use the variables that are contained in the list. If you type any other
variables, even though they are valid in the operating system, the directory path
is not resolved.
Table 8-3
System-defined paths
Variable
Definition
$LocalDrives$
All locally-mounted drives with non-removable media. For example:
C:\ or D:\
$NetworkDrives$
Mapped network drives.
$CommonDesktop$ File system directory that contains the files and folders that appear
on the desktop for all users. Typically:
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Desktop
$CommonDocuments$ File system directory that contains the documents that all users share.
Typically:
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Documents
$CommonStartMenu$ File system directory that contains the programs and folders that
appear on the Start menu for all users. Typically:
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu
$CommonStartup$ File system directory that contains the programs that appear in the
Startup folder for all users. Typically:
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
$Fonts$
Virtual folder that contains fonts. Typically:
\Windows\Fonts or \WINNT\Fonts
$MyDesktop$
File system directory that contains a user's desktop shortcuts.
Typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\Desktop
185
186
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
Table 8-3
System-defined paths (continued)
Variable
Definition
$MyDocuments$
$MyDocuments$ includes music, video, and picture files. You should
use the $MyDocuments$ variable on client computers running
Windows XP or earlier versions of Windows. If you use this variable
on a Windows Vista computer, then Symantec Ghost displays a
warning.
File system directory that contains a specific user's personal files.
Typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\My Documents
My Documents is the same as Personal.
$Documents$
You should use the $Documents$ variable on client computers running
Windows Vista. The $Documents$ variable does not include a user's
music, video, or picture files. To includes these files, you must use the
$Music$, $Video$, and $Pictures$ variables.
On Microsoft Vista computers, this directory is typically as follows:
\Users\<User Name>\Documents\
$MyMusic$
$Music$
File system directory that contains a user's music files. On Windows
XP computers, this is typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\My Documents\My Music
On Windows Vista computers, this is typically:
\Users\<User Name>\Music
$MyPictures$
$Pictures$
File system directory that contains a user's graphics files. On Windows
XP computers, this is typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\My Documents\My Pictures
On Windows Vista computers, this is typically:
\Users\<User Name>\Pictures\
$MyVideo$
$Video$
File system directory that contains a user's video files. On Windows
XP computers, this is typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\My Documents\My Videos
On Windows Vista computers, this is typically:
\Users\<User Name>\Video\
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
Table 8-3
System-defined paths (continued)
Variable
Definition
$Profile$
File system directory that contains a specific user's documents and
settings. Typically on Windows XP, this is:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\
Typically on Windows Vista, this is:
\Users\<User Name>\
$ProgramFiles$
File system directory that contains the program files. Typically:
\Program Files
$StartMenu$
File system directory that contains Start menu items. Typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\Start Menu or
\WINNT\Profiles\<User Name>\Start Menu
$Startup$
File system directory that corresponds to the user's Startup program
group. Typically:
\Documents and Settings\<User Name>\Start Menu\Programs\Startup
$Windows$
Windows directory or SYSROOT. Typically:
\WINDOWS or \WINNT
Specifying the registry entries to capture
You can capture and migrate registry entries. If you want to move a user’s personal
settings for an application that is installed on the computer, you need to capture
the appropriate registry entries.
You specify the registry entries that you want to capture with a migration template.
You must determine whether the registry entries require a destination paths. You
must use a destination path when you want to move all entries and subkeys under
a particular registry key to a different location (for example, for backup purposes).
To specify the registry entries to capture
1
In the Include Registry Keys dialog box, under Options, in the Path box, type
the registry path and entry definition for the registry entries.
2
If you want to include the child keys in the capture, then check Include Child
Keys.
187
188
User Migration
Creating user migration templates
3
In the Replace drop-down list, select one of the following:
Never
Existing entries are not replaced.
Always
Existing entries are always replaced.
4
If you want to restore the entries to another key or hive other than the source
key, then check Specify destination path, and type the registry path and
entry definition for the registry entries.
5
Click OK.
About managing migration templates
The Ghost Console provides a set of options that help you organize and manage
your migration templates. These options let you set up the folder structure and
move migration templates within them. You can also rename migration templates
and delete any that you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Viewing or modifying a migration template
You can open a migration template to view or modify. For example, you can view
the contents of a migration template before you assign the template to a task.
Note: Any changes that you make to a migration template take effect immediately.
The changes apply to every user profile that uses the template.
To view or modify a migration template
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the User Migration Templates folder, and then select the parent
folder of the migration template that you want to open.
User Migration
Capturing user data
3
Select the migration template, and then on the File menu, click Properties.
4
In the Properties for <Template name> window, view the options that are set
in the migration template, and then make the appropriate changes.
See “Creating a migration template” on page 179.
Exporting a migration template
You can export a migration template as a text file. You can use the exported text
file as a template in the Symantec User Migration Wizard.
For more information, see the Symantec User Migration Implementation Guide.
To export a migration template
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the User Migration Templates folder, and then select the parent
folder of the migration template that you want to export.
3
Select the migration template, and then on the File menu, click Export
Migration Template.
4
In the Save As dialog box, select a name and location for the template and
click Save.
Capturing user data
You capture user data from a computer by setting up and running a User Migration:
Capture task. This capture saves the user data in a user package. You can use the
package to restore the user data to the same computer or to another computer by
running a User Migration: Restore task. You can save all of the user packages on
the Console server, or you can save each user package on the client computer from
which it was collected.
You should save all user packages on the Console server when you want to move
users from one computer to another. If the target of the task is a computer group,
all packages are named automatically. If the target is a single computer, you can
specify a name for the package or use the automatic naming option. You can set
the location to which the user package files are saved on the Console server.
See “Setting the storage location for user packages” on page 197.
If you want to restore the user settings to the same computers from which they
were collected, you may prefer to save each user package on the client computer.
This option saves network bandwidth during the capture or restore process.
189
190
User Migration
Capturing user data
To capture user data
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Tasks folder.
2
Select the parent folder in which to place the task.
3
On the File menu, click New > Task.
4
In the Properties for New Task window, in the Name box, type a name for the
new task.
5
In the Task Steps list, check User Migration: Capture to activate the step.
You can select other steps to perform, if required.
6
In the Target Machine Group/Machine box, click Browse, select the destination
computer or computer group from the folder structure, and then click OK.
7
On the User Migration: Capture tab, under Package, select one of the following
options to specify where to save the migration packages that are created by
this task:
Save on the Ghost Console Server
All user packages are saved on the Console
server. You must select this option when you
move a user from one computer to another.
The packages are saved to the location that
is selected in the preferences for the Console.
See “Setting the storage location for user
packages” on page 197.
Save on the Client machine(s)
8
Each user package is saved on the computer
from which it was collected.
In the User Package Naming box, specify a name for the user package and
the location in which you want to save the package.
See “Setting the name of the user package ” on page 193.
User Migration
Capturing user data
9
In the User Options box, in the Capture drop-down list, select one of the
following options:
Domain user only
Migrates only the users that belong to a
domain
Local machine only
Migrates only the user accounts that are
stored locally
All users
Migrates all the user profiles that are on the
computer
Last logged in user
Migrates only the user who last logged in to
this computer
DOMAIN\Username
Migrates the users that are specified in this
box. You can use a wildcard character with
a user name or a domain. For example,
2K3N\* selects all users on the 2K3N domain,
and *\Joe_* selects all users that start with
Joe_ in any domain.
On Windows 98 computers, you can migrate only the last logged-in user.
10 If you want to limit the number of users that you want to migrate to recent
users, then check Only Profiles Accessed Within, and then in the Day box,
scroll to the number of days.
This setting limits the migration to those users who have logged in to the
computer within the specified number of days. The maximum number of days
that you can set is 365.
11 Under User Migration Templates, click Browse.
12 In the Select Migration Template dialog box, do one of the following:
■
To use an existing template, expand User Migration Templates, and then
select a template.
The migration template specifies the migration that is captured in the
task.
To view the template properties, double-click it.
■
To create a template, highlight User Migration Templates, and then click
New > New Item.
See “Specifying the user files to include or exclude in the template”
on page 180.
13 Click OK.
191
192
User Migration
Capturing user data
14 In the Logging Level drop-down list, select one of the following event logging
options:
None
No logging
Low
Logs errors and warnings only
Medium
Logs errors, warnings, and debugging information
Full
Logs errors, warnings, information, and debug details
15 In the Compression Level drop-down list, select the level to which the files
are compressed when captured in a package as follows:
■
None
■
Low
■
Medium
■
Full
You can compress the file transmissions during create operations. The
compression helps improve performance during the package creation and
minimizes the storage requirements on the server.
16 If you want the task to stop if a warning is issued, then check Abort on
Warning.
If multiple steps are included in the task, the task stops at the point of error.
It does not attempt to run the rest of the steps. For example, if the task
includes a capture step, clone step, and restore step, and the capture step
returns a warning. The task fails without running the clone and restore steps.
17 Do one of the following:
■
To save the task, click Save.
■
To run the task immediately, click Execute.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
When you run a User Migration: Create task, the user settings on each
destination computer are stored in a user package. Each user package is an
.ump file. It is saved on the Console server or on the client computer, according
to the settings that you specified in the task. If the user package is saved on
the Console server, the package definition is added to the User Packages
folder.
User Migration
Capturing user data
Setting the name of the user package
The procedure for setting the name of the user package depends on whether you
store the user packages on the Console server or on the client computers.
If the User Migration: Create task collects user packages from a group of
computers, each user package is named automatically. The name uses the computer
name and the creation date.
Note: The name that you specify for user packages that are stored on the Console
server is used only in the Console. The actual file name on the server is always
automatically set, and has the following format:
scmpkg#.ump
The name that you specify for user packages that are stored on the client
computers is the actual file name and location. You cannot view the package in
the Ghost Console.
To set the name for user packages that are stored on the Console server
◆
Under Package, select one of the following options:
Automatically, using the Machine Name The name format is: machinename
(yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss).
Specified
If the User Migration: Create task collects a
user package from a single computer, type
the name of the user package.
This option is available only if you select a
single computer, not a group.
To set the name for user packages that are stored on the client computers
1
Under Package, click Edit.
2
In the Path to User Migration Package on Client window, under Volume
Identifier, select one of the following:
Drive letter
Type the drive letter.
Volume label
Type the volume label.
193
194
User Migration
Restoring user data
3
In the Path box, type the appropriate path and file name.
4
Click OK.
Each user package is saved in the specified file on the client computer.
Restoring user data
You restore user data from a user package to a computer by setting up and running
a User Migration: Restore task.
You can set up a User Migration: Restore task as a stand-alone task or as a step
within a task.
To create a User Migration: Restore task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Tasks folder.
2
Select the parent folder in which to place the task.
3
On the File menu, click New > Task.
4
In the Properties for New Task window, in the Name box, type a name for the
new task.
5
In the Task Steps list, check User Migration: Restore to activate the step.
You can select other steps to perform, if required.
6
In the Target Machine Group/Machine box, click Browse, select the destination
computer or computer group from the folder structure, and then click OK.
7
On the User Migration: Restore tab, under Package, select one of the following
options to specify the location of the user packages to restore:
8
The package is located on the Ghost Console
Server
All user packages are located on
the Console server.
The package is located on the Client machine(s)
Each user package is located on
the computer to which it will be
restored.
Under Package, specify the name of the user package that you want to restore.
See “To select the package to restore ” on page 195.
User Migration
Restoring user data
9
In the Logging Level drop-down list, select one of the following event logging
options:
None
No logging
Low
Logs errors and warnings only
Medium
Logs errors, warnings, and information
Full
Logs errors, warnings, information, and debugging information
10 Do one of the following:
■
To save the task, click Save.
■
To run the task immediately, click Execute.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
To select the package to restore
◆
Under User Package Naming, do one of the following:
■
To select a package that has been named automatically, click Select latest
Package based on Package's Target Machine Name.
The name format is: machinename (yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss).
By default, the target computer name of a package is set to the source
computer name.
See “Viewing information about a user package” on page 197.
■
To use the same naming convention that was selected in the capture step,
click As specified in the User Migration: Capture step.
■
To specify a package name and location if a package is stored on the
Console, click Specified, and then click Browse.
See “To select a package that is stored on the Console” on page 195.
■
To specify a package name and location if a package is stored on the client
computer, click Specified, and then click Edit.
See “To select a package that is stored on the client computer” on page 196.
To select a package that is stored on the Console
1
In the Select User Package dialog box, expand User Packages.
2
Select the package that you want to restore, and then click OK.
195
196
User Migration
Managing user packages
To select a package that is stored on the client computer
1
In the Path to User Migration Package on Client dialog box, under Volume
Identifier, select one of the following:
Drive letter
Type the drive letter.
Volume label
Type the volume label.
2
In the Path box, type the appropriate path and file name.
3
Click OK.
Managing user packages
The user packages that are saved on the Console server are displayed in the User
Packages folder in Configuration Resources. You can organize and manage these
user packages as you want, using a standard set of Console options. These options
let you set up the folder structure and move user packages within them. You can
also rename user packages and delete any that you don’t need.
The Migration Report lists any skipped files or missing applications. You can view
the Migration Report (SCMMigrationReport.log) in the Ghost Console, or in
Symantec User Migration Package Explorer.
You can also use Symantec User Migration Package Explorer to view user packages.
You can run Symantec User Migration Package Explorer from the Ghost Console
or from the Start menu.
See “About Symantec User Migration Package Explorer” on page 198.
Note: User packages that are stored on client computers are not shown in the
Console. When you save a user package on a client computer, you must specify a
name for the user package file and a location in which to store it. When you set
up the restore task, you must provide the full path, or volume label and directory
and the file name of the user package to include.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
User Migration
Managing user packages
Setting the storage location for user packages
You can specify the location on the Console server in which to store the user
packages if they are not stored on the client computers. To ensure that there is
enough available space for the packages you might need to change the storage
location.
To set the storage location for user packages
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, under User Migration, specify the location in which
you want to store the user packages.
You can type the full directory path, or click Browse to select it.
3
Click Apply.
Viewing information about a user package
You can view the following information about any user package that is stored on
the Console server:
■
User package name
■
Name of the client computer from which the user package was collected
■
Name of the user package file and its location on the Console server
■
Date and time that the user package was created
■
Target computer name
The name of the client computer to which the package is restored if the Select
latest Package based on Package's Target Machine Name is selected in a task.
You can edit this setting.
You can also open the user package with Symantec User Migration Package
Explorer. You can view the files, application settings, and logging information
that is in a package. The features of Symantec User Migration Package Explorer
are integrated into the Ghost Console.
To view information about a user package
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Configuration
Resources folder.
2
Expand the User Migration Packages folder, and then select the parent folder
of the user package for which you want to view details.
3
Select the user package, and then on the File menu, click Properties.
197
198
User Migration
Managing user packages
4
If you want to view the user package, on the Property Sheet, click Launch
User Migration Explorer.
5
Click OK to close the Property Sheet.
About Symantec User Migration Package Explorer
Symantec User Migration Package Explorer lets you manage all user migration
packages. You can use Symantec User Migration Explorer to do the following:
■
Open migration packages
■
View the contents of a migration package
■
Open user and application files in a migration package
■
Save files from a migration package
■
View user and application settings
■
View or export logs
Using Symantec User Migration Package Explorer
You can start Symantec User Migration Package Explorer from the Start menu.
You can also use the Explorer functionality from the Ghost Console.
Figure 8-1 shows the Symantec User Migration Package Explorer main window.
Figure 8-1
Symantec User Migration Package Explorer
User Migration
Managing user packages
To start Symantec User Migration Package Explorer
◆
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost > User
Migration Package Explorer.
To open a migration package
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, click Open.
2
In the Please select User Data Package dialog box, browse to the folder that
contains the migration package that you want to open, and then select the
package.
3
Click Open.
To open a file in a package
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, open a migration package.
2
On the User Files, Applications Files, or Logs tab, select a file, and then click
Open.
To save a file in a package
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, open a migration package.
2
On the User Files or Applications Files, select a file, and then click Save As.
3
In the Please select location to save the file to dialog box, browse to a location.
4
Type a name for the file, and then click Save.
To view application settings
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, open a migration package.
2
On the Settings tab, select an application.
The settings for the selected application are listed in the application Settings
panel.
To export log files
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, open a migration package.
2
In the Please select existing archive to store logs to or create a new one dialog
box, select a location to which to export the logs.
3
Click Save.
To view logs
1
In Symantec User Migration Package Explorer, open a migration package.
2
On the Logs tab, select a log and click Open.
199
200
User Migration
Managing user packages
Chapter
9
Using Client Inventory
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About the Client Inventory feature
■
Managing collected data sets
■
Viewing inventory information
■
Creating and maintaining filters
■
Creating and running reports
■
Setting up dynamic machine groups
About the Client Inventory feature
The Symantec Ghost Client Inventory feature lets you obtain information from
the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) repository on each Console
client. You can choose the type of information that you want to collect and which
computers to collect it from.
The information that you collect is stored in a database on the Console server and
is updated on request. You can query this database to select the computers that
have certain properties and can then use the selected computers as the target of
a task. For example, you can select the computers that have available memory
that is greater than a specified amount. You can view the property values for each
computer. You can also produce reports that contain the property values for each
computer in a group.
Installing WMI Core 1.5 to client computers
In order to use the Symantec Ghost Client Inventory, each client computer must
have WMI Core 1.5 or later installed.
202
Using Client Inventory
About the Client Inventory feature
You can do this manually if you want, or you can automate the process by using
Console tasks.
You need to set up a task for installing to Windows NT 4.0 computers, and a
separate task for installing to Windows 98 computers.
To install WMI Core 1.5 to client computers
1
In the Machine Groups folder, create a new computer group.
Give the new group a suitable name, such as Install NT4 or Install 98.
See “Creating computer groups” on page 87.
2
Copy into the new computer group all the computers to which you want to
install WMI Core 1.5.
Ensure that you are only choosing clients running the appropriate operating
system for the group.
3
In the Tasks folder, create a new task.
See “Setting up tasks” on page 128.
4
In the Properties for New Task window, on the General tab, under Task Steps,
check the following:
■
Transfer Files
■
Execute Command
5
In the Target Machine Group box, click Browse and then select your new
group: Install NT4, or Install 98, whichever is appropriate.
6
On the File Transfer tab, click Add.
7
Browse to the installation directory (the default is C:\Program
Files\Symantec\Ghost), and expand the ClientInstall folder.
8
In the ClientInstall folder, select one of the following files:
9
■
wmint4.exe, if you are installing to Windows NT 4.0 computers
■
wmi9x.exe, if you are installing to Windows 98 or 98SE computers
Click Open.
10 In the Source window, click Next.
11 In the Destination window, click Ghost Incoming Directory.
12 Click Finish.
13 On the Command tab, in the Command box, type one of the following
executable names:
■
Incoming\wmint4.exe: if you are installing to Windows NT 4.0 computers
Using Client Inventory
About the Client Inventory feature
■
Incoming\wmi9x.exe: if you are installing to Windows 98 or 98SE
computers
14 In the Arguments box, type /s
15 Click Add.
16 Click OK to save the task.
17 Execute the task.
See “Executing tasks” on page 153.
Client Inventory resources
You can access and maintain the Client Inventory via the Symantec Ghost Console.
The Client Inventory resources are stored under the Inventory folder, and in the
Dynamic Machine Groups folder. You can also view Client Inventory information
via the Machine Groups folder.
The Inventory folder contains the following subfolders:
Collected Data
Stores the collected data sets that define the type of information that
you want to collect from other computers and store in the inventory
database. You specify the WMI classes that you want to collect from
the client computers. You can assign user-friendly names to the classes
and properties. If you create a new class then all properties are
collected. You can turn off any properties that you don’t want to
collect.
See “Managing collected data sets” on page 206.
Filter
Stores the filters that you use for querying the Inventory database. A
filter contains a list of conditions, which may be linked by logical
operators. Each condition specifies a single property and a
corresponding restriction. When you apply a filter to a computer
group, the result is a list of all the computers in the group that match
the filter conditions.
See “Creating and maintaining filters” on page 221.
Report
Stores the reports that you use for retrieving detailed information for
computers that match a specific filter. A report typically contains a
filter and a view, and is applied to a particular computer group. The
output of a report is the list of computers that match the filter
conditions and, for each computer, the properties specified in the
view. You can view reports on the screen, print them, and save them
as text files.
See “Creating and running reports” on page 230.
203
204
Using Client Inventory
About the Client Inventory feature
View
Stores the views that you use for displaying property data. A view is
the list of properties that is displayed when the view is applied to a
computer group. Applying views is an efficient way of selecting and
displaying the properties you are interested in. For example, you may
want to set up views containing groups of related properties (such as
software, hardware, or network) and apply them each time you want
to view those properties for a computer group.
See “Viewing inventory information” on page 214.
The other folders that are used by the Client Inventory are as follows:
Machine Groups
Stores all the computers known to the Console, and the computer
groups that you have set up. You can see inventory information for
individual computers in the Properties window. You can also specify
the views associated with each computer in a computer group.
See “Setting the common Inventory view for computer groups”
on page 217.
See “Viewing inventory information for client computers” on page 219.
Dynamic Machine Stores the dynamic machine groups that you have set up. A dynamic
Groups
machine group is the result of a filter applied to a computer group,
and contains the computers in the target group that match the filter
conditions. Each dynamic machine group is treated as a virtual
computer group, and can be used as the target of a task.
See “Setting up dynamic machine groups” on page 235.
Using the Client Inventory
You need to set up and maintain the collected data sets, filters, and views that
you want to use. You can use the available filters and views to create and run
reports on particular computer groups, and view inventory information for client
computers. You can also set up dynamic machine groups, and use them as the
target of a task.
The Client Inventory relies on the data provided by Microsoft Windows
Management Instrumentation (WMI). The accuracy of the data returned by WMI
depends upon the version of the operating system, the service pack, and the
version of WMI installed.
Using Client Inventory
About the Client Inventory feature
To use the Client Inventory
1
Set up the collected data sets to include all the WMI classes that you want to
collect from the client computers.
See “Setting up collected data sets” on page 207.
2
If necessary, set up the computer groups that you require.
See “Setting up computer groups” on page 87.
3
Run a refresh inventory task to collect the appropriate WMI class instances
from each of the computers in the target computer group.
This task populates the inventory database, and produces the properties list
for each collected data set.
See “Populating the Inventory database” on page 210.
4
Set up the properties for each collected data set to suit your requirements.
When you add a new collected data set and get data for it, all the properties
in the WMI class become available. You can then set the property display
names, and specify which properties to include in the collected data set for
subsequent database refreshes.
See “Setting up collected data set properties” on page 211.
5
Set up the views that you want to use.
A view is essentially a list of properties that you want to display. You can
display the inventory information you are interested in by applying the
appropriate views to client computers or computer groups.
See “Viewing inventory information” on page 214.
6
Set up the filters that you want to use.
A filter is essentially a query that you apply to a computer group. It searches
the Inventory database and selects all the computers in the target group that
match the filter conditions. You can set up filters to search for any
combination of properties and property values that you want.
See “Creating and maintaining filters” on page 221.
7
Use the filters and views to create reports, set up dynamic machine groups,
and show inventory information.
See “Creating and running reports” on page 230.
See “Setting up dynamic machine groups” on page 235.
See “Viewing inventory information for client computers” on page 219.
205
206
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
Managing Inventory resources
The Inventory folders show the resources that you have created and are available
for you to use. The Symantec Ghost Console provides standard options to help
you organize these resources as you wish. These options allow you to set up the
folder structure, and move items within it as appropriate. You can also rename
items, and delete any items that you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Managing collected data sets
The Collected Data folder shows all the WMI classes defined in the inventory
database. You need to set up the collected data sets to suit your requirements and
to ensure that you collect data for all the WMI classes that you want. You can also
choose to collect particular properties within a WMI class, and ignore the
properties that you are not interested in.
Note: By default, the Collected Data folder is hidden in the Console. You must
show it before you can create, view or modify any collected data sets.
See “Showing the Collected Data folder” on page 207.
About collected data sets
The collected data sets specify the WMI classes that are collected from client
computers when you run a refresh inventory task. All instances of the specified
classes found on client computers are copied and stored in the inventory database
on the Console server. You can query the inventory database to obtain the
information you want.
Groups of pre-defined collected data sets that contain commonly used WMI classes
are provided. These include the basic Windows classes such as operating system,
memory, and hard disk space.
Each WMI class has a number of properties, which represent the information
gathered for the class. System properties are not displayed, and you cannot collect
them.
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
If you need more information on these classes, or on WMI classes in general, refer
to the documentation supplied by Microsoft. For more information see the article
at the following URL:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wmisdk/wmi/
wmi_classes.asp
You can add additional collected data sets to collect the information you require
from the client computers. There is no restriction on the WMI classes you can
use: they may be additional Microsoft WMI classes, or third-party vendor classes.
See “Setting up collected data sets” on page 207.
Showing the Collected Data folder
By default, the Collected Data folder is hidden in the Console. You can show it
when you want to view the collected data sets, or make any changes.
To show the Collected Data folder
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Inventory tab, check Show Collected Data Sets in Inventory.
3
Click Apply.
Setting up collected data sets
If you want to collect data for a WMI class that is not included in a collected data
set, you need to create a new collected data set in the Console. You can then specify
the WMI class and properties to collect. You can also modify existing collected
data sets to change property names, or specify different properties to collect.
207
208
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
To set up collected data sets
1
Create the new collected data sets that you require.
This defines the WMI namespace, WMI class name, and display name for
each data set that you want to include.
See “Creating a new collected data set” on page 208.
2
Run a refresh inventory task.
The refresh inventory task reads the WMI repository on each client computer,
and populates the inventory database with all the properties of all the new
WMI classes that are found.
See “Populating the Inventory database” on page 210.
3
Set up the WMI class properties for each collected data set.
You can specify the display name of each property and whether or not to use
it in data collection.
See “Setting up collected data set properties” on page 211.
Creating a new collected data set
You create a new collected data set by defining the WMI namespace, WMI class
name, and display name for the new collected data set in the Console.
To create a new collected data set
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Expand the Collected Data folder, then expand the subfolder in which you
want to create the new collected data set.
3
Do one of the following:
■
In the Collected Data pane, right-click, then click New Collected Data Set.
■
On the File menu, click New > Collected Data Set.
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
4
In the Properties for New Collected Data Set window, in the Display Name
field, type a name for your new collected data set.
The name must be unique and may contain up to 50 alphanumeric characters.
You should type a descriptive name that is easy to recognize when you are
setting up filters and views.
5
In the Namespace drop-down list, select the namespace of the WMI class that
you want to collect, if it is listed.
The Namespace list contains all the WMI namespaces known to the Console.
These are read from the WMI repository on the Console server. If the
namespace of the class that you want to collect is not listed, go to step 7.
209
210
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
6
In the WMI Class Name list, select the class, if it is listed.
The WMI Class Name list contains all the WMI classes known to the Console
in the selected namespace.
If you selected the WMI class that you want to collect from the list, go to step
10.
If the name of the WMI class that you want to collect is not listed, go to step
7.
7
Click Enter WMI Class details.
8
In the Namespace field, type the full namespace of the class that you want to
collect.
The name may contain up to 255 alphanumeric characters.
9
In the WMI Class Name field, type the class name.
The name may contain up to 255 alphanumeric characters. The Console does
not perform any validation on user-defined classes. If you make an error in
typing the namespace or the class name, the Console is not able to find the
class instance data on the client computers.
10 Click OK.
11 In the Properties dialog box, view the details of the new collected data set
properties.
If the new collected data set is a user-defined WMI class, there are no
properties displayed.
If the new collected data set is a WMI class already known to the Console, the
Properties dialog box displays the class properties as they are currently
defined. These are read from the WMI repository on the Console server, and
are usually sufficient to work with. You can set up the properties as you want,
or you may prefer to perform an Inventory task to update the Inventory
database first.
12 Click OK to close the Properties dialog box.
The new class is added to the Collected Data view.
Populating the Inventory database
The properties for all WMI classes defined in the collected data sets are gathered
when you run an Inventory task on the client computers. When you add a new
collected data set, you need to run an Inventory task to collect the appropriate
WMI class properties and add them to the Inventory database.
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
When you have populated the Inventory database, you need to proceed to the next
step of the process, setting up the class properties for each collected data set.
See “Setting up collected data set properties” on page 211.
To populate the Inventory database
1
Set up an inventory refresh task, by selecting the Refresh Inventory step in
the task definition.
See “Setting up tasks” on page 128.
2
Run the inventory refresh task on the appropriate computer group.
You may want to set up a computer group that contains all the Console client
computers, to ensure that the Inventory database is complete and up-to-date.
See “Executing a task from the Symantec Ghost Console” on page 154.
If a WMI class has instances with different properties on different computers,
the class properties are merged in the Inventory database.
If no instances of a WMI class are found on any client computers, the class
properties cannot be added to the database. If this occurs, you may want to
check that you have specified the WMI namespace and class name correctly
in the collected data set.
Setting up collected data set properties
You can set up the properties of each collected data set to suit your requirements.
When you create a new collected data set, you need to set up the WMI class
properties as part of the process. You can modify the property settings at any
time.
The default display name for each property is the WMI property name. You can
change the property display names to make them more descriptive when showing
inventory data. Descriptive property display names are also easier to use when
you create filters and views.
You can specify the properties in each class that you want to collect from client
computers. You can choose to collect particular properties within a class, and
ignore the properties that you are not interested in. You may want to do this to
make the inventory data collection process quicker and more efficient, and keep
the size of the Inventory database to a minimum. By default, all properties of a
class are enabled for collection, so they are included in the Inventory database.
211
212
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
To set up collected data set properties
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Expand the Collected Data folder, then expand the subfolder that contains
the collected data set that you want to set up.
3
In the Collected Data pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the class.
■
Right-click the class, then click Properties.
■
Select the class, then, on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for New Collected Data Set window, set up the collected data
set properties to suit your requirements.
You can sort the properties by display name, WMI name, or type, by clicking
the appropriate column header to toggle the order.
Using Client Inventory
Managing collected data sets
5
If you want to change the display name of a property, right-click the property
name, then click Rename.
Type the new name, then press Enter or click anywhere in the window.
The name must be unique, and may contain up to 50 alphanumeric characters.
You should choose a descriptive name that is easy to recognize when you are
setting up filters and views.
6
To specify whether or not a property is collected from client computers and
added to the Inventory database, right-click the property name, then click
the one of the following options:
■
Enable: To collect the property
■
Disable: To ignore the property
The property status is indicated by the symbol beside the property display
name. A green check mark means the property is enabled for data collection;
an empty space means it is disabled.
You can also click directly on the space or green check mark to turn the status
on and off.
A key symbol indicates a key property, and a padlock indicates a property
that is currently used in a filter or view. These properties are always included
in data collections, and you cannot disable them.
7
If you want to hide disabled properties, check Hide disabled properties.
8
If you want to ignore this collected data set when refreshing the Inventory
database, check Do not collect data for this class.
This lets you temporarily disable all properties in the collected data set. You
may want to do this to minimize the time that the refresh inventory task
requires, by collecting only the data sets that you want.
9
When you have finished setting up the collected data set properties, click
OK.
The refresh inventory task collects the enabled properties from the target
computers. Any disabled properties are removed from the Inventory database.
Collected data sets that are ignored when refreshing the Inventory database
are indicated in the Console by a small barred circle on the left side of the
collected data set icon.
About managing collected data sets
You can organize the Collected Data folder as you want. The Console provides
standard options that let you set up the folder structure, and move collected data
213
214
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
sets within it as appropriate. You can also rename items, and delete any items
that you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Viewing inventory information
You can view the inventory information you want for client computers or computer
groups by selecting pre-defined views. A view is essentially a collection of
properties that you want to display.
You would typically set up a view as a group of related properties that you’re
interested in. For example, the Hardware view may include information such as
the make and model of the client computer, its physical memory, processor speed
and number and size of its hard drives. The Software view may include the
operating system, versions of installed software, and any patches applied. The
Networking view may include the IP and MAC addresses, Domain membership
and the DNS server to which the computer is connected.
You can use views in reports, to obtain inventory information for the computers
in a computer group. You can also use views to customize the information shown
on the Inventory tab in the Properties window for client computers.
See “Creating reports” on page 231.
See “Setting the common Inventory view for computer groups” on page 217.
See “Setting the default Inventory views for new client computers” on page 219.
See “Viewing inventory information for client computers” on page 219.
Note: A set of pre-defined views is provided. These contain groups of properties
that are commonly used. You can modify them to suit your requirements.
Creating views
You can create new views and modify existing views at any time. When you create
a view, you select the properties that you want to include.
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
Note: Disabled properties have no values when you use a view in a report or to
display inventory information. If you want to see the values of these properties,
enable the properties in the collected data set, and then perform a refresh
inventory task to update the inventory database.
To create a view
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Expand the View folder, then select the subfolder in which you want to place
the new view.
3
Do one of the following:
4
■
In the View pane, right-click, then click New Inventory View.
■
On the File menu, click New > Inventory View.
In the Properties for New Inventory View window, in the View Name box,
type the name of the new view.
The name must be unique, and may contain up to 50 alphanumeric characters.
You should choose a descriptive name that indicates which properties are
contained in the view.
215
216
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
5
In the Collected Data Sets list, select the collected data set that contains
properties that you want to add.
The Properties list shows the available properties for the selected data set.
By default, the available properties are those that are enabled in the collected
data set.
6
If you want to include disabled properties in the view, uncheck Hide disabled
properties.
This option is checked by default. When you uncheck it, the Properties list is
updated to show all properties of the selected data set, allowing you to select
the properties that you want. Remember that the disabled properties are not
collected from client computers until they have been enabled in the collected
data set and a refresh task has been executed.
7
In the Properties list, select the properties you want to add.
If you want to select all the properties in the collected data set, click Select
All.
If you want to clear your selection, click Deselect All.
8
Click Add.
The selected properties are added to the list in the Preview pane.
9
Repeat steps 5 through 8 for each collected data set that has properties that
you want to include in the view.
10 In the Preview pane, arrange the list of properties in the order that you want
them to appear when inventory information is displayed.
To move an item in the list, click it to select it, then click Move Up or Move
Down as many times as necessary. Each click moves the item one place in
the list.
If you want to remove an item from the list, click it to select it, then click
Remove.
If you want to remove all items from the list, click Remove All.
11 When you have finished setting up the view, click OK.
The new view is added to the View folder.
Viewing or modifying views
You can view details of a view. You can modify a view by changing the properties
to include. You may do this at any time.
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
To view or modify a view
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Expand the View folder, then select the subfolder that contains the view that
you want to modify.
3
In the View pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the view that you want to modify.
■
Right-click the view that you want to modify, then click Properties.
■
Select the view that you want to modify, then, on the File menu, click
Properties.
In the Properties for <View name> window, view the properties currently
selected for the view, then make the appropriate changes.
See “Creating views” on page 214.
About managing views
You can organize the View folder as you want. The Symantec Ghost Console
provides standard options that let you set up the folder structure, and move views
within it as appropriate. You can also rename views, and delete any views that
you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Setting the common Inventory view for computer groups
You can set the common Inventory views for computer groups. These views are
applied to all computers that are currently in the group. If a new computer is
added to the group, it uses the default views set in the Console Option window.
See “Setting the default Inventory views for new client computers” on page 219.
You will see the common views on the Inventory tab in the Properties window for
each client computer. You can change the views for individual computers, for
example, if you want to show more information for particular computers.
See “Viewing inventory information for client computers” on page 219.
217
218
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
To set the common Inventory view for a computer group
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
In the Machine Groups pane, right-click the computer group that you want
to set up, then click Set Inventory Views.
3
In the Set Inventory Views window, in the Settings for box, select the
appropriate option:
4
This Machine
Group only
The view settings apply to this computer group only.
All Machine
Groups in
hierarchy
The view settings to apply to all computer groups in the same
branch as this group.
If you want the computer group view settings to overwrite the individual
settings for each computer in the group, check Overwrite individual machine
settings.
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
5
6
To move the views that you want to use into the Assigned Views pane, do the
following:
■
To add views, select them in the Available Views pane, then click Add.
■
To remove views, select them in the Assigned Views pane, then click
Remove.
The View Properties pane shows the properties (and their values if known)
of the selected view. The properties are listed in the order in which they
are set up in their respective views.
Click OK.
Setting the default Inventory views for new client computers
You can specify the views to use for a client computer when it is detected by the
Symantec Ghost Console.
To set the default Inventory views for new client computers
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Inventory tab, click Modify.
3
In the Set Inventory Views window, to move the views that you want to use
into the Assigned Views pane, do the following:
■
To add a view, select it in the Available Views pane, then click Add.
■
To remove a view, select it in the Assigned Views pane, then click Remove.
The View Properties pane shows the properties of the selected view.
The properties are listed in the order in which they are set up in their
respective views.
4
Click OK.
5
In the Options window, on the Inventory tab, click Apply.
Viewing inventory information for client computers
You can view inventory information for any client computer. The common views
applied to the machine group folders are automatically applied to each computer.
You can add views to individual computers to see more inventory information.
If you later change the common views for the computer group, the changes are
merged with the views that are currently applied to individual computers in the
group. The individual settings are updated to include any new views, but are not
overwritten unless you choose to overwrite them.
219
220
Using Client Inventory
Viewing inventory information
To view inventory information for a client computer
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Machine Groups
folder.
2
Expand the computer group that contains the client computer that you want
to view.
3
In the Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the computer for which you want to view inventory details.
■
Right-click the computer for which you want to view inventory details,
then click Properties.
■
Select the computer for which you want to view inventory details, then,
on the File menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Computer name> window, click the Inventory tab.
This tab lists the views assigned to the computer. The default views are the
common views currently applied to the computer groups folder.
5
In the Inventory Views list, select a view to display the instance number,
name and value of each property that it contains.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
6
If you want to change the views assigned to this computer, click Set Views.
7
In the Set Inventory Views window, to move the views that you want to use
into the Assigned Views pane, do the following:
8
■
To add a view, select it in the Available Views pane, then click Add.
■
To remove a view, select it in the Assigned Views pane, then click Remove.
The View Properties pane shows the properties of the selected view.
If you remove a view that is one of the common views set for the computer
group, it is automatically removed from the list of common views.
Click OK to close the Set Inventory Views window.
The Inventory Views pane on the Inventory tab shows the updated list of
views.
9
If you want to save the changes you have made to the selected views, click
OK.
If you want to remove the changes you have made and restore the previous
selected views, click Cancel.
Creating and maintaining filters
A filter is a query that searches the Inventory database and returns all the records
that match the specified property conditions. You can set up filters to search for
the combination of properties you want. You can also set up filters to return all
the records that do not match the filter conditions.
Note: You can only use properties that are enabled in the collected data sets.
Disabled properties are not available. If you want to use any, you need to enable
them in the collected data set first.
See “Setting up collected data set properties” on page 211.
The filters have been developed for US English client computers. As the data
provided by WMI is dependent on the language of the client operating system,
filters used with clients that are not US English may return an incorrect number
of clients.
The Filter folder stores all the available filters. You can create new filters to suit
your requirements, and can edit, copy or delete existing filters.
You can use filters in reports, to select the computers in a computer group that
have particular property values. You can also use filters in dynamic machine
221
222
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
groups, to set up virtual computer groups that contain the computers that match
the filter conditions.
See “Creating reports” on page 231.
See “Creating dynamic machine groups” on page 236.
A set of pre-defined filters is provided. These are examples that illustrate the use
of a filter. You can modify them to suit your requirements. The pre-defined filters
include filters that are based upon the minimum requirements for Microsoft Vista
as defined by Microsoft.
Creating filters
You can create new filters to suit your requirements. When you create a filter,
you specify the filter conditions to use. Each filter condition is a restriction, such
as a maximum or minimum value, placed on a single property. The conditions are
linked by And, Or, And Not, or Or Not statements, which lets you group (nest)
them as appropriate.
Before you create a filter, you should decide which filter conditions you need, and
determine the grouping required. This lets you add the conditions in the correct
order for the grouping you want to use. You cannot move a condition within the
list.
To create a filter
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Click the Filter folder.
3
Do one of the following:
■
In the Filter pane, right-click, then click New Inventory Filter.
■
On the File menu, click New > Inventory Filter.
If appropriate, you can copy an existing filter and rename it, and then modify
it to suit your requirements. You may want to do this when you are creating
a number of filters with the same components.
4
In the Properties for <Filter name> window, in the Filter Name box, type the
new filter name.
5
Set up the filter conditions that you require.
See “Setting up filter conditions” on page 223.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
6
If you need to nest certain groups of conditions, or need two or more
conditions to apply to the same instance of a class, create the appropriate
groups.
See “Grouping filter conditions” on page 226.
7
If you want to remove a condition, select it, then click Delete.
The grouping, if any is applied to the condition, is automatically adjusted.
8
9
Specify whether you want to select the computers that match the filter
conditions, or those that do not match the filter conditions, by clicking one
of the following:
■
All machines from the Target group matching these filter conditions
■
All machines from the Target group that do not match these filter
conditions
Click OK to save the filter.
The new filter is added to the Filter pane, and is available for you to use in a
report or dynamic machine group.
Setting up filter conditions
You can add or modify filter conditions as required.
To set up a filter condition
1
In the Properties for <Filter name> window, do one of the following:
■
If you want to add a new condition, select the condition below that you
want to add the new one, and then click Add.
If you don’t select a condition, the new condition is added to the bottom
of the list.
223
224
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
■
2
If you want to modify a condition, select it and then click Modify.
In the Filter Condition window, in the Collected Data Sets pane, select the
data set that contains the property for which you want to set a condition.
The Collected Properties pane lists all the available properties in the selected
collected data set.
Available properties are those that are currently enabled for collection in the
collected data sets. If a property is disabled in the collected data set, you
cannot use it in a filter.
3
In the Collected Properties pane, select the property for which you want to
set a condition.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
4
In the Restriction box, from the drop-down list, select the operator that you
want to use for the property.
The list contains all the operators that are relevant to the type of property
selected.
The available comparison operators (conditions) and their limitations are
described as follows:
=
Equal to
All except Array
<>
Not equal to
All except Array
<
Less than
All except Array and
Boolean
<=
Less than or equal
All except Array and
Boolean
>
Greater than
All except Array and
Boolean
>=
Greater than or equal
All except Array and
Boolean
Contains
Contains the specified string
String and Array only
Not Contains
Does not contain the specified string
String and Array only
Is Empty
Contains no characters
String and Array only
Is Not Empty
Contains characters
String and Array only
Is Null
Property does not exist; no instances
collected
All property types
Is Not Null
Property exists; one or more instances All property types
collected
The numeric operators refer to the alphabetical order when applied to strings.
225
226
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
5
In the Value field, specify the value against which you want to compare the
property as follows:
Boolean
Select the value from the drop-down list.
String, Array, UInt Type the value.
DateTime
In the Value box, click to open a calendar, then select the date.
If you want to specify a time as well, check Time, then type the
time value or set it using the arrow buttons.
6
In the Link with previous/next condition drop-down list, select one of the
following:
■
AND
■
OR
■
AND NOT
■
OR NOT
The default is AND. If you are adding a new condition, you can specify the
link with the previous condition. If you are modifying a condition, you can
specify the link with the next condition.
7
Click OK.
If you are creating a new condition, it is added to the list in the Properties for
<Filter name> window.
Grouping filter conditions
By default, the filter conditions are evaluated in the order in which they are listed,
and the links between them have the same priority. Each condition is evaluated
independently of other conditions.
If you want to give higher priority to the links between particular conditions, or
make two or more conditions apply to the same class instance, you need to group
the filter conditions.
You can group filter conditions as follows:
Group
Evaluate the conditions as a single unit within the list of conditions.
See “Grouping (nesting) filter conditions” on page 227.
Group on Instance Evaluate the conditions on the same instance of a class.
See “Grouping filter conditions on instance” on page 228.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
Grouping (nesting) filter conditions
You can group two or more conditions as a single unit within the list of conditions.
The grouped conditions are evaluated before the conditions outside the group.
A group may contain multiple nested levels of sub-groups, but each sub-group
must be completely within its parent group. When a filter contains multiple levels
of grouping, the innermost group is evaluated first.
For example, if you have a number of computers, with some running Windows
XP and some running Windows 2000, you can apply the following filter:
OperatingSystem.Name
PhysicalMemory.Capacity
OperatingSystem.Name
PhysicalMemory.Capacity
=
>
=
<
Windows XP
512 Mb
OR
Windows 2000
256 Mb
AND
AND
Without grouping, this filter returns only the Windows 2000 computers that have
less than 256 MB of memory. The Windows XP computers that were selected with
the first two conditions are not returned as they do not satisfy the fourth condition.
To make the filter return the Windows XP computers that have over 512 MB of
memory and the Windows 2000 computers that have less than 256 MB of memory,
you need to group each OperatingSystem condition with the corresponding
PhysicalMemory condition. This grouping is shown below:
(
(
OperatingSystem.Name
PhysicalMemory.Capacity
OperatingSystem.Name
PhysicalMemory.Capacity
=
>
=
<
Windows XP
512 Mb
)
Windows 2000
256 Mb
)
AND
OR
AND
The grouping is indicated in the list of conditions as follows:
An opening parenthesis in
the (... column
The first condition in the group.
A closing parenthesis in the
...) column
The last condition in the group.
When you delete conditions from a group, the grouping is automatically adjusted
according to the remaining group start and end conditions. The grouping
adjustment depends on whether the deleted conditions are at the start or end of
the group, or in the middle as follows:
Conditions deleted from within a group, and no
end-of-group conditions deleted.
Grouping is preserved on remaining
conditions.
227
228
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
Condition deleted from start or end of a group.
Grouping is removed from remaining
conditions.
If a deleted condition is the start or
end of two or more nested groups, all
nested groups are ungrouped.
To group (nest) filter conditions
1
In the Properties for <Filter name> window, in the list of conditions, select
the conditions that you want to group.
You can select all the conditions, or just the first and last conditions. Any
unselected conditions between the selected conditions are automatically
included in the group.
2
Click Group.
The grouping is indicated in the list of conditions.
3
If you need to undo any grouping, select all the conditions in the group, or
the first or last condition of the group, then click Ungroup.
If the selected condition is the first or last for two or more groups, the
outermost group is ungrouped.
Grouping filter conditions on instance
If you need to apply two or more conditions to the same instance of a class, you
can group the conditions on instance. When you do this, all the conditions in the
group must be satisfied for properties of the same class instance. The same
restrictions as for a nested group apply, but you cannot create any sub-groups on
instance.
For example, you might have a computer with two logical disks as follows:
■
Drive C: NTFS, 10 gigabytes
■
Drive D: FAT, 30 gigabytes
You can apply the following filter:
LogicalDisk.FileSystem
LogicalDisk.Size
=
>
NTFS
20 Gb
AND
By default, the filter returns this computer because both conditions are met, one
on each logical disk, even though the computer does not contain a disk that meets
the filter criteria.
To make the filter exclude the computer unless it contains a logical disk that
satisfies both the conditions, you need to group the conditions on instance:
Using Client Inventory
Creating and maintaining filters
(
<* LogicalDisk.FileSystem
*>LogicalDisk.Size
=
NTFS
>
AND
20 Gb
)
The grouping is indicated in the Property column, as follows:
<* preceding the class name
The first condition in the group on instance.
* preceding the class name
A condition (not the first or last) in the group on instance.
*> preceding the class name
The last condition in the group on instance.
A group on instance is automatically a nested group. This grouping is indicated
by the ( symbol in the (... column and the ) symbol in the ...) column.
When you add conditions to the filter within a group on instance, you are restricted
to properties for the same class as in the group.
To group filter conditions on instance
1
In the Properties for <Filter name> window, in the list of conditions, select
the conditions that you want to group on instance.
You can select all the conditions, or just the first and last conditions. Any
unselected conditions between the selected conditions are automatically
included in the group.
All the conditions must relate to the same class in order to group them on
instance.
2
Click Group on Instance.
The grouping is indicated in the list of conditions, in the Property column.
3
If you need to undo the grouping on instance, select all the conditions in the
group, or the first or last condition of the group, then click Ungroup.
Viewing or modifying filters
You can view details of a filter. You can modify a filter by changing the conditions
it contains. You may do this at any time.
Note: If the filter is used in a dynamic machine group, any changes to the filter
conditions affect the dynamic machine group.
To view or modify a filter
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Click the Filter folder.
229
230
Using Client Inventory
Creating and running reports
3
4
In the Filter pane, do one of the following:
■
Double-click the filter that you want to modify.
■
Right-click the filter that you want to modify, then click Properties.
■
Select the filter that you want to modify, then, on the File menu, click
Properties.
In the Properties for <Filter name> window, view the conditions currently
set for the filter, then make the appropriate changes.
If the filter is used in a dynamic machine group that is the target of a task, a
warning message is shown. Click Details to view the list of tasks that are
affected by changes to the filter.
See “Setting up filter conditions” on page 223.
5
Click OK.
About managing filters
You can organize the Filter folder as you want. The Symantec Ghost Console
provides standard options that let you set up the folder structure, and move filters
within it as appropriate. You can also rename filters, and delete any filters that
you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Creating and running reports
A report is simply the association of one filter, one view, or one of each, and a
target computer group. You cannot have two or more filters or views in the same
report. If you run a report on a single computer, you must use a view; you cannot
use a filter.
The output of a report depends on whether or not it includes a view. If the report
has no view (just a filter), the output is the list of computers that satisfy the filter
criteria. If the report contains a view, the output is the list of computers in the
target computer group, and the values of the properties contained in the view.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and running reports
You need to set up your filters and views before you can include them in a report.
If necessary, you can create a new filter or view as you set up your new report.
Creating reports
You can create a new report at any time, and can use any combination of filters
and views. You can preview a report by running it immediately, or you can save
it in the Reports folder and run it later.
To create a report
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Click the Report folder.
3
Do one of the following:
4
■
In the Report pane, right-click, then click New Inventory Report.
■
On the File menu, click New > Inventory Report.
In the Properties for New Inventory Report window, in the Report Name field,
type the name of the new report.
The name must be unique, and may contain up to 50 alphanumeric characters.
You should choose a descriptive name that indicates what information is
contained in the report.
5
Next to the Target box, click Browse then, in the Select Target window, select
the computer group that you want to use as the target of the report.
6
If you want to use a filter in the report, check Use Filter, then click Browse.
231
232
Using Client Inventory
Creating and running reports
7
In the Select Inventory Filter window, select the filter that you want to use
in the report.
If you need to create a new filter, in the Select Filter window, click New to
open the Properties for New Filter window, then specify the appropriate
details.
See “Creating filters” on page 222.
8
If you want to use a view in the report, check Use View, then click Browse.
9
In the Select Inventory View window, select the view that you want to use in
the report.
If you need to create a new view, in the Select Inventory View window, click
New to open the Properties for New View window, then specify the appropriate
details.
See “Creating views” on page 214.
10 If you want to preview the report results before saving the report, click Run
Report.
11 In the Inventory Report Results window, view the results, then click Close.
12 Click OK to save the report.
The new report is added to the Report folder.
Viewing or modifying reports
You can view details of a report, and can change the name, the filter, the view, or
the target computer group if necessary.
To view or modify a report
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Click the Report folder.
3
In the Report pane, do one of the following:
4
■
Double-click the report you want to modify.
■
Right-click the report that you want to modify, then click Properties.
■
Select the report you want to modify, then, on the File menu, click
Properties.
In the Properties for <Report name> window, view the report properties, then
make the appropriate changes.
See “Creating reports” on page 231.
Using Client Inventory
Creating and running reports
About managing reports
You can organize the Report folder as you want. The Symantec Ghost Console
provides standard options that let you set up the folder structure, and move reports
within it as appropriate. You can also rename reports, and delete any reports that
you don’t need.
See “Setting the resource folder view mode” on page 81.
See “Creating new folders” on page 81.
See “Moving Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 82.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
Running a report
You can run a report to obtain inventory information from the database. You
should update the inventory database before running a report to ensure that the
report results are up-to-date.
The following formats are for report results, depending on whether or not a view
is included:
If the report contains
a view
The output is a table listing computers and the values of the
properties that were included in the view.
You can set the sort order for each column by clicking the column
headers.
If the report contains a filter and a view, the table contains the
computers that match the filter conditions. If the report does not
contain a filter, the table contains all the computers in the target
computer group.
If the report does not
contain a view (just a
filter)
The output is the list of computers in the target computer group
that meet the filter criteria.
For example, you may want to obtain a list of computers that have
the prerequisites for a software rollout.
You can print the report results, or export the results to a formatted text file or
a comma-separated file. You can also create a new dynamic machine group from
the report.
See “Printing the report results” on page 234.
See “Exporting the report results to a file” on page 234.
See “Saving a report as a dynamic machine group” on page 235.
233
234
Using Client Inventory
Creating and running reports
Note: You can also run a report directly from the Properties for <Report name>
window, by clicking Run Report.
To run a report
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Inventory folder.
2
Click the Report folder.
3
In the Report pane, do one of the following:
■
Right-click the report that you want to run, then click Run Report.
■
Select the report that you want to run, then, on the View menu, click Run
Report.
4
In the Inventory Report Results window, view the report result.
5
If you want to preserve the report results, you can save the report as a dynamic
machine group, export the results to a file, and print the results.
6
Click OK to close the Inventory Report Results window.
Printing the report results
You can print the report results on any printer that the Console can access.
To print the report results
1
In the Inventory Report Results window, click Print.
2
In the Print window, select the appropriate settings.
3
Click OK.
Exporting the report results to a file
You can export the report results to a formatted text file, or a comma-separated
file. The file can be exported to any directory that the Console can access.
To export the report results to a file
1
In the Inventory Report Results window, click Export.
2
In the Export Inventory Report To window, browse to the location to which
you want to export the results.
3
In the File Name field, type the file name.
4
In the Save as Type drop-down list, select one of the following:
■
Formatted Text File
■
Comma-separated File
Using Client Inventory
Setting up dynamic machine groups
■
5
Comma-separated File (legacy format)
Click OK.
The file is saved in the specified location, and is automatically opened in
Notepad.
6
View the file and make any appropriate changes or add extra information.
7
If necessary, save your changes, then close Notepad.
Saving a report as a dynamic machine group
You can save the filter and target computer group association in a report as a new
dynamic machine group. The dynamic machine group contains only the computers
in the target computer group that match the filter criteria. Computers may be
added to, or removed from, a dynamic machine group as their property values
change. Any view in the report is ignored, as a view always applies to all computers
in the target group.
See “Setting up dynamic machine groups” on page 235.
To save a report as a dynamic machine group
1
In the Inventory Report Results window, click Save.
2
In the Properties for New Dynamic Machine Group window, type the name
for the dynamic machine group.
3
Click OK.
The new dynamic machine group is added to the Dynamic Machine Groups
folder.
Setting up dynamic machine groups
A dynamic machine group is similar to a report, but consists only of a filter applied
to a target computer group. Dynamic machine groups are populated each time
the inventory database is updated, and contain all the computers in the target
computer group that currently match the filter conditions. The members of a
dynamic machine group may change as their property values change.
Dynamic machine groups are stored as folders within the Dynamic Machine
Groups folder. Each dynamic machine group can be used as the target of a task,
in the same way as a computer group.
235
236
Using Client Inventory
Setting up dynamic machine groups
Note: You may want to refresh the inventory database before you use a dynamic
machine group as the target of a task, to ensure the dynamic machine group
contains the appropriate computers. The inventory database is not updated
automatically.
Creating dynamic machine groups
You can create a new dynamic machine group at any time, and can use any filter
and target computer group.
You can also create a dynamic machine group directly from the results of a report.
See “Saving a report as a dynamic machine group” on page 235.
To create a dynamic machine group
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, in the left pane, expand the Dynamic Machine
Groups folder.
2
Do one of the following:
3
■
In the Dynamic Machine Groups pane, right-click, then click New Dynamic
Machine Group.
■
On the File menu, click New > Dynamic Machine Group.
In the Properties for New Dynamic Machine Group window, in the Dynamic
Machine Group Name box, type the name of the new dynamic machine group.
The name must be unique, and may contain up to 50 alphanumeric characters.
4
Next to the Target box, click Browse, then, in the Select Target window, select
the computer group that you want to use as the target of the dynamic machine
group.
5
Next to the Filter Name box, click Browse, then, in the Select Inventory Filter
window, select the filter that you want to use in the dynamic machine group.
If you need to create a new filter, in the Select Filter window, click New to
open the Properties for New Filter window, then specify the appropriate
details.
See “Creating filters” on page 222.
6
Click OK.
The new dynamic machine group is added to the Dynamic Machine Groups
folder.
Using Client Inventory
Setting up dynamic machine groups
Viewing or modifying dynamic machine groups
You can view details of a dynamic machine group, and can change its name, the
filter used, or the target computer group.
To view or modify a dynamic machine group
1
2
In the Dynamic Machine Groups pane, do one of the following:
■
Right-click the dynamic machine group that you want to view, then click
Properties.
■
Select the dynamic machine group that you want to view, then, on the File
menu, click Properties.
In the Properties for <Dynamic machine group name> window, view the
details of the dynamic machine group, then make any appropriate changes.
See “Creating dynamic machine groups” on page 236.
About managing dynamic machine groups
You can rename or delete dynamic machine groups. You cannot create folders
inside the Dynamic Machine Groups folder, and you cannot copy or move dynamic
machine groups.
See “Renaming Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
See “Deleting Symantec Ghost Console resources” on page 83.
237
238
Using Client Inventory
Setting up dynamic machine groups
Chapter
10
Additional Console options
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity
■
Launching the Configuration Server
■
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
■
Symantec Ghost Console security
■
Changing the Symantec Ghost database account and password
Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity
Table 10-1 lists the logs and summaries with which you can review the history of
a task or client computer.
Table 10-1
Logs and summaries
Logs/summaries
Description
Task Log
The history of execution for all tasks.
See “To view the Task Log” on page 240.
Scheduler
A list of the tasks that are scheduled to run.
See “To view or modify a list of scheduled tasks” on page 240.
Console Log
A log of all steps occurring during the execution of tasks
from the command line or scheduler.
See “To view the Console Log” on page 241.
Client Summary
A summary of all executions for a client computer.
See “To view a Client Summary” on page 241.
240
Additional Console options
Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity
Table 10-1
Logs and summaries (continued)
Logs/summaries
Description
Event Log
The history of all events for all computers for a task.
See “To view the Event Log” on page 241.
Migration Report
A log of all errors that occurred during a User Migration
task. This report can be opened from the Ghost Console or
from Symantec User Migration Package Explorer.
See “To view the Migration Report from the Ghost Console”
on page 241.
Ghost error file
The error file that is created on the client computer if an
image create or image restore task fails.
See “To view the Event Log” on page 241.
Event Details
The details for an item in the Client Summary or Event Log.
See “To view Event Details” on page 241.
Active Tasks
The lower pane of the Console that shows details of tasks
that are currently executing.
See “To view Event Details” on page 241.
To view the Task Log
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, select a sort option:
■
Time: Time and date of execution
■
User: User name from the logon window
■
Name: Task title
Any task executed from the command line is logged under the user name
command.
When a task cannot be completed successfully, the Task Log contains
diagnostic data if it is available.
To view or modify a list of scheduled tasks
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Scheduler.
2
To view or modify the schedule properties, double-click the task.
Additional Console options
Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity
To view the Console Log
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, click Console Log.
To view a Client Summary
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, select the task for which you want to view the log.
3
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, click Client Summary.
4
In the Client Summary window, double-click an item to open the Client
Summary.
To view the Event Log
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, select the task for which you want to view the log.
3
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, click Event Log.
4
In the Event Log window, on the View menu, select a sort option:
5
■
Time: Time and date of execution
■
Step: Alphabetical sort of the steps in the task
■
Client: Computer name
In the Event Log window, on the View menu, click View Ghost error file to
view the Ghost error log.
To view the Migration Report from the Ghost Console
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, select the task for which you want to view the log.
3
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, click Event Log.
You can also open the Event Log by right-clicking the task in the bottom panel
of the Ghost Console.
4
Highlight the step with a warning, then click View Error file.
To view Event Details
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Task Log.
2
In the Task Log window, select the task for which you want to view the log.
3
In the Task Log window, on the View menu, click Event Log.
4
In the Event Log window, on the View menu, click Event Details.
241
242
Additional Console options
Launching the Configuration Server
To view Active Tasks
◆
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the View menu, click Active Task Pane.
Launching the Configuration Server
The Configuration Server manages task executions and communication with
clients. It usually runs in the background and does not require direct access.
However, you can manually launch the Configuration Server from the Symantec
Ghost Console if you need to for any reason, for example, if you have closed down
the Configuration Server by mistake.
To launch the Configuration Server
◆
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the File menu, click Launch Server.
This item is unavailable if the Configuration Server is already running.
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
You can set the following user options in the Symantec Ghost Console:
Optional splash screen
If you select this option, a splash screen appears
when the user opens the Console.
Turn off Ghost watermark
The Ghost watermark is the large, transparent
icon in the lower-right of each folder.
Optional task start and stop messages
If you select this option, an message appears when
you start a task and end a task.
Casual task warning
If you select this option, a warning message
appears when you try to close a task without
saving it.
Task log history
You can select the number of days that you want
to retain a task log.
You can also choose to clear the task log.
Number of minutes the Configuration
Server waits for a client to respond
after each step of a task
If the client fails to respond within the specified
time, the task fails.
Folder in which to store baseline and
incremental backups
See “Setting the location for backup images”
on page 170.
Additional Console options
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
Folder in which to store User Migration See “Setting the storage location for user
packages
packages” on page 197.
Abort task warning
You can choose to warn users that you are about
to run a task give them the option to cancel the
task.
Frequency with which status reports
This lets you reduce network traffic if required.
are sent from Console client computers This may be useful if computers are networked
to the Console
over a WAN. You can also set the client heartbeat
for each subnet and for each client computer. If
you set the client heartbeat to 0, then the status
of the client computer is indicated as Unavailable
on the Console.
See “Setting the default client heartbeat interval”
on page 90.
See “Setting properties for a subnet” on page 92.
See “Setting the client computer heartbeat
interval ” on page 96.
Set the size of the virtual partition
You can alter the size of the virtual partition if
you require, for example, if you need to transfer
a large executable to the virtual partition.
See “Setting the virtual partition size” on page 99.
Set the default DOS version for the
virtual partition
You can select a default version of DOS that is
installed when the virtual partition is created on
a client. The client computer runs under the
selected version of DOS. You can select MS-DOS
only if it is installed on your computer.
See “Setting the default DOS version” on page 99.
Allow tasks to be initiated from a client If a task is set up to run from a client, then you
computer
can initiate the execution of the task from the
client computer. This lets end users execute tasks,
or administrators execute tasks immediately from
a client without having to return to the Console
computer.
243
244
Additional Console options
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
Control the amount of network
bandwidth used
Symantec Ghost lets you control how much
network bandwidth is used when transferring
image files, data files, user packages or AI
packages between the Console server and the
client computers. By using this functionality, you
can avoid overloading the network with
GhostCasting traffic.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties”
on page 90.
Set the data transfer mode
You can set the data transfer mode depending on
your network hardware setup. Used in
conjunction with the network bandwidth limits,
you can optimize the way in which image files,
MTU user packages, and AI packages are
transferred over your network. You can alter these
settings globally, for a task, and for a single
execution of a task.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties”
on page 90.
Set Inventory options
You can choose to show collected data sets in the
Inventory folder and set default inventory views.
See “Setting the default Inventory views for new
client computers” on page 219.
See “Showing the Collected Data folder” on page 207.
Additional Console options
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
To display the splash screen
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, check Display Splash Screen on start.
3
Click Apply.
To display the Ghost watermark in the Symantec Ghost Console
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, check Display Watermarks.
3
Click Apply.
To display task start and finish messages
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, check the following:
■
Display Task Start Message
245
246
Additional Console options
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
■
3
Display Task Finish Message
Click Apply.
To remind users to save a task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, check Display Casual Task Warning.
3
Click Apply.
To set the Task Log option
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, under Task Log, type the number of days that you
want to keep tasks in the log.
The maximum amount of time that you can keep tasks in the log is one year.
3
Click Clear Log to clear the Task Log immediately.
4
Click Apply.
To warn the client about a task
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Client tab, in the Warn client field, type the number of seconds.
This causes a warning message to appear on the client computer a specified
number of seconds before a task runs.
3
Click User can abort an operation to let the user abort the task.
4
Click Proceed with operation if no user intervention to let the task continue
if the user does not respond to the warning message.
5
Click Apply.
Additional Console options
Setting Symantec Ghost Console options
To set the configuration server timeout option
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Preferences tab, under Server Timeout, type the number of minutes
that you want the configuration server to wait for clients.
3
Click Apply.
To allow client-initiated tasks
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Options.
2
On the Client tab, click Enable Client User Interface to allow client computers
to initiate execution of tasks.
3
Click Apply.
247
248
Additional Console options
Symantec Ghost Console security
Symantec Ghost Console security
The Symantec Ghost Console Server and clients use public-key cryptography
techniques to authenticate the server to the client. This ensures that only
authorized servers remotely control, back up, restore, clone, and reconfigure
client computers. During the Symantec Ghost Console Server installation, public
and private certificate files are generated. These files are called Pubkey.crt and
Privkey.crt.
These private certificates must be safeguarded. If an unauthorized user copies
one, security is compromised. If you accidentally delete your private certificate
and have no other copy, generate a new certificate pair and distribute the public
certificate to all clients.
See “Generating new certificates” on page 248.
When a client communicates with the server, it uses a challenge-response protocol.
The client must have the server’s public certificate to perform this operation.
Therefore, the server’s public certificate must be distributed to all clients.
When the Console client is installed, it prompts for the Console computer name.
This is the Windows computer name specified in Windows network settings. The
client uses this name to communicate with the correct Console.
If the client computer is installed with a Ghost boot partition, you can generate
a boot disk and a boot partition image file with the Ghost Boot Wizard. Use the
wizard from the Console Server to ensure that the correct public certificate file
is automatically included with all boot partition image files that include the Console
client. If the client is installed with the virtual partition, this is done automatically.
Updating the client certificates
If you have more than one Symantec Ghost Console in your organization and you
want to move a client from one to another, the public certificate must be updated
on the client. You can do this manually by copying the Pubkey.crt file from the
Console to which you want to move the client. You can also do this by performing
a remote client install from the Console to which you want to move the client.
This changes the Pubkey.crt on the client computer. After replacing Pubkey.crt
restart the client service to ensure that the service uses the updated certificate.
Generating new certificates
If you lose your private certificate or if you think that security has been
compromised, you should generate a new certificate pair and distribute the public
certificate to all clients. You can distribute the certificate manually by copying
the Pubkey.crt file to each client. You can also distribute the certificate to each
Additional Console options
Changing the Symantec Ghost database account and password
client by performing a remote installation from the Console. The remote
installation replaces the Pubkey.crt file on the client computer.
See “Updating the client certificates” on page 248.
To generate new certificates
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Run.
2
Browse to the Symantec Ghost installation directory.
The default directory is C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost.
3
Type ngserver.exe -keygen
Changing the Symantec Ghost database account and
password
When you first install the Symantec Ghost Console, a user name and password
are created for the Ghost database. This lets you access the database directly, for
example, to run a script.
Warning: You should directly access the database only if you are an experienced
user.
You can change the password to increase security on the database.
To change the database password
1
In the Symantec Ghost Console, on the Tools menu, click Database Password.
2
In the Database Credentials dialog box, in the Password field, type a new
password.
3
Click OK.
Using a script file to manage your database credentials
You can retrieve the Ghost database account and password by using the scripting
API for the Ghost Configuration Server service. You can use the script in one of
the following ways:
With no arguments
Retrieves the user account name and password that are used
by the Ghost Console to access the configuration database.
With one argument
Sets the password for the user account that is used by the
Ghost Console to access the configuration database.
249
250
Additional Console options
Changing the Symantec Ghost database account and password
With two arguments, the
first being the string dba
This lets you set a password for the built-in DBA user
account for which you may have dependent code. This user
account is turned off during installation for additional
security. You can activate the account by running this script.
The script is as follows:
<job id="PasswordUtility">
<script language="VBScript"
' Access the Configuration Server service's root COM scripting object
set server = CreateObject("ConfigServer.Application")
' Get the database configuration object from the configuration server
set dbInfo = server.ConfigDatabase
'Obtain the current database username and password
user = dbInfo.Username
pass = dbInfo.Password
set args = WScript.Arguments
if args.Count = O then
WScript.Echo "User: " & user & vbCr & "Password: " & pass
elseif args.count = 2 and args.item(0) = "dba" then
pass = args.item(1)
call dbInfo.SetCredentials ("dba", pass)
end if
</script>
</job>
Section
Creating boot disks,
exploring image files and
Symantec Ghost support
■
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
■
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
■
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
■
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
3
252
Chapter
Creating boot packages
with the Ghost Boot Wizard
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard
■
About Ghost boot packages
■
How to use a Ghost boot package
■
Files included in a Ghost package
■
Opening the Ghost Boot Wizard
■
Selecting which boot package to create
■
Creating boot packages
■
Selecting and adding a network driver
■
Selecting a template
■
Creating a multicard template
■
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
■
Adding command-line parameters to a boot package
■
Providing MS-DOS
■
Installing MS-DOS Client files
■
Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards
■
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
11
254
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard
■
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets
About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard
The Ghost Boot Wizard creates boot packages that let you complete various Ghost
tasks. For any task, the Ghost Boot Wizard guides you through the steps for
selecting the settings and drivers that you need to create the boot package.
About Ghost boot packages
A Ghost boot package can be one of the following:
The Ghost executable,
DOS, and driver files that
are loaded from a floppy
disk set or USB flash drive
to let you run Ghost.exe on
your computer
Symantec fully supports USB flash drives as removable
devices; however other devices also work with these options.
Note: When you format a USB drive using the Ghost Boot
Wizard one partition is created with maximum size of 2 GB.
You cannot create another partition in any remaining free
space.
Depending on the driver files that are included on your boot
disk, the Ghost Boot Wizard usually requires two floppy disks
to make a boot disk set. A Mapped Network Drive boot package
may fit on one disk.
An image file
An image file that loads DOS and driver files from a network
to let you run Ghost.exe on your computer without a boot disk
An ISO image
An ISO image that you can write to a CD or DVD to create a
bootable CD or DVD that runs Ghost on your computer
Note: Multicard templates are not supported for ISO images.
How to use a Ghost boot package
You can use a boot package to restart a computer from the package in DOS. If the
package contains the Ghost executable, the computer starts Ghost.exe. You can
then run Ghost.exe to back up, restore, and clone the computer from DOS without
using the Console.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Files included in a Ghost package
Files included in a Ghost package
The following files are required to run Ghost.exe and are included in a boot
package:
Ghost.exe
The Ghost executable that is run from DOS.
Note: Mapped Network Drive packages might not include
Ghost.exe.
DOS system files
PC-DOS is supplied for the purpose of creating Ghost boot
packages. The DOS files are installed automatically when
you create the boot package using the Ghost Boot Wizard.
Any files and drivers
required to access the
selected hardware
This includes CD-R/RW drivers, network protocol files, or
network interface card (NIC) drivers, or any other files for
external storage access.
Note: For best performance , you should use the latest
version of the NIC driver. You might need to download the
driver from the manufacturer.
Note: In versions previous to 8.0 of Symantec Ghost, MSCDEX was required to
read an image from a CD. If you created a bootable CD using any version of
Symantec Ghost you do not need to include MSCDEX in the boot package. If you
created a bootable CD with another utility, MSCDEX must be included.
When to include a network card driver
If the boot package includes network support, the Universal Packet Driver (UNDI
driver) enables detection of network cards in most computers without a specific
network card driver. If the boot package does not work on a computer, then a new
boot package must be created that uses the correct network card driver.
The UNDI driver can replace a specific driver in most of the following situations:
■
If the computer has been manufactured within the last two or three years
■
If the computer supports network booting using PXE (version 2.1)
Note: Symantec Ghost supports any version of PXE when booting a computer
over a network from a PXE server.
The UNDI drivers support multiple network interface cards (NIC) in a computer.
If you have more than one NIC in your computer, and you do not use the UNDI
255
256
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Opening the Ghost Boot Wizard
driver, then it is possible that Ghost might not select the correct card. If you do
not want to use the UNDI driver, then you should edit the Protocol.ini file to select
the correct card.
See “Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards ” on page 286.
The UNDI driver installation loads a driver from the option ROM of a network
card. If any one of the following is disabled in the BIOS, you must enable the option
in the BIOS before using the UNDI driver:
■
Option ROM
■
PXE
■
UNDI
Symantec provides a Universal Packet Driver, but to create a mapped network
boot package, you must provide a Universal NDIS Driver. You can download this
from the 3Com Site at the following URL:
http://support.3com.com/infodeli/tools/nic/mba.htm
When creating the mapped network boot package you are prompted for the location
of the Universal NDIS Driver.
When to include MS-DOS in a boot package
By default, Symantec Ghost includes PC-DOS in a Ghost boot package. However,
some computer models may not start from a Ghost boot package that contains
PC-DOS. If your computer does not start from a Ghost boot package, you should
create a new Ghost boot package from the Ghost Boot Wizard and include Windows
95/98 MS-DOS.
Before you create an MS-DOS Ghost boot package, you must provide Windows
95/98 MS-DOS for the computer that is running the Ghost Boot Wizard.
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
Opening the Ghost Boot Wizard
After you start the Ghost Boot Wizard, you can create boot packages.
To open the Ghost Boot Wizard
■
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost > Ghost
Boot Wizard.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Selecting which boot package to create
Selecting which boot package to create
You can include any of the following features in a boot package:
■
Support for CD-R/RW, DVD, LPT, USB, and FireWire
■
Network support for TCP/IP peer-to-peer connections and GhostCasting
■
Support for reading and writing an image to and from CD/DVD
■
Support for mapping network drives
■
An image of the Console Boot Partition.
■
RIS boot packages that support Microsoft Remote Installation Service (RIS)
with Symantec Ghost
■
TCP/IP network boot images that use 3Com DynamicAccess Boot Services to
allow access to Symantec Ghost without a boot disk
Table 11-1 provides information about the types of boot packages that you can
make and how they can be used.
Table 11-1
Boot package types
Intended use
Ghost Boot Wizard options
Local use of Ghost.exe:
You can use either of the following
options:
■
Disk-to-disk
■
Partition-to-partition
■
Disk or partition to and from local JAZ or ZIP
drive
■
Clone, back up, or restore over peer-to-peer
Standard Ghost Boot Package
connection between two computers using LPT,
See “Standard boot packages”
FireWire, or USB cable.
on page 259.
Standard Ghost Boot Package
See “Standard boot packages”
on page 259.
■ Network Boot Package
See “Boot packages with network
support” on page 264.
■
257
258
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Selecting which boot package to create
Table 11-1
Boot package types (continued)
Intended use
■
Ghost Boot Wizard options
Clone, back up, or restore over TCP/IP
You can use either of the following
peer-to-peer connection with network support options:
between two computers.
■ Network Boot Package
See “Boot packages with network
support” on page 264.
■ Drive Mapping Boot Package
See “Creating a boot package that
supports mapped network drives”
on page 265.
Note: A Drive Mapping Boot Package
supports NDIS drivers but does not
support using packet drivers. To use
Ghost.exe with network support using
packet drivers, you should create a
Network Boot Package.
■
Back up or restore a computer onto an image Standard Ghost Boot Package
file on a CD/DVD that is on a CD/DVD writer
See “Standard boot packages”
supported by Symantec Ghost.
on page 259.
Restore a computer from a Ghost image file
on a CD that is on a CD-R/RW drive not
supported by Symantec Ghost. The image file
was not stored on the CD using Symantec
Ghost. Contains generic CD drivers.
■ Access files other than a Ghost image file on
a CD.
■
CD/DVD Startup Boot Package with
Ghost
See “Boot packages with CD and DVD
support” on page 268.
■
Map a drive on a workstation to a shared
Drive Mapping Boot Package
resource on a server and use Symantec Ghost
See “Creating a boot package that
to clone, back up, or restore.
supports mapped network drives”
on page 265.
■
Install the Console boot partition on a client
computer.
■
Console Boot Partition
See “Creating a boot image containing
the Console boot partition” on page 269.
Start Ghost.exe on a client computer from the TCP/IP Network Boot Image
network (without a boot disk).
See “Starting client computers in
Ghost.exe from the network” on page 273.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
Table 11-1
Boot package types (continued)
Intended use
■
Start a client computer from the network to
connect to the Symantec Ghost Console.
Ghost Boot Wizard options
TCP/IP Network Ghost Client Boot
Image
See “Starting client computers from the
network to connect with the Symantec
Ghost Console” on page 274.
■
Create an entry in the RIS menu on a client
computer to start the computer from the
network.
Microsoft RIS Boot Option
See “Boot packages that support
Remote Installation Service (RIS)”
on page 271.
Creating boot packages
After you have decided which boot which boot package to create you can create
it.
Standard boot packages
The Ghost Boot Wizard creates a boot package that does the following:
■
Runs Ghost.exe for local operations.
■
Writes Ghost images directly to media on a CD/DVD writer supported by
Symantec Ghost. The media must be supported by the CD/DVD writer.
■
Runs Ghost.exe on two computers that are connected by either an LPT or USB
cable.
■
Runs Ghost.exe to back up to or restore from an external device that is
connected by USB or FireWire.
To create standard boot package
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Standard Ghost Boot Package.
2
Click Next.
259
260
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
3
Select one or more of the following:
USB support
To add support for USB peer-to-peer to the boot package.
Advanced
To set the USB peer-to-peer drivers.
See “Setting the USB peer-to-peer drivers” on page 261.
LPT support
To add support for LPT peer-to-peer to the boot package.
See “Setting the LPT port or mode” on page 261.
4
Advanced
To change the LPT mode or port.
Include Adaptec
ASPI drivers
To add Adaptec ASPI drivers to the boot package.
These drivers are required to write an image directly to a SCSI
CD-R that is supported by Symantec Ghost.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
5
Click Next.
6
In the Ghost.exe field, type the correct path if the executable has been moved
or you want to use a different version of Symantec Ghost.
The default path to Ghost.exe appears in the Ghost.exe field.
7
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
8
Click Next.
9
If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
This option is unavailable if you have previously included USB support in the
boot package.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
10 If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
11 Click Next.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
12 Select a destination for the boot package.
See “Selecting a destination drive” on page 262.
13 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the boot
package.
Follow the prompts to create a boot package.
Setting the USB peer-to-peer drivers
You can select USB peer-to-peer drivers to include in the boot package. In most
cases, you do not need to change the default driver setting. If you have problems
connecting using peer-to-peer, then select another option and try again.
To set USB peer-to-peer drivers
1
2
In the Load USB drivers dialog box, select one of the following:
All drivers
Includes all USB peer-to-peer drivers in the boot package
UHCI driver
Includes only UHCI drivers in the boot package
OHCI driver
Includes only OHCI drivers in the boot package
Click OK.
Setting the LPT port or mode
The default mode for an LPT connection is ECP/EPP. If you are having problems
with your LPT connection, set the mode to Bidirectional 8bit or Bidirectional 4bit.
The next time that you create a boot package, the mode is reset to the default,
ECP/EPP High Speed.
If you have multiple parallel ports and want to connect using a port other than
the default LPT1, use the LPT port option to specify the port into which your cable
is plugged.
To set the LPT port or mode
1
2
In the LPT configuration dialog box, under Mode, select one of the following:
■
ECP/EPP High Speed
■
Bidirectional 8bit
■
Bidirectional 4bit
Under Port, select one of the following:
■
Default
261
262
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
3
■
LPT1
■
LPT2
■
LPT3
Click OK.
Selecting a destination drive
You can select one of the following destinations for the boot package:
Floppy disk set
This option is unavailable if you are creating a Drive Mapping Boot
Package that includes Ghost.exe.
ISO image
This option lets you create an ISO image that you can write to a CD
or DVD using third-party software.
This option is unavailable if you use a Multicard template.
Removable and
unremovable
devices
Symantec fully supports USB flash drives as a removable device;
however, other devices also work with this options. The client
computer must support starting from the device and be configured
correctly. For example, the BIOS must support the option to start from
the device.
For a list of supported devices, see the Knowledgebase article at the
following URL:
http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/docid/2006081110304125
A 2 GB partition is created on the device, and any remaining space on
the device becomes unavailable. The device is reformatted, and any
existing data is overwritten.
Warning: All information on the selected device is deleted. The device is
automatically formatted before use.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
To select a package type
1
In the Destination Drive window, select one of the following:
Format floppy disk Lets you create a floppy disk boot set
set
2
Create ISO image
Lets you create an ISO image to write to a CD/DVD
Format Disk
Lets you create a boot package on a removable or unremovable
device
Select one of the following destination options for the selected package type:
Format floppy disk See “To set floppy disk options” on page 263.
set
Create ISO image
See “To set ISO image options” on page 263.
Format Disk
See “To set removable or unremovable disk options” on page 264.
To set floppy disk options
1
In the Destination Drive window, in the Floppy Disk Drive field, select the
appropriate drive letter.
2
In the Number of disk sets to create field, select the number that you want
to create.
3
Ensure that Format disk(s) First is checked to format the disks before disk
creation.
Ensure that this option is checked unless you are creating a custom boot disk
with custom system files. If this option is unchecked, the boot disk is not
bootable.
4
Ensure that Quick Format is checked to perform a quick format.
5
Click Next.
To set ISO image options
1
In the Destination Drive window, click Browse and select a location and file
name for the image file.
2
Click Next.
263
264
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
To set removable or unremovable disk options
1
In the Destination Drive window, under Available Devices, click the down
arrow, and select one of the devices listed.
2
If you want to display unremovable devices, uncheck Show only removable
devices.
3
If you want to add support for creating a bootable CD/DVD, click Support for
creating bootable CD/DVDs.
This option adds an image of a bootable floppy disk to the boot package. If
you are using Ghost to write an image directly to a CD or DVD, this option
adds support for making the CD or DVD bootable.
4
Click Next.
Boot packages with network support
The Ghost Boot Wizard helps you create boot packages that provide network
support for GhostCasting and TCP/IP peer-to-peer connections.
To create a boot package with network support
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Network Boot Package.
2
Click Next.
3
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
4
■
Select the Universal Packet Driver, and then click Next.
See “When to include a network card driver” on page 255.
■
Click Show all drivers, select or add a network driver, and then click Next.
See “Selecting and adding a network driver” on page 276.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
5
Click Next.
6
Click Symantec Ghost to create a boot package for the client that loads
Symantec Ghost. You can connect to a running GhostCast Server to transfer
image files to and from the client.
The default path to Ghost.exe is entered in the Ghost.exe field. If the
executable has been moved, or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe,
type the correct path.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
7
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
8
Click Next.
9
If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
This option is unavailable if you have previously included USB support in the
boot package.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
10 If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
11 Click Next.
12 Do one of the following:
■
Click DHCP will assign the IP settings if your network contains a DHCP
server.
■
Click The IP settings will be statically defined and complete the fields
below this option if your network does not contain a DHCP server.
If you create more than one boot package, then the static IP address
incrementally increases as each boot package is created.
13 If you want to alter the number of router hops then select the correct number
in Router Hops.
This specifies how many routers the client searches across when attempting
to find the Multicast Server. The default value of 16 lets Ghost find the server
as long as it is not more than 16 router hops away. This is sufficient for most
networks.
14 Click Next.
15 Select a destination for the boot package.
See “Selecting a destination drive” on page 262.
16 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the boot
package.
Follow the prompts to create a boot package.
Creating a boot package that supports mapped network drives
You can use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create boot packages that map a drive letter
to a shared resource on a network server. This drive mapping lets you access a
network drive from Ghost.exe.
265
266
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
You can choose to include Ghost.exe in the boot package. If you do not include
Ghost.exe, you must run Ghost from the network drive. If you include Ghost.exe
in the boot package, you cannot create a boot package on a floppy disk set. You
can save the package to a USB flash drive or an to an ISO image.
Note: A Drive Mapping Boot Package supports NDIS drivers but does not support
using packet drivers. If you want to run Ghost.exe with network support and you
want to use packet drivers, you should create a Network Boot Package.
Note: If you do not run Ghost.exe from the A drive, then you must reset the
environment variable WATTCP to provide the location of the Wattcp.cfg file.
See “To reset the environment variable to the correct location of Wattcp.cfg”
on page 326.
To create a boot package that supports mapped network drives
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Drive Mapping Boot Package.
2
Click Next.
3
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
4
5
■
In the driver list, double-click the Universal NDIS Driver, browse to the
location of the Universal NDIS Driver files, and then click OK.
See “When to include a network card driver” on page 255.
■
In the driver list, select or add a network driver, and then click Next.
See “Selecting and adding a network driver” on page 276.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
Click Get MS Client and browse to the MS-DOS Client files to include if you
are using MS-DOS.
If you are using MS-DOS, you must include the Microsoft DOS Client files.
You must install the files on the Ghost Boot Wizard computer before you can
include them in the boot package.
See “Installing MS-DOS Client files” on page 285.
6
Click Next.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
7
In the Client type dialog box, check Do not include any Ghost executables if
you do not want to include Ghost.exe in the boot package.
If you do not include Ghost.exe in the package, you must run Ghost from a
network drive. If you do not include Ghost.exe in the package, then the
remaining Client Type boxes are unavailable.
8
Click Symantec Ghost to create a boot package for the client that loads
Symantec Ghost. You can connect to a GhostCast Server to transfer image
files to and from the client.
The default path to Ghost.exe is entered in the Ghost.exe field. If the
executable has been moved, or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe,
type the correct path.
9
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
10 Click Next.
11 If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
This option is unavailable if you have previously included USB support in the
boot package or if you have selected not to include Ghost.exe in the boot
package.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
12 If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
This option is unavailable if you have selected not to include Ghost.exe in the
boot package.
13 Click Next.
14 In the Client Computer Name field, type the name of the client computer.
This specifies the name of the computer after it starts from the package and
does not have to be the same name given to the computer in Windows. If you
create more than one package, a number is added to the computer name so
that the names for subsequent packages are unique.
15 In the User Name field, type the user name that the boot package will use to
log on to the network.
This user must exist on the network and have sufficient access rights to the
mapped network drive, files, and directories that you want to use.
16 In the Domain field, type the domain to which the user belongs.
267
268
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
17 In the Drive Letter field, select a drive letter to access a network share through
a mapped drive.
Select a drive letter greater than any existing drive letter.
18 If you want to prevent the boot package from mapping a drive when the
computer starts, click None.
In this case, map a drive from the DOS prompt after the computer has started.
19 In the Maps To field, type the complete UNC path to the network share.
For example, to access a shared folder named Ghost on a computer named
Boss, the UNC path is \\Boss\Ghost.
20 Click Next.
21 Do one of the following:
DHCP will assign the IP
settings
If your network contains a DHCP server
The IP settings will be
statically defined
Complete the fields below this option if your network
does not contain a DHCP server. Your network
administrator can provide the values for these fields.
22 Click Next.
23 Select a destination for the boot package.
If you have selected to include Ghost.exe in the boot package then you cannot
create a floppy disk set.
See “Selecting a destination drive” on page 262.
24 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the boot
package.
Follow the prompts to create a boot package.
Boot packages with CD and DVD support
A boot package with CD/DVD support lets you access images and other files stored
on CD-R/RW and DVD drives that are not supported by Symantec Ghost.
This kind of package also contains the DOS system files and Ghost.exe.
To create a boot package with CD-ROM and DVD support
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click CD/DVD Startup Package with Ghost.
2
Click Next.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
3
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
4
Click Next.
5
In the Ghost.exe field, type the correct path if the executable has been moved
or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe.
The default path to the Ghost.exe appears in the Ghost.exe field.
6
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
7
Click Next.
8
If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
9
If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
10 Click Next.
11 Select a destination for the boot package.
See “Selecting a destination drive” on page 262.
12 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the boot
package.
Follow the prompts to create a boot package.
Creating a boot image containing the Console boot partition
You can create an image that contains the Console boot partition. Install this
image on client computers to allow remote control by the Console.
See “Installing the Console client” on page 58.
To create a boot image that contains a Console boot partition
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Console Boot Partition.
2
Click Next.
3
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
■
Select the Universal Packet Driver and click Next.
See “When to include a network card driver” on page 255.
269
270
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
■
4
Click Show all drivers, select or add a network driver and then click Next.
See “Selecting and adding a network driver” on page 276.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
5
Click Next.
6
Type the correct path in the Ghost.exe field if the executable has been moved,
or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe.
The default path to Ghost.exe appears in the Ghost.exe field.
7
Type the correct path in the Ngctdos.exe field if the executable has been
moved, or you want to use a different version.
The default path to the Ghost DOS client executable appears in the Ngctdos.exe
field.
8
Type the correct path in the Ghstwalk.exe field if the executable has been
moved, or you want to use a different version.
The default path to the Ghost Walker executable is entered in the Ghstwalk.exe
field.
9
In the Machine Group field, type the computer group folder, if required.
When a Console Client is first discovered on the network, the Console creates
an icon for it in the Machine Group section of the Default folder. When DOS
Console Client computers are discovered, they are identified by Adapter
Address only. Specifying a group folder makes identification of the computer
easier.
10 Click Next.
11 Do one of the following:
DHCP will assign the IP
settings
If your network contains a DHCP server
The IP settings will be
statically defined
Complete the fields below this option if your network
does not contain a DHCP server. Your network
administrator can provide the values for these fields.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
12 If you want to alter the number of router hops then select the correct number
in Router Hops.
This specifies how many routers the client searches across when attempting
to find the Multicast Server. The default value of 16 lets Ghost find the server
as long as it is not more than 16 router hops away. This is sufficient for most
networks.
13 Click Next.
14 In the Image File field, type a name for the image file.
15 In the Description field, type a description for the image file.
16 To execute creation of the image file, click Next.
Boot packages that support Remote Installation Service (RIS)
Ghost Boot Wizard Remote Installation Service (RIS) leverages the Preboot
Execution Environment (PXE) feature of PC-98 specified computers to provide a
remote installation service for Windows 2000. Symantec Ghost provides a cloning
solution suitable for deployment or migration of any computer operating system
with specific support for Microsoft Windows. Symantec Ghost also works with
Windows systems prepared with the Microsoft SysPrep tool.
You can create a RIS boot package in the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard only when
running on a Windows 2000/2003/XP server with RIS installed. An entry for the
boot package appears in the RIS menu.
Note: This option only appears if Microsoft Remote Installation Service is installed
on your computer.
To create a boot package that supports RIS
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Microsoft RIS Boot Option.
2
Select the generic PXE packet driver template.
3
Click Next.
4
Select one of the following:
5
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
Click Next.
271
272
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
6
Click Symantec Ghost to create a boot package that loads Symantec Ghost.
You can connect to a running GhostCast Server to transfer image files to and
from the client.
The default path to Ghost.exe is entered in the Ghost.exe field. If the
executable has been moved, or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe,
type the correct path.
7
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
8
Click Next.
9
If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
10 If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
11 Click Next.
12 Do one of the following:
DHCP will assign the IP
settings
If your network contains a DHCP server
The IP settings will be
statically defined
Complete the fields below this option if your network
does not contain a DHCP server. Your network
administrator can provide the values for these fields.
13 If you want to alter the number of router hops then select the correct number
in Router Hops.
This specifies how many routers the client searches across when attempting
to find the Multicast Server. The default value of 16 lets Ghost find the server
as long as it is not more than 16 router hops away. This is sufficient for most
networks.
14 Click Next.
15 In the RIS Boot Menu Name field, type the name that will appear on the RIS
Boot menu.
When you select this menu item, the client computer starts from the network
card.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
16 In the RIS Boot Description field, type a description for the boot package.
This text appears as a help message when the menu option is selected.
In the RIS Boot directory field, the name of the directory under the main RIS
tree in which the boot package is installed is displayed.
The contents of this field are generated from the text you type for the RIS
menu name. You should not change the text in this field from the default.
17 Click Next.
18 Select a language if there is more than one.
19 Click Next.
20 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the image
file.
Starting client computers in Ghost.exe from the network
You can create an image file that lets you start client computers in Ghost.exe,
from the network, using 3Com DynamicAccess Boot Services software.
To create an image file to start client computers from the network
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click TCP/IP Network Boot Image.
2
Click Next.
3
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
4
■
Select the Universal Packet Driver, and click Next.
See “When to include a network card driver” on page 255.
■
Click Show all drivers, select or add a network driver, and then click Next.
See “Selecting and adding a network driver” on page 276.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
5
Click Next.
6
Click Symantec Ghost to include the Ghost client in the boot package.
The default path to Ghost.exe is entered in the Ghost.exe field. If the
executable has been moved, or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe,
type the correct path.
273
274
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
7
In the Parameters field, type any required command-line parameters.
See “Adding command-line parameters to a boot package” on page 282.
8
Click Next.
9
If you want to move control of USB devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS USB control.
Do not select this option if you are creating a bootable USB device.
10 If you want to move control of FireWire devices from the BIOS to Ghost, check
Override BIOS FireWire control.
11 Click Next.
12 Do one of the following:
DHCP will assign the IP
settings
If your network contains a DHCP server
The IP settings will be
statically defined
Complete the fields below this option if your network
does not contain a DHCP server. Your network
administrator can provide the values for these fields.
13 If you want to alter the number of router hops then select the correct number
in Router Hops.
This specifies how many routers the client searches across when attempting
to find the Multicast Server. The default value of 16 lets Ghost find the server
as long as it is not more than 16 router hops away. This is sufficient for most
networks.
14 Click Next.
15 In the Image File field, type a file name for the image file.
This image can be used with any BOOTP/TFTP server.
16 Click Next.
17 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the image
file.
Starting client computers from the network to connect with the
Symantec Ghost Console
You can create an image file that lets you start client computers from the network
and connect to the Symantec Ghost Console, using 3Com DynamicAccess Boot
Services software.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating boot packages
To create an image file to start client computers from the network
1
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click TCP/IP Network Ghost Client Boot
Image.
2
Click Next.
3
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
4
■
Select the Universal Packet Driver, and click Next.
See “When to include a network card driver” on page 255.
■
Click Show all drivers, select or add a network driver, and then click Next.
See “Selecting and adding a network driver” on page 276.
Select one of the following:
■
Use PC-DOS
■
Use MS-DOS
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
5
Click Next.
6
Type the correct path in the Ghost.exe field if the executable has been moved,
or you want to use a different version of Ghost.exe.
The default path to Ghost.exe appears in the Ghost.exe field.
7
Type the correct path in the Ngctdos.exe field if the executable has been
moved, or you want to use a different version.
The default path to the Ghost DOS client executable appears in the Ngctdos.exe
field.
8
Type the correct path in the Ghstwalk.exe field if the executable has been
moved, or you want to use a different version.
The default path to the Ghost Walker executable is entered in the Ghstwalk.exe
field.
9
In the Machine Group field, type the computer group folder, if required.
When a Console Client is first discovered on the network, the Console creates
an icon for it in the Machine Group section of the Default folder. When DOS
Console Client computers are discovered, they are identified by Adapter
Address only. Specifying a group folder makes identification of the computer
easier.
10 Click Next.
275
276
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Selecting and adding a network driver
11 Do one of the following:
DHCP will assign the IP
settings
If your network contains a DHCP server
The IP settings will be
statically defined
Complete the fields below this option if your network
does not contain a DHCP server. Your network
administrator can provide the values for these fields.
12 If you want to alter the number of router hops then select the correct number
in Router Hops.
This specifies how many routers the client searches across when attempting
to find the Multicast Server. The default value of 16 lets Ghost find the server
as long as it is not more than 16 router hops away. This is sufficient for most
networks.
13 Click Next.
14 In the Image File field, type a file name for the image file.
This image can be used with any BOOTP/TFTP server.
15 Click Next.
16 Review the boot package details and click Next to start creating the image
file.
Selecting and adding a network driver
If the Universal Network Driver cannot access the network interface card installed
in the target computer then you must either select or add a driver.
Unless you use the multicard template, you must create a boot package for each
network card.
To select or add a network driver
■
In the Network Interface Card window, do one of the following:
■
Select the network driver for the make and model of the network card
installed on the client computer.
See “Selecting a template” on page 277.
■
If the correct driver is not in the list, add the driver.
See “Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 279.
You can add more than one driver to the boot package.
See “Creating a multicard template” on page 278.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Selecting a template
Selecting a template
For the boot package to work correctly, it is important that you select the correct
template. When you create a boot package for client computers, the template that
you select must be suitable for the network cards installed in the computers that
are to start from the package. You can use the Ghost Console to check the client
computer's network interface card in the Ghost Console.
See “Viewing Symantec Ghost Console resource properties” on page 84.
If the client computer is not installed with the Console client, then you can find
the name of the driver from Network Properties within Windows. This must be
done on the client computer for which you are preparing the boot package. The
name of the network interface card as shown in Windows may not exactly match
the name of the correct template in the Ghost Boot Wizard. For example, Windows
might list the card as 3Com Fast EtherLink XL 10/100Mb TX Ethernet NIC
(3C905B-TX). In this case, 3C905B-TX is the model number of the card. Therefore,
you can use the Ghost Boot Wizard template that is named 3COM 3C90X. This
template works for all 3C90- cards.
In some cases, you might have a choice between an NDIS2 driver and a packet
driver version of the same template. Both templates should work, but you might
find that one gives better performance. You can experiment to determine which
one works better.
It is possible that there is no existing template in the Ghost Boot Wizard that is
suitable for the network interface card installed in your computer. In this case,
obtain the DOS drivers for the network interface card either from the disk supplied
with the card or from the manufacturer’s Web site, and add a new template to the
Ghost Boot Wizard.
See “Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 279.
If you have different network interface cards installed in client computers, then
you may be able to use the multicard template to create a single boot package that
works on each of your computers without modification.
To determine which network interface card is installed on a Windows 98 computer
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
Double-click System.
3
Click Device Manager.
4
Expand Network Adapter.
The make and model of the installed network interface card are listed.
277
278
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating a multicard template
To determine which network interface card is installed on a Windows NT 4 computer
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
Double-click Network.
The make and model of the installed network interface card are listed on the
Adapters tab.
To determine which network interface card is installed on a Windows 2000 computer
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
Double-click System.
3
On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager.
4
Expand Network adapters.
The make and model of the installed network interface card are listed.
To determine which network interface card is installed on a Windows XP computer
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Control Panel > System.
2
On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager.
3
Expand Network adapters.
The make and model of the installed network interface card are listed.
Creating a multicard template
You can use multicard templates to create a boot package containing several
NDIS2 drivers. When the computer starts from the boot package, a special
multicard driver checks the computer’s hardware to see if any of the NDIS2 drivers
can be used to access the installed network card.
Multicard templates are useful because several makes and models of network
cards are often used in a single LAN. You can create a single boot package for use
with all of your computers without modification.
Note: Multicard templates are not supported for ISO images.
Refer to the Software License Agreement for use restrictions.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
To create a multicard template
1
In the Network Interface Card window, ensure that Show All Drivers is
checked.
The Network Interface Card window appears when you create a boot package
that requires a NIC. It is the second window in the Ghost Boot Wizard.
2
Click Multicard Template.
3
Click Next.
4
In the list of NDIS2 drivers, select the required drivers.
If you create a floppy disk set you should select no more than four or five
drivers. The space is limited on a floppy disk.
5
Click Next, and then follow the on-screen prompts to create the boot package.
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
The Ghost Boot Wizard includes drivers for over 130 network interface cards. If
your driver is not in the list, you can add it to the wizard so that it is set up the
next time that you need it.
To begin adding a network driver to the Ghost Boot Wizard
1
In the Network Interface window, click Add.
2
In the Template Type dialog box, select one of the following:
■
Packet Driver
■
NDIS2 Driver
Many manufacturers ship both drivers with their network cards so you have
a choice of which one to use.
3
Click OK.
You can then complete the details to add a packet driver or NDIS2 driver.
See “Adding packet drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 279.
See “Adding NDIS2 drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 280.
Adding packet drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Packet drivers are usually DOS executables (with .com or .exe file extensions) that
load from the Autoexec.bat file before Symantec Ghost loads. Symantec Ghost
communicates directly with the packet driver to use the services provided by the
network card.
279
280
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
To add a packet driver to the Ghost Boot Wizard
1
In the Template Properties window, on the Packet Driver tab, in the Driver
Executable field, click Browse to locate the packet driver so that the Ghost
Boot Wizard can copy the file to the current template.
Packet drivers are usually included on the driver disk supplied with the
network card. If you are installing the packet driver from the original disks
that came with your network interface card, the packet driver should be in a
directory called Packet or Pktdrv. The driver date lets you check whether you
have the latest driver.
2
In the Parameters field, type the command-line parameters if the network
card requires them.
These parameters vary from driver to driver and are usually optional with
plug-and-play network cards. Consult the documentation that came with the
network card. This is often in the form of a Readme.txt file in the same
directory as the driver itself.
3
In the Mode drop-down list, click Select Automatically to let Ghost determine
the best multicasting mode based on the information in the packet driver.
If the Select Automatically mode does not work, try Receive Mode 5. If that
does not work, try Receive Mode 6.
4
Click OK to continue creating the boot package.
You can also add additional drivers or programs or customize the Autoexec.bat
and Config.sys files of the resulting boot package. If you are creating a floppy disk
set and you edit Autoexec.bat you should ensure that the same changes are made
to Autoexec.bat on both disks in the floppy disk set.
See “Customizing the template” on page 281.
Adding NDIS2 drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
NDIS2 drivers work with the Microsoft Network Client. Symantec Ghost also uses
them for GhostCasting. NDIS2 drivers are DOS drivers that load from the DOS
Config.sys file.
You can also to add additional drivers or programs or customize the Autoexec.bat
and Config.sys files of the resulting boot package. If you are creating a floppy disk
set and you edit Autoexec.bat, you should ensure that the same changes are made
to Autoexec.bat on both disks in the floppy disk set.
See “Customizing the template” on page 281.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Adding network drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
To add an NDIS2 driver to the Ghost Boot Wizard
1
In the Template Properties window, on the NDIS Driver tab, click Setup.
2
Locate the NDIS2 driver.
In many cases Ghost can automatically determine the other parameters for
your network. When locating the directory that contains the driver, look for
a folder named Ndis or Ndis2. If you have a choice between DOS and OS2
folders, select DOS. The driver date lets you check whether you have the latest
driver.
3
Click OK.
If the setup fails to complete the driver properties, then complete the following
fields manually:
Filename
Type the DOS file name for the NDIS2 driver.
Driver Name
Type the internal name of the driver.
The internal name of the driver is used when generating the
Protocol.ini configuration file and must always end with a $
character. Read the sample Protocol.ini file in the same directory
as the driver itself to find the internal driver name.
The internal name of the driver is often the DOS file name with
the file name extension replaced with a $. For example, the
internal name of Mydriver.dos is Mydriver$.
Parameters
Type the parameters for the Protocol.ini configuration file.
If you use Setup to automatically fill in this page, you will see
the parameters that you need to adjust. For the majority of
plug-and-play cards, all of the parameters are optional, so you
can either accept the defaults or leave this field empty.
4
In the Mode drop-down list, click Select Automatically to let Ghost determine
the best multicasting mode based on the information in the NDIS driver.
If the Select Automatically mode does not work, try Receive Mode 5. If that
does not work, try Receive Mode 6.
5
Click OK to continue creating the boot package.
Customizing the template
You may require additional drivers and programs in order to use the network
device attached to your computer. For example, many USB network devices must
load an extra driver for the USB port before the driver for the network device.
281
282
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Adding command-line parameters to a boot package
You can add files to the template and customize the Autoexec.bat and Config.sys
files of the resulting boot package. Usually these are either DOS drivers or
executable programs, but you can add any type of file. Files added to the template
appear in the list to the right of the button.
Note: If you are creating a floppy disk set and you edit Autoexec.bat, you should
ensure that the same changes are made to Autoexec.bat on both disks in the floppy
disk set.
If this template is used as a multicard template, then any additional files or
modifications are overridden by its settings.
To modify a template
1
2
In the Template Properties window, on the Advanced tab, do any of the
following:
■
Click New and select a file to add to the template.
■
Click Delete to delete the selected file from the list.
■
In the Autoexec.bat field, type any additional Autoexec.bat entries for the
driver.
The entries appear before any network-related commands, such as
Netbind.com or the packet driver executable.
■
In the Config.sys field, type any additional Config.sys entries for the driver.
The entries appear before any driver-related devices to ensure that the
enabling drivers load before the main network device drivers specified on
the network driver page.
Click OK to continue creating the boot package.
Adding command-line parameters to a boot package
You can add command-line parameters to a boot package to instruct Symantec
Ghost to perform certain actions.
Command-line parameters can be added while creating a Standard Boot Package,
Network Boot Package, CD/DVD Startup Package with Ghost, TCP/IP Network
Boot Image, or boot package in the Client Type window.
In the following example, the parameters instruct Symantec Ghost to connect to
the GhostCast session called test and restore the disk image to the first drive:
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Adding command-line parameters to a boot package
Table 11-2
Command parameters
Switch
Description
-sure
Removes the need to confirm the specified details.
-rb
Causes a restart immediately after the cloning
operation.
-clone
Used with the parameter [email protected] and dst=1.
@mc indicates the GhostCast session name. In this
case, the session name is test.
The session name must match on the client and
server.
dst=1 refers to the destination being fixed disk 1.
In the following example, the parameters instruct Symantec Ghost to back up
your main disk to an image on another drive:
-clone,mode=create,src=1,dst=D:\backups\maindrv.gho
Table 11-3
Command parameters
Clone parameters
Description
mode=create
Creates an image file
283
284
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Providing MS-DOS
Table 11-3
Command parameters (continued)
Clone parameters
Description
src=1
Specifies drive 1 as the source drive
dst=D:\Backups\Maindrv.gho
Saves the image to the file D:\Backups\Maindrv.gho
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Providing MS-DOS
The Ghost Boot Wizard includes PC-DOS on boot packages. However, a boot
package that includes PC-DOS might not start all computers. When you create a
boot package, you can include MS-DOS instead of PC-DOS.
If you use MS-DOS, then you must provide MS-DOS files on the computer on which
you are creating the boot package. Using an MS-DOS system disk that was
formatted on a Windows 95/98 computer, you can install the MS-DOS files during
the creation of the boot package.
For more information, see the Knowledgebase articles at the following URLs:
■
How to create a Microsoft Client boot disk
■
How to create an MS-DOS system disk for Ghost
■
Drive mapping to Windows 2003 Server
To create an MS-DOS system disk on a Windows 95/98 computer
1
Insert a blank floppy disk into drive A of a Windows 95/98 computer.
2
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Program Files > Windows Explorer.
3
Right-click drive A.
Warning: Do not right-click drive C.
4
Click Format.
5
Check Copy System Files.
6
Click Start to format the disk.
You can install or uninstall MS-DOS while you are creating a boot disk.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Installing MS-DOS Client files
To copy MS-DOS to your computer
1
Insert the formatted floppy disk into drive A of the computer on which the
Ghost Boot Wizard is running.
2
In the DOS Version window, click Get MS-DOS.
3
In the Get MS-DOS dialog box, do one of the following steps:
4
To get MS-DOS from a floppy
disk.
Click From Floppy Disk, and select a floppy drive.
To get MS-DOS from a folder.
Click From Directory.
Click OK.
To remove MS-DOS from your computer
1
In the DOS Version window, click Remove MS-DOS.
2
Click OK.
Installing MS-DOS Client files
If you are using the mapped network drive functionality and MS-DOS, you must
include the Microsoft DOS Client files. You must install the files on the computer
before you can include them on the boot package.
For more information, see the Knowledgebase articles at the following URLs:
■
How to create a Microsoft Client boot disk
■
How to create an MS-DOS system disk for Ghost
■
Drive mapping to Windows 2003 Server
The following files are required:
■
EMSBFR.EXE
■
LMHOSTS
■
NEMM.DOS
■
NET.EXE
■
NET.MSG
■
NETBIND.COM
■
NETH.MSG
■
NETWORKS
285
286
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards
■
NMTSR.EXE
■
PROTMAN.DOS
■
PROTMAN.EXE
■
PROTOCOL
■
TCPDRV.DOS
■
TCPTSR.EXE
■
TCPUTILS.INI
■
TINYRFC.EXE
■
UMB.COM
■
IFSHLP.SYS
■
EMM386.EXE
■
HIMEM.SYS
■
WFWSYS.CFG
To install the Microsoft DOS Client files
1
In the DOS version window, click Get MS Client.
2
In the Browse for Folder dialog box, select the MS-DOS LAN Client files.
3
Click OK to continue creating a boot package.
Symantec Ghost support for multiple network
interface cards
The UNDI drivers support multiple network interface cards (NIC) in a computer.
If you have more than one NIC in your computer, and you do not use the UNDI
driver, then it is possible that Ghost might not select the correct card. If you do
not want to use the UNDI driver, then you should edit the Protocol.ini file to select
the correct card.
If Ghost does not select the correct card, you can edit the Protocol.ini file to specify
the correct settings to bind the network driver to the correct network card. You
must specify the physical location of the network card in the computer. The
information that you must include in the Protocol.ini file is specific to the driver
and to the network.
Note: The network driver must be a PCI network card.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards
Before you edit the Protocol.ini file, you need the following information:
PCI Location Bus, Slot, and Function
keywords
You can obtain this information from the
manufacturer of your NIC. The manufacturer
might also require you to include additional
information in the Protocol.ini file. For
example, the manufacturer might require
you to place the keyword information in a
specific section of the Protocol.ini file.
Some manufacturers use the term device
instead of the word slot.
PCI bus number, slot number, and function
number
You can obtain this information by checking
the client computer properties in the Ghost
Console.
See “To view Symantec Ghost Console client
computer properties” on page 95.
Symantec Ghost displays the PCI
information in decimal format. A
manufacturer might require that you use
this hexadecimal format in the Protocol.ini
file.
When you have the PCI information, you can edit the Protocol.ini file.
For example, a manufacturer provides the following keywords:
■
SLOT
■
BUSNO
■
FUNCTNO
The Symantec Ghost client dialog properties lists the following properties:
B:0 S:17 F:0
In this case, you would edit the Protocol.ini file as follows:
■
SLOT=17
■
BUSNO=0
■
FUNCTNO=0
287
288
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
There may be times when you want to create boot disks manually. For example,
you may wish to create a NetWare boot disk, add custom programs, or add batch
files.
To create a DOS boot disk manually
1
If the operating system is DOS/Win 98, insert a blank, formatted floppy disk
into drive A.
2
Type the following:
C:\> sys c: a:
3
Set up the packet driver interface.
For example, type the following command to copy the network interface card
packet driver file:
C:\> copy 3c5x9pd.com a:\
See “Setting up packet drivers” on page 289.
4
To copy Ghost.exe and Wattcp.cfg to the floppy disk, type the following:
C:\> copy progra~1\Symantec\ghost\ghost.exe a:\
C:\> copy progra~1\Symantec\ghost\wattcp.cfg a:\
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
5
289
Edit the Wattcp.cfg file.
For example:
IP = 192.168.100.44
NETMASK = 255.255.255.0
The Wattcp.cfg file stores the TCP/IP stack configuration details and specifies
the IP address and subnet mask of the computer.
See your system administrator for IP and netmask values.
6
Edit the Autoexec.bat startup file.
For example:
3c5x9pd.com 0x60
ghost.exe
Add the command line for the packet drive to the Autoexec.bat file.
For more information, see the packet driver documentation.
Ensure that the same changes are made to Autoexec.bat on both disks in the
floppy disk set.
You can add additional command-line switches to the Ghost.exe command
to automate the cloning process.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Setting up packet drivers
There are several packet driver interface options as follows:
■
Network interface card-dependent packet driver.
See “To set up a network interface card-dependent packet driver” on page 290.
■
NDIS version 2.01 driver with packet driver shim supplied by Symantec Ghost.
NDIS version 3 or later drivers do not work with the Ghost client.
See “To set up an NDIS 2.01 network adapter driver with supplied packet driver
shim” on page 290.
■
Third-party network adapter driver and packet driver shim. These have not
been tested or documented with the GhostCasting feature. This includes
ODI-based packet driver shims such as Odipkt.com.
Packet drivers are easy to set up and require minimal configuration.
The NDIS driver setup is more complex. The selection of NDIS 2.01 and shim, or
a network interface card-specific packet driver depends on factors such as
availability, reliability, ease of use, and speed. By running a system test, you can
290
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
choose the best alternative for your network interface card (that is, the specific
packet driver or the NDIS 2.01 driver and shim).
Note: Do not use the Network Client Administrator from Windows NT 4 or the
Microsoft Network Client Installation program to create a GhostCast boot package
as they are not compatible.
To set up a network interface card-dependent packet driver
1
Locate the packet driver for your network interface card.
Packet drivers are usually supplied on the installation disk included with a
network interface card or may be available on the manufacturer’s Web site.
2
Load the packet driver onto the computer.
The command-line arguments vary slightly from driver to driver as follows:
■
3COM590 PCI network interface card packet driver:
A:\> 3c59xpd.com
■
3COM509 ISA network interface card packet driver:
A:\> 3c5x9pd.com 0x60
■
NE2000 compatible using software interrupt 0x60 at IRQ10 and IObase
0x280:
A:\> ne2000pd.com 0x60 10 0x280
The syntax for the NE2000pd command is a typical example of an ISA
driver command line. You can find the IRQ and IO base address values
using the setup program included with the network interface card. The
software interrupt can be between 0x60—0x7f.
To set up an NDIS 2.01 network adapter driver with supplied packet driver shim
1
Locate the NDIS 2.01 driver for the network interface card.
NDIS (version 2.01) drivers are usually supplied on the installation disk
included with a network interface card and have a .dos file extension.
Alternatively, NDIS (version 2.01) drivers may be available on the network
interface card manufacturer’s Web site.
2
Copy and modify Protocol.ini, Config.sys, and Autoexec.bat.
Base configuration files ready for editing are included in the GhostCasting
installation files. Extract these configuration files and edit as shown. If you
are creating a floppy disk set and you edit Autoexec.bat, you should ensure
that the same changes are made to Autoexec.bat on both disks in the floppy
disk set.
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Creating a DOS boot disk manually
3
4
In the Ghost directory, copy the following files from the \ndis directory:
■
Protman.dos
■
Protman.exe
■
Netbind.com
■
Dis_pkt.dos
Restart the computer.
The packet driver interface should now be ready for Symantec Ghost to use.
Table 11-4 lists the files that your directory or floppy package should contain.
Table 11-4
Required files
System files
Configuration files
NDIS files
Command.com
Config.sys
Dis_pkt.dos
Msdos.sys (hidden)
Autoexec.bat
Netbind.com
Io.sys (hidden)
Protocol.ini
Protman.dos
Protman.exe
*.dos
Note the following:
■
Protman.exe is used during the NETBIND and is not needed in Autoexec.bat.
■
*.dos is the network interface card specific driver (for example, ELNK3.DOS).
Following is a sample Protocol.ini file:
[PROTMAN]
drivername = PROTMAN$
[PKTDRV]
drivername = PKTDRV$
bindings = PC_CARD
intvec = 0x60
chainvec = 0x66
[PC_CARD]
drivername = PNPND$
Change the [PC_CARD] module driver name to correspond to the NDIS driver in
use for your network interface card. For example, if you use a 3COM509 card then
change the driver name to:
291
292
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets
drivername = ELNK3$
Type any additional required options for the network interface card configuration
in the [PC_CARD] module. Refer to the documentation or the sample Protocol.ini
for the network interface card in use, if required. For example, the 3COM509 card
lets you optionally specify the IO Base address:
[PC_CARD]
drivername = ELNK3$
IOADDRESS = 0x300
Following is a sample Config.sys file:
device=protman.dos /I:\
device=dis_pkt.dos
device=pnpnd.dos
The /I: in the first line indicates the location of the Protocol.ini file and must be
present. For example, /I:\ specifies the root directory and /I:A:\NET specifies
A:\NET.
The last line refers to the driver for the network interface card. For example, if
you use a 3COM509, the last line of Config.sys should be replaced with:
device=ELNK3.DOS
Following is a sample Autoexec.bat file:
prompt $p$g
netbind
NETBIND binds the NDIS drivers together and installs the packet driver interface.
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets
You can customize boot disks and packages to support regional keyboards and
character sets by editing the Local.cfg file. The Local.cfg file does not support
languages that use double-byte character sets.
The Local.cfg file is one of the files that is required to support the Ghost Boot
Wizard. It is stored in one of the following locations:
Windows XP
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Template\Common
Windows 2000
\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Template\Common
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets
Windows NT 4
\WINNT\Profiles\All Users\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Template\Common
Windows 98
\Windows\All Users\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Template\Common
The Local.cfg file includes instructions for editing the file.
293
294
Creating boot packages with the Ghost Boot Wizard
Supporting regional keyboards and character sets
Chapter
12
Backing up with CD-R/RW
and DVD-R/RW
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Image files and CD/DVD writers
■
Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive
■
Saving an image file to a supported CD/DVD
■
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
Image files and CD/DVD writers
Symantec Ghost support of SCSI, IDE, FireWire, and USB CD and DVD writers
allows the storage of a single image file onto one or more CD-R/RW or DVD-R/RW.
Symantec Ghost supports many CD and DVD drives. If you have problems writing
to CD-R/RW or DVD-R/RW, then check that your drive is listed on the support
Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/cddvddriver
When you use CD/DVD writers with Ghost.exe, you can select a writer as the
destination device in the File Locator window. Each writer is shown as @CD-Rx,
where x is a number starting at one and increasing incrementally for each writer
present.
Figure 12-1 shows an example of a CD writer that is available for use.
296
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Image files and CD/DVD writers
Figure 12-1
Ghost with CD writer
For Symantec Ghost to access SCSI CD/DVD writers, a DOS ASPI driver must be
installed. Also, when you create a Ghost boot package from the Ghost Boot Wizard,
you must include the Adaptec ASPI drivers.
See “Standard boot packages” on page 259.
Symantec Ghost works with most SCSI and IDE writers produced in 2000 and
later. It may or may not work with older models. Use the latest firmware available
for your CD/DVD writer. An IDE CD/DVD writer performs best if it is mounted on
the secondary IDE controller.
A list of CD/DVD writers with which Symantec Ghost has been tested is available
on the Symantec Service and Support Web site:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/cddvddriver
Table 12-1 lists the media that you should use with CD and DVD writers and the
action, if any, that Symantec Ghost takes.
Table 12-1
CD and DVD media
Type of drive
Media
CD-R
Blank
CD-RW
Prompts you to erase existing data before writing new data
DVD-R
Blank
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive
Table 12-1
CD and DVD media (continued)
Type of drive
Media
DVD-RW
Prompts you to erase existing data before writing new data
DVD+R
Blank
DVD+RW
Prompts you to overwrite existing data
When you create an image on a CD/DVD, you can make the CD/DVD bootable. To
make the CD/DVD bootable you must have a Windows boot disk that loads the
CD/DVD drivers and assigns the drive letters to the CD/DVD drives. You must
have the Windows boot disk available when you create the image using Ghost.exe.
When you use the bootable CD/DVD to restore the image file, you must run
Ghost.exe from the mounted drive. If you make the CD/DVD bootable, you must
have the DOS drivers that let you view the contents of the CD/DVD.
Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive
You can save an image file directly to a CD or DVD. You can also make the CD/DVD
bootable.
When writing an image file directly to a CD-R/RW or DVD-R/RW, note the
following:
■
The CD/DVD drive must be compatible with Symantec Ghost.
■
Symantec Ghost automatically spans CD-R/RW disks if necessary. You do not
need to use a spanning switch.
See “Image files and volume spanning” on page 303.
If Symantec Ghost does not support your CD-R/RW drive and the image file
is too large to fit on one CD, you can still save the image file to CD.
See “Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive” on page 298.
■
If the CD-RW/DVD-RW contains data, Symantec Ghost prompts you to confirm
that you want the data erased.
Saving an image file to a supported CD/DVD
Saving an image file to a supported CD/DVD and making it bootable is a process
with several phases as follows:
■
Create a Ghost boot package.
■
Start your computer.
297
298
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
■
Create and save the image file.
When writing an image file directly to a CD/DVD, note the following:
■
The CD/DVD drive must be compatible with Symantec Ghost.
■
Symantec Ghost automatically spans CD/DVDs if necessary. You do not need
to use a spanning switch.
Note: When creating the bootable CD/DVD ensure that the floppy disk that you
use to make the CD or DVD bootable has mouse.ini on it already, or does not load
mouse.com. If you do not then the mouse driver tries to write mouse.ini to the
CD/DVD and hangs while attempting to do this.
Create the Ghost boot disks
To write an image file directly to a CD/DVD, you must have a boot package that
includes the appropriate drivers to start the computer. You can use the Ghost
Boot Wizard to create a boot package, using the CD/DVD Startup Disk with Ghost
option. This option creates a boot package that contains the Ghost executable,
DOS system files, and the CD/DVD driver files.
See “Boot packages with CD and DVD support” on page 268.
Create and save the image file
Restart your computer using the boot package and create an image of the computer,
choosing the CD/DVD drive as the destination drive.
See “Creating a backup image file” on page 329.
Symantec Ghost lets you make the CD bootable during the creation of the image
file. To make the CD bootable, follow the on-screen instructions. If you are using
a floppy disk set, when prompted for the required files, insert the first boot disk
into the computer’s floppy disk drive. When asked if you want to copy Symantec
Ghost to the CD/DVD, insert the second boot disk and follow the on-screen
instructions.
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
Not all CD/DVD drives are supported by Symantec Ghost. If your drive is
unsupported, you can create an image file and then write it to CD/DVD using
third-party software.
If your drive is unsupported, and the image file is too large to fit onto one disk,
you can still save the image file to CD/DVD.
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
There is more than one way to save an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
as follows:
■
Splitting the image file during a backup
See “Splitting an image file during a backup” on page 299.
■
Splitting the image file after it has been created
See “About image file spans” on page 317.
The image file is initially saved to another partition or hard disk and then copied
to a CD/DVD using your CD/DVD recording software.
To save an image file onto a CD, you must split the image file into files that fit on
a CD. Split the image into files that are not larger than 620 MB. This leaves room
on a CD for any additional files that you might need or any difference in the
capacity of the CD.
Note: Some CD/DVD writers let you write directly to the CD/DVD as if to a drive
letter. Symantec Ghost does not support the ability to write data directly to a
CD/DVD.
Splitting an image file during a backup
To split an image file as it is created, run Symantec Ghost from the command line
in DOS, using the -split and -auto switches.
To split an image file during a backup
1
Start Ghost.exe using the -split and -auto switches.
For example:
a:\ghost.exe -split=600 -auto
2
Create and save the image file.
The -split switch in this example limits the image size to a maximum of 600
megabytes for any one segment. The -auto switch names each of the segments
numerically.
See “Creating a backup image file” on page 329.
299
300
Backing up with CD-R/RW and DVD-R/RW
Saving an image file to an unsupported CD/DVD drive
Chapter
13
Symantec Ghost support for
image files and disks
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Symantec Ghost image files
■
Image files and compression
■
Image files and CRC32
■
Image files and volume spanning
■
Image files and tape drives
■
Drives with BitLocker Drive Encryption
■
Dynamic disks in Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000
■
Support for Disk Drive Overlays (DDO)
■
Hibernation and swap files
■
Backing up or migrating a server
About Symantec Ghost image files
You can create image files by using the Symantec Ghost executable, the GhostCast
Server, or the Symantec Ghost Console.
The image files created with Symantec Ghost have a .gho or .ghs extension by
default. They contain the entire disk or partitions of the disk. Image files support
the following:
■
Various levels of compression
302
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Image files and compression
■
CRC32 data integrity checking
■
Splitting of media files
■
Spanning across volumes
Symantec Ghost images contain only the actual data on a disk. If you have a 9 GB
drive with only 600 MB of data, the Symantec Ghost image is approximately 600
MB, or is smaller if you use compression.
You can use Ghost Explorer to selectively recover individual files from an image
file without restoring the complete disk or partition. You can also use Ghost
Explorer to edit Ghost images.
Image files and compression
Image files created in Symantec Ghost support several levels of data compression.
When Symantec Ghost is in interactive mode, three compression options are
available: none, fast, and high. The Symantec Ghost command-line switch -z
provides access to nine levels of compression.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
As a rule, the more compression you use, the slower Symantec Ghost operates.
However, compression can improve speed when there is a data transfer bottleneck.
There is a big difference in speed between high compression and no compression
when creating an image file on a local disk. Over a network connection, fast
compression is often as fast as, or faster than, no compression. Over a parallel
cable, high compression is often faster than no compression because fewer bytes
are sent over the cable. Decompression of high-compressed images is much faster
than the original compression. The level of compression that you select depends
on your individual requirements.
The compression option is not available when you take an image of a drive that
uses BitLocker Drive Encryption.
Performance on a network
One advantage of Symantec Ghost is speed. It takes minutes to install an operating
system such as Windows XP, onto 10 or 100 computers. Many factors affect
performance.
When you use Symantec Ghost across a network, use the fast compression option.
If disk space is at a premium, you can use higher compression, but it can affect
speed. The fastest performance over a network is usually achieved with
GhostCasting.
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Image files and CRC32
Using a 10 MB/second Ethernet network, a 25-60 MB/minute server speed is
common.
The following factors influence this range:
■
Using up-to-date drivers
■
LAN traffic
■
Choice of network hubs or switches, including brand and model
■
Compression
On a 100 MB/second Ethernet network, it is possible to achieve 80-300 MB/minute
under ideal conditions. This speed is influenced by computer hardware and LAN
performance. Greater performance is achieved with faster computers, NICs, and
hard disks.
Image files and CRC32
Cyclic Redundancy Checking (CRC) is a data error checking technique. CRC ensures
that the original data written to the image file is the same as the data on the disk.
CRC32 is a CRC technique that uses a 32-bit value to store error checking
information.
When an image file is created, CRC32 details are embedded into the file to ensure
that image file corruption is detected when the image is restored to disk. CRC32
is currently included on a file-by-file basis with FAT partitions and on a volume
basis for NTFS partitions.
In addition to image file error detection, the CRC values are used to verify that
image files and partitions or disks are identical. This offers an additional method
to detect bad sector writes and other drive anomalies that may be missed during
normal imaging checks.
You can generate a text file that contains CRC values and associated file attributes
using the -CRC32 command-line switch.
See “Using the -CRC32 switch” on page 493.
Image files and volume spanning
You can capture an image in a single file or span an image across a number of
files.
Standard image files consist of a single file that contains the contents of the
complete disk or required partitions. This type of image file is used for storing
system configurations on server network drives for later restoration, or on other
303
304
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Image files and volume spanning
hard drives and tape drives where the volume is large enough to hold the complete
image file.
Limitations on the image file size
The maximum file size is determined by the file system. If Ghost is writing an
image onto a FAT32-formatted disk, the maximum file size is 4 GB. If the image
is written to an NTFS-formatted disk, there is no maximum file size. Ghost writes
to an image file until a write failure occurs. If the write failure occurs because the
maximum file size is reached or because there is no more space left on the disk,
then Ghost spans the image and creates a new image-file segment.
Size-limited image files
There are situations in which it is not practical to have a standard image file.
Symantec Ghost can split an image file into segments (known as spans) that are
limited to a user-specified size. For example, you may want to keep files created
on your network drive limited to 100 MB so that you can transfer them easily in
the future. This option is most commonly used to limit span sizes to 620 MB for
later transfer to a CD.
If you access a large image file over a mapped network drive verify that the file
is no bigger than 2 GB. The DOS drivers cannot successfully access large files over
a mapped network drive. By splitting the file into spans, you enable Ghost to access
a large image file.
See “About image file spans” on page 317.
Spanned image files
Spanned image files are similar to size-limited image files. The difference is that
each segment file (or span) of the image file is limited by the actual volume size
of the media to which the image is being saved. This lets you specify a drive and
file name and lets Symantec Ghost determine when to request another volume
or location for the remaining data. This is very useful when using ZIP, JAZ, LS120
Superdisk, and other drive types.
Spanning must be executed locally. If you try to span over a peer-to-peer
connection (LPT, USB, TCP/IP, or GhostCasting), a disk full error message appears.
However, splitting can be used in all situations.
Symantec Ghost also allows size limiting of spans when spanning volumes to
ensure that no span exceeds the maximum size.
See “Spanning across multiple volumes and limiting span sizes” on page 305.
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Image files and volume spanning
With all image files, the only constraint on the selection of the destination volume
is that it must not be part of the source selection. For example, it cannot be on a
source disk or partition if that disk or partition is to be included in the image.
The spanned files are named according to Microsoft application guidelines.
For example, as follows:
■
First file: Filename.gho
■
Second file: Filen001.ghs
■
Third file: Filen002.ghs
You can use the -cns switch for an alternative naming standard.
For example, as follows:
■
First file: Filename.gho
■
Second file: Filename.001
■
Third file: Filename.002
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Spanning across multiple volumes and limiting span sizes
When you create an image file from a disk or partition, the destination drive might
have insufficient space to store the image file. If Symantec Ghost determines that
this is the case, it alerts you and asks whether to enable spanning. Symantec Ghost
assumes that compression reduces the size of the image by one-third when it
determines whether the image will fit. Alternatively, you can use the -span and
-split command-line switches to configure Symantec Ghost to use image file size
limiting.
See “Command-line switches” on page 468.
Before it saves the disk contents to the image file, Symantec Ghost shows the
source and destination details and offers a chance to cancel. The default is to
cancel.
Once the process starts, the image file creation continues until the destination
volume is full.
If you started spanning onto a JAZ disk and want to span a 3.0 GB drive onto JAZ
disks, you can choose to continue on JAZ disks. If you want to span across different
forms of media, you can select a different type once the first portion of the span
has completed. You cannot mix CD/DVD media with other types of media, such
as JAZ or hard disk.
305
306
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Image files and tape drives
Note: You must record where the span segments are saved and the segment file
names. Symantec Ghost does not record the locations and file names you selected.
Information about the partitions is stored at the start of the image file. This is
updated at the end of the Ghost process, which might require you to reinsert the
first disk in the span set. Symantec Ghost prompts you for the first disk in the
span set and for subsequent volumes when restoring from an image.
Restoring from a spanned image
The process when restoring a disk or partition from a spanned image file is the
same as restoring from an unspanned image file. However, during the restoration
of the spanned image file, you are prompted for the locations of the image file
spans. You must know the span segment locations and file names.
You can continue on the same form of media. For example, if you originally
spanned onto a JAZ disk and want to restore a 3.0 GB drive from JAZ disks, you
can replace the disk and continue from JAZ disks. Alternatively, you can restore
from different media types.
Symantec Ghost automatically restores spanned images without prompting if it
can find the next span.
Image files and tape drives
Ghost support of tape drives allows the storage of a single image file on a tape.
When the image is written to the tape, Ghost.exe uses no associated file system,
which means that you cannot access the tape from a drive letter as if it were
another storage drive. Ghost does not support spanning to multiple tapes.
When you use tape drives with Ghost.exe, you can select the tape drive as the
source or destination device in the File Locator window. Each tape device is shown
as MTx, where x is a number starting at 0 and increasing incrementally for each
drive present.
Figure 13-1 shows an example of a tape drive, MT0, that is available for use.
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Drives with BitLocker Drive Encryption
Figure 13-1
Tape drive access
For Ghost.exe to access SCSI tape drives, a DOS ASPI driver must be installed
prior to use.
See “Standard boot packages” on page 259.
Ghost.exe in its default mode performs well with most tape devices. In some
situations with older tape devices and possibly with unreliable tapes, Ghost.exe
may need to be configured to slow down or alter the way it uses the tape device.
See “Command-line switches” on page 468.
Note: Ghost Explorer cannot access an image stored on tape.
Drives with BitLocker Drive Encryption
The compression option is not available when you take an image of a disk that
uses BitLocker Drive Encryption. Ghost performs a sector-by-sector copy of the
entire disk.
You must verify that the disk on which the image is to be restored is identical to
the source disk in every way. You should take a copy of a disk that uses BitLocker
Drive Encryption only as a backup. If you restore an image onto a drive that has
a different geometry, Windows Vista cannot interpret the disk.
307
308
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Dynamic disks in Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000
Dynamic disks in Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000
Symantec Ghost supports backing up, restoring, and cloning simple or mirrored
volumes on dynamic disks. Spanned, striped, and RAID-5 volumes are not
supported by Symantec Ghost. You can back up an image of a partition on a disk
in a dynamic disk set to an image file. If you back up a disk, then all of the partitions
that Ghost supports on the disk, and only those partitions, are backed up to an
image file.
Operations that support dynamic disks are as follows:
■
Partition-to-partition
■
Partition-to-image
■
Disk-to-disk
■
Disk-to-image
■
Check image
■
Check disk
■
CRC32
■
CRC32 verify
You can restore an image of a dynamic disk only to a basic disk, not to a dynamic
disk. After you have restored the image file to a basic disk, you can then use
Windows 2000 Disk Manager to convert the disk to a dynamic disk.
To delete a dynamic disk, use GDisk. Use the switch gdisk /mbr /wipe to delete all
partitions from the disk. This method destroys all data on the disk.
See “About GDisk” on page 423.
See “Command-line switches” on page 468.
You can also take a disk image of a dynamic disk if you use the image all (-ia)
switch. The -ia switch performs a sector-by-sector copy of the entire disk. The
disk on which the image is to be restored must be identical to the source disk in
every way. This function is only useful for creating a backup. If you restore an
image created using -ia onto a drive with different geometry, Windows cannot
interpret the dynamic disk.
If you restore an -ia disk image of a dynamic disk onto a SCSI hard drive and you
receive a Destination drive too small message, you must load the ASPI driver for
the SCSI card. Without an ASPI driver, Symantec Ghost does not always detect
the correct size of the SCSI drive and cannot determine whether the drive is large
enough to hold the image.
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Support for Disk Drive Overlays (DDO)
Note: Use the -ia switch with caution because it is slow and the image file would
be very large.
Support for Disk Drive Overlays (DDO)
Symantec Ghost supports DDO as follows:
■
Backing up or cloning a disk with a DDO creates an image file that does not
include the DDO.
■
Restoring an image onto a disk with a DDO leaves the DDO intact.
■
Use the -ib switch to include the DDO in the backup or clone.
■
Restoring the image file created replaces the existing DDO with the DDO
included in the image.
■
A GDisk disk wipe overwrites a DDO.
See “Deleting and wiping your disk” on page 434.
Hibernation and swap files
When Symantec Ghost creates image files or clones, it does not include hibernation
and swap files. These files are valid only for one Windows session, and when they
are included in an image file, they make it significantly larger.
Symantec Ghost implements file skipping differently for each of the following
file systems:
■
FAT file systems: Files are not included on the image file or destination disk.
■
NTFS file systems: A file with the same name is created on the image file or
destination disk, but the contents of the file are not copied.
The following files are skipped on all file systems:
■
386Spart.par
■
Amizvsus.pmf
■
Dos data.sf
■
Ghost.dta
■
Hiberfil.sys
■
Hibrn8.dat
■
Hybern8
■
Navsysl.dat
309
310
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Backing up or migrating a server
■
Navsysr.dat
■
Pagefile.sys
■
Pm_hiber.bin
■
Save2dsk.bin
■
Saveto.dsk
■
Spart.par
■
Swapper.dat
■
Toshiber.dat
■
Virtpart.dat
■
Win386.swp
Backing up or migrating a server
You can use Symantec Ghost to back up or migrate a server. However, it is not
recommended that you use Symantec Ghost to roll out an image of a server to
multiple computers.
If you are rolling out an image of a server you must resolve Security Identifier
(SID) and configuration issues.
Resolving SID and configuration issues
If you are backing up a server then you do not need to change the SID and the
operation should be successful if the computer’s hardware is not changed after
the backup has been made. If the hardware is changed then the computer might
not start after the backup is restored.
If you are migrating a server then you do not need to change the SID and the
operation should be successful if the hardware is identical on the source and
destination hard drives or computers.
You can clone a server if the source and destination servers log on to two totally
different networks and the two servers cannot see each other on the network. The
source and destination computers must have identical hardware. In addition to
SID considerations, Windows maintains many configuration settings that are
unique to each server. For example, the choice of Domain Name Service (DNS) or
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) might affect whether a server can
start, or if that computer can log on to a particular network or be recognized on
the network. Symantec Ghost does not automatically configure such settings.
These configuration settings must be manually changed.
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Backing up or migrating a server
For more information, consult your Windows and networking documentation.
311
312
Symantec Ghost support for image files and disks
Backing up or migrating a server
Chapter
14
Modifying image file
contents with Ghost
Explorer
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Using Ghost Explorer
■
Viewing image files and their properties
■
Launching a file
■
Extracting a file or directory from an image file
■
Modifying image files
■
Listing the contents of an image file
■
About image file spans
■
Setting the default split options
■
Compiling an image file
■
Using Ghost Explorer from the command line
Using Ghost Explorer
The Ghost Explorer utility lets you view, alter, add, and extract files from an image
file.
Using Ghost Explorer, you can do the following:
■
View image file contents and save a list of files within an image file.
314
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Viewing image files and their properties
■
Extract files or directories from an image file.
■
Add, move, copy, delete, and launch files from and within an image file.
■
Use drag-and-drop or cut-and-paste functionality to add files and directories
from Windows Explorer to the image file.
■
Set span sizes.
■
Add a description to an image file.
■
Compile an image file to improve restore performance.
Ghost Explorer supports the following partition types:
■
FAT12
■
FAT16
■
FAT32
■
NTFS
■
Linux Ext2/3
To open Ghost Explorer
◆
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > All Programs > Symantec Ghost >
Ghost Explorer.
To access a list of file commands
◆
Right-click a file or directory in Ghost Explorer to access a list of file
commands.
Viewing image files and their properties
You can view the contents of an image file, including details of the partitions,
directories, and files. You can also view the image file properties.
If the image file contains NTFS partitions that are stored on a CD you might receive
frequent prompts to swap CDs when you try to view the image file. To avoid this
problem, copy the spans from the CD onto a hard disk and then view the image
file on the hard disk.
To view an image file and the properties
1
Open Ghost Explorer.
See “To open Ghost Explorer” on page 314.
2
On the File menu, click Open.
3
Select an image file.
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Launching a file
4
Click Open.
5
On the File menu, click Properties to view the image file properties.
Launching a file
Ghost Explorer restores a file to a temporary directory and attempts to open it.
If the file is an executable program, it is run. If it is a data file and there is an
application installed and associated with this file type, the application opens with
the data file.
If you try to launch an application that depends on other files within the image
file, it will probably fail. Ghost Explorer does not determine what dependencies
exist. Extract the required files and then run the application file.
To launch a file
1
In Ghost Explorer, in the right pane, select a file.
2
On the File menu, click Launch.
Extracting a file or directory from an image file
You can extract a file or directory directly from an image file using Ghost Explorer.
This does not delete the original file, but copies it to a new location.
Note: You can also use a drag-and-drop operation to move a file from Ghost
Explorer to Windows Explorer to extract it.
To extract a file or directory from an image file
1
In Ghost Explorer, open the image file.
2
Select the file or directory to be extracted.
3
On the File menu, click Extract.
4
In the Extract To dialog box, select the location to which you want to extract
the file or directory.
5
Click Extract to save the file or directory to the chosen location.
Modifying image files
Whether you can add, delete, or view an image file, or move files within an image
file, depends on the version of Symantec Ghost that was used to create the image
315
316
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Listing the contents of an image file
file. You can check the version of Symantec Ghost used to create your image file
in the image file properties. Ghost Explorer cannot open a file created with a
version of Symantec Ghost earlier than 3.0.
You can use Ghost Explorer to add files or directories from Windows Explorer to
any image file that was created in Symantec Ghost version 6.0 or later. You can
also delete files from any image file that was created in Symantec Ghost 5.1d or
later. If you add a file or directory to an image file the original span split is
preserved.
See “Viewing image files and their properties” on page 314.
Ghost Explorer supports Windows cut-and-paste operations within image files.
For example, you can copy, paste, move, delete, and add files to images. You can
also use a drag-and-drop operation to move files from Windows Explorer to Ghost
Explorer.
To avoid problems, you should avoid making the following types of changes to an
image file:
■
Do not add files to the root folder of Linux Ext2/3 partitions. If you add files,
the new files are not visible when you restore the image, and the e2fsck tool
reports errors.
■
Do not add files to the root folder of a Ghost boot-partition image that contains
PC DOS. A computer that is cloned from this image does not start.
Warning: If you use Ghost Explorer to add files to an image file, there may be some
performance degradation when you restore the file using GhostCasting. Ghost
Explorer calculates whether compilation is recommended. If it is, you can compile
the file to improve performance.
See “Compiling an image file” on page 318.
Listing the contents of an image file
You can create a text file that contains a list of the directories and their details
(and, optionally, files) that are in the current image file. You can store this file
with the image file to keep an easily accessible list of the image file contents.
To list the contents of an image file
1
In Ghost Explorer, open the image file.
2
On the File menu, click List Contents.
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
About image file spans
3
Click one of the following:
Directories Only
List the directories only
Include Files
List the directories and the files
Include Details
List directories, files, and file details
4
Select a directory to which to save the text file.
5
Type a file name.
6
Click Save.
About image file spans
You can split an existing image file into smaller spans. This function is useful if,
for example, you need to split a file into two or more files that can then be saved
onto a CD/DVD drive that is unsupported by Symantec Ghost. After you split an
image file you must compile it.
See “Compiling an image file” on page 318.
Note: If the CD/DVD drive is supported by Symantec Ghost, then as you create
the image file you can save the image file directly to the CD/DVD.
Setting the default split options
Once this option is set, it becomes the default for all regenerated files.
To set the default split options
1
In Ghost Explorer, on the View menu, click Options.
2
In the Options dialog box, check Span Image.
3
In the Split point (MB) box, type the required size.
If you are splitting the file to save onto CD, then set the size to 600 MB.
4
If you want Ghost Explorer to choose a default name for additional span files
that it creates, click Autoname Spans.
5
Click OK.
317
318
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Compiling an image file
Compiling an image file
If you add or delete files from an image file, the image file becomes fragmented.
Symantec Ghost takes longer to restore a fragmented image than a compiled file.
You can improve the performance of a restore by compiling a file before you
restore it. When you compile a file, the file is defragmented. If you want to split
an existing image, then you must compile it to span the image file.
You can check the properties of the image file to determine whether compilation
is recommended.
To compile an image file
1
On the File menu, click Compile.
2
If you want to span the image file, in the Save As dialog box, check Span
Image, and then in the Split point (MB) box, type the required size.
If you are splitting the file to save it on a CD, then set the size to 600 MB.
3
If you want Ghost Explorer to choose a default name for any additional span
files that it creates, click Autoname Spans.
4
In the File name box, type a name and a location for the first new file.
If you are splitting a file, all of the new files that are created are saved in the
same location. You should use a different name than the original image file
to avoid confusion.
5
Click Save.
6
If you are splitting the file, click OK each time that you are prompted to create
a new span segment.
Using Ghost Explorer from the command line
You can start Ghost Explorer from a command prompt by typing its path and file
name.
To start Ghost Explorer from a command prompt
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Accessories > Command
Prompt.
2
Type:
c:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Ghostexp
This is the default path to Ghost Explorer.
3
Press Enter.
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Using Ghost Explorer from the command line
Ghost Explorer has a batch mode in which it carries out a single command and
then exits. In this version, batch mode supports the saving of the contents to a
text file only.
Table 14-1 specifies the switches to use the batch mode.
Table 14-1
Batch mode switches
Switch
Description
-t
Saves the list of directories in the dump file to a file with
the same name as the image file but with an extension of
.txt
-tf=filename
Saves a list of directories and files to filename
-tv
Saves a verbose listing of directories and files
-tv=filename
Saves a verbose list of directories and files to the file
specified
See “Listing the contents of an image file” on page 316.
If Ghost Explorer reports that a spanned or split image is corrupt without
prompting for the second part of the image, it may not recognize that the image
is split. Starting with the -split argument forces Ghost Explorer to treat an image
as a split image.
Using Ghost Explorer with long file names
The image index created by versions of Symantec Ghost prior to 5.1c did not
handle long file names containing double-byte characters correctly, such as file
names in Asian or Eastern European languages. Ghost Explorer may be able to
show these names properly by reading them directly from the image file instead
of from the index. However, the restoring of the image is much slower. Use the
switch -ignoreindex to force this behavior. You must have the correct char set
loaded.
To set the correct char set
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Settings > Control Panel.
2
Double-click Regional Options.
3
Select the required language option, and then click OK.
319
320
Modifying image file contents with Ghost Explorer
Using Ghost Explorer from the command line
Section
Using Symantec Ghost
locally
■
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
■
Post-clone configuration (stand-alone)
4
322
Chapter
15
Using Symantec Ghost as a
stand-alone program
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Ghost.exe
■
Using Ghost.exe on a stand-alone computer
■
Starting Ghost.exe
■
Using Ghost.exe with a mapped network drive
■
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
■
Creating a backup image file
■
Restoring from an image file
■
Cloning disks and partitions
■
Verifying integrity
■
Adding switches to your Ghost.exe operation
■
Running Ghost32.exe in Windows
About Ghost.exe
Ghost.exe is a stand-alone program run within DOS that lets you copy disks or
partitions from one computer to another. You can use Ghost to create image files
and restore them.
324
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Using Ghost.exe on a stand-alone computer
Using Ghost.exe on a stand-alone computer
The following is an overview of how to start and run Ghost.exe.
Note: Ghost.exe does not fit on a single floppy disk. Ghost.exe is concatenated on
a RAM drive in DOS and executed from the RAM drive. The concatenation is
transparent.
To use Ghost.exe on a stand-alone computer
1
Start Ghost.exe.
See “Starting Ghost.exe” on page 325.
Add command-line switches, if necessary.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
2
If necessary, establish a peer-to-peer connection.
See “Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe” on page 326.
3
4
5
Select the Ghost.exe operation:
■
Disk or partition to image file
■
Disk or partition from image file
■
Disk to disk
■
Partition to partition
■
Check image or disk
Do one of the following:
■
Select the source hard disk or partitions.
■
Select the image file.
Do one of the following for operations other than checking an image:
■
Select the destination hard disk or partition.
■
Select the image file.
Warning: Make sure that you select the correct destination. The destination
disk is completely overwritten with no chance of recovering any data.
6
Complete the Ghost.exe operation.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Starting Ghost.exe
Starting Ghost.exe
Ghost.exe is a DOS-based application that runs in DOS mode outside of Windows.
You cannot run Ghost.exe within Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/Me/98, Linux,
OS/2, or other non-DOS operating systems. You can run Ghost.exe on a non-DOS
operating system by using a Ghost boot package. The Ghost boot package lets you
start the computer in DOS.
See “About Ghost boot packages” on page 254.
To start Ghost.exe
◆
Do one of the following:
Start the computer in
DOS mode.
At the DOS prompt, type the following command:
progra~1\symantec \ghost\ghost.exe
Use a DOS boot disk to After the first DOS boot disk loads you are prompted to insert
start the computer.
the second Ghost boot disk. Ghost starts automatically.
You can create a DOS boot disk on a computer that is running
Windows or DOS. Additional DOS drivers might be required
to runGhost.exe. If you cannot access some hardware or
network resources, such as a CD-R/RW drive, you can use
the Ghost Boot Wizard to create a boot disk that contains the
necessary drivers.
See “About Ghost boot packages” on page 254.
Use a DOS boot
package to start the
computer.
When the computer starts Ghost starts automatically.
You can use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create a DOS boot
package.
See “About Ghost boot packages” on page 254.
Using Ghost.exe with a mapped network drive
When you access a mapped network drive you must be aware of the following:
■
You must use a mapped network boot package created from the Ghost Boot
Wizard.
See “Creating a boot package that supports mapped network drives” on page 265.
■
If the boot package contains Ghost.exe then you cannot save the package to a
floppy disk set. You can save the package to a USB flash drive or an ISO image.
325
326
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
■
If you run Ghost.exe from any location other than A: then you must reset the
environment variable to the correct location of Wattcp.cfg before you start
Ghost.
See “About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file” on page 539.
■
DOS drivers cannot handle large files over a mapped network drive. Therefore,
Ghost sets a 2 GB split limit when writing to a mapped network drive. Before
you access a large image file over a mapped network drive you should split the
image file into spans that are no greater than 2 GB.
See “About image file spans” on page 317.
If you have restarted the computer with a boot package that does not contain
Ghost. exe then the computer restarts to a command prompt, for example D:\.
You must reset the Wattcp environment variable to D:\net\wattcp.cfg. You can
then start Ghost.exe from the mapped network drive.
If you have restarted the computer with a boot package that contains Ghost.exe
then Ghost starts after the computer has restarted. If GhostCasting or peer-to-peer
services are not available from the menu then ensure that Ghost is reading a
Wattcp.cfg that has SHARE_MODE=1. Exit Ghost and then at the command prompt,
reset the Wattcp environment variable. For example, if you are at the command
prompt D:\, then reset the Wattcp environment variable to D:\net\wattcp.cfg,
ensuring that D:\net\wattcp.cfg has SHARE_MODE=1. You can then restart Ghost
from either D:\ or from a mapped network drive.
To reset the environment variable to the correct location of Wattcp.cfg
1
On the command line, type the following:
set wattcp=<drive>\net\wattcp.cfg
2
Press Enter.
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
If you are using an LPT, USB, or TCP peer-to-peer connection, then you must set
up the connection between computers before a clone, backup, or restore operation.
The computers must be physically connected using one of the following:
LPT
A parallel connection cable
USB
A USB 1.1 cable
See “Parallel Technologies cables” on page 537.
TCP peer-to-peer
A network connection
See “TCP/IP connections” on page 532.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
In a peer-to-peer operation, one computer is designated the master computer,
and the other is designated the slave computer.
Table 15-1 describes the possible Ghost.exe processes and the master/slave
relationships that exist within these processes.
Table 15-1
Master and slave computers
Action
Master
Slave
Disk-to-disk clone
Computer containing
source disk
Computer containing
destination disk
Back up disk to image file
Computer containing
source disk
Computer receiving
destination image file
Restore disk from image file
Computer containing
destination disk
Computer containing
source image file
Partition-to-partition clone
Computer containing
source partition
Computer containing
destination partition
Back up partition to image file
Computer containing
source partition
Computer receiving
destination image file
Restore partition from image file
Computer containing
destination partition
Computer containing
source image file
Select which computer is the master (the computer from which you control the
connection) and which is the slave (the other computer participating in the
connection). All operator input must occur on the master computer.
You must have two Ghost boot packages with which to start both the master and
slave computers. You can create the boot packages using the Ghost Boot Wizard.
See “About Ghost boot packages” on page 254.
Note: You must create both boot packages in the same version of Symantec Ghost.
You cannot use one boot disk that was created in Symantec Ghost 8.0 and one
boot disk that was created in Symantec Ghost 11.0 in the same task.
To establish a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
1
Do one of the following:
■
On the master computer, insert the first Ghost boot disk into the floppy
disk drive, and then restart the computer.
Repeat this step on the slave computer.
327
328
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Establishing a peer-to-peer connection with Ghost.exe
■
2
Restart the master computer and the slave computer by using the Ghost
boot package.
If you are using a floppy disk set, then, when prompted, insert the second
Ghost boot disk into the floppy disk drives of the master computer and the
slave computer.
Ghost.exe starts automatically.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Creating a backup image file
3
On the slave computer, on the main menu, do one of the following:
USB connection
Click Peer to peer > USB > Slave to start the computer
as the slave computer.
LPT connection
Click Peer to peer > LPT > Slave to start the computer
as the slave computer.
TCP/IP connection
Click Peer to peer > TCP/IP > Slave to start the
computer as the slave computer.
Make note of the IP address that is displayed in the
Slave Connect dialog box.
4
On the master computer, on the main menu, do one of the following:
USB connection
Click Peer to peer > USB > Master to start the computer
as the master computer.
LPT connection
Click Peer to peer > LPT > Master to start the computer
as the master computer.
TCP/IP connection
Click Peer to peer > TCP/IP > Master to start the
computer as the master computer.
Type the IP address that is displayed on the slave
computer.
About splitting images in a peer-to-peer operation
When you perform a peer-to-peer operation, an image is split when it reaches 2
GB in size unless you have set the split size to another value using the -split
command switch. If this switch is explicitly set to 0, the image does not split.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Creating a backup image file
You can create a backup of a hard disk or one or more partitions.
The backup is saved as an image file, which you can store on the following:
■
Second hard disk
■
Second partition on your hard disk (partition backup only)
■
LS120 Superdisk, JAZ, or ZIP disk
329
330
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Creating a backup image file
■
CD-R/RW or DVD-R/RW/+R/+RW
See “Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive” on page 297.
■
FireWire hard disk
■
USB 1.1/2.0 hard disk
■
Tape
■
Locally mapped network file server
■
Another computer using a peer-to-peer connection
Compression may affect the speed of your operation. When you select a
compression level, Ghost.exe estimates the amount of space available for the
destination image file. If there is insufficient space, Ghost.exe prompts you to
enable spanning of image files.
Backing up a hard disk to an image file
When you back up a hard disk, a copy of the entire disk is saved as an image file.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Creating a backup image file
To back up a disk to an image file
1
2
On the Ghost.exe main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Disk > To Image.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Disk > To Image.
In the Source Drive dialog box, select the source disk.
The Source Drive dialog box shows details of every disk that Ghost.exe finds
on the local computer.
3
In the File Locator dialog box, type the image file destination and name.
4
In the Image file description dialog box, type a description of the image file.
You can modify this description on the Console or in Ghost Explorer.
5
Click Save.
6
When you are prompted to select the compression level, select one of the
following:
No
For no compression
Fast
For low compression
High
For high compression
See “Image files and compression” on page 302.
331
332
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Creating a backup image file
7
In the Compress Image dialog box, select a compression option.
8
If Ghost detects that there is not enough space for the image file, you are
prompted to enable spanning.
9
Check the details and ensure that the correct options are selected.
10 Do one of the following:
To proceed with the image file Click Yes.
creation
The system performs an integrity check of the file
structure on the source disk. The source disk is then
copied to the destination image file.
If you need to cancel the process, press Ctrl+C, but
be aware that this action leaves the destination image
file in an unknown state.
To return to the menu
Click No.
11 If spanning is required, do one of the following:
■
Insert the next media, then click OK.
■
Click Browse, then select the location of the next span of the image file.
See “Image files and volume spanning” on page 303.
12 Verify the integrity of the image file.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
Backing up a partition to an image file
You can create an image file from one or more partitions to use as a backup or to
clone onto another partition or disk.
To back up a partition to an image file
1
2
On the main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Partition > To Image.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Partition > To Image.
In the Source Drive dialog box, select the source drive.
The Source Drive dialog box contains the details of every disk that Ghost.exe
finds on the local computer.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Creating a backup image file
3
In the Source Partition dialog box, select the source partitions to include in
the destination image file.
The Source Partition dialog box contains the details of all the partitions on
the selected source disk. You can select multiple partitions.
4
Click OK.
5
In the File Locator dialog box, select the image file destination and name.
6
In the Image file description box, type a description of the image file.
7
Click Save.
8
When you are prompted to select the compression level, select one of the
following:
No
For no compression.
Fast
For low compression.
High
For high compression.
See “Image files and compression” on page 302.
9
In the Compress Image dialog box, select a compression option.
10 If Ghost detects that there is not enough space for the image file, you are
prompted to enable spanning.
11 In the Proceed with partition image creation? dialog box, do one of the
following:
To proceed with the image file Click Yes.
creation
The system performs an integrity check of the file
structure on the source partitions. The source
partitions are then copied to the destination image
file.
If you need to cancel the process, press Ctrl+C, but
be aware that this action leaves the destination image
file in an unknown state.
To return to the menu
Click No.
12 If spanning is required, do one of the following:
■
Insert the next media, then click OK.
■
Click Browse, then select the location of the next span of the image file.
333
334
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Restoring from an image file
See “Image files and volume spanning” on page 303.
13 Verify the integrity of the image file when it has been created.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
Restoring from an image file
You can restore a hard disk or a partition.
The restore is made from a previously created image file that is stored on one of
the following:
■
Second hard disk
■
Second partition on your hard disk
■
LS120 Superdisk, JAZ, or ZIP disk
■
CD-R/RW or DVD-R/RW/+R/+RW
See “Saving an image file directly to a CD/DVD drive” on page 297.
■
FireWire hard disk
■
USB 1.1/2.0 hard disk
■
Tape
■
Mapped network drive
■
Drive on another computer (peer-to-peer)
■
Drive or partition being restored
Restoring a hard disk from an image file
When you restore a hard disk, it is overwritten by the contents of the image file.
To restore a disk from an image file
1
2
On the main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Disk > From Image.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Disk > From Image.
In the File Locator dialog box, do one of the following:
■
Type the path and file name of the image file.
■
Click Browse to locate the image file.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Restoring from an image file
Specify the drive or device and select the full path name. The image file
may reside on a local drive or on a locally mapped network file server.
When using a peer-to-peer connection, the image file is located on the
slave computer.
3
Press Enter.
4
In the Destination Drive dialog box, select the destination disk.
Choose carefully as this is the disk that will be overwritten.
The Destination Drive dialog box shows the details of every drive that
Ghost.exe finds on the local computer.
5
In the Destination Drive Details dialog box, confirm or change the destination
disk partition layout.
The Destination Drive Details dialog box shows a suggested partition layout
for the destination disk. By default, Ghost.exe tries to maintain the same size
ratio between new disk partitions.
You can change the size of any target FAT, NTFS, or Linux Ext2/3 partition
by entering the new size in megabytes.
You cannot enter a value that exceeds the available space, is beyond the file
system's limitations, or is not large enough to contain the data held in the
source image.
Warning: The Destination Drive Details dialog box shows a suggested partition
layout for the destination drive once the cloning process is completed. This
partition layout may mirror the source drive layout. Therefore, the destination
drive details appear similar to the source drive.
6
Click OK.
335
336
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Restoring from an image file
7
Do one of the following:
To proceed with the disk
cloning.
Click Yes.
To return to the menu.
Click No.
Ghost.exe creates the destination disk using the
source image file disk details. If you need to abort
the process, press Ctrl+C, but be aware that this
leaves the destination disk in an unknown state.
Warning: Only click Yes if you are sure that you want to proceed. The
destination disk is completely overwritten with no chance of recovering any
data.
8
9
If prompted to insert an image span, when prompted, do one of the following:
■
Insert the next media, then click OK to continue.
■
Click Browse to restore from a different location, then type the location
and file name of the image file span.
Restart the computer when the disk image restore is complete.
10 Verify the integrity of the destination disk.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
You can also run Symantec Disk Doctor, Chkdsk, ScanDisk, or a similar utility
to verify the integrity of the destination disk.
Restoring a partition from an image file
When you restore a partition, it is overwritten by the data from an image file.
To restore a partition from an image file
1
2
On the main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Partition > From Image.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Partition > From Image.
In the File Locator dialog box, do one of the following:
■
Type the path and file name of the image file.
■
Click Browse to locate the image file.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Restoring from an image file
Specify the drive or device and select the full path name. The image file
may reside on a local drive or on a locally mapped network file server.
When using a peer-to-peer connection, the image file is located on the
slave computer.
3
Press Enter.
4
In the Source Partition dialog box, select the source partition from the image
file.
The Source Partition dialog box contains the details of all of the partitions
in the image file.
5
In the Destination Drive dialog box, select the destination disk.
The Destination Drive dialog box contains the details of every disk that
Ghost.exe finds on the local computer.
6
In the Destination Partition dialog box, select the destination partition.
Select an existing partition carefully as this is the partition that will be
overwritten.
The Destination Partition dialog box contains the details of all of the partitions
on the selected destination disk. You can create a new partition if space is
available. If you create a new partition, it can be resized during the cloning
operation.
7
In the Proceed with partition restore? dialog box, do one of the following:
To proceed with the partition
cloning.
Click Yes.
To return to the menu.
Click No.
Ghost.exe overwrites the destination partition using
the partition details contained in the image file. If
you need to abort the process, press Ctrl+C, but be
aware that this leaves the destination partition in an
unknown state.
Warning: Only click Yes if you are sure that you want to proceed. The
destination partition is completely overwritten with no chance of recovering
any data.
8
If prompted to insert an image span, when prompted, do one of the following:
■
Insert the next media, then click OK to continue.
337
338
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Cloning disks and partitions
■
9
Click Browse to restore from a different location, then type the location
and file name of the image file span.
Restart the destination computer when the partition copy is complete.
10 Verify the integrity of the destination partition.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
You can also run Symantec Disk Doctor, Chkdsk, ScanDisk, or a similar utility
to verify the integrity of the destination partition.
Cloning disks and partitions
By default, Ghost.exe tries to maintain the same size ratio between new disk
partitions. However, you should note the following:
■
You can change the size of any destination FAT, NTFS, or Linux Ext2/3 partition
by entering the new size in megabytes.
■
You cannot enter a value that exceeds the available space, is beyond the file
system's limitations, or that is not large enough to contain the data held in
the source partition.
Cloning disk to disk
When you clone disk to disk, Ghost.exe copies the contents of one hard disk onto
another.
To clone disk to disk
1
2
On the Ghost.exe main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Disk > To Disk.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Disk > To Disk.
In the Source Drive dialog box, select the source disk.
The Source Drive dialog box shows the details of every disk that Ghost.exe
finds on the local computer.
3
In the Destination Drive dialog box, select the destination disk.
Choose carefully as this is the disk that will be overwritten.
If a peer-to-peer connection method is used, the destination disk can be any
of the slave computer's disks. However, if this is a local disk-to-disk copy,
then the source disk is unavailable for selection.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Cloning disks and partitions
4
Confirm the destination disk layout.
Warning: The Destination Drive Details dialog box shows a suggested partition
layout for the destination drive once the cloning process is completed. This
partition layout may mirror the source drive layout. Therefore, the destination
drive details appear similar to the source drive.
5
Click OK.
6
When the “Proceed with disk clone?” prompt appears, do one of the following:
To proceed with the disk
cloning.
Click Yes.
To return to the menu.
Click No.
The system performs an integrity check of the file
structure on the source disk, and then copies the
source disk to the destination. If you need to abort
the process, press Ctrl+C, but be aware that this
leaves the destination disk in an unknown state.
Warning: Only click Yes if you are sure that you want to proceed. The
destination disk is overwritten with no chance of recovering any data.
7
Restart the computer.
Warning: You should remove one of the hard disks before you restart your
computer. If you leave two hard disks in the computer, damage can occur to
both of the bootable operating systems.
8
Verify the integrity of the destination disk.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
You can also run Symantec Disk Doctor, Chkdsk, ScanDisk, or a similar utility
to verify the integrity of the destination disk.
Cloning partition to partition
When you clone partition to partition, Ghost.exe copies the contents of one
partition onto another.
339
340
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Cloning disks and partitions
To clone from partition to partition
1
2
On the main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Partition > To Partition.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Partition >To Partition.
In the Source Drive dialog box, select the source disk.
The Source Drive dialog box shows details of every disk that Ghost.exe finds
on the local computer.
3
In the Source Partition dialog box, select the source partition.
The Source Partition dialog box shows the details of all of the partitions on
the selected source disk.
4
In the Destination Drive dialog box, select the destination disk.
The Destination Drive dialog box shows the details of every disk that Ghost.exe
finds on the destination computer. For peer-to-peer connections, the slave
computer is the destination.
5
In the Destination Partition dialog box, select the destination partition.
Select an existing partition carefully as this is the partition that is overwritten.
The Destination Partition dialog box shows the details of all of the partitions
on the selected destination disk. If this is a local partition-to-partition copy,
then the source partition is unavailable for selection. However, you can create
a new partition if space is available. If you create a new partition, it can be
resized during the cloning operation.
6
Click OK.
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Verifying integrity
7
When the final Proceed with Partition Copy? prompt appears, do one of the
following:
To proceed with the partition
copy.
Click Yes.
To return to the menu.
Click No.
If you need to abort the process, press Ctrl+C, but
be aware that this leaves the destination disk in an
unknown state.
Warning: Only click Yes if you are sure that you want to proceed. The
destination partition is completely overwritten with no chance of recovering
any data. This is the last chance to back out.
8
Restart the destination computer when the partition copy is complete.
9
Verify the integrity of the destination partition.
See “Verifying integrity” on page 341.
You can also run Symantec Disk Doctor, Chkdsk, ScanDisk, or a similar utility
to verify the integrity of the destination partition.
Verifying integrity
After a backup, restore, or clone operation, check the integrity of the partition,
hard disk, or image file.
To verify the integrity of an image file
◆
On the computer on which the image file is saved, on the main menu, do one
of the following:
Local
Click Local > Check > Image File
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Check > Image File.
341
342
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Adding switches to your Ghost.exe operation
To verify the integrity of a disk
1
On the main menu, do one of the following:
Local
Click Local > Check > Disk.
Peer-to-peer connection
Click Check > Disk.
2
Select the source disk to verify.
3
Click OK.
4
Click Yes to start the disk check.
Adding switches to your Ghost.exe operation
You can include a number of options (or switches) that can also be entered using
the command line. These switches are set in the Ghost.exe user interface as follows:
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Running Ghost32.exe in Windows
To add switches to your Ghost.exe operation
1
On the main menu, click Options.
2
Select from the following the options to include in your current cloning task.
Span/CRC
-span, -auto, -cns, -crcignore, -fcr
FAT 32/64
-f32,-f64, -fatlimit
Misc
-sure, -fro, -rb, -fx
Image/Tape
-ia, -ib, -id
-tapeeject, -tapesafe, -tapeunbuffered,
-tapebuffered
Security
-pwd, -locktype=type
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
3
On the Save Settings tab, click Save Settings to confirm the list of active
switches listed.
4
Click Accept to include the settings in the current task.
Running Ghost32.exe in Windows
Ghost32.exe is a Win32 version of Ghost.exe. It is designed to run on Microsoft
Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98. You can use Ghost32.exe to perform most Ghost
operations on hard drives that are accessible from these operating systems. The
hard drives must be able to communicate with the GhostCast Server.
If you run Ghost32.exe in Windows, note the following information:
■
The partition on which Windows is installed cannot be overwritten.
■
In Windows 98/Me, if you overwrite a disk or partition, you might have to
restart the computer. In Windows XP/2003 Server, you should not have to
restart the computer. In Windows NT/2000, you must restart the computer if
you are overwriting a disk.
■
Hard-disk sizes might appear smaller than their actual sizes. Ghost32.exe can
only access the shown destination size. The remaining space is not used.
■
Ghost32.exe does not support mount-point volumes on Windows
Vista/XP/2000/NT computers.
Before executing Ghost32 on Windows 9x-based computers, ensure that the
following files are in the same directory as Ghost32.exe:
343
344
Using Symantec Ghost as a stand-alone program
Running Ghost32.exe in Windows
■
Int86_32.dll
■
Int86_16.dll
You can find these files in the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite folder.
To run Ghost32 in Microsoft Vista, you must run the command prompt as an
administrator.
To run the command prompt as an administrator
1
On the taskbar, click Start > All Programs > Accessories, right-click
Command Prompt and click Run as administrator.
2
In the User Account Control dialog box, type the administrator credentials.
3
Click OK.
Compatibility with Ghost.exe
Ghost32.exe shares the following functions with Ghost.exe:
■
Both Ghost.exe and Ghost32.exe can be a master or slave in a TCP/IP
peer-to-peer operation.
■
Image files that are created with Ghost.exe and Ghost32.exe are
interchangeable.
Ghost32.exe differs from Ghost.exe in the following ways:
■
You can run Ghost32.exe in Microsoft Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98.
■
LPT peer-to-peer is not supported.
■
USB peer-to-peer is not supported.
■
You cannot use Ghost32.exe with a disk or partition that has files open during
the operation.
For example, the system partition.
■
When writing to CD/DVD, Ghost32.exe is not copied onto the CD/DVD.
Chapter
16
Post-clone configuration
(stand-alone)
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About performing applying post-clone configuration changes from the
command-line
■
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line
About performing applying post-clone configuration
changes from the command-line
GhConfig is a executable program that lets you create configuration data files.
You can use the configuration data files to apply configuration settings to a cloned
computer. You can apply the configuration settings from the command-line
without using the Console.
The versions of GhConfig are as follows:
■
GhConfig.exe: Runs in DOS
■
GhConfig32.exe: Runs in Windows PE
The differences between the GhConfig tool and the post-clone configuration
features that are available from the Ghost Console are as follows:
■
The GhConfig tool lets you add Microsoft Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT
computers to a domain. However, you must create the computer account in
the domain before adding the computer to the domain. For the computer
account to work, you must first add the security permissions for the Windows
2000/XP native mode, domain controllers in active directory.
346
Post-clone configuration (stand-alone)
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line
■
You can configure GhConfig to run one time. This option is available on
stand-alone computer installations only. It prevents GhConfig from running
on that computer after it runs the first time. To use GhConfig again on that
computer, you must uninstall and reinstall GhConfig.
Applying a post-clone configuration from the
command-line
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line involves the following
steps:
■
If you want to add the computer to a domain, then install the Configuration
client on the computer.
The Configuration client installation installs the GhConfig executable program
and a simplified version of the Console client on the computer.
See “Installing the Configuration Client Stand-alone” on page 62.
■
Create a configuration data file, which contains a set of configuration settings..
■
Run GhConfig to apply the configuration data files to the target computer.
■
Restart the computer.
Creating a configuration data file
You can create a configuration data file using the GhConfig keywords. You can
also export a configuration data file from the Ghost Console for a client computer.
See “Creating a new configuration set” on page 104.
The configuration data file that you create must meet the following requirements:
■
It must follow a pre-defined format, which consists of a command keyword
that is followed by a value, repeated.
■
Each configuration data file must begin with the keyword CONFIG_COMMANDS
and end with the keyword END_CONFIG_COMMANDS.
■
The data files must be named either Ghregupd.reg or Gvpcfg.bin.
The following text provides an example of the contents of a configuration data
file:
CONFIG_COMMANDS COMPUTERNAME = "MY_COMPUTER" "MY_COMPUTER"
COMPUTERDESCRIPTION = “This is my demonstration computer” “This is my
demonstration computer” WORKGROUP = “DEMONSTRATION”
“DEMONSTRATION” END_CONFIG_COMMANDS
Post-clone configuration (stand-alone)
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line
Table 16-1 lists the command keywords that you can use to build the configuration
data file.
Table 16-1
Configuration data file keyword commands
Keyword
Description
COMPUTERNAME
The name of the computer
COMPUTERDESCRIPTION
A description of the computer
DOMAINNAME
The name of the domain to which the computer
belongs
DOMAINLOGIN
For Windows 98 computers, a number value that
defines whether the computer should log on to
the domain.
The DOMAINLOGIN values are as follows:
■
1: Yes
■
0: No
DNSHOST
The name of the DNS host
DNSDOMAIN
The name of the DNS domain
DNSSERVER
The IP address of the DNS server
DEFAULTUSER
The default user name
DEFAULTGATEWAY
The IP address of the default gateway
IPADDRESS
The IP address of the computer
SUBNETMASK
The subnet mask
WORKGROUP
The workgroup to which the computer belongs
WINSSERVER
The IP address WINS server
NOVELLUSERNAME
The Novell user name
NOVELLTREE
The NetWare tree
NOVELLCONTEXT
The NetWare context
NOVELLPREFERREDSERVER
The name of the Novell NetWare preferred server
347
348
Post-clone configuration (stand-alone)
Applying a post-clone configuration from the command-line
Applying the configuration data file
You can apply the settings defined in the configuration data file by running the
GhConfig executable program. Before you run GhConfig, you should verify that
the operating system that you want to configure is not running If you want to join
a computer to a domain, then the stand-alone client must be installed after you
start Windows.
Table 16-2 lists the modes that are available with GhConfig and Ghconfig32.
Table 16-2
GhConfig switches
Switch
Description
windows
Displays information about the Windows installations that
are available. You can use this information with the /w
switch.
[nics]
Displays information about the network cards that are
available in the specified Windows installation.
[/w=windows_dir]
[/c=config_dir]
Applies a configuration file to a Windows installation as
follows:
windows_dir is the path to the Windows folder.
If you do not specify a path, then GhConfig attempts to
locate the active Windows installation and requests
confirmation of the installation.
■ config_dir is the folder in which the configuration file
is stored.
■
help
Lists the commands that are available.
Any errors that are generated are logged to ghconfer.txt, which is stored in the
same folder as GhConfig.exe.
To apply the configuration data file
1
Start the computer in DOS or Windows PE.
2
Verify that the configuration data files and GhConfig are available on the
target computer and that they are in the same folder.
For example, you can place the files on a floppy disk or on a shared network
drive.
3
Restore the computer.
See “Restoring from an image file” on page 334.
4
Before you restart your computer, run GhConfig.exe.
Section
GhostCasting image files
■
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
■
GhostCasting from the command line
■
GhostCasting and IP addresses
5
350
Chapter
17
Using GhostCasting to
create and restore images
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About GhostCasting
■
Preparing for GhostCasting
■
Creating a GhostCast Server
■
Starting a GhostCast session
■
Creating an image file
■
Restoring an image file onto client computers
■
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server
■
Setting Auto Start parameters
■
Setting the data transfer mode
■
Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used
■
Viewing and changing GhostCast Server session options
■
Running Ghost.exe on a client computer
About GhostCasting
GhostCasting lets multiple computers running Symantec Ghost receive the same
information over a computer network simultaneously. The GhostCast Server
works with Ghost.exe to create an image file of a model computer or restore an
image file onto a number of client computers.
352
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Preparing for GhostCasting
The GhostCast Server supports the following forms of data transfer for transferring
files:
■
Unicasting
■
Direct Broadcasting
■
Multicasting
GhostCasting makes workstation migration and rollouts more efficient and may
eliminate replicated network traffic. You can use it through the Windows interface,
command-line switches, batch files, or a combination of all methods.
The following applications are used in GhostCasting:
■
The GhostCast Server on the network server restores image files to multiple
clients or creates an image file from a single connected client.
■
On a client workstation, Ghost.exe receives and writes the image file to the
local disk.
GhostCasting supports the following:
■
Ethernet networks
■
Token ring networks
■
Image file creation
■
Multicast-enabled routers
■
Automatic IP address selection using BOOTP or DHCP
■
Session start scheduling
■
Partition-only GhostCasting
■
Multiple, simultaneous sessions, or one session per server
Splitting images in a GhostCast operation
When you perform a GhostCast operation, an image is split when it reaches 2 GB
in size unless you have set the split size to another value with the -split command
switch. If this switch is explicitly set to 0, the image does not split.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Preparing for GhostCasting
Before GhostCasting, you must set up the required software and hardware.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Creating a GhostCast Server
To prepare for GhostCasting
1
2
Set up the network hardware.
■
Install the network adapter.
■
Connect cabling.
■
Set up the network adapter using the manufacturer's installation program.
■
Run the network adapter test program to check the network adapter and
cabling.
Determine the IP and networking settings.
■
BOOTP/DHCP vs. manual configuration
■
Network adapter drivers
■
Other overall requirements
See “About IP addresses for GhostCasting” on page 373.
About creating the model computer
Create a model computer to serve as a template for client computers. This is the
first step in creating a Symantec Ghost image. Set up a computer with Windows
and all of its drivers installed and configured as you want all of your computers
configured.
If you are creating a model computer for Windows NT computers, see the Online
Knowledge Base article: “How to clone a Windows NT or Windows 2000
workstation” at:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/clonent
You may need to create a model computer for each unique hardware setup. For
example, if you have some computers with SCSI disks and some with IDE disks,
you need to have separate images for them. However, on Windows 2000/XP
computers, Microsoft Sysprep can help you create a generic template image for
different hardware setups.
Note: Before you take an image of a Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT computer, you
should verify that the computer is not a member of a domain .
Creating a GhostCast Server
The GhostCast Server creates or distributes a copy of an image file to Symantec
Ghost clients in a session composed of one server, a single image file, and one or
353
354
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Starting a GhostCast session
more similar clients. The session name acts as a key. The session name identifies
the session and is used by clients to indicate the session that they are to join.
To create a GhostCast Server
1
Install GhostCast Server (Ghostsrv.exe).
2
Create a boot package that contains Ghost.exe for the client computers.
See “Boot packages with network support” on page 264.
Starting a GhostCast session
After setting up the server and preparing the boot package for the client computers,
you can run a GhostCast session.
To start a GhostCast session
1
On the GhostCast Server computer, on the Windows taskbar, click Start >
Programs > Symantec Ghost > GhostCast Server.
2
In the GhostCast Server window, in the Session Name box, type a session
name.
A GhostCast session name can be any alphanumeric sequence of characters
and must be unique on your network. You can use spaces on the GUI but not
with command-line switches. Session names are not case-sensitive.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Creating an image file
Creating an image file
To create an image file, you must first start a GhostCast session from the GhostCast
Server. Once you create a session on the server, join the GhostCast session from
the source computer.
To create an image file using the GhostCast Server
1
In the GhostCast Server window, click Create Image.
2
Do one of the following:
■
In the Image File box, type the name and full path of the image file that
you are creating.
■
Click Browse to find the location.
You can overwrite existing files.
3
4
Do one of the following:
■
To create an image of an entire disk, click Disk.
■
To create an image of a selected partition, click Partition.
Click Accept Clients to accept the client computer into the session.
The Accept Clients button becomes active when all boxes are filled in.
5
Start Ghost.exe on the destination client computers and begin a GhostCast
session.
See “To connect a source computer to a GhostCast session” on page 355.
Connecting a computer to a session
Once the GhostCast session is started on the server, you can start the client
computer from a boot disk and have it join the session.
To connect a source computer to a GhostCast session
1
Create a GhostCast session on the GhostCast Server.
See “To create an image file using the GhostCast Server” on page 355.
2
Using the Ghost network boot package, start Ghost.exe on the client computer.
355
356
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Restoring an image file onto client computers
3
On the Ghost.exe menu, click GhostCasting, then select one of the following:
Multicast
Connect to the session using Multicasting
Direct Broadcast
Connect to the session using direct broadcasting
Unicasting
Connect to the session using Unicasting
4
In the GhostCast Session Name to Join dialog box, type the session name.
5
Click OK.
6
Select the disk from which to take an image.
7
Click OK.
8
Select the partition from which to take an image, if required.
9
Click OK.
10 Select the level of compression that you require.
11 Click Yes to begin.
See “Running Ghost.exe on a client computer” on page 365.
Restoring an image file onto client computers
To restore an image file, you must first start a GhostCast session on the GhostCast
Server. Once you create a session, connect the client computers to the GhostCast
session.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Restoring an image file onto client computers
To restore an image onto client computers using the GhostCast Server
1
Click Restore Image to send an image file to all connecting clients.
2
Do one of the following:
3
■
In the Image File box, type the name and full path of the image file
containing the image.
■
Click Browse to find the location.
On the File menu, click Image Description to view or modify a description
of the image file.
The disk or partition settings must be selected. If the file selected is not a
valid image file, an error message appears.
4
5
Do one of the following:
■
To restore an image of an entire disk, click Disk.
■
To restore an image of a partition and select the partition from the image
file, click Partition.
Click Accept Clients to accept the client computer into the session.
The Accept Clients button becomes active when all required boxes are filled
out.
6
Join the client computers to the GhostCast session.
See “To join a GhostCast session to restore an image file to client computers”
on page 358.
7
Click Send to start the image restore and the GhostCast session when all of
the required clients have joined the session.
The progress indicator shows the status of the GhostCast session as it proceeds,
along with other image file and transfer details. The statistics shown are based
on the image file size and reflect the sizes after compression. The speed shows
the actual amount of data being sent over the network in megabytes-per-minute
from the image file. The client status changes to In Progress.
If you close the GhostCast Server or turn off the computer once a GhostCast
session has started, the GhostCast session stops and a warning message appears.
You must start Ghost.exe on the client computer and join the clients to the
GhostCast session.
357
358
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server
To join a GhostCast session to restore an image file to client computers
1
On the client computers, use the Ghost Boot Disk to start Ghost.exe.
2
On the Ghost.exe menu, click GhostCasting, then select one of the following:
Multicast
Connect to the session using Multicasting
Direct Broadcast
Connect to the session using Direct Broadcasting
Unicasting
Connect to the session using Unicasting
3
In the GhostCast Session Name to Join dialog box, type the session name.
4
Click OK.
5
Select the disk to restore.
6
Click OK.
7
Select the partition to restore, if required.
8
Click OK.
9
Click Yes to indicate that the computer is ready for the image restore to begin.
See “Running Ghost.exe on a client computer” on page 365.
The IP and MAC addresses of the client computers that are connected and
waiting for the GhostCast session to start appear in the Connected Clients
list along with their status.
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server
In the GhostCast session, you can specify the client disk or partition to restore
from the server. You can also define command-line options to execute on the
client computer as part of the cloning task.
To create an image file using the GhostCast Server and command-line options
1
On the GhostCast Server, start a GhostCast session to create an image file.
See “To create an image file using the GhostCast Server” on page 355.
2
Click More Options.
3
In the Disk No. box, type the disk number.
4
In the Partition No. box, type the partition number if you are creating an
image of a partition.
The client clone command appears in the Command line box.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server
5
Add other switches to the command line to execute specific command-line
options on the client computer, if required.
For example, if the initial command is:
-clone,mode=pcreate,src=2,[email protected]
Add the following switches to avoid prompts and restart the client computer
after the image has been extracted:
-clone,mode=pcreate,src=2,[email protected] -sure -rb
Only use the -sure switch when you are certain that you are writing from the
intended disk or partition.
6
Click Accept Clients to accept the client computer into the session.
7
Start the client computers in DOS.
8
Run Ghost.exe using the -ja switch to log on to the GhostCast session from
the command line:
ghost.exe -ja=SessionNm
9
Confirm your choices on the client computers if the -sure switch was not
used.
See “Running Ghost.exe on a client computer” on page 365.
To restore an image onto client computers using the GhostCast Server
1
Create a GhostCast session to restore an image from the GhostCast Server.
2
Click More Options.
3
In the Disk No. box, type the disk number.
359
360
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Controlling the GhostCast session from the server
4
In the Partition No. box, type the partition number, if required.
5
In the Command line box, type the client clone command.
Add other switches to the command line to execute specific commands on
the client computer.
For example, if the initial command is:
-clone,mode=prestore,[email protected],dst=1:1
Add the following switches to avoid prompts and restart the client computer
after the image has restored:
-clone,mode=prestore,[email protected],dst=1.1 -sure -rb
Only use the -sure switch when you are sure that you are writing to the
intended disk or partition.
6
Click Accept Clients to accept the client computer into the session.
7
Start the client computers in DOS.
8
Run Ghost.exe using the -ja switch to log on to the GhostCast session from
the command line:
ghost.exe -ja=SessionNm
9
Confirm your choices on the client computers if the -sure switch was not
used.
See “Running Ghost.exe on a client computer” on page 365.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Setting Auto Start parameters
Setting Auto Start parameters
When your GhostCast session includes restoring an image file to client computers,
you can set the server to start the session automatically. The start time can be
based on a single parameter or a combination of parameters.
If you specify more than one Auto Start parameter, the session starts when one
of the conditions is fulfilled.
To set Auto Start parameters
1
In the GhostCast Server window, click More Options.
2
Do one or more of the following:
To use the time parameter:
Type a specified time using a 24-hour clock and
within the next 24-hour time period.
For example, 5:30 AM would be 05:30, and 5:30 PM
would be 17:30.
To use the number of clients
parameter:
Type the number of clients that are connected to the
session.
For example, if the threshold is set to 10, then the
server waits and accepts clients until the tenth client.
Once the tenth and final client is accepted, the server
stops accepting clients and starts sending out to the
connected client computers.
To use the timeout parameter: Type a number of minutes after the last client joined.
For example, if the timeout is set to 15, the server
waits indefinitely until the first client is accepted.
After the first client joins, the 15 minute countdown
starts. If no more clients join, the session starts 15
minutes later. If another client joins before the 15
minutes timeout, the timeout counter resets to 15
minutes and starts counting down again.
Setting the data transfer mode
You can set the data transfer mode to optimize the use of your network hardware
setup. Used in conjunction with network bandwidth limits, you can optimize the
way data files are transferred over your network.
Table 17-1 lists the transfer options.
361
362
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Setting the data transfer mode
Transfer options
Table 17-1
Mode
Description
Use if
Unicast
Each packet is addressed to one
You are transferring a data packet
computer. One stream of data is sent to one or two computers only.
for each client.
Directed
broadcast
Data is sent to all computers on a
specified subnet. If clients are on
more than one subnet, one stream
is sent to each subnet.
Multicast
Data is sent to all computers on the Unicast or subnet targeted
network that have requested the
broadcasting are not appropriate.
data. Only one stream of data is sent.
Your network hardware does not
support Multicasting.
Multicasting is usually the most efficient option for the following reasons:
■
Only one stream of data is sent out for all clients.
■
Multicasting sends packets only to client computers that have requested data
from the GhostCast Server.
This requires the support of appropriately configured routers and switches. You
can alter settings globally or for a GhostCast session.
Symantec Ghost attempts to use Multicasting by default. If you have set the data
transfer mode to Unicast or Directed broadcast, then Symantec Ghost uses that
method. If Directed broadcast or Multicasting fails, then Symantec Ghost attempts
to use Unicast.
See “Setting the default data transfer properties” on page 90.
To set the data transfer mode
1
In the Symantec GhostCast Server window, on the File menu, click Options.
2
Click Force Mode.
3
Select one of the following:
4
■
Multicast
■
Directed Broadcast
■
Unicast
Click OK.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used
Controlling the amount of network bandwidth used
Symantec Ghost lets you control how much network bandwidth is used when
GhostCasting. By using this functionality, you can avoid overloading the network
with GhostCasting traffic.
You can enter a value for restoring an image, creating an image, or both. The
values are saved and loaded the next time that you run the GhostCast Server.
However, if you run a GhostCast session from the command line, the limits that
are set on the command line are used for that session only.
See “GhostCast Server command-line options” on page 368.
Limiting network bandwidth is useful in some circumstances. Consider the
following:
■
By limiting network bandwidth, you can increase performance on the network
for users who are not the intended recipients of image files.
■
If your network hardware does not support multicasting, then limiting
bandwidth is helpful in many situations.
Table 17-2 provides a guide to network hardware setups and when you may or
may not want to limit network bandwidth.
Table 17-2
Limiting network bandwidth
Limit network bandwidth Hub only
for
Layer 2 switch
Layer 3 switch or
multicasting
compatible
router and layer
2 switch
Unicast
Yes
No
No
Subnet targeted broadcast
Yes
Yes
Yes
Multicast
Yes
Yes
No
In situations where you would not limit network bandwidth, the hardware directs
the traffic to intended recipients only, and all other users should be unaffected.
To set a limit for network bandwidth
1
In the Symantec GhostCast Server window, on the File menu, click Options.
2
In the Options dialog box, check Limit data throughput for.
If this option is not enabled, then no limit is set.
363
364
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Viewing and changing GhostCast Server session options
3
In the Restoring box, type the maximum MB per minute to set a limit for
restoring an image.
4
In the Creating box, type the maximum MB per minute to set a limit for
creating an image.
The ideal maximum usage to expect is as follows:
100 BaseT
300 MB per minute
10 BaseT
60 MB per minute
Viewing and changing GhostCast Server session
options
In the Options dialog box you can specify session parameters.
You can specify a range of multicast addresses. Addresses in the following range
are valid: 224.0.2.0-239.255.255.255. To specify an exact address, set the end
address to the same as the start address. By setting a wide range of addresses, you
can limit the chance of conflict if you run two or more GhostCast operations
simultaneously. This option should be used by advanced users only.
To view or record GhostCast Server options
1
On the File menu, click Options.
2
If you want to use a specified multicast address range, click Use Specified
Multicast Address Range, then type the multicast From and To addresses.
3
Click Multicast Scope TTL to set the time to live.
This limits how far the data passes through a network. Time to live is
decremented by every router through which the data packet passes.
4
Select one of the following:
Restart On Completion
Restart the GhostCast Server, accepting clients and
using the same Auto Start parameters.
Close GhostCast Server On
Completion
Close Symantec GhostCast Server once the session
is complete.
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Running Ghost.exe on a client computer
5
Click Log clients to create a log that lists GhostCasting session details,
including when a session took place, the computers involved, and whether
the session was successful.
The log is saved to the path specified.
6
In the Log Level box, select a log level to set a level of diagnostic GhostCast
logging.
7
In the Log File box, type a destination log file location.
Running Ghost.exe on a client computer
When using GhostCasting, the client executable, Ghost.exe, restores a GhostCast
copy of an image file onto the client computer or creates an image file onto the
GhostCast Server.
Ghost.exe runs under DOS and uses a packet driver interface to the network card.
The TCP/IP settings are stored in a configuration file Wattcp.cfg that is located
in the same directory as Ghost.exe.
As with all Symantec Ghost applications, DHCP, BOOTP, and manually set IP
addresses are supported.
Use the Symantec Ghost GhostCast client command-line switches to run Ghost.exe
from the command line or in the GhostCast session.
For a GhostCasting session, the selection of the partition or drive to write to, or
read from, on the client is specified either on the client or in the command-line
option on the server. Use the -ja switch on the client to run the operation from
the server.
For any GhostCasting session, the session name on the entry screen of the client
should match the GhostCast Server session name.
365
366
Using GhostCasting to create and restore images
Running Ghost.exe on a client computer
Chapter
18
GhostCasting from the
command line
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About running GhostCast Server from the command line
■
Starting the GhostCast session
■
GhostCast Server command-line options
About running GhostCast Server from the command
line
You can run the Symantec GhostCast Server from the command line by including
switches with ghostsrv.
You can run GhostCast Server from the command line. Use a batch file or
third-party scheduler application to start the server.
The syntax for running GhostCast Server is as follows:
ghostsrv filename session [options]
Where:
filename
Specifies the path and file name of a disk image file.
session
Specifies the session name.
See “GhostCast Server command-line options” on page 368.
368
GhostCasting from the command line
Starting the GhostCast session
Starting the GhostCast session
Once you have created a GhostCast session and the client computers have appeared
on-screen, you can start the transmission.
To start the session transmission
■
When all clients have connected, click Start.
GhostCast Server command-line options
Table 18-1 lists the GhostCast Server command-line switches.
Table 18-1
GhostCast Server switches
Switch
Description
-Ncount
Starts the GhostCast transmission after count clients have
joined the session.
-Ttime
Starts sending to a session automatically after a specified time
(24-hour hh:mm format) with a maximum of 24 hours.
-Ominutes
Starts transmission minutes after the last client connection.
-Llevel
Creates a log file specifying log level E, S, W, I, or A.
The log level x can be E (errors), S (statistics), W (warnings),
I (information), or A (all) in increasing order of logging detail.
-Ffilename
Specifies log file name for the -L option and is by default,
Ghostlog.txt.
-C
Closes ghostsrv application after GhostCast session
completion.
-D
Uses create from client mode. Restore to client is the default.
-R
Restarts the GhostCast session on completion and waits for
client connections again after GhostCasting is complete.
-P
Specifies partition mode operation. If restoring to clients, the
partition number must be given. If creating an image from
client, no partition number is required.
-Mxxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Sets the multicast address to xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx. Addresses
between 224.0.2.0—239.255.255.255 are valid.
GhostCasting from the command line
GhostCast Server command-line options
Table 18-1
GhostCast Server switches (continued)
Switch
Description
-Mxxx.xxx.xxx.xxx-xxx.
xxx.xxx.xxx
Specifies a range of multicast addresses. The address is chosen
from within this range. Addresses between
224.0.2.0—239.255.255.255 are valid.
-DISKnumber
Specifies the client disk number to which to restore or create
the image file.
-PARTnumber
Specifies the client partition number to which to restore or
create the image file.
-Gswitch
Specifies switches to include in the command line and those
used by the Ghost application.
-HLxxx
Sets the maximum amount of bandwidth consumed while
restoring an image, where xxx is the number of megabytes
per minute.
-HDxxx
Sets the maximum amount of bandwidth consumed while
creating an image, where xxx is the number of megabytes per
minute.
-TTLxxx
Sets the multicasting time to live.
Command-line option examples using GhostCast Server
Table 18-2 lists some examples of using GhostCast Server.
Table 18-2
GhostCast Server command-line examples
Summary
Syntax
Description
Creating an image file of a
complete disk from a client
computer and saving to image
file c:\test123.gho using the
session name labmodel
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho labmodel -d
Starts a GhostCast session called
labmodel and creates or overwrites
the image file c:\test123.gho. The
first connecting client's IP address
appears on-screen, and the session
starts automatically. The client
computer indicates the source drive
to use for the image file creation.
369
370
GhostCasting from the command line
GhostCast Server command-line options
Table 18-2
Summary
GhostCast Server command-line examples (continued)
Syntax
Description
Creating an image file of a
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -d -p
partition from a client computer
to an image file
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and creates or
overwrites the image file c:\
test123.gho. The first connecting
client's IP address appears
on-screen, and the session starts
automatically. The client computer
indicates the source drive and
partitions to include in the image
created.
Restoring a disk image file onto
client computers
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and uses the image file
c:\test123.gho. The connecting
clients' IP addresses appear
on-screen. Start the session
transmission.
ghostsrv.exe c:\test123.gho TestSession
See “Starting a GhostCast session”
on page 354.
Restoring a specific partition
from an image file onto client
computers
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -p2
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and uses the second
partition in the image file c:\
test123.gho. The connecting clients'
IP addresses appear on-screen.
GhostCasting a specific partition ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -p1
from an image file to a specific
-DISK1-PART2
partition on a destination drive
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession, uses the first partition
in the image file c:\test123.gho, and
places it in the second partition of
the clients' first disk. The
connecting clients' IP addresses
appear on-screen. Start the
GhostCast transmission.
See “Starting a GhostCast session”
on page 354.
GhostCasting from the command line
GhostCast Server command-line options
Table 18-2
Summary
GhostCast Server command-line examples (continued)
Syntax
Specifying the number of clients ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -n10
to Auto Start
Description
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and uses the image file
c:\test123.gho. The connecting
clients' IP addresses appear
on-screen. Once 10 clients have
connected, the session transmission
starts automatically.
Specifying a time for Auto Start
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -t13:30 Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and uses the image file
c:\test123.gho. The connecting
clients' IP addresses appear
on-screen. At half past one in the
afternoon (1:30 PM), the session
transmission starts automatically.
Specifying time-based and
client-count Auto Start and
automatic closing
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -t13:30 Starts a GhostCast session called
-n10 -c
TestSession and uses the image file
c:\test123.gho. The connecting
clients' IP addresses appear
on-screen. At either half past one in
the afternoon (1:30 PM) or after 10
clients join the session, transmission
starts automatically. Ghostsrv does
not wait for both conditions to be
met. When the GhostCast session is
completed, ghostsrv closes down as
requested.
Isolating problems
ghostsrv c:\test123.gho TestSession -la
-ferrlog.txt-n10
Starts a GhostCast session called
TestSession and uses the image file
c:\test123.gho. The connecting
clients' IP addresses appear
on-screen. Once 10 clients connect,
the session transmission starts
automatically and a log file,
Errlog.txt, is created for debugging.
Creating a log file reduces the
performance of the GhostCast
transmission.
371
372
GhostCasting from the command line
GhostCast Server command-line options
Chapter
19
GhostCasting and IP
addresses
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About IP addresses for GhostCasting
■
Locally specified IP addresses
■
About using BOOTP/DHCP to assign IP addresses
About IP addresses for GhostCasting
An IP network using locally specified addresses requires each manually setup
computer to have the following:
■
A unique IP address
■
The correct subnet mask
■
The default gateway (optional)
Specify the TCP/IP configuration parameters using one of the following methods:
■
Locally on a computer in a configuration file
■
Automatically using a BOOTP or DHCP server
Locally specified IP addresses
The GhostCast Server receives its locally specified IP addresses, subnet masks,
and default gateways from the TCP/IP parameters in the Network option of the
Windows Control Panel.
374
GhostCasting and IP addresses
About using BOOTP/DHCP to assign IP addresses
Examples of Wattcp.cfg client configuration files
The following example displays the IP details on a computer and the details in
the Wattcp.cfg file:
IP details:
Wattcp.cfg:
■
IP address: 192.168.100.3
■
Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
■
Default gateway: 192.168.100.1
■
IP = 192.168.100.3
■
Netmask = 255.255.255.0
■
Gateway = 192.168.100.1
If the server and client are within the same subnet, a default gateway is not
required. If they are on a separate subnet, a default gateway must be supplied.
About using BOOTP/DHCP to assign IP addresses
If a BOOTP or DHCP server is installed on the network, you may take advantage
of DHCP or BOOTP for IP address assignment. A DHCP server is included in
Windows NT Server release 4.0 and Windows 2000. Other DHCP and BOOTP
applications are available for various operating systems and can be used with
GhostCasting.
If you are GhostCasting to many clients, not having to edit a unique Wattcp.cfg
file on every client may be advantageous. Balanced against this is the additional
complexity of the DHCP setup.
BOOTP/DHCP automatically defined IP address
Specifying a local configuration for every computer on an IP network can be
inconvenient or impractical. GhostCasting supports BOOTP and DHCP servers.
You must run the BOOTP or DHCP server to specify a computer's IP address. The
BOOTP/DHCP server listens on the network for computers requesting an IP address
and replies with the address that the BOOTP/DHCP server is configured to provide.
The BOOTP/DHCP server must be configured to provide the IP address, subnet
mask, and (optionally) the default gateway.
Section
6
Creating executables to roll
out applications
■
Getting started with AutoInstall
■
Creating AI packages
376
Chapter
20
Getting started with
AutoInstall
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
How AutoInstall works
■
Using AutoInstall
■
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
How AutoInstall works
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall (AI) reduces the time and cost of managing software
distribution across a network by providing an efficient means of installing
application packages and updates. Once installed, these packages can be removed
quickly using the AutoInstall applications.
AutoInstall captures changes to a single Windows computer that you can then
deploy across a network. For example, you can capture changes to files, registry
entries, or entire application suites and deploy the changes using the Symantec
Ghost Console software.
AutoInstall, in conjunction with the Symantec Ghost Console, simplifies and
streamlines the process of implementing workstation updates. AutoInstall lets
you create a comprehensive software install AI package that you can deploy to
workstations via the Symantec Ghost Console.
Symantec Ghost AutoInstall has the following components to help you create and
customize AI packages:
■
AI Snapshot creates an installation script that records the changes to a model
computer when software is installed.
378
Getting started with AutoInstall
Using AutoInstall
■
AI Builder uses the installation script to create a package that duplicates the
changes made by the software installation. AI Builder also lets you customize
the package to meet your needs.
Once created, packages can be modified using AI Builder.
Hardware and software restrictions
AutoInstall is designed to install packages to computers with the same hardware
and same operating system as the model computer.
The AutoInstall feature is not supported on Windows NT/9x. On x64 platforms,
you can only capture 32-bit applications. AutoInstall does not support 64-bit
applications.
Using AutoInstall
Ensure that AI Builder is installed on the Console server (AI Builder is included
in the Console installation), then perform the following procedures:
■
Install AI Builder and AI Snapshot on the model computer.
■
Scan to capture existing system information.
■
Install the software that you would like to deploy.
■
Scan a second time to capture system information again to determine changes.
AI Builder automatically builds and saves the file created by AI Snapshot as
an executable AI package. You can use AI Builder to customize the installation
script, prior to building, or after building the executable, if necessary.
■
Use the Symantec Ghost Console to deploy the AI package to target
workstations.
See “Creating an installation script for a software installation” on page 385.
Getting started with AutoInstall
Using AutoInstall
Figure 20-1
Using AutoInstall
Installing AI Snapshot and AI Builder on the model computer
Before you can create an AI package, you must set up a model computer with AI
Builder and AI Snapshot installed.
Choose a computer that has the same operating system and service packs to those
that will receive the finished AI package. Ideally, this computer should have only
the operating system installed and have network support to connect to the Console.
If Microsoft Installer is not installed on the computer, then you are asked if you
want to install it. If you want to include the installation of Microsoft Installer in
the AI package do not install it now.
To install AI Snapshot and AI Builder on the model computer
1
Insert the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite CD into the CD-ROM drive.
2
In the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite installation window, click Install Tools
and Utilities.
3
Click Install AutoInstall.
4
Click Next.
5
Accept the terms of the license agreement, then click Next.
6
Click Next.
7
In the Custom Setup window, click Next.
8
Click Install.
379
380
Getting started with AutoInstall
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
About setting up target computers
The AutoInstall client program is installed as part of the Symantec Ghost client
software.
See “Installing the Console client” on page 58.
Once installed, the client program runs in the background on client computers,
ready to launch AutoInstall deployment tasks when they are deployed from the
server.
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
There are some issues you may need to consider when using AutoInstall to install
Microsoft software.
About installing Microsoft service packs
Symantec does not recommend using AutoInstall to install Microsoft service
packs. To install service packs, use the Transfer Files and Execute Commands
tasks from the Console.
For more information, see:
■
See “Setting File Transfer properties” on page 139.
■
See “About letting the model computer restart” on page 380.
■
See “About adding uninstall commands” on page 381.
■
See “Using AutoInstall to install Office XP” on page 381.
■
See “Replicating Office XP” on page 381.
About letting the model computer restart
If you use AI Snapshot to create an installation script to include in an AI package
executable, you must capture system information and build the executable AI
package before restarting the computer.
If you are installing non-Microsoft software, then you can allow restarts and
configure the application before performing the comparison scans and building
the AI package.
Getting started with AutoInstall
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
About adding uninstall commands
You can add an AutoInstall uninstall command to an AI package if you are
deploying non-Microsoft software. This feature does not work with Microsoft
products because you must build the AI package before any restarts.
Using AutoInstall to install Office XP
Due to the new Product Activation feature in Microsoft Office XP, you must stop
Office XP from locking to the model computer before cloning. By using Microsoft
Office Installer commands, you can prevent the hardware detection and activation
process from occurring until Office XP is deployed to the client computers and
launched for the first time.
Note: You must have a Volume License Key from Microsoft to perform this
installation.
To install Office XP using AutoInstall
1
Download the Microsoft patch for enterprise deployments specified in
Microsoft Knowledge Base article number Q304226 at:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q304/2/26.ASP
2
Install AI Snapshot.
3
Start AI Snapshot and perform the first system scan.
4
Run Office XP setup using the following command line:
driveletter:\Setup.exe enterprise_image="1" nousername="1" pidkey="[Enter
your Volume License Key here]"/qb+
Type the Volume License Key without any hyphens.
5
Apply the Microsoft patch for enterprise deployments specified in the
Microsoft Knowledge Base article number Q304226.
6
Perform a system compare and build the package.
Do not let the computer restart after installing Microsoft Office XP and the
patch.
Replicating Office XP
You can build Office XP into a single package on Windows Vista/XP/2000.
Before you build an Office XP package, you must have the following requirements:
381
382
Getting started with AutoInstall
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
■
The Microsoft patch for enterprise deployments that is specified in the
Microsoft Knowledge Base article number Q304226
You can find the article at the following URL:
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q304/2/26.ASP
■
A Volume License Key from Microsoft
Table 20-1 details the parameters used in the Office XP installation from the
command line.
Table 20-1
Command-line parameters
Parameter
Description
Setup.exe
The setup file for MSI. If MSI is already installed,
Office XP MSI script file (PROPLUS.MSI) can be
called instead.
ENTERPRISE_IMAGE [boolean] - 1
Prevents Setup.exe from creating a digital license
identification based on the hardware components
of the computer used to create the original
hard-disk image. This setting lets Setup generate
a unique digital license identification on each user
computer when any Office application is started
on the new computer.
NOUSERNAME [boolean] - 1:
If this parameter is set to 1, then Office prompts
for the user name the first time the user runs any
Office application. By default, the property is not
set (property is clear).
PIDKEY [string] ["xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"]:
Allows an administrator to submit a Product ID
number on the command line. Do not include
dashes when entering the Product ID number.
To replicate Office XP on Windows 2000/XP
1
Perform the first scan.
2
Launch Office XP installation via the following command line:
"Office XP_path\Setup.exe" ENTERPRISE_IMAGE="1" NOUSERNAME="1"
PIDKEY="{Product_ID_KEY}"
See Table 20-1 on page 382.
3
After the MS Office XP installation finishes, apply the Microsoft patch.
Getting started with AutoInstall
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
4
Perform a compare scan and build an Office XP package before allowing the
computer to restart.
5
Build an Office XP package.
383
384
Getting started with AutoInstall
About installing Microsoft products using AutoInstall
Chapter
21
Creating AI packages
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
Creating an installation script for a software installation
■
About customizing and building AI packages
■
About executing and rolling out AI packages
Creating an installation script for a software
installation
Creating the installation script involves a number of steps. First, AI Snapshot
captures computer information before the software is installed. Then, you install
the software and AI Snapshot captures the computer information again. Finally,
AI Snapshot creates the installation script file that contains the differences.
The default name for the installation script is Install.aic.
Capturing existing system information
The first step in creating an installation script is to prepare the model computer
and run AI Snapshot to capture existing system information.
When installing software, the model computer should only have the operating
system installed.
You can restrict the disks and directories that are monitored on the target platform.
If you monitor only the disks affected by the installation, the monitor process
goes faster. For example, if the installation affects drive C, you don't need to
monitor drive D.
386
Creating AI packages
Creating an installation script for a software installation
You can also change the default working directory at this time. AI Snapshot
automatically purges the working directory at regular intervals, except for the
resulting installation packages.
To take a snapshot of the model system
1
Disable any programs that are running in the background.
2
If the installation process includes restarting the computer, disable any
programs that execute during the restarting process.
3
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost > AI
Snapshot.
4
Click Options.
5
Change the Search Path or Temporary Work Directory, if desired.
6
Click OK.
7
Click Next.
When AI Snapshot finishes analyzing your system, the Start Your Installation
screen appears.
The next step is to install the software that you would like to package.
Installing the software that you would like to package
After you take a snapshot of the model system (the first scan), install the software
that you would like to package while AI Snapshot is still running.
Warning: For a Microsoft installation, it is important that you let AI snapshot
perform a complete scan of the computer by cancelling all restarts until the
package is built.
You can install the software from the network or from a CD. If you are installing
the software from an autorun CD, the initial installation steps are automatically
performed.
To monitor the software installation from the network
1
In the Start Your Installation screen, do one of the following:
■
Type the path to the software's installation program, usually named
Setup.exe.
■
Click Browse, and then navigate to the file.
Creating AI packages
Creating an installation script for a software installation
2
Click Monitor.
3
During the installation, select the options in the application being installed
that you want to install on the target workstations.
Some installation programs launch slowly and have long pauses between
screens.
4
5
Do one of the following:
Microsoft installation
Cancel any restart by clicking No or pressing
Ctrl+Esc to continue creating the AI
package.
All other installations
Restart the computer if the installation
requires it.
Type a name for the installation package when the software installation is
complete. The default name is INSTALL.
To monitor the software installation from an autorun CD
1
In the Start Your Installation screen, click Next.
2
Insert the autorun CD into the CD-ROM drive.
3
Follow the installation instructions for the software package.
4
Type a name for the installation package when the software installation is
complete. The default name is INSTALL.
387
388
Creating AI packages
Creating an installation script for a software installation
Capturing system information again to determine changes
The next step in the installation script process is to take another snapshot of the
model computer.
AI Snapshot places references to the differences, such as new files and directories,
groups and icons, and modifications to the System Registry, in the installation
script. When the comparison is complete, the location of the installation script
appears.
To take another snapshot of the model computer
1
In the Is Software Installation Complete window, click Compare for AI
Snapshot to check the new configuration against the original configuration.
2
Click OK when the installation script file name appears.
3
Do one of the following:
To let AI Builder make an AI package
Click Build.
from the installation script as it stands:
A message appears showing the package
progress and file location.
To customize the installation script or Click Modify.
add an uninstall command:
See “About customizing and building AI
packages” on page 389.
Once the installation script has been
modified, the package should be built before
any further changes are made to the model
computer. This prevents the changes from
being included in the package.
4
Click Finish.
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
AI Builder uses the installation script created by AI Snapshot to build an AI package
that can be customized to meet your needs. For example, you can add a specialized
splash screen to the package or customize a lengthy installation process to run
automatically without user interaction. Once a package is created, you can use AI
Builder to modify and rebuild the package.
Note: AI Builder does not build the package if it will exceed 2 GB.
The installation script is an ASCII text file that is read by AI Builder, a text editor.
The commands in the installation script dictate how the software is installed.
AI Builder integrates graphics, sound, and animation. It includes messages and
questions and allows .ini file and registry editing.
The checklist interface guides you through the required steps. Installations can
test for CPU, RAM, and video configurations. You can use If statements to adapt
to individual configurations. AI Builder creates a wizard interface for AI packages
that can be run on the client.
Note: If the customized installation requires user interaction, it cannot be deployed
by the console.
Extra lines are ignored, so you can add them for readability. However, extra spaces
and carriage returns should not be added as they cause syntax errors. You can
use the REM command to add remarks to any line. The text on that line is ignored
by AI Builder even if it is a valid command. This is useful for documenting your
installation script.
AI Snapshot does not automatically add the uninstall command to a replicated
application. You can include this option by selecting the Uninstall command in
AI Builder.
See “To include an uninstall command in a build package” on page 394.
For troubleshooting purposes, AI Builder uses error messages for invalid commands
in the installation script. AI Builder gives you the line number of the invalid
command, along with the contents of the line. For example, if you use a BEGIN
command and forget to include the END command, an error message appears
with the line number in the .aic file.
Use AI Snapshot or AI Builder to generate the AI package to avoid any syntax
errors that may result from using other text editors. Once a package is generated,
389
390
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
you can use the Run option on the Build menu to test the installations that you
create.
An example of variables and commands in AutoInstall
Using the commands and variables in an AutoInstall script lets you ask for and
receive user input, run commands, and customize AutoInstall. The following
example script gives the user a choice of options and then installs a file.
A sample script follows.
UNINSTALL: yes, packagename="Distribute Files Package"
BEGINFIRSTSCREEN title="Installing template files"
This program lets you install template files to your hard drive.
ENDFIRSTSCREEN
BEGINGROUP EXCLUSIVE, caption="Installing template files"
Select one of the following options to install the correct template files.
01 [x] Administration
Install Administrative templates
02 [ ] Customer Service
Install Customer Service templates
03 [ ] Cancel
ENDGROUP
POPMESSAGE 0, fontsize=23
Installing administration templates
EndPop
POPMESSAGE 01
Installing customer service templates
EndPop
IF GROUP = 01
FILE: "Admin.000", overwrite=ask, popid=00,
From=";C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Admin.dot"
SHORTCUT: "$ALLUSERSDIR$", "Administration"
ENDIF
IF GROUP = 02
FILE: "CUST_S~1.000", overwrite=ask, popid=01,
From="C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Cust_service.dot
"SHORTCUT: "$ALLUSERSDIR$", "Customer Service"
ENDIF
IF GROUP = 01
BEGINLASTSCREEN title="Files Install", caption="Files Install"
The file has been successfully installed onto your computer.
ENDLASTSCREEN
ENDIF
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
IF GROUP = 02
BEGINLASTSCREEN title="Files Install", caption="Files Install"
The file has been successfully installed on your computer.
ENDLASTSCREEN
ENDIF
This example provides the following choices for the user:
■
To install templates for administration personnel
■
To install templates for customer service personnel
■
To cancel without installing any files
An AI package is created using AI Builder commands and variables. The package
is distributed to users and is executed on client computers. The user can then run
the AI package and install files as required.
Customizing installation scripts
Installation scripts can be modified as they are created. They can also be modified
after the AI package is built by opening the package in AI Builder as follows:
391
392
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
The customizing options appear in the left pane, and details of the selected option
appear in the bottom right pane. The installation script is in the top right pane.
Table 21-1 outlines the command types that are available in AI Builder.
Table 21-1
AI Builder command types
Command type
Description
Base Installation
Defines how the installation begins.
For example, select WindowsItem to add, remove, or replace
items within a program group.
Appearance
Defines how the installation appears to the user.
For example, select IntroScreen to display a graphic when the
installation begins.
Messages & Input
Adds messages that require user input.
For example, select Prompts to change the messages that
display during the installation.
System Changes
Makes changes to Windows during the installation.
For example, select Registry to insert or delete items in the
Windows registry.
If Conditions
Lets you include If statements for unattended installations.
For example, select IfMemory() to check a memory value
during the installation.
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
Table 21-1
AI Builder command types (continued)
Command type
Description
Defaults & Calls
Set up defaults and include calls to external programs.
For example, select RunAtExit to run an external program at
the end of the installation.
See “AutoInstall AI Builder menus” on page 497.
To customize an installation script
1
2
Do one of the following:
■
In AI Snapshot, click Modify if you have just created an installation script.
■
In AI Builder, select the AI package that you want to modify.
In the AI Builder window, in the left pane, expand a command type.
For attended installations, you can add custom screens and messages, as well
as graphics and sound files.
For unattended installations, you can add If conditions to check client
compatibility before the installation proceeds.
3
Select a command.
4
In the AI Builder window, in the right pane, type the parameters for the
selected command.
See “AutoInstall AI Builder menus” on page 497.
5
Do one of the following:
To add a command
Click Add.
To remove a command
Click Remove.
6
Repeat steps 1 through 5 until the installation script is complete.
7
Build the AI package.
See “Building AI packages” on page 394.
Adding an uninstall command to the installation script
The uninstall program is placed in the default directory and a hidden file,
Uninstall.aic, is created that captures the changes made during the installation.
Successive installations modify the Uninstall.aic file so that the uninstall program
returns the system to the state before the first installation.
393
394
Creating AI packages
About customizing and building AI packages
The uninstall program does not uninstall an application. The program places an
option on the Control Panel Add or Remove Programs dialog box from which the
user can uninstall the application.
To include an uninstall command in a build package
1
In the left pane of the builder options, select BASE INSTALLATION, then click
UnInstall to include an uninstall package.
2
Check Remove Groups During Uninstall to remove any program groups that
were created during the installation.
Use this option cautiously as some users might select an existing group for
the installation, or add files to the group after installation.
3
Type the name for the uninstall in the space provided.
This name appears on-screen when the uninstall runs.
4
Click Add to record the options that you have chosen.
Building AI packages
When you have made all of the changes to your installation script that you require,
you can build the AI package.
The package is saved as a single file that requires a large storage medium, such
as a hard drive, network file server, or CD-ROM.
To build an AI package
1
On the Build menu, click Build.
2
Type the build directory if it is not already listed.
The default directory is:
C:\Program Files\Symantec\Ghost\Working
Creating AI packages
About executing and rolling out AI packages
3
Click Build.
4
Close AI Builder.
AI Builder automatically creates an entry in the task log with a status of Hold.
Modifying installation scripts and AI packages
Installation scripts can be modified before a package is created if the model
computer is the same as it was when the installation script was created.
Once created, AI packages can be modified at any time on any computer.
To modify an installation script
1
Open AI Builder on the model system.
2
On the File menu, click Open.
3
Navigate to the installation script (Install.aic).
The default location is:
C:\Documents and Settings\Current user\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Working\Configs\
4
Double-click the file to open it.
You can then customize the file as required.
To modify an AI package
1
Open AI Builder.
2
On the File menu, click Open.
3
Navigate to the package (an .exe file).
The default location is:
C:\Documents and Settings\Current user\Application
Data\Symantec\Ghost\Working\
4
Double-click the file to open it.
The installation script is extracted from the file.
About executing and rolling out AI packages
AI Builder creates executable files that can be run on individual workstations to
install the packaged software. You can deploy the package to a number of
workstations via the Symantec Ghost Console.
395
396
Creating AI packages
About executing and rolling out AI packages
The Symantec Ghost Console creates an installation task that rolls out AI packages
to client computers. The Console task provides the path to the AI package to be
run, as well as the parameters that dictate which target workstations receive the
package.
When the distribution server tells the target workstation that an AI package is
available for installation, the Symantec Ghost client runs the executable.
Section
7
Updating Security
Identifiers (SIDs) and
computer names
■
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
■
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
398
Chapter
22
Updating Security
Identifiers (SIDs) and
computer names
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About making SID changes with Sysprep and Ghost Walker on NT-based clients
■
About losing access to external data objects
■
About identifying user names and passwords across workstations
■
Using Ghost Walker
About making SID changes with Sysprep and Ghost
Walker on NT-based clients
Client computers must be uniquely identified to operate on a network. This is
achieved using the Security Identifier (SID) and the computer name. When you
restore an image onto a number of client computers, you must assign unique
identifiers as part of the task.
Note: If an image file of a Windows Vista/XP/2000 computer contains encrypted
files and you perform a SID change, then these files become inaccessible. Before
you create the image file, you should decrypt any encrypted files.
Symantec Ghost supports the following SID-changing tools:
■
Microsoft application Sysprep
400
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
About making SID changes with Sysprep and Ghost Walker on NT-based clients
■
Symantec utility Ghost Walker
Symantec Ghost Walker capabilities
The following versions of Ghost Walker are included with Symantec Ghost:
Ghstwalk.exe
Runs in DOS
GhWalk32.exe
Runs from the command line in a Windows operating system
Before you execute GhWalk32 on 9x-based computers, ensure that the following
files are in the same directory as GhWalk32.exe:
■
Int86_32.dll
■
Int86_16.dll
You can find these files in the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite folder.
Ghost Walker has the following capabilities:
■
Lets you change the SID after a clone operation without having to restart the
computer.
■
Alters the computer SID to a unique and randomly generated value.
■
Alters the SIDs of all local workstation users present on the operating system
installation.
■
Alters all local workstation user SIDs in Access Control Lists (ACLs) for file
and registry objects. Local users retain user profiles and access rights.
■
Alters the computer names for Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98 operating
systems.
The computer name does not change in the Symantec Ghost Console.
Symantec Ghost Walker limitations
Ghost Walker has the following limitations:
■
Computer name change functionality is limited. A new name must contain the
same number of characters as the original.
■
It is not officially endorsed by Microsoft.
■
If you run GhWalk32.exe in Windows, then you cannot change the computer
name or SID of the boot volume.
Microsoft Sysprep capabilities
Due to Microsoft policies, Sysprep is the recommended tool for Windows XP.
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
About making SID changes with Sysprep and Ghost Walker on NT-based clients
Microsoft Sysprep has the following capabilities:
■
Invokes the Windows Setup Wizard (normally only seen during installation)
so that users can enter new user, license, and identification details.
■
Can be configured to trigger a driver database rebuild, letting Windows use
plug-and-play to detect all device drivers required for the new hardware
environment and to discard any unused drivers. Use of this option is not
supported by Symantec Ghost.
■
Allows alternate mass storage controller drivers to be installed during the
initial post-clone boot. The newly cloned operating system can then start in
the new hardware environment to the point when plug-and-play detection can
be safely invoked.
■
Supports almost all of the unattended installation parameters set, including
computer name, domain, network settings, and more. This provides a
comprehensive set of tools for reconfiguring the newly cloned computer and
also allows a fully automated process to be conducted.
■
Optionally alters the identity of the operating system installation by changing
the SID.
Microsoft Sysprep limitations
Microsoft Sysprep has the following limitations:
■
Does not change the SID of a local workstation user and, therefore, does not
have to alter SIDs located in file or registry Access Control Lists (ACLs).
■
Requires an additional restart.
■
The version of Sysprep that runs on Windows NT 4.0 is limited in its
functionality. It is not supported by Symantec Ghost.
■
No equivalent exists for Windows 98 and Me for computer name changes.
SID changing limitations
SID changing is an approximate technology, as you can only change SIDs in known
locations.
Problems arise because of the following factors:
■
A growing number of third-party and Microsoft applications are taking their
own private or derived copies of the computer name and SID and storing them
in proprietary formats in registry and file locations, making them inaccessible
to SID changes.
401
402
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
About losing access to external data objects
■
Microsoft technologies such as Windows NTFS File Encryption, Windows NT,
and Windows Protected Storage make use of SIDs as unique tokens. They use
local workstation user SIDs as part of the encryption key that controls access
to encrypted information. If the SID is changed, it renders encrypted data
unreadable.
Warning: For these reasons, you are strongly advised to test computer
environments and the applications on them before mass rollouts or upgrades.
About losing access to external data objects
Changing the SID of a workstation or a clone of a workstation that has been in
use for some time may be more problematic than changing the SID of a newly
installed workstation or a clone of a newly installed workstation. When a
workstation user, as opposed to a domain user, creates data objects on computers
that are participating in a workgroup or a peer-to-peer environment, security
information is created for those data objects that are based on the user's SID
(which is based on the workstation SID).
When Ghost Walker updates the SID, it not only changes the computer SID, but
also all of the workstation user and group SIDs. This is done because user and
group SIDs are assumed to be based on the workstation's computer SID (which is
now updated). This may mean that the security information on external computers
no longer matches the new SIDs of the workstation users, which may result in a
loss of access to those data objects.
About identifying user names and passwords across
workstations
If there are two workstations in a domain that have two users with the same user
name and password, the domain gives each of them access to the other's resources
even if their SIDs are different. This is a fairly common situation following cloning.
Updating the SID on a workstation does not stop this situation from occurring.
You must change the password of one of the users.
Using Ghost Walker
Ghost Walker lets you alter the identification details of Windows
Vista/XP/2000/NT/98 computers after a clone operation. You can assign a unique
name to each Windows 98 computer. You can assign a unique computer name
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
and a computer Security Identifier (SID) Each Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT
computer.
When you update the SID using Ghost Walker, all existing workstation users and
their passwords, permissions, and registry settings are maintained.
Ghost Walker can be operated from the GUI or from the command line. Ghost
Walker does not run from the following:
■
A Windows NT or 2000 DOS shell
■
A Windows 98, or Me DOS shell
The Ghost Walker window lists all bootable Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98
systems on the computer. Ghost Walker determines that there is an installed
operating system if a full set of registry hive files and the operating system kernel
executable are located in their normal locations.
Ghost Walker lists the following operating system details:
■
Logical ID (system ID generated by Ghost Walker)
■
Drive number
■
Partition number
■
Volume label (partition name)
■
Partition file system type
■
Computer name
■
Operating system type, version, or build
To alter identification details for a client computer using Ghost Walker
1
Remove any Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT workstations that are members of
a server domain.
After you complete the update, you must add each workstation to the domain
with the new SID and computer name.
2
Do one of the following:
■
Start DOS, and then, at the command line, type Ghstwalk.exe, and then
press Enter.
■
Start the computer in WinPE, and then run GhWalk32.exe.
Ghost Walker lists all of the interpretable volumes on the computer as follows:
■
If there is one operating system on the computer, the details of this
operating system appear in the top pane, and all volumes appear in the
bottom pane.
403
404
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
■
3
If there is more than one operating system on the computer, the details
of all of the operating systems appear in the top pane.
If there is more than one operating system on the computer, in the Select a
System ID box, type an ID to select an operating system. Then, click V -Change
Additional Vols to add or remove non-bootable volumes to be updated.
Warning: You must include any non-bootable volumes that might have security
information or shortcuts that contain the computer name of the bootable
operating system embedded in them. Failure to do so results in mismatched
data and a loss of security access.
4
To change the computer name, type N, and then press Enter.
The new name must be the same length as the previous name. The box that
you type the name into is the correct length of the name.
The name cannot contain any of the following characters:
/\[]“:;|<>+=,?*
5
Press Enter to start the update.
The screen displays the new name. For Windows NT/2000 computers, a new
SID is included.
The computer name and SID updates occur in the following locations:
6
■
The registry of the selected operating system
■
The file system on which the operating system resides
■
Any additional volumes that are included in the update
If you removed a Windows NT/2000 computer from a server domain, add the
computer back to the domain.
Running Ghost Walker from the command line
You can run Ghost Walker from the command line in DOS or WinPE.
The command-line syntax is as follows:
GHSTWALK[/CN=
<new_computer_name>|“<random_computer_name_format>”]
[/BV=<drv>:<part>[/AV=ALL|/AV=<drv>:<part> ... ]]
[/SURE][/DIAG][/IGNORE_DOMAIN][/IGNORE_ENCRYPTFILES]
[/REBOOT][/REPORT[=<report filename>]][/#E=<license file>]
[SID=<replacement SID][/FNI][/FNS][/FNX]
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
[/MNUPD=<registry path>][@<argumentfile>]
[LOGGING][SAFE_LOGGING][/H|/HELP|/?]
Table 22-1 describes the command-line options.
Table 22-1
Command-line options
Switch
Description
/CN=
Specifies a new computer name.
<new_computer_name>
The new name must be the same length as the original
name and cannot contain any of the following
characters:
/\[]”:;|<>+=,?*
To include spaces in the computer name, enclose the
computer name in quotes. For example, /CN="EW PC
123"
405
406
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
Table 22-1
Command-line options (continued)
Switch
Description
/CN=
Replaces the original computer name with a randomly
generated name using the
<random_computer_name_format> template. The
<random_computer_name_format> template specifies
which sections of the new name are randomly generated
and the type of random value to place in that location.
"<random_computer_name_
format>"
Only one instance of the following keywords is
permitted in a template:
<RANDOM_NUMERIC> - Generate random numbers
<RANDOM_ALPHA>- Generate random letters
<RANDOM_HEX> - Generate random hex digits (0-9, A-F)
Examples:
/CN=“PC<RANDOM_NUMERIC>” replaces the computer
name with a name that starts with PC, followed by a
series of random digits between 0 and 9.
/CN=“ID<RANDOM_ALPHA>X” replaces the computer
name with a name that starts with ID, followed by a
series of random letters, ending with the character X.
/CN=“<RANDOM_ALPHA>” replaces the computer name
with a name that is randomly generated using letters.
The random output fills out the format string to produce
a new computer name of the same length as the original
name. Ensure that the format string allows enough room
to embed at least one random character without
exceeding the length of the original name.
/BV=<drv:part>
Specifies the drive number and partition number of the
bootable operating system installation to update.
If there is more than one operating system, then this
switch must be included in the command.
/AV=<drv:part>
Specifies the drive number and partition number of an
additional volume containing a file system to update.
More than one volume may be specified by repeating
the argument for each additional volume.
This switch cannot be combined with /AV=ALL.
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
Table 22-1
Command-line options (continued)
Switch
Description
/AV=ALL
Specifies that all other volumes are to be included as
additional volumes.
/AV=ALL cannot be combined with the
/AV=<drv>:<part> switch.
/SURE
Specifies that the update should start without user
confirmation.
/BATCH
Specifies that the update should start without user
confirmation, and operation during error situations
requires no user input.
/DIAG
Specifies that the utility can only generate diagnostic
dumps and log files (not update the computer name or
SID).
/IGNORE_DOMAIN
Specifies that Ghost Walker should not check Windows
NT or 2000 installations for domain membership.
/REBOOT
Restarts the computer after a successful update.
/REPORT[=<filespec>]
Generates a report containing details of the update to
\UPDATE.RPT. An alternate report file can be specified.
/LOGGING
Specifies that diagnostic logging is generated to the
Gwalklog.txt file. Recommended for Technical Support
use only.
/SAFE_LOGGING
Ensures that all diagnostic logging gets flushed to disk
by closing and reopening the Gwalklog.txt file after
every log statement. This results in very slow execution.
Recommended for Technical Support use only.
/#E=<license file>
Specifies a Ghost license file to activate Ghost Walker.
/H|/HELP|/?
Shows command-line syntax Help.
/SID=<replacement SID>
Specifies a replacement SID to be used instead of a
randomly generated one. The replacement SID must be
in the format S-1-5-21-xxx-xxx-xxx and have the same
number of characters as the original SID.
407
408
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
Table 22-1
Command-line options (continued)
Switch
Description
/IGNORE_ENCRYPTFILES
Disables the warning generated by Ghost Walker when
it encounters Windows 2000/XP NTFS encrypted files
during its initial disk scan.
Changing the SID of a Windows 2000 installation results
in indecipherable NTFS encrypted files.
/MNUPD=<registry path>
Specifies a registry location that you want Ghost Walker
to search for instances of the computer name to update
them. This registry key and its subkeys are searched
for matched instances of the computer name (of the
same length). If any are found, they are updated to the
new computer name.
Multiple registry locations may be specified with
multiple instances of this switch.
@<argumentfile>
Specifies a file containing command-line switches that
Ghost Walker should open and read in addition to those
specified in the command line.
The argument file should only contain one argument
on each line. Do not include “” in the file.
/FNI
Disables the direct IDE drive access method.
/FNS
Disables the direct SCSI drive access method.
/FNX
Disables the Extended Int0x13 drive access method.
Following is an example of command-line use:
GHSTWALK /BV=1:2 /AV=1:1 /AV=2:1
/CN=“WS4-<RANDOM_HEX>-443”/SURE /REBOOT
The above command line does the following:
■
Updates the Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98 installation that is located on the
second partition of the first disk.
■
Updates file systems on additional volumes on the first partition of the first
and second disks.
■
Changes the computer name to one starting with WS4- and ending with -443,
placing random hexadecimal values in the remaining spaces until the new
name is the same length as the old one. For example, WS4-53ADF76-443.
■
Does not prompt the user for final confirmation.
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
■
Reboots after the computer name is changed.
409
410
Updating Security Identifiers (SIDs) and computer names
Using Ghost Walker
Chapter
23
Using Symantec Ghost with
Sysprep
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About Sysprep
■
Setting up Sysprep
■
How Sysprep works with cloning and the Console post-configuration process
■
Cloning with Sysprep
■
Configuring the unattended files
About Sysprep
Sysprep is a Microsoft utility that helps prepare Microsoft Windows computers
for cloning and customizes the configuration settings when a computer is cloned.
It is available on the Microsoft Web site, or it may be on your Microsoft Windows
installation CD. Sysprep changes the settings on source and target computers to
make cloning among computers with different hardware setups possible.
Sysprep uses unattended files that you can edit to provide computer-specific
information before and after you complete a cloning task. Depending on your
operating system, the unattended file is named follows:
Windows 2000/XP/2003
Sysprep.inf
Windows Vista
Unattend.xml
Sysprep uses the unattended files in the following ways:
■
As a source of information that is usually provided to the user through prompts.
412
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
About Sysprep
■
To alter configuration settings that are not provided for in the Sysprep user
interface.
■
To specify defaults that the Mini-Setup Wizard uses to configure the destination
computers after receiving the image.
If the source or target computers are running Microsoft Windows XP Home, then
Sysprep uses the Windows Welcome to request computer-specific information
from user input.
Some data from the unattended files is used to prepare the source computer for
duplication and customization before creating the image. Some of the settings
specified in the unattended files are applied by Sysprep after you restore the image
back onto the destination computers. The unattended files are not included with
the Sysprep download from Microsoft. You must create the unattended files
according to Microsoft guidelines or with the tools provided by Microsoft.
Sysprep also ensures that the Security Identifiers (SID) on the destination
computers are unique.
It is recommended that you read the documents listed in Table 23-1, even if you
are familiar with Sysprep.
Table 23-1
Sysprep documentation
Get information on
From
How to deploy Microsoft
Windows 2000 using
Sysprep
The following documents on the Microsoft Windows 2000
Professional CD:
How to deploy Microsoft
Windows XP through
Sysprep
How to deploy Microsoft
Windows Vista using
Sysprep
■
Support\Tools\Deploy.cab\Deptool.chm
■
Support\Tools\Deploy.cab\Unattend.doc
The following documents are available on the Microsoft
Windows XP Professional CD:
■
Support\Tools\Deploy.cab\Deploy.chm
■
Support\Tools\Deploy.cab\Ref.chm
The following documents on the Microsoft Windows
Automated Installation Kit DVD:
■
Docs\Chms\Waik.chm
■
Docs\Chms\Unattend.chm
Note: Do not use Sysprep and a configuration task to set the same configuration
settings in case of conflict between the settings. For example, do not instruct
Sysprep to add a computer to a domain and set this in a configuration task.
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Setting up Sysprep
For more information about using Sysprep with Ghost, see the Knowledge Base
article at the following URL:
http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/docid/2000081610075225
Setting up Sysprep
Use the Symantec Ghost Console to automatically install and configure Sysprep
on the Console client computers.
Symantec Ghost supports Sysprep version 1.1 for Windows 2000 and Sysprep
version 2.0 for Windows XP. The version that is included with Windows 2000 is
Sysprep version 1.0, which has reduced functionality.
Sysprep for Windows Vista is included in the Vista installation.
Adding a Sysprep configuration
Once you have copied the Sysprep files on to your computer, you can set up and
configure a version from the Console. The configuration can be added from the
Tools menu or from an image create task.
The Sysprep files are available for a specific operating system as follows:
Windows 2000
Download Sysprep version 1.1 from the Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/downloads/tools/sysprep/default.asp
Windows XP
Copy Sysprep version 2.0 from the following directory on the Windows
XP installation CD:
Support\Tools\Deploy.cab
Windows Vista
Sysprep for Vista is included in the Vista installation. It is installed
in <Windows>\system32\sysprep.
To add a Sysprep configuration
1
In the Ghost Console, do one of the following to move the Sysprep files to the
Symantec Ghost Console data directory:
■
On the Tools menu, click Sysprep Configurations, and then on the Add
or Delete Sysprep Configurations dialog box, click Add.
■
On the File menu, click New > Image Create Task, and then on the Sysprep
tab, click New.
413
414
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Setting up Sysprep
If you do not install the Sysprep files, your Sysprep tasks fail to execute.
2
In the Sysprep Configuration dialog, in the Name box, type a name for the
version of Sysprep that you want to install.
3
Select the operating system on which you are installing Sysprep:
■
Windows 2000/XP
■
Windows Vista
4
Click Browse.
5
Do one of the following:
Windows 2000/XP In the Browse for Folder window, browse for the Sysprep folder
location, select the Sysprep folder, and then click OK.
Sysprep.exe and Setupcl.exe must be present in the Sysprep
folder for Sysprep to install the files.
All files in the Sysprep folder and subfolders are installed in the
Console local data area (except for the empty ones). Before you
create a Sysprep image, all folders and files from that location
are copied to the Console client computer.
Windows Vista
6
In the Open window, browse to Unattend.xml, select it, and then
click OK.
Click OK.
Updating a Sysprep configuration
You cannot overwrite an existing Sysprep configuration with a new version if the
configuration is attached to a task. To update a Sysprep configuration that is
attached to a task, add a new version of Sysprep to the task.
See “Adding a Sysprep configuration” on page 413.
The new configuration does not update the unattend file. You must edit the
unattend file to make any changes.
See “Configuring the unattended files” on page 418.
Deleting a Sysprep configuration
If you delete a Sysprep configuration, all Sysprep files for that version are removed
from the Console local data area. Sysprep configurations are deleted from within
an image create task.
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
How Sysprep works with cloning and the Console post-configuration process
You cannot delete a Sysprep configuration if it has been selected within a task.
To delete a Sysprep configuration
1
In the Ghost Console, On the Tools menu, click Sysprep Configurations.
2
On the Add or Delete Sysprep Configurations dialog box, select a configuration,
and click Delete.
3
Click Done.
How Sysprep works with cloning and the Console
post-configuration process
Sysprep and the Console client interact in the following ways:
■
Image create task
■
Image restore task
Image create task
During a create image file task, Sysprep does the following:
■
Sysprep sets up the model computer before you create an image.
■
It then restarts the computer and the image create task executes.
■
After the image is created, the client remains in DOS and does not process the
Mini-Setup Wizard or Windows Welcome.
Image restore task
During a restore task, Sysprep does the following:
■
The image file is restored onto the Console client computers and the computers
start.
■
The Ghost post-clone configuration checks whether Sysprep is configured to
run. If Sysprep is configured to run then Ghost updates the unattended files
(Sysprep.inf or unattend.xml) with the configuration details from Ghost.
If you configured Ghost to use the default settings, then the Ghost
post-configuration process applies the default computer name or workgroup
settings. Any custom settings that you included in the Sysprep.inf or
unattend.xml file are overwritten. If you do not want your Sysprep answer file
settings to be overwritten, verify that Ghost is not configured to apply the
default settings.
■
The Sysprep process starts.
415
416
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Cloning with Sysprep
■
Sysprep uses either the Mini-Setup Wizard along with information specified
in Sysprep.inf, or the Windows Welcome, to gather configuration parameters
and then complete its post-cloning configuration.
Note: If mandatory configuration settings are not defined in Sysprep.inf, the
user is prompted for them in the Mini-Setup Wizard.
See “Configuring the unattended files” on page 418.
■
If Sysprep has been enabled to change the SID, it changes it once the Console
client computer has been configured.
■
The Console client completes the remainder of its post-configuration tasks
after Sysprep has restarted a second time. Depending on the post-configuration
tasks that the Console client has completed, it may restart the computer a
third time.
Cloning with Sysprep
Include Sysprep in an image restore task by including an image file that was
created in an image create task using Sysprep.
To create an image with Sysprep
1
In the Ghost Console, on the File menu, click New > Image Create Task.
2
Complete the Network and the General image create details.
See “Setting general image create task properties” on page 123.
See “Setting network properties” on page 126.
3
On the Sysprep tab, on the Sysprep Configuration drop-down list, select a
Sysprep configuration.
You can also add a Sysprep configuration now.
See “Adding a Sysprep configuration” on page 413.
4
Click Run Sysprep on this machine before creating the image.
5
In the Extra Sysprep Command Line Arguments box, type the Sysprep switches
to execute commands that are not automatically generated by Symantec
Ghost.
See “About using Sysprep switches” on page 417.
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Cloning with Sysprep
6
If the Sysprep configuration is Windows 20000/XP, then click Tell Sysprep
to perform a SID change when restoring this image to a destination machine
for Sysprep to change the SID on the destination computer.
If this option is selected, then do not use Ghost Walker to perform a SID
change when restoring an image onto client computers.
7
If the Sysprep configuration is Windows Vista, then click Tell Sysprep to
perform a SID change and remove hardware-specific information to add
the generalize switch.
The generalize switch adds SID-change functionality and removes and
hardware-specific information.
8
Leave Run the MiniSetup wizard which processes the sysprep.inf file checked.
This lets Sysprep run the Mini-Setup Wizard when cloning Microsoft Windows
XP Professional.
If this option is not selected, then the Windows Welcome appears instead of
the Mini-Setup Wizard the next time the computer is started.
9
Click Edit unattend file to make changes to the Sysprep.inf file for this task.
You can configure the file to let Sysprep set up the client computers without
user interaction.
See “Editing, restoring, or reloading the unattended files” on page 419.
About using Sysprep switches
If you are using other Sysprep switches, consult the Sysprep documentation and
ensure that they do not conflict with Ghost operation.
Table 23-2 lists the Sysprep switches are generated automatically by Symantec
Ghost or are set in the Console.
Table 23-2
Operating
System
Switches set by Ghost
Windows 2000
The following switches are set by The following switch is optional:
Ghost:
■ -pnp
■ -quiet
-nosidgen
You can set this option on the
Ghost Console Sysprep task
window.
■ -reboot
■
Optional switches
417
418
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Configuring the unattended files
Table 23-2
(continued)
Operating
System
Switches set by Ghost
Windows XP
The following switches are set by The following switches are
Ghost:
optional
■
-quiet
Optional switches
■
-pnp
-nosidgen
■ -activated
You can set this option on the
Ghost Console Sysprep task
window.
■ -reboot
■
Windows Vista
■
-reseal
■
-mini
You can set this option on the
Ghost Console Sysprep task
window.
The following switches are set by
Ghost:
■
-oobe
■
-reboot
■
-quiet
■
-generalize
You can set this option on the
Ghost Console Sysprep task
window.
Configuring the unattended files
When you update a Sysprep configuration, the unattended file (Sysprep.inf or
unattend.xml) that is copied by the Ghost Console becomes the template for all
Sysprep tasks for that configuration. For any task you can edit and configure the
copied template. However, if you want to alter the template file, you must make
the changes to the unattended files and update the Sysprep configuration by
overwriting the existing one.
See “Updating a Sysprep configuration” on page 414.
You can configure Sysprep in many ways. To let unattended files apply the
computer name, you must request that Sysprep randomly generates the computer
name. If you do not, Sysprep supplies a default name to the MiniSetup Wizard
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Configuring the unattended files
and the user is prompted to confirm it. To request a randomly generated computer
name, use the following parameter:
[UserData] ComputerName=*
Editing, restoring, or reloading the unattended files
You can edit the Sysprep template file that is included in a task. If you do not edit
the template file, then Ghost uses the default unattended files (Sysprep.inf or
unattend.xml) in the Console's data folder.
See “Configuring the unattended files” on page 418.
To edit, restore, or reload the unattended files
1
In the Properties for New Task window, on the Sysprep tab, click Edit
unattend files.
2
Edit the unattended file.
You can configure the file to let Sysprep set up the client computers without
user interaction.
See “Configuring the unattended files” on page 418.
3
Select one of the following:
Save
Saves your changes
Restore
Returns to the unattended file that was used when the task was
first created
Reload
Replaces the unattended file from the configuration template
(Sysprep.inf or unattend.xml)
419
420
Using Symantec Ghost with Sysprep
Configuring the unattended files
Section
Symantec Ghost utilities
■
Managing partitions using GDisk
■
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
■
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
8
422
Chapter
24
Managing partitions using
GDisk
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About GDisk
■
Overview of the main command-line switches
■
Creating a partition
■
Reinitializing the Master Boot Record
■
Reinitializing GPT disks
■
Showing information about disks
■
Performing multiple GDisk operations using batch mode
■
Deleting and wiping your disk
■
Activating or deactivating a partition
■
Hiding or unhiding a partition
■
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
■
About FAT16 partitions in Windows NT
■
Support for large hard-disks
About GDisk
GDisk is a utility that lets you create partitions, reinitialize master boot records,
delete data, and wipe your disks in many different ways.
424
Managing partitions using GDisk
About GDisk
The following versions of GDisk are included with Symantec Ghost:
GDisk.exe
Runs in DOS
GDisk32.exe
Runs from the command line in a Windows operating system
Before executing GDisk32 on 9x-based computers, ensure that the following files
are in the same directory as GDisk32.exe:
■
Int86_32.dll
■
Int86_16.dll
You can find these files in the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite folder.
GDisk is a complete replacement for the Fdisk and Format utilities and offers the
following features:
■
On-the-fly formatting
■
Extensive partition reporting
■
High-security disk wiping
■
The ability to hide a partition or make a hidden partition visible
■
Compliance with the U.S. Department of Defense requirements for securely
wiping disks
Unlike Fdisk, which uses interactive menus and prompts, GDisk is command-line
driven. This offers quicker configuration of a disk's partitions and the ability to
define GDisk operations in a batch file.
Running GDisk
GDisk.exe must be run in DOS mode. GDisk32.exe can be run from within Windows.
To run GDisk.exe
1
Start your computer in DOS mode.
2
At the DOS prompt, type progra~1\symantec \ghost\GDisk followed by the
required disk and switches.
To run GDisk32 in Microsoft Vista, you must run the command prompt as an
administrator.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Overview of the main command-line switches
To run the command prompt as an administrator
1
On the taskbar, click Start > All Programs > Accessories, right-click
Command Prompt and click Run as administrator.
2
In the User Account Control dialog box, type the administrator credentials.
3
Click OK.
To run GDisk32.exe
1
On the Windows taskbar, open a DOS window.
2
At the DOS prompt, type progra~1\symantec \ghost\GDisk32 followed by
the required disk and switches.
Overview of the main command-line switches
GDisk has 11 main modes of operation. The first four correspond to the menu
options on the FDisk main menu.
Some command-line switches work only with the DOS version of GDisk or only
with the Windows 32 version of GDisk.
Table 24-1 describes the switches that set the mode in which GDisk operates.
Table 24-1
GDisk main commands
Mode
Switch
Explanation
Create
/cre
Creates primary DOS partitions and extended DOS
partitions.
Delete
/del
Deletes partitions of any type, including non-DOS
partitions.
Status (default)
/status
Lists information on the specified fixed disk and its
partitions.
Activate
/act
Activates and deactivates a partition (specifying it as
the bootable partition).
/-act
Hide
/hide
Hides or unhides an existing partition.
/-hide
Reinitialize MBR
/mbr
Reinitializes the Master Boot Record.
Reinitialize GPT
/gpt
Reinitializes a GPT disk.
Batch
/batch
Uses batch-mode command execution.
425
426
Managing partitions using GDisk
Overview of the main command-line switches
Table 24-1
GDisk main commands (continued)
Mode
Switch
Explanation
Disk wipe
/diskwipe
Wipes the contents of the whole disk.
Boot.ini
/bootini
Makes a modification to the Windows NT/2000/XP
boot menu (Windows only).
View
/view
Lets you view the contents of a disk to confirm an
overwrite pattern after a disk wipe.
Online Help for command-line switches
You can get an overview of the nine modes of operation and their switches by
using the Help switch. The syntax for displaying help in GDisk is as follows:
Note: An additional switch not shown is the /VERSION switch. This switch shows
the version information for the GDisk and GDisk32 executable.
More detailed Help is available by qualifying the Help command with the switch
for one of the nine main modes of operation.
For example, to view the detailed Help file for Hide, type one of the following
command lines:
GDisk.exe
C:\progra~1\symantec\ghost\gdisk /hide /?
GDisk32.exe
C:\progra~1\symantec\ghost\gdisk32 /hide /?
Switches common to all GDisk commands
Table 24-2 describes the switches for any of the main GDisk operations.
Table 24-2
Switches common to all GDisk commands
Switch
Explanation
/x
Prevents GDisk from using extended disk access support. This may
result in GDisk not being aware of the full capacity of the disk.
/I
Prevents GDisk from using direct IDE disk access support. This may
result in GDisk not being aware of the full capacity of the disk.
/s
Prevents GDisk from using direct SCSI disk access support. This may
result in GDisk not being aware of the full capacity of the disk.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Overview of the main command-line switches
Table 24-2
Switches common to all GDisk commands (continued)
Switch
Explanation
/y
Suppresses prompting to confirm the operation. If you do not use this
switch, you are not necessarily prompted before a partition is deleted
or another possibly destructive operation is executed.
/sure
Suppresses prompting to confirm the operation and has the same
functionality as /y.
/r
Causes GDisk to restart the computer if the operation is successful.
/u
Turns off Ultra Direct Memory Access (UDMA).
This switch works in DOS only.
/forceusb
Forces USB support to start, even when the USB controller is being
run by something else. The forceusb attempts to take over the USB
Host Controller and then attempts to return it to the previous state
once the Ghost operation is complete. This works for controllers as
follows:
EHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
■ UHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
For example, the keyboard is returned after the Ghost operation
is finished.
■ OHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over but not returned
to the BIOS.
■
Note the following:
■
Use this switch with caution.
■
Avoid using the forceusb switch to take over a USB controller from
a driver, for example, Iomega USB drivers. You may encounter
problems if you do this.
This switch works in DOS only.
/nousb
Disables USB support.
This switch works in DOS only.
427
428
Managing partitions using GDisk
Creating a partition
Switches common to all GDisk commands (continued)
Table 24-2
Switch
Explanation
/
Forces FireWire support to start, even when the FireWire controller
is being run by something else. The force1394 switch attempts to take
over the FireWire Host Controller. To enable native BIOS support, you
must restart the computer.
force1394
Note the following:
■
Use this switch with caution.
■
Avoid using the force1394 switch to take over a FireWire controller
from a driver, for example, Iomega FireWire drivers. You may
encounter problems if you do this.
This switch works in DOS only.
/no1394
Disables FireWire support.
This switch works in DOS only.
Creating a partition
The create command lets you create a partition and specify the parameters of the
partition. The command uses the largest block of unused disk space to create the
partition. You can specify the partition type and the partition size. You can use
the /for switch with the create command to format the partition. Otherwise, the
partition is not formatted. You cannot create a dynamic disk partition.
Note: When GDisk creates a FAT32 partition, it aligns the first data sector to a 4
KB boundary from the start of the partition.
The create command uses the following syntax:
GDisk
gdisk disk /cre {/pri| /ext| /log}[/sz: {MB|pcent{p|%}}]
[/end] [/for [/q] [/ntfs[:vista|xp|2000|nt4|nt351]]
[/align[:chs|1mb]] [/v[:label]]] [/-32] [/ntfat16]
GDisk32
gdisk32 disk /cre{/pri|/ext|/log} [/sz:{MB|pcent{p|%}}]
[/end][/for [/q][/ntfs[:vista|xp|2000|nt4|nt351]]
[/align[:chs|1mb]][/v[:label]]] [/-32] [/ntfat16]
For example, to create a FAT32 formatted partition that uses the entire disk, you
can use the following command:
Managing partitions using GDisk
Creating a partition
gdisk 1 /cre /pri /for /q
Table 24-3 describes the switches that you can use with the create command.
Table 24-3
Create switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/cre
Creates a partition or a logical drive.
/pri
Creates a primary partition for an MBR or a GPT disk.
/ext
Creates an extended partition. This is supported for MBR only.
/log
Creates a logical drive in the extended partition. This is supported for
MBR only.
/sz:MB
Specifies the size of the partition in megabytes (MB). This is rounded
up to the nearest cylinder.
/sz:pcent{p|%}
Specifies the size of the partition as a percentage of the total disk size,
not the available disk space.
/end
Creates the partition at the end of the free space. If this switch is not
used, then the partition is created at the beginning of the free space.
If the command line specifies that all of the available space is to be
used to create the partition, then the /end switch is ignored.
/for
Formats the new partition once it has been created. Unless the /ntfat16
or /-32 switches are used, the partition type is determined by the
following:
■
If the partition is less than 16MB: FAT12
■
If the partition is between 16MB and 512MB: FAT16
■
If the partition is greater than 512MB: FAT32
/ntfs[:vista|xp|
2000|nt4|nt351]
Formats the new partition as NTFS. You can use the /for switch with
this command to format the NTFS partition with the required volume
type.
/align[:CHS|1MB]
Aligns the partition with a boundary as follows:
CHS: Aligns the partition to a track or cylinder boundary. This
setting is the default.
■ 1MB: Aligns the partition with a boundary of 1 MB.
■
You can use the lba switch to view the partition alignment.
Note: The 1MB alignment option supports Windows Vista.
429
430
Managing partitions using GDisk
Reinitializing the Master Boot Record
Table 24-3
Create switches (continued)
Switch
Explanation
/q
Performs a quick format if used in combination with the /for switch.
If you do not use this switch, then GDisk performs a surface scan of
the partition and marks any bad sectors.
/v[:label]
Gives the new formatted partition the specified label when used in
combination with the /for switch.
/-32
Indicates that the partition is not formatted as FAT32. Limits primary
and logical partitions to 2048 MB. Partitions over 16 MB are formatted
as FAT16. This switch is useful if the operating system does not
support FAT32, such as Windows NT 4.
/ntfat16
Lets you create a FAT16 primary or logical partition, up to 4097 MB.
The cluster size is 64 KB. Partitions over 16 MB are formatted as
FAT16. Windows 98 and DOS systems may be unable to access
partitions that are created with this switch and are over 2048 MB.
Reinitializing the Master Boot Record
You can use the /mbr command to rewrite the boot code in the master boot record
(MBR). For example, you can use the /mbr command to reinitialize the MBR to
eliminate a boot-sector virus. You can also use the /mbr command with the /wipe
option in DOS to delete a dynamic disk.
Note: You must use the /mbr command when you delete Linux partitions if LILO
resides in the MBR.
The syntax for this command is as follows:
GDisk.exe
gdisk disk /mbr [/wipe] [/p] [/z]
GDisk32.exe
gdisk32 disk /mbr {/p /z}
Table 24-4 lists the mbr switches.
Table 24-4
/mbr switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Reinitializing GPT disks
Table 24-4
/mbr switches (continued)
Switch
Explanation
/mbr
Reinitializes the boot code in the Master Boot Record.
/wipe
Deletes the partition on the disk (DOS only).
/p
Preserves the disk signature.
/z
Clears the disk signature and sets it to 0.
If you clear the disk signature on a Windows computer then the disk must be
initialized by Windows before it can be used. This is performed automatically
when a computer is started. You can use the Disk Manager feature in Windows
to initialize the disk manually. Microsoft Vista does not support automatic
initialization.
When running GDisk in DOS the default behavior is to use the signature in the
reinitialized MBR which already has both the 98 and NT signatures. The signatures
are then initialized during startup if Windows detects that there are duplicate
signatures.
When running GDisk in Windows the computer can crash if the signatures are
the same. There is no default behavior, so either /p or /z must be used.
Reinitializing GPT disks
You can use the /gpt command with /wipe to reformat a GPT disk. You can also
use the /gpt switch with the /wipe switch in DOS to delete a dynamic disk.
The syntax for this command is as follows:
gdisk disk /gpt /wipe
Table 24-5 lists the gpt switches.
Table 24-5
/gpt switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128
/gpt /wipe
Reformats a GPT disk (DOS only)
431
432
Managing partitions using GDisk
Showing information about disks
Showing information about disks
The status switch shows information about the fixed disks and partitions on a
disk, including the model of the disk. You must specify the disk number to get
information about the partitions on a disk.
Depending on the version of GDisk that you require, the syntax for this command
is one of the following:
GDisk.exe
gdisk [disk] [/status] [/raw|lba] [/ser]
GDisk32.exe
gdisk32 [disk] [/status] [/raw|lba] [/ser]
Table 24-6 lists the status switches.
Table 24-6
/status switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/raw
Shows the contents of the partition table in CHS or GPT form if used
with the disk switch.
/lba
Shows the contents of the partition table in logical block form if used
with the disk switch.
/ser
Shows the serial number of the disk.
Performing multiple GDisk operations using batch
mode
Use the batch mode switch, /batch, to perform multiple GDisk operations with a
single command. Using the /batch switch lets you avoid loading GDisk from the
boot disk each time. Batch commands can either be supplied interactively at a
prompt or in a previously prepared text file.
If the name of a text file is supplied along with the batch mode switch, GDisk
opens the file and executes the commands within it until all commands have been
executed or one of the commands encounters an error.
For example:
C:\> gdisk /batch:cmds.txt
If the batch mode switch is supplied without a file name, GDisk prompts you for
the commands to execute.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Performing multiple GDisk operations using batch mode
Note: To use GDisk32.exe in the example commands, replace gdisk with gdisk32.
Command-line arguments that apply to all of the batch commands can be specified
on the original command line along with the batch mode switch. The lines found
in the batch file (or typed at the prompt) are appended to the already partially
formed command line.
Following is a sample batch command file called Two-new.txt. Blank lines and
lines starting with the number (hash) symbol are considered comments. These
lines are ignored. In the following example, the commands do not specify the fixed
disk on which to operate:
# delete all partitions
/del /all
# create formatted FAT16 primary DOS partition and then create
an extended # partition
/cre /pri /-32 /for /q
/cre /ext
# create formatted FAT16 logical DOS partition
/cre /log /-32 /for /q
The following command deletes all partitions and creates two new ones on the
second fixed disk with confirmation prompting turned off:
gdisk 2 /y /batch:two-new.txt
The following four commands to be executed are a combination of the original
command plus the commands from the batch file:
gdisk 2 /y /del /all
gdisk 2 /y /cre /pri /-32 /for /q
gdisk 2 /y /cre /ext
gdisk 2 /y /cre /log /-32 /for /q
Batch files may be nested recursively. For example, a second file called Std_init.txt
contains the following lines:
1 /batch:two-new.txt
2 /batch:two-new.txt
As a result, the following command performs the actions of two-new.txt on both
fixed disks:
gdisk /batch:std-init.txt
433
434
Managing partitions using GDisk
Deleting and wiping your disk
Deleting and wiping your disk
GDisk lets you delete data and partitions on your disk or wipe your entire disk.
You cannot delete a dynamic disk partition with the /del switch.
The switch /del /all deletes all partitions that are on the disk. Any other space
that has not been used for creating a partition is not deleted. Deleting an extended
partition also deletes any logical partition within it.
The /diskwipe switch wipes the entire disk, partitions, partition table, MBR, and
all used and unused space.
See “About GDisk disk-wipe specifications” on page 545.
Depending on the version of GDisk that you require, the syntax for the delete
command is one of the following:
GDisk
gdisk disk /del {/pri[:nth]|/ext[:nth]|/log:nth|
/p:partn-no|/all}
[/qwipe|/dodwipe|/customwipe:n][/[-]hpa]
GDisk32
gdisk32 disk /del {/p:partn-no|/all} [/qwipe|/dodwipe
|/customwipe:n]
Table 24-7 lists the delete command switches.
Table 24-7
/del switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/del
Deletes a partition or a logical drive.
/pri[:nth]
Deletes the nth primary partition on an MBR or a GPT disk. The default
setting is 1.
/ext[:nth]
Deletes the nth extended partition as well as any logical partitions in
the extended partition. This switch is supported on MBR disks only.
The default setting is 1.
/log:nth
Deletes the nth logical drive from the extended partition. This switch
is supported on MBR disks only.
/p:partn-no
Indicates which partition to delete on an MBR or a GPT disk. You
should use the partition number that is reported by GDisk in standard
display mode for partn-no. Do not use the /lba or the /raw switches
to find the partition number.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Deleting and wiping your disk
Table 24-7
/del switches (continued)
Switch
Explanation
/all
Deletes all partitions.
/qwipe
Overwrites the partition's data area before deleting the partition.
Makes 1 pass of deleting the data on the disk.
/dodwipe
Overwrites the partition's data area before deleting the partition.
Makes 6 passes of deleting the data on the disk.
/customwipe:n
Overwrites the partition's data area n times before deleting the
partition. You can set n from 1 to 100. The /customwipe:6 switch is
equivalent to a sanitize /dodwipe operation.
Depending on the version of GDisk that you require, the syntax for the diskwipe
switch is as follows:
GDisk.exe
gdisk disk /diskwipe [dodwipe| /customwipe:n][/[-]hpa]
GDisk32.exe
gdisk32 disk /diskwipe [dodwipe| /customwipe:n]
Note: You must restart the computer after a disk wipe operation.
Table 24-8 lists the diskwipe switches.
Table 24-8
/diskwipe switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/diskwipe
Wipes the contents of the entire disk. Using this switch on its own
wipes all partitions.
/dodwipe
Overwrites the disk including all partitions. Makes six passes of
deleting the data on the disk.
/customwipe:n
Overwrites the disk's data area n times and deletes partitions. You
can set n from 1 to 100. The /customwipe:6 switch is equivalent to a
sanitize /dodwipe operation.
/hpa
Wipes any HPA/PARTIES area found on the disk. (DOS only)
/-hpa
Ignores any HPA/PARTIES area found on the disk. (DOS only)
Following are examples of the delete and wipe switches:
435
436
Managing partitions using GDisk
Deleting and wiping your disk
■
gdisk 1 /del /all /qwipe completes one pass to delete all partitions and data on
disk 1.
■
gdisk 1 /del /p:2 /qwipe wipes partition 2 on disk 1 with one pass.
■
gdisk 1 /diskwipe /customwipe:15 wipes the entire disk with 15 passes.
Wiping Host Protected Areas (HPA)/PARTIES
During execution of a DoD disk wipe, GDisk attempts to detect an HPA/PARTIES
area on the disk. This functionality operates with GDisk.exe only.
The sequence of the wipe is as follows:
■
If GDisk detects such an area, then it shall notify the user that it was found
and ask the user whether this area should be unlocked so that it can be erased.
■
If the user requests that the area be unlocked, then GDisk will attempt to
unlock the area. Otherwise, GDisk continues, ignoring the HPA area.
■
If the area is not password-protected and is successfully unlocked, then GDisk
notifies the user and erases the entire disk, including the HPA/PARTIES area.
■
If the area is password-protected and cannot be unlocked, then it notifies the
user that the unlock failed and asks if the users wants to continue. The user
is also informed that the HPA/PARTIES area could possibly be unlocked using
the BIOS.
■
If the user wants to continue, then GDisk continues to erase the disk, ignoring
the HPA/PARTIES area.
There are optional command-line switches as follows:
/-hpa
GDisk does not look for an HPA on the disk.
For example:
gdisk 1 /diskwipe /dodwipe /-hpa performs a DoD disk wipe without
checking for an HPA on the disk. If an HPA area is present, it is not
wiped.
/hpa
GDisk detects and attempts to unlock the HPA on the disk. If the area
cannot be unlocked, then GDisk exits.
For example:
gdisk 1 /diskwipe /dodwipe /hpa performs a DoD disk wipe attempting
to unlock any HPA on the disk.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Activating or deactivating a partition
Confirming a disk wipe
The view:n command-line switch lets you view the overwrite pattern on the disk
to confirm the overwrite has occurred. This lets you display one or more sectors,
starting at sector n, of a physical disk on screen (by default, 1 sector shall be
displayed). Sector numbers start at 0.
The optional arguments are as follows:
num:m
m sectors are displayed starting at the sector indicated in the view
command.
If num:m is not specified, then GDisk defaults to displaying only one
sector as indicated by view:n.
page
GDisk waits for you to press a key after each page of sector content
is displayed. You can press q to exit.
If page is not specified, then GDisk defaults to continuously outputting
the contents of the sectors specified until finished.
Each sector is displayed as a table with 16 columns containing the sector offset,
then hex bytes, and lastly 16 ASCII characters representing each byte. The table
has n rows where n depends on the sector size. This is usually 32 rows (sector size
of 512 bytes).
For example, displays sectors 0, 1, and 2 on screen:
gdisk 1 /view:0 /num:3
Figure 24-1 shows the output display.
Figure 24-1
Viewing disk wipe output
Activating or deactivating a partition
A computer starts in an active partition. Using the /act or /-act switches, you can
choose the partition to which the computer starts.
Depending on the version of GDisk that you require, the syntax for this command
is one of the following:
437
438
Managing partitions using GDisk
Hiding or unhiding a partition
GDisk.exe
gdisk disk /[-]act /p:partn-no
GDisk32.exe
gdisk32 disk /[-]act /p:partn-no
Table 24-9 lists the act switches.
Table 24-9
/act switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/act
Activates a partition.
/-act
Deactivates a partition.
/p:partn-no
Indicates the partition to activate or deactivate. Only primary
partitions can be activated. Use the number reported by GDisk in
standard display mode (not using /lba or /raw) for partn-no.
Hiding or unhiding a partition
You can hide a partition so that a user cannot see it.
Depending on the version of GDisk that you require, the syntax for this command
is one of the following:
GDisk.exe
gdisk disk /[-]hide /p:partn-no
GDisk32.exe
gdisk32 disk /[-]hide /p:partn-no
Table 24-10 lists the hide switches.
Table 24-10
/hide switches
Switch
Explanation
disk
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/hide
Hides a partition.
/-hide
Unhides a partition.
/p:partn-no
Indicates the partition to hide or unhide. Use the number reported by
GDisk in standard display mode (not using /lba or /raw) for partn-no.
Managing partitions using GDisk
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
The /bootini switch lets you make a modification to a Windows NT/2000/XP boot
menu. The following modifications are supported:
■
Displaying a list of current boot entries
■
Adding an entry to boot.ini
■
Removing an entry from boot.ini
■
Setting the default boot option and timeout
This switch functions with GDisk32.exe only.
When GDisk32 changes the state of boot.ini, a copy of the current boot.ini is
created.
Table 24-11 lists the boot.ini copy names.
Table 24-11
Original and copy names
Original boot.ini filename
Boot.ini copy name
Named boot.ini
boot_GDISK32_copy.ini
Not named boot.ini and with a period. For
example:
my_GDISK32_copy.ini
my.ini
Not named boot.ini and without a period. For _GDISK32_copy is appended to the end of
example:
the file name:
myBootFile
myBootFile_GDISK32_copy
Specifying the boot.ini path and file name
The /inifile switch is common to all operations performed with the /bootini switch.
The /inifile switch lets you specify the full path and file name of the current
Windows NT/2000/XP boot.ini file. This lets you locate boot.ini if it is not on drive
C.
The default value for this switch is C:\boot.ini.
Displaying the list of current boot entries
Use the /bootini switch to display the existing boot menu for the current Windows
NT/2000/XP operating system.
The syntax for this command is as follows:
439
440
Managing partitions using GDisk
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
gdisk32 /bootini [/inifile:filename]
Adding an entry to boot.ini
You can add the following functions to a boot.ini file:
■
Starting another installation of Windows NT/2000/XP that resides on a
different partition.
■
Starting a non-Windows NT/2000/XP operating system that resides on a
different partition.
GDisk does not add an entry to boot.ini in the following cases:
■
An entry with the description already exists in Boot.ini (case insensitive).
■
The referenced partition is of type Extended.
■
The referenced partition is hidden.
Table 24-12 describes the function of each switch for both types of entries.
Table 24-12
Boot.ini switches
Switch
Explanation
/bootini
Modifies boot.ini.
/add
Creates a new entry in boot.ini.
/d:diskno
Represents the physical fixed disk, from 1 to 128.
/p:partno
Indicates the partition from which to boot.
/desc:description
Specifies the description to appear in the NT boot loader menu.
/inifile:filename
Specifies the full path and file name for boot.ini. The default
value is C:\boot.ini.
/bsectfile:filename
Specifies the boot-sector file to create. For example, C:\bsect.dat.
/winnt
Adds an entry to start a Windows NT/2000/XP operating system.
/sysfolder:folder
Specifies the system folder on the Windows NT/2000/XP
operating system from which to start. The default value is
Winnt.
/r
Restarts after the execution of the command.
Adding an entry to start Windows NT/2000/XP
The syntax for this command is as follows:
Managing partitions using GDisk
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
gdisk32 /bootini /add /d:disknumber/p:partno /desc:description /winnt
[/sysfolder:folder] [/inifile:filename] [/r]
This entry uses the Advanced RISC Computing (ARC) style path to describe the
relative disk location for the entry. The entry has the following format:
<ARC style path>\<system folder>=“description”
For example:
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\winnt=“Boot NT System”
For more information, see the Microsoft Knowledge Base article Q102873 “BOOT.INI and ARC Path Naming Conventions and Usage.”
Note the following:
■
GDisk uses only Multi(X) syntax when describing ARC style paths, as opposed
to SCSI(X).
■
GDisk always uses multi(0)disk(0) as the beginning of the ARC style path.
■
/winnt instructs GDisk32 to create an ARC style entry and must be used if the
target operating system is Windows NT/2000/XP. If this switch is not used,
then GDisk32 creates an entry as if the target operating system is not Windows
NT/2000/XP.
■
/sysfolder lets you specify the Windows system folder on the target operating
system. The system folder is usually Winnt. If the system folder is not Winnt,
then provide the path to this folder, but do not include the root directory.
For example, use /sysfolder:"2k\WinNt", not /sysfolder:"f:\2k\WinNt".
Adding an entry to start a non-Windows NT/2000/XP operating
system
The syntax for this command is as follows:
gdisk32 /bootini /add /d:diskno/p:partno /desc:description
[/inifile:filename] [/bsectfile:filename] [/r]
This entry to boot.ini references a boot-sector file used to continue the boot
process.
The entry has the following format:
<full path to boot sector file>\<boot sector file>="description"
For example:
C:\bootos2s.dat="Boot OS/2 System"
When adding this entry, GDisk does the following:
441
442
Managing partitions using GDisk
Modifying the Windows NT/2000/XP boot menu
■
Reads the first sector of the targeted partition (boot sector).
■
Writes out the contents of that sector to a boot-sector file.
■
Adds a reference to that boot-sector file to boot.ini.
The /bsectfile switch is optional. It is used if you want the created bootsect.dat
file to be saved somewhere other than the default location.
You must specify the full path and file name for the boot-sector file that is created
when you use the /bsectfile switch.
GDisk32 does the following by default:
■
Builds the file name from the entry descriptions, omitting any invalid
characters under DOS rules for 8.3 file name format.
■
Creates the boot-sector file in the root directory of the C drive and gives it a
.dat file extension.
For example:
gdisk32 /add /d:1 /p:2 /desc:“*** Boot OS/2 ***”
This produces a boot-sector file C:\bootos2.dat.
Removing an entry from boot.ini
The syntax to remove an entry from boot.ini is as follows:
gdisk32 /bootini /remove /entry:number [/inifile:filename] [/r]
Table 24-13 lists the remove switches.
Table 24-13
/remove switches
Switch
Explanation
/remove
Removes the entry from boot.ini.
/entry:number
Removes the ID of the entry from boot.ini.
If the entry to be removed is the default boot option, then GDisk removes the
entry and sets the first entry in the remaining list as the default boot entry.
GDisk does not remove the entry if it is the only entry in boot.ini.
Setting the default boot option and timeout
Use the /default switch to set the default boot option and timeout.
The syntax for this command is as follows:
Managing partitions using GDisk
About FAT16 partitions in Windows NT
gdisk32 /bootini /default [/entry:number] [/timeout:sec]
[/inifile:filename] [/r]
Table 24-14 lists the default boot option and timeout switches.
Table 24-14
Default boot option and timeout switches
Switch
Explanation
/default
Sets the default boot option and timeout.
/entry:number
Sets the ID of the entry as the default boot option.
/timeout:sec
Sets the number of seconds before the default boot option is selected.
About FAT16 partitions in Windows NT
FAT16 partitions can be up to 4 GB using 64 K clusters in Windows NT. GDisk can
create a FAT16 partition using 64 K clusters when the /ntfat16 switch is added
to the create partition command line. This switch disables the creation of FAT32
partitions and allows the creation of FAT16 partitions up to 4 GB.
Note: DOS and Windows 98 do not support FAT16 partitions using 64 K clusters
and are limited to 2 GB FAT16 partitions.
Support for large hard-disks
GDisk supports all operations on disks up to 2 TB, and can also wipe disks larger
than 2 TB.
GDisk includes large disk-drive support for IDE and SCSI hard drives (disks that
exceed the 1024 cylinder BIOS limitation, which translates to a capacity greater
than 7.8 GB). GDisk can directly access hard disks through the IDE controller or
ASPI interface provided by an ASPI driver. Take care when creating partitions
for operating systems with inherent partition-size limitations.
Remember the following information when you create partitions for use in
Windows 98:
■
On a system with PC BIOS that does not support interrupt 13h extended disk
services, ensure that the partitions created can be used as intended. When a
primary partition or extended partition starts or ends past the 7.8 GB limit of
the hard drive, it is not accessible on such systems in Windows or in DOS-only
mode. This affects all logical partitions contained within an extended partition
that starts or ends past the limit.
443
444
Managing partitions using GDisk
Support for large hard-disks
Remember the following information when you create partitions for use in
Windows NT:
■
According to the Microsoft Knowledge Base, Windows NT NTFS bootable
partitions cannot exceed 7.8 GB (8,455,716,864 bytes). This information is
detailed in the Microsoft Knowledge Base Article “Windows NT Boot Process
and Hard Disk Constraints,” Article ID: Q114841.
Non-bootable NTFS partitions do not have this size limitation.
■
Windows NT cannot start from partitions that start or end beyond the
1024-cylinder boundary. If this condition exists, Windows NT reports a “Boot
Record Signature AA55 Not Found” error message.
Windows NT does not support drives larger than 7.8 GB unless you install Service
Pack 4 or apply the ATAPI hot fix to Service Pack 3. This information is included
in the Microsoft Knowledge Base Article “IBM DTTA-351010 10.1 GB Drive Capacity
Is Inaccurate,” Article ID: Q183654.
Chapter
25
Manipulating files and
directories using OmniFS
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About OmniFS
■
OmniFS operating environments
■
Using OmniFS
■
OmniFS operations
■
Using OmniFS to recover files
■
Using a script file
■
OmniFS scenarios
■
OmniFS error handling
■
Correcting the date and time
About OmniFS
OmniFS is a general-purpose utility for manipulating files and directories in a
locally attached NTFS or FAT file system (including hidden partitions) from DOS
or WinPE.
OmniFS32 performs the same functions but runs them in a Windows environment.
446
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS operating environments
What OmniFS does
OmniFS performs selected file input/output operations on a file system that is
not accessible from a utility's operating environment. In particular, OmniFS
accesses NTFS volumes from DOS or Windows 98, and FAT32 volumes from
Windows NT.
OmniFS supports scripting and batch mode execution.
OmniFS operating environments
Table 25-1 lists the versions of OmniFS.
Table 25-1
OmniFS versions
Executable
Operating system
OmniFS
PC-DOS, MS-DOS
OmniFS32
Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT/98
Before you run OmniFS32 on Windows 98 computers, ensure that the following
files are in the same directory as OmniFS32.exe:
■
Int86_32.dll
■
Int86_16.dll
You can find these files in the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite folder.
Long file names are supported on NTFS file systems, but support for long file
names on FAT file systems depends on the operating system and access method.
If you use the OmniFS library to access a file system, then long file names are
supported. You can use the access method switches to directly access a file system.
Using OmniFS
You can execute OmniFS from the command line only. The executables are called
OmniFS.exe and OmniFS32.exe. Running OmniFS without any arguments provides
a list of the interfaces and lists the access method switches.
The following interfaces are supported for both OmniFS.exe and OmniFS32.exe:
omnifs [/accessmethods]<operation to Performs the file operation and exits. It uses the
perform> <operation arguments, if
exit code to signal whether or not the operation
any>
was successful, making it suitable for batch mode
execution.
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Using OmniFS
omnifs [/accessmethods]script<script
file name>
Performs all of the operations that are nominated
in the script file and exits. It uses the exit code to
signal whether the operation was successful. If
any operation in the script file is unsuccessful,
the script stops running and the utility exits,
which signifies that the operation failed.
omnifs help
Lists the available commands.
To run OmniFS32 in Microsoft Vista, you must run the command prompt as an
administrator.
To run the command prompt as an administrator
1
On the taskbar, click Start > All Programs > Accessories, right-click
Command Prompt and click Run as administrator.
2
In the User Account Control dialog box, type the administrator credentials.
3
Click OK.
Access method switches
Table 25-2 lists the access method switches that you can use in any operation.
Not all access methods are relevant to the Win32 version, OmniFS32.exe.
Table 25-2
Access method switches
Switch
Description
/cp=codepage
Handles the code page in the same way as the current OEM page. The
code page is specified as a number.
/diskfs
Specifies that the preferred file system access is through the
application file system code.
/diskvol
Specifies that the preferred volume access is through the application
volume code.
/dl=n
Specifies the number of hard drives present.
/ffi
Prefers use of Direct IDE Access (DOS only).
/ffs
Prefers use of Direct ASPI/SCSI Access.
/ffx
Prefers use of Extended Int13h.
/fna
Disables asynchronous I/o.
/fni
Disables Direct IDE Access support (DOS only).
447
448
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Using OmniFS
Table 25-2
Access method switches (continued)
Switch
Description
/fns
Disables Direct ASPI/SCSI Access support.
/fnx
Disables Extended Int13h support.
/force1394
Forces the IEEE1394 device (Firewire) to start (DOS only).
/forceusb
Forces USB support to start, even when the USB controller is being
run by something else (DOS only).The -forceusb switch attempts to
take over the USB Host Controller and then attempts to return it to
the previous state once the Ghost operation is complete. This works
for controllers as follows:
EHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
■ UHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
For example, the keyboard is returned after the Ghost operation
is finished.
■ OHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over but not returned
to the BIOS.
■
Note the following:
■
Use this switch with caution.
■
Avoid using the forceusb switch to take over a USB controller from
a driver, for example, the Ghost peer-to-peer USB driver. You may
encounter problems if you do this.
/no1394
Tuns off the IEEE1394 (Firewire) support (DOS only).
/noide
Tuns off the IDE support (DOS only).
/noscsi
Tuns off the SCSI support.
/nousb
Tuns off USB support (DOS only).
/osfs
Specifies that the preferred file system access is through the operating
system.
/osvol
Specifies that the preferred volume access is through the operating
system.
/pfpath=path
Sets the path to the directory in which the recovery file system resides.
/usbtimeout=n
Sets the USB emulation timeout in microseconds, where n is greater
than or equal to 1 (DOS only). The default setting is 3000ms.
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Using OmniFS
Table 25-2
Access method switches (continued)
Switch
Description
/vdw
Verifies every disk write.
Accessing files and folders with names that contain spaces
When using any of the OmniFS operations on files or folders that contain spaces
in the file name or folder name, you must use one of these methods.
To display the directory for the folder My Documents in volume 1, use one of the
following:
OmniFS dir “1.1:\My Documents” OmniFS dir 1.1:“\My Documents”
The following example would not work:
OmniFS dir 1.1:\“My Documents”
Listing drive identifiers
An NTFS file system cannot be mounted by DOS and, therefore, does not have a
drive letter assigned by DOS. Use the info or diskinfo command to list the drive
identifiers that are assigned by OmniFS on a computer.
In all cases, the characters :\ distinguish the volume identifier from the path name.
For example, the output of c:\>omnifs info might look like the following:
Disk:
Disk:
1
(95.42GB)
M:[Maxtor 4 G100H5 GAK8]
S:[G5001MGF]
1.1
(87.89GB)
[C:\] Active Volume NTFS
l:[Rasfline] Primary
(7.53GB)
Unused Space Primary
2
(3.01GB)
M:[QUANTUM FIREBALL
EX3 A0A.] S:[673826342323]
2.1
(55.09MB)
Active Volume EXT2 Primary
2.2
(2.95GB)
[E:\] Volume FAT32 Primary
(3.94MB)
Unused Space Primary
The output provides additional information that is required to address partitions
by the physical arrangement on the drives. Volume labels can also be used. To
449
450
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS operations
copy a file from the NTFS partition to the FAT32 partition in the example above,
you can use the following syntax:
omnifs copy Rasfline:\test\data.txt 2.2:\test\data.txt
OmniFS operations
The supported OmniFS operations are as follows:
■
Attrib
■
Copy
■
Rename
■
Delete
■
Deltree
■
Dir
■
Info
■
Help
■
Version
■
Mkdir
Commands are not case sensitive.
Note: The diskinfo command has been removed from Symantec Ghost 11.0.
However, the functionality for diskinfo remains in OmniFS for backward
compatibility.
Setting the attribute for a file
The syntax for the attrib command is as follows:
attrib [+r][-r][+s][-s][+h][-h][+w][-w][+x][-x] <source>
Table 25-3 lists the attributes. Some attributes are not available for some file
systems.
Table 25-3
Attribute descriptions
Attribute
Description
r
Readable
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS operations
Table 25-3
Attribute descriptions (continued)
Attribute
Description
s
System
h
Hidden
w
Writable
x
Executable
You must set the source argument as an absolute path. This command sets or
clears the file attributes to read only, system or hidden.
Copying files and directories
The syntax for the copy command is as follows:
copy <source> <destination>
Both the source and destination arguments must be specified as absolute paths.
For example, as follows:
Copy a file from a volume that is
copy a:\temp\test.txt 2:1\user\data.txt
accessible to the current operating
system to a folder test on a volume
that is inaccessible to it.
Copy a file from a volume that is
copy 2:1\user\data.txt a:\temp\test.txt
inaccessible to the current
operating system to a volume that
is accessible to it.
In both examples, the absolute path to the files must be valid.
If the source argument points to a directory, the copy operation copies all of the
files and subdirectories from the source location to the destination location. In
this case, the destination argument must point to a valid directory. The last portion
of the destination path is created if required.
If the first argument points to a file and the second argument points to a directory,
the file is created with the same name as the source file in the destination directory.
Renaming files and folders
The syntax for the rename command is as follows:
451
452
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS operations
rename <source> <destination>
Both the source and destination arguments must be specified. The source argument
must be specified as an absolute path, and the destination argument must contain
the new name only. To move the file or folder to a new location use the copy
command.
For example:
rename 2:1\user\data.txt "my data.txt"
This renames 2:1\user\data.txt to 2:1\user\ my data.txt.
The following operation is illegal because the destination argument contains a
location:
rename 2:1\user\data.txt 2:1\temp\"my data.txt"
Deleting a file
The syntax for the delete command is as follows:
delete <source>
The source argument must be specified as an absolute path, and the path must
be valid. No wildcard characters are accepted.
For example:
delete 2:1\user\data.txt
A directory can be deleted only if it is empty.
Deleting a folder
The syntax for the deltree command is as follows:
deltree <source>
This command is similar to delete, but the source is a directory. The contents of
the directory, including all subdirectories, are deleted before the directory is
deleted.
Listing a folder
The syntax for the directory listing command is as follows:
dir <source>
The source argument must be specified as an absolute path, and the path must
be valid.
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS operations
For example:
dir 2:1\user
The output is similar to that of the 4Dos dir command.
Listing all volumes on a computer
The syntax for the info command is as follows:
info
The info operation has no parameters, and outputs the list of all the volumes that
OmniFS is able to detect on the computer, regardless of whether they are
recognizable by the current operating system.
Listing the commands
The syntax for the help command is as follows:
help
The help command lists the OmniFS commands.
Displaying the OmniFS version and copyright
The syntax for the version command is as follows:
version
This command displays the OmniFS version number and copyright.
Creating a directory
The syntax for the mkdir command is as follows:
mkdir <destination>
This command creates a directory. The destination argument must include an
absolute path, and all components of the path except for the last directory must
exist.
For example:
mkdir 2:1\user\test
The directory 2:1\user must already exist.
453
454
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Using OmniFS to recover files
Using OmniFS to recover files
If a Clone task has failed on a client computer and the computer cannot start in
Windows, you can use OmniFS to do a directory listing of preserved files in the
File Preservation Metadata File and to copy the files to other locations.
Table 25-4 displays the formats that you can use for designating drives.
Table 25-4
Designating drives formats
Format
Example
Format c_drive when the
origin partition was a FAT
partition accessible from
DOS.
omnifs dir pf:\e_drive\data
Format disk_1\partition_2
omnifs dir pf:\disk_1\partition_2\data
when the origin partition was
NTFS or hidden FAT.
Table 25-5 lists the commands you can use for recovering files. No other OmniFS
commands are supported for use with the File Preservation Metadata File.
Table 25-5
OmniFS recovery commands
Command line
Description
omnifs dir pf:\c_drive\path
Displays a directory listing from the File Preservation
Metadata File of the preserved files if the File Preservation
Metadata File is in the current directory. If a path is not
included, a full listing is displayed. The drive must be
included in the command, in the format c_drive or e_drive.
For example, omnifs dir “pf:\c_drive\My Documents”
Displays all preserved files from c:\My Documents.
omnifs dir
pf:\c:\recovery:\c_drive\path
Displays a directory listing from the File Preservation
Metadata File of the preserved files if the File Preservation
Metadata File is not in the current directory. If a path is
not included, a full listing is displayed. The drive must be
included in the command, in the format c_drive or e_drive.
For example, omnifs dir pf:\c:\recovery:\c_drive\Data
Displays all preserved files from c:\Data from the File
Preservation Metadata File, which is located in c:\recovery.
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Using a script file
Table 25-5
OmniFS recovery commands (continued)
Command line
Description
omnifs copy pf:\source
destination
Copies all files listed in the File Preservation Metadata
File to the specified location.
For example, omnifs copy pf:\1.2:\ 1:1\temp
Copies all files listed in the File Preservation Metadata
File, which is in the root directory of the second partition
of the first disk, to the temp directory on the first partition
on the first disk. This example uses the notation that lets
you avoid having to use a drive letter.
omnifs delete pf:\source
destination
Deletes specified file.
For example, omnifs delete pf:\1.2:\ghost:
disk_0\partition_1\recovery\extra.txt
Deletes the extra.txt file in the directory recovery listed
in the File Preservation Metadata File that is in the Ghost
directory on the second partition on the first disk.
omnifs deltree pf:\source
destination
Deletes specified directory.
For example, omnifs deltree pf:\1.2:\ghost: \recovery
Deletes the recovery directory and all files within the
directory.
Using a script file
The script file format that is recognized by the utility uses the following rules:
■
Each line in the script file begins with the operation and is followed by all of
the required arguments for the nominated operation.
■
When specifying operation arguments with long file names, use quotation
marks (as you would on the command line).
■
Empty lines in the script file will be ignored.
An example of the script file is as follows:
copy a:\temp\user.dat 2:1\user\profile.dat
copy a:\userdir 2:1\user\data
delete 2:1\user\data\copy.bat
rename 2:1\user\data\catalog.cpy catalog.dat
455
456
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS scenarios
The user can execute the set of commands provided in the script file using the
following command:
omnifs script scriptfs.txt
Each command in the script file is echoed to the screen immediately before
execution.
OmniFS scenarios
OmniFS can be used from the command line with a batch file and with a script
file.
Using OmniFS from the command line
In this scenario, OmniFS is executed from the command line.
The user executes a single operation. For example:
omnifs copy a:\temp\user.dat 2:1\user\profile.dat
Or, the user executes a set of commands provided in the script file. For example:
omnifs script scriptfs.txt
Following are the contents of Scriptfs.txt:
copy a:\temp\user.dat 2:1\user\profile.dat
copy a:\userdir 2:1\user\data
delete 2:1\user\data\copy.bat
rename 2:1\user\data\catalog.cpy catalog.dat
Using OmniFS with a script file
This scenario uses a batch file and a script file to copy, delete, and rename files
on a volume that is not recognized by the operating system on the computer.
Following are the contents of a batch file, Goomnifs.bat:
omnifs script scriptfs.txt
Following are the contents of Scriptfs.txt:
copy a:\temp\user.dat 2:1\user\profile.dat
copy a:\userdir 2:1\user\data
delete 2:1\user\data\copy.bat
rename 2:1\user\data\catalog.cpy catalog.dat
This scenario would be more efficient than using a batch file.
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
OmniFS error handling
Using OmniFS with a batch file
This scenario uses a batch file to copy, delete, and rename files on a volume that
is not recognized by the operating system on the computer.
Following are the contents of a batch file, Goomnifs.bat:
omnifs
omnifs
omnifs
omnifs
copy a:\temp\user.dat 2:1\user\profile.dat
copy a:\userdir 2:1\user\data
delete 2:1\user\data\copy.bat
rename 2:1\user\data\catalog.cpy catalog.dat
OmniFS error handling
If an error occurs during the OmniFS operation, an error file, OmniFSer.txt, is
created in the current directory.
Correcting the date and time
When you copy files from a FAT partition to an NTFS partition under DOS, there
is a time-zone issue that must be addressed.
The date and time data in the FAT file system are local to the computer that the
files are on. NTFS, however, uses UTC (Universal Time Coordinated) dates and
times, also known as Greenwich Mean Time. Therefore, to set the date and time
data correctly, OmniFS needs to know the time zone that the computer is in. This
can be done either in the autoexec.bat file or from the command line, using the
DOS environment variable, tz. For example:
set tz=aaa[+|-]h[h][bbb]
Where:
aaa
The abbreviation for your standard time.
[+|-]h[h][:mm]
A one-two digit signed number that indicates the
difference as number of hours West of Greenwich.
bbb
The abbreviation for your daylight (summer) time
zone (can be omitted).
For example:
Auckland, Wellington
set TZ=NST-12
457
458
Manipulating files and directories using OmniFS
Correcting the date and time
U.S. and Canada Central Time
set TZ=EST+6
Central America
set TZ=CST+5
There is no significance in the abbreviation string other than it must be three
alphanumeric characters.
Following are examples with part hour time differences:
India (Delhi)
set TZ=IST-5:30
Nepal (Katmandu)
set TZ=NST-5:45
These settings are in contrast to Windows times zones, which are the number of
hours East of Greenwich, in which Auckland would be GMT+12.
Chapter
26
Editing registry keys and
values using GhRegEdit
This chapter includes the following topics:
■
About GhRegEdit
■
Using GhRegEdit
About GhRegEdit
GhRegEdit lets you edit Windows registry keys and values.
Table 26-1 lists the versions of GhRegEdit.
Table 26-1
GhRegEdit versions
Executable
Operating system
GhRegEdt
PC-DOS, MS-DOS
GhRegEdit32
Windows Vista/XP/WinPE/2000/NT/98
Using GhRegEdit
You can run GhRegEdt and GhRegEdit32 from the command line or from a batch
file. Before you use GhRegEdit, you should verify that the registry is not read-only.
You can use GhRegEdit32 to edit the registry without starting the operating
system. You can also edit the registry as the operating system runs.
All GhRegEdt command-line switches can be run with GhRegEdit32.
460
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
Using GhRegEdit
Where the Windows directory is listed as a parameter, it is not optional if you are
running GhRegEdit in DOS. The Windows directory is optional if you are running
GhRegEdit32 in Windows, and you want to edit the current operating system
registry.
Before you run GhRegdit32 on Windows 98 computers, you should verify that the
following files are in the same directory as GhRegEdit32.exe:
■
Int86_32.dll
■
Int86_16.dll
You can find these files in the Symantec Ghost Solution Suite folder.
If the OEM code page language is not English, then GhRegEdit does not recognize
path names. In this case, you should specify the code page to use for accessing
the file system. For example, on a Japanese operating system, you should use the
following command:
ghregedt.exe -cp=932 export c:\windows c:\exported.reg
For information about the file system OEM code page, see the following registry
key:
HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Nls\ Codepage\OEMCP
Table 26-2 lists the display operations.
Table 26-2
GhRegEdit display switches
Switch
Description
windows
Displays Windows installations.
GhRegEdit looks for a Boot.ini or Msdos.sys file. If it finds one of these
files, it displays the following:
The location of the boot.ini or msdos.sys file in the format
disk.partition:\filename
■ Operating systems to which the file points
■
See “Accessing files and folders with names that contain spaces”
on page 449.
Note: The format for displaying in GhRegEdit is disk.partition, not
disk:partition.
To access registry files stored in an NTFS partition from within DOS,
you must use the disk.partition notation because NTFS volumes do
not have drive letters assigned in DOS.
help
Displays a help file listing command-line switches.
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
Using GhRegEdit
Table 26-3 lists the import and export switches.
Table 26-3
GhRegEdit import and export switches
Switch
Description
import [windowsdir] filename
Imports a registry import file as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Filename is the name and location of the .reg
file.
■
export [windowsdir] filename
Exports the entire registry as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Filename is the name and location of the .reg
file.
■
Key operations switches must include the hive and can only operate on the local
computer (HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE) or the local user (HKEY_USERS).
Table 26-4 lists the key operations switches.
Table 26-4
GhRegEdit key switches
Switch
Description
addkey [windowsdir] key
Adds the specified key to the registry as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be
set.
■
For example:
ghregedt addkey
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MyTestApp
461
462
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
Using GhRegEdit
Table 26-4
GhRegEdit key switches (continued)
Switch
Description
delkey [windowsdir] key
Deletes the specified key from the registry as
follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be
deleted.
■
For example:
ghregedt delkey
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MyTestApp
enumkey [windowsdir] key
Enumerates the subkeys for the specified key as
follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Key is the name and location of the key.
■
For example:
ghregedt enumkey
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software
export [windowsdir] filename key
Exports the key with subkeys as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows
directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Filename is the name and location of the .reg
file.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be
exported.
■
Table 26-5 lists the value switches.
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
Using GhRegEdit
Table 26-5
463
GhRegEdit value switches
Switch
Description
addvalue
[windowsdir] key
[value] type data
Modifies the specified value as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows directory.
For example, C:\WINNT.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be modified.
■
Value is the name of the value to be modified.
If value is not specified then the operation executes on the default
value.
■ Type is the type of the value to be modified.
Type can be any supported by Windows, for example, REG_SZ,
REG_DWORD, REG_BINARY.
■ Data is the data to be set for the value.
■
For example:
ghregedt addvalue
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MyTestApp REG_SZ "This
is my test app"
If you add a value of type REG_MULTI_SZ (multiple strings), you must
use the following syntax:
addvalue [WINDOWSDIR] KEY [VALUE] TYPE [ESC] DATA
The [ESC] optional parameter represents escape sequence. It is used
in DATA to mark the end of one string and the beginning of another.
You must always use the [ESC] parameter when you add values of type
REG_MULTI_SZ. You must always terminate DATA with [ESC].
For example:
addvalue
C:\WINNT HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Test
TestValue REG_MULTI_SZ
:: "First string"::"Second string"::"Third string"::
464
Editing registry keys and values using GhRegEdit
Using GhRegEdit
Table 26-5
GhRegEdit value switches (continued)
Switch
Description
delvalue
[windowsdir] key
value
Deletes the specified value as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be modified.
■
■
Value is the name of the value to be modified.
If value is not specified, then the operation executes on the default
value.
For example,
ghregedt delvalue
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MyTestApp Version
enumvalue
[windowsdir] key
Enumerates the specified key's value as follows:
Windowsdir is the location of the Windows directory.
For example, C:\Windows.
■ Key is the name and location of the key to be modified.
■
For example,
ghregedt enumvalue
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\MyTestApp
Section
Appendixes
■
Command-line switches
■
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
■
Transfer methods and hardware setup
■
USB and DirectParallel cables
■
Wattcp.cfg network configuration file
■
Cloning with Linux
■
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
■
Customizing Symantec Ghost functionality
■
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
■
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
■
Installing the boot partition
■
Configuring firewalls
■
Troubleshooting
■
Diagnostics
■
User Migration supported applications
9
466
Appendix
A
Command-line switches
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About Symantec Ghost switches
■
Command-line switches
■
Accessing files
■
Using the clone switch
■
Using the -CRC32 switch
■
About numbering the Virtual Partition
About Symantec Ghost switches
Symantec Ghost can be run in the following ways:
■
Interactively with no command-line switches
■
Interactively with selected switches
■
Automated in batch files (batch mode)
The Symantec Ghost command-line switches are used to alter Symantec Ghost
behavior and automate procedures.
A hyphen (-) or a slash (/) must precede all switches except @filename. Switches
are not case sensitive.
If you are adding switches from the Advanced Options dialog box, some of the
switches, for example the -clone switch, are not applicable to your task. Because
you are already performing a backup, restore, or clone operation, the -clone switch
is redundant.
468
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
@filename
@filename specifies a file that contains additional command-line
switches that Symantec Ghost should read. Filename indicates
the path and file name of the command-line switch file. The
command-line switch file can include any Symantec Ghost
command-line switch. The Symantec Ghost command-line switch
file must be a text file with each switch on a separate line. This
lets you exceed the DOS command-line limit of 150 characters.
For example:
ghost.exe @ghswitch.txt
For this command-line switch, the Ghswitch.txt file reads:
-clone,mode=pcreate,src=1:2,dst=g:\part2.gho
-fcr
-sure
-afile=filename
Replaces the default abort error log file name, Ghosterr.txt, with
the directory and file given in filename.
-align = chs
Lets you override the way in which the partitions are aligned when
an individual partition or disk full of partitions is restored. This
switch aligns the partition to the boundary as follows:
-align = 1mb
■
CHS: Aligns to a track or cylinder boundary
■
1MB: Aligns with a boundary of 1 MB
By default, a partition is aligned on the destination computer as
it was on the source computer.
Note: The 1MB alignment option supports Windows Vista.
-auto
Automatically names spanned image files during creation. Using
this switch avoids the user prompt that asks for confirmation of
the next destination location for the remainder of the image file
that is being restored.
This switch is the default behavior for Symantec Ghost.
-batch
Batch mode switch. Prevents abort messages from waiting for
user acknowledgment and removes user interaction prompts. The
return value of Ghost.exe must be checked to identify whether
the operation was successful. Symantec Ghost returns 0 on success
and 1 or higher on failure or error.
See “Batch file example” on page 492.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-bfc
Handles bad FAT clusters when writing to disk. If this switch is
set and the target partition is FAT, Symantec Ghost checks for
and works around bad sectors, and all free sectors are verified.
This option may slow Symantec Ghost operation substantially.
-blind
Prevents any GUI display. The blind switch must be used with
switches that do not require any user input, for example, the clone
switch. Using this switch lets you execute Ghost operations on a
computer with no video adapter.
-bootcd
When writing an image directly to a CD/DVD writer, makes the
CD/DVD bootable. You need a bootable floppy disk in drive A. If
you use the -sure switch with -bootcd and a floppy disk is not in
drive A, then a non-bootable CD/DVD is created.
-buffersize=x
Ghost creates an image file using a buffer of size x where x =
number of KB. The default size of the buffer is automatically
calculated by Symantec Ghost. The buffersize switch lets you
override this size. You can set the buffer size value from 1 to 32.
-chkimg,filename
Checks the integrity of the image file indicated by filename.
-clone
Ghost.exe operation switch. This switch allows automation of
Ghost.exe operations and has a series of arguments that define
the operation parameters.
See “Using the clone switch” on page 485.
-cns
Reverts the naming of spanned files to the system used by versions
of Symantec Ghost prior to Symantec Ghost 6.5. If this switch is
not used, then the naming of spanned files conforms to Microsoft
application guidelines. You do not need to use this switch when
reading an existing file. Use this switch when the first five
characters in a file name must be unique.
Table A-1 lists some examples of how spanned files are named.
Table A-1
With -cns
Without -cns
Filename.gho
Filename.gho
Filename.001
Filen001.ghs
Filename.002
Filen002.ghs
469
470
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-CRC32
The -CRC32 switch lists the files on a disk or partition or creates
an image file with CRC values and then verifies the list against
the original or a copy. The purpose is to allow both quick listing
of the contents of an image file and verification that a disk created
by Symantec Ghost contains the same files as the original.
See “Using the -CRC32 switch” on page 493.
-crcignore
Ignores CRC errors. CRC errors indicate data corruption. This
switch overrides CRC error detection and may allow a corrupted
image file to be used. Using this switch leaves the corrupted files
in an unknown state. You can use this switch to help you extract
files from a corrupted image file.
-cvtarea
Creates a file, Cvtarea.tmp, that is the location of the MFT when
the FAT32 partition is converted to NTFS. This switch operates
in a similar manner to the cvtarea program that Microsoft provides
in Deploy.cab on the Windows XP installation CD.
For more information, see the Microsoft Web site:
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/system/winpreinst/ntfs-preinstall.mspx
The file is created in the root directory of the partition during a
partition or disk restore and is created as a contiguous space on
the disk. The largest size allowed is 4 GB. If the file is larger than
this, it is truncated to 4 GB.
The syntax for this switch is as follows:
-cvtarea,filename=xxx,size=yyy{%disk,%free,KB,MB,GB},
firstcluster=zzz{%disk,%free,KB,MB,GB}
The default settings are as follows:
filename
cvtarea.tmp
size
12%disk
firstcluster
1|3 GB|33%disk
Defaults to the following:
-dd
■
1/3 of the partition size if the partition size is less than 2 GB
■
1 GB if the partition size is less than 6 GB
■
3 GB if the partition size is equal to or greater than 6 GB
Dumps disk metrics information to the dump log file, Ghststat.txt.
The file location can be altered using the -dfile=filename switch.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-dfile=filename
Changes the path and file name of the dump log file created using
the -dd switch.
-disabledrive=drive
The specified drive is not available in the file requestor dialogs.
You can use this switch with Ghost.exe only.
-dl=number
Specifies the number of hard disks present. Valid numbers are
between 1 and 8. This may help when the BIOS does not report
the number of drives correctly.
-dlist=drives
Specifies a list of drives to search for span files. If a span file
cannot be found, then the drive letters in dlist are substituted one
by one to look for the file on other drives.
For example, the command ghost -dlist=CDEFG instructs Symantec
Ghost to look for files on C, D, E, F, and G drives. The path remains
the same.
-f32
Lets Symantec Ghost convert all FAT16 volumes to FAT32 volumes
when the destination partition to convert is larger than 256 MB
in size. Ensure that the installed operating systems can access the
volumes that will be converted to support FAT32.
-f64
Lets Symantec Ghost resize FAT16 partitions to be larger than
2047 MB using 64 KB clusters. This is only supported by Windows
NT and Windows 2000. Do not use on computers with other
operating systems.
-fatlimit
Limits the size of FAT16 partitions to 2047 MB. Useful when
Windows NT FAT16 partitions are present on the disk and 64 KB
clusters are not wanted.
-fcr
Creates a CRC32 file, Ghost.crc, while creating an image file.
See “Using the -CRC32 switch” on page 493.
-fdsp
Preserves the signature bytes on the destination disk when
performing a disk-to-disk or image-to-disk cloning operation.
-fdsz
Clears the signature bytes on the destination disk. This is the
default for disk-to-disk and image-to-disk operations.
-femax
When an extended partition is created in a disk-to-disk or
image-to-disk operation, the femax switch ensures that the
extended partition takes up all free space.
-fgpt
Forces the disk to restore to a GPT disk.
471
472
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-ffatid
Forces the FAT partition id. This switch changes the partition id
to the recommended partition id for the FAT partition within the
destination image file or the destination partition table. This
switch only takes effect if the source is a disk or partition, not an
image file.
For example, if you are cloning a partition of type 0xA0 (some
unknown partition id), and Symantec Ghost sees it as a valid FATx
(FAT12/FAT16/FAT32) partition, then the partition id is changed
from 0xA0 to FATx.
This was default Symantec Ghost behavior before Symantec Ghost
7.5. This switch allows for backward compatibility.
-ffi
Prefers the use of direct IDE access for IDE hard-disk operations.
-ffs
Prefers the use of direct ASPI/SCSI disk access for SCSI hard-disk
operations.
-ffx
Prefers the use of Extended Interrupt 13h disk access for hard-disk
operations.
-finger
Shows the fingerprint details written on a hard disk created by
Symantec Ghost. The fingerprint details include the process used
to create the disk or partition and the time, date, and disk on which
the operation was performed.
Reports the presence of a Ghost fingerprint with the following
return code:
■
If any of the disks that Ghost can access have a fingerprint: 1
If none of the disks that Ghost can access have a fingerprint:
0
■ If the computer has no disk or none of the disks can be
accessed: 2
■
-fis
Uses all available disk space when creating partitions. By default,
Symantec Ghost often leaves a small amount of free space at the
end of the disk. Because partitions must be aligned to cylinder
boundaries, Symantec Ghost may leave up to 8 MB free even when
-fis is specified.
-fmbr
Forces the disk to restore to a MBR-based disk.
-fni
Disables direct IDE access support for IDE hard-disk operations.
-fns
Disables direct ASPI/SCSI access support for SCSI hard-disk
operations.
-fnx
Disables extended INT13 support for hard-disk operations.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-force1394
Forces FireWire support to start, even when the FireWire
controller is being run by something else. The -force1394 switch
attempts to take over the FireWire Host Controller. To enable
native BIOS support you must restart the computer.
Note the following:
-forceusb
■
Use this switch with caution.
■
Avoid using the force1394 switch to take over a FireWire
controller from a driver, for example, Iomega FireWire drivers.
You may encounter problems if you do this.
Forces USB support to start, even when the USB controller is being
run by something else. The -forceusb switch attempts to take over
the USB Host Controller and then attempts to return it to the
previous state once the Ghost operation is complete. This works
for controllers as follows:
EHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
■ UHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over and then
returned to the BIOS.
For example, the keyboard is returned after the Ghost
operation is finished.
■ OHCI controllers with BIOS support are taken over but not
returned to the BIOS.
■
Note the following:
■
Use this switch with caution.
■
Avoid using the forceusb switch to take over a USB controller
from a driver, for example, the Ghost peer-to-peer USB driver.
You may encounter problems if you do this.
-fpr
Forces destination partitions to be resized proportionally to their
original size. By default, Ghost evenly distributes free space to
the destination partitions based on the amount of free space that
is available in each source partition. The fpr switch determines
the size of the destination partitions based on the size of the source
partitions.
-fro
Forces Symantec Ghost to continue cloning even if the source
contains bad clusters.
-ftxp
This switch prevents Ghost from updating the transactional NTFS
(TxF) Resource Manager GUIDs. You can use this switch to keep
the same identity in transactions for a single computer that you
are restoring from an image. The ftxp switch maintains all existing
transactions in progress instead of flushing them as part of the
volume GUID change.
473
474
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-fx
Causes Symantec Ghost to exit to DOS after an operation is
complete. By default, Symantec Ghost prompts the user to restart
or exit when the operation has finished. If Symantec Ghost is run
as part of a batch file, it is sometimes useful to exit back to the
DOS prompt after completion so that further batch commands
are processed.
For more information, see the -rb switch.
-ghostoncd
Includes Ghost.exe on a CD/DVD when writing an image to a
CD/DVD.
-h or -? or -help
Shows the Symantec Ghost command-line switch Help page.
-hasfingerprint
Reports the presence of a Ghost fingerprint with the following:
If any of the disks that Ghost can access have a fingerprint:
Display to screen: 1
Return code: 1
■ If none of the disks that Ghost can access have a fingerprint:
Display to screen: 0
Return code: 0
■ If the computer has no disk or none of the disks can be
accessed:
Display to screen: unknown
Return code: 2
■
The display to the screen can be interpreted by any script language
that is executing Ghost. However, it is easiest to use the return
value.
-ia
The image all switch forces Symantec Ghost to perform a
sector-by-sector copy of all partitions. By default, when copying
a partition from a disk to an image file or to another disk,
Symantec Ghost examines the source partition and decides
whether to copy just the files and directory structure or to do a
sector-by-sector copy. If it understands the internal format of the
partition, it defaults to copying the files and directory structure.
Generally, this is the best option. However, if a disk has been set
up with special hidden security files that are in specific positions
on the partition, the only way to reproduce them accurately on
the target partition is through a sector-by-sector copy. If you use
this switch to create an image of a dynamic disk, then the image
must be restored to a disk with identical geometry.
-ial
Forces a sector-by-sector copy of Linux partitions. Other partitions
are copied normally.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-ib
The image boot switch copies the entire boot track, including the
boot sector, when creating a disk image file or copying disk-to-disk.
Use this switch when installed applications, such as boot-time
utilities, use the boot track to store information. By default,
Symantec Ghost copies only the boot sector and does not copy the
remainder of the boot track. You cannot perform
partition-to-partition or partition-to-image functions with the -ib
switch.
-id
The image disk switch is similar to -ia (image all), but also copies
the boot track, as in -ib (image boot), extended partition tables,
and unpartitioned space on the disk. When looking at an image
with -id, you see the unpartitioned space and extended partitions
in the list of partitions. The -id switch is primarily used by law
enforcement agencies that require forensic images.
When Symantec Ghost restores from an -id image, it relocates
partitions to cylinder boundaries and adjusts partition tables
accordingly. Head, sector, and cylinder information in partition
tables is adjusted to match the geometry of the destination disk.
Partitions are not resizeable. You will need an identical or larger
disk than the original.
Symantec Ghost does not wipe the destination disk when restoring
from an -id image. Geometry differences between disks may leave
tracks on the destination disk with their previous contents.
Use the -ia (image all) switch instead of the -id switch when
copying partition-to-partition or partition-to-image. An individual
partition can be restored from an image created with -id.
-imgdesc
Adds a single-line image file description to the image file with the
following restrictions:
■
Cannot include any new lines
■
Cannot be used with -imgdescfile
■
Must be used with the clone switch
■
Clone switch mode must be create, dump, pcreate, or pdump
-imgdescfile=filename Specifies a text file that contains an image file description to be
added to the image file with the following restrictions:
■
Cannot be used with -imgdesc
■
Must be used with the clone switch
■
Clone switch mode must be create, dump, prcreate, or pdump
475
476
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-ir
The image raw switch copies the entire disk, ignoring the partition
table. This is useful when a disk does not contain a partition table
in the standard PC format, or you do not want partitions to be
realigned to track boundaries on the destination disk. Some
operating systems may not be able to access unaligned partitions.
Partitions cannot be resized during restore and you need an
identical or larger disk.
-ja=sessionnm
Connects to the GhostCast Server using the specified session name.
Set the disk and possibly partition to be cloned on the GhostCast
Server.
-jaddr=<ip_address>
Use the IP address for the GhostCast Server.
-jl:x=filename
Creates a log file to assist in diagnosing GhostCasting and TCP/IP
peer-to-peer problems. The amount of information logged is set
by the log level x. The log level x can be E (errors), S (statistics),
W (warnings), I (information), or A (all) in increasing order of
logging detail. The file name indicates the path and file name of
the log to be created. In general, the error and statistic levels do
not affect session performance. All other levels may reduce
performance and should be used for diagnostic purposes only.
-jm=[u|d|m]
Use unicasting, direct broadcast, or multicasting.
-js=n
Sets to n the number of router hops Symantec Ghost is allowed
to cross in an attempt to find the GhostCast Server. (Default is
16.)
-lockinfo
Shows the type code and information stored in the BIOS or the
Pentium III Processor ID.
Table A-2 shows some examples of type codes and provides example values.
Lockinfo type codes
Table A-2
Type
Based On
Value
M
Manufacturer
Compaq
P
Product name
Deskpro EN Series SFF
V
Version
Award Software
S
Serial number
H925CKH60020
U
UUID
2DA9379B4707D31185E8C800A4F232BC
C
M&P combined
Compaq Deskpro EN Series SFF
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
Lockinfo type codes (continued)
Table A-2
-locktype= Type
Type
Based On
Value
I
PIII ID
0000067200028E72A6994A20
Lets you lock an image file for use with a specific set of computers defined
by the type chosen and the source computer.
For example, ghost -locktype=P creates an image that can be used only
on systems that have the same product name type as the source computer.
On computers with multiple processors, the processorID bios lock option
does not work as intended when running Ghost32.exe. In this situation,
do not create or restore images with the -locktype parameter set to I.
Other -locktype values work as intended.
-lpm
The LPT master mode switch causes Symantec Ghost to automatically
go into LPT master mode and is the equivalent of selecting LPT Master
from the main menu.
-lps
The LPT slave mode switch causes Symantec Ghost to automatically go
into LPT slave mode and is the equivalent of selecting LPT Slave from
the main menu.
-mcyl=[1022|1023]
Forces the cylinder value to either 1022 or 1023 when the cylinder value
is insufficient to address the whole partition.
This switch works in DOS only.
When Ghost restores the partitions on an MBR disk, it initializes the
starting sector, the sector count, and ending sector of the partition. Ghost
stores the starting sector and ending sector in an MBR disk as a cylinder,
head, and sector address. Ghost also stores an absolute start sector and
count. The cylinder value has a maximum value of 1023. However, the
cylinder maximum of 1023 is often insufficient to represent the size of
the partition. When the cylinder maximum is insufficient, the cylinder
is set to a predetermined value. Ghost sets the cylinder maximum to 1022
for FAT partitions and 1023 for other partitions. For some tools, the
cylinder value must be set specifically for the tool to recognize that it is
insufficient.
-noauto
Disables the automatic naming of spanned image files during creation.
The user is prompted for confirmation of the next destination location
for the remainder of the image file that is being restored.
-noautoskip
Includes the hibernation and skip files in the image file. These files are
excluded by default.
See “Hibernation and swap files” on page 309.
477
478
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-nofile
Disables the Image File Selection dialog box. Useful when opening
directories with large numbers of files and slow links.
-noide
Disables access to IDE devices. This is equivalent to -fni for IDE disks,
but noide also affects ATAPI CD writers, tape drives, and other IDE
devices.
-noindex
Prevents Symantec Ghost from creating an index when creating an image
file. This slightly reduces the size of the image file and saves memory,
but Ghost Explorer is much slower in reading the image file. This switch
is useful if you are saving an image file from a large disk with very little
memory.
-nolilo
Does not attempt to patch the LILO or GRUB boot loader after a clone. If
you use the -nolilo switch, you can restart your computer from a floppy
disk or CD after a clone and then run
/sbin/lilo or the GRUB install script as the root user to reinstall the boot
loader.
-noscsi
Disables access to SCSI devices using ASPI. This is equivalent to -fns for
SCSI disks, but noscsi also affects SCSI CD writers, tape drives, and other
SCSI devices.
-no1394
Disables FireWire
-nousb
Disables USB support.
-ntc-
Disables NTFS contiguous run allocation.
-ntchkdsk
Sets the CHKDSK bit set on a copied NTFS volume. This causes Windows
NT to check the integrity of the volume when it is started.
-ntd
Enables NTFS internal diagnostic checking.
-ntexact
Attempts to arrange the restored NTFS volume in the same way as the
source volume.
-ntic
Ignores the NTFS volume CHKDSK bit. Symantec Ghost checks the
CHKDSK bit on an NTFS volume before performing operations. When
Symantec Ghost indicates that the CHDSK bit is set, you should run
CHKDSK on the volume to ensure that the disk is in a sound state before
cloning.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-ntiid
This switch forces Symantec Ghost to ignore the partition table system
ids and instead to check the partition contents when detecting NTFS file
systems. This switch is useful when the system id is not set to 0x07 for
partitions containing NTFS file systems. The partitions would otherwise
be inefficiently imaged sector-by-sector. This switch can be used when
it is necessary to image a Windows NT4 FTDisk mirrored partition.
Take care when using this switch. Do not use the -ntiid switch with volume
sets and stripe sets.
To clone mirrored partitions (also known as Windows NT software
RAID partitions), do the following:
1
With Windows NT disk administrator, break the mirror set.
2
Using the -ntiid switch, clone one of the mirror partitions.
3
Resize as desired. Partitions can only be resized by Symantec Ghost
during a disk operation. When performing a partition operation,
the target partition size must already be established.
4
After cloning, recreate the mirror set using the Windows NT disk
administrator. The disk administrator creates the partitions in the
mirror set.
-ntil
Ignores NTFS log file check (inconsistent volume).
-or
The override switch allows the override of internal space and integrity
checks and lets you put a very big image into a small partition. The
operation fails if it is unable to write to the limited partition size. This
switch lets you override spanning, which fails if there is limited space.
Avoid using this switch.
-pfile
Saves the File Preservation Metadata File that holds the location of
preserved files to a specified location. By default, it is saved to the current
directory.
For example:
ghost - pfile=c:\pathname
Where pathname is the directory for the File Preservation Metadata File.
-pmbr
Specifies that the master boot record of the destination disk is to be
preserved when performing a disk-to-disk or image-to-disk operation.
-prefghst
If Symantec Ghost has a choice, it attempts to use internal Ghost file
system access as opposed to using the operating system for file system
access.
This switch is intended for use under instruction from Symantec
Technical Support when troubleshooting.
479
480
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-prefos
If Symantec Ghost has a choice, it attempts to use the operating system
for file system access as opposed to using the internal Ghost file system
access.
This switch is intended for use under instruction from Symantec
Technical Support when troubleshooting.
-preserve
Preserves files specified by the preservedest switch. The task fails if the
specified files do not exist. To preserve files or directories other than the
image file, the syntax is as follows:
-preserve=filepath[=newpath] [,filepath[=newpath]...]
Each filepath can refer to an individual file or a directory. All files and
subdirectories of a specified directory are preserved. If a file does not
exist, then the restore fails. After a Clone step in a task, all preserved
files are added back to the partition that is specified by
the-preservedest=n switch. Ghost renames them to newpath where it is
specified. You must use -preserve with -preservedest.
If you are running Ghost from a CD, you must use the -pfile switch with
the -preserve command. You also must specify a writeable location for
the file-preservation metadata file. Otherwise, Ghost tries to write the
file-preservation metadata file to the CD. Because the CD is read-only.
the data cannot be written, and the process fails.
-preservedest=n
Where n is the number of the partition relative to the destination disk,
not relative to the partitions being restored. Specifies the partition to
which files specified with the preserve switch are restored.
-preservedimagedeleteafterclone
Deletes a preserved image file once the restore has completed successfully.
This switch overrides the default, which is to retain the preserved image
file.
-preserveifexists
Preserves files specified by the preservedest switch if they exist. The task
does not fail if the specified files do not exist. To preserve files or
directories other than the image file, the syntax is as follows:
-preserveifexists=filepath[=newpath]
[,filepath[=newpath]...]
Each filepath can refer to an individual file or a directory. All files and
subdirectories of a specified directory are preserved. If a file does not
exist, then the restore fails. After a Clone step in a task, all preserved
files are added back to the destination specified by the -preservedest=n
switch, renaming them to newpath where specified. You must use the
-preserveifexists switch with -preservedest.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-pwd and -pwd=x
Specifies that password protection be used when creating an image file.
x indicates the password for the image file. If no password is given in the
switch, Symantec Ghost prompts for one. You can enter a maximum of
10 alphanumeric characters.
-quiet
The quiet mode switch disables status updates and user intervention.
-rb
Restarts after finishing a restore or copy. After completing a restore or
copy operation, the target computer must be restarted so that the
operating system can restore the new disk/partition information.
Normally, Symantec Ghost prompts the user to restart or exit. The -rb
switch tells Symantec Ghost to restart automatically after it completes
the restore or copy. This is useful when automating Symantec Ghost in
a batch command file.
For more information, see the -fx switch.
-recover
Sets the default to recover preserved files if a previous restore has failed
and the File Preservation Metadata File still exists. If this switch is not
used, the default is set to abort.
-script
Allows you to specify a series of commands (one per line) that Symantec
Ghost will execute in sequential order.
For example:
ghost -script=script.txt
Following is an example of script.txt:
-clone,mode=create,src=2,dst=1:1\drv2.gho
-chkimg,1:1\drv2.gho
-clone,mode=create,src=2,dst=c:\part2.gho
-chkimg,c:\part2.gho
In this example 1:1 is equivalent to c:\.
481
482
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-skip=x
The skip file switch causes Symantec Ghost to exclude the indicated files
during a create or restore operation. A skip entry can specify a single
file, a directory, or multiple files using the * wildcard. File names must
be given in short file name format and all path names are absolute. Only
FAT system files can be skipped. It is not possible to skip files on NTFS
or other file systems. The skip switch may only be included in the
command line once. To specify multiple skip entries, they must be
included in a text file indicated using [email protected] The format of the
skip text file, skipfile, matches the format used with the CRC32 vexcept
option.
For example, as follows:
■
-skip=\windows\user.dll
■
Skips the file User.dll in the Windows directory.
-skip=*\readme.txt
■
Skips any file called Readme.txt in any directory.
-skip=\ghost\*.dll
■
Skips any file ending with .dll in the Ghost directory.
-skip=\progra~1\
■
Skips the program files directory (note the short file name).
[email protected]
Skips files as outlined in Skipfile.txt. For example:
*\*.tmt
[partition:1]
\windows\
*\*.exe
[Partition:2]
*\*me.txt
This Skipfile.txt file would skip all *.tmt files on any partition, the
Windows directory, all *.exe files on the first partition, and any file
that ends with me.txt on the second partition.
When using the skip switch with a wildcard extension, only those files
with an extension are skipped. For example:
-skip=asdf.* skips asdf.txt but does not skip asdf.
-span
Enables spanning of image files across volumes.
Do not use this switch if you are running Ghost.exe to write an image file
directly to a CD-R/RW. Ghost.exe automatically spans CD-R/RW disks if
required.
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-split=x
Splits image file into x MB spans. Use this switch to create a forced-size
volume set. For example, if you want to force smaller image files from a
1024-MB drive, you could specify 200-MB segments.
For example:
ghost.exe -split=200
This divides the image into 200-MB segments.
If this switch is not used then an image is split at 2 GB in the following
operations:
■
GhostCast
■
Peer-to-peer
■
Creating an image on a mapped-network drive
If the operation runs locally on a FAT partition, then the image splits at
4 GB.
If this switch is explicitly set to 0, the image does not split.
-sure
Use the -sure switch in conjunction with -clone to avoid being prompted
with the final question “Proceed with disk clone - destination drive will
be overwritten?” This command is useful in batch mode.
-sze
Sets the size for the destination partitions for either a disk restore or
disk copy operation. When numbering partitions in the -sze switch, do
not include the hidden Ghost partition. This switch is intended to be used
in the Additional command line in the Console. All functionality of -sze
switches are supported.
See “Setting a destination size for the clone switch” on page 490.
-szee
Forces Symantec Ghost to keep the sizes of all destination partitions the
same size as in the source partition (no resizing).
This switch can be used with or without the -clone switch.
See “Setting a destination size for the clone switch” on page 490.
-szef
Forces Symantec Ghost to keep the sizes of all destination partitions,
except for the first one, the same size as in the source partition. The first
partition uses the remaining disk space.
This switch can be used with or without the -clone switch.
See “Setting a destination size for the clone switch” on page 490.
483
484
Command-line switches
Command-line switches
-szel
Forces Symantec Ghost to keep the sizes of all destination partitions,
except for the last one, the same size as in the source partition. The last
partition uses the remaining disk space.
This switch can be used with or without the -clone switch.
See “Setting a destination size for the clone switch” on page 490.
-tapebuffered
Default tape mode. Sets the ASPI driver to report a read/write as
successful as soon as the data has been transferred to memory. Useful
when using older or unreliable tape devices or sequential media.
-tapeeject
Forces Symantec Ghost to eject the tape following a tape operation. If
the tape drive does not support remote ejection, you must eject and insert
the tape manually before further use. Earlier versions ejected the tape
by default. By default, Symantec Ghost does not eject the tape. It rewinds
the tape before exiting to DOS.
-tapebsize=x
Specifies the tape block size in units of 512 bytes, where x is a number
between 1 and 128.
-tapespeed=x
Allows control of tape speed, where x is 0 to F. 0 is the default. 1 to F
increases tape speed. Only use this when the tape does not work correctly
at the speed used by Symantec Ghost.
-tapeunbuffered
Sets the ASPI driver to report a read/write as successful only when the
data has been transferred to the tape drive. This can occur before the
data is physically written to the medium.
-tcpm[:slave IP address]
The TCP/IP master mode switch causes Symantec Ghost to go into TCP/IP
master mode automatically and is the equivalent of selecting TCP/IP
Master from the main menu. The IP address of the slave computer may
be specified.
See “Peer-to-peer connections” on page 532.
-tcps
The TCP/IP slave mode switch causes Symantec Ghost to go into TCP/IP
slave mode automatically and is the equivalent of selecting TCP/IP Slave
from the main menu.
See “Peer-to-peer connections” on page 532.
-unpreserveimage
After a failed restore, do not preserve the image file that was used on the
failed restore.
-usbm
The USB master mode switch causes Symantec Ghost to go into USB
master mode automatically and is the equivalent of selecting USB Master
from the main menu.
See “Peer-to-peer connections” on page 532.
Command-line switches
Accessing files
-usbs
The -usbs switch causes Symantec Ghost to go into USB slave mode
automatically and is the equivalent of selecting USB Slave from the main
menu.
See “Peer-to-peer connections” on page 532.
-vdw
If the -vdw switch is set, Symantec Ghost uses the disk's verify command
to check every sector on the disk before it is written. This option may
slow Symantec Ghost operation substantially.
-ver
Shows the version number of Symantec Ghost.
-z
Runs compression when saving a disk or partition to an image file. The
greater the compression, the slower the transmission, as follows:
■
-z or -z1: Low compression (fast transmission)
■
-z2: High compression (medium transmission)
■
-z3 through -z9: Higher compression (slower transmission)
See “Image files and volume spanning” on page 303.
Accessing files
Table A-3 lists the formats that you can use to access files.
Table A-3
Accessing file format
Format
Example
Drive letter
c:\My Images\image.gho
Disk and partition
src=1:2\image.gho
This lets you specify an otherwise inaccessible file, for
example, a file located on a file system not recognized by
DOS, such as NTFS, or a file on a hidden partition. It
provides an alternative to using drive letters.
In this example, Image.gho
resides on an NTFS file
system on the second
partition of the first disk.
This format cannot be used
with the -afile=filename
switch.
Using the clone switch
Some cloning switches for use in Ghost can be specified on the GhostCast Server.
The syntax for the clone switch is:
485
486
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
-clone,MODE={operation},SRC={source},DST={destination},
[SZE{size},SZE{size}.......]
Defining the type of clone command
MODE defines the type of clone command.
The syntax is as follows:
MODE={copy | restore | create | pcopy | prestore | pcreate}
Table A-4 lists the mode commands.
Table A-4
Mode commands
Switch
Action
copy
Disk-to-disk copy
restore
File-to-disk restore
Note: The load switch is replaced by the restore switch.
The load switch is still fully functional and is
interchangeable with restore.
create
Disk-to-file backup
Note: The dump switch is replaced by the create switch.
The dump switch is still fully functional and is
interchangeable with create.
pcopy
Partition-to-partition copy
prestore
File-to-partition restore
Note: The pload switch is replaced by the prestore
switch. The pload switch is still fully functional and is
interchangeable with prestore.
pcreate
Note: The pdump switch is replaced by the pcreate
switch. The pdump switch is still fully functional and
is interchangeable with pcreate.
Partition-to-file backup (allows
multipartition Ghost backup
selection)
Cloning combination options
Table A-5 illustrates the possible cloning operations that you can perform.
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Cloning operations
Table A-5
Mode
Source
Destination
copy
■
disk
■
disk
restore
■
file
■
disk
■
GhostCast Server
■
tape
■
CD-ROM
■
file
■
GhostCast Server
■
tape
■
CD writer
USB 1.1 and 2.0 Mass Storage
Device
■ DVD
■
create
■
FireWire hard disk
■
disk
USB 1.1 and 2.0 Mass Storage
Device
■ DVD
■
■
FireWire hard disk
pcopy
■
disk:partition
■
disk:partition
prestore
■
file:partition
■
disk:partition
file
GhostCast Server (no partition
specified)
tape:partition
■ CD:image:partition
■
USB 1.1 and 2.0 Mass Storage
Device
■ FireWire hard disk
■
pcreate
■
disk:partition
■
■
partition:partition
■
You can specify more than one
partition.
GhostCast Server
tape
■ CD writer
USB 1.1 and 2.0 Mass Storage
Device
■ DVD
■
■
FireWire hard disk
487
488
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Setting a source for the clone switch
The syntax for this switch is as follows:
SRC={disk | file | multicast | tape | cd writer }
SRC defines the source for the operation that is selected by the clone mode option.
Table A-6 lists the source switches.
Table A-6
Source options for cloning
Switch
Source
Explanation
disk
drive number
Source disk drive number. Numbers start at 1.
For example:
SRC=1
A partition on a drive can also be specified.
Numbers start at 1. For example:
SRC=1:2
file
filename
The source image file name. For example:
SRC= g:\source.gho
A partition in an image file can also be specified.
For example:
SRC=g:\source.gho:2
Files can also be read from a CD-ROM drive.
multicast
@mcsessionname
The name of the multicast session.
tape
@MTx
The tape drive number. Numbers start at 0. For
example:
[email protected]
A partition on a tape can also be specified. For
example:
[email protected]:3
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Table A-6
Source options for cloning (continued)
Switch
Source
Explanation
CD ROM
@CDx
The CD or DVD drive number. If you have a CD
reader and a CD writer, in the Ghost.exe user
interface you would see @CD1 and @CD2. The
number is optional if you are specifying an
operation from the command line.
You can specify partitions for the image stored
on a CD for a restore operation. For example:
[email protected]:2
Preservation
file
@PF
An image file that was preserved during a restore
that failed.
For example:
ghost -recover -clone,mode=[p] load, [email protected],...
Setting a destination for the clone switch
The syntax for this switch is as follows:
DST={disk | file | multicast | tape | cdwriter}
DST defines the destination location for the operation.
Table A-7 lists the destination options for cloning.
Table A-7
Destination options for cloning
Switch
Destination
Explanation
disk
drive
The destination disk drive number, such as
DST=2.
A partition on a drive can also be specified. For
example:
DST=2:1
To create a new partition, type a destination
partition one greater than the existing number
of partitions, if there is enough free space.
file
filename
The destination image file name. For example:
DST= g:\destination.gho
multicast
@mcsessionname
The name of the multicast session.
489
490
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Table A-7
Destination options for cloning (continued)
Switch
Destination
Explanation
tape
@MTx
The tape drive number. Numbers start at 0. For
example:
[email protected]
cd/dvdwriter
@CDx
The CD or DVD writer drive number. Numbers
start at 1. For example:
[email protected]
If you have a CD reader and a CD writer, in the
Ghost.exe user interface you would see @CD1 and
@ CD2. The number is optional if specifying an
operation from the command line.
Setting a destination size for the clone switch
The SZE switch sets the size of the destination partitions for either a disk restore
or disk copy operation. This is optional. Multiple partition size switches are
supported.
The number of size switches depends on the number of partition sizes that you
want to specify. There may be none.
You can use the sze switch in the Advanced command-line options in the Console.
SZE{E | F | L | n={xxxxM | mmP| F | V}}
Table A-8 lists the destination size switches.
Table A-8
Destination size options for cloning
Switch
Explanation
n=xxxxM
Indicates that the nth destination partition is to have a size of xxxxMB
(for example, SZE2=800M indicates partition two is to have 800 MB).
n=mmP
Indicates that the nth destination partition is to have a size of mm percent
of the target disk. Due to partition size rounding and alignment issues,
100% physical use of disk space may not be possible.
n=F
Indicates that the nth destination partition is to remain the same size on
the destination as it was on the source. This is referred to as a fixed size.
n=V
Indicates that the partition may be made bigger or smaller depending on
how much disk space is available. This is the default.
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Table A-8
Destination size options for cloning (continued)
Switch
Explanation
E
Indicates that the sizes of all partitions remain fixed.
F
Indicates that the sizes of all partitions except the first remain fixed. The
first partition uses the remaining space.
L
Indicates that the sizes of all partitions except the last remain fixed. The
last partition uses the remaining space.
Examples of clone switch usage
Table A-9 describes clone switches and their functions.
Table A-9
Clone switch usage examples
Switch
Function
ghost.exe -clone,mode=copy,src=1,dst=2
Copies local disk one to local disk two.
ghost.exe -lpm -clone,mode=create,src=2,dst=c:\drive2.gho Connects a master computer using LPT to another
computer running Ghost.exe in slave mode and saves
a disk image of local disk two to the remote file
c:\drive2.gho. The slave computer can be started with
ghost.exe -lps.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=pcopy,src=1:2,dst=2:1 -sure
Copies the second partition of local disk one to the first
partition of local disk two without the final warning
prompt.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=restore,src=e:\savedsk.gho,dst=1
-sure
Restores the disk image file Savedsk.gho that is held
on the server drive that is mapped locally to drive E
onto local disk one. Performed without the final
warning prompt. This example is typical of a command
line included in a batch file to automate workstation
installations from a network file server.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=pcreate,src=1:2,dst=g:\part2.gho
Saves the second partition of disk one to an image file
on mapped network drive G.
ghost -clone,mode=prestore,src=g:\part2.gho:2,dst=1:2
Restores partition two from a two-partition image file
on mapped drive G onto the second partition of the
local disk.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=restore,src=g:\
3prtdisk.gho,dst=2,sze1=60P,sze2=20P
Restores disk two from an image file and resizes the
destination partitions into a 60:20:20 allocation,
assuming that the image contains 3 partitions.
491
492
Command-line switches
Using the clone switch
Table A-9
Clone switch usage examples (continued)
Switch
Function
ghost.exe -clone,mode=copy,src=1,dst=2,sze2=F
Clones a two-partition disk and keeps the second
partition on the destination disk the same size as on
the source disk and lets the first partition use the
remaining space, leaving no unallocated space.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=create,src=1,dst=2:3\image.gho
Saves disk one to the image file image.gho located on
the third partition of the second disk.
This works only if the third partition of the second disk
is an NTFS file system.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=prestore,src=2:3\image.gho:5,dst=4:2 Restores the fifth partition of the image file image.gho,
which is located on the third partition of the second
disk, to the second partition on the fourth disk. This
switch only works if the third partition on the second
disk is NTFS.
ghost.exe-clone,mode=restore,src=g:\3prtdisk.gho,dst=1,
sze1=450M,sze2=1599M,sze3=2047M
Restores disk one from an image file and resizes the
first partition to 450 MB, the second to 1599 MB, and
the third to 2047 MB.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=restore,src=g:\
2prtdisk.gho,dst=1,szeL
Restores a disk from an image file and resizes the last
partition to fill the remaining space.
ghost.exe -clone,[email protected],dst=1 -sure
Restores disk one from an image file being sent from
the GhostCast Server with the session name
“sessionname” without the final warning prompt.
ghost.exe -clone,src=1,[email protected] -sure
Creates an image file of disk one to an image file being
created by the GhostCast Server with the session name
“sessionname” without the final warning prompt.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=create,src=2:2,[email protected]
Creates an image file of the second partition on disk 2
onto the first tape drive.
ghost.exe -clone,mode=pcreate,src=2:1:4:6,dst=d:\
part146.gho
Creates an image file with only the selected partitions.
This example selects partitions 1, 4, and 6 from disk
2.
Batch file example
This example restores disk one from an image file sent by the GhostCast Server
using session name SN and resizes the first partition to 450 MB, the second to
1599 MB, and the third to 2047 MB. This is done in a batch file with no user
Command-line switches
Using the -CRC32 switch
intervention. The batch file commands change depending on the success or failure
of the Symantec Ghost operation.
Batch file contents:
@ECHO OFF
ghost.exe
-clone,[email protected],dst=1,sze1=450M,sze2=1599,sze3=2047M -batch
IF ERRORLEVEL 1 GOTO PROBLEM
ECHO Symantec Ghost exited with value 0 indicating success.
REM ** Add any commands required to run if Symantec Ghost
REM succeeds here**
GOTO FINISH
:PROBLEM
ECHO Symantec Ghost returned with an Error value 1 or higher
ECHO Symantec Ghost operation was not completed successfully
REM **Add any commands required to run if Symantec Ghost
REM fails here **
:FINISH
ECHO Batch File Finished
Using the -CRC32 switch
CRC checking works file-by-file with FAT partitions. NTFS partitions are
CRC-checked within an image file by each MFT table. It is not possible at present
to obtain a list of files failing a CRC check with an NTFS file system. When a CRC
file is created for an NTFS partition, only a single CRC value is generated. You can
also create a CRC file from an image file and verify it against a disk.
The full syntax for this switch is as follows:
-CRC32,action={create|verify|pcreate|pverify|dcreate|dverify},
src={{disk}|{partition}|{file}},crcfile={file}|{partition},vlist={file},
vexcept={file}
The parameters in Table A-10 can be used with the -CRC32 switch.
Table A-10
Parameters for the -CRC32 switches
Parameter
Explanation
create
Create an ASCII CRC32 file from a disk
verify
Verify a disk from a CRC32 file
pcreate
Create an ASCII CRC32 file from a partition
493
494
Command-line switches
Using the -CRC32 switch
Parameters for the -CRC32 switches (continued)
Table A-10
Parameter
Explanation
pverify
Verify a partition from an ASCII CRC32 file
dcreate
Create an ASCII CRC32 file from an image file
dverify
Verify an image file from an ASCII CRC32 file
crcfile
ASCII CRC32 file (default=Ghost.crc)
vlist
Verification list file (default=Ghost.ls)
vexcept
Verification exception file (no default)
Examples of -CRC32 usage
Table A-11 provides some examples of how you can use the -CRC32 switch.
Table A-11
-CRC32 usage examples
Switch
Function
ghost.exe -fcr
Creates a CRC32 file (called
Ghost.crc) while making an image
file.
ghost.exe -fcr=d:\test.crc
Creates a CRC32 file (called
Test.crc) while making an image
file.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=create,src=1,crcfile=ghost.crc
Creates a list of files and CRC32
values for a disk.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=dverify,src=x:dumpfile.gho,crcfile=ghost.crc
Verifies the list against an image
file.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=pverify,src=1:2,crcfile=filename.crc:2
Verifies a partition on a disk with
multiple partitions. This example
verifies that partition 2 on disk 1
is the same as partition 2 in the
CRC file.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=create
Creates an ASCII CRC32 file from
the primary hard drive. Note that
the default disk is the primary
drive. The default ASCII CRC32
file is Ghost.crc.
Command-line switches
Using the -CRC32 switch
Table A-11
-CRC32 usage examples (continued)
Switch
Function
ghost.exe -crc32,action=create,src=2,crcfile=myfile.txt
Creates an ASCII CRC32 file,
Myfile.txt. This example uses disk
2 as the source drive and the
output file.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=verify
Verifies the contents of the
primary disk against a default
ASCII CRC32 file, Ghost.crc (in the
current directory). The default
disk is the primary drive. The
default verification list file is
Ghost.ls.
Note: If you want to keep
Ghost.crc then copy Ghost.crc to
a new location to ensure that it is
accessible after you restart the
computer.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=verify,src=1,crcfile=myfile.txt,vlist=myfile.out
Verifies the contents of the
primary disk, 1, against the CRC32
file, Myfile.txt. Same as previous
example, but specifies the disk,
CRC file, and list file. This example
uses disk 1 as the source drive,
Myfile.txt as the ASCII CRC32 file,
and Myfile.out as the verification
list file.
ghost.exe -crc32,action=verify,src=1,crcfile=myfile.txt,vlist=myfile.out,
vexcept=myfile.exc
Verifies the contents of the
primary disk against a CRC32 file.
Same as above with the inclusion
of the EXCEPTION argument that
excludes compared files based
upon its entries.
Files not checked with CRC
The switch vexcept=filename specifies files that are not checked with CRC. This
is normally used to exclude files that are always changed on start up. A sample
exception file follows:
[ghost exclusion list]
\PERSONAL\PHONE
495
496
Command-line switches
About numbering the Virtual Partition
[partition:1]
\WINDOWS\COOKIES\*.*
\WINDOWS\HISTORY\*
\WINDOWS\RECENT\*
\WINDOWS\USER.DAT
\WINDOWS\TEMPOR~1\CACHE1\*
\WINDOWS\TEMPOR~1\CACHE2\*
\WINDOWS\TEMPOR~1\CACHE3\*
\WINDOWS\TEMPOR~1\CACHE4\*
[partition:2]
*\*.1
[end of list]
The exclusion list is case-sensitive. All files should be specified in uppercase. The
(*) wildcard symbol follows UNIX rules, and is more powerful than the MS-DOS
(*) wildcard. In particular, it matches the (.) character, as well as any other
character, but other characters can follow the *. Therefore, a wildcard of *br*
matches any files containing the letters br, such as, Brxyz.txt, Abr.txt, and Abc.dbr.
The specification of \WINDOWS\COOKIES\*.* in the previous example means
match all files in the \WINDOWS\COOKIES subdirectory that have extensions.
To match all files with or without extensions, use WINDOWS\COOKIES\*.
Use short file names in exclusion files. Files specified before the first [Partition:x]
heading are used to match files in any partition.
A directory of * matches any subdirectory, regardless of nesting. The previous
exclusion file matches any file with an extension of .1 in any subdirectory on the
second partition. Apart from this, use wildcards for files, not for directories.
About numbering the Virtual Partition
Ghost.exe does not see the Virtual Partition when it runs from the command line.
The numbering of the partitions is consistent with the numbering that appears
when you run the Ghost.exe user interface.
If you use GDisk to view the disk, the Virtual Partition is displayed with the volume
label VPSGHBOOT. Therefore, the partition numbering that you can see in GDisk
is not the same as the partition numbering in Ghost.exe.
Appendix
B
AI Builder variables,
commands, and conditions
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
AutoInstall AI Builder menus
■
Commands
AutoInstall AI Builder menus
Many of the menu commands in AutoInstall AI Builder are self-explanatory.
Table B-1 details the commands that are proprietary to AI Builder.
Table B-1
AI Builder proprietary commands
Command
Description
Build > Build
Compress new files only and build an installation.
Build > Run
Execute the most recently built installation.
Edit > Rem
Turn the highlighted commands into remarks or REM lines. AI Builder
ignores all remark lines when it processes the Configuration file. REM
lets you add remarks to the .aic file or prevent a command from
executing without erasing the command from the file.
Edit > UnRem
Remove the remark commands.
Commands
For attended installations, you can add custom screens and messages, as well as
graphics and sound files.
498
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
For unattended installations, you can add If conditions to check client compatibility
before the installation proceeds.
The commands are grouped in the left pane of AI Builder under the following
headings:
■
Base Installation
■
Appearance
■
Messages & Inputs
■
System changes
■
If Conditions
■
Defaults and Calls
Some of the commands support using variables.
See “Using variables in commands and assigning values” on page 524.
Base Installation
The base installation commands include the following:
■
Title
■
FirstScreen
■
Directory
■
File
■
WindowsItem
■
LastScreen
■
UnInstall
Title
Customize the title that appears in the top left pane of the screen when the user
receives an installation. You can specify the title and subtitle wording, as well as
the font appearance.
FirstScreen
Customize a message that appears at the beginning of the installation, providing
additional installation information to the user. Enter the title and caption wording.
Use carriage returns for line breaks. AI Builder sizes the width of the message
box automatically.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
You can also select a bitmap to appear on the left side of the message box. The
bitmap should be 125 pixels wide and 275 pixels high. It can have up to 256 colors.
FirstScreen can be used many times.
Directory
Specify the installation path options. Your options include the following:
■
Installing the program in the default directory, as well as an alternate directory.
To create a subdirectory in the default directory, use the File command. To
create a subdirectory relative to the default directory, use the $DEFAULTDIR$
variable.
■
Prompting the user to type an installation path, suggest a path, or prevent the
user from changing the installation drive or directory.
■
Specifying the minimum disk space required for the installation. AI Builder
prompts the user if the system has less than the minimum disk space.
■
Displaying additional messages or bitmaps to the user.
File
Specify the files to include in the application image. Identify the directories into
which the files are copied.
Each file or directory of files in the installation set needs a File command associated
with it. You can create an individual File command for each file, or use wildcards
to combine File commands. The order of the File commands determines the order
in which files are copied.
Your File options include the following:
■
Including individual files or directories of files.
■
Specifying where the installation files are located on the distribution source
media. If no value is specified, files are installed from where the installation
program was executed. The source function is commonly used to install from
a CD-ROM or network drive or to backup files on the user's system.
■
Specifying where to install files. This is not the same as the default directory.
The most common use for the Destination box is to create a subdirectory in
the default directory. To install files in the Windows directory or other special
directory, enter a variable in the Destination box, such as $WINDIR$,
$WINSYSDIR$, $WINTEMPDIR$, $PROGFILESDIR$, $DIRn$, $SOURCEDIR$,
$LOCATEDIR$, or $ASKn$. Click System Variable to display a list of variable
names.
499
500
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
You can also specify a directory path in the Destination box. For example, c:\
installs the files to the root directory on the C drive. Use \ to install the files
on the root of the default directory. Use .. to install files to the directory above
the default directory. Only use a path you are sure already exists on the user's
system.
■
Specifying whether to overwrite a file if it already exists on the user's system.
Click Yes to overwrite existing files. Click No to leave existing files intact. You
can also choose to ask the user whether to overwrite existing files using the
Ask parameter. When you select New, an overwrite occurs only if the existing
file is older (based on time/date stamp) than the file in the installation set. If
the file is a .vbs, .dll., exe, or .ocx file, the age is based on the internal version
number instead of the time/date stamp.
■
Selecting the file's DOS attribute after installation: read only, archive, hidden,
or system. If you do not select an attribute, the default is to Normal, which
allows read/write access.
■
Installing a file only if the user selects certain parameters, such as the Group
ID.
■
Displaying a pop-up message as files are copied. This message remains on the
screen until the next file with a Pop ID is specified or until the end of file
copying.
■
Displaying a bitmap on the left, middle side of the background screen. You can
also specify a wave sound.
The following advanced settings are also available:
No shrink
Removes the file compression. This is common when the installation
files are on a CD-ROM and you want the files to be accessible to the
user without using the installation program.
No bind
Prevents combining the specified file with the .exe file, leaving them
as independent files that are accessible outside the installation
program. If unchecked, the installation program combines all files
into a single file and binds it to the installation executable.
No uninstall
Leaves the specified file on the user's system when the user runs the
uninstall program.
Fonts
Installs the file to the font directory and registers it in Windows. This
automatically sets up the new font.
Shared
Adds a ShareDLL specification to the file. On installation, it registers
this file as a shared DLL in the registry key,
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Shared DLLs.
Uninstalling this package unregisters this file.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
Self-register
Registers the file in the Windows registry during the installation. The
file must be an autoregistering file, such as a .dll, .ocx, or .vbx file. If
the file does not autoregister, use the Registry command to manually
specify the registration parameters.
Temp
Specifies that the file is copied to the Windows temp directory for use
during installation. It is removed after installation.
WindowsItem
Select the Windows program group and associated icon.
Your options include the following:
■
Creating a Windows program group.
■
Adding, removing, or replacing items within a program group. If you add an
item that already exists, the Add command keeps the original item, as well as
the new item. If you replace an item, only the new one exists. The remove
command isn't generally used for installations. You can create a separate
configuration file that removes a program group or program group icon. You
must specify both the program group and item to remove an item.
■
Adding additional command-line entries and the associated working directory
that executes when the user runs the program icon.
■
Specifying an icon for the program group item, either by file name or index
number. If the icon is embedded in a program file and there are multiple icons
in the file, the index number specifies the icon that appears. For example, 1
means the first icon embedded in the program file.
LastScreen
Add a personalized message that appears at the end of the installation. It lets you
provide additional installation information to the user.
Your options include the following:
■
Defining a title and caption.
■
Specifying text to appear to the user. Use returns for line breaks. AI Builder
automatically sizes the width of the message box.
■
Specifying a bitmap to appear on the left side of the message box. The bitmap
should be 125 pixels wide by 275 pixels high. It can have up to 256 colors.
501
502
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
UnInstall
Specify whether an uninstall program is created for the user. The uninstall
program is placed in the default directory and creates a hidden file, Unstall.aic,
that captures the changes made during the installation. Successive installations
modify the Unstall.aic file so that the uninstall program returns the system to its
state before the first installation. You can delete any program groups that were
created during the installation. Use the Remove Groups During Uninstall option
carefully, as some users might select an existing group for the installation or add
files to the group after installation.
Appearance
The appearance commands include the following:
■
Animation
■
IntroScreen
■
IntroSound
■
ScreenColor
■
ScreenGraphic
Animation
Display still or animated pictures during the file copy or search process. The files
appear sequentially so that they produce an animated effect.
The bitmaps should be 55 pixels wide by 55 pixels high. They can have up to 256
colors.
IntroScreen
Display a graphic as the installation begins.
Your options include the following:
■
Choosing the bitmap that appears and whether it covers the full screen.
■
Specifying how long the bitmap appears on-screen. The user can avoid the
bitmap by touching a key.
IntroSound
Specify a sound file to play as installation begins.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
ScreenColor
Select the background color for the installation screen. You can select a color for
the entire screen, or choose a top and bottom color for a gradient effect.
ScreenGraphic
Display a graphic during installation. You can set the bitmap that appears and its
location on the screen.
The ScreenGraphic command is generally used to display company logos. AI
Builder automatically makes the bitmap background transparent. If you do not
want to use a transparent bitmap, change the upper-left pixel to a different color.
Messages & Inputs
The messages and inputs commands include the following:
■
Ask
■
Group
■
InsertDisk
■
PopMessage
■
Prompts
■
SetVariable
■
ShowReadme
Ask
Prompt the user for input and store it in the $ASKn$ variable. The user can type
information or answer a Yes/No question.
Your options include the following:
■
Assigning a numeric value to the $Askn$ variable, where n equals the number
you select.
For example, if you select 3, the variable is $Ask3$. Once you collect input
from the user, you can use the $ASKn$ variable with the WinItem, IniFile,
AddText, Config, Autoexec, RunAtExit, File, and other commands.
■
Using Caption to specify the title that appears on the top border of the dialog
box.
■
Entering the message the user sees in the Prompt box. Use the Text box to
type a more detailed description of the question.
503
504
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
Using the User Entry and Yes and No buttons to specify whether the user
enters information or answers a Yes/No question.
■
Entering a suggested value. This information appears in the entry box on the
dialog box.
■
Using the Yes prompt and No prompt to specify the words that appear on the
Yes and No buttons. Yes and No are the defaults, but you can use Agree and
Disagree or a combination you choose.
■
Entering a text file name to display a message during installation. The Text
File Name box is useful for displaying a copyright file or license agreement.
■
Selecting a bitmap to appear on the left side of the message box. The bitmap
should be 125 pixels wide by 275 pixels high. It can have up to 256 colors.
Group
Provide the user with installation options, such as which files are copied during
installation. This command defines the file groups and creates a dialog box
detailing the user's choices. It is generally used to provide different installation
options, such as adding the program documentation to the complete installation
instead of including only the program files for a light installation.
Your options include the following:
■
Caption: The dialog box title.
■
Prompt: The message that instructs the user to select one or more items in the
dialog box.
■
Selecting whether the options use check boxes or radio buttons. Check boxes
let the user select one or more items. They are displayed in a scrollable list.
Radio buttons let the user select only one item. You can create up to 24 check
boxes and radio buttons, but only the first eight buttons appear in the dialog
box. If you have a lot of options, you can divide them into subgroups of the
original group.
■
Selecting a bitmap to display on the left side of the message box. The bitmap
should be 125 pixels wide and 275 pixels high. It can have up to 256 colors.
■
Entering the name of the selectable item in the Item name box and assigning
it an identification number. This number is used by the File command to
determine which files are installed. It can also be used in an If statement. You
can also set the item to be selected by default. The user can select it or deselect
it during installation.
■
Text: A more detailed description of the item.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
Item name, Selected, and Text: Repeated so that you can enter multiple items
at once.
InsertDisk
Prompts the user to insert a disk. Users receive on-screen instructions when they
run the installation package.
PopMessage
Display text to the user when the installation is copying files.
Your options include the following:
■
Pop ID: Controls when the message appears during file copying. The Pop ID is
set in the File command.
■
Selecting a font name and size for the message.
■
Typing the text that appears within the pop-up message box.
Prompts
Change the default messages that the user sees during the installation. Click the
following prompts to apply them to the .aic file.
AutoexecPrompt
Asks the user for permission to change the Autoexec.bat
file.
BackPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the Back button. The
underline character, when pressed in conjunction with the
Alt key, creates a shortcut to the button.
BadDrivePrompt
Appears when the user specifies a drive that is not available.
The prompt for drive name is based on the DefaultDir, Dir2,
and Dir3 commands.
BrowseButton Prompt
Defines the word that appears on the Browse button.
BrowseCaption Prompt
Defines what appears in the title bar of the Browse dialog
box.
BrowseDrivePrompt and
BrowseDirPrompt
Defines the drive and directory that appear by default in
the Browse dialog box.
CancelPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the Cancel button.
ConfigPrompt
Appears when the Config command is used. It asks the user
for permission to change the Config.sys file.
505
506
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
CopyFilePrompt
Defines what appears while the installation copies files to
the user's system.
CopyTitlePrompt
Defines the title that appears when files are copied during
installation.
DetailPrompt
Defines the words that appear on the Detail button.
FileExistPrompt
Appears when the overwrite=ask parameter is used with
the File command.
FileNotFoundPrompt
Appears when a file name specified in the .aic file is not
found on the installation disk. This usually occurs when the
user inserts the wrong disk in the drive.
FinishPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the Finish button.
IniFilePrompt
Appears when the INIFILE command asks the user for
permission to modify an .ini file.
InsertDiskCaption
The caption that appears when the user is prompted for a
disk.
InsertDiskPrompt
Appears when the user is prompted to insert the next disk.
InstallToPrompt
Prompts the user to specify the location to which the files
should be installed
LocatePrompt
Appears when AI Builder is scanning for files on the user's
system. It is associated with the Locate command.
NextPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the Next button.
NoAllPrompt
Defaults all answers to No.
NoGroupPrompt
Appears when the BeginGroup command is used and the
user has not selected at least one program group.
NoPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the No button.
NoSpacePrompt
Appears when there is not enough disk space on the user's
system. It is used in conjunction with the MinDiskSpace
command.
OKPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the OK button.
QuitPrompt
Appears when the user clicks Cancel during an installation.
RebootPrompt
Appears when the Reboot command is used. It asks the user
for permission to restart the system.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
RecoverPrompt
Message that is displayed when an AI package fails to deploy.
The message is shown on a message box with Yes/No
buttons. Clicking Yes continues package deployment from
the point of failure. Clicking No starts package deployment
from the beginning.
ReplaceFileCaption
Message that is presented to the user to request
confirmation of file replacement.
ReplaceLockFile Prompt
Appears when the user's computer needs to be restarted in
order to replace files that are open and locked by the system.
UninstallBegin Prompt
Appears when the user runs the uninstall program.
UninstallEndPrompt
Appears when the uninstall program finishes.
UninstallTitlePrompt
Defines the title that appears at the top of the uninstall
screen.
WarningCaption
Defines the caption for warning messages.
YesAllPrompt
Defaults all answers to Yes.
YesPrompt
Defines the word that appears on the Yes button.
SetVariable
Create a custom variable name and assign a string value to it. If the value contains
all numbers, it is tested as a number instead of a string. The value can be a
constant, a system value, or from previous user input. The value is not case
sensitive.
This command is commonly used for easier readability or to give a label to a
constant.
ShowReadme
Specify a text file that appears at the conclusion of the installation process.
System changes
The system changes commands include the following:
■
AddText
■
Autoexec
■
Backup
■
Config
507
508
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
Copy
■
Delete
■
IniFile
■
Reboot
■
Registry
■
Regserver
■
Rename
■
Shortcut
■
NTService
■
WinGroup
AddText
Create or edit a text file to include in the installation.
Your options include the following:
■
Creating or modifying a text file.
■
Adding text to the specified text file in the indicated position. The position
can be a number or string. If you enter a positive number in the Position box,
the text is placed the specified number of lines from the top of the text file.
Negative entries count up from the bottom of the text file. The text is inserted
in the file unless you click Replace.
If you enter a string, the installation program finds the string in the text file
and inserts the specified text below the string or replaces it. You can use a
wildcard as the last character.
For example,
FILES=*.
Installation searches for a text line that starts with the string to the left of the
asterisk and either adds a line after it or replaces it, depending on the options
you select.
Autoexec
Modify the user's Autoexe.bat file. You can use this command multiple times in
one application image.
Your options include the following:
■
Adding the default installation path to the user's Autoexec.bat file.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
Adding an additional path to the user's Autoexec.bat file.
■
Adding a line to the end of the user's Autoexec.bat file.
■
Adding a SHARE command to the file. The /F parameter is the minimum part
of the SHARE command. This allocates the specified bytes of memory to hold
file sharing information. The /L parameter specifies the minimum number of
simultaneous file-region locks. Refer to your operating system documentation
for more information.
■
Displaying a dialog box to ask the user for permission to make the specified
changes.
Backup
Create a backup subdirectory under the default installation directory, $DefaultDir$,
and back up any file that will be overwritten during installation. All overwritten
files are copied to the backup directory whether or not they were in the same
directory originally.
Config
Specify changes to the user's Config.sys file. It is sometimes used to add a device
driver that is required by the newly installed software. If AI Builder makes a change
to the user's Config.sys file, it creates a backup of the original named Config.bak.
This command can be used multiple times in the .aic file. Your options include
the following:
■
Setting the minimum value for the Buffers command in the user's Config.sys
file.
■
Setting the minimum files value for the Files command in the user's Config.sys
file.
■
Adding a line to the user's Config.sys file.
■
Displaying a dialog box to ask the user for permission to make the specified
changes.
Copy
Copy a file from one location to another. This command is often used to make
copies of files from one directory on the user's system to another directory.
Your options include the following:
■
The original path and file to be copied.
509
510
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
The destination, if the destination file already exists. It is overwritten if it is
older than the source file.
Delete
Lets you delete a file during the installation. The file can be on the user's system
or a part of the installation set.
IniFile
Create or modify an .ini file on the user's system.
Your options include the following:
■
Specifying the .ini file you want to create or modify.
■
Entering the section of the file in which the new line will be placed. If the
section doesn't already exist, AI Builder creates it.
■
Entering the parameter that appears to the left of the equal sign. For example,
if the line is HOSTDIR=c:\temp, then HOSTDIR is the Entry parameter.
■
Entering the parameter that appears to the right of the equal sign. For example,
if the line is HOSTDIR=c:\temp, the c:\temp is the String parameter.
■
Adding a line to the .ini file even if a line with the same entry value exists in
the section. If Add is unchecked, AI Builder replaces a line with the same entry
value with the new line.
■
Asking the user for permission to modify the .ini file.
Reboot
Restart the user's system after the installation.
Your options include the following:
System
Restart the operating system. In Windows 98/NT, this is equivalent
to restarting Windows.
Windows
Restart Windows. In Windows 98/NT, this is equivalent to stopping
all programs and logging off from Windows.
Registry
Insert, delete, or modify items in the Windows registry. There can be multiple
Registry commands in a single .aic file.
Options include entering the name of the registry key that you want to insert,
delete, or modify and then entering the action you want to perform.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
Your options include the following:
Delete
Removes the key from the registry.
New
Adds a key to the registry.
Query
Specifies where in the structure the key and associated values should
be stored.
To create a new key or modify the existing key organization, use the new or delete
commands.
To add information to the registry, use the New and Query functions. Use the Key
command followed by one or more Value statements. Single Key commands and
all Value statements begin with the BeginRegistry command and end with
EndRegistry.
Regserver
Register a self-registering component, for example, an .ocx or .dll file.
Rename
Rename a file on the user's system or on the installation disks. You specify the
existing file name and associated path and the new file name and path.
Shortcut
Create a shortcut on the user's system.
Your options include the following:
■
Specifying the command-line executable the shortcut invokes, any additional
command-line parameters, and the working directory for the command-line
arguments.
■
Specifying the shortcut name that appears to the user.
■
Defining whether the shortcut is visible by all users or just the user currently
logged on to the Windows operating system.
■
Specifying an icon for the shortcut, either by file name or index number. If
the icon is embedded in a program file and there are multiple icons in the file,
the index number specifies the icon that appears. For example, 1 means the
first icon embedded in the program file.
■
Specifying the size of the window in which the specified executable runs.
511
512
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
NTService
Start or stop a service on a Windows NT system.
Your options include the following:
■
If you stop a service, it stops at the beginning of the installation, before any
files are installed.
■
If you start a service, it occurs after all of the file commands are executed, so
that the service file is in the correct location to be executed.
WinGroup
Let the user choose an existing program group or create a new one. The WinGroup
command displays the current Windows program groups so that the user can
select from the list or create a new one.
Your options include the following:
■
Entering a default program group name.
■
Specifying a message that prompts the user for a Windows group name.
If Conditions
You can include the following If statements for unattended installations:
■
If $ASKn$
■
If $SYSn$
■
If $variable$
■
If CPU()
■
If DiskSpace()
■
If DOSVer()
■
If FileVer()
■
If CDROM()
■
If Group
■
If IsFile()
■
If Locate()
■
If Memory()
■
If Search()
■
If SoundCard()
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
If Video()
■
If WinVer()
■
Else
■
EndIf
■
ExitMessage
If $ASKn$
$ASKn$ values are assigned by collecting user input in response to an Ask
command. There are nine variables, $ASK1$ through $ASK9$.
For example:
ASK3: "", prompt="Enter your serial number:"
IF $ASK3$ <> "1B456Q9"
EXITMESSAGE
Invalid serial number - installation terminated
EXIT
ENDIF
The user is prompted to enter a serial number, and the response is stored in the
variable $ASK3$. The If statement compares the user's value to 1B456Q9. If it
isn't the same, the exit message appears and the installation ends.
Refer to the EXITMESSAGE/EXIT command for usage information. The values
stored in the $ASKn$ variables are strings and are compared alphabetically. For
example, 99 is considered larger than 100 because the first character 9 is larger
than the first character 1.
If $SYSn$
Test a condition against the $System$ value.
$SYSTEM$, $SYS2$, and $SYS3$ values are assigned by collecting input that the
user enters during the installation program. The user must type a dash (-) in front
of the value to assign it to a variable.
Example 1:
If the user enters install -update, the $System$ variable becomes update.
Example 2:
If the user enters setup -d:\network -c:\local -update, the $System$ variable
becomes d:\network, $Sys2$ becomes c:\local, and $Sys3$ becomes update.
Example 3:
513
514
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
IF $SYSTEM$ <> open_sesame
EXITMESSAGE
Incorrect password - installation terminated.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example expects the user to enter a password on the command line, such as
open_sesame, and checks the entry. If it does not match, installation is aborted.
If $variable$
Test a condition against the $variable$ value. The $variable$ gets its input from
the SetVariable command. The value can be tested against a constant or a system
variable.
Example 1:
ASK1: "", prompt="What day of the week is today?"
SET $day_of_week$ = "$ASK1$"
IF $day_of_week$ = "Tuesday"
BEGINFIRSTSCREEN
Today is Tuesday. Your installation may proceed.
ENDFIRSTSCREEN
ELSE
EXITMESSAGE
Today is not Tuesday. This installation should be run only on a Tuesday.
EXIT
ENDIF
A text value corresponding to the day of the week had been set earlier in the script
with the SETVARIABLE command, as shown. If the day of the week is correct, a
short message appears. Otherwise, installation is aborted.
Example 2:
A numeric value can also be checked. If the text value contains all digits, it is
assumed to be a number.
Thus
SET $A$="6"
IF $A$<"1234"
is true, because the number 6 is less than the number 1234, but
SET $A$="6a"
IF $A$<"1234"
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
is false, because 6 alphabetizes higher than 1.
If CPU()
This command detects the user's system and lets the installation perform
differently based on the user's CPU.
Select the comparison (equal to, less than, and so on) and the CPU value from the
lists.
If DiskSpace()
The If DiskSpace( ) condition detects the free space on the specified drive and lets
the installation perform differently based on the available space. AI Builder
automatically detects available disk space for installing files. Therefore, the If
DiskSpace( ) command is usually not needed. You can also specify required space
in the DefaultDir/Dirn command.
If DOSVer()
DOSVer() =|>|<|>=|<=|<>value or DOSVER() = range(value1, value2) is a function
that returns the version number of the DOS operating system. You may compare
against a single value or provide a range to compare against.
Example 1:
IF DOSVer() >= 5
ELSE
EXITMESSAGE
Not compatible with your DOS version - install ended.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example checks for DOS 5.0 or greater on the user's system.
Example 2:
IF DOSVer() = range(3.1,4.9)
ELSE
EXITMESSAGE
Not compatible with your DOS version - install ended.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example checks for at least DOS version 3.1 but less than version 5.0.
515
516
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
If FileVer()
Use the If FileVer( ) condition to check the time stamp or internal version number
of a specific file. It is generally used to determine if certain files need to be installed
or to determine the version of an application that is currently installed on the
user's computer.
If CDROM()
This command detects whether the user's system has a CD-ROM drive.
If Group
GROUP is assigned the value of the file group that the user has selected for
installation.
See “Group” on page 504.
For example:
IF GROUP=10, 20
WINITEM: "Zip Finder", "$defaultdir$\zip.exe", "ZIPman"
ENDIF
If the user selects group 10 or 20 (as defined in the Group command), then AI
Builder creates a program group and program item. The values are separated by
commas and are in an Or relationship. If the user selects a group that matches
any of the values provided, then the condition is considered true and AI Builder
executes true_commands.
If the user selects the first and third groups (which the administrator assigned to
group numbers 10 and 30), then IF GROUP = 10,20 is true because group number
10 is selected.
If IsFile()
If IsFile([path]file name) checks for the existence of a file within a specific directory
on the user's system. If the file is found, ISFILE() is assigned the value of true. If
the file is not found, then the function is assigned the value of false. The file name
parameter is the file to be searched for, and the optional path parameter is used
to specify a specific drive and directory. You can use variables as the path
parameter (for example, $WINDIR$, $SYSTEM$, $SOURCEDIR$, $LOCATEDIR$,
and so on).
For example:
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
IF ISFILE("$WINDIR$\myprog.ini")
RENAME: "$windir$\myprog.ini" "$windir$\myprog.inx"
ENDIF
An existing file, Myprog.ini, is renamed to Myprog.inx, if it exists in the Windows
directory on the user's system. You can also use this function to determine if a
directory exists by using a \ after the directory name, ISFILE(c:\xyz\), for example.
If Locate()
If Locate(file name, drive/dir) searches the user's system for a specific file. It
searches all directories on some or all drives. If the function does not find the
specified file, it assigns a value of false. Otherwise, it assigns the value of true and
files the $LocateDir$ value with the file path. The file name parameter is the name
of the file to be searched for, and the optional drive/dir parameter (you can type
in any drive letter or directory name) is used to limit the search to a specific drive
or directory. The optional local parameter limits the search to all local drives, and
the optional network parameter limits the search to all network drives. Note that
CD-ROM drives are treated as local or network drives and are searched, which
may be a slow process.
For example:
IF LOCATE("zipcode.exe", c)
DEFAULTDIR: "$LOCATEDIR$"
ELSE
DEFAULTDIR: "c:\zipcode"
ENDIF
This example searches the C drive on the user's system for the file Zipcode.exe.
If found, the suggested installation directory is set to the directory containing
Zipcode.exe. If it isn't found, the suggested installation directory is set to
C:\Zipcode.
If Memory()
If Memory() returns the total memory of the computer.
For example:
IF MEMORY()<2000K
EXITMESSAGE
Not enough memory.
ENDIF
517
518
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
This example checks to see if the computer has 2 MB of RAM and if it does not, it
exits.
If Search()
If Search() searches a text file for the occurrence of a specific text string. It skips
the occurrence of the string if it is on a line beginning with skipstring. It searches
within the section bracketed by search-after-string and search-before-string.
When found, the function returns a true condition for use in the If statement and
assigns the variable $SEARCH$ with the numeric value of the line number in
which the string was found. It also assigns values to $LEFT$ and $RIGHT$
variables. These two variables contain the text that appears to the left and the
right of the string. Most frequently, this function is used with the ADDTEXT
command to edit a line in an existing text file.
Example 1:
IF Search("zipcode.exe","c:\Autoexec.bat")
ADDTEXT: "$LEFT$zipcode.exe -USA$RIGHT$", "c:\Autoexec.bat",
"$SEARCH$", replace
ENDIF
This example searches the text file C:\Autoexec.bat for the string Zipcode.exe. If
it is found, then the parameter -USA is inserted into the line immediately after
Zipcode.exe. Any other text in that line, either in front of or following Zipcode.exe,
is maintained.
Example 2:
ASK1: "your name", prompt="Please enter your name:"
IF Search("Sir","$sourcedir$\readme.txt")
ADDTEXT: "$LEFT$$ASK1$$RIGHT$", "$defaultdir$\readme.txt",
"$SEARCH$", replace
ENDIF
This example prompts the user for a name and assigns the value to $ASK1$. The
SEARCH function searches the Readme.txt file that is on the source drive for Sir.
The line number in which Sir appears in this text file is assigned to the variable
$SEARCH$. The ADDTEXT command locates that line and replaces it with the
user's name (as stored in $ASK1$). It restores whatever came before Sir by using
$LEFT$ and whatever was to the right of Sir by using $RIGHT$.
Example 3:
IF SEARCH("Drive=","$windir$\pcloan.ini", ";", begin="[Network]",
end="[end]")
ADDTEXT: "$LEFT$Drive1=$RIGHT$", "$windir$\pcloan.ini", "$SEARCH$",
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
replace
ENDIF
You can also replace a line in a specific section in an .ini file. This example searches
in the section labeled Network for the occurrence of Drive= and substitutes the
value Drive1. Note that this example skips any line starting with a semicolon (;).
If SoundCard()
If SoundCard() checks for a sound card on one of the serial ports on the user's
system. If a sound card is detected, a value of true is returned.
For example:
IF SOUNDCARD()
FILE: "sound.000", FROM="c:\sound\sound.drv"
ELSE
FILE: "nosound.000", FROM="c:\sound\nosound.drv"
ENDIF
The file Sound.drv is installed if a sound card is detected. Otherwise, it installs
the file Nosound.drv.
If Video()
If Video returns three values describing the video display capability of the user's
computer: number of colors supported, horizontal resolution, and vertical
resolution. Any of the numbers can be omitted.
Example 1:
IF VIDEO() > 3,640,480
FILE: "color.000", FROM="c:\video\color.drv"
ELSE
FILE: "bw.000", FROM="c:\video\bw.drv"
ENDIF
If the user's video capability is greater than 640 horizontal resolution by 480
vertical resolution and 3 colors, then Color.drv is installed. Otherwise, Bw.drv is
installed.
Example 2:
IF VIDEO() > 3
FILE: "color.000", FROM="c:\video\color.drv"
ELSE
519
520
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
FILE: "bw.000", FROM="c:\video\bw.drv"
ENDIF
In this example, only the number of colors is checked.
Example 3:
IF VIDEO() > 640,480
FILE: "color.000", FROM="c:\video\color.drv"
ELSE
FILE: "bw.000", FROM="c:\video\bw.drv"
ENDIF
The example checks the resolution.
If WinVer()
If WinVer() =|>|<|>=|<=|<>value or WinVer() = range(value1, value2) returns the
version number of the Windows operating system. This is a Windows-only
function. You can compare against a single value or provide a range to compare
against.
The value of a Window's version is the same as the value defined by Microsoft as
follows:
Windows NT 4.0
4.0
Windows 2000
5.0
Windows XP
5.1
Windows Vista
6.0
Example 1:
IF WINVER() >= 5.1
ELSE
EXITMESSAGE
Not compatible with your Windows version - install ended.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example checks whether the user has Windows XP or later installed.
Example 2:
IF WINVER() = range(5.0,6.0)
ELSE
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
EXITMESSAGE
Not compatible with your Windows version - install ended.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example checks whether the user has at least Windows version 5.0 but less
than Windows version 6.0. In other words, it checks to see that the user is running
Windows 2000 or Windows XP.
Else
Create an Else condition within an If statement.
EndIf
The EndIf statement is required to end an If condition.
ExitMessage
Add a message that appears at the end of the installation based on an If condition.
Type the title of the message box and the text to appear. Use carriage returns for
line breaks. AI Builder automatically sizes the width of the message box. The
ExitMessage command is only available within an If statement.
For example:
IF LOCATE("zipcode.exe")
DEFAULTDIR: "$LOCATEDIR$"
ELSE
EXITMESSAGE
A previous version of the software was not found.
You may not install this upgrade.
EXIT
ENDIF
This example checks for a previously installed copy of Zipcode.exe. If it is not
found, it displays a message and exits the installation immediately.
Note: If there is only a blank line or single space on the line between EXITMESSAGE
and EXIT, the installation terminates silently. A message does not appear and is
not required.
Defaults and Calls
The defaults and calls commands include the following:
521
522
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
BlankLine
■
FontName
■
OverWriteFile
■
ProgressBar
■
Rem
■
RunAtStart
■
RunAtMiddle
■
RunAtExit
BlankLine
Insert a blank line in the .aic file. This has no effect on the execution of the file.
FontName
Enter the font that is used as the default font in dialog boxes. The font is used
when no font is specified for the individual dialog boxes.
This command is useful for international users because the default font (MS Sans
Serif) does not display some international character sets, such as Japanese and
Chinese.
OverWriteFile
Defines what happens when a file in the installation set already exists on the
user's system. This command is used when no entry is made in the File command.
Your options include the following:
No
Leaves existing files intact.
Ask
Asks the user whether to overwrite existing files.
New
Overwrites if the existing file is older (based on time/date stamp) than
the file in the installation set. If the file is a .vbs, .dll, exe, or .ocx file,
the age is based on the internal version number instead of the
time/date stamp.
Yes
Overwrites files.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
ProgressBar
Specify the total file size so that the progress bar moves smoothly. If you let AI
Builder collect files, compress them, and build the installation, AI Builder already
knows this value. You only need this command if you build disks manually.
Rem
Add a remark to the configuration file. The compiler ignores remark lines.
RunAtStart
Run an external program at the beginning of the installation.
Your options include the following:
■
Specifying an .exe, .com, .bat, .pif, or .dll file to execute.
■
Entering command-line parameters for the executable files.
■
Entering the function that is run from a .dll library, as well as an input variable
that is necessary to run the .dll. The $DLLRETURN$ variable uses an integer,
unless you add str after the variable. For example, 128, str is an acceptable
variable name.
■
Specifying whether the .dll returns a value. The default return type is an
integer. If your .dll returns a string, check the Function Returns a String option.
The string is saved in the $DLLReturnStr$ variable.
RunAtMiddle
Run an external program before file copying.
Your options include the following:
■
Specifying an .exe, .com, .bat, .pif, or .dll file to execute.
■
Entering command-line parameters for the executable files.
■
Entering the function that is run from a .dll library, as well as an input variable
that is necessary to run the .dll. The $DLLRETURN$ variable uses an integer,
unless you add str after the variable. For example, 128, str is an acceptable
variable name.
■
Specifying whether the .dll returns a value. The default return type is an
integer. If your .dll returns a string, check the Function Returns a String option.
The string is saved in the $DLLReturnStr$ variable.
523
524
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
RunAtExit
Run an external program at the end of the installation.
Your options include the following:
■
Specifying an .exe, .com, .bat, .pif, or .dll file to execute.
■
Entering command-line parameters for the executable files.
■
Entering the function that is run from a .dll library, as well as an input variable
that is necessary to run the .dll. The $DLLRETURN$ variable uses an integer,
unless you add str after the variable. For example, 128, str is an acceptable
variable name.
■
Specifying whether the .dll returns a value. The default return type is an
integer. If your .dll returns a string, check the Function Returns a String option.
The string is saved in the $DLLReturnStr$ variable.
Using variables in commands and assigning values
Many AI Builder commands support using variables. Variables are assigned values
based on the user's unique system or input. For example, the $WINSYSDIR$
variable can be used as part of the directory path in several commands. This
variable is assigned the value of the Windows system directory. When used with
the File command, it lets you install files into the user's Windows system directory,
despite the fact that each user may have this directory in a different location.
All of the variable commands are used in conjunction with other commands. Refer
to the individual commands for examples and specific applications.
The available variables are as follows:
■
$ALLUSERSDIR$
■
$ASKn$
■
$COMPUTERNAME$
■
$CURUSERDIR$
■
$DEFAULTDIR$
■
$DEFAULTDRIVE$
■
$DIRn$
■
$DLLRETURN$ and $DLLRETURNSTR$
■
$LOCATEDIR$
■
$LOCATEDRIVE$
■
$MACHINENAME$
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
■
$MODEMCOM$
■
$PROGFILESDIR$
■
$SEARCH$, $LEFT$, and $RIGHT$
■
$SOURCEDIR$
■
$SOURCEDRIVE$
■
$SYSTEM$, $SYS2$, and $SYS3$
■
$Variable$
■
$WINDIR$, $WINDRIVE$, $WINSYSDIR$, and $WINTEMPDIR$
■
$WINHELPDIR$
■
$WINGROUP$
$ALLUSERSDIR$
$ALLUSERSDIR$ is assigned the Common Programs (WinNT) subdirectory of the
All Users directory. The All Users directory is given by the following registry key:
WinNT
Common Programs entry in HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\
CurrentVersion\Explorer\Shell Folders
$ASKn$
$ASK1$ through $ASK9$ are assigned values if the ASK1 through ASK9 commands
are used, respectively. Each is assigned a value after the user has been prompted
for information (see the ASK1 through ASK9 commands).
Common uses include the following:
■
A request for personalization information (such as user name and company)
to personalize the installed software.
■
A request for a serial number to verify that installation is authorized.
$COMPUTERNAME$
$COMPUTERNAME$ is the NetBIOS name of the computer. This command is
identical to $MACHINENAME$.
$CURUSERDIR$
$CURUSERDIR$ is assigned the value of $SystemDir$\Profiles\Username for the
currently logged on user. This variable is supported in the Windows NT
525
526
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
environment only. It is most commonly used to assign desktop shortcuts, Send
To or Start Menu settings, and other entries in the user profile for the currently
logged on user only, instead of to the Default User or All Users. This value includes
both the disk drive and the directory path. When an install occurs, the value is
read from the destination computer's system.
$DEFAULTDIR$
$DEFAULTDIR$ is assigned the value of the primary directory in which the
installation occurs. This value includes both the disk drive and the directory path.
Typically, the administrator assigns a suggested value using the DEFAULTDIR
command and gives the user the option of changing it. The variable is assigned
its value after the user has had a chance to change the value so that it accurately
reflects where to install the files.
Common uses include the following:
■
Adding the installation directory to the user's PATH.
■
Adding a device driver to the Config.sys file.
■
Providing the installation directory path to an external executable.
$DEFAULTDRIVE$
$DEFAULTDRIVE$ is assigned the value of the default installation drive, for
example, C. This variable is similar to $DEFAULTDIR$. However, it contains the
drive value (one letter) only and not the directory value. It is assigned the value
after the user enters information in response to the DEFAULTDIR prompt.
$DIRn$
$DIR2$ through $DIR9$ are assigned values if the DIR2 through DIR9 commands
are used, respectively. Each is assigned a value after the user is prompted for a
path (see the DIR2 through DIR9 commands).
Common uses include the following:
■
Adding the installation directory to the user's PATH.
■
Adding a device driver to the Config.sys file.
■
Providing the installation directory path to an external executable.
$DLLRETURN$ and $DLLRETURNSTR$
$DLLRETURN$ and $DLLRETURNSTR$ are assigned values when a .dll is executed
using the RUNATSTART, RUNATMIDDLE, and RUNATEXIT commands and the
executed .dll function generates a return value. Many .dlls do not generate return
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
values. If the return value from the .dll is a string instead of a number, the returned
string is stored in the variable $DLLRETURNSTR$. To specify that the .dll returns
a string, check the RunAtStart, RunAtMiddle, RunAtExit commands.
$LOCATEDIR$
$LOCATEDIR$ is assigned a value with the LOCATE function. LOCATE searches
the user's system for a particular file, and $LOCATEDIR$ is assigned the value of
the directory path in which the file was located. This value includes both the disk
drive and the directory path. Refer to the LOCATE command for more information.
Common uses include the following:
■
Setting the installation directory to the directory in which a previous version
of the software is found. For example, you are upgrading and you want to
install in the directory in which the user installed the last version of the
software.
■
Installing a file in another application's directory. For example, you supply a
script file for a database program and you want this script to reside in the
database program's directory rather than the directory in which your software
is being installed.
$LOCATEDRIVE$
$LOCATEDRIVE$ is assigned a value with the LOCATE function. LOCATE searches
the user's system for a particular file, and $LOCATEDRIVE$ is assigned the value
of the drive in which the file was located. This variable is similar to $LOCATEDIR$.
However, it contains the drive value (one letter) only and not the directory value.
Refer to the LOCATE command for more information.
$MACHINENAME$
$MACHINENAME$ is assigned a value corresponding to the computer name stored
in the user's system. This variable is useful for a silent-installation customization.
$MODEMCOM$
$MODEMCOM$ is assigned a value corresponding to the COM port in which the
modem was found. Values are 1, 2, 3, and so on. This variable is assigned its value
when the FINDMODEM() function is used.
527
528
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
$PROGFILESDIR$
$PROGFILESDIR$ assigns the value of the Program Files directory for a particular
computer. This value includes both the disk drive and the directory path. When
an install occurs, the value is read from the destination computer's system.
$SEARCH$, $LEFT$, and $RIGHT$
$SEARCH$, $LEFT$, and $RIGHT$ are assigned values using the SEARCH function.
The SEARCH function is used within an If statement to search the user's text file
for a text string. If the text string is found, the variable $SEARCH$ is assigned
the numeric value of the line number in which the string was first found in the
user's text file. $LEFT$ is assigned the string value of whatever is on the line in
the user's text file to the left of the searched for string. $RIGHT$ is assigned the
string value of whatever is on the line in the user's text file to the right of the
searched for string. For example, the tenth line in the user's text file is:
c:\dos\share /l:500
Search for share and the three variables are defined as follows:
$SEARCH$ = 10
$LEFT$ = c:\dos\
$RIGHT$ = /l:500
These variables (along with the If function and ADDTEXT function) can be used
to edit specific lines in text files. Common uses of these variables are as follows:
■
Adding parameters to commands currently in Autoexec.bat or Config.sys files
without removing existing parameters.
■
Editing a line in a database or network control text file.
$SOURCEDIR$
$SOURCEDIR$ is assigned the value of the drive and the directory on which the
installation occurs. Usually this is the root directory of the floppy disk drive,
which has your installation disk in it. This value includes both the disk drive and
the directory path.
Common uses include the following:
■
Passing the location of the original installation disk to an external program
invoked with the RunAtExit command.
■
Using the variable to remove a file from the installation disk (using the DELETE
command) to prevent a second installation.
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
$SOURCEDRIVE$
$SOURCEDRIVE$ is assigned the value of the drive on which the installation
occurs and is usually the floppy disk drive that has your installation disk in it.
This variable is similar to $SOURCEDIR$. However, it contains the drive value
(one letter) only and not the directory value.
For example, you can use a variable to define a device driver for a CD-ROM drive
in an .ini file using the INIFILE command or in a Config.sys file using the CONFIG
command.
$SYSTEM$, $SYS2$, and $SYS3$
$SYSTEM$, $SYS2$, and $SYS3$ are text variables that are assigned the value
that the user types on the command line when running the installation program.
For example, if the user types install -update -c:\data -15236, $SYSTEM$ is
assigned the value update, $SYS2$ is assigned the value c:\data, and $SYS3$ is
assigned the value 15236. If the user types setup -d:\network, $SYSTEM$ is
assigned the value d:\network. The dash (-) must precede the text that the user
types on the command line. If the dash is omitted, the parameter is interpreted
as the .aic file name.
Common uses include the following:
■
Allowing variables to be passed from one installation to a second installation.
■
Providing a user-supplied variable for testing with an If statement.
$Variable$
$Variable$ is a custom-named text variable that is equal to a constant or one of
the other variables listed. The name between the dollar signs may be up to 20
characters long. Spaces are not allowed, but you can use the underscore (_) and
dash (-) as separators. The text value is not case sensitive. If the value of $variable$
contains all digits, the value is evaluated as a number and not text. For example,
Tuesday, TUESDAY, and tuesday are all equivalent text values. The variable 6
would be evaluated as less than 1234, but 6a would be evaluated as greater than
1234zzz.
Common uses include the following:
■
Allowing variables meaningful names.
■
Providing a user-named variable for testing with an If statement.
529
530
AI Builder variables, commands, and conditions
Commands
$WINDIR$, $WINDRIVE$, $WINSYSDIR$, and $WINTEMPDIR$
$WINDIR$, $WINDRIVE$, $WINSYSDIR$, and $WINTEMPDIR$ are assigned the
directory path of the Windows directory, the drive letter on which Windows is
located, the Windows system directory, and the Windows temporary directory,
respectively.
Common uses of the FILE command include the following:
■
Installing fonts or drivers into the Windows system directory.
■
Copying or updating .ini files in the Windows directory.
$WINHELPDIR$
$WINHELPDIR$ is supported in the Windows 98/NT environment only. This
variable is assigned the directory path of the Windows Help directory.
For example, copying application Help files with the FILE command into the
Windows 98/NT Help directory.
$WINGROUP$
$WINGROUP$ is assigned a value only if the WINGROUP command is used. It is
assigned a value after the user has been prompted for the name of a Windows
program group into which to install the software.
See “WinGroup” on page 512.
It takes on the value of whatever the user has entered.
For example, installing icons into the specified program group (with the WINITEM
command).
Appendix
C
Transfer methods and
hardware setup
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Transfer and hardware requirements
■
Peer-to-peer connections
■
SCSI tape drives
■
GhostCast transfers
■
Removable media
■
CD/DVD usage
■
Mapped network volume
■
Internal drives
■
USB devices
■
FireWire devices
■
Third-party device
Transfer and hardware requirements
Before using Symantec Ghost, consider the transfer and hardware requirements
for the transfer method that you want to use. Ensure that all hard drives are
installed correctly and that the BIOS of the system is configured and shows the
valid parameters of the drives.
532
Transfer methods and hardware setup
Peer-to-peer connections
Peer-to-peer connections
Peer-to-peer connections enable Symantec Ghost to run on two computers, copying
drives and partitions and using image files between them.
LPT or USB connections
On an LPT/parallel port connection, use a parallel connection cable and a parallel
port to connect the computers. For data transfer of approximately 19-25 MB per
minute, Symantec Ghost provides support for the Parallel Technologies universal
DirectParallel cable. For peer-to-peer USB port connections, use a USB 1.1 cable
that supports a host-to-host connection and a data transfer of approximately
20-30 MB per minute. Symantec Ghost does not support the following:
■
Removal or addition of drives while Symantec Ghost is running
■
USB 2.0 peer-to-peer
■
Starting from a USB floppy disk drive
Due to problems with USB controllers, you should disable BIOS USB keyboard
and mouse support when using Symantec Ghost with a USB device. In most cases,
this is identified as Legacy support in the BIOS.
Symantec Ghost supports one USB 1.1 controller; therefore, you may have to try
different ports to execute a Ghost USB peer-to-peer operation.
ECP is the best option for LPT connections and has a data transfer rate of
approximately 5 MB/min. Symantec Ghost must be running under DOS on both
computers.
See “Parallel Technologies cables” on page 537.
TCP/IP connections
Connect the computers with an Ethernet or token-ring network interface card
and an established network connection, which includes one of the following:
■
Crossover cable
■
Coaxial or twisted pair cable
■
Ethernet or token ring (network interface card)
■
Ethernet or MSAU hub
Transfer methods and hardware setup
SCSI tape drives
SCSI tape drives
To use Symantec Ghost with a SCSI tape device, the tape media and the tape device
must have an Advanced SCSI Programming Interface (ASPI) driver for DOS
installed. The driver is installed in the Config.sys file as shown in the following
example:
device=C:\scsitape\aspi4dos.sys
The driver can be included on a Ghost boot disk with the Standard Ghost Boot
Disk option.
Refer to the documentation included with your SCSI tape device for more
information.
GhostCast transfers
For GhostCasting transfers, the following hardware and software are required:
■
Ethernet or token ring NIC
■
Established network connection
■
Optional multicast-enabled router
■
Optional BOOTP/DHCP software
Set up the NIC using the manufacturer's installation program and run the NIC
test program to check the NIC and cabling.
Removable media
The removable media drive, media, and media drivers for use in DOS are required.
CD/DVD usage
A CD/DVD writer and blank CD-R/RW or DVD media as suitable by the writer's
manufacturers are required.
See “Image files and CD/DVD writers” on page 295.
Mapped network volume
An installed network interface card and established network connection are
required to use a mapped network volume for cloning.
533
534
Transfer methods and hardware setup
Internal drives
Network file server access within Windows is unavailable when Symantec Ghost
runs in DOS. To access a network file server, a DOS network client boot disk must
be created. A network client boot disk contains the appropriate network drivers
and network client software to allow connection to a network. You can create a
boot disk for connecting to a Microsoft network volume or an IBM LAN server.
See “About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 254.
Internal drives
To work with internal drives, ensure that each of the drives is properly configured.
This means that if fixed IDE drives are in use, then the jumpers on the drives are
set up correctly and the BIOS of the computer is configured for the disk
arrangement. Both the source and the destination drives must be free from file
corruption and physical hard-drive defects.
USB devices
When using a USB device Symantec Ghost supports the following:
■
USB hubs
■
Devices that must comply to the Mass Storage Specification, Bulk only
Symantec Ghost does not support the removal or addition of drives while Symantec
Ghost is running.
Symantec Ghost does not support using a peer-to-peer USB cable with peer-to-peer
drivers from a boot disk and another USB mass storage device on the same
controller. Ghost internal USB support only starts when nothing else is controlling
the controllers. You can use the switches -forceusb and -nousb to force USB support
or disable USB support, but these switches should be used with caution.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
FireWire devices
Symantec Ghost does not support the removal or addition of drives while Symantec
Ghost is running.
To be supported by Symantec Ghost, the FireWire drive must comply to the
following standards:
■
Controllers must comply to the 1394 Open Host Controller Interface (OHCI)
1.0 Specification.
Transfer methods and hardware setup
Third-party device
■
Devices must comply to the Serial Bus Protocol 2 (SBP-2).
■
Devices must support SCSI Primary Commands 2.0 (SPC-2).
Third-party device
Install the DOS driver as outlined in the device documentation.
535
536
Transfer methods and hardware setup
Third-party device
Appendix
D
USB and DirectParallel
cables
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Parallel Technologies cables
■
Other USB cables
Parallel Technologies cables
Parallel Technologies USB and DirectParallel Universal Fast Cable provide
high-speed data transfer and can significantly increase Symantec Ghost
performance.
USB and DirectParallel connection cables are available directly from Parallel
Technologies as follows:
■
http://www.lpt.com
■
Telephone:
■
800.789.4784 (U.S.)
■
425.869.1119 (International)
■
Fax: 253.813.8730
■
Email: [email protected]
For peer-to-peer connections, Symantec Ghost supports USB 1.1 cables and USB
1.1 controllers. Some USB 2.0 controllers may work, but Symantec Ghost does
not support this configuration.
The USB and DirectParallel connection cables can also be used for high-speed
computer-to-computer file transfer and networking in Windows 98 and Windows
538
USB and DirectParallel cables
Other USB cables
2000. Symantec Ghost contains DirectParallel driver technology from Parallel
Technologies, Inc., the developers of the Direct Cable Connection
computer-to-computer technology built into Windows 98 and Windows 2000. The
DirectParallel drivers and cables contain patent-pending parallel port interface
technology.
Other USB cables
The following USB peer-to-peer cables can also be used with Symantec Ghost:
■
EzLink USB Instant Network, model 2710
■
USB LinQ Network
■
BusLink USB to USB File Transfer cable, model UFT06
■
USB Net Linq Network Bridge cable, model 2K398
■
USB Net Linq Network Bridge cable, model 00115G
Appendix
E
Wattcp.cfg network
configuration file
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file
■
Wattcp.cfg keywords
About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file
The Wattcp.cfg configuration file contains the TCP/IP networking configuration
details for Symantec Ghost. The Wattcp.cfg file is not required for the GhostCast
Server, Ghostsrv.exe.
Wattcp.cfg is created automatically in the virtual partition and when you create
a boot package using the Ghost Boot Wizard.
The Wattcp.cfg file specifies the IP address and the subnet mask of the computer
and lets you set other optional network parameters. The file should be located in
the current directory where Ghost.exe is started.
Comments in the file start with a semicolon (;). Options are set using the format
option = value. For example:
receive_mode=5;set receive mode
Wattcp.cfg keywords
The keywords in the Wattcp.cfg configuration file are listed in Table E-1.
540
Wattcp.cfg network configuration file
Wattcp.cfg keywords
Table E-1
Wattcp.cfg keywords
Keyword
Description
IP
Specifies the IP address of the local computer. Each computer must
have a unique IP address. Symantec Ghost supports the use of DHCP
and BOOTP servers and defaults to using them when the IP address
is left blank or is invalid. DHCP and BOOTP provide automatic
assignment of IP addresses to computers. This lets identical boot disks
be used on computers with similar network cards.
For example:
IP=192.168.100.10
Netmask
Specifies the network IP subnet mask.
For example:
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
Gateway (optional) Specifies the IP address of the gateway. This option is required when
routers are present on the network and when participating computers
are located on different subnets.
For example:
GATEWAY=192.168.100.1
Bootpto (optional) Overrides the timeout value in seconds for BOOTP/DHCP.
For example:
BOOTPTO=60
Receive_Mode
(Ethernet only)
Overrides the automatically configured packet driver mode used by
Symantec Ghost. The modes, in order of preference, are 4, 5, and 6.
The default mode is 4.
Some packet drivers misrepresent their abilities in receiving multicast
information from the network and allow the use of packet receive
modes that they do not support. The packet driver should be set to
mode 4 so that it only accepts the multicast packets required. If the
packet driver does not support this mode, mode 5 can be used to collect
all multicast packets. The final option, mode 6, configures the packet
driver to see all packets being sent on the network.
For example:
RECEIVE_MODE=6
share_mode
Must be set to 1 to allow GhostCast or peer-to-peer operations on a
mapped network drive.
You should set this option to 0 for all other operations.
Appendix
F
Cloning with Linux
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Supported configurations
■
Boot configuration
■
Support for advanced Linux features
■
Symantec Ghost utility support
Supported configurations
Symantec Ghost can copy or clone many different Linux distributions. However,
Symantec Ghost is sensitive to any possible changes in Ext2/3 file systems and
LILO and GRUB specifications. If changes are made to these specifications,
Symantec Ghost may no longer support the Linux distribution.
See “Boot configuration” on page 542.
Symantec Ghost is not sensitive to kernel versions. Use the -ial and -nolilo
command-line switches to resolve problems with any incompatibilities.
See “Command-line switches” on page 468.
Symantec Ghost provides the following support:
■
Symantec Ghost copies or clones any x86-based Linux system with full support
for Ext2/3 file systems (type 0x83) containing 1 KB, 2 KB, or 4 KB block sizes.
Other file systems, such as ReiserFS, are cloned on a sector-by-sector basis
and cannot be resized during cloning.
■
Linux systems that use LILO or GRUB as their boot loader in the MBR or in the
active Ext2/3 partition are supported with some exceptions. Any references
to a disk other than the first hard disk in the system (/dev/hda or /dev/sda)
542
Cloning with Linux
Boot configuration
are not supported. The /boot and root file systems must be on the first hard
disk. The /boot directory can be a directory within the root file system.
■
Type 0 and type 1 Linux swap file systems (type 0x82) are supported.
■
Skip file is not supported.
■
Linux extended partitions (type 0x85) are partially supported. Ghost copies
file systems inside these extended partitions, but restores them as DOS
extended partitions. This is not known to cause problems with Linux systems
after cloning.
■
LVM partitions are created as extended/logical partitions.
■
Symantec Ghost does not support Linux if there is no valid boot record in the
disk MBR and more than one partition on a disk is installed with LILO or GRUB.
If the Linux disk is set up to start from a partition MBR, there can be only 1
partition with a LILO or GRUB boot record in its MBR.
Symantec Ghost has been tested with the following versions:
■
Red Hat up to version 9.0
■
Red Hat Linux Enterprise versions 3 and 4
■
Fedora Core up to version 5
■
SuSE up to version 10.1
■
Ubuntu up to Dapper Drake version 6.06
Boot configuration
Symantec Ghost uses the /etc/lilo.conf file to determine the boot configuration.
If this file does not match the boot configuration, Symantec Ghost may be unable
to patch LILO during cloning.
Symantec Ghost assumes that GRUB has been installed in the standard /boot/grub
directory or /grub in a /boot partition and uses the standard file name
/boot/grub/stage 2. Non-standard GRUB installations are not supported.
If a boot loader for Linux other than LILO or GRUB is used or the preceding
conditions are not met, Symantec Ghost clones the system, but the new disk
probably will not boot. The system should be started from the Linux distribution
rescue disk or a floppy boot disk, and the boot loader should be reinstalled by
running /sbin/lilo, the GRUB install script, or an equivalent.
Warning: Always have a boot disk available in case of problems with starting a
Linux system after cloning.
Cloning with Linux
Support for advanced Linux features
Support for advanced Linux features
Symantec Ghost provides the following limited support for advanced Linux
features:
Resize inode
Symantec Ghost can create an image of a volume that contains a Resize
Inode, but cannot create a file system with a Resize Inode. Any volume
that is restored by Ghost does not contain a Resize Inode, even if the
source volume did. No warning message is displayed.
Access Control
Lists (ACL)
ACLs are an advanced file system feature that allow finer grained
permissions to be set than the standard Linux permission scheme
(user, owner, group). Symantec Ghost fully supports ACLs.
LogicalVolume
Manager (LVM)
The LVM provides an advanced block-level abstraction of the systems
disks, which allows for volumes that span more than one physical
device, mirroring, and striping.
Ghost has limited support for LVM volumes. It clones only
single-striped or non-mirrored logical volumes with a single segment.
When creating an image, or cloning disk-to-disk Ghost operates as
though the LVM volumes are simple partitions. Therefore Ghost,
cannot recreate the LVM volumes on the destination. These volumes
will be cloned as if they were simple partitions. You may need to
manually edit the /etc/fstab file if these volumes are automatically
mounted because the Linux device will have changed.
Ghost can clone or restore a single partition into an already existing
LVM volume on the destination disk. In this case, the volume is still
part of the LVM in the operating system.
Symantec Ghost utility support
Ghost Explorer substantially supports Ext2/3 file systems within image files,
including the restoration, deletion, and addition of files within these file systems.
Problems arise when files that have names that are illegal on Windows are
manipulated. Ghost Explorer cannot manipulate device files or symbolic links.
Sparse files are expanded on restoration, and hard links are broken.
GDisk does not create any Linux file systems or recognize any partitions within
a Linux extended partition.
543
544
Cloning with Linux
Symantec Ghost utility support
Appendix
G
GDisk disk-wipe
specifications
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About GDisk disk-wipe specifications
■
Clearing, sanitizing, and viewing hard disks
■
About completeness of coverage
■
Determining disk size
About GDisk disk-wipe specifications
GDisk, a component of Symantec Ghost 11, is a tool for partitioning hard drives
that also has a secure, disk-wiping function.
The disk-wipe feature in GDisk conforms to the standards that are detailed in the
following documents:
■
U.S. Department of Defense NISPOM (National Industrial Security Program
Operating Manual), DoD 5220.22-M, January 1995.
The NISPOM document is available at the following URL:
www.usaid.gov/policy/ads/500/d522022m.pdf
■
Assistant Secretary of Defense, Memorandum of Disposition of Unclassified
DoD Computer Hard Drives, 4 June 2001.
Clearing, sanitizing, and viewing hard disks
Chapter 8 of the NISPOM (Automated Information System Security) contains a
matrix of actions required to clear and sanitize magnetic disks of various types.
546
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
Clearing, sanitizing, and viewing hard disks
Table G-1 is an extract from Section 8-306 of the NISPOM.
Table G-1
Clearing and sanitizing a hard disk
Magnetic disk type
Clear
Sanitize
Bernoullis
a, b, c
m
Floppy disk
a, b, c
m
Non-removable rigid disk
c
a,b,d,m
Removable rigid disk
a,b,c
a,b,d,m
Where Clear is as follows:
a
Degauss with a Type I degausser
b
Degauss with a Type II degausser
c
Overwrite all addressable locations with a single character
d
Overwrite all addressable locations with a character, its complement,
then a random character and verify
Note: This method is not approved for sanitizing media that contains
Top Secret information.
m
Destroy (disintegrate, incinerate, pulverize, shred, or melt)
Table G-2 lists the GDisk operations for clearing, sanitizing, or viewing a disk.
Table G-2
GDisk clearing, sanitizing or viewing operations
Operation
Description
Clearing a disk
GDisk performs a clear operation, as defined by action c, as the
default disk-wipe operation. All addressable locations are
overwritten with 0x00.
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
About completeness of coverage
Table G-2
GDisk clearing, sanitizing or viewing operations (continued)
Operation
Description
Sanitizing a disk
GDisk performs a sanitize operation, as defined by action d, when
performing a disk-wipe operation with the /diskwipe /dodwipe
command modifier.
The following cycle occurs six times:
■
All addressable locations are overwritten with 0x35.
■
All addressable locations are overwritten with 0xCA.
All addressable locations are overwritten with a
pseudo-random character.
■ All addressable locations are verified in hardware using the
Verify Sectors command to the disk.
■
Viewing a disk
You can use GDisk to view the overwrite pattern on the disk to
confirm the overwrite has occurred. This lets you display one or
more sectors to the screen, starting at sector n, of a physical disk
(by default, 1 sector is displayed).
About completeness of coverage
Table G-3 details the control that GDisk has over the disk and, therefore, the
completeness of the wipe.
Table G-3
Completeness of coverage
Control
Description
Addressable locations
The smallest addressable unit on a hard disk is the sector. The
sector comprises 512 bytes in IDE drives but may have larger
numbers of bytes in SCSI or ATAPI disks.
The NISPOM assumes that the smallest addressable location is
the size of a character, presumably an 8-bit character, which
occupies 1 byte of storage.
GDisk assumes that the smallest addressable location on the disk
is a byte. Byte addressing is achieved by constructing a block of
data, one or more sectors in size with the chosen character filling
each byte in the block, and writing that block to the disk.
547
548
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
About completeness of coverage
Table G-3
Completeness of coverage (continued)
Control
Description
Wiping Host Protected During execution of a DoD disk wipe, GDisk attempts to detect an
Area (HPA) PARTIES
HPA/PARTIES area on the disk. If an HPA/PARTIES area is
detected, then you are asked if this area is to be wiped. If the area
is not password protected, then the area is wiped. In all cases, you
are informed of the success or failure of the wipe.
Confirming the wipe
GDisk provides the view:n command to view the overwrite pattern
on the disk to confirm the overwrite has occurred by sampling.
You can use the view:n command-line switch to display one or
more sectors, starting at n, of a physical disk on stdout (by default,
1 sector is displayed). Sector numbers start at 0.
Each sector is displayed as a table with 16 columns containing the
sector offset, then hex bytes, and lastly 16 ASCII characters
representing each byte. This table has n rows, where n depends
on the sector size and is usually 32 rows (sector size of 512 bytes).
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
Determining disk size
Table G-3
Completeness of coverage (continued)
Control
Description
Non-addressable
locations
There may be storage on the disk that is not directly addressable
by GDisk. GDisk does not support the following features:
■
■
■
■
■
Bad sector remapping
The disk may have spare sectors available that are used to
automatically remap, or substitute, bad sectors by the disk
firmware. This is a potential security risk, for example, if a bad
sector may have been remapped and the original location on
the disk platter previously used by that sector becomes
inaccessible. However, it is possible that the bad sector may
still contain readable data that could be accessed by a skilled
hard-drive engineer.
Host Protected Area (HPA)
If the HPA is password protected, then this area of the disk is
not addressable by GDisk.
Inaccurate disk geometry detection
An error in determining the disk size could result in
non-accessibility.
Specialized disk commands
Specialized disk commands, such as those used to access
SMART logs, indicate that a disk may store data that is not
accessible using standard commands.
Wiping of locked sectors
The operating system may lock some of the sectors on the disk.
These sectors cannot be accessed by GDisk and are not wiped.
This is more likely to happen when you run GDisk in Windows
than in DOS. GDisk gives notification of which sectors were
not overwritten.
Determining disk size
The BIOS function calls, or disk commands, used for determining the size of the
disk are as follows:
■
Int13h, Get Drive Parameters (08h)
■
Extended Int13h, Get Drive Parameters (48h)
■
Direct IDE, IDENTIFY DEVICE(ECh)
■
Direct SCSI, READ CAPACITY (25h)
549
550
GDisk disk-wipe specifications
Determining disk size
Appendix
H
Customizing Symantec
Ghost functionality
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About customization
■
Limiting functionality from the environment file
■
Examples of customized functionality
■
OEM version of Symantec Ghost
About customization
Symantec Ghost functionality can be customized. In some situations, the holder
of a license may want to provide versions of Symantec Ghost that have some
features disabled.
Limiting functionality from the environment file
To limit Symantec Ghost functionality, edit the Symantec Ghost environment
file. The environment file includes the following:
■
The licensed user's details
■
The maximum number of licensed, concurrent users
■
Additional product licensing information
■
Functionality switches
Table H-1 lists the available switches.
552
Customizing Symantec Ghost functionality
Limiting functionality from the environment file
Table H-1
Environment file switches
Switch
Description
LOAD
Loads disk or partition from image file actions
DUMP
Dumps disk or partition to image file actions
WRITE
Stops Symantec Ghost from writing to destination partition or disk
DISK
Performs disk-to-disk and partition-to-partition actions
PEER
Connect via LPT, USB, or TCP/IP peer-to-peer
FPRNT
Creates a fingerprint that is a hidden mark on a cloned drive or
partition that includes the following:
■
Process used to create the drive or partition
■
Time the operation was performed
■
Date the operation was performed
■
Disk number
IMGTMO
Sets the maximum age of an image file in days
TIMEOUT
Disables Symantec Ghost until a valid license is reapplied
To limit Symantec Ghost functionality
1
Manually edit the environment file, Ghost.env.
The file should be located in the same directory in which Ghost.exe is started
unless otherwise configured.
2
Add a switch parameter line as the first line of the environment file.
Each feature except IMGTMO can be activated with switchname=y or
deactivated with switchname=n in the bound executable.
3
Ensure that the Ghost.env file is in the same directory as Ghost.exe.
4
Run Symantec Ghost using the following command:
C:\ghost> ghost.exe
5
If you have an environment file with a name other than Ghost.env, at the
command line, run Symantec Ghost with the following switch and your
environment file name:
C:\ghost> ghost.exe -#e=filename.env
Customizing Symantec Ghost functionality
Examples of customized functionality
Examples of customized functionality
You can customize functionality for end users of Symantec Ghost as follows:
■
Image file restoration only
■
Backup tool only
Image file restoration only
A company may have 100 laptops in use by its sales staff with the IT system
administrator controlling the organization and maintenance of these laptops.
Each laptop in use could include a copy of Symantec Ghost and a model image file
burned on a CD-ROM for fast system restoration by the user. The system
administrator can configure the Symantec Ghost edition that is burned onto the
CD-ROM to enable only image file restoration, thus removing the possibility of
end users attempting to use other Symantec Ghost functions.
The administrator's version of Symantec Ghost has all of the options available
after binding the original environment file. The CD-ROM version of Symantec
Ghost is activated with:
Switches: load=y,dump=n,disk=n,peer=n
KeyNum: 12345
License: BM-512
MaxUsers: 10
Name: ABC Inc.
Address1: 200 John Wayne Blvd.
Address2: Irvine, CA 91024
Backup tool only
Symantec Ghost can be used as a backup tool. In the example above, it may be
advisable to disable the load option so that image file creation procedures can be
carried out without the possibility of users accidentally overwriting their local
drives. Restoration would require the availability of another executable or the
use of Ghost Explorer.
You can use Symantec Ghost as a backup tool with the following switches:
load=n,dump=y,disk=n,peer=n
553
554
Customizing Symantec Ghost functionality
OEM version of Symantec Ghost
OEM version of Symantec Ghost
Symantec Ghost can be further customized for OEM customers. Contact Symantec
Sales for more information about this version.
Appendix
I
Adding DOS drivers to the
Ghost Boot Wizard
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About adding DOS drivers
■
Downloading the driver from the manufacturer's Web site
■
Making a driver template
■
Getting the PCI information
About adding DOS drivers
The process described here details how to add DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot
Wizard. You can create a boot disk that supports network interface cards (NICs)
that are not currently available in Symantec Ghost.
See “About the Symantec Ghost Boot Wizard” on page 254.
The following is an overview of the process for adding DOS drivers to the Ghost
Boot Wizard:
■
Download the driver from the manufacturer's Web site.
■
Make a driver template.
■
Get the PCI information.
Downloading the driver from the manufacturer's Web
site
Download the latest drivers from the NIC manufacturer.
556
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Making a driver template
To download drivers from the manufacturer's Web site
1
Go to the manufacturer's Web site.
Use a search engine if the name is not obvious. Once you have found the Web
site, there is usually a section titled Support or Driver downloads.
2
Download the driver archive.
Often there is more than one archive for a card. If you have a choice, then
download the archive for DOS and the archive for Windows. The SCO, Linux,
and NetWare drivers are not required.
3
Unpack the archive into a directory.
The archives are usually self-extracting.
4
Read Readme.txt from the archive to see which drivers are included.
All cards should come with NDIS drivers, and some cards also have packet
drivers.
Making a driver template
The second step in the process is to create a driver template.
When you make a driver template in the Ghost Boot Wizard, the setup boxes may
be automatically completed. If this does not happen, you must manually complete
the boxes.
To start creating a driver template
1
On the Windows taskbar, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost > Ghost
Boot Wizard.
2
In the Ghost Boot Wizard window, click Network Boot Disk.
3
Click Next.
4
Select one of the following:
Add
Add a new template.
Modify
Change an existing template.
5
Click NDIS2 Driver.
6
Click OK.
7
On the NDIS Driver tab, click Setup.
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Making a driver template
8
Select the folder that holds the NDIS2 driver that you previously downloaded.
The NDIS2 driver is usually in a subdirectory called ndis\dos. If this directory
does not exist, the NDIS driver will be in a directory with a similar name.
9
Click OK.
All boxes in the dialog box are automatically completed. If this is not
successful, then you must complete the details.
10 Click OK.
To complete details on the NDIS driver tab
1
On the NDIS driver tab, click Browse.
2
Find the NDIS2 driver file.
3
Open Windows Explorer.
4
In the NDIS2 driver file directory, use Notepad to open Protocol.ini.
The Protocol.ini file looks similar to this:
;Module description for Adaptec 69XX Ethernet PCI Adapter Family
; DriverName = EMPCI$
;
; Optional Parameters :
;
;
NetAddress
= "000000000000"
;
MaxTransmits = 1 - 8
;
MaxReceives = 1 - 8
5
Copy the text that follows Drivername =.
In the above example, you would copy the text EMPCI$. Ensure that you
maintain the case.
6
Click OK.
If the template is new, then rename it.
The standard convention for naming a template is <Manufacturer><Name
of card>. Readme.txt usually lists the cards with which the driver can be used,
so name the template to reflect this.
For example, Adaptec 69XX Ethernet PCI Adapter Family.
557
558
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Getting the PCI information
Getting the PCI information
The Ghost Boot Wizard and the Symantec Ghost Console require PCI information.
It can be accessed only by manually opening the hidden Ghost Boot Wizard
template.
To get the PCI information
1
Press Control on the keyboard and select the copyright message on the first
page of the Ghost Boot Wizard.
The folder in which the templates are stored appears.
2
Open Windows Explorer, and open the folder containing the templates.
Ensure that you can view hidden files.
3
Double-click Mcassist.cfg.
The contents of Mcassist.cfg looks similar to this:
# This file is used by the Ghost Boot Wizard.
# You should not attempt to edit this file yourself
DRIVER-TYPE = NDIS
DRIVER-NAME = El90x.dos
NDIS-NAME = EL90X$
RECEIVE-MODE = 0
PCI-TAG = 10B7 9000 : 3C900-TPO Fast Ethernet$
PCI-TAG = 10B7 9001 : 3C900-Combo Fast Etherlink$
4
In Notepad, open the Windows 95 driver configuration file downloaded from
the manufacturer's Web site. This is called <name of driver>.inf and is usually
in its own directory.
Find the lines that look similar to the following:
[HP]
%en1207d.DeviceDesc%=en1207d.ndi,PCI\VEN_1113&
DEV_1211&SUBSYS_1207103C
%en1207d.DeviceDesc%=en1207d.ndi,PCI\VEN_1113&DEV_1211&
SUBSYS_9207103C
5
Copy the PCI vendor ID and the PCI Device ID.
These are stored as 4-digit hexadecimal numbers. In the example above, the
correct numbers follow VEN_ and &DEV_, namely 1113 and 1211.
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Getting the PCI information
6
Add a new line to Mcassist.cfg that reads as follows:
PCI-TAG = <vendor ID> <device ID> : <name of card>$
In this example, both lines in the Windows configuration file are the same.
Only one line is added to Mcassist.cfg.
For example,
PCI-TAG = 1113 1211 : HP EN1207D-TX PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter$
7
Save Mcassist.cfg.
8
Restart the Ghost Boot Wizard.
559
560
Adding DOS drivers to the Ghost Boot Wizard
Getting the PCI information
Appendix
J
Installing Symantec Ghost
from the command line
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About installation interface types
■
About installation modes
■
Installing from the command line
■
Uninstalling from the command line
About installation interface types
Microsoft Windows Installer lets you choose the user interface that you see during
installation. If you are installing in Basic or Silent mode, you must run the
installation from the command line. If you are using a Windows 98 or Windows
NT computer, then you must run the installation from a setup file.
Symantec Ghost does not support the Microsoft Windows Installer modifier, or
the Reduced UI mode.
Full interface mode
The Full interface mode guides you through a series of dialog boxes to install
Symantec Ghost. You can change installation settings. For example, you can select
components and change installation directories. Because a user interface is
provided, you do not need to include parameters in the command line.
562
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
About installation modes
Basic interface mode
The Basic interface mode shows a progress bar and any system-level error
messages. If you alter any default installation settings, you must pass this
information through as parameters from the command line.
Table J-1 lists the syntax for this installation.
Table J-1
Basic installation syntax
Installation package
Syntax
Symantec Ghost Console
msiexec /I “<path to msi package>\Symantec Ghost.msi” /qb
Standard Tools
msiexec /I “<path to msi package>\Symantec Ghost.msi” /qb
GHOSTINSTALLTYPE=“xxxxxxx”
AutoInstall
where xxxxxxx is one of the following:
■
Server Tools = Standard Tools
■
AutoInstall = AutoInstall
Console client
msiexec /I “<path to msi package>\Client.msi” /qb
Configuration client
(standalone)
msiexec /I “<path to msi package>\Client.msi” /qb
GHOSTINSTALLTYPE=“Standalone Client”
Symantec User Migration
Wizard
msiexec /I "<path to msi package>\SUMWizard.msi /qb
Silent interface mode
The Silent interface mode does not show any dialog boxes or error messages. If
you alter any default settings, you must pass this information through as
parameters from the command line. To install a component of Symantec Ghost,
use the syntax in Table J-1 but with the switch /q, not /qb. For example, to install
Symantec Ghost Console, the syntax is:
msiexec /I "c:\temp\Symantec Ghost.msi" /q
About installation modes
Microsoft Windows Installer lets you choose the way you install Symantec Ghost.
Unless you choose a Normal installation, run the installation from the command
line. Table J-2 describes the installation modes.
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
Installing from the command line
Table J-2
Installation Modes
Mode
Description
Normal
The Normal installation mode provides dialog boxes to guide you
through installation. It lets you install Symantec Ghost on the target
computer by selecting the location and the required components.
Administrative
The Administrative installation mode installs the entire installation
package to a network location. All installation files are copied from
the CD to the specified location. This lets users with access to the
network location install Symantec Ghost from this location. This
installation requires administrative privileges. The syntax for this
installation is as follows:
msiexec /a “<path to msi package>
\“installation package”.msi”
Repair
The Repair installation lets you repair the current installation. It is
accessed once Symantec Ghost is installed on your computer. You can
activate this by using Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel.
You can also run this mode from the command line. The syntax for
this installation is as follows:
msiexec /f “<path to msi package>
\ “installation package”.msi”
The switch /fa reinstalls all files, /fu rewrites all required user registry
entries, and /fs overwrites any existing shortcuts.
The /f switch reinstalls all required files, registry entries, and
shortcuts, but it ignores any property values entered in the command
line.
Modify
The Modify installation mode lets you change the user's current
configuration. To do this, use Add/Remove Programs in the Control
Panel. On Windows 2000/XP, click Change. You cannot use this mode
for a client package.
Installing from the command line
You can specify parameters when installing Symantec Ghost from the command
line by setting installer properties. The syntax for these properties is as follows:
msiexec /I “c:\temp\Symantec Ghost.msi” /q PROPERTY = VALUE
The property name must be in uppercase, and the value is case-sensitive.
563
564
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
Installing from the command line
In Windows Vista/XP/2003/2000, Msiexec.exe is in the path by default, so it can
be called from any directory. On Windows NT computers with Microsoft Installer
2.0 installed, Msiexec.exe is in the path by default. On Windows 98 computers,
Msiexec.exe is not in the path. It is always located in the Windows\System directory
on Windows 98 systems and in Winnt\System32 on Windows NT systems.
If you are not running Windows XP and you do not have Windows Installer version
2 installed, then the installation must be performed through a setup file.
Console Setup.exe
In the Symantec Ghost \Install
directory.
ClientSetup.exe
In the Symantec Ghost
\Install\Client directory.
Symantec User Migration Setup.exe
In the Symantec Ghost
\SUMWizard directory.
If you are installing in Administrative mode, you do not need to set these properties
because you are copying the installation package to a location on the network.
Set these properties once you run the installation from the network location.
If the installation fails review the Windows Installer log file to help determine
the cause of the failure. To increase the amount of logged information you can
execute msiexec.exe with the /l*v <log-file-name> command line.
When installing the Symantec Ghost Console, you must set company name in the
command line, or the installation fails. When installing Standard Tools or
AutoInstall, these properties are optional.
Table J-3 shows the package properties that can be set from the command line
when installing one of these components.
Table J-3
Symantec Ghost package properties
Property
Default value
Description
INSTALLDIR
Program files\
Symantec\Ghost
Destination directory
USERNAME
Registered user
User name
COMPANYNAME
Registered company
Company name
EMAILADDRESS
Email address
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
Installing from the command line
Table J-3
Symantec Ghost package properties (continued)
Property
Default value
Description
GHOSTINSTALLTYPE
Server
Installs one of the following:
Symantec Ghost Console
(value=Server)
■ Standard Tools
(value=Server Tools)
■ AutoInstall
(value=AutoInstall)
■
Table J-4 shows the package properties that can be set from the command line
when you install a client.
Table J-4
Client package properties
Property
Default value
Description
GHOSTCONSOLENAME
No default
Symantec Ghost Console
INSTALLDIR
Program files\
Symantec\Ghost
Destination directory
GHOSTINSTALLTYPE
Client
Installs one of the following:
Console client
(value=Client)
■ Configuration client
Standalone
(value=Configuration)
■
Table J-5 contains the switches that can be used with Setup.exe and
ClientSetup.exe.
Table J-5
Setup.exe switches
Switch
Description
/a
Runs installation in Administrative installation mode.
/s
Hides the initialization dialog.
/s /v/qn
Runs the installation in Silent installation mode.
/x
Uninstalls the application.
565
566
Installing Symantec Ghost from the command line
Uninstalling from the command line
Table J-5
Setup.exe switches (continued)
Switch
Description
/v
Passes the parameters to the installation. All of the parameters must
be enclosed in quotation marks, and the opening quotation mark must
immediately follow the /v switch. Any other quotation marks must
be preceded by a backslash.
The following command line installs Symantec Ghost in a specified folder,
registering Symantec Ghost with the user name in silent mode:
setup.exe /v"USERNAME=\"Me\" INSTALLDIR=\"c:\temp\" /qn"
Uninstalling from the command line
You can uninstall Symantec Ghost from the command line using Microsoft
Installer.
To uninstall Symantec Ghost from the command line
◆
At the command prompt, type the following command:
Msiexec /x "<path to msi package> \msipackagename.msi” [/q or /qb]
The switches /q and /qb are optional.
See “Installing from the command line” on page 563.
Appendix
K
Installing the boot partition
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About boot partitions
■
Installing a boot partition on a client computer
About boot partitions
If the computer that you want to connect to the Ghost Console does not have an
operating system, you can do one of the following:
■
Install a Ghost boot partition on the client computer.
■
Create a boot package that lets you use 3Com Boot Services to start the client
computer from the network.
See “Using 3Com Boot Services and Symantec Ghost” on page 48.
See “Starting client computers from the network to connect with the Symantec
Ghost Console” on page 274.
You could also create a Ghost boot partition on a computer if you do not want to
keep the existing operating system and configuration settings on the Console.
See “The Symantec Ghost partition” on page 45.
Installing a boot partition on a client computer
The process for installing a boot partition is as follows:
■
Use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create a network boot package.
The GhostCast Server uses this boot package to copy the boot partition image
to the client computers.
See “Boot packages with network support” on page 264.
■
Use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create a Console Boot Partition image file.
568
Installing the boot partition
Installing a boot partition on a client computer
The Console Boot Partition image file includes the Console client, the Symantec
Ghost executable, and the drivers for your network card.
See “Creating a boot image containing the Console boot partition” on page 269.
■
Restart the client computers by using the network boot package, and then
connect to the GhostCast session.
See “To join a GhostCast session to restore an image file to client computers”
on page 358.
■
Use the GhostCast Server to image the client computers from the boot partition
image file that you have created.
See “To restore an image onto client computers using the GhostCast Server”
on page 357.
Appendix
L
Configuring firewalls
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Symantec Ghost port configuration
Symantec Ghost port configuration
Table L-1 lists the ports that must be open in a firewall to allow the Ghost Console
and the Console client to work.
Table L-1
Sent by
Ghost Console and Console client port configuration
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
1346
229.55.150.208
1345
UDP
Low
Client
Varies
WINS server
137
UDP
Low
Server
1345
Client IP
Varies
UDP
Low
Client
1346
Server IP
1347
UDP
Low
Server
1347
Client IP
1346
UDP
Low
Client
Varies
Server IP
1347
TCP
Low
Server
1347
Client IP
Varies
TCP
Medium
Stage 1: Server Discovery
Stage 2: Status update
Stage 3: Task execution
File transfer steps using
Multicast
570
Configuring firewalls
Symantec Ghost port configuration
Table L-1
Ghost Console and Console client port configuration (continued)
Sent by
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
7777
Server IP
Varies
UDP
Medium
Server
Varies
224.77.xxx.xxx
7777
UDP
High
Table L-2 lists the ports that must be open in a firewall to allow GhostCast
multicasting to work.
Table L-2
Sent by
GhostCast server multicasting port configuration
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
Varies
224.77.0.0 Client IP
6666
UDP
Low
Server
6666
Client IP
Varies
UDP
Low
Client
Varies
Server IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
Medium
Server
Varies
Client IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
medium
Client
7777
Server IP
Varies
UDP
High
Server
Varies
224.77.1.0
7777
UDP
Low
Server
Varies
224.77.xxx.xxx
7777
UDP
High
Stage 1: Server discovery
Stage 2: Status update
Stage 3: Task execution
Table L-3 lists the ports that must be open in a firewall to allow the GhostCast
directed broadcasting to work.
Table L-3
Sent by
GhostCast server directed broadcasting port configuration
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
Varies
224.77.0.0 Client IP
6666
UDP
Low
Server
6666
Client IP
Varies
UDP
Low
Stage 1: Server discovery
Stage 2: Status update
Configuring firewalls
Symantec Ghost port configuration
Table L-3
GhostCast server directed broadcasting port configuration
(continued)
Sent by
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
Varies
Server IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
medium
Server
Varies
Client IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
medium
Client
7777
Server IP
Varies
UDP
High
Server
Varies
Clients's subnet
broadcast address
7777
UDP
High
Stage 3: Task execution
Table L-4 lists the ports that must be open in a firewall to allow the GhostCast
unicasting to work.
Table L-4
Sent by
GhostCast server unicasting port configuration
Source port
Destination address Destination port Type
Volume
Client
Varies
224.77.0.0 Client IP
6666
UDP
Low
Server
6666
Client IP
Varies
UDP
Low
Client
Varies
Server IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
medium
Server
Varies
Client IP
Varies
TCP
Low to
medium
Client
7777
Server IP
Varies
UDP
High
Server
Varies
Client IP
7777
UDP
High
Stage 1: Server discovery
Stage 2: Status update
Stage 3: Task execution
571
572
Configuring firewalls
Symantec Ghost port configuration
Appendix
M
Troubleshooting
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Ghost.exe errors messages
■
Ghost.exe problems
■
Symantec Ghost Console errors
■
Symantec GhostCast errors
■
Symantec Ghost and legacy network cards
■
About command-line or scheduled tasks
■
Problems running Symantec Ghost
■
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
Ghost.exe errors messages
A Symantec Ghost error message consists of an error number and a description.
A Ghosterr.txt file is generated when an abort error occurs.
See “Hard-drive detection and diagnostic information” on page 595.
More information about Ghost.exe error messages is available on the Symantec
Ghost Technical Support Web site:
www.symantec.com/techsupp
Table M-1 details some error messages that you may encounter.
574
Troubleshooting
Ghost.exe errors messages
Table M-1
Error messages
Error code
Description
8006, 8008
The trial period of the evaluation has expired. Visit the Symantec
Web site at http://www.symantec.com for details on how to
purchase Symantec Ghost.
10030
Symantec Ghost was unable to communicate with the GhostCast
Server. Check that the GhostCast session name is correct and, the
GhostCast Server is ready to accept clients.
10098
The partition number must be included in the command-line
switches.
See “Command-line switches” on page 468.
10010
Incorrect path/file syntax. Ensure that the path and file name are
correct. Also make sure that you have the proper user rights to
read or create the image file.
19906
Symantec Ghost was unable to establish a connection with the
GhostCast Server.
See “About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file” on page 539.
19910, 20070
No packet driver was found.
See Table M-5 on page 582.
19913
Cannot find the BOOTP/DHCP server. Ensure that the computer
is connected to the network and that a BOOTP or DHCP server is
set up for this subnet.
19916
Duplicate IP address detected. An IP address has been allocated
that is already in use.
19900
The GhostCast session is set up incorrectly. Ensure that the TCP/IP
settings are correct.
CDR101: Not ready
A system error message. This error is not caused by Symantec
reading drive X, Abort, Ghost. It is caused by malfunctioning hardware or software
Retry, Fail
configurations. The image file on the CD is not readable. To verify
this, go into DOS and copy the image file off of the CD-ROM using
copy verification, copy /v.
Troubleshooting
Ghost.exe problems
Universal Network Driver errors
If you have problems when starting a computer from a boot disk set that includes
the Universal Network Driver(UNDI driver), ensure that the LAN cable is plugged
in.
Table M-2 lists errors that you may encounter when using the UNDI driver on
specific computers.
Table M-2
UNDI driver error messages
Error
Description
UNDI Option ROM not This error may be encountered on DELL laptops as the BIOS does
detected!
not support the UNDI installer. Create the boot package again
using the specific network driver template for the computer.
Multicast session
starts and then hangs
If this error is encountered on the following computers then the
work around for this error is to use Directed Broadcast or Unicast:
Computer based on a "ABIT AV8 - 3rd Eye" motherboard with
a "VIA K8T800 PRO" chipset that includes an integrated "VIA
Networking Velocity Family Gigabit Ethernet Adapter".
■ HP ProLiant ML350 G3 Server (specific model is ML350T03)
with HP NC7760 Gigabit server network adapter.
■ HP Compaq D330 Microtower Desktop PC with BroadCom
NetExtreme Gigabit Ethernet for hp network adapter.
■
If this problem is encountered in other computers, set the
RECEIVE_MODE to 6 which may allow the UNDI driver to work
in multicast mode.
Bad UNDI Image
Load undi driver failed
with status code 0xC6
To use the UNDI driver with the 3Com PXE server, verify that in
the 3Com PXE boot image properties, Keep UNDI is set to Yes.
Ghost.exe problems
Some errors may occur that do not produce an error code.
Writing to USB CD/DVD
Ghost does not always detect that a USB CD/DVD writer is available to be written
to because some USB CD/DVD writers can take several seconds to respond. The
work-around to this problem is to wait several seconds and then open the file
requestor dialog again. This workaround usually gives the device time to respond.
575
576
Troubleshooting
Ghost.exe problems
Booting from a 3Com PXE image
Some newer (PXE 2.1) clients may hang when starting from a 3Com PXE image if
the Base Code is set to keep. By default, the Ghost Boot Wizard has the base code
set to keep. This ensures that earlier versions of the clients (for example, PXE
0.99) start correctly and retain backward compatibility with earlier Ghost releases.
The backward comparability is required because older PXE clients require the
base code to enable the UNDI drive to operate correctly and therefore the Universal
Packet Driver to operate correctly. To prevent this problem modify the PXE image
using the 3Com boot image editor and turn off the keep base code option.
Starting from a PXE image on a Dell Dimension 8100 computer
On a Dell Dimension 8100 computer a conflict between the PXE BIOS and the
Ghost USB code causes Ghost.exe to fail. Run Ghost with the -nousb switch to
overcome this problem.
USB and FireWire support
Ghost.exe may not start if you have created the boot disk with the Ghost Boot
Wizard and one of the following options:
■
You have specified to override BIOS USB support when creating the boot disk
■
You have specified to override BIOS FireWire support when creating the boot
disk
■
You have started Ghost with either the -forceusb or -force1394 switch
With these specifications Ghost takes control of either the USB or FireWire
controller. The control is not always successful especially if the BIOS actively uses
them. If you use the -forceusb switch then no USB device is usable. In most cases
if you want to use either a FireWire or USB disk then Ghost can do so without
using the override or switch.
Phoenix-Award BIOS computers
A computer with a Phoenix-Award BIOS does one of the following:
If the computer is started from a USB flash Hang
drive, which includes PC DOS
If started from an ISO image or CD/DVD with Display the error; Boot disk failure
PC DOS
Troubleshooting
Ghost.exe problems
The work-around for this problem is to start the computer with a floppy disk boot
package. You can also create a boot package on an ISO image or USB flash drive
with MS DOS taken from a Windows 98 installation.
Vista volume containing system restore points
When a Vista volume containing system restore points is mounted in a Windows
XP/2003 volume, the restore points are deleted. The following error is displayed:
Question 1854: A source volume could not be locked as it is in use by another
process. Do you wish to attempt to force a dismount on the volume?
Run the task on Vista WinPE or in DOS as a work-around for this error.
Resolving interrupt conflicts
Ghost might hang when running a task. This might be caused by an interrupt
conflict between a network device, and a mass storage device. You can use the
Symantec Ghost tool Irqcfg in several different ways to solve this problem.
You can find this tool in the following template directories:
■
\Documents & Settings\All Users\Symantec\Ghost\Templates\Universal
Packet Driver v2 [irqcfg]\
■
\Documents & Settings\All Users\Symantec\Ghost\Templates\Universal NDIS
Driver v2 [irqcfg]\
You can run Irqcfg in the command line with the summarize switch. The
summarize switch causes Irqcfg to display PCI devices and IRQ that are on the
computer and any conflict between the devices. The syntax for this switch is as
follows:
irqcfg /summarize
You can also run Irqcfg without parameters. Irqcfg tries to resolve conflicts
between devices. This might cause other problems, depending upon the
configuration that you are using. Run the Irqcfg tool before the template installs
the network driver.
You can run Ghost using a boot package that includes Irqcfg. Irqcfg attempts to
resolve the conflicts. You must use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create the boot
package and you must use the driver templates that include the tool.
The following driver templates include Irqcfg:
■
Universal Packet Driver v2.0 [irqcfg]
■
Universal NDIS Driver [irqcfg]
577
578
Troubleshooting
Symantec Ghost Console errors
You can run the Irqcfg tool as a driver in Config.sys using the following syntax:
DEVICE=\net\irqcfg.exe
You can also add the Irqcfg tool to a network template if you have an interrupt
conflict using the template. Use the Ghost UNDI irqcfg templates as an example.
Symantec Ghost Console errors
If a task to restore a backup fails and your backups are stored in a mapped network
location, ensure that the network connection is still available.
Table M-3 details some error messages that you may encounter.
Table M-3
Console error messages
Error
Description
c0000005
This is a general error message that has more than one cause. You
can try one of the following options to help to resolve the problem:
Read the Online Knowledge Base article, “Error: "...c0000005..."
when using Ghost” at the following
URL:http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/errc0000005
■ When the error, occurs a description of the error is copied to the
clipboard. Paste this error and send it to Symantec Technical
Support for help with this problem.
■
19235
This is a general error message that has more than one cause. Read
the Online Knowledge Base article, “Error: "19235 or 19225 Decompression error" when restoring images to client computers” at
the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/decomperr
Conflict with
existing set of
credentials
The Ghost Configuration Server has a domain logon that is used to
create computer accounts for Windows NT/2000/XP clients. Only one
sessions is allowed from a client to a server when using Microsoft
networking. If you have mapped a drive to a share on the Primary
Domain Controller (PDC) the configuration Server cannot log on to
the domain. The conflict error is displayed.
For more information see the following Microsoft Knowledgebase
article at the following URL:
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=106211
Troubleshooting
Symantec Ghost Console errors
Table M-3
Console error messages (continued)
Error
Description
Ghost could not
find a unique
volume matching
the specified
attribute
This message appears in the Ghost error file when a clone step with
preserved files fail on a computer running Windows NT4 and has a
SCSI hard drive. For Ghost to complete a preserve operation
successfully it needs to gather unique information about the hard
drives in Windows. This information is then matched with the
information that Ghost finds in DOS. This matching is not always
possible.
The first possible solution is to modify the DOS template that is used
for the client to include an ASPI driver.
To include an ASPI driver in a DOS template
1
Start the Ghost Boot Wizard, and select the network boot disk.
2
Select the template that is used for the client, and click Modify.
3
In the Modify window, select the Advanced tab and add the ASPI
driver.
Having the ASPI driver available for a SCSI hard drive enables
Ghost to obtain the serial number of the hard drive.
The second possible solution is to go to the client computer and run
Disk Administrator. Disk Administrator writes a unique ID to each
disk in the computer, which is used by Ghost in both Windows and
DOS.
Connection:
Credentials
conflict
This error appears when you are attempting a remote client install
and the Console already has a connection to the client computer.
Try the following:
1
From the command line, execute the following to establish a
connection to the client computer:
net user \\machine\c$
2
Execute the following to force shut the open connection to the
client computer:
net use /delete \\machine\c$
3
Retry the remote client installation.
If the remote client install fails again, restart the Console computer.
579
580
Troubleshooting
Symantec Ghost Console errors
Table M-3
Console error messages (continued)
Error
Description
Unable to obtain
IP address via
DHCP
This message may appear after loading the boot partition and
restarting the computer.
Try configuring the network interface card (NIC) using the utility that
came with it. You may need to alter the speed and duplex settings.
This error can also be caused when using dual NIC computers.
See “Symantec Ghost support for multiple network interface cards ”
on page 286.
About using Ghost with NTFS files
There are some errors that may occur when using Ghost with NTFS files.
Table M-4
Errors when using Ghost with NTFS files
Error message
Description
Error 25002 - Unhandled
condition encountered: Attr
translation will result in
corruption of MFT table
This error occurs when Ghost has finished mapping the
location of disk clusters used to store data for an NTFS file
and determines that it cannot allocate enough space to store
those cluster mappings. This situation can occur with very
fragmented or compressed NTFS files.
Possible workarounds include the following:
Defragmenting the source drive before cloning or
creating an image.
■ Using the -ntc- switch, which lets Ghost attempt to
allocate disk clusters at or near their original location
on the source volume. This minimizes the amount of
disruption to the cluster mappings and the subsequent
space required to store the mappings.
■
Troubleshooting
Symantec Ghost Console errors
Table M-4
Errors when using Ghost with NTFS files (continued)
Error message
Description
Error 25058 - "Unable to
locate enough contiguous
free space to load run.
Increase the destination
partition size or run Ghost
with -NTC- switch."
This error occurs when Ghost cannot find a large enough
free space to store a section of an NTFS file. There may be
enough total free space in smaller allocations scattered
about the volume to store the contents of the file, but due
to the fact that Ghost does not attempt to break up
contiguous sections of files as they are cloned, it produces
this error. When cloning volumes with minimal free space
and containing large files comprised of a small number of
contiguous sections, the operation will be particularly
vulnerable to this error.
Possible workarounds include the following:
Defragmenting the source drive before cloning or
creating an image.
■ Using the -ntc- switch, which lets Ghost attempt to
allocate disk clusters at or near their original location
on the source volume. This minimizes the amount of
disruption to the cluster mappings and the subsequent
space required to store the mappings.
■
Error 24010 - "Encountered
BAD used MFT Record - run
CHKDSK"
This error can occur when cloning or creating an image
from a source NTFS volume. It may be caused by either
corruption or by a bad sector on the drive.
Possible workarounds include the following:
If the file system is corrupted, running CHKDSK /F on
the NTFS volume before attempting to clone it again will
pick this up.
■ If the problem is due to a bad sector, run Ghost with the
-fro switch to force Ghost to read sectors one-by-one if
it detects a bad sector during a read of a range of bad
sectors.
■
Error 25030 "NTFSGetClusterCount
failed"
This error can occur when Ghost is cloning or creating an
image of an NTFS volume. It is most likely to have been
caused by file system corruption.
A possible workaround is to do the following:
■
If this is a file system corruption, run CHKDSK /F on the
volume.
581
582
Troubleshooting
Symantec GhostCast errors
Symantec GhostCast errors
If you are having problems using Symantec Ghost or the Symantec GhostCast
Server ensure that you have the latest drivers for your network card installed.
The manufacturer of your network card or computer should have the latest drivers
available on its Web site.
Table M-5 lists specific answers to GhostCasting errors. Use the solution most
closely related to the problem that you are experiencing.
Table M-5
Symantec GhostCast errors
Problem
Solution
When I launch Symantec
Ghost, I am unable to select
GhostCasting.
Symantec Ghost uses a packet driver or NDIS2 drivers to
perform GhostCasting. If Symantec Ghost does not detect
a packet driver in memory or if the packet driver is
inappropriate for your network card, the GhostCasting
option is not available. You must have a boot disk that loads
the appropriate packet driver or NDIS2 drivers for your
network card.
Use the Ghost Boot Wizard to create a packet-driver boot
disk.
See “Boot packages with network support” on page 264.
Troubleshooting
Symantec GhostCast errors
Table M-5
Symantec GhostCast errors (continued)
Problem
Solution
Symantec Ghost times-out
after I type a session name.
This is usually caused by a connectivity problem between
the server and the client. To determine the source of the
problem try the following:
■
■
■
■
■
Verify the spelling of the session name on both the client
and the GhostCast Server.
Check all physical connections, including cabling, hubs,
routers, switches, and so on for physical problems.
Verify that any routers present between the server and
the client are configured properly and have GhostCasting
enabled.
Check the Wattcp.cfg file for a valid IP address and
subnet mask if you are using static IP.
Confirm that a network communication topology
problem exists by connecting the GhostCast Server and
client to a dumb hub or cross-over cable. Then use, static
IP to try to complete the task.
You can also try pinging the IP address of the client
computer from the server computer.
If you are not able to ping the client, there is a
communication problem, and IP packets are not being passed
between these computers.
To ping the IP address of the client computer:
■
Start the client computer.
■
On the Symantec Ghost main menu, click GhostCast and
select one of the following:
■ Unicast
■
Direct Broadcast
Multicast
Do not enter a session name. Stop at the dialog box
requesting the session name. This will initialize the
IP address.
■ Ping the client from the server.
■
583
584
Troubleshooting
Symantec Ghost and legacy network cards
Table M-5
Problem
Symantec GhostCast errors (continued)
Solution
When I begin sending data
Add a RECEIVE_MODE=X value to the Wattcp.cfg file. Add
via GhostCasting, the session RECEIVE_MODE=5 first, then try 6.
fails or times out.
See “About the Wattcp.cfg configuration file” on page 539.
If you are GhostCasting across routers or switches, you must
enable a GhostCasting protocol on these devices.
For more information on GhostCast protocols, refer to your
router or switch documentation.
Symantec Ghost and legacy network cards
Windows 95 and 98 are plug-and-play operating systems. They reconfigure most
network cards if they find an IRQ conflict. Because GhostCasting runs on a DOS
level and DOS is not a plug-and-play operating system, IRQ conflicts may arise.
Most newer network cards come with a software configuration utility that
automatically checks for IRQ conflicts and reconfigures the card if a conflict
exists. Otherwise, you must manually change the IRQ of the network card. Refer
to your network adapter manual for more information on changing the IRQ address
of your card.
DOS drivers can also have problems detecting the type and speed of your network.
A DOS configuration utility that may have been supplied by the network card
manufacturer lets you set these explicitly.
About command-line or scheduled tasks
Normal task logging can be viewed from the Console task log.
See “Monitoring Symantec Ghost Console activity” on page 239.
When you launch a task from the command line or from Scheduler, you can also
check two error log files for the cause of failure of a task.
Console log.txt logs the success or failure of a task launched from the command
line or Scheduler. However, if a task has been initiated from the Scheduler, then
the Console might not start. In this case, you can check Schedulgu.txt for a cause
of failure.
Failure is most often caused by a lack of user name and password.
See “Setting up backup regimes” on page 170.
Troubleshooting
Problems running Symantec Ghost
Problems running Symantec Ghost
Some errors may occur that do not produce an error code.
Cloning Windows 2000/XP computers
If a Windows 2000/XP computer fails to start after being cloned it may not have
the correct mass storage controller driver configured and loaded for the hardware
on which it starts. This failure may be due to hardware differences between the
source and destination computers. You can fix this problem by editing the section
SyprepMassStorage in Sysprep.inf to specify one or more mass storage controllers
that you want Windows to load.
Vista partition restore
After a NTFS Vista partition is restored the following error is reported in the event
viewer:
The default transaction resource manager on volume <drive> encountered an
error while starting and its metadata was reset. The data contains the error code.
The warning is issued, but does not affect the successful restore of the partition.
AutoInstall limitations
Table M-6 lists some limitations when using AutoInstall to install specific
applications.
Table M-6
Application
AutoInstall limitations
Description
Lotus Smart Suite Millennium Edition Lotus Smart Suite Millennium Edition cannot be
installed to multiple users on a single computer.
It must be installed for each user as a licensing
protection. If the AutoInstall package is deployed
when a user is logged onto the computer then it
is installed for that user. If no user is logged on
then it is installed for the last logged-on user.
585
586
Troubleshooting
Problems running Symantec Ghost
Table M-6
AutoInstall limitations (continued)
Application
Description
McAfee Office Suite
An AutoInstall package containing McAfee Office
Suite installs, but may produce an error message
when the application is launched. The error is due
to a font being installed to the McAfee installation
directory, and not the Windows fonts directory.
A work-around for this problem is to install the
fonts as follows:
1
In the Control Panel, open the fonts folder.
2
Install the font.
Executing a clone and configuration change task
A clone and configuration change task may fail to apply the configuration with
the following setup:
■
The image file contains a Console client from a version previous to Symantec
Ghost 8.2.
■
The configuration settings specify that the client computer is added to an
Active Directory container or that the Netbios name be overwritten.
If the Console client does not support Active Directory containers or the option
to overwrite Netbios names then you do one of the following:
■
Recreate the image with a new Console client.
■
Change the configuration settings.
Installing a client remotely
If a remote install to Windows 2000/XP clients, which are members of an Active
Directory domain fails check that the time on the client computer matches the
Primary Domain Controller (PDC) time. Windows 2000/XP computers use the time
as a part of security authentication.
Transferring files to clients with Firewalls installed
The file transfer part of a task may time-out with the following setup:
■
When you are transferring files to one or more clients
■
The client computer is using the default Windows XP firewall.
Troubleshooting
Problems running Symantec Ghost
The firewall causes the time-out by preventing the Ghost Client seeing the
multicast packets. To solve this problem do one of the following:
■
In the Task Properties window, on the Network tab, select Unicast
■
Disable the Windows XP firewall.
Wake on LAN (WOL)
WOL does not work correctly for some hardware and software configurations
when you fully shut down the computer. In all cases, the Ghost Console sends the
required message to the computer but sometimes the computer does not wake
up. A computer in standby mode always wakes up using WOL.
Check the following:
■
Ensure that WOL is enabled on the card itself using DOS or Windows
configuration programs for the card.
■
Ensure that WOL is enabled in the network card drivers under the operating
system.
■
Ensure that WOL is enabled in the BIOS of the computer.
Joining client computers to Active Directory Domains
If you have problems joining clients to Active Directory-based domains ensure
that the Domain Name Server (DNS) is configured correctly.
You may want to use the DCDIAG tool available from the Windows 2000 Server
resource kit.
Network card not found/Card not installed
This error can occur if a driver cannot find a network card installed on your
computer. The error can occur when you start your computer with a Ghost boot
disk or run a task in the virtual partition. . Check the following:
■
Ensure that you selected the correct network card template when you created
the Ghost boot disk.
■
Ensure that the plug-and-play operating system setting in the BIOS does set
up plug-and-play devices.
Locate the Plug and Play OS setting in the BIOS configuration screens. Some
network cards require that this setting be set to No before they function in
DOS. See your computer manual for instructions specific to your computer.
If the driver still fails to load, set the plug-and-play operating system setting
explicitly to Yes and try again.
587
588
Troubleshooting
Problems running Symantec Ghost
Your BIOS may phrase the name of this setting differently; its function is the
same.
Cannot start from drive A
If your computer does not check drive A first on startup, use your computer's
Setup program to change its settings. The Setup program may be named differently
on your computer, for example, BIOS settings or CMOS settings. You may need
to refer to the computer manufacturer's documentation for the key sequence to
enter the Setup program.
Be careful when you make changes using your computer's Setup program. If you
have never used it before, you may want to refer to your computer manufacturer's
documentation.
To change your computer's settings
1
Restart your computer.
2
When a message appears telling you the key or keys to press to run Setup,
press the appropriate key or keys.
3
Set the Boot Sequence to boot drive A first and drive C second.
Setup programs vary from one manufacturer to the next. If you cannot find
the Boot Sequence option, use the Setup program's Help system, refer to the
documentation that came with your computer, or contact your computer
manufacturer.
4
Save the changes, then exit the Setup program.
Windows blue screen
If you are restoring, backing up, or cloning a computer onto another Windows
computer with incompatible hardware, you may get a blue screen. To prevent this
problem, do not use incompatible hardware, or on Windows 2000/XP, use Sysprep
when creating the image file.
Try restoring the computer using the -fdsp or -fdsz switch and ensuring the
partition sizes are the same on the destination drive as in the image file.
See “About Sysprep” on page 411.
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
Missing hibernation file
If the hibernation file is missing, the following message may appear:
Troubleshooting
Problems running Symantec Ghost
“Cannot hibernate because there is no hibernation file or the hibernation file has
an error.”
Recreate the hibernation files according to the instructions for your Windows
operating system.
Getting out of the virtual partition
If your client computer is stuck in the virtual partition, you can use the executable
Ngctdos.exe to restart your computer back into Windows.
To restart your client computer back into Windows
1
At the command line, type ngctdos -hide
2
Press Enter.
About cancelling a Ghost.exe operation
If you start a Ghost.exe operation, you can abort the process by pressing Ctrl+C.
Be aware that pressing Ctrl+C leaves the destination image file, disk, or partition
in an unknown state.
Installing and uninstalling Symantec Ghost
If you have problems installing or uninstalling Symantec Ghost, providing a log
file of the installation or uninstallation assists Technical Support in analyzing
the problem.
Add the following to the end of a command line to create a Logfile.txt file in the
root directory of drive C: - /l*v c:\logfile.txt
See “About installation interface types” on page 561.
To add logging to the end of a command line for Windows NT/2000/XP
installations, use the following command line:
Msiexec.exe /I <install package location> /l*v c:\logfile.txt
Where <install package location> is the path to the installation package that you
want to install.
For example,
d:\Install\SymantecGhost.msi, or d:\Install\Client\Client.msi.
589
590
Troubleshooting
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
About connecting using USB peer-to-peer
If you cannot connect using USB peer-to-peer, then try altering the drivers that
are installed. You could also try different ports.
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD
or DVD
If you are having problems saving a file directly to or restoring from a CD-R/RW
or DVD, there are a number of possible solutions.
Supported CD-R/RW and DVD drives
Symantec Ghost supports a large number of CD-R/RW and DVD drives. Check
that your drive is listed here at the following URL:
http://www.symantec.com/techsupp/cddvddriver
Inaccessible CD-ROM drive
When writing to a compatible CD-R/RW drive, the drive may not be accessible to
Symantec Ghost. To discover whether this is a problem, check Ghosterr.txt, located
in the same directory as the Ghost executable.
See “Hard-drive detection and diagnostic information” on page 595.
IDE CD-ROM drives
To see if an IDE CD-R/RW drive is inaccessible to Symantec Ghost, open
Ghosterr.txt or the log file.
The IDE sections are named one or more of the following:
■
IDE
■
IDE for PIO
■
IDE for UDMA
If the word Unavailable appears under these headings, then check the following:
Ensure that the firmware for your
CD-R/RW drive is current.
Check the Web site for the CD-R/RW drive
manufacturer for the most current firmware.
Update the computer BIOS with the
The computer BIOS may not be enabled to detect
latest version, following the computer the IDE drive.
manufacturer's instructions.
Troubleshooting
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
Check the controller to which the IDE
drive is attached.
The IDE drive might be attached to a controller
that requires a driver for access. Check the
documentation for the controller to determine
whether you need to load an IDE driver when
starting your computer. Drivers may be needed
for controllers that are included on the computer's
motherboard.
Reading and writing from a CD-R/RW drive are
different processes. You may be able to access a
CD-R/RW drive from DOS to read the drive, but
not to write to the drive.
SCSI CD-R/RW drives
To see if a SCSI CD-R/RW drive is inaccessible to Symantec Ghost, open
Ghosterr.txt or the log file. The SCSI section is named ASPI.
If the word Unavailable appears under the ASPI heading, then check the ASPI
files loaded from Config.sys. The following files must be loaded:
■
aspi2dos.sys
■
aspi4dos.sys
■
aspi8dos.sys
■
aspi8u2.sys
All SCSI controllers require an ASPI driver. The listed ASPI files are sufficient for
most SCSI controllers. The controller might require a driver that is usually supplied
with the controller. Copy the driver to the bootable floppy disk and edit Config.sys
to load the driver. The controller's documentation should include the correct
syntax for loading the driver from DOS. If you do not have the driver, then contact
the controller's manufacturer.
If the correct ASPI drivers are loaded, then update the computer BIOS and the
controller BIOS with the latest versions, following the manufacturer's instructions.
For example, older versions of the BIOS for the Adaptec 2940 controller card are
not compatible with Symantec Ghost.
CD-R/RW disc
The CD disc to which you are writing may have a problem. Try the following:
Use an unformatted CD-RW disc.
To write an image to a CD-RW disc that you have
already used, use the CD-RW utility to wipe all
information off the disc, including the file system.
591
592
Troubleshooting
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
Try a second disc.
If you have tried one disc only, then you have not
eliminated the possibility of a damaged disc. Try
again, using an unused new disc.
Try a different brand of disc.
Some CD-R/RW drives do not work with
low-quality discs or specific manufacturers of
discs. Try a different brand.
Use a standard 650 MB CD-R/RW disc. Symantec Ghost or the CD-R/RW drive may have
problems with high-speed discs or with discs that
record more information.
Loading Ghost.exe from the floppy disk drive
If you have problems loading Ghost.exe from a floppy disk, you can sometimes
resolve a problem by loading Ghost.exe from a hard drive.
For example, if you are creating an image file of the first partition, copy Ghost.exe
to the second partition. Edit Autoexec.bat to start Ghost.exe from the second
partition as follows:
d:\ghost.exe
Do not load Ghost.exe from the partition that is being cloned.
Outdated computer BIOS
Your computer might have an old BIOS version. Check the manufacturer's Web
site for an update. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for updating the BIOS.
Outdated CD-R/RW drive BIOS
The CD-R/RW drive might have an old BIOS version. An update to the BIOS often
fixes problems. Check the manufacturer's Web site for an update. Follow the
manufacturer's instructions for updating the BIOS.
About PC-DOS or MS-DOS
If you put PC-DOS system files on the boot disk, recreate the boot disk with MS-DOS
system files. You can choose MS-DOS while creating the boot disk.
See “Providing MS-DOS” on page 284.
High compression
Try using a lower or no compression when creating the image file.
Troubleshooting
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
Using third-party software to write to the CD-R/RW disc
If you are unable to write directly to a CD-R/RW disc using Symantec Ghost, you
can create the Ghost image and then use third-party software to write to the
CD-R/RW disc. If you use software to write an image file directly to the CD, you
may experience problems when restoring the image file. Software designed to
write directly to a CD, such as Adaptec Direct CD, uses a different file format.
Therefore, the copied files are not recognized by Ghost.
If you are writing directly to a CD using third-party software, use a program that
lays out the format of the disc before it writes it, such as Adaptec E-Z CD Creator.
Symantec Ghost does not provide technical support for third-party software, but
details on this method can be found in the Knowledge Base on the Symantec
Support Web site.
To write an image to CD using third-party software
1
Create the Ghost image file and save it to a temporary location.
2
Collect and edit the other required files.
3
Use third-party software to save the image file and other required files to the
CD-R/RW disk.
4
Do one of the following:
■
Make the CD bootable, including the drivers to let Ghost read the CD.
■
Create a boot disk using the CD/DVD Startup Disk with Ghost option in
the Ghost Boot Wizard. This disk will be required when you want to restore
the image from the CD.
About restoring from an image spanned over multiple CD/DVDs
Using GhostCast to restore from an image that is spanned over multiple CD/DVDs
fails because GhostCast cannot find the second Ghost image on the second CD. A
GhostCast session cannot be interrupted to prompt for the second CD. The
workaround is to copy each of the image files to the same directory and use
GhostCast to restore the image from that directory.
593
594
Troubleshooting
About writing to or restoring from a recordable CD or DVD
Appendix
N
Diagnostics
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
Hard-drive detection and diagnostic information
■
Elementary network testing techniques
■
Testing TCP/IP functionality
Hard-drive detection and diagnostic information
Symantec Ghost can generate diagnostic reports that outline the hard-drive
devices detected, other system-related information, and error conditions when
they are detected.
View Log
If you are running tasks from the Console, a task log may be generated. This can
help in diagnosing problems.
See “To view the Task Log” on page 240.
Abort error file (Ghosterr.txt)
An error message consists of an error number, a description, and possibly a
suggestion of how to remedy the problem.
The Symantec Ghost abort error file includes these details along with additional
drive diagnostics and details required to assist Technical Support in diagnosing
the cause of the problem.
The Symantec Ghost abort error file is generated when Symantec Ghost detects
an erroneous condition that Symantec Ghost is unable to recover from or work
around. The Ghosterr.txt file is generated in the current directory. If this location
596
Diagnostics
Elementary network testing techniques
is read-only, the Ghosterr.txt file output location should be redirected. The location
and file name of the abort file can be altered using the -afile=drive:\path\filename
command-line switch.
See “Ghost.exe errors messages” on page 573.
Creating a full diagnostic statistics dump summary
A full diagnostic statistics dump summary file contains the detected hard-disk
geometry details along with other Symantec Ghost statistics. The full Symantec
Ghost diagnostic statistics dump can be created using the command-line switch
-dd. The default statistics dump file name is Ghststat.txt. You can alter the location
and file name by adding the -dfile=drive:\path\filename command-line switch.
For example:
ghost.exe -dd -dfile=c:\diagnose\log.txt
Elementary network testing techniques
Following are the methods that you can use to test networking functionality:
■
Testing TCP/IP functionality
■
Generating a GhostCast log file for Technical Support to use in diagnosing
problems
Testing TCP/IP functionality
There are several testing utilities available in the Microsoft TCP/IP application
suite. Examples are the output of two Windows TCP/IP utilities, Ping.exe and
Ipconfig.exe.
The Ping.exe utility shows TCP/IP networking response and can be used to show
connectivity between computers. For a mapped network volume connection, a
client can ping the server and vice versa to check that they have basic connectivity
at any time.
For GhostCast connections, Symantec Ghost only responds to a ping request sent
from another computer if it is in GhostCast or TCP/IP peer-to-peer mode and
running Ghost in that mode.
Ping utilities that do not indicate multicast packets can traverse between two
points on a network. This determines that Unicast will work but not necessarily
Multicast or Direct Broadcast. For example, a ping test may indicate successful
TCP/IP operation between two computers on differing subnets, while GhostCast
Diagnostics
Testing TCP/IP functionality
packets may not be able to cross due to a nonmulticast-enabled router that
separates the subnets.
Pinging a local host shows basic local TCP/IP functionality.
Pinging another computer
The address used in this example identifies the local host on the network.
On the GhostCast Server, a DOS prompt dialog box is run with the following
session:
C:\> Ping 192.168.100.3
Pinging [192.168.100.3] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.100.3: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.100.3: bytes=32 time<20ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.100.3: bytes=32 time<20ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.100.3: bytes=32 time<20ms TTL=128
The outcome of the first command indicates that the client using the IP address
192.168.100.3 received the ping request and replied. This indicates basic TCP/IP
operation between the two computers. This does not indicate that multicast packets
can traverse between the two computers.
On Windows Vista/XP/2000/NT computers, you can run the ipconfig to get
information about the Windows IP configuration and the IP address for the local
area connection.
Generating a GhostCast log file
You can generate a GhostCast log file for Technical Support diagnostic purposes.
Logging can slow down the GhostCasting process and should be used to assist in
diagnosing problems noted during normal use.
The diagnostic levels in order of increasing detail are shown in Table N-1.
Table N-1
Diagnostic levels
Diagnostic level Description
Error
Reports any unrecoverable error that occurs during the GhostCast
session. Use of this level should not affect session performance.
Statistics
Reports all errors and additional statistic information on completion
of the session. Use of this level should not affect session performance.
Warning
Reports all statistic level details and includes any additional warning
messages. Use of this level may affect session performance.
597
598
Diagnostics
Testing TCP/IP functionality
Table N-1
Diagnostic levels (continued)
Diagnostic level Description
Information
Reports all warning level details and adds additional diagnostic
information. Use of this level may affect session performance.
All
Reports all logging messages. Use of this level reduces GhostCast
session performance.
Generating a GhostCast Server log file
You can generate a log file while running the Symantec GhostCast Server.
To generate a GhostCast Server log file
1
On the GhostCast Server, on the File menu, click Options.
2
Use the Symantec GhostCast Server as required.
The Symantec GhostCast Server can be used for normal operation and the
log file can be inspected upon completion.
Generating a GhostCast Client log file
You can generate a log file while running Ghost.exe on a client computer.
To generate a GhostCast Client log file
1
Add the logging switch -jl:loglevel = filename, where loglevel specifies the
diagnostic reporting level. (E, S, W, I, or A.)
For example:
ghost.exe -jl:a=d:\filename
See “About Symantec Ghost switches” on page 467.
2
Select a location for the log file other than the drive being written to by
Symantec Ghost. It should have sufficient space to create the file.
For example, to create a GhostCast log file, D:\Logs\Multi.log, to log all
information while using GhostCasting in interactive mode:
ghost.exe -jl:a=d:\logs\multi.log
3
Run Ghost.exe.
4
Connect to the GhostCast Server.
On completion, the log is written to the selected location.
Appendix
User Migration supported
applications
This appendix includes the following topics:
■
About supported applications
■
AOL Instant Messenger
■
BackupExec System Recovery
■
Cisco VPN Client
■
LiveState Recovery Desktop
■
Lotus Notes
■
Lotus Organizer
■
McAfee VirusScan
■
Microsoft Access
■
Microsoft Excel
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer
■
Microsoft OneNote
■
Microsoft Outlook
■
Microsoft Outlook Express
■
Microsoft PowerPoint
■
Microsoft Project
O
600
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
■
Microsoft Visio
■
Microsoft Word
■
MSN Messenger
■
NetMeeting
■
Palm Desktop
■
Symantec Norton AntiVirus
■
Symantec pcAnywhere
■
Windows Desktop Display
■
Windows Explorer
■
Windows Accessibility Settings
■
Windows Mouse Settings
■
Windows Regional Settings
■
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows Taskbar and Start Menu
■
WinZip
■
Yahoo Messenger
About supported applications
Symantec Ghost supports migrating application settings using the Ghost Console
user migration feature and Symantec User Migration. Details of the supported
applications and any caveats are listed here.
Adobe Acrobat Reader
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0
■
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.05b
■
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0
■
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.1
■
Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0
Table O-1 describes the Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0 supported settings.
Table O-1
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preference->General->Display
Display Large Images not supported.
File->Preference->General->Magnification
File->Preference->General->Color
File->Preference->General->Options
File->Preference->Annotations
File->Preference->Full Screen->Navigation
File->Preference->Full Screen->Appearance
File->Preference->Web Buy->Search the following identifiers
File->Preference->Web Link->View
Not migrated to higher versions.
File->Preference->Web Link->Web Browser Application
Not migrated to higher versions.
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.05b
Table O-2 describes the Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.05b supported settings.
Table O-2
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.05b supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preference->General->Display
Use Logical Page Numbers not supported.
File->Preference->General->Magnification
File->Preference->General->Color
File->Preference->General->Options
File->Preference->Annotations
File->Preference->Full Screen->Navigation
File->Preference->Full Screen->Appearance
File->Preference->Speech
601
602
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-2
Adobe Acrobat Reader 4.05b supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preference->Search->Query
File->Preference->Search->Results
File->Preference->Search->Highlight
File->Preference->Web Buy->Search the following identifiers
File->Preference->Web Link->View
Not migrated to higher versions.
File->Preference->Web Link->Web Browser Application
Not migrated to higher versions.
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0
Table O-3 describes the Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 supported settings.
Table O-3
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Display
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Custom Scheme
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Content Delivery
Edit->Preferences->Comments->Comments
Edit->Preferences->General->Display
Edit->Preferences->General->Magnification
Edit->Preferences->General->Smoothing
Edit->Preferences->General->Options
Edit->Preferences->Forms->Forms
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Navigation
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Appearance
Edit->Preferences->Identity->Identity
Edit->Preferences->Options->Web Browser Options
Edit->Preferences->Options->Startup
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-3
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->Options->Miscellaneous
Edit->Preferences->Search->Include in Query
Edit->Preferences->Search->Results
Edit->Preferences->Search->Display
Edit->Preferences->Search->View Dialog Options
Edit->Preferences->Update
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Warnings
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Select Other Identifiers
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Bookshelf
Edit->DocBox->Preferences
Document->Select Reading Order
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.1
Table O-4 describes the Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.1 supported settings.
Table O-4
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.1 supported settings
Settings Location
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Alternate Document Color
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Custom Scheme
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Content Delivery
Edit->Preferences->Comments->Comments
Edit->Preferences->Digital Signatures
Edit->Preferences->General->Display
Edit->Preferences->General->Magnification
Edit->Preferences->General->Smoothing
Exceptions
603
604
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-4
Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.1 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->Forms->Forms
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Navigation
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Appearance
Edit->Preferences->Identity->Identity
Edit->Preferences->Options->Web Browser Options
Edit->Preferences->Options->Startup
Edit->Preferences->Options->Miscellaneous
Edit->Preferences->Search->Include in Query
Edit->Preferences->Search->Results
Edit->Preferences->Search->Display
Edit->Preferences->Search->View Dialog Options
Edit->Preferences->Self-Sign Security
Edit->Preferences->Update
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Warnings
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Select Other Identifiers
Edit->Preferences->Web Buy->Bookshelf
Edit->DocBox->Preferences
Document->Select Reading Order
Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0
Table O-5 describes the Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-5
Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Document Color Options
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-5
Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Edit->Preferences->Accessibility->Tab Order
Edit->Preferences->Digital Signatures->Appearance
Edit->Preferences->Digital Signatures->Signing Method
Edit->Preferences->Digital Signatures->Verifying Signatures
Edit->Preferences->Digital Signatures->Advanced Preferences
Edit->Preferences->Forms->General
Edit->Preferences->Forms->Background Color
Edit->Preferences->Forms->Auto-Complete
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Navigation
Edit->Preferences->Full Screen->Full Screen Appearance
Edit->Preferences->General->Selection
Edit->Preferences->General->Miscellaneous
Edit->Preferences->Identity->Identity
Edit->Preferences->Internet->Web Browser Options
Edit->Preferences->Internet->Internet Options
Edit->Preferences->JavaScript
Edit->Preferences->Multimedia->Player Options
Edit->Preferences->Multimedia->Accessibility Options
Edit->Preferences->PageDisplay
Edit->Preferences->Magnification
Edit->Preferences->Reading->ReadingOrderOptions
Edit->Preferences->Reading->ReadingOutLoudOptions
Edit->Preferences->Reading->ScreenReaderOptions
Edit->Preferences->Search->Search
Edit->Preferences->Search
Exceptions
605
606
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-5
Adobe Acrobat Reader 6.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->Search->Fast Find
Edit->Preferences->Smoothing
Edit->Preferences->Startup->Opening Documents
Edit->Preferences->Startup->Application Startup
Edit->Preferences->Trust Manager
Edit->Preferences->Trust Manager->Multimedia
Edit->Preferences->Units
Edit->Preferences->Update
Edit->Search
Adobe Illustrator
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
Adobe Illustrator 8.0
■
Adobe Illustrator 9.0
■
Adobe Illustrator 10.0
Adobe Illustrator 8.0
Table O-6 describes the Adobe Illustrator 8.0 supported settings.
Table O-6
Adobe Illustrator 8.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Preferences->General
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Type & Auto Tracing
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Units & Undo
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Guides & Grid
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Smart Guides
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Hyphenation Options
Settings not migrated to higher versions
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-6
Adobe Illustrator 8.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Preferences->Plug-ins & Scratch Disk
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Color Settings->Profiles
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Adobe Illustrator 9.0
Table O-7 describes the Adobe Illustrator 9.0 supported settings.
Table O-7
Adobe Illustrator 9.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Preferences->General
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Type & Auto Tracing
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Units & Undo
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Guides & Grid
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Smart Guides
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Hyphenation Options
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Plug-ins & Scratch Disk
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Preferences->Files & Clipboard
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Color Settings
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Color Settings->Working Spaces
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Color Settings->Color Management Policies
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Adobe Illustrator 10.0
Table O-8 describes the Adobe Illustrator 10.0 supported settings.
Table O-8
Settings Location
Preferences->General
Preferences->Type & Auto Tracing
Adobe Illustrator 10.0 supported settings
Exceptions
607
608
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-8
Adobe Illustrator 10.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Preferences->Units & Undo
Preferences->Guides & Grid
Preferences->Smart Guides & Slices
Preferences->Hyphenation Options
Preferences->Plug-ins & Scratch Disk
Preferences->Files & Clipboard
Preferences->Workgroup
Color Settings
Color Settings->Working Spaces
Color Settings->Color Management Policies
Adobe Photoshop
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
Adobe Photoshop 5.5
■
Adobe Photoshop 6.0
■
Adobe Photoshop 7.0
Adobe Photoshop 5.5
Table O-9 describes the Adobe Photoshop 5.5 supported settings.
Table O-9
Adobe Photoshop 5.5 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preferences->General
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Saving Files
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Display & Cursors
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Transparency & Gamut
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Units & Rulers
Settings not migrated to higher versions
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-9
Adobe Photoshop 5.5 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preferences->Guides & Grid
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Plug-Ins & Scratch Disks
Choose Plug-Ins folder not supported.
File->Preferences->Memory & Image Cache
Available RAM used by Photoshop not supported.
File->Color Settings->RGB Set Up
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Color settings->CMYK Setup
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Color settings->Grayscale Setup
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Color settings->Profile Setup
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Table O-10 describes the Adobe Image Ready 2.0 supported settings.
Table O-10
Image Ready 2.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->General
Edit->Preferences->Saving Files
Edit->Preferences->Slices
Edit->Preferences->HTML
Edit->Preferences->Optimization
Edit->Preferences->Cursors
Edit->Preferences->Transparency
Edit->Preferences->Plug-ins
Not supported
Adobe Photoshop 6.0
Table O-11 describes the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-11
Adobe Photoshop 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preferences->General
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Saving Files
Settings not migrated to higher versions
609
610
User Migration supported applications
About supported applications
Table O-11
Adobe Photoshop 6.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preferences->Display & Cursors
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Transparency & Gamut
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Units & Rulers
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Guides & Grid
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Preferences->Plug-Ins & Scratch Disks
Additional Plug-Ins Directory not supported.
File->Preferences->Memory & Image Cache
Memory used by Photoshop not supported.
File->Color Settings
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Color settings->Working Spaces
Settings not migrated to higher versions
File->Color settings->Color Management Policies
Settings not migrated to higher versions
Table O-12 describes the Adobe Image Ready 3.0 supported settings.
Table O-12
Image Ready 3.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->General
Edit->Preferences->Slices
Edit->Preferences->Image Maps
Edit->Preferences->Optimization
Edit->Preferences->Cursors
Edit->Preferences->Transparency
Edit->Preferences->Plug-ins
Not supported
Adobe Photoshop 7.0
Table O-13 describes the Adobe Photoshop 7.0 supported settings.
Table O-13
Settings Location
File->Preferences->General
Adobe Photoshop 7.0 supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-13
Adobe Photoshop 7.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Preferences->File Handling
File->Preferences->Display & Cursors
File->Preferences->Transparency & Gamut
File->Preferences->Units & Rulers
File->Preferences->Guides & Grid
File->Preferences->Plug-Ins & Scratch Disks
Additional Plug-Ins Directory not supported.
File->Preferences->Memory & Image Cache
Memory used by Photoshop not supported.
Edit->Color Settings
Edit->Color Settings->Working Spaces
Edit->Color Settings->Color Management Policies
Edit->Color Settings->Conversion Options
Edit->Color Settings->Advanced Controls
Table O-14 describes the Adobe Image Ready 7.0 supported settings.
Table O-14
Image Ready 7.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit->Preferences->General
Edit->Preferences->Slices
Edit->Preferences->Image Maps
Edit->Preferences->Optimization
Edit->Preferences->Cursors
Edit->Preferences->Transparency
Edit->Preferences->Plug-ins
Not supported
AOL Instant Messenger
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
611
612
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
■
AOL Instant Messenger 3.0
■
AOL Instant Messenger 4.3
■
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7
■
AOL Instant Messenger 4.8
■
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1
■
AOL Instant Messenger 5.2
AOL Instant Messenger 3.0
Table O-15 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 3.0 supported settings.
Table O-15
AOL Instant Messenger 3.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
General->Sign On
Starting AIM when window starts not supported
Connection
Ticker->News Ticker
Ticker->Stock Ticker
AOL Instant Messenger 4.3
Table O-16 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 4.3 supported settings.
Table O-16
AOL Instant Messenger 4.3 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
General->Sign On
Starting AIM when window starts not supported
Connection
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7
Table O-17 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 4.7 supported settings.
Table O-17
Settings Location
Buddy List
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7 supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-17
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Privacy->Who can contact me
Privacy->Allow users to see
Privacy->Allow users who know my email address to find
Sign On->Sign On
Starting AIM when window starts not supported.
Sign On->Internet Connection
Sign On->Auto Upgrade
Sign On->Connection
Idle message
Away Message->When away
Buddy Icons
Images to use for buddies not supported.
For buddy icons set by others not supported.
Buddy Icons->Display Buddy Icons
Mail->Mail alert notification
Mail->Sound
Stock Ticker->Display
News Ticker
News Ticker->Topics
IM/Buddy Chat->IM Window
IM/Buddy Chat->Chat Room Window
IM/Buddy Chat->Defaults for Composing Windows
IM/Buddy Chat->Text Magnification
IM Image->When I open an IM Image
IM Image->When others send an IM Image
Talk->when I start a talk session
Talk->when others want to talk to you
613
614
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-17
AOL Instant Messenger 4.7 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Talk->Sounds
File sharing
File Transfer
Games
AOL Instant Messenger 4.8
Table O-18 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 4.8 supported settings.
Table O-18
AOL Instant Messenger 4.8 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Buddy List
Privacy->Who can contact me
Privacy->Allow users to see
Privacy->Allow users who know my email address to find
Sign On->Sign On
Starting AIM when window starts not supported.
Sign On->Internet Connection
Sign On->Auto Upgrade
Sign On->Connection
Idle message
Away Message->When away
Buddy Icons
Images to use for buddies not supported.
For buddy icons set by others not supported.
Buddy Icons->Display Buddy Icons
Mail->Mail alert notification
Mail->Sound
Stock Ticker->Display
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-18
AOL Instant Messenger 4.8 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
News Ticker
News Ticker->Topics
IM Chat->IM Window
IM Chat->Chat Room Window
IM/Buddy Chat->Defaults for Composing Windows
IM/Buddy Chat->Text Magnification
IM Image->When I open an IM Image
IM Image->When others send an IM Image
Talk->when I start a talk session
Talk->when others want to talk to you
Talk->Sounds
File sharing
File Transfer
Send buddy list
Add-ins
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1
Table O-19 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 5.1 supported settings.
Table O-19
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1 supported settings
Settings Location
Buddy List
Privacy->Who can contact me
Privacy->Allow users to see
Privacy->Allow users who know my email address to find
Exceptions
615
616
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-19
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Sign On->Sign On
Automatically signing on when AIM starts not
supported.
Sign On->Internet Connection
Sign On->Auto Upgrade
Sign On->Connection
Sign On
Make AIM my default instant messenging program not
supported.
Idle message
Away Message->When away
Buddy Icons
Images to use for buddies not supported.
For buddy icons set by others not supported.
Buddy Icons->Display Buddy Icons
Mail->Mail alert notification
Mail->Sound
News Ticker
News Ticker->Topics
IM Chat->IM Window
IM Chat->Chat Room Window
Font->Default for Composing Windows
Font
AIM Expressions
IM Image->When I open an IM Image
IM Image->When others send an IM Image
Talk->when I start a talk session
Talk->when others want to talk to you
Talk->Sounds
User Migration supported applications
AOL Instant Messenger
Table O-19
AOL Instant Messenger 5.1 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File sharing
File Transfer
Send buddy list
Add-ins
AOL Instant Messenger 5.2
Table O-20 describes the AOL Instant Messenger 5.2 supported settings.
Table O-20
AOL Instant Messenger 5.2 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Buddy List
Privacy->Who can contact me
Privacy->Allow users to see
Privacy->Allow users who know my email address to find
Sign On->Sign On
Automatically signing on when AIM starts not
supported.
Sign On->Internet Connection
Sign On->Auto Upgrade
Sign On->Connection
Sign On
Make AIM my default instant messenging program not
supported.
Idle message
Away Message->When away
Buddy Icons
Images to use for buddies not supported.
For buddy icons set by others not supported.
Buddy Icons->Display Buddy Icons
Mail->Mail alert notification
617
618
User Migration supported applications
BackupExec System Recovery
Table O-20
Settings Location
AOL Instant Messenger 5.2 supported settings (continued)
Exceptions
Mail->Sound
News Ticker
News Ticker->Topics
Stock Ticker
IM Chat->IM Window
IM Chat->Chat Room Window
Font->Default for Composing Windows
Font
AIM Expressions
IM Image->When I open an IM Image
IM Image->When others send an IM Image
Talk->when I start a talk session
Talk->when others want to talk to you
Talk->Sounds
File sharing
File Transfer
Send buddy list
Add-ins
Direct IM
Send Buddy List
Security
BackupExec System Recovery
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
BackupExec System Recovery 6.0
User Migration supported applications
Cisco VPN Client
Table O-21 describes the BackupExec System Recovery 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-21
BackupExec System Recovery 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools > options > Settings
Tools > options > notification > Log file > properties
Tools > options > notification > Event Log > properties
Tools > options > notification > SMTP > properties
Tools > options > notification > SNMP Trap > properties
Tools > options > Performance
Tools > options > Tray Icon
View
Cisco VPN Client
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
Cisco VPN Client 3.6.3
■
Cisco VPN Client 4.0.2
Cisco VPN Client 3.6.3
Table O-22 describes the Cisco VPN Client 3.6.3 supported settings.
Table O-22
Cisco VPN Client 3.6.3 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> Authentication
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> General
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> Connections
Options->Application Launcher
Options->Windows Logon Properties
Enable start before logon not
supported.
619
620
User Migration supported applications
LiveState Recovery Desktop
Cisco VPN Client 4.0.2
Table O-23 describes the Cisco VPN Client 4.0.2 supported settings.
Table O-23
Cisco VPN Client 4.0.2 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> Authentication
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> Transport
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> Backup Servers
Connection Entries (For Each Connection) -> Properties -> DialUp
Log > Log Settings
Options->Application Launcher
Options->Application Launcher
Options->Windows Logon Properties
Enable start before logon not
supported.
LiveState Recovery Desktop
Ghost User Migration supports the following:
■
LiveState Recovery Desktop 6.0
Note: Migration to BackupExec System Recovery 6.0 is supported.
Table O-24 describes the LiveState Recovery Desktop 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-24
LiveState Recovery Desktop 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools > options > Settings
Tools > options > notification > Log file > properties
Tools > options > notification > Event Log > properties
Tools > options > notification > SMTP > properties
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Lotus Notes
Table O-24
LiveState Recovery Desktop 6.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools > options > notification > SNMP Trap > properties
Tools > options > Performance
Tools > options > Tray Icon
View
Lotus Notes
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Lotus Notes 4.6
■
Lotus Notes 5.0
■
Lotus Notes 6.0
Note: If you restore a user migration package without first starting the Lotus
Notes client on the target machine, the Lotus Notes client will start automatically
and go though the first run process. The Lotus Notes client will prompt you to
provide the user ID (user mail file). The user ID has been migrated to the default
Lotus Notes location on the target machine. To enable Lotus Notes to start, you
need to browse to that location and select the appropriate file.
Lotus Notes 4.6
Table O-25 describes the Lotus Notes 4.6 supported settings.
Table O-25
Lotus Notes 4.6 supported settings
Settings Location
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Advanced Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Security Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->User Dictionary
File->Tools->User Preferences->International
File->Tools->User Preferences->Mail
Exceptions
621
622
User Migration supported applications
Lotus Notes
Table O-25
Lotus Notes 4.6 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Tools->User Preferences->Ports
Lotus Notes 5.0
Table O-26 describes the Lotus Notes 5.0 supported settings.
Table O-26
Lotus Notes 5.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics -> Display Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Startup Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Additional Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Additional Options -> Security Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->International
File->Tools->User Preferences->Mail and News
File->Tools->User Preferences->Ports
Lotus Notes 6.0
Table O-27 describes the Lotus Notes 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-27
Lotus Notes 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics -> Display Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Startup Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Additional Options
File->Tools->User Preferences->Basics->Additional Options -> Customize Logout Screen
File->Tools->User Preferences->International
File->Tools->User Preferences->Mail and News
File->Tools->User Preferences->Ports
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Lotus Organizer
Lotus Organizer
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Lotus Organizer 6.0
Table O-28 describes the Lotus Organizer 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-28
Lotus Organizer 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
File->User Setup->Organizer Preferences ->Default File
File->User Setup->Organizer Preferences ->Environment
File->User Setup->Organizer Preferences ->Folders
File->User Setup->Organizer Preferences ->Alarms
File->User Setup->Mail and Scheduling
File->User Setup->SmartIcon Setup
File->User Setup->Telephone Dialing
Edit->Layouts->Layouts
McAfee VirusScan
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
McAfee VirusScan 6.0
■
McAfee VirusScan 7.0
McAfee VirusScan 6.0
Table O-29 describes the McAfee VirusScan 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-29
Settings Location
McAfee VirusScan->Service
McAfee VirusScan->Components
View and edit scheduled scans
McAfee VirusScan 6.0 supported settings
Exceptions
623
624
User Migration supported applications
McAfee VirusScan
Table O-29
McAfee VirusScan 6.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
System Scan Properties->Detection
System Scan Properties->Action
System Scan Properties->Alert
System Scan Properties->Report
System Scan Properties->Exclusion
E-Mail Scan Properties->Detection
E-Mail Scan Properties->Action
E-Mail Scan Properties->Alert
E-Mail Scan Properties->Report
Download Scan Properties->Detection
Download Scan Properties->Action
Download Scan Properties->Possible actions
Download Scan Properties->Alert
Download Scan Properties->Report
Internet Filter Properties->Detection
Internet Filter Properties->Action
Internet Filter Properties->Alert
Internet Filter Properties->Report->Log file
Hostile Activity Watch Kernel Properties->Outlook
Instant Updater->Configure automatic updates
Instant Updater->Configure advanced settings
McAfee VirusScan 7.0
Table O-30 describes the McAfee VirusScan 7.0 supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Access
Table O-30
McAfee VirusScan 7.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
McAfee VirusScan->Service
View and edit scheduled scans
System Scan Properties->Detection
System Scan Properties->Action
System Scan Properties->Report
System Scan Properties->Exclusion
E-Mail Scan Properties->Detection
E-Mail Scan Properties->Action
E-Mail Scan Properties->Alert
E-Mail Scan Properties->Report
Hostile Activity Watch Kernel Properties->E-mail
Hostile Activity Watch Kernel Properties->Script Stopper
Instant Updater->Configure automatic updates
Instant Updater->Configure advanced settings
Microsoft Access
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Access 97
■
Microsoft Access 2000
■
Microsoft Access XP
■
Microsoft Access 2003
■
Microsoft Access 2007
Microsoft Access 97
Table O-31 describes the Microsoft Access 97 supported settings.
625
626
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Access
Table O-31
Microsoft Access 97 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> General
New database sort order not migrated to higher versions.
Tools -> Options -> Hyperlinks/ HTML
Tools -> Options -> Edit/Find
Tools -> Options -> Keyboard
Tools -> Options -> Datasheet
Tools -> Options -> Tables/Queries
Tools -> Options -> Forms/Reports
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Tools -> Options -> Module
Tools -> AutoCorrect
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Access 2000
Table O-32 describes the Microsoft Access 2000 supported settings.
Table O-32
Microsoft Access 2000 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> Show in Macro Design
Tools -> Options -> Database window Click Option
Tools -> Options -> Dual Font Support
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools -> Options -> Edit/Find
Tools -> Options -> Keyboard
Tools -> Options -> Datasheet
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Access
Table O-32
Microsoft Access 2000 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> Tables/Queries
Tools -> Options -> Forms/Reports
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Access XP
Table O-33 describes the Microsoft Access XP supported settings.
Table O-33
Microsoft Access XP supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> Show in Macro Design
Tools -> Options -> Database window Click Option
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools -> Options -> Edit/Find
Tools -> Options -> Keyboard
Tools -> Options -> Datasheet
Tools -> Options -> Tables/Queries
Tools -> Options -> Forms/Reports
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Tools -> Options -> Pages
Tools -> Options -> International
Tools -> Options -> Spelling
Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Access 2003
Table O-34 describes the Microsoft Access 2003 supported settings.
627
628
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Access
Table O-34
Microsoft Access 2003 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> Show in Macro Design
Tools -> Options -> Database window Click Option
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools -> Options -> Edit/Find
Tools -> Options -> Keyboard
Tools -> Options -> Datasheet
Tools -> Options -> Tables/Queries
Tools -> Options -> Forms/Reports
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Tools -> Options -> Pages
Tools -> Options -> Error Checking
Tools -> Options -> International
Tools -> Options -> Spelling
Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Access 2007
Table O-35 describes the Microsoft Access 2007 supported settings.
Table O-35
Settings Location
Personalize
Current Database
DataSheet
Object Designers
Proofing
Microsoft Access 2007 supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Excel
Table O-35
Microsoft Access 2007 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Advanced -> Editing
Advanced -> Display
Advanced -> Printing
Advanced -> General
Advanced -> Advanced
Trust Center -> Trust Center settings
Microsoft Excel
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Excel 97
■
Microsoft Excel 2000
■
Microsoft Excel XP
■
Microsoft Excel 2003
■
Microsoft Excel 2007
Microsoft Excel 97
Table O-36 describes the Microsoft Excel 97 supported settings.
Table O-36
Microsoft Excel 97 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Comments
Tools->Options->View->Objects
Not supported
Tools->Options->View->Windows options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Calculation->Calculation
Tools->Options->Calculation->Iteration
Tools->Options->Calculation->Workbook options
Not supported
629
630
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Excel
Table O-36
Microsoft Excel 97 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Edit->Settings
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Transition -> Settings
Tools->Options->Transition -> Sheet Options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Custom Lists
Tools->Options->Chart->Active chart
Not supported
Tools->Options->Chart->Chart tips
Tools->Options->Colors
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Commands
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Options
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Toolbars
Migration to higher versions not supported
Microsoft Excel 2000
Table O-37 describes the Microsoft Excel 2000 supported settings.
Table O-37
Microsoft Excel 2000 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Comments
Tools->Options->View->Objects
Not supported
Tools->Options->View->Windows options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Calculation->Calculation
Tools->Options->Calculation->Iteration
Tools->Options->Calculation->Workbook options
Tools->Options->Edit->Settings
Tools->Options->General
Not supported
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Excel
Table O-37
Microsoft Excel 2000 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Transition -> Settings
Tools->Options->Transition -> Sheet Options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Custom Lists
Tools->Options->Chart->Active chart
Not supported
Tools->Options->Chart->Chart tips
Tools->Options->Colors
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Commands
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Options
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Excel XP
Table O-38 describes the Microsoft Excel XP supported settings.
Table O-38
Microsoft Excel XP supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Comments
Tools->Options->View->Objects
Not supported
Tools->Options->View->Windows options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Calculation->Calculation
Tools->Options->Calculation->Iteration
Tools->Options->Calculation->Workbook options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Edit->Settings
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Transition -> Settings
Tools->Options->Transition -> Sheet Options
Not supported
631
632
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Excel
Table O-38
Microsoft Excel XP supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Custom Lists
Tools->Options->Chart->Active chart
Not supported
Tools->Options->Chart->Chart tips
Tools->Options->Colors
Tools->Options->International
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Error Checking
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Commands
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Options
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Excel 2003
Table O-39 describes the Microsoft Excel 2003 supported settings.
Table O-39
Microsoft Excel 2003 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Comments
Tools->Options->View->Objects
Not supported
Tools->Options->View->Windows options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Calculation->Calculation
Tools->Options->Calculation->Iteration
Tools->Options->Calculation->Workbook options
Tools->Options->Edit->Settings
Not supported
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Excel
Table O-39
Microsoft Excel 2003 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Transition -> Settings
Tools->Options->Transition -> Sheet Options
Not supported
Tools->Options->Custom Lists
Tools->Options->Chart->Active chart
Not supported
Tools->Options->Chart->Chart tips
Tools->Options->Colors
Tools->Options->International
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Error Checking
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Commands
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Options
View -> Toolbars Customize -> Toolbars
Settings not migrated to higher versions.
Microsoft Excel 2007
Table O-40 describes the Microsoft Excel 2007 supported settings.
Table O-40
Microsoft Excel 2007 supported settings
Settings Location
Personalize -> Top options for working with Excel
Personalize -> When creating new work book
Personalize -> Personalize your copy
Formulas >calculation options
Formulas > working with formulas
Exceptions
633
634
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Internet Explorer
Table O-40
Microsoft Excel 2007 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Formulas > Error checking
Formulas > Error checking rules
Proofing -> Autocorrect Options
Proofing ->When correcting spelling in Office
Save > preserve backup info
Save > autorecover exceptions for
Save >offline editing options
Save > preserve
Advanced > editing options
Advanced >cut copy and paste
Advanced > display
Advanced > display options for this workbook
Advanced > formulas
Advanced > when calculating this work book
Advanced >General
Trust Center-> Trust center settings
Microsoft Internet Explorer
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and 5.5
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0
Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0
Table O-41 describes the Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Internet Explorer
Table O-41
Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Internet Options->General
Amount of disk space not supported.
Tools->Internet Options->Security
Tools->Internet Options->Programs
Tools->Internet Options->Advanced
Favorites
Tools->Internet Options->General->Colors
Tools->Internet Options->General->Fonts
Tools->Internet Options->General->Accessibility
Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and 5.5
Table O-42 describes the Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and 5.5 supported
settings.
Table O-42
Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 and 5.5 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Internet Options->General
Amount of disk space not supported.
Tools->Internet Options->Security
Tools->Internet Options->Content
Tools->Internet Options->Programs
Tools->Internet Options->Advanced
Favorites
Tools->Internet Options->General->Colors
Tools->Internet Options->General->Fonts
Tools->Internet Options->General->Accessibility
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0
Table O-43 describes the Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 supported settings.
635
636
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Internet Explorer
Table O-43
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Internet Options->General
Amount of disk space not supported.
Tools->Internet Options->Security
Tools->Internet Options->Content
Tools->Internet Options->Programs
Tools->Internet Options->Advanced
Favorites
Tools->Internet Options->General->Colors
Tools->Internet Options->General->Fonts
Tools->Internet Options->General->Accessibility
Tools->Internet Options->Privacy
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0
Table O-44 describes the Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 supported settings.
Table O-44
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Internet Options->General
Amount of disk space not supported.
Tools->Internet Options->Security
Tools->Internet Options->Content
Tools->Internet Options->Programs
Tools->Internet Options->Advanced
Favorites
Tools->Internet Options->General->Colors
Tools->Internet Options->General->Fonts
Tools->Internet Options->General->Accessibility
Tools->Internet Options->Privacy
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft OneNote
Table O-44
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Internet Options->General->Languages
Tools->Internet Options->Connections
Microsoft OneNote
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft OneNote 2003
■
Microsoft OneNote 2007
Microsoft OneNote 2003
Table O-45 describes the Microsoft OneNote 2003 supported settings.
Table O-45
Settings Location
Tools->AutoCorrect Options->AutoCorrect
Tools->Customize->Options
Tools->Options->Display
Tools->Options->Editing
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Handwriting
Tools->Options->E-Mail
Tools->Options->Note Flags
Tools->Options->Audio and Video
Tools->Options->Open and Save
Tools->Options->Backup
Tools->Options->Passwords
Tools->Options->Other
Microsoft OneNote 2003 supported settings
Exceptions
637
638
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-45
Settings Location
Microsoft OneNote 2003 supported settings (continued)
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Live Sharing
Microsoft OneNote 2007
Table O-46 describes the Microsoft OneNote 2007 supported settings.
Table O-46
Settings Location
Microsoft OneNote 2007 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->AutoCorrect Options->AutoCorrect
Tools->Customize->Options
Tools->Options->Display
Adjust Darkness setting not available.
Tools->Options->Editing
Empty deleted pages and Permanently delete pages
settings not available.
Tools->Options->Pen
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Synchronization
Tools->Options->Filing Rules
Tools->Options->E-Mail
Tools->Options->Note Flags
Tools->Options->Audio and Video
Tools->Options->Open and Save
Tools->Options->Backup
Tools->Options->Passwords
Tools->Options->Other
Online Content options not supported.
Tools->Options->Live Sharing
Microsoft Outlook
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
■
Microsoft Outlook 97
■
Microsoft Outlook 98
■
Microsoft Outlook 2000
■
Microsoft Outlook XP
■
Microsoft Outlook 2003
Microsoft Outlook 97
Table O-47 describes the Microsoft Outlook 97 supported settings.
Table O-47
Settings Location
Microsoft Outlook 97 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->E-mail
Tools->Options->Sending
Tools->Options->Reading
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Tasks/Notes
Tools->Options->Journal
Tools->Options->Reminders
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->AutoArchive
Tools->Options->Attachments
Tools->Options->Manage Forms
View
Tools
Tools->AutoSignature
Microsoft Outlook 98
Table O-48 describes the Microsoft Outlook 98 supported settings.
639
640
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-48
Microsoft Outlook 98 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->E-mail Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Tasks
Tools->Options->Preferences->Task Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Contact Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Journal Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Notes Options
Tools->Options->Mail Services
Tools->Options->Mail Format
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Other->General
Tools->Options->Other->AutoArchive
Tools->Options->Other->Preview Pane
View
Tools
Microsoft Outlook 2000
Table O-49 describes the Microsoft Outlook 2000 supported settings.
Table O-49
Microsoft Outlook 2000 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->Preferences->E-mail Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar Options
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-49
Microsoft Outlook 2000 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->Tasks
Tools->Options->Preferences->Task Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Contact Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Journal Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Notes Options
Tools->Options->Mail Services
Tools->Options->Mail Format
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Other->General
Tools->Options->Other->AutoArchive
Tools->Options->Other->Preview Pane
Tools->Options->Internet E-mail
View
Tools
Microsoft Outlook XP
Table O-50 describes the Microsoft Outlook XP supported settings.
Table O-50
Microsoft Outlook XP supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->Preferences->E-mail Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Tasks
Tools->Options->Preferences->Task Options
Exceptions
641
642
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-50
Microsoft Outlook XP supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->Contact Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Journal Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Notes Options
Tools->Options->Mail Setup
Tools->Options->Mail Format
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Other->General
Tools->Options->Other->AutoArchive
Tools->Options->Other->Preview Pane
View
Tools
Microsoft Outlook 2003
Table O-51 describes the Microsoft Outlook 2003 supported settings.
Table O-51
Microsoft Outlook 2003 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->Preferences->Junk E-mail
Tools->Options->Preferences->E-mail Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar
Tools->Options->Preferences->Calendar Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Tasks
Tools->Options->Preferences->Task Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Contact Options
Tools->Options->Preferences->Journal Options
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-51
Microsoft Outlook 2003 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->Notes Options
Tools->Options->Mail Setup
Tools->Options->Mail Format
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Other->General
Tools->Options->Other->AutoArchive
Tools->Options->Other->Reading Pane
View
Tools
Microsoft Outlook Caveats
There are a number of issues that may cause problems when migrating Microsoft
Outlook settings and files.
User Migration does not support the migration of POP services. The source
computer must be configured to use the Microsoft Exchange Server service.
The following sections describe the caveats for migrating Microsoft Outlook:
■
Migrating the default profile
■
Profiles and services
■
Restoring multiple packages
■
Setting the default profile
■
Migrating Outlook 97
■
Migrating signature files
■
Troubleshooting Microsoft Outlook migration
Migrating the default profile
User Migration supports the migration of the Outlook Default Profile only.
643
644
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
If multiple profiles exist on the same computer, only the profile that is set as the
default is migrated. The exception is Outlook 2003, in which all the profiles are
migrated.
For example, user A creates a package on the source computer. User B logs on to
the Windows 2000 target computer and restores user A's package. User B now
has user A's profile.
Profiles and services
Outlook profiles have a set of associated files and services. User Migration migrates
the following services with each profile:
■
Microsoft Exchange Server
■
Personal Address Book and associated *.pab files
■
Personal Folders and associated *.pst files
The following are details about migrating Mail Service settings:
■
The migration process moves one Personal Address Book (.pab file) for each
profile.
■
To migrate other profiles from the source to the target computer, change the
default profile (select the desired profile) on the source computer and follow
the migration process. After the restore process, a new profile is created on
the target computer. This process does not overwrite existing profiles with
different profile names on the target computer.
■
To move the default signature settings, the default editor must be set to use
the internal editor in Outlook.
For example, the default editor must not be set to Microsoft Word.
■
The migration process only moves the Mail Service profile identified as the
default profile. A profile of the same name is created on the target computer.
Outlook does not need to be initiated beforehand. However, when a user starts
Outlook on the target computer, the application sometimes prompts the user
to create a profile. This occurs when Outlook runs for the first time. It does
not mean that the profile did not migrate to the target computer. If prompted
to create a profile, create one for the corporate or workgroup environment
and type a name other than the one that is being moved by User Migration.
Services should not be added to this profile. This is not a profile that you need
to use and you can safely delete it later.
■
User Interface settings are found in the Outlook Mail Service. These settings
are an entirely separate class of functions from the Mail Service settings. They
do not share restrictions.
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
■
Delegation settings are only accessible if the Microsoft Exchange Server service
is migrated to the target computer. Delegation settings are stored on the
Exchange Server and, while these settings are not moved directly, if the
Microsoft Exchange Server service is moved, the user still has access.
To view the Mail Service settings for Outlook 2000
◆
In Outlook 2000, click Tools > Services > Mail Control Panel.
Restoring multiple packages
Because of the way in which Outlook 2000 and later versions store user settings,
restoring multiple packages after changing the default profile overwrites the user
settings on the target computer.
To view these settings
◆
In Outlook 2000/2002/2003, click Tools > Options.
Setting the default profile
If Outlook prompts you to select a profile from the list when you launch Outlook
on the source computer, there is not a default account from which User Migration
can copy the settings. The Outlook profile information does not migrate unless
there is a default profile selected.
To set the default profile
1
On the target computer, on the Windows desktop, click Start > Control Panel
> Mail.
2
Click Show Profiles.
3
Select the profile that you want to use.
4
Click Apply.
Migrating Outlook 97
Outlook Personal Address Book and associated settings do not transfer between
Outlook 97 and Outlook 2000/2002. This is due to a change in the Outlook file
format that prohibits User Migration from migrating the file.
Migrating signature files
Signature files are migrated if they are available in the locations listed in
Table O-52.
645
646
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook
Table O-52
Signature file location
Outlook version
Signature file location on source computer
Outlook 97
Either of the following locations:
Outlook 98/2000
■
\Windows\<profile name>.rtf
■
\WinNT\<profile name>.rtf
Either of the following locations:
<user profiles path>\<user name>\Applications
Data\Microsoft\Shared\Signatures
■ <user profiles path>\<user name>\Applications
Data\Microsoft\Signature
■
Outlook 2002/2003
Either of the following locations:
<user profiles path>\<user name>\Applications
Data\Microsoft\Shared\Signatures
■ <user profiles path>\<user name>\Applications
Data\Microsoft\Signature
■
To move a signature file from Outlook 97
◆
In Outlook 97, click Tools > Autosignature > Add this signature to the end
of new messages.
Troubleshooting Microsoft Outlook migration
Table O-53 lists some of the problems that you may encounter when using User
Migration, and the workarounds.
Table O-53
Microsoft Outlook migration troubleshooting
Problem
Workaround
Some of your Outlook
profiles do not move to the
target computer.
User Migration only moves settings that are associated with
the default profile setup. It does not move settings for other
profiles. This is a limitation of how Outlook 2000/2002/2003
stores settings.
Your offline address book
does not migrate.
Offline address books and associated settings do not transfer
between Outlook 97 and Outlook 2000 due to a change in
the Outlook file format.
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Outlook Express
Table O-53
Microsoft Outlook migration troubleshooting (continued)
Problem
Workaround
You cannot access your
delegation settings.
If the Microsoft Exchange Server service is not moved,
delegation settings are not accessible. Delegation settings
are stored on the Exchange Server, and while these settings
do not move directly, if the Microsoft Exchange Server
service is moved, the user still has access.
Outlook Personal Address
Book and the associated
settings do not transfer
between Outlook 97 and
Outlook 2000/2002.
This is due to a change in the Outlook file format that
prohibits User Migration from migrating the file.
Microsoft Outlook Express
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0
■
Microsoft Outlook Express 5.0 and 6.0
Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0
Table O-54 describes the Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0 supported settings.
Table O-54
Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Send
Tools->Options->Read
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Dial Up
Tools->Options->Advanced
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->General
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Servers
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Connection
Exceptions
647
648
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft PowerPoint
Table O-54
Microsoft Outlook Express 4.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Security
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Advanced
Microsoft Outlook Express 5.0 and 6.0
Table O-55 describes the Microsoft Outlook Express 5.0 and 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-55
Microsoft Outlook Express 5.0 and 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Send
Tools->Options->Read
Tools->Options->Receipts
Tools->Options->Compose
Tools->Options->Signatures
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Connection
Tools->Options->Maintenance
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->General
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Servers
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Connection
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Security
Tools->Accounts->Mail->Properties->Advanced
Microsoft PowerPoint
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft PowerPoint
■
Microsoft PowerPoint 97
■
Microsoft PowerPoint 2000
■
Microsoft PowerPoint XP
■
Microsoft PowerPoint 2003
■
Microsoft PowerPoint 2007
Microsoft PowerPoint 97
Table O-56 describes the Microsoft PowerPoint 97 supported settings.
Table O-56
Microsoft PowerPoint 97 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Slide Show
Tools->Options->General->General options
Tools->Options->General->User Information
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Advanced
Tools->Customize->Toolbars
Tools->AutoCorrect Options->AutoFormat As You Type
View -> Toolbars->Customize->Toolbars
Microsoft PowerPoint 2000
Table O-57 describes the Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 supported settings.
Table O-57
Settings Location
Tools->Options->View->Show
Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 supported settings
Exceptions
649
650
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft PowerPoint
Table O-57
Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Slide Show
Tools->Options->General->General options
Tools->Options->General->User Information
Tools->Options->General->Web Options
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Spelling and Style
Tools->Customize->Toolbars
View -> Toolbars->Customize->Toolbars
Microsoft PowerPoint XP
Table O-58 describes the Microsoft PowerPoint XP supported settings.
Table O-58
Microsoft PowerPoint XP supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Slide Show
Tools->Options->View->Default View
Tools->Options->General->General options
Tools->Options->General->User Information
Tools->Options->General->Web Options
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Security
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft PowerPoint
Table O-58
Microsoft PowerPoint XP supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Spelling and Style
Tools->Customize->Toolbars
Tools->AutoCorrect Options->AutoFormat As You Type
View -> Toolbars->Customize->Toolbars
Not supported.
Microsoft PowerPoint 2003
Table O-59 describes the Microsoft PowerPoint 2003 supported settings.
Table O-59
Microsoft PowerPoint 2003 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View->Show
Tools->Options->View->Slide Show
Tools->Options->View->Default View
Tools->Options->General->General options
Tools->Options->General->User Information
Tools->Options->General->Web Options
Tools->Options->General->Service Options
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Spelling and Style
Tools->Customize->Toolbars
Tools->AutoCorrect Options->AutoFormat As You Type
View -> Toolbars->Customize->Toolbars
Migration to higher versions not supported.
651
652
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Project
Microsoft PowerPoint 2007
Table O-60 describes the Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 supported settings.
Table O-60
Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Personalize > Top options
Personalize > Personalize
Proofing > AutoCorrect options
Proofing > When correcting spelling in Office programs
Proofing > When correcting spelling in PowerPoint
Save
Advanced > Editing options
Advanced > Cut, copy, and paste
Advanced > Display
Advanced > Slide Show
Advanced > Print
Advanced > When Printing this doc
Advanced > Save
Advanced > General > Web options
Advanced > General > Service options
Trust Center-> Trust center settings
Microsoft Project
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Project 98
■
Microsoft Project 2000
■
Microsoft Project 2002
■
Microsoft Project 2003
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Project
■
Microsoft Project 2007
Microsoft Project 98
Table O-61 describes the Microsoft Project 98 supported settings.
Table O-61
Settings Location
Microsoft Project 98 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->AutoCorrect
Tools->Resource Leveling
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Schedule
Tools->Options->Calculation
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Workgroup
Microsoft Project 2000
Table O-62 describes the Microsoft Project 2000 supported settings.
Table O-62
Settings Location
Tools->AutoCorrect
Tools->Resource Leveling
Tools->Customize->Toolbar->Options
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Microsoft Project 2000 supported settings
Exceptions
653
654
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Project
Table O-62
Settings Location
Microsoft Project 2000 supported settings (continued)
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Schedule
Tools->Options->Calculation
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Workgroup
Tools->Options->Save
Microsoft Project 2002
Table O-63 describes the Microsoft Project 2002 supported settings.
Table O-63
Settings Location
Tools->AutoCorrect
Tools->Resource Leveling
Tools->Customize->Toolbar->Options
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Schedule
Tools->Options->Calculation
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Collaborate
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Interface
Microsoft Project 2002 supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Project
Microsoft Project 2003
Table O-64 describes the Microsoft Project 2003 supported settings.
Table O-64
Settings Location
Microsoft Project 2003 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->AutoCorrect Options -> AutoCorrect
Tools->Level Resources
Tools->Customize->Options
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Schedule
Tools->Options->Calculation
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Collaborate
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Interface
Tools->Options->Security
Microsoft Project 2007
Table O-65 describes the Microsoft Project 2007 supported settings.
Table O-65
Settings Location
Tools->AutoCorrect Options -> AutoCorrect
Tools->Level Resources
Tools->Customize->Toolbar->Options
Tools->Options->View
Microsoft Project 2007 supported settings
Exceptions
655
656
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Visio
Table O-65
Microsoft Project 2007 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Calendar
Tools->Options->Schedule
Tools->Options->Calculation
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools->Options->Collaborate
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Interface
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Enterprise Options->Project Server Accounts/When starting
Microsoft Visio
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro
■
Microsoft Visio 2000
■
Microsoft Visio 2002
■
Microsoft Visio 2003
■
Microsoft Visio 2007
Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro
Table O-66 describes the Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro supported settings.
Table O-66
Settings Location
Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro supported settings
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools->Options->File Paths
Not supported
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Visio
Table O-66
Settings Location
Microsoft Visio 5.0 Std and 5.0 Pro supported settings (continued)
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> Default Units
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Microsoft Visio 2000
Table O-67 describes the Microsoft Visio 2000 supported settings.
Table O-67
Settings Location
Microsoft Visio 2000 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools->Options->File Paths
Not supported
Tools -> Options -> Drawing
Tools -> Options -> Regional Settings
Tools->Options->Spelling
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Microsoft Visio 2002
Table O-68 describes the Microsoft Visio 2002 supported settings.
Table O-68
Settings Location
Microsoft Visio 2002 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools->Options->File Paths
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> Regional
Tools->Options->Save
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Not supported
657
658
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Visio
Microsoft Visio 2003
Table O-69 describes the Microsoft Visio 2003 supported settings.
Table O-69
Microsoft Visio 2003 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools->Options->Advanced->File Paths
Not supported
Tools -> Options -> View
Tools -> Options -> Regional
Tools->Options->Save
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
Tools -> Options -> Units
Tools -> Options -> Advanced -> Color Settings
Tools -> Options -> Security
Tools->Options->Shape Search
Tools -> Options -> Spelling
Microsoft Visio 2007
Table O-70 describes the Microsoft Visio 2007 supported settings.
Table O-70
Settings Location
Microsoft Visio 2007 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> General
Tools->Options->Advanced->File Paths
Not supported
Tools -> Options -> View
Startup Task Pane and Choose Drawing Type
Pane not supported.
Tools -> Options -> Regional
Not supported.
Tools->Options->Save/Open
Tools -> Options -> Advanced
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Word
Table O-70
Microsoft Visio 2007 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools -> Options -> Units
Tools -> Options -> Advanced -> Color Settings
Tools -> Options -> Security
Tools->Options->Shape Search
Tools -> Options -> Spelling
Tools -> Customize -> Toolbar
Tools->Autocorrectoptions->Autocorrect
Tools->Autocorrectoptions->Auto Format As you Type
Microsoft Word
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Microsoft Word 97
■
Microsoft Word 2000
■
Microsoft Word XP
■
Microsoft Word 2003
■
Microsoft Word 2007
Microsoft Word 97
Table O-71 describes the Microsoft Word 97 supported settings.
Table O-71
Settings Location
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Microsoft Word 97 supported settings
Exceptions
659
660
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Word
Table O-71
Microsoft Word 97 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Save
Always create backup copy OR Allow Fast Saves setting
not migrated to higher versions.
Tools->Options->Spelling and Grammar
Tools->Options->Track Changes
Tools->Options->User Information
Tools->Options->Compatibility
Tools->Options->File Locations
View -> Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Not migrated to higher versions.
Microsoft Word 2000
Table O-72 describes the Microsoft Word 2000 supported settings.
Table O-72
Settings Location
Microsoft Word 2000 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Spelling and Grammar
Tools->Options->Track Changes
Tools->Options->User Information
Tools->Options->Compatibility
Tools->Options->File Locations
View -> Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Not migrated to higher versions.
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Word
Microsoft Word XP
Table O-73 describes the Microsoft Word XP supported settings.
Table O-73
Settings Location
Microsoft Word XP supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->E-Mail Options
Tools->Options->Edit
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Spelling and Grammar
Tools->Options->Track Changes
Tools->Options->User Information
Tools->Options->Compatibility
Tools->Options->File Locations
Tools->AutoCorrect Options
View -> Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Microsoft Word 2003
Table O-74 describes the Microsoft Word 2003 supported settings.
Table O-74
Settings Location
Tools->Options->View
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->E-Mail Options
Tools->Options->Edit
Microsoft Word 2003 supported settings
Exceptions
661
662
User Migration supported applications
Microsoft Word
Table O-74
Microsoft Word 2003 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Print
Tools->Options->Save
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Spelling and Grammar
Tools->Options->Track Changes
Tools->Options->User Information
Tools->Options->Compatibility
Tools->Options->File Locations
Tools->AutoCorrect Options
View -> Toolbars -> Customize -> Toolbars
Office Assistant->Options
Not supported
Microsoft Word 2007
Table O-75 describes the Microsoft Word 2007 supported settings.
Table O-75
Microsoft Word 2007 supported settings
Settings Location
Personalize > Top options
Personalize > Personalize
Display > Page display options
Display > Always show formatting
Display > Printing options
Proofing > AutoCorrect options
Proofing > When correcting spelling in Office programs
Proofing > When correcting spelling in Word
Proofing > When correcting grammar in Word
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
MSN Messenger
Table O-75
Microsoft Word 2007 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Proofing > Exceptions for
Save
Advanced > Editing options
Advanced > Cut, copy, and paste
Advanced > Show document content
Advanced > Display
Advanced > Print
Advanced > When Printing this doc
Advanced > Save
Advanced > Preserve
Advanced > General
Advanced > General > File location
Advanced > General > Web options
Advanced > General > Service options
Advanced > Compatibility options
Trust Center-> Trust center settings
MSN Messenger
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
MSN Messenger 3.5
■
MSN Messenger 4.6
■
MSN Messenger 5.0
■
MSN Messenger 6.0
■
MSN Messenger 7.0 and 7.5
■
MSN Messenger 8.0
663
664
User Migration supported applications
MSN Messenger
MSN Messenger 3.5
Table O-76 describes the MSN Messenger 3.5 supported settings.
Table O-76
Settings Location
MSN Messenger 3.5 supported settings
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->General
Tools->Options->Preferences->File Transfer
Tools->Options->Personal->Edit Font
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Connections
View
MSN Messenger 4.6
Table O-77 describes the MSN Messenger 4.6 supported settings.
Table O-77
MSN Messenger 4.6 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Preferences->General
Run this program when Windows starts not supported.
Tools->Options->Preferences->File Transfer
Tools->Options->Personal->Change Font
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Privacy
Tools->Options->Connections
Tools->Use Windows Color Scheme
View
MSN Messenger 5.0
Table O-78 describes the MSN Messenger 5.0 supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
MSN Messenger
Table O-78
MSN Messenger 5.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options-> General
Run this program when Windows starts not supported.
Tools->Options->Messages->Change Font
Tools->Options->Messages
Tools->Options->Personal
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Privacy
Tools->Options->Connections
Tools->Use Windows Color Scheme
View
MSN Messenger 6.0
Table O-79 describes the MSN Messenger 6.0 supported settings.
Table O-79
MSN Messenger 6.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options-> General
Run this program when Windows starts not supported.
Tools->Options->Messages->Change Font
Tools->Options->Messages->File Transfer
Tools->Options->Messages
Tools->Options->Personal
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Privacy
Tools->Options->Connections
View
MSN Messenger 7.0 and 7.5
Table O-80 describes the MSN Messenger 7.0 and 7.5 supported settings.
665
666
User Migration supported applications
MSN Messenger
Table O-80
MSN Messenger 7.0 and 7.5 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options-> General
Run this program when Windows starts not supported.
Tools->Options->Messages->Change Font
Tools->Options->Messages->File Transfer
Tools->Options->Messages
Tools->Options->Personal
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Privacy
Tools->Options->Connections
View
MSN Messenger 8.0
Table O-81 describes the MSN Messenger 8.0 supported settings.
Table O-81
Windows Live Messenger 8.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options-> General
Run this program when Windows starts not supported.
Tools->Options->Messages->Change Font
Tools->Options->Messages->File Transfer
Tools->Options->Messages
Tools->Options->Personal
Tools->Options->Accounts
Tools->Options->Privacy
Tools->Options->Connections
View
User Migration supported applications
NetMeeting
NetMeeting
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
NetMeeting 2.11
■
NetMeeting 3.01
NetMeeting 2.11
Table O-82 describes the NetMeeting 2.11 supported settings.
Table O-82
NetMeeting 2.11 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->Protocols
Tools->Options->Video
Tools->Options->Calling
Tools->Options->My Information
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Chat->Options->Chat Format
Tools->Chat->Options->Fonts
View
NetMeeting 3.01
Table O-83 describes the NetMeeting 3.01 supported settings.
Table O-83
NetMeeting 3.01 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools->Options->General
Tools->Options->General -> Advanced Calling
Tools->Options->Video
Call
Exceptions
667
668
User Migration supported applications
Palm Desktop
Table O-83
NetMeeting 3.01 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Chat->Options->Information Display
Tools->Chat->Options->Fonts
View
Tools->Remote Desktop Sharing
Palm Desktop
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Palm Desktop 3.0
■
Palm Desktop 4.0.1
■
Palm Desktop 4.1
Palm Desktop 3.0
Table O-84 describes the Palm Desktop 3.0 supported settings.
Table O-84
Palm Desktop 3.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Data directory not supported.
Tools->Options->Date Book->Date and Time
View
HotSync->Setup
Tools->Users
Mail Setup
Synchronize with not supported.
Palm Desktop 4.0.1
Table O-85 describes the Palm Desktop 4.0.1 supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Palm Desktop
Table O-85
Palm Desktop 4.0.1 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Data directory not supported.
Tools->Options->Date Book->Date and Time
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Address
Tools->Options->To Do
Tools->Options->Alarms
Tools->Options->Themes
View
HotSync->Setup
Tools->Users
Mail Setup
Synchronize with not supported.
Palm Desktop 4.1
Table O-86 describes the Palm Desktop 4.1 supported settings.
Table O-86
Palm Desktop 4.1 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Tools->Options->General
Data directory not supported.
Tools->Preferences->Date Book->Date and Time
Tools->Options->Security
Tools->Options->Alarms
Tools->Options->Tools
Tools->Options->Themes
View
HotSync->Setup
Tools->Users
669
670
User Migration supported applications
Symantec Norton AntiVirus
Table O-86
Palm Desktop 4.1 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Mail Setup
Synchronize with not supported.
Symantec Norton AntiVirus
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 7.5 and 7.6
■
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 7.5 and 7.6
Table O-87 describes the Symantec Norton AntiVirus 7.5 and 7.6 supported
settings.
Table O-87
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 7.5 and 7.6 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Configure->File System Realtime Protection
File->Configure Histories
Configure->Lotus Notes Realtime Protection
Configure->Microsoft Exchange Realtime Protection
File->Schedule Updates
Scan->Scan Floppy Disk
Custom Scan
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1
Table O-88 describes the Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1 supported settings.
Table O-88
Settings Location
File->Configure Histories
File->Schedule Updates
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1 supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Symantec pcAnywhere
Table O-88
Symantec Norton AntiVirus 8.1 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Configure->Lotus Notes Realtime Protection
Configure->Microsoft Exchange Realtime Protection
Configure->File System Realtime Protection
Scan->Scan Floppy Disk
Custom Task
Symantec pcAnywhere
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0
■
Symantec pcAnywhere 9.2
■
Symantec pcAnywhere 10.0 and 10.5
■
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.0
■
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.5 and 12.0
Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0
Table O-89 describes the Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0 supported settings.
Table O-89
Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Application Options->System Setup
Application Options->Remote Operation
Application Options->Remote Printing
Application Options->DOS Sessions->Options
Application Options->Host Operation->Options
Application Options->TCP/IP
Application Options->File Transfer
Application Options->Terminal Emulation
Exceptions
671
672
User Migration supported applications
Symantec pcAnywhere
Table O-89
Symantec pcAnywhere 8.0 supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Application Options->Button Bars->Action Bar
Application Options->Button Bars->Toolbar
Symantec pcAnywhere 9.2
Table O-90 describes the Symantec pcAnywhere 9.2 supported settings.
Table O-90
Symantec pcAnywhere 9.2 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Application Options->System Setup
Application Options->Host Operation
Application Options->Remote Operation
Application Options->File Transfer
Application Options->Remote Printing
Application Options->DOS Sessions->Options
Network Options->TCP/IP
Network Options->Directory Services
Application Options->Terminal Emulation
Application Options->Button Bars->Action Bar
Application Options->Button Bars->Toolbar
Logging Options->NT Event Logging
Logging Options->pcA Logging
Logging Options->SNMP Options
Logging Options->Host Session Recording
Symantec pcAnywhere 10.0 and 10.5
Table O-91 describes the Symantec pcAnywhere 10.0 and 10.5 supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Symantec pcAnywhere
Table O-91
Symantec pcAnywhere 10.0 and 10.5 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
pcAnywhere Options->Host Operation
pcAnywhere Options->Remote Operation
pcAnywhere Options->Host Communications -> Dial-up properties
pcAnywhere Options->Host Communications -> TCP/IP options
pcAnywhere Options->Host Communications -> Remote Communications
pcAnywhere Options->File Transfer
pcAnywhere Options->Event Logging
pcAnywhere Options->Directory Services
pcAnywhere Options->Remote Printing
pcAnywhere Options->Encryption
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.0
Table O-92 describes the Symantec pcAnywhere 11.0 supported settings.
Table O-92
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Tools-> Options->Host Operation
Tools-> Options->Remote Operation
Tools-> Options->Host Communications -> Dial-up properties
Tools-> Options->Host Communications -> TCP/IP options
Tools-> Options->Host Communications -> Remote Communications
Tools-> Options->Host Communications -> Session Manager
Tools-> Options->File Transfer
Tools-> Options->Event Logging
Tools-> Options->Directory Services
Tools-> Options->Encryption
Exceptions
673
674
User Migration supported applications
Windows Desktop Display
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.5 and 12.0
Table O-93 describes the Symantec pcAnywhere 11.5 and 12.0 supported settings.
Table O-93
Symantec pcAnywhere 11.5 and 12.0 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Edit -> Preferences ->Host Operation
Edit -> Preferences ->Remote Operation
Edit -> Preferences ->Host Communications -> Dial-up properties
Edit -> Preferences ->Host Communications -> TCP/IP options
Edit -> Preferences -> Remote Communications
Edit -> Preferences -> Session Manager
Edit -> Preferences ->File Transfer
Edit -> Preferences ->Event Logging
Edit -> Preferences ->Directory Services
Edit -> Preferences ->Encryption
Windows Desktop Display
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows Desktop Display 95
■
Windows Desktop Display 98
■
Windows Desktop Display NT
■
Windows Desktop Display 2000
■
Windows Desktop Display XP
Windows Desktop Display 95
Table O-94 describes the Windows 95 Desktop supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Windows Desktop Display
Table O-94
Windows 95 Desktop supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Display Properties->Background
Display Properties->Screen Saver
Settings setting is not migrated to higher versions
Display Properties->Appearance
Display Properties->Web
Windows Desktop Display 98
Table O-95 describes the Windows 98 Desktop supported settings.
Table O-95
Windows 98 Desktop supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Display Properties->Background
Display Properties->Screen Saver
Settings setting is not migrated to higher versions
Display Properties->Appearance
Display Properties->Effects
Desktop icons setting is not migrated to higher versions
Display Properties->Web
Power Management Properties->Power Schemes
Power Management Properties->Advanced
Windows Desktop Display NT
Table O-96 describes the Windows NT Desktop supported settings.
Table O-96
Settings Location
Display Properties->Background
Display Properties->Screen Saver
Display Properties->Appearance
Display Properties->Settings
Windows NT Desktop supported settings
Exceptions
675
676
User Migration supported applications
Windows Desktop Display
Table O-96
Windows NT Desktop supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Display Properties->Web
Display Properties->Plus!
Windows Desktop Display 2000
Table O-97 describes the Windows 2000 Desktop supported settings.
Table O-97
Windows 2000 Desktop supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Display Properties->Background
Display Properties->Screen Saver
Display Properties->Appearance
Display Properties->Effects
Display Properties->Web
Windows Desktop Display XP
Table O-98 describes the Windows XP Desktop supported settings.
Table O-98
Windows XP Desktop supported settings
Settings Location
Display Properties->Themes
Display Properties->Desktop
Display Properties->Screen Saver
Display Properties->Appearance
Display Properties->Appearance -> Effects
Display Properties->Appearance -> Advanced Appearance
Power Options Properties->Power Schemes
Power Options Properties->Advanced
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Windows Explorer
Windows Explorer
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows Explorer 95 and 98
■
Windows Explorer NT
■
Windows Explorer 2000
■
Windows Explorer XP
Windows Explorer 95 and 98
Table O-99 describes the Windows Explorer 95 and 98 supported settings.
Table O-99
Windows Explorer 95 and 98 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
View->Folder Options->General->Windows Desktop Updates
View->Folder Options->General->Windows Desktop Updates->Custom->Settings Underline icon titles setting not
supported.
View->Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Files and Folders
View->Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Visual Settings
View->Folder Options->File Types
Registered File Types setting not
supported.
Windows Explorer NT
Table O-100 describes the Windows Explorer NT supported settings.
Table O-100
Windows Explorer NT supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Folder Options->General->Windows Desktop Updates
Folder Options->General->Windows Desktop Updates->Custom->Settings
Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Files and Folders
View->Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Visual Settings
Underline icon titles setting not
supported.
677
678
User Migration supported applications
Windows Explorer
Table O-100
Windows Explorer NT supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Folder Options->File Types
Registered File Types setting not
supported.
Windows Explorer 2000
Table O-101 describes the Windows Explorer 2000 supported settings.
Table O-101
Windows Explorer 2000 supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Folder Options->General->Active Desktop
Folder Options->General-> Web View
Folder Options->General-> Browse Folders
Folder Options->General->Click Items as follows
Underline icon titles setting not supported.
Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Files and Folders
Folder Options->File Types
Registered File Types setting not supported.
Folder Options->Offline Files
Windows Explorer XP
Table O-102 describes the Windows Explorer XP supported settings.
Table O-102
Windows Explorer XP supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Folder Options->General-> Tasks
Folder Options->General-> Browse Folders
Folder Options->General->Click Items as follows
Underline icon titles setting not supported.
Folder Options->View->Advanced settings->Files and Folders
Folder Options->File Types
Registered File Types setting not supported.
User Migration supported applications
Windows Accessibility Settings
Windows Accessibility Settings
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows 95 Accessibility Settings
■
Windows 98 Accessibility Settings
■
Windows NT Accessibility Settings
■
Windows 2000 Accessibility Settings
■
Windows XP Accessibility Settings
■
Windows Vista Accessibility Settings
Windows 95 Accessibility Settings
Table O-103 describes the Windows 95 Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-103
Windows 95 Accessibility Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Accessibility Properties\Keyboard
Accessibility Properties\Sound
Accessibility Properties\Display
Accessibility Properties\Mouse\MouseKeys
Accessibility Properties\General
Windows 98 Accessibility Settings
Table O-104 describes the Windows 98 Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-104
Windows 98 Accessibility Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Accessibility Properties\Keyboard
Accessibility Properties\Sound
Accessibility Properties\Display\High Contrast
Accessibility Properties\Mouse\MouseKeys
Accessibility Properties\General
Exceptions
679
680
User Migration supported applications
Windows Accessibility Settings
Windows NT Accessibility Settings
Table O-105 describes the Windows NT Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-105
Windows NT Accessibility Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Accessibility Properties\Keyboard
Accessibility Properties\Sound
Accessibility Properties\Mouse\MouseKeys
Accessibility Properties\General
Windows 2000 Accessibility Settings
Table O-106 describes the Windows 2000 Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-106
Windows 2000 Accessibility Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Accessibility Options\Keyboard
Accessibility Options\Sound
Accessibility Options\Display\High Contrast
Accessibility Options\Mouse\MouseKeys
Accessibility Options\General
Windows XP Accessibility Settings
Table O-107 describes the Windows XP Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-107
Settings Location
Accessibility Options\Keyboard
Accessibility Options\Sound
Accessibility Options\Display\High Contrast
Accessibility Options\Mouse\MouseKeys
Windows XP Accessibility Settings supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Windows Mouse Settings
Table O-107
Windows XP Accessibility Settings supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Accessibility Options\General
Windows Vista Accessibility Settings
Table O-108 describes the Windows Vista Accessibility Settings supported settings.
Table O-108
Windows Vista Accessibility Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on Magnifier
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on Narrator
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on On screen keyboard
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on sticky keys
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on High contrast
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Setup high contrast
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Turn on Filter keys
Ease of access > Quick access common tools > Set up Filter keys
Ease of access >windows can read and highlight
Ease of access > explore all available settings > use computer without display
Ease of access > explore all available settings > optomize visual display
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Alternative input devices
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse -> Setup Mouse keys
Ease of access > explore all available settings > keyboard
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Sounds
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Reasoning Tasks
Windows Mouse Settings
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
681
682
User Migration supported applications
Windows Mouse Settings
■
Windows 95 and NT Mouse Settings
■
Windows 98 Mouse Settings
■
Windows 2000 Mouse Settings
■
Windows XP Mouse Settings
■
Windows Vista Mouse Settings
Windows 95 and NT Mouse Settings
Table O-109 describes the Windows 95 and NT Mouse Settings supported settings.
Table O-109
Windows 95 and NT Mouse Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Button Configuration
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Double-click speed
Mouse Properties->Pointers
Mouse Properties->Motion->Pointer speed
Mouse Properties->Motion->Snap to default
Windows 98 Mouse Settings
Table O-110 describes the Windows 98 Mouse Settings supported settings.
Table O-110
Windows 98 Mouse Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Button Configuration
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Double-click speed
Mouse Properties->Pointers
Mouse Properties->Motion->Pointer speed
Mouse Properties->Motion->Pointer trails
Windows 2000 Mouse Settings
Table O-111 describes the Windows 2000 Mouse Settings supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Windows Mouse Settings
Table O-111
Windows 2000 Mouse Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Button Configuration
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Files and Folders
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Double-click speed
Mouse Properties->Pointers
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Motion
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Acceleration
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Snap to Default
Windows XP Mouse Settings
Table O-112 describes the Windows XP Mouse Settings supported settings.
Table O-112
Windows XP Mouse Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Button Configuration
Mouse Properties->Buttons->Double-click speed
Mouse Properties->Buttons->ClickLock
Mouse Properties->Buttons->ClickLock -> Settings
Mouse Properties->Pointers
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Motion
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Snap to
Mouse Properties->Pointer Options->Visuality
Mouse Properties->Wheel->Scrolling
Windows Vista Mouse Settings
Table O-113 describes the Windows Vista Mouse Settings supported settings.
683
684
User Migration supported applications
Windows Regional Settings
Table O-113
Windows Vista Mouse Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Buttons
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Buttons >
ClickLock > Settings
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Pointers
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Pointer Options
> Motion
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Pointer Options
> Snap To
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Pointer Options
> Visibility
Ease of access > explore all available settings > Mouse > Mouse settings > Pointer Options
> Wheel
Windows Regional Settings
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows 95 Regional Settings
■
Windows 98 Regional Settings
■
Windows NT Regional Settings
■
Windows 2000 Regional Settings
■
Windows XP Regional Settings
■
Windows Vista Regional Settings
Windows 95 Regional Settings
Table O-114 describes the Windows 95 Regional Settings supported settings.
Table O-114
Settings Location
Date/Time Properties->Date & Time
Date/Time Properties->Time Zone
Windows 95 Regional Settings supported settings
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Windows Regional Settings
Table O-114
Windows 95 Regional Settings supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Regional Settings Properties->Regional Settings
Regional Settings Properties->Number
Regional Settings Properties->Currency
Regional Settings Properties->Time->Appearance
Regional Settings Properties->Time
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Short date
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Long date
Keyboard Properties->Speed->Character repeat
Keyboard Properties->Speed
Keyboard Properties->Language
Windows 98 Regional Settings
Table O-115 describes the Windows 98 Regional Settings supported settings.
Table O-115
Windows 98 Regional Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Date/Time Properties->Date & Time
Regional Settings Properties->Regional Settings
Regional Settings Properties->Number
Regional Settings Properties->Currency
Regional Settings Properties->Time->Appearance
Regional Settings Properties->Time
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Short date
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Long date
Keyboard Properties->Speed->Character repeat
Keyboard Properties->Speed
Exceptions
685
686
User Migration supported applications
Windows Regional Settings
Table O-115
Windows 98 Regional Settings supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Keyboard Properties->Language
Windows NT Regional Settings
Table O-116 describes the Windows NT Regional Settings supported settings.
Table O-116
Windows NT Regional Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Date/Time Properties->Date & Time
Date/Time Properties->Time Zone
Regional Settings Properties->Regional Settings
Regional Settings Properties->Number
Regional Settings Properties->Currency
Regional Settings Properties->Time->Appearance
Regional Settings Properties->Time
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Short date
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Long date
Regional Settings Properties->Input Locales
Keyboard Properties->Speed->Character repeat
Keyboard Properties->Speed
Keyboard Properties->Language
Keyboard Properties->Input Locales
Windows 2000 Regional Settings
Table O-117 describes the Windows 2000 Regional Settings supported settings.
User Migration supported applications
Windows Regional Settings
Table O-117
Windows 2000 Regional Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Date/Time Properties->Date & Time
Date/Time Properties->Time Zone
Regional Settings Properties->Regional Settings
Regional Settings Properties->Language settings to the system
Regional Settings Properties->Language settings to the system -> Advanced
Regional Settings Properties->Numbers
Regional Settings Properties->Currency
Regional Settings Properties->Time->Appearance
Regional Settings Properties->Time
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Calendar
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Short date
Regional Settings Properties->Date->Long date
Regional Settings Properties->Input Locales
Keyboard Properties->Speed->Character repeat
Keyboard Properties->Speed
Keyboard Properties->Language
Keyboard Properties->Input Locales
Windows XP Regional Settings
Table O-118 describes the Windows XP Regional Settings supported settings.
Table O-118
Settings Location
Date and Time Properties->Date & Time
Date and Time Properties->Time Zone
Date and Time Properties->Internet Time
Windows XP Regional Settings supported settings
Exceptions
687
688
User Migration supported applications
Windows Regional Settings
Table O-118
Windows XP Regional Settings supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Regional and Language Options ->Regional Settings
Regional and Language Options->Language settings to the system
Regional and Language Options->Language settings to the system -> Advanced
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Numbers
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Currency
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Time
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Date->Calendar
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Date->Short date
Regional and Language Options->Customize->Date->Long date
Regional and Language Options->Languages->Text Services and Input Languages->Settings
Regional and Language Options->Languages->Text Services and Input
Languages->Settings->Preferences->Language Bar
Regional and Language Options->Languages->Text Services and Input Languages->Key
Settings
Regional and Language Options->Advanced
Regional and Language Options->Advanced->Default user account settings
Keyboard Properties->Speed->Character repeat
Keyboard Properties->Speed
Keyboard Properties->Input Locales
Windows Vista Regional Settings
Table O-119 describes the Windows Vista Regional Settings supported settings.
Table O-119
Windows Vista Regional Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Date and Time Properties->Date & Time
Date and Time Properties->Additional Clocks
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-119
Windows Vista Regional Settings supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Date and Time Properties->Internet Time -> Change Settings
Regional and Language Options -> Formats
Regional and Language Options->Formats -> Customize this Format -> Formats
Regional and Language Options->Formats -> Customize this Format -> Currency
Regional and Language Options->Formats -> Customize this Format -> Time
Time Separator setting not
supported.
Regional and Language Options->Formats -> Customize this Format -> Date
Regional and Language Options->Location
Regional and Language Options-> Keyboards and Languages -> Settings ->
General
Regional and Language Options-> Keyboards and Languages -> Settings ->
Language Bar
Regional and Language Options-> Keyboards and Languages -> Settings ->
Advanced Key Settings
Turn off advanced text services
setting not supported.
Regional and Language Options-> Keyboards and Languages -> Settings ->
Advanced Key Settings -> Change Key Sequence
Regional and Language Options-> Administrative->Change System Locale
Regional and Language Options-> Administrative->Reserved Account Settings…
Keyboard ->Speed
Keyboard Properties->Input Locales
Settings not supported
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows 95 Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows 98 Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows NT Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows 2000 Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows XP Sound and Multimedia Settings
689
690
User Migration supported applications
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
■
Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings
Windows 95 Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-120 describes the Windows 95 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported
settings.
Table O-120
Windows 95 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Playback
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Recording
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio
Multimedia Properties->Video
Multimedia Properties->MIDI->MIDI Output
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->CD Music->Volume settings
Settings not supported
Windows 98 Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-121 describes the Windows 98 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported
settings.
Table O-121
Windows 98 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Playback
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Recording
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio
Multimedia Properties->Video
Multimedia Properties->MIDI->MIDI Output
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->CD Music-> CD-ROM selection
Settings not supported
Windows NT Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-122 describes the Windows NT Sound and Multimedia Settings supported
settings.
User Migration supported applications
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-122
Windows NT Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Playback
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio->Recording
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->Audio
Multimedia Properties->Video -> Show Video in
Multimedia Properties->Video
Multimedia Properties->Video -> Advanced
Multimedia Properties->MIDI->MIDI Output
Settings not supported
Multimedia Properties->CD Music->Volume settings
Settings not supported
Windows 2000 Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-123 describes the Windows 2000 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported
settings.
Table O-123
Windows 2000 Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds->Sound Events
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds->Sound Volume
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->Sound Playback
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->Sound Recording
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->MIDI Music Playback
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio
Windows XP Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-124 describes the Windows XP Sound and Multimedia Settings supported
settings.
691
692
User Migration supported applications
Windows Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-124
Windows XP Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
SoundsAD Properties->Volume
SoundsAD Properties->Volume -> Advanced
SoundsAD Properties->Volume -> Speaker Settings
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds->Sound Events
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds->Sound Volume
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->Sound Playback
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->Sound Recording
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio->MIDI Music Playback
Settings not supported
SoundsMM Properties->Audio
Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings
Table O-125 describes the Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings
supported settings.
Table O-125
Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
Settings Location
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Volume Control> General
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Volume Control> Configuration
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Volume Control> Other
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Volume Control> Levels
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Volume Control> Options
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Microphone > General
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Microphone > Other
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Microphone > Levels
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Windows Taskbar and Start Menu
Table O-125
Windows Vista Sound and Multimedia Settings supported settings
(continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Line In > General
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Audio Devices> Line In > Levels
SoundsMM Properties->Sounds->Sound Volume
Audio Devices and Sound Themes> Sound Events
Windows Taskbar and Start Menu
Ghost User Migration supports the following versions:
■
Windows 95, 98, and NT Taskbar and Start Menu
■
Windows 2000 Taskbar and Start Menu
■
Windows XP Taskbar and Start Menu
Windows 95, 98, and NT Taskbar and Start Menu
Table O-126 describes the Windows 95, 98, and NT Taskbar and Start Menu
supported settings.
Table O-126
Windows 95, 98, and NT Taskbar and Start Menu supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Taskbar Properties->Taskbar Options
Settings not supported
Taskbar Properties->Start Menu Programs
Windows 2000 Taskbar and Start Menu
Table O-127 describes the Windows 2000 Taskbar and Start Menu supported
settings.
Table O-127
Windows 2000 Taskbar and Start Menu supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->General
Settings not supported
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Advanced->Start Menu Settings
693
694
User Migration supported applications
WinZip
Windows XP Taskbar and Start Menu
Table O-128 describes the Windows XP Taskbar and Start Menu supported settings.
Table O-128
Windows XP Taskbar and Start Menu supported settings
Settings Location
Exceptions
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Taskbar->Taskbar Appearance
Settings not supported
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Taskbar->Notification area
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Start Menu
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Start Menu>Start
menu->Customize->General->Select an icon size for program
Taskbar and Start Menu Properties->Start Menu>Classic Start
menu->Customize->Advanced Start menu options
WinZip
Ghost User Migration supports all versions of WinZip.
Table O-129 describes the WinZip supported settings.
Table O-129
WinZip supported settings
Settings Location
Options->Configuration->View->Columns
Options->Configuration->View->General
Options->Configuration->View->Mouse Selection
Options->Configuration->View->Mouse Selection->Single Click To Open File
Toolbar
Folders
Folders->Working Folders
Folders->Startup Folders
Folders->Extract Folder
Folders->Add Folder
Exceptions
User Migration supported applications
Yahoo Messenger
Table O-129
WinZip supported settings (continued)
Settings Location
Exceptions
System->General
System->Show Add Dialog When Dropping Files On
System->Explore Shell Extension->
System->Explore Shell Extension->Use Shell Extensions
System->Explore Shell Extension->Check For Self Extracting CAB Files
Miscellaneous->Start up
Miscellaneous->Other
Yahoo Messenger
Ghost User Migration supports the following version:
■
Yahoo Messenger 5.6
Table O-130 describes the Yahoo Messenger 5.6 supported settings.
Table O-130
Yahoo Messenger 5.6 supported settings
Settings Location
Login -> Preferences -> General
Login -> Preferences -> General->Misc
Login -> Preferences -> Content
Login -> Preferences -> Appearance->Main Messenger Window
Login -> Preferenc