XJet Internal Ethernet Print Servers For Hewlett

XJet Internal Ethernet Print Servers For Hewlett
___________________________
XJet Internal
Ethernet Print Servers
For Hewlett-Packard Printers
Administrator's Guide
September 8, 2001 Printed in U.S.A.
TROY Group, Inc.
2331 South Pullman St.
ISanta Ana, CA 92705-5571
TEL: (949) 250-3280
FAX: (949) 250-3283
http://www.troygroup.com
[email protected]
___________________________
Notice
TROY GROUP, INC. SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS OF THIS PRODUCT
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. TROY shall not be liable for any errors
contained in this manual or for any damages resulting from loss of use, data profits,
or any incidental or consequential damages arising from the use of TROY products
or services.
Warning
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against such interference when operating in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio
frequency energy, and if not installed and used in accordance with this guide, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause interference in
which case the user, at his or her own expense, will be required to take whatever
measures will be required to correct the interference.
Trademarks
HP, HP/UX, LaserJet, DesignJet, DeskJet, PaintJet, JetDirect, and JetAdmin are
trademarks of Hewlett-Packard Company. DEC, DECserver, VMS, LAT, and
ULTRIX are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. UNIX is a trademark of
UNIX Systems Laboratories. Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.
PostScript is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. NetWare is a trademark
of Novell, Inc. Apple, Macintosh, LaserWriter, and AppleTalk are trademarks of
Apple Computer, Inc. IBM, LAN Server, and AIX are trademarks of International
Business Machines Corporation. LAN Manager, Windows, and MS-DOS are
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. VINES is a trademark of Banyan Systems
Inc. PrintKit is a trademark of Northlake Software. QADD is a trademark of
Network Compatibility Group. LAN Attached and UNIX Printing for VINES is a
trademark of Incognito Software Inc. XJet, XMark, XConnect, and XAdmin are
trademarks of TROY Group, Inc.
© Copyright 1992-2000 TROY Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
___________________________
Table of Contents
1.
Introduction
Overview ......................................................................................... 1-1
2.
Installing the XJet Hardware
Overview ......................................................................................... 2-1
Before You Start.............................................................................. 2-1
Unpacking and Handling ................................................................. 2-1
XJet 3000 Installation ...................................................................... 2-3
XJet 2000 Installation ...................................................................... 2-4
XJet IV and XJet 100 Installation.................................................... 2-6
XJet III Installation ........................................................................ 2-11
Ethernet Installation....................................................................... 2-11
Connecting the XJet IV-Plus to a LocalTalk Network .................. 2-16
Using the XJet IV-Plus and XJet 100 Serial Port .......................... 2-17
Using the XJet 3000 Serial Port..................................................... 2-18
Verifying Successful Hardware Installation .................................. 2-21
Changing the Print Server Configuration ...................................... 2-23
3.
TROY Print Server Management Methods
Overview ......................................................................................... 3-1
TROY XAdmin32 and XAdmin...................................................... 3-1
TROY WebXAdmin........................................................................ 3-3
TROY Print Server Console ............................................................ 3-4
HP JetAdmin.................................................................................... 3-6
HP Web JetAdmin ........................................................................... 3-6
4.
TCP/IP Network Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 4-1
TROY TCP/IP Concepts.................................................................. 4-1
TCP/IP UNIX Host Configuration .................................................. 4-2
IP Security ..................................................................................... 4-17
Raw TCP Ports .............................................................................. 4-17
Changing the Configuration (Optional) ......................................... 4-19
5.
Novell Network Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 5-1
NetWare Concepts ........................................................................... 5-1
General Information......................................................................... 5-3
Default Service Names .................................................................... 5-3
Configuring the Print Server and Queue in Queue Server Mode..... 5-5
Configuring the Print Server and Queue Using NDPS .................. 5-15
Configuring the Print Server and Queue in Remote Printer Mode 5-16
Configuring the Workstation ........................................................ 5-22
Changing the Print Server Configuration ...................................... 5-24
6.
AppleTalk Network Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 6-1
XJet AppleTalk Concepts................................................................ 6-1
Step 1 Macintosh Configuration...................................................... 6-1
Step 2 Printing ................................................................................. 6-2
Changing the Configuration ............................................................ 6-2
7.
Windows NT Network and LAN Server Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 7-1
IP Configuration .............................................................................. 7-2
Windows 2000 Standard TCP/IP Printer Configuration.................. 7-3
Windows NT 4.xx/2000Configuration (NetBIOS/NetBEUI).......... 7-4
Windows NT 4.xx Configuration (LPR/LPD)................................. 7-5
Windows NT 3.5x Configuration .................................................... 7-6
IBM LAN Server Installation .......................................................... 7-7
8.
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 8-1
Configuring the Windows 95/98 PC................................................ 8-1
9.
Microsoft Networks Configuration
Overview ......................................................................................... 9-1
Print Server Configuration............................................................... 9-1
Windows 95/98 and Windows NT Port Monitor Installation .......... 9-2
LAN Server/Warp Server Configuration......................................... 9-4
10. DLC/LLC Configuration
Overview ....................................................................................... 10-1
Configuring DLC/LLC on Windows NT....................................... 10-1
Configuring DLC/LLC on Other Systems..................................... 10-3
11. LAT Network Configuration
Overview ....................................................................................... 11-1
XJet LAT Concepts ....................................................................... 11-1
VMS LAT Host Configuration...................................................... 11-1
Eliminating Blank Pages (Optional).............................................. 11-4
PATHWORKS for DOS Configuration ........................................ 11-4
PATHWORKS for Macintosh Configuration................................ 11-7
DECprint Supervisor Configuration Notes.................................... 11-7
Installation on Other Host Computers ........................................... 11-8
Changing the Configuration (Optional)......................................... 11-8
12. Banyan VINES Configuration (Optional)
Overview ....................................................................................... 12-1
File Server User Configuration...................................................... 12-1
File Server Queue Configuration................................................... 12-2
Print Server Configuration Using XAdmin ................................... 12-4
Print Server Configuration Using the Console .............................. 12-6
Testing the Print Queue ................................................................. 12-7
13. PrintraNet Remote Internet Printing
Overview ....................................................................................... 13-1
PrintraNet Concepts....................................................................... 13-1
Installing the Software on a Windows 95/98 PC ........................... 13-3
Configuring the Remote TROY Print Server................................. 13-7
Printing to the Remote TROY Print Server ................................. 13-10
Print Server Console Command Summary .................................. 13-11
14. JetSend Configuration................................................................. 14-1
15. IPP Configuration........................................................................ 15-1
16. Troubleshooting
Overview ....................................................................................... 16-1
Installation Problems (Printer Not Ready)..................................... 16-1
Installation Problems (Printer Ready)............................................ 16-2
Intermittent Problems .................................................................... 16-5
TCP/IP Troubleshooting................................................................ 16-6
NetWare Troubleshooting ............................................................. 16-9
AppleTalk and PATHWORKS for Mac Troubleshooting........... 16-10
Windows NT and LAN Server Troubleshooting ......................... 16-12
Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer Troubleshooting................................. 16-13
LAT Troubleshooting .................................................................. 16-14
Banyan VINES Troubleshooting ................................................. 16-17
17. Warranty and Service Information
Customer Support .......................................................................... 17-1
Whom to Call................................................................................. 17-1
Returning Products ........................................................................ 17-2
Advance Replacement and Extended Services .............................. 17-2
Warranty ........................................................................................ 17-2
A.
B.
C.
D.
XJet Command Summary ........................................................... A-1
Using Services (lpd-Plus) ..............................................................B-1
Reloading the XJet IV-Plus Firmware ........................................C-1
Glossary/Index ............................................................................. D-1
1
Introduction
Overview
The TROY XJet family of network interface cards allows multiple host
computers to share a Hewlett-Packard printer or plotter on an Ethernet
network (the XJet 3000 and XJet 100 also work on Fast Ethernet networks).
Any user can print jobs on the printer or plotter as if it were directly
connected to his computer. No special software is required on the host
computers, and application programs run without any modification.
Because the XJet provides multiprotocol capabilities, users on DEC, UNIX,
Novell, AppleTalk, LAN Server, Windows NT/2000, Windows 95/98, LAN
Manager, and Banyan VINES computers can simultaneously access the
same printer. With the optional XJet LocalTalk feature, non-Ethernet
Macintosh computers can also access the same printer. Figure 1-1 shows
how the XJet is used in a typical network.
Windows 95/98
PC
HP Printer with
TROY XCD
Print Server
NetWare LAN Manager
PC
PC
Warp Server Windows NT
PC
PC
UNIX Host
Banyan VINES
Apple
PC
Macintosh
DEC VAX
Figure 1-1
XJet Concept
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Introduction
1-1
Features
The XJet family offers the widest range of features in the industry,
including:
•
TCP/IP, IPX/SPX, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC, NetBEUI, LAT, and VINES
IP protocols (protocols supported depend on model)
•
Network Operating System compatibility:
-
Digital Equipment Corporation networks, including
PATHWORKS and DECprint Supervisor
UNIX systems that support either the Berkeley lpr/lpd printing
protocol, the HP JetDirect card, or printing to a raw TCP port
Novell NetWare V2.15 or above, V3.xx, or V4.xx, including
support for bindery mode and Novell Directory Services (NDS)*.
AppleTalk Phase 2
Windows 2000, NT and NTAS V3.5 or above
IBM OS/2, LAN Server, Warp Server
Windows 95/98 (Peer-to-Peer or client mode)
Windows for Workgroups (Peer-to-Peer or client mode; Peer-toPeer requires DLC/LLC support on print server)
Optional Banyan VINES and LAN Manager support
*The NDS support on the XJet III (all models), XJet IV-2, XJet
IV-T, plus certain models of the XJet IV-Plus is limited to
NPrinter mode only.
•
Very high performance
•
Superior network and printer management
-
XAdmin32 and XAdmin Windows-based management utilities
(NetWare, TCP/IP, and VINES)
Web XAdmin browser-based management
SNMP MIB I and MIB II over IP or IPX
Remote console management via DEC NCP, TELNET, NetWare,
or XJet IV-Plus serial port
Compatible with Hewlett-Packard JetAdmin and Web JetAdmin
printer management software
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1-2
Introduction
•
PrintraNet software for transparently sending documents to remote
locations over the Internet
•
JetSend protocol support (Pony 100 only)
•
Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) support (XJet 3000 only)
•
lpd-Plus feature for providing multiple services with custom setup and
reset strings plus text-to-PostScript conversion
•
Flash memory for easy updating of firmware via NetWare, BOOTP,
tftp (master or slave mode), DEC MOP, Banyan VINES, or serial port
(XJet IV-Plus, XJet 2000, XJet 3000, and XJet 100 only)
•
AppleTalk binary support
•
IP address configuration via DHCP, printer front panel, BOOTP, rarp,
arp, serial port, XAdmin, or remote console.
•
IP security to restrict printing based on IP address
•
Optional DEC LN03 emulation
•
Optional LocalTalk support (special order on XJet IV-Plus only)
•
Serial port for console terminal or second printer (XJet IV-Plus, XJet
3000, and XJet 100 only; XJet 100 serial port is limited to console
operation only).
XJet Models
The XJet is available in the following models:
•
XJet 3000. The XJet 3000 plugs into the Enhanced I/O slot (EIO) on
the LaserJet 4000 (all versions), 5000 (all versions), 8000 (all
versions), and future EIO-compatible printers and plotters. It includes
a 100baseTX/10baseT Ethernet connector plus a serial port. XJet 3000
models include:
XJet 3000-8S
XJet 3000-8N
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC, NetBEUI,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, http
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC, NetBEUI,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, VINES IP, http
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Introduction
1-3
•
XJet 2000. The XJet 2000 plugs into the Enhanced I/O slot (EIO) on
the LaserJet 4000 (all versions), 5000 (all versions), 8000 (all
versions), and future EIO-compatible printers and plotters. It includes
a 10baseT Ethernet connector. XJet 2000 models include:
XJet 2000-8S
XJet 2000-8N
•
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC, NetBEUI,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, http
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC, NetBEUI,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, VINES IP, http
XJet IV. The XJet IV plugs into the Modular I/O slot (MIO) on the
LaserJet IIISi, 4, 4M, 4 Plus, 4M Plus, 4V, 4MV, 4Si, 4Si MX, 5, 5M,
5N, 5Si, 5Si MX, Color LaserJet (all models), CopyJet/CopyJet M,
DesignJet (all models except 2xx, 3xx, and 4xx), DeskJet
1200C/1600C/1600CM, and PaintJet XL300. In addition, its MIO
compatibility means that it can be used in future HP printers that use
this interface standard. The XJet IV is available in the following
versions:
-
XJet IV-Plus (10baseT UTP and 10base2 thin Ethernet connectors
with serial port and optional LocalTalk). The XJet IV-Plus models
include:
XJet IV-Plus-8S
XJet IV-Plus-8
XJet IV-Plus-8N
XJet IV-Plus-8-LN03
IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC,
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, http
IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC,
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, http
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC,
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, VINES
IP, http
IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC.
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, http,
DEC LN03 emulation option
*XJet IV-Plus-8 and XJet IV-Plus-8-LN03 NDS support is limited to NPRINTER
remote printer mode only
-
XJet IV-2 (10base5 thick Ethernet and 10base2 thin Ethernet
connectors). XJet IV-2 models include:
XJet IV-2
XJet IV-2-LN03
IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, Direct Mode IPX/IP
XJet IV-2 with LN03 option
*XJet IV-2 and XJet IV-2-LN03 NDS support is limited to NPrinter remote printer
mode only
-
XJet IV-T (10baseT Ethernet connectors). XJet IV-T models
include:
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1-4
Introduction
XJet IV-T
XJet IV-T-LN03
IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, Direct Mode IPX/IP
XJet IV-2 with LN03 option
*XJet IV-T and XJet IV-T-LN03 NDS support is limited to NPrinter remote printer
mode only
•
XJet 100 is a 100baseTX and 10baseT print server that plugs into
MIO-compatible printers (see XJet IV-Plus section for a list of MIO
printers). It automatically detects 100baseTX or 10baseT operation
and provides a serial port for a console terminal. The XJet 100 models
include:
XJet 100-8S
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC,
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, http
XJet 100-8N
IPX/SPX, TCP/IP, AppleTalk, DLC/LLC,
NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT, VINES
IP, http
XJet 100-8J (NetSend) JetSend, TCP/IP, NetBEUI/NetBIOS IP, DLC/LLC, Direct
Mode IP, http
•
XJet III. The XJet III is compatible with the Expanded I/O (XIO) slot
on the LaserJet II, IID, III, or IIID. Versions include:
XJet III-T
XJet III-T-LN03
XJet III-2
XJet III-2-LN03
10baseT Ethernet with IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT,
XJet III-T with LN03 option
10base2 Ethernet with IPX/SPX*, TCP/IP, AppleTalk,
Direct Mode IPX/IP, LAT,
XJet III-2 with LN03 option
*XJet III (all models) NDS support is limited to NPRINTER remote printer
mode only
XJet Advantages
Compared to competing products, TROY print servers offer the following
advantages:
• Support for the most protocols and network operating systems in the
industry. This allows TROY print servers to be used on virtually any
network.
• Network management. TROY offers more ways to manage the print
server, including proprietary Windows and DOS-based utilities, Web
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Introduction
1-5
browser management, HP JetAdmin compatibility, and a powerful
remote console.
• High performance. The TROY print server family has the highest
overall throughput capabilities in the industry.
• More features. Capabilities like multiple services per port,
programmable setup/reset strings, IP security, and character substitution
allow TROY print servers to handle virtually any network printing
situation.
Terminology
The term "XJet" in this manual covers all models of the XJet III, XJet IV,
XJet 100, XJet 2000, and XJet 3000. The term "XJet III" is used to
represent either the XJet III-2 or XJet III-T, while the term "XJet IV"
designates either an XJet IV-Plus (all versions), an XJet IV-2, or an XJet
IV-T.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject
to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful
interference and (2) this device must accept any interference received,
including interference that may cause undesired operation.
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1-6
Introduction
2
Installing the Hardware
Overview
This chapter describes:
•
How to install the XJet Ethernet interface card into a Hewlett-Packard
printer or plotter.
•
How to connect the XJet to the Ethernet cable.
Before You Start
Before attempting to install the XJet, first make sure that you have
completed installing your printer or plotter as described in documentation
included with the device. If your printer is properly installed (the XJet card
should not be installed at this point), you should get a message on the
printer's front panel similar to one of the following:
READY
PCL READY
PS READY
READY TO PLOT
(LaserJet II/III/4/4V/4Si/5Si/
4000/5000/8000)
(LaserJet IIISi)
(LaserJet IIISi with
PostScript option)
(DesignJet)
The PaintJet XL300 and DeskJet 1200C do not have a front panel. When
the initialization process is complete (this will take 4 to 5 minutes with the
Paint Jet), only the Ready light and On Line lights will be lit.
Unpacking and Handling
The XJet shipping container contains the following items:
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-1
•
XJet Ethernet print server card (the exact model number is labeled on
the card)
•
XJet Internal Ethernet Print Servers for Hewlett-Packard Printers
Administrator's Manual
•
1284C miniature Centronics to standard Centronics cable (XJet 2000
models only)
•
TROY Print Server Software CD-ROM or 3.5" diskette
•
Optional XJ12V 12V voltage converter (a 3 x 4.5 cm printed circuit
board)* for XJet IV-2 models only.
*The XJ12V is an extra cost option that is required if you are using the
AUI port with the LaserJet 4, 4M, 4 Plus, 4M Plus, 4V, 4MV, 5Si,
DeskJet 1200C or 1600C, PaintJet XL300, Color LaserJet, the upper
(but not lower) slot of the LaserJet 4Si and 4Si MX, or any other
printer that does not supply +12V to the MIO interface. Refer to the
Installing the Ethernet Jumper Block and the Optional XJ12V Voltage
Converter section for more information.
The XJet is a printed circuit board that contains components that are very
susceptible to damage from static electricity. To avoid such damage, use
the following precautions when removing the card from its shipping
container and when handling it:
•
Leave the XJet in its anti-static bag until you are ready to install it.
•
Make sure that you are adequately grounded before touching the XJet.
Use an anti-static wrist strap and a grounding mat if possible. Touch
one of the bare metal surfaces on the back of the printer before
handling the XJet, and maintain contact with this surface while
working with the card.
•
Avoid moving around the work area in order to eliminate static charge
buildup.
•
If possible, do not work on a carpeted area.
•
Do not flex the card and do not touch the components on the card.
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2-2
Hardware Installation
Important: TURN THE PRINTER OR PLOTTER POWER OFF AND
UNPLUG THE POWER CORD BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL
THE XJET.
XJet 3000 Installation
Note: This section applies only to the XJet 3000 Ethernet print server for
EIO-based printers (HP LaserJet 4000, 5000, 8000, etc.). Skip this section
if you have an XJet 2000, XJet IV, XJet 100, or XJet III.
The XJet 3000 plugs into the I/O slot located on the rear of your printer or
plotter as shown in figure 2-1. The installation steps are as follows:
Figure 2-1
Installing the XJet 3000 Print Server
1.
Turn off the printer or plotter and unplug the power cord.
2.
If another I/O card is already installed in the I/O slot, loosen the two
thumbscrews and pull the card straight out. If no card is currently
installed, remove the faceplate by unscrewing the two retaining screws.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-3
Insert the XJet 3000 into the I/O slot and tighten down the two
thumbscrews as shown in figure 2-1.
Note: Some EIO printers have two slots. The XJet 3000 may be installed
in either slot.
You have now completed the hardware installation of the XJet 3000. You
may now skip to the Ethernet Installation section later in this manual.
XJet 2000 Installation
Note: This section applies only to the XJet 2000 Ethernet print server for
EIO-based printers (HP LaserJet 4000, 5000, 8000, etc.). Skip this section
if you have an XJet IV or XJet III.
Figure 2-2
Installing the XJet 2000 Print Server
The XJet 2000 plugs into the I/O slot located on the rear of your printer or
plotter as shown in figure 2-2. The installation steps are as follows:
1.
Turn off the printer or plotter and unplug the power cord.
_____________________________________________________________
2-4
Hardware Installation
2.
If another I/O card is already installed in the I/O slot, loosen the two
thumbscrews and pull the card straight out. If no card is currently
installed, remove the faceplate by unscrewing the two retaining screws.
3.
Insert the XJet 2000 into the I/O slot and tighten down the two
thumbscrews as shown in figure 2-2.
4.
Connect the cable from the XJet 2000 to the printer's parallel port as
shown in figure 2-3.
Important Note: If you have a LaserJet 8000 or other printer that
uses the IEEE 1284C miniature Centronics connector instead of a
standard 36-pin Centronics connector, you must order the optional
CABLE-C/C 1284C-to-1284C cable.
Figure 2-3
Installing the XJet 2000 Cable
Note: Some EIO printers have two slots. The XJet 2000 may be installed
in either slot.
You have now completed the hardware installation of the XJet 2000. You
may now skip to the Ethernet Installation section later in this manual.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-5
XJet IV and XJet 100 Installation
Note: This section applies only to the XJet IV and XJet 100 print servers
for MIO-based printers (HP LaserJet IIISi, LaserJet 4, 4M, 4 Plus, 4M
Plus, 4Si, 4Si MX, 4V, 4MV, 5, 5M, 5Si, 5Si MX, Color LaserJet, DesignJet,
DeskJet 1200C/1600C, PaintJet XL300, and similar printers). Skip this
section if you have an XJet 2000 or XJet III interface.
Caution: A special version of the XJet IV-Plus is required for operation in
the PaintJet XL300. Also, XJet IV-2 cards with a serial number lower than
381 will not work in the PaintJet XL300 unless special firmware is
installed. Contact TROY Technical Support if you are installing an XJet
IV-Plus or one of the early revision XJet IV-2 cards in a PaintJet
Setting the Switches (Optional; XJet IV-Plus Models Only)
If you have an XJet IV-Plus model (the version with one thin Ethernet
connector and one 10baseT unshielded twisted pair Ethernet connector),
then you may need to set the switches (refer to figure 2-4).
Sw4
Sw3
ON
Sw2
OFF
Sw1
XJetIV-Plus (Component Side)
Figure 2-4
Setting the XJet IV-Plus switches (not requred for XJet IV-2 or XJet IV-T; component
locations may vary tdepending on the revision level of the board)
There are 4 DIP switches near one edge of the XJet IV-Plus that are used
for power-up options (OFF=0, ON=1). To change the functionality of a
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2-6
Hardware Installation
switch, use a small screwdriver or pen to flip it to the opposite position.
The switches have the following purposes:
Switch 1 (Console/Serial)
This switch defines whether the Console/Serial port will be used for a
console terminal or for a serial printer. Leave switch 4 in the default OFF
position if you want to use the serial port for a console terminal.
Switches 2 and 3 (10baseT/10base2)
These switches do not need to be changed from the default ON position
with newer versions of the XJet IV-Plus firmware. However, if you are
using 10baseT Ethernet, putting the switches in the OFF position will
conserve energy by drawing less power from the printer.
Note: With V3.22 or earlier firmware (included with XJet IV-Plus cards
shipped from TROY prior to September, 1995), switches 2 and 3 must both
be in the OFF position for 10baseT operation or in the ON position for
10base2 operation.
A
(thin)
B
(AU I)
JP1
JP2
JP3
JP4
JP5
JP6
JP7
JP8
JP9
JP10
JP1
JP2
JP3
JP4
JP5
JP6
JP7
JP8
JP9
JP10
Figure 2-5
Setting the XJet IV-2 jumper block (not requred for XJet IV-Plus or XJet IV-T;
component locations may vary tdepending on the revision level of the board)
Switch 4 (Normal/Factory Default)
Setting this switch ON allows you to restore the XJet parameter settings to
their original factory settings. The next time the XJet is powered on, all
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Hardware Installation
2-7
parameters (for example, node name, serial port speed, etc.) will be returned
to the factory defaults. If you use this switch, don't forget to put it back to
the OFF position after the factory default settings have been restored.
Installing the Ethernet Jumper Block and the
Optional XJ12V Voltage Converter (XJet IV-2
Models Only)
If you have an XJet IV-2 model (the version with one thin Ethernet
connector and one standard Ethernet connector), then the first step in the
hardware installation process is to set the Ethernet jumper block for
operation on either thin Ethernet or on other types of Ethernet. This jumper
block is located in the middle front part of the card as shown in figure 2-4
(note that if you have the LN03 option, you will need to remove the
daughtercard in order to access this jumper).
To install the XJet IV-2 on a 10base2 thin Ethernet network using the BNC
connector, set the jumper block to the position shown in figure 2-5A (this is
the factory default).
If you are using the XJet IV-2 AUI connector with a LaserJet IIISi, 4Si, 4Si
MX (lower slot only), or DesignJet, set the jumper block to the position
shown in figure 2-5B.
XJ12V
jumper
posts
XJetIV-2 (Component Side)
Figure 2-6
Installing the XJ12V Voltage Converter on the XJet IV-2
_____________________________________________________________
2-8
Hardware Installation
If you are using the XJetIV-2 AUI connector with a LaserJet 4, 4M, 4 Plus,
4M Plus, 5Si, 5Si MX, Color LaserJet, DeskJet 1200C, PaintJet XL300, or
any other printer that does not supply 12V, first remove the jumper block.
Then install the optional XJ12V voltage converter on the jumper posts as
shown in figure 2-6.
Important Note: The XJ12V supplies a maximum of 200 mA of current,
so please make sure that the power requirement of your transceiver does
not exceed this limitation.
Plugging the XJet IV or XJet 100 Card (all models) into the Printer
The XJet IV and XJet 100 plug into the I/O slot located on the rear of your
printer or plotter as shown in figure 2-7. The installation steps are as
follows:
LaserJet IIISi
(rear view)
XJet IV
Figure 2-7
Installing the XJet IV (any model) in a LaserJet IIISi printer (installation into other
printers is similar)
1.
Turn off the printer or plotter and unplug the power cord.
2.
If another I/O card (such as the serial/parallel I/O interface card) is
already installed in the I/O slot, loosen the two thumbscrews and pull
the card straight out. If no card is currently installed, remove the
faceplate by unscrewing the two retaining screws.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-9
3.
Insert the XJet IV or XJet 100 firmly into the slot, and tighten the two
screws.
If you have a LaserJet 4Si, note that there are two I/O slots. The XJet
normally plugs into the lower slot. If it is necessary to use the upper
slot, you must order a special front panel (part numbers XJetIV-PlusFP for 10baseT/10base2 , XJetIV-2-FP for AUI/10base2), or XJetIV-TFP for 10baseT only). If you have a LaserJet 4Si MX, you must
remove one of the JetDirect cards in order to plug in the XJet. Note:
you may get the message 18 UPPER MIO if you install the XJet in the
lower slot of a 4Si MX and have an HP JetDirect card in the upper slot.
This should not impact operation of the XJet (the HP card must be
connected to the Ethernet to eliminate this message).
4.
TROY recommends that AUTOCONTINUE be enabled on the
LaserJet so that minor errors do not interrupt the operation of the
printer. Refer to your printer manual for instructions on enabling this
parameter.
You are now ready to connect your printer or plotter to the Ethernet. Skip
to the Ethernet Installation section below.
LaserJet III (rear view)
XJet III
Figure 2-8
Installing the XJet III in a LaserJet III printer (installation into other printers is similar)
_____________________________________________________________
2-10
Hardware Installation
XJet III Installation
Note: Skip this section if you have an XJet 2000 or XJet IV Ethernet print
server.
The XJet III plugs into the I/O slot in the rear of the LaserJet III, IIID, II, or
IID. The installation procedure is as follows
(see figure 2-8):
1.
Turn off the printer and unplug the power cord.
2.
Remove the 2.6 x 8 cm (1 x 3.1 inches) faceplate on the rear of the
printer by removing the two screws.
3.
Insert the XJet III firmly into the slot, and use the two screws from step
2 to secure it.
4.
Put the printer off line by pressing the On Line key (the light on the
key will go off). Hold down the Menu key on the LaserJet for about
five seconds to get the Configuration menu. Press the Menu key a few
times until the display shows either I/O=SERIAL* or
I/O=PARALLEL*. Press the + key until I/O=OPTIONAL appears,
and then press the Enter/Reset Menu Key. An "*" will then appear in
the display to indicate that the XJet III has been selected. Hold down
the On Line key again until the message 00 READY appears to put the
printer back on line (if you get the message 10 RESET TO SAVE, then
hold down the Continue/Reset key until the message 07 RESET
appears).
5.
TROY recommends that AUTOCONTINUE be enabled on the
LaserJet to prevent minor errors from disrupting operation. Refer to
your printer manual for information on enabling this parameter.
You are now ready to connect your printer to the Ethernet.
Ethernet Installation
The XJet IV-Plus comes with two built-in Ethernet ports, one RJ45 modular
jack port for 10baseT unshielded twisted pair Ethernet and one BNC port
for thin Ethernet. The XJet 100 comes with a single RJ45 port that can be
used with either 100baseTX or 10baseT. The XJet IV-2 comes with two
built-in Ethernet ports, one AUI port for standard Ethernet (the 15-pin Dshaped connector) and one BNC port for thin Ethernet. The standard
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-11
Ethernet port can also be used in conjunction with an adapter for connecting
the XJet to other types of Ethernet (e.g., 10baseF fiber optics). The XJet
III-2 has a single BNC port for thin Ethernet, while the XJet 2000, XJet IVT and the XJet III-T each have one 10baseT unshielded twisted pair
connector (RJ45).
Connecting the XJet 3000, XJet 2000, XJet IV-Plus, XJet 100, XJet IVT or XJet III-T to an Unshielded Twisted Pair Ethernet network
To connect the XJet 3000, XJet 2000, XJet IV-Plus, XJet 100, XJet IV-T or
XJet III-T to a 10baseT unshielded twisted pair (UTP) Ethernet or (for the
XJet 100 only) a 100baseTX UTP Fast Ethernet, you will need an RJ45
cable (similar to the modular jack cable used with telephones, but with a
slightly larger connector). You should already have an unshielded twisted
pair Ethernet hub with at least one unused port installed on your network.
The installation procedure is as follows (see figure 2-9):
RJ45
cable
to 10baseT hub
Figure 2-9
Connecting the XJet III-T to an Unshielded Twisted Pair network (procedure is similar
for XJet 100, XJet IV-Plus, or XJet IV-T)
1.
Connect one end of the RJ45 cable to the connector on the faceplate of
the XJet 3000, XJet 2000, XJet IV-Plus, XJet 100, XJet IV-T, or XJet
III-T and the other end to a port on the twisted pair Ethernet hub.
_____________________________________________________________
2-12
Hardware Installation
Important: On the XJet IV-Plus and XJet 100, make sure that you plug the
cable into the connector marked "10baseT", not the one marked "Serial".
Note: The XJet 3000 and XJet 100 will automatically detect if they are
connected to a 10baseT or 100baseTX network.
Important: Make sure that SQE (heartbeat) is disabled on the hub port, or
the XJet may not operate properly.
You have now completed the unshielded twisted pair Ethernet installation.
Proceed to the Verifying Successful Hardware Installation section below to
confirm that you have properly installed the XJet.
Connecting the XJet IV-Plus, XJet IV-2, or XJet III-2 to a Thin
Ethernet Network
To use the XJet IV-Plus, XJet IV-2, or XJet III-2 on a thin Ethernet
network, you will need to connect the BNC port (the cylindrical connector)
on the card to a BNC "T" connector. If you are installing the card on an
existing network, this "T" connector may already be installed on the cable.
A
Thin
Ethernet
Cable
"T"
Thin
Ethernet
Cable
B
50 ohm
terminator
"T"
Printer
XJet IV
Thin
Ethernet
Cable
H1000
Figure 2-10
Connecting the XJet IV-Plus or XJet IV-2 to a thin Ethernet network (procedure is
similar for XJet III-2)
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-13
If this is the case, simply connect the "T" connector to the XJet BNC
connector as shown in figure 2-10A (if the connection is in the middle of
the thin Ethernet segment) or 2-10B (if the connection is at the end of the
thin Ethernet segment). This operation can be performed without impacting
the operation of the network.
If the "T" connector is not already installed, proceed as follows (caution: if
you are connecting to a live network, perform the following steps as quickly
as possible to minimize the disruption of the network):
1.
Connect one section of the thin Ethernet cable to one end of the "T"
connector as shown in figure 2-10.
2.
If you are connecting the XJet card in the middle of a thin Ethernet
segment, attach the second section of thin Ethernet cable to the other
end of the "T" connector as shown in figure 2-10A. If you are
connecting the XJet at the end of a thin Ethernet segment, attach a 50
ohm terminator to the other end of the "T" connector as shown in 210B.
3.
Connect the "T" connector to the BNC connector on the XJet front
panel.
You have now completed the thin Ethernet installation. Skip to the
Verifying Successful Hardware Installation section below to confirm that
you have correctly installed the XJet.
Connecting the XJet IV-2 to a Standard (Thick)
Ethernet Network
To connect the XJet IV-2 to a standard (thick) Ethernet network, you will
need an Ethernet transceiver or multiport transceiver and (if required) a 15pin male-to-female Ethernet AUI cable.
Important Note: The LaserJet III, 4Si (lower slot only), DesignJet,
DesignJet 600, and DesignJet 750C are the only printers that supply the
+12V required to power an external transceiver. If you are using the XJet
IV-2 AUI port with any other printer, you must use a self-powered
transceiver (such as the DEC DELNI multiport transceiver) or use the
XJ12V voltage converter described earlier in this chapter (note that the
XJ12V only supports transceivers that draw 200mA or less current).
_____________________________________________________________
2-14
Hardware Installation
1.
First install the transceiver or multiport transceiver onto the Ethernet
cable following the instructions provided with the device (the
transceiver heartbeat is ignored by the XJet IV-2).
2.
Make sure that the retainer clip on the AUI port (the D-shaped
connector) is positioned to the right (towards the thin Ethernet BNC
connector).
A
AUI cable
B
LaserJet IIISi
XJet IV-2
External
transceiver
H1000
Figure 2-11
Connecting the XJet IV-2 AUI port to a standard (thick) Ethernet network
3.
If you are using an AUI cable, connect the male end of the cable to the
AUI port on the XJet IV-2 as shown in figure 2-11A and slide the clip
to the left to lock the cable in place. Then connect the other end of the
cable to the transceiver or multiport transceiver. If you are using an
external transceiver that does not require an AUI cable, then simply
plug the transceiver into the XJet's AUI port as shown in figure 2-11B
and slide the clip to the left to secure it.
You have now completed the standard Ethernet installation. Skip to the
Verifying Successful Hardware Installation section below to confirm that
you have correctly installed the XJet IV.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-15
Connecting the XJet IV-Plus to a LocalTalk Network (Optional)
You can connect the XJet IV-Plus with the LocalTalk option to an Apple
LocalTalk network to allow Macintosh computers on the LocalTalk
network to print jobs on a printer attached to the XJet. Both the LocalTalk
and Ethernet ports can be used simultaneously. To use the LocalTalk
feature:
1.
Make sure that your LocalTalk network is operating properly before
connecting the XJet IV-Plus.
2.
Plug a LocalTalk-compatible connector (such as the Apple LocalTalk
connector or the Farallon PhoneNet connector) into the XJet LocalTalk
port as shown in figure 2-12.
Note: This port can only be used for printing from computers on the
LocalTalk to printers connected via the XJet; it cannot be used to allow
computers on the Ethernet to send jobs to printers connected to the
LocalTalk network.
Note: LocalTalk is enabled by default if you have the LocalTalk option. If
you are not using LocalTalk, you should turn it off for improved
performance on the Ethernet by using the SET LOCALTALK DISABLED
command as described in Appendix B of this manual.
Ethernet
Printer with XJet IV-Plus
LocalTalk
Connector
LocalTalk
Connector
LocalTalk
Connector
Macintosh Computers
Figure 2-12
Connecting the XJet IV-Plus to a LocalTalk network
_____________________________________________________________
2-16
Hardware Installation
Using the XJet IV-Plus and XJet 100 Serial Port
The XJet IV-Plus and XJet 100 have an RJ45 connector for connecting an
RS-232-compatible serial console terminal for configuration and
diagnostics. The XJet IV-Plus also allows this port to be used for
connecting a serial printer. This connector is marked "Serial"; do not
confuse it with the 10baseT or 100baseTX unshielded twisted pair
connector, which is also an RJ45.
Most terminals and printers use a DB25 connector for the serial connection.
Unfortunately, there are a number of variations as to how this connector is
implemented on different printers. For example, some printers have male
connectors configured as a DTE (Receive Data on pin 3), while others have
DCE female connectors (Receive Data on pin 2). Hewlett-Packard,
Lexmark, and Apple printers generally have female DTE connectors. You
must consult the manual for your terminal or printer in order to determine
what type of adapter cable you need. TROY sells a variety of adapters for
connecting serial devices to the RJ45 connector.
Basically, the cable must connect input signals (e.g., Receive Data) on the
XJet IV-Plus to the equivalent output signals (e.g., Transmit Data) on the
device and vice-versa.
12345678
RJ45
pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Print Server
RJ45 Signal
RTS out*
DTR out*
Transmit Data
Transmit return
Receive Return
Receive Data
DSR in*
CTS in*
Printer/Terminal DTE DCE
DB25 signal
pin
pin
CTS in
5
4
DSR in
6
20
Receive Data
3
2
Signal Ground
7
7
Signal Ground
7
7
Transmit Data
2
3
DTR out
20
6
RTS out
4
5
The serial port pinout is shown above. The XJet 100 serial port is restricted
to 9600bps, 8-bit data, no parity, and XON/XOFF flow control. The XJet
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-17
IV-Plus serial port is factory set at 9600bps, 8-bit data, XON/XOFF flow
control, and no parity. This settings can be changed using WebXAdmin or
the print server console as described in the Changing the Serial Port
Settings section below.
Using the XJet 3000 Serial Port
The XJet 3000 has a DB9 female connector that has identical pinouts as the serial
port found on many HP LaserJet printers. The two most common cables are
shown in the tables below. If you are connecting to a computer other than a PC,
check the computer's documentation for cabling information.
Basically, the cable must connect input signals (e.g., Receive Data)
on the XJet 3000 to the equivalent output signals (e.g., Transmit
Data) on the device and vice-versa.
Important Note: The serial port settings on your computer must
exactly match the settings of the XJet 3000.
5 4 3 2
1
9 8 7 6
DB9
pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Print Server/Printer
DB9 Signal
No connection
Transmit data
Receive data
DSR in
Ground
DTR out
No connection
DTR out
No connection
Computer
DB25 Signal
No connection
Receive data
Transmit data
DTR out
Ground
DSR in
No connection
CTS in
No connection
DB25
pin
N/C
3
2
20
7
6
5
-
Changing the Serial Port Settings
If you are connecting a printer to the XJet IV-Plus that requires different
settings, you must use the console terminal (refer to Appendix A for
_____________________________________________________________
2-18
Hardware Installation
information on how to use the console) to change the settings with one or
more of the following commands (note that a console terminal connected to
the XJet 3000, XJet IV-Plus or XJet 100 must always operate at 9600bps,8bits, and no parity):
DEFINE PORT S1 SPEED baudrate
DEFINE PORT S1 PARITY parity_type
DEFINE PORT S1 FLOW flowctrl
DEFINE PORT S1 CHARACTER charsize
Don't forget to set your serial port settings on your terminal or printer to
match the settings of the XJetIV-Plus. Also, make sure that switch 1
(console/serial printer) is in the proper position (OFF if you are using the
serial port for a console terminal or ON if you are using it to connect a
printer. Refer to Appendix A for information on using the XJet console.
Setting the XJet 3000 Serial Port Parameters Using the Switches
The XJet 3000 is different from other TROY products in that this connector
can be used for serial input applications. That is, the XJet 3000 basically
adds a serial port to the printer, which allows the printer to be connected
serially instead of through the parallel port. The serial port baud rate, flow
control, parity may be set from either the front panel of the printer (if the
printer has a front panel) or by using the DIP switches on the board. If you
plan to use the front panel for configuration, skip this section, install the
board in the printer, and then refer the Setting the XJet 3000 Serial Port
Parameters Using the Front Panel section.
Note: By default all switches are set in the OFF position.
There are 8 DIP switches near one edge of the XJet 3000 printed circuit
board that are used for serial port options. To change the functionality of a
switch, use a small screwdriver or pen to flip it to the opposite position
(depress the switch in the desired direction). The factory default settings
are 9600 bps, no parity, 8 bits, and 1 stop bit with Robust XON/XOFF and
DTR active high
The switches have the following purposes (1=ON and 0=OFF):
SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
Speed
Use front panel settings
300
1200
2400
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-19
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
9600
19200
38400
57600
115200
All other settings are reserved (see below)
SW5 SW6
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
Flow Control Pacing
Robust XON/XOFF
XON/XOFF
Hardware DTR/DSR
Hardware RTS/CTS
SW7
0
1
DTR polarity
DTR high when printer is "ready"
DTR low when printer is "ready"
SW8
0
1
Operational Mode
Normal operation
Factory defaults
Important: Parity, character size, and stop bits cannot be set using the
switches (these parameters also cannot be set on a standard LaserJet serial
port). These parameters have a factory default settings of 8 bit character
size, no parity, and 1 stop bit . If you need to change these parameters, you
must use the printer front panel.
SW1 SW2 SW3 SW4
1
1
1
1
Special Functions
Use DB9 serial port as
console port for diagnostic
purposes (115.2Kbps, no
parity, 8 bits, 1 stop bit)
Note: The XJet 3000 serial port can also be enabled or disabled for
console port operation by using the console command SET PORT S1
CONSOLE ENABLED|DISABLED command. Refer to Chapter 3 for
information on how to use the console.
Setting the XJet 3000 Serial Port Parameters Using the Front Panel
The XJet 3000 serial port parameters may also be set from the front panel
of the printer (certain printers, such as the LaserJet 2100, do not have a
front panel). To use the front panel to configure the serial port, press the
_____________________________________________________________
2-20
Hardware Installation
Menu key until you get to the SERIAL MENU (SERIAL MENU 2 if two
2Port boards are installed). Press the Item key to select the parameter you
wish to configure (for example, baud rate) and press + or - to scroll between
the available values for the parameter. When the desired value appears,
press the Select key. Press Item again to select the next parameter, and
continue the process until you have configured all the desired parameters.
Important Note: Using the front panel will override the switch settings,
and vice-versa. For example, if you set the baud rate to 38400 with the
switches and later set it to 9600 through the front panel, the baud rate will
be 9600. If you then change the switches to 19200, the baud rate will be
19200.
Verifying Successful Installation
After you have finished connecting the XJet to the Ethernet as described
above, plug in the printer or plotter and turn it on. After the appropriate
warm-up period, you should get the normal printer ready status message
displayed in the LCD (READY for the LaserJet II, III, or any of the
LaserJet 4, 5, 4000, 5000, or 8000 Series; PCL READY or PS READY for
the LaserJet IIISi; or READY TO PLOT for the DesignJet). In the case of
the PaintJet XL300 and DeskJet 1200C (which have no LCD), the Ready
and On Line lights should be lit.
Important note: If the XJet is not connected to the Ethernet, you may get
an error message on the printer.
Printing the Self Test Page (XJet IV and XJet 100 models only)
For final verification of the installation of the XJet IV (any model), you
need to print the self test page. In the case of the LaserJet IIISi, you do this
by putting the printer off-line, holding down the Print Fonts/Test key until
the message 05 SELF TEST appears, and then releasing the button. On the
LaserJet 4, 4M, 4M Plus, 4V, 4MV, 4Si, 4Si MX, and Color LaserJet, you
press the Menu key several times until Test Menu appears, then press the
Item key to select the Self Test entry, and press the Enter key to start the
test. On the DeskJet 1200C, you press both the Shift key and the Test key
simultaneously, while on the DeskJet 1600C, you press the large blue
button on the right side of the printer. On the PaintJet XL300, you simply
press the Test key. The DesignJet requires you to press the Enter key and
use the arrow buttons to scroll to the Utilities menu; you then press Enter
again, scroll to the Configuration Plot entry, and press Enter to print the
self test page.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-21
Look at the MIO CONFIGURATION section of the printout. If you do not
see this section, or if you get a message like MIO NOT INSTALLED OR
NOT FUNCTIONING CORRECTLY, then you have either installed the
XJet improperly or you have a defective card. Try reinstalling the XJet
making sure that the card is securely seated in the slot; if this does not fix
the problem, then refer to the Troubleshooting chapter in this manual for
additional hints.
Note that the format of the self-test page differs among printers, but the
MIO CONFIGURATION sections are identical.
Save this printout for future reference, because it contains important
information you will need for the network configuration.
Printing the Self Test Page (XJet 3000 and XJet 2000 models)
For final verification of the installation of the XJet 3000 and XJet 2000, you
need to print the self test page. To do this press and then release the small
button on the front panel of the print server. A test page will appear. If the
test page does not appear, try reinstalling the XJet making sure that the card
is securely seated in the slot. If this does not fix the problem, then refer to
the Troubleshooting chapter in this manual for additional hints.
Save the test page printout for future reference, because it contains
important information you will need for the network configuration.
Verifying the Ethernet Connection
To verify the Ethernet connection with the XJet IV-Plus, XJet 100, XJet IV2, XJet IV-T, or XJet 2000, you may check the self-test page, which should
show Ethernet packets being transmitted and received. With the XJet IVPlus, XJet 100, XJet 3000, or XJet 2000, you may also observe the LEDs:
•
The XJet IV-Plus R and X LEDs will be on solid with a valid 10baseT
connection, while the L LED will blink with either a valid 10baseT or
10base2 connection. The T LED must not be on.
• The XJet 100 L LED will be on solid, and the F LED will also be on if
you are connected to a 100baseTX network. The T LED must not be
on.
•
The XJet 2000 LED will blink randomly if there is a valid connection).
•
The XJet 3000 LED will come on solid if there is a valid connection).
_____________________________________________________________
2-22
Hardware Installation
The XJet III does not have self-test or LEDs, so you must print a small job
across the network to verify the connection.
Changing the Print Server Configuration (Optional)
The XJet configuration can be modified in a number of ways to provide the
maximum possible user flexibility. The procedure and commands for
changing the configuration are described in Appendix A.
_____________________________________________________________
Hardware Installation
2-23
_____________________________________________________________
2-24
Hardware Installation
3
Management Methods
Overview
TROY offers a wide variety of ways to configure and monitor the print
server. These methods include:
• TROY XAdmin Windows-based utility
• TROY WebXAdmin Web-browser utility
• TROY print server console
• HP JetAdmin Windows-based utility
• HP Web JetAdmin Web-browser utility
This chapter discusses the installation and the basic usage of these utilities.
Refer to the various chapters of this manual for specific details on
configuring the print server.
TROY XAdmin
TROY offers two graphical utilities for configuration and management of
TROY print servers:
• XAdmin32. This 32-bit version works on either Windows NT 4.xx or
Windows 95/98 using the TCP/IP or IPX/SPX protocols. To take full
advantage of the capabilities of XAdmin32, you should use the Novell
32-bit client software on the PC workstation that is used for configuring
the print queues.
• XAdmin. This 16-bit version works on Windows 3.1 and Windows 95
for NetWare and Banyan VINES.
To install XAdmin32 or XAdmin, insert the appropriate diskette or CDROM in the computer. The menu of options will automatically appear if
you are using the CD-ROM. If you are installing from diskette or a
download, select Run from the Windows menu, select Browse, choose the
appropriate drive, and double click on Setup.exe and then click OK.
Note: XAdmin32 and other TROY utilities are available on the TROY web
site (http://www.troyxcd.com) if you did not receive them on disk.
_____________________________________________________________
Management
3-1
1.
Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation.
2.
Double click on the XAdmin icon or use the Windows 95/NT 4.x
Start button to select XAdmin in the XCD folder in the list of
Programs.
3.
A list of configured print servers will appear. If you are running
XAdmin or if you are running NetWare with XAdmin32, skip to step
4. If you are running TCP/IP, then you must enter an IP address into
the print server as follows (refer to Chapters 4 or 7 for alternate
methods for configuring the IP address):
-
Make sure that your computer is configured for TCP/IP with a
valid IP address configured for LAN operation (not PPP dial-up;
refer to your system documentation for additional information).
Important Note: Consult your system manager before assigning
IP addresses to your computer or to the print server in order to
avoid duplications. If your network does not have an officially
assigned block of IP addresses, you may use any unique address
between 192.168.254.1 and 192.168.254.254 (this is a reserved
range of Class C addresses for private networks that are not
connected to the Internet per RFC 1918; note that you must also
assign the print server an IP address in this range). You may also
use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 with no gateway address. If
you have more than one LAN adapter card, select the one you
want to use for TCP/IP.
-
Click on the TCP/IP folder icon under Filter on the left side of
the XAdmin screen.
-
Click on the Search button (the leftmost button) or select Devices
and then Search Active Devices from the menu bar.
-
If you have a DHCP, BOOTP, or rarp server (or if the print server
already has an IP address from some other source), the print
server should appear in the list of configured print servers. If this
is the case, skip to step 4.
-
If the print server does not have an IP address, then click on the
Setup Unconfigured Devices button (the third from the left) or
select Devices and then Setup Unconfigured Devices from the
menu bar. This will display the unconfigured print servers listed
_____________________________________________________________
3-2
Management
by their Ethernet address (MAC Address). Double click on the
desired print server to configure it.
4.
-
Enter the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway and click OK.
-
The list of unconfigured print servers will again be displayed.
Click on Close to return to the main screen.
-
The print server should show up on the main XAdmin32 screen
(the default name will be XCD_xxxxxx, where "xxxxxx" is the
last six digits of the Ethernet address). If the print server does not
appear on the main screen, click on the Search button to find new
print servers.
To configure a print server, double click on its name and enter the
password (ACCESS is the default password). A series of "index
cards" will be displayed. Each of these "cards" represents a protocol
or other configurable item. Click on the appropriate tab to configure
the item.
TROY WebXAdmin
WebXAdmin allows the user to configure the print server with a standard
web browser like Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer. It can
therefore be used on any operating system that supports web browser
capabilities. To use WebXAdmin, you must first make sure that you have
a web browser installed on your computer and that you have configured an
IP address in both the computer and the print server (refer to the previous
XAdmin section if you do not know how to put an IP address in the print
server). Also make sure that you have configured your TCP/IP stack to
communicate over the local area network (rather than via a PPP dial-up
connection).
To use WebXAdmin, start your web browser and enter the IP address of the
print server as the destination web site. Once you are connected, enter the
password (ACCESS is the default password) and select the protocol or
other item that you wish to configure. You will then be connected to the
appropriate web page for configuration of that item. You may use the
normal browser buttons to move forward and back through the web pages.
_____________________________________________________________
Management
3-3
TROY Print Server Console
All TROY print servers support a sophisticated command-line oriented
console for configuration and management. This console contains features
that are not available through XAdmin or WebXAdmin, including
sophisticated diagnostic capabilities. The TROY print server console can
be accessed via TELNET, DEC NCP/NCL/ccr, the print server serial port
(if present), and the TROY XCONFIG NetWare utility. It also available
through one of the web pages using the WebXAdmin facility.
The general configuration procedure is the same regardless of which
method is used.
DEC NCP, NCL, ccr. To connect to the print server console with the VMS
NCP utility, use the following commands:
MCR NCP
CONNECT VIA circuit PHY ADD ethernetaddress
where circuit is the circuit-ID of the VAX or Alpha (for example, SVA-0
for most DEC workstations, MNA-0 for XMI systems, BNA-0 for BI
systems, and QNA-0 for Q-BUS systems) and ethernetaddress is the
hardware address of the print server (for example, 00-40-17-00-61-35).
The VMS SHOW KNOWN CIRCUITS command will list the circuit ID.
Newer OpenVMS systems use NCL instead of NCP. The NCL command
to connect to the print server console is:
SET HOST/MOP/CIRCUIT=circuit/ADD=ethernetaddress
ULTRIX systems use the addnode and ccr commands as follows:
addnode xcdname -c circuit -h ethernetaddress
ccr xcdname
where xcdname is an arbitrary name for the print server (each print server
on the network needs a unique name).
In all cases, you will get a message like Console Connected or Remote
Console Reserved when you are connected. When you are connected, push
RETURN or ENTER to get the "#" prompt, enter the password ACCESS (it
will not print), and type anything in response to the Enter Username>
prompt. When you get the Local> prompt, you are ready to enter
commands.
_____________________________________________________________
3-4
Management
Note: The commands available are generally a subset of the ones used on
the DECserver terminal server. Note that unlike the DECserver, there is no
distinction between the SET and DEFINE commands or between the
CLEAR and PURGE commands. Instead, when you type CTRL-D to exit
the remote console, any of these commands take effect immediately and the
results are stored permanently (for example, it is not necessary to enter both
a SET and a DEFINE to execute a command and save the results).
TELNET. To connect to the print server using TELNET on UNIX,
Windows NT, or most other TCP/IP systems, type:
TELNET ipaddress
at the UNIX system prompt, where ipaddress is the IP address of the print
server. When you are connected, push RETURN or ENTER to get the "#"
prompt, enter the password ACCESS (it will not print), and type anything
in response to the Enter Username> prompt. When you get the Local>
prompt, you are ready to enter commands.
XCONFIG. To connect to the print server using the TROY XCONFIG
NetWare utility, insert the TROY Print Server Software diskette in Drive A
and type:
A:XCONFIG
at the DOS system prompt (or choose the appropriate path if you are
running XCONFIG from your CD-ROM or hard drive). If you have only
one print server, you will be immediately connected. If you have more than
one print server, you will be given a list of available print servers. Type the
number of the print server to which you want to connect. When you are
connected, enter the password ACCESS (it will not print) at the "#" prompt,
and type anything in response to the Enter Username> prompt. When
you get the Local> prompt, you are ready to enter commands.
Serial Port. To connect to the print server using the serial port, refer to
Chapter 2 for details on how to use this port. Once you have established a
connection, press RETURN or ENTER to get the Local> prompt (no
password is required). You are now ready to enter commands.
Use the Windows Run command to expand the downloaded file. Then use
the Run command again to execute the SETUP.EXE file in the destination
directory that you selected (this file is generally in the DISK1 subdirectory)
_____________________________________________________________
Management
3-5
and begin the installation. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete
the installation.
HP JetAdmin
TROY print servers work transparently with the HP JetAdmin utility. You
can download JetAdmin from the HP web site (http://www.hp.com). Use
the Windows Run command to expand the downloaded file. Then use the
Run command again to execute the SETUP.EXE file in the destination
directory that you selected (this file is generally in the DISK1 subdirectory)
and begin the installation. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete
the installation.
Important: Windows 98 requires either JetAdmin V2.54 (this version can
be installed from the Microsoft Windows 98 CD by running the
SETUP.EXE file in the DRIVERS/PRINTERS/JETADMIN/DISK1/
directory) or V3.30 or later (available on the HP web site).
The TROY print server will appear in the list of configured print servers
unless IPX is not running on the computer and the print server is not
configured with a valid IP address. If this is the case, then select Device
from the menu bar and click on New. Select the desired print server from
the list of unconfigured devices and then press Configure. Enter the
requested information, including the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway.
Then click Close to return to the list of configured print servers.
You may now select the print server from the list and click on the Modify
button (or select Device and then Modify from the menu bar) to change the
print server configuration.
HP Web JetAdmin
TROY print servers work transparently with the HP Web JetAdmin utility
for Windows NT Advanced Server. You can download this program at no
charge from the HP web site (http://www.hp.com). Use the Windows NT
Run command to expand the downloaded file. The files will be expanded
and the installation program will be automatically run. Follow the
instructions on the screen to complete the installation.
After you have completed the installation, you may use a web browser on
any computer that has access to the Windows NT server to access the
TROY print server. Start the browser and connect to the file server. Once
_____________________________________________________________
3-6
Management
you are connected and are at Web JetAdmin home page, click on the Find
Device tab. Then click on Find All Devices to get a list of all Web
JetAdmin-compatible print servers (or you may limit your search by using
the Advanced Search method). Click on the desired TROY print server
name, and the Properties page will be displayed for that print server. Then
click on the Config tab to configure the print server.
_____________________________________________________________
Management
3-7
_____________________________________________________________
3-8
Management
4
UNIX and other TCP/IP Systems
Network Configuration
Overview
TROY print servers include the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol suite. Since virtually all UNIX host computers
support TCP/IP, this capability allows a printer to be shared on a UNIX
Ethernet network. TCP/IP communications can proceed concurrently with
other protocols, which means that UNIX, DEC, NetWare, Apple, and other
computers can share the same printer over an Ethernet network using the
TROY print server.
Note: Windows NT and OS/2 TCP/IP configuration is covered in Chapter
7, while Windows 95/98 TCP/IP configuration is covered in Chapter 9.
TROY TCP/IP Concepts
A TROY print server with TCP/IP appears to the network as a UNIX host
computer with a unique IP address running the lpd line printer daemon
protocol. As a result, any host computer that supports the Berkeley remoteLPR command can spool jobs to the TROY print server without the need
for any special software on the host computer. Application programs run
transparently and users do not need to learn new procedures in order to use
the printer. TROY print servers also support gateways for communications
with hosts on remote networks. In addition, raw TCP ports are available for
special applications and compatibility with the HP JetDirect print server.
TROY print servers come preconfigured to run on a TCP/IP network with a
minimum of setup. The only mandatory configuration in the print server is
the entering of an IP address (TROY print servers come with a default IP
address of 192.0.0.192 (192.189.207.254 on some models) but this should be
changed to meet the addressing requirements of your network).
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-1
TCP/IP UNIX Host Configuration
The configuration process for most UNIX systems is described in the
following steps. Unfortunately, this process is not very standardized, so
refer to your system documentation (or man pages) for additional
information.
1.
Configure the /etc/hosts file (or equivalent local host table) on each
UNIX host that needs to communicate with the TROY print server,
or provide similar information to a name server on the network. Use
your favorite editor to add an entry to the /etc/hosts file containing
the IP address and node name of the TROY print server. For
example:
192.189.207.3
XCD_00C351
The actual format of the entry may vary depending on your system,
so check your system documentation and also note the format of
other entries in the etc/hosts file.
Note: The node name in this file does not necessarily need to be the
same as the one that is actually configured into the TROY print
server (the name that appears on the printer self-test), but it is good
practice to make the names the same (however, some operating
systems, such as HP/UX, do not accept the "_" character in the
default name, so for these systems you must use a different name).
In any case, the node name in the /etc/hosts file must match the node
name in the /etc/printcap file.
Note: Some systems, such as HP/UX and AIX allow you to enter the
IP address as the host name when setting up the print queue. If this
is the case, you do not need to configure the hosts file.
2.
Choose which TROY print server service you want to use. There are
two types of services available on the TROY print server. Binary
services pass data through unmodified and are therefore required for
PCL or PostScript rasterized graphics printouts. Text services add a
carriage return at the end of each line for proper formatting of UNIX
text files (which end in linefeed and do not have carriage returns).
The text service can also be used for non-rasterized graphics, such as
ASCII PostScript graphics or many types of PCL graphics.
_____________________________________________________________
4-2
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
If you are using EIO MIO, or XIO port on the print server, choose
one of the available services (this service name will be used in step
3):
BINARY_P1
TEXT_P1
Binary (EIO/MIO/XIO port)
Text (EIO/MIO/XIO port)
The XJet IV-Plus and XJet 3000 also support the following services:
BINARY_S1
TEXT_S1
Binary (serial port)
Text (serial port)
You may set up multiple print queues on your UNIX host computer
for the same TROY print server, each with a different service name
(for example, one queue for binary graphics jobs and one for text
jobs). Refer to Appendix B for additional information on using
services.
3.
Note: This step applies to the majority of UNIX systems, including
Linux, Sun OS (but not Solaris 2.xx), Silicon Graphics (lpr/lpd option
required), DEC ULTRIX, DEC OSF/1, and Digital UNIX. Users of
RS/6000 AIX, HP/UX, Sun Solaris 2.xx, and other systems that do
not use the printcap file should skip to section 3-A. SCO users
should also skip to section 3-A (SCO uses the printcap file, but this
file is automatically configured via the rlpconf command.
Configure the /etc/printcap file on each host computer to
specify the local print queue, the TROY print server name (also
called remote machine or rm), and the TROY print server service
name (also called remote printer, remote queue, or rp), and the spool
directory.
An example of a typical printcap file is as follows:
laser1|Printer on Floor 1:\
:lp=:\
:rm=XCD_003C51:\
:rp=TEXT_P1:\
:sd=/usr/spool/lpd/laser1:
This will create a queue named laser1 on the host computer that
communicates to a TROY print server with a node name (rm) of
XCD_003C51 and a service name (rp) of TEXT_P1 for printing text
files to the printer through the spool directory
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-3
/usr/spool/lpd/laser1. If you are printing binary graphics
files, you would use the service BINARY_P1 instead of TEXT_P1.
Note: The rm and rp options are not available on all UNIX systems,
so if necessary check your documentation (or man pages) to
determine the equivalent options.
Users of Berkeley-compatible UNIX systems can use the lpc
command to obtain the printer status:
%lpc status
laser1:
queuing is enabled
printing is enabled
no entries
no daemon present
Users of AT&T-compatible UNIX systems can generally use the
lpstat or rlpstat commands to obtain similar status information.
Because this procedure varies from system to system, refer to your
system documentation for the exact usage.
3-a
Note: Skip this section if you have completed Step 3, unless you
have an SCO UNIX system.
If you have an HP/UX system, IBM RS/6000 AIX computer, or Sun
Solaris 2.xx, there is no printcap file. This is also true for some other
AT&T-based UNIX systems, as well as many VMS-based TCP/IP
software packages (for example, UCX, TGV Multinet, etc.). On
SCO systems, there is a printcap file, but it is automatically
configured by rlpconf command. Most of these systems use a printer
setup program to define the service name (remote printer), the TROY
print server name (remote machine) or IP address, and the local
queue name (spool directory).
HP/UX Configuration
In the case of HP/UX 10.xx, the sam program is used to set up the
remote printer. The steps are as follows:
•
Execute the sam program. When you get a list of options, select
Printers and Plotters.
• Select LP Spooler.
• Select Printers and Plotters.
_____________________________________________________________
4-4
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
•
Select Actions and then Add Remote Printer/Plotter.
- Enter any name as the Printer Name (this will be the name
of the print queue)
- Enter the IP address of the print server as the Remote System
Name
- Enter the desired print server service name as the Remote
Printer Name.
- Check the box next to Remote Printer is on BSD System.
- You may accept the default values for the remaining items.
- Click OK to configure the printer.
- You should now be able to print using the lp -d command
with the printer name.
If you are using the HP Distributed Print Service, the configuration
procedure is slightly different because you are sending the print jobs
to a file server, which in turn spools the jobs to the print server. You
must therefore know the name of the file server (spooler host) in
addition to the above information. You will add a physical printer
and a remote printer, and then assign a logical printer name to the
remote printer (a unique name that does not match any other name).
To print, use the lp -d command with the logical printer name.
Earlier versions of HP/UX use similar procedures to 10.xx:
• Enter sam and select "Peripheral Devices" and then "Add Remote
Printer" (not "networked printer")
• Enter the following remote printer settings (the other settings do
not matter):
- Line printer name (user-selectable)
- Remote system name (the TROY print
server name; must match what is in hosts file or
use TROY print server IP address)
- Remote printer queue (TROY print server
binary or text service name)
- Remote Printer is on a BSD System (Yes)
IBM RS/6000 AIX Configuration
The RS/6000 AIX operating system uses the smit program to set up
the remote printer. The procedure is as follows for AIX 4.0 and
later:
• Enter SMIT and select “devices”
• Select “Printer/Plotter”
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-5
•
•
•
•
Select “Print Spooling”
Select “Add a Print Queue”
Select “Remote”
Enter the following Remote Printer Settings:
- Name of queue (user selectable)
- Host Name of Remote Printer (TROY Print server name;
must match name /etc/hosts file or use TROY print server
IP address)
- Name of queue on remote server (TROY print server binary
or text service name)
- Type of print spooler: BSD (press the list button and
choose BSD).
The procedure for pre-V4.0 systems is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Enter smit and select "Devices"
Select "Printer/plotter"
Select "Manage remote printer subsystem"
Select "Client services"
Select "Remote printer queues"
Select "Add a remote queue"
Enter the following remote queue settings:
- Name of queue to add (user selectable)
- Activate the queue
(Yes)
- Destination host (TROY print server
name; must match name in /etc/hosts file or use
the print server IP address)
- Name of queue on remote printer
(TROY print server binary or text service
name)
- Name of device to add (user selectable; for
example lp0)
Sun Solaris 2.x Configuration
Sun Solaris 2.x uses the lpsystem and lpadmin programs for remote
printer configuration:
lpsystem -t bsd xcdname
lpadmin -p queue -s xcdname!\xcdservice
accept queue
[not required on newer Solaris systems]
enable queue
[not required on newer Solaris systems]
_____________________________________________________________
4-6
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
where queue is the name of the local print queue, xcdname is the
TROY print server name (must match the entry in the /etc/hosts file)
or IP address and xcdservice is the TROY print server binary or text
service. If this is the first printer configured, you must also use the
lpsched command immediately prior to the accept command.
As an alternative, you may use Printer Manager in the admintool utility
under OpenWindows. Select Edit, Add, and Add Access to Remote
Printer. Then enter the TROY print server name in the format
xcdname!\xcdservice as described above. Make sure that the
Printer Server OS is set to BSD (the default setting), and then click Add.
Note that we recommend that use the /etc/hosts file for the printer
name rather than NIS or other name services. Also note that due to a
bug in the Sun lpd implementation on Solaris 2.4 and earlier releases,
you may experience problems printing very long print jobs. If this is
the case, a workaround is to use the raw TCP port with the HP
JetDirect software as described later in this chapter.
SCO UNIX Configuration
SCO UNIX requires TCP/IP V1.2 or later to work with TROY print
servers. You must first configure the /etc/hosts file as
described in step 2. If necessary, start lpr services with the mkdev
rlp command (this command must be executed only one time or
serious problems may result!). Then issue the rlpconf command
at the SCO system prompt. Respond to the questions as follows:
•
•
•
•
Printer name. Enter the name of the print server service
(usually BINARY_P1 for binary graphics files or TEXT_P1 for
ASCII text files). If you are configuring more than one TROY
print server, you will need to change the print server service
name on each print server to a unique name (using the
WebXAdmin Configure Service facility or the SET SERVICE
oldname NAME newname command; refer to chapter 3 and
Appendix B for details), because the service name is also used
as the name of the print queue.
Remote printer or a local printer: Enter "r" for remote
Name of the remote host that <Printer name> is attached to:
Enter the name of the TROY print server that you configured in
the /etc/hosts file)
System default printer. Enter either "y or "n" to make the printer
the system default printer.
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-7
You should now be able to print to your queue. Note that his
procedure assigns the queue name as the same as the name of the
print server's service. If you want to name the queue something
different than the service name, edit the /etc/printcap file.
On older SCO systems, you can also use the sysadmsh utility to
create the printer. Contact TROY Technical Support if you need to
use sysadmsh.
Other Non-Standard Configurations
With DEC TCP/IP Services for VMS (UCX), you first need to put a
name for the TROY print server in the HOSTS file using the
command SET HOST name /ADDRESS=ipaddress at the
UCX> prompt, where name is the desired name for the print server
and ipaddress is the IP address for the print server. Then use the
sys$system:ucx$lprsetup command to add a printer (print
queue). Enter the desired printer name, and then use the TROY
print server name as the remote system name. Specify one of the
TROY print server services (see beginning of this section for
options) as the remote system printer name (accept the defaults for
other questions).
Process Software's TCPware simply uses the VMS INIT/QUEU
command with their special symbiont in the following format:
INIT/QUEUE/PROC=TCPWARE_TSSSYM/ON="host,port" queue
where host is the IP address or name of the TROY print server, port
is the TROY print server raw TCP port number (9100 for the EIO,
MIO, or XIO port, or 9101 for the serial), and queue is the VMS
queue name.
TGV's Multinet requires you to run the MULTINET CONFIGURE
/PRINTERS command, then use the ADD command to add a printer,
specifying the TROY print server IP address, a protocol type of LPD,
and one of the service options described at the beginning of this
section as the remote print queue.
With Wollongong's PATHWAY, first make sure that you have the
Access option with lpd enabled. Then enter the print server name
and IP address in the TWG$TCP:[NETDIST.ETC]HOSTS. file,
_____________________________________________________________
4-8
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
run the LPGEN program, and execute the command add
queue/rmachine=xcdname/rprinter=service, where
queue is the name of the queue, xcdname is the TROY print server
name from the hosts file, and service is the TROY print server
service name.
To use a TROY print server with an IBM AS/400 running IBM’s
TCP/IP Gateway Services for OS/400 (the OS/400 system must be
v3.1 or later):
•
•
Assign a TCP/IP address to the AS/400 and the TROY print
server.
Use the CFGTCP command at your OS/400 prompt to add the
print server’s TCP/IP address to the AS/400 host table. Use the
following one-line OS/400 command to create the LPD queue:
CRTOUTQ OUTQ(<queuename> RMSTSYS
(*INTNETADR) RMTPRTO(<service>)
AUTOSTRWTR(1) CNNTYPE(*IP) DESTTYPE (*OTHER)
MFRTYPMDL (<driver>)
INTNETADR(‘<ipaddress>’) TEXT
(‘<description>’)
where <queuename> is the new AS/400 print queue name,
<service> is the TROY print server service name, <driver> is the
OS/400 printer driver name (*HP4 is recommended if in doubt),
and <ipaddress> is the IP address of the print server. Note that
the IP address and description must be enclosed in single quotes.
Other systems use similar procedures to set up the TROY print
server. These programs will generally ask for the following
information:
Requested information:
remote printer or remote
You should use:
TROY print server binary or
text service name
remote host computer name
Any name (must match
name in printcap file, if
any) or in some cases,
you may enter the TROY
print server IP address
here
remote host IP address
TROY print server IP
address
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-9
Tech support specialists for these companies can usually answer
configuration questions if you provide them with the equivalent
UNIX configuration information (tell them that the TROY print
server looks like a remote UNIX host computer running the lpd line
printer daemon).
4.
If you have not created a spool directory for the TROY print server
on your UNIX host computer, you will need to do so now (the printer
setup utilities in HP/UX, AIX, Solaris 2.xx, and other systems will
automatically create the spool directory). The lpd spool directory is
usually located in the /usr/spool directory (check with your system
manager to see if the location is different for your system). To create
a new spool directory, use the mkdir command. For example, to
create a spool directory for the queue laser1, you would enter:
mkdir /usr/spool/lpd/laser1
On some systems it is also necessary to start the daemon. This is
done on Berkeley-compatible UNIX systems with the lpc start
command as shown in the following example:
lpc start laser1
5.
The final step before printing is to add the IP address to the TROY
print server. Consult with your system administrator before
assigning an IP address to avoid conflicts with other devices. If your
network does not have an officially assigned block of IP addresses,
you may use any unique address between 192.168.254.1 and
192.168.254.254 (this is a reserved range of Class C addresses for
private networks that are not connected to the Internet per RFC 1918;
note that you must also assign your host computer an IP address in
this range).
The IP address can be set in his can be done in any of the following
ways:
•
•
•
•
•
•
XAdmin32
HP JetAdmin
DHCP
The UNIX arp and ping commands
Reverse Arp (rarp)
BOOTP
_____________________________________________________________
4-10
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
•
•
•
DEC NCP, NCL, or ccr utilities
TROY XCONFIG NetWare utility
Serial port
The easiest way to configure the IP address is using either
XAdmin32 or JetAdmin as described in Chapter 3. The remaining
configuration methods are described in the following paragraphs.
Important Note: The IP address you assign to the print server must
be on the same logical network as your host computers (e.g., if your
host has an IP address of 192.189.207.3, the TROY print server
should have an IP of 192.189.207.x, where x is an integer between 1
and 254), or you must properly configure your router to work with
the TROY print server.
Using DHCP to Configure the Print Server IP Address
TROY print servers support the DHCP protocol for automatically
loading the IP address from a host computer that supports DHCP.
By default, the print server will automatically try DHCP, BOOTP,
and rarp before using the IP address configured in the server.
Note: This procedure may take about a minute, so the print server
cannot be accessed via TCP/IP during that time. If a faster IP
address load is required, select the desired IP configuration method
(AUTO, DHCP, BOOTP, RARP, STATIC) via XAdmin,
WebXAdmin, or the print server console SET IP METHOD
command (STATIC is used when the IP address is manually
entered).
Using arp and ping to Configure the Print Server IP Address
The arp and ping method is one of the simplest ways of configuring
the print server IP address (this method requires V3.27 or later
firmware). To use arp and ping, enter the following commands at
the operating system prompt::
arp -s ipaddress ethernetaddress [temp]
ping ipaddress
where ethernetaddress is the Ethernet address of the print server and
ipaddress is the IP address of the print server. The temp parameter
should be used with UNIX systems, but is not supported by
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-11
Microsoft operating systems. For example, a typical UNIX entry
would be:
arp -s 192.189.207.2 00:40:17:00:c3:e4 temp
ping 192.189.207.2
while a typical Microsoft entry would be:
arp -s 192.189.207.2 00-40-17-00-c3-e4
ping 192.189.207.2
If everything is OK, you will get a message back on the screen
indicating that the print server is alive. If you do not get such a
message, first check the note bellow, and then try entering the
commands again.
Note: This procedure will not work through a router (gateway) and
only works if the print server IP address has never been configured
before. If you have previously configured an IP address, then use
TELNET as described in Appendix A to change the IP address.
Note: In order for the ARP command to work on Windows 95/98, the
ARP table on the PC must have at least one IP address defined other
than its own. Type ARP -A at the DOS command prompt to verify
that there is at least one entry in the ARP table. If there is no other
entry besides the local machine, ping another IP address on your
network, such as another workstation, in order to build the ARP
table. This can not be the IP address of the computer you're working
on. This procedure will not work with Windows 95 unless there are
already entries in the Windows 95 arp table. If there are no entries,
you can add one by pinging a known device on the network (you
cannot ping yourself).
Using rarp to Configure the TROY Print Server IP Address
The TROY print server IP address can be configured using the
Reverse ARP (rarp) facility on your host computer. This is done by
editing the /etc/ethers file (if this file does not exist, you can create it)
with an entry similar to the following:
00:40:17:00:01:07
XCD_000107
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4-12
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
where the first entry is the Ethernet address of the TROY print server
and the second entry is the name of the TROY print server (the name
must be the same as the one you put in the /etc/hosts file).
If the rarp daemon is not already running, start it (depending on the
system the command can be rarpd, rarpd -a, in.rarpd -a
or something else; type man rarpd or refer to your system
documentation for additional information). To verify that the rarp
daemon is running on a Berkeley UNIX-based system, type the
following command:
ps -ax | grep -v grep | grep rarpd
For AT&T UNIX-based systems, type:
ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep rarpd
The TROY print server will get the IP address from the rarp daemon
when it is powered on.
Using BOOTP to Configure the TROY print server IP Address
BOOTP is an alternative to rarp that has the advantage of allowing
configuration of the subnet mask and gateway. In order to use
BOOTP to configure the IP address into the TROY print server, first
make sure that BOOTP is installed and running on your host
computer (it should appear in the /etc/services file on your host as a
real service; type man bootpd or refer to your system documentation
for information). BOOTP is usually started up via the /etc/inetd.conf
file, so you may need to enable it by removing the "#" in front of the
bootp entry in that file. For example, a typical bootp entry in the
/etc/inetd.conf file would be:
#bootp dgram udp wait /usr/etc/bootpd bootpd -i
Depending on the system, this entry might be called "bootps" instead
of "bootp". In order to enable BOOTP, simply use an editor to delete
the "#" (if there is no "#", then BOOTP is already enabled). Then
edit the BOOTP configuration file (usually /etc/bootptab) to
enter the name, network type (1 for Ethernet), Ethernet address
(which can be found on the label on the TROY print server), and the
IP address, subnet mask and gateway of the TROY print server.
Unfortunately, the exact format for doing this is not standardized, so
you will need to refer to your system documentation to determine
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-13
how to enter this information (many UNIX systems also have
template examples in the bootptab file that you can use for
reference). Some examples of typical /etc/bootptab entries include:
xcd_000107 1
00:40:17:00:01:07 192.189.207.3
and:
xcd_000107:ht=ethernet:ha=004017000107:\
ip=192.189.207.3:
Certain BOOTP host software implementations will not respond to
BOOTP requests if you have not included a download filename in
the configuration file; if this is the case, simply create a null file on
the host and specify the name of this file and its path in the
configuration file.
As with rarp, the TROY print server will load its IP address from the
BOOTP server when the printer is powered on.
Configuring the TROY Print Server IP Address with NCP,
XCONFIG, or the Serial Port
Users of DEC and Novell computers have additional alternatives for
configuring the TROY print server IP address by using the remote
console facility, while XJet IV-Plus, XJet 3000, and XJet 100 users
can also utilize the serial port. On VMS systems, you will need to
have DECNET running in order to use the remote console. The
procedure is as follows:
a.
Connect to the remote console or serial port (see chapter 2 for
information on the serial port). If you are using the remote
console with VMS or ULTRIX, you will need to know the
circuit ID (EWA-0 for Alpha PCI systems, QNA-0 for Q-BUS
systems, SVA-0 for DEC workstations, UNA-0 for UNIBUS
systems, BNA-0 for BI systems, and MNA-0 for XMI systems;
you can get the circuit ID by executing the VMS NCP command
SHOW KNOWN CIRCUITS) and the Ethernet address of the
TROY print server (which you can get either from the label on
the TROY print server or via the printer self-test). On VMS
systems, the connection is made as shown in the following
example:
$ MCR NCP
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4-14
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
NCP>CONNECT VIA QNA-0 PHY ADD 00-40-17-00-01-07
On ULTRIX systems, you would execute commands similar to
the following example:
# addnode XCD -c qna-0 -h 00-40-17-00-01-07
# ccr XCD
On a NetWare system, you would use the XCONFIG utility
included with every TROY print server. Simply type
XCONFIG at the DOS prompt and select the desired TROY
print server.
b.
If you are using the remote console, you will get the message
Console connected (VMS) or Connection established
XCONFIG) or Remote console reserved (ULTRIX). Press
RETURN and enter the password ACCESS in response to the
"#" prompt (it will not echo). Note: You will not be asked for a
password if you are using the XConnect II or XConnect 100
serial port.
c.
You will be prompted for a user name. Enter anything in
response to this prompt (older versions do not ask for the user
name).
d.
You will then get the Local> prompt. Type SET IP ADDRESS
ipaddress, where ipaddress is the desired IP address you wish
to assign to the TROY print server (check with your network
manager for the IP address to use). For example:
Local> SET IP ADDRESS 192.189.207.3
e.
You will now need to set the subnet mask by typing SET IP
SUBNET subnetmask, where subnetmask is the desired subnet
mask you wish to assign to the TROY print server (check with
your network manager for the subnet mask to use). For
example:
Local> SET IP SUBNET 255.255.255.0
If you do not have any subnets, use one of the following default
subnet masks:
255.255.255.0
for class C networks
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UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-15
255.255.0.0
255.0.0.0
for class B networks
for class A networks
f.
The type of network you have can be identified by the leftmost
group of digits in your IP address. The value of this group
ranges from 192 through 255 for Class C networks (e.g.,
192.189.207.3), 128 through 191 for Class B networks (e.g.,
128.10.1.30), and 1 through 127 for Class A networks (e.g.,
13.27.7.1).
g.
If you have a gateway (router), enter its address with the
command SET IP ROUTER routeraddress, where routeraddress
is the desired IP address of the gateway you wish to assign to
the TROY print server. For example:
Local> SET IP ROUTER 192.189.207.1
6.
h.
To verify that you have entered the IP information correctly,
type SHOW IP.
i.
Type EXIT or CTRL-D (i.e., hold down the control key and type
"D") to end the remote console session.
j.
With older versions of the firmware (V3.26 or earlier), you must
wait about ten second and then power the printer off and then on
again to make the IP address take effect (not necessary with
newer versions).
Before attempting to print, it is very important to verify the
connection between the host and the TROY print server by using the
UNIX ping command with the IP address of the TROY print server.
For example:
ping 192.189.207.3
You should get a message that the TROY print server is alive. If you
get an error message or no response, then there is no connection.
You will not be able to print if you cannot ping the TROY print
server. If this is the case, verify that you have set up the host and
TROY print server correctly and that the physical connections (e.g.,
the transceivers and cabling) are good. Refer to the Troubleshooting
chapter for additional information.
_____________________________________________________________
4-16
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
7.
To print to the TROY print server from UNIX, use the standard lpr
command with the -P option to specify the queue name. For
example, to print the file TEST on the queue laser1, you would type:
lpr -Plaser1 TEST
Some AT&T-based UNIX systems, such as SCO and HP/UX, use
the standard lp command instead of lpr. In these cases, use the -d
option instead of -P to specify the queue name as shown in the
following example:
lp -dlaser1 TEST
Note that TROY print servers implement only a subset of the lpr
options. If you want to utilize printing options such as landscape
mode, language switching, etc., refer to Appendix B for information
on using services.
For non-UNIX systems such as VMS, the TCP/IP printing process is
normally transparent, so you use the same commands or procedures
as you would for a local printer.
IP Security
TROY print servers provide a means of allowing only host computers with
authorized IP addresses to access the print server. This is very useful for
applications like check printing, where general access to the printer is not
allowed. The console command SET IP ACCESS ENABLED
ipaddress enters a host computer IP address into the access table of the
print server (where ipaddress is the IP address of the host computer; refer to
Appendix A for information on using the print server console). To remove
an IP address, use the command SET IP ACCESS DISABLED
ipaddress. To reenable general access, use the command SET IP
ACCESS ALL.
Raw TCP Ports
TROY print servers provide a raw TCP port capability that can be used by
any application that can open and send data to a TCP port. The port
number is 9100 (238C hex) for the EIO, MIO, or XIO port, or 9101 for the
serial port. The ports pass data through unmodified, so there is no TELNET
interpretation provided. When using the raw TCP ports, make sure that
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-17
TELNET interpretation is disabled in your software or else you may get
distorted printouts.
The raw TCP port is compatible with many popular software packages,
including HP's JetDirect software for UNIX, TGV Multinet (streams
mode), IBM AIX for the RS/6000 (V3.25 or later), and any TCP/IP-based
software that supports HP's JetDirect Ethernet network interface card.
The HP JetDirect software for UNIX is available for Sun Solaris, SunOS,
and HP/UX. HP printer users can download these utilities from HP's web
site (http://www.hp.com or FTP site (ftp.hp.com).
To use an TROY print server with the HP host printing utilities on an
HP/UX or Sun system:
1.
Download the software from the HP web site or FTP site.
2.
If the download file is in tar format, use the tar xvf filename
command to extract the software, where filename is the name of the
software that you downloaded (you must be logged in as root). If the
file is in pkgadd format, use the pkgadd -d filename all
command to extract the software. Accept the default directory to
store the files. Follow the instructions in the README files to
install the software.
3.
Run JetAdmin by typing jetadmin at the UNIX prompt (on
SunOS 4.xx systems, you use the hpnpcfg program instead of
JetAdmin, but the configuration steps are similar).
4.
Select item 1 (Configuration) and then select item 3 (Add printer to
local spooler).
5.
Enter the desired name for the TROY print server or IP address at the
Enter the network printer name/IP Name prompt.
Note: With versions of firmware earlier than 3.46, you must enter
the name (do not enter the IP address) before configuring the print
server name in the /etc/hosts file, or in NIS or DNS. You will get a
message Unknown printer. Do you wish to continue?". Enter "Y" to
continue.
6.
Select the printer type (for example, “HP LaserJet IIISi Printers”).
_____________________________________________________________
4-18
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
7.
If desired, change any of the configurable parameters (note that the
default queue name is the name of the printer plus an “_” and a
number (e.g., laser_1)). Then enter 0 to configure the queue.
8.
Answer “Y” at the “OK to Continue?” prompt. Exit the JetAdmin
utility by pressing RETURN and then “q” twice.
9.
Print a job using the lp command. For example,
lp -dlaser_1 /etc/hosts
If you need a different TCP port number or if you want additional TCP
ports, you may define a TCP port number on any TROY print server service
by using the
SET SERVICE servicename TCP nn
where servicename is the name of the service, and nn is the desired port
number (must be greater than 1023). Refer to Appendix A for information
on using the console.
Changing the Configuration (Optional)
You may use TELNET, the DEC NCP utility, the XCONFIG NetWare
utility, or the XConnect II/Pony 100/XConnect 100/Serial Server serial port
to connect to the TROY print server remote console and change the
configuration or view the status. The procedure and configuration
commands are described in Appendix A.
_____________________________________________________________
UNIX and other TCP/IP Network Configuration
4-19
_____________________________________________________________
4-20
UNIX and Other TCP/IP Network Configuration
5
NetWare Network Configuration
Overview
The XJet family of print servers allow NetWare client PCs to print jobs on
the same printer as DEC, UNIX, AppleTalk, LAN Manager, and Banyan
users. All NetWare jobs are spooled through the Novell server, so NetWare
utilities and application programs can use the printer transparently.
NetWare Concepts
Novell NetWare is a sophisticated network operating system that allows PC
clients (and other nodes) to access network resources such as disk drives
and printers as if they were directly connected. NetWare networks require
at least one file server, and users must log into this server to take advantage
of the NetWare capabilities.
To handle printing over the network, the file server provides print spooling
for the clients. It holds print jobs locally until contacted by a print server
on the network, which in turn sends the job to appropriate printer. In the
past, a NetWare print server was typically either a PC dedicated to handling
printers or a Network Loadable Module (NLM) or Value Added Process
(VAP) running on the file server. Today, NetWare print servers are often
special-purpose networking hardware like the XJet family of print servers.
The XJet can operate in two different modes to service NetWare print
queues:
• Remote Printer mode (also known as NPRINTER mode on NetWare
4.xx or RPRINTER mode on NetWare 2.xx or 3.xx networks)
• Queue Server mode (also called print server or PSERVER mode)
In remote printer mode (see figure 5-1), the client PC sends the print job to
the file server, which in turn spools it to a print server (the print server may
be a physical device like a PC or a software NLM or VAP on the file
server), which in turn sends it to the printer. This approach provides good
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-1
performance, and has the advantage of not consuming a user slot on the file
server.
File
Server
Print
Server
Printer
TROY XCD
with
print server
PC
Client
PC
Workstatio
n
Figure 5-1
Remote Printer Mode
File
Server
Printer
TROY XCD
with
print server
PC
Client
PC
Figure 5-2
Queue Server Mode
A TROY XJet print server can also act as a NetWare print server (queue
server) with an attached printer, which therefore eliminates the need for a
dedicated PC print server or for an NLM or VAP on the file server. As
shown in figure 5-2, this means that jobs from the client PC are spooled to
the file server, which in turn spools the job directly to the TROY print
server. The advantage of this approach is higher performance, but it has the
drawback of requiring a user slot on the file server.
Generally speaking, TROY recommends that you use queue server mode
instead of remote printer mode because the performance will be much
_____________________________________________________________
5-2
NetWare Network Configuration
higher. The exception to this recommendation is if you have a limited
number of available user slots (for example, if you have a 5-user NetWare
license and you have five active users).
TROY print servers will work with NetWare Directory Services (NDS) or
bindery emulation mode on NetWare 4.xx and later networks (not all
TROY print servers support NDS queue server mode; refer to chapter 2 for
specific protocol support information).
General Information
In order to use a TROY print server on a NetWare network, one or more
file servers must be configured with a print queue that the TROY print
server can service. Users send their print requests to the file server’s print
queue, and the jobs are then spooled (either directly, or in the case or
remote printer mode, via an intermediate print server) to the TROY print
server.
TROY print servers can be configured under Windows using HewlettPackard's JetAdmin utility or TROY's XAdmin32 and XAdmin utilities.
Alternatively, they can be configured using the NetWare PCONSOLE
utility in conjunction with TROY's DOS XCONFIG utility.
Important Note: Not all TROY print server models support queue server
mode with Novell Directory Services (refer to chapter 2 for protocol
support information). You must enable bindery emulation in order to use
queue server mode with these products.
Before You Begin
Before you can configure a NetWare print queue, you must have sufficient
privileges. With NetWare 3.xx and earlier, you MUST be logged in as
SUPERVISOR (not someone with Supervisor privileges). With NetWare
4.xx and later, make sure that you have sufficient administrator privileges to
create a print queue in the desired context.
Default Names (Service Names)
TROY print servers automatically make themselves known on a NetWare
network. The default NetWare Print Server name is XCD_xxxxxx_P1,
where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the Ethernet address (the Ethernet
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-3
address is on a label that is affixed to the TROY print server). Note that the
NetWare Print Server name is used for either NDS or bindery mode
configuration.
If you are configuring the first port with XAdmin32, the NDS Printer Name
for this port is automatically assigned as XCD_xxxxxx_P1. If you are using
an alternate configuration method like NWAdmin, you may assign any
arbitrary unique name for the printer.
If you are configuring the serial port, the NDS Printer Name is
XCD_xxxxxx_S1.
The Print Server and Printer names are used extensively during the
configuration process, so be sure to remember them. Note that these names
are actually the names of the print server's NetWare services (refer to
Appendix B for more information on services). If desired, you may change
the default names to something more meaningful by using XAdmin32,
WebXAdmin, or the print server console.
XJet IV-Plus
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
XCD_xxxxxx_S1
(MIO port; default NetWare Print Server
name)
(serial port, if enabled; NDS Printer name for
this port)
XJet IV-2 and XJet IV-T
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
(MIO port; default NetWare Print Server
Name
XCD_ xxxxxx_LN
(MIO port if LN03 option is installed; default
NetWare Print Server Name)
XJet 100
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
XJet 3000
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
XJet 2000
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
(MIO port; default NetWare Print Server name)
(EIO port; default NetWare Print Server
name)
(EIO port; default NetWare Print Server
name)
_____________________________________________________________
5-4
NetWare Network Configuration
XJet III
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
(XIO port; default NetWare Print Server
Name)
Note: The XJet III, XJet IV-2, XJet IV-T, all 4Mb XJet IV-Plus, and all
8Mb "-8" models do not support NetWare NDS queue server mode.
Configuring the Print Server and Adding the Print Queue in Queue
Server Mode
TROY print servers can be configured in Queue Server mode for either
bindery or NDS mode operation. The simplest way to do this is with
TROY's XAdmin32 or HP's JetAdmin utilities. XAdmin32 is a Windows
95/98 and Windows NT 4.xx-based utility that allows you to configure the
print server and create NetWare print queues without using NetWare
utilities like PCONSOLE or NWAdmin (if you have Windows 3.xx, you
must use XAdmin as described later in this chapter). JetAdmin is a
Hewlett-Packard utility that provides similar capabilities. Other methods
include TROY's XAdmin or XCONFIG utilities in conjunction with
Novell's NWAdmin or PCONSOLE.
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue with XAdmin32 (Queue
Server Mode)
NOTE: TROY recommends you use the Novell 32-bit client on your
Windows 95/98/NT workstation instead of the Microsoft NetWare client,
because it allows direct configuration of print queues without the need for a
Novell utility like NWAdmin or PCONSOLE.
NOTE: If you have a Windows 3.xx system, you must use XAdmin as
described later in this chapter.
NOTE: NDS Queue Server mode is only supported by "S" and "N" Series
models (for example, PPS-8S and XConnect II-8N; refer to Chapter 2 for
specific mode information).
1.
Make sure that you are logged in as ADMIN or equivalent (NetWare
4.xx and above) or SUPERVISOR (NetWare 2.xx and 3.xx). Install
the XAdmin32 software from the TROY Print Server Software CDROM by clicking on the Start button and selecting Run. Click on
Browse and select the CD-ROM drive. Open the Utilities folder,
open the XAdmin32 folder, and click on SETUP.EXE, Click OK
twice and follow the instructions on the screen.
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-5
2.
Click on Start, select Programs, select the XAdmin32 folder, and
then select XAdmin32.
3.
Click on the IPX/SPX icon under Filters to set the operating mode to
IPX/SPX (TCP/IP mode will not allow you to configure NetWare
print queues directly). The TROY external print server should
appear in the list of available printers (the name will one of the ones
listed in the Default Print Server Names section at the beginning of
this chapter). If it does not, try going to the menu bar and selecting
Devices and then Search Active Devices.
Important Note: V3.73 and earlier firmware do not support more
than one service and one port (the firmware version is listed on the
self-test page). If you have an XConnect II or XConnect 100 and
need to use the serial port for printing, you must upgrade to a newer
revision of the firmware.
4.
Double click on the printer that you wish to configure, enter the
configuration password (ACCESS is the default), and press OK.
5.
A series of index card tabs will be displayed. Click on the NetWare
P1 tab to configure the MIO/EIO port or on the NetWare S1 tab to
configure the serial port (if present).
• If it is not already selected, select Queue Server as the operating
mode.
• Click on the inverted triangle button and select the NDS tree (if
you are using the Microsoft NetWare client, you must type in the
name of the tree)..
• Click the Change... button to select the NDS context where the
queue will reside (if you are using the Microsoft client, you must
type in the name of the context).
• If you are configuring the first port (the P1 MIO/EIO/XIO), the
box labeled "Print Server" contains the name of the NetWare
Print Server. If you are configuring any other port, this box
contains the name of the NDS Printer. If desired, you may
change these names.
If you are configuring more than one port, repeat the steps 1 through 5 for
each port. Important: Do not use the Change NDS Queues Button at this
time.
_____________________________________________________________
5-6
NetWare Network Configuration
If you are using the Microsoft Client for NetWare, STOP HERE. Go to
the Adding NetWare Print Queues Using NWAdmin section to complete the
configuration.
You may now create a print queue for the first port (the MIO/EIO port). If
you are configuring the serial port, skip to step 11.
6.
Click on the Change NDS Queues... button to configure an NDS
print queue or click the Change Bindery Queues... to configure a
bindery mode queue.
7.
Two windows will appear, Available Print Queues and Serviced
Print Queues. First go to the Available Print Queues window:
• If you are configuring an NDS queue, click on the context where
the print queue will reside.
• If you are configuring a bindery queue, click on the volume
where the queue will reside (a volume name will have a file
server icon next to it).
8.
Click on New Queue.
• Enter any unique name for the Queue name. If you are
configuring a bindery queue, click OK and proceed to step 8.
• If you are configuring an NDS queue, click Browse, select the
file server volume where you want the queue to reside (a volume
name will have a file server icon next to it), and click OK.
9.
The queue name will now appear in the Available Print Queues
under the selected volume (for bindery mode) or in the selected
context (for NDS mode).
• Click on the desired queue.
• Click on Add>>
The name will now appear in the Serviced Print Queues window.
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-7
1.
2.
Click Close and then OK. You can now use the print queue from
your NetWare workstation. Refer to the appropriate Configuring the
Workstation section at the end of this chapter.
If you want to configure additional queues and ports, you must use the
Novell NWAdmin utility (this program is usually found in the Public
directory on the NetWare file server). The procedure is as follows:
1.
Start the NWAdmin utility and make sure that you are in the right
context (if not, go to Tools on the menu bar, select NDS Browser,
and then browse for the desired context).
2. Select the container where you want the print queue to reside.
3. Go to Tools on the menu bar and select Print Services Quick
Setup.
4. Browse for the NetWare Print Server by clicking on the button
next to the Print Server Name window.
5. Enter the name of the NDS Printer for the desired port in the
Name box (for example, XCD_04ECBA_P2)
6. The Type box should be left at the default Parallel setting.
7. Select the desired banner type.
8. Enter any desired name for the print queue.
9. If necessary, browse for the volume.
10. Click Create to create the print queue. You are now ready to use
the queue from a NetWare workstation. Refer to the appropriate
Configuring the Workstation section at the end of this chapter.
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue with HP JetAdmin 3.XX
(Queue Server Mode)
NOTE: JetAdmin 1.xx and 2.xx do not allow direct configuration of
NetWare print queues. If you are using these versions, you may configure
the print server with JetAdmin and then use NWAdmin or PCONSOLE to
add the print queue. If possible, TROY recommends that you upgrade to
JetAdmin 3.xx (available on the HP web site at http://www.hp.com).
1.
Make sure that JetAdmin 3.xx is running on your system and that you
have sufficient privileges to use it to create print queues. If you are
using the Microsoft NetWare client on your workstation, make sure
that you have installed Services for NetWare Directory Services in
the Network control panel.
2.
Click on Start, select Programs, select the HP JetAdmin Utilities
3.0 folder, and then select HP JetAdmin.
_____________________________________________________________
5-8
NetWare Network Configuration
3.
One or more TROY print server NetWare services will show up in
the list of printers (the default service names are listed in the Default
Print Server Names section at the beginning of this chapter). Single
click on the one that you wish to configure and then go the menu bar,
select File and then Modify.
Important Note: V3.59 and earlier firmware do not support more
than one service and one port (the firmware version is listed on the
self-test page). If you have an XConnect II or XConnect 100 and
need to use more than one port for printing, you must upgrade to a
newer revision of the firmware.
4.
If desired, change the print server name and description. Click Next.
Do this with caution because this will change the print server service
name, and will therefore affect any other protocols that use this
service.
5.
Make sure that NetWare Directory Services is selected in the
window on the left side of the display.
• Click on the inverted triangle button and select the NDS tree.
• Click Change... button to select the NDS context.
6.
Click on the Operating Mode button and select Queue Server
Mode.
7.
Click on the Queues button and then click on the Change... button.
Two windows will appear, Available Print Queues and Serviced
Print Queues. Go to the Available Print Queues window:
• If you are configuring an NDS queue, click on the context where
the print queue will reside.
• If you are configuring a bindery queue, click on the volume
where the queue will reside.
8.
Click on Create and enter any unique name for the Queue name.
• If you are configuring an NDS queue, the default file server on
which the print queue will reside will be listed.. You may
optionally change this by clicking on the inverted triangle button
and selecting a different server. You may also optionally change
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-9
the context that you selected in the previous step by clicking on
the Browse... button. Click OK and proceed to step 9.
• If you are configuring a bindery queue, you may optionally click
on the inverted triangle button to change the file server volume
that you selected in the previous step. Click OK to continue and
go to step 9.
9.
Click Yes when asked if you want to add the queue to the list of
serviced queues. The queue name will now appear in the Available
Print Queues in the selected context (for NDS mode) or under the
selected volume (for bindery mode).
10. Click OK and then Next. If applicable, enter the IP address and click
Next.
11. If desired you can enable users that will be notified in the event of
printer problems. Click Finish. You can now use the print queue
from your NetWare workstation.
Configuring the Print Server using XAdmin Version 2.0 or
WebXAdmin (Queue Server Mode):
Important Note: Although XAdmin runs on Windows 95/98, TROY
recommends that you use XAdmin32 on these operating systems.
1.
If you are using XAdmin 2.0, install the XAdmin software. On
Windows 3.xx systems, go the menu bar in the Program Manager,
select File, and then Run. Click Browse to locate the Setup file
(either on floppy disk or in the \Utilities\XAdmin folder on CDROM. On Windows 95, go the Start button, select Run, and then
Browse for the Setup file.
Click OK to start the installation.
2.
If you are using XAdmin, start it up by double clicking on the icon.
If you are using WebXAdmin, start up your web browser (you must
have a valid IP address configured in the PC and in the print server).
3.
If you are using XAdmin, one or more TROY print server NetWare
services will show up in the list of printers (the default services
names are listed in the Default Print Server Names section at the
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NetWare Network Configuration
beginning of this chapter). Double click on the one that you wish to
configure.
If you are using WebXAdmin, enter the IP address of the print server
as the destination address in your browser and press ENTER or
RETURN.
4.
Enter the configuration password (ACCESS is the default) and press
OK (XAdmin) or Submit (WebXAdmin).
5.
If you have XAdmin, click on the NetWare tab.
If you are using WebXAdmin, click on Configure NetWare. You
will see one or more enabled services (the default service names are
listed in the Default Print Server Names section at the beginning of
this manual). Click on the desired service.
6.
If you are using NDS, type in the tree and context (the context may
be entered in either the form printers.mytree or
OU=printers.O=mytree. If you are using XAdmin, click OK, Yes,
and OK to save the configuration changes. If you are using
WebXAdmin, click Submit and exit the browser. Proceed to the next
section, Adding NetWare Print Queues using NWAdmin.
If you are using bindery mode with XAdmin (not available with
WebXAdmin), you may click on the Add Queue button to directly
add a NetWare bindery queue:
• Click Create. Use the inverted triangle button to change the file
server volume and then enter any unique name for the print and
click OK.
• Click Yes when asked if you want to add the queue to the service
list, click OK and Close. The queue will appear in the Bindery
Print Queues window. Click OK and then Yes. You can now
use the print queue from a NetWare workstation. Skip to the
Configuring the Windows Printer section.
If you are using bindery mode with WebXAdmin, click Configure
NetWare from the main menu, type in the name of the file server
where the print queue will reside, and click Add. Proceed to the next
section, Configuring NetWare Print Queues using NWAdmin.
Adding NetWare Print Queues Using NWAdmin (Queue Server Mode)
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NetWare Network Configuration
5-11
If you are using XAdmin32 with the Microsoft NetWare client, or you are
using XAdmin, WebXAdmin, or JetAdmin 1.xx or 2.xx, you need to use
NWAdmin to configure the actual NetWare print queue. This is because
these utilities only allow you to define the print server context and tree (or
file server, if you are using bindery mode). The following steps are
required:
1.
Make sure that you have defined the context and tree for each NetWare
Print Server and Printer that you wish to configure by using
XAdmin32, XAdmin, WebXAdmin, or the print server console as
described in previous sections. Then start the Novell NWAdmin
program by double clicking on the icon.
2.
Create a printer object:
3.
Click on the container where the object will reside.
•
•
•
4.
Create a print queue object:
−
−
−
−
−
5.
Select Object from the menu bar and then Create.
When you get the New Object menu, select Printer and then OK.
If you are configuring the MIO/EIO/XIO port (P1), you may enter
any arbitrary name for the Printer. If you are configuring th serial
port, enter the NDS Printer name for that port (for example,
XCD_xxxxxx_P2).
Click on the container where the object will reside. Select Object
from the menu bar and then Create.
When you get the New Object menu, select Print Queue and then
OK.
Enter any desired name for the print queue
Click on the Print Queue Volume button and select the volume
on which the print queue will reside.
Press OK and then Create.
Create a print server object:
•
•
•
Click on the container where the object will reside.
Select Object from the menu bar and then Create.
When you get the New Object menu, select Print Server and then
OK.
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NetWare Network Configuration
•
6.
Enter the name of the TROY print server (by default, this
XCD_xxxxxx_P1 by default) and select Create. Use the default
print server name (the default names are listed in the Default Print
Server Names section at the beginning of this chapter) unless you
specifically changed it with XAdmin32, Admin, JetAdmin, or the
print server console.
Associate the printer with the print queue:
-
7.
Change context if required and then double click on the name of
the printer you created in step 3.
Click on Assignments and then Add...
Change context if necessary and select the print queue you created
in step 4. Click OK and then OK again
Associate the print server with the printer:
•
•
•
8.
Change context if required and then double click on the name of
the print server you created in step 5.
Click on Assignments and then Add...
Change context if necessary and select the printer you created in
step 3. Click OK and then OK again.
Exit NWAdmin. You are now ready to use the print queue from a
NetWare workstation.
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue Using PCONSOLE and
XCONFIG (Queue Server Mode)
As an alternative to JetAdmin and XAdmin, you can use the standard
Novell PCONSOLE utility in conjunction with TROY's XCONFIG
program to set up your print queues (note that if desired, you may use
TELNET, the DEC NCP utility, or the serial port instead of XCONFIG).
The procedure is basically as follows:
1.
Use XCONFIG to connect to the print server. Enter the password
(ACCESS is the default) and type anything in response to the Enter
Username> prompt.
2.
If you are configuring an NDS queue, enter the commands:
SET SERVICE servicename TREE treename
SET SERVICE servicename CONTEXT contextname
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NetWare Network Configuration
5-13
where servicename is the service that you want to configure (the
default service names are listed in the Default Print Server Names
section at the beginning of this chapter), treename is the name of
your NDS tree, and contextname is the NDS context where the print
server will reside. Now skip to step 3.
If you are configuring a bindery queue, enter the command:
SET NETW QSERVER fileserver ON servicename
where fileserver is the name of the file server where the queue will
reside (note that this is not necessarily the same as the volume
name), and servicename is the name of the print server service (the
default service names are listed in the Default Print Server Names
section at the beginning of this chapter).
Note: The SET NETWARE SERVER command, which enables file
servers on a global basis, is available for compatibility with older
firmware releases, but is not recommended for new applications.
3.
4.
Start PCONSOLE
•
If necessary, change to the desired context if you are using NDS.
•
Go to Print Queues, press Insert to create a new print queue,
and enter the name of the print queue. If you are configuring an
NDS queue, you will also need to enter a volume name (press
Insert to browse for available volumes).
•
Select Print Servers (NetWare 4.xx and later) or Queue
Servers (NetWare 2.xx and 3.xx), press Insert and enter the
name of the TROY print server (the default print server names
are discussed in the Default Print Server Names section at the
beginning of this manual).
•
Go to Print Queues, select the desired print queue, then select
Print Servers and press Insert to select the name of the TROY
print server.
•
Exit PCONSOLE.
Go back to XCONFIG and enter the command:
SET NETWARE RESCAN
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NetWare Network Configuration
After a few seconds, do a SHOW NETWARE command; you should
see the queue you created being serviced by the file server. You are
now ready to use the queue.
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue using NDPS
Novell Distributed Print Services (NDPS) is Novell’s new method of
handling printers. The biggest advantage of NDPS compared to the old
queue server and remote printer methods is simpler configuration for the
user.
NDPS is currently implemented on NetWare 5 through the use of NetWare
Loadable Modules (NLMs) known as gateways. TROY print servers are
compatible with the Novell Gateway, which is included with the Novell
NetWare 5 software and is also available as an option for NetWare 4.
To configure a TROY print server with the Novell gateway, you must first
install the NDPS on the client workstation (use any NetWare client 2.2 or
later CD-ROM and specify "Custom installation"). Then install the NDPS
Broker and create an NDPS Manager (use the NetWare Administrator
"Create" command and select the appropriate NDPS object).
Next you must create an NDPS Printer object (which emulates a Print
Server NLM) and you must also configure the print server as a remote
printer (NPRINTER) that is connected to this Printer Object. The print
server can be configured using BRAdmin (XAdmin32), the web browser, or
the console (specify the Printer Object as the name of the Print Server NLM
and select any desired printer number for the TROY print server). The
NDPS Printer is created as follows:
•
In the NetWare Administrator (NWAdmin), select the container
where you want to put the printer object.
•
You will get the Object menu. Select Create to get the New
Object dialog.
•
Select NDPS Printer.
•
Type in any name for the NDPS Printer.
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NetWare Network Configuration
5-15
•
Select Create a New Printer Agent to create a new printer that
uses the Novell gateway and click Create.
•
Make sure that he Printer Agent name is correct, and then click
on Browse to select the NDPS manager.
•
Select the Novell Printer Gateway as the Gateway Type.
•
Configure the Connection type as "Remote" and specify the
Port type as Other.
•
In the PServer Emulation box, use the default SAP name (which
should be the same as the name of the Printer Agent) and specify
the printer number (this number must match the one that you
configured in the TROY print server). Click "Next".
•
Click Finish to get the Select Printer Drivers dialog.
•
Select the printer driver for each operating system (Win3.1 or
Win95).
•
Click Continue and you are finished.
You can then use the standard Windows95 Add Printer utility to add the
printer on any client workstation. Specify a Network Printer and then use
then browse to find the Printer Agent that you just created. The driver will
be automatically downloaded and you will be ready to print.
Configuring the Print Server and Adding the Print Queue in Remote
Printer Mode
To configure a TROY print server for remote printer mode, there are two
basic steps required. First, you must use Novell's NWAdmin or
PCONSOLE to add the print queue to the NetWare server. Then you must
configure the print server for remote printer operation using XAdmin32,
XAdmin, JetAdmin, WebXAdmin, or the print server console.
Important Note: You cannot configure both Queue Server and Remote
Printer mode on the same print server port. It is possible, however, to
configure a multiport print server (such as the XConnect 100) with one port
running in Queue Server mode and the other in Remote Printer mode.
_____________________________________________________________
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NetWare Network Configuration
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue using NWADMIN and
XAdmin32, XAdmin, WebXAdmin, or JetAdmin (NDS Remote Printer
Mode):
To configure an TROY print server for remote printer mode with
NWADMIN (NetWare Administrator utility) and XAdmin32, XAdmin,
WebXAdmin, or JetAdmin, first make sure that you have V3.28 or later
firmware (refer to the self-test page or do a SHOW VERSION command
from the console). Then perform the following steps:
1.
Make sure that the PSERVER NLM (NetWare Loadable Module) is
loaded on your file server and that you are logged in as ADMIN in
NDS mode on the NetWare 4.xx or later file server.
2.
Start NWADMIN by double clicking on the icon. Select the desired
Container Object (Organizational Unit) that will contain the new
printer.
3.
Select Object from the menu bar and then Create. When you get the
New Object menu, select Printer and then OK.
4.
Enter the name of the printer and select Create.
5.
Double click on the name of your PSERVER NLM. Click on
Assignments and then Add...
6.
If necessary, change the directory context. Select the printer you
created and click OK. Note the number of the printer, as you will
use this later, then click OK.
7.
Select the desired Container Object (Organizational Unit) that will
contain the default print queue, and then click on Object and Create
to get New Object menu.
8.
Select Print Queue and then OK. Make sure that Directory Service
Queue is selected, and then type in a name for the default print
queue.
9.
Click on the button to select the print queue volume. Change the
directory context if necessary, then select the desired volume
(Objects) and click OK. Click Create to create the print queue.
10.
Change context if required and then double click the name of the
printer you created previously.
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NetWare Network Configuration
5-17
11.
Click Assignments and then Add..
12.
Change context if necessary and select the print queue you created.
Click OK and then OK again, and then exit NWADMIN.
13.
Select the print server and service that you wish to configure:
• If you have XAdmin32, double click on the print server name and
then click on the appropriate NetWare tab (NetWare P1 for the
MIO/EIO port or NetWare S1 for serial port).
• If you are using XAdmin, one or more TROY print server
NetWare services will show up in the list of printers (the default
service names are listed in the Default Print Server Names
section at the beginning of this chapter). Double click on the one
that you wish to configure and then click on the NetWare tab.
• If you are using WebXAdmin, start your web browser, enter the
IP address of the print server as the destination address, and then
push ENTER or RETURN. Click on Configure NetWare, and
then click on the Enabled Service that you wish to configure (the
default service names are listed in the Default Print Server Names
section at the beginning of this chapter).
• If you are using JetAdmin, one or more TROY print server
NetWare services will show up in the list of printers (the default
service names are listed in the Default Print Server Names
section at the beginning of this chapter; note that JetAdmin
supports a maximum of three ports per print server). Single click
on the one you want to configure, go to the menu bar and select
Device and then Modify. Then click Next and select Operating
Mode.
NOTE: If you want to enable remote printer capabilities on services
other than the default NetWare services, you must define new
services that are enabled for NetWare and for the desired port (only
one service per port can be defined for NetWare). Refer to Appendix
B in this manual for information on how to do this.
14. Select the Remote Printer as the Operating Mode, enter the name of
your PSERVER NLM as the Print Server Name, and select the
number of the printer from step 6 as the Printer Number
_____________________________________________________________
5-18
NetWare Network Configuration
(XAdmin32 and JetAdmin allow you to choose from a list of
available print server NLMs rather than typing in the name).
15.
If you have XAdmin 32 or XAdmin, click OK. If you have
JetAdmin, click Next two times, and then click Finish. If you have
WebXAdmin, click Submit.
16. Exit the configuration utility. You must now unload the PSERVER
NLM from your NetWare file server console and then reload it in order
for the changes to take effect.
Configuring the Print Server and Print Queue using PCONSOLE and
XCONFIG (Remote Printer Mode)
To configure an TROY print server for remote printer mode operation using
PCONSOLE and XCONFIG, first make sure that you have V3.27 or later
firmware (refer to the self-test page or do a SHOW VERSION command
from the console). Then perform the following steps:
1.
Make sure that the PSERVER NLM (NetWare Loadable Module) is
loaded on your file server.
2.
Log into the file server from your PC workstation as ADMIN if you
are using NetWare 4.xx (if you want NDS support, do not login
under bindery mode). If you are using NetWare 2.XX or 3.xx, login
as SUPERVISOR.
3.
Run the PCONSOLE utility from your PC workstation.
4.
If you are creating a new print queue, select Print Queue
Information (NetWare 3.xx) or Print Queues (NetWare 4.xx) from
the Available Options menu. Press INSERT, type in the desired
print queue name (with NetWare 4.xx, you will also be asked for a
volume name; press INSERT and select the appropriate volume),
and press ESCAPE to return to the main menu.
The following steps apply to configuring a remote printer with NDS
support on NetWare 4.xx systems:
a.
Select Print Servers from the PCONSOLE menu and then
select the name of the PSERVER NLM on your host computer.
b.
Select Printers.
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-19
c.
Press INSERT to get Object, Class menu.
d.
Press INSERT and enter the Printer Name (any unique name
is OK).
e.
Highlight the printer name and press ENTER twice to get
Printer Configuration Menu.
f.
PCONSOLE will assign a Printer Number. Remember this
number, since it will be used later.
g.
Highlight Print Queues Assigned and press ENTER and then
INSERT to get a list of available queues.
h.
Highlight the name of the print queue you wish to assign to the
remote printer and press ENTER.
i.
The other settings in the menu are not required. Push ESCAPE
several times to exit PCONSOLE.
j.
Skip to step 5 below.
The following steps apply to configuring a remote printer on NetWare
3.xx systems:
a.
Select Print Server Information from the PCONSOLE main
menu and choose the name of the PSERVER NLM.
b.
Select Print Server Configuration and then Printer
Configuration. Select any "Not Installed" printer and press
Enter. Remember the number of this printer, since it will be
used later in the configuration process.
c.
If desired, type in a new name for the printer.
d.
Go to Type, press ENTER, highlight Remote Other/Unknown
and press ENTER again. The other settings in this menu are not
required.
e.
Push ESCAPE and save the changes.
f.
Push ESCAPE and select Queues Serviced by Printer.
_____________________________________________________________
5-20
NetWare Network Configuration
5.
g.
Highlight the printer name that you just configured and press
ENTER.
h.
Press INSERT, choose the desired print queue, and press
ENTER (you can accept the default priority).
i.
Press ESCAPE several times to exit PCONSOLE.
Insert the TROY Print Server Software diskette or CD-ROM into
your PC and run the XCONFIG utility (in the \utilities directory on
the CD-ROM)
Select the TROY print server from the list of print servers. When
you get the message that the print server is connected, press the
ENTER key and type the password ACCESS in response to the "#"
prompt (the password will not echo), and then press the ENTER key
again in response to the Enter Username> prompt. When you
get the Local> prompt, type:
SET NETW NPRINTER nlm number ON service
SET NETW RESCAN
EXIT
where nlm is the name of the PSERVER NLM on your file server,
number is the printer number (must match the printer number you
selected during the PCONSOLE configuration in the previous steps)
and service is the name of the service (the default service names are
listed in the Default Print Server Names section of this chapter). For
example, to set up remote printer 3 for an HP printer with the TROY
print server XCD_00C3E4 using the PSERVER NLM called
XCD1PS, you would type:
SET NET NPRINTER XCD1PS 3 ON XCD_00C3E4_P1
SET NET RESCAN
EXIT
NOTE: The same service cannot be used for both queue server
mode and remote printer mode.
NOTE: If you want to enable remote printer capabilities on services
other than the default NetWare services, you must define new
services that are enabled for NetWare and for the desired port.
Refer to Appendix B in this manual for information on how to do
this.
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-21
6.
You must now unload the PSERVER NLM from your NetWare file
server console and then reload it in order for the changes to take
effect.
Configuring the Workstation
The final step is to configure the workstation(s) to print to the TROY print
server. The TROY print server can be used with any workstation that
supports either the Novell or Microsoft client software.
Configuring the Workstation (Windows 95/98)
To use a NetWare print queue from a Windows 95 workstation, first make
sure that the appropriate NetWare drivers are installed. Then go to the
Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printers. Double click on
the Add Printer icon and then execute the following steps when you get to
the Add Printer Wizard.
1.
Click on Next, Select Network Printer and click on Next again.
2.
Select Browse, double click on the appropriate file server name,
select the print queue, and click OK. If you used JetAdmin to
configure the queue, you should double click on the
HP_Network_Printers icon instead of the file server icon, and then
select the TROY print server name. Click on Next.
3.
Select the desired printer manufacturer and model (click Have Disk
if your printer is not listed), and click on Next.
4.
If the driver already exists, select Keep Existing Driver (if it does
not, this step will be skipped), and then click on Next.
5.
If desired, change the name of the printer and/or make it the default,
and then click on Next.
6.
Select Yes when you are asked "Would you like to print a test page?"
Click on Finish.
Configuring the Workstation (Windows NT 4.xx/2000)
To add a queue from a Windows NT 4.xx or 2000 workstation, execute the
following steps: NetWare Windows VLM drivers and utilities installed.
Then go to the Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printers.
_____________________________________________________________
5-22
NetWare Network Configuration
Double click on the Add Printer icon and then execute the following steps
when you get to the Add Printer Wizard:
1.
Select Network Printer Server and click on Next.
2.
Select the desired print queue and click OK. Answer OK when
asked if you want to install the printer driver.
3.
Select the desired printer manufacturer and model, and click on
Next.
4.
If desired, make the printer the default, and then click on Next.
5.
Click on Finish.
Configuring the Workstation (Windows 3.xx)
To use a NetWare print queue from a Windows 3.xx workstation, first make
sure that you have the appropriate NetWare Windows VLM drivers and
utilities installed. Then execute the following steps:
1.
Open the Main window of the Windows Program Manager and start
the Print Manager.
2.
Select Options (or Printer) from the menu bar and then Network
Connections.
3.
Select the desired port (for example, LPT1:) under Ports: and the
desired print queue under Resources. If you have configured the
TROY print server for NDS mode, you may alternatively select the
printer name instead of the print queue name.
4.
Click Capture and Permanent.
5.
Close the window and select Options and then Printer Setup.
6.
Choose the desired printer under Installed Printers. If the desired
printer does not exist, select Add>> and select the printer from the
List of Printers, and click on Install (normally you will need either
the original Windows diskette distribution or the printer
manufacturer's driver diskette).
7.
If the desired printer is not on the correct port, click on Connect,
select the port, and click OK.
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NetWare Network Configuration
5-23
8.
If desired, click Set as Default Printer to make the printer your
default printer.
9. Exit the Print Manager.
Configuring the Workstation (DOS-based NetWare drivers)
To configure the PC workstation so that DOS applications can print
transparently to the TROY print server (you may also use this procedure if
you do not have Windows-specific NetWare drivers), use the DOS editor to
add a command with the following format to the AUTOEXEC.BAT file on
your PC:
capture l=n q=queuename ti=timeout
where n is the number of the parallel port you wish to redirect, queuename
is the name of the queue you created (if you using NetWare 4.xx in NDS
mode, you may specify p=printername instead of the queue, where
printername is the name of the NDS printer; be sure to enter the entire
directory context of the printer), and timeout is a the number of seconds the
file server will send data to the printer after the application last writes to a
file (use at least 5 seconds for DOS applications and at least 50 seconds for
Windows applications, and you may need to increase the values if you are
unable to print). For example, if your queue is called myqueue and you
wish to use LPT1 with a timeout of 5 seconds, you would enter:
capture l=1 q=myqueue ti=5
After the workstation is restarted, you will be able to print from applications
programs as if the printer were directly connected to the LPT1 parallel port.
Testing the Print Queue
Test the queue by printing a small job from an application program like the
Windows 95 Paint Accessory program (make sure that the program is set up
to print to the correct print queue if the TROY print server is not assigned to
service the default queue). The file will be spooled to the TROY print
server for printing and should print on the printer within a short period of
time. If it does not, double check your configuration, and if necessary, refer
to the Troubleshooting chapter of this manual for additional information.
_____________________________________________________________
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NetWare Network Configuration
Changing the Print Server Configuration (Optional)
The TROY print server default parameters can be changed via the
XCONFIG utility to meet a wide variety of user needs. The procedure for
doing this is described in detail in Appendix A of this manual.
_____________________________________________________________
NetWare Network Configuration
5-25
6
Appletalk Network Configuration
Overview
All TROY internal print servers support the AppleTalk protocol running
over Ethernet (also known as EtherTalk). This capability allows Macintosh
computers to print jobs to a printer simultaneously with jobs from DEC,
UNIX, NetWare, and other computers.
If you have the XJet IV-Plus LocalTalk option, LocalTalk-based Macintosh
computers can also share the same printer with Ethernet-based systems.
AppleTalk Concepts
TROY print server AppleTalk capabilities allow a printer to appear as a
shareable printer node on an AppleTalk Phase 2 network. The TROY print
server broadcasts information to Macintoshes on the network, and
automatically appears in the Chooser on each Macintosh. Application
programs (such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PageMaker, etc.) can print
without modification or special software on the Macintosh.
Step 1 Macintosh Configuration
TROY print servers are compatible with the Apple LaserWriter 8 drivers as
well as drivers supplied by many printer manufacturers (earlier versions of
the LaserWriter drivers may crash or cause PostScript errors on large
networks). If none of these drivers is installed on your Macintosh, you
must install one of them from diskette following the instructions of the
manufacturer.
Before using a TROY print server, you must first enable Ethernet or
LocalTalk (if you want to use the XConnect II LocalTalk option) from the
Network Control Panel on the Macintosh. If Ethernet is not selectable or
the Network Control Panel does not exist, you must use Apple's Network
Installer software to add these capabilities.
_____________________________________________________________
AppleTalk Network Configuration
6-1
Step 2 Printing
Once the print server is installed powered on, the print server service name
(default is XCD_xxxxxx_pp_AT, where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the
Ethernet address and "pp" is P1 for the EIO, MIO, or XIO port, or S1 for
the serial port; for example, XCD_009C53_P1_AT) should appear in the
Chooser. Note that the serial port will not appear if it is set for console
mode operation.
To select the TROY print server, open the Chooser from the Apple Menu
on the Macintosh, and then click on the LaserWriter icon (if necessary,
select the appropriate AppleTalk zone from the Network Control Panel).
Then click on the TROY print server name and close the Chooser. You
should now be able to print from the Macintosh.
If you cannot see the print server, first make sure that your cabling is
correct and that you have enabled EtherTalk or (if applicable) LocalTalk
from your Macintosh Network Control Panel. You may also need to force
the TROY print server into the correct AppleTalk zone using the SET
APPLETALK ZONE command described in Appendix A.
Important: AppleTalk requires a PostScript printer.
Changing the Configuration (Optional)
You may use the Apple LaserWriter Utility or Apple Printer Utility (or
equivalent utility from your printer manufacturer) to change the AppleTalk
name of the TROY print server. You may also use NCP, TELNET,
XCONFIG, or the serial port to access the print server remote console to
change TROY print server AppleTalk name and default zone name, and to
disable AppleTalk broadcasts. The exact procedure and configuration
commands are described in Appendix A.
Note: A free unsupported version of TELNET is available on the
National Center for Supercomputer Applications (NCSA) FTP site
(ftp.ncsa.edu/Mac/Telnet/Telnet2.7). This TELNET requires Mac
TCP, which is standard with all new versions of the Mac OS.
_____________________________________________________________
6-2
AppleTalk Network Configuration
7
Windows NT/Windows 2000/LAN
Server/Warp Server Configuration
Overview
Users of Windows NT V3.5 or later (including Windows NT Advanced
Server) and Windows 2000 can print directly using the TCP/IP protocol to
printers that are equipped with a TROY print server. No special software is
required on the Windows NT system, and the printing operates
transparently with any application program.
TROY print servers also support transparent printing from IBM LAN
Server and Warp Server file server, as well as from OS/2 Warp Connect
workstations, using the TCP/IP protocol. TCP/IP is included standard with
Warp Server and with LAN Server V4.0, and is optional on LAN Server
V3.x systems. It is also included standard with OS/2 Warp Connect, and is
optional on earlier versions of OS/2.
In addition, client PCs connected to a Windows NT Advanced Server or to
an IBM LAN Server file server can print transparently to the TROY print
server. In this case, the client PCs typically use the NetBEUI protocol to
print jobs to the file server, which in turn spools the job to the TROY print
server via TCP/IP. The advantage of TCP/IP compared to other approaches
is that it is a high-performance routable industry-standard protocol.
Important: TROY recommends TCP/IP for Windows NT and OS/2
printing because it is routable and provides higher performance. Some
TROY print server models also support printing using the NetBEUI or
DLC/LLC protocols (refer to Chapter 1 for specific protocol support
information). Windows NT and OS/2 configuration using these protocols is
described in Chapters 9 and 10 of this manual.
_____________________________________________________________
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuratioin
7-1
Windows NT/2000 IP Configuration
To configure a print queue from a Windows NT computer, you must first
configure an IP address in both the computer and in the print server as
follows:
1.
If you have not already done so, install TCP/IP on your Windows NT
system. This is done via the Network icon in the Control Panel
window of the Windows NT system (the Control Panel is in the
Main window on NT V3.5x systems, or use the Start button on NT
V4.xx to access the Settings menu).
a. On NT V3.5x systems, select Add Software and add TCP/IP
Protocol and related components. Click on Continue and
choose the options TCP/IP Network Printing Support and
Connectivity Options, and click on Continue again. Insert the
requested disk(s) to copy the required files.
b. On NT V4.xx and 2000 systems, click on the Protocols tab, select
Add, and double click on TCP/IP protocol. Insert the requested
disk(s) to copy the required files. Then click on the Services tab
and double click on Microsoft TCP/IP Printing. (only required if
printing from Windows NT 4.xx and using LPR printing). Again
insert the requested disk(s). Click on the Protocols tab when then
copying is finished.
Double click on the TCP/IP Protocol option and add the host IP
address, subnet mask, and gateway address. Consult your system
manager for these addresses. If you are not directly connected to the
Internet, you may assign any arbitrary Class C address of the form
aaa.bbb.ccc.ddd, where aaa is any number from 192 to 222, bbb and
ccc are any number from 0 to 255, and ddd is any number from 0 to
254; for example, 192.189.207.3. You may also use a subnet mask
of 255.255.255.0 with no gateway address. If you have more than
one LAN adapter card, select the one you want to use for TCP/IP.
If you have more than one LAN adapter card, select the one you
want to use with TCP/IP. Click OK twice to exit (you may need to
restart the system).
2.
If you have not already configured the print server IP address, you
will need to do so now. If you have a DHCP server on your network,
an IP address will automatically be assigned. If you do not have
_____________________________________________________________
7-2
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuration
DHCP, the simplest way to assign an IP address with Windows NT
4.x or Windows 2000 is to use XAdmin32 as described in Chapter 3.
As an alternative, or if you have Windows NT 3.5x, you may go to
the MS-DOS Command Prompt and use the arp -s command to
enter the IP address into the TROY print server as shown in the
following example:
arp -s 192.189.207.77 00-40-17-00-ed-d6
ping 192.189.207.77
Again, substitute your actual IP address for 192.189.207.77, and
replace the 00-40-17-00-ed-d6 with the actual Ethernet hardware
address of the TROY print server (which can be found on the label
affixed to the bottom of the box or via the printer self-test). If you
get the message "The arp entry addition failed: 3", try pinging a
known device on the network using the command ping
ipaddress, where ipaddress is the IP address of that device.
Important: You must be on the same Ethernet segment (that is,
there cannot be a router between the TROY print server and the
Windows NT system) to use the arp -s command. If there is a router,
you may use BOOTP or other methods described in Chapter 4 to
enter the IP address. Also, this method only works the first time the
TROY print server is configured. If the TROY print server already
has an IP address, you may use TELNET to access it and change the
IP address using the SET IP ADDRESS command described in
Appendix A.
Important: The TROY print server has a default IP address of
192.0.0.192 (192.189.207.254 on older firmware versions). You
must change this address to a unique value to avoid having duplicate
IP addresses.
Windows 2000 Standard TCP/IP Printer Configuration
Note: Skip this section if you have Windows NT V4.xx or V3.51.
Windows 2000 now allows you to configure a “Standard TCP/IP printer”
that uses a raw TCP port (port 9100 by default) for printing. This feature
will work with any TROY print server that has V3.26 firmware or later. To
use this capability, execute the following steps:
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Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuratioin
7-3
1. Go to the Start button, click on Printers.
2. Double click on Add Printer.
3. Click on Next.
4. Select Local Printer and the click on Next
5. Click on Create New Port and select Standard TCP/IP Port as the
type.
6. Click on Next at the Welcome screen.
7. Enter the IP address or (if you have a name server on the network) the
name of the TROY print server. You can accep the default name for
the port or type in any desired name.
8. Select Generic Network Card unless you want to use a different TCP
port than 9100, in which case select Custom. If you are configuring
XJet IV-Plus or XJet 3000 serial port, select Custom and specify port
9101 for the serial port.
9. Click on Finish.
10. Select the desired printer type and then click on Next.
11. If desired, make the printer the default printer. Click on Next.
12. If desired, make the printer shared. Click on Next.
13. If desired, print a test page. Click on Next.
14. Click on Finish.
Windows NT 4.xx Configuration (NetBIOS IP/NetBEUI)
Note: If you have Windows NT V3.5 or V3.51, skip to the Windows NT
3.5x Configuration section.
If you are running Windows NT 4.xx, we recommend that you use
NetBIOS IP protocol. Please refer to Chapter 9 of this manual, Microsoft
Network Configuration, for the procedure to configure a print queue using
NetBIOS IP and Windows NT 4.xx. This procedure also works with
_____________________________________________________________
7-4
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuration
Windows 2000, but the Standard TCP/IP Port described previously gives
higher performance and does not require installation of special software.
Windows NT V4.xx and 2000 Configuration (LPR/LPD)
As an alternative to NetBIOS printing, you can use lpr/lpd. The
configuration procedure is as follows:
Note: If you have Windows NT V3.5 or V3.51, skip to the next section.
1.
Go to the Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printer.
Double click on the Add Printer icon to get the Add Printer Wizard.
Click. Select My Computer (Not Network Printer) and click on
Next.
2.
Select Add Port, select LPR Port from the list of available ports,
and click on New Port.
3.
Type in the IP address that you wish to assign to the print server in
the Name or address of server providing lpd: box. If you do not
have a router on the network, this IP address must match the first
three bytes of the IP address of your computer. For example, if your
computer has an IP address of 192.189.207.53, your print server
must have an address like 192.189.207.27.
4.
Type in the print server service name in the Name of printer of
print queue on that server: box. If you do not know which service
name to use, enter BINARY_P1 for the MIO/EIO/XIO port and
BINARY_S1 for the XJet IV-Plus serial port, and then click on OK:
5.
Click on Close. The new print server IP address should be listed and
highlighted as an available port. Click on Next.
6.
Select the desired printer manufacturer and model (click Have Disk
if your printer is not listed), and click on Next.
7.
If the driver already exists, select Keep Existing Driver (if it does
not, this step will be skipped), and then click on Next.
8.
If desired, change the name of the printer and/or make it the default,
and then click on Next.
_____________________________________________________________
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuratioin
7-5
9.
If desired, make the printer shared (so other users can access it), and
select the operating system(s) that these other computers will be
running. Click on Next.
10.
Select Yes when you are asked "Would you like to print a test page?"
Click on Finish to complete the installation.
You may now print to the printer as if it were a local printer.
Windows NT 3.5x Configuration
If you have Windows NT or NT AS 3.5 or 3.51, use the following
procedure to configure the TROY print server:
1.
Go to the Main window and elect Print Manager icon.
2.
Select Printer menu.
3.
Select Create Printer
4.
Enter any name for the printer for the Printer Name.
5.
Select Driver. Choose appropriate driver.
6.
Select Description. Enter anything.
7.
Select Print to.
8.
Select Other.
9.
Select LPR Port.
10.
Enter the TROY print server IP address or name (from HOSTS file)
as the Name or Address of Host Providing LPD.
11.
Enter the TROY print server service name as the Name of Printer
on That Machine. Generally speaking, you should use the service
BINARY_xx (where "xx" is the P1 for the first MIO/EIO/XIO port
or S1 for the XJet IV-Plus or XJet 3000 serial port to pass the data
through unmodified.
_____________________________________________________________
7-6
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuration
LAN Server/Warp Server Configuration
TROY print servers will work with IBM LAN Server/Warp Server
networks that have IBM TCP/IP V2.0 or later software installed on the file
server (TCP/IP is standard with LAN Server V4.0 and later, and on Warp
Server). Use the following procedure to configure the TROY print server
on an OS/2 LAN Server or Warp Server file server, or on a OS/2 Warp
Connect workstation:
Important: TROY recommends TCP/IP for OS/2 printing because it is
routable and provides higher performance. Some TROY print server
models also support OS/2 printing using the NetBEUI or DLC/LLC
protocols (refer to Chapter 1 for specific protocol support information).
OS/2 configuration using these protocols is described in Chapters 9 and 10
of this manual.
1.
Make sure that TCP/IP software is installed on your OS/2 file server.
If you have not already done so, open the TCP/IP folder on the
desktop, and double click on the TCP/IP Configuration icon to add
the IP address to the OS/2 file server (consult your system manager
for this address).
2.
Add the TROY print server name to the HOSTS file (usually located
in the \tcpip\etc directory; this step is not required if you use the
TROY print server IP address as the name). To do this, go to the
OS/2 System icon, open the Command Prompts folder, and double
click on the OS/2 Window icon. Use the OS/2 editor and add the an
entry similar to the following:
192.189.207.77
xps
Substitute the name of the TROY print server (any unique name will
do) and the desired IP address in place of xps and 192.189.207.77 in
the above example.
3.
While still at the OS/2 prompt, use the following command to enter
the IP address into the TROY print server:
arp -s xps 00:40:17:00:ed:d6 temp
Again, substitute your actual name and IP address for xps and
192.189.207.77, and replace the 00:40:17:00:ed:d6 with the actual
Ethernet hardware address of the TROY print server (which can be
found on the label affixed to the TROY print server box or via the
_____________________________________________________________
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuratioin
7-7
printer self-test; note that you should use colons rather than hyphens
to separate the bytes of the hardware address). The IP address will
be set when you ping the print server in the next step.
Important: You must be on the same Ethernet segment (that is,
there cannot be a router between the TROY print server and the
OS/2 system). If there is a router, you may use BOOTP or other
methods described in Chapter 4 to enter the IP address. Also, this
method only works the first time the TROY print server is configured.
If the TROY print server already has an IP address, you may use
TELNET to access it and change the IP address using the SET IP
ADDRESS command described in Appendix A.
4.
Set the IP address and verify the connection by using the ping
command with the address or name of the TROY print server. For
example:
ping 192.189.207.77
ping xps
or
Again, substitute your actual name and IP address in place of xps and
192.189.207.77 in the above examples. You should get a response
back from the TROY print server if the IP address has been set and
the print server is alive on the network. If you do not, run the printer
self-test as described in Chapter 2 and verify that you have entered
the correct IP address.
5.
From the OS/2 desktop open the Templates folder. Use the right
mouse button to drag the Printer icon (not the Network Printer
icon) onto the desktop.
6.
The Create a Printer window should be open (if it is not, double
click on the printer icon).
-
Type in any name for the printer.
-
Select the default printer driver. If the desired printer driver is
not listed, click on the Install new Printer Driver button and
add the driver.
-
Choose the output port. IBM TCP/IP automatically creates 8
named pipes called \PIPE\LPD0 through \PIPE\LPD7.
Pick an unused one and double click on it.
_____________________________________________________________
7-8
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuration
Important Note: Early versions of Warp Server have a bug in
which the named pipes do not appear (the problem does not
affect Warp Connect or LAN Server). This problem is fixed via
a patch available from IBM.
You will get the Settings window. Enter the following:
LPD server
LPD printer
Host name
User
The TROY print
server name (from HOSTS
file) or IP address.
For most applications, use the
TROY print server
binary service BINARY_P1
(for the MIO/EIO/XIO port),
BINARY_S1 (for the
XJet IV-Plus or XJet 3000 serial port)
to pass data through unmodified.
However, if you are printing
text files from the DOS or
OS/2 command prompt, you
should use the text service
TEXT_P1, which will add
carriage returns for proper
formatting of the data (but
will potentially distort
graphics printouts).
The IP name of the OS/2
file server
The IP address of the OS/2
file server
You may leave the other entries blank. Click on the OK button.
The pipe should be highlighted; if not click on it.
7.
- Click on the Create button to create the printer.
Open the LAN Services folder and execute the LAN Requester
program:
-
Select Definitions
Select Aliases
Select Printers
Select Create. Enter the following:
_____________________________________________________________
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuratioin
7-9
Alias
Description
Server name
Spooler queue
Maximum number
of users
8.
Should be same as printer
name previously defined
Anything you want
Name of OS/2 server
Name of printer as defined
previously
Leave blank unless you want
to limit the number of users
Exit the LAN Requester program.
You should now be able to print. To test the queue, type the
following from either the OS/2 command prompt or from a DOS
workstation:
COPY C:\CONFIG.SYS \\servername\alias
where servername is the name of the file server and alias is the alias
name that you specified during this configuration process. This
should print the CONFIG.SYS file on the printer. Note that if you
selected a binary service as the LPD printer name, the lines will be
staggered; don't worry about this because normal DOS, Windows,
and OS/2 applications will print OK.
9.
The TROY print server will appear as a standard OS/2 printer to
application programs. To make the TROY print server operate
transparently with DOS programs, execute the following command
on each workstation:
NET USE LPT1: \\servername\alias
This will make the printer and the TROY print server appear to the
software as a printer that is directly connected to the parallel port of
the workstation.
_____________________________________________________________
7-10
Windows NT/2000 and Warp Server Configuration
8
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer
Configuration (HP JetAdmin)
Overview
The Windows 95 and Windows 98 operating systems feature a built-in
peer-to-peer networking capability that allows network printing without a
central file server. TROY print servers support this capability using either
the Direct Mode IPX or TCP/IP protocols.
Note: TROY recommends using Direct Mode IPX or TCP/IP for Windows
95/98 Peer-to-Peer printing because these protocols are routable and
provide the highest performance. Some TROY print server models also
support the NetBEUI protocol for printing from Windows 95 computers
(refer to Chapter 1 for protocol support information). Refer to Chapter 9
for information on using NetBEUI.
Configuring the Windows 95/98 PC
To use a peer-to-peer print queue from a Windows 95/98 workstation, first
make sure that the following items are configured in the Network Control
Panel:
•
•
•
•
Client for Microsoft Networks
IPX/SPX-Compatible Protocol or TCP/IP Protocol (TCP/IP requires
V3.46 or later firmware and is not supported on older versions of
JetAdmin; if you are using TCP/IP, both your PC and print server must
be configured with a valid IP address; refer to chapter 3 for information
on setting the print server IP address with XAdmin32)
HP JetAdmin (only required in the Control Panel if you have a
version of JetAdmin earlier than V2.33)
The appropriate network adapter driver (for example, 3Com EtherLink
III)
If you want to use a version of JetAdmin later than 2.0, you must install
JetAdmin on your PC. JetAdmin is included on the Windows 95
distribution CD, or it can be downloaded from the HP web site. The
_______________________________________________________
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
8-1
JetAdmin setup program provides a step-by-step guide through the
installation process.
Important: JetAdmin 3.3 or later requires XJet firmware version 3.58 or
higher.
Important: Windows 98 requires either JetAdmin V2.54 (this version can
be installed from the Microsoft Windows 98 CD by running the
SETUP.EXE file in the DRIVERS/PRINTERS/JETADMIN/DISK1/
directory) or V3.30 or later (available on the HP web site).
Configuring Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer (JetAdmin V3.0 and Above)
1.
Go the Start button, choose Programs, HP JetAdmin Utilities and
then Add HP JetDirect Printers. Select Custom Setup and press
Next.
2.
Select either IPX/SPX or TCP/IP printer, depending on which
protocol you want to use. Click on Printer List to get a list of
available printers (or you may manually enter the information).
3.
Click on the print server name (XCD_xxxxxx_P1 is the default name
for IPX/SPX and XCD_xxxxxx is the default for TCP/IP, where
"xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the Ethernet address) and press OK
and then Next. Note that if you have an multiple ports enabled, the
print server name will show up twice in the list; you may click on
either name to configure it.
4.
Select the desired port (port #1 for the EIO or MIO port, and if
present, port #2 for serial port). Press Next.
5.
If you need to print from DOS, type in LPT2 or LPT3 as the port
name (do not put in the colon). Do not use LPT1 or any other
physical port on the PC. If you do not need to print from DOS, you
may enter any name. Click Next for TCP/IP or Finish for IPX/SPX.
Note: If you specify LPT2 or LPT3 you can ignore the message
about potential hardware conflicts if you do not have physical ports
with these names.
If you are using IPX/SPX, click Finish and skip to step 7. If you are
using TCP/IP, click Next.
_______________________________________________________
8-2
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
6.
If you are using TCP/IP, you can change the desired IP address.
Click on Finish to continue.
7.
Click OK when you get the message that the port has been
successfully created.
8.
Select the appropriate printer driver and click Next.
9.
Choose the port you created in step 5 and then click Next.
10.
Pick any name for the printer and click Next. Print a test page if
desired, and then press Finish.
Configuring Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer (JetAdmin V2.33 to 2.53)
1.
Go to the Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printers.
Click on the Add Printer icon, click Next, select Local printer, and
click Next again.
2.
Select the appropriate printer driver and click Next. Choose LPT1:
as the port and click Next. Pick any name for the printer and click
Next. Do not print a test page. Click Finish to complete the
preliminary printer installation.
3.
Click on the printer icon of the printer you just created. From the
File menu, choose the Properties and then select the Details tab.
4.
Choose Add Port.
5.
Select Other.
6.
Choose HP JetDirect port, OK.
7.
Select IPX/SPX Printer (if you are using the IP/SPX compatible
protocol) or TCP/IP Printer (if you are using TCP/IP) and click on
Search. Select the desired print server from the list and click OK (it
is also possible to manually type in the print server address, name,
and IP address). The print server information will now be displayed.
Click Next to continue.
8.
You will get the message that "The network device you have selected
has more than one port. Please select the port used in your printer."
_______________________________________________________
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
8-3
Select port 1 for the EIO or MIO port, and if present, port 2 for the
serial, and then click OK.
9.
If you need to print from DOS, type in LPT2 or LPT3 as the port
name (do not put in the colon). Do not use LPT1 or any other
physical port on the PC. If you do not need to print from DOS, you
may enter any name. Click Finish if you are using the IPX/SPX
protocol or Next if you are using TCP/IP.
10.
If you are using TCP/IP, the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway of
the print server should be displayed. Click Finish.
11.
At the Details tab, the section "Print to the following port" should
read something similar to "LPT2 (HP Direct Port)."
12.
Click Apply and then OK to exit the Properties menu.
You should now be able to print to the new printer from either
Windows 95 or DOS applications.
Configuring Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer (pre-V2.33)
1.
Click on Next, Select Network Printer and click on Next again.
2.
Select Browse, double click the HP_Network_Printers icon, and
then select the print server name server name (default name is
XCD_xxxxxx_pp , where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the Ethernet
address and "pp" is P1 for the EIO or MIO port, and if present, S1
for serial port). Click on Next.
Please note pre-V2.33 versions of JetAdmin do not support Peer-toPeer printing from DOS applications (this is a Microsoft/HP bug).
3.
Select the desired printer manufacturer and model (click Have Disk
if your printer is not listed), and click on Next.
4.
If the driver already exists, select Keep Existing Driver (if it does
not, this step will be skipped), and then click on Next.
5.
If desired, change the name of the printer and/or make it the default,
and then click on Next.
_______________________________________________________
8-4
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
6.
If desired, you may print a test page (this may take a few minutes to
print). Click on Finish to complete the installation. You may now
print to the printer as if it were a local printer
_______________________________________________________
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
8-5
_______________________________________________________
8-6
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Configuration
9
Microsoft Network Configuration
(NetBEUI or NetBIOS IP)
Overview
Certain TROY print server models support the NetBEUI and NetBIOS/IP
protocols for printing on Microsoft-compatible networks (refer to chapter 1
for specific protocol support information). Because they also support the
SMB protocol, TROY print servers automatically appear in the Windows
Network Neighborhood and can be managed using standard operating
system utilities.
Note: The workstation will automatically use NetBIOS/IP if TCP/IP is
enabled on it. It will use NetBEUI only if TCP/IP is not available.
Note: NetBIOS/IP operation and support for more than one port requires
V3.62 or later firmware. The latest firmware is available on the Internet at
http://www.troyxcd.com.
Important: If you are using NetBIOS/IP, you must first configure the print
server with a valid IP address using the XAdmin32 utility as described in
Chapter 3. You may also need to set the WINS primary and secondary
servers using the commands SET NETBIOS METHOD, SET NETBIOS
PRIMARY, and SET NETBIOS SECONDARY commands from the print
server console as described in Appendix A. This is not required if you are
using NetBEUI only.
Print Server Configuration
To use the print server with a Microsoft network, you must know which
domain it resides on. By default, Microsoft networks use the domain name
WORKGROUP, so if you have not specifically configured a domain name
for your network, you may use the name WORKGROUP and skip the
remainder of this section.
If you have a different domain name, then you must configure this name
into the print server. To do this, you may use XAdmin32, XAdmin,
_____________________________________________________________
Microsoft Network Configuration
9-1
WebXAdmin, or the print server console to connect to the print server (refer
to Chapter 3 for information on installing and using these utilities):
• With XAdmin32, double click on the print server name and then click
on the NetBIOS tab. Then enter the desired domain name.
• With WebXAdmin, click on Configure NetBIOS and then enter the
desired domain name.
• With the print server console, enter the command:
SET NETB DOMAIN domainname,
where domainname is the desired domain name.
Windows 95/98 and Windows NT/2000 Port Monitor Installation
Although it is possible to install the TROY print server as a network printer
on Windows 95/98 or Windows NT/2000, this procedure is not
recommended unless you have a very simple network. The reason is that
these operating systems do not adequately support queuing print jobs from
multiple host computers to a diskless print server (the queues may stop).
To get around this problem, TROY provides a port monitor that installs on
the Windows 95/98 or NT/2000 computer. This port monitor acts like a
local printer port, and therefore operates transparently with all Windows
software. If you did not receive this software on CD-ROM or diskette, you
may download it from the TROY web site (http://www.troyxcd.com).
To install the port monitor, go the Start button, select Run and click
Browse.. Choose the appropriate drive, and if you are installing from CDROM, open the Monitors folder. Double click on the SETUP program.
Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation.
1.
Click Next at the welcome screen.
2.
Select Next at the Choose Destination Location screen (or Browse
to choose a different folder).
3.
Select Next at the Select Program Folder screen (or select an
existing folder from the list).
4.
Click Yes when asked if you would like to configure a NetBIOS
Port.
_____________________________________________________________
9-2
Microsoft Network Configuration
5.
You will be asked to enter a port name, which must begin with "NB"
(for example NB23). Enter the desired name or accept the default
NB1. Click OK.
6.
Select Browse when asked for the Remote Print Server.
- Choose the desired workgroup and click Next.
- Choose the TROY print server from the list of available devices.
The default name of the print server is XCD_xxxxxx, where
"xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the Ethernet address (for example,
XCD_035893).
- Choose the desired printer (service) from the list. The default
service is BINARY_P1 for the EIO or MIO port, or BINARY_S1
for the serial port.
- Click Finish and then OK.
7.
Click Finish to restart the computer.
Note: Print servers with firmware versions 3.58 and earlier use an address
of the form \\XCD_xxxxxx_pp\pp, where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the
Ethernet address and "pp" is the port name (P1 for the EIO or MIO port, or
S1 for the serial port..
You must then create a local (not network) printer on your system that uses
this port. First go the Networks icon in the Control Panel on your
workstation and make sure that you have the following enabled:
- TCP/IP or NetBEUI protocol
- Client for Microsoft Network
- Appropriate Ethernet LAN adapter card
The procedures for doing this are as follows:
Windows 95/98 Printer Installation
1.
Go to the Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printer.
Click on the Add Printer icon, click Next, select Local printer,
and click Next again.
2.
Select the appropriate printer driver and click Next. Choose NB1 as
the port (unless you changed the name to something else) and click
Next. Pick any name for the printer and click Next. If desired, print
_____________________________________________________________
Microsoft Network Configuration
9-3
a test page. Click Finish to complete the preliminary printer
installation.
Windows NT 4.x/2000 Printer Installation
1.
Go to the Start button, choose Settings, and then select Printer.
Click on the Add Printer icon, select My Computer, and click
Next again.
2.
Choose NB1 as the port (unless you changed the name to something
else) and click Next. Select the appropriate printer driver and click
Next. Pick any name for the printer and click Next. Selected
Shared or Not Shared, depending on whether you want other
computers to access the printer. If desired, print a test page. Click
Finish to complete the preliminary printer installation.
LAN Server/WARP Server Configuration
OS/2 File Server Configuration:
1.
Open the Templates folder on the OS/2 desktop.
2.
Using the right mouse button, drag the Printer template onto the
desktop.
3.
Type in any desired name for the printer from the Create a Printer
window.
4.
Choose an unused port (for example, LPT3) to connect to the
printer.
5.
Choose the appropriate printer driver from the list.
6.
Click Create and then OK.
7.
If desired, indicate whether you want to share the printer.
OS/2 Workstation Configuration:
On each workstation that you wish to print from, execute the following
step:
_____________________________________________________________
9-4
Microsoft Network Configuration
1
Go to the DOS or OS/2 command prompt and enter the command:
NET USE LPTx: \\servername\servicename
where “x” is the LPT port number (1 through 9), servername is the
print server name (XCD_xxxxxx) by default, where “xxxxxx” is the
last six digits of Ethernet address and servicename is the service
name, (BINARY_P1, BINARY_S1, BINARY_P2, or BINARY_S2)
NET USE LPT2: \\XCD_002477\BINARY_P1
_____________________________________________________________
Microsoft Network Configuration
9-5
_____________________________________________________________
9-6
Microsoft Network Configuration
10
DLC/LLC Network Configuration
Overview
Certain TROY print server models support the DLC/LLC protocol, a simple
protocol that is supported on a wide range of network operating systems
(refer to chapter 1 for specific print server protocol support information).
DLC/LLC is included as a standard part of Windows NT and Windows NT
AS. It can be used on other systems with the addition of vendor supplied
software that supports the Hewlett-Packard JetDirect card.
Important Note: The DLC protocol cannot be enabled on more than one
print server service, and is therefore limited to a single port. By default,
print jobs will go the EIO or MIO port. Because DLC is a non-routable
protocol, there cannot be a router between the print server and the sending
computer.
Configuring DLC/LLC on Windows NT/2000
To use DLC/LLC on Windows NT/2000, you must first install the DLC
protocol:
1.
Go to the NT Control Panel and double click on the Network icon.
2.
Click Add Software
3.
On Windows NT 3.xx systems, select Add Software. On Windows
NT 4.xx/2000 systems, click on the Protocols tab, and click Add.
4.
Select DLC Protocol. Click Continue (for 3.xx systems) or Close
(for 4.xx systems).
5.
Reboot your system to make the change take effect.
_____________________________________________________________
DLC/LLC Configuration
10-1
Windows NT 4.xx/2000 Printer Setup
1.
From the Start menu, select Settings and then Printers. Double click
on Add Printer.
2.
Select My Computer and then click Next.
3.
Select Add a Port.
4.
Select Hewlett-Packard Network Port and then click New Port
5.
A list of available print server Ethernet addresses appears in the larger
box under Card Address. Select the address of the desired print server
(the address is on the label affixed to the print server, or it can be
gotten through the self-test page). The selected print server address
will then appear in the smaller box under Card Address.
6.
Type in any desired name for the port (the name must not be the name
of an existing port or DOS device, such as LPT1) and click OK and
Close.
7.
The Printer Ports menu will appear. The name you selected in step 6
will appear as a checked port in the list of available ports. Click Next.
8.
Select the desired printer manufacturer and model and click Next.
9.
Give a name to the printer. If desired, select the printer as the default.
10. Select Shared or Not Shared. If shared, select the type of operating
systems that will be printing to it.
11. Select whether or not you want a test page, and then select Finish.
12. You will need to reboot your system in order to make the change take
effect.
Windows NT 3.xx Printer Setup
1.
From the Windows NT Main group, double click on the Print
Manager icon.
2.
Select Printer from the menu bar and click on Create Printer.
_____________________________________________________________
10-2
DLC/LLC Configuration
3.
Enter any desired name for the printer in the Printer Name box.
4.
Select the printer model in the Driver menu.
5.
Choose Other (or Network Printer for V3.1 systems) from the Print
to menu.
6.
Click on Hewlett-Packard Network Port.
7.
Type in your desired name for the port (this name must not be an
existing port or DOS device, such as LPT1).
8.
The Ethernet addresses of available print servers will appear in the
Card Address menu. Select the desired address (the address is on
the label affixed to the print server, or it can be gotten through the
self-test page) and then click OK.
9.
If you want to share the printer, click Share the Printer on the
Network.
10.
Click OK
11.
If necessary, select the appropriate printer options and then click
OK.
Configuring DLC/LLC on Other Systems
To use DLC/LLC on other network systems, you will generally need
vendor supplied software. Typically such software is designed to support
the HP JetDirect print server. Follow the vendor's instructions to install the
DLC protocol on your system.
Once the protocol is installed, you create a network port in a manner similar
to the Windows NT procedure described in the previous sections. The
Ethernet address of the print server should automatically appear during the
configuration process.
The final step is to create a printer using the normal operating system
printer setup method. The only difference is that instead of connecting the
printer to the LPT1 parallel port, you point it to the network port you just
created.
_____________________________________________________________
DLC/LLC Configuration
10-3
Note: TROY does not recommend using the DLC protocol with Windows
for Workgroups 3.11 in a peer-to-peer configuration if the printer will be
heavily used. This is because jobs may be rejected due to print spooler
timeouts. The best solution in these situations is to set up one PC as a
server for handling network print jobs. All of the other PCs send their print
jobs to the server PC using NetBEUI or TCP/IP, and the server PC then
uses DLC to send the print jobs to the TROY print server.
_____________________________________________________________
10-4
DLC/LLC Configuration
11
LAT Network Configuration
Overview
TROY print servers equipped with the LAT protocol are compatible with
the Digital Equipment DECserver family of terminal servers. This means
that if you are already familiar with configuring DECservers or compatible
terminal servers in your network, you can use similar procedures to
configure the TROY print server.
TROY Print Server LAT Concepts
The TROY print server is a node on the Ethernet that offers a printing
service to other nodes on the network. A node is simply a device, such as a
host computer, terminal server, or print server. Every node on the network
has a unique name, so the TROY print server comes preconfigured with the
name "XCD_" followed by the last six digits of the Ethernet address (for
example, "XCD_00C351").
The TROY print server comes preconfigured to run on a LAT network
without any additional setup. The configuration can be changed if
necessary by using the NCP, NCL, or ccr facility on your host computer, or
via the serial port; this procedure is described in Appendix A of this
manual. Note that in most cases it is not necessary to change the
configuration.
To use the TROY print server with a VMS host computer, you will first
need to create a LAT application port on the host. A LAT application port
allows a program to send and receive data over a LAT connection as if it
were communicating with a directly-connected physical port. You will then
need to associate a print queue with this port.
VMS LAT Host Configuration
The configuration process requires that you have system manager
privileges. Before beginning the LAT configuration process, you must first
make sure that LAT has been started on your system. If you are currently
_____________________________________________________________
DEC LAT Network Configuration
11-1
using terminal servers on your network, then LAT has probably already
been activated. If LAT is not started, then you need to execute the
following command before proceeding with configuration of the TROY
print server:
@SYS$STARTUP:LAT$STARTUP
1.
Before creating print queue, you will need to determine the
following:
•
The VMS queue name. This can be any unique name (do a
SHOW QUEUE command at the VMS prompt to list the existing
queues).
•
The LAT application port. This name of this port is LTAxxx,
where "xxx" is any unused number (do a SHOW PORT command
in the VMS LATCP program to see the existing ports).
•
The TROY print server node name and port name . The
default node name is XCD_xxxxxx, where "xxxxxx" is the last six
digits of the Ethernet address (for example, XCD_00C3E4).
You can get the name of your print server by running the TROY
print server self-test (refer to Chapter 2 for information on
running the self-test), or with the SHOW SERVER command
from the TROY print server console. The port name is P1 for
the first EIO, MIO, or XIO port, or P2 for the serial port.If you
the LN03 option on the XJet IV, the port name is LN instead of
P1.
Important: If you wish to use a different node name, you must
change the print server name as described in as described in
Appendix A.
2.
Use the VMS editor to create a text file with the necessary
configuration commands (alternatively, you may edit the file
LAT$SYSTARTUP.COM for VMS 5.5-x and later systems or
LTLOAD.COM for earlier VMS systems). For instance, the
following sample command file creates a queue named XCD on LAT
port 33 for a TROY print server with a default node name of
XCD_00C351 using the LATSYM processor and the default VMS
form:
$MCR LATCP
_____________________________________________________________
11-2
DEC LAT Network Configuration
CREATE PORT LTA33:/APPLICATION
SET PORT LTA33:/NODE=XCD_003C51/PORT=P1
SHOW PORT LTA33:
EXIT
$SET TERM LTA33:/PASTHRU/TAB/NOBROADCAST/PERM
$SET DEVICE/SPOOL LTA33:
$INIT/QUEUE/START/ON=LTA33:/PROC=LATSYM XCD
Substitute your actual node name, port name (P1, S1, P2, S2, or LN),
LAT port and queue name for the ones in the example. If you are
using a service name, specify /SERVICE= servicename instead
of /PORT=P1.
Important: Use the default names unless you have specifically
changed the names via the TROY print server remote console.
Important: Be sure to specify PROC=LATSYM or the queue will
not service requests from multiple host computers.
3.
Execute the command file you have just created by typing "@" plus
the file name in response to the VMS "$" prompt (for example,
@LATSTART.COM). For additional convenience, you may want to
include the "@filename" command in your system startup file so
that the procedure is executed automatically when the system is
booted.
4.
Define or modify a form for use with the TROY print server. VMS
uses forms to define the page layout. If you are printing graphics or
PostScript jobs, you must define your form for NOTRUNCATE and
NOWRAP to prevent printer errors. For example, to redefine the
VMS default form DEFAULT, you would type the following at the
"$" prompt:
DEFINE/FORM DEFAULT/NOTRUNCATE/NOWRAP
If you are defining a new form, be sure to specify
STOCK=DEFAULT (unless you are using a special stock) and
initialize the queue with the DEFAULT=FORM option. For example,
to create a form called PCL for the queue XCD on LAT port
LTA33:, you would type:
DEFINE/FORM PCL/NOTRUNC/NOWRAP/STOCK=DEFAULT
INIT/QUEUE/START/ON=LTA33:/PROC=LATSYM/-
_____________________________________________________________
DEC LAT Network Configuration
11-3
DEFAULT=FORM=PCL XCD
5.
You are now ready to print. Use the PRINT command with the
name of the queue and the file you wish to print as shown in the
following example:
PRINT/QUEUE=XCD MYFILE.TXT
If the file does not print, recheck the hardware and software
configuration, and then try printing again. If the file still does not
print, refer to the Troubleshooting, chapter for further assistance.
Eliminating Blank Pages (Optional)
When Hewlett-Packard printers are used with VMS, a blank page is often
printed after each job. To eliminate this blank page, first create a text file
with the following contents:
<ESC>]VMS;2<ESC>\
where <ESC> is the escape character (ASCII 27) and the "VMS" must be in
uppercase characters. Then insert this file into your default library
(normally SYSDEVCTL.TLB), and specify it as a setup module in your
form (stop and reset all queues that use the library before doing this
procedure). For example:
$LIB/INS SYS$SYSROOT:[SYSLIB]SYSDEVCTL.TLB NOBL
$DEF/FORM PCL/SETUP=NOBL
The above example inserts the file NOBL.TXT into the default library and
then redefines the form PCL (previously defined in step 4) to eliminate
blank pages.
Note: This procedure is not required for DECprint Supervisor (DCPS).
PATHWORKS for DOS Configuration
The instructions for configuring a PATHWORKS print queue depend on
whether you have V4.X or V5.X.
_____________________________________________________________
11-4
DEC LAT Network Configuration
PATHWORKS V5.X Server Setup Instructions:
To print from PATHWORKS V5.X, you must first create a LAN Manager
printer destination, and then you must make it shareable. The procedure is
as follows:
1. To create a LAN Manager printer destination, use one of the following
methods (note that by default the printer name you supply also
identifies the printer destination, a default LAN Manager print
queue, and a VMS print queue):
-
Type ADMINISTRATE/PATHWORKS from the VMS prompt
to enter the Server Admin interface. Then select Printer
Destinations option from the View Menu and enter the required
information.
OR
-
Use the MANAGEWORKS program on a PATHWORKS PC.
Select the desired server, choose the Create option from the
Actions menu, and then choose the LAN Manager Printer
Queue option (the Create LM Print Queue dialog box will be
displayed). In the Print Destinations section of the dialog box,
choose ADD.
These two methods will automatically create a VMS print queue
and a default LAN Manager print queue associated with the
printer destination.
2.
To share a LAN Manager print queue:
-
From the Server Admin interface, choose the Shared resources
option from the View menu.
-
From the MANAGEWORKS interface, select the desired server,
choose the Create option from the Actions menu, and choose
LAN Manager Shared Printer.
-
At the VMS Command line, type the command:
NET SHARE sharename=printername
where sharename is the share name associated with the print
queue and printername is the name of the printer from Step 1.
_____________________________________________________________
DEC LAT Network Configuration
11-5
PATHWORKS V4.X Server Setup Instructions:
1.
Create a VMS queue as described in previous sections.
2.
Run PCSA_MANAGER on the VMS system.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
Type MENU to get the PCSA menu.
Select SERVICE OPTIONS
Select ADD SERVICE (do not use the ADD PRINTER QUEUE
option, as this will add a PCL printer reset that will affect
PostScript printing.
Select PRINTER SERVICE
Enter service name (pick any name)
Enter VMS queue name (previously defined)
Enter VMS form name (use the default if you do not have a
specific form defined)
PC Setup Instructions (All Versions):
1.
Perform the following steps on the PC to connect to the print service
you created in the previous steps:
a.
If you are using DOS, type the command USE
LPTx:\\node\service at the DOS prompt, where x is the
PC parallel port number, node is the DECnet node name and
service is the service name picked previously. For example:
USE LPT1:\\VAX\LASER
You may delete this print service by typing LATCP at the C:>
prompt and then entering the command DELETE LPT1:
b.
If you are using WINDOWS, first make sure that you have
selected DEC PATHWORKS as the network under the
Windows Setup icon. Then:
-
-
Click on the Print Manager icon and select Options and
then Printer Setup
Click Add, go to the List of Printers, select the desired
printer type, and click Install. If desired, click Set as
Default Printer.
Click Connect and select the desired port (e.g., LPT1)
_____________________________________________________________
11-6
DEC LAT Network Configuration
-
-
Click Network and select the port you chose above and type
in the network path (\\node\service, where node is
the DECnet node name and service is the service name
picked previously; for example, \\VAX\LASER)
Click Connect (the Current Printer Connection should
show the port and the network path that you selected)
Click Close, OK, Close, and Exit to get out of the Print
Manager
PATHWORKS for Macintosh Configuration
If you are using PATHWORKS for Macintosh, you will need to make sure
that you have a bidirectional channel (in other words, you did NOT enter
the command SET SERVICE servicename RECEIVE ENABLED from the
TROY print server remote console). Then create a LAT port using LATCP
as shown in the following example (substitute your actual node name and
LAT port number):
CREATE PORT LTA53:/APPLICATION
SET PORT LTA53:/NODE=XCD_009C53/PORT=P1
Do not set the LAT port as a spooled device. Now go into ADMIN/MSA
and enter the command :
ADD PRINTER name/QUEUE=queuename/DEST=LTA53:
where name is the name of the printer, and queuename is the queue name.
DECprint Supervisor Configuration Notes
If you want to use a TROY print server with the DECprint Supervisor
software, you must have the DCPS-Open option in order to support
Hewlett-Packard printers (you may also need to modify the DCPS device
control modules and queue setup to handle "unrecognized" printers). Do
not use the print server console command SET SERVICE RECEIVE,
because bidirectional communications is required for DCPS.
Important: DCPS requires that the printer be forced into PostScript
mode. It will NOT work if the printer is set to autosense between PCL and
PostScript.
_____________________________________________________________
DEC LAT Network Configuration
11-7
Installation on Other Host Computers
Installation procedures differ somewhat for other DEC operating systems
(e.g., RSTS/E and RSX-11M-PLUS). Refer to the appropriate DEC
documentation for information on setting up LAT print queues on these
systems.
Changing the Configuration (Optional)
The print server default configuration is adequate for most applications.
However, if you wish to change the configuration, you may access the print
server console via the NCP or NCL utilities on a VMS system, the ccr or
TELNET commands on an ULTRIX computer, or through the serial port
using DECserver-style commands. The configuration procedure is
described in detail in Appendix A.
_____________________________________________________________
11-8
DEC LAT Network Configuration
12
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
Overview
TROY print servers that include the Banyan VINES IP protocol (refer to
chapter 1 for specific protocol support information) allow printers to be
shared on a Banyan VINES network. Users on client PCs send their jobs to
any VINES file server running the Banyan PCPrint software, which in turn
spools the jobs to the TROY print server and the printer. Printing is
transparent to user applications, and the print server can be managed using
standard VINES utilities like MANAGE, MSERVICE, MUSER, and the
Operator Console printer control. In addition, VINES users can print
concurrently with users of NetWare, TCP/IP, and AppleTalk.
In order to use a TROY print server on a VINES network, you will need the
following:
• Banyan's PCPrint software (a Banyan-supplied software option that is
installed on the VINES file server)
• Optional Banyan firmware on the TROY print server
• TROY XAdmin 16-bit utility software (on TROY Print Server Software
diskette or CD-ROM) or access to print server console via serial port, or
through TELNET, DEC NCP or NCL, or TROY XCONFIG NetWare
utilities (refer to Appendix A of the TROY print server manual for
information on using the console).
Note: The new XAdmin32 32-bit utility does not currently work on a
Banyan VINES workstation unless the workstation is also running
TCP/IP or NetWare.
A. File Server User Configuration
The first step in the configuration process is to configure the file server so
that the TROY print server can log into the Banyan VINES network. To do
this, you will need to configure a StreetTalk user name for the print server
(all VINES print servers log into the file server as users).
_____________________________________________________________
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
12-1
1.
From any VINES workstation log in as a supervisor and execute the
MANAGE program by typing MANAGE at the DOS prompt.
2.
At the main menu, select 2 - Users and press ENTER.
3.
You will get the Manage Users screen. Select ADD a user to get
the Add A User screen. Type in a StreetTalk name for the desired
TROY print server service. You may optionally type in a
description, nickname, and a password. Press the F10 key when you
are finished.
4.
You will then get the Add User Profile screen. Select a blank user
profile and then press ENTER. If there is no existing blank profile,
the select the Sample Profile.
5.
You will get the message "Do you want to force the user to change
passwords on the next login?". Select No and press ENTER.
6.
You will then get the Manage A User screen. If you selected a
blank user profile in step 4, you can skip to step 8. Otherwise, use
the arrow keys to select MANAGE User Profile and press ENTER.
7.
You will get the Manage User Profile screen. Execute the
following steps to create a blank user profile:
- Select EDIT profile
- When the profile appears on the screen, press CTRL-X multiple
times to delete every line in the profile, and press F10 when you
have finished. You may then use this newly created blank profile
as a template when configuring additional TROY print servers.
Then press ESCAPE to return to the Manage a User screen.
8.
Press ESCAPE twice to return to the main menu.
B. File Server Queue Configuration
You must now configure the queue(s) on the Banyan VINES file servers.
Print queues are one of several different types of services that are available
on a VINES file server. You may configure several print queues for a
single TROY print server. For example, one print queue could be for
printing jobs to the print server MIO port, while another would be for the
_____________________________________________________________
12-2
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
serial port. To configure a print queue, use the MANAGE utility as
follows:
1.
From the main menu, select 1 - Services and press ENTER.
2.
You will get the Manage Services menu. Select ADD a serverbased service and press ENTER.
3.
From the Add A Service screen type the desired StreetTalk name for
the print queue, press ENTER, and then type in a description of the
print server followed by ENTER.
4.
Select the desired file server (if there is more than one) and press
ENTER.
5.
When you get the Select Type Of Service screen, select 3 - VINES
print service (for VINES 5.xx) or 2 - Banyan Print Service (for
VINES 6.xx) and press ENTER.
6.
Use the arrow keys to select the disk where the print queue service
will reside and press ENTER.
7.
You will get the message "The service is running but not yet
available to users." Press F10.
8.
If desired, type in the maximum number of jobs and maximum size
of job for the queue when you get the Configure Queue screen.
Otherwise press F10 for unlimited number and size.
9.
If desired, choose a default paper format when you get the
Configure Paper Formats screen. Otherwise, press F10 to select
the defaults.
10.
If desired, enter the user names who are authorized to use the printer
when you get the Access Lists screen. Otherwise, press F10 to
accept the defaults.
11.
If you have a VINES 5.xx system, you may optionally enter the users
to be notified in the event of printer problems when you get the Alert
list screen. Otherwise, press F10 to accept the defaults (not
applicable for VINES 6.xx).
12.
When you get the Add A Destination screen, use the arrow keys to
select PCPrint and press ENTER.
_____________________________________________________________
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
12-3
IMPORTANT NOTE: If the PCPrint option is not installed,
PCPrint will not appear on this screen. You must have PCPrint
installed in order to use a TROY print server.
13.
When you get the Destination Attributes screen, enter the
StreetTalk name of the TROY print server (from step A-3) and an
optional description. Press F10.
14.
You will get the Output strings menu. This screen allows you to
define strings of characters that can be sent before and after the print
job to put the printer in a particular state (for example, duplex mode).
The default values work OK for most applications. However, if you
are printing text files directly from the DOS prompt, you should
define a Post-job string such as \f (formfeed) to insure that the paper
is ejected (this is generally not needed with DOS or Windows
application programs, since the program or drivers reset the printer
after each job, and it may cause problems with binary graphics files).
Press F10 to accept the output string values.
15.
You will then get the Enable strings menu. This menu allows you
to select whether or not a banner page is printed, whether or not to
use the setup and reset strings, and other options. Choose the desired
options or press F10 to select the defaults.
16.
You will be asked "Would you like to add another destination at this
time?" Select No.
17. You will then get the Print Queue Status screen, which will show that
the queue is not accepting jobs or printing jobs. Change both values
to Yes and then press F10. You will get the message that the queue
is now ready to accept and print jobs. Press F10 again.
18.
C.
If you are configuring more than one queue on the file server, repeat
steps 1 through 17 of this section. Otherwise, press ESCAPE
multiple times to exit the MANAGE utility.
Print Server Configuration Using XAdmin
The last step is to add the StreetTalk login name to the TROY print server
and to associate the file server queue with one of the services on the print
server. The procedure is as follows:
_____________________________________________________________
12-4
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
1.
Install the software from the TROY Print Server Software diskette or
CD-ROM by selecting File from the Windows Program Manager
menu bar. Then select Run, enter A:SETUP.EXE as the command
line (or select the \Utilities\Xadmin\Setup.exe path on the CD-ROM),
click OK, and follow the instructions on the screen.
2.
Double click on the XAdmin icon to start the program under
Windows.
3.
The print server name (XCD_xxxxxx_P1, where "xxxxxx" is the last
six digits of the Ethernet address) will show up in the list. If it does
not, double check your Ethernet cabling and (if applicable) hub
connection. Click on this name with the mouse button.
4.
Click on the Configure button.
5.
Click on the Banyan tab.
6.
The Banyan hop count is set by default to two hops, which is
adequate for most networks. However, if the file server is located
more than two hops from the print server, you must set the hop count
to the appropriate value.
7.
Enter the StreetTalk name of the TROY print server (this must
exactly match the name you entered in Step A-3). If the StreetTalk
name has spaces in it, you must enclose the name in double quotation
marks (for example, "john [email protected] [email protected]"). If you
entered a password in step A-3, you should also enter the same
password here.
8.
Click on the Services tab.
9.
Double click on the service you wish to enable for VINES. If in
doubt, use BINARY_P1 (for the EIO or MIO port), or BINARY_S1
(for the serial port). Refer to Appendix B of the manual for
additional information on using services.
10. Type in the StreetTalk name of the print queue you defined in step B3.
11. Click on OK, and then click OK again to save the configuration.
12. Click OK and then OK again to exit XAdmin
_____________________________________________________________
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
12-5
D.
Print Server Configuration Using the Print Server Console
(Optional)
As an alternative to XAdmin, you may use the print server console to
configure an TROY print server. The steps are as follows:
1.
Connect to the print server console using TELNET, NCP, XCONFIG,
or the serial port (refer to Appendix A for information on using the
console).
2.
Execute the following commands:
SET BANyan LOgin loginname
Purpose: Sets StreetTalk login name of print server.
SET BANyan PAssword password
Purpose: Sets login password of print server. The password (if any)
must match the password you set in step A-3. This command is not
required if you did not assign a password to the print server with the
MANAGE program.
SET SERVIce service STreettalk queuename
Purpose: Enables the Banyan protocol on the specified TROY print
server service and associates this service with the StreetTalk name of
a given print queue the VINES file server. Type SHOW SERVICE
to see a list of the available services (if in doubt, use BINARY_P1
for the EIO or MIO port , or BINARY_S1 for the serial port).
3.
If required, the following additional commands are available:
SET BANyan HOp nn
Purpose: Sets number of hops between the TROY print server and
the Banyan file server. The default value is 2, which is adequate for
most sites, but you will need to change this value if the file server is
more than two hops away from the print server.
SET BANyan [ENable|DISable]
Purpose: Enables or disables Banyan protocol on the TROY print
server. Banyan is enabled by default.
SET BANyan TImeout nn
Purpose: Sets job timeout (in seconds).
_____________________________________________________________
12-6
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
CLEAR SERVIce service STreettalk
Purpose: Disables the Banyan protocol on the specified service.
SHow BANyan
Purpose: Shows Banyan protocol settings and statistics.
4.
E.
When you have finished entering commands, type EXIT to exit the
remote console and cause the commands to take effect.
Testing the Print Queue
To test the queue, use the Banyan BPRINT command from the DOS prompt
on your workstation. For example:
BPRINT TEST.TXT /P:MYQUEUE
prints the file TEST.TXT to the file server queue MYQUEUE.
_____________________________________________________________
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
12-7
_____________________________________________________________
12-8
Banyan VINES Network Configuration
13
PrintraNet Remote Internet Printing
Overview
TROY's PrintraNet product is a software driver for WindowsTM 95,
Windows 98, or Windows NT that allows a PC user at one location to send
a print job to a printer connected to an TROY print server at a remote
location across the Internet in a simple and transparent manner. For
example, a user on a PC in New York could print a document directly from
his Microsoft Excel application program to a printer in Chicago. The PC
may be attached to a Local Area Network, or it may be connected via a
dial-up PPP link to an Internet Service Provider. Because of the low cost of
accessing the Internet, the PrintraNet software can save the user a
significant amount of money in toll charges, particularly when international
communications is involved.
If you did not receive the PrintraNet software on diskette or CD-ROM, you
may download it from the TROY web site (http://www.troyxcd.com).
PrintraNet Concepts
The PrintraNet software is installed using a standard Windows Installation
Wizard. It creates a virtual port on the Windows 95, Windows 98, or
Windows NT PC that operates similar to the standard LPT1 printer port
from the applications program point of view. The user can use the
Windows 95/98/NT Print Manager to create a printer that uses this port
along with a standard Windows 95/98/NT-compatible printer driver (for
example, the Hewlett-Packard LaserJet 5 or Lexmark Optra drivers). Any
Windows 95/98/NT applications program can therefore print to this printer
(and hence to the virtual port) without modification or change in operational
procedure.
When a job is printed to the PrintraNet virtual port, it is actually MIMEencoded, converted to a standard Internet E-mail message, and sent out to a
TROY print server at the remote location using either the Messaging API
(MAPI) or WINSOCK. This means that PrintraNet is compatible with most
common E-mail software packages, and there is no requirement to install a
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-1
TCP/IP stack on the PC. The only requirement is that the E-mail server be
capable of sending E-mail messages over the Internet.
In more detail, the procedure is as follows:
•
If you are connected to a Local Area Network, the E-mail message gets
passed to the E-mail server, which in turn sends it out over the Internet
using the SMTP protocol (Simple Mail Transport Protocol) to the
remote TROY print server.
•
If you are connecting via a modem directly to an Internet Service
Provider (ISP), the ISP handles the routing of the E-mail to the remote
TROY print server.
At the remote site, an E-mail server receives the E-mail message. The
remote print server, which has its own E-mail address, uses the POP3
protocol (Post Office Protocol 3) to download the E-mail message from the
E-mail server. It then decodes the attachment and prints it out on the
printer. As a configurable option, the remote print server can send an Email message back to notify the sending PC that the job was successfully
printed.
The remote print server must be running Version 3.38 or later firmware.
This firmware is available at no charge on the TROY web site
(http://www.troyxcd.com directory). PrintraNet is supported by all TROY
print servers except the XConnect II Lite and XJet III.
A new feature of PrintraNet is its Address Book capability. This capability
allows the Windows user to have a predefined list of remote printers. A
print job can be sent to any of these remote printers by simply clicking on
the appropriate address book entry. In addition, groups of remote printers
can be defined, so that a single print job can be sent to multiple printers.
Another new feature of PrintraNet is direct E-mail printing. This feature
allows ordinary text E-mail messages to be sent to the print server and then
printed out on the printer. No special software (other than an E-mail
program) is required on the sending computer.
This chapter covers the following topics:
•
Installation of the PrintraNet software on a Windows 95/98/NT PC at
the local site
_____________________________________________________________
13-2
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
•
Enabling the PrintraNet capability on the TROY print server at the
remote site.
The manual assumes that you have already installed the TROY print server
at the remote site with a valid IP address per the instructions in the
appropriate print server Administrator's Guide. It also assumes that you
have the capability of configuring E-mail services on your PC and E-mail
server, or that you have access to a network administrator who can perform
these tasks for you.
Step 1 Installing the Software on a Windows 95/98/NT/2000 PC
To install the PrintraNet software on a Windows 95/98/NT/2000 PC,
execute the following steps:
1.
Make sure that the PC is running an E-mail program (for example,
Microsoft Exchange) that is capable of sending E-mail messages using
either MAPI or WINSOCK. MAPI (Messaging Applications Program
Interface) is used by most popular Windows 95/98/NT E-mail
packages, while WINSOCK is used by TCP/IP-based mail packages.
2.
Make sure that your E-mail server is capable of sending messages
across the Internet. Alternatively, if you are communicating directly
from the PC via a modem to an Internet Service Provider, make sure
that you have an Internet mail account on the ISP, and that the PC is
configured to send E-mail using this account.
3.
Make a backup copy of the PrintraNet software, and use this backup
for the installation process. Store the original diskette in a safe place.
4.
Insert the backup installation diskette into the PC. From the Windows
95/98/NT Start button, select Run. Then enter A:SETUP and press
Enter to start the PrintraNet installation program.
5.
Push the Next button in response to the Welcome message.
6.
Select the desired directory to install the PrintraNet files (the default
directory is C:\Program Files\XCD\ PrintraNet\), and then push Next.
7.
Select either MAPI (the default) or WINSOCK as the mail transport
and press Next. Many newer mail programs like NetScape Messenger
use WINSOCK, but MAPI is still very popular. The installation
program will then begin installing the files.
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-3
8.
You will then be asked for a port name. The default port name is
PNET1. If you want to select a different port name (for example, if
you have more than one PrintraNet remote printer), then enter the name
of the port. The port name must begin with PNET and end with a
number, for example, PNET3.
Press OK to continue.
9.
You will now get the Port Settings dialog box for the remote print
server. Enter the following information:
•
E-Mail Address: Enter any unique legal Internet E-mail address
for the remote TROY print server (for example,
[email protected]).
Note: Internet E-mail addresses cannot have spaces in them.
You may also click on the Address Book button. This allows you
to add E-mail addresses of other printers. To add addresses, go to
the menu bar, select File and then New Address (or click on the
New Address icon, which is the one with a single person). Enter a
description, an E-mail address, and an optional memo for the
remote TROY print server. Click on OK to add it to the address
book. The address book allows you to send print job to any of the
remote print servers without having to type in its E-mail address.
In addition, the Address Book allows you to create groups of
remote printers. To do this, select File and then New Group (or
click on the New Group icon, which is the one with three people)
to add users. The Group capability allows you to send a single
print job to more than one remote printer.
The Partial E-mail Print option breaks the print job into several
smaller E-mail messages, which the print server reassembles at the
remote end into a single print job. It is useful if you are sending
print jobs through E-mail servers that limit the size of print jobs.
If you check this option, you can enter a partition value or use the
default value of 1024K bytes.
The Port Settings dialog box will be displayed each time you
print, thereby allowing you to select a remote print server from the
address book or to manually enter an address. The Show this
dialog for each Print Job box should be checked unless you plan
_____________________________________________________________
13-4
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
to send jobs to only a single TROY remote print server and
therefore do not need to change the destination E-mail address.
•
Service Name: Enter the service name on the remote TROY print
server that you wish to use for printing. This is normally
BINARY_P1 for the MIO or EIO port, or BINARY_S1 for the
serial port. If you do not know the service name, you may leave
this field blank and the default binary service will be used. Refer
to Appendix B of the appropriate TROY print server
Administrator's Guide for information on how to use services.
•
Your E-Mail Address: If you are using MAPI, skip this step. If
you are using WINSOCK, enter your E-mail address (for example,
[email protected]).
•
SMTP E-Mail Server: If you are using MAPI, skip this step. If
you are using WINSOCK, enter the IP address of your SMTP Email server (consult your network administrator if you do not
know this address).
•
Select Desired Notification: You may optionally have the remote
TROY print server notify you when the job is complete or when
the job fails or both when the job is complete and if it fails. Select
the desired option and then enter the E-mail address where you
want the notification sent (generally you would want the
notification sent to your own E-mail address).
•
Press OK to continue.
10. If desired, you can read the README file for release note information
regarding PrintraNet. The PrintraNet driver installation is now
complete.
11. You must now create a printer on your Windows 95/98/NT system
using the standard Windows 95/98/NT printer setup procedure. To do
this, go the Start button, select Settings and then Printers.
12. Select Add Printer to begin the printer installation.
13. Click Next when you get the Add Printer Wizard window.
14. Select Local Printer when you are asked how the printer is connected
to your computer, and push Next.
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-5
15. Select the desired manufacturer and model of the remote printer (for
example, Hewlett-Packard LaserJet 5). If necessary click Have Disk to
load the driver off of the printer's installation diskette. Click Next
when you are done.
16. If you have picked a printer driver that is already being used, you have
the option of either keeping the existing driver (recommended) or
replacing it. Select the desired option and press Next.
17. Select the PrintraNet E-mail port (PNET1 by default) and press Next.
18. Enter any desired name for the PrintraNet remote printer and press
Next. For example, you could call the printer "E-mail Printer". Note
that this name does not need to match the E-mail address that you
assigned in step 9.
19. Select No when asked if you want to print a test page, unless you have
already configured the remote TROY print server to receive PrintraNet
print jobs.
You have now finished installing the PrintraNet software. If you have only
one E-mail printer, go to Step 2, Configuring the Remote TROY Print
Server.
Adding a Second E-Mail Printer Port
You should not rerun the install program to add a new E-Mail printer port.
Instead, press the Start button, select Settings, and open the Printers
window. Click on the icon of a PrintraNet printer, select File from the
menu bar, and then choose Properties. Click on the Details tab and push
the Add Port button.
In the Add Port dialog, select the Other radio button and then "PrintraNet
Port". Click on OK and it will give you the Port Name dialog (like in the
install program). Any unique name can be given here as long as it starts
with "PNET" and another port does not already exist with the same name.
Then enter the port settings as described in step 9 of the Installing the
PrintraNet Software on a Windows 95/98/NT PC section.
Step 2 Configuring the Remote TROY Print Server
The next step is to configure the remote TROY print server. The remote
print server can be configured with TROY's XAdmin or XAdmin32
_____________________________________________________________
13-6
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
Windows 95/98/NT configuration utility, WebXAdmin browser-based
utility, or by accessing the print server console through the print server
serial port or via TELNET, DEC NCP, or XCD's XCONFIG utilities. Refer
to Appendix A for information on how to use the serial port, TELNET,
NCP, or XCONFIG to access the print server console.
Print Server Configuration Checklist
Before configuring the print server to receive PrintraNet print jobs, check
the following:
1.
Make sure that the E-mail server at the remote site (the receiving end)
is configured to handle the TCP/IP POP3, and SMTP protocols (SMTP
is only required if the notification feature is enabled).
2.
Configure the POP3 server on the E-mail server at the remote site with
a mail account and password for the remote printer (generally, the mail
account name will be the first part of the name that you assigned in step
9 of the previous section; for example, if you assigned the name
[email protected], the account name would be emailprinter). The
procedure for configuring a POP3 server varies depending on the
operating system of the E-mail server, so consult your operating system
documentation for details.
3.
Make sure that the TROY print server is installed and running with
TCP/IP enabled and has a valid IP address assigned to it.
Because access to the E-mail server on most networks is usually restricted,
you may need to have your network administrator check the configuration
and add the mail account.
Using XAdmin, XAdmin32, or WebXAdmin to Configure the Print
Server
NOTE: Skip this section if you wish to use the print server console to
configure the print server.
Two graphical user configuration programs are included on the TROY Print
Server Software diskette or CD-ROM that is shipped with every TROY
print server. XAdmin runs on Windows 3.11 or Windows 95/98, while
XAdmin32 runs on Windows 95/98 and Windows NT. To use XAdmin or
XAdmin32, you must be running either NetWare or Banyan VINES client
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-7
software, and the PC must be on the same network as the TROY remote
print server.
WebXAdmin allows the print server to be managed by any standard web
browser using the TCP/IP protocol. Refer to Chapter 3 for additional
information on XAdmin, XAdmin32, and WebXAdmin.
The steps required to configure the print server to receive print jobs from a
Windows 95/98/NT PC running the PrintraNet software are as follows:
1.
Select the name of the desired TROY print server from the list by
double clicking on it (XAdmin or XAdmin32) or entering its IP address
(WebXAdmin).
4.
Click on the Internet tab or button.
5.
Enter the IP address of the POP3 server (consult your network
administrator if you do not know this address).
6.
Enter the mailbox name for the remote TROY print server. Usually
this will be the first part of the E-mail address that you entered in step 9
(for example, if the E-mail address of the remote print server is
[email protected], then the mailbox name would be emailprinter.
7.
Enter the password for the mailbox, if any.
8.
The print server is configured by default to poll the POP3 server every
30 seconds. You may change this value, if desired.
9.
If you have enabled notification, enter the IP address of your SMTP
server (consult your network administrator if you do not know this
address).
10. Press the OK button., and exit XAdmin or XAdmin32. You have now
configured the print server to receive print jobs. Skip to the Printing to
the Remote TROY Print Server section later in this manual.
Using the Console to Configure the Print Server
NOTE: Skip this section if you used XAdmin, Admin32, or WebXAdmin to
configure the remote TROY print server.
_____________________________________________________________
13-8
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
As an alternative to the TROY graphical configuration utilities, you can use
the print server console to configure the remote TROY print server. The
console can be accessed via the print server serial port, TELNET, DEC
NCP, or the TROY XCONFIG utility. Refer to Appendix A if you do not
know how to use the console.
1.
When you get the "Local>" prompt after connecting to the console,
enter the command
SET POP3 ADDRESS ipaddress
where ipaddress is the IP address of your POP3 server (consult with
your network administrator if you do not know this address).
2.
Enter the commands:
SET POP3 NAME mailboxname
SET POP3 PASSWORD emailpassword
where mailboxname is the name of the remote TROY print server
mailbox and emailpassword is the password associated with this
mailbox. Usually the mailbox name is the same as the first part of the
E-mail address that you defined previously (for example, if the E-mail
address is [email protected], then the mailbox name is
emailprinter.
3.
The print server is set by default to poll the POP3 server every 30
seconds. If you wish to change this value, enter the command:
SET POP3 POLLING rate
where rate is the polling rate in seconds.
4.
If you have enabled notification, enter the command:
SET SMTP ADDRESS ipaddress
where ipaddress is the IP address of your SMTP server (usually the
same as the IP address of your POP3 server).
5.
Type EXIT to exit the console and save the changes. You have now
completed configuring the remote TROY print server.
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-9
Step 3 Printing to the Remote TROY Print Server
To print to the remote TROY print server from the local Windows
95/98/NT PC, you simply use select the printer that you created in Step 1
and print to it the normal manner. For example, to print the remote printer
named Email Printer, you would select Print from the menu bar, push the
Printer Setup button, click on the name Email Printer, and then click OK
twice.
You will then get the Port Settings dialog box (assuming that you have not
unchecked the Show this dialog for each Print Job box). You can now
use the address book, manually change the E-mail address of the
destination, or modify other parameters. Click OK when you are ready to
print.
The job will then be sent over the Internet to the remote TROY print server.
Troubleshooting
The first step in troubleshooting is to make sure that you have a valid Email connection on both the sending PC and the receiving print server. Try
sending an E-mail message from the PC to a user at the remote site who can
receive mail via the POP3 server. If this does not work, there may be an Email configuration problem on the PC, on the local E-mail server, or on the
remote POP3 server. Double check to make sure that the E-mail parameters
that you configured on the PC and on the remote print server match those
that are configured on the E-mail servers.
If you can print small files OK but are having trouble printing large files,
the problem may be in the E-mail system. Some E-Mail systems have
difficulties printing files that are larger than about 400KB in length. To
verify this, try sending the large file as an attachment to an E-mail message.
If the file does not reach its destination intact, then the problem is with the
E-Mail system.
If you get an SMTP error when using a WINSOCK connection, you may
need to configure the hosts file on your Windows 95/98/NT system. To do
this create a file named HOSTS in the \WINDOWS\SYSTEM directory (or
edit this file if it already exists) and add an entry for your mail server
similar to the following using the DOS editor (substitute the actual IP
address and name of your SMTP mail server):
192.189.207.222
mail.troyxcd.com
_____________________________________________________________
13-10
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
If you require additional support, contact TROY Technical support at (949)
399-0820, FAX: (949) 399-0825, E-mail: [email protected]
Print Server Console Command Summary
The following PrintraNet-related configuration and status commands are
available from the TROY print server console (for a complete list of
commands, refer to Appendix A in the appropriate print server
Administrator's Guide):
SET POP3 ADdress aa.bb.cc.dd
Purpose: Sets POP3 Server IP address
SET POP3 ENable/DISable
Enables or disables POP3 protocol
POP3 POlling nn
Sets POP3 server polling frequency in seconds
POP3 NAme <name>
Sets POP3 mailbox name for print server
POP3 PAssword <password>
Sets the POP3 Mailbox password
SET SMTP ADdress aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets the SMTP server IP address
SET SMTP ENable/DISable
Enables or disables SMTP capabilities
SHOW POP3
Shows POP3 parameter settings
SHOW SMTP
Shows SMTP parameter settings
_____________________________________________________________
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
13-11
_____________________________________________________________
13-12
PrintraNet Internet Remote Printing
14
JetSend Configuration (NetSend
Models Only)
The TROY NetSend Internet print servers include the HP JetSend protocol
to allow simple device-to-device communications over an Ethernet network
without the need for a PC. For example, a user can scan a document on a
JetSend-enabled scanner (for example, the HP Digital Sender) and have that
document immediately printed out on a printer that is connected to a
NetSend print server. The XJet 100-8J includes the JetSend protocol.
Important Note: The printer must support the PCL page description
language. This means that it will not work with PPA-based DeskJets like
the 710C, 712C, 720C, 722C, 820C, and 1000C (most other DeskJets
support PCL and will therefore work with the NetSend) or with DesignJet
plotters.
To use the JetSend capabilities of NetSend, you must first enter an IP
address into the print server as described in Chapter 3 or 4. The print server
is then ready to receive JetSend print jobs from any JetSend-enabled
TCP/IP sending device (it will not work with infrared JetSend sending
devices, except through an Infrared-to-IP gateway like the Clarinet Systems
irLAN product) . Please refer to the documentation for the sending device
to determine how to send jobs.
The default JetSend settings are color disabled, PCL 3, and resolution 300
dpi. If your printer supports color, PCL5, and/or higher resolutions, you
can change the settings using the print server console. To do this, connect
to the IP address of the print server using TELNET, type in anything for the
user name, enter the password ACCESS, and then execute one or more of
the following commands (examples are shown in brackets; refer to chapter
3 for additional information on how to use the console).
SET PORT <port name> COLOR ENA/DIS
[SET PORT P1 COLOR ENA]
SET PORT <port name> PCL 3/5
[SET PORT P1 PCL 5]
_____________________________________________________________
JetSend Configuration
14-1
SET PORT <port name> RES 300/600/1200
[SET PORT P1 RES 1200]
Type EXIT to exit the console and save the settings. You are now ready to
use the NetSend.
_____________________________________________________________
14-2
JetSend Configuration
15
IPP Configuration (Special Order
Only)
The Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) allows you to print over both local area
networks and LANs. IPP is currently included with the Windows 2000
operating systems, and will be supported on other operating systems in the
future. IPP is included standard with the XJet 3000.
Windows 2000 IPP Configuration
The following steps are required to use IPP with Windows 2000 and a
TROY print server:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Make sure that the print server is powered on and configured with a
valid IP address (see chapter 4 for information on how to configure the
IP address). Note that the printer cannot be configured unless the
Windows 2000 server can communicate with the print server. Also,
make sure that your print server has the special V3.76 or later firmware
with IPP support.
Go to the Start button, click on Printers.
Double click on Add Printer.
Click on Next.
Select Network Printer and then click on Next.
Select Connect to a Printer on the Internet or on your Intranet. Enter
the URL of the print server along with the service name (BINARY_P1
is the default service). For example:
http://192.189.207.99/binary_P1
7.
It may take a couple of minutes to find the print server. You may also
get a message that the correct driver is not installed; if so, click OK to
install the driver and select the appropriate printer.
8. Select the printer type and click on Next.
9. If desired, make the printer the default printer and click on Next.
10. Click on Finish. You are now ready to use the IPP printer.
_____________________________________________________________
IPP Configuration
15-1
Configuring IPP on Other Operating Systems
IPP is beginning to be implemented on other operating systems. The
procedures for configuring IPP print queue varies from system to system,
but in all cases, you must specify the URL of the print server. This address
has the following format:
http://ipaddress/service
where ipaddress is the IP address of the print server and service is a service
on the print server that is enabled for IPP. By default the BINARY_xx
services (for example, BINARY_P1 for the first parallel port or MIO/EIO
port) are enabled for IPP. An example of a valid URL would be:
http://192.189.207.253/BINARY_P1
_____________________________________________________________
15-2
IPP Configuration
16
Troubleshooting
Overview
This chapter describes procedures for troubleshooting problems you may
encounter with the XJet, and is divided into the following sections:
1.
Installation Problems
2.
Intermittent Problems
3.
Protocol-Specific Troubleshooting
If you have followed the steps in this chapter and you believe that you have
a bad board, then please refer to the Customer Support and Warranty
chapter for information on returning defective products.
Installation Problems (Printer Does Not Come Up Ready)
If you cannot print to the XJet after you install it, check the following:
1.
Make sure that the printer are powered on, that the XJet is securely
plugged into the printer, and that the printer is on-line.
2.
If the printer LCD displays an error message such as 80 SERVICE
xxxx (on the LaserJet IIISi and newer LaserJets), 42 OPT
INTERFACE (on the LaserJet II or III), or a 4000 error message (on
the DesignJet), first make sure that the Ethernet cable is connected
securely to the XJet (Some versions of XJet IV firmware will produce
an error message if the Ethernet is not plugged in). If the Ethernet
connection is OK, then try removing the XJet and powering the printer
back up again. If the error message goes away when the XJet has been
removed, then try reinstalling the board (make sure that the board is
securely connected). If the error message appears again when the
printer is powered on, you may have a bad XJet board.
Important Note: If you have an early version of the DesignJet 750C
or 755CM, there is a bug in the HP firmware that produces an error
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-1
message on startup with third-party cards like the XJet IV. The
solution is to upgrade the plotter firmware to V2.08 or later (available
at no charge from Hewlett-Packard).
If possible, connect a terminal to the serial port. If you see the boot>
prompt, the XJet firmware has not been loaded properly. Refer to
Appendix C for instructions on reloading the firmware. If reloading
does not fix the problem, try setting switch 1 to ON (factory defaults)
and powering the XJet off and then on again; if the problem persists,
the product may be defective.
3.
If you have an XJet IV card in a PaintJet XL300, and the BUSY light
flashes indefinitely, check the serial number of the card. If it is an XJet
IV-2 with a serial #380 or earlier, contact TROY for upgrade
information. If it is an XJet IV-Plus, verify that the Altera FPGA chip
(the square chip near the MIO connector is revision B, C, or D, since
other revisions of this chip will not work with the PaintJet..
4.
If you have an XJet III card, make sure that
I/O=OPTIONAL can be selected from the front panel of the printer. If
it cannot be selected, the card is probably bad (one exception: Certain
font cartridges, notably the Adobe PostScript cartridge, do not allow
I/O=OPTIONAL to be selected. To verify this, try the XJet board with
the font cartridge removed from the printer.
Installation Problems (Printer Comes up Ready but You Cannot Print)
If the printer starts up OK but you cannot print, the problem could one of
the following:
•
There is a problem with the interface between the card and the printer
•
There is a problem with the network connection or cabling.
•
There is a queue setup problem, a print server setup problem, or other
protocol-related problem.
Checking the Interface between the XJet and the Printer
First make sure that the XJet is securely plugged into the printer. Then:
1.
Wait about two minutes after the printer is powered on and then run a
printer self-test (see chapter 2 for information on how to run the selftest).
_____________________________________________________________
16-2
Troubleshooting
a. If the self-test does not print, then there is possibly a hardware
problem. Try removing and reinstalling the board, making sure it is
tightened down securely. If you have an XJet 2000, verify that the
cable is securely connected at both ends. If you still cannot print,
you may have a hardware problem.
b. If the self-test does print and you have an XJet IV or XJet 100, the
XJet card Ethernet address, node name, and Ethernet statistics
should appear on the printout. If they do not, first check the front
panel spacing as shown in figure 14-1 (this has been a major cause
of this problem). If the front panel is OK, try reinstalling the board
(if you have a LaserJet 4 or 4M, make sure that the board is
tightened all the way because this printer is especially sensitive to
loose connections). If none of this works, the board may be bad.
2.
If you have an XJet III card, make sure that
I/O=OPTIONAL can be selected from the front panel of the printer. If
it cannot be selected, the card is probably bad (one exception: Certain
font cartridges, notably the Adobe PostScript cartridge, do not allow
I/O=OPTIONAL to be selected. To verify this, try the XJet board with
the font cartridge removed from the printer.
3.
If the self-test prints OK but you cannot print or you get garbage
printouts, make sure that the printer is set for the correct Page
Description Language. Most new printers support AUTO mode, which
means that they will automatically switch between PCL and PostScript.
However, older printers like the LaserJet II, LaserJet III, and LaserJet
IIISi require that the printer be set to the desired language through the
printer front panel.
Checking the Network Connection and Cabling
If the self-test page prints but you cannot print documents, first check the
network connection and cabling.
1.
If you are connecting to a 10baseT network, verify that the XJet IVPlus or XJet 100 R and X LEDs are BOTH lit. If you have an XJet 100
or XJet 3000, the Link OK LED should be on. If the appropriate
LEDs are not on, there is probably a bad 10baseT or 100baseTX cable
or the hub port is bad. If possible, try a different cable and hub port, or
try connecting a different device (such as a PC) to the cable.
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-3
2.
If you have an XJet IV or XJet 100 card, check the printer self-test
page. The XJet card Ethernet address, node name, and Ethernet
statistics should appear on the printout. If they do not, first check the
front panel spacing as shown in figure 14-1 (this has been a major
cause of this problem). If the front panel is OK, try reinstalling the
board (if you have a LaserJet 4 or 4M, make sure that the board is
tightened all the way because this printer is especially sensitive to loose
connections). If none of this works, the board may be bad.
3.
If you are using an XJet IV-2, make sure the jumper is in the correct
position for 10base2 or AUI operation (see Chapter 2).
4.
If you are using a transceiver with the XJet IV-2, check the following
(most transceivers have an LED that indicates whether or not the
transceiver is getting power):
a.
If the XJet IV-2 is not being used with a LaserJet IIISi, DesignJet,
DesignJet 600/650C, or the bottom slot of a LaserJet 4Si, you will
need one of the following:
•
The XJ12V voltage converter (refer to Chapter 2)
or
•
a.
A self powered transceiver (such as the DEC DELNI
multiport transceiver), which uses an AC power source.
If you are using the XJ12V voltage converter, verify that the
transceiver uses 200mA or less power.
(check the label on the transceiver for information on current
consumption).
5.
If you have an old XJet IV-Plus (V3.19 firmware or earlier), make sure
that you have set switches 2 and 3 for the correct type of Ethernet.
6.
If after checking the cabling, transceiver, switches, and jumper there is
still no traffic, then try doing a cold restart of the printer (for LaserJets
only). This is done by turning the printer off and then holding down
the On Line key while turning the printer on again. You should get the
message 08 COLD RESTART; when you release the On Line key, the
normal printer startup sequence will begin (note that a cold restart will
reset all of the printer settings back to the factory defaults). If this does
not fix the problem, the board is probably bad
_____________________________________________________________
16-4
Troubleshooting
7.
If you are using a repeater or hub, make sure that SQE (heartbeat) is
turned off at the hub (this is the default setting for most hubs). Also, if
you have a hub or multiport repeater, verify that the hub or repeater
port is good by trying the print server on a different port.
8.
If you have a bridge or router located between the XJet and the host
computer, make sure that the device is set up to allow the print server
to send and receive data from the host. For example, a bridge can be
set up to only allow certain types of Ethernet addresses to pass through
(a process known as filtering); therefore, such a bridge must be
configured to allow XJet addresses. Likewise, a router can be set up to
pass only certain protocols, so be sure that the desired protocol can be
passed through to the XJet. In the case of routers, also make sure that
the protocol is routable (LAT, NetBEUI, and DLC/LLC are not
routable).
9.
If the job exits the queue but does not print, make sure that you are not
trying to print a text job to a PostScript printer. If you have a printer
that is capable of automatic language switching, make sure that the
printer is not forced into PostScript mode.
10. Make sure that you are not trying to perform an illegal operation, such
as attempting to print a legal-size form when the printer only supports
8.5" x 11" paper.
11. If you are using the serial port for printing, make sure that the baud
rate, parity, stop bits, and character size on the print server exactly
match those on the printer.
12. Older HP plotters require a specially-wired cable to connect to the XJet
IV-Plus serial port. Contact TROY Tech Support for details regarding
this cable.
13. Check the individual protocol troubleshooting sections in this chapter
for additional causes of intermittent printer problems.
Intermittent Problems
If the XJet and the printer start up OK, but you intermittently have
problems printing, check the following:
1.
Excessive NetWare polling can be a big cause of intermittent problems.
Make sure that you have only enabled the NetWare file servers that you
need for printing (do a SHOW NETWARE command from the print
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-5
server console to see the enabled file servers). If you have V3.21 or
earlier firmware, make sure that NetWare polling is disabled by using
the console command SET NETWARE RANGE 0. If you are not
using NetWare, you can disable NetWare entirely with the command
SET NETWARE DISABLED.
2.
Another major cause of intermittent operation with the XJet IV-Plus is
the front panel problem shown in figure 14-1. Make sure that the front
panel is properly mounted, and then reinstall the board in the printer.
3.
If you can print small jobs OK but large graphics jobs are distorted or
incomplete, make sure that you have adequate memory in your printer.
4.
Random 79 SERVICE xxxx errors on the printer can be caused by the
front panel problem described previously and in figure 14-1. If
adjusting the front panel does not fix the problem, the hardware may be
defective. Contact TROY Tech Support for additional information.
5.
There is a problem with V3.34 and earlier versions of firmware when
printing long jobs over the serial port. The solution is to upgrade the
print server to the latest firmware.
6.
Check the individual protocol troubleshooting sections in this chapter
for additional causes of intermittent printer problems.
TCP/IP Troubleshooting
If you are using TCP/IP and cannot print to the XJet and you have checked
the hardware and network as described in the previous steps, then check the
following (note that it is always a good idea to try creating a another print
queue to eliminate the possibility of setup errors):
1.
The problem may be the result of mismatched or duplicate IP
addresses. Verify that the IP address is correctly loaded into the XJet
(via the self-test page or through the remote console) and make sure
that no other nodes on the network have this address (DUPLICATE IP
ADDRESSES ARE THE BIGGEST CAUSE OF TCP/IP PRINTING
PROBLEMS). If the address is not correct, then check whether the
loading procedure was properly executed.
2.
If you used NCP, XCONFIG, or ccr to enter the IP address, make sure
that you exited the remote console properly with a CTRL-D or EXIT
command.
_____________________________________________________________
16-6
Troubleshooting
3.
If you used rarp, make sure that you started the rarp daemon using the
rarpd, rarpd -a, in.rarpd -a, or equivalent command.
Verify that the /etc/ethers file contains the correct Ethernet address and
that the XJet name matches the name in the /etc/hosts file.
4.
If you used bootp, make sure that bootp is enabled (i.e., the “#” is
removed from the bootp entry) in the /etc/inetd.conf file.
Verify that /etc/bootptab file is correctly configured.
5.
Also verify that the host computer and the print server are either on the
same subnet (for example, if the XJet has a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0, the host must have the same subnet mask) or that the
router is properly configured to pass data between the two devices.
6.
Make sure that the /etc/printcap file (if applicable) is typed in
correctly. In particular, look for missing ":" and "\" characters, because
a small error anywhere in the file can have major consequences. Also
check the /usr/spool directory to make sure that you have created a
valid spool directory.
7.
If you are using a Berkeley-based UNIX, make sure that the daemon is
started on Berkeley based systems with the command lpc start printer,
where printer is the name of the local print queue.
8.
If you are using an AT&T-based UNIX, make sure the printer is
enabled (enable printer, where printer is the name of the local print
queue).
9.
Make sure that the lpr/lpd remote line printer service are running on the
host computer (refer to your host computer documentation for
information on how to do this).
10. If you cannot print from DEC TCP/IP Services for VMS (UCX), make
sure that you have version 2.0B or later of this software, because earlier
versions will not work with the XJet.
11. If jobs are run together or do not eject from the printer, try setting the
service (remote printer) with EOT set to the appropriate printer reset
string. This string is number 4 (<ESC>%-12345X) for all newer HP
printers. For example:
SET SERVICE BINARY_P1 EOT 4
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-7
Important: Do not use the above command if you have a LaserJet II,
IID, III, or IIID printer. Instead, use an EOT 2 for PCL jobs or 3 for
PostScript jobs.
12. If the lines of a text file are staggered, make sure that you have
specified a remote printer (rp) name of TEXT in your
/etc/printcap file.
13. If you are having trouble printing long jobs (over 1MB), add the line
mx#0 to your /etc/printcap file entry. Important: Sun Solaris
has a bug with lpr/lpd printing and long jobs. This bug affects any
diskless print server, not just TROY. The solution is to use the HP
JetDirect UNIX host printing utilities as described in the Raw TCP
Port section at the end of Chapter 4.
14. If you are using the raw TCP port and are experiencing intermittent
queue stalling problems, make sure that queueing is enabled on the
service (do a SHOW SERVICE command from the remote console,
and note if "Q" is listed in the OPT column for the desired service). If
it is not, enable queueing with the command SET SERVICE
servicename QUE ENA command.
15. If the wrong IP address is loaded, check your network for file servers
that have DHCP, BOOTP, or rarp enabled, and make sure that these
file servers are not set up to load IP addresses into the print server.
Also, make sure that you do not use the command SET IP BOOT 0
to disable TCP/IP broadcasts; instead, you should use the command
SET IP METHOD STATIC (unpredictable results will occur
otherwise).
16. If you have problems with queues locking up when the active print job
is deleted, try setting the IP timeout to one minute with the console
command SET IP TIMEOUT 1.
17. There were a number of lpr/lpd-related problems fixed in the V3.46
firmware. Therefore, if you are experiencing intermittent queue
problems and you have an older version of firmware, TROY
recommends that you upgrade to 3.46 or later.
18. If you are using certain IP switch models with a TROY print server,
you may not be able to communicate unless you set the Keepalive
Timer to 5 using the WebXAdmin Configure TCP/IP facility or the
console command SET IP KEEPALIVE 5. This sends out a ping
_____________________________________________________________
16-8
Troubleshooting
command every 5 minutes to notify the switch that the print server is
still on the network.
NetWare Troubleshooting
If you cannot print from NetWare and you have checked the hardware and
network as described in the previous steps, first verify that the XJet is
attached to the server queue by going to PCONSOLE, selecting PRINT
QUEUE INFORMATION, and then CURRENTLY ATTACHED
SERVERS. If the XJet does not appear in the list of attached servers, then
check the following (note that it is always a good idea to try deleting and
recreating the print server and creating a new print queue in order to
eliminate the possibility of setup errors):
1.
If you cannot create a print queue, make sure that you have sufficient
NetWare privileges. With NetWare 3.12 and earlier, you MUST be
logged in as SUPERVISOR (not someone with Supervisor privileges).
If you are having problems creating queues with NetWare 4.xx and
later, try logging in as ADMIN. Also, make sure that you are not
trying to run XAdmin32 with the Microsoft NetWare client (you must
use the Novell 32-bit client).
2.
If you changed the login password, you must change the password in
both the XJet (using the SET NETWARE PASSWORD command) and
in the file server (using the PCONSOLE Print Server Information
Change Password command).
3.
Make sure that you have enabled at least one NetWare file server using
the SET NETWARE SERVER servername ENABLED command.
4.
Have you exceeded your NetWare user limit?
5.
If you have V3.00 or earlier firmware , make sure that you enabled
either 802.3 or Ethernet II frames on your file server, particularly if you
have a NetWare 3.12 or 4.xx file server (since these NetWare versions
default to 802.2), since these versions of firmware do not support 802.2
or SNAP frames. Also, if you are using NetWare 4.xx, make sure that
you have enabled bindery emulation on the file server.
6.
Make sure that the print server name you used in PCONSOLE exactly
matches the name that is configured in the XJet, and make sure it is
defined as a Queue Server for the print queue.
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-9
7.
If you are running both 802.3 and Ethernet II frames on different file
servers on your network, there is a possibility that the XJet may not
make a connection to the desired file server. Try forcing the frame
type to the desired one using the SET NETWARE FRAME command
from the XJet remote console.
8.
If you are losing portions of your print job and you are using the DOS
NetWare drivers, try setting the TIMEOUT parameter in your
CAPTURE statement to a higher value (at least 50 seconds for
Windows).
9.
Because of a bug in the vendor's software driver, file servers equipped
with certain models of SMC Ethernet controllers may crash when an
TROY print server is connected to the network. This problem, which
primarily affects EISA-based controllers made in 1993 or earlier, is not
specific to TROY print servers, and can be fixed by upgrading the file
server with the latest SMC drivers. Contact SMC technical support at
(516) 435-6250 for additional information and instructions on how to
download the new drivers from the SMC bulletin board.
AppleTalk and PATHWORKS for Macintosh Troubleshooting
If you cannot print from an AppleTalk or PATHWORKS for Macintosh
computer, you have checked the hardware and network as described in the
previous steps, then check:
1.
Make sure that you are running Phase 2 AppleTalk and that you have
selected the correct network interface from the Network Control Panel
on the Macintosh.
2.
If you have a large network, make sure that you have the Laser Writer
V8.2 or later drivers (or equivalent driver such as the HP LaserJet 8.2),
since earlier versions may cause PostScript errors. Also, verify that
you get the correct printer information when you select Printer Info
from the Setup button in the Chooser.
3.
If you are using the LaserWriter 8.4 (or above) drivers and the print
server is at firmware revision 3.34 or earlier, then upgrade the print
server to the latest firmware.
4.
Make sure that you have selected the correct Printer Description File
(PPD) from the Chooser (otherwise PostScript errors may result)
_____________________________________________________________
16-10
Troubleshooting
5.
If you are running PATHWORKS for Macintosh verify that you can
print directly from VMS and that you have V1.1 or later of
PATHWORKS.
6.
Verify that you have selected the correct AppleTalk zone. Because the
XJet gets its zone information from router broadcasts, it may not be in
the zone you expect, and will therefore not show up in the Chooser. If
this is the case, you may need to force the zone name with the SET
APPLETALK ZONE command described in Appendix A.
7.
Verify that you have a PostScript printer, because AppleTalk and
PATHWORKS for Macintosh require PostScript. If you have a printer
with automatic language switching, the printer may need to be
manually forced into PostScript mode via the printer front panel.
8.
If you are using PATHWORKS for Macintosh, make sure that you
specified the LAT port (not the normal [email protected]) as the destination.
9.
Make sure that PATHWORKS for Macintosh software has been
upgraded for support of the Macintosh System 7 finder (a patch is
required; the easiest way to determine this is to find out if you have
Macintosh computers with System 7 that are successfully printing to
other printers via PATHWORKS for Macintosh).
10. If you are using older versions of the LaserWriter drivers, verify that
the Laser Prep versions on all Macintosh computers that need to print
to the XJet are the same (not required with LaserWriter 8.xx drivers).
11. Make sure that bidirectional communications are working, because this
is essential for PATHWORKS for Macintosh. To verify this on a VMS
system:
-
-
Stop the queue (STOP/QUEUE/RESET queuename)
Connect to the device (SET HOST/DTE LTAxxx:)
When you get the message that you are connected, type a <CTRLT> to query the printer
You should get a response back similar to
%%[ status: idle ]%%. If you do not get this response
back, make sure that the printer is forced into PostScript mode; if
necessary, do a SET SERVICE servicename RECEIVE
DISABLED to put the XJet back into bidirectional mode.
To exit the SET HOST/DTE mode, type a <CTRL-\>. Then try
printing again.
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-11
If the above does not work, verify that you have not put the AppleTalk
service into receive-only mode with the SET SERVICE servicename
RECEIVE ENABLED command.
12. If you get an error message when printing from PATHWORKS for
MACINTOSH that indicates that the name cannot be found, the
probably cause is that the LAT port is set as spooled (i.e., the queue
was set up using the SET DEVICE/SPOOL LTAxxx command). If
this is the case execute the STOP/QUEUE/RESET queuename
followed by the SET DEVICE/NOSPOOL LTAxxx command.
13. If you are having problems printing scanned images, bitmapped
graphics, or other binary graphics, first make sure that the proper mode
is enabled on the port. Do a SHOW PORT command; if you have a
LaserJet 4, 4M, 4 Plus, or 4M plus, the port should be set for LJ4 (do a
SET PORT P1 BINARY LJ4 command); if you have a LaserJet
IIISi, the port should be set for BIN (do a SET PORT P1 BINARY
ENABLED). For all other LaserJets, the port should be set for AUTO
(the default setting)
If you are still having problems after setting the port mode, try printing
in ASCII mode instead of binary mode (most graphics programs
support printing in either mode).
14. If you are using a LaserJet 4, 4M, 4 Plus, and 4M Plus, and printing
problems (typically PostScript errors) occur, use the XJet command
SET PORT P1 BINARY LJ4 command to enable binary mode.
Windows NT/2000/LAN Server Troubleshooting
If you are having trouble printing with Windows NT or LAN Server, check
the following (also refer to the TCP/IP Troubleshooting section if you are
using lpr or NetBIOS IP for printing)::
1.
Make sure that you can ping the XJet using the DOS or OS/2 command
PING ipaddress, where ipaddress is the IP address of the XJet. If you
cannot ping the XJet, you will not be able to print.
2.
Make sure that TCP/IP and lpr printing are installed and running on the
Windows NT system or the LAN Server file server.
_____________________________________________________________
16-12
Troubleshooting
3.
If you are having problems printing to the XJet from a client PC that is
connected to a Windows NTAS or LAN Server file server, verify that
you can print a job directly from the DOS or OS/2 prompt on the file
server. If you can print from the file server but not from the client,
then the problem is probably with the NetBEUI communications rather
than with the TCP/IP link to the XJet. Check your file server network
setup (for example, make sure that you can print from the client to
other printers on the network.
4.
If you have problems with Windows NT queues locking up when the
active print job is deleted, try setting the IP timeout to one minute with
the console command SET IP TIMEOUT 1.
5.
There were a number of lpr/lpd-related problems fixed in the V3.46
firmware. Therefore, if you are experiencing intermittent queue
problems and you have an older version of firmware, TROY
recommends that you upgrade to 3.46 or later.
Windows 95/98 Peer-to-Peer Troubleshooting
If you are having trouble printing on a Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer network,
check the following:
1.
2.
If the print server does not show up under JetAdmin on a Windows
95/98 Peer-to-Peer network, try removing all of the Windows 95/98
network software from the Network Control panel and then reinstalling
them as follows:
-
First install the IPX/SPX-Compatible Protocol, the Client for
Microsoft Networks, and the network adapter card driver.
-
Restart the system, and then add the HP JetAdmin service.
Because of the many changes that have been incorporated in Windows
95/98 Peer-to-Peer printing since its introduction, it is a good idea to
upgrade to the latest version of JetAdmin (available on the HP web site
at http://www.hp.com).
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-13
LAT Troubleshooting
If you cannot print from a VMS system and you have checked the hardware
and network as described in the previous steps, then check the following
(note that it is always a good idea to try creating a new queue with a
different LAT port to reduce the possibility of setup errors):
1.
If the queue pauses (Dataset Hangup or Error Writing As) when you try
to print, check that the XJet node name and port name (or service
name) agree with the names defined for the VMS print queue in
LATCP or for ULTRIX print queue in the /etc/printcap file (ts
parameter) and lcp -h command. The names MUST EXACTLY
agree in order for printing to work (in the case of ULTRIX, the case of
the letters must also match exactly).
2.
If you are using DECprint Supervisor (DCPS) make sure that the
printer is forced into PostScript mode (DCPS will not work with
printers in auto language switching mode and will not work with PCLonly printers).
3.
Make sure LAT is enabled for outgoing connections. For VMS, enter
LATCP and type SHOW NODE at the Latcp> prompt. The display
should show Outgoing Connections Enabled. If it does not, you should
type SET NODE/CONNECTIONS=BOTH. If you are using ULTRIX,
make sure that you have started LAT with the lcp -s command and that
you have enabled host-initiated connections with the lcp -h
command.
4.
Make sure that there are no duplicate LAT node names or LAT port
numbers. Try changing the node name to a different name and/or
creating a different LAT port to fix the problem. Also avoid having
multiple print queues that use the same LAT port.
5.
If you are running ULTRIX, make sure that the /etc/printcap
file is typed in correctly. In particular, look for missing ":" and "\"
characters, because a small error anywhere in the file can have major
consequences. Also check the /usr/spool directory to make sure
that you have created a valid spool directory.
6.
If you are running ULTRIX, check your tty device to make sure that :
_____________________________________________________________
16-14
Troubleshooting
-
The tty is a valid LAT tty (execute the command file /dev/tty*
| grep LAT and observe if the device has a "39" in its
description).
-
The device is in the /etc/ttys file and in the /dev directory.
-
The same tty number was entered throughout the configuration
process.
7.
Intermittent random queue pauses can be caused if the VMS LAT port
is not set up as spooled device. Type SHOW DEVICE LTAxxx from
the VMS console; if the device is not spooled, type SET
DEVICE/SPOOL LTAxxx command. (One exception:
PATHWORKS for MACINTOSH queues should not be set up with the
LTA device set as spooled).
8.
Make sure that PROCESSOR=LATSYM is enabled on your VMS print
queue if you get any of the following symptoms:
9.
-
The queue pauses when you power off the XJet for no apparent
reason.
-
The XJet generates excessive LAT traffic on the network
-
Only one host computer can access the XJet and others are locked
out
If the VMS LAT symbiont abruptly terminates and shuts down one or
more queues, the problem may be the result of the inability of the LAT
symbiont to handle the load (particularly if you are printing heavy
graphics). Try creating multiple LAT processors (copy the
LATSYM.EXE file) and splitting the load among these processors.
10. If your VMS graphics printouts are distorted, make sure that you have
the LTA port set for PASSALL, PASTHRU, and TAB.
11. If you are having trouble printing PostScript files with VMS
(PostScript errors or no printout), make sure that you have the form set
for NOTRUNCATE and NOWRAP. Also, make sure you are not
trying to print a flag page (unless you are using DCPS) since the flag
page in the LAT symbiont is a non-PostScript text file.
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-15
12. If you are having trouble printing PostScript files (for example, from
DECprint Supervisor or from a Windows-based PATHWORKS PC),
try disabling binary mode on the printer with the command SET
PORT P1 BINARY DISABLED. If you have a LaserJet 4 or 4M,
you can also try the command SET PORT P1 BINARY LJ4; this
command allows the printer to automatically switch between normal
mode and AppleTalk binary mode (the default BINARY ENABLED
mode automatically switches between normal and binary mode when
used with the LaserJet 4Si and newer printers).
13. WordPerfect for VMS will cause problems printing to any network
printer, not just TROY. Specifically:
•
If WordPerfect for VMS is installed on VMS 6.xx, you will not be
able to print to the print server from more than one VMS system,
even for non-WordPerfect print jobs. This is because WordPerfect
does not properly break the circuit at the end of each job. The only
solution is to de-integrate the WordPerfect and VMS print queues
on the host computer, which often means removing WordPerfect
entirely from the system. This is a known bug with WordPerfect;
contact WordPerfect for possible fixes.
•
If you have V6.1 of VMS and you are experiencing consistent
queue pauses, you need to upgrade to XJet V3.21 or later
firmware. This problem is generally associated with a
WordPerfect for VMS bug.
14. If DECprint Supervisor jobs print very slowly, you need to upgrade to
XJet V3.23E or later firmware.
15. If you are printing across a wide area network bridge (for example,
Vitalink) and you get paused or stalled queues, increase the XJet circuit
timer to 120 milliseconds with the command SET SERVER
TRANSMIT 120.
16. If you can print successfully from PATHWORKS using DOS but have
problems printing from Windows, try increasing the Device Not
Selected and Transmission Retry timeouts from the Windows Printer
Manager (select Printer Setup, select the desired printer, and press the
Connect button).
_____________________________________________________________
16-16
Troubleshooting
17. If overlay forms print out as separate pages, try setting the EOT to 0 on
the service with the command SET SERVICE servicename EOT
0 command.
Banyan VINES Troubleshooting
If you are having trouble printing with Banyan VINES, check the
following:
1.
Make sure that you have the Banyan VINES PCPrint software option
installed.
2.
If there are more than two hops (i.e., more than two routers) between
the print server and the file server, make sure that you have changed
the hop count to the appropriate number via XAdmin or the print server
console.
3.
Use the VINES MUSER or MANAGE utility to verify that the print
server has logged in. If it has not, make sure that the StreetTalk login
name configured in the print server exactly matches the login name that
was configured using the MUSER or MANAGE utility on the file
server.
4.
Verify that the StreetTalk name associated with the print server service
name exactly matches the name of the print queue that was configured
using the MSERVICE or MANAGE utility on the file server.
5.
Check to see that you have not exceeded the user limit on your Banyan
file server (because the print server must login as a user), that printing
is enabled on the queue, and that there are no security restrictions on
the file server that would prevent the print server from logging in.
6.
There is a problem with Banyan 7.1 and diskless print servers (not just
TROY) which causes the print server to intermittently go into a logged
out state. This problem was fixed in V3.40E firmware, so upgrade the
print server to this firmware version or later.
7.
There was a problem with firmware versions 3.40B and earlier in
which the print server would not log into very large networks. If you
are experiencing this problem, upgrade the print server to the latest
firmware.
8.
If the print server does not log in to the network (the typical symptom
is a LOGIN DELAY) and you have Banyan VINES 7.xx or 8.xx, try
_____________________________________________________________
Troubleshooting
16-17
upgrading to the latest version of firmware (some earlier versions of
firmware will not log into VINES 7.xx and/or VINES 8.xx).
9.
If you are running both NetWare and VINES on your client PC,
XAdmin will default to NetWare. To force XAdmin to look at
Banyan-enabled print servers, select Run from the Windows 95 Start
menu. Enter the appropriate path plus the command xadmin -b (for
example, "\program files\xcd\xadmin\xadmin -b") to
start XAdmin in Banyan mode (alternatively, you may modify the
Target in the Properties of the XAdmin shortcut with this command).
_____________________________________________________________
16-18
Troubleshooting
17
Customer Support and Warranty
Customer Support
TROY, Inc. offers several customer support options to assist you in the
event you experience difficulties with your TROY print server, including
telephone support, repair services, extended warranty, and advance
replacement.
Worldwide Web Support
The TROY worldwide web site provides a quick and easy way to answer
many common technical questions. It includes a wide variety of technical
support tips, as well as copies of product manuals, product literature, and
firmware load images.
The web site is located at http://www.troyxcd.com.
Whom to Call
Your first point of contact for technical support is the Distributor or Dealer
from whom you bought your TROY print server. They are familiar with
your needs, and will generally be able to provide you with the fastest and
most comprehensive support.
If your Distributor or Dealer is unable to answer your questions or is for
some reason not available, then contact TROY directly at 949-399-0820
(fax: 949-399-0825; e-mail [email protected]). Our technical support
line is open weekdays 8 AM to 5 PM Pacific Time.
Before contacting Technical support, please check the Troubleshooting
chapter of this manual or the TROY web site to isolate any problems and be
sure to write down any error messages. Also, make sure that you have the
serial number of the product (located on the product label on the card).
_____________________________________________________________
Customer Support and Warranty
17-1
Returning Products
If you need to return an TROY product for any reason (failures, incorrect
shipments, etc.), first contact TROY at (949) 399-0820 and request a
Return Authorization Number. Make sure that you put this number on
the outside of the shipping container you use to return the product and (if
out-of-warranty) on your purchase order. You will also be asked for the
serial number of the defective print server. Ship the unit freight prepaid to:
TROY Group, Inc.
Wireless and Connectivity Division
Returns Department
1692 Browning
Irvine, CA 92606-4809 USA
(Adequate insurance is recommended)
If the unit is not in warranty, you will be billed for the standard repair
charges. If you do not have a valid TROY account number, you may be
asked for payment in advance (Mastercard, Visa, American Express, check,
or money order).
The TROY Advance Replacement Program is now included at no extra cost
during the warranty period. This program allows you to get an immediate
replacement for a defective unit during the warranty period rather than
waiting until TROY has received the defective unit. To take advantage of
this program you will need to fill out an Advance Replacement form
(available from TROY Technical Support) with details about the defective
product and the problem, and then fax this form back to TROY at (949)
399-0825.
Warranty
To obtain the benefits of the Advance Replacement Program after the
warranty period has expired, the Extended Service Program is available.
This Program provides the same features as the Advance Replacement
program but also adds an extended warranty period. This program is also
available for an annual fee; contact your distributor or TROY for ordering
information.
With the Advance Replacement or Extended Services Programs, you
simply call TROY at (949) 399-0820 and give the Order Representative
your account number. A new card will be shipped to you immediately by
_____________________________________________________________
17-2
Customer Support and Warranty
express freight. You will be invoiced for the list price of a new unit. Ship
the defective unit back prepaid to TROY per the "Returning Products"
section of this chapter. Upon receipt of the defective unit, TROY will
credit your account.
Units returned after 30 days will not qualify for a refund and will be
returned to you.
TROY print servers are warranted to be free of defects in materials and
workmanship for a period of three years. This period begins upon the date
of shipment if the Hardware is installed by the Purchaser, or upon
installation if the Hardware is installed by TROY. During the warranty
period, TROY will repair or replace the unit at no charge provided it is
returned to TROY freight prepaid as described in the "Returning Products"
section of this chapter. To ensure prompt service, please fill out the
enclosed warranty card.
The warranty on repaired products or replacement products is 30 days or
the last day of the warranty of the original defective product, whichever is
longer.
This warranty does not apply if the Product has been damaged by accident,
misuse, natural catastrophe, modification, improper service, or conditions
resulting from causes external to the Product. The warranty shall be void if
the TROY serial numbers have been removed.
DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES. THE ABOVE WARRANTIES ARE
THE EXCLUSIVE WARRANTIES, AND NO OTHER WARRANTY,
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, SHALL APPLY. TROY SPECIFICALLY
DISCLAIMS THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
PURCHASER'S SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FOR ANY
BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY, REGARDLESS OF THE FORM OF
ACTION, WHETHER CONTRACT, TORT, OR OTHERWISE, SHALL
BE TROY'S OBLIGATION TO REPAIR OR REPLACE AS SET FORTH
ABOVE.
_____________________________________________________________
Customer Support and Warranty
17-3
_____________________________________________________________
17-4
Customer Support and Warranty
A
Command Summary
Overview
Although it is not normally necessary to change the print server default
parameters, you can change the configuration through any following
methods:
•
•
•
•
DEC NCP or NCL Utility
TELNET
TROY XCONFIG NetWare Utility
Serial Port
The general configuration procedure is the same regardless of which
method is used.
Certain print server NetWare parameters (such as the NetWare service
name) can also be changed by using the Hewlett-Packard JetAdmin utility
or TROY XAdmin utility.
DEC NCP, NCL, ccr. To connect to the print server console with the
VMS NCP utility, use the following commands:
MCR NCP
CONNECT VIA circuit PHY ADD ethernetaddress
where circuit is the circuit-ID of the VAX or Alpha (for example, SVA-0
for most DEC workstations, MNA-0 for XMI systems, BNA-0 for BI
systems, and QNA-0 for Q-BUS systems) and ethernetaddress is the
hardware address of the print server (for example, 00-40-17-00-61-35).
Type the command SHOW KNOW CIRCUITS at the NCP> prompt if you
do not know the circuit ID.
Newer OpenVMS systems use NCL instead of NCP. The NCL command
to connect to the print server console is:
SET HOST/MOP/CIRCUIT=circuit/ADD=ethernetaddress
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-1
ULTRIX systems use the addnode and ccr commands as follows:
addnode xcdname -c circuit -h ethernetaddress
ccr xcdname
where xcdname is an arbitrary name for the print server (each print server
on the network needs a unique name).
In all cases, you will get a message like Console Connected or Remote
Console Reserved when you are connected. When you are connected, push
RETURN or ENTER to get the "#" prompt, enter the password ACCESS
(it will not print), and type anything in response to the Enter
Username> prompt. When you get the Local> prompt, you are ready to
enter commands.
Note: The commands available are generally a subset of the ones used on
the DECserver terminal server. Note that unlike the DECserver, there is no
distinction between the SET and DEFINE commands or between the
CLEAR and PURGE commands. Instead, when you type CTRL-D to exit
the remote console, any of these commands take effect immediately and the
results are stored permanently (for example, it is not necessary to enter
both a SET and a DEFINE to execute a command and save the results).
TELNET. To connect to the print server using TELNET on UNIX,
Windows NT, or most other TCP/IP systems, type:
TELNET ipaddress
at the UNIX system prompt, where ipaddress is the IP address of the print
server. When you are connected, push RETURN or ENTER to get the "#"
prompt, enter the password ACCESS (it will not print), and type anything
in response to the Enter Username> prompt. When you get the Local>
prompt, you are ready to enter commands.
XCONFIG. The XCONFIG utility can be installed from the TROY Print
Server Software CD-ROM or diskette. To connect to the print server using
the TROY XCONFIG NetWare utility, execute the command
XCONFIG
at the DOS system prompt. If you have only one print server, you will be
immediately connected. If you have more than one print server, you will be
given a list of available print servers. Type the number of the print server
to which you want to connect. When you are connected, When you are
_____________________________________________________________
A-2
Command Summary
connected, enter the password ACCESS (it will not print) at the "#" prompt,
and type anything in response to the Enter Username> prompt. When
you get the Local> prompt, you are ready to enter commands.
GENERAL SERVER COMMANDS
CLear FAtal
Deletes fatal error log
CLear PAssword
Remove console password
CLear POrt portname JOB
Clears current entry in the print server's internal queue for the specified
portname (P1 for the EIO, MIO, or XIO port, and S1 for the serial port)
CLear SERVEr STRing n
Remove BOT/EOT string (see Appendix B)
EXIT/^D
Exits print server console
HElp
Provides information on available commands
SET DEFAULT
Sets print server parameters to factory defaults
SET LOAD DIsable
Disables firmware reload after exit
SET LOAD ENable
Enables firmware reload after exit
SET LOAD HOst <name>
Sets node name of boot host for (NetWare firmware load)
SET LOAD IP aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets IP address of load host (TCP/IP firmware load)
SET LOAD SOftware <filename>
Sets host filename of firmware to load
SET LOAD XModem
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-3
Begins XModem serial download of new firmware
SET PAssword <password>
Sets console password (default password is ACCESS)
SET PORT P1 BINARY [EN|DIS|LJ4]
Enables or disables AppleTalk binary mode on MIO port, or sets this port
into special binary AppleTalk mode for LaserJet 4/4M/4 Plus/4M Plus
printers.
SET PORT P1 NODG [EN|DIS|LJ4]
Enables or inhibits datagram support
SET PORT <serialportname> FLow [NO|XO|CT|DS]
Set serial port flow control to NONE, XON/XOFF, CTS, or DSR
SET PORT <serialportname> PArity <parity>
Set serial port parity to NONE, EVEN, ODD, MARK, or SPACE
SET PORT <serialportname> SIgnal [EN|DIS]
Enables/disables DTR signal check on serial port
SET PORT <serialportname> SPeed <baudrate>
Sets serial port baud rate
SET PORT <serialportname>
Sets serial port stop bits per character
STop [1|2]
SET PROtect <password>
Set console protection password to prevent access to SET commands (use
UNPROTECT command to access SET commands)
SET SERVEr DEscription
Sets node description string displayed with SHOW SERVER command
SET SERVEr STRing n "..."
Defines server BOT/EOT string (see Appendix B)
SET SERVIce <servicename> <protocol> [EN|DIS]
Enable or disables specified protocol on the specified service.
SET SERVIce <servicename> BOT nn
Set service BOT string to nn (see Appendix B)
_____________________________________________________________
A-4
Command Summary
SET SERVIce <servicename> EOT nn
Set service EOT string to nn (see Appendix B)
SET SERVIce <servicename> FIlter nn
Set service filter to nn (see Appendix B)
SET SERVIce <servicename> FMS nn
Sets filter 1 match string to nn
SET SERVIce <servicename> FRS nn
Sets filter 1 replace string to nn
SET SERVIce <servicename> NAme <newname>
Changes service name
SET SERVIce <servicename> POrt <portname>
Change service port (<portname> is P1 for EIO, MIO, or XIO port and S1
for the serial port)
SET SERVIce <servicename> RECeive [EN|DIS]
Set receive only mode on specified service
SET SERVIce <servicename> TCP nn
Sets TCP port number of service
SHow FAtal
Show fatal error log
SHow FRee
Shows memory available
SHow LOAd
Shows firmware update parameters
SHow POP3
Shows POP3 parameters
SHow POrt
Shows port parameters
SHow POrt <name> STA
Shows current port status. SHOW PORT P1 STATUS enables JetStatus
feature to display detailed printer status on XJet IV and XJet 100 models.
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-5
SHow SERVEr
Shows server and LAT parameters
SHow SERVEr COunters
Shows server statistics
SHow SERVEr QUeue
Shows print server internal queue
SHow SERVIce
Shows service Parameters
SHow SMTP
Shows SMTP parameters
SHow SNMP
Shows SNMP variables
SHow TEstpage
Prints test page
SHow VErsion
Shows server firmware version
UNPROtect
Allows system manager to temporarily access SET commands when remote
console is in protected mode (See SET PROTECTION command). The
SET DEFAULT command can be used to permanently disable the protected
mode.
ZEro
Zeroes statistical counts
AppleTalk Commands
SET APpletalk [EN|DIS]
Enables or Disables Appletalk Processing
SET APpletalk ZOne "<name>"
Set Appletalk zone name
SET LOCaltalk [EN|DIS]
Enables/disables LocalTalk port
_____________________________________________________________
A-6
Command Summary
SET APpletalk [EN|DIS]
Enables/disables Appletalk processing
SET SERVIce <servicename> APP [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables AppleTalk jobs on specified service
SET SERVIce <servicename> ATYPE <string>
Sets AppleTalk type
SET SERVIce <servicename> RECEIVE [EN|DIS]
Enables or Disables bidirectional communications on service.
SHow APpletalk
Shows AppleTalk parameters
SHow LOCaltalk
Shows LocalTalk parameters
Banyan VINES Commands
CLEAR BANYAN PAssword <password>
Clears Banyan login password
CLEAR SERVIce <servicename> STreettalk
Disables the Banyan protocol on the specified service
SET BANyan LOgin <loginname>
Sets StreetTalk login name of print server
SET BANyan PAssword <password>
Sets login password of print server
SET SERVIce <servicename> STreettalk <queuename>
Enables the Banyan protocol on the specified print server service and
associates this service with the StreetTalk name of a given print queue the
VINES file server
SET BANyan HOp nn
Sets number of hops between the print server and the Banyan file server
(default value is 2)
SET BANyan [EN|DIS]
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-7
Purpose: Enables or disables Banyan protocol on print server. Banyan is
enabled by default
SET BANyan TImeout nn
Sets job timeout (in seconds)
SHow BANyan
Shows Banyan protocol settings and statistics
DLC/LLC Commands
SET DLC [EN|DIS]
Enables/disables DLC/LLC protocol
SHOw DLC [EN|DIS]
Shows DLC/LLC parameters
LAT Commands
CLear/PUrge/DELete SERVEr GRoup number
Removes LAT group membership
SET LAT RB nn
Sets LAT receive buffer size (0-5)
SET LAT TB nn
Sets LAT transmit buffer size (0-5)
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVer GRoup mm[-nn]
Add to current LAT group membership
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVEr KEepalive nn
LAT keepalive timer (sec)
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVEr NAme <name>
Sets LAT Node name
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVEr TImeout nn
LAT inactivity timeout (sec)
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVEr TRansmit nn
_____________________________________________________________
A-8
Command Summary
LAT transmit interval (msec)
SET/DEFine/CHange SERVIce <servicename> LAT [EN|DIS]
Enables/disables LAT jobs on specified service
SHow LAT
Shows LAT parameters
NetBEUI /NetBIOS Commands
CLear NETBios DOMain <domainname>
Clears domain name
SET NETBios DOMain <domainname>
Sets NetBIOS domain name
SET NETBeui [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables NetBEUI
SET NETBios MEthod <type>
Sets method of getting WINS server address
SET NETBios PRimary aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets IP address of primary WINS server
SET NETBios SEcondary aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets IP address of secondary WINS server
SET SERVIce <servicename> NETBeui [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables NetBEUI on service
SHow NETBios
Shows NetBEUI/NetBIOS parameters
NetWare Commands
CLear NETWare SErver <server>
Removes specified NetWare file server from print server access list.
CLear NETWare QServer <fileserver> ON <servicename>
Removes queue server mode on service
CLear SERVIce <servicename> CONtext
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-9
Remove NDS context
CLear SERVIce <servicename> TREE
Remove NDS tree
SET NETWare ADvertise n
Sets advertising frequency of print server
SET NETWare [EN|DIS]
Enables/Disables Netware protocol on print server
SET NETWare FRame [802.2|802.3|ETH|AL|AU|SNA]
Sets Netware frame type to 802.2, 802.3, Ethernet II, ALL, AUTO, or
SNAP
SET NETWare NEtwork n
Sets Netware internal network number
SET NETWare NPrinter <pserver> n ON <service>
Set NPrinter mode on service
SET NETWare PAssword <psw>
Sets print server login password for file server
SET NETWare POlling n
Sets queue polling time in seconds
SET NETWare QServer <fileserver> ON <service>
Sets Queue Server mode on service
SET NETWare Rescan
Rescans file servers for new queues
SET NETWare SErver <name> [EN|DIS]
Enables file server
SET SERVIce <servicename> CONtext <string>
Sets NDS context
SET SERVIce <servicename> NETW [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables NetWare jobs on specified service
SET SERVIce <servicename> TREE <string>
Sets NDS tree
_____________________________________________________________
A-10
Command Summary
SHow NETWare
Shows NetWare parameters
PrintraNet Commands
SET POP3 ADdress aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets POP3 server IP address
SET POP3 [ENable|DISable]
Enables/disables POP3
SET POP3 POlling nn
Sets POP3 server polling frequency
SET POP3 NAme <name>
Sets POP3 mailbox
SET POP3 PAssword <password>
Sets POP3 mailbox password
SET POP3 TImeout nn
Sets POP3 message timeout
SET SMTP ADdress aa.bb.cc.dd
Set SMTP server IP address
SET SMTP [ENA|DIS]
Enables or disables SMTP protocol
SNMP Commands
CLear SNMP CONtact <string>
Removes SNMP SysContact
CLear SNMP LOCation <string>
Removes SNMP SysLocation
SET SNMP GETCOMM
Gets SNMP community
<string>
SET SNMP SETCOMM1 <string>
Set SNMP community 1 name
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-11
SET SNMP SETCOMM2 <string>
Set SNMP community 2 name
SET SNMP CONtact
Set SNMP SysContact
<string>
SET SNMP LOCation <string>
Sets SNMP SysLocation
SET SNMP JETADmin [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables JetAdmin
TCP/IP Commands
SET IP ACcess [EN|DI|ALL] aa.bb.cc.dd {MAsk ee.ff.gg.hh}
Allows or prevents specified IP address from accessing print server.
SET IP ADdress aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets IP address of print server
SET IP BAnner [EN|DIS]
Enables or Disables trailing banner page for lpr/lpd jobs
SET IP BOot n
Number of DHCP/BOOTP/RARP tries
SET IP CHKSUM [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables IP receive checksum
SET IP [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables IP Processing
SET IP FTime [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables fast timeout
SET IP KEepalive n
Sets IP keepalive timer in minutes
SET IP MEthod [AUTO|BOOTP|RARP|STATIC]
Sets method of getting IP address
SET IP PIng aa.bb.cc.dd
Test connection to IP host
_____________________________________________________________
A-12
Command Summary
SET IP RArp nn
Sets procedure used by print server when obtaining its IP address. By
default the IP address is set along with a default subnet mask and a router
address that is the same as the address of the load host. By setting nn to 1,
the subnet mask is not set. If nn is set to 2, the router address is not set. If
nn is set to 3, neither the subnet mask nor the router address is set.
SET IP REtry [EN|DIS]
Sets lpd retry continuation
SET IP ROuter aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets default router address
SET IP SUbnet aa.bb.cc.dd
Sets subnet mask
SET IP TImeout n
Sets inactivity timeout (minutes)
SET IP WIndow nn
Sets LPD/TCP maximum window size
SET SERVIce <servicename> IP [EN|DIS]
Enables or disables TCP/IP jobs on specified service
SET SERVICE <servicename> TCP nn
Sets TCP port number (>1023) on service
SHow IP
Shows LPD/TCP/TELNET Parameters
SHow IP ACcess
Shows IP addresses that are allowed to access print server
_____________________________________________________________
Command Summary
A-13
B
Using Services (lpd-Plus)
Overview
A service is a resource that can be accessed by computers that wish to print
the print server. TROY external print servers provide the following
predefined services (do a SHOW SERVICE command in the print server
remote console to get a list of available services; note that the serial port
services will only be displayed if the serial port has been enabled for
printing):
Service
XCD_xxxxxx_P1
BINARY_P1
TEXT_P1_TX
POSTSCRIPT_P1
PCL_P1
XCD_xxxxxx_P1_AT
XCD_xxxxxx_S1
BINARY_S1
TEXT_S1
POSTSCRIPT_S1
PCL_S1
XCD_xxxxxx_S1_AT
Definition
MIO/EIO/XIO port binary service
MIO/EIO/XIO port binary service
MIO/EIO/XIO port TCP/IP text service
(adds carriage return after each line feed)
MIO/EIO/XIO PostScript service
(switches PJL-compatible printer to
PostScript mode)
MIO/EIO/XIO port PCL service (switches
PJL-compatible printer to PCL mode)
MIO/EIO/XIO AppleTalk service
Serial port binary service
Serial port binary service
Serial port TCP/IP text service (adds
carriage return after each line feed)
Serial port PostScript service
(switches PJL-compatible printer to
PostScript mode)
Serial port PCL service (switches
PJL-compatible printer to PCL mode)
Serial port AppleTalk
service
where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the Ethernet address (for example,
XCD_009C53_P1). If the LN03 option is installed on the XJet IV-Plus),
the service names for the MIO port service ends in "LN" instead of "P1"
_____________________________________________________________
Using Services
B-1
(for example, XCD_033355_LN). Note that any of the services, not just the
user-defined ones, can be modified to meet a user's particular requirements.
TROY print servers provide the powerful capability to customize any of the
services to meet specific user requirements through the use of setup and
reset strings. Such strings are printer command sequences that are sent to
the printer before or after the print job. For example, you could define one
of the services to provide landscape mode printing by defining a setup
string that contains the appropriate command to put the printer into
landscape mode.
The print server provides several predefined strings for popular PCL,
PostScript, and PJL (the Page Job Language used by new Hewlett-Packard
and other printers) commands. These include (do a SHOW SERVER
STRING command in the remote console to see the available strings):
No. String
0
(special)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
NULL
\1BE
\04
\1B%-12345X
@PJL
Enter Language=
PCL\0A
Postscript\0A
\FF\04\FF\05\FF\06\FF\07
\FF\04\FF\05\FF\06\FF\08
\0C
Definition
Using this number causes
printer not to be automatically
reset at the end of each job.
Null string
PCL reset (<ESC>E )
PostScript reset (CTRL-D)
PJL UEL
Enter PJL mode
PJL language switch
PJL PCL command
PJL PostScript command
Enter Language=PCL
Enter Language=PostScript
Formfeed
To define a new string, use the command:
SET SERVER STRING number “string”
where number is the number of the string (12 through 31) and string is the
desired string (must be enclosed in quotation marks).
A given string can include hexadecimal characters by preceding the value
with a “\” character. The next two characters after the “\” will then be
interpreted as the hexadecimal value of a character. For example, to specify
<ESC>E as string number 12, you would enter:
_____________________________________________________________
B-2
Using Services
SET SERVER STRING 12 “\1BE”
Please note that when you associate a string number with a service, the new
string number completely replaces any previous string numbers. Also, if
you are using one of the predefined PostScript or PCL services, the new
string will nullify the language switching function of these services.
However, you can combine several string numbers together by preceding
the string number with “\FF”. For example, if you defined string number
21 as "\1B" (<ESC>), and string number 22 as “&l1O”, you can create a
new string number 23 that contains <ESC>&l1O (the PCL landscape mode
command) by entering:
SET SERVER STRING 23 “\FF\15\FF\16”
Note that the string numbers within the quotation marks are expressed in
hexadecimal when used with this command.
To associate a string with the service, use the following commands:
SET SERVICE servicename BOT stringnumber
SET SERVICE servicename EOT stringnumber
where servicename is the name or number of the service and stringnumber
is the number of the string as defined above. The first command (BOT)
adds the specified string to the beginning of the job, while the second
command (EOT) adds the specified string to the end of the job. A given
service can have both a setup and reset string associated with it.
To clear a string number, type:
CLEAR SERVER STRING stringnumber
To clear a setup or reset string, set the string number to 1 (the null string):
SET SERVICE servicename BOT 1
SET SERVICE servicename EOT 1
Enabling Protocols on a Service
You may enable or disable protocols that can access a given service with
the following commands:
SET SERVICE name LAT ENABLED
_____________________________________________________________
Using Services
B-3
SET
SET
SET
SET
SET
SERVICE
SERVICE
SERVICE
SERVICE
SERVICE
name
name
name
name
name
IP ENABLED
NETWARE ENABLED
APPLE ENABLED
NETBEUI ENABLED
DLC ENABLED
where name is the name or number of the service (Banyan VINES services
are slightly more complex to configure; refer to the Banyan chapter in this
manual for details). Do a SHOW SERVICE command to see the enabled
protocols. Note that a given service must have at least one protocol
enabled.
Adding Filters to a Service
A filter is a program built into the print server that performs a specific
function. The following filters are available:
filter no.
1
Description
This filter substitutes one user-specified
character string for another character string.
By default, it substitutes a carriage return
character plus a linefeed character
every time a linefeed character is
encountered in the data stream. It is useful
for printing UNIX text files, because such
files do not have carriage returns at the end
at the end of lines.
filter no.
2
Description
This filter species that AppleTalk can be used
on the service.
filter no.
3
Description
This filter converts a text file to PostScript
for use with PostScript-only printers
filter no.
5
Description
This filter enables LN03 emulation on the
specified service (XConnect 100 models only)
The service TEXT_pp is predefined with the text filter, while the service
XCD_xxxxxx_pp_AT has the AppleTalk filter enabled. To use a filter with
other services, use the following command:
_____________________________________________________________
B-4
Using Services
SET SERVICE name FILTER fltrno ENABLED
where name is the name of the service and fltrno is the number of the filter
(e.g., 1 for the text filter).
Changing the Service Name
The default service names are rather long and difficult to remember. If you
want to change a service name to something more meaningful, execute the
following command from the print server remote console:
SET SERVICE oldname NAME newname
Using Service Names with LAT, TCP/IP, or NetWare
To use a service in LAT, specify the /SERVICE option instead of the
/PORT option when defining the LATCP port. For example:
LATCP> CREATE PORT LTA555
LATCP> SET PORT LTA555/NODE=XCD_0009C3/SERVICE=BINARY_P1
To use services from TCP/IP, specify the service name as the remote printer
or "rp" parameter in the printcap file or the printer setup program (e.g.,
SAM or SMIT). Remember that if you want to print text files to a UNIX
service, you should enable the TEXT filter (filter number 1).
To use a service with NetWare, use PCONSOLE to specify the default
NetWare service name as one of the print servers for the queue (this service
is XCD_xxxxxx_P1 by default, where "xxxxxx" is the last six digits of the
Ethernet address). If you want to use a different service, you must also
specify this service as one of the print servers for the print queue.
Using the Character Substitution Filter
The character substitution filter (filter 1) allows a user to substitute any text
string for any other text string (strings may be up to 64 characters, and the
two strings may have different lengths). To use this filter:
_____________________________________________________________
Using Services
B-5
1.
Define the desired strings using the SET SERVER STRING
stringnumber string command (the same command used to
define EOT and BOT strings). For example:
SET SERVER STRING 15 “\01”
SET SERVER STRING 16 “This is a test\0D”
sets string 15 as <CONTROL-A> and string 16 as “This is a
test”<RETURN>. The command SHOW SERVER STRINGS shows
the string settings.
2.
Enable filter 1 on the desired service with the SET SERVICE
servicename FILTER 1 command. The command SHOW
SERVICE displays which filters are enabled on the services, and the
SHOW SERVICE FILTER displays the filter settings.
3.
Define the service with the desired match string and replacement string
with the following commands:
SET SERVICE servicename FMS matchnumber
SET SERVICE servicename FRS replacenumber
where matchnumber and replacenumber are the numbers of the strings
defined in step 1. Note that if the match string is set to 00, the default
match string <LINEFEED> and replacement string <CARRIAGE
RETURN><LINEFEED> will be used. If the replacement string is set
to 00 (and the match string is not zero), then the replacement is NULL,
and any matches are just deleted from the input stream.
4.
As an example of the use of filter 1, in certain types of IBM CICS print
jobs, pages end with a <CONTROL-A>. By using filter 1, you can
substitute each occurrence of <CONTROL-A> with <FORMFEED>.
This would be implemented as follows on a service called “CICS”:
SET
SET
SET
SET
SERVER STRING 12 “\01”
SERVICE CICS FILTER 1
SERVICE CICS FMS 12
SERVICE CICS FRS 11
When jobs are printed to the CICS service, all occurrences of <CONTROLA> will be replaced with <FORMFEED>. Note that filter 11 is predefined
as <FORMFEED>.
_____________________________________________________________
B-6
Using Services
C
Reloading the Firmware
General
The firmware on TROY print servers is stored in flash memory. This
means that you can upgrade the firmware by downloading the appropriate
update file. Such update files are available from TROY on floppy disk
(DOS format), CD-ROM, or Internet access.
Downloading from a DEC VMS Host Computer
The download procedure for DEC computers is basically identical to the
procedure for downloading a DEC terminal server. If MOP is not running
on your host computer, enter the following VMS commands to enable it:
$ RUN SYS$SYSTEM:NCP
NCP> SHOW CIRCUIT QNA-0 CHARACTERISTIC
NCP> SET CIRCUIT QNA-0 STATE OFF
NCP> SET CIRCUIT QNA-0 SERVICE ENABLE
NCP> SET CIRCUIT QNA-0 STATE ON
NCP> DEFINE CIRCUIT QNA-0 SERVICE ENABLE
NCP> SHOW CIRCUIT QNA-0 CHARACTERISTIC
NCP> EXIT
Refer to the documentation included with your VMS system and/or your
terminal server if you need additional information on starting MOP.
The print server firmware update file must be installed in the directory
SYS$SYSROOT:[MOM$SYSTEM]. The best way to copy this file from
diskette is to use the NFT (Network File Transfer) utility included with
PATHWORKS, making sure that you copy in image mode with a
maximum record size (MRS) of 512 bytes as shown in the following
example:
COPY/IMAGE/MRS=512 A:file host::directory
where host is the name of the VAX host computer and directory is the VMS
load directory (for example, VAX::SYS$SYSROOT:[MOM$SYSTEM].,
_____________________________________________________________
Reloading the Firmware
C-1
and file is the name of the firmware update file. Note that you must specify
both /IMAGE and /MRS=512 because the copy command defaults to DOS
stream mode and 128 byte records.
Make sure that the system logical MOM$LOAD is set correctly by
verifying that the following line is in your site startup file:
$DEF/SYSTEM/EXEC/NOLOG MOM$LOAD SYS$SYSROOT:[MOM$SYSTEM]
If there are other directories listed in the same command, add the server
directory (if necessary) to the list separated by commas. If this command
does not exist, type it in at the VMS "$" prompt and also add it to the
startup file using the VMS editor.
Now use NCP or the serial port to access the print server remote console
(refer to Appendix A if you do not know how to do this), and type:
SET LOAD SOFTWARE XCD.BIN
SET LOAD ENABLE
in response to the Local> prompt. Substitute your actual firmware update
file name for the "XCD.BIN" example name.
When you type a CTRL-D to exit the remote console, the file XCD.BIN
will then be loaded into the print server. The red TEST LED will blink
during the load process and will go out when the process is complete.
If the red LED does not go out after about two minutes, check to make sure
that you correctly entered all parameters and that your network connections
are good. Then power the print server off and then on again, enter the SET
LOAD ENABLE command, and exit the remote console to retry the
download.
Downloading from a Windows NT or UNIX Host Computer using
Master Mode tftp
To download the print server firmware from a Windows NT or UNIX
system using master mode tftp, first copy the firmware update file to that
host. Make sure that tftp is started by checking the appropriate files on your
system (on Windows NT, TCP/IP and Simple TCP/IP Services must be
enabled in the Network Control Panel); with UNIX, tftp must be enabled in
your /etc/services file and possibly in another configuration file, such as
_____________________________________________________________
C-2
Reloading the Firmware
/etc/inetd.conf. Refer to your system documentation or the UNIX
man pages for additional information.
Important Note: Master mode tftp requires V3.46 or later firmware plus
4.6 or later boot firmware. Do a SHOW VERSION command in the print
server console to verify which version you are using.
To download the firmware from Windows NT, enter the following
command:
tftp - i ipaddr put file password
where ipaddr is the IP address of the TROY print server, file is the name of
the firmware update file, and password is the print server password
(ACCESS is the default password).
To download the file from most UNIX systems, enter the following
commands from the UNIX system prompt:
tftp ipaddress
tftp> binary
tftp> put file password
where ipaddress is the IP address of the TROY print server, file is the name
of the firmware update file, and password is the print server password
(ACCESS is the default password).
Downloading from a UNIX Host Computer using Slave Mode tftp
To download the print server firmware from a UNIX host using slave mode
tftp, first copy the appropriate firmware update file (for example,
XCD.BIN) to that host. Make sure that tftp is started by checking the
appropriate files on your system (generally speaking, tftp must be enabled
in your /etc/services file and possibly in another configuration file, such as
/etc/inetd.conf). Refer to your UNIX system documentation or man pages
for additional information.
Now log into the print server remote console using TELNET or the serial
port (see Appendix A if you do not know how to do this), and execute the
following commands:
SET LOAD IP unixhost-ipaddress
SET LOAD SOFTWARE "pathname"
SET LOAD ENABLE
_____________________________________________________________
Reloading the Firmware
C-3
where unixhost-ip address is the IP address of the UNIX load host and
pathname is the full path name for the firmware update file (e.g.,
/tftpboot/XCD.BIN). Note that some tftp implementations require
that the update file be located in the /tftpboot directory. Be sure to put
the path name in quotes and remember that UNIX names are case-sensitive.
Also, make sure that your file protection allows general access to the boot
directory.
When you type a CTRL-D to exit the remote console, the firmware update
file will then be loaded into the print server. The red TEST LED will blink
about during the load process and will go out when the process is complete.
If the red LED does not go out after about two minutes, check to make sure
that you correctly entered all parameters and that your network connections
are good. Then power the print server off and then on again, enter the SET
LOAD ENABLE command, and exit the remote console to retry the
download.
Downloading from a UNIX Host Computer using BOOTP
To download the print server firmware from a UNIX host using BOOTP,
first copy the firmware update file to that host. Make sure that BOOTP and
tftp are started by checking the appropriate files on your system (generally
speaking, BOOTP must be enabled in the /etc/inetd.conf file, while
tftp must be enabled in your /etc/services file and possibly in another
configuration file, such as the /etc/inetd.conf file). Refer to your
UNIX system documentation or man pages for additional information.
Configure your /etc/bootptab file to specify the Ethernet address of
the print server and the name of the update file (for example, XCD.BIN).
Make sure that your file protection allows general access to the directory
that contains the update file. The exact format of the file
/etc/bootptab varies widely, so you will need to refer to your UNIX
system documentation for details. A typical /etc/bootptab file entry
might be:
xc2:ht=ethernet:ha=00401700c953:\
ip=192.189.207.3:bf=/usr/XCD.BIN:
Now log into the print server remote console using TELNET or the serial
port (see Appendix A if you do not know how to do this), and execute the
following commands:
_____________________________________________________________
C-4
Reloading the Firmware
SET LOAD SOFTWARE "pathname"
SET LOAD ENABLE
where unixhost-ip address is the IP address of the UNIX load host and
pathname is the full path name for the firmware update file (e.g.,
/tftpboot/XCD.BIN). Be sure to put the path name in quotes and
remember that UNIX names are case-sensitive. Also, make sure that your
file protection allows general access to the boot directory.
When you type a CTRL-D to exit the remote console, the firmware update
file will then be loaded into the print server. The red TEST LED will blink
during the load process and will go out when the process is complete.
If the red LED does not go out after about two minutes, check to make sure
that you correctly entered all parameters and that your network connections
are good. Power the printer off and then on again, enter the SET LOAD
ENABLE command, and then type EXIT to exit the remote console and
retry the download.
Downloading from a NetWare Server
To download from a NetWare server, first copy the firmware update file
into the \login directory on your SYS partition (SYS:\LOGIN). Using the
\login directory will eliminate any potential file protection problems.
Connect to the print server remote console using XCONFIG or the serial
port (refer to Appendix A if you do not know how to do this) and enter the
following commands in response to Local> prompt.
SET LOAD HOST fileservername
SET LOAD SOFTWARE SYS:\LOGIN\XCD.BIN
SET LOAD ENABLE
where fileservername is the name of the file server. Substitute the actual
name of your firmware update file for "XCD.BIN". When you type a
CTRL-D to exit the remote console, the file XCD.BIN will then be loaded
into the print server. The red diagnostic LED will blink during the load
process and will go out when the process is complete.
If the red LED does not go out after about two minutes, check to make sure
that you correctly entered all parameters and that your network connections
are good. Then power the print server off and then on again, enter the SET
_____________________________________________________________
Reloading the Firmware
C-5
LOAD ENABLE command, and exit the remote console to retry the
download.
Downloading through the Serial Port (All Models Except Pony Print
Server Plus)
The print server can be downloaded from a PC connected to the serial port
via the XMODEM protocol. To do this, first make sure that you have
Switch 1 in Console mode (OFF) and that the PC can communicate
successfully with the print server using terminal emulation mode (for
example, through a program like QLII or PCTERM). Then type in the
following commands in response to the Local> prompt:
SET LOAD ENABLE
Type EXIT to exit console mode. The print server will then reboot. You
will get a series of messages displayed on the terminal; press RETURN at
any time and then type:
SET LOAD XMODEM
in response to the Boot> prompt. You will get the message "You may
begin your XModem transfer now." Set your PC terminal emulation
program to send a file using the XMODEM protocol with the file name of
the firmware load. The print server will then download the firmware update
file.
Obtaining Firmware Updates
To get the latest firmware updates, go to the Tech Support pages of the
TROY web site (http:/www.troyxcd.com). Alternatively, you may obtain
the firmware from the TROY FTP server (ftp.troyxcd.com) in the firmware
directory. Log in under the user name anonymous with your e-mail address
as the password.
If you do not have Internet access, you may contact TROY Tech Support at
(949) 399-0820, fax (949) 399-0825 or e-mail [email protected] The
firmware can be mailed to you on diskette or electronically sent to you.
_____________________________________________________________
C-6
Reloading the Firmware
D
Glossary/Index
10base2 A type of Ethernet that uses RG58 coaxial cable. Also called
Thin Ethernet, ThinNet, and CheaperNet. pp. 1-4, 1-5, 2-7, 2-13 to 2-14.
10base5 The original Ethernet standard that uses a thick coaxial cable.
Also called thick Ethernet or standard Ethernet. pp. 1-4, 2-7, 2-15.
10baseT A type of Ethernet that uses unshielded twisted pair cable. pp. 13 to 1-5, 2-11 to 2-13.
100baseT4 A 100 megabit/second networking standard based on Ethernet
technology that uses four pairs on a Category 3 twisted pair cable. Not
widely used.
100baseTX The most popular 100 megabit/second networking standard
based on Ethernet technology. It uses two pairs on a Category 5 twisted
pair cable. 1-4, 1-5, 2-11 to 2-13.
802.2 1. The IEEE standard for the Logical Link Control layer of the
Ethernet protocol. The LLC layer is implemented as special fields
containing control information within an IEEE compatible Ethernet frame.
2. The NetWare Ethernet frame type that includes both the IEEE 802.3 and
802.2 fields. p. A-10.
802.3 1. The IEEE standard for Ethernet. 2. The default Ethernet frame
type for NetWare 3.xx and 2.xx (also called 802.3 raw; the NetWare 802.3
is technically not IEEE compatible because it does not have the 802.2
fields). p. A-10.
A4 The international standard paper size (210 x 297mm).
Address An identifier. Every device on a network has a unique address.
AIX The variation of UNIX that runs on IBM computers. pp. 4-5. 4-6.
Anonymous FTP A method by which any user on a network can access
certain files on a given host computer by logging in under the name
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-1
anonymous after connecting to that computer with the FTP protocol. pp. C6.
AppleTalk A protocol developed by Apple Computer for file sharing and
print sharing. AppleTalk runs over Ethernet, LocalTalk, and Token Ring.
pp. 1-1 to 1-5, 6-1 to 6-2, 16-10 to 16-11, A-6. A-7.
arp The standard TCP/IP method for determining a device's actual network
address based on its IP address. Also used by TROY print servers to set the
IP address. pp. 4-11, 4-12.
ASCII A standard for the binary representation of characters.
AT&T UNIX One of two major variants of UNIX on which operating
systems like HP/UX, Solaris, and SCO UNIX are based. Originally
developed by AT&T.
AUI Attachment Unit Interface; the 15-pin Ethernet connector that is used
to connect to a transceiver. Also called a DIX connector or a thick Ethernet
port. See also 10base5.
Batch File A file containing a number of system-level commands. When
this file is run, each of the commands in the file are executed, thereby
eliminating the need to type in each command individually.
Berkeley UNIX One of two major variants of UNIX on which operating
systems like Digital UNIX and SunOS are based. Originally developed by
the University of California-Berkeley.
Bidirectional Capable of communications in two directions. With
printers, this usually means that the printer is capable of receiving data and
sending back status information to the host computer. pp. 16-11, A-5.
Binary File 1. A file that contains data that is not in a standard format like
ASCII. In printing, binary files typically contain graphical information
such as scanned photographs. 2. A special type of PostScript file that
contains compressed binary information. pp. 1-3, 4-3, 16-12.
Bindery In NetWare 2.xx and 3.xx, a database containing definitions for
network entities, including users, file servers, print servers, etc., along with
the properties associated with such entities. In NetWare 4.xx, bindery
emulation is available for compatibility with older versions. p. 5-7, 5-11.
Bitronics Refers to a bidirectional P1284-compatible parallel port.
_____________________________________________________________
D-2
Glossary/Index
BOOTP A standard TCP/IP method for downloading information such as
the IP address into a network device. pp. 4-13 to 4-14, C-4 to C-5.
Bridge A device that connects two local area network segments together.
A bridge operates at level 2 of the OSI Reference model, which means that
it operates transparently with higher level protocols like NetWare and LAT.
p. 16-16.
Broadcast In a network, a situation in which all destinations on the
network receive a copy of a given packet.
Centronics The de facto standard for parallel printer ports that is used on
the vast majority of all printers.
Chooser A Macintosh program that allows a user to select a printer on a
network. p. 6-2.
Circuit A logical connection between two or more devices on a network.
Client A computer on a local area network that obtains services from a
server on the network.
Command File The VMS equivalent of a batch file. See batch file.
Console A program running on a device (such as print server) that allows a
user to configure and monitor that device. Appendix A.
DCPS Abbreviation for DECprint Supervisor. p. 1-2, 11-7, 16-14, 16-16.
Data Link Layer. Layer 2 of the OSI Reference Model that assembles and
disassembles frames, handles synchronization, and detects errors.
Dataproducts A standard for parallel printer ports that was originally
developed by Dataproducts Corporation for its line printers and is common
on older Digital Equipment corporation printers. Rarely used today. Can
be handled with TROY external print servers via a third-party adapter.
DECNET A network operating system and the corresponding protocol
developed by Digital Equipment Corporation. Not to be confused with
LAT, which is a different DEC protocol.
DECprint Supervisor Sophisticated PostScript-based printing software
for VMS that handles job queueing, error and status reporting, and
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-3
translation of PCL, Tektronix 4014, and LN03 page description languages.
pp. 1-2, 11-7, 16-14. 16-16.
Digital UNIX The latest Digital Equipment Corporation version of UNIX.
It replaces OSF/1 and ULTRIX, and uses standard Berkeley UNIX TCP/IP
and lpr/lpd for printing. p. 4-3.
Direct Mode IPX The protocol used by Windows 95 for peer-to-peer
communications. Chapter 8.
DLC/LLC A protocol used for printing on Windows for Workgroups,
LAN Manager, and other network operating systems; being phased out in
favor of newer protocols like Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer direct mode IPX
and TCP/IP. Chapter 10.
DMA Direct Memory Access. A high performance computer architecture
in which data is transferred in large blocks between the processor's memory
and an external device without any processor intervention.
DOS Disk Operating System; now commonly refers to the PC operating
system developed by Microsoft that is officially called MS-DOS.
Download The process of copying firmware or software from a computer
to another computer or other device on the network (such as a print server).
Appendix C.
Driver Low-level software that interfaces a hardware device such as a
printer to the computer's operating system. The driver allows programs
running on the computer to access the hardware device in a relatively
simple manner.
Duplex Printing Printing on both sides of a sheet of paper.
EIO The internal bus used by the latest HP printers like the HP LaserJet
4000, 5000, and 8000. pp. 1-3, 1-4.
Escape Sequence A series of characters, usually starting with the ESCAPE
character (ASCII 27), that is used to control a printer or print job.
Ethernet The most popular Local Area Network standard, which was
developed originally by Xerox, Intel, and Digital Equipment Corporation.
It operates at a speed of 10 million bits per second.
_____________________________________________________________
D-4
Glossary/Index
Ethernet II 1. The second generation of Ethernet, which was developed
before the IEEE 802.3 standard. 2. A frame that is compatible with the
Ethernet II standard. p. A-10.
Ethernet_SNAP Ethernet Sub-Network Access Protocol, an Ethernet
frame type that is derived from the 802.2 standard. p. A-10.
FTP File Transfer Protocol, a TCP/IP-related protocol for transferring files
between devices on a network. p. c-6.
File Server A device on a local area network that provides services to
client computers on the network, such as file sharing, print services, etc.
Firmware The program that operates a microprocessor-based device like a
print server. Essentially the same as software, but the term "software"
usually applies to general-purpose computers. Appendix C.
Flash Memory A type of memory which allows read and write operations,
but permanently stores data when the power is turned off. Useful for
storing firmware, because it can be easily updated by downloading new
code. pp. 1-2, Appendix C.
Font A set of characters (usually the alphabet plus numbers punctuation,
and special characters) that have a particular style.
Form A template describing the way a page will appear when printed. pp.
11-3 to 11-4, 16-15.
Frame A group of data and control information that is sent over a network.
Often used interchangeably with packet, although frame is normally used
with lower-layer protocols like Ethernet, while packet is associated with
higher layer protocols like IP and IPX. p. A-10.
Gateway 1. In TCP/IP jargon, a gateway is the same as a router (see
Router). 2. A device that converts one higher-level network protocol to a
different higher level protocol (for example, a LAT-to-TCP/IP gateway).
pp. 4-16.
Hops The number of routers that are located between two devices, such as
the print server and the file server. pp. 12-5, 12-6.
Host Computer A computer that provides services to one or more users.
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-5
Hosts File The file on a UNIX host computer (usually in the /etc directory)
that contains a list of host computers on the network). p. 4-2.
HP/UX The variation of UNIX that runs on Hewlett-Packard computers.
pp. 4-4, 4-5.
Hub 1. A multiport repeater for connecting several network segments
together; this term is usually associated with 10baseT networks. 2. A
sophisticated network device consisting of a chassis plus several plug-in
boards, including bridges, routers, 10baseT hubs, and other devices. p 2-12.
IEEE International Electronics and Electrical Engineers, a standards body
that controls the specifications for Ethernet and other networking-related
standards.
IETF Internet Engineering Task Force; the group that defines the de facto
standards for TCP/IP.
I/O Slot Input/Output slot; in printers, a place where network interface
cards like the TROY XJet are mounted.
IOP Internal Option Port; the bus used on Lexmark 4039 and Optra Series
printers to connect network interface cards like the TROY XMark.
IP Internet Protocol, one of the core protocols of the TCP/IP protocol suite.
Chapter 4.
IP Address A network address used by the TCP/IP protocol. pp. 3-2 to 33, 4-1, 4-2, 4-10 to 4-17,7-2, 7-3, 7-5 to 7-9.
IPP Internet Printing Protocol, an emerging standard for printing across
LANs and the Internet. Chapter 15.
IPX Internetwork Packet Exchange, one of the NetWare core protocols.
Used in conjunction with SPX for printing and other applications. 1-2;
chapter 5.
JetAdmin A Hewlett-Packard printer management program available for
NetWare and TCP/IP. pp. 1-2, 3-5 to 3-6, 4-18, 5-8 to 5-10,5-17.
JetSend A protocol originally designed by Hewlett-Packard for simple
device-to-device communications. Chapter 14.
_____________________________________________________________
D-6
Glossary/Index
JetStatus A feature of TROY print servers that allows a user to view the
status of the printer. The SHOW SERVER QUEUE command invokes
JetStatus; on XJet IV print servers, more detailed information is available
via the SHOW PORT P1 STATUS command. p A-6.
Job In printing, a document that is sent to the printer from a computer. p.
1-1.
LAN Local Area Network; a high-speed method of interconnecting devices
in a local or campus environment.
LAN Manager A network operating system developed by Microsoft
Corporation. p. 1-1.
LAN Server A network operating system based on Microsoft's LAN
Manager; developed by IBM Corporation. pp. 1-1 to 1-2; pp. 7-7 to 7-11.
Landscape mode Printing a document with the long edge of the paper at
the top. p. B-3.
LAT Local Area Transport, a protocol originally developed by Digital
Equipment Corporation. pp 1-1 to 1-2, chapter 11, 16-14 to 16-17, A8, A9.
LAT port A logical port through which LAT devices can send data to
other LAT devices. A LAT application port is the default type of LAT port
that is used for printing applications (the other type of LAT port is a
dedicated port that always accesses a single service on the host computer).
Chapter 11.
LATCP A VMS utility program used to configure LAT ports. pp. 11-2,
11-3.
LAT Symbiont (LATSYM) A VMS program that controls the printing of
jobs via LAT ports. pp. 11-3.
Legal Size The U.S. long paper size (8.5 x 14 inches).
Letter Size The U.S. standard paper size (8.5 x 11 inches).
Linux A popular free version of UNIX. p. 4-3.
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Glossary/Index
D-7
LLC Logical Link Control, one of two Ethernet protocol layers that
combined correspond to the OSI data link layer. The LLC layer provides a
hardware-independent interface to higher level protocols.
LN03 An older Digital Equipment Corporation laser printer. The LN03
used the ANSI PPL page description language, while its successor the
LN03-Plus added Sixel graphics capabilities. pp. 1-3.
LocalTalk A low-speed (230.4Kbps) local area network standard
developed by Apple Computer. Normally used with the AppleTalk
protocol. pp. 1-1, 1-3, 2-16, A-7.
Logical Refers to conceptual rather than physical. For example, a
computer may have a single physical connection to the network (an
Ethernet adapter card), but may have logical connections to many different
devices on the network.
lpd Line Printer Daemon, a program that runs on a host computer or a
dedicated print server that allows other host computers to print jobs on that
computer or print server. TROY print servers use lpd to allow printing
from computers on the network. p. 1-2, Chapter 4, 7-6, 7-8, 7-10.
lpd-Plus A feature of TROY print servers that allows the user to define
multiple services, each with a different setup and reset string. For example,
a user could have one service for landscape printing and another for duplex
printing. Also called logical printers. p. 1-3, Appendix B.
lpr Line Printer Remote, the program that runs on a client computer to
request print services from an lpd host computer or print server. p. 4-17, 76, 7-7.
lpq A Berkeley UNIX command for obtaining the status of printers.
lpstat An AT&T UNIX command for obtaining the status of printers.
LPT1 The primary parallel port on a PC. Many networking programs allow
transparent printing to network printers by accepting output intended for
LPT1 and redirecting it over the network. pp. 5-24, 7-10, 8-2, 11-6.
MAC Medium Access Control, one of two Ethernet protocol layers that
together correspond to the Data Link layer of the OSI model. The MAC
layer interfaces to the Ethernet hardware. A MAC address is the same as an
Ethernet address.
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D-8
Glossary/Index
man page In UNIX systems, the man pages are an on-line help facility
that provide information on various topics.
MAPI Messaging Applications Program Interface, a popular method for
applications programs to send E-mail messages through Windows operating
systems. pp. 13-1 through 13-5.
MIO Modular I/O, the internal bus on newer HP printers that connects to
network interface cards like the TROY XJet IV. p. 1-4.
MOP Maintenance-Oriented Protocol, the protocol used by the VMS NCP
and NCL utilities and for downloading files. pp. A-1 to A-2, C-1 to C-3.
multiprotocol Refers to the ability to handle multiple protocols
simultaneously. In a print server, this means that multiple computers can
concurrently send print jobs to the same printer.
Name Server A node on a TCP/IP network that provides a list of all nodes
on the network. The name server is accessible from any node, and
eliminates the need to have separate hosts files on each node.
NCL Network Control Language, the method in OpenVMS V6.1 and later
for accessing and maintaining remote devices. Replaces NCP. pp. 11-1, A1 to A-2.
NCP Network Control Program, a VMS utility for accessing and
maintaining remote devices. pp. 11-1, A-1 to A-2.
NDPS Novell Distributed Print Services, a method for configuring printers
in NetWare 5.0 and later systems. pp. 5-15 to 5-16.
NDS NetWare Directory Services, a database of network entities in
NetWare 4.xx, such as users, file servers, print servers, etc. NDS is a global
directory service, which means that users anywhere on a network can
access a service such as a printer by name without being logged into the file
server that offers that service. p. 1-2, Chapter 5.
NetBEUI A networking protocol that is used on Microsoft network
operating systems. Although NetBEUI can be used for printing, it is being
replaced by newer printing protocols like the Windows 95 Peer-to-Peer
direct mode IPX and TCP/IP. Chapter 9.
NetWare A network operating system developed by Novell. pp. 1-1 to 12, Chapter 5, 16-9 to 16-10, A-9 to A-11.
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-9
Network Layer Layer 3 of the OSI Reference Model; establishes paths to
allow packets to be routed throughout the network. IP and IPX are
examples of this layer.
Network Operating System A program that controls the operation of a
network. pp 1-2.
NLM (NetWare Loadable Module) In NetWare 3.xx or 4.xx, a program
that runs on the file server that performs a specific function such as
communications. pp. 5-1, 5-17 to 5-20.
Node A device connected to a network, such as a computer or print server.
NPRINTER The method for connecting a remote printer to a print server
in NetWare V4.xx. See also Remote Printer. p. 5-1.
NWADMIN The Windows-based NetWare Administrator utility that is
used to manage NetWare file servers from a client workstation. pp. 5-8, 512 to 5-13; 5-17 to 5-18.
OpenVMS DEC's latest name for the VMS operating system, which was
originally called VAX/VMS. Chapter 11.
OS/2 IBM's PC operating system. Primarily significant because it is used
as the file server operating system on LAN Manager and LAN Server
networks. Chapter 7.
OS/400 The operating system used on IBM AS/400 minicomputers. p 4-9.
OSF/1 DEC's version of UNIX that was originally called ULTRIX and is
now called Digital UNIX. OSF/1 uses the standard Berkeley lpr/lpd
procedures for printing to remote host computers and print servers.
OSI Reference Model A seven-layer model developed by the International
Standards Organization which is used as a reference for developing
protocols. Since each layer performs a different function, development and
debugging are simplified, and there is greater flexibility (for example, this
approach allows TCP/IP to run over both Ethernet and Token Ring).
P1284 An IEEE standard that defines a high-speed bidirectional parallel
printer port. P1284 ports are also compatible with the Centronics standard.
There are three types of physical connectors associated with the 1284
_____________________________________________________________
D-10
Glossary/Index
standard: 1284A (25-pin DB25), 1284B (36-pin standard Centronics), and
1284C (miniature Centronics).
Packet A group of data and control information that is sent over a network.
Often used interchangeably with frame, although frame is normally used
with lower-layer protocols like Ethernet, while packet is associated with
higher layer protocols like IP and IPX.
Page Description Language A control language usually consisting of
commands embedded within a document that control the way the document
will look when printed. Such commands would set the type of fonts, page
margins, colors, graphics, etc. within the document.
Parallel Port On a printer, a port that transfers data 8 bits at a time for
maximum performance. The parallel port usually has a 36-pin Centronics
connector.
PATHWORKS The Digital Equipment Corporation network operating
system for PCs and Macintosh computers. pp. 1-2; 11-6 to 11-7, 16-11, 1612, 16-15, 16-16.
PCL A page description language originally developed by HewlettPackard for its LaserJet printers.
PCONSOLE A NetWare utility program for configuring and managing
printers. pp. 5-13 through 5-14; 5-19 through 5-21.
PDL An abbreviation for Page Description Language.
Peer-to-Peer 1. A LAN in which nodes communicate with each other
without the need for a file server. 2. A new protocol for peer-to-peer
communications that is included with Windows 95 (also known as Direct
Mode IPX). Chapter 8.
Physical Layer Layer 1 of the OSI Reference Model; defines the physical
and electrical connection to the network.
Ping A TCP/IP command that determines whether a device is alive on the
network. pp. 4-16. 7-8, 7-9, A-13.
PJL Page Job Language, a Hewlett-Packard printer control language that is
independent of the page description language.
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Glossary/Index
D-11
POP3 Post Office Protocol, the protocol used to retrieve E-mail from the
server. pp. 13-2, 13-8, 13-9, 13-11, A-14.
Port 1. A physical connector, such as the parallel port. 2. A logical
connection to a device.
Portrait mode Printing a document with the short edge of the paper at the
top (the normal method of printing).
PostScript A page description language originally developed by Adobe
that is widely used in graphics arts applications. pp. 6-1, 6-2, 11-7, 16-10,
16-11 16-12, 16-15, B3, B4.
PPD See Printer Description File.
PPL An ANSI-standard page description language originally used in the
DEC LN03 laser printer.
Printcap File The file on a UNIX host computer (usually in the /etc
directory) that contains a list of printers. p. 4-3.
PRINTCON A NetWare utility program for defining the characteristics of
the print job.
PRINTDEF A NetWare utility program for defining the characteristics of
a printer or form. These characteristics are associated with the print job via
the PRINTCON utility.
Printer Description File A file used in PostScript printing that describes
the features available on the printer. Commonly used with Apple
Macintosh computers. Also called a PPD.
Print Server 1. A device that allows multiple host computers to share a
printer over a local area network. 2. In Novell NetWare, a logical device
that services print queues on a file server. Chapter 1, 5.
Protocol A method of sending and receiving data between two or more
nodes on a network, and insuring that the data is received without errors.
Queue A region on the computer or file server's disk where files are
temporarily stored before printing. Since the queue can store multiple files,
it effectively allows users to send their jobs to the printer even if the printer
is busy (a procedure called spooling). Chapters 4 through 12.
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D-12
Glossary/Index
Queue Server In Novell NetWare, a queue server is basically the same as
a NetWare print server. Queue Server mode is a NetWare printing method
in which the printer is directly connected to the print server with no
PSERVER NLM installed on the file server. Chapter 5.
rarp Reverse Arp, a standard TCP/IP method of determining a devices IP
address based on its Ethernet address. pp. 4-11 to 4-13, A-13.
Raw TCP port A type of TCP port (see TCP port) in which data is passed
unmodified to the receiving node. pp. 1-2, 4-23 through 4-25.
RCONSOLE A NetWare utility program that allows a workstation user to
access the file server console.
Remote Console A method of accessing the print server console remotely
via protocols like TELNET or NCP for configuration and management
purposes. pp. 1-2; A-1 to A-3.
Remote Printer In Novell NetWare, a remote printer is a device that
connects a printer to a NetWare print server via a network connection rather
than through the parallel or serial port of the print server. pp. 5-1, 5-2; 5-16
to 5-21.
Repeater A network devices that connects two or more network segments
together and provides the additional function of strengthening and
reshaping the electrical signals, thereby allowing the network to be
extended over greater distances.
Reset In printing, a reset is a one or more characters sent after a print job.
Usually, the purpose of a reset is to restore the printer back to its normal
state. pp. B-2, B-3.
RJ45 A type of modular jack connector similar to a telephone connector
but with 8 wires. Used for 10baseT Ethernet connections and for serial
port connections. pp. 2-12, 2-17.
Router A device that connects networks together. A router operates at
level 3 of the OSI Reference model. A router is called a gateway in TCP/IP
terminology. pp. 4-16, A-13.
RPRINTER The method for connecting a remote printer to a print server
in NetWare V3.xx and V2.xx. Replaced by NPRINTER in NetWare V4.xx.
pp. 5-16 to 5-21.
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-13
RS-232 The most common serial interface electrical standard. p. 2-17.
RS/6000 IBM's RISC-based family of computers. pp 4-5; 4-5 to 4-6.
SCO UNIX A PC-based UNIX developed by the Santa Cruz Operation.
pp. 4-7.
Segment A physically or logically separate part of a network, usually a
different cable, that is joined with other segments of the network via a
repeater, bridge, or router to form the complete network.
Serial Port On a printer or print server, a port that transfers data one bit at
a time. Serial ports usually have either 25-pin, 9-pin "D", or RJ45
connectors. pp. 1-3, 2-16.
Server A device on a local area network that provides services to client
computers on the network. See File Server, Print Server.
Service A capability offered by a node on a network. A single node can
have multiple services available. Appendix B.
Setup string. A series of characters that is sent before a print job. Usually
the purpose of a setup string is to put the printer in a special state (for
example, landscape mode). pp. 11-4; Appendix B.
Shell Script The UNIX equivalent of a batch file. See batch file.
SMTP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, a protocol used to send E-mail
messages over the Internet. pp. 13-2, 13-7, 13-9, 13-10, 13-11, A-11.
SNAP See Ethernet_SNAP.
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol, a protocol for monitoring
and controlling devices on a network. pp. 1-2, A-11, A-12.
Solaris A UNIX operating system developed by Sun Microsystems that
runs on Sun computers and Intel-based PCs. pp. 4-6, 4-7.
Spoofing A method normally associated with AppleTalk in which the
print server simulates a bidirectional communications link by sending back
control information to the printer rather than relying on the printer to send
back this information.
_____________________________________________________________
D-14
Glossary/Index
Spool Directory On UNIX systems, a directory that contains the names
of files being spooled to a printer. p. 4-9.
Spooling In printing applications, spooling is the transfer of data to a
temporary storage area on disk (the print queue) prior to printing. Spooling
allows many jobs to be queued to a single printer. Since printers are
relatively slow devices compared to disk drives, spooling allows a user to
submit a job to the printer and then perform other tasks while the job is
being printed.
SPX Sequenced Packet Exchange, one of the NetWare core protocols.
Used in conjunction with IPX for printing and other applications. Chapter
5.
StreetTalk Name The Banyan VINES naming convention used to identify
all items on the network. Chapter 12.
Subnetwork One of several small networks that are joined together into a
single large network.
Subnet Mask A TCP/IP method of dividing a network into several smaller
subnetworks. pp. 3-2, 3-3, 4-15, A-13.
Symbiont Software that handles job queuing and printing on an operating
system.
SYSCON A NetWare utility for managing file servers from a client
workstation.
TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, the de facto
standard for Internet communications that is widely used on local area
networks. Technically, this means the TCP and IP protocols, but the term
has come to encompass all of the related protocols, such as TELNET, FTP,
lpd, etc. pp. 1-1 to 1-2, Chapter 4, Chapter 7, 16-6 to 16-8, A-12 to A-14.
TCP Port A method of accessing a TCP/IP service, where a device with a
single IP address can have multiple TCP ports. For example, TELNET is
port 23, lpd is port 515, etc.; to access a service, you would specify the IP
address of the device plus the TCP port number of the service. p. 4-17
through 4-19.
TCPware A popular VMS TCP/IP software package sold by Process
Software. p. 4-8.
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-15
TELNET A TCP/IP protocol that allows two devices to communicate over
a LAN. One of the devices appears as if it were a dumb serial terminal that
is hardwired to the other device. TELNET is used by TROY print servers
to allow devices like PCs to access the print server remote console. pp. 6-2,
A-1 to A-3.
TELNET interpretation In the TELNET protocol, certain characters are
intercepted and handled in a special manner, rather than being sent directly
to the device. p. 4-18.
Text file A file that contains ASCII formatted information, with each line
of text usually separated by a line feed and/or carriage return.
tftp Trivial File Transfer Protocol, a simple method of transferring
information between two TCP/IP devices. pp. C-2 to C-4.
TGV Multinet A TCP/IP software package that runs on VMS. pp. 4-8.
Thin Ethernet See 10base2.
Transport layer Layer 4 of the OSI Reference Model; provides end-to-end
data integrity. TCP is an example of this layer.
Transceiver In Ethernet networks, a small box that plugs into the AUI port
of a device to allow that device to connect to the Ethernet cable. Many
Ethernet devices have one or more built-in transceivers, which eliminate
need for the AUI port.
UCX The old name for DEC's TCP/IP services for VMS. p. 4-8.
ULTRIX The original DEC UNIX. ULTRIX supports both TCP/IP and
LAT printing. pp. 4-3. 4-14.
.
UNIX A general-purpose computer operating system used on many
different kinds of computers. pp. 1-1 to 1-2; Chapter 4.
VAP Value Added Process, a program that runs on a NetWare 2.xx file
server and performs a specific function such as communications.
VAX Digital Equipment Corporation's family of 32-bit computers that runs
either VMS or some variation of UNIX (ULTRIX, OSF/1, or Digital
UNIX). Chapter 11.
_____________________________________________________________
D-16
Glossary/Index
VINES An network operating system developed by Banyan Systems
Incorporated. pp. 1-1 to 1-2; Chapter 12; 16-17, 16-18, A-7, A-8.
VINES IP The protocol used with Banyan VINES. Chapter 12.
VMS An operating system used on Digital Equipment Corporation
computers. pp. 1-1 to 1-2, Chapter 11
WAN Wide Area Network, a network that interconnects computers and
other devices over large distances, most often via telephone company
facilities but also via private networks, public data networks, and satellites.
Warp IBM's latest version of the OS/2 operating system.
Web JetAdmin A Hewlett-Packard software program for Windows NT
that allows HP, TROY, and other print servers to be configured and
managed over the network using a web browser. pp. 1-2, 3-6, 3-7.
WebXAdmin A feature of new TROY print servers that allows
configuration and management via a web browser. pp. 1-2, 3-3, 5-11, 5-12,
5-16, 5-17
Windows 95 and Windows 98 Microsoft's PC operating systems that
feature built-in peer-to-peer networking. pp. 1-1 to 1-2; Chapter 8.
Windows NT Microsoft's multitasking operating system that can be used
either as a client or as a server (Windows NT Advanced Server). pp. 1-1 to
1-2; chapter 7, 9, 10.
Windows 2000 Microsoft's multitasking operating system that replaces
Windows NT; can be used as either as a client or as a server. pp. 1-1 to 12; chapter 7, 9, 10.
WINSOCK A popular applications program interface for TCP/IP
networking using Windows operating systems. pp. 13-1 to 13-5.
Wollongong PATHWAY A TCP/IP software package for VMS. pp. 4-8,
4-9.
XAdmin TROY's Windows-based utility for managing and configuring
print servers. pp 1-2; pp. 3-1 through 3-3; 5-10 to 5-11; 5-16, 5-18, 5-19,
12-4 to 12-5, 13-7, 13-8.
_____________________________________________________________
Glossary/Index
D-17
XAdmin32 The 32-bit version of TROY's Windows configuration utility.
pp. 1-2; pp. 3-1 through 3-2; 4-14; 5-5 through 5-8; 5-16, 5-18, 7-3, 13-7,
13-8.
XIO Expanded I/O; the internal bus on HP LaserJet II and III printers that
connects to network interface cards like the TROY XJet III. p. 1-5.
Zone In AppleTalk, a zone is a subnetwork; that is, a given network can be
subdivided into multiple zones. pp. 6-2, A-7.
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D-18
Glossary/Index
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