Personal Protective Equipment PDF File

Personal Protective Equipment PDF File

CITY AND COUNTY OF CARDIFF

CODE OF GUIDANCE

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Purpose

This Code of Guidance is concerned with Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), identified as being required following the undertaking of a task risk assessment. PPE is considered as a last resort to control risks if risks cannot be controlled by other means. This Code of

Guidance will help managers understand the legal requirements of legislation and the management and maintenance of PPE.

The Code of Guidance addresses the following:-

1.0 Background

2.0 Legal Requirements

3.0 Provision of Personal Protective Equipment

4.0 Assessment and Selection of Personal Protective Equipment

5.0 Ergonomic and Other Factors

6.0 The Quality of Personal Protective Equipment

7.0 Compatibility of Personal Protective Equipment

8.0 Maintenance and Replacement of Personal Protective Equipment

9.0 Accommodation for Personal Protective Equipment

10.0 Information, Instruction and Training

11.0 Reporting Loss or Defect

Appendix 1 Selection of Suitable PPE – A Step by Step Guide.

Appendix 2 PPE EN Standards

Appendix 3 Employee Feedback Form

1.0 Background

There will be many work activities within Cardiff Council, which present a degree of hazard to those undertaking the work. People need adequate protection from these hazards and safe systems of work and effective control measures should be applied to minimise the risk of harm occurring. However, even where safe systems of work are in place some hazards might remain. These could include, for example, injuries to the head or feet from falling materials; to the eyes from flying particles or splashes of corrosive liquids; to the lungs from breathing in contaminated air; to the body from extremes of heat or cold; and to the skin from contact with corrosive materials. In cases such as these Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is needed to reduce the risk of injury.

2.0 Legal Requirements

The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974.

The Act places a general duty on the Council to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all their employees. This extends

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to the provision of any personal protective equipment considered necessary to reduce risk, at no charge to the employee.

Employees have a duty to co-operate with the Council in matters of health and safety and to make full use of any personal protective equipment they are provided with. Such equipment must not be misused and any defects, which

arise, need to be reported.

The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 (amended by The

Health and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2002):

These Regulations, together with the associated guidance document, give the main requirements that need to be followed regarding PPE at the workplace. Under these

Regulations it is the responsibility of the Service Area Managers to:i ii iii iv ix

Provide suitable PPE to employees who may be exposed to risk to their health and safety, when it is not possible to control the risk adequately by other means;

Issue PPE for the sole use by an individual employee if there is a hygiene consideration of sharing the equipment;

Ensure that when more than one item of PPE needs to be worn, the different items are compatible with each other;

Carry out an assessment to ensure that the PPE. to be provided is suitable v vi and effective for the particular risks involved, the circumstances of its use and for the time over which it is to be worn;

Ensure that there are effective arrangements for the maintenance of PPE so that it is kept in efficient working order;

Provide appropriate accommodation for PPE so that it can be safely stored or kept when it is not in use; vii Ensure that information on the risks that the PPE protects against, how the

PPE is to be used and maintained is kept available to employees viii

Ensure that employees provided with PPE are given suitable comprehensible information, instruction and training to enable them to make effective use of the PPE and to keep it in efficient working order;

Ensure that any PPE provided to employees is properly used in accordance with the Service Area's instructions and organise periodically demonstrations of the wearing of the PPE if appropriate.

Employees also have duties under these Regulations and are required to:i ii iii

Make full use of any PPE provided to them in accordance with both the training and instruction they have been given;

Ensure the PPE is stored or kept safely after its use;

Take reasonable care of the PPE provided and to report to their supervisor or manager any loss or apparent defect in the equipment.

Application of Other Regulations

Other Regulations, as listed below, require the provision and use of certain PPE against particular hazards. Whilst these Regulations remain in force they take precedence over the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992

(amended 2002). For example, a person working with asbestos would, where

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i ii iii iv v vi necessary, have to use respiratory protective equipment and protective clothing under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006, rather than the Personal Protective

Equipment at Work Regulations 1992 (amended 2002).

Even in circumstances where the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations

1992 (amended 2002) do not apply, it still provides a valuable source of guidance and good practice in respect of P.P.E.

Other Regulations which require the provision or use of PPE and would override the

PPE Regulations

Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002.

Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999.

Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006.

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1999.

Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005.

Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989.

3.0 Provision of Personal Protective Equipment

When assessing the most appropriate means of reducing workplace health and safety risks to an acceptable level, there is in effect a hierarchy of control measures which can be adopted. For example, it may be possible to eliminate the risk entirely by using another method, or it may be possible to introduce engineering controls and a safe system of work.

PPE should always be regarded as a ‘last resort’ to protect against health and safety risks because:i ii iii

PPE only protects the person wearing it, whereas controlling the risk at source can protect everyone at the workplace;

Effective protection is only achieved by PPE when it is correctly fitted, maintained, properly used; and

PPE may restrict the wearer to some extent by limiting mobility or visibility, or by requiring additional weight to be carried.

4.0 Assessment and Selection of Personal Protective Equipment

The purpose of the assessment is to ensure that the PPE, which is chosen, is correct for the particular risks involved and for the circumstances of its use. It follows on from, but does not duplicate, the risk assessment requirement of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. Appendix 1 outlines a step by step guide to the selection of suitable PPE

In the simplest and most obvious cases which can easily be explained, the assessment to identify suitable PPE need not be recorded. In more complex cases however, the assessment will need to be recorded and kept accessible to those who need to know the results. A convenient way of recording the results of a PPE assessment is to include the EN standard of the PPE within the task risk

assessment mentioned above, leaving the reader in no doubt as to what PPE standard is appropriate for the activity.

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Once potential hazards are known there may be several types of PPE that would be suitable. The risks at the workplace and the parts of the body endangered are the two key elements to consider.

For example, when assessing the need for eye protection, the first step is to identify the types of hazard present, such as airborne dust, liquid splashes or projectiles, and then assess the degree of risk - for example the likely size and velocity of the projectiles. It is then possible to select a suitable type of PPE from the range of ‘CE’ marked equipment available. In this case, eye protection is designed for dust or chemical protection, and to different levels of impact resistance.

Further guidance on the selection of suitable PPE once the hazards and parts of the body endangered have been identified is given below:-

EYES

Hazards: chemical or metal splash, dust, projectiles, gas and vapour, radiation.

Options: spectacles, goggles, face screens, helmets.

Note: make sure the eye protection chosen has the right combination of impact/dust/splash/molten metal etc protection for the task.

HEAD AND NECK

Hazards: impact from falling or flying objects, risk of head bumping, hair entanglement, chemical drips or splash, climate or temperature.

Options: helmets bump caps, hairnets, Sou’westers and cape hoods.

Note: some safety helmets incorporate or can be fitted with specially designed breathing or hearing protection. Don’t forget neck protection, e.g. scarves for use during welding.

EARS

Hazards: impact noise, high intensities (even if short exposure), pitch (high and low frequency).

Options: ear-plugs or muffs.

Note: ear-plugs may be pre-shaped or individually moulded in rubber or plastic, or disposable and made of compressible plastic foam, glass down etc. Take advice to make sure they can reduce noise to an acceptable level. Fit only specially designed ear-muffs over safety helmets.

HANDS AND ARMS

Hazards: abrasion; temperature extremes; cuts and punctures; impact; chemicals; electric shock; skin irritation, disease or contamination; vibration; risk of product contamination.

Options: gloves, gauntlets, mitts, wrist cuffs, armlets.

Note: don’t wear gloves or mitts when operating machines such as bench drills where the gloves might get caught. Some materials are quickly penetrated by chemicals care in selection is needed. Use skin conditioning cream after work with water or fat solvents. Barrier creams provide limited protection. Disposable or cotton inner gloves can reduce sweating. Latex gloves can cause sensitisation; do not use these for work.

FEET AND LEGS

Hazards: wet; electrostatic build-up; slipping; cuts and punctures; falling objects; heavy loads; metal and chemical splash; vehicles.

Options: safety boots and shoes with steel toe caps (and steel mid-sole), gaiters, leggings, spats and clogs.

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Notes: footwear can have a variety of sole patterns and materials to prevent slips in different conditions; can have oil or chemical-resistant soles; and can be anti-static, electrically conductive or insulating. There are a variety of styles including ‘trainers’ and ankle supports. Avoid high heeled shoes and open sandals.

LUNGS

Hazards: dusts, gases and vapours

Options: disposable respirators; half masks or full face mask respirators fitted with a filtering cartridge or canister; powered respirators blowing filtered air to a mask, visor, helmet, hood or blouse; fresh air hose equipment; breathing apparatus (selfcontained, rebreathers and fresh air line types).

Notes: The right type of respirator filter must be used as each is effective for only a limited range of substances. Cartridges and canisters have only a limited life. Where there is a shortage of oxygen or any danger of losing consciousness due to exposure to high levels of harmful fumes, use only breathing apparatus - never use a filtering cartridge. All equipment should be suitable for its purpose and meet the necessary standards.

WHOLE BODY

Hazards: heat; cold; bad weather; chemical or metal splash; spray from pressure leaks or spray guns; impact or penetration; contaminated dust; excessive wear or entanglement of own clothing.

Options: conventional or disposable overalls, boiler suits, warehouse coats, donkey jackets, aprons, chemical suits, thermal clothing.

Note: the choice of materials includes non-flammable; anti-static; chain-mail; chemically impermeable; and high visibility.

5.0 Ergonomic and Other Factors

When selecting PPE to be used while doing a job, the nature of the job, the individual characteristics of each workstation and the demands they impose on the worker should be taken into account. This will involve considering the physical effort required to do the job, the methods of work, how long the PPE needs to be worn, and requirements for visibility and communication. Those who do the job are usually best placed to know what is involved, and they should be consulted. Other factors may also influence selection: for example, PPE used in food preparation areas may need to be cleaned easily. The aim should always be to choose P.P.E., which will give minimum discomfort to the wearer, as uncomfortable equipment is unlikely to be worn properly.

There will be considerable differences in the physical dimensions of different workers and therefore, more than one type or size of PPE may be needed. The required range may not be available from a single supplier. Those having to use PPE should be consulted and involved in the selection and specification of the equipment as there is a better chance of PPE being used effectively if it is accepted by each wearer.

All PPE which is approved by HSE or bears the ‘CE’ mark must pass basic performance requirements. These have usually been set following medical advice, and the use of such PPE should cause no problems to average healthy adults.

Where problems occur, medical advice may need to be sought as to whether the individual can tolerate wearing the PPE.

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6.0 The Quality of Personal Protective Equipment

It is necessary to ensure that any PPE to be purchased complies with the Personal

Protective Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1992, which implement relevant European

Community directives on the design and manufacture of PPE.

The Personal Protective Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1992 require that almost all

PPE supplied for use at work must be certified by an independent inspection body which will, if the PPE meets the basic safety requirements, issue a certificate of conformity. For a few types of simple PPE protecting against low risks (e.g. gardening gloves) the manufacturer can certify that the PPE meets the basic safety requirements. The manufacturer is then able to display the ‘CE’ mark on the product. It is illegal for suppliers to sell PPE unless is it ‘CE’ marked

.

7.0 Compatibility of Personal Protective Equipment

If more than one item of PPE is being worn, the different items of PPE must be compatible with each other. For example, certain types of respirators will not fit properly and give adequate protection if a safety helmet is worn. In such cases when selecting PPE it should be ensured that both items when used together will adequately control the risks against which they are provided to protect.

8.0 Maintenance and Replacement of Personal Protective Equipment

The Service Area will arrange for an effective system of maintenance of PPE to be in place to make sure the equipment continues to provide the degree of protection for which it was designed. Maintenance includes, where appropriate, cleaning, disinfection, examination, replacement, repair and testing. The responsibility for carrying out maintenance should be laid down, together with the details of the procedures to be followed and their frequency. Where appropriate, records of tests and examinations should also be kept. The maintenance programme will vary with the type of equipment and the use to which is put. For example, mechanical fall-arrestors will require a regular planned preventative maintenance programme which will include examination, testing and overhaul. Gloves may only require periodic inspection by the user, depending on what they are being used to protect against.

In general, PPE should be examined to ensure that it is in good working order, before being issued to the wearer. PPE should also be examined by the user before it is put on and should not be worn if it is found to be defective or has not been cleaned. Such examinations should be carried out in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

While most PPE will be provided on a personal basis, some may be used by a number of people. There should therefore be arrangements for cleaning and disinfecting, if necessary, before PPE is reissued.

A sufficient stock of spare parts, when appropriate, should be available to wearers.

Only proper spare parts should be used in maintaining PPE, or the equipment may not provide the required degree of protection.

Manufacturers’ maintenance schedules and instructions (including recommended replacement periods and shelf lives) should normally be followed: any significant departure from them should be discussed beforehand with the manufacturers or their authorised agent.

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The trained wearer can carry out simple maintenance, but specialist personnel should only do more intricate repairs. With complex equipment, a high standard of training will be required. As an alternative to in-house maintenance, contract maintenance services are available from both manufacturers and suppliers of equipment and specialist maintenance firms.

In certain circumstances it may be more appropriate, instead of instituting a specific maintenance procedure, to provide a supply of disposable PPE (e.g. single use coveralls) which can simply be discarded after use. If disposable PPE is used, it is important that users know when it should be discarded and replaced.

9.0 Accommodation for Personal Protective Equipment

Arrangements should be made to ensure that accommodation is provided for PPE so that it can be safety stored or kept when it is not in use. Accommodation may be simple, for example, pegs for weatherproof clothing or safety helmets. It need not be fixed, for example, the user could keep safety spectacles in a suitable carrying case, and PPE used by mobile workers can be stored in suitable containers in their vehicle.

The storage should be adequate to protect the PPE from contamination, loss, or damage by (for example) harmful substances, damp or sunlight. Where PPE becomes contaminated during use, the accommodation should be separate from any provided for ordinary clothing (accommodation for ordinary work clothing is dealt with in the

Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (amended 2002), and where necessary be suitably labelled. If the PPE itself contains hazardous materials, for example asbestos, it may need special storage arrangements. Where quantities of

PPE are stored, equipment which is ready for use should be clearly segregated from that which is awaiting repair or maintenance.

10.0 Information, Instruction and Training

Managers will be responsible for ensuring that employees are provided with suitable information, instruction and training to enable them to make effective use of the PPE provided to protect them against workplace hazards to their health and safety.

Information provided to employees must be kept available. A systematic approach to training is needed; this means that everyone who is involved in the use or maintenance of PPE should be trained appropriately.

Users must be trained in the proper use of PPE, how to correctly fit and wear it, and what its limitations are. Managers and supervisors must also be aware of why PPE is being used and how it is used properly. People involved in maintaining, repairing and testing the equipment and in its selection for use will also need training. Training should include elements of theory as well as practice in using the equipment, and should be carried out in accordance with the recommendations and instructions supplied by the PPE manufacturer.

The extent of the instruction and training will vary with the complexity and performance of the equipment. For PPE which is simple to use and maintain safety helmets for example, some basic instructions to the users may be all that is required. On the other hand, the safe use of breathing apparatus or laser eye protection will depend on an adequate understanding of the principles behind them, and in the case of the former, regular maintenance and testing. Many manufacturers of PPE run training courses for users of their equipment. It is recommended that, in order to comply with legislation, that employers organise practical demonstrations of the wearing of PPE at suitable intervals.

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In addition to initial training users of PPE and others involved with the equipment may need refresher training from time to time. Records of training details should be kept, to assist in the efficient administration of the training programme.

It is also important that employees receiving the instruction and training understand what they are being taught. Employees may have difficulty in understanding their training for a number of reasons. For example, the risks (and precautions) may be of a particularly complex nature, making it difficult for employees to understand the precise nature of the protective measures they must take. English may not be the first language of some employees, and in this case the instruction and training may have to be undertaken in the employee’s mother tongue to ensure comprehensibility.

11.0 Reporting Loss or Defect

Suitable arrangements should be made to ensure that employees could report the loss of or defects in PPE These arrangements should also ensure that defective PPE is repaired or replaced before the employee concerned re-starts work. Employees must take reasonable care of PPE provided and report to their supervisor or manager, any loss or obvious defect as soon as possible. If employees have any concerns about the service ability of the PPE, they should immediately consult their manager/supervisor.

Further information

Control of Lead at Work Regulations 2002

Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006

Construction (Head Protection) Regulations 1989

Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005

Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992(amended by The Health and Safety (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2002)

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2003

Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007

Leaflet IND(G)174 – a short guide to the Personal Protective Equipment at Work

Regulations 1992.

Cardiff Council Health and Safety Intranet, “How to Guides” relating to the selection of appropriate PPE.

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Appendix 1

Selection of suitable PPE

Step 1

Identify the hazards and risks

The hazards should have been identified in the risk assessment relating to the activity being performed.

Remember use of PPE to control hazards is a last resort, if you can control the risk from the hazards by other means you are obliged to do so.

Step 2

Identify the body part to be protected

Step 3

Identify PPE which will provide the required standard of protection against risks identified by referring to

Appendix 2.

Step 4

Obtain samples of the appropriate standard PPE of varying styles, fit, quality etc. Ensure that the PPE selected takes the demands of the job into consideration e.g. physical effort required to do the job, need for communication, health of the employee, etc and is compatible with any other PPE being worn.

Step 5

Arrange for a group of employees for whom the PPE is required, to test the PPE under normal working conditions. Ensure that the employees selected are informed of which risks the PPE is designed to protect them from, how the PPE is to be used and how the employee is to maintain the equipment in good repair.

Inform the relevant trade union Health and Safety Representatives that PPE is being reviewed.

Step 6

After an appropriate length of time (possibly up to 3months) obtain feedback from the employees involved in the testing using the form shown in Appendix 3. (The form will need to be customized depending on what product is being tested)

Step 7

Select the most appropriate PPE taking into account the feedback of the test group. Inform the trade union

Health and Safety Representatives of the outcome.

Step 8

Record the reasons for not selecting unsuitable PPE. Retain the record as evidence of PPE review and continuing improvements in PPE technology.

Step 9

Ensure that the standard of PPE selected is noted on the appropriate task risk assessment.

Step 10

Evaluate the selected PPE after 1year to ensure continued suitability for use or following an accident or incident where the PPE could have been a contributory factor.

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Appendix 2. Personal Protective Equipment EN Standards

Body Part

Protected

Eyes

Head

Type of Protector

Safety spectacles

Type of hazard

Mechanical

Chemical

Radiation

Laser light

European

Standard

EN 166

Safety goggles

Safety eye/face shield

Mesh visor

Mechanical

Chemical

Radiation

Laser light

Mechanical

Chemical

Radiation

Laser light

Mechanical

Industrial safety helmet Impact from falling materials

Contact with overhead structures

Bump caps Contact with overhead structures

EN 166

EN 166

EN 1731

EN 397

EN 812

Other information

Class

1 or 2 optical glass

3- Liquid droplet/splashes

4- Large dust particles

5- Gas and fine dust

9- Molten metals/hot solids

A- High energy

B- Medium energy impact

F- Low energy impact

Example: safety spectacles to protect against low energy impact EN 166 1F.

Example: safety goggles to protect against medium impact, liquid droplet, dust, EN 166 1B

3.5.

Example: face shield to protect against medium impact, liquid droplet when jet washing, EN

166 B 3.

Ears Ear muffs

Ear plugs

Helmet mounted ear muffs

Level dependent ear muffs

Active noise reduction ear muffs

Ear muffs with electrical audio input

Level dependent ear plugs

Noise

Noise

Noise

Noise

Noise

Noise

Noise

EN 352 Part

1

EN 352 Part

2

EN 352 Part

3

For use with Forestry

Commission

Combination Safety

Helmet – Chainsaw work.

EN 352 Part

4

EN 352 Part

5

EN 352 Part

6

EN 352 Part

7

Respiratory tract

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Filtering face piece particulate respirators

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Fine respirable dust particles

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EN

149:2001

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Personal monitoring may be required to establish

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Simple filtering devices. A range of more complex

RPE is available dependent on hazard.

Hands

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(dust mask) FFP1 which level of respiratory protection is required.

Face fit testing is required to ensure that

RPE fits the wearer correctly. Face fit testing will need to be repeated if the wearer, gains/loses significant amount of weight, grows a beard etc.

Filtering face piece particulate respirators

Half mask face pieces

Gloves

Gloves

January 2011

Water and oil based mists, fine dusts, metal fumes, and ozone.

Dependent on filter selected e.g. P3 filter gives protection for solid and liquid particulates

(dusts, fibres, mists, fumes, bacteria and virus)

EN

149:2001

FFP2

EN 140

(with appropriate filter cartridges)

Mechanical EN388

Simple Design

(Category 1)

For tasks with minimal risk where the effects of not wearing a glove are superficial.

Intermediate Design

(Category 2)

Mechanical risks

Complex Design

(Category 3)

Tasks which can result in irreversible harm

Mechanical hazards /

Performance level

Abrasion resistance

0-4

Blade-cut resistance

0-4

Tear resistance

0-4

Puncture resistance

0-4

Cold

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EN511

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Example: work involving risks of cuts from glass would need to be EN388

Intermediate or Complex design with a blade cut resistance of 3 to 4.

Cold / Performance

Level

Convective cold

0-4

Contact cold

0-4

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Gloves Heat EN407

Water proof ness

0-4

Thermal hazards /

Performance level

Burning

0-4

Contact heat

0-4

Convective heat

0-4

Radiant heat

0-4

Small splashes molten metal 0-4

Large splashes molten metal 0-4

Gloves

Sleeves

Chemical and / or microorganisms

Cuts to the forearm

EN374

EN 388 Example: Recycling sort line, EN 388

Intermediate or Complex design, with cut resistance level 4

Feet Boots and Shoes Impact from falling items

Puncture from objects on surface walked on

Injury from walking on uneven surfaces

EN345 200

Joules

EN346 100

Joules

Higher rated toe protection for heavy industry

There is no separate standard for foot wear with steel mid soles, ankle protection, water resistance etc. The selection of the footwear will be dependent on what risks it is designed to protect against

Example: for work on the landfill site EN346 100

Joules with steel mid sole and ankle protection.

Whole body

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Boots and Shoes

High visibility clothing

Waterproof/breathable clothing

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Anti-Static /

Slipping

Contact by vehicles/plant

Inclement weather

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EN 347

EN471

EN 343

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Class 1

Lowest protection level where visibility is an advantage but for minimal risk/off road purposes only.

Class 2

Intermediate protection for use on the public highway.

Class 3

Highest protection level for use on motorways and high-speed routes.

Class 1,2 & 3, class 3 being the highest rating.

Example: landfill employees EN 471

Class 2, EN 343 Class 3

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Waterproof, Class 3

Breathable.

Full body

Whole body

Disposable coveralls

Harness

Lanyards

Buoyancy aids and

Lifejacket

Attachment of

Asbestos fibres

Falls from height

EN 361

EN 354

EN 355

En 360

Drowning EN 393

(50N)

EN 395

(100N)

EN 396

(150N)

EN 399

(275N)

Expander lanyards

Retractable lanyards

Suitable for competent swimmers in inshore and coastal conditions.

Assists conscious wearer to self rescue.

This is not a lifejacket and does not turn wearer onto back position.

Suitable for nonswimmers and swimmers inshore and coastal waters in moderate conditions.

Normally turns wearer onto back position.

Suitable for non swimmers and swimmers for all weather conditions. Turns unconscious wearer onto back position.

Suitable for wearers of heavy watertight clothing in rough waters and offshore. Turns unconscious wearer onto back position.

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Appendix 3

(Example feedback form for gloves. A similar form would need to be developed for other items of PPE)

Personal Protective Equipment (Glove)

Employee Feedback Form

(A separate feedback form must be completed for each product tested)

Employee Name

(Please Print)

Occupation

Product

Insert details of item being tested.

Characteristics

(insert characteristics appropriate to the product)

Cut resistance

Puncture resistance

Grip dry

Grip wet

Comfort

Durability

Suitability for task

Other Comments

Please rate 1 – 5 (1=poor)

Date…………………

Name (Please Print)………………………………………………………………………….

Designation……………………………………………………………………………………

Signature……………………………………………………………………………………….

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