2011 Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions

2011 Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 Introduction ...............................................................................................
1
2.0 What Is A Conservation Measure? .......................................................
1
2.1 Prescriptive Measure ...............................................................................
1
2.2 Quasi-Prescriptive Measure ....................................................................
2
2.3 Custom Measure ......................................................................................
2
3.0 The 2011 Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions List ................
3
3.1 Conservation Measures under the Prescriptive List ............................
4
3.2 How is the Prescriptive List Structured? ...............................................
5
3.3 How can the Prescriptive List Help Program Designers ......................
7
4.0 Free Ridership and Other Adjustment Factors .................................
7
5.0 Interactive Effects (Cross Effects) ........................................................
7
6.0 Submission Process for Measures .......................................................
8
7.0 Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions Summary List .................
11
8.0 Prescriptive Measures Substantiation Sheets ...................................
19
8.1 Agri-Business .............................................................................................
21
Double Creep Heat Pads …………………………………………………………………
23
Single Creep Heat Pad …………………………………………………………………..
28
8.2 Electric Auxiliary ......................................................................................
33
Commercial Clothes Dryer (Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas) ..................
35
Dual Speed Pool Pump Motors ..……………………………………………………….
38
Energy Efficient Televisions – CEE Tier 4 .........................................................
43
Energy Star® Qualified Audio/Video Equipment – Audio Amplifiers .....................
47
Energy Star® Qualified Audio/Video Equipment – Optical Disc Player .................
52
Energy Star® Qualified Computers – Desktop ...................................................
57
Energy Star® Qualified Computers – Notebook .................................................
62
Energy Star® Qualified Displays (Monitors) .......................................................
67
Energy Star® Qualified Game Consoles ............................................................
72
Energy Star® Qualified Set Top Box ..................................................................
77
Pool Pump with Time Clock or Controller ...........................................................
82
Variable Speed Pool Pump Motors ....................................................................
86
8.3 Household Appliances ..............................................................................
91
Convection Oven .....................................................................................................
93
Energy Star® Clothes Washer – Electric Water Heating ........................................
97
Energy Star® Clothes Washer – Gas Water Heating .............................................
101
Energy Star® Dishwasher – Electric Water Heating ...............................................
105
Energy Star® Freezer – New Purchase or Replacement of Freezer …..................
109
Energy Star® Refrigerator – New Purchase or Replacement of Refrigerator .........
113
Freezer Replacement – Early Replacement ………………………….......................
117
Freezer Retirement – Early Retirement, No Replacement .....................................
121
Gas Range – Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas ..........................................
124
Refrigerator Replacement – Early Replacement …….............................................
127
Refrigerator Retirement – Early Retirement, No Replacement ..............................
131
Residential Clothes Dryer (Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas .......................
134
8.4 Lighting ...................................................................................................
137
3-way Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – Low Wattage 3-Way CFL ...............
139
3-way Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – High Wattage 3-Way CFL ..............
142
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 11 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In ....
145
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 13 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In ....
149
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 15 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In ....
153
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 20 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In ....
158
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 23 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In .....
163
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 25 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In .....
167
Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 27 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In .....
172
Dimmable Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – 19W Dimmable CFL .................
177
Energy Star® Ceiling Fan – Lighting Replacement .................................................
180
Energy Star® CFL Flood Light – 26W, Indoor ........................................................
186
Energy Star® CFL Flood Light – 26W, Outdoor .....................................................
190
Energy Star® Qualified Decorative Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) –
Chandelier CFLs ………………………………………………………………………….
194
Energy Star® Qualified Decorative Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – Globe
CFLs ……………………………………………………………………………………..
197
Energy Star® Qualified Decorative Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) – Vanity
CFLs ………………………………………………………………………………………
200
Energy Star® Qualified Indoor Light Fixture – Ceiling Mounted Fixture .................
203
Energy Star® Qualified Indoor Light Fixture – Torchiere .........................................
207
Energy Star® Qualified Indoor Light Fixture – Desk Lamp Fixture .........................
211
Fluorescent Light Fixtures – T-8 Fixtures, 1 Lamp ..................................................
215
Fluorescent Light Fixtures – T-8 Fixtures, 2 Lamps ................................................
219
Induction Lamp – Outdoor Lighting …………………................................................
223
LED Lights – 6W LED Screw-In ...............................................................................
227
Metal Halide Fixture – 39W CMH PAR ....................................................................
232
Seasonal Led Lights – C-7 LED Lights ...................................................................
236
Seasonal Led Lights – Mini LED Lights ..................................................................
240
8.5 Controls for Lighting .................................................................................
245
Dimmer Switch ........................................................................................................
247
Lighting Timers – Indoor Lighting Timer …..............................................................
251
Lighting Timers – Outdoor Lighting Timer …............................................................
254
Motion Sensors – Hard Wired Indoor Motion Sensor .............................................
258
Motion Sensors – Outdoor Motion Sensor .….........................................................
261
8.6 Solar Energy Applications ........................................................................
267
Solar Landscape Lights ...........................................................................................
269
Solar Thermal Water Heater ...................................................................................
272
8.7 Space Cooling and Heating – Residential ……........................................ 277
Central Air Conditioners - Proper Sizing .................................................................
279
Electric Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating & Cooling,
New Homes ……......................................................................................................
283
Electric Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, New Homes ..............................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating & Cooling,
Existing Homes ......................................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, Existing Homes .........................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only, New
Homes ....................................................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
New Homes ...........................................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
Existing Homes ......................................................................................................
Electric Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
Existing Homes ......................................................................................................
287
291
295
299
303
307
311
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner SEER 14.5 .................................................
315
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner SEER 15 ….................................................
319
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner SEER 14.5 Higher Temperature Setting .....
324
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner SEER 15 Higher Temperature Setting ........
329
Energy Star® Dehumidifier .....................................................................................
334
Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner .......................................................................
338
Furnace/Air Conditioner Filter .................................................................................
343
Gas Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating & Cooling, New
Homes .....................................................................................................................
346
Gas Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, New Homes …………..…………………………………………………………
Gas Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating & Cooling,
Existing Homes ……………………………………………………………………………
Gas Furnace With ECM (Non - Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, Existing Homes …………………………………………………………………
Gas Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only, New
Homes ....................................................................................................................
Gas Furnace With ECM (Non-Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only, New
Homes ....................................................................................................................
Gas Furnace With ECM (Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only, Existing
Homes ....................................................................................................................
Gas Furnace With ECM (Non-Continuous Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
Existing Homes …………………………………………………………………………...
Gas Furnace With ECM (Change Behaviour in Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, Existing Homes ........................................................................................
350
354
358
362
366
370
374
378
Gas Furnace With ECM (Change Behaviour in Fan Usage) – Space Heating &
Cooling, New Homes .............................................................................................
382
Gas Furnace With ECM (Change Behaviour in Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
Existing Homes ......................................................................................................
386
Gas Furnace With ECM (Change Behaviour in Fan Usage) – Space Heating Only,
New Homes ...........................................................................................................
390
Pellet Stove ............................................................................................................
394
8.8 Controls for Space Cooling and Heating - Residential .........................
399
Programmable Thermostat – Baseboard Heaters .................................................
401
Programmable Thermostat – Electric Forced-Air Heating ......................................
405
Programmable Thermostat – Gas Forced-Air Heating ............................................
410
8.9 Thermal Envelope .......................................................................................................
415
Duct Sealing – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes ........................................
417
Duct Sealing – Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes ..................................................
421
Duct Sealing – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes ….……..................................
425
Duct Sealing – Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes .......................................................
429
Duct Sealing – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes ...................................
433
Duct Sealing – Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes ............................................
437
Duct Sealing – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes ........................................
441
Duct Sealing – Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes .................................................
445
Energy Star® Windows – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes .................
449
Energy Star® Windows – Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes ...........................
455
Energy Star® Windows – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes .......................
461
Energy Star® Windows – Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes .................................
466
Energy Star® Windows – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes .......................
471
Energy Star® Windows – Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes .................................
477
Energy Star® Windows – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes ............................
482
Energy Star® Windows – Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes ......................................
487
Residential Attic Insulation – Electric Heating .........................................................
492
Residential Attic Insulation – Gas Heating ..............................................................
495
Window Solar Film – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes .............................
498
Window Solar Film – Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes .......................................
503
Window Solar Film – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes ..................................
508
Window Solar Film – Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes …………..............................
513
Window Solar Film – Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes ........................
518
Window Solar Film – Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes ..................................
523
Window Solar Film – Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes .............................
528
Window Solar Film – Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes .......................................
533
8.10 Water Heating – Residential ...................................................................
539
Domestic Hot Water Pipe Insulation (Per 3' of Pipe Insulation) ..............................
541
Domestic Water Heater – Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas .......................
544
Drain Water Heat Recovery ....................................................................................
548
Point of Use (Tankless) Water Heater – Commercial, Large Office .......................
551
Point of Use (Tankless) Water Heater – Commercial, Medium Office ...................
558
Water Heater Blanket – Residential …………………………………………………….
565
8.11 Miscellaneous .........................................................................................
571
Clotheslines - Outdoor ………………………….......................................................
573
Cold Water Clothes Washing – Multi Family ..........................................................
576
Cold Water Clothes Washing – Single Family .......................................................
580
Energy Star® Battery Chargers .............................................................................
584
Heavy Duty Plug-In Timers – Car Block Heater Timer ...........................................
587
Heavy Duty Plug-In Timers – Pool Pump Timer ......................................................
590
Heavy Duty Plug-In Timers – Spa Pump Timer ......................................................
594
Low-Flow Faucet Aerator ........................................................................................
597
Low-Flow Showerhead – Electric Water Heating ...................................................
601
9.0 Glossary .............................................................................................
607
Appendix A – Peak Demand Savings Methodology .............................
613
Appendix B – Modeling and Simulation: Methodology & Results .......
621
Appendix C – Interactive Effects ...........................................................
637
Appendix D – OPA Measures & Assumptions Substantiation Form …
643
This is Release Version 1.0 of the 2011 OPA Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions
List. There are new measures that have been added and measures to be reviewed and
updated which have not been included in this release. Please refer to the measures
below:
NEW MEASURES:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Cold Water Detergent
Creep Heat Pads
Energy Star® Qualified Audio/Video Equipment
Energy Star® Qualified Computers
Energy Star® Qualified Displays
Energy Star® Qualified Game Consoles
Energy Star® Qualified Set Top Boxes
Gas Furnace with ECM (with Behaviour Changes in Fan Usage)
Induction Lamps
Point of Use (Tankless) Water Heater
Pool Pump Motors
Water Heater Blanket
MEASURES FOR UPDATES:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Energy Star® Dishwasher – Gas Water Heating
Power Bar – With Integrated Timer
Solar Attic Fan
Variable Frequency Drives
MEASURES REMOVED:
The following measures have been removed in the List due to new eligibility requirements or
measures were deemed to complex to be considered prescriptive measures:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner – SEER 14
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner – SEER 14, Higher Temperature Setting
(peaksaver®) Commercial Load Control Device - Installing a Switch
(peaksaver®) Commercial Load Control Device - Installing a Thermostat
(peaksaver®) Residential Load Control Device - Installing a Switch
(peaksaver®) Residential Load Control Device - Installing a Thermostat
1.0 INTRODUCTION
Recognizing the benefits that conservation brings to the province, the Ontario Power Authority
(OPA) has created Prescriptive and Quasi-Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions Lists
containing fully substantiated conservation measures for different end-use applications in the
residential, commercial and institutional and industrial sectors.
2.0 WHAT IS A CONSERVATION MEASURE?
A conservation measure is an action or set of actions undertaken in a Conservation program to
reduce the consumption of important resources such as electricity, gas or water. The actions
involve one or more of: physical changes to facility equipment, revisions to operating and
maintenance procedures, software changes, or new means of training operations and
maintenance staff. They may be implemented as a retrofit to an existing system or facility, or as
a modification to a design before construction of a new system or facility.
Conservation measures bring significant potential energy and demand savings for energy
conservation programs. It is, therefore, important to substantiate the potential energy and
demand savings as they serve as the basis for the design, implementation, and evaluation of
conservation and demand side management programs. Depending on various factors such as
project size, ease of implementation or level of incentives, the estimation of savings may be
approached in three different ways: prescriptive, quasi-prescriptive or custom.
To provide a better view of how these approaches are used, an example, “Operation LightSwap Program”, is used to define and differentiate the three approaches. The Operation LightSwap Program is a program that gives program participants incentives for replacing their old
fluorescent lights with more efficient fluorescent lighting. This program is valid across various
sectors such as residential, commercial & institutional, and industrial sectors. Since the
potential participants range from multiple sectors, the program varies the way potential resource
savings and the corresponding levels of incentives for each approach are estimated. The
Program describes the prescriptive, quasi-prescriptive and custom approaches in the following
manner:
2.1 Prescriptive Measure
A prescriptive measure uses defined or fixed input assumptions embedded into the
energy and demand savings equations. These input assumptions can include default
efficiencies for a type of equipment specified or annual operating hours for the type of
building selected. A prescriptive measure represents how a typical Conservation
program participant obtains resource savings as a blended average. For example,
changing old T-12 lights in a garage at home with T-8 lights may be thought of as a
prescriptive measure in estimating the resource savings. In this scenario, an average
number of hours used by the lights in the garage may be stipulated to be the same for all
residential units in estimating the resource savings. This is acceptable since the
measure will only be looking at one simple type of light swap. The estimated savings will
likely not differ too much from the actual savings. Creating a prescriptive measure for
this is an efficient and low-cost way to forecast the savings and the incentive level.
1
2.2 Quasi-Prescriptive Measure
In a non-residential scenario where program participants opt to complete fluorescent
lighting retrofits that involve multiple retrofits (e.g. changing lights used in public space
retail advertisement; retrofitting lights in storage areas or stock rooms; or changing lights
in the underground parking garage of a mall), a quasi-prescriptive lighting measure may
be considered. Instead of simply assigning a prescriptive measure to represent all T-8
retrofits in a particular building, the Program may use a quasi-prescriptive approach in
estimating resource savings.
A quasi-prescriptive measure has varying resource savings estimates according to the
technology or type of equipment and the context in which they are used. It contains key,
measure-specific inputs to estimate energy and peak demand savings for each program
participant. It provides a methodology that allows estimating resource savings for
various scenarios rather than relying on a fixed savings value for all scenarios. A quasiprescriptive approach will allow different parameters or variables to be assumed to
estimate different levels of resource savings for different retrofits in different business
segments.
For the Operation Light Swap Program, a quasi-prescriptive measure would allow
multiple variations of replacing T-12 fixtures stipulating different key input parameters
such as the number of 8’ lamps or 4’ lamps, whether using standard or high performance
T8 fixtures or the number of operating hours in a stock room versus the number of hours
for an underground parking garage.
2.3 Custom Measure
Measures are classified as custom when neither prescriptive input assumptions nor key
measure-specific input parameters are sufficient in estimating the resource savings.
Custom measures require measure-specific inputs and assumptions to generate
accurate estimates of savings. They are usually implemented when project complexity
is high, when very precise and accurate savings estimates are required, or when
program budget and timeline are able to accommodate the implementation. Custom
measures are tailored to maximize the accuracy and precision in the resource savings
estimates for a project and therefore do not allow for quick calculation of the resource
savings. Custom measures are used when imprecise estimates will cause significant
unjustified costs or unaccounted resource savings to a program or participant to be
incurred. For a custom measure, detailed analyses (more extensive than both
prescriptive and quasi-prescriptive measures) are conducted to minimize the amount of
deviation from actual savings and forecasted savings. Savings from these measures are
quantified with a detailed evaluation & verification plan to ensure that the verified
resource savings are measured as precisely as possible.
For the Operation Light Swap Program example, a custom measure that involves a
multiple lighting system retrofit would require interactive effects to be estimated.
Interactive effects refer to how various systems within a building (e.g. space heating and
space cooling) will be affected when there is a reduction in energy use in another
system. Reducing the amount of lighting energy will lead to reduced space cooling
requirements but may also lead to increased space heating. Due to the complexity,
2
variation of outcomes, level of detail, and size of the individual projects, a custom
approach may be appropriate to estimate resource savings.
Designing custom measures usually requires much more resources than quasiprescriptive and prescriptive measures; therefore the benefits and disadvantages of
creating custom measures should be weighed prior to implementation. For complex
projects, where there are many factors that need to be accounted for, it is recommended
that custom measures be created and used.
The example of “Operation Light-Swap Program” was mainly used to illustrate how and when to
use a prescriptive versus a quasi-prescriptive versus a custom approach for input assumptions
and estimation of resource savings. In no way does the OPA restrict lighting retrofit programs to
any of the particular approaches described above. There are many possible scenarios of how
conservation measures may be implemented.
3.0 THE 2011 PRESCRIPTIVE MEASURES AND ASSUMPTIONS LIST
The 2011 Prescriptive Measures and Assumptions List (“Prescriptive List”) is a collection of
electricity conservation measures which present energy and demand savings using prescriptive
input assumptions (PIAs). It is a revised and updated version of the 2010 Prescriptive
Measures and Assumptions List. Revisions and updates to the 2011 List include revised values
for some measure assumptions based on program evaluation feedback and measures’ research
as well as the addition of new measures. Further to this, the Prescriptive List now includes
measures for residential, commercial and institutional and industrial sectors. The format of the
substantiation sheets was also revised to present in the Resource Savings Table the base and
conservation measure equipment and operating and maintenance (O&M) costs as well as
additional columns for other resources saved (e.g. propane and heating oil).
The annual energy savings and coincident peak demand savings found within the Prescriptive
List have been estimated to represent potential gross level savings for an average Ontario
consumer. These potential savings do not account for adjustment factors such as percent free
ridership, spillover or rebound effect as represented by the net-to-gross ratio.
Annual energy savings in most of the measures are presented as the difference of the base
measure annual consumption and conservation measure annual consumption. Where there is
sufficient information, annual consumption is estimated as a function of the kW rating and the
number of operating hours. Peak demand savings, on the other hand, require more detailed
information to estimate since OPA considers coincident peak demand savings. Estimation of
coincident peak demand savings makes use of Seasonal Energy Savings Patterns (SESPs) and
coincidence factors.
SESPs represent potential energy savings by various end-uses in terms of a percentage of
occurrences within specific season-and- time-of-use periods. They have been developed based
on 8760 1 end use load profiles representing the energy consumed hourly (by end-use) over the
span of a year. Depending on the period of concern (the peak electricity system hour; the top10 hours; the summer peak period; the winter peak periods; etc.), relevant demand savings
1
8,760 is the number of hours in a year
3
estimate can be derived from these SESPs. Improvement and expansion of the documentation
of these load profiles had been a focus of work in 2010. In the current publication, new
measures contain 8760 end use load profiles that have been generated taking into account the
typical hourly electricity consumption of the base and conservation measures across the whole
year and thereby deriving the annual hourly electricity savings and seasonal energy savings
pattern from these 8760 load profiles. The OPA will still continue to improve and enhance the
8760 load profiles for each measure in the next years to come. It welcomes submissions of new
or improved load profiles that can enhance the accuracy of demand calculations. Refer to
Appendix A for a detailed discussion of the methodology used in determining coincident peak
demand savings.
Information presented in the Prescriptive List is derived and gathered from various sources
ranging from previous evaluation studies involving engineering calculations to in situ (in its
original place) metering studies. It may also be based on studies undertaken in different
jurisdictions outside Ontario but contain input assumptions that have been found to be valid for
Ontario.
3.1 Conservation Measures under the Prescriptive List
The conservation measures included in the Prescriptive List are categorized by the
following major end-uses:
Agri-Business – single and double creep pads
Electric Auxiliary - commercial clothes dryer, variable speed pool pump
motors, pool pump controls, energy efficient televisions, Energy Star®
qualified set top box, game consoles, audio/video equipment, computers
and displays (monitors)
Household Appliances – Energy Star® refrigerator and freezer,
refrigerator and freezer retirement, Energy Star® clothes washer, Energy
Star® dishwasher, clothes dryer, convection oven, gas range
Lighting – Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs), Energy Star® CFL flood
light, fluorescent T8 fixtures, metal halide fixtures, Light Emitting Diodes
(LEDs), Energy Star® qualified indoor light fixtures, Energy Star®
qualified decorative CFLs, dimmable CFLs, 3-way CFLs
Lighting Controls – dimmer switch, indoor and outdoor lighting timers,
indoor and outdoor motion sensors
Solar Energy Applications – solar assisted water heater, solar attic fan,
solar landscape lights
Space Cooling and Heating – Energy Star® central air conditioners,
Energy Star® room air conditioner, Energy Star® dehumidifier, Energy
Star® ceiling fan, furnace with ECM, heat pump, pellet stove, furnace/airconditioner filter, proper sizing of central air conditioner
Space Cooling and Heating Controls – programmable thermostats
4
Thermal Envelope – residential attic insulation, basement insulation,
Energy Star® windows, window solar film, duct sealing
Water Heating – heat pump water heater, domestic water heater, pipe
insulation
Miscellaneous - Energy Star® battery chargers, heavy duty plug in
timers, power bar with integrated timer, central air-conditioner tune up,
low flow faucet aerator, low-flow showerhead, clotheslines, in-home
energy use displays
3.2 How is the Prescriptive List Structured?
The Prescriptive List contains substantiation sheets for each measure.
The
substantiation sheets are used to document the references and rationale for each
measure’s input assumptions. Refer to Appendix D for the measure substantiation
template. Each substantiation sheet consists of the following information:
Revision Number, Description/Comment, Date Revised – shows
reason for revision, the number of revisions made for the measure and
when it was revised.
Base and Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description –
describes the existing equipment to be replaced (base case) and high
efficiency equipment that will replace it (energy efficient case); units of the
equipment or technologies (e.g. single unit, package of 3, string of lights)
as well as the different sizes, capacities, types and efficiency levels
available in the market and applications for the measure are specified.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations – lists the applicable codes,
standards, and/or regulations that govern the performance (i.e. energy
consumption) of the base case and/or energy efficient case equipment.
Decision Type – there are 4 decision types: New, Replacement, Retrofit,
and Retirement. Decision types refer to the action or purchase that will
occur when initiating an energy savings measure. They are defined as
follows:
New
An energy efficiency measure that builders and
developers can install that goes above and
beyond building codes and product or system
standards at the time of construction.
Replacement An energy efficiency measure that customers
can implement when the existing measure is
either worn out or needs replacing that is more
efficient installing products or systems that just
meet codes and standards.
5
Retrofit
An energy efficiency measure where customers
replace and dispose of old existing products
and/or systems with a more energy efficient
option when the existing measure is still working
with several years of useful life remaining.
Retirement
An energy efficiency measure where customers
remove/dispose of inefficient existing products
and/or systems, without replacement.
Target Markets – all applicable target markets are specified whether
residential or small commercial, new homes or existing homes, single
family or multi family.
Load Type – indicates the measure’s end-use and the end-use load
profile that is used to define the seasonal energy savings.
Resource Savings Table – summarizes the base and conservation
measure annual consumption, electricity, natural gas and water savings,
base and conservation measure equipment and operating and
maintenance costs, and the summer and winter peak demand savings.
Resource Savings Assumptions – lists all prescribed input assumptions
and methodology for the estimation of energy, demand and other
resource savings.
All sources of information are provided with
references.
Effective Useful Life (EUL) - savings persistence of measures are based
on the EUL of the technology. It is defined as an estimate of the median
number of years that the measure installed will still be in place and
effectively operable.
Base and Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs –
presents the cost difference between implementing high efficiency case
and base case. They usually include the initial cost of the equipment plus
the cost of installation and the annual operating and maintenance costs.
Since costs easily fluctuate with time, it is recommended that the
prescribed incremental costs of the measures be used as a guide for cost
estimation purposes and should be independently validated if being used
for program design and/or budgeting purposes.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern – describes when the potential
energy savings will occur over the period of a year for the specific
measure. The seasonal energy savings pattern provides a means for
systematically estimating peak demand savings from annual energy
savings. The savings patterns are created using “8,760” hourly load
shapes (8,760 is the number of hours in a year). The hourly data can
then be distributed into the various time-of-use periods or buckets, which
then allows a percentage to be derived. For more details on the
6
methodology for estimating peak demand savings and OPA’s current
definitions, please refer to Appendix A for more details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions – lists measure
assumptions as used in other Canadian province or in other locations in
the U.S.
3.3 How can the Prescriptive List Help Program Designers
The Prescriptive List was created to provide a source of useful information needed by
program designers to determine the resource savings and cost effectiveness of
measures included in conservation programs. It provides the input assumptions,
parameters and/or equations used to estimate resource savings for each measure. It
also contains effective useful life and incremental costs.
For each measure, the base and conservation measures are clearly specified as they
form the basis of the input assumptions and the estimations of resource savings.
Program designers need to be careful in using the input assumptions and to check
whether these assumptions are valid and relevant for their program assumptions before
doing any cost effectiveness analysis. Otherwise, program designers can re-estimate
the resource savings using their own program assumptions and plugging them in the
equations that are used to estimate the savings. Program designers may also refer to
information presented in the Quasi-Prescriptive List. The Quasi-Prescriptive Measures
and Assumptions List is compiled as a separate document.
The Prescriptive List also provides useful information for the local distribution
companies. On January 27, 2009, the Ontario Energy Board recognized and endorsed
the use of the Lists by local distribution companies for the purposes of applications for
new distribution rate-funded CDM programs, Lost Revenue Adjustment Mechanism
(“LRAM”) and Shared Savings Mechanism (“SSM”).
4.0 FREE RIDERSHIP AND OTHER ADJUSTMENT FACTORS
Free ridership rates and other net-to-gross adjustment factors are not included in any the
Prescriptive List measures and assumptions. Adjustment factors are a function of program
design, delivery, and measure type and should be determined and maintained on a regular
basis through program evaluation research.
5.0 INTERACTIVE EFFECTS (CROSS EFFECTS)
Due to the advancement of technology, energy efficient equipment now consumes less energy
while producing the same amount of useful work or the same level of needed service.
Consequently, energy efficient equipment also dissipates less waste heat into its surroundings
and depending on the season and weather, the reduced waste heat may have a positive impact
(reduced cooling load) and/or negative impact (increased heating load) on the energy savings.
For example, during the summer or warm weather, energy efficient lighting, which dissipates
less heat, would reduce the cooling load of the cooling system thereby increasing energy
7
savings. The reverse scenario will occur during the winter or cold weather, where the heating
load will increase and the energy consumption will increase for the heating system. These
impacts of energy efficient equipment on energy use are commonly referred to as interactive
effects or cross effects.
When considering the overall net savings of an energy conservation measure, it is worthwhile to
consider the interactive effects of the measure on space heating, space cooling or refrigeration
systems. Interactive effects generate different impact levels on energy savings for different
scenarios. Their impacts may range from a savings gain of 0.4 to 10% and a savings penalty of
30-36%.
Though accounting for the interactive effects will lead to more precise and realistic estimates of
energy savings, the current measures in the prescriptive list do not account for interactive
effects. It is inappropriate to assign a prescriptive or quasi-prescriptive value to account for
interactive effects involved in each measure since there are many variables that must be taken
into account. If it is believed that the interactive effects will be substantial for the measure
involved, a custom, non-prescriptive, Measure & Verification plan is to be designed and used to
evaluate the measure. Refer to Appendix C for more details on interactive effects.
6.0 SUBMISSION PROCESS FOR MEASURES
The OPA has adopted an open, transparent and flexible approach for reviewing and maintaining
its Measures and Assumptions Lists. Through this approach, it is hoped that the OPA can
harness the creativity and knowledge of local utility distribution companies (LDCs),
manufacturers, academics and others interested in contributing to Ontario’s Measures and
Assumptions Lists. This approach enables any stakeholder to submit new measures, measure
revisions or other measure ideas to the OPA. Submissions are welcome from any individual or
group of individuals (e.g., company, organization, association).
New measures are developed internally by the OPA or may be part of new measures research
performed by an external party. For these new measures, OPA Measures and Assumptions
Substantiation Forms are used as a guideline of the type of information that is to be included for
measure substantiation. Refer to Appendix D for the template that can be used for
substantiating measures. The information includes references and rationales behind all values
that make up the set of assumptions for the new measures. For external submissions for new
measures, as well as revisions to existing measures, the substantiation forms can be submitted
by email to [email protected]
The OPA will review all submissions and based on the merits of the substantiation provided, the
submissions will be accepted, modified and accepted, or rejected. The review process time and
approval will be primarily dependant on the quality (relevancy and credibility) of information that
is provided within the submission form. References used within the document are to be
available and accessible by the OPA. Where sources of information are proprietary or
confidential, the OPA is willing to arrange for Non-Disclosure Agreements prior to accessing the
information. OPA strongly encourages the inclusion of an hourly (8760) annual load profile
created from metered data or from a verified operating schedule in the submission form. If
unavailable, a description of the operating hours during weekdays and weekends for different
seasons is acceptable.
8
Depending on when the submission is made, new and revised submissions may be either
included in the annual official publication of the List or appended to the List during updates that
occur within the year.
9
10
Prescriptive Measures and
Assumptions Summary List
11
12
OPA Measures and Assumptions List - Prescriptive
(as of April 06, 2011)
Conservation Measure
Subcategory
Base Measure
Decision Type
Seasonal Energy
Savings Pattern
First Year
Base Case
(kWh/yr)
First Year
First Year
Conservation
Energy Savings
Case (kWh/year)
(kWh)
Summer
On Peak
(kW)
Winter On Annual Gas
Savings
Peak
(kW)
(m3/yr)
Annual Propane Annual Heating
Annual Water
Savings
Oil Savings
Savings (L/yr)
(L/yr)
(L/yr)
EUL
(yr)
Base
Equipment
Cost
($)
Base
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Conservation
Equipment Cost
($)
Conservation
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Winter Mid
Incremental Winter Peak
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Cost (Life) ($)
(kWh/yr)
Winter Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Off Peak
(kWh/yr)
Agri-Business
SINGLE CREEP HEAT PAD
Heat Lamps
New/Retrofit
Baseload
1207.5
552.0
655.5
0.075
0.075
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
30.00
60.00
188.00
0.00
98.00
45.0
51.5
120.8
39.5
59.3
120.3
96.5
122.6
DOUBLE CREEP HEAT PAD
Heat Lamps
New/Retrofit
Baseload
1207.5
524.4
683.1
0.078
0.078
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
30.00
60.00
235.00
0.00
145.00
46.9
53.6
125.9
41.2
61.8
125.4
100.6
127.7
Fuel Switch from Electric to
Natural Gas
Commercial Electric Clothes Dryer
New/Retrofit
Commercial Clothes Dryer
3500.0
0.0
3500.0
0.932
0.843
-380.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
369.00
0.00
369.00
507.5
626.5
35.0
486.5
644.0
35.0
1130.5
35.0
Dual Speed Pool Pump Motors Res
New/Replacement
Dual Speed Pool Pump
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.722
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
778.00
0.00
914.00
0.00
136.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
384.0
175.6
30.6
0.0
0.0
ENERGY EFFICIENT TELEVISION
CEE Tier 4
Standard Televisions
New/Replacement
Energy Efficient Television
310.0
216.0
94.0
0.002
0.022
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
6
970.00
0.00
970.00
0.00
0.00
13.3
8.9
9.0
4.5
18.1
8.8
22.1
9.3
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED A/V EQUIPMENT
Audio Amplifiers
Non Energy Star Qualified A/V Equipment
New/Replacement
Audio Amplifier
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.000
0.012
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
0.00
8.0
3.9
4.8
0.0
12.1
4.7
11.8
5.0
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED A/V EQUIPMENT
Optical Disc Players
Non Energy Star Qualified A/V Equipment
New/Replacement
Optical Disc Player
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.001
0.001
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7
150.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
0.00
0.1
1.7
3.1
0.7
1.2
3.1
1.9
3.2
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED COMPUTERS
Desktop
Non Energy Star Qualified Computers
New/Replacement
Desktop Computers
234.0
133.0
101.0
0.020
0.033
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
0.00
12.9
10.2
10.4
6.1
17.6
10.1
23.1
10.7
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED COMPUTERS
Notebook
Non Energy Star Qualified Computers
New/Replacement
Notebook Computers
72.0
28.0
44.0
0.007
0.015
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
0.00
5.4
3.9
5.3
2.5
7.0
5.2
9.3
5.4
Non Energy Star Qualified Displays (Monitors)
New/Replacement
Computer
Displays/Monitors
Non Energy Star Qualified Game Consoles
New/Replacement
Game Console
Electric Auxiliary
COMMERCIAL CLOTHES DRYER
DUAL SPEED POOL PUMP MOTORS
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DISPLAYS
(MONITORS)
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED GAME CONSOLES
Microsoft Xbox 360
79.6
49.8
29.8
0.001
0.011
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
211.00
0.00
211.00
0.00
0.00
5.6
1.4
2.9
1.4
5.8
2.8
7.0
2.9
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.031
0.115
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
0.00
69.5
39.7
170.2
40.7
71.1
170.0
109.3
172.5
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED GAME CONSOLES
Nintendo Wii
Non Energy Star Qualified Game Consoles
New/Replacement
Game Console
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.002
0.009
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
200.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
0.00
5.2
3.0
12.7
3.0
5.3
12.7
8.1
12.9
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED GAME CONSOLES
Sony Playstation 3
Non Energy Star Qualified Game Consoles
New/Replacement
Game Console
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.025
0.095
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
362.00
0.00
362.00
0.00
0.00
57.2
32.7
140.0
33.4
58.5
139.8
89.9
141.9
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED SET TOP BOX
Standard Set Top Box
New/Replacement
Set Top Box
130.0
57.0
73.0
0.008
0.008
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
38.00
0.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
5.0
5.8
13.4
4.4
6.6
13.4
10.8
13.6
POOL PUMP WITH TIME-CLOCK OR CONTROLLER
No Time-Clock or Controller
New/Replacement
Pool Pump Control (Res)
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.191
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
80.00
0.00
80.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
167.9
167.9
131.0
0.0
0.0
VARIABLE SPEED POOL PUMP MOTORS
Variable Speed Pool Pump Motors Res
New/Replacement
Variable Speed Pool Pump
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.775
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
778.00
0.00
1273.00
0.00
495.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
416.6
209.4
71.2
0.0
0.0
Household Appliances
CONVECTION OVEN
ENERGY STAR® CLOTHES WASHER
Gas Water Heating
Standard Wall Oven
New/Replacement
OPA Res Miscellaneous
386.0
308.8
77.2
0.669
0.956
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
19
1060.00
0.00
1750.00
0.00
690.00
4.9
5.5
14.2
3.3
6.7
16.0
10.8
15.8
Standard Clothes Washer
New/Replacement
OPA Res Clothes
Washer/Dryer
80.7
56.9
23.8
0.003
0.005
0.2
0.0
0.0
25911.1
14
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
137.51
1.8
2.1
4.4
1.2
2.2
4.2
3.7
4.2
604.3
423.0
181.3
0.020
0.036
0.0
0.0
0.0
25911.1
14
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
137.51
14.1
15.9
33.6
8.9
16.7
31.9
27.8
32.3
158.0
135.0
23.0
0.002
0.006
7.0
0.0
0.0
1627.7
11
0.00
0.00
45.00
0.00
45.00
2.3
2.1
3.6
1.0
2.8
3.3
4.3
3.7
ENERGY STAR® CLOTHES WASHER
Electric Water Heating
Standard Clothes Washer
New/Replacement
OPA Res Clothes
Washer/Dryer
ENERGY STAR® DISHWASHER
Gas Water Heating
Standard Dishwasher
New/Replacement
OPA Res Dishwasher
ENERGY STAR® DISHWASHER
Electric Water Heating
Standard Dishwasher
New/Replacement
OPA Res Dishwasher
358.0
307.0
51.0
0.001
0.002
0.0
0.0
0.0
1627.7
11
0.00
0.00
45.00
0.00
45.00
0.7
0.6
1.1
0.3
0.8
1.0
1.3
1.1
ENERGY STAR® FREEZER
New Purchase or
Replacement of Freezer
Standard Freezer
New/Replacement
Modified OPA Res Freezer
458.1
412.3
45.8
0.006
0.005
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
11
399.99
0.00
449.99
0.00
50.00
2.7
3.3
7.7
3.0
4.4
9.2
6.6
8.8
Standard Refrigerator
New/Replacement
Modified OPA Res
Refrigerator
564.0
451.2
112.8
0.016
0.014
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
14
848.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
50.00
6.7
7.7
19.1
7.4
11.0
22.7
15.9
22.4
ENERGY STAR® REFRIGERATOR
New Purchase or
Replacement of Refrigerator
FREEZER REPLACEMENT
(*Savings only valid for first 5 years, refer to
measure substantiation for details)
Early Replacement
Average freezer of existing stock
Retrofit/Replacement
Modified OPA Res Freezer
1288.1
412.3
875.8
0.122
0.102
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
11
399.99
0.00
449.99
0.00
50.00
51.7
63.9
148.0
56.9
83.8
176.1
126.4
168.9
FREEZER RETIREMENT
Early Retirement, No
Replacement
15 year or older freezer of existing stock
Retirement
Modified OPA Res Freezer
1288.1
0.0
1288.1
0.179
0.150
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
140.00
76.0
94.0
217.7
83.7
123.3
259.0
185.9
248.5
GAS RANGE
Fuel Switch from Electric to
Natural Gas
Average existing stock of electric ranges
New/Replacement
OPA Res Miscellaneous
509.0
0.0
509.0
0.044
0.063
-81.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
800.00
0.00
1200.00
0.00
400.00
32.2
36.2
93.8
21.7
44.3
105.5
71.4
103.9
REFRIGERATOR REPLACEMENT
(*Savings only valid for first 4 years, refer to
measure substantiation for details)
Early Replacement
Average refrigerator of existing stock
Retrofit/Replacement
Modified OPA Res
Refrigerator
1227.9
451.2
776.7
0.108
0.096
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
14
848.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
50.00
45.9
52.9
131.4
51.2
76.0
156.0
109.4
154.0
REFRIGERATOR RETIREMENT
Early Retirement, No
Replacement
15 year or older refrigerator
Retirement
Modified OPA Res
Refrigerator
1227.9
0.0
1227.9
0.171
0.152
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
0.00
0.00
100.00
0.00
100.00
72.6
83.6
207.8
80.9
120.2
246.6
172.9
243.5
RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES DRYER
Fuel Switch from Electric to
Natural Gas
Average Existing Stock of Electric Clothes Dryers
New/Replacement
OPA Res Clothes
Washer/Dryer
914.0
77.7
836.3
0.093
0.165
-112.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
285.00
0.00
285.00
65.0
73.3
155.1
41.1
77.2
147.1
128.3
149.2
13
14
OPA Measures and Assumptions List - Prescriptive
(as of April 06, 2011)
Conservation Measure
Subcategory
Base Measure
Decision Type
Seasonal Energy
Savings Pattern
First Year
Base Case
(kWh/yr)
First Year
First Year
Conservation
Energy Savings
Case (kWh/year)
(kWh)
Summer
On Peak
(kW)
Winter On Annual Gas
Savings
Peak
(kW)
(m3/yr)
Annual Propane Annual Heating
Annual Water
Savings
Oil Savings
Savings (L/yr)
(L/yr)
(L/yr)
EUL
(yr)
Base
Equipment
Cost
($)
Base
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Conservation
Equipment Cost
($)
Conservation
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Winter Mid
Incremental Winter Peak
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Cost (Life) ($)
(kWh/yr)
Winter Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Off Peak
(kWh/yr)
Lighting
3-WAY COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
High Wattage 3-Way CFL
High Wattage 3-Way Incandescent Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
160.6
35.3
125.3
0.004
0.035
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
6
1.99
1.99
13.74
0.00
9.76
10.9
10.2
24.3
2.2
12.1
22.2
18.5
24.8
3-WAY COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Low Wattage 3-Way CFL
Low Wattage 3-Way Incandescent Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
120.5
30.5
89.9
0.003
0.025
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
6
3.28
3.28
9.96
0.00
3.40
7.8
7.3
17.5
1.6
8.7
16.0
13.3
17.8
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
11 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
40W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
39.4
10.8
28.6
0.001
0.008
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
4.30
1.50
1.50
0.00
-4.30
2.5
2.3
5.6
0.5
2.8
5.1
4.2
5.7
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
15 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
60W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
59.1
14.8
44.4
0.001
0.012
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
1.25
1.25
4.52
0.00
2.02
3.9
3.6
8.6
0.8
4.3
7.9
6.6
8.8
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
20 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
75W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
73.9
19.7
54.2
0.002
0.015
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
1.15
1.15
5.79
0.00
3.49
4.7
4.4
10.5
1.0
5.2
9.6
8.0
10.7
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
23 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
75W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
73.9
22.7
51.2
0.002
0.014
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
1.15
1.15
5.56
0.00
3.26
4.5
4.2
10.0
0.9
4.9
9.1
7.6
10.1
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
25 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
100W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
98.6
24.6
73.9
0.002
0.021
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
1.24
1.24
5.39
0.00
2.91
6.4
6.0
14.4
1.3
7.1
13.1
10.9
14.6
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
27 W General Service Lamp,
Screw-In
100W Incandescent
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
98.6
26.6
71.9
0.002
0.020
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
1.24
1.24
6.85
0.00
4.37
6.3
5.8
14.0
1.3
6.9
12.8
10.6
14.2
DIMMABLE COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS
(CFLS)
19W Dimmable CFL
75W Incandescent Dimmable Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
123.2
31.2
92.0
0.003
0.026
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
2.44
2.44
15.98
0.00
11.10
8.0
7.5
17.9
1.6
8.9
16.3
13.6
18.2
ENERGY STAR® CEILING FAN
Lighting Replacement
Conventional non-Energy Star® qualified ceiling fan New/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
227.8
105.2
122.6
0.004
0.034
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
3.75
47.00
17.37
60.62
10.7
9.9
23.8
2.2
11.8
21.7
18.1
24.3
ENERGY STAR® CFL FLOOD LIGHT
26W, Indoor
90W Incandescent PAR Flood Light
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
123.2
35.6
87.6
0.003
0.025
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7
7.70
7.70
11.50
0.00
-3.90
7.6
7.1
17.0
1.6
8.5
15.5
13.0
17.3
ENERGY STAR® CFL FLOOD LIGHT
26W, Outdoor
90W Incandescent PAR
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Outdoor Light Timer
128.1
37.0
91.1
0.000
0.022
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
7.70
7.70
11.50
0.00
-3.90
13.5
6.8
17.7
0.0
10.2
12.2
15.2
15.4
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Chandelier CFLs
25W Incandescent Chandelier Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
28.3
5.7
22.6
0.001
0.006
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
1.25
1.25
7.99
0.00
5.49
2.0
1.8
4.4
0.4
2.2
4.0
3.3
4.5
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Globe CFLs
40W Incandescent Globe Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
46.7
8.2
38.5
0.001
0.011
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
1.25
1.25
7.23
0.00
4.73
3.4
3.1
7.5
0.7
3.7
6.8
5.7
7.6
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Vanity CFLs
40W Incandescent Vanity Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
39.4
6.9
32.5
0.001
0.009
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
1.25
0.00
7.23
0.00
5.98
2.8
2.6
6.3
0.6
3.1
5.8
4.8
6.4
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT
FIXTURE
Ceiling Mounted Fixture
Non-ENERGY STAR® Ceiling Mounted Fixture
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
170.8
45.6
125.3
0.004
0.035
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
16
30.00
3.50
60.00
9.04
35.54
10.9
10.2
24.3
2.2
12.1
22.2
18.5
24.8
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT
FIXTURE
Desk Lamp Fixture
Non-ENERGY STAR® Desk Lamp Fixture
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
135.1
36.5
98.6
0.003
0.028
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
16
35.00
1.24
35.00
6.85
5.61
8.6
8.0
19.2
1.7
9.5
17.5
14.6
19.5
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT
FIXTURE
Torchiere
Non-ENERGY STAR® Torchiere
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
404.0
128.8
275.3
0.009
0.077
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
16
20.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
20.00
24.0
22.3
53.5
4.9
26.6
48.8
40.7
54.5
FLUORESCENT LIGHT FIXTURES
T-8 Fixtures, 2 Lamps
Standard T-12 Light Fixture with two 40W lamps
Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
96.4
63.5
32.9
0.001
0.009
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
9.00
2.9
2.7
6.4
0.6
3.2
5.8
4.9
6.5
FLUORESCENT LIGHT FIXTURES
T-8 Fixtures, 1 Lamp
Standard T-12 Light Fixture with one 40W Lamp
Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
55.8
32.9
23.0
0.001
0.006
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
9.00
2.0
1.9
4.5
0.4
2.2
4.1
3.4
4.5
INDUCTION LAMP
Outdoor Lighting
175W Metal Halide HID with probe start ballast
Retrofit
Induction Lamp - Exterior
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.000
0.024
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
21
195.00
0.00
503.00
0.00
308.00
12.1
9.2
60.2
0.0
12.5
46.0
17.0
53.1
LED LIGHTS
6W LED Screw-In
15W Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
14.8
5.9
8.9
0.000
0.002
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
30
4.52
0.00
54.95
0.00
50.43
0.8
0.7
1.7
0.2
0.9
1.6
1.3
1.8
METAL HALIDE FIXTURE
39W CMH PAR
150W Incandescent PAR
SEASONAL LED LIGHTS
C-7 LED Lights
SEASONAL LED LIGHTS
Mini LED Lights
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
169.7
62.2
107.5
0.003
0.030
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
8
24.54
4.54
79.25
0.00
50.17
9.4
8.7
20.9
1.9
10.4
19.1
15.9
21.3
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Holiday Lighting
15.5
1.6
14.0
0.000
0.006
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
6.99
0.00
7.58
0.00
0.59
3.6
3.6
6.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Mini Incandescent Light String (70 bulbs/string)
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Holiday Lighting
5.4
0.4
5.0
0.000
0.002
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
5.00
0.00
13.00
0.00
8.00
1.3
1.3
2.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
2 x 60W Incandescent bulbs with a conventional
On/Off switch for a ceiling fixture
New
OPA Res Lighting
118.3
94.6
23.7
0.001
0.007
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
1.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
13.00
2.1
1.9
4.6
0.4
2.3
4.2
3.5
4.7
Conventional light fixtures with no control devices
New/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
107.3
42.9
64.4
0.002
0.018
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
19.50
0.00
19.50
5.6
5.2
12.5
1.1
6.2
11.4
9.5
12.7
Controls for Lighting
DIMMER SWITCH
LIGHTING TIMERS
Indoor Lighting Timer
LIGHTING TIMERS
Outdoor Lighting Timer
Conventional light fixtures with no control devices
New/Replacement
OPA Outdoor Light Timer
73.2
53.0
20.2
0.000
0.005
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
17.98
0.00
17.98
3.0
1.5
3.9
0.0
2.3
2.7
3.4
3.4
LIGHTING TIMERS
Outdoor Lighting Timer
Conventional light fixtures with no control devices
New/Replacement
OPA Res Holiday Lighting
73.2
53.0
20.2
0.000
0.009
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
17.98
0.00
17.98
5.2
5.2
9.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
MOTION SENSORS
Hard Wired Indoor Motion
Sensor
Conventional light fixtures with no control devices
New/Replacement
OPA Res Lighting
78.0
35.9
42.0
0.001
0.012
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
34.00
3.7
3.4
8.2
0.7
4.1
7.5
6.2
8.3
MOTION SENSORS
Outdoor Motion Sensor
Wall-mounted 2 socket security/spotlight / typical
one socket porch light fixture
New/Replacement
OPA Res Outdoor Solar
Lighting
420.6
261.2
159.4
0.000
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
34.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
21.0
103.9
7.8
26.6
OPA Measures and Assumptions List - Prescriptive
(as of April 06, 2011)
Conservation Measure
Subcategory
Base Measure
Decision Type
Seasonal Energy
Savings Pattern
First Year
Base Case
(kWh/yr)
First Year
First Year
Conservation
Energy Savings
Case (kWh/year)
(kWh)
Summer
On Peak
(kW)
Winter On Annual Gas
Savings
Peak
(kW)
(m3/yr)
Annual Propane Annual Heating
Annual Water
Savings
Oil Savings
Savings (L/yr)
(L/yr)
(L/yr)
EUL
(yr)
Base
Equipment
Cost
($)
Base
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Conservation
Equipment Cost
($)
Conservation
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Winter Mid
Incremental Winter Peak
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Cost (Life) ($)
(kWh/yr)
Winter Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Off Peak
(kWh/yr)
Miscellaneous
ENERGY STAR® BATTERY CHARGERS
Standard Battery Charger
New/Replacement
OPA Res Miscellaneous
6.0
3.9
2.1
0.000
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7
25.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
0.00
0.1
0.1
0.4
0.1
0.2
0.4
0.3
0.4
HEAVY DUTY PLUG-IN TIMERS
Spa Pump Timer
No timer on the spa pump
New/Retrofit
OPA Res Miscellaneous
1918.3
1151.0
767.3
0.066
0.095
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
30.00
0.00
30.00
48.5
54.6
141.3
32.8
66.8
159.0
107.7
156.6
HEAVY DUTY PLUG-IN TIMERS
Car Block Heater Timer
No timer on the car block heater
New/Retrofit
OPA Block Heater
1031.0
378.5
652.5
0.000
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
30.00
0.00
30.00
0.0
52.2
600.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
HEAVY DUTY PLUG-IN TIMERS
Pool Pump Timer
No timer on the pool pumps
New/Retrofit
Pool Pump
959.1
575.5
383.7
0.131
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
30.00
0.00
30.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
68.3
102.4
212.5
0.0
0.0
Average Existing Stock
Retrofit
OPA Res Water Heating
554.4
378.1
176.3
0.014
0.033
0.0
0.0
0.0
3281.1
10
0.00
0.00
5.00
0.00
5.00
17.7
15.4
29.5
7.4
17.6
25.8
31.5
31.4
LOW-FLOW SHOWERHEAD
Electric Water Heating
Average Existing Stock
Retrofit
OPA Res Water Heating
377.0
0.0
377.0
0.029
0.070
0.0
0.0
0.0
12400.0
10
0.00
0.00
7.00
0.00
7.00
37.9
33.0
63.2
15.7
37.6
55.2
67.4
67.1
COLD WATER CLOTHES WASHING
Multi Family
Hot water clothes washing
New/Retrofit
Cold Water Clothes
Washing MF
510.0
0.0
510.0
0.074
0.068
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1
0.00
0.00
10.00
0.00
10.00
52.6
53.9
62.6
43.5
65.5
61.5
106.5
64.0
Hot water clothes washing
New/Retrofit
Cold Water Clothes
Washing SF
765.3
0.0
765.3
0.110
0.102
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1
0.00
0.00
10.00
0.00
219.00
79.1
81.0
94.1
65.4
98.5
90.8
160.1
96.3
Conventional electric powered garden lights
New/Retrofit/Replacement
OPA Res Outdoor Solar
Lighting
4.8
0.0
4.8
0.000
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
5
7.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
0.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.6
3.1
0.2
0.8
80.2
New/Retrofit
Solar Thermal Water
Heater
0.0
-1713.0
1713.0
0.580
0.009
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4
451.00
0.00
7493.00
0.00
7042.00
83.4
167.3
87.9
340.7
215.7
252.1
380.3
185.5
LOW-FLOW FAUCET AERATOR
COLD WATER CLOTHES WASHING
Single Family
Solar Energy Applications
SOLAR LANDSCAPE LIGHTS
SOLAR THERMAL WATER HEATER
No Solar Thermal Water Heater
Space Cooling and Heating (Continued on Next Page)
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS - PROPER SIZING
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS
FAN USAGE)
Oversized Standard Central Air Conditioner
Space Heating & Cooling,
Existing Homes
New/Replacement
Elec furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat/cool
Retrofit/Replacement
- existing home
OPA Res Space Cooling Central
1307.0
1254.7
52.3
0.057
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
1371.00
0.00
1294.00
0.00
-77.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
13.3
11.4
25.4
0.8
1.4
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (1)
33473.0
32515.0
958.0
1.676
-0.149
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-86.2
-98.7
-300.8
383.2
326.7
725.2
10.5
-1.9
23182.0
21964.0
1218.0
1.752
-0.092
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-54.8
-67.0
-209.5
400.7
342.3
760.0
23.1
21.9
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS
FAN USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Elec furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat/cool
New
Homes
- new home
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (2)
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS
FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing
Homes
Elec furnace with PSC motor continous - heat only Retrofit/Replacement
existing home
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (4)
30792.0
31121.0
-329.0
0.838
-0.311
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-174.7
-187.5
-542.9
190.5
159.9
353.3
-38.2
-89.5
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS
FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New
Homes
Elec furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat only
New
- new home
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (5)
20050.0
20188.0
-138.0
0.855
-0.259
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-146.0
-157.6
-458.4
194.4
163.9
362.5
-27.9
-69.1
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NONCONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Elec furnace with PSC motor non-continuous Homes
heat/cool - new home
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (3)
21955.0
21874.0
81.0
0.150
-0.014
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-8.3
-9.6
-29.3
34.2
29.2
64.6
0.9
-0.4
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NONCONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing
Homes
Elec furnace with PSC motor non-continuous - heat
Retrofit/Replacement
only - existing homes
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (6)
31354.0
31289.0
65.0
0.176
-0.026
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-14.7
-16.4
-49.1
40.0
34.0
75.3
-0.5
-3.7
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NONCONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New
Homes
Elec Furnace with PSC motor non-continous - heat
only - new home
New
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (7)
20244.0
20223.0
21.0
0.114
-0.023
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-13.0
-14.3
-42.1
26.0
22.0
48.7
-1.5
-4.8
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NONCONTINUOUS USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling,
Existing Homes
Elec furnace with PSC motor non-continuous heat/cool - existing home
Retrofit/Replacement
Furnace with ECM Electric Fired (3)
32696.0
32582.0
114.0
0.211
-0.020
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
-11.7
-13.6
-41.3
48.1
41.0
90.9
1.3
-0.6
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
14 SEER
SEER 13 Central Air Conditioner
New/Replacement
OPA Res Space Cooling Central
1000.0
928.6
71.4
0.078
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
475.00
0.00
475.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
18.2
15.6
34.6
1.0
2.0
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
SEER 14, Higher Temperature
Setting
New
New/Replacement
OPA Res Space Cooling Central
1000.0
715.0
285.0
0.312
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
475.00
0.00
475.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
72.6
62.1
138.2
4.2
7.9
Non-Energy Star® Dehumidifier
Retrofit/Replacement
Residential Dehumidifiers
984.8
485.1
499.8
0.289
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
12
0.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
40.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
64.5
97.0
200.9
68.5
68.5
ENERGY STAR® ROOM AIR CONDITIONER
Non-Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner
New/Replacement
OPA Res Space Cooling Room
371.4
230.7
140.7
0.142
0.000
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
9
0.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
40.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
31.8
30.0
73.9
0.8
4.3
FURNACE/AIR CONDITIONER FILTER
Replace filters twice a year (heating & cooling
Replacement
season)
OPA Res Furnace Fan
714.4
680.4
34.0
0.019
0.005
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
1
0.00
0.00
12.00
0.00
12.00
2.9
2.9
7.9
4.2
3.7
8.2
1.5
2.7
Gas furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat/cool
Retrofit/Replacement
- existing home
Furnace with ECM - Gas
Fired (1)
4827.0
2006.0
2821.0
1.687
0.398
-180.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
217.2
217.2
595.2
386.5
335.7
744.7
115.7
208.8
ENERGY STAR® DEHUMIDIFIER
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling,
Existing Homes
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Gas furnace with PSC continuous - heat/cool - new
New
Homes
home
Furnace with ECM - Gas
Fired (1)
5140.0
2215.0
2925.0
1.749
0.413
-164.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
225.2
225.2
617.2
400.7
348.1
772.2
119.9
216.5
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing
Homes
Gas furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat only
Retrofit/Replacement
- existing home
OPA Res Furnace Fan
2146.0
612.0
1534.0
0.836
0.239
-180.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
130.7
130.9
357.7
191.0
166.6
370.3
66.7
120.1
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New
Homes
Gas furnace with PSC motor continuous - heat only
New
- new home
OPA Res Furnace Fan
2008.0
439.0
1569.0
0.855
0.245
-164.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
133.7
133.8
365.9
195.3
170.4
378.8
68.3
122.9
Gas furnace with PSC motor non-continuous heat/cool - existing homes
Retrofit/Replacement
Furnace with ECM - Gas
Fired (2)
2146.0
1773.0
373.0
0.210
0.056
-26.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
30.6
31.0
84.3
48.1
41.8
92.9
16.0
28.7
New
Furnace with ECM - Gas
Fired (2)
2226.0
1959.0
267.0
0.151
0.040
-18.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
21.9
22.2
60.3
34.4
29.9
66.5
11.5
20.6
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN Space Heating & Cooling,
USAGE)
Existing Homes
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN Space Heating & Cooling, New Gas Furnace with PSC motor non-continuous USAGE)
Homes
heat/cool - new home
15
16
OPA Measures and Assumptions List - Prescriptive
(as of April 06, 2011)
Conservation Measure
Subcategory
Base Measure
Decision Type
Seasonal Energy
Savings Pattern
First Year
Base Case
(kWh/yr)
First Year
First Year
Conservation
Energy Savings
Case (kWh/year)
(kWh)
Summer
On Peak
(kW)
Winter On Annual Gas
Savings
Peak
(kW)
(m3/yr)
Annual Propane Annual Heating
Annual Water
Savings
Oil Savings
Savings (L/yr)
(L/yr)
(L/yr)
EUL
(yr)
Base
Equipment
Cost
($)
Base
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Conservation
Equipment Cost
($)
Conservation
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Winter Mid
Incremental Winter Peak
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Cost (Life) ($)
(kWh/yr)
Winter Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Off Peak
(kWh/yr)
Space Cooling and Heating (Continued)
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN Space Heating Only, Existing
USAGE)
Homes
Gas furnace with PSC motor non-continuous - heat
Retrofit/Replacement
only - existing homes
OPA Res Furnace Fan
804.0
480.0
324.0
0.177
0.051
-26.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
27.6
27.6
75.6
40.3
35.2
78.2
14.1
25.4
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN Space Heating Only, New
USAGE)
Homes
Gas furnace with PSC motor non-continuous - heat
New
only - new home
OPA Res Furnace Fan
515.0
308.0
207.0
0.113
0.032
-18.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
18
0.00
0.00
960.00
0.00
960.00
17.6
17.7
48.3
25.8
22.5
50.0
9.0
16.2
Standard Air Source Heat Pump
New
Heat Pump - Ground
Source
8498.7
5673.1
2825.6
0.227
0.772
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
3200.00
0.00
10000.00
0.00
6800.00
428.9
446.7
1263.9
54.3
55.1
125.7
150.6
300.1
Existing electric baseboard heating
Retrofit
OPA Res Space Heating
SF
17000.0
600.0
16400.0
0.000
4.840
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
25
300.00
0.00
1600.00
1179.30
2479.30
2688.0
2799.5
7919.6
8.2
60.7
155.8
925.0
1843.4
HEAT PUMP
Ground Source
PELLET STOVE
Controls for Space Cooling and Heating - Residential
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Baseboard Heaters
Non-programmable thermostats installed on
baseboard heaters
Retrofit
OPA Res Space Heating
SF
2486.3
2423.2
63.2
0.000
0.019
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
11
0.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
25.00
10.4
10.8
30.5
0.0
0.2
0.6
3.6
7.1
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Electric Forced-Air Heating
Non-programmable thermostat
Retrofit
Programmable Thermostat
- Electric Fired
32942.0
30791.0
2151.0
0.176
0.588
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
11
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
140.00
326.3
339.6
960.2
41.7
42.4
96.4
115.1
228.9
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Gas Forced-Air Heating
Non-programmable thermostat
Retrofit
Programmable Thermostat
- Gas Fired
2977.0
2774.0
203.0
0.176
0.013
188.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
11
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
140.00
7.2
7.2
19.7
40.8
35.0
77.9
5.4
9.9
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Retrofit
Duct Sealing - Electric
Fired
32556.9
30929.0
1627.8
0.125
0.447
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
248.2
258.3
729.9
29.8
30.3
69.7
87.6
174.0
Thermal Envelope (Continued on Next Page)
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Retrofit
Duct Sealing - Electric
Fired
32933.1
31286.5
1646.7
0.127
0.453
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
251.1
261.3
738.4
30.1
30.6
70.5
88.6
176.0
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New
Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
New
Duct Sealing - Electric
Fired
21899.4
20804.4
1095.0
0.084
0.301
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
167.0
173.8
491.0
20.0
20.4
46.9
58.9
117.1
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
New Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
New
Duct Sealing - Electric
Fired
22332.8
21216.2
1116.6
0.086
0.307
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
170.3
177.2
500.7
20.4
20.8
47.8
60.1
119.4
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Retrofit
Duct Sealing - Gas Fired,
ECM
1845.2
1753.0
92.3
0.080
0.006
148.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
3.3
3.3
8.9
18.5
15.9
35.4
2.5
4.5
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Retrofit
Duct Sealing - Gas Fired,
PSC
2977.1
2828.3
148.9
0.114
0.014
144.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
7.6
7.6
20.7
26.3
22.7
50.5
4.7
8.6
2038.4
1936.4
101.9
0.088
0.007
96.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
3.6
3.6
9.9
20.5
17.6
39.1
2.7
5.0
3129.3
2972.9
156.5
0.120
0.015
92.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
90.00
8.0
8.0
21.8
27.7
23.9
53.1
5.0
9.1
168.8
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
New
Duct Sealing - Gas Fired,
ECM
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New
Homes
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
New
Duct Sealing - Gas Fired,
PSC
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
Retrofit/Replacement
Energy Star Windows Electric Fired
41184.9
39625.3
1559.6
0.092
0.436
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
241.9
251.9
711.8
21.8
23.7
54.9
84.8
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
Retrofit/Replacement
Energy Star Windows Electric Fired
42265.6
40658.8
1606.8
0.094
0.449
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
249.2
259.5
733.3
22.5
24.4
56.6
87.4
173.9
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New
Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
New
Energy Star Windows Electric Fired
23339.5
21941.0
1398.6
0.082
0.391
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
216.9
225.9
638.3
19.6
21.3
49.2
76.1
151.3
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
New Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
New
Energy Star Windows Electric Fired
24210.6
22757.9
1452.7
0.085
0.406
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
225.3
234.6
663.0
20.3
22.1
51.1
79.0
157.2
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
Retrofit/Replacement
Energy Star Windows Gas Fired, ECM
1349.0
1253.9
95.1
0.081
0.006
141.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
3.5
3.5
9.5
18.7
16.2
36.5
2.5
4.7
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
Retrofit/Replacement
Energy Star Windows Gas Fired, PSC
2429.6
2287.4
142.3
0.105
0.014
141.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
7.7
7.7
21.2
24.2
21.0
47.2
4.6
8.5
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
New
Energy Star Windows Gas Fired, ECM
1049.0
968.5
80.5
0.069
0.005
127.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
2.9
2.9
8.0
15.8
13.7
30.9
2.1
4.0
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New
Homes
Energy Star® windows double glazed (e ~ 0.150.20 and U = 0.37)
New
Energy Star Windows Gas Fired, PSC
1920.0
1785.4
134.6
0.099
0.013
127.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
200.00
7.3
7.3
20.0
22.9
19.9
44.7
4.4
8.1
3937.5
0.0
3937.5
0.127
1.127
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
1000.00
0.00
1000.00
626.1
653.6
1846.7
31.5
39.4
90.6
216.6
433.1
136.7
0.0
136.7
0.052
0.026
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
20
0.00
0.00
1000.00
0.00
1000.00
14.6
15.2
43.1
12.2
10.7
23.9
5.7
11.3
42270.6
38522.9
3747.8
0.215
1.049
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
582.0
606.0
1712.7
51.3
55.8
130.0
203.9
405.9
RESIDENTIAL ATTIC INSULATION
Electric Heating
Residential Attic Insulation (R-10)
Retrofit
Attic Insulation - Electric
Fired
RESIDENTIAL ATTIC INSULATION
Gas Heating
Residential Attic Insulation (R-10)
Retrofit
Attic Insulation - Gas Fired
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
Standard windows with no window solar film
Retrofit/Replacement
Window Solar Film Electric Fired
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
Standard windows with no window solar film
Retrofit/Replacement
Window Solar Film Electric Fired
43339.8
39491.1
3848.7
0.221
1.077
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
597.7
622.3
1758.9
52.7
57.3
133.6
209.4
416.8
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New
Homes
Standard windows with no window solar film
New
Window Solar Film Electric Fired
24583.8
22384.3
2199.5
0.126
0.616
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
341.6
355.7
1005.2
30.1
32.8
76.3
119.7
238.2
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors,
New Homes
Standard Windows with no window solar film
New
Window Solar Film Electric Fired
25470.0
23186.5
2283.5
0.131
0.639
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
354.6
369.2
1043.6
31.3
34.0
79.2
124.2
247.3
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing
Homes
Standard windows with no window solar film
Retrofit/Replacement
Window Solar Film - Gas
Fired
1145.9
996.5
149.3
0.118
0.013
347.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
6.9
6.9
19.0
27.1
23.6
53.1
4.4
8.3
OPA Measures and Assumptions List - Prescriptive
(as of April 06, 2011)
Conservation Measure
Subcategory
Base Measure
Decision Type
Seasonal Energy
Savings Pattern
First Year
Base Case
(kWh/yr)
First Year
First Year
Conservation
Energy Savings
Case (kWh/year)
(kWh)
Summer
On Peak
(kW)
Winter On Annual Gas
Savings
Peak
(kW)
(m3/yr)
Annual Propane Annual Heating
Annual Water
Savings
Oil Savings
Savings (L/yr)
(L/yr)
(L/yr)
EUL
(yr)
Base
Equipment
Cost
($)
Base
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Conservation
Equipment Cost
($)
Conservation
Annual
O&MCost
($)
Winter Mid
Winter Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Summer Off
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Mid Peak
(kWh/yr)
Shoulder
Off Peak
(kWh/yr)
Incremental Winter Peak
Peak
(kWh/yr)
Cost (Life) ($)
(kWh/yr)
Thermal Envelope (Continued)
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors,
Existing Homes
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes Standard windows with no window solar film
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New
Homes
Standard windows with no window solar film
Standard window with no window solar film
Retrofit/Replacement
Window Solar Film - Gas
Fired
2215.0
1964.7
250.3
0.197
0.021
347.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
11.6
11.6
31.8
45.4
39.5
89.1
7.4
13.9
New
Window Solar Film - Gas
Fired
858.0
734.5
123.5
0.097
0.011
200.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
5.7
5.7
15.7
22.4
19.5
44.0
3.6
6.9
New
Window Solar Film - Gas
Fired
1744.2
1536.7
207.5
0.164
0.018
200.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
10
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
800.00
9.6
9.6
26.3
37.6
32.8
73.8
6.1
11.5
Water Heating - Residential
DOMESTIC HOT WATER PIPE INSULATION
Per 3' of Pipe Insulation
No pipe insulation
Retrofit
OPA Res Water Heating
52.0
14.0
38.0
0.003
0.007
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
15
0.00
0.00
0.70
0.00
0.70
3.8
3.3
6.4
1.6
3.8
5.6
6.8
6.8
DOMESTIC WATER HEATER
Fuel Switch from Electric to
Natural Gas
Standard Electric Water Heater
Retrofit
OPA Res Water Heating
4712.0
0.0
4712.0
0.365
0.871
-521.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
13
0.00
0.00
540.00
60.00
600.00
473.6
412.8
789.7
196.5
470.3
689.4
842.0
838.7
No drain water heat recovery
Retrofit
OPA Res Water Heating
816.0
0.0
816.0
0.063
0.151
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
30
0.00
0.00
749.00
0.00
749.00
82.0
71.5
136.8
34.0
81.4
119.4
145.8
145.2
No Water Heater Blanket
Retrofit
Water Heater Blanket Res
5629.0
5359.0
270.0
0.028
0.048
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
7
0.00
0.00
23.25
0.00
23.25
30.3
22.2
37.1
15.7
38.0
36.3
52.5
37.9
DRAIN WATER HEAT RECOVERY
WATER HEATER BLANKET
Residential
17
18
Prescriptive Measures
and Assumptions
Substantiation Sheets
19
20
Agri-Business
21
22
DOUBLE CREEP PADS
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Double creep pad (also known as farrowing heat pad, heat mat, or floor heat pad). This can be used
to provide warmth for newborn piglets in two, side-by-side crates at farrowing facilities. A crate holds
one sow and her litter. Creep pads provide a uniformly warm surface 16-20ºC above air
temperature; this creates a 32-38ºC resting surface in a 15-21ºC building that is best for young pigs.1
Piglets will seek the warmth and sleep safely away from the sow. Heat lamps may be used in
conjunction with the creep pad during and shortly after farrowing to dry the piglets to prevent
chilling.2,3,4 A creep pad controller (a separate measure) may be used in conjunction with the creep
pad to further reduce electricity consumption from the savings shown here.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Overhead heat lamps mounted in a reflective fixture (manually controlled).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Retrofit
Agribusiness - Swine
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
Heating
Propane
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1207.5
524.4
683.1
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.078
0.078
30.00
10.00
235.00
0.00
2
1207.5
524.4
683.1
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.078
0.078
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
3
1207.5
524.4
683.1
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.078
0.078
0.00
20.00
0.00
0.00
4
1207.5
524.4
683.1
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.078
0.078
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
5
1207.5
524.4
683.1
-26.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.078
0.078
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
6037.5
2622.0
3415.5
-132.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
30.00
60.00
235.00
0.00
23
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:



No. of heating days per litter cycle (HDPL) = 16.3 days. This is the average of 18 days2 and 1417 days5.
No. of heating operating hours per year (HPY) = 6,900 hours.3 This is the average of 7,309
hours (56,276 kWh/yr for 44 x 175W heat lamps), 5,892 hours (16,852 kWh/yr for 22 x 130W
heat pads), and 7,500 hours (annual operating hours quoted for heat lamp replacement)
No. of litters per year (LPY) = [ HPY / (HDPL x 24) ] = 18 litters/yr
Base Measure Assumptions:


Number of heat lamps in use = 0.5 or 1 lamp per crate. Use 1 lamp per crate.
Wattage of heat lamp = 175 W2,3 or 125 W6. Assume 175W since this is commonly installed.
Conservation Measure Assumptions:


Wattage per creep pad (WCP) = 153 W. This is an average of 160 Watts1, 200 W1, 130 W3 and
120 Watts6.
Wattage per crate = 76 W
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (175 W x 6900 hrs) / 1000
= 1,207.5 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (76 W x 6900 hrs) / 1000
= 524.4 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 1,207.5 – 524.4
= 683.1 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
There is no water or natural gas savings but there is an increase in gas consumption during the
heating season if the farrowing rooms are heated with forced air gas heaters due to decreased
electricity consumption by heating devices. Since each heat lamp supplies 175 W of heat to the
crate and each creep pad supplies only 80 W, 95 W less heat is supplied to each crate and therefore
to the entire farrowing room. If the farrowing room is heated by a thermostatically controlled gas
heater, the gas heater will need to run longer and consume more gas to maintain the set point
temperature in the room.
24
Assuming there are 120 days per heating season and a gas heating system efficiency of 80%,
increased gas consumption is estimated as follows:
Annual Gas Consumption (m3/yr) = [ 683.1 kWh/yr x (120/365) x 0.094 m3/kWh ] / 0.8
= 26.4 m3 per crate
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The useful life of a heat lamp is reported to be 5,000 hours.2,3 When operated for 6,900 hours per
year, this is equivalent to 0.7 years.
The useful life of a creep pad is reported to be as 5 years2 and up to 15 years,3 with a 5-year
warranty.5 When operated for 6,900 hours per year, this is equivalent to 34,500 hours. A
conservative EUL of 5 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Base equipment costs:
 Cost of heat lamp fixture is assumed to be $30.00 per fixture (including lamp)2 and $10.00 for the
heat lamp only.3
 Number of heat lamps replaced per year = (6,900 hrs/year) / (5000 hrs/lamp) = 1.4 heat lamps
 Cost to replace heat lamp = 1.4 heat lamps x $ 10 /heat lamp = $14 per year
Conservation measure costs:
 Cost of double (60x120 cm) creep pad is assumed to be CAD$235.00 per pad. This is an
average of US$140.00 per pad1, US$170.00 per pad1, $250.00 per pad3, US$211.00 per pad5,
US$143,00 per pad7 and US$167.00 per pad7 plus an installation cost of $50.00.3
 Assume 1 US$ = CAD $1.033548.8
Incremental costs:
 For new installations, incremental cost is [ ($235.00/2) – ($ 30.00 + $ 60.00) ] = $ 27.50 per
crate
 For early retirement, incremental cost is ($235.00/2) = $117.50 per crate
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
7.85%
18.42%
6.03%
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off Peak
Mid-Peak
Shoulder
Off Peak
1608
1290
1638
9.04%
18.36%
14.73%
18.70%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
Baseload
6.87%
Remarks
The operating hours for double creep pads are assumed to be uniformly distributed
throughout the year, hence, giving a baseload profile.
25
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Savings
(kWh)
Ontario Ministry of
Agriculture, Food and
Rural Affairs2
630
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
Effective Useful
Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost
($)
0.115
0.115
5
$120-170
Comments: Above data is “per creep pad”. Piglets stay 18 days in the farrowing barn. 60-W single
creep pads cost $150-200. Heat lamp fixtures using 175-W lamps cost $30. Creep pads last five
years. Heat lamps last 5,000 hours.
Advances in Pork
Production (Boris,
2008)3
896
0.109
0.109
Up to 15
$150
Comments: Above data is “per crate”. Replacement heat lamps cost $10/lamp. 1.5 heat lamps are
replaced per crate per year. Heat lamps are 175-W parabolic aluminized reflector (PAR) lamps.
Smaller heat lamps (100 W PAR lamps) are operated along with creep pads for the first 4-48 hours
after birth. Double creep pads use 130 W and serve two crates (65 W per crate). Double creep
pads cost $250 ($125 per crate). Installation cost of creep pad is $50 ($25 per crate). Expected life
of creep pad is up to 15 years. Heat lamps are operated 7,500 hours per year [implying 312 days,
86% of year, (assuming 18 days per litter2) 3 days between litters]. Expected life of heat lamp is
two-thirds year [implying 5,000 hours].
Prairie Swine Center4
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Heat lamps are used only during and shortly after farrowing, to prevent chilling. Floor
creep pads are used thereafter.
American Society of
Agricultural &
Biological Engineers
(MacDonald,
Feldmann, and
Wrigglesworth, 2008)6
498
0.065
0.065
N/A
US$72
Comments: Above data is “per crate”. Two rooms (30 crates/room) had 125-W heat lamps, with
heat output modulated by a controller based on room temperature. Heat lamps used 29,290 kWh/yr,
or $2,929/year at $0.10/kWh [implying 3,905 effective full load operating hours per year]. Per room
capital cost was US$974.00 for heat lamps [implying US$33 each], with US$113 average annual
replacement cost for heat lamps. Two other rooms (30 crates/room) had 120-W double creep pads
(60 W/crate), again with heat modulated by a controller. Creep pads used 14,340 kWh/yr, or
$1,434/year [implying 3,983 effective full load operating hours per year]. Per room capital cost is
US$3,160 for 15 reep pads [implying US$211 each double pad or US$105 per crate].
26
References
1
Jeffers Livestock Heating Pads Price List http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/ and search for “heat
pad”, then select “Farrowing Heat Pads”.
2
Improving Creep Heat Conditions and Reducing Energy Use, Farm Profile: Swine, Ontario
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/prof_swine.htm
http://www.powerauthority.on.ca/Storage/50/4602_OPANews_Sept.pdf
3
Energy Savings with Heat Pads and Lighting, R. E. Boris, Advances in Pork Production (2008)
Volume 19, pg. 61.
http://www.banffpork.ca/proc/2008pdf/081-Boris.pdf
4
Farrowing Facilities at PSC Elstow Research Farm, Prairie Swine Center.
http://www.prairieswine.com/psc-elstow/farrowing.html
5
Heat Pad System Pays Off, Joe Vansickle, National Hog Farmer, Jan. 15, 2001.
http://nationalhogfarmer.com/mag/farming_heat_pad_system/
6
Abstract of Comparison of Heat Lamp to Heat Pad Creep Heat in Farrowing Units, R. MacDonald,
T. Feldmann, M. Wrigglesworth, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2008.
http://asae.frymulti.com/abstract.asp?aid=88&t=2.
7
Vittetoe, Inc., Heat Mats
http://www.vittetoe.com/catalog/accessories.htm#Heat%20Mats
8
Bank of Canada - Monthly and Annual Noon Exchange Rate Averages (Average exchange rate for
Jan-May 2010 is $1.033548 per US$)
(http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html)
27
SINGLE CREEP PADS
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Single creep pad (also known as farrowing heat pad, heat mat, or floor heat pad). This can be
used to provide warmth for newborn piglets in a single crate at farrowing facilities. A crate holds
one sow and her litter. Creep pads provide a uniformly warm surface 16-20°C above air
temperature; this creates a 32-38°C resting surface in a 15-21°C building that is best for young
pigs.1 Piglets will seek the warmth and sleep safely away from the sow. Heat lamps may be used
in conjunction with the creep pad during and shortly after farrowing to dry the piglets and prevent
chilling.2,3,4 A creep pad controller (a separate measure) may be used in conjunction with the
creep pad to further reduce electricity consumption from the savings shown here.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Overhead heat lamps mounted in a reflective fixture (manually controlled).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Retrofit
Agribusiness - Swine
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
28
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1207.5
552.0
655.5
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.075
0.075
30.00
10.00
188.00
0.00
2
1207.5
552.0
655.5
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.075
0.075
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
3
1207.5
552.0
655.5
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.075
0.075
0.00
20.00
0.00
0.00
4
1207.5
552.0
655.5
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.075
0.075
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
5
1207.5
552.0
655.5
-25.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.075
0.075
0.00
10.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
6037.5
2760.0
3277.5
-126.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
30.00
60.00
188.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:



No. of heating days per litter cycle (HDPL) = 16.3 days. This is the average of 18 days2 and
14-17 days5.
No. of heating operating hours per year (HPY) = 6,900 hours.3 This is the average of 7,309
hours (56,276 kWh/yr for 44 x 175W heat lamps), 5,892 hours (16,852 kWh/yr for 22 x 130W
heat pads), and 7,500 hours (annual operating hours quoted for heat lamp replacement)
No. of litters per year (LPY) = [ HPY / (HDPL x 24) ] = 18 litters/yr
Base Measure Assumptions:

Wattage of heat lamp = 175 W2,3 or 125 W6. Assume 175W since this is commonly installed.
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

Wattage per creep pad = 80 W. This is an average of 100 W1 and 60 W2.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (175 W x 6900 hrs) / 1000
= 1,207.5 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (80 W x 6900 hrs) / 1000
= 552.0 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 1,207.5 – 552.0 = 655.5 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
There is no water or natural gas savings but there is an increase in gas consumption during the
heating season if the farrowing rooms are heated with forced air gas heaters due to decreased
electricity consumption by heating devices. Since each heat lamp supplies 175 W of heat to the
crate and each creep pad supplies only 80 W, 95 W less heat is supplied to each crate and
therefore to the entire farrowing room. If the farrowing room is heated by a thermostatically
controlled gas heater, the gas heater will need to run longer and consume more gas to maintain
the set point temperature in the room.
Assuming there are 120 days per heating season and a gas heating system efficiency of 80%,
increased gas consumption is estimated as follows:
Annual Gas Consumption (m3/yr) = [ 655.5 kWh/yr x (120/365) x 0.094 m3/kWh ] / 0.8
= 25.3 m3 per crate
29
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The useful life of a heat lamp is reported to be 5,000 hours.2,3 When operated for 6,900 hours per
year, this is equivalent to 0.7 years.
The useful life of a creep pad is reported to be as 5 years2 and up to 15 years,3 with a 5-year
warranty.5 When operated for 6,900 hours per year, this is equivalent to 34,500 hours. A
conservative EUL of 5 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Base equipment costs:
 Cost of heat lamp fixture is assumed to be $30.00 per fixture (including lamp)2 and $10.00 for
the heat lamp only.3
 Number of heat lamps replaced per year = (6,900 hrs/year) / (5000 hrs/lamp) = 1.4 heat lamps
 Cost to replace heat lamp = 1.4 heat lamps x $ 10 /heat lamp = $14 per year
Conservation measure costs:
 Cost of single (30x120 cm) creep pad is assumed to be CAD $188.00 per pad. This is an
average of US$130.00 per pad1, $150.00-200.00 per pad2, US$97.00 per pad7, and
US$101.00 per pad8 plus an installation cost of $50.00.3
 Assume 1 US$ = CAD $1.033548.9
Incremental costs:
 For new installations, incremental cost is $188.00 – [ $ 30.00 + $ 60.00) ] = $ 98.00 per crate
 For early retirement, incremental cost is $188.00 per crate
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
30
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
7.85%
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
18.42%
6.03%
Summer
MidPeak
792
9.04%
Off
Peak
1608
18.36%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
14.73%
18.70%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
Baseload
6.87%
Remarks
The operating hours for single creep pads are assumed to be uniformly distributed
throughout the year, hence, giving a baseload profile.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Ontario Ministry of
Agriculture, Food
and Rural Affairs2
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
630
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
0.115
0.115
5
$120-170
Comments: Above data is “per creep pad”. Piglets stay 18 days in the farrowing barn. 60-W
single creep pads cost $150-200. Heat lamp fixtures using 175-W lamps cost $30. Creep pads
last five years. Heat lamps last 5,000 hours.
Advances in Pork
Production (Boris,
2008)3
896
0.109
0.109
Up to 15
$150
Comments: Above data is “per crate”. Replacement heat lamps cost $10/lamp. 1.5 heat lamps
are replaced per crate per year. Heat lamps are 175-W parabolic aluminized reflector (PAR)
lamps. Smaller heat lamps (100 W PAR lamps) are operated along with creep pads for the first 448 hours after birth. Double creep pads use 130 W and serve two crates (65 W per crate). Double
creep pads cost $250 ($125 per crate). Installation cost of creep pad is $50 ($25 per crate).
Expected life of creep pad is up to 15 years. Heat lamps are operated 7,500 hours per year
[implying 312 days, 86% of year, (assuming 18 days per litter2) 3 days between litters]. Expected
life of heat lamp is two-thirds year [implying 5,000 hours].
Prairie Swine Center4
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Heat lamps are used only during and shortly after farrowing, to prevent chilling.
Floor creep pads are used thereafter.
American Society of
Agricultural &
Biological Engineers
(MacDonald,
Feldmann, and
Wrigglesworth,
2008)6
498
0.065
0.065
N/A
US$72
Comments: Above data is “per crate”. Two rooms (30 crates/room) had 125-W heat lamps, with
heat output modulated by a controller based on room temperature. Heat lamps used 29,290
kWh/yr, or $2,929/year at $0.10/kWh [implying 3,905 effective full load operating hours per year].
Per room capital cost was US$974.00 for heat lamps [implying US$33 each], with US$113
average annual replacement cost for heat lamps. Two other rooms (30 crates/room) had 120-W
double creep pads (60 W/crate), again with heat modulated by a controller. Creep pads used
14,340 kWh/yr, or $1,434/year [implying 3,983 effective full load operating hours per year]. Per
room capital cost is US$3,160 for 15 reep pads [implying US$211 each double pad or US$105 per
crate].
31
References
1
Jeffers Livestock Heating Pads Price List http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/ and search for “heat
pad”, then select “Farrowing Heat Pads”.
2
Improving Creep Heat Conditions and Reducing Energy Use, Farm Profile: Swine, Ontario
Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs.
http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/prof_swine.htm
http://www.powerauthority.on.ca/Storage/50/4602_OPANews_Sept.pdf
3
Energy Savings with Heat Pads and Lighting, R. E. Boris, Advances in Pork Production (2008)
Volume 19, pg. 61.
http://www.banffpork.ca/proc/2008pdf/081-Boris.pdf
4
Farrowing Facilities at PSC Elstow Research Farm, Prairie Swine Center.
http://www.prairieswine.com/psc-elstow/farrowing.html
5
Heat Pad System Pays Off, Joe Vansickle, National Hog Farmer, Jan. 15, 2001.
http://nationalhogfarmer.com/mag/farming_heat_pad_system/
6
Abstract of Comparison of Heat Lamp to Heat Pad Creep Heat in Farrowing Units, R. MacDonald,
T. Feldmann, M. Wrigglesworth, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2008.
http://asae.frymulti.com/abstract.asp?aid=88&t=2.
7
Valley Vet, Heat Mats http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e07553-7b6a-11d5-a19200b0d0204ae5#tabs
8
9
Vittetoe, Inc., Heat Mats http://www.vittetoe.com/catalog/accessories.htm#Heat%20Mats
Bank of Canada - Monthly and Annual Noon Exchange Rate Averages (Average exchange rate for
Jan-May 2010 is $1.033548 per US$)
(http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html)
32
Electric Auxiliary
33
34
COMMERCIAL CLOTHES DRYER
Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Jan 27, 2010
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Switching to a Commercial Gas Clothes Dryer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Commercial Electric Clothes Dryer
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Office of Energy Efficiency1 Regulations stated that the minimum energy efficiency
(based on Canadian test standard CAN/CSA-C361-92) for standard electric clothes dryers
be 1.36 kg/kWh (3.01 lb/kWh).
Decision Type
New / Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Commercial
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
369.00
0.00
2
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
3,500.00
0.00
3,500.00
-380.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.932
0.843
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
63,000.00
-6,840.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
369.00
0.00
Totals 63,000.00
35
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
In 2006, Enbridge contracted Natural Gas Technologies Centre to undertake a Commercial
Dryer Energy Consumption Study 2.
This study aimed to determine the change in energy consumption from converting commercial
electric dryers to gas-fired dryers in a multi-residential laundry facility. Results of the study
showed an average energy savings of 3,500 kWh for each electric dryer replaced with a gas
dryer.
Peak Demand Savings
The average peak demand savings was estimated using a custom load profile as described
below and coincidence factors of 1.0 for both winter and summer. The peak demand savings are
estimated to be 0.932 kW (summer) and 0.843 kW (winter).
Other Resource Savings
Switching to gas clothes dryer will have an increase in gas consumption by about 380 m3.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List lists 18 years as the effective useful life based on
NRCAN estimate. Seeline Group Inc. specifies that a clothes dryer has a useful life of about
15-20 years3. Other jurisdictions like Calfornia suggest 15 years as the useful life.
Based on the available research, the useful life of 18 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
With the same specification, gas dryers sell slightly higher than electric dryers by about US$
70-80 (CDN 84-96)4,5. If there is no gas line in a home to connect the natural gas dryer, the
installation cost is estimated to be $250.00 for the first 15 ft of piping (additional cost of $5.00
for every additional foot). There is also a $35.00 cost for the flexible connection resulting in an
estimated incremental cost of $ 369.00.
36
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Commercial
Clothes Dryer
ver: CI-2010-0
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
Summer
Off
On
Peak Peak
1614
528
Mid
Peak
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
14.5% 17.9% 1.0% 13.9% 18.4% 1.0% 32.3%
1.0%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
The custom load profile was estimated based on an 18-hour operation in the
laundry room area of multi-residential housing facilities.
Remarks
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Proposal Information Template Commercial Clothes Dryer, 2008
Appliance Efficiency Standards
On-Peak
Demand
Annual
Effective
Incremental
Reduction
Electricity
Useful
Cost ($)
Saving(kWh) Winter Summer Life (yrs)
(kW)
(kW)
730
15
Comments: Refer to reference for more information.6
Multi-Housing Laundry Association
2649.9
Comments: An all-electric dryer uses 3.3 kilowatt hours in a 45-minute cycle. Industry averages
show 72 cycles per month on dryers (this equals 2.2 cycles per day).7
Comments: The annual electricity savings was calculated using 3.3kWh/cycle x 2.2 cycles/day x
365 days/year = 2649.9 kWh/year.
References
1 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Clothes Dryers” April 20, 2009
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/clothes-dryers.cfm?text=N&printview=N (Accessed
September 21, 2009).
2 Communication with Michael Brophy of Enbridge.
3 Seeline Group Inc., “Technology Assessment Study and TRC Analysis for The Ontario Power
Authority” December 2005
http://www.conservationbureau.on.ca/Storage/12/1727_OPA_Technology_Study_12_08_Final.pdf (July
31, 2007).
4 http://www.bizrate.com/washers_dryers/products__keyword--commercial+clothes+dryer.html (accessed
12 May 2009).
5 http://www.sears.com/shc/s/s_10153_12605_Appliances_Washers+%26+Dryers_CoinOperated+Washers+and+Dryers (accessed 12 May 2009).
6 Proposal Information Template – Commercial Clothes Dryer. January 2008.
http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-0201_documents/templates/Commercial_Clothes_Dryers_Template_from_SCG_SDG+E_SCE.pdf.
7 Multi-Housing Laundry Association. http://www.mla-online.com/workback.htm
37
DUAL SPEED POOL PUMP MOTORS
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Dual-speed pool pump used in an outdoor pool with 40,000 to 150,000 litres. Generally, this
encompasses residential-sized pools.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Single-speed pool pump used in an outdoor pool with 40,000 to 150,000 litres.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
No codes, standards or regulations currently exist that govern pool pumps. However, the
Association for Pool and Spa Professionals (APSP) has been working since January 2010 to
develop an ANSI standard that would require two-speed motors in the U.S. and Canada.1
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single Family and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
38
Base
(kWh)
Electricity
Conservation
(kWh)
Natural
Gas
Savings
(kWh)
(m3)
1
1167.3
577.1
590.2
2
1167.3
3
1167.3
577.1
577.1
4
1167.3
5
Peak Demand
Savings
Summer
Winter
Capacity
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
778.00
0.00
914.00
0.00
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1167.3
577.1
590.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.722
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
11673
5771
5902
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
778.00
0.00
914.00
0.00
O&M
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:





High-speed operating hours = 10 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 900 hrs/yr 2
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 2
Motor efficiency = 70% 3
High-speed power = 1,297 W 3
High-speed flow rate = 208 litres (55 gallons) per minute 3
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Dual-speed motors will save energy by operating at a lower flow rate for a longer period of time.
Operating a pump at half speed for twice as long therefore moves the same volume of water, but in
theory uses only one-quarter the amount of energy. In reality, dual-speed motors are less efficient
at the lower speed and the cube law does not hold for systems with orifices.4
Operating hours for conservation measures are determined by calculating the hours of operation at
the lower flow rate required to turnover the same volume of water per day as the single-speed
system. In addition, it is assumed that the system would be operated in high-speed mode for 1.3
hours per day for activities such as pool cleaning and backwashing the filter. 5








High-speed operating hours = 1.3 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 117 hrs/yr
Low-speed operating hours = 21.4 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 1926 hrs/yr
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 2
Motor efficiency = 58% 3
High-speed power = 1,031 W 3
Low-speed power = 237 W 3
High-speed flow rate = 178 litres (47 gallons) per min. 3
Low-speed flow rate = 98 litres (26 gallons) per min. 3
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (High Speed Power
x High-Speed Operating Hours)
+ (Low-Speed Power
x Low-Speed Operating Hours) ] / 1000
= [ (1,297 W x 900 hrs) + (0 ) ] / 1000
= 1,167.3 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (High Speed Power
x High-Speed Operating Hours)
+ (Low-Speed Power
x Low-Speed Operating Hours) ] / 1000
= [ (1031 W x 117 hrs)
+ (237 W x 1926 hrs ) ] / 1000
= 577.1 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 1,167.3 – 577.1
= 590.2 kWh/yr
39
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a dual speed pool pump is assumed to be 10 years.6
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of a single-speed pool pump is approximately $409.00 6,7 with an additional $369.00 6,7 for
installation. Total installed costs are $778.00 per pump.
The cost of a variable-speed pool pump is approximately $545.00 7,8 with an additional $369.00 6,7 for
installation. Total installed costs are per $914.00 per pump.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Dual Speed Pool
Pump (Res)
Remarks
40
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
65.07%
Summer
MidPeak
792
29.75%
Off
Peak
1608
5.18%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
0.00%
0.00%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
0.000
0.978
0.000
0.993
The seasonal energy savings pattern assumes that the pool is only in operation
during the summer. The baseline measure is assumed to run 10 hours from 9 am to
7 pm and the conservation measure is assumed to operate on average 22 hours per
day at low-speed from 2 am to 9 am, high-speed from 9 am to 10 am, and then again
at low-speed from 10 am to midnight.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
SDG&E Pool Pump
Fact Sheet9
Annual
Electricity
Savings
(kWh)
1,606
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
Effective Useful
Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost
($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: The reference estimated the savings that would result from upgrading a 1.5 hp
standard efficiency single-speed pump operating 6 hours per day (5,037 kWh / year) to a 1.5 hp
multi-speed pump operating two hours per day on high speed and eight hours per day on low speed
(3,431 kWh / year). It also notes that most energy-efficient equipment will operate on low speed for
more hours.
SCE Pool Pump Fact
Sheet 10
1,712
-
-
-
-
Comments: The reference estimated savings for a 20,000 gallon pool that needs cycling once per
day. The baseline is assumed to be a single-speed motor operating 6 hours per day. The
conservation measure is assumed to be a variable-speed motor that operates 12 hours per day
(1,730 kWh / year).
PG&E Pool Pump Fact
Sheet 11
1,400
-
-
-
-
Comments: Only an energy savings value was provided. No estimate of baseline and conservation
measure consumption or operating hours are provided.
Ohio Edison Company
Energy Efficiency &
Peak Demand
Reduction Program
Portfolio and Initial
Benchmark Report
(15/12/2009)12
342
-
1.470
15
-
Comments: This reference provided savings estimates for direct load control pool pumps.
41
References
1
CEE Program Meeting. Diving into the World of Swimming Pool Pumps. Presentation by Eileen
Eaton from CEE January 12-14, 2010 http://www.cee1.org/cee/mtg/0110mtg/files/AppliancesEaton.pdf
2
The Cadmus Group Inc., "Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts
Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs", July 9, 2009.
3
Average parameters of 1.0 hp pool pump motors as reported in the California Energy
Commission’s Appliance Efficiency Database. Accessed on June 10, 2010.
http://www.appliances.energy.ca.gov/AdvancedSearch.aspx
4
“Analysis of Standards Options For Residential Pool Pumps, Motors, and Controls”. Davis Energy
Group. 2004. http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-0515_workshop/other/PGE_Updated_Proposal_Information_Template_for_Residential_Pool_Pump_M
easure_Revisions.pdf
5
“Proposal Information Template for: Residential Pool Pump Measure Revisions.” Davis Energy
Group. 2008. http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-0515_workshop/other/PGE_Updated_Proposal_Information_Template_for_Residential_Pool_Pump_M
easure_Revisions.pdf
6
California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), Database
on Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER), 2005 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources Version 2005.2.01.
October 26, 2005. Complete 2.01 Data base with Energy, EUL and Cost Data included.
http://www.deeresources.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=36&I
temid=53
7
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
8
http://www.h2opoolproducts.com/product_info.php?products_id=2702 (Accessed August 06, 2010)
9
SDGE Pool Pump Fact Sheet. http://www.sdge.com/documents/residential/PoolMotorBrochure.pdf
10
SCE Pool Pump Fact Sheet
http://www.sce.com/NR/rdonlyres/961234BB-7BE6-4ED3-AB455587EC8851AC/0/100510_PoolPumpSavingsFS.pdf
11
PG&E Pool Pump Fact Sheet
http://www.pge.com/myhome/saveenergymoney/rebates/seasonal/poolpumps/
12
Ohio Edison Company, Energy Efficiency & Peak Demand Reduction Program Portfolio And Initial
Benchmark Report (For the Period January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012.) – December 15th,
2009 http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/TiffToPDf/A1001001A09L15B65254C79103.pdf
42
ENERGY EFFICIENT TELEVISIONS
CEE Tier 4 Televisions
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
A television meeting Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) Tier 4 specification
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
A television that meets Natural Resources Canada’s Tier 2 minimum energy performance standards
for televisions.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

Natural Resources Canada defines energy performance standards for televisions as follows:1
Screen Area
A < 275 square inches
275 ≤ A ≤ 1068 square
inches
A > 1068 square inches

Maximum On Mode Power
Consumption in Watts
Version 4.1 Effective May 1,
2010
P max = (0.190 x A) + 5
Maximum On Mode Power
Consumption in Watts
Version 5.1 Effective May 1,
2012
P max = (0.130 x A) + 5
P max = (0.120 x A) + 25
P max = (0.084 x A) + 18
P max = (0.120 x A) + 25
P max = 108
The Consortium for Energy Efficiency defines a high efficiency specification for televisions, which
sets maximum power consumption when the television is in On Mode and in Standby Mode. Tier
4 is currently its most aggressive tier and is approximately 30% more efficient than an average
television.2
Screen Area
A < 680 inch
2
2
680 inch ≤ A <
2
1045 inch
A > 1045 inch
2
Tier 1 (≥
ENERGY
STAR)
P max = 0.2xA +
32
P max = 0.24xA
+ 27
P max =
0.156xA + 151
Tier 2 (≥ 15%
more efficient
than ENERGY
STAR)
P max = 0.17xA +
27.2
Tier 3 (≥ 30%
more efficient
than ENERGY
STAR)
P max = 0.14xA +
22.4
P max = 0.204xA +
22.95
P max = 0.1326xA
+ 128.35
P max = 0.168xA +
18.9
P max = 0.1092xA
+ 105.7
Tier 4 (≥ 45%
more efficient
than ENERGY
STAR)
P max = 0.11xA +
17.6
P max = 0.132xA +
14.85
P max = 0.0858xA
+ 83.05
NOTE: This specification incorporates all requirements of the ENERGY STAR Version 3.0
television specification, including standby power (max 1 Watt) and product testing. On
CEE’s Qualifying Products List, models will be listed only at the highest tier for which
manufacturers represent they qualify.
43
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Base
(kWh)
Electricity
Conservation
(kWh)
Savings
(kWh)
Natural
Gas
(m3)
1
310
216
94
2
310
216
3
310
216
4
310
5
Peak Demand
Savings
Summer
Winter
Capacity
Capacity
(kW)
(kW)
(L)
Heating
Oil
(L)
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
94
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
94
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
216
94
0.0
0.0
0.0
310
216
94
0.0
0.0
6
310
216
94
0.0
TOTAL
1860
1296
564
0.0
Year
Propane
Water
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
($)
($)
($)
($)
0.022
970.00
0.00
970.00
0.00
0.002
0.022
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.022
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.0
0.002
0.022
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.022
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.022
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.0
0.0
0.0
970.00
0.00
970.00
0.00
(L)
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:





TV size of 106.7 cm (42 inch) diameter with 16:9 aspect ratio
Area (A) = 4,865 square cm (754 square inches)
On mode hours = 5 hours/day x 365 days/year = 1825 hours 3
Standby hours = 19 hours/day x 365 days/year = 6935 hours 3
Standby wattage = 1 watt 1, 2
Base Measure Assumptions:

On mode wattage = 166 watts 4
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

On mode wattage 2 = (0.132 x A) + 14.85 = (0.132 x 754) + 14.85
= 114.4 W
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption = On Mode Wattage x On Mode Hours + Standby Wattage
x Standby Hours
= [ (166 W x 1825) + (1 x 6935) ] / 1000
= 310 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption = On Mode Wattage x On Mode Hours
+ Standby Wattage x Standby Hours
= [ (114.4 W x 1825) + (1 x 6935) ] / 1000
= 216 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 94 kWh/yr
44
O&M
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life for CEE Tier 4 televisions is assumed to be 6 years.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are estimated to cost $970.004, with no O&M costs.
Therefore, the incremental cost is assumed to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Energy
Efficient
Television
OnPeak
602
14.14%
Winter
MidPeak
688
9.42%
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
9.59%
4.82%
19.29%
9.32%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
23.56%
9.86%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.000
0.000
1.000
0.200
(Tier 4)
Remarks
Savings are assumed to occur when the television is in on mode for five hours per
day. It is further assumed that the on mode hours would occur during the evening
from 4 pm to 9 pm.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
US EPA
Presentation 6
Annual
Electricity
Savings
(kWh)
52
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
0.006
0.006
Effective Useful
Life
Incremental
Cost
(yrs)
($)
6
-
Comments: Savings values are listed as “potential” savings available for efficient televisions.
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector 7
53
-
-
20
50
Comments: Exhibit 2.4 indicates annual electricity use for televisions is estimated at 178 kWh, page
104 indicates savings potential of 30% for new and existing units that are replaced with ENERGY
STAR qualified televisions (assumed to be version 3.0 of the guidelines), as well as a $50 incremental
cost and 20 year life.
45
California Energy
Commission 8
84
-
-
10
0
Comments: Question 9 suggests that California’s efficiency standard for televisions will result in no
cost increase. California standards, which will be enacted in 2011 and made more stringent in 2013,
are less stringent than CEE Tier 4 but suggest that increases in energy efficiency result in little or no
incremental cost.
References
1
Natural Resources Canada Energy Efficiency Regulations for Standby Power for Televisions.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/standbypower-june-2010.cfm?attr=0.
2
Consortium for Energy Efficiency High Efficiency Specification for Televisions, Effective June 30,
2009. http://www.cee1.org/files/CEETelevisionSpecification.pdf
3
Natural Resources Canada ENERGY STAR Qualifying Criteria for Televisions Versions 4 and 5.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/tv.cfm?attr=12
4
CNET Energy Efficiency Guide, The basics of TV power. Accessed on June 9, 2010. Average
wattage of 42 inch LCD and Plasma televisions in calibrated setting is 166 W. Average cost of all 42”
televisions with pricing available was $970 CAD.
http://reviews.cnet.com/green-tech/tv-consumption-chart/?tag=contentBody;nextPage
5
Natural Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency ENERGY STAR Simple Savings Calculator,
Version 5.0, for televisions.
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/tvs.cfm
6
ENERGY STAR Electronics Strategy, Tools & Resources Workshop on ENERGY STAR
Electronics Program Design, September 24, 2008, Hewan Tomlinson, US EPA.
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/downloads/meetings/SpecStrategy_Tomlinson.pdf.
7
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia
8
California Energy Commission TV requirements: CEA comment responses
http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2009_tvregs/documents/2009-11-18_meeting/2009-1102_Supplemental_Response_to_Consumer_Electronics_Association_Comments_TN-53929.pdf
9
Hydro One Residential Appliance Saturation Survey (RASS). Marcom, Inc. 2006. This survey found
that in Hydro One’s territory 2% of homes had no televisions, 35% had one, 35% had two, and 28%
had more than two. Therefore, the average quantity of televisions per home is 1.9, assuming three
televisions for those homes with more than two.
46
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED AUDIO/VIDEO EQUIPMENT
Audio Amplifiers
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
0
Sep 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
An Energy Star® qualified mains-connected product that offers audio amplification
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
A mains-connected product that offers audio amplification and is not Energy Star® qualified.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
audio/video equipment.

Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for audio/video equipment,
version 2.0, Tier 2, defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products.1 It requires the
inclusion of an auto power down function and defines limits for power consumption in On, Idle,
and Sleep modes as shown below. Power limits within each modes are additive with the
exception of the optical disc player limits. Note that dedicated audio digital signal processing
products are exempted from the On mode requirements.
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for On Mode
Product Function
High Resolution Display
(> 480x234 pixel resolution and 5“ diagonal
screen size)
In-use Networking / Control Protocol
Standard Definition (SD) Source
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
SD Source to HD Output “Upconversion”
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
High Definition (HD) Source
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
Power Consumption Limit
(W)
P = (6 x R) + (0.05 x A) + 3
2.0
6 (Playback)
16 (Recording)
10 (Playback)
16 (Recording)
15 (Playback)
20 (Recording)
where:
R = Display resolution (x * y) in megapixels
A = Viewable screen area in square inches
47
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for Idle State
Product Function
Base (All
Products)
Audio
Amplification
Power Consumption Limit (W)
5.0
P = (0.10 x P out ) or 5 W, whichever is greater
Where: P out = Output Power @ 1/8 MUP 1kHz Sine
Wave
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for Sleep Mode
Product Function
Base (All Products)
In-use Networking / Control Protocol
(Wake / Sleep Capability Only)

Power Consumption
Limit (W)
1.0
2.0
Additional requirements regarding the efficiency of audio amplifiers are listed in the Table below.
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Additional Requirements for Audio Amplifiers in On Mode
Product Function
Audio Amplification Small
Amplifiers
(P IN < 20 W)
Audio Amplification Medium
Amplifiers
(20 W ≤P IN < 100 W)
Audio Amplification Large
Amplifiers
(P IN ≥ 100 W)
Amplifier Efficiency
No Requirements
Efficiency > 55%
Where: Efficiency = P OUT / (P IN * 0.80)
Efficiency > 55%
Where: Efficiency = P OUT / P IN
where:
P in = Input Power @ 1/8 Maximum Undistorted Power (MUP) 1kHz Sine Wave
P out = Output Power @ 1/8 Maximum Undistorted Power (MUP)1kHz Sine Wave
48
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New / Replacement
Residential (Single and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
2
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
88.7
38.5
50.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
620.9
269.5
351.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:

The annual hours of operation are assumed to be as follows:2
Annual Hours of Operation by Mode
Mode
Hours
Active (H active )
1,580
Idle (H idle )
730
Sleep/Off
6,450
(H sleep/off )
Base Measure Assumptions:

The base measure corresponds to the Energy Star® medium amplifier classification with Active
Mode power, P active , assumed to be 38.0 W 2 and output power, P out , equal to 7.6 W 3, for an
efficiency of 38.0 / (7.6 x 0.80) = 25%.

The base measure is assumed to have Idle Mode power, P idle , of 34.0 W 2 and Off/Sleep Mode
power, P off , equal to 0.6 W 2.
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

The conservation measure is assumed to produce an identical output power, P out , equal to 7.6
W, but with the minimum required efficiency for Energy Star® qualification of 55%. Therefore,
the input power during Active Mode, P active , is calculated to be equal to 17.3 W.

The Energy Star® qualified conservation measure is required to have Idle Mode power, P idle , no
greater than 5.0 W plus the greater of 5.0 W or 10% x P out . Therefore, P idle is assumed to be 5.0
W + 5.0 W = 10.0 W.

The Off/Sleep Mode power, P off , must be less than 1.0 W to meet Energy Star® requirements,
and was assumed to equal the base measure value of 0.6 W.
49
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P idle x H idle ) + (P active x H active )] /1000
= [(0.6 x 6450) + (34.0 x 730) + (38.0 x 1580)]/1000
= 88.7 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P idle x H idle )
+ (P active x H active )] /1000
= [(0.6 x 6450) + (10.0 x 730)
+ (17.3 x 1580)]/1000
= 38.5 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 88.7 – 38.5
= 50.2 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of Energy Star® qualified audio/visual equipment is assumed to be 7 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are estimated to cost $300.00 for audio amplifiers with no
O&M costs.4 Therefore, the incremental cost is estimated to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Audio
Amplifiers
OnPeak
602
15.87%
Winter
MidPeak
688
7.69%
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
9.59%
0.00%
24.11%
9.32%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
23.56%
9.86%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
0.336
0.000
0.886
0.000
Audio amplifiers are assumed to operate in Active Mode briefly in the morning and
then again in the evening hours. Idle Mode is assumed to occur after the morning
and evening hours of use and the Off Mode hours are assumed to occur for the
remainder of the 24 hours. The assumed hours are summarized as follows:
Remarks
50
Mode
Active
Idle
Hours
8:00-9:00 am
5:00-9:00 pm
9:00-10:00 am
9:00-10:00 pm
Off
Midnight – 8:00 am
10:00 am – 5:00 pm
10:00 pm - Midnight
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics3
Annual
Electricity
Savings
(kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
-
-
-
-
Winter
($)
Comments: The TIAX study provides an estimate of average annual electricity consumption for
standalone DVD players and home theater equipment in the United States, which is equal to 34 kWh
and 89 kWh respectively (page 27, table 5.1).
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector 5
-
-
-
-
-
Comments: This study does not include savings potential for audio/video equipment, but does
estimate typical end-use consumption of DVD players and audio systems to be 35 kWh and 55 kWh
per year, respectively.
References
1
Energy Star® for Audio/Video Products, Version 2.0
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/home-audio.cfm?attr=12.
2
Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. January 2007
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
3
Published data regarding typical efficiency of medium-size amplifiers were not found. An efficiency
of 25% was assumed.
4
Natural Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency ENERGY STAR Simple Savings Calculator,
Version 4.0, for stereo receivers and DVD players. http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=4
5
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia.
51
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED AUDIO/VIDEO EQUIPMENT
Optical Disc Players
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions List
Sep 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
An Energy Star® qualified mains-connected product that offers optical disc drive functions (e.g.
DVD player or Blu-Ray player)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
A mains-connected product that offers optical disc drive functions (e.g. DVD player or Blu-Ray
player) and is not Energy Star® qualified.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
audio/video equipment.

Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for audio/video equipment,
version 2.0, Tier 2, defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products.1 It requires the
inclusion of an auto power down function and defines limits for power consumption in On, Idle,
and Sleep modes as shown below. Power limits within each modes are additive with the
exception of the optical disc player limits. Note that dedicated audio digital signal processing
products are exempted from the On mode requirements.
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for On Mode
Product Function
High Resolution Display
(> 480x234 pixel resolution and 5“ diagonal
screen size)
In-use Networking / Control Protocol
Standard Definition (SD) Source
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
SD Source to HD Output “Upconversion”
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
High Definition (HD) Source
Optical Disc Player/Recorder
where:
R = Display resolution (x * y) in megapixels
A = Viewable screen area in square inches
52
Power Consumption Limit
(W)
P = (6 x R) + (0.05 x A) + 3
2.0
6 (Playback)
16 (Recording)
10 (Playback)
16 (Recording)
15 (Playback)
20 (Recording)
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for Idle State
Product Function
Base (All Products)
Power Consumption Limit (W)
5.0
P = (0.10 x P out ) or 5 W, whichever is greater
Where: P out = Output Power @ 1/8 MUP 1kHz Sine
Wave
Audio Amplification
Tier 2 Energy Star® Audio/Video Requirements for Sleep Mode
Power Consumption Limit
(W)
1.0
Product Function
Base (All Products)
In-use Networking / Control Protocol
(Wake / Sleep Capability Only)
2.0
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
150.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
2
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
30.0
14.8
15.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.001
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
210.0
103.6
106.4
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
150.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
Year
O&M
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base and Conservation Measure Assumptions:

The annual hours of operation are assumed to be as follows:2
Annual Hours of Operation by Mode
Mode
Active (H active )
Idle (H idle )
Sleep/Off (H sleep/off )

Hours
270
900
7,590
The average power consumed in each mode for the base and conservation measure optical
disc player is indicated in the Table below. Values were selected assuming that the device
was a stand-alone player without recording capabilities or integrated VCR, as data indicate this
to be the most common configuration.2
53
Average Power (W) Consumed by Mode and Measure Type
Mode
Active
Sleep/Idle
Off
Base
Measure3
13.0 W
10.0 W
2.3 W
Energy Star®1
10.0 W
5.0 W
1.0 W
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P idle x H idle ) + (P active x H active )] /1000
= [(2.3 x 7590) + (10.0 x 900) + (13.0 x 270)]/1000
= 30.0 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P idle x H idle )
+ (P active x H active )] /1000
= [(1.0 x 7590) + (5.0 x 900)
+ (10.0 x 270)]/1000
= 14.8 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 30.0 – 14.8
= 15.2 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of Energy Star® qualified audio/visual equipment is assumed to be 7
years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are estimated to cost $150.00 for optical disc players with
no O&M costs.4 Therefore, the incremental cost is estimated to be $0.
54
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Optical
Disc
Players
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
11.50%
20.72%
4.61%
OnPeak
602
0.92%
Summer
MidOff Peak
Peak
792
1608
8.10%
20.71%
Shoulder
MidOff Peak
Peak
1290
1638
12.43%
21.00%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
5.688
1.000
5.688
1.000
Audio amplifiers are assumed to operate in Active Mode only in the evening hours. Idle
Mode is assumed to occur after the evening hours of use and the Off Mode hours are
assumed to occur for the remainder of the 24 hours. The assumed hours are
Remarks summarized as follows:
Mode
Active
Idle
Hours
8:00-9:00 pm
9:00-11:00 pm
Off
Midnight – 8:00 am
11:00 pm - Midnight
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics3
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
-
-
-
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
Comments: The TIAX study provides an estimate of average annual electricity consumption for
standalone DVD players and home theater equipment in the United States, which is equal to 34
kWh and 89 kWh respectively (page 27, table 5.1).
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector 5
-
-
-
-
-
Comments: This study does not include savings potential for audio/video equipment, but does
estimate typical end-use consumption of DVD players and audio systems to be 35 kWh and 55
kWh per year, respectively.
55
References
1
Energy Star® for Audio/Video Products, Version 2.0
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/home-audio.cfm?attr=12.
2
Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. January 2007
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
3
Published data regarding typical efficiency of medium-size amplifiers were not found. An efficiency
of 25% was assumed.
4
Natural Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency ENERGY STAR Simple Savings Calculator,
Version 4.0, for stereo receivers and DVD players. http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=4
5
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia.
56
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED COMPUTERS
Desktop Computers
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Desktop computer that is Energy Star® qualified
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Desktop computer that is not Energy Star® qualified
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
computers.
Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for computers, version 5.01,
defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products. This requires the use of energy efficient
power supplies and limits the typical energy consumption (TEC) based upon the type of computer
and presence of features.
A desktop computer with two physical cores and greater than or equal to two gigabytes of system
memory is defined as Category B for desktop computers. This is the most common configuration
qualified among products with a defined category type, as determined using the list of products
qualified under the same Energy Star® specification in the United States, as shown below.2,3
Quantity and Percentage of Energy Star® Qualified Desktops by Category
Desktop Category
Category A
Category B
Category C
Category D
No Category
Indicated

Count
303
851
142
339
%
11%
30%
5%
12%
1241
43%
Natural Resources Canada specified the TEC limit for desktop computer configurations to be
less than or equal to 175.0 kWh per year and operational mode weighing values to be as
follows:1
Operational Mode Weighting
Toff
Tsleep
Tidle
Desktop (Conventional)
55%
5%
40%
57
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single and Multi Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
234
133
101
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.020
0.033
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
2
234
133
101
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.020
0.033
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
234
133
101
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.020
0.033
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
234
133
101
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.020
0.033
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
936
532
404
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
Year
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base and Conservation Measure Assumptions:

Operational mode hours are assumed to be as follows:4
Off Mode Hours (H off ) = 14.9 hours/day x 365 days/year = 5,438 hours
Sleep Mode Hours (H sleep ) = 1.0 hour/day x 365 days/year = 365 hours
Active Mode Hours (H active ) = 8.1 hours/day x 365 days/year = 2,957 hours

Average power consumed in each mode for the base and conservation measure are listed
below:2,3
Average Power Consumed (P) by Mode
Mode
Off
Sleep
Active
Base Desktop
2.0 W
4.0 W
75.0 W
Efficient Desktop
1.1 W
2.4 W
42.5 W
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active x H active )]
/1000
= [(2.0 x 5438) + (4.0 x 365) + (75.0 x 2957)]/1000
= 234 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [(P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active
x H active )] /1000
= [(1.1 x 5438) + (2.4 x 365) + (42.5 x 2957)]
/1000
= 133 kWh/yr
58
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 234 – 133
= 101 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a computer is assumed to be 4 years.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are assumed to cost $735.005, with no O&M costs.
Therefore, the incremental cost is assumed to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Desktop
Computers
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
12.77%
10.10%
10.28%
6.01%
17.39%
Off
Peak
1608
10.02%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
22.87%
10.56%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.525
2.843
1.525
1.737
Desktop computers are assumed to operate in active mode briefly in the morning and
then again in the afternoon and evening hours. Sleep was assumed to occur after the
morning hours of use and the off mode hours were assumed to occur for the remainder of
the 24 hours. The assumptions are summarized as follows:
Remarks
Mode
Active
Sleep
Hours
8:00-9:30 am
3:00-9:30 pm
9:30-10:30 am
Off
Midnight – 8:00 am
10:30 am – 3:00 pm
9:30 pm - Midnight
59
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics4
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: TIAX estimates average consumption of desktop and notebook computers to be 237
and 72 kWh, respectively.
Natural Resources
Canada Savings
Calculator5
31
-
-
4
0
Comments: The savings calculator estimates the incremental cost and savings from desktop
computers only, not including a monitor.
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector6
60%
-
-
8
1000
85
0.016
0.016
-
5
Comments:
CL&P and UI Program
Savings
Documentation7
Comments: The incremental cost and savings only encompass an efficient power supply, rather
than full Energy Star® qualification.
References
1
Energy Star® for Computers v 5.0.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/computers.cfm?attr=12
2
The quantity of desktop computers qualified by category type, as well as the average power
consumed in each mode, was determined using the Energy Star® qualified product list for desktops
and integrated computers, posted on June 16, 2010 at
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/computers_prod_list.xls
3
The quantity of notebook computers qualified by category type, as well as the average power
consumed in each mode, was determined using the Energy Star® qualified product list for notebook
computers, posted on June 17, 2010 at
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/laptops_prod_list.xls
4
Annual hours of operation and average power consumed, by mode, for desktop and notebook
computers are reported and were used to derive daily hours of operation and base measure power
assumptions. Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. Table
5-35. January 2007.
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
5
Natural Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator,
Version 4.0, for desktop computers. http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=4
60
6
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia
7
Connecticut Light & Power, United Illuminating. “CL&P and UI Program Savings Documentation for
2008 Program Year”. 2007.
http://www.ctsavesenergy.org/files/Final%202008%20Program%20Savings%20Document0.pdf
61
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED COMPUTERS
Notebook Computers
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Notebook computer that is Energy Star® qualified
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Notebook computer that is not Energy Star® qualified
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
computers.
Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for computers, version 5.01,
defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products. This requires the use of energy efficient
power supplies and limits the typical energy consumption (TEC) based upon the type of computer
and presence of features.
A notebook computer with two physical cores, two gigabytes of system memory, and integrated (i.e.,
non-discrete) graphics is defined as Category A for notebook computers. This is the most common
configuration qualified among products with a defined category type, as determined using the list of
products qualified under the same Energy Star® specification in the United States, as shown
below.2,3
Quantity and Percentage of Energy Star® Qualified Notebooks by Category
Notebook Category
Category A
Category B
Category C
No Category
Indicated

Count
3238
1599
130
%
56%
28%
2%
832
14%
Natural Resources Canada specified the TEC limit for notebook computer configurations to be
less than or equal to 40.0 kWh per year and operational mode weighing values to be as follows:1
Operational Mode Weighting
Toff
Tsleep
Tidle
62
Desktop (Conventional)
60%
10%
30%
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single and Multi Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
72
28
44
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.007
0.015
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
2
72
28
44
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.007
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
72
28
44
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.007
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
72
28
44
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.007
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
288
112
176
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
735.00
0.00
735.00
0.00
Year
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base and Conservation Measure Assumptions:

Operational mode hours are assumed to be as follows:4
Off Mode Hours (H off ) = 14.9 hours/day x 365 days/year = 5,438 hours
Sleep Mode Hours (H sleep ) = 2.6 hours/day x 365 days/year = 949 hours
Active Mode Hours (H active ) = 6.5 hours/day x 365 days/year = 2,373 hours

Average power consumed in each mode for the base and conservation measure are listed
below:2,3
Average Power Consumed (P) by Mode
Mode
Off
Sleep
Active
Base Notebook
2.0 W
2.0 W
25.0 W
Efficient
Notebook
0.6 W
1.1 W
9.9 W
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active x H active ) ]
/1000
= [ (2.0 x 5438) + (2.0 x 949) + (25.0 x 2373) ]/1000
= 72 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active
x H active ) ] /1000
= [ (0.6 x 5438) + (1.1 x 949) + (9.9 x 2373) ]
/1000
= 28 kWh/yr
63
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 72 – 28
= 44 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a computer is assumed to be 4 years.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are assumed to cost $735.005, with no O&M costs.
Therefore, the incremental cost is assumed to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Notebook
Computers
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
12.34%
8.77%
12.03%
5.70%
Summer
MidPeak
792
15.91%
Off
Peak
1608
11.82%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
21.12%
12.31%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.662
1.725
1.662
1.438
Notebook computers are assumed to operate in active mode briefly in the morning and
then again in the afternoon and evening hours. Sleep was assumed to occur after the
morning hours of use and the off mode hours were assumed to occur for the remainder
of the 24 hours. The assumptions are summarized as follows:
Remarks
64
Mode
Active
Sleep
Hours
8:00-9:00 am
3:30-9:00 pm
9:00-11:30 am
Off
Midnight – 8:00 am
11:30 am – 3:30 pm
9:00 pm - Midnight
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics4
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: TIAX estimates average consumption of desktop and notebook computers to be 237
and 72 kWh, respectively.
Natural Resources
Canada Savings
Calculator5
31
-
-
4
0
Comments: The savings calculator estimates the incremental cost and savings from desktop
computers only, not including a monitor.
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector6
60%
-
-
8
1000
85
0.016
0.016
-
5
Comments:
CL&P and UI Program
Savings
Documentation7
Comments: The incremental cost and savings only encompass an efficient power supply, rather
than full Energy Star® qualification.
References
1
Energy Star® for Computers v 5.0.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/computers.cfm?attr=12
2
The quantity of desktop computers qualified by category type, as well as the average power
consumed in each mode, was determined using the Energy Star® qualified product list for desktops
and integrated computers, posted on June 16, 2010 at
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/computers_prod_list.xls
3
The quantity of notebook computers qualified by category type, as well as the average power
consumed in each mode, was determined using the Energy Star® qualified product list for notebook
computers, posted on June 17, 2010 at
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/laptops_prod_list.xls
4
Annual hours of operation and average power consumed, by mode, for desktop and notebook
computers are reported and were used to derive daily hours of operation and base measure power
assumptions. Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. Table
5-35. January 2007.
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
5
Natural Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator,
Version 4.0, for desktop computers. http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=4
65
6
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia
7
Connecticut Light & Power, United Illuminating. “CL&P and UI Program Savings Documentation for
2008 Program Year”. 2007.
http://www.ctsavesenergy.org/files/Final%202008%20Program%20Savings%20Document0.pdf
66
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DISPLAYS (MONITORS)
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
A display (monitor) that is Energy Star® qualified
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
A display (monitor) that is not Energy Star® qualified
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
computers.

Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for displays (monitors),
version 5.0, Tier 1, defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products.1 It defines limits for
power consumption in On, Sleep, and Off modes as shown below:
Tier 1 Energy Star® Display Requirements for On Mode
Display Category
Maximum On Mode Power Consumption
(W)
Diagonal Screen Size < 30
inches
Screen Resolution ≤ 1.1 MP
Diagonal Screen Size < 30
inches
Screen Resolution > 1.1 MP
Diagonal Screen Size 30 - 60
inches
All Screen Resolutions
P o = (6 x MP) + (0.05 x A) + 3
P o = (9 x MP) + (0.05 x A) + 3
P o = (0.27 x A) + 8
where:
MP = Display Resolution (megapixels)
A = Viewable Screen Area (square inches)
Tier 1 Energy Star® Display Requirements for Sleep and Off Modes
Mode
Maximum Sleep Mode Power
Consumption
Maximum Off Mode Power
Consumption
Tier 1 Limit (W)
<2
<1
67
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
Load Type
New/Replacement
Residential (Single and Multi-Family)
Displays (Monitors)
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Peak Demand Savings
Heating
Oil
Propane
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
79.6
49.8
29.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.011
211.00
0.00
211.00
0.00
2
79.6
49.8
29.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.011
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
79.6
49.8
29.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.011
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
79.6
49.8
29.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.001
0.011
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
318.4
199.2
119.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
211.00
0.00
211.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:

Energy consumption and savings for displays (monitors) vary considerably with screen size.
Therefore, average consumption and savings were calculated using the quantity of Energy Star®
qualified displays within the three most common screen size ranges as shown below:
Quantity of Energy Star® Qualified Displays by Screen Size2
Product Type
LCD 17.1"-19.0"
LCD 19.1"-22.0"
LCD 22.1"-25.0"

Quantity of Products
149
201
105
Displays (monitors) commonly operate in one of the following three modes: Active, Sleep, and
Off. The average annual hours of operation assumed for each mode are assumed to be as
follows:
Annual Hours of Operation by Mode3
Active (H active )
1,865
Sleep (H sleep )
875
Off (H off )
6,020
Base Measure Assumptions:

68
Available data indicating the typical power used in each mode was last updated in 2007 and
therefore excluded estimates for larger display (monitor) sizes that are now commonly sold.
Therefore, for display (monitor) sizes under 19” the data are reported directly while for displays
(monitors) over 19”, the available data for smaller displays were extrapolated. The results are
shown below.3
Weighted Average Power (W) of Base Measure Displays by Screen Size and Mode
Screen Size
LCD 17.1"-19.0"
LCD 19.1"-22.0"
LCD 22.1"-25.0"
Average
Quantity of
Products
149
201
105
Weighted Power (W)
Active
Sleep
Off
35
1
1
40
1
1
45
1
1
39
1
1
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

The power used in each mode is assumed based on the current list of Energy Star® qualified
displays (monitors) as shown below.2
Weighted Average Power (W) of Energy Star® Qualified Displays by Screen Size and Mode
Screen Size
LCD 17.1"-19.0"
LCD 19.1"-22.0"
LCD 22.1"-25.0"
Average
Quantity of
Products
149
201
105
Weighted Power (W)
Active
Sleep
Off
19
1
1
23
1
1
27
1
1
23
1
1
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active x H active ) ]
/1000
= [ (1.0 x 6020) + (1.0 x 875) + (39.0 x 1865) ]/1000
= 79.6 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (P off x H off ) + (P sleep x H sleep ) + (P active
x H active ) ] /1000
= [ (1.0 x 6020) + (1.0 x 875) + (23.0 x 1865) ]
/1000
= 49.8 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 79.6 – 49.8
= 29.8 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
69
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a display is assumed to be 4 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Both base and conservation measures are assumed to cost $211.004, 5, with no O&M costs.
Therefore, the incremental cost is assumed to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
OnPeak
602
Description
Displays
(Monitors)
18.94%
Winter
MidPeak
688
4.62%
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
9.59%
4.73%
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off Peak
19.38%
1608
9.32%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
23.56%
9.86%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.220
0.000
1.220
0.200
Displays are assumed to operate in Active Mode briefly in the morning and then again in
the afternoon and evening hours. Sleep Mode is assumed to occur after the morning
hours of use and the Off Mode hours are assumed to occur for the remainder of the 24
hours. The assumptions are summarized as follows:
Remarks
Mode
Active
Sleep
Hours
8:00-9:00 am
4:00-8:00 pm
9:00-11:00 am
Off
Midnight – 8:00 am
11:00 am – 4:00 pm
8:00 pm - Midnight
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics 3
Annual
Electricity
Savings
(kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
Effective Useful
Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost
($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: TIAX estimates average consumption of displays to be 85 kWh, with approximately 78
kWh used in Active mode, 1 kWh used in Sleep mode, and 5 kWh used in Off mode.
Natural Resources
Canada Savings
Calculator 4
18
-
-
4
0
Comments: The default settings of the savings calculator estimate the incremental cost and
savings from a 19+” LCD display.
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector 6
61%
-
-
10
Comments: This estimate is for a typical LCD display relative to a standard CRT display, as
opposed to one that is specifically ENERGY STAR qualified.
70
60
References
1
ENERGY STAR for Displays v 5.0
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/monitors.cfm?attr=12
2
The quantity of displays qualified within each screen size range was determined using the
ENERGY STAR Displays Product List, posted on June 15, 2010 at
http://downloads.energystar.gov/bi/qplist/displays_prod_list.pdf
3
Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. January 2007.
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
4
Effective useful life of four years and zero incremental cost were obtained from the Natural
Resources Canada Office of Energy Efficiency ENERGY STAR Simple Savings Calculator, Version
4.0, for displays. http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=4
5
Average cost for displays were calculated using products sold on June 25, 2010 at the Canadian
Best Buy web site. for displays. http://www.bestbuy.ca/enCA/category/monitors/20367.aspx?path=7a3c3eb0bccbbcc34eecd18eb335b3ccen01
6
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Technology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia
71
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED GAME CONSOLES
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Game console that is Energy Star® qualified
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Game console that is not Energy Star® qualified
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
game consoles.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Energy Star® Program Requirements for Computers,
Draft Final Version 5.1, Tier 1, defines maximum power requirements for game consoles in
sleep mode and requires an auto power down feature that is enabled by default.1

Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single Family and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Nintendo Wii
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
72
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.009
200.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
96.3
33.5
62.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.002
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
481.5
167.5
314.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
200.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Microsoft Xbox 360
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Peak Demand Savings
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.031
0.115
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
2
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.031
0.115
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.031
0.115
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.031
0.115
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1030.2
187.1
843.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.031
0.115
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
5151.0
935.5
4215.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
300.00
0.00
300.00
0.00
Sony Playstation 3
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
Year
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.025
0.095
362.00
0.00
362.00
0.00
2
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.025
0.095
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.025
0.095
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.025
0.095
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
836.3
142.8
693.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.025
0.095
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
4181.5
714.0
3467.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
362.00
0.00
362.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:



Electricity savings result from maximum power requirements for the console in sleep mode,
and from the implementation of an auto power down feature that reduces the numbers of hours
the console is in Idle Mode. The auto power down feature takes effect after the console has
been in Idle Mode for one hour.
Assume Active Mode hours to be 2 hours/day for 365 days/year2,3. This is equivalent to 730
hours.
Assume the following wattages for Active Mode, Idle Mode and Off Mode
Wattage by Console Type and Mode
Console
Nintendo Wii 3
Microsoft Xbox 360 3
Sony PlayStation 3 (Slim)
Active
Mode
(W)
16.4
118.8
96.2
Idle Mode
(W)
Off Mode
(W)
10.5
117.5
95.4
1.9
3.1
0.4
4
73
Base Measure Assumptions:


Idle Mode Hours = 22 hours/day x 365 days/year = 8,030 hours
Off Mode Hours = 0 hours/day
Conservation Measure Assumptions:



Idle Mode Hours = 2 hours/day x 365 days/year = 730 hours
Off Mode Hours = 20 hours/day x 365 days/year = 7,300 hours
To meet Energy Star® requirements, the Microsoft Xbox Off Mode will be set to 2.0 W.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Active Mode Wattage x Active Mode Hours)
+ (Idle Mode Wattage x Idle Mode Hours)
+ (Off Wattage x Off Hours)
Nintendo Wii
kWh/yr = (16.4 x 730) + (10.5 x 8030) + (1.9 x 0) = 96.3
MS Xbox
kWh/yr = (118.8 x 730) + (117.5 x 8030) + (3.1 x 0) = 1,030.2
Sony PlayStation 3
kWh/yr = (96.2 x 730) + (95.4 x 8030) + (0.4 x 0) = 836.3
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Active Mode Wattage
x Active Mode Hours)
+ (Idle Mode Wattage x Idle Mode Hours)
+ (Off Wattage x Off Hours)
Nintendo Wii
MS Xbox
kWh/yr = (16.4 x 730) + (10.5 x 730) + (1.9 x 7300) = 33.5
kWh/yr = (118.8 x 730) + (117.5 x 730) + (2.0 x 7300) = 187.1
Sony PlayStation 3
kWh/yr = (96.2 x 730) + (95.4 x 730) + (0.4 x 7300) = 142.8
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
– Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
Nintendo Wii
MS Xbox
Sony PlayStation 3
Savings = 96.3 – 33.5 = 62.8 kWh/yr
Savings = 1030.2 – 187.1 = 843.1 kWh/yr
Savings = 836.3 – 142.8 = 693.5 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
74
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for Energy Star® qualified game consoles is assumed to be 5 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
No data were found that specifically estimated the cost of the base and conservation measures.
Gaming consoles are only available from three major vendors, Sony, Nintendo, and Microsoft.
The average price of these vendors’ systems are $362.00 for the Sony Playstation 3 5,6, $300.00
for the Xbox 360 7, and $200.00 for the Wii.7
The gaming consoles will not be sold with and without an option for Energy Star® qualification.
Therefore the incremental cost to the manufacturer specifically for the efficiency measure is
difficult to discern and the incremental cost to the consumer is zero. Incremental equipment and
O&M costs are estimated to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
20.19%
4.82%
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.000
0.000
1.000
0.400
Game
Console
8.25%
Remarks
Game consoles are assumed to be in Active Mode between 3 pm and 4 pm, and
between 8 pm and 9 pm, based on usage patterns that generally reflect two hour-long
gaming sessions.2 In the base case, game consoles are is assumed to be in Idle Mode
for all other hours. In the conservation case, the console is assumed to be in Idle
Mode for one hour immediately following each Active Mode. For all other hours, the
console is assumed to be in Off Mode.
4.71%
8.44%
20.16%
12.96%
20.47%
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Natural Resources
Defense Council –
Sony PlayStation 3
(Revision 2007)3
Natural Resources
Defense Council –
Nintendo Wii3
Natural Resources
Defense Council –
Microsoft Xbox 360
(Revision 2007)3
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
1164
-
-
-
-
66
-
-
-
-
877
-
-
-
-
Comments: Table 6 of the NRDC study estimates the savings potential of a 1-hour automatic
power down scenario for systems that are normally left running continuously. This power down
feature is required by the ENERGY STAR program requirements. Note, however, that not all
systems will be operated continuously by users. For users that turn off their console between play,
the savings from the 1-hour automatic power down scenario will be significantly smaller.
75
References
1
US EPA. ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Computers, Version 5.1, Draft Final.
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=revisions.game_console_spec
2
Nielsen, “The State of the Video Gamer”, PC Game and Video Game Console Usage Fourth
Quarter 2008
http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/stateofvgamer_040609_fnl1.pdf
3
Natural Resources Defense Council. “Improving the Energy Efficiency of Video Game Consoles”.
2008. http://www.nrdc.org/energy/consoles/contents.asp and Nielsen, “The State of the Video
Gamer”, PC Game and Video Game Console Usage Fourth Quarter 2008
http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/stateofvgamer_040609_fnl1.pdf.
The report notes average daily usage by console type for December 2008: Sony PlayStation 3 =
2.80 hours; Microsoft Xbox 360 = 2.58 hours; Nintendo Wii = 1.72 hours.
4
CNET, PS3 Slim uses half the power of PS3 ‘Fat’ http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_10510318727-1.html.
5
Amazon.com online store. Accessed 08 June 2010. http://www.amazon.com
6
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
7
76
Best Buy Canada online store. Accessed 06 August 2010. http://www.bestbuy.ca.
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED SET-TOP BOX
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® qualified set-top box
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard set-top box
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

No codes, standards, or regulations currently exist that mandate minimum efficiency levels in
set-top boxes.
Natural Resources Canada’s Energy Star® technical specification for set-top boxes, version
2.0, Tier 1, defines the minimum efficiency of qualifying products. It provides an annual energy
allowance for the base functionality of the set-top box and additional allowances for specific
additional functionalities included in the product.1

Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single Family and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
130
57
73
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.008
0.008
38.00
0.00
38.00
0.00
2
130
57
73
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.008
0.008
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
130
57
73
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.008
0.008
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
130
57
73
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.008
0.008
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
520
228
292
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
38.00
0.00
38.00
0.00
77
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings

Set-top boxes come in many configurations. For example, signals may be provided through
satellite or cable. Added features such as high-definition signals and processing as well as
digital video recorders (DVR) increase functionality but also increase energy consumption.
Therefore, weighted average electricity consumption and savings were determined using data
for the installed base of set-top boxes. Lacking specific Canadian data, the proportion of
installed devices in the United States was used, as shown below. Devices receiving analog
signals were not included in this analysis because many locales in Canada will be transitioning
to fully digital television signals by August 31, 2011.2
Quantity of Installed Base Devices, by Set-Top Box Category3
Set-Top Box Category
Digital – Cable
Digital – Satellite
With High-Definition – Cable
With High-Definition – Satellite
With Digital Video Recorder –
Cable
With Digital Video Recorder Satellite
With Both HD & DVR – Cable
With Both HD & DVR - Satellite
Total
DC
DS
HDC
HDS
Installed Base
Devices
(Millions)
42.0
61.0
1.0
1.4
DVRC
4.0
DVRS
6.0
HD-DVRC
HD-DVRS
1.0
1.4
117.8
Key
Base Measure Assumptions:

The annual typical energy consumption (TEC) of installed base devices is shown below
Typical Energy Consumption of Installed Base Devices by Set-Top Box Category3
78
Set-Top Box Category
Key
Digital – Cable
Digital – Satellite
With High-Definition – Cable
With High-Definition –
Satellite
With Digital Video Recorder –
Cable
With Digital Video Recorder Satellite
With Both HD & DVR –
Cable
With Both HD & DVR –
Satellite
Average
DC
DS
HDC
HDS
DVRC
DVRS
HDDVRC
HDDVRS
Typical Energy
Consumption
(kWh)
123
113
182
169
198
222
224
360
130
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

The annual typical energy consumption (TEC) of conservation measure devices was defined
using the requirements of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Energy Star®
technical specification for set-top boxes, version 2.0, Tier 1, as shown below.
Maximum Allowed Energy Consumption of Conservation Measure Devices by Set-Top Box
Category1
Set-Top Box Category
Key
Digital – Cable
Digital – Satellite
With High-Definition – Cable
With High-Definition – Satellite
With Digital Video Recorder –
Cable
With Digital Video Recorder Satellite
With Both HD & DVR - Cable
With Both HD & DVR Satellite
Average
DC
DS
HDC
HDS
DVRC
DVRS
HD-DVRC
HD-DVRS
Max. Allowed
Energy
Consumption
(kWh)
50
56
62
68
82
88
94
100
57
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Sales DC x TEC DC ) + ( Sales DS x TEC DS )
+ (Sales HDC x TEC HDC ) + (Sales HDS x TEC HDS )
+ (Sales H DVRC x TEC DVRC ) + (Sales DVRS
x TEC DVRS )+ (Sales HD-DVRC x TEC HD-DVRC )
+ (Sales HD-DVRS x TEC HD-DVRS )
= (42.0 x 123) + (61.0 x 113) + (1.0 x 182)
+ (1.4 x 169) + (4.0 x 198) + (6.0 x 222)
+ (1.0 x 224) + (1.4 x 360)
= 130 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption = (Sales DC x TEC DC ) + ( Sales DS x TEC DS )
+ (Sales HDC x TEC HDC )
+ (Sales HDS x TEC HDS ) + (Sales H DVRC x TEC DVRC )
+ (Sales DVRS x TEC DVRS )+ (Sales HD-DVRC
x TEC HD-DVRC ) + (Sales HD-DVRS x TEC HD-DVRS )
= (42.0 x 50) + (61.0 x 56) + (1.0 x 62) + (1.4 x 68)
+ (4.0 x 82) +( 6.0 x 88) + (1.0 x 94) + (1.4 x 100)
= 57 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
– Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 130 – 57
= 73 kWh/yr
79
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
For set-top boxes, the effective life is defined as design life rather than the full life of the equipment
because it assumed that new technology is developed faster than old technology wears out and
set-top boxes are replaced on schedule with technological advancements rather than equipment
failure. Effective useful life for Energy Star® qualified set-top boxes is assumed to 4 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for the semiconductor bill of materials for a set-top box is assumed to be
$38.005,6. No data were found that estimated the incremental cost of the conservation measure.
Unlike most consumer electronic devices, which are selected and purchased by consumers, settop boxes are leased to consumers via their service providers. Consumers are not charged a
separate fee related to the efficiency of the box. Therefore the incremental cost to the
manufacturer is difficult to discern and the incremental cost to the consumer is typically zero. Both
base and conservation measure equipment cost is assumed to be $38 and O&M cost is assumed
to be $0. Incremental equipment and O&M costs are assumed to be $0.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
18.37%
6.05%
Summer
MidPeak
792
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
Off
Peak
1608
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
1.011
1.009
1.011
1.006
High
Efficiency Set
Top Box
6.88%
Remarks
Set-top boxes are assumed to operate in active mode for 8 hours from 2:00 p.m. to
10:00 p.m. Off mode hours are assumed to occur for the remainder of the 24 hours.
7.90%
9.08%
18.30%
14.78%
18.64%
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
TIAX Study on
Consumer
Electronics3
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
-
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: Table 5-45 provides an estimate of average annual electricity consumption for cable
and satellite set-top boxes in the United States, which is equal to 133 kWh and 129 kWh
respectively.
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review –
Res Sector7
-
-
-
-
-
Comments: Exhibit 2.9 provides a weighted average estimate of annual electricity consumption
for digital cable service and satellite service set-top boxes per household, which is equal to 187
kWh.
80
References
1
US EPA ENERGY STAR Technical Specifications for Set-top Boxes Version 2.0.
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/product_specs/program_reqs/set_top_boxes_prog_req.pdf
2
“Canadian local over-the-air television stations moving to digital: August 31, 2011“. Canadian
Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. Accessed on June 23, 2010.
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/info_sht/bdt14.htm
3
Energy Consumption by Consumer Electronics in US Residences. TIAX, LLC. Table 5-40, 5-42, 543, and 5-45. January 2007.
http://www.ce.org/pdf/Energy%20Consumption%20by%20CE%20in%20U.S.%20Residences%20(J
anuary%202007).pdf
4
Davis Energy Group, 2004, “Analysis of Standards Options for Consumer Electronics Standby
Losses,” Codes and standards Enhancement Initiative for PY2004: Title 20 Standards Development,
Report for Gary Fernstrom, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, May, Section 5.2: Design Life, p. 1314.
http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2004rulemaking/documents/case_studies/CASE_Consumer_E
lectronics.pdf
5
”Set-top Box Costs Stabilizing, Spending to Grow with Volume”. IMS Research. May 2007.
http://www.imsresearch.com/search.html&type=&region=&cat_id=&keywords=top&to_month=&to_ye
ar=&from_month=&from_year=
6
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
7
Marbek Resource Consultants, Ltd., BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review - The Potential
for Electricity Savings through Phnology Adoption, 2006 – 2026, Residential Sector in British
Columbia.
81
POOL PUMPS WITH TIME-CLOCK OR CONTROLLER
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Single-speed pool pump with a time-clock or controller programmed to operate only 6 hours per day;
applicable to outdoor pool with 40,000 to 150,000 litres. Generally, this encompasses residentialsized pools.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Single-speed pool pump with no time-clock or controller running 10 hours per day
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
No codes, standards or regulations currently exist that govern pool pumps with time-clocks or
controllers.
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single Family and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
82
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
80.00
0.00
2
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1167.3
700.4
466.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.191
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
11673
7004
4669
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.00
0.00
80.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:





High-speed operating hours = 10 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 900 hrs/yr 1
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 1
Motor efficiency = 70% 2
High-speed power = 1,297 W 2
High-speed flow rate = 208 litres (55 gallons) per minute 2
Conservation Measure Assumptions:




High-speed operating hours = 6 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 540 hrs/yr
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 1
Motor efficiency = 70% 2
High-speed power = 1,297 W 2
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (High Speed Power x High-Speed Operating Hours)
/ 1000
= (1,297 W x 900 hrs) / 1000
= 1,167.3 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (High Speed Power
x High-Speed Operating Hours) / 1000
= (1297 W x 540 hrs) / 1000
= 700.4 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 1,167.3 – 700.4
= 466.9 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
83
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a pool pump with time-clock or controller is assumed to be 10 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Base measure equipment cost is assumed to be $0, with $0 installation and O&M costs for a pool
pump with no switches or controls installed.
Conservation measure equipment and installation cost is assumed to be $80.00 and $0 for O&M
costs.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
Pool Pump
Control
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
35.97%
35.97%
28.07%
Remarks
The seasonal energy savings pattern assumes that the pool is only in operation
during the summer. The baseline measure is assumed to run 10 hours from 9 am to
7 pm and the conservation measure is assumed to operate on average 6 hours per
day from 9 am to 3 pm.
Description
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
0.00%
0.00%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
0.000
1.000
0.000
0.600
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
BC Hydro 2007
Conservation
Potential Review
(Residential Sector in
British Columbia)3
50%
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
10
80
Comments: “A pool pump circulates the water through the water heater and a filtration system. A
typical residential pool has a one-hp pump (750 W) running 24 hours a day in the pool season. A
timer can be installed onto the pump to reduce the pump operating hours to a recommended
operating cycle of 12 hours per day resulting in energy savings of 50%.”
Ohio Edison Company
Energy Efficiency &
Peak Demand
Reduction Program
Portfolio and Initial
Benchmark Report
(15/12/2009)4
342
-
1.470
15
-
Comments: This reference provided savings estimates for direct load control pool pumps.
Riverside Public
Utilities energy
efficient rebate and
billing credit program
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
5
Comments: This measure can be used explicitly to mitigate peak demand. The Riverside Public
Utilities offers a $5 credit to a customer’s monthly bill if the customer agrees to install an automatic
timer that ensures that the pool pump will not be running between noon and 10pm.
84
References
1
The Cadmus Group Inc., "Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts
Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs", July 9, 2009.
2
Average parameters of 1.0 hp pool pump motors as reported in the California Energy
Commission’s Appliance Efficiency Database. Accessed on June 10, 2010.
http://www.appliances.energy.ca.gov/AdvancedSearch.aspx
3
BC Hydro 2007 Conservation Potential Review (Detailed Residential Sector in British Columbia).
Summary Report available on
http://www.bchydro.com/about/company_information/reports/electricity_conservation.html
4
Ohio Edison Company, Energy Efficiency & Peak Demand Reduction Program Portfolio And Initial
Benchmark Report (For the Period January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012.) – December 15th,
2009 http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/TiffToPDf/A1001001A09L15B65254C79103.pdf
5
Riverside Public Utilities energy efficient rebate and billing credit program
http://www.riversideca.gov/utilities/pdf/rebates/PoolSaver07.pdf
85
VARIABLE SPEED POOL PUMP MOTORS
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Variable-speed pool pump used in an outdoor pool with 40,000 to 150,000 litres. Generally, this
encompasses residential-sized pools.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Single-speed pool pump used in an outdoor pool with 40,000 to 150,000 litres.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
No codes, standards or regulations currently exist that govern pool pumps. However, the
Association for Pool and Spa Professionals (APSP) has been working since January 2010 to
develop an ANSI standard that would require two-speed motors in the U.S. and Canada.1
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Replacement
Residential (Single Family and Multi-Family)
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
86
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
3
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment
Conservation Cost
O&M
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
778.00
0.00
1273.00
0.00
2
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1167.3
470.1
697.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.775
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
11673
4701
6972
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
778.00
0.00
1273.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:





High-speed operating hours = 10 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 900 hrs/yr 2
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 2
Motor efficiency = 70% 3
High-speed power = 1,297 W 3
High-speed flow rate = 208 litres (55 gallons) per minute 3
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Variable-speed motors will save energy by operating at a lower flow rate for a longer period of
time. Operating a pump at half speed for twice as long therefore moves the same volume of
water, but in theory uses only one-quarter the amount of energy. In reality, variable-speed motors
are less efficient at the lower speed and the cube law does not hold for systems with orifices.4
Operating hours for conservation measures are determined by calculating the hours of operation at
the lower flow rate required to turnover the same volume of water per day as the single-speed
system. In addition, it is assumed that the system would be operated in high-speed mode for 1.3
hours per day for activities such as pool cleaning and backwashing the filter. 5 Assumptions for
variable-speed system are interpolated using 1.5 hp data because no data are available for 1.0 hp
variable-speed systems:








High-speed operating hours = 1.3 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 117 hrs/yr
Low-speed operating hours = 21.4 hrs/day x 90 days/yr = 1926 hrs/yr
Nameplate pump horsepower = 1.0 hp 2
Motor efficiency = 75% 3
High-speed power = 841 W 3
Low-speed power = 193 W 3
High-speed flow rate = 174 litres (46 gallons) per min. 3
Low-speed flow rate = 95 litres (25 gallons) per min. 3
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (High Speed Power
x High-Speed Operating Hours)
+ (Low-Speed Power
x Low-Speed Operating Hours) ] / 1000
= [ (1,297 W x 900 hrs) + (0 ) ] / 1000
= 1,167.3 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ (High Speed Power
x High-Speed Operating Hours)
+ (Low-Speed Power
x Low-Speed Operating Hours) ] / 1000
= [ (841 W x 117 hrs) + (193 W x 1926 hrs ) ]
/ 1000
= 470.1 kWh/yr
87
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 1,167.3 – 470.1
= 697.2 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of a variable speed pool pump is assumed to be 10 years.6
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of a single-speed pool pump is approximately $409.00 6,7 with an additional $369.00 6,7 for
installation. Total installed costs are $778.00 per pump.
The cost of a variable-speed pool pump is approximately $904.00 7,8 with an additional $369.00 6,7
for installation. Total installed costs are per $1,273.00 per pump.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
Variable
Speed Pool
Pump (Res)
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
59.75%
30.04%
10.21%
Remarks
The seasonal energy savings pattern assumes that the pool is only in operation
during the summer. The baseline measure is assumed to run 10 hours from 9 am to
7 pm and the conservation measure is assumed to operate on average 22 hours per
day at low-speed from 2 am to 9 am, high-speed from 9 am to 10 am, and then again
at low-speed from 10 am to midnight.
Description
88
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
0.00%
0.00%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
0.000
0.982
0.000
0.995
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
SDG&E Pool Pump
Fact Sheet9
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
1,606
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
-
-
-
Comments: The reference estimated the savings that would result from upgrading a 1.5 hp
standard efficiency single-speed pump operating 6 hours per day (5,037 kWh / year) to a 1.5 hp
multi-speed pump operating two hours per day on high speed and eight hours per day on low
speed (3,431 kWh / year). It also notes that most energy-efficient equipment will operate on low
speed for more hours.
SCE Pool Pump Fact
Sheet 10
1,712
-
-
-
-
Comments: The reference estimated savings for a 20,000 gallon pool that needs cycling once
per day. The baseline is assumed to be a single-speed motor operating 6 hours per day. The
conservation measure is assumed to be a variable-speed motor that operates 12 hours per day
(1,730 kWh / year).
PG&E Pool Pump
Fact Sheet 11
1,400
-
-
-
-
Comments: Only an energy savings value was provided. No estimate of baseline and
conservation measure consumption or operating hours are provided.
Ohio Edison
Company
Energy Efficiency &
Peak Demand
Reduction Program
Portfolio and Initial
Benchmark Report
(15/12/2009)12
342
-
1.470
15
-
Comments: This reference provided savings estimates for direct load control pool pumps.
89
References
1
CEE Program Meeting. Diving into the World of Swimming Pool Pumps. Presentation by Eileen
Eaton from CEE January 12-14, 2010 http://www.cee1.org/cee/mtg/0110mtg/files/AppliancesEaton.pdf
2
The Cadmus Group Inc., "Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts
Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs", July 9, 2009.
3
Average parameters of 1.0 hp pool pump motors as reported in the California Energy
Commission’s Appliance Efficiency Database. Accessed on June 10, 2010.
http://www.appliances.energy.ca.gov/AdvancedSearch.aspx
4
“Analysis of Standards Options For Residential Pool Pumps, Motors, and Controls”. Davis Energy
Group. 2004. http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-0515_workshop/other/PGE_Updated_Proposal_Information_Template_for_Residential_Pool_Pump_M
easure_Revisions.pdf
5
“Proposal Information Template for: Residential Pool Pump Measure Revisions.” Davis Energy
Group. 2008. http://www.energy.ca.gov/appliances/2008rulemaking/documents/2008-0515_workshop/other/PGE_Updated_Proposal_Information_Template_for_Residential_Pool_Pump_M
easure_Revisions.pdf
6
California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), Database
on Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER), 2005 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources Version 2005.2.01.
October 26, 2005. Complete 2.01 Data base with Energy, EUL and Cost Data included.
http://www.deeresources.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=36&I
temid=53
7
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
8
http://www.h2opoolproducts.com/product_info.php?products_id=2702 (Accessed August 06, 2010)
9
SDGE Pool Pump Fact Sheet. http://www.sdge.com/documents/residential/PoolMotorBrochure.pdf
10
SCE Pool Pump Fact Sheet
http://www.sce.com/NR/rdonlyres/961234BB-7BE6-4ED3-AB455587EC8851AC/0/100510_PoolPumpSavingsFS.pdf
11
PG&E Pool Pump Fact Sheet
http://www.pge.com/myhome/saveenergymoney/rebates/seasonal/poolpumps/
12
Ohio Edison Company, Energy Efficiency & Peak Demand Reduction Program Portfolio And Initial
Benchmark Report (For the Period January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012.) – December 15th,
2009 http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/TiffToPDf/A1001001A09L15B65254C79103.pdf
90
Household Appliances
91
92
CONVECTION OVEN
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 23, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Convection Wall Oven
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Wall Oven
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Baseline appliance energy consumption is projected from NRCAN’s Energy Efficiency
Regulations, which state that built-in or wall-mounted ranges without surface elements and with
one or more ovens must comply with a maximum allowable energy consumption in kWh/year
equal to or less than 2.0V + 200 where V is the volume of the oven in cubic liters. Typical oven
size is around 93 cubic liters, which gives:
Maximum Allowable Energy = (2.0 x 93 cubic liters) + 200 = 386 kWh/year1.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Existing Homes / Single-Family / New Homes / Small
Commercial / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
1,060.00
0.00
1,750.00
0.00
2
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
386.00
308.80
77.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.007
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5,867.20
1,466.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,060.00
0.00
1,750.00
0.00
Totals 7,334.00
93
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
As shown in Codes, Standards, and Regulations section above, the maximum allowable
energy for a 93 cubic liter (assumed to be the most typical size) standard oven is 386
kWh/year. Although this represents a maximum allowable amount, units larger than 93 cubic
liters are more common than smaller units, and this consumption will be used to represent
the average consumption of a standard oven.
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Convection ovens are more energy efficient than conventional ovens because the heated air
is continuously circulated around the food being cooked, reducing required temperature and
cooking times. On average, such an oven would reduce energy consumption by 20% 2.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption
- Conservation Measure Consumption
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 386 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption
x (1 - Percentage Energy Reduction)
= 386 x (1 - 0.20) = 308.8 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 386 - 308.8 = 77.2 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Res Miscellaneous end use load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.179 (winter) and 1.059 (summer). Refer to Appendix A for the
description of the methodology used in estimating peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
94
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy lists 19 years
as the expected useful life for electric ovens 3.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Standard electric ovens (27" - 30") have a price range of $750 - $1,400 while convection wall
ovens have a price range of $1,400 - $3,000. An average cost of $1,060 for standard electric
ovens and $1,750 for convection wall ovens are assumed.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
CF1
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Miscellaneous
6.32% 7.11% 18.42% 4.27% 8.71% 20.72% 14.03% 20.41% 1.243
ver: MM-20091
Remarks
CF2
0.976
1.179
1.059
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Marin County
Community Development
Agency
127
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.0111
0.0157
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: For the 127 kWh hour savings, savings determined by multiplying OPA assumed
savings percentage by baseline consumption specified in Annual Electricity Savings section
above. Convection ovens distribute heat more evenly than ordinary ovens, so cooking time and
cooking temperatures can be reduced, cutting energy use by about a third, on average 5.
95
References
1 Natural Resources Canada. Energy Efficiency Regulations for Electric Ranges
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/electric-ranges.cfm?text=N&printview=N
2 American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, “Consumer Guide to Home Energy Savings:
Condensed Online Version- Cooking”. http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide/cooking.htm
3 US DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, “Draft Oven LCC Spreadsheet”.
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/cooking_products.html
4 Sears Online Catalogue, 2009 (accessed November 2009).
5 Marin County Community Development Agency.
http://www.co.marin.ca.us/depts/CD/main/pdf/BEST_pdf/solar/rebate_energy_tips.pdf.
96
ENERGY STAR® CLOTHES WASHER
Gas Water Heating
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated Annual Energy Savings & Peak Demand Savings
Updated References, Annual Energy Savings, & Peak Demand
Savings Calculations
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Aug 13, 2008
Sep 18, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Clothes Washer
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulation1 regulate the minimum energy factor (based on the test
standard (CAN/CSA-C360-92, CAN/CSA-C360-03 (Canada) and CAN/CSA C360-93 (Ontario))
to be 18.40 L/kWh/cycle or greater for compact and 35.68 L/kWh/cycle for standard clothes
washers.
On July 1, 2009, the ENERGY STAR® criteria for qualified clothes washers changed to MEF =
50.97 L/kWh/cycle (1.8 ft 3/kWh/cycle). In addition, a maximum water factor (WF) was introduced
as WF = 1.0 L (7.5 gal/cycle/ft3) with effective date as of July 1, 2009. 2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Multi-Family / Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
97
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
2
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
80.70
56.90
23.80
17.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.003
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
796.60
333.20
238.00
0.00
0.00
362,755.96
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
Totals 1,129.80
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
ENERGY STAR® provides a savings calculator to estimate the potential savings from
purchasing an ENERGY STAR® rated clothes washer over a conventional clothes washer. For
a home with natural gas water heating and no drying, a conventional unit would consume about
80.7 kWh/year while an ENERGY STAR® rated unit would consume about 56.9 kWh/year based
on 392 cycles per year.3
Annual Electricity Savings: Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption
- Conservation Measure Annual Consumption = 80.70 - 56.90 = 23.80 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Clothes Washer/Dryer end use
load profile and coincidence factors of 1.528 (winter) and 1.186 (summer). See Appendix A for
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
98
Other Resource Savings
Based on the ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator for Residential Clothes Washer, about 6.10
therms or 17 m3 of natural gas and 25,911.14 liters of water will be saved annually. 3
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
EUL is assumed to be 14 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests an ENERGY STAR® qualified unit costs $702
and a conventional unit costs $573 both costs are in American dollars.3 Using the 2008
annual average exchange rate from the Bank of Canada (1.06601429 CAD to 1.00 USD)5 the
costs become $748.33 and $610.82. This translates to an incremental cost of $137.51.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Clothes
Washer/Dryer 7.77% 8.76% 18.54% 4.92% 9.23% 17.59% 15.34% 17.84% 1.662
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
CF2
1.129
1.528
1.186
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
99
References
1 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Clothes Washers – Energy Efficiency Regulations”, Compliance Date
January 1, 2007,Regulated since May 1, 1995.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/clothes-washers.cfm?text=N&printview=N
(accessed September 18, 2009)
2 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “ENERGY STAR® Qualifying Criteria for Clothes Washers”
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/appliance.cfm?attr=4
(accessed September 18, 2009)
3 ENERGY STAR, “ENERGY STAR Savings Calculator – clothes washer”
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorConsumerClothesWas
her.xls
(September 18, 2009).
4 Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”
5 Bank of Canada, "Financial Markets Department Year Average of Exchange Rates", Ottawa, 2008.
http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/pdf/nraa08.pdf
100
ENERGY STAR® CLOTHES WASHER
Electric Water Heating
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated Annual Energy Savings & Peak Demand Savings
Updated References, Annual Energy Savings, & Peak Demand
Savings Calculations
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Aug 13, 2008
Sep 18, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Clothes Washer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Clothes Washer
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulation1 regulates the minimum energy factor (MEF) based on
the test standard CAN/CSA-C360-92, CAN/CSA-C360-03 (Canada) and CAN/CSA C360-93
(Ontario) to be 18.40 L/kWh/cycle or greater for compact and 35.68 L/kWh/cycle for standard
clothes washers.
On July 1, 2009, the ENERGY STAR® criteria for qualified clothes washers changed to MEF =
50.97 L/kWh/cycle (1.8 ft 3/kWh/cycle). In addition, a maximum water factor (WF) was introduced
as WF = 1.0 L (7.5 gal/cycle/ft3) with effective date as of July 1, 2009. 2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Multi-Family / New Homes / Single-Family / Residential
101
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
2
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
604.26
422.99
181.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,911.14
0.020
0.036
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5,921.86
2,537.78
0.00
0.00
0.00
362,755.96
610.82
0.00
748.33
0.00
Totals 8,459.64
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Base Measure Energy Factor = 35.68 L/kWh/cycle
Capacity of washer = 55 L
Cycles per year = 392 cycles/year 3
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Conservation Measure Energy Factor = 50.97 L/kWh/cycle
Capacity of Washer = 55L
Cycles per year = 392 cycles/year 3
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Capacity of Washer x Cycles per year / MEF
= 55 L x 392 Cycles / 35.68 L/kWh/cycle
= 604.26 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Capacity of Washer x Cycles per year / MEF
= 55 L x 392 Cycles / 50.97 L/kWh/cycle
= 422.99 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption
- Conservation Measure Consumption = 604.26 - 422.99 = 181.27 kWh/yr
102
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Clothes Washer/Dryer end use
load profile and coincidence factors of 1.528 (winter) and 1.186 (summer). See Appendix A for
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
ENERGY STAR® provides a savings calculator to estimate the potential savings from
purchasing an average ENERGY STAR® rated clothes washer over the average conventional
clothes washer. The water savings estimated by the savings calculator are 25,911.14 L/year
(6845 gallons/year). 4
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life of 14 years is assumed.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests an ENERGY STAR® qualified unit costs $702
and a conventional unit costs $573 both costs are in American dollars.4 Using the 2008
annual average exchange rate from the Bank of Canada (1.06601429 CAD to 1.00 USD)6 the
costs become $748.33 and $610.82. This translates to an incremental cost of $137.51.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Clothes
Washer/Dryer 7.77% 8.76% 18.54% 4.92% 9.23% 17.59% 15.34% 17.84% 1.662
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
CF2
1.129
1.528
1.186
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
103
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
212
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
14
270
N/A
Comments: The baseline efficiency is determined according to the modified energy factor
(MEF). The federal baseline MEF of 1.04 is inflated by 10% to 1.14 for saving comparison to
account non- ENERGY STAR® models that are higher then the federal baseline. High efficiency
ENERGY STAR® standards are with an MEF factor of 1.42 or higher. The operating cycles is 379
clothes washer cycles per year.7
New Jersey Board of Public
Utilities
201
N/A
N/A
20
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: ENERGY STAR® dishwasher has a service life of 20 years.8
Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
298
N/A
N/A
Comments: An energy savings of 298 kWh/yr was assumed in Texas. 9
References
1 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Clothes Washers – Energy Efficiency Regulations”, Compliance Date
January 1, 2007,Regulated since May 1, 1995. http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/clotheswashers.cfm?text=N&printview=N (Accessed September 18, 2009).
2 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “ENERGY STAR® Qualifying Criteria for Clothes Washers”
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/appliance.cfm?attr=4 (Accessed
September 18, 2009)
3 Natural Resources Canada, "Canada's ENERGY STAR Simple Savings Calculator (v4.0)" March
2008. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/programfiles/download.cfm.
4 ENERGY STAR, “ENERGY STAR Savings Calculator – Clothes Washer”
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorConsumerClothesWas
her.xls (September 18, 2009).
5 Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”
6 Bank of Canada, "Financial Markets Department Year Average of Exchange Rates", Ottawa, 2008. http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/pdf/nraa08.pdf 7 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 90-91.
8 New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Office of Clean Energy, New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program:
Protocols to Measure Resource Savings (New Jersey, January 2007) 35.
9 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 28
104
ENERGY STAR® DISHWASHER
Electric Water Heating
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
1
Updated References and Annual Energy & Water Savings
Feb 15, 2008
Sep 21, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Dishwasher
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Dishwasher
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
As of January 1, 2010 Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations1 regulate the maximum total
annual energy consumption (kWh) of standard and compact dishwashers to be 355 kWh/yr and
260 kWh/yr, respectively. ENERGY STAR® criteria effective August 11, 2009, has changed to have a maximum total
annual energy consumption (TAEC) of 324 kWh/yr and maximum water factor (WF) of 21.96
L/cycle for standard dishwashers and maximum TAEC of 234 kWh/yr and maximum WF of
15.14 L/cycle for compact dishwashers 2.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Residential / Multi-Family / SingleFamily / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
45.00
0.00
2
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
358.00
307.00
51.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,627.73
0.004
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3,377.00
561.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17,905.03
0.00
0.00
45.00
0.00
Totals 3,938.00
105
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009 suggests that in 2008, the annual energy consumption of
standard dishwasher was 319 kWh and an ENERGY STAR® dishwasher was 308 kWh.
Base Measure Assumptions:
Base measure energy consumption is assumed to be the average energy consumption of
non-ENERGY STAR® dishwashers listed EnerGuide Appliance Directory (as of November
2009). This was found to be 331 kWh/yr.2
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Conservation Measure Energy Consumption = 324 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings: Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 331 - 324 kWh = 7 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Dishwasher end use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.590 (winter) and 0.904 (summer). See Appendix A for description
of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
ENERGY STAR® diswashers were found to consume about 3,255.46 L/year while non-qualified
units consume 4,883.19 L/year. 3 Based on this, annual water savings was estimated to be
1,627.73 L/year.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Dishwashers3 quotes an average life
of 11 years (based on Annual Portrait of the U.S. Appliance Industry, Appliance Magazine,
September 2006).
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Dishwashers3 suggests an
incremental cost of $30 - $60 (average $45).
106
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
CF1
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Dishwasher
10.14% 9.04% 15.44% 4.15% 11.96% 14.31% 18.8% 16.16% 1.126
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
CF2
0.802
1.59
0.904
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
68.6
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
13
N/A
N/A
Comments: Baseline reflects federal efficiency standards effective January 1, 2001. High
efficiency is an ENERGY STAR® dishwasher meeting the specifications of ENERGY STAR®
program effective January 1, 2001. It is assumed that a dishwasher is used 3,427 hours annually. ENERGY STAR® dishwasher has a life of 13 years. The annual electricity savings of 68.6 kWh is
a weighted average of various different fuel type dishwashers. An electric dishwasher has an
annual energy savings of 113.3 kWh and the gas dishwasher has an annual energy savings of 34
kWh.4
New Jersey Board of Public
Utilities
82.4
N/A
N/A
13
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: ENERGY STAR® dishwasher has a service life of 13 years.5
Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
142
N/A
N/A
Comments: This was deemed savings in 2003. 6
107
References
1 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Dishwashers – Energy Efficiency Regulations - Compliance Date
January 1, 2004 and January 1, 2010.” April 20, 2009.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/dishwashers.cfm?text=N&printview=N (Accessed September
21, 2009)
2 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009”
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2009/pdf/appliance-directory-09.pdf.
3 ENERGY STAR®, “ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Dishwashers"
www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/manuf_res/downloads/2007Dishwasher_prg.pdf
4 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 90-91.
5 New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Office of Clean Energy, New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program:
Protocols to Measure Resource Savings (New Jersey, January 2007) 35.
6 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 28
108
ENERGY STAR® FREEZER
New Purchase or Replacement of Freezer
Revision
#
0
1
2
3
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated Using Great Refridgerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Reported Data
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
Updated using 2009 GRRP Evaluation Results
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Dec 04, 2009
Dec 13, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Freezer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Freezer
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act regulates the maximum energy consumption for new
freezers based on the configuration (e.g. upright vs. chest) and the freezers adjusted
volume1.
To qualify for an ENERGY STAR® rating, a full-size freezer must exceed the minimum
levels by 10% 2.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Single-Family / Multi-Family / New
Homes / Residential
109
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
399.99
0.00
449.99
0.00
2
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4,535.52
503.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
399.99
0.00
449.99
0.00
Totals 5,039.43
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Chest freezers are generally more energy efficient than upright models because only a little
amount of cold air flows out when you open them. Upright freezers lose cold air because it flows
down and out of the freezer when the door is opened. 2
Automatic defrost freezers use more energy than manual defrost models. 2
The average consumptions of an ENERGY STAR® freezer and standard freezer were found to
be 412.32 kWh/yr and 458.13 kWh/yr respectively. 3
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 458.13 kWh/yr - 412.32 kWh/yr
= 45.81 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Freezer load profile3
and coincidence factors of 1.189 (winter) and 1.118 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
110
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of the freezer was found to be 11 years.3 Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The price difference between two comparable models, a model with the ENERGY STAR®
certification $449.99 and a standard unit $399.99, was found to be $50.00.5 Costing data may
vary depending on features and sizing differences, and more research will be required for
specific cases that differ from the above scenario.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Modified
OPA Res
Freezer
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
5.9%
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
7.3% 16.9% 6.5% 9.57% 20.11% 14.43% 19.29%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.28
1.052
1.189
1.118
The OPA Res Freezer load profile used was modified to reflect the usage behaviour
observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This augmentation
was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Vermont - Residential
Master Technical Reference
Manual
56.7
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
16
30.83
Comments: The baseline efficiency is a residential freezer meeting the minimum federal
efficiency standard for freezer efficiency. The high efficiency level freezer is one that meets the
ENERGY STAR® specifications for efficiency established January 1, 2004. The savings were
determined with consideration that a freezer operates a total of 5000 hours annually. 6
111
References
Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "Guide to Canada's Energy Efficiency
Regulations", http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/refrigerators-freezers.cfm?
text=N&printview=N (February 14, 2008)
2Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009”
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2009/page6.cfm?attr=4 (December 08,
2009).
3The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Round Up Program Impact Evaluation.” June 2010.
4Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009",
Ottawa, Ontario. September 04, 2009.
5Sears Canada, "Sears - Appliances - Freezers - Chest", http://www.sears.ca/ (Accessed December 07,
2009)
6Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 100-101.
1
112
ENERGY STAR® REFRIGERATOR
New Purchase or Replacement of Refrigerator
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated Using Great Refridgerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Reported Data
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Dec 04, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Refrigerator
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard Refrigerator
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act regulates the maximum energy consumption of new
refrigerators based on the refrigerator’s configuration (e.g. top freezer vs. bottom freezer)
and the refrigerator’s adjusted volume1.
To qualify for an ENERGY STAR® rating, a standard-size refrigerator must exceed the
minimum levels by 15%, moving to 20% on April 28, 20082.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Existing Homes / Single-Family / Multi-Family / Small
Commercial / Residential
113
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
848.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
2
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
564.01
0.016
0.014
Totals 7,896.14
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,316.94
1,579.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
848.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
The annual energy consumption of an ENERGY STAR® refrigerator and standard refrigerator
were 451.21 kWh/yr and 564.01 kWh/yr respectively. The annual electricity savings value is
calculated as a weighted average of the different refrigerators, according to size and
configuration. 3
The most popular size category, 16.5 to 18.4 cubic feet (cu. ft.), accounts 39 percent of the
market. Inserting these values into the ENERGY STAR® Simple Savings Calculator 4 provides a
default savings of 71 kWh (top freezer, auto-defrost) and 83 kWh (bottom freezer, auto-defrost).
EnerGuide reports that the average annual energy consumption for standard and ENERGY
STAR® refrigerators with top-mounted freezers is 465 kWh and 411 kWh, respectively.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 564.01 kWh/yr - 451.21 kWh/yr
= 112.80 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Refrigerator load
profile and coincidence factors of 1.258 (winter) and 1.104 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
114
Other Resource Savings
Interactive effects with the heating system and cooling system are assumed to be negligible.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Refrigerators suggest the average
lifetime of a new ENERGY STAR® refrigerator to be 14 years.6
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The price difference between two comparable models, a model with the ENERGY STAR®
certification $898.00 and a standard unit $848.00, was found to be $50.00.6 Costing data may
vary depending on features and sizing differences, and more research will be required for
specific cases that differ from the above scenario.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Modified
OPA Res
Refrigerator 5.91% 6.81% 16.92% 6.59% 9.79% 20.08% 14.08% 19.83%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.29
1.036
1.258
1.104
The OPA Res Refrigerator load profile used was modified to reflect the usage
behaviour observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This
augmentation was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
115
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
85.5
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
17
30
Comments: ENERGY STAR® standards for 2001 are set 10% more efficient than applicable
Department of Energy (DOE) standards for 2001. 7
New York - NYSERDA
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Refrigerators with top-mounted Freezer and compact all-refrigerators have a
minimum annual consumption of 0.90 (12.70AV + 355.0) kWh. Refrigerators with bottom –
mounted freezers have a minimum annual consumption of 0.90 (13.10AV + 367.0) where AV is
the total adjusted volume. 8
New Jersey Board of Public
Utilities Office of Clean
Energy
48
N/A
N/A
17
N/A
Comments: Please refer to reference below 9.
References
Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "Guide to Canada's Energy Efficiency
Regulations", http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/refrigerators-freezers.cfm?
text=N&printview=N(February 14, 2008)
2Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2007 Refrigerators” September 8, 2006
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2007/page6.cfm?attr=4 (August 8,
2007).
3The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Retirement Program Impact Evaluation.” November 2009.
4ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator Version 4.0 http://oee.nrcanrncan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/calculator.cfm?attr=8 (Accessed November 05,
2009)
5ENERGY STAR®, “ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Refrigerators“
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/manuf_res/downloads/2007Refrigerator_prg.pdf
6Home Depot, "Home Depot - Major Appliances - Refrigerators", http://www.homedepot.ca/ (Accessed
December 07, 2009)
7Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 100-101.
8New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, “Residential Refrigerators and
Freezers” 2004, http://www.nyserda.org/programs/EquipmentStandards/resRefrigFreezers.asp (June
26, 2006) .
9New Jersey Board of Public Utilities Office of Clean Energy, New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program:
Protocols to Measure Resource Savings (New Jersey, January 2007) 35.
1
116
FREEZER REPLACEMENT
Early Replacement
Revision
#
0
1
2
3
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using 2007 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Evaluation Report Results
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
Updated using 2009 GRRP Evaluated Results
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Dec 04, 2009
Dec 10, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Retirement of a freezer prior to the end of its useful life and replaced with a ENERGY STAR®
chest freezer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average freezer of existing stock
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act regulates the maximum energy consumption for new
freezers based on the configuration (e.g. upright vs. chest) and the freezers adjusted
volume1.
To qualify for an ENERGY STAR® rating, a full-size freezer must exceed the minimum
levels by 10% 2.
Decision Type
Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Small Commercial / Existing Homes / Multi-Family / SingleFamily
117
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,288.14
412.32
875.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.122
0.102
0.00
0.00
449.99
0.00
2
1,288.14
412.32
875.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.122
0.102
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,288.14
412.32
875.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.122
0.102
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,288.14
412.32
875.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.122
0.102
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
399.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
458.13
412.32
45.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.006
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4,535.52
3,823.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
399.99
0.00
449.99
0.00
Totals 8,359.47
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
It is assumed that the existing freezer will be replaced in 4 years time with
a standard freezer. Therefore savings for the first 4 years are the annual energy consumption of
the ENERGY STAR® freezer minus the average energy consumption of the existing unit. Energy
savings after 4 years are the difference between of the energy consumption of the ENERGY
STAR® unit and the average consumption of a new standard chest freezer. The annual energy consumption of existing 15 years or older freezers is estimated to be
1288.14 kWh/yr, this value is based on an in situ metering study that was conducted in 2009. 3 The average consumptions of an ENERGY STAR® freezer and standard freezer were 412.32
kWh/yr and 458.13 kWh/yr respectively. 3
For the scenario of the early replacement by an ENERGY STAR® freezer the first 4 years of
savings will be the difference between the consumption of existing older refrigerators and the
average ENERGY STAR® freezer consumption. Then for the remaining years the consumption
will be the consumption difference between the ENERGY STAR® and standard units.
If the existing freezer was replaced by a standard unit 4 years prior to the end of its useful life,
there would only be savings for 4 years where the savings would be the difference between the
existing older freezer and the standard freezer consumption (830.01 kWh/yr).
Annual Electricity Savings (First 4 years):
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 1288.14 kWh/yr - 412.32 kWh/yr
= 875.82 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (Remaining years of EUL):
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 458.13 kWh/yr - 412.32 kWh/yr
= 45.81 kWh/yr
118
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Freezer load profile3
and coincidence factors of 1.189 (winter) and 1.118 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life was found to be 11 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The price difference between two comparable models, a model with the ENERGY STAR®
certification $449.99 and a standard unit $399.99, was found to be $50.00.5 Costing data may
vary depending on features and sizing differences, and more research will be required for
specific cases that differ from the above scenario.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Modified
OPA Res
Freezer
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
5.9%
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
7.3% 16.9% 6.5% 9.57% 20.11% 14.43% 19.29%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.28
1.052
1.189
1.118
The OPA Res Freezer load profile used was modified to reflect the usage behaviour
observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This augmentation
was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
119
References
Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "Guide to Canada's Energy Efficiency
Regulations", http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/refrigerators-freezers.cfm?
text=N&printview=N (February 14, 2008)
2Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009”
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2007/page7.cfm?attr=0 (December 08,
2009 ).
3The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Round Up - Impact
Evaluation.” June 2010.
4Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009",
Ottawa, Ontario. September 04, 2009.
5Sears Canada, "Sears - Appliances - Freezers - Chest", http://www.homedepot.ca/ (Accessed
December 07, 2009)
1
120
FREEZER RETIREMENT
Early Retirement, No Replacement
Revision
#
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using 2007 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Evaluation Report Results
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
Updated using 2009 GRRP Evaluation Results
1
2
3
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Dec 04, 2009
Dec 10, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Retirement of a freezer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average 15 year or older freezer of existing stock
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retirement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Residential / Multi-Family / Single-Family / Small Commercial
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1,288.14
0.00
1,288.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.179
0.151
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
2
1,288.14
0.00
1,288.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.179
0.151
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,288.14
0.00
1,288.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.179
0.151
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,288.14
0.179
0.151
Totals 5,152.56
0.00
1,288.14
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5,152.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
121
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual energy savings of retiring 15 year or older freezers are estimated to be 1288.14
kWh/yr, this value is based on an in situ metering study that was conducted in 2009. 1
The Cadmus Group, along with Morrison Hershfield, conducted a metering study and participant
& nonparticipant surveys that were used to estimate annual energy consumption and part-use
(when participating appliances are not operated year-round) of retired freezers for the 2008
GRRP. The average annual energy consumption of the refrigerators of various sizes
and configurations was found to be 1288.14 kWh/yr and part-use factor was found to be
0.891. Therefore, for the 2008 GRRP, the average retired freezer consumption was estimated to
be 1147.36 kWh/yr.1
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Refrigerator load
profile1 and coincidence factors of 1.189 (winter) and 1.118 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life for a freezer retirement is 4 years The 2008 DEER database states
that 1/3 of the new measure effective useful life should be used as the remaining useful
life (RUL) for retirement scenarios. For freezers, the new measure EUL is 12 years. The
resulting freezer RUL is therefore 4 years.1
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of retiring a freezer was found to be $140. 2
122
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Modified
OPA Res
Freezer
ver: MM2010-0
5.9%
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
7.3% 16.9% 6.5% 9.57% 20.11% 14.43% 19.29%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.28
1.052
1.189
1.118
The OPA Res Freezer load profile used was modified to reflect the usage behaviour
observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This augmentation
was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Southern
California
Edison
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
1265
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful Incremental
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Please refer to reference3 for more details.
References
The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Round Up Program Impact Evaluation.” June 2010.
2Quantec LLC., Seeline Group Inc. “Impact and Process Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority’s Great
Refrigerator Roundup Program.” May 2008.
3ADM Associates, Inc., Research, Hiner & Partners, Innovologie LLC, “Evaluation Study of the 2004-05
Statewide Residential Appliance Recycling Program” April 2008.
1
123
GAS RANGE
Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Fuel switching to a natural gas range
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average existing stock of electric ranges
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Multi-Family / SingleFamily / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
800.00
0.00
1,200.00
0.00
2
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
509.00
0.00
509.00
-81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.044
0.063
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,162.00
-1,458.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
1,200.00
0.00
Totals 9,162.00
124
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009 has specified that in 2008, self-cleaning and non-selfcleaning ranges had an average annual consumption of 513 kWh and 502 kWh, respectively. 1
In 2005, the distribution of self-cleaning versus non-self-cleaning range ovens in Ontario was
58.2% to 41.9%. 2
Annual Electricity Savings:
Since it is a fuel swap, annual electricity savings is assumed to be the avoided amount of
electricity consumed by electric ranges.
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = (0.582 x 513 kWh) + (0.419 x 502 kWh) = 509 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Res Miscellaneous end use load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.179 (winter) and 1.059 (summer). Refer to Appendix A for the
description of the methodology used in estimating peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Switching from an all electric oven to a gas oven results in an increase of 81 m3 in annual gas
consumption.3
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List lists 18 years as the effective useful life based on
an NRCAN estimate. 3 Seeline Group Inc. reports that ranges have an effective useful life of
about 20 years4. 18 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of electric ranges is between $500 - $1,500 while gas ranges cost between $700 $1,700. An average cost of $800 for electric ranges and $1,200 for gas ranges are
assumed.5
125
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
CF1
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Miscellaneous
6.32% 7.11% 18.42% 4.27% 8.71% 20.72% 14.03% 20.41% 1.243
ver: MM-20091
Remarks
CF2
0.976
1.179
1.059
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Ontario Energy Board
Measures and
Assumptions
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
735.00
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: The OEB Measures and Assumptions List lists a value of 735 kWh switching from
an electrical range to a natural gas range.3
References
The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory
2009” http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2009/pdf/appliance-directory09.pdf (Accessed November 2009).
2The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Energy Consumption of Major Household Appliances Shipped in
Canada” http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/Publications/statistics/cama06/pdf/cama06.pdf (accessed
November 2009).
3Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”. October 14, 2005.
4Seeline Group Inc., “Technology Assessment Study and TRC Analysis for The Ontario Power
Authority” December 2005
http://www.conservationbureau.on.ca/Storage/12/1727_OPA_Technology_Study_12_08_Final.pdf(July
31, 2007) 12.
5Sears Canada Online Catalogue, 2009 (accessed November 2009).
1
126
REFRIGERATOR REPLACEMENT
Early Replacement
Revision
#
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
2
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using 2007 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Evaluation Report Results
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
3
Updated using 2009 GRRP Evaluation Results
Dec 10, 2010
1
Dec 04, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Retirement of refrigerator prior to the end of its useful life and replaced with a ENERGY STAR®
refrigerator
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average refrigerator of existing stock
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act regulates the maximum energy consumption of new
refrigerators based on the refrigerator’s configuration (e.g. top freezer vs. bottom freezer)
and the refrigerator’s adjusted volume1.
To qualify for an ENERGY STAR® rating, a standard-size refrigerator must exceed the
minimum levels by 15%, moving to 20% on April 28, 20082.
Decision Type
Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Small Commercial / Existing Homes / Multi-Family /
Residential
127
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,227.86
451.21
776.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.108
0.096
0.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
2
1,227.86
451.21
776.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.108
0.096
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,227.86
451.21
776.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.108
0.096
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,227.86
451.21
776.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.108
0.096
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,227.86
451.21
776.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.108
0.096
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
848.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
564.01
451.21
112.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.016
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,316.94
4,898.45
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
848.00
0.00
898.00
0.00
Totals 11,215.39
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
It is assumed that the existing refrigerator will be replaced in 5 years time with
a standard refrigerator. Therefore savings for the first 5 years are the annual energy
consumption of the ENERGY STAR® refrigerator minus the average energy consumption of the
existing unit. Energy savings after 5 years are the difference between of the energy
consumption of the ENERGY STAR® unit and the average consumption of a new standard
refrigerator. The annual energy consumption of existing 15 years or older refrigerators is estimated to be
1227.86 kWh/yr, this value is based on an in situ metering study that was conducted in 2009. 3 The average consumptions of an ENERGY STAR® refrigerator and standard refrigerator were
451.21 kWh/yr and 564.01 kWh/yr respectively. 3
For the scenario of the early replacement by an ENERGY STAR® refrigerator the first 5 years of
savings will be the difference between the consumption of existing older refrigerators and the
average ENERGY STAR® refrigerator consumption. Then for the remaining years the
consumption will be the consumption difference between the ENERGY STAR® and standard
units.
If an existing refrigerator was replaced by a standard unit 5 years prior to the end of its useful
life, there would only be savings for 5 years where the savings would be the difference between
the existing older refrigerator and the standard refrigerator consumption (663.85 kWh/yr).
Annual Electricity Savings (First 5 years):
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 1227.86 kWh/yr - 451.21 kWh/yr
= 776.65 kWh/yr
128
Annual Electricity Savings (Remaining years of EUL):
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Case Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation
Case Energy Consumption
= 564.01 kWh/yr - 451.21 kWh/yr
= 112.80 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Refrigerator load
profile3 and coincidence factors of 1.258 (winter) and 1.104 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Refrigerators4 suggest the average
lifetime of a new ENERGY STAR® refrigerator to be 14 years. The remaining useful life
(RUL) of a refrigerator was found to be 5 years (Assumption of 1/3 of EUL = RUL,
then rounded to nearest year = 5). 3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The price difference between two comparable models, a model with the ENERGY STAR®
certification $898.00 and a standard unit $848.00, was found to be $50.00.5 Costing data may
vary depending on features and sizing differences, and more research will be required for
specific cases that differ from the above scenario.
129
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Modified
OPA Res
Refrigerator 5.91% 6.81% 16.92% 6.59% 9.79% 20.08% 14.08% 19.83%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.29
1.036
1.258
1.104
The OPA Res Refrigerator load profile used was modified to reflect the usage
behaviour observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This
augmentation was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
References
Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, "Guide to Canada's Energy Efficiency
Regulations", http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/refrigerators-freezers.cfm?
text=N&printview=N (February 14, 2008)
2Natural Resources Canada - The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2007 Refrigerators” September 8, 2006
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2007/page6.cfm?attr=4 (August 8,
2007).
3The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Round Up Program Impact Evaluation.” June 2010.
4ENERGY STAR®, “ENERGY STAR® 2007 Partner Resource Guide for Refrigerators “
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/manuf_res/downloads/2007Refrigerator_prg.pdf
5Home Depot, "Home Depot - Major Appliances - Refrigerators", http://www.homedepot.ca/ (Accessed
December 07, 2009)
1
130
REFRIGERATOR RETIREMENT
Early Retirement, No Replacement
Revision
#
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
May 20, 2008
2
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using 2007 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Evaluation Report Results
Updated using 2008 GRRP Report Results
3
Updated using 2009 GRRP Report Results
Dec 10, 2010
1
Feb 15, 2008
Dec 04, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Retirement of refrigerator
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average 15 year or older refrigerator of existing stock
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retirement
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Single-Family / Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1,227.86
0.00
1,227.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.171
0.152
0.00
0.00
100.00
0.00
2
1,227.86
0.00
1,227.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.171
0.152
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,227.86
0.00
1,227.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.171
0.152
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,227.86
0.00
1,227.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.171
0.152
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,227.86
0.00
1,227.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.171
0.152
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,139.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
100.00
0.00
Totals 6,139.30
131
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual energy savings of retiring 15 year or older refrigerators are estimated to be 1227.86
kWh/yr, this value is based on an in situ metering study that was conducted in 2009. 1
The Cadmus Group, along with Morrison Hershfield, conducted a metering study and participant
& nonparticipant surveys that were used to estimate annual energy consumption and part-use
(when participating appliances are not operated year-round) of retired refrigerators for the 2008
GRRP. The average annual energy consumption of the refrigerators of various sizes
and configurations was found to be 1227.86 kWh/yr and part-use factor was found to be
0.897. Therefore, for the 2008 GRRP, the average retired refrigerator consumption was
estimated to be 1101.29 kWh/yr.1
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using the Modified OPA Residential Refrigerator load
profile and coincidence factors of 1.258 (winter) and 1.104 (summer). See Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life for a refrigerator retirement is 5 years. The 2008 DEER database
states that 1/3 of the new measure effective useful life (EUL) should be used as the remaining
useful life (RUL) in retirement scenarios. The EUL is 14 years and resulting refrigerator RUL
therefore is 4.7, or once rounded to the nearest year, 5 years.1
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List 3 lists a value of $100.00 for the incremental cost
based on phone calls to several rubbish removal companies.
132
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Modified
OPA Res
Refrigerator 5.91% 6.81% 16.92% 6.59% 9.79% 20.08% 14.08% 19.83%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.29
1.036
1.258
1.104
The OPA Res Refrigerator load profile used was modified to reflect the usage
behaviour observed in the metering study conducted for the OPA in 2009. This
augmentation was done only for the summer, since no metering was conducted in the
winter. Therefore no changes were made to the load profile for the shoulder and
winter periods.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Southern
California
Edison
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
1656
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful Incremental
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
10
N/A
Comments: Please refer to reference4 for more details.
References
1The Cadmus Group, Inc., Morrison Hershfield “2008-2009 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program Impact Evaluation.” June 2010.
2Quantec LLC., Seeline Group Inc. “Impact and Process Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority’s Great
Refrigerator Roundup Program.” May 2008.
3Itron, Assessment of the Ontario Energy Board’s Measure Database (Ontario) 5.
4ADM Associates, Inc., Research, Hiner & Partners, Innovologie LLC, “Evaluation Study of the 2004-05
Statewide Residential Appliance Recycling Program” April 2008.
133
RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES DRYER
Fuel Switch from Electric to Natural Gas
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Fuel Switching - Gas Clothes Dryer
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Average Existing Stock of Electric Clothes Dryers
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Office of Energy Efficiency of Natural Resources Canada 1 regulate the minimum energy
efficiency of electric clothes dryers based on test standard CAN/CSA-C361-92 (Canada) to be
1.36 kg/kWh (3.01 lb/kWh).
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Existing Homes / Multi-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3
)
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
285.00
0.00
2
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
914.00
77.69
836.31
-112.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.093
0.164
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,398.42
15,053.58
-2,016.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
285.00
0.00
Totals 16,452.00
134
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
The EnerGuide Appliance Directory 2009 specifies that in 2008 a standard electric clothes
dryer had an average annual consumption of 914 kWh.2 This already includes the amount
of energy consumed by the spin motors as it is indicated in test standard CAN/CSA-36192 that all loads in excess of 10 W must be included in the energy consumption of the
dryer. 3
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
The electricity consumption of gas-fired clothes dryers is equivalent to the amount of
electrical energy needed to spin the drum of the dryer.
Assume that common gas-fired clothes dryers (all having a capacity of 7.0 cu.ft.) require a
motor speed of 1/3 hp or 0.249 kW.4
Assume 416 loads6 per year and time of dryer operation is 0.75 hour per load.
Annual Electricity Savings: Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 914 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Motor Capacity x Duration of Dryer Load x
Loads per year
= 0.249 kW x 0.75 hr/load x 416 loads/yr
= 77.69 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption
- Conservation Measure Consumption = 914 - 77.69 = 836.31 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Clothes Washer/Dryer end use
load profile and coincidence factors of 1.528 (winter) and 1.186 (summer). See Appendix A for
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
The Ontario Energy Board Measures and Assumptions List 6 assumed 112 m3 increase in
annual gas consumption by switching to a gas clothes dryer based on Enbridge Average End
Use Load Report.
135
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life is assumed to be 18 years.6,7
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List 6 lists a value of $0.00 for the incremental cost
based on the average price difference between an electric and gas dryer. Sears appliance
store sells gas and electric dryers that are the same in specifications for the same price. If
there is no gas line in a home to connect the natural gas dryer, the installation cost is
estimated to be $250.00 for the first 15 ft of piping (additional cost of $5.00 for every
additional foot). There is also a $35.00 cost for the flexible connection resulting in an
estimated incremental cost of $285.00.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
Winter Summer Winter Summer
OPA Res
Clothes
Washer/Dryer 7.77% 8.76% 18.54% 4.92% 9.23% 17.59% 15.34% 17.84% 1.662
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
CF2
1.129
1.528
1.186
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
1The Office of Energy Efficiency, “Clothes Dryers” April 20, 2009
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/clothes-dryers.cfm?text=N&printview=N (Accessed
September 21, 2009).
2 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Appliance Directory
2009” http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/appliances/2009/pdf/appliance-directory09.pdf (accessed November 2009).
3 “CAN/CSA-361-92 Test Method for Measuring Energy Consumption and Drum Volume of Electrically
Heated Household Tumble-Type Clothes Dryers”, Canadian Standards Association - 1998.
4 Sears, http://www.sears.ca/gp/product/B001IOX464/sr=1-1/qid=1253550503/ref=sr_1_1/176-51084051251664?ie=UTF8&searsBrand=core&mqnodeid=APS (Accessed September 21, 2009).
5 The Office of Energy Efficiency, “ Major Household Appliances”
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/energy_use/sheu_e/sheu_5.cfm (1997)
6 Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”
7 Itron, Assessment of the Ontario Energy Board’s Measure Database (Ontario) 5.
136
Lighting
137
138
3-WAY COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Low Wattage 3-Way CFL
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
12W/19W/22W 3-Way CFL Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
60/75/100W 3-Way Incandescent Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Small Commercial / Residential / New Homes / Multi-Family / SingleFamily / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
6.56
0.00
9.96
0.00
2
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
3.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
3.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
3.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
3.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
120.45
30.51
89.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
3.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
183.06
539.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
22.96
0.00
9.96
0.00
Totals 722.70
139
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 75 W (the middle wattage of the 60/75/100W bulb was used to calculate base
measure consumption) 4
Operating Hours = 4.4 hours/day4, 1606 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 19W (the middle wattage of the 12/19/22W bulb was used to calculate
the conservation measure consumption) 4
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.075 kW x 1606 hrs/yr
= 120.45 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.019 kW x 1606 hrs/yr
= 30.51 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 120.45 kWh/yr - 30.51 kWh/yr
= 89.94 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
140
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of 3-way CFLs is 6 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 60/75/100W decorative light bulb was found to be $3.28 and the
cost of the 12/19/22W CFL equivalent is $9.96.4 Since the EUL of the incandescent is
actually 0.9 years, the incandescent bulb will actually be replaced 7 times in 6 years. Hence
the doubling of cost in the first year.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
141
3-WAY COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
High Wattage 3-Way CFL
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
12W/22W/33W 3-Way CFL Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
60/100/150W 3-Way Incandescent Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Single-Family / Residential / New Homes / Existing
Homes / Small Commercial
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.98
0.00
13.74
0.00
2
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
1.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
1.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
1.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
1.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
160.60
35.33
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
1.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
211.98
751.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13.93
0.00
13.74
0.00
Totals 963.60
142
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 100 W (the middle wattage of the 60/100/150W bulb was used to calculate base
measure consumption) 4
Operating Hours = 4.4 hours/day4, 1606 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 22W (the middle wattage of the 12/22/33W bulb was used to calculate
the conservation measure consumption) 4
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.100 kW x 1606 hrs/yr
= 160.60 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.022 kW x 1606 hrs/yr
= 35.33 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 160.60 kWh/yr - 35.33 kWh/yr
= 125.27 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
143
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of 3-way CFLs is 6 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 60/100/150W decorative light bulb was found to be $1.99 and the
cost of the 12/22/33W CFL equivalent is $13.74.4 Since the EUL of the incandescent is
actually 0.9 years, the incandescent bulb will actually be replaced 7 times in 6 years. Hence
the doubling of cost in the first year.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
144
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
11 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Feb 20, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 11W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
40W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
Decision Type
New / Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
4.30
0.00
2
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
39.42
10.84
28.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.008
1.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
86.72
228.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12.00
0.00
4.30
0.00
Totals 315.36
145
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 40W
Assume operating hours = 2.7 hours/day3, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 4 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 5
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 11W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.040 kW x 985.5 hrs = 39.42 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.011 kW x 985.5 hrs = 10.84 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 39.42 kWh - 10.84 kWh = 28.58 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.6 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
146
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 7 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
A package of 2 x 40 W incandescent bulbs for $2.98, so the price of a 40 W incandescent
bulb is roughly $1.50 per bulb. 8 Assuming each incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would
take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1 CFL. It was found that CFL 11W sell for an
average price of $4.30 per lamp.9
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Remarks
Shoulder
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Summer
Mid
Peak
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
36.50
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: The equivalent CFL Wattage for a 40 W incandescent light is 14-18 W. For this
measure, 15 W was taken into consideration. Values were calculated based on average daily
usage of 4 hours per day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and
efficiency level for lamps of less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt. 10
147
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 11
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.12
References
1 Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-productsdec08.cfm?attr=0.
(Accessed November 2009)
2 Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November 2009).
3 Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt
Counts Program, September 2007.
4 ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls
(accessed August 2009).
5 California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline
(California, September 1999) 31.
6 Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group
(Ontario, October 2006).
7 American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
8 Home Depot Canada (www.homedepot.ca)
9 1000 Bulbs.com (www.1000bulbs.com)
10Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards:
Residential and Small Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer
Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
11Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
12BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html
(Accessed January 05, 2010).
148
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
13 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 29, 2010
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 13W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
60W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Single-Family / New Homes /
Residential / Multi-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
4.52
0.00
2
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
59.13
12.81
46.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
102.48
370.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10.00
0.00
4.52
0.00
Totals 473.04
149
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 60W
Assume operating Hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 13 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.060 kW x 985.5 hrs = 59.13 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.013 kW x 985.5 hrs = 12.81 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 59.13 kWh - 12.81 kWh = 46.32 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
150
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 60 W incandescent bulb is about $1.25/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 15W registered an average price of $4.52 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Remarks
Shoulder
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Summer
Mid
Peak
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
58.3
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.009
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: The equivalent CFL Wattage for a 60 W incandescent light is 19-21 W. For this
measure, 15 W was taken into consideration. Values were calculated based on average daily
usage of 4 hours per day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and
efficiency level for lamps of less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt. 11 151
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accesse
d August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
10 http://paemv2:8080/emv2Web/www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
/P>
152
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
15 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 15W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
60W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Multi-Family / Small Commercial / Residential / Existing
Homes / Single-Family
153
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
4.52
0.00
2
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
59.13
14.78
44.35
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
118.24
354.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10.00
0.00
4.52
0.00
Totals 473.04
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 60W
Assume operating Hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 15 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.060 kW x 985.5 hrs = 59.13 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.015 kW x 985.5 hrs = 14.78 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 59.13 kWh - 14.78 kWh = 44.35 kWh/yr
154
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 60 W incandescent bulb is about $1.25/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 15W registered an average price of $4.52 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
155
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
58.3
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.009
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: The equivalent CFL Wattage for a 60 W incandescent light is 19-21 W. For this
measure, 15 W was taken into consideration. Values were calculated based on average daily
usage of 4 hours per day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and
efficiency level for lamps of less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt. 11 Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
156
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
10 http://paemv2:8080/emv2Web/www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
157
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
20 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from 2007 Final Evaluation Report of Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 20W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
75W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
158
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes / New Homes / MultiFamily / Small Commercial
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
5.79
0.00
2
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
73.91
19.71
54.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.015
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
157.68
433.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9.20
0.00
5.79
0.00
Totals 591.28
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 75W
Assume operating Hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 20 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.075 kW x 985.5 hrs = 73.91 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.020 kW x 985.5 hrs = 19.71 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 73.91kWh - 19.71kWh = 54.20kWh/yr
159
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 75 W incandescent bulb is about $1.15/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 20W registered an average price of $5.79 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
160
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
75.8
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Savings were calculated based on average daily usage of 4 hours per
day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and efficiency level for lamps of
less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt. 11
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
161
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
10 http://paemv2:8080/emv2Web/www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, "Compact Flourescent Lamps" July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
162
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
23 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Oct 10, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 23W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
75W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act.3
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Small Commercial / Single-Family / Existing Homes /
New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
5.56
0.00
2
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
73.91
22.67
51.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.014
1.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
181.36
409.92
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9.20
0.00
5.56
0.00
Totals 591.28
163
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 75W
Assume operating hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 23 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.075 kW x 985.5 hrs = 73.91 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.023 kW x 985.5 hrs = 22.67 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 73.91 kWh - 22.67 kWh = 51.24 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
164
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 75 W incandescent bulb is about $1.15/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 23W registered an average price of $5.56 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Remarks
Shoulder
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Summer
Mid
Peak
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
75.8
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Savings were calculated based on average daily usage of 4 hours per
day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and efficiency level for lamps of
less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt. 11
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
165
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-productsdec08.cfm?attr=0 (accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in
Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed
November 2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
10 http://www.ballastwise.com/(accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
166
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
25 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from 2007 Final Evaluation Report of Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 25W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
100W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act.3
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Small Commercial / New Homes / MultiFamily / Existing Homes
167
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
5.39
0.00
2
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
98.55
24.64
73.91
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.021
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
197.12
591.28
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9.92
0.00
5.39
0.00
Totals 788.40
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure
Wattage = 100W
Assume operating hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 25 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings: Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.100 kW x 985.5 hrs = 98.55 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.025 kW x 985.5 hrs = 24.64 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 98.55 kWh - 24.64 kWh = 73.91 kWh/yr
168
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 100 W incandescent bulb is about $1.24/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 25W registered an average price of $5.39 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
169
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
106.5
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: The equivalent CFL Wattage for a 100 W incandescent light is 26-28 W. For this
measure, 20 W was taken into consideration. Values were calculated based on average daily
usage of 4 hours per day. Efficiency level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and
efficiency level for lamps of less than 15 W is 45 lumens/watt.11
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
170
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-productsdec08.cfm?attr=0 (accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resources Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
10 http://www.ballast.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
171
COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
27 W General Service Lamp, Screw-In
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
CFL Screw-in 27W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
100W Incandescent
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act.3
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
172
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Small Commercial / Single-Family / Existing Homes /
Residential / Multi-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
6.85
0.00
2
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
98.55
26.61
71.94
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.020
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
212.88
575.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9.92
0.00
6.85
0.00
Totals 788.40
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 100 W
Assume operating hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr. This operating hour assumption is
based on the average hours of operation of a lamp in various locations of a house. The
ENERGY STAR® savings calculator suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 5 The
Lighting Efficiency Technology Report provides that the average operating hours for all
lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 6
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 27 W
Assume operating hours to be the same as base measure.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.100 kW x 985.5 hrs = 98.55 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.027 kW x 985.5 hrs
= 26.61 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 98.55 - 26.61
= 71.94 kWh/yr
173
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.7 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 8 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 100 W incandescent bulb is about $1.24/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 27W registered an average price of $6.85 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 9,10
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
174
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
106.5
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Values were calculated based on average daily usage of 4 hours per day. Efficiency
level for lamps of 15 W or more is 60 lumens/watt and efficiency level for lamps of less than 15 W
is 45 lumens/watt.11
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
44.20
N/A
N/A
3.4
6.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings of 44.2 kWh takes into account waste heat factor for
energy to account for cooling savings from efficient lighting. Most CFLs have a rated lifetime of
10000 hours, however units that are turned on and off more frequently have shorter lives than
those that stay on for longer periods of time. Therefore CFLs are assumed to have a life of 8000
hours for residential applications (assumed average daily usage of 3.4 hours). 12
BC Hydro
N/A
N/A
N/A
5-6
N/A
Comments: CFLs use about one-third as much energy as incandescents to deliver the same
amount of light. They also save on materials and maintenance costs because they last 10 times
as long – an average of 10,000 hours compared with fewer than 1,000 hours for an incandescent
bulb. CFLs initially cost more – on the order of $3 to $10. That's considerably less than they cost
just a few years ago, but it's still a lot compared with less than $1 for an incandescent lamp. Even
so, depending on the application, they can pay for themselves pretty quickly. The longer the hours
of operation, the shorter the payback period. A CFL operating for typical business hours of 2,500
hours or more per year will pay for itself in less than a year.13
175
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-productsdec08.cfm?attr=0(Accessed November 2009).
2 Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007
4Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
5ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
6California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
7Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
8American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
9http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
10 http://www.ballast.com/(Accessed August 2009).
11 Frontier Associates LLC, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards: Residential and Small
Commercial Offer Program, and Hard-to-Reach Standard Offer Program (Austin, Texas, May 2003) 30.
12 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 154-155.
13 BC Hydro, “Compact Flourescent Lamps” July 16, 2009.
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/lighting/compact_fluorescent_lamps
.html (Accessed January 05, 2010).
1
176
DIMMABLE COMPACT FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
19W Dimmable CFL
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
19W CFL Dimmable Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
75W Incandescent Dimmable Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Small Commercial / Residential / Multi-Family / New Homes / SingleFamily / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
123.19
31.21
91.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.026
4.88
0.00
15.98
0.00
2
123.19
31.21
91.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.026
2.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
123.19
31.21
91.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.026
2.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
123.19
31.21
91.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.026
2.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
123.19
31.21
91.98
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.026
2.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
156.05
459.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14.64
0.00
15.98
0.00
Totals 615.95
177
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 75 W
Operating Hours = 4.5 hours/day4, 1642.5 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 19 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.075 kW x 1642.5 hrs/yr
= 123.19kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.019 kW x 1642.5 hrs/yr
= 31.21 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 123.19 kWh/yr - 31.21 kWh/yr
= 91.98 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
178
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of dimmable CFLs is 5 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 25W decorative light bulb was found to be $2.44 and the cost of
the 5W CFL equivalent is $15.98. Since the EUL of the incandescent is actually 0.8 years, the
incandescent bulb will actually be replaced 6 times in 5 years. Hence the doubling of cost in
the first year.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
179
ENERGY STAR® CEILING FAN
Lighting Replacement
Revision #
0
1
Description/Comment
Created in Measures and Assumptions List
Updated from 2007 EKC Program Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® qualified ceiling fan equipped with three pin based 20 W CFL bulbs
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Conventional non-Energy Star® qualified ceiling fan fitted with three medium screw base socket
using three 60 W incandescent bulbs
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The energy standard for ENERGY STAR® does not meet the Ontario standard on energy
requirements for ceiling fans; ceiling fans sold in Ontario must meet CAN/CSA-C814-96, Energy
Performance of Ceiling Fans. Therefore the Ontario standard should be followed for energy
requirements, but there is no standard that applies to the air flow of the fan. 1
Ontario Regulations apply to household ceiling fans with integrated lighting greater than 10W
and ceiling fan light kits that are either included with the ceiling fan or sold as a separate product
to be attached to a ceiling fan. The Regulations apply to lighting with sockets that are not pinbased such as those for fluorescent lighting, and thus applies to medium screw-based,
candelabra base and GU24 socket types.
Base Case Assumptions for the Ontario Standard:
Effective date: January 1, 2010
No analysis performed on units with pin-based sockets since these units meet the Minimum
Energy Performance Standard (MEPS)
Service life of ceiling fans with lighting: 13 years
Lighting type used with a ceiling fan will remain constant throughout the service life of the
ceiling fan
Typical unit equipped with three lamp sockets
Typical unit will use lamps that are the same wattage and lighting type
Service life of replacement compact fluorescent lamps: 8 000 hours
Service life of replacement incandescent lamps: 1 000 hours
Baseline model used was a unit equipped with three 100-W incandescent lamps
100-W to 60-W incandescent lamp replacement: a general heat-loss factor of 17%
180
The testing standard C22.2 No.9.0 is followed for determining the maximum wattage of the
product.
ENERGY STAR® Standards for ceiling fan airflow:
Criteria for ENERGY STAR® Qualified Residential Ceiling Fans*
Efficiency Requirement CFM/W
Minimum Airflow CFM
(m3 /min/W)
(m3 /min)
Fan
Speed
Low
1250 (35.4)
155 (4.4)
Medium
3000 (85.0)
100 (2.8)
High
5000 (141.6)
75 (2.1)
*when operating in a downward-blowing direction
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
0.00
0.00
47.00
0.00
2
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
17.37
0.00
9
227.76
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.034
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
227.76
0.004
0.034
Totals 2,277.60
105.18
122.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,051.80
1,225.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
33.75
0.00
64.37
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Lighting wattage per fixture = 180 W (3-60W incandescent bulbs)
Lighting hours = 2.7 hours/day (985.5 hrs/yr)
Fan wattage 2 = 15.2 W (low speed); 34.8 W (medium speed); 72.5 W (high speed)
Fan usage = 40% low speed, 40% medium speed, 20% high speed
Average fan operating hours = 4 hours/day
181
Conservation Measure:
Lighting wattage per fixture = 60 Watts (3 - 20W CFL bulbs)
Lighting hours = 2.7 hours/day (985.5 hrs/yr)
Fan wattage 2 = Low speed: 11.7 W, Medium speed: 31.4 W, High speed: 71.5 W
Fan usage = 40% low speed, 40% medium speed, 20% high speed
Average fan operating hours = 4 hours/day Average fan operating hours = 4 hours/day3
Fan usage = 40% low speed, 40% medium speed, 20% high speed4
Base Measure Energy Consumption:
Lighting:
Annual Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) = Lighting Wattage (kW) x Annual hours of operation
(hrs/yr)
= 0.180 kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 177.39 kWh/yr
Fan Motor:
Annual Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) = [∑(Fan Wattagei x Fan Usage%i) ] x (Operating Hours)
where i represents the fan speed: low, medium, high
= [(0.0152)(0.40)+(0.0348)(0.40)+(0.0725)(0.20)] x (4 x 365)
= 50.37 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Energy Consumption:
Lighting:
Annual Energy Consumption (kWh/yr)= Lighting Wattage (kW) x Annual hours of operation
(hrs/yr)
= 0.060 kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 59.13 kWh/yr
Fan Motor:
Annual Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) = [∑(Fan Wattagei x Fan Usage%i)i ] x (Operating Hours)
where i represents the fan speed: low, medium, high
= [(0.0152)(0.40)+(0.0348)(0.40)+(0.0725)(0.20)] x (4 x 365)
= 46.05 kWh/yr
Annual Energy Savings:
Annual Energy Savings (kWh/yr) = Total Base Measure Energy Consumption - Total
Conservation Measure Energy Consumption
= 227.76 kWh/yr - 105.18 kWh/yr
= 122.58 kWh/yr
182
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Energy Star® Savings Calculator indicates an effective useful life of 10 years for Energy Star®
qualified ceiling fans. 2
An average bulb life of 8,000 hours 5 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365
days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
An OPA study on prescriptive inputs assumptions by Navigant Consulting determined an
incremental cost of $47.00 based on the average price difference between a conventional
ceiling fan and an ENERGY STAR® qualified ceiling fans from Canadian Tire website and
Home Depot website. Therefore the cost of the conservation measure equipment will be
assumed to be $47.00 and the base measure equipment costs will be $0. More information is
required to find if there are any O&M costs applicable to this measure besides light bulb
replacements.6
The average cost for a 60 W incandescent bulb is about $1.25/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1 year, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 20W registered an average price of $5.79 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 7,8 Therefore, assuming that all the bulbs in the fixture will cease to
function at the same time, the cost for replacing the three incandescents costs $3.75 and the
three 20W CFLs costs $17.37
183
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 2006 - 1
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
175.2
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
10
25
Comments: Baseline conditions assumes four sockets fitted with 60W incandescent bulb,
whereas the high efficiency ENERGY STAR® fans assumes 2-D lamps totaling 60W. Many of the
main assumptions have been derived from the ENERGY STAR® Saving’s Calculator (ENERGY
STAR® Website, 2007), including the operating hours for lights being 4 hours/day (1,460
hours/year). The annual demand savings for the high efficiency fan was calculated to be 0.120
kW.6
SDG&E Statewide Investor Owned
Utility Ceiling Fan Study, RLW
Analytics, 2002
32.5
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Based on residential metered study with 360 hours/year of lighting usage and 897
hours of fan motor usage. Used a conservative energy lighting reduction of 60% and fan motor
savings of 20%.6
184
References
Natural Resource Canada - Office of Energy Efficiency, "Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations,
Proposed Regulations, Bulletin March 2007 Ceiling Fans and Ceiling Fan
Light Kits" http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/tceilng-fans-and-light-kits-feb2007.cfm?
text=N&printview=N, September 2007.
2ENERGY STAR® Calculator "Assumptions for Ceiling Fans with Lighting", (April, 2009)
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Ceiling_Fan_Savings_Calculato
r_Consumer.xls
3Efficiency Maine, Technical Reference User Manual (TRM) No. 2006-1, "Measure Saving Algorithms
and Cost Assumptions" Augusta, Maine. Energy Solutions Alberta Website
http://www.energysolutionsalberta.com/. 2006.
4USEPA, Energy Star Website, www.energystar.gov, 2007
5American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
6Navigant Consulting Inc. "Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program" Toronto, Canada. September, 2007.
7http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
8http://paemv2:8080/emv2Web/www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
1
185
ENERGY STAR® CFL FLOOD LIGHT
26W, Indoor
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using results from Spring Every Kilowatt Counts (EKC) and
Keep Cool Pilot Program
Updated using results from OPA EKC Power Savings Event, Keep
Cool Pilot and Rewards 4 Recycling (R4R) evaluation report
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Nov 17, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Flood Light, 26W CFL
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Flood Light, 90W Incandescent Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Ontario Energy Efficiency Act requires that incandescent PAR lamps with a rated wattage of
86-115 have a minimum average efficiency of 14 lm/W1. CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.2
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).3
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act4.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
186
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Multi-Family / Residential / Single-Family / Small
Commercial / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
7.70
0.00
11.50
0.00
2
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
7.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
7.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
123.21
35.60
87.61
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.025
7.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
249.20
613.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
30.80
0.00
11.50
0.00
Totals 862.47
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 90W
Operating Hours = 3.75 hours/day5, 1369 hrs/yr. The ENERGY STAR® savings calculator
suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3hrs/day6. The Lighting Efficiency Technology Report
provides that the average operating hours for all lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.)
is 2.34 hrs/day7. Conservation Measure: Wattage = 26 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.090 kW x 1369 hrs/yr
= 123.21 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.026 kW x 1369 hrs/yr
= 35.60 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 123.21 kWh/yr - 35.60kWh/yr
= 87.61 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
187
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of 26W CFL flood lights is 7 years.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The difference between the average cost of a single CFL flood light (~$11.50) and that of a
90W incandescent flood light (~$7.70) is $3.80.5 Based on the rated hours of each bulb, it
should be noted the 90W incandescent flood light will likely need to be replaced 3 times, every
2000 hrs8, compared to the expected life of a CFL flood light.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
California - Database for
Energy Efficient Resources
(DEER)
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
75
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
Comments: Please refer to the reference for more details9.
188
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
7
N/A
References
“Ontario Efficiency Act Guide – Lighting
Products’’http://www.mei.gov.on.ca/english/pdf/conservation/2006%20-%20eea%20guide%20d%20%20lighting%20products.pdf (September 04, 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
3Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
4Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
5The Cadmus Group, "Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs." July 9, 2009.
6ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
7California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
8Natural Resources Canada, Lighting Reference Guide, 2005.
9California Public Utilities Commission, DEER. http://www.energy.ca.gov/deer/., April,20, 2009.
1
189
ENERGY STAR® CFL FLOOD LIGHT
26W, Outdoor
Revision
#
Description/Comment
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
1
Updated using results from Spring EKC and Keep Cool Pilot Program
Updated using results from OPA Power Savings Event, Keep Cool
Pilot and Rewards 4 Recycling (R4R) evaluation report
2
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Nov 17, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Flood Light, 26W CFL
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Flood Light, 90W Incandescent Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Ontario Energy Efficiency Act requires that incandescent PAR lamps with a rated wattage of
86-115 have a minimum average efficiency of 14 lm/W. 1 CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.2
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).3
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act4.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
190
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Small Commercial / Residential / New Homes / Existing
Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
128.12
37.01
91.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
7.70
0.00
11.50
0.00
2
128.12
37.01
91.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
7.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
128.12
37.01
91.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
128.12
37.01
91.11
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
7.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
148.04
364.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
23.10
0.00
11.50
0.00
Totals 512.48
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 90W
Operating Hours = 3.9 hours/day5, 1423.5 hrs/yr. The ENERGY STAR® savings calculator
suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 6 The Lighting Efficiency Technology
Report provides that the average operating hours for all lighting (e.g. living room, dining
room etc.) is 2.34 hrs/day. 7 Please note the difference between the general average of
operating hours versus the specific operating hours that are assumed for outdoor lighting. The average is lower since it includes all lighting; lights that are frequently used and not.
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 26 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.090 kW x 1423.5 hrs/yr
= 128.12kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.026 kW x 1423.5 hrs/yr
= 37.01kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 128.12kWh/yr - 37.01kWh/yr
= 91.11kWh/yr
191
Peak Demand Savings
For outdoor lighting, it is assumed that outdoor flood lights would not significantly operate during
peak periods in the summer, therefore, the average summer on-peak demand savings is
assumed to be zero.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Based on the available research, the effective useful life for the CFL outdoor flood lights was
estimated to be 4 years considering a useful life of 6,000 hours and a daily operation of 3.9
hours 5. Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The difference between the average cost of a single CFL flood light (~$11.50) and that of a
90W incandescent flood light (~$7.70) is $3.80.8 Based on the rated hours of each bulb, it
should be noted the 90W incandescent flood light will likely need to be replaced 3 times, every
2000 hrs9, compared to the expected life of a CFL flood light.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
OPA
Outdoor
Light Timer 14.83% 7.41% 19.48% 0.0% 11.25% 13.36% 16.72% 16.94%
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
192
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
California
- DEER
75
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Winter
(kW)
Summer
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
7
N/A
Comments: Please refer to the reference for more details. 10
References
“Ontario Efficiency Act Guide – Lighting Products’’
http://www.mei.gov.on.ca/english/pdf/conservation/2006%20-%20eea%20guide%20d%20%20lighting%20products.pdf
2Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
3Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
4Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
5Impact Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority’s Spring Every Kilowatt Counts Campaign and Keep
Cool Pilot Program, Nov. 5, 2008.
6ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
7California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
8The Cadmus Group, "Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs." July 9, 2009.
9Natural Resources Canada, Lighting Reference Guide, 2005.
10 California Public Utilities Commission, DEER. http://www.energy.ca.gov/deer/. April, 20, 2009.
1
193
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE COMPACT
FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Chandelier CFLs
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
5W CFL Chandelier Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
25 W Incandescent Chandelier Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Small Commercial / Residential / MultiFamily / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
28.29
5.66
22.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
1.25
0.00
7.99
0.00
2
28.29
5.66
22.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
28.29
5.66
22.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
28.29
5.66
22.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
28.29
5.66
22.63
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
28.30
113.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.75
0.00
7.99
0.00
Totals 141.45
194
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure
Wattage = 25W
Operating Hours = 3.1 hours/day4, 1131.5 hrs/yr Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 5 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.025 kW x 1131.5 hrs/yr
= 28.29 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.005 kW x 1131.5 hrs/yr
= 5.66 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 28.29 kWh/yr - 5.66 kWh/yr
= 22.63kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
Only10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
195
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of the decorative CFLs is 5 years (6000 hrs).4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 25W decorative light bulb was found to be $1.25 and the cost of
the 5W CFL equivalent was $7.99.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
196
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE COMPACT
FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Globe CFLs
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
7W CFL Globe Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
40W Incandescent Globe Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Multi-Family / Existing Homes / Small Commercial /
Residential / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
46.72
8.18
38.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.011
1.25
0.00
7.23
0.00
2
46.72
8.18
38.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.011
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
46.72
8.18
38.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.011
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
46.72
8.18
38.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.011
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
46.72
8.18
38.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.011
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
40.90
192.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.75
0.00
7.23
0.00
Totals 233.60
197
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 40W
Operating Hours = 3.2 hours/day4, 1168.0 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 7 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.040 kW x 1168.0 hrs/yr
= 46.72 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.007 kW x 1168.0 hrs/yr
= 8.18 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 46.72 kWh/yr - 8.18 kWh/yr
= 38.54 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
198
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life of the decorative CFLs is 5 years (6000 hrs).4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 40W decorative light bulb was found to be $1.25 and the average
cost of the 7W CFL equivalent was $7.23.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
199
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED DECORATIVE COMPACT
FLUORESCENT LAMPS (CFLS)
Vanity CFLs
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Sep 11, 2009
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
7W CFL Vanity Bulb
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
40W Incandescent Vanity Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CFLs have been defined as integrally ballasted fluorescent lamps with a screw base designed to
replace the general service incandescent lamp. Energy performance test procedures for CFLs
are covered under CAN/CSA C861-06 - Performance of Self-Ballasted Compact Fluorescent
Lamps and Ballasted Adapters.1
ENERGY STAR® qualified CFLs fit in most fixtures - indoors and out, use up to 75% less
energy than incandescent bulbs, and last for at least 5 years (based on 3 hours of use per
day).2
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient incandescent
light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under Canada’s Energy
Efficiency Act3.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Small Commercial / Multi-Family / New Homes / Residential / Existing
Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
39.42
6.90
32.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
1.25
0.00
7.23
0.00
2
39.42
6.90
32.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
39.42
6.90
32.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
39.42
6.90
32.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
1.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
39.42
6.90
32.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
34.50
162.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.75
0.00
7.23
0.00
Totals 197.10
200
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 40W
Operating Hours = 2.7 hours/day4, 985.5 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 7 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.040 kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 39.42 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.007 kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 6.90 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 39.42 kWh/yr - 6.90 kWh/yr
= 32.52 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincident factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings. Other Resource Savings
Only 10% of energy used by standard incandescent bulbs is generated as light, the remaining
90% is released in the form of heat.5 CFL lamps generate less heat therefore can potentially
reduce annual consumption for cooling and increase annual energy consumption for heating.
201
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
From the 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Program report, it was found that the effective useful life
of the decorative CFLs is 5 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost of an incandescent 40W decorative light bulb was found to be $1.25 and the average
cost of the 7W CFL equivalent was $7.23.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Natural Resources Canada. Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations - Lighting Products: Package
Labelling - December 2008.http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lighting-products-dec08.cfm?
attr=0(accessed November 2009).
2Natural Resources Canada. Additional ENERGY STAR® Product Categories in Canada. http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/light.cfm?attr=4 (accessed November
2009).
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
5Seeline Group Inc., “Every KiloWatt Counts” TRC Assesment for The Summerhill Group (Ontario,
October 2006) 2.
1
202
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT FIXTURE
Ceiling Mounted Fixture
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using results from Spring Every Kilowatt Counts (EKC) and
Keep Cool Pilot Program
Updated using results from 2008 EKC Program Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Sep 11, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Ceiling Mounted Fixture with 2 - 15W CFL bulbs w/ Ballast
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-ENERGY STAR® Ceiling Mounted Fixture with 2 - 60W Incandescent bulbs
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a new version (version 4) for
specifications for residential light fixtures in October 2005. In order for a light fixture to eligible to
qualify as an Energy Star light fixture, it must meet specific criteria established by the U.S. EPA
including minimum lamp life, warranty, safety requirements and quality assurance testing1.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Small Commercial / New Homes / Single-Family / MultiFamily / Existing Homes
203
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
33.50
0.00
60.00
0.00
2
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
9.04
0.00
7
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
9.04
0.00
13
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
170.82
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.004
0.035
7.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
170.82
0.004
0.035
Totals 2,733.12
45.55
125.27
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
728.80
2,004.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
107.00
0.00
78.08
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 120W (2 x 60W)
Operating Hours = 3.9 hours/day2, 1423.5 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure: Wattage = 32W (2 x (15W bulb + 1W ballast))
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 1423.5 hrs
= 170.82 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.032 kW x 1423.5 hrs
= 45.55kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 170.82kWh - 45.55kWh
= 125.27 kWh/yr
204
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using the OPA Res Lighting load profile. Refer to
Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Based on the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC)3 the EUL was found to be 16 years
for all Energy Star fixtures. This assumption coincides with the Database for Energy Efficient
Resources (DEER) 20084 assumptions of 16 years as well.
An average compact fluorescent bulb has a useful life of 8,000 hours 5.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost for a Conventional Ceiling Mounted Fixture = $30 2
Average cost for a ENERGY STAR® Ceiling Mounted Fixture = $60 2
The average cost for a 60 W incandescent bulb is about $1.25/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1000 hrs, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to 1
CFL. CFL 15W registered an average price of $4.52 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 6,7
From 1423.5 hrs/yr of operation, the incandescent replacements will occur around every 0.7
years and the CFL replacements will occur every 5.6 years.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
205
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 20061
64.4
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
20
40
Comments: Based on interior light fixtures only: 2.1 hours/day usage (766.5 hours/year) with
efficiency wattage = 36W and baseline wattage = 120W. Annual Demand Savings = 0.084 kW.
(Free-ridership = 0.08, spillover = 0.04, persistence = 1.0)8
Vermont - Residential
Master Technical Reference
Manual
104.4
N/A
N/A
25.6
30
Comments: For the Interior, the baseline condition is an interior surface lighting fixture with
incandescent lamp(s). An ENERGY STAR® interior surface lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.9
References
Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September 2007).
2The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
3California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), 2001, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs.
Report to the Legislature. San Francisco, California: California Public Utilities Commission.
4CPUC, "2008 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources - Version 2008.2.05", December 16, 2008.
5American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
6http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
7http://paemv2:8080/emv2Web/www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
8Efficiency Maine, 2007, Residential Technical Reference Manual No. 2006-1.
http://www.cee1.org/eval/db_pdf/566.pdf
9Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 415-416.
1
206
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT FIXTURE
Torchiere
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using results from Spring Every Kilowatt Counts (EKC) and
Keep Cool Pilot Program
Updated using results from 2008 EKC Program Evaluation Report
Feb 15, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Sep 11, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Torchiere
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-ENERGY STAR® Torchiere
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a new version (version 4) for
specifications for residential light fixtures in October 2005. In order for a light fixture to eligible to
qualify as an Energy Star light fixture, it must meet specific criteria established by the U.S. EPA
including minimum lamp life, warranty, safety requirements and quality assurance testing1
Torchieres must be equipped with a power limiting device. The power limitation, by torchiere
type, and effective dates are found in the table below: Type of torchiere
Power limitation Effective dates
Torchiere with no additional sockets
190 watts
75 watts
January 1, 2007*
January 1, 2010
Torchiere with additional sockets
230 watts
100 watts
January 1, 2007
January 1, 2010
*This date applies to date of manufacture, it will be enforced as of the date of registration of the
regulation.
The maximum wattage will be verified according to the CSA standard C22.2 No.12.0. This is
the same standard that is used for safety certification.
207
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Multi-Family / New Homes / Single-Family /
Residential / Small Commercial
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
20.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
2
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
404.02
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.009
0.077
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
404.02
0.009
0.077
Totals 6,464.32
128.77
275.25
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,060.32
4,404.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 226W (one 226W halogen bulb2, from the R4R Metering Study)
Operating Hours = 4.9 hours/day2, 1788.5 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure: Wattage = 72W (two 36W CFL bulbs3)
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.2259 kW x 1788.5 hrs
= 404.02kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.072 kW x 1788.5 hrs
= 128.77 kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 404.02 kWh - 128.77 kWh
= 275.25 kWh
208
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using the OPA Res Lighting load profile. Refer to
Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Based on the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC)4 the EUL was found to be 16 years
for all Energy Star fixtures. This assumption coincides with the Database for Energy Efficient
Resources (DEER) 20085 assumptions of 16 years as well.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost for a Conventional Torchiere = $20 2
Average cost for a ENERGY STAR® Torchiere = $40 2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
209
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 2006-1
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
98.55
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
10
40
Comments: Based on torchieres only: 2.5 hours/day usage (912.5 hours/year) with efficiency
wattage = 42 W and baseline wattage = 150W. Annual Demand Savings = 0.108 kW. (Freeridership = 0.06, spillover = 0.07, persistence = 1.0). 6
New York Energy $mart
Programs - Deemed Savings
Database
325
0.025
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Based on torchieres only: 3.63 operating hours/day (1328 hours/year) replacing a
conventional halogen torchiere. 7
Efficiency Vermont: Technical
Reference User Manual (TRM),
No. 4-19
257.9
0.028
0.052
N/A
N/A
Comments: Based on torchieres only: a high efficiency fluorescent torchiere replacing a halogen
torchiere operating at 3.4 hours/day or 1241 hours/year. 7
References
Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September 2007).
2The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
3Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N, 2007.
4California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), 2001, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs.
Report to the Legislature. San Francisco, California: California Public Utilities Commission.
5CPUC, "2008 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources - Version 2008.2.05", December 16, 2008.
6Efficiency Maine, 2007, Residential Technical Reference Manual No. 2006-1.
http://www.cee1.org/eval/db_pdf/566.pdf (Accessed September 2009)
7Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September 2007).
1
210
ENERGY STAR® QUALIFIED INDOOR LIGHT FIXTURE
Desk Lamp Fixture
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using results from Spring Every Kilowatt Counts (EKC) and
Keep Cool Pilot Program
Updated using results from 2008 EKC Program Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Sep 11, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
ENERGY STAR® Desk Lamp Fixture
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-ENERGY STAR® Desk Lamp Fixture
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a new version (version 4) for
specifications for residential light fixtures in October 2005. In order for a light fixture to eligible to
qualify as an Energy Star light fixture, it must meet specific criteria established by the U.S. EPA
including minimum lamp life, warranty, safety requirements and quality assurance testing1
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Existing Homes / Multi-Family /
Residential / Small Commercial
211
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
35.00
0.00
35.00
0.00
2
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
2.48
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
2.48
0.00
6.85
0.00
7
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
2.48
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
2.48
0.00
6.85
0.00
13
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
135.05
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.028
2.48
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
135.05
0.003
0.028
Totals 2,160.80
36.46
98.59
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
583.36
1,577.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
59.80
0.00
48.70
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 100W (1 x 100W incandescent bulb)
Operating Hours = 3.7 hours/day2, 1350.5 hrs/yr
Conservation Measure: Wattage = 27W (1 x 27W CFL bulb)
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.100 kW x 1350.5 hrs
= 135.05 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.027 kW x 1350.5 hrs
= 36.46 kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 135.05kWh - 36.46kWh
= 98.59 kWh
212
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using the OPA Res Lighting load profile. Refer to
Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Based on the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC)3 the EUL was found to be 16 years
for all Energy Star fixtures. This assumption coincides with the Database for Energy Efficient
Resources (DEER) 20084 assumptions of 16 years as well.
Effective useful life for CFLs vary from 6,000 to 12,000 hours. An average bulb life of 8,000
hours 5 and annual operating hours of 2.7 hours/day x 365 days/year = 985.5 hours suggest a
lifetime of approximately 8 years.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost for a Conventional Ceiling Mounted Fixture = $35 2
Average cost for a ENERGY STAR® Ceiling Mounted Fixture = $35 2
The average cost for a 100 W incandescent bulb is about $1.24/bulb. Assuming each
incandescent bulb lasts for 1000 hours, it would take 8 incandescent bulbs to be equivalent to
1 CFL. CFL 27W registered an average price of $6.85 per lamp offered by
different manufacturers. 6,7
Bulb life in this fixture would average around 0.75 years for the base case and 5.9 years for
the efficient case.
213
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 20061
64.4
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
20
40
Comments: Based on interior light fixtures only: 2.1 hours/day usage (766.5 hours/year) with
efficiency wattage = 36W and baseline wattage = 120W. Annual Demand Savings = 0.084 kW.
(Free-ridership = 0.08, spillover = 0.04, persistence = 1.0)8
Vermont - Residential
Master Technical Reference
Manual
104.4
N/A
N/A
25.6
30
Comments: For the Interior, the baseline condition is an interior surface lighting fixture with
incandescent lamp(s). An ENERGY STAR® interior surface lighting fixture wired for exclusive use
with pin-based compact fluorescent lamps.9
References
Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September 2007).
2The Cadmus Group Inc., Evaluation of Ontario Power Authority's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power
Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, Prepared for: Ontario Power
Authority. July 9, 2009.
3California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), 2001, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs.
Report to the Legislature. San Francisco, California: California Public Utilities Commission.
4CPUC, "2008 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources - Version 2008.2.05", December 16, 2008.
5American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy. "Welcome to the Dark Side: The Effect of
Switching on CFL Measure Life". 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.
6http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
7http://www.ballast.com/(Accessed August 2009).
8Efficiency Maine, 2007, Residential Technical Reference Manual No. 2006-1.
http://www.cee1.org/eval/db_pdf/566.pdf (Accessed September 2009)
9Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 415-416.
1
214
FLUORESCENT LIGHT FIXTURES
T-8 Fixtures, 1 Lamp
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Revised Resource Savings Calculations
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Sep 04, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard T-8 Light Fixture with one 32W lamp (electronic ballast)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard T-12 Light Fixture with one 40W lamp (magnetic ballast)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
As of April 1, 2005, new ballast efficiency regulations in the Canadian Standards Association
standard, CAN/CSA-C654-M91 Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Efficacy Measurements were applied
to fluorescent magnetic to improve the energy efficiency of fluorescent lamp ballasts. 1 (Note: For
this measure, it is assumed that the magnetic ballast being replaced was purchased prior to this
new standard coming into effect)
Decision Type
Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Multi-Family / Small Commercial / Existing Homes / New
Homes / Residential
215
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
2
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
55.84
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
55.84
0.001
0.006
Totals 1,005.12
32.85
22.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
591.30
413.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
T-12 Fixture Total Wattage = 51W (51W lamp + ballast)2
Operating Hours = Average of 3 hours/day, 1095 hrs/yr (3.5 hours/day in kitchen, 2.5
hours/day in garage)3
Conservation Measure:
T-8 Fixture Total Wattage = 30W (30W lamp + ballast)2
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.051 kW x 1095 hrs/yr
= 55.84 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.030kW x 1095 hrs/yr
= 32.85 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 55.84 kWh/yr - 32.85 kWh/yr
= 22.99 kWh/yr
216
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life of standard T8 and T12 ballasts are rated for 50,000 hours and the lamps
are rated for 20,000 hours, 18 years based on 3 hrs/day of usage. 4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost of T12 fixture with ballasts is $16 and average cost of T8 fixture with ballasts is
$25.5,6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
217
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
BC Hydro Conservation Potential
Review 2002, Residential Sector
Report, June 2003
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
18
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Based on 1,200 hours on two 48 W lamps (including ballasts) for common areas in
9,600 apartments in British Columbia. Savings relative to conventional T12 lamps are estimated to
be 20%. Typical installed cost estimated to be $25.7
References
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), "Proposed Regulations for Fluorescent Lamp
Ballasts". http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/fluorescent.cfm?attr=4, April 20, 2009. (Accessed
November 16, 2009).
2Caneta Research Inc., "Ontario Power Authority Commercial/Institutional CDM Program Measures
Review". December 12, 2007.
3Kema Inc. 2005. CFL Metering Study: Final Report. Prepared for Pacific Gas & Electric Company San
Francisco, California, San Diego Gas & Electric Company San Diego, and Southern California Edison
Company, Rosemead California.
4Natural Resources Canada, Lighting Reference Guide, 2005.
51000 Bulbs, http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
6http://www.ballastwise.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
7Sampson Research, Residential Lighting Hours-of Use Study - Prepared for BC Hydro, Sampson
Research, Vancouver, BC, 2004.
1
218
FLUORESCENT LIGHT FIXTURES
T-8 Fixtures, 2 Lamps
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Revised Resource Savings Calculations
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Sep 04, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard T-8 Light Fixture with two 32W lamps (electronic ballast)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard T-12 Light Fixture with two 40W lamps (magnetic ballast)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
As of April 1, 2005, new ballast efficiency regulations in the Canadian Standards Association
standard, CAN/CSA-C654-M91 Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Efficacy Measurements were applied
to fluorescent magnetic to improve the energy efficiency of fluorescent lamp ballasts. 1 (Note: For
this measure, it is assumed that the magnetic ballast being replaced was purchased prior to this
new standard coming into effect)
Decision Type
Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / New Homes / Multi-Family / Residential / Small
Commercial / Single-Family
219
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
2
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
96.36
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
96.36
0.001
0.009
Totals 1,734.48
63.51
32.85
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,143.18
591.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
T-12 Fixture Total Wattage = 88W (88W lamp + ballast)2
Operating Hours = Average of 3 hours/day, 1095 hrs/yr (3.5 hours/day in kitchen, 2.5
hours/day in garage)3
Conservation Measure:
T-8 Fixture Total Wattage = 58W (58W lamp + ballast)2
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.088 kW x 1095 hrs
= 96.36 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.058 kW x 1095 hrs
= 63.51 kWh
220
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 96.36 kWh - 63.51 kWh
= 32.85 kWh
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life of standard T8 and T12 ballasts are rated for 50,000 hours and the lamps
are rated for 20,000 hours, which is 18 years based on a daily usage of 3hrs.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost of T12 fixture with ballasts is $16 and average cost of T8 fixture with ballasts is
$25.5,6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
221
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
BC Hydro Conservation Potential
Review 2002, Residential Sector
Report, June 2003
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
18
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Based on 1,200 hours on two 48 W lamps (including ballasts) for common areas in
9,600 apartments in British Columbia. Savings relative to conventional T12 lamps are estimated to
be 20%. Typical installed cost estimated to be $25.7
References
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), "Proposed Regulations for Fluorescent Lamp
Ballasts". http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/fluorescent.cfm?attr=4, April 20, 2009. (Accessed
November 16, 2009).
2Caneta Research Inc., "Ontario Power Authority Commercial/Institutional CDM Program Measures
Review". December 12, 2007.
3Kema Inc. 2005. CFL Metering Study: Final Report. Prepared for Pacific Gas & Electric Company San
Francisco, California, San Diego Gas & Electric Company San Diego, and Southern California Edison
Company, Rosemead, California.
4Natural Resources Canada, Lighting Reference Guide, 2005.
51000 Bulbs, http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
6http://www.ballastwise.com/ (Accessed August 2009).
7Sampson Research, Residential Lighting Hours-of Use Study, Sampson Research, Vancouver, BC,
2004, prepared for BC Hydro.
1
222
INDUCTION LAMP
Outdoor Lighting
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
15-Nov-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
150 W Induction Lamp
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
175 W Metal Halide HID with probe start ballast
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is proposing to amend Canada's Energy Efficiency
Regulations (the Regulations) to include certain high intensity discharge (HID) lamp ballasts.
Dealers of regulated HID lamp ballasts imported or manufactured in Canada and shipped interprovincially for sale or lease, are required to comply with minimum energy performance
standards and other regulatory requirements.1

NRCan is proposing to regulate high-intensity discharge metal halide lamp ballast in
harmonization with the US by adopting the standards as listed below
Proposed Standard for HID Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts1
Lamp Rated
Wattage
Minimum Rated
Ballast Efficiency
(%)
Magnetic Probe Start
150-500
94
Pulse Start
150-500
88
Non Pulse Start
Electronic
150-250
90
251-500
92
Ballasts Type

Metal halide ballasts can be pulse start or probe start. In the US, the new HID lighting
standards mandate pulse start ballast vs. the older probe start ballasts. Canada is likely to
follow suit. Additionally, the majority of lamp makers make lamps that are only operable on
pulse start ballasts. While induction lamps may have higher lumens/watt output over the older
probe start systems, the newer pulse start systems come ahead of the induction lamps on a
lumens/output basis. So the claimed extended life for induction lamps is the only benefit over
metal halides. Unfortunately, there are still no industry recognized standard testing procedure
for induction lamps. For example, Philips Induction is considered HID and they test on a 12
hour cycle for life, OSRAM Sylvania considers their lamps to be fluorescent and tests on 3 hour
cycles. Consequently, light output and lamp life claims may not be consistent between
manufacturers. For this reason this measure is applicable only to retrofit existing metal halides
with probe start ballasts which have not yet completed their useful life.2
223
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
Retrofit
Commercial sector
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Base
(kWh)
Electricity
Conservation
(kWh)
Savings
(kWh)
1
980.7
770.6
2
980.7
3
980.7
4
5
Natural
Gas
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
3
(m )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
69.00
0.00
503.00
0.00
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
19.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
19.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
19.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
50.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
19.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
21
980.7
770.6
210.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.000
0.024
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
20594.7
16182.6
4412.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
195.00
0.00
503.00
0.00
O&M
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Measure Assumptions:

Hours of operation (H). Assume number of hours for outdoor lighting for all building types to be
4,670 hours/year.3
Base Measure Assumptions:

224
Wattage of base measure (W base ). Assume 210 W for a 175 W standard metal halide with the
following characteristics: 13,500 initial lumens (64 initial system lumens/W); 8,775 mean
lumens (42 mean system lumens/W)2
Conservation Measure Assumptions:

Wattage of conservation measure (W conservation ). Assume 165 W for a 150 W induction lamp
with the following characteristics: 12,000 initial lumens (72.73 initial system lumens/W); 8,800
mean lumens (53.34 mean system lumens/W)2. Note that there is no industry recognized
standard testing procedure for induction lamps. Consequently, light output claims may not be
consistent between manufacturers.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Lighting Wattage (W) x Base Lighting Hours
/ 1000
= 210 x 4670 / 1000
= 980.7 kWh/yr
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Lighting Wattage (W)
x Conservation Lighting Hours / 1000
= 165 x 4670 / 1000
= 770.6 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 980.7 – 770.6
= 210.1 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful Life (EUL) for metal halide lamp is typically 15,000 - 20,000 hours.2 EUL for
metal halide ballast is assumed to be 70,000 hours.4 Assuming that there are 4670 hours of
outdoor lighting per year, EUL for metal halide lamp is 4.3 years and 15 years for the ballast.
EUL for induction lamps is assumed to be100,000 hours1 or 21 years assuming annual lighting
hours of 4670.
Note: There is no industry recognized standard testing procedure for induction lamps.
Consequently, lamp life claims may not be consistent between manufacturers.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost per lamp and ballast for 175 W metal halide HID lamps is assumed to be $19.00 and
$50.005.
The cost per lamp and ballast for induction lamps is $473.006,7.
An installation adder of $30.00/fixture can be added for existing fixtures assuming 30 minutes of
labour at $60.00/hour2. Therefore total installed costs are $503.00.
Since measure is for retrofit only, incremental cost is full installation cost of $503.00.
225
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Description
Induction
Lamp Exterior
Remarks
OnPeak
602
5.78%
Winter
MidPeak
688
4.37%
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
28.65%
0.00%
Summer
MidPeak
792
5.93%
Off
Peak
1608
21.88%
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
8.10%
25.29%
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
0.893
0.000
1.199
0.000
Exterior lighting requirements were based on daylight timing from the Canadian
Weather for Energy Calculations (CWEC) weather files used in the BEACON®
Modeling Tool3. All exterior lighting is modeled to be controlled by photocells and
controllers that turn lights on and off based on sunlight and hence is the same for all
sectors.
References
1
Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Regulations: High
Intensity Discharge (HID) Lamp Ballasts Bulletin on Developing Standards May 2010.
2
ICF Lighting Expertise including analysis completed for Natural Resources Canada. Data sources
synthesized include CSA Standards, US EISA, cuts sheets for individual lamps from various
manufacturers, consultations with lighting industry stakeholder including utilities, standards
organizations, manufacturers, etc.
3
ICF weather zone specific modeling using BEACON® energy simulation tool. Beacon® utilizes a
streamlined proprietary interface coupled with publicly available state-of-the-art simulation engines
to facilitate efficient, robust analysis that reflects variations in weather conditions, building types,
architectural characteristics, energy efficiency features and operating profiles.
4
California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), Database
on Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER), 2008 Database for Energy-Efficient Resources Version 2008.2.05.
December 16, 2008
http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
5
www.1000bulbs.com (accessed August 2009).
6
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
7
Price Catalog from Commercial Salesperson at Full Spectrum Solutions (Received by email dated
May 17, 2010).
226
LED LIGHTS
6W LED Screw-In
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Date Revised
Sep 23, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
LED Screw-In, 6W
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
15W Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Canadian Federal government announced in Spring 2007 its commitment to setting
performance standards for all lighting that would phase out the use of inefficient
incandescent light bulbs in common applications by 2012, through the Regulations under
Canada’s Energy Efficiency Act1. While CFLs have emerged as a low-cost, energy-saving
alternative to traditional incandescent bulbs, LEDs provide even greater savings than CFLs.
Beginning on September 30, 2008, solid-state lighting (SSL) products that meet efficiency
and performance criteria set by the U.S. Department of Energy can earn the ENERGY
STAR rating. The new program will include both residential and commercial applications
intended for general illumination 2.
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Residential / Multi-Family / Small
Commercial / Existing Homes
227
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
4.52
0.00
54.95
0.00
2
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
4.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
4.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
21
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
22
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
23
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
24
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
25
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
4.52
0.00
0.00
26
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
27
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
28
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
29
14.78
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
30
14.78
0.000
0.002
Totals 443.40
5.91
8.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
177.30
266.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18.08
0.00
54.95
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 15W
Operating Hours = 2.7 hours/day, 985.5 hrs/yr. The ENERGY STAR® savings calculator
suggests that a CFL bulb operates at 3 hrs/day. 3 The Lighting Efficiency Technology Report
provides that the average operating hours for all lighting (e.g. living room, dining room etc.) is
2.34 hrs/day. 4 An OPA study on prescriptive inputs assumptions by Navigant Consulting
suggests the average hours of operation per day is 2.7 hrs/day. 5
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 6 W
Operating Hours = same as base measure
228
O&M
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.015 kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 14.78 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.006kW x 985.5 hrs/yr
= 5.91 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 14.78 kWh/yr - 5.91 kWh/yr
= 8.87 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
While CFLs use ~4mg of mercury in each bulb, LEDs use no mercury and avoid disposal
complications associated with CFLs6.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Data from manufacturers and the US Department of Energy state the effective useful life of
LED light bulbs falls between 35,000 and 50,000 hours 7.The lower end of this range is used
to provide a conservative estimate of measure life. Using the above assumption of 2.7
hours/day usage, this translates to a 35 year effective useful life:
EUL = 35,000 hours / (2.7 hrs/day x 365 days/year) = 35 years
Because this is a relatively new application for LED lights, the actual expected lifetime is not
well known. For the purpose of cost-effectiveness analysis, a conservative estimate of 30
years will be used.
It is assumed that the alternative would be installing a CFL every 6 years8.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
A 6W LED is assumed to be comparable replacement equipment for a 60W incandescent or a
15W CFL9.
229
Average cost of a 6-7W LED screw in light bulb is assumed to be $54.95 10.
While LEDs remain prohibitively expensive for many consumers, advances in solid state
lighting technology promise to significantly reduce production costs in the coming years.
Electronics giant, Phillips has entered into the LED space with its line of LumiLed products,
and hopes to reduce costs to the consumer by a factor of ten in the coming years11.
Researchers at Purdue University have made significant advances in the affordability of LED
technology and believe that LED bulbs should be commercially viable within two years12.
Average cost of 15 W CFL = $4.52 / bulb. 13
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
CF1
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
Remarks
CF2
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Center for
ReSource
Conservation
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
99
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
*
53.60
Comments: Light Emitting Diodes or LEDs are the next big innovation on the horizon for
household lighting. They are more efficient, contain no mercury and can last 10 times longer than
CFLs. They are not appropriate for every application, however. Standard LEDs are not quite as
bright as a traditional bulb, but the lighting quality is closer to daylight. Plus they work with
dimmers. They give off a very direct field of light, which makes them most useful for task lighting
or when aimed directly at what you want to light. LED bulbs are harder to find and more expensive
than CFLs. The incremental cost is based on the difference between the up-front capital costs of
an LED versus an incandescent.11
Comments: *Note: EUL is reported as 60,000 hrs, by assuming 2.7hrs/day of usage the EUL is
equivalent to 60.9 years
230
US Department of
Energy
N/A
N/A
N/A
*
N/A
Comments: Full life testing for LEDs is impractical due to the long expected lifetimes. Switching
is not a determining factor in LED life, so there is no need for the on-off cycling used with other
light sources. But even with 24/7 operation, testing an LED for 50,000 hours would take 5.7 years.
Because the technology continues to develop and evolve so quickly, products would be obsolete
by the time they finished life testing.
Comments: *Note: EUL is reported as 35000-50,000 hrs, by assuming 2.7hrs/day of usage the
EUL is equivalent to 35.5-50.7 years
References
Natural Resource Canada, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Proposed Regulations, Bulletin
February 2007, Office of Energy Efficiency, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/torchierebulletin-feb-2007.cfm?text=N&printview=N
2ENERGY STAR®, “DOE ENERGY STAR® Criteria for Solid-State Lighting”
http://www.netl.doe.gov/ssl/energy_star-criteria.html,(August 25, 2008).
3ENERGY STAR® Savings Calculator – Compact Fluorescent Lights
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/CalculatorCFLsBulk.xls (accessed August 2009).
4California Energy Commission, The Lighting Efficiency Report Volume I California Baseline (California,
September 1999) 31.
5Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, September 2007.
6ENERGY STAR®, “Frequently Asked Questions Information on Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs
(CFLs) and Mercury”June 2008
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/promotions/change_light/downloads/Fact_Sheet_Mercury.pdf.
7US Department of Energy, “Lifetime of White LEDs” 2000
http://www.netl.doe.gov/SSL/PDFs/lifetimeWhiteLEDs_aug16_r1.pdf (August 21,2008).
8OPA Measures and Assumptions List – CFL Screw-in 15W, Updated July 4, 2008
9Center for ReSource Conservation, “The Skinny: Energy Efficient Lighting” 2008
http://www.conservationcenter.org/assets/docs/Skinny-efficientlighting.pdf
10 Creative Lightings Online Catalog. http://www.creativelightings.com/Par-30-High-Power-LED-Bulb7W-p/cl-7w-par30-hp.htm
11 Frank Steranka, LumiLeds Vice-President of Research and Development, in an interview with Opto &
Laser Europe. http://optics.org/cws/article/articles/17372
12 Purdue University Website, “Advance brings low-cost, bright LED lighting closer to reality”. July 17,
2008. http://www.purdue.edu/uns/x/2008b/080717SandsLighting.html
13 http://www.1000bulbs.com/ (accessed August 2009).
1
231
METAL HALIDE FIXTURE
39W CMH PAR
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Metal Halide Fixture with a 39W Ceramic Metal Halide (CMH) Parabolic Aluminized
Reflector (PAR) lamp (55W with ballast)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Flood Light, 150W Incandescent PAR
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The Office of Energy Efficiency regulates that General Service incandescent reflector lamps
must follow CAN/CSA C862-09 for brightness, efficiency, energy used, and life. 1
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Multi-Family / Small Commercial / SingleFamily / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
24.54
0.00
79.25
0.00
2
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
4.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
4.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
4.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
169.73
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
169.73
0.003
0.030
Totals 1,357.84
232
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
62.23
107.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
497.84
860.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
38.16
0.00
79.25
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Flood Light Wattage = 150W Incandescent PAR . The Lighting Study Guide, created by the
California Energy Commission, suggests that the average annual hours of operation for
indoor and outdoor lighting is 850 hours. More specifically, the average daily hours of
operation for a yard is 3.1 hours.2
Operating Hours = Average of 3.1 hours/day, 1131.5 hrs/yr (365days x 3.1 hours)
Conservation Measure:
Fixture Wattage = Metal Halide Fixture 55W (39W without ballast)
Operating Hours = Same as Base Measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.150 kW x 1131.5 hrs/yr
= 169.73 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.055 kW x 1131.5 hrs/yr
= 62.23 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 169.73 kWh/yr - 62.23 kWh/yr
= 107.50 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Lighting load profile and
coincidence factors of 1.940 (winter) and 0.914 (summer). See Appendix A for the description of
methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
233
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The Lighting Reference Guide specifies the effective useful life of a 39W CMH lamp to be
9000 hours and a 150W incandescent PAR lamp is 2000 hours.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 150 W incandescent PAR bulb is about $4.54/bulb. A CMH 39W
PAR has an average price of $44.25 per lamp offered by different manufacturers. And the
ballasts for the incandescent fixture and CMH fixture have an average cost of $20.00 and $35
respectively. 4,5 This results in an incremental cost of $54.71.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
American Council for an
Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
177
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: Metal halide lamps have a useful life of 9000 to 12000 hours and produce 2200 –
2400 lumens. The annual energy consumption of a 39 W metal halide lamp is 177 kWh (assumes
11 hours/day (DOE 2002)). 6
234
References
Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada, "Canada's Energy Efficiency Regulations Lamp (Light Bulb) Labelling for Lighting Products". http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/lamplabelling-july2010.cfm?attr=0 Date modified August 03, 2010.
2California Energy Commission, The Lighting Study Guide (California, September 1999) 2.
3Natural Resources Canada, Lighting Reference Guide, 2005.
4 www.ballastwise.com (accessed August 2009).
5http://www.1000bulbs.com/(accessed August 2009).
6ACEEE, “Emerging Technologies and Practices” 2004, http://www.aceee.org/pubs/a042_l6.pdf (July 5,
2007)
1
235
SEASONAL LED LIGHTS
C-7 LED Lights
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Results updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt
Counts (EKC) Program
Results Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2009 EKC Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Oct 01, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
C7 LED Light String (25 bulbs/string)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Typical C7 Incandescent Light String (25 bulbs/string)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
ENERGY STAR® has identified criteria for SLEDs to be qualified as a Canadian Energy
Star® product assessing both the energy efficiency and quality of the decorative lights. 1
There are also two safety standards available for decorative lighting:1
CSA-22.2 No.37-M1989 Christmas Tree and Other Decorative Lighting Outfits
UL 588-2000 Standard for Seasonal and Holiday Decorative Products
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Small Commercial / Existing Homes /
Multi-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
236
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
15.50
1.55
13.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
6.99
0.00
7.58
0.00
2
15.50
1.55
13.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
15.50
1.55
13.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
15.50
1.55
13.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
15.50
1.55
13.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Totals 77.50
7.75
69.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6.99
0.00
7.58
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 125 Watts (5W x 25 bulbs/string)2,3
Operating Hours = 5 hours/day, 31 days 2 Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 12.5 W (0.5 x 25 bulbs/string)2
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.1 kW x 155 hrs
= 15.5 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.01 kW x 155 hrs
= 1.55 kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 15.5 kWh - 1.55 kWh
= 13.95 kWh
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Holiday Lighting load profile. See
Appendix A for the description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
A study done by OEE, NRCan and Navigant Consulting Inc. estimates the effective useful life
of life of SLEDs to be 5 years.2
237
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost of C7 SLED string = $7.58/string of 25 bulbs, from retail stores (Home Depot,
Canadian Tire, and Rona websites, November 2009)
Average cost of C7 incandescent string = $6.99/string of 25 bulbs from retail stores (Canadian
Tire, Home Depot, and Rona websites, November 2009)
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
OPA Res
Holiday
25.7% 25.7% 48.6% 0.0%
Lighting ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
0.0%
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 2006-1
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
17.8
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0
N/A
20
N/A
Comments: Based on 150 hours/season usage of one string of C7 incandescent bulbs (25) and
one string of “mini” incandescent bulbs (70). Annual demand savings is 0.1187 kW.4
Ontario Energy Board, Total
Resource Cost Guide, October
2006
26
0.0
0.011
30
4
Comments: Electricity savings based on baseline scenario of one C7 incandescent bulb string
(25 bulbs) and one “mini” incandescent bulb string (did not specify number of bulbs) used for 150
hours per season and consuming 27 kWh/year in comparison with C7 and “mini” LED lights
operating at the same length of time, using less than 2 kWh/year. Comments: The higher expected useful lifetime of the LED lights may be attributed to the fact
that the OEB uses a lifespan of the LED bulbs as 200,000 hours.5
238
References
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), "ENERGY STAR® Program Requirements for Decorative Light
Strings Test Procedure and Eligibility Criteria"
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/decorative-lights.cfm?attr=4,
March 1, 2008. (Accessed November 18, 2009).
2Navigant Consulting Inc. and NRCan, 2006, Proposal for Decorative Light Strings for Inclusion as Part
of the ENERGY STAR Program Version 1.1, Prepared for: United States Environmental Protection
Agency.
3Sampson Research, 2003, Holiday Lighting Market Assessment Phase III Report: Adjusted Baseline
Estimates, Prepared for: Power Smart Quality and Assurance BC Hydro, British Columbia.
4Efficiency Maine, 2007, Residential Technical Reference Manual No. 2006-1.
http://www.cee1.org/eval/db_pdf/566.pdf (Accessed September 2009)
5Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
1
239
SEASONAL LED LIGHTS
Mini LED Lights
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Results updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt
Counts (EKC) Program
Results updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2009 EKC Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Oct 01, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Mini LED Light String (70 bulbs/string)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Typical Mini Incandescent Light String (70 bulbs/string)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Energy Star® has identified criteria for SLEDs to be qualified as a Canadian Energy Star®
product assessing both the energy efficiency and quality of the decorative lights. 1
There are also two safety standards available for decorative lighting:1
CSA-22.2 No.37-M1989 Christmas Tree and Other Decorative Lighting Outfits
UL 588-2000 Standard for Seasonal and Holiday Decorative Products
Decision Type
New / Retrofit /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / New Homes / Residential / Multi-Family / Small
Commercial / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
5.42
0.43
4.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
3.15
0.00
16.98
0.00
2
5.42
0.43
4.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
5.42
0.43
4.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
5.42
0.43
4.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
5.42
0.43
4.99
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.002
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2.15
24.95
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3.15
0.00
16.98
0.00
Totals 27.10
240
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 35 Watts (0.5W x 70 bulbs/string)2,3
Operating Hours = 5 hours/day, 31 days 2 Conservation Measure:
Wattage = 2.8 W (0.04 x 70 bulbs/string)2
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.035 kW x 155 hrs/yr
= 5.425 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.0028 kW x 150 hrs/yr
= 0.434 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 5.425 kWh/yr - 0.434 kWh/yr
=4.99 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were calculated using OPA Residential Holiday Lighting load profile. See
Appendix A for the description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
A study done by OEE, NRCan and Navigant Consulting Inc. estimates the effective useful life
of life of SLEDs to be 5 years2
241
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost of C7 SLED string = $16.98/string of 70 bulbs, from retail stores (Home Depot,
Canadian Tire, and Rona websites, November 2009)
Average cost of C7 incandescent string = $3.15/string of 25 bulbs from retail stores (Canadian
Tire, Home Depot, and Rona websites, November 2009)
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
OPA Res
Holiday
25.7% 25.7% 48.6% 0.0%
Lighting ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
0.0%
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Maine Residential
Technical Manual No. 2006-1
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
17.8
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0
N/A
20
N/A
Comments: Based on 150 hours/season usage of one string of C7 incandescent bulbs (25) and
one string of “mini” incandescent bulbs (70). Annual demand savings is 0.1187 kW.4
Ontario Energy Board, Total
Resource Cost Guide, October
2006
26
0.0
0.011
30
4
Comments: Electricity savings based on baseline scenario of one C7 incandescent bulb string
(25 bulbs) and one “mini” incandescent bulb string (did not specify number of bulbs) used for 150
hours per season and consuming 27 kWh/year in comparison with C7 and “mini” LED lights
operating at the same length of time, using less than 2 kWh/year. Comments: The higher expected useful lifetime of the LED lights may be attributed to the fact
that the OEB uses a lifespan of the LED bulbs as 200,000 hours.5
242
References
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), "ENERGY STAR® Program Requirements for Decorative Light
Strings Test Procedure and Eligibility Criteria"
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/specifications/decorative-lights.cfm?attr=4,
March 1, 2008. (Accessed November 18, 2009).
2Navigant Consulting Inc. and NRCan, 2006, Proposal for Decorative Light Strings for Inclusion as Part
of the ENERGY STAR Program Version 1.1, Prepared for: United States Environmental Protection
Agency.
3Sampson Research, 2003, Holiday Lighting Market Assessment Phase III Report: Adjusted Baseline
Estimates, Prepared for: Power Smart Quality and Assurance BC Hydro, Burnaby, British Columbia.
4Efficiency Maine, 2007, Residential Technical Reference Manual No. 2006-1.
http://www.cee1.org/eval/db_pdf/566.pdf (Accessed September 2009)
5Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
1
243
244
Controls for Lighting
245
246
DIMMER SWITCH
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
2 x 60W Incandescent bulbs with a Dimmer switch for a ceiling fixture
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
2 x 60W Incandescent bulbs with a conventional On/Off switch for a ceiling fixture
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CSA standards for lighting control products.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Small Commercial / Residential / New Homes / Multi-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
1.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
2
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
118.26
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
118.26
0.001
0.007
Totals 1,182.60
94.61
23.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
946.10
236.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
247
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 120W
Operating Hours = 2.71 hours/day, 985.5 hrs/yr
Average lifetime usage of incandescent bulb = 750 hours 2 Conservation Measure:
Assume light fixture is dimmed by 25%, resulting in 20% energy savings and increasing the
life of the incandescent bulbs by a factor of 4 3
Wattage = 96 W (120W x 0.8)
Operating Hours = same as base measure
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 985.5 hrs
= 118.26 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.096 kW x 985.5 hrs
= 94.61 kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 118.26 - 94.61 kWh
= 23.65 kWh
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings will only occur if the timer is used to reduce the amount of usage during
peak hours. If the timer is used to shut off the lights during off peak hours, there should be no
peak savings. See Appendix A for description of methodology in determining the peak demand
savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
248
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List 4 lists 10 years as the effective useful life.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The Average cost of on/off switch is assumed to be $1.00 and average cost of dimmer
switch is assumed to be $14.00 (based on average unit cost data from Every Kilowatt
Counts distributor sales data)
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Ontario Energy Board, Total
Resource Cost Guide, October
2006
139
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0
0.090
10
5.00
Comments: Baseline conditions for two 100 W incandescent bulbs operating for 2,320
hours/year, totalling 464 kWh/year. Annual electricity savings using dimmer is based on an
assumed 30% savings, as referenced from an Ontario Hydro Retailer Program. 5
249
References
1 Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, Toronto,Canada, September 2007.
2 USEPA, Energy Star Website, www.energystar.gov, 2007
3 Ecos Consulting, 2002, Market Research Report - Energy Efficient Lighting in New Construction,
prepared for Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA).
4 Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”, October 14, 2005.
5 Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
250
LIGHTING TIMERS
Indoor Lighting Timer
Revision #
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Jul 11, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated based on 2009 EKC Program Survey Results
Oct 01, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Simple timers which can be programmed to turn on/off specific indoor lamps/fixtures rather than
leaving operational for longer periods.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
The baseline conditions for this analysis are conventional light fixtures with no control devices to
reduce the operational hours of the device
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CSA standards for lighting control products.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Multi-Family / Small Commercial / Residential / Existing Homes / New Homes
/ Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
19.50
0.00
2
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
107.31
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.002
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
107.31
0.002
0.018
Totals 1,073.10
42.92
64.39
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
429.20
643.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19.50
0.00
251
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Energy savings from this measure largely depend on the user's behaviourial habits, this scenario
is assuming that the user will reduce the operation time by 60%. Average indoor hours of
operation per day was found to be 2.45 hours/day1. Calculated savings are based only on the
usage of the lighting control device itself with potential for additional savings using in
combination with other energy efficient products (i.e. CFL bulbs).
Base Measure
Wattage = 120W (two 60W incandescent bulbs)
Operating Hours = 2.45 hours/day (894.25 hours/year) 1
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = Same as Base Measure
Operating Hours = 0.98 hours/day (357.7 hours/year) (Assumed 60% savings from installing
the timer)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 894.25 hrs/yr
= 107.31 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 357.7 hrs/yr
= 42.924 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 107.31 kWh/yr - 42.924 kWh/yr
= 64.39 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings will only occur if the timer is used to reduce the amount of usage during
peak hours. If the timer is used to shut off the lights during off peak hours, there should be no
peak savings. See Appendix A for description of methodology in determining the peak demand
savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
252
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life was estimated to be 10 years.1
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Based on different prices from retail stores in Canada the average light timer price was
$19.50.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2009 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, Toronto, Canada. September 2009.
1
253
LIGHTING TIMERS
Outdoor Lighting Timer
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated with results from OPA 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts (EKC)
Power Saving Event (PSE), Keep Cool Pilot & Rewards for Recycling
(R4R) programs
Updated based on 2009 EKC Program Survey Results
Jul 04, 2008
Oct 26, 2009
Oct 01, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Simple timers which can be programmed to turn on/off specific outdoor lamps/fixtures rather than
leaving operational for longer periods.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
The baseline conditions for this analysis are conventional light fixtures with no control devices to
reduce the operational hours of the device
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CSA standards for lighting control products.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Multi-Family / Single-Family / Small
Commercial / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
17.98
0.00
2
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
73.21
53.00
20.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
530.00
202.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17.98
0.00
Totals 732.10
254
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Outdoor timers were found to be commonly used for outdoor lighting and holiday lighting 1,2. Outdoor lighting is assumed to operate for 138 days/year and holiday lighting is assumed to
operate for 31 days/year. The wattage and distribution of use is outlined below. Outdoor Timer Use
Average Wattage 2
Average
Use without Timer
(hours/day)
Average Use with
Timer (hours/day)
Distribution of Timer
Use
180
97
7
10
5.7
5
30%
70%
Outdoor Lighting
Holiday Lighting
Base
Measure:
Wattage = 180W for Outdoor lighting and 97W for holiday lighting
Operating Hours = 7 hours per day for 138 days/year and 10 hours per day for 31 days/yr
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = Same as Base Measure
Operating Hours = 5.7 hours/day for 138 days/year and 5 hours/day for 31 days/year Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 0.3 x [(Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours
(hrs/yr)]Outdoor lighting + 0.7 x [(Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)]Holiday
Lighting
= 0.3 x [0.180W x 7 hrs/day x 138 days/yr] + 0.7 x
[0.097 x 10 hrs/day x 31 days/yr]
= 73.21 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 0.3 x [(Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)]Outdoor lighting + 0.7 x [(Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)]Holiday Lighting = 0.3 x [0.180W x 5.7 hrs/day x 138 days/yr]
+ 0.7 x [0.097 x 5 hrs/day x 31 days/yr]
= 53.00 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 73.21 kWh/yr - 53.00 kWh/yr
= 20.21 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
The two seasonal energy savings patterns found in the SESP section are blended by using the
30% Outdoor Lighting and 70% Holiday Lighting assumption. The resulting blended pattern is
shown in the table below.
255
Description
Blend (70% Holiday, 30%
Outdoor)
OnPeak
602
18.0%
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off-Peak
1614
On-Peak
522
18.0%
34.0%
0.0%
Summer
MidPeak
783
4.0%
OffPeak
1623
Shoulder
Mid-Peak
Off-Peak
1350
1623
19.6%
1.5%
5.0%
The blended CF2 values are assumed to be 1.554 for winter and 0.733 for summer See
Appendix A for description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The effective useful life was estimated to be 10 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The cost for an outdoor timer is estimated to be $17.98 based on average cost of several
retailers.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
OPA
Outdoor
Light Timer 14.83% 7.41% 19.48% 0.0% 11.25% 13.36% 16.72% 16.94%
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
OPA Res
Holiday
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
256
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
25.7% 25.7% 48.6% 0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Ontario Energy Board, Total
Resource Cost Guide, October
2006
292
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.0
0.189
20
20
Comments: For outdoor timer only. Based on two floodlights (each 75W incandescent bulbs)
operational 50% of the time (4,380 hours/year). Timer is assumed to be operational for only 8
hours/day. 4
References
1 Navigant Consulting Inc., Every Kilowatt Counts Program Survey, Toronto, Canada, September 2009.
2 Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September, 2007).
3 Canadian Tire, Home Depot, and Walmart websites
4 Ontario Energy Board (OEB), "Total Resource Cost Guide" October 2, 2006.
257
MOTION SENSORS
Hard Wired Indoor Motion Sensor
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
1
Date Revised
Jul 04, 2008
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated based on 2009 EKC program survey results
Oct 01, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Indoor motion sensors which reduce the operational hours of lamps/fixtures.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
The baseline conditions for this analysis are conventional light fixtures with no control devices to
reduce the operational hours of the device.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
There are no minimum standards or regulations for general outdoor motion sensors
however Energy Star® qualified outdoor lighting fixtures must meet specific requirements
set out by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) / Department of Energy (DOE) with
respect to motion control to be compliant with reduced operating time qualifications.
CSA standards for lighting control products.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Multi-Family / Existing Homes / Small Commercial / Residential
/ Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
2
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
77.96
35.92
42.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.001
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
359.20
420.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
Totals 779.60
258
Peak Demand Savings
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Wattage = 120W (Simple Indoor Light Fixture with 2 x 60W incandescent light bulbs)
Operating Hours = 1.78 hours/day, 649.7 hrs/yr.1
Conservation Measure:
Wattage = Same as base measure
Operating Hours = 0.82 hours/day (299.3 hrs/yr) - Calculated by using average savings
using indoor motion sensor = 54% 2
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 649.7 hrs
= 77.96 kWh
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.120 kW x 299.3 hrs
= 35.92 kWh
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 77.96 kWh - 35.92 kWh
= 42.04 kWh
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using the OPA Res Lighting load profile. Refer to
Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
259
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Average useful life of indoor motion sensor was found to be 10 years2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Average cost of lights with motion sensors = $34/sensor (Home Depot and Canadian Tire
November, 2009)
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
OPA Res
Lighting
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
8.72% 8.11% 19.43% 1.77% 9.65% 17.74% 14.79% 19.79% 1.566
0.78
1.94
0.914
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
1 Navigant Consulting Inc., Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2009 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program, Toronto, Canada, September 2009.
California Energy Commission (CEC), 1999c, “Lighting Efficiency and Technical Report”, Volume II
Appendix: Description of the California Model and It’s Inputs, Prepared by Heschong Mahone Group.
2
260
MOTION SENSORS
Outdoor Motion Sensor
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from Final Evaluation Report of 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
(EKC) Program
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Wall-mounted 2 socket security/spotlight with motion sensor or one socket wall mounted porch
light fixture using a motion sensor.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Two baseline conditions:
Conventional wall-mounted 2 socket security/spotlight using a representative mix of
incandescent, halogen, and CFL bulbs
Typical one socket wall mounted porch light fixture, also using a representative mix of
incandescent and CFL bulbs
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
There are no minimum standards or regulations for general outdoor motion sensors
however Energy Star® qualified outdoor lighting fixtures must meet specific requirements
set out by the US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) / Department of Energy (DOE) with
respect to motion control to be compliant with reduced operating time qualifications.
Decision Type
New /
Replacement
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Small Commercial / Existing Homes / MultiFamily / Residential
261
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
2
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
420.58
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
420.58
0.000
0.000
Totals 4,205.80
261.20
159.38
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,612.00
1,593.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
34.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Common Assumptions:
Effective lifetime of bulbs1
Incandescent: 750 hours
Halogen: 3,000 hours
26 W CFL: 6000 hours
15 W CFL: 8000 hours
85% of consumers purchasing security/spotlight motion sensor (scenario#1) and 15%
consumers purchasing porch light motion sensor (scenario #2) based on sales mix data
from the EKC survey.
Base Measure Assumptions:
1st Baseline Conditions (security/spotlight)
Average hours of operation per day = 4.75 hours/day (based on EKC survey were almost
100% of households leave lights on during evening hours only [calculated])
Representative type of bulb mix = 85% two 150 W incandescent bulbs, 10% using two 90 W
halogen bulbs, and 5% using two 26 W CFL bulbs2-3
Total Average Wattage (based on bulb mix) = 275.6 Watts (calculated)
2nd Baseline Conditions (porch light)
Average hours of operation per day = 4.75 hours/day (based on EKC survey were almost
100% of households leave lights on during evening hours only [calculated])
Representative type of bulb mix = 90% using one 60 W incandescent bulb and 10% using
one 15 W CFL bulb2-3
Total Average Wattage (based on bulb mix) = 55.5 Watts (calculated)
262
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
1st Scenario Efficient Technology Conditions
Average hours of operation per day = 2.95 hours/day (based on 75% savings4 and
households leaving lights on all night – 11.78 hours/day [calculated])
Representative type of bulb mix = 85% two 150 W incandescent bulbs, 10% using two 45 W
halogen bulbs, and 5% using two 26 W CFL bulbs2-3
Total Average Wattage (based on bulb mix) = 275.6 Watts (calculated)
2nd Scenario Efficient Technology Conditions
Average hours of operation per day = 2.95 hours/day (based on 75% savings4 and
households leaving lights on all night – 11.78 hours/day [calculated])
Representative type of bulb mix = 90% using one 60 W incandescent bulb and 10% using
one 15 W CFL bulb2-3
Total Average Wattage (based on bulb mix) = 55.5 Watts (calculated)
The OEB Measures and Assumptions List 5lists a value of 209 kWh for annual electricity savings
based on 30% savings based on Ontario Hydro Retailer Program. An OPA study on
prescriptive inputs assumptions by Navigant Consulting estimated 161.1 kWh for the annual
electricity savings (based on an average for wall mounted security spotlight and porch light) 6. The Lighting Study Guide 7 has determined the hours of use multiplier of 1.14. When this value
is multiplied by the hours of operation for an on-off switch it reveals the hours of operation for a
motion detector.
Annual Electricity Savings:
1 st Case Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating
Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.2756 kW x 1733.75hrs
= 477.82 kWh
1 st Case Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW) x
Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.2756 kW x 1076.75hrs
= 296.75 kWh
2 nd Case Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Wattage (kW) x Operating
Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.0555 kW x 1733.75 hrs
= 96.22 kWh
2 nd Case Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Conservation Measure Wattage (kW)
x Operating Hours (hrs/yr)
= 0.0555 kW x 1076.75 hrs
= 59.76 kWh Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 0.85(477.82 - 296.75) kWh + 0.15(96.22-59.76)
= 159.38 kWh
263
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using the OPA Res Outdoor Solar Lighting load profile. Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining the peak demand
savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Based on typical light fixture useful lifetime 1-8
The OEB Assumptions and Measures List 8 lists 10 years as the effective useful life. An OPA
study on prescriptive inputs assumptions by Navigant Consulting suggests 10 years as the
effective useful life6. Other jurisdiction (see below) suggests 15 years (Vermont) and 8 years
(California) as the useful life.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Incremental cost ($34.00) calculated based on the assumed purchasing mix and based on a
review of the average price difference between the conventional security light or porch light
and one equipped with a motion sensor (Home Depot and Canadian Tire, November 2009).
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Outdoor
Solar
Lighting ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
264
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0% 13.2% 65.2%
4.9%
16.7%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Vermont - Residential
Master Technical Reference
Manual
N/A
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
15
33
N/A
8
N/A
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
Comments: Refer to the reference below 9 for more details.
California - DEER
272
N/A
Comments: Refer to reference below 10 for more details.
References
USEPA, Energy Star Website, www.energystar.gov, 2007
Opinion Dynamics Corporation, 2000, Residential Lighting Fixture Market Assessment: Ceiling Fans
and Outdoor Lighting, prepared for The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE)
3Natural Resources Canada. Office of Energy Efficiency. 2003 Survey of Household Energy Use
(SHEU) : Summary Report. Ottawa, Ont., Natural Resources Canada, 2006.
4California Energy Commission (CEC), 1999a, “Lighting Efficiency and Technical Report”, Volume 1:
California Baseline, Prepared by Heschong Mahone Group.
5Ontario Energy Board “OEB Assumption and Measure List: Residential”, October 14, 2005.
6Navigant Consulting Inc., “Review of Prescriptive Input Assumptions: 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts
Program” (September 2007).
7California Energy Commission, Lighting Study Guide (California, September 1999) 41.
8Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
9Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 438-439.
10 Itron, Assessment of the Ontario Energy Board’s Measure Database (Ontario) 4.
1
2
265
266
Solar Energy
Applications
267
268
SOLAR LANDSCAPE LIGHTS
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Updated from the 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts Program Final
Evaluation Report
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Solar landscape lights
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Conventional electric powered garden lights use low voltage requiring transformers, weatherproof
outlets, cables and extension cords
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
CSA Standard C22.2 No.250.0 or UL 1598 (Luminaires) applies to luminaires for use in nonhazardous locations and that are intended for installation on branch circuits of 600 V nominal or
less between conductors.
Low voltage landscape lightings (30 V nominal or less) are not covered under this standard. 1
Decision Type
New / Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
4.80
0.00
4.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
7.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
2
4.80
0.00
4.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
4.80
0.00
4.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
4.80
0.00
4.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
4.80
0.00
4.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
24.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7.00
0.00
14.00
0.00
Totals 24.00
269
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Although some of the newer electric powered garden lights are equipped with photo
sensors, conventional garden lights need to be either manually shut on/off or used with a
timer.
Different bulb types and wattages are used as garden lights. Assume representative type of
bulb mix to be 50% using 10 W halogen bulbs, 25% using 7W incandescent bulbs, and 25%
using 1.5W LEDs. This adds up to an average of 7.125 W.2
Average hours of operation per season is about 675 hours/season.2
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = 7.125 W x 675 hours / 1000 W/kW
= 4.8 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Res Outdoor Solar Lighting load shape. Refer
to Appendix A for the methodology in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
An OPA commissioned study by Navigant on prescriptive input assumptions reports 5 years
as the effective useful life due to the general wear and tear of the lights and degradation of the
plastic material from the sun.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost of outdoor garden light is about $7.00 while the average cost of solar
outdoor garden light is about $ 13-15.3
270
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Outdoor
Solar
Lighting ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0% 13.2% 65.2%
4.9%
16.7%
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
1 Luminaires UL1598, http://ulstandardsinfonet.ul.com/scopes/1598.html.
2 Navigant Consulting, Inc., 2007 Every Kilowatt Counts Final Evaluation Report, A report prepared for
the Ontario Power Authority, June 17, 2008.
3 Home Depot website, October 2009.
271
SOLAR THERMAL WATER HEATER
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Included in the OPA Measures and Assumptions
List
15-Feb-2008
1
Updated resource savings assumptions
15-Oct-2009
2
Updated savings equation
30-Sep-2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric storage water heater paired with solar thermal water heater.
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric storage water heater with no solar thermal water heater.
Codes, Standards, and Regulations

Natural Resources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency defines energy performance
standards for stationary electric storage tank water heaters with a capacity of not less than 50
litres and not more than 450 litres that are intended for use on a pressure system.1
Product Class
Maximum Allowable
Standby Loss (W)
Water Heaters with Bottom Inlet*:
50 to 270 litres (11 to 59 imperial
gallons)
> 270 to 454 litres (60 to 100 imperial
gallons)
40 + (0.20V)
(0.472V) – 33.5
Water Heaters with Top Inlet:
50 to 270 litres (11 to 59 imperial
gallons)
> 270 to 454 litres (60 to 100 imperial
gallons)
35 + (0.20V)
(0.472V) – 38.5
* Supply pipe external to tank and connection near the bottom
where:
V - rated storage capacity in litres
W - watts

272
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Star® qualified solar water heater
program requirements define the minimum solar fraction (SF) allowed to be greater than or
equal to 0.5. Products must also meet the minimum requirements of the energy efficiency
regulations. The solar fraction is defined as the energy delivered by the system divided by the
electrical energy input into the system. The solar water heating system provides a minimum of
50% of the water heating load, with the remaining load being provided by a standard efficiency
electric water heater.2
Decision Type
Target Market(s)
New/Retrofit
Residential (Single Family and Multi Family)
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Base
(kWh)
Electricity
Conservation
(kWh)
Savings
(kWh)
Natural
Gas
(m3)
1
0
-1713
1713
2
0
-1713
3
0
-1713
4
0
5
Peak Demand Savings
(L)
Summer
Capacity
(kW)
Winter
Capacity
(kW)
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
(L)
Heating
Oil
(L)
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
451.00
0.00
7493.00
0.00
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
0
-1713
1713
0
0
0
0
0.580
0.009
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TOTAL
0
-25695
25695
0
0
0
0
451.00
0.00
7493.00
0.00
Propane
Water
Equipment
O&M
Equipment
($)
($)
($)
O&M
($)
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Annual Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 0
Conservation Measure:
To develop an equation that represents the energy production potential of a solar thermal system,
rated performance data from the Solar Rating and Certification Council (SRCC)3 were used. SRCC
estimates the annual performance of rated systems in kWh saved using standard test conditions
representative of specific geographic locations. Currently, SRCC only provides performance
estimates for locations in the United States and data representing Rochester, New York, were
selected.
A regression was created for all rated systems in Rochester using the Solar Energy Factor (SEF)
of the system and its normalized energy, defined as annual kWh of production divided by SEF.
SRCC uses SEF as its performance rating for solar domestic water heating systems, which is
defined as the energy delivered by the system divided by the electrical or gas energy put into the
system. The SEF is presented as a number similar to the Energy Factor (EF) given to conventional
water heaters by the Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association (GAMA)4.
273
The regression equation that was produced from the data was then converted so that Solar
Fraction (SF) is used as the input in place of SEF because ® defines its criteria in terms of SF.
Also, note that the Weather Location Factor is applied in the resulting equation to adjust the
performance in Rochester to reflect Ontario-specific weather conditions.
LOCATION
Toronto
Ottawa
North Bay
WEATHER FACTOR
(WF)
0.95
0.97
1.03
The resulting equation is as follows:
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = - 1482.6 x (0.904 / (1 – SF)) 0.3306 x WF
Assume SF = 0.5
Annual Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = - 1482.6 x (0.904 / (1 – 0.5)) 0.3306 x 0.95
= - 1,713 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Annual Base Measure Consumption
- Annual Conservation Measure Consumption
= 0 – (-1713)
= 1713 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
See Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining peak demand savings using
end use load profiles.
Other Resource Savings
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life for solar thermal water heaters is assumed to be 15 years.5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Base measure equipment cost is assumed to be $296.00, installation cost to be $155.00, and
O&M cost to be $0 for a 189 litre (standard 50 US gallon) electric storage water heater. 6,7,8
Conservation measure equipment and installation cost is assumed to be $7,493.00 and O&M cost
to be $0 for a 189 litre (standard 50 US gallon) electric storage water heater paired with a solar
water heater.8,9
Therefore, incremental cost is assumed to be $7,042.00 for equipment and installation, with a $0
incremental cost for annual O&M for a 189 litre (standard 50 US gallon) tank paired with a solar
water heater.
274
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
OnPeak
602
Winter
MidPeak
688
Off
Peak
1614
OnPeak
528
Summer
MidPeak
792
Off
Peak
1608
SWHToronto
4.87%
9.77%
5.13%
19.89%
12.59%
14.71%
22.20%
SWHOttawa
5.64%
12.51%
7.31%
18.77%
11.79%
13.23%
SWH-North
Bay
5.76%
9.36%
5.72%
18.77%
12.40%
16.18%
Description
Shoulder
MidOff
Peak
Peak
1290
1638
CF1
CF2
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
10.83%
0.201
0.844
0.063
0.899
20.03%
10.73%
0.190
0.864
0.061
0.909
22.11%
9.71%
0.099
0.783
0.030
0.873
A seasonal energy savings pattern was generated for each housing sector (i.e., singlefamily and multi-family), and three geographic locations. The seasonal energy savings
pattern was generated based on a hot water usage profile outlined in the Building
America Performance Analysis 10. The Building America study estimated the hourly
profile of hot water drawn for all end-uses in residential homes on a daily basis. The
daily profile was used for each day of the year and was multiplied by the average amount
of hot water used per day to generate the annual hot water consumption and savings
profiles.
The seasonal energy savings pattern is identical for single family and multi-family
scenarios because the hourly profile was assumed to be identical for both sectors. While
Remarks
the annual energy consumption for hot water varies between the two sectors, the
percentage of energy used in each hour remains the same. Therefore, the seasonal
energy savings patterns are identical.
While the efficiency of the solar thermal water heater will also influence the savings
pattern, this was not accounted for in order to limit the number of savings patterns to a
usable quantity. Instead, a representative pattern was generated for each scenario
assuming a base measure minimally compliant with efficiency regulations for water
heaters and a conservation measure that combined a minimally compliant water heater
with a solar thermal water heating system that was minimally compliant with the U.S.
EPA’s Energy Star® qualified solar water heater program requirements (i.e., SF = 0.5).
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Savings (kWh)
ACEEE Emerging
Technologies – Solar
Water Heaters11
2,000
On-Peak Demand Reduction
Winter (kW)
Summer (kW)
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
-
0.6
14
4,850
Comments: Calculated savings represents 58% electricity savings when compared to a 0.88 EF
electric water heater. Cost represents installed system cost without O&M.
EIA – Technology
Forecast Updates12
-
-
-
20
6,050-7,550
Comments: Solar water heater sized to provide 50% of overall water heating load. Cost data
included is for northern installations, providing additional collector area and meeting requirements
for freeze protection. Full cost of $6,500-8,000 was provided in reference. Incremental cost
presented here subtracts assumed baseline cost of $436 (see Base & Conservation Measure
Equipment and O&M Costs) and rounds to nearest $50.
275
Vermont Electric
Efficiency Potential
Study13
1,665
-
-
20
4,500
Comments: Estimated savings compared to a standard efficiency electric water heater.
Incremental cost represents installed cost without O&M.
Solar Hot Water in
Cold Climates14
-
-
-
-
6,500-7,350
Comments: Cost information represents actual costs for solar water heating systems in northern
climates, including Wisconsin & Massachusetts. Full cost of $6,500-7,800 was provided in
reference. Incremental cost presented here subtracts assumed baseline cost of $436 (see Base &
Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs) and rounds to nearest $50.
References
1
Natural Resourcers Canada Energy Efficiency Regulations for Electric Water Heaters.
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/electric-water-heaters.cfm?attr=0
2
United States EPA ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Residential Water Heaters.
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/product_specs/program_reqs/WaterHeater_ProgramRequire
ments.pdf
3
SRCC Annual Performance Search. http://securedb.fsec.ucf.edu/srcc/annual_search. Accessed on
22/07/2010.
4
SRCC. “OG-300 Certification of Solar Water Heating Systems”. http://www.solarrating.org/ratings/og300_ratings%20info.htm
5
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) http://www.deeresources.com/
6
Equipment costs are taken from Lowes.com Web site, accessed on 23/04/2010. The following link
was used to estimate the equipment cost for a standard electric storage water heater:
http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=140452-135-E2F50HD045V&langId=1&storeId=10151&productId=1015941&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=sim&rel=nofollow.
7
Installation and O&M costs were taken from Navigant Consulting’s report for EIA. See reference 8.
8
Converted to CAD using Average (January – May 2010) Monthly US-CAD Noon Exchange Rate
from Bank of Canada http://www.bankofcanada.ca/en/rates/exchange_avg_pdf.html
9
Conservation measure equipment and installation cost is average value for systems installed in
colder areas from Navigant Consulting document prepared for EIA. See reference 8 for details.
10
Daily Water Use Profile.” Building America Performance Analysis. 2010.
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building_america/perf_analysis.html
11
ACEEE Emerging Technologies – Solar Water Heaters
http://www.aceee.org/emertech/2006_SolarWH.pdf
12
Navigant Consulting. “EIA – Technology Forecast Updates – Residential and Commercial Building
Technologies – Reference Case Second Edition (Revised)”. 2007
13
GDS Associates, Inc. “Vermont Electric Energy Efficiency Potential Study Final Report”. 2007.
http://publicservice.vermont.gov/energy/vteefinalreportjan07v3andappendices.pdf
14
Steven Winters Associates, Inc. “Cost, Design and Performance of Solar Hot Water in ColdClimate Homes”. http://www.swinter.com/news/documents/CostDesignPerfSolarHW.pdf. 2006.
276
Space Cooling and
Heating - Residential
277
278
CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS - PROPER SIZING
Revision #
0
1
Description/Comment
Created in Measures and Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Date Revised
Sep 23, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Properly Sized Standard Central Air Conditioner
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Oversized Standard Central Air Conditioner
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
To determine sizes of new central cooling equipment, contractors often use a simple calculation
based on square footage. The traditional calculation is one ton for every 500 square feet of floor
area. 1 However, this can lead to oversized equipment. A more accurate means of determining
proper sizes (such as Manual J) takes into account local climate, size, shape, and orientation of
the house, insulation levels, window area, location, and type, air infiltration rates, the number
and ages of occupants, occupant comfort preferences and the types and efficiencies of lights
and major home appliances (which give off heat). 2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
279
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
1,371.00
0.00
1,294.00
0.00
2
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,307.00
1,254.70
52.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.057
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
22,584.60
941.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,371.00
0.00
1,294.00
0.00
Totals 23,526.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
For central air conditioners, furnaces, or heat pumps, there is an optimal air flow for comfort and
savings. If airflow is too high, duct leakage increases and the temperature at the register is not
sufficient for optimal home comfort. If airflow is too low, distribution efficiency drops and
accelerates the wear on system components leading to premature failure. 3
Base Measure:
Based on a Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study, a typical new home in
Toronto, Ontario with centralized air-conditioning equipped with ECMs would have a cooling
load of 1,307 kWh per year. A rated cooling capacity of 26,700 Btu/hr for air-conditioners
was used in the study. 4
Conservation Measure:
An Energy Star review of residential air conditioners and heat pumps for units under 65,000
Btu/hr found that proper sizing accounted for savings potentials between 2 and 11%.5
According to the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), improper air
conditioning sizing can result in an increased cooling load of 4%.6
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,307 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) x ( 1 - %
Cooling Load Savings)
= 1,307 x ( 1 - .04) = 1,254.7 kWh/yr
280
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 1,307 - 1,254.7 = 52.3 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Central and
coincidence factor of 2.239 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Energy savings will persist over the life of the air-conditioner which is assumed to be 18
years.7
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Assuming a 3.5 ton unit would have been installed, where a 3 ton unit was appropriate,
according to Energy Star, the oversized unit costs $1,371 while the properly sized unit costs
$1,219.8 According to the ACEEE, the cost to have a house audited for proper sizing would
be approximately $75.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Central ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
688
1614
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.49% 21.8% 48.48% 1.46%
1638
2.77%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.0
2.798
0.0
2.239
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
281
References
1 Vieira, R.K., et al., “How Contractors Really Size Air Conditioning Systems,” Florida Solar Energy
Center (http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/publications/html/FSEC-PF-289-95/).
2 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy
(http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/mytopic=12340).
3 Energy Star® Products, Sizing and Installation, (http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?
c=heat_cool.pr_properly_sized).
4 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
5 Energy Star®, “Appendix A - Information on the SEER, EER, and HSPF of Residential Air conditioners
and Heat Pumps”.
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/prod_development/revisions/downloads/ac_ashp/CAC_ASHP_Opt
ions_Appendices_A_B.pdf.
6 ACEEE, Emerging Technologies and Practices, 2004 (http://www.aceee.org/pubs/a042_pr6.pdf).
7 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
(http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls).
8 Energy Star®, http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Calc_CAC.xls.
282
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) continuously used
for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor continuously used
for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / New Homes
283
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
23,182.00
21,964.00
1,218.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.753
-0.092
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
417,316.00
23,142.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 440,458.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 3,545 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,595 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,744 m3/yr (equivalent to 18,042 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 908 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,307 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,909 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,749 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 3,545 + 1,595 + 18,042 = 23,182 kWh/yr
284
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 908 + 1,307 + 19,749 = 21,964 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 23,182 - 21,964 = 1,218 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Furnace
with ECM Electric
-4.5% -5.5%
32.9% 28.1% 62.4%
17.2%
Fired (2) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.9%
1.8%
0.888
2.851
1.01
2.282
A custom load profile was developed for typical new homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA
Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to
Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
285
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual
484
N/A
N/A
18
200
Comments: A furnace meeting minimum Federal efficiency standards using a low-efficiency
permanent split capacitor (PSC) fan motor is replaced with a high efficiency ENERGY STAR®
qualified furnace with a high-efficiency ECM motor. Vermont suggests annual electricity savings of
484 kWh for both space cooling and space heating. 4
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
4 Efficiency Vermont, "Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 2005-37 - Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions", p 154-155, February 13, 2006.
286
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) non-continuously
used for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor noncontinuously used for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
287
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
21,955.00
21,874.00
81.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.150
-0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
415,606.00
1,539.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 417,145.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 935 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,291 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,907 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,729 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 679 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,280 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,925 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,915 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 935 + 1,291 + 19,729 = 21,955 kWh/yr
288
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 679 + 1,280 + 19,915 = 21,874 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 21,955 - 21,874 = 81 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Furnace
with ECM Electric
Fired (3)
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
42.2% 36.0% 79.7%
10.3% 11.9% 36.2%
1.1%
-0.5%
0.942
2.859
1.037
2.289
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA
Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix
A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
289
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual
484
N/A
N/A
18
200
Comments: A furnace meeting minimum Federal efficiency standards using a low-efficiency
permanent split capacitor (PSC) fan motor is replaced with a high efficiency ENERGY STAR®
qualified furnace with a high-efficiency ECM motor. Vermont suggests annual electricity savings of
484 kWh for both space cooling and space heating. 4
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
4 Efficiency Vermont, "Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 2005-37 - Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions", p 154-155, February 13, 2006.
290
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously
for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously
for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential
291
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
33,473.00
32,515.00
958.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.678
-0.149
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
617,785.00
18,202.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 635,987.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 3,563 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,264 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,769 m3/yr (equivalent to 28,646 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 998 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,008 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,949 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,509 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 3,563 + 1,264 + 28,646 = 33,473 kWh/yr
292
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 998 + 1,008 + 30,509 = 32,515 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWhyr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 33,473 - 32,515 = 958 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Furnace
with ECM Electric
-9.0%
40.0% 34.1% 75.7%
10.3% 31.4%
Fired (1) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.1%
-0.2%
0.946
2.852
1.038
2.283
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA
Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to
Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
293
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
294
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used noncontinuously for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously) for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
295
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
32,696.00
32,582.00
114.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
-0.020
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
619,058.00
2,166.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 621,224.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 1,150 kWh/yr
A/C load = 996 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,953 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,550 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 786 kWh/yr
A/C load = 987 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,978 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,809 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 1,150 + 996 + 30,550 = 32,696 kWh/yr
296
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 786 + 987 + 30,809 = 32,582 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 32,696 - 32,582 = 114 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Furnace
with ECM Electric
Fired (3)
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
42.2% 36.0% 79.7%
10.3% 11.9% 36.2%
1.1%
-0.5%
0.942
2.859
1.037
2.289
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA
Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix
A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
297
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
298
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Jul 07, 2008
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Sep 15, 2009
2
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) continuously used
for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor continuously used
for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
299
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
20,050.00
20,188.00
-138.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.855
-0.259
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
383,572.00
2,622.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 380,950.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 2,008 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,744 m3/yr (equivalent to 18,042 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 439 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,909 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,749 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 2,008 + 18,042 = 20,050 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 439 + 19,749 = 20,188 kWh/yr
300
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 20,050 - 20,188 = -138 kWh/yr
Note:
Replacing PSC motors with ECM in electric forced-air heating furnaces used continuously for
space heating only will result to increased electricity consumption.
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Furnace
with ECM Electric
105.8% 114.2% 332.2%
20.2%
Fired (5)
140.9% 118.8% 262.7%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
50.1%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.005
2.868
1.068
2.296
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired furnace
used for space heating only combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space Heating Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
301
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual
484
N/A
N/A
18
200
Comments: A furnace meeting minimum Federal efficiency standards using a low-efficiency
permanent split capacitor (PSC) fan motor is replaced with a high efficiency ENERGY STAR®
qualified furnace with a high-efficiency ECM motor. Vermont suggests annual electricity savings of
484 kWh for both space cooling and space heating. 4
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
4 Efficiency Vermont, "Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 2005-37 - Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions", p 154-155, February 13, 2006.
302
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
2
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) non-continuously
used for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor noncontinuously used for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
303
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
20,244.00
20,223.00
21.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
-0.023
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
384,237.00
399.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 384,636.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 515 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,907 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,729 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 308 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 1,925 m3/yr (equivalent to 19,915 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 515 + 19,729 = 20,244 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 308+ 19,915 = 20,223 kWh/yr
304
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 20,244 - 20,223 = 21 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Furnace
with ECM Electric
123.6% 104.8% 231.9% -7.1%
Fired (7)
61.9% 68.0% 200.4%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
-22.8%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.988
2.865
1.059
2.294
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating only combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space
Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
305
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual
484
N/A
N/A
18
200
Comments: A furnace meeting minimum Federal efficiency standards using a low-efficiency
permanent split capacitor (PSC) fan motor is replaced with a high efficiency ENERGY STAR®
qualified furnace with a high-efficiency ECM motor. Vermont suggests annual electricity savings of
484 kWh for both space cooling and space heating. 4
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
4 Efficiency Vermont, "Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 2005-37 - Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions", p 154-155, February 13, 2006.
306
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously
for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously
for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
307
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
30,792.00
31,121.00
-329.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.838
-0.310
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
591,299.00
6,251.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 585,048.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 2,146 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,769 m3/yr (equivalent to 28,646 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 612 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,949 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,509 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 2,146 + 28,646 = 30,792 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 612 + 30,509 = 31,121 kWh/yr
308
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 30,792 - 31,121 = -329 kWh/yr
Note:
Replacing PSC motors with ECMs in electric forced-air heating furnace used for space heating
only will result to increased electricity consumption.
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Furnace
with ECM Electric
53.1% 57.0% 165.0%
11.6%
Fired (4)
57.9% 48.6% 107.4%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
27.2%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.011
2.869
1.071
2.297
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating only combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load
shapes.
309
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
310
ELECTRIC FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 07, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used noncontinuously for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Electric forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
311
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
31,354.00
31,289.00
65.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
-0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
594,491.00
1,235.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 595,726.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.1
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 804 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,953 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,550 kWh/yr)
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 480 kWh/yr
Furnace consumption = 2,978 m3/yr (equivalent to 30,809 kWh/yr)
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 804 + 30,550 = 31,354 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 480 + 30,809 = 31,289 kWh/yr
312
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 31,354 - 31,289 = 65 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.2
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Furnace
with ECM Electric
Fired (6)
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
61.5% 52.3% 115.9% -0.7%
22.6% 25.3% 75.5%
-5.7%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.97
2.864
1.05
2.293
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace used for space heating only combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load
shapes.
313
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).3
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
3 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
314
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
SEER 14.5
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Sep 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner (SEER 14.5)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Current Standard for Central Air Conditioner (SEER 13)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
According to Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, energy efficiency of central air conditioners
is measured by Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER)
with ENERGY STAR® qualified central air conditioning systems being about 20% more efficient
than standard models. Typical residential systems may be "split" systems with a separate indoor
evaporator unit in the furnace ducting and an outdoor condenser unit or may be "single package"
systems that have the evaporator and condenser in one unit. As of January 1, 2009, the
following levels must be met or exceeded to qualify for ENERGY STAR®: 1 TYPE
SEER
EER
Split
> 14.5
> 12.0
Single
Package
> 14.0
> 11.0
Canada's Energy Efficiency Act regulates minimum heating and cooling standards for
permanently installed air-source air-conditioner and heat pumps. Air conditioners and heat
pumps that are single package and split system, single and three-phase, with rated capacity of
less than 19kW (65,000 Btu/h) must have a SEER of 13. This applicable minimum energy
performance standards came into effect on November 2006 (under test standard CAN/CSAC656-05).2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Residential / New Homes / Single-Family
315
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
662.00
0.00
2
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,000.00
896.60
103.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16,138.80
1,861.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
662.00
0.00
Totals 18,000.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 13 Btu/W-hr Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5 Conservation Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 14.5 Btu/W-hr Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W/kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (13 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x 500
hrs/yr
= 1,000 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000
W/kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours = [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (14.5 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
] x 500 hrs/yr
= 896.6 kWh/yr
316
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 1,000 - 896.6 = 103.4 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Central and
coincidence factor of 2.239 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The California Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) reports 18 years effective
useful life (EUL) for SEER 14 and 15 split system central air conditioners. 6
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Incremental cost is assumed to be $662.00 based on the mid incremental cost for SEER 14
and SEER 15.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Central ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
688
1614
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.49% 21.8% 48.48% 1.46%
1638
2.77%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.0
2.798
0.0
2.239
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
317
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual (Vermont)
On-Peak
Demand
Annual
Effective
Incremental
Reduction
Electricity
Useful
Cost ($)
Saving(kWh) Winter Summer Life (yrs)
(kW)
(kW)
311.50
N/A
N/A
18
379.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings were estimated using a base SEER of 10 and a high
efficiency SEER of 13 with a cooling capacity of 36,000 Btu/hr and annual operating hours of 375
hours.7
California Database for Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER) Version
2.01 October 26, 2005
20.53
0.07
N/A
18
185.00
Comments: Based on a 2-ton 14 SEER split system CAC replacing a 13 SEER split system
CAC in California climate – based on Quantum Consulting study for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999. 8
Energy Deemed Savings Database
(Texas), October 2005
410.00
0.27
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: A 2.5 ton SEER 14 was assumed to replace SEER 13.
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Considerations for Central Air Conditioners
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/cooling-ventilation/central-ac/ee.cfm?attr=4.
2 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Regulations
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/single-package.cfm?text=N&printview=N.
3 Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), 2006 Cool Savings Rebate
Program, Prepared for the Ontario Power Authority, April 2007; based on average Ontario CAC unit
size shipments data recorded by the HRAI Manufacturing Division.
4 EPA (EPA Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator – Central Air
Conditioners, https://energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Calc_CAC.xls
5 ARI Unitary Directory, August 1, 1992 - January 31, 1993 (http://energyexperts.org/ac_calc/).
6 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
7 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 490-491.
8 Evaluation of Pacific Gas & Electric Company’s 1997 Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives
Program: Lighting Technologies”, prepared by Quantum Consulting, Inc., for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999.
9 Frontier Associates, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards, 2006 Residential and Small
Commercial, Standard Offer Program, prepared for Entergy, Texas, October 2005.
318
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
SEER 15
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from the 2007 Cool and Hot Savings Program Evaluation
Report
Updated Resource Savings Assumptions
Feb 15, 2008
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® or CEE Tier 2 Central Air Conditioner (SEER 15)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Current Standard for Central Air Conditioners (SEER 13)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
According to Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, energy efficiency of central air conditioners
is measured by Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER)
with ENERGY STAR® qualified central air conditioning systems being about 20% more efficient
than standard models. Typical residential systems may be "split" systems with a separate indoor
evaporator unit in the furnace ducting and an outdoor condenser unit or may be "single package"
systems that have the evaporator and condenser in one unit. As of January 1, 2009, the
following levels must be met or exceeded to qualify for ENERGY STAR®: 1 TYPE
SEER
EER
Split
> 14.5
> 12.0
Single
Package
> 14.0
> 11.0
Canada's Energy Efficiency Act regulates minimum heating and cooling standards for
permanently installed air-source air-conditioner and heat pumps. Air conditioners and heat
pumps that are single package and split system, single and three-phase, with rated capacity of
less than 19kW (65,000 Btu/h) must have a SEER of 13. This applicable minimum energy
performance standards came into effect on November 2006 (under test standard CAN/CSAC656-05).2
319
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Existing Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
850.00
0.00
2
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,000.00
866.70
133.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.146
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15,600.60
2,399.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
850.00
0.00
Totals 18,000.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 13 Btu/W-hr Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Conservation Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 15 Btu/W-hr
Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W/kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (13 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x 500
hrs/yr
= 1,000 kWh/yr
320
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W/kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (15 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x
500 hrs/yr
= 866.7 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 1,000 kWh - 866.7 kWh = 133.3 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Central and
coincidence factor of 2.239 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The California Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) reports 18 years effective
useful life (EUL) for SEER 14 and 15 split system central air conditioners. 6
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Increment cost is assumed to be $850.00 based on the results from the 2007 Hot and Cool
Savings Program (HCSP) Contractor and Participant Survey.
321
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Central ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
688
1614
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.49% 21.8% 48.48% 1.46%
1638
2.77%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.0
2.798
0.0
2.239
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual (Vermont)
On-Peak
Demand
Annual
Effective
Incremental
Reduction
Electricity
Useful
Cost ($)
Saving(kWh) Winter Summer Life (yrs)
(kW)
(kW)
311.50
N/A
N/A
18
379.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings were estimated using a base SEER of 10 and a high
efficiency SEER of 13 with a cooling capacity of 36,000 Btu/hr and annual operating hours of 375
hours.7
California Database for Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER) Version
2.01 October 26, 2005
20.53
N/A
N/A
18
185.00
Comments: Based on a 2-ton 14 SEER split system CAC replacing a 13 SEER split system
CAC in California climate – based on Quantum Consulting study for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999. 8
Energy Deemed Savings Database
(Texas), October 2005
410.00
0.27
N/A
Comments: A 2.5 ton SEER 14 was assumed to replace SEER 13.
322
N/A
0.00
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Considerations for Central Air Conditioners
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/cooling-ventilation/central-ac/ee.cfm?attr=4.
2 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Regulations
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/single-package.cfm?text=N&printview=N.
3 Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), 2006 Cool Savings Rebate
Program, Prepared for the Ontario Power Authority, April 2007; based on average Ontario CAC unit
size shipments data recorded by the HRAI Manufacturing Division.
4 EPA (EPA Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator – Central Air
Conditioners, https://energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Calc_CAC.xls
5 ARI Unitary Directory, August 1, 1992 - January 31, 1993 (http://energyexperts.org/ac_calc/).
6 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
7 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 490-491.
8 Evaluation of Pacific Gas & Electric Company’s 1997 Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives
Program: Lighting Technologies”, prepared by Quantum Consulting, Inc., for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999.
9 Frontier Associates, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards, 2006 Residential and Small
Commercial, Standard Offer Program, prepared for Entergy, Texas, October 2005.
323
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
SEER 14.5, Higher Temperature Setting
Revision #
0
1
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from 2007 Hot & Cool Savings Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Jul 07, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner (SEER 14.5) with higher thermostat setting (2°C)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Current Standard for Central Air Condiitoners (SEER 13)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
According to Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, energy efficiency of central air conditioners
is measured by Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER)
with ENERGY STAR® qualified central air conditioning systems being about 20% more efficient
than standard models. Typical residential systems may be "split" systems with a separate indoor
evaporator unit in the furnace ducting and an outdoor condenser unit or may be "single package"
systems that have the evaporator and condenser in one unit. As of January 1, 2009, the
following levels must be met or exceeded to qualify for ENERGY STAR®:1 TYPE
SEER
EER
Split
> 14.5
> 12.0
Single
Package
> 14.0
> 11.0
Canada's Energy Efficiency Act regulates minimum heating and cooling standards for
permanently installed air-source air-conditioner and heat pumps. Air conditioners and heat
pumps that are single package and split system, single and three-phase, with rated capacity of
less than 19kW (65,000 Btu/h) must have a SEER of 13. This applicable minimum energy
performance standards came into effect on November 2006 (under test standard CAN/CSAC656-05).2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
324
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / New Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
662.00
0.00
2
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,000.00
690.30
309.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.339
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12,425.40
5,574.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
662.00
0.00
Totals 18,000.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 13
Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Conservation Measure:
Based on an NRCan study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology,
setting the thermostat higher by 2 degrees for the entire season (from a base of 22°C to
24°C) is estimated to result in a 23% energy savings. 6
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 13 Btu/W-hr
Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W / kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (13 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x 500
hrs/yr
= 1,000 kWh/yr
325
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = { [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W /
kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours } x { 1 - % Energy Savings due to Higher Temperature
Setting }
= { [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (14.5 Btu/W-hr x 1000
W/kW) ]
x 500 hrs/yr } x { 1 - 23% }
= 690.3 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 1,000 kWh - 690.3 kWh = 309.7 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Central and
coincidence factor of 2.239 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The California Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) for SEER 14 and 15 split
system central air conditioners reports 18 years effective useful life (EUL).7
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Incremental cost is assumed to be $662.00 based on the mid incremental cost for SEER 14
and SEER 15.
326
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Central ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
688
1614
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.49% 21.8% 48.48% 1.46%
1638
2.77%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.0
2.798
0.0
2.239
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual (Vermont)
On-Peak
Demand
Annual
Effective
Incremental
Reduction
Electricity
Useful
Cost ($)
Saving(kWh) Winter Summer Life (yrs)
(kW)
(kW)
311.50
N/A
N/A
18
379.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings were estimated using a base SEER of 10 and a high
efficiency SEER of 13 with a cooling capacity of 36,000 Btu/hr and annual operating hours of 375
hours.8
California Database for Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER) Version
2.01 October 26, 2005
20.53
N/A
N/A
18
185.00
Comments: Based on a 2-ton 14 SEER split system CAC replacing a 13 SEER split system
CAC in California climate – based on Quantum Consulting study for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999. 9
Energy Deemed Savings Database
(Texas), October 2005
410.00
0.27
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: A 2.5 ton SEER 14 is assumed to replace SEER 13.
327
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Considerations for Central Air Conditioners
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/cooling-ventilation/central-ac/ee.cfm?attr=4.
2 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Regulations
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/single-package.cfm?text=N&printview=N.
3 Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), 2006 Cool Savings Rebate
Program, Prepared for the Ontario Power Authority, April 2007.
4 EPA (EPA Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator – Central Air
Conditioners, https://energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Calc_CAC.xls
5 ARI Unitary Directory, August 1, 1992 - January 31, 1993 http://energyexperts.org/ac_calc/.
6 Manning, M.M., et al, The Effects of Thermostat Set-Back and Set-Up on Seasonal Energy
Consumption, Surface Tempreatures and Recovery Times at the CCHT Twin House Facility, NRCC48361, National Research Council of Canada, March 2007.
7 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
8 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 490-491.
9 Evaluation of Pacific Gas & Electric Company’s 1997 Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives
Program: Lighting Technologies”, prepared by Quantum Consulting, Inc., for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999.
10Frontier Associates, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards, 2006 Residential and
Small Commercial, Standard Offer Program, prepared for Entergy, Texas, October 2005.
328
ENERGY STAR® CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONER
SEER 15, Higher Temperature Setting
Revision #
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated from 2007 Hot & Cool Savings Evaluation Report
Feb 15, 2008
Jul 07, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® Central Air Conditioner (SEER 15) with higher thermostat setting (2°C)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Current Standard for Central Air Conditioners (SEER 13)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
According to Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, energy efficiency of central air conditioners
is measured by Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER)
with ENERGY STAR® qualified central air conditioning systems being about 20% more efficient
than standard models. Typical residential systems may be "split" systems with a separate indoor
evaporator unit in the furnace ducting and an outdoor condenser unit or may be "single package"
systems that have the evaporator and condenser in one unit. As of January 1, 2009, the
following levels must be met or exceeded to qualify for ENERGY STAR®:1 TYPE
SEER
EER
Split
> 14.5
> 12.0
Single
Package
> 14.0
> 11.0
Canada's Energy Efficiency Act regulates minimum heating and cooling standards for
permanently installed air-source air-conditioner and heat pumps. Air conditioners and heat
pumps that are single package and split system, single and three-phase, with rated capacity of
less than 19kW (65,000 Btu/h) must have a SEER of 13. This applicable minimum energy
performance standards came into effect on November 2006 (under test standard CAN/CSAC656-05).2
Decision Type
New / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
329
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
850.00
0.00
2
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,000.00
667.30
332.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.364
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12,011.40
5,988.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
850.00
0.00
Totals 18,000.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure:
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 13 Btu/W-hr
Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Conservation Measure:
Based on an NRCan study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology,
setting the thermostat higher by 2 degrees for the entire season (from a base of 22°C to
24°C) is estimated to result in a 23% energy savings. 6
Cooling capacity = 26,000 Btu/hr 3
Seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) = 15 Btu/W-hr
Full-load cooling hours = 500 hours/year4,5
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W / kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (13 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x 500
hrs/yr
= 1,000 kWh/yr
330
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = { [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / SEER x 1000 W /
kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours } x { 1 - % Energy Savings due to Higher Temperature
Setting }
= { [ 26,000 Btu/hr / (15 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ]
x 500 hrs/yr } x { 1 - 23% }
= 667.3 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
= 1,000 kWh - 667.3 kWh = 332.7 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Central and
coincidence factor of 2.239 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The California Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) reports 18 years effective
useful life (EUL) for SEER 14 and 15 split system central air conditioners. 7
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Based on the results from the 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program (HCSP) Contractor and
Participant Survey, a SEER 15 will have an incremental cost of 850.00.
331
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Central ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
688
1614
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 25.49% 21.8% 48.48% 1.46%
1638
2.77%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.0
2.798
0.0
2.239
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Residential Master Technical
Reference Manual (Vermont)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Annual
Effective
Incremental
Electricity
Useful
Cost ($)
Saving(kWh) Winter Summer Life (yrs)
(kW)
(kW)
311.50
N/A
N/A
18
379.00
Comments: The annual electricity savings were estimated using a base SEER of 10 and a high
efficiency SEER of 13 with a cooling capacity of 36,000 Btu/hr and annual operating hours of 375
hours.8
California Database for Energy
Efficient Resources (DEER) Version
2.01 October 26, 2005
20.53
N/A
N/A
18
185.00
Comments: Based on a 2-ton 14 SEER split system CAC replacing a 13 SEER split system
CAC in California climate – based on Quantum Consulting study for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999. 9
Energy Deemed Savings Database
(Texas), October 2005
410.00
Comments: A 2.5 ton SEER 14 was assumed to replace SEER 13.
332
0.27
N/A
N/A
N/A
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Considerations for Central Air Conditioners
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/cooling-ventilation/central-ac/ee.cfm?attr=4.
2 Office of Energy Efficiency, Energy Efficiency Regulations
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/product/single-package.cfm?text=N&printview=N.
3 Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI), 2006 Cool Savings Rebate
Program, Prepared for the Ontario Power Authority, April 2007.
4 EPA (EPA Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator – Central Air
Conditioners, https://energystar.gov/ia/business/bulk_purchasing/bpsavings_calc/Calc_CAC.xls
5 ARI Unitary Directory, August 1, 1992 - January 31, 1993 http://energyexperts.org/ac_calc/.
6 Manning, M.M., et al, The Effects of Thermostat Set-Back and Set-Up on Seasonal Energy
Consumption, Surface Tempreatures and Recovery Times at the CCHT Twin House Facility, NRCC48361, National Research Council of Canada, March 2007 (http://irc.nrccnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc48361/nrcc48361.pdf).
7 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
8 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 490-491.
9 Evaluation of Pacific Gas & Electric Company’s 1997 Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives
Program: Lighting Technologies”, prepared by Quantum Consulting, Inc., for Pacific Gas & Electric
Company, March 1, 1999.
10Frontier Associates, Deemed Savings, Installation & Efficiency Standards, 2006 Residential and
Small Commercial, Standard Offer Program, prepared for Entergy, Texas, October 2005.
333
ENERGY STAR® DEHUMIDIFIER
Revision
#
0
1
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures and Assumptions List
Updated using 2008 EKC Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and
Rewards for Recycling Programs Evaluation Report
Oct 31, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® Dehumidifier
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-Energy Star® Dehumidifier
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
As of June 1, 2008, to qualify for the ENERGY STAR® symbol, standard-capacity
dehumidifiers (i.e., that have a water removal capacity up to or equal 35.5 litres per day) must
have an energy factor of at least 1.20, 1.40, 1.50, 1.60 and 1.80 based on water removal
capacity. High-capacity dehumidifiers (i.e., that have a water removal capacity greater than 35.5
to 87.5 litres per day) must have an energy factor of 2.50 or higher. Normally, the higher the
capacity of the dehumidifier, the more energy efficient it is.1
Guide to Canada's Energy
Efficiency Regulations
October 1,
October 1,
2007
2012
Standard Capacity Dehumidifiers
Cr < 11.8
1.00
1.35
11.8 < Cr < 16.6
1.20
1.35
16.6 < Cr < 21.3
1.30
1.50
21.3 < Cr < 25.5
1.30
1.60
25.5 < Cr < 35.5
1.50
25.5 < Cr < 35.5
1.70
High Capacity Dehumidifiers
2.50
Cr > 35.5
35.5 < Cr < 87.5
2.25
Water Removal
Capacity, Cr
(L/day)
Energy Star
Effective June 1,
2008
1.20
1.40
1.50
1.60
1.80
2.50
Based on the Ontario Energy Efficiency Act, the minimum energy factor (EF) for dehumidifiers
with rated daily water-removal capacity of up to 30 liters must be greater than 1.00 L/kWh. 2
334
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
150.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
2
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
984.84
485.07
499.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.289
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5,820.84
5,997.24
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
150.00
0.00
Totals 11,818.08
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
The following assumptions are based on an in-situ metering conducted for OPA's Keep Cool
Pilot Program. The average age of the metered dehumidifiers, as estimated by the study
participants, was 12.9 years old and an average water removal capacity of 3.869 liters/day.3
Base Measure:
Average Energy Factor (EF) = 0.66 L/kWh
Average no. of days dehumidifiers are operating = 168 days
Conservation Measure:
Average Energy Factor (EF) = 1.34 L/kWh
Average no. of days dehumidifiers are operating = 168 days
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Water Removal Capacity (L/day) / EF (L/kWh) ] x No.
of Days of Operation
= [ 3.869 L/day / 0.66 L/kWh ] x 168 days
= 984.84 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Water Removal Capacity (L/day) / EF (L/kWh) ]
x No. of Days of Operation
= [ 3.869 L/day / 1.34 L/kWh ] x 168 days
= 485.07 kWh/yr
335
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 984.84 - 485.07 = 499.8 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using an end-use load profile for residential dehumidifier
(see custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life of dehumidifiers is assumed to be 12 years.4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Canada's Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator suggests an incremental cost of $40.00
between a non-Energy Star® and an Energy Star® room air conditioner. 5
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Off
On
Peak Peak Peak Peak
602
Residential
Dehumidifiers
ver: MM-2010-0
Remarks
336
Summer
688
1614
528
Mid
Peak
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 12.9% 19.4% 40.2% 13.7%
13.7%
0.0
3.09
0.0
This end-use load profile was generated based on the results of an in-situ
metering conducted for OPA's Keep Cool Pilot Program in 2008.
2.338
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
New Jersey
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
56.4
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: Energy and demand savings from engineering estimate based on 600 hours of use.
Based on delta watts for ENERGY STAR and non-ENERGY STAR units in five different size
(cooling capacity) categories.6
Residential Master
Technical Reference
Manual
39.6
N/A
N/A
13
40.00
Comments: The annual energy savings were calculated using a base measure connected load
of 1.0282 kW and a conservation measure connected load of 0.9225 kW and an annual full load
hours for residential as 375 hours.7
References
1 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, "Energy Star® Qualified Major Appliances"
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/manufacturers/appliance.cfm?
attr=12#dehumidifiers (accessed September 25, 2009).
2 Ministry of Energy and Infrastructure, Ontario Energy Efficiency
Act (http://www.mei.gov.on.ca/english/energy/conservation/?page=conservation-legislation).
3 The Cadmus Group, Inc., Evaluation of OPA's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power Savings Event,
Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, July 9, 2009.
4 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
5 Natural Resources Canada, Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator Version 4.0 (revised March
2008) http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/programfiles/download.cfm.
6 New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program, Protocols to Measure Resource Savings (New Jersey,
December 2007) http://www.njcleanenergy.com/files/file/Protocols_REVISED_VERSION_12-1807_Clean_draft_(Complete).pdf.
7 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 118-119.
337
ENERGY STAR® ROOM AIR CONDITIONER
Revision
#
0
1
2
3
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Updated using 2007 Great Refrigerator Roundup Program (GRRP)
Report Data
Updated using 2008 Impact Evaluation of Spring EKC Report Data
Updated using 2008 EKC Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and
Rewards for Recycling Programs Evaluation Report
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Oct 31, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
EnerGuide Room Air Conditioner Directory 2007 provides the energy efficiency ratio (EER) for
ENERGY STAR® qualified air-conditioners for two main types as shown in the following table:1
Type
Cooling Capacity
(Btu/hr)
Standard
Less than 6,000
6,000 to 7,999
8,000 to 13,999
14,000 to 19,999
20,000 and over
Casement only
Casement-slider
WindowWindow-Mounted
Mounted
(Without Louvred
(Louvred
Sides)
Sides)
Minimum EER to be Energy Star
Qualified
10.7
10.7
10.8
10.7
9.4
9.6
10.5
9.9
9.9
9.4
9.4
9.4
The Ontario Energy Efficiency Act regulates the minimum energy efficiency ratio (EER) for room
air conditioners as shown in the following table. Room air conditioners are single-phase electric
room air conditioners that are not "packaged terminal air conditioners" and that do not exceed
10.55 kilowatts (36,000 Btu/h). 2
338
Type
Standard
Less than 6,000
6,000 to 7,999
8,000 to 13,999
14,000 to 19,999
20,000 and over
With Reverse Cycle
Less than 20,000
20,000 and over
Less than 14,000
14,000 and over
Casement only
Casement-slider
Decision Type
New / Replacement
WindowMounted
(Louvred
Sides)
Window-Mounted
(Without Louvred
Sides)
9.7
9.7
9.8
9.7
8.5
9.0
9.0
8.5
8.5
8.5
9.0
8.5
-
8.5
8.0
8.7
9.5
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Existing Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
2
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
371.40
230.70
140.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.142
0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,076.30
1,266.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
40.00
0.00
Totals 3,342.60
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
The following assumptions are based on an in-situ metering conducted for OPA's Keep Cool
Pilot Program. The average age of the metered room air conditioner units, as estimated by the
study participants, was 11 years old and with an average capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr.3
Base Measure:
Average Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) = 6.69 Btu/W-hr
339
Cooling hours = 310.6 hours (calculated)
Conservation Measure:
Average Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) = 10.77 Btu/W-hr
Cooling hours = 310.6 hours (calculated)
Annual Electricity Savings
:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / EER x 1000 W/kW ] x Full
Load Cooling Hours
= [ 8,000 Btu/hr / (6.69 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW) ] x
310.6 hrs
= 371.4 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = [ Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) / EER x 1000 W/kW ]
x Full Load Cooling Hours
= [ 8,000 Btu/hr / (10.77 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
] x 310.6 hrs
= 230.7 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 371.4 - 230.7 = 140.7 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Cooling - Room and
coincidence factor of 2.338 for summer. See Appendix A for the description of the methodology
used in determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The California Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER) reports 9 years for residential
room air-conditioners. 4
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Canada's Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator suggests an incremental cost of $40.00
between a non-Energy Star® and an Energy Star® room air conditioner. 5
340
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
602
OPA Res
Space
Cooling Room ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
Summer
On
Mid
Off
Peak Peak Peak
688
1614
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 22.61% 21.31% 52.5% 0.55%
3.03%
0.0
3.09
0.0
2.338
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
New Jersey
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
56.4
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: Energy and demand savings from engineering estimate based on 600 hours of use.
Based on delta watts for ENERGY STAR and non-ENERGY STAR units in five different size
(cooling capacity) categories.6
Residential Master
Technical Reference
Manual
39.6
N/A
N/A
13
40.00
Comments: The annual energy savings were calculated using a base measure connected load
of 1.0282 kW and a conservation measure connected load of 0.9225 kW and an annual full load
hours for residential as 375 hours.7
341
References
1 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “EnerGuide Room Air Conditioner Directory
2007” May 7, 2007 (http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/Publications/equipment/roomaircond-2007/readlabel.cfm?attr=4#how-to-read.
2 Ministry of Energy and Infrastructure, Ontario Energy Efficiency
Act (http://www.mei.gov.on.ca/english/energy/conservation/?page=conservation-legislation).
3 The Cadmus Group, Inc., Evaluation of OPA's 2008 Every Kilowatt Counts Power Savings Event,
Keep Cool Pilot and Rewards for Recycling Programs, July 9, 2009.
4 California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and California Energy Commission (CEC), 2009-11 2008
Database for Energy Efficient Resources (DEER), Version 2008.2.05 December 16, 2008
(http://www.deeresources.com/deer0911planning/downloads/EUL_Summary_10-1-08.xls.
5 Natural Resources Canada, Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator Version 4.0 (revised March
2008) http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/business/energystar/procurement/programfiles/download.cfm.
6 New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program, Protocols to Measure Resource Savings (New Jersey,
December 2007) http://www.njcleanenergy.com/files/file/Protocols_REVISED_VERSION_12-1807_Clean_draft_(Complete).pdf.
7 Vermont Efficiency, Residential Master Technical Reference Manual: Number 37 Measure Savings
Algorithms and Cost Assumptions (Vermont, 2005) 118-119.
342
FURNACE/AIR CONDITIONER FILTER
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
May 20, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Regular replacement of furnace/AC filters
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Replacing furnace/AC filter twice a year (once for the heating season and once for the cooling
season).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Each filter is labelled with a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) rating number
indicating the filter's ability to trap small particles. The number is derived from a test method
designed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers
(ASHRAE) as an industry standard rating enabling comparison of various filters manufactured by
different companies.
Residential filters commonly have MERV ratings of 1 to 11. The higher the MERV rating, the
more efficient the filter is, and the more particles it can filter.
Decision Type
Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
714.37
680.35
34.02
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.019
0.005
0.00
0.00
12.00
0.00
680.35
34.02
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12.00
0.00
Totals 714.37
343
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Typical clean heating fan wattage = 1/2 hp (373 W)1
Heating full-load hours 2 = 1324 hours
Cooling full-load hours 3 = 500 hours
Conservation Measure
Assumptions:
Monthly replacement of furnace filters in forced-air heating systems can save as much as
5% on heating bills. 4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Heating Annual Consumption + Cooling Annual
Consumption)
x (1 + % Increase in Consumption due to Dirty
Filter)
= [ (0.373 kW x 1324 hrs) + (0.373 kW x 500) ] x (1 +
0.05)
= 714.37 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Heating Annual Consumption
+ Cooling Annual Consumption
= (0.373 kW x 1324 hrs) + (0.373 kW x 500)
= 680.35 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = 714.37 - 680.35 = 34.02 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Furnace Fan load shape with
coincidence factors of 2.286 (summer) and 1.103 (winter). Refer to Appendix A for the
description of methodology in determining the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
344
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Effective useful life of bundle is based on replacing furnace filter three times through the
heating season and twice during the cooling season.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Although the cost of furnace filters remain the same, this incremental cost represents the cost
of an additional furnace filter priced at $4.00 a filter (Canadian Tire, 2009). The efficient
conditions require an additional purchase of 3 filters per year i.e. an incremental cost of
$12.00.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
1 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
2 Average equivalent full load heating hours from Ottawa, ON, Thunderbay, ON and Toronto, ON
obtained from Canada's Energy Star® Simple Savings Calculator V4.0.
3 ARI Unitary Directory, August 1, 1992 - January 31, 1993 http://energyexperts.org/ac_calc/.
4 American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE), 2004, “Top 5 ‘Musts’ for Consumers to
Cut Winter Heating Bills”, ACEEE News Release, October 2004,
http://www.aceee.org/press/0410wntrheat.htm.
345
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
346
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
5,140.00
2,215.00
2,925.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.749
0.413
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
42,085.00
55,575.00
-3,116.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 97,660.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 3,545 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,595 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 908 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,307 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load
= 3,545 + 1,595 = 5,140 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load
= 908 + 1,307 = 2,215 kWh/yr
347
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 5,140 - 2,215 = 2,925 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 164 m3 when
the gas furnace is used continuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Peak Peak
602
Furnace with
ECM - Gas
7.7%
Fired (1) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
348
688
Summer
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
7.7% 21.1% 13.7% 11.9% 26.4%
4.1%
7.4%
1.076
2.845
1.103
2.278
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan
and OPA Res Space Cooling - Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use
load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
349
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used non-continuously
for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
350
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,226.00
1,959.00
267.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.151
0.040
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
37,221.00
5,073.00
-342.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 42,294.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 935 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,291 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 679 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,280 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 935 + 1,291 = 2,226 kWh/yr
351
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 679 + 1,280 = 1,959 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,226 - 1,959 = 267 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 18 m3 when the gas
furnace is used continuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Peak Peak
602
Furnace with
ECM - Gas
8.2%
Fired (2) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
352
688
Summer
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
8.3% 22.6% 12.9% 11.2% 24.9%
4.3%
7.7%
1.076
2.851
1.103
2.283
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan
and OPA Res Space Cooling - Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use
load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
353
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
354
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
4,827.00
2,006.00
2,821.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.687
0.398
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
38,114.00
53,599.00
-3,420.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 91,713.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 3,563 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,264 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (continuous) = 998 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,008 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load
= 3,563 + 1,264 = 4,827 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load
= 998 + 1,008 = 2,006 kWh/yr
355
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 4,827 - 2,006 = 2,821 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 180 m3 when
the gas furnace is used continuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Peak Peak
602
Furnace with
ECM - Gas
7.7%
Fired (1) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
356
688
Summer
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
7.7% 21.1% 13.7% 11.9% 26.4%
4.1%
7.4%
1.076
2.845
1.103
2.278
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan
and OPA Res Space Cooling - Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use
load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
357
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, Existing Homes
Revision
#
0
1
2
Description/Comment
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Date Revised
Jul 07, 2008
Sep 15, 2009
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used non-continuously
for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for both space heating and cooling in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
358
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,146.00
1,773.00
373.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.210
0.056
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
33,687.00
7,087.00
-494.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 40,774.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output ws 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 1,150 kWh/yr
A/C load = 996 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 786 kWh/yr
A/C load = 987 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 1,150 + 996 = 2,146 kWh/yr
359
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 786 + 987 = 1,773 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,146 - 1,773 = 373 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 26 m3 when the gas
furnace is used continuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
On
Mid
Peak Peak
602
Furnace with
ECM - Gas
8.2%
Fired (2) ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
360
688
Summer
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
8.3% 22.6% 12.9% 11.2% 24.9%
4.3%
7.7%
1.076
2.851
1.103
2.283
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired
furnace used for space heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan
and OPA Res Space Cooling - Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use
load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
361
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Jul 07, 2008
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Sep 15, 2009
2
Dec 09, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously
for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
362
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,008.00
439.00
1,569.00
-164.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.859
0.244
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8,341.00
29,811.00
-3,116.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 38,152.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical new homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used continuously for space heating
only, annual electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. PSC motors consume
2,008 kWh/yr while ECMs consume 439 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,008 - 439 = 1,569 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
363
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 164 m3 when
the gas furnace is used continuously.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $960.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
364
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
365
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Jul 07, 2008
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Sep 15, 2009
2
Dec 09, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used non-continuously
for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
366
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Residential / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
515.00
308.00
207.00
-18.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.113
0.032
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5,852.00
3,933.00
-342.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 9,785.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical new homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used non-countinuously for space
heating only, annual electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. PSC motors
consume 515 kWh/yr while ECMs consume 308 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 515 - 308 = 207 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
367
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 18 m3 when the gas
furnace is used continuously.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
368
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
369
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CONTINUOUS FAN USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Jul 07, 2008
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Sep 15, 2009
2
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used continuously
for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
370
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Residential / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,146.00
612.00
1,534.00
-180.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.840
0.239
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11,628.00
29,146.00
-3,420.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 40,774.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical existing homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used continuously for space
heating only, annual electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. PSC motors
consume 2,146 kWh/yr while ECMs consume 612 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,146 - 612 = 1,534 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
371
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 180 m3 when
the gas furnace is used continuously.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
372
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
373
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (NON-CONTINUOUS FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing Homes
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in Measures & Assumptions List
Jul 07, 2008
1
Revised Resource Savings Assumptions
Revised input assumptions based on 2009 Cool Savings Program
Evaluation Report
Sep 15, 2009
2
Dec 08, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used non-continuously
for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
374
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
804.00
480.00
324.00
-26.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.177
0.050
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,120.00
6,156.00
-494.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 15,276.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical existing homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used non-continuously for space
heating only, annual electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. PSC motors
consume 804 kWh/yr while ECMs consume 480 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 804 - 480 = 324 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
375
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 26 m3 when the gas
furnace is used non-continuously.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
376
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
377
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CHANGE BEHAVIOUR IN FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Date Revised
Nov 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
378
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,226.00
-0.003
0.004
Totals 42,294.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
42,085.00
209.00
-38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 935 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,291 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 908 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,307 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 935 + 1,291 = 2,226 kWh/yr
379
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 908 + 1,307 = 2,215 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,226 - 2,215 = 11 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 2 m3 when
the furnace fan is used continuously for heating and cooling and was previously used noncontinuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
Winter Summer Winter Summer
Gas
Furnace
with ECM
20.92% 20.94% 57.25%
8.57% 15.19% 1.102
(CB-GS6.52% 5.06% 11.27%
NH) ver: P2011-0
Remarks
380
CF2
2.657
1.129
2.127
This was developed for typical new homes with gas-fired furnaces used for space
heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Res Space Cooling Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
381
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CHANGE BEHAVIOUR IN FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating & Cooling, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Date Revised
Nov 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for both space heating and cooling in new homes (homes built in or after 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
382
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,226.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-0.003
0.004
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,226.00
-0.003
0.004
Totals 42,294.00
2,215.00
11.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
42,085.00
209.00
-38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
Base Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 935 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,291 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure:
Furnace fan consumption (non-continuous) = 908 kWh/yr
A/C load = 1,307 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings:
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load + Furnace Fuel
Consumption
= 935 + 1,291 = 2,226 kWh/yr
383
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Furnace Fan Consumption + A/C Load +
Furnace Fuel Consumption
= 908 + 1,307 = 2,215 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 2,226 - 2,215 = 11 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using a combination of OPA residential end-use load
profiles (see below). Refer to Appendix A for the description of the methodology in determining
the peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 2 m3 when
the furnace fan is used continuously for heating and cooling and was previously used noncontinuously for heating and cooling.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
1638
CF1
Winter Summer Winter Summer
Gas
Furnace
with ECM
20.92% 20.94% 57.25%
8.57% 15.19% 1.102
(CB-GS6.52% 5.06% 11.27%
NH) ver: P2011-0
Remarks
384
CF2
2.657
1.129
2.127
This was developed for typical new homes with gas-fired furnaces used for space
heating and cooling combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Res Space Cooling Central. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
385
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CHANGE BEHAVIOUR IN FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Nov 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for space heating only in existing homes (homes built before 1980).
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
386
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
804.00
612.00
192.00
4.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.103
0.030
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11,628.00
3,648.00
76.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 15,276.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical existing homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used for space heating only,
annual electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. Annual electricity consumption
for furnace with PSC motors running non-continuously consume 804 kWh/yr while furnace with
ECMs running continuously consume 612 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 804 - 612 = 192 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
387
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in a decrease in natural gas consumption by 4 m3 when
the furnace fan is used continuously for heating and was previously used non-continuously for
heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.3
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
388
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
389
GAS FURNACE WITH ECM (CHANGE BEHAVIOUR IN FAN
USAGE)
Space Heating Only, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures & Assumptions List
Date Revised
Nov 30, 2010
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with electronically commutated motor (ECM) used continuously for
space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Gas forced-air heating furnace with a permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor used noncontinuously for space heating only in new homes (homes built in or after 1980)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
The minimum performance level, Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE), for gas-fired
furnaces with an input rate not exceeding 65.92 kW (225 000 Btu/h) shall be 90%.1
Presently, there is no minimum energy performance standard restricting the electricity
consumption of furnace fan blowers.
Decision Type
New
390
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
2
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
515.00
439.00
76.00
-2.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.041
0.012
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8,341.00
1,444.00
-38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
933.00
0.00
Totals 9,785.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Annual electricity savings achieved from replacing furnace fan PSC motors with ECMs are
estimated using the results from a study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing
Technology (CCHT) for Toronto, Ontario. The study aimed to demonstrate the ability of the high
efficiency ECM technology to save large amounts of electrical energy in moving air in forced-air
heating and cooling systems, but also to quantify the amount of any extra natural gas that would
be required during the heating season, and extra electrical energy that could be saved in the
cooling season. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500
Btu/hr and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.2
For typical new homes with gas forced-air heating furnace used for space heating only, annual
electricity savings is estimated from furnace fan savings. Annual electricity consumption for
furnace with PSC motors running non-continuously consume 515 kWh/yr while furnace with
ECMs running continuously consume 439 kWh/yr.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption - Conservation Measure
Consumption
= 515 - 439 = 76 kWh/yr
391
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential furnace fan end-use load profile
and coincidence factors of 1.103 (winter) and 2.286 (summer).
Other Resource Savings
A Canadian Centre for Housing Technology (CCHT) study2 determined that replacing the PSC
motor with an ECM will result in an increase in natural gas consumption by 2 m3 when
the furnace fan is used continuously for heating and was previously used non-continuously for
heating.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Furnace fan motors have useful life of 19 years.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of replacing PSC motors with ECMs is $933.00.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
OPA Res
Furnace
8.52% 8.53% 23.32% 12.45% 10.86% 24.14% 4.35%
Fan ver:
MM-2009-1
Remarks
392
1638
7.83%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.855
1.103
2.286
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
State of Wisconsin Department
of Administration Division of
Energy
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
400-600
Comments: Annual electricity savings (kWh) for continuous fan usage is 3,455 kWh and 465
kWh for non-continuous fan usage. This is based on 2001-2002 study of 31 new furnaces
(average 94% AFUE) with average annual gas usage of 800 therms, a 2.5-ton air conditioner with
airflow of 1,000 cfm and 400 hours of operation per year, using Madison Wisconsin weather data
(about 7,600 heating degree days/year).4
References
1 Office of Energy Efficiency, Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, Final Bulletin, December 2008,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/regulations/bulletin/gas-furnaces-dec08.cfm?attr=0.
2 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
3 Frontier Associates, 2009 Cool Savings Rebate Program Final Evaluation Report, June 2010.
4 Energy Centre Wisconsin, "Electricity Use by New Furnaces", A report prepared for the State of
Wisconsin's Department of Administration, Division of Energy, October 2003,
http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?docid=1812.
393
PELLET STOVE
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Sep 23, 2008
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Pellet stove
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Existing electric baseboard heating
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Residential / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Conservation
Cost
Water
Summer
Capacity
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
300.00
0.00
2,679.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
9
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
10
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
11
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
12
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
13
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
14
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
15
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
16
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
300.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
17
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
18
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
19
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
20
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
21
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
22
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
23
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
24
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
4.840
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
25
17,000.00
0.000
4.840
Base
Conservation
Savings
Natural
Gas
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
1
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
2
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
3
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
4
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
5
17,000.00
600.00
16,400.00
6
17,000.00
600.00
7
17,000.00
8
Year
Totals 425,000.00
394
Base Cost
Propane
Heating
Oil
600.00
16,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15,000.00
410,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
0.00
0.00
1,179.30
0.00
600.00
0.00
30,982.50
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Average electricity consumed for electric space heating in Ontario home = 17,000
kWh/year. 1
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a pellet stove will consume roughly 100 kWh
per month. 2
Assume a six month heating season.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption = 17,000 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption = 100 kWh/month x 6 months = 600 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 17,000 – 600 = 16,400 kWh/yr
Notes:
Manufacturer specifications claim heat output of up to 50,000 BTUs in high end pellet
stoves, enough to heat homes up to 2,200 sq. ft 3. This may not be true for all homes and
the percentage of baseboard heating consumption that can be offset may be influenced by
building characteristics, such as floor plan, number of stories, and insulation levels. No
studies were found that estimate the average percentage of electric heating consumption
that would be offset.
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were estimated using OPA Residential Space Heating - Single Family and
a coincidence factor of 1.084. See Appendix A for a description of the methodology used in
determining peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
395
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
EUL is assumed to be 25 years, based on manufacturers’ specifications.3
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
A stove rated to heat a 2,000 square foot home costs CDN $1,600, from StoveWorks. 4
Annual operating costs are based on the cost of pellets to offset 17,000 kWh of electricity
consumption. Assuming pellet stove efficiency of about 85% 2, the input Btu requirements of a
pellet stove is:
Input BTU = 17,000 kWh x 3,413 Btu/kWh / 0.85 = 68.3 million Btu
Wood pellets contain roughly 13.6 million Btu/ton 5, therefore the number of tons required
annually is:
Tons of Pellets = 68.3 million Btu / 13.6 million Btu/ton = 5.02 tons
Canadian Tire sells 40 pound bags of wood pellets for $6.99 6, which would translate to
roughly $384 per ton. However, customers are likely to buy pellets in much larger quantities,
such as by the ton, where costs would be closer to $215/ton7. Therefore, annual fuel costs
are expected to be:
Annual Fuel Costs = 5.02 tons x $215 / ton = $1,079.30
Thus, the first year cost would be $1,600 + $1,079.30 = $2,679.30
Annual maintenance, including cleaning of chimneys and vents is recommended. The cost of
this maintenance can vary based on the rigor and frequency of the maintenance, as well as
how much of this the customer performs. The average annual cost is estimated to be $100,
based on one hour of labor plus any necessary parts. Thus, the total annual cost of
maintenance and fuel is $1,079.30 + $100 = $1,179.30.
Electric baseboard heaters would need to be replaced every 15 years8, on average. The cost
of each heater is around $50 9, and it is assumed that a typical house with baseboard heat will
have six such heaters. This translates to a cost of 300 dollars every 15 years for the baseline
equipment.
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
OPA Res
Space
Heating SF 16.39% 17.07% 48.29% 0.05% 0.37% 0.95% 5.64% 11.24% 1.039
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
396
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0
1.084
0.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
References
1 ICF Consulting, 2005. Factor Analysis of Ontario Electricity Use - 1999-2003. A Report prepared for
the Ontario Power Authority, Revised November 2005.
2 U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Savers: Wood and Pellet Heating,
http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/mytopic=12570 (accessed October 2009).
3 Bixby Energy Systems Online, Maxfire Stove Product Details.
http://www.bixbyenergy.com/stoves/products/maxfire_stove.html (accessed October 2009).
4 StoveWorks, http://www.stoveworksusa.com/16-24.html (accessed October 2009).
5 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory,
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/techline/fuel-value-calculator.pdf (accessed October 2009).
6 Canadian Tire, 2009. Wood Pellets (accessed October 2009).
7 Encyclopedia of Alternative Energy and Sustainable
Living, http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/W/AE_wood_pellet_cost_and_availability.html (accessed October 2009).
8 Colorado Springs
Utilities, http://www.csu.org/environment/conservation_bus/energy/library/11406.pdf (accessed October
2009).
9 Canadian Tire, 2009. Electric Baseboard Heaters (accessed October 2009).
397
398
Controls for Space Cooling
and Heating - Residential
399
400
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Baseboard Heaters
Revision
#
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
1
Updated from 2007 EKC Program Final Evaluation Report
Updated from 2008 EKC Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and
Rewards for Recycling Programs Evaluation Report
2
Feb 15, 2008
May 20, 2008
Oct 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Baseboard programmable thermostat
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-programmable thermostats installed on baseboard heaters with no overnight temperature set
back
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
For a programmable thermostat to receive ENERGY STAR® qualification, it must meet specific
criteria such as having at least two different programming periods (for weekday and weekend
programming), at least four possible temperature settings and allow for temporary overriding by
the user.1 In Canada, applicable CSA standards can be found in CSA C828-99- CAN/CSA Performance
Requirements for Thermostats used with Individual Room Electric Space Heating Devices.
The Office of Energy Efficiency has listed several criteria for ENERGY STAR® qualifying
programmable thermostats as summarized in the tables below.2
Setting
Wake
Day
Evening
Sleep
Programmable
Thermostat
Setpoint
Temperatures
(heat)
< 21°C
Set back at least
5°C
< 21°C
Set back at least
5°C
Acceptable Setpoint
Times and Temperature
Settings
Setpoint
Time
Temperature
(heat)
6:00 a.m.
21°C
8:00 a.m.
17°C
6:00 p.m.
21°C
10:00 p.m.
17°C
401
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
2
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,486.34
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.000
0.019
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,486.34
0.000
0.019
Totals 27,349.74
2,423.19
63.15
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
26,655.09
694.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
25.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Annual electricity consumed for electric space heating in Ontario home = 17,000 kWh/yr 3
Based on a participant survey, about 27% of participating households use baseboard
heaters as their primary source of heating and on the average, there are 5.1 baseboard
heaters per household. Likewise, the remaining 73% use baseboard heaters to supplement
another heating source and these baseboard heaters were found to supply 37% of the total
heating load. There were about 2.9 baseboard heaters per home being used as a
supplementary heater. 4
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Energy savings from temperature set back at night time may save 1% for every degree set
back.5
Based on a participant survey, about 51% of the participants reduced temperature by 1-3°C
(2°C), 38% reduced greater than 3°C (4°C) and 11% did not do any set back.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Baseboard Heater Consumption)Primary + (Baseboard Heater Consumption)Supplementary
= [ (17,000 kWh / 5.133 baseboard heaters/home) x 0.27]
+ [ (17,000 kWh x 0.37 / 2.884 baseboard heaters)
x 0.73]
= 894.21 + 1,592.13 = 2,486.34 kWh/yr
402
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Baseboard Heater Consumption)No Set Back + (Baseboard Heater Consumption)1-3 deg Set Back + (Baseboard Heater Consumption)> 3 Set Back
= [ 2486.34 x (1 - 0) x 0.11 ] + [ 2486.34 x (1 - 0.02)
x 0.51 ] + [ 2486.34 x (1 - 0.04) x 0.38 ]
= 273.50 + 1,242.67 + 907.02
= 2,423.19 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = 2,486.34 - 2,423.19
= 63.15 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using OPA Residential Space Heating - Single Family
load shape and coincidence factors of 1.084 (winter) and 0 (summer). Refer to Appendix A for
the methodology in determining the estimation of peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) assumed 10-12 years for
programmable thermostats. 6 DEER assumes 11 years.7 11 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost of $25.00 was found based on difference for average prices of nonprogrammable and programmable thermostats from Canadian Tire website. Home Depot
programmable (4 programs per day) sell for $ 50.00
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
OPA Res
Space
Heating SF 16.39% 17.07% 48.29% 0.05% 0.37% 0.95% 5.64% 11.24% 1.039
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
0.0
1.084
0.0
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour enduse load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
403
References
1 Natural Resources Canada, Energy Star® for Heating Your
Home, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/energy-star-home-heating.cfm?
attr=4#thermostat (accessed October 2009).
2 Energy Star® Programmable Thermostats, http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?
c=thermostats.pr_thermostats (accessed October 2009).
3 ICF Consulting, 2005. Factor Analysis of Ontario Electricity Use – 1999-2003, A Report prepared for
The Ontario Power Authority, Revised November 2005.
4 The Cadmus Group, Inc. Evaluation of OPA's 2008 EKC Power Savings Event, Keep Cool Pilot and
Rewards for Recycling Programs. A Report prepared for the Ontario Power Authority. July 9, 2009.
5 U.S. Department of Energy. Thermostats and Control Systems.
http://www.energysavers.gov/your_home/space_heating_cooling/index.cfm/mytopic=12720 (accessed
October 2009).
6 GDS Associates Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures", A report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for use as
an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity Market
(FCM), June 2007.
7 California Public Utilities Commission, 2008 Database of Energy Efficient Resources, Version
2008.2.05 December 16, 2008.
404
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Electric Forced-Air Heating
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Feb 15, 2008
1
Updated from 2007 EKC Program Final Evaluation Report
2
Updated Resource Savings Assumptions
May 20, 2008
Oct 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Programmable thermostat for electric forced-air heating systems
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-programmable thermostats
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
For a programmable thermostat to receive ENERGY STAR® qualification, it must meet specific
criteria such as having at least two different programming periods (for weekday and weekend
programming), at least four possible temperature settings and allow for temporary overriding by
the user.1
In Canada, applicable CSA standards can be found in CSA C828-99- CAN/CSA Performance
Requirements for Thermostats used with Individual Room Electric Space Heating Devices.
The Office of Energy Efficiency has listed several criteria for ENERGY STAR® qualifying
programmable thermostats as summarized in the tables below.2
Programmable Thermostat Setpoint Temperatures
Setpoint
Setpoint
Setting
Temperature (heat) Temperature (cool)
Wake
< 21°C
> 26°C
Day
Set back at least 5°C
Set back at least 5°C
> 26°C
Evening
< 21°C
Sleep
Set back at least 5°C
Set back at least 2°C
Acceptable Setpoint Times and Temperature
Settings
Setpoint
Setpoint
Setting Time
Temperature
Temperature
(heat)
(cool)
6:00
Wake
a.m.
21ºC
26ºC
8:00
Day
a.m.
17ºC
30ºC
6:00
Evening
p.m.
21ºC
26ºC
10:00
Sleep
p.m.
17ºC
28ºC
405
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Base Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
2
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
32,942.00
30,791.00
2,151.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.588
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
338,701.00
23,661.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
Totals 362,362.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Consumption:
Assume the following baseline energy consumption for typical existing homes in Toronto, Ontario. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500 Btu/hr and for the air
conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Furnace Gas Consumption
(m 3)
A/C Load Consumption (kWh)
Furnace Fanwinter (kWh)
2,769
NonContinuous
Usage
2,953
1,264
2,146
996
804
1,079
1,220
Furnace Fansummer (kWh)
1,417
346
678
End Use
Continuous
Usage
Blended
2,896
Based on a participant survey, about 31% operates furnace fan on a continuous mode and 69%
operates on a non-continuous mode.4
Conservation Measure Consumption:
A side-by-side housing study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology
determined seasonal energy savings for residential units from night time and daytime temperature
set back using a programmable thermostat. Assume 4°C night time set back during winter and 3°C
daytime set back during summer.5
406
Temperature Set
Back
None (22°C)
18°C night-time set back
18°C night-time and
daytime set back
16°C night-time and
daytime set back
Total Winter Furnace
Electricity Consumption
(kWh/year)
2,314
2,295
Temp Set Up
None (22°C)
25°C daytime set back
24°C daytime set back
Seasonal
Savings (%)
Total Winter Gas
Consumption (MJ)
Seasonal
Savings (%)
---0.8
66,131
61,854
---6.5%
2,270
1.9
59,231
10%
2,261
2.3
57,241
13%
Total Summer Furnace and CAC
Electricity Consumption (kWh)
3,099
2,767
2,376
Seasonal Savings
(%)
0%
11%
23%
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Heating Load Consumption + Cooling Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fanwinter Consumption
+ Furnace Fansummer Consumption
= (2,896 m3 x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 / 3,413 Btu/kWh) + 1,079 kWh + 1,220 kWh + 678 kWh
= 32,942 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Heating Load Consumption
+ Cooling Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fanwinter Consumption
+ Furnace Fansummer
Consumption Heating Load Consumption = [ (2,896 m3 x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 / 3,413 Btu/kWh) ] x ( 1 - 0.065)
= 28,017 kWh/yr
Cooling Load Consumption = 1,079 x (1 - 0.11) = 960.3 kWh/yr
Furnace Fanwinter Consumption = 1,220 x (1 - 0.008) = 1,210.2 kWh/yr
Furnace Fansummer Consumption = 678 x (1 - 0.11) = 603.4 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 28,017 + 960.3 + 1,210.2 + 603.4
= 30,790.9 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = 32,942 - 30,791
= 2,151 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using OPA Residential Space Heating - Single Family
load shape and coincidence factors of 1.084 (winter) and 0 (summer). Refer to Appendix A for
the methodology in determining the estimation of peak demand savings.
407
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) assumed 10-12 years for
programmable thermostats. 6 DEER assumes 11 years.7 11 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Based on the results from OPA's Hot and Cool Savings Program (HCSP) Contractor and
Participant Survey, the incremental cost was found to be $140.00.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF1
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
Programmable
Thermostat Electric Fired 15.17% 15.79% 44.64% 1.94% 1.97% 4.48% 5.35% 10.64%
ver: MM-20100
Remarks
CF2
1.04
2.746
1.085
2.198
A custom load profile was developed for programmable thermostats in typical existing
homes with electric forced air heating system combining the following end-use profiles:
OPA Res Space Cooling – Central, OPA Res Space Heating – Single Family and
OPA Res Furnace Fan. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Ontario Energy Board,
Total Resource Cost
Guide
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
1,625
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.163
1.175
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
18
60
Comments: OEB’s savings are based on programmable thermostats having 8.1% savings
(based on Enbridge source) with base annual energy usage is 1,964 kWh/year (summer) and
18,103 kWh (winter). 8
408
References
1 Natural Resources Canada, Energy Star® for Heating Your
Home, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/energy-star-home-heating.cfm?
attr=4#thermostat (accessed October 2009).
2 Energy Star® Programmable Thermostats, http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?
c=thermostats.pr_thermostats (accessed October 2009).
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 Canadian Center for Housing Technologies, The Effects of Thermostat Set-back and Set-up on
Seasonal Energy Consumption, Surface Temperatures and Recovery Times at the CCHT Twin House
Facility, March 2007 http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc48361/nrcc48361.pdf.
6 GDS Associates Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures", A report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for use as
an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity Market
(FCM), June 2007.
7 California Public Utilities Commission, 2008 Database of Energy Efficient Resources, Version
2008.2.05 December 16, 2008.
8 Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
409
PROGRAMMABLE THERMOSTAT
Gas Forced-Air Heating
Revision #
Description/Comment
Date Revised
0
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Feb 15, 2008
1
Updated from 2007 EKC Program Final Evaluation Report
2
Updated Resource Savings Assumptions
May 20, 2008
Oct 15, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Programmable thermostat for gas forced-air heating systems
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Non-programmable thermostat
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
For a programmable thermostat to receive ENERGY STAR® qualification, it must meet specific
criteria such as having at least two different programming periods (for weekday and weekend
programming), at least four possible temperature settings and allow for temporary overriding by
the user.1
In Canada, applicable CSA standards can be found in CSA C828-99- CAN/CSA Performance
Requirements for Thermostats used with Individual Room Electric Space Heating Devices.
The Office of Energy Efficiency has listed several criteria for ENERGY STAR® qualifying
programmable thermostats as summarized in the tables below.2
Programmable Thermostat Setpoint
Temperatures
Setpoint
Setpoint
Setting
Temperature
Temperature
(heat)
(cool)
Wake
< 21°C
> 26°C
Set back at least
Set back at least
Day
5°C
5°C
> 26°C
Evening
< 21°C
Set back at least
Set back at least
Sleep
5°C
2°C
410
Acceptable Setpoint Times and Temperature
Settings
Setpoint
Setpoint
Setting Time
Temperature
Temperature
(heat)
(cool)
6:00
Wake
a.m.
21ºC
26ºC
8:00
Day
a.m.
17ºC
30ºC
6:00
Evening
p.m.
21ºC
26ºC
10:00
Sleep
p.m.
17ºC
28ºC
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
2
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,977.00
2,774.00
203.00
188.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.176
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
30,514.00
2,233.00
2,068.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
140.00
0.00
Totals 32,747.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Consumption:
Assume the following baseline energy consumption for typical existing homes in Toronto,
Ontario. The rated output of the high efficiency furnaces used for the study was 67,500 Btu/hr
and for the air conditioners, rated output was 26,700 Btu/hr.3
411
End Use
Furnace Gas Consumption (m 3 )
Continuous
Usage
2,769
Non-Continuous
Usage
2,953
1,264
2,146
996
804
1,079
1,220
1,417
346
678
A/C Load Consumption (kWh)
Furnace Fanwinter (kWh)
Furnace Fansummer (kWh)
Blended
2,896
Based on a participant survey, about 31% operates furnace fan on a continuous mode and
69% operates on a non-continuous mode.4
Conservation Measure Consumption:
A side-by-side housing study conducted by the Canadian Centre for Housing Technology
determined seasonal energy savings for residential units from night time and daytime
temperature set back using a programmable thermostat. A night time set back of 4°C during
winter and a daytime set back of 3°C during summer are assumed.5
Temperature Set
Back
None (22°C)
18°C night-time set back
18°C night-time and
daytime set back
16°C night-time and
daytime set back
Total Winter Furnace
Electricity Consumption
(kWh/year)
2,314
2,295
Seasonal
Savings (%)
Total Winter Gas
Consumption (MJ)
Seasonal
Savings (%)
---0.8
66,131
61,854
---6.5%
2,270
1.9
59,231
10%
2,261
2.3
57,241
13%
Temp Set Up
None (22°C)
25°C daytime set back
24°C daytime set back
Total Summer Furnace and
CAC Electricity Consumption
(kWh)
3,099
2,767
2,376
Seasonal
Savings (%)
0%
11%
23%
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Cooling Load Consumption + Furnace Fanwinter
Consumption
+ Furnace Fansummer Consumption
= 1,079 + 1,220 + 678 = 2,977 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Cooling Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fanwinter Consumption
+ Furnace Fansummer Consumption
Cooling Load Consumption = 1,079 x (1 - 0.11) = 960.3 kWh/yr
Furnace Fanwinter Consumption = 1,220 x (1 - 0.008) = 1,210.2 kWh/yr
Furnace Fansummer Consumption = 678 x (1 - 0.11) = 603.4 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 960.3 + 1,210.2 + 603.4 = 2,774 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = 2,977 - 2,774
= 203 kWh/yr
412
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a custom load profile (see below).
Other Resource Savings
It is assumed that about 6.5% is saved when night time temperature set back during winter is
set to 4°C (from 22°C to 18°C). Gas savings were estimated to be 188 m 3 .
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) assumed 10-12 years for
programmable thermostats. 6 DEER assumes 11 years.7 11 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Based on the results from OPA's Hot and Cool Savings Program (HCSP) Contractor and
Participant Survey the incremental cost was found to be $140.00.4
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Programmable
Thermostat 3.54% 3.54% 9.69% 20.08% 17.26% 38.37% 2.66%
Gas Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
4.87%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.813
1.103
2.251
A custom load profile was developed for programmable thermostats in typical existing
homes with gas forced air heating system combining the following end-use profiles:
OPA Res Space Cooling – Central and OPA Res Furnace Fan. Refer to Appendix A
for the OPA end-use load shapes.
413
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Ontario Energy Board,
Total Resource Cost
Guide
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
1,625
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.163
1.175
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
18
60
Comments: OEB’s savings are based on programmable thermostats having 8.1% savings
(based on Enbridge source) with base annual energy usage is 1,964 kWh/year (summer) and
18,103 kWh (winter). 8
References
1 Natural Resources Canada, Energy Star® for Heating Your
Home, http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/energy-star-home-heating.cfm?
attr=4#thermostat (accessed October 2009).
2 Energy Star® Programmable Thermostats, http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?
c=thermostats.pr_thermostats (accessed October 2009).
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technology, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 21, 2003.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
Canadian Center for Housing Technologies, The Effects of Thermostat Set-back and Set-up on
Seasonal Energy Consumption, Surface Temperatures and Recovery Times at the CCHT Twin House
Facility, March 2007 http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc48361/nrcc48361.pdf.
6 GDS Associates Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures", A report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for use as
an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity Market
(FCM), June 2007.
7 California Public Utilities Commission, 2008 Database of Energy Efficient Resources, Version
2008.2.05 December 16, 2008.
8 Ontario Energy Board (OEB), 2006, Total Resource Cost Guide.
414
Thermal Envelope
415
416
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for electric-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / New Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
22,332.80
21,216.16
1,116.64
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.086
0.307
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
318,242.40
16,749.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 334,992.00
417
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical new centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,595
1,291
1,385.24
1,307
1,280
1,288.37
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,744
1,907
1,856.47
1,909
1,925
1,920.04
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,545
935
1,744.10
908
679
749.99
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Load Consumption (kWh/yr) + Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,385.24 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = (1,856.47 m3/yr x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3) / 3,414 Btu/kWh =
19,203.46 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 1,744.10 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,385.24 + 19,203.46 + 1,744.10 = 22,332.80
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 22,332.80 x (1 - 0.05) = 21,216.16
Annual Electricity Savings = 22,332.80 - 21,216.16 = 1,116.64 kWh/yr
418
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
Duct
Sealing Electric
15.25% 15.87% 44.84% 1.83% 1.86% 4.28% 5.38% 10.69%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
1.04
2.74
1.085
2.193
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
419
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
420
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for electric-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
21,899.39
20,804.42
1,094.97
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.084
0.300
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
312,066.30
16,424.55
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 328,490.85
421
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical new centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,595
1,291
1,385.24
1,307
1,280
1,288.37
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,744
1,907
1,856.47
1,909
1,925
1,920.04
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,545
935
1,744.10
908
679
749.99
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Load Consumption (kWh/yr) + Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,288.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = (1,920.04 m3/yr x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3) / 3,414 Btu/kWh =
19,861.03 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 749.99 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,288.37 + 19,861.03 + 749.99 = 21,899.39
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 21,899.39 x (1 - 0.05) = 20,804.42
Annual Electricity Savings = 21,899.39 - 20,804.42 = 1,094.97 kWh/yr
422
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
Duct
Sealing Electric
15.25% 15.87% 44.84% 1.83% 1.86% 4.28% 5.38% 10.69%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
1.04
2.74
1.085
2.193
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
423
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
424
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for gas-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / New Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
3,129.34
2,972.87
156.47
92.82
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.120
0.015
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
44,593.05
2,347.05
1,392.30
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 46,940.10
425
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical new centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,595
1,291
1,385.24
1,307
1,280
1,288.37
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,744
1,907
1,856.47
1,909
1,925
1,920.04
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,545
935
1,744.10
908
679
749.99
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base MeasureConsumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,385.24 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 1,744.10 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,385.24 + 1,744.10 = 3,129.34
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Annual Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 3,129.34 x (1 - 0.05) = 2,972.87
Annual Electricity Savings = 3,129.34 - 2,972.87 = 156.47 kWh/yr
426
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Using the same assumption of 5% average savings for duct sealing in gas-fired homes, gas
savings will be about 1,856.47 m3/yr x 0.05 = 92.82 m3/yr.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Mid
Description
Peak Peak
602
688
Summer
Shoulder
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Duct
Sealing Gas Fired, 5.09% 5.1% 13.93% 17.7% 15.26% 33.94% 3.19%
PSC ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.79%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.822
1.103
2.259
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space Cooling. Refer to Appendix A for
the OPA end-use load shapes.
427
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
428
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for gas-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,038.36
1,936.44
101.92
96.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.088
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
29,046.60
1,528.80
1,440.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 30,575.40
429
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical new centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,595
1,291
1,385.24
1,307
1,280
1,288.37
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,744
1,907
1,856.47
1,909
1,925
1,920.04
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,545
935
1,744.10
908
679
749.99
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,288.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 749.99 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,288.37 + 749.99 = 2,038.36
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 2,038.36 x (1 - 0.05) = 1,936.44
Annual Electricity Savings = 2,038.36 - 1,936.44 = 101.92 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
430
Other Resource Savings
Using the same assumption of 5% average savings for duct sealing in gas-fired homes, gas
savings will be about 1,920.04 m3/yr x 0.05 = 96.00 m3/yr.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Duct
Sealing Gas Fired, 3.53% 3.54% 9.67% 20.08% 17.26% 38.38% 2.66%
ECM ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
4.87%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.813
1.103
2.251
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space Cooling. Refer to Appendix A for
the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
431
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
432
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for electric-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
32,933.13
31,286.47
1,646.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.127
0.453
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
469,297.05
24,699.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 493,996.95
433
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical existing centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space Heating
PSC
ECM
Space Heating
and Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous Fan
Intermittent Fan
Blended
Use
Use
1,264
996
1,079.08
1,008
987
993.51
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous Fan
Intermittent Fan
Blended
Use
Use
2,769
2,953
2,895.96
2,949
2,978
2,969.01
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous Fan
Intermittent Fan
Blended
Use
Use
3,563
1,150
1,898.03
998
786
851.72
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,079.08 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = (2,895.96 m3/yr x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3) / 3,414 Btu/kWh
= 29,956.02 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 1,898.03 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,079.08 + 29,956.02 + 1,898.03 = 32,933.13
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 32,933.13 x (1 - 0.05)
= 31,286.47
Annual Electricity Savings = 32,933.13 - 31,286.47 = 1,646.66 kWh/yr
434
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
Duct
Sealing Electric
15.25% 15.87% 44.84% 1.83% 1.86% 4.28% 5.38% 10.69%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
1.04
2.74
1.085
2.193
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
435
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
436
DUCT SEALING
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for electric-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
32,556.88
30,929.04
1,627.84
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.125
0.447
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
463,935.60
24,417.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 488,353.20
437
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical existing centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,264
996
1,079.08
1,008
987
993.51
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
2,769
2,953
2,895.96
2,949
2,978
2,969.01
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,563
1,150
1,898.03
998
786
851.72
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Load Consumption (kWh/yr) + Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 993.51 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = (2,969.01 m3/yr x 35,314.66 Btu/m 3) / 3,414 Btu/kWh =
30,711.65 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 851.72 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 993.51 + 30,711.65 + 851.72 = 32,556.88
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 32,556.88 x (1 - 0.05) = 30,929.04 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 32,556.88 - 30,929.04 = 1,627.84 kWh/yr
438
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Duct
Sealing Electric
15.25% 15.87% 44.84% 1.83% 1.86% 4.28% 5.38% 10.69%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.74
1.085
2.193
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA
Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
439
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
440
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for gas-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Residential / Existing Homes / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,977.11
2,828.25
148.86
144.80
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.114
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
42,423.75
2,232.90
2,172.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 44,656.65
441
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical existing centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,264
996
1,079.08
1,008
987
993.51
Furnace Consumption (m3 /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
2,769
2,953
2,895.96
2,949
2,978
2,969.01
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,563
1,150
1,898.03
998
786
851.72
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 1,079.08 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 1,898.03 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 1,079.08 + 1,898.03 = 2,977.11
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 2,977.11 x (1 - 0.05) = 2,828.25
Annual Electricity Savings = 2,977.11 - 2,828.25 = 148.86 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
442
Other Resource Savings
Using the same assumption of 5% average savings for duct sealing in gas-fired homes, gas
savings will be about 2,895.96 m3/yr x 0.05 = 144.8 m3/yr.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Mid
Description
Peak Peak
602
688
Summer
Shoulder
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Duct
Sealing Gas Fired, 5.09% 5.1% 13.93% 17.7% 15.26% 33.94% 3.19%
PSC ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.79%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.822
1.103
2.259
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space Cooling. Refer to Appendix A for
the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
443
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
444
DUCT SEALING
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Foil tape used to seal ducts for gas-forced air furnace
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Leaky and unsealed residential air ducts
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
All joints in ducts are required to be sealed, even if the ducts are run entirely within conditioned
space.1
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
2
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,845.23
1,752.97
92.26
148.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.080
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
26,294.55
1,383.90
2,226.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
90.00
0.00
Totals 27,678.45
445
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Average savings for duct sealing is 5%.2 Annual energy savings come from reduced furnace fan
consumption, reduced heating and cooling load.
Annual space heating and space cooling consumption for furnace fan and A/C and furnace load
for typical existing centralized homes in Toronto are tabulated below. Rated output of furnace is
67,500 Btu/hr and rated output of the air-conditioner is 26,700 Btu/hr.3
Space
Cooling
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating
PSC
ECM
Space
Heating and
Cooling
PSC
ECM
A/C Load Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
1,264
996
1,079.08
1,008
987
993.51
3
Furnace Consumption (m /year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
2,769
2,953
2,895.96
2,949
2,978
2,969.01
Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/year)
Continuous
Intermittent
Blended
Fan Use
Fan Use
3,563
1,150
1,898.03
998
786
851.72
Continuous fan usage and intermittent fan usage are assumed to be 31% and 69%, respectively,
based on 2008 customer survey results.4
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
- Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = AC Load Consumption (kWh/yr)
+ Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh/yr)
AC Load Consumption = 993.51 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 851.72 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = 993.51 + 851.72 = 1,845.23
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
x (1 - Percentage Savings)
= 1,845.23 x (1 - 0.05) = 1,752.97
Annual Electricity Savings = 1,845.23 - 1,752.97 = 92.26 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
446
Other Resource Savings
Using the same assumption of 5% average savings for duct sealing in gas-fired homes, gas
savings will be about 2,969.01 m3/yr x 0.05 = 148.4 m3/yr.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2,5
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $90.00 based on home builder interviews.6
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
602
Winter Summer
1290
1638
Duct
Sealing Gas Fired, 3.53% 3.54% 9.67% 20.08% 17.26% 38.38% 2.66%
ECM ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
4.87%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.813
1.103
2.251
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan and OPA Space Cooling. Refer to Appendix A for
the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficiency Vermont
Technical Reference
Manual
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
91-553
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
15
300
Comments: Savings from duct sealing is estimated to be 5%, based on annual gas usage of
1,000 therms and 375 CAC hours.2
447
References
1 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Comparison of U.S. and Canadian Building Codes,
http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/hoficlincl/cmhcin/suexin/inre/inre_008.cfm (accessed October 2009).
2 Efficiency Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual, Number 2005-37 Measure
Savings Algorithms and Cost Assumptions, February 2006.
3 Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies, "Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on
Electricity and Gas Use: Results from the CCHT Research Facility and Projections", NRCC-38500,
August 2003. http://irc.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/pubs/fulltext/nrcc38500/.
4 Navigant Consulting, OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
5 GDS Associates, Inc., "Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and
HVAC Measures", A Report prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG) for
use as an Energy Efficiency Measures/Programs Reference Document for the ISO Forward Capacity
Market (FCM), June 2007.
6 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
448
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / Existing Homes
449
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Heating
Oil
Propane
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
42,265.59
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.094
0.449
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
42,265.59
0.094
0.449
Totals 845,311.80
40,658.78
1,606.81
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
813,175.60
32,136.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
Code #
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
321
431
0.37
0.27
555
497
136.0
131.0
58
5.0
(10.45%)
(3.68%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
10.45%.
450
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 and 3,414 Btu/kWh.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
PSC Motors
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
1.121
0.347
0.587
0.775
0.272
0.428
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 555 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 136.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh = 39,835.97 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (555 x 0.587) + (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66) = 1,974.05 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 555 + 39,835.97 + 1,974.05
= 42,365.02 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 136.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 39,835.97 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,648.27 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 39,835.97 + 1,648.27
= 41,909.77 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (42,365.02 x 0.7816) + (41,909.77 x 0.2184) = 42,265.59 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
451
AC Load Consumption = 497 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 131.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 38,371.41 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (497 x 0.587) + (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66) = 1,879.41 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 497 + 38,371.41 + 1,879.41
= 40,747.82 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 x (1 - 0.1045) = 381.06 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 131.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 38,371.41 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,587.67 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 381.06 + 38,371.41 + 1,587.67
= 40,340.14 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (40,747.82 x 0.7816) + (40,340.14 x 0.2184) = 40,658.78 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 42,265.59 - 40,658.78
= 1,606.81 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
452
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
On
Mid
Peak Peak
528
792
Shoulder
Energy
Star
Windows 15.51% 16.15% 45.64% 1.4% 1.52% 3.52% 5.44% 10.82%
Electric
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.749
1.085
2.188
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA
Space Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A
for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful Incremental
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
453
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
454
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential
455
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Heating
Oil
Propane
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
41,184.94
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.091
0.436
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
41,184.94
0.091
0.436
Totals 823,698.80
39,625.32
1,559.62
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
792,506.40
31,192.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
Code #
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
321
431
0.37
0.27
555
497
136.0
131.0
58
5.0
(10.45%)
(3.68%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
10.45%.
456
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 and 3,414 Btu/kWh.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
ECMs
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.383
0.310
0.333
0.208
0.161
0.176
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 555 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 136.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh 4
= 39,835.97 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (555 x 0.333) + (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 862.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 555 + 39,835.97 + 862.61
= 41,253.58 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 136.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 39,835.97 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 677.79 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 39,835.97 + 677.79
= 40,939.29 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (41,253.58 x 0.7816) + (40,939.29 x 0.2184) = 41,184.94 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
457
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 497 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 131.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 38,371.41 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (497 x 0.333) + (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66) = 818.37 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 497 + 38,371.41 + 818.37
= 39,686.79 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 x (1 - 0.1045) = 381.06 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 131.0 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 38,371.41 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 652.87 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 381.06 + 38,371.41 + 652.87
= 39,405.35 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (39,686.79 x 0.7816) + (39,405.35 x 0.2184) = 39,625.32 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 41,184.94 - 39,625.32
= 1,559.62 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
458
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
On
Mid
Peak Peak
528
792
Shoulder
Energy
Star
Windows 15.51% 16.15% 45.64% 1.4% 1.52% 3.52% 5.44% 10.82%
Electric
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.749
1.085
2.188
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA
Space Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A
for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Effective Useful Incremental
Saving(kWh)
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
459
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
460
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
461
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Conservation Savings
Propane
Heating
Oil
Base Cost
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
2,429.63
2,287.37
142.26
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.105
0.014
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
45,747.40
2,845.20
2,831.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Totals 48,592.60
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
321
431
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
0.37
0.27
Code #
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
555
497
136.0
131.0
58
(10.45%)
5.0
(3.68%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
10.45%.
462
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
PSC Motors
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
1.121
0.347
0.587
0.775
0.272
0.428
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 555 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (555 x 0.587) + (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66) = 1,974.05 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 555 + 1,974.05
= 2,529.05 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,648.27 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 1,648.27
= 2,073.80 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (2,529.05 x 0.7816) + (2,073.80 x 0.2184) = 2,429.63 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 497 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (497 x 0.587) + (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
463
= 1,879.41 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 497 + 1,879.41
= 2,376.41 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 x (1 - 0.1045) = 381.06 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,587.67 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 381.06 + 1,587.67
= 1,968.73 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (2,376.41 x 0.7816) + (1,968.73 x 0.2184) = 2,287.37 kWh/yr Annual Electricity Savings = 2,429.63 - 2,287.37
= 142.26 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Based on the above computations, there will be gas savings resulting from the installation of
Energy Star® windows:
Annual Gas Savings (m 3/yr) = (136 - 131) x 10 6 Btu/yr / 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 = 141.58 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
464
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Energy
Star
Windows 5.44% 5.44% 14.88% 17.0% 14.79% 33.19% 3.25%
Gas Fired,
PSC ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
6.01%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.846
1.103
2.266
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Effective Useful Incremental
Saving(kWh)
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
465
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
466
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Conservation Savings
Propane
Heating
Oil
Base Cost
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
1,348.97
1,253.91
95.06
141.58
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.081
0.006
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
25,078.20
1,901.20
2,831.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Totals 26,979.40
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
Code #
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
321
431
0.37
0.27
555
497
136.0
131.0
58
5.0
(10.45%)
(3.68%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
10.45%.
467
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
ECMs
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.383
0.310
0.333
0.208
0.161
0.176
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 555 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (555 x 0.333) + (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66) = 862.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 555 + 862.61
= 1,417.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (136.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 677.79 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 677.79
= 1,103.32 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,417.61 x 0.7816) + (1,103.32 x 0.2184)
= 1,348.97 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
468
AC Load Consumption = 497 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (497 x 0.333) + (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 818.37 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 497 + 818.37
= 1,315.37 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 x (1 - 0.1045) = 381.06 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (131.0 x 10 6 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 652.87 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 381.06 + 652.87
= 1,033.94 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,315.37 x 0.7816) + (1,033.94 x 0.2184) = 1,253.91 kWh/yr Annual Electricity Savings = 1,348.97 - 1,253.91
= 95.06 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Based on the above computations, there will be gas savings resulting from the installation of
Energy Star® windows:
Annual Gas Savings (m 3/yr) = (136 - 131) x 10 6 Btu/yr / 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 = 141.58 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
469
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Energy
Star
Windows 3.65% 3.65% 9.99% 19.63% 17.07% 38.44% 2.61%
Gas Fired,
ECM ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
4.96%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.846
1.103
2.266
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful Incremental
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
470
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / New Homes / Single-Family
471
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Heating
Oil
Propane
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
24,210.57
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.085
0.406
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
24,210.57
0.085
0.406
Totals 484,211.40
22,757.89
1,452.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
455,157.80
29,053.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
Code #
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
321
431
0.37
0.27
562
513
76.1
71.6
49
4.5
(8.72%)
(5.91%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
8.72%.
472
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 and 3,414 Btu/kWh.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
PSC Motors
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.964
0.325
0.523
1.151
0.270
0.543
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 562 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 76.1 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 22,290.57 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (562 x 0.523) + (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66) = 1,464.04 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 562 + 22,290.57 + 1,464.04
= 24,316.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 76.1 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 22,290.57 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,170.12 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 22,290.57 + 1,170.12
= 23,831.06 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (24,316.61 x 0.7816) + (23,831.06 x 0.2184)
= 24,210.57 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
473
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 513 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 71.6 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 20,972.47 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (513 x 0.523) + (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,369.22 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 513 + 20,972.47 + 1,369.22
= 22,854.69 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 x (1 - 0.1045) = 338.07 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 71.6 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 20,972.47 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,100.93 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 338.07 + 20,972.47 + 1,100.93
= 22,411.47 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (22,854.69 x 0.7816) + (22,411.47 x 0.2184)
= 22,757.89 kWh/yr Annual Electricity Savings = 24,210.57 - 22,757.89
= 1,452.68 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
474
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
On
Mid
Peak Peak
528
792
Shoulder
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
Energy
Star
Windows 15.51% 16.15% 45.64% 1.4% 1.52% 3.52% 5.44% 10.82%
Electric
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
1.04
2.749
1.085
2.188
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA
Space Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A
for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful Incremental
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
475
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
476
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / New Homes / Single-Family
477
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Heating
Oil
Propane
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
23,339.52
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.082
0.391
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
23,339.52
0.082
0.391
Totals 466,790.40
21,940.96
1,398.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
438,819.20
27,971.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
321
431
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
0.37
0.27
Code #
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
562
513
76.1
71.6
49
(8.72%)
4.5
(5.91%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
8.72%.
478
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 and 3,414 Btu/kWh.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
ECMs
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.359
0.290
0.311
0.230
0.160
0.182
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 562 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 76.1 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 22,290.57 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (562 x 0.311) + (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66) = 566.98 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 562 + 22,290.57 + 566.98
= 23,419.54 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 76.1 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 22,290.57 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 392.19 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 22,290.57 + 392.19
= 23,053.13 kWh/yr
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (23,419.54 x 0.7816) + (23,053.13 x 0.2184) = 23,339.52 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
479
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 513 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 71.6 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 20,972.47 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (513 x 0.311) + (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66) = 528.55 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 513 + 20,972.47 + 528.55
= 22,014.01 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 x (1 - 0.1045) = 338.07 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 71.6 x 10 6 Btu/yr / 3414 Btu/kWh
= 20,972.47 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 369.00 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 338.07 + 20,972.47 + 369.00
= 21,679.54 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (22,014.01 x 0.7816) + (21,679.54 x 0.2184) = 21,940.96 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 23,339.52 - 21,940.96
= 1,398.56 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
480
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
On
Mid
Peak Peak
528
792
Shoulder
Energy
Star
Windows 15.51% 16.15% 45.64% 1.4% 1.52% 3.52% 5.44% 10.82%
Electric
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.749
1.085
2.188
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA
Space Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A
for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Effective Useful Incremental
Saving(kWh)
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
481
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
New
482
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Residential / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Conservation Savings
Propane
Heating
Oil
Base Cost
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
1,920.00
1,785.42
134.58
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.099
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
35,708.40
2,691.60
2,548.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Totals 38,400.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
321
431
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
0.37
0.27
Code #
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
562
513
76.1
71.6
49
(8.72%)
4.5
(5.91%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
8.72%.
483
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
PSC Motors
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.964
0.325
0.523
1.151
0.270
0.543
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 562 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (562 x 0.523) + (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66) = 1,464.04 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 562 + 1,464.04
= 2,026.04 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,170.12 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 1,170.12
= 1,540.49 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (2,026.04 x 0.7816) + (1,540.49 x 0.2184) = 1,920.00 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
484
AC Load Consumption = 513 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (513 x 0.523) + (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66) = 1,369.22 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 513 + 1,369.22
= 1,882.22 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 x (1 - 0.1045) = 338.07 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,100.93 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 338.07 + 1,100.93
= 1,439.00 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,882.22 x 0.7816) + (1,439.00 x 0.2184) = 1,785.42 kWh/yr Annual Electricity Savings = 1,920.00 - 1,785.42
= 134.58 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Based on the above computations, there will be gas savings resulting from the installation of
Energy Star® windows
Annual Gas Savings (m 3/yr) = (76.1 - 71.6) x 10 6 Btu/yr / 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 = 127.42 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
485
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Energy
Star
Windows 5.44% 5.44% 14.88% 17.0% 14.79% 33.19% 3.25%
Gas Fired,
PSC ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
6.01%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.846
1.103
2.266
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Effective Useful Incremental
Saving(kWh)
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
486
ENERGY STAR® WINDOWS
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Date Revised
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using sputter low E coating (e ~ 0.10, moderate solar gain)
with argon gas injection, insulated spacers (U=0.27)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Energy Star® windows double glazed using pyrolytic coating (e ~ 0.15-0.20, high solar gain) with
argon gas injection, wood/vinyl (U=0.37) 1
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum Energy Star® requirements to qualify for energy efficiency are based on either a U-value
or Energy Rating (ER) for each of the four Canadian zones.2
Minimum Energy Rating
(ER) Values (Maximum
U-value 2.00 W/m2 -°K)
Most
Windows
Heating
and All
Degree
Zone
Doors
Picture
Days
R-value
UU(includes
Windows
(HDD)
value(Btu/hr(ft2 fixed
only
value(W/m 2 -°K)
2
ft -°F)
hr-°F/Btu) casement
style
windows)
1998 2004 1998 2004
A
< 3500
2.0
0.35
2.9
-16
17
-6
27
B
> 3500 1.8
0.32
3.2
-12
21
-2
31
< 5500
C
> 5500 1.6
0.28
3.6
-8
25
2
35
< 8000
D
> 8000
1.4
0.25
4.0
-5
29
5
39
Maximum U-values and Minimum Rvalues
The Ontario province has 3 climate zones, zones B, C and D. The Greater Toronto Area and other
cities stretching from Sault Ste. Marie to Windsor to Ottawa are in Zone B. Zone C covers mostly
the northwestern and northeastern part of Ontario.
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
487
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Conservation Savings
Propane
Heating
Oil
Base Cost
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
2
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
1,048.95
968.50
80.45
127.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.069
0.005
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19,370.00
1,609.00
2,548.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
Totals 20,979.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:3
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of the RESFEN 5.0 Simulation
Base Case
Efficiency
Case
Savings
321
431
U-factor
(Btu/hrft2 -°F)
0.37
0.27
Code #
Cooling*
(kWh/y)
Heating*
(MBtu/y)
562
513
76.1
71.6
49
(8.72%)
4.5
(5.91%)
* Does not include furnace fan consumption
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours. Space cooling
savings is assumed to have the same percentage as that of central air-conditioning which is
8.72%.
488
Space heating savings were derived from the gas-fired furnace consumptions from RESFEN 5.0
simulation. Assume 35,314.66 Btu/m 3.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use4 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 5. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
ECMs
Space Cooling (kWh fan
consumption/kWh A/C load)
Space Heating (kWh fan
consumption/m3 of gas
usage)
Continuous
Usage
NonContinuous
Usage
Blended
0.359
0.290
0.311
0.230
0.160
0.182
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 6
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure
Consumption (kWh/yr)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 562 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (562 x 0.311) + (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 566.98 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 562 + 566.98
= 1,128.98 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (76.1 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 392.19 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 392.19
= 762.56 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,128.98 x 0.7816) + (762.56 x 0.2184) = 1,048.95 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 513 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (513 x 0.311) + (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
489
= 528.55 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 513 + 528.55
= 1,041.55 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 x (1 - 0.1045) = 338.07 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (71.6 x 10 6 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 369.00 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 338.07 + 369.00
= 707.08 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,041.55 x 0.7816) + (707.08 x 0.2184)
= 968.50 kWh/yr
Annual Electricity Savings = 1,048.95 - 968.50
= 80.45 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Based on the above computations, there will be gas savings resulting from the installation of
Energy Star® windows:
Annual Gas Savings (m 3/yr) = (76.1 - 71.6) x 10 6 Btu/yr / 35,314.66 Btu/m 3 = 127.42 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL is reported to be 25 years based on The New England State Program Working
Group (SPWG)7, and 20 years based on NYSERDA8. 20 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The incremental cost is estimated to be $200 based on home builder interviews.9
490
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Energy
Star
Windows 3.65% 3.65% 9.99% 19.63% 17.07% 38.44% 2.61%
Gas Fired,
ECM ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
1638
4.96%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.846
1.103
2.266
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Efficient Windows
Collaborative
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Annual Electricity
Effective Useful Incremental
Saving(kWh)
Life (yrs)
Cost ($)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
410-600
Comments: A typical house in Boston, MA was estimated to reduce annual heating costs by
27% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and by 39% for triple clear, moderate solar
gain, low-E insulated frames. Likewise, a typical house in Phoenix, AZ will reduce its annual
cooling costs by 16% when double clear wood/vinyl frames are installed and 32% for double clear
low solar gain, low-E wood/vinyl frames.10
References
1 R-2000 Standard – 2005 Edition (April 1 st , 2005). http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/residential/personal/new-
homes/r-2000/standard/current/R2000-standard.pdf.
2 NRCan, Office of Energy Efficiency,
http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/energystar/english/consumers/zones.cfm?text=N&printview=N
3 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
4 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
5 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
6 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
7 GDS Associates, Measure Life Report: Residential and Commercial/Industrial Lighting and HVAC
Measures prepared for The New England State Program Working Group (SPWG), June 2007.
http://www.neep.org/about/measure_life_GDS.pdf
8 NYSERDA, New York Energy $mart Programs, Deemed Savings Database, August 2006.
9 Navigant Consulting, Inc, Home Builder Interviews.
10Efficient Windows Collaborative, http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm.
491
RESIDENTIAL ATTIC INSULATION
Electric Heating
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Oct 31, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Residential Attic Insulation (R-40)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Residential Attic Insulation (R-10)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
0.00
2
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
3,937.50
0.00
3,937.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.130
1.130
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
78,750.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
0.00
Totals 78,750.00
492
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Assume:
Savings are modelled for a typical 1,500 ft 2, 1-storey, single-detached house using
HOT2000 Simulation Program of Natural Resources Canada.
Furnace Size: 70,000 Btu/hr, 100% efficiency
AC Capacity: 28,000 Btu/hr
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 1
Using HOT2000, annual household electricity savings without air conditioning is estimated to be
3,892.16 kWh and 3,950.16 kWh with air conditioning.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = (3,950.16 x 0.7816) + [ 3,892.16 x (1 - 0.7816)]
= 3,937.5 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL for attic insulation is reported to be 20 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Incremental cost is assumed to be $1,000.00.3
493
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Attic
Insulation Electric Fired 15.9% 16.6% 46.9% 0.8%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1.0%
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
2.3%
5.5%
11.0%
1.04
2.931
1.084
2.098
A custom load profile was developed by Navigant, Inc. combining the following end
use profiles: OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA Res Space Heating – Single
Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Ontario
Energy
Board
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
2,715
On-Peak Demand
Reduction
Effective Useful
Life (yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
25
Incremental
Cost ($)
2,253
Comments: Existing homes, single family, detached house. Attic Insulation R-11upgrade to R38, Base Annual Energy Usage (kWh/yr): 18,103, Energy Efficient Technology Annual Energy
Usage (kWh/yr): 15,388.4
References
2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
2Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual No.2005-37.
3GDS Associates, Inc., A Study of the Feasibility of Energy Efficiency as an Eligible Resource as Part
of a Renewable Portfolio Standard for the State of North Carolina, December 2006.
http://www.ncuc.commerce.state.nc.us/reps/NCRPSEnergyEfficiencyReport12-06.pdf.
4Ontario Energy Board (OEB) Assumptions and Measures List (2005).
1
494
RESIDENTIAL ATTIC INSULATION
Gas Heating
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Oct 31, 2008
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Residential Attic Insulation (R-40)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Residential Attic Insulation (R-10)
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
0.00
2
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
16
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
17
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
20
136.70
0.00
136.70
489.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.051
0.026
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,734.00
9,780.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
0.00
Totals 2,734.00
495
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Assume:
Savings are modelled for a typical 1,500 ft 2, 1-storey, single-detached house using
HOT2000 Simulation Program of Natural Resources Canada.
Furnace Size: 70,000 Btu/hr, 100% efficiency
AC Capacity: 28,000 Btu/hr
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 1
Using HOT2000, annual household electricity savings without air conditioning is estimated to be
77.3 kWh and 153.3 kWh with air conditioning.
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = (153.3 x 0.7816) + [ 77.3 x (1 - 0.7816)]
= 136.7 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Using HOT2000 Program, natural gas savings was estimated to be 489m 3.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
The EUL for attic insulation is reported to be 20 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Incremental cost is assumed to be $1,000.00.3
496
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Attic
Insulation Gas Fired
ver: MM2010-0
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
10.7% 11.1% 31.5% 8.9%
Remarks
Shoulder
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
7.8% 17.5%
4.2%
8.3%
1.076
2.822
1.084
2.231
A custom load profile was developed by Navigant, Inc. combining the following end
use profiles: OPA Space Cooling – Central and OPA Res Space Heating – Single
Family. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Wisconsin
Department of
Agriculture
Annual Electricity
Saving(kWh)
328
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
0.15
N/A
Effective
Useful Life
(yrs)
Incremental
Cost ($)
N/A
N/A
Comments: The estimates for the savings are based on a blended average across heating fuel
types, assuming that 95 percent of participating homes are heated with natural gas and 5 percent
are electrically heated.4
References
1 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
2 Vermont Residential Master Technical Reference Manual No.2005-37.
3 GDS Associates, Inc., A Study of the Feasibility of Energy Efficiency as an Eligible Resource as Part
of a Renewable Portfolio Standard for the State of North Carolina, December 2006.
http://www.ncuc.commerce.state.nc.us/reps/NCRPSEnergyEfficiencyReport12-06.pdf.
4 Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Focus on Energy, Savings Adjustments for Home Performance
with Energy Star Insulation Measures (July 14, 2006) http://www.doa.state.wi.us/docs_view2.asp?
docid=5716.
497
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
New Homes / Single-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
25,470.01
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.131
0.639
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
25,470.01
0.131
0.639
Totals 254,700.10
498
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
23,186.52
2,283.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
231,865.20
22,834.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 351 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 81.0 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 23,725.83 kWh/yr and 2,293.67
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
PSC Motors
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.964
0.325
0.523
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
1.151
0.270
0.543
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
499
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (351 x 0.523) + (2,293.67 x 0.543)
= 1,429.03 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 351 + 23,725.83 + 1,429.03
= 25,505.87
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 2,293.67 x 0.543
= 1,245.46 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 23,725.83 + 1,245.46
= 25,341.67
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (25,505.87 x 0.7816) + (25,341.67 x 0.2184)
= 25,470.01
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 - (351 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 281.68 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 - (23,725.83 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 21,649.82 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (281.68 x 0.523) + (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,283.80 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 281.68 + 21,649.82+ 1,283.80
= 23,215.30
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 - (370.37 x .25 x 0.79) = 297.22 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 - (23,725.83 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 21,649.82 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,136.48 kWh/yr
500
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 297.22 + 21,649.82 + 1,136.48
= 23,083.53
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (23,215.30 x 0.7816) + (23,083.53 x 0.2184) = 23,186.52
Annual Electricity Savings = 25,470.01 - 23,186.52
= 2,283.49 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
501
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Window
Solar Film Electric
15.53% 16.17% 45.7% 1.37% 1.49% 3.47% 5.44% 10.83%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.746
1.085
2.183
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA Space
Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the
OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
502
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / New Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
24,583.83
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.126
0.616
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
24,583.83
0.126
0.616
Totals 245,838.30
22,384.29
2,199.54
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
223,842.90
21,995.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
503
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 351 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 81.0 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 23,725.83 kWh/yr and 2,293.67
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
ECMs
Continuous Blended
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.359
0.290
0.311
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.230
0.160
0.182
consumption/m3
of gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
504
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (351 x 0.311) + (2,293.67 x 0.182)
= 526.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 351 + 23,725.83 + 526.61
= 24,603.44
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 2,293.67 x 0.182
= 417.45 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 23,725.83 + 417.45
= 24,513.65
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (24,603.44 x 0.7816) + (24,513.65 x 0.2184) = 24,583.83
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 - (351 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 281.68 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 - (23,725.83 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 21,649.82 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (281.68 x 0.311) + (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.182 / 35,314.66) = 468.52 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 281.68 + 21,649.82+ 468.52
= 22,400.02
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 - (370.37 x .25 x 0.79) = 297.22 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 23,725.83 - (23,725.83 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 21,649.82 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 380.92 kWh/yr
505
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 297.22 + 21,649.82 + 380.92
= 22,327.97
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (22,400.02 x 0.7816) + (22,327.97 x 0.2184)
= 22,384.29
Annual Electricity Savings = 24,583.83 - 22,384.29
= 2,199.54 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
506
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Window
Solar Film Electric
15.53% 16.17% 45.7% 1.37% 1.49% 3.47% 5.44% 10.83%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.746
1.085
2.183
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA Space
Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the
OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
507
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, New Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,744.17
1,536.70
207.47
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.164
0.018
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15,367.00
2,074.70
2,007.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
Totals 17,441.70
508
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 351 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 81.0 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 23,725.83 kWh/yr and 2,293.67
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
PSC Motors
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.964
0.325
0.523
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
1.151
0.270
0.543
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
509
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption + Furnace Load
Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (351 x 0.523) + (2,293.67 x 0.543)
= 1,429.03 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 351 + 1,429.03
= 1,780.03
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 2,293.67 x 0.543
= 1,245.46 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 1,245.46
= 1,615.83
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,780.03 x 0.7816) + (1,615.83 x 0.2184) = 1,744.17
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 - (351 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 281.68 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (281.68 x 0.523) + (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,283.80 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 281.68 + 1,283.80
= 1,565.48
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 - (370.37 x .25 x 0.79) = 297.22 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.543 / 35,314.66)
= 1,136.48 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 297.22 + 1,136.48
= 1,433.70
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,565.48 x 0.7816) + (1,433.70 x 0.2184)
= 1,536.70
510
Annual Electricity Savings = 1,744.17 - 1,536.70
= 207.47 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Gas savings is estimated to be 2,293.67 m3yr x 0.25 x 0.35 = 200.70 m3yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
511
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Window
Solar Film Gas Fired
4.64% 4.64% 12.7% 18.14% 15.8% 35.58% 2.95%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.55%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.852
1.103
2.268
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
512
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, ECMs, New Homes
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
New
Target Market(s)
Residential / Single-Family / New Homes
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
1
Electricity
Base
Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
858.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.097
0.010
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
858.00
0.097
0.010
Totals 8,580.00
734.46
123.54
200.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
7,344.60
1,235.40
2,007.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
513
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey new frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.78; A/C SEER = 10.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 351 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 81.0 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 23,725.83 kWh/yr and 2,293.67
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized new homes is assumed to have a cooling capacity
of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 10.8. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
ECMs
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.359
0.290
0.311
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.230
0.160
0.182
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
514
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (351 x 0.311) + (2,293.67 x 0.182) = 526.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 351 + 526.61
= 877.61
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (10.8 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 370.37 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 2,293.67 x 0.182
= 417.45 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 370.37 + 417.45
= 787.82
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (877.61 x 0.7816) + (787.82 x 0.2184) = 858.00
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 351 - (351 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 281.68 kWh/yr
FF Consumption = (281.68 x 0.311) + (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.182 / 35,314.66) = 468.52 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 281.68 + 468.52
= 750.20
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 370.37 - (370.37 x .25 x 0.79) = 297.22 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (21,649.82 x 3414 x 0.182 / 35,314.66)
= 380.92 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 297.22 + 380.92
= 678.14
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (750.20 x 0.7816) + (678.14 x 0.2184)
= 734.46
Annual Electricity Savings = 858.00 - 734.46
515
= 123.54 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Gas savings is estimated to be 2,293.67 m3/yr x 0.25 x 0.35 = 200.70 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
516
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Window
Solar Film Gas Fired
4.64% 4.64% 12.7% 18.14% 15.8% 35.58% 2.95%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.55%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.852
1.103
2.268
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
517
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Residential / Single-Family
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
43,339.81
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.220
1.078
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
43,339.81
0.220
1.078
Totals 433,398.10
518
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
39,491.09
3,848.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
394,910.90
38,487.20
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 339 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 140.4 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 41,124.78 kWh/yr and 3,975.69
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
PSC Motors
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
1.121
0.347
0.587
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.775
0.272
0.428
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
519
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (339 x 0.587) + (3,975.69 x 0.428) = 1,900.59 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 339 + 41,124.78 + 1,900.59
= 43,364.37
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 3,975.69 x 0.428
= 1,701.59 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 41,124.78 + 1,701.59
= 43,251.91
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (43,364.37 x 0.7816) + (43,251.91 x 0.2184)
= 43,339.81
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 - (339 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 272.05 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 - (41,124.78 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 37,526.36 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (272.05 x 0.587) + (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.428 / 35,314.66) = 1,712.40 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 272.05 + 37,526.36+ 1,712.40
= 39,510.81
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
520
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 - (425.53 x .25 x 0.79) = 341.49 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 - (41,124.78 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 37,526.36 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,552.70 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 341.49 + 37,526.36 + 1,552.70
= 39,420.56
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (39,510.81 x 0.7816) + (39,420.56 x 0.2184)
= 39,491.09
Annual Electricity Savings = 43,339.81 - 39,491.09
= 3,848.72 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
521
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Window
Solar Film Electric
15.53% 16.17% 45.7% 1.37% 1.49% 3.47% 5.44% 10.83%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.746
1.085
2.183
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA Space
Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the
OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
522
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Electric-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
1
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Winter
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
Capacity
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
42,270.63
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.214
1.049
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
42,270.63
0.214
1.049
Totals 422,706.30
38,522.88
3,747.75
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
385,228.80
37,477.50
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
523
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 339 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 140.4 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 41,124.78 kWh/yr and 3,975.69
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
ECMs
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.383
0.310
0.333
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.208
0.161
0.176
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
524
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (339 x 0.333) + (3,975.69 x 0.176) = 812.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 339 + 41,124.78 + 812.61
= 42,276.39
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 3,975.69 x 0.176
= 699.72 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 41,124.78 + 699.72
= 42,250.03
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (42,276.39 x 0.7816) + (42,250.03 x 0.2184) = 42,270.63
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 - (339 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 272.05 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 - (41,124.78 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 37,526.36 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (272.05 x 0.333) + (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 729.09 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 272.05 + 37,526.36+ 729.09
= 38,527.50 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 - (425.53 x .25 x 0.79) = 341.49 kWh/yr
Furnace Load Consumption = 41,124.78 - (41,124.78 x 0.25 x 0.35)
= 37,526.36 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 638.50 kWh/yr
525
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 341.49 + 37,526.36 + 638.50
= 38,506.35
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (38,527.50 x 0.7816) + (38,506.35 x 0.2184) = 38,522.88
Annual Electricity Savings = 42,270.63 - 38,522.88
= 3,747.75 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
526
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
Shoulder
Window
Solar Film Electric
15.53% 16.17% 45.7% 1.37% 1.49% 3.47% 5.44% 10.83%
Fired ver:
MM-2010-0
Remarks
CF1
CF2
Off
Winter Summer
Peak
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1608 1290
1638
1.04
2.746
1.085
2.183
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with electric-fired
furnace combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, OPA Space
Cooling – Room and OPA Space Heating - Single Family. Refer to Appendix A for the
OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
527
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, PSC Motors, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Residential / Existing Homes
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
2,215.03
1,964.73
250.30
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.197
0.021
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19,647.30
2,503.00
3,478.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
Totals 22,150.30
528
Conservation Savings
Base Cost
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 339 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 140.4 MBtu/yr (3,975.69 m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
PSC Motors
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
1.121
0.347
0.587
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.775
0.272
0.428
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
529
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (339 x 0.587) + (3,975.69 x 0.428)
= 1,900.59 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 339 + 1,900.59
= 2,239.59
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 3,975.69 x 0.428
= 1,701.59 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 1,701.59
= 2,127.13
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (2,239.59 x 0.7816) + (2,127.13 x 0.2184)
= 2,215.03
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 - (339 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 272.05 kWh/yr
FF Consumption = (272.05 x 0.587) + (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,712.40 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 272.05 + 1,712.40
= 1,984.44
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 - (425.53 x .25 x 0.79) = 341.49 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.428 / 35,314.66)
= 1,552.70 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 341.49 + 1,552.70
= 1,894.19
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,984.44 x 0.7816) + (1,894.19 x 0.2184)
= 1,964.73
Annual Electricity Savings = 2,215.03 - 1,964.73
530
= 250.30 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Gas savings is estimated to be 3,975.69 m3/yr x 0.25 x 0.35 = 347.87 m3/yr
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
531
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
On
Description
Peak
602
Summer
Shoulder
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Window
Solar Film Gas Fired
4.64% 4.64% 12.7% 18.14% 15.8% 35.58% 2.95%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.55%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.852
1.103
2.268
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
532
WINDOW SOLAR FILM
Gas-Fired, ECMs, Existing Homes
Revision #
0
Description/Comment
Date Revised
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Apr 01, 2009
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Window solar film (rejects 79% of sun's heat)
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
Standard windows (double glazed with low E-coating) with no window solar film
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
Minimum window standards and rating shall conform to CAN/CSA Standards A440 and
A440.1. Thermal resistance of windows must have an overall coefficient of heat transfer of not
more than 2.0 W/m 2-°C and an energy rating of not less than 17 for operable windows, and 27
for fixed windows. A basement window shall be double glazed with a low-E coating. 1
Decision Type
Retrofit / Replacement
Target Market(s)
Existing Homes / Single-Family / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Peak Demand
Savings
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Electricity
Year
Base
Conservation Savings
Natural
Gas
Propane
Heating
Oil
Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Conservation
Cost
Equipment O&M Equipment O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
2
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
1,145.85
996.52
149.33
347.87
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.118
0.013
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,965.20
1,493.30
3,478.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
800.00
0.00
Totals 11,458.50
533
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Electricity savings are derived from reduced space heating and cooling load including reduced
furnace fan usage.
The Office of Energy Efficiency states that windows account for 25% of total house heat loss. 2 It is assumed that the same amount of solar heat can be transferred into the home to contribute
to the cooling load. The International Window Film Association (IWFA) indicated that window
films can reject up to 80% of the sun’s heat.3 In addition, 3M suggests that solar window films
can reduce up to 79% of the suns heat and can help reduce winter heat loss by reflecting up to
35% of indoor heat back into the room. 4
Space cooling (A/C load) and space heating (furnace load) consumptions were estimated using
RESFEN 5.0 software with the following assumptions:5
2-storey existing frame
2,000 ft 2 total floor area and 300 ft 2 in windows (15% floor area)
Base window is double glazed with spectrally selective low E-coatings and framed with
wood/vinyl.
Base window U-value is 0.34 Btu/hr-ft 2-°F
Gas furnace and central air conditioner, and Ontario, Toronto weather.
HVAC efficiency (existing construction): AFUE = 0.70; A/C SEER = 8.0
Results of RESFEN 5.0 simulation exhibited space cooling consumption of 339 kWh/yr and a
space heating consumption of 140.4 MBtu/yr (equivalent to 41,124.78 kWh/yr and 3,975.69
m3/yr).
Space cooling (A/C load) for non-centralized existing homes is assumed to have a cooling
capacity of 8,000 Btu/hr and an EER of 9.4. Assumed cooling hours is 500 hours.
Savings from reduced furnace fan usage were estimated using data from the Final Report on the
Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use6 for typical existing construction in
Toronto and assuming 31% uses furnace fan continuously and 69% non-continuously 7. Furnace Fan Consumption (kWh) with respect to A/C Load and Gas Usage:
NonContinuous
Continuous Blended
ECMs
Usage
Usage
Space Cooling
(kWh fan
0.383
0.310
0.333
consumption/kWh
A/C load)
Space Heating
(kWh fan
0.208
0.161
0.176
consumption/m3 of
gas usage)
About 78.16% of air-conditioned households in Ontario are centralized. 8
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh) = Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) - Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)
534
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (Base Measure Consumptionwith AC x 0.7816)
+ (Base Measure Consumptionw/o AC x 0.2184)
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (339 x 0.333) + (3,975.69 x 0.176) = 812.61 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 339 + 812.61
= 1,151.61
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = (8,000 Btu/hr x 500 hrs) / (9.4 Btu/W-hr x 1000 W/kW)
= 425.53 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = 3,975.69 x 0.176
= 699.72 kWh/yr Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 425.53 + 699.72
= 1,125.25
Base Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,151.61 x 0.7816) + (1,125.25 x 0.2184) = 1,145.85
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 339 - (339 x 0.25 x 0.79)
= 272.05 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (272.05 x 0.333) + (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.176 / 35,314.66) = 729.09 kWh/yr Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)with AC = 272.05 + 729.09
= 1,001.13
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = AC Load Consumption
+ Furnace Load Consumption
+ Furnace Fan Consumption
AC Load Consumption = 425.53 - (425.53 x .25 x 0.79) = 341.49 kWh/yr
Furnace Fan Consumption = (37,526.36 x 3414 x 0.176 / 35,314.66)
= 638.50 kWh/yr
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr)w/o AC = 341.49 + 638.50
= 979.98
Conservation Measure Consumption (kWh/yr) = (1,001.13 x 0.7816) + (979.98 x 0.2184)
= 996.52
535
Annual Electricity Savings = 1,145.85 - 996.52
= 149.33 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using a combination of OPA end-use load profiles (see
custom load profile below).
Other Resource Savings
Gas savings is estimated to be 3,975.69 m3/yr x 0.25 x 0.35 = 347.87 m3/yr.
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
Films generally last for 5 to 15 years, depending on both the quality of the product and the
environment in which it is installed. Ask your film manufacturers about the expected lifetime of
their product in a particular application. Warranties are typically five to 10 years, although
some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties under specific conditions.9
3M suggests that most of their window solar films last up to 10 years while some have lasted
up to 15 years.10
10 years is assumed.
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
Home Depot 11 offers window films in different sizes and different percentages of heat
rejection. GILA window films (3 ft x 6.5 ft) which can reject about 55-70% of summer heat
have an average cost of $ 22.47 per film or $ 1.15 per ft 2. 3M’s sun control window film (25
in. x 48 in) blocking 45% of solar energy costs $34.95 per film or $ 4.19 per ft 2. Energy Film
with Glare Control rejecting about 75% of solar energy offers an average cost of $2.05 per
ft 2. Averaging these, cost of the window film is assumed to be $2.46 per ft 2. For a 300 ft 2,
window films will cost $738.00.
For professionally installed window films, labour cost is added and this is assumed to be about
$60. Assume total cost for installing window solar films is $800.00.
536
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
Window
Solar Film Gas Fired
4.64% 4.64% 12.7% 18.14% 15.8% 35.58% 2.95%
ver: MM2010-0
Remarks
1638
5.55%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
1.076
2.852
1.103
2.268
A custom load profile was developed for typical existing homes with gas-fired furnace
combining OPA Res Furnace Fan, OPA Space Cooling – Central, and OPA Space
Cooling – Room. Refer to Appendix A for the OPA end-use load shapes.
References
1 Markham Builder Tips, June 2008 (http://www.city.markham.on.ca/NR/rdonlyres/79148D37-BDF8-
48E4-9F88-79D8488562F8/0/TIP6007.pdf).
2 Natural Resources Canada, Office of Energy Efficiency, “Improving Window Energy Efficiency”
(http://www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca/publications/infosource/pub/renovate/windowefficiency/index.cfm?attr=4).
3 International Window Film Association, Residential Film
(http://www.iwfa.com/PreProduction_copy(1)/consumer_info/residential.html).
4 3M, “3M Window Films” (http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/WF/3MWindowFilms/).
5 LBNL Window and Daylighting Software. http://windows.lbl.gov/software/resfen/resfen.html.
6 Final Report on the Effects of ECM Furnace Motors on Electricity and Gas Use. http://canmetenergycanmetenergie.nrcan-rncan.gc.ca/fichier/79243/ECM.pdf.
7 Navigant Consulting, Inc. OPA 2007 Hot and Cool Savings Program Evaluation, July 2008.
8 2003 Household Energy Use Survey,
http://oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/data_e/sheu03/publication_en_018_3.cfm?attr=0.
9 BC Hydro, Window Film,
http://www.bchydro.com/powersmart/technology_tips/buying_guides/building_shell/window_film.html (accessed October 2009).
103M, “Frequently Asked Questions”
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_GB/Facilities/Home/ProductInformation/GlazingProtection/FA
Qs/#q5 (accessed October 2009).
11Home Depot, http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?
D=931983&Ntt=931983&catalogId=10051&langId=15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=112872&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNu
mber (accessed October 2009).
537
538
Water Heating - Residential
539
540
DOMESTIC HOT WATER PIPE INSULATION
Per 3' of Pipe Insulation
Revision #
Description/Comment
0
1
Date Revised
Feb 15, 2008
Jul 14, 2008
Created in the Measures and Assumptions List
Adjusted to 3 from 6 feet of pipe insulation
Efficient Equipment and Technologies Description
Pipe insulation (3')
Base Equipment and Technologies Description
No pipe insulation
Codes, Standards, and Regulations
N/A
Decision Type
Retrofit
Target Market(s)
Single-Family / Existing Homes / Residential
Resource Savings Table
Electricity and Other Resource Savings
Year
Electricity
Base Conservation Savings
Peak Demand Savings
Natural Gas Propane Heating Oil Water
Summer
Capacity
Winter
Capacity
Base Cost
Equipment O&M
Conservation Cost
Equipment
O&M
(kWh)
(kWh)
(kWh)
(m3 )
(L)
(L)
(L)
(kW)
(kW)
($)
($)
($)
($)
1
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.70
0.00
2
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
4
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
7
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
8
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
13
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
14
52.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.003
0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15
52.00
0.003
0.007
Totals 780.00
14.00
38.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
210.00
570.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.70
0.00
541
Resource Savings Assumptions
Annual Electricity Savings
Base Measure Assumptions:
Assume heat loss through a bare pipe (0.75 inch diameter) to be 38.36 W/m.1
Assume copper pipe schedule M where 0.75 in pipe diameter (radius has a corresponding
nominal value of 10.7 mm).
Assume temperature of water in the pipe to be 55°C and ambient temperature to be 21.1°C.
Assume about 1475 hours/year for domestic hot water use.
Conservation Measure Assumptions:
Assume polyethylene foam as insulation material with a thermal conductivity of 0.036 W/m°C.
Assume insulation thickness of 12 mm
Annual Electricity Savings:
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = Heat Loss through the Bare Pipe - Heat Loss through
Insulation
Heat Loss through Insulation (W/m) = 2π k ΔT / ln (r 2/r 1)
= 2 x 3.1416 x 0.036 x (55 - 21.1) / [ ln (12 + 10.7)/10.7]
= 10.20 W/m
Annual Electricity Savings (kWh/yr) = [ (38.36 - 10.20) W/m / 1000 W/kW ] x 0.9144 m x 1475
hours/yr
= 38 kWh/yr
Peak Demand Savings
Peak demand savings were computed using OPA Residential Water Heating and coincidence
factors of 1.107 (winter) and 0969 (summer). Refer to Appendix A for the methodology in
determining the estimation of peak demand savings.
Other Resource Savings
N/A
Other Input Assumptions
Effective Useful Life (EUL)
EUL is assumed to be 15 years.2
Base & Conservation Measure Equipment and O&M Costs
The average cost for a 3' foam pipe insulation is about $0.70 (Canadian Tire website, 2009
and Home Depot website, 2009).
542
Seasonal Energy Savings Pattern
Winter
Description
OPA Res
Water
Heating
ver: MM2009-1
Remarks
Summer
Shoulder
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
On
Peak
Mid
Peak
Off
Peak
602
688
1614
528
792
1608
Winter Summer
1290
10.05% 8.76% 16.76% 4.17% 9.98% 14.63% 17.87%
1638
17.8%
CF1
CF2
Winter Summer Winter Summer
0.986
0.893
1.107
0.969
This seasonal energy savings pattern has been developed using an 8760 hour end-use
load profile that was utilized in the load forecasting analysis conducted for the
Integrated Power System Plan (IPSP). See Appendix A for further details.
Measure Assumptions Used by Other Jurisdictions
Source
Annual
Electricity
Saving(kWh)
Austin, Texas Deemed Savings,
Installation & Efficiency
Standards
40
On-Peak
Demand
Reduction
Effective
Incremental
Useful Life
Cost ($)
(yrs)
Winter Summer
(kW)
(kW)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Comments: Water pipe insulation must have a minimum thickness of 3/4 in. 3
Vermont - Residential Master
Technical Reference Manual
33
N/A
N/A
13
15
Comments: The base technology is a hot water pipe without a wrap and the efficient technology
is a hot water pipe with a wrap.4
References
1 The Engineering Toolbox, Heat Loss of Uninsulated Copper Pipes,
http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/copper-pipe-heat-loss-d_19
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