wiring markets 51-100
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How? You'll find out quickly when you check
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On DYNAIR program switchers you won't find
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ut.Low Budget Video Switching and Effects."
tains a wealth of useful information about
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Top quality program origiration at a reasonable price;he new 2830 Series Camera
rom Cohu. Self-contained with
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ras the same reliable circuitry
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Use the 2830 in a wide
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und broadcasting EIA signals.
Synchronization can be from
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iimilar to EIA RS-330 or
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For specific applications,
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Vidicons provide h1g~
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For wide ranges of scene
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Plumbicons provide low lag
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Let us assist in selecting
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Linear-phase, delay line
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viewfinder can be
switched from camera to program to allow the camera
operator to maintain proper
camera position for insert
keying. To resolve studio noise,
the amplified intercom system
has jacks to both camera
and program audio. Should you
desire remote operation, camera
controls and other functions
are available.
This 2830 is worth looking
into. Learn about its many
fine features by asking for a
descriptive data sheet.
Contact Cohu Electronics,
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Telephone: 714-277-6700
TWX: 910-335-1244
ELECTRc:>NIC::S,
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See Cohu
at
INC
o I V I s Io N
NCTA
Booth 212
I
MAY 1972/VOLUME 8/NUMBER 5
6
Broadcast Industry News
NAB Convention is good news. At NCTA meet,
it will be even better.
14
Interpreting the FCC Rules and Regulations
New Cable Rules: Part II-Operating Requirements,
Non-Broadcast Channels and Technical Standards.
19
Editorial
The converging broadcast and cable industries.
20
KPRC (AM-TV), Houston, A Landmark and More
How to spread out over two acres.
23
Some broadcasters and
some cable operators may
not feel as great affection
for each other as our
tatooist Sudduth implies;
but as both sectors of the
electronic media grow, we
predict a convergence
of interests.
(See Editorial, page 19.)
WYENIs Counting on Clean and Pleasant Sound
to Buck 77 Competitors
Selecting equipment and a format.
25
Independent KPHO-TV in Booming Phoenix Gets
a Plant That Fits Its Size
From overcrowded downtown to the suburbs.
27
From 220 to 100,000 Watts ERP on PM: Oklahoma State's
KOSU-FMMakes the Leap
More power for the lOOth station on the National Public
Radio network.
27
Low-Light Color Cameras Serve Ohio State Medical CCTV
New cameras solve medical problems.
28
Cathedral Is Fully Wired As Radio and TV Remote
How to keep microphones and cameras from interfering
with worship.
29
BROADBAND
INFORMATION SERVICES, INC.
274 Madison Ave.
New York, N. Y. 10016
212-685-5320
30
Editor
Assistant Editor
A. E. Gehlhaar
Art Di rector
Gus Sauter
Production Manager
Arline G. Jacobs
FCC Counsel
Pittman Lovett Ford
Hennessey and White
Discrete Four-Channel Advocate Charges Matrix Promoters
Rip-off Public
Four-channel believers are on the offensive.
James A. Lippke
Contributing
Editor
Thomas R. Haskett
Automation For a Medium-Small Radio Market in New Mexico
His and her automation: one for AM, one for FM.
31
Associate Editor
Robin Lanier
Expandable Lighting at PTV Station WPBT
This center can double its size with ease.
33
Broadcast Equipment
New and significant products for broadcasters.
35
New Literature
Useful reading materials.
CM/E MAGAZINE:For Cable ReadersOnly/Between pages 18b and 19.
~
~
BM/E, BROADCAST
MANAGEMENT/ENGINEERING,
is published monthly by Broadband Information Services,Inc. All notices pertaining to undeliverable mail or subscriptions should be addressedto 274 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016. BM/E
is circulated without charge to those responsible for station operation and for spec!fYi.ng
and authorizing the purchase of equipment used in broadcast faciliti.es. These tactütles
include AM, FM, and TV broadcast stations; CATV systems; ETV stations; networks and
studios;
audio
and video recording studios; consultants, etc. Subscription prices to others:
$15.00
one
year, $25.00two.
Copyright © 1972 by BroadbandInformation Services,Inc., New York City.
Controlled Circulation postage paid at East Stroudsburg, Penna.
4
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-BM/
www.americanradiohistory.com
It Was Good News
At The NAB Convention
There were the usual warnings on
what broadcasters had to do to survive, but they came from the insiders-NAB
prexy Vince Wasilewski, chairman of the license renewal
task force, Mark Evans, and others.
The outsiders brought friendly
greetings.
Herb Klein from the
White House read a warm Nixon
message. Secretary of the Treasury
Connally thanked broadcasters
for
their "outstanding
service to the
nation." Clay T. Whitehead from
the OTP showed that he was generally concerned about the possibility of a government-controlled
broadcast
system (vis-a-vis
D.C.
Court of Appeals ruling on the
Business Executives Movement for
Vietnam Peace, FTC's counter advertising, etc.).
Although
Whitehead saw no return to the status
yond first run. The Justice Department action has been called a bad
joke-"they
must be kidding," is
the universal reaction of the mass
media industry. Time will tell if it
is bad news or merely a bad joke.
Bad news will have a lingering effect, but bad jokes die rather quickly.
On the exhibit floor, reaction was
good as equipment
manufacturers
took some orders on the floor and
sensed a very definite intention of
many to buy needed gear in the
coming months.
quo of yesteryear, he said the answer lies in freedom in broadcasting
under a private enterprise system.
The FCC, while trying to maintain a neutral stance-looking
out
for the public-certainly
wasn't
anti-broadcasting.
In
fact,
the
promise of the FCC to take a new
look at all aspects of Part 73 of the
rules (under the direction of Commissioner Wiley) was indeed good
news. There was hope that, out of
this, radio may become less regulated.
The bad news came after the
convention
when the Justice Department filed (April 14, Los Angeles District Court) a suit against
the three networks and Viacom for
violating the Sherman Act in their
control of prime time. Justice Department would prohibit networks
from producing their own programs
for broadcast and holding an interest in entertainment
programs be-
Network TV Hit $1.6 Billion
in 1971; 48 NewClients
Last year 432 advertisers
spent
$1.6 billion on network television,
according to a report from the Television
Bureau
of Advertising.
continued on page 8
"CATV, The New Communicator" Is Theme of NCTA Meet
The 1972 convention of the National Cable Television Association, at
the Conrad Hilton in Chicago, May
14 through 17, will have the theme
"CATY, The New Communicator,"
and will hear addresses by Ralph
Nader,
consumer
crusader,
and
Dean Burch, chairman of the FCC.
Parallel management and technical
sessior.s will constitute a comprehensive run-down on topics that are
stirring the industry deeply today.
Among the management
sessions
are reports on the "new" CATY
from the management
view, the
financial view, the regulatory view,
etc., with panels of experts.
Technical sessions will cover program origination,
two-way system
experience, multichannel microwave
distribution, and many others. The
exhibit of CATV equipment
by
manufacturers
will be larger than
ever, reflecting the general feeling
that cable stands on the edge of at
least a moderate boom.
UTILITY
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8ANt.. OF TV RECEIVEll5
Theta-Com of California will demonstrate live at NCTA a complete two-way
CATV system shown in simplified block diagram above. It will incorporate
a SRS subscriber-response system and a two-way multi-channel AML microwave link operating in conjunction with a 16-amplifier cascade of XR-2
equipment and Phoenician coaxial and drop cable provided by its newly
acquired CATV Division (formerly Kaiser CATV).
6
www.americanradiohistory.com
1
Longer Life
for an Old Timer
Introduced in 1947, the EIMAC 4-400A quickly became the mainstay
for the majority of broadcast, shortwave and FM transmitters. Still
popular today, this power tetrode design is now available as the improved long-life 4-400C.
Get an EIMAC 4-400C - the new generation tetrode specifically
designed for long-life, high-performance broadcast and FM service.
This premium quality tetrode is directly interchangeable with the 4-400A
in existing equipment and is recommended for new equipment design.
The EIMAC 4-400C features a low temperature filament structure
which retains its initial high level of electron emission for an extended
period of time, greatly reducing frequency of tube replacement. This
improved filament structure, plus strict processing and quality control,
combines with improved current division and low drive requirements
to provide a high-quality, long-life product.
Reduce down-time and replacement cost with the EIMAC 4-400C
when you re-tube. And use this improved tetrode in your new equipment design. With a maximum plate dissipation of 400 watts, the
EIMAC 4-400C provides long-life and consistent performance as an
amplifier, oscillator or modulator. Another example of EIMAC's continuing program of quality, reliability and service.
For further information, contact EIMAC, Division
of Varian, 301 Industrial Way, San Carlos, Calif.
•
(I)
94070. Or any of the more than 30 Varian/EIMAC
Electron Tube and Device Group Sales Offices
division
throughout the world.
••
varian
e
Circle I04 on Reader Service Card
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
7
NEWS
continued
That compares with 427 clients and
$1.7 billion in 1970. Of the 1971
advertisers,
48 were new to the
medium, and they represented
a
wide spectrum of products, indicating a continuing
commitment
to
television throughout
the business
community.
Cable Scripts Tell How
Law Works in Community
A series of ten scripts designed expressly for half-hour cable shows,
"This Is Your Law," has been developed
by the Communications
Library, 1535 Francisco Street, San
Francisco. Costing $2.50 each, the
scripts are adaptable to local variations in the law, and give a layman's view of the law on hair,
dress, family, money, credit, drugs,
and many other topics.
Massachusetts Stations
Unfair, Says United Church
A comprehensive
report has been
issued by the Office of Communication of the United Church of
Christ charging many Massachusetts television stations with discrimination
against
blacks
and
women in hiring personnel. The report has been forwarded
to the
FCC, along with a letter signed by
that formidable
crusader Dr. Everett Parker,
in which he "requests" that the Commission make
an inquiry into the situation, with
all Massachusetts
license renewals
deferred
in the meantime!
Dr.
Parker has proved over and over
that wc had better take him seriously, but on this particular request
his chances seem remote.
Andersen Sets Up Subsidiary
To Make Data, CATV Equip
Optical Communications,
Inc. of
Orlando, Florida, is a new subsidiary of Andersen
Laboratories,
Bloomfield,
Connecticut.
An announcement by the parent company says that Optical Communications will develop and sell shorthaul communications
systems and
other devices using related technology. First products will be laser diode/LED
links for the common
carriers, to be followed by video
links for the CATV and broadcast
industries. Principals are Francis E.
Baker, Jr., chairman; Elmer Dahl,
secretary; Warren A. Birge, president and general manager; Rich-
ard Wangler,
gineering
vice president
for en-
Cable Dynamics, New Cable
Engineering Firm
Cable
Dynamics,
Inc. of Burlingame, California, is a new engineering service .corporation
which
will supply technical
advice and
consultation to CA TV firms. Principals are Joe E. Hale, most recently
technical director of Western Communications, owner and operator of
numerous cable systems in California; and Robert L. Hammett, Edward Edison
and Lawrence
W.
Templeton, who were founders and
sole partners of the consulting firm
of Hammett and Edison, which has
had numerous
CA TV consulting
jobs for city governments,
cable
systems, and equipment
manufacturers. An early assignment for Cable Dynamics is complete engineering responsibility
for design, contractor selection, and supervision of
construct ion for Buckeye Cablevision, to build a system in Toledo,
Ohio.
MST Says FCC Proposals
on Land Mobile EP
Are Faulty
The Association of Maximum Service Telecasters
has filed reply
comments with the FCC on a Second Further
Notice of Proposed
Rule Making, Docket No. 18261,
which concerns the opening of land
mobile channels
in the 470-512
MHz UHF television
band. The
FCC has proposed
allowing land
mobile operators
to use antenna
heights above 500 feet, with certain
reductions in ERP to protect television stations. MST agrees with the
proposal in general, but states that
the reductions specified underestimate the field strength from high
antennas. MST asks that the rule
be amended to incorporate
a universal power reduction curve like
that used in the Domestic Public
Land Mobile Radio Services.
Univamp To Make Miniature
CATV Amplifiers,
Accessories
A new firm, UnivAmp of Bisbee,
Arizona, announced plans to make
and market modular, miniaturized
CATV amplifiers and accessories,
aiming for prices at a fraction of
the present "normal" level. Principals of the firm are Donn G. Nel-
8
son, president: Frank Kovacs, vice·
president;
Nick Pavlovich,
secreJ
tary; and W. A. Janssen, treasurer.
NAB Active on Cable
Copyrights, Other Issues
The National Association of Broadcasters
recently
defined
strong
stands on a number of important
public issues.
On CATV copyright rules, NAB
pledged full support for legislation
that embraces all applicable provisions of the cable-broadcast
"compromise," in a letter to the Senate
Subcommittee
on Patents,
Trademarks, and Copyrights.
Among the
provisions
supported
was the exemption from copyright liability of\
independently-owned
systems now
in existence with less than 3500
subscribers.
In
another
action,
NAB filed a brief with the FCC
pointing out that broadcasters
had I
consistently been held by the courts
to be not common carriers, so they
do not have to supply air time to
all groups petitioning
for access.
And James H. Hulbert, executive·
vice president, told a broadcasting
symposium
at Cornell
University
that recent attacks on broadcast advertrsmg were striking at the very
heart of broadcasting
as we know
it.
NAB Attacks Violence in TV
Programming, Disc Payola
Two other subjects on which the National Association
of Broadcasters
took strong stands were excessive
violence in TV programming,
and
pay-offs by recording companies to
disc jockeys, the perennially recurrent "paylola."
On violence,
NAB
President
Vincent T. Wasilewski said: "The
creators
and schedulers
of programs have a particular responsibility to take a harder than ever look
at the manner in which violence is
presented.
Violence
which could
reasonably be argued as excessive
or gratuitous
can and must be
avoided." He pointed out that the
alternative is likely to be deep government
regulation
of television
programming.
The statement on payola was in
response
to claims by columnist
Jack Anderson
that pay-offs to
disc jockeys
are again rampant.
Wasilewski
said: "We abhor the
practice described ...
If there has
been a recurrence,
all broadcasters should join together to eliminate such practices
"
MAY,
www.americanradiohistory.com
'"
COLOR MONITORING FOR UNDER $400
...AND THE QUALITY SPEAKS FOR ITSELF!
Listen to what Otto Claus, Chief Engineer,WBAL-TV, Baltimore.says about
general purpose monitoring with RCA'S low-cost commercial color receiver:
\.
"Everv
OY1e
of our 17 units
perfectly
from original
has operated
f,
turn ori"
"Our only
regret is that
these units
"The guelity
of reoroouction
were not
available
of these
sooner."
receivers ...i s more
than adequate
foral I but the most
exacting monitoring
functions.\'
V
la
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of·
Unlike color sets intended for home use, this receiver is equipped to accept RF
or bridged direct video and audio line feed without the need for costly adaptors.
For under $400, you get every noncritical monitoring function you can
ask for - picture, sound, live or tape,
color or monochrome. It's especially
suitable for monitoring needs backstage, for the band, for the audience,
and simi lar applications.
For complete details, send the coupon. We'll show you cold cash reasons
why RCA's commercial color TV is
your best answer.
-E:;¡
fRCA Service Company- - - A Division of RCA
Commercial Products Sales.Bldg. 203-3
Camden, N. J. 08101
Name
I
Title
:
Station
Service Card
<11'··
www.americanradiohistory.com
I
I
I
Phone
Address
_
Zip
-------------
105 on Reader
I
I
State
Circle
J
Please furnish further information about
RCA commercial color sets for broadcast
monitoring purposes.
City
MAY,1972-BM/E
I
J
9
NEWS
continued
KIOI Tells FCC
Four-Channel Is
Compatible
Kror, San Francisco, has advised
the FCC it will begin four-channel
broadcasting using the Doreen
Quadracast system on May l unless the FCC says it will be in violation of its license.
Although KIOI has earlier petitioned for a rule-making to permit
a baseband spectrum of 0-95 KHz
for quadraphonic broadcasting, it is
now asserting a rule change is not
necessary since no more interference is produced by quadraphonic
than by stereo. Actually, the interference is less, Gabbert says. Station coverage will not suffer; suppression of the 38KHz and 76 KHz
subscribers (inherent in the Doreen
system) causes less deterioration of
signal than does SCA or normal
stereo broadcasting which does not
suppress the carrier.
What the FCC reaction will be is
not known as BM I E goes to press.
The Commission has a number of
filings before it, including another
on a discrete four-channel method
filed by General Electric in April.
product could be considered dangerous or controversial by some
critics," he notes, adding that there
is a real need for advance guidelines for advertisers so they can
avoid this kind of trouble. But he
says advertisers must in any case
learn to live "in a world of more
attention, more criticism, and more
regulation."
Rahall Communications Buys
Stations from Time-Life
N. Joe Rahall, chairman of Rahall
Communications Corp., and Barry
Zorthian, president of Time-Life
Broadcast, Inc., jointly announced
that Time-Life had sold to Rahall
stations
WFBM-AM, WFBM-FM,
WFBM-Muzak, and Sound Systems
Inc., all in Indianapolis, Indiana.
The price was $3,050,000 plus an
unannounced sum for certain inventory items. The sale is subject to
FCC approval.
First T-Bar Antenna
Pittsburgh's two educational TV
stations, WQEDand WQEX,have ordered a half-million dollar tower
and antenna system which will employ a unique T-bar structure (see
diagram), Rather than stack antenk/Qé.(
Oak Will Finance
Terminal Equipment
Purchases
The CATV Division of Oak Electro/Netics announced that it. was
establishing a financing program to
help its CATV customers buy new
terminal equipment for system expansion. Carl Bradshaw, president
of the CATV Division, noted that
estimates put CATV capital needs
at around $1 billion a year for the
next decade. "We saw both a need
and an opportunity," he said. "Our
service will not only help our customers ... but will also provide the
general public with excellent cable
television much sooner than might
otherwise have been possible."
cs. 16
f
1r1·r
78'
'/
·- ')L
RC!l
~F(J-3lV
..
nas above one another-as
the sta
tions presently do-the
new instar
lation will permit greater ease
maintenance. In addition, each sta
tion's antenna will be approximatelí
the same height above ground. . .
WQED, which broadcasts genera)
educational programming on chars
nel 13, will use an RCA traveling.
wave antenna. WQEX, which use
channel 16 for in-school and oth
educational programming, will
an RCA pylon antenna.
t
I
NET Gets Ampex High-Speeci
Video Duplicator
f
According to an announcement o
NET Television, Inc., Ann Arbori
Michigan, that firm received in lattl
October the first Ampex ADR
150-5 high-speed video-tape dupli
cator. It will be used in the firm':
extensive duplicating service fo
broadcasters, industry, and educa
tion.
GE Expanding
CCTVDealer Net
General Electric's Visual Commuc
nication Products Operation, wittl
headquarters in Syracuse, N.Y., fo
currently looking for additionas
franchised dealers across the country to sell and service GE's CCTV1
products, according to R. F. Tufts
manager. "We view the closed-I
circuit arena as a real growth op-1
portunity and we are gearing up to
perpetuate our quality and product
leadership position," Tufts said.
·._•,!,·
Non-Profit Group Pleads
For Waterbury Cable Rights
600'
Harvard Prof SeesChaos
in Ad "Rebuttals"
The FCC policy of requiring free
rebuttal time for critics of "controversial" advertisements, under the
Fairness Doctrine, is a likely road
to chaos, writes Stephen A. Greyser, associate professor of the Harvard Business School, in the Harvard Business Review. "Almost any
The New Samaritan Corporation, a¡
non-profit Connecticut group affili!
ated with the United Church of
Christ, filed a petition with the,
Connecticut Public Utilities Commission asking for revocation of a
certificate for a Waterbury cable
system held by Waterbury Community Antenna Inc., and for the
award of the certificate to the New
Samaritan .Corporation. The petition says that Waterbury Cornmunity Antenna has held the certificate for five years without starting
construction, whereas Connecticut
law requires construction to begin:
within two years; and that certíñcate has been sold to another cor-'
poration (Sammons Conununications, Inc.) without approval of the
Commission, another illegal act•.,
New Samaritan has promised to
continued on page 3
10
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
www.americanradiohistory.com
Some of our substitutes
for those big, fat incandescents.:
~
www.americanradiohistory.com
Some of our substitutes
for our substitutes.
Those big, fat incandescents blessed
the world with a lot of big, fat fixtures and
sockets.
So after we came up with our skinny,
little tungsten-halogen
lamps, the first
thing we had to do was set them up on
big, fat bases so that they'd fit the old
sockets.
Which meant developing a complete
line of Substitution Lamps. (You see
Isome of them at the left.)
But soon new fixtures arrived on the
scene. These took full advantage of the
inherent small size of Sylvania tungstenhalogen lamps.
(Which, by the way, outlast the fat incandescents about 3-to- l, don't blacken
and lose brightness with age, and don't
fall off in color temperature.)
For the new fixtures, we developed a
complete new Standard Line of tungsten-.
halogen lamps, like the ones on the right.
Whenever studios replace their old fixtures with new ones, they can substitute
r;,rlo
11 I nn Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
our new lamps for our Substitutes.
Which is OK with us.
Because both of these lines are so much
better than the old lamps, that no matter
which our customers use, we feel we've
done them a world of good.
And there's just no substitute for that.
We have a brochure 011 each line. For
your copies, write to: Sylvania Lighting
Center, Danvers, Massachusetts 01923.
(?ii~
SYLVANIA
INTERPRETINGTHE~~~Qt_/TIONS
New Cable Rules: Part II
Operating Requirements,
Non-Broadcast
Channels
and Technical Standards
Last month Interpreting the FCC Rules analyzed that
portion of the Commission's new cable rules dealing
with signal carriage. The Cable Television Report
and Order (FCC 72-108, in Dockets 18397, et al.)
covers a wide range of issues beyond signal importation. including I) operating requirements,
2) use
of and access to non-broadcast
CA TV channels,
ar.d 3) technical standards. This month's column
will conclude examination of the new rules with a
particular
emphasis on the aforementioned
three
areas.
Operating Requirements
Operating requirements
are spelled out for both
existing and new cable licensees. New cable systems
must, before commencing operations, file with the
Commission an application for a certificate of compliance. lnformation
contained
therein must include:
I) The applicants
name and address;
2) The name of the community it plans to serve and
starting date of proposed service;
3) A list of broadcast stations expected to be carried.
Note: Stations to be carried as "substituted" programming (i.e., those stations carried in lieu of regularly
carried independents during times when the programming of same is protected by program exclusivity rules)
need not be listed;
4) A statement
any signals;
of proposed use of microwave to import
5) A copy of revised FCC Form 325 "Annual Report
Of Cable Television Systems" which requires (a) ownership data, including all holdings in other CATV systems, and/ or other communications media and/ or bu si-
nesses in which the cable owner has a "substantial interest," (b) statistical data concerning all CATV originations and (c) statistical data re all channel services
and advertising;
6) A copy of the franchise, license, permit or certificate
granted by the local authority.
Note: Once a system
is certified by the Commission, it need not file numbers
5, above, and 6 (FCC Form 325 and franchise copy)
pursuant to an application
for a "new" certificate to
add local or distant signals;
7) A statement demonstrating that the system's proposal
complies with the cable television rules, including, in
particular,
compliance
with (a) signal carriage and
exclusivity regulations, (b) rules relating to access to
and use of non-broadcast
channels and (e) technical
standards.
Separate applications
for certificates of compliance must be filed for each community served by
the cable system. However, information
pertaining
to a number of communities
need not be refiled
separately for each community, but may be incorporated by reference. Attendant to its filing, the system operator must notify (a) the local franchising
authority, (b) all local TVs, (e) the superintendent
of schools, and (d) all local educational authorities
of such application to the Commission. The Commission will issue a public notice on all applications
and interested parties will be permitted 30 days to
submit objections. If objections are raised, restrictions on otherwise permitted signals will be imposed
on the cable operator if the challenger
(e.g., the
station operator) can sustain his very considerable
burden of showing clearly (a) that "the proposed
service is not consistent with the orderly integration
of cable television service into the national commu-
14
continued
on page 16
MAY, 1972-BM/&
www.americanradiohistory.com
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Circle I07 on Reader Service Card
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'!Im
~COffiPANY
FCC RULES
continued
from page 14
nications structure," and (b ) that "the results would
be inimical to the public interest." On the other
hand, the cable system may secure special relief and
bring in signals otherwise not permitted by the rules
onlv upon a "substantial showing," itself.
Existing systems (those operating as of March
31, 1972) need file an application for certification
only if the addition of new signals is proposed. Otherwise, applications need not be filed until either
(a) the system's current franchise expires, or (b)
March 3 I, I977, whichever comes first.
Non-Broadcast Channels
A) Franchises
Operating under a "deliberately
structured dualism," the Commission indicated that it would set
minimum standards for franchises from local authorities (e.g., construction deadlines, franchise duration, handling of service complaints and franchise
fees), but that matters peculiarly local in nature
(e.g., character
qualifications
for franchise applicants, determination
of franchise
area and subscriber rates) would continue to be in the hands of
the local regulating authority. Included in the Commission's "minimum standards"
for franchises are
the following.
1) Construction
deadlines:
The Commission requires
that construction "commence" within a vear "after a
certificate of compliance is issued" by the FCC and
that the cable facilities should be completed at a rate
of 20 percent per annum with some variance permitted
because of local conditions.
2) Franchise duration:
The Commission
admonished
that cable franchise, generally should 1101 exceed 15
years. Whatever the franchise period, the local franchising authority should provide for a renewal period
of reasonable duration.
3) Service complaints: Regulations are set forth by the
Commission that require a local business office or agent
to handle the investigation and resolution of subscriber
complaints.
4) Franchise fees: The Commission imposes a three percent ceiling on franchise fees. Any local government
which desires to asses' a greater fee must meet a difficult, two-pronged test that (a) requires the RO\'P/'11ment to show that its fee is "appropriate in light of
the local regulatory program,"
and (b) requires the
franchisee to "demonstrate that the fee will not interfere
with its ability to meet the obligations imposed by the
rules."
The three key areas of local jurisdiction (i.e., (a)
applicant qualifications, (b) determination
of franchise area, and (e) subscriber rates) are subject to
Commission standards of "fairness" and "reasonability" only and are, therefore, essentially controlled
by the local franchising authority.
B) Use of and Access to Non-Broadcast
Channels
The Commission concluded that, despite its intense interest in local programming by CATV systems and despite the present availability of greater
channel capacities. it would require a minimum
channel-capacity
of only 20 channels, and this requirement would pertain solely to systems in the
top- I 00 markets. The Commission
also specified
that top-100
market
systems
must make
available,
for non-broadcast use, one signal for each signal
carrying an off-air television station.
As to the public service use of non-broadcast
channels. the Commission
promulgated
the following
rules. They are anplicable to all top-JOO market
svstems. Existing CATVs will have five years from
the effective elate to comply and waiver requests
will be considered.
1) Public access: CA TV systems will be required to
make one public access channel available on a "free,"
"non-discriminatory,"
"first come, first served" basis
and maintain production facilities for those using same.
"Free" means no charge for use of facilities and no
charge for production costs unless the program exceeds
five minutes in duration.
Cable operators will not be
permitted anv form of censorship, program content control or discrimination on public access channels. Only
lotteries. obscene or indecent matter. political spot announcements. and other forms of advertising would be
prohibited.
(Advertising would be permitted on CATVcontrolled local channels at "natural breaks."
Note:
Tf the public user libels someone. the Commission does
not believe that the courts will hold the CATV liable
because. "it is doubtful that (actual) malice could be
imputed to a cable operator who has no control over
the given program's content." However, prudence would
dictate that CA TVs carry insurance for same.
2) Educational
access: Cable systems will be required
to make available to local educational authorities one
designated channel "for instructional programming
and
other educational purposes."
3) Government
access: Cable systems will be further
required to dedicate one channel for use by the local
government.
4) Leased access: Any "unused channels" on the system shall be made available for lease use. "Unused
channels"
include, besides the remaining
bandwidth,
all broadcast channels when "blacked out" by the program exclusivity rules and all education and government
access channels not in use. Operators must also adopt
rules proscribing the presentation
of lotteries, obscene
or indecent matter and advertising material not containing sponsorship
identification
on leased channels,
as well as others. Unlike other "access" channels, commercials are permitted on leased access channels and
may be presented at times other than "natural breaks."
We re-emphasize that only systems in the top-100
markets are required to comply with the rules on
non-broadcast
services. New systems must comply
immediately; existing systems have a five-year grace
period. In communities outside the top-I 00, where
access channels are not required, the Commission
permits local authorities to require access services so
long as such services (a) are based on the above
maier market standards,
and (b) do not exceed
said standards.
Cable systems will further be required to make
additional channels available as public demand increases. The Commission's
test for defining the
point in time when additional channels are necessary is somewhat obscure; i.e., whenever the system
lacks sufficient unused channel space "to encourage
public participation."
This standard will likely be
more clearly defined in a later rule-making proceeding.
C) Two-Way Capacity
Cable systems will be required
to have a capacity
continued
on page 18
16
www.americanradiohistory.com
Circle I08 on Reader Service Carel •
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_________________
www.americanradiohistory.com
16
J
FCC RULES
At the '71 NAB,
TFT was brand new
Now, more than 85
stations use our
3rd generation TV
frequency and aural
modulation monitors
CHANNEL
WU ND-TV
KTVU
KOTl
WKAQ-TV
CHANNEL
KEYT
WWAY
WSVA-TV
CKSO-TV-1
CKSO-TV-2
CHANNEL
WCVB-TV
WCSC-TV
KSD-TV
WTVN-TV
CHANNEL
WECT
WJBF
WLUC-TV
WI PR-TV
KAVE-TV
WTVN-TV
CHANNEL
KLZ-TV
KIHO-TV
WNAC-TV
KET\/
CllANNEL
KGNS-T\I
KLAS-TV
KCW-TV
CHANNEL
WTWV
KBTV
KU AC-TV
WGN-T\I
CHANNEL
WHEC-TV
WTEN
WIS-TV
CHANNEL
KNTV
mEm_
.
2
3
5
6
7
8
9
IO
II
CHANNEL
KPLH-TV
WQXI-TV
CKSO-TV-3
CHANNEL
WTJK-TV
KSAT-TV
WHYY-T\I
WPRl-T\I
WJRT-TV
CHANNEL
WJZ-TV
KEET-TV
WHO-TV
\V CAN-TV
CHANNEL
KMEC
CHANNEL
WBRA-TV
WICD-TV
WKPC-TV
CHANNEL
WNEP-T\I
WNOU-T\I
CHANNEL
KJTY
WAND-TV
CHANNEL
WCCB-TV
WVTV
CHANNEL
WBBH-TV
CHANNEL
WNJS
CHANNEL
KMJ
KVUE-TV
CHANNEL
KVRL-TV
CHANNEL
WYAH
WHFT-TV
II
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
20
23
24
26
27
CHANNEL 28
WBRE-TV
KCET
CHANNEL 29
KBAK-TV
WT AF-TV
CHANNEL30
WHNB-TV
CHANNEL 32
WFLD-TV
CHANNEL 33
WRBT
WM UL-TV
CHANNEL 40
WI CZ-TV
CHANNEL 43
WU AB-TV
CHANNEL 44
WTOG
WSNS-TV
CHANNEL 45
WICI
CHANNEL 46
WHAE
CHANNEL 50
WNJM
CHANNEL 51
WVPT
CHANNEL 53
WNVT (2)
CHANNEL 57
WGBY-TV
CHANNEL 58
WNJB
CHANNEL 61
WHIP
CHANNEL 67
WMPB
CHANNEL E-2,
E-4, E-6, E-10
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Circle I09 on Reader Service Card
continued from page 16
"for return communications on at least a non-voice
basis." The Commission indicated that this requirement did not extend to "two-way capacity for each
subscriber," but, rather, its "return communications" standard was designed to meet the existing
state-of-the-art and to provide for future two-way
communications without time-consuming and costly
system rebuilding.
Technical Standards
The Commission adopted a series of minimal
technical standards based on its rules proposed June
24, 1970 (Docket 18894). Most contemporary
CATVs already more than meet these technical requirements.
The Commission divided all CATV channels into
four classes according to use:
1) Class I: Channels carrying standard TV signals;
2) Class II: Channels carrying CATV-originated
programs;
3) Class III: Channels carrying non-TV, miscellaneous services, printed messages, etc.;
4) Class IV: Channels used ·for return (twoway communications).
Presently, the precise technical standards apply to
Class I (broadcast carriage) signals only.
Requirements for (a) performance testing, (b)
station lists, and (e) measurement data apply to all
systems and are effective March 31, 1972.
A system operator must check performance on
his system annually by testing each broadcast signal
at three widely separated points, including one point
at the extremis of the system input. These tests must
be kept in a public file for five years. In addition,
each system must keep a current list of (a) the
cable channels it delivers and (b) the stations
whose signals are delivered. Finally, measurement
procedures are recommended to be made under
"normal operating conditions." Though not mandatory, these measurements must, nevertheless, be authoritative in nature,
The system operator is held responsible for his
system's interference with (a) reception of authorized radio signals, and (b ) interference generated by
a radio or TV receiver. He is not responsible for
"receiver-generated interference;" rather, the operator may suspend service to the subscriber to remedy
same.
New technical standards, particularly for Classes
II, III and IV, will be the subject of future Commission rule-making.
In addition, the Commission will likely promulgate, in separate proceedings, definitive rules to prohibit 1) undue concentration of control and ownership of CATV, and 2) undesirable cross-ownership
between CATV and other media and businesses
(such as newspapers). Furthermore, new rulemaking proceedings relating to local governments, manufacture of special TV sets for CA TV, standardized
accounting for CATVs, and common carrier rules
will likely be forthcoming. Interpreting the FCC
Rules will analyze these myriad, yet related, subjects in future articles.
BM/E
18
www.americanradiohistory.com
Circle 11O on Reader Service Card ~
resenting the first broadcast
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www.americanradiohistory.com
Wiring Markets
or Cable TV
51-100
verriding concern is building a system that will
iandle upstream signals reliably when that time
ornes, Next worry after that is how to interconnect
ubsysterns,
:ALL TEN CHIEF ENGINEERS or executives of MSO's
.nd ask them, "What is the best way to build multihannel two-way?" and the majority will respond
omething like this: "Why did you call me? I wish
te knew."
A few will reply, "What's the problem? Today's
tate-of-the-art equipment can handle 27 channels.
f we need a converter, we'll add one." This group
vill claim that two-way is no problem-just
add
titers and upstream amplifiers.
Others admit that there are a lot of unknowns but
vill provide no details on how they will tackle them
ince they say the solution depends entirely on the
narket. They may build in a particular way in one
narket, another way in a different market.
I A very few will share their full thinking on the
natter at this time. We will report on some of these
system philosophies" in this report.
Last issue, CM/ E published details provided by
Aac Ferguson of Tele Vision Communications Inc.
,··n the dual-cable system that is being installed in
:• ~kron. In this report, we provide details on a dual
'nrunk, but single feeder, system adopted as some1 hing of a standard by Cox Cable Communications
ne. One trunk is downstream only and the other
,;lvill handle both downstream and upstream signals.
,. LVO Cable has a two-phase approach which will
1e used in Tulsa. The basic plant is a 27-channel
ingle cable system, but the city will be overlaid with
e 't second system called the Metro 14-12. The latter
t rverlaid network will accommodate two-way comf,t nunications and dedicated
channels. Malarkey·; 1 Faylor was a consultant to LVO in conceiving this
01 ipproach.
¡;I Although we did not seek out equipment manuacturers initially for information in preparing this
·!eport, it is clear that two equipment manufacturers,
;i· errold and EIE, have played a major role in helpi' pg MSO's decide how they should go in planning
nd building future systems. Some of the futuristic
ystems that will be installed in '72-'73 were first
blanned out two years ago.
Gualcable all the way is not dead
CM I E began this report suspecting that dual caile - trunks/feeders/housedrops-was
yesterday's
lolution. Dual cable, with an A-B switch, seemed
··i he logical choice in the absence of an inexpensive
.. 1ind reliable converter, but since dual cable didn't
'' I 'eally solve the direct pick-up problem, which is
(Ver present in the top markets, it seemed a single
n
1
V.AY, 1972-CM
I
feeder/ converter approach was the only real
choice. Further, dual cable sounds more expensive.
Dual cable shouldn't be dismissed too readily from a
cost point of view. And if your system won't become
fully loaded with signals for several years yet, you
might determine that you can reassign channels for a
time to avoid ghosts. A few years from now direct
pickup will be less serious as TV sets improve.
The RCA Laboratories at Princeton, New Jersey,
recently made what it called a "realistic and objective cost comparison." The conclusions were reported by Dr. Kerns H. Powers, director of communications research, at the First International Cable Television Market (MICAB) Conference. Portions of
Dr. Powers' talk follow:
For the analysis, we have assumed a module of a
system consisting of one of the trunks fanning out
from the headend over an area of approximately five
square miles. Subscriber density has been left as a
parameter ranging from 500-5000 per square mile
typical of the suburban/urban market. The assumed
specification is for delivery of 24 channels. For the
dual-cable system the standard 12 VHF channels (with
an upper frequency of 216 MHz) are applied in each
cable; for the single-cable system we assume the use,
in addition, of eight midband channels and four superband channels extending the upper frequency limit
of 240 MHz. The system layout takes into account
the higher cable attenuation (at 240 MHz) as well as
the 6 dB worse cross-modulation performance from
the use of 24 versus 12 channels. Accordingly, the
amplifiers in the single-cable system are assumed to
be operated at 3 dB lower amplification and total output level than those in the dual-cable system to provide
equal picture quality in both distribution methods
In a well-behaved amplifier, a reduction of output level
by 3 dBs results in a reduction of cross-modulation
by 6 dBs.
The higher cable attenuation and lower amplifier
gain in the single-cable system results in amplifiers
being spaced closer together. Our analysis has used
trunk amplifier spacing of 2100 feet for the singlecable system and 2700 feet in the case o.f dual cable.
Unit costs for the amplifiers, power supplies, distribution cable and cable installation were obtained
by averaging the prices of typical American suppliers.
The dual-cable amplifier unit costs were obtained by
applying a factor to the single-cable amplifier costs,
that factor varying from 50 percent higher for the
lower cost line extender amplifiers to almost 100 percent higher for the more expensive trunk bridging
amplifiers that contain automatic gain control. Jn these
amplifiers, the electronics dominate the cost and the
electronics are duplicated in the dual amplifiers. On
the other hand, in the less expensive amplifiers. the
power supply and housing are a more significant fraction of the total cost resulting in the smaller factor.
The set-top converter was costed at $20 per subscriber
CM I E-3
E
www.americanradiohistory.com
of all: By distributing only 12 channels per cable of·
normal programming, the midband capacity is still
available for internal system use an:d for leased communication services and, of course, these frequencies
are not readily accessible to the normal subscribers.
WIRING MARKETS 51·100
in the single-cable system and the coaxial switch for
the dual-cable was estimated at $4.00.
When these unit costs were then applied to the
approximate system layout over the five-square-mile
trunk module and the total investment cost calculated,
a rather surprising result oocurred for the high subscriber density. At a density of 5000 subscribers
per square mile, typical of an urban area, the investment cost was found to be $71 per subscriber for the
single cable system and $66 for ilie dual-cable.
At a subscriber density of 500 per square mile, the
irnvestment cost was found to be $220 per subscriber
for the single cable and $222 for dual cable. These
figures have some uncertainty in their values for a
typical installation, of course, and should not be taken
at face value. My purpose is not so much to report a
precise cost comparison as it is to dispel the popular
notion that dual-cable .installations will command a
premium over the single cable. This notion is simply
not valid.
Now, since there is no significant premium on dualcable, let me point out certain bonus advantages that
a dual-cable installation can offer:
I) Because of the higher permissible output level and
lower cable attenuation the dual-cable system can
actually serve 70 percent greater area per trunk for
a given performance level than 1:he wideband singlecable system.
2) The dual-cable offers higher system reliability from
the coaxial switch over the set-top converter.
3) And perhaps this is the most important advantage
In his analysis, Dr. Powers ignored degradations'
due to local oscillator radiation, images, and nonlinear distortions in the set-top converter that might
occur in the single-cable system. Other assumptions
implicit in the analysis:
I) The systems are constructed for 100 percent penetration of the service area; 2) Every trunk-bridging
amplifier in the distribution area feeds subscribers·
3) Each output from the trunk/bridgers
feeds tw
distribution
amplifiers (line extenders)
in cascad
per feeder line; 4) Alternate trunk amplifiers corn
tain AGC; 5) A minimum signal level of 3 dBm\i
(75 ohms) is supplied each subscriber and a mini
mum isolation of 9 dB is maintained
at the sub·
scriber most remote from the trunk/bridger;
6) Om
cable power supply unit serves three amplifiers.
Table I gives the assumed system specifícatiom
and Tables JI and III give the assumed unit costs
derived from prices of typical American equipment!
meeting the assumed specifications. The costs of cer
tain common items (e.g., headend equipment ) an
omitted. Table IV summarizes the results of the cos
analysis, normalized to a per subscriber investmen
value.
Single
24
240 MHz
43 dB
-51 dB
12 dB
17 dB
2100 ft .•
Dual
12
216 MHz
43 dB
-51 dB
12 dB
20 dB
2700 ft .•
Trunk Amplifier
Trunk Amplifier (AGC)
Trunk/ Bridger
Trunk/ Bridger (AGC)
Distribution Amp
Cable Installation
Set-top Converter
Coaxial Switch
Dual Cable 1 I
$470
560
880
970
410
2100/mi.
Single-Cable
$314
365
470
515
290
1800/mi.
20.00
.
.
3.50
• New high-quatity "Dynafoam" cable is assumed. This permits
up to 35 percent increase in cable spacing over older cable types.
Table IV
CTV System Costs ($/Subscriber)
(Exduding Headend and Dead Run)
Table II
Assumed Unit Costs (Common)
Trunk Cable
Feeder 'Cable
Drop Cable
Power Supply
4-Way Tap
2-Way Splitter
Line Termination
Pole Rearrangement
Pole Rental (10 year)
.
.
11
Table Ill
Assumed Unit Costs (Uncommon)
Table I
Specifications
No. channels/cable
Bandwidth
S/N (at end of cascade)
Cross-mod (at end of cascade)
Noise figure
Gain/ amplifier
Amp Spacing (Trunk)
1
$300/ Kft
140/Kft
38/Kft
212.60
11.50
17.50
1.05
500/mi
880/mi
Item
Amplifiers and Power Supplies
Trunk and Feeder •Cable"
Passive Components
Cable Installation
Pole Rearrangement
Pole Rental (10 year)
Drop
Balun
Set-Top Converter
Coaxial Switch
.
500 Subscribers/
sq. ml.
Single
Dual
Cable
Cable
$75
$63
24
44
4
8
51
54
14
13
25
22
7
14
20
4
Total
$220
+
• The increased amplifier spacing
of cable for the dual-cable system.
CM I E-4
www.americanradiohistory.com
-
permits
-
5000 Subscribers/
sq.ml.
Dual
Single
Cable
Cable
$13
$14
11
6
6
3
16
14
4
4
6
7
6
3
20
4
-
-
$222
a slight
$71
reduction
-
$66
in the total
mil
MAY, 1972-C;M I
·--·hen they told me I could sho~t
local programs in black-and-white
show full color, I told them to
go fly a kite.
and
1
They flew it. I filmed it. In black-and-White.
It came out color.
,,~Colorfrom black-and-white? At half
l:the cost? Come see for yourself."
1
t
Abtography.
11 1
It happened at the right time.
~coto,
1926 BROADWAY I NEW YORK, N.Y. I 0023 / (212) 787-5000
'1
i
1
See us at Booth 136, East Hall at NCTA.
Circle
r
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CM I E-5
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WIRING MARKETS 51·100
Can one ignore direct pickup? Dr. Powers isn't on
the firing line if he makes an error in judgment that
will create all kinds of subscriber discontent in the
shortrun, so he takes the long view. The long view is
that direct pickup will be no problem with new TV
sets because future models will contain coax cable
directly to better shielded tuners. Adding shielding
will cost only pennies during manufacture
and, although TV set manufacturers
in the past have always maintained a few pennies crucial to profitability, times have changed and there is now a marketing
advantage to be gained if a set can be advertised as
including extra shielding. For this same reason, there
will be, Dr. Powers feels, improvements in intermediate skirt selectivity and additional traps will be
added so that adjacent channels can be received.
Dr. Powers told CM I E that RCA TV sets will include extra shielding next year. We didn't ask for
confirmation, but we suspect Zenith and Magnavox
and others are headed this way. Tt may take five
years before most sets will be direct-pickup immune,
but the problem should become less severe.
There are cable operators who are not put off by
direct pickup problems. Lyle Kneeskern, chief engineer for Continental Cablevision, doesn't feel it is a
major factor in Stockton, California. The plan for
Stockton is dual cable with an A-B switch.
Toledo, Ohio, will be built using dual cable.
Buckeye Cablevision, franchise holder for Toledo,
selected a new firm, Cable Dynamics of Burlingame,
California,
as its system consultant.
Cable Dynamics' president is Joe Hale, formerly of Western
Communications
of South San Francisco. Hale has
lived with direct pickup problems all his life. His
first objective is to make the system immune from
pickup by care in selecting connectors,
making
splices, cte. (And he will modify a customer's set, in
extreme cases.) We note from the technical specifications written for Buckeye Cablevision-the
system
will be put out for bid-that
Cable Dynamics reserves the right to unilaterally select the connectors
it thinks best suited to the system. They must be "so
designed to have a proven suitability for use in high
ambient signal arca," the spec declares.
The amplifier in the Buckeye Cablevision spec
must be capable of 54-240 MHz band so the cost
may not be as low as that used in Powers' RCA
calculation. The specs for this system, in general,
exceed the new FCC requirements.
Whereas the
FCC spec relaxed its requirements in some areas,
the Buckeye Cablevision spec calls for the more
demanding requirements included in the FCC proposals; e.g., subscriber terminal isolation should not
be less than 30 dB. (Requirements for bi-directional
equipment, if used, state envelope delay should be
not more than 200 nsec in the longest cascadereferenced to 3.58 MHz above the visual carrier
frequency for the channel of interest.)
Dual trunk, single feeder will be popular
A number of system operators
have indicated
that
they will build single cable systems with possibly a
dual trunk. Cox Cable Communications
will definitely use a dual trunk and Richard C. Hickman, vice
president,
engineering,
Cox Cable Development
Company, has a number of very good reasons for
this decision. The Cox plan is shown in Fig. 1. Cable
A trunk is one-way only with a bandpass of 54 to
260 MHz; Cable A feeder has provision for 5-30
MHz return signal. The returning 25 MHz is routed
through a filter and directional coupler into Cable B
trunk. Cable B trunk is two-way with 150-260 MHz
forward and 5-108 MHz reverse. The crossover
filter is a high-frequency
type (in the midband)
which means very little distortion is added compared
to the low frequency filter in the feeder lines of
Cable A.
Installation of a dual trunk is certainly more expensive than a single cable system, but Hickman is
convinced a single cable two-way system is not going
to work when the need arises. Hickman lists a number of potential problem areas that could arise on a
single cable two-way system:
a) How to handle automatic gain control.
b) Spurious signals arising in the upstream path that
could reflect into the forward or downstream system.
The reverse system looks like a large drain field
connected to the trunk system. There are expected
to be high ambient signals in the 5-50 MHz region
and unknown spurious signals from home attachments could cause severe problems.
e) If the FCC implements standards, as they say
they will, on envelope delay, differential phase and
differential gain, one may find it difficult to prevent
excesses especially near filter cutoff frequencies in
the sub-channel band and the lower VHF channel
frequencies. The longer the cascade (which is the
case with single cable), the greater the distortion.
d) Filter design trade-offs may increase amplitude
gain ripple or cause closed-loop feedback.
e) Maintenance
problems associated with the upstream may interrupt service on the forward trunk
system if there is a limit of 25 MHz bandwidth for
return signals.
Anticipating that some or all of these problems
would arise, Cox decided it could not afford to run
the risk of interference with its downstream signal.
After all this is the financial base on which the
whole cable communication system is based.
Cox made some sample layouts with various dual
cable possibilities and determined what their problems with balancing levels might be. They settled on
the dual trunk single feeder compromise.
Some of
the advantages are:
• Cable A trunk, being one-way only, is free of
filter distortions and is immune from cross-talk.
• By restricting two-way service to feeder line
only, envelope delay and phase and gain distortion,
caused by the low cutoff frequencies, are minimum
because, at most, no more than six filters will be
cascaded.
• Cable B has a great deal of capability and could
be used on a common carrier basis in two directions
for schools, hospitals, industrial, governmental,
or
CM I E-6
continued on page CM/E·lO
MAY, 1972-CM
www.americanradiohistory.com
I
E
1
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I
1
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1
I
1
Before
you make
,our first move ...
Look to
our
firsts
SEE US AT NCTA CONVENTION
'BOOTH 211. MAY 14-17
There are good reasons that Oak is a solid first
in CATV converter sales. We are first to provide
perfect isolation from all forms of interference.
We've eliminated ghosting, herringbone and
color deterioration on all channels. Oak converters have proven low maintenance. And
only Oak offers electromechanical or varactortuned converters, with or without AFC, all (including power supply) in one, attractive unit.
Oak is first with a full year warranty and is
the only converter that's U.L. listed-a
vital
consideration when you install a unit in your
subscriber's home.
Your first move in converters is to call Oak.
With our 25 years of TV tuner experience, we
can show you that it is the best move you can
make. Write or phone today for additional
information.
CATV DIVISION
OAK ELECTRO/NETICS
CRYSTAL LAKE. ILLINOlS
aoo ra
CORP
(815) 459-5000
TELEX: 722-a47
Circle
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CM I E-8
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-CM
I
E
EVERYBODY TALKS
ABOUT THE FUTURE OF
CATV.
WE'RE ALREADY THERE.
Come see the future. In the E.l. E. booth at the N. C.T.A.
convention we will show you a bi-directional system available now,
with which you can deliver these services: cable TV, remote
origination, performance monitoring, audience rating, restricted
programming, data transmission, security, interactive education.
Our systems are complete, from head-end to subscriber and
all the in-betweens. We'll demonstrate how they can work for you.
See us at the N. C.T.A. Convention, booth 128, May 14- 17 at
the Conrad Hilton Hotel in Chicago.
Electronic
Industrial
Engineering,
Inc.
7355 Fulton Ave. I No. Hollywood, Ca. 91605 I (213) 764-2411
COME SEE THE FUTURE NOW.
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CM I E-9
WIRING MARKETS 51·100
other use. The high frequency cross-over filters in
Cable B cause less distortion than the low-frequency
type used in Cable A feeders.
• Automatic gain control for return signals can be
handled in Cable B.
• Maintenance of the reverse system doesn't involve trunk Cable A.
The system just described has capability for
growth and it can be built today. It has a good
chance of working and it can be built with reasonable economy.
Cox will hang the trunk amplifiers for Cable A
and Cable B back-to-back. This will simplify installation. Cost of this system is somewhere between
$6000 and $6200 per mile not counting any modules in the return-trunk amplifiers which can be
added as needed. This system is being installed by
Cox in the Davenport-Moline market.
Another advocate of the dual trunk single feeder
approach is Tom Smith, general manager of the Ca-
""A"' CABLE
Fig. l. Dual trunk
single-feeder
system adopted
by Cox Cable
Communications.
Two separate
back-to-back
amplifier housings
are used.
ble Communications Division of Scientific-Atlanta.
Smith is highly conscious of two-way problems because he will be testing two-way communication
originating from subscriber homes. Smith points out
that 75 percent of most cable plant is the feeder
system; hence use of a single cable feeder is less
expensive.
Smith emphasizes that any return signal from a
normal house drop passes only through the diplexing
(crossover) filter associated with the line extenders
and the bridger amplifier. Thus usually no more
than four filters are in the reverse path and this
means filter requirements can be more easily met.
Smith's system diagram is similar to Cox's except
that he sees the possibility of the second trunk being
upstream only. A directional tap can be located in
the return trunk for customers, such as schools, that
need to return large bandwidths. Such signals woul
not pass through any diplexing filters.
Smith prefers a wide downstream bandwidth50-300 MHz. Since the upstream bandwidth is only
5-108 MHz, smaller trunk cable could be used and
fewer amplifiers required.
AMPLIFIER
"'A"' CABLE
•••••
54·260 MHz
~
:::;
a:
LINE EXTENDER
UJ
a
UJ
ii'
íJ
5-30 MHz
""B"' CABLE
I l 'i
~
5·108 MHz
C>
t. ~-1
I '.•..,.
' " ···-~
,,, -, W'''
' '
' J.
L).__._:µ..~2~~'-~
,
-
/////
/////
/////
INDICA TES FUTURE
USE
AMPLIFIER
TRUNK AMP
TRUNK 50-300 MHz
DROP
I
""B"' CABLE
DOWNSTREAM
CUSTOMER
--
-----,
COUPLER
-
HIGH PASS
FILTER
---
BRIDGER AMP
UPSTREAM
TRUNK
5·108 MHz
4·WAY SPLITTER
REVER~E AMP
L__
_J
COUPLER
TYPICAL TRUNK BRIDGER
STATION
LARGE RETURN
BANDWITH DROP
30·108MHz
FEEDER LINE
COUPLER
L_
I
I
_I
COUPLER
LINE EXTENDER
CUSTOMER DROP
DOWNSTREAM
50-300 MHz
UPSTREAM 5·30
DUAL TRUNK SINGLE FEEDER
DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
CM I E-10
www.americanradiohistory.com
Fig. 2. Dual trunk
single feeder
system favored by
Scientific-Atlanta
.reserves second
trunk cable for
upstream only.
MAY, 1972-CM I E
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www.americanradiohistory.com
WIRING MARKETS 51·100
Hedging one's decision: single cable now with
quick conversion to dual
Scientific-Atlanta will soon find out whether a single cable system will work or whether the dual reverse trunk is necessary since the company will be
doing some two-way experiments on the LVO Cable
Inc. system now under construction in Carpentersville
and Crystal Lake, IUinois. The 27-channel singlecable system will provide the capability of carrying
all foreseeable future signals at the lowest possible
initial investment. It will be push-pull and bidirectional, utilizing bi-directional tapping devices,
splitters and directional couplers. All amplifier housings and line extenders will accommodate bidirectional modules. Filters and reverse amplifiers
will be included as needed. Initially the two-way test
at Crystal Lake will involve only a few homes.
The basic distribution system, however, will be
overlaid in part by a Metro 14-12 trunk ( 14 signals
out; 12 return) which will serve key points of the
community. These key points can return 12 channels
of local origination signals. Although this return is
envisioned to be coming from schools or institutional
customers, rather than individual homes, the 14-12
system could be converted into a dual trunk basic
system to accommodate upstream signals from the
home. Dual feeder could then be added, depending
on expanded response and interaction signals from
homes. LVO says a third trunk to key points could
be added also if the nature of the 14-12 system (as
a dedicated service) should be maintained. If this
sounds like hedging, it probably is-LVO feels it
has the option to get around its single-cable system
if it proves inadequate.
At Orlando, dual feeders
American Television and Communications Corp.
will try two-way from some 25 homes within the
coming two months. This is expected to expand to
1000 homes before the year is out. A central computer will program various services, including alarms
(fire and burglar), opinion polling, in-home merchandising, subscription programming and automatic
connect/disconnect. The equipment is all EJE designed. EJE systems are capable of single cable or
dual cable distribution. ATC has elected to go with
a dual system including dual feeders. This decision
was made a/ ter some experimentation with two-way
return on a single cable. The EJE return band is
10-30 MHz. Austin Coryell, technical director for
ATC at Orlando, reports that the experiments revealed a considerable amount of RF pickup in this
band. The RF ambient in Orlando is probably higher than other regions and it is enough to produce
interference. ATC also experienced some second
harmonic problems and crosstalk. These problems
may eventually be licked, but for the upcoming
large scale test, ATC wants to avoid any interference or maintenance problems that might result
from the reverse communications. The second cable
will be capable of two-way communication, but in
the upcoming demonstration will handle reverse signals primarily. Those homes equipped with subscriber response terminals will have dual drops.
EJE maintains that two-way, both video and
data, can be handled on a single cable, but feels
dual cable is usually necessary from a videocapacity point of view. If you have more than 12
channels to carry, a dual cable system with an A-B
switch is economically sound.
Interconnecting the subsystems:
Supertrunk or microwave?
Large markets call for hub systems; i.e., several
subsystems fed from a central distribution pointsimply to limit the number of amplifiers in cascade.
Jn subdividing a city, the operator takes into account what are natural districts or areas. These may
be legal political subdivisions, areas defined by
school districts, or neighborhoods with common
civic, cultural or social interests. If each subdivision
is distinct enough, it may require its own special
local programming. Thus it is desirable that some of
the public channels or dedicated channels be electrically isolated from other parts of the system. But
how do you feed the signals from the headend (or
several hcadends) to the subsystems? Via a supertrunk, which may be one-inch diameter cable of the
highest quality? Or local distribution via microwave?
Determinants arc cost, quality and reliability. The
answer may come out different for different cities.
Jn some situations, natural terrain pushes the operator to microwave. That's the situation Cox Cable
Communications is in in the Quint City area of
Davenport and Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline, East
Moline and Rockford, Illinois. The Mississippi River
separates the franchise area and spanning it with
cable is the least attractive solution. Thus one goes
with completely separate headends or interconnects
different areas with microwave. Cox chose mi- ~
crowave and will use Theta-Com's AML system.
'JJ
Other systems operators who have a choice are
deciding not to go with microwave simply because ~
they don't want to be a pioneer in a technology r ·~I
which is new. They anticipate some as yet unforeseen problems and want somebody else to iron out •\JI
difficulties. To some extent, this caution stems from 1
unfamiliarity with any microwave equipment. System engineers who are well-versed in microwave
have confidence that such systems will present no
problems.
Some operators who might feel microwave is a
logical choice have been put off by the controversy,
charges and counter-charges, that have been raised
over amplitude modulation versus frequency modulation. There are theoretical limits to each-reserve
power for AML, possible cross-modulation for FM,
are those most often raised. Whether or not these
limits will affect day-to-day operation depends on
one's own investigation. If the engineer is not sure of
himself, he can be scared by doubts raised by competitive salesmen. What questions should be asked,
what facts to investigate regarding microwave, is the
theme of a special report on this subject in CM/E
~
CM I E-12
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-CM
IE
"When one computerized management
information service provides more accurate inf ormation more often at a lower price for 129 CATV
systems representing 600,000 subscribers
across America, isn't it time we talked?''
If you're interested in how we've helped solve problems in marketing, accounting,
engineering and top management by supplying fast, accurate information from Yazoo, Mississippi to Los Angeles - stop by our booth 204 in the West Hall at the NCTA.
We'll show you our microfilm viewer, six-month historical ledger and a lot more.
You won't believe we've got the whole thing.
2330 Auburn Boulevard, Sacramento, Calif. 95821
Circle
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Service Card
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www.americanradiohistory.com
WIRING MARKETS 51-100
next month. One cannot ignore microwave because it
may cost less than trunk.
If the operator decides not to use microwave, he
is still in a quandry over the form of super trunk,
how to multiplex signals, etc. If you can't get away
with a single central distribution center, how do you
interconnect one spoke or subsystem to another?
Will you put two-way signals on the supertrunk or
run a separate one-way cable for locally-originated
signals-perhaps a small-diameter cable?
We've already discussed the reasons for separate
cables; A forward and B forward-and-reverse or reverse only. There is another possibility and that is a
third cable for reverse (Cable B can be reserved for
forward use only). Some systems are laying this
third cable in.
Others are tending to favor a bundle of discrete
trunks (3, 4, 5 or 6 cables-shades
of Discade)
between spokes. This approach buys the insurance
that any contingency can be handled with minimum
future disruption.
Some systems are speculating that the carrier frequency on these dedicated trunks can be below 54
MHz, thus reducing attenuation losses and the number of amplifiers needed.
Continental Cablevision is considering this approach if they get the franchise to cable the entire
county of San Joaquin in addition to the city of
Stockton.
Metro 14-12
Tn.mi.;lnbouno
5-108MH¡
Mc><Hlied
Channel Commanders
Super
Trunk
Metro 14·12
Trunk lnl)Ouno
5-108MH1
Possible method for converting upstream signals to
low band for transmission or super trunk.
The band of 5 to 50 MHz will be used by Orange
Cablevision to expand services in the Orlando area.
One headend site will feed the super trunk cable
which serves a hub distribution point every 6 to 8
miles. Austin Coryell is planning his hub sites so
that they are on a straight line. Thus, if he uses local '
distribution microwave, he can hit a series of hub
points with one transmitter antenna dish.
To serve present franchises, Orange Cablevision
plans to put three hubs on a super trunk. A franchise
for the entire county is being sought ( 1000 square
miles). The final distribution plan will depend on
the outcome of this application. It may be super
trunk, microwave, or both.
The first three areas on this link will get all signals
from the one headend site. A reverse cable with
amplifiers every 1.5 miles feeds signals from the
local origination studio to the headend.
Regardless of what the final distribution area
turns out to be, the number of amplifiers cascaded
including the super trunk would never exceed 25. ~
Typically the cascade will not run more than 12. On U
any feeder, the Coryell limit is 12.
The 5 to 50 MHz carrier equipment to be used by
Orange Cablevision is the Jerrold SLA equipment.
Ameco has a similar 20-40 MHz system. Coryell
plans individual channel processors, placing a guard
band between channels. He is interested in a con- ~
verter that would not process separately audio and
video carriers.
Coverage problems pose difficulties
If a large number of channels are carried on a
single cable, the problem of maintaining adequate
quality is serious if many amplifiers are cascaded.
Assuming a loss of 1 dB per 100 feet ( 3/ 4-in. cable
and a frequency of 216 MHz) and 22 dB gain
amplifiers, about 2.5 amplifiers per mile are required. However, because of power splitters, intermediate bridger amplifiers, etc., a closer spacing
by about 1o percent is required.
Moreover, if the band is extended to 270 MHz,
instead of 216 MHz, attenuation is 16 percent higher calling for more amplifiers.
The Rand study, Cable Communications in the
Dayton Miami Valley: Basic Report, stated that cable engineers it contacted felt that signal quality is
appreciably impaired when amplifiers exceed 15 to
25 in cascade. Twenty was a figure often cited to
CM I E. Although careful adjustment of signal level
throughout the system can largely eliminate these
effects for many viewers, there is a decrease in system margin and an increase in cost as field technician man-hours mount. Cable systems strung out
over 15 or 20 miles might adequately serve captive
markets, but not metropolitan ones. Something in
the order of five to six miles seems an urban limit;
hence the need for hub systems or microwave links.
What to carry in major markets-to
the home
and from
Although the new FCC rules permit cable operators to go into major markets and to import distant
signals, success is not guaranteed unless that particular market was previously underserved.
CM I E-14
MAY, 1972-CM
www.americanradiohistory.com
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~ow well do you know your state flag?
Fro111
, and from the
sunny shores of
to the rock·
bound coast of
, Anixter·Pruzan
serves CATV syste111s. You can be in
or
;;:::======:::'J 5
still count on us for
'
'
11
10
To us, all 50 are solid-states.
Your National CATV Supply Service
Look at the state you're in ...
.
Seattle, Wa. 98134I 1963 1st Ave. S. I (206) 624-6505
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1. Alaska
2. Florida
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4. Wyoming
5. Rhode Island
6. Alabama
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9. Hardware
10. Tools
11. Passive Devices
12. Electronics
--
Circle 157 on Reader Service Card
MAY, 1972-CM
I
CMI E-15
E
www.americanradiohistory.com
WIRING MARKETS 51·100
Because of leapfrogging restrictions, the independent station or stations that can be brought into
some markets are not all that attractive. The independent U functioning in a small market relies. on
sports, old syndicated features and old movies.
Sports programs may sell the man of the house, and
kids will watch old syndicated shows, but how many
subscribers can you sell on the basis of a baby-sitting
channel? Probably not many unless it is part of a
larger package. Until more is known about what will
motivate a customer, the tendency will be to offer a
variety of items. The programming plan for Tulsa
Cable Television provides a good example. The
head of Tulsa Cable Television (a joint venture with
LVO Cable Inc.) is William Swanson, a former TV
broadcaster. He has no delusions about any given
program being magic so he is making full use of
cable channel capacity to offer a smorgasbord. He
has a channel for every taste-personalized
TV, as
Swanson prefers to call it. There is a feature movie
channel, a news service channel (which will get inputs from a mobile van), a general programming
channel (which will draw from various sources), a
children's channel, a sports channel, a religious
channel, a community affairs channel which schools
can use, a business and finance channel and, on top
of this, dedicated channels made possible with the
Metro 14-12 overlay system described earlier.
It's a little too early to tell for sure, but Coaxial
Communications of Columbus Inc., which has the
franchise for the northeast portion of Columbus,
Ohio, has been growing nicely without distant imports by doing a lot of special interest programs of a
community service nature. Various public groups are
coming into the cable studio and doing their thing,
according to David Hackel, program director. Coax
Cable TV offers a channel of old films; just how
important this service has been is hard to tell.
If the suburbs of New York City are any criterion, sports and local news will go a long way.
Madison Square Garden events sell subscribers in
Wayne County, New Jersey. Good local news is of
value in the suburbs, but probably will be less so in
cities where the local TV stations do an adequate
job.
What will cable operators do in markets that are
already saturated with over-the-air TV? Can they
really sell extra service to the householder-fire and
burglar protection, premium movies for an extra fee,
education? Can the cable operator become a video
mailman of sorts by selling a direct shop-by-cable
service? Will programmers or advertisers pay for
polling services? Do we know enough about home
terminals or system operating characteristics to even
offer these services?
Premium movies for a fee will get a definite test
this year and some tentative answers to other services ~ay turn up in the next 12 months as two-way
expenments commence.
Experiments at El Segundo by Theta Cable of
California, using various versions of subscriber re-
Scheduling is critical
¡,
Getting the necessary cooperation from the
telephone company and/or power utility is always
a problem and it is of critical importance in large
cities particularly when precise construction time·
tables must be met-for financial or franchise
reasons.
I•
Burnup and Sims says this is an important
reason to use an experienced construction company
such as itself. B&S, for example, as a long-tirne
contractor to the telephone and power utility
,.1
industry, has developed the working relationships
I
which can speed approval of plans. Furthermore,
I
a construction company with a reputation for
craftsmanship has the confidence of pole-owners
and this helps.
Scheduling problems are also involved in getting
cable, amplifiers, and tap-off equipment on the
side at the right time. On-time delivery of equipment will become a growing problem as construction accelerates. The companies that will make
out best will be those who can 1) come up with
reasonable delivery schedules, but 2) have working
for them an effective expediter.
A third critical scheduling problem is to have
the necessary trained manpower on hand to
"climb the poles." If an MOS intends to run his
own construction crews, it is imperative that he
have a practical on-the-job training program. If
¡
he contracts such work out, he ought to be
sure his contractor can really deliver the
I
experienced manpower.
'
sponse systems (SRS) developed by Hughes, will
determine just how a home terminal performs under
actual conditions. Theta Cable will learn more about
how to program a computer. The first homes to get
terminals will be "company" people so the test is
more hardware-and-system-oriented rather than service-research-oriented. Similarly the test to be run
at Carpentersville, Illinois, by Scientific-Atlanta for
LVO Cable will be limited and will mainly test the
concept of the system and will not reveal what services are viable.
Refinements in system tests and more knowledge
of practical problems will be forthcoming from
Overland Park, Kansas, and Restan, Virginia, as
these systems (CM/ E, October 1971) move into
their second year of operation. A fire and burglar
alarm system using a passive return cable will be
tested by Davis Communications in DeKalb County,
Georgia.
At Orlando, Florida, ATC hopes to get a thousand or more home subscriber terminals on stream.
The test there in cooperation with EIE will, hopefully, help define both hardware configurations and service concepts.
The most revealing test may come from Irving,
CM I E-16
MAY, 1972-CM I E
www.americanradiohistory.com
How to put your local
merchants on the spot.
With color film, you con put the townspeople to work
for you. Simply toke your cornero and shoot o commercial
at Lou's Laundry, Bill's Bakery, or Pete'sPets.The merchants
get their message across while you get to defray your expenses and make some money in the bargain.
Film is flexible and portable so it's the ideal medium
for local origination: news, elections, sports, porodes ..
all featuring local people.
We'd like to send you our new publication VIDEOfilm
NOTES. Each issue contains new ways to use film in your
business. If you're not already receiving it, please send your
name, address and zip to Dept. 640, Eastman
Kodak Company, Rochester, New York 14650.
•
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
Atlanta. 404/351-6510. Chicago 312/654-5300. Dellos 214/351-3221 Holly·
wood 213/464-6131, New York 212/262-7100. Son Francisco 415/776-605~
www.americanradiohistory.com
WIRING MARKETS 51·100
Texas, where TOCOM hopes to get a large scale
cooperative
research program going to really test
what services subscribers will use. The plan is to sell
shares of stock in the Irving system to a number
of cable operators. If ten shares arc sold, $750,000
is available for some rather thorough tests.
Although TOCOM has a complete system for
two-way availability, various pieces of equipment as
determined by shareholders will be tested.
Whether or not an urban area with no reception
problems will pay extra for sports and cultural programs will be determined
by Sterling Communications in a test it is running in the Hicksville-Plainview, New York, area.
How interactive cable TV can work in a new
community
will be tested at Jonathon,
Minnesota.
The nature of these tests and what they can prove or
not prove will be the subject of a report in CM /E
next month.
CM/E
The Cost of Urban Cable Systems
Costs to wire major
markets
with ad·
vanced systems are high, although
esti·
mates vary widely depending on local circumstances.
A fair representation
of these
costs appeared in the Rand study, Cable
Communications
in the Dayton-Miami
Valley: Basic Report, m papers authored
by
N. E. Feldman, W. S. Baer and R. Bretz.
Estimates from that report follow.
As a base for comparison,
Rand estimates a conventional
12·channel
system
to cost $50 to $75 per home in front of
the plant for a headend and distribution
system.
A s:ngle-drop
cable from
the
feeder cable to the TV set costs an·
other $25.
Fixed capital costs for an advance system are given in Table l. A simple computer with a limited
memory
and few
peripherals could be procured for a little
under
$40.000.
Systems
that
permit
cumulative
responses to be displayed
in
real time cost more. In addition to hard·
ware costs shown, are costs of software
which can run $150,000
to $200,000.
This software could be shared with com·
man users at a cost of a bout $15,000 to
$25,000 per system.
The cost of a dual cable distribution
system is shown in Table 2. Costs for
interconnecting
five districts by FM micro·
wave are shown in Table 3.
Some rates of return for the investment costs cited for the greater Dayton
area-192,000
homes-are
as shown in~Table 4. This return is based on a sub·
scriber fee of $6 monthly.
If some of
the more sparsely located homes-50.000
in the suburbs-are
not included
the
subscription
price could drop to pe~haps
$3.95
per subscriber.
The
additional
revenue from channel leasing assumes a
cost of $35,000 per channel per year. and
an income of $700.000,
at least half of
which would come from leasing a pay TV
channel to a movie operator.
Table I-Fixed
Capital Costs For An Urban Cable Television System
Tower and Headend
Land for tower
Site preparation
300· to 500·ft guyed tower
Microwave shack, temperature controlled
Antennas for broadcast signals
UHF/VHF converters and spares
Audio-video processors plus all racks, cables, connectors,
FM antennas and audio processors
Automatic nonduplication
equipment
Office building
Local Origination
Equipment for origination
Mobile equipment
Time and weather equipment
Program and announcement wheel
Portable l/2·inch videotape recorders for community
Miscellaneous
Test equipment
Spare parts and equipment
Microwave importation of up to 3 distant
Computers and real-time display
Computer software
Emergency power
use
$ 10,000·$ 35,000
10,000
3,000·
25,000- 50,000
80,000- 120,000
15,000· 25,000
8,000
4,000·
signals
.... . . . . . .. .
------
Table 3-lnvestment Costs For Microwave Interconnection And
Associated Headend Equipment
Number of Outbound Television Channels
Network Configuration
4
4
5
5
4
paths, 1 return channel
paths, 2 return channels
paths, 1 return channel
paths, 2 return channels
Subtotal
Tree trimming
$7800
700
I
$ 30,000·$210.000
25,000- 85,000
3,0006,000
2.0003,000
12,000- 60,000
$137,000·$248,000
$4500
500
1500
500
800
CM
pads
$ 72,000·$364,000
Single 12-channel cable
Increasing capacity of single cable to 20·25 channels
Simultaneously adding a second 12-channel cable
Increasing capacity of second cable to 20·25 channels
Adding two-way capability to one cable
TOTAL
$ 30,000·$ 40,000
5,000· 10,000
11,000· 20,000
4,0005,000
8,00012,000
4 ,0006,000
27,000· 120,000
3,00010,000
4,0008,000
15,000· 100,000
$11 l,000·$331,000
Table 2-Estimated Investment Costs Of AboveGround Cable Installation Per Mile
and pole preparation
Cost Range
Facilities
$8500
$
. .. . ..
.
888,000
924,000
1,076,000
1,121,000
Table 4-lnternal
10
7
$ 988,000
1,024,000
l, 196,000
1.241,000
$1,088,000
1,125,000
1,315,000
1,361,000
Rates Of Return
Internal
Rate of Return
Case
I.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
The base case 40 percent penetration
One-to-one debt-equity ratio
Thirty percent cable penetration
Fifty percent cable penetration
Use of converters instead of dual cable
Subscription fee of $4.00
.
Additional revenue from channel leasing
Austere local program origination ....
E-18
Total
Equity
14.0
14.0
3.1
20.9
12.3
6.5
19.0
16.7
17.0
15.4
-18.2
26.0
14.3
1.2
23.8
20.8
MAY, 1972-CM
www.americanradiohistory.com
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN
rou GET A BAD REEL OF
CABLE?
If you've ever received a sub-par
reel of cable, you know how costly and
infuriating it can be. Sure, your supplier
will take it back and give you a new reel.
But that never compensates you for the
time and money you lose handling a defective reel, construction delays, etc., etc.
At Cerro, we don't claim to beat
r competitive specifications. What we
promise is that every reel of cable we
sendyou will be top quality, rugged, and
up to spec in every way.
How do we do it? With full logic
automated analog/digital computer controlled extrusion lines. Every important
cable parameter is monitored every step
of the manufacturing process. Built-in recording facilities identify each length of
cable automatically, facilitating in-process
quaIity control. Then, every reel gets a
final test before it is shipped.
With Cerro, you can forget about
the possibility of ever receiving a bad reel.
Make us prove our claims. Before you
place your next cable order, check with
Cerro.
TRY CERRO TRUNK DISTRIBUTION
AND DROP CABLES. YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED!
Copper clad
aluminum
center conductors
available
·~
\
\
CERRO WIRE & CABLE CO.
DIVISION
OF
CERRO CORPORATION
Halls Mill Road, Freehold, N.J. 07728, (201) 462-8700
SEE US AT NCTA BOOTH 129
Circle
158 on Reader
Service Card
CM I E-19
MAY, 1972-CM I E
www.americanradiohistory.com
Computer CATV System Design
ror The Major Markets
l. T. Frisch-Network
The CA TV systems in the top 51-100 markets are
going to be a lot more complicated and a good deal
more costly than most of their country cousins now in
operation. The FCC has ruled that they must have a
minimum capacity of 20 channels and be capable of
two-way operation should the future demand it. The
system mileage and the number of headends will be
greater. Much of the mileage will be underground.
What all this means is that the system owner will have
to commit himself to far reaching technical and financial decisions at early stages of system design or even at
the proposal stage. The consequence of poor decisions
based upon imprecise information will be systems which
perform poorly or cost more-or
as has been the usual
case in the past-both.
The computer can take the guesswork out of these
decisions by carrying through actual designs or design
alternatives which can be thoroughly evaluated. The
system owner can then proceed with confidence that be
/
Analysis Corporation
has his system under both technical and cost control.
NAC's Computer CATV System Design Service can
produce a complete layout design that will have the
lowest possible hardware cost and be guaranteed to
meet system specifications. Equally important, it will
not contain the usual human design and drafting compromises and errors.
The number of ways of using NAC's Computer D
sign Service for making design decisions is immense. To
give you an idea of these uses I will quote a few of th
actual questions that system owners have asked us an
give our answers to them.
"I want to build a two-way system. Can you tell me
how much extra it w.ill cost to have two-way capability
on the feeder as well as the trunk?"
The answer is yes, but we must first reformulate the
question more precisely. Express the owner's concern.
The reason the question is vague is that there are so
- ~~·
New computer-controlled automatic drafting machine.
CM I E-20
www.americanradiohistory.com
Circle
I59 on Reader
Service Card
-"'*
www.americanradiohistory.com
Computer
CATV System
many possible options for going two-way and s_o little
experience with them, that system owners find it difficult to even ask the right question. For example one
manufacturer offers the following two-way options: single trunk and feeder; dual trunk and feeder; dual trunk
and single feeder: 5-30 MHz upstream band; 5-108
MHz upstream band; upstream and downstream signals
on different cables or combinations of both on each
cable. Which should be the owner use?
Naturally, the owner must make some_ decisions
based upon the services he wishes to p_rov1de. ~s the
primary objective to have several studios s~odmg 6
MHz signals to the headend or will return signals be
narrow band data from, say, meter reading. However,
the desired services often depend on how much they
cost. Once the choices are narrowed to such viable
options, N AC's CATV program is an economical way
to evaluate them. Only the computer has the capability
to produce designs from which rational decisions can be
made with confidence.
"I am bidding on a franchise for a system for which
I have a strand map and system and equipment specifications. Can you deliver by next week a drawing of the
trunk layout and a section of feeder design along with a
complete bill of materials?"
Yes! We feed the strand map and specifications into
the computer and NAC's program generates the complete system design and bill of materials. Furthermore,
to augment its CATV design service, NAC has recently
completed an automated drafting program. With this
new program, layouts developed by NA C's design program are drawn as complete final construction maps by
an automatic drafting machine under direct command
of the computer. NAC's computer designs have already
been proven to give the lowest cost, and most reliable
designs in the industry-without
human design errors.
The automated drawing program has now eliminated
human dra] ring errors and the long check inf? time needed to look for drafting errors. In addition, the time to
produce drawings has been reduced by a factor of IO
over a draftsman's drawing time. For a typical JOO-mile
system the computer has drawn complete layouts in
about four hours. Parts of the design such as the trunk
and sections of feeder can be extracted and drawn
separately. The drawings can be made to any scale and
drawings may be repeated with different scales. Different trunk routings can also be generated through high
population density areas to maximize initial revenue
return from the system.
"I am bidding on a franchise for a city for which I
have a street map, but I do not yet have a strand map.
Can you obtain an estimate of system cost?"
We can indeed, and we may even be of help in
gettrng you the best strand map. Suppose you have a
street map, the locations of poles and an estimate of the
number of houses to be feel from each pole. The computer will draw the best system design along with the
strand map that goes with it. This strand map will of
course have to be walked to check for rights of way and
other restrictions. Any changes in the strand can then
be fed to the computer and the appropriate parts of the
layout can be redesigned.
. If you do not have pole locations, but the street map
is drawn to scale or you have an aerial photograph. the
program .can assign poles on an average pole span
basis, assign the houses to poles and obtain a dedicated
design. If you do not have locations of houses the
designs can be made for different population densities
and saturations.
Our experience has been that even if only the street
map, estimated population densities and selected equipment line are given, the estimated hardware cost is:
within IO percent of the cost of the final design.
"I have price quotes from two manufacturers fori
different Jines of equipment. One manufacturer seems.
to have better trunk equipment and the other better:
feeder equipment. Can you help me decide which man-í
ufacturer to use for my system?"
This is one of the most common services we perform. We simply read into the computer all the specifications for both lines of equipment including quoted I
prices, cross modulation,
intermodulation
and hum I
levels, noise figures, power requirements, temperature¡
characteristics and so on; in short, all the usual relevant¡
parameters. We also read in any unusual ones that you:
might have available from your own experience such as·
failure rates, estimated lifetime and installation costs forl
amplifiers. The computer produces the best layout using]
each line of equipment.
You can then evaluate the designs and choose the
manufacturer with confidence on any basis you wish.
One common criterion is system cost. In one comparison we performed, there was a 9.8 percent difference inl
hardware cost between two designs obtained from apparently similar lines of equipment even though thei
quoted prices for comparable items were very close.
"I am building a 350-mile, 27-channel system, some
20 percent of which is already receiving signal from al
12-channel system built 10 years ago. Can you help meo
decide whether to use the existing feeder cable or re-.
place it?"
Yes! NAC's Computer CATV Design Service has, ,,
been used to answer questions like this. The program
can be restricted to use specified equipment in given
locations. Thus to solve this problem we run three designs to the same specifications. In design 1 we requirer 1
the computer to use existing bridgers and feeder cable.:
In design 2 we require the computer to use existing¡
feeder cable. Jn design 3 we do not restrict the computer's choices. To illustrate how this works, the tablet
below summarizes the results for one section of 16, 130[
feet of .412" and .500" feeder fed from one terminating
bridger in the original system.
Design l, existing bridgers
and feeder cable
Design 2, existing feeder
cable
Design 3, unrestricted
Cost of feeder
Equipment
(Dollars)
Cost of feeder equip·
ment excluding cable
(Dollars)
$9,332.14
$5,504.35
$7,491.95
$3,715.85
$5,71l.83
I
Since we need not pay for existing cable we compare¡
the bold numbers and it is clear that in this case it is
best to keep existing feeder cable and allow the cornputer to locate trunk bridgers and terminating bridgers ..
With other cost structures, the results might be very
different.
I am sure you have many other design questions
which have troubled you. With NAC's Computer CATV1
Design Service you can now have reliable conclusive
answers.
Suggested Reading
••A Computer Design of CATV Distribution Systems," [van T. Frisch,
Bill Rothfarb, Aaron Kershenbaum, 20th NCT A Official Convention!
Transcript, July 6-9, 1971, Washington, D.C.
"A Computer Design of CATV Distribution Systems." Ivan T. Frisch
Aaron Kershenbaum, Cablecasting, Vol. 7, No. 5, July-August 19íl,
pp. 20-26.
"Network Optimization for Two-Way CATV System Design is Pro·
gramrned on a Computer" New Product Applications, IEEE Spec·
tru m, Vol. 8. No. 11. Nov. 1971, p. 82.
"Stranded in the Map Maze? A Computerized Way Out," Ivan T
Frisch, TV Communications, Vol. 9, No. 2, February 1972, pp. 34-42
CM I E-22
MAY, 1972-CM
www.americanradiohistory.com
I
E
Be sure
the color
you originate
will compare
to network quality.
II
This is the $65,000Norelco PC-70.
The 3-Plumbicon* color television
camera that's used to televise
more live and taped network TV
shows than any other camera. It is
the standard of the television industry. Buy it, if you can afford it.
This is the new Norelco LDH-1
color camera. A remarkably stable, all-purpose 3-Plumbicon* (or
Vidicon) camera that has major
design advantages of the PC-70.
It brings faithful live and film color
within easy reach of any CATV
station because it costs as little
as $14,970.
Be sure you select
/:12£.~l~~~'º""
One Philips Parkway, Montvale, N.J. 07645
A NORI/I A,\\(RI<
1\r'\,
Plllt.IP'"i COMPA'\.'!
Check this list for the Nore/co CA TV Distnbutot nearest you
Arkansas All-State Supply, Little Rock • California Tn-Trorucs. N. Hollywood, General Erectrorucs. Oakland • Carolinas Electronic Systems, Columbia. SC •
Colorado Video Electronics, Lakewood • Florida Midwest Talecommuruc ancns. M1am1~ vrdex. Orlando • Georgia Electronic Equipment, Atlanta • Hawaii Hawkins
Audio Engineers. Honolulu • Louisiana Interstate School Supply, Baton Rouge • Metropolitan New York/New Jersey Norean Elec1ron1cs. Brooktvn: Sonocraft.
New York; Tele-Measurements. Clifton , Michigan R.P. Hermes. Detroit • Mid-Atlantic Lerra Electrical, Philadelphia • Minnesota Wahl & Wahl, Minneapolis •
New England Northeast Electronics Needham, MA • Puerto Rico Ptuhp s Electronics. Santurce • Texas Video Systems, Houston. Austin, San Antonio; Video
Electronic Systems, t.ubbock » Utah lntermountam Video. Salt Lake City
"Reg TM N v Ph1l1psof Holland
Circle
MAY, 1972-CM
I
160 on Reader Service Card
CM I E-23
E
www.americanradiohistory.com
Franchise
www.americanradiohistory.com
How to get your next CATV
system off the ground,
after you get the franchise.
Let GTE Sylvania do it.
You get the franchise, we'll do the rest.
We'll design, plan, engineer and install your
whole CATV system. We make a full line of matched
components. And we put them all together in a modular system that gives you all the capacity you need
now, plus the capability to expand when you want to.
That's what we call a true "turnkey" operation.
The GTE Sylvania name is on many operating
turnkey CATV systems now. More are on the way.
And our experience in electronics stretches from
the first vacuum tubes to the TV sets a lot of your
subscribers will use.
So we know what we're talking about.
Our latest book spells out what we can do for you.
It's called "The CATV Pathmakers," and you're welcome to a copy.
It shows how far we'll go to help you grow in
CATV.
Sylvania Electronic Components Group, CATV
Operations, Seneca Falls, N.Y. 13148.
(ij
iª
www.americanradiohistory.com
SYLVANIA
Avantek's Remote Automatic Sweep System is the
result of total vertical
product integration. From
transistors to radio relay
and test equipment, Avantek serves the electronic
communications industry.
CT-1000 Transmitter
Installed at the head end of your cable
system, the CT-1000 operates continuously without interference to your normal
programming.
CR-1000 Receiver
The lightweight, weatherproof CR-1000
affords simple, one-man measurement
of swept frequency response or spectrum
analysis at any time and at any point
in your cable system.
Visit Avantek's booth, riumber 309, at
the NCTA Convention, May 14 to 17, in
Chicago and get the full particulars on
this outstanding system - designed
for you.
Avantek ... years ahead today.
Avantek, lnc., 2981 Copper Road, Santa Clara, California
95051. Phone (408) 739-6170. TWX 910-339-9274 Cable: AVANTEK
Circle 163 on Reader Service Card
CM I E-26
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Inexpensive
Commercial Ideas
By Roberta Weinberg
You can strike a chord to
oppor-tune-ity right now.
It's easy to play.
AREN'T YOU STAGGERED by the reported costs of
producing national television commercials?
T know
I'm amazed every time I read about how high
they're skyrocketing.
For instance, I recall the commercial created to
introduce a new model of a popular car. The locale
was Utah. The scene? High atop an obviously insurmountable
desert plateau.
The carnera,
shooting
from a helicopter,
sweeps in, zoom lens focusing
closer and closer on the gleaming, low-slung beauty.
Then, suddenly, it pulls away as a full orchestra
underplays
the
announcer's
dramatic
voice"Introducing the all new, incomparable--."
Great. Fantastic. Magnificent. Unbelievable.
And
the 60-second spot, according to published accounts,
cost in excess of $100,000 to produce. For someone
used to working in CA TV, that's what I call really
unbelievable.
Undoubtedly,
it doesn't catch you by surprise for
me to say that CATV system operators don't have
large bankrolls for commercial production. But you
may be surprised to hear that effective commercials
can be created for just a few dollars.
What's more important, your spot sales can probably be increased by presenting fairly comprehensive ideas (not finished commercials)
to prospective
clients at the same time you solicit their business.
Successful salesmen always use this approach to attract the prospect's attention, the first step in culminating a sale. What you're really saying is, "We
know how to sell your products on television. Here's
a creative idea that will work."
Idea creation doesn't mean high cost. In fact, a
creative commercial
idea can be as close as your
nearest five-and-dime,
drug store, hobby shop,
bank, travel agency or similar outlet. Here you can
buy, even borrow, the necessary props.
Ridiculous? Not at all. Some of you may be familiar with my instant commercial kit. I've used it at
several CATV regional conferences. The items in it
are absurdly simple, with purposeful exaggeration.
Yet, they make a point. None of them cost more
than 29¢.
Roberta Weinberg
is executive vice president of
Good Communications,
Inc., Philadelphia,
Pennsyl1 vania.
MAY, 1972-CM
I
AN
EASY LOAN
A simple visual can serve several purposes.
For instance, we have our little "clicker·'-a
popular child's toy since we all attended kindergarten.
You simply press the little metal strip on the back to
get a snappy "click." Can it be a quick commercial
idea designed to "click" with a prospective client?
Of course, with an introduction
like. "My Lady's
Boutique is having a year-end, half-price sale that's
bound to click with you." Or how about, "Get clicking this Spring with a special warm weather tune-up.
Just $9.95 at Smith & Jones Chevrolet."
Sec how
easy it is. Gets to be fun after awhile.
Another prop from our instant commercial kit is a
soft soap eraser. Combine it with a yellow writing
pad and a pencil and you have a commercial for a
finance company. Just picture this. A man's hand
holding the pencil while he works on the family
budget. All the dollar figures are on the paper but
it's apparent that the budget is $300 in the hole.
Bring in the eraser, wipe out the debt and substitute,
"An easy loan from Friendly Finance." Voila' Try
it. Take the idea down to a loan company office
CM/E-27
E
www.americanradiohistory.com
AN LOAN
EASY
from
FRIENDLY
FINAN~,,,
./'
¿
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~
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Inexpensive
tomorrow (make it today if you can) and discuss it
with the manager. Even ask him how the idea can
be made more effective. Get him involved and get
that sale.
Next from our little bag of magic moneymakers is
a cheap plastic bracelet. If you made it yourself it
would cost less than a dime. So how do you use it?
Turn the concept around completely. Mount the ugly
thing on a display pillow costing much more and
create a commercial for the finest jewelry store in
town. Now don't recoil, because there's real madness
in our method. Can you just visualize our piece of
junk rotating under a single spotlight while your
favorite basso bravado announcer
intones,
"Regardless of an item's cost, Tiffany Jewelers' service
and guarantee is always the same." The thought of
it just has to make your heart go pitterpat.
The final item in our grand and glorious kit is a
telescope. Not the kind you find in an astronomy
kit, but rather the kind you drop in a Christmas
stocking knowing full well it won't last out the day.
It's the kind with those spellbinding words, "Made
in Hong Kong," imprinted somewhere on its surface.
But let's use it well. Let's use it to "focus on the
tempting menu at the Le Food Restaurant."
It's an
easy switch from a man and a toy telescope to a
zoom-in on the menu with feature dishes highlighted
with a magic marker.
Opportunities
for creating commercials
are as
varied as your imagination. Just browsing on your
lunch hour will give you many ideas. Can a wall
mirror be used for a beauty shop commercial? Of
course, with your copy theme running, "Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is fairest of them all?" You add
the tag.
Ever seen a money bag? Your bank has hundreds
of them. So get some, stuff 'em with paper and pile
them high on a table. Then go out and get yourself a
client who will respond to, "save piles and piles of
money at the greatest sale of the year!"
Now, let's play a game.
Wherever you are right now, take a look around.
What do you sec? Is there an ashtray? A cup of
coffee? A telephone or telephone book, coat hanger,
flowers? Are you sitting on a chair?
O.K., stop! You have one picked out, right. How
can it be used for a client you haven't been able to
get on the air? Can you adapt that same idea for a
different client?
Commercial Ideas
The objectives of this little exercise are 1) to g!;
business of course, and 2) to get those cerebr
juices moving so that anyone can see that there ar¡
innumerable opportunities
around for idea creation
However, don't forget that the ideas you create ar,
to be starting points, door openers to added busi
ness. Once you get to talking to Mr. or Mrs. or Mf
Inaccessible,
you're bound to strike on the perfec
prop. Your own creation is apt to be the right one
but feel free to borrow from our "swipe" file if yot
see something that fits.
"You can take a simple item
like a carrot and ...
Optician
"You've probably heard the adage,
'Carrots make you see better.' Well,
maybe so, maybe not. But certainly, a
pair of modern frame glasses help you
see better and look better."
Fuel Oil Co.
"Donkeys often get fooled by the carrot
and stick treatment. But we don't fool
around. When you need oil or service,
we're there 24 hours a day."
Food Market
"A single carrot. It's important to us. Just
like everything else we sell, this carrot is
important because you're important."
One of the businesses we are in at Good Com
munications
is subscriber increase for CATV sys
terns. We use exactly the same method we hav
outlined here for you-the
attention-getting
device
In our case, we tell our potential
clients, "W
guarantee you X percent more subscribers at thi•
time next year." How can we do that? Because w,
have an idea that works.
You can too. Go out there and present your ow1
ideas to your own clients. Tell them that these idee
properly presented on CA TV will work. Then watc
out. You're gonna be successful!
CM/l
I
More of Ms. Weinberg's idea file will be found on page
CM/E 30.
CM/E-28
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-CM
I
I
RC~s TV Sweep Chanalyst
checks every VHF channel.
'And this complete system has other features
you need to restore new-set performance.
,,,,,,, ••..
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LEVEL
TV SWEEP CHANAL YST
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EXIERN'J
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TOSCOl'l
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CSS CARRIERL. 98-108___./
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•Concerned about CATV, CCTV,
MATV? W R-514A checks all
VHF channels for tuner malfunction
• Precision attenuator permits peak
fringe area reception adjustment
• Versatile snap-on probe allows
fast, accurate alignment technique
• One-year warranty on parts and
labor ... local replacement parts
availability
Unit combines the functions of a
sweep/marker generator, marker adder. RF, IF, video and special ChromAl ign sweep signals permit checking of
VHF tuners and alignment of IF, video
and color bandpass amplifiers. That's
why we call the RCA WR-514A a complete system.
Yours for only $380* including RF
output cable, three direct cables, connector adapter, VF/IF 75-ohm input
head. and two direct termination
units. Ask your distributor if he offers
easy payment terms.
Together with the bonus accessories
offered below, you will have just what
you need for TV alignment procedures.
To get the special bonus offer, simply mail the WR-514A warranty card
to RCA Test Equipment Headquarters,
Harrison, N.J. 07029. Offer subject to
withdrawal without notice. See your
RCA Distributor for a demonstration
of the RCA TV Sweep Chanalvst. Application Notes and other technical
data are also available - on request.
"Optional Distributor ResalePrice
Special bonus offer-3 accessories worth $42.25*
1 free with purchase of an RCAWR-514A
I
WG-433A
WG-434A
$11.25*
$15.00*
WG-435A
~\
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MIXER-INPUT ADAPTER
MY,
1972-CM
IE
VI DEO/CH ROMA
BANDPASS DETECTOR
LINK/IF
DETECTOR
Circle 163 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
RCll
Electronic
Components
CMI E-29
t«
E:YLOAN I'
from
·,
FRIENDLY.,,~-'.~
FINAN~
-
L,f<~-
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«£..-
Inexpensive
Florist
Commercial Ideas
"Just one flower can make a difference."
Newspaper
Q)
I =oe
Exterminator "Your home can be as perfect as a flower.''
Garden Shop "This spring, plant happiness in your backyard."
I
ro
u Restaurant
al
.•..
-~
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"Let the light of knowledge shine throughevery day-with
your local newspaper." '
"A candle on the table. Special service.1
Special smiles. Special food. All at the
---restaurant."
s:
Drug Store
Record Store "For less than $5, you can have Frank
Sinatra, Barbra Streisand or Elvis Presley
in your home tonight."
Book Store
[IJ
"Abraham Lincoln read all the books he
could. Today his picture is on the $5 bill.
For less than five dollars, you can buy five
paperbacks at
book store."
I .:.::.
JS
(/)
Bank
--
~ro
"One of these saved weekly in a Christmas
Club opens the door to joys and toys."
>-
-Any Store
"You can clean up dring the biggest saving
spree of the year."
Appliance
Store
"Don't be a housekeeper. Be a homemaker
with a new floor waxer and polisher."
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Q)
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o
TV Store
::?;
--
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Men's
Clothing
"Ready-to-wear fits like a yardstick. That's
why our alterations are always free."
Insurance
Agency
"A little flame can start a big fire.
home properly insured?"
Furniture
Store
"Put your worries on ice with clean plastic
slipcovers."
Appliance
Store
"The coldest spot in town. Inside your
--refrigerator /freezer. And we have
'ern.':
Is your,
•
o
o
a 1.:.::.
"Black and white TV is as outdated as
mop and bucket. But tonite you can be
watching your favorite show in glorious
color .
"
g
co
"None of us really grows up. But our play·rr1
things change. So see th~. complete line of -;¡;
adult games at
.
o
Dress Shop
"You'll look like a doll when you dress in
the latest fashions from
"
Savings
& Loan
"Your little girl may play with dolls now.
But someday she'll be grown. Isn't now the
time to save for that day."
Optician
.•..
g
Auto Garage "When you bring your car here for service,
we go over it inch by inch."
Income Tax "Don't freeze when you have that íncome
Preparation tax form in front of you. Get professiona
Service
service."
I
Gift Shop
o
Q)
"A candle is old-fashioned. But so are our
prices and service. We're not a drug store
We're more like an apothecary.
Fuel Oil Co.
ro
u
"You've probably heard the adage, 'Carrots
make you see better.' Well, maybe so,
maybe not. But certainly, a pair of modern
frame glasses help you see better and look
better."
"Donkeys often get fooled by the carrot and
stick treatment. But we don't fool around.
When you need oil or service, we're there.
24 hours a day."
Food Market "A single carrot. It's important to us. Justl
like everything else we sell, this carrot is
important because you're important."
"O
e
ro
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ro
o
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t:
8
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Formal Wear
"You'll be on target day or night with th1
Rental
newest fashions in formal wear from--.'
I Real Estate
Agency
I Telephone
Company
"Sound construction. Piece by piece uslní
the finest materials. That's what you ge'
when you have
build your drean
home."
(Using photos pasted on blocks.)
Camera
Store
"Build a family history with photographs.',
(Using photos pasted on b.ocks.)
Stockbroker
"Blocks of stocks are traded daily aroun«
the nation. Learn more about your persone
investment possibilities by calling -.'
bO
e
::>
tn
"Don't dart around. Let your fingers de
the walking through the yellow pages."
Homebuilders
co
32
¡
"Pick any spot-any
section of town-anc
let us help you find the perfect house fo
you through multiple listing service."
·"'
"O
B
CM I E-30
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-CM /I
We make the
communication sistem
that will work best
for you.
!\.t GTE Lenkurt,
we make all
rinds of communication systems.
Systems for transmitting
zideo, voice and data via open
vire, cable, microwave, or coax.
,._,,-,.
.
Why is that fact important?
It means that when you ask us
to look at your communication
needs, we can be completely
objective in making our recommendation. Whatever kind of
system will work best for you, we
make the equipment that makes
it work.
More than that, we can engineer and install the whole system,
including things we don't make.
(Like cable, antennas and such.)
When we're through you can
start communicating.
Whatever way is best for you.
Subscriber
carrier
•.-,
Data modem
a ..
Coax repeater
a "!"
..L
FDM cable carrier
PCM cable carrier
Multiplex
Microwave
Whatever it may be.
For more information,
call:
Atlanta (404) 261-8282
Chicago (312) 263-1321
Dallas (214) 363-0286
Falls Church (703) 533_33;4
San Carlos (415) 591-8461
Or write,
GTE Lenkurt
Incorporated
1105County Road. San Carlos. CA 9·1070
ICi i#t LEnKURT
Circle 164 on Reader Service Card
"'-AY, 1972-CM I E
CMI E-31
www.americanradiohistory.com
All You Ever Wanted to Know About ProductionJust Ask
Part Seven of a seriesThe Floor Manager/ Assistant Director
by Douglas Gratton
GIDE WAS OPPOSED
to the idea of analysis.
He said-in French, of course-"To
dissect is to
murder!" Yes, old André was not one for mincing
his words. But I suppose that he felt that there were
some things that defied precise definition and that
they just ... existed. Such things should be enjoyed,
appreciated, and left well alone!
Now, what has all this got to do with an article on
the role and responsibilities of the Floor Manager/ Assistant Director (FM/ AD) in CATV production? Well, if you remember, Socrates used to
wander around ancient Athens asking everybody if
they had seen "Justice." And while he could describe a "just" act or the behavior of a "just" man,
he couldn't isolate a definition of "justice."
Now, while I do not wish to follow his example, I
really do find it difficult to define the apotheosistic
functions of the AD/FM. I can only think of the
good ADs whom I have worked with in the past ...
Don, who was always there and who was ready to
tackle any problem ... Mike, who was very quiet,
very polite and very efficient ... Bruce, who really
did not do too much but who kept everyone happy
... well, before this begins to sound like a rewrite of
the "Boys in the Band," let me just tell you that if
you haven't been there, then you don't know!
But for those amongst us who like lists:
1) The FM/ AD is the senior "below-the-line"
crewman in the studio.
2) His main function is to assist the Director during
the principal production phase-namely,
the stage
of rehearsing and the transmission/taping of the
production.
3) Another important function is, that he represents
the interest of the crew and talent to the Director.
(You've got to watch some of these little Hitlers in
the Control Room!)
So, how does it all work out in practice? Well, the
Director begins the rehearsal on time since the AD
got the crew out of the coffee shop on time. And, as
he works his way thru the program, the AD is, well,
he is there! The Director wants a camera position to be marked on the floor with tape . . . the
"talent" has to be given a "start" mark . . . the
cameraman needs a chinagraph pencil to mark a
split-screen special effect level on his viewfinder monitor ... the talent wants a cup of coffee and a six
ANDRE
course meal to go with it
Fred wants to go to the
bathroom rather badly
the paint is peeling off
the set ... all this and more are the responsibilities
of the Floor Manager/ Assistant Director!
Next month, I will go over the taping records.,
admin. information, visual cues etc., which involve
the FM/ AD. But to make a final attempt to explain
the devilish complexity of the job, here is a copy of
the list of odds and ends which my FM/ AD, John,'
can produce instantly-which
explains why he is so
good at his job!
Manicure, pinking and all sorts of scissors ...
sharp knife ... plastic clothes pins (very handy for
"on the spot" alterations) ... darning and sewing¡
needles ...
all colors of thread and big spools of
extra-strength black and white . . . big and small: ~
safety pins ... claw hammers ... electric drill ...
tenon and hack saws with sharp blades ... several r
Stanley knives (excellent for cutting "No-Seam" paper) . . . nails in all their various sizes (boss, brad
and flat head) ...
Band-Aids (pink and black skin tones) ... aspirin ... small office-type stapler ... big factory-type
staple gun . . . refills for both . . . quick-drying
aerosol paint in gray, black, white and other colors
(essential for quick touching-up of sets; to speed up
the drying process, just roll over a 2K studio spot)
... a regular and Phillips screwdriver ...
Standard power extension cords (you can never
have too many) ... hi-intensity Tensor lamps (extremely useful for lighting small areas such as product shots and visuals for monochrome, and they do
save theatrical lighting and power) ... spare Tensor light bulbs (you can guarantee that they willl
need to be replaced during the production) ...
white gloves (essential for direct placement of hotsurfaced products and glasses without leaving I
fingerprints) . . . two or three pairs of asbestos
gloves (why wait for a lamp to cool before moving¡
it) ... black gloves (still great in monochrome for
creating animation) . . . one long-sleeved black
wool sweater (to go with the above item) ...
Black matte cheap cloth (you can never have too
much of this stuff, it's so useful for screening offl
space from the camera)
flashlights (yes, Virginny, there is a Con. Ed.)
thermos flask (to keep
the dust out of the client's favorite beverage)
.
paper clips ... dulling spray by the gallon
2"
CM I E-32
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972-CM I E
Sylvania
Electronic
Components
Group.Seneca
Falls, NY 13148.
We're offering you the key
to CATV.
The right key to our treasure chest will give the holder a Sylvania console
color TV set.
It could be you.
If you have one of our keys, come in and try it.
If you don't have one, stop at our booth and pick
one out of our grab bag.
If your key doesn't work, you're still eligible
to register for a special drawing on a Sylvaniaportable color set .
Either way you've got a lot to gain.
You'll get a chance to look at our complete line of CATV equipmenteverything from line amplifiers to line couplers.
And that's quite a line.
You'll also find out all about our "Turnkey"
program.
With this program, you can get a system analysis, including a computer checkout on everything
from your antenna pattern to your customer breakeven point.
You also get full systems design, engineering
and a complete installation.
With Sylvania'sturnkey approach, all you have
to do is get the franchise, we'll do the rest.
Visit us at Booth 219, West Hall, at the Conrad-Hilton, Chicago,
May 14-17.
And bring along your key people. ( Ci"'i
l :I SYLVAN
IA
Circle 165 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
ALL YOU EVER ...
and 1" grip tape by the mile and
double-sided tape by the furlong
...
2x4x6's (if you don't know
what they are, write to me because
it's very complicated and I'll have
to draw you a diagram) ...
Yellow and black grease pencils
... some children's toys ... AlkaSeltzer (see thermos flask above)
. . . various paint brushes that
should be kept clean when used ...
cord, twine, rope, string, and plastic-covered clothesline . . . misc.
lengths of glass shelving . . . hijump standards . . . paper towels
. . . sanitary towels . . . cloth
towels ... Kleenex ... light and
dark foundation make-up ... powder puffs and powder . . . dental
floss (not for your teeth! If you
have to hang something so as to
give it that invisible look, use either
dental floss or fishing gut if it's
something heavy) . . . wire and
pliers ...
Rubber cement and glue from
Elmer ... 35mm slide holders ...
a ruler (you'd be amazed how difficult it is to find a simple straightedge) ... tape measure (why move
a set to fill a corner, when you
can measure it first . . . fire extinguisher (foam-NEVER,
NEVER
NEVER water) . . . dictionary
(when you stare at a visual for
hours "on system," it begins to look
misspelt) ... white India ink and
brush to correct misspelling . . .
Letraset catalogue . . . blank black
and white visual boards . . . thumb
tacks . . . lead weights and sandbags ...
Director board . . . crew notice
board . . . liability policy against
possible crew and talent claims ...
happiness music (you may not like
the Rolling Stones' music, but you
would be amazed at the increase
in productivity if the crew has
something to listen to when they
change the set) ... train and bus
timetables . . . coffee shop menus
(I am constantly amazed by the
amount of time taken by most people in their selection of lunch in
a studio. If you have only one
menu, you can spend an hour passing it around, then another hour
waiting for delivery, and then you
have ten minutes to eat-see AlkaSeltzer) . . . pens, pencils and paper . . . trash-cans (large) with
liners . . . chalk . . . etc., etc!
CAYOX-
the new currency
For the CATV operator. CAVOX Stereo Theater is as profitable as printing his own legal tender. CAVOX is a subscriberpaid music service using TV cable hook-ups for transmission.
A splitter/decoder at the subscriber's site allows 4 "stations"
of stereo or mono music to be channeled directly to his FM
radio. He receives continuous music, no breaks, no commercials. and can listen to 4 different formats, 24 hours a day.
Tape-Athan leases your channel and provides all the equipment. Your profits are high and many new cable subscribers
will result. And with Tape-Athon equipment and music on the
job you can be assured of quality programming and dependable system operation. Write for details or phone Tape-Athon.
Tapi-Afhtt &p.
502 S. Isis Avenue
Inglewood, California 90301
213/776-6933
See CAVOX at Tape·Athon's Booth, No. 237, at NCTA.
CM
I E-34
Circle 167 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
MAY, 1972--CM
/E
1
FROM THE
EDITOR
A Coawergeace ol laleresls
For many years broadcasters and cable operators have
been on divergent paths. The adoption of the FCC's
new rules on March 31 indubitably marks a turning
point. From here on in, the two industries will be on a
path of convergence.
The FCC has given cable an opportunity to grow in
the major markets by permitting signal importation, but
has protected the future of free TV by restrictive exclusivity and antisyphoning rules affecting movies and
sports. The FCC has clearly said that it expects cable's
ultimate development and success to depend on new
services-access
channels,
local origination,
leased
channel services, etc.
Thus, the challenge of the future is to develop such
services which subscribers or advertisers will pay for.
This is a job not for "broadcasters," or "cablernen," but
creative communicators.
In a talk before the just-concluded NAB Convention,
entitled "Cable's Future Impact on Television Broadoasting," Clifford M. Kirtland Jr., executive vice president of Cox Broadcasting, did much to destroy some of
the old myths. The network's evening entertainment
fare will not be threatened by cablecasting.
A factor that could fractionalize the network audience would be the increased availability of alternative
programming. But the producer representatives so far
believe broadcast to be their prime buyer. The FCC
supports this concept with rules. Sports programming
that is normally televised will be protected for broadcasting. Existing blackout provisions apply to cable, so
it has no edge. Although pay-TV sports programming
n.could evolve, the FCC will rule in favor of national
ileague events being free.
Curbing any immediate impact of cable will be a
growth rate slower than that predicted. Although many
iproject 50-60 percent by 1980, Cox feels the penetration will be closer to 30-40 percent. (Restraints are lack
of money, equipment, and manpower, and a slow-down
tin franchise awards.)
Broadcasters are protected on theatrical film released
more than two years ago. New movies can be bid for
on a per-program basis, and pay-TY via cable may
evolve. But this entrepreneural game is open to allcable operators thus far are willing to lease a channel.
Kirtland sees no erosion of the commercial TV advertising base by 1980, and he quotes the Stanford
Research Institute's report which predicts only three
percent going to cable within the foreseeable future.
¡Cablecasters are restricted in advertising opportunity to
the beginning and end of programs. Until the number
of subscribers climbs dramatically, the national and
regional advertisers will find cable unattractive. Currently advertising revenues can't offset even modest production costs. Radio shouldn't be worried. Cable is
space-bound; radio is everywhere.
Channel leasing to enterprising program suppliers
who promote programming that will be supported by
advertisers will come about, but it's unlikely to divert
any portion of the advertising budget which is allocated
to moving products to millions.
The availability of channels for lease offers an oppor-
tunity to over-the-air broadcasters to better serve their
audience and to, at the same time, help solve the problem of access. Kirtland suggests that over-the-air stations could lease one or more channels to repeat all or
some of the day's programming at different time periods
and therefore increase its accumulative audience basis.
Some of the broadcasters'
public service programs
might be run on cable in better time slots for viewing.
Kirkland recommends a full study of total communications needs of a city, the county, and the state. In the
area of politics, candidates might find closed-circuit
channels better than over-the-air whether there is a
limit to the time available on a fair and equitable basis.
Kirkland hypothesized that candidates on leased channels answering call-in questions to be a stimulating
solution to the problem of access.
With so many conduits to the home, the pressure on
the broadcaster to be all things to all people will surely
abate. Kirtland suggests that there may be less TV
regulation in the future. With all that additional channel capacity for access or leasing, he asks, "Why should
there not be common ownership of a TV station and a
cable system in the same market? Monopoly of expression simply will not exist."
This is a notion this editor has long supported. The
FCC could have promoted its cherished idea of a UHF
outlet in every market a long time ago if it would have
permitted or encouraged joint-UHF-cable ownership. A
low power UHF could reach an entire metropolitan
area over-the-air and with cable distribution it would be
on a par with Y's in ease of tuning. In Toronto, a new
U station has been formed to take advantage of the
distribution it will get on cable. The local programming
of the station could reduce the pressure on a cable
system for extensive local origination.
Toronto cable provides an example for radio. There
is an ethnic FM programmer on cable that has no
license because he has no transmitter. Prior to cable, he
leased telephone lines-now his service is available at a
lesser cost. Just recently, Vancouver Cablevision joined
forces with the staff and facilities of radio CHOM to
cover an extraordinary meeting of the Vancouver City
Council-which
ran until two in the morning. The combination of the cable company's camera and the special
public affairs staff of the radio station made the meeting
interesting and exciting.
The forms of convergence that will take place by
radio-TV-cable, and to a lesser extent by publishers,
will vary from the leasing-of-cable-by-broadcasters
or
contracting-of-broadcasters-services-by-cable),
to jointventure, to common-ownership.
Additional special
forms will include arrangement between movie theatres
and producers, video cassette sources and other program producers, news agencies and sports promoters.
There has already been a considerable degree of investment in the new technology by groups comprised
jointly of broadcasters, community antenna operators,
newspapers, and movie producers. Now other service/leisure-oriented
industries are eyeing cable. It's
past the time for fighting. 'em; it's time to join 'em.
James Lippke, Editor
19
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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New Stations Are Built
To Fit Market Needs.
You don't just build a station by-the-book.
Rather you determine carefully what your needs
are and how they can best be met. BM/E
takes a look at some of the new
facilities designed by and for broadcasters.
KPRC (AM·TVJ, Bousloa, A l.aadmark
ON MARCH21, KPRC (AM-TV), Houston, Texas,
dedicated its new $31/2 million home-its
third,
which is a testimony to the station's progress. Floor
plans of the striking new plant were published in
BM/ E, August 1971. Jn this report we'll look at
sorne of the equipment that fills the two-acre (83,375 sq. ft.) "Houston Taj Mahal" as KPRC'ers jokingly refer to their gleaming white edifice-which is
not made of marble, but does have a lot of mirrored
glass.
KPRC is architecturally and ecologically in harmony. The broadcast center is divided into six distinct
operations arcas designed to minimize confusion.
(Areas are radio studios, TV studios, newsroom,
film lab, videotape central and administration.) To
offset the windowless environment of the production
studios, an arching. glassed "Galleria" runs through
the center of the building from one end to the other.
The 187-foot tower, necessary to house microwave
antennas, is enclosed in a striking pylon made of
architectural concrete.
Radio facilities include three AM studios (two
air, one production) and a control room on the "terrace level"-which is largely below ground but has
daylight exposure on the terrace side. New Gates
equipment customized to KPRc's specs fill these
studios. The production section has four-channel
recording capability. All equipment is set on a computer floor.
Double-wall construction of high density concrete
provides complete sound isolation for each studio.
The studio windows arc double, high-density Acoustipane glass. Each pane is approximately threequarters of an inch thick and weighs approximately
300 pounds. The ceilings and all plumbing and pipes
between floors arc suspended on "shock hangers" to
eliminate any chance of unwanted sound from vibration or noise transfer from above.
Proper acoustical control is maintained by a mixture of sound absorbing and sound reflecting materials. Large three-inch thick panels on the walls and
ceilings arc Tcckturn, an acoustical absorber, and
the solid walls form the reflecting surface. The prop-
aad More
er ratio of the absorbing surface to the reflecting
surface has been determined to provide ideal acoustical properties.
Three TV studios and their control rooms take up
the majority of the first floor (newsrooms which
dominate the rest of the space will be discussed
later). Two studios are 50 X 70 feet in size; a third
is 40 X 50 feet. Control rooms look not unlike
NASA's Houston Space Control Center-a
separate
monitor is devoted to every input which adds up to
20 monitors. Entire end walls of the control rooms
are filled with monitors. Charles Hunt, engineering,
bought 40 new black-and-white Conracs and eight
color units which were added to the previous complement of monitors to meet the needs of the new
facilities. Video switchers which can handle 42 inputs were purchased from Central Dynamics, Ltd.
There are four control rooms, two for air and two
for production, although any control room can be
used for any purpose or combination of purposes.
The custom-built audio console accommodates 108
signal sources. Pre-select systems help directors handle the many inputs available to them.
Two unusually large announce booths to record
voice-over announcements flank the control room.
These are 12 X 15 foot studios with 10 foot ceilings
the size deemed necessary to provide the proper
acoustical properties. If a room has a dimension of
less than nine feet, reproduction quality suffers, according to KPRCexperts.
Between the announce studios is a glass booth
which isolates a film projector. The picture is projected into the studio, sans projector noise, to enable
the talent to synchronize voice to the picture sequence.
On the same floor are ample quarters for production staff people including separate facilities for visiting NBC sports announcers and news correspondents. Because of KPRc's ample facilities, production
work can be handled simultaneously along with local-live and network-feeding activities.
On the floor above the TV studios and control
room is master control-divided
into three areas:
20
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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Once outside
Is open.
I
a confining
studio,
the
environment
'.lVer-the-airmaster, audio distribution and telco.
Master control can delegate the assignment of the
station's equipment in any way it pleases. A pulse
assignment system was built locally under the direction of Charles Hunt. It uses Grass Valley generators and COL decoders, a Tracor rubidium source
provides the time standard.
The audio distribution system employs Taft Communications distribution amplifiers-no
more pads
and bridges. Some 70 of these amplifiers can be
I
Arched glass Galleria runs to other end of building.
found in the station. A 25-station intercom system is
also part of this audio switching center.
All telephone equipment is located in a room adjacent to the master control room. The switchboard
is probably as large as that found in the central
switching centers of small towns. Part of the telephone equipment includes a nine-channel microwave relay system. The system consists of two
permanent incoming loops and one outgoing channel
to the transmitter. When KPRC is connected to
MAY, 1972-BM/E
21
www.americanradiohistory.com
Decor is white
Glass provides
isolation with
visibility.
Above
is view of radio
newsroom.
Below is view into
radio on-air
studio.
New master TV
control has at its
nerve center a
video routing
switcher to control all inputs and
VTRs. Below is a
view of a TV
studio control
room.
NASA's Space Control Center, the six extra loops
may be in service all at the same time (as they were.
during Apollo 11 coverage).
Crossing over the Galleria catwalk on the second
floor, and opposite the master control area, are the
film processing laboratory, the film production areas
and the videotape and film chain room.
KPRC feels it has the finest motion picture processing laboratory to be found in any station. No
expense was spared to make sure film would never
get ruined in the processor. Chemicals are constantly
replenished in the processor by a gravity flow system
from the mixed-chemical storage room. Since the
secret of good processing is "time and temperature
control," the lab is provided with its own hot and
chilled water supply.
The station processes from 130,000 to 140,000
feet of film a month. To alleviate the deterioration
problem, all fumes from the lab are exhausted directly to the outside and spent chemicals are discharged into the city sewer system where they are
quickly dissipated. The floors and walls are tile and
the upper wall arca is covered with a special vinyl.
These materials arc easy to clean and impervious to
chemicals. There are two darkrooms for film handling and a chemical testing lab.
Next to the film lab is the commercial film production unit (news film editing is handled in the
newsroom). This room includes fully-equipped editing benches, a film cutting area, sound displacers
and recording and mixing equipment. The room is
wired so that top-quality kinescope recordings can
be made in the videotape room. Facilities include
the new Scimens projector which has special filters,
and screens so that the projected image will look the
same as if it were played through a film chain. This·
speeds up screenings.
No new equipment was added to the videotape
central or the film chain proiection room since they
were already complete facilities-six high-band recorders and an Ampex slow-motion and stop-action
recorder, along with the Ampex editing equipment.
Film islands are equipped with three projectors
each-two Eastmans and one RCA. (The RCA has·
dual automatic exciters and picture lamps.)
Back on the first floor, opposite the TV studios.:
are the radio and TV newsrooms, of which KPRC is'
most proud. Radio and TV areas are separate and
each has its own directors, who command their respective arcas from glass-walled offices.
Tn the radio section a glassed-off room houses all
telephone recording equipment. Four field editors·
can be recorded simultaneously. Equipment is on 1
hand for editing and transfer to air cartridges.
A communications room serving both radio and 1
TV news includes a lot of receiving equipment-the
station's two-way gear, as well as receivers to monitor the Houston Police and Fire Departments, the
Highway Department, and the Texas Department of
Public Safety, airport towers, and others. The communications room is unattended, and slave units are
located in the "bull pens" of both the radio and TV
areas. There is also a separate wire room used by
22
www.americanradiohistory.com
both staffs. A conference room is common to areas
in which visitors can be interviewed or filmed.
Other facilities are devoted exclusively to either
radio or TV functions. A radio newsroom on this
'floor feeds the radio station control room down on
'the terrace level. TV facilities include a film edit
:room and a news film morgue. There are separate
areas or rooms for KPRC major programs: "The Five
I
O'Clock News," the "News Documentary,"
and
"News-Special" crews.
Keno's own weather room is located in this area.
fo addition to the U. S. Weather Bureau's wire service and map service, KPRC maintains its own radar
and weather station. Altogether the news area takes
up 6000 square feet.
A separate wing (three levels) houses the administrative offices. Within key offices and conference
rooms are stations that bring in all Houston overnhe-air stations as well as the weather radar picture
and the NBC line. There is also an in-house preview
channel and one channel to carry inter-office visual
communications.
Out in the garage, one will see the unusual sight
of five remote TV trucks.
A nine-channs¡ microwave link is part of KPRC's
telecommunications center.
WYENis Counting on Clean and Pleasant
Sound lo Buck 77 Compelilors
IN JANUARY 1972, WYEN, a new FM-stereo station
in Des Plaines, Illinois, a few miles from downtown
Chicago, fired up its transmitter
and studio equipment and set out to make a living in a market with
77 broadcast competitors, one of the most aircrowded metropolitan areas in the United States.
However it looks, this was not equivalent
to
1 jumping out of a window with both eyes closed. The
I management
of WYEN had its eyes wide open and
was making a carefully-calculated
move. A study of
the on-the-air radio product in the Chicago area had
convinced them that there was a good chance for a
I new station that put out a technically
superior sig1 nal, extra-clean
and fresh sounding. Tn addition, they
thought the station would increase its chances by
working hard for listener participation
in the selec1 tion of program material, which would be basically a
wide spectrum of MOR music. In other words,
WYEN would try to disprove the notion that FM
listeners used radio music mainly for background
listening. The station would benefit heavily, its sponsors believed, by giving listeners a more active interest in the station, a sense that it was serving them
directly and individually in its broadcasts.
As this is written, after its first two months on the
air, WYEN's management is convinced that the policy
is right on: the station seems to be on its way to a
secure place on the Chicago airwaves.
The good-signal part of the policy depends heavily, of course, on the selection of equipment. Tt would
not be difficult to buy all top-of-the-line professional
equipment if money were no object. WYEN shopped
for equipment that put out a clean signal at competitive prices.
The disc line-up starts with the
Shure VJ S pickup in a Shure arm. It includes
the Panasonic SP- I O turntable. installed after a competitive table could not be rid of flutter and rumble.
According to WYEN's engineers, the Panasonic table
has proved to be outstanding
for low flutter and
noise, at a price (about $360) below that of standard broadcast-station
turntables.
A number of sophisticated listeners have called in to ask what table
is being used, so impressed were they with the low
mechanical noise level.
Audio consoles arc the CCA "ultimate."
The
audio line-up includes CBS Audimax and Volurnax
units for signal processing.
For production of commercials,
announcements,
etc., WYEN uses a variety of tape equipment. There
are two Panasonic RS-275US stereo cassette recorders; a QRK cartridge
recorder/player,
and four
Panasonic RS- 736US reel-to-reel stereo decks. Ivan
Bukovsky, chief engineer, admits that the cartridge
system has better frequency response than the cassette system, but he -likes the cassette system on
general mechanical grounds and regards the cas-
MAY, 1972-BM/E
23
www.americanradiohistory.com
Panasonic
tape decks, turntables
WYEN savs the SP-10 turntab!e
motors were reworked.
and cassette
replaced
player
a more
(right)
expensive
filled the requirements
professional
unit
24
which
of WYEN.
exhibited
excessive
rumble
even
after
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
iette, in an improved form, as tihe wave of the fuure. When cassettes are used to put material on the
air, the high frequencies are boosted to restore top
iheen.
One disadvantage of the cassette, the lack of
orovision for accurate start-cueing, is overcome at
by cutting out the leader at the start of the
1WYEN
tape and substituting live tape. The Panasonic mabhines come up to speed very quickly, and have no
audible output when they are not running. Thus the
machine can be left open and program material
started right behind the stop position, for tight startcueing.
However, there is no practical way to cue material that is away from the ends of the tape. Bukowsky, probably like many other broadcast engineers,
believes-hopes,
anyway-that
cassette makers will
soon work out a flexible cueing system.
Usually commercial and announcement programs
are produced by feeding from various sourcesoassette, cartridge, voice, etc.c-onto a reel-to-reel
recorder. The finally edited program is then most
loften dubbed back onto cassettes for broadcast.
WYEN uses microwave radio to get its signal to the
'transmitter, about ten miles from the studio. This
avoids the frequency limitations of telco lines, as
well as the danger of phase slippage between the
two stereo channels, always a threat when two separate telco lines are used. The studio-transmitter
iequipment is by Moseley.
ladepeadeal
Moseley telemetry receiver and remote control
units allow the operators to monitor and control the
transmitter from the studio. McMartin digital frequency monitor, stereo monitor, and SCA monitor
are the reading instruments.
The transmitter is a CCA 25-kw model, feeding a
five-bay circularly-polarized antenna system.
Manager Ed Walters sums up the station's thinking on signal quality: "Our only product is sound,
and we have tried to make it the cleanest sound in
the market."
The programming is built mainly on disc jockeys
who try to create strong direct links with listeners by
repeated invitations to phone-in requests, and by
friendly discussion of program ideas with the phoners. The basic MOR formula is often stretched to
include blues, folk, light rock, light classical; the
main criteria for any selection is that the station's
music personnel think it is good music. Thus WYEN's
programming often goes far afield as compared with
a standard rock format, or a top-forty, or most
MOR formats.
It works. Phone requests have gone from the initial zero to about 3000 a day. The management finds
that figure extremely gratifying, and so do the advertisers. Admittedly, the experiment is in an early
stage and lots more time is needed to really tell. But
excellent sound, and music that specific individuals
want, looks like a potent combination for this new
station in a crowded market.
KPBO·TVla Booming Phoenix
Gel• A Plaal Thal ril• II• Size
1
j
r
1
KPHO-TVWENT ON THE AIR in Phoenix, Arizona, in
1949, rthe first television station in the state. It became a solid operation quite early in the game. By
the mid 60's, <though, KPHO had a problem: it was
pushing out the walls of its downtown plant, trying
to keep pace with needs and opportunities in the
booming community.
This was all the more true because KPHO-TV is an
independent station, with a strong slant toward local
programming-local
news, public service, education, sports, cultural activities, etc. There is, among
many others, a daily magazine-format program that
covers a wide spectrum of local interest materialpersonalities,
home economics, do-it-yourself
instruction, news, and much more.
The owning Meredith Corporation (publishers of
Better Homes and Gardens) bought a new site in
1969. Construction of a new plant, with design and
construction by the Aus-tin Company, started in
1970. In November 1971, the new plant went into
regular service, It is aiway from downtown Phoenix
and more nearly in the center of the area's exploding
population.
The building has two wings. The single-story administrative wing is connected by the main entrance
lobby to the two-story production wing. The administrative wing holds the management offices, plus
two conference rooms with projection booths and
monitors that can be fed any studio output from a
routing switcher in the engineering department.
The production wing has two studios-one
65 X
80 feet, the other 40 X 52 feet. The larger studio
goes mainly for audience shows and commercial
production, the smaller one mainly for the station's
extensive live programming.
Each studio has an adjoining control room; either
studio can be controlled from either room. The three
TV color cameras are GE four-vidicon types.
There is in addition a master control room, which
allows for overall routing of program material.
Control equipment includes a RCA TS-40 and
two Grass Valley video switchers with special effects
capabilities, and BC-7 audio consoles. Also in the
master control room is a custom-built Grass Valley
unit for mechanical control of telecine units.
There are three film islands, and equipment in25
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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eludes a General Electric PE-240 film camera, RCA
multiplexer, and two RCA TP66 projectors.
Videotape machines include two Ampex VRl 200C, one VR2000, and one A VR-1. Spot programming and commercial production are rounded
out with Arriflex film cameras, Siemens projector,
Nagra sound recorder, and a Houston color processor for at-home development of film.
The transmitter is not new: it is an RCA TT25
CL, with I00 kw of visual signal put on the air, 15
kw of aural signal.
KPHO-TV is doing well. Of course, the station was
doing well before the new plant came in. What the
station gained is largely the ability to make up its
own programs, from original or recorded material,
far more efficiently, more rapidly, with more technical finish and editorial flexibility, and at an equipment cost fully in line with the station's operating
level. That kind of top-grade production efficiency is
basic to a station that wants to keep on "rolling its
own" in an already large metropolitan area that is
expanding like a super-nova .
.
:_
..
KPHU located away from downtown and could go single story on a 31/2 acre site. Total floor space in the
new plant is about 43,000 sq. ft., compared to approxrnately 20,000 in the old building. There is room
for an anticipated computer installation.
- ..... - ... -
~-
Typical studio control room showing new Grass Valley switcher, RCA audio console, and Gates cartridge
tape equipment. Monitors are "jeeped" Sony 1201 color receivers.
26
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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From 220 lo 100,000 Walls ERP On FM:
Oklahoma Slate's KOSV-FM Makes lhe l.eap
AN ENTIRELY NEW magnitude of operation opened
up for KOSU-FM, stereo station of Oklahoma State
University, when a long-planned
expansion was
completed in March, at a total cost of about $100,000.
Cornerstone of the expansion is an RCA BTF20El FM transmitter, rated at 20 kilowatts. With
the circularly-polarized
antenna, on a new 400-foot
tower, helping to provide 100,000 watts of ERP, the
reliable coverage of the station is expected to have a
radius of more than 90 miles. The transmitter is in a
new building about four miles from the studios. Both
the remote control and the microwave STL are also
by RCA.
Source material can be live, or from tape car' rtridge or disc recordings. The studio equipment is all
RCA, and is designed for easy use by the station's
professional staff of five and the student operators
who are majoring in the university's radio-TV I film
program.
The greatly expanded coverage will allow the station to reach many times its former audience with
educational, cultural, and public service programs.
This service to students with specific programs, and
the service to the general public with cultural and
public service material, are two of the main benefits
the State of Oklahoma set out to buy with the money invested in the expansion.
An 12·h::iur day is broadcast from KCSU·FM's studios.
Station is part of the National Public Radio network.
l.ow-1.ighl Color Cameras Serve
Ohio Stale Medical CCTV
RCA TK-44B COLOR CAMERAS,which produce clear
pictures at light levels as low as five foot candles,
1 are major items in a $300,000
expansion of the
CCTV system used in Ohio State University's medi. cal education program. The system can handle up to
12 program inputs simultaneously, and a large master switching unit allows distribution of any program
to any or all of more than 170 monitors in 12 differ! ent buildings. The university produces all the programs, using two RCA quad tape machines for original recording and dubbing onto helical TVC-870C
for input to the system. Split-screen techniques give
flexibility to teaching presentations, and an audio
talk-back at each monitor allows students to ask
questions during the program.
Color cameras that work with natura! lighting filled
medical school's need precisely.
MAY,1972-BM/E
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Cathedral Is rully Wired
As Radio Aad TV Remole
the Cathedral of SS.
Peter and Paul had for years presented radio and
TV men with a whole series of headaches when they
came in to originate broadcasts. Jury-rigged lights,
and power for the lights, had to be strung in, making
an unchurchly mess. TV camera cables snaked '
across the floor. Getting the signals out of the building made another mess.
Now all that is ended. The cathedral has a com- 1
bined sound-reinforcement and radio-TV remote- I,
pickup system, designed to fit most unobstrusively
into the interior. Microphones and speakers are either concealed (two mikes are under cloths at the
ends of the altar), or designed to match the decor,
like the central ceiling-hung speaker behind a gold I
screen. There is a control room that serves for both
the sound reinforcement and the broadcasting feed.
Floor channels for TV cables have been laid to
every conceivable pickup point so that only a few
feet of mike cable need ever be exposed.
There are dependable feeds for up to 15 broadcasters, in two duplicate systems. Hookup facilities ,
are installed in the wall outside the cathedral for
television mobile units. The lighting was redesigned
to make available when needed, a uniform 50 footcandles across the entire cathedral from the regular
lights, so that little or no fill light is needed for TV.
Wiring the cathedral for sound, radio and TV was •
a joint effort of Phillip Taylor, chief engineer of
WJAR-Tv; his assistant, Robert Gurney; David Coffey, ,
diocesan director of radio and TV; Monsignor
William J. Carey, cathedral rector; architects
Kennedy, Kennedy, and Keefe; and the Gertz Company, sound engineers.
JN PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND,
~;¡i2_:.'
~
Camera is in position for telecast, without the usual confusion of cables.
(Top) Cableraceways at all conceivable
camera positions keep cable from being exposed to view. (Bottom) The
mobile unit can be hooked up to the
sound system in the cathedral from the
outside, eliminating the laying of cables.
28
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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A sound engineer from the Gertz Company, who designed the cathedral sound system, instructs
on the use of the audio console, which controls both output feeds, the public address system
broadcast system.
a priest
and the
Expandable Lighting At PTV Station
Educational station WPBT (Channel 2) opened their
new home in North Miami, Florida, in January 1972
-a converted film facility.
lmero Fiorentino Associates was given the re·
sponsibility for the lighting and rigging facilities for
the "live" studio. The first phase consisted of
installing a lighting and suspension system which
provides 3500 sq. ft. of net production area. The
master plan called for the final studio that covers
an area over twice the size of that actually outfitted. The ease of future expansion was given
priority consideration. Eventually, for example, the
36 dimmer control system can be easily expanded
to a multi-preset 80·channel system.
Besides the large amount of floor area available for production and service functions, the
studio has a cyclorama height of 30 feet, a distinct advantage uncommon in most present-day
studios. The scene below is the opening silhouette
of the WPBT local nightly news-the first show
produced in WPBT's new facility. The 36-12KW
dimmer system (right) controls 318 outlets.
29
MAY, 1972-BM/E
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Aulomallon ror A Medium-Small
Radio Markel in New Mexico
ers. That system has the very high audio quality that
can be put to use by FM stereo.
1
Collins equipment rounds out the stations, ending.
up with a Collins 500-watt AM transmitter feeding a
direotional antenna, and a Collins 50 Kw FM stereo
transmitter which provides circularly-polarized coverage. The studio and transmitter are housed in a 3600
sq. ft. building, made up of components produced
by Stran-Steel Corp., a subsidiary of National Steel
Corp.
The two stations broadcast the same news and
wake-up programs each morning up til 9 a.m.; then
they part company, the AM station concentrating
heavily on the top-40, the FM being slanted 'to pleasant listening MOR music. The staff consists of three
programmers and an engineer, under Operations'
Manager Hal Gore. During the day, material is
dubbed onto the emits and the reels for later programs, the station working about three weeks in advance so that three weeks' programs are on tape at I
any given time. The Clovis stations draw on several
disc jockeys who work at other radio stations-e-they
record their material and send it in.
Eaoh night after sign-off the next day's programs
are set up so that the day can begin simply by pushing the start buttons. The AM day 'takes about 45
minutes to set up, the FM day about an hour. Lt is
a totally rationalized operation, and it has helped ito
make KWKA-KTOM a success in the broadcast role
the management has chosen for the stations.
1
The home of KWKA·1FMand KT10M·FMis a 3600 sq. ft.
building made up of components produced by Stran·Steel
Corp., a Subsidiary of National SteelCorp.
IN AN AREA WITH 40,000 PEOPLE, the operator of
a combined AM/FM radio station will want to keep
operating costs low; but he must also keep program
finish and quality up if he is to compete with network outlets.
That is why Norman Petty, licensee of KWKA (AM)
and KTOM (FM) in Clovis, New Mexico, in a new
joint plant for the two stations, went wholeheartedly
for program automation. For the AM transmitter, he
got Sono-Mag equipment, including a DP-1 computer to control it. Mastertone carts hold the program units. For FM, there is a Sono-Mag chip-reading system, driving six Revox open-reel tape record-
WCVB-TV Tests Its On-Air Signal
Custom-designed production control console was built
by Philips Broadcast for the new Boston station, WCVB·
TV. COL video switching is in center, start-stop panel on
left, special effects on right. Program desk is at left
of console. Audio control booth is through window at
right. A full report on this station wi'll appear in a subsequent issue. 'It's equipped with five o·f the new third·
generation cameras, the digitally-controlled PC-100.
30
www.americanradiohistory.com
Discrete rour Channel
Advocate Charges Matrix
Promoters Rip-oll Public
PROPONENTS
OF
THE
DISCRETE
FOUR-CHANNEL APPROACH to quad-
raphonic broadcasting tangled with
promoters of the matrix approach
at both the NAB and NAFMB
conferences in Chicago last month.
Jim Gabbert, KIOI, and pioneer
four-channel broadcaster, accused
the matrix people of ripping off the
public when they refer to their
"out-of-phase" schemes as "four
r'. J discrete
channels of sound." He
warned broadcasters not to promote
•matrix approaches dishonestly because the public will become jaded
1 and
won't buy true four-channel
when it finally arrives.
Gabbert told BM/E that he departed from his prepared remarks
at NAFMB after listening to "absurd" statements made by Emil To·':-11 J rick of CBS Laboratories. The CBS
"SQ" matrix system is the leading
matrix approach to quadraphonic
· sound. Torick claimed CBS Labs
tried and discarded all discrete
four-channel approaches as unworkable in practice before it settled
on the SQ approach (BM/E, December, pages 24-27). He said the
SQ matrix provides all of the
acoustic information that the brain
can assimilate and that the matrix
approach has won the acclaim of
music critics. CBS spokesmen implied that the discrete disc would
not work because dust accumulation would fill the fine-tolerance 50
KHz track that carries the modulation for the extra two channels.
Furthermore, he said, the recording
level on four-channel discs is 5-12
dB lower than standard. (Torick
was unphased by Gabbert's counter
' blast, since he repeated his assertions at the NAB panel which followed the NAFMB by three days.
Lou Doreen, inventor of the
Quadracast discrete four-channel
system, who has also been associ-
ated with both JVC (Japan) and
RCA recording people, vehemently
denied that dust is a problem-and
500 plays showed no wear, he
said. He claimed the recording
level is only 4 dB below standard
(NAB zero level) and that there is
45 dB S/N. Torick implied at the
NAFMB meet that RCA is not
committed to the discrete fourchannel record. At NAB, Doreen
dramatically flourished a number
of RCA releases and said more
were coming fast. RCA, said
Doreen, will stamp records suitable
for either quadraphonic or stereo
playing whereas the SQ approach
issues separate records-s-one for
stereo, another for quadraphonic
playing.
At both the NAFMB and NAB
panels, the matrix proponents were
on the defensive because of lack of
channel separation. Matrixing can
reproduce the concert hall satisfactorily because reverberations ( applied to rear speakers) are correlated to sounds coming from the orchestra. And, although listeners of
matrixed-quadraphonic
sound are
satisfied that they hear "fuller"
stereo on two-channel equipment,
they aren't getting all of the benefits possible. For instance, as Gabbert emphasized, you can't create
new music, such as rock, recorded
on four microphones, or uncomprised antiphonal choral arrangements. Furthermore, some of the
program content is lost to the monophonic listener when matrixing
systems are used. This is important to a station, Gabbert said, because car and kitchen FM listening
is 70 percent mono. Moreover, matrixing leads to some "loss of location" (directionality) according to
some critics. Sid Silver, speaking
for Sansui, granted that phase shift
techniques theoretically suffer such
shortings, but they may not be particularly serious because many persons have been unable to tell the
difference between matrixing and
four-channel tapes on A-B tests.
Four-channel discs may impact
the home market, but will the FCC
permit broadcasters to play them?
The Quadracast system is compatible (with mono and stereo) but it
does require an additional subcarrier with 15 KHz audio at 76 KHz to
transmit the front-minus-rear information. It has been commonly
thought that modulating this subcarrier with 15 KHz audio would
produce bandwidth deviations that
might interfere with adjacent FM
channels. Jn actual practice, this
apparently does not happen. There
is very little sideband energy at the
91 KHz deviation point. Tests run
by the DOC in Canada of actual
broadcasts made by CHFI, Rogers
Broadcasting Ltd., showed spectrum content at 200 KHz deviation
(the maximum measured) down
26 dB. It was down 26 dB at 192
KHz-26
dB was also measured
for standard stereo transmission
(no quadraphonic
modulation).
Some 12 spectrum signatures were
taken and all were within CRTC
bandwidth requirements.
R. H. Turnpenny. vice president
of engineering for Rogers Broadcasting, was an NAB panelist. He
said that it was his opinion that
discrete methods were far superior
to matrixing. Rogers has petitioned
the CRTC in Canada for pennission to use the Doreen system regularly. Because of full compatibility
with mono and stereo and because
no adjacent channel interference
has been detected, Jim Gabbert of
KIOI said he would begin such
broadcasting in the U. S. unless forbidden to do so by the FCC.
BM/E
31
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
WOULD
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photoconductive telecine
CINTEL TELECINE is an entirely new approach
to telecine for film chain use. It accommodates
film reels up to 20" in diameter, film loops and
slides. Modular construction permits simple extension from uniplex to multiplex format. It
used Bauer 16 and 35 mm television projectors
fitted with Cintel automatic lamp houses.
And there is much more.
Write for complete information
and prices
RANK PRECISION INDUSTRIES, INC.
New York
Illinois
260 N. Rt. 303 West Nyack, N.Y. 10994 (914) 3584450
411 Jarvis Ave., Des Plaines, Ill.
60018 (3121 297-7720
California 5437 E. SheilaSt., Los Angeles, Calif. 90040 (213) 722-3221
Circle 11O on Reader Service Card
32
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
BROADCAST
EQIJIPMElWT
Black burst generator allows smooth
fades to black without loss of color.
Model 330 has burst phase, burst
amplitude and sync amplitude adjustments; and two 75-ohm terminated
outputs, individually adjustable from
0.2 volts to 0.6 volts. DYNASCIENCES.
276
Tape evaluator-cleaner
is designed for
two-inch videotape. Hermes-Magnatek
B-60 I uses blade and tissue cleaning
signal is transmitted
free of discernable distortion.
MARCO VIDEO SYSTEMS.
286
3~ -inch/hour
speeds
from
to 12
inches/minute
are available. GuL TON
TECHNl-RtTE ELECTRONICS.
300
RF and microwave attenuators
cover
DC to 2 GHz, at up to 3 watts. Series
8120 uses a thick film substrate,
is
accurate to ±0.3 dB at 1 O dB, has
insertion loss of 0.2 dB and impedance
of 50 ohms. Rotary units are I.3 1 in.
in diameter and 2.22 in. long. $78
and up. TELONIC INDUSTRIES. 290
Simultaneous
reproduction
of original
key numbers from either side of original 16mm negatives is provided by
Instrument
cleaning
fluid removes
dust, lint, atmospheric
oil, moisture
and carbon or oxide particles.
Purakleen is designed for all precision instruments,
including
magnetic
tape
heads and guides, and magnetic tape
itself. CRC CHEMICALS.
292
system recommended by NASA. While
cleaning it simultaneously
evaluates a
one-hour tape in nine minutes, with
a pen recording of video dropout and
another for edge damage. The tape
is also erased and wound in a flat
pack with constant
tension.
TELEVISION EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES. 277
Spectrum analyser has 70 dB distortion-free display from 1 MHz to 3
GHz. Model AL-60 covers range in
three bands, all having - I05 dBm
sensitivity and 1 GHz maximum dispersion.
Resolution
bandwidth
is
switchable among 200 KHz, 10 KHz
and 0.5 KHz. A birdy-bypass marker
ystem has crystal-controlled
harmonic markers through 3 GHz. $4500.
TEXSCAN.
278
Omnidirectional
dynamic microphone
is designed for drums. acoustic guitars and other musical instruments
requiring extended. flat. frequency reponse. Model 655AL has filtering to
virtually eliminate pop and wind-blast
noise. LTV LING ALTEC.
279
Vidco-nudio routing switchers connect
any of 12 inputs to each output. Series RS switchers can have outputs
~rom two to infinity. All inputs arc
100 percent isolated for clirninntion
of switching transients. NTSC color
Stainless steel splice cases for underground cable are ava.ilable in 6.3- and
9.5-inch diameters.
Preformed
cases
are 38 in. long overall. accommodate
any size cable available today in the
31 in. inner length of the stretched
case, and take four rows of 3M MS2
units without crowding. PREFORMED
LINE PRODUCTS.
294
Bulk magnetic tape eraser handles audio. video. instrumentation
tape and
magnetic films from 150 111ilto 2 in.
widths. Taberaser is designed for tape
on reels or in cartridges. has a field
that automatically
diminishes slowly
.rt the end of a 30-s..:1.:ond cycle, Fru111
30 Hz to 15 KHz. erasure is 76 dB
below saturation.
Automatic
blower
keeps heat within safe limits. $3.95.
TAnER MFG. & ENG. Co.
295
Twcnty-ch:mnel
event recorder uses
non-impact
thermal recording
principle. eliminating writing pens. Model
820 will also print identifying 11u111erical information. is intended for monitoring relays in power. utility and
communications.
as well as munuf'acturing and scientific studies.
Chart
---~"""'-
" -1 ~DUPLICATE
I
MASTER
KEY
NUMBER
ORIGINAL ~ r. •
NEGATIVE
KEY
NUMBER
special liquid gate optical printers.
Numbers are copied onto optical master or negative.
CINEMA RESEARCH
CORP.
291
UHF television translator is rated at
I 00 Watts. has interchangeable
broadband modules to simplify maintenance. Model TU-100 is solid state
except for the final amplifier. covers
channels 14-83 and CCIR bands TY
and Y. Also available are completely
solid-state
I and I O Watt models.
EMCEE BROADCASTPRODUCTS
309
Videocassette
with "Scotch"
brand
tape uses Y.í -in. format. compatible
with Sony. Wollcnsak, and all other
Ll-Matic videocassette
player/recorders.
High Energy
cobalt-energized
tape has special formula! ion for high
s/n ratio and crisp chroma response.
and a hack treatment
for smooth
wind. $17 to $35. I O to 60 mi ns.
310
JM Cor-.1PANY.
Stereo system for CCTV uses special
dual lens on carnera. screen on monitor. and stereo viewing accessory. for
----·------
'
three-dimensional
images.
Stereotronic system is entirely optical. requires
no electronic
modification.
Lens. Model 5002. $1950: screen.
$150: viewing hood. $550. S rERfOTRONIC TEI EVISION Co.
303
continued on page 34
33
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
PRODUCTS
Optical multiplier has self-dousing,
image transfer without bounce, and
up to three input stations. Model
tween channels in stereo, can be used
with any cartridge. BROADCAST
ELECTRONICS.
304
Transverse viedotape for four-head 1
machines is designed for educational
and commercial monochrome broadcasting and CCTV. Series 145 tape
has a coating for reduced head wear,
(less than two microinches per hour),
and smaller oxide particles than previous monochrome tapes. $190 for
one-hour reel. AMPEX.
305
Miniature packaged hybrid audio amplifiers are available in 1h Watt, 1
Watt, 3 Watt and 5 Watt designs.
Ceracircuit audio amplifiers have less
than 5 percent harmonic distortion at
3100 has 1.8 x 2.4-in. image at field
lens, 2-in. TY camera lens, 4-in.
I6mm projector lens. Image transfer
time is I00 msecs. ZEIMARKCORPORATION.
296
Cardioid condenser microphone has
FET-input amplifier. Neumann U-47
uses op amps, has 136 dB dynamic
range, switchable I O dB overload protect ion between capsule and amplifier, 6 dB switchable output attenuator. GOTHAM AUDIO CORP.
297
"Noise eliminator" com presses program dynamics in recording. expands
in playback to give tape machine as
much as 11O dB dynamic range at 15
ips. Mocle! 2000 has three different
rated output; frequency response is
essentially flat from 60 Hz to 15 KHz
for S-Watt unit, higher for others.
SPRAGUEELECTRIC.
306
Memory system for pre-programming
events will handle up to 500 events
on each of up to four optional devices. Model CMS-500 consists of
rack-mounted
memory and power
record characteristics, optimized respectively for 15 ips, 71/2 ips, and
slow-speed recording, FM broadcasts
or disc records. Noise reduction is
50 dB for tape mastering and 35 dB
for prerecorded tapes, records and
FM. $5300 (two-channel).
BuRwE
LARORA
TORIES.
299
Magnetic head bracket with precision
die-cast construction is intended to
minimize tape guidance variations in
tape cartridges.
Spotmaster Model
PL-HB2 reduces phase slippage be-
Circle
112 on Reader
supplies, and a desk-top operator's
console with simple 16-key keyboard.
A six-digit readout shows all entries
and deletions. Access •is random, and
instantaneous to any event. CYBRIX
CORP.
308
Alarm system uses small unit which
emits piercing sound when jostled or
moved out of position. "Stop Thief"
weighs less than a pound, is the size
and shape of a slightly oversized cigarette package. Batteries are within
unit, which needs only attachment to
a surface where it will be used. Novx
INDUSTRIES,!NC.
315
Service Card
34
MAY,1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
EW
LIT
For copies of these literature offerings,
circle numbers for appropriate items
on Reader Service Card.
lini;: RF tranvmiwion
llnes, hoth
oax and wavej!uide.
" the vubjcct a
new 16 page data 'hect; icvt arruys
covering 0.01 to 18 úHl arc detailed
or swept mcavurerncntv
ol insertion
and return lo\\ V\. frequency. and for
Ircqucncy-vclcctivc
locations of Iaults.
Hewlett-Pack ard.
200
Broad
line
of
photomultiptierx,
1!1l'l
nd 'oc uum photodiodes,
electron
rnuluplierv. and integrated phorcdcrcction avvcrnhlicv, i\ covered in detail in
new enlarged and revived 86-page catlog, mcludmg
background material
mhination of solid-state and vacuum technology
in the Quantacon
photomultiplier.
RCA.
20L
II chart
i;:ive, quick
reference
tunable
microwave
radio
•
data
cngmccrx, dcsigncr-. scicntivts and
educator'
working with electronic intrumcntatinn.
h,1, tahlcv, charts. curvcv. nomogr.rphs.
cquationv. such a
digit.ii code':
digital-analog
convcrion f.1ctor': pulse ch.ir.ictcr isric-, .ind
nomenclature:
urvev. time
mum
rcvonancc
uruvcrval
dorn.iin/Trequcncv
convcrvrons:
and
m.inv
ll.1ll;rnt1ne I nhoratorics.
do-
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f V m.rvtcr .rntcnn.,
tc111dl·,1¡.:ncd or multi vet 111,t.tll.1h11n,
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rnotclv.
lw,p1t.1k
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for
11tl11,lq t) pes. ll'~l'tlll'r
pcrfor m.uu c d.1t.1 .111d .ipplil'.I
tion notes on th1.·'"-
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RC \
TerraCom's
new microwave
radio rs
frequency agile for use rn any
band from 1.7 to 15.25 GHz.
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The TCM 6 Series rs this and more.
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proven 111every customer lab test
The most easily mamtarned microwave
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FDM voice (up to
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Tripod
mount. rack mount. or remote the RF
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no waveguide
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nunute s hy exc hangmg plug rn RF
modules. without external test
equiprnent If you don't need tunabrhtv.
buy the TCM 6 111its íixed
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Wr1te or call Bruce Jenrungs for
det.uted m íorrnatron .it TerraC0111 a
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RF Commurucauons
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more
202
Rodio multiplex
')'"'tem
capable
of
trnn ••mittin11 up to 1260 voice or dat.1
1gn.tl' vrruult.mcouvlv over .1 'ingle
mrcrnw.ivc or co.i x channel.
up to
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TRULY PORTABLE
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TUNABLE OR FIXED
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J5
•I
www.americanradiohistory.com
NEWS
•
continued
operate a non-profit cable system in
Waterbury
with instantaneous
access for schools, public meetings,
community
groups,
and with a
training
program
in cable techniques for local. citizens.
Replace
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Tubes
Directly
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Distribution
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Alabama Cable System Sets
Up Civil Defense Alert
,..
In what was said to be a "first" for
any cable system in this country,
Decatur Telecable,
Decatur,
Alabama, has worked closely with Civil Defense officials to develop a
warning
capability
for its subscribers. A Retrieve and Broadcast
Warning System has been set up,
with origination at local CD headquarters,
which sends audio and
visual warning signals over the cable. The signals are also sent by
cable or by microwave relay from
Telecable to a number of local radio and television stations for rebroadcast, increasing the alert coverage.
O
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O
No more filament heat and consequent filament burnout ... lower
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The solid state AD 1 B distributes audio
signals to five separate points within a
studio system orto telephone lines. Output level controls are individuallY
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with input metering
and audio monitoring for all 25 provided
by the AD1 B. Both units meet traditional
SPOTMASTER
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Response is essentially flat from 40 to 20,000 Hz with
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Input transformers
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--A Fllmw•w• Corhpenw --8810 Brookville Rd., Silver Spring, Md. 20910
Kodak Report Promises
In-Camera Color Processing
Eastman Kodak Company reported
world-wide sales of $2.9 billion for
1971, up seven percent over 1970.
The annual report also predicted,
in the foreseeable future, color films
for in-camera processing, part of a
new Kodak approach
to instant
photography.
President G. B. Zornow said: "We know where we are
going [on instant photography]
and
we know how to get there. The
system ...
will be based on a new
Kodak approach to color forming,
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TELEl'HONE I'll 51 874-5236 174-5237
FCCCounts Five Million
CATV Subscribers in U.S.
As of January
1, 1971, there
were 5,008,580 CATV subscribers
in 4017 communities in the United
States, according to a report by the
FCC
derived
from
its annual
CATV fee returns for the calendar
year 1970. Some other elata from
the report:
50 communities
had
more than I0,000 subscribers each;
TelePrompTer-Manhattan
had the
largest number in one city, 30,422;
and California was the state with
the largest number, 721,445.
SPARTA makes a stereo console
for every broadcast application!
The AS-30B features 5 channels
with 9 inputs, and the all new AS40B has 14 inputs with 8 mixing
channels. SPARTA Extender Panels
can expand the capabilities of both
consoles! For quality equipment at
a realistic price, contact your
SPARTAman today!
((2
~
Circle 114 on Reader Service Card
~.!::~~:
~ .~.~~:~~~~~~=
A 01'11St0N Of' COt.tPUTCA fOUIPt.lfNf
C:ORP01Vi1ION
Circle 115 on Reader Service ·c·a-rd
36
www.americanradiohistory.com
EWS
continued
:re
Is Watchdog For
:alse Ads, Says FCC
[he FCC has reaffirmed, in recent
esponses to several petitions
for
•cc action against alleged false
tdvertising
on the air, that the
'main thrust" of regulation against
leceptive ads must come from the
•ederal Trade
Commission.
The
<cc said it might act in a "clear,
lagrant case," but will generally
xpect from broadcasters
only that
hey police advertising
with the
'assiduous attention which can be
¡xpected from intelligent
and in:ormed individuals." In another reiponse to a third-party
plea, the
<cc said that a broadcaster charged
is
11vith airing a false advertisement
'" rot required,
under the Fairness
)octrine, to broadcast a refutation
if the ad claims.
lCA Solid-State Camera
..•.'oreshadows Tiny TV Unit
'\ research model of a camera with
1 solid-state "eye," recently demon:'.' •>trated by RCA, may be the pre.ursor of a radically new style of
camera that could be as small
ts a wristwatch. The research model's light sensor has 32 rows of phoiosensitive solid-state elements, and
i4 elements in each row. By rapidy scanning the elements "bucketorigade" style, the scene is converted into a sequential
signal. Dr.
William M. Webster, vice president
)f RCA Laboratories,
said that
considerable work is needed before
:he all-solid-state
camera is ready
¡1~· i?r military or consumer applicauons; he looked forward to a large
increase in the number of elements.
RCA Continuing Operations
Gain; Computer Withdrawal
Brings Loss
This turned the year's overall result
into a loss of $156 million. The
report hails the recovery in color
set sales as the largest single factor
in RCA's improved continuing operations. Also sharply higher were
sales of RCA Global Communications, of components
to the electronics industry
(particularly
TY
picture tubes), and of RCA's foreign subsidiaries.
However, the report noted a decline in sales and
earnings of the National
Broadcasting Company.
Total sales for
Annual
report of RCA for the
calendar year 1971 showed a net
profit on continuing operations
of
$128.6 million (against $107 million in 1970). But the company's
decision to withdraw from the general computer
business entailed a
net write-off of $250 million, in addition to a loss during the year on
computer operations of $34 million.
continued on page 38
ask about our new
am Im tv monitors
I
1
-....-a:nm
Call or Write ARNO MEYER
BELAR ELECTRONICS LABORATORY,
Delaware
& Montrose
Avenues,
INC.
Upper Darby, Pa. 19084 Box 83
(215) 789-0550
Circle
11b on Reader
Service Card
rv
LOOK FAMILIAR?
I
Harris to Introduce
!"I-Electronic Newsroom
Harris-Intertype
announced an allelectronic newsroom
system, with
reporters
writing
on
"video
,typewriters" that display the news
tories on a video screen, editors
,•,·
etrieving the copy from a central
C·
memory and amending it electronically, then pushing a "set-it" button
for totally automatic,
high speed
photo-typesetting.
Not
a single
piece of copy paper or punched
. tape is involved, and the editor has
.( direct control of the material to be
11
set in type. According to the announcement, the Gannett newspapers will install the system in a dai;r~
paper in Florida this year.
11y
¡
The famous Brush Crystal headphone, standard in the broadcast industry for fidelity is now available, as are all products of
the Clevite headphone and microphone cartridge product line,
from the Murdock Corporation ... oldest and most respected
name in headphones.
Write for details.
Circle
117 on Reader
Service
Card
37
MAY,1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
NEWS continued
the year were $3,545
million,
against $3,340 million in 1970.
News Briefs
Cox Broadcasting said first-quarter
1972 revenues should be up 20
percent over last year, net income
up about 30 percent, continuing the
advance
against
broadcasting
trends: 1971 was itself a banner
year for the company ... Gordon's
Television Systems, North Hollywood, California, has installed the
first Sony Videocassette Duplicating Center in the western United
States; equipment will transfer program material in any film or videotape form to the Sony '.)/,¡-inch cassette ... Joseph Roizcn, president
of Telegen, Palo Alto, California.
proposed at the Vidca videocassette
conference in Cannes, France, that
a universal color encoding process,
SECAM/60, a U. S. adaptation of
the French SECAM, be used for
exchange of scientific, medical and
educational programs on video cassettes.
McMartin
Industries
has received a U. S. Patent on a non-
inductive pulse-type FM detector,
invented
by L.
E. Hedlund,
McMartin's vice president for research and development
Theta-Com has asked the FCC to
supplement the frequency assignment plan for microwave local distribution service by adding an alternate set of frequencies carrying
miel-band and super-band channels
in their normal spectral relationship
with respect to VHF channels. This
should aid CA TV operators who
must go to 20 or more channels ...
Alan Gordon
Enterprises
announces availability
of the new
I6BL Crystalok which makes crystal sync possible on the Arriftex
I6BL camera . . . Trans-World
Communications,
division of Columbia Pictures Industries,
lnc.,
has agreed with the Democratic
National
Committee
to supply
closed-circuit TV coverage of the
convention this July at Miami to
about 30,000 hotel rooms housing
the delegates.
Dolby Laboratories, Inc. has entered the film industry with the
Model 364 Cinema Noise Reduction Unit, using the Dolby "A" system. Film sound will be recorded
with the standard Dolby 360 or
361; it will be projected using the
new model 364
. Harris.
Intertype Corporation said they are
holding discussions with General
Electric on buying certain assets of
G.E.'s Visual Communications Products Operation in Syracuse, N.Y.
... Station KW AC, Bakersfield, California, was charged by MexicanAmerican groups and the United
Farm Workers Organizing Committee, in a petition to the FCC,
with exploiting Mexican-American
listeners by failing to serve their interests; a spokesman for the petitioners said: "We are not trying to;
get rid of the station but to make it '
live up to its obligations."
Dr. Peter C. Goldmark, who recently retired as head of CBS Laboratories, has been elected to the
board of directors of the Academy
for Educational
Development,
a
non-profit
organization
that aids
schools, colleges and government
agencies to improve operations ...
New York station WQXR-FM is
using the Dolby B-Type noise reduction system on all its broadcasts; listeners with Doiby circuitry
in their receivers will get the full I
benefit of the 1O-dB reduction in
high-frequency noise, listeners with-
Sl>-A~T.A
the ''8 channel"
mcmartin consoles everything
1n
FM transmitters
B-801
MONAURAL
$2,350.
STEREO
B-802
$3,200.
Features such as solid-state direct
exciters, "Stripline" tuning, oversize cooling,
and broadband
grounded-grid
amplifiers
are
unique to SPARTA's FM transmitters! Clean and straightforward designs make all SPARTA FM Transmitters highly reliable. Call or write
your SPARTAman today for full
information.
DUAL CHANNEL
B-803
$2,650.
The 8-mixer McMartinconsoles feature outstanding flexibility, ease of operation
and clean-cut styling. All modules are plug-in. Up to 27 inputs may be accommodated. Highest quality components, including maintainable step-type attenuators, are used.
Typical program circuit program specifications are: ::+:: 0.5 dB frequency response;
distortion of 0.5%, 20 to 20,000 Hz; and signal-to-noise ratio of 74 dB for all
models. Full cue. intercom and monitor facilities are standard.
For complete information please contact: Director of Sales (402) 342-2753
MCMartin
.1ncniartin iruLUNE
nes. i ne.· 005 north ttürt.eerun street. ornaha, nebraslca. 68102 •
((3
~.!::~.~!.~
.~.~~=~~~~.~~--
.~
Circle
11B on Reader
Service Card
38
A DIVISIOlll Of COl.tPUTEfl
Circle
I 19 on Reader
(OUIPl.tElllT
COAPOJIA,Tl()lll
Service
Card
MAY,1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
a'.
NEWS
,----------------------------------------------------,
continued
out Dolby will simply hear a moderate brightening of tone in some
music.
Conrac
Corporation
reported
sales of $48,931,214
and net income of $1,925,922
for calendar
1971; profit per share was $ 1.40,
up 25 percent from 1970's $1, 12
per share ... Society of Photographic Scientists and Engineers holds
a combined conference and tutorial
seminar in San Francisco, May 7 to
12, with many papers and discussions on holography,
processing
theory, novel photo systems, and
other related topics; information
comes from R. W. Wood, 1330
Massachusetts
Avenue,
N.W.,
Ii"
Washington, D.C.
C-Cor Electronics comp 1et ed
the sale of $400,000 of five-year,
deben.f\' nine percent subordinated
tures, which will help supply workJi~
ing capital for expansion to an
annual level of $7 million in sales,
according to James R. Palmer, CCor president . . . Zenith Radio
Corporation sales for calendar 1971
totalled $613 million, up seven
percent from 1970, and earnings
from operations were $31.3 million, up 27 percent from 1970, according to a company announcement ...
Cypress Cable TV of
Oshkosh, Inc., a subsidiary of Cypress Communications
Corp., received a franchise from the city of
Oshkosh for construction of a cable
system there; plans call for a
36-channel
bi-directional
broadband telecommunications
network.
·er:
International Video Corporation,
Sunnyvale, California, has opened a
new manufacturing plant with 47,000 square feet of space, adjacent
to the company's
headquarters
rbuilding, for production
of color
TV cameras and videotape recorders . . . Ampex Corporaton reported a loss of $86 million for the
first three quarters of its fiscal year,
and estimated an additional loss of
$3 million for the last quarter,
which ends April 29, 1972.
TOCOM, Inc. is the new name of
CAS Manufacturing Company, according to an announcement
by
John Campbell, company president.
"Total communications"
better expresses the company's wider thrust,
he said, with development of a twoway computer-controlled
central
ATV system ...
KNEV-FM,
Reno, Novada. has a new phone:
(702) FCC-KNEV.
·-
continued on page 40
/
Checklist of Boo~ that Belong in
Every Radio & TV Station Library
MANAGEMENT, ORGANIZATION
& OPERATION
O The Business of Radio Broadcasting-By
Edd Routt. Truly an all-ln-one
station
operating
guidebook.
Without
exaggeration-the
most authoritative
and
useful station operating
handbook ever
published. 400 pps.,
No. 587 Sl2.95
O Managing Today's Radio Station-Encom·
passes management, programming.
sales,
training. rates, etc. 288 pps. No. 461 $12.95
O Modern Radio Broadcasting:
Management & Operation in Small to Medium
Ma rkets-Stra
ightforwa
rd information
on all aspects of broadcasting
in these
markets. 288 pps .• 69 illus.
No. 482 Sl2.95
O Broadcast -Sta tion Operating
Guide-An
invaluable "nuts & bolts" reference for
everyone at your sta lion. 256p. No. 467S12.95
O AM-FM
Broadcast
Station
Planning
Guide-A
comprehensive
guide to plan.
ning, building,
and operating
a radio
broadcast facility-AM,
FM, or combined
operation. 160pps .. 8112 x ll".
No. 500 $12.95
O Organization & Operation of Broadcast
Stations-A
complete rundown on all the
organizational
and operational aspects of
running a broadcast station. 256 pps .. 36
illus.
No. 533 Sl2.95
OPlanning
the Local UHF-TV
StationCovers location, equipment. organization,
and operation. 296 pps.
No. T-43 510.00
O When Pirates Ruled the Waves-Complete
story of unauthorized
British radio ships.
216 pps.
No. 299 57.95
O Education
of a Broadcaster-A
racy,
fascinating,
anecdotal
account
of the
growth of broadcasting. No. T-79 Only $5.95
SPECIAL-FREE
OFFER!
Order S25.00 of books from this ad, send
remittance with your order, and we'll send
you the above book (T79) absolutely FREE!
ADVERTISING, SA,LES,
PROMOTION & PUBLICITY
DHandbook
of
Radio
Publicity
&
Promotion-A
giant 372-page, 250.000-word
encyclopedia of over 1500 on-air promo
ideas. 372 pps .. 3-ring binder. No. 213529.95
O Radio Station Sa les Promotions-JOO
creative
merchandise-moving
ideas
designed exclusively
for radio stations ..
sales tools that really work! No. 214 $10.00
O Radio Promotion Handbook-A
complete
guide on ways to develop better ratings,
and increase sales. 256 pps.
No. 26759.95
O How to Sell Radio Advertising-Sales
pitches, approaches, and clinchers. with
your customer's
objections and how to
counter them. 320 pps.
No. 51l $12.95
PROGRAMMING & NEWS
O Radio
Program
ldeabook-All
the
programming
ideas you need to build and
hold an audience. 256 pps.
No. 268 Sl2.95
O Guide
to
Professional
Radio
& TV
Newscasting.
A practical
refresher
for
pros-a
complete
self-study
guide for
beq inner s. 192pps.
No. 535 $9.95
OTelevision
News
Handbook-Solid,
practical grounding in news basics. style
and newsroom workings. 256 p. No. 567 59.95
O Radio News Handbook-2nd
Ed. A vital,
day-lo-day guide to improve newscasting.
192pps .. 44 illus.
No. 216 57.95
O Guidelines for News Reporters-Scores
of
practical techniques used by the "pros."
192pps .• 18illus.
No. 516$9.95
ANNOUNCING
O The Man Behind the Mik~Offers
practical guidance on every phase of an.
nouncing. Contains over 40 drills to spark
interest. 288 pps .. 26 illus.
No. 266 57.95
O How to Become a Radio. Disc Jockey-A
brand-new
sel í-s tudv guide for would-be
radio announcers.
256 pps.
No. 557 $7.95
FCC RULES & REGULATIONS
O Interpreting
FCC Broadcast
Rules &
Regulations, Vol. 2-Discusses
recent FCC
decisions. 192pps .• 20 chap. No. T-492 56.95
O Interpreting
FCC Broadcast
Rules &
Regulations,
Vol. 3-lndispensable
for
broadcast station personnel. Covers legal
requirements behind today's FCC policies
and regulations,
including
new CATV
rules. 208 pps. Leatherette.
No. 603 $6.95
O Commercial
FCC License
HandbookHelps you prepare for 1st. 2nd and 3rd
class exams plus broadcast and radar
endorsements. Complete theory and Q&A.
432 pps.
No. 582 SB.95
CATV & VIDEO TAPE
O CATV System Engineering, New 3rd Ed.By Wm. A. Rheinfelder.
The accepted
technical standard of the CATV industry.
256 pps .• 126illus.
No. 298 $12.95
O CATV System Management & OperationA complete guidebook
to CATV from
locating new CATV situations,
through
acquiring a franchise, obtaining financing,
opening
and
operating
a system,
budgeting,
and buying
and
selling
systems. 256 pps.
No. TlOO S12.95
O CATV System Maintenance-Only
book on
CATV maintenance, and troubleshooting.
192 pps .• 47 ill.
No. T-82 Sl2.9S
O CATV Operator's
Handbook-Covers
all
aspects from franchise to planning.
160
pps .• over 100 ill.
No. T-73 57.95
SAVE Sll.85 ON CATV COMBO
All 4 books above, only S34.95
OVideo
Tape
Production
and
Communication Techniques-An
indispensable
how-f o-do-i t handbook
on production,
direction. 256 pps .. 100illus.
No. 541 S12.95
ENGINEERING
O Broadcast Antenna Systems Handbook-A
practical guide to designing, engineering
and operating antenna systems. 160 pps ..
104illus. Comb-bound.
No. T-44 S7.95
O A Guide to Radio & TV Broadcast
Engineering
Practice-A
"how-to"
book
on all
aspects
of engineering
from
schedules to antennas. 288 p. No. 523 512.95
Technical
Papers Presented al the NAB
Engineering
Conference-Annual
issues.
individually
bound.
O 1971Ed .. leatherette cover. No. T-171 510.00
O 1970Ed .. leatherette cover. No. T-170510.00
O 1969Ed .. leatherette cover. No. T-149510.00
O 1968Ed .. comb-bound.
No. T-148 Sl0.00
O 1967Ed .. comb-bound.
No. T-140510.00
SAVE 522.05 ON PROCEEDINGS
All 5 Proceedings. for only 527.95
NO RISK COUPON-MAIL
ENTIRE
AO
TAB BOOKS. Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 17114
Please send me the TAB BOOKS checked abcv
O
O
O
e
I enclose $
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Please invoice on 10-day FR E E lrial.
Send FREE 20-page calalog.
Name
1
1
Company
I
Address
I
City
State
Zip___
SAVE POSTAGE by rem1t11n9 with order
Foreign, add JO'. Pa residents. soc e". sates tav
I
1
B 51 1
L----------------------------------------------------J
Circle
120 on Reader
Service Card
39
MAY,1972-BM/E
.v
COPYWRITING
O The Anatomy of Local Radio- TV CopyScores of ideas on how to increase station
billing with proven, result-getting
copy.
104pps .• comb-bound.
No. T-90 S5.95
DThe
Power
Technique
of Radio-TV
Copywriting--How
to write resutt-qettinq
copy for any purpose. 224 pps. No. 518S9.95
O Promotiona I & Advertising
Copywriter's
Handbook-A
practical
down.to-earth
guide for copywriters,
with 18 workbook
assignments. 128 pps. 8' 2 x 11" No. 579 S7.95
www.americanradiohistory.com
~rn& lYOOrn[n~íllYrn
í[email protected]®®
®
QUARTZ LIGHTING KIT
WEIGHS ONLY 31 POUNDS!
NEWS
continued
Century Strand, Inc. has opened
new Eastern offices at 20 Bushes
Lane, Paterson, New Jersey ...
Mid-Texas
Communications
Systems will sell to CableVision Properties, its cable ·systems in Killen,
Belton, Harker Heights and Copperas Cove, Texas; Mid-Texas will
continue to supply telephone
service in those communities.
The Consumer Electronics Show
made
two
announcements:
the
1972 show at McCormick Place in
Chicago, June 11-14, was a complete sell-out by early March and
will be the largest show in history
exclusively for consumer electronic
products;
the Winter
Consumer
Electronics
Show, slated for the
McCormick Inn, will run from January 12 through 15, 1973, a day
beyond original plans, because of
requests from many potential exhibitors.
AND GIVES YOU ALL YOU NEED
for location T.V., Movie
and Photo lighting.
2 600W Quartz Focusing Spots
with barndoors & scrims
1 600W Quartz Focusing Board
with barndoors & scrims
3 600W Quartz Lamps
3 Stainless Steel Adjustable Stands
with extendable legs
1 Heavy-duty Gaffer Grip
3 1O ft. 3-wire cord & switch,
and 3-15 ft. extension cables
Aluminum Carrying Case - it stows
under an aircraft seat
PRICE? It's less than $13.00 per pound!
CENTURY STRAND INC.
A COMPANY WITHIN THE RANK OHGA..NISATION
3411 W. El Segundo Blvd.
Hawthorne, Ca. 90250
20 Bushes Lane, East Paterson
New Jersey 07407
CENTURY STRAND LIMITED
6334 Viscount Road,
Malton, Ontario, Canada
Circle
People
L. Richard Fisher will fill the new
position of western area sales manager for GTE Sylvania's CATV operations ...
Dr. J. H. Vogelman
was advanced to vice chairman and
chief operating
officer of Laser
Link Corporation,
and Ken Knight
was promoted from vice president
to executive vice president
...
Robert P. Hill was named vice
president-sales
of
Video record
Corp.
of
America,
Westport,
Conn.; he was formerly vice president of marketing
for the CBS
Electronic Video Recording
Division ...
Kerwin F. McMahon is
the new CA TV sales manager for
TeleMation
East, Inc., with headquarters in New York City. McMahon not only has a 14-year background in CA TV sales, but also
was a student of music and later
had years of production experience
in the theatre and in radio broadcasting.
Don Shuler was elected president of the Ohio Cable TV Association; Jack Rubins became vice
president and John Raines secretary-treasurer.
All are associated
with cable firms in Ohio . . .
William L. Kacin will be general
manager of the HF Photo Systems
Division of Technology Incorporated, based in Los Angeles ... James
A. Underwood is the new operations manager of w-rwo, channel
2 station in Terre Haute, Indiana.
BM/E
121 on Reader Service Card
-~-PHICI
yourbroadcast e~uipment
against lightning surges
with WllKINSON
AC UNI SORGI
PHICJOHS~
Excessive voltage surges caused by light·
ning, transformer arcing and induced translents are everyday occurances that cause heavy
damage to valuable broadcast equipment.
Now through the use of WILKINSON voltage
sensitive Line Surge. Protectors you can pro·
tect your equipment from line surges that may
exceed even twenty times the normal line
voltage.
A WILKINSON pulse compensated Line Surge
Varister, is placed across a line of its rated
voltage. Should a surge or increase of voltage
occur, the resistance of the varister decreases
at log scale as the voltage increases, thus act·
ing as a momentary load or short circuit to the
surge. WILKINSON Line Surge Protectors draw
little or no current and are capacitor cornpensated for microsecond surges, thus damping
all line disturbances as well as excessive voltage increase.
A small investment in WILKINSON Line Surge
Protectors is your assurance that your valuable broadcast equipment will not be damaged
due to ljne surges.
~~~~~~~~~~~-
Mod eI SIA·l
110 V. Single
phase $150.00
Model
SIA-2 220 V. Single
phase $250.00
Model
SIA-3
220 V. Three phase
Model
SIA-4
440 V. Three phase $450.00
For complete details write to:
Circle
40
$350.00
122 on Reader
Service
Card
MAY,1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
BM/E . CLASSIFIED MARl(ETPLACE
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: $22.50 per inch lx; $22.00 per inch 3x; $21.00 per inch 6x; $20.00
per inch 12x. ALL OTHER CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING 25¢ per word; minimum $3.00. BLIND BOX NUMBER;
No extra charge. Replies sent to address berow Ylill be forwarded to you. PAYABLE IN ADVANCE; send
check with order. CLOSING DATE: 5th of 2nd month preceding issue date.
BM/E, Monterey and Pinola Avenues, Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 17214
••••••••••••••••••••••••• •
VIDEOCASSETTE
••
PROGRAM
••
COORDINATOR
••
•
SUCCESSFUL
CANDIDATE
SHOULD•
HAVE MIN. 2 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN:
ITV PRODUCTION
AS PRODUCER/•
DIRECTOR. SHOULD HAVE STRONG:
•TECHNICAL
BACKGROUND TO MAIN-•
•TAIN STUDIO FACILITY AND BE CAP-:
:ABLE OF WORKING
INDEPENDENTLY•
'•OF OTHERS.
DUTIES WILL INCLUDE:
I :MARKET RESEARCH TO DETERMINE:
•AREAS OF PROGRAMMING.
GROUND e
FLOOR OPPORTUNITY
WITH ESTAB-:
'•LISHED
GROWING
COMPANY
CUR-e
1 :RENTLY IN THE VIDEO INDUSTRY.:
l •SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOCATION.•
1 • :sEND
LETTER AND/OR
RESUME · 1N:
•CONFIDENCE
TO: BOX 572-2, BM/E,•
~:BLUE
RIDGE SUMMIT, PA. 17214.
:
I' :
••••••••••••••••••••••••••
SALES
MANAGERS
and
REGIONAL
required
,, •
SERVICE
ENGINEERS
by the expanding
sales opera-
tions of Scully/ Mefrofech
in the cities
of N. Y., Chic.,
and
Dallas.
market
Experience
ers necessary.
Ittner,
L. A., Nash,
and professional
Send
120 Old
D. C.,
in
tape
resume
studio
record-
10580.
WANTED
. Chief in AM/FM stereo now. Also contract all
~ phases broadcast. Need a good permanent future at progressive,
stable
station.
Family
man,
., experience and references. John Gudgel, Box
;., 683, Fort Morgan, Colo. 303-867-6176.
I?· D J with third endorsed, seeks similar position
the southeast.
Six (6) mos. experience.
1:! in
" Doug Galliher, 3907 Angol PI. Jacksonville, Fla.
32210, Ph. 904-771-7386.
EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
FOR SALE: I Continental stereo automation
system, presently operational in Miami. System consists of:
/
,.¡
/
,
~
~
typewriter
J
~
input, using photo
cell sensing, 4 (mono) MaCarTa cart machines.
4 (stereo) Carousals, 6 (stereo) playback 14:'
machines, 7-Vz ITS, reversible with tone or Ioil
sensing. System is all late model solid 'tate.
Make offer to: WMYQ-FM. 825-41 St. Miami
Beach, Fla. Ph. 305-538-5321, Rob't. Blumenkranz, Ch. Eng.
FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY: New AMPEX
AG-440B, AG-500B, AG-600B, AM-10, AA-620,
CBS Volumax & Audimax RUSSCO turntables,
GRAY Tonearms, E.V &' AKG microphones,
CONTEL Tape Cartridge equipment and many
other broadcast products. SPECIAL PACKAGE DEALS. CONTINENTAL ELECTRONIC
WHOLESALE CORPORATION, P. O. Box 206,
Hialeah, Flo. 33012. Phone (305) 822-142\.
~I
NEW FILM CAMERA FOR TV NEWS. 16mm
CP-16.
Extremely lightweight, crystal-control
camera specifically designed for the TV news
cameraman
and
documentary
filmmaker.
Smgle
WANTED: Locke 25086 or equivalent base insulator for 190 fool Trucson self-supporting
tower. Contact E. Cummings. LTD. 2100 Lec
St. Evanston, Ill 60202 312-475-1590.
system, double system sound, wired for Filmagnetic,
magnesium
body,
maximum
portability
and comfortable hand-holding balance.
Write
for specs and price Orders now being taken
by Alan Gordon Enterprises, 1430 N. Cahuenga,
Hollywood, Calif. 90028. (213) 466-3561.
SOLID-STATE AUDIO PLUG-IN OCTAL (I"
Dia x 2" H) modules. Mic prearnps. disc &
tape preamp-equalizers,
tape bias ose. & record
arnpl., power amps & power supplies. Send for
free catalog and audio applications.
Oparnp
Labs., 172 So. Alla Vista Blvd., Los Angeles,
Cal. 90036.
TELEVISION
CAMERA PEDESTAL.
Manufactured by Television Products Co. Model
PN-6.
Complete w/33" base, large steering
wheel. dual wheels, cable guards. Designed specifically for use w/TV color cameras.
Incorporates pneumatic counterbalance.
One only
available.
New list price, $2595.00 Demonstrator, like new, $1500.00. Alan Gordon Enterprises, 1430 N. Cahuenga, Hollywood, Calif.
90028. (213) 466-3561.
MOTORS FOR SPOTMASTERS
NEW Papst hysteresis synchronous motor HSZ
20.50-4-4700 as used in series 400 and 500 machines. Price $39.00 each prepaid while they
last. 90 day warrantee.
Terms check with
order only, no COD's
Not recommended fer
Tapecaster series 600 or 700.
TAPECASTER TCM, INC., Box 662
Rockville, Maryla~n~d=-2..,0,.,85~1-~~~
SCULLY TAPE RECORDERS: Mono, 2, 4, 8,
12, & 16 track models plus 270 automatic players. Some models in stock now. W.A.L. custom
audio control console & console modules.
Solid state 120 Watt power Amps. We buy and
rebuild Scully lathes. WIEGAND AUDIO LABORATORIES.
INC. R.O. 3, Middleburg, Pa.
17842, 717-837-1444.
Broadcast tape cartridges.
New empties: load
yourself and save' Sold in lots of 25 only. 25/
$1.00-.20 ea. 50 or 75/$1.00-.10 ca. 100/$1.00
ea.
Enclose payment with order, shipping col-
lect. Redding Radio, Box 334, Fairfield, Conn.
06430.
CARTRIDGE
TAPE EQUIPMENT
Completely
to E. C.
Post Rd., Rye, N. Y.
POSITIONS
WANTED (cont'd)
EQUIPMENT FOR SALE (cont'd)
HELP WANTED
REGIONAL
Phone 717 /794/2191
rehuilt
and
reconditioned.
our
plug-in
transistor
preamo.
fication write VIF INTERNATIONAL,
1555. Min. View, Ca. 94040.
:z.¡
For
speci-
PO Box
SERVICES
""'
FOO AUTOM•.,ION
en B
I THE
Specializing
STUDIOS
in Custom
Services
3415 BERESFORD AVENUE
BELMONT,CAllFOANIA 94002
415
¡ 592.6t49
"F'ree" Catalog .
. Everything for the deejay! Comedy, books. airchccks,
wild tracks, old
radio
shows,
and
more!
Write:
Command,
Box
26348-A, San Francisco 94126.
Just For Laughs! Sullivan 's Comedy Tonight.
4301-7th. Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama
35222.
CONSULTANTS
JANSKY & BAILEY
TeleCommunications
Consulting
Department
& CCTV
Phone 202/296-6400
1812 K Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20006
Atlantic Research
CATV
The Susquehanna
Corporation
TECHNICAL SERVICES
CUSTOM CARTRIDGE
furbishing.
Fidelipac
RELOADING
replacement
and re-
parts
and
cartridges. Write us today for prices. PROFESSIONAL AUDIO SERVICES, BOX 1953. FT.
WORTH, TEX. 76101.
Tapecaster
and Spotrnaster record playback $375.00. Playbacks $250.00. 30 day mo-icy-back guarantee
AUTODYNE.
P.D. Box 1004, Rockville, Md.
20850 (301 i 762-7626.
AMERICA's
LARGEST STOCK AND CONSIGNMENT LISTING of new and used broadcast and recording
equiornent. We trade-sell and
buy. THE MAZE CORPORATION,
P.O. Box
6636. Birmingham. Ala. 35210.
AMPEX 300, 350. 352. 400, 450 users. for greater S/N ratio. replace first playback stage 12SJ7
with
PROGRAM
INSTRUCTIONS
First
home
phone
plus
through
tape recorded
lessons
one week personal
instruction
at
in
Washington.
D.C.. Atlanta. Boston, Detroit,
New Orleans, Minneapolis.
Seattle, Denver,
Portland. Los Angeles. Proven results. Our 17th
year teaching FCC license courses. Bob Johnson
Broadcast
License
Manhallan
Beach, CaJif. 90266. 213-379-4461.
ATTENTION
Training.
VETERANS!
10600
Duncan,
First class license
in five weeks with complete
theory and R.C.A.equipped
laboratory
training.
Approved
for
veterans
per
week.
Tuition $333.00. Housing cost $16.00
American
Institute
of
Radio,
2622
The complete
and reliable
source for new and
used broadcast
cquinrnent.
Request
our free
listings.
Broadcast Equipment
and Supply Co ..
Old Lebanon
6 I5-889-0469.
Box 3141. Bristol. Tennessee 37620.
FCC FIRST CLASS RADIOTELEPHONE
LICENSE IN SIX WEEKS. Classes in El Paso,
Mica
and
vacuum
capacitors.
Price
lists on re-
quest. Surcorn Associates. 1147 Venice Blvd
Los Angeles, Ca. 90015. (213) 382-6985.
Any type tower erection finance. Bill Angle.
Tel. 919-752-3040. Box 55, Greenville, N.C.
27834.
PRINTED Circuit Drill Bits. Trumbell,
Balra Dr .. El Cerrito, Ca. 94530.
833
Channel 10 T-V Antenna. 6-bay R.C.A. batwing. Box BM/E-572-1, Blue Ridge Summit, Pa.
17214.
WANTED
ATTENTION: STATION OWNERS OR CORPORATIONS
OWNING
CHAIN
OF STATIONS. I AM. INTERESTED IN LOCATNG
A NEW FM STATION IN UPSTATE N.Y.
PROGRAMMING
COUNTRY,
GOSPEL,
FOLK. BLUE GRASS, WRITE:
CANALTOWN RECORDS, G. L. GRIFFEN 239 E.
MAIN, PALMYRA, N.Y. 14522.
Road,
Nashville,
Tenn.
37214.
Dallas.
Atlanta.
Chicago.
Cincinnati.
Denver.
Ft. Worth.
Hartford.
Houston
Memphis,
Miami
Beach.
Minneapolis.
Nashville.
New Orleans,
Oklahoma
City. St. Louis.
San Antonio.
San
Francisco.
and Seattle.
For information
contact
Elkins Institute. 2727 Inwood Rd. Dallas, Tex.
75235 214/357-4001.
PUBLICATIONS
BROADCASTING
AND THE LAW
A publication
íor the entire
station
staff.
Keeps you advised of FCC rule changes, court
decisions,
and Congressional
actions affecting
you ...
in a unique way. For further informetion and a sample copy write:
BROADCASTING
AND THE LAW
Box 8357
Knoxville, Tennessee 37916
continued on page 42
41
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
Classified (cont'd)
ADVERTISERS' INDEX
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
VIR JAMES
CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS
Applications and Field Engineering
Computerized Frequency Surveys
345 Colorado Blvd.-80206
(303) 333-5562
DENVER, COLORADO
Member AFCCE
COHEN
&
DIPPELL
CONSULTING ENGINEERS
Formerly GEO. C. DAVIS
527 Munsey Bldg.
I 202l 783·0111
Washington, D. C. 20004
.....
CM/E-5
of America . CM/ E-34
.... CM/E-15
.CM/E-26
Abto Inc ...
Angenieux Corporation
Anixter-Pruzan
Avantek, Inc. . .....
Befar Electronics Laboratory
Broadcast Electronics, Inc.
37
.36, 42
Inc.
17
40
Canon U.S.A., Inc •.....
Century Strand Inc.
Cerro Wire & Cable Co.,
Div. of Cerro Corp.
Charles Machine Works Inc.
Cohu Electronics Inc.
Dynair
Electronics,
.. CM/E-19
.. Cover 3
Broadcasters' Choice:
A77 Mk.ID·B
<,
Spotmaster/Revox
3
....
Inc.
Cover 2
Member AFCCE
Eastman Kodak Company
... CM/E-17
Eimac Division of Varian
7
Electronic Industrial Engineering,
Inc. .. .. .. . . .. . . . ..
.. ... CM/ E-8, 9
Fort Worth Tower Co., Inc.
42
GTE Lenkurt
.......
. .....
CM/ E.Jl
GTE Sylvania
12, 13, CM/E.24, 25, 33
Grass Valley Group, Inc., The . . . . . .
5
THE
International
International
Jerrold
Good Music,
Video Corp.
Electronics
Corp.
Inc.
11
. .18a, 18b
..
.CM/E-2
McMartin Industries Inc.
Magnavox Video Systems
3M Co., Mincom Division
Murdock Corp., The ....
Oak Electro/Netics
Philips
Broadcast
38
. Cover 4
15
37
Corp., CATV Div,
Equipment
Corp.
CM/E·7
CM/E·23
RCA/ Electronic Components
CM/ E-29
RCA Service Company
......
9
Rank Precision Industries, Inc. . . . . .
32
Scott·Buttner
Coastcom
Sparta Electronic Corp.
T
Systems
"Qualitv-Service
and Price/"
Wire & cable
Take advantage
of our experience. For assistance in systems
planning, engineering and complete systems quotations
CALL OR WRITE TOO.AY
';tnt 1(/tnd, 7~
COMPANY,
INCORPORATED
P.O. Box 8597, f.ort Worth, TexH
(817) JE 6-5676
-Associated CompaniesTommy Moor<l, Inc.
Big State Engin•ering, Inc.
Tower Construetlon
Finance, Inc.
Circle
Inc.
TAB Books
39
Tape-Athon Corporation
... CM/ E-34
TerraCom, A Div. of Conic Corp.
35
Theta-Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. CM/ E-11
Time & Frequency Technology, Inc.
18
U. S. Computer
Yes, quolity, service and price
on CATV systems are the reasons for Fort Worth Tower's position as the industry's leading
supplier. Experience gained as
a pioneer supplier of CATV enables Fort Worth Tower to provide you with a quality product
at a price that is reasonable
and attractive.
34
. .36, 38
. .CM/E·21
Wilkinson
Systems
Electronlcs
Inc.
.......
CM/E-13
.
36, 40
SALES OFFICES
Broadband Information Services, Inc.
274 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10016
Charles c. Lenz Jr .. Advertisin11: Director
EASTERN & MIDWESTERN STATES
274 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10016
212-685-5320
Charles 'C. Lenz Jr.
WESTERN STATES
ll ll Hearst Building
San Francisco, California
415-362-854 7
William J. Healey
94130
16400 Ventura Blvd.
Encino. California 91316
213-981-4721
Art Mandell
JAPAN
Nippon Keisoku Inc.
P.O. Box 410
Central Tokyo, Japan
536-6614
Yoshi Yamamoto
$699
•
•
•
•
Lifetime guarantee
Superb specs & performance
Advanced features
Accepts 10%" reels & NAB hubs
Check that price again ... for a broadcast quality stereo tape recorder with
all the performance and features of
machines costing 50% more. Spotrnaster
and Revox have joined forces to create
the Model A77 Mark IIl-8 (the "B"
stands for "broadcast"), a ruggedized
version of the recorder that is winning
laurels all over the world.
Guaranteed for life. Every basic part of
the A77 Mark IIl-8 is protected by a
lifetime guarantee except the heads,
capstan and pressure roller, which are
guaranteed for a full year. This should
tell you something about the reliability
engineered into the Mark III-8.
18 new features. The original A77 mod·
el, so widely praised since its introduction, has been improved in 18 ways.
For example, a new oscillator circuit for
greater efficiency, lower distortion. A
modified and strengthened braking sys·
tern. A new hardening process to reduce
capstan wear. Improved tape handling
and spooling.
But we didn't change the already
great things: servo control capstan, out·
standing speed stability, lOW'
reel
operation, modular and plug-in electron·
ics. pinpoint editing ease, separate bias
adjustment for each channel and speed,
remote control of all functions, undetectable wow and flutter, 30 Hz to 20
KHz response, etc.
Designed for rack-mounting, the A77
Mark III·B provides 2- or 4-track stereo
operation at 7V2 and 33/.¡ ips. Other
speeds, full-track heads, accessories op·
tional. Call or write:
BROADCAST ELECTROllCS, INC.
----A
Fllmw•~•
Companw
----
8810Brookville Rd.. Silver Spring, Md. 20910
(301) 588-4983
123 on Reader Service Card
42
MAY, 1972-BM/E
www.americanradiohistory.com
BM/E READER SERVICE CARD/May,
Use this FREE post-paid card for more
information on the products described.
NAME
1972 Issue
TELL US WHAT YOU LIKE OR DISLIKE ABOUT THIS ISSUE:
TITLE
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ORCOMPANY-------------------------
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ADDRESS/CITY--------------------------STATE
IP-------------~
100-199: ADSI 200-274: LITI 275-440:
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130 131 132 133 134 13~
166 167 168 169 170 171
202 203 204
238 239 240
274
275 276
310 311 312
346 347 348
382 383 384
418 419 420
205 206 20:
241 242 24:
277
313
349
385
421
278
314
350
386
422
27~
31~
35:
38:
42:
BM/E READER SERVICE CARD/ May, 1972 Issue
Use this FREE post-paid card for more
information on the products described.
NAME
TELL US WHAT YOU LIKE OR D!SLIKE ABOUT THIS ISSUE:
TITLE
_
STATION
ORCOMPANY
_
ADDRESS/CITY
WHAT ARTICLES WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE'
_
STAT
IP
100-199: ADSI 200-274: LITI 275-440:
_
EDITORIAL
USEUNTILJULY31, 1972
100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 Ill 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129
,,, 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165
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200 201
208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237
244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273
-· 280
316
352
388
•. 424
281
317
353
389
425
282
318
354
390
426
283
319
355
391
427
284
320
356
392
428
285
321
357
393
429
286
322
358
394
430
287
323
359
395
431
288
324
360
396
432
289
325
361
397
433
290
326
362
398
434
291
327
363
399
435
292
328
364
400
436
293
329
365
401
437
294
330
366
402
438
295
331
367
403
439
296
332
368
404
440
297
333
369
405
298
334
370
406
299
335
371
407
300
336
372
408
301
337
373
409
302
338
374
410
303
339
375
411
304
340
376
412
305
341
377
413
306
342
378
414
307
343
379
415
308
344
380
416
309
345
381
417
130 131 132 133 134 135
166 167 168 169 170 171
202 203 204
238 239 240
274
275 276
310 311 312
346 347 348
382 383 384
418 419 420
205 206 207
241 242 243
277
313
349
385
421
278
314
350
386
422
279
315
351
387
423
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Permit No. 665
Duluth, Minnesota
BM/E
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CABLE MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING
Broadband Information Services, Inc.
P.O. BOX 6058
Duluth, Minnesota 55806
BUSINESS
REPLY
MAIL
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·Permit No. 665
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1
BM/E
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P.O. BOX 6058
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------•"'
FIRST CLASS
•..-----~
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Duluth, Minnesota
11
Build from the bottom ...
by starting at the TOP!
The Ditch Witch "building block" concept of
modular digging gives
you top superiority, top
versatility for your underground requirements.
BUILD FROM THE BOTTOM ... with Ditch Witch
versatility! Ditch Witch
modular attachments all ow you to convert
quickly, inexpensively
from basic trencher to
backhoe or plow to earth
saw or front-end loader.
All in all, you can handle
eight digging/clean-up
operations.
Let us tell you about the
complete range of modu1ar attachments, today
... and enjoy top versatility by starting at the top
. .. with Ditch Witch!
START AT THE TOP ..•
with Ditch Witch superiority!
Top technical
design, operational superiority, product development, service-after-thes a I e. Put them
all
together and Ditch Witch
is tops in its class, with
more sales* than all the
competition put together.
*U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of Census,
50.5 per cent of 1970 sales
(1971 sales figures not yet available).
Charles Machine Works, Inc.IP. O. Box 66/Perry, Oklahoma 73077
CHING VEHICLES FROM 7 - 65 HP •.. MODULAR ATTACHMENTS FOR EIGHT SEPARATE DIGGING FUNCTIC
Circle 124 on Reader Service Card
www.americanradiohistory.com
Light (20% lbs) ...
small (17%" long, 61h'; high, 61h" wide) ...
and easy-to-operate (only
2 controls: electrical focus & pedestal), the Series 200 is ideally suited for all uses where
size and price previously have prohibited color origination.
This outstanding self-contained camera (with built-in EIA RS-170 sync generator
and color bar generator) supplies an NTSC-tYR~lt..c_olor-enqpdedvideo signal.
.
~ ..
-~
.•.•.
_
Seethe new Magnavox 200 ... the picture of p~rfec~ion1'
•suggr,sted list price, less lens. F .O.B. Torrance.
www.americanradiohistory.com
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