Fox`s Chase Carey - American Radio History

Fox`s Chase Carey - American Radio History
June 22;
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Cahners
$4.95.
c ble.com
.
Fox's Chase Carey:
TV SPORTS SPECIAL
Advertisers balk
at higher ad rates
Rights roundup
The technology
of field to screen
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June 12,1998
Vlume 128
www.broadcastingcable.com
None,
Y6
TOP OF THE WEEK / 4
Spot walks a tightrope
Midterm elections could mean a record $400 million
political advertising bonanza for a nonpresidential voting year, but the spot market is
extremely soft this month, prompting worries about the third quarter
/4
Primestar operators may surrender to DO) Cable operators that own
61% of Primestar are considering selling their entire stake to overcome Department of
Justice objections to Primestar's proposed takeover of American Sky Broadcasting. 10
/
ABC dealing for Alibritton's TVs Allbritton Communications Co.'s eight
television stations and two local marketing agreements reportedly are being sold to
ABC Inc. for more than $1 billion /12
Unity Motion to launch HDTV Start-up HDTV satellite distributor
Unity
Motion is planning its first national broadcast of HDTV programming this week /12
More than 6,600 promotion, marketing
and design executives made their way
to Toronto for the annual PromaxBDA
conference las! week. / 13
Disney stakes big 'Net claim Following NBC's lead with its CNet deal, The Walt Disney Co. acquires
stake in Info.eek and an option to take a majority piece of the popular Web search engine.
/15
a 43%
.
Chipping away
Viewers saw the first working V-chip in action last week, when one of the devices blocked a live
broadcast of CBS's TV-14 -D rated The Young and the Restless in a Capitol Hill demonstration. /15
Radio pirate walks the plank Broadcasters won a long- sought victory last week when a California judge ordered
a
pirate radio station in the state oft the air
/19
For late-breaking news, see "In Brief" on pages 80 -81
BROADCASTING
148
'King' could top 'Simpsons' syndication sales
Microsoft, Compaq to make tracks with
Twentieth Television's off -network sales for King of the Hill
Road Runner Microsoft Corp. and Compaq Computer
are on target to eclipse the studio's last animated series to hit
syndication. The Simpsons, by more than $1 million an
episode.
won the bidding war over a sizable piece of Road Runner
last week, and a bigger piece of the action in cable software. 62
/48
'Party'
clears 95%
/
COVER STORY
Weekend syndication runs of
Columbia TriStar Television
Feature films are Hollywood's hot tickets. /54
Distribution's
Party of Fire have been cleared in more than 95% of the
country for a September launch.
leave the
Advertiser Syndicated Television Association (ASTA) at
the end of next year. after 11 years at the helm.
/50
CABLE / 55
Interactive Channel focuses
on digital delivery Dallas -based
Source Media may be small, but it's
placing a big bet -$300 million-on a
digital cable future. 55
/
In January, the networks paid an unprecedented $18 billion for the rights to air NFL games.
But advertisers say that they should
not have to foot the bill, and some observers say those high -priced contracts
may spell financial trouble. 26
/
/48
Duncan exits ASTA Tim Duncan will
In hot pursuit
Chase Carey got game Chase
SPSus
ploommi
aiumumm
Carey, chairman of Fox Television and
co -COO of
the parent,
News Corp..
sits down
With BROADCASTING & CABLE
to talk about the emergence
of News Corp./Fox on the
domestic sports scene.
/40
Cover photo by Craig
T.
Mathew
EchoStar, Loral in venture
EchoStar and Loral Skynet are allying
is expanding its
to deliver niche programming, including CNN
nightly 'Moneyline'
ethnic and business services. 58
to an hour. /
/
Changing Hands
Classified
Closed Circuit
75
64 Datebook
82
66 Editorials
18 Fates & Fortunes ..._78
JUNE 22, 1998
1
Fifth Estater
In Brief
Open Mike
BROADCASTING & CABLE
76
80
77
3
BroadcastmgaCable
TOP OF THE WEEK
isin
Spot walks a tightrope
If not for expected political business, spending projected to be up only 2 % -3%
By
Steve McClellan
There's good news and bad news on the national spot
advertising front. The good news is Congress is gearing up for midterm elections this fall, which may translate to a $400 million bonanza in political dollars, a record
for a nonpresidential voting year.
The bad news is the spot market is extremely soft this
month, prompting worries
about the third quarter.
Indeed, political spending
this year will be the spot market's salvation -helping to
boost it to perhaps a 7% gain
tributing to the softness, he says, are spending cutbacks in the
automotive, telecommunications and movie industries.
Trigony says that some regions of the country are being
hurt worse than others. The Southeast, for example, is a particular challenge for national spot, although the West Coast
seems somewhat robust.
The TVB estimates that the second quarter will still manage 6r4 growth despite the June slump.
Most of the third quarter may be worse, but
f
LOCAL /SPOT SPENDING
Trigony says that the
comparison to 1997 is
tough: Last year's third
quarter was up by double
for the year. Without the
political spending, spot
digits
because
the
Atlanta Olympics of the
would be facing an estimated
2 % -3% increase in 1998.
previous year sucked a
lot of third -quarter spot
dollars out of the market.
The tail end of the
third quarter and early
November should soar,
however, when close to
70% of this year's
Local spending remains
robust, but has slowed from
the 12% growth pace of the
first quarter.
According to Harold
Simpson, research vice
president at the Television
expected political money
is likely to be spent. The
TVB's Simpson still estimates that the spot market will be up 5 % -7% for
the year. "The way it's
going now, I'd bet on the
Bureau of Advertising.
political spending in the
first four months of this
B=Bi000
year is tracking 25% ahead
of the first four months of
1886
1887
1994, the last nonpresidential election year.
Local
$7.2
$7,5 +6% -8%
high end" of that estiIn 1994, political spendhe says.
National Spot $7.0
+5% -7% mate,
ing totalled $355 million, a
Ad spending at the
record for a nonpresidential
local level remains strong,
Source for 1996 and 1997 spending: TVB from data reported by
election year. Simpson prealthough growth there is
.0 R's Media Wa., Servige.
growth esti ,
ar
dicts that political spending
cooling off as the year
this year will be in the $400
progresses. TVB, relying
million range. That would be at the same level as in 1996. a on CMR data, says that local spending in the first quarter was
presidential election year that brought in $400.4 million in up an average 12% over the first quarter of 1997. In April, the
political spending, according to Competitive Media Reports. last month of available data, Simpson says that local spending
Of that total, $366.6 million was spent locally or in national was up 7 %, according to a survey of local stations compiled by
spot, with the remaining $33.8 million going to the net- Ernst & Young. Simpson estimates that the full -year 1998
works.
growth rate for local TV ad spending will average 6 % -8 %.
In the first quarter, national spot (where national advertis- "Again, at this point I'd bet on the high end," he says.
ers place ads in select local markets) chugged along at 9 %"Local business is good," says Trigony. The Cox TV
10% above the first quarter of 1997. It held that pace in April group will show a 20% gain in local sales in the second quarbut slowed down in May
somewhere in the mid single ter, with every station ahead of where they were a year ago.
digit range. And in June sales are running just 1%-3% above Trigony says that his stations are getting more local sales
last year, rep executives say.
and fewer national spot dollars than in the past
trend he
"June is the softest month of the second quarter" for nation- sees continuing. "It used to be 50 -50, but in the second quaral spot, says Nick Trigony, president of Cox Broadcasting,
ter, for us, it will be 55 % -45% local to national," he says.
which includes rep firms Telerep, HRP and MMT. "EveryOne reason that he cites for that trend: It's easier to develbody is going into the third quarter a little concerned." Con - op new business locally.
4$7
-to
-a
4
BROADCASTING & CABLE / JUNE 22,
111118
On September
something
awesome
to
is
6th
totally
going
happen.
DUH.
It's more like, October 6th.
sorry, sorry.
I'm totally
The date
is
spaci«
August
31st.
o
Get ready
for a totally awesome Clueless launch.
*f\
,; <,4 *
Available September2000. Duh.
fluì
A
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t
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[
TOP OF THE WEEK
Primestar operators may surrender to
DOJ
MSO partners pondering selling out of DBS service to allow ASkyB takeover
By John M. Higgins
Cable operators that own 61% of
Primestar are considering selling
their entire interest in the DBS
service to overcome Department of
Justice objections to Primestar's pro-
posed takeover of American Sky
Broadcasting.
Primestar and MSO executives have
grown extremely skeptical that a less
radical change in the ownership will
appease Justice antitrust chief Joel
Klein, who has gone to court to block
Primestar's acquisition of News Corp.
and MCI Communications Inc.'s
ASkyB and its crucial high -power DBS
license. Not only has the restructuring
proposal to settle that suit received a
chilly response from Justice officials,
but discussions have broken down
because of internal disagreements.
An exit would essentially be a surrender to Klein, who believes that a
strengthened DBS service with large
MSO ownership will avoid competing
vigorously with cable systems, instead
primarily targeting satellite rivals
EchoStar and DirecTV. Primestar and
its owners counter that Justice should
be focusing on the competition among
the three DBS operators.
Industry executives
familiar with the discussions say that the
companies now are
seriously discussing a
complete exit to simply
with life," says an executive with one
MSO that owns a slice of the company.
"They're moving along."
Primestar's new CEO, Carl Vogel,
gave an unusually pessimistic assessment of the company's prospects for a
less radical settlement with antitrust regulators. According to financiers attending a Primestar presentation at Donaldson,
Lufkin & Jenrette's
satellite investment
conference in New
York last Wednesday,
Vogel said that a complete exit would most
likely be the only way
to get the ASkyB deal
done.
"He prefers a total
takeout of the MSOs,"
says one money manager at the presentation.
"He was really upfront.
really unequivocal."
"He
didn't say
However, even if cable
operators are willing to
sell, the exit would be
wickedly complicated.
The first obstacle would
be finding a buyer willing to put up the $600
millionplus
it
would
take to buy out the cable
Justice's Joel Klein looks to
operators. The compa- win this light.
ny is owned by Time
Warner Inc., Comcast Corp., Cox Communications Inc. and MediaOne Group,
plus many key shareholders of TeleCommunications Inc. (General Electric
Corp.'s satellite division, GE Americom,
also owns a small slice.)
"I think everyone's ready to get on
10
BBOADCABTIN6 & CABLE / JUNE
22,1888
est. even nonvoting.
will Justice let them buy
ASkyB?"
Also, they need
a
buyer. Primestar can't
afford to buy out the
companies itself, and
no one else is in the
wings.
Vogel told the DLJ
conference that the
Primestar's Carl Vogel is
pessimistic about a DOJ
settlement.
whether it had to be in
one step or two steps, but he did say
that's what Justice wants," adds another money manager. "I was a little surprised that he was forthright about it."
However, in an interview last Friday
salvage their investment in Primestar.
two weeks ago. However, no one has
agreed to exit completely -and the
MSOs worry that they'd be selling out at
the bottom, when Primestar's stock price
is about $6 per share. off more than 33%
from its 52 -week high.
"They'd want some way to participate
in the upside," says one Wall Street executive familiar with the
discussions. "But if they
have an economic inter-
company has not even
retained an investment
banker to find some
sort of financial help.
"Clearly
a
pro rata
transaction would be easier to finance."
he said.
The ASkyB deal has been dragging
on for months. News Corp. and MCI rattled the cable market two years ago by
morning, Vogel said
that the company is
exploring some other
way of completing the
deal, either through a
bidding $682 million at an FCC auction
for the last remaining high -powered
DBS orbital slot. After boasting and
braying about their threat to cable, News
milder settlement or by
simply fighting assistant attorney general
Klein in court. But he
did not express much
optimism: "It looks to
me [as if] the Justice
Department wants the
cable industry in general to exit this transaction. Is there a solution
between here and that?
I don't know."
prospects as the fourth entrant in the
Officials at Justice
and several of the Primestar partners
would not comment.
Engineering such a deal would be difficult. The MSO partners all have agreed
to shrink their position, with Time
Warner Inc. Chairman Gerald Levin
publicly acknowledging that position
Corp. and MCI realized that their
DBS market were bleak, so they agreed
to merge the company into EchoStar.
However, News Corp. executives
clashed with EchoStar Chairman Charlie
Ergen, so ASkyB scrapped the deal and
agreed to a merger with Primestar for
$1.1 billion in nonvoting stock-essen tially covering the cost of the license and
a satellite under construction.
To Primestar, the deal would be a
godsend. As a medium -power service,
Primestar requires subscribers to buy
dishes twice the size of the DirecTV and
EchoStar units, and it can offer fewer
channels. A high -power license would
free the company of those handicaps.
But after a lengthy investigation, the
Justice Department sued to block the
Continues on page 18
Trlune welcomes
Seattle
and Grand Rapids
SEATTLE TACOMA
fl Stay
L9E,
KTZZ
TinetL..
TELEVISION
l'-presented by ViAT
Tribune is proud to welcome KTZZ (WB) in Seattle
and WXMI -TV (Fox), Grand Rapids into our growing
station group. The addition of these outstanding
markets gives Tribune 18 stations reaching 35.5'/0
of all U.S. television housedholds over the air.
And 74% of all U.S. homes when WGN -TV's
national cable signal is included.
But stay tuned.
TRi
BUNE
BROADCASTING
KDAF -TV, DALLAS
WIVI -TV, 30'_TON
KFLA -TV, LOS ANGELES
WGN -TV, CHICAGO
WPHL -TV, PHILADELPHIA
KWGN -TV, DENVEi
I.TXL -TV, SACFANENTO
WGMX -TV, ATLANTA
KHTV -TV, HOUSTON
WBZL -TV, MIAMI
WPMT -TV, HARRI;BUR3
WXIN -TV, INDIANAPOLIS
KSWB -TV, SAN DIEGO
WTIC -TV, HARTFORD WGMO -TV, NEW ORLEANS
TRIBUN_ EVTERTAIMMENT
CLTV NEWS, CHI_AGO
WGN -AM, CHICAGO KEIN- AMIKOSI -FMI "THE HAWK " -FM, DENVER
WPIX -TV, NEW YORK
www.americanradiohistory.com
TOP OF
THE WEEK
ABC dealing
ABC Inc.
for Allbritton's Ns
New York
Robert Iger, president, ABC
Subsidiary of The Walt Disney Co.,
Michael Eisner, chairman
Is said to he paying more than $1 billion for eight stations
FCC coverage:
By Sara Brown
AIlbritton Communications Co.'s
eight television stations and two
local marketing agreements
(LMAs) reportedly are being sold to
ABC Inc. for more than $1 billion,
almost 16 times the group's $62.8 million broadcast cash flow in 1997.
All the stations are ABC affiliates.
Although the deal may still be in the
negotiation phase, sources say that
Allbritton, which already rejected
a
smaller offer from ABC, sources say,
has informed the stations' management of an impending sale.
The group's WJLA -TV (for Joseph L.
Allbritton) Washington is the most
attractive station for ABC., sources
say.
ABC currently owns IO television
stations, which reach 24.2% of U.S.
TV households. The Allbritton stations
would add another 4.8 %, boosting
ABC's total coverage to 29 %.
ABC was number six on BROADCASTING & CABLE'S list of top 25 TV
groups in April based on its FCC coverage (discounting UHF stations by
50% and not counting LMAs) of
23.9 %. With the Allbritton stations, the
group would have FCC coverage of
28.1% and would move up the list two
places, unseating both NBC Inc. and
Tribune Broadcasting.
The Allbritton stations would bring
ABC's total to 18 TV stations and two
LMAs with no market overlaps.
ABC was the only buyer consulted
about the sale, according to sources.
The price
in excess of $1 billion
would be high, considering the absence
of any bidding process.
Officials at Allbritton and ABC have
not publicly addressed reports of the
sale and did not return phone calls.
-
-if
Station
wASC -Tv
KASC
-Tv
wi.s -ry
win -Tv
KGO
-TV
KTHK -TV
wrvo(rv)
KFSN
-w
WJRT-TV
wrvG(TV)
23.9%10 stations
Total coverage: 24.2%
DMA/Rank
New York/1
Los Angeles/2
Chicago/3
Philadelphia/4
San Francisco/5
Houston/11
Raleigh /Durham, N.C. /29
Fresno, Calif. /55
Flint, Mich. /63
Toledo, Ohio/66
7
7
7
6
7
13
11
30
12
13
Allbritton Communications Co.
Washington
Joseph L. Allbritton, chairman
Robert L. Allbritton, president/C00
FCC coverage:
Station
WJLA-TV
WHIM -TV
WJxx(TV)
KATV(TV)
KTUL(TV)
wsEr -TV
wCN(Tv)
WCFT -TV
4.2 %/10 stations
Total coverage: 4.8%
DMA/Rank
Washington/8
Harrisburg, Pa. /45
Jacksonville, Fla. /54
Little Rock, Ark. /56
Tulsa, Okla. /58
Lynchburg/Roanoke, Va. /68
Charleston, S.C. /117
Tuscaloosa, Ala. /187
7
27
25
7
8
13
4
33
LMAs with options
Brunswick, Ga./Jacksonville, Fla. /54 21
WJSU -TV Anniston, Ala. /201
40
wnsG -IV
Unity Motion to launch MDIV this week
By Glen Dickson
has secured the
satellite distrib-
rights to 15
other motion
pictures from
utor
Sony,
Start -up
HDTV
Unit%
Motion is planning its
first national broad
cast of HDTV programming Tuesday
(June
23).
St.
Louis based Unity
Motion will uplink a
as
Unity's HDTV satellite demo will include
the movie 'Jumanji.'
Ku -band signal from Washington International Teleport in Alexandria, Va., and
distribute it via the GE Americom Telstar 5 satellite. Downlink sites in Seattle.
Los Angeles and St. Louis will demon-
strate the programming -which will
include both ATSC -standard 10801 and
480P content
home theater dealers
and select customers.
According to Sean Henry, Unity
Motion vice president of sales and marketing, programming demonstrated will
include a full - length screening of the
Sony Pictures movie "Jumanji" and a
-to
mix of prerecorded documentary.
sports and news footage. Unity Motion
12
Henry
says; the titles
will be disclosed
BROADCASTING & CABLE / JUNE
Unity Motion
rolls them out
during its promotion
this
summer. Henry
isn't discussing the price Unity Motion
paid for "Jumanji," either, citing a
nondisclosure agreement between the
company and Sony. But he says that
Sony charged "half of one percent" of
what Unity Motion had budgeted for
the Robin Williams flick.
Unity Motion, which has secured private investor funding through Marion
Bass Securities, plans its official launch
for late September. The company will
use transponder space on either the Tel star 7 or 8 satellite, according to Henry.
Consumer hardware required for the
service includes a DBS -type dish,
which will range between 18 inches and
22,1098
www.americanradiohistory.com
30 inches in its final specification. Signals will be decoded by a Samsung built IRD and displayed on a multisync
monitor made by Princeton Graphics.
The monitor shows each ATSC format
in its native mode. The Samsung IRD
also will have a built -in 8 -VSB decoder
to handle terrestrial DTV signals from a
separate off-air antenna.
The equipment. which will go on sale
in late September, will cost $2,495 for the
dish and IRD and $6,995 for the monitor.
Unity Motion won't charge anything for
its programming until second quarter
1999, Henry says. It will then charge $35$50 per month for its service, which it
views as complementary to a consumer's
existing cable or DBS provider.
"We make no pretensions that anybody is going to replace their cable,
Primestar or DirecTV for this," Henry
says.
Unity Motion will begin shipping
demo systems to dealers in mid -July
and will run a series of in -store demonstrations throughout the summer.
Henry's goal is to run 125 demo sites a
night by mid -August.
TOP OF THE
WEEK
It's about promotion
Promax /BDA convention attracts more than 6,600 to Toronto
By Joe Schlosser
BDA conference headed north of the border last week and didn't appear to
lose any steam. Branding was the buzzword, but with a caution about taking
the concept too far.
More than 6,60() promotion, marketing and design executives made their
way to Toronto to swap trade secrets.
check out the competition and get their
"please and thank yous" from the handful of syndicators debuting new shows:
The "thank yous" in the form of food.
drink and parting gifts for buying the
shows; the "please" in the form of
pitches to stations to commit as much
airtime and promotional muscle as possible to make those shows a success.
"We had a bigger turnout than we
expected," said Promax President Jim
Chabin. "We thought all the consolidation in radio and the fact that we came
to Canada might throw off our attendance. But we wound up with a bigger
turnout than last year" (6,400 executives in Chicago).
You can extend the brand, and you
must defend the brand, but don't "beat
it to death." That was the advice of
MTV Networks Chairman Tom Freston in his keynote address.
Freston warned against trying to
drive the "brandwagon" to places it
shouldn't be going. He cited Coke's
unsuccessful attempts to market clothing and McDonald's marketing of a
low -fat meal as cases in which the consumer had not granted "brand permission." Don't look for any MTV -themed
restaurants or refrigerators in the near
future; overextending the brand can do
"irreparable harm," he warned.
Freston said that the fundamental
challenge for his company is to integrate its networks and new online services. To do that, he said, it must make
the entertainment networks more interactive and the online sites more entertaining. Freston called online sites a
"perfect complement" to his networks,
pointing out that the same viewers who
watch MTV and Nickelodeon are the
heaviest Web users.
In addition to the station executives,
a number of celebrities and entertainers
The annual Promax and
`It's About Time' was the theme of
Promax at Toronto's Convention Centre.
were on hand to meet and greet, including Roseanne, Judge Judy, Lorenzo
Lamas and Rosie O'Donnell. Station
executives were given a taste of Martha
Stewart's summer concoctions as well
as a sample of new theme week promotions and retailer tie -ins.
King World's Michael and Roger
King showed why they were named
Promax's marketers of the year. by cosponsoring the conference's opening
night entertainment, a concert by
Aretha Franklin.
Gloria Stewart. co -star of the Oscar winning film "Titanic," helped to open
the show with a pep talk: "I love Pro max and BDA; I take them every morning after breakfast. So does my horse."
But beyond the one -liners, the octogekeeping with the
narian's message
-in
convention's theme. "It's About
Time" -was to make the most of it.
Warner Bros. and its Telepictures
syndication unit appeared to make
some friends with its new hour relationship block. Along with a revamped
Love Connection. Telepictures executives gave stations a first look at
Change of Heart. The buzz after a 1Ominute outtake of the series was very
strong, some station executives even
suggesting that Change of Heart
should be the lead -in to
I
1
-year veteran
MTV's Tom Freston: Branding is
good. but 'con t teat 't to death.'
Love Cortr,ee'tcun.
Studios USA threw a party at the
Hockey Hall of Fame for The New
Maure Povich .Show. In addition to
unveiling some marketing ploys for
Povich's revamped talker. Povich and
Studios USA President Steve Rosenberg played a little hockey. Rysher,
whose Highlander series is morphing
into Highlander: The Raven. introduced executives to its co- stars-Elizabeth Gracen and Paul Johansson. And
Judge Judy's workshop gave station
marketin executives a quick look at
Worldvi,iuns promotion plans for
year three. "Justice with an Attitude"
is the theme. Worldvision executives
say that they will try to attract more
men to the show, which saw its national ratings rise more than 150 %r in its
second season
JUNE
22, 1188
I BROADCASTING & CABLE
13
TOP
IF TIE
WEEK
COMING SOON
`The Revenge
of the Studios'
Production companies to demand more for renewals
By Michael Stroud
Last spring, the Big Four broadcast
networks forced studios to give them
longer licensing terms and fatter
stakes in new fall programs. In 1998 -99,
studios and production companies will
return the favor, seeking to squeeze record
sums from the networks in return for contract renewals for established programs
that networks are desperate to retain.
Studios and production companies
could seek to negotiate substantially better terms on as many as one -quarter of the
fall's 57 returning sitcoms and dramas
after next season. That's the estimate of
studio executives, agents and analysts.
The shows range from hits that have aired
for four years or more. such as Home
Improvement and Frasier, to newer hit
shows, like Just Shoot Me and JAG.
"Studios have no choice but to stick it
to the networks," says Dave Davis, vice
ABC may be faced with a higher fee
to keep 'Home Improvement.'
president at Los Angeles investment
banking firm Houlihan, Lokey, Howard
& Zukin. "If networks are demanding
higher equity stakes, studios have to
demand ever -higher licensing fees."
To offset their dwindling profitability,
studios are more likely to demand that
networks share up front in the escalating
costs of talent, industry executives say.
Columbia TriStar set the stage earlier this
year when it pressed NBC to pay most of
next fall's higher salaries for Mad About
You stars Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser by
doubling its license fee to the studio to
some $3.25 million an episode.
"This is a show that isn't even performing that well in its time period [on
Tuesday nights]," says a studio executive. "But NBC felt like it had no choice
but to pay the cost in a year when it was
losing other important franchises," like
Seinfeld and the NFL.
While no $13 million -per -episode
ERs loom next season, even moderately
popular shows could command millions
more from ratings -hungry networks.
Take ABC's Home Improvement. Star
14
Expect a 'monstrous' renegotiation for
'Just Shoot Me.'
Tim Allen has said that he may leave the
show after the upcoming eighth season.
But Allen may change his mind if sagging ratings jump next season because of
NBC's decision to move Frasier to
Thursday night from its position opposite
Home Improvement on Tuesday.
ABC, with few arrows in its prime
time quiver, might be forced to pay more
to cover a boost in Allen's $1.25 million
per episode salary.
And Wind Dancer Productions,
which already is suing ABC parent and
co- producer Disney for self- dealing in
previous Home Improvement negotia-
BROADCASTING 8 CABLE I JUNE 22, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
tions, would be only too happy to further
increase Disney's bill for the show.
Disney and Wind Dancer officials
declined to comment.
Frasier star Kelsey Grammer also
could cause some big headaches for
NBC. As of a few months ago. the star's
salary was said to be just $250,000 per
episode, arguably quite low for a star
expected to fill Seinfeld's big shoes on
Thursday night. If Frasier's ratings stay
the same or rise, Paramount could
demand that the network share in its
costs to boost his salary.
Other old but strong shows that may
end up in the middle of studio network
tussles in the coming year could include
ABC's Spin City and CBS's Chicago
Hope and Touched by an Angel, as well
as NBC's 3rd Rock from the Sun.
Fox Broadcasting Co.'s ownership of
such shows as The Simpson, The X -Files
and Millennium helps the network avoid
being held hostage to studio demands, but
it's still vulnerable to escalating demands
from talent. This spring, the five key
voices in The Simpsons got the network
to increase their salaries from $I5,000$25,000 an episode to $150,000.
With a dearth of breakout hits, even
shows that are about a year old -and
their producers -also are expected to hit
the networks for more dough.
Brillstein- Grey's Just Shoot Me on
NBC is one of the hottest candidates.
Launched a season and a half ago, the
show has performed so well that it was
once considered a shoo -in for Seinfeld's
Thursday night slot. With Mad About
You fading. the show is becoming
NBC's biggest hope for Tuesday night.
And at an estimated $500,000 per
episode for NBC, it's a bargain.
"You're going to see a monstrous
renegotiation over the next year," says
one source close to both sides.
Other possibly short-lived bargains
for networks include ABC's Dharma &
Greg and The Practice, (licensed from
20th Century Fox Television for about
$600,000 and $1 million, respectively),
and CBS's JAG (from Columbia TriStar, for $ I million).
There's another reason for paying
more for successful shows, even if a
network isn't strictly obligated by its
contract with a studio to do so: Every
network wants to be associated with a
winning team. Thus, NBC's decision to
pay Warner Bros. and producer John
Wells $13 million an episode for ER
was partially based on the network's
desire to have first crack at Wells'
future projects.
1111111:
TIP IF TIE
Disney stakes big 'Net
claim with Infoseek
Pays $70 million and trades Starware in deal
By Richard Tedesco
The Walt Disney Co. has acquired
a 43% stake in Infoseek and an
option to take a majority piece of
the popular Web search
engine.
Disney followed the
lead of NBC, which
bought into CNet and its
Snap! service a week earlier (B &C, June 15) for $26
million. Disney had been in discussions with Excite, Infoseek and other
portal services over the past year. The
result is
a
deal that gives Infoseek $70
million and Starwave Corp.. the unit in
which Disney acquired a majority
stake last year to bolster its Internet
business.
"It seemed to be the best fit," says
Jake Winebaum, chairman of Disney's
Buena Vista Group, who adds that Infoseek's "long -term vision was very much
in line with what we wanted to do."
Disney aims at leveraging its considerable entertainment assets online.
infoseek
and -more
immediately- connecting
its existing online assets with Infoseek. The companies plan to launch a
new portal service later this year that
will combine content from ABC.com.
ABCNews.com. Disney.com, DisneyBlast.com (its subscription children's site). ESPN.com and the NBA,
NFL and NASCAR sites that Star wave produces.
The purpose of this deal is to estab-
lish an online service stocked with
diversified content. "The game is to
end up with something bigger and better than AOL." an ABC insider says.
As part of the deal, Disney will help
build Infoseek's profile with $165 million in promotional support. The idea is
to expand the Internet market by promoting on cable. attempting to capture
the next big group of surfers. "Families
are potentially ground zero for the next
wave of consumers on the Internet."
says Winebaum. who estimates that
only 20'4 of families which own PCs
now are going online.
Once Disney attracts a larger percentage of those PC households online,
it can deliver an increasingly greater
variety of content as high -speed connections become more common.
"We're blessed with a lot of rich media
assets," says Winebaum. "The Internet
is not ready for their distribution yet,
but we're ready when that does become
the case."
Disney and Infoseek executives
readily acknowledge the Internet's
nascent stage of development. "The
Internet's still in the Stone Age," says
Harry Motro, president of Infoseek.
"We haven't figured out how to deliver
products that really meet users' needs."
Motro will continue to direct Info seek's operations in Sunnyvale. Calif.
will oversee the operations of
Bellevue, Wash. based Starwave.
The deal. which gives Disney 25.8
million shares of Infoseek and a
minority position on its board, is subject to shareholder and regulatory
approvals.
He also
61-
V-chip day in Congress
Viewers saw the first working V -chip in action last week,
when one of the devices blocked a live broadcast of
CBS's TV -14 -D rated The Young and the Restless in a
Capitol Hill demonstration.
Rep. Ed Markey (D- Mass.), considered the father of
the V -chip, announced its inauguration with CBS's first
V- chip-enabled broadcast: "From this day forward, any
parent can say Not in my house, not for my child. CBS
is the first network on air with the ratings, with ABC
close behind, Markey added.
Other V -chip legislative champions -Reps. Dan Burton (R- Ind.), John Spratt (D-S.C.) and Jim Moran (DVa.)- helped Markey to kick off the first day of Vchip- enabled broadcasts. "With television programming like this, with school shootings on the rise, parents
need the V -chip more than ever," Spratt said.
Parental Guide (a company that makes V -chip set-top
boxes) and TV set manufacturer Panasonic showed their
technologies. Parental Guide demonstrated the chip in
an external device on an older TV set, while Panasonic
demonstrated a new set with a built-in V -chip.
WEEK
-
Panasonic's Peter Fannon (1) helps Rep. Ed Markey block
programming with a V-chip included in a new television set.
Parental Guide CEO Larry Lien said that his company has two versions of the V -chip box available, one for
$79 and one for $99. The more expensive model digi-
tally displays the rating of the show being aired,
whether or not it is being blocked.
A new V- chip- equipped Panasonic set will cost
$549.99 -but the manufacturer expects the price of Vchip- enabled TVs to fall as soon as V -chips are included in the sets' baseline technology, according to Peter
Fannon, the manufacturer's director of government and
-Paige Albiniak
public affairs.
JUNE 15, 1998
'
BROADCASTING & CABLE
15
HOURS
Not only do Earth: Final Conflict
as the new first -run hours this season
TOP 10 LIST OF ALL
Season- ro -Oete
A18 -49
A25 -54
Rtg
Rtg
PE'N WIEEIQY FIRST -RUN HOURS
1 EARTH: FINAL CONFLICT
2.5
2.7
2 IIGHTMAN
1.8
1.8
1.6
1.8
1.6
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.3
1,2
7 SiIdier of Fortune
1.1
1.2
Poke Academy
1.1
1.0
0.9
1.0
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.8
0.6
0.6
3
Nnsacofa: Wings of Gold
4 honey.
5 Wild
Shrunk the Kids
Thugs
6 Team
8
I
Kright Rider
9 Conan
10 Fz ene LA
11
Ghost Stories
12 DUE South
13 Mike Hammer
"Scarce
IS:. 1á/
511719: ",
GAA', where applicable
,I
I
I
,
I
J
0
r)
0.5
r
NighlMen average includes
I
2
0.5
hour premuero.
/
I
1
j*iÀ1i
o
F POWER
and NightMan rank #1 & #2
with adults, but they rank in the
WEEKLY HOURS.
Season -To -Date
A25 -54
A18 -49
Rtg
Rtg
ALL WEEKLY HOURS
5.0
5.0
2 Star Trek: Deep Space 9
3.8
3.9
3 Xena
3.5
3.6
4 Hercules
3.3
3.3
5 EARTH: FINAL CONFLICT
2.5
2.7
6 Walker, Texas Ranger
2.3
2.6
7 NYPD Blue
2.1
2.3
2.0
2.1
9 Baywatch
2.0
1.9
10 NIGHTMAN
1.8
1.8
1.6
1.8
1.6
1.5
1.5
1.5
1
X -Files
Limits
8 Outer
11
Pensacola: Wings of Gold
12 Honey,
I
Shrunk the Kids
13 Wild Things & Highlander (tie)
"
Soute.
NSS, 3 13/97
-
5/17/98'.
.AA% where epplcaMe.
Mgt-Mar aye age includes
2
hone
pr+mere.
X-Files cuiroires
GENE RODDENBERRY'S
AT
and
episic sings.
TOP OF THE WEEK
Primestar
CLOSED CIRCUIT
continued from page 10
deal, with Klein saying that DBS is
critical to keeping cable rates in check
and that the merger would harm consumers by lessening competition.
While the conflict of interest between
Primestar and cable systems is obvious,
the DOJ's case is not a slam dunk.
Antitrust lawyers not affiliated with the
case say Klein's biggest weakness is that
the case rests partly on potential rather
than actual competition.
If
Primestar were acquiring
EchoStar or DirecTV -which are up
and running -the erosion of competition in the marketplace would be easy
to demonstrate. But ASkyB hasn't
launched, so the Justice action presumes that News Corp. and MCI would
actually go ahead and launch if the
Primestar takeover fails.
"Proving that potential competitors
will actually compete is very difficult,"
says one antitrust lawyer.
But fighting antitrust suits takes years.
so most targets generally engineer a settlement or watch their deals die of old
age. Indeed, the ASkyB deal originally
had a June 30 closing deadline, but that
is expected to be extended.
During the Justice investigation, exec-
utives familiar with the deal say that
Primestar made no significant settlement
offer to Klein, partly at the behest of
Time Warner. Some MSOs thought that
simply shrinking their position from
61% to less than 30% might satisfy
Klein. News Corp. and MCI could pay
up to get voting stock and step up their
post- merger stake from 20% to 33 %. GE
was being wooed to increase its 3% position to more than 33 %.
But executives involved in the deal
say that the approach to GE crumbled
because GE wanted too much control.
News Corp. has told Wall Street executives that the plan is troubled.
Vogel said that the deal is not crucial
and that even limited -to medium power satellites can be a good business. He has other operational issues
reorganizing Primestar's sales operation, reducing customer churn, focusing more on selling than on leasing
dishes to consumers and the $300
wholesale cost of a Primestar receiver.
But he has a lot of incentives to complete the AskyB deal. He told the DU
conference that his compensation is
mostly stock options for 2 million shares
-
exercisable at $7.50 per share.
18
BROADCASTING & CABLE / JUNE 22, 1888
Behind the scenes, before the fact
BOSTON
Busy days at ABRY
ook for at least three major
television deals involving
ABRY Broadcast Partners in the
coming weeks. Boston -based
ABRY owns Nexstar Broadcasting Group Inc. and PHI Holdings
Inc. and used to own 80% of Sullivan Broadcasting Co. before that
group was sold to Sinclair.
Sources say ABRY has three deals
on the table right now, each in the
$100 million range and at least
one involving former partner Dan
Sullivan. One deal in which the
company has an interest is the
impending sale of the Disney
family's Retlaw Enterprises,
sources say.
WASHINGTON
Two weeks and counting
/July 9 the FCC commissioners
ope to launch their long-awaited effort to define how must -carry
rules will apply to digital TV signals. At press time last Friday,
drafts of the rulemaking proposal
had not reached commissionersbut sources expected the draft rules
to be distributed by week's end or
early this week. Commissioners
want to decide how laws requiring
cable carriage of local broadcast
signals will apply to digital TV signals that some stations will begin
airing this fall.
DALLAS
More minority interest
alliance formed by TSG
Capital Group LLC and Hicks
Muse media companies Chancellor Media, Capstar Broadcasting
and LIN Television, which invested $25 million in Z- Spanish
Media last week (see "In Brief,"
page 81), is looking for other
investment opportunities in
minority broadcasting. The group
is in talks to back a black -owned
television group. Prospective partners who have been contacted
about the venture include Lyle
An
Banks of Banks Broadcasting
LLC and Eddie Whitehead of
Whitehead Media, sources say.
BRIM=
More choice from
Your Choice
our Choice TV is planning to
launch two additional content
channels in August and will add
Comedy Central to one of its five
current program channels around
July 20, the company confirms.
Your Choice expects to add more
titles from its existing library,
some of which have never aired
on Your Choice, to the new channels. It also plans to revamp its
promotional channel from a standard program preview service to a
format with live hosts who will
introduce program selections and
direct viewers.
TIII.SA
Sneak preview at
Sneak Prevue
n
the wake
of its $2 billion
I acquisition of News Corp.'s
TV Guide assets, United Video
Satellite Group (UVSG) is exploring the possibility of reprogramming Sneak Prevue, a barker
channel for pay per view. Sneak
Prevue reaches some 43 million
cable homes, but with the advent
of interactive programming
guides, its value is likely to diminish. At the same time, it's a valuable piece of analog real estate for
UVSG; with the participation of a
strong programming entity it
could become a strong cash generator. Analysts looking at possible
deals with Barry Diller's USA
Networks or Rupert Murdoch's
Fox Television to provide programming punch for Sneak Pre vue, say that a sale of the channel
is possible. Other than president
Peter Boylan's comment when the
TV Guide deal was announced that
UVSG is "exploring opportunities" regarding Sneak Prevue, the
company will not comment.
TOP OF THE WEEK
Radio pirate walks the plank
Lt'clrl rip court orders Free Radio Berkeley off the
By Chris McConnell
roadcasters won a long- sought
victory last week when a California judge ordered a pirate radio
station in the state off the air.
Stephen Dunifer, operator of Free
Radio Berkeley, had challenged FCC
radio regulations as an infringement on
free speech. Dunifer also had argued
that radio microstations such as his
could operate between the frequencies
of licensed stations without causing
interference.
U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken,
however. said that Dunifer could not
assert that the FCC rules applied to him
B
are unconstitutional because Dunifer
had never applied for a broadcasting
license. The judge also rejected
Dunifer's claim that the FCC's rules are
too broad.
"This decision represents a great
victory for legitimate broadcasters
who play by the rules," says NAB
President Eddie Fritts. The FCC
deserves credit for putting Mr. Dunifer
and other broadcast bandits out of
business."
FCC officials have been looking to
do that for years, asking the district
court in 1994 to stop Dunifer from
broadcasting without a license. But the
court rejected the request then, insisting
air
that the government had not made a
strong enough case that Dunifer's constitutional objections would fail.
The court later denied another government request to dismiss Dunifer's
challenge to the radio rules on the
grounds that the court lacked jurisdiction to review the arguments.
But last week FCC lawyers got some
good news from the court when the
judge rejected Dunifer's argument that
the radio rules are overbroad.
The decision comes as the FCC is
trying to crack down on pirate radio
stations. There are 112 pirate stations
currently operating in the United
States, according to the FCC's Compliance and Information Bureau. The
count is part of a project the bureau has
been working on during the past 10
months to identify and shut down the
pirates, says bureau chief Richard Lee,
who adds that there are 24 pirate -free
states.
FCC field office officials have been
conducting a state -by -state sweep of the
pirates, Lee adds. FCC officials also say
that they have shut down more than 200
pirate stations during the past two
years.
FCC Chairman William Kennard,
meanwhile, welcomed the court action.
"This decisive court action puts to rest
any doubts about the FCC's authority to
Kennard asks remain,ng pirates to join
'efforts to expand the legal uses' of
airwaves.
manage the public airwaves to prevent
interference and protect the public's
safety," Kennard said.
Kennard also called on the remaining
pirate broadcasters to "obey the law
-
and join the FCC in our efforts to
expand the legal uses of the public airwaves."
Since last fall regulators have been
reviewing proposals- opposed by
broadcasters
establish a low -power
radio service as a means of promoting
minority station ownership.
-to
House committee votes to delay satellite fees
-an
A bill that would delay -pending FCC review
increase in copyright fees paid by satellite TV companies
was passed unanimously by the House Telecommunications Subcommittee last week.
Last summer, the U.S. Copyright Office increased-to
27 cents per subscriber per month -the copyright fees
that satellite TV carriers pay for imported network signals
and superstations. Direct broadcast satellite companies
previously paid 6 cents for imported signals and 14
cents#17.5 cents for superstations.
The bill-sponsored by Subcommittee Chairman Billy
Tauzin (R-La.), Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) and Rep. Rick
Boucher (D -Va.) --now goes to the full Commerce Committee for a vote. It will be referred to the House Judiciary Committee afterward because of its copyright- related
provisions.
Rep. Howard Coble (R-N.C.) last week met with representatives from the broadcasting and cable industries as
-if
well as copyright holders to learn what
any-provisions they would like to see attached to the bill, says a
Judiciary committee staffer. Coble also plans to meet with
DBS industry representatives.
Coble earlier this year introduced legislation intended
to reform the DBS industry, but that bill has been stalled in
the full Judiciary Committee. Legislators are looki ig at the
law governing the DBS industry because it expires in
December 1999 and because they see DBS as a corn petitor to cable.
Coble has asked industry representatives how to
resolve the dispute between DBS providers and broadcasters over importing network signals into so- called
white areas, which are places where a grade -B broadcast
signal is not received clearly over the air. He also has
expressed concern about whether DBS companies
should be required to carry all local broadcast signals in
local markets they plan to serve. -Paige Albiniak
BBOADCABTIN3 & CABLE / JUNE 22,
www.americanradiohistory.com
tees
is
TOP OF THE WEEK
WASHINGTON WATCH
By CerIa McConnell
In contempt
In a 9 -7 vote, the House
Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee last
week found Tennessee
real estate developer and
Portals investor Franklin
Haney in contempt after
Haney did not turn over
documents subpoenaed by
the lawmakers. The panel
has been
investigating
circumstances
surrounding
the FCC's
planned move
to the Portals
development,
particularly
in
Paige Albiniak
ly will hold off on broad-
casting high -definition
until they get digital mustcarry rights. So say Reed
Hundt and Blair Levin,
who talk about one of their
favorite topics in the inaugural issue of Steven
Brill's new media watchdog mag, Brill's Content.
The former
FCC chairman
and chief of
staff-both of
(and our own political
lives) reiterated," Hundt
and Levin write. The two
will be writing regularly
for Brill's Content , Levin
says.
Maines complains
edia Institute PresiPatrick Maims
doesn't like the direction
being taken by Vice President Gore's advisory committee on digital TV public interest obligations. A
list of possible "core recommendations" distributed at the group's meeting this month in Minneapolis would "intrude
deeply on broadcasters'
editorial discretion,"
Maims wrote in a letter
last week to committee
co- chairs Norm Ornstein
and Leslie Moonves.
IYI
whom are
playing the
consulting
game these
days-liken
digital TV's
history to the
Haney's $1
sinister world
The problematic Portals
million payof last summent to Washington lobmer's film LA. Confidenbyist Peter Knight.
tial, insisting secret agenAppearing before the subdas still threaten to undercommittee, a lawyer from
mine the new technology.
Knight's firm agreed to
One text-bite: "Despite ediCommission cops
turn over subpoenaed doctorials in the New York
The FCC in March
uments after SubcommitTimes, the Wall Street
wrapped up an intee Chairman Joe Barton
Journal and the Los Angehouse investigation of
(R -Tex.) threatened to
les Times
Internet porn surffind the firm in contempt
that
ing by commission
if it did not. Haney
opposed the
employees. In its
spokesman Kenneth Vest
spectrum
semi -annual report
later said Haney may congrants, for
released last week,
sider a suing the firm for
millions of
the FCC Office of
turning over the subpoeAmericans
Inspector General
naed documents to the
who get
says its probe
subcommittee. The contheir news
found that several
tempt vote against Haney,
solely from
sites accessed by
meanwhile, now goes to
TV, the digemployees conFrom FCC chairman
the full House Commerce
ital story was to magazine writer.
tained or advertised
Committee.
strictly on the
material that would
q.t." Hundt and Levin also
qualify as child pornograAnd another thing...
recount face -offs with
phy under federal law, but
TV news ignored the conWashington's hard- bitten,
that investigators found no
gressional grant of specknee -cap breaking lobbyevidence the employees
trum to broadcasters, conists over the technical
had downloaded any of
sumer electronics and
aspects of digital TV. "In
that material. The investibroadcast lobbyists tried to
hundreds of meetings over
gation, however, found
strong -arm regulators into
the next several years, we
that employees were
mandating an interlace
consistently heard threats
downloading other pornostandard, and stations liketo our television legacy
graphic images and text
ri
22
BROADCASTING & CABLE
I
JUNE 22, 1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
onto FCC computers.
Names have been given to
the chairman and bureau
chiefs for "appropriate
administrative action."
The inspector general said
another investigation of
potential post- employment conflict of interest
by a former FCC officials
remains open.
EEOpposition
The Lutheran Church-
Missouri Synod last
week told a court that it
opposes the FCC's request
for a review of April's
decision that the commission's equal employment
opportunity rules are
unconstitutional. Last
month the commission
asked the full court to rehear the case, arguing that
the three -judge panel went
to far in throwing out the
EEO rules. The judges
issued the decision after
reviewing the Lutheran
Church's appeal of FCC
sanctions placed on it after
officials determined the
church's tcFUo-AM -FM
Clayton, Mo., had violated
EEO rules. After the court
ordered it to respond to
the FCC filing, the
Lutheran Church argued
that the commission is
seeking "to impose substantial additional litigation expenses on the
church in re- hearing proceedings that will result in
the FCC losing this case
on different grounds." The
church also insisted that
judges made the right
decision in throwing out
the rules. "While the
church is fully committed
to the goal of nondiscrimination and engages in its
own affirmative action
efforts ... the church is
persuaded that based on
the record evidence and
the legal issues presented
by the parties, the court's
legal analysis was cor-
rect."
Introducing
.
One of six new digital channels front the innovators of music tetcvision
-
K
x,
Looking for soul salvation? Well,VHI has it
digitally. Packaged within the first digital
suite of music channeb,VHI Soul
is the
only
place dedicated to delivering it all right to
you. From Marvin to Aretha, VHI Soul
delivers the music, video and intrigue that
moves viewers' bodies as well as their souls.
For more information
call sour
MTV Networks representative.
www.americanradiohistory.com
FCC sets fees; hopes
to raise $163 million
FCC officials last week issued their final schedule of regulatory fees for fiscal 1998. Aimed at collecting $163 million,
the final plan establishes a different approach to radio fees than the one proposed in March. That proposal would have
divided AM and FM stations into 10 groups, but broadcasters argued for using a system that would assess fees based
on a station's class and population served. Regulators adopted such a plan in the revised schedule. The FCC also
rejected satellite industry complaints that their fees are too high, but said it will launch a notice of inquiry to review its
approach to assessing fees for regulating satellites.
FEE CATEGORY
PROPOSED
FINAL
FEE CATEGORY
VHF TV
PROPOSED
FINAL
UHF TV
$41,275 ....$37,575
24,850
31,275
22,600
21,400
11,375
11,975
3,250
3,100
4,100
2,525
Markets 1 -10
Markets 11 -25
Markets 26 -50
Markets 51 -100
Remaining Markets
Construction Permits
Markets -10
Markets 11 -25
Markets 26 -50
Markets 51 -100
Remaining Markets
Construction Permits
$14,625 ...$14,175
10,575 ....10,725
5,750
6,650
3,775
3,975
1
1,500
1,075
3,625
2,650
Radio Station Regulatory Fees
AM/CLASS
AM/CLASS
AM/CLASS
AM/CLASS
POPULATION SERVED
A
B
C
D
More than 1 million
400,001 -1 million
125,001-400,000
50,001- 125,000
20,001- 50,000
fewer than 20,000
$4,000
2,500
1,750
1,250
750
400
$3,250
2,000
1,250
800
600
300
$1,500
1,000
600
400
300
200
$2,000
1,250
750
600
400
250
FM/CLASSES
A, B1 & C3
FM/CLASSES B,
C1 & C2
C
$3,250
2,000
1,250
800
600
300
$4,000
2,500
1,750
1,250
750
400
Source: FCC
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26
BROADCASTING & CABLE
JUNE 22,
1998
COVER STORY
COVER STORE
In hot pursuit
Networks scramble for ad dollars to pay for sky -high NFL rights
The NFL delivers one of the most reliable, demographically -strong audiences on television. But
that audience is shrinking. And after shelling out nearly $18 billion for the rights to broadcast the
games, CBS, ABC, Fox and ESPN are asking advertisers to pay more for less.
If
the networks over-
paid, say advertisers, that's their problem. This special report looks at the network -advertiser price -ofrights battle, beginning on this page. There's a rundown of who has what among televised contests
on page 34. An interview with Chase Carey, who is leading Fox's pursuit of TV sports dominance,
begins on page 40. And a look at the technology that brings the field to the screen is on page 44.
By Joe Schlosser
networks
The
paid an unprecedented $18 billion in January
for the rights to
air NFL games,
but advertisers say they
should not have to foot
the bill.
In the long run,
some Wall Street
observers say, those
SPORTS REVENUE ON TH E BIC TNREE
(Figures in Thousands)
Total Gross Revenue
1st Quarter
1998
% Increase
$585,655
$1,216,764
107.76%
$86,716
$181,220
108.98%
$498,939
$1,035,544
107.55%
1st Quarter
1997
From Time Sales
Less Advertising
Agency Commissions
Total Net Revenue
From Time Sales
Source: Ernst & Young LLP /Broadcast Cable Financial Management
high -priced contracts may spell financial trouble.
And analysts and ad buyers who criticized NBC
(which broadcast the games for 30 years), for dropping out of the bidding now praise that decision.
The billion -dollar players include Fox, which
renewed its contract for the National Football Conference rights for $4.4 billion, a 39% increase over
its first deal in 1993. CBS is the newcomer this fall,
rekindling its relationship with the NFL after a
four -year separation. The Tiffany Network anted
up $4 billion over five seasons for American Football Conference games. To retain its Monday Night
Football franchise, ABC coughed up $4.4 billion,
a substantial increase from its previous four -year,
$920 million pact. And ESPN (co -owned with
ABC) knocked rival TNT out of the cable picture,
taking over sole ownership of the Sunday night
package for a whopping $4.8 billion.
To pay off these multibillion dollar deals, the
broadcast networks and ESPN need to generate top
advertising dollars -and selling has begun. In the
past month, CBS, Fox and ABC have hit the pavement.
Over the past few weeks, the networks have
started talking to the automotive and beer industries, traditionally the first two stops on the quest
for football ad sales. Before the summer is over,
soft drink and financial companies will be brought
in to chat about possible multiyear advertising
deals, while fast -food chains, insurance companies
and others will look to tie up halftime and pregame
sponsorships.
But negotiations this summer will be anything
but smooth, ad buyers and Wall Street analysts say.
The networks are looking for ad -rate increases in
the ballpark of 15% to 20 %, while advertisers are
making noise about keeping prices the same or
only slightly higher.
MEN LOVE FOOTBALL
roadcasters signed up for the next five years
with the NFL point to the league's strong TV
track record and say it will remain steady in
spite of a competitive television environment.
"The negotiations for the cost of the advertising
will be pretty tough," admits CBS Sports President
Sean McManus. "But there are an awful lot of
advertisers who need to reach that male demographic in the fourth quarter, and NFL football is by far
the best and the surest way of reaching that demo."
Steve Bornstein, president of ESPN Inc. and president of ABC Sports, says that no matter what the
critics say, the NFL is still tops. Bomstein predicts
"double -digit increases" in ad rates this season.
B
JUNE 22,
1118 / BROADCASTING
& CABLE
Y7
V'
-
-'
www.americanradiohistory.com
".
Yes, women watch
sports. Big time. In fact, one
in four adult
viewers is
ESPN
a
woman, and each
month over 13 million women tune in to
SportsCenter. They're dedicated. They're loyal.
And they're some of our most devoted fans.
T
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C--WEST
W
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www.americanradiohistory.com
SPORTS
D
E
R
I
N
S
P
O
R
T
S
C=Pr/ I
COYER ¡TOOT
"The NFL is the platinum standard
of sports television, and it will always
"We're going to see this year if
there is enough [advertising] support
to get higher rates," says analyst Tom
Wolzien of Sanford C. Bernstein &
Co. "And the question is, how much
are consumers going to end up paying
in higher cable rates and at the grocery
store ?"
BBDO senior vice president/director of network TV buying, Steve
Grubbs, says: "My sense is that some
of the [advertisers] are going to step
NAYSAYEIS
achieve the highest ratings-and in the
'n 1994, Fox took a $350 million
universe of fragmented ratings, the
write -off stemming from losses it
NFL will fragment less," Bornstein
suffered on its $1.58 billion NFL
says. "Clearly it is an expensive propdeal. That was four years ago, when
erty, but it also is an exclusive one, and
Fox's deal was far beyond the price
we feel pretty good having both Sunthat the incumbent networks had paid
day night and Monday exclusively on
for their packages. Now, with the
our networks."
stakes much higher, industry analysts
Fox Chairman Chase Carey believes
predict even bigger losses.
that his network's decision to retain the
If ad revenue fails to meet expectaNFL was a crucial move. And as
tions, the three broadcasters
for NBC's pass on football,
"could be in huge, huge trouFOLLOWING THE BOUNCING BALLS
Carey told Fox affiliates earlier
ble," predicts one top advertisBroadcast sports household ratings trends
in the month that was a "defining executive. "They're going
ing moment
to be in huge trouble anyway. I
in recent netthink all of their forecasts for
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
work history"
profit and loss were based
1995
1391
1937
and that NBC
upon best -case scenarios and
Regular Season
12.9
12.3
11.6
affiliates will
really assumed a strong ad
Playoffs
22.1
21.1
19.2
not look back
marketplace over the next sevSuper Bowl
46.0
43.3
44.5
on the decieral years. Right now, that
sion
with
marketplace is weak."
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
favor. Carey
When the latest NFL con1995
1995
1997
may be biased
tract
was announced in JanuRegular Season
5.7
2.7
2.7
toward the
ary,
NBC
West Coast PresiPlayoffs
12.0
8.0
8.0
NFL: Fox's
dent
Don
Ohlmeyer
predicted
World Series
19.5
17.4
16.7
football rights
that each of the networks
would lose at least $150 milI.PRINICRON deal in 1994
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
has helped the
lion a year on its investment.
1995
1991
1997
network grow into a powerNBC Sports President Dick
Regular Season
5.0
4.7
5.0
house.
Ebersol even said that he
Playoffs
8.1
8.0
7.4
"I think the NFL is the most
didn't want to put the "liveliChampionship
Series
13.9
16.7
16.8
important event in the televihood" of NBC employees in
sion industry," Carey says. "I
jeopardy.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
can't speak to what specifically
Now some advertisers pre1995
1991
1997
will happen [to NBC]. But I
dict that the networks will try
Regular Season
2.0
2.1
1.9
think that events will become
to renegotiate their deals with
Playoffs
1.9
2.4
2.1
more and more important in the
the NFL after suffering early
Stanley Cup
3.4
4.0
3.6
business."
losses.
"I think you are going to see
Sources: TN Media Inc. and Nielsen Media Research
A LEXUS IS NOT
after three years that they are
going to want desperately to
WORTH $100,000
up, but they're not necessarily going to renegotiate," DeCabia says. "They are
Nobody on either side of the fence step up to the degree that they had going to want to step back and take a
will disagree that the NFL delivers hoped.... It is not going to be 15 to 20 closer look at the deals, because I still
one of the most reliable, demo- percent, and the reason I can say that don't see how any of these networks
graphic- strong audiences on television. with confidence is by looking at what are going to make any money in the
But many in advertising point out that transpired in the prime time upfront. current situation. It is just a matter of
ratings are declining and that advertis- On average, price increases were more how bad they're going to lose and how
ers should not have to foot the bill for like five percent."
long it takes their boards and stockastronomical rights fees.
Harvey Schiller, president of Turner holders to start saying enough is
"The buyers are going to dig in," Sports, which passed on the NFL this enough."
says Tom DeCabia, senior vice presi- time around, says that the networks are
dent at the Paul Schulman Co. "Every going to fall short of their advertising AYESAYERS
client is telling every buyer out there projections.
Enxecutives of all three NFL network
that they overpaid and that we are not
"They're not going to get 15% or
outlets say that is not the case. The
going to fix their mistake. If that was anything like that," Schiller says. "I
etworks have gone to their affiliwhat they wanted to do, that was their have heard that it will be more in the ates for financial aid in the past few
business. But it is only worth X range of six- to eight -percent increas- months, trying to hammer out deals that
amount to me. I love a Lexus, but I'm es. They need somewhere above 20 will take $35 million -$60 million per
not going to pay $100,000 for a percent to make their advertising year off the network's annual payments
$40,000 car."
goals."
to the league. CBS is the only one of the
30
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www.americanradiohistory.com
COYER :TORY
Big Three networks that has a final deal
with its stations, which will pay a combination of cash and inventory totaling
$50 million$60 million. The value of
the CBS deal depends on how much the
inventory goes for, CBS executives say.
Fox and ABC are said to be looking
for similar pacts with their affiliates, but
nothing has been settled. ESPN doesn't
have affiliates, but it does have basic
cable rates. Analysts say that the most
profitable cable network could demand
higher rates down the road. ESPN executives had no comment.
Executives at Fox, CBS and
ABC/ESPN predict that they will either
break even or make a
small amount from
their NFL deals.
"At this point, we
expect to be whole
against the current
contract." says Fox's
Chase Carey. "Obviously that is making
certain assumptions
about life in the
future, which we
can't control, but we
have time."
"We are optimistic
that we will do very well," says Bornstein about ESPN and ABC's financial
outlook regarding their NFL deals.
"There is a lot of activity right now in
the upfront market. and we feel pretty
good in our position in having both Sunday night exclusivity on cable and
exclusivity on Mondays on the network.
Advertisers like that environment, and
we have a lot of inventory to make them
happy."
And CBS's McManus says, "When
you factor everything in over the course
of a five -year deal or possibly an eight year deal, we think we are going to at
least break even."
McManus uses the Fox model from
1994 as an example of how his network
will make good on its $4 billion investment. He says that Fox forced the industry to look at sports as more than just
pure profit and loss.
"From a pure dollars and cents standpoint, the Fox deal for the NFL didn't
make much sense," he says. "From a
standpoint of what it did for the Fox network and structure of that company, it
was an incredibly smart deal. There are
some people criticizing the kind of
money we paid for our package. We
think the same situation will exist four
or five years down the road here at
CBS."
32
BROADCASTING & CABLE ' JUNE 22, 1998
Significant others
In many ways, the TV sports rights
business is the NFL. But the NBA
and star Michael Jordan have
been able to maintain ratings better
than any other sport lately- including the NFL. This month's NBA
finals turned out to be the highest rated championship series in NBA
history, averaging a 18.8 rating/33
share nationally.
The critics say it
was Jordan, one
season -cutting labor dispute on its
hands next year.
Major League Baseball draws the
third -highest annual ratings among
professional sports, ahead of the
slumping fourth -place National
Hockey League. Fox, NBC and
ESPN, which own the national broadcast rights for baseball, pay a com-
bined $1.57 bil-
lion for their
From 1995 to
1997 the NBA
packages. That
includes
the
recent addition of
FX and Fox
Sports
Net's
$160
million
package. Some
critics, including
Paul Schulman
Co.'s
Tom
increased its rat-
DeCabia, say that
ings
for the
championship
America's pastime is in need of
series each season. Its playoffs
a jump start.
have remained
ESPN President
Steve Bornstein,
of the NBA's
all -time
players,
top
who
kept the league
afloat during a
period of declining TV ratings.
ABC Sports/
relatively flat
across the board.
"I'll
tell you,
the NBA does a
great job of marketing their product,"
says
BBDO's Steve
Grubbs, senior
Advertisers, who hope for
performances like those of Michael
Jordan, last year spent $4 billion on
national sports, according to
Competitive Media Reporting.
vice president/director of network TV
buying. "There's concern over
Michael Jordan leaving, but something tells me they'll find someone to
replace him. They probably have
somebody waiting in the wings who
could assume a greater leadership
role. If not, they'll create one."
NBC has a four-year, $1.75 billion
contract with the NBA that it signed
last December. Turner Sports
(TNT/I'BS) also signed on last year
for another four -year contract that
extends through the 2001 -02 NBA
season. Turner paid close to $900
million, up from its previous deal of
four years for $350 million.
Analysts say that the NBA, already
facing the possible retirement of Jordan from the league during the offseason, also may have a potentially
who disagrees
with DeCabia,
believes theMLB
is moving in the
right direction
after the players'
strike a few years
ago.
The National Hockey League has
slumped this year in the ratings, and
broadcast networks and Wall Street
analysts wonder why. The national
broadcast rights are shared by ESPN
and Fox, with Fox's contract up for
renewal after next season. Fox paid
$155 million three years ago and
vowed to take hockey to another level
with a number of technical enhancements and by putting the spotlight on
the game's top players. The results
have been disappointing-especially
this season, with ratings slipping more
than 15% in some cases.
DeCabia says that if Fox did not
renew its contract with the NHL, it
"would be a nail in the game's coffin.
Fox has tried every which way to promote this game, and none of them has
seemed to work."
-Joe Schlosser
This is where you are
with DTV now
This is where you can be
with PowerVu°
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Atlanitic
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COVER STORY
Sports Rights Scorecard
A
rundown of who has what among televised contests
Week) plus the National League Cham-
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Turner paid $890 million for a four -year
package of NBA games. seen on
weekdays exclusively on TBS and TNT.
pionship Series and the World Series.
FX and Fox SportsNet start year two of
a four -year $1.7 billion contract that
includes a 26 -week package of Saturday night and Thursday night games,
respectively. Annual cable rights for
FX and Fox Sports Net total more than
$400 million this year.
ESPN is in the third year of its five year, $455 million contract to air
Wednesday and Sunday night games.
In addition, ESPN will carry 6 -12 divisional playoff games this fall, for a
total tab of about $115 million this
year.
NBC begins the third year of its
$475 million, five -year contract. This
year, $95 million buys the network the
All -Star Game and American League
Championship series.
NBC's regular weekend deal cost
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
he rich get richer. The cost of NFL
rights more than doubled in a new
eight -year contract that totaled
a
reported $17.6 billion. Fox renewed its
National Football Conference package
for $4.4 billion, or $550 million per
year. CBS returned to the fold by winning the American
Football Conference
rights from NBC for
$4 billion ($500 million per year). The
fear of loss boosted
ABC's and ESPN's
winning bids for
Monday Night Foot -
ball and Sunday
night telecasts to
$4.4 billion and $4.8
billion, respectively.
That's $550 million
and $600 million per
year, respectively.
$1.75 billion, or $437 million per year.
The package includes more regular season and playoff broadcasts than
before. Turner's exclusive weekday
package on TBS and TNT cost $890
million, or $225 million per year.
MAJOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
ox's branding of MLB continues as
the network enters the third year of
its $575 million, five -year deal. At
$115 million per year, Fox has the
rights to an 18 -week schedule of weekend games (including the Game of the
he league's national broadcast contracts with Fox and ESPN expire
after the 1998 -99 season. ESPN's deal
is worth a reported $80 million for
coverage of more than 100 regular season games and up to 50 playoff
contests a year on ESPN and ESPN2.
Fox's current $155 million contract
permits it to carry regular- season
weekend games, plus selected Stanley
Cup playoff games and the finals. Fox
also has two option years that could
carry the agreement until the 2000 -01
season. Without a fee reduction, however, Fox probably will not exercise
that option.
NCAA BASKETBALL
TOURNAMENT
n 1995, CBS agreed
to pay $1.725 billion
After years of NFC coverage. CBS
returns to football in the fall with AFC
games. It paid $4 billion for eight years.
to carry the premier
college athletic tour-
nament for the next
seven years. This
year's $250 million
payment will cover
NATIONAL BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATION
ncumbents NBC and Turner more
than doubled their previous rights
payments for a four-year renewal of
their exclusive carriage agreements.
34
BROADCASTING & CABLE
/
JUNE 22, 1998
the opening rounds to
the Final Four in what
ESPN carries MLB action, such as this Orioles game. on
Wednesdays and Sundays. The cable network paid $455
million for five years. It also will air playoffs this fall.
remains the most
exciting tournament in
college sports.
1
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©
1998 Fuji Kioto Film U.S
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COVES STORY
the world's most popular sports event
FOOTBALL BOWL
eginning this fall season, ABC pays
close to $500 million for a seven year deal that recasts the structure of
the end -of -year college football bowl
games. ABC will broadcast the Fiesta,
Orange, Sugar and Rose Bowl games
each year; the bowls will rotate hosting
the championship game between the
first- and second -rated football teams.
Broadcasting these four games will
cost $70 million this year.
NOTRE DAME FOOTBALL
he
PROCRAIOlMC
,PROOt1CTlOM
remaining 52 games.
OLYMPICS
BC takes over broadcast coverage
of all Olympic games until 2008. It
will pay $715 million for the 2000
summer games in Sydney and $555
million for the 2002 winter games in
Salt Lake City.
WIMBLEDON
NBC and HBO will be in the
third year of a three -year contract for
coverage of the most prestigious tournament in tennis. NBC will pay $18
million to broadcast the men's and
women's final rounds of the championships, while HBO will pay $8 million for its 24th year of hosting the
early -round action.
n 1999,
only college
football team with
a national contract is
in the first of a seven year, $45 million
deal with NBC.
Notre Dame will
make $6.25 million
this year, with no
national
will broadcast 12 games,
including the championship final,
while ESPN and ESPN2 will show the
in 1994. It
CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES
champi-
onship in sight.
WORLD CUP SOCCER
BC paid $25 million for this event,
more than double the price paid for
U.S. OPEN TENNIS
BS is in the third year of a five -year
'deal with the tournament. CBS covers weekend, semifinal and final
action. USA Network carries all other
weekday coverage -totaling more than
84 hours per year -through 2002.
HBO hosts early rounds of Wimbledon.
The cable network paid $8 million for
its 24th year of coverage in 1999.
PROFESSIONAL GOLF
ASSOCIATION
BS will dominate PGA events
through 2002. Under its new three year contract, CBS will broadcast 17 of
the PGA's 40 annual tournaments.
ABC, NBC and cable networks ESPN.
USA Network and The Golf Channel
will divide the remaining tournaments.
Total annual payment to the PGA:
$100 million.
THE MASTERS
BS and USA Network split coverage of the tournament. Each year
the Augusta National Country Club
renews its contract with the network
and enforces what are supposedly the
strictest broadcaster guidelines of all
sporting events. USA, which has covered the first two rounds on cable for
the past 16 years, has a year -to -year
contract as well.
INDIANAPOLIS 500
Team USA s Cobi Jones can be seen
on ABC, which paid $25 million for 12
games, including the championship.
36
BROADCASTING & CABLE
JUNE 22,
he granddaddy of auto racing events
is in the last year of a three -year contract with ABC. Cost for the 1999 race
will
range between $13
million and
$15 million.
1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
Tiger sizes up a shot during the
Masters. CBS and USA Network share
coverage and renegotiate rights yearly.
When top broadcasters like CNN,Te1e- Metropole anc the
Belo Group prepared themselves for the digital broadcasting revoluton, they relied on the Av.dNerd"
Environment to get them there. With high -caliber components like video edting ant playback,
media v,orgroup and newsroom ccmputing systems, it's no wonder more than 1,100
broadas: sites
from arauai the world rely on the expertise and experience of Avid to bring item into the
digita
broadcast ng era. That's because, over the past 10 years, we've askec the rich: questions, and have
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COVER STORY
__-TfY`
+'i'ár..-..
CBS has covered the Daytona 500 for nearly 20 years. The network pays $8 million
to $10 million per year, and its contract expires in 2001.
DAYTONA
500
BS has aired this
premier NASCAR
event since 1979. Its
current six -year contract expires in 2001;
it pays $8 mil -
MRS
lion$10 million
a
year for flag -to -flag
coverage.
110fiti0.441iNC
áPROíáuCTION
U.S. FIGURE
SKATING
CHAMPIONSHIPS
BC has broadcast this event since
1964, when the network first added
figure skating to its roster of sporting
events. Last year the network renewed
its contract to carry the championship- through 2006, for $96 million
($12 million per year).
KENTUCKY DERBY,
PREAKNESS AND BELMONT
BC is reported to pay more than $8
million to broadcast the three jewels
of horse racing's Triple Crown. The
network's broadcasting rights extend
into the next century.
-Compiled
by Rick Churchill, B &C
correspondent
ABC airs the Derby as well as the other
two jewels, said to be worth more than
$8 million to the network.
BIC TICKETS
(Figures in millions)
Rights Fees
Network
in Millions
Contract Status Last Year /Season
Year /Years
of Contract
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
$4,400
1/8
2005 -06
$4,000
1/8
2005 -06
$4,400
1/8
2005 -06
1/8
$4,800
2005 -06
Fox
CBS
ABC
ESPN
TOTAL:
617,600
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
$575
3/5
2000
S475
3/5
2000
$455
3/5
2000
Fox/Liberty
$172
3/5
2000
Fox
NBC
ESPN
TOTAL:
S1,677
NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION
NBC
$1,750
1/4
2001 -02
Turner
$890
1/4
2001 -02
TOTAL:
38
Rights Fees
Network
/
Contract Status Last Year /Season
Year/Years
of Contract
NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
CBS
1,725
3/8
2002
r
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE
$155
4/5
1999 -2000
ESPN
4/5
1999 -2000
$80
TOTAL:
S235
Fox
OLYMPICS
NBC
NBC
NBC
NBC
NBC
S715
$555
S793
S613
S894
Summer
Winter
Summer
Winter
Summer
2000
2002
2004
2006
2008
COLLEGE FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS
ABC
700
1/7
2004
$2,640
BROADCASTING & CABLE
in Millions
JUNE 22, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
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www.americanradiohistory.com
COVER STORY
FOX'S CHASE CAREY
The man with mt
the game plan
1994, News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch gave
Fox executives in the U.S. a
green light to do something a
lot of so- called experts on Wall
Street and top studio executives
in Hollywood called foolish.
Murdoch approved Fox's entry
into the NFL with an unprecented $1.58 billion bid for the rights
to National Football Conference
games. In so doing, Murdoch
surprised the Tiffany Network right out of the top n
rated televised sport -and, with a loud roar,
arrived on the American sports scene. Four years
later, Fox Sports stands as a leader in TV sports.
Earlier this year. Fox acquired the Los Angeles
Dodgers for more than $300 million dollars. In
1997, Fox. along with TCI -owned Liberty Media,
purchased a 40% ownership stake in Cablevision
System Corp.'s sports programming service. In
the deal, Fox acquired ownership in Madison
Square Garden, the New York Knicks, the New
York Rangers and eight strategic regional sports
channels. Along the way. Fox has strung togethWhy did Fox buy the Dodgers?
There were a number of reasons. We were not interested in just any sports franchise. The Dodgers are in
many ways one of the most unique and valuable franchises in all of sports. That comes from their location,
their history, their following and the like. For us, sports
is obviously becoming a big part of our business. We
are located in Los Angeles, so it is in our home. We
have major business in Los Angeles, whether it is
regional cable networks or otherwise.
What is your role with the Dodgers? Is it a day -to-day
business relationship where you are actively watching
the box scores and the free-agent market?
Day -to -day, Fm a fan. No, realistically, it is no different than any other business here. We've got manage-
40
er TV rights to the National Hockey League.
Major League Baseball, National Basketball
Association and a number of other top sporting
events for its national broadcast network and
regional sports channels. The Fox Broadcast
Network, since its entry into the NFL TV game in
1993, has moved from fourth to second among
the broadcast networks in the key 18 -to -49 demographic. Fox has just renewed its contract with
the NFL for more than $4 billion and is getting
ready to televise both the Super Bowl and the
World Series during the 1998 -99 TV season. Fox
Sports Net, the band of regional cable channels,
now consists of 22 regional networks, 10 owned and- operated networks and 12 affiliates, covering
61% of the country.
Behind all of the wheeling and dealing is Chase
Carey. chairman of Fox Television and co -COO of
the parent, News Corp. In the past two months,
Carey has been instrumental in a number of high profile sports moves, including the Dodgers' trade
of All -Star catcher Mike Piazza to the Florida Marlins. Carey sat down With BROADCASTING & CABLE'S
Joe Schlosser to talk about the emergence of
News Corp. /Fox on the domestic sports scene.
ment in place to run the Dodgers, and there is a misperception that we are more involved than we are. [News
Corp. President] Peter Chemin and I are not running
this team. We have people in place to run it, and we
look forward to working with them.
You've admitted to carrying out the Mike Piazza
trade
trade that some have described as the
biggest in baseball history-and you called it a
"unique situation." How did that come about? Was it
a really a one -shot deal?
-a
I'm not really going to comment much on the Piazza
trade. There were discussions Dodger management and
we at Fox had over a long period of time, a number of
weeks prior to that trade. So it was certainly something
that was discussed between Fox and the management of
the Dodgers, and the trade we concluded was one that
BROADCASTING & CABLE / JUNE 22, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
i
`'
had been discussed
COVER STORY
thoroughly between Fox and the
Dodger management.
Was Dodger GM Fred Claire in the loop?
I'ni not going to get into that. I don't think it's constructive.
hinted that you might have been seeking ownership in the Sunshine network as part of the Piazza deal. Any truth there?
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
None whatsoever.
Are you represented as well as you would like in Florida?
We are a part -owner of Sunshine, and we have an even
smaller stake in Sports Channel Florida through our part-
nership with Rainbow [Programming], Chuck Dolan's
company, which is a minority partner in
Sports Channel Florida. Realistically, all
that means is we have a personal relationship. So, because we are minority
owners, we know some of the people.
That is the extent of it.
Would you like to increase your sports
presence in Florida?
Yes. We would look to have a regional
SNITS
sports business in place that operates
under the Fox Sports brand. It is one of
the obvious places where we don't have a MINNIMMINS
Fox Sports channel. Certainly we would IkPIIMNICTION
like to find ways to press that.
Looking back on Fox's $1.58 billion entry into the NFL in
1994, how good does that decision look today?
The decision was clearly an important one for Fox that
helped the network, the broader broadcasting business and
really all the Fox -related companies go to another level.
Fox did take a $350 million write -off after acquiring the
NFL in 1994.
Yes. We did take a $350 million -write off after the contract
was done. I really look at it as an investment, and the businesses at Fox increased in value as a result. It certainly led
to the opportunity to get the New World station affiliations
and ultimately New World station ownership and other
things. This is a subjective valuation, but it increased the
overall value of Fox by a number that is in the billions.
Will there be a write-off with the latest contract?
At this point we expect ourselves to
be whole against the
current contract. Obviously, we are making certain
assumptions about life into the future that we can't control,
but we have time.
earlier in the month to the Fox affiliates in
Los Angeles, you said that NBC's decision to get out of
the NFL rights business was a "defining moment in recent
network history. NBC affiliates will not look back on this
with favor." Can you elaborate on that? Are you predicting
In a speech
NBC's demise?
Events will become more and more important in this business. The NFL is second to none in [the event] category.
NBC has some obvious strengths. They have the NBA con JUNE 22, 1999
/
BROADCASTING & SABLE
41
COZIER STORY
tract, and they have the Olympics. So it is not like they are
without strengths. But I think the NFL is unique in terms of
your ability to have it for in excess of 20 weeks per year. It
is not a I7 -day event every few years. It is not an event driven by a couple of weeks of playoffs. It is weekly event programming that covers a major portion of the year-and it is
uniquely important in that regard, both for the value it creates and the ability it has to drive your overall business for
viewers, for other programming, for advertisers and for
related TV businesses.
Is NBC's loss your gain as far as
getting that key 18 -49
demographic? Could this put you over the top?
a competitive edge. There will always be differences-but sure, the NFL will be a competitive advantage
going forward. The challenge is for us to take advantage of
Certainly it's
process that continues to go around and around. And it makes
for a difficult time coming to a conclusion. Our discussions on
the NFL have narrowed substantially, and we've made great
headway. I'm confident in the short term we will get through
the remaining couple of things they want to address with us.
Along with TCI in 1997, News Corp. entered into a venture
with Cablevision for 40% of Madison Square Garden. the
New York Knicks. the Rangers and eight regional sports
channels. Would you agree that was your key play?
It was tremendously important. Realistically, once we formed
our partnership with [TCI chairman John] Malone, you really
had the regionals in two different groups: A group [Charles]
Dolan controlled and a group we controlled. By putting them
together, it gave us the ability to have a national reach. So it
was a tremendously important cornerstone to being able to fulfill the opportunity inherent in those regional sports networks.
[THE NFL] IS UNIQUELY IMPORTANT...
Has the Net started to turn a profit?
BOTH FOR THE VALUE IT CREATES
Yes. It's
AND THE ABILITY IT HAS TO DRIVE
After adding the Dodgers to the Fox fold earlier in the year.
Fox Liberty made news by buying into the new Staples
Center in downtown Los Angeles. With that comes an
option to buy into the Kings and, through them, into the
Lakers. What's your interest in those teams?
YOUR OVERALL BUSINESS FOR
VIEWERS, FOR OTHER PROGRAM-
SPOIIIS
S""N
MING, FOR ADVERTISERS AND FOR
RELATED TV BUSINESSES.
it. To be the leader in I8 -to -49 is certainly our goal, and it is
a goal we have made continual progress toward, having
passed CBS a few years back. Having this year for the first
time in an overall year passed ABC, we think this is a year
with great opportunities with the combination of some major
events-the Super Bowl, the World Series, "Lost World"
and "Independence Day." There is some real strength in programming. In each of the past two years, I would say we
have launched the most successful new shows: King of the
Hill two years ago and Ally McBeal last year. So the ability
for us to continue to build on that entertainment momentum
and use these events as locomotives to drive the business
forward gives us opportunities to make real strides.
You've been trying to get your affiliates to foot some of the
NFL bill. What's the status of those negotiations?
In general, some of the reporting has been inaccurate. Our
relationship with our affiliates overall continues to be great
and strong. As in any relationship, there are always issues
that come up. We have an issue here on the NFL that we are
working out with them, and we have been addressing it con tructively. It is really just one issue in a much broader relationship. I'm sure we'll work it through.
The goal was to finalize the deal by the end of the affiliate
meetings on June 5. What's the hang -up?
I'm not going to break down the issues in what
at this point is
private discussion. To some degree, it has become complicated by the fact that the other networks are out there having
similar discussions. So everybody spends too much time looking at what everybody else does. And anytime you spend too
much time looking at the other guys, it leads to a circular
a
42
BROADCASTING B CABLE / JUNE 22, 1888
a
profitable business today.
It's our intention to exercise the options, subject to the
approval of the NHL and the NBA. That would give us that
40% stake in the Kings and just under 10% of the Lakers.
Your deal with the NHL is up at the end of next season,
and the league is not exactly turning in the greatest ratings. Will you continue to air the NHL on the Fox Network?
We are certainly committed to the NHL. Obviously, as you
reach ends of agreements, you have to conclude new agreements. We are certainly committed, and we believe the
inherent strengths we saw in hockey continue to be there.
That being said, there is no question that it has been a disappointing year. In many ways hockey has really had a string
of tough luck. Certainly, the Olympics did not pan out. They
had a series of problems that didn't lift the sport. There have
been Stanley Cup sweeps the last four years in a row, which
is almost inconceivable. The sport certainly has had trouble,
but I think that is the nature of sports -they go through up
and down years.
We believe there continues to be a great youth appeal to it
as you grow the next generation of stars. Stars are important.
Lately we had the [Mark] Messiers and [Wayne] Gretzkys. I
think hockey recognizes that there are a number of things it
needs to do, as any sport does, to try and enhance the game.
The NFL has done it in terms of rule changes. Baseball has
made some changes that have enhanced it. That is all part of
building and growing a sport. We have great confidence in it.
How can a Yankees fan be at the helm of the Dodgers?
What if the Yankees meet the Dodgers this year in the
World Series on Fox?
should only wish for such a problem, and I'll be happy to
deal with it if and when it occurs. I grew up a Yankee fan.
But although I've learned to divide my loyalties well, I can
assure you -as I suffer through every Dodgers loss and celebrate every win
got more feelings for them than anybody else right now.
I
-I've
-t
PERFECTION OF IMA 6E
or sports and all types of broadcast applications, Chyron
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140
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COVER STORY
`X- Games' get Max Air
ESPN uses SporTVision technology for half-pipe events
By Glen Dickson
jump that the in -line skaters, skateboard-
For its X Games coverage, ESPN is
using vertical -leap technology to
measure the altitude achieved by
competitors in half -pipe skateboarding,
biking and in -line skating.
The technology that ESPN is using is
being supplied by SporTVision Systems, which originally developed its
AIRf/x system to
measure the vertical
leap of basketball
players. AIRf/x uses
three cameras and a
Silicon Graphics
computer to triangu-
late images and
measure how high
players jump. The
system, which is
accurate to within
PROGRAMING half an inch, disEPft00UC iIOM plays the measure-
SNITS
ers and bikers make, and ESPN analysts
will be able to replay selected leaps with
an accompanying graphic.
"It's a lower -left graphic, and the Chyron will animate it from the coping level
[of the half-pipe] to the height of the data
fed by SporTVision," Reynolds says. "It
will read up like a thermometer."
Jerry Gepner, SporTVision chief
operating officer, says that AIRf/x's
Silicon Graphics computer will allow
ESPN to "clip" each jump in real time.
The statistical information can be
stored in files and then later in a database, allowing ESPN to go back and
compare archived jumps if it elects to
use "Max Air" for future X Games.
Reynolds adds that ESPN is thinking
abut using the SporTVision technology
for applications other than the halfpipe, such as its big -air snowboarding
event in the Winter X Games.
This year, 'X- Games' viewers will know
exactly how high skateboarders fly out
of the half -pipe, thanks to SporTVision's
AIRS/x system.
ment graphically in
an instant replay using a Chyron Infinit
character generator.
After AlRf/x was used successfully
by Fox Sports Bay Area, MSG and
Turner Sports in the second half of the
National Basketball Association season,
SporTVision pitched ESPN on the technology for the X Games, where a good
part of athletes' time is spent in the air.
ESPN liked the idea and has branded the
system "Max Air" for its X Games coverage of the half-pipe events.
"We tend to be innovative and technology- oriented, and this was an easy
crossover of their technology," says
Jamie Reynolds, X Games coordinating producer. "One question we've
always asked is, 'How do you quantify
maximum height in the vert ramp ?"
ABC, ESPN
go virtual for
World Cup
By Glen Dickson
ABC Sports and ESPN are using
new 3 -D animation technology
from virtual -set supplier Orad to
enhance their World Cup soccer coverage. The Orad technology, called Virtual
Replay, takes video frames of the soccer
action and converts them into 3 -D ani-
many point- scoring tricks they can do.
"If you go higher, you have more
time in the air, and you can pull more
BROADCASTING & CABLE
I
JUNE
players throughout a play and measure
various distances and velocities. The
system runs on a Silicon Graphics
Onyx computer and prepares operator- selected play frames in less than
three minutes.
ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 have been
using Virtual Replay in all of their
pregame shows, and ABC and ESPN also
have used it during game telecasts to
recreate plays from unconventional
According to Matthew Straeb, Orad
vice president, the World Cup has been
a boon to the Israel -based company,
bringing in some $4 million -$6 million
in revenue. Orad has five virtual studios at work in Paris for various rights holders, a bank of computers driving
Virtual Replay, and other machines
aren't judged on the height they achieve,
the altitude they get determines how
44
highlight and track the ball or the
angles.
Although half -pipe competitors
revolutions," Reynolds says. "It's a
very definable quality."
While ESPN analysts have speculated
about how high athletes have gone in the
past, they now will have an exact measurement of the altitude they achieve.
The Max Air system will measure every
mations that can be shown as replays.
The Orad sports analysis technology also allows viewers to see a play
from several different angles, such as
the players' point of view or that of
the referee. Virtual Replay also can
and operators driving an Internet
Virtual Replay creates animated 3 -D
replays of soccer action.
22, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
replay product. Straeb says that Virtual
Replay is currently available for football, and Orad is developing a basketball version as well.
COVER
NBC tackles U.S. Open
Rolls out 'rat patrols,' lipstick camera
By Glen Dickson
For its coverage
of
STORY
hilly course with a lot of thick cypress
trees. So NBC has erected four
microwave towers to relay feeds, twice
the number required for a flatter course.
Besides the standard camera positions and rat patrols, NBC was planning to use a movable -crane camera on
the first hole, a boom camera on holes
forklift camera on holes
The network was planning to
place Sony Super Slo -Mo replay systems on holes 7 and 18 and a tiny lipstick camera right next to the tee marker on the 17th tee.
"That will let us see a different angle of
the golfer's swing and will probably be
used in swing analysis," Parinello said.
the 98th annual
1
and 18, and a
5 and 12.
U.S. Open tournament last week,
NBC Sports was planning at press
time to cover the Olympic Club golf
course with about twice the number of
cameras it normally uses to cover a
PGA tour event.
That's not only because the Open is
a major sports event but also because
NBC was planning at least 16 hours of
live coverage, including two hours (3 -5
p.m.) of coverage on Thursday and Friday. NBC also is responsible for the
production and engineering of ESPN's
cable coverage (5 -10:30 p.m.) on the
tournament's first two days.
"It's intensive coverage for 18 holes,
with seven and a half hours on Thursday
and Friday," said Bill Parinello, NBC
Sports technical manager. "Normally.
we'd come on around the seventh hole."
NBC was planning to use 23 "hard"
Other production
equipment includes
18 videotape replay
machines, one Telestrator, three character generators and a
blimp camera for aerial views.
NBC planned to have
three of its 'rat patrol'
mobile camera units
covering the Olympic
Club's course.
Ikegami cameras stationed behind
greens and tees and alongside fairways; six "flanker" cameras that can
shoot a combination of greens, fairways and tees; three wireless mini
cameras, and three so- called rat patrol
units -tiny flatbed trucks mounted
with hard cameras that are free to roam
the course from hole to hole.
In the high pressure
Each rat patrol has a handheld camera converted to a studio kit with a long
lens, which yields better pictures than a
portable camera with a short lens operated by a cameraman in a golf cart.
"They're decent -looking cameras with
a long lens," Parinello said. "Mounting
them on the flatbed lets us get more use
can get three or four
out of it
holes out of each camera."
One rat -patrol unit was assigned to
cover holes 2, 9 and 16; one to 4, 11
and 17, and one to cover 6 and 14. The
units transmit video back to production
ment financing, Charter
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-we
control via microwave links; Cam Mate microwave units mounted on
carts follow the rat patrols to relay the
feeds, Parinello said.
"We use as much microwave as we
can," Parinello said. "Cabling limits
you, especially with the crowds at the
U.S. Open."
But the Olympic Club is a particularly challenging venue for microwave
operation, Parinello said, because it's a
I- 800 -805 -9999.
CIIARTFI2
JUNE 22, 1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
'
HI!x'A\CII.
BROADCASTING & CABLE
45
COVER STORY
ESPN checks swings with Bat Track
Innovative technology focuses on hitters, not hitchers
By Glen Dickson
'
`
`°
''
so much technical analysis
of
baseball coverage has
focused for years on how fast
pitchers throw the ball, little
While
statistical attention has been paid to the
speed at which a hitter swings his bat.
That has changed with ESPN's Sunday
Night Baseball coverage this year: The
cable sports network has developed a
new technology. Bat
Track. to measure
the bat speed of
major league hitters.
Tim
Scanlan,
ESPN coordinating
producer for Major
League Baseball, says
that the idea to measure bat speed came
$insout of a conversation
with ESPN analyst
P..
ir'
M
Joe Morgan at the end
of last season. "We do
OPPORTUNITY +
TIMING = $
the pitcher, showing the
speed of every pitch and
showing a lot of replays of
pitch location and how the
pitcher destroys hitters' tim-
ing," says Scanlan. "But we
rarely apply technology to
what the batter does.
"Joe made a comment
if we could show the
speed of the hitters' swing
in relationship to the pitches
thrown, we could show how Bat Track measures hitters' bat speed and shows
the path of the swing.
the great hitters take a little
extra time and are able to make adjusttravels with the Bat Track system to
ments. We went [over] how we could
Sunday Night Baseball games.
do that, and Bat Track was born."
"Bat Track factors in the angles, the
Bat Track is a two -dimensional anidegree of pitch and the height of the
mation that charts the hitter's swing cameras, using home plate as the locapath and bat speed by capturing a swing
tion of measurement," says Scanlan.
from several angles using overhead "Then it measures- through the comcameras. ESPN uses a Silicon Graphics
puter-how fast the object travels
02 computer to perform the calcula- through that space, which is 17 inches
tions. employing some of the same wide-that's how quickly the bat is
measurement software from Trimble swung through the zone. The same softNavigation that the network used in its ware also allows us to draw over the
SailTrack graphic for America's Cup side angle of the hitter to animate the
sailing coverage. A Trimble technician path of the bat. That helps Joe [Morgan]
that
CBS taps Pro -Bel
There is nothing as powerful
as an idea who's time has
come!
switchers for NFL
CBS has purchased eight Pro -
Bel TX 320 master control
switchers from Chyron Corp.
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a
BROADCASTING & CABLE
The 601 serial digital switchers
will be employed in a new digital component facility that CBS
is creating for its upcoming NFL coverage and other applications; the bulk
of the equipment for the facility was originally purchased for CBS's Nagano
coverage and will be repurposed in the CBS Broadcast Center in New York.
The CBS deal marks Chyron's first sale of the TX 320, which was
introduced at NAB '98. The switcher processes 10 -bit component digital
video combined with either analog or AES /EBU digital audio. Up to six
channels can be controlled with a single panel.
The TX 320, which has an ergonomic control panel and a plasma display for both audio monitoring and switcher configurations, provides full
integration with all Pro -Bel and third -party automation packages.
The units that CBS has purchased include 20 video inputs with imbedded digital audio, eight independent audio channels, audio breakaway,
two linear keyers, full- function DVE, machine control, bypass switcher
and an internal 32 x 32 matrix.
"We're obviously going to be originating a number of simultaneous
games, and [the TX 320] is an effective origination tool," says Bob Seidel,
CBS engineering vice president.
-Glen Dickson
JUNE 22, 1898
www.americanradiohistory.com
COVER STORY
in demonstrating the bat level in an
uppercut versus a chop swing."
ESPN has used Bat Track an average of three times a game, choosing to
focus on specific hitters. So far, the
fastest hitters measured have been
Ken Griffey Jr. of the Seattle
Mariners and Barry Bonds of the San
Francisco Giants, both of whose
swings have been clocked at 97 mph.
Griffey's 97 mph swing produced a
home run, while Bonds' superfast cut
resulted in a ground out. Interestingly. Bonds' teammate. Bill Mueller, hit
a home run with a 77 mph swing
some 20 mph slower.
"What's been most noticeable to us
is the adjustments certain hitters make,
-
like John Olerud of the Mets [who leads
the National League in batting average]," Scanlan says. "On an outside offspeed switch, Olerud will adjust his
swing to go the opposite way, which
differentiates greatly from his swing on
an inside fastball. There's a 20 mph differential on his bat speed between the
two different pitches."
TV Globo broadcasts
World Cup in HDTV
Comark provides turnkey system
By Glen Dickson
over the Intelsat network for distribution
Brazilian broadcaster TV Globo is
demonstrating HDTV with
a
transatlantic feed from the World
These remote camera systems from
H tachi catch relief pitchers
warming up at Turner Field.
Turner Production
peeks at the bullpen
TurnEr Production has installed
two remote observation systems to
capture video of relief pitchers
warming up in the bullpens at
Turner Field in Atlanta. Turner's
field operations division has
mourted two Hitachi Eagle Systems with Hitachi's HVC -10A color
CCD cameras above the bullpens
for the application.
"We needed new cameras that
were broadcast -quality, could pan
and tilt to capture three pitchers
warming up at the same time,
could work well under a wide
range of lighting conditions, were
compact enough to fit into weatherprcof housing, could withstand
very hot temperatures and would
not be visually distracting," says
Mike Ross, senior video engineer
for Turner Production's field operatiors division.
TI-e Hitachi Eagle Systems use
a bt.ilt -in computer interface to
cont-ol pan/tilt, lens and camera
operation from a remote PC. The
HVC -10A cameras have three 1/2inch CCDs and feature 700 TV
lines of resolution. -Glen Dickson
Cup in France.
System provider Comark Digital
Services is supplying TV Globo with
a turnkey production and transmission package for the ATSC- compli-
ant 1,080 -line HDTV broadcast.
Comark, which has contracted with
Japanese broadcaster NHK to shoot
World Cup matches in HDTV using
their Japanese standard Hi- Vision
cameras, has hired HD Vision of Dallas to outfit a complete HDTV post -
production suite (also using HiVision equipment).
"NHK has seven or eight camera feeds
coming in the post- production suite
we've put together for TV Globo," says
Mark Aitken, Comark director of marketing. "They're creating their own content in Paris at the International Broadcast Center -and after that's done, they
do the final encoding there to send it up
to Brazil."
The analog HiVision content is
converted to ATSCcompliant 19.4 Mb/s
digital HDTV using
Mitsubishi
a
SPIN'S
encoder. The HDTV PRO C iîAM IM6
feed is then uplinked LE1~t7alfCTIQN
via Newtek satellite
modems to the Intelsat 801 satellite,
where Globo has contracted for
transponder space. After the pre encoded HDTV signal is received in
Brazil, it is being retransmitted locally
using Comark UHF LDMOS solid state digital transmitters.
TV Globo is using two Comark
DTV transmitters -one in Rio de
Janeiro and one in Sao Paulo
-to
broadcast to selected audiences at exhibition sites. The Brazilian broadcaster
is using HDTV receivers from Sharp
and Zenith and Panasonic set -top DTV
receivers to display the HDTV signals.
TWO WIN SPORTS MARKETING Inc.
DAVE TIPTON
&
REX LARDNER
MANAGING PARTNERS
CONSULTING SERVICES, TALENT REPRESENTATION
CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP SALES REPRESENTATION
TV PRODUCTION, PROGRAMMING and CREATION
1500 SKOKIE BLVD., SUITE 500
NORTHBROOK, IL 60062
PHONE 847.
JUNE
272.5002 FAX 847.272.5062
22, 1888
/ BROADCASTING & CABLE
47
Broadcaslhg1Cable
BROADCASTING
`King' poised
to beat Bart
Could top 'Simpsons' syndication sales
by $1 millionplus per episode
By Joe Schlosser
Twentieth Television's off-network sales for King of the Hill are
on target to eclipse the studio's
last animated series to hit syndication,
The Simpsons, by more than $1 million
an episode.
King of the
Hill is cleaning up where
second -cycle runs of Seinfeld left off,
and sources say that the hit series will
likely generate close to $4 million an
episode. The show is now cleared in
more than 65% of the country after a
month of sales, Twentieth executives
say. King of the Hill debuts in syndication in fall 2001.
"Every single market we have gone
into has had spirited bidding, with more
than one offer in each city," says Twentieth Television President Rick Jacob-
son. "If you take
Seinfeld out of the
mix, King of the
Hill
is getting the
next -best price in
each market."
'King of the Hill' may soon be king of syndication for Twentieth.
New clearances
for the series include KTxL(TV) Sacra- sources say. Twentieth executives
mento, Calif.; wot (Tv) Orlando, Fla.;
would not comment on the prices.
wRAz(Tv) Raleigh, N.C.; wxlx -Tv
"In virtually every market we have
Cincinnati; KVVU -TV Las Vegas, and set pricing records," says Paul Franklin,
WLUK -TV Green Bay, Wis. The 22 Fox
Twentieth's head of sales. "People are
owned- and -operated stations cleared looking at this show as the show that
King of the Hill in the show's first off- makes or breaks their future."
network cycle.
Twentieth Television has not made
Sources say that the Fox affiliate in
any official announcement on a potenSacramento (KTxt.) paid more than tial cable deal for King of the Hill.
$30,000 a week for Hill, while the Twentieth executives say they have a
Orlando station paid over $35,000. The clause in their station deals for a simulLas Vegas and Raleigh deals both taneous cable run that could debut in the
came in at close to $20,000 a week.
show's fourth season in syndication.
`Party' clears 95 °0
Series will get August cable launch on Lifetime
By Joe Schlosser
paid
of Columbia
early evening time
periods.
Distribution's Party
of Five have been
This is the second
such deal that CTTD
executives have brokered in the past two
years. Last fall, Walker. Texas Ranger was
cleared in more than
95% of the country
September
a
launch. The show's
cable run
getting
of
Weekend syndication runs
TriStar Television
for
upwards
$700,000 an episode,
will run Party of Five
five nights a week in
will also
launched on USA
Network during the
be
head start
this summer.
a
week and had off-network weekend clearances on stations.
Lifetime Network
has been given the
green light from Fox Weekend 'Party' begins in
Columbia TriStar will
and Columbia TriStar syndiction in the fall.
likely take the same
executives to launch the series on the
approach with the current WB hour
cable channel Aug. 17. Lifetime, which
series Dawson's Creek when it becomes
48
BROADCASTING
a
CABLE / JUNE
22, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
available in syndication.
"Through our experience with Walker, Texas Ranger, we have learned that
stations and the cable channels benefit
from having it on simultaneously," says
CI -1D President Barry Thurston. "They
actually boost each other's ratings."
New clearances for the show include
Miami, WKMG -TV Orlando,
Indianapolis and KAKE -TV
Wichita, Kan. Also signed on for the
Fox Broadcast Network series are
WTVQ -TV Lexington, Ky.; WGBA(TV)
WPLG(TV)
WTHR(TV)
Green Bay, Wis., and KsEE(Tv) Fresno,
Calif. The series was launched in syndication earlier in the year with a 22 -station deal on the Fox owned- and -operated stations. The weekend runs of the
series are straight barter deals; stations
will debut it in September. More than
185 stations have now cleared Party of
Five.
"The show is coming into syndication
just as it is really hitting its stride on the
network," Thurston says. "The stations
like it because it brings in the 18 -49
demos."
-1
4
BRJAIICASTIYC
STATION BREAK
By Ban
Trigaholf
Don't raise
the ceiling,
lower the floor
Rtinning
tinning a TV station is
never easy, but what
do you do when the bottom drops out? The floor
in WBBM -TV Chicago's
main control room fell
half a foot, possibly
because of some repair
work in a nearby studio.
Station officials say that
no one was hurt, but the
room was cordoned off
last week and will be out
of commission for awhile.
The 64 -year old building
near Lake Shore Drive has
been dropping for some
time, but never anything so
dramatic. That sinking feeling has forced VP/GM
Hank Price to rethink the
idea of putting off relocating a few years until the
station can move into a
fully equipped facility.
WBBM-TV had hoped to
avoid either a second move
or an overhaul. Engineers
were at the site last week,
Price says, and will report
on whether the building can
hold up until digital equipment is ready. "We may
have to go back and reeval-
P
Marcia
Kimpton,
'Live from
the Starlight
Room'
`Starlight,'
starbright
ration managers at
ABC, UPN or WB stations can expect a visit
this summer from former
San Francisco entertainment reporter and would be entertainment impresario Marcia Kimpton.
The former KTVU(TV)
weekend entertainment
reporter, now with KGO -TV
San Francisco, is pitching,
producing and hosting a
late -night Saturday variety
show to compete with
NBC's Saturday Night
Live, Fox's Mad TV and
the forthcoming Howard
uate everything," he says.
Stem syndicated entry
The McClurg Court
location may have a history of standing on shaky
ground. According to the
station, the land originally
was swamp, turned into
landfill with the addition
of the ashes from Chicago's great fire. In 1924 the
building opened as a horse
arena and later became a
skating rink. CBS bought
it in 1956 and converted it
into a TV station, where
the first Kennedy Nixon
debate was held in 1960.
from Eyemark.
Kimpton hopes to pitch
the music- comedy -fashion-and more offering,
Live from the Starlight
Room, to 100 stations over
the next few months. Her
last road show proved successful: A stop in St.
Louis landed Budweiser
as a sponsor. She's also
sold spots to Pepsi and
Saturn. Kimpton says
she's put 14 shows in the
can so far for about
$2,000 each, and a dozen
more are likely this fall. A
few shows already have
aired locally, with ratings
in the low- to mid -2 range.
"It's hard to get people to
watch on Saturday night,"
she says. "I'm not Leno or
Letterman. But I like to
think I'm offering some-
thing different from
Howard Stern."
Kimpton says that the
show represents her lifetime dreams and her lifetime savings. "Right now
no one's knocking down
the door," she says, although there has been interest from stations in Dallas and Cleveland and in
Sacramento, Fresno and
Eureka, Calif. "I've spent
my whole life making this
happen," she says. The talent, so far, has been local.
"San Francisco is such an
incredible place to do this
type of show." The halfhour show will be taped at
Harry Denton's Starlight
Room atop the Sir Francis
Drake Hotel, accompanied
by the Daniel Castro Band.
Harry Denton himself,
a
statement promises, "will
also be on hand as Kimpton's sidekick and sounding board."
Save
it for soccer
Anticipating a Bulls win
in the NBA finals and
fearing a replay of that
first championship season
in 1991 -when more than
1,000 were arrested for
rowdiness and looting
Chicago -area TV stations
aired public service
announcements asking
area residents to "Celebrate with Dignity." Featured were Michael Jordan, Phil Jackson-and
that symbol of both celebration and dignity, Dennis Rodman. Peter Mathes, VP /GM of KTVx(TV) in
the hometown of the Utah
Jazz, reports no such messages were broadcast in
Salt Lake City.
-
Vldci auma Is back at
WIAQ -TV.
Burns returns
Chicago
VP/GM Larry Wert
has looted the vault at
Chicago news leader wtsTV again, this time coming
away with producers Vicki
Burns and Chris Myers.
Burns will be wntAQ-Tv's
assistant news director;
Myers will be an executive
producer. Myers had been
with WLS -TV since 1995.
It will be a homecoming
for Bums who worked for
WMAQ -TV
years at wMAQ-TV before
joining WLS-TV and joins
fellow wt.s -Tv departees
Phyllis Schwartz and Frank
Whivaker. Schwartz, former news director at wtsTV, is now VP, news at
wiaAQ -TV. Whittaker, who
was assistant news director
at WLS-TV, is wMAQ -TV's
news director.
The moves are the latest
in Wert's efforts to strengthen his station's news department and to rehabilitate its image, which suffered before Wert's arrival
when station management
put controversial talk show
host Jerry Springer on as a
commentator. Numerous
staff changes have been
attributed to the Springer
fiasco.
All news is local. Contact
Dan Trigobof at (202)
463 -3710, fax (202) 4290651, or e-mail to
d.trig @cahners.com.
JUNE 22, 1990 / BROADCASTING
ti
CABLE
49
BROADCASTING
NBC investing in NBA futures
Past results may not he an indicator offuture performance
By Michael Stroud
Whire
last two years' finals
excitement has revolved
around the Chicago
Bulls, but key players in
those championships
Michael Jordan, Scottie
Pippen and coach Phil
Jackson -may
not
return to the team. Other
teams in the finals, analysts suggest, wouldn't
NBC is
-
still celebrating
the
highest rated NBA final series
ever, some observers
are wondering whether
advertising fees enough to cover the
increase," says Paul Sweeney of Smith
Barney Shearson. "We don't know."
But there will be more spots for sale.
NBC will broadcast more games than in
its previous contract over the next four
years: seven more per year in the regular
season and eight more playoff games.
NBC Sports Chairman Dick Ebersol
says the increased number of games
will give the network the extra ad revenue it needs to keep advertising rate
increases at just over 10 %. NBC
already has sold "considerably more
than half' of the next four years of ad
inventory at about those rates, he says.
"Nobody has sold half of the football
inventory for fall," he said in an interview. NBC's NBA advertisers include
General Motors, Honda, Chrysler and
Toyota, as well as McDonald's, Prudential Insurance and Coca -Cola.
While Ebersol insists that the NBA
has "never missed a day of meaningful
sports competition," the network could
be out tens of millions of dollars next
year if players and owners deadlock.
NBC would continue to make agreed upon payments for the first year of the
agreements, after which fees would drop.
But NBA owners voted in April to
lock players out of NBA facilities on
July 1 if changes aren't made in the
the network can keep
the momentum -and
the profits- rolling in
1998 -1999.
garner the same ratings.
After agreeing to a It a lockout turns into a long
Then there's the issue
record $1.75 billion for standoff, the NBA could be
of rights fees. NBC's
NBA broadcast rights crippled; NBC would lose big. four -year, $1.75 billion
last November, the network faces an contract is more than double the
uncertain future for the champion amount of its previous four -year conChicago Bulls and a general reluctance
tract and nearly three times the size of
among advertisers to keep paying for the contract it signed in 1990-91.
whopping increases in broadcast rights
To cover the increased costs, NBC
fees, Most worrisome: The entire season
will have to ask for hefty increases
could be put on hold by a possible NBA
from advertisers. In talks with Honda,
owners' lockout of players on July 1.
General Motors, Nissan, Chrysler and
"You tell me if there is a lockout, and other auto makers, the network is
I'll tell you whether [NBC's $1.75 billion reportedly asking for as much as 50%
rights purchase] is a bargain," says media
more than in past deals.
buying consultant Paul Schulman.
It will also seek increased fees for
Questions about NBC's NBA deal individual spots, banking off the finals'
come amid concerns that Turner Sports,
high ratings. The network earned an
which acquired its own four -year NBA estimated $100,000 for each spot in
package for $890 million, also won't
regular- season games and as much as
lure enough advertisers to make a prof$500,000 per spot for playoff games.
current collective bargaining agreeit. And even with affiliates chipping in,
"The question is whether you can raise ments to control player salaries.
CBS, ABC and Fox are also considered
unlikely to make money on their multibillion- dollar pro football investments.
"The economy is not all that great
for sports." Schulman says. "A lot of
advertisers were able to get the male Syndication
organization takes new direction
audiences they wanted in prime -time
television at reasonable prices, as By Steve McClellan
opposed to stepping up and paying for
the extraordinary rights fees."
It's transition time at the
To be sure, NBC had reason to celesales -side TV advertising
brate last week. The previous Sunday
trade organizations.
night's game six of the NBA finals
Tim Duncan, executive
attracted a 22.3 rating and 38 share to
director of the Advertiser
become the highest -rated NBA game
Syndicated Television Asin history, according to Nielsen Media
sociation (ASTA), is leaving
Research. The network's six -game the organization after I I
series average was an 18.8 rating and years at the helm. Ave Buten33 share, also the top figure of all
sky, president of TVB since
time -up 4% from last year's final
1992, confirms that he will
between Phoenix and Chicago on step down as president at the ASTA'S Duncan (I) and TVB 's Butensky are leaving.
NBC, the previous record.
end of his current contract, which Bureau President Joe Ostrow might be
But those numbers are by no means expires Dec. 31, 1999.
retiring soon. But last week Ostrow
certain for next season. Much of the
There was even talk circulating last denied those rumors, indicating that
week that Cabletelevision Advertising
he's under a contract with a little more
Duncan exiting ASTA
ad
50
BROADCASTING & CABLE
/
JUNE 22, 1888
BROADCASTING
than two years to go.
ASTA is reorganizing and expanding and expects to name a new president from the ad agency ranks within
weeks. Until now, ASTA has had a
staff of two-Duncan and one assistant-working on a shoestring budget.
Syndicators now want to take the organization to a level that would compete
more effectively with other sales -side
advertising trade organizations, including the CAB and the TVB.
"I am proud of what ASTA has
accomplished with the resources available to us," says Duncan. "However,
going further will require a larger orga-
nization, a bigger travel commitment
and a different set of managerial skills.
It is appropriate for ASTA to have new
leadership at this point."
Duncan lives in the Boston suburb of
Dedham, Mass., and has served as
executive director of ASTA through a
contract with his consulting firm,
Boston Media Consultants. He steps
down as operating head of ASTA
effective July 1, with plans to expand
his consultancy.
"Tim Duncan did a great job" as executive director of ASTA, says Bob Cesa.
He is executive vice president, advertiser sales, Twentieth Television, and a former ASTA president. "But we need to
hire someone more involved in the day to-day running of the advertising business and give them the support to step it
up a little bit." Cesa says that with
cable's growth and new emerging networks, not to mention the majors, "you
have to have someone out there constantly reinforcing the strength that syndication brings to national advertisers."
The TVB's Butensky says that he is
not retiring per se, noting that he prob-
ably will remain with TVB for a transitional period before moving on to other
activities. By the end of his current
contract Butensky will be 66. "I just
felt that they wanted to get someone
else in there" at that point, he says. "So
we'll move accordingly and have an
orderly transition."
Ostrow has been with the CAB since
August 1994. Asked whether he'll
renew his contract in 2000 when it expires or move on, he replies: "Who
knows? I don't know what's happening
in this business two months ahead of
time, let alone more than two years
from now."
Deep pockets for `Deep Impact'
Feature, films are Hollywood's hot tickets
By Michael Stroud
Wnth
"Deep Impact"
going for $25 mil lion to CBS, Hollywood accountants are hurriedly pulling out their calculators to figure out how
much their own feature films
will bring.
I
)I
I
I
'
IVIPIA
If 'Deep Impact' grosses over $150 million, CBS will
pay Paramount extra.
On tap over the next year:
Jim Carrey vehicle "The Truman Show," "Armageddon," "Saving
Private Ryan. "The Mask of Zorro" and
animated film "The Prince of Egypt."
A few years ago $10 million seemed
like a lot to pay for TV rights, but $25
million is fast becoming the norm for
films that gross $100 million in their
first few weeks of distribution.
"Godzilla," once thought to be the
year's hottest event film, was dubbed a
disappointment when it garnered only
$25 million from NBC.
A $200 million gross brings an
entirely different bidding range. Universal got $85 million for its "Lost
World" movie, and Columbia TriStar
earned $50 million for "Men in Black."
"You already have bidding wars for
top actors, producers and writers. Why
should it surprise anybody that there
are now bidding wars for TV rights to
top movies ?" says Paul Dergarabedian.
acting president of film market
researcher Exhibitor Relations Inc.
Under Paramount's "Deep Impact"
deal with CBS, the film's TV rights deal
includes escalators that add to the
amount CBS pays if the film's gross tops
$150 million. As of last week, the film
had grossed about $130 million This
time, the studio took care not to repeat
the so- called humiliation of receiving a
paltry $30 million from NBC for "Titanic." With domestic receipts approaching
$600 million, "Titanic" is the top- grossing film of all time.
Spanish station delivers strong demos
By Steve McClellan
Spanish- language wxrv(TV) New
York showed surprising strength in
key demographic races during the
May sweeps, placing first among young
adult news viewers (18 -34) at 6-7 p.m.
and tying WABC -TV for first among newsviewing adults 18-49 at 6-6:30 p.m.
Those results come from the Nielsen
station index, which measures the entire
New York market, not just the Hispanic
household universe. In New York, Spanish- language households now account for
a little under 15% of the Nielsen sample in
the market, up from 12% just a few years
ago.
For its 6 -6:30 p.m. newscast, wxTv
doubled its rating and share (May 1998
versus May 1997) among adults 18-49, to
a
3/14, tying wAC -TV's rating/share in
the time period and beating WCBS -TV and
wNBC(TV). A year ago, WABC -TV did a
4.6/20 in the same demo and time period.
Despite the declines, WABC -TV still won
more key demographic races in news than
any other station in the market.
Researchers say that theres no direct correlation between wxTV's gains and WABCTv's losses.
wxTV, the Univision owned-and -operated station, was the top -rated station
among male news watchers 8-49 and 2554 at 6 -7 p.m. The demographic results
also reflect the station's household ratings
gains. This year wxTV had its best May
book ever, with a 23% gain, to a I.6/4.
may officials say they've been pushing Nielsen to get the percentage of Spanish- language households in the New York
ratings sample more in line with the universe percentage of 15.1%. They also say
that better promotion and more viewing
of the station in bilingual households has
helped to boost the numbers.
1
JUNE 22, 19118 / BROADCASTING
www.americanradiohistory.com
i
CABLE
51
BROADCASTING
JUNE 8 -14
Rufus! network prime
CHOICE
lime
NBC had its own 'three- peat,' with the NBA finals again taking
the top three slots. Game 6's post-game show came in fourth.
ratings according /o Nielsen
Week
38
45.
America's Funniest
30. Ev Loves Raymd 7.4/14
56. Suddenly Susan 5.6/11
84. Damon
4.0/8 109. Love Boat: The Next
Home Videos
26. Ev Loves Raymd 7.6/13
74. House Rules
4.8/8
87. Getting Personal
3.7/6
30. Ev Loves Raymd 7.4/12
64. Caroline in /City
5.2/9
30. Ev Loves Raymd 7.4/12
56. Caroline in /City
64. Ally McBeal
5.6/9
5.2/9
13.20/20
QC
s.
6.4/12
10.3/17
43 The Practice
6.5/11
40. Soul Man
6.8/13
46. Smthng So Right 6.3/11
18. Home
58. Michael Hayes
5.5/10
39. JAG
6.9/13
Imprvmnt 9.2/15
43. CBS Tuesday Movie
-
29. NYPD Blue
Stranger in My Home
61
7
6.5/11
7.1/12
5.5.11
64. The Nanny
30
41. Dharma & Greg
6.7/12
71. The
^O
33. Drew Carey
7.2/12
33. Public Eye
Z_
30
64. Ellen
5.2/8
Gumbel
?
Simple Life
5.0/9
1.4/2
112. Clueless
1.6/3
101. Moesha
2.3/4
103. In the House
2.2/4
36. Mad About You
7.1/13
37. NewsRadio
7'0/12
24. Frasier
8.5/14
Washington Capitals
107. Malcolm & Eddie 2.0/3
9.6/16
vs. Detroit Red Wings
103. Good News
16.
Just Shoot Me
89 Stanley Cup Finals
-
2.2/4
21. PrimeTime Live 9.1/15
54. Chicago Hope
}E
0
C'iU)
4.4/8
5.2/9
47. Promised Land
3.9/7
52. Working
6.0/11
3. NBA Finals Game
C{
D _:-
89 Prey
18.
3.3/6
47. ABC News
Thursday
Night
64. Fox Summer Movie
53
i
Sabrina/Witch
61. You Wish
':
0.3C
5.2/9
4-
50 Kids /Darndest
5.9/13
54. Boy Meets World 5.7/11
103. The Sentinel
9. Seinfeld
5.1/9
Matters
4.6/9
58. Nash Bridges
4.5/8
61. Early Edition
4.117
NOTE: THE FOLLOWING PROGRAMS WERE 15 MINUTES OR
86. Beyond Belief: Fact or
Fiction?
3.8/8
5-
88.
Millennium
3.6/7
4.6/10
Wonderful World of
Disney-The Big
Green
22. Touched by an Angel
9.3/19
12.5/25
1L8/21
SUNDAY 11. NBA FINALS TIP-OFF: GAME 6
10.5/22
Movie-Lightning
Jack
4.9/10
Profiler
33. Dateline NBC
98.0 MILLION
YELLOW TINT IS WINNER OF TIME SLOT
(NR) =NOT RANKED; RATING /SHARE ESTIMATED FOR PERIOD SHOWN
82 Cops
4.4/10
69 Cops
5 1/11
'PREMIERE
RESEARCH. CBS RESEARCH
SOURCES: NIELSEN MEDIA
GRAPHIC BY KENNETH RAY
63. AMW: America Fights
Back
78.
TOP TEN SHOWS OF THE WEEK ARE NUMBERED IN RED
HOMES
5.3/11
4.6/9
19.2/34
17.60 Minutes
7. NBA FINALS TIP.OFF: GAME 5
8. NBA FINALS TIP-OFF: GAME 4
TELEVISION UNIVERSE ESTIMATED AT
5.0/11
73. NBC Saturday Night
5.4/11
8.4/14
FRIDAY
WEDNESDAY
HOUSEHOLDS; ONE RATINGS POINT IS EQUAL TO 980,000 TV
4.8/10
7.6/15
4.3/7
1.8/3
7.2/15
111. Nick Freno
92. World's Funniest! 3.2/6
25. CBS Sunday Movie
Movie- Nowhere to
-
1. NBA Finals Game
6-
Chicago Bulls vs. Utah
Jazz
22.3/38
71. The
Simpsons
74. King of the Hill
77. The
X
-Files
5.0/9
110. Sister, Sister
4.8/8
107. Jamie Foxx Show 2.0/3
112.
Man Without a Face
7.0/11
AVG
Alright Already
8.0/14
SID AVG
52
6.0/11
8.1/14
BROADCASTING
&
6.9/12
9.4/16
CABLE
/
JUNE 22, 1888
11.7/21
10.2/17
4.4/8
6.9/11
1.8/3
103. Unhap Ever After 2.2/3
4.7i7
4. NBA Postgame 16.7/29
WED[
1.7/3
114. The Parent 'Hood 1.5/3
9.0/15
Hide
6.7/12
Utah Jazz vs. Chicago
Bulls
19.8/37
5.5/10
26. Walker, Texas Ranger
5.9/10
7.6/16
2. NBA Finals Game
95. ABC Saturday Night
37 ABC Sunday Night
2.4/4
83. New York Undercover
3.7/7
Medicine
Woman
4.8`9
2.6/5
95. The Wayans Bros. 2.6/4
93. Star Trek: Voyager
KEY: RANKING /SHOW [PROGRAM RATING /SHARE)
5.8/12
.
74.
4/19
10.5/18
26. Dateline NBC
6.1/12
78. Dr. Quinn,
-In
Videos
9.0/16
11
6.1/13
81. Step by Step
9.2/17
Movie
the Name
of the Father
2.6/5
2.3/4
95. The Smart Guy
41. World's Wildest Police
10. Just Shoot Me 10.6/18
11. ER
2.2/4
01. The Smart Guy
2.7/4 100. Steve Harvey
14.1/28
50. Candid Camera
78. Family
2.6/5
Q
93. Invasion America 2.7/5
LESS IN LENGTH AND WERE NOT INCLUDED ON THIS CHART:
5.4/11
18.20/20
2.5/5
5.4/10
9.7/18
6.2/11
5.4/10
69. Teen Angel
Slayer
2.5/4
Special -Nine Months
10.3/18
10.0/18
99. Buffy the Vampire
19.1/33
15. Friends
Diagnosis Murder
92/16
14.48 Hours
6.2/11
6.7/13
Q
Bulls
5.7/10
22. Veronica's Gist
-.-
95. Invasion America 2.6/4
2.4/4
47.3rd Rock fr /Sun 62/12
8.5/15
85. C-16
3.3/6
12.8/22
Utah Jazz vs. Chicago
30
89. 7th Heaven
3.3/6
6. Dateline NBC
with Bryant
7.2/12
115. Clueless
13.0/23
13.3/24
5.2110
1.9/3
5. Dateline NBC
6.0/10
58. Spin City
-
-
Wave
2.1/4
2.7/4
2.4/4
3.0/5
1.6/2
r,
BROADCASTING
GET WITH THE PROGRAM
By Joe
Schlosser
elected two new directors:
David Hanna,
president/GM of Lockwood Broadcasting Inc.,
and Randy Rigby, GM of
KJZZ -TV Salt Lake City.
Neither of the two has
served previously. The
board has 10 members.
les and WMAQ -TV Chicago.
Cable channel Speedvision
and New Line Television
will co- produce and develop the motor sports weekly series for fall 1999.
Paxson joins TVB
Television Bureau of
Advertising has signed
up 30 Paxson -owned TV
stations and Pax Net, the
upcoming TV network.
That brings TVB's total
membership to 457 stations, the highest it's been
in at least 10 years -as far
back as existing records go,
according to a TVB
spokesperson.
The
Gerber
Gerber signs
with Fox
Fminer All American
Television President
David Gerber has signed a
contract with Fox Television Studios to produce
original series and long form programming for
broadcast, cable and international markets. Gerber is
currently producing a two hour made- for-TV movie
for ABC: The Sky's on
Fire is scheduled to air
next season. He was president of All American until
its recent acquisition by
Pearson. Before All American he was chairman of
MGM Worldwide Television Group, overseeing
such series as NBC's In
the Heat of the Night and
ABC's thirtysonredring.
Conrad to chair UPN
affil board
UI'N's altiliate board of
governors has elected
a new chairman: Mark
Conrad, VP/GM of
wJZV(TV) Belmont /Charlotte, N.C. Conrad has
been on the board since
1995. The outgoing chairman is Michael Lambert,
president of Lambert Television. The board also
Reggie White
forming TV studio
Teen Bay Packers star
VI
Reggie White couldn't
get a gig with CBS Sports
as an NFL analyst, so he's
starting his own TV studio. The outspoken defensive end is opening Reggie
White Studios in downtown Denver. The $100
million studio will produce made- for-TV movies
and cable programming.
White's partners are Colorado Rockies Vice Chairman Richard Monfort and
Denver businessman Rodney Linafelter.
Racing for fall
New Line Television
has cleared Speedvision: NASCAR at 50 in
more than 90% of the
country and plans to
develop a syndicated
weekly series for 1999.
Clearances for NASCAR at
50 include WABC -TV New
York, KcAL(TV) Los Ange-
Rollins
New job, mate
for Rollins
SKerrie Rollins, execu-
tive vice president,
network communications,
ABC Television Network,
is joining Children's Television Workshop, where
she will oversee both the
marketing and communications departments.
Rollins said last week that
she will join CTW toward
the end of July, after helping ABC with the transition. Separately, Rollins
confirmed reports that she
and ABC News President
David Westin are engaged
to be married. She said
that while they haven't set
a date, the two are planning a fall wedding.
Protter upped at
The WB
WB Telex ision Network has promoted
Hal Protter from VP to
senior VP and head of
affiliate relations. He will
continue to report to Ken
Werner, executive VP for
The
distribution. Protter's
appointment comes as the
network attempts to attract
new affiliates and improve
the performance of existing stations. Jenny
Sanders, previously a contract administrator for the
network, becomes manager of affiliate relations.
Promotion at
Star Fleet
Brannon Braga was
named executive producer of Star Trek: Voyager as the UPN show began production on its fifth
season. Braga was co -executive producer last year;
he takes on many of the
duties of former co- executive producer Jeri Taylor,
who is retiring. Braga
began as an intern on the
show in 1990. Rick Berman, the standard -bearer
on all Star Trek TV shows
and movies since creator
Gene Roddenberry's
death, will also hold the
title of executive producer
on this year's Voyager.
TV skews family life
Broadcast television
uffers a skewed depiction of Americans' lives,
according to a study by
the National Partnership
for Women & Families.
The study, released last
week, looked at two
weeks of prime time on all
six commercial broadcast
networks. The study found
that of 150 episodes
screened, only 13 dealt
with work /family conflict.
Other findings; 34% of the
TV moms work for pay,
while 67% of real -life
mothers do; 14% of adult
TV characters are over 50,
while 38% of the nation's
adult population falls into
that category; just 26 of
820 adult TV characters
had children over 6 -and
42% of the time, it was
impossible to tell who was
looking after the kids.
JUNE 22, 1898
www.americanradiohistory.com
BROADCASTING & CABLE
53
BROADCASTING
Radio Unica delivers World Cup
By Kristine Lamm
adio
SS
Unica,
which
just
announced the $21 million purchase of KBLA(AM) Los Angeles
(B &C, June 1), is offering exclusive
Spanish- language coverage of the
1998 World Cup.
"It's like 32 days of Super Bowls for
us," says Nickie Jurado, Unica's director of communications. The network
began its exclusive Spanish -language
coverage of the 1998 World Cup on
June 10 with a game between Scotland
and Brazil. Although the network has
`r
Spanish -langua
listeners to the
World Cup can
hear 50 games
on Radio
Unica's 66 mr
U.S. affiliates.
launched a promotional campaign
using TV, radio and print, "even if we
didn't spend a dollar, the way Hispan-
ics are, they would all know about
this," she says.
With the purchase of KBLA, Unica
owns nine stations. In addition, it has
66 affiliates across the country. World
Cup soccer is "an awesome opportunity -not only for our listeners, but for
advertisers as well," Jurado says.
Radio Unica is broadcasting 50 of the
World Cup's 64 games from France.
There is no need to tape -delay any of
the contests because -despite the
nine -hour time difference between the
U.S. and France -all the games will
take place during morning and afternoon drive. "Unlike other World Cups,
this [one] falls perfectly into radio
broadcast times."
Altoids mint advertisements. The show "promises to cause accidents, traffic snarls and fresh breath
for Chicago's commuters."
A Disney ending
Chicago's WFMT to
broadcast N.Y.
Philharmonic
he New York Philharmonic Orchestra has
reached well beyond the
Big Apple to tap the Fine
Arts Network of Chicago's WFMT(FM) to produce
and distribute its live
national radio series, starting with the 1998 -99 season. The series, underwritten by Time Warner, also
will expand from nine to
12 live broadcasts starting
in September.
Many decades of live
Philharmonic radio broadcasts went dark for an
eight -year period -until
1997, when Time Warner
pitched in. The Philharmonic was the first
orchestra featured in a live
broadcast, starting in
1922. The live program,
which went national in
1930, was a popular Sunday afternoon radio fea54
BROADCASTING & CABLE
ture in many markets from
1928 to 1958.
The WFMT Fine Arts
Network was established
22 years ago to produce
and air Chicago Symphony concerts. It serves
more than 500 stations in
North America and
Europe with full -length
commercial -free concerts
featuring several orchestras and operatic and fine
arts companies.
Candy is dandy
billboard promoting WCX(FM)'s
Mancow in the Morning
plays off the popular
This new
Disney is sending
Radio
seven -year-old Shaun
Bosse of Dorchester,
Mass., and his family to
Disney World. The trip is
a reward for the child's
donation of $98 (his life's
savings) to local families
whose homes were
recently destroyed by fire.
The boy had been saving
to help pay for a family
trip to the theme park. His
fourth -grade class at St.
Margaret's Covenant
School in Dorchester also
raised money for the fire
victims and was rewarded
last Tuesday (June 16)
with a class party hosted
Sign of the times
in Chicago?
'MANCOW
MORNINGS'
JUNE 22, 1990
www.americanradiohistory.com
by Radio Disney. Radio
Disney has 24 affiliates
across the country,
including WPZE(AM)
Boston.
Wolfman Jack
wouldn't have had
this problem
ate -night DJs just
aren't loud enough,
evidently. A recent study
published in the Journal
of the American Medical
Association says that
sleepy drivers cause 3% of
U.S. highway accidents,
100,000 police- reported
crashes per year. Worst of
all, turning up the radio
won't help. "The only
way to reverse the physiological need for sleep is to
sleep," the study says.
Wanna talk?
wDB(FM)
Philadelphia
TT is looking for new
talent in every corner of
the Delaware Valley. The
station is holding public
auditions for talk show
hosts this week (June 2125) and has invited anyone to try out. The winner
will be offered a one-week
contract to co -host various
shows on the station.
BroadcaslPAgBCahle
U In
L L
11J
Interactive Ch. to focus on digital delivery
Analog distribution dropped after test of sen'ice offering VOD, Internet access, e- commerce
five Telephone Network
By Price Colman
(ter a launching a high -
profile test of its Interactive Channel in Colorado Springs in late 1996,
...,,.,,.,
President John Reed. Instead,
Source could see a digital
cable future taking shape and
wanted to catch that wave
CHANNEL
tir
Source Media and its partners
in the test quietly pulled the
plug in April.
It wasn't that the test was
unsuccessful, says Source
- INTERACTIVE
!..
T NETWORK
T m
uri
1,11,
n
1...
Jr..!41!
t
,
IOUICINIOII
rloflu
("7:17"..".,.
Sta,
e,,,
.,t
RODEN
_
drive .e .i.,
!
1
IONS
tive advertising, electronic
commerce and VOD, Reed
says.
remoras-rim .
Source Media is retooling its Interactive Channel
before it crested.
with or without Source's software.
Dallas -based Source may be small
At the same time, "Source has some
with a market cap of roughly $300 million -but it's placing a big bet on that wonderful technology in the form of
digital cable future. Its ante: an Interac- applications they have written or can
tive Channel retooled for digital distri- write," says David Robinson, GI's vice
bution and proprietary software intend- president and general manager of digital network systems. "We're excited
ed to permit 'Net surfing on the tube
without aid of a modem.
about that."
Source has an agreement with GI
Reed says the software, called Virtual Modem and SourceWare, would dating back to 1996 that allows Source
enable the current generation of Gener- applications to be used on GI digital
boxes. The company reached a similar
al Instrument digital set- tops -the
DCT - 000, DCT - 200 and DCT - agreement with Scientific -Atlanta in
offer true video on demand late 1997.
2000
With three divisions- Interactive
(VOD). Executives at GI counter that
the boxes already are capable of that, Channel, Virtual Modem and Interac-
-to
satellite or terrestrial microwave. Such transactions include Internet surfing, interac-
VI
,.
-
Source's corporate structure is
complex. But at its foundation
are patents that Reed believes
give Source a piece of any
"addressed" electronic transaction that occurs over cable,
-
1
"The company as a whole is
really positioned as a portal to
a local online experience
deliver advertising sales and localized
content over the Web and interactive
voice over the Interactive Channel,"
-to
Reed says.
The patents-which date to the mid1980s and an early interactive television
trial called Telaction that was backed by
J.C. Penney and a Canadian company
play a pivotai
called Cableshare
role in Source's future. Guided by the
prominent Palo Alto, Calif., intellectual
property rights law firm, Wilson Sonsi-
-will
ni Goodrich Rosatti, Source recently
sued privately held WorldGate, claiming patent infringement.
"If the patents are enforceable,
Diversity takes center stage at TCI meeting
Tele- Communications Inc.'s 1998 annual shareholder
meeing was a far cry from the year before, when chairman John Malone issued his "beware Microsoft" warning.
But it wasn't absent a few controversial moments as
representatives of the Rev. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow PUSH Coalition took the MSO to task for allegedly discriminating against minorities in the delivery of products
and services.
Daring the informal question /answer portion of the
meeting, Washington attorney Thomas A. Hart, representing the coalition, accused the cable industry in general and TCI specifically of redlining -deliberately
delaying network upgrades in low- income neighborhoods and thus denying delivery of such advanced services as cable modems and digital cable. Hart also chided CI for lack of minorities on its board.
The allegations by Hart, who also praised TCI stock
performance, prompted Malone to respond that "We're
business to serve all our customers, and minority cus-
i
tomers are among our best." Malone also pointed out
that TCI has been a longtime financial backer of Black
Entertainment Television, will begir delivering multiplexed channels for Hispanic audiences later this fall
and, through its programming arm, Liberty Media, is
majority owner of the International Channel, wnich provides diverse cultural programming.
The response from TCI President Leo Hindery. who
has placed considerable emphasis on the diversity
issue, was a passionate rebuttal: "This company takes
the issue of diversity as seriously-as I hope Mr. Hart
and the Rev. Jackson now know -as any industry or
company in the country." He added that he's conducting
an ongoing discussion with Jackson and NAACP Chairman Julian Bond on the issue.
Adding that redlining is unacceptable and won't be
countenanced at TCI, Hindery said that TCI's policy iE
to provide "all of the services all of the time to all of the
-Price Calmar
people."
-
JUNE 22, 1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
!
BROADCASTING & CABLE
55
they're sitting on well over $ I billion in
value," says Anthony Stoss of Southeast Research Partners, which has a buy
recommendation on Source stock. "1f
¡the patents] cover Internet access,
VOD and interactive advertising, then
these guys are ripe for takeover."
Because of takeover speculation
Yahoo! pops up frequently as a potential acquirer- Source stock (Nasdaq:
SRCM) has been subject to wide fluctuations. Over the past month alone it has
ranged from $13.50 to $17.3125. It has
traded recently at about $16.
Stoss isn't alone in his buy recommendation. Ted Henderson at Janco
Partners, Steve Mazur at Gleacher
NatWest and James Thayer at Prudential Securities all are recommending
-
Source as a buy.
"It's a smoky battlefield," says Henderson of the interactive television sec-
tor. "The true driver is when the Interactive Channel is launched in a major
cable system."
That raises a key question: Why
aren't cable operators carrying the
Interactive Channel, with its mix of
local news, weather, sports, online
newspaper and interactive shopping? In
addition to the Colorado Springs test,
which was conducted jointly by Source,
Century Communications and the city's
Gazette newspaper, the Interactive
Channel is being tested on a 23,000 subscriber cable system in Denton,
Tex., that Marcus Cable acquired from
Sammons in 1995. Interactive Channel
also has a corporate -level carriage
agreement with Cablevision Systems
that hasn't yet produced a launch.
"This is vaporware," says one shortseller about the Interactive Channel. "I
don't think the technology works, and
CABLE'S TOP 25
I
1
f
Nickelodeon's 'Blues Clues Birthday' special
delivered 2.5 million kids 2 -11 on Sunday
night, finishing first in that demo for that
time period.
Following are the top 25 basic cable programs for the week of June 8 -14, ranked by rating. Cable rating is coverage area rating within each basic cable network's universe: U.S. rating is of 98 million TV
households.
Rank Program
1
2
3
4
5
5
5
8
9
9
9
12
12
12
12
16
16
16
19
19
21
21
21
21
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
25
58
South Park
WWF Wrestling
WCW Monday Nitro
WWF Wrestling
WCW Monday Nitro
WCW Monday Nitro
Thunder
Rugrats Vacation
Rugrats
Rugrats
Thunder
Blues Clues Birthday
Angry Beavers
Movie: 'Dead by Sunset,' Part 2.
Movie: 'She Fought Alone'
Rugrats
Doug
NHL Hockey: Washington vs. Detroit
Angry Beavers
Rugrats
Hey Arnold
Looney Tunes
Journey of Allen Strange
Doug
Rugrats
Tiny boons Adventures
Rugrats
The Brady Bunch
Blues Clues
Rugrats
Blues Clues
Blues Clues
Network Day
COM
USA
TNT
USA
TNT
TNT
TBS
NICK
NICK
NICK
TBS
NICK
NICK
LIFE
LIFE
NICK
NICK
ESPN
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
NICK
BROADCASTING L CABLE / JUNE 22, 1988
Rating
Time Duration Cable U.S.
Wed 10:00P
Mon 10:00P
Mon 8:OOP
Mon
Mon
Mon
Thu
8:57P
10:OOP
9:00P
9:03P
7:30P
Tue
Sun 10:OOA
Sat 10:OOA
Thu 8:05P
Sun 8:00P
Sat 10:30A
Sat 10:00P
Mon 9:00P
Thu 7:30P
Tue
7:00P
Thu
8:0013
Sun 10:30A
Wed 7:3013
Sun 11:OOA
Sun 9:OOA
Tue
8:00P
Mon 7:00P
Sat
8:00P
Sat
9:30P
Fri
7:30A
Thu
Thu
Thu
Wed
9:OOp
9:30A
8:30A
9:30A
Mon 9:30A
30
63
63
165
60
120
69
60
30
5.2
4.4
4.3
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.9
3.8
Cable
Share
2.7
3.3
3.2
2,572
3,253
3.164
7.9
7.4
6.8
3.1
3,009 6.9
2,937 7.5
2,773 6.6
2,926 6.6
2,765 6.1
2,626 7.1
2,508 11.3
2,482 5.5
3.0
3.0
3.1
2.8
30
3.4
69
3.4
30
30
120
3.4
3.3
3.2
120
3.2
3.2
2.4
2.5
2.5
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
3.1
2.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
2.2
30
30
30
30
30
30
58
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
3.4
HHs
(000)
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.9
2.1
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
2,461
2,393
2,362
6.4
6.4
5.0
6.2
2,329
2,322 5.1
2,245 5.9
2,240 5.5
2,233 5.4
2,227 4.8
2,224 10.9
2,268 5.6
2,211 4.6
2,164 4.9
2,145 4.7
2,123 4.8
2,121
5.0
2,092 10.2
2,077 4.7
2,123
4.8
2,121
5.0
2,092 10.2
even if it does, it's not going to sell."
The same short- seller has equally negative opinions about WorldGate and
Wink, two other key players in the
interactive television arena.
MSOs' reluctance to take Interactive
Channel may be the result of the baggage such carriage would bring in an
analog environment: an additional
"sidecar" converter solely for the channel, a $6.95- per -month fee to subscribers and use of an increasingly
valuable 6 mhz chunk of spectrum.
Reed calls the Colorado Springs test
success, saying that 20% of subscribers who took the network tuned in
daily, and 70% saw it weekly. Reed
declined to disclose how many customers in the 105,000- subscriber system paid to get the channel. According
to published reports, the channel had
about 3,000 subs, or about 2.8% of the
market.
So why drop it? "We just didn't
think the public was responding dwell
enough] to justify devoting 6 mhz of
bandwidth to that particular service,"
says Dan Gold, president of Century
Comunications' Century Cable division.
Chris Anderson, president /publisher
of the Gazette, calls the trial "a great
a
experiment," although
he acknowledges that chum was high. According
to some sources, it hit 100% a month in
the latter stages of the test, necessitating
frequent costly service calls to remove
and reinstall the special converter box.
Gazette parent Freedom Newspapers
maintains an equity stake in Source,
although David Kuykendall, Freedom's
CFO, has resigned his position on
Source's board. Anderson says that's
because the company's confident
enough of its investment in Source that
it no longer feels a need to have a representative on the board.
With Source essentially shutting
down the analog version of Interactive
Channel to focus on the digital platform, where the channel would be
offered free, MSOs may be skittish
about carrying the network until patent
issues are resolved.
"A lot of companies are making
noise" about their patents, says a source
at a large MSO. "We're not sure of the
substance beneath it."
Source has about $100 million in debt
financing to fund development of the
Interactive Channel and its Virtual
Modem technology, but a substantial
portion of that is escrowed to pay interest
on the 12% bonds. At the end of the first
"Doing the right thing often
comes with a. price..."
11
veryone was put here for a
purpose. With all modesty, I
now believe that mine was to
change the cable industry in a
'Short period of time. I didn't know what my
purpose was for a long, long time; didn't
really know what it was until this year."
"I don't remember not working. I was nine when
I started working in the fields. I was 13 when I
left home, independent of my parents, I worked
in the shipyards -graveyard shift-and drove
trucks in the afternoon for United Parcel all
through college, went in the Merchant Marine
for two years between high school and college"
"I was blessed to be educated both in high school
and college by Jesuits. And so, in effect, educators
changed my life. They got me through; they gave
me this intellectual curiosity. They taught me
how to work really hard."
went to business school at Stanford and met
this wonderful, esteemed man -Edmund
Littlefield-who should never have hired me.
There were 300 of us in the business school,
any one of whom, on paper, was preferable to
me, I thought. He hired me, changed my life
and taught me everything I ever needed to
know about business, and ethics, and values."
"1
would rather be chairman of
C -SPAN than any other thing -literally any other
thing that could happen to me... I don't think
there's anything any industry has ever done,
certainly not this industry, that's as notable
as C -SPAN. In no other society of the world is
there that degree of intimacy with its political
institutions that C -SPAN brings... Somebody
out there is going to be president of the United
States because of C -SPAN. Somebody will have
gotten turned on to politics through C -SPAN
who's going to change the world."
"In this industry,
I
"I want to spend the money that I have to spend
for C -SPAN. I am actually gratified by the
substantial money which my company spends for
C -SPAN because I want TCI to know that doing
business well comes at a price. Doing the right
thing often comes with a price "
Leo
Hindery
"About my tenure at ICI, I want people to say
in roughly five years, 'It was ore of the finest
shareholder efforts ever and they really were
an industry leader.'"
President
Tele -Communications, Inc.
Chairman
C -SPAN
Executive Committee
C-SPAN
Created by Cable.
Offered as a Public Service.
CABLE
quarter. Source had about $20 million in
cash available. With a quarterly cash
bum rate of about $5 million, plus cash
generated by its Interactive Telephone
(IT) Network division, the company figures it has 18 months to two years to
build the Interactive Channel business.
More conservative estimates indicate
that Source could mn out of cash by the
end of this year or early next.
While Reed says he's confident
of
the IT Network division's ability to
generate cash to support other operations, he acknowledges the need for an
eventual Interactive Channel launch by
a major MSO. As a fallback position,
the company could rely on licensing its
proprietary technology. hut that's a
move Reed says he's reluctant to make.
"The history of patents and licensing
actually favors openness." he says.
"This market in the end will be no different. The strategy for Source is not to
be a passive player but to actively work
to become a great solution for programmers and distributors in the marketplace."
`Moneyline' embraces inflation
Show becomes an how; starting at 6:30, adding mix of general news
By John M. Higgins
ru.hing
off
an
uack on its fran-
chise
business
news show by CNBC.
CNN is expanding its
nightly Money line to an
hour and broadening its
casters' evening newscasts while also drawing
Money line's traditional
audience.
Moneyline's 0.6 average Nielsen
rating is
about 50% higher than
what CNN currently gets
at 6:30 with the second
half of CNN World View.
coverage to include more
general news.
Moneyline anchor Lou
Beginning today (June
Dobbs says that the entire
22). Moneyline Newsluushow will retain Moneywill start at 6:30 p.m. ET. Lou Dobbs says the extra line's reporting style and
bumped up from the tra- time will allow 'Moneyline' will put a business spin
ditional 7 p.m. slot the to tackle longer stories.
even on most general
show has occupied for 18 years. More
news stories. "You will be receiving
significantly, instead of focusing strict- almost all the traditional Moneyline,"
ly on business news, the first half -hour Dobbs says, adding that extra time
of Moneyline will include in the top means that the show can broaden its
general news of the day.
coverage a bit and do longer features.
CNN President Tom Johnson ex- "We now have the time for major takeplained that the move is an attempt to outs." he says.
lure more viewers away from the broadThe move comes eight months after
EchoStar, Loral in DBS venture
EchoStar Communications Corp. and Loral Skynet are allying to deliver
niche programming, including ethnic and business services, from Loral's Tel star 5 bird at 97 degrees west longitude. The alliance is intended to provide
a distribution vehicle for smaller, less-established niche services that can't
afford to run from EchoStar slots at 61.5 degrees and 148 degrees. One
potential side effect is that EchoStar could gain capacity for delivering more
local- into-local programming from those two slots. In addition, by delivering
the service from the 97 degree slot, EchoStar gains reach into the
Caribbean, Alaska and Hawaii that it does not have on its full -CONUS bird at
119 degrees. Loral will be the distributor; EchoStar, through its terrestrial
infrastructure, will handle uplinking, billing and customer service for the new
services. The niche programming will be packaged separately from
EchoStar's Dish Network and will include the option to add 20 basic cable
channels and three premium channels.
The service will require a 90- centimeter-slightly under three-foot-dish
and receiver. A future -generation EchoStar receiver will permit reception of
Dish Network and the niche services through a single receiver with a single
conditional- access smart card. The separate larger dish antenna would still
be required for the niche services. Pricing and branding for the new service
haven't been determined.
58
BROADCASTING & CABLE
JUNE 22, 1998
CNBC tried to attack Dobbs' franchise
with its own high -profile 7 p.m. show,
Business Center. That program
launched last October with tremendous
hype, particularly of co- anchor Maria
Bartiromo, who was dubbed "The
Money Honey" in some articles.
CNBC gave Business Center a huge
budget that network staffers pegged at
$10 million in its first year.
Business Center's launch has been a
bit rocky. Average Nielsen ratings are
short of the network's expectations,
coming up about 40% shy of the initial
0.5 guarantee. When parent broadcaster NBC cut a deal with Geraldo Rivera,
he told one newspaper that he would be
taking Business Center's 7 p.m. slot.
But that was quickly knocked down by
CNBC President Bill Bolster. "We're
very bullish on Business Center," Bolster says. "It's a very profitable show."
The goal was to replace what was
largely a straight stock market show,
Money Club. with a slicker, jazzier program that would appeal to younger
audiences. What wound up on the air
was Business Week meets Entertain men! Tonight-sort of business -lite
focusing on soft features and lots of
entertainment news.
That hit a with a thud. CNBC pulled
the show back, changing producers and
focusing back on hard stories and market news. Bolster says the show is on
track and in no danger. Total household ratings are still above those of the
show that Business Center replaced,
and he contends that Business Center is
outperforming Moneyline in adults 2554, which he identifies as his target.
Dobbs says that he is unconcerned
by the competition: "We do what we
do very well."
And now he'll be doing more of it.
Moneyline's high- income, baby boomer
demos give the show's advertising some
of the best CPMs in cable.
CIBLE
Fox Family plans
Jordan bio
Brill makes
headlines with
first issue
will watch
media watchdog Steve
Brill'? Just about all the
other media, it turns out.
Brill, the ex Court TV
CEO, certainly made a big
splash at his new gig,
media criticism magazine
Brill's Content, by throwing a glittery launch party
and igniting a media
firestorm. About a year
after getting ousted from
the legal network and
companion American
o who
schmooze spot, the Four
Seasons, that was overstuffed with media bigwigs. 60 Minutes' Mike
Wallace and Morley Safer
staked out opposite ends
of the room but had not
yet read the two articles
slamming their show.
"I've haven't had a chance
yet," Wallace said. ER star
George Clooney, who
wrote an article in the premiere issue slamming the
media's overblown coverage of celebrities, stopped
by with his father, Nick,
former news anchor and
director for WKRC -TV
Lawyer publishing operation,
Brill shepherded
his media watchdog magazine out
of the gate with a
21 -page story
("Pressgate")
about coverage of
the Monica
Lewinsky scan-
dal. Among other
things, the story
Former Beetle Ringo Starr and Bill
contended that
Flanagan, VHI's VP for editorial
independent
specials, following the taping of
'Ringo Starr Storytellers,' which
counsel Ken Starr
premieres on the cable channel on
admitted that he
Sunday, June 28.
and his staff had
leaked grand jury testimoCincinnati. Other guests
ny to reporters- which, if
included former FCC hontrue, would be illegal. Ken
chos Reed Hundt and
Starr blasted back at Brill
Blair Levin, plus Fox
in a 19 -page letter, saying
News President Roger
that his accusations "borAiles.
dered on libel."
It's not clear when Brill
Brill made the rounds
picked up a distaste for
of the Sunday chat shows,
grand jury leaks. He happlus Larry King Live and
pily relied on leaked grand
Charlie Rose, as reporters
jury testimony to write
that he had slammed
"The Teamsters," the
howled in protest on other
scathing book that
outlets and picked apart
launched his career. "I
weaknesses in his story.
guess I wouldn't have
That set the stage for an
been able to do The
extremely upbeat party at
Teamsters', would I ?"
Manhattan's central
Brill said.
Fox Family Channel is
searching for an actor to
play Michael Jordan for a
movie biography of the
Chicago Bulls superstar to
air on the channel. Michael
Jordan: The Untold Story
of an American Hero is
scheduled for an early 1999
debut. The script is being
written by Michael J. Murray, whose credits include
Honor Thy Father and
Mother: The True Story of
the Menendez Killings for
Fox and Witches for ABC.
MN emphasizes
online synergy
Don't look for MTV
restaurants anytime
soon.
MTV Networks
Chairman Tom Freston
told an opening
Promax/BDA convention
crowd in Toronto last
Wednesday that there is a
difference between leveraging a brand and "beating
it to death." The latter, he
said, can do "irreparable
damage." Freston said that
the fundamental challenge
for his company is to integrate its networks and new
online services. To do that,
it must make the entertainment networks more interactive and the online sites
more entertaining, he said.
Freston called online sites
a "perfect complement" to
MTV networks, pointing
out that the same viewers
who watch MTV and
Nickelodeon are the heaviest Web users.
Sinclair envisions
cable on air
inclair Broadcast
Group Inc. is considering offering an over-theair service of the most
popular cable networks
coupled with the broadcaster's own local offer ings-at a much lower
cost than local cable sys-
tems. "We could put up 12
channels ourselves," says
Nat Ostroff, vice president
of new technology at Sinclair. "At that point we are
a
multichannel provider,
and under the Cable Act
we are entitled to buy that
programming.... We
would like to be able to do
a condensed over-the -air
cable -like service as an
option to viewers, at a
fraction of the cost of
cable." Ostroff says Sinclair is talking with stations in Baltimore about
partnering in that kind of
service and competing
with local cable systems.
A future for
`TV Guide'?
I
1
Guide executives
say that they have no
intention of dropping the
printed version of the
company's TV listings in
the wake of their deal to
sell to United Video Satellite Group, parent of Pre vue Guide. The magazine
issued a statement rebutting a wire report that
executives were consider-
ing making TV Guide a
glossy news and features
magazine, dropping the fat
section of detailed TV
schedules that makes up
the bulk of the publication.
"Accurate television programming listings are the
backbone of the new TV
Guide branded products,"
News America Publishing
Group Chairman Anthea
Disney said in a statement.
Primestar, UVSG
deal shelved
l
rimestars $480 million acquisition of
United Video Satellite
Group's Superstar/Netlink
C -band business is on
hold -perhaps permanentunless Primestar can
get Justice Department
approval for taking over
ly-
the 110 degree west longitude high -power slot.
JUNE 22, 1998 I BROADCASTING & CABLE
59
DBS prepares for break -even
Strong subscriber growth is boosting cash floe
By
Price Colman
Domestic DBS operators say they
won't raise prices in the next 12
months. Nonetheless, most
expect to reach cash -flow break -even
by the end of next year at the latest.
DBS executives delivered projections at the Global DBS Summit last
week in Denver.
Industry leader DirecTV should hit
cash -flow break -even at the "low 4
million subscribers" level, said Eddy
Hartenstein, president of the DBS
provider. Assuming that DirecTV can
maintain the strong subscriber- growth
trend it has shown in the first five
months of 1998, the company should
emerge from negative cash flow before
the end of the year.
Earnings break -even, an equally
important yardstick for an industry
with a history of subsidizing subscriber
growth, will come as DirecTV
approaches
5
million subscribers,
tice Department. O'Brien says that
Primestar is conducting talks with a
variety of potential financial and
strategic partners who would reduce
what's currently 96% equity and voting control of Primestar by cable or
cable -related companies. O'Brien
says that the approach is low -risk for
potential investors, because a buy -in
would be contingent on the Justice
Department giving a green light to
the Primestar /ASkyB merger.
O'Brien also says it's unlikely that
Primestar's cable owners would entirely divest their equity interests. A more
likely scenario is a shift in ownership
of Primestar supervoting (IO votes per
share) B shares.
Resolution of ownership of the 110
degree slot may be the issue du jour,
but subscriber growth remains the
overriding concern for DBS operators. Chuck Hewitt, president of the
Satellite Broadcasting and Communications Association, predicts that the
industry -including C- band -will
pass the 10 million subscriber mark
handily this year. And the more bullish industry leaders say that the next
IO million should come as, if not
more, easily.
The biggest cloud on that horizon is
the cable industry's launch of digital
cable as a competitor to DBS. But so
far, that's a non -issue, DBS executives
say. O'Brien, calling digital cable a
"flawed product" because it combines
analog and digital offerings, questions
whether consumers will be satisfied
with a hybrid package, compared with
DBS's all- digital selection.
Consensus among the DBS executives is that the rollout of digital cable
will take longer than the cable industry says, giving DBS ample time to
capture customers. If anything, digital
cable represents more opportunity
than threat for DBS, says USSB's
Hubbard: "When you look at digital
cable alongside satellite, it puts customers in a shopping mode. Customers buy for choice, quality and
value. I think digital cable is going to
put more customers into a buying role
with more average families looking at
DBS."
Hartenstein projects.
EchoStar Communications Corp.'s
Dish Network anticipates hitting
cash -flow and earnings break -even
Knowledge, Conus team up
next year, said Dish Network President John Reardon. And U.S. Satellite Broadcasting, DirecTV's partner
in the DSS consortium, expects cash flow break -even next year and earnings break -even in 2000, according to
USSB President Stanley E. Hubbard.
Only Dan O'Brien, president of
Primestar Inc., was wary about making projections about break -even
deal with
Conus Com-
thresholds, saying it "depends."
munications last
A
key variable for Primestar is if and
when it gains Justice Department
approval for taking over the 110
degree west longitude orbital slot
from News Corp. /MCI joint venture
ASkyB. Also, because the vast majority of Primestar customers lease
rather than buy hardware, the compa-
ny's subscriber acquisition costs of
some $700 per customer are about
75% higher than competitors
DirecTV and Dish. That, in turn,
pushes out break-even.
On the 110 issue, O'Brien says that
there's
a
consensus among Prime -
star's cable owners "to sell down or
out if necessary in order to maximize
chances for approval" from the JusgQ BROADCASTING & CABLE
I JUNE
`Money Guide' will he first show from deal
By Donna
Petrozzello
Know ledge TV
signed a co- production
week, marking
o
the fifth time that
Knowledge
has
teamed with broadcast
news suppliers for original
prime time programming.
The Conus deal is similar to
others that Knowledge has made over
the past four years with A.H. Belo
Corp., Tribune Broadcasting, KRONTV San Francisco and KICU -TV San
Jose, Calif. Under terms of the deal,
Knowledge will cover Conus's cost
of producing Money Guide
30minute business news show and companion business news briefs. Knowledge expects to launch the show in
September.
-a
E2, 1888
www.americanradiohistory.com
Money Guide joins a host of
other original news shows that
Knowledge is moving to prime
time this fall in an effort to brand
the channel's programming around issues
Reof personal finance,
health and business,
says Bob Jones,
Knowledge TV vice
president of programming.
"The shows we'll place in prime
tune this fall contain all of the programming elements that define Knowledge TV," Jones says. "Each of them
serves as the backbone of the focus of
the network."
Along with Money Guide. Knowledge airs Pulse, a health news show
produced by Belo and licensed to
Knowledge. Knowledge will begin
co- producing the show with Belo this
fall, Jones says. Knowledge also airs
RX TV, a health news show that it coproduces with Tribune Broadcasting.
Knowledge pays $25,000 -$35,000
per hour to cover co- production costs
for Pulse. Money Guide and RX TV.
according to industry sources.
Knowledge also has licensing agreements to carry New Media News, produced by KRON-TV and to carry Silicon
Business Report, produced by KICU -TV.
And starting last year, Knowledge also
co- produces with KICU -TV a health and
lifestyle empowerment show, Meeting
the Challenge.
Knowledge is hacking the on -air
branding strategy with an aggressive
summer promotion campaign involving national print ads, radio campaigns
,
and targeted outdoor advertising,
according to Stan Weil, Knowledge
TV's executive vice president of
national ad sales.
Starting in September. Knowledge
will moee its weeknight 5 -7 p.m. block
of global language and culture shows
to weekday mornings and will begin
stripping Pulse and Money Guide at 5
p.m. and 6 p.m. ET, respectively. At
5:30, Knowledge will air a checkerboard of health news shows, and at
6:30 it will show a financial news
checkerboard. Knowledge also adds a
strip of Money Guide at 9 p.m. Monday- Thursday.
Knowledge will fill the remaining
prime time hours with a checkerboard
pattern of news shows about health,
finance and computers, Jones says. He
hopes to encourage appointment viewing, not only for Knowledge's series
but also for shows that air on a similar
topic each night at the same time: "We
want to be as predictable in our programming grid as possible to make our
original prime time lineup as accessible as possible."
Knowledge claims 22 million sub-
(Bonus Distribution at CTAM)
Issue Date: June 29
Ad Close: June 19
scribers (Nielsen ratings started in
January). The network earned an
average 0.1 rating /13,500 households
in prime time for May, according to
AD AGENCY
FORECAST
Nielsen.
Issue Date: July 13
Ad Close: July 3
Sundance gets boost from rebuilds
With analog capacity tight for most major MSOs, channels are racing to
get on new -product tiers on rebuilt systems. Sundance Channel is one of
them.
Sundance signed corporate carriage agreements with MediaOne and
Jones Intercable last week that are expected to place the independent film
network in front of 1.3 million -1.8 million additional subscribers over the
next six months. By the end of 1999, Sundance is hoping the deal will provide them with more than 5 million new subscribers.
Sundance expects to launch on MediaOne's rebuilt system serving New
England and suburban Boston in July. Jones's systems in a half dozen
markets -including Alexandria, Va.,- already have launched Sundance
to 280,000 homes. Sundance President Larry Aidem says that Sundance,
like others, is chasing "a window of opportunity" for analog carriage on
system rebuilds.
"There's no doubt that it's extremely difficult to get on analog," says
Aidem. "New product tiers have offered us a very welcome source of distribution."
The deals bring Sundance's subscriber base to more than 13 million in
mainly urban and suburban metro areas, Aidem says. Sundance also is
carried on Primestar, EchoStar and USSB.
In addition to launching Sundance, MediaOne will roll out Sci -Fi Channel, The History Channel, Speedvision, FXM: Movies from Fox, a series of
premium multiplex channels and up to 12 pay -per -view channels on its
rebuilt Boston system in July.
Jedd Palmer, senior vice president of programming for MediaOne, says
additional launches on MediaOne systems over the next 18 months
should place Sundance in front of almost 3 million new subscribers. Also,
the MediaOne deal locks Sundance into MediaOne's digital tier service
planned to roll out in Detroit this year, Palmer says.
While Sundance would not comment on whether it will pay a launch fee
to MediaOne and Jones, Aidem says that the network is providing cooperative marketing support "aimed at attracting people to Sundance and to
-Donna Petrozzello
the new product tiers."
CHILDREN'S
PROGRQMMINI_'
Issue Date: July 27
Ad Close: July 17
EMMY
NOMIII7T fWÇ
Issue Date: August 3
Ad Close: July 24
Issue Date: August 10
Ad Close: July 31
CALL TO ADVERTISE:
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JUNE 22, 10118 I BROADCASTING IL CABLE
81
r
BroadcastmgBCaóle
IIb
T
Microsoft, Compaq to make
tracks with Road Runner
$425 million deal presents many opportunities for synergies
By Richard Tedesco
Microsoft Corp. and Compaq
Computer last week won the
bidding war over
later net
sizable
piece of Road Runner and a bigger
piece of the action in cable software.
The $425 million that the two computer giants committed to Time Warner Cable and MediaOne represents
about a 20% equity stake in a business
that could directly and indirectly boost
bottom lines for Microsoft and Compaq. Anything that advances PC technology and penetration pushes software development for Microsoft and
drives PC sales for Compaq.
"We want to build off the technologies we have in existence and try to
offer those to the joint venture," says
Steve Guggenheimer, Microsoft group
product manager for its digital television unit.
Microsoft already has provided Road
Runner with a custom -tailored version
of its Internet Explorer Web browser.
Microsoft also could offer downloads of
a
its NetShow streaming technology
through Road Runner, or it could distribute software in a gaming site.
Guggenheimer, who doesn't rule anything out, says that various applications
of Microsoft assets to Road Runner
have been discussed with Time Warner
and MediaOne over the past year.
"Our fundamental offering to start
with is the [software] platform," says
Guggenheimer. "And secondarily.
there are services we can offer to run
on that platform."
Those services probably will include
games, according to Glenn Britt, president of Time Warner Cable Ventures.
Britt says that a prime objective of the
deal is to build Road Runner into a
more robust service.
As Microsoft develops new software
or customizes existing software for
Road Runner, Compaq has committed
to pushing cable -ready PCs into the
marketplace, which means more high -
82
BROADCABTIN6
I
CABLE / JUNE
22, 1000
al Roaalrxnner
similar overture from Oracle Corp.
and Intel Corp., but Britt would not
say how much better the winning
offer was.
The $425 million changed hands
last week as Road Runner and
MediaOne Express consummated
end machines with tuner cards and
built -in modems.
Time Warner saw a big advantage to
involving a major PC manufacturer to
help drive its data delivery business.
Having the largest manufacturer of
PCs involved will accelerate the
deployment of cable modems," Time
Warner Inc. Chairman Gerald Levin
says. "Compaq will have PCs with
cable modemsin them, which cuts out a
lot of things we do during an installa-
tion."
The $425 million package pitched
by Microsoft and Compaq overcame a
their consolidation deal. The money
will
be used to reduce Road Runner
debt and drive infrastructure development.
Time Warner Cable now effectively
holds a 37% stake in Road Runner, with
MediaOne at 34% and Advance/New
House holding some 10 %.
Road Runner expects to be in the
150,000 to 200,000 subscriber range by
year's end, according to Britt. The venture valued at some $4 billion today, currently boasts 90,000 users-more than
one -third of than MediaOne Express
customers.
MN cranks up
the AMPs
Electronic music site aims at tekkies
By Richard Tedesco
Electronic music and its PC-
savvy ravers got a boost
from MTV last week as the
network decided to offer a full featured AMP Website.
www.amp.mtv.com is intended as a companion to, and an
expansion of, the weekly late night AMP show that appeals to
the techheads who spend time on
MTV's site. Now they'll have an
online venue for original DJ
mixes played to animation sug-
AMP, MTV's latest
Website, is really
trippy.'
gesting the early days of psychedelic
rock. "It's really trippy, with neon
pinks and blues and animated characters that reappear through the loop,"
says Rick Holtzman, vice president of
programming and promotion for MTV
Online. "Think of it as a light organ for
the '90s."
AMP's online counterpart will also
carry music videos from the current
week's episode for streaming in
Real Video and RealAudio, along with
an archive of clips from past AMPs. A
selection of so- called electronica music
videos, both full -length and 30- second
clips, also is accessible for streaming.
AMP plans to create fresh animated
accompaniments to its original DJ
mixes each week -up to an hour in
length, Holtzman says. Most of the
available bandwidth is dedicated to
audio; a downloaded Java animation
file enables the visuals to work well
over 28.8 kb/s modem connections.
The aim is to create a 24 -hour electronica community, complete with chat
rooms. Live electronica online events
also are contemplated. And MTV plans
to expand treatment of all the musical
genres it covers online, according to
Holtzman.
"We plan to make a bigger deal
with each of the genres," he says. That
doesn't mean MTV will necessarily
spawn sites as full -blown as AMP for
any other genres. But it does mean it
intends to explore the possibilities,
especially if a particular musical style
appeals to an audience disposed to
buying CDs online through MTV's
commerce links.
Hands-on multimedia
from
By Richard
Philips
H -P,
Tedesco
HP Color Pal vita;
Takes Vnu PI t,
Oaline multimedia gets more
palatable and more portable
with the release of Hewlett Packard's 660LX palmtop PC.
In its second color palmtop
model, Hewlett- Packard has
upped multimedia speed and quality with an optional 56 kb/s wireless modem. Street price is
expected to be just under $1,000
when the palmtop starts shipping
next month. In a brief demo at last
week's PC Expo in New York
City, the new palmtop PC deliv-
Hewlett- Packard's 660LX palmtop PC will sell
for just less than $1,000 next month.
ered a remarkably rich screen
quality from an 8 x 4 -inch screen sporting a 256 -color display of 640 x 240
pixels.
H -P's new palmtop also will come
with 32 MB of RAM. The earlier H -P
620LX palmtop, introduced last
November, has a top memory capacity of 16 MB and offers an optional
14.4 kb /s modem, for about $200 less
than the new model. Both models use
Windows CE-and hence, Internet
Explorer -and work with a stylus
instead of a mouse.
Philips Mobile Computing Group
doubtless will make its presence felt in
the palmtop category with its latest
entry: a pocket -sized "personal companion," also based on Windows CE,
called Nino 300. Models with small
green screens in versions boasting 4
MB ($399) or 8 MB ($459) of RAM
were on display at PC Expo last week.
An optional modem will provide Internet access without a proper browser at a
rate of 19 kb/s.
This advance on Philips' Vero product barely approaches real PC status.
The new H -P color palmtop may have
a miniature screen, but PC users
blessed with good vision will find it a
real eye -opener in comparison with the
Philips product.
AOL tops Website ratings
The following are the most heavily
trafficked news and entertainment
Websites as categorized by BROAD CASTING & CABLE from the Relevant
Knowledge May 1998 survey of
Internet usage.
RelevantKnowledge maintains a
PC user sample base of 11,000.
These April numbers were based on
Internet usage data from 4,000
users with software downloaded in
PCs in households, workplaces and
schools. RelevantKnowledge estimates a universe of 57 million Web
users in the U.S.
The survey's leading sites,
AOL corn and MSN.com, are primar-
ily content aggregation sites.
Rank/site
Unique users
22,824,000
1. AOL.com
9,852,000
2. MSN.com
6,102,000
3. ZDNet.com
4,291,000
4. CNN.com
4,258,000
5. Pathfinder.com
3,793,000
6. MSNBC.com
7. Weather.com
3,482,000
8. ESPN SportsZone 3,281,000
2,627,000
9. USAToday
2,452,000
10. Disney.com
2,248,000
11. Broadcast.com*
2,164,000
12. ABCNews.com
1,803,000
13. CNet.com
1,784,000
14. WashingtonPost
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
Sony.com
1,719,000
CBS Sportsline
CNNSI.com
NYTimes.com
CNNfn.com
TVGEN.com
NBC.com
ABC.com
NASCAR.com
CBS.com
EOnline.com
News.com
PBS.org
DisneyBlast.com
MTV.com
Pointcast.com
ComedyCentral
1,693,000
1,661,000
1,558,000
1,449,000
1,324,000
1,251,000
1,143,000
1,012,000
1,113,000
1,080,000
1,040,000
991,000
843,000
834,000
815,000
771,000
'formerly AudioNet.con
JUNE 22, 1998 I BROADCASTING & CABLE
www.americanradiohistory.com
g$
Broslltasigabll
CHANGING HANDS
The week's tabulation of station sales
COMBOS
PROPOSED STATION TRADES
WGY(AM)-WRVE(FM) and WHRLIFM)
Albany, WADR(AM) -WRFM(FM),
WRNY(AM)-WSKS(FM) and
WUTQ(AM)-WOURIFM) Rome/Utica, all
N.Y.; WHP(AM)-WRVV(FM),
WKBOIAM), WWKL -AM -FM and
WRBT(FM) Harrisburg, WNTJ(AM)WMTZ(FM) Johnstown and WRAK(AMIWKSBIFM), WRKK(AM) and
WMYLIFMI Williamsport, all Pa.
Price: $85 million (stock- for -stock
By dollar volume and number of sales;
does not Include mergers or acquisitions
Involving substantial non -station assets
exchange)
Buyer. Clear Channel Communications Inc., San Antonio (L. Lowry
Mays. president) owns /is buying
146 FMs, 92 AMs and 11 TVs
Seller: Dame Media Inc., Harrisburg
Pa. (J. Albert Dame, chairman /CEO):
no other broadcast interests
Facilities: wGY(AM): 810 khz, 50 kw;
WRVE(FM): 99.5 mhz. 5.8 kw, ant.
282 m.; WHRL(FM): 103.1 mhz, 6 kw,
ant. 328 ft.; WADR(AM): 1480 khz, 5
kw; WRFM(FM): 93.5 mhz, 6 kw, ant.
73 m.; WRNY(AM): 1350 khz. 500 w
day, 60 w night; wsl<s(FM): 102.5
mhz, 27 kw, ant. 649 ft.;wuTG(AM):
1550 khz, kw: wouR(FM): 96.9
mhz. 16 kw, ant. 790 ft.; WHP(AM):
580 khz. 5 kw: wRvv(FM): 97.3 mhz,
17 kw, ant. 840 ft.; wKBo(AM): 1230
khz, kw; wwKL(AM): 1460 khz. 5
kw wwKL(FM): 99.3 mhz, 6 kw, ant.
328 ft.; WRBT(FM): 94.9 mhz. 25 kw,
ant. 699: wNTJ(AM): 1490 khz, kw;
wMTz(FM): 96.5 mhz, 50 kw, ant.
489 ft.; WRAK(AM): 1400 khz, kw;
wKse(FM): 102.7 mhz. 53 kw, ant.
1,270 ft.; wRKK(AM): 1190 khz, 1 kw;
WMYL(FM): 95.5 mhz, 3.9 kw. ant.
TVs.
Combos
FMs
AMs
Total
;
1
1
;
1
1
73 m.
Formats: wGY(AM): news /talk;
WRVE(FM): adult contemporary, classic rock: WHRL(FM): smooth jazz:
WADR(AM): nostalgia; WRFM(FM): new
adult contemporary; WRNY(AM): nostalgia; wuro(AM): nostalgia, religion.;
rock/AOR: wsKs(FM):
CHR, hot adult contemporary;
WHP(AM): news /talk, sports: WRVV(FM):
rock, adult contemporary; wKBo(AM):
news; wwKL(AM): news /talk
WWKL(FM): oldies; wRBT(FM): oldies;
WNTJ(AM): news /talk; WMTZ(FM): new
country: wRAK(AM): news /talk, sports:
WKSe(FM): adult contemporary;
WRKK(AM): news /talk; WMYL(FM): nostalgia
WOUR(FM):
KMAJ -AM -FM and KTOP(AM)-
KDW(FM) Topeka, Kan.
Price: $10.425 million
64
BROADCASTING 8 CABLE / JUNE 22, 1998
TITIS
w
TVs -S0r 0
Combos $115,275 ,000 8
FMs $33,515,000 4
AMs $775,000 1
Total $149,565,000 13
SO FAR
'
NUM
$4,740,597,000 47
$1,172,175,107 154
$492,155,837. 178
$338,779,599 116
$6,743,707,543 495
BALAIE PERIOD
N 1887
TVs $3,731,488,000 58
Combos $4,865,729,904 160
FMs $1,345,891,298 193
AMs; $174,746,395. 98
Total $10,118,255,597. 511
Bserec Biwa mpg a C*i
.
Buyer. Cumulus Media LLC.. Milwau-
kee, (Richard Weening, chairman.
and Lew Dickey. vice chairman):
owns/is buying 110 FMs and 50 AMs
Seller. Midland Broadcasters Inc..
Topeka. Kan. (Frederick P. Reynolds
Jr., principal); no other broadcast
interests
Facilities: KMAJ(AM): 1440 khz, 5 kw
day, 1 kw night; KMAJ -FM: 107.7 mhz.
100 kw, ant. 1,214 ft.; KTOP(AM):
1490 khz, 1 kw; KDVV(FM): 100.3
mhz, 100 kw, ant. 984 ft.
Formats: KMAJ(AM): news /talk, sports;
adult contemp.; KTOP(AM):
memory music; KDVV(FM): classic
rock
Broker. Montcalm Inc.
WMUS -AM -FM Muskegon, Mich.
Price: $5.25 million
Buyer. Connoisseur Inc.. Westport,
Conn. (Jeffrey D. Warshaw. general
partner /75% owner); owns/is buying
21 FMs and 11 AMs
Seller. Greater Muskegon Broadcasters Inc.. Muskegon, Mich. (Harvey
Nedeau. principal); no other broadcast interests
Facilities: AM: 1090 khz, kw day;
FM: 106.9 mh, 50 kw, ant. 480 ft.
Formats: Both: contemporary country
Broker: The Connelly Co.
1
WYMBIAM)- WHLZ(FM) Manning, S.C.
Price: $3.25 million
Buyer. Cumulus Media LLC., Milwau-
kee (Richard Weening. chairman,
and Lew Dickey. vice chairman);
owns /is buying 110 FMs and 50
AMs.
Seller Clarendon County Broadcasting Co Inc.. Manning. S.C. (Betty
Roper, principal): no other broadcast
interests
Facilities: AM: 920 khz. 2.3 kw day, 1
kw night; FM: 92.5 mhz. 100 kw, ant.
1,207 ft.
Formats: Both: country
WGPC -AM -FM Albany, Ga.
Price: $2.25 million
Buyer: Cumulus Media LLC.. Mil-
waukee (Richard Weening, chairman. and Lew Dickey, vice chairman) owns /is buying 110 FMs and
50 AMs
Seller. Albany Broadcasting Company.
Albany, Ga. (Leonard M. George,
principal); no other broadcast interests
Facilities: 1450 khz, 1 kw
Formats: Both: full service radio, light
adult
KMAJ-FM:
WLVU -AM -FM Dunedin/Holiday Fla.
Price: $7 million
Buyer. Concord Media Group Inc..
Odessa, Fla.(Mark W. Jorgenson.
president); owns WRMD(AM) St.
Petersburg and wAMA(AM) Tampa,
Fla.
Seller. Times Publishing Company.
Erie, Pa.(Edward Mead and Michael
Mead, principals); no other broad-
cast interests
Facilities: AM: 1470 khz. 5 kw day.
500 w night: FM: 106.3 mhz, 3.3 kw,
ant. 300 ft.
Formats: AM: ethnic, diversity: FM:
adult standards. MOR
Amplifications
Gainesville /Ocala, Fla.,
was sold to Asterisk Inc. -not Asterick Inc. -for $1.15 million (B &C
June 15). The seller in the deal
was Newberry Broadcasting Co.
of Gainesville, whose principal is
Cornelia O. Stern, not Willie Martin. The deal was brokered by
Stan Raymond & Associates.
The $5.5 million sale of KccF(AM)
WNFQ(FM)
Cave Creek /Phoenix,
Ariz.,
by Broadcast Development LLC to
North American Broadcasting Co.
(B &C, June 15) was brokered by
both Gary Stevens Co. and Quest com Media Brokerage.
CHANGING HANDS
Broker. Force Communications
WAGNIAM)-WHYB(FM) and WSFQ(FM)
Marinette, Wis.
Price: $1.6 million
Buyer. Badger Communications LLC,
Marinette, Wis. (David W. Winters,
principal); owns wMAM(AM)- wLST(FM)
Marinette, Wis.
Seller: Good Neighbor Broadcasting
Inc., Menominee, Mich. (Bill Sauve,
principal); no other broadcast interests
Facilities: WAGN(AM): 1340 khz, 1 kw;
WHVB(FM): 103.7 mhz, 3 kw, ant. 300 ft.;
wsFO(FM): 96.3 mhz, 49 kw, ant. 147 m.
Formats: wAGN(AM): sports talk;
wHVB(FM): country; wsFO(FM): oldies
WUA -AM -FM Ellijay, Ga
Price: $500,000
Buyer. Byron L. Dobbs and Randy
Doc Gravley, Canton, Ga.; no other
broadcast interests
Seller Lee Broadcasting Co Inc., Ellijay, Ga (Della L. Rucker, principal);
no other broadcast interests
Facilities: AM: 1560 khz, 1 kw day;
FM: 93.5 mhz, 5.2 kw, ant. 272 ft.
Formats: Both: MOR
BY THE NUMBERS
Service
Total
Commercial AM
4,724
Commercial FM
5,591
Educational FM
Total Radio
1,961
Mansfield, Ohio
WMFO(TV)
RADIO: FM
Facilities: 104.9 mhz, 6 kw, ant. 91 m.
Format: Classic hits of 70s and 80s
LMA and Option for WGST -FM
Canton/Atlanta, Ga.
Price: $31 million (for exercise
of option)
Buyer. Jacor Communications Inc.,
Cincinnati (Samuel Zell, chairman;
Randy Michaels, CEO; ZeII/
Chilmark Fund LP, 30% owner;
David H. Growl, president, Radio
Division); owns one TV station;
owns /is buying 130 FMs and 68
AMs.
Seller: Cherokee Broadcasting Co.
Inc., Atlanta (Bob Houghton, principal); owns wcHK(AM) Canton, Ga.
Facilities: 105.7 mhz, 50 kw, ant.
492 ft.
Format: News, talk
Broker. Questcom Media Brokerage
WWWY(FM) Columbus, Ind.
Price: $1.275 million
Buyer. Artistic Media Partners LP,
Indianapolis (Arthur A. Angotti, president); owns/is buying four FMs and
one AM
Seller. Mid -State Media Inc. Mans-
field, Ohio (Gunther Meisse, principal); owns wvNO(FM) Mansfield,
Ohio; WRGM(AM) Ontario, Ohio;
WGPM(FM) Farmville, N.C.
Price: $750,000
Buyer. Grantsboro Tower Company
Inc., Greenville, N.C. (Henry W. Hinton and Harry L. Land Sr., principals);
owns wczl(FM) Washington, N.C.
Seller. Hardy Broadcasting Inc.,
Greenville N.C. (Steven Cohen,
principal)
Facilities: 94.3 mhz, 1.95 kw, ant
407 ft.
Format: Hot AC
WQHG(FM) Huntingdon, Pa.
Price: $490,000
Buyer. Millenium Broadcasting Inc.,
Williamsport, Pa. (Warren S.
Diggens and Sabitino Cupelli, principals); Cupelli owns/is buying four
FMs and one AM
Seller. Huntingdon County Broadcasting Inc., Huntingdon Pa. (Louis
J. Maierhoer, principal); no other
broadcast interests
Facilities: 106.3 mhz, 6 kw, ant. 154 fL
Format Adult contemporary, easy listening
-Compiled by Kristine Lamm
12,276
VHF LPTV
559
UHF LPTV
1,515
Total LPTV
2,074
FM translators & boosters
2,928
VHF translators
2,248
has acquired
UHF translators
2,752
7,928
KLGT TV
Total Translators
Commercial VHF TV
SINCLAIR
COMMUNICATIONS. INC
558
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Commercial UHF TV
Educational VHF TV
651
The WB Afilliate
From
Educational UHF TV
242
Total TV
125
1,576
Lakeland Group Television, Inc.
11,600
James R. Kelly, President -Television, of Kepper, Tupper &
Company, represented Sinclair Communications, Inc., initiated
this transaction and assisted the parties in the negotiations
CABLE
Total systems
Basic subscribers
64,800,000
Homes passed
93,790,000
Basic penetration*
66.1%
Kepper, Tupper & Company
112
High Ridge Avenue Ridgefield, CT 06877 1203) 431 -3366
sod on TV household universe of 98 million
Sources: FCC, Nielsen, Paul Kagan Associates
aarCATlse ACM
JUNE 22, 1998 / BROADCASTING IL CABLE
65
BroadcastmggCable
CLASSIFIEDS
SITUATIONS WANTED MANAGEMENT
RADIO
HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT
Station Manager. Wheaton College is seeking
applications for Station Manager of its local FM
station, WETN. Responsibilities include managing programming, scheduling, operational
policies, and staff development for WEIN Radio,
with additional duties in cable television. Successful candidate will have a BA in Communication or a related field, along with three years of
experience and an understanding of the broadcast and computer tools used in radio and television operations. Wheaton College is an
evangelical Christian liberal arts college whose
faculty and staff affirm a Statement of Faith and
adhere to lifestyle expectations. The college complies with federal and state guidelines for nondiscrimination in employment. Women and minority candidates are encouraged to apply. Resumes should be sent to the Director of Human
Resources Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois
60187.
+ veteran with sales,
programming and technical expertise including
ownership and multi -unit operations. Will relocate. Ed 1- 800 -827 -2483.
Can do combo guy! Need any of these? Sales
and marketing, programming, on -air and production, engineering! GM experience. Available immediately, permanent or temporary. Bill Elliott
813- 920 -7102.
Aggressive sales oriented General Manager
over 15 years in radio NY, San Fran. and Miami,
went into own business, but now wants back in
broadcast. This former West Pointer unequalled
sales performance,
goal orientation.
Larry
Leibowitz 305 -531 -8116.
WOWT -TV, NBC affiliate in Omaha, NE seeks
an experienced, high- energy General Sales
Manager to provide sales leadership to the
market's ratings leader. Candidates must demonstrate strong skills in: sales planning/
management, inventory control/pricing, revenue/
expense budgeting, new business strategies, effective rep relations, interpersonal and interdepartmental communications, and account
executive development and motivation. 3 -5 years
television sales manager experience is preferred.
Verifiable strong leadership skills. Strengths in
presentation and research. Computer proficiency
including Excel spreadsheet desired. No phone
calls please. Fill out application at or send /fax/
email resume to: WOWT -Human Resources,
3501 Farnam Street, Omaha, NE 68131, fax:
402 -233 -7885, email: hr @wowt.com Chronicle
Broadcasting Company is a drug -free company
and requires pre -employment drug testing. EOE.
LEASED PROGRAMMING
Traffic Manager: KONG TV, an LMA operated
General Manager. Equity for performance:
Produce, host your own radio show, and gen-
Unique opportunity to take our stations to the
next level and share in ownership for doing the
job. You'll operate independently and need to be
willing to sell retail and help motivate and develop the sales and programming team. Our two
AM's simulcast a highly successful format in
Lowell- Lawrence, Mass. A market of nearly half a
million people. $50- 60,000 plus incentives and
equity. Resume, references, accomplishments,
and philosophy to: Arnold Lerner, PO Box 1555,
Hollis, NH 03049. EOE.
erate hundreds of qualified Leads 50,000 watt
NYC radio station. Call Ken Sperber 212 -7601050.
by KING TV, a subsidiary of the A.H. Belo Corporation, is seeking a motivated individual with
minimum 5 years experience managing a traffic
HELP WANTED SALES
Traffic Manager. Growing New Jersey Radio
Group seeks a Traffic Manager for two (2) of its
radio stations. Successful applicant should have
a minimum 3 years prior traffic management experience, a thorough knoweledge of super -log,
CBSI or Columbine systems, inventory control,
and management. Must be detail oriented and
possess extra ordinary people skills. College degree preferred. Send resume and cover letter
with salary requirements to Reply to Box 01389.
HELP WANTED PRODUCTION
Freelance Applicants for National full service
automative advertising agency. We're seeking
fresh male/female production talent with a flair for
voicing exciting auto spots for our clients. We supply the script for a 24 hour turnaround. Forward a
brief resume and 3 of your best local Auto
Dealer" spots on a non -returnable cassette to:
Production Dept. c/o Skyline Media, Inc. d/b/a
CAR ADS. 1415 Hooper Ave., Suite #303, Toms
River, N.J. 08753
FOR DAILY CLASSIFIED UPDATES...
VISIT BROADCASTING & CABLE
ONLINE
www.broadcastingcable.com
66
General Manager. 15 years
HELP WANTED SALES
BROADCASTING & CABLE
/
JUNE
22,1908
TELEVISION
HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT
dept. Experience with the BIAS system preferred.
Only candidates with television, radio, or cable
traffic experience will be considered. Must have excellent written and oral communication skills, previous supervisory experience, detail oriented,
and ability to work under pressure. If qualified
send 2 copies of your resume to: KONG -TV,
Attn: HR Dept.. #K98R31, 333 Dexter Ave., N.
Seattle, WA 98109. EOE - M /F/DN
Director. General Manager. KUAT Communications Group. KUAT Tucson, AZ. The KUAT
Local Sales Manager: KECI -Missoula, KCFW
Communications Group, (KUAT -TV, KUAS -TV,
KUAT -FM, KUAT -AM, KUAZ -FM, VideoServices)
an outreach service of the University of Arizona
in Tucson seeks an experienced chief executive
to provide creative leadership for an organization
with a $6 million budget and 100 employees dedicated to providing the diverse populations of
southern Arizona with public broadcasting and community services. The successful candidate will
lead the organization in the transition to digital
technology and the challenges of the 21st Century. Send cover letter, resume and three references (names, addresses and telephone numbers) to: Amelia Tynan, Administration, 403, PO
Box 210066, The University of Arizona, Tucson,
AZ 85721 -0066. Initial review of applications begins September 15, 1998. Position open until
filled. Full job description and requirements available online at:
http://w3.arizona.edu/-kuat/gmjob.htm
The University of Arizona is an EEO/AA
Employer M/W/DN
Local Sales Manager. WSAW-TV
Operations Manager: KING
subsidiary
of the A.H. Belo Corporation and the number one
station in the Pacific Northwest, is seeking an
Operations Manager. Will oversee and manage
studio production, master control, and directors;
prepare schedules: assist in the capital and
operating budget process; and be the liaison between operations and other depts. College degree preferred with min. 10 years experience and
3 years in a management capacity; excellent written and communication skills: strong leadership
skills; and SBE certification preferred. Send 2
copies of your resume and cover letter to: KING
5 TV, Attn: HR Dept. #K98R32. 333 Dexter Ave.,
N. Seattle, WA 98209. EOE - M /F /DN
5 TV, a
-
Kalispell, KTVM - Butte /Bozeman NBC affiliates in
western Montana. Seeking person to manage
multiple station inventories, multiple projects and set
records in local sales. Must have excellent
interpersonal skills, good computer skills, must be
highly motivated, creative, organized. Travel
required. Send resume, references to Keith
Sommer, General Manager, KECI -TV, Box 5268,
Missoula. MT 59806. EOE.
is seeking a
leader with a proven track record in sales training, new business development, maximizing existing business, and inventory/pricing management.
Our tools include AVI Training System, Nielsen
Advantage, TV Scan, Columbine, and Media
Center. Prefer 2+ years of previous management
experience. Send letter and resume to Human
Resources, WSAW -TV, 1114 Grand Avenue,
Wausau, WI 54403. EOE.
GSM needed for midwest affiliate. Come join a
great company with great pay and benefits. Company is currently in a growth mode so there will
be plenty of opportunities for advancement. Send
resume to Box 01383 EOE.
Local Sales Manager needed to lead local television sales team in one of the Northwest's most
beautiful states. The right person must have 3 -5
years broadcast experience, a competitive spirit
and ability to lead a winning sales team. New
business development. direct and agency savvy
a must. Live the outdoor life in a city setting. All
replies confidential, send resume and salary requirements to Box 01390 EOE.
--4
CLASSIFIEDS
Account Executive. KTRV FOX
12 in beautiful
Boise, Icahn is looking for an enterprising, self starter to join our sales team. If you possess a
strong work ethic, are highly motivated and are
driven to be the best, FOX 12 is the place for
you. TV sales experience, knowledge of NSI ratings, TV Scan and basic computer skills are a
must. If you would like to work for one of the best
FOX stations, and company in the TV industry,
and don't mind living in a city rated one of the
best for quaïty of life and business growth, KTRV
FOX 12 may be your dream come true. Send resume to: Attn: General Manager, KTRV FOX 12,
PO Box 1212, Nampa, ID 83653.
Account Executive: WKCF -TV, Orlando. top
rated WB affiliate is seeking a highly motivated
AE that has agency experience as well as new
business development skills. Candidates must
have the ability to handle continuous changes in
market conditions. A minimum of 3 years experience in television sales and knowledge of
TvScan /Scarborough is preferred. Submit resumes to Human Resources, WKCF /AE, 602
Court land Street, Suite 200. Orlando, FL 32804.
EOE. No phone calls or walk ins.
HELP WANTED MARKETING
KPTM /KXVO National Marketing Manager.
KPTM FOX 42 and KXVO WB 15 are currently
accepting applications for a National Marketing
Manager. Duties will include selling KPTM FOX
42 and KXVO WB 15 to national advertising
buyers and reps, travel to outside offices and
negotiating national schedules. The successful
candidate will need three years national rep or
sales management experience, fluency with ratings, familiarity with qualitative research (i.e.
Leigh Stowell) and an understanding of inventory
and positioning. Persistence, resilience and
strong presentation /closing skills are prerequisites. Please send applications or apply in person
to: KPTM =OX 42 and KXVO WB 15, Attention:
Personnel, 4625 Farnam Street.
Omaha,
Nebraska 68132. EOE.
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
WE PLACE ENGINEERS
TV, POST, SATELLITE, VIDEO
KEYSTONE INT'L., INC.
Dime Bank Bldg., 49 S. Main St.
Pittston, PA 18640, USA
Phone (717) 655 -7143
Fax/Resume (717) 654-5765
Chief Engineer. KRGV -TV, the ABC affiliate
in
the Rio Grande Valley. Texas. is looking for a
Chief Engineer. Candidates should have 3 -5
years solid experience as a Chief or Assistant
Chief. Should be thoroughly familiar with transmitter operations and maintenance, studio operations. FCC regulations, and computers. The ability to manage personnel and budget effectively is
a must. Send resumes and salary requirements
to Ray Aexander, General Manager, KRGV -TV,
PO Box 5, Weslaco, TX 78599 or Fax 956 -9735003. EOE.
1UN
I1.-A11.Y
(7.AS11111J)
l
11/.11
VISIT BROADCASTING & CABLE
ONLINE
www.broadcastingcable.com
..-
TV Maintenance Engineer.
Northeast UHF Television Station WHSH -TV, part of the USA
Broadcast Group has an immediate opening for a maintenance engineer experienced
with transmitter and studio
equipment. Responsibilities will
include all aspects of television
installation, repair to component level, and maintenance. Immediate opportunity to be involved with the installation of a
digital transmitter. RCA TTU110 experience a plus. SBE cer-
tification preferred. Please send
resume and cover letter by fax
to WHSH -TV 978 -562 -1166 or
mail to WHSH -TV, 71 Parmenter
Road, Hudson, Massachusetts
01749. Attention Engineering
Dept.
TV Maintenance Engineer. Install, troubleshoot
and repair broadcast equipment, computer and
RF systems to the component level. Requires
five years recent broadcast maintenance experience including -, beta. digital and ENG equipment, ASET or equivalent. FCC license or SBE
1
certification. Resume. salary history, references
to Chief Engineer, WKMG, 4466 John Young
Parkway, Orlando. FL 32804. Fax 407 -521 -1317.
EOE.
Maintenance Engineer. KUSI -TV
in San Diego
is seeking an experienced engineer to service
and repair analog and digital electronic equip-
ment including computer systems. UHF transmitter experience is desirable. Minimum of four
years hands -on maintenance experience required. Excellent career opportunity with one of
the finest technical facilities in the country. Send
resumes to: KUSI -TV. Human Resources. P.O.
Box 719051, San Diego, CA 92123. EOE
KOLO/TV NewsChannel 8, in beautiful Reno,
NV. has an immediate opening for a Chief
Engineer. Strong background in transmitters and
RF maintenance, familiar with latest technological
advances. Willing to lead facility through the conversion to digital and HDTV. Team leadership,
good communicator and teacher. Thorough
knowledge of computers and computer based
systems: Novell and Microsoft, newsroom and
studio systems maintenance. Translator and
microwave knowledge helpful. Must be fully
versed in FCC regulations. General Class FCC
license and/or SBE certification is required. Resume to: Faye H. Kitchel, Human Resources.
KOLO/TV,
EEO.
PO Box 10.000. Reno, NV 89510.
Chief Engineer. WCBD -TV. the Media General
station in Charleston, South Carolina has an immediate opening for a Chief Engineer. Successful candidate will have 3 -5 years solid experience as a chief or assistant chief. Should be
thoroughly familiar with transmitter operations
and maintenance, studio operations, FCC regulations. Computer literacy a must. Send resume
and salary requirements to WCBD -TV, Personnel
Department. 210 West Coleman Blvd.. Mt.
Pleasant, SC 29464. M /F, EOE. drug test required.
ENG Field
ENG and Broadcast Personnel.
Operations with Camera and Microwave Experience. Videotape Editors. Studio Operations and
Maintenance Including: 1) Technical Directors
(GVG-300 switcher with Kaleidoscope) 2) Audio
(mixing for live studio and news broadcasts) 3)
Studio Camerapersons (studio productions and
news broadcasts) 4) Chyron Operators (iNFiNiT!)
5) Still Store Operations 6) Tape Operators
(Beta) 7) Maintenance (plant systems with experience in distribution and patching) 8) Lighting
Director Engineer 9) Robo-ic Camera Operations
10) Master Control. For the East Coast. Midwest
and West Coast. Would commence spring/
summer 1998. Out -of -town applicants accepted
for the positions will be reimbursed for airfare,
hotel, and per diem expenses. Send resumes to:
MMS. Suite 345, 847A Second Avenue. New
York. NY 10017, Or Fax 212 -338-0360. This
employment would occur in the event of a work
stoppage and would be of a temporary nature to
replace striking personnel This is not an ad for
permanent employment. An Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Chief Engineer. The Wicks Broadcast Group
has an immediate opening for a Chief Engineer.
The successful candidate must have a minimum
of 3 to 5 years experience as a chief or assistant
with a thorough knowledge of FCC regulations.
transmitter operations and maintenance as well
as studio operations. The ideal candidate also
must have strong computer skills. Fax resume
and a cover letter to Fex Tackett, President,
Wicks Broadcast Group at 210 -698 -5339. EOE.
Broadcast Technician. KTRK -TV has an immediate opening for Broadcast Technician who
has experience in two or more of the following
areas: Audio (mixing for live studio and news
broadcasts...as well as taped production mixing).
Chyron (iNFiNiT!). Still Store and non -linear editing (AVID). Three or more years of commercia
television experience preferred. Must be able to
work a flexible schedule. Send resumes and
tapes to Rick Herring. KTRK -TV, 3310 Bissonnet,
Houston. TX 77005. Equal Opportunity
Employer. M /F/V/D.
Chief Engineer. Growing UHF station in small
midwestern market looking for a high energy individual. We need a person that has hands on
experience. but can build a great engineering
department. The right person should have experience overseeing building projects, good communication skills and the desire to work as part cf
the team. Send resume to Owl Engineering, 8899
Hastings St. NE, Minneapolis, MN 55449.
Broadcast Engineer Sr, Tucson, AZ. KUAT
Communications Group. the public television and
radio service in southern Arizona, is seeking
applicants for the position of Broadcast Engineer
Sr. This position provides technical support to
broadcast facilities in repair, maintenance, installation and modification of technical broadcasting equipment in the studio and at remote sites.
For more information regarding KUAT. the
U of A, and the Tucson area, browse the KUAT
home page at http: //w3.arizona.edu.kuat. Mirimum qualifications: Associates degree in electronics, broadcasting or related field and three
years experience in broadcast engineering which
includes equipment repair and installation: or.
Five years experience in broadcast engineering
which includes equipment repair and installation
Preferred qualifications: FCC license or SBE certification. Salary range: $27,389 - $31.452. To apply. please submit a letter of interest and resume
referencing Job # 11467 to: Human Resources
888 N Euclid, #114, P.O. Box 210158, Tucson.
AZ 85721 -0158. The University of Arizona is an
EEO/AA Employer- MNV'D /V.
JUNE
www.americanradiohistory.com
22,1898
/ BROADCASTING & CABLE
B7
CLASSIFIEDS
Broadcast Engineering Installation
Engineer.
In this critical role. you will
coordinate, perform
and maintain the installation of new audio and
video wiring for broadcast systems and components. The ideal candidate is skilled in diagnosing complex system problems and providing
rapid, temporary solutions to keep broadcast operations functional. Must have familiarity with
technical TV and Radio broadcasting equipment including cameras, robotics. VTRs. digital recordings, routing equipment production switchers/
mixers, computer controlling and power distribution systems. Must be able to maintain /construct
wire and cable systems and possess a thorough
understanding of PC hardware and software.
May be required to work flexible hours including
regular evening and/or weekend shifts. Independent, quick thinking in high pressure situations is
essential. Send resume and cover letter indicating salary history and qualifications to: Bloomberg L.P., Human Resources Dept. B &C -ENG,
499 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10022. Fax:
212- 940 -1954; email: careers @bloomberg.com
Qualified candidates will be contacted. No phone
calls please. EOE. M /F /D/V.
POST -NEWSWEEK
I
\
i
r
NEWS EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS
out-of-the -box television production ideas, and great people skills. If you
are the best, and are looking for the kind of company which can challenge
you to be even better, we want to hear from you. Please send letter,
resume, and salary history to:
Mark Effron
Vice President, News
Post- Newsweek Stations
3 Constitution Plaza
Hartford, CT 06103
EOE.
WDIV a WKMG a
a WPLG a KPRC a
WJXT
KSAT
Detroit Orlando Jacksonville
Miami
Houston San Antonio
NEWS DIRECTOR
CREATIVE & VERSATILE
DIRECTOR -PRODUCER
For BALTIMORE'S NUMBER
NEWSCASTS!
1
Minimum 4 years prior major market
newscast experience with fast -paced,
graphics- intensive programs.
Strong conceptualization and visualization
skills. Analog and non -linear editing.
Familiarity with Ampex, Sony, Ahekas,
and Grass Valley.
College degree preferred.
(we'll contact you for tape) to
Warren Hills, Production Manager
WBAt -511
3800 Hooper Avenue
MD 21211
E
oE
W E3AL-T
llearsteuvuiow.
journalist with exceptional news judgement
and strong leadership skills. Successful
candidate will be responsible for all daily
news gathering operations, long term
personnel
planning,
management,
financial management and budgeting.
Must have a minimum of 5 years
progressive news management experience
in a medium to large market. Must have
demonstrated winning record of strong
strategic management, organizational and
communication skills. Deadline for
application is July 6, 1998. Please send
resume and cover letter to:
KGO -TV /Channel 7
900 Front Street
San Francisco, CA 94111
Attn: Kathryn Cox
Personnel Manager
le
INC.
Weekday Anchor. After three years our main
anchor has made a 130* market jump so we are
looking for his replacement. This is not an entry
level position. If you are a weekend or morning
anchor with solid reporting and anchoring skills
this may be your opportunity to step up and coanchor our 6:00pm and 11:00pm newscasts.
Strong live and /or producing background a plus.
Please rush tape. resume and short list of references to Steven D. Kalb, News Director.
WMDT -TV, 202 Downtown Plaza, Salisbury, MD,
21804. EOE. No phone calls please.
Producer. We are looking for a Producer who
can lead, write, and win the big story everyday.
Storytellers, not stackers should apply. If you
have great passion for local TV news, can make
great visuals sing, and coax reporters and
anchors into really selling their stories, then
please contact us. Send tape and resume to:
Michael Goldrick, Executive Producer, Dept. 95,
WSOC -TV, 1901 N. Tyron Street. Charlotte, NC
28206. No phone calls please. EOE M/F
ß8
KGO-TV, an ABC owned station, has an
immediate opening for an experienced
News Director/WHIO -TV: Dayton's dominant
number one station is looking for an experienced,
hands-on leader with the professional skills to
assume total responsibility for this powerful CBS
affiliate's news product and news people. You
must know how to identify and recruit good
talent. organize resources and develop and lead
effective teamwork. You must understand how to
balance good news judgement with researchbased decision -making. Knowledge of strategic
and tactical marketing is necessary. You must
have a strong track record with minimum 3 years
experience as a news director. assistant news
director, executive producer or managing editor
with exceptional leadership and administrative
skills. If you want to come to work for a top -rated
Cox station that intends to keep getting better,
send your resume (no phone calls please) to:
Lee Armstrong, Vice President & General Manager, WHIO -TV, 1414 Wilmington Ave., Dayton.
OH. 45420. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Sports Director. The best TV sports job
Send resume only
Baltimore,
I
We are constantly looking for the very best news executive producers for
future openings. We want people who combine journalistic excellence,
HELP WANTED NEWS
PRODUCER- DIRECTOR
i\
BROADCASTING & CABLE I JUNE
KGOTELEVISION
An Equal Opportunity Employer
News. CONUS Washington Direct is seeking
qualified candidates for the following positions:
Executive Producer Job #140 -98, TVDirect Pro der Job #136 -98, Video Archivist/Producer Job
#135 -98, Master Control Operator Job #69 -98,
Photographer/Editor Job #143-98. A full- service
news gathering organization, CONUS Washington Direct provides bureau services to the CON US national feeds; produces two teed services;
TVDirect and DCXtra, provides special contract
and daily custom news coverage, and arranges
technical staffing and coverage coordination for
CBNC's Washington bureau and the First Business news team. Submit resume and salary requirements (include job #) to: CONUS WASHINGTON, Attn: Human Resources, 3415 University Avenue, St. Paul, MN 55114. No telephone
calls please. Equal Opportunity Employer.
22,1898
www.americanradiohistory.com
in the
country with the market's number one anchor
team at the number one news station. You know
Indiana basketball from 'Hoosiers' to the Pacers.
Add the Colts, the Indianapolis 500. the Brickyard
400, the Mini Marathon, the Indians, and the
"Amateur Sports Capital of the World," and you're
getting the picture of sports coverage from the corn munity to the classics. Exceptional anchor talent
and live ability, experience, energy, work ethic
and team spirit are essential in producing, covering, reporting and anchoring sportscasts and extended sports specials. A passion for winning
must be balanced with a positive, friendly
personality that appeals to all segments of the audience. Qualified applicants only should submit
letter, resume, and a non -returnable videotape of
on -air work samples to: News Director, WISH -TV,
PO Box 7088, Indianapolis, IN 46207. No phone
calls, please M/F EOE.
Producer. KSDK -TV, St. Louis #1 NBC affiliate
powerhouse is looking for a main show producer.
We want someone with energy, intelligence and
news sense to keep the momentum going on a
well- crafted, locally driven, highly produced
newscast. Candidate should work well in groups,
bring lots of ideas to the table and be willing to
pitch in. Computer literacy and college degree required. Five years of solid producing experience
preferred. Send resume, tape with critique and
news philosophy to: KSDK -TV, Human Resources Administrator, 1000 Market Street. St.
Louis, MO 63101. No calls please. EOE.
CLAitIFIEIi
WTNH -TV, the ABC affiliate in Connecticut is
looking for a bright, energetic "morning person.' to
co- anchor our two hour morning newscast. We
supply our winning morning newscasts with the
tools and people to produce an informative and
energetic newscast. To join this team you will
need to be a great reporter/anchor with impeccable journalistic standards. College degree and a
minimum of 5 years reporting and anchoring experience required. Rush tape to Billy Otwell.
News Director, WTNH -TV, 8 Elm Street. New
Haven 065' 0. No phone calls. EOE.
Promotion Producer. NBC O &O looking for
a
News Promotion Producer to continue building
on our #1 rated news. If you write, produce and
edit (linear and /or non- linear) with the best.
want to see your stuff! -2 years news promotion
and editing experience preferred. Join an award
winning creative staff, grow as a producer and
have a ton of fun doing it! We are not your typical
promotion department. Rush resume and nonreturnable reel to Rick Green, Creative Director,
PO Box 4. Columbus, Ohio 43216. Drug screenI
1
ing. EOE.
Photographer: WICS -TV. the NBC affiliate in
Springfield, IL, is looking for an experienced
photograp.ner with some reporting background.
The job w,ll entail some one -man band reporting.
Live truck experience a plus. Send nonreturnable tape, resume and references to: Sue
Stephens, News Director, WICS -TV, 2680 East
Cook Street, Springfield, IL 62703. EOE. Women
and minorities are encouraged to apply. WICS is
an Equal Opportunity Employer and a division of
Guy Gannett Communications.
TV Assistant News Director Assignment Manager: Need seasoned. newsroom leader with
strong writing and management skills to guide
young reporters in aggressive weekday coverage
from story selection through final product
oversight Substantial broadcast news experience required. No beginners. No phone calls, faxes or email. Send letter, resume and nonreturnable videotape to: News Director, WVIRTV. 503 East Market Street. Charlottesville, VA
22902. EOE.
WMC -TV, Memphis, the Mid -South's News
Leader is losing its News Director to NYC and
we're looking for a successor to lead us into the
new millennium. We need a born leader with
strong journalistic skills and a creative imagination. Someone who thrives on competition and
plays to win! Metered market experience as an
Asst. News Director or Exec. Producer is a must.
We have all the rescurces required and a market
legacy of excellence. We are part of the growing
Raycom Media. Inc. family of stations and we are
EOE. Please no phone calls. To apply, send resume to: General Manager, News Director, WMC
Stations, 1960 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN
38104 or fax to: 901-726-0720.
News Videotape Editor. WTVD -TV, an ABC
owned station, has an immediate opening for an
experienced videotape editor. Successful candidate must be able to handle a high story count
while maintaining attention to detail. Beta format
editing experience a plus. No beginners. Send resume and tape (no music pieces) to: Ted
Holtzclaw, News Operations Manager. WTVDTV, 41' Liberty Street, Durham, NC 27701. No
phone calls. EOE.
News Videographer: Immediate opening for a
News Videographer. Will be responsible for shootnews and sporting events. Knowledge of
ENG operations a plus. Send non-returnable
tapes. resume. and references to Ron Harmeyer,
Chief Photographer, WANE -TV, 2915 W. State
Blvd., Fort Wayne, IN 46808. No calls please.
EOE -M /F.
ing
News Director. KRGV -TV, the ABC affiliate in
the Rio Grande Valley. Texas is looking for a topnotch news director to join our #1 news team.
Strong producing, writing and marketing skills,
along with a keen eye for local news are required. Qualified candidates must be established
journalists with fiscal management experience
and 3 -5 years in a news management position.
Send resume and letter of application with salary
range requirements to Ray Alexander, General
Manager, PO Box 5. Weslaco, Texas 78599 or
Fax 956- 973 -5003. EOE.
News Director. WDTN -TV, an ABC affiliate in
Dayton, OH is looking for an experienced News
Director that has a proven track record of success. If you are a "hands on" manager, tireless
worker, have outstanding leadership skills,
budget minded, understand news promotion, and
know how to get the best out of a quality staff, we
want you! Send tape, resume and cover letter to
General Manager, WDTN -TV, PO Box 741,
Dayton, OH 45401. EOE. MN /H /D.
WXII-TV, NBC, Is going strong! Reporter: Enterprising, versatile reporter needed for general
assignment coverage. Minimum two years experience and demonstrated ability to handle live coverage of major breaking stories. Producer: Only
those producers dedicated to being the best! If
you understand what it means to push the
envelope to get your shows to the next level, we
want you! Photographer: If you're the photographer all the reporters want to work with, then
we want you too! Only the best need apply.
Editor: Help make our leading news station even
stronger! We need experience and versatility. To
apply for any of these positions, please send a
tape and resume to: Personnel, WXII -TV, 700 Coliseum Drive, Winston -Salem, NC 27106. EOE.
Morning Anchor /Producer. KTTC, NBC Rochester, Minnesota. is looking for an aggressive self- starter to compliment our morning
team. Responsibilities include co- producing and
co- anchoring our number one ranked morning
show and general assignment reporting. The winning candidate will have strong writing and
editorial skills, be a morning team leader, and
have a strong on -air presence. Send resume and
VHS tape to: News Director, KTTC TV, 601 1st
Avenue SW, Rochester, MN 55902. No phone
calls please. KTTC is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Meteorologist
- KGWC -TV, Casper, Wyoming
seeks weekday meteorologist for the 5:30 and
0:00 pm newscasts. Must be energetic,
enthusiastic and dynamic on -air and familiar with
computer weather systems. Weather related reporting required. Degree in meteorology or related with NWA/AMS a plus. Resumes/tapes to:
Vicki Daniels, News Director, KGWC -TV, 2500
CY Avenue, Casper, WY 82604. EOE.
1
Editor. Local television station
is looking for a
creative, dynamic, self starter on line editor with 3
to 4 years of experience. Knowledge of the GVG
VPE Series 151 and 351 editor, DVEous, GVG
4000 switchers a must. Apply in person at: 500
Frank W. Burr Blvd., 6th Floor, Teaneck, NJ
07666. EOE.
Dynamic Central Texas television station is
looking for an experienced Videographer. Position includes lighting, shooting and editing commercials for local clients. Producing. writing and
non -linear editing experience moves you to the
top of the list. Qualified candidates should have
two years experience and a bachelor's in communications. Send resume, demo tape (VHS)
and salary requirements to Production Operations Supervisor. Position closes 6/26/98. Reply
to Box 01387 EOE.
Director, Jr.
- KGWC -TV, Casper, Wyoming has
immediate opening for Director. Ability to direct
newscasts and other live or taped programs.
Provide training of other operations personnel
and familiarity with all related equipment
necessary. Join our NewsChannel 14 crew and
share your experience in our new facility! Resumes to: Bill Howard, Dir. Eng. and Operations,
KGWC -TV, 2500 CY Avenue, Casper, WY
82604. Fax: 307- 234-2835. EOE.
Assignment Editor. WFTV, the NBC affiliate in
West Palm Beach, is searching for an energetic,
enthusiastic team player to help drive our early
evening and 11pm news coverage. If you're
ready to move to America's 43rd largest TV
market, mail your resume to Chris Ford. Assistant
News Director, 622 North Flagler Drive, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401. You can also fax your resume to him at 561- 653 -5719, or email it to him
at cdford @scripps.com Questions? Call Chris
after 6:30pm EDT at 561- 653 -5700. WPTV is an
Equal Opportunity Employer. Candidates must
pass a successful drug screen.
Assignment Editor (Weekdays). WSOC-TV is
looking for that newsroom leader who loves
breaking news and knows how to enterprise. This
is not just about being a scanner jockey it's about
generating ideas, directing crews, and planning
ahead. Send resume and tape to: Robin Whit meyer, Executive Editor, Dept. 95, WSOC -TV.
1901 N. Tyron Street, Charlotte, NC 28206. EOE
M/F
Anchor/Reporter. Creative, self- starter who
knows how to generate news stories wanted for
weekend anchor /reporter position at KETV
Omaha, Nebraska. Good live and investigative
work a must. Three years experience preferred.
Send resume and non -returnable tape to Rose
Ann Shannon, News Director, KETV, 2665
Douglas Street, Omaha. Nebraska 68131.
HELP WANTED PRODUCTION
Researcher/Tape Editor. Louisville Tonight Live.
WHAS 11, market leader, is looking for a researcher/editor to work in Louisville Tonight Live,
a unique access information show. Individual
must have 3 years of experience in broadcasting
and a college degree. Candidate must be a
strong writer and videotape editor. Experience in
videography is a plus. Individual should have excellent organizational skills and be a self -starter. l'tterested candidates forward resume. tape and cover letter to: Cindy Vaughan. Human Resources
Manager, HR #821, WHAS 11. 520 West
Chestnut Street, Louisville, KY 40202. EOE.
Camera Person ENG /Production. Local television station is looking for experienced camera
personnel with 3 to 5 years of experience. Familiarity with Betacam Format. Must be creative,
dynamic and have knowledge of the tri -state
area. Apply in person at: 500 Frank W. Burr
Blvd.. 6th Floor. Teaneck. NJ 07666. EOE.
JUNE
www.americanradiohistory.com
22,1998
i
BROADCASTING & CABLE
69
CLASSIFIEDS
Camera Director. Local television station is looking for a dynamic, creative and proactive Director
for their local shows. Must have 4 to 5 years of
directing experience. Apply in person at 500
Frank W. Burr Blvd., 6th Floor, Teaneck, NJ
07666. EOE.
Audio Person. Local television station looking
for a dynamic audio person. Must be able to mix
for live studio and news broadcast, with 3 to 4
years of experience. Familiarity with Wheatstone
TV 600 and Clearcom Digital Matrix Ill. Apply in
person at: 500 Frank W. Burr Blvd., 6th Floor,
Teaneck, NJ 07666. EOE.
HELP WANTED
FINANCIAL & ACCOUNTING
Vice President of Finance. KTVI FOX 2 has an immediate opening for a Vice President of Finance.
Full benefits package available. Essential functions of the position include management of all
station accounting personnel and operations including cash flow. profit and loss, forecasting,
A/P, A/R, credit, payroll, financial analysis, and
tax packages; preparation of annual financial
plan; execution of company policies and procedures; supervising station information systems
personnel: participating as a member of the KTVI
management team. Essential qualifications: 1)
Bachelors degree in accounting/finance, business or equivalent, 2) Five to seven (5 -7) years
accounting experience in broadcasting or related
field, TV station experience preferred, 3)
Thorough background and knowledge of account
analysis and reconciliation, journal entries and all
facets of general ledger accounting, cash flow
management, profit and loss forecasts, fixed
asset maintenance, and budgeting, 4) Proven
ability to create, analyze, and interpret a variety
of financial reports, 5) Excellent computer skills:
proficiency with Excel and mainframe input, 6)
Strong leadership skills with the ability to project
a professional image over the phone and in
person with co- workers, corporate personnel and
the public while working under pressure in a fast paced, team -oriented environment, 7) Proven record of dependability, ability to consistently meet
deadlines, and ability to work a variety of
schedules to meet company needs. Other
qualifications: 1) Prefer Certified Public Accountants and /or applicants with a Master Degree, 2)
Prefer applicants that are familiar with J.D.
Edwards software systems and Enterprise Traffic
and Film system, 3) Prefer prior department head
experience. To apply, please send resume or
application to: KTVI/FOX 2 Television, Attn: Human Resources, 5915 Berthold Avenue, St.
Louis, MO 63110 or Fax 314- 647 -1724
News Business Manager. An integral member
of the news management team, responsible for
managing and analyzing the business affairs of
the television news department. Specific duties include preparing the annual budget, monthly closings, variance analysis, monthly forecasts,
monitoring and controlling variable expenses,
approving invoices for payment, review of
timesheets, monthly ASCAP per program reporting. Serve as liaison with Personnel, participate
in contract negotiations: schedule AFTRA employees. College degree in finance/business or
equivalent experience; minimum 5 years experience in similar capacity; familiarity with broadcast
operations; supervisory experience a plus: must
have excellent interpersonal, communication, computer and analytical skills. Send resume to Randy
Pringle, Controller, KYW -TV, 101 S. Independence Mall East, Philadelphia, PA 19106 (no
phone calls please). EOE. M /F. ADA.
HELP WANTED CREATIVE SERVICES
WLS-TVG (ABC, Inc.) is looking for an experienced graphic designer to join our award -winning
team. Must have strong typography and communication skills! We're looking for a team player
who is willing to work a flexible schedule. News
come first at the #1 television station in Chicago
but on -air and print promotion, programming and
special projects will keep you challenged. Proficiency with Quantel systems (Paintbox, Hal,
Picturebox) and Mac software ( Photoshop,
Quark, Illustrator) an Equal Opportunity
Employer. Send reel and resume to: Abel
Sanchez, WLS -TV, 190 N. State St., Chicago, IL
60601.
Graphic Designer. KTRK -TV, an ABC owned
station, has an exceptional opportunity for a
talented and experienced graphic designer. If you
are ready to move up, we offer the tools, the resources and a great working environment.
Quantel Hal, Paintbox, and Mac experience a
plus. Please send resume to Dana Decker, Art
Director, KTRK -TV, 3310 Bissonnet, Houston, TX
77005. Equal Opportunity Employer. M /FN /D.
Creative Services Supervisor
is needed for
dominant CBS affiliate in the Midwest. Promotion /Program Manager looking for a number two
person. Candidate must have strong writing,
creative, organizational and technical skills - no
beginners please. Looking for a hands -on commercial and promotion writer /producer able to
supervise and train others. Send a cover letter, resume and a non -returnable VHS resume tape to:
Personnel Assistant, KOLN /KGIN -TV, PO Box
30350. Lincoln, NE 68503. EOE.
HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS
As one
of the fastest growing, most progressive
groups in the nation, SINCLAIR
broadcast
COMMUNICATIONS, INC.
owns and/or provides
programming services or has agreements to acquire
57 stations in 37 separate markets, and owns,
provides sales and programming services to, or has
50radiostationsin
tellI, ßagreementsoroptionstoacquire
will
Sinclair's television
I
l
separate markets.
group
include ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, WB and UPN affiliates. As our
phenomenal growth continues, we seek the one element which gives
us the edge on the competition and the power to stay on top -the best
people in the business. if you are a motivated team player with a
successful track record, an opportunity may await you at Sinclair
Baltimore - WBFF/WNUV -TV - FOX -WB
News Photojournalist
experience. NPPA standards, live truck
experience a must. Great attitude. Send resume and
tape.
BC #III
3-1 years
Baltimore - WBFF/WNUV.TV - FOX -WB
Weekend Assignment Editor
Looking for someone to run our weekend desk.
Position includes future story planning.
management of news crews. extensive phone and
research work and associate producer duties. One
year news experience needed. Send resume and
news philosophy.
BC#I 12
Columbus - WSYX -TV
Director of Creative Services
Recently developed ABC /Fox LMA is seeking creative,
multi-skilled individual to oversee marketing &
promotions. Must have extensive experience with onair news, programming promotion and research.
Should have knowledge of outdoor, the Internet. cop. radio, cable and be familiar w/events marketing.
Candidate should have college degree in
Marketing/Communications or related field. Send
resume and non -returnable tape:
BC #119
Des Moines KDSM-TV - FOX
Local Sales Manager
We are looking for a dynamic candidate with proven
leadership skills who can train, motivate and direct
our sales staff. Must have minimum 5 years of
broadcast sales experience. Send resume. BC/113
Kansas City - KSMO -T V - WB
Local Sales Manager
WB 62 is looking for a highly aggressive ISM with
minimum 3 years local broadcast experience in sales
& management to lead the most dynamic sales team
in Kansas City. Must think 'outside the bof to come
up with creative ideas to generate additional
revenue. Send resume.
BC#I11
San Antonio
KABB -TV - FOX
Chief Engineer
San Antonio's FOX affiliate is seeking a Chief
Engineer with five years experience and complete
knowledge of broadcast equipment and transmitter
systems. Send resume.
BCE ,
1
Sinclair Radio of
St. Louis - KPNT/WVRV-FM
Assistant Radio Engineer
Seeking an experienced Asst. Engineer to work in
expanding St. Louis facility. Candidate should provid
working knowledge of remote broadcast equipment
and technique used to produce quality broadcast.
Basic knowledge of electronics. audio and RF
technology, and computer skills, including networkiuc
a plus. Send resume and cover letter.
B0/1
I
M. Louis .KDNL,TV ABC
Reporter
enterprise
reporting, creative storytelling and live shots. Send
3-5 years TV exp., heavy emphasis on
WANT TO RESPOND TO A
resume.
BC#I
I
St. Louis - KDNUTV - ABC
BROADCASTING & CABLE BLIND BOX ?
Send resume /tape to:
General Sales Manager
Minimum of 4 years exp.. proven track record of
ability to attract new business. and thorough
knowledge of Nielsen, Scarborough and TVScan.
Send resume.
BC#1 Ih
Mail your resume In confidence Immediately to:
Broadcasting &Cable. 245 W. 17th Street, NY, N1
Box
1001 1.
245 West 17th St.,
Attn: Job
#
SIBS
smCIAIXaROAOCASTOROUP
New York, New York 10011
70
BROADCASTING & CABLE
JUNE
22,1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
Sinclair Is proud to be an
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
and a DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE
WOMEN AND MINORr11ES ARE ENCOURAGED TO APPLY
CLASSIFIEDS
,I:II.
IN
CABLE
I
Are you currently selling TV. table. Radio. or
Interconnects? Here is a great opp. to step up to
the next level. You will call on NYC's lop
agencies for TV station with over 2 million
viewers a week in the Tri-State area. treat
HELP WANTED NEWS
EDITORIAL OPPORTUNITIES
Lsr:dn,n.
MULTICHANNEL NEWS
CABLEVISION
TV SYND/VP WORLDN IUE
MKT TO 75K
If
you are #2 or 3 in Syndie Marketing Dept. or
Promotion Mgr. For TV /Radio this is a great
opp. tojoitl growing t)omestic /Int'I. firm local.]
in NYC. You will work with Slat' s.
A Ivertisers and oversee dev. of ad campaign
material NATI'E. MIPCOM.
DBI
MEDIA
Contact: L.. Rudni.k
Director. I)81 Media Executive Sear.h
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR
Multichannel News, a leading trade publication of the cable irdustry, has an imnediate opportunity for
an Assistant Managing Editor. Ideal candidale should have at least 3 years experience on a weekly or daily
newspaper. Strong edit and organizational skills needed to handle editorial and procuction duties. Knowledge of industry desirable. (Code: MCAME)
MANAGING EDITOR
Cablevision, a leading features and analysis trade publication of the cable industry, is seeking a Managing Editor. Position oversees the day to day operations of the magazine driving news coverage and production. Works closely with Editor to plan editorial content and direction of magazine. Strong leadership
and management skills necessary. Knowledge of cable and related fields preferred. (Code: CVME)
Please send resume indicating job code and salary requ.rements to: Human Resources Department. Cahners Business Information, 245 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011 or fax to: 212 -727 -2425. We appreciate your responses, but will only be replying to quaified candidates.
Fax: 212-338-0632
Phone: 212-338-0808 Ext. 5
Visit us at www.1111i11y.e
HELP WANTED MISCELLANEOUS
TV RESUME TAPES
Career Videos prepares your personalized
demo. Unique format, excellent rates, coaching,
job search assistance, tape critiques. Great track
record. 847 -272 -2917.
TV SALES TRAINING
Best
Teams
Have the Best Players
All Working Togethfor
The
Nicurrcnth haw opportutitics
LEARN TO SELL
TV TIME
The program works. Former students
now sell for NBC, ABC, ESPN, MTV,
Katz, Turner, Petry, and dozens of TV
stations across the country.
(Over 25 years in the TV industry)
Cafe
mailable in the fol dow ing :rcas:
Oul-laedirlr ream privets /tine
1:51:S en. motion's
PRODUCTION
uoM.
41
11)1
OPERATIONS
You can simply fax your
classified ad to
Broadcasting & Cable at
(212)200 -8327.
a.p row u
illlf.;ra.l
lins.-rlced corno
r. roan cmnIplislunem
I s
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
If you are ready to cork with our
team, send your resume to:
ESPN, Inc., Ad.! 33,
ESPN PIa.a,
employer.
.e,o.e
slrrlcll our
se
a pmore surr zc
d},el into ehr
Ilu .
1==r7
IJ
The worl:wide leader in sporta.
JUNE
www.americanradiohistory.com
\
he ara
prll o'lhr'cnrjdrn alrliol
ea cer plqer in
FINANCE /ACCOUNTING
nl
F`P,\' MO* .1 -eao dull
caTerard0e4.0.4 Ir. You'll
SALES AND MARKETING
Bristol. ('t' OMI i 0- 743.I.
I:SI'.N ixnn equal moan 8888
.=.1
decl4nled
AND ENGINEERING
for free information packet.
ANTONELLI MEDIA
TRAINING CENTER
(212) 206 -8063
(212) 206 -8064 fax
a-Ia,}sl nrhlr
nn. 7tl nnn
PROGRAMMING
m,d
p.:+I.io sporla
72,1998
BRJABCASIIVG
&
CGlilf
-/1
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED PRODUCTION
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
FREELANCE PRODUCER
Video Production. Use your digital media skills
to help children! The Administration for Children's
Services, the national leader in innovative approaches to the delivery and development of
Television Networks is currently offering an exciting freelance
an experienced writer /segment -producer for a new halfhour talk show to air on The History Channel. The individual will be
responsible for booking guests, writing scripts and producing segments.
Requirements include a minimum of 5 yrs. producing live (live-to -tape)
news /political oriented talk shows, strong booking skills, and a solid
background in all aspects of TV production and post production.
Please forward resume only to:
A &E
opportunity for
A &E Television
HR Dept. /FP
Networks
235 East 45th Street
New York, NY 10017
Fax: (212) 907-9402
THE HISTORY CHANNEL.
HELP WANTED TECHNICAL
Group cable operator seeking an experienced
TECHNICIAN
ENGINEERING SERVICES
Long Island, NY based state of the art broadcast
cable manager to head a cluster of systems.
Must have strong leadership qualities and have
proven marketing and people skills. Must understand all phases of the cable laws and requirements, including technical. Must have a vision for
cable growth being active in the industry desirable. An equal opportunity employer. Please send
resumes to Box 01386. EOE.
facility seeks individuals with strong background in
electronics and RE with ability to troubleshoot to the
board level. Experience with digital television,
HELP WANTED NEWS
ALLIED FIELDS
D2,
IMS, UNIX Windows NT preferred. Duties include
repair and maintenance of broadcast equipment.
Minimum of 5 years experience with appropriate
HELP WANTED INSTRUCTION
educational background. Flexible work schedule
required. We do not cover relocation costs. Send
Chairperson - Assistant or Associate Professor, Tenure Track. Department of Mass
Communication: to start August 18. 1998
resume and salary requirements to: P.O. Box 634TES,
Volley Stream, NY 11582. We will respond only to
those that meet the above requirements. We are an
equal opportunity employer.
Chief Engineer -ZDTV, Your Computer Channel, based in San Francisco, seeks a seasoned.
team -oriented. hands-on engineer to be responsible for the studio and broadcast engineering department. You will be responsible for for maintaining and installing technical facilities for the studio,
maintenance department and air operations
management. You will have excellent technical
and managerial skills, plus a thorough knowledge
of broadcast equipment including satellite
transmission. computer and Internet systems.
FCC license and college or technical degree or
equivalent needed. At least 10 years broadcast
engineering experience preferred. Please send
resume to: ZDTV, Attn: Human Resources/BC.
650 Townsend Street, San Francisco, CA 94103.
Email: [email protected], fax: 415-551 -4501. No
phone calls please. An Equal Opportunity
Employer.
HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT
Senior Management. Communications /Media
Company seeks successful "Take Charge' individual with extensive Cable Management background. Must have cable operations. cable acquisition. IPO, and high yield fund raising experience. Applications will be kept in strict confidence. Reporting to the Chairman. Favorable remuneration package offered. Please send resume to private fax: 914- 634 -0948
72
BROADCASTING & CABLE I JUNE
child welfare services, under the leadership of
Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Commissioner
Nicholas Scoppetta is seeking two highly
motivated. creative and experienced production
professionals. Positions available include: an
Avid Media Composer 1000 editor. and a digital
video technician /camera operator. Employees will
perform a variety of production. directing, editing
and software duties in creating employee training. internal communication and public relations
videos in both long and short form. BAckground
in documentary child welfare is a plus. F T including excellent pay and NYC government benefits!
Send resume, reel and salary history to: Julia
Rothwax. Special Asst. to the Deputy Commissioner, 80 Lafayette St. 18th FI, New York,
NY 10013. ACS is an EOE. To learn more about
these exciting opportunities and other emerging
technology positions with New York City; visit the
Department of Information Technology and
Telecommunications Technology Position Recruitment site at http:www.ci.nyc.ny.us /ITJOBS on
the world wide web.
(preferred) or as soon thereafter as possible, or
January 1999 possible. To lead department in
planning, communication, student support and
other administrative functions. Must be advocate
of University improvement initiatives and college
media. Teach Mass Communication classes. Requires Ph.D. in Mass Communication or related
field. Apply to: Matthew Bosisio, Chair, Search
Committee, Department of Mass Communication,
College of Professional and Applied Studies.
Wells Hall 234, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri 64468. Provide a letter of
application addressing the position: current resume; names, addresses and telephone numbers for three references: undergraduate and
graduate transcripts (copies acceptable): and
three letters of reference. Deadline Date: July 24.
1998 or until filled. AA/EOE Northwest encourages women and minorities to apply.
Ad - Editor, Catholic Spirit. The Diocese of
Wheeling -Charleston, Wheeling, WV, is seeking
applicants for the position of Editorial/General
Manager of its newspaper. The Catholic Spirit.
and released print publications. The Catholic
Spirit has a potential outreach to over 41,000 registered Catholics in West Virginia. The Editor/
General Manager of the Catholic Spirit plans,
coordinates and directs the editorial and business activities of the newspaper and related print
vehicles. The successful candidate must be a
highly creative person who is committed to
spreading the Gospel Mission of the Church.
Candidates must be self -starters with excellent
writing, editing, interpersonal, and organizational
skills. Management experience a plus. Must be
an active practicing Catholic, who has a sound
knowledge of the church's teachings. practices
and traditions. MA Degree in communications,
journalism or public relations. BA Degree with
appropriate years of experience will be considered. Background in theology preferred. Send
resume and salary requirements by to: Director of
Human Resources. Diocese of Wheeling Charleston, 1300 Byron Street. PO Box 230.
Wheeling, WV 26003. Fax# (304) 233 -0890.
Phone# (304) 233 -0880 Ext 265.
Assistant/Assciate Professor in Department
of Radio-Television at Arkansas State Univer
sity in Jonesboro. Requires graduate degree
(PhD preferred) in mass communications or
equivalent and significant professional media experience. Teach some combination of advertising, management. radio and television production. corporate video, programming, research.
mass communications, media writing and other
mass communications courses. Send resume, references. and copies of transcripts to: Richard
Carvell, Chair, Department of Radio -Television.
Arkansas State University, PO Box 2160. State
University, Arkansas 72467. Review of applications begins June 30, 1998. Employment date:
August 15, 1998. Arkansas State University is an
Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer.
M /F.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL JOBS
WITH ENTERTAINMENT COMPANIES
BROADCAST & CABLE TELEVISION. DISTRIBUTORS.
MOTION PICTURE, POST PRODUCTION& MORE
Entry to senior level jobs nationwide in ALL fields
(news. sales. production. management. etc.).
Published biweekly. For subscription information:
(800) 335-4335
Entertainment Employment JournalTM
email: [email protected]
22,1908
www.americanradiohistory.com
CLAiiIFIEIt
Jobs in the Beautiful
Northwest On -air, sales, engineering,
production, management. Washington
State Association of Broadcasters Job Bari.
FOR SALE EQUIPMENT
AM and FM transmitters, used, excellent condition, tuned and tested your frequency. Guaranteed. Financing available. Transcom. 800 -4418454,215- 884-0888. Fax 215- 884 -0738.
STOCK
For Sale: Brand new
Radio & TV
Phone: 360 -705-0774 Fax: 360- 705-0873
THE HOT SHEET. Broadcasting's most corn prehensivejob- listings journal. Television, radio,
corporate communications. Opportunities in all
fields. From major -market to entry- level. Subscribe today. Give your career the winning edge!
Media Marketing, P.O. Box 1476 --PD. Palm
Harbor. FL 34682 -1476. (813)786 -3603.
Just For Starters: Entry-level jobs and "hands on" internships in TV and radio news. National
listings. For a sample lead sheet call: 800 -6807513.
WANTED TO BUY EQUIPMENT
Used videotape: Cash for 3/4` SP, M2 -90's,
Betacam SP's. Call Carpel Video 301 -694 -3500.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
OWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Western Virginia
6kw FM / $300.000
Blue Ridge Foothills
Very Profitable FM
$750,000 / Terms
Northern Virginia
Single Station Market
FM /51.6M /CF
Tidewater Virginia
AM/FM - lkw/6kw
$2.0M /CF
We Have Others
SNOWDEN
Associates
Valuations Staticn Brokerage - Financing
1252) 355-0327 FAX (2521 355 -8386
-
COLLECTION AGENCY
MEDIA COLLECTION
DREAM TEAM
CCR
Attorney (former broadcast/cable ad sales
manager NBC -TV, Katz, Petry, Lifetime)
and staff handle the USA's top media
firm's collection accounts offering:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Unequalled knowledge of media business.
Ten years of unequalled /documentable
recovery rates.
Customized reporting.
Competitive contingent fee schedule.
References available.
CCR
Call/Write:
George Stella
1025 Old Country Road
Suite 303S
Westbury, NY 11590
Tel:516. 997 -2000.212- 766 -0851 Fax: 516 -997 -2071
E -Mail: CCRCollect @AOl.com
ANSWERS.
For video duplication, demos,
audition reels, work tapes, our
recycled tapes are technically
up to any task and downright
bargains. All formats, fully guaranteed. To order call:
(800)238 -4300 CARPEL
VIDEO
Lowest prices on videotape! Since 1979 we
have been beating the high cost of videotape.
Call Carpel for a catalog. 800 -238 -4300.
3 Compaq Servers and
Workstations. external storage. 15 Audio Cards
(PCX 80. 9 and 11) Call for complete list. (305)
377-8125. This hot digital broadcasting equipment will sell quickly!
FOR SALE STATIONS
WMMW- Meriden, Connecticut. 2,500 Watts
full time stereo on 1470 kHz. covers most of central Connecticut and New Haven. LMA format is
tropical Spanish, and wide coverage is also ideal
for brokered/ethnic/religion. or local radio for densely populated region. No studios included. Offers above 550K. Call Dennis Jackson, New England Media, 203/762 -9425.
Florida: Leading Keys FM, with bonus of very
attractive lifestyle; Also AM close to Orlando and
attractions. Mayo Communications, 813 -9712061.
BROADCASTING & CABLE'S CLASSIFIED RATES
All orders to place classified ads & all correspondence pertaining to this section should be sent to
BROADCASTING & CABLE, Classified Department, 245 West 17th Street, New York, NY 10011. For
information call Antoinette Pellegrino at (212) 337 -7073 or Francesca Mazzucca at (212)337 -6962 .
Payable in advance. Check, money order or credit card (Visa, Mastercard or American Express).
Full and correct payment must be in writing by either letter or Fax (212) 206 -8327. If payment is
made by credit card, indicate card number, expiration date and daytime phone number.
Deadline is Monday at 5:00pm Eastern Time for the following Monday's issue. Earlier deadlines
apply for issues published during a week containing a legal holiday. A special notice announcing the
earlier deadline will be published. Orders, changes, and /or cancellations must be submitted in writing. NO TELEPHONE ORDERS, CHANGES, AND /OR CANCELLATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED.
When placing an ad, indicate the EXACT category desired: Television, Radio, Cable or Allied Fields;
Help Wanted or Situations Wanted; Management, Sales, News, etc. If this information is omitted, we
will determine the appropriate category according to the copy. NO make goods will run if all information is not included. No personal ads.
The publisher is not responsible for errors in printing due to illegible copy
copy must be clearly typed or printed. Any and all errors must be reported to the Classified Advertising Department within 7 days of publication date. No credits or make goods will be made on errors which do not materially affect the advertisement. Publisher reserves the right to alter classified copy to conform with
the provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended. Publisher reserves the right to
abbreviate, alter or reject any copy.
Rates: Classified listings (non -display). Per issue: Help Wanted: $2.30 per word, $46 weekly minimum. Situations Wanted: 1.25e per word, $25 weekly minimum. Optional formats: Bold Type: $2.65
per word, Screened Background: $2.80, Expanded Type: $3.45 Bold, Screened, Expanded Type:
$3.90 per word. All other classifications: $2.30 per word, $46 weekly minimum.
Word count: Count each abbreviation, initial, single figure or group of figures or letters as one word
each. Symbols such as 35mm, COD, PD etc., count as one word each. A phone number with area
code and the zip code count as one word each.
Rates: Classified display (minimum 1 inch, upward in half inch increments). Per issue: Help Wanted: $202 per inch. Situations Wanted: $101 per inch. Public Notice & Business Opportunities advertising require display space. Agency commission only on display space (when camera -ready art is
provided). Frequency rates available.
Non -Display: Help wanted: $2.30 /word. Situations Wanted: $1.25. Bold Type $2.65. Screened
Background $2.80. Expanded Type $3.45. Bold, Screened, Expanded Type $3.90.
Color Classified Rates
Non -Display: Highlighted Position Title: $75. Display: Logo 4 /C: $250. All 4 /C: $500.
Blind Box Service: (In addition to basic advertising costs) Situations Wanted: No charge. All othr
classifications: $35 per issue. The charge for the blind box service applies to advertisers running listings and display ads. Each advertisement must have a separate box number. BROADCASTING &
CABLE will now forward tapes, but will not forward transcripts, portfolios, writing samples, or other
oversized materials; such are returned to sender. Do not use folders, binders or the like. Replies to
ads with Blind Box numbers should be addressed to: Box (number), c/o Broadcasting & Cable. 245
W. 17th Street, New York, NY 10011
Confidential Service. To protect your identity seal your reply in an envelope addressed to the box
number. In a separate note list the companies and subsidiaries you do not want your reply to reach.
Then, enclose both in a second envelope addressed to CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE, Broadcasting &
Cable Magazine, at the address above.
-all
JUNE
22,1088 / BROADCASTING &
CABLE
78
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
du Treil, Lundin & Racklev, Inc.
CARL T.
Consulting Engineers
240 N Washington Blvd *Suite 700
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JONES=
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8309 Cherry Lane
Laurel. MD 20707 4830
13011 776 4488
PHONE:(941)366-2611
FAX:(941)366 -5533
YARNWOOD COURT
SPRINGFIELD VIRGINIA M153
( 703 )569 -T704
Member AFCCE
alaafaO APCCI
John F.X. Browne
HAA'IME TT & EDISON, INC.
7901
t Y)Nyl'I
& Associates
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BROADCAST / TELECOMMUNICATIONS
Blaomóeid Hills, MI
washington, DC
248.642 6226
(TEL)
101 293 2020
248 642 6027
(FAO)
202 293 2021
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CARL E. SMITH
Member AFCCE
e -mail:
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Member AFCCE
ulrr
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P.O. Box 97262 - Raleigh, NC 27624
Tel / Fax (919) 846-2976
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Since 1837
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9049 Shady Grove Court
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301- 921 -0115
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COHEN. DIPPELL AND EV6eST. PC.
CONSULTINO ENGINEERS
Domestic arid Intemwlonr Communication.
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6091 985-0077
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DATEBOOK
July 8- 10- WCA'98,
11th annual Wireless Cable Association convention and exposition. Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia. Contact: Susan Bishop, (202) 452 -7823.
Sept. 17- BROAOCasnNG & CABLE Interface XII conference. New
York Grand Hyatt, New York City. Contact: Cahners Business
Information, (212) 337-7053.
Sept. 23 -26- Radio- Television News Directors Association
international conference and exhibition. San Antonio Convention Center, San Antonio, Tex. Contact: Rick Osmanski, (202)
467 -5200.
Oct. 14- 17-National Association of Broadcasters Radio
Show. Washington State Convention and Trade Center, Seattle. Contact: (800) 342 -2460.
Oct. 26- 28-Southern Cable Telecommunications Associa-
THIS WEEK
Through June 24 -Cable Telecommunications
Association of Maryland, Delaware and the District
of Columbia annual conference. Sheraton
Fontainebleau Hotel. Ocean City. Md. Contact:
(410) 266-9111.
June 24- Federal Communications Bar Association luncheon featuring FCC Chairman William
Kennard. Capital Hilton Hotel, Washington. Contact: Paula Friedman, (202) 736 -8640.
June 24.27- Association of Higher Education
Cable Television Administrators first annual conference. Sheraton Orlando North. Orlando. Contact: Angel Marlowe. (919) 684 -2930.
June 25.26 -1998 Forum on Cable/Telco Franchising & Competition ` presented by the Strategic Research Institute. Embassy Row Hilton.
Washington. Contact: (800) 599 -4950.
June 25.27- DISCOP'98, Central and Eastern
European television programming expo and conference presented by The Happening Group. The
Atrium Hotel, Budapest. Contact: (310) 277 -3633.
June 28.30-New York State Broadcasters
Association 37th annual executive conference.
Sagamore Resort, Lake George. N.Y. Contact:
Mary Anne Jacon, (518) 456 -8888.
June 28-July 1-CTAM National Marketing
Conference. Chicago Hilton & Towers. Chicago.
Contact: M.C. Anti!, (703) 549 -4200.
JUNE
June
MEN
30-Deadline for entries for the Siegen -
thaleriNationai Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association Electronic Media Awards honoring excellence in TV and radio reporting on lesbian and
gay issues. Contact: (202) 588 -9888.
June 30- "Microbroadcasting and the War for
the Airwaves." policy forum presented by The
Cato Institute, Washington. Contact: Michelle
Rider. (202) 789 -5229.
IMB
JULY
July 8-12-11th
.
11- International Teleproduction Society
International Monitor Awards presentation and
gala. Regal Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles. Contact:
Julie H.J. Chung. (703) 319 -0800.
July 11.14- "Winning on a Higher Plain,"
Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau 5th annual
Local Cable Sales Management Conference. Colorado Convention Center, Denver. Contact:
Nancy Lagos, (212) 508-1229.
July 11-17-National Association of Broadcasters Management Development Seminar for Television Executives. Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Contact: John Porter, (202) 775 -2559.
July
15-Alfred I. duPont -Columbia University
Awards deadline for submissions of news and
July
public affairs programming aired on TV or radio.
9-
Contact: Jonnet Alleles, (212) 854-5047.
July 16 -35th annual Broadcast Advertising
Club of Chicago Sports Day (golf and tennis outing). Indian Lakes Resort. Bloomingdale, III. Contact: (312) 440 -0540.
July 17.16- Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters summer meeting. Shangri -La Resort.
Afton. Okla. Contact: Carl Smith. (405) 848 -0771.
July 18-21 -1998 National Association of Broadcasters Executive Development Program for Radio
Broadcasters. Georgetown University. Washington.
Contact: Chris Suever, (202) 775 -3511.
July 19.22 -Women in Cable & Telecommunications national management conference. JW Marriott Hotel. Washington. Contact: (312) 634 -2330.
July 20-23 -New England Cable Television
Association 24th annual convention and exhibition.
Newport. R.I. Contact: Bill Durans. (781) 843 -3418.
July 22.24- Montana Cable Telecommunica-
tions Association annual convention. Grouse
Mountain Lodge, Whitefish. Mont. Contact: Greg
Herbert. (406) 628-2100.
July 22.25- SBCA'98, national satellite convention and exposition presented by the Satellite
Broadcasting and Communications Association.
Opryland Hotel. Nashville. Contact: Jennifer Snyder, (703) 549 -6990.
July 23-25-Southwest National Religious
Broadcasters convention. Dallas/Ft. Worth Marriott. Ft. Worth, Tex. Contact: (918) 743-9188.
July 24.25 -Michigan Association of Broadcasters annual meeting and management retreat.
Shanty Creek Resort, Bellaire, Mich. Contact:
Michael Steger, (517) 484 -7444.
California Broadcasters Association convention. Doubletree Hotel.
Monterey. Calif. Contact: (916) 444-2237.
July 29 -Aug.
National Association of Black
Journalists 23rd annual convention and job fair.
Grand Hyatt Hotel. Washington. Contact: (301)
405 -8500.
July 25.27 -51st annual
2-
11=1 NMI
annual International Teleproduction Society forum and exhibition. Regal Biltmore
Hotel. Los Angeles. Contact: (703) 319 -0800.
July 10-12- "Covering the '98 Elections." workshop sponsored by the Radio -Television News
Directors Foundation Swissotel. Chicago. Contact: Kathleen Graham. (202) 467 -5216.
fion Eastern Show. Orange County Convention Center, Orlando,
Fla. Contact: Patti Hall, (404) 255 -1608.
Oct. 27.29- Society of Broadcast Engineers national meeting
and electronic media expo. Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue
(Seattle), Washington. Contact: John Poray, (317) 253 -1640.
Oct. 28.31- Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 140th technical conference and exhibition. Pasadena Convention Center, Pasadena, Calif. Contact: (914) 761 -1100.
Nov.
BROADCASTING & CABLE 1998 Hall of Fame Dinner. Marriott Marquis Hotel, New York City. Contact: Cahners Business
Information, (212) 337 -7053.
Dec. 1.4-The Western Show, conference and exhibition presented by the California Cable Television Association. Anaheim
Convention Center, Anaheim, Calif. Contact: (510) 429 -5300.
Aug. 3-The
AUGUST
1998 New York Festivals Interna-
tional Television Programming and Promotion
deadline for entries. Contact: (914) 238 -4481.
Aug. 3-5--Alabama Cable Telecommunications
Association annual convention. Marriott's Grand
Hotel. Point Clear, Ala. Contact: Jennifer Robinson. (334) 271-2281.
Aug. 5Association for Education in Journalism & Mass CommunicatiomAssociation of
Schools of Journalism & Mass Communication
81th annual convention. Hyatt Regency Baltimore,
Baltimore. Contact: (803) 777 -2005.
Aug. 7.8- "Sportscaster Institute." seminar
sponsored by the Texas Association of Broadcasters. Arlington Hilton Hotel. Arlington. Tex.
Contact: Michael Schneider. (512) 322 -9944.
Aug. 13.15- Nebraska Broadcasters Association 65th annual convention. Holiday Inn, York.
Neb. Contact: Dick Palmquist, (402) 778 -5178.
Aug. 13.15- Tennessee Association of Broadcasters annual convention. Clubhouse Inn and
Conference Center. Nashville. Contact: Jill Green.
6-
(615) 399-3791.
Aug. 19- Hollywood Radio & TV Society "kid's
day' newsmaker luncheon. Regent Beverly Wilshire
Hotel, Los Angeles. Calif. Contact: (818) 789 -1182.
MIMI
SEPTEMBER
and Society of Broadcast Engineers 45th annual
convention and trade show. Hotel InterContinental. Dallas. Contact: (512) 322 -9944.
Sept. 3.4 -World Summit on Financing for
Satellite Communications and Broadcasting, presented by Euroconsult and Donaldson. Lufkin 6
Jenrette. Le Grand Hôtel Inter -Continental. Paris.
Contact: (212) 892 -3000.
Sept 11.13-"Covering the '98 Elections," workshop sponsored by Radio Television News
Directors Foundation. Austin. TX. Contact: Kathleen Graham, (202) 467 -5216.
Sept. 11.15-1998 International Broadcasting
Convention. Amsterdam. Holland. Contact: 011 44
171 240 3839.
Sept. 12.14- National Association of Broadcasters Hundred Plus Exchange. Wigwam Hotel, Phoenix. Contact: Carolyn Wilkins. (202) 429-5362.
Sept. 13.15- "Internat Services Over Cable
Systems." technical workshop presented by the
Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers.
Don CeSar Beach Resort, St. Pete Beach, Fla.
Contact: Anna Riker. (610) 363 -6888.
Sept. 14-SkyFORUM X, direct -to -home satellite TV business symposium presented by the
Satellite Broadcasting and Communications
Association. Marriott Marquis Hotel, New York
City. Contact: Jennifer Snyder, (703) 549 -6990
Sept. 14-15- National Association of Minorities
in Communications Urban Markets Conference.
New York Hilton and Towers. New York City. Contact: (202) 965 -0046.
Sept. 15- International Radio & Television Society Foundation newsmaker luncheon featuring FCC
Chairman William Kennard. Waldorf- Astoria. New
York City. Contact: Marilyn Ellis. (212) 867 -6650
Sept. 15- National Association of Broadcasters
1998 Service to Children's Television Awards.
Washington. Contact: Anna Sims. (202) 429 -5362.
Sept. 16-"Staying Focused. "1998 Service to
Children's Television Symposium presented by
National Association of Broadcasters NAB Executive Conference Center, Washington. Contact:
Anna Sims. (202) 429 -5362.
Sept. 22- Hollywood Radio & TV Society newsmaker luncheon featuring entertainment presidents
of the six broadcast networks. Century Plaza Hotel.
Los Angeles, Calif. Contact: (818) 789 -1182.
Sept. 23- "Effective New Business Presentations." lunch seminar presented by the Broadcast
Advertising Club of Chicago. Loyola University Busi.
ness School, Chicago. Contact: (312) 440 -0540.
Sept - 25 -26th annual regional convention
of
the Central New York chapter of the Society of
Broadcast Engineers. Four Points Hotel, Liverpool. N.Y. Contact: (703) 739 -5172.
Major Meeting date, in red
-Compiled
by Kenneth Ray
(ken.ray @cahners.com)
JUNE 22, 1998
www.americanradiohistory.com
MIMI
Sept. 2.4 -Texas Association of Broadcasters
BROADCASTING
&
CIBLE 75
FIFTH ESTATER
A marketer for all customers
Leave it to Steve Heyer to lead a marketing group that would conceive of
space -age cartoon dad George Jetson
as the perfect pitch man for Radio Shack.
To Heyer, a savvy marketer with sea-
soned knowledge of TV audiences and
advertisers, the concept perfectly blends
Turner Broadcasting System Inc.'s copyright ownership of The Jetsons cartoon
with Radio Shack's need for a consumerfriendly point man. The ads ran last fall.
"Finding those opportunities is what the
marketing solutions group, a group that I
founded when I came to Turner four years
ago, is all about." Heyer says.
As president and chief operating officer
of Turner, Heyer acts as the guardian of
primary revenue and cost streams for all
Turner news and entertainment networks
worldwide. Yet his sight is focused on creating value for each of the company's constituents, from viewers to advertisers to
cable operators.
In an increasingly fragmented cable
world, Heyer says that one wins "by building the best product that meets a consumer's needs and then exploiting that
product in a way that is in the best interest
of your partners in the value chain."
He's taken that approach hundreds of
times at Turner. An advocate of investing
wisely both to create original shows and to
acquire high- quality programming, Heyer
has voiced strong support for Turner's
strategy to bid successfully for first broadcast window rights for major theatricals
rather than settle for the later basic -cable
window premieres.
"It's an aggressive strategy on our part to
change the game," Heyer says. "It makes
the entire cable package more attractive."
Gaining first -run movies and leveraging
copyrighted products and marrying them
with marketing campaigns are priorities
for Heyer, who advises marketers to "create a pod, an environment, that's as discernible and break -out as possible" on the
cluttered cable dial.
As adamant as Heyer is about not skimping on costs for premium programming, he
supported Turner's decision in January to
punt on the multibillion -dollar cost of retaining cable rights for NFL games, a venture
that cost rival ESPN $4.8 billion.
"We would have had to pass on extraordinarily high costs to advertisers and cable
operators, and we were unwilling to do that,"
Heyer says. "I thought it would be irresponsible and not in our partners' best interests."
78
11111111111111 6
CARE
I
With a background in sales, marketing
and advertising, Heyer is well -versed in
keeping the interests of diverse partners in
balance. During his I5 -year tenure with
Booz, Allen & Hamilton, Heyer achieved
the level of senior vice president and managing partner and directed the firm's consumer industries group, which encom-
"Create a pod, an
environment, that's
as discernible
and break -out as
possible."
Steven Jay
Heyer
President/chief operating
officer, Turner Broadcasting
System Inc., New York; b. June
13, 1952, New York; BS,
industrial relations, Cornell
University, 1974; MBA, Stern
School of Business at New
York University, 1976; various
positions with Booz, Allen &
Hamilton, New York, most
recently as senior vice
president/managing partner,
1976 -1992; president/C00,
Young & Rubicam Advertising
Worldwide and executive vice
president, Young & Rubicam
Inc., both New York, 1992 -94;
president, Turner Broadcasting
Sales Inc., 1994 -98; added
role of president of Worldwide
Sales, Marketing, Distribution
and International Networks,
Turner Broadcasting System,
1996.98; current position
since January 1998; m.
Margaret Tobin, Feb. 13,
1989; daughter, Kate, 8; son,
David, 4
JINE 22, 1111
www.americanradiohistory.com
passed clients in fields from packaged
goods to communications.
Ted Turner and Turner Broadcasting
Chairman Terry McGuirk were clients during Heyer's Booz, Allen days. Because of a
relationship forged then, Heyer says "it felt
natural that Terry called" two years later to
discuss a job with Turner Broadcasting.
McGuirk says that his relationship with
Heyer is built on mutual respect. "Steve
has a very strong ethic for the highest -quality work -and because of that, the quality
of work that takes place under Steve is
going to be at the highest levels in our history," McGuirk says. "He's a great business partner to have in this company."
From Booz, Allen & Hamilton, in 1992
Heyer joined Young & Rubicam Advertising Worldwide, where he developed marketing strategies for global clients. "A lot
of what I put into motion at Turner was
sensitized by my experience with Y &R
and is why I tend to be client- centered and
customer -focused," Heyer says.
Heyer parlayed his customer- centered
attitude into Turner's "Media at the Millennium" research study, which is used to show
media buyers that the value of advertising
impressions on cable TV is equal to and
often greater than their value on broadcast
networks. "At some point, the dollars have
to follow the impressions," Heyer says.
Heyer is bullish on projections for
cable's continued ratings growth and for
ongoing ratings erosion at broadcast networks. He also is confident that high -quality program acquisitions and original productions will help cable's general entertainment networks, such as Turner Network Television and TBS Superstation, to
"look more like perfect substitutes for
NBC and CBS for advertisers and achieve
parity with the broadcast networks."
As cable growth continues, Heyer says
that his "primary contribution will be integrating Turner's revenues with program
acquisitions so that we are making and
buying programs that will be hits not only
with consumers but with cable operators
and advertisers. That's about the highest
calling I could have." -Donna Petro ==eIlo
i
OPEN MIKE
An open letter to
EDrroR: After reading BROADCASTING & CABLE'S June I5 critique of
House Telecommunications Subcommittee Chairman Billy Tauzin,
a couple of things came to mind: How petty. How misleading. How
true to forth for a trade magazine that caters to the cable industry.
As an award -winning journalist whose career spanned 25
years, I learned to ask tough questions. And I am not afraid to
answer them, either. Like alligators, which are
indigenous to Louisiana, both Billy and I have
developed thick skins. And, like alligators, we
don't bite unless we're poked with a stick.
Well, your article did a lot more poking than
probing.
Certainly, BROADCASTING & CABLE has a
right -even a responsibility to its readers
ask tough questions. Why hasn't Tauzin
delivered on some of the legislation he
promised? Why does he get out front on so
many issues? What is the relationship
between Tauzin and Commerce Committee
Chairman Tom Bliley? Good questions.
They all deserve answers.
But BROADCASTING & CABLE also has
an obligation to be factual. As a reporter
for most of my life, I am offended by the
misleading, incomplete and inaccurate inform
tion found in this story. So let's go back to Journalism 101 and
start with the misleading.
The story began with Billy making a tongue -in -cheek reference that he had "graciously accepted" an invitation to testify
before the Senate Commerce Committee on cable TV rates. But
wait a minute, the story went on, there was no hearing, and
Tauzin had never been invited to testify.
"That's Billy," the story deadpanned. No, actually, that's poor
reporting. A tentative hearing had been scheduled for June (and
later delayed because of the tobacco bill), and Billy was invited
to be the lead- off witness.
Want more misleading? The story later went on to document
the debate over Chairman Bliley's bill to privatize the international satellite market. Once again, Tauzin was condemned for
coming up "with a legislative solution of his own." Not really.
Mr. Bliley, in fact, was the one who asked Billy to come up with
a legislative compromise.
Enough of the misleading. Let's move on now to the incomplete. Quoting an anonymous source, who was critical of
our legislative efforts to date, the story continued, "To the extent
that there's a shortcoming in legislative skills, it's his [ Tauzin's]
to fix."
Well, that's not correct either. As I repeatedly pointed out in
vain to your reporter, the Commerce Committee hires all of the
subcommittee staff. We don't. The Commerce Committee sets
the agenda. We don't. And the Commerce Committee schedules
all hearings and markups. We don't. In other words, no one on
the subcommittee staff-not a single person -was hired by
Billy, works for Billy, or answers directly to Billy. Your nameless source was right about one thing: That is a shortcoming.
Here's another example of incomplete. Taking a shot at me,
the story goes on to say, "Sometimes, he puts his foot -and
Tauzin's
his mouth." Well, don't we all. What, specifically
are you referring to though? There are no instances cited. Not
-to
-in
&
BROADCASTING
CABLE
one. Isn't that a little like saying Bill Clinton is a "womanizer'
but never mentioning any women or any of his trysts?
Now let's move on to my favorite, the inaccurate. For five
years now, I have fielded questions from BROADCASTING &
CABLE, never ducking tough questions, always respectful of
deadlines. And during all of that time, I never, not even once.
asked for a retraction or clarification of a statement. Does that
mean that BROADCASTING & CABLE got it right every
time? Well, you be the judge.
In this one story, in one sentence alone,
i
there are three glaring factual errors. " Tauzin
is not typically involved in taxes, is not a
member of the Republican leadership and has
been a Republican only since 1994."
Wrong. Wrong. And wrong, again! In fact,
Billy is deeply involved in taxes. He has written
a comprehensive book on taxation in America.
co -wrote the National Retail Sales Tax Act,
founded the National Retail Sales Tax Caucus,
and published tax op -eds in major newspapers all
across the nation. Secondly, he is a member of the
Republican leadership, serving as deputy majority
whip. And, finally, he switched parties in August
1995. Oh, yes, one other correction. ABC's Bill
Pitts never worked for the House majority leader.
He worked for the House minority leader.
Is this nit -picking? Of course, it is. But so was BROADCASTING
& CABLE'S "hit piece." which relied exclusively on unnamed
sources, most of them rooted in the cable industry-an industry
which we have attacked repeatedly for "gouging consumers" in
many markets across America -and an industry that is scared to
death of our pending cable bill. Think about it. Not one single
person critical of us spoke "on the record." Whatever happened
to credibility?
Finally, there is something hypocritical when the media, on
deadline, calls up begging for a quick response to a breaking
story, only to burn you at the stake later for being "quick on the
draw." Well, I would rather be criticized for having a trigger finger than be criticized for being indecisive, unresponsive or
unavailable to the media, as so many people are on Capitol Hill.
Sadly, for me anyway, the rules of engagement have now
changed, but just remember who did the poking first.
In closing, your story admittedly had a huge impact on us. We
heard you loud and clear. The message from the cable industry
seems to be: Congress isn't telling us what to do anymore. The
message back to the cable industry: Get ready. We're coming.
And the message from BROADCASTING & CABLE: When we're on
deadline, we need immediate access and a quick response from you.
The message back (and, please, stick this in your Rolodex): "Le: me
think about it. I'll get back to you soon."
By the way, in order to save time in the future, feel free to use
that quote anytime. -Ken Johnson, communications director.
U.S. Rep. Billy Tauzin
EDITOR'S NOTE: BROADCASTING & CABLE stands by the June 15
story
on Rep. Tauzin. We regret some factual errors: Tauzin became a
Republican on Aug. 6. 1995; he is one of /6 deputy whips in Ike
House, which makes him a member of the leadership, and former
Rep. Bob Michel (R -/ll.) was House Minority Leader.
JUNE
www.americanradiohistory.com
22, 1998
I
BROADCASTING & CABLE
77
BroadcastmgeCaóle
FATES & FORTUNES
A.H. Belo appointments in Dallas
BROADCAST TV
woto(Tv)
Cleveland /Shaker Heights, Ohio, joins
Pax Net, Chicago, as VP, Midwest.
Dennis Thatcher, VP /GM,
Lisa Barhorst, senior account executive,
wKEE(TV) Dayton, Ohio, named national sales manager.
Michael Kronley, station manager, KNXVTv Phoenix. joins wxyz -Tv Detroit as
VP /station manager.
McCarthy
Appointments at Paxson Communica-
Moroney
finance, treasury, investor relations, investment banking
and board activities; Dunia Shive, senior VP, corporate operations, adds CFO to her responsibilities; Marian Spitzberg,
VP /deputy general counsel, adds corporate secretary to
her responsibilities; Jack Sander, executive VP, television
group, named president.
PROGRAMMING
nator.
Gregory Ferenbach, VP /acting general
counsel, Public Broadcasting Service,
Alexandria, Va., named senior VP/general counsel.
Comm, manager, Detroit advertising
sales. Television Food Network, joins
wvPx -TV Cleveland as GM.
Appointments at vTvT(TV) Tampa,
Soheila Abel, director, human resources,
Appointments
Dallas:
Thomas Comerford, general sales manager, wiui -1v Portland. Me.. joins as
director, sales; Valerie Bonney, sales
manager, KJAC-TV Port Arthur, Tex.,
joins as national sales manager.
West Coast. Playboy Enterprises Inc..
joins Studios USA, Universal City.
Calif., as VP, human resources.
Gustavo Basal,
GM, The Locomotion Channel,
joins Hearst Entertainment's enter-
at KXTX -TV
Mark Rodman, local sales manager,
KTvx(Tv) Salt Lake City, joins KTBC -TV
Austin. Tex., as general sales manager.
production manager, Vermont Public Television, Colchester,
Vt., named VP. production and business development.
Dan Harvey,
78
Appointments at Fox Kids Network's
station relations and promotion department, Los Angeles: Susan Kiel, associate
VP, named VP: Kathleen Cecil, sales
planner, Turner Broadcasting, joins as
director: Monique McAlonis named manager: Elizabeth Sagehorn joins as coordi-
Dale Remy, general sales manager,
wok\ K -TV Huntington, W.Va., joins
wDPx -Tv Dayton, Ohio as GM; Samuel
Fla.: Angela Schultz, senior producer,
wGHP -TV High Point, N.C., joins as
supervising producer; Rebecca Courier,
producer, wFrx(Tv) Cape Coral. Fla.,
joins in same capacity.
BROADCASTING $ CABLE / JUNE 22,
Spitzberg
Michael McCarthy, senior corporate VP /general counsel/secretary. named executive VP /general counsel; James
Moroney, president, television group, named executive VP,
tions Corp. stations: David Petersen, general sales manager/national sales manager, KLGT -TV Minneapolis, joins
KPXM -TV Minneapolis as GM; Richard
Hinds, president. Action Resources,
Miami, joins WNPX -TV Nashville as
GM; Glenn Haygood, local sales manager, wxtt -Tv Winston -Salem, N.C., joins
WGPX -Tv Greensboro, N.C., as GM;
Shive
Basalo
tainment and syndication group,
New York, as
managing director,
international network development.
of sales and coproductions, BBC Worldwide Americas, has been appointed COO of the
BBC/Discovery Communications Inc.
joint venture production.
Candace Carlisle, head
David Gerber, president,
All American
Television Production, is launching an
MS
www.americanradiohistory.com
independent production company, joining the group of production entities
supported by Fox Television Studios.
Gerber will produce original series and
long -form programming for broadcast
network, first -run cable, international
and other major markets.
director, acquisitions,
GoodTimes Entertainment, joins
Unapix Entertainment, New York,
director, Unapix North America.
Dayna Lustig,
as
Appointments at The WB. Burbank,
Calif.: Hal Protter, VP/head of affiliate
relations. named senior VP/head of
affiliate relations: Jenny Sanders, contract administrator, named manager,
affiliate relations.
JOURNALISM
Melissa Gale, anchor /reporter/producer.
WOWK -TV Huntington, W.Va., joins
KVUE -TV Austin, Tex., as co- anchor.
Jim Brown, anchor /reporter/producer.
KMTR(TV) Eugene, Ore., named news
director. NewsSource Network,
Eugene, Ore.
Flint,
Mich.. joins WOOD -Tv Grand Rapids,
Mich., in same capacity.
Rachael Ruiz, reporter, wiRT-TV
Beasley Reece, anchor /sports director.
wT(x;(iv) St. Petersburg, Fla., joins
KYW -TV Philadelphia as weekday sports
anchor and game analyst.
Brenda Stanton, reporter, KVBC(TV) Las
Vegas. joins KPLR -TV St. Louis in same
capacity.
FATE: 6
RADIO
Tom Rivers, opera-
tions manager,
WQYK -FM
Tampa/St. Petersburg, Fla., named
VP/GM, WQYKAM-FM.
Rick Poder,
VP/GM, Jacor
Communications'
Salt Lake City
Rivers
broadcast region,
named VP/market manager, Dayton,
Ohio.
David Sinykin, director, accounts services
and creative director, The Toushin
Advertising Agency, Minneapolis.
joins K -Tel International (USA) Inc. as
director. marketing.
Randy Gaeckler, sales manager, Katz
Radio. Philadelphia. named VP. Southeast. based in Atlanta.
Kevin Metbeny, operations manager.
Jacksonville group, Jacor Communications Inc., named operations manager.
WTAM(AM) Cleveland (Jacor Cleve-
Lloyd Scott, executive director, program-
ming scheduling and acquisitions, Fox
Net, joins Universal Studios Networks,
Los Angeles. as VP, programming.
Anthony Antonelli Ill, marketing manager,
Primestar by Comcast, Mid -Atlantic
region, joins Comcast Cablevision of
Delmarva Inc., Dover, Del., as director,
marketing.
Appointments at
American Movie
Classics. Woodbury. N.Y.: linda
Schildkraut, regional sales director,
named VP, Eastern region, AMC
and Romance
Classics; John Harran, division VP,
Schildkraut
Encore Media. Los
Angeles, joins Atlanta office as regional director. Southeast, AMC.
Appointments at MTV Networks.
Santa Monica, Calif.: Todd Phillips,
director. communications, named VP;
Vanessa Reyes, senior publicist, named
director, communications.
Gustavo Tonelli, consultant and
land).
CABLE
director, consumer marketing. Disney
Channel, joins
Animal Planet.
Bethesda. Md., as
director, on -air
Jaye Toeliner,
director,
artist relations. Latin Music Channel
Partners, joins HTV, Miami, as marketing director.
Appointments at VH I. New York: Mimi
James named VP, talent and creative
NBC signs contracts
with prime timers
promotion.
Appointments at
Fox Family Chan-
Toellner
nel. Los Angeles:
Julia Gilbert, executive in charge of production. Funniest
Comedy Duos, and co- producer. Cray ola Kids Adventures, joins as VP, production. reality -based programming:
Todd McNulty, senior writer /producer.
Another Large Production, joins as
director. on -air promotion, family programming; Tracy Barrett, director, affiliate marketing. International Family
Entertainment, joins in same capacity.
Heather O'Mara, executive VP/COO,
Jones li ternct Channel Inc., joins Jones
International Ltd.. Englewood. Colo..
VP/treasurer.
as
Mary Lee Quaid, account executive. USA
Networks. Chicago. named director,
advertising sales. Central region.
a
.
FIITIVEI
development: Robert Katz named VP.
East Coast production: George Moll
named VP. West Coast production.
affiliate special
projects, Home Box Office, New York,
named VP. affiliate special projects.
Leslie Read, director,
Equal Time,
CNBC, Fort Lee, N.J., named senior
Robin Gellman, producer,
producer.
Appointments at Turner Broadcasting
Sales, New York: Christopher Piuurro,
director, multimedia. corporate marketing and research, becomes VP.
multimedia marketing; Robert Romano,
manager, marketing communications.
Television Bureau of Advertising,
joins as manager. public relations.
Andrew Conte, director, MIS desktop
applications, NBC, New York. joins
CBNC, Fort Lee, N.J., as VP, MIS,
NBC cable networks.
Appointments at TCI Communications
Inc., Englewood, Colo.: Jerry Machovina,
senior VP, named executive VP, advertising sales: Tracy Wagner, senior VP.
programming distribution, named executive VP: Doug Seserman, VP. marketing, named senior VP.
Appointments at USA Networks, New
York: Lee Miller, senior VP. human
resources. Barney's New York Inc..
joins as VP, human resources: Jim
Degni, director, management information systems, named VP. information
technology; Hali Simon, senior publicist.
named manager. media relations.
ALLIED FIELDS
Appointments at Broadcast Video Inc..
Miami: Rick Cordero, GM, named VP.
sales: Randy Mihalchik, senior editor, and
Lisa Allan, operations manager, Coconut
Grove facility, named GMs for the
company's four South Florida facilities.
William Merriam, president, WDMerriam
& Associates. joins the National Cap-
Burke
McCrory
senior VP, prime time
series, the NBC Entertainment executive who was most responsible for
tioning Institute. Washington,
the fastest growing show on television this season, and Shelley McCrory,
VP, prime time series, who will be
responsible for the development and
production of Friends, Veronica's
Closet and All My Life, have signed
new multiyear contracts with NBC
Entertainment.
COO.
INTERNET
Karey Burke,
recognizing the potential of Just
Shoot Me and helping it to become
as
Greg Verdino, VP, interactive marketing.
Blau Marketing Technologies. Bethesda, Md., joins Arbitron NewMedia.
New York. as VP/GM, Internet information services.
Daniel Levy, senior director, product
development. NetChannel Inc., joins
Wink Communications, Alameda.
Calif.. as director, program development.
Compiled he Denise Smith
e-mail: dsmilh(i cuhnrrs.nnn
JUNE 22, 1888
I
BROADCASTING & CABLE
79
Broadcaslmg &Cable
IN BRIEF
bill that would protect
copyrighted material in
the digital world took a
step closer to becoming
law last week. The
A
House Telecommunications Subcommittee
passed the bill on voice
vote, adding amendments
meant to ease consumer
electronics manufacturers'
worries that the legislation
would make it illegal to
make digital copies with
devices such as VCRs or
minidisk recorders. Copyright holders. software
companies and telecommunications services
providers endorse the bill
and are pushing Congress
to sign it into law this year.
The bill passed the Senate
99 -0 last month. It goes to
the full House Commerce
Committee for a vote next
week
PBS is looking at developing a second pro-
gramming service for
overlapping public TV
stations. "The present
problem of overlap and
duplication ... is untenable
in the long term," PBS
President Ervin Duggan
said at last week's PBS
annual meeting in Miami
Beach. Duggan said that
PBS, the Corporation for
Public Broadcasting and a
group of secondary stations
have been working to cre-
Cover subjects
New York's Museum of
Television & Radio debuted
a new exhibit, A Television
Diary: 45 years of TV Guide
Covers, with
a
cocktail
reception. On hand were
(I -r) Steve Reddicliffe, TV
Guide
editor -in- chief;
CBS's Morley Safer, Diane
Sawyer and Mike Wallace,
and Robert Batscha, the
museum's president.
ate a differentiated pro-
gramming service. PBS's
Kathy Quattrone later said
that the new service initially
might be limited to about
six hours of programming a
week and could appear as
early as next summer.
Media Access Project
last week urged FCC
commissioners not to
adopt a proposal to ax
the requirement that
stations file sales contracts- including sales
prices -with the FCC as
part of station transfers. The commission in
April proposed eliminating
the requirement as part of
a broad streamlining of
paperwork requirements.
"The information included
in these contracts is critical
to understanding the
underlying interests at
stake when a station
changes hands," the
watchdog group told the
FCC. "If the commission
does not maintain copies
of the contracts, an important source of independent
scrutiny will be lost." The
NAB took no position on
the matter, but voiced support for most of the other
streamlining proposals.
NAB also suggested that
the commission hold a
special forum on the proposals.
CNN legal analyst
retired Maj. Gen.Perry
Smith last week
resigned in protest over
the network's report that
U.S. forces used nerve gas
while hunting American
defectors in Laos during
the Vietnam War. Smith
had tried to convince the
network to retract the
piece, which ran June 7,
Promotions for Schanzer, Ebersol
Ken Schanzer has been promoted to president of NBC Sports, succeeding Dick Ebersol, who has been named chairman of the division and to whom Schanzer will still
report. Ebersol had been president of the division since 1989 and in March assumed
the additional title of chairman of NBC's Olympics division, set up to coordinate and
produce the Olympics NBC has acquired the rights to (through 2008). Schanzer will
have day to day responsibility for all aspects of NBC Sports except production. NBC
Sports executive producer Tom Roy continues to report directly to Ebersol. "That just
makes sense because production is my background," Ebersol said last week. Ebersol
will concentrate on the Olympics, the NBA and production activity.
"This was something that was well deserved for a long time," Ebersol said of
Schanzer's promotion. Ebersol's current contract keeps him in place until 2004
and Schanzer's new deal will keep him at NBC "almost as long," Ebersol said.
Schanzer has been with NBC Sports since 1981, serving as executive vice president for nine years, with a brief stint as president of The Baseball Network in 1994
and 1995.
-Steve McClellan
80
BROADCASTING & CABLE
/
JUNE
22, 1888
but CNN continues to stand
by the controversial story.
Avid Technology is
acquiring Microsoft animation subsidiary SOFT IMAGE in a transaction
valued at $285 million.
Upon completion of the
transaction, Microsoft will
own a 9.1% stake in Avid,
which makes nonlinear
editing systems and newsroom computer software.
The deal is expected to
close in the second half of
July.
Senate Commerce
Committee Chairman
John McCain (R- Ariz.)
will hold a hearing on
cable rate increases on
July 28. The hearing was
initially planned for March
31 but had to be postponed when the Senator
became too busy with
tobacco legislation.
About 92% of Telemundo Group shareholders
voted in favor of merging subsidiary TLMD
Station Group with
Telemundo. As a result,
TLMD Station Group Inc.
will be 50.1% owned by
Apollo Investment Fund Ill
and Bastion Capital Fund,
with Liberty Media Corp.
and Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. each owning
24.5 %. The $540 million
cash acquisition and
assumption of $200 million
in Telemundo debt by
Sony, Liberty and the two
r
1
IN BRIEF
venture capital funds is
intended to reinvigorate the
network and help bolster its
competitive position against
Univision, the leading
Spanish -language broadcaster in the United States.
Following the merger, Liberty and Sony will buy the
company's network assets
for $75 million. Telemundo
stockholders will have the
right to receive $44 in cash
for each share of Telemundo common stock they
hold. If the merger isn't finished by July 30, the company will pay an amount
equal to 8% a year on the
$44 per share.
Stanley E. Hubbard
says it's likely that
Satellite Broadcasting will return 8
transponder licenses it
U.S.
holds at 148 degrees
west longitude. The flip
side: USSB will hang onto
three transponder licenses at 110 degrees and
probably will launch a
high -speed data service
from the slot. Hubbard,
speaking on a panel at
last week's DBS Global
Summit in Denver, said
that uncertainty about the
status of the 110 degree
slot is delaying USSB's
plans for use of its three
transponders in the slot.
Jacor Communications
Board Chairman Sam
Clooney signs production
pact with CBS
ER star George Clooney signed a deal to produce dramas and television movies for CBS, as the actor continues to seex new TV and movie opportunities beyond
his top -rated show. The deal replaces a similar two year deal with NBC that
expired. Financial terms
weren't disclosed.
pact.
Under
the
Clooney's Maysville Pictures will develop one
Zell will keynote the
NAB Radio Show, which
series and two TV movies
for the network. Clooney
will serve as executive
producer on all projects,
and has the option of acting as well. The deal
will be held in Seattle Oct.
14 -17.
Errata: A May 25 story,
The Next Step: Searchable Television," said
that Worldwide Broadcasting Network "would
like to sell its searchable
TV to the Library of Congress." The company
would like the LOC to use
the system, but does not
expect any monetary
compensation.
Hicks Muse buys into Z-Spanish
Z- Spanish Radio announced on June 15 that an
brings together Clooney
and CBS Television Chief
Clooney's new deal will let
him produce as well as act.
Executive
Leslie
Moonves, who as president of Warner Bros. Tele-
vision signed and cast the actor.
Clooney will retain the option of producing for other
networks after he fulfills his NBC obligations. He will
continue to work on an exclusive basis for Warner
Bros., which produces ER.
The actor is not expected to return to ER after next
season, and has been attempting to carve out a movie
career for himse'f with films like Out of Sight," which
will open June 26.
-Michael Stroud
alliance between TSG Capital Group and three
Hicks Muse broadcasting entities (Chancellor
Media, Capstar Broadcasting and LIN Television)
will buy a 20% non voting equity interest in Z -Spanish for $25 million.
In addition, Syndicated Communications Venture
Partners II & Ill LP (Syncom) announced that it will sell
its majority equity stake in Z- Spanish to Par Holdings
Inc. (wholly owned by TSG) for about $101 million. Par
Holdings Inc. /Douglas Broadcasting Inc., headquartered in Palo Alto, Calif., already held a 15% share in
Z- Spanish and also owns two FMs and 12 AMs. Par
and Z- Spanish will merge to form Z- Spanish Media
Corp: the new company plans to pursue opportunities
both in radio and in television.
Z- Spanish owns 22 stations and has established a
network of 26 affiliates nationwide. Z- Spanish produces
three different 24 -hour Spanish -language music for-
-Kristine Lamm
mats.
5r-Of
Ura% n tor Bet
Wicks rvr.
& CAMS by lack Schmidt
"We set our !. -chip to block vicious fighting und distortions and
now we can't get C-SPAN."
Prinled in the U.S A Founded in 1931 as Broadcasting. the News Magazine of the Fifth Estate BroadcestrngTelecesbng introduced in 1945. Television' acquired in 1961. Cablacasbng' introduced in 1972 Broadcast,
rng'Cable introduced in 1989. Broadcasting 8 Cable introduced in 1993. Broadcasting 8 Cable' rs a registered trademark at Reed Publishing (Nederland) B.V.. used under license. Telemadia Week" s a register.) trade
mark of Reed Elsevier Inc 'Reg. U.S. Patent Office.
R
CCIIVNIJ.
Incorporating 'IheFdthFstate TELEVISION Broadcasting:
Car n,
Rusin ss
Broadcasting 8 Cade (ISSN 0007 -20281 IGST 8123397457) is published weekly. except at years end when two issues are combined. by 3ahners Business Information. 245 West 17th St.. New York. NV DO,
Information is a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.. 275 Washington St. Newton. MA 02158 :1630. Bruce A. Barnet President and Chief Executive Oficer, Jackie A. Daya. Vrae President and Chi&I Financial On cet. Mark Lieberman.
Executive Vice President Bloadcasang B Cable copyright 1998 by Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Broadcasting 8 Cable is a registeed trademark of Reed Elsevier Properties Inc used under license Periodicals postage pad
at New York NV. and additional maAng offices Canada Post International Publications Mail Product (Canada Dotnbusonl Sales Agreement No 0607533 Postmaster pease send address changes to Broadcasting d Cable. PO
Box 6399, Torrance. CA 905040399. Rates for nonquali ied subscepaons. including all issues. USA. $129: Canada. $169 'includes GSTI foreign Air 5350. Foregr. Surface. $199 A reasonable lee shall be assessed to cc ver ban
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6399. Torrance. CA 905040399. Microfilm of Broadcasting 8 Cable is available from University Microfilms. 300 North Zeeb Road. Ann Arbor. MI 48106 It '800.521 -0600' Canners Business Information does not assume :nd hereby disclaims any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions in the material contained herein. regardless 4f whether such errors result from negligence accident or any other cause wharso.ver
r
.
JUNE
22, 1888
/ BROADCASTING
8 CABLE
81
BroadcastmggCaúle
EDITtLS
COMMITTED TO THE FIRST AMENDMENT AND THE FIFTH ESTATE
Old line and online
The right idea
If you build
The Promax /BDA convention isn't really about sessions
and speeches and workshops and parties- although all
those were present and accounted for in Toronto last week.
including the six -figure King World bash to show its appreciation for what promotion has done for its programs. The
show isn't really about the latest generics and tags and
episodics and tune -in and wild lines (wild lines ?). although
all of those are part of the inescapable lingo of the trade.
And it isn't even about time -the theme of this year's
show -although syndicators certainly push for all the promotional airtime they can get for their shows, trying to
catch viewers who spend less and less time parked in front
of any one show or channel.
All those things are the currency of the convention. Its
principal export, however. is ideas. Its beneficiaries may be a
producer looking for an eye -catching but economical opening for a documentary series, a promotion manager searching
for a successful online strategy (a good place to start would
be Warner Bros.' Jim Moloshok, who has helped to put the
W and B in the Web) or a small -market station looking to do
more with less. It's about getting all that creative energy and
experience under one roof, united by the goal of having to try
to be brilliant
at least shinier than the competition -on
time, and on a budget that is. to borrow from a session title,
more often beer than champagne.
One idea worth taking home came from the champagne
side of the marketing equation. Tom Freston. whose MTV
Networks have long since entered the household -word category. applied the brakes to the "brandwagon" a bit, suggesting that a brand should be extended and defended, but
not "beaten to death."
Wise counsel at a time when branding is threatening to
supplant "synergy" or "convergence" as the queen bee of
TV buzzwords.
better mousetrap. the saying goes. the rest of
beat a path to your door. But if you've built a
company around the world's most famous mouse, you're
better off making your own path.
With an investment last week (likely to run into hundreds of millions of dollars) in the Internet's fourth most
popular search engine, The Walt Disney Co. will not get an
icon as recognizable as Barbara Walters, ESPN or Mickey
Mouse ears. But the Infoseek deal gives the entertainment
giant an opportunity to direct consumers toward its myriad
products, opening new doors for information, promotion
and merchandising.
Estimates put Internet advertising at about $900 million
last year and overall 'Net commerce at more than $2 billion.
Those numbers may be small compared with established
advertising media and overall commercial distribution, but
they are growing -and many old -line media companies plan
to grow with them. Ask NBC, which last week invested
more than $25 million in CNet's Snap! search engine.
And in television, TCI's $2 billion acquisition of TV
Guide surely seeks not only a magazine with flat subscriber
growth and declining ads but also a directory service for
menu -driven set -top boxes that will direct consumers to
content across many platforms.
For content providers-including broadcasters and cable
programmers-Internet portals and interactive TV guides
will place their products the way supermarket shelves display canned foods. Many media companies have spent
much of this century creating some of the most recognizable products in the world, directing consumers to their
brands through advertising. In the future, programmers will
need to understand the importance of on- screen navigating
and securing prominent placement on interactive menus.
Disney's Tomorrowland is fast approaching.
the world
a
will
-or
Washington 1705 DeSates Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20036
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Harry A. Jessell, editor
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Elizabeth A. Rathbun, Chris McConnell,
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In a field as dynamic as yours, it's essential to stay informed of daily changes in the
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