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VSET
HANDBOOK
Volusia System
2013-2014
for
Empowering
Teachers
FINAL – July 24, 2013
Table of Contents
Disclaimer ....................................................................................................................................... 3
Statement of Philosophy ................................................................................................................ 3
General Guidelines ......................................................................................................................... 3
VSET Steering Committee Members .............................................................................................. 3
Definitions/Common Language ...................................................................................................... 4
Statutory Requirements ................................................................................................................. 8
Implementation of the 2007 Danielson Framework for Teaching ................................................. 8
Framework for Teaching................................................................................................................. 9
Volusia System for Empowering Teachers ..................................................................................... 10
Domains and Components ............................................................................................................. 11
Nine Power Components................................................................................................................ 12
Breakdown of Weights Assigned to Each Domain and Component .............................................. 13
Steps in the Observation Cycle ....................................................................................................... 14
Scheduled Observation Cycle ......................................................................................................... 15
Unscheduled Observation Cycle ..................................................................................................... 17
Planning Conference Form ............................................................................................................. 18
Walk-Throughs ............................................................................................................................... 19
Observation Overviews .................................................................................................................. 20-22
Deliberate Practice Plan ................................................................................................................ 23-26
Ongoing Monitoring of the DPP ..................................................................................................... 26
DPP Rubric ...................................................................................................................................... 27-29
Evaluator Training........................................................................................................................... 30
Peer Assistance and Review ........................................................................................................... 30
Teachers Hired Second Semester ................................................................................................... 31
VSET 2013-2014 End-of-Year Procedures....................................................................................... 32
Open Investigations ........................................................................................................................ 33
No Progress or Insufficient Progress Re: Reading and ESOL ......................................................... 33
Itinerant Teachers........................................................................................................................... 34
Teachers With More Than One Job Function ................................................................................. 34
VSET Improvement Plan ................................................................................................................. 35
VSET Support Form ......................................................................................................................... 36
Placement on VSET Improvement Plan Form................................................................................. 37
VSET Improvement Plan Form ........................................................................................................ 38-40
Accessing the Teacher Evaluation System (VSET) .......................................................................... 41
Appendix 1 ..................................................................................................................................... 42
Input Form .............................................................................................................................. 43
Effective Evaluations............................................................................................................... 44
Record of Conference ............................................................................................................. 45
Letter of Caution ..................................................................................................................... 46
Letter of Reprimand................................................................................................................ 47
Appendix 2 ..................................................................................................................................... 48
Rubrics………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..48
The Framework for Teaching – Classroom Teacher Rubric………………………………………………….49-58
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 2
INTRODUCTION
Disclaimer
This handbook is a reference guide for assessment of employees represented by the Volusia Teachers
Organization (VTO) bargaining unit serving the School District of Volusia County. The Volusia System for
Empowering Teachers (VSET) Implementation Committee may consider changes to these procedures. Such
changes will be recommended to the Superintendent and submitted to the School Board for approval. Neither
the handbook, nor its content, in any way creates an expressed or implied contract of employment.
Statement of Philosophy
Evaluation is a continuous, collaborative process designed to improve instruction and the performance of
students. It is intended to be positive and growth-oriented. It is based on fundamental principles of effective
evaluation and contemporary research in assessment practices. The assessment system shall be applied
equitably and shall conform to legally sound evaluation procedures.
General Guidelines
1. Administrators and VSET teams are responsible for training teachers at their
schools/sites/departments as it relates to their evaluations.
2. Evaluations shall identify strengths as well as establish a plan for continued professional growth and
development.
3. Components of the Volusia System for Empowering Teachers (VSET) are designed to reflect the
performance of teachers and increased student achievement.
4. Evaluations shall be based on observable evidence or records pertaining to job performance.
5. The principal or administrative designee shall evaluate teachers.
6. In addition, Peer Assistance and Review (PAR) teachers, as defined in the VTO contract, will be involved
in the evaluation process of teachers participating in the PAR program.
7. Judgment of the evaluator may not be grieved. Procedures may be grieved in accordance with Article 23
of the VTO Contract within 10 days of the event.
8. Contacts:
VSET Questions – Marta Pascale, Ext. 50817
Professional Development – Dr. Karen Beattie – Ext. 50761
Technology – Help Desk, Ext. 25000 and Ext. 20000
Value Added Questions – Dr. Alicia Parker, Ext. 20695
VSET STEERING COMMITTEE
Sandra Archer, PAR Teacher
Karen Beattie, Coordinator, Professional Development
Gary Blair, Teacher, Heritage Middle School
Primrose Cameron-Hall, Specialist, VTO
Mike Dyer, Chief Counsel
Leslie Frazee, Principal, Pride Elementary School
Susan Freeman, Principal, Deltona High School
Peromnia Grant, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources
Susan Higle, Teacher, David Hinson Middle School
Barbara Hoffman, Executive Vice-President, VTO
Linda Knowles, Specialist, Human Resources
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Jennifer Morrison, Teacher, Freedom Elementary School
Dana Paige-Pender, Director, Human Resources
Janet Piazza, Teacher, Read-Pattillo Elementary School
Vickie Presley, Area Superintendent
Patricia Randall, Teacher, Osteen Elementary School
Susan Reaves, Coordinator, ESE Programs
Tom Russell, Area Superintendent
Marlo Spallone, Teacher, Pine Ridge High School
Andrew Spar, President, VTO
Craig Zablo, Principal, Campbell Middle School
July 24, 2013
Page 3
Definitions/Common Language
24 hours
Administrative Educator
Evaluation
24 hours = 1 work day
Tab in My PGS that contains the administrator evaluator portion
of the evaluation including Walk-Through, announced
observation and unannounced observation data.
PAR Educator Evaluation
Tab in My PGS that contains the PAR evaluator portion of the
evaluation including Walk-Through, announced observation and
unannounced observation data.
Announced
Artifacts
Scheduled
Examples selected to provide evidence of aspects of a teacher's
practice (i.e. lesson plans, teacher assignments, scoring rubrics,
data, student work, communication to parents, etc.)
Collaboration
Collaboration as it relates to VSET and/or the Deliberate Practice
Plan refers to a coordinated, structured, interactive process that
facilitates the accomplishment of an end product or goal.
Collaborators employ comprehensive planning to construct and
develop new knowledge, projects and plans, together achieving
better results than they are likely to achieve alone.
Component
An identified aspect of teaching within one of the four domains
Core Teachers
Teachers of language arts, mathematics, science, or social studies
Deliberate Practice Plan
Florida Statute requires all instructional personnel to annually
create an individual Deliberate Practice Plan. Instructional
personnel use FCAT results (if applicable) as well as other forms
of student performance data to determine learning goals for
student growth, measurable objectives to meet the goals that
clearly identify the expected change(s) in professional practice,
and an evaluation plan to determine the effectiveness of the
professional development.
Note: Deliberate Practice
Plans align with state
language.
Deliberate Practice:
Individual
Teachers who are rated Highly Effective or Effective shall
develop an Individual Deliberate Practice Plan designed to
improve performance on domains and/or components identified
by the teacher.
Monitored
A teacher shall be placed on a Monitored Deliberate Practice
Plan when he/she is new to teaching or is a veteran teacher in
need of improvement. The evaluator and teacher will identify
the domains and/or components to be addressed, as well as the
goals to be accomplished, and the activities the teacher will
undertake to achieve proficiency in these areas
Directed
A teacher shall be placed on a Directed Deliberate Practice
Plan when he/she is rated Unsatisfactory in the overall rating.
The evaluator of the teacher shall identify the domains and/or
components to be improved, the goals to be accomplished, and
the activities the teacher is to complete to achieve proficiency.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 4
Domain
One of four areas in which teachers execute professional roles
Domain 1
Danielson Framework - Planning and Preparation
Domain 2
Danielson Framework - Classroom Environment
Domain 3
Danielson Framework – Instruction
Domain 4
Danielson Framework - Professional Responsibilities
E3 (Empowering Teachers for
Excellence)
Evidence
Teacher Induction Program/Volusia Beginning Teacher Program
FEAPs
Florida Educator Accomplished Practices
Feedback
Information shared relevant to evidence in the context of
learning or other educational setting
Report which includes the combination of all metrics: final
evaluation ratings, the Deliberate Practice, and value added
measures
Formal and informal assessment procedures intended to modify
teaching and learning activities to improve student achievement
Final Summative Report
Formative Assessment
Formative Period
Formative Observation
Framework for Teaching
Input Form
Leader
Multi-metric
MyPGS
New to assignment
New to teaching
Newly hired
Non-Classroom Teachers
Non-Core Teachers
Non-FCAT Teachers
Novice Teacher
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Evidence may include factual reporting of teacher and student
actions and behaviors. It may also include artifacts prepared by
the teacher, students, or others. It does not include personal
opinions or biases.
The first quarter of the school year; a time for growth, not
evaluation.
Observation conducted for gathering evidence. Formative
observations shall be ongoing throughout the school year.
Teacher observation and evaluation rubric based on Charlotte
Danielson’s research
Form used by parents, teachers, or other interested parties to
provide input regarding the assessment of teachers
Volusia school and district-level administrators
Using more than one measure to evaluate performance
My Professional Growth System: an online, web-based system
that supports evaluation, professional development, mentoring
logs and HR support data
Teacher for whom more than 50% of the assignment has
changed
First-year teacher
Personnel “newly hired” for their first year of employment in our
district regardless of their prior work experience elsewhere
Teachers who do not have a roster of students assigned directly
to them
Teachers of subjects other than language arts, mathematics,
science, or social studies
Teachers of non-FCAT tested courses
Teachers in their first year of teaching
July 24, 2013
Page 5
Observation
Observation Cycle
Observation Length
Observer
PAR Teacher
The monitoring actions in evaluation systems that contribute
evidence to performance, or the impact of performance on
others. Evidence collected through observation is used for
formative feedback and contributes to the final evaluation rating.
Observations may be formal or informal, and announced or
unannounced.
Pre-observation conference, observation, post-observation
conference
Best practice for secondary is one class period. Best practice for
elementary is a minimum of 30 minutes.
Individual qualified to conduct observations for the evaluation
process.
Peer Assistance and Review district-based teachers-onassignment who provide peer support for teachers.
Peer Evaluator
Peer Mentor
Post Conference
District-based peer evaluator for teachers
District or school-based peer mentor for teachers
Teacher submits responses and artifacts as evidence for
Domains 2-4. The reflection or post-conference provides an
opportunity for the teacher and the evaluator to reflect about the
lesson/event, to clarify expectations, and to plan using the postconference form as a guide for reflection and feedback.
PLC
Power Components
Professional Learning Community
Power Components are the nine components of the 2007
Danielson Framework for Teaching that have the greatest
correlation to increased student achievement. They are also the
components that are highly interrelated with other components.
Ratings
Distinguished/
Highly Effective
4
Description of professional teaching that innovatively involves
students in the learning process and creates a true community of
learners. Teachers performing at this level are master teachers
and leaders in the field, both inside and outside of their schools.
Proficient/
Effective
3
Description of successful, professional teaching that is
consistently at a high level. Most experienced teachers should
consistently perform at this level.
Basic/Developing/
Needs Improvement
2
Description of teaching that includes the necessary knowledge
and skills to be effective, but its application is inconsistent
(perhaps due to recently entering the profession or recently
transitioning to a new curriculum, grade level, or subject).
(Developing – Teachers in Year 1, 2, or 3 only)
Unsatisfactory
1
Description of teaching that does not demonstrate
understanding of the concepts underlying the component. This
level of performance is doing harm in the classroom.
Reflection
Responsiveness
Rubric
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Thoughtful analysis and processing of a teaching event or data
Reacting to situations within and beyond the classroom that
further learning opportunities
A set of criteria used to distinguish between performance or
proficiency levels. The rubric is used to assess evidence; the
rubric is not evidence.
July 24, 2013
Page 6
Scheduled Observation
Self-Assessment
Self-Inventory
Student Evidence
Summative Rating
Teacher Evidence
TOA
Unannounced
Unscheduled Observation
Value Added Measure (VAM)
Teacher is notified by the evaluator in advance of observation
cycle, which includes the pre-conference, observation, and postconference
Personal assessment
A self-assessment based on teacher evaluation rubric
Specific observable student behaviors in response to the
teacher's use of particular instructional strategies, student work
samples, assessment data
Rating which summarizes the combination of all metrics – final
evaluation(s), the Deliberate Practice, and student achievement,
as determined by the state, to determine the rating of Highly
Effective, Effective, Needs Improvement/Developing, or
Unsatisfactory.
Specific, observable behaviors demonstrated by teachers when
using a particular instructional strategy. Evidence could also be
documents or data relevant to a domain/component.
Teacher-on-Assignment
Not scheduled, unscheduled
Observation which occurs without prior notice. This observation
cycle does not include a pre-observation conference.
Value-added models measure the influence of schools or
teachers on the academic growth rates of students. Value-added
compares the change in achievement of a group of students from
one year to the next to an expected amount of change based on
their prior achievement history and other potential influences.
VSET
Volusia System for Empowering Teachers – the evaluation
system approved by the FL DOE
Walk-Throughs
As in the formal observation, Walk-Throughs can be scheduled
or unscheduled. Walk-Throughs generally consist of very brief
classroom observations during which the observer gathers
evidence regarding classroom instructional practices and
behaviors on a regular basis with timely and actionable feedback
to teachers. Walk-Throughs provide opportunities for individual
feedback as well as trend and pattern data over time. WalkThroughs also inform professional development needs for
individual and groups of teachers and provide a means to gauge
the implementation of professional development against
individual professional development plans and school
improvement plans. Walk-Through evidence may also be
collected during instructional activities when students are not
present, such as PLC meetings or planning time. Note: WalkThroughs are marked “observed” or “unobserved,” not rated.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 7
STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS
Florida Statute 1012.34 requires that evaluations:
 be conducted at least once a year for classroom teachers, EXCEPT teachers newly hired by the
district who must be evaluated at least twice in their first year;
 are based on at least 50% student learning growth data;
 are based on four levels of performance: “Highly Effective,” “Effective,” “Needs Improvement”
(“Developing” for teachers in their first three years) and “Unsatisfactory,” and;
 include criteria based on the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices.
In addition, Florida statute requires that:
 districts report performance evaluation results from the previous school year to the State by
December 1 (1012.34(1)(c), F.S); and,
 any reductions in workforce be based primarily on performance evaluations (1012.33(5), F.S.).
Volusia County Schools has adopted a new multi-metric instructional evaluation system: The Volusia
System for Empowering Teachers (VSET). VSET is an instructional improvement system that:
 is based on current research;
 supports teacher professional growth;
 is aligned with the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices, Race to the Top requirements, and
Florida Statute;
 is divided into 22 components clustered into four domains of teaching responsibility: planning
and preparation (Domain 1), classroom environment (Domain 2), instruction (Domain 3), and
professional responsibilities (Domain 4).
 includes a Deliberate Practice;
o The Deliberate Practice Plan (DPP) is completed online collaboratively with the principal
or supervisor.
o Deliberate Practice Planning is a self-directed process focused on what teachers need to
learn and to do to improve their teaching skills, resulting in improved student learning.
 is based on four levels of performance:
“Distinguished,” “Proficient,” “Basic,” and
“Unsatisfactory.”
Implementation of the 2007 Danielson Framework for Teaching
Charlotte Danielson’s 2007 Framework for Teaching establishes a common language for teaching
practice. The four Domains of Danielson’s 2007 Framework for Teaching are included in the evaluation
system. The teacher and observer gather evidence for Domains 1 and 4 outside of the classroom
observation and discuss the evidence for these domains at the planning conference. The observer
collects evidence for Domains 2 and 3 during a classroom observation or Walk-Through. The tables on
the following pages display a breakdown of the weights assigned to each domain and component for the
classroom teacher rubric. Other instructional specialist job roles have similar weights under each
domain and component, even though the wording of the domain or component may have been adapted
to suit the role and responsibilities of each specialized position. The rubric score is calculated using the
component weights. The nine components with the greatest weighting are called Power Components.
The nine Power Components represent the areas of effective teaching practice that have the greatest
correlation to increased student achievement. These components are also highly interrelated with other
components. Since research indicates the centrality to good teaching of these practices, the new teacher
induction program focuses on the nine Power Components to ensure that beginning teachers
concentrate on the practices that directly relate to student achievement.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 8
The Framework for Teaching Instrument
The Volusia System for Empowering Teachers is based on the 2007 edition of The Framework, by
Charlotte Danielson, and was published by ASCD as Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for
Teaching. The Framework was enhanced in 2011 to add “Critical Attributes” for each level of
performance for each component and examples for each level of performance for each component. The
architecture of The Framework for Teaching 2011 did not change the 4 domains, the 22 components, nor
the elements.
The Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument (2011) is available in a PDF and iPad format
http://www.danielsongroup.org/article.aspx?page=FfTEvaluationInstrument from the Danielson Group
website. Any educator may download this file and use the print version in his/her own setting.
(Statement from website – http://www.danielsongroup.org).
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 9
VOLUSIA SYSTEM FOR EMPOWERING TEACHERS






The VSET system is designed to support effective instruction and student learning growth.
Results will be used when developing district and school improvement plans.
Results will be used to identify professional development for instructional personnel and school
administrators.
The system will provide online access to examine performance data from multiple sources,
including opportunities for parents to provide input into employee evaluations, when
appropriate.
The system will provide identification of teaching fields for which special evaluation
procedures/criteria are necessary.
The evaluation process will be managed for each teacher and instructional leader, following
state statute.
The charts below represent the multi-metric evaluation system that is differentiated according to
certain categories of teachers. Experienced teachers with “Highly Effective” or “Effective” ratings have
three metrics in their evaluation. New teachers or experienced teachers in need of improvement have an
additional Peer Assistance and Review component.
This evaluation model is designed for
experienced teachers rated as
“Highly Effective” or “Effective.”
Administrative Evaluation (25%) + Deliberate Practice (25%) + Student Achievement (50%)
= Final Summative Rating (100%)
This evaluation model is designed for:
• Teachers new to teaching
• Experienced teachers with overall
ratings of “Needs Improvement” or
“Unsatisfactory.”
Administrative Evaluation (20%) + PAR Evaluation (20%) + Deliberate Practice (10%)
System Components + Student Achievement (50%) = Final Summative Rating (100%)
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 10
The Framework for Teaching by Charlotte Danielson consists of:
Four Domains and Twenty-Two Components
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 11
Professional Development for new teachers concentrates on the Nine Power Components, which are:
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 12
BREAKDOWN OF THE WEIGHTS ASSIGNED TO EACH DOMAIN AND COMPONENT
Evidence and Artifacts are collected “Off Stage” for Domains 1 and 4.
•
•
•
•
Teacher prepares lesson plan for observation and collects data prior to conference.
Lesson plan and data are discussed during pre-observation conference.
Evidence could be artifacts (e.g. , data reports, lesson plans, communications).
Evidence could be collected in other contexts (e.g., PLC meeting, professional development).
Domain 1 – Planning and Preparation – 20%
2.5% Demonstrating knowledge of content and
pedagogy
2.5% Demonstrating knowledge of students
5.0% Setting instructional outcomes
2.5% Demonstrating knowledge of resources
2.5% Designing coherent instruction
5.0% Assessing Student Learning
Domain 4 – Professional Responsibilities - 20%
5.0% Reflecting on teaching
5.0% Maintaining accurate records
2.5% Communicating with families
2.5% Participating in a professional community
2.5% Growing and developing professionally
2.5% Showing professionalism
Observable Behaviors are documented through “On Stage” Domains 2 and 3.
•
Evidence is observed during observation or Walk-Through.
Domain 2- The Classroom Environment - 20 %
5.0% Creating an environment of respect and
rapport
5.0% Establishing a culture for learning
3.0% Managing classroom procedures
4.0% Managing student behavior
3.0% Organizing physical space
Domain 3 – Instruction - 40%
5.0% Communicating with students
10.0% Using questioning and discussion
techniques
10.0% Engaging students in learning
10.0% Using assessment in instruction
5.0% Demonstrating flexibility and
responsiveness
Note: Power components are in bold.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 13
STEPS IN THE OBSERVATION CYCLE
Evaluators and PARS are encouraged to schedule the dates and times of observations and
conferences on the calendar well in advance to assure compliance with deadlines.
Observations
Under routine circumstances, the length of a scheduled or unscheduled VSET observation should be a
minimum of 30 minutes in elementary schools and a full class period in secondary schools.
Scheduled and unscheduled VSET observations and Walk-Throughs shall not occur:
 On the first or last five days of the school year
 On the first two days or last two days of a course
 On the two days before or after Thanksgiving, Winter Break, or Spring Break
 Conferences and meetings may be conducted at any time with the required 24 hours’ notice,
as per the VTO contract.
 On an FCAT or other standardized testing date. (This does not refer to the test window.)
This refers to all teachers, including those who do not administer FCAT or other
standardized tests. A formal VSET observation may occur during a test make-up day, if
circumstances are conducive to a formal observation. However, it is recommended that
these days be avoided, if possible.
Note:
 Conferences may occur during the state-wide assessment window.
 A qualified observer, upon written request of the teacher, may perform a second scheduled
observation.
 The teacher may not waive the above.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 14
THE SCHEDULED OBSERVATION CYCLE
Step 1: Schedule the pre-observation conference and the observation.
 The evaluator informs the teacher of the pre-conference date at least 5 work days prior to the
meeting so the teacher has time to do the required paperwork.
 The evaluator schedules the pre-observation conference to occur within three school days
before the observation. At the same time, the evaluator schedules the post-observation
conference to occur no later than seven (7*) school days after the observation.
* During 2013-2014, post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days
of the observation. It will not be considered a violation if the post-conference is conducted
within 10 days of the observation. Day 1 is the day after the observation.
 The evaluator schedules an observation date and time of observation with the teacher.
 The teacher shares the completed Pre-Observation Conference Form with the evaluator at least
one day in advance of the conference.
 An observation consists of one complete learning experience or lesson.
 Under routine circumstances, the length of a scheduled or unscheduled VSET observation should
be a minimum of 30 minutes in elementary schools and a full class period in secondary
schools.
Step 2: Conduct the pre-observation conference
 The evaluator reviews the completed Pre-Observation Planning Conference Form (see Page 18)
to guide the conversation and adds any additional evidence of Domains 1 and 4.
 The evaluator and teacher discuss the lesson to be observed. The teacher should do most of the
talking, but the evaluator should ask questions for guidance and understanding and offer
suggestions for improvement to the lesson, if necessary. Any evidence regarding that lesson
should be added to the Pre-Observation Conference Form.
Step 3: Observe the teacher
 The evaluator gathers evidence of the teacher’s and students’ actions, statements, and questions
on the Observation of Evidence Form.
 The evaluator submits evidence to the teacher within *24 hours of the observation. The teacher
adds to the evidence, as necessary, also within 24 hours.
*It is expected that evidence is shared with teachers within 24 hours. However, it will not be
considered a violation of VSET procedures if evidence is shared within 48 hours for the 20132014 school year. Evidence for this observation cannot be added after the post-conference.
Step 4: Prepare for the post-observation conference
 The teacher and the evaluator independently score the rubric assessment of the lesson based on
preponderance of all evidence collected on domains and components. There is no expectation
that the evaluator’s and the teacher’s ratings must match. Any component for which there is no
evidence is marked unobserved.
 The teacher submits a self-assessment rubric to the evaluator at least one day prior to the postobservation. The teacher must have at least one day to complete the self-assessment after
evidence is received.
 The evaluator reviews the teacher’s self-assessment and marks areas of agreement on his/her
rubric and leaves blank the areas not observed or areas that require further discussion.
 Assessment of evidence will be discussed at the post-conference.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 15
Step 5: Conduct the post-observation conference within 7* school days of observation
 The teacher may add additional evidence related to this observation at this post conference.
Evidence may not be added after the post-conference.
 The evaluator shares and acknowledges ratings for areas of agreement on components at the
post-conference meeting, not before.
 The teacher shares and is invited to discuss the evidence for components when the ratings of the
evaluator and teacher differ.
 The evaluator and teacher attempt to come to consensus on component ratings. Ultimately, the
final rating is based on the judgment of the evaluator based on preponderance of evidence.
 The evaluator and/or teacher add relevant evidence for Domain 4.
 Both the evaluator and teacher review status of the Deliberate Practice Plan at each postobservation conference.
 Both the evaluator and teacher develop next steps, if necessary.
Note: The teacher has the right to write a rebuttal at any time at any step of the evaluation process.
However, the rebuttal must be signed and dated by the teacher.
* During 2013-2014, post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days of
the observation; however, it will not be considered a violation if the post-conference is
conducted within 10 days of the observation. Day 1 is the day after the observation.
Note: Ratings are based on preponderance of EVIDENCE.
Timelines may be extended when delays occur due to district-wide or school-wide technology
interruptions, as determined by the Technology Assistance Program (TAP) team.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 16
THE UNSCHEDULED OBSERVATION CYCLE
Step 1: Observe the teacher
 The evaluator gathers evidence of the teacher’s and students’ actions, statements, and questions
on the Observation of Evidence Form.
 The evaluator submits evidence to the teacher within *24 hours of the observation. The teacher
adds to the evidence, as necessary, also within 24 hours.
*It is expected that evidence is shared with teachers within 24 hours. However, it will not be
considered a violation of VSET procedures if evidence is shared within 48 hours.
Step 2: Prepare for the post-observation conference
 The teacher and the evaluator independently score the rubric assessment of the lesson based on
all evidence collected on domains and components. There is no expectation that the evaluator’s
and the teacher’s ratings must match. Any component for which there is no evidence is marked
unobserved.
 The teacher submits a self-assessment rubric to the evaluator at least one day prior to the postobservation conference.
 The evaluator reviews the teacher’s self-assessment and marks areas of agreement on his/her
rubric and leaves blank the areas not observed or areas that require further discussion.
 The teacher may add additional evidence related to this observation. Evidence may not be
added after the post-conference.
 Assessment of evidence will be discussed at the post-conference.
Step 3: Conduct the post-observation conference within 7* school days of observation
 The evaluator shares and acknowledges ratings for areas of agreement on components at the
post-conference meeting, not before.
 The teacher shares and is invited to discuss the evidence for components when the ratings of the
evaluator and teacher differ.
 The evaluator and teacher attempt to come to consensus on component ratings. Ultimately, the
final rating is based on the judgment of the evaluator based on preponderance of the evidence.
 The evaluator and/or teacher add relevant evidence for Domains 1 and 4, if applicable.
 Both the evaluator and teacher review status of the Deliberate Practice Plan at each postobservation conference.
 Both the evaluator and teacher develop next steps, if necessary.
*During 2013-2014, post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days of
the observation; however, it will not be considered a violation if the post-conference is
conducted within 10 days of the observation. Day 1 is the day after the observation.
Note: Ratings are based on preponderance of the EVIDENCE.
Timelines may be extended when delays occur due to district-wide or school-wide technology
interruptions, as determined by the TAP team.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 17
Volusia System for Empowering Teachers
PLANNING CONFERENCE 2013-2014
(The planning conference form is completed by the educator prior to the announced observation.
The educator shares the completed form with the evaluator at least one day in advance of the conference.)
Teacher:
Date:
Observer:
DOMAIN 1: Elements of the Lesson
DOMAIN 4: Professional Responsibilities List
any evidence that relates to the lesson being taught;
evidence is not required for all components
1a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and
Pedagogy: What are the skills and content of the
discipline to be observed? What prerequisite
learning is required?
4a. Reflecting on Teaching: Discuss the degree to
which students met the objectives. What is the
evidence? What might you do next time to
improve your effectiveness?
1b. Demonstrating Knowledge of Students:
Describe the students in the setting. How will you
use your knowledge of these students to meet
individual learning needs?
4b. Maintaining Accurate Records: How do you
document and maintain records?
1c. Selecting Instructional Outcomes: What are
your targeted instructional outcomes for this
setting?
4c: Communicating with Families: How do you
communicate with and engage families and/or
stakeholders in student learning?
1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources:
Describe the resources you are using and why.
4d: Participating in a Professional Community:
In what way is today’s lesson related to
*collaboration with colleagues? In addition,
describe professional contributions to your
school/site and/or district.
1e. Designing Coherent Instruction: Describe
your plan of support or instruction to include
activities as they align with the goal(s) in 1c.
4e. Growing and Developing Professionally:
What aspects of this lesson are the result of recent
professional learning?
1f. Assessing Student Learning: How will you
measure the goal(s) articulated in 1c? What does
success look like?
4f: Showing Professionalism: In what ways do
you demonstrate professionalism, leadership, and
student advocacy?
* Collaboration is a coordinated, structured, interactive process that facilitates the accomplishment of an
end product or goal. Collaborators employ comprehensive planning to construct and develop new
knowledge, projects and plans, together achieving better results than they are likely to achieve alone.
Note: Student also refers to client, etc., as appropriate.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 18
WALK-THROUGHS
Walk-Throughs generally consist of classroom observations of 3-10 minutes in length during which the
observer gathers evidence regarding classroom instructional practices and behaviors on a regular basis.
Walk-Throughs provide opportunities for timely and actionable individual feedback as well as trend and
pattern data over time. Walk-Throughs also inform professional development needs for individual and
groups of teachers and provide a means to gauge the implementation of professional development
against Deliberate Practice Plans and school improvement plans. Walk-Throughs may occur in settings
other than the classroom, such as meetings, trainings, etc. Teachers may or may not be aware of which
component the evaluator is focusing on during a particular Walk-Through.
Who Conducts the Walk-Through Observation and Data Reviews?
A number of individuals may conduct Walk-Through observations for feedback. For the purpose of the
evaluation, the evaluator might be the principal, the assistant principal, a PAR Evaluator, a district
administrator, or a combination thereof.
Walk-Throughs are important for all teachers. The purpose of the informal Walk-Through is to ensure
that what is observed in a formal observation is also seen during day-to-day practice. Evidence
collected will align with the components observed.
The Walk-Through can focus on any component or on the Deliberate Practice Plan. The teacher or
evaluator may elect to include a Walk-Through observation as evidence. Teachers may request that an
evaluator visit the classroom to observe specific activities as evidence for the Deliberate Practice or for a
particular component or as follow-up to a Walk-Through. The charts that follow indicate the minimum
number of Walk-Through observations required for different groups of teachers.
The evaluator shares Walk-Through evidence within 24 - 48 hours. The teacher may or may not add
evidence or respond to the evaluator’s comments within 48 hours.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 19
ADMINISTRATIVE/PAR EVALUATOR OBSERVATION OVERVIEW
CATEGORY 1
Teachers in the 1st Year of Teaching
(New to Teaching or Experienced Teachers New to Volusia County)
Note: Only Novice (First Year Teachers) will receive services of a PAR Teacher.
EVALUATOR
PAR TEACHERS
1st Quarter (Formative) (1st Quarter ends October 18, 2013.)
1 Administrator Walk-Through for Domain 2 or 3
PAR Evaluator Walk-Through(s) at discretion of PAR
Evaluator
1 PAR Scheduled Observation Cycle
Pre-Observation Conference – Within 3 School Days of
Observation
Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* School Days
of Observation
2nd Quarter (2ND Quarter ends December 19, 2013.)
1 Administrator Scheduled Observation Cycle
Pre-Observation Conference – Within 3 School Days of
Observation
Observation
Post-Observation Conference - Within 7* School Days
of Observation
1 PAR Evaluator Walk-Through at discretion of PAR
Evaluator
1 PAR Unscheduled Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* Days of
Observation
Mid-Year Evaluation
All 22 Components must be rated by end of Quarter 2.
Between the end of Quarter 2 (December 19, 2013) and April 15
1 Administrator Walk-Through in any Domain
PAR Evaluator Walk-Through(s) at discretion of PAR
Evaluator
1 Administrator Unscheduled Observation
1 PAR Scheduled Observation Cycle
Pre-Observation Conference – Within 3 School Days of
Observation
Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* School Days
of Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* School Days
of Observation
Between May 1 – 23: (Last Friday of May)
Final Evaluation Report Based on Evidence of Administrator and PAR
Deliberate Practice Plan
Note:
Number of occurrences is minimum. More may be conducted.
It is expected that evidence will be collected prior to May 1 for the purpose of rating all 22 components.
“Summative” refers to a calculation which consists of observation cycles, Walk-Throughs, the Deliberate
Practice Plan rating, and Value Added Measures as determined by the State of Florida.
*Post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days of the observation. It will not be
considered a violation if the post-conference is conducted within 10 days of the observation. Day 1 is the day
after the observation.
Late Hires: A scheduled observation must be conducted for late hires so that Domains 1 and 4 can be addressed.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 20
ADMINISTRATIVE OBSERVATION OVERVIEW
CATEGORY 2
Teachers With At Least One Full Year of Teaching Experience in Volusia County
who were rated Proficient or Distinguished the previous year
(Whether New Teachers or Experienced Teachers)
EVALUATOR
1st Quarter (Formative) (First Quarter ends October 18, 2013.)
1 Administrator Walk-Through in a Power Component
By April 15
2 Administrator Walk-Throughs (one before February 1 and one before April 15) for school-based
instructional staff
(1 Administrator Walk-Through is required for instructional staff evaluated by district-level
administrators by April 15.)
1 Administrator Scheduled Observation Cycle
Pre-Observation Conference – Within 3 School Days of Observation
Observation
Post-Observation Conference - Within 7* School Days of Observation
Between May 1 – 23
Final Evaluation Report Based on Evidence
Deliberate Practice Plan
Note:
Number of occurrences is minimum. More may be conducted.
It is expected that evidence will be collected prior to May 1 for the purpose of rating all 22
components.
“Summative” refers to a calculation which consists of observation cycles, Walk-Throughs, the
Deliberate Practice Plan rating, and Value Added Measures as determined by the State of
Florida.
The teacher may request one additional scheduled observation cycle.
* Post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days of the observation. It will not
be considered a violation if the post-conference is conducted within 10 days of the observation. Day 1
is the day after the observation.
Late Hires: A scheduled observation must be conducted for late hires so that Domains 1 and 4 can be
addressed.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 21
ADMINISTRATIVE OBSERVATION OVERVIEW
CATEGORY 3
Veteran/Tenured Teachers Requiring Assistance
(Overall “NI” or “U” Observation Ratings (not including VAM) from Previous Year)
EVALUATOR
1st Quarter (Formative) (1st Quarter ends October 18, 2013.
2 Administrator Walk-Throughs in Power Components
2nd Quarter (2nd Quarter ends December 19, 2013.)
1 Administrator Walk-Through in Any Domain Which Supports the Deliberate Practice Plan
Administrator Scheduled Observation Cycle
Pre-Observation Conference – Within 3 School Days of Observation
Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* School Days of Observation
Between the end of Quarter 2 (December 19, 2013) and April 15
1 Administrator Walk-Through in Any Domain Which Supports the Deliberate Practice Plan
1 Administrator Unscheduled Observation
Post-Observation Conference – Within 7* School Days of Observation
Between May 1 – 23
Final Evaluation Report Based on Evidence
Deliberate Practice Plan
Note: Number of occurrences is minimum. More may be conducted.
It is expected that evidence will be collected prior to May 1 for the purpose of rating all 22
components.
“Summative” refers to a calculation which consists of observation cycles, Walk-Throughs, the
Deliberate Practice Plan rating, and Value Added Measures as determined by the State of Florida.
* Post-observation conferences are to be conducted within 7 school days of the observation. It will not
be considered a violation if the post-conference is conducted within 10 days of the observation. Day 1
is the day after the observation.
It is recognized that budget may limit service to veteran teachers requiring assistance. In this
case, differentiated support will be provided to veteran teachers requiring support as
determined by the Superintendent.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 22
DELIBERATE PRACTICE PLAN (DPP)
Professional growth planning is a process of inquiry focused on what teachers need to learn and to do to
improve their practice, resulting in improved student learning. In this process, teachers engage in selfassessment, analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data, and the priorities of both the school and
district. A meaningful DPP is one that engages teachers in significant learning or improving a skill
related to one’s professional practice. A teacher’s DPP will align with one or two components in the
Framework for Teaching. The teacher works on the activities of the plan individually as well as
collaboratively with colleagues. The evaluator supports the implementation of the goals, and monitors
the progress at each post conference. Modifications should be made, as necessary, with the desired
outcome of improved classroom practice and enhanced student learning. Modifications to the plan are
not required when deemed not necessary.
The Deliberate Practice Plan rating is 25% of the summative evaluation rating for those teachers
previously rated “Highly Effective” or “Effective” or 10% for those teachers new to teaching and
experienced teachers previously rated as “Needs Improvement” and “Unsatisfactory.” All teachers are
responsible for developing a Deliberate Practice Plan and collaborating with their evaluators regarding
the plan.
The DPP is a vehicle by which the teacher sets and charts professional growth: what was learned by the
teacher? Meeting the goals of the DPP is not dependent on student data. However, student data may
support the fact that the goals of the DPP were met.
Developing Deliberate Practice Plans
Teachers are to identify individual professional needs and to establish learning goals. Teachers are
expected to write professionally employing writing conventions, such as correct spelling, grammar and
punctuation.
STEPS
Identifying
DPP Type
ACTIONS
The teacher’s type of DPP is determined by the previous year’s summative evaluation
rating.
 Individual DPP: Teachers identified as “Highly Effective” or “Effective”
 Monitored DPP: Teachers identified as new to teaching or “Needs
Improvement”
 Directed DPP: Teachers identified as “Unsatisfactory”
Teachers’ due date of the DPP is October 15.
A completed DPP means the following steps have occurred:
 Teachers have reflected on evidence, identified growth areas, written 1-2
professional learning goals and identified professional learning activities.
 All of the above information has been recorded in MyPGS.
 DPPs have been shared with evaluators based on the DPP type.
 DPPs have been discussed with evaluators.
 Monitored and Directed DPPs have been discussed and approved by evaluator.
 Both the teacher and the evaluator have submitted the date for
acknowledgement of review of the DPP on MyPGS.
If the teacher wishes to use the same DPP goals as last year (not recommended), the
following questions should be asked of the teacher:
 Was the goal met last year?
 If so, why are you working on the same goal this year?
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 23
Reflecting on
Evidence
A. Use one or more of the following when identifying an area of growth:


Self-Reflection using the Framework for Teaching rubric
The teacher conducts a self-assessment using the Framework for Teaching
rubric.
 Previous Year’s Summative Evaluation
 Empowering Educators for Excellence, Year 1
 Empowering Educators for Excellence, Year 2
 Endorsement requirements
B. The teacher identifies and examines student data to guide the development of the
DPP. One or more of the following data pieces shall be considered.





C.
Academic-Formative/Progress Monitoring
Academic-Summative/Outcome
Attendance
Behavior/Discipline
Other Measurable Data
The teacher participates in a school-wide review and discussion of school
improvement plans and goals.
Note: A teacher in a school classified as a Prevent, Focus, or Priority school in
Florida’s Differentiated Accountability system must align his or her DPP to the needs
of a targeted subgroup that did not meet Annual Measurable Objectives (AMO). The
DPP for a teacher in a DA school must include participation in professional
development that helps the teacher to identify and target the needs of that subgroup
and hold rigorous and relevant expectations for all students. Professional
Development must be designed to strengthen the ability of the teacher to prepare
students for college and careers.
Identification
Using the information from “Reflecting on Evidence,” the teacher selects the
of
domain(s) and component(s) as the area(s) of focus.
Growth Areas
Development
 The teacher develops one or two professional learning goals to strengthen
of
his/her practice. These goals should address individual needs, but balance
Professional
those needs with those of the students, school, and district.
Learning Goals
 The teacher meets with the evaluator to review growth area(s). Teachers with
Monitored and Directed DPPs require administrative approval to proceed
with the development of the professional learning goals. Teachers with
Individual DPPs discuss their proposed plan with the evaluator before
proceeding.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 24
Professional learning activities and actions are selected that will assist the teacher to attain the goals.
Professional learning activities provided by the district may include, but are not limited to:
District or School-Based Professional Development opportunities for inservice credit.
These may include, but are not limited to:
Face-to-Face Workshops
Online Courses
Book Studies
Lesson Studies
Endorsement or Add-on Certification Programs
Volusia Teacher Organization Workshops
Job-embedded professional development (no inservice credit)
These may include, but are not limited to:
PLC Work
Collaborative Groups On-line
Reading Journal/Research
Ongoing Monitoring and Review
Step 1: The teacher collects data, tracks, and analyzes progress towards attaining goals.
Step 2: The teacher brings the Deliberate Practice Plan to all post-conferences for discussion purposes.
Evidence is presented to support a teacher’s progress. Modifications are made to the plan as needed
with evaluator notification (verbally or in an email by the teacher). Monitoring and review may be
conducted by a peer evaluator or an administrator. A specific meeting for the purpose of monitoring and
reviewing the DPP is not necessary but may occur at the discretion of the evaluator.
Note: There is no requirement that modifications are made to the Deliberate Practice Plan.
End-of-the-Year Review
Step 1: The teacher completes the end-of-year reflection summarizing his/her work and results of the
DPP. Supporting evidence may be attached at this time and may include no more than 5 artifacts.
Note: It is recommended that the teacher reflect on the DPP throughout the year, in order to make this
step less time-consuming.
Step 2: The teacher meets with the evaluator to share evidence and artifacts demonstrating that
professional learning goals have been met. Supporting evidence of the DPP should include no more than
5 quality, relevant artifacts.
Step 3: The evaluator and the teacher utilize the rubric to determine the overall rating of the DPP
considering the preponderance of the evidence.
Step 4: When the teacher disagrees with the DPP rating, the teacher may contact the Office of Employee
Performance Assessment.
Note: Teachers on leave during May should have completed their DPP requirements prior to going on
leave.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 25
ONGOING MONITORING OF THE DPP
The DPP is an ongoing, living document. The expectation is that teachers will work on their DPPs
throughout the year. Doing so will make the end-of-year process much easier on teachers.
When is the DPP reviewed? As part of VSET, it is required that the evaluator and teacher discuss and
review progress being made on the DPP at every post-conference.
Do the evaluator and teacher conduct a separate meeting? No, it is only required that the DPP be
reviewed at post-conferences. However, a separate meeting may be conducted for the purpose of
monitoring the DPP.
Who is responsible for the review? The teacher and evaluator will discuss the teacher’s progress and
then record a summary of the conversation in MyPGS under the Ongoing Monitoring tab. If a
modification is needed, that would be recorded in the modification tab in MyPGS.
Is the teacher required to record evidence of progress in MyPGS? No, however it is encouraged by
the district and VTO that teachers keep records of their activities to meet the goals of their DPPs.
Teachers may use MyPGS or some other format. This will make it easier to complete the reflection that
is due May 1.
Does the teacher need to write a reflection for the ongoing monitoring? No. The required
reflection is due no later than May 1 by 5 p.m.
When is the DPP rated? The DPP is rated first by the teacher when submitting the reflection no later
than May 1 by 5 p.m. and then by the evaluator prior to the final conference in May.
Deliberate Practice Review Committee Procedures
The Deliberate Practice Review Committee will review DPPs when there is disagreement in the rating
between the teacher and the evaluating administrator. The teacher is to advise the evaluator in writing
(email is acceptable) within five (5) work days of the DPP final rating conference of his/her decision to
refer the plan to the committee for review. The teacher makes the request with the understanding that
the rating decision of the Deliberate Practice Review Committee is the final rating to be assigned to the
teacher’s final evaluation.
The DPP Review Committee will review a DPP rating only when each segment of the DPP has been
completed.
Procedures:

The teacher may request a review of the DPP by the Deliberate Practice Review Committee if
the teacher and evaluator disagree on the rating of the DPP and each section of the DPP has
been completed.

The Administrator notifies the Office of Employee Performance Assessment of the request,
(Linda Knowles, Extension 50762), within three (3) days of the request.

The administrator submits the DPP to the committee as it was presented during the
evaluation conference (including all evidence submitted by the teacher at that meeting)
within three (3) days of notification. No additional documents may be submitted to the
committee.

The Deliberate Practice Review Committee convenes to review the plan and to determine the
final rating.

The decision of the committee will be sent to the administrator/evaluator and teacher in
writing within five (5) days of the decision.

The Evaluator submits the final rating for the DPP into VSET.
Note: Each teacher’s DPP work must be in his/her own words. If plagiarism is suspected, the
work of all involved parties will be forwarded to Professional Standards for review.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 26
DELIBERATE PRACTICE PLAN PERFORMANCE RATING RUBRIC 2013-2014
A preponderance of evidence should be used to determine the overall rubric-based score.
Unsatisfactory
Basic/Needs
Improvement/Developing
Distinguished/
Highly Effective
Proficient/Effective
The Teacher…
The Teacher…
The Teacher…
The Teacher…

Created a plan that
included a professional
learning goal(s) that
was (were) unclear
and not supported by
the needs identified by
student, teacher
and/or school data.

Created a plan in which
the professional learning
goal(s) lacked clarity in
demonstrating the
connection between the
goal(s) and the needs
identified by student,
teacher and/or school
data.

Created a coherent
plan that included
professional learning
goal(s) focused on the
needs identified by
student, teacher and
school data.

Created a
comprehensive plan
with professional
learning goal(s) that
included specific
expectations for
professional growth
and directly aligned
with identified growth
areas based on
student, teacher and
school data.

Did not outline a plan
of action identifying
professional learning
that would assist
him/her in
accomplishing
professional learning
goal(s).

Outlined a plan of action
for professional learning
that was general and/or
partially related to
his/her professional
learning goals but was
unable to align
anticipated instructional
practice improvements
to goals.

Outlined a plan of
action for specific
research-based and/or
evidence-based
professional learning
with an anticipated
timeline that is
directly related to
assisting him/her in
accomplishing
professional learning
goal(s).

Outlined a plan of
action that included
steps for progress
monitoring and specific
indicators that enabled
the teacher to
continuously assess
intended learning
outcomes for both
professional practice
and student
learning/performance.

Did not identify
and/or implement
new instructional
strategies into his/her
professional practice.

Inconsistently
implemented
instructional strategies
and rarely reflected on
the impact to his/her
professional growth
and/or student
learning/performance.

Implemented specific
instructional
strategies learned
during professional
learning events.

Implemented specific
instructional strategies
learned during
professional learning
events, and based on
results from the
implementation of
specific instructional
strategies and ongoing
assessment of intended
learning outcomes of
professional practice,
participated in
additional professional
learning as needed.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 27

Did not review his/her
plan throughout the
school year.

Made insufficient
modifications to the
plan when
student/teacher data
indicated it was
needed.

Produced coherent
evidence that he/she
monitored (reflected
on) the instructional
strategy or strategies
as well as the impact
on student
learning/performance,
and, if necessary,
made modifications to
the strategy or
strategies and/or plan
based on monitoring
results.

Explained in specific
terms the progress
monitoring of changes
in instructional practice
utilizing a systematic
approach for gathering
feedback from both
colleagues and
students, reflected
frequently on the
impact of these
changes and readily
adjusted either the
plan or the
instructional strategy
to promote the
intended learning goal.

Provided no evidence
he/she collaborated
with colleagues to
improve his/her
professional practice
for the purpose of
improving student
performance.

Evidence demonstrated
minimal collaboration
with colleagues to
improve his/her
professional practice for
the purpose of
improving student
performance.

Provided evidence that
throughout the year
the teacher frequently
collaborated with
colleagues to improve
his/her own
professional practice
for the purpose of
improving student
performance as
described in his/her
Deliberate Practice
Plan.

Provided evidence that
throughout the year
the teacher frequently
collaborated with
colleagues to improve
his/her own
professional practice
for the purpose of
improving student
performance as
described in his/her
Deliberate Practice
Plan. In addition,
provided extensive
evidence that he/she
assisted other
educators beyond
his/her job role in an
ongoing, planned, and
meaningful way to
improve professional
practice for the
purpose of improving
student performance.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 28
The Teacher’s End-of-Year
Review and optional
artifacts…
The Teacher’s End-of-Year
Review and optional
artifacts…
The Teacher’s End-of-Year
Review and optional
artifacts…
The Teacher’s End-of-Year
Review and optional
artifacts…




Did not describe new
professional learning
implemented, showed
no analysis of student
impact from new
learning, and
instructional practice
was not adjusted
accordingly. The
artifacts that are
included are
unrelated to the
professional learning
goals.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Inadequately described
the new professional
learning implemented,
showed limited and/or
incorrect analysis of
student impact from
new learning, and did
not adjust instructional
practice accordingly
Demonstrated the
reflective process,
specifically the effect
on
changing/improving
the teacher's practice,
examples of how
he/she impacted
student
learning/performance,
and next steps for
continued professional
growth.
July 24, 2013
Demonstrated the
reflective process,
specifically the effect
on changing/improving
the teacher’s practice,
examples of how
he/she impacted
student learning/
performance, and next
steps for continued
professional growth. In
addition, he/she
included reflections
describing the impact
on his/her own
instructional practices
as well as the other
educators that
occurred as a direct
result of the ongoing
planned collaboration.
Page 29
EVALUATOR TRAINING
Who is an Evaluator?
An evaluator is defined as: a site-based administrator, district-based administrator, or district-based peer
evaluator with training in collecting evidence and scoring the Framework for Teaching rubric as well as the
Deliberate Practice Plan rubric. PAR teachers do not evaluate any teacher they support as a mentor.
How is the Evaluator Determined?
The school principal will determine which administrator will evaluate each teacher. In instances where the
principal supervises more than one building, additional evaluators may be recruited from district staff or
other trained evaluators. In the case of specialized instructional employees who report to a district
administrator, the appropriate district administrator will conduct the evaluation.
Input Into Evaluation by Personnel Other Than the Supervisor
The evaluator may consider input from other trained evaluators. The teacher may also elect to submit as
evidence Walk-Through observations completed by coaches or district staff, records of participation in
special assignments and committees, and commendations from district staff or other agencies, and other
relevant evidence (within this school year only).
PEER ASSISTANCE AND REVIEW
Volusia County School District has established a peer assistance and review process as part of the
evaluation system which is supported by the Volusia Teachers Organization. The evaluation and
feedback of the PAR teacher will be separate from, and equal to, the weight of the evaluating
supervisor’s evaluation.
Responsibilities of PAR Teachers
 Assist assigned teachers with classroom procedures and environment.
 Assist with data analysis for assigned teachers’ incoming students.
 Assist assigned teachers to develop Deliberate Practice Plans.
 Monitor and assist to refine assigned teachers’ instructional planning and delivery.
 Provide timely feedback to assigned teachers to improve practice.
 Maintain confidentiality while working with assigned teachers. (Share progress with the
building administrator with teacher permission.)
 Seek additional assistance if assigned teacher is not making sufficient progress.
 Follow the appropriate observation cycle procedures and timelines for evaluation set by the
Volusia System for Empowering Teachers.
Note: It is the PAR teacher’s professional obligation to report misconduct to the principal/site
supervisor in a timely manner.
Evaluation Process for PAR teachers
 PAR teachers are district-based teachers-on-assignment.
 PAR teachers are evaluated using an adapted Danielson Framework rubric.
 The district administrator designated as supervisor for the PAR program (Human Resource
Specialist) shall serve as evaluator for the PAR teachers.
 The number of observation cycles will be the same as Effective or Highly Effective teachers.
 PAR teachers will complete a Deliberate Practice Plan.
 The designated district supervisor will monitor and evaluate the Deliberate Practice Plan
developed by a PAR teacher.
 The final Summative Evaluation Rating for a PAR teacher will consist of 25% Administrator
Evaluation, 25% Deliberate Practice, and 50% based on a value-added measure.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 30
TEACHERS HIRED SECOND SEMESTER



Teachers hired after the start of the second semester of the 2012-2013 school year will be
considered to be first year teachers during 2013-2014.
Administrative evaluators of teachers hired in the second semester of the 2013-2014 school
year will follow the cycle (including Deliberate Practice Plan) corresponding with their hire date
(Category 2) with a due date of May 23, 2014. It will be necessary to include a scheduled
observation in order to rate domains 1 and 4.
Teachers hired after the start of the fourth nine weeks of the 2013-2014 school year will not be
required to complete Deliberate Practice Plans for the 2013-2014 school year.
Teachers hired by March 31, 2014, must comply with Category 2
requirements. However, due date is May 1 (not April).
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 31
VSET 2013-2014 End-of-Year Procedures
(PARs will follow the same procedures as administrators, as applicable.)
District rating labels (Distinguished, Proficient, Basic, Unsatisfactory) will not change for 2013-2014.
Note: State rating labels are Highly Effective, Effective, Needs Improvement and Unsatisfactory.
The Rubric completed in the final post-conference must include ratings for all 22 components and must
include any evidence collected or presented after the first quarter prior to the final post-conference.
At any time up to and including the final evaluation conference, the teacher may bring forward evidence
collected after the first quarter including evidence by another person trained in VSET, such as a PAR
mentor (not a PAR evaluator) or district administrator, but not his/her school-based or district
evaluator as that evaluation information will be in the system. However, neither the teacher nor the
administrator may bring forward new evidence or artifacts after the final evaluation conference.
Ratings are based on the preponderance of the EVIDENCE. This would include ALL of the following:

Walk-Through(s)

Pre-observation form(s) and conference(s) (Domains 1 and 4)

Evidence Collection form(s) (Domains 2 and 3)

Post-conference(s)

A teacher may add no more than five (5) artifacts to capture components not observed via
Walk-Through(s) or Observations(s). This is not a portfolio; and a portfolio is not one
artifact. (These five (5) artifacts are in addition to the five (5) artifacts to support the DPP
goals.)

The teacher may bring forward evidence collected after the first quarter by another
person trained in VSET such as a PAR mentor (not evaluator) or district administrator.

Records of Conference and Letters of Caution issued after the first quarter or Letters of
Reprimand issued in the first or second semesters may count as evidence.

Records of Conference (R of C) and Letters of Caution (L of C) issued in the first quarter may
count as evidence after the first quarter when behaviors warranting the R of C or L of C
carry over and are documented after the first quarter.
Note: The evidence will guide the evaluator to the teacher’s ratings in each component.
Teachers will rate themselves using all EVIDENCE as described above. Administrators will rate teachers.
Teachers and evaluators will meet to discuss areas of disagreement, citing evidence and artifacts.
Principals and/or assistant principals shall conduct the final evaluation report and Deliberate Practice
Plan conferences between May 1 and May 23. At this conference, the evaluator and the teacher will
review the evaluator’s component ratings and the DPP rating.
When all or parts of the evaluation cycles cannot be completed due to leaves of absence, resignations,
retirements, or other extenuating circumstance, the evaluator is to indicate this information in the
evaluation system.
If the teacher and evaluator are aware that the teacher will be taking a leave of absence or in some other
manner not completing the school year, all 22 components and the DPP should be finalized prior to the
teacher’s departure, except in case of emergency.
The final summative report will be available after the value added scores are released from the state.
Note: If additional evidence is required to assess a rating, another Walk-Through may be conducted or
another quality, relevant artifact may be provided.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 32
OPEN INVESTIGATIONS
When a teacher is subject to an on-going investigation by the Professional Standards Department or
school-based administrator, or when a disciplinary action is being processed through grievance
procedures levels 1, 2, or 3, completion of the final evaluation will be extended beyond May 23, but not
beyond June 30.
NO PROGRESS OR INSUFFICIENT PROGRESS RE: READING AND ESOL
Note: The district will provide evaluators with a list of affected teachers.
1. For those teachers who have made no progress toward Reading and/or ESOL for the second year or
longer, the rating in the area of Professional Development will be no better than B/NI (Basic/Needs
Improvement).
2. For those teachers who have made inadequate progress toward ESOL for the second year or longer
(including insufficient hours or inservice toward ESOL from May 1, 2013, until April 1, 2014), the
rating in the area of Professional Development will be no better than B/NI (Basic/Needs
Improvement).
Note: ESOL portfolios must be submitted to Professional Development no later than April 15, 2014.
3. For those teachers who have made inadequate progress toward Reading for the second year or
longer (meaning they have not taken the required courses in the required period of time), the rating
in the area of Professional Development will be no better than B/NI (Basic/Needs Improvement).
4. For those teachers who have made no progress or inadequate progress toward Reading and/or
ESOL for the first time during 2013-2014, the rating will be no better than a B/NI (Basic/Needs
Improvement) in the area of Professional Development.
Note: All requirements must be COMPLETED and ASSESSED by the due date of May 21, 2014, to be
considered in the 2013-2014 final ratings.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 33
ITINERANT TEACHERS
Itinerant teachers (teachers who serve more than one location) will be evaluated by the building-level
administrator of the base school, as determined by MyPGS. Observations may be conducted by both
administrators who will confer on one final evaluation.
The following teachers are evaluated by their district-level supervisors with input from the site-based
administrator(s):
Deaf/Hard of Hearing Teachers
ESE Placement Specialists
ESE Program Specialists
High School Gifted Consultation Teachers
Pre-K Instructional Support Teachers
School Psychologists
School Social Workers
Speech/Language Clinicians
Transition Specialists
VAATT Teachers
Vision Teachers
TEACHERS WITH MORE THAN ONE JOB FUNCTION
Teachers with more than one job function, on the same site or shared between sites, are to be evaluated
as one teacher, not per job function.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 34
VSET IMPROVEMENT PLAN
After one semester of support*, or the equivalent**, when performance continues to be deficient, as
determined by the administrator, the principal/site administrator places the teacher on a VSET
Improvement Plan. Timeline for improvement is 90 calendar days. The VSET Improvement Plan may
be written at any point in the year as determined by the principal/site supervisor.
The VSET Improvement Plan requires a Support Team which is coordinated with the Office of Employee
Performance Assessment. The teacher and evaluator may each select three employees of the district,
any site, to serve on the Support Team. The role of the Support Team is that of support, not evaluation.
Typically, one Support Team meeting per month is held for the purpose of offering suggestions to the
teacher. Between Support Team meetings, the Support Team members may shadow, or be shadowed
by, the teacher on the improvement plan for the purpose of constructive feedback.
If sufficient improvement by the teacher has been recognized while on the Improvement Plan, the
teacher is monitored via a Directed Deliberate Practice Plan.
If sufficient improvement has not been demonstrated by the teacher while on the Improvement Plan,
termination of the teacher’s employment will be recommended by the Superintendent to the school
board. The principal/site administrator, who serves as the evaluator during the VSET Improvement
Plan, is to work closely with the Office of Employee Performance Assessment at this level of technical
assistance.
*Support could include assignment of a PAR (budget permitting). When funding prevents the
assignment of a PAR, another method of support will be utilized, as directed by the Superintendent or
designee which may include, but is not limited to, school-based coaches, school-based support, and/or
district-level support.
**For those teachers who begin later in the year, the equivalent of one semester of support is to be
provided.
OUTCOMES WITH PAR
Three possible outcomes when completing a semester with a PAR evaluator include:
 Exit with success
 Recommendation for another semester
 Exit without success; 90-day “Improvement Plan”
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 35
VSET 2013-2014
One Semester of Support (18 weeks)
Teacher: _________________________________________________________________
Teacher’s Assignment: _________________ School/Site: __________________________
Administrator:_________________________________
Date of meeting with teacher to discuss concerns and offer support and for the teacher to
provide input regarding support:
________________________________________________________________________
List Support Provided and/or Offered
Date Initiated
Note: One semester of support refers to 18 weeks of support which could begin at any
point in the year.
Teacher’s Signature ________________________________ Date _____________________
Administrator’s Signature ____________________________ Date _____________________
_________________________________________________ Date _____________________
Signature of Witness denoting that employee received
a copy of this document but refused to sign it
(Witness signature is necessary only if employee refuses to sign this document.)
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 36
DATE:
Write out the month, include the year
TO:
Name, Title
Complete Social Security Number
FROM:
Name, Title
School/Site
RE:
Placement on VSET Improvement Plan
______________________________________ is being placed on a VSET Improvement Plan
(Teacher’s Name
and has until ___________________________ to provide his/her evaluator with the names of
(Date)
three (3) employees of the district (any school/site) to serve on his/her VSET Improvement Plan
Support Team. The evaluator will also be suggesting three (3) employees of the district (any
school/site) to serve on this VSET Improvement Plan Support Team.
___________________________________________________
Signature of Teacher
_____________
Date
______________________________________________
Signature of Administrator
______________
Date
______________________________________________
Signature of Witness denoting that employee received
a copy of this document but refused to sign it
______________
Date
(Witness signature is necessary only if employee refuses to sign this document.)
Original:
Copies:
Employee’s File at the School/Site
Employee
Coordinator of Employee Performance Assessment
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 37
VSET IMPROVEMENT PLAN
TEACHER’S NAME
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
SCHOOL/SITE
ASSIGNMENT
PRINCIPAL/SITE ADMINISTRATOR’S NAME
SCHOOL YEAR
SUPPORT TEAM MEMBERS’ NAMES
Note: Contact Office of Employee Performance Assessment for VSET Improvement Plan template
and assistance.
(X)
Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy
Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
Setting Instructional Outcomes
Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources
Designing Coherent Instruction
Assessing Student Learning
Domain 3:
Instruction
Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport
Establishing a Culture for Learning
Managing Classroom Procedures
Managing Student Behavior
Organizing Physical Space
Communicating with Students
Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
Engaging Students in Learning
Using Assessment in Instruction
Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
Domain 4:
Professional
Responsibilities
Domain 2:
Classroom
Environment
Domain 1:
Planning and
Preparation
MARK AREA(S) OF CONCERN WITH AN “X”
Reflecting on Teaching
Maintaining Accurate Records
Communicating with Families
Participating in a Professional Community
Growing and Developing Professionally
Showing Professionalism
Note: Initials of teacher and administrator are required on each page not containing
signatures.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 38
VSET IMPROVEMENT PLAN
Page 2
Teacher’s Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________
Component of Concern
Details of Concern
The teacher needs to
Improvement Expected (The teacher is assessed by way of expectations.)
The teacher will
Suggestions for Improvement (The teacher is not assessed by way of suggestions.)
The teacher should
(For more than one component, duplicate the above as needed.)
VSET Improvement Plan Developed On:
____________________________________
Improvement Assessed On or After
____________________________________
Date
(Same as date of signature)
Date
(90 calendar days not including holidays or summer)
______________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________
Teacher’s Signature Denoting Receipt of a Copy of This
Improvement Plan
Date
______________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________
Evaluator’s Signature
Date
______________________________________________________________________
Signature of Witness Denoting that Teacher Received a
Copy of this Improvement Plan but refused to sign it.
(Witness signature is necessary only if teacher refuses to
sign this Improvement Plan.)
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
___________________________________________
Date
Page 39
RESULTS OF VSET IMPROVEMENT PLAN
Teacher’s Name: _____________________________________________________________________________________________

Performance meets expectations.

Teacher has demonstrated improvement, and will be returned to a Directed DPP.

Teacher failed to show sufficient improvement. Termination of the teacher’s
employment will be recommended to the School Board.
_________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
Evaluator’s Signature
___________________________________________
Date
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Signature of Witness Denoting that Teacher Received a
Copy of this Improvement Plan Results Page but refused to sign it.
(Witness signature is necessary only if teacher refused to
sign this Improvement Plan Results Page.)
___________________________________________
Date
Teacher’s Signature Denoting Receipt of a Copy of This Improvement Plan
Original:
Copies:
Date
Teacher’s Personnel File at the School/Site
Teacher
May be used as evidence in VSET System
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 40
ACCESSING THE TEACHER EVALUATION SYSTEM (VSET)
The teacher evaluation system is managed through MyPGS (My Professional Growth System),
linked from the district’s homepage or at: http://volusia.truenorthlogic.com/. This system can be
accessed from school, home or anywhere with Internet access. The user can log-on through the
district’s portal, using his/her network user ID and password.
Teachers will not only use this system to access and manage their evaluation activities, but this will
also be the system to search, register and manage professional development learning opportunities.
MyPGS provides a Learning Channel with Step-by-Step Directions, Videos, and Tutorials for
assistance.
The online system is linked from the district’s homepage under Staff Applications and the URL is
http://vweb13/. The site is maintained by the district’s Technology Services Department, and
users should call the Technical Services Help Desk at extension 20000 for technical assistance.
The VSET online system provides an individualized dashboard in which the user selects the school
year, observation type, and can filter by: date, type, and school year. The user can view, edit and
print appropriate fields and can view all completed observations.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 41
Other Evidence Collection Tools
The input form may be used by parents, teachers, or other interested parties to provide evidence
regarding the assessment of teachers.
At times, the evaluator may feel that the issue is less academic and more behavioral. In this case,
the evaluator may choose to utilize the Record of Conference or Letter of Caution or Letter of
Reprimand.
The following documents are not part of the VSET evaluation process. However, they are
documents that may be used by an administrator who has concerns outside of the evaluation
process and may be used as evidence.
APPENDIX 1
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 42
VOLUSIA COUNTY SCHOOLS
INPUT FORM
This form is to be used by parents, teachers, or other interested parties to provide input
towards the assessment of teachers.
TEACHER’S NAME:
____________________________________________
SITE: _____________________________________________________________
Comments:
Signature: _____________________________Date:
___________________
Please Print Name/Title:______________________________________________
Note: When used as evidence, the Input Form will be uploaded into the VSET system.
This signed form will be placed in the Principal’s correspondence file for this
year and the following school year.
Copy: Area Superintendent or Site Supervisor
Revised: 7/14/2013
Owner: Human Resources
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
2008-144VCS
Print Locally
July 24, 2013
Page 43
EFFECTIVE EVALUATIONS
An expectation of effective evaluation is timely communication of concerns by way of a
conversation. This could result in a conversation only or a conversation that leads to a document
within the VSET procedures, meaning a Record of Conference, Letter of Caution, Letter of
Reprimand, or VSET Improvement Plan. Emails and personal notes do not suffice as “documents
within the VEST procedures.”
Record of Conference
In assessing the performance of instructional personnel, issues may occasionally arise for which a
Record of Conference is the appropriate vehicle for comment. These performance issues are not
too serious and require immediate change. A Record of Conference is designed to provide the
employee with a description of concerns and expectations.
The Record of Conference should be signed and dated by the evaluator and the teacher. A copy is
given to the teacher, and the original is retained in the teacher’s personnel file at the worksite.
When used as evidence, the Record of Conference will be uploaded into the VSET system.
Letter of Caution
The Letter of Caution is not discipline. It is used to serve as a warning and to provide written
expectations for future conduct and performance. The Letter of Caution should be signed and dated
by the evaluator and the teacher. A copy is given to the teacher, and the original is retained in the
teacher’s personnel file at the worksite. When used as evidence, the Letter of Caution will be
uploaded into the VSET system.
Letter of Reprimand
Per the *definition of discipline in the VTO Contract, the Letter of Reprimand is discipline. It is used
for serious infractions of behavior or judgment. The Letter of Reprimand should be signed and
dated by the evaluator and the teacher. A copy is given to the teacher and a copy is forwarded to
Professional Standards. The original is retained in the teacher’s personnel file at the worksite.
When used as evidence, the Letter of Reprimand will be uploaded into the VSET system.
Note: Conversations, emails, and notes will not be considered sufficient evidence under VSET to
support deficient ratings as they relate to professional indiscretions.
Note: When they support ratings, documents such as Records of Conference, Letters of
Caution/Reprimand, Improvement Plans, and Letters in Place of Final Evaluations are to be
downloaded into MyPGS.
*Definition of discipline in the VTO contract:
A written reprimand, suspension without pay, or termination from employment.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 44
INSTRUCTIONAL
RECORD OF CONFERENCE
Teacher’s Name_______________________________
School/Site_____________________
Social Security Number
__________________________________________________________
This form constitutes a Record of Conference based on our conference held on
_________
date
to discuss the following area(s) of concern.
___________________________________________________________________
Proper procedures must be followed, meaning two
___________________________________________________________________
conferences will be required; one to provide the
employee with an opportunity to discuss the
___________________________________________________________________
administrator’s concerns, and, IF NECESSARY, a
___________________________________________________________________
second to sign any paperwork resulting from the first
conference.
___________________________________________________________________
Summary of Conference:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
My expectations are that you will
________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
I am confident, through your commitment, this will lead to successful performance.
___________________________________________________________
Teacher’s Signature denoting receipt of a copy of
this Record of Conference
_______________________________________
Date
__________________________________________________________
Administrator’s Signature
_______________________________________
Date
__________________________________________________________
________________________
Signature of Witness denoting that teacher received a copy of this
Record of Conference but refused to sign it (Witness signature is
necessary only if teacher refuses to sign this Record of Conference.)
Date
Note: The teacher has the right to submit a written response (must be signed and dated) which shall become a part of
this document.
Original:
Copies:
Teacher’s Personnel File at the School/Site
Teacher
May be used as evidence in VSET System
Owner:
Human Resources
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Print Locally
July 24, 2013
Page 45
SCHOOL/SITE LETTERHEAD
Date:
[Insert date]
To:
[Insert name of employee, title]
From:
[Insert name of administrator/evaluator, title]
Re:
LETTER OF CAUTION
At times it becomes necessary to provide written clarification or guidance regarding the
expectations of the district. Such letters are referred to as letters of caution and are not
disciplinary action.
Please note that all employees are required to follow all rules, procedures, policies, laws and
other direction/requirement from his or her evaluator and/or supervisor. Should an employee fail
to comply with those requirements, it is possible that disciplinary action may result. Letters of
caution serve as a warning and provide written expectations for future conduct and performance
that may be relied upon in performance evaluations consistent with applicable district evaluation
procedures and are intended to avoid a future situation warranting disciplinary action.
On [insert date], we discussed my concern about your compliance with [insert specific reference
to rule, procedure, policy, law and other direction/requirement.] This letter is intended to
memorialize my concern and advise you to take immediate steps to [insert detail(s) of your
expectation(s)] to ensure your compliance with the aforementioned requirement.
Please contact me if you have any questions regarding this letter. You are not required to
respond to this letter. In the event you elect to write a rebuttal to me, a copy of that response will
be attached to this letter and placed in your school/site employee file.
______________________________________________
Signature of Administrator
______________________
Date
______________________________________________
Signature of Employee denoting receipt of a copy
of this Letter of Caution
_____________________
Date
______________________________________________
______________________
Signature of Witness denoting that employee received
Date
a copy of this Letter of Caution but refused to sign it
(Witness signature is necessary only if employee refuses to sign this Letter of Caution.)
Original:
Copies:
Employee’s File at the School/Site
Employee
For teachers: May be used as evidence in VSET System
For administrators: May be used as evidence in VSEL System
For AFSCME, Non-Bargaining/Non-Instructional and VESA: May be attached to final evaluations
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 46
SCHOOL/SITE LETTERHEAD
Date:
Complete Date
To:
Name of Employee, Title
Social Security Number
From:
Name of Administrator/Evaluator, Title
Re:
LETTER OF REPRIMAND
Paragraph 1 – Describe the incident/indiscretion.
Example – On (complete date), it was reported to me that (specifics).
Paragraph 2 – Reference the due process conference.
Example – During our conference on (complete date), you admitted that (or you denied
that… )
Note: Based on all the evidence you have gathered, even with a denial, a letter of
reprimand may be written.
Paragraph 3 – State your findings.
Example – Having heard and considered your response regarding…, I have determined
that it is necessary to issue this Letter of Reprimand.
Note: Re-state the incident/indiscretion and why it is not acceptable.
Paragraph 4 – Clarify your expectations.
Example – If you repeat the behavior that necessitated this Letter of Reprimand, or if
there is another incident of unsatisfactory behavior or poor judgment on your part,
further disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment, may result.
______________________________________________
Signature of Administrator/Evaluator
______________________
Date
______________________________________________________
Signature of Employee denoting receipt of a copy of this
Letter of Reprimand
___________________________
Date
______________________________________________
_____________________
Signature of Witness denoting that employee received
Date
a copy of this Letter of Reprimand but refused to sign it
(Witness signature is necessary only if employee refuses to sign this Letter of Reprimand.)
Original:
Copies:
Employee’s File at the School/Site
Employee
Professional Standards
For teachers: May be used as evidence in VSET System
For administrators: May be used as evidence in VSEL System
For AFSCME, Non-Bargaining/Non-Instructional and VESA: May be attached to final evaluations
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 47
APPENDIX 2
RUBRICS
The 2012-2013 non-classroom instructional rubrics will be used as hard copy conference tools
(look fors) and may be uploaded into the VSET system during the 2013-2014 school year.
Rubrics may be located in MyPGS VSET Online Help in pdf format.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 48
The Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument 2011 – Rubrics
© 2011 The Danielson Group
Classroom Teachers
1
UNSATISFACTORY
2
BASIC/DEVELOPING/
NEEDS IMPROVEMENT
3
PROFICIENT/EFFECTIVE
1b Demonstrating Knowledge
of Students
1a Knowledge of
Content and Pedagogy
In planning and practice, teacher makes
Teacher is familiar with the important concepts Teacher displays solid knowledge of the
content errors or does not correct errors made in the discipline but displays lack of awareness important concepts in the discipline and the
by students.
of how these concepts relate to one another. ways they relate to one another.
4
DISTINGUISHED/HIGHLY EFFECTIVE
Teacher displays extensive knowledge of the
important concepts in the discipline and the
ways they relate both to one another and to
other disciplines.
Teacher’s plans and practice display little
Teacher’s plans and practice indicate some
understanding of prerequisite relationships
awareness of prerequisite relationships,
important to student’s learning of the content. although such knowledge may be inaccurate
or incomplete.
Teacher displays little or no understanding of
the range of pedagogical approaches suitable Teacher’s plans and practice reflect a limited
to student’s learning of the content.
range of pedagogical approaches to the
discipline or to the students.
Teacher’s plans and practice reflect accurate
understanding of prerequisite relationships
Teacher’s plans and practice reflect
among topics and concepts.
understanding of prerequisite relationships
among topics and concepts and provide a link
Teacher’s plans and practice reflect familiarity
to necessary cognitive structures needed by
with a wide range of effective pedagogical
students to ensure understanding.
approaches in the discipline.
Teacher’s plans and practice reflect familiarity
with a wide range of effective pedagogical
approaches in the discipline, anticipating
student misconceptions.
Teacher demonstrates little or no
understanding of how students learn, and
little knowledge of students’ backgrounds,
cultures, skills, language proficiency,
interests, and special needs, and does not
seek such understanding.
Teacher understands the active nature of
student learning, and attains information
about levels of development for groups of
students. The teacher also purposefully
seeks knowledge from several sources of
students’ backgrounds, cultures, skills,
language proficiency, interests, and special
needs, and attains this knowledge for groups
of students.
Teacher indicates the importance of
understanding how students learn and the
students’ backgrounds, cultures, skills,
language proficiency, interests, and special
needs, and attains this knowledge for the
class as a whole.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Teacher actively seeks knowledge of
students’ levels of development and their
backgrounds, cultures, skills, language
proficiency, interests, and special needs from
a variety of sources. This information is
acquired for individual students.
Page 49
1c Setting Instructional
Outcomes
1d Knowledge of
Resources
Outcomes represent low expectations for
Outcomes represent moderately high
students and lack of rigor, and not all of them expectations and rigor.
reflect important learning in the discipline.
Some reflect important learning in the
Outcomes are stated as activities rather than discipline and consist of a combination of
as student learning.
outcomes and activities.
Most outcomes represent rigorous and
important learning in the discipline.
All outcomes represent rigorous and
important learning in the discipline.
All the instructional outcomes are clear, are
written in the form of student learning, and
suggest viable methods of assessment.
The outcomes are clear, are written in the
form of student learning, and permit viable
methods of assessment.
Outcomes reflect only one type of learning
and only one discipline or strand and are
suitable for only some students.
Outcomes reflect several different types of
learning and opportunities for coordination.
Outcomes reflect several different types of
learning and, where appropriate, represent
opportunities for both coordination and
integration.
Teacher is unaware of school or district
resources for classroom use, for the
expansion of his or her own knowledge, or for
students.
Outcomes reflect several types of learning,
but teacher has made no attempt at
coordination or integration.
Outcomes take into account the varying
Most of the outcomes are suitable for most of needs of groups of students.
the students in the class in accordance with
global assessments of student learning.
Teacher displays basic awareness of school
or district resources available for classroom
use, for the expansion of his or her own
knowledge, and for students, but no
knowledge of resources available more
broadly.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Teacher displays awareness of resources—
not only through the school and district but
also through sources external to the school
and on the Internet—available for classroom
use, for the expansion of his or her own
knowledge, and for students.
July 24, 2013
Outcomes take into account the varying
needs of individual students.
Teacher displays extensive knowledge of
resources—not only through the school and
district but also in the community, through
professional organizations and universities,
and on the Internet—for classroom use, for
the expansion of his or her own knowledge,
and for students.
Page 50
1f Designing Student
Assessments
1e Designing
Coherent Instruction
The series of learning experiences is poorly
aligned with the instructional outcomes and
does not represent a coherent structure.
Some of the learning activities and materials
are suitable to the instructional outcomes and
represent a moderate cognitive challenge but
with no differentiation for different students.
The activities are not designed to engage
Instructional groups partially support the
students in active intellectual activity and
instructional outcomes, with an effort by the
have unrealistic time allocations. Instructional
teacher at providing some variety.
groups do not support the instructional
outcomes and offer no variety.
The lesson or unit has a recognizable
structure; the progression of activities is
uneven, with most time allocations
reasonable.
Assessment procedures are not congruent
with instructional outcomes; the proposed
approach contains no criteria or standards.
Some of the instructional outcomes are
assessed through the proposed approach,
but others are not.
Teacher has no plan to incorporate
formative assessment in the lesson or unit
nor any plan to use assessment results in
designing future instruction.
Assessment criteria and standards have
been developed, but they are not clear.
Approach to the use of formative
assessment is rudimentary, including only
some of the instructional outcomes.
Teacher intends to use assessment results
to plan for future instruction for the class as
a whole.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Teacher coordinates knowledge of content,
of students, and of resources, to design a
series of learning experiences aligned to
instructional outcomes and suitable to groups
of students.
The learning activities have reasonable time
allocations; they represent significant
cognitive challenge, with some differentiation
for different groups of students.
The lesson or unit has a clear structure, with
appropriate and varied use of instructional
groups.
Teacher’s plan for student assessment is
aligned with the instructional outcomes;
assessment methodologies may have been
adapted for groups of students.
Assessment criteria and standards are
clear. Teacher has a well-developed
strategy for using formative assessment and
has designed particular approaches to be
used.
Teacher intends to use assessment results
to plan for future instruction for groups of
students.
July 24, 2013
Plans represent the coordination of in-depth
content knowledge, understanding of
different students’ needs, and available
resources (including technology), resulting in
a series of learning activities designed to
engage students in high-level cognitive
activity.
Learning activities are differentiated
appropriately for individual learners.
Instructional groups are varied appropriately
with some opportunity for student choice.
The lesson’s or unit’s structure is clear and
allows for different pathways according to
diverse student needs.
Teacher’s plan for student assessment is
fully aligned with the instructional outcomes
and has clear criteria and standards that
show evidence of student contribution to
their development.
Assessment methodologies have been
adapted for individual students, as needed.
The approach to using formative
assessment is well designed and includes
student as well as teacher use of the
assessment information. Teacher intends to
use assessment results to plan future
instruction for individual students.
Page 51
2a Environment of
Respect and Rapport
2b Establishing a
Culture for Learning
Patterns of classroom interactions, both
between the teacher and students and
among students, are mostly negative,
inappropriate, or insensitive to students’
ages, cultural backgrounds, and
developmental levels. Interactions are
characterized by sarcasm, put-downs, or
conflict.
Teacher does not deal with disrespectful
behavior.
The classroom culture is characterized by a
lack of teacher or student commitment to
learning and/or little or no investment of
student energy into the task at hand. Hard
work is not expected or valued.
Medium or low expectations for student
achievement are the norm, with high
expectations for learning reserved for only
one or two students.
Patterns of classroom interactions, both
between the teacher and students and
among students, are generally appropriate
but may reflect occasional inconsistencies,
favoritism, and disregard for students’ ages,
cultures, and developmental levels.
Students rarely demonstrate disrespect for
one another.
Teacher attempts to respond to
disrespectful behavior, with uneven results.
The net result of the interactions is neutral,
conveying neither warmth nor conflict.
The classroom culture is characterized by
little commitment to learning by teacher or
students.
The teacher appears to be only going
through the motions, and students indicate
that they are interested in completion of a
task, rather than quality.
The teacher conveys that student success is
the result of natural ability rather than hard
work; high expectations for learning are
reserved for those students thought to have
a natural aptitude for the subject.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Teacher-student interactions are friendly
and demonstrate general caring and
respect. Such interactions are appropriate to
the ages of the students.
Classroom interactions among the teacher
and individual students are highly respectful,
reflecting genuine warmth and caring and
sensitivity to students as individuals.
Students exhibit respect for the teacher.
Interactions among students are generally
polite and respectful.
Students exhibit respect for the teacher and
contribute to high levels of civil interaction
between all members of the class. The net
result of interactions is that of connections
with students as individuals.
Teacher responds successfully to
disrespectful behavior among students. The
net result of the interactions is polite and
respectful, but impersonal.
The classroom culture is a cognitively busy
place where learning is valued by all, with
high expectations for learning being the
norm for most students.
The teacher conveys that with hard work
students can be successful.
Students understand their role as learners
and consistently expend effort to learn.
Classroom interactions support learning and
hard work.
July 24, 2013
The classroom culture is a cognitively
vibrant place, characterized by a shared
belief in the importance of learning.
The teacher conveys high expectations for
learning by all students and insists on hard
work.
Students assume responsibility for high
quality by initiating improvements, making
revisions, adding detail, and/or helping
peers.
Page 52
2c Managing
Classroom Procedures
2d Managing
Student Behavior
Much instructional time is lost through
inefficient classroom routines and
procedures.
Some instructional time is lost through only
partially effective classroom routines and
procedures.
There is little loss of instructional time
because of effective classroom routines and
procedures.
There is little or no evidence that the teacher
is managing instructional groups, transitions,
and/or the handling of materials and
supplies effectively.
The teacher’s management of instructional
groups, transitions, and/or the handling of
materials and supplies is inconsistent, the
result being some disruption of learning.
The teacher’s management of instructional
groups and the handling of materials and
supplies are consistently successful.
There is little evidence that students know or
follow established routines.
With regular guidance and prompting,
students follow established routines.
There appear to be no established
standards of conduct and little or no teacher
monitoring of student behavior.
Standards of conduct appear to have been
established, but their implementation is
inconsistent.
Students challenge the standards of
conduct.
Teacher tries, with uneven results, to
monitor student behavior and respond to
student misbehavior.
Response to students’ misbehavior is
repressive or disrespectful of student
dignity.
2e Organizing
Physical Space
The physical environment is unsafe, or
many students don’t have access to learning
resources.
There is poor coordination between the
lesson activities and the arrangement of
furniture and resources, including computer
technology.
With minimal guidance and prompting,
students follow established classroom
routines.
The teacher’s use of physical resources,
including computer technology, is
moderately effective.
Teacher makes some attempt to modify the
physical arrangement to suit learning
activities, with partial success.
Students contribute to the management of
instructional groups, transitions, and the
handling of materials and supplies.
Routines are well understood and may be
initiated by students.
Student behavior is generally appropriate.
Student behavior is entirely appropriate.
The teacher monitors student behavior
against established standards of conduct.
Students take an active role in monitoring
their own behavior and that of other
students against standards of conduct.
Teacher response to student misbehavior is
consistent, proportionate, respectful to
students, and effective.
There is inconsistent implementation of the
standards of conduct.
The classroom is safe, and essential
learning is accessible to most students.
Instructional time is maximized because of
efficient classroom routines and procedures.
Teachers’ monitoring of student behavior is
subtle and preventive.
Teacher’s response to student misbehavior
is sensitive to individual student needs and
respects students’ dignity.
The classroom is safe, and learning is
accessible to all students; teacher ensures
that the physical arrangement is appropriate
to the learning activities.
Teacher makes effective use of physical
resources, including computer technology.
The classroom is safe, and learning is
accessible to all students, including those
with special needs.
Teacher makes effective use of physical
resources, including computer technology.
The teacher ensures that the physical
arrangement is appropriate to the learning
activities.
Students contribute to the use or adaptation
of the physical environment to advance
learning.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 53
3b Questioning and Discussion Techniques
3a Communicating with Students
The instructional purpose of the lesson is
unclear to students, and the directions and
procedures are confusing.
The teacher’s explanation of the content
contains major errors.
The teacher’s spoken or written language
contains errors of grammar or syntax.
The teacher’s vocabulary is inappropriate,
vague, or used incorrectly, leaving students
confused.
The teacher’s attempt to explain the
instructional purpose has only limited
success, and/or directions and procedures
must be clarified after initial student
confusion.
The teacher clearly communicates
instructional purpose of the lesson, including
where it is situated within broader learning,
and explains procedures and directions
clearly.
The teacher links the instructional purpose
of the lesson to student interests; the
directions and procedures are clear and
anticipate possible student
misunderstanding.
The teacher’s explanation of the content
may contain minor errors; some portions are
clear; other portions are difficult to follow.
Teacher’s explanation of content is well
scaffolded, clear and accurate, and
connects with students’ knowledge and
experience.
The teacher’s explanation of content is
thorough and clear, developing conceptual
understanding through artful scaffolding and
connecting with students’ interests.
During the explanation of content, the
teacher invites student intellectual
engagement.
Students contribute to extending the content
and help explain concepts to their
classmates.
Teacher’s spoken and written language is
clear and correct and uses vocabulary
appropriate to the students’ ages and
interests.
The teacher’s spoken and written language
is expressive, and the teacher finds
opportunities to extend students’
vocabularies.
Although the teacher may use some lowlevel questions, he or she asks the students
questions designed to promote thinking and
understanding.
Teacher uses a variety or series of
questions or prompts to challenge students
cognitively, advance high-level thinking and
discourse, and promote metacognition.
Teacher creates a genuine discussion
among students, providing adequate time
for students to respond and stepping aside
when appropriate.
Students formulate many questions, initiate
topics, and make unsolicited contributions.
The teacher’s explanation consists of a
monologue, with no invitation to the students
for intellectual engagement.
Teacher’s spoken language is correct;
however, his or her vocabulary is limited, or
not fully appropriate to the students’ ages or
backgrounds.
Teacher’s questions are of low cognitive
challenge, require single correct responses,
and are asked in rapid succession.
Teacher’s questions lead students through a
single path of inquiry, with answers
seemingly determined in advance.
Interaction between teacher and students is
predominantly recitation style, with the
teacher mediating all questions and
answers.
Alternatively, the teacher attempts to frame
some questions designed to promote
student thinking and understanding, but only
a few students are involved.
A few students dominate the discussion.
Teacher attempts to engage all students in
the discussion and to encourage them to
respond to one another, but with uneven
results.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Students themselves ensure that all voices
are heard in the discussion.
Teacher successfully engages most
students in the discussion, employing a
range of strategies to ensure that most
students are heard.
July 24, 2013
Page 54
3c Engaging Students
in Learning
The learning tasks and activities, materials,
resources, instructional groups and
technology are poorly aligned with the
instructional outcomes or require only rote
responses.
The learning tasks and activities are partially
aligned with the instructional outcomes but
require only minimal thinking by students,
allowing most to be passive or merely
compliant.
The pace of the lesson is too slow or too
rushed.
The pacing of the lesson may not provide
students the time needed to be intellectually
engaged.
Few students are intellectually engaged or
interested.
The learning tasks and activities are aligned
with the instructional outcomes and
designed to challenge student thinking, the
result being that most students display
active intellectual engagement with
important and challenging content and are
supported in that engagement by teacher
scaffolding.
The pacing of the lesson is appropriate,
providing most students the time needed to
be intellectually engaged.
Virtually all students are intellectually
engaged in challenging content through
well-designed learning tasks and suitable
scaffolding by the teacher and fully aligned
with the instructional outcomes.
In addition, there is evidence of some
student initiation of inquiry and of student
contribution to the exploration of important
content.
The pacing of the lesson provides students
the time needed to intellectually engage with
and reflect upon their learning and to
consolidate their understanding.
Students may have some choice in how
they complete tasks and may serve as
resources for one another.
3d Using Assessment
in Instruction
There is little or no assessment or
monitoring of student learning; feedback is
absent or of poor quality.
Students do not appear to be aware of the
assessment criteria and do not engage in
self-assessment.
Assessment is used sporadically by teacher
and/or students to support instruction
through some monitoring of progress in
learning.
Feedback to students is general, students
appear to be only partially aware of the
assessment criteria used to evaluate their
work, and few assess their own work.
Questions, prompts, and assessments are
rarely used to diagnose evidence of
learning.
Assessment is used regularly by teacher
and/or students during the lesson through
monitoring of learning progress and results
in accurate, specific feedback that advances
learning.
Students appear to be aware of the
assessment criteria; some of them engage
in self-assessment.
Questions, prompts, assessments are used
to diagnose evidence of learning.
Assessment is fully integrated into
instruction through extensive use of
formative assessment.
Students appear to be aware of, and there is
some evidence that they have contributed
to, the assessment criteria.
Students self-assess and monitor their
progress.
A variety of feedback, from both their
teacher and their peers, is accurate,
specific, and advances learning.
Questions, prompts, assessments are used
regularly to diagnose evidence of learning
by individual students.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 55
3e Demonstrating Flexibility and
Responsiveness
4a Reflecting on
Teaching
4b Maintaining Accurate
Records
Teacher adheres to the instruction plan in
spite of evidence of poor student
understanding or lack of interest.
Teacher attempts to modify the lesson when
needed and to respond to student questions
and interests, with moderate success.
Teacher ignores student questions; when
students experience difficulty, the teacher
blames the students or their home
environment.
Teacher accepts responsibility for student
success but has only a limited repertoire of
strategies to draw upon.
Teacher does not know whether a lesson
was effective or achieved its instructional
outcomes, or he/she profoundly misjudges
the success of a lesson.
Teacher has a generally accurate
impression of a lesson’s effectiveness and
the extent to which instructional outcomes
were met.
Teacher has no suggestions for how a
lesson could be improved.
Teacher makes general suggestions about
how a lesson could be improved.
Teacher’s system for maintaining
information on student completion of
assignments and student progress in
learning is nonexistent or in disarray.
Teacher’s records for noninstructional
activities are in disarray, resulting in errors
and confusion.
Teacher’s system for maintaining
information on student completion of
assignments and student progress in
learning is rudimentary and only partially
effective.
Teacher promotes the successful learning of
all students, making minor adjustments as
needed to instruction plans and
accommodating student questions, needs,
and interests.
Teacher seizes an opportunity to enhance
learning, building on a spontaneous event or
student interests, or successfully adjusts
and differentiates instruction to address
individual student misunderstandings.
Drawing on a broad repertoire of strategies,
the teacher persists in seeking approaches
for students who have difficulty learning.
Teacher persists in seeking effective
approaches for students who need help,
using an extensive repertoire of instructional
strategies and soliciting additional resources
from the school or community.
Teacher makes an accurate assessment of
a lesson’s effectiveness and the extent to
which it achieved its instructional outcomes
and can cite general references to support
the judgment.
Teacher makes a thoughtful and accurate
assessment of a lesson’s effectiveness and
the extent to which it achieved its
instructional outcomes, citing many specific
examples from the lesson and weighing the
relative strengths of each.
Teacher makes a few specific suggestions
of what could be tried another time the
lesson is taught.
Teacher’s system for maintaining
information on student completion of
assignments, student progress in learning,
and noninstructional records is fully
effective.
Teacher’s records for noninstructional
activities are adequate but require frequent
monitoring to avoid errors.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Drawing on an extensive repertoire of skills,
teacher offers specific alternative actions,
complete with the probable success of
different courses of action.
Teacher’s system for maintaining
information on student completion of
assignments, student progress in learning,
and noninstructional records is fully
effective.
Students contribute information and
participate in maintaining the records.
July 24, 2013
Page 56
4c Communicating with Families
Teacher communication with families—
about the instructional program, about
individual students—is sporadic or culturally
inappropriate.
Teacher makes no attempt to engage
families in the instructional program.
4e Growing and
Developing Professionally
4d Participating in
Professional Community
Teacher’s relationships with colleagues are
negative or self-serving.
Teacher avoids participation in a
professional culture of inquiry, resisting
opportunities to become involved.
Teacher avoids becoming involved in school
events or school and district projects.
Teacher makes sporadic attempts to
communicate with families about the
instructional program and about the
progress of individual students but does not
attempt to engage families in the
instructional program. Communications are
one-way and not always appropriate to the
cultural norms of those families.
Teacher communicates frequently with
families about the instructional program and
conveys information about individual student
progress.
Teacher’s communication with families is
frequent and sensitive to cultural traditions,
with students contributing to the
communication.
Teacher makes some attempts to engage
families in the instructional program.
Response to family concerns is handled with
professional and cultural sensitivity.
Information to families is conveyed in a
culturally appropriate manner.
Teacher’s efforts to engage families in the
instructional program are frequent and
successful.
Teacher maintains cordial relationships with
colleagues to fulfill duties that the school or
district requires.
Teacher’s relationships with colleagues are
characterized by mutual support and
cooperation; teacher actively participates in
a culture of professional inquiry.
Teacher’s relationships with colleagues are
characterized by mutual support and
cooperation, with the teacher taking initiative
in assuming leadership among the faculty.
Teacher volunteers to participate in school
events and in school and district projects,
making a substantial contribution.
Teacher takes a leadership role in
promoting a culture of professional inquiry.
Teacher becomes involved in the school’s
culture of professional inquiry when invited
to do so.
Teacher participates in school events and
school and district projects when specifically
asked to do so.
Teacher volunteers to participate in school
events and district projects making a
substantial contribution, and assuming a
leadership role in at least one aspect of
school or district life.
Teacher engages in no professional
development activities to enhance
knowledge or skill.
Teacher participates in professional
activities to a limited extent when they are
convenient.
Teacher seeks out opportunities for
professional development to enhance
content knowledge and pedagogical skill.
Teacher seeks out opportunities for
professional development and makes a
systematic effort to conduct action research.
Teacher resists feedback on teaching
performance from either supervisors or
more experienced colleagues.
Teacher accepts, with some reluctance,
feedback on teaching performance from
both supervisors and colleagues.
Teacher seeks out feedback on teaching
from both supervisors and colleagues.
Teacher makes no effort to share
knowledge with others or to assume
professional responsibilities.
Teacher finds limited ways to contribute to
the profession.
Teacher welcomes feedback from
colleagues—either when made by
supervisors or when opportunities arise
through professional collaboration.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
Teacher initiates important activities to
contribute to the profession.
Teacher participates actively in assisting
other educators.
July 24, 2013
Page 57
4f Showing
Professionalism
Teacher displays dishonesty in interactions
with colleagues, students, and the public.
Teacher is honest in interactions with
colleagues, students, and the public.
Teacher is not alert to students’ needs and
contributes to school practices that result in
some students’ being ill served by the
school.
Teacher attempts, though inconsistently, to
serve students. Teacher does not knowingly
contribute to some students’ being ill served
by the school.
Teacher makes decisions and
recommendations based on self-serving
interests. Teacher does not comply with
school and district regulations.
Teacher’s decisions and recommendations
are based on limited but genuinely
professional considerations.
Teacher complies minimally with school and
district regulations, doing just enough to get
by.
Teacher displays high standards of honesty,
integrity, and confidentiality in interactions
with colleagues, students, and the public.
Teacher is active in serving students,
working to ensure that all students receive a
fair opportunity to succeed.
Teacher maintains an open mind in team or
departmental decision making.
Teacher complies fully with school and
district regulations.
Teacher takes a leadership role with
colleagues and can be counted on to hold to
the highest standards of honesty, integrity,
and confidentiality.
Teacher is highly proactive in serving
students, seeking out resources when
needed. Teacher makes a concerted effort
to challenge negative attitudes or practices
to ensure that all students, particularly those
traditionally underserved, are honored in the
school.
Teacher takes a leadership role in team or
departmental decision making and helps
ensure that such decisions are based on the
highest professional standards.
Teacher complies fully with school and
district regulations, taking a leadership role
with colleagues.
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 58
School Board Members
Mrs. Diane Smith, Chairman
Ms. Candace Lankford, Vice-Chairman
Mrs. Linda Costello
Mr. Stan Schmidt
Mrs. Ida D. Wright
Superintendent of Schools
Dr. Margaret A. Smith
Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources
Mrs. Peromnia Grant
SCHOOL DISTRICT OF VOLUSIA COUNTY
VISION STATEMENT
Through the individual commitment of all, our students will graduate
with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to be successful
contributors to our democratic society.
School Board adopted April 14, 1992
Reaffirmed January 14, 1997
VSET Handbook, 2013-2014
July 24, 2013
Page 59
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