Jackpot Math File Folder Game

Jackpot Math File Folder Game
Bemidji State University
Number Sense and Operations Activities
Summer Math Institute
Summer 2006
Grades 1 and 2
Mac Grewe
[email protected]
Eileen Spilman
[email protected]
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Table of Contents
Executive Summary of Friday Fun Activities ............................ 3
Survey of Hair and Eye Colors.................................................... 4
Tug Addition ................................................................................. 6
Step-Down Subtraction ................................................................ 8
Exchange Game: One-Dollar Exchange .................................. 10
Exchange Games: Base-10 Exchange........................................ 13
Jackpot Math .............................................................................. 16
Number Grid Game.................................................................... 19
Remainder of One....................................................................... 21
Yekttis (Yek-tees)........................................................................ 23
Animals in the Neighborhood .................................................... 31
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Executive Summary of Friday Fun Activities
The first lesson that we have chosen is to be used on the first Friday of
the school year to enable the students to get to know each other, with
the goal of creating a classroom of cooperative learners.
We have chosen a ten number of activities to be used on Fridays
throughout the school year to reinforce the lessons that have previously
been presented to our students. This will enable the students to have
additional practice as needed, and give us an additional opportunity to
see if the students have mastered the presented objectives.
Many of our activities are also games that once introduced to the class,
may be placed in the Math center for children to use during center time.
This unit addresses 6 of the 20 Minnesota Academic Standards in
Mathematics for first grade standards and 4 of the 15 Minnesota
Academic Standards in Mathematics for second grade.
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Survey of Hair and Eye Colors
Standards: 1.1.1.7 Use a variety of models and strategies to solve addition and
subtraction problems in real world and mathematical contexts.
Objective: A beginning of the year activity which will allow all students in the class to
get to know each other. Students will learn to collect data, and interpret their results
through counting and comparison skills to create and analyze tally charts. Students will
be able to predict the probability of outcomes of simple experiments and test the
predictions.
Materials: Printed activity sheet and class list for each student.
Launch: Introduce yourself to your neighbor. Do you have the same name? Do you
look the same? How are you different from your neighbor? How are you the same?
Explore: Hand out survey to each student, and give instructions. They will begin by
placing a tally mark in the appropriate space that describes him. They then interview
every other student in the class to complete their worksheet, checking off the name on the
class list as they go. After interviewing each student and recording their tally marks they
will go back to their desks and complete the worksheet.
Share: Students will discuss their results and predictions and turn in their completed
assignments. What was the most common hair color? What was the most common eye
color? Which is your favorite eye color? Do more girls have blue eyes than boys? Do
more boys than girls have brown eyes?
Summarize: Students were able to collect data by completing their survey.
The students were able to predict the probability of the eye and hair color of
the next student to walk into their classroom. The student will also have had
the opportunity to get to know everyone else in their class, including putting
a name with a student.
Citation: http:illuminations.nctm.org/LessonDetail.aspx?ID=L230
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Survey of Hair and Eye Colors
Complete this survey by interviewing all your classmates. Remember to
begin with yourself.
Hair Color
Tally Marks
Total
Black
Brown
Blond
Red
Eye Color
Tally Marks
Total
Brown
Blue
Green
Complete the following:
1. Which hair color is most common?__________
Least common?_________
2. Which eye color is most common?__________
Least common?
3. On the basis of your survey, predict the eye and hair color of the next
student to walk into our classroom.
_____________________________________________________________
4. Explain how you arrived at your prediction.
_____________________________________________________________
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Tug Addition
Standards: 1.1.1.5 Count, compare and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an
emphasis on groups of 10 and ones; use a variety of models and strategies to solve
addition and subtractions problems in real world and mathematical contexts.
Objective: Understanding estimating of two digit sums, as well as actually adding the
two digit sums and comparing estimate with answer.
Materials: Each group of 2 needs a number cube 1-6 (die), two counters and worksheet
Launch: Catch their interest by asking about their experiences (if any) of playing Tug of
War. Discuss rules of game – the object of the game is to “pull” all members of the other
team across the start line onto your side.
Explore: Divide players into teams of two, distribute worksheet, counters and die to
each group.
Players both put their playing pieces on Start. In the first move of the game, partners
each roll the number cube and move that number of spaces in opposite directions from
Start. They look at the numbers they each land on and estimate what the sum will be.
Have players write their guesses. They then add the two numbers and compare the actual
sums with their estimates. The child whose estimate is closer to the sum rolls the number
cube first on the next turn. Both children must then move their pieces in that player’s
directions on the board. (In case of a tie, the children will both shake the die and the
highest number goes first.) Play continues until one player has moved off of the board,
winning the tug addition.
Share: Discuss how the students estimates related to the actual sums, and did the
estimates become more accurate as the game proceeded? Did you enjoy the game? Was
it difficult to make an estimate? What strategies did you use to come up with your
estimated?
Summarize: The main point of this lesson was to further develop their estimating
abilities and 2 digit addition skills. It also gave the instructor the opportunity to see
which students need additional help in this area.
Citations: Creed, Margaret, Grade 2 Brain Boosting Math Activities, p. 18-19.
Scholastic Inc., 1997
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Step-Down Subtraction
Standards: 1.1.2.1 Use a variety of models and strategies to solve addition and
subtraction problems in real-world and mathematical contexts.
Objective: To help the child see the relationship between the numbers they are
subtracting and the idea of counting back by that number.
Materials: Each group of 2 students needs a worksheet, pencil and die.
Launch: Have any of you seen the movie with Meg Ryan “You Got Mail”? Where
did Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks meet on New Years Eve in N. Y. C.? Where have you
seen a staircase with many steps?
Explore: Divide the class into pairs and pass out the worksheet. Explain that partners
each start at the top of the steps. One should be X and the other O. They take turns
rolling the number cube (die) and moving down from 1 to 6 steps. On the step where
they land, they should draw an X or an O to record their own move. Then they write a
subtraction sentence for the move, beginning with 25 and taking away the number of
their first roll.
Share: When children are finished, invite them to share the sentences they wrote. Ask
them to look back at the X’s and O’s. Did they ever end up on the same step? How did
that happen? How many turns did it take for each of them to land at the bottom? If not
the same number of turns, why not?
Summarize: As the children are working, notice what strategies they use to subtract.
Listen as partners talk about the numbers they use. Do they use the steps on the sheet to
count back from a number? What patterns do they notice in the equations they write?
How do they do the computation when subtracting from 2 digit numbers? Is their
subtraction an “automatic” process when they get to basic facts, or do they use a counting
technique to determine the answers?
Citation: Creed, Margaret, Grade 2 Brain Boosting Math Activities, p. 20-21.
Scholastic Inc., 1997
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Exchange Game: One-Dollar Exchange
Standards: 1.3.2.3 Use basic concepts of measurement in real-world and
mathematical situations involving length, time and money.
Objective: Identify pennies and dimes and find the value of a group of these coins, up
to one dollar.
Materials: A player board (yellow) for each child, 1 bank board for each group, 2 dice,
realistic money (1 – 1 dollar bill, 20 dimes and 20 pennies) for each group.
Launch: How many of you have gone to the store and purchased a candy bar? What
was the cost? Did you have enough money? Did you get change back? Was the amount
of change you received the correct amount? How do you know? What are the names of
the different coins? Would you rather have one dollar bill or 100 pennies? Which is
easier to carry?
Explore: Divide group into pairs. The object of the game is to be the first player to
make an exchange for a dollar bill. The bank starts with a $1 bill, 20 dimes and 20
pennies. Players take turns. Player one rolls the die. The player takes that number of
pennies from the bank and places the pennies on the game-board. Whenever possible a
player exchanges 10 pennies for a dime. The player not rolling the dice checks the
accuracy of the transactions. The first player to make an exchange for a dollar bill wins
the game.
Share: Students will discuss their transactions, and how long it took them to get to a
dollar. What would change if we added a nickel? What would change if we added a
quarter? Would it take longer to get to a dollar using a quarter?
Summarize: Students should understand that 10 pennies equals a dime and 10 dimes
equal a dollar.
Citation: Grades 1-3 “Everyday Mathematics Family Games Kit Guide”, page 15,
Wright Group/McGraw-Hill, 2003.
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Exchange Games: Base-10 Exchange
Standards: 1.1.1.2 Count, compare and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an
emphasis on groups of tens and ones.
Objective: Reinforce the student’s understanding of our number system – that 10 ones
(cubes) is equal to 1 ten (long) and that 10 tens (longs) is equal to 1 hundred (flat).
Materials: A player board (yellow) for each child, 1 exchange board for each group, 2
dice, 1 flat, 20 longs and 20 cubes for each group.
Launch: Have you ever exchanged trading cards with a friend? Do you always
exchange one card for one card? Are some cards worth more than others? If so, how do
you make the exchanges?
Explore: Divide group into pairs. The object of the game is to be the first player to
make an exchange for a hundred (flat). The bank starts with 1 hundred (flat), 20 tens
(longs), and 20 ones (cubes). Players take turns. One player rolls the dice. The player
takes that number of cubes from the bank and places the cubes on the game-board.
Whenever possible, a player exchanges 10 cubes for 1 long. The player not rolling the
dice checks on the accuracy of the transactions. The first player to make an exchange for
a flat wins the game.
Share: Were all exchanges accurate on the first try? If you were the one checking the
accuracy and you thought there was a mistake made, were you able to explain the error
and help the other person correct the error? How many turns did it take to get a long? 2
longs? 5 longs? The flat?
Summarize: Does each student have an understanding that 10 cubes equal 1 long and
10 longs equal a flat? Reinforce the concept of base 10.
Citation: Grades 1-3 “Everyday Mathematics Family Games Kit Guide”, page 14,
Wright Group/McGraw-Hill, 2003.
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Jackpot Math
File Folder Game
Standards: 2.1.2.1. Demonstrate mastery of addition and subtraction basic facts; add
and subtract one and two digit numbers in real world and mathematical problems.
Objective: Develop and demonstrate fluency with basic addition and related
subtraction facts.
Materials: 1 file folder game board per group, 1 die and one set of math cards. You
could use any number cards you presently have, or cut 30 - 3 by 5 cards – in half, and
write the numbers 1 through 20 on the cards. You will have three cards with each
number for the set.
Launch: Discussion about playing games at home with the family. Share how often
we play games, what types, etc. Have children share about their favorite games. Lead
into the introduction of this game.
Explore: Divide group into pairs (three in a group at the most). Game board and set of
math cards divided into two separate piles are placed in front of the group. Student A
draws one card from each pile. He reads the numbers and adds them together, telling
student B the answer. Student B also adds them together, and if he determines that the
answer is correct, then student A continues his turn by shaking the die. He places his
cards on the area of the game board covering the number he shook. If it is determined that
the answer is incorrect, the cards go on the bottom of the draw pile, and his turn is
finished without shaking the die. It is then the next persons turn to draw a card from each
pile. Reversing rolls, student A now decides if the answer student B gives is correct.
Again if correct, he shakes the die and covers the number on the board that correlates to
the number on the die. If that number is already covered, his cards will be placed in the
Jackpot space. The object of the game is to cover the last number 1 through 6 on the
game board. If time permits to play a number of games, it is fun to keep track of points
for the entire game. The winner (person who covers the last number) receives all the
points for that round – one round for every card on the game board.
Share: Students will share with the class what was easy about this game, and what was
difficult about this game. What was the largest number of points any one person received
during a round? Compare answers. Can the game be completed in 6 throws of the die?
What do you like about this game? Can you think of any other ways we can use this
game other than adding the numbers on the cards together?
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Summarize: This game could be played using the same cards, and changing the
computation to subtraction. It gives the children the opportunity to develop speed and
accuracy while having fun playing the game. If several of the children in the class have
mastered their addition facts using numbers up to 20, add higher numbers to their set of
cards. Also if you have a group of children struggling with addition facts, you could
easily let them practice using numbers 1 to 10, gradually increasing the numbers they will
use.
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Number Grid Game
Standards: 1.1.1.2 Count, compare and represent whole numbers up to 120, with an
emphasis on groups of tens and ones.
Objective: Read whole numbers up to 100, including using these numbers when
adding and/or subtracting. Practice counting by 1’s and 10’s and identifying place-value
patterns.
Materials: Number chart 1 to 100, 1 die and 2 markers – for each group of two
students.
Launch: Discussion of running races, the fastest runner gets to the finish line first.
Does the same person always win the race? If someone gets ahead right at the beginning
of the race is it possible to someone else to catch up and win the race. Introduce the
game as a race to the finish.
Explore: Divide into pairs. Choose different colored markers and place your marker
above the number 1. Players take turns. For each turn, a player will roll the die. If he
rolls a 1 he may choose to move 1 space or 10 spaces. If he rolls a 2 he may choose to
move 2 spaces or 20 spaces. If he rolls a 3, 4, 5 or 6 you may only move a corresponding
number of spaces (3, 4, 5 or 6). The winner is the first player to get to 100 or past 100.
Share: Discussion of how one person was able to reach 100 before the other person.
What was the final difference between the two scores? Why was one person able to
reach 100 before the other person?
Summarize: Teacher may move among students and see which students can do this
easily and which students need extra practice. A variation would be to begin at 100, and
using subtraction, move back to 0. You could also extend the number sheet to 120, 150
or 200.
Citation: Grades 1-3 “Everyday Mathematics Family Games Kit Guide”, page 14,
Wright Group/McGraw-Hill, 2003.
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Remainder of One
Standards: 2.2.1.1. Recognize, create, describe and use patterns and rules to solve
real-world and mathematical problems.
Objective: Identify, create and describe simple number patterns involving repeated
addition or subtraction, skip counting and arrays of objects. Use patterns to solve
problems in various contexts.
Materials: Worksheet and scissors
Launch: Do you remember what Asian Beetles look like? Did they get into your
house? Ask how many Asian Beetles did you have in your house? Read book
Remainder of One.
Explore: Distribute worksheets and scissors. Cut out 25 insects carefully. Arrange
bugs on desk in as many different arrays as possible, including arrangements with a
remainder of one.
Share: Discussion with students on how many different arrays they found. Model
answers on magnetic board.
Summarize: Review how many patterns students can make with 25 insects. How
many insects were in each row? Practice counting insects by 2’s. What is your
remainder?
Citation: Pinces, Elinor J. A Remainder of One, Houghton Mifflin Co., 1995
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Yekttis (Yek-tees)
Guess My Rule with Yektti Cards
Standards: 2.3.1.1. Identify and compare basic shapes according to their geometric
attributes.
Objective: The students will identify attributes of a data set. They will work on
grouping data by similar attributes, recognizing facial features, shapes and grouping of
attributes.
Materials: Prepared set of large Yektti Picture cards (one set for class). Prepared set
of small Yektti picture cards (one set per group). Prepared set of Yektti word cards (1 set
per group).
Launch: Read “A Strange Discovery”, page 23, to introduce what Yekttis are.
Explore: Show students large Yektti cards one at a time. Discuss the attributes of each
Yektti shown on the cards and ask what is the same or different about the Yektti. Model
some of the descriptions, (this one has a square head and three antennae) etc. Ask
students to summarize the attributes they found (no nose, a mouth, no ears, different type
of eyes, etc.). Divide class into groups of 3 or 4. Describe the game “Guess my Rule”
with Yektti cards. Show word cards. One person picks out one or two Yektti word cards
and says “These Yekttis fit my rule: He then places the card(s) face down in front of
him. The other group members will take turns guessing an attribute (Does this Yektti
with a square head fit your rule?) and if not correct they will place the card face down,
and the turn moves to the next group member. When a group member guesses the rule
correctly, the person to the right chooses the next mystery rule. Every group member
should have a chance to choose a mystery rule.
Share: The students should discuss how many classifications of attributes they found.
Taking turns and giving positive feed back to each other should be modeled and
encouraged.
Summarize: The students will collaborate to guess the mystery rule of each Yekttis.
Students will identify and group data by similar attributes. Encourage students to notice
shapes, eyes and mouths which will be helpful for special needs students, especially
students with ASD, to recognize facial expressions.
Citation: Russell, Susan Jo. Sorting and Classifying Data, Does It Walk, Crawl or
Swim? Grade 2 p. 23-25. Dale Seymour Pub. 1998.
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square
hexagon
triangle
diamond
plain eyes
Ringed eyes
1 antenna
2 antennae
3 antennae
4 antennae
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Animals in the Neighborhood
Standards: 2.2.1.1 Recognize, create, describe and use patterns and rules to solve realworld and mathematical problems.
Objective: Students will construct categories to describe data. Students will articulate
clear definitions of categories. Students will organize categorical data.
Materials: Sticky notes or index cards, chart paper, large sheets of paper, crayons or
markers and 2 student worksheets.
Launch: Read Splash aloud. Make a list of the animals in the backyard and count the
animals.
Explore: Today we will be collecting data by thinking about what we already know
about the animals that live in our neighborhood. Think back to when you have walked
around your neighborhood. What animals have you seen that live around you? Some
animals are easy to see and some animals are hard to see. What animals do you see in the
winter? What animals do you see in the summer? What animals are easy to see? What
animals hide or are very tiny and you have to look carefully to find? List all the animals
that the children have named. There may be some animals students have seen whose
names they don’t know. Find some way to identify them – maybe other students know
what they are, or make up a name for them (silver bathtub bug, little yellow bird).
After creating list, then talk about how animals move differently. As a class make a list
of the different ways animals move (walk, fly, crawl, swim, hop, etc.). Today we are
going to divide our list of animals by how they move.
Separate students into groups of 4 or 5. Each group will make a chart showing how
animals move. They may decide which categories of movement they will use on their
chart, utilizing the class list of movements, or changing and adding some of their own
ideas. Provide each group with sticky notes or index cards so each animal may be written
down separately.
Each group also needs a large sheet of paper on which to record their groupings. Let
students experiment with different arrangements for their categories. Encourage students
to sort the animals in whatever ways make sense to them and to articulate why they are
putting certain animals into certain categories. It’s important that students discuss their
reasoning with one another. Students may not always agree, but they should be
encouraged to resolve differences by clarifying the definitions of their categories.
Hand out student sheet 7 and 8. Complete as homework that needs to be returned the
following day.
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Share: Students will present their findings to the class by sharing their large paper
showing animal lists, and explaining how and why they did their charts.
Summarize: Students were able to organize categorical data as a small group,
working cooperatively to describe their data. Students were able to articulate clear
definitions of categories during their presentations.
Citation: Russell, Susan Jo. Sorting and Classifying Data, Does It Walk, Crawl or
Swim? Grade 2 p. 58-65. Dell Seymour Pub. 1998.
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Name_____________________________________
Animals in the Neighborhood
1. What question did you answer about the animals in your
neighborhood?
2. What categories did you use to sort your data?
3. Draw a picture of the representation you made of your data.
4. What are three interesting things you noticed about your data?
Write them on the back of this paper.
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Name_________________________________
Animals near My Home
Look carefully in, around, and near your home for any kind of animal.
The animal may be the tiniest bug or a large, furry creature! Draw or
write about your findings.
What category or categories might this animal fit? If you see more than
one animal, what different categories might they fit? You may use the
back of this sheet.
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