Injury Prevention Resources - Cincinnati Children`s Hospital

Injury Prevention Resources - Cincinnati Children`s Hospital
Injury Prevention
Resources
Please contact your Physician Service Representative for additional copies.
Visit http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/ps-toolkit for additional resources and
information.
Table of Contents
Under 1 year

Playground Safety
Pedestrian Safety

Car Seat Safety


Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks

Gun Safety

Fall Prevention: Window Falls

Sports Safety

Sleep and Crib Safety

Toy Safety and Injury Prevention

Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety
Ages 10-14

Fire and Burn Prevention

Second Hand Smoke Dangers

Choosing Safe Infant Products

Car Seat Safety

Swallowing Hazards

All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety

Safety in Sun and Heat

Fire and Burn Prevention

Water and Pool Safety
Ages 1-4

Second Hand Smoke Dangers

Water and Pool Safety
Bike and Wheeled Safety

Car Seat Safety


Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks

Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection

Fall Prevention: Window Falls

Playground Safety

Toy Safety and Injury Prevention

Pedestrian Safety

Fire and Burn Prevention

Gun Safety

Second Hand Smoke Dangers

Sports Safety

Choosing Safe Infant Products

Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety

Swallowing Hazards

Safety in Sun and Heat

Water and Pool Safety

Teen Driving Tips

Bike and Wheeled Safety

All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety

Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection

Fire and Burn Prevention

Playground Safety

Second Hand Smoke Dangers

Pedestrian Safety
Ages 5-9

Gun Safety

Sports Safety
Water and Pool Safety
Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety

Lawn Mower Safety
Ages 15-18

Car Seat Safety


Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks


Lawn Mower Safety
Miscellaneous

Fire and Burn Prevention

Second Hand Smoke Dangers

Water and Pool Safety

Fireworks Safety

Bike and Wheeled Safety

Halloween Safety

Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection

Winter Safety Tips
Under 1 Year
Car Seat Safety
Less than 1 year old
The American Academy of Pediatrics
Using a Car Seat
recommends children remain rear-facing

Always use the seat rear-facing only.
until 2 years old or until they reach the

A child should remain rear facing until they
reach a minimum of 1 year AND 20 pounds.
Check your state’s law.

The baby should always ride in the back seat
of the car. If your child must ride in the front
seat, make sure the air bag is turned off.

Rear-facing harnesses should be at or below
the shoulders. The chest clip should be at
armpit level or across the nipple line.

The harness should be snug around the child.
Make sure you buckle around the legs first.

Child’s head needs to be 1 inch below the top
of the seat.
highest weight and height limit for their
child restraint (car seat).
Choosing a Car Seat
Infant

An infant seat usually has a base that you can leave
attached in the car and a seat with a carrying handle. A
child can use this seat beginning around 4-5 pounds.

Please check the label on the side of the seat to see
what the weight limit is for your particular seat. Many
seats are rear-facing until 22-35 pounds.

Once your child weighs more than the limit of the seat,
or when their head gets closer than 1 inch to the top of
the seat, it is time to move them into the next seat.
Proper Installation is Key

Before installing the seat, read both your car
and the car seat’s instruction manuals to make
sure the seat is installed properly.

Make sure to use either the latch system or the
seat belt, NEVER BOTH!

Make sure your child’s car seat is checked by a
certified seat technician!

To find a fitting station near you, call your local
fire or police station or visit www.nhtsa.gov
Convertible

Many convertible seats are great for infants because
they can be used beginning at 5 pounds.

Convertible car seats go both rear and forward facing
in the car and can typically be longer an infant seat.

This seat is installed in the car and does not allow you
to carry the child in the seat.
Other Helpful Tips

Never purchase a used car seat!

Never use anything with the car seat that was
not originally sold with the seat. When car
seats are tested for safety, they are crashtested with only the products that come with
the seat.
For more information, please contact Trauma
Services at 513-636-7865
10/12
Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks
By Appointment Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Children’s Hospital Medical Center
(513) 636-7865
Amberley Village Police and Fire Department
(513) 531-2040
Anderson Township Fire & Rescue
(513) 688-8093 OR (513) 688-8400
Blue Ash Fire Department
(513) 745-8533
Central Joint Fire-EMS District
(513) 732-3876
Cheviot Fire and Police Department
(513) 661-2700
City of Cincinnati Fire Department
(513) 357-7585
City of Ft. Wright
(859) 331-1700
Colerain Township Department of Fire & EMS
(513) 245-6505
Crescent Springs/Villa Hills Fire Department
(859) 341-3840
Deerfield Township Fire Department
(513) 678-2292
Delhi Township Fire Department
(513) 922-2011
Elmwood Place Fire Department
(513) 242-0790
Fairfield Township Fire Department
(513) 887-4402 ext 51
City of Fairfield Fire Department
(513) 867-5379
Florence Fire Department
(859) 647-5660
Forest Park Fire Department
(513) 595-5243
Ft. Mitchell Fire Department
(859) 331-1267
Green Township Fire Department
(513) 574-0474
Hamilton Township Fire Department
(513) 683-1622
Harrison Fire Department
(513) 367-4194
Hebron Fire Protective Services
(859) 586-9009
23. Lakeside/Crestview Hills Police Dept
(859) 331-5368
24. Liberty Township Fire Department
(513) 759-7530
25. Little Miami Joint Fire and Rescue
(513) 271-3636
26. Madeira/ Indian Hill Joint Fire Department
(513) 271-2669
27. Mariemont Fire Department
(513) 271-4089
28. Miami Township Fire Department (Clermont)
(513) 248-3709
29. Milford Fire Department
(513) 831-7777
30. Monroe Township Fire Department
(513) 734-0847 or (513) 734-4151
31. Montgomery Fire Department
(513) 985-1633
32. Newport Fire Department
(859) 292-3616
33. Norwood Health Department
(513) 458-4600
34. Pierce Township Fire Department
(513) 752-6273
35. Ross Township Fire Department
(513) 863-3410
36. Sharonville Fire Department
(513) 563-0252
37. Springdale Fire Department
(513) 346-5580
38. Sycamore Township Fire Department
(513) 792-8565
39. Taylor Mill Fire Department
(859) 581-6565
40. Union Emergency Services (KY)
(859) 384-3342 Option 2
41. Union Township Fire Dept. (Clermont)
(513) 528-4446
42. Walton Fire Protection District
(859) 485-7439
43. West Chester Fire Department
(513) 777-1133
10/12
Fall Prevention
Window Falls
Each year in the United States, 15 to 20 children under the age of 11 die, and nearly 15,000 are injured, because of falls
from windows. Window falls tend to occur in low-income neighborhoods with deteriorating housing, unsatisfactory window
construction and no air conditioning.
"Window falls are a major cause of injuries and death in children, especially those living in urban areas," says Wendy
Pomerantz, MD, an Emergency Medicine physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
Children living in apartment buildings fall from windows at five times the rate of children living in other types of homes. The
height of the fall, rate of the fall, force of impact and surface on which the child falls influence the severity of injuries. The
greater the height of the fall, the higher the death rate.
Tips for Preventing Falls





Never put a baby’s crib next to a window.
Never depend on screens to keep children from
falling out of windows. Screens are not designed
to prevent falls.
Safeguard windows with window guards or
window stops. Window guards prevent children
from falling out of open windows. Window stops
prevent windows from opening more than a few
inches.
Children are constantly moving and should
always be supervised to make sure they stay
safe.
It is important to always watch and keep an eye
on your child. Turning your head for just a
second is enough time for your child to fall and
injure themselves.




Never leave your child alone on any high
surface, such as:
o Changing table
o Bed
o Couch or sofa
o Chair
If you need to do something and can’t hold your
child, place them in a crib or playpen until you
are done.
If your home has stairs, install gates at both the
top and bottom of the staircases.
o Gates at the top of the stairs should bolt
into the wall for extra safety.
Do not use a baby walker. They can fall or tip
over and could seriously injure your child.
If Your Child Has a Fall
If your child does have a fall and is not acting normal, please seek medical care and call your child’s medical provider right
away.
09/12
Sleep and Crib Safety
The way your baby sleeps is important for their safety. Sudden infant
death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden and unexplained death of an
infant. It is the major cause of death in babies from 1 month to 1 year
of age.
Ways to Prevent SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)
o
o
o
o
o

Always place baby on back to sleep
Avoid smoking around infant
Avoid overheating
Use a firm, tight-fitting mattress in a crib that meets current safety standards
Do not use bumper pads
Never place your child on a water bed, bean bag or any kind of furniture that is soft. Your baby’s nose or mouth may
become blocked and he/she may suffocate.

Avoid putting your baby in bed with you. Unlike cribs, which are designed to meet safety standards for babies, adult
beds are not designed for a baby and may trap him/her and cause suffocation. Room-sharing, but not bed-sharing,
is recommended.
NEW Crib regulations
o
o
o
o
Cribs with drop sides are no longer sold due to their safety hazards.
Cribs sold in stores today must meet the new regulations.
The crib slats should be no more than 2 3/8” apart.

A soda can should not be able to fit between the slats.
Make sure the mattress fits securely against the bed rails, with no gaps.

Do not buy or accept a second-hand crib without checking to make sure it hasn’t been recalled.

It is important not to put any blankets, pillows or stuffed animals in your child’s crib to protect them from suffocating or
choking.

Never place a crib near window blind cords or draperies. Children can get caught in the cords and strangle.
09/12
Fire and Burn Prevention
Fire Prevention

Install a smoke detector on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas.
o Test the smoke detector once a month to make sure it is still working.
o Change the batteries every year (or unless the directions say otherwise).

Carbon monoxide detectors are also important to have installed in your family’s home.
o Carbon monoxide gas is released from gas appliances that may not be functioning properly.
o These detectors find the colorless and odorless carbon monoxide gas which can be deadly.

Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children.

Check your furnace or heating system each year to make sure it is working properly.

Check electrical appliances and cords regularly for damage or worn wires.

Have a fire extinguisher in your home, especially near the kitchen, furnace or fireplace in case of an emergency.

Create a fire escape plan for your house. Have your family practice what to do in case of a fire.
o Know two ways out of each room.
o Have a meeting spot outside.
o Call the fire department once outside.
Burn Prevention

Never carry your child with hot liquids in your hand or drink hot liquids while holding a child in your lap. Young
children tend to grab at things so put down your child before picking up something hot.

Turn the handles of pots toward the rear of the stove when cooking on the front burners.

Never leave a hot iron unattended. A child can easily pull on the cord and get burned.

Check the temperature of your home’s water heater. It should be less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you
and your family from getting burned.

If your child gets burned, put the burned area in cold water right away.
o Cover the area loosely with a clean cloth and call your child’s healthcare provider right away.
09/12
Second Hand Smoke Dangers
Second hand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by
the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar, and the smoke
exhaled from the lungs of smokers.
Second hand smoke is harmful to your children

Adults breathe in and out 14 to 18 times per minute.

A newborn baby breathes up to 60 times per minute.

When there is cigarette smoke in the air, children get more toxins in their lungs than adults.

Young children depend on adults to keep their surroundings safe. They need you to keep their air smoke-free.

Children who spend one hour in a very smoky room breathe in the toxic chemicals equal to smoking 10 cigarettes.

Infants in smoking households have more middle ear infections because the smoke irritates the tube leading to
the ear.
Other Important Facts
While you are trying to quit, here are some tips to keep your child safe from second hand smoke:

Do not smoke while holding a child.

Do not smoke in your home or car. The chemicals from smoking stay in your walls, furniture and even your child’s
toys and can stay in the air for several weeks.

If you must smoke, do it outdoors away from your child.

Seat your family in the non-smoking areas of restaurants and other public places.
The Effects of Smoking

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of having a premature baby and/or a baby with low birth weight.

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) increases up to four times for babies with mothers who
smoke, or smoked when they were pregnant.

Researchers have found that children exposed to second hand smoke every day are three times more likely to
develop lung cancer.

Children exposed to second hand smoke have smaller lungs and decreased lung function.
Thoughts about Quitting Smoking

It is not easy to quit smoking. Trying to do it alone can make it even harder.

Talk to your healthcare professional to find support.

The health benefits of quitting are great for both you and your child.

Find support in your attempt to quit smoking.
09/12
Choosing Safe Infant Products
Changing Tables
•
Many injuries result from babies falling off
changing tables onto the floor. Make sure the
table has safety straps and always use them
when changing your baby.
•
Never leave your baby unattended on a
changing table.
Pacifiers
Crib Safety
•
Secure and tighten all hardware/pieces.
•
Crib mattress should fit tightly.
•
Do not put pillows in the crib with your baby.
•
To help prevent SIDS, place babies on their
back or side on a firm crib mattress.
•
Do not place the crib near a window with
drapes/blinds. Your baby could get tangled in
the cords which could cause strangulation.
•
Remove all toys and objects from the crib
before leaving your infant.
•
Do not put your infant to sleep in a parent’s
bed due to suffocation risk.
Carrier Seats
•
Always use safety belts/straps.
•
Never leave an infant unattended.
•
•
•
•
Do not hang a pacifier around your child’s neck.
Clip the pacifier to your child’s clothing.
•
Check pacifiers often for tears, holes, rips and
small changes in texture. Throw away any
pacifier that is damaged.
Strollers and Carriages
•
Never leave a child alone in a stroller. They
could slip and become caught in the leg
opening.
•
Make sure the brake is easy to get to and easy
to operate.
•
Never use a blanket or pillow as a cushion in a
stroller. These objects may create a risk of
suffocation.
•
Always secure the seat belt.
•
Check to make sure the seat is snug and
comfortable, yet strong and durable.
•
Never allow children to play with or around the
stroller. It is not a toy.
Bassinets and Cradles
•
Never place a carrier seat on soft surfaces the seat may flip over.
If you are buying a bassinet or cradle, make
sure it has a sturdy, wide base. Make sure the
spaces between the spindles are small.
•
Place non-slip feet on carrier if there are none
present.
Check screws and bolts to make sure they are
tight.
•
A carrier seat should not be used as car/safety
seat unless it is specifically labeled as one.
Never use pillows for padding. Use a firm
mattress pad that fits smooth and snug.
•
If you have a swinging cradle, make sure there
is a way to manually stop the swing once the
baby is asleep.
•
Follow the manufacturer guidelines to make
sure the cradle is okay to use based on your
baby’s height and weight.
10/12
Choosing Safe Infant Products
(continued)
Baby Gates
Pack n’ Play/Playpens
Baby gates help prevent children from falling down
stairs and keep them away from open, unsafe areas.
However, the gates themselves can be dangerous. It is
important to keep these safety tips in mind when looking
at baby gates:
Deaths have occurred mostly when the sides of the
Pack n’ Play/playpens have been left in the open
position, and have closed in and collapsed on the child.
To prevent anything like this from happening to your
child you should:
•
Do not use accordion-style expandable
enclosures with V-shaped or diamond
openings. Babies can get their heads trapped
between one of the wide openings if they try to
crawl through or over the gates.
•
Choose a gate with straight top edges and
small holes and/or openings.
•
Remove all toys and large objects because the
child can use these to climb out. • Beware of
playpens that have rotating latches in the
center of the top rails. Those latches can come
loose and cause the rails to collapse and the
sides to come down on the child.
•
If using a playpen, don’t leave the drop-side
down while the child is in the playpen. The
child may roll over into the side pocket and
suffocate on the mesh side.
•
If you are buying a new Pack n’ Play, make
sure the top rails lock automatically in the
normal use position. Look for mesh netting with
very tiny weave.
•
Do not place any objects on top or across the
Pack n’ Play/ playpen that could possibly
cause strangulation.
High Chairs
Here are some safety tips that can help prevent
accidents:
•
Make sure to use restraining straps provided
with the chair. Straps should be snug.
•
Do not let your child stand up in a high chair.
•
Keep children from running around or leaning
on the high chair to prevent the chair from
falling over.
•
Do not leave your child unattended while in the
high chair.
Toy Chests
The biggest cause of injury or death with toy chests is
when the top of the chest falls on the child’s head or
neck. Children may also crawl into the chest space to
hide or sleep and end up suffocating because of the
lack of ventilation. To prevent injuries or deaths from
happening:
•
If you already own a toy chest, remove the lid.
If you are buying one, look for a chest with a
detachable lid. If you cannot do that, purchase
a lid support device that holds the chest in its
open position, such as a spring-loaded support.
•
Make sure that the lid of the chest does not
have a latch.
•
Look for a chest that has holes for ventilation
that cannot be blocked by items in the chest.
10/12
Swallowing Hazards
How to Keep Kids Safe
Choking
Children aged 1-3 are at the highest risk for choking/ingestions. Talk with your doctor about the steps you need to know if
your child begins choking.
Here are some tips:

Do not allow your child to play with small objects including, nuts, coins and
beads. These objects are easily swallowed and can cause a child to choke.
o
You can test your child’s toys by putting them through a toilet paper roll
tube. If it fits, then it can easily fit in your child’s throat and they can
choke or possibly swallow it.

When feeding your child, make sure to cut up each food into small thin pieces to
prevent choking.

Keep both plastic wrappers and bags away from your child. These things can cause a child to suffocate if they
are able to put them over their nose and mouth.
Poison Prevention
Always keep the number of the local Poison Control Center near a telephone in case of an emergency. The Poison
Control Center is a great resource if you have a question about something your child swallowed. They will walk you
through what to do if your child swallows something potentially harmful
1-800-222-1222
Medication Safety

Before giving your child any type of medicine, always double check the dose to
make sure it is the correct amount.

Keep all medicine stored out of reach and in a locked cabinet or drawer to
prevent any accidental ingestions.

Never confuse your child by calling medicine ‘candy’.

Keep products in their original containers.

Always read the label before using any product.
IMPORTANT TIP: Grandparents and other family member’s medicine can also be
harmful. Make sure all visitors keep any medicine they have out of reach, too!
09/12
Safety in Sun and Heat
Follow these safety tips for outdoor activities under the sun:
•
If your child begins to get sick or queasy from the heat, have him /
her lie down in a cool, shady spot and give fluids. If this doesn't help,
seek medical assistance.
•
Children need constant fluids to avoid heat stress. Water is ideal, but lemonade, fruit juices, snow cones and
popsicles also are good choices.
•
Avoid caffeinated drinks. Caffeine is a diuretic, which causes a person to urinate the water he / she should be
retaining.
•
Protect babies and children’s skin from sunburns. Most of our sun exposure happens before we turn 18 years
old and may contribute to the risk of developing cancer later in life.
Tips for children younger than 1:
•
Babies under 6 months of age should be kept out of direct sunlight.
•
Dress your baby in comfortable lightweight clothing that covers their entire body.
•
If your baby gets a sunburn, contact your healthcare provider immediately.
•
Sunscreen can be applied if you cannot keep them covered or in the shade.
•
Before using sunscreen, apply a small amount to limited area and watch for any reaction.
Tips for kids older than 1 year old:
•
Choose sunscreen specifically made for children, preferably waterproof.
•
If a rash develops, contact your child’s healthcare provider.
•
Dress your child in clothing made of tightly woven fabrics.
•
Sunglasses with UV protection are also a great idea to protect your child’s eyes from the sun.
More Sun Safety tips:
•
Avoid going out in the sun when the sun is the strongest: between 10 am and 4pm.
•
Use sunscreen even on a cloudy day. The sun’s rays can still get through clouds.
•
Look for sunscreen that will protect against both UVB and UVA rays for the best protection.
•
Sunscreen should be reapplied often for the best protection.
•
Use a SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15.
•
Put on sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going outdoors—it needs time to work on the skin.
•
If you child develops a sunburn, keep them out of the sun until the burn completely heals.
09/12
Water and Pool Safety
Infants (less than 1 year old)
If children are around bodies of water on a regular basis, it benefits parents to learn
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which, in case of an emergency, can save lives, reduce
the severity of injury, and improve the chance of survival.
CPR training is available through the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association.
Never leave your child alone in or near any water (including a bath tub, swimming pool, toilet, etc). Supervision is key to
preventing an injury in or near water.
Most infant drowning occurs in bathtubs.
•
Infants can drown in just one inch of water.
•
Keep the door to the bathroom closed to prevent your child from getting injured. Install a lock on the bathroom
door and install childproof devices to keep your child out of the bathroom (such as doorknob covers).
•
NEVER leave a young child alone in the bathtub, not even for a minute. Even supportive bathtub “rings” cannot
keep your child from drowning.
•
Empty any buckets or other containers with liquids.
•
Keep toilets closed and/or use childproof toilet locks.
**Recommendation: Turn down your hot water heater’s thermometer to 120 degrees F or less to prevent burns.**
Pool Safety
Always supervise your child closely in or near a swimming pool. NEVER leave a small child lone in or near a pool, even
for a moment.
•
Consider not installing a pool at your home until your child is at least 5 years old.
•
If your home has a swimming pool, it is recommended that you install 4-sided fencing around it.
o
This has been determined to be the best protection against injuries in pools.
o
Make sure to always lock up the pool after use.
•
Remove all toys from around the pool so your child is not tempted to reach for them.
•
Always empty blow up pools after each use, and put them away.
•
Keep a telephone near the poolside for emergency use.
•
Start thinking about enrolling your child in swimming lessons. It’s never too early to start thinking about your
child’s safety.
09/12
Ages 1-4
Car Seat Safety
Ages 1-4

Check your manufacturers’ instructions for
weight and height requirements.
Using a Car Seat
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children
remain rear-facing until 2 years old or until they reach the
highest weight and height limit for their child restraint (car seat).
Choosing a Car Seat
Convertible


Convertible car seats go both rear and forward facing
in the car and usually can be used to a higher weight
limit than an infant seat.
This seat helps to keep a child rear-facing longer and
can be used to a weight limit around 40-80 pounds,
depending on the brand.
Combination

Forward facing only.

This seat has a 5-point harness that can be used up to
a certain weight limit (40-65 pounds)

Once the child reaches the upper weight limit of the
harness, they can then begin to use the seat as a
booster seat. The seat is then used with a lap or
shoulder seat belt.

Check the manufacturers’ instructions for weight and
height requirements.

Remind your child to NEVER put the shoulder
part of the belt behind them. This will not keep
them safe if they are in a car crash.

The harness should be at or just above the
shoulders.

The retainer clip, or chest clip, should be at
armpit level or across the nipple line.

The harness should be snug around the child.
Make sure you buckle around the legs first.
Proper Installation is Key

Before installing the seat, read both your car
and the car seat’s instruction manuals to make
sure the seat is installed properly.

Make sure to use either the latch system or the
seat belt, NEVER BOTH!

Make sure your child’s car seat is checked by a
certified seat technician!

To find a fitting station near you, call your local
fire or police station or visit www.nhtsa.gov
Other Helpful Tips

Never purchase a used car seat!

Never use anything with the car seat that was
not originally sold with the seat. When car
seats are tested for safety, they are crashtested with only the products that come with
the seat

Check your state’s booster seat laws to make
sure you are following the law!
For more information, please contact Trauma
Services at 513-636-7865
Booster Seats

Booster seats are typically used for children aged 4
years up to 8 years of age. They can be used from 40
pounds to 80-120 pounds and the height of 4’9”

They boost the child up to help the car’s seat belt fit
better.
10/12
Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks
By Appointment Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Children’s Hospital Medical Center
(513) 636-7865
Amberley Village Police and Fire Department
(513) 531-2040
Anderson Township Fire & Rescue
(513) 688-8093 OR (513) 688-8400
Blue Ash Fire Department
(513) 745-8533
Central Joint Fire-EMS District
(513) 732-3876
Cheviot Fire and Police Department
(513) 661-2700
City of Cincinnati Fire Department
(513) 357-7585
City of Ft. Wright
(859) 331-1700
Colerain Township Department of Fire & EMS
(513) 245-6505
Crescent Springs/Villa Hills Fire Department
(859) 341-3840
Deerfield Township Fire Department
(513) 678-2292
Delhi Township Fire Department
(513) 922-2011
Elmwood Place Fire Department
(513) 242-0790
Fairfield Township Fire Department
(513) 887-4402 ext 51
City of Fairfield Fire Department
(513) 867-5379
Florence Fire Department
(859) 647-5660
Forest Park Fire Department
(513) 595-5243
Ft. Mitchell Fire Department
(859) 331-1267
Green Township Fire Department
(513) 574-0474
Hamilton Township Fire Department
(513) 683-1622
Harrison Fire Department
(513) 367-4194
Hebron Fire Protective Services
(859) 586-9009
23. Lakeside/Crestview Hills Police Dept
(859) 331-5368
24. Liberty Township Fire Department
(513) 759-7530
25. Little Miami Joint Fire and Rescue
(513) 271-3636
26. Madeira/ Indian Hill Joint Fire Department
(513) 271-2669
27. Mariemont Fire Department
(513) 271-4089
28. Miami Township Fire Department (Clermont)
(513) 248-3709
29. Milford Fire Department
(513) 831-7777
30. Monroe Township Fire Department
(513) 734-0847 or (513) 734-4151
31. Montgomery Fire Department
(513) 985-1633
32. Newport Fire Department
(859) 292-3616
33. Norwood Health Department
(513) 458-4600
34. Pierce Township Fire Department
(513) 752-6273
35. Ross Township Fire Department
(513) 863-3410
36. Sharonville Fire Department
(513) 563-0252
37. Springdale Fire Department
(513) 346-5580
38. Sycamore Township Fire Department
(513) 792-8565
39. Taylor Mill Fire Department
(859) 581-6565
40. Union Emergency Services (KY)
(859) 384-3342 Option 2
41. Union Township Fire Dept. (Clermont)
(513) 528-4446
42. Walton Fire Protection District
(859) 485-7439
43. West Chester Fire Department
(513) 777-1133
10/12
Fall Prevention
Window Falls
Each year in the United States, 15 to 20 children under the age of 11 die, and nearly 15,000 are injured, because of falls
from windows. Window falls tend to occur in low-income neighborhoods with deteriorating housing, unsatisfactory window
construction and no air conditioning.
"Window falls are a major cause of injuries and death in children, especially those living in urban areas," says Wendy
Pomerantz, MD, an Emergency Medicine physician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
Children living in apartment buildings fall from windows at five times the rate of children living in other types of homes. The
height of the fall, rate of the fall, force of impact and surface on which the child falls influence the severity of injuries. The
greater the height of the fall, the higher the death rate.
Tips for Preventing Falls





Never put a baby’s crib next to a window.
Never depend on screens to keep children from
falling out of windows. Screens are not designed
to prevent falls.
Safeguard windows with window guards or
window stops. Window guards prevent children
from falling out of open windows. Window stops
prevent windows from opening more than a few
inches.
Children are constantly moving and should
always be supervised to make sure they stay
safe.
It is important to always watch and keep an eye
on your child. Turning your head for just a
second is enough time for your child to fall and
injure themselves.




Never leave your child alone on any high
surface, such as:
o Changing table
o Bed
o Couch or sofa
o Chair
If you need to do something and can’t hold your
child, place them in a crib or playpen until you
are done.
If your home has stairs, install gates at both the
top and bottom of the staircases.
o Gates at the top of the stairs should bolt
into the wall for extra safety.
Do not use a baby walker. They can fall or tip
over and could seriously injure your child.
If Your Child Has a Fall
If your child does have a fall and is not acting normal, please seek medical care and call your child’s medical provider right
away.
09/12
Toy Safety and Injury Prevention





Billions of toys for children of all ages are sold each year
in the US. Unfortunately, toys also are linked with
thousands of injuries each year, some of which result in
death. Children ages 4 and under are especially at risk
for injury from toys. Injuries can range from falling,
choking, strangulation, burning, drowning and even
poisoning. However, the leading cause of toy-related
death is choking, usually on latex balloons.
Injury often results when a toy is misused or used by
children who are too young for that particular toy. Toys
with small parts, designed for older children, can cause
choking when a small child puts this toy in his/her mouth.
Knowing what dangers are linked with certain toys and
age groups can help you better protect your child from
toy injuries.
Toy Recommendations



Choose toys that are age-appropriate and
meet your child's skill level and interest (read
the toy's labeling).
Use mylar balloons instead of latex balloons
because of the danger of suffocation. Children
under the age of eight should not be allowed to
play with uninflated latex balloons.
Strings, straps and cords on any toy should be
less than 7 inches long to prevent
strangulation. Remove crib mobiles when your




infant is able to pull up on his or her hands and
knees (usually about 5 months old).
Children under 16 years of age should not use
high-velocity BB or pellet guns.
Children should be watched closely when
playing with cap guns. They may cause burns
as well as noise damage if they are fired closer
than one foot to the ear.
Check toys regularly for damage and other
hazards.
Be involved in your child's play.
Store toys intended for older children
separately from toys used by younger children.
Use a small parts tester to find which small
toys or parts are choking hazards to children
under age 3. If an object fits into the tester, it is
unsafe. If you do not own a small parts tester,
use the cardboard tube from inside a roll of
paper towels or bathroom tissue; if an object is
able to fit inside the tube, it is a choking hazard
and not suitable for young children.
Make sure toys are used in safe environments.
Keep riding toys away from stairs and bodies
of water.
Children should always wear helmets when
roller skating or using ride-on toys such as
bicycles, tricycles, scooters and skateboards.
Throw away packing materials from new toys
right away. Plastic bags, foam peanuts,
staples, nails and wire ties are all safety
hazards.
Stay up-to-date on toy recalls through the US Consumer
Product Safety Commission or through the US
Government's online recall page. Supervising your
child's play, in addition to following the
recommendations made by toy manufacturers could
save lives.
Contact Us
For additional information, please call the Family
Resource Center, 513-636-7606, or your healthcare
provider.
09/12
Fire and Burn Prevention
Fire Prevention

Install a smoke detector on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas.
o Test the smoke detector once a month to make sure it is still working.
o Change the batteries every year (or unless the directions say otherwise).

Carbon monoxide detectors are also important to have installed in your family’s home.
o Carbon monoxide gas is released from gas appliances that may not be functioning properly.
o These detectors find the colorless and odorless carbon monoxide gas which can be deadly.

Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children.

Check your furnace or heating system each year to make sure it is working properly.

Check electrical appliances and cords regularly for damage or worn wires.

Have a fire extinguisher in your home, especially near the kitchen, furnace or fireplace in case of an emergency.

Create a fire escape plan for your house. Have your family practice what to do in case of a fire.
o Know two ways out of each room.
o Have a meeting spot outside.
o Call the fire department once outside.
Burn Prevention

Never carry your child with hot liquids in your hand or drink hot liquids while holding a child in your lap. Young
children tend to grab at things so put down your child before picking up something hot.

Turn the handles of pots toward the rear of the stove when cooking on the front burners.

Never leave a hot iron unattended. A child can easily pull on the cord and get burned.

Check the temperature of your home’s water heater. It should be less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you
and your family from getting burned.

If your child gets burned, put the burned area in cold water right away.
o Cover the area loosely with a clean cloth and call your child’s healthcare provider right away.
09/12
Second Hand Smoke Dangers
Second hand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by
the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar, and the smoke
exhaled from the lungs of smokers.
Second hand smoke is harmful to your children

Adults breathe in and out 14 to 18 times per minute.

A newborn baby breathes up to 60 times per minute.

When there is cigarette smoke in the air, children get more toxins in their lungs than adults.

Young children depend on adults to keep their surroundings safe. They need you to keep their air smoke-free.

Children who spend one hour in a very smoky room breathe in the toxic chemicals equal to smoking 10 cigarettes.

Infants in smoking households have more middle ear infections because the smoke irritates the tube leading to
the ear.
Other Important Facts
While you are trying to quit, here are some tips to keep your child safe from second hand smoke:

Do not smoke while holding a child.

Do not smoke in your home or car. The chemicals from smoking stay in your walls, furniture and even your child’s
toys and can stay in the air for several weeks.

If you must smoke, do it outdoors away from your child.

Seat your family in the non-smoking areas of restaurants and other public places.
The Effects of Smoking

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of having a premature baby and/or a baby with low birth weight.

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) increases up to four times for babies with mothers who
smoke, or smoked when they were pregnant.

Researchers have found that children exposed to second hand smoke every day are three times more likely to
develop lung cancer.

Children exposed to second hand smoke have smaller lungs and decreased lung function.
Thoughts about Quitting Smoking

It is not easy to quit smoking. Trying to do it alone can make it even harder.

Talk to your healthcare professional to find support.

The health benefits of quitting are great for both you and your child.

Find support in your attempt to quit smoking.
09/12
Choosing Safe Infant Products
Changing Tables
•
Many injuries result from babies falling off
changing tables onto the floor. Make sure the
table has safety straps and always use them
when changing your baby.
•
Never leave your baby unattended on a
changing table.
Pacifiers
Crib Safety
•
Secure and tighten all hardware/pieces.
•
Crib mattress should fit tightly.
•
Do not put pillows in the crib with your baby.
•
To help prevent SIDS, place babies on their
back or side on a firm crib mattress.
•
Do not place the crib near a window with
drapes/blinds. Your baby could get tangled in
the cords which could cause strangulation.
•
Remove all toys and objects from the crib
before leaving your infant.
•
Do not put your infant to sleep in a parent’s
bed due to suffocation risk.
Carrier Seats
•
Always use safety belts/straps.
•
Never leave an infant unattended.
•
•
•
•
Do not hang a pacifier around your child’s neck.
Clip the pacifier to your child’s clothing.
•
Check pacifiers often for tears, holes, rips and
small changes in texture. Throw away any
pacifier that is damaged.
Strollers and Carriages
•
Never leave a child alone in a stroller. They
could slip and become caught in the leg
opening.
•
Make sure the brake is easy to get to and easy
to operate.
•
Never use a blanket or pillow as a cushion in a
stroller. These objects may create a risk of
suffocation.
•
Always secure the seat belt.
•
Check to make sure the seat is snug and
comfortable, yet strong and durable.
•
Never allow children to play with or around the
stroller. It is not a toy.
Bassinets and Cradles
•
Never place a carrier seat on soft surfaces the seat may flip over.
If you are buying a bassinet or cradle, make
sure it has a sturdy, wide base. Make sure the
spaces between the spindles are small.
•
Place non-slip feet on carrier if there are none
present.
Check screws and bolts to make sure they are
tight.
•
A carrier seat should not be used as car/safety
seat unless it is specifically labeled as one.
Never use pillows for padding. Use a firm
mattress pad that fits smooth and snug.
•
If you have a swinging cradle, make sure there
is a way to manually stop the swing once the
baby is asleep.
•
Follow the manufacturer guidelines to make
sure the cradle is okay to use based on your
baby’s height and weight.
10/12
Choosing Safe Infant Products
(continued)
Baby Gates
Pack n’ Play/Playpens
Baby gates help prevent children from falling down
stairs and keep them away from open, unsafe areas.
However, the gates themselves can be dangerous. It is
important to keep these safety tips in mind when looking
at baby gates:
Deaths have occurred mostly when the sides of the
Pack n’ Play/playpens have been left in the open
position, and have closed in and collapsed on the child.
To prevent anything like this from happening to your
child you should:
•
Do not use accordion-style expandable
enclosures with V-shaped or diamond
openings. Babies can get their heads trapped
between one of the wide openings if they try to
crawl through or over the gates.
•
Choose a gate with straight top edges and
small holes and/or openings.
•
Remove all toys and large objects because the
child can use these to climb out. • Beware of
playpens that have rotating latches in the
center of the top rails. Those latches can come
loose and cause the rails to collapse and the
sides to come down on the child.
•
If using a playpen, don’t leave the drop-side
down while the child is in the playpen. The
child may roll over into the side pocket and
suffocate on the mesh side.
•
If you are buying a new Pack n’ Play, make
sure the top rails lock automatically in the
normal use position. Look for mesh netting with
very tiny weave.
•
Do not place any objects on top or across the
Pack n’ Play/ playpen that could possibly
cause strangulation.
High Chairs
Here are some safety tips that can help prevent
accidents:
•
Make sure to use restraining straps provided
with the chair. Straps should be snug.
•
Do not let your child stand up in a high chair.
•
Keep children from running around or leaning
on the high chair to prevent the chair from
falling over.
•
Do not leave your child unattended while in the
high chair.
Toy Chests
The biggest cause of injury or death with toy chests is
when the top of the chest falls on the child’s head or
neck. Children may also crawl into the chest space to
hide or sleep and end up suffocating because of the
lack of ventilation. To prevent injuries or deaths from
happening:
•
If you already own a toy chest, remove the lid.
If you are buying one, look for a chest with a
detachable lid. If you cannot do that, purchase
a lid support device that holds the chest in its
open position, such as a spring-loaded support.
•
Make sure that the lid of the chest does not
have a latch.
•
Look for a chest that has holes for ventilation
that cannot be blocked by items in the chest.
10/12
Swallowing Hazards
How to Keep Kids Safe
Choking
Children aged 1-3 are at the highest risk for choking/ingestions. Talk with your doctor about the steps you need to know if
your child begins choking.
Here are some tips:

Do not allow your child to play with small objects including, nuts, coins and
beads. These objects are easily swallowed and can cause a child to choke.
o
You can test your child’s toys by putting them through a toilet paper roll
tube. If it fits, then it can easily fit in your child’s throat and they can
choke or possibly swallow it.

When feeding your child, make sure to cut up each food into small thin pieces to
prevent choking.

Keep both plastic wrappers and bags away from your child. These things can cause a child to suffocate if they
are able to put them over their nose and mouth.
Poison Prevention
Always keep the number of the local Poison Control Center near a telephone in case of an emergency. The Poison
Control Center is a great resource if you have a question about something your child swallowed. They will walk you
through what to do if your child swallows something potentially harmful
1-800-222-1222
Medication Safety

Before giving your child any type of medicine, always double check the dose to
make sure it is the correct amount.

Keep all medicine stored out of reach and in a locked cabinet or drawer to
prevent any accidental ingestions.

Never confuse your child by calling medicine ‘candy’.

Keep products in their original containers.

Always read the label before using any product.
IMPORTANT TIP: Grandparents and other family member’s medicine can also be
harmful. Make sure all visitors keep any medicine they have out of reach, too!
09/12
Safety in Sun and Heat
Follow these safety tips for outdoor activities under the sun:
•
If your child begins to get sick or queasy from the heat, have him /
her lie down in a cool, shady spot and give fluids. If this doesn't help,
seek medical assistance.
•
Children need constant fluids to avoid heat stress. Water is ideal, but lemonade, fruit juices, snow cones and
popsicles also are good choices.
•
Avoid caffeinated drinks. Caffeine is a diuretic, which causes a person to urinate the water he / she should be
retaining.
•
Protect babies and children’s skin from sunburns. Most of our sun exposure happens before we turn 18 years
old and may contribute to the risk of developing cancer later in life.
Tips for children younger than 1:
•
Babies under 6 months of age should be kept out of direct sunlight.
•
Dress your baby in comfortable lightweight clothing that covers their entire body.
•
If your baby gets a sunburn, contact your healthcare provider immediately.
•
Sunscreen can be applied if you cannot keep them covered or in the shade.
•
Before using sunscreen, apply a small amount to limited area and watch for any reaction.
Tips for kids older than 1 year old:
•
Choose sunscreen specifically made for children, preferably waterproof.
•
If a rash develops, contact your child’s healthcare provider.
•
Dress your child in clothing made of tightly woven fabrics.
•
Sunglasses with UV protection are also a great idea to protect your child’s eyes from the sun.
More Sun Safety tips:
•
Avoid going out in the sun when the sun is the strongest: between 10 am and 4pm.
•
Use sunscreen even on a cloudy day. The sun’s rays can still get through clouds.
•
Look for sunscreen that will protect against both UVB and UVA rays for the best protection.
•
Sunscreen should be reapplied often for the best protection.
•
Use a SPF (sun protection factor) of at least 15.
•
Put on sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going outdoors—it needs time to work on the skin.
•
If you child develops a sunburn, keep them out of the sun until the burn completely heals.
09/12
Water and Pool Safety
Ages 1-4
If children are around bodies of
water on a regular basis, it
benefits parents to learn
cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR), which, in case of an
emergency, can save lives, reduce
the severity of injury, and improve
the chance of survival.
CPR training is available through
the American Red Cross, the
American Heart Association.
Pool Safety
Children in this age group most often drown in swimming pools.
This often occurs when the preschooler wanders away from
the house and into the pool without parents being aware of the
child’s absence. Children can slip into swimming pools without
a sound or splash.
Always supervise your child closely in or near a swimming pool.
NEVER leave a small child alone in or near a pool, even for a
moment.
•
Consider not installing a pool at your home until your
child is at least 5 years old.
•
If your home has a swimming pool, it is recommended
that you install 4-sided fencing around it.
Never leave your child alone in or near any water (including a
bath tub, swimming pool, toilet, etc). Supervision is key to
preventing an injury in or near water.
•
Children can drown in just one inch of water.
•
Keep the door to the bathroom closed to prevent your
child from getting injured. Install a lock on the
bathroom door and install childproof devices to keep
your child out of the bathroom (such as doorknob
covers).
o
This has been determined to be the best
protection against injuries in pools.
o
Make sure to always lock up the pool after
use.
o
The fence should have a self-closing and
self-latching gate, with latches that are
above a child’s reach. The gate should open
away from the pool, so if a toddler leans
against an unlatched gate, it will close.
•
Remove all toys from around the pool so your child is
not tempted to reach for them.
•
NEVER leave a young child alone in the bathtub, not
even for a minute.
•
Always empty blow up pools after each use, and put
them away.
•
Empty any buckets or other containers with liquids.
•
•
Keep toilets closed and/or use childproof toilet locks.
Keep a telephone near the poolside for emergency
use.
•
Enroll your child in swimming lessons.
•
Do not let your child use a diving board in a pool that
is not approved for it.
**Recommendation: Turn down your hot water heater’s
thermometer to 120 degrees F or less to prevent burns.**
Teach your child these safety tips while swimming:
•
Avoid pool slides; they are very dangerous.

Never swim alone.
•
Do not allow riding toys near pools.

Never dive into water before checking with an adult to
make sure the water is deep enough.
•

Always use a life jacket when on a boat or fishing.
Do not let your children use air-filled “swimming aids”
because they are not an approved life vest and can
be extremely dangerous.
IMPORTANT TIP: Just because your child may know how to swim DOES NOT mean your child is safe in water. They still require
adult supervision at all times!
09/12
Bike and Wheeled Safety
Be sure to check your city’s
laws on bike safety and
helmet laws. It may be against
the law for your child or you to
ride without a helmet. Be a
good role model as a parent.
Scooter Safety
In November 2000, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) issued an updated safety standard
recommending that all children who ride scooters wear
proper safety gear.

Wearing proper safety gear, including a helmet
and knee and elbow pads, will help prevent
injuries.

Wrist guards are no longer advised as part of kids'
scooter safety gear. Wrist guards can make it hard
for a child to grip the handle and steer the scooter.

A person should wear a helmet to help protect the
head when doing these activities:
Make sure to always put your
helmet on each time you get
on your bike and head out for
a ride.
Rules of the Road
Parents should teach children the following rules of the
road:

Stop at every stop sign. Look left, right, and left
again before proceeding.

Stop at the end of the driveway. Look left, right,
and left before entering the street.

Use proper hand signals.

Obey traffic signs and signals.

Ride bikes, scooters, and other wheeled toys on
smooth, paved surfaces without traffic.

Avoid streets and surfaces with water, sand,
gravel or dirt.

Do not ride at night.
o
Riding a bicycle, skateboard or scooter
o
Rollerblading or skating
Most injuries from scooter-related accidents have
resulted when a rider falls off of a scooter. According to
the CPSC, fractures and dislocations of the arms and
hands account for 29 percent of most scooter injuries.
Contact Us
For more information, please contact the Children's
Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati Trauma Services
Department ([email protected]), 513-636-7865.
Bike Safety
When buying a bicycle for your child, it is important that
you purchase one that currently fits them, instead of one
they’ll grow into. A bike that fits is a safe choice; same
goes for the helmet.

Children should be able to place their feet on the
ground when sitting on the bike with their hands
on the handlebars.
09/12
Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection
o
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for preventing
head injuries. It can even save your child‟s life!
•
•
•
•
•
Take this number with you when
buying a helmet. It will help you get
the right size for your child.
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for
preventing head injuries. It can even save your
child‟s life!
•
Protect your child‟s head-make sure they
always wear their helmet before heading out
for a bike ride.
A helmet fits properly if the straps that go
around the ears look like the letter „V‟ under the
child‟s ear.
•
Babies younger than 1 year old have weak
neck structures and shouldn‟t wear a helmet or
travel on a bike.
You should be able to fasten the chin strap
securely under the child‟s chin without causing
discomfort.
•
The helmet should sit on the child‟s head tight
enough that once the buckle is secure, the
helmet cannot be rocked from side to side or
front to back.
•
The front rim of the helmet should be two
fingers width (about an inch) above the child‟s
eyebrows.
•
If the helmet has a rear stabilizer, make sure it
is snug below the bulge at the back of the head.
o
Children should not wear a helmet
until they at least one year old
o
Children less than one year old
should not ride on the back of a
parent‟s bike or ride in a trailer behind
a bike.
A helmet is considered safe if it is certified by
CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission)
o
Check the inside of the helmet for the
CPSC sticker.
o
Check the outside of the helmet box
to see if it is certified by CPSC.
Never buy or use a second-hand helmet. It
may be too old to protect your child‟s head or it
may have been involved in a crash.
Testing the Fit
•
Shake your head “yes” and “no”. If the helmet
does not move, the fit is good. If there is
movement, try adjusting the straps again or try
a different helmet.
•
Place your palm on the front of the helmet and
push up and back. If the helmet moves more
than one inch, try adjusting the straps or try a
different helmet.
Proper Fit is Key
•
The best way to find a helmet for your child is
to first measure their head circumference.
o
Run a tape measure across your
child‟s forehead, around the back of
the head and stop where the two ends
meet.
o
The number of inches shown on the
tape measure is your child‟s head
circumference.
09/12
Playground Safety
Each year, over 200,000 children are injured on America's playgrounds. That's one every 2 1/2
minutes. The leading cause of playground equipment-related fatalities is strangulation.
Strangulation as a result of entanglement or entrapment accounts for nearly half of the deaths.
The majority of these deaths occur on home playgrounds.
Preventive Action
Lack of supervision is associated with 40 percent of playground injuries.

The best way to prevent injuries on playgrounds is close supervision.

Falls are the #1 injury children get while playing on playgrounds.

Strangulations can also occur while a child is on a playground.
o Avoid loose hanging ropes- they are a strangulation risk.
o A rope should be secured at both ends.
o Never let your child wear helmets, necklaces, purses, scarves or
clothing with drawstrings while on a playground.

Teach your child the rules of the playground, including;
o
Never walk in front of a person swinging.
o
Go down the slide the right way, never backwards or head first.

Before using playground equipment, make sure the metal surfaces are not too hot. They can cause serious
burns if a child touches them.

If your home has a playground, make sure to follow these tips:
o Install according to the manufacturer’s instructions and pay careful attention to anchoring (to prevent the
playground set from falling over).
o Install surfacing under your playground to help soften the impact of falls and prevent serious injuries.
Good surfaces include:

Rubber

Sand

Sawdust (12 inches deep)

Wood chip

Bark
Install the playground at least 6 feet away from fences or walls.

Did you know?
o Asphalt, dirt, concrete and grass are not acceptable surfaces for underneath playground equipment.
o A one foot fall onto concrete could cause a concussion.
IMPORTANT TIP: If you see something unsafe while at a playground, notify the local agency, organization or school in
charge to make them aware so they can fix the problem.
Contact Us
For additional information on this or any Health Topic, please call the Family Resource Center, 513-636-7606, or your
healthcare provider.
09/12
Pedestrian Safety
Teach your child how to be safe near streets to help prevent injuries. Here are some tips to
share with your child:

Always look “left, then right and left” again before crossing the street to make sure a
car is not coming.

Use the sidewalks whenever available.

Know what street signs mean, including:
o Stop
o Walk
o Don’t walk
o Red, yellow and green stop light signals

Always cross the street at a cross walk with an adult. If you are in a group, cross
together, not one right after another. Make eye contact with the driver when crossing in front of a car.

Do not let children walk alone or cross the street by themselves until you know they can do it safely. This is
usually not until the pre-teen/early teen years.

Never run across a street trying to beat an oncoming car.

Do not walk between parked cars.

Use care when walking in parking lots. Watch for cars backing out of parking spaces.

Wear reflectors after dusk or use a flashlight when traveling near roads.
09/12
Ages 5-9
Car Seat Safety
Ages 5-9
Please check your state’s law to make sure your child is
using the right seat for their age and weight. Make sure
child is riding in the back seat using a car seat or booster
seat with lap and shoulder belt.
Choosing a Car Seat
Combination
Using a Car Seat

Remind your child to NEVER put the shoulder
part of the belt behind them. This will not keep
them safe if they are in a car crash.
This seat has a 5-point harness that can be used up to
a certain weight limit (40-65 pounds)

The harness should be at or just above the
shoulders.

It is safer to keep your child in a 5-point harness longer
than to put them in a booster seat too early.

The retainer clip, or chest clip, should be at
armpit level or across the nipple line.

Once the child reaches the upper weight limit of the
harness, they can usually begin to use the seat as a
booster seat.

The harness should be snug around the child.
Make sure you buckle around the legs first.

The seat is them used with a lap and shoulder seat belt
to keep the child secure.

A child who is small for their age may still need to be in
this type of seat.

Proper Installation is Key

Before installing the seat, read both your car
and the car seat’s instruction manuals to make
sure the seat is installed properly.

Make sure to use either the latch system or the
seat belt, NEVER BOTH!

Make sure your child’s car seat is checked by a
certified seat technician!

To find a fitting station near you, call your local
fire or police station or visit www.nhtsa.gov
Booster Seat

Booster seats are typically used for children aged 4
years up to 8 years of age. They can be used from 40
pounds to 80-120 pounds and the height of 4’9”

They boost the child up to help the car’s seat belt fit
better.

Check your manufacturers’ instructions for weight and
height requirements.

There are two types of booster seats: (1) No Back:
Can be used if there are head-rests in the seat where
the child sits. (2) High Back: Must be used if there are
NO head-rests in the seat where the child sits. This
seat is also nice for children who still like to take naps
in the car, as it helps to better protect their head and
neck while they sleep.
Other Helpful Tips

Never purchase a used car seat!

Never use anything with the car seat that was
not originally sold with the seat. When car
seats are tested for safety, they are crashtested with only the products that come with
the seat

Check your state’s booster seat laws to make
sure you are following the law!
For more information, please contact Trauma
Services at 513-636-7865
10/12
Fitting Station Locations for Car Seat Checks
By Appointment Only
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
Children’s Hospital Medical Center
(513) 636-7865
Amberley Village Police and Fire Department
(513) 531-2040
Anderson Township Fire & Rescue
(513) 688-8093 OR (513) 688-8400
Blue Ash Fire Department
(513) 745-8533
Central Joint Fire-EMS District
(513) 732-3876
Cheviot Fire and Police Department
(513) 661-2700
City of Cincinnati Fire Department
(513) 357-7585
City of Ft. Wright
(859) 331-1700
Colerain Township Department of Fire & EMS
(513) 245-6505
Crescent Springs/Villa Hills Fire Department
(859) 341-3840
Deerfield Township Fire Department
(513) 678-2292
Delhi Township Fire Department
(513) 922-2011
Elmwood Place Fire Department
(513) 242-0790
Fairfield Township Fire Department
(513) 887-4402 ext 51
City of Fairfield Fire Department
(513) 867-5379
Florence Fire Department
(859) 647-5660
Forest Park Fire Department
(513) 595-5243
Ft. Mitchell Fire Department
(859) 331-1267
Green Township Fire Department
(513) 574-0474
Hamilton Township Fire Department
(513) 683-1622
Harrison Fire Department
(513) 367-4194
Hebron Fire Protective Services
(859) 586-9009
23. Lakeside/Crestview Hills Police Dept
(859) 331-5368
24. Liberty Township Fire Department
(513) 759-7530
25. Little Miami Joint Fire and Rescue
(513) 271-3636
26. Madeira/ Indian Hill Joint Fire Department
(513) 271-2669
27. Mariemont Fire Department
(513) 271-4089
28. Miami Township Fire Department (Clermont)
(513) 248-3709
29. Milford Fire Department
(513) 831-7777
30. Monroe Township Fire Department
(513) 734-0847 or (513) 734-4151
31. Montgomery Fire Department
(513) 985-1633
32. Newport Fire Department
(859) 292-3616
33. Norwood Health Department
(513) 458-4600
34. Pierce Township Fire Department
(513) 752-6273
35. Ross Township Fire Department
(513) 863-3410
36. Sharonville Fire Department
(513) 563-0252
37. Springdale Fire Department
(513) 346-5580
38. Sycamore Township Fire Department
(513) 792-8565
39. Taylor Mill Fire Department
(859) 581-6565
40. Union Emergency Services (KY)
(859) 384-3342 Option 2
41. Union Township Fire Dept. (Clermont)
(513) 528-4446
42. Walton Fire Protection District
(859) 485-7439
43. West Chester Fire Department
(513) 777-1133
10/12
Fire and Burn Prevention
Fire Prevention

Install a smoke detector on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas.
o Test the smoke detector once a month to make sure it is still working.
o Change the batteries every year (or unless the directions say otherwise).

Carbon monoxide detectors are also important to have installed in your family’s home.
o Carbon monoxide gas is released from gas appliances that may not be functioning properly.
o These detectors find the colorless and odorless carbon monoxide gas which can be deadly.

Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children.

Check your furnace or heating system each year to make sure it is working properly.

Check electrical appliances and cords regularly for damage or worn wires.

Have a fire extinguisher in your home, especially near the kitchen, furnace or fireplace in case of an emergency.

Create a fire escape plan for your house. Have your family practice what to do in case of a fire.
o Know two ways out of each room.
o Have a meeting spot outside.
o Call the fire department once outside.
Burn Prevention

Never carry your child with hot liquids in your hand or drink hot liquids while holding a child in your lap. Young
children tend to grab at things so put down your child before picking up something hot.

Turn the handles of pots toward the rear of the stove when cooking on the front burners.

Never leave a hot iron unattended. A child can easily pull on the cord and get burned.

Check the temperature of your home’s water heater. It should be less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you
and your family from getting burned.

If your child gets burned, put the burned area in cold water right away.
o Cover the area loosely with a clean cloth and call your child’s healthcare provider right away.
09/12
Second Hand Smoke Dangers
Second hand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by
the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar, and the smoke
exhaled from the lungs of smokers.
Second hand smoke is harmful to your children

Adults breathe in and out 14 to 18 times per minute.

A newborn baby breathes up to 60 times per minute.

When there is cigarette smoke in the air, children get more toxins in their lungs than adults.

Young children depend on adults to keep their surroundings safe. They need you to keep their air smoke-free.

Children who spend one hour in a very smoky room breathe in the toxic chemicals equal to smoking 10 cigarettes.

Infants in smoking households have more middle ear infections because the smoke irritates the tube leading to
the ear.
Other Important Facts
While you are trying to quit, here are some tips to keep your child safe from second hand smoke:

Do not smoke while holding a child.

Do not smoke in your home or car. The chemicals from smoking stay in your walls, furniture and even your child’s
toys and can stay in the air for several weeks.

If you must smoke, do it outdoors away from your child.

Seat your family in the non-smoking areas of restaurants and other public places.
The Effects of Smoking

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of having a premature baby and/or a baby with low birth weight.

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) increases up to four times for babies with mothers who
smoke, or smoked when they were pregnant.

Researchers have found that children exposed to second hand smoke every day are three times more likely to
develop lung cancer.

Children exposed to second hand smoke have smaller lungs and decreased lung function.
Thoughts about Quitting Smoking

It is not easy to quit smoking. Trying to do it alone can make it even harder.

Talk to your healthcare professional to find support.

The health benefits of quitting are great for both you and your child.

Find support in your attempt to quit smoking.
09/12
Water and Pool Safety
Ages 5-9
IMPORTANT TIP: Just because your child may know how to swim DOES NOT mean your child is safe in water. They still require
adult supervision at all times!
If children are around bodies
of water on a regular basis,
it benefits parents to learn
cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR), which,
in case of an emergency,
can save lives, reduce the
severity of injury, and
improve the chance of
survival.
CPR training is available through the American Red Cross and
the American Heart Association.
Children in this age group are more likely to drown in bodies of
waters such as oceans, lakes, and rivers.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Always supervise your child when s/he is swimming in
any body of water.
Do not let your child dive unless you know the depth of
the water and it is at least nine feet.
Do not allow your child to swim during thunderstorms
or lightning storms.
Do not let your child rough-house with others in the
water in ways that may be mistaken for drowning.
Teach your child to stay calm and tread water until help
arrives if s/he drifts too far from shore.
Make sure your child wears a personal flotation device
(PFD) approved by the US Coast Guard when boating.
Do not allow your child to swim around boats and/or in
areas where people are water-skiing.
Avoid letting your child play with blow-up water toys in
water that is above the waist.
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)
•
•
•
•
•
Diving
•
•
•
•
•
Diving accidents can result in permanent spinal cord
injuries, brain damage, and/or death.
Do not dive in shallow water.
Do not dive in above-ground pools- they are too
shallow.
Do not dive in the shallow end of a pool.
Never dive into water before checking with an adult to
make sure the water is deep enough.
Pool Safety
Always supervise your child closely in or near a swimming pool.
NEVER leave a child alone in or near a pool, even for a
moment.
• Never allow a child to swim alone.
• If your home has a swimming pool, it is recommended
that you install 4-sided fencing around it.
o This has been determined to be the best
protection against injuries in pools.
o Make sure to always lock up the pool after
use.
o The fence should have a self-closing and
self-latching gate, with latches that are
above a child’s reach. The gate should open
away from the pool.
• Keep a telephone near the poolside for emergency
use.
• Enroll your child in swimming lessons.
• Do not let your child use a diving board in a pool that
is not approved for it
• Avoid pool slides; they are very dangerous.
• Do not allow riding toys near pools.
• Do not let your children use air-filled “swimming aids”
because they are not an approved life vest and can
be extremely dangerous.
PFDs should be US Coast Guard approved.
Many states require the use of PFDs on all boats at all
times.
Blow-up swimming devices, such as “water wings,”
rafts, toys, and other items are not considered safe and
should not be relied on to prevent drowning.
It is important that the PFD is the correct size for your
child.
PFDs do not replace adult supervision!
09/12
Bike and Wheeled Safety
Be sure to check your city’s
laws on bike safety and
helmet laws. It may be against
the law for your child or you to
ride without a helmet. Be a
good role model as a parent.
Scooter Safety
In November 2000, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) issued an updated safety standard
recommending that all children who ride scooters wear
proper safety gear.

Wearing proper safety gear, including a helmet
and knee and elbow pads, will help prevent
injuries.

Wrist guards are no longer advised as part of kids'
scooter safety gear. Wrist guards can make it hard
for a child to grip the handle and steer the scooter.

A person should wear a helmet to help protect the
head when doing these activities:
Make sure to always put your
helmet on each time you get
on your bike and head out for
a ride.
Rules of the Road
Parents should teach children the following rules of the
road:

Stop at every stop sign. Look left, right, and left
again before proceeding.

Stop at the end of the driveway. Look left, right,
and left before entering the street.

Use proper hand signals.

Obey traffic signs and signals.

Ride bikes, scooters, and other wheeled toys on
smooth, paved surfaces without traffic.

Avoid streets and surfaces with water, sand,
gravel or dirt.

Do not ride at night.
o
Riding a bicycle, skateboard or scooter
o
Rollerblading or skating
Most injuries from scooter-related accidents have
resulted when a rider falls off of a scooter. According to
the CPSC, fractures and dislocations of the arms and
hands account for 29 percent of most scooter injuries.
Contact Us
For more information, please contact the Children's
Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati Trauma Services
Department ([email protected]), 513-636-7865.
Bike Safety
When buying a bicycle for your child, it is important that
you purchase one that currently fits them, instead of one
they’ll grow into. A bike that fits is a safe choice; same
goes for the helmet.

Children should be able to place their feet on the
ground when sitting on the bike with their hands
on the handlebars.
09/12
Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection
o
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for preventing
head injuries. It can even save your child‟s life!
•
•
•
•
•
Take this number with you when
buying a helmet. It will help you get
the right size for your child.
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for
preventing head injuries. It can even save your
child‟s life!
•
Protect your child‟s head-make sure they
always wear their helmet before heading out
for a bike ride.
A helmet fits properly if the straps that go
around the ears look like the letter „V‟ under the
child‟s ear.
•
Babies younger than 1 year old have weak
neck structures and shouldn‟t wear a helmet or
travel on a bike.
You should be able to fasten the chin strap
securely under the child‟s chin without causing
discomfort.
•
The helmet should sit on the child‟s head tight
enough that once the buckle is secure, the
helmet cannot be rocked from side to side or
front to back.
•
The front rim of the helmet should be two
fingers width (about an inch) above the child‟s
eyebrows.
•
If the helmet has a rear stabilizer, make sure it
is snug below the bulge at the back of the head.
o
Children should not wear a helmet
until they at least one year old
o
Children less than one year old
should not ride on the back of a
parent‟s bike or ride in a trailer behind
a bike.
A helmet is considered safe if it is certified by
CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission)
o
Check the inside of the helmet for the
CPSC sticker.
o
Check the outside of the helmet box
to see if it is certified by CPSC.
Never buy or use a second-hand helmet. It
may be too old to protect your child‟s head or it
may have been involved in a crash.
Testing the Fit
•
Shake your head “yes” and “no”. If the helmet
does not move, the fit is good. If there is
movement, try adjusting the straps again or try
a different helmet.
•
Place your palm on the front of the helmet and
push up and back. If the helmet moves more
than one inch, try adjusting the straps or try a
different helmet.
Proper Fit is Key
•
The best way to find a helmet for your child is
to first measure their head circumference.
o
Run a tape measure across your
child‟s forehead, around the back of
the head and stop where the two ends
meet.
o
The number of inches shown on the
tape measure is your child‟s head
circumference.
09/12
Playground Safety
Each year, over 200,000 children are injured on America's playgrounds. That's one every 2 1/2
minutes. The leading cause of playground equipment-related fatalities is strangulation.
Strangulation as a result of entanglement or entrapment accounts for nearly half of the deaths.
The majority of these deaths occur on home playgrounds.
Preventive Action
Lack of supervision is associated with 40 percent of playground injuries.

The best way to prevent injuries on playgrounds is close supervision.

Falls are the #1 injury children get while playing on playgrounds.

Strangulations can also occur while a child is on a playground.
o Avoid loose hanging ropes- they are a strangulation risk.
o A rope should be secured at both ends.
o Never let your child wear helmets, necklaces, purses, scarves or
clothing with drawstrings while on a playground.

Teach your child the rules of the playground, including;
o
Never walk in front of a person swinging.
o
Go down the slide the right way, never backwards or head first.

Before using playground equipment, make sure the metal surfaces are not too hot. They can cause serious
burns if a child touches them.

If your home has a playground, make sure to follow these tips:
o Install according to the manufacturer’s instructions and pay careful attention to anchoring (to prevent the
playground set from falling over).
o Install surfacing under your playground to help soften the impact of falls and prevent serious injuries.
Good surfaces include:

Rubber

Sand

Sawdust (12 inches deep)

Wood chip

Bark
Install the playground at least 6 feet away from fences or walls.

Did you know?
o Asphalt, dirt, concrete and grass are not acceptable surfaces for underneath playground equipment.
o A one foot fall onto concrete could cause a concussion.
IMPORTANT TIP: If you see something unsafe while at a playground, notify the local agency, organization or school in
charge to make them aware so they can fix the problem.
Contact Us
For additional information on this or any Health Topic, please call the Family Resource Center, 513-636-7606, or your
healthcare provider.
09/12
Pedestrian Safety
Teach your child how to be safe near streets to help prevent injuries. Here are some tips to
share with your child:

Always look “left, then right and left” again before crossing the street to make sure a
car is not coming.

Use the sidewalks whenever available.

Know what street signs mean, including:
o Stop
o Walk
o Don’t walk
o Red, yellow and green stop light signals

Always cross the street at a cross walk with an adult. If you are in a group, cross
together, not one right after another. Make eye contact with the driver when crossing in front of a car.

Do not let children walk alone or cross the street by themselves until you know they can do it safely. This is
usually not until the pre-teen/early teen years.

Never run across a street trying to beat an oncoming car.

Do not walk between parked cars.

Use care when walking in parking lots. Watch for cars backing out of parking spaces.

Wear reflectors after dusk or use a flashlight when traveling near roads.
09/12
Gun Safety
Gun violence is one of the most common killers of children in America. One-third of all families in America have guns in
their home. Having a gun in the home significantly increases the chances of an accidental or intentional firearm injury or
death to you or a child in your home.
If you have a gun in your home:

Always store the gun unloaded.

Keep the gun locked in a box or safe that can only be accessed by the gun owner.

Store the bullets or other ammunition separately from the gun in another locked box or safe.

Hide the keys to both of the locked boxes.

Keep both the locked gun and ammunition boxes out of the reach of children.

Lock up gun-cleaning products - they may be harmful if swallowed.

Don’t ever keep a loaded gun next to your bed.
Talk to your child about gun safety. If your child sees a gun, he/she should:

Not touch the gun.

Walk away from the gun and leave the area.

Tell an adult.
To protect your child, find out if there is a gun in the homes where your kids play and talk to the parents to confirm that
they are practicing gun safety in their home.
REMEMBER: If there is a gun in the home, it is very important to make sure proper gun safety is being practiced by the
owner, especially when children live or visit the home often.
09/12
Sports Safety
Concussions
A concussion is a brain injury and should be taken
seriously. Your child may have a concussion if he or she
shows some of these signs and symptoms:
The National Youth Sports Safety Foundation reports
that more than 5 million youth athletes are seen and
treated in hospital emergency rooms each year due to
sports-related injuries.
Here are some tips for children who are playing sports:
•
•
•
•
•
Before starting any sport, make sure your child
has a physical exam done by their provider.
Make sure your child wears all of the protective
gear needed to safely participate in that sport.
Your child’s coach can help you with this.
Make sure your child knows the rules of the
sport to keep him/her safe.
Proper hydration is the key to prevent sportsrelated heat illness. Have your child drink
liquids before or during all athletic activities.
Coaches and other adults assisting the team
should know CPR and First Aid to help out in
the event of an emergency.
•
loses consciousness (even briefly)
•
confused
•
headache
•
vomiting
•
moving clumsily
•
can’t recall events just prior to or just after a
hit or fall
•
shows behavior or personality changes
•
dazed
If your child does have a concussion
•
Pull them out of the game
•
Get medical attention right away
•
Keep them out of the game until medically
cleared by their provider
Concussions take time to heal---so don’t rush the
recovery process!
Contact Us
For more information, visit our website. Click on Sports
Medicine to learn more.
http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/patients/child/health/
09/12
Toy Safety and Injury Prevention





Billions of toys for children of all ages are sold each year
in the US. Unfortunately, toys also are linked with
thousands of injuries each year, some of which result in
death. Children ages 4 and under are especially at risk
for injury from toys. Injuries can range from falling,
choking, strangulation, burning, drowning and even
poisoning. However, the leading cause of toy-related
death is choking, usually on latex balloons.
Injury often results when a toy is misused or used by
children who are too young for that particular toy. Toys
with small parts, designed for older children, can cause
choking when a small child puts this toy in his/her mouth.
Knowing what dangers are linked with certain toys and
age groups can help you better protect your child from
toy injuries.
Toy Recommendations



Choose toys that are age-appropriate and
meet your child's skill level and interest (read
the toy's labeling).
Use mylar balloons instead of latex balloons
because of the danger of suffocation. Children
under the age of eight should not be allowed to
play with uninflated latex balloons.
Strings, straps and cords on any toy should be
less than 7 inches long to prevent
strangulation. Remove crib mobiles when your




infant is able to pull up on his or her hands and
knees (usually about 5 months old).
Children under 16 years of age should not use
high-velocity BB or pellet guns.
Children should be watched closely when
playing with cap guns. They may cause burns
as well as noise damage if they are fired closer
than one foot to the ear.
Check toys regularly for damage and other
hazards.
Be involved in your child's play.
Store toys intended for older children
separately from toys used by younger children.
Use a small parts tester to find which small
toys or parts are choking hazards to children
under age 3. If an object fits into the tester, it is
unsafe. If you do not own a small parts tester,
use the cardboard tube from inside a roll of
paper towels or bathroom tissue; if an object is
able to fit inside the tube, it is a choking hazard
and not suitable for young children.
Make sure toys are used in safe environments.
Keep riding toys away from stairs and bodies
of water.
Children should always wear helmets when
roller skating or using ride-on toys such as
bicycles, tricycles, scooters and skateboards.
Throw away packing materials from new toys
right away. Plastic bags, foam peanuts,
staples, nails and wire ties are all safety
hazards.
Stay up-to-date on toy recalls through the US Consumer
Product Safety Commission or through the US
Government's online recall page. Supervising your
child's play, in addition to following the
recommendations made by toy manufacturers could
save lives.
Contact Us
For additional information, please call the Family
Resource Center, 513-636-7606, or your healthcare
provider.
09/12
Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety
•
Be a good example to your child by not watching too
much television yourself. Be involved in other activities,
especially reading. Read to your child.
•
Avoid using the TV as the child's "babysitter."
•
Encourage play and exercise for your child. Plan
other fun activities for your child, so he/she has
choices other than TV.
•
Limit using TV as a reward for good behavior.
Instead, offer a trip to the park, a festival,
playground, or a visit to a relative's/friend's house.
•
Do not watch TV during meal times.
Internet
•
•
As children grow and develop, they can easily be influenced by
what they see and hear. While television programs and internet
sites can be educational, many children are exposed to television
that is inappropriate.
•
Parents can help decrease the harmful effects of media usage by
closely watching what your child is viewing on television and
searching on the internet.
•
Keep a close eye on your child’s TV and internet use.
Television
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose programs for your child to watch. Always plan
what your child will see on TV. Do not turn on the TV
randomly. You may give choices between two programs
you think are right for your child.
Turn to educational shows from the local Public
Broadcasting Station (PBS), or from programming such
as Discovery Channel, Learning Channel, or History
Channel.
Watch TV with your child. Talk about what happened on
the show. Talk about what was good or what was bad
about the program and the difference between reality
and make-believe.
Turn the TV off if the program is something you believe
your child should not see.
Do not assume all cartoons are acceptable and
appropriate, as many cartoons contain violence.
Many daytime programs (such as soap operas and talk
shows) are not appropriate for children.
•
•
•
•
Keep the computer in a common area of the house.
This will allow you to monitor usage.
Use parental control and filtering settings on the
computer.
Bookmark the sites your children go to often to make
access easier.
Watch your credit card and phone bills for unusual
charges.
Share an email account with your child so you can
monitor it.
Older kids may be very computer savvy but they still
need to be watched for safe behaviors.
Be aware of internet safety practices at school and
at the home of your child’s friends.
Discuss internet safety with your child as soon as
they start using the computer.
Computer Tips for Your Children
•
•
•
•
•
•
Stay away from chat rooms.
Never give out ANY personal information including what
city you live in, your age, your real name, or what school
you go to.
NEVER agree to meet someone you met online in person.
NEVER share photographs of yourself with someone you
don’t know.
If you receive an email that makes you feel uncomfortable
or threatening, tell your parents right away and do not
respond.
Remember that people may not be who they say they are.
09/12
Ages 10-14
Car Seat Safety
Ages 10-14
All children less than 13 years old should ride in the back seat.
Please check your state’s law to make sure your child is using the right seat
for their age and weight.
When children are old enough and large enough to the use the vehicle seat belts alone, they should ALWAYS use both
the lap and shoulder belt
o The lap belt should fit low on the hips and the shoulder belt should fit across the middle of the child’s
shoulder and chest .
o The child’s knees should bend at the edge of the seat without slouching.
o The child should be able to sit with their back against the back of the vehicle seat and they should be able to
sit this way the entire ride.
o If a child cannot ride this way, then they are probably too small for the seat belt and should use a booster
seat.
For more information, please contact Trauma Services at 513-636-7865
10/12
All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety
ATVs are not toys. An ATV can travel up to 60 miles per hour and may weigh close to 700 pounds. About one-third of all
ATV related deaths and injuries involve children.
Here are some safety tips related to ATVs:

No child under the age of 16 should ride on an adult ATV.

Wearing safety equipment is important since an ATV can easily flip or turn over.

A child should always wear a helmet while riding on an ATV.
o
Choose the right kind of helmet – use one that is designed for ATV use.
o
Do not use a bike helmet.

Never ride on an ATV as a passenger. Many ATVs are only made for one person to ride at a time.

Stay off of paved roads or uneven terrain.

Make sure you know your state’s laws regarding ATVs.
For more information, go to www.atvsafety.gov
09/12
Fire and Burn Prevention
Fire Prevention

Install a smoke detector on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas.
o Test the smoke detector once a month to make sure it is still working.
o Change the batteries every year (or unless the directions say otherwise).

Carbon monoxide detectors are also important to have installed in your family’s home.
o Carbon monoxide gas is released from gas appliances that may not be functioning properly.
o These detectors find the colorless and odorless carbon monoxide gas which can be deadly.

Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children.

Check your furnace or heating system each year to make sure it is working properly.

Check electrical appliances and cords regularly for damage or worn wires.

Have a fire extinguisher in your home, especially near the kitchen, furnace or fireplace in case of an emergency.

Create a fire escape plan for your house. Have your family practice what to do in case of a fire.
o Know two ways out of each room.
o Have a meeting spot outside.
o Call the fire department once outside.
Burn Prevention

Never carry your child with hot liquids in your hand or drink hot liquids while holding a child in your lap. Young
children tend to grab at things so put down your child before picking up something hot.

Turn the handles of pots toward the rear of the stove when cooking on the front burners.

Never leave a hot iron unattended. A child can easily pull on the cord and get burned.

Check the temperature of your home’s water heater. It should be less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you
and your family from getting burned.

If your child gets burned, put the burned area in cold water right away.
o Cover the area loosely with a clean cloth and call your child’s healthcare provider right away.
09/12
Second Hand Smoke Dangers
Second hand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by
the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar, and the smoke
exhaled from the lungs of smokers.
Second hand smoke is harmful to your children

Adults breathe in and out 14 to 18 times per minute.

A newborn baby breathes up to 60 times per minute.

When there is cigarette smoke in the air, children get more toxins in their lungs than adults.

Young children depend on adults to keep their surroundings safe. They need you to keep their air smoke-free.

Children who spend one hour in a very smoky room breathe in the toxic chemicals equal to smoking 10 cigarettes.

Infants in smoking households have more middle ear infections because the smoke irritates the tube leading to
the ear.
Other Important Facts
While you are trying to quit, here are some tips to keep your child safe from second hand smoke:

Do not smoke while holding a child.

Do not smoke in your home or car. The chemicals from smoking stay in your walls, furniture and even your child’s
toys and can stay in the air for several weeks.

If you must smoke, do it outdoors away from your child.

Seat your family in the non-smoking areas of restaurants and other public places.
The Effects of Smoking

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of having a premature baby and/or a baby with low birth weight.

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) increases up to four times for babies with mothers who
smoke, or smoked when they were pregnant.

Researchers have found that children exposed to second hand smoke every day are three times more likely to
develop lung cancer.

Children exposed to second hand smoke have smaller lungs and decreased lung function.
Thoughts about Quitting Smoking

It is not easy to quit smoking. Trying to do it alone can make it even harder.

Talk to your healthcare professional to find support.

The health benefits of quitting are great for both you and your child.

Find support in your attempt to quit smoking.
09/12
Water and Pool Safety
Ages 10-14
Although older children are more likely to know how to swim, they are at risk for drowning by overestimating their skills,
being unaware of water currents or water depth, and when drinking alcohol or using drugs.
If children are around bodies of
water on a regular basis, it
benefits parents to learn
cardiopulmonary resuscitation
(CPR), which, in case of an
emergency, can save lives,
reduce the severity of injury, and
improve the chance of survival.
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)
CPR training is available through
the American Red Cross and the
American Heart Association.

PFDs should be US Coast Guard approved. Many
states require the use of PFDs on all boats at all
times.

Blow-up swimming devices, such as “water wings,”
rafts, toys, and other items are not considered safe
and should not be relied on to prevent drowning.

It is important that the PFD is the correct size for your
child.

PFDs do not replace adult supervision!
Diving
Children in this age group are more likely to drown in bodies of
waters such as oceans, lakes, and rivers.

Always supervise your child when s/he is swimming in
any body of water.

Do not let your child dive unless you know the depth of
the water and it is at least nine feet.

Do not allow your child to swim during thunderstorms
or lightning storms.

Diving accidents can result in permanent spinal cord
injuries, brain damage, and/or death.

Do not dive in shallow water.

Do not dive in above-ground pools- they are too
shallow.

Do not dive in the shallow end of a pool.

Make sure to check the depth of the water before
diving.
Pool Safety

Do not let your child rough-house with others in the
water in ways that may be mistaken for drowning.
•
Never allow a child to swim alone. Insist that your child
always swim with a buddy.

Teach your child to stay calm and tread water until help
arrives if s/he drifts too far from shore.
•

Make sure your child wears a personal flotation device
(PFD) approved by the US Coast Guard when boating.
Encourage teens to take swimming, diving, and water
safety or rescue classes to give them the skills needed to
swim and dive safely. These classes may also prevent your
teen from acting recklessly.

Do not allow your child to swim around boats and/or in
areas where people are water-skiing.
•
Teach your teen to NEVER swim or dive while under the
influence of alcohol or drugs.

Avoid letting your child play with blow-up water toys in
water that is above the waist.
•
Keep a telephone near the poolside for emergency use.
•
Do not let your child use a diving board in a pool that is not
approved for it.
•
Avoid pool slides; they are very dangerous.
•
Do not let your children use air-filled “swimming aids”
because they are not an approved life vest and can be
extremely dangerous.
09/12
Bike and Wheeled Safety
Be sure to check your city’s
laws on bike safety and
helmet laws. It may be against
the law for your child or you to
ride without a helmet. Be a
good role model as a parent.
Scooter Safety
In November 2000, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety
Commission (CPSC) issued an updated safety standard
recommending that all children who ride scooters wear
proper safety gear.

Wearing proper safety gear, including a helmet
and knee and elbow pads, will help prevent
injuries.

Wrist guards are no longer advised as part of kids'
scooter safety gear. Wrist guards can make it hard
for a child to grip the handle and steer the scooter.

A person should wear a helmet to help protect the
head when doing these activities:
Make sure to always put your
helmet on each time you get
on your bike and head out for
a ride.
Rules of the Road
Parents should teach children the following rules of the
road:

Stop at every stop sign. Look left, right, and left
again before proceeding.

Stop at the end of the driveway. Look left, right,
and left before entering the street.

Use proper hand signals.

Obey traffic signs and signals.

Ride bikes, scooters, and other wheeled toys on
smooth, paved surfaces without traffic.

Avoid streets and surfaces with water, sand,
gravel or dirt.

Do not ride at night.
o
Riding a bicycle, skateboard or scooter
o
Rollerblading or skating
Most injuries from scooter-related accidents have
resulted when a rider falls off of a scooter. According to
the CPSC, fractures and dislocations of the arms and
hands account for 29 percent of most scooter injuries.
Contact Us
For more information, please contact the Children's
Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati Trauma Services
Department ([email protected]), 513-636-7865.
Bike Safety
When buying a bicycle for your child, it is important that
you purchase one that currently fits them, instead of one
they’ll grow into. A bike that fits is a safe choice; same
goes for the helmet.

Children should be able to place their feet on the
ground when sitting on the bike with their hands
on the handlebars.
09/12
Wearing a Helmet is the Best Protection
o
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for preventing
head injuries. It can even save your child‟s life!
•
•
•
•
•
Take this number with you when
buying a helmet. It will help you get
the right size for your child.
Wearing a helmet is the best protection for
preventing head injuries. It can even save your
child‟s life!
•
Protect your child‟s head-make sure they
always wear their helmet before heading out
for a bike ride.
A helmet fits properly if the straps that go
around the ears look like the letter „V‟ under the
child‟s ear.
•
Babies younger than 1 year old have weak
neck structures and shouldn‟t wear a helmet or
travel on a bike.
You should be able to fasten the chin strap
securely under the child‟s chin without causing
discomfort.
•
The helmet should sit on the child‟s head tight
enough that once the buckle is secure, the
helmet cannot be rocked from side to side or
front to back.
•
The front rim of the helmet should be two
fingers width (about an inch) above the child‟s
eyebrows.
•
If the helmet has a rear stabilizer, make sure it
is snug below the bulge at the back of the head.
o
Children should not wear a helmet
until they at least one year old
o
Children less than one year old
should not ride on the back of a
parent‟s bike or ride in a trailer behind
a bike.
A helmet is considered safe if it is certified by
CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission)
o
Check the inside of the helmet for the
CPSC sticker.
o
Check the outside of the helmet box
to see if it is certified by CPSC.
Never buy or use a second-hand helmet. It
may be too old to protect your child‟s head or it
may have been involved in a crash.
Testing the Fit
•
Shake your head “yes” and “no”. If the helmet
does not move, the fit is good. If there is
movement, try adjusting the straps again or try
a different helmet.
•
Place your palm on the front of the helmet and
push up and back. If the helmet moves more
than one inch, try adjusting the straps or try a
different helmet.
Proper Fit is Key
•
The best way to find a helmet for your child is
to first measure their head circumference.
o
Run a tape measure across your
child‟s forehead, around the back of
the head and stop where the two ends
meet.
o
The number of inches shown on the
tape measure is your child‟s head
circumference.
09/12
Playground Safety
Each year, over 200,000 children are injured on America's playgrounds. That's one every 2 1/2
minutes. The leading cause of playground equipment-related fatalities is strangulation.
Strangulation as a result of entanglement or entrapment accounts for nearly half of the deaths.
The majority of these deaths occur on home playgrounds.
Preventive Action
Lack of supervision is associated with 40 percent of playground injuries.

The best way to prevent injuries on playgrounds is close supervision.

Falls are the #1 injury children get while playing on playgrounds.

Strangulations can also occur while a child is on a playground.
o Avoid loose hanging ropes- they are a strangulation risk.
o A rope should be secured at both ends.
o Never let your child wear helmets, necklaces, purses, scarves or
clothing with drawstrings while on a playground.

Teach your child the rules of the playground, including;
o
Never walk in front of a person swinging.
o
Go down the slide the right way, never backwards or head first.

Before using playground equipment, make sure the metal surfaces are not too hot. They can cause serious
burns if a child touches them.

If your home has a playground, make sure to follow these tips:
o Install according to the manufacturer’s instructions and pay careful attention to anchoring (to prevent the
playground set from falling over).
o Install surfacing under your playground to help soften the impact of falls and prevent serious injuries.
Good surfaces include:

Rubber

Sand

Sawdust (12 inches deep)

Wood chip

Bark
Install the playground at least 6 feet away from fences or walls.

Did you know?
o Asphalt, dirt, concrete and grass are not acceptable surfaces for underneath playground equipment.
o A one foot fall onto concrete could cause a concussion.
IMPORTANT TIP: If you see something unsafe while at a playground, notify the local agency, organization or school in
charge to make them aware so they can fix the problem.
Contact Us
For additional information on this or any Health Topic, please call the Family Resource Center, 513-636-7606, or your
healthcare provider.
09/12
Pedestrian Safety
Teach your child how to be safe near streets to help prevent injuries. Here are some tips to
share with your child:

Always look “left, then right and left” again before crossing the street to make sure a
car is not coming.

Use the sidewalks whenever available.

Know what street signs mean, including:
o Stop
o Walk
o Don’t walk
o Red, yellow and green stop light signals

Always cross the street at a cross walk with an adult. If you are in a group, cross
together, not one right after another. Make eye contact with the driver when crossing in front of a car.

Do not let children walk alone or cross the street by themselves until you know they can do it safely. This is
usually not until the pre-teen/early teen years.

Never run across a street trying to beat an oncoming car.

Do not walk between parked cars.

Use care when walking in parking lots. Watch for cars backing out of parking spaces.

Wear reflectors after dusk or use a flashlight when traveling near roads.
09/12
Gun Safety
Gun violence is one of the most common killers of children in America. One-third of all families in America have guns in
their home. Having a gun in the home significantly increases the chances of an accidental or intentional firearm injury or
death to you or a child in your home.
If you have a gun in your home:

Always store the gun unloaded.

Keep the gun locked in a box or safe that can only be accessed by the gun owner.

Store the bullets or other ammunition separately from the gun in another locked box or safe.

Hide the keys to both of the locked boxes.

Keep both the locked gun and ammunition boxes out of the reach of children.

Lock up gun-cleaning products - they may be harmful if swallowed.

Don’t ever keep a loaded gun next to your bed.
Talk to your child about gun safety. If your child sees a gun, he/she should:

Not touch the gun.

Walk away from the gun and leave the area.

Tell an adult.
To protect your child, find out if there is a gun in the homes where your kids play and talk to the parents to confirm that
they are practicing gun safety in their home.
REMEMBER: If there is a gun in the home, it is very important to make sure proper gun safety is being practiced by the
owner, especially when children live or visit the home often.
09/12
Sports Safety
Concussions
A concussion is a brain injury and should be taken
seriously. Your child may have a concussion if he or she
shows some of these signs and symptoms:
The National Youth Sports Safety Foundation reports
that more than 5 million youth athletes are seen and
treated in hospital emergency rooms each year due to
sports-related injuries.
Here are some tips for children who are playing sports:
•
•
•
•
•
Before starting any sport, make sure your child
has a physical exam done by their provider.
Make sure your child wears all of the protective
gear needed to safely participate in that sport.
Your child’s coach can help you with this.
Make sure your child knows the rules of the
sport to keep him/her safe.
Proper hydration is the key to prevent sportsrelated heat illness. Have your child drink
liquids before or during all athletic activities.
Coaches and other adults assisting the team
should know CPR and First Aid to help out in
the event of an emergency.
•
loses consciousness (even briefly)
•
confused
•
headache
•
vomiting
•
moving clumsily
•
can’t recall events just prior to or just after a
hit or fall
•
shows behavior or personality changes
•
dazed
If your child does have a concussion
•
Pull them out of the game
•
Get medical attention right away
•
Keep them out of the game until medically
cleared by their provider
Concussions take time to heal---so don’t rush the
recovery process!
Contact Us
For more information, visit our website. Click on Sports
Medicine to learn more.
http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/patients/child/health/
09/12
Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety
•
•
•
•
Internet
•
•
As children grow and develop, they can easily be influenced by
what they see and hear. While television programs and internet
sites can be educational, many children are exposed to television
that is inappropriate.
•
Parents can help decrease the harmful effects of media usage by
closely watching what your child is viewing on television and
searching on the internet.
•
Keep a close eye on your child’s TV and internet use.
Television
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose programs for your child to watch. Always plan
what your child will see on TV. Do not turn on the TV
randomly. You may give choices between two programs
you think are right for your child.
Turn to educational shows from the local Public
Broadcasting Station (PBS), or from programming such
as Discovery Channel, Learning Channel, or History
Channel.
Watch TV with your child. Talk about what happened on
the show. Talk about what was good or what was bad
about the program and the difference between reality
and make-believe.
Turn the TV off if the program is something you believe
your child should not see.
Do not assume all cartoons are acceptable and
appropriate, as many cartoons contain violence.
Many daytime programs (such as soap operas and talk
shows) are not appropriate for children.
Be a good example to your child by not watching too
much television yourself. Be involved in other activities,
especially reading. Read to your child.
•
•
•
•
Avoid using the TV as the child's "babysitter."
Encourage play and exercise for your child. Plan
other fun activities for your child, so he/she has
choices other than TV.
Limit using TV as a reward for good behavior.
Instead, offer a trip to the park, a festival,
playground, or a visit to a relative's/friend's house.
Do not watch TV during meal times.
Keep the computer in a common area of the house.
This will allow you to monitor usage.
Use parental control and filtering settings on the
computer.
Bookmark the sites your children go to often to make
access easier.
Watch your credit card and phone bills for unusual
charges.
Share an email account with your child so you can
monitor it.
Older kids may be very computer savvy but they still
need to be watched for safe behaviors.
Be aware of internet safety practices at school and
at the home of your child’s friends.
Discuss internet safety with your child as soon as
they start using the computer.
Computer Tips for Your Children
•
•
•
•
•
•
Stay away from chat rooms.
Never give out ANY personal information including what
city you live in, your age, your real name, or what school
you go to.
NEVER agree to meet someone you met online in person.
NEVER share photographs of yourself with someone you
don’t know.
If you receive an email that makes you feel uncomfortable
or threatening, tell your parents right away and do not
respond.
Remember that people may not be who they say they are.
09/12
Lawn Mower Safety
Mowing the lawn is a routine chore for most of us and we often don’t think
about the dangers related to lawn mowers. But a lawn mower can be a
deadly piece of equipment. Lawn Mower injuries are on the rise, up 3%
since 2009. Safety is key when using a lawn mower.
Why is Lawn Mower Safety So Important?


Common Causes of Lawn Mower Injuries
Lawn mower injuries can:
o
cause life changing injuries, both physical and
emotional
o
be very painful and disfiguring

Contact with rotating blade

Being hit by flying objects

Overturning

Ride-on mowers running over person
Following safety guidelines can save lives.
Injury Prevention Tips

Do not let children less than 12 years old operate any lawn mower. For ride-on mowers, children should be at
least 16 years old.

Never have passengers on ride-on mowers.

Keep young children at a safe distance from the area you are mowing.

Pick up stones, toys and debris from the lawn to prevent injuries from flying objects.

Use a mower with a control that stops it from moving forward if the handle is released.

Never pull backward or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary – carefully look for others behind you when
you do.

Always wear sturdy shoes while mowing – not sandals.

Always wear eye and hearing protection.
What Kind of Injury Can Happen?






Dislocated bones
Deep cuts
Arm, leg or genital amputation
Missing fingers or toes
Burns
Eye injuries
Treatment of Lawn Mower Injuries



Often requires a team of specialized doctors
Child may need multiple surgeries to repair the
injury
May need therapy to help regain function to
injured limb
11/11
Ages 15-18
Teen Driving Tips
As a driver, you are responsible for yourself, people in your car, and people on the road
around you.
All drivers, both teens and adults, should follow these tips:









Follow the rules of the road.
No matter how short the drive, always buckle up!
Make sure all of your passengers are buckled up.
Drive the speed limit.
Be alert. Always be aware of what is going on around you.
Be a courteous and safe driver at all times.
Keep at least a car’s length between you and the car ahead of you.
Always signal before making a turn. This helps other cars know what you’re doing and where you’re headed.
Children under 13 should remain in the backseat for their safety.
DON’T DRIVE DISTRACTED
Distraction includes the following activities:

Texting

Using a cell phone or smartphone

Eating and/or drinking

Talking to passengers

Grooming

Reading, including maps

Using a navigation system

Watching a video

Adjusting the radio, CD player or MP3 player
What if My Friends Won’t Buckle Up?
Stop the car until they do.
Unbuckled friends can get seriously hurt or killed in a
crash.
Click and save your life!
Double click and save your friend!
Driving With Friends



One friend doubles the risk of a crash.
Two friends triple the risk.
Three or more friends puts you at six times more risk of having an accident.
Never try to fit more people in the car than there are seat belts. Someone may get seriously hurt if you are in an accident.
Check your state laws for passenger limits for teen drivers.
Contact Us Injury Prevention 513-636-7865
09/12
All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Safety
ATVs are not toys. An ATV can travel up to 60 miles per hour and may weigh close to 700 pounds. About one-third of all
ATV related deaths and injuries involve children.
Here are some safety tips related to ATVs:

No child under the age of 16 should ride on an adult ATV.

Wearing safety equipment is important since an ATV can easily flip or turn over.

A child should always wear a helmet while riding on an ATV.
o
Choose the right kind of helmet – use one that is designed for ATV use.
o
Do not use a bike helmet.

Never ride on an ATV as a passenger. Many ATVs are only made for one person to ride at a time.

Stay off of paved roads or uneven terrain.

Make sure you know your state’s laws regarding ATVs.
For more information, go to www.atvsafety.gov
09/12
Fire and Burn Prevention
Fire Prevention

Install a smoke detector on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas.
o Test the smoke detector once a month to make sure it is still working.
o Change the batteries every year (or unless the directions say otherwise).

Carbon monoxide detectors are also important to have installed in your family’s home.
o Carbon monoxide gas is released from gas appliances that may not be functioning properly.
o These detectors find the colorless and odorless carbon monoxide gas which can be deadly.

Keep matches and lighters out of the reach of children.

Check your furnace or heating system each year to make sure it is working properly.

Check electrical appliances and cords regularly for damage or worn wires.

Have a fire extinguisher in your home, especially near the kitchen, furnace or fireplace in case of an emergency.

Create a fire escape plan for your house. Have your family practice what to do in case of a fire.
o Know two ways out of each room.
o Have a meeting spot outside.
o Call the fire department once outside.
Burn Prevention

Never carry your child with hot liquids in your hand or drink hot liquids while holding a child in your lap. Young
children tend to grab at things so put down your child before picking up something hot.

Turn the handles of pots toward the rear of the stove when cooking on the front burners.

Never leave a hot iron unattended. A child can easily pull on the cord and get burned.

Check the temperature of your home’s water heater. It should be less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit to keep you
and your family from getting burned.

If your child gets burned, put the burned area in cold water right away.
o Cover the area loosely with a clean cloth and call your child’s healthcare provider right away.
09/12
Second Hand Smoke Dangers
Second hand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by
the burning end of a cigarette, pipe, or cigar, and the smoke
exhaled from the lungs of smokers.
Second hand smoke is harmful to your children

Adults breathe in and out 14 to 18 times per minute.

A newborn baby breathes up to 60 times per minute.

When there is cigarette smoke in the air, children get more toxins in their lungs than adults.

Young children depend on adults to keep their surroundings safe. They need you to keep their air smoke-free.

Children who spend one hour in a very smoky room breathe in the toxic chemicals equal to smoking 10 cigarettes.

Infants in smoking households have more middle ear infections because the smoke irritates the tube leading to
the ear.
Other Important Facts
While you are trying to quit, here are some tips to keep your child safe from second hand smoke:

Do not smoke while holding a child.

Do not smoke in your home or car. The chemicals from smoking stay in your walls, furniture and even your child’s
toys and can stay in the air for several weeks.

If you must smoke, do it outdoors away from your child.

Seat your family in the non-smoking areas of restaurants and other public places.
The Effects of Smoking

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of having a premature baby and/or a baby with low birth weight.

The risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) increases up to four times for babies with mothers who
smoke, or smoked when they were pregnant.

Researchers have found that children exposed to second hand smoke every day are three times more likely to
develop lung cancer.

Children exposed to second hand smoke have smaller lungs and decreased lung function.
Thoughts about Quitting Smoking

It is not easy to quit smoking. Trying to do it alone can make it even harder.

Talk to your healthcare professional to find support.

The health benefits of quitting are great for both you and your child.

Find support in your attempt to quit smoking.
09/12
Gun Safety
Gun violence is one of the most common killers of children in America. One-third of all families in America have guns in
their home. Having a gun in the home significantly increases the chances of an accidental or intentional firearm injury or
death to you or a child in your home.
If you have a gun in your home:

Always store the gun unloaded.

Keep the gun locked in a box or safe that can only be accessed by the gun owner.

Store the bullets or other ammunition separately from the gun in another locked box or safe.

Hide the keys to both of the locked boxes.

Keep both the locked gun and ammunition boxes out of the reach of children.

Lock up gun-cleaning products - they may be harmful if swallowed.

Don’t ever keep a loaded gun next to your bed.
Talk to your child about gun safety. If your child sees a gun, he/she should:

Not touch the gun.

Walk away from the gun and leave the area.

Tell an adult.
To protect your child, find out if there is a gun in the homes where your kids play and talk to the parents to confirm that
they are practicing gun safety in their home.
REMEMBER: If there is a gun in the home, it is very important to make sure proper gun safety is being practiced by the
owner, especially when children live or visit the home often.
09/12
Sports Safety
Concussions
A concussion is a brain injury and should be taken
seriously. Your child may have a concussion if he or she
shows some of these signs and symptoms:
The National Youth Sports Safety Foundation reports
that more than 5 million youth athletes are seen and
treated in hospital emergency rooms each year due to
sports-related injuries.
Here are some tips for children who are playing sports:
•
•
•
•
•
Before starting any sport, make sure your child
has a physical exam done by their provider.
Make sure your child wears all of the protective
gear needed to safely participate in that sport.
Your child’s coach can help you with this.
Make sure your child knows the rules of the
sport to keep him/her safe.
Proper hydration is the key to prevent sportsrelated heat illness. Have your child drink
liquids before or during all athletic activities.
Coaches and other adults assisting the team
should know CPR and First Aid to help out in
the event of an emergency.
•
loses consciousness (even briefly)
•
confused
•
headache
•
vomiting
•
moving clumsily
•
can’t recall events just prior to or just after a
hit or fall
•
shows behavior or personality changes
•
dazed
If your child does have a concussion
•
Pull them out of the game
•
Get medical attention right away
•
Keep them out of the game until medically
cleared by their provider
Concussions take time to heal---so don’t rush the
recovery process!
Contact Us
For more information, visit our website. Click on Sports
Medicine to learn more.
http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/patients/child/health/
09/12
Water and Pool Safety
Ages 15-18
Although older children are more likely to know how to swim, they are at risk for drowning by overestimating their skills,
being unaware of water currents or water depth, and when drinking alcohol or using drugs.
Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)
CPR training is available through the American Red Cross and
the American Heart Association.

PFDs should be US Coast Guard approved.

Many states require the use of PFDs on all boats at
all times.

Blow-up swimming devices, such as “water wings,”
rafts, toys, and other items are not considered safe
and should not be relied on to prevent drowning.

It is important that the PFD is the correct size for your
child.

PFDs do not replace adult supervision!
Diving
Children in this age group are more likely to drown in bodies of
waters such as oceans, lakes, and rivers.

Always supervise your child when s/he is swimming in
any body of water.

Do not let your child dive unless you know the depth of
the water and it is at least nine feet.

Do not allow your child to swim during thunderstorms
or lightning storms.

Do not let your child rough-house with others in the
water in ways that may be mistaken for drowning.

Teach your child to stay calm and tread water until help
arrives if s/he drifts too far from shore.

Make sure your child wears a personal flotation device
(PFD) approved by the US Coast Guard when boating.



Diving accidents can result in permanent spinal cord
injuries, brain damage, and/or death.

Do not dive in shallow water.

Do not dive in above-ground pools- they are too
shallow.

Do not dive in the shallow end of a pool.

Make sure your teen checks the depth of the water
before diving.
Pool Safety
•
Insist that your teen always swim with a buddy.
•
Encourage teens to take swimming, diving, and water
safety or rescue classes to give them the skills needed to
swim and dive safely. These classes may also prevent your
teen from acting recklessly.
Do not allow your child to swim around boats and/or in
areas where people are water-skiing.
•
Teach your teen to NEVER swim or dive while under the
influence of alcohol or drugs.
Avoid letting your child play with blow-up water toys in
water that is above the waist.
•
Keep a telephone near the poolside for emergency use.
•
Do not let your child use a diving board in a pool that is not
approved for it.
•
Avoid pool slides; they are very dangerous.
•
Do not let your children use air-filled “swimming aids”
because they are not an approved life vest and can be
extremely dangerous.
09/12
Television, Media Usage, and Internet Safety
•
Be a good example to your child by not watching too
much television yourself. Be involved in other activities,
especially reading. Read to your child.
•
Avoid using the TV as the child's "babysitter."
•
Encourage play and exercise for your child. Plan
other fun activities for your child, so he/she has
choices other than TV.
•
Limit using TV as a reward for good behavior.
Instead, offer a trip to the park, a festival,
playground, or a visit to a relative's/friend's house.
•
Do not watch TV during meal times.
Internet
•
As children grow and develop, they can easily be influenced by
what they see and hear. While television programs and internet
sites can be educational, many children are exposed to television
that is inappropriate.
Parents can help decrease the harmful effects of media usage by
closely watching what your child is viewing on television and
searching on the internet.
Keep a close eye on your child’s TV and internet use.
•
•
•
•
•
Television
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choose programs for your child to watch. Always plan
what your child will see on TV. Do not turn on the TV
randomly. You may give choices between two programs
you think are right for your child.
Turn to educational shows from the local Public
Broadcasting Station (PBS), or from programming such
as Discovery Channel, Learning Channel, or History
Channel.
Watch TV with your child. Talk about what happened on
the show. Talk about what was good or what was bad
about the program and the difference between reality
and make-believe.
Turn the TV off if the program is something you believe
your child should not see.
Do not assume all cartoons are acceptable and
appropriate, as many cartoons contain violence.
Many daytime programs (such as soap operas and talk
shows) are not appropriate for children.
•
Keep the computer in a common area of the house.
This will allow you to monitor usage.
Use parental control and filtering settings on the
computer.
Bookmark the sites your children go to often to make
access easier.
Watch your credit card and phone bills for unusual
charges.
Share an email account with your child so you can
monitor it.
Older kids may be very computer savvy but they still
need to be watched for safe behaviors.
Be aware of internet safety practices at school and
at the home of your child’s friends.
Discuss internet safety with your child as soon as
they start using the computer.
Computer Tips for Your Children
•
•
•
•
•
•
Stay away from chat rooms.
Never give out ANY personal information including what
city you live in, your age, your real name, or what school
you go to.
NEVER agree to meet someone you met online in person.
NEVER share photographs of yourself with someone you
don’t know.
If you receive an email that makes you feel uncomfortable
or threatening, tell your parents right away and do not
respond.
Remember that people may not be who they say they are.
09/12
Lawn Mower Safety
Mowing the lawn is a routine chore for most of us and we often don’t think
about the dangers related to lawn mowers. But a lawn mower can be a
deadly piece of equipment. Lawn Mower injuries are on the rise, up 3%
since 2009. Safety is key when using a lawn mower.
Why is Lawn Mower Safety So Important?


Common Causes of Lawn Mower Injuries
Lawn mower injuries can:
o
cause life changing injuries, both physical and
emotional
o
be very painful and disfiguring

Contact with rotating blade

Being hit by flying objects

Overturning

Ride-on mowers running over person
Following safety guidelines can save lives.
Injury Prevention Tips

Do not let children less than 12 years old operate any lawn mower. For ride-on mowers, children should be at
least 16 years old.

Never have passengers on ride-on mowers.

Keep young children at a safe distance from the area you are mowing.

Pick up stones, toys and debris from the lawn to prevent injuries from flying objects.

Use a mower with a control that stops it from moving forward if the handle is released.

Never pull backward or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary – carefully look for others behind you when
you do.

Always wear sturdy shoes while mowing – not sandals.

Always wear eye and hearing protection.
What Kind of Injury Can Happen?






Dislocated bones
Deep cuts
Arm, leg or genital amputation
Missing fingers or toes
Burns
Eye injuries
Treatment of Lawn Mower Injuries



Often requires a team of specialized doctors
Child may need multiple surgeries to repair the
injury
May need therapy to help regain function to
injured limb
11/11
Miscellaneous
Fireworks Safety
During the summer, fireworks become a fascination for people of all ages, especially children. However, some people do
not realize how dangerous fireworks, even sparklers, can be.

Be sure other people are out of range before
lighting fireworks.
Make sure you know

your local laws on the
Only light fireworks on a smooth, flat surface away
from the house, dry leaves and grass, and other
use of fireworks.
things that may catch on fire.

Light only one firework at a time.

Use long match sticks to light the fireworks, not
Make your holiday and summer safe, and make sure
lighters or cigarettes.
you and your family take precautions when around

Never shorten or lengthen the fuse.
fireworks.

Never try to relight "dud" fireworks that have not
Incidence of Injury from Fireworks Accidents
Children aged 5 to 9 years have the highest injury rates.
Sparklers, which are considered safe by many, can be
very dangerous. They can burn at temperatures over
1000 degrees Fahrenheit and easily set clothing on fire,
causing serious burns.
fully functioned; if it does not go off, wait 15
minutes and soak the firework in water.

Keep water handy (a garden hose and a bucket) in
case of a malfunction or a fire.

The shooter should always wear eye and ear
protection and never have any part of the body
Common Injuries from Fireworks
over the firework when lighting.

Burns

Hand and finger injuries

Head injuries

Never shoot fireworks in metal or glass containers.

Eye injuries

If necessary, store fireworks in a cool, dry place.

Hearing loss

Dispose of fireworks properly by soaking them in

animals, or buildings that can catch on fire.
water and then disposing of them in your trashcan
Preventing Injuries



Never throw or point fireworks at other people,
(wait 15 to 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket
of water).
Leave fireworks to the professionals.
Never allow children to play with or light fireworks,

Never carry fireworks in your pocket.
even sparklers.

Observe all local laws.
Older children who decide to use fireworks should
always be supervised by an adult.

Only buy from reliable sellers.
Contact Us

Never experiment or make your own fireworks.

Stay away from illegal explosives.

Use outdoors only.
For additional information on this or any Safety and
Injury Prevention Health Topic, please call Trauma
Services, 513-636-7865

Always read and follow all warnings and label
instructions.
09/12
Halloween Safety
Pedestrian Safety
Nutrition and Treat Safety

Never go trick-or-treating alone. Make sure an
adult is always with you.


Walk from house to house. Do not run.
Tell your children to bring the candy home to be
inspected before eating anything. Avoid eating
homemade treats made by strangers.

Stay on well-lit streets. Look left, right and then left
again before crossing the street.

Check candy for choking hazards for younger
children, like hard or chewy candy.

Walk with a flashlight. Put reflective tape on your
child’s costume and/or bag so drivers easily see
them.

Limit the amount of candy eaten each day. Make
sure children brush their teeth well after eating
candy.

Go only to well-lit houses and remain on porches
rather than entering houses


Stay away from and don't pet animals you don't
know.
Healthy food alternatives for trick-or-treaters include
packages of low-fat crackers with cheese or peanut
butter filling, single-serve boxes of cereal,
packaged fruit rolls, mini boxes of raisins and
single-serve packets of low-fat popcorn.

Cross streets at the corner; use crosswalks when
available and never cross between parked cars.

Non-food treats may include plastic rings, pencils,
stickers, erasers and coins.
Costume Safety
Other Halloween Options

Use nontoxic face paint instead of masks. Masks
can limit your child’s ability to see.

Try decorating pumpkins with markers and stickers
instead of carving.

Test the face paint or makeup on a small part of the
child’s skin to check for allergic reactions.


Toy swords, knives and other toy weapons should
be short, soft and flexible.
Invite children over to have a costume party with
games. This will limit the dangers of walking from
house-to-house in the dark.

Many recreation centers, schools, churches and
community centers host a Halloween or fall party.

Battery powered jack-o'-lantern candles are
preferable to a real flame. If you do use candles,
place the pumpkin well away from where trick-ortreaters will be walking or standing.

Wear flame-resistant costumes. Look for a tag or
sticker saying the costume is flame-resistant before
purchasing.

Have your child's name and address attached to his
or her costume.

Make sure your child's costume doesn't drag on the
ground.

Shoes should fit well, even if they don't go with the
costume.

Wear clothing with reflective markings or tape.
Contact Us
The Drug and Poison Information Center is available
24-hours/day, 1-800-222-1222.
09/12
Winter Safety Tips
The holiday season is usually
a time of joy, but it also brings
with it the potential for
poisonings and other safety
hazards. The following tips
include frequent holiday safety
hazards and ways to ensure
that families have a safe
holiday season.
Holly
There are a least 400 different types of holly. Although
the exact nature of the toxic chemicals in holly is not yet
known, it is claimed that deaths have occurred in
children who have eaten as few as 12 berries.


Alcohol
Ethyl alcohol is a common and potentially toxic
ingredient in holiday beverages. It, or denatured alcohol,
is also found in gifts such as perfumes and colognes. .

Alcohol poisoning is often due to families
leaving unfinished drinks lying around after
holiday parties where children might find them.

Because of their small size, children are more
likely to get alcohol poisoning than are adults.

Make sure all alcohol is put away before bed.
Poinsettia



Serious incidents probably do not occur due to
ingestion of parts of the domestic varieties of
poinsettia (gastrointestinal and local irritation
are occasionally reported).
It is possible for children who play with the
leaves of this plant and then rub their eyes to
get redness and local irritation.
Claims that poinsettia can cause "fatal
convulsions,” severe gastrointestinal
symptoms, or that it is completely harmless,
are not supported by scientific evidence.
Mistletoe
Certain varieties of mistletoe contain substances that, in
large quantities, can affect the nervous system, blood
pressure and the heart.

Berries have the greatest risk for causing
symptoms of poisoning, although other parts of
the plant also contain toxins. In the amounts
(one or two) usually ingested by small children,
there is no documented cause for alarm or
need for treatment.
The berries of a few types of holly plants are
poisonous. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and a
slowing down of breathing and heart rate can
occur after eating holly berries.
Children might also eat the leaves of holly
plants. These could also contain potentially
toxic chemicals.
Jerusalem Cherry
Although this plant is thought to contain solanine, a
substance found in several plants with known toxic
potential, reports of toxicity are rare.

Reported signs and symptoms of solanine
toxicity include: dilated pupils, salivation,
nausea, vomiting, headache, bloating, diarrhea,
respiratory depression, central nervous system
depression, confusion, irregular heartbeat,
coma and death.

It is unclear how many cherries would have to
be eaten to produce any of these symptoms.
Other Poisonous Products
Many people think that other products used during the
holiday season cause poisoning, but they do not. These
include angel hair, candles, Christmas cactus,
Christmas trees and evergreens, garland, tinsel, icicles,
and snow spray or flock.
Essential Oils and Flavors
Some ingredients, such as salicylates in oil of
wintergreen, menthol, camphor, eucalyptol, and other
oils and flavorings, can be poisonous. Other products
may have high alcohol content or the risk to cause
severe problems if eaten.
Contact the Drug and Poison Information Center
(DPIC) if ingestion occurs
513-636-5111 or 1-800-222-1222
10/12
Winter Safety Tips (continued)
Dry Ice
Lights- indoor and outdoor
Dry ice is used in many ways throughout the holiday
season. Dry ice is made up of carbon dioxide.

Avoid skin contact with solid pieces of dry ice
or with pieces that might be eaten.

Skin contact can cause tissue damage, and
burns to the mouth can occur if eaten.

Flush the skin with lukewarm water if direct
exposure occurs, and give lukewarm water to
drink if a solid piece is swallowed.
Check each set of lights for damaged sockets or wires
and throw away any bad strands. Follow the
manufacturer’s recommendations on the maximum
number of light sets that can be connected together.
Turn off all lights when you go to bed or leave the
house. Use only light sets and extension cords marked
“for outdoor use” outside your home.
Christmas Tree Ornaments
Use only non-combustible or flame-resistant materials to
trim a tree. Never use lighted candles on or near a tree
or other evergreens. Keep children and pets in mind
when placing decorations on a tree. Make sure easy-tobreak ornaments are out of reach.
Made of thin metal, plastic, wood, glass, etc., Christmas
tree ornaments are of concern for their potential to cut
or block the airway if eaten. Ingestion of the dry paint or
coloring on these objects should not pose a hazard.
Decorations
Gifts
Disc (Button) Batteries
These can be found in such common gift items as toys,
cameras, watches and calculators.

Children or adults swallowing a disc battery
should be evaluated, which may include
referral to an emergency department for x-ray
location of the object.

The type of care given depends on the
findings.

Problems usually only occur if the battery
becomes lodged or ruptures.
Trees
When buying an artificial tree, look for a “Fire Resistant”
label. When buying a live tree, check for freshnessmake sure the needles are soft and don’t fall off. Live
trees need plenty of water so check your tree’s water
level daily - dry trees can burn in seconds! Do not block
your home’s exit with the tree. Remove live trees from
your home as soon as possible. Many tree fires occur
on or after New Year’s Day.
“Think Big” when choosing toys for small children- small
parts could be a choking hazard. Make sure gifts are
appropriate for the child’s age. “Think Easy” when
choosing a gift for someone who may have arthritis or
some other physical challenge. Consider giving the gift
of safety- smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors
and fire extinguishers make great gifts!
Fireplaces and Heaters
Before starting a fire in a fireplace, remove all
decorations (including stockings) and be sure the flu is
open. Do not burn wrapping paper in the fireplace- it can
burn very fast and throw off sparks. Always place a
screen in front of the fireplace.
When plugging in electric heaters, make sure the outlet
was designed to handle the load. When using kerosene
heaters, make sure you use the correct fuel- using the
wrong fuel can cause a fire or even an explosion.
Be Prepared!
Check the batteries in your smoke detector and carbon
monoxide detector monthly! Change the batteries as
instructed by the manufacturer. Install smoke detectors
on each level of your home, especially near sleeping
areas. Develop a fire escape plan and practice the plan
with your family!
Contact the Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) if ingestion occurs
513-636-5111 or 1-800-222-1222
10/12
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