Car Seat and Air Bag Information - Children`s Health and Safety

Car Seat and Air Bag Information - Children`s Health and Safety
Car Seat Safety
Please click on any of the links below to go directly to your specified topic within this document.
New Child Seat Regulations
Frequently Asked Questions
Your Child Could Be In Danger
Protecting Your Unborn Child
Child Restraints – Safety Regulations
Very Important Issues
Accessories to Car Seats
Shopping for a Child Restraint System
Used Car Seats
Sleeping in Car Seats
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
 Stage One: Rear Facing Infant Seat
 Stage Two: Forward Facing Child Seat
 Stage Three: Booster Seat
 Stage Four: Seat Belt
Lower Universal Anchorage System
More Information on Types of Seats
Special Case Installations
Child Restraints on Aircraft
Child Restraints on School Buses
Child Restraints in a Taxi
Child Restraints in a Motor Home
Child Restraints on a Boat
Car Seat Manufacturers
Car Dealerships
Department of Justice Canada – Criminal Court of Canada
Car Seat Installation Videos
Car Seat Glossary
Canadian Car and Booster Seat Legislation Chart
Canada – Provincial and Territorial Governments
Other Provincial and Territorial Links
Emergency Preparedness Guide
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
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April 14, 2014
New Child Seat Regulations
On January 1st, 2012, new child restraint systems and booster seat requirements became
mandatory. A 19-month transition period allows manufacturers to make the necessary
design modifications to their seats and testing equipment while continuing to supply the
Canadian market with restraint systems that provide a high level of safety. Parents
do not need to replace their child's current car seat if it is in good condition and is
designed for their child's height and weight.
Frequently Asked Questions
1) What are the new regulations for car seat testing?
The new regulations for car seats (Motor Vehicle Restraint Systems and Booster Seats Safety
Regulations) are an upgrade to the previous regulations. These regulations were rewritten to align
with the United States on many issues and to incorporate some new and unique Canadian testing
requirements. The new regulations ensure an appropriate minimum level of safety for children while
using the most up-to-date technology available for testing.
2) What is the difference between the new regulations and the old ones?
The major changes incorporated in the new Canadian regulations include:
a lap/shoulder seat belt testing requirement for all types of car seats, since lap/shoulder belts have
been commonly found in most vehicles for several years;
changes to child seats' dynamic testing to adopt most of the U.S. testing parameters, including
using the United States acceleration corridor and their performance criteria;
changing the definition of an infant from up to 9 kg, to up to 10 kg;
an increase in the maximum allowable weight limit of child seats from 22 kg to 30 kg;
an introduction of dynamic testing requirements for booster seats;
extending the limitation on rebound to all rear facing child seats; and
the allowance of harnesses to be certified for usage on school buses for special needs children.
3) What are the differences between the new Canadian regulations and the regulations in the
United States?
These regulations were rewritten to align with the United States on many issues and to incorporate
some new and unique Canadian testing requirements. The differences between the Canadian and
U.S. regulations include:
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The need for labels, information, and instructions to be provided in both of Canada’s official
languages;
The minimum weight requirement to use a booster seat remains at 18kg (versus 13.6 kg in the
US);
The mandatory use of a tether strap for front-facing child seats;
A mandatory inversion test for both infant and child seats;
A unique booster deflection test;
The lap/shoulder seat belt testing requirement for all types of car seats;
The extension of the limitation on rebound to all rear facing child seats; and
Energy absorbing material requirements.
4) Why were these regulations created?
These regulations were originally created in the 1980s because the vehicle seat belt systems (which
are meant for adult occupants) were not designed to protect children in the event of a collision.
Requirements were also added to address special situations. For example, standards for restraint
systems for infants with special needs were created partly because child seats are required to have a
certain seat back angle, while infants with special needs need to lie flat on their backs.
5) Do I need to replace my car seat?
It is not necessary to replace a child seat as a result of these new requirements. However, the child
seat should be replaced if it was in a car that was involved in a collision. Even if your child wasn’t in
the child seat when the collision occurred, the child seat could be damaged. Child seats have expiry
dates - so make sure you replace yours when it expires. If the shell or materials on the seat are ripped
or damaged, replace it.
The previous standards have provided a high level of safety for children for many years and will
continue to provide protection throughout the useful life of a child restraint
It is important to note that if you own a car seat or booster seat made before January 1, 2012, under
Health Canada's Canada Consumer Product Safety Act, you may not be able to advertise, sell, or
give it (including lending) away because it may not meet the latest requirements set out by Health
Canada and Transport Canada.
6) Why do car seats have expiry dates?
Although expiry dates, or useful life dates, are not required by regulation, all manufacturers of
children’s restraint systems provide them. Manufacturers indicate (stamp) an expiry or useful life date
because over time:
frequent use and exposure to sunlight can damage and weaken plastic;
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safe-use labels on the products fade or become hard to read;
instruction manuals have likely been lost;
food, cleaners, drinks and other materials that have been spilled or used on webbing, buckles,
adjusters and other parts may prevent them from working safely;
the history or condition of the car seat or booster cushion becomes hard to check (was it in a
collision, was it stored in a place or in a way that caused damage to parts, etc.?);
safety regulations & standards may have changed & improved products may now be on the market
second or subsequent owners may not get product safety recall notices if problems arise.
The provincial and territorial laws state that children's car seats and booster seats (if applicable)
must be certified to Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and must be used according to the
manufacturer's instructions. If you don't follow the instructions or if you use them past their expiry
or useful life dates, you may be putting your child’s safety at risk and you may be found guilty of
breaking the law. People should not use children’s car seats and booster cushions past their expiry
or useful life date.
7) Are there unsafe child seats in the market?
All seats that are on the Canadian market must bear the National Safety Mark attesting to the fact that
the authorized manufacturer is certifying that the seat meets the prescribed Canadian safety
standards. Transport Canada monitors the manufacturers’ testing and certification programs through
its own independent compliance-testing program. Transport Canada does not endorse individual
products, nor does it rank or rate them against each other as all seats of a particular kind must
achieve the same minimum level of performance, as referenced in the regulations. The level of safety
provided by a seat ultimately depends on the unique conditions of a collision, including the
appropriate use and proper installation of the seat using the available restraint systems (belts,
anchorages, etc.) of the vehicle.
Transport Canada continues to examine ways to improve the level of safety provided by existing
standards through the Department’s research program. If the department sees an opportunity to
enhance the safety of Canadian products regulated under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act, we then work
with our international partners in an effort to create harmonized regulations, so that seat
manufacturers can offer very similar, updated, compliant seats in multiple markets. This keeps the
seats affordable for Canadians.
8) What is the National Safety Mark?
The National Safety Mark (NSM) is the property of the Government of Canada and
its use is authorized by the Minister of Transport to manufacturers and/or importers
of new vehicles and vehicle restraint systems offered for sale in Canada. Transport
Canada requires the manufacturers and/or importers that are authorized to affix
the mark, to have the capability to certify their vehicle or restraint system
production to comply with the regulations under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act.
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NSM sample - the unique number assigned to a company is to appear in the center of the NSM.
9) Where can I find out more information on car seats?
Information on car seats and the stages of car seat use can be found on the Transport Canada web
site at http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/roadsafety/safedrivers-childsafety-car-time-stages-1083.htm
The 'Frequently Asked Questions' listed above was resourced from Transport Canada.
Your Child Could Be In Danger
Every year, over 10,000 children 12 or under are injured, some of them
fatally, in traffic collisions. Surveys show that as many as 80% of Canadian
children are not properly restrained when they are travelling in motor
vehicles.
The best way to protect children from the danger of collisions or sudden
stops is to restrain them properly in the rear seat of your vehicle - the "Kid
Zone." The "Kid Zone" is the safest place for children aged 12 or under. In
fact, statistics show that kids are 25% safer in the rear seat.
Protecting Your Unborn Child
Seat belts are required by law and the best way to protect an unborn child in a motor vehicle collision
is to protect the mother. Pregnant women should always wear the lap and shoulder belt when riding
in a vehicle. Worn properly, the seat belt will not harm the baby. The belt should be worn low over
the pelvic bones and not against the soft stomach area. It should be as snug as possible without
being uncomfortable and the shoulder belt should be worn across the chest.
Child Restraints - Safety Regulations
Various organizations and government agencies are involved in setting regulations and providing
information on child restraint systems (child car seats).
Transport Canada is responsible for setting safety standards on infant and child restraint systems.
This federal government department ensures that manufacturers who produce child restraints comply
with Canadian safety standards. The Department also investigates public complaints regarding
possible safety defects in child restraints and ensures that manufacturers inform the public of any
defective seat.
Health Canada in conjunction with Transport Canada is responsible for ensuring the safety of child
safety seats by regulating or prohibiting their sale, advertisement, and importation. This would include
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the sale of seats in second-hand stores or garage sales.
All child restraint systems (infant, child, and booster seats) sold in Canada must meet Canadian
Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (CMVSS) set by Transport Canada. These standards ensure that
the movement of the child will be limited in the event of a collision or a sudden stop. They also set
safety levels for strength, flammability, padding thickness, and requirements for installation
instructions. Look for the National Safety Mark on the car seat like the one pictured here:
For additional information on child restraints or if you suspect a safety-related defect
with your child car seat, click on Transport Canada to send them an email or call
them at.
Information Centre: 1-800-333-0371
Web Site: www.tc.gc.ca/roadsafety
Very Important Issues
Transport Canada and safety exports strongly recommend that children under the age of 12
always ride in the back seat of a vehicle.
Regardless of where a child sits, their car seat must be appropriate for their height and weight and
the car seat must be attached correctly to the vehicle seat and according to the manufacturer's
instructions.
It is against the law in Canada to leave a child alone in a vehicle at anytime. The 'Highway Traffic
Act' states: "
Be mindful of power window buttons or switches that children can accidentally lean on and cause
to open.
Remove sleeping babies and children from your vehicle right away.
Remember to lock your vehicle doors and the trunk of your car when not in use so that children
cannot get into the vehicle on their own.
Accessories to Car Seats
Accessories such as bunting bags, seat belt adjusters, plastic trays, mirrors, harness strap covers
and head support pads that are not included with the new car seat should not be used. They could
cause injury to your child when your car stops suddenly or is in a collision.
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April 14, 2014
Shopping for a Child Restraint System
The seat must meet Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (CMVSS) as set by Transport
Canada. Seats bought in other countries, including the United States, may not meet strict Canadian
standards. It is against the law to use a child restraint that does not meet Canadian standards. Look
for the National Safety Mark.
Make sure the seat is appropriate for the height, weight and muscular development of your child
and that the seat allows space for the child to grow.
A higher price is often only an indication of a more expensive fabric covering or additional
accessory features. The 'best' car seat is one that fits the above criteria, can be installed correctly in
your car, and one that you will use every time you drive.
All vehicles are different. The restraint you require for your child must fit firmly and securely on
your vehicle seat. Prior to September 1, 2002, most restraints required the use of the seat belt system.
Try the seat out before buying it. Does your child look comfortable? Consider the material, the
freedom for arm movement, the comfort for sleep, the space for bulky clothing, etc. Also, make sure
the harness straps are long enough for continued use as your child grows.
Finally, remember to fill out the registration card that comes with your seat so the manufacturer can
contact you for any recalls.
Used Car Seats
Take CCAUTION when buying a used car seat. Car seats must meet the Canadian Motor Vehicle
Safety Standard (CMVSS) and carry the compliance label stating the height and weight of the child for
which the seat is designed. Detailed instructions, all straps and parts, (including the tether strap for
forward-facing seats), must be present. Please read the following checklist to ensure your child's
safety.
Does the car seat have a 'National Safety Mark' sticker and an expiry date? If not, it may not meet
Transport Canada's safety regulations.
If the car seat does not have a label with the date of manufacture and seat name or model number,
it may be too old, or it may have been subject to recall. Without a label, you cannot check with
Transport Canada website for recalls, and you place your child's safety at risk.
Does the car seat come with instructions and a manual? Is it missing parts? You need
instructions to know how to install the car seat and need all the parts so that you can install it properly.
Does the car seat have any cracks in the frame? Has the car seat been in a collision? Seats that
are cracked or broken must not be sold. It is important to know the history of any second-hand car
seat, and it should not be used if it has ever been involved in a collision.
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If a car seat is no longer safe to use, please cut the harness straps and tear the fabric before
placing it into the garbage for pick-up. This will ensure that the car seat will not be reused.
Sleeping in Car Seats
Children often fall asleep in their car seats while travelling. Car seats are designed to transport
children safely from one destination to another, and never be used in place of a crib.
Newborn children are at risk of suffering from breathing difficulties while in their car seats because
they do not have the strength to hold their heads up.
Very young infants should not spend more than an hour at a time in their car seat and parents
should ensure that the infant is positioned properly, and monitor that they are breathing comfortably.
Ensuring that the rear-facing car seat is positioned at a 45-degree angle reduces the risk of a
baby's head dropping forward and causing breathing problems.
Continued…next page
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Children's Health and Safety Association
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April 14, 2014
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Stage One: Rear-Facing Infant Seat
Weight: 0 to 10 kg (0 - 22 lb.)
Age: Birth to around 1 year old
Canadian law requires newborns and infants use a rear-facing car seat from birth until a child
reaches the height and weight limitations of the car seat.
At this stage, the recommended infant restraint is a Rear-Facing Infant Seat. (For heavier babies,
use an infant/child seat that allows a higher weight in the rear-facing position. Please refer to
manufacturer's instructions for weight limits.)
The safest position for a rear-facing infant seat is in the rear seat of the vehicle (the "KID
ZONE").
Install the rear-facing infant seat according to manufacturer's instruction, placing it in the centre
position of the rear seat whenever possible.
Secure the infant seat tightly with the seat belt so that the base doesn't slide or move more that
2.5 cm (1 inch) in any direction.
Properly place the infant into the rear-facing seat, ensuring the harness straps are snug.
This is the most protective car seat designed for larger infants so use it for as long as it
accommodates your infant's height and weight. The laws vary from province to province so please
check the provincial laws for specific legal requirements. If you would like more information or have
questions regarding your child's car seat, please click on Transport Canada to send them an email or
call them at 1-800-333-0371.
If your vehicle has Side Air Bags in the Rear Seat:
If you choose to install the infant seat next to a door, clear the area between the infant seat and the
door of all objects. Toys, blankets and even pillows could harm your baby if the side air bag inflates.
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If your vehicle has NO Rear Seat:
Never place an infant seat in the front seat of a vehicle equipped with a front air bag unless you
are sure that the air bag is de-activated.
If the front passenger air bag has been deactivated and you have no alternative but to travel with
your baby in the front seat of a vehicle:
1. Adjust the front passenger seat to the rearmost track position by sliding the seat back as far
as it will go.
2. Install the rear-facing infant seat according to manufacturer's instructions. Tightly secure it
with the seat belt so that the base doesn't slide or move more than 2.5 cm (1 inch) in any
direction.
3. Clear the area between the infant seat and the door of all objects. Toys, blankets, and even
pillows could harm your baby if the side air bag inflates.
Stage Two:
Forward-Facing Child Seat
Weight: 10 – 30 kg (22.5 – 67.5 lb.)
Age: About 1 - 4½ years old
If a child can walk unassisted and has outgrown the height and weight restrictions for the rearfacing car seat, then they, according to Canadian law, are ready for a forward-facing car seat. The
laws vary from province to province so please check the provincial laws for specific legal
requirements. If you would like more information or have questions regarding your child's car seat,
please click on Transport Canada to send them an email or call them at 1-800-333-0371.
Also, you will find that some child seats can be used for a longer duration - until your child weighs
22 kg. or 48 lb. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions for weight limits in the forward-facing position.
The safest position for a forward-facing child seat is in the rear seat of the vehicle (the "KID
ZONE").
Install the forward-facing child seat according to manufacturer's instructions, placing it in the
centre position of the rear seat whenever possible.
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Tightly secure it with the seat belt and the top tether strap so that the base doesn't slide or move
more than 2.5 cm (1 inch) in any direction.
If your vehicle has Side Air Bags in the Rear Seat:
If you choose to install the infant seat next to a door, clear the area between the infant seat and
the door of all objects. Toys, blankets and even pillows could harm your baby if the side air bag
inflates.
If your vehicle has NO Rear Seat:
Never place an infant seat in the front seat of a vehicle equipped with a front air bag unless you are
sure that the air bag has been deactivated.
Never place a child seat in the front seat of a vehicle that doesn't have a tether anchorage
location.
If the front passenger air bag has been deactivated and you have no alternative but to travel with
your baby in the front seat of a vehicle:
1. Adjust the front passenger seat to the rearmost track position by sliding the seat back as far
as it will go.
2. Install the forward-facing child seat according to manufacturer's instructions. Tightly secure it
with the seat belt and top tether strap so that the base doesn't slide or move more than 2.5 cm
(1 inch) in any direction.
3. Clear the area between the child seat and the door of all objects. Toys, blankets, and even
pillows could harm your child if the side air bag inflates.
Continued…next page
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Children's Health and Safety Association
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April 14, 2014
Stage Three: Booster Seat
Weight: 18 to 27 kg (40.5 – 60.75 lb.)
Age: About 4½ - 8 years old
At this stage, your child is ready for a Booster Seat and has
become too tall for their child car seat. (Check that the mid-point of
your child's ears is not above the child car seat).
You may find that a high-back booster seat will do the best job of preventing your child from
leaning against the door.
It is very important to get a good fit so try several booster seats before purchasing.
The booster seat raises the child in the vehicle seat enabling the lap and shoulder belts to be
positioned correctly.
Install the booster seat according to manufacturer's instructions, ensuring your child is buckled up
properly and for weight and height limitations.
Position the vehicle seat belt low on the child's hips and place the shoulder belt on the middle of
the child's shoulder being careful not to touch the child's neck
On the road, remind your child not to lean out of the booster seat and to keep his or her head,
arms, and feet away from the door.
Check your child's position frequently throughout the journey.
If you would like more information regarding your child's booster seat, please click on Transport
Canada or call them at 1-800-333-0371.
If your vehicle has Side Air Bags in the Rear Seat:
Select a seating location away from side air bags whenever possible.
If you place the booster seat near a door, clear the area between the booster seat and the door of
all objects. Toys, blankets and even pillows could harm your child if the side air bag inflates.
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If your vehiclee has NO Rear Seat:
Never place a booster seat in the front seat of a vehicle equipped with a front air bag unless the air
bag is deactivated.
If the front passenger air bag has been deactivated, and you have no alternative but to travel with
your child in the front seat of a vehicle:
1. Adjust the front passenger seat to the rearmost track position by sliding the seat back as far
as it will go.
2. Install the booster seat according to manufacturer's instructions. If the front passenger air bag
has been deactivated and you have no alternative but to travel with your baby in the front
seat of a vehicle:
3. Clear the area between the infant seat and the door of all objects. Toys, blankets, and even
pillows could harm your baby if the side air bag inflates.
While you are on the road, remind your child not to lean out of the booster seat and to keep his or
her head, arms, and feet away from the door, and check your child's position frequently throughout
the journey.
Stage Four: Seat Belt
Weight: Over 27 kg (60 lb.)
Age: About 8 - 12 years old
At this stage, your child is ready to buckle up using a seat belt. Teach
your children that this is the law.
The safest position for a child aged 12 and under is still in the rear seat of the vehicle (the "KID
ZONE").
If your vehicle has Side Air Bags in the Rear Seat:
Select a seating location away from side air bags whenever possible.
Position the vehicle seat belt low on the child's hips and place the shoulder belt on the middle of
the child's shoulder being careful not to touch the child's neck
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Never place the shoulder belt behind the child or under the arm.
If you have no alternative but to place your child in a seat equipped with a side air bag:
1. Fasten the seat belt as above.
2. Have your child sit up straight and remind your child not to lean against the door at any time.
3. Ensure the area between your child and the door is clear of all objects. Toys, blankets, and
even pillows could harm your child if the side air bag inflates.
Check your child's position frequently throughout the journey.
If your vehicle has NO Rear Seat:
Don't let children travel in the front seat of a vehicle equipped with a front passenger air bag unless
the air bag has been deactivated.
If you have no alternative but to travel with your child in the front seat of a vehicle:
1. Adjust the front passenger seat to the rearmost track position by sliding the seat back as far
as it will go.
2. Make sure your child is properly buckled up, with the lap belt low and snug over the hips and
the shoulder belt across the chest. Never place the shoulder belt behind the child or under the
arm.
3. Have your child sit up straight and remind your child not to lean against the door at any time.
4. Ensure the area between your child and the door is clear of all objects. Toys, blankets, and
even pillows could harm your child if the side air bag inflates.
Since children may be able to manipulate or unfasten their seat belt, remind them that the seat belt
is not only for their safety but that it is the law. Set a good example by always wearing one yourself.
Continued…next page
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Children's Health and Safety Association
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Lower Universal Anchorages
Systems for Vehicles, Infant and
Child Seats
All new vehicles manufactured in Canada, on or after September 1, 2002, are equipped with the
Lower Universal Anchorage System (UAS) in at least two rear-seating positions. The new system,
also known as the ISOFIX or Latch (Lower Anchors and Tether for Children), makes installing car
seats easier. This innovative system was built into some earlier vehicle models but it is now the norm
for most vehicles as required by Transport Canada.
Concurrently, all new infant and child seats manufactured in Canada, on or after September 1, 2002,
are equipped with two connectors that can be attached to the new system in vehicles. These new
seats are still designed to work with seat belts in any vehicle. Both systems are equal in terms of
safety when properly installed, however the new design is far more convenient to use. Never use
both systems at the same time.
To use the new system:
In your vehicle, you will need to locate the 2 lower anchors installed between the vehicle seat back
and seat cushion. Look for the "LATCH" symbol (see above) or consult the vehicle owner's manual.
There will be at least two rear-seating positions with a system. Each positions will have a top tether
anchor installed.
Besides the top tether strap, your new car seat will have two attachments with connectors. Look for
the "LATCH" symbol. These attachments are 1 of 2 types:


Flexible (strap) attachments use a hook that is connected to a length of belt webbing that
tightens like a seat belt after being hooked to the vehicle's anchor. (Refer to the diagram
below).
Rigid (bar) attachments are metal bars that clamp to the vehicle anchor. (Not shown).
Read and follow the vehicle owner's manual and car seat manufacturer's instructions for correct
installation of ALL car seats.
Regardless of which system you use (UAS or seat belts) all forward-facing car seats and combination
seats, used as a forward- facing seat, will have a top tether strap attachment that hooks to the top
tether anchor. A tether strap is an additional belt that anchors the car seat top to the vehicle,
reducing the forward movement and rotation of the seat in a crash. Never use the top tether strap
with a rear-facing car seat, booster seat or a combination seat. When it is being used as a booster
seat, remember to remove the loose and unused strap as it may cause injury in the case of a sudden
stop.
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Stages 1, 2, 3 and 4
More Information on Types of Seats
Rear-Facing to Forward-Facing
Although 10 kg (22 lbs.) is generally considered the weight at which an infant could be placed in a
forward-facing child restraint, the child's physical development is considered more crucial in defining
when to place an infant forward facing. For example, there are infants who are 10 kg (22 lbs.) but
only four or five months old. The neck muscles of these infants are not strong enough to support the
weight of their head, and the seat should therefore, be left in a rear-facing position.
Combination Child Seats
A Combination Child Seat can be used for the infant as a rear-facing carrier and, when the child is
older, as a front-facing car seat.
Integrated (Built-in) Child Seats
Some vehicles have child restraint systems built into the vehicle seat bench. These seats are
required to meet CMVSS 213.4. Since these seats are built right into the vehicle seat bench, they do
not require the use of a tether strap. If your vehicle is equipped with built-in child seats, consult your
owner's manual for age and weight limits.
Booster (Cushion) Seats
The Booster Seat helps position the lap belt and shoulder belt properly over the child's body. The
Booster Seat is secured by the vehicle seat belt system. In vehicles with a low seat back, the child's
head might protrude over the vehicle seat back when placed in a booster cushion. In this case, the
child must be placed in the vehicle seat belt system without a booster cushion.
DON'T rush to move your child from a booster seat to a vehicle seat belt. An alternative is to
purchase a high-back booster. Currently, all high-back boosters must be used with a lap and
shoulder belt.
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Special Case Installations
Vehicles with Automatic Restraint Systems
Some vehicles are equipped with door-mounted seat belt systems. As the door opens, the belt
stretches with the door, allowing the occupant to get in and out. As the door closes, the belt
automatically wraps around the passenger. Child restraints cannot be used with this type of seat belt
system because the lap portion of the seat belt does not hold the restraint firmly in place. In cases
where child seats must be used in a seating position with automatic seat belts, a floor-mounted
(manual) belt, available from the vehicle dealer, must be installed. For more information, consult your
vehicle owner's manual, or see your car dealer.
Vehicles with Continuous Loop Lap/Shoulder Belts
Some vehicles have continuous loop lap/shoulder belts with metal tongues that slide freely up and
down the belt. When used with child restraints the lap belt can work loose as the car swerves and
turns corners. With continuous loop lap/shoulder belts, a locking clip must be used to prevent the lap
portion of the belt from loosening. This device is a special H-shaped metal clip that locks together the
lap and shoulder portion of the seat belt, keeping the child car seat firmly in place. In newer vehicles,
these seat belt systems can be converted to seat belt systems that lock up. Consult your vehicle
owner's manual when using this type of seat belt to secure a child restraint.
Child Restraints on Aircraft


There are no Canadian laws that require the use of car seats on airplanes.
Most child car seats on the market today are accepted on commercial airlines. Before flying, give
your airline the name of the child seat manufacturer and the model number (found on the
Statement of Compliance label on the seat). The airline can confirm whether that seat is allowed
on its aircraft.
Child Restraints on School Buses
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
School-Aged Children: Seat belts are not required for school-aged children on school buses.
High seat backs provide 'passive protection', which acts as a cushioned compartment to contain
the passengers if the bus stops suddenly or is involved in a collision.
Infants, Toddlers, Pre-Schoolers: Transport Canada recommends they be properly restrained
in the right car seat according to their height and weight. School buses manufactured after March
2007 will have a minimum number of lower anchorage systems in place and tether straps for car
seats that require them.
Child Restraints in a Taxi

In Canada, car seats are not required for child passengers in taxis.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 17 of 34
April 14, 2014
Child Restraints in a Motor Home
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The only safe place for a child travelling in a motor home is in the front, forward- facing passenger
seat next to the driver providing that it has an anchor for the tether strap and that the airbag for the
seat is deactivated.
Passenger seats located behind the driver are usually not secured to the motor home consistent
with the driver's seat and front passenger's seat, and can become dislodged more easily in the
event of an accident.
Motor homes have side-facing seats and car seats cannot be secured in seats that face sideways.
Contact the motor home dealership for more information on forward-facing passenger seats.
Experts agree that it is safer to follow behind a motor home in a vehicle with the children in their
appropriate car seats. Contact Transport Canada for more information.
Child Restraints on a Boat
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Canadian laws require that recreational boats have one properly fitting lifejacket for every person
on a boat but there is no law or regulation that requires people to wear them.
Statistics have shown that 9 out of 10 people that drowned in boating incidents were not wearing
lifejackets.
Make sure all children and adults wear a lifejacket when on a boat.
At present, there are no Canadian-approved lifejackets for infants who weigh less than 20 lbs. (9
kgs.) therefore having infants on boats is not recommended.
Lifejackets would not help to keep a young baby safe because of their level of physical
development. Wait until your child is at least 20 lbs. (9 kgs.), around 9 to 12 months of age, and
can fit into a Canadian-approved lifejacket before taking him/her on a boat.
,
Continued…next page
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 18 of 34
April 14, 2014
Car Seat Manufacturers
All children’s car seats and booster seats sold in Canada have an expiry or useful life date even
though this is not required by regulation. Manufacturers do this to inform current owners and
prospective buyers of the potential risks of using car seats and booster seats that may be missing
important parts, labels or instructions and/or may have an unknown history, which could lead to less
than optimal safe performance.
Do not use children’s car seats and booster seats past their expiry or useful life date. Beyond this
date it is preferable that the car seat be permanently discarded rather than donated to a charitable
organization, second hand store, or given to friends or relatives. Please cut the harness straps and
tear the fabric before placing it into the garbage for pick-up. This will ensure that the car seat will not
be reused.
Manufacturers give an expiry or useful life date because over time:
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frequent use and exposure to sunlight can damage and weaken plastic;
safe-use labels on the products fade or become hard to read;
instruction manuals have likely been misplaced or lost;
food, cleaners, drinks and other materials that have been spilled or used on webbing, buckles,
adjusters and other parts may prevent them from working safely;
The history or condition of the car seat or booster seat becomes hard to check (was it in a
crash, was it stored in a place or in a way that caused damage to parts, etc.?);
safety regulations and standards may have changed, so safer products may now be on the
market; and
Second or subsequent owners may not get product safety recall notices if problems arise.
In Canada, all provinces and territories require infants and toddlers to be buckled up in the
appropriate car seat. Several provinces also require booster seats for children who have outgrown a
child car seat but are too small for a regular seat belt. The provincial and territorial laws also say that
the children's car seats and booster seats must be certified to Canada Motor Vehicle Safety
Standards and must be used according to the manufacturer's instructions. If you don't follow the
instructions or if you use them past their expiry or useful life dates - you may be putting your child’s
safety at risk and you may be found guilty of breaking the law.
Listed below, in alphabetical order, are the manufacturers who sell car seats and/or booster seats in
Canada, the brand name and the useful life period of their products. Depending on the make or
model, they can be used safely for five to nine years. Transport Canada strongly advises parents and
caregivers follow all of the manufacturer’s instructions and respect the expiry or useful life dates.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 19 of 34
April 14, 2014
Manufacturer
Baby Trend Inc.
Product Type1
Brand Name(s)
Useful
Life
Baby Trend
I
6 years
Britax
I, I/C, B
6 years
Britax
C/B
9 years
Canadian Tire Corp.
Apramo
B
9 years
Chicco USA, Inc.
Chicco
I
6 years
Combi USA, Inc.
Combi
I, B
7 years
Diono, Inc.
Diono Radian – 3 models
I, I/C, B, C/B, and
I/C/B
10 years
B
6 years
Cosco, Eddie Bauer, Safety 1
I, I/C, C/B, B
6 years
Maxi Cosi
I, B
Britax Child Safety, Inc.
Diono Monterey
st
Dorel Juvenile Group
Quinny, Lux
6 years
I
6 years
I/C/B
8 years
Evenflo
I, I/C, C/B, B
6 years
Evenflo
I/C/B
8 years
Graco
I, I/C, C/B, B
6 years
Nautilus (low back booster only)
B
9 years
Harmony Juvenile Products
Harmony
B
6 years
Learning Curve Brands, Inc.
First Years, Compass
I, I/C, B
7 years
Magna Aftermarket Inc./ CLEK
CLEK
Inc.
B
7 years
Orbit Baby Inc.
Orbit Baby
I
7 years
Peg-Pérego
I
5 years
All seats manufactured after
01/01/2011
I
7 years
Cosco, Eddie Bauer, Safety 1
Evenflo Company Inc.
Graco Children’s Products
Peg-Pérego S.p.A.
st
Legend: I = Infant; I/C = Infant and Child; B = Booster; C/B = Child and Booster; I/C/B = Infant, Child
and Booster
Car Seat Manufacturer listing courtesy of Transport Canada
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 20 of 34
April 14, 2014
Car Seat Manufacturer's Contact Information
Company Name
Web Address
Telephone Number
Baby Trend Inc.
www.babytrend.com/carseats
1-800-328-7363
Britax Child Safety, Inc.
http://www.britax.ca/car-seats
1-888-427-4829
Canadian Tire Corp.
www.canadiantire.ca
1-866-746-7287
Chicco USA, Inc.
www.chiccousa.com
1-877-424-4226
Combi USA, Inc.
www.combiusa.com
1-800-992-6624
Diono, Inc.
www.diono.com
1-866-954-9786
Dorel Juvenile Group
www.djgusa.com
1-800-387-2229
Evenflo Company Inc.
www.evenflo.com
1-937-773-3971
Graco Children’s Products
www.graco.net
1-800-667-8184
Harmony Juvenile Products
www.harmonyjuvenile.com
1-877-306-1001
Learning Curve Brands, Inc.
www.learningcurve.com
1-563-875-2000
Magna Aftermarket Inc./
CLEK Inc.
www.clekinc.com
1-866-656-2462
Orbit Baby Inc.
www.orbitbaby.com
Perego Canada
www.pegperegocanada.com
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 21 of 34
1-877.ORB.BABY
1-800-661-5050
April 14, 2014
Car Dealerships
ACURA
AM GENERAL
ARO
AUDI
BMW
BUICK
CADILLAC
CHEVROLET
CHRYSLER
DAEWOO
DODGE
FORD
GMC
HONDA
HYUNDAI
INFINITI
ISUZU
JAGUAR
Jeep
KIA
LAND ROVER
LEXUS
LINCOLN
LOTUS
MAZDA
MERCEDES BENZ
MINI
MERCURY
MITSUBISHI
NISSAN
OLDSMOBILE
PLYMOUTH
PONTIAC
PORSCHE
ROLLS ROYCE
SAAB
SATURN
SUBARU
SUZUKI
TOYOTA
VOLKSWAGEN
VOLVO
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
1-888 922-8729
1-800-348-6833
1-888-276-4294
1-800-367-2834 or 1-800-822-2834
1-800-831-1117
1-800-521-7300
1-800-333-4223
1-800-222-1020
1-800-465-2001
1-877-463-2396
1-800-465-2001
1-800-565-3673
1-800-263-3777
1-888-946-6329
1-800-826-2277
1-800-826-6500
1-800-263-1999
1-800-668-6257
1-800-465-2001
1-800-333-4542
1-800-346-3493
1-800-255-3987 or 1-800-872-5398
1-800-521-4140
1-800-245-6887
1-800-263-4680
1-800-367-6372 or 1-800-222-0100
1-866-378-6464
1-800-392-3673
1-800-222-0037 or 1-888-648-7820
1-800-387-0122
1-800-442-6537
1-800-992-1997
1-800-263-3777
1-800-767-7243 or 1-800-545-8039
+44 (0) 1243 384000
1-800-263-1999
1-800-263-1999
1-800-894-4212
1-800-934-0934 or 1-800-650-4445
1-888-869-6828
1-800-822-8987 or 1-800-444-8987
1-800-663-8255
Page 22 of 34
April 14, 2014
Department of Justice Canada - Criminal Code of Canada
It is a criminal offence to leave a child unattended in a car in Canada under Sections 215 and 219 of
the Criminal Code of Canada.
DUTIES TENDING TO PRESERVATION OF LIFE
215. (1) Every one is under a legal duty
(a) as a parent, foster parent, guardian or head of a family, to provide necessaries of
life for a child under the age of sixteen years;
(b) to provide necessaries of life to their spouse or common-law partner; and
(c) to provide necessaries of life to a person under his charge if that person
(i) is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other
cause, to withdraw himself from that charge, and
(ii) is unable to provide himself with necessaries of life.
219. (1) Every one is criminally negligent who
(a) in doing anything, or
(b) in omitting to do anything that it is his duty to do,
shows wanton or reckless disregard for the lives or safety of other persons.
Definition of “duty”
(2) For the purposes of this section, “duty” means a duty imposed by law.
R.S., c. C-34, s. 202.
Car Seat Installation Videos
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How to install a rear-facing seat for infants
How to install a forward-facing seat for toddlers
How to use a booster seat
Seat Belt Campaign radio ads (courtesy of Ministry of Transportation):
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Feels so good (MP3 1200KB)
I wear one (MP3 800KB)
Most of us (MP3 700KB)
What you get (MP3 1000KB)
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 23 of 34
April 14, 2014
CAR SEAT GLOSSARY
Airbag
An airbag is an automotive safety device designed to inflate upon
collision and prevent passengers from pitching forward.
Booster Seat - UAS
Connectors
Universal Anchorage Systems (UAS) Connectors are also called
LATCH. Car seats manufactured after September 1, 2002 come
with UAS connectors. The UAS connectors are connected to plastic
bars on the booster seat. Please refer to your booster seat manual
and your car owner's manual for more information about the UAS.
Booster Seat Shell
Plastic or metal frame of the booster seat
Booster Seat - Shoulder Strap
Slot Guide
Some booster seats have a plastic slot guide for the shoulder strap
of a seat belt. The shoulder belt of your car's seat belt can be
threaded through a slot guide to help keep the shoulder strap off
your child's face and neck when they are riding in the booster seat.
Please refer to your booster seat manual for instructions on how to
use the slot guide.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 24 of 34
April 14, 2014
Car Seat - UAS Connectors
Universal Anchorage Systems (UAS) Connectors are also called
LATCH. Car seats manufactured after September 1, 2002 come
with UAS connectors, which are two metal clips that are attached to
each strap. The strap and connectors must be threaded through the
right pathway on your child's car seat and then buckled into UAS
anchors in your car. You can use either the UAS connectors or the
car's seat belt to hold your child's car seat in place. Please refer to
your car seat booklet or manual for more information about the UAS.
Car Seat Shell
Plastic or metal frame of the car seat
Chest Clip
Chest clips help keep harness straps safely in place. They are
attached to the harness straps, which buckle-up, and are positioned
at armpit level of your child.
Harness Slots
All car seats have at least one set of harness slots. Harness straps
thread through harness slots on the car seat frame. As your child
grows, you may need to re-thread them through harness slots that
are higher up on the car seat. Please refer to your car seat booklet
or manual for instructions.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 25 of 34
April 14, 2014
Harness Straps
Harness straps are made from strong fabric 'webbing' that keep
children seated securely in rear-facing and forward-facing car seats.
They prevent your child from coming out of the car seat during a
crash or sudden stop. Harness straps thread through harness slots
on the car seat frame.
Locking Clip
A locking clip is an 'H' shaped metal bar that can be attached to the
seat belt to keep the car's seat belt tight when installing a car seat.
This piece comes with your car seat when you purchase it and it is
located on the back on the car seat frame. These pieces can also be
purchased separately. Please refer to your car owner's manual to
see if you need to use a locking clip to install a car seat using the
seat belt. Many seat belts are designed so that you do not need to
use a locking clip.
Seat Belt
A seat belt (also called a safety belt) is a safety harness designed to
secure the occupant of a vehicle against harmful movement that may
result from a collision or sudden stop.
Seat Belt – Lap & Shoulder
A lap and shoulder belt has two straps that buckle up. The lap belt
positioned low across the hips and the shoulder belt positioned
across the chest protect the upper and lower body. All cars have lap
and shoulder belts in the front seats and most cars have lap and
shoulder belts on at least one of the seats in the back of the car.
Seat Belt – Lap Only
A lap belt consisting of one strap or harness is positioned across the
hips and buckles up. It protects the lower portion of the body and not
the upper body consisting of the head, neck and chest. Some
vehicles have lap-only belts in the back seat and some have middle
seats in the back seat with a lap-only belt.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 26 of 34
April 14, 2014
Tether Anchor
Cars manufactured after September 1, 2002, come with at least one
tether anchor. Please refer to your car owner's manual to locate the
tether anchor in your car. If you car does not have a tether anchor,
take it to a dealership and have one installed. Please do not attempt
to install one yourself.
Tether Strap
Forward-facing car seats use a tether strap (made from fabric
webbing) to help keep the car seat in place. Tether straps also help
keep the top of the seat and the child's head from moving too far
forward during a crash or sudden stop. One end is attached to the
tope of your child's car seat and the other end has a hook on it so
that it can be hooked to your car's tether anchor.
UAS Anchors
Cars manufactured after September 1, 2002 come with Universal
Anchorage Systems (UAS), which are also known as LATCH. Please
refer to your car owner's manual to see if you have UAS anchors in
your car. UAS anchors look like small metal bars that are attached
to the car's seat. Please refer to your car owner's manual to see
where they are located in your car. If your car does not have UAS
anchors, use the car's seat belt to install your child's car seat.
If an item or part of your car seat or booster seat is not mentioned above, please check with your car
seat instruction booklet or manual to obtain a complete listing.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 27 of 34
April 14, 2014
CANADIAN
CAR AND BOOSTER SEAT
LEGISLATION CHART
Province/Territory
Infant and Children's
Rear-facing and Forward-facing Car Seat
Legislation
Older Children
Booster Seat Legislation
Alberta
Traffic Safety Act – Vehicle
Equipment & Regulation - Part 5 –
Occupant Restraint Systems
Children from birth to 18 kg (40 lbs.) or under 6 years of
age must be restrained according to Section 213 of the
Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations.
NO PROVINCIAL LAW
Children must ride in a rear-facing car seat until they are a
minimum of 20 lbs. (9 kg) and at least one (1) year of age.
Children who are at least one (1) year of age and at least
20 lbs. (9kg) but less than 40 lbs. (18 kg), must ride in an
appropriate car or seat. The restrain system must not be
used in a designated seating position that has an active
frontal airbag for that seat.
A child who is no longer required, or permitted, to be
fastened in a child restraint system in accordance with
section 36.05 must be fastened on a booster seat,
specified by the manufacturer to be appropriate for the
child's height and weight, using the vehicle's seat belt
assembly until the child reaches a height of 145 cm or
more.
No person shall operate, or permit the operation of, a
motor vehicle on a highway unless every passenger in
the vehicle who has not yet attained the age of 5 years
and who is under 50 pounds (23 kg.) in weight is
properly secured in a restraining device of a kind
prescribed in the regulations and the device is properly
secured to the motor vehicle.
As of August 8th, 2013, a new law took effect in
Manitoba making it compulsory for older children
travelling in motor vehicles to use booster seats.
Provincial law requires children to remain in booster
seats until they are at least 145 cm (4’9”) tall, 36 kg
(80 lb.) OR 9 years old. Drivers are responsible for
ensuring that child passengers are properly seated
and restrained in car and booster seats.
British Columbia
Motor Vehicle Act - Division 36
Manitoba
Highway Traffic Act – 186(9)
New Brunswick
Motor Vehicle Act – Seat Belt
Section, Regulation 83-163
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Children must ride in a car seat until they are a minimum of
five (5) years of age or less than 40 lbs. (18 kg).
Page 28 of 34
A driver of a motor vehicle on a highway shall ensure
that a passenger who meets all of the following criteria
is occupying and is properly secured in a child seating
and restraint system prescribed under section 7:
(a) the passenger is under the age of 9 years;
(b) the passenger weighs less than 36 kg; and
(c) the passenger has a standing height of less than
145 cm.
April 14, 2014
Newfoundland and Labrador
Highway Traffic Act
A person shall not operate on a highway a vehicle in which
there is a passenger who is a child 8 years of age or under
unless that child is occupying and properly secured in a
child seat restraint system in accordance with the following:
(a) a child who weighs less than 9 kilograms shall be
secured in a rearward-facing infant car seat that is used in
the manner recommended by the manufacturer;
(b) a child who weighs 9 kilograms or more and less than
18 kilograms shall be secured
(i) in a child car seat that is used in the manner
recommended by the manufacturer, or
(ii) in an infant car seat that is used in the manner
recommended by the manufacturer, where the
manufacturer's specifications permit or recommend the use
of an infant car seat by a child described in this paragraph.
A child who weighs not less than 18 kilograms and not
more than 37 kilograms and who is less than 145
centimetres in height shall be secured
(i) on a booster seat that is used in the manner
recommended by the manufacturer, and by the
vehicle's complete seat belt assembly, worn as
described in subsection 178(4.1), or
(ii) in a child car seat that is used in the manner
recommended by the manufacturer, where the
manufacturer's specifications permit or recommend
the use of a child car seat by a child described
in this paragraph.
Northwest Territories
Motor Vehicle Act s. 146 – Seat Belt
Assembly and Child Restraint System
Regulations
It is the driver’s responsibility to ensure that children from
birth to 18 kg must be restrained according to ss.146(4) of
the Motor Vehicles Act.
Infants (persons weighing less than 9 kgs) must be secured
in a rearward facing restraint system that meets the
requirements of section 213.1 of Schedule IV of the Motor
Vehicle Safety Regulations under the Motor Vehicle
Safety Act (Canada). Toddlers (persons weighing 9 kgs or
more but less than 18 kgs) must be secured in a child
restraint system that meets the requirements of section 213
of Schedule IV of the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations
under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada), if being
transported in a vehicle that is owned, leased or regularly
used by his or her parent or legal guardian. If being
transported by a vehicle not owned / used by a parent or
legal guardian, the toddler may be secured by a pelvic
restraint mechanism of a seat belt assembly.
NO PROVINCIAL LAW
Nova Scotia
Motor Vehicle Act - Seat Belt
Regulations
a) Infants: children less than 1 year and those who weigh
less than 10 kgs. must be secured in a rearward facing
seat.
b) Young children: children who are at least 1 year and
weigh at least 10 kg. and less than 18 kg. may face
forward.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 29 of 34
Children who weigh more than 18 kg. must be in a
booster seat if they are younger than 9 years and less
than 145 cm. tall.
April 14, 2014
Nunavut
Motor Vehicle Act – Seat Belt
Assembly and Child Restraint System
Regulations
Children must ride in a rear-facing car seat until they are a
minimum of 20 lbs. (9 kg). Children who are at least 20 lbs.
(9 kg) but less than 40 lbs. (18kg) must ride in an
appropriate car or seat.
NO PROVINCIAL LAW
Ontario
Highway Traffic Act s. 106, Seat Belt
Assemblies, Regulation 613
Children must ride in a rear-facing car seat until they are a
minimum of 20 lbs. (9 kg). Toddlers who weigh 9 kg or
more, but less 18 kg (20-40 lbs.), are to travel forward
facing. May travel rear facing if the manufacturer of the
child car seat being used recommends its use by toddlers.
Booster seat requirements:
children under eight years of age, who weigh 18 kg or
more but less than 36 kg (40-80 lbs.) and stand less
than 145 cm, (4’, 9”) in height.
With specific exemptions, most drivers now required
to secure children in a proper child restraint. 2
demerit points for non-compliance Highway Traffic Act
– R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 613
Prince Edward Island
Highway Traffic Act – Seat Belt
Regulations
An infant (less than 10 kg) shall be secured in a rearward
facing infant restraint system that conforms to CMVSS and
which is used in accordance to manufactures instructions.
A toddler (10 kg – 18 kg) shall be secured in a child
restraint system that conforms to CMVSS and which is
used in accordance to manufactures instructions.
Children who weigh 18 kilograms or more under
the age of 10 years shall be secured by a booster
seat system that conforms to CMVSS and which is
used in accordance to manufactures instructions.
Quebec
Highway Safety Code s. 397
Amendment to section 397 of the Highway Safety Code: “In a moving road vehicle, every child whose sitting height is
less than 63 cm, measured from the seat to the top of the head, must be restrained by a restraint system or booster
cushion that complies with the regulations under the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Statutes of Canada, 1993, chapter
16). The restraint system or booster cushion must, in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions affixed
thereon, be suitable for the child's height and weight and be securely attached to the vehicle.
The driver is responsible for ensuring that all children whose sitting height is less than 63 cm are seated in a properly
installed safety seat. Fines: $80-$100 Demerit points: 3
Saskatchewan
Vehicle Administration Act
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Where a motor vehicle has a seating position equipped with
a seat-belt assembly available for a passenger, no person
shall drive that vehicle on a highway with a passenger
under the age of 16 years unless: (b) if the passenger
weighs less than 18 kilograms:
(i) the passenger occupies a child restraint system or infant
restraint system, as defined in the regulations made
pursuant to 'The Vehicle Administration Act', so that it is
Page 30 of 34
Saskatchewan’s legislation for mandatory booster
seats for children under the age of seven, less than
4’9” in height and weigh less than 80 lbs. goes into
effect at the end of June 2014. Failing to wear a
seatbelt or not having a child properly restrained
results in a $175 ticket and three demerit points under
SGI's Safe Driver Recognition program. Once the
new booster seat law takes effect, it will also result in
April 14, 2014
properly adjusted and securely fastened in the manner
recommended by the manufacturer; and (ii) the child
restraint system or infant restraint system: (A) is appropriate
for the passenger’s weight and height; and (B) is secured to
the vehicle in the manner recommended by the
manufacturer.
a $175 fine for non-compliance.
Children must ride in a car seat that is appropriate for their
size until they are a minimum of 40 lbs. (18kg)
Yukon
Infants must ride in a rear-facing car seat until they are a
Motor Vehicle Act – Regulations,
Child Restraint Systems
minimum of 20 lbs. (9 kg). Children* who are at least 20
lbs. (9 kg) but less than 48 lbs. (22 kg) must ride in an
appropriate car seat.
87.(1) In this section “child restraint system” means a child
restraint system as defined in the Motor Vehicle Safety
Regulations; “infant restraint system” means an infant
restraint system as defined in the Motor Vehicle Safety
Regulations. (2) A child weighing less than nine kilograms
is properly secured for the purpose of the Act if secured in
an infant restraint system in the manner set out in the Motor
Vehicle Safety Regulations.
(3) A child weighing nine kilograms or more but less than 22
kilograms is properly secured for the purpose of the Act if
secured in a child restraint system in the manner set out in
the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations.
(4) A child weighing 22 kilograms or more is properly
secured for the purpose of the Act if secured in the manner
set out in the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations in a seat
belt assembly installed in accordance with those
Regulations.
The use of a booster cushion in accordance with the
Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations is permitted.
*'Children' denotes a child under the age of six (6).
Please Note:
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All information in the above chart was resourced from Transport Canada and National Occupant Restraint Program (NORP) 2011.
All the information in the above chart is for information purposes only. Please refer to your local authorities for further interpretation and status.
All height and weight measurement conversions are entered as approximates for convenience purposes only.
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 31 of 34
April 14, 2014
Canada - Provincial and Territorial Governments
To obtain more information regarding car seat safety for you children, please click on the links below.
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Alberta
o Alberta Transportation
British Columbia
o Ministry of Transportation
o Insurance Corporation of British Columbia - ICBC
Manitoba
o Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation
New Brunswick
o Department of Transportation
Newfoundland and Labrador
o Department of Transportation and Works
Northwest Territories
o Department of Transportation
Nova Scotia
o Transportation & Public Works
Nunavut
o Department of Economic Development and Transportation
Ontario
o Ministry of Transportation
o Ontario's Drive Clean
Prince Edward Island
o Transportation and Public Works
Québec
o Ministère des Transports
o Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec - SAAQ
Saskatchewan
o Saskatchewan Government Insurance - SGI
o Saskatchewan - Highways and Transportation
Yukon
o Department of Highways and Public Works - Transportation - Road Safety
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 32 of 34
April 14, 2014
Other Provincial and Territorial Links
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research http://www.acicr.ualberta.ca/
The Insurance Bureau of British Columbia http://www.icbc.com/road_safety/carseat_law.asp#changes
IMPACT, the injury prevention centre of Children’s Hospital Winnipeg, Manitoba http://www.hsc.mb.ca/impact/
Manitoba Public Insurance http://www.mpi.mb.ca/english/rd_safety/roadsafety.html
Société de l’assurance automobile http://www.saaq.gouv.qc.ca/en/index.php
The Saskatchewan Prevention Institute http://www.preventioninstitute.sk.ca
Saskatchewan Government Insurance http://www.sgi.sk.ca/sgi_pub/road_safety/child_restraints.htm
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Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 33 of 34
April 14, 2014
Emergency Preparedness Guide
While you are travelling in your vehicle, you may run into a difficult situation or an unforeseen emergency.
There are simple things that you can do now to prepare yourself and your loved ones. We highly recommend
that you keep the following list of basic supplies in a duffle bag in your vehicle. Your basic car safety kit should
include:
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Food that won't spoil (such as energy bars)
Water
Blanket
Extra clothing and shoes
Candle in a deep can and matches
Flashlight (wind-up or battery-powered)
First Aid Kit with the following items:
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- first-aid manual
- sterile gauze pads of different sizes
- adhesive tape
- adhesive bandages in several sizes
- elastic bandages,
- a splint
- antiseptic wipes
- soap
- antibiotic ointment
- antiseptic solution (like hydrogen peroxide)
- Hydrocortisone cream (1%)
- acetaminophen and ibuprofen
- extra prescription medications (if the family is going on vacation)
- tweezers
- sharp scissors
- safety pins
- disposable instant cold packs
- calamine lotion
- alcohol wipes or ethyl alcohol
- thermometer
- plastic non-latex gloves (at least 2 pairs)
- mouthpiece for administering CPR (can be obtained from your local Red Cross).
Seatbelt cutter
Warning light or road flares
Small shovel, scraper and snowbrush
List of contact numbers
Sand, salt or cat litter (non-clumping)
Antifreeze and windshield washer fluid
Tow rope and jumper cables
Fire extinguisher
Roadmaps
Whistle
Car Seat and Air Bag Information
Children's Health and Safety Association
Page 34 of 34
April 14, 2014
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