A Parent s ` Guide to Safe Sleep

A Parent s ` Guide to Safe Sleep
Safe Sleep for Babies
September 2017
Look inside for…
 Reduce the risk of SIDS and Suffocation (English/Spanish)
 A Parent’s Guide to Safe Sleep (English/Spanish)
 A Child Care Providers Guide to Safe Sleep (English/Spanish)
 Keep Baby Safe in Play Yard Space (English/Spanish)
 What Does a Safe Sleep Environment Look Like?
 WIC Recipes: Celery Logs (English/Spanish)
For more information on
how to lead a healthier
lifestyle, visit our website
GetHealthyCT.org
Reduce the Risk of SIDS &
Suffocation
About 3,500 babies die each year in the United States during sleep because of unsafe sleep environments.
Some of these deaths are caused by entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation. Some infants die of sudden infant
death syndrome (SIDS). However, there are ways for parents to keep their sleeping baby safe. Read on for more
information from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on how parents can create a safe sleep environment
for their babies. This information should also be shared with anyone who cares for babies, including
grandparents, family, friends, babysitters, and child care center staff.
Note: These recommendations are for healthy babies up to 1 year of age. A very small number of babies with
certain medical conditions may need to be placed to sleep on their stomach. Your baby's doctor can tell you
what is best for your baby.
What You Can Do:




Place your baby to sleep on his back for every sleep.
o Babies up to 1 year of age should always be placed on their back to sleep during naps and at
night. However, if your baby has rolled from his back to his side or stomach on his own, he can
be left in that position if he is already able to roll from tummy to back and back to tummy.
o If your baby falls asleep in a car seat, stroller, swing, infant carrier, or infant sling, he should be
moved to a firm sleep surface as soon as possible.
o Swaddling (wrapping a light blanket snuggly around a baby) may help calm a crying baby. If you
swaddle your baby, be sure to place him on his back to sleep. Stop swaddling your baby when
he starts to roll.
Place your baby to sleep on a firm sleep surface.
o The crib, bassinet, portable crib, or play yard should meet current safety standards. Check to
make sure the product has not been recalled. Do not use a crib that is broken or missing parts
or that has drop-side rails. For more information about crib safety standards, visit the Consumer
Product Safety Commission Web site.
o Cover the mattress with a tight-fitting sheet.
o Do not put blankets or pillows between the mattress and fitted sheet.
o Never put your baby to sleep on a water bed, a cushion, or a sheepskin.
Keep soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment,
suffocation, or strangulation out of the crib.
o Pillows, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, bumper pads, and stuffed toys can cause your baby to
suffocate. Note: Research has not shown us when it's 100% safe to have these objects in the
crib; however, most experts agree that these objects pose little risk to healthy babies after 12
months of age.
Place your baby to sleep in the same room where you sleep but not the same bed.
o Do this for at least 6 months, but preferably up to 1 year of age. Room-sharing decreases the
risk of SIDS by as much as 50%.
o Keep the crib or bassinet within an arm's reach of your bed. You can easily watch or breastfeed
your baby by having your baby nearby.
o The AAP cannot make a recommendation for or against the use of bedside sleepers or in-bed
sleepers until more studies are done.
o Babies who sleep in the same bed as their parents are at risk of SIDS, suffocation, or
strangulation. Parents can roll onto babies during sleep, or babies can get tangled in the sheets
or blankets.







Breastfeed as much and for as long as you can. This helps reduce the risk of SIDS.
o The AAP recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6
months. When you add solid foods to your baby's diet, continue breastfeeding until at least 12
months. You can continue to breastfeed after 12 months if you and your baby desire.
Schedule and go to all well-child visits. Your baby will receive important immunizations.
o Recent evidence suggests that immunizations may have a protective effect against SIDS.
Keep your baby away from smokers and places where people smoke. This helps reduce the risk
of SIDS.
o If you smoke, try to quit. However, until you can quit, keep your car and home smoke-free. Don't
smoke inside your home or car, and don't smoke anywhere near your baby, even if you are
outside.
Do not let your baby get too hot. This helps reduce the risk of SIDS.
o Keep the room where your baby sleeps at a comfortable temperature.
o In general, dress your baby in no more than one extra layer than you would wear. Your baby
may be too hot if she is sweating or if her chest feels hot.
o If you are worried that your baby is cold, use a wearable blanket, such as a sleeping sack, or
warm sleeper that is the right size for your baby. These are made to cover the body and not the
head.
Offer a pacifier at nap time and bedtime. This helps reduce the risk of SIDS.
o If you are breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is going well before offering a pacifier. This
usually takes 3 to 4 weeks. If you are not breastfeeding, you can start a pacifier as soon as you
like.
o It's OK if your baby doesn't want to use a pacifier. You can try offering a pacifier again, but
some babies don't like to use pacifiers.
o If the pacifier falls out after your baby falls asleep, you don't have to put it back in.
o Do not use pacifiers that attach to infant clothing.
o Do not use pacifiers that are attached to objects, such as stuffed toys and other items that may
be a suffocation or choking risk.
Do not use home cardiorespiratory monitors to help reduce the risk of SIDS.
o Home cardiorespiratory monitors can be helpful for babies with breathing or heart problems, but
they have not been found to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Use caution when buying products that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS.
o Wedges, positioners, special mattresses and specialized sleep surfaces have not been shown
to reduce the risk of SIDS, according to the AAP.
What Expectant Moms Can Do:



Schedule and go to all prenatal doctor visits.
Do not smoke, drink alcohol, or use drugs while pregnant or after the birth of your newborn. Stay away
from smokers and places where people smoke.
Hold your newborn skin to skin while breastfeeding. If you can breastfeed, do this as soon as you can
after birth. Skin-to-skin contact is also beneficial for bottle-fed newborns.
What Sleepy Parents Need to Know:


It is safer to feed your baby on your bed than on a sofa or cushioned chair. Make sure to remove
pillows, blankets, or other soft bedding, in case you fall asleep while feeding. If you do fall asleep, move
your baby back into her own bed as soon as you awake.
Be careful not to fall asleep on a sofa or cushioned chair while holding your baby.
Remember Tummy Time: Give your baby plenty of "tummy time" when she is awake. This will help
strengthen neck muscles and help prevent flat spots on the head. Always stay with your baby during tummy
time, and make sure she is awake.
Source: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/sleep/Pages/Preventing-SIDS.aspx
Reduzca el riesgo del síndrome
de muerte súbita del lactante y
de la asfixia
Más de 3.500 bebés mueren en los Estados Unidos de manera súbita e inesperada todos los años mientras duermen, con
frecuencia se debe al síndrome de la muerte súbita del lactante (SMSL) o debido a muertes accidentales por asfixia o
estrangulamiento. Sin embargo, existen formas de mantener seguro a su bebé mientras duerme. Continúe leyendo para
obtener más información de la American Academy of Pediatrics acerca de cómo los padres pueden lograr un ambiente
seguro de sueño para sus bebés. Esta información también debe ser compartida con todas las personas que cuiden a los
bebés, incluidos abuelos, familiares, amigos, niñeras y el personal de las guarderías y de los centros para el cuidado
infantil.
Nota: estas recomendaciones son para bebés sanos de hasta 1 año de vida. Es posible que una pequeña cantidad de
bebés con determinadas afecciones médicas deban ser colocados boca abajo para dormir. El médico de su bebé puede
decirle qué es lo mejor para su bebé.
Lo que puede hacer




Coloque a su bebé boca arriba cada vez que lo ponga a dormir.
o Los bebés de hasta 1 año de vida siempre deben colocarse boca arriba para dormir durante las siestas y
por la noche. Sin embargo, si su bebé ha girado y se ha puesto de lado o boca abajo por sí mismo, puede
dejarlo en esa posición si ya puede darse vuelta de boca abajo a boca arriba y de boca arriba a boca abajo.
o Si su bebé se duerme en un asiento de seguridad para el auto, un paseador, un columpio, un portabebés
o un marsupio debe pasárselo a una superficie firme tan pronto como sea posible.
o Envolver al bebé en una manta puede ayudar a calmarlo. Si envuelve al bebé, cerciórese de colocarlo
bocarriba (sobre su espalda). Deje de envolverlo cuando su bebé empiece a darse vuelta.
Ponga a su bebé a dormir en una superficie firme.
o La cuna, el moisés, la cuna portátil o el patio de juegos deben cumplir con las medidas vigentes de
seguridad. Verifique que el producto no haya sido retirado del mercado. No use una cuna que esté rota o
a la cual le falten piezas o que tenga barandas laterales que se puedan bajar. Para más información sobre
los estándares de seguridad para las cunas, visite el sitio web de la Comisión de Seguridad de los
Productos del Consumidor de los Estados Unidos.
o Cubra el colchón que viene con el producto con una sábana ajustada (tirante) a la medida.
o No coloque mantas ni almohadas entre el colchón y la sábana ajustada a la medida.
o Nunca ponga a su bebé a dormir en una silla, un sofá, una cama de agua, un almohadón ni una manta de
piel de carnero/oveja.
Mantenga fuera de la cuna los objetos blandos/suaves, la ropa de cama suelta o cualquier otro objeto que
pueda aumentar el riesgo de que el bebé quede atrapado, se asfixie o sufra estrangulación.
o Las almohadas, las colchas, los edredones, las mantas de piel de carnero, los cojines de protección y los
juguetes de peluche pueden hacer que su bebé se asfixie. Nota: Las investigaciones no han demostrado
cuándo es 100 % seguro dejar estos objetos en la cuna. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los expertos están de
acuerdo en que después de los 12 meses de vida, estos objetos implican un riesgo bajo para los bebés
sanos.
Ponga a su bebé a dormir en la misma habitación en que usted duerme, pero no en la misma cama.
o Hágalo por lo menos durante 6 meses, pero mejor hasta cuando cumpla 1 año de edad. Compartir la
habitación reduce el riesgo del SMSL hasta por un 50 %.
o Mantenga la cuna o el moisés cerca de su cama, de forma que pueda alcanzarlo con la mano (a un brazo
de distancia). Puede observar o amamantar fácilmente a su bebé si lo tiene cerca. La
o La AAP no puede hacer recomendaciones a favor o en contra del uso de cunas colecho (adyacentes) o de
durmientes hasta que se hayan realizado más estudios.
o Los bebés que duermen en la misma cama que sus padres corren riesgo de sufrir SMSL, asfixia o
estrangulación. Los padres pueden darse vuelta y quedar encima de los bebés mientras duermen, o los
bebés pueden enredarse en las sábanas o mantas.







Amamante a su bebé tanto como pueda y durante tanto tiempo como pueda. Los estudios muestran que
amamantar a su bebé puede ayudar a reducir el riesgo del SMSL.
o La AAP recomienda la lactancia como la única fuente de nutrición para su bebé hasta los 6 meses de vida.
Cuando añada alimentos sólidos a la dieta del bebé, continúe amamantando por lo menos hasta los 12
meses y después si usted y su bebé lo desean.
Programe y vaya a todas las visitas del niño sano. Su bebé recibirá vacunas importantes.
o Evidencia reciente sugiere que las vacunas pueden ayudar a proteger al bebé contra el SMSL.
Mantenga a su bebé alejado de los fumadores y de los lugares en los que la gente fuma. Esto reduce el
riesgo del SML.
o Si usted fuma, intente dejar de hacerlo. No obstante, hasta que pueda dejar de fumar, mantenga su
automóvil y su hogar libres de humo. No fume dentro de su hogar o auto y no fume cerca de su bebé,
incluso si está al aire libre.
No permita que el bebé tenga demasiado calor. Esto ayuda a reducir el riesgo del SMSL.
o Mantenga la habitación en la que duerme su bebé a una temperatura cómoda.
o En general, vista al bebé con apenas una capa más de las que usted usaría. Si su bebé suda o tiene el
pecho caliente, es posible que tenga mucho calor.
o Si le preocupa que su bebé tenga frío, puede use una manta para vestir (vestible) para bebés o saco para
dormir que sea del tamaño adecuado para el bebé. Este tipo de ropa está diseñada para cubrir el cuerpo
y no la cabeza.
Ofrézcale un chupete (chupón o chupo) a la hora de la siesta y a la hora de acostarse. Esto ayuda a reducir
el riesgo del SMSL.
o Si está amamantando, espere a que la lactancia materna esté afianzada para ofrecer un chupete, chupón
o chupo. Esto generalmente lleva de 3 a 4 semanas. Si no está amamantando puede empezar con
el chupete tan pronto como guste.
o No hay problema si su bebé no quiere usar un chupete. Puede probar volver a ofrecerle un chupete en el
futuro, pero a algunos bebés no les gusta usarlo.
o Si su bebé toma el chupete y se le cae después de que se duerme, no tiene que volver a ponérselo en la
boca.
o No utilice chupetes que se sujeten a la ropa del bebé.
o No utilice chupetes que se fijan a objetos, tales como juguetes u otros artículos que pueden presentar un
iego de asfixia o estrangulamiento.
No utilice monitores cardiorrespiratorios caseros para ayudar a reducir el riesgo del SML.
o Los monitores cardiorrespiratorios pueden ser buenos para los bebés que tienen problemas de respiración
o problemas cardíacos, pero no hay evidencia de que ayuden a reducir el riesgo del SMSL.
Tenga precaución al comprar productos que afirman (promoten) reducir el riesgo del SMSL.
o Productos tales como los sujeta bebés, los 'posicionadores', los colchones especiales y las superficies
especiales para dormir no han demostrado reducir el riesgo del SMSL, de acuerdo con la AAP.
Lo que las madres embarazadas pueden hacer



Programe y asista a todas las visitas médicas prenatales.
No fume, no bebe alcohol ni consuma drogas mientras esté embarazada y después del nacimiento. Manténgase
alejada de los fumadores y de los lugares en los que la gente fuma.
Cargue a su bebé piel con piel mientras lo está amamantando. Si puede amamantar, hágalo tan pronto pueda
después del parto. La atención de piel con piel también tiene beneficios para los bebés alimentados con biberón.
Lo que los padres somnolientos deben saber:


Es más seguro alimentar a su bebé en la cama que en un sofá o un sillón acolchado. Cerciórese de sacar todas
las almohadas, mantas y cualquier otro objeto (ropa) de cama suave/blando de la cama en caso de que usted se
duerma mientras está amantando. Tan pronto como despierte, ponga al bebé en su propia cama/cuna.
Tenga cuidado de no quedarse dormida en un sofá o sillón acolchado mientras está cargando a su bebé.
Recuerde el tiempo boca abajo: Dele a su bebé suficiente tiempo boca abajo mientras esté despierto. Esto ayudará a
fortalecer los músculos del cuello y evitará cabezas planas. Siempre quédese con su bebé durante el tiempo bocabajo y
asegúrese de que esté despierto.
Source: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/sleep/Pages/Preventing-SIDS.aspx
A Parent’s Guide to Safe Sleep
Helping you to reduce the risk of SIDS
DID YOU KNOW?
‡ About one in five sudden infant death syndrome
(SIDS) deaths occur while an infant is in the care
of someone other than a parent. Many
of these deaths occur when babies who are used
to sleeping on their backs at home are then
placed to sleep on their tummies by another
caregiver. We call this “unaccustomed tummy
sleeping.”
‡ Unaccustomed tummy sleeping increases the
risk of SIDS. Babies who are used to sleeping on
their backs and are placed to sleep on their
tummies are 18 times more likely to die from
SIDS.
You can reduce your baby’s risk of dying
from SIDS by talking to those who care for
your baby, including child care providers,
babysitters, family, and friends, about placing
your baby to sleep on his back during naps
and at night.
WHO IS AT RISK
FOR SIDS?
MORE WAYS TO PROTECT
YOUR BABY
‡ SIDS is the leading cause of death for infants
between 1 month and 12 months of age.
Do your best to follow the guidelines on these
pages. This way, you will know that you are doing
all that you can to keep your baby healthy and
safe.
‡ SIDS is most common among infants that are
1-4 months old. However, babies can die
from SIDS until they are 1 year old.
KNOW T H E T R U T H …
SIDS IS NOT CAUSED BY:
‡ Immunizations
‡ It is important for your baby to be up to date on
her immunizations and well-baby check-ups.
‡ Vomiting or choking
WHAT CAN I DO
BEFORE MY BABY IS
BORN TO REDUCE
THE RISK OF SIDS?
Take care of yourself during pregnancy and after
the birth of your baby. During pregnancy, before
you even give birth, you can reduce the risk of
your baby dying from SIDS! Don’t smoke or
expose yourself to others’ smoke while you are
pregnant and after the baby is born. Alcohol and
drug use can also increase your baby’s risk for
SIDS. Be sure to visit a physician for regular
prenatal checkups to reduce your risk of having a
low birth weight or premature baby.
Supported in part by Grant No. U46MC04436-06-00, a cooperative
agreement of the Office of Child Care and the Maternal and Child Health
Bureau.
‡ Breastfeed your baby. Experts recommend that
mothers feed their children human milk for as
long and as much as possible, and for at least
the first 6 months of life, if possible.
WHERE I S T H E S A F E S T
PLACE FOR MY BABY
TO SLEEP?
The safest place for your baby to sleep is in the
room where you sleep, but not in your bed.
Place the baby’s crib or bassinet near your bed
(within arm’s reach). This makes it easier to
breastfeed and to bond with your baby.
The crib or bassinet should be free from toys,
soft bedding, blankets, and pillows. (See picture
on next page.)
TALK ABOUT SAFE SLEEP
PRACTICES WITH EVERYONE
WHO CARES FOR YOUR BABY!
When looking for someone to take care of your
baby, including a child care provider, a family
member, or a friend, make sure that you talk with
this person about safe sleep practices.
Bring this fact sheet along to help, if needed. If a
caregiver does not know the best safe sleep
practices, respectfully try to teach the caregiver
what you have learned about safe sleep practices
and the importance of following these rules when
caring for infants. Before leaving your baby with
anyone, be sure that person agrees that the safe
sleep practices explained in this brochure will be
followed all of the time.
Face up to wake up – healthy babies sleep
safest on their backs.
WHAT ELSE CAN I DO TO
REDUCE MY BABY’S RISK?
Follow these easy and free steps to help you
reduce your baby’s risk of dying from SIDS.
SAFE SLEEP PRACTICES
‡ Always place babies to sleep on their backs
during naps and at nighttime. Because babies
sleeping on their sides are more likely to
accidentally roll onto their stomach, the side
position is just as dangerous as the stomach
position.
‡ Avoid letting the baby get too hot. The baby
could be too hot if you notice sweating, damp
hair, flushed cheeks, heat rash, and rapid
breathing. Dress the baby lightly for sleep. Set
the room temperature in a range that is
comfortable for a lightly clothed adult.
‡ Consider using a pacifier at nap time and bed
time. The pacifier should not have cords or
clips that might be a strangulation risk.
SAFE SLEEP ENVIRONMENT
‡ Place your baby on a firm mattress,
covered by a fitted sheet that meets current
safety standards. For more about crib safety
standards, visit the Consumer Product
Safety Commission’s Web site at
http://www.cspc.gov.
‡ Place the crib in an area that is always
smoke free.
‡ Don’t place babies to sleep on adult beds,
chairs, sofas, waterbeds, pillows, or cushions.
‡ Toys and other soft bedding, including fluffy
blankets, comforters, pillows, stuffed animals,
bumper pads, and wedges should not be
placed in the crib with the baby. Loose
bedding, such as sheets and blankets, should
not be used as these items can impair the
infant’s ability to breathe if they are close to his
face. Sleep clothing, such as sleepers, sleep
sacks, and wearable blankets are better
alternatives to blankets.
Do not place pillows, quilts, toys, or anything
in the crib.
Supervised, daily tummy time during play is
important to baby’s healthy development.
IS IT EVER SAFE TO HAVE
BABIES ON THEIR TUMMIES?
If you have questions about safe sleep
practices please contact Healthy Child Care
America at the American Academy of
Pediatrics at [email protected] or 888/2275409. Remember, if you have a question
about the health and safety of your child, talk
to your baby’s doctor.
Yes! You should talk to your child care provider
about making tummy time a part of your baby’s
daily activities. Your baby needs plenty of
tummy time while supervised and awake to
help build strong neck and shoulder muscles.
Remember to make sure that your baby is
having tummy time at home with you.
TUMMY TO PLAY AND
BACK TO SLEEP
‡ Place babies to sleep on their backs to
reduce the risk of SIDS. Side sleeping is not
as safe as back sleeping and is not advised.
Babies sleep comfortably on their backs, and
no special equipment or extra money is
needed.
‡ “Tummy time” is playtime when infants are
awake and placed on their tummies while
someone is watching them. Have tummy time
to allow babies to develop normally.
WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP
SPREAD THE WORD ABOUT
BACK TO SLEEP?
‡ Be aware of safe sleep practices and how
they can be made a part of our everyday lives.
R ES OUR CES:
American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aappolicy.org
SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths:
Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe
Infant Sleeping Environment
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/rep
rint/pediatrics;128/5/e1341.pdf
Healthy Child Care America
http://www.healthychildcare.org
National Resource Center for Health and
Safety in Child Care and Early Education
http://nrc.uchsc.edu
Healthy Kids, Healthy Care: A Parent Friendly
Tool on Health and Safety Issues in Child
Care http://www.healthykids.us
National Institute for Child and Human
Development Back to Sleep Campaign (Order
free educational materials)
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sids/sids.cfm
First Candle/SIDS Alliance
http://www.firstcandle.org
‡ When shopping in stores with crib displays
that show heavy quilts, pillows, and stuffed
animals, talk to the manager about safe sleep,
and ask them not to display cribs in this way.
Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality
Programs http://www.asip1.org
‡ Monitor the media. When you see an ad or a
picture in the paper that shows a baby
sleeping on her tummy, write a letter to the
editor.
National SIDS and Infant Death Resource
Center http://www.sidscenter.org/
‡ If you know teenagers who take care of
babies, talk with them. They may need help
with following the proper safe sleep practices.
‡ Set a good example – realize that you may
not have slept on your back as a baby, but
we now know that this is the safest way for
babies to sleep. When placing babies to
sleep, be sure to always place them on their
backs.
CJ Foundation for SIDS
http://www.cjsids.com
The Juvenile Products Manufacturers
Association http://www.jpma.org/
Revised 2012
Guía para sueño seguro del bebé, para madres y padres
Ayuda para disminuir el riesgo de SIDS
¿LO SABÍA?
• Alrededor de uno de cada cinco decesos por
síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante (sudden
infant death syndrome [SIDS]) ocurre mientras
un lactante (bebé) está al cuidado de alguien que
no es la madre o el padre. Muchas de estas
muertes suceden cuando los bebés que están
acostumbrados a dormir boca arriba en el hogar
posteriormente son puestos a dormir boca abajo
por otro cuidador. Llamamos a esto “sueño boca
abajo no acostumbrado”.
• Poner a dormir boca abajo a un bebé sin que
esté acostumbrado a ello, aumenta el riesgo de
SIDS. Los bebés habituados a dormir boca arriba
y que son puestos a dormir boca abajo tienen 18
veces más probabilidades de morir por SIDS.
Usted puede disminuir el riesgo de que su
bebé muera por SIDS al hablar con quienes
cuidan de él, niñeras, familiares y amigos,
acerca de colocar a su bebé a dormir boca
arriba durante siestas y por la noche.
¿QUIÉN TIENE
RIESGO DE SIDS?
MÁS MANERAS DE PROTEGER A
• El SIDS es la principal causa de muerte de
bebés de un mes a 12 meses de edad.
Esfuércese al máximo para seguir las pautas que
aparecen en estas páginas. De esta manera,
sabrá que está haciendo todo lo que puede para
mantener a su bebé sano y seguro.
• El SIDS es más común entre bebés de uno a
cuatro meses de edad. Sin embargo, bebés
hasta de un año de edad pueden morir por SIDS.
S E P A L A V E R D A D . ..
E L S I DS N O S E O R I G I N A
POR:
• Inmunizaciones
SU BEBÉ
• Amamante a su bebé. Los expertos
recomiendan que las madres alimenten a sus
hijos con leche materna durante tanto tiempo y
en tanta cantidad como sea posible, y durante al
menos los primeros seis meses de vida, si es
posible.
• Es importante que las inmunizaciones y los
chequeos de bebé sano de su bebé estén al día.
• Vómitos o asfixia
¿QUÉ PUEDO HACER ANTES DE
QUE MI BEBÉ NAZCA PARA
DISMINUIR EL RIESGO DE
SIDS?
Cuide de sí misma durante el embarazo y
después de que nazca su bebé. Durante el
embarazo, incluso antes de que dé a luz ¡usted
puede disminuir el riesgo de que su bebé muera
por SIDS! No fume ni se exponga al humo de
tabaco fumado por terceros mientras esté
embarazada y después de que nazca el bebé. El
consumo de alcohol y drogas también puede
aumentar el riesgo de SIDS. Asegúrese de
visitar a un médico para chequeos prenatales
regulares a fin de disminuir su riesgo de tener
un bebé con peso bajo al nacer o prematuro.
¿D Ó N D E
ES EL LUGAR
MÁS SEGURO PARA QUE
MI BEBÉ DUERMA?
El lugar más seguro para que su bebé duerma
es el cuarto donde usted duerme, pero no en la
cama para adulto. Coloque la cuna o el moisés
del bebé cerca de la cama de usted (al alcance
de la mano). Esto hace más fácil amamantar al
bebé, y que se establezca un enlace entre
usted y él.
En la cuna o el moisés no debe de haber
juguetes, ropa de cama mullida, frazadas y
almohadas. (Vea la fotografía que aparece en la
página siguiente.)
¡HABLE ACERCA DE PRÁCTICAS
DE SUEÑO SEGURO CON TODA
PERSONA QUE CUIDE DE SU
BEBÉ!
Apoyado en parte por la Grant No. U46MC 04436-06-00, un acuerdo
cooperativo de la Office of Child Care y el Maternal and Child Health
Bureau
Cuando busque a alguien para que cuide de su
bebé, incluso un proveedor de cuidado de niños,
un miembro de la familia, o un amigo, asegúrese
de hablar con esta persona acerca de prácticas
de sueño seguro. Lleve consigo esta hoja
informativa como un auxiliar, si es necesario. Si
un cuidador desconoce las mejores prácticas de
sueño seguro, trate respetuosamente de
enseñarle lo que ha aprendido acerca de
prácticas de sueño seguras, y la importancia de
seguir estas reglas cuando atienda a bebés.
Antes de dejar a su bebé con alguien, asegúrese
de que esa persona esté de acuerdo en seguir en
todo momento las prácticas de sueño seguro
explicadas en este folleto.
Boca arriba para despertarse—los lactantes sanos
duermen más seguros boca arriba.
¿QUÉ MÁS PUEDO HACER
PARA DISMINUIR EL RIESGO DE
MI BEBÉ?
Siga estos pasos fáciles y sin costo, para
ayudar a disminuir el riesgo de que su bebé
muera por SIDS.
PRÁCTICAS DE SUEÑO SEGURO
• Siempre coloque a los bebés a dormir boca
arriba durante siestas y por la noche. Puesto
que los bebés que duermen de lado tienen más
probabilidades de girar accidentalmente y
quedar boca abajo, la posición de lado es igual
de peligrosa que la posición boca abajo.
• Evite permitir que aumente demasiado la
temperatura del bebé. El bebé podría estar
demasiado caliente si nota sudoración, pelo
húmedo, rubor en las mejillas, erupción en la
piel por calor, y respiración rápida. Vista al
bebé con ropa ligera para que duerma. Ajuste
la temperatura de la habitación dentro de un
rango que sea cómodo para un adulto que vista
ropa ligera.
• Considere usar un chupón a la hora de la
siesta y a la hora de dormir por la noche. El
chupón no debe tener cordones ni clips que
pudieran plantear un riesgo de estrangulación.
AMBIENTE SEGURO PARA
DORMIR
• Coloque a su bebé sobre un colchón firme,
cubierto con una sábana que se ajuste bien y
que satisfaga las normas de seguridad
actuales. Para obtener más información acerca
de las normas de seguridad de cunas, visite el
sitio web de la Comisión de Seguridad de
Productos para el Consumidor (Consumer
Product Safety Commission) en
http://www.cspc.gov.
• Coloque la cuna en un área que siempre esté
libre de humo.
• No ponga a los bebés a dormir en camas para
adulto, sillas, sofás, camas de agua,
almohadas o cojines.
• No deben colocarse en la cuna con el bebé
juguetes ni otras ropas de cama mullidas,
incluso frazadas, edredones, almohadas,
muñecos de peluche, protectores para cuna, y
cuñas. Estos artículos pueden alterar la
capacidad del lactante para respirar si están
cerca de su cara.
• No debe usarse ropa de cama suelta, como
sábanas y frazadas. La ropa para dormir, como
mamelucos, sacos para dormir de bebé y
mantas de vestir son mejores opciones que las
frazadas.
No coloque almohadas, colchas, juguetes ni otros
objetos en la cuna.
El tiempo boca abajo diario, supervisado, durante
el juego es importante para el desarrollo sano del
bebé.
¿ALGUNA VEZ ES SEGURO
COLOCAR A LOS BEBÉS BOCA
ABAJO?
¡Sí! Debe hablar con el proveedor de cuidado de
su hijo acerca de hacer del tiempo boca abajo
una parte de las actividades diarias de su bebé.
Su bebé necesita suficiente tiempo boca abajo
mientras esté supervisado y despierto para
ayudar a fortalecer los músculos del cuello y del
hombro. Recuerde asegurarse de que su bebé
esté pasando tiempo boca abajo en el hogar con
usted.
BOCA ABAJO PARA QUE
JUEGUE, Y BOCA ARRIBA PARA
QUE DUERMA
• Coloque a los bebés a dormir boca arriba a fin
de disminuir el riesgo de SIDS. Poner a los
bebés a dormir de lado no es tan seguro como
colocarlos a dormir boca arriba, y no se
recomienda. Los bebés duermen cómodamente
boca arriba, y no se necesita equipo especial ni
dinero extra.
• El "tiempo boca abajo" es tiempo de juego
cuando los bebés están despiertos y son
colocados boca abajo mientras alguien los está
viendo. Coloque a los bebés boca abajo por un
rato para permitir que se desarrollen
normalmente.
¿QUÉ PUEDO HACER PARA
Si tiene preguntas acerca de las prácticas de
sueño seguro por favor póngase en contacto
con Healthy Child Care America en la
American Academy of Pediatrics en
[email protected] o llame al 888/227-5409.
Recuerde, si tiene una pregunta sobre la
salud y la seguridad de su hijo, hable con el
médico de su bebé.
RECURSOS:
American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aappolicy.org
SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths:
Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe
Infant Sleeping Environment
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/
pediatrics;128/5/e1341.pdf
Healthy Child Care America
http://www.healthychildcare.org
National Resource Center for Health and
Safety in Child Care and Early Education
http://nrc.uchsc.edu
Healthy Kids, Healthy Care: A Parent Friendly
Tool on Health and Safety Issues in Child
Care http://www.healthykids.us
AYUDAR A DIFUNDIR EL
MENSAJE ACERCA DE COLOCAR
A LOS BEBÉS BOCA ARRIBA
PARA DORMIR?
National Institute for Child and Human
Development Back to Sleep Campaign
(solicite materiales educativos gratuitos)
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sids/sids.cfm
• Conozca cuáles son las prácticas de sueño
seguro y cómo pueden formar parte de la vida
diaria.
First Candle/SIDS Alliance
http://www.firstcandle.org
• Cuando vaya de compras y encuentre tiendas
donde estén en exposición cunas que muestren
colchas pesadas, almohadas y muñecos de
peluche, hable con el gerente acerca del sueño
seguro, y pídale que no exhiba cunas de esta
manera.
• Vigile los medios de comunicación. Cuando vea
un anuncio o una fotografía en el periódico en la
que aparezca un bebé durmiendo boca abajo,
escriba una carta al editor.
Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality
Programs http://www.asip1.org
CJ Foundation for SIDS
http://www.cjsids.com
National SIDS and Infant Death Resource
Center http://www.sidscenter.org/
The Juvenile Products Manufacturers
Association http://www.jpma.org/
• Si conoce a adolescentes que cuidan de bebés,
hable con ellos. Pueden necesitar ayuda para
seguir las prácticas de sueño seguro apropiadas.
• Ponga un buen ejemplo—dese cuenta de que
usted puede no haber dormido boca arriba
cuando era bebé, pero ahora se sabe que ésta
es la manera más segura para que los niños
duerman. Cuando ponga a bebés a dormir,
asegúrese de siempre colocarlos boca arriba.
Revisado en 2011
A Child Care Provider’s
Guide to Safe Sleep
Helping you to reduce the risk of SIDS
DID YOU KNOW?
• About one in five sudden infant syndrome
(SIDS) deaths occur while an infant is being
cared for by someone other than a parent.
Many of these deaths occur when infants
who are used to sleeping on their backs
at home are then placed to sleep on their
tummies by another caregiver. We call this
“unaccustomed tummy sleeping.”
• Unaccustomed tummy sleeping increases the
risk of SIDS. Babies who are used to sleeping
on their backs and placed to sleep on their
tummies are 18 times more likely to die from
SIDS.
WHO IS AT RISK
FOR SIDS?
• SIDS is the leading cause of death for infants
between 1 month and 12 months of age.
• SIDS is most common among infants that are
1-4 months old. However, babies can die from
SIDS until they are 1 year old.
Because we don’t know what causes SIDS,
safe sleep practices should be used to reduce
the risk of SIDS in every infant under the age of
1 year.
KNOW THE T R U T H …
SIDS IS NOT CAUSED BY:
• Immunizations
• Vomiting or choking
WHAT CAN CHILD CARE
PROVIDERS DO?
Follow these guidelines to help protect the
infants in your care:
CREATE A SAFE
SLEEP POLICY
Create and use a written safe sleep policy:
Reducing the Risk of Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome, Applicable Standards from Caring
for Our Children National Health and Safety
Performance Standards: Guidelines for Outof-Home Child Care Programs outlines safe
sleep policy guidelines. Visit
http://nrckids.org/CFOC3/HTMLVersion/Chap
ter03.html#3.1.4.1 to download a free copy.
A SAFE SLEEP POLICY
SHOULD INCLUDE THE
FOLLOWING:
• Back to sleep for every sleep. To reduce the
risks of SIDS, infants should be placed for
sleep in a supine position (completely on the
back) for every sleep by every caregiver until 1
year of life. Side sleeping is not safe and not
advised.
• Consider offering a pacifier at nap time and
bedtime. The pacifier should not have cords or
attaching mechanisms that might be a
strangulation risk.
Supported in part by Grant No. U46MC 04436-06-00, a cooperative
agreement of the Office of Child Care and the Maternal and Child
Health Bureau.
• Place babies on a firm sleep surface, covered
by a fitted sheet that meets current safety
standards. For more information about crib
safety standards, visit the Consumer Product
Safety Commissions’ Web site at
http://www.cpsc.gov.
• Keep soft objects, loose bedding, bumper pads,
or any objects that could increase the risk of
suffocation or strangulation from the baby’s
sleep area.
• Loose bedding, such as sheets and blankets,
should not be used. Sleep clothing, such as
sleepers, sleep sacks, and wearable blankets,
are good alternatives to blankets.
• Sleep only 1 baby per crib.
• Keep the room at a temperature that is
comfortable for a lightly clothed adult.
• Do not use wedges or infant positioners, since
there’s no evidence that they reduce the risk of
SIDS, and they may increase the risk of
suffocation.
• Never allow smoking in a room where babies
sleep, as exposure to smoke is linked to an
increased risk of SIDS.
• Have supervised, daily “tummy time” for
babies who are awake. This will help babies
strengthen their muscles and develop
normally.
• Teach all staff, substitutes, and volunteers
about safe sleep policies and practices and
be sure to review these practices often.
When a new baby is coming into the program,
be sure to talk to the parents about your safe
sleep policy and how their baby sleeps. If the
baby sleeps in a way other than on her back,
the child’s parents or guardians need a note
from the child’s physician that explains how
she should sleep, the medical reason for this
position and a time frame for this position. This
note should be kept on file and all staff,
including substitutes and volunteers, should be
informed of this special situation. It is also a
good idea to put a sign on the baby’s crib.
If you are not sure how to create a safe sleep policy,
work with a child care health consultant to create a
policy that fits your child care center or home.
Face up to wake up – healthy babies sleep
safest on their backs.
SAFE SLEEP PRACTICES
• Practice SIDS reduction in your program by
using the Caring for Our Children standards.
• Always place babies to sleep on their backs
during naps and at nighttime.
• Avoid letting the baby get too hot. The infant
could be too hot if you notice sweating, damp
hair, flushed cheeks, heat rash, and/or rapid
breathing. Dress the baby lightly for sleep. Set
the room temperature in a range that is
comfortable for a lightly clothed adult.
• Talk with families about the importance of
sleep positioning and encourage them to
follow these guidelines at home.
SAFE SLEEP ENVIRONMENT
• Place babies to sleep only in a safetyapproved crib with a firm mattress and a wellfitting sheet. Don’t place babies to sleep on
chairs, sofas, waterbeds, or cushions. Adult
beds are NOT safe places for babies to sleep.
• Toys and other soft bedding, including fluffy
blankets, comforters, pillows, stuffed
animals, bumper pads, and wedges should
not be placed in the crib with the baby.
These items can impair the infant’s ability to
breathe if they are close to their face.
• The crib should be placed in an area that
is always smoke-free.
• Room sharing without bed-sharing is
recommended. Evidence has shown this
arrangement can decrease the risk of
SIDS as much as 50%.
Do not place pillows, quilts, pillow-like toys, or
anything in the crib.
OTHER
RECOMMENDATIONS
• Support parents who want to breastfeed or
feed their children breast milk.
• Encourage parents to keep up with their
baby’s recommended immunizations, which
may provide a protective effect against
SIDS.
• Talk with a child care health consultant about
health and safety in child care.
• Have a plan to respond if there is an infant
medical emergency.
• Be aware of bereavement/grief resources.
AM I A CHILD CARE
PROVIDER?
Some child care providers are professionals
with college degrees and years of experience,
but other kinds of child care providers could be
grandparents, babysitters, family friends, or
anyone who cares for a baby. These guidelines
apply to any kind of child care provider. If you
ever care for a child who is less than 12
months of age, you should be aware of and
follow these safe sleep practices.
If you have questions about safe sleep
practices please contact Healthy Child Care
America at the American Academy of
Pediatrics at [email protected] or 888/2275409. Remember, if you have a question about
the health and safety of an infant in your care,
ask the baby’s parents if you can talk to the
baby’s doctor.
Supervised daily tummy time during play is
important to baby’s healthy development.
R E S O U R C E S:
American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aappolicy.org
SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths:
Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe Infant
Sleeping Environment
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cont
ent/128/5/1030.full
Healthy Child Care America
http://www.healthychildcare.org
Caring for Our Children, National Health and
Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for
Out-of-Home Child Care, Third Edition.
Visit the National Resource Center for Health and
Safety in Child Care and Early Education Web site
at: http://nrckids.org/CFOC3/ to download a free
copy. Hard copies are available from the American
Academy of Pediatrics Bookstore at
http://www.aap.org.
National Institute for Child and Human
Development Back to Sleep Campaign
Order free educational materials from the
Back to Sleep Campaign at
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sids/sids.cfm
First Candle/SIDS Alliance
http://www.firstcandle.org
Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs
http://www.asip1.org/
CJ Foundation for SIDS
http://www.cjsids.com/
National SIDS and Infant Death Resource Center
http://www.sidscenter.org/
The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association
http://www.jpma.org/
Revised 2012
Guía para sueño seguro del bebé,
para proveedores de cuidado de niños
Ayuda para disminuir el riesgo de SIDS
¿LO SABÍA?
• Alrededor de uno de cada cinco decesos por
síndrome de muerte súbita del lactante (sudden
infant death syndrome [SIDS]) ocurre mientras
un lactante (bebé) está al cuidado de alguien
que no es la madre o el padre. Muchas de estas
muertes suceden cuando los bebés que están
acostumbrados a dormir boca arriba en el hogar
posteriormente son puestos a dormir boca abajo
por otro cuidador. Llamamos a esto “sueño boca
abajo no acostumbrado”.
• Poner a dormir boca abajo a un bebé sin que
esté acostumbrado a ello, aumenta el riesgo de
SIDS. Los bebés habituados a dormir boca
arriba y que son puestos a dormir boca abajo
tienen 18 veces más probabilidades de morir por
SIDS.
¿QUIÉN TIENE RIESGO
DE SIDS?
• El SIDS es la principal causa de muerte de
bebés de un mes a 12 meses de edad.
• El SIDS es más común entre bebés de uno a
cuatro meses de edad. Sin embargo, bebés
hasta de un año de edad pueden morir por
SIDS.
Dado que se desconoce la causa del SIDS,
deben usarse prácticas de sueño seguro a fin
de disminuir el riesgo de SIDS en todo bebé de
menos de un año de edad.
SEPA LA VERDAD...
EL SIDS NO SE ORIGINA POR:
• Inmunizaciones
• Vómitos o asfixia
¿QUÉ PUEDEN HACER LOS
PROVEEDORES DE CUIDADO DE
NIÑOS?
Siga estas pautas para ayudar a proteger
a los bebés que estén a su cuidado:
CREE UNA POLÍTICA DE
SUEÑO SEGURO
Escriba, practique y establezca una práctica
de sueño seguro — Visite
http://nrckids.org/CFOC3/HTMLVersion/Chap
ter03.html#3.1.4.1 para descargar una copia
gratuita (en idioma inglés) del documento:
Reducing the Risk of Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome, Applicable Standards from Caring
for Our Children National Health and Safety
Performance Standards: Guidelines for Outof-Home Child Care Programs, en el cual se
esbozan guías para un sueño seguro.
UNA POLÍTICA DE SUEÑO
SEGURO DEBE INCLUIR LO
QUE SIGUE:
• Cada vez que se ponga al bebé a dormir, se le
debe colocar boca arriba. Para disminuir el
riesgo de SIDS, cada vez que cualquier
proveedor de cuidado ponga a dormir a un
bebé menor de un año de edad, debe colocarlo
en una posición supina (completamente boca
arriba). Colocar de lado al bebé para que
duerma no es seguro y no se recomienda.
• Considere ofrecer al bebé un chupón a la hora
de la siesta y a la hora de dormir por la noche.
El chupón no debe tener cordones ni
mecanismos de fijación que pudieran plantear
un riesgo de estrangulación.
Apoyado en parte por la Grant No. U46MC 04436-06-00, un acuerdo
cooperativo de la Office of Child Care y el Maternal and Child Health
Bureau.
• Coloque a los bebés sobre una superficie firme
para dormir, cubiertos con una sábana que se
ajuste bien y que satisfaga las normas de
seguridad actuales. Para obtener más información
acerca de las normas de seguridad de cunas,
visite el sitio web de la Comisión de Seguridad de
Productos para el Consumidor (Consumer Product
Safety Commission) en http://www.cpsc.gov.
• Mantenga lejos del área donde duerme el bebé
objetos blandos, ropa de cama suelta, protectores
para cuna, o cualquier objeto que pudiera
aumentar el riesgo de asfixia o estrangulación.
• No debe usarse ropa de cama suelta, como
sábanas y frazadas. La ropa para dormir, como
mamelucos, sacos para dormir de bebé y mantas
de vestir son buenas alternativas para las
frazadas.
• Ponga a dormir sólo a un bebé por cada cuna.
• Mantenga el cuarto a una temperatura que sea
cómoda para un adulto que vista ropa ligera.
• No use cuñas ni cojines posicionadores para
bebés, porque no hay evidencia de que
disminuyan el riesgo de SIDS, y pueden aumentar
el riesgo de asfixia.
• Nunca permita que se fume en un cuarto donde
duerman bebés, porque la exposición al humo
está enlazada con un incremento del riesgo de
SIDS.
• Asigne "tiempo boca abajo" supervisado, a diario,
para bebés que estén despiertos. Esto ayudará a
los bebés a fortalecer sus músculos y a
desarrollarse normalmente.
• Enseñe a todo el personal, sustitutos y voluntarios
las políticas y prácticas de sueño seguro, y
asegúrese de revisar estas prácticas a menudo.
Cuando un nuevo bebé llegue al programa,
asegúrese de hablar con los padres acerca de su
política de sueño seguro, y de cómo duerme su
bebé. Si el bebé duerme de alguna otra manera
que no es boca arriba, los padres o guardianes del
niño necesitan una nota extendida por el médico del
niño en la que explique cómo debe dormir, la razón
médica para esta posición, y un marco de tiempo
para esta posición. Es necesario mantener esta
nota en el expediente, e informar de esta situación
especial a todo el personal, incluso sustitutos y
voluntarios. También es buena idea poner una nota
en la cuna del bebé.
Si no está seguro de cómo crear una política de
sueño seguro, trabaje con un consultor de salud
en el cuidado infantil para crear una política que
se adapte a su centro u hogar de cuidado de
niños.
Boca arriba para despertarse—los lactantes
sanos duermen más seguros boca arriba.
No coloque almohadas, colchas, juguetes en
forma de almohada, ni otras cosas en la cuna.
PRÁCTICAS DE SUEÑO SEGURO
OTRAS RECOMENDACIONES
• Practique la reducción del SIDS en su
programa al usar las normas Caring for Our
Children (Cuidado de nuestros niños).
• Apoye a los padres que deseen amamantar
a su hijo o alimentarlo con leche materna.
• Siempre coloque a los bebés a dormir boca
arriba durante siestas y por la noche.
• Evite dejar que la temperatura del bebé
aumente demasiado. La temperatura del
bebé podría estar demasiado alta si usted
nota sudoración, pelo húmedo, rubor en las
mejillas, erupción en la piel por calor, o
respiración rápida, o una combinación de los
anteriores. Vista al bebé con ropa ligera para
que duerma. Ajuste la temperatura del cuarto
dentro de un rango que sea cómodo para un
adulto que vista ropa ligera.
• Hable con las familias acerca de la
importancia de colocar al niño en la posición
recomendada para que duerma, y estimúlelas
para que sigan estas pautas en el hogar.
AMBIENTE DE SUEÑO
SEGURO
• Sólo ponga a los bebés a dormir en una cuna
aprobada en cuanto a seguridad, con un
colchón firme y una sábana que se ajuste
bien. No coloque a los bebés a dormir en
sillas, sofás, camas de agua o cojines. Las
camas para adulto NO son lugares seguros
para que duerman los bebés.
• No deben colocarse en la cuna con el bebé
juguetes ni otra ropa de cama mullida,
incluso frazadas, edredones, almohadas,
muñecos de peluche, protectores para cuna
y cuñas. Estos artículos pueden alterar la
capacidad del lactante para respirar si están
cerca de su cara.
• La cuna debe colocarse en un área que
siempre esté libre de humo.
• Se recomienda que se compartan cuartos
sin compartir camas. La evidencia ha
mostrado que este arreglo puede
disminuir hasta 50% el riesgo de SIDS.
El tiempo boca abajo supervisado durante el
juego es importante para el desarrollo sano
del bebé.
RECURSOS:
American Academy of Pediatrics
http://www.aappolicy.org
• Estimule a los padres para que mantengan
al corriente las inmunizaciones
recomendadas para su bebé, lo cual puede
proporcionar un efecto protector contra
SIDS.
SIDS and Other Sleep-Related Infant Deaths:
Expansion of Recommendations for a Safe Infant
Sleeping Environment
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/repri
nt/pediatrics;128/5/e1341.pdf
• Hable con un consultor de salud en el
cuidado infantil acerca de la salud y la
seguridad en el cuidado de niños.
Healthy Child Care America
http://www.healthychildcare.org
• Tenga un plan para responder si hay una
emergencia médica en un lactante.
• Conozca recursos para afrontar el
duelo/pena.
¿SOY UN PROVEEDOR DE
CUIDADO DE NIÑOS?
Algunos proveedores de cuidado de niños son
profesionales con títulos universitarios y años
de experiencia, pero otras clases de
proveedores de cuidado de niños podrían ser
los abuelos, niñeras, amigos de la familia o
cualquier persona que cuide a un bebé. Estas
pautas se aplican a cualquier clase de
proveedor de cuidado de niños. Si usted
alguna vez cuida de un niño de menos de 12
meses de edad, debe conocer estas prácticas
de sueño seguro y seguirlas.
Si tiene preguntas acerca de las prácticas de
sueño seguro, por favor póngase en contacto
con Healthy Child Care America en la
American Academy of Pediatrics en
[email protected] o al llamar al 888/2275409. Recuerde, si tiene preguntas sobre la
salud y la seguridad de un bebé que esté a su
cuidado, pregunte a los padres si puede hablar
con el médico que atiende al bebé.
Caring for Our Children, National Health and
Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for
Out-of-Home Child Care, Third Edition.
Visite el sitio web del National Resource Center
for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early
Education en: http://nrckids.org/CFOC3/ para
descargar una copia gratuita (en idioma inglés).
Hay copias impresas disponibles en la American
Academy of Pediatrics Bookstore en
http://www.aap.org.
National Institute for Child and Human
Development Back to Sleep Campaign
Solicite materiales educativos gratuitos de
la Back to Sleep Campaign en
http://www.nichd.nih.gov/sids/sids.cfm
First Candle/SIDS Alliance
http://www.firstcandle.org
Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Programs
http://www.asip1.org/
CJ Foundation for SIDS
http://www.cjsids.com/
National SIDS and Infant Death Resource Center
http://www.sidscenter.org/
The Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association
http://www.jpma.org/
Revisado en 2011
KEEP BABY SAFE
IN PLAY YARD SPACE
Starting February 28, 2013, testing for play yards will be more rigorous.
Play yards that meet new safety standards must have:
Side rails that
resist forming
a sharp V when
folded to prevent
strangulation
Stronger corner
brackets to prevent
sharp-edged
cracks and side
rail collapse
SAFE SLEEP TIPS:
• Always place baby on back to sleep.
• Only use the mattress sold with the play yard.
• Keep pillows, quilts, comforters, and cushions
out of play yards, cribs, and bassinets.
• Dress baby in footed pajamas for warmth.
Sturdier mattress
attachments to the
play yard floor to
prevent entrapments
and injuries
A play yard is a framed enclosure with a floor and
mesh or fabric side panels. It may be folded for
storage or travel. It is primarily intended to provide
a play or sleeping environment for children who are
less than 35 inches tall who cannot climb out of
the product.
NSN 13-1
www.CPSC.gov
MANTENGA A SU BEBÉ SEGURO
EN UN CORRALITO
A partir del 28 de febrero de 2013, las pruebas de corrales para bebés serán más rigurosas.
Los corralitos en cumplimiento con las nuevas normas de seguridad deberán tener:
Barandas laterales que
no formen una V afilada
al doblarse para prevenir
el estrangulamiento
Soportes de esquina
más resistentes para
prevenir grietas afiladas
y el colapso de las
barandas laterales
CONSEJOS PARA QUE
SU BEBÉ DUERMA SEGURO:
• Siempre acueste a dormir a su bebé boca arriba.
• Use solamente el colchón vendido con el corralito.
• Mantenga almohadas, colchas, edredones y cojines
fuera del corralito, la cuna y el moisés.
• Para que su bebé duerma calientito, póngale pijamas con pies.
Accesorios de
sujeción del colchón
al piso del corralito más
fuertes para prevenir
atrapamientos
y lesiones
Un corral para bebés o corralito es una estructura con un
piso y paneles laterales de malla o tela. Puede doblarse para
guardarlo o viajar. Este artículo está previsto para ser utilizado
principalmente como un lugar para que niños de hasta 35
pulgadas de altura, quienes no puedan treparse para salir
fuera de él, jueguen o duerman.
NSN 13-1
www.CPSC.gov
What Does a Safe Sleep
Environment Look Like?
Reduce the Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
and Other Sleep-Related Causes of Infant Death
Use a firm sleep
surface, such as
a mattress in a
safety-approved*
crib, covered by
a fitted sheet.
Do not use
pillows, blankets,
sheepskins, or
crib bumpers
anywhere in your
baby’s sleep area.
Keep soft objects,
toys, and loose
bedding out
of your baby’s
sleep area.
Do not smoke
or let anyone
smoke around
your baby.
Make sure
nothing covers
the baby’s head.
Always place your
baby on his or her
back to sleep, for
naps and at night.
Dress your baby
in sleep clothing,
such as a onepiece sleeper,
and do not use
a blanket.
Baby’s sleep area
is next to where
parents sleep.
Baby should not
sleep in an adult
bed, on a couch,
or on a chair
alone, with you, or
with anyone else.
*For more information on crib safety guidelines, contact the Consumer Product Safety Commission at 1-800-638-2772 or http://www.cpsc.gov.
Safe Sleep For Your Baby
Always place your baby on his or her back to sleep,
for naps and at night, to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Follow health care provider guidance on your
baby’s vaccines and regular health checkups.
Use a firm sleep surface, such as a mattress in a
safety-approved* crib, covered by a fitted sheet,
to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related
causes of infant death.
Avoid products that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS
and other sleep-related causes of infant death.
Room sharing—keeping baby’s sleep area in the
same room where you sleep—reduces the risk of
SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.
Do not use home heart or breathing monitors to
reduce the risk of SIDS.
Give your baby plenty of Tummy Time when he or
she is awake and when someone is watching.
Keep soft objects, toys, crib bumpers, and loose
bedding out of your baby’s sleep area to reduce
the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of
infant death.
To reduce the risk of SIDS, women should:
•
•
Get regular health care during pregnancy, and
Not smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs
during pregnancy or after the baby is born.
To reduce the risk of SIDS, do not smoke during
pregnancy, and do not smoke or allow smoking
around your baby.
Breastfeed your baby to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Give your baby a dry pacifier that is not attached
to a string for naps and at night to reduce the risk
of SIDS.
Do not let your baby get too hot during sleep.
* For more information on crib safety guidelines, contact the Consumer
Product Safety Commission at 1-800-638-2772 or http://www.cpsc.gov.
Remember Tummy Time!
Place babies on their stomachs when they are awake
and when someone is watching. Tummy Time helps
your baby’s head, neck, and shoulder muscles get
stronger and helps to prevent flat spots on the head.
For more information about SIDS and the Safe to Sleep® campaign:
Mail: 31 Center Drive, 31/2A32, Bethesda, MD 20892-2425
Phone: 1-800-505-CRIB (2742)
Fax: 1-866-760-5947
Website: http://safetosleep.nichd.nih.gov
NIH Pub. No. 12-5759
August 2014
Safe to Sleep® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
TRONCOS DE APIO
4
SERVES
PORCIONES
CELERY LOGS
1 carrot, shredded
¼ cup raisins
½ cup lowfat cottage cheese
6 celery stalks, cut into 3-inch pieces
1
1 zanahoria, rallada
¼ taza de pasas
½ taza de requesón bajo en grasa
6 tallos de apio, cortados en pedazos de 3
pulgadas
1
En un tazón pequeño, mezcle las zanahorias,
las pasas y el requesón.
2 Añada la mezcla a los pedazos de apio.
In a small bowl, mix together carrots, raisins,
and cottage cheese.
2 Top celery pieces with mixture.
INFORMACIÓN DE NUTRICIÓN ( en cada porción )
CALORÍAS 74; GRASA 0.4g; PROTEÍNA 4g; CARB. 14g; FIBRA
2g; CALCIO 90mg; HIERRO 0.6mg; VITAMINA A (RE) 274mcg;
VITAMINA C 8mg; FOLATO 3mcg
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION ( per serving )
CALORIES 74; FAT 0.4g; PROTEIN 4g; CARB 14g; FIBER 2g;
CALCIUM 90mg; IRON 0.6mg; VITAMIN A (RE) 274mcg;
VITAMIN C 8mg; FOLATE 3mcg
DID YOU KNOW?...
Celery also can be filled with an assortment of
healthy dips. Try using hummus or other bean dips.
SABÍA USTED QUE?…
El apio también puede rellenarse de una diversa
variedad de dips nutritivos. Pruebe con hummus u
otros dips de frijoles.
30
SNACKS
BOCADILLOS
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement