Junos® OS CLI User Guide

Junos® OS CLI User Guide
Junos® OS
CLI User Guide
Modified: 2017-09-19
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Juniper Networks, Inc.
1133 Innovation Way
Sunnyvale, California 94089
USA
408-745-2000
www.juniper.net
Juniper Networks, the Juniper Networks logo, Juniper, and Junos are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. and/or its affiliates in
the United States and other countries. All other trademarks may be property of their respective owners.
Juniper Networks assumes no responsibility for any inaccuracies in this document. Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify,
transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice.
®
Junos OS CLI User Guide
Copyright © 2017 Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved.
The information in this document is current as of the date on the title page.
YEAR 2000 NOTICE
Juniper Networks hardware and software products are Year 2000 compliant. Junos OS has no known time-related limitations through the
year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036.
END USER LICENSE AGREEMENT
The Juniper Networks product that is the subject of this technical documentation consists of (or is intended for use with) Juniper Networks
software. Use of such software is subject to the terms and conditions of the End User License Agreement (“EULA”) posted at
http://www.juniper.net/support/eula/. By downloading, installing or using such software, you agree to the terms and conditions of that
EULA.
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Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Table of Contents
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Documentation and Release Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Supported Platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Using the Examples in This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Merging a Full Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Merging a Snippet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi
Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Requesting Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix
Opening a Case with JTAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Introducing the Junos OS Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Key Features of the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement
Hierarchies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Junos OS CLI Command Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
CLI Command Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Configuration Statement Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Moving Among Hierarchy Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CLI Explorer Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Other Tools to Configure and Monitor Devices Running Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Commands and Configuration Statements for Junos-FIPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Chapter 2
Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Switching Between Junos OS CLI Operational and Configuration Modes . . . . . . . 31
Configuring a User Account on a Device Running Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Checking the Status of a Device Running Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Example: Configuring a Routing Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Shortcut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Longer Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Making Changes to a Routing Protocol Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Rolling Back Junos OS Configuration Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Chapter 3
Getting Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Getting Help About Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Getting Help About a String in a Statement or Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Getting Help About Configuration Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
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Getting Help About System Log Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Junos OS CLI Online Help Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Help for Omitted Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Using CLI Command Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Displaying Tips About CLI Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Examples: Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Chapter 4
Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Configuration Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Configuration Statements and Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Configuration Statement Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies . . . . . . . . . . 66
Forms of the configure Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Using the configure exclusive Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Using the configure Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Modifying the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Example: Deleting a Statement from the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Example: Copying a Statement in the Junos Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Issuing Relative Junos OS Configuration Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Examples: Re-Using Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Example: Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Example: Using the Wildcard Command with the Range Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS
Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Example: Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos
OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Adding Comments in a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Adding Comments in the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Adding Comments in a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Example: Including Comments in a Junos OS Configuration by Using the CLI . . . 98
Updating the configure private Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Example: Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Displaying Additional Information About the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . 103
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Example: Displaying set Commands from the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Example: Displaying Required set Commands at the
Current Hierarchy Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
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Example: Displaying set Commands with the match Option . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Verifying a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Chapter 5
Committing a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Junos OS Commit Model for Router or Switch Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Committing a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Committing a Junos OS Configuration and Exiting Configuration Mode . . . . . . . . 112
Commit Operation When Multiple Users Configure the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Activating a Junos OS Configuration but Requiring Confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Scheduling a Junos OS Commit Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Monitoring the Junos OS Commit Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Adding a Comment to Describe the Committed Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Backing Up the Committed Configuration on the Alternate Boot Drive . . . . . . . . 118
Junos OS Batch Commits Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Aggregation and Error Handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and
Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Chapter 6
Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Understanding How the Junos OS Configuration Is Stored . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Understanding the show | compare | display xml Command Output . . . . . . . . . 136
Adding a Statement (create Operation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Deleting a Statement (delete Operation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Changing a Statement (delete and create Operations) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Changing Metadata (inactive Attribute and Operation) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Adding an Annotation (comment Tag and create Operation) . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Changing an Annotation (comment Tag, and delete and create
Operations) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Adding a Statement Inside a Container (create Operation, and insert and
key Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Changing the Order Inside a Container (merge Operation, and insert and
key Attributes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . 142
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Returning to a Configuration Prior to the One Most Recently Committed . . 143
Displaying Previous Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Saving a Configuration to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Saving a Configuration to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Additional Details About Specifying Junos OS Statements and Identifiers . . . . . 149
Specifying Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Performing CLI Type Checking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
Examples: Loading a Configuration from a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
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Compressing the Current Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Example: Protecting the Junos OS Configuration from Modification or
Deletion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Synchronizing Routing Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Configuring Multiple Routing Engines to Synchronize Committed Configurations
Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Chapter 7
Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
CLI Command Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Junos OS Operational Mode Commands That Combine Other Commands . . . . 176
Understanding the Brief, Detail, Extensive, and Terse Options of Junos OS
Operational Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Controlling the Scope of an Operational Mode Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Operational Mode Commands on a TX Matrix Router or TX Matrix Plus
Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Examples of Routing Matrix Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Monitoring Who Uses the Junos OS CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Physical Part of an Interface Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Logical Part of an Interface Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Channel Identifier Part of an Interface Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Viewing Files and Directories on a Device Running Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Directories on the Router or Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Listing Files and Directories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Specifying Filenames and URLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
Displaying Junos OS Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Managing Programs and Processes Using Junos OS Operational Mode
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Showing Software Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
Restarting the Junos OS Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
Stopping Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Rebooting Junos OS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Using the Junos OS CLI Comment Character # for Operational Mode
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Example: Using Comments in Junos OS Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . 195
Chapter 8
Filtering Command Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Filtering Operational Mode Command Output in a QFabric System . . . . . . . . . . 199
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface . . . . . . . . . 200
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in Text . . . . . . . . 201
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in XML . . . . . . . 202
Counting the Number of Lines of Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Displaying Output in XML Tag Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Displaying Ephemeral Configuration Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
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Displaying Output in JSON Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
Displaying the Configuration with YANG Translation Scripts Applied . . . . . 204
Displaying the RPC Tags for a Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Ignoring Output That Does Not Match a Regular Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
Displaying Output from the First Match of a Regular Expression . . . . . . . . . 206
Retaining Output After the Last Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Displaying Output Beginning with the Last Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Displaying Output That Matches a Regular Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Preventing Output from Being Paginated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Sending Command Output to Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Resolving IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
Saving Output to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Appending Output to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Displaying Output on Screen and Writing to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Trimming Output by Specifying the Starting Column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Refreshing the Output of a Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210
Chapter 9
Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI . . . . . . . . . 211
Using Keyboard Sequences to Move Around and Edit the Junos OS CLI . . . . . . . . 211
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Replacing an
Interface Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto
Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Using Regular Expressions to Delete Related Items from a Junos OS
cConfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Chapter 10
Using Configuration Groups to Quickly Configure Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Configuration Groups Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Inheritance Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Configuring Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Example: Configuring and Applying Junos OS Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . 230
Example: Creating and Applying Configuration Groups on a TX Matrix Router . . 231
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . 237
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups . . . . . . . 238
Example: Configuring a Consistent IP Address for the Management Interface . . 241
Example: Configuring Peer Entities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242
Establishing Regional Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Configuring Wildcard Configuration Group Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
Example: Referencing the Preset Statement From the Junos OS defaults
Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
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Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied
to the Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
Using Conditions to Apply Configuration Groups Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Example: Configuring Conditions for Applying Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . 248
Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Example: Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . 251
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
Setting Up Routing Engine Configuration Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
Chapter 11
Controlling the CLI Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
Setting the Terminal Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting the CLI Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting the CLI Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting the CLI Timestamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting the Idle Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting the CLI to Prompt After a Software Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258
Setting Command Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Displaying CLI Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Setting the Junos OS CLI Screen Length and Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Setting the Screen Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Setting the Screen Width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Example: Controlling the CLI Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Example: Enabling Configuration Breadcrumbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Chapter 12
Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
apply-groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
apply-groups-except . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
activate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
annotate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273
clear system commit prepared . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274
commit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275
commit activate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
commit prepare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
commit-interval (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
configuration-breadcrumbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
copy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
days-to-keep-error-logs (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284
deactivate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285
delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
edit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
export-format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
insert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
maximum-aggregate-pool (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
maximum-entries (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296
no-hidden-commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
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protect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298
quit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299
rename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
replace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
rollback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
server (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
show configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
show | display inheritance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312
show | display omit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
show | display set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
show | display set relative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
show groups junos-defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
top . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
traceoptions (Batch Commits) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
unprotect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
when . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
wildcard delete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
Chapter 13
Junos OS CLI Environment Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
set cli complete-on-space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
set cli directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
set cli idle-timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
set cli prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331
set cli restart-on-upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332
set cli screen-length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
set cli screen-width . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
set cli terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
set cli timestamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
set date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337
show cli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
show cli . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
show cli authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
show cli directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
show cli history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Chapter 14
Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
configure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349
| (pipe) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
request system commit server pause . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
request system commit server queue cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
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request system commit server start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
show system commit server queue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
show system commit server status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
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List of Figures
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Figure 1: Monitoring and Configuring Routers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Figure 2: Committing a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Figure 3: Configuration Statement Hierarchy Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Chapter 4
Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Figure 4: Configuration Mode Hierarchy of Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Chapter 5
Committing a Junos OS Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Figure 5: Confirm a Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Chapter 6
Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Figure 6: Overriding the Current Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Figure 7: Using the replace Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Figure 8: Using the merge Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Figure 9: Using a Patch File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Figure 10: Using the set Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Chapter 7
Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Figure 11: Commands That Combine Other Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Figure 12: Command Output Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Figure 13: Restarting a Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Chapter 9
Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI . . . . . . . . . 211
Figure 14: Replacement by Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
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List of Tables
About the Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
Table 1: Notice Icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii
Chapter 1
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Table 3: CLI Configuration Mode Navigation Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Chapter 4
Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Table 4: Summary of Configuration Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Table 5: Configuration Mode Top-Level Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Table 6: Forms of the configure Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Chapter 6
Managing Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Table 7: CLI Configuration Input Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Chapter 7
Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Table 8: Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Table 9: Directories on the Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Table 10: show system process extensive Command Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . 192
Chapter 8
Filtering Command Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
Table 11: Common Regular Expression Operators in Operational Mode
Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Chapter 9
Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI . . . . . . . . . 211
Table 12: CLI Keyboard Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212
Table 13: Wildcard Characters for Specifying Interface Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
Table 14: Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command . . . . 214
Table 15: Replacement Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Chapter 13
Junos OS CLI Environment Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327
Table 16: show cli Output Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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xiv
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
•
Documentation and Release Notes on page xv
•
Supported Platforms on page xv
•
Using the Examples in This Manual on page xv
•
Documentation Conventions on page xvii
•
Documentation Feedback on page xix
•
Requesting Technical Support on page xix
Documentation and Release Notes
®
To obtain the most current version of all Juniper Networks technical documentation,
see the product documentation page on the Juniper Networks website at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/.
If the information in the latest release notes differs from the information in the
documentation, follow the product Release Notes.
Juniper Networks Books publishes books by Juniper Networks engineers and subject
matter experts. These books go beyond the technical documentation to explore the
nuances of network architecture, deployment, and administration. The current list can
be viewed at http://www.juniper.net/books.
Supported Platforms
For the features described in this document, the following platforms are supported:
•
ACX Series
•
M Series
•
MX Series
•
T Series
•
PTX Series
Using the Examples in This Manual
If you want to use the examples in this manual, you can use the load merge or the load
merge relative command. These commands cause the software to merge the incoming
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
configuration into the current candidate configuration. The example does not become
active until you commit the candidate configuration.
If the example configuration contains the top level of the hierarchy (or multiple
hierarchies), the example is a full example. In this case, use the load merge command.
If the example configuration does not start at the top level of the hierarchy, the example
is a snippet. In this case, use the load merge relative command. These procedures are
described in the following sections.
Merging a Full Example
To merge a full example, follow these steps:
1.
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration example into a
text file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing
platform.
For example, copy the following configuration to a file and name the file ex-script.conf.
Copy the ex-script.conf file to the /var/tmp directory on your routing platform.
system {
scripts {
commit {
file ex-script.xsl;
}
}
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
disable;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
2. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge configuration mode command:
[edit]
[email protected]# load merge /var/tmp/ex-script.conf
load complete
Merging a Snippet
To merge a snippet, follow these steps:
1.
xvi
From the HTML or PDF version of the manual, copy a configuration snippet into a text
file, save the file with a name, and copy the file to a directory on your routing platform.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
For example, copy the following snippet to a file and name the file
ex-script-snippet.conf. Copy the ex-script-snippet.conf file to the /var/tmp directory
on your routing platform.
commit {
file ex-script-snippet.xsl; }
2. Move to the hierarchy level that is relevant for this snippet by issuing the following
configuration mode command:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit system scripts
[edit system scripts]
3. Merge the contents of the file into your routing platform configuration by issuing the
load merge relative configuration mode command:
[edit system scripts]
[email protected]# load merge relative /var/tmp/ex-script-snippet.conf
load complete
For more information about the load command, see CLI Explorer.
Documentation Conventions
Table 1 on page xvii defines notice icons used in this guide.
Table 1: Notice Icons
Icon
Meaning
Description
Informational note
Indicates important features or instructions.
Caution
Indicates a situation that might result in loss of data or hardware damage.
Warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury or death.
Laser warning
Alerts you to the risk of personal injury from a laser.
Tip
Indicates helpful information.
Best practice
Alerts you to a recommended use or implementation.
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Table 2 on page xviii defines the text and syntax conventions used in this guide.
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions
Convention
Description
Examples
Bold text like this
Represents text that you type.
To enter configuration mode, type the
configure command:
[email protected]> configure
Fixed-width text like this
Italic text like this
Italic text like this
Represents output that appears on the
terminal screen.
[email protected]> show chassis alarms
•
Introduces or emphasizes important
new terms.
•
•
Identifies guide names.
A policy term is a named structure
that defines match conditions and
actions.
•
Identifies RFC and Internet draft titles.
•
Junos OS CLI User Guide
•
RFC 1997, BGP Communities Attribute
No alarms currently active
Represents variables (options for which
you substitute a value) in commands or
configuration statements.
Configure the machine’s domain name:
Represents names of configuration
statements, commands, files, and
directories; configuration hierarchy levels;
or labels on routing platform
components.
•
To configure a stub area, include the
stub statement at the [edit protocols
ospf area area-id] hierarchy level.
•
The console port is labeled CONSOLE.
< > (angle brackets)
Encloses optional keywords or variables.
stub <default-metric metric>;
| (pipe symbol)
Indicates a choice between the mutually
exclusive keywords or variables on either
side of the symbol. The set of choices is
often enclosed in parentheses for clarity.
broadcast | multicast
# (pound sign)
Indicates a comment specified on the
same line as the configuration statement
to which it applies.
rsvp { # Required for dynamic MPLS only
[ ] (square brackets)
Encloses a variable for which you can
substitute one or more values.
community name members [
community-ids ]
Indention and braces ( { } )
Identifies a level in the configuration
hierarchy.
; (semicolon)
Identifies a leaf statement at a
configuration hierarchy level.
Text like this
xviii
[edit]
[email protected]# set system domain-name
domain-name
(string1 | string2 | string3)
[edit]
routing-options {
static {
route default {
nexthop address;
retain;
}
}
}
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
About the Documentation
Table 2: Text and Syntax Conventions (continued)
Convention
Description
Examples
Represents graphical user interface (GUI)
items you click or select.
•
In the Logical Interfaces box, select
All Interfaces.
•
To cancel the configuration, click
Cancel.
GUI Conventions
Bold text like this
> (bold right angle bracket)
Separates levels in a hierarchy of menu
selections.
In the configuration editor hierarchy,
select Protocols>Ospf.
Documentation Feedback
We encourage you to provide feedback, comments, and suggestions so that we can
improve the documentation. You can provide feedback by using either of the following
methods:
•
Online feedback rating system—On any page of the Juniper Networks TechLibrary site
at http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/index.html, simply click the stars to rate the content,
and use the pop-up form to provide us with information about your experience.
Alternately, you can use the online feedback form at
http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/feedback/.
•
E-mail—Send your comments to [email protected] Include the document
or topic name, URL or page number, and software version (if applicable).
Requesting Technical Support
Technical product support is available through the Juniper Networks Technical Assistance
Center (JTAC). If you are a customer with an active J-Care or Partner Support Service
support contract, or are covered under warranty, and need post-sales technical support,
you can access our tools and resources online or open a case with JTAC.
•
JTAC policies—For a complete understanding of our JTAC procedures and policies,
review the JTAC User Guide located at
http://www.juniper.net/us/en/local/pdf/resource-guides/7100059-en.pdf.
•
Product warranties—For product warranty information, visit
http://www.juniper.net/support/warranty/.
•
JTAC hours of operation—The JTAC centers have resources available 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, 365 days a year.
Self-Help Online Tools and Resources
For quick and easy problem resolution, Juniper Networks has designed an online
self-service portal called the Customer Support Center (CSC) that provides you with the
following features:
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
•
Find CSC offerings: http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/
•
Search for known bugs: https://prsearch.juniper.net/
•
Find product documentation: http://www.juniper.net/documentation/
•
Find solutions and answer questions using our Knowledge Base: http://kb.juniper.net/
•
Download the latest versions of software and review release notes:
http://www.juniper.net/customers/csc/software/
•
Search technical bulletins for relevant hardware and software notifications:
http://kb.juniper.net/InfoCenter/
•
Join and participate in the Juniper Networks Community Forum:
http://www.juniper.net/company/communities/
•
Open a case online in the CSC Case Management tool: http://www.juniper.net/cm/
To verify service entitlement by product serial number, use our Serial Number Entitlement
(SNE) Tool: https://entitlementsearch.juniper.net/entitlementsearch/
Opening a Case with JTAC
You can open a case with JTAC on the Web or by telephone.
•
Use the Case Management tool in the CSC at http://www.juniper.net/cm/.
•
Call 1-888-314-JTAC (1-888-314-5822 toll-free in the USA, Canada, and Mexico).
For international or direct-dial options in countries without toll-free numbers, see
http://www.juniper.net/support/requesting-support.html.
xx
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 1
Overview
•
Introducing the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 21
•
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement
Hierarchies on page 23
•
CLI Explorer Overview on page 26
•
Other Tools to Configure and Monitor Devices Running Junos OS on page 26
•
Commands and Configuration Statements for Junos-FIPS on page 27
Introducing the Junos OS Command-Line Interface
®
The Junos operating system (Junos OS) command-line interface (CLI) is the software
interface you use to access a device running Junos OS—whether from the console or
through a network connection.
The Junos OS CLI is a Juniper Networks-specific command shell that runs on top of a
FreeBSD UNIX-based operating system kernel. By leveraging industry-standard tools
and utilities, the CLI provides a powerful set of commands that you can use to monitor
and configure devices running Junos OS (see Figure 1 on page 22).
The Junos OS CLI has two modes:
•
Operational mode—This mode displays the current status of the device. In operational
mode, you enter commands to monitor and troubleshoot the Junos OS, devices, and
network connectivity.
•
Configuration mode—This mode enables you to configure the device. A configuration
is stored as a hierarchy of configuration statements. In this mode, you enter statements
to configure all properties of the device, including interfaces, general routing information,
routing protocols, user access, and several system and hardware properties.
When you enter configuration mode, you are actually viewing and changing a file called
the candidate configuration. The candidate configuration file enables you to make
configuration changes without causing operational changes to the current operating
configuration, called the active configuration. The router or switch does not implement
the changes you added to the candidate configuration file until you commit them,
which activates the configuration on the device. Candidate configurations enable you
to alter your configuration without causing potential damage to your current network
operations.
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CLI User Guide
Figure 1: Monitoring and Configuring Routers
Key Features of the CLI
The Junos OS CLI commands and statements follow a hierarchal organization and have
a regular syntax. The Junos OS CLI provides the following features to simplify CLI use:
•
Consistent command names—Commands that provide the same type of function have
the same name, regardless of the portion of the software on which they are operating.
For example, all show commands display software information and statistics, and all
clear commands erase various types of system information.
•
Lists and short descriptions of available commands—Information about available
commands is provided at each level of the CLI command hierarchy. If you type a
question mark (?) at any level, you see a list of the available commands along with a
short description of each command. This means that if you already are familiar with
the Junos OS or with other routing software, you can use many of the CLI commands
without referring to the documentation.
•
Command completion—Command completion for command names (keywords) and
for command options is available at each level of the hierarchy. To complete a
command or option that you have partially typed, press the Tab key or the Spacebar.
If the partially typed letters begin a string that uniquely identifies a command, the
complete command name appears. Otherwise, a beep indicates that you have entered
an ambiguous command, and the possible completions are displayed. Completion
also applies to other strings, such as filenames, interface names, usernames, and
configuration statements.
If you have typed the mandatory arguments for executing a command in the operational
or configuration mode the CLI displays <[Enter]> as one of the choices when you type
a question mark (?). This indicates that you have entered the mandatory arguments
and can execute the command at that level without specifying any further options.
Likewise, the CLI also displays <[Enter]> when you have reached a specific hierarchy
level in the configuration mode and do not have to enter any more mandatory
arguments or statements.
•
Industry-standard technology—With FreeBSD UNIX as the kernel, a variety of UNIX
utilities are available on the Junos OS CLI. For example, you can:
•
22
Use regular expression matching to locate and replace values and identifiers in a
configuration, filter command output, or examine log file entries.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Related
Documentation
•
Use Emacs-based key sequences to move around on a command line and scroll
through the recently executed commands and command output.
•
Store and archive Junos OS device files on a UNIX-based file system.
•
Use standard UNIX conventions to specify filenames and paths.
•
Exit from the CLI environment and create a UNIX C shell or Bourne shell to navigate
the file system, manage router processes, and so on.
•
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement Hierarchies on
page 23
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Other Tools to Configure and Monitor Devices Running Junos OS on page 26
•
Commands and Configuration Statements for Junos-FIPS on page 27
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement Hierarchies
The Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) commands and statements are organized
under two command modes and various hierarchies. The following sections provide you
an overview of the Junos OS CLI command modes and commands and statements
hierarchies:
•
Junos OS CLI Command Modes on page 23
•
CLI Command Hierarchy on page 24
•
Configuration Statement Hierarchy on page 24
•
Moving Among Hierarchy Levels on page 25
Junos OS CLI Command Modes
The Junos OS CLI has two modes:
•
Operational mode—This mode displays the current status of the device. In operational
mode, you enter commands to monitor and troubleshoot the Junos OS, devices, and
network connectivity. To enter the operational mode, type the CLI command. The
character “>” identifies operational mode. For example, [email protected]>
•
Configuration mode—A configuration for a device running on Junos OS is stored as a
hierarchy of statements. In configuration mode, you enter these statements to define
all properties of the Junos OS, including interfaces, general routing information, routing
protocols, user access, and several system and hardware properties. You enter the
configuration mode by issuing the configure command from the operational mode.
The character “#” identifies configuration mode. For example, [email protected]#
When you enter configuration mode, you are actually viewing and changing a file called
the candidate configuration. The candidate configuration file enables you to make
configuration changes without causing operational changes to the current operating
configuration, called the active configuration. The router or switch does not implement
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CLI User Guide
the changes you added to the candidate configuration file until you commit them, which
activates the configuration on the router or switch (see Figure 2 on page 24). Candidate
configurations enable you to alter your configuration without causing potential damage
to your current network operations.
Figure 2: Committing a Configuration
CLI Command Hierarchy
CLI commands are organized in a hierarchy. Commands that perform a similar function
are grouped together under the same level of the hierarchy. For example, all commands
that display information about the system and the system software are grouped under
the show system command, and all commands that display information about the routing
table are grouped under the show route command.
To execute a command, you enter the full command name, starting at the top level of
the hierarchy. For example, to display a brief view of the routes in the routing table, use
the command show route brief.
Configuration Statement Hierarchy
The configuration statement hierarchy has two types of statements: container statements,
which are statements that contain other statements, and leaf statements, which do not
contain other statements. All of the container and leaf statements together form the
configuration hierarchy.
Figure 3 on page 25 illustrates a part of the hierarchy tree. The protocols statement is a
top-level statement at the trunk of the configuration tree. The ospf, area, and interface
statements are all subordinate container statements of a higher statement (they are
branches of the hierarchy tree), and the hello-interval statement is a leaf on the tree.
24
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Figure 3: Configuration Statement Hierarchy Example
Moving Among Hierarchy Levels
You can use the CLI commands in Table 3 on page 25 to navigate the levels of the
configuration statement hierarchy.
Table 3: CLI Configuration Mode Navigation Commands
Related
Documentation
Command
Description
edit
hierarchy-level
Moves to an existing configuration statement hierarchy or creates a hierarchy
and moves to that level.
exit
Moves up the hierarchy to the previous level where you were working. This
command is, in effect, the opposite of the edit command. Alternatively, you
can use the quit command. The exit and quit commands are interchangeable.
up
Moves up the hierarchy one level at a time.
top
Moves directly to the top level of the hierarchy.
•
Introducing the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 21
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
CLI Explorer Overview
CLI Explorer is a Web application that helps you to explore Junos OS configuration
statements and commands. It lists all the configuration statements and commands
supported in the Junos OS across different platforms on several products.
To view the available configuration statements and commands, you can use any of the
following filtering options:
•
Filter by product family—To find the CLI reference information by product family, you
can either select “All products” or select any of the specific product.
For example: ACX Series, EX Series.
•
Filter by number or letter—To find the CLI reference information by number or letter,
you can either select “All” or filter by numbers “3” or “8” or any of the letters (“A”, “B”,
“C”...).
For example, if you select the letter “A”, commands such as aaa, aaa clients (TDF),
aaa-access-profile (L2TP LNS) appear.
•
Filter by the normal search option—To use this option to filter the commands and
statements, you enter your search criteria.
For example, if you enter the number “3”, all the commands and statements containing
the number “3” appear in the search results.
When you click on the link in the search results, you are directed to a page describing the
command or statement that is referenced in a feature guide.
To explore the Junos OS configuration statements and commands, see the CLI Explorer.
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement Hierarchies on
page 23
Other Tools to Configure and Monitor Devices Running Junos OS
Apart from the command-line interface, Junos OS also supports the following applications,
scripts, and utilities that enable you to configure and monitor devices running Junos OS:
26
•
J-Web graphical user interface (GUI)—Allows you to monitor, configure, troubleshoot,
and manage the router on a client by means of a Web browser with Hypertext Transfer
Protocol (HTTP) or HTTP over Secure Sockets Layer (HTTPS) enabled. For more
information, see the J-Web Interface User Guide.
•
Junos XML management protocol—Application programmers can use the Junos XML
management protocol to monitor and configure Juniper Networks routers. Juniper
Networks provides a Perl module with the API to help you more quickly and easily
develop custom Perl scripts for configuring and monitoring routers. For more
information, see the Junos XML Management Protocol Developer Guide.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 1: Overview
Related
Documentation
•
NETCONF Application Programming Interface (API)—Application programmers can
also use the NETCONF XML management protocol to monitor and configure Juniper
Networks routers. For more information, see the NETCONF XML Management Protocol
Developer Guide.
•
Junos OS commit scripts and self-diagnosis features—You can define scripts to enforce
custom configuration rules, use commit script macros to provide simplified aliases for
frequently used configuration statements, and configure diagnostic event policies and
actions associated with each policy. For more information, see the Automation Scripting
Feature Guide.
•
Management Information Bases (MIBs)—You can use enterprise-specific and standard
MIBS to retrieve information about the hardware and software components on a Juniper
Networks router. For more information about MIBs, see the Network Management
Administration Guide.
•
Introducing the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 21
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Commands and Configuration Statements for Junos-FIPS on page 27
Commands and Configuration Statements for Junos-FIPS
Junos-FIPS enables you to configure a network of Juniper Networks routers in a Federal
Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 environment.
The Junos-FIPS software environment requires the installation of FIPS software by a
crypto officer. In Junos-FIPS, some Junos OS commands and statements have restrictions
and some additional configuration statements are available. For more information, see
the following resources:
•
Common Criteria and FIPS Certifications—Provides links to guidelines for configuring
devices running Junos OS so that the secure environment is in compliance with the
requirements of public sector certifications such as Common Criteria (CC) and FIPS
certification.
•
Compliance Advisor—A Web application that provides regulatory compliance information
about Common Criteria, FIPS, Homologation, ROHS2, and USGv6 for Juniper Networks
products.
Related
Documentation
•
IPsec Requirements for Junos-FIPS
•
Configuring IPsec for Enabling Internal Communications Between Routing Engines for
Junos OS in FIPS Mode
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
28
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 2
Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Switching Between Junos OS CLI Operational and Configuration Modes on page 31
•
Configuring a User Account on a Device Running Junos OS on page 32
•
Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode on page 34
•
Checking the Status of a Device Running Junos OS on page 36
•
Example: Configuring a Routing Protocol on page 39
•
Rolling Back Junos OS Configuration Changes on page 44
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface
As an introduction to the Junos OS command-line interface (CLI), this topic provides
instructions for simple steps you take after installing Junos OS on the device. It shows
you how to start the CLI, view the command hierarchy, and make small configuration
changes. The related topics listed at the end of this topic provide you more detailed
information about using the CLI.
NOTE:
•
The instructions and examples in this topic are based on sample M Series
and T Series routers. You can use them as a guideline for entering
commands on your devices running Junos OS.
•
Before you begin, make sure your device hardware is set up and Junos OS
is installed. You must have a direct console connection to the device or
network access using SSH or Telnet. If your device is not set up, follow the
installation instructions provided with the device before proceeding.
To log in to a router and start the CLI:
1.
Log in as root.
The root login account has superuser privileges, with access to all commands and
statements.
2. Start the CLI:
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root# cli
[email protected]>
The > command prompt shows you are in operational mode. Later, when you enter
configuration mode, the prompt will change to #.
NOTE: If you are using the root account for the first time on the device,
remember that the device ships with no password required for root, but the
first time you commit a configuration with Junos OS Release 7.6 or later, you
must set a root password. Root access is not allowed over a telnet session.
To enable root access over an SSH connection, you must configure the system
services ssh root-login allow statement.
The CLI includes several ways to get help about commands. This section shows some
examples of how to get help:
1.
Type ? to show the top-level commands available in operational mode.
[email protected]> ?
Possible completions:
clear
Clear information in the system
configure
Manipulate software configuration information
diagnose
Invoke diagnose script
file
Perform file operations
help
Provide help information
monitor
Show real-time debugging information
mtrace
Trace multicast path from source to receiver
ping
Ping remote target
quit
Exit the management session
request
Make system-level requests
restart
Restart software process
set
Set CLI properties, date/time, craft interface message
show
Show system information
ssh
Start secure shell on another host
start
Start shell
telnet
Telnet to another host
test
Perform diagnostic debugging
traceroute
Trace route to remote host
2. Type file ? to show all possible completions for the file command.
[email protected]> file ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
archive
checksum
compare
copy
delete
list
rename
show
source-address
|
30
Execute this command
Archives files from the system
Calculate file checksum
Compare files
Copy files (local or remote)
Delete files from the system
List file information
Rename files
Show file contents
Local address to use in originating the connection
Pipe through a command
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
3. Type file archive ? to show all possible completions for the file archive command.
[email protected]> file archive ?
Possible completions:
compress
destination
source
Related
Documentation
Compresses the archived file using GNU gzip (.tgz)
Name of created archive (URL, local, remote, or floppy)
Path of directory to archive
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
•
Switching Between Junos OS CLI Operational and Configuration Modes on page 31
•
Checking the Status of a Device Running Junos OS on page 36
•
Configuring a User Account on a Device Running Junos OS on page 32
•
Example: Configuring a Routing Protocol on page 39
•
Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion on page 54
Switching Between Junos OS CLI Operational and Configuration Modes
When you monitor and configure a device running Junos OS, you may need to switch
between operational mode and configuration mode. When you change to configuration
mode, the command prompt also changes. The operational mode prompt is a right angle
bracket (>) and the configuration mode prompt is a pound sign (#).
To switch between operational mode and configuration mode:
1.
When you log in to the router and type the cli command, you are automatically in
operational mode:
--- JUNOS 9.2B1.8 built 2008-05-09 23:41:29 UTC
% cli
[email protected]>
2. To enter configuration mode, type the configure command or the edit command from
the CLI operation mode. For example:
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]#
The CLI prompt changes from [email protected]> to [email protected]# and a banner appears to
indicate the hierarchy level.
3. You can return to operational mode in one of the following ways:
•
To commit the configuration and exit:
[edit]
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CLI User Guide
[email protected]# commit and-quit
commit complete
Exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
•
To exit without committing:
[edit]
[email protected]# exit
Exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
When you exit configuration mode, the CLI prompt changes from [email protected]# to
[email protected]> and the banner no longer appears. You can enter or exit configuration
mode as many times as you wish without committing your changes.
4. To display the output of an operational mode command, such as show, while in
configuration mode, issue the run configuration mode command and then specify the
operational mode command:
[edit]
[email protected]# run operational-mode-command
For example, to display the currently set priority value of the Virtual Router Redundancy
Protocol (VRRP) primary router while you are modifying the VRRP configuration for
a backup router:
[edit interfaces xe-4/2/0 unit 0 family inet vrrp-group 27]
[email protected]# show
virtual-address [ 192.168.1.15 ];
[edit interfaces xe-4/2/0 unit 0 family inet vrrp-group 27]
[email protected]# run show vrrp detail
Physical interface: xe-5/2/0, Unit: 0, Address: 192.168.29.10/24
Interface state: up, Group: 10, State: backup
Priority: 190, Advertisement interval: 3, Authentication type: simple
Preempt: yes, VIP count: 1, VIP: 192.168.29.55
Dead timer: 8.326, Master priority: 201, Master router: 192.168.29.254
[edit interfaces xe-4/2/0 unit 0 family inet vrrp-group 27]
[email protected]# set priority ...
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement Hierarchies on
page 23
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
•
Configuring a User Account on a Device Running Junos OS on page 32
Configuring a User Account on a Device Running Junos OS
This topic describes how to log on to a device running Junos OS using a root account and
configure a new user account. You can configure an account for your own use or create
a test account.
32
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
To configure a new user account on the device:
1.
Log in as root and enter configuration mode:
[email protected]> configure
[edit]
[email protected]#
The prompt in brackets ([edit]), also known as a banner, shows that you are in
configuration edit mode at the top of the hierarchy.
2. Change to the [edit system login] section of the configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit system login
[edit system login]
[email protected]#
The prompt in brackets changes to [edit system login] to show that you are at a new
level in the hierarchy.
3. Now add a new user account:
[edit system login]
[email protected]# edit user nchen
This example adds an account nchen (for Nathan Chen).
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 12.2 and later, user account names can contain
a period (.) in the name. For example, you can have a user account named
nathan.chen. However, the username cannot begin or end with a period.
4. Configure a full name for the account. If the name includes spaces, enclose the entire
name in quotation marks (" " ):
[edit system login user nchen]
[email protected]# set full-name "Nathan Chen"
5. Configure an account class. The account class sets the user access privileges for the
account:
[edit system login user nchen]
[email protected]# set class super-user
6. Configure an authentication method and password for the account:
[edit system login user nchen
[email protected]# set authentication plain-text-password
New password:
Retype new password:
When the new password prompt appears, enter a clear-text password that the system
can encrypt, and then confirm the new password.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
7. Commit the configuration:
[edit system login user nchen]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
Configuration changes are not activated until you commit the configuration. If the
commit is successful, a commit complete message appears.
8. Return to the top level of the configuration, and then exit:
[edit system login user nchen]
[email protected]# top
[edit]
[email protected]# exit
Exiting configuration mode
9. Log out of the device:
[email protected]> exit
% logout Connection closed.
10. To test your changes, log back in with the user account and password you just
configured:
login: nchen
Password: password
--- Junos 8.3-R1.1 built 2005-12-15 22:42:19 UTC
[email protected]>
When you log in, you should see the new username at the command prompt.
You have successfully used the CLI to view the device status and perform a simple
configuration change. See the related topics listed in this section for more information
about the Junos OS CLI features.
NOTE: For complete information about the commands to issue to configure
your device, including examples, see the Junos OS configuration guides.
Related
Documentation
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
•
Example: Configuring a Routing Protocol on page 39
Using the CLI Editor in Configuration Mode
This topic describes some of the basic commands that you must use to enter configuration
mode in the command-line interface (CLI) editor, navigate through the configuration
34
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
hierarchy, get help, and commit or revert the changes that you make during the
configuration session.
Task
Command/Statement
Example
Edit Your Configuration
Enter configuration mode.
configure
[edit]
[email protected]#
When you first log in to the device, the
device is in operational mode. You must
explicitly enter configuration mode.
When you do, the CLI prompt changes
from [email protected]> to [email protected]# and the
hierarchy level appears in square
brackets.
Create a statement hierarchy.
edit hierarchy-level value
You can use the edit command to
simultaneously create a hierarchy and
move to that new level in the hierarchy.
You cannot use the edit command to
change the value of identifiers.
Create a statement hierarchy and set
identifier values.
[email protected]> configure
[edit]
[email protected]# edit security zones
security-zone myzone
[edit security zones security-zone
myzone]
[email protected]#
set hierarchy-level value
The set command is similar to edit
except that your current level in the
hierarchy does not change.
[edit]
[email protected]# set security zones
security-zone myzone
[edit]
[email protected]#
Navigate the Hierarchy
Navigate down to an existing hierarchy
level.
edit hierarchy-level
[edit]
[email protected]# edit security zones
[edit security zones]
[email protected]#
Navigate up one level in the hierarchy.
up
[edit security zones]
[email protected]# up
[edit security]
[email protected]#
Navigate to the top of the hierarchy.
top
[edit security zones]
[email protected]# top
[edit]
[email protected]#
Commit or Revert Changes
Commit your configuration.
commit
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
35
CLI User Guide
Task
Command/Statement
Roll back changes from the current
session.
Example
rollback
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
load complete
Use the rollback command to revert all
changes from the current configuration
session. When you run the rollback
command before exiting your session or
committing changes, the software loads
the most recently committed
configuration onto the device. You must
enter the rollback statement at the edit
level in the hierarchy.
Exit Configuration Mode
Commit the configuration and exit
configuration mode.
commit and-quit
[edit]
[email protected]# commit and-quit
[email protected]>
Exit configuration mode without
committing your configuration.
exit
[edit]
[email protected]# exit
The configuration has been changed
but not committed
Exit with uncommitted changes?
[yes,no] (yes)
You must navigate to the top of the
hierarchy using the up or top commands
before you can exit configuration mode.
Get Help
Display a list of valid options for the
current hierarchy level.
?
[edit ]
[email protected]# edit security zones ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]> Execute this command
> functional-zone Functional zone
> security-zone Security zones
| Pipe through a command
[edit]
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 58
•
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 64
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
Checking the Status of a Device Running Junos OS
You can use show commands to check the status of the device and monitor the activities
on the device.
To help you become familiar with show commands:
•
Type show ? to display the list of show commands you can use to monitor the router:
[email protected]> show ?
36
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
Possible completions:
accounting
aps
arp
as-path
bfd
bgp
chassis
class-of-service
cli
configuration
connections
dvmrp
info
dynamic-tunnels
esis
firewall
helper
host
igmp
ike
ilmi
interfaces
ipsec
ipv6
isis
l2circuit
l2vpn
lacp
ldp
link-management
llc2
log
mld
mpls
msdp
multicast
ntp
ospf
ospf3
passive-monitoring
pfe
pgm
pim
policer
policy
ppp
rip
ripng
route
rsvp
sap
security
services
snmp
system
task
ted
version
vpls
vrrp
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
accounting profiles and records
Automatic Protection Switching information
system Address Resolution Protocol table entries
table of known autonomous system paths
Bidirectional Forwarding Detection information
Border Gateway Protocol information
chassis information
class-of-service (CoS) information
command-line interface settings
current configuration
circuit cross-connect connections
Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
Show
dynamic tunnel information information
end system-to-intermediate system information
firewall information
port-forwarding helper information
hostname information from domain name server
Internet Group Management Protocol information
Internet Key Exchange information
interim local management interface information
interface information
IP Security information
IP version 6 information
Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System info
Layer 2 circuit information
Layer 2 VPN information
Link Aggregation Control Protocol information
Label Distribution Protocol information
link management information
LLC2 protocol related information
contents of log file
multicast listener discovery information
Multiprotocol Label Switching information
Multicast Source Discovery Protocol information
multicast information
Network Time Protocol information
Open Shortest Path First information
Open Shortest Path First version 3 information
information about passive monitoring
Packet Forwarding Engine information
Pragmatic Generalized Multicast information
Protocol Independent Multicast information
interface policer counters and information
policy information
PPP process information
Routing Information Protocol information
Routing Information Protocol for IPv6 info
routing table information
Resource Reservation Protocol information
Session Announcement Protocol information
security information
services information
Simple Network Management Protocol information
system information
routing protocol per-task information
Traffic Engineering Database information
software process revision levels
VPLS information
Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol information
37
CLI User Guide
•
Use the show chassis routing-engine command to view the Routing Engine status:
[email protected]> show chassis routing-engine
Routing Engine status:
Slot 0:
Current state
Master
Election priority
Master (default)
Temperature
31 degrees C / 87 degrees F
CPU temperature
32 degrees C / 89 degrees F
DRAM
768 MB
Memory utilization
84 percent
CPU utilization:
User
0 percent
Background
0 percent
Kernel
1 percent
Interrupt
0 percent
Idle
99 percent
Model
RE-2.0
Serial ID
b10000078c10d701
Start time
2005-12-28 13:52:00 PST
Uptime
12 days, 3 hours, 44 minutes, 19 seconds
Load averages:
1 minute
5 minute 15 minute
0.02
0.01
0.00
•
Use the show system storage command to view available storage on the device:
[email protected]> show system storage
Filesystem
Size
Used
/dev/ad0s1a
865M
127M
devfs
1.0K
1.0K
devfs
1.0K
1.0K
/dev/md0
30M
30M
/dev/md1
158M
158M
/packages/mnt/jkernel-9.3B1.5
/dev/md2
16M
16M
/packages/mnt/jpfe-M7i-9.3B1.5
/dev/md3
3.8M
3.8M
/packages/mnt/jdocs-9.3B1.5
/dev/md4
44M
44M
/packages/mnt/jroute-9.3B1.5
/dev/md5
12M
12M
/packages/mnt/jcrypto-9.3B1.5
/dev/md6
25M
25M
/packages/mnt/jpfe-common-9.3B1.5
/dev/md7
1.5G
196K
/dev/md8
1.5G
910K
/dev/ad0s1e
96M
38K
procfs
4.0K
4.0K
/dev/ad1s1f
17G
2.6G
Related
Documentation
38
Avail
669M
0B
0B
0B
0B
Capacity
16%
100%
100%
100%
100%
0B
100%
0B
100%
0B
100%
0B
100%
0B
100%
1.4G
1.4G
88M
0B
13G
0%
0%
0%
100%
17%
Mounted on
/
/dev
/dev/
/packages/mnt/jbase
/tmp
/mfs
/config
/proc
/var
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
•
Managing Programs and Processes Using Junos OS Operational Mode Commands on
page 190
•
Viewing Files and Directories on a Device Running Junos OS on page 183
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
Example: Configuring a Routing Protocol
This topic provides a sample configuration that describes how to configure an OSPF
backbone area that has two SONET interfaces.
The final configuration looks like this:
[edit]
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
}
}
}
This topic contains the following examples of configuring a routing protocol:
•
Shortcut on page 39
•
Longer Configuration on page 39
•
Making Changes to a Routing Protocol Configuration on page 42
Shortcut
You can create a shortcut for this entire configuration with the following two commands:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0 hello-interval 5
dead-interval 20
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1 hello-interval 5
dead-interval 20
Longer Configuration
This section provides a longer example of creating the previous OSPF configuration. In
the process, it illustrates how to use the different features of the CLI.
1.
Enter configuration mode by issuing the configure top-level command:
[email protected]> configure
entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]#
Notice that the prompt has changed to a pound sign (#) to indicate configuration
mode.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
39
CLI User Guide
2. To create the above configuration, you start by editing the protocols ospf statements:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf
[edit protocols ospf]
[email protected]#
3. Now add the OSPF area:
[edit protocols ospf]
[email protected]# edit area 0.0.0.0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]#
4. Add the first interface:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# edit interface so0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]#
You now have four nested statements.
5. Set the hello and dead intervals.
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]#set ?
[email protected]# set hello-interval 5
[email protected]# set dead-interval 20
[email protected]#
6. You can see what is configured at the current level with the show command:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]# show
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]#
7. You are finished at this level, so back up a level and take a look at what you have so
far:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]# up
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# show
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]#
The interface statement appears because you have moved to the area statement.
40
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
8. Add the second interface:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# edit interface so-0/0/1
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# set hello-interval 5
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# set dead-interval 20
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# up
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# show
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]#
9. Back up to the top level and see what you have:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# top
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
This configuration now contains the statements you want.
10. Before committing the configuration (and thereby activating it), verify that the
configuration is correct:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit check
configuration check succeeds
[edit]
[email protected]#
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
41
CLI User Guide
11. Commit the configuration to activate it on the router:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
Making Changes to a Routing Protocol Configuration
Suppose you decide to use different dead and hello intervals on interface so-0/0/1. You
can make changes to the configuration.
1.
Go directly to the appropriate hierarchy level by typing the full hierarchy path to the
statement you want to edit:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# show
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# set hello-interval 7
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# set dead-interval 28
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# top
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 7;
dead-interval 28;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
2. If you decide not to run OSPF on the first interface, delete the statement:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# delete interface so-0/0/0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# top
42
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 7;
dead-interval 28;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
Everything inside the statement you deleted was deleted with it. You can also eliminate
the entire OSPF configuration by simply entering delete protocols ospf while at the
top level.
3. If you decide to use the default values for the hello and dead intervals on your remaining
interface but you want OSPF to run on that interface, delete the hello and dead interval
timers:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# delete hello-interval
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# delete dead-interval
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# top
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/1;
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
You can set multiple statements at the same time as long as they are all part of the
same hierarchy (the path of statements from the top inward, as well as one or more
statements at the bottom of the hierarchy). This feature can reduce considerably the
number of commands you must enter.
4. To go back to the original hello and dead interval timers on interface so-0/0/1, enter:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
[email protected]# set hello-interval 5 dead-interval 20
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1]
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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CLI User Guide
[email protected]# exit
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
5. You also can recreate the other interface, as you had it before, with only a single entry:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/1 hello-interval 5
dead-interval 20
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
dead-interval 20;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]#
Related
Documentation
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
•
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational Commands on page 182
Rolling Back Junos OS Configuration Changes
This topic shows how to use the rollback command to return to the most recently
committed Junos OS configuration. The rollback command is useful if you make
configuration changes and then decide not to keep the changes.
44
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 2: Getting Started: A Quick Tour of the CLI
The following procedure shows how to configure an SNMP health monitor on a device
running Junos OS and then return to the most recently committed configuration that
does not include the health monitor. When configured, the SNMP health monitor provides
the network management system (NMS) with predefined monitoring for file system
usage, CPU usage, and memory usage on the device.
1.
Enter configuration mode:
[email protected]> configure
entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]#
2. Show the current configuration (if any) for SNMP:
[edit]
[email protected]# show snmp
No snmp statements appear because SNMP has not been configured on the device.
3. Configure the health monitor:
[edit]
[email protected]# set snmp health-monitor
4. Show the new configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# show snmp
health-monitor;
The health-monitor statement indicates that SNMP health monitoring is configured
on the device.
5. Enter the rollback configuration mode command to return to the most recently
committed configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
load complete
6. Show the configuration again to make sure your change is no longer present:
[edit]
[email protected]# show snmp
No snmp configuration statements appear. The health monitor is no longer configured.
7. Enter the commit command to activate the configuration to which you rolled back:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
8. Exit configuration mode:
[edit]
[email protected]# exit
Exiting configuration mode
You can also use the rollback command to return to earlier configurations.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
45
CLI User Guide
Related
Documentation
46
•
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 142
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 3
Getting Online Help
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
•
Junos OS CLI Online Help Features on page 50
•
Examples: Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode on page 52
•
Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion on page 54
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface
The Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) has a context-sensitive online help feature
that enables you to access information about commands and statements from the Junos
OS CLI. This topic contains the following sections:
•
Getting Help About Commands on page 47
•
Getting Help About a String in a Statement or Command on page 49
•
Getting Help About Configuration Statements on page 49
•
Getting Help About System Log Messages on page 49
Getting Help About Commands
Information about commands is provided at each level of the CLI command hierarchy.
You can type a question mark to get help about commands:
•
If you type the question mark at the command-line prompt, the CLI lists the available
commands and options. For example, to view a list of top-level operational mode
commands, type a question mark (?) at the command-line prompt.
[email protected]> ?
Possible completions:
clear
Clear information in the system
configure
Manipulate software configuration information
file
Perform file operations
help
Provide help information
mtrace
Trace mtrace packets from source to receiver.
monitor
Real-time debugging
ping
Ping a remote target
quit
Exit the management session
request
Make system-level requests
restart
Restart a software process
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set
show
ssh
start
telnet
test
traceroute
[email protected]>
•
Set CLI properties, date, time, craft display text
Show information about the system
Open a secure shell to another host
Start a software process
Telnet to another host
Diagnostic debugging commands
Trace the route to a remote host
If you type the question mark after entering the complete name of a command or
command option, the CLI lists the available commands and options and then redisplays
the command names and options that you typed.
[email protected]> clear ?
Possible completions:
arp
Clear address-resolution information
bgp
Clear BGP information
chassis
Clear chassis information
firewall
Clear firewall counters
igmp
Clear IGMP information
interfaces
Clear interface information
ilmi
Clear ILMI statistics information
isis
Clear IS-IS information
ldp
Clear LDP information
log
Clear contents of a log file
mpls
Clear MPLS information
msdp
Clear MSDP information
multicast
Clear Multicast information
ospf
Clear OSPF information
pim
Clear PIM information
rip
Clear RIP information
route
Clear routing table information
rsvp
Clear RSVP information
snmp
Clear SNMP information
system
Clear system status
vrrp
Clear VRRP statistics information
[email protected]> clear
•
If you type the question mark in the middle of a command name, the CLI lists possible
command completions that match the letters you have entered so far. It then redisplays
the letters that you typed. For example, to list all operational mode commands that
start with the letter c, type the following:
[email protected]> c?
Possible completions:
clear
Clear information in the system
configure Manipulate software configuration information
[email protected]> c
•
For introductory information on using the question mark or the help command, you
can also type help and press Enter:
[email protected]> help
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Chapter 3: Getting Online Help
Getting Help About a String in a Statement or Command
You can use the help command to display help about a text string contained in a
statement or command name:
help apropos string
string is a text string about which you want to get help. This string is used to match
statement or command names as well as to match the help strings that are displayed
for the statements or commands.
If the string contains spaces, enclose it in quotation marks (" " ). You can also specify a
regular expression for the string, using standard UNIX-style regular expression syntax.
For statements or commands which need input data type as STRING, the supported
characters set are as follows:
•
Any printable ASCII characters
•
For characters with space, it should be enclosed in double-quotes
•
To have double-quote as the input, it should be escaped with ‘\’
NOTE: No escape characters are supported in a string other than to escape
from double quotes.
Range of supported characters for attributes is 0 through 65499 characters.
Range of supported characters for string type identifiers is 1 through 255 characters.
In configuration mode, this command displays statement names and help text that match
the string specified. In operational mode, this command displays command names and
help text that match the string specified.
Getting Help About Configuration Statements
You can display help based on text contained in a statement name using the help topic
and help reference commands:
help topic word
help reference statement-name
The help topic command displays usage guidelines for the statement based on information
that appears in the Junos OS configuration guides. The help reference command displays
summary information about the statement based on the summary descriptions that
appear in the Junos OS configuration guides.
Getting Help About System Log Messages
You can display help based on a system log tag using the help syslog command:
help syslog syslog-tag
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The help syslog command displays the contents of a system log message.
Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS CLI Online Help Features on page 50
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
Junos OS CLI Online Help Features
The Junos OS CLI online help provides the following features for ease of use and error
prevention:
•
Help for Omitted Statements on page 50
•
Using CLI Command Completion on page 50
•
Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode on page 51
•
Displaying Tips About CLI Commands on page 51
Help for Omitted Statements
If you have omitted a required statement at a particular hierarchy level, when you attempt
to move from that hierarchy level or when you issue the show command in configuration
mode, a message indicates which statement is missing. For example:
[edit protocols pim interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]# top
Warning: missing mandatory statement: 'mode'
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
pim {
interface so-0/0/0 {
priority 4;
version 2;
# Warning: missing mandatory statement(s): 'mode'
}
}
}
Using CLI Command Completion
The Junos OS CLI provides you a command completion option that enables Junos OS to
recognize commands and options based on the initial few letters you typed. That is, you
do not always have to remember or type the full command or option name for the CLI
to recognize it.
50
•
To display all possible command or option completions, type the partial command
followed immediately by a question mark.
•
To complete a command or option that you have partially typed, press Tab or the
Spacebar. If the partially typed letters begin a string that uniquely identifies a command,
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 3: Getting Online Help
the complete command name appears. Otherwise, a prompt indicates that you have
entered an ambiguous command, and the possible completions are displayed.
Command completion also applies to other strings, such as filenames, interface names,
and usernames. To display all possible values, type a partial string followed immediately
by a question mark. To complete a string, press Tab.
Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode
The CLI command completion functions also apply to the commands in configuration
mode and to configuration statements. Specifically, to display all possible commands
or statements, type the partial string followed immediately by a question mark. To
complete a command or statement that you have partially typed, press Tab or the
Spacebar.
Command completion also applies to identifiers, with one slight difference. To display
all possible identifiers, type a partial string followed immediately by a question mark. To
complete an identifier, you must press Tab. This scheme allows you to enter identifiers
with similar names; then press the Spacebar when you are done typing the identifier
name.
Displaying Tips About CLI Commands
To get tips about CLI commands, issue the help tip cli command. Each time you enter
the command, a new tip appears. For example:
[email protected]> help tip cli
Junos tip:
Use 'request system software validate' to validate the incoming software
against the current configuration without impacting the running system.
[email protected]> help tip cli
Junos tip:
Use 'commit and-quit' to exit configuration mode after the commit has
succeeded. If the commit fails, you are left in configuration mode.
You can also enter help tip cli number to associate a tip with a number. This enables you
to recall the tip at a later time. For example:
[email protected]> help tip cli 10
JUNOS tip:
Use '#' in the beginning of a line in command scripts to cause the
rest of the line to be ignored.
[email protected]> help tip cli
JUNOS tip:
Use the 'apply-groups' statement at any level of the configuration
hierarchy to inherit configuration statements from a configuration group.
[email protected]>
Related
Documentation
•
Getting Started with the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 29
•
Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion on page 54
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Examples: Using Command Completion in Configuration Mode
List the configuration mode commands:
[edit]
[email protected]# ?
<[Enter]>
activate
annotate
commit
copy
deactivate
delete
edit
exit
extension
help
insert
load
quit
rename
replace
rollback
run
save
set
show
status
top
up
wildcard
[edit][email protected]#
Execute this command
Remove the inactive tag from a statement
Annotate the statement with a comment
Commit current set of changes
Copy a statement
Add the inactive tag to a statement
Delete a data element
Edit a sub-element
Exit from this level
Extension operations
Provide help information
Insert a new ordered data element
Load configuration from ASCII file
Quit from this level
Rename a statement
Replace character string in configuration
Roll back to previous committed configuration
Run an operational-mode command
Save configuration to ASCII file
Set a parameter
Show a parameter
Show users currently editing configuration
Exit to top level of configuration
Exit one level of configuration
Wildcard operations
List all the statements available at a particular hierarchy level:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit ?
Possible completions:
> accounting-options
> chassis
> class-of-service
> firewall
> forwarding-options
> groups
> interfaces
> policy-options
> protocols
> routing-instances
> routing-options
> snmp
> system
Accounting data configuration
Chassis configuration
Class-of-service configuration
Define a firewall configuration
Configure options to control packet sampling
Configuration groups
Interface configuration
Routing policy option configuration
Routing protocol configuration
Routing instance configuration
Protocol-independent routing option configuration
Simple Network Management Protocol
System parameters
[email protected]# edit protocols ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
Execute this command
> bgp
BGP options
> connections
Circuit cross-connect configuration
> dvmrp
DVMRP options
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>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
|
igmp
isis
ldp
mpls
msdp
ospf
pim
rip
router-discovery
rsvp
sapSession
vrrp
IGMP options
IS-IS options
LDP options
Multiprotocol Label Switching options
MSDP options
OSPF configuration
PIM options
RIP options
ICMP router discovery options
RSVP options
Advertisement Protocol options
VRRP options
Pipe through a command
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols
List all commands that start with a particular letter or string:
[email protected]# edit routing-options a?
Possible completions:
> aggregate
Coalesced routes
> autonomous-system
Autonomous system number
[edit]
[email protected]# edit routing-options a
List all configured Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) interfaces:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit interfaces at?
<interface_name>
Interface name
at-0/2/0
Interface name
at-0/2/1
Interface name
[edit]
[email protected]# edit interfaces at
Display a list of all configured policy statements:
[edit]
[email protected]# show policy-options policy-statement ?
<policy_name>
Name to identify a policy filter
[email protected]# show policy-options policy-statement
<policy_name>
Name to identify a policy filter
lo0only-v4
Name to identify a policy filter
lo0only-v6
Name to identify a policy filter
lo2bgp
Name to identify a policy filter
Related
Documentation
•
Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion on page 54
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
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Examples: Using the Junos OS CLI Command Completion
The following examples show how you can use the command completion feature in
Junos OS. Issue the show interfaces command:
[email protected]> sh<Space>ow i<Space>
'i' is ambiguous.
Possible completions:
igmp
Show information about IGMP
interface
Show interface information
isis
Show information about IS-IS
[email protected]> show in<Space>terfaces
Physical interface: at-0/1/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 11, SNMP ifIndex: 65
Link-level type: ATM-PVC, MTU: 4482, Clocking: Internal, SONET mode
Speed: OC12, Loopback: None, Payload scrambler: Enabled
Device flags: Present Running
Link flags: 0x01
...
[email protected]>
Display a list of all log files whose names start with the string “messages,” and then
display the contents of one of the files:
[email protected]> show log mes?
Possible completions:
<filename>Log file to display
messagesSize: 1417052, Last changed: Mar 3 00:33
messages.0.gzSize: 145575, Last changed: Mar 3 00:00
messages.1.gzSize: 134253, Last changed: Mar 2 23:00
messages.10.gzSize: 137022, Last changed: Mar 2 14:00
messages.2.grSize: 137112, Last changed: Mar 2 22:00
messages.3.gzSize: 121633, Last changed: Mar 2 21:00
messages.4.gzSize: 135715, Last changed: Mar 2 20:00
messages.5.gzSize: 137504, Last changed: Mar 2 19:00
messages.6.gzSize: 134591, Last changed: Mar 2 18:00
messages.7.gzSize: 132670, Last changed: Mar 2 17:00
messages.8.gzSize: 136596, Last changed: Mar 2 16:00
messages.9.gzSize: 136210, Last changed: Mar 2 15:00
[email protected]> show log mes<Tab>sages.4<Tab>.gz<Enter>
Jan 15 21:00:00 myhost newsyslog[1381]: logfile turned over
...
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History
To display a list of recent commands that you issued, use the show cli history command:
[email protected]> show cli history 3
01:01:44 -- show bgp next-hop-database
01:01:51 -- show cli history
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01:02:51 -- show cli history 3
You can press Esc+. (period) or Alt+. (period) to insert the last word of the previous
command. Repeat Esc+. or Alt+. to scroll backwards through the list of recently entered
words. For example:
[email protected]> show interfaces terse fe-0/0/0
Interface
Admin
Link
Proto
fe-0/0/0
up
up
fe-0/0/0.0
up
up
inet
Local
Remote
192.168.220.1/30
[email protected]> <Esc>
[email protected]st> fe-0/0/0
If you scroll completely to the beginning of the list, pressing Esc+. or Alt+. again restarts
scrolling from the last word entered.
Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS CLI Online Help Features on page 50
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CHAPTER 4
Using Configuration Statements to
Configure a Device
•
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 58
•
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 64
•
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies on page 66
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
•
Using the configure Command on page 70
•
Modifying the Junos OS Configuration on page 71
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration on page 73
•
Example: Deleting a Statement from the Junos OS Configuration on page 74
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
•
Example: Copying a Statement in the Junos Configuration on page 76
•
Issuing Relative Junos OS Configuration Mode Commands on page 78
•
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 79
•
Examples: Re-Using Configuration on page 79
•
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 84
•
Example: Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos Configuration on page 85
•
Example: Using the Wildcard Command with the Range Option on page 88
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS
Configuration on page 93
•
Example: Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS
Configuration on page 93
•
Adding Comments in a Junos OS Configuration on page 95
•
Example: Including Comments in a Junos OS Configuration by Using the CLI on page 98
•
Updating the configure private Configuration on page 100
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
Example: Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 101
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•
Displaying Additional Information About the Junos OS Configuration on page 103
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
•
Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration on page 107
•
Verifying a Junos OS Configuration on page 108
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode
You can configure all properties of Junos OS, including interfaces, general routing
information, routing protocols, and user access, as well as several system hardware
properties.
As described in “Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement
Hierarchies” on page 23, a router configuration is stored as a hierarchy of statements. In
configuration mode, you create the specific hierarchy of configuration statements that
you want to use. When you have finished entering the configuration statements, you
commit them, which activates the configuration on the router.
You can create the hierarchy interactively or you can create an ASCII text file that is
loaded onto the router or switch and then committed.
This topic covers:
58
•
Configuration Mode Commands on page 59
•
Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 60
•
Configuration Statement Hierarchy on page 62
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Configuration Mode Commands
Table 4 on page 59 summarizes each CLI configuration mode command. The commands
are organized alphabetically.
Table 4: Summary of Configuration Mode Commands
Command
Description
activate
Remove the inactive: tag from a statement, effectively reading the
statement or identifier to the configuration. Statements or identifiers
that have been activated take effect when you next issue the commit
command.
annotate
Add comments to a configuration. You can add comments only at
the current hierarchy level.
commit
Commit the set of changes to the database and cause the changes
to take operational effect.
copy
Make a copy of an existing statement in the configuration.
deactivate
Add the inactive: tag to a statement, effectively commenting out
the statement or identifier from the configuration. Statements or
identifiers marked as inactive do not take effect when you issue the
commit command.
delete
Delete a statement or identifier. All subordinate statements and
identifiers contained within the specified statement path are deleted
with it.
edit
Move inside the specified statement hierarchy. If the statement does
not exist, it is created.
exit
Exit the current level of the statement hierarchy, returning to the
level prior to the last edit command, or exit from configuration mode.
The quit and exit commands are synonyms.
extension
Manage configurations that are contributed by SDK application
packages. Either display or delete user-defined configuration
contributed by the named SDK application package. A configuration
defined in any native Junos OS package is never deleted by the
extension command.
help
Display help about available configuration statements.
insert
Insert an identifier into an existing hierarchy.
load
Load a configuration from an ASCII configuration file or from terminal
input. Your current location in the configuration hierarchy is ignored
when the load operation occurs.
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Table 4: Summary of Configuration Mode Commands (continued)
Command
Description
quit
Exit the current level of the statement hierarchy, returning to the
level prior to the last edit command, or exit from configuration mode.
The quit and exit commands are synonyms.
rename
Rename an existing configuration statement or identifier.
replace
Replace identifiers or values in a configuration.
rollback
Return to a previously committed configuration. The software saves
the last 10 committed configurations, including the rollback number,
date, time, and name of the user who issued the commit configuration
command.
run
Run a top-level CLI command without exiting from configuration
mode.
save
Save the configuration to an ASCII file. The contents of the current
level of the statement hierarchy (and below) are saved, along with
the statement hierarchy containing it. This allows a section of the
configuration to be saved, while fully specifying the statement
hierarchy.
set
Create a statement hierarchy and set identifier values. This is similar
to edit except that your current level in the hierarchy does not
change.
show
Display the current configuration.
status
Display the users currently editing the configuration.
top
Return to the top level of configuration command mode, which is
indicated by the [edit] banner.
up
Move up one level in the statement hierarchy.
update
Update a private database.
wildcard
Delete a statement or identifier. All subordinate statements and
identifiers contained within the specified statement path are deleted
with it. You can use regular expressions to specify a pattern. Based
on this pattern, you search for items that contain these patterns
and delete them.
Configuration Statements and Identifiers
You can configure router or switch properties by including the corresponding statements
in the configuration. Typically, a statement consists of a keyword, which is fixed text, and,
optionally, an identifier. An identifier is an identifying name that you can define, such as
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
the name of an interface or a username, which enables you and the CLI to differentiate
among a collection of statements.
Table 5 on page 61 describes top-level CLI configuration mode statements.
NOTE: The QFX3500 switch does not support the IS-IS, OSPF, BGP, LDP,
MPLS, and RSVP protocols.
Table 5: Configuration Mode Top-Level Statements
Statement
Description
access
Configure the Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol (CHAP). For
information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS
Administration Library.
accounting-options
Configure accounting statistics data collection for interfaces and firewall
filters. For information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Network
Management Administration Guide.
chassis
Configure properties of the router chassis, including conditions that activate
alarms and SONET/SDH framing and concatenation properties. For
information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS
Administration Library.
class-of-service
Configure class-of-service parameters. For information about the statements
in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS Class of Service Feature Guide for
Routing Devices.
firewall
Define filters that select packets based on their contents. For information
about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Routing Policies, Firewall Filters,
and Traffic Policers Feature Guide.
forwarding-options
Define forwarding options, including traffic sampling options. For information
about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces
Library for Routing Devices.
groups
Configure configuration groups. For information about statements in this
hierarchy, see the Junos OS Administration Library.
interfaces
Configure interface information, such as encapsulation, interfaces, virtual
channel identifiers (VCIs), and data-link connection identifiers (DLCIs). For
information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS Network
Interfaces Library for Routing Devices.
policy-options
Define routing policies, which allow you to filter and set properties in incoming
and outgoing routes. For information about the statements in this hierarchy,
see the Routing Policies, Firewall Filters, and Traffic Policers Feature Guide.
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Table 5: Configuration Mode Top-Level Statements (continued)
Statement
Description
protocols
Configure routing protocols, including BGP, IS-IS, LDP, MPLS, OSPF, RIP, and
RSVP. For information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the chapters
that discuss how to configure the individual routing protocols in the Junos OS
Routing Protocols Library and the MPLS Applications Feature Guide for
Routing Devices.
routing-instances
Configure multiple routing instances. For information about the statements
in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library.
routing-options
Configure protocol-independent routing options, such as static routes,
autonomous system numbers, confederation members, and global tracing
(debugging) operations to log. For information about the statements in this
hierarchy, see the Junos OS Routing Protocols Library.
security
Configure IP Security (IPsec) services. For information about the statements
in this hierarchy see the Junos OS Administration Library.
snmp
Configure SNMP community strings, interfaces, traps, and notifications. For
information about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Network
Management Administration Guide.
system
Configure systemwide properties, including the hostname, domain name,
Domain Name System (DNS) server, user logins and permissions, mappings
between hostnames and addresses, and software processes. For information
about the statements in this hierarchy, see the Junos OS Administration Library.
For specific information on configuration statements, see the Junos OS configuration
guides.
Configuration Statement Hierarchy
The Junos OS configuration consists of a hierarchy of statements. There are two types
of statements: container statements, which are statements that contain other statements,
and leaf statements, which do not contain other statements (see Figure 4 on page 63).
All of the container and leaf statements together form the configuration hierarchy.
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Figure 4: Configuration Mode Hierarchy of Statements
Each statement at the top level of the configuration hierarchy resides at the trunk (or
root level) of a hierarchy tree. The top-level statements are container statements,
containing other statements that form the tree branches. The leaf statements are the
leaves of the hierarchy tree. An individual hierarchy of statements, which starts at the
trunk of the hierarchy tree, is called a statement path. Figure 4 on page 63 illustrates the
hierarchy tree, showing a statement path for the portion of the protocol configuration
hierarchy that configures the hello interval on an interface in an OSPF area.
The protocols statement is a top-level statement at the trunk of the configuration tree.
The ospf, area, and interface statements are all subordinate container statements of a
higher statement (they are branches of the hierarchy tree); and the hello-interval
statement is a leaf on the tree which in this case contains a data value: the length of the
hello interval, in seconds.
The CLI represents the statement path shown in Figure 4 on page 63
as [edit protocols ospf area area-number interface interface-name] and displays the
configuration as follows:
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
interface so-0/0/1 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
}
The CLI indents each level in the hierarchy to indicate each statement’s relative position
in the hierarchy and generally sets off each level with braces, using an open brace at the
beginning of each hierarchy level and a closing brace at the end. If the statement at a
hierarchy level is empty, the braces are not printed.
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Each leaf statement ends with a semicolon. If the hierarchy does not extend as far as a
leaf statement, the last statement in the hierarchy ends with a semicolon.
The configuration hierarchy can also contain “oneliners” at the last level in the hierarchy.
Oneliners remove one level of braces in the syntax and display the container statement,
its identifiers, the child or leaf statement and its attributes all on one line. For example,
in the following sample configuration hierarchy, the line level 1 metric 10 is a oneliner
because the level container statement with identifier 1, its child statement metric, and
its corresponding attribute 10 all appear on a single line in the hierarchy:
[edit protocols]
isis {
interface ge-0/0/0.0 {
level 1 metric 10;
}
}
}
Likewise, in the following example, dynamic-profile dynamic-profile-name aggregate-clients;
is a oneliner because the dynamic-profile statement, its identifier dynamic-profile-name,
and leaf statement aggregate-clients all appear on one line when you run the show
command in the configuration mode:
[edit forwarding-options]
[email protected]# show
dhcp-relay {
dynamic-profile dynamic-profile-name aggregate-clients;
}
Related
Documentation
•
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 64
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode
You configure Junos OS by entering configuration mode and creating a hierarchy of
configuration mode statements.
•
To enter configuration mode, use the configure command.
When you enter configuration mode, the following configuration mode commands are
available:
[email protected]>configure
entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]#?
possible completions:
<[Enter]>
activate
annotate
commit
copy
deactivate
delete
64
Execute this command
Remove the inactive tag from a statement
Annotate the statement with a comment
Commit current set of changes
Copy a statement
Add the inactive tag to a statement
Delete a data element
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
edit
exit
help
insert
load
quit
rename
replace
rollback
run
save
set
show
status
top
up
wildcard
[edit]
[email protected]>
Edit a sub-element
Exit from this level
Provide help information
Insert a new ordered data element
Load configuration from ASCII file
Quit from this level
Rename a statement
Replace character string in configuration
Roll back to previous committed configuration
Run an operational-mode command
Save configuration to ASCII file
Set a parameter
Show a parameter
Show users currently editing configuration
Exit to top level of configuration
Exit one level of configuration
Wildcard operations
Users must have configure permission to view and use the configure command. When
in configuration mode, a user can view and modify only those statements for which
they have access privileges set. For more information, see the Junos OS Administration
Library.
•
If you enter configuration mode and another user is also in configuration mode, a
message shows the user’s name and what part of the configuration the user is viewing
or editing:
us[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
Users currently editing the configuration:
root terminal d0 (pid 4137) on since 2008-04-09 23:03:07 PDT, idle 7w6d 08:22
[edit]
The configuration has been changed but not committed
[edit]
[email protected]#
Up to 32 users can be in configuration mode simultaneously, and they all can make
changes to the configuration at the same time.
•
To exit configuration mode, use the exit configuration-mode configuration mode
command from any level, or use the exit command from the top level. For example:
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0]
[email protected]# exit configuration-mode
exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
[edit]
[email protected]# exit
exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
If you try to exit from configuration mode using the exit command and the configuration
contains changes that have not been committed, you see a message and prompt:
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[edit]
[email protected]# exit
The configuration has been changed but not committed
Exit with uncommitted changes? [yes,no] (yes) <Enter>
Exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
•
To exit with uncommitted changes without having to respond to a prompt, use the exit
configuration-mode command. This command is useful when you are using scripts to
perform remote configuration.
[edit]
[email protected]# exit configuration-mode
The configuration has been changed but not committed
Exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 58
•
Modifying the Junos OS Configuration on page 71
•
Commit Operation When Multiple Users Configure the Software on page 113
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
•
Issuing Relative Junos OS Configuration Mode Commands on page 78
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
•
Updating the configure private Configuration on page 100
•
Switching Between Junos OS CLI Operational and Configuration Modes on page 31
Notational Conventions Used in Junos OS Configuration Hierarchies
When you are working in Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) configuration mode,
the banner on the line preceding the prompt indicates the current hierarchy level. In the
following example, the level is [edit protocols ospf]:
[edit protocols ospf]
[email protected]#
(The Junos OS documentation uses [email protected]# as the standard configuration mode
prompt. In an actual CLI session, the prompt shows your user ID and the name of the
Juniper Networks device you are working on.)
Use the set ? command to display the statements that you can include in the configuration
at the current level. The help apropos command is also context-sensitive, displaying
matching statements only at the current level and below.
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NOTE: In this document, statements are listed alphabetically within each
hierarchy and subhierarchy. If a subhierarchy is sufficiently long that it might
be difficult to determine where it ends and its next peer statement begins,
the subhierarchy appears at the end of its parent hierarchy instead of in
alphabetical order. In this case, a placeholder appears in its actual
alphabetical position.
For example, at the [edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]
hierarchy level, the family family-name subhierarchy has more than 20 child
statements, including several subhierarchies with child statements of their
own. The full family family-name hierarchy appears at the end of its parent
hierarchy ([edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number]), and the
following placeholder appears at its actual alphabetical position:
family family-name {
... the family subhierarchy appears after the main [edit interfaces interface-name
unit logical-unit-number] hierarchy ...
}
Another exception to alphabetical order is that the disable statement always
appears first in any hierarchy that includes it.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuration Features in the Junos OS
•
Configuration Mode Commands in the Junos OS
Forms of the configure Command
The Junos OS supports three forms of the configure command: configure, configure
private, and configure exclusive. These forms control how users edit and commit
configurations and can be useful when multiple users configure the software. See
Table 6 on page 68.
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Table 6: Forms of the configure Command
Command
Edit Access
Commit Access
configure
•
•
No one can lock the configuration. All users
can commit all changes to the
configuration.
•
If you and another user make changes and
the other user commits changes, your
changes are committed as well.
No one can lock the
configuration. All users
can make configuration
changes.
When you enter
configuration mode, the
CLI displays the
following information:
configure exclusive
configure private
68
•
A list of other users
editing the
configuration.
•
Hierarchy levels the
users are viewing or
editing.
•
Whether the
configuration has
been changed, but
not committed.
•
When multiple users
enter conflicting
configurations, the
most recent change
to be entered takes
precedence.
•
One user locks the configuration and makes changes without interference
from other users.
•
Other users can enter and exit configuration mode, but they cannot
commit the configuration.
•
If you enter configuration mode while another user has locked the
configuration (with the configure exclusive command), the CLI displays
the user and the hierarchy level the user is viewing or editing.
•
If you enter configuration mode while another user has locked the
configuration, you can forcibly log out that user with the request system
logout operational mode command. For details, see the CLI Explorer.
•
Multiple users can edit
the configuration at the
same time.
•
Each user has a private
candidate configuration
to edit independently of
other users.
•
When multiple users
enter conflicting
configurations, the first
commit operation takes
precedence over
subsequent commit
operations.
•
When you commit the configuration, the
router verifies that the operational
(running) configuration has not been
modified by another user before accepting
your private candidate configuration as the
new operational configuration.
•
If the configuration has been modified by
another user, you can merge the
modifications into your private candidate
configuration and attempt to commit
again.
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Using the configure Command on page 70
•
Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration on page 107
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
•
Updating the configure private Configuration on page 100
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
Using the configure exclusive Command
If you enter configuration mode with the configure exclusive command, you lock the
candidate global configuration (also known as the shared configuration or shared
configuration database) for as long as you remain in configuration mode, allowing you to
make changes without interference from other users. Other users can enter and exit
configuration mode, but they cannot commit the configuration.
If another user has locked the configuration, and you need to forcibly log the person out,
enter the operational mode command request system logout pid pid_number.
If you enter configuration mode and another user is also in configuration mode and has
locked the configuration, a message identifies the user and the portion of the configuration
that the user is viewing or editing:
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
Users currently editing the configuration:
root terminal p3 (pid 1088) on since 2000-10-30 19:47:58 EDT, idle 00:00:44
exclusive [edit interfaces so-3/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
In configure exclusive mode, any uncommitted changes are discarded when you exit:
[email protected]> configure exclusive
warning: uncommitted changes will be discarded on exit
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]# set system host-name cool
[edit]
[email protected]# quit
The configuration has been changed but not committed
warning: Auto rollback on exiting 'configure exclusive'
Discard uncommitted changes? [yes,no] (yes)
warning: discarding uncommitted changes
load complete
Exiting configuration mode
When you use the yes option to exit configure exclusive mode, Junos OS discards your
uncommitted changes and rolls backs your configuration. The no option allows you to
continue editing or to commit your changes in configure exclusive mode.
When a user exits from configure exclusive mode while another user is in configure private
mode, Junos OS will roll back any uncommitted changes.
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If you enter the configuration mode with the configure exclusive command, and issue
commit confirmed, but do not confirm the commit, auto rollback happens. Once auto
rollback happens, the management daemon (MGD) removes the exclusive lock from
your session and as a result, the error message “access has been revoked” is displayed.
This is because the session is no more an exclusive session.
[email protected]> configure exclusive
warning: uncommitted changes will be discarded on exit
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]# commit confirmed 1
commit confirmed will be automatically rolled back in 1 minutes unless confirmed
commit
# commit confirmed will be rolled back in 1 minute
Commit was not confirmed; automatic rollback complete.
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
error: access has been revoked.
[email protected]# commit check
error: access has been revoked.
If the you initiate a configure exclusive session, issue commit confirmed and confirm the
commit, the exclusive lock is retained in your session
[email protected]> configure exclusive
warning: uncommitted changes will be discarded on exit
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]# commit confirmed 1
commit confirmed will be automatically rolled back in 1 minutes unless confirmed
commit complete
# commit confirmed will be rolled back in 1 minute
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
Using the configure Command
You can use the configure command to not only enter the CLI configuration mode but
also to gather other information, such as other users currently in configuration mode.
Up to 32 users can be in configuration mode simultaneously, and they all can make
changes to the configuration at the same time. When you commit changes to the
configuration, you may be committing a combination of changes you and other users
have made. For this reason, you will want to keep track on who if anyone is in configuration
mode with you.
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To see other users currently logged onto the same device in configuration mode:
•
Use the configure command to enter the CLI configuration mode.
If there are other users, the message displayed indicates who the users are and what
portion of the configuration the each person is viewing or editing.
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
Current configuration users:
root terminal p3 (pid 1088) on since 1999-05-13 01:03:27 EDT
[edit interfaces so-3/0/0 unit 0 family inet]
The configuration has been changed but not committed
[edit]
[email protected]#
Notice also that If, when you enter configuration mode, the configuration contains changes
that have not been committed, another message is displayed:
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
The configuration has been changed but not committed
[edit]
[email protected]#
This tells you that another user has already made changes to the configuration.
Related
Documentation
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
Modifying the Junos OS Configuration
To configure a device running Junos OS or to modify an existing Junos OS configuration,
you add statements to the configuration. For each statement hierarchy, you create the
hierarchy starting with a statement at the top level and continuing with statements that
move progressively lower in the hierarchy.
To modify the hierarchy, you use two configuration mode commands:
•
edit—Moves to a particular hierarchy level. If that hierarchy level does not exist, the
edit command creates it. The edit command has the following syntax:
edit <statement-path>
•
set—Creates a configuration statement and sets identifier values. After you issue a set
command, you remain at the same level in the hierarchy. The set command has the
following syntax:
set <statement-path> statement <identifier>
statement-path is the hierarchy to the configuration statement and the statement itself.
If you have already moved to the statement’s hierarchy level, you can omit the
statement path. statement is the configuration statement itself. identifier is a string
that identifies an instance of a statement.
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You cannot use the edit command to change the value of identifiers. You must use the
set command.
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
•
Updating the configure private Configuration on page 100
•
Issuing Relative Junos OS Configuration Mode Commands on page 78
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers
All properties of a device running Junos OS are configured by including statements in the
configuration. A statement consists of a keyword, which is fixed text, and, optionally, an
identifier. An identifier is an identifying name which you define, such as the name of an
interface or a username, and which allows you and the CLI to discriminate among a
collection of statements.
For example, the following list shows the statements available at the top level of
configuration mode:
[email protected]# set?
Possible completions:
> accounting-options
+ apply-groups
> chassis
> class-of-service
> firewall
> forwarding-options
> groups
> interfaces
> policy-options
> protocols
> routing-instances
> routing-options
> snmp
> system
Accounting data configuration
Groups from which to inherit configuration data
Chassis configuration
Class-of-service configuration
Define a firewall configuration
Configure options to control packet sampling
Configuration groups
Interface configuration
Routing policy option configuration
Routing protocol configuration
Routing instance configuration
Protocol-independent routing option configuration
Simple Network Management Protocol
System parameters
An angle bracket ( > ) before the statement name indicates that it is a container statement
and that you can define other statements at levels below it. If there is no angle bracket
( > ) before the statement name, the statement is a leaf statement; you cannot define
other statements at hierarchy levels below it.
A plus sign (+) before the statement name indicates that it can contain a set of values.
To specify a set, include the values in brackets. For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options community my-as1-transit members [65535:10 65535:11]
In some statements, you can include an identifier. For some identifiers, such as interface
names, you must specify the identifier in a precise format. For example, the interface
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name so-0/0/0 refers to a SONET/SDH interface that is on the Flexible PIC Concentrator
(FPC) in slot 0, in the first PIC location, and in the first port on the Physical Interface Card
(PIC). For other identifiers, such as interface descriptive text and policy and firewall term
names, you can specify any name, including special characters, spaces, and tabs.
You must enclose in quotation marks (double quotes) identifiers and any strings that
include a space or tab character or any of the following characters:
()[]{}[email protected]#$%^&|'=?
If you do not type an option for a statement that requires one, a message indicates the
type of information required. In this example, you need to type an area number to complete
the command:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area<Enter>
^
syntax error, expecting <identifier>
Related
Documentation
•
Modifying the Junos OS Configuration on page 71
•
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration on page 73
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
•
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 79
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
•
Additional Details About Specifying Junos OS Statements and Identifiers on page 149
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration
To delete a statement or identifier from a Junos OS configuration, use the delete
configuration mode command. Deleting a statement or an identifier effectively
"unconfigures" the functionality associated with that statement or identifier, returning
that functionality to its default condition.
[email protected]# delete <statement-path> <identifier>
When you delete a statement, the statement and all its subordinate statements and
identifiers are removed from the configuration.
For statements that can have more than one identifier, when you delete one identifier,
only that identifier is deleted. The other identifiers in the statement remain.
To delete the entire hierarchy starting at the current hierarchy level, do not specify a
statement or an identifier in the delete command. When you omit the statement or
identifier, you are prompted to confirm the deletion:
[edit]
[email protected]# delete
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Delete everything under this level? [yes, no] (no)
Possible completions:
no
Don't delete everything under this level
yes
Delete everything under this level
Delete everything under this level? [yes, no] (no)
NOTE: You cannot delete multiple statements or identifiers within a hierarchy
using a single delete command. You must delete each statement or identifier
individually using multiple delete commands. For example, consider the
following configuration at the [edit system] hierarchy level:
system {
host-name host-211;
domain-name domain-122;
backup-router 192.168.71.254;
arp;
authentication-order [ radius password tacplus ];
}
To delete the domain-name, host-name, and backup-router from the
configuration, you cannot issue a single delete command:
[email protected]> delete system hostname host-211 domain-name domain-122 backup-router
192.168.71.254
You can only delete each statement individually:
[email protected] delete system host-name host-211
[email protected] delete system domain-name domain-122
[email protected] delete system backup-router 192.168.71.254
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Deleting a Statement from the Junos OS Configuration on page 74
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
Example: Deleting a Statement from the Junos OS Configuration
The following example shows how to delete the ospf statement, effectively unconfiguring
OSPF on the router:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0 hello-interval 5
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
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}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# delete protocols ospf
[edit]
[email protected]# show
[edit]
[email protected]#
Delete all statements from the current level down:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# set interface so-0/0/0 hello-interval 5
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# delete
Delete everything under this level? [yes, no] (no) yes
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# show
[edit]
[email protected]#
Unconfigure a particular property:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces so-3/0/0 speed 100mb
[edit]
[email protected]# show
interfaces {
so-3/0/0 {
speed 100mb;
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# delete interfaces so-3/0/0 speed
[edit]
[email protected]# show
interfaces {
so-3/0/0;
}
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
on page 220
•
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration on page 73
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration
When you have many similar statements in a Junos configuration, you can add one
statement and then make copies of that statement. Copying a statement duplicates
that statement and the entire hierarchy of statements configured under that statement.
Copying statements is useful when you are configuring many physical or logical interfaces
of the same type.
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To make a copy of an existing statement in the configuration, use the configuration mode
copy command:
[email protected]# copy existing-statement to new-statement
Immediately after you have copied a portion of the configuration, the configuration might
not be valid. You must check the validity of the new configuration, and if necessary,
modify either the copied portion or the original portion for the configuration to be valid.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Copying a Statement in the Junos Configuration on page 76
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Examples: Re-Using Configuration on page 79
Example: Copying a Statement in the Junos Configuration
This example shows how you can create one virtual connection (VC) on an interface by
copying an existing VC.
•
Requirements on page 76
•
Overview on page 77
•
Configuration on page 77
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this
example.
Before you begin this example, configure the following initial configuration.
[edit interfaces]
[email protected]# show
at-1/0/0 {
description "PAIX to MAE West"
encapsulation atm-pvc;
unit 61 {
point-to-point;
vci 0.61;
family inet {
address 10.0.1.1/24;
}
}
}
To quickly configure the initial configuration for this example, copy the following
commands, paste it into a text file, remove any line breaks and change any details
necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste this command into the
CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set interfaces at-1/0/0 description "PAIX to MAE West"
set interfaces at-1/0/0 encapsulation atm-pvc
set interfaces at-1/0/0 unit 61 point-to-point
set interfaces at-1/0/0 unit 61 vci 0.61
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set interfaces at-1/0/0 unit 61 family inet address 10.0.1.1/24
Overview
Copying statements is useful when you are configuring many physical or logical interfaces
of the same type. You can add one statement and then make copies of that statement.
Copying a statement duplicates that statement and the entire hierarchy of statements
configured under that statement. In the case of this example, we are adding a virtual
connection that is very similar to a virtual connection already configured.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
Start at the [edit interfaces at-1/0/0] hierarchy level.
copy unit 61 to unit 62
set unit 62 vci 0.62
edit unit 62
replace pattern 10.0.1.1 with 10.0.2.1
Configuring by Copying
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure by copying a configuration:
1.
Go to the [edit interfaces at-1/0/0] hierarchy level and copy unit 61.
[edit interfaces at-1/0/0]
[email protected]# copy unit 61 to unit 62
2.
Take a look at the new configuration and see what you need to change to make the
configuration valid..
[email protected]# show interfaces at-1/0/0
description "PAIX to MAE West"
encapsulation atm-pvc;
unit 61 {
point-to-point;
vci 0.61;
family inet {
address 10.0.1.1/24;
}
}
unit 62 {
point-to-point;
vci 0.61;
family inet {
address 10.0.1.1/24;
}
}
3.
Change the configuration to make it valid.
In this example you want to reconfigure the virtual circuit identifier (VCI) and virtual
path identifier (VPI).
[edit interfaces at-1/0/0]
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[email protected]# set unit 62 vci 0.62
You also want to replace the IP address of the new interface with its own IP address.
[edit interfaces at-1/0/0]
[email protected]# edit unit 62
[email protected]# replace pattern 10.0.1.1 with 10.0.2.1
Results
[edit]
show interfaces
at-1/0/0 {
description "PAIX to MAE West"
encapsulation atm-pvc;
unit 61 {
point-to-point;
vci 0.61;
family inet {
address 10.0.1.1/24;
}
}
unit 62 {
point-to-point;
vci 0.62;
family inet {
address 10.0.2.1/24;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
Issuing Relative Junos OS Configuration Mode Commands
The top or up command followed by another configuration command, including edit,
insert, delete, deactivate, annotate, or show enables you to quickly move to the top of the
hierarchy or to a level above the area you are configuring.
To issue configuration mode commands from the top of the hierarchy, use the top
command; then specify a configuration command. For example:
[edit interfaces fxp0 unit 0 family inet]
[email protected]# top edit system login
[edit system login]
[email protected]#
To issue configuration mode commands from a location higher up in the hierarchy, use
the up configuration mode command; specify the number of levels you want to move up
the hierarchy and then specify a configuration command. For example:
[edit protocols bgp]
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[email protected]# up 2 activate system
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration
When modifying a Junos configuration, you can rename an identifier that is already in the
configuration. You can do this either by deleting the identifier (using the delete command)
and then adding the renamed identifier (using the set and edit commands), or you can
rename the identifier using the rename configuration mode command:
[email protected]# rename <statement-path> identifier1 to identifier2
Related
Documentation
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Examples: Re-Using Configuration on page 79
•
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 84
Examples: Re-Using Configuration
If you need to make changes to the configuration of a device, you can always remove the
original configuration settings using the delete command and add your new configuration
settings using the set command. There are, however, other ways of modifying a
configuration that are more efficient and easier to use.
This example shows how to use the following configuration mode commands to update
an existing configuration:
•
rename—Rename an existing configuration setting, such as an interface name. This
can be useful when you are adding new interfaces to a device.
•
copy—Copy a configuration setting and the entire hierarchy of statements configured
under that setting. Copying configuration statements is useful when you are configuring
many physical or logical interfaces of the same type.
•
replace—Make global changes to text patterns in the configuration. For example, if you
consistently misspell a word common to the description statement for all of the
interfaces on your device, you can fix this mistake with a single command.
•
Requirements on page 79
•
Overview on page 80
•
Configuration on page 80
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this
example.
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Overview
In the course of the first example in this topic, you will make the following configuration
changes:
•
Create a new interface with a description that contains a typing error.
•
Copy the configuration from the interface that you created to create a new interface.
•
Rename one of the interfaces that you created.
•
Fix the typing error in the description for the interfaces that you created.
In the second, shorter example, you will experiment with some of the same commands
under slightly different circumstances.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
This example does not use commands that are suitable for this section.
Using the Copy, Rename, and Replace Commands to Modify a Loopback Interface
Configuration
Step-by-Step
Procedure
CAUTION: If your configuration uses any of the loopback interface unit
numbers used in this example, you must substitute different loopback
interface unit numbers that you are not using in your device’s configuration
in the following steps to avoid adversely impacting the operational status of
your device.
To create and modify a configuration of a loopback interface using the copy, rename,
and replace commands:
1.
Create a new loopback interface unit number and include a description.
The mistakes in the spelling of loopback in the description are intentional.
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces lo0 unit 100 description "this is a lopbck interface"
2.
Display the configuration for the loopback interface you have just added.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 100
description "this is a lopbck interface";
3.
Duplicate the loopback interface you have just created, warts and all, from unit 100
to unit 101.
[edit]
[email protected]# copy interfaces lo0 unit 100 to unit 101
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4.
Display the configurations for loopback interfaces lo0 unit 100 and lo0 unit 101.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 100
description "this is a lopbck interface";
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 101
description "this is a lopbck interface";
The copy command duplicates an interface including any child statements such as
description.
5.
Rename the loopback interface lo0 unit 100 to loopback interface lo0 unit 102.
[edit]
[email protected]# rename interfaces lo0 unit 100 to unit 102
6.
Display the configuration for loopback interface lo0 unit 100.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 100
[edit]
[email protected]#
You should not see any results from this command. The loopback interface lo0 unit
100 is now gone. The rename command replaces the configuration statement
indicated with the new configuration.
7.
Fix the misspelling of the word loopback in the descriptions for loopback interfaces
lo0 unit 101 and lo0 unit 102.
[edit]
[email protected]# replace pattern lopbck with loopback
8.
Display the configuration for loopback interfaces lo0 unit 101 and lo0 102 to verify
that the word loopback is spelled correctly now.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 101
description "this is a loopback interface";
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 102
description "this is a loopback interface";
The replace command replaces all instances of the pattern specified in the
command, unless limited in some way. The next example in this topic shows one
way to limit the effect of the replace command.
9.
From configuration mode, use the rollback command to put the device’s
configuration back to the state it was in before you executed the previous steps.
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
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Results
From configuration mode, use the show interfaces lo0 unit 101 and show interfaces lo0
unit 102 commands to ensure that the device’s configuration is back to the state it was
in before you executed the steps in this example.
[edit]
[email protected]: show interfaces lo0 unit 101
[edit]
[email protected]#
You should not see any results from this command.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces lo0 unit 102
[edit]
[email protected]#
You should not see any results from this command.
Compare the Copy Command at the Top-Level Configuration Hierarchy Level
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The previous example shows the copy, rename, and replace commands at the [edit
interfaces interface-name unit logical-interface-number] hierarchy level. This example
shows how some of these commands work at the top level of the CLI configuration mode
hierarchy.
The following example requires you to navigate to various levels in the configuration
hierarchy. For information about navigating the CLI, see “Using the CLI Editor in
Configuration Mode” on page 34 in the CLI User Guide.
1.
Create an Ethernet interface.
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces et-2/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.0.2.2
2.
Copy the interface you just created to another interface.
[edit]
[email protected]# copy interfaces et-2/0/0 to et-2/1/0
Compare this copy command to the one in Step 3 in the first example, where the
copy command takes the keyword unit before the value to be copied. Notice thatthe
keyword interfaces is not repeated after the preposition to and before the value to
be copied. This happens in some top-level statements with the copy command.
TIP: Similarly, in the rename command, you do not repeat the keyword
part of the statement before the new identifier in some top-level
statements.
3.
Show your configuration so far.
[edit]
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
[email protected]# show interfaces
et-2/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.0.2.2/32;
}
}
}
et-2/1/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.0.2.2/32;
}
}
}
4.
Replace the address for et-2/1/0 with another IP address.
[edit interfaces et-2/1/0 unit 0 family inet]
[email protected]# replace pattern 192.0.2.2 with 192.0.2.40
Notice that if you want to change only a specific occurrence of a pattern instead of
all of them (as you did in Step 7 in the first example), you need to drill down to that
specific hierarchy level before using the replace command.
5.
Show your interfaces again.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces
et-2/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.0.2.2/32;
}
}
}
et-2/1/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.0.2.40/32;
}
}
}
6.
From configuration mode, use the rollback command to put the device’s
configuration back to the state it was in before you executed the previous steps.
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
Results
From configuration mode, use the show interfaces et-2/0/0 and show interfaces et-2/1/0
commands to ensure that the device’s configuration is back to the state it was in before
you executed the steps in this example.
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[edit]
[email protected] interfaces et-2/0/0
[edit]
[email protected]#
You should not see any results from this command.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces et-2/1/0
[edit]
[email protected]#
You should not see any results from this command.
Related
Documentation
•
rename on page 300
•
replace on page 301
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference on page 216
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
on page 220
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
•
Example: Copying a Statement in the Junos Configuration on page 76
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration
When configuring a device running Junos OS, you can enter most statements and
identifiers in any order. Regardless of the order in which you enter the configuration
statements, the CLI always displays the configuration in a strict order. However, there
are a few cases where the ordering of the statements matters because the configuration
statements create a sequence that is analyzed in order.
For example, in a routing policy or firewall filter, you define terms that are analyzed
sequentially. Also, when you create a named path in dynamic MPLS, you define an ordered
list of the transit routers in the path, starting with the first transit router and ending with
the last one.
To modify a portion of the configuration in which the statement order matters, use the
insert configuration mode command:
[email protected]# insert <statement-path> identifier1 (before | after) identifier2
If you do not use the insert command, but instead simply configure the identifier, it is
placed at the end of the list of similar identifiers.
Related
Documentation
84
•
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 79
•
Examples: Re-Using Configuration on page 79
•
Example: Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos Configuration on page 85
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93
Example: Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos Configuration
This example shows the use of the insert command.
Whereas a term added using the set command is placed at the end of the existing list of
terms, you use the insert command to add a term in the order you specify. Specifying the
order of statement is important in the cases in which the order of the statements matters
because the configuration statements create a sequence that is analyzed in order.
Also notice, as shown in this example, that you must create the term before you can
place it using the insert command.
•
Requirements on page 85
•
Overview on page 86
•
Configuration on page 86
Requirements
Before you can insert a term, you must configure an initial policy. To quickly configure
the initial policy for this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks and change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit policy-options]
hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set policy-statement statics term term1 from route-filter 192.168.0.0/16 orlonger
set policy-statement statics term term1 from route-filter 224.0.0.0/3 orlonger
set policy-statement statics term term1 then reject
set policy-statement statics term term2 from protocol direct
set policy-statement statics term term2 then reject
set policy-statement statics term term3 from protocol static
set policy-statement statics term term3 then reject
set policy-statement statics term term4 then accept
Now check that you have the hierarchy correctly configured.
[edit policy-options]
[email protected]# show
policy-statement statics {
term term1 {
from {
route-filter 192.168.0.0/16 orlonger;
route-filter 224.0.0.0/3 orlonger;
}
then reject;
}
term term2 {
from protocol direct;
then reject;
}
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term term3 {
from protocol static;
then reject;
}
term term4 {
then accept;
}
}
Overview
When configuring a device running Junos OS, you can enter most statements and
identifiers in any order. However, there are a few cases, such as in routing policies or
firewall filters, in which the order of the statements matters because the configuration
statements create a sequence that is analyzed in order.
To modify a portion of the configuration in which the statement order matters, you must
use the insert configuration mode command. If you use the set command instead, the
added statement or identifier will be in the wrong place sequentially. The only other way
to get the terms of the command in the correct order is to dismantle the configuration
and start over.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks and change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit policy-options]
hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.
[edit]
[email protected]# rename policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 to term term6
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 from protocol local
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 then reject
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 from protocol
aggregate
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 then reject
[edit]
[email protected]# insert policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 after term term3
[edit]
[email protected]# insert policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 after term term4
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Configuring to Insert Terms
Step-by-Step
Procedure
1.
Determine in what order the terms in your configuration need to go—the original
terms and the new terms you plan to add.
In the original configuration, the policy is named statics and there are four terms.
Each of the first three terms matches on a different match criteria and the resulting
matches are rejected. The last term accepts all the rest of the traffic.
In this example, you need to add two terms that weed out additional types of traffic.
Both of these terms need to go before the last term in the original configuration.
2.
Rename original term4 to term6.
[edit]
[email protected]# rename policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 to term
term6
This step preserves the original last term, now renamed term6, as the last term.
3.
Create a new term4.
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 from protocol
local
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 then reject
A new term is added that matches traffic from local system addresses and rejects
it.
4.
Create new term5.
[edit]
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 from protocol
aggregate
[email protected]# set policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 then reject
A new term is added that matches traffic from aggregate routes and rejects it.
5.
Insert term4 after term3.
[edit]
[email protected]# insert policy-options policy-statement statics term term4 after term
term3
6.
Insert term5 after term4.
[edit]
[email protected]# insert policy-options policy-statement statics term term5 after term
term4
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Results
[edit]
[email protected]# show policy-options policy-statement statics
term term1 {
from {
route-filter 192.168.0.0/16 orlonger;
route-filter 224.0.0.0/3 orlonger;
}
then reject;
}
term term2 {
from protocol direct;
then reject;
}
term term3 {
from protocol static;
then accept;
}
term term4 {
from protocol local;
then reject;
}
term term5 {
from protocol aggregate;
then reject;
}
term term6 {
then accept;
}
Related
Documentation
•
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 84
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
Example: Using the Wildcard Command with the Range Option
•
Requirements on page 88
•
Overview on page 89
•
Configuration on page 89
•
Verification on page 92
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
88
•
M Series, MX Series, T Series or EX Series device
•
Junos OS Release 12.1 or later running on the device
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Overview
The range option with the wildcard command enables you to specify ranges in activate,
deactivate, delete, protect, set, show, and unprotect commands. You can use ranges to
specify a range of interfaces, logical units, VLANs, and other numbered elements. The
wildcard range option expands the command you entered into multiple commands, each
of which corresponds to one item in the range.
The wildcard range option enables you to configure multiple configuration statements
using a single set command, instead of configuring each of them individually. For example,
to configure 24 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces with different port numbers, you can use a
single wildcard range set command instead of 24 individual set interfaces commands.
Similarly, to deactivate a group of 30 logical interfaces, you can use the wildcard range
deactivate command instead of deactivating each logical interface individually.
You can use wildcard range with the active, deactivate, delete, protect, set, show, and
unprotect configuration commands:
[email protected]# wildcard range ?
Possible completions:
activate
Remove the inactive tag from a statement
deactivate
Add the inactive tag to a statement
delete
Delete a data element
protect
Protect the statement
set
Set a parameter
show
Show a parameter
unprotect
Unprotect the statement
You can also specify all configuration hierarchy levels and their child configuration
statements in the CLI by using wildcard range with the set option:
Possible completions:
> > access
> > access-profile
> > accounting-options
> > applications
...
Network access configuration
Access profile for this instance
Accounting data configuration
Define applications by protocol characteristics
Configuration
The following examples show how to configure multiple configuration statements in a
single step by using the range option with the wildcard configuration command:
•
Using the Range Option for Configuring a Series of Named Identifiers for a Configuration
Statement on page 90
•
Specifying Multiple Ranges in the Syntax on page 90
•
Specifying a Range and Unique Numbers In the Syntax on page 91
•
Excluding Some Values from a Range on page 91
•
Specifying a Range with a Step Number on page 91
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Using the Range Option for Configuring a Series of Named Identifiers for a
Configuration Statement
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can configure a series of identifiers for a configuration statement, by specifying a
numerical range of values for the identifiers.
•
To configure a series of the same type of interface with different port numbers (0
through 23), specify the range for the port numbers by using the following format:
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard range set interfaces ge-0/0/[0-23] unit 0 family vpls
Results
Expands to 24 different set commands to configure interfaces with port numbers ranging
from 0 through 23:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family vpls
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family vpls
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/2 unit 0 family vpls
...
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/23 unit 0 family vpls
Specifying Multiple Ranges in the Syntax
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can have multiple ranges specified in a wildcard range command. Each range must
be separated by a comma. You can also have overlapping ranges.
•
To specify more than one range in the syntax, include the minimum and maximum
values for each range, separated by a comma.
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard range protect event-options policy p[1-3,5-7,6-9]
Results
Expands to the following set commands:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p1
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p2
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p3
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p5
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p6
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p7
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p8
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p9
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Specifying a Range and Unique Numbers In the Syntax
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can also specify a combination of a range and unique numbers in the syntax of the
wildcard range command.
•
To specify a range and unique numbers, separate them with a comma.
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard range protect event-options policy p[1-3,5,7,10]
Results
Expands to the following set commands:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p1
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p2
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p3
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p5
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p7
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p10
Excluding Some Values from a Range
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can exclude certain values from a range by marking the numbers or the range of
numbers to be excluded by using an exclamation mark.
•
To exclude certain values from a range, include the portion to be excluded with ! in
the syntax.
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard range protect event-options policy p[1-5,!3-4]
Results
Expands to the following set commands:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p1
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p2
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p5
Specifying a Range with a Step Number
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can provide a step number for a range to have a constant interval in the range.
•
To provide a step, include the step value in the syntax preceded by a forward slash
(/).
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard range protect event-options policy p[1-10/2]
Results
Expands to the following set commands:
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[edit]
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p1
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p3
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p5
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p7
[email protected]# set protect event-options policy p9
Verification
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
•
Checking the Configuration on page 92
Checking the Configuration
Purpose
Action
Meaning
Related
Documentation
92
Check the configuration created using the wildcard range option. The following sample
shows output for the configuration described in “Using the Range Option for Configuring
a Series of Named Identifiers for a Configuration Statement” on page 90.
[email protected]> show configuration interfaces
ge-0/0/0 {
unit 0 {
family vpls;
}
}
ge-0/0/1 {
unit 0 {
family vpls;
}
}
ge-0/0/2 {
unit 0 {
family vpls;
}
}
ge-0/0/3 {
unit 0 {
family vpls;
}
}
...
ge-0/0/23 {
unit 0 {
family vpls;
}
}
The output indicates that 24 Gigabit Ethernet interfaces ranging from ge-0/0/0 through
ge-0/0/23 are created.
•
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names on page 213
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
In a Junos configuration, you can deactivate statements and identifiers so that they do
not take effect when you issue the commit command. Any deactivated statements and
identifiers are marked with the inactive tag. They remain in the configuration, but are not
activated when you issue a commit command.
To deactivate a statement or identifier, use the deactivate configuration mode command:
[email protected]# deactivate( statement | identifier )
To reactivate a statement or identifier, use the activate configuration mode command:
[email protected]# activate ( statement | identifier )
In both commands, the statement and identifier you specify must be at the current
hierarchy level. When you deactivate a statement, that specific statement is completely
ignored and is not applied at all when you issue a commit command.
To disable a statement, use the disable configuration mode command:
In some portions of the configuration hierarchy, you can include a disable statement to
disable functionality. One example is disabling an interface by including the disable
statement at the [edit interface interface-name] hierarchy level. When you disable a
functionality, it is activated when you issue a commit command but is treated as though
it is down or administratively disabled.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS
Configuration on page 93
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
Example: Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS
Configuration
This example shows a common use case in which the deactivate and activate configuration
mode commands are used. It involves dual Routing Engines, master and backup, that
have graceful Routing Engine switchover (GRES) configured. The software on both
Routing Engines needs to be upgraded. This can easily be accomplished by deactivating
GRES, updating the Routing Engines, and then reactivating GRES.
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NOTE: You can also perform a similar upgrade using the same setup except
that nonstop active routing (NSR) is configured instead of GRES. You would
need to deactivate NSR and then upgrade the Routing Engines before
reactivating NSR.
•
Requirements on page 94
•
Overview on page 94
•
Configuration on page 94
Requirements
This example requires the use of a router with dual Routing Engines that can be upgraded.
Before you begin this example, make sure that your have GRES configured.
Overview
In this example, there are two Routing Engines. GRES is configured, and the Routing
Engines need to be upgraded. To accomplish the upgrading, you need to deactivate the
GRES feature, upgrade each of the Routing Engines, and then activate GRES again.
Configuration
Configuring the Deactivation and Reactivation of GRES
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To deactivate and reactivate GRES for Routing Engine upgrade:
1.
Show that GRES is enabled for the router.
[edit]
[email protected]# show chassis
redundancy {
graceful-switchover;
}
fpc 2 {
pic 0 {
tunnel-services {
bandwidth 1g;
}
}
}
2.
Deactivate GRES.
[edit]
[email protected]# deactivate chassis redundancy graceful-switchover
[email protected]# commit
3.
Show that GRES is deactivated.
[edit]
[email protected]# show chassis
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
redundancy {
inactive: graceful-switchover;
}
fpc 2 {
pic 0 {
tunnel-services {
bandwidth 1g;
}
}
}
4.
Upgrade the Routing Engines one by one.
For instructions on upgrading Junos OS on dual Routing Engines, see tasks 2 and 3
in Installing the Software Package on a Router with Redundant Routing Engines.
5.
Reactivate GRES.
[edit]
[email protected]# activate chassis redundancy graceful-switchover
[email protected]# commit
Results
Verify that GRES feature is activated again.
[edit]
[email protected]# show chassis
redundancy {
graceful-switchover;
}
fpc 2 {
pic 0 {
tunnel-services {
bandwidth 1g;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93
Adding Comments in a Junos OS Configuration
You can include comments in a Junos configuration to describe any statement in the
configuration. You can add comments interactively in the CLI and by editing the ASCII
configuration file.
When configuring interfaces, you can add comments about the interface by including
the description statement at the [edit interfaces interface-name] hierarchy level. Any
comments you include appear in the output of the show interfaces commands. For more
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information about the description statement, see the Junos OS Network Interfaces Library
for Routing Devices.
•
Adding Comments in the CLI on page 96
•
Adding Comments in a File on page 97
Adding Comments in the CLI
When you add comments in configuration mode, they are associated with a statement
at the current level. Each statement can have one single-line comment associated with
it. Before you can associate a comment with a statement, the statement must exist. The
comment is placed on the line preceding the statement.
To add comments to a configuration, use the annotate configuration mode command:
[email protected]# annotate statement "comment-string"
statement is the configuration statement to which you are attaching the comment; it
must be at the current hierarchy level. If a comment for the specified statement already
exists, it is deleted and replaced with the new comment.
comment-string is the text of the comment. The comment text can be any length, and
you must type it on a single line. If the comment contains spaces, you must enclose it in
quotation marks. In the comment string, you can include the comment delimiters /* */
or #. If you do not specify any, the comment string is enclosed with the /* */ comment
delimiters.
To delete an existing comment, specify an empty comment string:
[email protected]# annotate statement ""
If you add comments with the annotate command, you can view the comments within
the configuration by entering the show configuration mode command or the show
configuration operational mode command.
NOTE: The Junos OS supports annotation up to the last level in the
configuration hierarchy, including oneliners. However, annotation of parts
(the child statements or identifiers within the oneliner) of the oneliner is not
supported. For example, in the following sample configuration hierarchy,
annotation is supported up to the level 1 parent hierarchy, but not supported
for the metric child statement:
[edit protocols]
isis {
interface ge-0/0/0.0 {
level 1 metric 10;
}
}
}
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Adding Comments in a File
When you edit the ASCII configuration file and add comments, they can be one or more
lines and must precede the statement they are associated with. If you place the comments
in other places in the file, such as on the same line following a statement or on a separate
line following a statement, they are removed when you use the load command to open
the configuration into the CLI.
The following excerpt from a configuration example illustrates how to place and how
not to place comments in a configuration file:
/* This comment goes with routing-options */
routing-options {
/* This comment goes with routing-options traceoptions */
traceoptions {
/* This comment goes with routing-options traceoptions tracefile */
tracefile rpd size 1m files 10;
/* This comment goes with routing-options traceoptions traceflag task */
traceflag task;
/* This comment goes with routing-options traceoptions traceflag general */
traceflag general;
}
autonomous-system 10458; /* This comment is dropped */
}
routing-options {
rib-groups {
ifrg {
import-rib [ inet.0 inet.2 ];
/* A comment here is dropped */
}
dvmrp-rib {
import-rib inet.2;
export-rib inet.2;
/* A comment here is dropped */
}
/* A comment here is dropped */
}
/* A comment here is dropped */
}
When you include comments in the configuration file directly, you can format comments
in the following ways:
Related
Documentation
•
Start the comment with a /* and end it with a */. The comment text can be on a single
line or can span multiple lines.
•
Start the comment with a # and end it with a new line (carriage return).
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Example: Including Comments in a Junos OS Configuration by Using the CLI on page 98
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Example: Including Comments in a Junos OS Configuration by Using the CLI
Adding comments to a Junos OS configuration makes the configuration file readable and
more readily understood by users. Using the Junos OS CLI, you can include comments
as you configure by using the annotate statement. In this example, comments are added
by using the CLI for an already existing configuration:
•
Requirements on page 98
•
Overview on page 98
•
Configuration on page 98
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this
example.
Before you add a comment, you must configure the following hierarchy on the router.
To quickly configure the initial configuration for this example, copy the following command,
paste it into a text file, remove any line breaks and change any details necessary to match
your network configuration, copy and paste this command into the CLI at the [edit]
hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0.0 hello-interval 5
Now, check that you have this hierarchy configured.
[email protected]# show protocols
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
Overview
When you add comments by using the CLI, you do so in configuration mode using the
annotate statement. Each comment you add is associated with a statement at the current
level. Each statement can have one single-line comment associated with it.
To configure the annotate statement, move to the level of the statement with which you
want to associate a comment. To view the comments, go to the top of the configuration
hierarchy and use the show command.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
98
To quickly configure the comments for this example, copy the following commands,
paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks and change any details necessary to
match your network configuration, copy and paste the commands into the CLI, starting
at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
edit protocols ospf
annotate area 0.0.0.0 "Backbone area configuration added June 15, 1998"
edit area 0.0.0.0
annotate interface so-0/0/0.0 "Interface from router sj1 to router sj2"
Notice that the commands are moving you down the hierarchy as you annotate different
sections of the hierarchy.
Including Comments in the CLI Configuration Mode
Step-by-Step
Procedure
This procedure assumes that you have already configured the initial configuration.
To add comments to a configuration:
1.
Move to the first hierarchy level to which you need to add a comment.
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf
2.
Add a comment to the area configuration statement by using the annotate
statement.
[edit protocols ospf]
[email protected]# annotate area 0.0.0.0 "Backbone area configuration added June 15,
1998"
3.
Move down a level to the interface configuration statement.
[edit protocols ospf]
[email protected]# edit area 0.0.0.0
4.
Add a comment to interface so-0/0/0.0 by using the annotate statement.
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# annotate interface so-0/0/0.0 "Interface from router sj1 to router sj2"
Results
Move to the top of the hierarchy and use the show command to see the comments you
added. The comments precede the statement they are associated with.
[edit]
[email protected]# show protocols
ospf {
/* Backbone area configuration added June 15, 1998 */
area 0.0.0.0 {
/* Interface from router sj1 to router sj2 */
interface so-0/0/0.0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
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After you have confirmed that the configuration is correct, enter the commit command.
Related
Documentation
•
Adding Comments in a Junos OS Configuration on page 95
Updating the configure private Configuration
When you are in configure private mode, you must work with a copy of the most recently
committed shared configuration. If the global configuration changes, you can issue the
update command to update your private candidate configuration. When you do this, your
private candidate configuration contains a copy of the most recently committed
configuration with your private changes merged in. For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# update
[edit]
[email protected]#
NOTE: Merge conflicts can occur when you issue the update command.
You can also issue the rollback command to discard your private candidate configuration
changes and obtain the most recently committed configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
[edit]
[email protected]#
Related
Documentation
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration
To display the current configuration for a device running Junos OS, use the show
configuration mode command. This command displays the configuration at the current
hierarchy level or at the specified level.
[email protected]# show <statement-path>
The configuration statements appear in a fixed order, interfaces appear alphabetically
by type, and then in numerical order by slot number, PIC number, and port number. Note
that when you configure the router, you can enter statements in any order.
You also can use the CLI operational mode show configuration command to display the
last committed current configuration, which is the configuration currently running on the
router:
[email protected]> show configuration
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When you show a configuration, a timestamp at the top of the configuration indicates
when the configuration was last changed:
## Last commit: 2006-07-18 11:21:58 PDT by echen
version 8.3
If you have omitted a required statement at a particular hierarchy level, when you issue
the show command in configuration mode, a message indicates which statement is
missing. As long as a mandatory statement is missing, the CLI continues to display this
message each time you issue a show command. For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# show
protocols {
pim {
interface so-0/0/0 {
priority 4;
version 2;
# Warning: missing mandatory statement(s): 'mode'
}
}
}
When you issue the show configuration command with the | display set pipe option to
view the configuration as set commands, those portions of the configuration that you
do not have permissions to view are substituted with the text ACCESS-DENIED.
Unsupported statements included in the CLI configuration are displayed with the
“unsupported” text in the configuration. For example, if a statement is configured on an
unsupported platform, the CLI displays a message that the statement is ignored in the
configuration because it is configured on an unsupported platform. When you issue the
show command with the | display xml option, you can see the unsupported="unsupported”
attribute for configuration that is unsupported.
The “unsupported” attribute included in text configuration or XML configuration is provided
to scripts when the unsupported="unsupported" attribute is included in the
<get-configuration> RPC call.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 101
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
Example: Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration
The following example shows how you can display the current Junos configuration.
Set a configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0 hello-interval 5
To display the current configuration:
[edit]
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[email protected]# show
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
}
Display a particular hierarchy in the configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# show protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
Move down a level and display the configuration at that level:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0
[edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0]
[email protected]# show
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
Set and commit a configuration:
[edit]
[email protected]# set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0 hello-interval 5
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]# quit
exiting configuration mode
Display the last committed configuration:
[email protected]> show configuration
## Last commit: 2006-08-10 11:21:58 PDT by user
version 8.3
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
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•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Displaying Additional Information About the Junos OS Configuration
In configuration mode only, to display additional information about the configuration,
use the display detail command after the pipe ( | ) in conjunction with a show command.
The additional information includes the help string that explains each configuration
statement and the permission bits required to add and modify the configuration
statement.
[email protected]# show <hierarchy-level> | display detail
For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display detail
##
## version: Software version information
## require: system
##
version "3.4R1 [tlim]";
system {
##
## host-name: Host name for this router
## match: ^[[:alnum:]._-]+$
## require: system
##
}
host-name router-name;
##
## domain-name: Domain name for this router
## match: ^[[:alnum:]._-]+$
## require: system
##
domain-name isp.net;
##
## backup-router: Address of router to use while booting
##
backup-router 192.168.100.1;
root-authentication {
##
## encrypted-password: Encrypted password string
##
encrypted-password "$ABC123"; # SECRET-DATA
}
##
## name-server: DNS name servers
## require: system
##
name-server {
##
## name-server: DNS name server address
##
208.197.1.0;
}
login {
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##
## class: User name (login)
## match: ^[[:alnum:]_-]+$
##
class super-user {
##
## permissions: Set of permitted operation categories
##
permissions all;
}
...
##
## services: System services
## require: system
##
services {
## services: Service name
##
ftp;
##
## services: Service name
##
telnet;
##
}
syslog {
##
## file-name: File to record logging data
##
file messages {
##
## Facility type
## Level name
##
any notice;
##
## Facility type
## Level name
##
authorization info;
}
}
}
chassis {
alarm {
sonet {
##
## lol: Loss of light
## alias: loss-of-light
##
lol red;
}
}
}
interfaces {
##
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
## Interface name
##
at-2/1/1 {
atm-options {
##
## vpi: Virtual path index
## range: 0 .. 255
## maximum-vcs: Maximum number of virtual circuits on this VP
##
vpi 0 maximum-vcs 512;
}
##
## unit: Logical unit number
## range: 0 .. 16384
##
unit 0 {
##
## vci: ATM point-to-point virtual circuit identifier ([vpi.]vci)
}
##
vci 0.128;
}
}
...
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration
In configuration mode, you can display the configuration as a series of configuration mode
commands required to re-create the configuration. This is useful if you are not familiar
with how to use configuration mode commands or if you want to cut, paste, and edit the
displayed configuration.
To display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands, which are
required to re-create the configuration from the top level of the hierarchy as set
commands, issue the show configuration mode command with the display set option:
[email protected]# show | display set
This topic contains the following examples:
•
Example: Displaying set Commands from the Configuration on page 105
•
Example: Displaying Required set Commands at the Current Hierarchy Level on page 106
•
Example: Displaying set Commands with the match Option on page 107
Example: Displaying set Commands from the Configuration
Display the set commands from the configuration at the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces fe-0/0/0]
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[email protected]# show
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.107.1.230/24;
}
family iso;
family mpls;
}
inactive: unit 1 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/8;
}
}
[email protected]# show | display set
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.107.1.230/24
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family iso
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family mpls
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 1 family inet address 10.0.0.1/8
deactivate interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 1
To display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands required to
re-create the configuration from the current hierarchy level, issue the show configuration
mode command with the display set relative option:
[email protected]# show | display set relative
Example: Displaying Required set Commands at the Current Hierarchy Level
Display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands required to
re-create the configuration from the current hierarchy level:
[edit interfaces fe-0/0/0]
[email protected]# show
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.107.1.230/24;
}
family iso;
family mpls;
}
inactive: unit 1 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/8;
}
}
[email protected]# show | display set relative
set unit 0 family inet address 192.107.1.230/24
set unit 0 family iso
set unit 0 family mpls
set unit 1 family inet address 10.0.0.1/8
deactivate unit 1
To display the configuration as set commands and search for text matching a regular
expression by filtering output, specify the match option after the pipe ( | ):
[email protected]# show | display set | match regular-expression
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Chapter 4: Using Configuration Statements to Configure a Device
Example: Displaying set Commands with the match Option
Display IP addresses associated with an interface:
xe-2/3/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.107.9.106/30;
}
}
}
so-5/1/0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.107.9.15/32 {
destination 192.107.9.192;
}
}
}
}
lo0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 127.0.0.1/32;
}
}
}
[email protected]# show interfaces | display set | match address
set interfaces xe-2/3/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.9.106/30
set interfaces so-5/1/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.9.15/32 destination 192.168.9.192
set interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet address 127.0.0.1/32
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration
To display the users currently editing the configuration, use the status configuration mode
command:
[email protected]# status
Users currently editing the configuration:
rchen terminal p0 (pid 55691) on since 2006-03-01 13:17:25 PST
[edit interfaces]
The system displays who is editing the configuration (rchen), where the user is logged in
(terminal p0), the date and time the user logged in (2006-03-01 13:17:25 PST), and what
level of the hierarchy the user is editing ([edit interfaces]).
If you issue the status configuration mode command and a user has scheduled a candidate
configuration to become active for a future time, the system displays who scheduled the
commit (root), where the user is logged in (terminal d0), the date and time the user
logged in (2002-10-31 14:55:15 PST), and that a commit is pending (commit at).
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[edit]
[email protected]# status
Users currently editing the configuration:
root terminal d0 (pid 767) on since 2002-10-31 14:55:15 PST, idle 00:03:09
commit at
For information about how to schedule a commit, see “Scheduling a Junos OS Commit
Operation” on page 115.
If you issue the status configuration mode command and a user is editing the configuration
in configure exclusive mode, the system displays who is editing the configuration (root),
where the user is logged in (terminal d0), the date and time the user logged in (2002-11-01
13:05:11 PST), and that a user is editing the configuration in configure exclusive mode
(exclusive [edit]).
[edit]
[email protected]# status
Users currently editing the configuration:
root terminal d0 (pid 2088) on since 2002-11-01 13:05:11 PST
exclusive [edit]
Related
Documentation
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
•
Using the configure exclusive Command on page 69
Verifying a Junos OS Configuration
To verify that the syntax of a Junos configuration is correct, use the configuration mode
commit check command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit check
configuration check succeeds
[edit]
[email protected]#
If the commit check command finds an error, a message indicates the location of the
error.
Related
Documentation
108
•
Adding Junos OS Configuration Statements and Identifiers on page 72
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 5
Committing a Junos OS Configuration
•
Junos OS Commit Model for Router or Switch Configuration on page 109
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration and Exiting Configuration Mode on page 112
•
Commit Operation When Multiple Users Configure the Software on page 113
•
Activating a Junos OS Configuration but Requiring Confirmation on page 114
•
Scheduling a Junos OS Commit Operation on page 115
•
Monitoring the Junos OS Commit Process on page 116
•
Adding a Comment to Describe the Committed Configuration on page 117
•
Backing Up the Committed Configuration on the Alternate Boot Drive on page 118
•
Junos OS Batch Commits Overview on page 118
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
•
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview on page 129
•
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and
Activation on page 131
Junos OS Commit Model for Router or Switch Configuration
The router or switch configuration is saved using a commit model—a candidate
configuration is modified as desired and then committed to the system. When a
configuration is committed, the router or switch checks the configuration for syntax errors,
and if no errors are found, the configuration is saved as juniper.conf.gz and activated. The
formerly active configuration file is saved as the first rollback configuration file
(juniper.conf.1.gz), and any other rollback configuration files are incremented by 1. For
example, juniper.conf.1.gz is incremented to juniper.conf.2.gz, making it the second rollback
configuration file. The router or switch can have a maximum of 49 rollback configurations
(numbered 1 through 49) saved on the system.
On the router or switch, the active configuration file and the first three rollback files
(juniper.conf.gz.1, juniper.conf.gz.2, juniper.conf.gz.3) are located in the /config directory.
If the file rescue.conf.gz is saved on the system, this file should also be saved in the /config
directory. The factory default files are located in the /etc/config directory.
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There are two mechanisms used to propagate the configurations between Routing
Engines within a router or switch:
•
Synchronization—Propagates a configuration from one Routing Engine to a second
Routing Engine within the same router or switch chassis.
NOTE: The QFX3500 switch has only one Routing Engine.
To synchronize configurations, use the commit synchronize CLI command. If one of the
Routing Engines is locked, the synchronization fails. If synchronization fails because of
a locked configuration file, you can use the commit synchronize force command. This
command overrides the lock and synchronizes the configuration files.
•
Distribution—Propagates a configuration across the routing plane on a multichassis
router or switch. Distribution occurs automatically. There is no user command available
to control the distribution process. If a configuration is locked during a distribution of
a configuration, the locked configuration does not receive the distributed configuration
file, so the synchronization fails. You need to clear the lock before the configuration
and resynchronize the routing planes.
NOTE: When you use the commit synchronize force CLI command on a
multichassis platform, the forced synchronization of the configuration files
does not affect the distribution of the configuration file across the routing
plane. If a configuration file is locked on a router or switch remote from the
router or switch where the command was issued, the synchronization fails
on the remote router or switch. You need to clear the lock and reissue the
synchronization command.
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Junos OS for the First Time on a Router or Switch with a Single Routing Engine
•
commit on page 275
Committing a Junos OS Configuration
To save Junos OS configuration changes to the configuration database and to activate
the configuration on the router, use the commit configuration mode command. You can
issue the commit command from any hierarchy level:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
When you enter the commit command, the configuration is first checked for syntax errors
(commit check). Then, if the syntax is correct, the configuration is activated and becomes
the current, operational router configuration.
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You can issue the commit command from any hierarchy level.
A configuration commit can fail for any of the following reasons:
•
The configuration includes incorrect syntax, which causes the commit check to fail.
•
The candidate configuration that you are trying to commit is larger than 700 MB.
•
The configuration is locked by a user who entered the configure exclusive command.
If the configuration contains syntax errors, a message indicates the location of the error,
and the configuration is not activated. The error message has the following format:
[edit edit-path]
‘offending-statement;’
error-message
For example:
[edit firewall filter login-allowed term allowed from]
‘icmp-type [ echo-request echo-reply ];’
keyword ‘echo-reply’ unrecognized
You must correct the error before recommitting the configuration. To return quickly to
the hierarchy level where the error is located, copy the path from the first line of the error
and paste it at the configuration mode prompt at the [edit] hierarchy level.
The uncommitted, candidate configuration file is /var/rundb/juniper.db. It is limited to
700 MB. If the commit fails with a message configuration database size limit exceeded,
view the file size from configuration mode by entering the command run file list /var/rundb
detail. You can simplify the configuration and reduce the file size by creating configuration
groups with wildcards or defining less specific match policies in your firewall filters.
NOTE: CLI commit-time warnings displayed for configuration changes at the
[edit interfaces] hierarchy level are removed and are logged as system log
messages.
This is also applicable to VRRP configuration at the following hierarchy levels:
•
[edit interfaces interface-name unit logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6)
address address]
•
[edit logical-systems logical-system-name interfaces interface-name unit
logical-unit-number family (inet | inet6) address address]
When you commit a configuration, you commit the entire configuration in its current form.
If more than one user is modifying the configuration, committing it saves and activates
the changes of all the users.
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NOTE:
•
If you are using Junos OS in a Common Criteria environment, system log
messages are created whenever a secret attribute is changed (for example,
password changes or changes to the RADIUS shared secret). These changes
are logged during the following configuration load operations:
load merge
load replace
load override
load update
For more information, see the Secure Configuration Guide for Common
Criteria and Junos-FIPS.
•
We do not recommend performing a commit operation on the backup
Routing Engine when graceful Routing Engine switchover is enabled on the
router.
•
NOTE: If you configure the same IP address for a management
interface or internal interface such as fxp0 and an external
physical interface such as ge-0/0/1, when graceful Routing
Engine switchover (GRES) is enabled, the CLI displays an
appropriate commit error message that identical addresses have
been found on the private and public interfaces. In such cases,
you must assign unique IP addresses for the two interfaces that
have duplicate addresses.
The management Ethernet interface used for the TX Matrix Plus
router, T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing matrix, and PTX
Series Packet Transport Routers, is em0. Junos OS automatically
creates the router’s management Ethernet interface, em0.
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration and Exiting Configuration Mode on page 112
•
Activating a Junos OS Configuration but Requiring Confirmation on page 114
•
Backing Up the Committed Configuration on the Alternate Boot Drive on page 118
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
Committing a Junos OS Configuration and Exiting Configuration Mode
To save Junos OS configuration changes, activate the configuration on the device and
exit configuration mode, using the commit and-quit configuration mode command. This
command succeeds only if the configuration contains no errors.
[edit]
[email protected]# commit and-quit
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commit complete
exiting configuration mode
[email protected]>
NOTE: We do not recommend performing a commit operation on the backup
Routing Engine when graceful Routing Engine switchover is enabled on the
router.
Related
Documentation
•
Activating a Junos OS Configuration but Requiring Confirmation on page 114
Commit Operation When Multiple Users Configure the Software
Up to 32 users can be in configuration mode simultaneously, and they all can be making
changes to the configuration. All changes made by all users are visible to everyone editing
the configuration—the changes become visible as soon as the user presses the Enter key
at the end of a command that changes the configuration, such as set, edit, or delete.
When any of the users editing the configuration issues a commit command, all changes
made by all users are checked and activated.
If you enter configuration mode with the configure private command, each user has a
private candidate configuration to edit somewhat independently of other users. When
you commit the configuration, only your own changes get committed. To synchronize
your copy of the configuration after other users have committed changes, you can run
the update command in configuration mode. A commit operation also updates all of the
private candidate configurations. For example, suppose user X and user Y are both in
configure private mode, and user X commits a configuration change. When user Y performs
a subsequent commit operation and then views the new configuration, the new
configuration seen by user Y includes the changes made by user X.
If you enter configuration mode with the configure exclusive command, you lock the
candidate configuration for as long as you remain in configuration mode, allowing you
to make changes without interference from other users. Other users can enter and exit
configuration mode, but they cannot commit the configuration. This is true even if the
other users entered configuration mode before you enter the configure exclusive command.
For example, suppose user X is already in the configure private or configure mode. Then
suppose user Y enters the configure exclusive mode. User X cannot commit any changes
to the configuration, even if those changes were entered before user Y logged in. If user
Y exits configure exclusive mode, user X can then commit the changes made in configure
private or configure mode.
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Forms of the configure Command on page 67
•
Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration on page 107
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Activating a Junos OS Configuration but Requiring Confirmation
When you commit the current candidate configuration, you can require an explicit
confirmation for the commit to become permanent. This is useful if you want to verify
that a configuration change works correctly and does not prevent access to the router.
If the change prevents access or causes other errors, the router automatically returns to
the previous configuration and restores access after the rollback confirmation timeout
passes. This feature is called automatic rollback.
To commit the current candidate configuration but require an explicit confirmation for
the commit to become permanent, use the commit confirmed configuration mode
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit confirmed
commit confirmed will be automatically rolled back in 10 minutes unless confirmed
commit complete
#commit confirmed will be rolled back in 10 minutes
[edit]
[email protected]#
Once you have verified that the change works correctly, you can keep the new
configuration active by entering a commit or commit check command within 10 minutes
of the commit confirmed command. For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit check
commit confirmed will be automatically rolled back in 10 minutes unless confirmed
commit complete
#commit confirmed will be rolled back in 10 minutes
[edit]
[email protected]#
If the commit is not confirmed within a certain time (10 minutes by default), Junos OS
automatically rolls back to the previous configuration and a broadcast message is sent
to all logged-in users.
To show when a rollback is scheduled after a commit confirmed command, enter the
show system commit command. For example:
[email protected]>show system commit
0 2005-01-05 15:00:37 PST by root via cli commit confirmed, rollback in 3mins
Like the commit command, the commit confirmed command verifies the configuration
syntax and reports any errors. If there are no errors, the configuration is activated
temporarily (10 minutes by default), and begins running on the router.
Figure 5 on page 115 illustrates how the commit confirmed command works.
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Figure 5: Confirm a Configuration
To change the amount of time before you have to confirm the new configuration, specify
the number of minutes when you issue the command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit confirmed minutes
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
In Junos OS Release 11.4 and later, you can also use the commit confirmed command in
the [edit private] configuration mode.
Related
Documentation
•
Scheduling a Junos OS Commit Operation on page 115
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
Scheduling a Junos OS Commit Operation
You can schedule when you want your candidate configuration to become active. To
save Junos OS configuration changes and activate the configuration on the router at a
future time or upon reboot, use the commit at configuration mode command, specifying
reboot or a future time at the [edit] hierarchy level:
[edit]
[email protected] # commit at string
Where string is reboot or the future time to activate the configuration changes. You can
specify time in two formats:
•
A time value in the form hh:mm[:ss] hours, minutes, and optionally seconds)—Commit
the configuration at the specified time, which must be in the future but before 11:59:59
PM on the day the commit at configuration mode command is issued. Use 24-hour
time for the hh value; for example, 04:30:00 is 4:30:00 AM, and 20:00 is 8:00 PM. The
time is interpreted with respect to the clock and time zone settings on the router.
•
A date and time value in the form yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm[:ss] (year, month, date, hours,
minutes, and, optionally, seconds)—Commit the configuration at the specified day and
time, which must be after the commit at command is issued. Use 24-hour time for the
hh value. For example, 2003-08-21 12:30:00 is 12:30 PM on August 21, 2003. The time
is interpreted with respect to the clock and time zone settings on the router.
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Enclose the string value in quotation marks (" "). For example, commit at "18:00:00". For
date and time, include both values in the same set of quotation marks. For example,
commit at "2005-03-10 14:00:00".
A commit check is performed immediately when you issue the commit at configuration
mode command. If the result of the check is successful, then the current user is logged
out of configuration mode, and the configuration data is left in a read-only state. No other
commit can be performed until the scheduled commit is completed.
NOTE: If Junos OS fails before the configuration changes become active, all
configuration changes are lost.
You cannot enter the commit at configuration command after you issue the
request system reboot command.
You cannot enter the request system reboot command once you schedule a
commit operation for a specific time in the future.
You cannot commit a configuration when a scheduled commit is pending.
For information about how to cancel a scheduled configuration by means of
the clear command, see the CLI Explorer.
NOTE: We do not recommend performing a commit operation on the backup
Routing Engine when graceful Routing Engine switchover is enabled on the
router.
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Monitoring the Junos OS Commit Process on page 116
Monitoring the Junos OS Commit Process
To monitor the Junos commit process, use the display detail command after the pipe
with the commit command:
[email protected]# commit | display detail
For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit | display detail
2003-09-22 15:39:39 PDT: exporting juniper.conf
2003-09-22 15:39:39 PDT: setup foreign files
2003-09-22 15:39:39 PDT: propagating foreign files
2003-09-22 15:39:39 PDT: complete foreign files
2003-09-22 15:39:40 PDT: copying configuration to juniper.data+
2003-09-22 15:39:40 PDT: dropping unchanged foreign files
2003-09-22 15:39:40 PDT: daemons checking new configuration
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2003-09-22 15:39:41 PDT: commit wrapup...
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: activating '/var/etc/ntp.conf'
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: activating '/var/etc/kmd.conf'
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: activating '/var/db/juniper.data'
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: notifying daemons of new configuration
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: signaling 'Firewall daemon', pid 24567, signal 1,
status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:42 PDT: signaling 'Interface daemon', pid 24568, signal 1,
status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'Routing protocol daemon', pid 25679,
signal 1, status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'MIB2 daemon', pid 24549, signal 1,
status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'NTP daemon', pid 37863, signal 1, status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'Sonet APS daemon', pid 24551, signal 1,
status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'VRRP daemon', pid 24552, signal 1,
status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'PFE daemon', pid 2316, signal 1, status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'Traffic sampling control daemon', pid 24553
signal 1, status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'IPsec Key Management daemon', pid
24556, signal 1, status 0
2003-09-22 15:39:43 PDT: signaling 'Forwarding UDP daemon', pid 2320,
signal 1, status 0
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Adding a Comment to Describe the Committed Configuration on page 117
Adding a Comment to Describe the Committed Configuration
You can include a comment that describes changes to the committed configuration. To
do so, include the commit comment statement. The comment can be as long as 512 bytes
and you must type it on a single line.
[edit]
[email protected]# commit comment comment-string
comment-string is the text of the comment.
NOTE: You cannot include a comment with the commit check command.
To add a comment to the commit command, include the comment statement after the
commit command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit comment "add user joe"
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
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To add a comment to the commit confirmed command, include the comment statement
after the commit confirmed command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit confirmed comment "add customer to port 27"
commit confirmed will be automatically rolled back in 10 minutes unless confirmed
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
To view these commit comments, issue the show system commit operational mode
command.
In Junos OS Release 11.4 and later, you can also use the commit confirmed command in
the [edit private] configuration mode.
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
•
Backing Up the Committed Configuration on the Alternate Boot Drive on page 118
Backing Up the Committed Configuration on the Alternate Boot Drive
After you commit the configuration and are satisfied that it is running successfully, you
should issue the request system snapshot command to back up the new software onto
the /altconfig file system. If you do not issue the request system snapshot command, the
configuration on the alternate boot drive will be out of sync with the configuration on the
primary boot drive.
The request system snapshot command backs up the root file system to /altroot, and
/config to /altconfig. The root and /config file systems are on the router’s flash drive, and
the /altroot and /altconfig file systems are on the router’s hard disk (if available).
NOTE: For more information about backing up the file system on an ACX
Series Universal Access Router, see Understanding System Snapshot on an
ACX Series Router.
After you issue the request system snapshot command, you cannot return to the previous
version of the software because the running and backup copies of the software are
identical.
Related
Documentation
•
Committing a Junos OS Configuration on page 110
Junos OS Batch Commits Overview
Junos OS provides a batch commit feature that aggregates or merges multiple
configuration edits from different CLI sessions or users and adds them to a batch commit
queue. A batch commit server running on the device takes one or more jobs from the
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batch commit queue, applies the configuration changes to the shared configuration
database, and then commits the configuration changes in a single commit operation.
Batches are prioritized by the commit server based on priority of the batch specified by
the user or the time when the batch job is added. When one batch commit is complete,
the next set of configuration changes are aggregated and loaded into the batch queue
for the next session of the batch commit operation. Batches are created until there are
no commit entries left in the queue directory.
When compared to the regular commit operation where all commits are independently
committed sequentially, batch commits save time and system resources by committing
multiple small configuration edits in a single commit operation.
Batch commits are performed from the [edit batch] configuration mode. The commit
server properties can be configured at the [edit system commit server] hierarchy level.
Aggregation and Error Handling
When there is a load-time error in one of the aggregated jobs, the commit job that
encounters the error is discarded and the remaining jobs are aggregated and committed.
For example, if there are five commit jobs (commit-1, commit-2, commit-3, commit-4, and
commit-5) being aggregated, and commit-3 encounters an error while loading, commit-3
is discarded and commit-1, commit-2, commit-4, and commit-5 are aggregated and
committed.
If there is an error during the commit operation when two or more jobs are aggregated
and committed, the aggregation is discarded and each of those jobs is committed
individually like a regular commit operation.
For example, if there are five commit jobs (commit-1, commit-2, commit-3, commit-4, and
commit-5) that are aggregated and if there is a commit error caused because of commit-3,
the aggregation is discarded, commit-1, commit-2, commit-3, commit-4, and commit-5
are committed individually, and the CLI reports a commit error for commit-3.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties
This example shows how to configure batch commit server properties to manage batch
commit operations.
•
Requirements on page 120
•
Overview on page 120
•
Configuration on page 120
•
Verification on page 122
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Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
MX Series 3D Universal Edge Router
•
Junos OS Release 12.1 or later running on the device
Overview
You can control how the batch commit queue is handled by the commit server by
configuring the server properties at the [edit system commit server] hierarchy level. This
enables you to control how many commit jobs are aggregated or merged into a single
batch commit, the maximum number of jobs that can be added to the queue, days to
keep batch commit error logs, interval between two batch commits, and tracing operations
for batch commit operations.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this section of the example, copy the following commands, paste
them into a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your
network configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit]
hierarchy level. You can configure the commit server properties from either the regular
[edit] mode or the [edit batch] mode.
Device R0
set system commit server maximum-aggregate-pool 4
set system commit server maximum-entries 500
set system commit server commit-interval 5
set system commit server days-to-keep-error-logs 30
set system commit server traceoptions file commitd_nov
set system commit server traceoptions flag all
Configuring the Commit Server Properties
Step-by-Step
Procedure
1.
(Optional) Configure the number of commit transactions to aggregate or merge in
a single commit operation.
The default value for maximum-aggregate-pool is 5.
NOTE: Setting maximum-aggregate-pool to 1 commits each of the jobs
individually.
In this example, the number of commit transactions is set to 4 indicating that four
different commit jobs are aggregated into a single commit before the commit
operation is initiated.
[edit system commit server]
[email protected]# set maximum-aggregate-pool 4
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Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
2.
(Optional) Configure the maximum number of jobs allowed in a batch.
This limits the number of commits jobs that are added to the queue.
[edit system commit server]
[email protected]# set maximum-entries 500
NOTE: If you set maximum-entries to 1, the commit server cannot add
more than one job to the queue, and the CLI displays an appropriate
message when you try to commit more than one job.
3.
(Optional) Configure the time (in seconds) to wait before starting the next batch
commit operation.
[edit system commit server]
[email protected]# set commit-interval 5
4.
(Optional) Configure the number of days to keep error logs.
The default value is 30 days.
[edit system commit server]
[email protected]# set days-to-keep-error-logs 30
5.
(Optional) Configure tracing operations to log batch commit events.
In this example, the filename for logging batch commit events is commitd_nov, and
all traceoption flags are set.
[edit system commit server]
[email protected]# set traceoptions commitd_nov
[email protected]# set traceoptions flag all
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show system commit
server command. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the
instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
[email protected]# show system commit server
maximum-aggregate-pool 4;
maximum-entries 500;
commit-interval 5;
days-to-keep-error-logs 30;
traceoptions {
file commitd_nov;
flag all;
}
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Committing the Configuration from Batch Configuration Mode
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To commit the configuration from the [edit batch] mode, do one of the following:
•
Log in to the device and enter commit.
[edit batch]
[email protected]# commit
Added to commit queue request-id: 1000
•
To assign a higher priority to a batch commit job, issue the commit command with
the priority option.
[edit batch]
[email protected]# commit priority
Added to commit queue request-id: 1001
•
To commit a configuration without aggregating the configuration changes with
other commit jobs in the queue, issue the commit command with the atomic option.
[edit batch]
[email protected]# commit atomic
Added to commit queue request-id: 1002
•
To commit a configuration without aggregating the configuration changes with
other commit jobs in the queue, and issuing a higher priority to the commit job, issue
the commit command with the atomic priority option.
[edit batch]
[email protected]# commit atomic priority
Added to commit queue request-id: 1003
Verification
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
•
Checking the Batch Commit Server Status on page 122
•
Checking the Batch Commit Status on page 123
•
Viewing the Patch Files in a Batch Commit Job on page 124
•
Viewing the Trace Files for Batch Commit Operations on page 126
Checking the Batch Commit Server Status
Purpose
122
Check the status of the batch commit server.
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Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
Action
[email protected]> show system commit server
Commit server status : Not running
By default, the status of the commit server is Not running. The commit server starts
running only when a batch commit job is added to the queue.
When a batch commit job is added to the queue, the status of the commit server changes
to Running.
[email protected]> show system commit server
Commit server status : Running
Jobs in process:
1003 1004 1005
Meaning
The Jobs in process field lists the commit IDs of jobs that are in process.
Checking the Batch Commit Status
Purpose
Check the commit server queue for the status of the batch commits.
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Action
[email protected]> show system commit server queue
Pending commits:
Id: 1005
Last Modified: Tue Nov
1 23:56:43 2011
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Id: 1002
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:50:35 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1002
Id: 1004
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:51:48 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1004
Id: 1007
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:04 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1007
Id: 1009
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:16:45 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1009
Id: 1010
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:19:25 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1010
Id: 1011
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:28:16 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1011
Error commits:
Id: 1008
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:18 2011
Status: Error while commiting 1008
Meaning
Pending commits displays commit jobs that are added to the commit queue but are not
committed yet. Completed commits displays the list of commit jobs that are successful.
Error commits are commits that failed because of an error.
Viewing the Patch Files in a Batch Commit Job
Purpose
Action
124
View the timestamps, patch files, and the status of each of the commit jobs. Patch files
show the configuration changes that occur in each commit operation that is added to
the batch commit queue.
1.
Issue the show system commit server queue patch command to view the patches for
all commit operations.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
[email protected]> show system commit server queue patch
Pending commits:
none
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Patch:
[edit groups]
re1 { ... }
+ GRP-DHCP-POOL-NOACCESS {
+
access {
+
address-assignment {
+
pool <*> {
+
family inet {
+
dhcp-attributes {
+
maximum-lease-time 300;
+
grace-period 300;
+
domain-name verizon.net;
+
name-server {
+
4.4.4.1;
+
4.4.4.2;
+
}
+
}
+
}
+
}
+
}
+
}
+ }
Id: 1002
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:50:35 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1002
Patch:
[edit]
+ snmp {
+
community abc;
+ }
Id: 1010
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:19:25 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1010
Patch:
[edit system syslog]
file test { ... }
+ file j {
+
any any;
+ }
Error commits:
Id: 1008
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:18 2011
Status: Error while commiting 1008
Patch:
[edit system]
+ radius-server {
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+
+ }
10.1.1.1 port 222;
The output shows the changes in configuration for each commit job ID.
2. To view the patch for a specific commit job ID, issue the show system commit server
queue patch id <id-number> command.
[email protected]> show system commit server queue patch id 1000
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Patch:
[edit system]
+ radius-server {
+
192.168.69.162 secret teH.bTc/RVbPM;
+
192.168.64.10 secret teH.bTc/RVbPM;
+
192.168.60.52 secret teH.bTc/RVbPM;
+
192.168.60.55 secret teH.bTc/RVbPM;
+
192.168.4.240 secret teH.bTc/RVbPM;
+ }
Meaning
The output shows the patch created for a commit job. The + or - sign indicates the changes
in the configuration for a specific commit job.
Viewing the Trace Files for Batch Commit Operations
Purpose
126
View the trace files for batch commit operations. You can use the trace files for
troubleshooting purposes.
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Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
Action
•
Issue the file show /var/log/<filename> command to view all entries in the log file.
[email protected]> file show/var/log/commitd_nov
The output shows commit server event logs and other logs for batch commits.
•
Nov
Nov
...
Nov
...
1 22:46:43 Successfully committed 1000
1 22:46:43 pausing after commit for 0 seconds
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
...
Nov
Nov
Nov
...
1
1
1
1
1
Nov
Nov
...
1 22:47:18 Error while commiting 1001
1 22:47:18 doing rollback
1 22:46:43 Done working on queue
22:47:17
22:47:17
22:47:17
22:47:17
22:47:17
maximum-aggregate-pool = 5
maximum-entries= 0
asynchronous-prompt = no
commit-interval = 0
days-to-keep-error-logs = -1
1 22:47:17 Added to commit queue request-id: 1001
1 22:47:17 Commit server status=running
1 22:47:17 No need to pause
To view log entries only for successful batch commit operations, issue the file show
/var/log/<filename> command with the | match committed pipe option.
[email protected]> file show/var/log/commitd_nov | match committed
The output shows batch commit job IDs for successful commit operations.
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
•
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
22:46:43
22:50:35
22:51:48
01:08:04
01:16:45
01:19:25
01:28:16
Successfully
Successfully
Successfully
Successfully
Successfully
Successfully
Successfully
committed
committed
committed
committed
committed
committed
committed
1000
1002
1004
1007
1009
1010
1011
To view log entries only for failed batch commit operations, issue the file show
/var/log/<filename> command with the | match “Error while” pipe option.
[email protected]> file show/var/log/commitd_nov | match “Error while”
The output shows commit job IDs for failed commit operations.
Nov
Nov
Nov
...
•
1 22:47:18 Error while commiting 1001
1 22:51:10 Error while commiting 1003
1 22:52:15 Error while commiting 1005
To view log entries only for commit server events, issue the file show
/var/log/<filename> command with the | match “commit server” pipe option.
[email protected]> file show/var/log/commitd_nov | match “commit server”
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The output shows commit server event logs.
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
Nov
...
Related
Documentation
128
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
22:46:39
22:46:39
22:46:43
22:46:43
22:47:17
22:47:18
22:47:18
22:47:18
22:47:18
22:50:31
22:50:31
22:50:35
22:50:35
22:51:09
22:51:10
22:51:10
22:51:10
Commit server status=running
Commit server jobs=1000
Commit server status=not running
Commit server jobs=
Commit server status=running
Commit server jobs=1001
2 errors reported by commit server
Commit server status=not running
Commit server jobs=
Commit server status=running
Commit server jobs=1002
Commit server status=not running
Commit server jobs=
Commit server status=running
Commit server jobs=1003
2 errors reported by commit server
Commit server status=not running
•
Junos OS Batch Commits Overview on page 118
•
commit-interval (Batch Commits) on page 283
•
days-to-keep-error-logs (Batch Commits) on page 284
•
maximum-aggregate-pool (Batch Commits) on page 296
•
maximum-entries (Batch Commits) on page 296
•
maximum-entries on page 296
•
server (Batch Commits) on page 306
•
traceoptions (Batch Commits) on page 319
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview
To save Junos configuration changes to the configuration database and to activate the
configuration on the router, the configuration mode command commit is used. Starting
in Junos OS Release 17.3, you can complete the commit process in two steps. This feature
enables you to configure a number of devices and simultaneously activate the
configurations. Prior to Junos OS Release 17.3R1, the commit process was completed in
a single step. The purpose of decoupling these stages of commit is to provide a definitive
time window for the commit to be effective on the system. You are allowed to enter into
commit mode after the commit is prepared, but you receive a message informing that
the commit is pending activation.
In the first step, known as the preparation stage, the commit is validated and a new
database with the necessary files is generated. If the configuration contains syntax errors,
an appropriate error message is displayed, and the configuration is not prepared. In the
event of failure during the preparation stage, the error message commit check-out failed
is logged.
In the second step, referred to as the activation stage, the previously prepared
configuration is activated. Next, if you need to clear the prepared configuration, you can
do so by using clear system commit prepared. A log message is generated upon successful
clearing of the pending commit.
NOTE: Commit operations cannot be performed in between preparation and
activation stages.
The two-step commit process is superior to the single-step process for time-critical
commits. In the single-step process, the preparation time can vary depending on the
existing configuration on the device. In the two-step process, the complex preparation
work is more efficiently handled.
Configuration statements are provided that allow you to prepare the configuration cache
and activate the configuration. You can prepare the devices with new configurations and
activate them at the exact times you want.
The commit prepare statement validates the configurations, and the commit activate
statement activates the configurations. The statements have the following configuration
options:
•
and-quit
•
no-synchronize
•
peers-synchronize
•
synchronize
The commit prepare and commit activate statements are available for private, exclusive
and shared commits only. The statements are not applicable for dynamic and ephemeral
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modes. This feature is applicable for multichassis devices, but it is not applicable for
batch commits.
To support this functionality using Network Configuration Protocol (NETCONF), the
following new remote procedure calls (RPCs) are provided:
•
<commit-configuration>< prepare/></commit-configuration>
•
<commit-configuration><activate/></commit-configuration>
•
<clear-system-commit><prepared/></clear-system-commit>
NOTE:
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
130
•
In an MX Series Virtual Chassis setup the following applies: When commit
prepare is issued on one Routing Engine followed by switchover, the Routing
Engine where the switchover command is issued reboots. Therefore, the
prepared cache gets cleared in that Routing Engine.
•
In an MX Series Virtual Chassis setup, it is advisable to execute clear system
commit prepared command only on VC master.
Release
Description
17.3R1
Starting in Junos OS Release 17.3, you can complete the commit process in
two steps. This feature enables you to configure a number of devices and
simultaneously activate the configurations
•
commit activate on page 281
•
commit prepare on page 282
•
clear system commit prepared on page 274
•
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and Activation on
page 131
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Chapter 5: Committing a Junos OS Configuration
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and Activation
To save Junos OS configuration changes to the configuration database and to activate
the configuration on the router, the configuration mode command commit is used. Starting
in Junos OS Release 17.3, you can complete the commit process in two steps. This enables
you to configure a number of devices, and the configurations can be activated
simultaneously. In the first step, known as the preparation stage, the commit is validated
and a new database along with necessary files is generated. If the configuration contains
syntax errors, an appropriate error message is displayed, and the configuration is not
prepared. In the second step, referred to as the activation stage, the previously prepared
configuration is activated and becomes the current, operational router configuration.
To prepare the configuration:
1.
At the [edit] hierarchy level in configuration mode, make the necessary changes to
the configuration.
[edit]
[email protected]# set system configuration change
For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# set system scripts language python
2. Issue the commit prepare command.
[edit]
[email protected]# commit prepare
The message commit prepare successful is displayed.
Verification
The output of the existing command show system commit is changed after commit
prepare is issued.
[edit]
[email protected]> show system commit
commit prepared by user via cli is pending activation
In the event of failure during the preparation stage, the error message commit check-out
failed is logged.
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 1.1.1.1/24
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet address 1.1.1.1/24
[edit]
[email protected]# commit prepare
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet]
address 1.1.1.1/24
identical address found on multiple private or public interfaces
error: configuration check-out failed
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To activate the prepared configuration:
•
Issue the commit activate command
The message commit complete is displayed.
Verification
To view the activated system configuration, issue the following command:
[email protected]> show configuration system scripts
language python;
The output of the existing commands show system commit and show system commit
revision detail is changed after commit activate is issued.
[email protected]> show system commit
0 2017-07-12 22:54:46 PDT by user via cli commit activate
[email protected]> show system commit revision detail
Revision: re0-1499925285-2214
User : regress
Client : cli
Time : 2017-07-12 22:54:46 PDT
Comment : commit activate
Related
Documentation
132
•
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview on page 129
•
commit activate on page 281
•
commit prepare on page 282
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 6
Managing Configurations
•
Understanding How the Junos OS Configuration Is Stored on page 133
•
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version on page 134
•
Understanding the show | compare | display xml Command Output on page 136
•
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 142
•
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 143
•
Saving a Configuration to a File on page 148
•
Additional Details About Specifying Junos OS Statements and Identifiers on page 149
•
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal on page 152
•
Examples: Loading a Configuration from a File on page 155
•
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration on page 157
•
Compressing the Current Configuration File on page 158
•
Example: Protecting the Junos OS Configuration from Modification or
Deletion on page 159
•
Synchronizing Routing Engines on page 167
•
Configuring Multiple Routing Engines to Synchronize Committed Configurations
Automatically on page 170
Understanding How the Junos OS Configuration Is Stored
When you edit a configuration, you work in a copy of the current configuration to create
a candidate configuration. The changes you make to the candidate configuration are
visible in the CLI immediately, so if multiple users are editing the configuration at the
same time, all users can see all changes.
To have a candidate configuration take effect, you commit the changes. At this point,
the candidate file is checked for proper syntax, activated, and marked as the current,
operational software configuration file. If multiple users are editing the configuration,
when you commit the candidate configuration, all changes made by all the users take
effect.
In addition to saving the current configuration, the CLI saves the current operational
version and the previous 49 versions of committed configurations. The most recently
committed configuration is version 0, which is the current operational version and the
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default configuration that the system returns to if you roll back to a previous configuration.
The oldest saved configuration is version 49.
By default, Junos OS saves the current configuration and three previous versions of the
committed configuration on the CompactFlash card. The currently operational Junos OS
configuration is stored in the file juniper.conf.gz, and the last three committed
configurations are stored in the files juniper.conf.1.gz, juniper.conf.2.gz, and conf.3.gz.
These four files are located in the router or switch’s CompactFlash card in the directory
/config.
The remaining 46 previous versions of committed configurations, the files juniper.conf.4
through juniper.conf.49, are stored in the directory /var/db/config on the hard disk.
Related
Documentation
•
Using Junos OS to Specify the Number of Configurations Stored on the CompactFlash
Card
•
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 142
•
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 143
•
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal on page 152
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version
In configuration mode only, when you have made changes to the configuration and want
to compare the candidate configuration with a prior version, you can use the compare
command to display the configuration. The compare command compares the candidate
configuration with either the current committed configuration or a configuration file and
displays the differences between the two configurations. To compare configurations,
specify the compare command after the pipe:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare (filename| rollback n)
filename is the full path to a configuration file. The file must be in the proper format: a
hierarchy of statements.
n is the index into the list of previously committed configurations. The most recently
saved configuration is number 0, and the oldest saved configuration is number 49. If you
do not specify arguments, the candidate configuration is compared against the active
configuration file (/config/juniper.conf).
The comparison output uses the following conventions:
134
•
Statements that are only in the candidate configuration are prefixed with a plus sign
(+).
•
Statements that are only in the comparison file are prefixed with a minus sign (-).
•
Statements that are unchanged are prefixed with a single blank space ( ).
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
The following example shows various changes, then a comparison of the candidate
configuration with the active configuration, showing only the changes made at the [edit
protocols bgp] hierarchy level:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols bgp
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show
group my-group {
type internal;
hold-time 60;
advertise-inactive;
allow 10.1.1.1/8;
}
group fred {
type external;
peer-as 33333;
allow 10.2.2.2/8;
}
group test-peers {
type external;
allow 10.3.3.3/8;
}
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# set group my-group hold-time 90
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# delete group my-group advertise-inactive
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# set group fred advertise-inactive
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# delete group test-peers
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show | compare
[edit protocols bgp group my-group]
-hold-time 60;
+hold-time 90;
-advertise-inactive;
[edit protocols bgp group fred]
+advertise-inactive;
[edit protocols bgp]
-group test-peers {
-type external;
-allow 10.3.3.3/8;
}
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show
group my-group {
type internal;
hold-time 90;
allow 10.1.1.1/8;
}
group fred {
type external;
advertise-inactive;
peer-as 3333;
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allow 10.2.2.2/8;
}
Related
Documentation
•
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration on page 146
Understanding the show | compare | display xml Command Output
The compare | display xml filter compares the candidate configuration with the current
committed configuration and displays the differences between the two configurations
in XML. To compare configurations, enter compare | display xml after the pipe ( | ) symbol
in either operational or configuration mode.
Example in operational mode:
[email protected]> show configuration | compare | display xml
Example in configuration mode:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
You can enter a specific configuration hierarchy immediately preceding the compare
filter, for example, show configuration system syslog | compare | display xml. In
configuration mode, you can navigate to a hierarchy where the command is applied.
The differences from the compare filter function are output in XML. The configuration
tag starts the output. The context for changes is established with hierarchy name tags
relative to the root of the compare. For element changes, an operation attribute are output
in the tag where a change occurs. This attribute has the value create, delete, or merge.
For metadata changes, the metadata name is specified. For example, if a statement is
marked inactive, the inactive="inactive" attribute and value are output. The nc namespace
is used when necessary to indicate that an attribute is in the NETCONF namespace rather
than the Junos OS namespace.
The following sections explain the XML that is generated for particular types of
configuration changes. The corresponding text changes are shown for comparison.
136
•
Adding a Statement (create Operation) on page 137
•
Deleting a Statement (delete Operation) on page 137
•
Changing a Statement (delete and create Operations) on page 138
•
Changing Metadata (inactive Attribute and Operation) on page 139
•
Adding an Annotation (comment Tag and create Operation) on page 140
•
Changing an Annotation (comment Tag, and delete and create Operations) on page 140
•
Adding a Statement Inside a Container (create Operation, and insert and key
Attributes) on page 141
•
Changing the Order Inside a Container (merge Operation, and insert and key
Attributes) on page 142
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
Adding a Statement (create Operation)
The following example shows the addition of IPv4 address 2.2.2.2 to unit 1. The tags
through name provide the context for the addition. The operation="create" attribute
indicates that a unit statement was created and is defined by the configuration within
the unit tag.
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
+
unit 1 {
+
family inet {
+
address 2.2.2.2/32;
+
}
+
}
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<interfaces>
<interface>
<name>ge-0/0/0</name>
<unit nc:operation="create">
<name>1</name>
<family>
<inet>
<address>
<name>2.2.2.2/32</name>
</address>
</inet>
</family>
</unit>
</interface>
</interfaces>
</configuration>
Deleting a Statement (delete Operation)
The following example shows the deletion of a simple statement in the configuration
hierarchy. The tags through system provide the context for the deletion. The
operation="delete" attribute indicates that the services statement was deleted. The
configuration following the services statement was deleted though is not output.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system]
services {
ftp;
}
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<services operation="delete"/>
</system>
</configuration>
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The following example shows the deletion of unit 1 from the ge-0/0/0 interface. The
configuration following the unit statement was deleted though is not output.
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
unit 1 {
family inet {
address 2.2.2.2/32;
}
}
[edit interfaces ge-0/0/0]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<interfaces>
<interface>
<name>ge-0/0/0</name>
<unit nc:operation="delete">
<name>1</name>
</unit>
</interface>
</interfaces>
</configuration>
The following example shows the deletion of the apply-groups configuration. The groups
that are deleted are not output.
[edit]
[email protected]# delete apply-groups
[edit]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit]
- apply-groups [ g1 g2 g3 ];
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<apply-groups operation="delete"/>
</configuration>
Changing a Statement (delete and create Operations)
The following example shows a change in a statement in the hierarchy. The tags through
system provide the context for the change. The operation="delete" attribute indicates
that the host-name statement was deleted. The configuration following the host-name
statement was deleted though is not output. The operation="create" attribute indicates
that a host-name statement was created and is defined by the configuration within the
host-name tag.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system]
- host-name router1;
+ host-name router2;
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Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<host-name nc:operation="delete"/>
<host-name nc:operation="create">router2</host-name>
</system>
</configuration>
Changing Metadata (inactive Attribute and Operation)
The following example shows the inactivation of a statement in the hierarchy. The tags
through system provide the context for the change. The inactive="inactive" attribute
indicates that the syslog statement was inactivated.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system]
!
inactive: syslog { ... }
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<syslog inactive="inactive"/>
</system>
</configuration>
The following example shows the addition of an inactive syslog statement. The
operation="create" attribute indicates that the syslog statement was created and is
defined by the configuration within the syslog tag. The inactive="inactive" attribute
indicates that the syslog statement was inactivated.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system]
+
inactive: syslog {
+
file foo {
+
any any;
+
}
+
}
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<syslog nc:operation="create"
inactive="inactive">
<file>
<name>foo</name>
<contents>
<name>any</name>
<any/>
</contents>
</file>
</syslog>
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</system>
</configuration>
Adding an Annotation (comment Tag and create Operation)
The following example shows the addition of a comment to a statement. The tags through
syslog provide the context for the annotation. The operation="create" attribute for the
junos:comment tag indicates that a comment was added to the [edit system syslog]
hierarchy.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system]
+
/* my-comments-simple */
syslog { ... }
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<junos:comment nc:operation="create">/* my-comments-simple
*/</junos:comment>
<syslog/>
</system>
</configuration>
The following example shows the addition of a comment to a statement. The tags through
syslog provide the context for the annotation. The operation="create" attribute for the
junos:comment tag indicates that a comment was added to the [edit system syslog]
hierarchy for the statement output within the syslog tag.
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
+
/* my-comments-ele */
file f1 { ... }
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<syslog>
<junos:comment nc:operation="create">/* my-comments-elem
*/</junos:comment>
<file>
<name>f1</name>
</file>
</syslog>
</system>
</configuration>
Changing an Annotation (comment Tag, and delete and create Operations)
The following example shows the change of a comment for a statement. The tags through
system provide the context for the annotation. The operation="delete" attribute for the
junos:comment tag indicates that a comment was deleted from the [edit system] hierarchy
at the syslog statement. The operation="create" attribute for the junos:comment tag
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Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
indicates that a comment was added to the [edit system] hierarchy for the syslog
statement.
[edit system]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
/* my-comments-1 */
+
/* my-comments-2 */
syslog { ... }
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<junos:comment nc:operation="delete"/>
<junos:comment nc:operation="create">/* my-comments-2
*/</junos:comment>
<syslog/>
</system>
</configuration>
Adding a Statement Inside a Container (create Operation, and insert and key Attributes)
The following example shows the addition of a file statement at the [edit system syslog]
hierarchy. The tags through syslog provide the context for the addition. The
operation="create" attribute for the file tag indicates that a file statement was added.
The yang:insert="after" attribute indicates that the file was added after the position
indicated by the yang:key="[name='file-1']" attribute. The file-1 value represents the
position within the existing file statements, where one is the first file. In this example, the
new file statement was added after the first file.
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system syslog]
file file-1 { ... }
+
file file-2 {
+
any any;
+
}
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<syslog>
<file nc:operation="create"
yang:insert="after"
yang:key="[name='file-1']">
<name>file-2</name>
<contents>
<name>any</name>
<any/>
</contents>
</file>
</syslog>
</system>
</configuration>
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Changing the Order Inside a Container (merge Operation, and insert and key Attributes)
The following example shows the change in order of file statements at the [edit system
syslog] hierarchy. The tags through syslog provide the context for the change. The
operation="merge" attribute for the file tag indicates that an existing file statement was
moved. The yang:insert="after" attribute indicates that the file was moved after the file
in the position indicated by the yang:key="[name='file-1']" attribute. The file-1 value
represents a position within the existing file statements, where one is the first file. The
value at the name tag, file-3, represents a position within the existing file statements. In
this example, the file statement in the third position was moved after the first file.
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]> show configuration | compare
[edit system syslog]
file f1 { ... }
!
file f3 { ... }
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
<configuration>
<system>
<syslog>
<file nc:operation="merge"
yang:insert="after"
yang:key="[name='file-1']">
<name>file-3</name>
</file>
</syslog>
</system>
</configuration>
Related
Documentation
•
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output on page 198
•
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 200
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration
To return to the most recently committed configuration and load it into configuration
mode without activating it, use the rollback configuration mode command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
load complete
To activate the configuration to which you rolled back, use the commit command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback
load complete
142
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Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
Related
Documentation
•
Rolling Back Junos OS Configuration Changes on page 44
•
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 143
•
Understanding How the Junos OS Configuration Is Stored on page 133
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration
This topic explains how you can return to a configuration prior to the most recently
committed one, and contains the following sections:
•
Returning to a Configuration Prior to the One Most Recently Committed on page 143
•
Displaying Previous Configurations on page 143
•
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version on page 144
•
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration on page 146
•
Saving a Configuration to a File on page 147
Returning to a Configuration Prior to the One Most Recently Committed
To return to a configuration prior to the most recently committed one, include the
configuration number, 0 through 49, in the rollback command. The most recently saved
configuration is number 0 (which is the default configuration to which the system returns),
and the oldest saved configuration is number 49.
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback number
load complete
Displaying Previous Configurations
To display previous configurations, including the rollback number, date, time, the name
of the user who committed changes, and the method of commit, use the rollback ?
command.
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]> Execute this command
<number> Numeric argument
0
2005-02-27 12:52:10 PST by abc via cli
1
2005-02-26 14:47:42 PST by def via cli
2
2005-02-14 21:55:45 PST by ghi via cli
3
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2005-03-16 14:51:38 PST by vwx via cli
8
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9
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39
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40
2005-03-10 22:16:56 PST by yzz via cli
41
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42
2005-03-10 20:44:00 PST by def via cli
43
2005-03-10 20:43:29 PST by ghi via cli
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2005-03-10 20:39:14 PST by jkl via cli
45
2005-03-10 20:31:30 PST by root via other
46
2005-03-10 18:57:01 PST by mno via cli
47
2005-03-10 18:56:18 PST by pqr via cli
48
2005-03-10 18:47:49 PST by stu via cli
49
2005-03-10 18:47:34 PST by vw via cli
| Pipe through a command
[edit]
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version
In configuration mode only, when you have made changes to the configuration and want
to compare the candidate configuration with a prior version, you can use the compare
command to display the configuration. The compare command compares the candidate
configuration with either the current committed configuration or a configuration file and
displays the differences between the two configurations. To compare configurations,
specify the compare command after the pipe:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare (filename| rollback n)
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Chapter 6: Managing Configurations
filename is the full path to a configuration file. The file must be in the proper format: a
hierarchy of statements.
n is the index into the list of previously committed configurations. The most recently
saved configuration is number 0, and the oldest saved configuration is number 49. If you
do not specify arguments, the candidate configuration is compared against the active
configuration file (/config/juniper.conf).
The comparison output uses the following conventions:
•
Statements that are only in the candidate configuration are prefixed with a plus sign
(+).
•
Statements that are only in the comparison file are prefixed with a minus sign (-).
•
Statements that are unchanged are prefixed with a single blank space ( ).
The following example shows various changes, then a comparison of the candidate
configuration with the active configuration, showing only the changes made at the [edit
protocols bgp] hierarchy level:
[edit]
[email protected]# edit protocols bgp
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show
group my-group {
type internal;
hold-time 60;
advertise-inactive;
allow 10.1.1.1/8;
}
group fred {
type external;
peer-as 33333;
allow 10.2.2.2/8;
}
group test-peers {
type external;
allow 10.3.3.3/8;
}
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# set group my-group hold-time 90
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# delete group my-group advertise-inactive
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# set group fred advertise-inactive
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# delete group test-peers
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show | compare
[edit protocols bgp group my-group]
-hold-time 60;
+hold-time 90;
-advertise-inactive;
[edit protocols bgp group fred]
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+advertise-inactive;
[edit protocols bgp]
-group test-peers {
-type external;
-allow 10.3.3.3/8;
}
[edit protocols bgp]
[email protected]# show
group my-group {
type internal;
hold-time 90;
allow 10.1.1.1/8;
}
group fred {
type external;
advertise-inactive;
peer-as 3333;
allow 10.2.2.2/8;
}
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration
A rescue configuration allows you to define a known working configuration or a
configuration with a known state that you can roll back to at any time. This alleviates
the necessity of having to remember the rollback number with the rollback command.
You use the rescue configuration when you need to roll back to a known configuration
or as a last resort if your router or switch configuration and the backup configuration files
become damaged beyond repair.
To save the most recently committed configuration as the rescue configuration so that
you can return to it at any time, issue the request system configuration rescue save
command:
[email protected]> request system configuration rescue save
To return to the rescue configuration, use the rollback rescue configuration mode
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback rescue
load complete
NOTE: If the rescue configuration does not exist, or if the rescue configuration
is not a complete, viable configuration, then the rollback command fails, an
error message appears, and the current configuration remains active.
To activate the rescue configuration that you have loaded, use the commit command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback rescue
load complete
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
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To delete an existing rescue configuration, issue the request system configuration rescue
delete command:
[email protected]> request system configuration rescue delete
[email protected]>
For more information about the request system configuration rescue delete and request
system configuration rescue save commands, see the CLI Explorer.
Saving a Configuration to a File
Save Junos OS configuration to a file so that you can edit it with a text editor of your
choice. You can save your current configuration to an ASCII file, which saves the
configuration in its current form, including any uncommitted changes. If more than one
user is modifying the configuration, all changes made by all users are saved.
To save software configuration changes to an ASCII file, use the save configuration mode
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# save filename
[edit]
[email protected]#
The contents of the current level of the statement hierarchy (and below) are saved, along
with the statement hierarchy containing it. This allows a section of the configuration to
be saved, while fully specifying the statement hierarchy.
By default, the configuration is saved to a file in your home directory, which is on the flash
drive.
When you issue this command from anywhere in the hierarchy (except the top level), a
replace tag is automatically included at the beginning of the file. You can use the replace
tag to control how a configuration is loaded from a file.
[email protected]> file show /var/home/user/myconf
replace:
protocols {
bgp {
disable;
group int {
type internal;
}
}
isis {
disable;
interface all {
level 1 disable;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
}
ospf {
traffic-engineering;
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reference-bandwidth 4g;
...
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Returning to the Most Recently Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 142
•
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal on page 152
•
Specifying Filenames and URLs on page 186
Saving a Configuration to a File
Save Junos OS configuration to a file so that you can edit it with a text editor of your
choice. You can save your current configuration to an ASCII file, which saves the
configuration in its current form, including any uncommitted changes. If more than one
user is modifying the configuration, all changes made by all users are saved.
To save software configuration changes to an ASCII file, use the save configuration mode
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# save filename
[edit]
[email protected]#
The contents of the current level of the statement hierarchy (and below) are saved, along
with the statement hierarchy containing it. This allows a section of the configuration to
be saved, while fully specifying the statement hierarchy.
By default, the configuration is saved to a file in your home directory, which is on the flash
drive.
When you issue this command from anywhere in the hierarchy (except the top level), a
replace tag is automatically included at the beginning of the file. You can use the replace
tag to control how a configuration is loaded from a file.
[email protected]> file show /var/home/user/myconf
replace:
protocols {
bgp {
disable;
group int {
type internal;
}
}
isis {
disable;
interface all {
level 1 disable;
}
interface fxp0.0 {
disable;
}
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}
ospf {
traffic-engineering;
reference-bandwidth 4g;
...
}
}
Additional Details About Specifying Junos OS Statements and Identifiers
This topic provides more detailed information about CLI container and leaf statements
so that you can better understand how you must specify them when creating ASCII
configuration files. It also describes how the CLI performs type checking to verify that
the data you entered is in the correct format.
•
Specifying Statements on page 149
•
Performing CLI Type Checking on page 151
Specifying Statements
Statements are shown one of two ways, either with braces or without:
•
Statement name and identifier, with one or more lower level statements enclosed in
braces:
statement-name1 identifier-name {
statement-name2;
additional-statements;
}
•
Statement name, identifier, and a single identifier:
statement-name identifier-name1 identifier-name2;
The statement-name is the name of the statement.
The identifier-name is a name or other string that uniquely identifies an instance of a
statement. An identifier is used when a statement can be specified more than once in a
configuration.
When specifying a statement, you must specify either a statement name or an identifier
name, or both, depending on the statement hierarchy.
You specify identifiers in one of the following ways:
•
identifier-name—The identifier-name is a keyword used to uniquely identify a statement
when a statement can be specified more than once in a statement.
•
identifier-name value—The identifier-name is a keyword, and the value is a required
option variable.
•
identifier-name [value1 value2 value3 ...]—The identifier-name is a keyword that accepts
multiple values. The brackets are required when you specify a set of values; however,
they are optional when you specify only one value.
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The following examples illustrate how statements and identifiers are specified in the
configuration:
protocol {
# Top-level statement (statement-name).
ospf {
# Statement under "protocol" (statement-name).
area 0.0.0.0 {
# OSPF area "0.0.0.0" (statement-name identifier-name),
interface so-0/0/0 { # which contains an interface named "so-0/0/0."
hello-interval 25; # Identifier and value (identifier-name value).
priority 2;
# Identifier and value (identifier-name value).
disable;
# Flag identifier (identifier-name).
}
interface so-0/0/1;
# Another instance of "interface," named so-0/0/1,
}
# this instance contains no data, so no braces
}
# are displayed.
}
policy-options {
# Top-level statement (statement-name).
term term1 {
# Statement under "policy-options"
# (statement-name value).
from {
# Statement under "term" (statement-name).
route-filter 10.0.0.0/8 orlonger reject;
# One identifier ("route-filter")
with
route-filter 127.0.0.0/8 orlonger reject;
# multiple values.
route-filter 128.0.0.0/16 orlonger reject;
route-filter 149.20.64.0/24 orlonger reject;
route-filter 172.16.0.0/12 orlonger reject;
route-filter 191.255.0.0/16 orlonger reject;
}
then {
# Statement under "term" (statement-name).
next term;
# Identifier (identifier-name).
}
}
}
When you create an ASCII configuration file, you can specify statements and identifiers
in one of the following ways. However, each statement has a preferred style, and the CLI
uses that style when displaying the configuration in response to a configuration mode
show command.
•
Statement followed by identifiers:
statement-name identifier-name [...] identifier-name value [...];
•
Statement followed by identifiers enclosed in braces:
statement-name {
identifier-name;
[...]
identifier-name value;
[...]
}
•
For some repeating identifiers, you can use one set of braces for all the statements:
statement-name {
identifier-name value1;
identifier-name value2;
}
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Performing CLI Type Checking
When you specify identifiers and values, the CLI performs type checking to verify that the
data you entered is in the correct format. For example, for a statement in which you must
specify an IP address, the CLI requires you to enter an address in a valid format. If you
have not, an error message indicates what you need to type. Table 7 on page 151 lists the
data types the CLI checks.
Table 7: CLI Configuration Input Types
Data Type
Format
Examples
Physical interface
name (used in the
[edit interfaces]
hierarchy)
type-fpc/pic/port
Correct: so-0/0/1
Full interface name
type-fpc/pic/port<:channel>.logical
Incorrect: so-0
Correct: so-0/0/1.0
Incorrect: so-0/0/1
Full or abbreviated
interface name (used
in places other than
the [edit interfaces]
hierarchy)
type-<fpc</pic/port>><<:
channel>.logical>
Correct: so, so-1, so-1/2/3:4.5
IP address
0xhex-bytesoctet<.octet<.octet.<octet>>>
Correct: 1.2.3.4, 0x01020304, 128.8.1, 128.8
Sample translations:
1.2.3 becomes 1.2.3.0
0x01020304 becomes 1.2.3.4
0x010203 becomes 0.1.2.3
IP address
(destination prefix)
and prefix length
0xhex-bytes</length>octet<octet
<octet.<octet>>></length>
Correct: 10/8, 128.8/16, 1.2.3.4/32, 1.2.3.4
Sample translations:
1.2.3 becomes 1.2.3.0/32
0x01020304 becomes 1.2.3.4/32
0x010203 becomes 0.1.2.3/32
default becomes 0.0.0.0/0
International
Organization for
Standardization (ISO)
address
hex-nibble<hex-nibble ...>
Correct: 47.1234.2345.3456.00, 47123423453456.00,
47.12.34.23.45.34.56.00
Sample translations:
47123456 becomes 47.1234.56
47.12.34.56 becomes 47.1234.56
4712.3456 becomes 47.1234.56
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Table 7: CLI Configuration Input Types (continued)
Data Type
Format
Examples
OSPF area identifier
(ID)
0xhex-bytesoctet<.octet<.octet.< octet
>>> decimal-number
Correct: 54, 0.0.0.54, 0x01020304, 1.2.3.4
Sample translations:
54 becomes 0.0.0.54
257 becomes 0.0.1.1
128.8 becomes 128.8.0.0
0x010203 becomes 0.1.2.3
Related
Documentation
•
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 64
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal
You can create a file containing configuration data for a device running Junos OS, copy
the file to the local router, and then load the file into the CLI. After you have loaded the
file, you can commit it to activate the configuration on the router, or you can edit the
configuration interactively using the CLI and commit it at a later time.
You can also create a configuration while typing at the terminal and then load it. Loading
a configuration from the terminal is generally useful when you are cutting existing portions
of the configuration and pasting them elsewhere in the configuration.
To load an existing configuration file that is located on the router, use the load
configuration mode command:
[edit]
[email protected]# load (factory-default | merge | override | patch | replace | set | update)
filename <relative> <json>
For information about specifying the filename, see “Specifying Filenames and URLs” on
page 186.
To load a configuration from the terminal, use the following version of the load
configuration mode command. Press Ctrl-d to end the input.
[edit]
[email protected]# load (factory-default | merge | override | patch | replace | set | update)
terminal <relative> <json>
To replace an entire configuration, specify the override option at any level of the hierarchy.
A load override operation completely replaces the current candidate configuration with
the file you are loading. Thus, if you saved a complete configuration, use this option.
An override operation discards the current candidate configuration and loads the
configuration in filename or the configuration that you type at the terminal. When you
use the override option and commit the configuration, all system processes reparse the
configuration. .
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To replace portions of a configuration, specify the replace option. The load replace
operation looks for replace: tags that you added to the loaded file, and replaces the parts
of the candidate configuration with whatever is specified after the tag. This is useful
when you want more control over exactly what is being changed. For this operation to
work, you must include replace: tags in the file or configuration you type at the terminal.
The software searches for the replace: tags, deletes the existing statements of the same
name, if any, and replaces them with the incoming configuration. If there is no existing
statement of the same name, the replace operation adds to the configuration the
statements marked with the replace: tag.
If, in an override or merge operation, you specify a file or type text that contains replace:
tags, the replace: tags are ignored and the override or merge operation is performed.
If you are performing a replace operation and the file you specify or text you type does
not contain any replace: tags, the replace operation is effectively equivalent to a merge
operation. This might be useful if you are running automated scripts and cannot know in
advance whether the scripts need to perform a replace or a merge operation. The scripts
can use the replace operation to cover either case.
The load merge operation merges the configuration from the saved file or terminal with
the existing candidate configuration. This is useful if you are adding new configuration
sections. For example, suppose that you are adding a BGP configuration to the [edit
protocols] hierarchy level, where there was no BGP configuration before. You can use
the load merge operation to combine the incoming configuration with the existing
candidate configuration. If the existing configuration and the incoming configuration
contain conflicting statements, the statements in the incoming configuration override
those in the existing configuration.
To replace only those parts of the configuration that have changed, specify the update
option at any level of the hierarchy. The load update operation compares the candidate
configuration and the new configuration data, and only changes the parts of the candidate
configuration that are different from the new configuration. You would use this, for
example, if there is an existing BGP configuration and the file you are loading changes it
in some way.
The merge, override, and update options support loading configuration data in JavaScript
Object Notation (JSON) format. When loading configuration data that uses JSON format,
you must specify the json option in the command.
To change part of the configuration with a patch file, specify the patch option. The load
patch operation loads a file or terminal input that contains configuration changes. First,
on a device that already has the configuration changes, you type the show | compare
command to output the differences between two configurations. Then you can load the
differences on another router. The advantage of the load patch command is that it saves
you from having to copy snippets from different hierarchy levels into a text file prior to
loading them into the target device. This might be a useful time saver if you are configuring
several devices with the same options. For example, suppose that you configure a routing
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policy on router1 and you want to replicate the policy configuration on router2, router3,
and router4. You can use the load patch operation.
First, run the show | compare command.
[email protected]# show | compare rollback 3
[edit protocols ospf]
+
export default-static;
export static-default
[edit policy-options]
+
policy-statement default-static {
+
from protocol static;
+
then accept;
+
}
Copy the output of the show | compare command to the clipboard, making sure to include
the hierarchy levels. On router2, router3, and router4, type load patch terminal and paste
the output. Press Enter and then press Ctrl-d to end the operation. If the patch input
specifies different values for an existing statement, the patch input overrides the existing
statement.
To use the merge, replace, set, or update option without specifying the full hierarchy level,
specify the relative option. This option loads the incoming configuration relative to your
current edit point in the configuration hierarchy. For example:
[edit system]
[email protected]# show static-host-mapping
bob sysid 987.654.321ab
[edit system]
[email protected]# load replace terminal relative
[Type ^D at a new line to end input]
replace: static-host-mapping {
bob sysid 0123.456.789bc;
}
load complete
[edit system]
[email protected]# show static-host-mapping
bob sysid 0123.456.789bc;
To load a configuration that contains set configuration mode commands, specify the set
option. This option executes the configuration instructions line by line as they are stored
in a file or from a terminal. The instructions can contain any configuration mode command,
such as set, edit, exit, and top.
To copy a configuration file from another network system to the local router, you can
use the SSH and Telnet utilities, as described in the CLI Explorer.
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NOTE: If you are using Junos OS in a Common Criteria environment, system
log messages are created whenever a secret attribute is changed (for example,
password changes or changes to the RADIUS shared secret). These changes
are logged during the following configuration load operations:
load
load
load
load
merge
replace
override
update
For more information, see the Secure Configuration Guide for Common Criteria
and Junos-FIPS.
Examples: Loading a Configuration from a File
Figure 6: Overriding the Current Configuration
Figure 7: Using the replace Option
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Figure 8: Using the merge Option
Figure 9: Using a Patch File
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Figure 10: Using the set Option
Related
Documentation
•
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal on page 152
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration
A rescue configuration allows you to define a known working configuration or a
configuration with a known state that you can roll back to at any time. This alleviates
the necessity of having to remember the rollback number with the rollback command.
You use the rescue configuration when you need to roll back to a known configuration
or as a last resort if your router or switch configuration and the backup configuration files
become damaged beyond repair.
To save the most recently committed configuration as the rescue configuration so that
you can return to it at any time, issue the request system configuration rescue save
command:
[email protected]> request system configuration rescue save
To return to the rescue configuration, use the rollback rescue configuration mode
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback rescue
load complete
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NOTE: If the rescue configuration does not exist, or if the rescue configuration
is not a complete, viable configuration, then the rollback command fails, an
error message appears, and the current configuration remains active.
To activate the rescue configuration that you have loaded, use the commit command:
[edit]
[email protected]# rollback rescue
load complete
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
To delete an existing rescue configuration, issue the request system configuration rescue
delete command:
[email protected]> request system configuration rescue delete
[email protected]>
For more information about the request system configuration rescue delete and request
system configuration rescue save commands, see the CLI Explorer.
Related
Documentation
•
Comparing Configuration Changes with a Prior Version on page 134
•
Saving a Configuration to a File on page 147
Compressing the Current Configuration File
By default, the current operational configuration file is compressed and is stored in the
file juniper.conf.gz the /config file system, along with the last three committed versions
of the configuration. If you have large networks, the current configuration file might exceed
the available space in the /config file system. Compressing the current configuration file
enables the file to fit in the file system, typically reducing the size of the file by 90 percent.
You might want to compress your current operation configuration files when they reach
3 megabytes (MB) in size.
When you compress the current configuration file, the names of the configuration files
change. To determine the size of the files in the /config file system, issue the file list
/config detail command.
NOTE: We recommend that you compress the configuration files (this is the
default) to minimize the amount of disk space that they require.
•
If you want to compress the current configuration file, include the
compress-configuration-files statement at the [edit system] hierarchy level:
[edit system]
compress-configuration-files;
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•
Commit the current configuration file to include the compression-configuration-files
statement. Commit the configuration again to compress the current configuration file:
[edit system]
[email protected]# set compress-configuration-files
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
•
If you do not want to compress the current operational configuration file, include the
no-compress-configuration-files statement at the [edit system] hierarchy level:
[edit system]
no-compression-configuration-files;
•
Commit the current configuration file to include the no-compress-configuration-files
statement. Commit the configuration again to uncompress the current configuration
file:
[edit system]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS Commit Model for Router or Switch Configuration on page 109
•
compress-configuration-files
Example: Protecting the Junos OS Configuration from Modification or Deletion
This example shows how to use the protect and unprotect commands in the configuration
mode to protect and unprotect the CLI configuration.
•
Requirements on page 159
•
Overview on page 160
•
Protecting a Parent-Level Hierarchy on page 160
•
Protecting a Child Hierarchy on page 161
•
Protecting a Configuration Statement Within a Hierarchy on page 161
•
Protecting a List of Identifiers for a Configuration Statement on page 161
•
Protecting an Individual Member from a Homogenous List on page 162
•
Unprotecting a Configuration on page 162
•
Verification on page 163
Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
A M Series, MX Series, PTX Series, or T Series device
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•
Junos OS 11.2 or later running on all devices
Overview
The Junos OS enables you to protect the device configuration from being modified or
deleted by other users. This can be accomplished by using the protect command in the
configuration mode of the CLI. Likewise, you can also unprotect a protected configuration
by using the unprotect command.
These commands can be used at any level of the configuration hierarchy—a top-level
parent hierarchy or a configuration statement or an identifier within the lowest level of
the hierarchy.
If a configuration hierarchy is protected, users cannot perform the following activities:
•
Deleting or modifying a hierarchy or a statement or identifier within the protected
hierarchy
•
Inserting a new configuration statement or an identifier within the protected hierarchy
•
Renaming a statement or identifier within the protected hierarchy
•
Copying a configuration into a protected hierarchy
•
Activating or deactivating statements within a protected hierarchy
•
Annotating a protected hierarchy
Protecting a Parent-Level Hierarchy
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To protect a configuration at the top level of the hierarchy:
•
Identify the hierarchy that you want to protect and issue the protect command for
the hierarchy at the [edit] hierarchy level.
For example, if you want to protect the entire [edit access] hierarchy level, issue the
following command:
[edit]
[email protected]# protect access
Results
Protects all elements under the parent hierarchy.
NOTE:
•
If you issue the protect command for a hierarchy that is not used in the
configuration, the Junos OS CLI displays the following error message:
[edit]
[email protected]# protect access
warning: statement not found
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Protecting a Child Hierarchy
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To protect a child hierarchy contained within a parent hierarchy:
•
Navigate to the parent container hierarchy. Use the protect command for the
hierarchy at the parent level.
For example, if you want to protect the [edit system syslog console] hierarchy level,
use the following command at the [edit system syslog] hierarchy level.
[edit system syslog]
[email protected]# protect console
Results
Protects all elements under the child hierarchy.
Protecting a Configuration Statement Within a Hierarchy
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To protect a configuration statement within a hierarchy level:
•
Navigate to the hierarchy level containing the statement that you want to protect
and issue the protect command for the hierarchy.
For example, if you want to protect the host-name statement under the [edit system]
hierarchy level, issue the following command:
[edit system]
[email protected]# protect host-name
Protecting a List of Identifiers for a Configuration Statement
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Some configuration statements can take multiple values. For example, the address
statement at the [edit system login deny-sources] hierarchy level can take a list of
hostnames, IPv4 addresses, or IPv6 addresses. Suppose you have the following
configuration:
[edit system login]
deny-sources {
address [ 172.17.28.19 172.17.28.20 172.17.28.21 172.17.28.22];
}
•
To protect all the addresses for the address statement, issue the following command
at the [edit] level:
[edit]
[email protected]# protect system login deny-sources address
Results
All the addresses ([172.17.28.19 172.17.28.20 172.17.28.21 172.17.28.22]) for the address
statement are protected.
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Protecting an Individual Member from a Homogenous List
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Suppose you have the following configuration:
[edit groups ]
test1 {
system {
name-server {
10.1.2.1;
10.1.2.2;
10.1.2.3;
10.1.2.4;
}
}
}
•
To protect one or more individual addresses for the name-server statement, issue
the following command at the [edit] level:
[edit]
[email protected]# protect groups test1 system name-server 10.1.2.1
[email protected]# protect groups test1 system name-server 10.1.2.4
Results
Addresses 10.1.2.1 and 10.1.2.4 are protected.
Unprotecting a Configuration
Step-by-Step
Procedure
Suppose you have the following configuration at the [edit system] hierarchy level:
protect: system {
host-name bigping;
domain-search 10.1.2.1;
login {
deny-sources {
protect: address [ 172.17.28.19 172.17.28.173 172.17.28.0 174.0.0.0 ];
}
}
}
•
To unprotect the entire [edit system] hierarchy level, issue the following command
at the [edit] level:
[edit]
[email protected]# unprotect system
Results
162
The entire system hierarchy level is unprotected.
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Verification
Verify That a Hierarchy Is Protected Using the show Command
Purpose
Action
To check that a configuration hierarchy is protected.
In the configuration mode, issue the show command at the [edit] hierarchy level to see
all the configuration hierarchies and configuration statements that are protected.
NOTE: All protected hierarchies or statements are prefixed with a protect:
string.
...
protect: system {
host-name bigping;
domain-search 10.1.2.1;
login {
deny-sources {
protect: address [ 172.17.28.19 172.17.28.173 172.17.28.0 174.0.0.0 ];
}
}
}
...
Verify That a Hierarchy Is Protected by Attempting to Modify a Configuration
Purpose
Action
To verify that a configuration is protected by trying to modify the configuration using the
activate, copy, insert, rename, and delete commands.
To verify that a configuration is protected:
1.
Try using the activate, copy, insert, rename, and delete commands for a top-level
hierarchy or a child-level hierarchy or a statement within the hierarchy.
For a protected hierarchy or statement, the Junos OS displays an appropriate warning
that the command has not executed. For example:
protect: system {
host-name a;
inactive: domain-search [ a b ];
}
2. To verify that the hierarchy is protected, try issuing the activate command for the
domain-search statement:
[edit system]
[email protected]# activate system domain-search
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The Junos OS CLI displays an appropriate message:
warning: [system] is protected, 'system domain-search' cannot be activated
Verify Usage of the protect Command
Purpose
Action
To view the protect commands used for protecting a configuration.
1.
Navigate to the required hierarchy.
2. Issue the show | display set relative command.
[email protected]> show | display set relative
set system host-name bigping
set system domain-search 10.1.2.1
set system login deny-sources address 172.17.28.19
set system login deny-sources address 172.17.28.173
set system login deny-sources address 172.17.28.0
set system login deny-sources address 174.0.0.0
protect system login deny-sources address
protect system
View the Configuration in XML
Purpose
164
To check if the protected hierarchies or statements are also displayed in the XML.
Protected hierarchies, statements, or identifiers are displayed with the | display xml
attribute in the XML.
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Action
To view the configuration in XML:
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1.
Navigate to the hierarchy you want to view and issue the show command with the
pipe symbol and option | display xml:
[edit system]
[email protected]# show | display xml
[edit]
[email protected]# show system | display xml
<rpc-reply xmlns:junos="http://xml.juniper.net/junos/11.2I0/junos">
<configuration junos:changed-seconds="1291279234"
junos:changed-localtime="2010-12-02 00:40:34 PST">
<system protect="protect">
<host-name>bigping</host-name>
<domain-search>10.1.2.1</domain-search>
<login>
<message>
\jnpr
\tUNAUTHORIZED USE OF THIS ROUTER
\tIS STRICTLY PROHIBITED!
</message>
<class>
<name>a</name>
<allow-commands>commit-synchronize</allow-commands>
<deny-commands>commit</deny-commands>
</class>
<deny-sources>
<address protect="protect">172.17.28.19</address>
<address protect="protect">172.17.28.173</address>
<address protect="protect">172.17.28.0</address>
<address protect="protect">174.0.0.0</address>
</deny-sources>
</login>
<syslog>
<archive>
</archive>
</syslog>
</system>
</configuration>
<cli>
<banner>[edit]</banner>
</cli>
</rpc-reply>
NOTE: Loading an XML configuration with the unprotect="unprotect" tag
unprotects an already protected hierarchy. For example, suppose you load
the following XML hierarchy:
<protocols unprotect="unprotect">
<ospf>
<area>
<name>0.0.0.0</name>
<interface>
<name>all</name>
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</interface>
</area>
</ospf>
</protocols>
The [edit protocols] hierarchy becomes unprotected if it is already
protected.
Synchronizing Routing Engines
If your router has two Routing Engines, you can manually direct one Routing Engine to
synchronize its configuration with the other by issuing the commit synchronize command.
The Routing Engine on which you execute this command (requesting Routing Engine)
copies and loads its candidate configuration to the other (responding Routing Engine).
Both Routing Engines then perform a syntax check on the candidate configuration file
being committed. If no errors are found, the configuration is activated and becomes the
current operational configuration on both Routing Engines.
The commit synchronize command does not work if the responding Routing Engine has
uncommitted configuration changes. However, you can enforce commit synchronization
on the Routing Engines by using the force option. When you issue the commit synchronize
command with the force option from one Routing Engine, the configuration sessions on
the other Routing Engine will be terminated and its configuration synchronized with that
on the Routing Engine from which you issued the command.
NOTE: We recommend that you use the force option only if you are unable
to resolve the issues that caused the commit synchronize command to fail.
For example, if you are logged in to re1 (requesting Routing Engine) and you want re0
(responding Routing Engine) to have the same configuration as re1, issue the commit
synchronize command on re1. re1 copies and loads its candidate configuration to re0.
Both Routing Engines then perform a syntax check on the candidate configuration file
being committed. If no errors are found, re1's candidate configuration is activated and
becomes the current operational configuration on both Routing Engines.
NOTE: When you issue the commit synchronize command, you must use the
groups re0 and re1. For information about how to use the apply-groups
statement, see “Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group” on page 229.
The responding Routing Engine must be running Junos OS Release 5.0 or
later.
For information about issuing the commit synchronize command on a routing
matrix, see the Junos OS Administration Library.
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To synchronize a Routing Engine's current operational configuration file with the other,
log in to the Routing Engine from which you want to synchronize and issue the commit
synchronize command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit synchronize
re0:
configuration check succeeds
re1:
commit complete
re0:
commit complete
NOTE: You can also add the commit synchronize statement at the [edit
system] hierarchy level so that a commit command automatically invokes a
commit synchronize command by default. For more information, see the Junos
OS Administration Library.
To enforce a commit synchronize on the Routing Engines, log in to the Routing Engine
from which you want to synchronize and issue the commit synchronize command with
the force option:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit synchronize force
re0:
re1:
commit complete
re0:
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]#
NOTE:
•
If you have nonstop routing enabled on your router, you must enter the
commit synchronize command from the master Routing Engine after you
make any changes to the configuration. If you enter this command on the
backup Routing Engine, the Junos OS displays a warning and commits the
configuration.
•
Starting with Junos OS Release 9.3, accounting of backup Routing Engine
events or operations is not supported on accounting servers such as
TACACS+ or RADIUS. Accounting is only supported for events or operations
on a master Routing Engine.
For the commit synchronization process, the master Routing Engine commits the
configuration and sends a copy of the configuration to the backup Routing Engine. Then
the backup Routing Engine loads and commits the configuration. So, the commit
synchronization between the master and backup Routing Engines takes place one Routing
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Engine at a time. If the configuration has a large text size or many apply-groups, commit
times can be longer than desired.
You can use the commit fast-synchronize statement to have the synchronization between
the master and backup Routing Engines occur simultaneously instead of sequentially.
This can reduce the time needed for synchronization because the commits on the master
and backup Routing Engines occur in parallel.
Include the fast-synchronize statement at the [edit system] hierarchy level to have the
synchronization occur simultaneously between the master and the backup Routing
Engines:
[edit system]
commit fast-synchronize;
NOTE:
•
When the fast-synchronize statement is configured, the commits on the
master Routing Engine and the backup Routing Engine run in parallel. In
this process, the configuration is validated only on the Routing Engine where
you execute the commit command. Therefore, it is recommended not to
include too many configuration details in groups like re0 and re1, because
the configuration specified in group re0 is applied only if the current Routing
Engine is in slot 0. Likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is applied
only if the current Routing Engine is in slot 1.
•
Ensure that the Junos OS software version running on both the Routing
Engines is same.
You can use the commit synchronize scripts command to synchronize a Routing Engine's
configuration and all commit, event, lib, op, and SNMP scripts with the other Routing
Engine. If the load-scripts-from-flash statement is configured for the requesting Routing
Engine, the device synchronizes the scripts from flash memory on the requesting Routing
Engine to flash memory on the responding Routing Engine. Otherwise, the device
synchronizes the scripts from the hard disk on the requesting Routing Engine to the hard
disk on the responding Routing Engine. The device synchronizes all scripts regardless of
whether they are enabled in the configuration or have been updated since the last
synchronization.
To synchronize a Routing Engine's configuration file and all scripts with the other Routing
Engine, log in to the Routing Engine from which you want to synchronize, and issue the
commit synchronize scripts command:
[edit]
[email protected]# commit synchronize scripts
re0:
configuration check succeeds
re1:
commit complete
re0:
commit complete
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If the commit check operation fails for the requesting Routing Engine, the process stops,
and the scripts are not copied to the responding Routing Engine. If the commit check or
commit operation fails for the responding Routing Engine, the scripts are still synchronized,
since the synchronization occurs prior to the commit check operation on the responding
Routing Engine.
Include the synchronize statement at the [edit system scripts] hierarchy level to
synchronize scripts every time you issue a commit synchronize command.
[edit system scripts]
synchronize;
NOTE:
Related
Documentation
•
If commit fails on either Routing Engine, the commit process is rolled back
on the other Routing Engine as well. This ensures that both Routing Engines
have the same configuration.
•
When the fast-synchronize statement is configured, the commits on the
master Routing Engine and the backup Routing Engine run in parallel. In
this process, the configuration is validated only on the Routing Engine where
you execute the commit command. Therefore, it is recommended not to
include too many configuration details in groups like re0 and re1, because
the configuration specified in group re0 is applied only if the current Routing
Engine is in slot 0. Likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is applied
only if the current Routing Engine is in slot 1.
•
Ensure that the Junos OS software version running on both the Routing
Engines is same.
•
Configuring the Junos OS to Support Redundancy on Routers Having Multiple Routing
Engines or Switching Boards
•
Junos OS Routing Engine Components and Processes
•
Configuring Junos OS for the First Time on a Device with Dual Routing Engines
Configuring Multiple Routing Engines to Synchronize Committed Configurations
Automatically
If your router or switch has multiple Routing Engines, you can manually direct one Routing
Engine to synchronize its configuration with the others by issuing the commit synchronize
command.
To make the Routing Engines synchronize automatically whenever a configuration is
committed, include the commit synchronize statement at the [edit system] hierarchy
level:
[edit system]
commit synchronize;
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The Routing Engine on which you execute the commit command (requesting Routing
Engine) copies and loads its candidate configuration to the other (responding) Routing
Engines. All Routing Engines then perform a syntax check on the candidate configuration
file being committed. If no errors are found, the configuration is activated and becomes
the current operational configuration on all Routing Engines.
For the commit synchronization process, the master Routing Engine commits the
configuration and sends a copy of the configuration to the backup Routing Engine. Then
the backup Routing Engine loads and commits the configuration. So, the commit
synchronization between the master and backup Routing Engines takes place one Routing
Engine at a time. If the configuration has a large text size or many apply-groups, commit
times can be longer than desired.
You can use the commit fast-synchronize statement to have the synchronization between
the master and backup Routing Engines occur simultaneously instead of sequentially.
This can reduce the time needed for synchronization because the commits on the master
and backup Routing Engines occur in parallel.
Include the fast-synchronize statement at the [edit system] hierarchy level to have
synchronize occur simultaneously between the master and the backup Routing Engines:
[edit system]
commit fast-synchronize
NOTE:
Related
Documentation
•
•
If commit fails on either Routing Engine, the commit process is rolled back
on the other Routing Engine as well. This ensures that both Routing Engines
have the same configuration.
•
When the fast-synchronize statement is configured, the commits on the
master Routing Engine and the backup Routing Engine run in parallel. In
this process, the configuration is validated only on the Routing Engine where
you execute the commit command. Therefore, it is recommended not to
include too many configuration details in groups like re0 and re1, because
the configuration specified in group re0 is applied only if the current Routing
Engine is in slot 0. Likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is applied
only if the current Routing Engine is in slot 1.
•
Ensure that the Junos OS software version running on both the Routing
Engines is same.
Junos OS Commit Model for Router or Switch Configuration on page 109
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CHAPTER 7
Using Operational Commands to Monitor
a Device
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
•
Junos OS Operational Mode Commands That Combine Other Commands on page 176
•
Understanding the Brief, Detail, Extensive, and Terse Options of Junos OS Operational
Commands on page 177
•
Controlling the Scope of an Operational Mode Command on page 178
•
Monitoring Who Uses the Junos OS CLI on page 181
•
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational Commands on page 182
•
Viewing Files and Directories on a Device Running Junos OS on page 183
•
Displaying Junos OS Information on page 188
•
Managing Programs and Processes Using Junos OS Operational Mode
Commands on page 190
•
Using the Junos OS CLI Comment Character # for Operational Mode
Commands on page 195
•
Example: Using Comments in Junos OS Operational Mode Commands on page 195
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
This topic provides an overview of Junos OS CLI operational mode commands and
contains the following sections:
•
CLI Command Categories on page 173
•
Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands on page 175
CLI Command Categories
When you log in to a device running Junos OS and the CLI starts, there are several broad
groups of CLI commands:
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•
Commands for controlling the CLI environment—Some set commands in the set
hierarchy configure the CLI display screen. For information about these commands,
see “Understanding the Junos OS CLI Modes, Commands, and Statement Hierarchies”
on page 23.
•
Commands for monitoring and troubleshooting—The following commands display
information and statistics about the software and test network connectivity. Detailed
command descriptions are provided in the Junos OS Interfaces Command Reference.
•
clear—Clear statistics and protocol database information.
•
mtrace—Trace mtrace packets from source to receiver.
•
monitor—Perform real-time debugging of various software components, including
the routing protocols and interfaces.
•
ping—Determine the reachability of a remote network host.
•
show—Display the current configuration and information about interfaces, routing
protocols, routing tables, routing policy filters, system alarms, and the chassis.
•
test—Test the configuration and application of policy filters and autonomous system
(AS) path regular expressions.
•
174
traceroute—Trace the route to a remote network host.
•
Commands for connecting to other network systems—The ssh command opens Secure
Shell connections, and the telnet command opens telnet sessions to other hosts on
the network. For information about these commands, see the CLI Explorer.
•
Commands for copying files—The copy command copies files from one location on
the router or switch to another, from the router or switch to a remote system, or from
a remote system to the router or switch. For information about these commands, see
the CLI Explorer.
•
Commands for restarting software processes—The commands in the restart hierarchy
restart the various Junos OS processes, including the routing protocol, interface, and
SNMP. For information about these commands, see the CLI Explorer.
•
A command—request—for performing system-level operations, including stopping and
rebooting the router or switch and loading Junos OS images. For information about
this command, see the CLI Explorer.
•
A command—start—to exit the CLI and start a UNIX shell. For information about this
command, see the CLI Explorer.
•
A command—configure—for entering configuration mode, which provides a series of
commands that configure Junos OS, including the routing protocols, interfaces, network
management, and user access. For information about the CLI configuration commands,
see “Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode” on page 58.
•
A command—quit—to exit the CLI. For information about this command, see the CLI
Explorer.
•
For more information about the CLI operational mode commands, see the CLI Explorer.
.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands
Table 8 on page 175 lists some operational commands you may find useful for monitoring
router or switch operation. For a complete description of operational commands, see
the Junos OS command references.
NOTE: The QFX3500 switch does not support the IS-IS, OSPF, BGP, MPLS,
and RSVP protocols.
Table 8: Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands
Items to Check
Description
Command
Software version
Versions of software running on the router or switch
show version
Log files
Contents of the log files
monitor
Log files and their contents and recent user logins
show log
Host reachability and network connectivity
ping
Route to a network system
traceroute
Configuration
Current system configuration
show configuration
Manipulate files
List of files and directories on the router or switch
file list
Contents of a file
file show
Interface information
Detailed information about interfaces
show interfaces
Chassis
Chassis alarm status
show chassis alarms
Information currently on craft display
show chassis craft-interface
Router or switch environment information
show chassis environment
Hardware inventory
show chassis hardware
Routing table information
Information about entries in the routing tables
show route
Forwarding table
information
Information about data in the kernel’s forwarding table
show route forwarding-table
IS-IS
Adjacent routers or switches
show isis adjacency
OSPF
Display standard information about OSPF neighbors
show ospf neighbor
BGP
Display information about BGP neighbors
show bgp neighbor
Remote systems
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Table 8: Commonly Used Operational Mode Commands (continued)
Items to Check
Description
Command
MPLS
Status of interfaces on which MPLS is running
show mpls interface
Configured LSPs on the router or switch, as well as all ingress,
transit, and egress LSPs
show mpls lsp
Routes that form a label-switched path
show route label-switched-path
Status of interfaces on which RSVP is running
show rsvp interface
Currently active RSVP sessions
show rsvp session
RSVP packet and error counters
show rsvp statistics
RSVP
Related
Documentation
•
Junos OS Operational Mode Commands That Combine Other Commands on page 176
•
Understanding the Brief, Detail, Extensive, and Terse Options of Junos OS Operational
Commands on page 177
Junos OS Operational Mode Commands That Combine Other Commands
In some cases, some Junos OS operational commands are created from a combination
of other operational commands. These commands can be useful shortcuts for collecting
information about the device, as shown in Figure 11 on page 177.
176
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Figure 11: Commands That Combine Other Commands
Related
Documentation
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
•
Understanding the Brief, Detail, Extensive, and Terse Options of Junos OS Operational
Commands on page 177
Understanding the Brief, Detail, Extensive, and Terse Options of Junos OS Operational
Commands
The Junos OS operational mode commands can include brief, detail, extensive, or terse
options. You can use these options to control the amount of information you want to
view.
1.
Use the ? prompt to list options available for the command. For example:
[email protected]> show interfaces fe-1/1/1 ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
Execute this command
brief
Display brief output
descriptions
Display interface description strings
detail
Display detailed output
extensive
Display extensive output
media
Display media information
snmp-index
SNMP index of interface
statistics
Display statistics and detailed output
terse
Display terse output
|
Pipe through a command
2. Choose the option you wish to use with the command. (See Figure 12 on page 178.)
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Figure 12: Command Output Options
Related
Documentation
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
•
Controlling the Scope of an Operational Mode Command on page 178
Controlling the Scope of an Operational Mode Command
The Junos OS CLI operational commands include options that you can use to identify
specific components on a device running Junos OS. For example:
1.
Type the show interfaces command to display information about all interfaces on the
router.
[email protected]> show interfaces
Physical interface: so-0/0/0, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 128, SNMP ifIndex: 23
Link-level type: PPP, MTU: 4474, Clocking: Internal, SONET mode, Speed: OC3,
Loopback: None, FCS: 16, Payload scrambler: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: Point-To-Point SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: Keepalives
Keepalive settings: Interval 10 seconds, Up-count 1, Down-count 3
Keepalive: Input: 13861 (00:00:05 ago), Output: 13891 (00:00:01 ago)
LCP state: Opened
NCP state: inet: Opened, inet6: Not-configured, iso: Opened, mpls:
Not-configured
CHAP state: Closed
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PAP state: Closed
CoS queues
: 4 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Last flapped
: 2008-06-02 17:16:14 PDT (1d 14:21 ago)
Input rate
: 40 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 48 bps (0 pps)
---(more)--2. To display information about a specific interface, type that interface as a command
option:
[email protected]> show interfaces fe-0/1/3
Physical interface: fe-0/1/3, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 135, SNMP ifIndex: 30
Link-level type: Ethernet, MTU: 1514, Speed: 100mbps, MAC-REWRITE Error:
None,
Loopback: Disabled, Source filtering: Disabled, Flow control: Enabled
Device flags
: Present Running
Interface flags: SNMP-Traps Internal: 0x4000
Link flags
: None
CoS queues
: 4 supported, 4 maximum usable queues
Current address: 00:05:85:8f:c8:22, Hardware address: 00:05:85:8f:c8:22
Last flapped
: 2008-06-02 17:16:15 PDT (1d 14:28 ago)
Input rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Output rate
: 0 bps (0 pps)
Active alarms : None
Active defects : None
[email protected]>
Operational Mode Commands on a TX Matrix Router or TX Matrix Plus Router
When you issue operational mode commands on the TX Matrix router, CLI command
options allow you to restrict the command output to show only a component of the
routing matrix rather than the routing matrix as a whole.
These are the options shown in the CLI:
•
scc—The TX Matrix router (or switch-card chassis)
•
sfc—The TX Matrix Plus router (also referred to as or switch-fabric chassis)
•
lcc number—A specific router in a routing matrix based on a TX Matrix router or a TX
Matrix Plus router.
•
all-lcc—All T640 routers (in a routing matrix based on a TX Matrix router) or all T1600
routers or T4000 routers (in a routing matrix based on a TX Matrix Plus router).
If you specify none of these options, then the command applies by default to the whole
routing matrix.
Examples of Routing Matrix Command Options
The following output samples, using the show version command, demonstrate some
different options for viewing information about the routing matrix.
[email protected]> show version ?
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Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
all-lcc
brief
detail
lcc
scc
|
Execute this command
Show software version on all LCC chassis
Display brief output
Display detailed output
Show software version on specific LCC (0..3)
Show software version on the SCC
Pipe through a command
Sample Output: No Routing Matrix Options Specified
[email protected]> show version
scc-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: scc
Model: TX Matrix
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
lcc0-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: lcc0
Model: t640
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Support Tools Package [7.0-20040630.0]
lcc1-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: lcc1
Model: t640
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Support Tools Package [7.0-20040630.0]
Sample Output: TX Matrix Router Only (scc Option)
[email protected]> show version scc
Hostname: scc
Model: TX Matrix
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
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Sample Output: Specific T640 Router (lcc number Option)
[email protected]> show version lcc 0
lcc0-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: lcc0
Model: t640
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Support Tools Package [7.0-20040630.0]
Sample Output: All T640 Routers
(all-lcc Option)
[email protected]> show version all-lcc
lcc0-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: lcc0
Model: t640
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Support Tools Package [7.0-20040630.0]
lcc1-re0:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Hostname: lcc1
Model: t640
JUNOS Base OS boot [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [7.0-20040629.0]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (T-Series) [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Online Documentation [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [7.0-20040630.0]
JUNOS Support Tools Package [7.0-20040630.0]
Related
Documentation
•
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational Commands on page 182
•
Using the Junos OS CLI Comment Character # for Operational Mode Commands on
page 195
Monitoring Who Uses the Junos OS CLI
Depending upon how you configure Junos OS, multiple users can log in to the router, use
the CLI, and configure or modify the software configuration.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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If, when you enter configuration mode, another user is also in configuration mode, a
notification message is displayed that indicates who the user is and what portion of the
configuration the person is viewing or editing:
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
Users currently editing the configuration:
root terminal d0 (pid 4137) on since 2008-04-09 23:03:07 PDT, idle 7w6d 08:22
[edit]
The configuration has been changed but not committed
[edit]
[email protected]#
Related
Documentation
•
Entering and Exiting the Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 64
•
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment on page 257
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational Commands
This topic explains the interface naming conventions used in the Junos OS operational
commands, and contains the following sections:
•
Physical Part of an Interface Name on page 182
•
Logical Part of an Interface Name on page 183
•
Channel Identifier Part of an Interface Name on page 183
Physical Part of an Interface Name
The physical interface naming conventions for Junos OS platforms is as follows:
•
On SRX devices, the unique name of each network interface has the following format
to identify the physical device that corresponds to a single physical network connector:
type-slot/pim-or-ioc/port
•
On other platforms, when you display information about an interface, you specify the
interface type, the slot in which the Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC) is installed, the
slot on the FPC in which the PIC is located, and the configured port number.
In the physical part of the interface name, a hyphen (-) separates the media type from
the FPC number, and a slash (/) separates the FPC, PIC, and port numbers:
type-fpc/pic/port
NOTE: Exceptions to the type-fpc/pic/port physical description include the
aggregated Ethernet and aggregated SONET/SDH interfaces, which use the
syntax aenumber and asnumber, respectively.
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Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
Logical Part of an Interface Name
The logical unit part of the interface name corresponds to the logical unit number, which
can be a number from 0 through 16,384. In the virtual part of the name, a period (.)
separates the port and logical unit numbers:
•
SRX devices:
type-slot/pim-or-ioc/port:channel.unit
•
Other platforms:
type-fpc/pic/port.logical
Channel Identifier Part of an Interface Name
The channel identifier part of the interface name is required only on channelized interfaces.
For channelized interfaces, channel 0 identifies the first channelized interface. For
channelized intelligent queuing (IQ) interfaces, channel 1 identifies the first channelized
interface.
NOTE: Depending on the type of channelized interface, up to three levels of
channelization can be specified. For more information, see the Junos Network
Interfaces Configuration Guide.
A colon (:) separates the physical and virtual parts of the interface name:
•
SRX devices:
type-slot/pim-or-ioc/port:channel
type-slot/pim-or-ioc/port:channel:channel
type-slot/pim-or-ioc/port:channel:channel:channel
•
Other platforms:
type-fpc/pic/port:channel
type-fpc//pic/port:channel:channel
type-fpc/pic/port:channel:channel:channel
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 238
•
Junos OS Network Interfaces Library for Routing Devices
Viewing Files and Directories on a Device Running Junos OS
Junos OS stores information in files on the device, including configuration files, log files,
and router software files. This topic shows some examples of operational commands
that you can use to view files and directories on a device running Junos OS.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
183
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Sections include:
•
Directories on the Router or Switch on page 184
•
Listing Files and Directories on page 184
•
Specifying Filenames and URLs on page 186
Directories on the Router or Switch
Table 9 on page 184 lists some standard directories on a device running Junos OS.
Table 9: Directories on the Router
DIrectory
Description
/config
This directory is located on the device’s router’s internal flash drive. It
contains the active configuration (juniper.conf) and rollback files 1, 2,
and 3.
/var/db/config
This directory is located on the router’sdevice’s hard drive and contains
rollback files 4 through 49.
/var/tmp
This directory is located on thedevice’s hard drive. It holds core files
from the various processes on the Routing Engines. Core files are
generated when a particular process crashes and are used by Juniper
Networks engineers to diagnose the reason for failure.
/var/log
This directory is located on the device’s hard drive. It contains files
generated by both the device’s logging function as well as the
traceoptions command.
/var/home
This directory is located on the device’s hard drive. It contains a
subdirectory for each configured user on the device. These individual
user directories are the default file location for many Junos OS
commands.
/altroot
This directory is located on the device’s hard drive and contains a copy
of the root file structure from the internal flash drive. This directory is
used in certain disaster recovery modes where the internal flash drive
is not operational.
/altconfig
This directory is located on the device’s hard drive and contains a copy
of the /config file structure from the internal flash drive. This directory
is also used in certain disaster recovery modes when the internal flash
drive is not operational.
Listing Files and Directories
You can view the device’s directory structure as well as individual files by issuing the file
command in operational mode.
1.
To get help about the file command, type the following:
[email protected]> file ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
184
Execute this command
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
archive
checksum
compare
copy
delete
list
rename
show
source-address
|
[email protected]> file
Archives files from the system
Calculate file checksum
Compare files
Copy files (local or remote)
Delete files from the system
List file information
Rename files
Show file contents
Local address to use in originating the connection
Pipe through a command
Help shows that the file command includes several options for manipulating files.
2. Use the list option to see the directory structure of the device. For example, to show
the files located in your home directory on the device:
[email protected]> file list
.ssh/
common
The default directory for the file list command is the home directory of the user logged
in to the device. In fact, the user’s home directory is the default directory for most of
Junos OS commands requiring a filename.
3. To view the contents of other file directories, specify the directory location. For
example:
[email protected]> file list /config
juniper.conf
juniper.conf.1.gz
juniper.conf.2.gz
juniper.conf.3.gz
4. You can also use the device’s context-sensitive help system to locate a directory. For
example:
[email protected]> file list /?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
<path>
/COPYRIGHT
/altconfig/
/altroot/
/bin/
/boot/
/config/
/data/
/dev/
/etc/
/kernel
/mfs/
/mnt/
/modules/
/opt/
/packages/
/proc/
/rdm.taf
/root/
/sbin/
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Execute this command
Path to list
Size: 6355, Last changed: Feb 13 2005
Last changed: Aug 07 2007
Last changed: Aug 07 2007
Last changed: Apr 09 22:31:35
Last changed: Apr 09 23:28:39
Last changed: Apr 16 22:35:35
Last changed: Aug 07 2007
Last changed: Apr 09 22:36:21
Last changed: Apr 11 03:14:22
Size: 27823246, Last changed: Aug 07 2007
Last changed: Apr 09 22:36:49
Last changed: Jan 11 2007
Last changed: Apr 09 22:33:54
Last changed: Apr 09 22:31:00
Last changed: Apr 09 22:34:38
Last changed: May 07 20:25:46
Size: 498, Last changed: Apr 09 22:37:31
Last changed: Apr 10 02:19:45
Last changed: Apr 09 22:33:55
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CLI User Guide
/staging/
Last changed: Apr 09
/tmp/
Last changed: Apr 11
/usr/
Last changed: Apr 09
/var/
Last changed: Apr 09
[email protected]> file list /var/?
<[Enter]>
Execute this command
<path>
Path to list
/var/account/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/at/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/backups/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/bin/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/crash/
Last changed: Apr 09
/var/cron/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/db/
Last changed: May 07
/var/empty/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/etc/
Last changed: Apr 16
/var/heimdal/
Last changed: Jul 10
/var/home/
Last changed: Apr 09
/var/jail/
Last changed: Oct 31
/var/log/
Last changed: Apr 17
/var/mail/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/msgs/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/named/
Last changed: Jul 10
/var/packages/
Last changed: Jan 18
/var/pdb/
Last changed: Oct 31
/var/preserve/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/run/
Last changed: Apr 17
/var/rundb/
Last changed: Apr 17
/var/rwho/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/sdb/
Last changed: Apr 09
/var/spool/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/sw/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/tmp/
Last changed: Apr 09
/var/transfer/
Last changed: Jul 09
/var/yp/
Last changed: Jul 09
[email protected]> file list /var/
23:28:41
03:14:49
22:31:34
22:37:30
2007
2007
2007
2007
22:31:08
2007
20:28:40
2007
22:35:36
2007
22:59:18
2007
02:00:10
2007
2007
2007
02:38:59
2007
2007
02:00:01
00:46:00
2007
22:37:31
2007
2007
23:28:41
2007
2007
5. You can also display the contents of a file. For example:
[email protected]>file show /var/log/inventory
Jul 9 23:17:46 CHASSISD release 8.4I0 built by builder on 2007-06-12 07:58:27
UTC
Jul 9 23:18:05 CHASSISD release 8.4I0 built by builder on 2007-06-12 07:58:27
UTC
Jul 9 23:18:06 Routing Engine 0 - part number 740-003239, serial number
9000016755
Jul 9 23:18:15 Routing Engine 1 - part number 740-003239, serial number
9001018324
Jul 9 23:19:03 SSB 0 - part number 710-001951, serial number AZ8025
Jul 9 23:19:03 SSRAM bank 0 - part number 710-001385, serial number 243071
Jul 9 23:19:03 SSRAM bank 1 - part number 710-001385, serial number 410608
...
Specifying Filenames and URLs
In some CLI commands and configuration statements—including file copy, file archive,
load, save, set system login user username authentication load-key-file, and request system
software add—you can include a filename. On a routing matrix, you can include chassis
information as part of the filename (for example, lcc0, lcc0-re0, or lcc0-re1).
186
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Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
You can specify a filename or URL in one of the following ways:
•
filename—File in the user’s current directory on the local flash drive. You can use
wildcards to specify multiple source files or a single destination file. Wildcards are not
supported in Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) or FTP.
NOTE: Wildcards are supported only by the file (compare | copy | delete |
list | rename | show) commands. When you issue the file show command
with a wildcard, it must resolve to one filename.
•
path/filename—File on the local flash disk.
•
/var/filename or /var/path/filename—File on the local hard disk. You can also specify
a file on a local Routing Engine for a specific T640 router on a routing matrix:
[email protected]> file delete lcc0-re0:/var/tmp/junk
•
a:filename or a:path/filename—File on the local drive. The default path is / (the root-level
directory). The removable media can be in MS-DOS or UNIX (UFS) format.
•
hostname:/path/filename, hostname:filename, hostname:path/filename, or
scp://hostname/path/filename—File on an scp/ssh client. This form is not available in
the worldwide version of Junos OS. The default path is the user’s home directory on
the remote system. You can also specify hostname as [email protected]
•
ftp://hostname/path/filename—File on an FTP server. You can also specify hostname
as [email protected] or username:[email protected] The default path is the
user’s home directory. To specify an absolute path, the path must start with %2F; for
example, ftp://hostname/%2Fpath/filename. To have the system prompt you for the
password, specify prompt in place of the password. If a password is required, and you
do not specify the password or prompt, an error message is displayed:
[email protected]> file copy ftp://[email protected]//filename
file copy ftp.hostname.net: Not logged in.
[email protected]> file copy ftp://username:[email protected]//filename
Password for [email protected]:
•
http://hostname/path/filename—File on an HTTP server. You can also specify hostname
as [email protected] or username:[email protected] If a password is required
and you omit it, you are prompted for it.
•
re0:/path/filename or re1:/path/filename—File on a local Routing Engine. You can also
specify a file on a local Routing Engine for a specific T640 router on a routing matrix:
[email protected]> show log lcc0-re1:chassisd
Related
Documentation
•
Displaying Junos OS Information on page 188
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
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Displaying Junos OS Information
You can display Junos OS version information and other status to determine if the version
of Junos OS that you are running supports particular features or hardware.
To display Junos OS information:
1.
Make sure you are in operational mode.
2. To display brief information and status for the kernel and Packet Forwarding Engine,
enter the show version brief command. This command shows version information for
Junos OS packages installed on the router. For example:
[email protected]> show version brief
Hostname: host
Model: m7i
JUNOS Base OS boot [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M/T Common) [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M7i/M10i) [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Online Documentation [9.1R1.8]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [9.1R1.8]
[email protected]>
If the Junos Crypto Software Suite is listed, the router has Canada and USA encrypted
Junos OS. If the Junos Crypto Software Suite is not listed, the router is running worldwide
nonencrypted Junos OS.
3. To display detailed version information, enter the show version detail command. This
command display shows the hostname and version information for Junos OS packages
installed on your router. It also includes the version information for each software
process. For example:
[email protected]> show version detail
Hostname: host
Model: m20
JUNOS Base OS boot [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M/T Common) [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M20/M40) [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Online Documentation [8.4R1.13]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [8.4R1.13]
KERNEL 8.4R1.13 #0 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:41 UTC
MGD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:00 UTC
CLI release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:47 UTC
RPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:45:21 UTC
CHASSISD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:59 UTC
DFWD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:39:32 UTC
DCD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:24 UTC
SNMPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:42:24 UTC
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MIB2D release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:46:47 UTC
APSD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:39 UTC
VRRPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:45:44 UTC
ALARMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:30 UTC
PFED release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:41:54 UTC
CRAFTD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:39:03 UTC
SAMPLED release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:05 UTC
ILMID release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:51 UTC
RMOPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:42:04 UTC
COSD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:38:39 UTC
FSAD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:43:01 UTC
IRSD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:35:37 UTC
FUD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:44:36 UTC
RTSPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:29:14 UTC
SMARTD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:13:32 UTC
KSYNCD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:17 UTC
SPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:43:50 UTC
L2TPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:43:12 UTC
HTTPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:27 UTC
PPPOED release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:04 UTC
RDD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:49 UTC
PPPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:45:13 UTC
DFCD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:39:11 UTC
DLSWD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:42:37 UTC
LACPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:35:41 UTC
USBD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:30:01 UTC
LFMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:35:52 UTC
CFMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:45 UTC
JDHCPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:35:40 UTC
PGCPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:46:31 UTC
SSD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:17 UTC
MSPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:42 UTC
KMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:44:02 UTC
PPMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:03 UTC
LMPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:49 UTC
LRMUXD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:33:55 UTC
PGMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:01 UTC
BFDD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:44:22 UTC
SDXD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:36:18 UTC
AUDITD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:34:40 UTC
L2ALD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:40:05 UTC
EVENTD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:39:55 UTC
L2CPD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:41:04 UTC
MPLSOAMD release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:45:11 UTC
jroute-dd release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:31:01 UTC
jkernel-dd release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:30:30 UTC
jcrypto-dd release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:30:12 UTC
jdocs-dd release 8.4R1.13 built by builder on 2007-08-08 00:02:52 UTC
[email protected]>
Related
Documentation
•
Managing Programs and Processes Using Junos OS Operational Mode Commands on
page 190
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Managing Programs and Processes Using Junos OS Operational Mode Commands
This topic shows some examples of Junos operational commands that you can use to
manage programs and processes on a device running Junos OS.
Sections include:
•
Showing Software Processes on page 190
•
Restarting the Junos OS Process on page 192
•
Stopping Junos OS on page 193
•
Rebooting Junos OS on page 194
Showing Software Processes
To verify system operation or to begin diagnosing an error condition, you may need to
display information about software processes running on the device.
To show software processes:
1.
Make sure you are in operational mode.
2. Type the show system processes extensive command. This command shows the CPU
utilization on the device and lists the processes in order of CPU utilization. For example:
[email protected]> show system processes extensive
last pid: 28689; load averages: 0.01,
73 processes: 1 running, 72 sleeping
0.00,
0.00
up 56+06:16:13
04:52:04
Mem: 101M Active, 101M Inact, 98M Wired, 159M Cache, 69M Buf, 286M Free
Swap: 1536M Total, 1536M Free
PID
3365
3508
3525
5532
3366
3529
3375
3506
4957
6
3521
3526
3543
190
USERNAME
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
root
PRI NICE SIZE
2
0 21408K
2
0 3352K
2
0 3904K
2
0 11660K
2
0 2080K
2
0 2040K
2
0 2900K
2
0 5176K
2
0 1284K
18
0
0K
2
0 2312K
2
0 5192K
2
0
0K
3512 root
3537 root
2
2
0
0
3527
3380
4136
3280
3528
2
2
2
2
2
0 3100K
0 3208K
0 11252K
0 2248K
0 2708K
root
root
root
root
root
3472K
0K
RES STATE
TIME
WCPU
CPU COMMAND
4464K select 511:23 0.00% 0.00% chassisd
1168K select 32:45 0.00% 0.00% l2ald
1620K select 13:40 0.00% 0.00% dcd
2856K kqread 10:36 0.00% 0.00% rpd
828K select
8:33 0.00% 0.00% alarmd
428K select
7:32 0.00% 0.00% irsd
1600K select
6:01 0.00% 0.00% ppmd
2568K select
5:38 0.00% 0.00% mib2d
624K select
5:16 0.00% 0.00% ntpd
0K syncer
4:49 0.00% 0.00% syncer
928K select
2:14 0.00% 0.00% lfmd
1988K select
2:04 0.00% 0.00% snmpd
0K peer_s
1:46 0.00% 0.00% peer proxy
1044K select
0K peer_s
1176K
1052K
3668K
1420K
672K
select
select
select
select
select
1:44 0.00% 0.00% rmopd
1:30 0.00% 0.00% peer proxy
1:14
1:11
0:54
0:28
0:28
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
pfed
bfdd
cli
eventd
dfwd
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
7 root
3371 root
13 root
3376 root
5 root
3368 root
3362 root
3381 root
3524 root
3343 root
---(more)---
-2
2
-18
2
-18
2
2
2
2
10
0
0
0
0
0
0K
1024K
0K
1228K
0K
0 15648K
0 1020K
0 2124K
0 6276K
0 1156K
0K vlruwt
216K sbwait
0K psleep
672K select
0K psleep
9428K
204K
808K
1492K
404K
select
select
select
select
nanslp
0:26
0:25
0:24
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00% vnlru
0.00% tnp.sntpd
0.00% vmuncacheda
0:22
0:17
0.00%
0.00%
0.00% smartd
0.00% bufdaemon
0:17
0:15
0:15
0:14
0:14
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
mgd
watchdog
lacpd
kmd
cron
Table 10 on page 192 lists and describes the output fields included in this example. The
fields are listed in alphabetical order.
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Table 10: show system process extensive Command Output Fields
Field
Description
COMMAND
Command that is running.
CPU
Raw (unweighted) CPU usage. The value of this field is used to sort the
processes in the output.
last pid
Last process identifier assigned to the process.
load averages
Three load averages, followed by the current time.
Mem
Information about physical and virtual memory allocation.
NICE
UNIX “nice” value. The nice value allows a process to change its final
scheduling priority.
PID
Process identifier.
PRI
Current kernel scheduling priority of the process. A lower number indicates a
higher priority.
processes
Number of existing processes and the number of processes in each state
(sleeping, running, starting, zombies, and stopped).
RES
Current amount of resident memory, in KB.
SIZE
Total size of the process (text, data, and stack), in KB.
STATE
Current state of the process (sleep, wait, run, idle, zombi, or stop).
Swap
Information about physical and virtual memory allocation.
USERNAME
Owner of the process.
WCPU
Weighted CPU usage.
Restarting the Junos OS Process
To correct an error condition, you might need to restart a software process running on
the device. You can use the restart command to force a restart of a software process.
CAUTION: Do not restart a software process unless specifically asked to do
so by your Juniper Networks customer support representative. Restarting a
software process during normal operation of a device could cause interruption
of packet forwarding and loss of data.
To restart a software process:
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Chapter 7: Using Operational Commands to Monitor a Device
1.
Make sure you are in operational mode.
2. Type the following command:
[email protected]> restart process-name < (immediately | gracefully | soft) >
•
process-name is the name of the process that you want to restart. For example,
routing or class-of-service. You can use the command completion feature of Junos
OS to see a list of software processes that you can restart using this command.
•
gracefully restarts the software process after performing clean-up tasks.
•
immediately restarts the software process without performing any clean-up tasks.
•
soft rereads and reactivates the configuration without completely restarting the
software processes. For example, BGP peers stay up and the routing table stays
constant.
The following example shows how to restart the routing process:
[email protected]> restart routing
Routing protocol daemon started, pid 751
When a process restarts, the process identifer (PID) is updated. (See Figure 13 on page 193.)
Figure 13: Restarting a Process
Stopping Junos OS
To avoid damage to the file system and to prevent loss of data, you must always gracefully
shut down Junos OS before powering off the device.
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NOTE: SRX Series Services Gateway devices for the branch and EX Series
Ethernet Switches support resilient dual-root partitioning.
If you are unable to shut down a device gracefully because of unexpected
circumstances such as a power outage or a device failure, resilient dual-root
partitioning prevents file corruption and enables a device to remain
operational. In addition, it enables a device to boot transparently from the
second root partition if the system fails to boot from the primary root partition.
Resilient dual-root partitioning serves as a backup mechanism for providing
additional resiliency to a device when there is an abnormal shutdown.
However, it is not an alternative to performing a graceful shutdown under
normal circumstances.
To stop Junos OS:
1.
Make sure you are in operational mode.
2. Enter the request system halt command. This command stops all system processes
and halts the operating system. For example:
[email protected]> request system halt
Halt the system? [yes,no] (no) yes
shutdown: [pid 3110]
Shutdown NOW!
*** FINAL System shutdown message from [email protected] ***
System going down IMMEDIATELY
[email protected]> Dec 17 17:28:40 init: syslogd (PID 2514) exited with status=0 Normal
Exit
Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `bufdaemon' to stop...stopped
Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `syncer' to stop...stopped
syncing disks... 4
done
Uptime: 3h31m41s
ata0: resetting devices.. done
The operating system has halted.
Please press any key to reboot.
Rebooting Junos OS
After a software upgrade or to recover (occasionally) from an error condition, you must
reboot Junos OS.
To reboot Junos OS:
1.
Make sure you are in operational mode.
2. Enter the request system reboot command. This command displays the final stages
of the system shutdown and executes the reboot. Reboot requests are recorded to
the system log files, which you can view with the show log messages command. For
example:
[email protected]>request system rebootReboot the system? [yes,no] (no)yes
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shutdown: [pid 845]
Shutdown NOW!
*** FINAL System shutdown message from [email protected] ***
System going down IMMEDIATELY
[email protected]> Dec 17 17:34:20 init: syslogd (PID 409) exited with status=0 Normal
Exit
Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `bufdaemon' to stop...stopped
Waiting (max 60 seconds) for system process `syncer' to stop...stopped
syncing disks... 10 6
done
Uptime: 2m45s
ata0: resetting devices.. done
Rebooting...
Related
Documentation
•
Checking the Status of a Device Running Junos OS on page 36
•
Displaying Junos OS Information on page 188
Using the Junos OS CLI Comment Character # for Operational Mode Commands
The comment character in Junos OS enables you to copy operational mode commands
that include comments from a file and paste them into the CLI. A pound sign (#) at the
beginning of the command-line indicates a comment line. This is useful for describing
frequently used operational mode commands; for example, a user’s work instructions
on how to monitor the network. To add a comment to a command file, the first character
of the line must be #. When you start a command with #, the rest of the line is disregarded
by Junos OS.
To add comments in operational mode, start with a # and end with a new line (carriage
return):
[email protected]> # comment-string
comment-string is the text of the comment. The comment text can be any length, but
each comment line must begin with a #.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Using Comments in Junos OS Operational Mode Commands on page 195
Example: Using Comments in Junos OS Operational Mode Commands
The following example shows how to use comments in a file:
#Command 1: Show the router version
show version
#Command 2: Show all router interfaces
show interfaces terse
The following example shows how to copy and paste contents of a file into the CLI:
[email protected]> #Command 1: Show the router version
[email protected]> show version
Hostname: myhost
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Model: m5
Junos Base OS boot [6.4-20040511.0]
Junos Base OS Software Suite [6.4-20040511.0]
Junos Kernel Software Suite [6.4-20040511.0]
Junos Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M5/M10) [6.4-20040511.0] Junos Routing
Software Suite [6.4-20040511.0] Junos Online Documentation [6.4-20040511.0] Junos
Crypto Software Suite [6.4-20040511.0]
[email protected]> # Command 2: Show all router interfaces
[email protected]> show interfaces terse
Interface Admin Link Proto Local Remote
fe-0/0/0 up up
fe-0/0/1 up down
fe-0/0/2 up down
mo-0/1/0 up
mo-0/1/0.16383 up up inet 10.0.0.1 --> 10.0.0.17
so-0/2/0 up up
so-0/2/1 up up
dsc up up
fxp0 up up
fxp0.0 up up inet 192.168.70.62/21
fxp1 up up
fxp1.0 up up tnp 4
gre up up
ipip up up
lo0 up up
lo0.0 up up inet 127.0.0.1 --> 0/0
lo0.16385 up up inet
Related
Documentation
196
•
Using the Junos OS CLI Comment Character # for Operational Mode Commands on
page 195
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 8
Filtering Command Output
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
•
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output on page 198
•
Filtering Operational Mode Command Output in a QFabric System on page 199
•
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 200
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output
The Junos OS enables you to filter command output by adding the pipe ( | ) symbol when
you enter a command.
For example:
[email protected]> show rip neighbor ?
Possible completions:
<[Enter]>
Execute this command
<name>
Name of RIP neighbor
instance
Name of RIP instance
logical-system
Name of logical system, or 'all'
|
Pipe through a command
The following example lists the filters that can be used with the pipe symbol ( | ):
[email protected]> show interfaces | ?
[email protected]> show interfaces | ?
Possible completions:
append
Append output text to file
count
Count occurrences
display
Show additional kinds of information
except
Show only text that does not match a pattern
find
Search for first occurrence of pattern
hold
Hold text without exiting the --More-- prompt
last
Display end of output only
match
Show only text that matches a pattern
no-more
Don't paginate output
refresh
Refresh a continuous display of the command
request
Make system-level requests
resolve
Resolve IP addresses
save
Save output text to file
tee
Write to standard output and file
trim
Trim specified number of columns from start of line
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For the show configuration command only, an additional compare filter is available:
[email protected]> show configuration | ?
Possible completions:
compare
Compare configuration changes with prior version
...
You can enter any of the pipe filters in conjunction. For example:
[email protected]>command | match regular-expression | save filename
NOTE: This topic describes only the filters that can be used for operational
mode command output. For information about filters that can be used in
configuration mode, see the Junos OS Administration Library.
Related
Documentation
•
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 200
•
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output on page 198
•
Filtering Operational Mode Command Output in a QFabric System on page 199
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output
The except, find, and match filters used with the pipe symbol employ regular expressions
to filter output. Juniper Networks uses the regular expressions as defined in POSIX 1003.2.
If the regular expressions contain spaces, operators, or wildcard characters, enclose the
expression in quotation marks.
Table 11: Common Regular Expression Operators in Operational Mode
Commands
198
Operator
Function
|
Indicates that a match can be one of the two terms on either side of
the pipe.
^
Used at the beginning of an expression, denotes where a match
should begin.
$
Used at the end of an expression, denotes that a term must be
matched exactly up to the point of the $ character.
[]
Specifies a range of letters or digits to match. To separate the start
and end of a range, use a hyphen ( - ).
()
Specifies a group of terms to match.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
For example, if a command produces the following output:
12
22
321
4
a pipe filter of | match 2 displays the following output:
12
22
321
and a pipe filter of | except 1 displays the following output:
22
4
Related
Documentation
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
•
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 200
Filtering Operational Mode Command Output in a QFabric System
When you issue an operational mode command in a QFabric system, the output generated
can be fairly extensive because of the number of components contained within the
system. To make the output more accessible, you can filter the output by appending the
| filter option to the end of most Junos OS commands.
1.
To filter operational mode command output and limit it to a Node group, include the
| filter node-group node-group-name option at the end of your Junos OS operational
mode command.
[email protected]> show interfaces terse | filter node-group NW-NG-0
Interface
NW-NG-0:dsc
NW-NG-0:em0
NW-NG-0:em1
NW-NG-0:gre
NW-NG-0:ipip
NW-NG-0:lo0
NW-NG-0:lo0.16384
NW-NG-0:lo0.16385
NW-NG-0:lsi
NW-NG-0:mtun
NW-NG-0:pimd
NW-NG-0:pime
NW-NG-0:tap
Node01:ge-0/0/10
Node01:ge-0/0/40
Node01:ge-0/0/41
vlan
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Admin
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
Link Proto
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
inet
up
inet
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
up
Local
127.0.0.1
Remote
--> 0/0
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2. To filter operational mode command output and limit it to a set of Node groups,
include the | filter node-group option at the end of your Junos OS operational mode
command and specify the list of Node group names in brackets.
[email protected]> show ethernet-switching interfaces | filter node-group [NW-NG-0 RSNG-1]
Interface
State VLAN members
Tag
Tagging Blocking
NW-NG-0:ae0.0 up
v200
200
tagged
unblocked
v50
50
tagged
unblocked
v51
51
tagged
unblocked
v52
52
tagged
unblocked
v53
53
tagged
unblocked
RSNG-1:ae0.0 up
v200
200
untagged unblocked
RSNG-1:ae47.0 up
v50
50
tagged
unblocked
v51
51
tagged
unblocked
v52
52
tagged
unblocked
v53
53
tagged
unblocked
Related
Documentation
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface
This topic describes the pipe ( | ) filter functions that are supported in the Junos OS
command-line interface (CLI):
200
•
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in Text on page 201
•
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in XML on page 202
•
Counting the Number of Lines of Output on page 202
•
Displaying Output in XML Tag Format on page 203
•
Displaying Ephemeral Configuration Data on page 203
•
Displaying Output in JSON Format on page 203
•
Displaying the Configuration with YANG Translation Scripts Applied on page 204
•
Displaying the RPC Tags for a Command on page 205
•
Ignoring Output That Does Not Match a Regular Expression on page 206
•
Displaying Output from the First Match of a Regular Expression on page 206
•
Retaining Output After the Last Screen on page 207
•
Displaying Output Beginning with the Last Entries on page 207
•
Displaying Output That Matches a Regular Expression on page 207
•
Preventing Output from Being Paginated on page 208
•
Sending Command Output to Other Users on page 208
•
Resolving IP Addresses on page 208
•
Saving Output to a File on page 209
•
Appending Output to a File on page 209
•
Displaying Output on Screen and Writing to a File on page 209
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Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
•
Trimming Output by Specifying the Starting Column on page 210
•
Refreshing the Output of a Command on page 210
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in Text
The compare filter compares the candidate configuration with either the current
committed configuration or a configuration file and displays the differences between
the two configurations with text characters. To compare configurations, enter compare
after the pipe ( | ) symbol:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare [filename| rollback n]
filename is the full path to a configuration file.
n is the index into the list of previously committed configurations. The most recently
saved configuration is 0. If you do not specify arguments, the candidate configuration is
compared against the active configuration file (/config/juniper.conf).
The comparison output uses the following conventions:
•
Statements that are only in the candidate configuration are prefixed with a plus sign
(+).
•
Statements that are only in the comparison file are prefixed with a minus sign (–).
•
Statements that are unchanged are prefixed with a single blank space ( ).
For example:
[email protected]> show configuration system | compare rollback 9
[edit system]
+ host-name device;
+ backup-router 192.168.71.254;
- ports {
console log-out-on-disconnect;
- }
[edit system name-server]
+ 172.17.28.11;
172.17.28.101 { ... }
[edit system name-server]
172.17.28.101 { ... }
+ 172.17.28.100;
+ 172.17.28.10;
[edit system]
- scripts {
commit {
allow-transients;
}
- }
+ services {
+
ftp;
+
rlogin;
+
rsh;
+
telnet;
+ }
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Starting with Junos OS Release 8.3, output from the show | compare command has been
enhanced to more accurately reflect configuration changes. This includes more intelligent
handling of order changes in lists. For example, consider names in a group that are
reordered as follows:
groups {
group_xmp;
group_cmp;
group_grp;
}
}
groups {
group_xmp;
group_grp:
group_cmp;
In previous releases, output from the show | compare command looked like the following:
[edit groups]
- group_xmp;
- group_cmp;
- group_grp;
+ group_xmp;
+ group_grp;
+ group_cmp;
Now, output from the show | compare command looks like the following:
[edit groups]
group_xmp {...}
! group_grp {...}
Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in XML
The compare | display xml filter compares the candidate configuration with the current
committed configuration and displays the differences between the two configurations
in XML. To compare configurations, enter compare | display xml after the pipe ( | ) symbol
in either operational or configuration mode.
Example in operational mode:
[email protected]> show configuration | compare | display xml
Example in configuration mode:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | compare | display xml
You can enter a specific configuration hierarchy prior to | compare. In configuration mode,
you can navigate to a hierarchy where the command is applied.
For a description of the XML output, see “Understanding the show | compare | display
xml Command Output” on page 136.
Counting the Number of Lines of Output
To count the number of lines in the output from a command, enter count after the pipe
symbol ( | ). For example:
[email protected]> show configuration | count
202
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Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
Count: 269 lines
Displaying Output in XML Tag Format
To display command output in XML tag format, enter display xml after the pipe symbol
( | ).
The following example displays the show cli directory command output as XML tags:
[email protected]> show cli directory | display xml
<rpc-reply xmlns:junos="http://xml.juniper.net/junos/7.5I0/junos">
<cli>
<working-directory>/var/home/user</working-directory>
</cli>
<cli>
<banner></banner>
</cli>
</rpc-reply>
To display the change in the candidate and active configurations in XML tag format, see
“Comparing Configurations and Displaying the Differences in XML” on page 202.
Displaying Ephemeral Configuration Data
Juniper Extension Toolkit (JET) applications and NETCONF and Junos XML protocol client
applications can configure the ephemeral configuration database. The ephemeral
database is an alternate configuration database that provides a fast programmatic
interface for performing configuration updates.
To view the complete post-inheritance configuration merged with the configuration data
in all instances of the ephemeral configuration database, issue the show
ephemeral-configuration | display merge command.
[email protected]> show ephemeral-configuration | display merge
## Last changed: 2017-02-01 09:47:20 PST
version 16.2R2;
system {
...
}
Displaying Output in JSON Format
Starting in Junos OS Release 14.2, you can display the configuration or command output
in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format by entering display json after the pipe symbol
( | ).
The following example displays the show cli directory command output in JSON format:
[email protected]> show cli directory | display json
{
"cli" : [
{
"working-directory" : [
{
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"data" : "/var/home/username"
}
]
}
]
}
NOTE: Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, devices running Junos OS emit
JSON-formatted configuration data using a new default implementation for
serialization.
NOTE: Starting in Junos OS Releases 16.1R4, 16.2R2, and 17.1R1, integers in
Junos OS configuration data emitted in JSON format are not enclosed in
quotation marks. In earlier releases, integers in JSON configuration data were
treated as strings and enclosed in quotation marks.
Displaying the Configuration with YANG Translation Scripts Applied
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, you can load YANG modules onto devices running
Junos OS to augment the configuration hierarchy with data models that are not natively
supported by Junos OS but can be supported by translation. The active and candidate
configurations contain the configuration data for non-native YANG data models in the
syntax defined by that model, but they do not explicitly display the corresponding
translated Junos OS syntax, which is committed as a transient change.
The | display translation-scripts filter displays the complete post-inheritance configuration,
with the translated configuration data from all enabled translation scripts explicitly
included in the output. To display the configuration with all enabled YANG translation
scripts applied, append the | display translation-scripts filter to the show configuration
command in operational mode or the show command in configuration mode. For example:
[email protected]> show configuration | display translation-scripts
To view just the non-native configuration data after translation, use the
| display translation-scripts translated-config filter in either operational or configuration
mode.
[email protected]> show configuration | display translation-scripts translated-config
In configuration mode, to display just the configuration differences in the hierarchies
corresponding to non-native YANG data models before or after translation scripts are
applied, append the configured-delta or translated-delta keyword, respectively, to the
show | display translation-scripts command. In both cases, the XML output displays the
deleted configuration data, followed by the new configuration data.
[email protected]# show | display-translation-scripts (configured-delta | translated-delta)
The following example displays a sample configuration with and without translation
scripts applied. The show command displays the configuration, which includes the
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Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
non-native configuration data in the syntax defined by the YANG data model. The | display
translation-scripts filter displays the non-native configuration data in both the syntax
defined by the YANG data model and the translated Junos OS syntax. Both commands
display the entire configuration, which has been truncated for brevity in this example.
However, the show command returns the pre-inhertitance configuration, whereas the
show | display translation-scripts command returns the post-inheritance configuration.
[email protected]# show
...
myint:intconfig {
interfaces {
interface ge-0/0/0 {
config {
description test;
}
}
}
}
...
[email protected]# show | display translation-scripts
...
interfaces {
ge-0/0/0 {
description test;
gigether-options {
no-flow-control;
}
}
}
...
myint:intconfig {
interfaces {
interface ge-0/0/0 {
config {
description test;
}
}
}
}
...
Displaying the RPC Tags for a Command
To display the remote procedure call (RPC) XML tags for an operational mode command,
enter display xml rpc after the pipe symbol ( | ).
The following example displays the RPC tags for the show route command:
[email protected]> show route | display xml rpc
<rpc-reply xmlns:junos="http://xml.juniper.net/junos/10.1I0/junos">
<rpc>
<get-route-information>
</get-route-information>
</rpc>
<cli>
<banner></banner>
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</cli>
</rpc-reply>
Ignoring Output That Does Not Match a Regular Expression
To ignore text that matches a regular expression, specify the except command after the
pipe symbol ( | ). If the regular expression contains any spaces, operators, or wildcard
characters, enclose it in quotation marks. For information on common regular expression
operators, see “Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS
Command Output” on page 198.
The following example displays all users who are logged in to the router, except for the
user root:
[email protected]> show system users | except root
8:28PM up 1 day, 13:59, 2 users, load averages: 0.01, 0.01, 0.00
USER
TTY FROM
[email protected] IDLE WHAT
user
p0 device1.example.com
7:25PM
- cli
Displaying Output from the First Match of a Regular Expression
To display output starting with the first occurrence of text matching a regular expression,
enter find after the pipe symbol ( | ). If the regular expression contains any spaces,
operators, or wildcard characters, enclose it in quotation marks. For information on
common regular expression operators, see “Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( |
) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output” on page 198.
The following example displays the routes in the routing table starting at IP address
208.197.169.0:
[email protected]> show route | find 208.197.169.0
208.197.169.0/24
*[Static/5] 1d 13:22:11
> to 192.168.4.254 via so-3/0/0.0
224.0.0.5/32
*[OSPF/10] 1d 13:22:12, metric 1
iso.0: 1 destinations, 1 routes (1 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden)
+ = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both
47.0005.80ff.f800.0000.0108.0001.1921.6800.4015.00/160
*[Direct/0] 1d 13:22:12
> via lo0.0
The following example displays the first CCC entry in the forwarding table:
[email protected]> show route forwarding-table | find ccc
Routing table: ccc
MPLS:
Interface.Label
Type RtRef Nexthop
default
perm
0
0
user
0
1
user
0
32769
user
0
fe-0/0/0. (CCC)
user
0
10.0.16.2
206
Type Index NhRef Netif
rjct
3
1
recv
5
2
recv
5
2
ucst
45
1 fe-0/0/0.534
indr
44
2
Push 32768, Push
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
Retaining Output After the Last Screen
To not return immediately to the CLI prompt after viewing the last screen of output, enter
hold after the pipe symbol ( | ). The following example prevents returning to the CLI
prompt after you have viewed the last screen of output from the show log log-file-1
command:
[email protected]> show log log-file-1 | hold
This filter is useful when you want to scroll or search through output.
Displaying Output Beginning with the Last Entries
To display text starting from the end of the output, enter last <lines> after the pipe symbol
( | ).
The following example displays the last entries in log-file-1 file:
[email protected]> show log log-file-1 | last
This filter is useful for viewing log files in which the end of the file contains the most recent
entries.
NOTE: When the number of lines requested is less than the number of lines
that the screen length setting permits you to display, Junos OS returns as
many lines as permitted by the screen length setting. That is, if your screen
length is set to 20 lines and you have requested only the last 10 lines, Junos
OS returns the last 19 lines instead of the last 10 lines.
Displaying Output That Matches a Regular Expression
To display output that matches a regular expression, enter match regular-expression after
the pipe symbol ( | ). If the regular expression contains any spaces, operators, or wildcard
characters, enclose it in quotation marks. For information on common regular expression
operators, see “Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS
Command Output” on page 198.
The following example matches all the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) interfaces
in the configuration:
[email protected]> show configuration | match atat-2/1/0 {
at-2/1/1 {
at-2/2/0 {
at-5/2/0 {
at-5/3/0 {
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Preventing Output from Being Paginated
By default, if output is longer than the length of the terminal screen, you are provided
with a ---(more)--- message to display the remaining output. To display the remaining
output, press the Spacebar.
To prevent the output from being paginated, enter no-more after the pipe symbol ( | ).
The following example displays output from the show configuration command all at once:
[email protected]> show configuration | no-more
This feature is useful, for example, if you want to copy the entire output and paste it into
an e-mail.
Sending Command Output to Other Users
To display command output on the terminal of a specific user logged in to your router,
or on the terminals of all users logged in to your router, enter request message (all | user
[email protected]) after the pipe symbol ( | ).
If you are troubleshooting your router and, for example, talking with a customer service
representative on the phone, you can use the request message command to send your
representative the command output you are currently viewing on your terminal.
The following example sends the output from the show interfaces command you enter
on your terminal to the terminal of the user [email protected]:
[email protected]> show interfaces | request message user [email protected]
The user [email protected] sees the following output appear on the terminal screen:
Message from [email protected] on /dev/ttyp0 at 10:32 PST...
Physical interface: dsc, Enabled, Physical link is Up
Interface index: 5, SNMP ifIndex: 5
Type: Software-Pseudo, MTU: Unlimited...
Resolving IP Addresses
In operational mode only, if the output of a command displays an unresolved IP address,
you can enter | resolve after the command to display the name associated with the IP
address. The resolve filter enables the system to perform a reverse DNS lookup of the IP
address. If DNS is not enabled, the lookup fails and no substitution is performed.
To perform a reverse DNS lookup of an unresolved IP address, enter resolve <full-names>
after the pipe symbol ( | ). If you do not specify the full-names option, the name is
truncated to fit whatever field width limitations apply to the IP address.
The following example performs a DNS lookup on any unresolved IP addresses in the
output from the show ospf neighbors command:
[email protected]> show ospf neighbors | resolve
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Chapter 8: Filtering Command Output
Saving Output to a File
When command output is lengthy, when you need to store or analyze the output, or when
you need to send the output in an e-mail or by FTP, you can save the output to a file. By
default, the file is placed in your home directory on the router.
To save command output to a file, enter save filename after the pipe symbol ( | ).
The following example saves the output from the request support information command
to a file named my-support-info.txt:
[email protected]> request support information | save my-support-info.txt
Wrote 1143 lines of output to ‘my-support-info.txt’
[email protected]>
Appending Output to a File
When command output is displayed, you can either save the output to a file, which
overwrites the existing contents of that file or you can append the output text to a specific
file.
To append the command output to the file, enter append filename after the pipe symbol
( | ).
The following example appends the output from the request support information
command to a file named my-support-info.txt:
[email protected]> request support information | append my-support-info.txt
Wrote 2247 lines of output to 'my-support-info.txt'
[email protected]>
Displaying Output on Screen and Writing to a File
When command output is displayed, you can also write the output to a file. To both
display the output and write it to a file, enter tee filename after the pipe symbol (|).
The following example displays the output from the show interfaces ge-* terse command
(displaying information about the status of the Gigabit Ethernet interfaces on the device)
and diverts the output to a file called ge-interfaces.txt:
[email protected]> show interfaces ge-* terse | tee ge-interfaces.txt
Interface
Admin Link Proto
Local
ge-0/1/0
up
down
ge-0/1/1
up
up
ge-0/1/2
up
down
ge-0/1/3
up
up
Remote
Unlike the UNIX tee command, only an error message is displayed if the file cannot be
opened (instead of displaying the output and then the error message).
[email protected]> show interfaces ge-* terse | tee /home/user/test.txt
error: tee failed: file /home/user/test.txt could not be opened
[email protected]>
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Trimming Output by Specifying the Starting Column
Output appears on the terminal screen in terms of rows and columns. The first
alphanumeric character starting at the left of the screen is in column 1, the second
character is in column 2, and so on. To display output starting from a specific column
(thus trimming the leftmost portion of the output), enter trim columns after the pipe
symbol ( | ). The trim filter is useful for trimming the date and time from the beginning
of system log messages.
The following example displays output from the show system storage command, filtering
out the first 10 columns:
[email protected]> show system storage | trim 11
NOTE: The trim command does not accept negative values.
Refreshing the Output of a Command
You can run an operational mode command with the | refresh pipe option to refresh the
output displayed on the screen periodically. The default refresh occurs every second.
However, you can also explicitly specify a refresh interval from 1 through 604,800 seconds.
For example, to refresh the output of the show interfaces command every 5 seconds, you
would run the following command:
[email protected]> show interfaces | refresh 5
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
210
Release
Description
16.1R4
Starting in Junos OS Releases 16.1R4, 16.2R2, and 17.1R1, integers in Junos OS
configuration data emitted in JSON format are not enclosed in quotation marks.
In earlier releases, integers in JSON configuration data were treated as strings and
enclosed in quotation marks.
16.1
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, devices running Junos OS emit JSON-formatted
configuration data using a new default implementation for serialization.
16.1
Starting in Junos OS Release 16.1, you can load YANG modules onto devices running
Junos OS to augment the configuration hierarchy with data models that are not
natively supported by Junos OS but can be supported by translation.
14.2
Starting in Junos OS Release 14.2, you can display the configuration or command
output in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format by entering display json after
the pipe symbol ( | ).
•
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output on page 198
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 9
Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular
Expressions in the CLI
•
Using Keyboard Sequences to Move Around and Edit the Junos OS CLI on page 211
•
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names on page 213
•
Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command on page 214
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference on page 216
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Replacing an Interface
Name on page 218
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto
Option on page 220
•
Using Regular Expressions to Delete Related Items from a Junos OS
cConfiguration on page 222
Using Keyboard Sequences to Move Around and Edit the Junos OS CLI
You can use keyboard sequences in the Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) to move
around and edit the command line. You can also use keyboard sequences to scroll through
a list of recently executed commands. Table 12 on page 212 lists some of the CLI keyboard
sequences. They are the same as those used in Emacs.
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Table 12: CLI Keyboard Sequences
Category
Action
Keyboard Sequence
Move the
Cursor
Move the cursor back one character.
Ctrl+b
Move the cursor back one word.
Esc+b or Alt+b
Move the cursor forward one
character.
Ctrl+f
Move the cursor forward one word.
Esc+f or Alt+f
Move the cursor to the beginning of
the command line.
Ctrl+a
Move the cursor to the end of the
command line.
Ctrl+e
Delete the character before the
cursor.
Ctrl+h, Delete, or Backspace
Delete the character at the cursor.
Ctrl+d
Delete all characters from the cursor
to the end of the command line.
Ctrl+k
Delete all characters on the
command line.
Ctrl+u or Ctrl+x
Delete the word before the cursor.
Ctrl+w, Esc+Backspace, or
Alt+Backspace
Delete the word after the cursor.
Esc+d or Alt+d
Insert Recently
Deleted Text
Insert the most recently deleted text
at the cursor.
Ctrl+y
Redraw the
Screen
Redraw the current line.
Ctrl+l
Delete
Characters
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Chapter 9: Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI
Table 12: CLI Keyboard Sequences (continued)
Related
Documentation
Category
Action
Keyboard Sequence
Display
Previous
Command
Lines
Scroll backward through the list of
recently executed commands.
Ctrl+p
Scroll forward through the list of
recently executed commands.
Ctrl+n
Search the CLI history in reverse order
for lines matching the search string.
Ctrl+r
Search the CLI history by typing some
text at the prompt, followed by the
keyboard sequence. The CLI attempts
to expand the text into the most
recent word in the history for which
the text is a prefix.
Esc+/
Display
Previous
Command
Words
Scroll backward through the list of
recently entered words in a command
line.
Esc+. or Alt+.
Repeat
Keyboard
Sequences
Specify the number of times to
execute a keyboard sequence.
number can be from 1 through 9 and
sequence is the keyboard sequence
that you want to execute.
Esc+number sequence or Alt+number
sequence
•
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names on page 213
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names
You can use wildcard characters in the Junos OS operational commands to specify groups
of interface names without having to type each name individually. Table 13 on page 213
lists the available wildcard characters. You must enclose all wildcard characters except
the asterisk (*) in quotation marks (“ ”).
Table 13: Wildcard Characters for Specifying Interface Names
Wildcard Character
Description
* (asterisk)
Match any string of characters in that position in the
interface name. For example, so* matches all
SONET/SDH interfaces.
"[character<character...>]"
Match one or more individual characters in that position
in the interface name. For example, so-“[03]”* matches
all SONET/SDH interfaces in slots 0 and 3.
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Table 13: Wildcard Characters for Specifying Interface Names (continued)
Related
Documentation
Wildcard Character
Description
"[!character<character...>]"
Match all characters except the ones included in the
brackets. For example, so-“[!03]”* matches all
SONET/SDH interfaces except those in slots 0 and 3.
"[character1-character2]"
Match a range of characters. For example, so-“[0-3]” *
matches all SONET/SDH interfaces in slots 0, 1, 2, and 3.
"[!character1-character2]"
Match all characters that are not in the specified range
of characters. For example, so-”[!0-3]”* matches all
SONET/SDH interfaces in slots 4, 5, 6, and 7.
•
Using Keyboard Sequences to Move Around and Edit the Junos OS CLI on page 211
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command
Table 14: Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command
214
Operator
Function
|
Indicates that a match can be one of the two terms on either side of
the pipe.
^
Used at the beginning of an expression, denotes where a match
should begin.
$
Used at the end of an expression, denotes that a term must be
matched exactly up to the point of the $ character.
[]
Specifies a range of letters or digits to match. To separate the start
and end of a range, use a hyphen ( - ).
()
Specifies a group of terms to match. Stored as numbered variables.
Use for back references as \1 \2 .... \9.
*
0 or more terms.
+
One or more terms.
.
Any character except for a space (" ").
\
A backslash escapes special characters to suppress their special
meaning. For example, \. matches . (period symbol).
\n
Back reference. Matches the nth group.
&
Back reference. Matches the entire match.
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Chapter 9: Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI
Table 15 on page 215 lists some replacement examples.
Table 15: Replacement Examples
Command
Result
replace pattern myrouter with router1
Match: myrouter
Result: router1
replace pattern " 192\.168\.(.*)/24" with " 10.2.\1/28"
Match: 192.168.3.4/24
Result: 10.2.3.4/28
replace pattern " 1.\1" with " abc&def"
Match: 1.1
Result: abc1.1def
replace pattern 1.1 with " abc\&def"
Match: 1#1
Result: abc&def
Related
Documentation
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference on page 216
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration
You can make global changes to variables and identifiers in the Junos OS configuration
by using the replace configuration mode command. This command replaces a pattern
in a configuration with another pattern. For example, you can use this command to find
and replace all occurrences of an interface name when a PIC is moved to another slot in
the router.
[email protected]# replace pattern pattern1 with pattern2 <upto n>
pattern pattern1 is a text string or regular expression that defines the identifiers and values
you want to replace in the configuration.
pattern2 is a text string or regular expression that replaces the identifiers and values
located with pattern1.
Juniper Networks uses standard UNIX-style regular expression syntax (as defined in
POSIX 1003.2). If the regular expression contains spaces, operators, or wildcard characters,
enclose the expression in quotation marks. Greedy qualifiers (match as much as possible)
are supported. Lazy qualifiers (match as little as possible) are not.
The upto n option specifies the number of objects replaced. The value of n controls the
total number of objects that are replaced in the configuration (not the total number of
times the pattern occurs). Objects at the same hierarchy level (siblings) are replaced
first. Multiple occurrences of a pattern within a given object are considered a single
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replacement. For example, if a configuration contains a 010101 text string, the command
replace pattern 01 with pattern 02 upto 2 replaces 010101 with 020202 (instead of 020201).
Replacement of 010101 with 020202 is considered a single replacement (n = 1), not three
separate replacements (n =3).
If you do not specify an upto option, all identifiers and values in the configuration that
match pattern1 are replaced.
The replace command is available in configuration mode at any hierarchy level. All
matches are case-sensitive.
Related
Documentation
•
Common Regular Expressions to Use with the replace Command on page 214
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference on page 216
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Replacing an Interface
Name on page 218
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
on page 220
•
Using Wildcard Characters in Interface Names on page 213
•
Using Keyboard Sequences to Move Around and Edit the Junos OS CLI on page 211
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the \n Back
Reference
This example shows how you can use a backreference to replace a pattern.
•
Requirements on page 216
•
Overview on page 217
•
Configuration on page 217
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initiation is required before configuring this
example.
Before you begin, configure the following:
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces
xe-0/0/0 {
unit 0;
}
fe-3/0/1 {
vlan-tagging;
unit 0 {
description "inet6 configuration. IP: 2000::c0a8::1bf5";
vlan-id 100;
family inet {
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address 17.10.1.1/24;
}
family inet6 {
address 2000::c0a8:1bf5/3;
}
}
}
To quickly configure this initial configuration, copy the following commands and paste
them in a text file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your
network configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit]
hierarchy level:
set interfaces xe-0/0/0 unit 0
set interfaces fe-3/0/1 vlan-tagging
set interfaces fe-3/0/1 unit 0 description "inet6 configuration IP: 2000::c0a8::1bf5"
set interfaces fe-3/0/1 unit 0 vlan-id 100
set interfaces fe-3/0/1 unit 0 family inet address 17.10.1.1/24
set interfaces fe-3/0/1 unit 0 family inet6 address 2000::c0a8:1bf5/3
Overview
One of the most useful features of regular expressions is the backreference.
Backreferences provide a convenient way to identify a repeated character or substring
within a string. Once you find the pattern, you can repeat it without writing it again. You
refer to the previously captured pattern with just \# (where # is a numeral that indicates
the number of times you want the pattern matched).
You can use backreferences to recall, or find, data and replace it with something else. In
this way you can reformat large sets of data with a single replace command, thus saving
you the time it would take to look for and replace the pattern manually.
Configuration
Configuring a Replacement Using a Backreference in the Command
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To replace a pattern in a Junos OS configuration using a backreference:
•
Use the replace command.
[edit]
[email protected]# replace pattern pattern1 with pattern2
In this case, we want to replace “:1bf5” with “1bf5”.
[edit]
[email protected]# replace pattern "(.*):1bf5" with "\11bf5"
Notice the backreference (\1), which indicates the pattern should be searched for
and replaced only once.
Results
Here is the resulting configuration:
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[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces
xe-0/0/0 {
unit 0;
}
fe-3/0/1 {
vlan-tagging;
unit 0 {
description "inet6 configuration. IP: 2000::c0a8:1bf5";
vlan-id 100;
family inet {
address 17.10.1.1/24;
}
family inet6 {
address 2000::c0a8:1bf5/3;
}
}
}
In this example, the pattern 2000::c0a8::1bf5 is replaced with 2000::c0a8:1bf5 once.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Replacing an Interface
Name on page 218
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Replacing an Interface
Name
This example shows how to replace an interface name globally in a configuration by
using the replace command.
Using the replace command can be a faster and better way to change a configuration.
For example, a PIC might be moved to another slot in a router, which changes the interface
name. With one command you can update the whole configuration. Or you might want
to quickly extend the configuration with other similar configurations, for example, similar
interfaces. By using a combination of the copy and replace commands, you can add to
a configuration and then replace certain aspects of the newly copied configurations. The
replace command works with regular expressions. Regular expressions are quick, flexible,
and ubiquitous. You can fashion just about any pattern you might need to search for, and
most programming languages support regular expressions.
•
Requirements on page 218
•
Overview on page 219
•
Configuration on page 219
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this
example.
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Chapter 9: Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI
Before you begin, configure the following hierarchy on the router. To quickly configure
this hierarchy, see “CLI Quick Configuration” on page 98 .
[email protected]# show interfaces
so-0/0/0 {
dce;
}
[email protected]# show protocols
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-0/0/0.0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
Overview
This example shows how to replace an interface name globally in a configuration by
using the replace command. It is a simple example.
The previous configuration is the starting point for this configuration update. In the course
of this example, you change the name of the initial interface throughout the configuration
with one command.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure the initial configuration for this example, copy the following
commands, paste them into a text file, remove any line breaks and change any details
necessary to match your network configuration, copy and paste these commands into
the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy level, and then enter commit from configuration mode.:
set interfaces so-0/0/0 dce
set protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface so-0/0/0.0 hello-interval 5
Configuring an Interface Name Change
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To change an interface name:
1.
Make sure that you are at the top of the configuration mode hierarchy.
[email protected]# top
2.
Replace so-0/0/0 with so-1/1/0 using the replace command, which uses the pattern
keyword.
[email protected]# replace pattern so-0/0/0 with so-1/1/0
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Results
After making the required changes, verify the configuration by using the show interfaces
and show protocols configuration mode commands.
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces
so-1/1/0 {
dce;
}
[email protected]# show protocols
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface so-1/1/0.0 {
hello-interval 5;
}
}
}
After you have confirmed that the configuration is correct, enter the commit command.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
on page 220
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
•
Examples: Re-Using Configuration on page 79
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
Consider the hierarchy shown in Figure 14 on page 221. The text string 010101 appears in
three places: the description sections of ge-0/0/0, ge-0/0/0.0, and fe-0/0/1. These three
instances are three objects. The following example shows how you can use the upto
option to perform replacements in a JUNOS configuration:
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Chapter 9: Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI
Figure 14: Replacement by Object
An upto 2 option in the replace command converts 01 to 02 for two object instances. The
objects under the main interfaces ge-0/0/0 and fe-0/0/1 will be replaced first (since
these are siblings in the hierarchy level). Because of the upto 2 restriction, the replace
command replaces patterns in the first and second instance in the hierarchy (siblings),
but not the third instance (child of the first instance).
[email protected]# show interfaces
ge-0/0/0 {
description "mkt 010101"; #First instance in the hierarchy
unit 0 {
description "mkt 010101"; #Third instance in the hierarchy (child of the first
instance)
}
}
fe-0/0/1 {
description "mkt 010101"; #second instance in the hierarchy (sibling of the first
instance)
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 200.200.20.2/24;
}
}
}
[edit]
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[email protected]# replace pattern 01 with 02 upto 2
[edit]
[email protected]# commit
commit complete
[edit]
[email protected]# show interfaces
ge-0/0/0 {
description "mkt 020202"; #First instance in the hierarchy
unit 0 {
description "mkt 010101"; #Third instance in the hierarchy (child of the first
instance)
}
}
fe-0/0/1 {
description "mkt 020202"; #second instance in the hierarchy (sibling of the first
instance)
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 200.200.20.2/24;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
Using Regular Expressions to Delete Related Items from a Junos OS cConfiguration
The Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) enables you to delete related configuration
items simultaneously, such as channelized interfaces or static routes, by using a single
command and regular expressions. Deleting a statement or an identifier effectively
“unconfigures” the functionality associated with that statement or identifier, returning
that functionality to its default condition.
You can only delete certain parts of the configuration where you normally put multiple
items, for example, interfaces. However, you cannot delete "groups" of different items;
for example:
[email protected]# show system services
ftp;
rlogin;
rsh;
ssh {
root-login allow;
}
telnet;
[edit]
[email protected]# wildcard delete system services *
syntax error.
When you delete a statement, the statement and all its subordinate statements and
identifiers are removed from the configuration.
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Chapter 9: Using Shortcuts, Wildcards, and Regular Expressions in the CLI
To delete related configuration items, issue the wildcard configuration mode command
with the delete option and specify the statement path, the items to be summarized with
a regular expression, and the regular expression.
[email protected]# wildcard delete <statement-path> <identifier> <regular-expression>
NOTE: When you use the wildcard command to delete related configuration
items, the regular expression must be the final statement.
If the Junos OS matches more than eight related items, the CLI displays only
the first eight items.
Deleting Interfaces
from the Configuration
Deleting Routes from
the Configuration
Related
Documentation
Delete multiple T1 interfaces in the range from t1-0/0/0:0 through t1-0/0/0:23:
[email protected]# wildcard delete interfaces t1-0/0/0:.*
matched: t1-0/0/0:0
matched: t1-0/0/0:1
matched: t1-0/0/0:2
Delete 3 objects? [yes,no] (no) no
Delete static routes in the range from 172.0.0.0 to 172.255.0.0:
[email protected]# wildcard delete routing-options static route 172.*
matched: 172.16.0.0/12
matched: 172.16.14.0/24
matched: 172.16.100.0/24
matched: 172.16.128.0/19
matched: 172.16.160.0/24
matched: 172.17.12.0/23
matched: 172.17.24.0/23
matched: 172.17.28.0/23
...
Delete 13 objects? [yes,no] (no)
•
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group on page 232
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CHAPTER 10
Using Configuration Groups to Quickly
Configure Devices
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
Example: Configuring and Applying Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 230
•
Example: Creating and Applying Configuration Groups on a TX Matrix Router on page 231
•
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group on page 232
•
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups on page 234
•
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups on page 237
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 238
•
Example: Configuring a Consistent IP Address for the Management Interface on page 241
•
Example: Configuring Peer Entities on page 242
•
Establishing Regional Configurations on page 244
•
Configuring Wildcard Configuration Group Names on page 245
•
Example: Referencing the Preset Statement From the Junos OS defaults
Group on page 247
•
Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied
to the Configuration on page 247
•
Using Conditions to Apply Configuration Groups Overview on page 248
•
Example: Configuring Conditions for Applying Configuration Groups on page 248
•
Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups on page 251
•
Example: Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups on page 251
•
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups on page 253
•
Setting Up Routing Engine Configuration Groups on page 254
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CLI User Guide
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups
This topic provides an overview of the configuration groups feature and the inheritance
model in Junos OS, and contains the following sections:
•
Configuration Groups Overview on page 226
•
Inheritance Model on page 226
•
Configuring Configuration Groups on page 226
Configuration Groups Overview
The configuration groups feature in Junos OS enables you to create a group containing
configuration statements and to direct the inheritance of that group’s statements in the
rest of the configuration. The same group can be applied to different sections of the
configuration, and different sections of one group’s configuration statements can be
inherited in different places in the configuration.
Configuration groups enable you to create smaller, more logically constructed
configuration files, making it easier to configure and maintain Junos OS. For example,
you can group statements that are repeated in many places in the configuration, such
as when configuring interfaces, and thereby limit updates to just the group.
You can also use wildcards in a configuration group to allow configuration data to be
inherited by any object that matches a wildcard expression.
The configuration group mechanism is separate from the grouping mechanisms used
elsewhere in the configuration, such as BGP groups. Configuration groups provide a
generic mechanism that can be used throughout the configuration but that are known
only to the Junos OS CLI. The individual software processes that perform the actions
directed by the configuration receive the expanded form of the configuration—they have
no knowledge of configuration groups.
Inheritance Model
Configuration groups use true inheritance, which involves a dynamic, ongoing relationship
between the source of the configuration data and the target of that data. Data values
changed in the configuration group are automatically inherited by the target. The target
does not need to contain the inherited information, although the inherited values can be
overridden in the target without affecting the source from which they were inherited.
This inheritance model allows you to see only the instance-specific information without
seeing the inherited details. A command pipe in configuration mode allows you to display
the inherited data.
Configuring Configuration Groups
For areas of your configuration to inherit configuration statements, you must first put the
statements into a configuration group and then apply that group to the levels in the
configuration hierarchy that require the statements.
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To configure configuration groups and inheritance, you can include the groups statement
at the [edit] hierarchy level:
[edit]
groups {
group-name {
configuration-data;
}
}
Include the apply-groups [ group-names ] statement anywhere in the configuration where
the configuration statements contained in a configuration group are needed.
Related
Documentation
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group
To create a configuration group, include the groups statement at the [edit] hierarchy
level:
[edit]
groups {
group-name {
configuration-data;
}
lccn-re0 {
configuration-data;
}
lccn-re1 {
configuration-data;
}
}
group-name is the name of a configuration group. You can configure more than one
configuration group by specifying multiple group-name statements. However, you cannot
use the prefix junos- in a group name because it is reserved for use by Junos OS. Similarly,
the configuration group juniper-ais is reserved exclusively for Juniper Advanced Insight
Solutions (AIS)-related configuration. For more information on the juniper-ais configuration
group, see the Juniper Networks Advanced Insight Solutions Guide.
One reason for the naming restriction is a configuration group called junos-defaults. This
preset configuration group is applied to the configuration automatically. You cannot
modify or remove the junos-defaults configuration group. For more information about
the Junos default configuration group, see “Using Junos OS Defaults Groups” on page 253.
On routers that support multiple Routing Engines, you can also specify two special group
names:
•
re0—Configuration statements applied to the Routing Engine in slot 0.
•
re1—Configuration statements applied to the Routing Engine in slot 1.
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NOTE: The configuration statements re0 and re1 are case senstive.
The configuration specified in group re0 is only applied if the current Routing Engine is in
slot 0; likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is only applied if the current Routing
Engine is in slot 1. Therefore, both Routing Engines can use the same configuration file,
each using only the configuration statements that apply to it. Each re0 or re1 group
contains at a minimum the configuration for the hostname and the management interface
(fxp0). If each Routing Engine uses a different management interface, the group also
should contain the configuration for the backup router and static routes.
In addition, the TX Matrix router supports group names for the Routing Engines in each
T640 router attached to the routing matrix. Providing special group names for all Routing
Engines in the routing matrix allows you to configure the individual Routing Engines in
each T640 router differently. Parameters that are not configured at the [edit groups]
hierarchy level apply to all Routing Engines in the routing matrix.
configuration-data contains the configuration statements applied elsewhere in the
configuration with the apply-groups statement. To have a configuration inherit the
statements in a configuration group, include the apply-groups statement. For information
about the apply-groups statement, see “Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group” on
page 229.
The group names for Routing Engines on the TX Matrix router have the following formats:
•
lccn-re0—Configuration statements applied to the Routing Engine in slot 0 in a specified
T640 router.
•
lccn-re1—Configuration statements applied to the Routing Engine in slot 1 in a specified
T640 router.
n identifies the T640 router and can be from 0 through 3. For example, to configure
Routing Engine 1 properties for lcc3, you include statements at the [edit groups lcc3–re1]
hierarchy level. For information about the TX Matrix router and routing matrix, see the
Administration Guide for Security Devices.
NOTE: The management Ethernet interface used for the TX Matrix Plus
router, T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing matrix, and PTX Series Packet
Transport Routers, is em0. Junos OS automatically creates the router’s
management Ethernet interface, em0.
Related
Documentation
228
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups on page 253
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group on page 232
•
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups on page 234
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Using Configuration Groups to Quickly Configure Devices
•
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups on page 237
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group
To have the Junos OS configuration inherit the statements from a configuration group,
include the apply-groups statement:
apply-groups [ group-names ];
If you specify more than one group name, list them in order of inheritance priority. The
configuration data in the first group takes priority over the data in subsequent groups.
For routers that support multiple Routing Engines, you can specify re0 and re1 group
names. The configuration specified in group re0 is only applied if the current Routing
Engine is in slot 0; likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is only applied if the
current Routing Engine is in slot 1. Therefore, both Routing Engines can use the same
configuration file, each using only the configuration statements that apply to it. Each re0
or re1 group contains at a minimum the configuration for the hostname and the
management interface (fxp0). If each Routing Engine uses a different management
interface, the group also should contain the configuration for the backup router and static
routes.
NOTE: The management Ethernet interface used for the TX Matrix Plus
router, T1600 routers in a routing matrix, and PTX Series Packet Transport
Switches, is em0.
You can include only one apply-groups statement at each specific level of the configuration
hierarchy. The apply-groups statement at a specific hierarchy level lists the configuration
groups to be added to the containing statement’s list of configuration groups.
Values specified at the specific hierarchy level override values inherited from the
configuration group.
Groups listed in nested apply-groups statements take priority over groups in outer
statements. In the following example, the BGP neighbor 10.0.0.1 inherits configuration
data from group one first, then from groups two and three. Configuration data in group
one overrides data in any other group. Data from group ten is used only if a statement is
not contained in any other group.
apply-groups [ eight nine ten ];
protocols {
apply-groups seven;
bgp {
apply-groups [ five six ];
group some-bgp-group {
apply-groups four;
neighbor 10.0.0.1 {
apply-groups [ one two three ];
}
}
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}
}
When you configure a group defined for the root level—that is, in the default logical
system–you cannot successfully apply that group to a nondefault logical system under
the [edit logical-systems logical-system-name] hierarchy level. Although the router accepts
the commit if you apply the group, the configuration group does not take effect for the
nondefault logical system. You can instead create an additional configuration group at
the root level and apply it within the logical system. Alternatively, you can modify the
original group so that it includes configuration for both the default and nondefault logical
system hierarchy levels.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring and Applying Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 230
•
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group on page 232
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups on page 234
•
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups on page 237
Example: Configuring and Applying Junos OS Configuration Groups
In this example, the SNMP configuration is divided between the group basic and the
normal configuration hierarchy.
There are a number of advantages to placing the system-specific configuration (SNMP
contact) into a configuration group and thus separating it from the normal configuration
hierarchy—the user can replace (using the load replace command) either section without
discarding data from the other.
In addition, setting a contact for a specific box is now possible because the group data
would be hidden by the router-specific data.
[edit]
groups {
basic { # User-defined group name
snmp { # This group contains some SNMP data
contact "My Engineering Group";
community BasicAccess {
authorization read-only;
}
}
}
}
apply-groups basic; # Enable inheritance from group "basic"
snmp { # Some normal (non-group) configuration
location "West of Nowhere";
}
This configuration is equivalent to the following:
[edit]
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snmp {
location "West of Nowhere";
contact "My Engineering Group";
community BasicAccess {
authorization read-only;
}
}
For information about how to disable inheritance of a configuration group, see “Disabling
Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group” on page 232.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Creating and Applying Configuration Groups on a TX Matrix Router on page 231
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 238
•
Example: Configuring Peer Entities on page 242
•
Example: Referencing the Preset Statement From the Junos OS defaults Group on
page 247
•
Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied to the Configuration
on page 247
•
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups on page 237
•
Example: Configuring a Consistent IP Address for the Management Interface on page 241
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
Example: Creating and Applying Configuration Groups on a TX Matrix Router
The following example shows how to configure and apply configuration groups on a TX
Matrix Router:
[edit]
groups {
re0 { # Routing Engine 0 on TX Matrix router
system {
host-name hostname;
backup-router ip-address;
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address ip-address;
}
}
}
}
}
re1 { # Routing Engine 1 on TX Matrix router
system {
host-name hostname;
backup-router ip-address;
}
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interfaces {
fxp0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address ip-address;
}
}
}
}
}
lcc0-re0 { # Routing Engine 0 on T640 router numbered 0
system {
host-name hostname;
backup-router ip-address;
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address ip-address;
}
}
}
}
}
lcc0-re1 { # Routing Engine 1 on T640 router numbered 0
system {
host-name hostname;
backup-router ip-address;
}
interfaces {
fxp0 {
unit 0 {
family inet {
address ip-address;
}
}
}
}
}
}
apply-groups [ re0 re1 lcc0-re0 lcc0-re1 ];
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring and Applying Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 230
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group
To disable inheritance of a configuration group at any level except the top level of the
hierarchy, include the apply-groups-except statement:
apply-groups-except [ group-names ];
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This statement is useful when you use the apply-group statement at a specific hierarchy
level but also want to override the values inherited from the configuration group for a
specific parameter.
Example: Disabling
Inheritance on
Interface so-1/1/0
In the following example, the apply-groups statement is applied globally at the interfaces
level. The apply-groups-except statement is also applied at interface so-1/1/0 so that it
uses the default values for the hold-time and link-mode statements.
[edit]
groups { # "groups" is a top-level statement
global { # User-defined group name
interfaces {
<*> {
hold-time down 640;
link-mode full-duplex;
}
}
}
}
apply-groups global;
interfaces {
so-1/1/0 {
apply-groups-except global; # Disables inheritance from group "global"
# so-1/1/0 uses default value for “hold-time”
# and "link-mode"
}
}
For information about applying a configuration group, see “Applying the Junos OS
Configuration Group” on page 229.
Configuration groups can add some confusion regarding the actual values used by the
router, because configuration data can be inherited from configuration groups. To view
the actual values used by the router, use the display inheritance command after the pipe
( | ) in a show command. This command displays the inherited statements at the level
at which they are inherited and the group from which they have been inherited.
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
snmp {
location "West of Nowhere";
##
## 'My Engineering Group' was inherited from group 'basic'
##
contact "My Engineering Group";
##
## 'BasicAccess' was inherited from group 'basic'
##
community BasicAccess {
##
## 'read-only' was inherited from group 'basic'
##
authorization read-only;
}
}
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To display the expanded configuration (the configuration, including the inherited
statements) without the ## lines, use the except command after the pipe in a show
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance | except ##
snmp {
location "West of Nowhere";
contact "My Engineering Group";
community BasicAccess {
authorization read-only;
}
}
NOTE: Using the display inheritance | except ## option removes all the lines
with ##. Therefore, you might also not be able to view information about
passwords and other important data where ## is used. To view the complete
configuration details with all the information without just the comments
marked with ##, use the no-comments option with the display inheritance
command:
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance no-comments
snmp {
location "West of Nowhere";
contact "My Engineering Group";
community BasicAccess {
authorization read-only;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups
You can use wildcards to identify names and allow one statement to provide data for a
variety of statements. For example, grouping the configuration of the sonet-options
statement over all SONET/SDH interfaces or the dead interval for OSPF over all
Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) interfaces simplifies configuration files and eases
their maintenance.
Using wildcards in normal configuration data is done in a style that is consistent with
that used with traditional UNIX shell wildcards. In this style, you can use the following
metacharacters:
234
•
Asterisk ( * )—Matches any string of characters.
•
Question mark ( ? )—Matches any single character.
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Chapter 10: Using Configuration Groups to Quickly Configure Devices
•
Open bracket ( [ )—Introduces a character class.
•
Close bracket ( ] )—Indicates the end of a character class. If the close bracket is missing,
the open bracket matches a [ rather than introduce a character class.
•
A character class matches any of the characters between the square brackets. Within
a configuration group, an interface name that includes a character class must be
enclosed in quotation marks.
•
Hyphen ( - )—Specifies a range of characters.
•
Exclamation point ( ! )—The character class can be complemented by making an
exclamation point the first character of the character class. To include a close bracket
(]) in a character class, make it the first character listed (after the !, if any). To include
a minus sign, make it the first or last character listed.
NOTE: If used inside the groups hierarchy, an identifier name cannot start
with < unless you are defining a wildcard statement, in which case the
wildcard statement must have a closing >.
Wildcarding in configuration groups follows the same rules, but < and > have a special
meaning when used under the groups hierarchy. In the groups hierarchy, any term using
a wildcard pattern must be enclosed in angle brackets <pattern> to differentiate it from
other wildcarding in the configuration file.
[edit]
groups {
sonet-default {
interfaces {
<so-*> {
sonet-options {
payload-scrambler;
rfc-2615;
}
}
}
}
}
Wildcard expressions match (and provide configuration data for) existing statements in
the configuration that match their expression only. In the previous example, the expression
<so-*> passes its sonet-options statement to any interface that matches the expression
so-*.
The following example shows how to specify a range of interfaces:
[edit]
groups {
gigabit-ethernet-interfaces {
interfaces {
"<ge-1/2/[5-8]>" {
description "These interfaces reserved for Customer ABC";
}
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}
}
}
Angle brackets allow you to pass normal wildcarding through without modification. In
any matching within the configuration, whether it is done with or without wildcards, the
first item encountered in the configuration that matches is used. In the following example,
data from the wildcarded BGP groups is inherited in the order in which the groups are
listed. The preference value from <*a*> overrides the preference in <*b*>, just as the p
value from <*c*> overrides the one from <*d*>. Data values from any of these groups
override the data values from abcd.
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
one {
protocols {
bgp {
group <*a*> {
preference 1;
}
group <*b*> {
preference 2;
}
group <*c*> {
out-delay 3;
}
group <*d*> {
out-delay 4;
}
group abcd {
preference 10;
hold-time 10;
out-delay 10;
}
}
}
}
}
protocols {
bgp {
group abcd {
apply-groups one;
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
protocols {
bgp {
group abcd {
##
## ’1’ was inherited from group ’one’
##
preference 1;
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##
## ’10’ was inherited from group ’one’
##
hold-time 10;
##
## ’3’ was inherited from group ’one’
##
out-delay 3;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Configuring Wildcard Configuration Group Names on page 245
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
Example: Configuring Sets of Statements with Configuration Groups
When sets of statements exist in configuration groups, all values are inherited. For
example:
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
basic {
snmp {
interface so-1/1/1.0;
}
}
}
apply-groups basic;
snmp {
interface so-0/0/0.0;
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
snmp {
##
## ’so-1/1/1.0’ was inherited from group ’basic’
##
interface [ so-0/0/0.0 so-1/1/1.0 ];
}
For sets that are not displayed within brackets, all values are also inherited. For example:
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
worldwide {
system {
name-server {
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10.0.0.100;
10.0.0.200;
}
}
}
}
apply-groups worldwide;
system {
name-server {
10.0.0.1;
10.0.0.2;
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
system {
name-server {
##
## ’10.0.0.100’ was inherited from group ’worldwide’
##
10.0.0.100;
##
## ’10.0.0.200’ was inherited from group ’worldwide’
##
10.0.0.200;
10.0.0.1;
10.0.0.2;
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups
You can use configuration groups to separate the common interface media parameters
from the interface-specific addressing information. The following example places
configuration data for ATM interfaces into a group called atm-options:
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
atm-options {
interfaces {
<at-*> {
atm-options {
vpi 0 maximum-vcs 1024;
}
unit <*> {
encapsulation atm-snap;
point-to-point;
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family iso;
}
}
}
}
}
apply-groups atm-options;
interfaces {
at-0/0/0 {
unit 100 {
vci 0.100;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.100/30;
}
}
unit 200 {
vci 0.200;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.200/30;
}
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
interfaces {
at-0/0/0 {
##
## "atm-options" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
atm-options {
##
## "1024" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
vpi 0 maximum-vcs 1024;
}
unit 100 {
##
## "atm-snap" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
encapsulation atm-snap;
##
## "point-to-point" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
point-to-point;
vci 0.100;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.100/30;
}
##
## "iso" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
family iso;
}
unit 200 {
##
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## "atm-snap" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
encapsulation atm-snap;
##
## "point-to-point" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
point-to-point;
vci 0.200;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.200/30;
}
##
## "iso" was inherited from group "atm-options"
##
family iso;
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance | except ##
interfaces {
at-0/0/0 {
atm-options {
vpi 0 maximum-vcs 1024;
}
unit 100 {
encapsulation atm-snap;
point-to-point;
vci 0.100;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.100/30;
}
family iso;
}
unit 200 {
encapsulation atm-snap;
point-to-point;
vci 0.200;
family inet {
address 10.0.0.200/30;
}
family iso;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
240
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Interface Naming Conventions Used in the Junos OS Operational Commands on page 182
•
Example: Configuring a Consistent IP Address for the Management Interface on page 241
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 10: Using Configuration Groups to Quickly Configure Devices
Example: Configuring a Consistent IP Address for the Management Interface
On routers with multiple Routing Engines, each Routing Engine is configured with a
separate IP address for the management interface (fxp0). To access the master Routing
Engine, you must know which Routing Engine is active and use the appropriate IP address.
Optionally, for consistent access to the master Routing Engine, you can configure an
additional IP address and use this address for the management interface regardless of
which Routing Engine is active. This additional IP address is active only on the
management interface for the master Routing Engine. During switchover, the address
moves to the new master Routing Engine.
In the following example, address 10.17.40.131 is configured for both Routing Engines and
includes a master-only statement. With this configuration, the 10.17.40.131 address is
active only on the master Routing Engine. The address remains consistent regardless of
which Routing Engine is active. Address 10.17.40.132 is assigned to fxp0 on re0, and
10.17.40.133 is assigned to fxp0 on re1.
[edit groups re0 interfaces fxp0]
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.17.40.131/25 {
master-only;
}
address 10.17.40.132/25;
}
}
[edit groups re1 interfaces fxp0]
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.17.40.131/25 {
master-only;
}
address 10.17.40.133/25;
}
}
This feature is available on all routers that include dual Routing Engines. On a routing
matrix composed of the TX Matrix router, this feature is applicable to the switch-card
chassis (SCC) only. Likewise, on a routing matrix composed of a TX Matrix Plus router,
this feature is applicable to the switch-fabric chassis (SFC) only.
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NOTE:
Related
Documentation
•
If you configure the same IP address for a management interface or internal
interface such as fxp0 and an external physical interface such as ge-0/0/1,
when graceful Routing Engine switchover (GRES) is enabled, the CLI
displays an appropriate commit error message that identical addresses
have been found on the private and public interfaces. In such cases, you
must assign unique IP addresses for the two interfaces that have duplicate
addresses.
•
The management Ethernet interface used for the TX Matrix Plus router,
T1600 routers in a routing matrix, and PTX Series Packet Transport Routers,
is em0. Junos OS automatically creates the router’s management Ethernet
interface, em0.
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Example: Configuring Interfaces Using Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 238
Example: Configuring Peer Entities
In this example, we create a group some-isp that contains configuration data relating to
another Internet service provider (ISP). We can then insert apply-group statements at
any point to allow any location in the configuration hierarchy to inherit this data.
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
some-isp {
interfaces {
<xe-*> {
gigether-options {
flow-control;
}
}
}
protocols {
bgp {
group <*> {
neighbor <*> {
remove-private;
}
}
}
pim {
interface <*> {
version 1;
}
}
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}
}
}
interfaces {
xe-0/0/0 {
apply-groups some-isp;
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
protocols {
bgp {
group main {
neighbor 10.254.0.1 {
apply-groups some-isp;
}
}
}
pim {
interface xe-0/0/0.0 {
apply-groups some-isp;
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
interfaces {
xe-0/0/0 {
##
## "gigether-options" was inherited from group "some-isp"
##
gigether-options {
##
## "flow-control" was inherited from group "some-isp"
##
flow-control;
}
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/24;
}
}
}
}
protocols {
bgp {
group main {
neighbor 10.254.0.1 {
##
## "remove-private" was inherited from group "some-isp"
##
remove-private;
}
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}
}
pim {
interface xe-0/0/0.0 {
##
## "1" was inherited from group "some-isp"
##
version 1;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Establishing Regional Configurations on page 244
Establishing Regional Configurations
In this example, one group is populated with configuration data that is standard
throughout the company, while another group contains regional deviations from this
standard:
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
standard {
interfaces {
<t3-*> {
t3-options {
compatibility-mode larscom subrate 10;
idle-cycle-flag ones;
}
}
}
}
northwest {
interfaces {
<t3-*> {
t3-options {
long-buildout;
compatibility-mode kentrox;
}
}
}
}
}
apply-groups standard;
interfaces {
t3-0/0/0 {
apply-groups northwest;
}
}
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[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
interfaces {
t3-0/0/0 {
##
## "t3-options" was inherited from group "northwest"
##
t3-options {
##
## "long-buildout" was inherited from group "northwest"
##
long-buildout;
##
## "kentrox" was inherited from group "northwest"
##
compatibility-mode kentrox;
##
## "ones" was inherited from group "standard"
##
idle-cycle-flag ones;
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Example: Configuring Peer Entities on page 242
Configuring Wildcard Configuration Group Names
Wildcards are configuration group names that use special characters to create a pattern
that can be applied to multiple statements. Wildcards are useful for copying one set of
configuration options to a large number of different configuration groups. It is important
to set up your wildcard name properly to ensure that the wildcard configuration options
get copied to the appropriate configuration groups.
In this example, you configure different values for the <*-major> and <*-minor> wildcard
groups under the label-switched-path statement. The asterisk (*) character represents
a section of the wildcard name that can match any string of characters. For example the
configuration options under label-switched-path <*-major> are passed onto
label-switched-path metro-major and any other label-switched-path configuration group
containing -major in its name.
[edit]
[email protected]# show
groups {
mpls-conf {
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path <*-major> {
retry-timer 5;
bandwidth 155m;
optimize-timer 60;
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}
label-switched-path <*-minor> {
retry-timer 15;
bandwidth 64k;
optimize-timer 120;
}
}
}
}
}
apply-groups mpls-conf;
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path metro-major {
to 10.0.0.10;
}
label-switched-path remote-minor {
to 10.0.0.20;
}
}
}
[edit]
[email protected]# show | display inheritance
protocols {
mpls {
label-switched-path metro-major {
to 10.0.0.10;
##
## "5" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
retry-timer 5;
## "155m" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
bandwidth 155m;
##
## "60" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
optimize-timer 60;
}
label-switched-path remote-minor {
to 10.0.0.20;
##
## "15" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
retry-timer 15;
##
## "64k" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
bandwidth 64k;
##
## "120" was inherited from group "mpls-conf"
##
optimize-timer 120;
}
}
}
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Related
Documentation
•
Using Wildcards with Configuration Groups on page 234
Example: Referencing the Preset Statement From the Junos OS defaults Group
The following example is a preset statement from the Junos defaults group that is
available for FTP in a stateful firewall:
[edit]
groups {
junos-defaults {
applications {
application junos-ftp {# Use FTP default configuration
application-protocol ftp;
protocol tcp;
destination-port 21;
}
}
}
To reference a preset Junos default statement from the Junos defaults group, include
the junos-default-name statement at the applicable hierarchy level. For example, to
reference the Junos default statement for FTP in a stateful firewall, include the junos-ftp
statement at the [edit services stateful-firewall rule my-rule term my-term from
applications] hierarchy level:
[edit]
services {
stateful-firewall {
rule my-rule {
term my-term {
from {
applications junos-ftp; #Reference predefined statement, junos-ftp
}
}
}
}
}
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied to the Configuration
on page 247
•
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups on page 253
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied to the Configuration
To view the Junos defaults that have been applied to the configuration, issue the show
| display inheritance defaults command. For example, to view the inherited Junos defaults
at the [edit system ports] hierarchy level:
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[email protected]# show system ports | display inheritance defaults
## ## 'console' was inherited from group 'junos-defaults'
## 'vt100' was inherited from group 'junos-defaults'
## console type vt100;
If you choose not to use existing Junos default statements, you can create your own
configuration groups manually.
To view the complete configuration information without the comments marked with ##,
use the no-comments option with the display inheritance command.
Related
Documentation
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Configuring Configuration Groups on page 226
Using Conditions to Apply Configuration Groups Overview
You can use the when statement at the [edit groups group-name] hierarchy level to define
conditions under which a configuration group should be applied.
You can configure a group to be applied based on the type of chassis, model, or Routing
Engine, virtual chassis member, cluster node, and start and optional end time of day or
date.
For example, you could use the when statement to create a generic configuration group
for each type of node and then apply the configuration based on certain node properties,
such as chassis or model.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Configuring Conditions for Applying Configuration Groups on page 248
Example: Configuring Conditions for Applying Configuration Groups
This example shows how to configure conditions under which a specified configuration
group is to be applied.
•
Requirements on page 248
•
Overview on page 248
•
Configuration on page 249
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before you configure this
example.
Overview
You can configure your group configuration data at the [edit groups group-name] hierarchy
level, then use the when statement to have the group applied based on conditions
including: type of chassis, model, routing-engine, virtual chassis member, cluster node,
and start and optional end time of day or date.
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If you specify multiple conditions in a single configuration group, all conditions must be
met before the configuration group is applied.
You can specify the start time or the time duration for the configuration group to be
applied. If only the start time is specified, the configuration group is applied at the specified
time and it remains in effect until the time is changed. If the end time is specified, then
on each day, the applied configuration group is started and stopped at the specified
times.
This example sets conditions in a configuration group, test1, such that this group is applied
only when all of the following conditions are met: the router is a model MX240 router
with chassis type LCC0, with a Routing Engine operating as RE0, is member0 of the virtual
chassis on node0, and the configuration group will only be in effect from 9:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. each day.
Configuration
CLI Quick
Configuration
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands, paste them into a text
file, remove any line breaks, change any details necessary to match your network
configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the [edit] hierarchy
level.
set groups test1 when model mx240
set groups test1 when chassis lcc0
set groups test1 when routing-engine re0
set groups test1 when member member0
set groups test1 when node node0
set groups test1 when time 9 to 5
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure conditions for configuration group test1:
1.
Set the condition that identifies the model MX240 router.
[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set model mx240
2.
Set the condition that identifies the chassis type as LCC0.
[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set chassis lcc0
3.
Set the condition that identifies the Routing Engine operating as RE0.
[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set routing-engine re0
4.
Set the condition that identifies the virtual chassis member0.
[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set member member0
5.
Set the condition that identifies the cluster node0.
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[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set node node0
6.
Set the condition that applies the group only between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. daily.
[edit groups test1 when]
[email protected]# set time 9 to 5
NOTE: The syntax for specifying the time is: time <start-time> [to
<end-time>] using the time format yyyy-mm-dd.hh:mm, hh:mm, or hh.
7.
Commit the configuration.
[email protected]# commit
Results
From configuration mode, confirm your configuration by entering the show groups test1
command. If the output does not display the intended configuration, repeat the
instructions in this example to correct the configuration.
[email protected]# show groups test1
when {
time 9 to 5;
chassis lcc0;
model mx240;
routing-engine re0;
member member0;
node node0;
}
Verification
Confirm that the configuration is working properly.
•
Checking Group Inheritance with Conditional Data on page 250
Checking Group Inheritance with Conditional Data
Purpose
Action
Verify that conditional data from a configuration group is inherited when applied.
The show | display inheritance operational command can be issued with the when data
to display the conditional inheritance. Using this example, you could issue one of these
commands to determine that the conditional data was inherited:
[email protected]> show | display inheritance when model mx240
[email protected]> show | display inheritance when chassis lcc0
[email protected]> show | display inheritance when routing-engine re0
[email protected]> show | display inheritance when member member0
[email protected]> show | display inheritance when node node0
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[email protected]> show | display inheritance when time 9 to 5
Related
Documentation
•
Understanding Junos OS Configuration Groups on page 226
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
Using Conditions to Apply Configuration Groups Overview on page 248
Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups
Configuration groups are used for applying configurations across other hierarchies without
re-entering configuration data. Some configuration groups specify every configuration
detail. Other configuration groups make use of wildcards to configure ranges of data,
without detailing each configuration line. Some configurations have an inheritance path
that includes a long string of configurations to be applied.
When a configuration that uses configuration groups is committed, the commit process
expands and reads all of the configuration data of the group into memory in order to
apply the configurations as intended. The commit performance can be negatively
impacted if many configuration groups are being applied, especially if the configuration
groups use wildcards extensively.
If your system uses many configuration groups that use wildcards, you can configure the
persist-groups-inheritance statement at the [edit system commit] hierarchy level to
improve commit time performance.
Using this option allows the system to build the inheritance path for each configuration
group inside the database, instead of in the process memory. This can improve commit
time performance. However, it can also can increase the database size by up to 22 percent.
Related
Documentation
•
Example: Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups on page 251
•
persist-groups-inheritance
Example: Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups
This example shows how to use the persist-groups-inheritance configuration statement
to improve commit time performance when committing configurations that make use
of many configuration groups that are created using wildcards.
•
Requirements on page 252
•
Overview on page 252
•
Configuration on page 252
•
Verification on page 252
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Requirements
This example uses the following hardware and software components:
•
One Juniper Networks M Series, MX Series, or T Series router that uses a number of
configuration groups created with wildcards.
•
Junos OS Release 13.2 or later.
Overview
When committing a configuration that uses configuration groups, at the time of commit,
all of the inheritance paths of the configuration groups must be fully expanded into
memory to apply the configurations as intended. This can negatively impact commit
performance if there are many configuration groups and they are configured using
wildcards.
To improve commit performance, you can configure persist-groups-inheritance at the
[edit system commit] hierarchy level. Configuring this option causes the configuration
groups to be expanded into the database instead of into the process memory at commit
time.
Configuration
Configuring Persist Groups Inheritance
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To configure persist-groups-inheritance:
1.
Set the persist-groups-inheritance option.
[edit system commit]
[email protected]# set persist-groups-inheritance
2.
Commit the configuration.
[edit system commit]
[email protected]# commit
Verification
Verifying the Configuration
Purpose
Action
Verify that persist-groups-inheritance is configured.
To confirm the configuration, use the show system commit command.
[edit ]
[email protected]# show system commit
persist-groups-inheritance
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Related
Documentation
•
Improving Commit Time When Using Configuration Groups on page 251
•
persist-groups-inheritance
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups
Junos OS provides a hidden and immutable configuration group called junos-defaults
that is automatically applied to the configuration of your router. The junos-defaults group
contains preconfigured statements that contain predefined values for common
applications. Some of the statements must be referenced to take effect, such as
definitions for applications (for example, FTP or telnet settings). Other statements are
applied automatically, such as terminal settings.
NOTE: Many identifiers included in the junos-defaults configuration group
begin with the name junos-. Because identifiers beginning with the name
junos- are reserved for use by Juniper Networks, you cannot define any
configuration objects using this name.
You cannot include junos-defaults as a configuration group name in an
apply-groups statement.
To view the full set of available preset statements from the Junos defaults group, issue
the show groups junos-defaults configuration mode command at the top level of the
configuration. The following example displays a partial list of Junos defaults groups:
[email protected]# show groups junos-defaults
# Make vt100 the default for the console port
system {
ports {
console type vt100;
}
}
applications {
# File Transfer Protocol
application junos-ftp {
application-protocol ftp;
protocol tcp;
destination-port 21;
}
# Trivial File Transfer Protocol
application junos-tftp {
application-protocol tftp;
protocol udp;
destination-port 69;
}
# RPC port mapper on TCP
application junos-rpc-portmap-tcp {
application-protocol rpc-portmap;
protocol tcp;
destination-port 111;
}
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# RPC port mapper on UDP
}
To reference statements available from the junos-defaults group, include the selected
junos- default-name statement at the applicable hierarchy level.
Related
Documentation
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
Example: Referencing the Preset Statement From the Junos OS defaults Group on
page 247
•
Example: Viewing Default Statements That Have Been Applied to the Configuration
on page 247
Setting Up Routing Engine Configuration Groups
In a router with two Routing Engines, one configuration should be shared between both
Routing Engines. This ensures that both Routing Engine configurations are identical.
Within this configuration, create two Routing Engine groups, one for each Routing Engine.
Within these groups, you specify the Routing Engine–specific parameters.
For more information about creating configuration groups, see the CLI User Guide.
For more information about the initial configuration for redundant Routing Engine systems
and the re0 group, see Junos OS High Availability Library for Routing Devices.
1.
Create the configuration group re0. The re0 group is a special group designator that
is only used by RE0 in a redundant routing platform.
[edit]
root# set groups re0
2. Navigate to the groups re0 level of the configuration hierarchy.
[edit]
root# edit groups re0
3. Specify the router hostname.
[edit groups re0]
root# set system host-name host-name
NOTE: The hostname specified in the router configuration is not used by
the DNS server to resolve to the correct IP address. This hostname is used
to display the name of the Routing Engine in the CLI. For example, the
hostname appears at the command-line prompt when the user is logged
in to the CLI:
[email protected]>
4. Configure the IP address and prefix length for the router Ethernet interface.
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•
For all devices except the TX Matrix Plus router, T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing
matrix, and PTX Series Packet Transport Routers:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces fxp0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
•
For the TX Matrix Plus router, T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing matrix only, and
PTX Series Packet Transport Routers:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces em0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
To use em0 as an out-of-band management Ethernet interface, you must configure
its logical port, em0.0, with a valid IP address.
•
For a T1600 standalone router (not connected to a TX Matrix Plus router and not
in a routing matrix):
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces fxp0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
5. Return to the top level of the hierarchy.
[edit groups re0]
root# top
6. Create the configuration group re1.
[edit]
root# set groups re1
7. Navigate to the groups re1 level of the configuration hierarchy.
[edit]
root# edit groups re1
8. Specify the router hostname.
[edit groups re1]
root# set system host-name host-name
9. Configure the IP address and prefix length for the router Ethernet interface.
•
For all devices except the TX Matrix Plus router, T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing
matrix, and PTX Series Packet Transport Routers:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces fxp0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
•
For the TX Matrix Plus router and T1600 or T4000 routers in a routing matrix only:
[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces em0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
To use em0 as an out-of-band management Ethernet interface, you must configure
its logical port, em0.0, with a valid IP address.
•
For a T1600 standalone router (not connected to a TX Matrix Plus router, and not
in a routing matrix):
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[edit]
[email protected]# set interfaces fxp0 unit 0 family inet address address/prefix-length
10. Return to the top level of the hierarchy.
[edit groups re0]
root# top
11. Specify the group application order.
[edit]
root# set apply-groups [ re0 re1 ]
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CHAPTER 11
Controlling the CLI Environment
•
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment on page 257
•
Setting the Junos OS CLI Screen Length and Width on page 259
•
Example: Controlling the CLI Environment on page 260
•
Example: Enabling Configuration Breadcrumbs on page 267
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment
In operational mode, you can control the Junos OS command-line interface (CLI)
environment. For example, you can specify the number of lines that are displayed on the
screen or your terminal type. The following output lists the options that you can use to
control the CLI environment:
[email protected]>set cli ?
Possible completions:
complete-on-space
directory
idle-timeout
logical-system
prompt
restart-on-upgrade
screen-length
screen-width
terminal
timestamp
Set
Set
Set
Set
Set
Set
whether typing space completes current word
working directory
maximum idle time before login session ends
default logical system
CLI command prompt string
whether CLI prompts to restart after software upgrade
Set number of lines on screen
Set number of characters on a line
Set terminal type
Timestamp CLI output
NOTE: When you use SSH to log in to the router or log in from the console
when its terminal type is already configured , your terminal type, screen length,
and screen width are already set.
This chapter discusses the following topics:
•
Setting the Terminal Type on page 258
•
Setting the CLI Prompt on page 258
•
Setting the CLI Directory on page 258
•
Setting the CLI Timestamp on page 258
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•
Setting the Idle Timeout on page 258
•
Setting the CLI to Prompt After a Software Upgrade on page 258
•
Setting Command Completion on page 259
•
Displaying CLI Settings on page 259
Setting the Terminal Type
To set the terminal type, use the set cli terminal command:
[email protected]> set cli terminal terminal-type
The terminal type can be one of the following: ansi, vt100, small-xterm, or xterm.
Setting the CLI Prompt
The default CLI prompt is [email protected]>. To change this prompt, use the set cli prompt
command. If the prompt string contains spaces, enclose the string in quotation marks ("
" ).
[email protected]> set cli prompt string
Setting the CLI Directory
To the set the current working directory, use the set cli directory command:
[email protected]> set cli directory directory
directory is the pathname of working directory.
Setting the CLI Timestamp
By default, CLI output does not include a timestamp. To include a timestamp in CLI
output, use the set cli timestamp command:
[email protected]> set cli timestamp [format time-date-format | disable]
If you do not specify a timestamp format, the default format is Mmm dd hh:mm:ss (for
example, Feb 08 17:20:49). Enclose the format in single quotation marks ( ‘).
Setting the Idle Timeout
By default, an individual CLI session never times out after extended times, unless the
idle-timeout statement has been included in the user’s login class configuration. To set
the maximum time an individual session can be idle before the user is logged off the
router, use the set cli idle-timeout command:
[email protected]> set cli idle-timeout timeout
timeout can be 0 through 100,000 minutes. Setting timeout to 0 disables the timeout.
Setting the CLI to Prompt After a Software Upgrade
By default, the CLI prompts you to restart after a software upgrade. To disable the prompt
for an individual session, use the set cli restart-on-upgrade off command:
[email protected]>set cli restart-on-upgrade off
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To reenable the prompt, use the set cli restart-on-upgrade on command:
[email protected]> set cli restart-on-upgrade on
Setting Command Completion
By default, you can press Tab or the Spacebar to have the CLI complete a command.
To have the CLI allow only a tab to complete a command, use the set cli
complete-on-space off command:
[email protected]> set cli complete-on-space off
Disabling complete-on-space
[email protected]>
To reenable the use of both spaces and tabs for command completion, use the set cli
complete-on-space on command:
[email protected]> set cli complete-on-space on
Enabling complete-on-space
[email protected]>
Displaying CLI Settings
To display the current CLI settings, use the show cli command:
us[email protected]> show cli
CLI screen length set to 24
CLI screen width set to 80
CLI complete-on-space set to on
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 13.3 and later, the value of screen width is 0 or in
the range of 40 through 1024.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
•
Release
Description
13.3
In Junos OS Release 13.3 and later, the value of screen width is 0 or in
the range of 40 through 1024.
Example: Controlling the CLI Environment on page 260
Setting the Junos OS CLI Screen Length and Width
You can set the Junos OS command-line interface (CLI) screen length and width according
to your specific requirements. This topic contains the following sections:
•
Setting the Screen Length on page 260
•
Setting the Screen Width on page 260
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Setting the Screen Length
The default CLI screen length is 24 lines. To change the length, use the set cli screen-length
command:
[email protected]> set cli screen-length length
Setting the screen length to 0 lines disables the display of output one screen at a time.
Disabling this UNIX more-type interface can be useful when you are issuing CLI commands
from scripts.
Setting the Screen Width
The value of CLI screen width is 0 or in the range of 40 through 1024. The default CLI
screen width is 80 characters. To change the width, use the set cli screen-width command:
[email protected]> set cli screen-width width
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 13.2 and earlier, the value of width is in the range
of 0 through 1024.
Release History Table
Related
Documentation
Release
Description
13.2
In Junos OS Release 13.2 and earlier, the value of width is in the range
of 0 through 1024.
•
Example: Controlling the CLI Environment on page 260
•
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment on page 257
Example: Controlling the CLI Environment
The following example shows you how to change the default CLI environment.
Changing the CLI environment is all about customizing the CLI window to fit your personal
preferences. Use the settings discussed in this topic to make the CLI window look and
behave according to what you find most convenient and efficient.
•
Requirements on page 260
•
Overview on page 261
•
Configuration on page 261
Requirements
No special configuration beyond device initialization is required before configuring this
example.
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Before starting this example, check what the default settings are. Use the show cli
operational mode command.
[email protected]> show cli
CLI complete-on-space set to on
CLI idle-timeout disabled
CLI restart-on-upgrade set to on
CLI screen length set to 66
CLI screen width set to 80
CLI terminal is 'xterm'
Is the prompt set to your [email protected]? If not, exit the CLI and enter the
operational mode again.
Is the CLI screen length set to 66 and the CLI screen width set to 80? If so, you can start
the example. Otherwise, make these changes to the CLI settings:
[email protected]> set cli screen-length 66
Screen length set to 66 lines long
[email protected]> set cli screen-width 80
Screen width set to 80 columns wide
Overview
To see a list of CLI environmental settings that you can change, use the set cli ? command.
[email protected]> set cli ?
Possible completions:
complete-on-space Set whether typing space completes current word
directory
Set working directory
idle-timeout
Set maximum idle time before login session ends
logical-system
Set default logical system
prompt
Set CLI command prompt string
restart-on-upgrade Set whether CLI prompts to restart after software upgrade
screen-length
Set number of lines on screen
screen-width
Set number of characters on a line
terminal
Set terminal type
timestamp
Timestamp CLI output
This example focuses on three of these commands: set cli screen-length, set cli
screen-width, and set cli prompt.
Configuration
This configuration example has the following sections:
CLI Quick
Configuration
•
Configuring the CLI Prompt on page 262
•
Configuring CLI Width on page 262
•
Configuring CLI Length on page 263
•
Return to the Default CLI Prompt on page 266
To quickly configure this example, copy the following commands and paste them in a
text file, remove any line breaks, change the values used to match your network
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configuration, and then copy and paste the commands into the CLI at the operational
command prompt.
set cli prompt "router1-san-jose> "
set cli screen-width 110
set cli screen-length 45
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 13.3 and later, the value of screen width is 0 or in
the range of 40 through 1024.
Configuring the CLI Prompt
Step-by-Step
Procedure
The default CLI prompt is your [email protected] But you can have any prompt you
find useful.
To configure a different CLI prompt:
•
Use the following operational mode command where string is the exact text you
want to see at the command line.
set cli prompt "string"
For example, if “string” is “router1-san-jose> “, the command is as follows:
set cli prompt "router1-san-jose> "
router1-san-jose>
Configuring CLI Width
Step-by-Step
Procedure
How do you know what width works best for you? This example discusses how CLI width
can affect what you see.
To configure a new default CLI width:
1.
See what the current defaults are for the CLI environment.
router1-san-jose> show cli
CLI complete-on-space set to on
CLI idle-timeout disabled
CLI restart-on-upgrade set to on
CLI screen length set to 66
CLI screen width set to 80
CLI terminal is 'xterm'
router1-san-jose>
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 13.3 and later, the value of width is 0 or in
the range of 40 through 1024.
262
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Chapter 11: Controlling the CLI Environment
2.
Look at the following output for the operational command show class-of-service
forwarding-class.
The output from this command is wider than some and so illustrates a common
problem with viewing output. If, for example, you have a relatively narrow window,
command output might show up in overrun lines.
router1-san-jose> show class-of-service forwarding-class
Forwarding class
ID
Queue Restricted queue Fabric
priority Policing priority
SPU priority
premium-rate
0
0
0
low
normal
low
medium-rate
1
1
1
low
normal
low
low-rate
2
2
2
low
normal
low
NC
3
3
3
low
normal
low
tunnel-rate
4
4
0
low
normal
low
The lines look to be intermingled and it is hard to read across to find the information
you might be seeking.
3.
Change the window width to 110 columns.
Notice how the output of this command is much easier to read in the wider format:
router1-san-jose> set cli screen-width 110
router1-san-jose> show class-of-service forwarding-class
Forwarding class
ID
Queue Restricted queue Fabric priority
premium-rate
0
0
0
low
medium-rate
1
1
1
low
low-rate
2
2
2
low
NC
3
3
3
low
tunnel-rate
4
4
0
low
Policing priority
normal
normal
normal
normal
normal
SPU priority
low
low
low
low
low
Configuring CLI Length
Step-by-Step
Procedure
You can configure the length of the CLI screen in a similar fashion as you did the width.
To configure a new default CLI length:
1.
See what the current defaults are for the CLI environment.
router1-san-jose> show cli
CLI complete-on-space set to on
CLI idle-timeout disabled
CLI restart-on-upgrade set to on
CLI screen length set to 66
CLI screen width set to 80
CLI terminal is 'xterm'
router1-san-jose>
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2.
Look at the following output for the operational command show version.
Makefile
sync-dpm-sb.manifest
build
sync-equilibrium-sb.manifest
etc
sync-equilibrium2-sb.manifest
include
sync-hellopics-sb.manifest
jexample
sync-ipprobe-mt-sb.manifest
jnx-cc-routeservice-sb.manifest
sync-ipprobe-sb.manifest
jnx-example-sb.manifest
sync-ipsnooper-sb.manifest
jnx-flow-sb.manifest
sync-monitube-sb.manifest
jnx-gateway-sb.manifest
sync-monitube2-plugin-sb.manifest
jnx-ifinfo-sb.manifest
sync-packetproc-sb.manifest
jnx-mspexampled-sb.manifest
sync-passthru-sb.manifest
jnx-msprsm-sb.manifest
sync-policy-manager-sb.manifest
jnx-routeservice-sb.manifest
sync-reassembler-sb.manifest
lib
sync-route-manager-sb.manifest
JnprFirewall-Proto.html Makefile.depend.octeon dfw_filter.proto
JnprFirewall.html
Makefile.depend.powerpc dfw_ifattach.proto
Makefile
Makefile.depend.xlr
dfw_policer.proto
Makefile.depend.arm
dfw.jsdl
dfw_stats.proto
Makefile.depend.host
dfw_bulk.proto
Makefile.depend.i386
dfw_common.proto
Trying 192.168.184.75...
Connected to spot-fxp0.englab.juniper.net.
Escape character is '^]'.
Unauthorized use is prohibited.
router1-san-jose> show version
Hostname: spot
Model: mx240
Junos: 14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1
JUNOS Base OS boot [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M/T/EX Common)
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (MX Common)
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Online Documentation [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services AACL Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Application Level Gateways [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS AppId Services [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Border Gateway Function package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Captive Portal and Content Delivery Container package
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services HTTP Content Management package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS IDP Services [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Jflow Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services LL-PDF Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services MobileNext Software package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Mobile Subscriber Service Container package
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services NAT [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services PTSP Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services RPM [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Stateful Firewall [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Voice Services Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Crypto [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services SSL [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
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JUNOS
JUNOS
JUNOS
JUNOS
JUNOS
JUNOS
Services IPSec [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
platform Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
Routing Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
Runtime Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
Web Management [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
py-base-i386 [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
router1-san-jose>
The current length is 66 lines, which is close to the length of a typical monitor. But
even though the output is fairly long, it hardly needs all that space to be clearly seen
in its entirety. In fact, it is harder to pick out just where the output starts in a screen
this long.
3.
Change the window width to 45 lines.
router1-san-jose> set cli screen-length 45
4.
Now look at the output again.
router1-san-jose> show version
Hostname: spot
Model: mx240
Junos: 14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1
JUNOS Base OS boot [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Base OS Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Kernel Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Crypto Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (M/T/EX Common)
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Packet Forwarding Engine Support (MX Common)
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Online Documentation [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services AACL Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Application Level Gateways [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS AppId Services [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Border Gateway Function package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Captive Portal and Content Delivery Container package
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services HTTP Content Management package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS IDP Services [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Jflow Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services LL-PDF Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services MobileNext Software package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Mobile Subscriber Service Container package
[14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services NAT [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services PTSP Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services RPM [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Stateful Firewall [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Voice Services Container package [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services Crypto [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services SSL [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Services IPSec [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS platform Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Routing Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Runtime Software Suite [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS Web Management [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
JUNOS py-base-i386 [14.2-20140710_ib_14_2_psd.1]
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router1-san-jose>
With a shorter sscreen, you can easily see where the current output begins and ends.
Return to the Default CLI Prompt
Step-by-Step
Procedure
To go back to the default prompt:
1.
Exit the CLI.
router1-san-jose> exit
%
2.
Enter the CLI operational mode again.
% cli
[email protected]>
Related
Documentation
266
•
Setting the Junos OS CLI Screen Length and Width on page 259
•
Controlling the Junos OS CLI Environment on page 257
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Chapter 11: Controlling the CLI Environment
Example: Enabling Configuration Breadcrumbs
The output of show configuration operational mode command and show configuration
mode commands can be configured to display configuration breadcrumbs that indicate
the exact location in the hierarchy of the output being viewed.
Before enabling the configuration breadcrumbs feature, check the output of the show
configuration command.
[email protected]> show configuration
...
}
}
}
}
}
fe-4/1/2 {
description "FA4/1/2: mxxj1-mr6 (64.12.137.160/27) (T=bblan, bbmail,
bbowmtc)";
unit 0 {
family inet {
filter {
output 151mj;
}
address 64.12.137.187/27 {
vrrp-group 1 {
virtual-address 64.12.137.189;
---(more 18%)-----------------------------------------------------
In the output, there is no clear indication about the section of the configuration being
viewed.
To enable the configuration breadcrumbs feature:
1.
Define a class at the [edit system login] hierarchy level.
[edit system login]
[email protected]# set class breadclass idle-timeout 10
2. Add a user to the defined login class to enable the breadcrumbs output view when
this user enters the show configuration operational mode command.
[edit system login user user1]
[email protected]# set class breadclass
3. Configure the configuration-breadcrumbs statement at the [edit system login class
<class name>] hierarchy level.
[edit system login class breadclass]
[email protected]# set configuration-breadcrumbs
4. Confirm the configuration.
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[edit]
[email protected]# commit
On enabling configuration breadcrumbs in the CLI, User1 (the user added to the login
class) can verify the feature in the output by entering the show configuration command.
[email protected]> show configuration
...
}
}
}
}
}
fe-4/1/2 {
description "FA4/1/2: mxxj1-mr6 (64.12.137.160/27) (T=bblan, bbmail,
bbowmtc)";
unit 0 {
family inet {
filter {
output 151mj;
}
address 64.12.137.187/27 {
vrrp-group 1 {
virtual-address 64.12.137.189;
---(more 18%)---[groups main interfaces fe-4/1/2 unit 0 family inet address
64.12.137.187/27 vrrp-group 1]---
The new output indicates the exact location of the configuration hierarchy being
viewed. User1 is currently viewing the interface configuration of a group.
NOTE: If you are enabling configuration breadcrumbs for your own user
account, you should log out and log in again to see the changes.
Related
Documentation
268
•
class
•
configuration-breadcrumbs on page 283
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CHAPTER 12
Junos OS Configuration Statements and
Commands
•
apply-groups on page 271
•
apply-groups-except on page 271
•
activate
•
annotate
•
clear system commit prepared
•
commit
•
commit activate on page 281
•
commit prepare on page 282
•
commit-interval (Batch Commits) on page 283
•
configuration-breadcrumbs on page 283
•
copy
•
days-to-keep-error-logs (Batch Commits) on page 284
•
deactivate
•
delete
•
edit
•
exit
•
export-format on page 289
•
groups on page 290
•
help
•
insert
•
load
•
maximum-aggregate-pool (Batch Commits) on page 296
•
maximum-entries (Batch Commits) on page 296
•
no-hidden-commands on page 297
•
protect
•
quit
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270
•
rename
•
replace
•
rollback
•
run
•
save
•
server (Batch Commits) on page 306
•
set
•
show
•
show configuration
•
show | display inheritance
•
show | display omit
•
show | display set
•
show | display set relative
•
show groups junos-defaults
•
status
•
top
•
traceoptions (Batch Commits) on page 319
•
unprotect
•
up
•
update
•
when on page 324
•
wildcard delete
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
apply-groups
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
apply-groups [ group-names ];
All hierarchy levels
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Apply a configuration group to a specific hierarchy level in a configuration, to have a
configuration inherit the statements in the configuration group.
You can specify more than one group name. You must list them in order of inheritance
priority. The configuration data in the first group takes priority over the data in subsequent
groups.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
group-names—One or more names specified in the groups statement.
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Applying the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 229
•
groups on page 290
apply-groups-except
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
apply-groups-except [ group-names ];
All hierarchy levels except the top level
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Disable inheritance of a configuration group.
group-names—One or more names specified in the groups statement.
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
groups on page 290
•
Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group on page 232
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activate
Syntax
Release Information
activate (statement | identifier)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Description
Remove the inactive: tag from a statement, effectively adding the statement or identifier
back to the configuration. Statements or identifiers that have been activated take effect
when you next issue the commit command.
Options
identifier—Identifier from which you are removing the inactive tag. It must be an identifier
at the current hierarchy level.
statement—Statement from which you are removing the inactive tag. It must be a
statement at the current hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
272
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
deactivate on page 285
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
annotate
Syntax
Release Information
Description
annotate statement "comment-string"
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Add comments to a configuration. You can add comments only at the current hierarchy
level.
Any comments you add appear only when you view the configuration by entering the
show command in configuration mode or the show configuration command in operational
mode.
NOTE: The Junos OS supports annotation up to the last level in the
configuration hierarchy, including oneliners. However, annotation of parts
(child statements or identifiers within a oneliner) of the oneliner is not
supported. For example, in the following sample configuration hierarchy,
annotation is supported up to the oneliner level 1 , but not supported for the
metric child statement and its attribute 10:
[edit protocols]
isis {
interface ge-0/0/0.0 {
level 1 metric 10;
}
}
}
Options
comment-string—Text of the comment. You must enclose it in quotation marks. In the
comment string, you can include the comment delimiters /* */ or #. If you do not specify
any, the comment string is enclosed with the /* */ comment delimiters. If a comment
for the specified statement already exists, it is deleted and replaced with the new
comment.
statement—Statement to which you are attaching the comment.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Adding Comments in a Junos OS Configuration on page 95
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clear system commit prepared
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
clear system commit prepared
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 17.3.
Clear the prepared commit. This initiates cleanup of the saved database data structures
and the necessary files that are generated as a result of the commit preparation stage
and unlinks the pending activation file. A log message is generated upon successful
clearing of the pending commit.
This command has no options.
maintenance (or the actual user who scheduled the commit)
•
clear system commit
clear system commit prepared on page 274
clear system commit prepared (None Prepared) on page 274
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
clear system commit prepared
[email protected]> clear system commit prepared
Prepared commit cleared.
clear system commit prepared (None Prepared)
[email protected]> clear system commit prepared
No commit prepared.
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commit
Syntax
Release Information
Description
commit <at “string”> <and-quit> <check> <comment “comment-string”>
<<confirmed> <in minutes>> < | display detail> <fast-synchronize>
<synchronize-peers> <synchronize <<force> <scripts>>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Option fast-synchronize added in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Option synchronize scripts introduced in Junos OS Release 13.2.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Option synchronize-peers introduced in Junos OS Release 14.2R6.
Option no-synchronize introduced in Junos OS Release 17.2R1
Commit the set of changes to the database and cause the changes to take operational
effect.
NOTE: The fast-synchronize option is not supported in a QFX Series Virtual
Chassis.
NOTE: Beginning in Junos OS 12.3, it is possible that FPCs brought offline
using the request chassis fpc slot fpc-slot offline operational-mode CLI
command can come online during a configuration commit or power-supply
replacement procedure. As an alternative, use the set fpc fpc-slot power off
configuration-mode command at the [edit chassis] hierarchy level to ensure
that the FPCs remain offline.
Options
at <"string">—(Optional) Save software configuration changes and activate the
configuration at a future time, or upon reboot.
string is reboot or the future time to activate the configuration changes. Enclose the string
value (including reboot) in quotation marks (“ ”). You can specify time in two formats:
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•
A time value in the form hh:mm[:ss] (hours, minutes, and optionally seconds)— Commit
the configuration at the specified time, which must be in the future but before 11:59:59
PM on the day the commit at configuration command is issued. Use 24-hour time for
the hh value; for example, 04:30:00 is 4:30:00 AM, and 20:00 is 8:00 PM. The time is
interpreted with respect to the clock and time zone settings on the router.
•
A date and time value in the form yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm[:ss] (year, month, date, hours,
minutes, and, optionally, seconds)—Commit the configuration at the specified day and
time, which must be after the commit at command is issued. Use 24-hour time for the
hh value. For example, 2003-08-21 12:30:00 is 12:30 PM on August 21, 2003. The time
is interpreted with respect to the clock and time zone settings on the router.
For example, commit at “18:00:00". For date and time, include both values in the same
set of quotation marks. For example, commit at "2005-03-10 14:00:00".
A commit check is performed when you issue the commit at configuration mode command.
If the result of the check is successful, then the current user is logged out of configuration
mode, and the configuration data is left in a read-only state. No other commit can be
performed until the scheduled commit is completed.
NOTE: If Junos OS fails before the configuration changes become active, all
configuration changes are lost.
You cannot enter the commit at configuration command when there is a
pending reboot.
You cannot enter the request system reboot command once you schedule a
commit operation for a specific time in the future.
You cannot commit a configuration when a scheduled commit is pending.
For information about how to use the clear command to cancel a scheduled
configuration, see the CLI Explorer.
and-quit—(Optional) Commit the configuration and, if the configuration contains no
errors and the commit succeeds, exit from configuration mode.
check—(Optional) Verify the syntax of the configuration, but do not activate it.
comment <"comment-string">—(Optional) Add a comment that describes the committed
configuration. The comment can be as long as 512 bytes and must be typed on a single
line. You cannot include a comment with the commit check command. Enclose
comment-string in quotation marks (" "). For example, commit comment "Includes changes
recommended by SW Lab".
confirmed < in minutes>—(Optional) Require that the commit be confirmed within the
specified amount of time. To confirm a commit, enter either a commit or commit check
command. If the commit is not confirmed within the time limit, the configuration rolls
back automatically to the precommit configuration and a broadcast message is sent to
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
all logged-in users. To show when a rollback is scheduled, enter the show system commit
command. The allowed range is 1 through 65,535 minutes, and the default is 10 minutes.
In Junos OS Release 11.4 and later, you can also use the commit confirmed command in
the [edit private] configuration mode.
display detail—(Optional) Monitors the commit process.
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 10.4 and later, if the number of commit details
or messages exceeds a page when used with the | display detail pipe option,
the more pagination option on the screen is no longer available. Instead, the
messages roll up on the screen by default, just like using the commit command
with the | no more pipe option.
fast-synchronize—(Optional) Configure the commits to run in parallel on both the master
and backup Routing Engines to reduce the time taken for commit synchronization.
NOTE: The fast-synchronize statement is not supported on QFX Series devices
when used in a Virtual Chassis.
synchronize-peers—(Optional) Automatically synchronizes and commits MC-LAG
configurations across the peers. The local peer (the requesting peer) on which you enable
the synchronize-peers statement copies and loads its configuration to the remote (the
responding) peer. Each peer then performs a syntax check on the configuration file being
committed. If no errors are found, the configuration is activated and becomes the current
operational configuration on both peers.
synchronize <force>> <scripts>—(Optional) If your router has two Routing Engines, you
can manually direct one Routing Engine to synchronize its configuration with the other
by issuing the commit synchronize command. The Routing Engine on which you execute
this command (the request Routing Engine) copies and loads its candidate configuration
to the other Routing Engine (the responding Routing Engine). Both Routing Engines then
perform a syntax check on the candidate configuration file being committed. If no errors
are found, the configuration is activated and becomes the current operational
configuration on both Routing Engines.
It can happen that the commit synchronize command is initiated at the same time from
both Routing Engines, which causes the process to hang. As of Junos OS Release 15.1,
this is a temporary (20 seconds) anomaly, after which the user can try the commit
sychronize command again.
The commit synchronize command does not work if the responding Routing Engine has
uncommitted configuration changes. However, you can enforce commit synchronization
on the Routing Engines by using the force option. When you issue the commit synchronize
command with the force option from one Routing Engine, the configuration sessions on
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the other Routing Engine are terminated and its configuration synchronized with that on
the Routing Engine from which you issued the command.
When you issue the commit synchronize command with the scripts option, the device
synchronizes all commit, event, lib, op, and SNMP scripts from the requesting Routing
Engine to the responding Routing Engine and also commits and synchronizes the
configuration. If the commit check operation fails for the requesting Routing Engine, the
process stops, and the scripts are not copied to the responding Routing Engine. If the
commit check or commit operation fails for the responding Routing Engine, the scripts
are still synchronized, since the synchronization occurs prior to the commit check operation
on the responding Routing Engine.
If the load-scripts-from-flash statement is configured for the requesting Routing Engine,
the device synchronizes the scripts from flash memory on the requesting Routing Engine
to flash memory on the responding Routing Engine. Otherwise, the device synchronizes
the scripts from the hard disk on the requesting Routing Engine to the hard disk on the
responding Routing Engine. The device synchronizes all scripts regardless of whether
they are enabled in the configuration or have been updated since the last synchronization.
NOTE: When you issue the commit synchronize command, you must use the
apply-groups re0 and re1 commands. For information about how to use groups,
see “Disabling Inheritance of a Junos OS Configuration Group” on page 232.
The responding Routing Engine must use Junos OS Release 5.0 or later.
no-synchronize—(Optional) Configure the commit command to run without
synchronization. This can be useful in situations, for example, where a Routine Engine
configuration is corrupted such that a commit synchronization is not possible or will block
the commit. This option allows you to commit only on the current Routing Engine even
if system commit synchronize is configured. This option overrides the commit
peer-synchronize configuration as well. If you have configured the commit synchronize
using set system commit synchronize and then use the command commit no-synchronize,
the commit will happen only on the device issuing the command. When using commit
synchronize, the commit is first done in the other Routing Engine and then in the current
one. If the other Routine Engine is not in a sane state, the commit will fail. In such cases,
you can use commit no-synchronize. This command cannot be configured using set. It
can only be run.
Required Privilege
Level
278
configure—To enter configuration mode.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
NOTE: If you are using Junos OS in a Common Criteria environment, system
log messages are created whenever a secret attribute is changed (for example,
password changes or changes to the RADIUS shared secret). These changes
are logged during the following configuration load operations:
load
load
load
load
merge
replace
override
update
For more information, see the Secure Configuration Guide for Common Criteria
and Junos-FIPS
Related
Documentation
•
Verifying a Junos OS Configuration on page 108, Committing a Junos OS Configuration
on page 110
•
Scheduling a Junos OS Commit Operation on page 115
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93
•
Monitoring the Junos OS Commit Process on page 116
•
Adding a Comment to Describe the Committed Configuration on page 117
•
Committing Configurations on a Routing Matrix with a TX Matrix Plus Router
Sample Output
commit | display detail
[email protected]> commit | display detail
-------------2011-08-24 01:08:08.00691 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00210 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00211 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00228 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00229 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00236 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00244 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00251 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00251 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00251 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00252 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00252 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00252 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00252 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00253 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00253 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00253 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00254 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00254 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00254 PDT:
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00255 PDT:
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
begin creating snapshots
end creating snapshots
begin preparing metadata
end preparing metadata
begin computing dcf root changes
end computing dcf root changes
begin computing additions
end computing additions
begin local object validation
end local object validation
begin update instances
end update instances
begin adjust metadata
end adjust metadata
begin validate metadata
end validate metadata
begin adjust allocations
end adjust allocations
begin adjust dependencies
end adjust dependencies
begin instance validation
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2011-08-24 01:08:09.00255
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00255
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00277
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00278
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00325
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00330
(qfabric-default---node0)
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00334
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00351
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00451
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00451
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00451
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00452
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00452
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00453
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00453
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00454
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00456
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00457
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00475
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00476
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00499
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00501
(qfabric-default---node0)
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00501
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00502
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00504
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00617
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00617
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00617
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00619
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00619
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00730
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00752
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00754
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00755
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00881
2011-08-24 01:08:09.00961
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00668
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00669
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00721
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00727
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00733
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00772
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00772
2011-08-24 01:08:10.00773
commit complete
280
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
end instance validation
begin opening all sessions eagerly
begin request #1 [login]
end request #1 [login]
begin processing globals
begin waiting for stamp check
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
end reply #1 [login]
end reply #1 [login]
begin request #2 [open]
end request #2 [open]
begin request #3 [get commit history]
end request #3 [get commit history]
begin request #4 [load]
end request #4 [load]
begin request #5 [load]
begin reply #2 [open]
end reply #2 [open]
begin reply #3 [get commit history]
end reply #3 [get commit history]
begin reply #4 [load]
begin reply #5 [load]
end waiting for stamp check
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
PDT:
begin waiting for open (qfabric-default---node0)
end waiting for open (qfabric-default---node0)
end processing globals
end request #5 [load]
begin request #6 [check]
end request #6 [check]
end reply #5 [load]
begin reply #6 [check]
end session
end request #5 [load]
begin request #6 [check]
end request #6 [check]
end request #5 [load]
begin commit to devices
begin request #8 [get commit history]
end request #8 [get commit history]
end session
end commit to devices
begin committing metadata
end committing metadata
begin calling commit callbacks
end calling commit callbacks
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
commit activate
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
commit activate{
comment;
and-quit;
peers-synchronize;
synchronize;
}
[edit system]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 17.3R1.
Activate a previously prepared commit. Upon successful validation, during the activation
stage, previously prepared commits are activated. Also, pending activation files are
checked during this stage. If there are pending activation files, the existence of required
files and daemon map present in the database data structures are checked. If there is
any failure, a log message is generated that informs you that the commit has failed.
and-quit—(Optional) Commit the configuration and, if the configuration contains no
errors and the commit succeeds, exit from configuration mode.
no-synchronize—(Optional) Do not synchronize the commit. Configure the commit prepare
statement to run without synchronization.
peers-synchronize—(Optional) Synchronize the commit on remote peers.
synchronize—(Optional) Synchronize the commit on both Routing Engines.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview on page 129
•
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and Activation on
page 131
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commit prepare
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
commit prepare{
and-quit;
no-synchronize;
peers-synchronize;
synchronize;
}
[edit system]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 17.3.
Prepare for an upcoming commit activation. Prepare the configurations that can be
activated at a later stage. During the preparation stage, all the required files and databases
are generated and the configuration is validated. A file is created that indicates if the
commit is pending for activation. In the event of failure during the preparation stage, the
log message commit preparation failed is generated.
and-quit—(Optional) Commit the configuration and, if the configuration contains no
errors and the commit succeeds, exit from configuration mode.
no-synchronize—(Optional) Do not synchronize the commit. Configure the commit prepare
statement to run without synchronization.
peers-synchronize—(Optional) Synchronize the commit on remote peers.
synchronize—(Optional) Synchronize the commit on both Routing Engines.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
282
configure—To enter configuration mode.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Commit Preparation and Activation Overview on page 129
•
Committing Junos OS Configurations in Two Steps: Preparation and Activation on
page 131
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
commit-interval (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
commit-interval number-of-seconds-between-commits;
[edit system commit server],
[edit system commit synchronize server]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Description
For Junos OS batch commits, specify the time interval (in seconds) between two commit
operations.
Options
number-of-seconds-between-commits—Time interval (in seconds) between two commit
operations.
Range: 1 through 30 seconds.
Default: 5 seconds.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
configuration-breadcrumbs
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configuration-breadcrumbs;
[edit system login class]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2.
Enable the configuration breadcrumbs view in the CLI to display the location in the
configuration hierarchy.
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Enabling Configuration Breadcrumbs on page 267
•
Defining Junos OS Login Classes
•
class
•
login
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copy
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
copy existing-statement to new-statement
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Make a copy of an existing statement in the configuration.
existing-statement—Statement to copy.
new-statement—Copy of the statement.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Copying a Junos OS Statement in the Configuration on page 75
days-to-keep-error-logs (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
days-to-keep-error-logs days-to-keep-error-log-entries;
[edit system commit server],
[edit system commit synchronize server]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
For Junos OS batch commits, specify the number of days to keep the error logs.
days-to-keep-error-log-entries—Number of days to keep the error logs.
Range: 1 through 366 days
Default: 1 day
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
284
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
deactivate
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
deactivate (statement | identifier)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Add the inactive: tag to a statement, effectively commenting out the statement or
identifier from the configuration. Statements or identifiers marked as inactive do not take
effect when you issue the commit command.
identifier—Identifier to which you are adding the inactive: tag. It must be an identifier at
the current hierarchy level.
statement—Statement to which you are adding the inactive: tag. It must be a statement
at the current hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
activate on page 272
•
delete on page 286
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93.
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delete
Syntax
Release Information
Description
delete <statement-path> <identifier>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Delete a statement or identifier. All subordinate statements and identifiers contained
within the specified statement path are deleted with it.
Deleting a statement or an identifier effectively “unconfigures” or disables the functionality
associated with that statement or identifier.
If you do not specify statement-path or identifier, the entire hierarchy, starting at the current
hierarchy level, is removed.
Options
statement-path—(Optional) Path to an existing statement or identifier. Include this if the
statement or identifier to be deleted is not at the current hierarchy level.
identifier—(Optional) Name of the statement or identifier to delete.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
286
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
deactivate on page 285
•
Deleting a Statement from a Junos OS Configuration on page 73
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
edit
Syntax
Release Information
Description
edit statement-path
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Move inside the specified statement hierarchy. If the statement does not exist, it is created.
You cannot use the edit command to change the value of identifiers. You must use the
set command.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
statement-path—Path to the statement.
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
•
set on page 307
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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exit
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
exit <configuration-mode>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Exit the current level of the statement hierarchy, returning to the level prior to the last
edit command, or exit from configuration mode. The quit and exit commands are
synonyms.
none—Return to the previous edit level. If you are at the top of the statement hierarchy,
exit configuration mode.
configuration-mode—(Optional) Exit from configuration mode.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
288
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
top on page 318
•
up on page 322
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
export-format
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
export-format {
json {
ietf;
}
}
[edit system]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1.
Specify the default implementation of the serialization to use for exported data in the
given format. This statement only affects Junos OS configuration data that is displayed
in the requested format.
json—Define which implementation of the serialization to use for configuration data
emitted in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format.
Acceptable values include:
•
ietf—JSON data is emitted according to the encoding rules defined in Internet
drafts draft-ietf-netmod-yang-json-09, JSON Encoding of Data Modeled with YANG,
and draft-ietf-netmod-yang-metadata-06, Defining and Using Metadata with YANG.
Default: ietf
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
maintenance—To view this statement in the configuration.
maintenance-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Mapping Junos OS Command Output to JSON Using the CLI
•
Mapping Junos OS Configuration Statements to JSON
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groups
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
groups {
group-name {
configuration-data;
when {
chassis chassis-id;
member member-id;
model model-id;
node node-id;
peers [ names of peers ]
routing-engine routing-engine-id;
time <start-time> [to <end-time>];
}
conditional-data;
}
lccn-re0 {
configuration-data;
}
lccn-re1 {
configuration-data;
}
}
[edit]
Statement introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Create a configuration group.
—
group-name——Name of the configuration group. To configure multiple groups, specify
more than one group-name.
configuration-data—The configuration statements that are to be applied elsewhere
in the configuration with the apply-groups statement, to have the target
configuration inherit the statements in the group.
when conditional-data—Option introduced in Junos 11.3. The conditional statements
that are to be applied when this configuration group is applied.
On routers that support multiple Routing Engines, you can also specify two special
group names:
re0—Configuration statements that are to be applied to the Routing Engine in slot 0.
re1—Configuration statements that are to be applied to the Routing Engine in slot 1.
The configuration specified in group re0 is applied only if the current Routing Engine
is in slot 0; likewise, the configuration specified in group re1 is applied only if the
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current Routing Engine is in slot 1. Therefore, both Routing Engines can use the same
configuration file, each using only the configuration statements that apply to it. Each
re0 or re1 group contains at a minimum the configuration for the hostname and the
management interface (fxp0). If each Routing Engine uses a different management
interface, the group also should contain the configuration for the backup router and
static routes.
(Routing matrix only) The TX Matrix router supports group names for the Routing
Engines in each connected T640 router in the following formats:
NOTE: The management Ethernet interface used for the TX Matrix Plus
router, T1600 routers in a routing matrix, and PTX Series Packet Transport
Routers, is em0. Junos OS automatically creates the router’s management
Ethernet interface, em0.
•
lccn-re0—Configuration statements applied to the Routing Engine in slot 0 of the
specified T640 router that is connected to a TX Matrix router.
•
lccn-re1—Configuration statements applied to the specified to the Routing Engine
in slot 1 of the specified T640 router that is connected to a TX Matrix router.
n identifies the T640 router and can be from 0 through 3.
The remaining statements are explained separately. See CLI Explorer.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
apply-groups on page 271
•
apply-groups-except on page 271
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help
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
help <(apropos string | reference <statement-name> | syslog <syslog-tag> |
tip cli number | topic <word>)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display help about available configuration statements or general information about
getting help.
apropos string—(Optional) Display statement names and help text that matches the
string specified. If the string contains spaces, enclose it in quotation marks (" "). You can
also specify a regular expression for the string, using standard UNIX-style regular
expression syntax.
reference <statement-name>—(Optional) Display summary information for the statement.
This information is based on summary descriptions that appear in the Junos configuration
guides.
syslog <syslog-tag>—(Optional) Display information about system log messages.
tip cli number—(Optional) Display a tip about using the CLI. Specify the number of the
tip you want to view.
topic <word>—(Optional) Display usage guidelines for a topic or configuration statement.
This information is based on subjects that appear in the Junos configuration guides.
Entering the help command without an option provides introductory information about
how to use the help command.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
292
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
insert
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
insert <statement-path> identifier1 (before | after) identifier2
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Insert an identifier in to an existing hierarchy.
after—Place identifier1 after identifier2.
before—Place identifier1 before identifier2.
identifier1—Existing identifier.
identifier2—New identifier to insert.
statement-path—(Optional) Path to the existing identifier.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Inserting a New Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 84
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load
Syntax
QFX Series
Release Information
Description
load (factory-default | merge | override | patch | replace | set | update) (filename | terminal)
<json>
<relative>
load (dhcp-snooping filename)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
json option introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1.
Load a configuration from an ASCII configuration file, from terminal input, or from the
factory default. Your current location in the configuration hierarchy is ignored when the
load operation occurs.
For information on valid filename and URL formats, see Format for Specifying Filenames
and URLs in Junos OS CLI Commands.
NOTE: load can be run from configuration mode only.
Options
dhcp-snooping—(QFX Series switches) Loads DHCP snooping entries.
factory-default—Loads the factory configuration. The factory configuration contains the
manufacturer’s suggested configuration settings. The factory configuration is the router
or switch’s first configuration and is loaded when the router or switch is first installed
and powered on. The factory-default option cannot be combined with other options.
NOTE: To load the factory default configuration, you must first unprotect
any protected hierarchies in the configuration.
filename—Name of the file to load. For information about specifying the filename, see
“Specifying Filenames and URLs” on page 186.
json—(Optional) Load configuration data that uses JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)
format. This option can be used with the merge, override, or update options.
merge—Combine the configuration that is currently shown in the CLI with the configuration.
override—Discard the entire configuration that is currently shown in the CLI and load the
entire configuration. Marks every object as changed.
patch—Change part of the configuration and mark only those parts as changed.
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relative—(Optional) Load the new configuration data relative to the current edit point in
the configuration hierarchy.
replace—Look for a replace tag in filename, delete the existing statement of the same
name, and replace it with the configuration.
set—Merge a set of commands with an existing configuration. This option executes the
configuration instructions line by line as they are stored in a file or from a terminal. The
instructions can contain any configuration mode command, such as set, edit, exit, and
top.
terminal—Use the text you type at the terminal as input to the configuration. Type Ctrl+d
to end terminal input.
update—Discard the entire configuration that is currently shown in the CLI, and load the
entire configuration. Marks changed objects only.
NOTE: If you are using Junos OS in a Common Criteria environment, system
log messages are created whenever a secret attribute is changed (for example,
password changes or changes to the RADIUS shared secret). These changes
are logged during the following configuration load operations:
load
load
load
load
merge
replace
override
update
For more information, see the Secure Configuration Guide for Common Criteria
and Junos-FIPS.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Loading a Configuration from a File or the Terminal on page 152
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maximum-aggregate-pool (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
maximum-aggregate-pool maximum-number-of-commits-to-aggregate;
[edit system commit server],
[edit system commit synchronize server]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
For Junos OS batch commits, specify the maximum number of individual commit
operations that are aggregated or merged into a single commit operation.
maximum-number-of-commits-to-aggregate—Maximum number of individual commit
operations that are aggregated or merged into a single commit operation.
Range: 1 through 4294967295
Default: 5
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
maximum-entries (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
296
maximum-entries number-of-entries;
[edit system commit server],
[edit system commit synchronize server]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
For Junos OS batch commits, specify the maximum number of commit jobs that are
included in the commit queue.
number-of-entries—Maximum number of commit jobs that are included in the commit
queue.
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
no-hidden-commands
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Default
Required Privilege
Level
no-hidden-commands;
[edit system]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 16.1 EX Series, M Series and MX Series.
Hidden commands are Junos OS commands that are not published but could be run on
a router. Hidden command serve a specific purpose but for most part are not expected
to be used by the customers and are not supported. The no-hidden-commands statement
allows the user to block all hidden commands to all users except root.
Hidden commands are enabled by default.
admin—To view this statement in the configuration.
admin-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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protect
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
298
protect (hierarchy | statement | identifier)
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Protect a hierarchy, statement, or identifier from modification or deletion.
none
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Example: Protecting the Junos OS Configuration from Modification or Deletion on
page 159
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
quit
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
quit <configuration-mode>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Exit the current level of the statement hierarchy, returning to the level prior to the last
edit command, or exit from configuration mode. The quit and exit commands are
synonyms.
none—Return to the previous edit level. If you are at the top of the statement hierarchy,
exit configuration mode.
configuration-mode—(Optional) Exit from configuration mode.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
top on page 318
•
up on page 322
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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rename
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
rename <statement-path> identifier1 to identifier2
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Rename an existing configuration statement or identifier.
identifier1—Existing identifier to rename.
identifier2—New name of identifier.
statement-path—(Optional) Path to an existing statement or identifier.
NOTE: For example, to rename interface ge-0/0/0.0 to ge-0/0/10.0 at the
following hierarchy level:
logical-systems {
logical-system-abc {
(...)
protocols {
ospf {
area 0.0.0.0 {
interface ge-0/1/0.0;
Issue the following command:
rename logical-systems logical-system-abc protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 interface
ge-0/1/0.0.0 to interface ge-0/1/10.0
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
300
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Renaming an Identifier in a Junos OS Configuration on page 79
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replace
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
replace pattern pattern1 with pattern2 <upto n>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 7.6.
Replace identifiers or values in a configuration. For more information, refer to KB30332.
pattern1—Text string or regular expression that defines the identifiers or values you want
to match.
pattern2—Text string or regular expression that replaces the identifiers and values located
with pattern1.
Juniper Networks uses standard UNIX-style regular expression syntax (as defined in
POSIX 1003.2). If the regular expression contains spaces, operators, or wildcard characters,
enclose the expression in quotation marks. Greedy qualifiers (match as much as possible)
are supported. Lazy qualifiers (match as little as possible) are not.
upto n—Number of objects replaced. The value of n controls the total number of objects
that are replaced in the configuration (not the total number of times the pattern occurs).
Objects at the same hierarchy level (siblings) are replaced first. Multiple occurrences of
a pattern within a given object are considered a single replacement. If you do not specify
an upto option, all identifiers and values in the configuration that match pattern1 are
replaced.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Using Global Replace in the Junos OS Configuration on page 215
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rollback
Syntax
Release Information
Description
rollback <number | rescue>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Return to a previously committed configuration. The software saves the last 50 committed
configurations, including the rollback number, date, time, and name of the user who
issued the commit configuration command.
The currently operational Junos OS configuration is stored in the file juniper.conf, and the
last three committed configurations are stored in the files juniper.conf.1, juniper.conf.2,
and juniper.conf.3. These four files are located in the directory /config, which is on the
router’s flash drive. The remaining 46 previous committed configurations, the files
juniper.conf.4 through juniper.conf.49, are stored in the directory /var/db/config, which
is on the router’s hard disk.
During rollback, the configuration you specify is loaded from the associated file. Only
objects in the rollback configuration that differ from the previously loaded configuration
are marked as changed (equivalent to load update).
Options
none (Optional)—Return to the most recently saved configuration.
number—(Optional) Configuration to return to. The range of values is from 0 through 49.
The most recently saved configuration is number 0, and the oldest saved configuration
is number 49. The default is 0.
rescue—(Optional) Return to the rescue configuration.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
302
rollback—To roll back to configurations other than the one most recently committed.
•
Returning to a Previously Committed Junos OS Configuration on page 143
•
Creating and Returning to a Rescue Configuration on page 146
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
run
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
run command
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Run a top-level CLI command without exiting from configuration mode.
command—CLI top-level command.
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Understanding Junos OS CLI Configuration Mode on page 58
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save
Syntax
QFX Series
Release Information
Description
save filename
save (dhcp-snooping filename)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Save the configuration to an ASCII file. The contents of the current level of the statement
hierarchy (and below) are saved, along with the statement hierarchy containing it. This
allows a section of the configuration to be saved, while fully specifying the statement
hierarchy.
For information on valid filename and URL formats, see Format for Specifying Filenames
and URLs in Junos OS CLI Commands.
When saving a file to a remote system, the software uses the scp/ssh protocol.
Options
filename—Name of the saved file. You can specify a filename in one of the following ways:
•
filename—File in the user’s home directory (the current directory) on the local flash
drive.
•
path/filename—File on the local flash drive.
•
/var/filename or /var/path/filename—File on the local hard disk.
•
a:filename or a:path/filename—File on the local drive. The default path is / (the root-level
directory). The removable media can be in MS-DOS or UNIX (UFS) format.
•
hostname:/path/filename, hostname:filename, hostname:path/filename, or scp://
hostname/path/filename—File on an scp/ssh client. This form is not available in the
worldwide version of Junos OS. The default path is the user’s home directory on the
remote system. You can also specify hostname as [email protected]
•
ftp://hostname/path/filename—File on an FTP server. You can also specify hostname
as username @hostname or username:password @hostname. The default path is the
user’s home directory. To specify an absolute path, the path must start with the string
%2F; for example, ftp://hostname/%2Fpath/filename. To have the system prompt you
for the password, specify prompt in place of the password. If a password is required,
and you do not specify the password or prompt, an error message is displayed:
[email protected]> file copy ftp://[email protected]//filename
file copy ftp.hostname.net: Not logged in.
[email protected]> file copy ftp://username:[email protected]//filename
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Password for [email protected]:
•
http://hostname/path/filename—File on a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) server.
You can also specify hostname as [email protected] or
username:[email protected] If a password is required and you omit it, you are
prompted for it.
•
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
re0:/path/filename or re1:/path/filename—File on a local Routing Engine.
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Deactivating and Reactivating Statements and Identifiers in a Junos OS Configuration
on page 93
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server (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
server {
commit-interval<number-of-seconds-between-commits>;
days-to-keep-error-logs<days-to-keep-error-log-entries>;
maximum-aggregate-pool<maximum-number-of-commits-to-aggregate>;
maximum-entries <number-of-entries>;
traceoptions {
file filename;
files number;
flag (all | batch | commit-server | configuration);
size maximum-file-size;
(world-readable | no-world-readable);
}
}
[edit system commit]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Configure the system commit to occur in batches. Configure parameters for aggregating
and saving batch commits.
commit-interval—Configure the interval between commits.
days-to-keep-error-logs—Configure the number of days to keep log entries.
maximum-aggregate-pool—Configure the maximum number of commits to aggregate
together.
maximum-entries —Configure the maximum number of commit entries.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
306
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
set
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
set <statement-path> identifier
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Create a statement hierarchy and set identifier values. This is similar to edit except that
your current level in the hierarchy does not change.
identifier—Name of the statement or identifier to set.
statement-path—(Optional) Path to an existing statement hierarchy level. If that hierarchy
level does not exist, it is created.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
edit on page 287
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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show
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show <statement-path> <identifier>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the current configuration.
none—Display the entire configuration at the current hierarchy level.
identifier—(Optional) Display the configuration for the specified identifier.
statement-path—(Optional) Display the configuration for the specified statement hierarchy
path.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
308
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
show | display inheritance on page 312
•
show | display omit on page 313
•
show | display set on page 314
•
show | display set relative on page 315
•
show groups junos-defaults on page 316
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
show configuration
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
show configuration
<statement-path>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Display the configuration that currently is running on the router or switch, which is the
last committed configuration.
none—Display the entire configuration.
statement-path—(Optional) Display one of the following hierarchies in a configuration.
(Each statement-path option has additional suboptions not described here. See the
appropriate feature guide or EX Series switch documentation for more information.)
•
access—Network access configuration.
•
access-profile—Access profile configuration.
•
accounting-options—Accounting data configuration.
•
applications—Applications defined by protocol characteristics.
•
apply-groups—Groups from which configuration data is inherited.
•
chassis—Chassis configuration.
•
chassis network-services—Current running mode.
•
class-of-service—Class-of-service configuration.
•
diameter—Diameter base protocol layer configuration.
•
ethernet-switching-options—(EX Series switch only) Ethernet switching
configuration.
•
event-options—Event processing configuration.
•
firewall—Firewall configuration.
•
forwarding-options—Options that control packet sampling.
•
groups—Configuration groups.
•
interfaces—Interface configuration.
•
jsrc—JSRC partition configuration.
•
jsrc-partition—JSRC partition configuration.
•
logical-systems—Logical system configuration.
•
poe—(EX Series switch only) Power over Ethernet configuration.
•
policy-options—Routing policy option configuration.
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Additional Information
•
protocols—Routing protocol configuration.
•
routing-instances—Routing instance configuration.
•
routing-options—Protocol-independent routing option configuration.
•
security—Security configuration.
•
services—Service PIC applications configuration.
•
snmp—Simple Network Management Protocol configuration.
•
system—System parameters configuration.
•
virtual-chassis—(EX Series switch only) Virtual Chassis configuration.
•
vlans—(EX Series switch only) VLAN configuration.
The portions of the configuration that you can view depend on the user class that you
belong to and the corresponding permissions. If you do not have permission to view a
portion of the configuration, the text ACCESS-DENIED is substituted for that portion of
the configuration. If you do not have permission to view authentication keys and passwords
in the configuration, because the secret permission bit is not set for your user account,
the text SECRET-DATA is substituted for that portion of the configuration. If an identifier
in the configuration contains a space, the identifier is displayed in quotation marks.
Likewise, when you issue the show configuration command with the | display set pipe
option to view the configuration as set commands, those portions of the configuration
that you do not have permissions to view are substituted with the text ACCESS-DENIED.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
show configuration on page 310
show configuration policy-options on page 311
This command displays information about the current running configuration.
Sample Output
show configuration
[email protected]> show configuration
## Last commit: 2006-10-31 14:13:00 PST by user1 version "8.2I0 [userb]"; ## last
changed: 2006-10-31 14:05:53 PST
system {
host-name exhost;
domain-name ex1.net;
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backup-router 198.51.100.254;
time-zone America/Los_Angeles;
default-address-selection;
name-server {
192.0.2.254;
192.0.2.249;
192.0.2.176;
}
services {
telnet;
}
tacplus-server {
10.2.3.4 {
secret /* SECRET-DATA */;
...
}
}
}
interfaces {
...
}
protocols {
isis {
export "direct routes";
}
}
policy-options {
policy-statement "direct routes" {
from protocol direct;
then accept;
}
}
show configuration policy-options
[email protected]> show configuration policy-options
policy-options {
policy-statement "direct routes" {
from protocol direct;
then accept;
}
}
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show | display inheritance
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show | display inheritance <brief | defaults | no-comments | terse>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Show the inherited configuration data and information about the source group from
which the configuration has been inherited. Show interface ranges configuration data in
expanded format and information about the source interface-range from which the
configuration has been expanded
[email protected]# show system ports | display inheritance defaults
## 'console' was inherited from group 'junos-defaults'
## 'vt100' was inherited from group 'junos-defaults'
## console type vt100;
[email protected]# show system login class readonly | display inheritance
## 'interface' was inherited from group global'
## 'network' was inherited from group global'
## 'routing' was inherited from group global'
## 'system' was inherited from group global'
## 'trace' was inherited from group global'
## 'view' was inherited from group global'
##
permissions [ interface network routing system trace view ];
[email protected]# show system login class readonly | display inheritance no-comments
permissions [ interface network routing system trace view ];
Options
•
brief—Display brief output for the command.
•
defaults—Display the Junos OS defaults that have been applied to the configuration.
•
no-comments—Display configuration information without inline comments marked
with ##.
•
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
312
terse—Display terse output with inheritance details as inline comment.
view
•
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups on page 253
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show | display omit
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show | display omit
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 8.2.
Display configuration statements (including those marked as hidden by the apply-flags
omit configuration statement).
[email protected]# show | display omit
system {
apply-flags omit;
login {
message lengthy-login-message;
}
}
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
show on page 308
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show | display set
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show | display set
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands required to
re-create the configuration from the top level of the hierarchy as set commands
[email protected]# show | display set
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 192.168.1.230/24
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family iso
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 0 family mpls
set interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 1 family inet address 10.0.0.1/8
deactivate interfaces fe-0/0/0 unit 1
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
314
view
•
show on page 308
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
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show | display set relative
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show | display set relative
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands required to
re-create the configuration from the current hierarchy level.
[edit interfaces fe-0/0/0]
[email protected]# show
unit 0 {
family inet {
address 192.107.1.230/24;
}
family iso;
family mpls;
}
inactive: unit 1 {
family inet {
address 10.0.0.1/8;
}
}
[email protected]# show | display set relative
set unit 0 family inet address 192.107.1.230/24
set unit 0 family iso
set unit 0 family mpls
set unit 1 family inet address 10.0.0.1/8
deactivate unit 1
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
Displaying set Commands from the Junos OS Configuration on page 105
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show groups junos-defaults
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show groups junos-defaults
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the full set of available preset statements from the Junos OS defaults group.
[email protected]# show groups junos-defaults
groups {
junos-defaults {
applications {
# File Transfer Protocol
application junos-ftp {
application-protocol ftp;
protocol tcp;
destination-port 21;
}
# Trivial File Transfer Protocol
application junos-tftp {
application-protocol tftp;
protocol udp;
destination-port 69;
}
# RPC port mapper on TCP
application junos-rpc-portmap-tcp {
application-protocol rpc-portmap;
protocol tcp;
destination-port 111;
}
# RPC port mapper on UDP
}
}
}
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
316
view
•
Using Junos OS Defaults Groups.
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
status
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Required Privilege
Level
status
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the users currently editing the configuration.
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
“Displaying Users Currently Editing the Junos OS Configuration” on page 107.
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top
Syntax
Release Information
top <configuration-command>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Description
Return to the top level of configuration command mode, which is indicated by the [edit]
banner.
Options
configuration-command—(Optional) Issue configuration mode commands from the top
of the hierarchy.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
318
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
exit on page 288
•
up on page 322
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traceoptions (Batch Commits)
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
Description
Options
traceoptions {
file filename;
files number;
flag (all | batch | commit-server | configuration);
size maximum-file-size;
(world-readable | no-world-readable);
}
[edit system commit server],
[edit system commit synchronize server]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
For Junos OS batch commits, configure tracing operations.
file name—Name of the file to receive the output of the tracing operation.
NOTE: If you configure traceoptions and do not explicitly specify a
filename for logging the events, the batch commit events are logged in
the commitd file (var/log/commitd) by default.
files number—Maximum number of trace files.
flag flag—Tracing operation to perform. To specify more than one tracing operation,
include multiple flag statements. You can include the following flags:
•
all—All tracing operations flags.
•
batch—Tracing operations for batch events.
•
commit-server—Tracing operations for commit server events.
•
configuration—Tracing operations for the reading of configuration.
size—Maximum size of each trace file, in kilobytes (KB), megabytes (MB), or gigabytes
(GB).
world-readable | no-world-readable—readable—Grant all users permission to read
archived log files, or restrict the permission only to the root user and users who have
the Junos OS maintenance permission.
Required Privilege
Level
system—To view this statement in the configuration.
system-control—To add this statement to the configuration.
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Related
Documentation
320
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
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unprotect
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
unprotect (hierarchy | statement | identifier)
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.2.
Unprotect a protected hierarchy, configuration statement, or an identifier.
none
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
top on page 318
•
up on page 322
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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up
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
up <number> <configuration-command>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Move up one level in the statement hierarchy.
none—Move up one level in the configuration hierarchy.
configuration-command—(Optional) Issue configuration mode commands from a location
higher in the hierarchy.
number—(Optional) Move up the specified number of levels in the configuration hierarchy.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
322
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
•
exit on page 288
•
top on page 318
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Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
update
Syntax
Release Information
Description
update
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 7.5.
Update private candidate configuration with a copy of the most recently committed
configuration, including your private changes.
NOTE: The update command is available only when you are in configure
private mode.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
configure—To enter configuration mode.
•
Updating the configure private Configuration on page 100.
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when
Syntax
Hierarchy Level
Release Information
when {
chassis chassis-id;
member member-id;
model model-id;
node [ names of peers ]node-id;
peers [ names of peers ];
routing-engine routing-engine-id;
time <start-time> [to <end-time>];
}
[edit groups group-name]
Statement introduced in Junos OS Release 11.3.
peers option added in Junos OS Release 14.2R6 for the MX Series.
peers option added in Junos OS Release 16.1R1 for the EX Series.
Description
Define conditions under which the configuration group should be applied. Conditions
include the type of chassis, model, or Routing Engine, virtual chassis member, cluster
node, and start and optional end time of day. If you specify multiple conditions in a single
configuration group, all conditions must be met before the configuration group is applied.
Options
chassis chassis-id—Specify the chassis type of the router. Valid types include SCC0, SCC1,
LCC0, LCC1 ... LCC3.
member member-id—Specify the name of the member of the virtual chassis.
model model-id—Specify the model name of the router, such as m7i or tx100.
node node-id—Specify the cluster node.
peers [ names of peers ]—Specify the names of the MC-LAG peers participating in commit
synchronization.
routing-engine routing-engine-id—Specify the type of Routing Engine, re0 or re1.
time <start-time> [to <end-time>]—Specify the start time or time duration for this
configuration group to be applied. If only the start time is specified, the configuration
group is applied at the specified time and remains in effect until the time is changed.
If the end time is specified, then on each day, the applied configuration group is
started and stopped at the specified times. The syntax for specifying the time is:
time <start-time> [to <end-time>] using the time format yyyy-mm-dd.hh:mm, hh:mm,
or hh.
Required Privilege
Level
324
configure—To enter configuration mode.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 12: Junos OS Configuration Statements and Commands
Related
Documentation
•
Creating the Junos OS Configuration Group on page 227
•
apply-groups on page 271
•
apply-groups-except on page 271
•
groups on page 290
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wildcard delete
Syntax
Release Information
Description
wildcard delete <statement-path> <identifier> <regular-expression>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Delete a statement or identifier. All subordinate statements and identifiers contained
within the specified statement path are deleted with it.
Deleting a statement or an identifier effectively “unconfigures” or disables the functionality
associated with that statement or identifier.
If you do not specify statement-path or identifier, the entire hierarchy starting at the current
hierarchy level is removed.
Options
identifier—(Optional) Name of the statement or identifier to delete.
regular-expression—(Optional) The pattern based on which you want to delete multiple
items. When you use the wildcard command to delete related configuration items, the
regular-expression must be the final statement.
statement-path—(Optional) Path to an existing statement or identifier. Include this if the
statement or identifier to be deleted is not at the current hierarchy level.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
326
configure—To enter configuration mode. Other required privilege levels depend on where
the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
Example: Using Global Replace in a Junos OS Configuration—Using the upto Option
on page 220.
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
CHAPTER 13
Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
•
set cli complete-on-space
•
set cli directory
•
set cli idle-timeout
•
set cli prompt
•
set cli restart-on-upgrade
•
set cli screen-length
•
set cli screen-width
•
set cli terminal
•
set cli timestamp
•
set date
•
show cli
•
show cli
•
show cli authorization
•
show cli directory
•
show cli history
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set cli complete-on-space
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
set cli complete-on-space (off | on)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set the command-line interface (CLI) to complete a partial command entry when you
type a space or a tab. This is the default behavior of the CLI.
off—Turn off command completion.
on—Allow either a space or a tab to be used for command completion.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli on page 338
set cli complete-on-space on page 328
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
set cli complete-on-space
In the following example, pressing the Spacebar changes the partial command entry
from com to complete-on-space. The example shows how adding the keyword off at the
end of the command disables command completion.
[email protected]> set cli com<Space>
[email protected]>set cli complete-on-space off
Disabling complete-on-space
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Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
set cli directory
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
set cli directory directory
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set the current working directory.
directory—Pathname of the working directory.
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli directory
set cli directory on page 329
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
set cli directory
[email protected]> set cli directory /var/tmp
Current directory: /var/tmp
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set cli idle-timeout
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
set cli idle-timeout
<minutes>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set the maximum time that an individual session can be idle before the user is logged
off the router or switch.
minutes—(Optional) Maximum idle time. The range of values, in minutes, is 0 through
100,000. If you do not issue this command, and the user’s login class does not specify
this value, the user is never forced off the system after extended idle times. Setting
the value to 0 disables the timeout.
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli on page 338
set cli idle-timeout on page 330
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
set cli idle-timeout
[email protected]> set cli idle-timeout 60
Idle timeout set to 60 minutes
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Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
set cli prompt
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
set cli prompt string
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set the prompt so that it is displayed within the CLI.
string—CLI prompt string. To include spaces in the prompt, enclose the string in quotation
marks. By default, the string is [email protected]
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli on page 338
set cli prompt on page 331
When you enter this command, the new CLI prompt is displayed.
Sample Output
set cli prompt
[email protected]> set cli prompt lab1-router>
lab1-router>
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set cli restart-on-upgrade
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
set cli restart-on-upgrade string (off | on)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
For an individual session, set the CLI to prompt you to restart the router or switch after
upgrading the software.
off—Disables the prompt.
on—Enables the prompt.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli on page 338
set cli restart-on-upgrade on page 332
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
set cli restart-on-upgrade
[email protected]> set cli restart-on-upgrade on
Enabling restart-on-upgrade
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Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
set cli screen-length
Syntax
Release Information
Description
set cli screen-length length
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set terminal screen length.
[email protected]> set cli screen-length 75
Screen length set to 75
Options
length—Number of lines of text that the terminal screen displays. The range of values, in
number of lines, is 24 through 100,000. The default is 24.
The point at which the ---(more)--- prompt appears on the screen is a function of this
setting and the settings for the set cli screen-width and set cli terminal commands.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
Setting the Screen Length on page 260
•
Setting the Junos OS CLI Screen Length and Width on page 259
•
set cli screen-width on page 334
•
set cli terminal on page 335
•
show cli on page 340
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set cli screen-width
Syntax
Release Information
Description
set cli screen-width width
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set the terminal screen width.
[email protected]> set cli screen-width
Screen width set to 132
Options
width—Number of characters in a line. The value is 0 or in the range of 40 through 1024.
The default value is 80.
NOTE: In Junos OS Release 13.2 and earlier, the value of width is in the range
of 0 through 1024.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
Setting the Screen Width on page 260
•
set cli screen-length on page 333
•
set cli terminal on page 335
•
334
show cli on page 340
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
set cli terminal
Syntax
Release Information
Description
set cli terminal terminal-type
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set the terminal type.
[email protected]> set cli terminal xterm
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
terminal-type—Type of terminal that is connected to the Ethernet management port:
•
ansi—ANSI-compatible terminal (80 characters by 24 lines)
•
small-xterm—Small xterm window (80 characters by 24 lines)
•
vt100—VT100-compatible terminal (80 characters by 24 lines)
•
xterm—Large xterm window (80 characters by 65 lines)
view
•
Setting the Terminal Type on page 258
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set cli timestamp
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
set cli timestamp (format timestamp-format | disable)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Set a timestamp for CLI output.
format timestamp-format—Set the date and time format for the timestamp. The
timestamp format you specify can include the following placeholders in any order:
•
%m—Two-digit month
•
%d—Two-digit date
•
%T—Six-digit hour, minute, and seconds
disable—Remove the timestamp from the CLI.
NOTE: A timestamp is displayed by default when no command output is
generated.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
•
CLI User Interface Overview
•
show cli on page 338
set cli timestamp on page 336
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
set cli timestamp
[email protected]> set cli timestamp format '%m-%d-%T'
'04-21-17:39:13'
CLI timestamp set to: '%m-%d-%T'
336
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Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
set date
Syntax
Release Information
Description
set date (date-time | ntp <ntp-server> <source-address source-address>)
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Set the date and time.
[email protected]> set date ntp
21 Apr 17:22:02 ntpdate[3867]: step time server 172.17.27.46 offset 8.759252 sec
Options
•
•
date-time—Specify date and time in one of the following formats:
•
YYYYMMDDHHMM.SS
•
“month DD, YYYY HH:MM(am | pm)”
ntp—Configure the router to synchronize the current date and time setting with a
Network Time Protocol (NTP) server.
•
ntp-server—(Optional) Specify the IP address of one or more NTP servers.
•
source-address source-address—(Optional) Specify the source address that is used by
the router to contact the remote NTP server.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
view
•
Setting the Date and Time Locally
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show cli
List of Syntax
Syntax
Syntax (QFX Series
and OCX Series)
Release Information
Syntax on page 338
Syntax (QFX Series and OCX Series) on page 338
show cli
show cli
<authorization>
<directory>
<history count>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Description
Display configured CLI settings.
Options
This command has no options.
Required Privilege
Level
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
view
show cli on page 339
Table 16 on page 338 lists the output fields for the show cli command. Output fields are
listed in the approximate order in which they appear.
Table 16: show cli Output Fields
Field Name
Field Description
CLI complete-on-space
Capability to complete a partial command entry when you type a space or a tab: on or off.
CLI idle-timeout
Maximum time that an individual session can be idle before the user is logged out from the router or
switch. When this feature is enabled, the number of minutes is displayed. Otherwise, the state is
disabled.
CLI restart-on-upgrade
CLI is set to prompt you to restart the router or switch after upgrading the software: on or off.
CLI screen-length
Number of lines of text that the terminal screen displays.
CLI screen-width
Number of characters in a line on the terminal screen.
CLI terminal
Terminal type.
CLI is operating in
Mode: enhanced.
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Table 16: show cli Output Fields (continued)
Field Name
Field Description
CLI timestamp
Date and time format for the timestamp. If the timestamp is not set, the state is disabled.
CLI working directory
Pathname of the working directory.
Sample Output
show cli
[email protected]> show cli
CLI complete-on-space set to on
CLI idle-timeout disabled
CLI restart-on-upgrade set to on
CLI screen-length set to 47
CLI screen-width set to 132
CLI terminal is 'vt100'
CLI is operating in enhanced mode
CLI timestamp disabled
CLI working directory is '/var/tmp'
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show cli
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show cli
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display configured CLI settings.
[email protected]> show cli
CLI complete-on-space set to on
CLI idle-timeout disabled
CLI restart-on-upgrade set to on
CLI screen-length set to 47
CLI screen-width set to 132
CLI terminal is 'vt100'
CLI is operating in enhanced mode
CLI timestamp disabled
CLI working directory is '/var/tmp'
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
340
view
•
show cli authorization on page 341
•
show cli directory on page 343
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
show cli authorization
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show cli authorization
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the permissions for the current user.
[email protected]> show cli authorization
Current user: 'root' login: ‘boojum’ class '(root)'
Permissions:
Permissions:
admin
-- Can view user accounts
admin-control-- Can modify user accounts
clear
-- Can clear learned network info
configure
-- Can enter configuration mode
control
-- Can modify any config
edit
-- Can edit full files
field
-- Can use field debug commands
floppy
-- Can read and write the floppy
interface
-- Can view interface configuration
interface-control-- Can modify interface configuration
network
-- Can access the network
reset
-- Can reset/restart interfaces and daemons
routing
-- Can view routing configuration
routing-control-- Can modify routing configuration
shell
-- Can start a local shell
snmp
-- Can view SNMP configuration
snmp-control-- Can modify SNMP configuration
system
-- Can view system configuration
system-control-- Can modify system configuration
trace
-- Can view trace file settings
trace-control-- Can modify trace file settings
view
-- Can view current values and statistics
maintenance -- Can become the super-user
firewall
-- Can view firewall configuration
firewall-control-- Can modify firewall configuration
secret
-- Can view secret statements
secret-control-- Can modify secret statements
rollback
-- Can rollback to previous configurations
security
-- Can view security configuration
security-control-- Can modify security configuration
access
-- Can view access configuration
access-control-- Can modify access configuration
view-configuration-- Can view all configuration (not including secrets)
flow-tap
-- Can view flow-tap configuration
flow-tap-control-- Can modify flow-tap configuration
idp-profiler-operation-- Can Profiler data
pgcp-session-mirroring-- Can view pgcp session mirroring configuration
pgcp-session-mirroring-control-- Can modify pgcp session mirroring
configuration
storage
-- Can view fibre channel storage protocol configuration
storage-control-- Can modify fibre channel storage protocol configuration
all-control -- Can modify any configuration
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Required Privilege
Level
342
view
Copyright © 2017, Juniper Networks, Inc.
Chapter 13: Junos OS CLI Environment Commands
show cli directory
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show cli directory
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display the current working directory.
[email protected]> show cli directory
Current directory: /var/tmp
Required Privilege
Level
view
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show cli history
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show cli history <count>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Display a list of previous CLI commands.
[email protected]>
11:14:14
11:22:10
11:27:12
Options
show cli history
-- show arp
-- show cli authorization
-- show cli history
none—Display all previous CLI commands.
count—(Optional) Maximum number of commands to display.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
344
view
•
Displaying the Junos OS CLI Command and Word History on page 54
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CHAPTER 14
Junos OS CLI Operational Mode
Commands
•
configure
•
file
•
help
•
| (pipe)
•
request
•
request system commit server pause
•
request system commit server queue cleanup
•
request system commit server start
•
restart
•
set
•
show system commit server queue
•
show system commit server status
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configure
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
configure
<batch>
<dynamic>
<exclusive>
<private>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Enter configuration mode. When this command is entered without any optional keywords,
everyone can make configuration changes and commit all changes made to the
configuration.
none—Enter configuration mode.
batch—(Optional) Work in the batch commit mode where commit operations are
executed in batches.
dynamic—(Optional) Configure routing policies and certain routing policy objects in a
dynamic database that is not subject to the same verification required in the standard
configuration database. As a result, the time it takes to commit changes to the
dynamic database is much shorter than for the standard configuration database.
You can then reference these policies and policy objects in routing policies you
configure in the standard database.
exclusive—(Optional) Lock the candidate configuration for as long as you remain in
configuration mode, allowing you to make changes without interference from other
users. Other users can enter and exit configuration mode, but they cannot change
the configuration.
private—(Optional) Allow multiple users to edit different parts of the configuration at
the same time and to commit only their own changes, or to roll back without
interfering with one another's changes. You cannot commit changes in configure
private mode when another user is in configure exclusive mode.
Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
346
For more information about the different methods of entering configuration mode and
the restrictions that apply, see the Junos OS Administration Library.
configure
•
show configuration on page 309
configure on page 347
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Chapter 14: Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
Output Fields
When you enter this command, you are placed in configuration mode and the system
prompt changes from hostname> to hostname#.
Sample Output
configure
[email protected]> configure
Entering configuration mode
[edit]
[email protected]#
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file
Syntax
Release Information
file <archive | checksum | compare | copy | delete | list | rename | show | source address>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Description
Archive files from the device, copy files to and from the router or switch, calculate the
file checksum, compare files, delete a file from the device, list files on the device, rename
a file, show file contents, or show the local address to initiate a connection.
Options
archive (Optional)—Archive, and optionally compress, one or multiple local system files
as a single file, locally or at a remote location.
checksum (Optional)—Calculate the Message Digest 5 (MD5) checksum of a file.
compare (Optional)—Compare two local files and describe the differences between
them in default, context, or unified output styles.
copy (Optional)—Copy files from one place to another on the local switch or between
the local switch and a remote system.
delete (Optional)—Delete a file on the local switch.
list (Optional)—Display a list of files on the local switch.
rename (Optional)—Rename a file on the local switch.
show (Optional)—Display the contents of a file.
source address (Optional)—Specify the source address of the local file.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
348
maintenance
•
Viewing Files and Directories on a Device Running Junos OS on page 183
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Chapter 14: Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
help
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
help < (apropos string | reference <statement-name> | syslog <syslog-tag> | tip cli number
| topic <word>)>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
apropos option added in Junos OS Release 8.0.
Display help about available operational commands, configuration statements, or general
information about getting help. Entering the help command without an option provides
introductory information about how to use the help and ? commands.
apropos string—(Optional) Display command names and help text that matches the
string specified. If the string contains spaces, enclose it in quotation marks (" " ). You
can also specify a regular expression for the string, using standard UNIX-style regular
expression syntax.
reference <statement-name>—(Optional) Display summary information for a configuration
statement. This information is based on summary descriptions that appear in the Junos
configuration guides.
syslog <syslog-tag>—(Optional) Display information about system log messages.
tip cli number—(Optional) Display a tip about using the CLI. Specify the number of the
tip you want to view.
topic <word>—(Optional) Display usage guidelines for a topic or configuration statement.
This information is based on subjects that appear in the Junos configuration guides.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
None
•
Getting Online Help from the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 47
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| (pipe)
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
| (compare | count | display (changed | commit-scripts | detail | inheritance | json | merge |
omit | set | translation-scripts <configured-delta | translated-config | translated-delta> |
xml) | except pattern | find pattern | hold | last lines | match pattern | no-more | refresh
interval | request message (all | [email protected]) resolve <full-names> | save filename
| append filename | tee | trim columns )
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
display commit-scripts option added in Junos OS Release 7.4.
tee option added in Junos OS Release 14.1.
display json option added in Junos OS Release 14.2.
compare | display xml option added in Junos OS Release 15.1.
display translation-scripts option added in Junos OS Release 16.1.
display merge option added in Junos OS Release 16.2R2.
Filter the output of an operational mode or a configuration mode command.
append filename—Append the output to a file.
compare (filename | rollback n )—Compare configuration changes with another
configuration file. In operational mode, use the show configuration command. In
configuration mode, use the show command. See “Comparing Configurations and
Displaying the Differences in Text” on page 201
compare | display xml—Compare configuration changes with the active configuration
and display them in XML format. In operational mode, use the show configuration
command. In configuration mode, use the show command. See “Understanding the
show | compare | display xml Command Output” on page 136.
count—Display the number of lines in the output.
display—Display additional information about the configuration contents.
changed—Tag changes with junos:changed attribute (XML only).
commit-scripts—(Configuration mode only) Display all statements that are in a
configuration, including statements that were generated by transient changes.
For more information, see the Automation Scripting Feature Guide.
detail—(Configuration mode only) Display configuration data detail.
inheritance <brief | default | no-comments |groups | terse>—(Configuration mode
only) Display inherited configuration data and source group.
json—Display the output for operational commands and configuration data in
JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) format.
merge—Use with the show ephemeral-configuration command to display the merged
view of the static and ephemeral configuration databases. Issuing the show
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ephemeral-configuration | display merge command displays the configuration
data from all instances of the ephemeral configuration database merged with
the complete post-inheritance configuration.
omit—(Configuration mode only) Display configuration statements omitted by the
apply-flags omit configuration statement.
set—Display the configuration as a series of configuration mode commands required
to re-create the configuration.
translation-scripts—Display the configuration with YANG translation scripts applied.
To view the complete post-inheritance configuration with the translated
configuration data from all enabled YANG translation scripts included in the
output, append the | display translation-scripts filter to the show configuration
command in operational mode or the show command in configuration mode.
You can also append one of several keywords to display different views of the
configuration data corresponding to the non-native YANG data models:
•
configured-delta—In configuration mode, compare the candidate and active
configurations, and display configuration changes in the statements or
hierarchies corresponding to non-native YANG data models before any
translation is applied. The XML output displays the deleted content, followed
by the new content in the syntax defined by the YANG data model.
•
translated-config—In operational or configuration mode, display all non-native
configuration data present in the committed or candidate configuration,
respectively, after processing by all enabled translation scripts into Junos OS
syntax.
•
translated-delta—In configuration mode, compare the candidate and active
configurations, and display configuration changes in the statements or
hierarchies corresponding to non-native YANG data models after translation
is applied. The XML output displays the deleted content, followed by the new
content in Junos OS syntax.
xml—(Operational mode only) Display the command output as Junos XML protocol
(Extensible Markup Language [XML]) tags.
except pattern—Ignore text matching a regular expression when searching the output.
If the regular expression contains spaces, operators, or wildcard characters, enclose
it in quotation marks.
find pattern—Display the output starting at the first occurrence of text matching a regular
expression. If the regular expression contains spaces, operators, or wildcard
characters, enclose it in quotation marks (" ").
hold—Hold text without exiting the --More-- prompt.
last lines—Display the last number of lines you want to view from the end of the
configuration. However, when the number of lines requested is less than the number
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of lines that the screen length setting permits you to display, Junos returns as many
lines as permitted by the screen length setting. For more information on using the
last lines option, see “Displaying Output Beginning with the Last Entries” on page 207.
match pattern—Search for text matching a regular expression. If the regular expression
contains spaces, operators, or wildcard characters, enclose it in quotation marks.
no-more—Display output all at once rather than one screen at a time.
resolve—(Operational mode only) Convert IP addresses into Domain Name System
(DNS) names. Truncates to fit original size unless full-names is specified. To prevent
the names from being truncated, use the full-names option.
refresh interval—Refresh the display of the command according to the interval specified.
The screen gets refreshed periodically to show you the current output of the
command until you quit the command. The default refresh interval is one second.
However, you can also explicitly specify a value from 1 through 604800 for the refresh
interval.
request message (all | [email protected] )—Display command output on the terminal
of a specific user logged in to your router, or on the terminals of all users logged in
to your router.
save filename—Save the output to a file or URL. For information about specifying the
filename, see “Specifying Filenames and URLs” on page 186.
tee—Allows you to both display the command output on screen and write it to a file.
Unlike the UNIX tee command, if the file cannot be opened, just an error message is
displayed.
trim columns—Trim specified number of columns from the start line. Only positive values
are accepted. An error message appears if a negative value is given.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
352
view
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100.
•
Using the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command Output on page 197
•
Using Regular Expressions with the Pipe ( | ) Symbol to Filter Junos OS Command
Output on page 198
•
Pipe ( | ) Filter Functions in the Junos OS Command-Line Interface on page 200
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Chapter 14: Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
request
Syntax
Release Information
Description
request <chassis | ipsec switch | message | mpls | routing-engine | security | services | system
| flow-collector | support information>
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Stop or reboot router components, switch between primary and backup components,
display messages, and display system information.
CAUTION: Halt the backup Routing Engine before you remove it or shut off
the power to the router; otherwise, you might need to reinstall the Junos OS.
NOTE: If your router contains two Routing Engines and you want to shut the
power off to the router or remove a Routing Engine, you must first halt the
backup Routing Engine (if it has been upgraded) and then the master Routing
Engine. To halt a Routing Engine, enter the request system halt command.
You can also halt both Routing Engines at the same time by issuing the request
system halt both-routing-engines command.
If you want to reboot a router that has two Routing Engines, reboot the backup
Routing Engine (if you have upgraded it) and then the master Routing Engine.
NOTE: If you reboot the TX Matrix router, all the T640 master Routing Engines
connected to the TX Matrix router reboot. If you halt both Routing Engines
on a TX Matrix router, all the T640 Routing Engines connected to the TX
Matrix router are also halted. Likewise, if you reboot the TX Matrix Plus router,
all the T1600 or T4000 master Routing Engines connected to the TX Matrix
Plus router reboot. If you halt both Routing Engines on a TX Matrix Plus router,
all the T1600 or T4000 Routing Engines connected to the TX Matrix Plus
router are also halted.
NOTE: If you insert a Flexible PIC Concentrator (FPC) into your router, you
may need to issue the request chassis fpc command (or press the online
button) to bring the FPC online. This applies to FPCs in M20, M40, M40e,
M160, M320, and T Series routers. For command usage, see the request chassis
fpc command description in the CLI Explorer.
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Additional Information
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
354
Most request commands are described in the Junos System Basics and Services Command
Reference. The following request commands are described in the Junos Interfaces
Command Reference: request ipsec switch and request services.
maintenance
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
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Chapter 14: Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
request system commit server pause
Syntax
Release Information
Description
request system commit server pause
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Pause the commit server.
NOTE: If you issue this command when a commit job is in process, the batch
commit server pauses only after the current commit job is completed.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
This command has no options.
view
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
Sample Output
When you enter the request system commit server pause command, you are provided
feedback on the status of your request.
request system commit server pause
[email protected]> request system commit server pause
Successfully paused the commit server.
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request system commit server queue cleanup
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
request system commit server queue cleanup
<id commit-id>
<job-status (error| pending| success)>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Clean up the batch commit queue.
id commit-id—(Optional) Clean up batch commit operation status messages for a specific
commit ID.
job-status—(Optional) Clean up batch commit operation status messages for the
following:
•
error—Clean up status messages for batch commit operations that have errors.
•
pending—Clean up status messages for batch commit operations that are pending.
•
success—Clean up status messages for batch commit operations that are
successful.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
view
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
request system commit server queue cleanup id on page 356
request system commit server queue cleanup job-status success on page 356
Sample Output
When you enter the request system commit server queue cleanup command, you are
provided feedback on the status of your request.
request system commit server queue cleanup id
[email protected]> request system commit server queue cleanup id 1008
Successfully cleaned up jobs.
request system commit server queue cleanup job-status success
[email protected]> request system commit server queue cleanup job-status success
Successfully cleaned up jobs.
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request system commit server start
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
request system commit server start
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Start the commit server.
This command has no options.
view
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
Sample Output
When you enter the request system commit server start command, you are provided
feedback on the status of your request.
request system commit server start
[email protected]> request system commit server start
Successfully started the commit server.
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restart
List of Syntax
Syntax on page 358
Syntax (ACX Series Routers) on page 358
Syntax (EX Series Switches) on page 358
Syntax (MX Series Routers) on page 359
Syntax (QFX Series) on page 359
Syntax (Routing Matrix) on page 359
Syntax (TX Matrix Routers) on page 359
Syntax (TX Matrix Plus Routers) on page 360
Syntax (QFX Series) on page 360
Syntax
restart
<adaptive-services |ancpd-service | application-identification |audit-process |
auto-configuration |captive-portal-content-delivery |ce-l2tp-service |chassis-control |
class-of-service |clksyncd-service |database-replication|datapath-trace-service
|dhcp-service | diameter-service | disk-monitoring | dynamic-flow-capture |
ecc-error-logging | ethernet-connectivity-fault-management
|ethernet-link-fault-management |event-processing | firewall
|general-authentication-service | gracefully | iccp-service |idp-policy | immediately
|interface-control | ipsec-key-management | kernel-replication | l2-learning | l2cpd-service
| l2tp-service | l2tp-universal-edge | lacp | license-service |link-management
|local-policy-decision-function |mac-validation |mib-process | mountd-service
|mpls-traceroute |mspd | multicast-snooping |named-service | nfsd-service |
packet-triggered-subscribers |peer-selection-service |pgm | pic-services-logging | pki-service
|ppp | ppp-service |pppoe | protected-system-domain-service |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations | root-system-domain-service | routing
<logical-system logical-system-name> | sampling | sbc-configuration-process | sdk-service
|service-deployment | services | snmp |soft |static-subscribers |statistics-service|
subscriber-management | subscriber-management-helper | tunnel-oamd |usb-control|
vrrp |web-management>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
Syntax (ACX Series
Routers)
restart
<adaptive-services |audit-process | auto-configuration | autoinstallation |chassis-control |
class-of-service |clksyncd-service |database-replication| dhcp-service | diameter-service
| disk-monitoring | dynamic-flow-capture | ethernet-connectivity-fault-management
|ethernet-link-fault-management |event-processing | firewall
|general-authentication-service | gracefully | immediately |interface-control |
ipsec-key-management | l2-learning | lacp |link-management |mib-process | mountd-service
|mpls-traceroute |mspd | named-service | nfsd-service | pgm | pki-service |ppp | pppoe |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations | routing | sampling | sdk-service
|secure-neighbor-discovery | service-deployment | services | snmp |soft |statistics-service|
subscriber-management | subscriber-management-helper | tunnel-oamd | vrrp>
Syntax (EX Series
Switches)
restart
<autoinstallation | chassis-control | class-of-service | database-replication | dhcp |
dhcp-service | diameter-service | dot1x-protocol | ethernet-link-fault-management |
ethernet-switching | event-processing | firewall | general-authentication-service |
interface-control | kernel-replication | l2-learning | lacp | license-service | link-management
| lldpd-service | mib-process | mountd-service | multicast-snooping | pgm |
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redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations | routing | secure-neighbor-discovery
| service-deployment | sflow-service | snmp | vrrp | web-management>
Syntax (MX Series
Routers)
restart
<adaptive-services | ancpd-service |application-identification|audit-process |
auto-configuration |captive-portal-content-delivery |ce-l2tp-service |chassis-control |
class-of-service |clksyncd-service |database-replication| datapath-trace-service
|dhcp-service | diameter-service | disk-monitoring | dynamic-flow-capture |
ecc-error-logging | ethernet-connectivity-fault-management
|ethernet-link-fault-management |event-processing | firewall |
general-authentication-service | gracefully |iccp-service |idp-policy |immediately
|interface-control | ipsec-key-management | kernel-replication | l2-learning |l2cpd-service
|l2tp-service | l2tp-universal-edge | lacp | license-service |link-management
|local-policy-decision-function |mac-validation |mib-process | mountd-service
|mpls-traceroute |mspd | multicast-snooping |named-service | nfsd-service |
packet-triggered-subscribers |peer-selection-service | pgm | pic-services-logging |
pki-service |ppp | ppp-service |pppoe | protected-system-domain-service |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations |root-system-domain-service | routing
|routing <logical-system logical-system-name> | sampling | sbc-configuration-process |
sdk-service |service-deployment |services | snmp |soft |static-subscribers |statistics-service|
subscriber-management | subscriber-management-helper | tunnel-oamd | usb-control|
vrrp |web-management>
<all-members>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
<local>
<member member-id>
Syntax (QFX Series)
restart
<adaptive-services | audit-process | chassis-control | class-of-service | dialer-services |
diameter-service | dlsw | ethernet-connectivity | event-processing | fibre-channel | firewall
| general-authentication-service | igmp-host-services | interface-control |
ipsec-key-management | isdn-signaling | l2ald | l2-learning | l2tp-service | mib-process |
named-service | network-access-service | nstrace-process | pgm | ppp | pppoe |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations |logical-system-name> | routing |
sampling |secure-neighbor-discovery | service-deployment | snmp | usb-control |
web-management>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
Syntax (Routing
Matrix)
Syntax (TX Matrix
Routers)
restart
<adaptive-services | audit-process | chassis-control | class-of-service | disk-monitoring |
dynamic-flow-capture | ecc-error-logging | event-processing | firewall | interface-control
| ipsec-key-management | kernel-replication | l2-learning | l2tp-service | lacp |
link-management | mib-process | pgm | pic-services-logging | ppp | pppoe |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations | routing <logical-system
logical-system-name> | sampling | service-deployment | snmp>
<all | all-lcc | lcc number>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
restart
<adaptive-services | audit-process | chassis-control | class-of-service | dhcp-service |
diameter-service | disk-monitoring | dynamic-flow-capture | ecc-error-logging |
event-processing | firewall | interface-control | ipsec-key-management | kernel-replication
| l2-learning | l2tp-service | lacp | link-management | mib-process |pgm | pic-services-logging
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| ppp | pppoe | redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations | routing <logical-system
logical-system-name> | sampling | service-deployment | snmp| statistics-service>
<all-chassis | all-lcc | lcc number | scc>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
Syntax (TX Matrix Plus
Routers)
restart
<adaptive-services | audit-process | chassis-control | class-of-service | dhcp-service |
diameter-service | disk-monitoring | dynamic-flow-capture | ecc-error-logging |
event-processing | firewall | interface-control | ipsec-key-management | kernel-replication
| l2-learning | l2tp-service | lacp | link-management | mib-process | pgm |
pic-services-logging | ppp | pppoe | redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations |
routing <logical-system logical-system-name> | sampling | service-deployment | snmp|
statistics-service>
<all-chassis | all-lcc | all-sfc | lcc number | sfc number>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
Syntax (QFX Series)
restart
<adaptive-services | audit-process | chassis-control | class-of-service | dialer-services |
diameter-service | dlsw | ethernet-connectivity | event-processing | fibre-channel | firewall
| general-authentication-service | igmp-host-services | interface-control |
ipsec-key-management | isdn-signaling | l2ald | l2-learning | l2tp-service | mib-process |
named-service | network-access-service | nstrace-process | pgm | ppp | pppoe |
redundancy-interface-process | remote-operations |logical-system-name> | routing |
sampling |secure-neighbor-discovery | service-deployment | snmp | usb-control |
web-management>
<gracefully | immediately | soft>
Release Information
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 9.0 for EX Series switches.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 11.1 for the QFX Series.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.2 for ACX Series routers.
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 14.1X53-D20 for the OCX Series.
Options added:
Description
360
•
dynamic-flow-capture in Junos OS Release 7.4.
•
dlsw in Junos OS Release 7.5.
•
event-processing in Junos OS Release 7.5.
•
ppp in Junos OS Release 7.5.
•
l2ald in Junos OS Release 8.0.
•
link-management in Release 8.0.
•
pgcp-service in Junos OS Release 8.4.
•
sbc-configuration-process in Junos OS Release 9.5.
•
services pgcp gateway in Junos OS Release 9.6.
•
sfc and all-sfc for the TX Matrix Router in Junos OS Release 9.6.
Restart a Junos OS process.
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CAUTION: Never restart a software process unless instructed to do so by a
customer support engineer. A restart might cause the router or switch to drop
calls and interrupt transmission, resulting in possible loss of data.
Options
none—Same as gracefully.
adaptive-services—(Optional) Restart the configuration management process that
manages the configuration for stateful firewall, Network Address Translation (NAT),
intrusion detection services (IDS), and IP Security (IPsec) services on the Adaptive
Services PIC.
all-chassis—(TX Matrix and TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) Restart the software
process on all chassis.
all-lcc—(TX Matrix and TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) For a TX Matrix router,
restart the software process on all T640 routers connected to the TX Matrix router.
For a TX Matrix Plus router, restart the software process on all T1600 routers
connected to the TX Matrix Plus router.
all-members—(MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the software process for all
members of the Virtual Chassis configuration.
all-sfc—(TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) For a TX Matrix Plus router, restart the
software processes for the TX Matrix Plus router (or switch-fabric chassis).
ancpd-service—(Optional) Restart the Access Node Control Protocol (ANCP) process,
which works with a special Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) session to
collect outgoing interface mapping events in a scalable manner.
application-identification—(Optional) Restart the process that identifies an application
using intrusion detection and prevention (IDP) to allow or deny traffic based on
applications running on standard or nonstandard ports.
audit-process—(Optional) Restart the RADIUS accounting process that gathers statistical
data that can be used for general network monitoring, analyzing, and tracking usage
patterns, for billing a user based on the amount of time or type of services accessed.
auto-configuration—(Optional) Restart the Interface Auto-Configuration process.
autoinstallation—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the autoinstallation
process.
captive-portal-content-delivery—(Optional) Restart the HTTP redirect service by
specifying the location to which a subscriber's initial Web browser session is
redirected, enabling initial provisioning and service selection for the subscriber.
ce-l2tp-service—(M10, M10i, M7i, and MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the
Universal Edge Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) process, which establishes L2TP
tunnels and Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) sessions through L2TP tunnels.
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chassis-control—(Optional) Restart the chassis management process.
class-of-service—(Optional) Restart the class-of-service (CoS) process, which controls
the router's or switch’s CoS configuration.
clksyncd-service—(Optional) Restart the external clock synchronization process, which
uses synchronous Ethernet (SyncE).
database-replication—(EX Series switches and MX Series routers only) (Optional)
Restart the database replication process.
datapath-trace-service—(Optional) Restart the packet path tracing process.
dhcp—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the software process for a Dynamic
Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. A DHCP server allocates network IP
addresses and delivers configuration settings to client hosts without user intervention.
dhcp-service—(Optional) Restart the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol process.
dialer-services—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the ISDN dial-out process.
diameter-service—(Optional) Restart the diameter process.
disk-monitoring—(Optional) Restart disk monitoring, which checks the health of the
hard disk drive on the Routing Engine.
dlsw—(QFX Series only) (Optional) Restart the data link switching (DLSw) service.
dot1x-protocol—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the port-based network
access control process.
dynamic-flow-capture—(Optional) Restart the dynamic flow capture (DFC) process,
which controls DFC configurations on Monitoring Services III PICs.
ecc-error-logging—(Optional) Restart the error checking and correction (ECC) process,
which logs ECC parity errors in memory on the Routing Engine.
ethernet-connectivity-fault-management—(Optional) Restart the process that provides
IEEE 802.1ag Operation, Administration, and Management (OAM) connectivity fault
management (CFM) database information for CFM maintenance association end
points (MEPs) in a CFM session.
ethernet-link-fault-management—(EX Series switches and MX Series routers only)
(Optional) Restart the process that provides the OAM link fault management (LFM)
information for Ethernet interfaces.
ethernet-switching—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the Ethernet switching
process.
event-processing—(Optional) Restart the event process (eventd).
fibre-channel—(QFX Series only) (Optional) Restart the Fibre Channel process.
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firewall—(Optional) Restart the firewall management process, which manages the
firewall configuration and enables accepting or rejecting packets that are transiting
an interface on a router or switch.
general-authentication-service—(EX Series switches and MX Series routers only)
(Optional) Restart the general authentication process.
gracefully—(Optional) Restart the software process.
iccp-service—(Optional) Restart the Inter-Chassis Communication Protocol (ICCP)
process.
idp-policy—(Optional) Restart the intrusion detection and prevention (IDP) protocol
process.
immediately—(Optional) Immediately restart the software process.
interface-control—(Optional) Restart the interface process, which controls the router's
or switch’s physical interface devices and logical interfaces.
ipsec-key-management—(Optional) Restart the IPsec key management process.
isdn-signaling—(QFX Series only) (Optional) Restart the ISDN signaling process, which
initiates ISDN connections.
kernel-replication—(Optional) Restart the kernel replication process, which replicates
the state of the backup Routing Engine when graceful Routing Engine switchover
(GRES) is configured.
l2-learning—(Optional) Restart the Layer 2 address flooding and learning process.
l2cpd-service—(Optional) Restart the Layer 2 Control Protocol process, which enables
features such as Layer 2 protocol tunneling and nonstop bridging.
l2tp-service— (M10, M10i, M7i, and MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the Layer 2
Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) process, which sets up client services for establishing
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) tunnels across a network and negotiating Multilink
PPP if it is implemented.
l2tp-universal-edge—(MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the L2TP process,
which establishes L2TP tunnels and PPP sessions through L2TP tunnels.
lacp—(Optional) Restart the Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) process. LACP
provides a standardized means for exchanging information between partner systems
on a link to allow their link aggregation control instances to reach agreement on the
identity of the LAG to which the link belongs, and then to move the link to that LAG,
and to enable the transmission and reception processes for the link to function in
an orderly manner.
lcc number—(TX Matrix and TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) For a TX Matrix
router, restart the software process for a specific T640 router that is connected to
the TX Matrix router. For a TX Matrix Plus router, restart the software process for a
specific router that is connected to the TX Matrix Plus router.
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Replace number with the following values depending on the LCC configuration:
•
0 through 3, when T640 routers are connected to a TX Matrix router in a routing
matrix.
•
0 through 3, when T1600 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router in a
routing matrix.
•
0 through 7, when T1600 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router with 3D
SIBs in a routing matrix.
•
0, 2, 4, or 6, when T4000 routers are connected to a TX Matrix Plus router with
3D SIBs in a routing matrix.
license-service—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the feature license
management process.
link-management— (TX Matrix and TX Matrix Plus routers and EX Series switches only)
(Optional) Restart the Link Management Protocol (LMP) process, which establishes
and maintains LMP control channels.
lldpd-service—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the Link Layer Discovery
Protocol (LLDP) process.
local—(MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the software process for the local
Virtual Chassis member.
local-policy-decision-function— (Optional) Restart the process for the Local Policy
Decision Function, which regulates collection of statistics related to applications
and application groups and tracking of information about dynamic subscribers and
static interfaces.
mac-validation— (Optional) Restart the Media Access Control (MAC) validation process,
which configures MAC address validation for subscriber interfaces created on demux
interfaces in dynamic profiles on MX Series routers.
member member-id—(MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart the software process
for a specific member of the Virtual Chassis configuration. Replace member-id with
a value of 0 or 1.
mib-process—(Optional) Restart the Management Information Base (MIB) version II
process, which provides the router's MIB II agent.
mobile-ip—(Optional) Restart the Mobile IP process, which configures Junos OS Mobile
IP features.
mountd-service—(EX Series switches and MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart
the service for NFS mount requests.
mpls-traceroute—(Optional) Restart the MPLS Periodic Traceroute process.
mspd—(Optional) Restart the Multiservice process.
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multicast-snooping—(EX Series switches and MX Series routers only) (Optional) Restart
the multicast snooping process, which makes Layer 2 devices, such as VLAN switches,
aware of Layer 3 information, such as the media access control (MAC) addresses
of members of a multicast group.
named-service—(Optional) Restart the DNS Server process, which is used by a router
or a switch to resolve hostnames into addresses.
network-access-service—( QFX Series only) (Optional) Restart the network access
process, which provides the router's Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol
(CHAP) authentication service.
nfsd-service—(Optional) Restart the Remote NFS Server process, which provides remote
file access for applications that need NFS-based transport.
packet-triggered-subscribers—(Optional) Restart the packet-triggered subscribers and
policy control (PTSP) process, which allows the application of policies to dynamic
subscribers that are controlled by a subscriber termination device.
peer-selection-service—(Optional) Restart the Peer Selection Service process.
pgcp-service—(Optional) Restart the pgcpd service process running on the Routing
Engine. This option does not restart pgcpd processes running on mobile station PICs.
To restart pgcpd processes running on mobile station PICs, use the services pgcp
gateway option.
pgm—(Optional) Restart the process that implements the Pragmatic General Multicast
(PGM) protocol for assisting in the reliable delivery of multicast packets.
pic-services-logging—(Optional) Restart the logging process for some PICs. With this
process, also known as fsad (the file system access daemon), PICs send special
logging information to the Routing Engine for archiving on the hard disk.
pki-service—(Optional) Restart the PKI Service process.
ppp—(Optional) Restart the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) process, which is the
encapsulation protocol process for transporting IP traffic across point-to-point links.
ppp-service—(Optional) Restart the Universal edge PPP process, which is the
encapsulation protocol process for transporting IP traffic across universal edge
routers.
pppoe—(Optional) Restart the Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) process,
which combines PPP that typically runs over broadband connections with the
Ethernet link-layer protocol that allows users to connect to a network of hosts over
a bridge or access concentrator.
protected-system-domain-service—(Optional) Restart the Protected System Domain
(PSD) process.
redundancy-interface-process—(Optional) Restart the ASP redundancy process.
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remote-operations—(Optional) Restart the remote operations process, which provides
the ping and traceroute MIBs.
root-system-domain-service—(Optional) Restart the Root System Domain (RSD)
service.
routing—(ACX Series routers, QFX Series, EX Series switches, and MX Series routers only)
(Optional) Restart the routing protocol process.
routing <logical-system logical-system-name>—(Optional) Restart the routing protocol
process, which controls the routing protocols that run on the router or switch and
maintains the routing tables. Optionally, restart the routing protocol process for the
specified logical system only.
sampling—(Optional) Restart the sampling process, which performs packet sampling
based on particular input interfaces and various fields in the packet header.
sbc-configuration-process—(Optional) Restart the session border controller (SBC)
process of the border signaling gateway (BSG).
scc—(TX Matrix routers only) (Optional) Restart the software process on the TX Matrix
router (or switch-card chassis).
sdk-service—(Optional) Restart the SDK Service process, which runs on the Routing
Engine and is responsible for communications between the SDK application and
Junos OS. Although the SDK Service process is present on the router, it is turned off
by default.
secure-neighbor-discovery—(QFX Series, EX Series switches, and MX Series routers
only) (Optional) Restart the secure Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP) process,
which provides support for protecting NDP messages.
sfc number—(TX Matrix Plus routers only) (Optional) Restart the software process on
the TX Matrix Plus router (or switch-fabric chassis). Replace number with 0.
service-deployment—(Optional) Restart the service deployment process, which enables
Junos OS to work with the Session and Resource Control (SRC) software.
services—(Optional) Restart a service.
services pgcp gateway gateway-name—(Optional) Restart the pgcpd process for a
specific border gateway function (BGF) running on an MS-PIC. This option does not
restart the pgcpd process running on the Routing Engine. To restart the pgcpd process
on the Routing Engine, use the pgcp-service option.
sflow-service—(EX Series switches only) (Optional) Restart the flow sampling (sFlow
technology) process.
snmp—(Optional) Restart the SNMP process, which enables the monitoring of network
devices from a central location and provides the router's or switch’s SNMP master
agent.
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soft—(Optional) Reread and reactivate the configuration without completely restarting
the software processes. For example, BGP peers stay up and the routing table stays
constant. Omitting this option results in a graceful restart of the software process.
static-subscribers—(Optional) Restart the static subscribers process, which associates
subscribers with statically configured interfaces and provides dynamic service
activation and activation for these subscribers.
statistics-service—(Optional) Restart the process that manages the Packet Forwarding
Engine statistics.
subscriber-management—(Optional) Restart the Subscriber Management process.
subscriber-management-helper—(Optional) Restart the Subscriber Management Helper
process.
tunnel-oamd—(Optional) Restart the Tunnel OAM process, which enables the Operations,
Administration, and Maintenance of Layer 2 tunneled networks. Layer 2 protocol
tunneling (L2PT) allows service providers to send Layer 2 protocol data units (PDUs)
across the provider’s cloud and deliver them to Juniper Networks EX Series Ethernet
Switches that are not part of the local broadcast domain.
usb-control—( MX Series routers) (Optional) Restart the USB control process.
vrrp—(ACX Series routers, EX Series switches, and MX Series routers only) (Optional)
Restart the Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) process, which enables
hosts on a LAN to make use of redundant routing platforms on that LAN without
requiring more than the static configuration of a single default route on the hosts.
web-management—(QFX Series, EX Series switches, and MX Series routers only)
(Optional) Restart the Web management process.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
Output Fields
reset
•
Overview of Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands on page 173
restart interface-control gracefully on page 367
When you enter this command, you are provided feedback on the status of your request.
Sample Output
restart interface-control gracefully
[email protected]> restart interface-control gracefully
Interface control process started, pid 41129
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set
Syntax
Release Information
Description
Options
set <statement-path> identifier
Command introduced before Junos OS Release 7.4.
Create a statement hierarchy and set identifier values. This is similar to edit except that
your current level in the hierarchy does not change.
identifier—Name of the statement or identifier to set.
statement-path—(Optional) Path to an existing statement hierarchy level. If that hierarchy
level does not exist, it is created.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
368
configure—To enter configuration mode, but other required privilege levels depend on
where the statement is located in the configuration hierarchy.
•
edit on page 287
•
Displaying the Current Junos OS Configuration on page 100
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Chapter 14: Junos OS CLI Operational Mode Commands
show system commit server queue
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show system commit server queue
<id commit-id>
<job-status (all| error| pending| success)>
<patch (none | id commit-id) | (job-status (all | error | pending | success)>
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Display the status of commit server queue transactions.
NOTE: Only 50 successful commit jobs are stored in the database and
displayed in the output. When the fifty-first job is committed, the first job is
deleted from the database and is no longer displayed in the output.
Options
id commit-id—(Optional) Display the batch commit operation status messages for a
specific commit ID.
job-status—(Optional) Display batch commit operation status messages for the following
batch commit statuses:
•
all—Status messages for all batch commit operations.
•
error—Status messages for batch commit operations that have errors.
•
pending—Status messages for batch commit operations that are pending.
•
success—Status messages for batch commit operations that are successful.
patch (none | id commit-id) | job-status (all |error | pending | success)—(Optional) Display
the patch file containing the configuration changes for all batch commit operations,
a specific batch commit ID, or a specific job status.
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
view
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
show system commit server queue on page 370
show system commit server queue job-status success on page 370
show system commit server queue patch on page 370
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Sample Output
show system commit server queue
[email protected]> show system commit server queue
Pending commits:
none
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Id: 1002
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:50:35 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1002
Id: 1004
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:51:48 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1004
Id: 1007
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:04 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1007
Id: 1009
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:16:45 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1009
Id: 1010
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:19:25 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1010
Id: 1011
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:28:16 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1011
Error commits:
Id: 1008
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:18 2011
Status: Error while commiting 1008
show system commit server queue job-status success
[email protected]> show system commit server queue job-status success
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Id: 1001
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:47:02 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1001
show system commit server queue patch
[email protected]> show system commit server queue patch
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Pending commits:
none
Completed commits:
Id: 1000
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:46:43 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1000
Patch:
[edit system commit]
+ server {
+
days-to-keep-error-logs 4294967295;
+
traceoptions {
+
file commitd_nov;
+
flag all;
+
}
+ }
Id: 1002
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:50:35 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1002
Patch:
[edit system commit server]
- days-to-keep-error-logs 4294967295;
Id: 1004
Last Modified: Tue Nov 1 22:51:48 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1004
Patch:
[edit system commit server]
+ days-to-keep-error-logs 4294967295;
Id: 1007
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:04 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1007
Patch:
[edit system commit server]
- days-to-keep-error-logs 4294967295;
+ days-to-keep-error-logs 2;
Id: 1009
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:16:45 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1009
Patch:
[edit]
+ snmp {
+
community abc;
+ }
Id: 1010
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:19:25 2011
Status: Successfully committed 1010
Patch:
[edit system syslog]
file test { ... }
+ file j {
+
any any;
+ }
Id: 1011
Last Modified: Wed Nov
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2 01:28:16 2011
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Status: Successfully committed 1011
Error commits:
Id: 1008
Last Modified: Wed Nov 2 01:08:18 2011
Status: Error while commiting 1008
Patch:
[edit system]
+ radius-server {
+
10.1.1.1 port 222;
+ }
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show system commit server status
Syntax
Release Information
Description
show system commit server status
Command introduced in Junos OS Release 12.1.
Display commit server status.
NOTE: By default, the status of the commit server is “Not running”. The
commit server starts running only when a commit job is added to the batch.
Options
Required Privilege
Level
Related
Documentation
List of Sample Output
This command has no options.
view
•
Example: Configuring Batch Commit Server Properties on page 119
show system commit server status (When Server Is Inactive) on page 373
show system commit server status (When Server Is Active) on page 373
Sample Output
show system commit server status (When Server Is Inactive)
[email protected]> show system commit server status
Commit server status : Not running
show system commit server status (When Server Is Active)
[email protected]> show system commit server status
Commit server status : Running
Jobs in process:
1369 1370 1371
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