Samsung-LG-HTC Ex. 1101 p. 1
US008359007B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent No.:
White et al.
US 8,359,007 B2
(45) Date of Patent:
,
(54) SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR
,
*Jan. 22, 2013
SUIIO d 3.
E3110
2
COMMUNICATING MEDIA CENTER
4,407,564 A
10/1983 Ellis
(75)
Inventors: Russell W. White, Austin, TX (US);
Kevin R_ [mess Austin, TX (US)
(73)
Assignee: Affinity Labs of Texas, LLC,Austin,
TX (Us)
.
j
j
j
.
Notice:
Subject to any d1scla1mer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
USC. 1540.)) by 0 days.
4,419,730 A
4,441,405
A
4,481,584 A
4,536,739 A
4,570,217 A
4,582,389 A
4,636,782 A
4,716,458 A
4,731,769
4,740,779 A
A
12/1983 Ito et a1._
4/1984 Takeuch1
11/1984
Holland
8/1985 Nobuta
2/1986 Allen etal.
4/1986 Wood et al.
1/1987 Nakamura et 31,
12/1987 Heitzman 61 31
3/1988 Cleary
Schaefer
4/1988
et al.
(*)
This patent is subject to a terminal disCjaimer.
(21)
(22)
(65)
(63)
4,740,730
4,752,824
4,795,223
4,802,492
4,807,292
4,809,177
Appl. No.: 13/052,559
,
Ffledi
Man 21, 2011
Prior Publication Data
US 2011/0312386 A1
Dec. 22, 2011
Related US. Application Data
CA
Continuation of application No. 12/495,190, filed on
CN
A
A
A
A
A
A
4/ 1988 BIOWII 61 31,
6/1988 Moore
1/1989 Moss
2/1989 Grunstein
2/1989 Sorscher ....................... .. 381/86
2/1989 Windle et al.
(Continued)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
2225910
12/1997
1218256 A
Jun. 30, 2009, now Pat. No. 7,953,390, which is a
continuation of application No. 12/015,320, filed on
(51)
. 6/1999
(comlnued)
Jan. 16, 2008, HOW Pat. No. 7,778,595, which is a
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
C0111111113111011 Of aPP11Ca11011 N0- 10/947,755, fi1ed 011
Sell 23: 2004: 110W P31 N0- 7,324,833, Wh1Ch 15 3
continuation of application No. 09/537,812, filed on
Mar. 28, 2000, HOW Pat. No. 7,187,947.
Multi Technology Equipment, “Neo Car Jukebox, Installation and
Instruction Manual,” Prior to Mar. 28, 2000, 29 pages.
.
(comlnued)
Int CL
Primary Examiner — Erika A Washington
H04M 3/16
(2006.01)
H04H 40/00
(2008.01)
(57)
ABSTRACT
(52)
U.S. Cl. ...................... .. 455/410; 455/306; 455/418
Amethod for communicating media content is disclosed. The
(58)
Field of Classification Search ...................... .. None
method Includes reeewmg In a server a request for 21 llstmg of
See application file for Complete Search history.
network addresses associated with a playlist for available
content, and sending a message having network addresses for
different portions ofthe content. The network addresses allow
a requesting device to use one transmission rate for a first part
of the content and a different transmission rate for a second
(56)
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Access Selectabie
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202
Select Information
Receive User Input
203
Mainiain
Information
Store Reference
Initiate
Communication of
Information
Communicate
off-line
204
205
End
Samsung-LG-HTC
Samsung-LG-HTC Ex.
Ex. 1101
1101 p.
p. 1
1
US 8,359,007 B2
Page2
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5,371,510
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M11111‘5V11Z
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Hidary
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Samsung-LG-HTC Ex.
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1101 p.
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US 8,359,007 B2
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Samsung-LG-HTC
Samsung-LG-HTC Ex.
Ex. 1101
1101 p.
p. 3
3
US 8,359,007 B2
Page 4
6,477,580
6,477,665
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6,493,429
6,493,546
6,496,205
6,496,692
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6,501,832
6,502,213
6,507,762
6,509,716
6,510,210
6,510,325
6,516,466
6,526,335
6,529,909
6,529,948
6,539,396
6,549,942
6,549,949
6,550,057
6,559,773
6,571,282
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6,591,085
6,594,723
6,594,740
6,594,774
6,601,192
6,601,234
6,606,082
6,606,660
6,606,744
6,609,105
6,615,199
6,615,253
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6,622,083
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6,629,197
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6,636,242
6,639,584
6,640,238
6,640,244
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6,640,306
6,647,257
6,658,247
6,671,567
6,671,715
6,671,745
6,671,818
6,675,233
6,678,215
6,681,120
6,694,200
6,697,470
6,697,824
6,697,944
6,704,394
6,707,889
6,708,086
6,715,145
6,721,489
6,721,710
6,725,022
6,728,531
6,731,625
6,741,980
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6,772,212
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Yi ............................... .. 320/115
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6,990,208
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7,065,342
7,085,710
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7,139,626
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7,149,543
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7,219,123
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7,321,923
7,324,833
7,339,993
7,343,414
7,346,687
7,376,586
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7,437,485
7,440,772
7,444,353
7,549,007
7,562,392
7,610,597
7,711,838
7,778,595
7,945,284
7,953,390
2001/0042107
2002/0010759
2002/0023028
2002/0026442
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2002/0058475
2002/0060701
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8/2010
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Albus et al.
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Ex. 1101
1101 p.
p. 4
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US 8,359,007 B2
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2004/0078274
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2000-0001465
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2001-0009302
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6/1999
6/1999
8/1999
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9/1999
10/1999
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fig
JP
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7/1998
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* cited by examiner
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U.S. Patent
Jan. 22, 2013
US 8,359,007 B2
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U.S. Patent
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Sheet 9 of9
US 8,359,007 B2
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1
2
SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR
transmitter and receiver sides, and there may be a low-investCOMMUNICATING MEDIA CENTER
ment upgrade to digital systems. Unfortunately, a workable
IBOC solution is yet to be seen though technology may someThis application is a continuation of U.S. patent applicaday make IBOC digital radio commercially possible.
tion Ser. No. 12/495,190, filed Jun. 30, 2009, which is now
Even if an IBOC solution becomes commercially available
U.S. Pat. No. 7,953,390, which issued on May 31, 2011
in the United States, IBOC digital radio may suffer from
entitled “Method for Content Delivery,” which is a continuseveral shortcomings. For example, there may global stanation ofU.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/015,320, filedJan.
dardization problems. Though the United States favors
16, 2008, which is now U.S. Pat. No. 7,778,595, which issued 10 IBOC, the European and Canadian communities seem to
on Aug. 17, 2010, which is a continuation of U.S. patent
favor L-Band making the establishment of a global standard
difiicult.
application Ser. No. 10/947,755, filed on Sep. 23, 2004,
which is now U.S. Pat. No. 7,324,833, which issued on Jan.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
29, 2008, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application
Ser. No. 09/537,812, filed on Mar. 28, 2000, which is now 15
U.S. Pat. No. 7,187,947, which issued on Mar. 6, 2007, the
A more complete understanding of the present embodidisclosures of which are all hereby incorporated herein by
ments and advantages thereofmay be acquired by referring to
reference in their entirety for all purposes.
the following description taken in conjunction with the
FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE
accompanying drawings, in which like reference numbers
20 indicate like features, and wherein:
FIG. 1 depicts a general system for wirelessly communiThe present disclosure relates to digitally stored content
cating selective information to an electronic device in accorand, more specifically, to a content delivery system and
method.
dance with one aspect of the present invention;
FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of a method ofwirelessly
25
BACKGROUND
communicating selected information to an electronic device;
FIG. 3 illustrates an electronic device operable to receive
The first commercial radio stations in the United States
selected audio information in accordance with the teachings
began operation around 1 920. Today, there may be as many as
of the present invention;
12,000 radio stations in the United States programming in
FIG. 4 illustrates a graphical user interface (GUI) for dis30
several distinct formats. When broadcasting their respective
playing selectable audio information according to one aspect
signals, these radio stations often use an analog signal, which
of the present invention;
may be modulated based on frequency or amplitude. FreFIG. 5A illustrates a portable radio system having a mount
quency modulated (FM) radio appears to be the dominant
for an electronic device according to one embodiment of the
entertainment medium while amplitude modulated (AM)
35 present invention;
radio seems to be a popular outlet for news and information.
FIG. 5B illustrates an automobile console having a mount
Unfortunately, analog radio may be unable to provide the
for coupling an electronic device according to one aspect of
sound quality and consistency that radio listeners desire. As
the present invention;
such, several broadcasting related companies have begun to
FIG. 6 illustrates a block diagram of a system for commuconsider a movement to digital radio. Unlike analog radio
nicating
voice mail messages using email according to one
40
reception, digital radio reception may be able to provide
embodiment of the present invention;
compact disk (CD) quality sound while remaining virtually
FIG. 7 illustrates a flow chart for providing voice email
immune to interference. Being immune to interference may
messages according to one embodiment of the present invenresult in reducing static growls or “multipat ” echoes, echoes
tion;
caused by signal reflections off buildings or topographical
FIG. 8 illustrates a flow diagram of a method for providing
45
features.
selected audio information to an electronic device according
Some countries, like Canada and many European counto one embodiment of the present invention; and
tries, may choose to have digital radio operate in a single
FIG. 9 illustrates an automobile console having a mount for
digital radio band such as the L-band between 1452-1492
an electronic device according to one embodiment of the
megahertz (MHZ). This band would allow the reception of
50 present invention.
both terrestrially and satellite-originated signals. By comDETAILED DESCRIPTION
parison, FM radio typically operates between 88 and 108
MHZ while AM radio typically operates between 0.525 and
1.705 MHZ. Neither of these bands allows for easy transmisThe conceptual groundwork for the present invention
sion via satellite.
includes wirelessly communicating selective information to
55
Canada proposed using the L-Band for digital radio as
an electronic device. According to one aspect, a user may
interact with the Internet to select information, such as audio
early as 1992. Several countries throughout the world have
since agreed to use the L-Band for digital radio with one
information, and wirelessly communicate the selected information to an electronic device. The electronic device receives
notable exception. It appears the United States has chosen not
the information via a wireless communications network and
to operate its digital radio within the L-Band. In the United
60
States, the L-Band may already be committed for military
processes the information accordingly. In a particularized
uses. Apparently, the United States plans to adopt a system
form, a user may select information from an Internet website
called in-band on-charmel, or IBOC, which fits within the AM
operable to allow selectivity of audio information such as
and FM frequencies.
songs, on-line radio stations, on-line broadcasts, streaming
IBOC technology may offer some advantages over L-Band
audio, or other selectable information. Upon selecting the
65
audio information, information or data associated with the
transmissions. For example, there may be no need for new
spectrum allocations. There may be backward and forward
selected audio information is wirelessly communicated to an
compatibility with existing AM and FM systems on both the
electronic device. The electronic device may then be used to
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process the selected audio information. In this manner, a user
may receive selective audio information via a wireless electronic device.
site operably associated with digital engine 101 allows a user
to select information to be wirelessly communicated to electronic device 101 utilizing a network environment. The Internet website may include several different types of information related to audio information.
In one form, the electronic device may be operable to
communicate with an individual’s automobile audio system.
A user may select audio information utilizing a personal
FIG. 4, described in greater detail below, illustrates one
computer with access to a website operable to display selectembodiment of providing an Internet website for displaying
able audio information. The selected audio information may
selectable audio information. For example, the Internet webthen be wirelessly communicated to the electronic device
10 site may include music and/or artist search engines, playlists,
associated with an automobile’s audio system. Therefore,
top 10 charts, artists by genre, and other information associupon receiving the selected audio information, a user may
ated with audio information. A user may select information
access and play the received audio information utilizing the
associated with the audio information and digital engine 101
electronic device in association with the automobile’s audio
can maintain the information or data associated with the
system.
15 selected information in a digital format. Communications
The present invention is not limited to communicating only
engine 102 coupled to digital engine 101 may wirelessly
audio information. One skilled in the art can appreciate that
communicate data associated with the selected audio inforother types of information, such as video, textual, etc. may be
mation to electronic device 103. Therefore, a user may access
communicated utilizing the systems and methods disclosed
and select audio information via an Internet website and
herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the
20
wirelessly communicate the data to an electronic device. As
present invention. Additionally, it will be understood that
such, system 100 advantageously allows for wireless cominformation may be formatted in a plurality of ways at differmunication of selected audio information to electronic
ent phases of communication without loosing the underlying
content ofthe selected information. For example, an audio file
devices that may be remotely located from a conventional
terrestrial communication network.
may be formatted, segmented, compressed, modified, etc. for
25
the purpose of providing or communicating the audio invenElectronic device 105 may be configured in a plurality of
tion. Therefore, the term “audio information” or “informaways for receiving wireless communication of selected audio
tion” is used in a general sense to relate to audio information
information. In one embodiment, electronic device 105 may
in all phases of communication.
be operable as a component configured to receive a cellular
FIG. 1 depicts a general system for wirelessly communisignal comprising the selected information communicated by
30
cating selective information to an electronic device in accorthe communication engine. For example, a device having a
dance with one aspect of the present invention. The system,
cellular modem may be operable to receive the information at
illustrated generally at 100, includes a digital engine 101
specified intervals. Upon receiving the information the eleccoupled to a communications engine 102. Communications
tronic device may process the received information. Elecengine 102 is remotely coupled to an electronic device 103.
tronic devices are described in more detail below and may
35
Digital engine 101 may be directly or indirectly coupled to
include a network radio, a modular device, an audio system,
storage device 105 operable to store information. Digital
a personal digital assistant (PDA), a cellular phone, or other
engine 101 maintains information or data associated with
electronic devices operable to receive information wirelessly
selected information in a digital format. The information may
communicated by communication engine 102.
be stored within storage device 105 or other storage devices
Communications engine 102 may be operable to wirelessly
40 communicate selected information to electronic device 103 in
operable to maintain data or information associated with the
selected information.
a plurality of ways. The present invention advantageously
Communications engine 102 is communicatively coupled
allows for several different embodiments of wirelessly comto digital engine 101 and operable to wirelessly communicate
municating selected audio information to electronic device
the selected information to electronic device 103. During
103 and is not limited to any specific configuration described
45
operation, audio information may be selected by a user utibelow. Several different types or combinations of wireless
lizing a personal computer or other devices operable to comcommunication may be realized by the present invention.
municate with an information network. Digital engine 101 is
Communications engine 102 may be operable to wirelessly
communicate the selected information from an information
operable to maintain information associated with the selected
audio information. For example, the information could be
network, such as the Internet, to an electronic device operable
50
to receive wireless communications. In one embodiment,
several songs or titles configured as an audio file and formatted in a digital format such as an MP3 file, wave file, etc. The
communications engine 102 may comprise a conduit to interface information with a wireless communication network.
maintained information may also be a reference to a network
location where an audio file may be stored, a network location
The conduit may configure the information located within the
where a network broadcast of audio information may be
information network into a format operable to be transmitted
55 via wireless communication.
located, etc. or other network locations having information
associated with the selected audio information. Therefore,
For example, a wireless device may be operable to receive
digital engine 101 may maintain a plurality of different types
packets of information having a specific size and in a specific
of information or data associated with the selected audio
format. In such an embodiment, communications engine 102
information.
could format the information into a desirable format for wire60
System 100, utilizing communication engine 102, may
lessly communicating the information to electronic device
wirelessly communicate data or information associated with
1 03. Several types ofwireless communication may be used by
the selected audio information to electronic device 103
communications engine 102 to communicate the selected
information to an electronic device. Communications netthereby providing wireless communication of selected information to an electronic device operable to receive wireless
works such as GSM, Digital Satellite communication, SB,
65
communications. In one embodiment, digital engine 101 may
Radio bands, DRC, SuperDRC or other systems or types of
be used in association with an Internet website configured to
transmission such as TDMA, CDMA, spread spectrum, etc.
provide access to selectable information. The Internet webor frequencies such as between about 1.7 GHz and 2.0 GHz
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may be realized by the present invention for communicating
information or data representing the selected audio information to electronic device 103.
high-speed communication may be required to wirelessly
communicate or stream the selected audio information to an
electronic device. In another embodiment, a hybrid of wireIn one embodiment, the selective information may be comless communication rates may be deployed depending on the
municated using a digital broadcast signal. Digital broadcast
requirements of the selected audio information and/or the
includes providing information via a signal such as AM, FM,
electronic device. For example, the selected audio informaand the like. Digital information may be included or encoded
tion may first be transmitted to the electronic device via
as a sub-carrier within the broadcast signal and received by
high-speed communication until enough information has
electronic device 103. A digital sub-carrier may include a
been wirelessly communicated and buffered into a memory
10
selective bandwidth of frequencies for a specific radio station
device operably associated with the electronic device. Upon
(i.e., 6 MHz for FM). The selective information may be wirecommunication of a certain percentage of the selected audio
lessly communicated to electronic device 103 utilizing a cominformation, slower communication speeds may then be used
to communicate additional selected audio information.
munication engine 102 operable to communicate the selective
information via a digital FM signal. In this manner, selective
Therefore, system 100 may be configured in a plurality of
15
information may be communicated within digital FM subways to communicate selected information to electronic
carriers to an electronic device operable to receive the infordevice 103. Digital engine 101 may be used to maintain data
or information associated with the selected information and
mation. For example, a user may subscribe to communicate
the information via an FM sub-carrier and receive the seleccommunication engine 102, communicatively coupled to
tive data through wireless communication via a specified FM
digital engine 101, may wirelessly communicate selected
20 information to electronic device 103.
sub-carrier.
In one embodiment, the selected information may be formatted and transmitted to achieve a desirable transmission
FIG. 2 illustrates a block diagram of a method ofwirelessly
communicating selected information to an electronic device.
rate. For example, conventional systems may transmit inforThe method may be used in association with the system
mation at a speed of 10 kilobits per second. Therefore, for 1
illustrated in FIG. 1 or other systems operable to utilize the
25 method of FIG. 2.
megabyte ofinformation to be communicated to an electronic
device, a transmission time of approximately 800 seconds
The method begins generally at step 200. At step 201,
may be required. The present invention may allow for a relaselectable audio information may be accessed utilizing a nettive increase in transmission speed by removing the requirework communications device. For example, selectable audio
ment that information be communicated asynchronously to
information may be displayed at an Internet website acces30
an electronic device. For example, conventional wireless
sible by a personal computer. In another embodiment, the
communication utilizes a specified frequency to communiselectable information may be accessed utilizing a wireless
cate information in two directions (i.e., cellular phones). As
communications device such as, a cellular phone, a PDA
such, information is communicated across a channel in an
device, or other devices operable to provide access to the
selectable audio information.
asynchronous manner to provide a continuous audio signal to
35
the recipient.
Upon accessing the selectable information, the method
The present invention advantageously allows for signals to
proceeds to step 202 where a user can identify or select audio
be transmitted to an electronic device in a less than asynchroinformation to be wirelessly communicated to an electronic
nous manner. For example, if a user selected a song to be
device. For example, a user may select an entire album to be
wirelessly communicated to an electronic device, system 100
wirelessly communicated to a PDA device.
40
could communicate the information in a less than asynchroUpon the user selecting the audio information, the method
nous manner allowing the selected information to be transproceeds to step 203 where the method maintains information
associated with the selected information. In one embodiment,
mitted efficiently thereby decreasing the overall download
time for the selected audio information. In one embodiment,
the information may be an audio file, such as a wave file, and
the selected information may be compressed and transmitted
MP3 file, etc. representative of the selected audio informa45
tion. In another embodiment, a network location that comacross the same frequency but at different phases thereby
allowing plural signals having different phases to be wireprises a file representing the selected information may be
lessly communicated to an electronic device. Therefore, the
maintained. Another example may include a network location
of a network broadcast of audio information. Therefore, the
electronic device may be operable to receive multiple phased
signals and process the selective information accordingly.
method at step 203 may maintain several different types of
50 information associated with the selected audio information.
In one embodiment, the information may be wirelessly
communicated at a relatively slow transmission rate. For
Upon maintaining information or data associated with the
example, a user may schedule when the selected audio inforselected information, the method proceeds to step 204 where
mation may be used by electronic device 103. The user may
the method wirelessly communicates information associated
with the selected information to an electronic device. For
select several different audio tracks or songs to be transmitted
55
to an electronic device associated with the user’ s vehicle such
example, if an audio file associated with the selected audio
that the user can listen to the user selected audio information
information was maintained, the method would communicate
the audio file to the electronic device. In another embodiment,
during the drive home at the end of a workday. Therefore, it
may be desirable to utilize a slower transfer speed due to the
a link or network address broadcasting the selected audio
extended amount of time available prior to actual use of the
information may be accessed and, at step 204, wirelessly
60 communicated to an electronic device. In another embodiselected audio information. In this manner, communications
networks having less or slower transfer rates may be used to
ment, a combination of different types of audio information
wirelessly communicate the selected audio information to the
may be wirelessly communicated to an electronic device.
electronic device.
Upon transmitting the selected audio information, the method
In another embodiment, high-speed wireless communicaproceeds to step 205 where the method ends.
65
tion networks may be used to communicate the selected audio
Selected audio information may be communicated in a
information. For example, a user may want to listen to an
plurality of ways as described above including communicatInternet broadcast of an Internet radio station. Therefore,
ing via a cellular communications network to an electronic
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be transmitted via a wireless communications network and
device operable to receive cellularly-communicated signals.
For example, the information may be selected from a website
received by electronic device 300 via transceiver 301. Transoperable to display selectable information. Upon selecting
ceiver 301 may be operable to convert the received wireless
the audio information, a data file representing the selected
communication signal into a desirable format and store the
5
audio information may be wirelessly communicated to an
received information within storage medium 303. The
electronic device thereby allowing a user to select audio inforreceived information may then be processed by electronic
device 300.
mation via the Internet and wirelessly communicate the information to an electronic device.
In one embodiment, electronic device 300 may be operable
In some embodiments, the wireless communication to an
as an audio player configured to play digital representations
10
electronic device may occur in an off-line environment. For
of music. For example, electronic device 300 may also
example, a user may go “on-line” to access a website and
include an MP3 player operable to process the received inforselect information and then go “off-line” or end the browsing
mation into an audio signal. Therefore, electronic device 300
session. The wireless communication may then occur while
may be used to receive wirelessly communicated MP3 audio
the user is off-line thereby removing the confines of using an
files andplay these files using an MP3 player when desired. In
15
active or on-line browsing environment (i.e. Internet radio
another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be configured as a PDA wherein the PDA includes a web browser
broadcast, streaming audio, etc.) for accessing selected information. Therefore, the method of FIG. 2 allows for informaoperable to wirelessly communicate with the Internet. The
tion, such as audio information, to be communicated from a
PDA device may include a user interface allowing a user to
network location such as a web site, to an electronic device
select information to be wirelessly communicated to elec20 tronic device 300.
“via” wireless communication. The present invention advantageously allows users to access and download information
By providing a website of selectable information, the PDA
accessible by a network location to an electronic device operdevices may provide an efficient embodiment for electronic
device 300 in that is allows a user to access and select inforable to receive wireless communications thereby reducing the
need for land lines, terrestrial communication networks, etc.
mation using a wireless communication network and receive
25
for communicating selective information.
the selected information using the same or different wireless
In one embodiment, the method of FIG. 2 may be deployed
communication network. In yet another embodiment, elecin association with an Internet website operable to display
tronic device 300 may be configured as a component operable
to receive selective information via wireless communication
selectable links for downloading information. The informaand communicate the information to a second electronic
tion may include audio information such as MP3s, streaming
30
audio, streaming. Internet broadcasts, etc. are selectable by a
device such as an automobile sound system, home stereo, etc.
user and operable to be wirelessly communicated to an elecFor example, electronic device 300 may utilize transceiver
tronic device. By providing a user with a website of selectable
301 to receive wirelessly communicated information. Elecaudio information operable to be wireless communicated to
tronic device 300 may then be coupled to an automobile
an electronic device, a user may customize information comsound system using an interface and communicate the
35
municated to an electronic device. In one embodiment, a user
received information to the automobile sound system. In this
may communicate information to an electronic device that
manner, electronic device 300 may be used to provide the
may not be owned by the user. For example the method of
automobile sound system with audio files received via wireless communication.
FIG. 2 could be modified to allow a user to wirelessly communicate audio information to a plurality of electronic
In another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be
40
devices that may or may not be owned by the user.
operable to communicate the received audio information to
FIG. 3 illustrates an electronic device operable to receive
an audio system via a localized communications-signaling
selected audio information in accordance with the teachings
network. One such network may include utilizing “Blueof the present invention. Electronic device 300 includes a
tooth” communication standard, used to provide communicommunication module 301 such as a transceiver coupled to
cation between electronic devices in a proximal setting. In
45
storage medium 303 such as a high speed buffer, programone embodiment, electronic device 300 may be integrated
mable memory, or other devices operable to store informainto an audio component such as a radio receiver. Electronic
tion. Electronic device 300 may also include processor 302
device 300 integrated into an audio component may be conoperably associated with communication module 301 and
figured to process digital audio files wirelessly communistorage medium 303. Processor 302 may be operable to procated to an audio component. In another embodiment, elec50
cess wirelessly communicated selected information and in
tronic device 300 may be operable to communicate with an
one embodiment may be integrated as part of communication
analog receiver at a predetermined frequency.
module 301 of storage medium 303. In the same manner, as
For example, a specific frequency may be selected (i.e.,
larger scale integration of electronic devices proliferate, com93.7 MHz) for communicating the wireless received selected
information from electronic device 300 to a localized audio
munication module 301, processor 302, and storage medium
55
303 may be integrated into one communication component or
system. Electronic device 300 communication of the wiredevice operable as electronic device 300.
lessly received information allows a conventional receiver to
receive the selected audio information. In one embodiment,
Processor 302 may be operable using software that may be
stored within storage medium 303. In one embodiment, softthe conventional receiver may be configured to receive a
ware upgrades may be communicated to electronic device
digital sub-carrier, on-carrier, or other within a specified fre60
300 via wireless communication allowing for efiicient system
quency. Therefore, electronic device 300 may be operable to
upgrades for electronic device 300. Storage medium 303 may
locally transmit the signal at a specific frequency thereby
include one or several different types of storage devices. For
allowing the conventional receiver to receive the information.
example, storage medium 303 may include programmable
In another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be opergate arrays, ROM devices, RAM devices, EEPROMs, minidable to scan plural bandwidths to receive the selective infor65
isks or other memory devices operable to store information.
mation. For example, transceiver 301 may be operable to
During use, electronic device 300 receives wireless comreceive selective information across several frequencies and
munications of selective information. The information may
process the received information accordingly.
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In another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be
Explorer, a WAP browser, or other browsers operable to disoperable to scan several frequencies to obtain the desirable
play the audio information. Browser 402 includes browser
information. For example, a user may select several Internet
functions, shown collectively at 403, for navigating a network
broadcasts comprised of streaming audio information. Theresuch as the Internet or an intranet. Homepage 401 may be
fore, the information may be transmitted across several wiredisplayed using browser 402 and may include several functions, features, information, etc. related to audio information.
less frequencies receivable by electronic device 300. Electronic device 300 may then be operable to allow a user to scan
Home page 401 may be developed using several different
wirelessly communicated Internet broadcast signals thereby
types of programming (i.e., HTML, XML, Java, etc.) used to
providing a user selected virtual broadcast radio network. In
developing a network location or website.
10
another embodiment, electronic device 300 may include a
The present invention is not limited to any one specific type
user interface operable to communicate with an Internet webof software and may be realized in plurality ofways as can be
site operable to display selectable audio information. The
appreciated by those skilled in the art. Homepage 401 may
Internet website may be configured as a user-preferred envialso include login region 410 allowing a user to log into
ronment displaying a users selected audio information. Interhomepage 401 and display a user-preferred environment. For
15
net broadcast selections, streaming audio selections, etc.
example, a user may want Radio Dial 412 to appear when a
With a display device for displaying a Website having
user logs into homepage 401. In another embodiment, a user
selectable information, electronic device 300 may allow a
may want to view a current playlist selected by the user or the
user to select audio information via a user interface and
status of wirelessly communicated playlist. A user may also
receive the selected information via wireless communication
provide demographic information allowing advertisers to
20
thereby providing a customizable WebRadio device for the
access the demographic information and provide advertiseuser. In another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be a
ments based upon the demographic information. For
modular device configured to be coupled to, for example, a
example, an advertiser may want to target Hispanic females in
portion of a cars interior. For example, electronic device 300
the 21-25 year old age group.
may be mounted to a portion of a car’s console thereby
Through providing demographic information to advertis25
providing a removably coupled electronic device operable to
ers, when a user logs into homepage 401 selective advertising
wirelessly receive selected audio information. As a removcan be “targeted” for a group of users. Homepage 401 may
able device, electronic device 300 may also be coupled to a
also include several tabs for efiiciently navigating homepage
home audio system, a portable radio system or other systems
401. Library tab 405 may be provided to allow a user to
thereby providing a versatile electronic device operable to
browse available audio information that may be presented by
30
receive wireles sly communicated selected audio information.
title, genre, artist, decade, culture, etc. Store tab 407 may also
In another embodiment, electronic device 300 may be
be provided for locating items available for purchase such as
operable as a PDA and/or a cellular phone that may be
CDs, PDA devices, MP3 players, wireless communication
mounted to an automobile’s console. Electronic device 300
hardware, interfaces, software or other types of products that
may then integrate with a user’s automobile to provide an
may be purchased while on-line. Chat tab 408 may also be
35
all-encompassing communications device. For example,
provided allowing a user to chat with other users of home
electronic device 300 configured as a PDA and cellular phone
page 401. For example, a guest musical artist may be availmay allow for communication with a user’s email account,
able to chat with visitors of home page 401 via a chat page
voice mail account, the Internet, as well as allowing for the
associated with chat tab 408. Home page 401 may also
receipt of selected audio information via wireless communiinclude contest tab 409 for displaying current contests, prizes,
40 and/or winners.
cation. Electronic device 300 may be operable in a hands-free
mode allowing a user to maintain safe driving fundamentals.
Radio tab 406 may also be provided for displaying audio
During use, electronic device 300 may be processing selecinformation. For example, radio tab 406 may display a collective menu 411 of selectable functions or features associtive audio information for communicating with an automobile audio system and may further be operating to receive
ated with audio information. Top ten lists may be provided to
45
incoming cellular calls.
a user based on several different billboard polls or genres. A
Electronic device 300 may be set-up by the user to pause
search engine may be provided allowing a user to search for
the music being played and allow the received cellular call to
a specific type of audio information such as an artist, song
be communicated either via an independent speaker or utiliztitle, and genre. Internet radio station, etc. In one embodiing the automobiles “audio system.” Additionally, electronic
ment, a user may input the lyrics to a song within the search
50
device 300 may be operable to adjust the listening level of an
engine. As such, the search engine may locate several differautomobile’s audio system, it may play received voice mail
ent songs having the desirable lyrics and allow a user to select
messages, allow a user to view the Internet, etc. In one
the search results. A user may also use a select a device feature
that allows a user to select a destination device for commuembodiment, electronic device 300 may be operable as a dual
mode electronic device capable of receiving both digital and
nicating selected audio information. For example, a user may
55
analog wireless communication signals. In this manner, elecwant to communicate a playlist to several different devices
tronic devices may efiiciently utilize available bandwidth for
such as a PDA, a home computer system, a work computer
system, etc.
receiving selected information from a communications
As such, a user can communicate selective information to
engine. For example, transceiver 301 may be a wireless communications modem operable to receive digital or analog
several devices without having to download the information
60
signals.
separately for each device. A send a friend link may also be
FIG. 4 illustrates a graphical user interface (GUI) for disprovided allowing a user to send selective audio information
playing selectable audio information according to one aspect
to a friend’s electronic device. A user may also join a group
of the present invention. The GUI may be operable with a
comprised of individuals that select a certain genre of music
to be communicated to the user’s electronic device. For
computer system, cellular device, PDA, or other electronic
65
devices or systems operable to display the GUI of FIG. 4. The
example, a user may want to join a group that plays only 50s
GUI, shown generally at 400, may be displayed using a conswing music. As such, the user could communicate the
ventional web browser 402 such as Microsoft® Internet
group’s selected songs to the user’s electronic device. A user
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may also utilize an email account provided by homepage 401
information. For example, portable radio 500 may include 32
allowing a user to correspond with others via email. A user
MB of RAM allowing electronic device 502 to receive selective information and download the selective information to
may also access a list of guest D]s that may provide playlists
of songs chosen by the guest DJ and selectable by a user.
memory located within portable radio 500. In this manner, the
In one embodiment, a user’s radio dial 412 may be prodownloaded music may be operable to be played within porvided when a registered user logs into homepage 401. As
table radio 500 while allowing electronic device to be
such, radio dial 412 may include several functional buttons
removed from portable radio 500. Therefore, portable radio
similar to conventional systems such as a volume control and
500 including electronic device 502 allows a user to commua station control. However, radio dial 412 surpasses the liminicate selected audio information to portable radio 500.
10
tations of conventional systems through providing a programFIG. 5B illustrates automobile console having a mount for
mable radio dial ofuser customized audio information. Radio
coupling an electronic device according to one aspect of the
dial 412 includes several stations that may be programmed
present invention. Console 510 includes mount 511 operable
using program interface 413. The preset stations may include
to receive electronic device 512. Mount 511 may be located in
several different types of user customized preset information
many different locations within an automobile such as
15
such as user selected playlists, Internet broadcast stations, top
coupled to a sun visor, center console, dashboard, floorboard,
lists, group playlists, artist-selected lists, on-line radio staetc. Mount 511 allows the user to couple electronic device
tion, conventional radio stations. Internet phone, cellular
512 to the automobile and provide an interface for communication between electronic device 512 and the automobile
phone, etc. and other functions, features, or information associated with audio information.
audio system. Mount 511 may also include a power connec20 tion that allows electronic device 512 to use the automobiles
Radio dial 412 may also be displayed as a separate user
interface and in some embodiments, does not require a
power during use. The power connection may also be used in
“browsing” environment to view radio dial 412. For example,
association with a recharging circuit operable to recharge a
an electronic device, such as a PDA, having a display may
power supply within the electronic device. During operation,
graphically present radio dial 412 to a user. One example may
electronic device 512 coupled to mount 511 may receive
25 selected audio information via wireless communication and
be using electronic device in association with an automobile
communicate the selective information to the automobile
audio system. Electronic device may display radio dial 412
and may allow a user to navigate, modify, select, adjust volaudio system.
ume, access daytimer, access phone lists, etc. or perform
In one embodiment, the automobile may include memory
other functions while the electronic device is used in associaoperable associated with the automobile for storing-informa30
tion with an automobile sound system. Therefore, radio dial
tion. The memory may be used in association with mount 511
and electronic device 512 to store the selected audio informa412 may be operable as an application for use with several
tion. In this manner, voluminous audio information can be
different types of electronic devices (i.e., computer systems,
portable computing devices, cellular phones, etc.) operable to
stored within the memory allowing electronic device 512 to
receive additional information. In one embodiment, a mount
display radio dial 412 and in come embodiments may be
35
wirelessly communicated to an electronic device.
may be provided for a home audio system (not shown) for
In another embodiment, homepage 401 may allow a user to
downloading selected audio information for use with a home
select when to download the information to an electronic
audio system. For example, a mount device may be coupled to
device. For example, a user may want to listen to a certain
a home stereo system such that the upon placing an electronic
device such as electronic device 500 within the mount,
genre of music at a specific time of day thereby allowing a
40
user to select the information. As such, a user may select a
selected audio information may be communicated to the
different playlist for every day of the week thereby allowing
home audio system thereby allowing a home audio system to
be used in association with an electronic device.
a user to listen to different songs on different days ofthe week.
The user can further identify when the selected playlist
FIG. 6 illustrates a block diagram of a system for commushould be available for listening. For example, if a user
nicating voice mail messages using email according to one
45
wanted to listen to “playlist #1” on Monday morning during
embodiment of the present invention. The system, indicated
the drive into work between 8:00 am and 9:00 am, the user
generally at 600, includes email server 601 coupled to a voice
would enter the time and the day “playlist #1” would be
mail storage device 602. System 600 further includes a comavailable for listening. In this manner, the playlist may be
puter system or network terminal 603 such as a computer
communicated to the electronic device thereby allowing a
coupled to network 604. System 600 further includes mount
user to listen to selective audio information at a desirable 50 605 for mounting electronic device 606 for hardwire commutime.
nication of information. Device 606 may also communicate
FIG. 5A illustrates a portable radio system having a mount
with network 604 using a wirelessly communication network
for an electronic device according to one embodiment of the
operably associated with network 604 and coupled, for
present invention. Portable radio 500 includes a mount 501
example, via tower 607.
55
operable to receive electronic device 502. Mount 501 may
During operation, system 600 communicates voice mail
include a connector operable to provide communications and
messages to a user utilizing email server 601. For example, if
power to electronic device 502. During use, electronic device
a user receives a voice mail message, email server 601 would
502 when mounted within portable radio 500 communicates
be notified and a voice mail message would be sent to the
with portable radio to provide remotely received selective
user’s email account in the form of an email message. For
60
audio information. In one embodiment, electronic device 502
example, a voice mail message would be sent to a user’ s email
account within intranet 604 in the form of an audio file as an
may include a user interface allowing a user to access the
Internet. Therefore, selective audio information located on
attachment to the email. Upon receiving the email, a user may
the Internet may be accessed by the user and remotely comclick on the audio file representing the voice mail message to
municated to electronic device 502 coupled to portable radio
hear the message left by a caller.
65
500.
In one embodiment, a user may be accessing the Internet
In another embodiment, portable radio 500 may include
via a phone line and, as such, be unable to receive notification
memory operably located within for storing downloaded
that a voice mail message has been received. System 600
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would receive the voice mail message and send an email
place of business, etc. The method then proceeds to step 702
comprising the voice mail message to the user email account.
where the message may be stored as an audio file within a
In this manner, a user can remain connected to the network
database operable to store a file comprised of the voice mail
and receive voice mail without having to log off or disconnect
message. Upon storing the file, the method proceeds to step
from the Internet. In one embodiment, a user may receive the
703 where an electronic mail message may be generated. The
voice mail message via a portable electronic device. For
electronic mail message may be addressed to the recipient of
example, a user may be using remote device 605 operable to
the voice mail mes sage. The method then proceeds to step 704
receive wirelessly communicated information. System 600
where the audio file representing the voice mail message is
would receive the voice mail message and forward the voice
attached to the electronic message.
10
mail message to a user’s portable electronic device 606. In
Upon attaching the audio file, the method then proceeds to
this manner, a user may be capable of receiving voice emails
step 705 where the email message may be sent to the email
at remote locations.
address. Upon sending the email message the method proIn another embodiment, a user may subscribe to use an
ceeds to step 706 where the method determines if the email
Internet email account that may be operably associated with
message should be sent to a wireless electronic device. If the
15
system 600. Utilizing an Internet email account may allow a
message is not to be sent to a wireless device, the method
user the flexibility to check voice email messages from any
proceeds to step 720 where the method ends. Ifthe message is
location in the world. For example, a user may access a
to be sent to a wireless electronic device, the method proceeds
“Hotmail” email account while traveling on business in a
to step 707 where a signal may be sent to the wireless elecforeign country. The user, upon gaining access to the “Hottronic device and at step 708 an indication is provided to the
20
mail” account, would be able to listen to voice mail messages
electronic device indicating that a voicemail message has
sent to the user via the “Hotmail” email account. Through
been received via a user’s email account. The method may
utilizing an email account to receive voice mail messages, a
then proceed to step 709 where the user decides whether or
user may be afforded great flexibility in communicating voice
not to listen to the voice email message. Ifthe user decides not
mail messages. For example, a user may be able to forward a
to listen to the voice email message, the method may proceed
25
voice mail message received in the form of an email to one or
to step 710 where the method ends. Ifthe user decides to listen
a plurality of other email accounts. In this manner, a voice
to the voice email message, the method proceeds to step 711
email message may be sent efficiently to other email users.
where a request may be sent by the electronic device requestFor example, a user may maintain a distribution list of
ing the voice email message be forwarded to the user’s electronic device.
individuals working on a particular project that may have a
30
need to hear certain voice email messages. In this manner, a
At step 712, the voicemail message may be sent to the
user may efficiently disseminate information to other indiuser’ s electronic device. Upon forwarding the voicemail mesviduals while adding additional textual information to the
sage to the user the method may proceed to step 720 where the
body of the email allowing a user to comment on the original
method ends. As such, FIG. 7 depicts one method of providvoice email message. In another embodiment, a user may
ing an email message comprised of a voice mail message.
35
forward a received voice email message to another account
Certainly, other methods may be deployed as advancements
operable to receive forwarded voice email messages. For
in technology and are made without departing for the spirit
example, system 600 may be operable to receive an email
and scope of the present invention.
message having a voice mail message as an attachment. The
FIG. 8 illustrates a flow diagram of a method for providing
system would then be operable to forward the voice mail
selected audio information to an electronic device according
40
message to specified phone number, separate email account,
to one embodiment of the present invention. The method
and/or voice mail account, etc. thereby providing a user flexbegins at step 800 where a user accesses a webpage via the
ibility in receiving voice email.
Internet. The webpage may be a home page illustrated in FIG.
In one embodiment, a user may utilize an email account to
4 or other web pages operable to display selectable references
establish an answering service for voice mails. For example,
to audio information. The method proceeds to step 801 where
45
a user’s telephone number may be operable with an email
a user selects desirable audio information. For example, a
account to provide an answering service. A user may record a
user may select a single song, a plurality different songs, an
message for a specified phone number or extension and, upon
entire album, a broadcast station, streaming audio, etc. or
receiving an incoming call; the recorded message may be
other selectable audio information. Upon the user selecting a
played back to incoming the call’s initiator. System 600
reference to audio information, the method may proceed to
50
would then forward the received voicemail message via an
step 802 where a playlist may be created that represents the
user’s selected audio information.
email account to the user. For example, a user may have an
account set up at a residence for receiving voicemail mesThe playlist may be variable in size and comprised of a
sages via a user-defined email account. The user could then
plurality of different types of available audio information.
forward all received voice mails from the home account to an
Upon creating a playlist, the method may proceed to step 803
55
email account at a place of work. Therefore, the user may
where information associated with the playlist is obtained.
have complete access to received voicemail messages. In the
For example, a list ofnetwork or URL locations comprised of
same manner, a user could set up their work phone number to
the desirable audio information may be obtained. In this
forward a voicemail message to the user’s home email
manner, desirable audio information may be obtained from
account thereby allowing a user to receive a voicemail at a
many different sources such as URLs, network addresses,
60
home email account. Therefore, system 600 may be operable
hard drives, databases comprised of audio information, etc.
in a plurality ofways to provide email messages comprised of
The sources may be accessed to obtain the selected audio
information.
voicemail messages received via a voice mail or email
account.
Upon obtaining data associated with the customized playFIG. 7 illustrates a flow chart for providing voice email
list, the method may proceed to step 804 where the user is
65
messages according to one embodiment of the present invenprompted for a destination for the playlist. For example, a
tion. The method begins at step 701 where a voice mail
user may want to communicate the selected audio informamessage is left for a user. The message couldbe at a residence,
tion to a remote electronic device, an automobile audio sys-
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tem, a home stereo system, a home computer, an electronic
In accordance with the teachings of the present invention,
device coupled to a home network or computer system, etc. or
a user may select an on-line broadcast or radio station as all or
other locations or devices operable to receive the selected
a part of the selected audio information. The user may then
audio information. In one embodiment, a user may select a
receive radio broadcasts without having to use a home com5
device owned by a friend to accept the selected audio inforputer system or conventional radio receiver.
mation. For example, a husband may want to send a romantic
At step 804, a user may select a device that does not require
playlist to his wife on their armiversary. In this situation, the
remote communication of information. For example, a user
husband would select his wife’s electronic device as the
may elect to communicate the selected audio information to
receiving device for the selected audio information.
device, such as a personal computer, PDA device, MP3
10
Upon selecting a device, the method proceeds to step 805
player, etc. coupled via a network connection to the Internet
where the method determines the destination of the selected
or an Intranet. The user may receive the selected playlist at the
audio information. If the information is to be sent to a device
determined device for eventual playing. In one embodiment,
via a wire line connection, the method proceeds to step 813
a user may select a plurality of devices as destination devices
where playlist data is sent to a user via a wire line connection.
for receiving downloads of the selected audio information.
15
The method may then proceed to step 814 where the playlist
For example, the user may want to download the information
is executed at the device. If the information is to be sent to a
to a home stereo system, a PDA device, and an automobile
device requiring wireless communication, the method prostereo. As such, the selected information may be communicated to more than one destination device. In addition, the
ceeds to step 806 where the information is formatted for
communicating the information to a wireless electronic
format ofthe download may match or conform to the selected
20
device. For example, a wireless PDA device may be selected
destination device(s).
as a destination device for the selected audio information. The
The present invention may be configured in a plurality of
PDA device may include an audio player, such as an MP3
ways to communicate desirable audio information to users by
player operable to play or execute MP3 audio files. In such an
allowing users to select desirable audio information and
embodiment, the method could format the information such
transmitting the desirable audio information to a specified
25
that the information may be wirelessly communicated and
destination thereby allowing a user to receive on-demand
subsequently played by the MP3 player.
customized audio information. Moreover, the download may
Upon formatting the information, the method may then
occur in an off-line environment, allowing a user to enjoy the
proceed to step 807 where the audio information is wirelessly
selected audio information accessed on-line without having
communicated to the selected device. In some embodiments,
to be on-line or utilizing a browsing environment. In one
30
the device may be operable to receive a limited amount of
embodiment of the present invention, the method of FIG. 8
information based upon storage capacity of the device (i.e.,
may be modified to allow a user to select a “user group” for
16 MB). In such a case, the method may divide the informareceiving customized audio information. For example, a
tion into component parts and periodically communicate the
“user group” may include users that prefer contemporary jazz
component parts, such as packets, to the electronic device.
wherein a user may request a certain song. Therefore, a virtual
35
Upon communicating the audio information, the method may
request line may be designed for a specific genre of music
then proceed to step 808 where the signal may be received by
allowing “members” to transmit audio information to the
the destination or electronic device.
“group”.
The method may then proceed to step 809 where the
In another embodiment of the present invention, the
method determines if all of the audio information has been
method may be modified to allow a user to select a specific
40
received. For example, if 16 MB or 32 MB of selected audio
genre to be transmitted to the users device. For example, a
information was initially transmitted due to capacity limitauser may elect to have random country and western music
tions of the selected device, the method may query the
transmitted to a destination device. The user could efficiently
create a radio station format and have the format received at a
selected device to determine if capacity is available. If availdestination device.
able memory exists, the method may proceed to step 807
45
where the method may communicate additional audio inforIn a further embodiment, a user may select a group of
mation based upon the amount of available memory. The
genres to be downloaded to a desirable device. As such, the
method repeats until all of the selected audio information has
method may be modified to allow a user to select several
been transmitted.
different genres to download random music within the speciUpon communicating the selected information, the method
fied genres. In another embodiment, a user may elect to down50
may proceed to step 810 where the playlist may be executed.
load the same music as another individual. For example, a
For example, a user may select a continuous communication
user may want to download the same music as their best
friend. Therefore the user could elect to download the same
of selected audio information (e.g., several hours of music.
Internet broadcast, etc.). As such, the method may continumusic as their friend or group of friends. In another example,
ously play or execute the received audio information. In
a user may want to listen to the same music that an artist
55
another embodiment, the method may proceed to step 811
listens to on a specific weekday of evening. For example, a
where the method may store or buffer the received informauser may want to listen to the same music that Barry White
tion until it is desirable to execute the received selected audio
listens to on a Saturday night.
information. As such, upon executing the selected audio
Therefore, the user may select “Barry White’s” Saturday
information, the method may proceed to step 809 where the
night playlist and receive the same playlist Barry White
60
method may repeat. In one embodiment, a user may elect to
receives on Saturday night. In another embodiment, the
download a broadcast of an on-line radio station. For
method of FIG. 8 may be modified to allow a user to manipuexample, a user may want to listen to a radio station located in
late song post download. For example, a user may want to
a remote location wherein conventional radio receivers could
store, delete, replay, copy, forward, etc. received audio infornot receive the desired broadcast. For example, a person
mation. Therefore, the method of FIG. 4 may be modified
65
living in Houston, Tex. may not be able to receive a radio
such that a user can manipulate or process the received audio
broadcast signal from a radio station in Seattle, Wash. utilizinformation in a plurality of ways. In one embodiment of the
ing a conventional radio receiver.
present invention, an on-line radio station may be provided.
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For example, the radio station may be created for transmitting
audio or on-line broadcasts. The on-line broadcasters or hosts
be understood that various changes, substitutions and alterations can be made to the embodiments without departing
may create their own format for broadcast. For example, an
from their spirit and scope.
on-line radio station may be provided that transmits only
The benefits, advantages, solutions to problems, and any
children’s songs.
element(s) that may cause any benefit, advantage, or solution
Prior to conception of the present invention, conventional
to occur or become more pronounced are not to be construed
radio stations were monetarily limited to be capable of transas a critical, required, or essential feature or element of the
mitting music such as children’s songs to conventional radio
present invention. Accordingly, the present invention is not
receivers. The present invention, by providing a medium for
intended to be limited to the specific form set forth herein, but
10
transmitting selectable audio information, enables the existon the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives,
ence ofon-line broadcasting with little or no overhead co st for
modifications, and equivalents, as can be reasonably included
a host. A user may select an on-line broadcast for on-line or
within the spirit and scope of the invention as provided by the
claims below.
off-line delivery. In another embodiment, on-line broadcast
of audio information representing books or novels may be
While the present invention has been described with
15
provided to individuals such as the visually impaired. For
respect to a limited number of embodiments, those skilled in
example, an on-line broadcast station may provide several
the art will appreciate numerous modifications and variations
hours of audio information broadcast representing books or
therefrom. It is intended that the appended claims cover all
novels to be broadcast with very little overhead.
such modifications and variations as fall within the true spirit
FIG. 9 illustrates an automobile console having a mount for
and scope of this present invention.
20
What is claimed is:
an electronic device according to one embodiment of the
present invention. Console 900 includes a conventional audio
1. A system comprising:
system 901 comprised of a receiver 902 and CD player 903.
a cellular telephone comprising a display, a non-volatile
Interface 904 may be coupled to audio system 901 via plug
memory, and a processing device operable to execute
905 and cable 908, which may be coupled to an auxiliary line
instructions stored in the non-volatile memory;
25
into audio system 901. Interface 904 may also include contact
a browser saved locally at the cellular telephone and con906 for contacting electronic device 907. Cable 908 may be a
figured to facilitate accessing of a web page; and
a collection of instructions stored in the non-volatile
multiple conductive cable for providing power from the automobiles power system via a protection circuit or fuse 909 for
memory and operable to direct the cellular telephone to
powering electronic device 907. In one embodiment, interrequest a list of network addresses for a plurality of
30
face 904 may be operable to recharge electronic device 907
portions of an available media, to request delivery of a
utilizing a power source associated with an automobile.
first portion of the available media such that the first
During operation, electronic device 907 may be mounted
portion is delivered at a first communication rate, and to
within interface 904. Electronic device 907 may also be powrequest delivery of a second portion of the available
ered or recharged via power line 910 and communicate with
media such that the second portion is delivered at a
35
second communication rate that is different than the first
the systems audio system via interface cable or bus line 911.
Audio information communicated to electronic device 907
communication rate.
may be transferred to audio system 901 such that a user may
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the browser utilizes
listen to selected audio information. For example, a user may
hyper text transfer protocol (http) to facilitate accessing the
available media.
have previously selected a plurality of audio files to be trans40
mitted to electronic device 907. Electronic device 907 may
3. The system of claim 1, further comprising a first wireless
communicate the selected audio information to the automoreceiver and a second wireless receiver, wherein the first
biles audio system that utilizes interface 901 thereby allowing
wireless receiver is configured to receive information at the
the user to listen to selected audio information. In one
first communication rate.
embodiment, cable 908 may be custom-installed to audio
4. The system of claim 3, wherein the first wireless receiver
45 is a wide area wireless transceiver and the second wireless
system 901. For example, the cable may be coupled to an
receiver is not a wide area wireless transceiver.
auxiliary line for the system’ s radio or may be coupled to CD
player line 912.
5. The system ofclaim 1, further comprising an email client
In another embodiment, a radio manufacturer may provide
saved locally to the cellular telephone, wherein the email
interface 904 as a standard interface integrated into the audio
client is operable to receive an email with a media file attach50 ment.
system, thereby allowing communication between electronic
device 907, audio system 901 and/or console 900. Electronic
6. The system of claim 1, further comprising a non-circular
device 907 may include a plurality of different types of
physical interface configured such that the non-circular
devices. For example, electronic device 907 may include a
physical interface acts as a single docking point that includes
PDA device operable to store selected audio information. The
a portion configured to transmit power and a different portion
55
information may be either remotely downloaded using an
configured to transmit data.
Internet web browser and wireless communication to the
7. A system comprising:
PDA device. In another embodiment, selected audio informaa computing device having a wireless receiver, a top surtion may communicated to a PDA device via a hard wire
face, a display that makes up a majority of the top surcoupled to a computer system interfacing with the Internet. In
face, a non-volatile memory, and a processing device
60
another embodiment, electronic device 907 may include an
operable to execute instructions stored in the non-volaaudio file player operable to play audio files such as MP3s,
tile memory;
etc.
a browser saved locally at the computing device and conThe audio files may be remotely or locally communicated
figured to facilitate accessing of a web page; and
a collection of instructions stored in the non-volatile
to electronic device 907 and upon coupling to audio system
65
901, the audio files may be transmitted to audio system 901 in
memory and operable to direct the computing device to
a form receivable by audio system 901. Although the disrequest a list of network addresses for a plurality of
closed embodiments have been described in detail, it should
portions of an available media, to request delivery of a
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first portion of the available media such that the first
portion is delivered at a first communication rate, and to
request delivery of a second portion of the available
media such that the second portion is delivered at a
second communication rate that is different than the first
communication rate.
20
14. The system of claim 11, further comprising a collection
of instructions configured for execution on the cellular
device, wherein the instructions are operable to direct the
cellular device to request the first and second segments ofthe
available media such that the first segment is delivered at the
first communication rate and the second segment is delivered
at the second communication rate that is slower than the first
communication rate.
8. The system of claim 7, wherein the computing device is
configured such that a user is able to access the browser and
15. The system ofclaim 14, wherein at least a portion ofthe
choose the available media without a physical keyboard or an 10
collection of instructions are configured to be used with a
external mouse.
browser executing at the cellular device and operable to make
9. The system of claim 7, further comprising a first wireless
use of a hyper text transfer protocol.
receiver and a second wireless receiver, wherein the first
16. The system ofclaim 11, further comprising instructions
wireless receiver is configured to receive information at the
operable to direct the cellular device to request the list, and to
first communication rate.
15 switch between the at least two communication rates based in
10. The system of claim 7, further comprising:
part on an amount of information buffered at the cellular
an email client saved locally to the cellular telephone,
device.
wherein the email client is operable to receive an email
17. The system ofclaim 16, wherein at least a portion ofthe
with a media file attachment;
instructions are configured to be used with a browser execut20
an audio file player; and
ing at the cellular device and operable to make use of a hyper
a non-circular physical interface configured such that the
text transfer protocol.
non-circular physical interface acts as a single docking
18. A method comprising:
point that includes a portion configured to transmit
receiving a communication at a component of a cellular
power and a different portion configured to transmit
network, wherein the communication comprises a
data.
25
request for a listing of network locations where a plural11. A system comprising:
ity of segments of an available media are stored, further
a cellular network component operable to receive a comwherein the request is from a cellular device having a
munication comprising a request for network locations
non-volatile memory and a collection of instructions
where a plurality of segments of an available media are
stored in the non-volatile memory that are operable to
stored, further wherein the request is from a cellular 30
direct the cellular device to switch between at least two
device having a non-volatile memory and a collection of
transmission rates for receiving a media stream based at
instructions stored in the non-volatile memory that are
least in part on an amount of information buffered at the
operable to direct the cellular device to switch between
wireless device; and
at least two transmission rates for receiving the available
sending a message comprising a plurality of network locamedia;
35
tions for different segments of the available media,
a list including
wherein the message comprises network locations that
a first network location for a file representing at least a first
allow a requesting device to utilize a first transmission
segment of the available media and
rate for a first segment of the available media and a
a second network location for a different file representing a
different transmission rate for a second segment of the
40
second segment of the available media; and
available media.
wireless data delivery resources operable to communicate
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the listing of network
a first stream representing the first segment of the availlocations comprises at least one Uniform Resource Locator
able media at a first communication rate and a second
(URL).
stream representing the second segment of the available
20. The method of claim 18, further comprising receiving
media at a second communication rate.
45
information representing the first segment of the available
12. The system ofclaim 11, wherein the list is a playlist and
media from a server and utilizing a wireless data network to
the available media is a collection of audio files.
deliver the information to the wireless device.
13. The system ofclaim 11, wherein the list is a playlist and
* * * * *
the available media is a collection of video files.
Samsung-LG-HTC
Samsung-LG-HTC Ex.
Ex. 1101
1101 p.
p. 31
31
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