Cut Like a Soul Reaper - Eat Like a Hollow!

Cut Like a Soul Reaper - Eat Like a Hollow!
Cut Like a Soul Reaper - Eat Like a Hollow!
Take on the Afterlife one Soul at a Time! The Bleach Trading Card Game lets you fight as your favorite Bleach
character against the forces of worthy opponents. Will Ichigo defeat Menos Grande, or will he get blasted into
pieces?
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Play for Fun or Compete With the Champions!
Collect Hi-Tech Guardian Cards!
Build Your Guardian to Fight on Your Terms!
Unlock the Power of the Foil Ultra-Rare Cards!
What's a Trading Card Game?
It's a game where you play with a deck of cards that you put together from your collection. Because you are in
charge of the cards you play with, you decide how to build your deck to fight the way you want. Just like the
Quincies, you may even break the universe itself!
The Golden Rule: Some cards are so powerful that they break the rules of the game. When a card contradicts a
rule in the rulebook, the card is always right!
How to Win!
You win the game the instant your opponent's guardian has 0 power. Power is the "life force" of a guardian.
When your guardian's power is gone - so are you.
You also win by emptying your opponent's deck. You win as soon as your opponent tries to draw or discard a
card from his deck and cannot.
How Does the Game Work?
During your turn, you play cards and then use them to attack your opponent's guardian. Each attack creates
damage that reduces his guardian's power when it hits him. Your opponent can defend against these attacks with
his character cards.
When you attack, you choose a stat on your character card to attack with. Your opponent can defend against that
attack with one of his characters that has the same stat.
After that, it becomes a war of one-upmanship with each player boosting their character's stat until the battle
ends. The player with the highest stat wins the battle. A tie means both characters lose the battle.
If your attack is strong enough to kill your opponent's defender the left over damage still pummels his guardian
with power damage!
Let's Look at the Cards!
Guardian Cards
A guardian card represents the Bleach persona you are playing. Guardians
start the game in play and never enter the play area.
Power. The number in the top right corner is your guardian's power. When
it's zero, your guardian loses the game - so stay strong!
Energy. The values going down the left side of the guardian are the three
kinds of energy you store in your side deck: mind, body and spirit.
Game Effect. At the bottom of the guardian card is an effect your guardian
can use during the game.
Energy Cards
Energy cards create the resources you need to play cards and use some game
effects. Energy cards appear in a separate deck of cards called a "Side Deck." To
use an energy card you turn it 90 degrees to create one type of energy. This is called
"depleting" an energy card.
Character Cards
Like guardians, character cards are made up of Bleach persona, but they
enter play from your hand. Characters are the cards you attack and defend
with. You play your character cards during your Main Step.
Title. Every card has a title above the image of the character. The large type
is the name of the character. The smaller type is the version of that character.
Stats. Located on the right side of the character card. When you attack or
defend, you use one of these stats.
Boost Value. In battle, you may discard this card from your hand to "boost"
your attacking or defending characters matching stat by the number in the top
right corner.
Cost. This is the cost of the card to play it. Check the left side of the card to
see its cost.
Traits. Traits are labels to show what categories a card belongs to. These are
displayed below the image of the character. Characters with the "NonUnique" trait can have multiple copies of itself in play.
Card Effect. These effects are used during the game as described by the
card. Always found at the bottom of each card.
Item Cards
Need a Zanpaku-to? Pick one up! Item cards represent physical things that
appear in Bleach. When you play an item you "attach" it to a character card
by placing it under it with the text box still showing. You play items in your
Main Step.
Boost Value. In battle, you may discard this card from your hand to "boost"
your attacking or defending characters matching stat by the number in the top
right corner.
Cost. This is the cost of the card to play it. Check the left side of the card to
see its cost.
Traits. Some items have the trait "Non-Unique". You can have as many of
these items as you want in play at a time.
Card Effect. These effects are used during the game as described by the
card. Always found at the bottom of each card.
Battlegrounds
Battlegrounds let you choose where you want to fight. You play
battlegrounds during your Main Step.
Boost Value. In battle, you may discard this card from your hand to
"boost" your attacking or defending characters matching stat by the
number in the top right corner.
Cost. This is the cost of the card to play it. Check the left side of the card
to see its cost.
Card Effect. These effects are used during the game as described by the
card. Always found at the bottom of each card.
Traits. Some battlegrounds have the "Non-Unique" trait. You can have as
many of these battlegrounds as you want in play at a time.
Events
Events represent the plot twists and surprises of Bleach. To play an event,
you deplete the required energy cards, play the event from your hand, use its
effect, and discard it. Events are some of the most powerful cards in the
game.
Boost Value. In battle, you may discard this card from your hand to "boost"
your attacking or defending characters matching stat by the number in the top
right corner.
Cost. This is the cost of the card to play it. Check the left side of the card to
see its cost.
Card Effect. These effects are used during the game as described by the
card. Always found at the bottom of each card.
Learn to Play Fast!
The fastest way to learn is using the online demo! Go to the demo page and follow along!
Game Basics
Depleting a Card: Many game effects are based on you "depleting" a card. When you deplete a card, you turn it
90 degrees so that it's horizontal. Depleting creates several effects in the game. When you deplete energy cards,
you gain one energy for each energy card you deplete. When you attack or defend, you deplete a character card
as a cost to attack or defend. You also deplete cards to use some card effects. You cannot deplete a card that is
already depleted.
Renewing a Card: When you renew a depleted card, you turn it so that it is vertical.
How to Play a Card. Playing a card is the act of paying the cost of a card to play it into the play area. For
example, to play the character card Chad - Young Student, you must deplete 1 mind energy, 2 body energy, and
1 spirit energy to play him from your hand into the play area.
Putting in Play a Card. Some effects have you "put a card in play." When you put a card in play you place it in
the play area without paying its cost. This action is not considered "playing" a card.
How Do You Win a Battle?
When you attack with a character, you attack with a base stat that appears on your character card. You win the
battle if your stat exceeds your opponent's. There are six stats total and each character card has up to three of
them.
To attack, you deplete one of your characters by turning it 90 degrees.
Your opponent can defend against the attack by depleting one of his characters that has the same stat as the
attack. Otherwise, his guardian takes the damage. After your opponent has declared a defender, you both can
boost your stats to higher levels. How? By discarding cards from your hand have a boost value that matches your
attacking stat, and by your opponent discarding cards from his hand that have a boost value that matches his
defending stat. When both players pass as their action in battle and there are no game effects left to resolve, the
battle ends and you see which character won the battle. There are three possible outcomes:
1. The attacker's final stat is bigger than the defender's stat. If this happens the defending character is
discarded after taking damage equal to his final stat. After that, the remaining difference hits your
opponent's guardian as power damage!
2. The attacker's final stat equals the defender's stat. If this happens, both characters are discarded.
3. The attacker's final stat is lower than the defender's stat. If this happens, the attacking character is
discarded, but the difference in the stat value does NOT deal damage to the attacker's guardian.
What Happens When You Don't Assign a Defender?
Your opponent attacks you directly with the stat he or she declared the attack with.
How a Turn Works
A turn is the three steps that a player goes through. When it's your turn, you go through each of these three steps
while your opponent responds to your actions. Each step is like its own world, with its own rules. When you are
done with all three steps, your opponent has a turn to go through each of these three steps with you responding
to his actions.
Here is each step as you go through it with an example.
What are the Three Steps?
1. The Resource Step
In this step, you get the stuff you need to attack your opponent and to defend later. When you go through this
step you do everything in the order shown below:
1. Renew your depleted cards.
2. Draw a card from the top of your deck.
3. Draw another card or play an energy card from your side deck.
4. Draw another card or play an energy card from your side deck.
After you have done these three steps in order, you go to the Main Step.
EXAMPLE: It's your turn. You enter the Resource Step. First, you renew all your depleted cards by turning them
to a vertical position. Second, you draw a card from the top of your deck. Third, you choose to either draw
another card. Fourth, you play an energy card from your side deck. After you have done these four things, you go
to the Main Step.
2. The Main Step
This is the step where the game play breaks out. Unlike the last step, you can do any of these actions in any
order as often as you can or want. Your opponent does NOT do these things, but may respond to your actions
with card effects or by playing events from his hand.
• Pass. If you pass this step, you go to the end step.
• Play a card. If you play a card, you deplete its energy cost and place it into the play area. You can play
character cards, battleground cards, items and events.
• Attack!
EXAMPLE: It's still your turn. You enter the Main Step. Now you can do any of the three choices in this step in
any order.
3. The End Step
In this step, the active player changes to the player to your left. The turn ends and it becomes your opponent's
turn instead.
Beginning a New Game
First Thing - Get a Deck!
A deck is made of 60 card draw deck plus 1 guardian card plus a side deck that contains the amount of energy
listed on your guardian. The pre-constructed deck you got with this starter is a legal deck. Your draw deck can
only have 4 copies of any one card. Some cards are limited to a certain number of copies per deck. Such card
will say "Limit 1 copy per deck" or something similar.
Setting Up
First place your guardian on the playmat in the space marked "Guardian." Next shuffle your deck and offer your
opponent a chance to cut. After that, place your deck in the area of your playmat marked "Deck." Take your side
deck of energy cards and place them in the area marked "Side Deck."
Flip a coin or roll a die with your opponent. The winner gets to choose who takes the first turn.
Both players draw five cards. If a player doesn't like his hand, he can place the cards at the bottom of his deck
and draw five more cards. He can only do this once per game.
How the Cards Work
Except for events, all cards are unique to your play area. That means you can only have one copy of that card in
play at a time.
Character Cards
When you play a character card as an action in your Main Step, you deplete the required energy to play the card
and place it in the play area face-up. Character card uniqueness is character dependant not card dependant.
This means you cannot have more than one copy of that character in play unless they have the trait "NonUnique." This includes any version of that character.
If you want, you can play a different version of a Unique character you already have in play to replace another
one in play. This is called "overlaying." To overlay a character card, pay its cost and replace the current version
of that character with the new version.
Using Character Cards. Character cards cannot deplete to attack unless they were in play at the start of your
turn. You can only deplete a character card to use its effect if it was in play at the start of your turn.
If a character card has an effect that does NOT require you to deplete the character to use it, you can use that
effect any time the character is in play. And you can deplete a character to defend against an attack anytime that
character is in play.
When you use an effect that requires you to deplete your character, you deplete your character by turning it
sideways and then deplete any energy required and pay any other kind of costs, and then use the effect as
described by the effect's text.
Attacking with a Character. When you are the active player, you may attack with a character by depleting it and
declaring what stat you are attacking with as long as that character was in play at the start of your turn.
Defending Against an Attack. When you defend with a character, deplete it if you have a stat that matches the
attacking stat of your opponent. You can always deplete a renewed character to defend against an attack, even if
that character just entered play.
Item Cards.
When you play an item, you deplete the required energy to play it and then place it under a character card in your
play area. You must have a character in your party to play an item card. Placing an item under a character card is
called "attaching" an item. There is no limit to the number of items a character can attach.
Effects on items. Some items create a constant effect that is always active in the game. Other items have
activated effects that require you to pay a cost before you can use its effect. Unlike characters, you can deplete
items for their effects on the same turn you play them.
Battleground Cards
To play a battleground, you pay its cost and put it into the play area. You can have multiple battlegrounds in play.
Your opponent can also play battlegrounds.
Event cards
Events are the wild cards of the game. Events can be played almost anytime in the game depending on their
game text. If an event has a specific time it can be played, it will tell you in its game text exactly when you can
play it. To play an event, you deplete its required energy cost, play it from your hand use its effect and then
discard it. Some events have effects that have an additional cost that you must pay to use the effect. If so, it will
be in bold like all other effect costs.
The Queue
Event cards and activated effects occur the instant they are played or used. So if you play an event card, its
effect happens RIGHT THEN. But what happens if you and your opponent have several event cards and
activated cards you want to play and use? If they all happen at the same time how do you sort them out? The
answer is the queue.
How the Queue works. The queue happens when one or more players use effects that happen right away. Even
though the effects happen "right away," a player can still respond with his or her own effect that happens "right
away." This situation creates a series of suspended effects that resolve in a "last in first out" fashion.
You may think, "Wait a minute, you can respond to my effect that happens 'right away' with YOUR effect that
happens 'right away?'
Yes. That's what we are saying.
Anytime an event or activated effect is played or used, a queue is created for these kinds of effects, even if it is
just one card deep.
EXAMPLE: Your opponent attacked with Chad choosing STR. You and your opponent's character are tied at 6
STR so he plays the event card Up Close and Personal, which gives him +4 to his STR making it reach 10! Since
Up Close and Personal is an event, its effect happens "right away" and goes on the queue. Even though it
happens right away, it doesn't resolve until after you have a chance to respond with your own effects. The queue
is now one effect deep.
For this example, we'll assume that you choose not to discard cards that boost STR, and you realize that you will
lose this battle 10 to 6 if this card resolves! You choose to play Reality Check which cancels any effect on the
queue before it and you choose the effect of Up Close and Personal.
Yikes! Now your effect that happens "right away" happens before your opponent's effect happens "right away."
But your opponent isn't done.
Your opponent also plays his own copy of Reality Check and chooses to cancel your copy of Reality Check.
But wait, you're not done yet. You play a second copy of Reality Check and choose to cancel your opponent's
Reality Check! What a twist!
So here's how it goes down. Your Reality Rheck cancels the Reality Check that your opponent played before
your last Reality Check. Now your remaining Reality Check cancels out your opponent's copy of Up Close and
Personal. Now you and your opponent are tied at 6 STR and both of you choose not to boost. So you both
discard your characters. Hey. If you're going down, you might as well go down fighting!
Glossary and Other Rules
Activated Effect: A dormant effect on guardians, characters, items and battlegrounds that enters the game state
when you choose to use it. Most activated effects have a cost to use them. You can tell if an effect is an activated
effect by the context of the card. An activated effect can be used as many times as you can pay for it. If there is a
limit to its use, it will limit itself in the game text.
Active Player: The active player is the player that holds the current turn and can perform actions in all three
steps.
Attaching Cards: The act of "attaching" a card is to place it under the card it is attached to with the game text
revealed.
Attack: The act of depleting a character card to attack your opponent's guardian with a stat appearing on that
character's card.
Boosting: Boosting is discarding cards from your hand that have a boost value that matches your defending or
attacking stat in a battle. Boosting a card is not considered "playing" a card. When an effect increases a stat, it
does not count as boosting. Boosting does go on the queue, but is not considered an effect.
Cherry Picking Rule: When a card lets you search for a card, you must reveal the card you searched for to your
opponent.
Choosing Rule: When a game effect uses the word "choose" then you choose the object the card tells you to
when you use the effect. This choice and the effect then go onto the queue.
Colon: Everything to the left of a colon in bold text is a cost you must pay to use the effect printed to the right of
that colon.
Constant Effect: A constant effect that is always in use. The context of a card's text will let you know if it is a
constant effect.
Control: The cards you have on your playmat that are not in a deck are the cards you control.
Defend: The act of depleting a character card to protect your guardian from an attacking character.
Deplete: The act of turning a card 90 degrees so that it's horizontal. A depleted card cannot deplete again until it
is renewed.
Diamonds: Diamonds are used in game text to multiple effects on a card.
Do What You Can Rule: Except for costs and effects that are conditional, if an effect tells you to do something
you cannot (or can only partially) do, do what you can and continue play.
Energy Cards: These are resources you deplete to play and use cards. You cannot deplete an Energy card
unless there is an effect or card you are using or playing.
Energy Cost: When a card effect uses the word "energy cost" it refers to the total amount of energy a card costs:
EXAMPLE: a card that costs 1 body energy, 1 spirit energy and 1 mind energy has an energy cost of 3. Energy
cost ALWAYS is a sum of the printed values on a card and not any modified costs that were paid to play it.
Floating Effects: An ongoing effect that is separate from the card that created it and that lasts a period of time
as defined by the card.
The Golden Rule: Some cards are so powerful that they break the rules of the game. When a card contradicts a
rule in the rulebook, the card is always right!
In Play: A card is in play if it is in either the play area or the energy row.
Limiting Text: If an effect or card is limited, then it has a restriction to its use either in deck construction or in
play. Such effects will read like "Limit 1 copy per deck" or "Limit once per turn."
Most Recent Printing Rule: Except for energy and guardian cards, if 2 or more cards share the same title, then
the text, number and all other symbols of that card are to be read as they appear on the most recent printing
(MRP) of that card.
Non-Unique: A card that has the trait "Non-Unique" can have multiple copies of itself in play on your side of the
table.
Overlay Rule: Overlaying is the act of playing a character card to replace one that has the same name (but a
different version) of a character you have in play. When you discard an overlaid character, all its attached cards
go to its owner's discard pile. An overlaid card must be in play at the beginning of your turn to attack with it or to
use its activated effect. Overlaid cards also take on the same depleted/renewed status of the card they overlay.
Ownership: Players "own" the cards that they bring to the game. When a card is discarded or removed from the
game, they always revert to their owner's discard pile or removed from the game pile.
Parenthesis: Some effects on cards happen outside the normal timing of the game (like cards that are "Limit 1
copy per deck.") Such effects appear in parenthesis.
Playing a Card: When you play a card, you pay its cost and place it into the play area.
Plural Rule: Card titles that are referenced in a plural form also target the singular form of those cards.
Putting a Card in Play: Putting a card in play is not considered playing a card. When an effect "puts a card in
play," you do not pay its cost to play it or use any cards or effects that are used when a card is "played."
Queue: A mechanic designed to handle effects that occur "at the same time."
Random Card Selection: If a player is instructed to randomly choose a card from his or her hand, the player
who is getting the card discarded shuffles their hand any way they wish and holds it with the back of his or her
cards facing the opponent. The opponent then chooses any card from that hand and completes the effect's
instruction.
Renew: The act of turning a card 90 degrees so that it's vertical.
Shuffling: Randomizing a deck of cards in such a way that the order of the cards within it are unknown.
Stat-Switching Rule: Some cards switch the attacking or defending stat in a battle. When that happens, you can
only boost the new stat and not the previous stat. For example, your opponent attacks with AGI and you switch
your defending stat to STR. That means your opponent will compare his AGI to your STR instead of your AGI.
Now instead of boosting AGI, you will try to boost your STR this battle.
When an effect switches your attacking or defending stat to a stat you have printed on a character, you use the
new stat's numeric value instead of the former stat's numeric value. If an effect switches your attacking or
defending stat to a stat you do not have on your character, the stat you switch to gets the numeric value of the
former stat.
Switching Rule: Some cards switch the attacking or defending stat in a battle. When that happens, you can only
boost that stat with boosts that match that stat. For example, your opponent attacks with AGI and you switch your
defending stat to STR. That means your opponent will compare his AGI to your STR instead of your AGI. You
can only boost your STR with cards that boost STR.
Trait: A trait is a keyword appearing on cards in the box above its game text. Each trait counts as a category that
the card belongs to. Traits are capitalized in game text and are used as a reference to cards that have that trait.
EXAMPLE: "Choose a Good character in play…" could choose the card Ichigo, Substitute Soul Reaper because
it has the "Good" trait.
Triggered Effect: An effect that comes into use the instant a specific condition is met. The context of the card's
text will reveal to you if an effect is a triggered effect.
Unique: Except for events, each card on your side of the play area is unique when they are in play. You can only
have multiple copies of a card in play if it has the trait "Non-Unique."
Using a Card: Some cards are used after they are put into play. You can use a card as many times as you can
pay for it in a turn.
Versions: The part of a character's title that denotes a different version of that character.
EXAMPLE: In the card Ichigo - Substitute Soul Reaper, the words "Substitute Soul Reaper" are the version.
Zero and Negative Numbers: If an effect reduces a stat or other value in the game below 0, that number counts
as "0" when comparing to other numbers in the game. This means that an -3 SPP is treated as "0." If that SPP
gets +1 then it becomes a -2 SPP that is treated as 0 SPP.
Credits
Creative Director: Carl Braun
Marketing: Deanna Cass
Lead Game Designer: Aik Tongtharadol
Editor/Rules: William Harper and Joshua Morris
In-House Playtesters: Joshua Morris and Michael Szymanski
Other Playtesters: Erin Giddings, Joe Harper, William Harper, Dan Posey, Garrett Wilkinson, George Wilkinson
Community Manager: Erin Giddings
Organized Play Manager: Dan Posey
Webmaster: Cory Davis
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