Explicit Dynamic Simulation of Tool Drop on the Outer Wing of the

Explicit Dynamic Simulation of Tool Drop on the Outer Wing of the
Success Story
Explicit Dynamic Simulation of Tool Drop on
the Outer Wing of the Swift020 Unmanned
Aerial System using RADIOSS®
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Background
Key Highlights
Industry
Aerospace
Challenge
Define the specification for maximum
weight of the maintenance tooling used
on the Swift020 UAS
Altair Solution
RADIOSS Explicit Dynamic Impact Simulation
Benefits
• Elimination of costly trial and error testing
• Reduction in maintenance and
component replacement time and cost
• Increased reliability
Numerical analysis and simulation is one
of the many techniques used to reduce cost
and design time in aerospace structural
engineering. To take these techniques into
explicit analysis (i.e. impact modeling) allows
precise visualization of many dynamic events
that have often been facilitated by expensive
high speed video testing, non-destructive
evaluation and lengthy trial and error efforts.
The net result of these evaluations typically
leads to increase in weight in order to
reduce the risk.
Swift Engineering, Inc., based in
San Clemente, California is a product
development company with over 30 years
of experience designing, developing and
building high performance advanced
composite vehicles, unmanned systems,
full-scale demonstrators, build-to-print,
and automated robotics. Swift specializes in
the design, development, and manufacturing
of lightweight composite structures,
components, and vehicles. Founded in 1983
as a leading developer of high-performance
racecars, Swift has been applying its depth
of composite talent to the aerospace and
aviation industries since 1997. Swift has
emerged as a premier air vehicle designer
and manufacturer, as demonstrated through
the successful KillerBee Unmanned Aerial
Systems (UAS), (now the Northrop Grumman
owned Bat™ UAS family), the Boeing
Sikorsky Joint Multi-Role (JMR) Demonstrator
(Full Airframe authority), the Eclipse Concept
Jet program (completed in 200 days from
contract to first flight), and many other
similar aerospace and oceanic build-to-print
composite manufacturing projects.
Keywords: RADIOSS, Impact Dynamic Analysis, Tool Drop, Limit Strain, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)
Swift Engineering Success Story
Portrait
Here
"RADIOSS solver coupled with HyperMesh were instrumental in
the rapid design exploration and visualization of the effects of tool
drop impact on a thin walled composite UAS wing structure".
William B Gianetti
Senior Research and Development Engineer
Swift Engineering, Inc.
An Accidental Tool Drop
on Your Flight Structure
irreparable damage, down-time
and expensive component replacement.
RADIOSS Explicit Dynamics
Impact Simulation
The successful launch of a new platform
UAS (Figure 1) is a comprehensive design
engineering and manufacturing endeavor.
From initial sketches to a fully functional
vertical launch; the horizontal high speed
flight system requires hundreds of hours
of engineering analysis. In addition to
engineering the flight system, the full
lifecycle must consider maintenance
and replacement components. As these
requirements often require the use of tools
(i.e. screw drivers, wrenches, pliers), the
concern became apparent that as the flight
surfaces are minimum gage, heavy tools
dropped on the structure could cause
The objective of this project was to
determine the specification for maximum
maintenance tool weight such that, if
dropped from a nominal height of
0.762 meters, would not cause permanent
damage to any part of the Swift020 UAS.
To accomplish this goal, an explicit model
of the UAS was generated in HyperMesh®
and impacted by a steel penetrator at
defined drop energies. A parametric curve
of maximum composite compression strain
vs. impact energy and limit strain for the
impacted composite material yielded the
specification for the maximum tool weight.
A full scale model of the Swift020 was
generated in HyperMesh (Figure 2).
The primary structural components
comprised of graphite, fiberglass and Kevlar®
epoxy advanced composite materials were
modelled using MAT25 material property
in RADIOSS. The majority of the structure
was minimum gage to reduce weight as
the aerodynamic surfaces are the most
susceptible areas to tool drop damage
due to their high impact cross-section.
The penetrator was modelled as a
0.0254 meter diameter hemispherical tip rod.
Initial velocity (INIVEL) of 3.867 m/s
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Figure 1. Swift020 Unmanned Aerial System
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Figure 2. Swift 020 UAS impacted by a steel rod at center of outer wing adjacent to outboard spar
was imposed on the penetrator to simulate
a 0.762 meter drop using Conservation of
Energy. The impact energy was modulated
using the density of the penetrator in the
material card. RADIOSS TYPE7 contact
was used between the penetrator and
the composite wing surface. A Type7 selfcontact was also modelled for all nodes
and surfaces of the aircraft. The aircraft
boundary conditions were modeled as two
rubber mounts positioned under the wings.
Type 7 contacts were used between the
rubber mounts and the wing surface.
The base of the rubber mounts were
constrained by a Rigid Body(RBODY) entity.
"RADIOSS solver coupled with HyperMesh
were instrumental in the rapid design
exploration and visualization of the effects of
tool drop impact on a thin walled composite
UAS wing structure", said William B Giannetti,
Senior Research and Development Engineer,
Swift Engineering, Inc.
Defining the Maximum
Tool Weight
A parametric analysis of the penetrator impact
energy was performed in RADIOSS and the
results were plotted as shown in Figure 3.
The resulting maximum compression strain
was compared to the allowable limit strain
of the system, resulting in a limit on the tool
energy and thus a limit on the tool mass
given a constant initial velocity.
For the case of the impact on the outer
Kevlar® epoxy wing, the maximum allowable
tool drop energy of 1.3 Joules was defined.
From the kinetic energy relationship,
the maximum tool mass of 0.174 Kg
was determined.
Using this value as a requirement for the
upper limit on tool mass, can mitigate tool
drop impact damage and thus increase
reliability and reduce the risk of
structural damage.
Tool Drop Impact Outboard Kevlar Wing
1.0"Impact Rod
Dropped from 2.5 feet
Figure 3. Maximum Laminate Compression Strain (P3min) as a function of Impact Energy and Margin Limit Strain
About Altair
Altair is focused on the development and broad application of
simulation technology to synthesize and optimize designs, processes
and decisions for improved business performance. Privately held and
headquartered in Troy, Michigan, USA the company operates globally to
serve customers in a diverse range of industries including automotive,
aerospace, defense, meteorology, architecture and construction,
Visit the HyperWorks library of
Success Stories
energy, electronics, and consumer goods.
www.altair.com
at www.altairhyperworks.com
About HyperWorks
HyperWorks is the most comprehensive open-architecture simulation
platform, offering technologies to design and optimize high performance,
efficient and innovative products. HyperWorks includes modeling,
analysis and optimization for structures, fluids, multi-body dynamics,
electromagnetics and antenna placement, model-based development,
and multiphysics. Users have full access to a wide suite of design,
engineering, visualization, and data management solutions from Altair
and its technology partners.
www.altairhyperworks.com
Altair Engineering, Inc., World Headquarters: 1820 E. Big Beaver Rd., Troy, MI 48083-2031 USA
Phone: +1.248.614.2400 • Fax: +1.248.614.2411 • www.altair.com • [email protected]
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