Safety Manual - Weiss
Health & Safety Manual
Health & Safety Manual
Introduction
This Health & Safety Manual serves as a strict guide in the development,
implementation and maintenance of Weiss-Johnson’s Group of Companies and
its safety program.
These companies include:
x Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
x Plumbing by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
x Fireplaces by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
x Gatt Heating-2014 Ltd.
If there is a question regarding any elements in this Health and Safety
Manual please forward to Barry Gabruch - Safety Director.
Thank-you.
Contact Information:
Phone 780-463-3096
Cell
780-399-6148
e-mail [email protected]
Health & Safety Manual
Table Of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
1.
Company Health and Safety Policy
2.
Workplace Hazard Assessment and Control
3.
Safe Work Practices
4.
Safe Job Procedures
5.
Company Rules
6.
Personal Protective Equipment ( PPE )
7.
Preventative Maintenance
8.
Training and Communication
9.
Inspections
10. Investigations and Reporting
11. Emergency Preparedness
12. Records and Statistics
13. Legislation
14. Policies
15. Terminology
Health & Safety Manual
Section 1
Company Health & Safety Policy
1.
COMPANY
HEALTH & SAFETY
POLICY
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Health & Safety Manual
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. believes that the safety and health
of our employees is of the utmost importance. We as management
recognize the right of our employees to work in a safe and healthy
work environment. We express a commitment to work in a spirit of
consultation and cooperation with our employees, and in so doing,
molding a positive Company Culture.
To maintain a safe work environment we need and insist upon the full
cooperation of each employee. All management and employees must
take a personal responsibility for their actions and adhere to the safety
policies, rules and regulations at all times.
No job at Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will ever be so
important that we can’t take the time to do it safely.
____________________________
_______________
_____
___________________________
_______
_____________
Dennis Johnson (Owner)
Mark Johnson (Owner)
__________________________________________
Gordon Garside (Chief Executive Officer)
Date: August 22, 2015
Health & Safety Manual
Section 1
Company Health & Safety Policy
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 2
Health and Safety Plan
11. If ordered to do so by a Director, an employer must prepare and
implement a health and safety plan that includes the policies, procedures
and plans to prevent work site incidents and occupational diseases at the
work site.
Occupational Health & Safety Code
Section 11
Company Health and Safety Policy Confirmation
1.1
Written Health and safety plan is signed and dated by current CEO.
1.2
This document includes management’s commitments to provide a safe and
healthy work environment.
1.3
This document is reviewed annually by management.
1.4
This document and Company Safety Policy is prominently posted or made
available to the worker upon request.
1.5
The document addresses accountability and responsibility for health &
safety for all workplace parties? a) Senior Managers b) Supervisors
c) Workers.
1.6
The Health & Safety program is communicated to and understood by
Weiss-Johnson employees.
1.7
Weiss-Johnson provides necessary resources to support the employers’
health & safety management system.
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Section 1
Company Health & Safety Policy
1.1 – Written Health and Safety Plan is signed and dated by current
CEO and Owners.
Align Quality and Safety Plan with Organizational Strategic Plan
Timely and relevant information about current performance together with knowledge on quality of
workmanship and safety of the employees are important ingredients in creating strategic goals for an
organization.
“The quality plan has to have specific measures, timelines and targets” so that we can quickly assess
progress of the organization on quality and safety initiatives. The quality and safety plan can cascade
throughout the organization by having measures and targets that align with the strategic plan of the
organization. Embedding the quality and safety plan into the broader strategic plan will ensure that it is
an integral part of a broader organizational strategic plan and agenda.
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Health & Safety Manual
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.2 – Management’s Commitment / Responsibilities towards Safety
1.2.1 RESPONSIBILITIES
Senior Management/ V.P. of Operations
Provide a Statement of Policy relating to the Health & Safety Program. The statement provides a
commitment that sets levels of expectations for safety performance throughout the corporation.
Lead by coaching and supporting your staff and actively supporting the Health and Safety Program.
Maintain overall control of the Health & Safety Program’s direction in your company.
Provide information, instructions, and assistance to all supervisory staff and/or sub-contractors in order
to protect the health and safety of all employees and the environment.
Confirm that the Health & Safety Program is administered and enforced in all departments.
Provide ongoing safety education programs to meet or exceed legislated requirements and the
requirements of our clients.
Make certain that all field operation personnel are aware of and are effectively following the practices
and procedures set out in the Health & Safety Program and in accordance with the Occupational Health
and Safety legislation.
Provide information and educational training to all employees with respect to current legislation
pertaining to the environment.
Ensure that all employees to a new work site are oriented to site specific hazards and procedures before
commencing work on the site.
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Company Health & Safety Policy
Set a good example by following the WEISS-JOHNSON Health & Safety Program and good industry
practices.
Review on an annual basis with the Supervisors their responsibilities and measure their performance
against these responsibilities.
Review on a monthly basis your employees’ safety performance in the field, at the shop and in the office.
Managers/Supervisors/Safety Team Leaders
Safety Team Leaders are responsible for ensuring implementation of the WEISS-JOHNSON Health &
Safety Program within their respective Companies.
Safety Team Leaders follow the direction of Safety Management and make certain that all employees
are educated and encouraged to work in a safe manner. That they use all protective devices and
procedures required to protect themselves, their co-employees and the environment and that this is
documented.
Conduct Health & Safety Orientations with new work candidates in their particular company. Certify
these employees and provide them with the appropriate PPE on their 1st day of work.
Ensure that all employees to a new work site are oriented to site specific hazards and procedures before
commencing work on the site.
Advise all employees, sub-contractors, vendors or visitors of any potential or actual hazards and how to
eliminate or control them.
Carry out and document regular Inspections, Personal Protective Equipment Score Cards, Toolbox
meetings and Safety Meetings to ensure a safe and healthy work site.
Document and report all accidents, incidents or spills immediately. If injured, report to Safety Director
as soon as possible. Phone # (780) 399-6148 The Safety Director will direct the worker to the closest
Occupational Injury System (OIS) clinic.
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Company Health & Safety Policy
Investigate all serious accidents and/or incidents, and to advise management on how to prevent similar
occurrences in the future through an action plan.
Conduct and participate in Job Hazard Assessments prior to starting work each day. “An employer must
assess a work site and identify existing and potential hazards before work begins at the work site or
prior to the construction of a new work site.” Alberta Occupational Health & Safety Code 7(1).
Workers
Report any unsafe hazards, working conditions, or physical injury or medical condition to your direct
supervisor, immediately.
Know, understand, and comply with the WEISS-JOHNSON Health and Safety Program, safe work
practices, procedures, and rules.
Co-operate with your employer for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of themselves and
other employees.
Correctly wear to the best of your ability the safety equipment, personal protective devices, and clothing
required by Alberta Occupational Health & Safety legislation and this safety manual.
Take every reasonable precaution to protect the safety of themselves and other employees and the
environment and document in the Toolbox Meetings and the Job Hazard Assessments.
Notify your supervisor of any unsafe conditions and practices that may be of danger to yourself and
other employees in your work environment.
Document and report all accidents, incidents, spills and injuries to your supervisor as soon as possible.
Ensure that all appropriate forms have been completed and filed.
If injured, report to Safety Director as soon as possible.
Phone # (780) 399-6148 He will direct the
worker to the closest Occupational Injury System (OIS) clinic.
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Section 1
Company Health & Safety Policy
Report to work “fit for duty”, and remain fit for duty during your shift, and be free from any conditions
that will adversely affect performance. If this should change in any way report to your supervisor,
immediately and if necessary see an Occupational Injury System (OIS) Doctor.
Report to their supervisor any conditions that may limit their fitness for duty including the use of any
“over the counter” or prescription medication that may affect their ability to work safely.
Assist with developing a positive Safety Culture by following the WEISS-JOHNSON Health & Safety
Program and good industry practices.
Contractor and Sub-Contractors
No worker will be allowed on site that is not covered by Workers’ Compensation Board of Alberta.
Contractors know, understand and comply with the WEISS-JOHNSON Health & Safety Program as it
pertains to the work site, and ensure that their employees abide by the safe work practices, procedures,
and rules.
An insurance certificate must be provided at the time of quotation with the condition stipulated by Risk
Management and it shall remain current for the duration of the contract.
Ensure that all your employees wear the appropriate safety equipment, personal protective devices, and
clothing as required by Occupational Health & Safety legislation, WEISS-JOHNSON or specific to the
project.
Notify the WEISS-JOHNSON Supervisor and a doctor, if necessary, of all accidents, incidents, spills
and injuries, as soon as possible.
Notify the WEISS-JOHNSON Supervisor of any unsafe conditions and practices that may be of danger
to their employees, other employees or the environment.
Supply copies of all accident or incident reports as may be required to the Safety Director of WeissJohnson.
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Company Health & Safety Policy
Ensure that safe work practices and job procedures are in place for the work being contracted and in
accordance with legislated requirements.
Assist the WEISS-JOHNSON Supervisor in hazard assessments, inspections and accident
investigations pertaining to the contracted work.
Ensure, where required by legislation, trades people must be properly licensed, but not limited to, first
aid, CSTS, WHMIS, job specific training, and the environment.
Set a good example by following the WEISS-JOHNSON Health & Safety Program and good industry
practices.
Visitors and Vendors
All visitors and vendors to any WEISS-JOHNSON worksite must follow the established safety rules for
the site and wear personal protective equipment appropriate to the hazards that may be encountered.
All visitors will document and sign an orientation at a Toolbox Talk prior to being escorted onto the
work site by a Safety Trained worker. Each visitor will be supplied with the proper Personal Protective
Equipment including:
x CSA Steel-toed boots or covers
x CSA approved Hard Hat
x Hearing Protection in required areas
x Eye protection in required areas
x High visibility vest in required areas
Once the visitor has completed the Job Hazard Assessment they must sign-in at the Front desk.
Visitors who do not comply with these procedures will not be allowed to remain on the site.
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Health & Safety Manual
Section 1
Company Health & Safety Policy
1.3 – This Document is reviewed periodically by management.
This document is reviewed in writing annually by management. Verified on Page 4
The Ownership and managers meet a minimum of once a month and have its annually Safety Review
following the Internal/ External audit each year. It has the overall responsibility to ensure that the
governance of the organization is in line with best practice and that all operational functions meet all
requirements under current legislation, company guidelines and health and safety standards. With the
aid of the audit a safety statement and an action list for the upcoming year is presented to Ownership
and the managers.
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.4 – Company posting of policy is verified through daily `
observation.
This manual is prominently displayed at the front desk of each main office building that Weiss-Johnson
is a part.
A copy of the company policy is also posted in plain sight in or around the lunchroom of each of the
companies that Weiss-Johnson owns.
Those employees in the field may also call the front desk of the main office at any time to reference the
details within the manual. Also, if our employees have access to a computer this manual is also made
available to our employees on our company website.
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Health & Safety Manual
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.5 – Accountability / Responsibility
Strategic Objective
This safety program has been developed and implemented to provide structure to our employee’s roles in terms
of safety and to eliminate unsafe work conditions, hazards and risks, thereby ensuring the well-being of our
employees and those that work with Weiss-Johnson in the construction industry.
Standards / Procedures
Health and safety roles and responsibilities are reviewed as a part of the annual performance review for
the workers. An on-going analysis of our safety program is done by our Safety Team Leaders and Safety
Supervisors through Inspections, Personal Protective Equipment Score Cards, Investigations, Toolbox
Meetings and regularly scheduled Safety Meetings for each Company. Points and safety levels may be awarded
and achieved by the individual based on their safety performance in the field.
Roles and Responsibilities
The health & safety program is the worker’s program. It is not something that a designated few can enforce.
Every employee has a vital link in this chain. The base-line rules for Manager, Supervisors, Safety Team
Leaders, Workers (including contract labor), contractors, sub-contractors, vendors and visitors must be adhered
to on all work sites. If there is a condition of non-compliance, however, Weiss-Johnson will introduce the
progressive discipline policy to aid in correcting any deficiencies in the Safety program.
Common Objectives:
a) When stepping onto a Weiss-Johnson Group of Companies work site one embraces the “Zero Accident”
work policy.
b) Reduce injuries to workers and the general public within the perimeters of the construction site.
c)
Reduce property loss or damage.
d)
Increased preparation and efficiency of projects.
e) Aid in project planning and employee training.
f)
Protect the environment.
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.6 – The Health & Safety Program is communicated to and understood
by Weiss-Johnson employees.
1.6.1 – Right to Refuse Unsafe Work
Responsibility of ownership and management to recognize this as
the # 1 Rule in Safety.
All Employees are reminded and tested on this rule during their Safety Orientation.
Right to Refuse Unsafe Work
Existence of imminent danger
35(1) No worker shall
(a)
carry out any work if, on reasonable and probable
grounds, if the worker believes that there exists an imminent
danger to the health or safety of that worker,
Occupational Health & Safety Act
Section 35
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.6.2 - Communication
This Health & Safety program will be reviewed with the workers and management during the performance
review process to be completed once every 12-16 months. Workers will have this communicated during
orientation for new hires.
Much of the Health & Safety Program is communicated daily to the employees through Job Hazard
Assessments, Toolbox talks and Safety Meetings. for existing workers, contractors and sub-contractors . Visitors
and one-time vendors will have appropriate orientation and supervision while on site.
Forms of Communication
x Formal Hazard Assessments
x Site-Specific Hazard Assessments
x Job Hazard Assessments
x Toolbox Meetings
x Safety Meetings
x Inspections
x Investigations
x Internal/External Audits
x Performance Reviews
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Health & Safety Manual
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Company Health & Safety Policy
1.6.3 Communication and Orientation
Employees must be informed of their right and the fact that they are not to work in any manner or
situation which may endanger themselves or others. They must also be instructed on the proper
procedure for refusing to do work which they deem to be unsafe.
Employees must have reasonable and probable grounds that an imminent danger to themselves or
other exists.
Employees who refuse work, which they perceive to be unsafe, must immediately report the situation to
their Supervisor, Safety Team Leader or Company Manager.
The situation must be documented and investigated as soon as possible by the Safety Supervisor or
Safety Director with the employee on the work site. The company representative (supervisor/manager)
will be invited to attend.
If the Safety Representative of Weiss-Johnson and the employee cannot reach an agreement on the
issue, assistance may be requested from:
x a member of the Human Resources or Company Manager or
x the Safety Director or the Safety Supervisor who is knowledgeable about the work or issue
being discussed.
If consensus cannot be achieved for a solution to the issue an Occupational Health and Safety Officer
must be informed about the situation and asked for clarification. The Safety Officer will investigate the
situation and decide whether a dangerous situation exists.
Employees, who still refuse the work, must be reassigned to other work.
Employees who refuse work cannot be disciplined or dismissed for their action. Other employees may
be assigned to the task if the original employee disagrees with the decision, but they must be informed
of the original refusal and subsequent investigation and decision.
It is very important that the procedure be followed by both parties in this situation. The employees must
know that they are to report unsafe acts or conditions immediately to their Supervisor and that remedial
action will be taken.
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1.7
Weiss-Johnson provides necessary resources to support the
Weiss-Johnson’s Health & Safety management system.
Weiss-Johnson uses the following resources as support for the Health and Safety program.
1.7.1 Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
Apprenticeship Training
NAIT’s School of Trades offers training in 35 program areas leading to journeyman certification, certificate or
diploma credentials. Sheet Metal, Gasfitting, Plumbing, Air conditioning and Refrigeration being the most
frequented by our staff.
NAIT’s instructors are certified, experienced and competent in their specific teaching disciplines and they are
exceptional teachers and mentors.
Apprenticeship is a method of gaining the expertise needed to become a skilled tradesperson. This is done
through a combination of on-the-job and classroom training. Typically, apprentices train for four years, spending
four to twelve weeks a year at NAIT, and the rest of the time training on the job.
In order to train as an apprentice, you must first be hired by Weiss-Johnson to provide you with job-site
training, and be registered as an apprentice through Apprenticeship & Industry Training.
Courses may be provided by the company if successfully completed.
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1.7.2 Leadership in Safety Excellence (ACSA)
This two-day course will assist managers and supervisors to integrate health and safety into their everyday
planning and to create and promote safe and healthy work environments. Course material is geared toward
management and supervisory positions.
This two-level program consists of a two-day course (Certificate of Completion) and documentation submission
(Certificate of Proficiency).
Course topics include:
x
the role of the supervisor
x
safety responsibilities of managers, supervisors and workers
x
the scope and significance of hazard assessments
x
company culture
x
inspections, reporting and follow-up
x
incident investigations
Course may be provided by the company if successfully completed.
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1.7.3 The Auditor Training Program (ACSA)
The Auditor Training Program is a three-day course designed for individuals who will be evaluating the effectiveness
of a company’s Health & Safety Program. Participants will be shown how quality audits reduce risk and incidents
through a systems approach.
This two-level program consists of a three-day course (Certificate of Completion) and Qualification Audit
submission (Certified Peer Auditor Certificate).
CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION – First Level of the Program
The three-day course covers:
x
introduction to the auditing process
x
responsibilities of all parties involved
x
chronological steps of an Audit process
x
how to use the ACSA Audit Document
x
workshop
The course has a very in-depth workshop in which all participants must demonstrate an understanding of
practical auditing procedure. Participants must also attain a minimum score of 80% on a written exam for course
certification (Certification of Completion).
Course may be provided by the company if successfully completed.
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1.7.4 The Safety Orientation Program
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. has a safety orientation program known as the Residential Orientation
of Construction Knowledge (The R.O.C.K.). Every employee must take the program prior to starting work
at Weiss-Johnson. The ROCK safety program is really a combination of the builder’s needs and the
Construction Safety Training System (C.S.T.S.) offered by the ACSA.
The employees are tested on construction safety training at Weiss-Johnson. Employees are shown
how to use the overall safety system and how to report an injury through the Occupational Injury
System (O.I.S.). They are shown how this system works to the advantage of the employee and the
company and how it can save precious minutes in the waiting room.
*Note-Employees are tested on The R.O.C.K. orientation program and must achieve a minimum of 90%
to pass to work at Weiss-Johnson.
Course provided by the company.
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1.7.5 Construction Safety Training System (CSTS)
The training is done individually and takes, on average, 5-6 hours to complete. The employee is instructed on
various health and safety topics and then tested for 100% mastery of content. This program gives our employer
the flexibility of training when and where it is most convenient.
This program provides workers with CSTS Generic WHMIS and will help reduce the amount of time and money
spent on conventional health & safety classroom training.
Course provided by the company.
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1.7.6 Fall Protection (OSSA and ACSA accredited)
The industrial/Commercial End-Use fall protection program has been created by Fall Protection Group Inc, a
leader in North American Fall Protection Training. The program is designed to address the fall safety needs
for industrial and commercial workers in the province of Alberta. This program was developed in accordance
with requirements acceptable to the Alberta Construction Safety Association (ACSA) and the Oil Sands Safety
Association (OSSA). This program is fully accredited by the OSSA and is simultaneously recognized by the
ACSA. The goal of this fall protection program is the ensure that recipients understand fall protection safety
principals as they apply to the work environment and to correctly use fall protection at all times.
Outline:
ƒ Fall Protection Fundamentals and Regulations
ƒ Methods of Eliminating Hazards
ƒ Equipment Specifications, Limitations, Care and Inspection
ƒ Proper Planning When Controlling Fall Hazards
ƒ Rescue Planning and Preparedness
Course Duration: 8 hours (Theory & Practical)
Certification: Upon successful completion, participants receive an OSSA recognized certification from the “Fall
Protection Group” valid for 36 months.
Course provided by the company.
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1.7.7 Standard First Aid and CPR
This course is designed to provide participants with more of the knowledge and skills necessary to assist anyone
experiencing a medical emergency. Although the information in this course is applicable to any setting, it is
ideally suited for industrial environments where, for example, personnel may be or will be exposed to chemicals,
poison/toxic substances, confined space situations or the operation and maintenance of equipment. This course
focuses on preventing further injury, easing pain and/or discomfort and promoting recovery. In addition, it provides
participants with the knowledge and skills required to perform basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
Course Outline:
In addition to the topics included in the Emergency First Aid and Level “A” CPR course, participants will be
provided with the knowledge and skills required to prevent or treat other medical emergencies, such as:
ƒ Musculoskeletal injuries
ƒ Head and Spinal Injuries
ƒ Burns
ƒ Poisoning
ƒ Sudden Medical Conditions
ƒ Soft Tissue Injuries
Course Duration: 16 Hours ( 2 day course)
Certification: Upon successful completion of the course, participants are awarded an industry recognized and
government approved certificate valid for 36 months.
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1.7.8 Back Injury Prevention
This one-day course is designed to inform managers and supervisors about the value of implementing a Back
Injury Prevention Program within their organization. This course is also beneficial for workers who undertake
manual lifting operations during their daily work activities. On Alberta work sites, back injuries are more prevalent
than other injuries sustained by workers.
Course topics include:
x
back injury statistics in the construction industry
x
injury prevention strategies
x
legal responsibilities of employers, managers, supervisors and workers for injury prevention
x
engineering controls and work site tools
x
proper lifting techniques and warm-up exercises
x
human factors associated with work (ergonomics)
x
incorporating back injury prevention into an existing Health & Safety Program developing modified/
light-duty work programs
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1.7.9 Principles of Health & Safety Management
This one-day course is designed to provide information and instruction about developing a simple, cost-effective
Health and Safety manual. Course material is directed towards the construction industry, and many construction
employers in the province have used this information as the foundation for developing their Health & Safety
programs.
Course topics include:
x
the purpose and benefits of a Health & Safety Program
x
required elements of an effective, company-specific Health & Safety Program
x
review of applicable sections of the OH&S Act, Regulation and Code
x
due diligence, responsibility and accountability
x
resources available for use in developing a Health & Safety manual
x
tools to develop, promote and implement a Safe Driving Program
x
strategies for communicating and implementing your safety program
Certification:
This course has a written exam component. Participants must achieve a minimum score of 80% for certification.
Prerequisites:
none.*
* Participation in this course is a pre-requisite of the Auditor Training Program.
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1.7.10 Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System
(WHMIS) Train-the-Trainer
This one-day course is designed for individuals who are responsible for providing WHMIS training and/or
establishing and maintaining their company’s WHMIS program.
Course topics include:
x
relevant legislation
x
warning symbols
x
labeling requirements for controlled products
x
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) interpretation
x
worker training requirements and techniques
x
information and instruction about developing site-specific programs for controlled products
Certification:
This course has a written exam component. Participants must achieve a minimum score of 80% for course
certification. Certification allows the trainer to conduct generic WHMIS training using ACSA materials.
Additional site-specific training will be required to achieve legislative compliance. Re-certification is required
every three years and can be achieved by taking the one-day course again, or by successfully challenging the
written exam
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1.7.11 Safety Program Terminology
Adequate (with regards to training of employees)
Training shall be “sufficient” – there has to be enough of it to ensure that the employee can perform the
duties expected without undue risk of injury.
It has to be “satisfactory” – of sufficiently high quality making use of effective communication techniques,
to leave no room for misunderstanding.
It has to be “proportionate”, to the degree of hazard involved.
It has to be specific to the work, equipment or tool that is to be undertaken or operated.
Training and retraining should be provided within a time frame that is appropriate for the work at hand.
This is critical when the task at hand is performed infrequently.
Aerial Work Platforms (AWP)
Work platforms that can be self-elevated to overhead work locations and have the primary controls on
the platform. This includes all self-propelled scissors lifts and boom-type elevating work platforms.
ANSI
American Nation Standards Institute
Authorized Person
Person approved or assigned to perform a specific type of duty or duties at a specific location or
locations at a work site.
CGSB
Canadian General Standards Board
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
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Code of Practice
A set of rules and standards concerning a given subject. For example, a Code of Practice for confined
space entry will identify the requirements for safely entering confined spaces in general. A site specific
procedure for entry of a specific confined space is then developed from the Code of Practice.
Competent Person
In relation to an employee, means adequately qualified, suitably trained and with sufficient experience to
safely perform work with only a minimal degree of supervision.
Imminent Danger
A danger which is not normal for that occupation, or
A danger under which a person engaged in that occupation would not normally work.
MSDS
Material Safety Data Sheet. A data sheet that contains detailed information related to the possible health
and safety hazards of a controlled product. The MSDS should be available from the manufacturer of any
chemical or mixture of chemicals used in industry.
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (United States). This can be a Federal or State
jurisdiction depending where the work is being performed.
Practicable
That which is reasonably capable of being put into practice or of being done or accomplished.
Professional Engineer
A Registered Professional Engineer
Project
The location or locations at which the Work is to be performed, including rights of way, leases and
temporary working spaces.
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Qualified Person
A competent person, who by reason of knowledge, experience and training is familiar with a procedure,
process or machine and the related hazards and hazard controls.
Shall
Denotes a mandatory requirement.
Should
A recommendation that is a sound safety and health practice; it does not denote a mandatory
requirement.
Sub-Contractor
The person, firm or corporation entering into a contract with Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. for the
performance of the Work.
Sub-sub-contractor
A person, firm or corporation having a contract with a Sub-contractor to perform a part or parts of the
Work or to supply material or products worked to a special design according to the Contract Document,
but does not include one who merely supplies materials not so worked.
Supervisor
A person, who instructs, directs and controls employees in the performance of their duties.
Transportation of Dangerous Good (TDG)
Federal legislation which is intended to protect the public from hazardous products during shipping. The
legislation is administered by the provincial and territorial governments.
UL
Underwriters Laboratories
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WEISS-JOHNSON
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Work
All labor, equipment and materials necessary to construct the facility in accordance with the Contract
Documents and includes without limitation all supervision, transportation and all things to be done,
supplied, furnished, or performed which are mentioned in or contemplated by Contract.
WHMIS
The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System. Federal Legislation that is administered by the
provincial and territorial governments and is intended to protect employees from hazardous products
during use and storage.
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Section 2
Hazard Assessment & Control
2.
HAZARD ASSESSMENT
AND CONTROL
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Section 2
Hazard Assessment & Control
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 2
Hazard Assessment
7(1) An employer must assess a work site and identify existing and
potential hazards before the work begins at the work site or prior to the
construction of a new work site.
Worker Participation
8(1) An employer must involve affected workers in the hazard assessment
and in the control or elimination of the hazards identified.
Occupational Health & Safety Code
Sections 7 & 8
Workplace Hazard Assessment and Control Verification
2.1
Formal written hazard assessments have been created.
2.2
The hazards are identified and documented.
2.3
There’s a risk level on the hazard assessment sheets.
2.4
There is a list of critical tasks that the field, shop and office personnel can
use to assist with the writing of the hazard assessment.
2.5
Weiss-Johnson uses ongoing hazard assessments at certain sites.
2.6
Appropriate employees take part in the on-going hazard assessment
process.
2.7
Controls are developed for these identified hazards.
2.8
Controls are implemented in a timely manner.
2.9
Documentation must show that employees are involved/informed of the
control strategies.
2.10 The company must implement a process for evaluating and/or monitoring
sub-contractors.
2.11 The company supports the ongoing application of the hazard assessment
process.
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2.1 Formal Hazard Assessment
Hazard Assessment and Controls
The safety manual program determines what Hazard Assessment means. It also identifies, eliminates
and or controls the safety hazards of a process, procedure or a work site to protect the health and
safety of the employees involved and to prevent injuries or other losses.
FORMAL HAZARD ASSESSMENTS must be done for jobs or work processes that:
Have the potential for serious health effects;
Are new work sites;
Are changed or which have never been previously assessed;
Have had new equipment added or the existing equipment has been modified,
Are done infrequently;
Involve inexperienced employees;
Are associated with frequent accidents;
Are critical, with the potential for serious injury;
Involve a change in an operating procedure;
Have the potential for severe property damage or environmental impact;
Have the potential for significant interruption to production.
Each job or work process must be considered to determine if inherent or introduced hazards exist or
have the potential to develop, and the necessary control measures must be determined and applied.
2.2 Hazard Assessment Guidelines (Daily-JOB HAZARD ASSESSMENT FORM)
Identify (Tasks)
Break down the job, procedure, or process into its tasks or components and identify all hazards
associated with each task or component.
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Eliminate
Plan to eliminate as many hazards as practicable. This is the best method of dealing with hazards, if it is
possible to implement. If hazards are eliminated it is impossible for them to recur.
Control
Control the hazards that cannot be eliminated. If hazards are controlled instead of eliminated, they can
recur. Control is the most common method of dealing with hazards or hazardous situations.
Safe Work Plan (Toolbox talk/Specialized FORM)
Follow a code of practice or develop a safe work procedure or safe work plan to lower the risk of an
incident occurring. By following the Safe Work Plan it will help reduce the hazard from occurring when a
standard control or procedure may be more difficult to implement or risky to apply.
Minimize through Training (FORM/LOG)
If an accident does occur, be prepared to reduce the effects by having trained first aid people with
appropriate first aid equipment available. Ensure all employee and supervisors are aware of the
emergency plan and their role in it.
Protect
Protect the employees with personal protective equipment, signs, barriers or guardrails. Ensure the work
will be performed by competent employees or directly supervised by a competent employee.
Signs
Institute methods to warn employees and other approaching or entering the work site or place of
business of the hazards.
2.3 Hierarchy of Hazard Elimination & Controls
How to Complete A Hazard Assessment
The 4 Steps of the Hazard Assessment Process
Step 1: Hazard Identification
o
Hazard Definition
o
Health and Safety Hazards
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o
Hazard Categories
o
Sources of Hazards
o
Types of Hazards
Step 2: Hazard Evaluation & Prioritization
o
Evaluation Criteria
o
Hazard Prioritization
Step 3: Hazard Control
o
Engineering Controls
o
Administrative Controls
o
Personal Protective Equipment
o
Hierarchy of Hazard Controls
o
Selection of Hazard Controls
Step 4: Review and Update of Hazard Assessments
o
Changes in the Work Environment
Types of Hazard Assessments
o
Ongoing Informal Hazard Assessment
o
Pre-Task or Field Level Hazard Assessment
o
Job Inventory and Task Hazard Assessment
o
Formal Job Hazard Assessment
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Hazard Assessment & Control
Effective October 15, 2015
Risk Assessment Matrix
There are many ways to assess risk, but the easiest and most effective for routine risk
management applications is the risk assessment matrix. The easiest way to understand the
application of the matrix is to apply it.
I. Imminent Danger - is combined with Reasonably Probable the priority is Extremely High because
it is 1B on the matrix.
RAM
Probability
Probable
Severity
Imminent Danger
Serious
Minor
Not Applicable
I
II
III
IV
Reasonably
Probable
Remote
A
B
C
Extremely
High
High
Medium
Low
Extremely
Remote
D
Combine severity and probability estimates to form a risk assessment for each hazard. By combining
the probability of occurrence with severity, a matrix is created where intersecting rows and columns
define a Risk Assessment Matrix.
The outcome of the risk assessment process is a list of risks developed from the output of the hazard
identification process. The first risk is the most serious threat to the mission, the last is the least serious
risk of any consequence.
Risk Priority List
Biggest hazard
Least hazard
worthy of action
By ranking the hazards, we can work them on a worst first basis.
This is vital because risk control resources are always limited and
should be directed at the big problems first to assure maximum
bang for the buck. In the fully mature ORM world, every individual
benefits from the knowledge of the priority of hazards that exist in
their life. A key obligation of leaders is to see that their subordinates
possess this knowledge.
The risk totem pole is designed to display the hazards of an
operation in a top down order of priority. The highest risk hazard
is placed at the top of the totem pole with progressively less risky
hazards displayed in order of priority below it.
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There is a risk level on the Hazard Assessment sheets to denote priority. An actual or potential hazard
that is revealed through the hazard assessment must be eliminated or controlled through:
Engineering controls such as but not limited to:
x Ventilation
x Guard-rails
x A Roll Over Protective Structure (ROPS), combined with an approved operator seat belt on
mobile equipment (Forklift)
x Non-secure Stairs to the basement
x Protective guards on machinery & shears
Administrative Controls such as:
Use of different, less hazardous product
x Training of employees
x Safe Work Plan
x Competency testing of employees
x Toolbox Meetings
x Job Hazard Assessment
x Safety Meetings
x Inspection
x Safety Committee Meetings
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
To be used if engineering or administrative controls do not adequately control the hazard. This tool is
designed to encourage proper usage of Personal Protective Equipment:
x CSA approved Hard Hats
x CSA approved Steel-toed boots
x Safety Glasses
x Cut Resistant Gloves
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x Reflective Vests
x Chainsaw Chaps/Hard Hats/Ear Protection
x Ear protection
x All forms of Fall Protection
o
Harness
o
Stirups
o
Lanyard
o
Caribiner(s)
o
Retractable Device
o
Rope
o
Anchor(s)
Any combination of engineering controls, administrative controls, or PPE that reduces the risk of the
hazard to as low a level as reasonably practical shall be implemented.
2.4 Critical Tasks located in the field, office and shop
2.5 Continuous Hazard Assessment (FORM)
Work environments and their hazards may not change that much in certain areas of the company, this
is when a Continuous Hazard Assessment is useful to allow work flow and production yet keeping staff
mindful of the potential hazards in that work area.
Examples of work areas that do not change much from their day to day work activities are the office
areas and the shop. If new conditions are introduced a New Hazard Assessment must be completed or
a Toolbox Talk must be arranged to administer the necessary controls for the hazard(s).
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Common Safety Hazards
Include these and/or others on the Hazard Assessment Sheet:
1. Working under a suspended load.
2. Entering a confined space without proper testing and without personal protective equipment.
3. Poorly erected and unsecured ladders.
4. Poorly erected and/or under-designed scaffolds.
5. Working at heights greater than 10 feet without safety harness or utilizing the Safe Work
Plan.
6. Inexperienced equipment operators.
7. Improper use of explosive fastening tools.
8. Improper housekeeping.
9. Working without personal protective equipment.
10. Horseplay.
11. Inadequate illumination of work area.
12. Insufficient fire extinguishers.
13. Inadequate ventilation of the work area.
14. Unsafe or defective tools.
15. Poor maintenance of personal protective equipment.
16. Improper use of information tags.
17. Handling rough materials without gloves.
18. Improper vehicle parking.
19. Overhead hazards.
20. Slips & falls risks.
21. Dangerous access.
22. Unsafe stairs.
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23. Working in awkward positions.
24. Working with hazardous material or gas leaks.
25. Working on uneven ground.
26. Driving on unsafe roads.
27. Working around animals
The following form(s) shall be used for assessing project hazards:
a) Weiss- Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Universal Hazard Assessment Sheet(s) - Daily
b) Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Toolbox Talk Sheet(s) -Weekly
c) Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Safe Work Plan(s)
d) Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. On-going Hazard Assessment(s) – Office
e) Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Inspection Sheet(s)
f) Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Safety Meeting Sheet(s)
Choose the appropriate form and complete it prior to the start of the project to assess
potential hazards. Obtain the appropriate personal protective equipment, and set up
necessary precautionary measures to eliminate or reduce the potential hazard.
2.6 Employees take part in on-going hazard assessment process.
2.7 Controls are developed for these identified hazards.
2.8 Controls are implemented in a timely manner.
Proof of whether this occurs is sporadic. A system that facilitates and encourages documentation and
action must be encouraged for residential to be effective and safety efficient. Most of this is currently
documented through e-mails safety personnel and through our Job Hazard Assessments.
2.9 Documentation shows that employees are informed/involved in control
strategies.
2.10 Weiss-Johnson implements a process for evaluating and/or monitoring
sub-contractors.
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Section 3
Safe Work Practices
3.
SAFE WORK PRACTICES
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Section 3
Safe Work Practices
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 41
Safe work practices
811. An employer must develop and implement safe work practices that
Include the assessment of hazards at the work site in accordance with Part 2,
(a) worker training, including hazard recognition and the selection,
(b) limitations, operation, inspection and maintenance of tools and
equipment,
(c) work positioning and fall protection, and
(d) the rescue procedures to be used in case of equipment malfunction, a
fall or injury that leaves a worker suspended and requiring rescue.
Occupational Health & Safety Code Section 811
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Office Area)
Weiss-Johnson Group of Companies
Office Environment
Tasks: Data Entry/ Stocking materials/ Bookkeeping/ Payroll/ File records/ Complete and mail bills, contracts,
policies, invoices or cheques. Operate office machines such as photocopier/ scanner/ facsimiles/ voice
mail and personal computers. Open sort and route incoming mail/ answer correspondence & prepare
outgoing mail. Deliver messages and run errands. Complete work schedules/ manage calendars/
arrange apptmnts. Train other staff members to perform work activities, such as using computer
applications/ Prepare meeting agendas/ attend meetings/ record and transcribe minutes/ Troubleshoot
problems involving office equipment/make travel arrangements/ Develop social committee and carry out
company events.
Potential Hazards
1. Minor Lacerations/cuts
a. May happen when handling boxes, incoming supplies and paperwork. Small metal cuts
may occur when handling staples, metal products and possibly hard plastic.
(Carefully handle such products and avoid rushing to get the job completed.)
2. Pinch points/Bumps or bruises
a. Inadvertently banging into desks, doors, drawers, boxes
b. Doors, drawers, or furniture pinching appendages or fingers.
(When moving items plan ahead and avoid being in a hurry.)
3. Trips or falls
a. Keep working areas and aisles clear of debris and fabricated products (There is shelving
space for completed products-file them correctly as they are completed)
b. Maintain a clean shop and office environment at all times.
4. Ergonomics
a. Ergonomics are important to every office environment. Whether it involves positioning of
keyboards, chairs, desks, tables they all aid in providing a comfortable work environment.
b. Maintaining a healthy environment involves Detection/ Prevention/ Activity. Early
Detection can prevent further damage from occurring. Many injuries are preventable if we
just practice good work habits. This is where applying ergonomics at work can positively
affect the staff. Finally, think about strengthening your body to avoid injury, it works.
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
Work Station 1 / Custom Fittings
Custom Fittings Bench
Tasks: Fabricate Custom Fittings / Plenum Take Offs (PTO’s)
Potential Hazards
1. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use cut resistant gloves/Kevlar sleeves or wear long sleeve shirts if one is inexperienced.
2. Pinch points
a. When banging the tin together this can occur. Avoid using non-dominant hand to hold
next to pounding area.
b. Pittsburgh bending requires worker to keep hands clear of all pinch points.
3. Trips or falls
a. Keep working areas and aisles clear of debris and fabricated products (There is shelving space
for completed products-file them correctly as they are completed)
b. Maintain a clean shop at all times.
4. Eye injury
a. Metal chards or slivers can fly through the air causing critical and irreparable eye injuries.
Safety Glasses are a must with this Work Station.
5. Ear Damage
a. Tools in this area are above 85 db and will cause temporary damage to the ear. The effect of
sensory damage may cause long-term damage to the inner ear. – (Must wear ear protection
when these tools are being used).
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
Work Station 2 / General Components
General Fabrication Bench
Tasks: Fabricating Pipe Supports / Increasers / General parts
Potential Hazards
1. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use cut resistant gloves/Kevlar sleeves or wear long sleeve shirts if one is inexperienced.
2. Pinch points
a. When bending metal with the folding bar it is possible to pinch a finger.
b. When using the roller one must be aware of the potential to pinch a finger in the mandrels if you
are not careful.
3. Trips or falls
a. Keep working areas and aisles clear of debris and fabricated products (There is shelving space
for completed products-file them correctly as they are completed)
b. Maintain a clean shop at all times and be especially mindful of the traffic that comes through the
office door the first hour of each morning.
4. Eye injury
a. Metal chards can fly through the air causing critical and irreparable eye injuries in this area. –
Safety Glasses are a must with this Work Station.
5. Ear Damage
a. Tools in this area and the work station next to it are above 85 db and will cause temporary
damage to the ear. Also when the worker drops the fabricated material into the collection
bins the noise created is above 90 dbs. The effect of sensory damage may cause longterm damage to the inner ear. – (Must wear ear protection when these tools are being used).
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
Work Station 3 / Duct Fabrication
Duct Fabrication Area
Tasks: Forming & Braking Duct / Cutting sheet metal / Forming metal
Potential Hazards
1. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use cut resistant gloves/Kevlar sleeves or wear long sleeve shirts if one is inexperienced.
2. Pinch points
a. When bending metal with the 8’ ft. brake or using the former it is possible to pinch a finger or be
pulled into the machine. Be aware of the guards that are in place and that they should not be
removed except by a certified journeyman.
b. When using the Former one must be aware of the potential for a loose glove to catch in the
machine if you are not careful. Be sure that gloves are tight or not worn at all on this machine
and hands are kept a safe distance away at all times.
3. Trips or falls
a. Keep working areas and aisles clear of debris and fabricated products (There is shelving space
for completed products-file them correctly as they are completed)
b. Maintain a clean shop at all times and be especially mindful of the traffic that comes through the
bay doors & office door the first hour of each morning.
4. Eye injury
a. Metal chards can fly through the air causing critical and irreparable eye injuries in this area. –
Safety Glasses are a must with this Work Station.
5. Ear Damage
a. Tools in the work station next to it are above 85 db and will cause temporary damage to the
ear. It is a good habit to wear ear protection because many times while working in this area a
worker may walk passed a person in another work station using a loud tool or fabricating
technique. This can have long-term effects. The effect of sensory damage may cause long-term
damage to the inner ear. – (Must wear ear protection when these tools are being used).
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
Work Station 4 / Warehouse
2nd Level Storage / Warehouse
Tasks: Storing Warehouse Product / Supplies
Potential Hazards
1. Trips or falls
a. Railings are in place but there shall be no leaning over or through the railings at any time while
performing duties on this level.
b. Keep working areas clear of debris and fabricated products (There is shelving space for
completed products-file them correctly as they are completed)
c. Maintain a clean 2nd level and work station at shop at all times.
2. Lifting / Back Injury
a. Maintain proper lifting technique
i.Do not over lift
ii.Do not lift anything awkward
iii.Ask for assistance whenever necessary
iv.Use a belt to help support proper technique
v.Use forklift & pallet Jacks whenever possible
3.Pinch points / Crush injuries
a. Careful not to be in blind spot of forklift.
b. Be aware of who is around when setting down & lifting up loads with forklift and pallet jacks.
c. Wear Vests when working around mobile equipment (Forklift) to avoid any crush injuries.
d. Understand and communicate hand signals between driver and helper. If verbal cues are used
one must be sure to be extremely vocal.
4. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use of cut resistant gloves is recommended but a choice at this work station. On-Going Hazard
Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm,AB)
Work Station 5 / Job Pulling Area
Rough-In & Basement Job Pulling
Tasks: Pulling Materials for Crew’s Jobs
Potential Hazards
1. Trips or falls
a. In this area we must reuse product as much as possible. Keep working areas clear of debris and
fabricated products (There is shelving space for products-file them correctly as they are
delivered or returned)
b. Maintain clean aisles at this work station at all times.
2. Lifting / Back Injury
a. Maintain proper lifting technique
i. Do not over lift
ii. Larger or over-sized boxes can be awkward (Ask for assistance whenever necessary)
iii. Use Pallet jacks and carts whenever necessary or possible
iv. Use a belt to help support proper technique
v. Use forklift whenever possible
3. Pinch points / Crush injuries
a. Careful not to be in blind spot of forklift.
b. Be aware of who is around when setting down & lifting up loads with forklift and pallet jacks.
c. Wear Vests when working around mobile equipment (Forklift) to avoid any crush injuries.
d. Understand and communicate hand signals between driver and helper. If verbal cues are used
one must be sure to be extremely vocal.
4. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use of cut resistant gloves is recommended but a choice at this work station.
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On-Going Hazard Assessment (Main Shop-5803 Roper Road, Edm, AB)
Work Station 6 / Duct Line Area
Duct Fabrication Area
Tasks: Running Duct / Running Button Lock
Potential Hazards
1. Lacerations/cuts
a. Use cut resistant gloves/Kevlar sleeves or wear long sleeve shirts if one is inexperienced.
2. Pinch points
a. When using the Former one must be aware of the potential for a loose glove or sleeve to catch
in the machine if you are not careful. Be sure that gloves are tight or not worn at all on this
machine and hands are kept a safe distance away at all times.
b. There are mandrels within this machine which have guards in place. When the guards are in
place the pinch points are limited. At the times when these guards are removed no hands must
be near these areas. They are removed during a jam. A certified trained Journeyman should be
overseeing this activity at all times.
c. While the machine is in production no hands should be in the tracking area or the shearing area
of the Duct Machine.
3. Trips or falls
a. Keep working areas and aisles clear of debris and fabricated products. There is shelving space
for completed products - file correctly as they are completed.
b. Maintain a clean shop at all times and be especially mindful of the traffic that comes through the
area from time to time.
c. While loading the coil one must be visible and loud while communicating with the driver of the
forklift. Deliberate, purposeful instructions must be given so there is no question what needs to
be done by the driver. If the driver is unsure he/she must come down from
the seat and confer with his navigator or see for themselves what is occurring.
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Safe Work Practices Program Confirmation
3.1
All required Safe Work Practices have been written.
3.2
These Safe Work Practices are communicated to the employees and are
understood.
3.3
Safe Work Practices are readily available/accessible to the workers.
3.4
Based on inspections, continued observation and documentation Safe
Work Practices are being followed by the workers.
3.5
Both management/supervisors and workers have been involved in the
development of the Safe Work Practices.
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INTRODUCTION
Everyone wants to get the job done “right”. To most people in our industry, that means, on time, on
budget and to the customer’s satisfaction. A major part of getting the job done “right” is also getting it
done safely. Getting the job done safely means that the people involved follow safe work practices.
3.1 Written Safe Work Practices
Safe work practices are ways of controlling hazards and doing jobs with a minimum of risk to people
and property. To reduce risks, we have a set of safe work practices. These have been developed to
fit the company’s particular needs. Management understands and fully endorses these safe work
practices, and ensures that:
Safe work practices are in writing
All employees understand the safe work practices that apply to them
All equipment and management support to permit compliance are available
Supervisors ensure that all safe work practices are followed
3.2 Safe Work Practices are communicated to the employees and are understood
JOB/TASK OBSERVATION
There is abundant evidence that undetected change in the workplace is a major source of causal factors
that contribute to a high percentage of incidents. These changes can slip into the workplace unnoticed and
unevaluated until problems result from them. Beneficial change can also occur as people discover better ways
of doing things. The key is to be certain that change is detected and evaluated to determine its full positive
or negative potential. An injury may occur because of a broken ladder, but the behavior patterns that resulted
in failure to recognize this hazard or even to maintain the ladder itself are the true causes of the incident.
As employees, we are responsible for safety and accountable for safety performance. Therefore, we must
understand the roots of behavior in order to manage it successfully.
Planned Observation is a tool for observing conditions and practices in an organized and
systematic way. Not only observing the changes but discussing these sometimes subtle
amendments to our work sites in our Toolbox Talks, JHA’s and Safety Meetings will assist us
with controlling hazards and seeing injuries before they occur in the workplace.
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Communicated to Employees
Safe Work Practices are communicated to the employees through:
x Safety Orientations (test their understanding)
x Safety Committee Meetings
x Board Meetings
x Safety Meetings
x Toolbox Meetings
x Inspections (evaluate comprehension in the field)
x Investigation Reports
x Review of Job Hazard Assessments
x Review of Occupational Health & Safety Code
x Annual Safety Audit (test their understanding)
x Safe Work Plan
x Occupational Health & Safety Reports / Inspections
SAFE WORK PLAN
A Safe Work Plan is a documented plan describing how to control hazards and manage risks for a
specific type of work. A Safe Work Plan is sometimes developed following a hazard assessment, and
should ensure that hazards and risks are carefully evaluated, that controls and contingencies are clearly
identified, and that the necessary actions and implementation strategies have been outlined.
Development Criteria
A Safe Work Plan must be developed when:
The hazards and risks of the work to be performed cannot be adequately controlled.
Deviations are required from approved WEISS-JOHNSON Codes of Practice.
The tasks to be performed are known as high risk operations. For example, work in deep excavations,
work using an extension ladder above 10 feet or work using a hole hawg.
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Development Method
Safe Work Plans should be developed by the following method:
A Safe Work Plan Leader will be appointed who is responsible to ensure technical integrity and content
of the plan.
The Safe Work Plan Leader will analyze the needs and select a team of knowledgeable individuals to
assist in the development of the plan. He may also consult the members of the Safety Committee.
The Safe Work Plan Leader ensures the objectives are established and clearly understood by all
members of the team.
The team must:
- conduct a Formal Hazard Assessment of the work by preparing an Activity Plan, analyzing each
activity, and identifying the relevant loss exposures and necessary controls.
- Refer to previously developed safe work plans as needed.
- Develop the action plan to control the loss exposure and minimize the risk.
- Perform an efficiency check of the action plan.
Safe Work Plan Content
Each Safe Work Plan must include all pertinent details and documentation relative to the activity,
personnel and equipment involved. The following should be included and recorded:
Title of activity/job
Reason for the Safe Work Plan
Major risk(s)
Personnel involved in developing the plan
Execution organization complete with roles and responsibilities
Date of preparation
Anticipated start and finished dates
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Communications (Who, When, How)
Work site (plan, equipment)
Work Scope – preparation, equipment req’d, reference to hazard controls & codes of practice
Detailed sequential work execution plan and schedule
Contingency plans, including rescue if necessary
Copy of hazard assessment
Job Hazard Assessment
Approvals required
PPE requirements
Implementation of the Safe Work Plan
The Safe Work Plan Leader is responsible to give the authorization to proceed with the work once all
requirements have been met. The Safe Work Plan Leader reports directly to his division manager in
regards to progress and scheduling of project or job.
3.3 Safe Work Practices readily available/accessible to the workers
HOUSEKEEPING
Poor housekeeping is a prime cause of trips, falls, slips, strains and fires, resulting in injuries.
Keep floor areas free of debris and scrap materials. Keep scrap and excess materials in containers.
Place welding, extension, and tool cords out of walkways. Hang them above or place them alongside
the walkways.
Make sure cords are not in water, are protected from sharp edges and not placed where they will get
caught in machinery.
If you are directed to a work area where there are housekeeping hazards arrange a clean-up before
proceeding.
Do not store flammables and combustibles together.
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Place Hazard Alert signs where required.
Make sure equipment or materials do not block access to emergency equipment, communication, or
escape routes.
Make sure equipment or materials in vehicles is stowed and secured properly to prevent injury or
damage in case of sudden stops or collision.
Make sure you have cleaned up and removed all scrap and excess material related to your job when
you leave a site.
Put tools and equipment back into place as you finish with it. Do an inventory of everything you have
prior to leaving.
COMPRESSED GASES & COMPRESSED AIR
Care shall be exercised in handling all compressed gas cylinders. They shall not be dropped, jarred, or
exposed to temperature extremes.
Cylinders shall have the valve cap or valve protection device in place at all times, except when in actual
use or connected to a welding set.
Cylinders shall not be rolled and shall not be lifted by the valve or valve-cap; a suitable cradle or other
device shall be used.
Cylinders shall have their contents properly identified.
Compressed gas cylinders, whether full or empty, shall be stored and transported in an upright position
and secured so they cannot fall or be upset.
Oxygen cylinders in storage shall be separated from fuel-gas cylinders or combustible materials
(especially oil or grease) a minimum distance of 6m (20ft.) or by a 1.5m (5ft) high non-combustible
barrier.
Cylinders shall not be placed where they might become part of an electric circuit or within 1.5m (5 ft.) of
an electrical.
Employees shall never force connections, which do not fit, nor shall they tamper with the safety relief
devices of cylinder valves.
Before the regulator is removed from a cylinder, the valve shall be closed and all pressure released from
the regulator.
A leaking cylinder shall not be used. Such cylinders shall be taken outdoors away from sources of
ignition. The supervisor shall be notified.
A flame shall never be used to detect gas leaks.
The recessed top of cylinders shall not be used as a place for tools.
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Oil, grease, or similar materials shall not be allowed to come in contact with any valve, fitting, regulator,
or gauge of oxygen cylinders;
- Oxygen shall never be used as a substitute for compressed air.
- When an oxygen cylinder is in use, the valve should be opened fully in order to prevent leakage around
the valve stem.
Acetylene cylinders shall be properly secured and always used, transported and stored in a vertical
position. Cylinders shall be protected from sparks, flames and contact with energized electrical
equipment:
- An acetylene cylinder valve shall not be opened more than one and one half turns of the spindle and
preferably no more than three fourths of a turn.
- Employees shall not use acetylene in a free state at pressures higher than 103 kPa (15psi).
For Gas Welding and Cutting only approved gas welding or cutting equipment and accessories shall be
used.
A flash back device must be installed at the regulator end and back flow prevention device must be
installed at the torch end on all oxygen and fuel gas hoses.
Welding hose shall not be repaired with tape or gear type (water hose) clamps.
COMPRESSED AIR
Compressed air at high velocity and pressure creates potentially dangerous situations. Compressed air
systems and tools are safe if properly maintained and the users are trained. The following guidelines are
to be followed to ensure the continued safe use of compressed air:
Compressed Air Tools and Systems must be maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications
and applicable regulations.
Air hoses shall have a minimum working pressure of 150% of the maximum pressure produced in the
system and be designed for compressed air service.
Air Receiver Tanks and Manifolds shall be equipped with an “EXCESS FLOW” valve, which will
automatically shut off the air in the event of a hose rupture.
All large diameter connections are to be equipped with “Whip Checks” and SMALL diameter
connections are to be pinned or provided with an alternate system to ensure a positive connection.
Air lines and hoes are to be relieved of pressure before being disconnected or disjointed. Hoses shall
not be kinked to relieve pressure.
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Breather Air Fittings must not be compatible with Tool Air Fittings.
Only clamps approved by the Manufacturer for compressed air service are to be used for attaching
hoses to fittings, this does not include gear type clamps.
Air pressure at the tool inlet, with the tool running, must not exceed the rated pressure capacity of the
tool, as specified by the Manufacturer.
When Quick Disconnect Couplings are used at a tool or at the end of a hose connected to the tool, the
female coupling is to be installed upstream or on the pressure side. The female coupling must contain
a valve, which closes automatically, when the coupling is disconnected. The male coupling shall be
attached downstream of the coupling.
Compressed air hoses are NEVER to be pointed at any part of an employee’s body and are NEVER to
be used for cleaning of employees’ clothing or person.
Compressed air hoses and fittings are to be inspected regularly, and damaged items are to be tagged
and removed from service.
When work involves removing debris with compressed air, the operator(s) must use the following
appropriate PPE:
- Eye Protection
- Face Shield
- Respiratory Protection
- Hearing Protection
- Appropriate protective clothing
“Cleaning Up” with compressed air is to be used as a last resort. Vacuum or water wash should be first
considerations so as not to redistribute the debris. Air pressure must be maintained at 210 kPa (30psi)
or less for clean-up. Only Pressure Limiting Safety Nozzles shall be used.
Air hoses must be arranged so as not to create tripping hazards for employees, and where they will be
protected from vehicles, tools, work processes, or mechanical damage.
Compressed air must not be used to transfer flammable liquids.
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Compressed gases, such as Nitrogen, or Oxygen shall NEVER be used as a substitute for compressed
air, for any purpose.
Air hoses shall be inspected and coiled up after use and then stored in a proper location until they are
required again.
Internal Combustion Engine driven air compressors must only be run in well ventilated areas.
FIRE PROTECTION
WEISS-JOHNSON will take all necessary precautions to protect employees and property from fire.
PRECAUTIONS shall include but not be limited to:
No fires shall be allowed on worksites unless authorized in writing by Client.
Assignment of fire or spark watches trained and equipped for all welding and cutting operations.
Proper identification, storage and handling of flammable materials.
Provision of adequate fire fighting tools and fire extinguishers.
All flammable materials must be stored in Underwriters Laboratories Approved metal containers.
All refueling of equipment shall be done with the engines off and no smoking within 7.5 meters (25 feet).
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FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
A liquid having a flash point below 60°C (140°F) are known as combustible liquids.
Handling flammable liquids in the workplace presents numerous hazards. Prior to receiving any
hazardous materials, consult the appropriate MSDS and follow the instructions. A drum of flammable
solvent arriving at the receiving dock potentially is a powerful explosive that careless handling or storage
can detonate. It has been said that 1 gallon of vaporized gasoline can explode with the same force as
20 sticks of dynamite. Because flammable liquids obviously are so hazardous, shop procedures must
include the safety factors necessary to keep flammables protected, if not isolated, from exposure to fire.
Designing a safety program to reduce the risk of fires simply requires an understanding of what needs
to be done and a focus on education. This two-part series of articles discusses the safe control of
flammable liquids in the plant, from storage to transfer and use, to disposal. This first article defines
flammable liquids and reviews safe storage practices and the equipment available to maximize safety.
The next article will outline the procedures to follow and the equipment to use for transferring, using and
disposing of flammables.
VAPOR PRESSURE
The force exerted at any given temperature by a vapor, either by itself or in a mixture of gases. The
vapor pressure is measured.
FLASH POINT
The lowest temperature of a flammable liquid at which it gives off sufficient vapor to form an ignitable
mixture with air near the surface of the liquid or within the vessel used.
The following precautions must be taken to prevent accidental ignition of flammable liquids.
Keep flammable liquids only in approved containers and do not dispose of any flammable liquid
containers are properly identified and labeled.
Proper warning signs must be posted around all flammable liquid storage areas.
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An 8kg (20 pound) ABC fire extinguisher must be placed within 7.5 meters (25 feet) of all flammable
liquid storage areas.
Obey all smoking restrictions and only smoke in designated areas.
Eliminate any potential source of ignition, and do not handle flammables near an open flame.
Do not use gasoline or other flammable liquids as cleaning fluids.
Dispose of rags or other items contaminated with flammable liquids in approved covered metal
containers.
Containers must be bonded to equalize their electrical potential whenever flammable liquids are
transferred.
GASOLINE AND DIESEL FUEL STORAGE TANKS
Signs that advise what the tank contains must be posted on the tank.
A sign warning that the contents are flammable and that engines are to be shut off and no sources of
ignition are within 7.5 meters (25 feet) when fuel is being dispensed.
A steel or plastic tank resting on the ground is not properly grounded. The tanks must have a proper
earth ground as defined by the Canadian Electrical Code. This is a 3m rod or an approved plate ground.
The tanks can also be connected to a building ground.
There must be secondary containment. The containment must be capable of holding 110% of the
contents of a single tank or 110% of the contents of the largest tank if there is more than one tank in the
containment area.
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The fuel delivery hose must be approved for fuel delivery and bonded to the tan and nozzle.
An 8kg (20 lb) ABC fire extinguisher must be located within 6m (20ft) of the fuel storage area.
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
All Fire Extinguishers shall be clearly marked and placed in a readily accessible locations.
All Fire Extinguishers shall be inspected monthly and the inspection recorded on the tag attached to
the extinguisher. Defective or damaged units must be removed from service and repaired by a qualified
agency.
Discharged, missing or unserviceable Fire Extinguishers shall be reported to the Supervisor
immediately.
CLASSES OF FIRES
Class A – These fires consist of wood, paper, rags, rubbish and other ordinary combustible materials.
Recommended Extinguishers – Water, through the use of a hose, pump type water cans or pressurized
extinguishers.
Class B – Flammable liquids, oil and grease.
Recommended Extinguishers – Dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide.
Class C – Electrical equipment
Recommended Extinguishers – Carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units).
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OFFICE SAFETY
WEISS-JOHNSON expects the same high level of safety in its offices as in the field and shop
operations.
Areas of concern for the office and the preventive actions are:
Falls: - Have adequate lighting in all areas.
- Keep office clean and free of clutter.
- Route electrical cords away from traffic areas.
- Repair damaged chairs.
- Fasten loose mats or carpets to the floor.
- Use proper ladders or step stools.
Fires: - keep exits clear and marked.
- Have and know how to use fire extinguishers.
- Use the provided ashtrays in smoking areas.
- Do not overload circuits.
- Post evacuation procedures and emergency numbers in the office.
Storage: - Load filing cabinets from the bottom up.
- Only open one drawer at a time.
- Do not overload shelves.
- Anchor shelves securely to the wall.
- Place heavy objects
Chemicals: - Make an inventory of WHMIS controlled products
- Obtain the Material Safety Data Sheets for all controlled products used in the office.
- Ensure all controlled products are properly labeled.
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MOTOR VEHICLES
WEISS-JOHNSON’s business involves considerable traveling; therefore the risk of accident or injury
involving motor vehicles is always present.
Drivers are required to know and comply with all provincial and municipal traffic regulations.
The following guidelines are designed to reduce the risk associated with motor vehicles:
Before starting the vehicle do a Pre-Trip Check. Include the following:
Windows clean and wipers working.
Check fuel, all fluid levels, belts, coolant, battery connections, lights, signal lamps.
Check ground for evidence of leaks.
Check all tires for proper inflation, wear or damage.
Check exhaust system for damage.
Check that a spare tire, jack and wheel wrench are on board.
Check that you have the necessary fire extinguisher, first aid, flares or warning triangles and inclement
weather equipment.
Ensure all equipment is stowed and secured properly.
Driving
Start the vehicle and let it warm up, checking that all gauges and systems are functioning normally.
Allow only as many passengers as there are seat belts-which must work.
Drive with headlights, not just day time running lights, on at all times.
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Always carry your driver’s license with you and be sure that the vehicle permits, insurance and
registration are in the vehicle at all times.
Lights, reflectors and glass must be kept clean at all times. This will require extra attention under certain
weather and road conditions.
Adjust your mirrors before your trip and use them often to monitor the traffic around you. Know your
vehicle’s blind spots, and take them into consideration when making any move.
The posted speed must not be exceeded at any time. Roads, traffic and weather conditions must have
priority over posted speed limits and schedules.
Tailgating or following too closely is extremely dangerous as well as illegal and will not be tolerated.
Eliminate backing up as much as possible. Always be sure of the conditions behind your vehicle and
remember, you, the driver, are responsible for any accident when backing up.
Maximum speed with Company vehicles is the posted speed limit.
Four way flashers are to be used if stopping on or beside a road even momentarily. If you are going to
remain stationary on a road for any reason, flags and/or reflectors should be placed immediately in line
with the vehicle, 75 feet behind and 75 feet ahead of your unit.
The most direct and practical route must be used to reach your destination unless otherwise directed.
Slow down and approach railway crossings with caution.
Never pass on hills, curves or intersections, when approaching a bridge or when prohibited by
pavement markings or signs.
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Always park your vehicle so as not to obstruct traffic or create a hazardous situation.
In case of vehicle break-down:
x Pull off as far to the right as possible.
x Set out flares or warning triangle and/or activate the four way flashers and raise hood.
x Notify WEISS-JOHNSON as soon as possible.
In cold weather or storm:
x Put on additional warm clothing.
x Set out flares or warning triangles and/or activate the four way flashers.
x Remain with vehicle and notify WEISS-JOHNSON if possible.
x If the vehicle will run, ensure the exhaust system is clear and working.
x Run the vehicle for short periods of time to help keep warm, ensuring at least one window is
open 25mm (1inch) or more.
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Motor Vehicle Accidents
Injury Accident:
If you are able to have someone to assist you:
- Set out flares or warning triangles to warn other traffic.
- If casualties are not in danger of further injury DO NOT MOVE THEM.
- notify emergency assistance and Company as quickly as possible.
- Apply care and first aid to injured as you are able and capable.
Non-Injury Accident:
- Photograph scene.
- If possible move vehicles out of traffic area after the scene is thoroughly photographed.
- Obtain necessary information.
- Notify WEISS-JOHNSON and authorities.
Do not discuss fault with anyone.
Do not leave the scene except as directed.
Transportation of employees
Any vehicle or boat used to transport employees shall be equipped with securely fastened seats to accommodate all employees.
Approved seat belts shall be provided and used by each employee transported in a motor vehicle.
Employees shall be seated entirely within the body of the vehicle when being transported, and shall not
disembark until the vehicle has come to a complete halt.
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When employees are being transported by motor vehicle, equipment or material shall not be carried
in the same compartment as the employees unless the equipment or material is placed or secured as
to prevent injury to the employees. No animals shall be transported in the operator’s cab or passenger
compartment.
No explosive or flammable liquids other than the necessary fuel supply shall be transported in a vehicle or boat transporting employees. All boats used to transport employees shall comply with the Small
Vessels Regulations of the Canadian Shipping Act.
An approved life jacket shall be worn by each employee when being transported by boat.
Refueling of Vehicles
All vehicles and machinery MUST BE SHUT OFF before being refueled and all smoking material extinguished.
Passengers shall not remain inside of any vehicle while refueling is in progress.
No refueling of vehicles or machinery shall be done inside shops or buildings.
Jerry cans are acceptable for fuel storage and use but must be an approved type and must be properly
marked as to contents.
Traveling on Radio Controlled Roads
The most common error that people make when travelling on radio controlled resource roads is to
assume that their radio is transmitting or receiving. Always call for a radio check at the entry point to the
road to confirm that your radio is working properly.
Ensure that your radio is equipped with the correct frequency before traveling on any radio controlled
road. If you do not have the correct frequency you must wait and follow a radio controlled vehicle. Make
arrangements with the driver to escort you. Do not just assume that the other vehicle has a radio. The
radio is for business purposes only, not for exchange of witticisms and pleasantries.
Keep conversation as brief as possible.
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Do not rely on radio clearance on the road, public vehicles could be on the road and may not be
equipped with radios.
Stay off the radio during radio emergency calls unless requested to relay messages.
Radios do not replace good driving practices. The posted speed limits must be obeyed at times and the
standard rules of the road apply.
MOBILE EQUIPMENT
These guidelines are to assist supervisors and employees in ensuring mobile equipment is operated,
maintained, and inspected in a proper and safe manner.
General
Operation, inspection, repair and maintenance will be carried out according to Manufacturer’s
Instructions, Company Policy, and Regulations.
All equipment will be properly shut down, and locked-out prior to servicing unless an alternate Safe
Guideline is in place.
Mobile equipment Lock-Out will include the following items as a minimum:
- All implements lowered to the ground or properly blocked to prevent lowering.
- All blocking will be spruce or fir, or proper steel stands.
- All hydraulic accumulators and hydraulic lines will have the pressure released before work commences.
- Safety bars will be installed on articulating machines.
- Ignition keys will be removed from equipment or the battery cables disconnected before work
commences.
- Signs warning other employees of ongoing work will be placed on the equipment doors or control
panel.
- Install wheel chocks.
Note: Hydraulic pressure must not be relied upon for equipment blocking.
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All equipment will e equipped with a horn or other audible warning device and a separate back up
alarm.
Equipment having a single cab entrance shall have an alternate means of escape.
Equipment cabs, floors and decks are to be kept free of any materials, objects or tools which may create
a tripping hazard, interfere with controls, or pose a hazard to the operator in an accident.
No unauthorized person is allowed on any part of running equipment, nor will any person board or leave
equipment in motion.
All mobile equipment designed and used for lifting, hoisting or similar operations will have the Safe
Working Load attached, legible and clearly visible to the operator.
The SAFE WORKING LOAD will not be exceeded.
Lighting and Operator Vision
All equipment will have lights, front and rear, sufficient to illuminate the path of travel in all conditions.
Mirrors will be mounted to provide the operator with a clear view of the rear and any “blind” areas.
Windshields and other windows will be kept clean to provide clear vision.
Breaking and Steering
The use of gas or fluid pressure to maintain application of a parking system is prohibited.
Steering wheel knobs are not allowed on any type of mobile equipment,
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Starting Systems
All mobile equipment will utilize starting systems that prevent start-up while wheels or tracks are
engaged.
Guards, Operator Protective Structures (OPS),
Roll-Over Protective Structures (ROPS), Seat Belts
Operators of mobile equipment, and employees, where applicable, will be protected against falling,
flying, or intruding objects, roll-over accident and exposure to hazards from moving parts.
Operation of Mobile Equipment
WEISS-JOHNSON will employ or sub-contract only competent mobile equipment operators. WEISSJOHNSON will ensure the operators receive adequate instructions, possess valid certification where
required, and work in compliance with WEISS-JOHNSON Policies and applicable Regulations.
Operation of equipment without authority will result in termination of employment.
Operators will be directly responsible for the safe operation of their assigned equipment.
All operators shall inspect area adjacent to machine, prior to starting up, to ensure that no employee or
the public are endangered.
Before starting equipment complete a walk-around-inspection.
All equipment shall be operated in such a manner that it does not endanger others – i.e. looking back
when reversing, using extreme caution when working near personnel.
Defective Equipment shall not be operated, it must be parked and the Supervisor must be notified.
An operator, who has reasonable cause to believe the equipment or load is hazardous, shall STOP and
SECURE the equipment and load and report the condition to the Supervisor immediately.
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When refueling equipment, the engine must be stopped, all smoking materials extinguished, and any
known source of ignition eliminated.
No one shall remain in the equipment cab while loads are passing overhead unless suitable protection
is provided.
Equipment blades, buckets or forks are to be lowered to the ground, and machines secured against
movement, any time they are left unattended.
On steep grades where brakes may not be sufficient for control, equipment will be snubbed or otherwise
assisted.
Barriers or other means are to be used to prevent employees entering any area where a hazard is
created by movement of any part of equipment.
Equipment is to be positioned so that no swinging part is closer than 600mm (2 ft) to an obstruction.
Operators shall not leave a suspended load unattended at any time.
Elevated equipment parts, including dump boxes, must be securely blocked before allowing employees
beneath them.
Hydraulic or pneumatic jacks shall not be used as blocking.
Always face equipment when mounting or dismounting. Use the three-point contact method for
mounting and dismounting. Never jump off a machine.
Equipment fitted with seat belts requires mandatory use at all times.
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Operate equipment with headlights on at all times.
No passengers are allowed to ride on equipment not equipped to carry additional personnel.
During winch or tow cable use, all employees on the ground must stay out of the whip area of the winch
or tow cable.
Leave a distance of 5m (15ft) when parking heavy equipment.
Wear all necessary Personal Protection Equipment (PPE), including hard hat, safety boots, safety
glasses, gloves and hearing protection.
Operate equipment within the manufacturer’s specifications and limitations, taking into consideration
weather and site conditions.
Whenever your vision is obstructed, including during the backing of equipment, the use of a competent
signal person is required.
LADDERS
Development of the Safe Work Plan for extension ladders was necessary due to the high risk of both
probability and severity in using this particular tool. A proper fastener has yet to be discovered that will
safely secure the ladder to a plywood sided new construction home. Safety harnesses and ropes have
become a greater risk and encumbrance in the completion of their tasks above 10 ft.
Falls from elevation are a leading cause of residential/industrial injuries, and a great number of these
falls are from ladders, both fixed and portable. WEISS-JOHNSON will endeavor to prevent falls and
accidents through purchasing, inspection, employee education and this safe work plan.
Guidelines for Safe Extension Ladder Use
The plan is that the lead hand will determine what 15-20 minutes of hole-cutting or activity needs to be
done above 10 feet. When s/he is ready both of the crew members will work together at using the
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extension ladder and do all the extension ladder work at one time using the 2 person system.
When one cannot reach a particular area the worker comes down and the ladder is moved. The ladder
is held again by the 2nd crew member until all work above 10 feet is complete.
The ladder will be raised up using the 4 and 1 rule. For every 4 ft. you go up the ladder is pulled out 1 ft.
The bottom of the ladder is levelled prior to ascending and the base of the ladder is held the entire time
by his/her fellow crew member.
Falls from elevation are a leading cause of industrial injuries, and a great number of these falls are from
ladders, both fixed and portable. WEISS-JOHNSON will endeavor to prevent falls and accidents through
purchasing, inspection, employee education and this safe work plan.
Portable ladders purchased new will conform to CSA/CAN3-Z11-M81 (R2001) Portable Ladders.
Ladders to be used in proximity of power lines or in electrical rooms will be made of non-conductive
fiberglass construction.
All ladders (portable and fixed) will be inspected on a regular basis, using the Hazard Assessment form
to communicate when a new ladder is needed, as well as checking ladders before each use.
USE GUIDELINES
Prior to use the proper length of ladder must be determined; the ladder must project at least 1m above
the landing to which it is to provide access.
The overlap distance on extension ladders must not be less than:
1 m (3.3 ft.)
on ladders up to
11m (36 ft.)
1.5 m (5.0 ft.) on ladders up to
11-14.6 m (36 – 48 ft.)
1.7 m (5.6 ft.) on ladders up to
14.6-20 m (48 – 66 ft.)
The work area must be inspected for overhead hazards such as power lines or overhead cranes.
Ladders with defects such as cracked, loose or broken rungs, must be tagged as defective and removed
from service. Non-skid feet must be in proper working condition.
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Single or extension ladders must be inclined at 75° by placing the bottom of the ladder ¼ of the working
height out from the base of the vertical support surface.
Portable ladders over 6m (20 ft.) or in high traffic area, must be secured in place during use or be
supported by one or more employees.
Moving and setting up of heavy or long ladders must not be carried up any ladder. Hands are to be kept
free for climbing; the tools and equipment must be hoisted in an approved container.
If both hands are needed for the task, fall protection attached to a proper anchor point must be used.
No work is to be done off the top two rungs of any single, extension or stepladder.
Ladders are never to be used as horizontal bridging devices.
Stepladders are only to be used in the fully opened position with the spreader bars locked.
Permanent Ladders
Must be vertical
Must have side rails which extend 90cm (36 in.) above the landing;
Must have rungs which are at least 18cm (7in.) from the wall and spaced at regular intervals of 30cm
(12in.);
Must meet the requirements of PIP Standard STF05501 (February 2002), Fixed ladders and Cages.
POWER TOOLS
The following are guidelines for safe operation of power tools to reduce the risk of electric shock.
Ensure you know how to use the tool. Ask your supervisor if you don’t.
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Identify areas where explosion proof equipment may be required. Use this equipment whenever
possible.
Before using power tools check for:
- defective cords,
- damage to tools,
- proper grounds,
- functioning safety devices.
Tag Defective Tools
Have any damaged tool repaired or replaced prior to use.
Extension Cords:
- Use heavy duty single length cords whenever possible.
- Make sure all extension cords are wired properly, suitable for damp & other hazard conditions.
- Use only properly grounded plugs.
- When using tools in a damp area:
x Ensure all equipment insulation is sound.
x Wear rubber gloves
x Use insulated platforms.
x The risk of electric shock is greater in damp areas and the effects more severe.
Shut off or unplug electric tools, which you leave unattended even for a short time.
Follow all manufacturer specifications and do not tamper with or remove any safety devices.
Follow the WEISS-JOHNSON LOCK-OUT GUIDELINES when repairing or servicing any Power Tools.
CHAIN SAWS
Chain saws are used by employees of WEISS-JOHNSON for various jobs.
Three major hazards are associated with the use of these tools:
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Noise
- Sometimes in the range if 100-115 dB.
- Hearing loss is permanent and worsens over time.
- Must use Ear protection at all times
Prevented by:
Maintaining the muffler on the saw and using properly fitting ear protectors.
Vibration
- Will over time cause circulatory problems in the fingers and hands leading to a condition called
Vibration White Finger Disease or Raynaud’s Disease.
Prevented by:
Ensuring the saw has vibration dampening features and maintaining the engine mounts.
Keeping the chain sharp
Not holding the saw so tight that the hands cramp
Keeping warm during work
Cuts
- Most common type of chain saw injury. Can range from nicks to amputations. Kickbacks take less than
1/5 of a second, and can create very serious injuries.
Prevented by: Proper training of operators in use and maintenance of chain saws, how to treat the
injuries, should they happen, and use of proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).
PLANNING AND TRAINING
Prior to any operation using chain saws, i.e., land or right of way clearing, a hazard assessment will be
done and plans made and communicated to all involved. These plans will include:
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SCOPE AND NATURE OF WORK
Spacing of employees, NO CLOSER THAN TWO TREE LENGTHS IN FALLING OPERATIONS.
Emergency Procedures.
Ensuring employees are trained in all aspects of the work and procedures and have proper PPE.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
The following is the minimum requirement when using a chainsaw:
x Hard hat;
x Hi-visibility clothing;
x Hearing protection;
x Face protection;
x Leg protection – approved failers pants or chainsaw chaps;
x Safety footwear;
x Hand protection;
x Emergency first aid kit, with pressure dressing;
x Fall protection equipment, if necessary:
o
Harness
o
Lanyard
o
Caribiner(s)
o
Rope
o
Retractable
o
Anchor
x Communication – whistle or radio.
GUIDELINES FOR SAFE CHAIN SAW USE
x Keep the saw chain sharp.
x Adjust the saw so that, when idling, the chain is stopped.
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x If the saw is fitted with a chain brake, keep it in good working order. (If the saw was originally
equipped with a chain brake, the brake must not be modified or removed.)
x Wear gloves while working and when filing, handling or changing the chain.
x Wear boots with good sole grips.
x Wear leg protectors.
x When carrying the saw, keep the chain bar to the rear. If you stumble, you won’t fall on the chain.
Also, the dogs and chain won’t hang up in brush.
x Don’t carry the saw on your shoulder unless the chain is removed or sheathed.
x Shut the motor off when carrying the saw any distance. This will prevent brush from hooking the
trigger, which could cause the chain to speed up and possibly cut you. (Stopping the motor before
limbing and bucking begins is a good practice. It gives you a chance to hear any debris which may
be falling toward you. It’s also a convenient time to listen for your “buddy”.)
x Don’t work off-balance or with poor footing.
x Learn to use the saw equally well, right- or left-handed, to avoid working in awkward positions.
x Maintain a firm, but not tense, grip with both hands on the saw.
x Keep thumb under the handle bar of the saw. This will stop the hand from slipping onto the chain in
cases of kickback.
x When pulling the saw out of cuts, or repositioning, do it smoothly.
x Don’t jerk the saw. Jerking the saw can cause loss of control, uncertain footing and possible back,
arm or shoulder strain.
x Start a wedge in the backcut as soon as possible. It will act as a guard if the saw kicks back.
x The tip of the bar causes most kickbacks. Know where the tip of the bar is at all times, especially
when working in large timber or when limbing.
x Use the right bar for the job. In large timber it is safer to use a long bar. A long bar will make
undercuts, reaching the far corners and bucking windfalls safer and easier.
x Hold the saw firmly against your body when using it in the boring position. This will reduce impact
from kickbacks.
x Don’t bore unnecessarily.
x Never stand directly behind the saw or straddle the saw. Work to one side to minimize injury from
kickbacks.
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With the exception of chain brakes, chain saws contain few mechanical safeguards. The nature of
the work and effectiveness of saw design is such that the cutting chain cannot be guarded. For safe
operation good saw handling skills must be developed.
GUIDELINES FOR CHAIN SAW MAINTENANCE
Proper maintenance takes little time, but will extend the life of the saw and make work easier. It’s good
practice to check over the saw at the end of the day.
Daily maintenance schedule for all makes of chain saws:
x Read the manuals and specifications for the saw. Use the fuel mixture and lubricating oil
recommended by the saw manufacturer.
x Clean off the saw.
x Do a quick check for loose bolts, missing screws, broken castings, etc.
x Clean the air filter.
x Fill with fuel and oil.
x Inspect the chain for excessive wear or damage, and replace any damaged chains.
x File the chain if necessary.
x If using ground chain, clean the grooves and oil holes and turn the bar over daily. If using filed chain,
do the same at least twice a week. Check the bar for burrs and remove them.
x Grease the tip.
x Check the floating sprocket for signs of wear at least once a week. Replace if necessary.
x Keep the chain brake clean and lubricated.
GUIDELINES FOR CHAIN SAW REFUELLING
x Allow hot saw to cool two or three minutes before refueling.
x Refuel saw only on a spot cleared to bare ground.
x After refueling, tighten the tank cap to prevent fuel spilling onto clothing.
x Clean spilled fuel from motor before starting.
x Check fuel lines, tank cap and connections for leaks.
x Move saw at least 3 m (10 ft.) from refueling spot before starting.
x Keep outside surface of saw clean of oil and sawdust.
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x If saw requires mechanical adjustment, set it on a stump or bare ground.
x Store fuel in approved containers.
x No smoking at any fuelling point.
x Have a Type A or AB Fire Extinguisher close by.
x NEVER operate chain saws WITHOUT TRAINING and PPE.
Personnel Check System
Weiss-Johnson will institute a Personnel Check System for the safety of its employees who
need to work alone because of their job duties and tasks. At no time should any of these
employees not have a form of communication that links them to the office, a manager, a
supervisor or peer. If this cannot be arranged the employee cannot work on that work site.
SCAFFOLDS
WEISS-JOHNSON will only utilize competent scaffolding Contractors.
Scaffolding Contractors providing service to WEISS-JOHNSON must have a fully developed Scaffold
‘Code of Practice’ that addresses:
- Hazard Assessments
- Fall Protection
- Apprentices
- Numbering
- Inspection and Tagging
- Planking
- Erection and Dismantling
- Record Keeping
WEISS-JOHNSON employees erecting and using single frame scaffold will consider the following:
- Inspection of the worksite for stability, debris, adjacent or overhead electrical services, unguarded
openings, adjacent equipment, employees or operations that may affect WEISS-JOHNSON work.
- Fall Protection Requirements
Scaffold Planking
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Planks to be used in scaffold construction must be selected using one of the three alternatives listed.
1. Use of double 51mm x 254mm nominal (2inchx10inch nominal) dressed planks, graded No. 2 or
better, from any of the species group; Douglas Fir – Larch; Hem-Fir; Spruce-Pine-Fir; or Coast Sitka
Spruce. Precautions must be taken where scaffold planking overlaps for continuous runs as the
75mm (3in.) height differential may create a possible tripping hazard if not done properly.
2. Use of a single thickness of sawn plank having actual dimensions of 51mm x 254mm (2inch thick
by 10inch) wide, graded No. 2 or better from any species group Douglas Fir-Larch; Hem-Fir; SprucePine-Fir; or Coast Sitka Spruce.
3. Use of manufactured laminated wood or combination wood and metal planks designed for use as
scaffold planks.
Erection
- Ensure scaffold is level and will not slip, slide or settle.
- Rolling scaffolds shall have a means of locking the wheels to prevent movement while employees are
on the deck.
- Ensure all braces and other necessary components are in place before using the scaffold.
Dismantling
- Inspect all components during dismantling for damage.
- Remove from service any defective components and notify the Supervisor.
- Stack away equipment properly where it will not be damaged by other work or equipment.
BACK CARE
One of the most common causes of lost time in the workplace is back injury. It is also one of the most
difficult conditions to diagnose and treat.
Poor body mechanics and posture are the prime reasons for back injury.
Following are some guidelines for back protection while reaching, stooping, pushing, pulling and
pivoting:
Maintain alignment and balance
- A stable base of support with feet separated and one foot slightly ahead of the other;
- Weight evenly distributed on both feet;
- Both knees slightly flexed;
- Buttocks tucked in;
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- Abdomen held up and in;
- Rib cage raised;
- Head held erect.
This standing posture, with the body in good alignment and balance, is the basis for all of the
movements used in working.
Work at comfortable height
- For most people approximately 76 to 82 cm (28 to 32 in.) above the floor. This level minimizes muscle
strain and allows the body to remain aligned and balanced.
- If the work level cannot be changed, provide a stable platform to raise yourself or stoop keeping the
body in good alignment.
Keep the work close to the body
- Carry objects to the object’s center of gravity falls within the base of support. It is easier and the
stronger muscles of the thighs and buttocks help support the weight, rather than the arms, shoulders
and back.
Use smooth coordinated movements
- Avoid yanking and jerking objects.
- do not try to catch falling objects that are too heavy, or if you are not prepared.
- When working with another person, coordinate the movement using team-work. Count down to lift or
pull. Maintain eye contact with your partner if possible.
“Set” or prepare the muscles for action
- Take a deep breath before the big lift or pull. This “sets” or tenses the abdominal muscles.
- It helps to distribute the load over more muscle groups protecting ligaments, joints and muscles from
sudden jerking and strain.
If a load is too heavy, big or awkwardly shaped, get assistance; do not attempt to move the item. Do not
take a chance of being injured, you only have one back. Take care of it.
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Forklift Loads
Loads are to be assembled, secured against shifting, and handled so that no part of the load can fall off
and create a hazard to employees during transportation.
A unitized load will not rise more than one half its height above the forklift carriage or backrest.
A load consisting of loose objects must not project above the forklift carriage.
Work platforms mounted on a forklift shall be:
- Constructed according to a design prepared by a Professional Engineer, and load rated.
- Attached to the fork carriage.
- Provided with standard guard rails and toe boards.
- Provided with a screen to prevent occupants contacting the hoist mechanism.
- Only used for the forklift for which it was designed.
Employees in the platform shall wear full body harnesses and shock-absorbing lanyards attached to
proper anchor points on the platform.
Note: Work platforms used in British Columbia must conform to WCB Standard A323.
CODES OF PRACTICE
Anyone who works in an area governed by a WEISS-JOHNSON Code of Practice
requires and will be given training in that Code of Practice. The Codes of Practice
are:
Lock-Out (When tools break down)
Hearing Conservation
Cold Weather Work
Blood Borne Pathogens
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Harassment & Violence in the Workplace
Occupational Injury System (What to do when someone gets hurt)
Broadened Job Description (Employees are trained to do various tasks)
LOCK-OUT
SCOPE
This Lock-Out Code of Practice is intended to supplement the Occupational Health and Safety
Regulations. It is for the protection of personnel who are working on any equipment and for the Safety
and Protection of the Client’s operating equipment. The Guidelines are to be followed by all WEISSJOHNSON employees, vendors and Sub-contractors. Lock-Out Requirements come into effect when
a system or pieces of equipment represent a potential hazard to life and property, and applies to all
energy sources. The following guidelines set out the necessary action to be taken in order to lock-out in
a safe manner. These guidelines are intended to supplement but not replace the regulations set out be
Occupational Health and Safety and the Client’s requirements.
DEFINITIONS
Personal Lock
A key type of padlock can be issued to an employee, to be used only for locking energy sources in an
inoperative or safe position. The only keys for a personal lock are in the possession of the employee to
whom the lock was issued.
#Tag
A tag used to convey information about the equipment or process that is locked out. The tag must be
attached to the personal lock. Tags without locks do not constitute lock-out.
GUIDELINES
When circumstances require the applications of lock-out procedures, the isolating device shall be
secured in the inoperative position by the use of a lock. Such locks shall be marked and tagged to
identify the person applying them.
Locks issued to an individual employee shall be operable only by that employee’s key and by a master
key for emergency use, which shall be securely kept by WEISS-JOHNSON Combination locks shall not
be used at any time.
It is imperative that all employees using the lock-out system, have locks suitably identified which indicate
the individual’s name.
Each employee protected by a lock-out on equipment will ensure that the equipment will not start prior
to commencing work on the unit or its associated parts.
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No WEISS-JOHNSON personnel will work on any equipment that represents a Safety Hazard unless
that equipment is properly locked-out.
WEISS-JOHNSON Supervisors are to determine what equipment needs to be locked-out before
proceeding with any work.
All WEISS-JOHNSON personnel who will be working on the equipment are required to place their own
lock on isolating devices.
Information Tags are to be attached to advise others that the pieces of equipment have been isolated
and locked-out. Tags will have the name of the Supervisor, employee(s) and date recorded on them.
When the work is completed and after all personal locks have been removed the Supervisor will
make a final check of the equipment before removing his lock to ensure that is safe to operate before
proceeding with clearing of lock-out.
Employees must remove their locks when they leave the worksite or are no longer working on the
equipment.
If the employee has left the Site (quit, discharged or injured), his personal locks must be removed from
service until the keys are recovered.
No one shall remove any personal lock other than his own.
LOCK REMOVAL BY OTHERS
The owner of the personal lock must be positively identified.
All reasonable efforts have been made to contact the employee who placed the lock, (i.e. camp, home),
and have him come back and remove his lock.
If the employee cannot be contacted or is incapable of removing the lock, the WEISS-JOHNSON
representative must ensure that no other employees will be endangered if the lock is removed and that
no process or machinery will be damaged.
All information regarding the personal lock removal must be documented.
HEARING CONSERVATION
SCOPE
The purpose of this Hearing Conservation Code of Practice is to protect workers from excessive noise
and to prevent hearing loss.
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Sound is a physical disturbance in the air caused by a vibrating object, which becomes noise when
it is considered unpleasant or becomes harmful. Noise is one of the most common hazards in the
construction industry.
The main effect of noise is on the ears and the ability to hear. Ongoing exposure to excessive noise
levels causes a gradual hearing loss. At first, noise induced hearing loss affects the ability to hear very
high pitched sounds and is usually not noticed as those high pitches are not used in normal speech.
With continued exposure to noise, hearing loss gets worse and eventually spreads in the lower pitches
that are needed for speech. Quite often a great deal of hearing loss can occur before any appreciable
loss of hearing is apparent.
Once hearing is lost because of noise, it cannot be replaced or repaired.
DEFINITIONS
Decibel
Decibel is the conventional unit of measurement for sound. Decibels are based on a logarithmic scale,
rather than a linear scale, which means the differences between values increase exponentially. Because
decibels use an exponential scale, sound pressure increases 100-fold every 20dBA, but this does not
mean that the sound feels 100 times as loud to the ear. For example; normal conversation will measure
about 60dBA, while the sound of a silenced compressor will measure about 80dBA. This represents
a 100-fold increase in sound pressure reaching the ear, although few workers would recognize the
compressor to be 100 times as loud as a human voice. Humans tend to feel a “doubling” of noise with
every increase of 10dBA, but the actual sound pressure reaching the ear double every 3dBA.
dBA
The scale generally referred to when measuring occupational exposure to noise. Sound level meters are
usually calibrated to measure dBA and measure the human ear’s response to sound pressures.
Exchange Rate
The principle that exposure limits should be cut in half every time sound pressure increases by a fixed
amount. For example; using a 3dBA exchange rate, if the maximum permissible exposure at 85dBA
is 8 hours, then the maximum permissible exposure at 88 dBA would be 4 hours. The Canadian
Standards Association, CSA, have adopted the 3dBA Exchange rate, therefore most Health and Safety
jurisdictions in Canada are favoring the 3dBA Exchange Rate instead of 5dBA.
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Frequency
The number of times per second that the medium undergoes a pressure disturbance (sound wave).
Frequency gives sounds their distinctive qualities and is usually expressed in Hertz (Hz). One cycle per
second is equivalent to one Hertz. A healthy human ear can detect sound ranging from 20 Hz to 20,000
Hz. A high pitched back-up alarm may have a frequency of about 6000 Hz. A transformer may have a
frequency of about 60 Hz.
Noise
Unpleasant or harmful sound.
Pitch
Often used to describe frequency.
Sound
Is created by anything that causes a pressure disturbance through a medium, whether solid, liquid
or gas. The pressure disturbance travels in the form of sound waves. When sound waves strike the
eardrum, it vibrates back and forth initiating the hearing process.
Sound pressure
The strength or intensity of sound waves.
NOISE MEASUREMENT
The only way that we can determine if a noise hazard is present is to measure both the intensity
and frequency of the noise. This is done with a Sound Level Meter. Generally the noise level of most
construction activities and sites exceeds the 8-hour allowable exposure limit, which is set by regulation
at 85 dBA.
Typical Noise Level Measurements for Construction Equipment. All measurements were recorded at the
operator’s position in the mobile equipment.
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EQUIPMENT
NOISE LEVEL (dBA)
Cranes
78-103
Backhoes
85-104
Explosive-actuated tools
120-140
Grinders
106-110
Cutoff saws
100-115
Concrete saws
97-103
Jackhammers
100-115
Compressors
85-104
There is a difference in noise levels due to style, make and model and maintenance of the various
machines. Generally newer equipment is quieter than older equipment.
WEISS-JOHNSON will conduct noise level surveys of the equipment they operate and for the
operations that they conduct.
Noise levels must be reassessed whenever:
Machinery is installed or removed.
New (to the company) mobile equipment is added to the fleet.
A building’s structure is changed.
The length of time that workers spend in a noisy area changes.
People who use the sound level meter must be trained in the calibration and use of the instrument.
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
The actual noise level readings for the equipment or groups of similar equipment, and processes used
by WEISS-JOHNSON must be posted in a convenient location or the works must be informers of the
levels through their safety meetings.
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Warning signs must be posted where practical that an area or machine is a high noise area and that the
use of hearing protection is mandatory.
Workers must be instructed in the following:
The effects of noise on hearing.
The need for hearing protective devices.
The proper use and maintenance of the devices.
The purpose of hearing testing.
NOISE CONTROL
Engineered controls:
- Reduction at source.
- Enclosure of the noise source.
- Enclosure of workers.
- Separating the workers from the source.
- Installation of acoustical barriers or sound-absorbing materials.
Administrative Controls:
- Reduction of length of exposure of workers.
Or by providing Personal Hearing Protective Devices.
HEARING PROTECTION
If reasonable steps for reducing noise levels or reducing exposure times do not effectively prevent noise
exposure, the next option is to provide personal hearing protective devices for the exposed workers.
Personal hearing protective devices can be either plug or earmuffs, but they must:
Reduce the noise so that the worker’s hearing is protected.
Be approved by the Canadian Standards Association.
Must be worn in noisy areas.
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The recommended criteria for selecting a class of hearing protector based on a daily 8-hour exposure to
noise levels is:
MAXIMUM NOISE LEVEL (dBA)
CLASS OF HEARING PROTECTOR
Less than 85dBA
No protection nrequired
Up to 90dBA
Class C, B or A
Up to 95dBA
Class B or A
Up to 100dBA
Class A
Up to 105dBA
Class A
Up to 110dBA
Class A plug & Class A or B Muff
More than 110dBA
Class A plug & Class A or Class B muff and limited
exposure.
Or based on the Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) system is:
CSA CLASS
NRR (approximate)
A
24+
B
17-24
C
less than 17
FIT, CARE AND USE
After selecting a hearing protective device, a number of checks are required to ensure the best possible
protection.
EARMUFFS
The earmuff must conform to CSA Standard Z94.2-02
For maximum protection it is important that earplugs are properly inserted. Since the ear canal is slightly
s-shaped, the ear must be pulled back to straighten out the canal before insertion of the plug.
Reusable earplugs should be washed with warm soapy water daily to prevent the possibility of ear
infections or the introduction of foreign bodies or substances into the ear canal. When not in use the
earplugs should be kept in a clean container.
Earplugs that are soiled and cannot be cleaned or are torn or damaged must be replaced.
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HEARING TESTING
Hearing tests are vital as they identify the beginning of noise induced hearing loss long before a person
notices the loss. The testing will be done by a qualified audiologist who will retain all of the records. The
audiologist will counsel the employee about the results and type of hearing protection to use.
PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION
It is the responsibility of managers and supervisors to ensure that machinery is maintained according to
the manufacturer’s recommendations to minimize noise levels and to enforce the proper use of personal
hearing protection devices.
Failure to provide preventative or control measures will result in temporary and ultimately permanent
hearing losses for the workers.
COLD WEATHER WORK
SCOPE
Many employees may be exposed to cold temperatures while working outdoors during the winter. In
a cold environment, body heat must be conserved to maintain the core temperature at normal levels
and to ensure an adequate blood flow to the brain and extremities. Feelings of cold and discomfort
should not be ignored, since these may be early warning signals. The effects of cold are such that
problems can occur before the employee is aware of them, and furthermore, over-exposure to cold
may affect judgment. Even temperatures above freezing can cause problems, especially if the person
is wet and exposed to cold for a long period of time. Employees can become fatigued earlier due to the
need to produce more body heat and due to the bulk or weight of the extra clothing that is worn in cold
environments.
DEFINITIONS
Frostbite
Frostbite is the actual formation of ice crystals (freezing) in exposed body parts. Pain in the extremities
may be the first sign of danger. Ice forms in the tissue and destroys it. Frostbite usually affects the noise,
fingers, or toes. The affected part becomes pale and numb.
Hypothermia
Hypothermia is the overcooling of the body due to excessive loss of body heat, which may lead to
death.
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PRECAUTIONS
Alcohol intake should be avoided when exposed to cold environments. Alcohol produces a deceptive
feeling of warmth and can affect circulation, particularly in the extremities.
Employees with health conditions that affect normal body temperature regulation or cause circulation
problems, e.g. Raynaud’s disease or diabetes, should avoid working in the cold.
Employees who have previously suffered from frostbite will remain extremely sensitive to cold and
should avoid further risk of frostbite.
If loose or bulky clothing is worn, special care should be taken when working around moving equipment
or machinery to prevent clothing from becoming entangled and pulling the employee into the equipment
or machinery.
Mobile equipment operators must have suitable cold weather clothing in the cab of the machine in case
of breakdown or other upset condition.
COLD INJURY
Frostbite and hypothermia are the two major health hazards resulting from cold exposure.
Frostbite occurs when:
Extremities such as hands, feet, ears, note, etc., are exposed (either unprotected or with improper
protection) to cold for an extended period of time.
Touching a very cold metal such as cab door handles, metal fences, etc.
Blood supply to extremities is obstructed by tight clothing or tightly laced boots.
Contact with gasoline or cleaning fluids left outdoors can cause “instant” frostbite. These liquids do
not freeze even when temperature falls far below the freezing point and can freeze the body tissue on
contact.
If frostbite is suspected, do the following:
Move the victim to a warm place. Apply warmth (do not massage) to the affected parts.
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Blow on affected fingers. If the nose is frostbitten, apply warm hands. If the hands are affected put them
in lukewarm (approx. 37°C) (not hot) water.
Remove tight clothes and jewelry. Use body warmth to warm the affected parts.
Wrap the frostbitten area in a soft material and elevate the affected area. Frostbite is serious if the skin
starts to harden and turns blotchy or blue.
Obtain medical help as soon as possible.
Frostbitten skin is highly susceptible to bacterial infection. Loosely cover the affected area with a sterile
dressing and take precautions against bacterial infection.
Do not rub the frostbitten area(s).
Do not pull the hand away if it should accidentally become attached to cold metal. Pour warm water or
another fluid to separate it.
Do not break any blisters that form as a result of frostbite.
Do not that a frostbitten area unless it can be assured it will not refreeze.
Hypothermia
Early signs of hypothermia are excessive shivering, blue lips and finger tips, slurred speech and
poor coordination. Shivering becomes more severe as body cooling continues and the inner body
temperature falls below 35° (normal body temperature is 37°C).
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More profound hypothermia impairs mental functioning, resulting in confusion, disorientation,
unconsciousness and poor decision making. The desire or ability to seek protection from cold is lost,
resulting in rapid loss of body heat which could be fatal.
Hypothermia slows down the heart rate. It may be difficult to feel the pulse rate of the victim.
In extreme cases, severe hypothermia can closely mimic death. Victims of such cases must be provided
with medical care, as if they were known to be alive.
Hypothermia may occur if a person is submerged in cold water well above the freezing point.
People with diabetes, injuries, kidney problems, epilepsy and arthritis are at a higher risk of hypothermia
in comparison to healthy people.
Hypothermia can be fatal and needs IMMEDIATE medical attention.
Do the following while waiting for the first aid giver and medical help to arrive:
Give dry clothes to a person removed from cold water. If no dry clothes are available, cover the person
with material such as a plastic sheet or rain coat.
Help or carry the victim to a warm shelter as soon as the signs of hypothermia are noticed. Such signs
are excessive shivering, blue lips and finger tips, slurred speech and poor coordination.
Use a blanket and body-to-body heat to warm the person.
Give a conscious victim warm, non-alcoholic drinks in small quantities.
Consult a certified first aid person for the proper way to deal with hypothermia.
Do not use alcohol as a warming agent. Alcohol may seem to provide warmth, but in reality it interferes
with the ability to retain heat, resulting in a dangerous drop in body temperature.
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Do not submerge a hypothermia victim in hot water or a hot shower as a means of warming. This may
result in “warming shock” which could be fatal.
Do not allow a hypothermia victim to exert himself/herself. Physical exertion such as walking, climbing,
lifting, etc. may cause heart failure and death. A mild hypothermia victim will slowly warm and return to
normal health.
PREVENTION
When possible, steps should be taken to protect employees from wind, as the cooling power of wind
results in a much lower equivalent temperature than the actual temperature when there is no wind.
Use the following guide for estimating wind velocity if accurate information is not available:
8km/h: light flag moves;
16km/h: light flag fully extended;
24km/h: raises newspaper sheet;
32km/h: blowing and drifting snow.
Refer to the WINDCHILL – MINUTES TO FROSTBITE chart on page 5.3 – 5 to determine the exposure
time at which frost bite may occur.
WIND CHILL HAZARD
Check the wind chill before you go outdoors in the winter, and make sure you are well prepared for the
weather. Even moderate wind chills can be dangerous if you are outside for long periods.
(Chart not inserted)
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BLOOD BORNE PATHOGENS
SCOPE
The purpose of the Blood Borne Pathogens Code of Practice is to provide workers with Information of
risk exposures, and appropriate precautionary measures when administering first aid.
Blood borne diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, are caused by viruses that are carried
in the bloodstream and in other body fluids. People who carry these viruses may show no signs of
illness, and may not be aware that they are infected. For this reason, treat all body fluids as potentially
infectious when administering first aid.
Universal precautions, such as disposable gloves and barrier masks, are designed for use in all
emergency situations where there is a risk of exposure to blood borne diseases. Always protect yourself
by minimizing direct contact with blood and body fluids.
RESPONSIBILITIES
EMPLOYER
Must make available the appropriate gloves and barrier masks in Company first aid kits.
Provide first aid training as per Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.
WORKERS
Must participate in first aid training at employer’s request and arrangement.
Use personal protective equipment and follow procedures as required when administering first aid.
Record first aid information on a “First Aid Record” report form.
Advise supervisor of all exposure incidents.
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PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Disposable Gloves
Disposable gloces are intended for one-time use. They are to be worn when there is a risk of direct
contact with blood, body fluids, opened wounds or sores.
Barrier Masks
Barrier masks reduce the risk of disease exposure during artificial respiration without altering approved
resuscitation techniques.
GENERAL GUIDELINES
Disposable gloves shall be worn when it is likely that there will be contact with blood or other body
fluids, non-intact skin and items or surfaces soiled with blood or other body fluids.
All spills and surfaces contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be cleaned with soap and
water first, using disposable towels, and then disinfected with a solution of one part household bleach to
nine parts water.
Open sores, wounds, or irritated skin on caregiver’s hands shall be covered by wearing gloves.
Barrier masks or a ventilation device shall be made readily available for use in resuscitation.
Wash hands or other skin surfaces as soon as practicable after any contact with blood or other body
fluids.
Clothing soiled with blood or other body fluids shall be removed as soon as practicable, handled as little
as possible and washed in a normal laundry cycle, using laundry detergent.
Waste contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be placed in a sturdy plastic bag, which shall
be secured with a twist tie and disposed with regular garbage.
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Occupational Injury System (Reporting an Injury)
When an injury occurs the employee is encouraged to see the doctor. Weiss-Johnson has arranged
a medical service with Occupational Injury System (OIS) for the employees to visit immediately
following a medical aid injury. If they call the Safety Director instantaneously they can be seen at the
clinic in 30-45 minutes.
The employee is provided with safety information at their orientation and are informed that they must
call immediately following any injury so it can be reported to the doctor, as soon as possible:
They are asked to call the:
Safety Director
Barry Gabruch
780-399-6148
The Safety Director will call the Clinic and provide them with the information needed to start a file on
the injured person. Then the Safety Director will begin the Employer’s Report for the WCB. In the
meantime, the injured person is driven to the OIS Medical Clinic by a competent Weiss-Johnson staff.
In terms of an EMS emergency the crew must call 911 first. As the crew waits for EMS they will do
their best to stabilize the injured worker at the work site. When EMS arrives the healthy employee must
call the Safety Director and update him on the incident and which Hospital the injured worker will be
transported.
The employee will be given a Physician’s First Report and possibly an Occupational Injury System Work
Readiness Report following the visit to the doctor. The employee must bring those sheets of paper with
him/her to the Safety Director the next morning before 8:00am.
The employee will fill out a 3-page WCB Worker’s Report and assist the Safety Director with the filling
out of the Employer’s Report. This needs to be completed and sent to WCB within 72 hours of hearing
about the injury.
All employees from all 4 of Weiss-Johnsons companies are responsible for contacting the Safety
Director at the above number. The injured person needs to contact the Safety Director the same
day the injury is reported to the doctor.
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BROADENED JOB DESCRIPTION
The Medical Professional will suggest various tasks from the employee’s Full Duties listed below that
s/he can do until they can return to their Primary Job Description. There will be little need to place an
employee on Modified Duties.
The Occupational Injury System Clinic specializes in injuries that occur at work. They assist the
employee with the process of recovery. In the past employees have had to take on duties that they were
not familiar with when they were injured. Their regular duties were modified in order for them to continue
to work. These modified duties helped them return to work but at times put the employees in another
hazardous position, for the reason that, the employees were never exposed to this task or role before.
The employees’ Full Duties now encompass a Broadened Job Description which includes:
x a Primary Job Description (the employee’s main job description);
x a Replacement Job Description(a job description the employee is training for);
x assist with Shop Duties(sheet metal fabrication & inventory duties);
x Orientation & Safety Training Job Description(Safety & Tool training which includes courses or
Ride Along training);
x Company administrative duties (all employees need to understand the importance of paper flow
in the workplace).
All of the above job descriptions are designed to enhance or develop the employee’s existing skillset
and are part of their Regular Job Duties at Weiss-Johnson. At any time employees will rotate through
their above job descriptions broadening their skillset in the trades or particular career. When an
employee is injured, many times this will limit what s/he is capable of doing, physically. However, there
will be many other options for our injured employee to contribute because of how the Broadened Job
Description is incorporated into each employee’s Full Job Duties.
3.4 Based on inspections and documentation Safe Work Practices are being
followed by the workers.
INSPECTIONS
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Best Business Practices require employers to make
regular safety inspections of their work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature
and hazard of the work and by Manufacturers’ instructions. Such inspections are made monthly with the
crews and will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.
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PURPOSE OF INSPECTIONS
x Discover any unsafe conditions.
x Prevent accidents and property damage.
x Identify existing and potential hazards.
x Identify safety code violations and reinforce and promote safe work practices.
x Help prevent breakdown of equipment, and reduce down time.
x Help prevent loss of tools, equipment and materials.
x Identify and prevent losses BEFORE they happen.
TYPES OF INSPECTIONS
INFORMAL (ONGOING)
• Before Use - usually done by employees as part of their regular duties, i.e. PPE, power
tools, mobile equipment, etc.
• Work Methods and Practices - should be continuously observed so that short cuts do not
develop.
• Manufacturers’ Recommendations - every day, every 40 hours, once a year, or at intervals
specified.
Supervisors must be constantly watching for unsafe acts and conditions, which cannot be left until a
scheduled inspection. Ongoing inspections are essential to prevent small problems from developing into
major ones.
Employees must be encouraged to do their own inspections of their work areas and to take any
corrective action they are capable of, or, if the situation is beyond their capabilities, they are to notify
their Supervisor immediately.
FORMAL (PLANNED OR SCHEDULED)
These inspections are formal and documented. The frequency depends upon:
x An item or crew appearing on the Inspection List.
x The number of employees and size of operation.
x The number of shifts and the activity level of each shift.
x The Manufacturers’ recommendations or specifications.
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x The regulations of governing bodies.
x The degree of hazard involved in the equipment and the work.
x A documented Toolbox Talk.
At the minimum: Inspections are completed bi-weekly on a rotational basis. There are times when some
crews will be visited repeatedly while other crews may miss the bi-weekly rotation.
POST ACCIDENT
These inspections are the result of an upset condition or accident, i.e. damage to a vehicle, building or
person will require it to be inspected and/or recertified; a release of a process product to a work area will
require an inspection before work resumes.
3.5 Both Management/supervisors and workers have been involved in the
development of the Safe Work Practices.
Development Method
Safe Work Plans should be developed by the following method:
A Safe Work Plan Leader will be appointed who is responsible to ensure technical integrity and
content of the plan.
The Safe Work Plan Leader will analyze the needs and select a team of knowledgeable individuals
to assist in the development of the plan. He may also consult the members of the Safety
Committee.
The Safe Work Plan Leader ensures the objectives are established and clearly understood by all
members of the team.
The team must:
Conduct a Formal Hazard Assessment of the work by preparing an Activity Plan, analyzing each
activity, and identifying the relevant loss exposures and necessary controls.
Refer to previously developed safe work plans as needed.
Develop the action plan to control the loss exposure and minimize the risk.
Perform an efficiency check of the action plan.
For more information related to the Safe Work Practices and Critical Tasks please refer to the
Safe Job Procedures Binder.
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4.
SAFE JOB
PROCEDURES
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 3
Approved Equipment
15 If this Code requires equipment to be approved by a named
organization, an employer must use best efforts to ensure that the seal,
stamp, logo or similar identifying mark of that organization is on the
equipment and legible.
Occupational Health & Safety Code Section 15
Safe Job Procedures Program Confirmation
4.1
All of the required Safe Job Procedures have been written.
4.2
The SJP’s have been communicated to the workers.
4.3
These procedures are readily available/accessible to the workers.
4.4
These Safe Job Procedures are followed by the workers as witnessed
through inspections and observation.
4.5
Both management/supervisors and the workers participated in the
development of these procedures.
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4.1 All of the required Safe Job Procedures have been written
Safe Job Procedures
A job procedure is a written step-by-step description of how to do a job from start to finish. Job
procedures are sometimes referred to as “proper job procedures” of “methods”. Written job procedures
are used to train new workers and workers that are moved to new job. Job procedures are also used
by workers as a reference, especially for complex jobs, particularly hazardous jobs, or for jobs that are
not done very often. A job procedure contains the appropriate safe work practices and highlights safety
points.
4.2 The Safe Job Procedures have been communicated to the workers
JOB/TASK OBSERVATION
Introduction
There is abundant evidence that undetected change in the workplace is a major source of casual factors
that contribute to a high percentage of incidents. These changes can slip into the workplace unnoticed
and unevaluated until problems result from them. Beneficial changes can also occur as people discover
better ways of doing things. The key is to be certain that change is detected and evaluated to determine
its full positive or negative potential. An injury may occur because of a broken ladder, but the behavior
patterns that resulted in failure to recognize this hazard or even to maintain the ladder itself are the true
causes of the incident. As employees, we are responsible for safety performance, therefore, we must
understand the roots of behavior in order to manage it successfully.
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Planned observations are a tool for observing conditions and practices in an organized and
systematic way.
Purpose
It enables you to:
x Pinpoint practices that could cause accidents, injuries, damage, inefficiency and waste
x Determine specific needs for coaching and training
x Learn more about the work habits of your people
x Check the adequacy of existing job/task methods and procedures
x Follow-up on the effectiveness of recent training
x Give appropriate on-the-spot constructive correction
x Spotlight specific behaviors for recognition and reinforcement
x Help employees prevent unsafe behavior through self-correction
x Encourage and enable employees to approach each other about unsafe acts, and
x Create an environment that supports employee’s active participation by making peer correction
easy and acceptable
Outcomes:
x Observation coverage of more tasks and more employees in a given amount of time
x Planned observations that would not otherwise be done because of the time factor
x A greater number of opportunities for meaningful coaching based on specific observable job
performance
x Additional checks on the adequacy of procedures, practices, training, and on-the-job instruction
x The opportunity to further identity risks and hazards with the tasks in each area
Communicated to Employees
Safe Job Procedures are communicated to the employees through:
x Safe Job Procedure Binders
o Placed at front desk of each company
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o On company website (L drive)
o Call front receptionist for access to manual or binder at any time
x Safety Orientations (test their understanding)
x Safety Committee Meetings
x Board Meetings
x Safety Meetings
x Toolbox Meetings
x Inspections (evaluate comprehension in the field)
x Investigation Reports
x Review of Job Hazard Assessments
x Review of Occupational Health & Safety Code
x Annual Safety Audit (test their understanding)
x Safe Work Plan
SAFE WORK PLAN
A Safe Work Plan is a documented plan describing how to control hazards and manage risks for a
specific type of work. A Safe Work Plan is sometimes developed following a hazard assessment, and
should ensure that hazards and risks are carefully evaluated, that controls and contingencies are clearly
identified, and that the necessary actions and implementation strategies have been outlined.
Development Criteria
A Safe Work Plan must be developed when:
The hazards and risks of the work to be performed cannot be adequately controlled.
Deviations are required from approved WEISS-JOHNSON Codes of Practice.
The tasks to be performed are known as high risk operations. For example, work in deep excavations,
work using an extension ladder above 10 feet or work using a hole hawg.
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Development Method
Safe Work Plans should be developed by the following method:
A Safe Work Plan Leader will be appointed who is responsible to ensure technical integrity and content
of the plan.
The Safe Work Plan Leader will analyze the needs and select a team of knowledgeable individuals to
assist in the development of the plan. He may also consult the members of the Safety Committee.
The Safe Work Plan Leader ensures the objectives are established and clearly understood by all
members of the team.
The team must:
- conduct a Formal Hazard Assessment of the work by preparing an Activity Plan, analyzing each
activity, and identifying the relevant loss exposures and necessary controls.
- Refer to previously developed safe work plans as needed.
- Develop the action plan to control the loss exposure and minimize the risk.
- Perform an efficiency check of the action plan.
Safe Work Plan Content
Each Safe Work Plan must include all pertinent details and documentation relative to the activity,
personnel and equipment involved. The content is listed in Section 3.
Implementation of the Safe Work Plan
The Safe Work Plan Leader is responsible to give the authorization to proceed with the work once all
requirements have been met. The Safe Work Plan Leader reports directly to his division manager in
regards to progress and scheduling of project or job.
Any need for deviation from the Safe Work Plan shall result in the activity being stopped and reevaluation of the Safe Work Plan with re-approval and re-authorization required.
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Field Safe Work Procedures
x F 01
Cutting holes in joist with Hole saw
x F 02
Cutting with Chainsaw
x F 03
Cutting metal with Unishears
x F 04
Using Reciprocating saw
x F 05
Using Power drill
x F 06
Using Cordless drill
x F 07
Using Generator
x F 08
Hanging ductwork
x F 09
Hanging metal pipe
x F 10
Hanging furnace with pulley
x F 11
Lower furnace in basement
x F 12
Loading material in truck
x F 13
Material handling of heavy loads
x F 14
Material handling of metal bundles
x F 15
Material handling of ductwork
x F 16
Heavy materials disposal in waste bin
x F 17
Cutting metal pipe with snips
x F 18
Cutting metal ductwork with snips
x F 19
Setting up Extension ladder
x F 20
Working off of a step ladder
x F 21
Working on rooftop
x F 22
Driving to jobsite
x F 23
Driving on the Jobsite
x F 24
Proper protocol following an vehicular accident
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May 18 2012
Procedure: F 01
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Page 1 of 2
Date: July 05, 2012
Cutting Holes in Joist with Hole Saw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, eye protection, hearing protection.
Safe Work Procedure
Safety Rules
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury
2) Keep work area clean and well lit
3) Do not operate power tools in explosive atmospheres such as in the presence of flammable liquids,
gases or dust
4) Keep children and bystanders away while operating a power tool
5) Power tools must match the outlet, never modify the plug in any way
6) Do not expose power tools to rain or wet conditions
7) Do not abuse the cord. Never use the cord for pulling or carrying or unplugging the power tool. Keep
cord away from heat, oil, sharp edges or moving parts
8) When operating a power tool outdoors, use an extension cord suitable for outdoor use
9) Stay alert, watch what are you are doing and use common sense when operating a power tool
10) Do not use a power tool if you are tired or under the influence of drugs, alcohol or medication
11) Use your PPE
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12) Avoid accidental starting. Ensure the switch is in the off position before plugging in
13) Remove any adjusting key or wrench before turning the power tool on
14) Do not over reach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times
15) Dress properly. Do not wear loose clothing or jewellery. Keep your hair clothing and gloves away from
moving equipment
16) Do not force the power tool. Use the correct tool for the application
17) Hold power tool by insulated gripping surfaces when performing an operation where the cutting tool may
come in contact with its own cord
18) Maintain power tools. Check for misalignment or binding of moving parts and any other conditions that
may affect the power tools operation
Operation
1) To select high speed (1200 RPM) pull up on the speed selector and slide it to the desired RPM, make
sure when you release the selector, it snaps down into the detent in the housing.
2) To select low speed (300 RPM) pull up on the speed selector and slide it to the desired RPM, Make
sure when you release the selector, it snaps down into the detent in the housing.
Note: It may be necessary to rotate the chuck slightly by hand when shifting speeds. Never change
speeds when the drill is running or coasting.
3) Depressing the trigger switch turns the tool ON, releasing the trigger switch turns the tool OFF.
There is a slide switch built into the handle directly behind the trigger switch for operating in reverse.
For drilling this switch is put in the F position and for reversing operations, it is pushed in the R
position.
4) Open the chuck jaws by turning the collar with fingers and insert bit fully into chuck. Tighten the chuck
collar by hand. Place chuck key in each of the three holes, and tighten in clockwise direction. It’s
important to tighten chuck with all three holes. To release bit, turn chuck key counter clockwise in just
one hole, then loosen chuck by hand.
5) Use sharp drill bits only. For wood, use twist drill bits, spade bits, power auger bits, or hole saws. For
metal, use high speed steel twist drill bits or hole saws. For masonary, such as brick or cement, etc.,
use carbide tips.
6) Caution-Drill may stall if overloaded causing a sudden twist. Always expect the stall. Grip the drill firmly
to control the twisting action and avoid injury.
7) If the drill stalls, it is usually because it is being overloaded or improperly used. Release trigger
immediately, remove drill bit from work, and determine cause of stalling. Do not click trigger off and on in
an attempt to start a stalled drill-THIS CAN DAMAGE THE DRILL.
8) To minimize stalling o breaking through the material, reduce pressure on drill and ease the bit through
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the last fractional part of the hole.
9) Keep the motor running when pulling the bit back out of a drilled hole. This will prevent jamming.
10) A racketing sound heard while using the tool in low speed indicates that the clutch is disengaging due to
a high load. Continuous use of the tool with the clutch racketing is not recommended.
11) Holes in wood can be made with the same twist drills used for metal. These bits may overheat unless
pulled out frequently to clear chips from the flutes. For larger holes, use power drill wood bits. Work that
is apt to splinter should be backed up with a block of wood. When using self-feed bits, no pressure is
required as these bits will pull themselves into the wood.
12) Make sure that you have your step ladder firmly in place directly in front of hole being drilled. Do not
overreach.
Oval-Hole Technique
The Oval-Hole technique is a technique used to create a slightly larger hole usually when having to run flex.
x 2 holes cut next to each other to create a larger hole.
x Only to be done by an experienced field hand.
Developed by: Barry Gabruch
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 02
Page 1 of 3
Date: July 05, 2012
Cutting Holes with Chainsaw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Dropping Material, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, Face protection, Chainsaw Pants
Safe Work Procedure
Safety Precautions
1) Reactive forces, including kickback, can be dangerous. Careless or improper use of any chainsaw may
cause serious or fatal injury.
2)
3) You must be in good physical condition and mental health and not under the influence of alcohol or
drugs.
4) Do not operate a chainsaw when you are fatigued.
5) To reduce the risk of injury, the operator should wear the proper P.P.E:
-Clothing must be snug but allow for freedom of movement
- Protect your hands with gloves if handling saw and chain
-Steel Toed work boots must be worn with non-slip soles and shoelaces well tied
-Chain saw pants must be worn when operating a chain saw
-Never operate a chain saw unless wearing goggles or visor and hardhat
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Transporting the saw
By Hand:
1) Always stop the engine before putting a chain saw down or carrying it.
2) When carrying your saw by hand, the engine must be stopped, grip the front handle and place muffler
away from body.
3) Chain guard should be over chain and bar should point behind you when walking forward.
By Vehicle:
When transporting in a vehicle, keep chain and bar covered with the chain guard. Properly secure your saw
to prevent turnover, fuel spillage and damage to the saw.
Preparation for use of the saw
1) Take off the chain guard and inspect for safety in operation
2) Proper tension of chain is extremely important. Loosen or tighten hexagonal nut with chainsaw tool so
that chain has no slack but yet still slides feely on bar.
3) Check chain before every start of the chain saw.
4) If the chain becomes loose when cutting, shut off engine and then tighten. Never try tightening the chain
when saw is running.
Fuelling
1) Your STIHL chainsaw uses a gas and oil mixture.
2) Fuel your chainsaw in well ventilated areas and always shut off engine and allow to cool before
refuelling.
3) Remove the fuel filler cap using chain saw tool or screwdriver, ensuring cap does not get dirt or saw
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dust on it.
4) Wipe off any fuel that may spill onto saw before starting.
5) Unit vibration can cause cap to come loose so check before every start that cap is securely on.
Starting
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) If starting chain saw on ground make sure the chain brake is engaged and place the chainsaw on firm
ground and maintain firm balance and good footing.
3) Grip the front handlebar of the saw firmly with your left hand and press down.
4) For saws with a rear handle level with the ground, put the toe of you right foot into the rear handle and
press down.
5) With your right hand pull out the starter grip slowly until you feel a definite resistance and then give it a
brisk, strong pull.
6) If starting the chainsaw without using the ground, make sure the chain brake is engaged, grip the front
handle of the chain saw firmly with your left hand.
7) Keep your arm on the front handle in a locked (straight) position. Hold the rear handle of the saw tightly
between your legs just above the knees. Maintain good balance and secure footing. Pull the starting grip
slowly with your right hand until you feel a definite resistance and then give it a brisk, strong pull.
Cutting instructions
1) Always hold the saw firmly with both hands when the engine is running.
2) Place your left hand on front handle bar and your right hand on rear handle and throttle trigger. Left
handers should follow these instructions too.
3) Wrap your fingers tightly around the handles, keeping the handles cradled between your thumb and
forefinger. With your hands in this position, you can best oppose and absorb the push, pull and kick
back forces of your saw without losing control. Make sure your chainsaw handles and grip are in good
condition and free of moisture, pitch, oil or grease.
4) Do not operate your chain saw with the starting throttle lock engaged. Cutting with the starting throttle
lock engaged does not permit the operator proper control of the saw or chain speed.
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5) Do not cut any material other than wood or wooden objects.
6) Position the chainsaw in such a way that your body is clear of the cutting attachment whenever the
engine is running.
7) Don’t put pressure on the saw when reaching the end of a cut. The pressure may cause the bar and
rotating chain to pop out of the cut and go out of control and strike the operator or some other object. If
the rotating chain strikes some other object, a reactive force may cause the moving chain to strike the
operator.
Reactive forces including kick back
1) Reactive forces may occur any time the chain is rotating. Reactive forces can be dangerous! In any
chainsaw, the powerful force used to cut wood can be reversed (and work against the operator). If
the rotating chain is suddenly stopped by contact with any solid object, the reactive forces may occur
instantly. These reactive forces may result in loss of control which may, in turn, cause serious or fatal
injury.
2) Kick back may occur when the moving saw chain near the upper quadrant of the nose bar contacts
a solid object or is pinched, under those circumstances the bar moves toward the operator, who may
suffer severe or fatal injury.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 03
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Cutting Metal with Unishears Saw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Keep work area clean, cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
3) Dress properly; do not wear loose clothing or jewelry as it may get caught in moving parts.
4) Avoid unintentional starts; don’t carry tool with finger on switch. Be sure to lock off trigger when
transporting tool.
5) Don’t operate tool if fatigued or impaired.
6) Keep work area well lit.
7) Use dust mask if when in dusty conditions.
8) Always disconnect power source when removing or installing accessories.
9) Lay out cutting line on the sheet metal to be cut.
10) Hold the shears so that the waste portion of the sheet metal is to the right of the shears.
11) With the shears turned on, start at the edge of the material and follow the cutting line.
12) Keep the back of the shears as low as possible.
13) Use even forward pressure
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NOTE:
x Excess pressure causes the tool to jam.
x Burrs result if the back of the shears is held too high.
x Waste to the left of the shears causes metal distortion and a rough edge on metal.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 04
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 18 2012
Using Reciprocating Saw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Dropping Material, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
Safety Rules
14) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury
15) Keep work area clean and well lit
16) Do not operate power tools in explosive atmospheres such as in the presence of flammable liquids,
gases or dust
17) Keep children and bystanders away while operating a power tool
18) Power tools must match the outlet, never modify the plug in any way
19) Do not expose power tools to rain or wet conditions
20) Do not abuse the cord. Never use the cord for pulling or carrying or unplugging the power tool. Keep
cord away from heat, oil, sharp edges or moving parts
21) When operating a power tool outdoors, use an extension cord suitable for outdoor use
22) Stay alert, watch what are you are doing and use common sense when operating a power tool
23) Do not use a power tool if you are tired or under the influence of drugs, alcohol or medication
24) Use your PPE
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25) Avoid accidental starting. Ensure the switch is in the off position before plugging in
26) Remove any adjusting key or wrench before turning the power tool on
27) Do not over reach. Keep proper footing and balance at all times
28) Dress properly. Do not wear loose clothing or jewelry. Keep your hair clothing and gloves away from
moving equipment
29) Do not force the power tool. Use the correct tool for the application
30) Hold power tool by insulated gripping surfaces when performing an operation where the cutting tool may
come in contact with its own cord
31) Maintain power tools. Check for misalignment or binding of moving parts and any other conditions that
may affect the power tools operation
Operation
1) To remove/install blade on quick lock clamp:
x Unplug the tool
x Point the tool downward, twist the collar, and shake the tool up and down the blade should then fall out
of the clamp
x If a stub of a broken blade does not fall out, use a thin blade or screwdriver to release it out of the clamp
x To install insert blade all the way to spindle and let collar back to original position, ensure blade is in
tightly before powering tool
2) To remove/install blade on screw clamp:
x Unplug the tool before changing blade
x Be sure the spindle and blade clamp area are clean
x To install blade, loosen the blade clamp screw, turning it counter clockwise. Insert the blade until the
tang buts against the spindle
x NOTE: The blade must be inserted all the way into spindle so that the tang on the blade seats firmly in
the blade clamp
x Insert the hex key into the blade clamp screw, turning it clockwise. Tighten securely
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x To remove a blade clamp screw and turn it counter clockwise one full turn. Then slide the blade out of
the spindle. Be careful when handling hot blades
3) Starting, stopping and controlling speed
x To start the tool, grasp the handle firmly and pull the trigger
x To stop the tool, release the trigger. Allow the tool to come to a complete stop before removing the blade
from a partial cut or laying the tool down.
4) General Cutting
x For straight or contour cutting from an edge, line the blade up with your cutting line
x Before the blade contacts the workpiece, grasp the handle firmly and pull the trigger
x Guide the tool along your cutting line
x Always hold the shoe flat against the workpiece to avoid excessive vibration
5) Cutting Metals:
x Begin cutting at slow speeds, gradually increasing speed as you cut.
x When cutting into metals or hard materials that cannot be cut from an edge, drill a starting hole larger
than the widest part of the blade
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 05
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Using Power Drill Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Shop and Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Keep work area clean, cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
3) Dress properly; do not wear loose clothing or jewelry as it may get caught in moving parts.
4) Do not over reach; Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
5) Avoid unintentional starts; don’t carry tool with finger on switch. Be sure to lock off trigger when
transporting tool.
6) Don’t operate tool if fatigued or impaired.
7) Keep work area well lit.
8) Use safety glasses if drilling overhead.
9) Use dust mask if when in dusty conditions.
10) Don’t contact any exposed electrical terminals.
11) Do not use drill for purposes not intended for drill.
12) Hold drill firmly to control the twisting action of the drill and prevent loss of control.
13) Always disconnect power source when removing or installing accessories.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Procedure: F 06
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Using Cordless Drill Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Keep work area clean, cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
3) Dress properly; do not wear loose clothing or jewelry as it may get caught in moving parts.
4) Do not over reach; Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
5) Avoid unintentional starts; don’t carry tool with finger on switch. Be sure to lock off trigger when
transporting tool.
6) Don’t operate tool if fatigued or impaired.
7) Keep work area well lit.
8) Use safety glasses if drilling overhead.
9) Use dust mask if when in dusty conditions.
10) Do not use drill for purposes not intended for drill.
11) Hold drill firmly to control the twisting action of the drill and prevent loss of control.
12) Always disconnect power source when removing or installing accessories.
13) Use only proper chargers for batteries
14) Do not place battery in pockets or areas where it can come in contact with metal objects.
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15) Do not use charger in wet, damp conditions.
16) Unplug charger when not in use
Developed by: Wayne Rendell
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Procedure: F 07
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2007
Using Generator Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Eye and Skin Contact of Hazardous Material, Shock Injury, Crush Injuries, Mild burns
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Use in well-ventilated area just like all internal combustion engines. Generators produce CO2.
3) Ground generator properly to avoid electric shock.
4) When refueling always shut off generator and avoid area with flames and/or cigarettes.
5) Avoid getting burned as many parts on the generator are very hot to touch.
6) Store gasoline for generator in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area.
7) Avoid excessive starts with pull cord.
Developed by: Wayne Rendell
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Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Hanging Ductwork Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Make sure your drive cleats are pre-cut and in arms reach of connection.
3) Ensure that S-cleats are on existing duct you are making the connection with and open corners of
S-cleat if tight fit is anticipated.
4) Securely mount hangers where duct is to be run before step 3.
5) Acquire assistance from helper or secure to duct hangers as mentioned above.
6) Lift duct together with helper climbing the ladder as necessary making sure proper footing is kept.
7) COMMUNICATE WITH YOUR PARTNER IN THE NEXT STEPS.
8) Slide bottom corner of ductwork into S-cleat, gently raise duct up and slide into top corner of that same
side being aware of pinched fingers.
9) When both top and bottom of duct are in one side, slide drive cleat on gently, and fold over top of drive
with hammer. No force should be used. If force is needed, bring duct back down and trim metal of ½ fold
so drive cleat will slide on easier.
10) Do the same to the other side of duct and screw in hangers mounted earlier.
Developed by: Mark Johnson
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Procedure: F 09
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Hanging Metal Pipe Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Always wear eye protection if screwing into metal overhead.
3) Snap pipe together and screw support in place about one foot from the end of where the pipe will be
located.
4) Climb ladder ensuring proper footing and a good grip on pipe and not arching or awkwardly bending
your body.
5) Rest one end on pipe support while connecting the pipe at the joint.
6) Once connected screw through pipe support into pipe. Note- Only screw joint if connected to a elbow or
fitting due to the sounds of expansion and contraction which could irritate potential customers.
Developed by: Mark Johnson
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Procedure: F 10
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Hanging Furnace with Pulley Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Ensure staircase is secure before bringing furnace downstairs.
3) Make sure the work area for the ladder and furnace are on level ground.
4) Do not use ladder as platform to hang furnace.
5) Attach c-clamps firmly to bottom of joist and center heat exchanger.
6) Cut 4 drive cleats at 4 feet if an 8 foot basement and 5 feet if a 9 foot basement and hang straps to
joists as marked. Pre drill 1/8 hole bottom of hanger so it will be easier to screw into side of furnace.
7) Connect pulley to c-clamp on joist and ensure enough slack for wire and hook to reach down to furnace.
8) Begin hoisting furnace with pulley until desired height is achieved which would be when pre drilled holes
in hangers reach the top of the furnace.
9) Screw hanger into furnace. Once all four hangers are secure, lower pulley slowly and remove from
c-clamps.
10) Ensure that furnace operating manual is removed from burner section and secured (or pinched)
between filter rack and furnace.
Developed by: Rick Schmidt
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Procedure: F 11
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Lowering Furnace in Basement Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
x Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
x This step can has two options, each with its own safety factors.
Option 1 (with pulley)
1) Connect c-clamps to bottom of joist and to center of heat exchanger
2) Connect pulley to c-clamps and take pressure off hangers by cranking pulley up.
3) Ensure that there is enough slack in electrical and gas lines before lowering. If there isn’t stop
immediately and shut off and tag gas and shut off and tag breaker and undo connections to furnace.
Inform supervisor of what has happened so he can call the site foreman.
4) When pressure is off furnace hangers take screws out and gently lower furnace to concrete floor.
Option 2 (without pulley)
1) This step requires 2 workers and is the most common.
2) Each worker grasps an end of the furnace ensuring that they have good grip. Worker 1 unscrews one
corner while worker 2 unscrew the corner diagonally from the one worker 1 unscrewed. This will balance
the furnace on two hangers but do not let go of grip as furnace could still drop.
3) Worker 1 unscrews the third hanger while still firmly holding furnace. Worker 2 unscrews the fourth
hanger also holding the furnace firmly.
4) Lower furnace to ground and unscrew hangers at joist.
Developed by: Rick Schmidt
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Procedure: F 12
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Loading Material in Truck Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Always keep your truck/van free of excess debris.
3) Use “Safe Work Procedures F 13, F 14 and F 15 on material handling before you load your truck.
4) Empty all left over material, garbage and tools so safe loading can be performed.
5) Always load ductwork first, with female side of duct horizontal and male end of duct vertical against
wheel well.
6) Load boxes next being careful of not to slip on ductwork already loaded.
7)
Load pipe on top of ductwork and beside boxes ensuring not to snag bundles of pipe on anything.
8) Lastly, load all tools and hardware into truck/van and ensure everything is securely fastened so you will
not lose load in transport.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Procedure: F 13
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 18 2012
Material Handling of Heavy Loads Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Back Injury
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, Gloves
Safe Work Procedure
Assess the situation
Before lifting or carrying a heavy object, ask yourself the following questions:
1) Can you lift this load safely, or is it a two person lift?
2) How far will you have to carry the load?
3) Is the path clear of clutter, cords or uneven surfaces, slippery areas, overhangs, stairs, curbs?
4) Will you encounter closed doors that need to be opened?
5) Once the load is lifted, will it block your view?
6) Can the load be broken down into smaller parts?
7) Should you wear gloves to get a better grip and protect your hands?
Size up the load
1) Test the weight by lifting one of the corners. If it is too heavy or an awkward shape, stop.
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2) If there is any doubt, ask for help from your fellow workers.
3) Try to use mechanical lift, dolly or pallet jack.
4) Try to break the load down into smaller parts.
Use good lifting techniques
1) Get close to the load. Center yourself over the load. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart.
2) Tighten your stomach muscles. Tight abdominal muscles increase intra-abdominal pressure and help to
support the back.
3) Get a good handhold and pull the load close to you. The farther the load is from your body, the heavier it
will feel.
4) Bend your knees. Bending your knees is the single most important thing you can do when you lift moderate to heavy objects. Squat down like a weight lifter, bend your knees, keep your back in its natural
arch, and let your legs do the lifting. Your leg muscles are much more powerful than the smaller muscles
in your back.
5) Do not jerk. Use a smooth motion and lift straight up.
6) Do not twist or turn your body while lifting. Keep your head up, and look straight ahead. Hold the load
close and keep it steady.
Carrying the load
1) Change direction by turning your feet, not your back.
2) Your nose and your toes should always be pointing in the same direction. Any sudden twisting can result
in taking out your back.
3) Rest if you fatigue. Set down the load and rest for a few minutes.
Setting the load down
1) Bend your knees. Squat down and let your legs do the work.
2) Keep your back curves. Remember not to twist your body while setting down a load, and keep your
head up. Keep the load close.
3) Plan your release. Once the load is where you want it, release your grip until the load is secure.
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Using pallet jack and lifting aids
1) Push rather than pull. It is easier and safer to push than to pull. You can use your body weight to assist
when pushing.
2) Keep close to the load and lock your arms. Try not to lean over and keep your back in natural arches.
3) Use both hands. Carts are easier to push and control using both hands.
4) Use tie-downs, if necessary, to secure the load.
Forklifts
1) Use a forklift to lift and transport very heavy objects.
2) Obtain training and authorization before using a forklift.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Procedure: F 14
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Material handling of Metal Bundles of Pipe Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Inspect bundle of pipe to ensure all pieces are five foot long, if smaller (4” in a 5” bundle) pieces are
present remove to prevent sliding and possible severe lacerations and load separately.
3) Securely grasp bundle of pipe making sure you are wearing approved work gloves.
4) With other hand securely place halfway down bundle for stability.
5) Ensure both hands are away from seams to avoid severe lacerations and pinch points.
6) Lift with legs and load intro truck or house making sure of not catching the bundle on any pedestrians or
other material.
7) If loading pipe into basement make sure to lean against wall in corners to prevent the domino effect of
falling bundles of pipe.
8) Remove one piece of pipe at a time and reuse small pieces as needed.
9) Never put back smaller pieces (4” in a 5” bundle) of pipe into bundle as that could cause the pipe to
slide i=when loading as mentioned above.
10) If a bundle of pipe is falling. LET IT FALL. Do not try to attempt to catch it.
Developed by: Mark Johnson
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 15
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Material Handling of Ductwork Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Securely grasp duct on female seam to avoid raw edges. Use approved work gloves to prevent slipping
and protection of hands.
3) If loading duct by yourself, do not attempt to over exert yourself by taking more than you should handle.
4) When loading on to truck or basement ensure that you will not snag it on pedestrians or other material
which could cause injury to both of you.
5) When passing duct to worker in basement, make sure he has a secure hold on it before releasing.
6) Stand duct against wall vertically when not in use to minimize tripping hazard.
Developed by: Mark Johnson
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Procedure: F 16
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 18 2012
Heavy Materials Disposal in Waste Bin Safe Work Procedure
Location: Shop & Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
6) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
Assess the situation
Before lifting or carrying a heavy object, ask yourself the following questions:
8) Can you lift this load safely, or is it a two person lift?
9) How far will you have to carry the load?
10) Is the path clear of clutter, cords or uneven surfaces, slippery areas, overhangs, stairs, curbs?
11) Will you encounter closed doors that need to be opened?
12) Once the load is lifted, will it block your view?
13) Can the load be broken down into smaller parts?
14) Should you wear gloves to get a better grip and protect your hands?
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Size up the load
5) Test the weight by lifting one of the corners. If it is too heavy or an awkward shape, stop.
6) If there is any doubt, ask for help from your fellow workers.
7) Try to use mechanical lift, dolly or pallet jack.
8) Try to break the load down into smaller parts.
Use good lifting techniques
7) Get close to the load. Center yourself over the load and stand with your feet shoulder width apart.
8) Tighten your stomach muscles. Tight abdominal muscles increase intra-abdominal pressure and help to
support the back.
9) Get a good handhold and pull the load close to you. The farther the load is from your body, the heavier it
will feel.
10) Bend your knees. Bending your knees is the single most important thing you can do when you lift
moderate to heavy objects. Squat down like a weight lifter, bend your knees, keep your back in its
natural arch, and let your legs do the lifting. Your leg muscles are much more powerful than the smaller
muscles in your back.
11) Do not jerk. Use a smooth motion and lift straight up.
12) Do not twist or turn your body while lifting. Keep your head up, and look straight ahead. Hold the load
close and keep it steady.
Carrying the load
4) Change direction by turning your feet, not your back.
5) Your nose and your toes should always be pointing in the same direction. Any sudden twisting can result
in taking out your back.
6) Rest if you fatigue. Set down the load and rest for a few minutes.
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Loading material in bin
1) Carry only enough up the stairs as you can with one arm so that you have a hand free to steady
yourself on railing.
2) Dump material into bin spreading out evenly so less likeliness of garbage building up and material
falling back towards you.
3) Do not throw material in bin in case of wind gusts blowing material back at you or other workers like a
boomerang.
4) If load is too heavy please see “Forklift Safe Work Procedure”.
Developed by: Dennis Johnson
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 17
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 15 2012
Cutting Metal Pipe with Snips Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Although safety gloves are not required they are recommended.
3) Use both hands to cut pipe, one to use snips and one to hold the pipe.
4) Cut away from your body to prevent possible impaling of yourself or cutting yourself.
5) Before finishing last cut, hold material as far away from you as possible to keep the falling pipe from
kicking back and possibly cutting you.
Developed by: Dennis Johnson
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 18
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 15 2012
Cutting Metal Ductwork with Snips Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Severe Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, Hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Although safety gloves are not required it is recommended for your own sake.
3) Tin snips should be heavy enough to cut the material so easily that the worker needs only one hand on
the snips and can use the other hand to hold the material.
4) The material is to be well supported before the last cut bringing you through the metal.
5) Jaws of snips are to be kept tight and well lubricated.
6) Employees should wear safety glasses when cutting notches or corners of duct because small slivers of
metal often come flying with considerable force at your face.
Developed by: Dennis Johnson
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 19
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 15 2012
Setting up Extension Ladder Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Pinch Points, Crush Injuries, Falling from heights, Severe Internal Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, Fall Protection
Safe Work Procedure
Ladder maintenance
1) Ensure that step ladder spreaders are sturdy, tight and can be properly locked in place.
2) Check all ladder hardware, nuts, bolts, spreaders, etc. for tightness and good repair with particular
attention to locking mechanisms.
3) Check pulleys on extension ladders for good condition and proper lubrication. If pulleys are damaged,
they should be replaced.
4) Check ropes on extension ladders and replace any frayed or worn ropes.
5) Check for damaged or excessive wear on the non-slip feet.
6) Check ladders for twisted or distorted rails. Do not attempt to straighten, or allow to remain in use, any
bent or bowed metal ladder.
7) Where damage or deterioration of any ladder is encountered, a qualified person must determine
whether or not the ladder can still be used.
8) Ladders cannot be safely repaired. If the damage is significant enough to affect the safety of the unit,
the ladder must be immediately removed from service, destroyed and replaced as soon as possible.
9) Ladders should also be thoroughly examined/inspected once every 3 months and a record of those
inspections should be kept on file for future reference.
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Extension Ladder set up
1) When erecting straight or extension ladders, check for overhead hazards, including power lines.
2) Top section of extension ladder must rest on solid, even surface.
3) With straight or extension ladders, use the 4 to 1 rule to determine the necessary length and placement.
This simply means that the ladder should be placed one foot away for every four feet in height to the
place where the ladder rests.
4) Make sure that the locking device is fully secured on extension ladder before using.
5) When a ladder is used to climb onto a platform or roof make certain that it extends at least 3 feet above
the platform or roof edge contact point, to provide support to the worker when getting on/off ladder.
6) When using a ladder to access high places, always securely tie-off at top.
7) NEVER attempt to walk or move an extension ladder sideways while standing on it.
8) NEVER slide down the side rails of ladders.
9) For long ladders, get assistance when raising or lowering them. It basically requires at least 2 people to
do it safely.
10) Ensure that 2 workers are present when a ladder is being secured or released.
11) Do not stand higher than the fourth rung from the top on an extension ladder.
12) The sections of extension ladders are to be used together as a unit and are not to be taken apart and
used individually as single ladders.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Procedure: F 20
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 15 2012
Working Off of a Step Ladder Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Falling from Heights, Severe Internal Injury
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, Fall Protection
Safe Work Procedure
Ladder maintenance
7) Ensure that step ladder spreaders are sturdy, tight and can be properly locked in place.
8) Check all ladder hardware, nuts, bolts, spreaders, etc. for tightness and good repair with particular
attention to locking mechanisms.
9) Check pulleys on extension ladders for good condition and proper lubrication. If pulleys are damaged,
they should be replaced.
10) Check ropes on extension ladders and replace any frayed or worn ropes.
11) Check for damaged or excessive wear on the non-slip feet.
12) Check ladders for twisted or distorted rails. Do not attempt to straighten, or allow to remain in use, any
bent or bowed metal ladder.
13) Where damage or deterioration of any ladder is encountered, a qualified person must determine
whether or not the ladder can still be used.
14) Ladders cannot be safely repaired. If the damage is significant enough to affect the safety of the unit,
the ladder must be immediately removed from service, destroyed and replaced as soon as possible.
15) Ladders should also be thoroughly examined/inspected once every 3 months and a record of those
inspections should be kept on file for future reference.
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Step ladder set up
1) When using a step ladder, make sure that it is fully open and that its spreader bar is securely locked.
2) NEVER stand on the top 2 sections of a stepladder.
3) NEVER stand on the top platform of a stepladder.
4) NEVER stand on the paint shelf or bucket holder of a stepladder.
5) Make sure that the stepladder is placed on a firm and level footing to ensure that it doesn’t slip.
6) If you need to reach a height in excess of 20 feet, use an extension ladder.
7) When using a stepladder for access to high places, always have a second worker support the
stepladder or tie-off the step ladder to prevent it from slipping.
8) Do not place a stepladder close to, or against pipes containing acids, chemicals or sprinkler systems.
9) NEVER attempt to walk or move a stepladder while standing on it.
10) NEVER use a stepladder while leaning it against a wall or other vertical surface, use an extension
ladder instead.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 21
Page 1 of 3
Date: May 18 2012
Working on Rooftop Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Pinch Points, Crush Injuries, Falling from heights, Severe Internal Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection, Fall Protection
Safe Work Procedure
Application
Fall protection must be used whenever there is a risk of a worker falling
x A vertical distance of 3 meters or more
x A vertical distance of less than 3 meters where there is an increased risk of injury due to the
surface or item on which the worker might land
x Through an opening on a work surface
Because in our line of work using a guard rail and or fall net is unlikely. So Weiss-Johnson primary fall
protection equipment is Fall Arrest:
1) Consists of a full body harness with shock absorbing lanyard with adequate attachment points
2) Is attached to a lifeline or lanyard to an independent fixed support
3) A rope grab is used so that a workers free fall distance does not exceed 1.2 meters excluding
the increase in the total fall distance resulting from the use of shock absorbers; and
4) Is arranged so that the worker cannot
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a) Hit the ground or an object or level below the work, or
b) Swing in a manner that poses risk to the safety or health of a worker
Requirements
The owner (General Contractor) of a building or structure must ensure that a permanent anchorage
system used as a fixed support in a travel restraint system or fall arrest system for that building meets
the following requirements:
1) The anchor has an ultimate capacity of 22.2 kN in any direction in which the load may be
applied for each worker attached
2) The anchorage system is in accordance with CAN/CSA Standard-Z91-02
Procedures
In residential construction projects there are circumstances where it is not reasonably practicable to
attach to the fixed anchor point or in some cases the owner (General contractor) of that building or
structure does not have a fixed anchor point, if this is the case call your safety supervisor immediately
and record in hazard assessment. The following is a guide line for the two scenarios you will see on a
residential project.
If building or structure has fixed anchor point:
1) Fall arrest can only be used if you have been trained by a competent employee or trainer
2) Ensure that the equipment (Harness, Lanyard, Lifeline and Rope Grab) used as part of
fall protection is inspected before each use the worker using the fall protection as well as a
competent person other than the worker using the system
3)
Kept free from any substance or condition that could contribute to deterioration of the equipment
4) Maintained in good working order and in accordance with the manufacturers specifications
5) Using “Safe work Procedure F 19” set up extension ladder against side of structure
6) Tie off or anchor ladder so that ladder cannot move sideways or backwards
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7) Nail 2x6 at roof edge as a support for accessing roof, nail 2X6’s as required to get to anchor
point at peak of roof
8) Before latching lifeline to anchor ensure that the anchor is adequately fastened to peak of roof
9) Latch hook on lifeline to anchor point
10) Ensure lifeline is free of knots and that travel of lifeline will not pass over any sharp edges
11) Ensure rope grab is installed on lifeline correctly and test rope grab before heading to chase for
required work
12) After work is completed return to anchor and detach lifeline and make your way to roof edge,
CAREFULLY USING COMMON SENSE
If building or structure does not have a fixed anchor point:
1) Fall arrest can only be used if you have been trained by a competent employee or trainer
2) Ensure that the equipment (Harness, Lanyard, Lifeline and Rope Grab) used as part of
fall protection is inspected before each use the worker using the fall protection as well as a
competent person other than the worker using the system
3)
Kept free from any substance or condition that could contribute to deterioration of the equipment
4) Maintained in good working order and in accordance with the manufacturers specifications
5) Using “Safe work Procedure F 19” set up extension ladder against side of structure
6) Tie off or anchor ladder so that ladder cannot move sideways or backwards
7) Nail 2x6 at roof edge as a support for accessing roof, nail 2X6’s as required to get to anchor
point at peak of roof
8) If at this point you see that there is no fixed anchor point at the peak of the roof using the
sharp side of your hammer create a hole about 5” through the sheeting on either side of the
roof trusses, pass your lifeline through the first hole, under the roof truss and loop through the
second hole latching on to rope.
9) Ensure lifeline is free of knots and that travel of lifeline will not pass over any sharp edges
10) Ensure rope grab is installed on lifeline correctly and test rope grab before heading to chase for
required work
11) After work is completed return to area of temporary anchor and detach lifeline and make your
way to roof edge, CAREFULLY USING COMMON SENSE
12) Immediately call Safety Supervisor and note in Hazard Assessment of lack of permanent Anchor
on this building or structure.
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Rescue of Worker after fall
1) If worker has fallen first check that worker is conscious. If worker is not conscious call 911 and
give them the address of worksite. Call safety foreman immediately after 911 call.
2) If worker is conscious but is complaining about serious pain, again, call 911
3) There is a 13-15 minute window to rescue an injured worker that has fallen. So time is of the
essence.
4) If worker is conscious and not seriously hurt call safety foreman to assess situation to see if 911
or a rescue by your self using an extension ladder is feasible. If rescue by extension ladder is to
be done use guidelines noted in safe work procedure F19.
Inspection after fall arrest
After a fall protection system has arrested the fall of a worker, an employer must ensure that the system
is not returned to service until it has been inspected and certified as safe by the manufacture or a
professional engineer.
Defective components
When a component of a fall protection system is defective in condition or function, an employer must not
use the component and must immediately remove it from service and either return it to the manufacturer
to be repaired or replaced or destroyed.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 22
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Driving to Jobsite Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Loss of Load, Vehicle Accident, Severe Injury, Environmental
PPE Required: Seat belt, Tie downs
Safe Work Procedure
42) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of vehicle ensuring:
x Tires are in good condition and do not have low air pressure
x All liquid levels on vehicle are adequate
x That ladders are tied down firmly
x That load in back of truck is firmly tied down with no loose material
x Obey all traffic signs especially school zones and construction areas and operate vehicle in safe
and courteous manner
x In winter driving, extra precaution must be taken when driving in slippery conditions
x No where you are going to before you start out
Developed by: Rick Schmidt
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: F 23
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Driving on the Job Site Safe Work Procedure
Location: Field
Hazards Present: Loss of Load, Vehicle Accident, Severe Injury, Flat Tire, Environmental
PPE Required: Seat Belt, Safety Vest
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of area that vehicle will be driving on ensuring all
debris and nails are out of the way.
2) If area is muddy or during spring thaw be careful that where you drive you will be able to get out as new
construction areas can have a very soft pack of dirt.
3) Backing up make sure someone is guiding you in so not to back into side of house.
4) DO NOT park on concrete driveways at any house at any time.
5) DO NOT drive across a property that is occupied.
6) Watch for children playing in residential areas and slow down.
Developed by: Rick Schmidt
Procedure: F 24
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What to do in case of a Vehicular Accident
Phone: 780-463-3096 (Main Office)
Cell: 780-399-6148 (Safety Director)
Terry Hlewka Cell: 780-224-4130
Claim Service Guide
x What to do at the accident scene
x Record Details
x Take pictures with phone - far away & close up
Please keep this in your glove compartment
What to do at the Accident Scene
x If the accident is serious, notify the police. Ask for medical aid, if needed.
x If you do not require 911 but need the Police (an injury or damages over $2000 )
call 780-423-4567
x Do not admit or assume responsibility. Do not make statements to anyone other
than the police or an insurance company representative.
x Obtain the names, addresses and telephone numbers of all persons involved and
of those who may have been witnesses.
x Get vehicle license number, driver’s license information of other driver and VIN #
of the other vehicle. If police are called to the scene be sure to note their badge
numbers for future reference, if needed.
x Disabled vehicles should be removed from the path of other motorists as soon as
possible after pictures are taken. Use emergency flashers to warn others.
Developed by : Barry Gabruch
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Shop Safe Work Procedures
x S 01
Bending metal in 8’ brake
x S 02
Cutting metal in shear
x S 03
Using Weld-o-matic on sheet metal
x S 04
Cutting metal in slitter
x S 05
Cutting metal in band saw
x S 06
Bending metal in box and pan brake
x S 07
Forming cleats in cleat former
x S 08
Forming metal through lock former
x S 09
Forming metal in Pittsburgh machine
x S 10
Forming metal in combination machine
x S 11
Cutting metal in portable band saw
x S 12
Notching metal in notcher
x S 13
Bending metal in roller
x S 14
Bending metal in bar folder
x S 15
Material handling of heavy loads
x S 16
Material handling of metal sheets
x S 17
Forklift
x S 18
Using Power drill
May 18 2012
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 01
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Bending Sheet Metal in 8‘ Brake Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Lift handle up to open jaws on the brake.
3) Insert sheet metal to be bent and insure hand placement is correct, material too large for 1 person will
require assistance.
4) Lower handle to apply pressure and hold sheet metal secure and insure hand placement is correct.
5) Lift bottom arm up to desired bend radius, be sure no workers are behind brake swing arm before
bending.
6) Release pressure on handle to visually inspect the proper brake. Repeat if necessary.
7) Lift handle up to open jaws on the brake and do not let the material to fall.
8) Remove metal from sheet metal brake.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 02
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Cutting Metal in Shear Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Make sure gauge of sheet metal is within requirements of shear.
3) Lay sheet metal on table and sight along your cutline or use the scale on the 90 degrees edge of the
table.
4) Ensure all safety guards are in place.
5) Gently push down on foot pedal to drop blade on sheet metal. If excessive force is needed. STOP!
Check gauge of metal. Do not use force on pedal to force cut.
6) Do not reach behind shear to manage material.
7) Remove sheet metal when knife is up and foot is off the pedal.
8) Replace used sheet stock to the appropriate area, small pieces should be placed in a designated area
as not to create interference with shear or cause a slipping problem.
9) Clean area of debris after use.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
Page 152
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 03
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Using Weld-o-matic on Sheet Metal Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Repetitive Muscle, Debris in eyes, Severe Burns
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Visor
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Workers must wear leather gloves to ensure that they will not get severe burns on fingers when
handling newly welded joints.
3) Workers also must put on visor provided on wall to operate this machine. And be aware of pedestrians
that may be in the area of the sparks.
4) Turn on power level on machine to 7-8 for 22 to 30 gauge.
5) Turn on water just a quarter turn for proper weld, and make sure is powered on located on switch
behind machine.
6) Ensure copper welding tips are cleaned if they are dirty from welding use file to bring tips to 70 degrees
on the point and shave tips flat to about a one eighth circle. Tips must be kept clean to have a proper
weld.
7) Place pieces of metal in between tips making sure fingers are not in any pinching points.
8) Press down on foot lever until contact is made and weld is done which is normally around 2 seconds.
9) Keep body parts away from new welds as they are extremely hot.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 04
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Cutting Metal In Slitter Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, safety glasses
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Set gauge to required cut size, again check work area that desired cut length will not interfere with
anything as it goes through slitter.
3) Slide metal sheet onto back gauge.
4) Slide metal sheet through slitter, guiding sheet with hands to ensure straight cut.
5) Most important keep fingers and hands away from cutting wheels.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 05
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Cutting Metal in Band saw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Repetitive Muscle, Loss of limbs, Debris in eyes, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, Gloves, Face Shield, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Ensure saw is locked out and conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection to insure cords, switches,
blade and guard for defects. Be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) If multiple sheets of metal are being cut, material clamps are needed 1 inch from point of entry of cut.
3) Adjust guard on to 1/8 inch above height of metal to be cut.
4) Turn on saw. Inspect blade as it runs to ensure no defects.
5) Push metal through blade very slowly.
6) Do not exert excessive force on when cutting. Let the blade do the work.
7) Shut off saw. Wait until blades stops. Remove metal from work platform
8) Lockout machine and clean off if there is a lot of metal shavings.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 06
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Bending Metal in Box & Pan Brake Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injuries.
2) Make sure all nose bars are properly clamped to top leaf.
3) Lift handle up to open jaws on the brake.
4) Insert sheet metal to be bent and insure hand placement is correct, material too large for 1 person will
require assistance.
5) Lower handle to apply pressure and hold sheet metal secure and insure hand placement is correct.
6) Lift bottom arm up to desired bend radius, be sure no workers are behind brake swing arm before
bending.
7) Release pressure on handle to visually inspect the proper brake. Repeat if necessary.
8) Lift handle up to open jaws on the brake and do not let the material to fall.
9) Remove metal from sheet metal brake.
Developed by: Karl Jamieson
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 07
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Forming Cleats in Cleat Former Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Turn power on to cleat former using switch located on side machine.
3) Place metal on proper guide, the bottom guide being standing seam (end caps) and the top guide being
a hammer lock.
4) S-cleat and drive cleat are run on center guide using the guide lines outlined below.
5) Push material through guide gently giving pressure into guide but letting the machine do the work
6) Remove hand from material if hands are within 6 inches of rollers instead using the wood stick located
on top of machine to push it through.
7) Turn off machine if away from it do not let it run without an operator.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 08
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Forming Metal Through Lock Former Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, Gloves, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Turn power on to Lockformer using switch located on side machine.
3) Place duct on right side of guide for male end of buttonlock and left side for female end of buttonlock.
4) Push material through guide gently giving pressure into guide but letting the machine do the work
5) Remove hand from material if hands are within 6 inches of rollers instead using the wood stick located
on top of machine to push it through.
6) Turn off machine if away from it do not let it run without an operator.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
Page 158
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 09
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Forming Metal In Pittsburgh Machine Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Turn power on to Pittsburgh machine using switch located on side machine.
3) Place metal on proper guide, the bottom guide being the male end and the top being the female end.
4) Push material through guide making sure notch is lined up and gently giving pressure into guide but
letting the machine do the work
5) Remove hand from material if hands are within 3 inches of rollers instead using the wood stick located
on top of machine to push it through.
6) Turn off machine if away from it do not let it run without an operator.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 10
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Forming Metal In Combination Machine Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Turn power on to Lockformer using switch located on side machine.
3) Place metal on proper guide, the bottom guide being standing seam (end caps) and the top guide being
a hammer lock.
4) S-cleat and drive cleat are run on center guide using the guide lines outlined below.
5) Push material through guide gently giving pressure into guide but letting the machine do the work
6) Remove hand from material if hands are within 6 inches of rollers instead using the wood stick located
on top of machine to push it through.
7) Turn off machine if away from it do not let it run without an operator.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 11
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Cutting Metal in Portable Band Saw Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Repetitive Muscle, Loss of limbs, Debris in eyes, Noise
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, Gloves, Face Shield, Hearing Protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Ensure saw is locked out and conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection to insure cords, switches,
blade and guard for defects. Be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) If multiple sheets of metal are being cut, material clamps are needed 1 inch from point of entry of cut.
3) Ensure proper stance and good grip on saw.
4) Turn on saw. Inspect blade as it runs to ensure no defects.
5) Push metal through blade very slowly.
6) Do not exert excessive force on when cutting. Let the blade do the work.
7) Shut off saw. Wait until blades stops. Remove metal from work platform
8) Lockout machine and clean off if there is a lot of metal shavings.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 12
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Notching Metal in Notcher Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Set notching guides to proper measurements required.
3) Slide sheet into notcher ensuring no pedestrians or hazards are in vicinity of work area
4) Slide sheet to back of gauge holding material firmly in hand.
5) Make sure you have steady footing while stepping down on foot petal bringing down the dyes to notch
the metal.
6) Pull sheet out of guide and repeat.
Developed by: Mike Kashman
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 13
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Bending Metal in Roller Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Set rollers for proper metal thickness using the two front adjustment knobs. If sheet has folded edge
ensure there is enough space between rollers not to crush fold.
3) Set the rear roll using adjustment knobs in back of machine. To make a large diameter the rear roll must
be lowered and raised if you need a smaller diameter.
4) Note- There is no set adjustment to produce a certain diameter.
5) Insert the sheet between the front rolls and turn handle to assess the diameter you are getting, adjust
rear roller to suit diameter needed.
6) Make sure finger are kept away from rollers when rolling metal.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 14
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Bending Metal in Bar Folder Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Loosen the locking screw.
3) With the gauge adjusting screw, set the gauge slightly less than the width of a hem.
4) Tighten the locking screw.
5) Insert edge of the metal to be folded between the folding blade and the jaw.
6) Hold the metal firmly against the gauge fingers with the left hand and place the right hand on the
operating handle.to fold the edge bring handle up to desired degree of angle, if 90 degrees is wanted
bend slightly more than 90.
7) Return handle to its former position.
8) If hem is wanted flip material over on blade of folder and bring wing 180 degrees to flatten hem.
9) Return handle to its former position.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 15
Page 1 of 2
Date: May 18 2012
Material Handling of Heavy Loads Safe Work Procedure
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries, back injury
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
Assess the situation
Before lifting or carrying a heavy object, ask yourself the following questions:
1) Can you lift this load safely, or is it a two person lift?
2) How far will you have to carry the load?
3) Is the path clear of clutter, cords or uneven surfaces, slippery areas, overhangs, stairs, curbs?
4) Will you encounter closed doors that need to be opened?
5) Once the load is lifted, will it block your view?
6) Can the load be broken down into smaller parts?
7) Should you wear gloves to get a better grip and protect your hands?
Size up the load
1) Test the weight by lifting one of the corners. If it is too heavy or an awkward shape, stop.
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2) If there is any doubt, ask for help from your fellow workers.
3) Try to use mechanical lift, dolly or pallet jack.
4) Try to break the load down into smaller parts.
Use good lifting techniques
1) Get close to the load. Center yourself over the load and stand with your feet shoulder width apart.
2) Tighten your stomach muscles. Tight abdominal muscles increase intra-abdominal pressure and help to
support the back.
3) Get a good handhold and pull the load close to you. The farther the load is from your body, the heavier it
will feel.
4) Bend your knees. Bending your knees is the single most important thing you can do when you lift
moderate to heavy objects. Squat down like a weight lifter, bend your knees, keep your back in its
natural arch, and let your legs do the lifting. Your leg muscles are much more powerful than the smaller
muscles in your back.
5) Do not jerk. Use a smooth motion and lift straight up.
6) Do not twist or turn your body while lifting. Keep your head up, and look straight ahead. Hold the load
close and keep it steady.
Carrying the load
1) Change direction by turning your feet, not your back.
2) Your nose and your toes should always be pointing in the same direction. Any sudden twisting can result
in taking out your back.
3) Rest if you fatigue. Set down the load and rest for a few minutes.
Setting the load down
1) Bend your knees. Squat down and let your legs do the work.
2) Keep your back curves. Remember not to twist your body while setting down a load, and keep your
head up. Keep the load close.
3) Plan your release. Once the load is where you want it, release your grip until the load is secure.
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Using pallet jack and lifting aids
1) Push rather than pull. It is easier and safer to push than to pull. You can use your body weight to assist
when pushing.
2) Keep close to the load and lock your arms. Try not to lean over and keep your back in natural arches.
3) Use both hands. Carts are easier to push and control using both hands.
4) Use tie-downs, if necessary, to secure the load.
Forklifts
1) Use a forklift to lift and transport very heavy objects.
2) Obtain training and authorization before using a forklift.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 16
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Material Handling of Metal Sheets Safe Work Procedure
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Dropping Metal, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Always wear gloves when handling metal sheets.
3) Always take your time when working with metal sheets and don’t be afraid to ask for a hand from one or
two workers if it is an awkward lift.
4) If talking metal sheets from a stack always give the metal a quick “whip” in order for air to pass between
the sheets for easy sliding onto work table.
5) If a sheet is falling do NOT attempt to stop it just get out of the way and let it fall.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 17
Page 1 of 3
Date: May 18 2012
Operating Forklift Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this machine must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below and must
be familiar with the location of the nearest exit, eyewash station and fire extinguisher.
Location: Shop
Hazards Present: Dropping Material, Pinch Points, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves
Safe Work Procedure
Preshift
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection, be aware of surroundings to prevent injury.
2) Do not operate a forklift that has a maintenance problem, or is not safe to operate. Remove key and put
out of service tag.
Loading
1) Check the rating capacity on the forklift nameplate.
2) Determine if the load weight is within the capacity of the forklift. Note that for every one inch further
away from the carriage that the load is placed, there is a loss of aprox. 100 lbs. Carrying capacity.
3) The forklift should be started with the forks down.
4) Always wear your seat belt when operating the forklift.
5) Lift the forks to 3 inches.
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Safe Job Procedures
Lifting a palletized load
1) Drive to the pallet. This applies to either a pallet on a lower or upper shelf. Stop with the fork 3 inches from
the load.
2) Level the mast. The mast must be at right angles to the load.
3) Raise the forks to 1 inch below the slot on the pallet.
4) Drive forward into the pallet.
5) Lift forks 4 inches.
6) Tilt back load until secured for travel. If load will obscure vision drive the lift in reverse taking care while
turning as the extra swing may cause load instability.
7) Look back. Honk. Drive back so that the load clears the pallets below.
8) Lower the load to 3 inches above the ground. Do not drag the forks on the floor.
9) Materials and equipment are to be loaded on the forklift in a manner that prevents any movement of the
load that could create a hazard to workers or others.
10) All Loads that could be subject to shifting during transport are to be restrained if shifting would result in
the forklift becoming unstable.
Picking up old furnaces and HWT`s
1) Drop forks to 1 inch above ground. Forks must be spaced accurately for a safe grip.
2) Slide furnace on forks ensuring proper balance.
3) Raise forks 12 inches above ground and tilt mast back to cradle furnace for travel.
Traveling
1) Do not drive with arms, head or legs outside the confines of the forklift.
2) Turn forklift only when the forks are lowered to a safe travelling height.
3) Drive only on smooth surfaces such as cement or asphalt, this vehicle is not designed to operate on
rough terrain.
4) Ensure that the operating (road) is free from ice. Use tire chains if required.
5) Avoid using forklift in high volumes of pedestrians. Wait for a quicker time to deliver to busy congested
areas.
6) When operating in area of pedestrian traffic minimize risk to others by cordoning off areas off areas with
signage and/or traffic cones to prevent walkthrough traffic.
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7) Use horn as a warning device for oncoming pedestrians.
8) Drive to the point of deposit. Position the forklift in front of the deposit area.
Unloading Pallets
1) Raise load 5-10 inches above the unloading point (space permitting).
2) Drive forward stopping 3-4 inches in front of the deposit point.
3) Tilt mast forward to a right angle position so load is level.
4) Drive forward until load is aligned with corners of the stack.
5) Stop. Lower load to resting place. Stack Pallets loaded with cases, cartons straight and square. Stagger
the top tier to ``tie in place``.
Unloading furnaces & HWT`s in Dumpster
1) Ensure forks are square to dumpster and raising them to desired height above dumpster.
2) Tilt forks forward and shake forks up and down until load falls into dumpster.
3) Ensure no pedestrians are in vicinity.
Parking
1) Tilt the upright forward until the forks are level or flat on the floor.
2) Apply the parking brake, place the transmission in neutral; chock the wheels if you have any doubt in
the forklift moving
Operations on Grades and Ramps
1) Never turn on an angled grade.
2) Keep unloaded forks facing down grade.
3) Loaded forks face upgrade.
Developed by: Brian Schroeder
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Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
Procedure: S 18
Page 1 of 1
Date: May 18 2012
Using Power Drill Safe Work Procedure
Note: Operators of this power tool must be trained by a qualified trainer, demonstrate operational competency
before using. Operators should be wearing the personal protective equipment recommended below.
Location: Shop and Field
Hazards Present: Lacerations, Pinch Points, Repetitive Muscle, Crush Injuries
PPE Required: CSA Footwear, gloves, hard hat, eye protection
Safe Work Procedure
1) Conduct a pre operation walk-around inspection of work area, be aware of surroundings to prevent
injury.
2) Keep work area clean, cluttered areas and benches invite injuries.
3) Dress properly; do not wear loose clothing or jewelry as it may get caught in moving parts.
4) Do not over reach; Keep proper footing and balance at all times.
5) Avoid unintentional starts; don’t carry tool with finger on switch. Be sure to lock off trigger when
transporting tool.
6) Don’t operate tool if fatigued or impaired.
7) Keep work area well lit.
8) Use safety glasses if drilling overhead.
9) Use dust mask if when in dusty conditions.
10) Don’t contact any exposed electrical terminals.
11) Do not use drill for purposes not intended for drill.
12) Hold drill firmly to control the twisting action of the drill and prevent loss of control.
13) Always disconnect power source when removing or installing accessories.
Developed by: Wayne Rendell
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4.4 The Safe Job Procedures are followed by the workers as witnessed
through inspections and observation
INSPECTIONS
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Best Business Practices require employers to make
regular safety inspections of their work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature
and hazard of the work and by Manufacturers’ instructions. Such inspections are made monthly with the
crews and will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.
PURPOSE OF INSPECTIONS
x Discover any unsafe conditions.
x Prevent accidents and property damage.
x Identify existing and potential hazards.
x Identify safety code violations and reinforce and promote safe work practices.
x Help prevent breakdown of equipment, and reduce down time.
x Help prevent loss of tools, equipment and materials.
x Identify and prevent losses BEFORE they happen.
4.5 Both management/supervisors and workers participated in the
development of these procedures
Development Method
Safe Work Plans should be developed by the following method:
A Safe Work Plan Leader will be appointed who is responsible to ensure technical integrity and
content of the plan.
The Safe Work Plan Leader will analyze the needs and select a team of knowledgeable individuals
to assist in the development of the plan. He may also consult the members of the Safety
Committee.
The Safe Work Plan Leader ensures the objectives are established and clearly understood by all
members of the team.
The team must:
Conduct a Formal Hazard Assessment of the work by preparing an Activity Plan, analyzing each
activity, and identifying the relevant loss exposures and necessary controls.
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Refer to previously developed safe work plans as needed.
Develop the action plan to control the loss exposure and minimize the risk.
Perform an efficiency check of the action plan.
For more information related to the Safe Work Practices and Critical Tasks please refer to the
Safe Job Procedures Binder.
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5.
Company Rules
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Occupational Health & Safety Act Section 2
Obligations of employers, workers, etc.
2(1) Every employer shall ensure, as far as it is reasonably
practicable for the employer to do so,
(a) the health and safety of
(i) workers engaged in the work of that employer, and
(ii) those workers not engaged in the work of that
employer but present at the work site at which that
work is being carried out, and
(b) that the workers engaged in the work of that employer are
aware of their responsibilities and duties under this Act, the
regulations and the adopted Code.
Occupational Health & Safety Act Section 2
Company Rules Program Confirmation
5.1
The Company rules are prominently posted or provided to each worker.
5.2
The workers understand company and site specific rules
5.3
The program includes progressive disciplinary actions by supervisors/
management.
5.4
All rules are applied/ enforced consistently with all employees.
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5.1 The Company rules are prominently posted or provided to each worker
INTRODUCTION
Rules and regulations are an integral part of our safety program. When used effectively, they contribute
to the overall success of Weiss-Johnson Group of Companies. They are prominently posted at the main
office of each company. Location areas within the office are the lunchroom, office areas or the shop.
Definitions
The following definitions are used in this section.
Rule: A directive that governs and controls conduct or action, and that is instituted by an
organization.
Regulation: An ordinance, a law, or a direction set by an outside organization or agency, such
as government, for the control of people and their environment.
About Rules
Rules are basic “thou shalt” or “thou shalt not” statements. They leave no room for discretion or
argument. Rules should be enforced. Action should be taken every time a rule is violated, and not only
when some loss occurs because of the violation of rules. Since our developing safety program already
contains assignments of responsibility, safe work practices, and job procedures, and since regulations
(discussed below) also control behavior, rules have been kept to a minimum.
5.2 The workers understand company and site specific rules
About Regulations
Alberta Occupational Health & Safety regulations are a fact of life and make a lot of sense. There
are numerous other regulations that affect the safety of employees, such as the highway traffic act,
electrical codes, building codes, etc.
You must draw on your expertise and experience and that of the employees, to determine what
regulations apply to the organization. Obtain copies of relevant regulations, then study them and
understand them. Applicable regulations must then be provided and explained to affected employees.
These regulations are for your benefit as well as for your employees’ benefit. Rules can sometimes be
difficult to “sell” to your employees. Regulations, which often do the same job, are easier to sell – IT’S
THE LAW.
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MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS
a. Wear safety boots at all times in all construction areas.
b. Report to your supervisor all unsafe acts, unsafe conditions and near miss incidents.
c. Report all injury or damage accidents immediately to appropriate supervision. First aid treatment
is to be obtained promptly for injury.
d. Perform all work in accordance with safe work practices and job procedures and your
supervisor’s direction.
PROHIBITIONS
The following are prohibited at all times on all company job-sites and company offices:
e. Possession or consumption of alcohol or illegal drugs.
f.
Possession of firearms.
g. Possession of knives for the purpose of causing harm to a fellow individual.
h. Fighting, horseplay, practical jokes.
i.
Theft or vandalism
j.
Damaging disabling or interfering with safety, firefighting or first aid equipment.
k. Arriving for work or remaining at work when ability to perform the job safely is impaired.
RESPONSIBILITIES
EMPLOYER
Must make available the appropriate gloves and barrier masks in Company first aid kits.
Provide first aid training as per Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.
Lead by coaching and supporting your staff and actively supporting the Health and Safety Program.
Maintain overall control of the Health & Safety Program’s direction in your company.
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Provide information, instructions, and assistance to all supervisory staff and/or sub-contractors in order
to protect the health and safety of all employees and the environment.
Confirm that the Health & Safety Program is administered and enforced in all departments.
Provide ongoing safety education programs to meet or exceed legislated requirements and the
requirements of our clients.
WORKERS
Must participate in first aid training at employer’s request and arrangement.
Use personal protective equipment and follow procedures as required when administering first aid.
Record first aid information on a “First Aid Record” report form, or report as a Near Miss on the Job
Hazard Assessment.
Advise supervisor of all exposure incidents.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Disposable Gloves
Disposable gloves are intended for one-time use. They are to be worn when there is a risk of direct
contact with blood, body fluids, opened wounds or sores.
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Barrier Masks
Barrier masks reduce the risk of disease exposure during artificial respiration without altering approved
resuscitation techniques.
Safety Boots
As approved by CSA to be worn in all construction sites and shop work areas.
Safety Glasses
To be worn on the construction site. Recommend wearing safety string to assist with wearing glasses
throughout the day.
Hard Hats
CSA approved hard hats to worn on the exterior of all construction sites. If boarding is complete and
there is no signs of overhead danger one may remove hard hat. One may also remove hard hat to
access areas in the joists or other tight spots.
GENERAL GUIDELINES
Disposable gloves shall be worn when it is likely that there will be contact with blood or other body
fluids, non-intact skin and items or surfaces soiled with blood or other body fluids.
Open sores, wounds, or irritated skin on caregiver’s hands shall be covered by wearing gloves.
Barrier masks or a ventilation device shall be made readily available for use in resuscitation.
Wash hands or other skin surfaces as soon as practicable after any contact with blood or other body
fluids.
All spills and surfaces contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be cleaned with soap and
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water first, using disposable towels, and then disinfected with a solution of one part household bleach to
nine parts water.
Clothing soiled with blood or other body fluids shall be removed as soon as practicable, handled as little
as possible and washed in a normal laundry cycle, using laundry detergent.
Waste contaminated with blood or other body fluids shall be placed in a sturdy plastic bag, which shall
be secured with a twist tie and disposed with regular garbage.
For more information related to the Safe Work Practices and Critical Tasks please refer to the
Safe Work Practices Binder.
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Weiss-Johnson Company Rules and Policy
x
Report all injuries, no matter how slight to Supervisor; get first aid treatment promptly.
x
Call super or Safety Manager to report all minor injuries (First Aid) or incidents (medical aid).
x
Know the 3 types of work-related injuries: a) Near Miss b) First Aid
x
Near Miss or Close Call must be recorded “Yes/No” in the Hazard Assessment Booklet.
x
Use First Aid type injury is recorded if it is a minor injury with no medical attention required. Hand into HR office.
x
Medical Aid injury is reported to a physician where a modified work program will begin. Call Safety Manger.
x
Job Hazard Assessments must be completed with worker involvement before the job begins each day
x
The Top 3 PPE are required 100% of the time when on exterior and interior of all projects or construction sites.
The Top 3 PPE are:
a) Steel-toed Boots
b) Hard Hat
c) Safety Glasses
x
Hard hats are to be worn 100% of the time on all construction sites. In special circumstances hard hats may be
removed temporarily to access confined spaces. If removed, it must be written in the Hazard Assessment Booklet.
x
CSA approved footwear to be worn 100% of the time when on the exterior of a project and 100% until interior
boarding is complete. They are to be worn 100% in the shop.
x
Safety Glasses are to be worn 100% of the time while on all construction sites. Safety Glasses are to be worn
100% of the time while fabricating materials in the shop.
x
Fall protection is required for above 3 meters as per OH&S Act (Section 139).
x
Hearing protection must be worn when exposed to noise greater than 85 dba.
x
Chainsaw pants and visor are required when using a chainsaw.
x
Correct or report unsafe conditions or acts immediately.
x
Only use, adjust or repair tools, eqpmnt. if authorized to do so. See Fleet Manager Terry Hlewka.
x
Maintain good housekeeping standards in the work area at all times
x
The use of non-prescription drugs or alcohol on any Weiss-Johnson premises, vehicle or worksite is prohibited.
The offending party will be escorted off the work site, immediately.
x
Discipline for above is Written Warning and Suspension or Termination.
x
Horseplay, fighting or harassment of other persons will not be tolerated. No firearms or other weapons are
permitted on any Weiss-Johnson worksite or vehicle.
x
No smoking in a building or company vehicle as per City of Edmonton Bylaw #14614. Smoking must be done
outdoors and 5 meters from doorway or window.
c) Medical Aid
I ____________________________ understand that the failure to abide by the policy may lead to a warning, suspension
or immediate dismissal.
Signature __________________________________
Date: ___ / ____ / 2015
dd
mm
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5.3
The program includes progressive disciplinary actions by
supervisors/management.
Progressive Discipline Policy
Intent
Weiss Johnson has adopted a policy of Progressive Discipline to ensure that employees have the opportunity
to correct any performance or behavioral problems that may arise. Weiss Johnson has established a set of
reasonable rules and guidelines for employees to follow. These have not been put in place to restrict the
freedoms of our employees, but rather they are in consideration of their safety, and the overall protection of
Weiss Johnson employees, property, and our business practices.
Guidelines
This policy addresses the following:
A. The Progressive Discipline Process
B. The Levels of Progressive Discipline
C. Investigation and Documentations
D. Suspension and Review Period
E. Termination
F. Suspension with Pay
A. Progressive Discipline Process
In the event that an employee of Weiss Johnson violates company policy or exhibits problematic behavior, a
system of progressive discipline shall be utilized.
Progressive Discipline can be issued on either: attendance, conduct, health & safety or performance concerns.
Employees will be given four opportunities to correct the unwanted behavior, unless the behaviour or concern
is one of a severe nature, in which case, progressive discipline can be accelerated to match the violation.
Typically, progressive discipline will progress through the following steps:
1. Coaching - informal
2. Verbal Warning - formal
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3. Written Warning - formal
4. Final Written Warning with Possible Suspension - formal
5. Termination
With each violation or apparent problem, the employee will be provided with a written document to: (1) alert
them to the problem, provide a reiteration of the correct company policy regarding the violation, (2) advise them
of the consequences associated with further infractions, and (3) provide a suggestion towards a method of
improvement.
All formal warnings will be kept on file for a period of eighteen (18) months. If no further discipline happens
within the time period, the warning will become inactive. If further offences relating to the issue have taken
place, the warning will be attached to the next set of progressive disciplinary actions.
Degrees of discipline shall be used in relation to the problem at hand. As the situation dictates, based on the
past performances of the employee, and the seriousness of the violation, Weiss Johnson reserves the right to
skip the three step disciplinary process and move straight to termination where necessary.
B. Progressive Discipline Levels
This policy contains attached Progressive Discipline Levels. The table outlines the progressive discipline steps
for common workplace issues. The chart provides clear examples of unacceptable offences and the resulting
violation in general terms. The chart does not contain all offences and depending on the nature and severity of
the offense Weiss Johnson reserves the right to advance discipline to a higher level.
C. Investigation and Documentation
All violations or alleged violations will be properly investigated and documented by a manager, and/or Human
Resources. All formal measures that have been taken within the progressive discipline process will be
documented and kept in the employee’s personnel file.
D. Suspension and Review Period
During the final written warning, an employee may be suspended and/or put on review.
x Suspension: Employees put on suspension will be excluded without pay from the workplace for a period
of one to three (1-3) days depending on the violation. Typically suspension will be for three (3) days
depending on sverity.
x Review: Employees may be put on a review period following the final written warning. The review period
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will last 6 months. During the review period the employee will be excluded from wage increases and
advancement and is discouraged from taking vacation.
E. Termination of Employment
The final stage of progressive discipline is termination of employment. Termination of employment with Weiss
Johnson may occur following an employee committing multiple violations of company policy, after the logical
steps for progressive disciplinary action have been taken or immediately following a severe violation.
F. Appeals
In the event that an employee feels that they have been wrongfully accused, or disciplined, they may file a
written appeal with Human Resources. Written appeals must contain:
x Details of the discipline;
x Events surrounding the discipline;
x Why the employee feels the discipline is not warranted or appropriate.
Human Resources shall review and respond to all written appeals within ten (10) business days.
G. Suspension with Pay – Pending Investigation
In the event that a Weiss Johnson employee is placed on suspension pending the results of an investigation,
the employee will be notified of the decision, a stated timeline for the investigation and the actions that
predicated the decision.
This form of suspension is not disciplinary but is intended to allow Weiss Johnson to examine the issues
thoroughly and to determine appropriate action. Should the investigation not be completed during the stated
timeline, Weiss Johnson will reserve the right to extend the suspension, as necessary.
During the course of the investigation, the suspended employee will be provided with the details of the
allegations and given an opportunity to respond to them. The suspended employee must ensure that he/she is
available for interviews during this period. If the suspended employee fails to make him/ herself available, Weiss
Johnson will proceed with the investigation and make a determination based on the information available.
The suspended employee will have the right to legal representation, or a Weiss Johnson representative present
at any such interview, and will be given 24 hours notice prior to any interview(s) taking place.
As the suspended employee will be suspended with full pay, he/she will be required to be available for
interviews during this period. Should the suspended employee need to leave town or be otherwise unavailable
for interviews, he/she must submit a request and be granted approved leave.
Weiss Johnson employee who is placed on suspension with pay will be required to temporarily turn over his/
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her office keys, access passes and Weiss Johnson identification and credit cards. Any and all Weiss Johnson
property, business information, and confidential information are to remain at the worksite. In the event that any
Weiss Johnson employee placed on suspension with pay maintains any files or equipment at his/her residence
which are the property of Weiss Johnson he/she will be required to turn these items over to a Weiss Johnson
representative, until such time as the investigation is completed.
Weiss Johnson employees placed on suspension with pay should not have contact with anyone from the office
other than their designated point of contact.
Administration
If you have any questions or concerns about this policy or its related procedures please contact:
Barry Gabruch
Human Resources Manager
Safety Director
Phone: (780) 399-6148
E-mail: [email protected]
Acknowledgment and Agreement
I, _________________________________, acknowledge that I have read and understand the Progressive
Discipline Policy of Weiss Johnson I agree to adhere to this policy and will ensure that employees working
under my direction adhere to this Policy. I understand that if I violate the rules set forth by this Policy, I may face
legal, punitive, or corrective action. Name:
____________________________________
Signature:
____________________________________
Date:
____________________________________
Witness:
____________________________________
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5.4
All rules are applied/ enforced consistently with all employees.
HARASSMENT and VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE
HARASSMENT in the WORKPLACE
WEISS-JOHNSON is committed to provide a harassment-free work environment for all of its employees.
Harassment in the workplace is a form of discrimination. It is unwelcome and unwanted. It affects not
only the individual’s ability to work and learn but also their self-esteem and sense of well-being.
Management is responsible to take appropriate preventative or corrective action and to put a stop to
any harassment it is aware of, whether or not a complaint is filed. The employer is liable for workplace
harassment that it does not deal with effectively.
The Human Rights Act of various provinces and the Canadian Human Rights Act make employer’s
responsible for the harassing and discriminatory conduct of their employees. Therefore, when an
employee files a complaint under the Human Rights Act, the employer becomes a co-respondent to the
complaint.
Prevention and reporting of harassment situations is the responsibility of all personnel. Any person who
believes that a colleague has experienced or is experiencing workplace harassment or retaliation for
having brought forward a complaint is encouraged to notify the General Manager.
This policy is not intended to limit or constrain the employer’s right to manage. Performance reviews,
work evaluations and disciplinary measures taken by the employer for any valid reason do not constitute
harassment in the workplace.
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Workplace Harassment Policy is:
x To maintain a working environment that is free from all types of harassment;
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x To alert all employees, supervisors, and management to the fact that workplace harassment is
against the law;
x To establish a process for receiving complaints of harassment and to provide a mechanism to
deal with those complaints effectively;
x To provide an example of the steps that can be taken towards maintaining a working
environments in which all employees treat each other with mutual respect;
Purpose (cont’d)
x To also establish protected grounds under race, colour, religion, national origin, ancestry, place
of origin, age, physical disability, marital status, sexual orientation or sex.
DEFINITIONS
Abuse of Authority
Examples of abuse of authority include but are not limited to such acts or misuse of power as
intimidation, threats, blackmail or coercion.
Discrimination
Discrimination includes, but is not limited to:
x Differential treatment having an adverse impact on an individual on the basis of any of the
protected grounds;
x Any action or policy which has an adverse impact on an individual based on any of the protected
grounds; and
x Use of stereotyped images or language (including jokes and anecdotes) which suggest that all
of most employees of a particular group of people are the same.
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Harassment
Harassment means any improper behavior by any person employed by WEISS-JOHNSON that is
directed to any employee or group of employees and which a person knew or ought reasonably to have
known to be unwelcome.
For the purposes of this policy, harassment in the workplace includes personal and sexual harassment,
poisoned work environment, discrimination and abuse of authority.
Personal Harassment
Personal Harassment includes, but is not limited to:
x Verbal harassment: based on any of the protected grounds; stereotypes; name-calling; insults;
threats; slurs; crude, degrading, suggestive, or unwelcome remarks; offensive songs or tapes;
jokes or innuendoes based on any of the protected grounds;
x Physical harassment: unwelcome physical touching or solicitation;
x Written or graphic materials: graffiti; unwanted notes or letters, texts, e-mails, etc.; and avoidance
or exclusion of any group or individual.
Poisoned Work Environment
A poisoned work environment is characterized by any activity or behavior, not necessarily directed at
anyone in particular, that creates a hostile or offensive workplace.
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment means any conduct, comment, gesture, or contact that:
x Might be reasonably be expected to cause offence or humiliation; or
x Is a condition of employment, an opportunity for training or promotion, receipt of services or a
contract.
RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
EMPLOYER
The employer is responsible for:
x Investigating all allegations of discrimination or harassment and ensuring appropriate
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documentation of all complaints;
x Administering the provisions of this policy and ensuring compliance;
x Providing education on harassment and discrimination to all employees and to all supervisors
and managers so that they will be better qualified to handle all aspects of their jobs;
x Ensuring that all employees are familiar with this policy and the procedure for handing
complaints under the policy;
x Taking corrective action and/or disciplinary action as required;
x Ensuring that the complainant and the respondent are informed, in writing, of the outcome of the
investigation, including any disciplinary action to be taken, as soon as possible;
x Providing status reports on the investigation at any time to the complainant and respondent;
x Recording the disciplinary action taken in the respondent’s personnel file;
x Ensure that under no circumstances will the remedial action taken in relation to the respondent,
in a substantiated case, penalize the complainant; and
x Determining the disciplinary action to be taken in the finding of a “bad faith” complaint.
MANAGERS OR SUPERVISORS
Managers and supervisors have authority to prevent or discourage harassment and may be held
accountable for failing to do so.
Managers are also responsible for ensuring that the rights of both the respondent and the complainant
involved in a harassment incident are protected. Fair and equitable procedures must be ensured for all
parties.
Managers and supervisors are responsible for:
x Establishing and maintaining a workplace that is free from harassment and discrimination;
x Refusing to condone harassment or discrimination; and
x Ensuring that employees are aware of their rights and responsibilities under this policy and
of the mechanisms that is in place to investigate and resolve discrimination and harassment
complaints.
COMPLAINANTS
An employee has the right to file a complaint and to obtain a review of that complaint without fear of
retaliation, through the procedures established according to this policy.
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Employees are encouraged to take assertive action should they feel they are being subjected to any
type of discrimination or harassment.
Employees are encouraged to make the feelings of harassment known to the respondent immediately
by:
x Advising the respondent that the behavior is not welcome, is offensive and must cease
immediately.
Employees should:
x Maintain a record of times, dates, witnesses and the nature of the behavior for future reference;
and
x Cooperate fully with all stages of the mediation and/or investigative processes
It is the right of the complainant, if so desired, to drop the allegations of harassment or discrimination,
made in good faith, without resolution, as long as:
x The decision was made without coercion; and
x The complainant understands that, where reasonable suspicion or definite evidence of
harassment or discrimination exists, the supervisor and/or manager(s) will be required to
complete the investigation and remedy the situation.
x Before making a decision on how to proceed, the complainant may seek advice and assistance.
RESPONDENTS
Employees against whom a complaint has been lodged are entitled to and shall:
x Be informed as soon as practical that a complaint has been filed;
x Be presented with a statement of allegations and be afforded an opportunity to respond to them;
x Have the right to speak to an impartial advisor to review options;
x Be accompanied by a person of the respondent’s choice, at no expense to the employer, during
any interviews and investigate proceedings; and
x Cooperate fully with all stages of the mediation and/or investigation process.
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WITNESSES
Employees are obligated to meet with the investigators and to cooperate with all those responsible for
the investigation of the complaint.
No employee shall be subjected to retaliation because that employee has participated as a witness.
Employees are obliged to maintain confidentiality with respect to the investigation.
PROCEDURES FOR DEALING WITH HARASSMENT CASES
Employees are encouraged to address alleged incidents of harassment internally.
An employee who believes that they have been subjected to harassment is encouraged to clearly and
firmly make known to the alleged harasser that the harassment is objectionable and must stop.
Where circumstances prevent an employee from taking action, or the action taken is unsuccessful, the
employee should report the alleged harassment to one of the following persons designated by WEISSJOHNSON to receive complaints of harassment:
1. Immediate Supervisor
2. General Manager
3. Human Resources
When the employee has reported the alleged harassment to their immediate Supervisor, the Supervisor
shall immediately bring the complaint to the attention of the General Manager or Human Resources.
Human Resources will notify the alleged harasser of the complaint, provide the alleged harasser with
information concerning the circumstances of the complaint, and undertake a confidential investigation.
INTERNAL
INFORMAL - RESOLUTION STAGE
Informal resolution of complaints is encouraged. An employee may request the assistance of his or her
supervisor or any other person in the informal resolution of a workplace harassment complaint. This
approach may include a mediation process to assist the parties in voluntary reaching an acceptable
solution.
FORMAL - RESOLUTION STAGE
Any employee may choose the formal resolution process either as a first step; on the advice of the
General Manager; or if the informal resolution process was not successful.
To proceed to the Formal Resolution Stage, the complaint must be submitted in writing, on the approved
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Harassment Complaint Form, and signed by the complainant before investigation can begin. It should
give an accurate account of the incident(s) of harassment or discrimination including times, places and
parties involved.
Although WEISS-JOHNSON is committed to responding to all complaints, it is recognized that
complaints not filed within a reasonable time (6-12 months) may be difficult to investigate or
substantiate.
External (OTHER OPTIONS)
Complaints to the Human Rights Commission
At any point in the complaint procedures, the complainant has the right to file a complaint with the
province’s Human Rights Commission.
Complaints should normally be filed within one year from the time the harassment occurred. This does
not, however, preclude the filing of the complaint at any time.
Complaints under the Criminal Code
Sexual and other forms of assault may be covered under the Criminal Code. In these instances, the
police may be asked to investigate. Sexual and other forms of assault are serious criminal offences that
should be reported to the police.
CONFIDENTIALITY
All information regarding discrimination of harassment complaints shall remain confidential, at all levels.
This confidentiality clause includes, but is not limited to, all files, notes, memos, correspondence, and
the identities of the complainant and respondent. Information will not be disclosed except as required by
law.
SANCTIONS
As discrimination and workplace harassment are serious matters, appropriate disciplinary action will
be imposed where the complaint is substantiated. Each case will be assessed on its own merits and
sanctions may range from written warnings to dismissal.
REDRESS
When the decision regarding a workplace harassment or discrimination investigation is rendered, the
complainant(s) and respondent(s) will be informed of both the decision and their right to appeal the
result of the investigation.
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ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES
Due to the seriousness of allegations of harassment and discrimination, it is vitally important that all
levels of the complaint procedures follow strict procedures to protect confidentiality and keep accurate
records for tracking incidents and their frequency.
FILING OF WRITTEN INFORMATION AND RESOLUTIONS
All files of the complaint process must be kept in a separate, locked and secure storage area.
Access to file information is to be restricted to those individuals directly involved with investigation
process.
In the case of founded allegations, the complaint and the sanctions imposed may be included in the
respondent’s personnel file.
Regardless of whether the allegation is founded or unfounded, no information regarding the complaint
will appear in the complainant’s file as long as the complaint was made in good faith.
VIOLENCE in the WORKPLACE
WEISS-JOHNSON is committed to provide a violence-free work environment for all of its employees.
Violence in the workplace is against the law, it is unwelcome and unwanted. It affects not only an
individual’s ability to work and learn but also their self-esteem and sense of well being.
Management is responsible to conduct a hazard/risk assessment with regard to workplace violence,
provide training to those at risk of encountering a violent person and develop a response strategy based
on the risks identified in the hazard assessment.
Violence includes such behaviors as:
x Physical assault or aggression
x Physical and/or physiological harm to any individual which creates fear or mistrust, or which
compromises and devalues an individual.
REPORTING
Any act of violence is considered a serious incident. After an incident is under control, investigation and
follow-up should be handled according to the “Harassment in the Workplace” section of the Health &
Safety Program.
Whenever threats, assault or physical harm has been involved the authorities must be contacted and
the incident reported.
TIPS FOR PREVENTING & MANAGING POTENTIAL VIOLENCE
VERBAL COMMUNICATION
x Focus your attention on the other person to let them know you are interested in what they have
to say.
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x DO NOT stare or glare, it may be perceived as a challenge.
x Remain calm and try to calm the other person.
x Speak slowly, quietly, confidently and simply. Do not use jargon.
x Listen carefully, do not interrupt, and do not offer unsolicited advice.
x DO NOT tell the person to calm down. Use silence as a calming tool.
x Acknowledge the person’s feelings. Let them know you can see he/she is upset.
NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION
x Use calm body language, try to appear relaxed and attentive.
x Arrange yourself so your exit is not blocked, stand at right angles to the person rather than
straight on.
x Give the person enough physical space, 1-2 meters.
x Get on the other person’s physical level, DO NOT pose a challenging stance such as:
o
Standing directly opposite someone
o
Pointing your finger
o
Putting your hands on your hips
o
Waving your arms
o
Crossing your arms
o
DO NOT make sudden moved that may be threatening.
o
DO NOT fight. Walk or run away and get assistance as quickly as possible.
RESPONDING TO PHYSICAL ATTACK
x Make a scene, yell or scream as loudly as possible, shout words like STOP, FIRE or HELP.
x If you are being dragged or pulled along, drop to the ground.
x Blow a whistle, activate an alarm.
x Give bystanders specific instructions to help you (you in the red shirt, call police).
x If someone grabs your purse or other belongings, DO NOT resist. Give the object to the person
or throw it and run in the other direction calling for help.
x DO NOT chase a thief, DO NOT attempt to stop a vehicle theft.
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x Run to the nearest safe place and call police or security.
x Inform your supervisor as soon as possible and file an incident report.
WORKING OFF SITE
x Have access to a cellular phone or other means or communication.
x Use an established check in procedure and prepare a daily work plan so others know where you
are.
x Arrange to meet others in a safe environment, be alert and make mental notes of your
surroundings when you arrive at a new place.
x Use a buddy system if you feel your personal safety may be threatened.
x Exercise your right to refuse to work in clearly hazardous situations.
x Tell your supervisor about any misgivings about a upcoming meeting or assignment.
TERMINATING A POTENTIALLY ABUSIVE INTERACTION
x Interrupt the conversation firmly but politely.
x Tell the person that you:
ƒ Do not like the tone of the conversation.
ƒ Will not accept abusive treatment.
x Will end the conversation if necessary.
x Tell the person you will ask them to leave or you will leave (if you are not at your premises).
x If the behavior continues end the conversation.
x If the person will not leave, remove yourself from the scene and inform your supervisor
immediately.
x DO NOT return to the conversation if you feel the person poses a physical threat.
x Clear other staff from the immediate area.
x Call police if necessary and file an incident report with your employer.
THREATS FROM AGGRESSIVE DRIVERS
x Call for help if the aggressive actions do not stop.
x DO NOT challenge aggressive drivers or enter into any kind of interaction with an aggressive
driver, including gestures, yelling, comments or retaliation of any kind.
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x Pull off the road into a service station or other area where other people are present.
x Stay in your vehicle and keep it locked if the other driver follows you into the area or gets out of
his or her vehicle.
x Sound your horn to attract attention and assistance. (3 long Blasts)
x Call police and file an incident report with your employer.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE & WEAPONS
x Domestic violence situations can enter the workplace and can be extremely dangerous.
x A person bringing a weapon into the workplace poses a serious risk.
x DO NOT intervene in either instance, call the authorities immediately, and get yourself and
everyone else to safety.
BROADENED JOB DESCRIPTION
PURPOSE
x To assist in the rehabilitation of our employees by having them return to work at an earlier date.
x To provide meaningful, familiar work to suit the physical capabilities of the employee for a
temporary, agreed upon period of time.
x To allow the employee a period of time to adjust following an illness or accident by doing duties
they are familiar with and are part of their regular full duties.
x By broadening the tasks and roles each employee has Weiss Johnson believes they may
reduce the frequency and duration of the absences from the workplace and promote employee
engagement.
x To reduce costs associated with the Workers’ Compensation Board.
TYPE OF DUTIES (Broadened Job Description)
x Primary Job Duties
An employee’s primary job duties or main job description on which the company most relies.
Many times these are the tasks and duties that s/he have spent a principal amount of their
studies and work experience developing. An example would be the trades, management and
various professional positions .
x Transitional or Replacement Duties:
An employee learns skills at a job s/he may need to develop in the future. These tasks or duties
are responsibilities that soon could become a role that this employee is training for. If the person
currently working at this position needs to take a holiday or time off Weiss-Johnson will have a
well-trained replacement. Employee would work alongside or observe the role of the person they
are job shadowing.
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x Shop Duties:
An employee is given duties that entails working in the shop, fabricating sheet metal into various
components and assisting with a variety of inventory duties in the warehouse. It is important that
the field hands understand warehouse procedures, including jobs outside of the company’s dayto-day operations.
x Orientation & Safety Training Duties:
The employee is sent for training, for example, a WHMIS, CSTS and First Aid Course, in order
to enhance job skills, thus increasing the employee’s value to the company. Safety courses,
seminars and ride-alongs all are designed to heighten the employee’s value to the company.
x Company Administrative Duties:
All employees need to understand the importance of paper flow in the workplace. An opportunity
to work within the office assists office employees and enlightens the field workers to the
importance of paperwork and how documentation sets the tone for professionalism in the
workplace.
The broadened job description must be meaningful and productive in that the work must contribute
to the company’s operation. The work should be incorporated into the natural work flow, in a way that
benefits the employee and the company. The work must be designed so as not to impede the healing of
the present injury, to avoid re-injury, and must not compromise the health or safety of other employees.
The success of the Broadened Job Description work program will depend on:
x All 5 duties are part of the employee’s job description;
x The employee actively completing these tasks or duties regularly;
x If injured the medical facility is aware of the expanded role that each of our employees can
perform;
x The company recognizing the potential of the injured employee;
x Ensuring that the employee is involved in the rehabilitation process from the beginning.
PROCEDURE
x It must be determined if there are any modified work assignments to which the injured employee
could be assigned.
x A “Physical Demands Assessment” or receive an Employer Report of Injury from Occupational
Health & Safety must be completed for the proposed Broadened Job Description which is part of
the injured employees Full Duties.
x The completed “Physical Demands Assessment” or the Work Readiness Report must be
submitted to the attending physician. The physician should be able to see that the employee has
regular duties that s/he can perform so that the employee will not need to go on modified duties.
x If the attending physician approves the proposed return to full duties, a written employer’s report
must be made to WCB. The offer must include:
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- The specific job duties
- The rate of pay
- The hours of work
- How the accident occurred
- The supervisor responsible for monitoring the program
The Employer’s Report must be signed and then sent to the Worker’s Compensation Board (WCB), with
all relevant documentation for their approval.
To determine whether the proposed Full Duties is suitable, the WCB will consult with the injured
employee, the company and the attending physician in order to evaluate the proposal.
The evaluation will be based on a description of the job being offered, including the physical
requirements, and detailed medical information outlining the employee’s physical restrictions and
medical requirements that must be accommodated by providing other regular job duties that the
employee is familiar with performing.
If this cannot be accommodated by the regular job duties then modified work duties may need to be
assigned. A Modified Work Agreement will be filled out and sent to WCB. It will be signed by all parties
involved.
When work is made available and the employee refuses to accept the modified work, the WCB will
consider the reasons for refusal. If, after evaluating the proposal, the WCB still considers it reasonable
that the worker accept the employment, the employee’s compensation benefits will be adjusted effective
the date of the decision, as if the employment had been accepted.
If the WCB approves the modified work assignment, the designated company supervisor will monitor
the progress of the employee. Concerns or problems must be addressed immediately. The WCB must
be kept informed of the employee’s progress at an interval specified by the WCB.
When the employee is deemed to be fit to perform regular duties, the “Return To Regular Work
Clearance” must be completed by the attending physician and a copy sent to the WCB.
WORKING ALONE
SCOPE
All businesses have employees who need to work alone. A system must be in place to ensure the safety
and well-being of these employees.
This does not mean that every work situation requires two or more employees.
Employees can work alone without risk to themselves or others.
A hazard assessment must be done for each situation where employees are required to work alone and
appropriate measures developed and followed to monitor the employees well-being.
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DEFINITIONS
Effective means of communication
Radio, telephone, or other electronic communication device.
Working Alone
An employee is considered to be working alone if the employee works alone at a work site in
circumstances where assistance is not readily available when needed.
HAZARD ASSESSMENT
x Existing or potential hazards arising from the conditions and circumstances of the employee’s
work must be identified.
x The identified hazards must be eliminated or controlled.
x Employees must be made aware of the hazards and the control methods.
x If practicable, the employee who is required to work alone should participate in the hazard
assessment and the identification of the control or elimination methods.
x The hazard assessment must be in writing and communicated to all employees affected by the
assessment.
COMMUNICATION
An effective means of communication must be established between the employee who is required to
work alone and persons capable of responding to the employee’s needs.
If an effective means of communication is not practicable, then the employee must be visited by another
employee. The frequency of the visit(s) is directly proportional to the hazards of the work and experience
of the employee. For instance, an employee working inside a high atmospheric hazard confined space
must have another employee present, but a mobile equipment operator does not have to have another
employee present. Someone must check periodically with the operator.
CHECKLISTS
The checklists on the following pages will assist the operations and facilities with conduction and hazard
assessment for their employees:
Hazard Assessment Checklist
Checklist for Employees installing Duct
Checklist for Employees completing Rough-ins
Quality Control Checklist
Materials Checklist
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Misconduct & Discipline
Workplace Rules and Policies
Employees must be made aware of their obligation to comply with workplace rules and policies. As a manager
or supervisor, it is up to you to make sure that the employee understands and abides by the workplace rules
and policies. If the employee does not adhere to the rules and policies, the person in charge must make sure
the employee is aware of the consequences. Regardless of how they feel about the rules and policies, they are
still required to do the work as assigned to them and address their concerns about the rules separately. This
does not apply if they’ve been asked to do a task that is illegal, unsafe or contrary to legislation. General Guidelines
Making rules:
x
Proposed rules and policies should be easy to understand and clearly connected to operational
effectiveness.
x
Employees should perceive that the proposed rules are fair.
x
Rules should be reviewed regularly so that they always support changing operational needs
Communication of the rules to employees:
x
Inform employees of the rules and policies they should be aware of by posting, emailing or writing to
the employee. This doesn’t refer to rules that are normally understood, such as rules against stealing or
fraud.
x
Include work rules and policies in new employees’ orientation process.
x
Tell employees when work rules and policies have changed.
Applying rules and policies:
x
Enforce all work rules and policies quickly, consistently and neutrally.
x
Make sure that the union and employees are informed before starting to enforce work rules and policies
that have lapsed, or haven’t been enforced in the past.
After workplace rules have been established and communicated clearly to employees, they may be held
accountable for breaking or disregarding the rules. Supervisors should consistently enforce the rules and
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6.
Personal Protective
Equipment
(PPE)
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 2
Hazard Elimination and control
9(5) If the hazard cannot be eliminated or controlled under subsections (2), (3)or
(4), the employer may use a combination of engineering controls,
administrative controls or personal protective equipment if there is a greater
level of worker safety because a combination is used.
Occupational Health & Safety Code Section 9
Personal Protective Equipment Program Confirmation
6.1
Workers are made aware and trained in the requirements for PPE.
6.2
All employees have access to basic PPE basic and/or specialized PPE.
6.3
The correct PPE is used by all employees when required.
6.4
There are written procedures for the proper fitting, care and use of
specialized PPE.
6.5
There is a system in place that verifies basic/ specialized PPE is being ins
spected and maintained.
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POLICY FOR PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Policy
The following will be observed and practiced by the company and employees when Weiss-Johnson
undertakes any job or contract.
x All employees, guests and visitors will wear CSA approved safety glasses, CSA approved safety
boots, long trousers and any other specialty PPE required for the job site.
x All PPE used by this company will be within the requirements of OH&S Regulations and CSA
Standards.
x All PPE used by this company will be maintained in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions
and requirements.
x Company issued PPE will be inspected at time of issue and before each use by the employee
using the PPE.
x All PPE that is of questionable reliability, damaged or in need of service or repair will be
removed from service, immediately.
x All PPE that has been removed from service will be tagged “OUT OF SERVICE”. Any PPE
tagged “OUT OF SERVICE” will not be returned to service until repaired and inspected by a
qualified person.
x The company will maintain appropriate inspection and service logs for specialty PPE.
x No piece of PPE will be modified or changed contrary to manufacturer’s instructions or
specifications or OH&S Regulations.
NOTE: The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over OH&S Regulations. All
employees should be familiar with OH&S Act and Regulations.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: ______________________________
Barry Gabruch, Safety Director
Date: 20___/_____/_____
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6.1
Workers are made aware and trained in the requirements for PPE
Personal Protective Equipment Training
Personal protection equipment is important. So important, that these conditions need to be met as
stated in Alberta’s Occupational Health & Safety Code, the “Personal Protection Equipment” standard.
Occupational Health and Safety Code 2009
Subsection 228(1)
If the hazard assessment required by section 7 of the OHS Code indicates that PPE is required, the employer
must ensure that workers wear and use the required PPE properly. Ensuring that workers have and wear their
PPE is not enough. The employer must ensure that the PPE is used properly.
The OHS Code requires employers to provide PPE in a limited number of situations where, for example, there
is a breathing hazard or where noise exposure limits are exceeded. This section does not require employers to
provide PPE such as hard hats, safety boots, flame resistant clothing or eye protection. Where such equipment
is necessary, employers must make sure that workers use it.
Regardless of who supplies the PPE, subsection 228(1)(c) makes the employer responsible for ensuring that
the PPE is in a condition to perform the function for which it was designed. Cracked eye protection, worn out
safety boots and excessively dirty flame resistant overalls are examples of conditions that employers need to be
aware of and either correct or have corrected.
For PPE to be effective, workers must be trained in its correct use, care, limitations and assigned maintenance.
The employer is responsible for providing this training. Workers must be aware that wearing and using PPE
does not eliminate the hazard. If the PPE fails, the worker will be exposed to the hazard. Workers need to
understand that PPE must not be altered or removed even though they may find it uncomfortable – sometimes
equipment may be uncomfortable simply because it does not fit properly.
Briefly stated, this standard requires that employers must establish and administer an effective PPE
(Personal Protection Equipment) program for employees and that employees be trained in the proper
use of PPE.
Personal Protective Equipment Training
After completion of the Personal Protective Training course, employees should be able to understand:
x
How Personal Protective Equipment is used in the workplace
x
How to properly use different types of PPE
x
CSA Safety standards in relation to PPE
x
How to maintain their PPE
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Key Points on PPE:
x
PPE stands for Personal Protective Equipment
x
PPE is primarily concerned with detailing individual protective gear and how they are used
x
All employers are required to show diligence when training employees
x
By taking both theory and practical on-site training employees will achieve OHS compliance
6.2
All employees have access to basic PPE basic and/or specialized PPE
The main shop of Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal houses the safety supplies for the entire company.
The safety supplies have maximum and minimum levels which are monitored each week by Vallen. This
is outsourced to keep track of the stock that flows through the room. If there is PPE that is not available
or missing it will be provided within 24 hours.
The other 4 companies will order from Vallen directly:
Weiss-Johnson Commercial HVAC Ltd.
Fireplaces by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
Plumbing by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
Gatt Heating -2014 Ltd.
Weiss-Johnson has a controlled Safety room in the main shop at 5803 Roper Road, Edmonton, AB.
This room provides PPE for all the companies, as needed. It must be stated that although the safety
room at Weiss-Johnson’s main shop can provide most of the PPE the above companies are responsible
for ordering their supplies directly from our suppliers.
All employees know how to access and use this PPE as provided. If this is in question the employee
and/or the supervisor must acknowledge and state in the Hazard Assessment that the worker is not fully
prepared to enter the designated work area.
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6.3 The correct PPE is used by all employees
The first step in the development of a PPE program is to identify the particular hazards at the worksite.
Some of these may be obvious, but an onsite inspection should still be performed. Work practices, job
procedures, equipment, workplace layout, and individual factors may play a deciding role in the type of controls
recommended for a certain job. Recognizing potential hazards should include reviewing the manufacturing
or work site processes, maintaining an inventory of physical and chemical agents encountered routinely or
periodically, examining all the different job activities of a work area, and studying the existing control measures.
Every effort should be made to control all hazards, where possible, at the source.
Particular attention should be paid to job requirements that may have important consequences for the
PPE selected because some types of hazards require multiple PPE solutions. It is important to continually
review Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) as part of the inspection, as they indicate the types of hazards
associated with specific materials.
A workplace evaluation should involve the Safety Committee as an integral part of the survey team.
Weiss Johnson companies are required to conduct an assessment to determine the various physical
hazards that may be present in the work area.
Physical hazards include:
Sources of motion;
Sources of high and low temperatures;
Sources of light radiation - brazing - heat treating - high intensity lights;
Sources of falling objects;
Sources of sharp objects;
Sources of rolling or pinching objects;
Sources of electric hazards; and
As part of the assessment, employers must also determine the various health hazards that may be present in
your work area.
Health hazards include:
- Types of chemicals you could be exposed to;
- Sources of harmful dusts; and
- Sources of nuclear radiation.
- Floor conditions.
Once your area has been assessed, your employer must select, with your help, appropriate personal protection
equipment for you to use while performing your job.
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6.4
There are written procedures for the proper fitting, care and use of
specialized PPE
For PPE to be effective, workers must be trained in its correct use, care, limitations and assigned
maintenance. Weiss-Johnson is responsible for providing this training. This training has written
procedures for the proper fitting care and use of the specialized PPE. Workers must be aware that
wearing and using PPE does not eliminate the hazard. If the PPE fails, the worker will be exposed to
the hazard. Workers need to understand that PPE must not be altered or removed even though they
may find it uncomfortable – sometimes equipment may be uncomfortable simply because it does not fit
properly.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
WEISS-JOHNSON will supply all special PPE required by its employees. Training as to correct fitting,
wearing, cleaning and protection of PPE will be provided. Supervisors will be responsible to ensure
employees obtain and utilize the required PPE for each job and worksite.
BASIC PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Head Protection
Hard hats meeting the applicable ANSI or CSA Standard will be worn
on all worksites and any other area where this is a risk for head injury.
Bump Caps
Bump caps are to be worn by those running the forklift and working in the
shipping area at all times.
Eye Protection
Safety glasses meeting CSA Standard Z94.3-99 or Z94.3-02 will be worn
on all worksites and any other area where there is a risk for eye injury.
When welding and cutting, employees will utilize the appropriate
protection.
Foot Protection
Safety work boots meeting CSA or OH&S Standards are required at all
times.
Fire Resistant Clothing
Fire resistant outer clothing may be required at some worksites and
when handling flammable materials. Consult the Clothing Policy for Fire
and Explosion in this section.
Hearing Protection
Shall be selected according to AB Code, Pt 16 and Schedule 3 or
Appendix M of the B.C. I.H.&S. Regulations, and must conform to CSA
Z94.2-02 Standard.
Fall Protection
All components of every fall protection system must meet the CSA or
equal Standards:
- Full Body Harness
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- Lanyard
- Shock Absorber
- Life Lines- Caribiner
- Anchor
- Retractable lines
- Stirrups
Respiratory Protection
Must have the proper NIOSH /MSHA approval for the contaminant
and concentration to which the employee will be exposed.
Any article of PPE, which does not meet the required approval, will not be used by WEISS-JOHNSON
employees. When inspection of PPE reveals damaged or sub-standard equipment the equipment will be
removed from service for repair or replacement. Any component of a fall protection system, which has
experienced an actual fall arrest, will be permanently removed from service.
SPECIAL PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Before any additional PPE is issued to employees, it must be determined if engineering or
administrative controls can eliminate the need for additional PPE.
Special PPE such as:
x Full Body Harness,
x Supplied Air or Self Contained Breathing Apparatus and
x Air Purifying Respirators
x Fall protection Equipment
Supervisors, through Hazard Assessment, must demonstrate the need for special PPE as opposed to
other controls.
PPE IS TO BE THE LAST METHOD OF PROTECTION CONSIDERED.
CLOTHING POLICY FOR FIRE AND EXPLOSION
WEISS-JOHNSON will conduct a hazard assessment of each worksite where flammable liquids or
materials may be stored, handled, processed or be present. The intent will be to determine if employees
may be exposed to fire or explosion hazards and will conclude one of the following:
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1. That flammable liquids or materials at a site include only those in the fuel tanks of vehicles and
equipment, or proper storage facilities, and that there is no risk of accidental release of these
materials into the work area.
OR
2. That employees are at risk from flammable liquids or materials that are:
(a) Stored or used for refueling vehicles or equipment;
(b) Stored or used for cleaning and maintenance;
(c) At more than minimum risk to being released by the process
WEISS-JOHNSON will ensure that all of its employees:
x Are made aware of the hazards associated with wearing flammable clothing or clothing that
melts when exposed to heat; and
x Are provided with suitable fire resistant clothing where required by regulation;
x Control or eliminate all sources of ignition from the site.
WEISS-JOHNSON is committed to ensuring that employees use these two types of PPE as
our required. PPE in our safety program generally falls into two categories. The first category
(Basic) is the PPE that should be worn at all times by all personnel in the workplace. This
includes safety footwear, and appropriate clothing. The second category (Specialized) covers
PPE, which is used only for specific jobs or for protection from specific hazards. This includes
gloves, welder’s goggles, respiratory equipment, fall arresting equipment and special clothing.
Personal Protective Equipment (ACSA & OSSA)
This Online PPE Course will guide you through all aspects of PPE, from Upper and Lower Body Protection,
to respirators and head protection. Our comprehensive course will explain in detail what you need to know,
emphasize key points and test your knowledge retention. This course is required by many industries and you
should check with your employer to see whether or not you need PPE Training.
After completion of this course, employee should be able to understand:
x
How Personal Protective Equipment is used in the workplace
x
How to properly use all types of PPE
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x
CSA Safety standards in relation to PPE
x
How to maintain your PPE
Key Points on PPE:
x
PPE stands for Personal Protective Equipment
x
PPE is primarily concerned with detailing individual protective gear and how they are used
x
All employers are required to show diligence when training employees
x
By taking both theory and practical on-site training employees will achieve OHS compliance
A certificate of completion is issued.
6.5 There is a system in place that verifies basic/specialized PPE as being
inspected and maintained.
Perform regular maintenance and inspections
Without proper maintenance, the effectiveness of PPE cannot be assured. Maintenance should include
inspection, care, cleaning, repair, and proper storage.
Probably the most important part of maintenance is the need for continuing inspection of the PPE. If carefully
performed, inspections will identify damaged or malfunctioning PPE before it is used. PPE that is not
performing up to manufacturers specifications, such as safety glasses with scratched lenses that have lost their
ability to withstand impact should be discarded.
Procedures should be set up to enable workers to obtain replacement parts for damaged PPE, and to keep it
clean. Respiratory protection devices require an elaborate program of repair, cleaning, storage and periodic
testing.
Wearing poorly maintained or malfunctioning PPE could be more dangerous than not wearing any form of
protection at all. The workers gain a false sense of security and think they are protected when, in reality, they
are not.
PPE is purchased new and distributed to the workers after a thorough inspection. Workers are reminded of their
training and instruction and knowledge of how-to-use is verified at this time.
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7.
Preventative
Maintenance
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 19
Inspection and maintenance
260(1)
An employer must ensure that powered mobile equipment is
inspected by a competent worker for defects and conditions that
are hazardous or may create a hazard.
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 19
Preventative Maintenance Program Confirmation
7.1
There is an inventory of items to be maintained.
7.2
A maintenance schedule and records with a description of
corrective actions taken are kept.
7.3
Defective tools, equipment and/or vehicles are removed from
service.
7.4
This system is followed and records are kept.
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7.1 There is an inventory of items to be maintained.
INTRODUCTION
This section has been included in our safety manual to highlight the importance of proper
maintenance as a vital part of a safety program and to provide information on our maintenance
program. There is an inventory of items to be maintained.
In addition to ensuring that workers use the tools and equipment properly, it is vital that tools
and equipment be properly inspected, maintained, and kept in good repair. Our maintenance
program will reduce the risk of injury, damage and lost production.
Maintenance Personnel Qualifications
The qualifications of maintenance personnel are key to the success of a maintenance program.
All individuals who perform maintenance work shall have the appropriate skills or will be under
the direct supervision of qualified contracted services. Weiss-Johnson uses professional
maintenance personnel to repair or maintain any equipment, vehicles or tools.
Most of this work is done off site or not on the premises of Weiss-Johnson.
7.2
A maintenance schedule and records with a description of corrective
actions taken are kept.
Records
The maintenance program should contain a recording system. Part of this system should be
made up of inventories and schedules. The recording system documents what maintenance
work was done, when, and by whom.
Monitoring
The monitoring functions in a maintenance program fall into two areas. First, the people
responsible for operating and /or maintaining equipment must monitor that equipment to ensure
that appropriate checks and maintenance are done.
Secondly, management should monitor the entire program to ensure that it is functioning in
accordance with company policy.
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Scheduled Inspections and Maintenance
All mobile equipment, vehicles, tools and miscellaneous equipment are to be inspected and
maintained according to the following schedules as a minimum. Records of all inspections and
maintenance should be completed and maintained for review and approval.
Vehicle maintenance will be regularly scheduled and completed by qualified personnel. The
vehicle assignee is responsible for tracking usage and scheduling maintenance. Assignee must
submit written records. Also, a monthly inspection must be carried out on all vehicles by the
assignee.
Safety equipment shall be inspected prior to every project. Any repair must be done before
taking to the project site. Broken or damaged equipment shall be tagged and removed from
service. Equipment shall be repaired by qualified personnel only.
7.3 Defective tools, equipment and/or vehicles are removed from service.
Company Vehicles
A company vehicle is an important tool in the day to day operations of Weiss-Johnson’s business. The
vehicle usage requirements have been developed to reduce accidents and to protect workers and the
people in the communities where we work.
A maintenance program for the vehicles is designed:
Every vehicle has its own set of individual characteristics. To keep these in good condition, WeissJohnson vehicles will have a list of good maintenance best practices, developed by the manufacturer
and described in your Owner’s Manual. Mr. Lube, as our general maintenance provider on most
of the fleet vehicles. Mr Lube is able to recognize each individual vehicle and provide service
recommendations tied directly to the vehicle’s scheduled service intervals. Warranty service intervals
are then maintained to warranty approved specifications.
To give you a rough idea of some of the recommended periods to leave between different auto
maintenance procedures, Car Care Canada have put together a set of general guidelines, but we
recommend that you always follow your owner’s manual:
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General Guidelines recommended by service provider
The maintenance services listed are only the general services that apply to the majority of vehicles. It is
possible that other vehicles may need more frequent checks and replacements than has been stated.
Manufacturers will sometimes recommend unique maintenance measures, such as periodic flushing and
refilling of the brake hydraulic system. The best way to find out is to have a good read through your owner’s
manual.
More involved mechanical procedures will be completed by journeyman Automobile Mechanics approved by the
fleet manager at Weiss-Johnson.
Tool Maintenance
Tools are removed from service and tagged whenever necessary. They are locked in the tool room until they
can be properly maintained/repaired or replaced.
All tools shall be tagged and removed from service if broken or damaged. Tools will be repaired by qualified
persons prior to being returned to service. Annual inspections will be done on tools.
7.4 This system is followed and records are kept.
This system is followed and records are kept by using computer entries and excel programming, general
invoicing, a gas card recording system and a GPS Tracking system. All of which contribute to the
tracking of maintenance and how the vehicles are being used.
Fleet Tracking System
Is used to track every vehicle in the fleet and record the maintenance and cost of maintenance
to each vehicle. The Fleet manager uses this excel spreadsheet to track and record all services
to the Weiss-Johnson fleet.
General Invoicing
In some cases general invoicing and accounting may also show that maintenance is being
performed on the vehicles. Weiss-Johnson uses the services of Kleiber Automotive and
Brookview Auto for mechanical concerns and Mr. Lube for ongoing maintenance needs.
Gas Card
Weiss-Johnson records the use of gas and all other fluids through the ESSO GAS Card system.
The use of this card also assists in recording vehicle usage as odometer readings are recorded
at each visit.
GPS Tracking
Many of the fleet vehicles have a Global Positioning System (GPS) installed to provide detailed
information on where the vehicles are and how they are being used.
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Auto Maintenance Item
Mileage or Time
Inspect lights and check tire pressure
Monthly
Oil & filter change and chassiss lubrication
6,000 km or 3 months
Under-hood belt and hose inspection
5,000 km or 3 months
Tire rotation and wheel balancing
10,000 km or every other oil change
Brake inspection
10,000 km or every other oil change
Replace air filter
Inspect filter at every oil chagne or more
frequently with heavy use
Replace fuel filter
Every 20,000 km - 40,000 km / 2 years
Automatic transmission serivce
Every 40,000 or 2 years
Wheel alignment check
Between 20,000 km - 40,000 km
or as indicated by tire wear
Cooling system flush and refill
Every 80,000 km - 100,000 km
Belt and hose replacement
Between 100,000 km - 160,000 km
or 5-8 years
Engine timing belt replacement
Between 100,000 km - 160,000 km
(when equipped) 5-8 years
Air conditioning performance check
Annually, usually in the spring
Forklift Maintenance
Permit only qualified persons to service and maintain equipment.
Wear proper personal protective equipment. Wear goggles when grinding. Wear face shields (with safety
goggles), aprons, gloves and rubber boots when handling lead-acid batteries or working around batterycharging equipment. Wear leather gloves when changing LPG fuel tanks.
Disconnect all batteries before doing any service work.
Before servicing LPG forklifts:
x Shut off the tank fuel valve.
x Run the engine until it stops.
x Disconnect the tank from the hose.
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x Block the forklift securely when removing wheels.
x Support the forklift hood in upright position or remove to do work.
x Keep the work area clean and well lit.
x Clean spilled oil or hydraulic fluid immediately.
x Check all tools before using.
x Remove all tools and parts before starting the engine.
x Handle batteries with care.
x Avoid contact with battery terminals with hoisting chains, tools and metal objects.
x Cover the battery top with some insulating material.
x Attach a chain hoist to the counterweight before removing it from a forklift.
x Check the bolts holding the counterweight to the body and replace any worn or missing bolts.
x Find out why a forklift is in for repairs before starting or driving it.
x Check the operator’s daily checklist before making repairs.
x Inspect by magnetic particle testing the main mast welds and forks annually or when cracks appear.
x Inspect by magnetic particle testing all hoses, couplings, fittings and connections to the cylinders in
the main mast assembly and the tilt control system.
x Inspect forks for distorted, twisted or bent sections. If defects are found, test the area of concern.
What should you not do when servicing a forklift truck?
x
Do not leave parts, creepers, cans, tools or other obstacles around.
x
Do not lift beyond your capacity. Use hoist or leverage tools to lift or move heavy parts or equipment.
x
Do not smoke, weld or light a match around refueling and battery-charging areas.
x
Do not start a forklift if it is on a lift hoist or wheel stands.
x
Do not work on forklift attachments unless you are familiar with their operation.
x
Do not work beneath elevated forklift trucks or forks unless they are securely supported by approved
blocks.
x
Do not run LPG, gas or diesel forklifts in unventilated areas.
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Training & Communication
8.
Training &
Communication
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 11
First aid providers
An employer must ensure that the number of first aiders at a work site and
their qualifications and training comply with Schedule 2, Tables 5, 6 or 7.
181(1)
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 11, Section 181
Safety Training and Communication Program Confirmation
8.1 The employer has a formal orientation program that includes Company Policy
and rules from the Safety Manual.
For example:
a)
Emergency Response Procedure
b)
Reporting Procedures (hazards/incidents/inspections etc.)
c)
Safe Work Practices/Safe Work Procedures
d)
General Rules
e)
Personal Protective Equipment
f)
Is signed by both the employee and the company representative.
8.2 The orientations are documented and completed for managers/supervisors/
workers/sub-contractors and visitors before starting work.
8.3
a)
This process has been followed.
b)
This process has been documented.
Certification requirements must be verified before workers are hired.
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 11
First aid providers
An employer must ensure that the number of first aiders at a work site and
their qualifications and training comply with Schedule 2, Tables 5, 6 or 7.
181(1)
Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 11, Section 181
Safety Training and Communication Program Confirmation
8.1
The employer has a formal orientation program that includes Company Policy
and rules from the Safety Manual.
For example:
8.2
8.3
a)
Emergency Response Procedure
b)
Reporting Procedures (hazards/incidents/inspections etc.)
c)
Safe Work Practices/Safe Work Procedures
d)
General Rules
e)
Personal Protective Equipment
f)
Is signed by both the employee and the company representative.
The orientations are documented and completed for managers/supervisors/
workers/sub-contractors and visitors before starting work.
a)
This process has been followed.
b)
This process has been documented.
Certification requirements must be verified before workers are hired.
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8.4
Recertification and/or refresher training is tracked and is renewed as required.
8.5
Job specific training includes job specific hazards and appropriate controls.
8.6
Safety supervisors have received training in workplace inspections and their
health and safety responsibilities.
8.7
Safety meetings and ongoing Toolbox meetings are being held at least every 2
weeks.
8.8
During the meetings two-way communication takes place.
8.9
Senior management attends and participates in these Health & Safety
Meetings.
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INTRODUCTION
Safety training at all levels of Weiss-Johnson is vital to the ongoing success of the company’s
safety program. The safety program will contain at least the following training components:
x Safety orientations
x Job-specific training
x Safety meetings
x Toolbox Talks
x Job Hazard Assessments
x ACSA approved courses
x Safety Committee Meetings
Additional safety training certificates can be required. This should include items such as:
x Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
x CSTS
x First Aid
x The R.O.C.K. (Residential Orientation Certification of Knowledge)
x Personal Protective Equipment Training
Our safety program realizes the need for safety training for our management and supervisors.
Such training should include the specialized training mentioned above. It may also include
training in such areas as:
x Loss control management
x Incident investigation
x WCB claims management
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8.1
The employer has a formal orientation program that includes Company
Policy and rules from the Safety Manual.
For example:
a)
Emergency Response Procedure
b)
Reporting Procedures (hazards/incidents/inspections etc.)
c)
Safe Work Practices/Safe Work Procedures
d)
General Rules
e)
Personal Protective Equipment
f)
Is signed by both the employee and the company representative.
Training for Emergency Response Plan
A definite plan to deal with major emergencies is an important element of OH&S programs. The training
and communication of the plan to the employees is equally important.
Besides the major benefit of providing guidance during an emergency, developing the plan has other
advantages. Weiss-Johnson may discover unrecognized hazardous conditions that would aggravate an
emergency situation and Weiss-Johnson can work to eliminate them. The planning process may bring to
light deficiencies, such as the lack of resources (equipment, trained personnel, supplies), or items that
can be rectified before an emergency occurs. In addition an emergency plan promotes safety awareness
and shows the company’s commitment to the safety of workers.
The lack of an emergency plan could lead to severe losses such as multiple casualties and possible
financial collapse of the organization.
An attitude of “it can’t happen here” may be present. People may not be willing to take the time and effort
to examine the problem. However, emergency planning is an important part of company operation.
An emergency plan specifies procedures for handling sudden or unexpected situations. The objective is
to be prepared to:
x
Prevent fatalities and injuries.
x
Reduce damage to buildings, stock, and equipment.
x
Protect the environment and the community.
x
Accelerate the resumption of normal operations.
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Development of the plan begins with a vulnerability assessment. The results of the study will show:
x
How likely a situation is to occur.
x
What means are available to stop or prevent the situation.
x
What is necessary for a given situation.
The emergency plan includes:
x
All possible emergencies, consequences, required actions, written procedures, and the resources
available.
x
Detailed lists of personnel including their home telephone numbers, their duties and responsibilities.
x
Floor plans.
x
Large scale maps showing evacuation routes and service conduits (such as gas and water lines).
The following are examples of the parts of an emergency plan. These elements may not cover every
situation in every workplace but serve they are provided as a general guideline when writing a
workplace specific plan:
Objective
The objective is a brief summary of the purpose of the plan; that is, to reduce human injury and damage
to property and environment in an emergency. It also specifies those staff members who may put the
plan into action. The objective identifies clearly who these staff members are since the normal chain
of command cannot always be available on short notice. At least one of them must be on the site at
all times when the premises are occupied. The extent of authority of these personnel must be clearly
indicated.
Organization
One individual should be appointed and trained to act as Emergency Co-ordinator as well as a “backup” co-ordinator. However, personnel on site during an emergency are key in ensuring that prompt and
efficient action is taken to minimize loss. In some cases it may be possible to recall off-duty employees
to help, but the critical initial decisions usually must be made immediately.
Specific duties, responsibilities, authority, and resources must be clearly defined. Among the
responsibilities that must be assigned are:
x
Reporting the emergency.
x
Activating the emergency plan.
x
Assuming overall command.
x
Establishing communication.
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x
Alerting staff.
x
Ordering evacuation.
x
Alerting external agencies.
x
Confirming evacuation is complete.
x
Alerting outside population of possible risk.
x
Requesting external aid.
x
Coordinating activities of various groups.
x
Advising relatives of casualties.
x
Providing medical aid.
x
Ensuring emergency shut offs are closed.
x
Sounding the all-clear.
x
Advising media.
This list of responsibilities should be completed and communicated to appropriate personnel using the
previously developed summary of countermeasures for each emergency situation. In organizations
operating on reduced staff during some shifts, some personnel must assume extra responsibilities
during emergencies. Sufficient alternates for each responsible position must be named to ensure that
someone with authority is available onsite at all times.
FIRE SAFETY PLAN
IN THE EVENT OF FIRE
•
Leave the fire area immediately taking all persons in the area with you
•
Close all doors behind you
•
Sound a verbal alarm by shouting “FIRE” in a loud clear voice
•
Dial 911 if it is safe to do so (Never assume that this has been done)
•
Use exits to leave the building immediately
•
DO NOT re-enter the building until it is declared safe to do so by fire official
•
All staff will meet at a designated muster point
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IF YOU HEAR A FIRE ALARM SIGNAL
•
Proceed to nearest exit and leave building
•
If closed doors are encountered – feel them for heat before opening
FIRE EXTINGUSHMENT AND CONFINEMENT
•
Close the door when leaving the fire area
•
Only after the alarm has been raised and 911 have been called should an attempt to extinguish
small fires. Attempt to extinguish a fire is a voluntary act. Only persons who are properly trained
and feel confident in the use of a fire extinguisher should contemplate their use.
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What should I do… if I get Injured?
1.
Tell your partner or someone on the crew about the injury (Minor injury go to # 3).
2. Stabilize the person. Decide, whether to call 911.
a. If you cannot move the injured person call 911 (continue to stabilize).
b.
Call the Safety Director after EMS arrives.
c.
Find out what hospital the EMS will be going to.
d. If you can, take some pictures of the work site or accident location.
3. If it is safe to move the injured person call the Safety Director, immediately.
Safety Director Cell: (780) 399-6148 (Barry Gabruch)
Then Call your Manager
Manager’s Cell: (780) 463-3096
The call to the Safety Director starts the process of a file being created at the Medi-centre.
If the call is made promptly, the patient is seen by the nurse within 30 minutes or less.
At the Medi-Centre
1. You will be directed to the nearest Occupational Injury System (OIS) Medi-Centre. The closest
being by Southgate @ 11076-51 Avenue (Rexall).
2. Tell the doctor that it was work-related and let the nurse and the doctor know that you have a
variety of tasks to do in your regular job description.
3. If the doctor advises you to stay at home you need to let them know that you have a variety light
duty tasks that are part of your regular job duties.
a. Call the Safety Director a.s.a.p. if they tell you to stay at home.
b. We will discuss other options.
4. Before you leave the clinic the physician will give you a report assessing your injury. Bring that re
port with you to the main office the next morning.
The Next Morning (Important):
•
Come into the Weiss-Johnson main office (5803 Roper Road) the next morning after the
accident by 8:00am.
•
Call to let Barry know you are coming. There is paperwork to do.
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•
We will assess your capabilities and limitations & begin a duty chart; explaining to you how you
will be reimbursed through this period of recovery.
Identify (Tasks)
Break down the job, procedure, or process into its tasks or components and identify all hazards
associated with each task or component.
Eliminate
Plan to eliminate as many hazards as practicable. This is the best method of dealing with hazards, if it is
possible to implement. If hazards are eliminated it is impossible for them to recur.
Control
Control the hazards that cannot be eliminated. If hazards are controlled instead of eliminated, they can
recur. Control is the most common method of dealing with hazards or hazardous situations.
Safe Work Plan (Toolbox talk/Specialized FORM)
Follow a code of practice or develop a safe work procedure or safe work plan to lower the risk of an
incident occurring. By following the Safe Work Plan it will help reduce the hazard from occurring when a
standard control or procedure may be more difficult to implement or risky to apply.
Minimize through Training (FORM/LOG)
If an accident does occur, be prepared to reduce the effects by having trained first aid people with
appropriate first aid equipment available. Ensure all employee and supervisors are aware of the
emergency plan and their role in it.
Protect
Protect the employees with personal protective equipment, signs, barriers or guardrails.
Ensure the work will be performed by competent employees or directly supervised by a competent
employee.
Signs
Institute methods to warn employees and other approaching or entering the work site or place of
business of the hazards.
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Training on Safe Work Practices/Safe Job Procedures
Weiss-Johnson trains their staff in the 4 basic stages of conducting a Job Safety Analysis. This analysis
is the basis for designing and developing the Safe Work Practices and Job Safety Procedures.
Four basic stages in conducting a Job Safety Analysis are:
x
selecting the job to be analyzed
x
breaking the job down into a sequence of steps
x
identifying potential hazards
x
determining preventive measures to overcome these hazard.
Training on General Company Rules
Weiss-Johnson explains at the time of the orientation which rules are specific to this company and
must be adhered to. There is a safety aspect to the orientation training that involves examinations and
powerpoint presentations that take 1-2 hours to complete.
Training on use of Personal Protective Equipment
After completion of the Personal Protective Training course, employees should be able to
understand:
x
How Personal Protective Equipment is used in the workplace
x
How to properly use different types of PPE
x
CSA Safety standards in relation to PPE
x
How to maintain their PPE
Key Points on PPE:
x
PPE stands for Personal Protective Equipment
x
PPE is primarily concerned with detailing individual protective gear and how they are used
x
All employers are required to show diligence when training employees
x
By taking both theory and practical on-site training employees will achieve OHS compliance
The previous orientation training is signed by both the employee and the company representative.
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8.2 The orientations are documented and completed for managers/
supervisors/workers/sub-contractors and visitors before starting work.
a)
This process has been followed.
b)
This process has been documented.
Safety Orientation and Training
A “new worker” is defined as any worker who is: new to the workplace; returning to the workplace
where the hazards in that workplace have changed during the worker’s absence; or a worker that has
relocated to a new workplace where the hazards in that workplace are different from the hazards in the
worker’s previous workplace. Ensuring that an appropriate Safety Orientation occurs is the responsibility of the supervisor. The
supervisor should be very familiar with the work tasks that will be performed, the hazards associated
with those work tasks and the processes and procedures that have been developed to mitigate the
hazards. The supervisor should review the information contained in the position specific Safety Orientation
package on a regular basis and/or at a minimum, prior to the new employee’s first day at the workplace,
to ensure that it is accurate and up to date. Delivery of the site and position specific safety information as outlined on the Safety Orientation
Checklist should be completed and documented on the first day of employment. Throughout the Safety
Orientation, the supervisor should be documenting any immediate training needs the new employee
requires, to safely conduct their work, on the employees “Safety Training Plan.” Training in the areas
indicated on the training plan must be conducted prior to the employee performing any hazardous work
tasks associated with the position. These orientations are documented and completed for all employees. It is the responsibility of
the managers to inform the Safety Director that a new employee has been hired. Of if the Human
Resources department was involved in the hiring they have the responsibility to notify the Safety
Department for the adequate orientation training.
These orientations are signed and documented by both the employee and the company representative.
8.3 Certification requirements must be verified before workers are hired.
Certifications are verified by the Human Resources department. Photocopying certificates and tickets
is part of the process. Weiss-Johnson will use such government resources to check the validity of such
certificates if brought into question:
x Apprenticeship & Industry Training
x Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
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x Alberta Construction Safety Association
x Red Cross
x Peak Safety Training
8.4 Recertification and /or refresher training is tracked and is renewed as
required.
Important Information
Canada has aligned the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) with the
Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS).
This document discusses the WHMIS requirements after the alignment of WHMIS with the GHS.
Information in this document is based on the federal legislation - the amended Hazardous Products Act
and the new Hazardous Products Regulation (HPR).
Health Canada is the government body responsible for making the required changes to the overall
federal WHMIS-related laws. Note that WHMIS-related occupational health and safety regulations
for the provinces, territories and federally regulated workplaces will also require updating. Soon it will
be mandatory that recertification and/or refresher training be completed specific to the handling of
hazardous chemicals.
While much is known with the federal legislation updates, legislative updates for each provincial or
territorial jurisdiction may affect some of the information in this document.
The WHMIS 2015 legislation is currently in force. “In force” means that suppliers may begin to use
and follow the new requirements for labels and safety data sheets (SDSs) for hazardous products
sold, distributed, or imported into Canada. However, there is a transition period with various stages. At
the outset of the transition period, the supplier must fully comply with either the repealed Controlled
Products Regulations (WHMIS 1988) or the HPR (WHMIS 2015) for a specific controlled or hazardous
product. The classification, label and (material) SDS must comply fully with the specific regulation
chosen by the supplier, and not be a combination of the two.
By 2016/2017 it will be mandatory that recertification and/or refresher training be completed specific to
the handling of hazardous chemicals and the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS).
Recertification
Certifications are tracked and employees are reminded of their renewal dates as they approach.
Refresher training is provided in house by certified trained staff or outsourced to professional training
facilities.
Such courses include but are not limited to:
x First Aid /CPR Training
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x Fall Protection
x Personal Protective Equipment
x Construction Safety Training System (CSTS)
x Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
Online training is provided in cases where it will be to the benefit of both the employee and the
company.
8.5 Job Specific training includes job specific hazards and appropriate controls.
Hazards specific to a particular job or work duties require job specific training. Many of these hazards
will not change much over the course of employment. An example of this would be working in an office
environment.
If new duties are introduced and hazards are associated it is the responsibility of management to
introduce job specific training to provide the appropriate controls in form of a Job Specific Assessment.
8.6 Safety Supervisors have received training in workplace inspections and
their health and safety responsibilities.
ORIENTATIONS
1. All new employees of Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will be required to go through a
safety orientation prior to beginning work at Weiss-Johnson
2. All employees will be required to attend job-site safety orientation
All orientations are to include the following topics:
x Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Safety Policy
x Worker Responsibility
x Emergency Plans and Response
x Codes of Practice
x Company Rules
x Emergency Response Plan
x Reporting Procedures
x Safe Work Practices
x Personal Protective Equipment
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Trainee employees should be identified to their crew members when work begins. This
provides a chance for experienced employees to help educate the trainee.
All trainees must receive a thorough explanation of established safe work methods and
procedures. It is the supervisor’s responsibility to monitor the new trainee, and to determine
the skillset and level of training the employee may have. This evaluation is critical to the safety
of the new employee and the rest of the crew members. This will be dealt with in the Toolbox
Talk and documented.
Training of Safety Supervisors
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will undertake appropriate supervisory training for all
employees functioning or intended to function in position of safety authority in the company
(e.g. ACSA courses)
x Principles of Health and Safety Management
x Legislation Awareness
x Leadership of Safety Excellence
x Auditor Training Program
8.7 Safety Meetings and ongoing Toolbox meetings are being held at least every
2 weeks.
SAFETY MEETINGS
Safety Meetings, involving supervisors and employees, will be held on a bi-weekly basis, preferably on
payday Fridays at 7:30am. This change resulted from the Safety Committee deciding that meetings held
once a month were not frequent enough.
Supervisors will be responsible to schedule the meeting and ensure attendance. Employee involvement
is to be encouraged by having an employee present the Safety topic. All Safety Meeting minutes will
be forwarded to Management for review and assistance in resolving concerns. These resolutions will
be communicated to the employees involved as soon as possible and presented at the next Safety
Meeting.
The safety topic should include items that will enhance employee awareness and job safety.
SAFETY MEETING PLANNING FORMAT
Prepare for Safety Meetings. Planning the event keeps the time needed to a minimum and enhances
interest in the Health & Safety Program and safety topics.
x Set an agenda.
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x Schedule the meeting as to place and time. Start the meeting promptly.
x Review the previous meeting with regard to employee concerns and follow-up action taken.
x Review any incidents or injuries since previous meeting with regard to employee concerns and
follow-up action taken.
x Review any incidents or injuries since previous meeting. Report corrective measures or job
procedure changes.
x Review Inspections or Hazard Assessments that have been conducted. Present any deficiencies
and correction action or guidelines.
x Present the safety topic. This may be a prepared topic from a resource document, a new job
procedure or changes in Company, Client, or Government rules.
x Ask participants if they have any safety problems or concerns. Note each contribution presented.
x Close the meeting on an upbeat tone (mention how well everyone is doing) and have all
participants sign the minutes.
x Present to Management for review and complete any unfinished action assignment.
Toolbox Meetings
Planned Observation is a tool for observing conditions and practices in an organized and systematic
way. Not only observing the changes but discussing these sometimes subtle amendments to our work
sites in our Toolbox Talks, JHA’s and Safety Meetings will assist us with controlling hazards and seeing
injuries before they occur in the workplace.
These meetings are being held consistently and being documented.
8.8 During the meetings two-way communication takes place.
Format for Toolbox Meetings
The general format for each Toolbox meeting is:
x Review the last meeting
o
Talk about what was done
x Bring up the new Topic
o
Ask employees how this will affect them
Facilitator then discusses the topic
o
Discuss how it will apply to the entire crew
o
Crew signs toolbox meeting sheet
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8.9 Senior Management attends and participates in these Health & Safety
Meetings.
Ownership and Management is in attendance and participates in the meetings whenever possible. This
is documented on the safety meeting minutes.
REPORTING PROCEDURES
The following are necessary actions or protocol that must followed in light of the various
incidents that may occur on the work site.
Near Miss Report
Must be completed for any incident (“near miss”) that does not cause
injury or property damage but had the potential to do so.
First Aid Record
Must be filled out for all injuries treated at the company work site. This
record must be kept for 3 years after the treatment date.
Accident Investigation Report #1
Must be completed for any treatment given at a customer’s medical facility
or by a licensed Medical Doctor; or for any property damage less than
$10,000.
Accident Investigation Report #2
Must be completed for a Lost Time injury; third party injury or accident; or
property damage in excess of $10,000.
WCB Employer’s Report
The supervisor is to complete this report and submit it to the General
Manager any time that an employee reports to a licensed medical Doctor
for any work related injury ot health problem. The General Manager must
submit the completed Worker`s Compensation Board Employer`s
Report fo the Worker`s Compensation Board within the time frame
required by legislation. This form is not an accident investigation.
WCB Worker`s Report
The injured employee must call the Satey Director. Cell #780-399-6148
Then fill out this report any time that an employee reports to a
licensed medical Doctor for any work related injury or health problem.
The supervisor or Safety Team Leader must submit the report to
the SafetyDirector within 8 hours of the incident. This will then be
forwarded to the Worker`s Compensation Board.
Accident/Incident Statements
Use these any time that other people have witnessed the accident and have information to contribute.
If the accident involved a third party, such as member of the public, record as much information and
detail as possible. Use Accident Investigation Report #2 for this type of accident, as well as any witness
statements.
If a public or licensed motor vehicle is involved, use the Motor Vehicle Accident Report.
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WORKER’S COMPENSATION BOARD REPORTING
WEISS-JOHNSON must submit an Employer’s Report of Injury to the Worker’s Compensation Board
within the time frame required by legislation if:
x The employee loses consciousness following an injury.
x The employee is transported or directed by a first aid attendant or other representative of the
employer to a hospital or other place of medical treatment, or is recommended to go there.
x The injury is one that obviously requires medical treatment.
x The employee states an intention to seek medical treatment.
x The employee has received medical treatment for the injury.
x The employee is unable or claims to be unable to return to his or her usual job on any day
subsequent to the day of injury.
x The injury or accident resulted or is claimed to have resulted in the breakage of an artificial
member, eyeglasses, dentures, or hearing aid.
x The employee or the Worker’s Compensation Board requests that a report be sent to the Board.
If a first aid attendant treats the injured employee, a completed First Aid Report must be submitted as
well.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES TO BE REPORTED TO THE WORKER’S COMPENSATION BOARD
If an employee dies on the job it must be reported to the Worker’s Compensation Board immediately as
well as immediate notification to the OH&S authority and the Police.
ADMINISTRATION
In the event of a work related injury or illness to a WEISS-JOHNSON employee the Supervisor/Safety
Team Leader is to report the details to the head office without delay.
DO NOT Submit the Employer’s Report of Accident or Industrial Disease report to the Worker’s
Compensation Board, this will be completed and sent from the head office by the Safety Director.
Prepare all documentation regarding the incident and fax or e-mail it to the head office within 8-12
hours of the incident. Do not delay reporting the incident to the doctor. This will only complicate matters
between Weiss-Johnson and the Worker’s Compensation Board.
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All Companies:
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. / Plumbing by Weiss-Johnson Ltd. / Fireplaces by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
/ Gatt Heating – 2014 Ltd.
have the employees report all injuries immediately to:
Safety Director
Barry Gabruch
[email protected]
Phone: (780) 399-6148
1. Safety Director - A medicentre in your area will be recommended
2. Transport injured person to Doctor/Seek Medical Attention
3. Hand in medical paperwork from the doctor to the Safety Director (by 8:00 the next morning)
4. Fill out 3-page Worker’s Report (When injured person sees Safety Director)
5. Safety Director will fill out Employer’s Report and e-mail or fax all documents into WCB
6. Recovery process begins.
Employers do not need to file an Employer’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease with the Worker’s
Compensation Board when:
No injury occurred, such as a near miss.
An employee says they are not hurt and do not need medical care. The incident must be recorded in the
first aid book in case medical attention is sought at a later date. This will allow for accurate reporting of
the incident.
COMMUNICATING WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
Occupational Health and Safety Officers and other government officials will perform periodic inspections
or investigations at WEISS-JOHNSON work sites. They are to be given unimpeded access to the
work areas. Determine whether an inspection or an investigation is occurring. All relationships with
government officers must be on an honest and cooperative basis.
Prior to visiting the work area they must be informed what personal protective equipment is needed;
what special training is required and of any restricted areas due to work processes.
The officer must always be accompanied by the senior WEISS-JOHNSON supervisor. The officer may
require having an employee or employee representative present.
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During an investigation the government officer must be accompanied by a WEISS-JOHNSON
supervisor.
Officers only have the right to ask for information or evidence relevant to the investigation or inspection
and to the jurisdiction they represent. The documents requested by the officer are to be photocopied
with one copy given to the officer and one put in a separate file established for the investigation or
inspection. Original documents are not to be given to the officer.
If the officer takes samples or photographs while on an inspection or investigation, the WEISSJOHNSON supervisor must take a sample or photograph of the same material at the same location as
the officer. The time, date, location, and circumstance of each sample or photograph must be recorded.
As a result of the investigation or inspection the officer may write orders requiring the immediate
correction of some hazard, or, if a condition of immediate danger threatens the health or safety of an
employee, issue a stop work order or a fine to an individual or the company.
If the supervisor does not agree with the officer, the situation or work process must be explained, only
with facts, not opinions. It is not appropriate to engage in a debate or argument.
Reports and orders from the officers are to be posted in a prominent location for seven days or until the
deficiency is corrected Items needing correction must be acted upon without delay and the officer must
be notified in writing of the action taken.
The methods Officers may use are EDUCATION, CONSULTATION or ENFORCEMENT. The method
that the Officer chooses is usually determined by the relationship established between the WEISSJOHNSON Supervisor and the Officer.
EMPLOYEE TRAINING
WEISS-JOHNSON’s supervisors and employees will be trained in the following areas and maintain
certification where applicable:
x New Employee Orientation
x Hazard Assessment and Control
x WHMIS (as needed)
x CSTS - Construction Safety Training System (as needed)
x Standard First Aid and CPR (Min. 1 person on each crew of 2-3)
x Worksite Inspection (as needed)
x Incident Investigation (Supervisor)
x Supervisor Safety Training (Supervisor)
x On the Job Training of new and existing workers
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NEW EMPLOYEE ORIENTATION
Before commencing work with WEISS-JOHNSON all new employees will be given a comprehensive
orientation.
The orientation must include but not be limited to the following:
x WEISS-JOHNSON’s Safety Policy and Goals.
x Management, Supervisor, Employee Responsibilities
x Right to Refuse Unsafe Work
x Discipline Policy and Procedures
x Drug and Alcohol Policy
x Hazard Assessment and Control
x Codes of Practice
x Personal Protective Equipment Policy and Requirements
x Accident/Near Miss Reporting
x Safety Meetings
x Required Employee Training
x Environment Policy
x Emergency Plans-Muster points
x Reporting of Unsafe Practices and Conditions
EMPLOYEE TRAINING
At WEISS-JOHNSON employee training is normally carried out by the supervisor, WEISS-JOHNSON
will ensure that the supervisors know what is to be taught and are performing the training functions, and
that employees receive adequate training and instruction to work safely.
Adequate (with regards to training)
In considering adequate training of employees:
x Training must be “sufficient” – there has to be enough of it to ensure that the employee can
perform the duties expected without undue risk of injury.
x It has to be “satisfactory” – of sufficiently high quality, making use of effective communication
techniques, to leave no room for misunderstanding.
x It has to be “proportionate”, to the degree of hazard involved.
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x Training and retaining should be provided within a time frame that is appropriate for the work at
hand. This is critical when the task at hand is performed infrequently.
Specific training must encompass the whole work procedure. There must be a complete breakdown
of all procedures involved in a work situation, hazards must be identified, and the employee must be
trained in the safe methods of handling any equipment involved. These procedures should be practically
demonstrated to the trainee, and any of the applicable Occupational Health and Safety Regulations that
may be pertinent should be explained to the employee so their responsibilities are clearly stated and
understood.
The object of such training is to create an aware employee with a solid background of safe work habits
on which to build their experience.
Job training must not be left to chance. Employees cannot be expected to learn their jobs correctly
without instruction or watching others do them. Inadequate training usually leads to the development
or imitation of unsafe practices, and it does little to provide information on how to handle unusual
conditions or to apply emergency procedures.
A training program should include demonstrations and descriptions on how the work should be
performed. The employees should practice under supervision, until they have shown that they are
capable of performing the job safely. At every significant stage in the work process the Supervisor
should discuss with the employee the hazards associated with the job or the wok environment, the
personal protective equipment or safety devices that are necessary, and the emergency procedures
which are to be followed. Even experienced employees should not undertake a new job function alone
until it has been demonstrated to the Supervisor that they are capable of performing the new job safely
and have a detailed knowledge of work hazards and emergency procedures.
BASIC PRINCIPLES FOR THE TEACHING OF ADULTS
Training adults is very different from training or teaching children or adolescents. Knowing the subject
is not enough for teaching adults. An adult offers a range of personal traits, some positive and others
negative, and it is necessary to know how to neutralize the latter and cultivate the former.
An adult sees education as interference in his/her personality in order to bring about a change, so he/
she puts up resistance – sometimes unknowingly – to this change. Many adults perceive it as a threat to
themselves or their habits. It is up to the trainer to offset this resistance by encouraging them to see the
advantages which change will bring them.
A child or adolescent attends school because they have to, but an adult attends courses out of choice.
This is positive, but an adult will quickly drop out of the learning process if they cannot see clear results
or if they consider that it is not worth their while. An adult learns to cater for certain necessities, which
means that the aims and objectives have to be clearly defined.
Whereas a child or adolescent possesses an unlimited curiosity an adult has limited capacity to adapt.
Adults will take part in training because it is a necessary step for the performance of their job, but it is
up to us to prove to them that what they are doing will enable them to perform their task better, more
efficiently and more safely.
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Adults are more impatient because of their concern for saving time and effort, and are afraid of
frustration and being ridiculed. A competitive situation and especially a qualifications-based system
should always be avoided. Certain adult reactions are extrapolations of events during their schooldays, so care must be taken to avoid anything which might remind them of those times, e.g. desks,
expressions, etc.
The motivation of adults is the setting of an individual objective which they recognize as capable or
fulfilling their needs. There should be no confusion between interest and motivation. Interest relates
more clearly to concrete objectives, while motivation related to something more general, the culminating
point of a complete process. The motivations behind the adult’s endeavors are generally social
advancement and financial reward.
THE INSTRUCTOR’S ROLE
It should always be remembered that an employee is not a pupil and should not therefore be treated as
one. The tendency to reproduce the school model – with the teacher giving the lesson in front of a class
which listens passively – must be avoided.
The instructor must be capable of getting a message across. A health and safety instructor must give
the employees the knowledge to react to specific situations, not on providing theoretical knowledge.
Instructors should not consider themselves to be a depository of knowledge but should use and give
added value to the experience of the participants. They should not come across as being all-powerful
in selecting the most appropriate methods; rather should define objectives and methods jointly with the
students and act as an adviser, not a boss, and help to solve problems.
The vehicle of communication between instructor and employee is language and gesture, upon which
the greater or lesser degree of understanding of the message being delivered will depend. Information
which is over-sophisticated or poorly transmitted is simply non-information for the employee.
THE EMPLOYEE’S ROLE
Adults are accustomed to making their own decisions, so there may be resistance on their part to being
a passive element in training. They must be as closely involved as possible.
They will not take kindly to an authoritarian manner. An adult likes to know the purpose of the training
in order to accept it, so the objective must be presented clearly. They like to be able to discuss it and to
have the opportunity of assessing the results. The training pursued must have social recognition.
Employees need to feel able to do or understand what they hear so there is a clear need to avoid
classroom-style lessons which employees would be unable to follow.
STRUCTURING COMMUNICATION
Acquiring knowledge, an attitude or a pattern of behavior, is a step-by-step process and this makes it
essential to:
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x Know the level of prior knowledge in order to forestall any gaps which could hold up the
acquiring of new knowledge,
x Structure the subject properly, so that one idea follows on from another,
x Assess each stage in order to check that there is proper assimilation.
The instructor must maintain the level of interest, because passivity is counter-productive and slows
down the learning process. Instructors must be on their toes to react, respond, etc., and recognize
the warning signs; One student looking out of the window, another doodling on a piece of paper, etc.
suggests that passivity is turning to apathy, leading to a break in communication.
RECOMMENDED PROCEDURES FOR TRAINING NEW EMPLOYEE(S)
INTRODUCTION
Prepare to receive the new employee(s)
x Review their work experience, training and education.
x Have a written up-to-date description of the job.
x Have a step-by-step breakdown of the job or list of duties and responsibilities.
x Plan what is going to be presented.
Welcome the new employee(s)
x Put them at ease.
x Show them their assigned workplace.
x Explain the work flow and arrangement.
x Explain where to obtain special tools or advice.
Tour the Facilities
x Explain the layout of the workplace.
x Tell them that if they have any problems with their work, to report to their Supervisor and the
problem will be resolved.
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TRAINING PROCEDURES
Prepare the new employee
x Explain the job and its purpose in detail.
x Encourage questions. Make certain the answers are correct and understood.
x Explain in detail any precautions which may be necessary to make the job safe, including
protective equipment.
x Do not hurry preparation.
x Try to associate past experiences with the new job.
x Give all necessary information before starting the demonstration.
x Make sure they can understand all that is going on.
x Do not start until their full attention and interest is given.
Demonstrate and describe how the job is done
x Go through the operation at normal speed.
x Go through the operation at slow speed and answer questions.
x Include safety precautions in the normal sequence of tasks.
x Explain each step in turn.
x Have the new employee perform the operation until they have mastered it, exactly as you want it.
x Proceed with the next operation.
x After all operations go smoothly, have the new employee go through the entire job. If it is
complex or too long and detailed to do at one time, have it broken down in segments to suit the
capacity of the new employees.
x Do not attempt to instruct more than the new employee can master.
x Discuss problems and answer questions.
Observe the new employee doing the job
x After a period of time, have the new employees perform the entire task at as near a normal
speed as possible. Do not rush.
x Answer any questions and repeat key points they may have missed. When it is felt that they are
ready, have the new employee perform on their own. Tell the new employee where to get help if
their Supervisor is absent.
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x Encourage initiative and responsibility; respect their suggestions.
Check the progress
x As each new employee learns the safe way to do the job, make visits shorter, less frequent.
x Maintain safety standards and correct work habits.
x Continue to monitor to ensure the new employee maintains the established safety standards.
Certifications Available
Emergency First Aid & CPR
COURSE OUTLINE:
Introduction to Red Cross
Check, Call, Care
Recognizing and Controlling Hazards
Personal Protection Equipment ( Barrier Devices)
Artificial Resuscitation (AR)
Chocking(treatment and prevention)
Shock, Fainting, Unconsciousness (treatment and prevention)
Wound and Bleeding Care
Adult/One Rescuer – Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
Note: It is recommended CPR be updated annually Course Duration: 7-8 Hours
Certification: Upon successful completion of the course, participants are awarded an industry recognized and
government approved certificate valid for 36 months.
Standard First Aid & CPR
Overview:
This course is designed to provide participants with more of the knowledge and skills necessary to assist anyone
experiencing a medical emergency. Although the information in this course is applicable to any setting, it is
ideally suited for industrial environments where, for example, personnel may be or will be exposed to chemicals,
poison/toxic substances, confined space situations or the operation and maintenance of equipment. This course
focuses on preventing further injury, easing pain and/or discomfort and promoting recovery. In addition, it provides
participants with the knowledge and skills required to preform basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
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Course Outline:
In addition to the topics included in the Emergency First Aid and Level “A” CPR course, participants will be
provided with the knowledge and skills required to prevent or treat other medical emergencies, such as:
ƒ Musculoskeletal injuries
ƒ Head and Spinal Injuries
ƒ Burns
ƒ Poisoning
ƒ Sudden Medical Conditions
ƒ Soft Tissue Injuries
NOTE: It is recommended that CPR is updated annually.
Course Duration: 16 Hours ( 2 day course)
Certification: Upon successful completion of the course, participants are awarded an industry recognized and
government approved certificate valid for 36 months.
Fall Protection
Overview:
The industrial/Commercial End-Use fall protection program has been created by Fall Protection Group Inc, a
leader in North American Fall Protection Training. The program is designed to address the fall safety needs
for industrial and commercial workers in the province of Alberta. This program was developed in accordance
with requirements acceptable to the Alberta Construction Safety Association (ACSA) and the Oil Sands Safety
Association (OSSA). This program is fully accredited by the OSSA and is simultaneously recognized by the
ACSA. The goal of this fall protection program is the ensure that recipients understand fall protection safety
principals as they apply to the work environment and to correctly use fall protection at all times.
Outline:
ƒ Fall Protection Fundamentals and Regulations
ƒ Methods of Eliminating Hazards
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ƒ Equipment Specifications, Limitations, Care and Inspection
ƒ Proper Planning When Controlling Fall Hazards
ƒ Rescue Planning and Preparedness
Course Duration: 8 hours (Theory & Practical)
Certification: Upon successful completion, participants receive an OSSA recognized certification from the “Fall
Protection Group” valid for 36 months
Fire Extinguisher Training - Portable
Overview:
Understand the basics of Fire Behavior, gain an awareness as to the classifications and ratings for fire
extinguishers. Also understand the hazards associated with the operations of various types of PFE and
understand the limitations of PFE.
Outline:
ƒ Inspection of PFE
ƒ Indentification of the Types of PFE
ƒ Extinguish a Class “A” Fire
ƒ Extinguish a Class “B” Fire, Level 1,2,3
Course Duration: 4 Hours
Certification: Participants receive a a wallet certificate valid for 36 months
Chainsaw instruction Program
STIHL can help you get the most from your equipment and help your crews reduce the risk of injury from
accidents. Their distributors can connect our managers with experienced instructors to demonstrate the proper
use of the equipment and keep them up-to-date on relevant equipment information. Seminars can be tailored to
fit your specific needs and group size.
Topics offered include:
x STIHL equipment maintenance
x Product applications (choosing the proper tool for the job)
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x Protective Apparel (PPE)
x Features of STIHL products
x Proper starting techniques
x Proper fuel mixtures/storage
x Choosing the proper accessory or cutting attachment for your needs
x Authorized cutting attachments
Basic Hand Tool Training
Description
The Occupational Health and Safety Act section 25 and 26 states that all employers are responsible for taking
every precaution necessary to ensure the safety of all employees working on-site.
As an Employer/Manager/Supervisor, Weiss-Johnson has legal
responsibilities to ensure their employees are aware of all hazards and
have received the proper training to include the safe use of Hand Tools
for personnel that is required to use tools to perform their job.
In order to assist you in reaching compliance with this training sessions are provided by 4th year and Journeyman personnel.
Personal Protective Equipment Training
After completion of the Personal Protective Training course, employees should be able to understand:
x
How Personal Protective Equipment is used in the workplace
x
How to properly use different types of PPE
x
CSA Safety standards in relation to PPE
x
How to maintain their PPE
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Key Points on PPE:
x
PPE stands for Personal Protective Equipment
x
PPE is primarily concerned with detailing individual protective gear and how they are used
x
All employers are required to show diligence when training employees
x
By taking both theory and practical on-site training employees will achieve OHS compliance
Construction Safety Training System (CSTS)
The training is done individually and takes, on average, 5-6 hours to complete. The employee is instructed
on various health and safety topics and then tested for 100% mastery of content. This program gives our
employer the flexibility of training when and where it is most convenient.
This program provides workers with CSTS Generic WHMIS and will help reduce the amount of time and
money spent on conventional health & safety classroom training.
Course provided by the company.
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
This one-day course is designed for individuals who are responsible for providing WHMIS training and/or
establishing and maintaining their company’s WHMIS program.
Course topics include:
o
relevant legislation
o
warning symbols
o
labeling requirements for controlled products
o
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) interpretation
o
worker training requirements and techniques
o
information and instruction about developing site-specific programs for controlled products
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Certification:
This course has a written exam component. Participants must achieve a minimum score of 80% for
course certification. Certification allows the trainer to conduct generic WHMIS training using ACSA
materials. Additional site-specific training will be required to achieve legislative compliance. Recertification is required every three years and can be achieved by taking the one-day course again, or
by successfully challenging the written exam.
Training Requirements for Staff in the Field
Effective October, 2015
When a candidate is hired please ask them to bring copies of their training certificates for the Safety Orientation so we may document the validity of their accreditations.
Requirements:
Lead Hand / Supervisor / Working Alone
• Emergency 1st Aid / CPR - 1 day course
• CSTS (online exam) - 6 hours
• PPE Training (Powerpoint & Exam) - 1 hour
• WHMIS - 1 hour
Fall Protection as needed
• Lead at Fireplaces / Commercial / Rough-ins
• Managers determine need
Helpers:
• Residential Orientation of Construction Knowledge (the R.O.C.K.) - 1 hour
• PPE Training - 1 hour
• WHMIS - 1 hour
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Inspections
9.
Inspections
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Occupational Health and Safety Code
Part 5
Safety and protection — generally
48(3) An employer must ensure that written records of the inspections required by subsection
(2) are retained as required by section 58.
Occupational Health and Safety Code
Part 5, Section 48
Inspections Program Confirmation
9.1 There is a written policy and procedure in regard to inspections.
9.2 There is a specific form and checklist used for inspections.
9.3 Inspections must be completed in a certain measurable period of
time for each company in Weiss-Johnson.
9.4 Safety Team Leaders/Safety Supervisors are completing
inspections as per policy.
9.5 Employees are encouraged to report unsafe or unhealthy
conditions or practices.
9.6 Documentation confirms that identified deficiencies are corrected
in a timely manner.
9.7 The Safety Director participates/reviews the inspection process.
9.8 Inspection reports or summaries are posted or communicated to
appropriate employees.
9.1 There is a written policy and procedure in regard to inspections.
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INSPECTION POLICY
Purpose
The purpose of this policy is to control losses of human and material resources by identifying and
correcting unsafe acts and conditions.
Policy
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will maintain a comprehensive program of safety inspections at all
facilities and jobsites. Workers are responsible for participating in and contributing to the inspection
program. Workers signing this policy agree to make the appropriate corrections to their operating
procedure as indicated through the inspection.
Responsibilities
The management is responsible for the overall operation of the program.
Safety Officers are responsible for directing formal inspections in work areas that they control and for
involving workers in such inspections.
Workers are responsible for participating in and contributing to the inspection program.
“INSPECTIONS ARE A PROVEN PROACTIVE METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES.“
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. requires employees to make regular safety inspections of their
work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature and hazard of the work. In
compliance with the law, such inspections are made with the crews and will prevent the development
of unsafe working conditions.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: _______________________________
Date:______/______/20_______
Safety Director
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INSPECTIONS
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Best Business Practices require employers to make
regular safety inspections of their work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature
and hazard of the work and by Manufacturers’ instructions. Such inspections are made monthly with the
crews and will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.
PURPOSE OF INSPECTIONS
x Discover any unsafe conditions.
x Prevent accidents and property damage.
x Identify existing and potential hazards.
x Identify safety code violations and reinforce and promote safe work practices.
x Help prevent breakdown of equipment, and reduce down time.
x Help prevent loss of tools, equipment and materials.
x Identify and prevent losses BEFORE they happen.
TYPES OF INSPECTIONS
INFORMAL (ONGOING)
x Before Use - usually done by employees as part of their regular
duties, i.e. PPE, power tools, mobile equipment, etc.
x Work Methods and Practices - should be continuously observed so that short cuts
do not develop.
x Manufacturers’ Recommendations - every day, every 40 hours, once a year, or at
intervals specified.
Supervisors must be constantly watching for unsafe acts and conditions, which cannot be left until a
scheduled inspection. Ongoing inspections are essential to prevent small problems from developing into
major ones.
Employees must be encouraged to do their own inspections of their work areas and to take any
corrective action they are capable of, or, if the situation is beyond their capabilities, they are to notify
their Supervisor immediately.
FORMAL (PLANNED OR SCHEDULED)
These inspections are formal and documented. The frequency depends upon:
x An item or crew appearing on the Inspection List.
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x The number of employees and size of operation.
x The number of shifts and the activity level of each shift.
x The Manufacturers’ recommendations or specifications.
x The regulations of governing bodies.
x The degree of hazard involved in the equipment and the work.
x A documented Toolbox Talk.
At the minimum: Inspections are completed bi-weekly on a rotational basis. There are times when some
crews will be visited repeatedly while other crews may miss the bi-weekly rotation.
POST ACCIDENT
These inspections are the result of an upset condition or accident, i.e. damage to a vehicle, building or
person will require it to be inspected and/or recertified; a release of a process product to a work area will
require an inspection before work resumes.
From this inspection the Safety Team Leader can determine if an investigation is warranted.
INSPECTION PROCEDURES
x Review the previous inspection reports from the area to be inspected and make a list of
previously identified hazards and their locations before starting. Take a copy of the inspection
report on the inspection to check if any items are still uncorrected.
x Familiarize yourself with the area and its related fire, health and safety problems before starting.
x Learn which critical jobs in the area have been associated with a high accident frequency or
have a high potential for severe loss.
x Look for “off the floor” items as well as those “on the floor”.
x Be methodical and thorough.
x Correct as much as you can during the inspection.
x Clearly describe each hazard and its location in your notes. Don’t try to remember details, write
them down. Take Pictures and measure distances between key items. Draw your own blueprint
of the scene.
x Prepare the inspection report, prioritize the hazards that were noted, and assign someone to
have them corrected within a specific time.
x Distribute the report, i.e. to Management, Safety Committee, Tool Box Meeting or Action List.
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x Follow up on all items requiring action to ensure they are completed.
HAZARD CLASSIFICATION
The most important feature of hazard classification is the priority given to hazards once they are
identified. The hazard posing the greatest risk must be given first position in the correction process.
The following hazard classifications can be used to describe the potential severity of loss from a
substandard practice or condition:
“HI” Hazard: A practice or condition, likely to cause permanent disability, loss of life
or body part, and/or extensive loss of structure, equipment or material.
or
A practice or condition likely to cause serious injury or illness (resulting
in temporary disability) or property damage that is disruptive, but less
severe than Class “A”.
“Lo” Hazard: A practice or condition likely to cause minor (non-disability) injury or
illness or non-disruptive property damage.
Use of this classification system will help to put remedial planning and action into proper perspective
and focus attention on areas that require the greatest concentration of time, effort and resources.
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Once the hazards are classified they must be addressed.
“Hi” hazard situations must be dealt with immediately as the risk is too high to allow the work to
continue. The work must be shut down and the employees warned what the hazard is.
“Hi” Hazard situations have to be remedied as soon as possible. No work can proceed until situation is
remedied or controlled.
“Lo” Hazard situations can be resolved at the beginning of the shift. In all cases it must be discussed
and the employees must be warned of the hazard and informed about what is going to be done.
CAUTION: “Lo” Hazards can become “Hi” Hazards if not corrected at the beginning of the shift.
DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Equipment that is found to be defective must be tagged “DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT” and removed from
service. A decision will be made whether to repair or replace the unit. Employees must be instructed
that they do not use defective equipment and report it to their Supervisor immediately.
Equipment that has been permanently removed from service must not be given to employees for their
own use, i.e. damaged extension cords, ladders or slings. If the item is not safe for an industrial work
site, it is not safe anywhere else.
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EXAMPLES OF HAZARD CLASSIFICATION
The following lists are meant to illustrate how different types of hazards may be classified. Individual
hazards will change classification depending upon the work or work procedure.
“Hi” hazards
x Equipment not de-energized and locked out during maintenance or repair.
x Working in trenches or excavations that are improperly sloped or shored.
x Working under a suspended machine or load without proper stands or blocking.
x Working in a Confined Space without being trained or following proper procedure.
x Working at heights greater than 8 feet without fall protection.
x Grinding and chipping without wearing proper eye and face protection.
x Working from a ladder without personal fall arrest equipment.
x Ladder not tied down or not at a proper angle.
x Horseplay.
x Fall arrest anchorage not capable of holding 5000 pounds.
x Fire extinguisher not properly serviced
x Inadequate housekeeping.
x Open excavation left without barricades and signs.
x Walking past a welding or spot welding operation without eye protection.
x Insufficient illumination at a work area.
x Bottom step of stairs too high off ground level.
x Vehicle parked so you must back out.
x Worn vehicle tire.
x Controls not adequately identified.
x Expired Licenses/Tickets.
x Employees not trained in the proper use of PPE. (This could be an A Class of hazard)
x Equipment certificates that have expired.
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“Lo” hazards
x MSDS present but out of date.
x Windshield of vehicle cracked.
x Dirty personal protective equipment.
x Employees with facial hair wearing respirator.
x Working with rough lumber without wearing gloves.
x Not wearing proper hearing protection.
x Drawers left open.
SUMMARY
Employees and supervisors who conduct informal or formal inspections must constantly be alert for
Unsafe Acts and Unsafe Conditions.
UNSAFE ACTS
1. Operating without Authority, Failure to Secure or Warn
o
Starting, stopping, using, operating, firing, moving, etc. without authority, or without giving proper
signal.
o
Failing to shut off equipment not in use.
o
Releasing or moving loads, etc., without giving warning.
o
Failure to place warning signs, signals, tags, etc.
o
Failure of crane signalman to give signal, or proper signal.
2. Operating or Working at Unsafe Speed
x Running.
x Feeding or supplying too rapidly.
x Driving too rapidly.
x Driving too slowly.
x Throwing material instead of carrying or passing it.
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x Jumping from vehicles, platforms, etc.
x Walking backwards.
x Working too fast or too slow endangering self and others.
3. Making Safety Devices Inoperative
This should be treated as a Criminal Act since it invariably leads to an accident:
x Removing safety devices.
x Blocking, plugging, tying, etc., of safety devices.
x Replacing safety devices with those of improper capacity (higher amperage electric fuses,
low capacity safety valves, etc.).
x Misadjusting safety devices
x Disconnecting safety devices
x Failure to secure safety devices.
4. Using Unsafe Equipment (Hands Instead of Equipment), or Equipment Unsafely
x Using defective equipment (mushroom head chisel, etc.).
x Unsafe use of equipment (e.g. iron bars for tamping explosives, operating pressure valves at
unsafe pressures, volume, etc.).
x Gripping objects insecurely, taking wrong hold of objects.
x Using a screwdriver as a chisel or pry bar.
5. Unsafe Loading, Placing, Mixing, Combining, etc.
x Overloading.
x Crowding or unsafe piling.
x Arranging or placing objects or material unsafely (parking, placing, stopping, or leaving vehicles,
elevators, and conveying apparatus in unsafe position for loading and unloading).
x Injecting, mixing or combining one substance with another so that explosion, fire or other hazard
is created (injecting cold water into hot boiler, pouring water into acid, etc.).
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x Introducing objects or materials unsafely (portable electric lights inside of boilers or in spaces
containing flammables or explosives; moving equipment on congested workplaces; smoking
where explosives or flammables are kept, etc.).
x Placing on working surfaces (tools, materials, debris, rope, chain, hose, electrical leads, etc.).
6. Taking Unsafe Position or Posture
x Exposure under suspended load (fixed or moving).
x Putting body or its parts into shaft way or opening; standing too close to openings; walking on
girders, beams or edges of working surfaces when not necessary; not using proper methods of
ascending or descending.
x Entering vessel or enclosure that is unsafe due to temperature, gases, electric, mechanical or
other exposures.
x Lifting with bent back or while in awkward position or the load is too heavy.
x Riding in unsafe position (on platforms, tailboards and running boards of vehicles; tailing on or
stealing rides, riding on apparatus designed only for materials, etc.).
x Exposure on vehicular right of way.
x Passing on grades and curves, cutting in and out, road hogging, etc.
x Exposure to falling or sliding objects.
x Riding on forks, crane hooks, conveyors or other devices not intended to carry passengers.
7. Working on Moving or Dangerous Equipment
x Getting on and off moving equipment (vehicles, conveyors, elevators, etc.).
x Cleaning, oiling, adjusting, etc., of equipment under pressure (pressure vessels, valves, joints,
pipes, fittings, etc.).
x Walking on electrically charged equipment (motors, generators, lines, and other electrical
equipment).
x Welding, repairing, etc., of equipment containing dangerous chemical substances.
8. Horseplay
x Calling, talking or making unnecessary noise.
x Throwing material.
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x Teasing, abusing, startling, horseplay.
x Practical joking, etc.
x Quarreling or fighting.
9. Failure to Use Safe Attire or Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
x Use of PPE is not an arbitrary requirement; it is based on experience and hazard analysis. It is
an invitation to injury to neglect wearing or using PPE.
x Failing to wear eye protection, gloves, masks, aprons, shoes, leggings, protective hats, safety
belts, etc.
x Wearing loose clothing or sleeves, ties, cuffs on trousers, etc.
x Failure to report defective Safety apparel.
10. Failure to Shut Down and Lock Out
x No service or repair work should ever be attempted unless the power is shut off at its source and
so locked out and tagged that it cannot be accidentally started.
UNSAFE CONDITIONS
1. Improper Guarding
x Inadequately guarded gears, belts, shafts, conveyors, floor openings, etc.
x Improper shoring in mining, construction and excavating.
x Lack of warning signs.
2. Substandard Materials or Environment
x Rough.
x Slippery.
x Sharp-edged.
x Low material strength.
x Inferior Composition.
x Decayed, aged, worn, frayed, cracked, etc.
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3. Hazardous Arrangement, Procedure, etc.
x Unsafely stored or piled tools, material, etc.
x Congestion of working spaces.
x Inadequate aisle space, exits blocked, etc.
x Unsafe planning and/or layout of traffic or process operations.
x Misaligning.
x Inadequate drainage.
x Poor housekeeping, debris on floors.
x Oil, water, grease, paint, etc., on working surfaces.
x Emergency exits not marked or blocked.
4. Improper Illumination
x Insufficient light.
x Glare.
x Unsuitable location or arrangement (producing shadows or contrasts).
x No light.
5. Improper Ventilation
x Insufficient air changes.
x Unsuitable capacity, location or arrangement of system.
x Impure air source, dust, gas, fumes, etc.
x Abnormal temperature and humidity (confined area).
6. Unsafe Dress or Apparel
x Eye or face protection, gloves or mitts, aprons or sleeves, shoes, respirators, leggings, hard
hats, safety belts, etc., defective, unsafe or unsuited for work.
x Loose hair.
x Loose clothing.
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x Inadequately clothed.
x Welder’s helmet or hand shields defective, unsafe or unsuited for work.
x Welder’s protective clothing (spats, capes, sleeves, jackets and others) defective, unsafe or
unsuited for work.
7. Unsafe Design or Construction
x Poorly designed, too big, small, poor material, poorly constructed, inadequate bracing, etc.
x Using defective equipment (equipment that has had its guards removed etc.).
x Gripping objects improperly, taking wrong hold of tools.
x Using a screwdriver as a chisel or pry bar.
8. Failure To Use Safe Attire
x Field workers cannot wear shorts or sleeveless shirts. This is not deemed acceptable or safe
by Weiss-Johnson.
INSPECTIONS ARE A PROVEN PROACTIVE METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTS AND
INJURIES.
9.2 There is a specific form and checklist used for inspections.
Inspection Form / Checklists
Weiss-Johnson has a specific Inspection Form used for evaluating each work site. The form has a
checklist of items that need to be assessed and evaluated. This is used as a guide for the inspection
and the form allows for further details or comments to be added.
Those items include but are not limited to:
o
Hard Hats
o
Safety Glasses
o
Steel Toed Boots
o
Hazard Assessment Filled Out
o
Chain Saw Pants/Shield
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9.3
o
Fall Protection
o
Ladders
o
First Aid Kit
o
Fire Extinguisher
o
Access to Safety Manual
o
Vehicle Maintenance
o
Odometer Reading
o
Oil Change
o
Misc.
Inspections must be completed in a certain measurable period of time for
each company in Weiss-Johnson.
How often inspections are performed will depend on several factors:
x
the frequency of planned formal inspections may be set in the legislation
x
past accident/incident records
x
number and size of different work operations
x
type of equipment and work processes--those that are hazardous or potentially hazardous may require
more regular inspections
x
number of shifts--the activity of every shift may vary
x
new processes or machinery
High hazard or high risk areas should receive extra attention.
It is often recommended to conduct inspections as often as Safety Committee meetings. Weiss-Johnson’s
Safety Committee meets once a month. This is a good time to evaluate findings. Do not conduct an
inspection immediately before a committee meeting but try to separate inspections and meetings by at least
one week. This time allows for small items to be fixed and gives the committee an opportunity to focus on
issues requiring further action.
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Inspection Schedule
Frequency of Inspections vs. Company Size
Based on Number of crews that go out on a daily basis.
9.4
Crews
Minimum Inspections
1-4 Crews
1 Inspection every 2 weeks
4-10 Crews
1 inspection every week
10-20 Crews
1.5 inspections every week
20-35 Crews
2 inspections every week
35-50 Crews
3 inspections every week
50-65 Crews
4 inspections every week
65-80 Crews
5 inspections every week
Safety Team Leaders/Safety Supervisors are completing inspections as per
policy.
Inspections completed as per Policy
Discuss the planned inspection route before undertaking the inspection. Review where inspection team
members are going and what they are looking for. For example, during the inspection, “huddle” before
going into noisy areas. This eliminates the need for arm waving, shouting and other unsatisfactory
methods of communication.
For inspections, wear personal protective equipment (PPE) where required. If you do not have PPE and
cannot get any, do not enter the area. List this as a deficiency during the inspection. Re-inspect the area
when PPE is provided.
Observation
Look for deviations from accepted work practices. Use statements such as, “a worker was observed
operating a machine without a guard.” Do not use information derived from inspections for disciplinary
measures.
Some common poor work practices include:
x
failing to fill out Job Hazard Assessment thoroughly and timely
x
Failing to use 2-person-hold on extension ladder when above 10 feet
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x
failing to use or maintain, or improperly using, personal protective equipment or safety devices
x
using machinery or tools without authority or certification
x
operating at unsafe speeds or in other violation of safe work practice
x
removing guards or other safety devices, or rendering them ineffective
x
using defective tools or equipment or using tools or equipment in unsafe ways
x
using hands or body instead of tools or push sticks
x
overloading, crowding, or failing to balance materials or handling materials in other unsafe ways,
including improper lifting
x
repairing or adjusting equipment that is in motion, under pressure, or electrically charged
x
creating unsafe, unsanitary, or unhealthy conditions by improper personal hygiene, by using
compressed air for cleaning clothes, by poor housekeeping, or by smoking in unauthorized areas
x
standing or working under suspended loads, scaffolds, shafts, or open hatches
x
failing to follow company procedure during an incident
Inspection Principles
When conducting inspections, follow these basic principles:
x
Draw attention to the presence of any immediate danger--other items can await the final report.
x
Shut down and “lock out” any hazardous items that cannot be brought to a safe operating standard
until repaired.
x
Do not operate equipment. Ask the operator for a demonstration. If the operator of any piece of
equipment does not know what dangers may be present, this is cause for concern. Never ignore any
item because you do not have knowledge to make an accurate judgement of safety.
x
Look up, down, around and inside. Be methodical and thorough. Do not spoil the inspection with a
“once-over-lightly” approach.
x
Clearly describe each hazard and its exact location in your rough notes. Allow “on-the-spot”
recording of all findings before they are forgotten. Record what you have or have not examined in
case the inspection is interrupted.
x
Ask questions, but do not unnecessarily disrupt work activities. This may interfere with efficient
assessment of the job function and may also create a potentially hazardous situation.
x
Consider the static (stop position) and dynamic (in motion) conditions of the item you are inspecting.
If a machine is shut down, consider postponing the inspection until it is functioning again.
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9.6
x
Discuss as a group, “Can any problem, hazard or accident generate from this situation when looking
at the equipment, the process or the environment?” Determine what corrections or controls are
appropriate.
x
Do not try to detect all hazards simply by relying on your senses or by looking at them during the
inspection. You may have to monitor equipment to measure the levels of exposure to chemicals,
noise, radiation or biological agents.
x
Take a photograph if you are unable to clearly describe or sketch a particular situation.
Documentation confirms that identified deficiencies are corrected in a
timely matter.
Documented Deficiencies are Corrected in a Timely Matter
Through Hazard Assessments and Inspections Deficiencies are documented and corrections
are discussed and if a correction is made it should be documented. During this discussion safety
supervisors will decide if an investigation is warranted. This investigation would be used if it reveals that
a long-term solution is necessary in such a case.
At times the control used for a particular hazard is improper or insufficient. This needs to be corrected
as soon as possible.
Selecting an appropriate control is not always easy. It often involves doing a risk assessment to evaluate
and prioritize the hazards and risks. In addition, both “normal” and any potential or unusual situations
must be studied. Each program should be specially designed to suit the needs of the individual
company.
Choosing a control method may involve:
x
Evaluating and selecting temporary and permanent controls.
x
Implementing temporary measures until permanent (engineering) controls can be put in place.
x
Implementing permanent controls when reasonably practicable.
For example, in the case of a noise hazard, temporary measures might require workers to use hearing
protection. Long term, permanent controls might use engineering methods to remove or isolate the
noise source. To evaluate what is best long-term an investigation should be completed.
These inspections and investigations are documented.
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9.7
The Safety Director and Management participates /reviews the inspection
process.
The Safety Director and Management is involved in the Inspection Process.
Management Document Review
Purpose
The purpose of this document is to assist management in performing hazard identification and
mitigation, through document review, within their departments/crown corporations on an annual basis,
or as required.
The following documents should be reviewed and results documented on the Management Document
Review Template annually, or as required:
9.8
x
Job descriptions - review of all job descriptions within your department/crown corporation should
initially occur. After the initial review, job descriptions should be reviewed when significant changes
occur to the original job description or when a new position is added to your workforce.
x
Incident reports and Near Miss Reports - review all SERIOUS Incident and Near Miss Reports and
Investigations - documented by the Safety Committee or by the Safety Team Leader. x
Formal Workplace Inspections - documented for the Safety Committee to review.
Inspection reports or summaries are posted or communicated to
appropriate employees.
Inspection Reports are Posted
The inspection reports for each month are reported to the Safety Committee which is made up of
Safety Team Leaders from each company of Weiss-Johnson. They are then encouraged to take
this information back to their respective companies and report it to their employees in the form of a
summary or report that may be understood by all employees.
Those employees who do and do not comply with the process and the company rules will be reflected in
these reports.
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10.
INVESTIGATIONS
& REPORTING
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Occupational Health & Safety Act
Section 18
Serious injuries and accidents
18.(3) If an injury or accident referred to in subsection (2) occurs at a
work site or if any other serious injury or any other accident that
has the potential of causing serious injury to a person occurs at a
work site, the prime contractor or, if there is no prime contractor,
the contractor or employer responsible for that work site shall
(a)
carry out an investigation into the circumstances
surrounding the serious injury or accident,
(b)
prepare a report outlining the circumstances of the serious
injury or accident and the corrective action, if any,
(c)
undertaken to prevent a recurrence of the serious injury or
accident, and ensure that a copy of the report is readily available for inspection by
an officer
Occupational Health & Safety Act
Section 18
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Investigations and Reporting Program Confirmation
10.1 There is a written Investigation Policy and reporting procedure.
10.2 Standardized forms are being used and the Policy is being followed.
10.3 Safety Personnel and the workers know the reporting process.
10.4 Safety Supervisors have been trained through the ACSA to do
investigations and reporting.
10.5 Appropriate employees are involved in investigations.
10.6 Near misses are being reported. Workers understand what a near miss
is.
10.7 Direct and indirect causes are investigated.
10.8 Corrective actions have been:
a) Identified
b) Implemented
c) Communicated
10.9 Investigation reports are reviewed by senior management.
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10.1 There is a written Investigation Policy and reporting procedure.
INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING POLICY
Purpose
The purpose of Accident/Incident reporting and the subsequent investigation is to accurately determine the immediate and
basic (root) causes of the occurrence, not to find fault, and to implement controls to prevent recurrence.
Policy
WEISS-JOHNSON requires that all accidents and incidents be reported. Investigations are done on incidents where
there is an opportunity to learn from the work site how this incident could have been prevented. Investigations should be
completed on Near Miss incidents where injury and / or a fatality was narrowly avoided or did occur.
Responsibilities
x
All employees shall report all incidents to their immediate supervisor and then to the Safety Director.
x
Supervisors shall conduct initial investigations and submit their reports to the Safety Director promptly.
x
The Safety Team Leader shall conduct the initial investigation by documenting the initial interview of the
crew.
x
Safety Director shall determine the need for, direct and immediate detailed investigation.
Media Contact
The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or his designate are the only people authorized to speak or release information
to the news media regarding any WEISS- JOHNSON operation.
Reporters are to be told to direct their questions to The CEO of the company.
All other personnel at the operations or office are to respond to the media by referring them to The President.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: ______________________________
Barry Gabruch - Safety Director
Date:______/______/20_______
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ACCIDENT/INCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATION
The purpose of Accident/Incident reporting and the subsequent investigation is to accurately determine
the immediate and basic (root) causes of the occurrence, not to find fault, and to implement controls to
prevent recurrence.
WEISS-JOHNSON requires that all accidents and/or incidents that do not have an obvious cause be
reported and investigated by the Safety Team Leader or the Safety Supervisor.
DEFINITIONS
Accident
An unforeseen or unplanned occurrence in a sequence of events, which results in unintended injury,
death and/or property damage.
Near Miss
An undesired event that, under slightly different circumstances, could have resulted in person harm,
property damage or loss.
Incident
An undesired event that, that has caused bodily harm and/or property damage or loss. Most events will
be referred to as “incidents” so as not to imply that their occurrence could not have been altered. An
“accident” suggests that no party is responsible for the occurrence of the unfortunate event.
SEVERE INCIDENTS OR A FATALITY MUST BE REPORTED TO THE Occupational Health & Safety
Authority
The following incidents must be reported to the Occupational Health and Safety authorities, without
delay:
x An injury which results in death.
x An injury or accident that results in an employee being admitted to a hospital for a period of
time stipulated by regulation.
x An unplanned or uncontrolled explosion; fire or flood that causes a serious injury or that has
the potential of causing a serious injury.
x The collapse or upset of a crane; derrick or hoist, or
x The collapse or failure of any component of a building or structure necessary for the
structural integrity of the building or structure.
x The major release of a hazardous substance.
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Investigation Procedure
1. Check the accident site and secure any equipment or structure that could endanger the victim of
rescuers.
2. Determine the extent of injuries and treat to the limit of your training.
3. If it is possible to move the injured person without aggravating their injuries, have them transported
to the nearest medical facility without delay.
4. If it is not possible to move the injured person, summon help, using the prearranged emergency call
numbers. Give your name, the location, the number of people injured, the extent of the injuries, and
if any extrication of rescue equipment is needed. Give them your cellular phone number so they can
communicate with you.
5. Designate a witness or fellow tradesperson to go to the nearest road, intersection, etc. to direct the
emergency units to the accident site.
6. If the incident involves a third party such as a member of the public or a subcontractor, follow steps
1 to 5. Refer questions to the General Manager unless questioned by a police officer.
7. If the incident has happened on public property such as a city street, a primary or secondary
highway the local police authority should be notified.
8. If the incident has happened on a Customer’s property, notify the Customer Representative.
9. Once the injured people have been cared for, notify the supervisor immediately. The supervisor is to
contact the Safety Team Leader or Safety Director. If they are not available contact the Manager of
the particular Weiss-Johnson company, directly. The Manager is to contact the Head Office of WeissJohnson and contact the Safety Director at (780) 399-6148.
10. If the incident involved the public, the General Manager is to notify the company insurance carrier,
the Safety Director and the CEO must be notified.
11. If the incident results in fatal injuries to an employee or is an incident which must be reported to the
Occupational Health and Safety Authorities, by the Safety Director or the Chief Executive Officer of
Weiss-Johnson without delay.
In the case of a serious or fatal accident, the accident site must not be disturbed, other than for rescue
activities, until authorized to do so by the Occupational Health & Safety authority having jurisdiction.
The police do not have the authority to release an industrial accident site when they have finished their
portion of the investigation. Once the injured people have been cared for, the site secured, and the
proper people have been notified, an accident investigation can begin.
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MEDIA CONTACT
The CEO or the General Manager or his designate if approved by the CEO are the only people
authorized to speak or release information to the news media regarding any WEISS-JOHNSON incident
or operation.
Reporters are to be told to direct their questions to the Chief Executive Officer.
All other personnel at the operations or office are to respond to the media contact by referring them to
the Chief Executive Oficer.
DO NOT DISCUSS BLAME OR ADMIT FAULT.
NEVER SPECULATE OR GUESS IN RESPONSE TO A QUESTION.
10.2 Standardized Forms are being used and the Policy is being followed.
One Page Inspection Forms
Standardized one page inspection forms are adopted for use in most investigations. These forms follow
and support the investigation procedure at Weiss-Johnson and are designed to steer the investigations
in the direction of finding the root cause of the incident. Once this is determined the proper long-term
corrective actions may be introduced.
If there is a need for further follow-up reporting attachments may be made and pictures taken for
analysis are encouraged as part of the investigative process.
These forms are available to all Safety Team Leaders at each company.
10.3 Safety Personnel and the workers know the reporting process.
Safety Supervisors/Safety Team Leaders assist Workers with Safety Procedures
Safety Team Leaders are responsible for ensuring implementation of the WEISS-JOHNSON Health &
Safety Program within their respective Companies.
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Safety Team Leaders follow the direction of Safety Management and make certain that all employees
are educated in the reporting process. That they use all protective devices and procedures required to
protect themselves while at work.
Conduct Health & Safety Orientations with new work candidates in their particular company. Certify
these employees and provide them with the appropriate PPE on their 1st day of work.
Ensure that all employees to a new work site are oriented to site specific hazards and procedures before
commencing work on the site.
Advise all employees, sub-contractors, vendors or visitors of any potential or actual hazards and how to
eliminate or control them and be sure that they are familiar with Weiss-Johnson’s reporting process.
Carry out and document regular Inspections, investigations, Personal Protective Equipment Score
Cards, Toolbox meetings and Safety Meetings to ensure a safe and healthy work site.
Document and report all accidents, incidents or spills immediately. If injured, report to Safety Director
as soon as possible. Phone # (780) 399-6148 The Safety Director will direct the worker to the closest
Occupational Injury System (OIS) clinic.
Investigate all serious accidents and/or incidents, and to advise management on how to prevent similar
occurrences in the future through an action plan.
Conduct and participate in Job Hazard Assessments prior to starting work each day. “An employer must
assess a work site and identify existing and potential hazards before work begins at the work site or
prior to the construction of a new work site.” Alberta Occupational Health & Safety Code 7(1).
Workers use Reporting Process
Report any unsafe hazards, working conditions, or physical injury or medical condition to your direct
supervisor, immediately. Call (780) 399-6148 for the Safety Director.
Know, understand, and comply with the WEISS-JOHNSON Health and Safety Program, safe work
practices, procedures, rules and reporting process.
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Co-operate with your employer for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of themselves and
other employees.
Correctly wear to the best of your ability the safety equipment, personal protective devices, and clothing
required by Alberta Occupational Health & Safety legislation and this safety manual.
Take every reasonable precaution to protect the safety of themselves and other employees and the
environment and document in the Toolbox Meetings and the Job Hazard Assessments.
Notify your supervisor of any unsafe conditions and practices that may be of danger to yourself and
other employees in your work environment.
Document and report all accidents, incidents, spills and injuries to your supervisor as soon as possible.
Ensure that all appropriate forms have been completed and filed.
If injured, report to Safety Director as soon as possible.
Phone # (780) 399-6148 He will direct the
worker to the closest Occupational Injury System (OIS) clinic.
Report to work “fit for duty”, and remain fit for duty during your shift, and be free from any conditions
that will adversely affect performance. If this should change in any way report to your supervisor,
immediately and if necessary see an Occupational Injury System (OIS) Doctor.
Report to their supervisor any conditions that may limit their fitness for duty including the use of any
“over the counter” or prescription medication that may affect their ability to work safely.
Assist with developing a positive Safety Culture by following the WEISS-JOHNSON Health & Safety
Program and good industry practices.
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10.4 Safety Supervisors have been trained through the ACSA to do
investigations and reporting.
Training of Safety Supervisors
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will undertake appropriate supervisory training for all
employees functioning or intended to function in position of safety authority in the company
(e.g. ACSA courses)
x Principles of Health and Safety Management
x Legislation Awareness
x Leadership of Safety Excellence
x Auditor Training Program
10.5 Appropriate employees are involved in the investigations
Those involved in the Investigation
A Safety Supervisor or Safety Team Leader is appointed to do the investigation. Those employees who
are directly and indirectly involved in the incident are invited to play an active role in the investigation
process. Statements are taken from those employees and others who may be deemed witnesses.
Their immediate supervisor is involved in the process and the events of that day will be examined.
Wherever applicable the builder will be notified and sent a copy of the investigation.
In cases that apply work will remain on hold until all proper controls are put in place.
10.6 Near Misses are being reported. Workers understand what a Near Miss is.
How to Report a Near Miss
Near misses are reported on the Hazard Assessment sheets in each of the companies at WeissJohnson. It is explained at the safety orientation what is the definition of a near miss and why it is
important to report them.
MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS
a. Wear safety boots at all times in all construction areas.
b. Report to your supervisor all unsafe acts, unsafe conditions and near miss incidents.
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c. Report all injury or damage accidents immediately to appropriate supervision. First aid treatment
is to be obtained promptly for injury.
d. Perform all work in accordance with safe work practices and job procedures and your
supervisor’s direction.
e.
10.7 Direct and indirect causes are investigated.
Purpose of Investigation
The purpose of Accident/Incident reporting and the subsequent investigation is to accurately determine
the immediate and basic (root) causes of the occurrence, not to find fault, and to implement controls to
prevent recurrence.
WEISS-JOHNSON requires that all accidents and/or incidents that do not have an obvious cause be
reported and investigated by the Safety Team Leader or the Safety Supervisor.
Investigation Form
Standardized one page inspection forms are adopted for use in most investigations. These forms follow
and support the investigation procedure at Weiss-Johnson and are designed to steer the investigations
in the direction of finding the root cause of the incident. Once this is determined the proper long-term
corrective actions may be introduced.
If there is a need for further follow-up reporting attachments may be made and pictures taken for
analysis are encouraged as part of the investigative process.
These forms are available to all Safety Team Leaders at each company.
10.8 Corrective Actions have been :
a) Identified
b) Implemented
c) Communicated
a) Inspections and Identifying Deficiencies
Occupational Health and Safety Regulations and Best Business Practices require employers to make
regular safety inspections of their work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature
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and hazard of the work and by Manufacturers’ instructions. Such inspections are made monthly with the
crews and will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.
Purpose of Inspection/Investigation
x Discover any unsafe conditions.
x Prevent accidents and property damage.
x Identify existing and potential hazards.
x Identify safety code violations and reinforce and promote safe work practices.
x Help prevent breakdown of equipment, and reduce down time.
x Help prevent loss of tools, equipment and materials.
x Identify and prevent losses BEFORE they happen.
Once deficiency is identified an investigation is implemented to reveal a short-term and long-term
corrective action for the incident so it may not recur.
b) Results are Documented and Corrective Actions Implemented
It must be determined if the Priority Risk in each particular case is “Hi” or “Lo”. This will determine how
quickly controls will need to be implemented. Once the cause is identified various controls will be
analyzed to reveal the most proactive and industry conscious solution.
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Once the corrective action is identified the solution can be addressed.
“Hi” hazard situations must be dealt with immediately as the risk is too high to allow the work to
continue. The work must be shut down and the employees warned what the hazard is.
“Hi” Hazard situations have to be remedied as soon as possible. No work can proceed until situation is
remedied or controlled.
“Lo” Hazard situations can be resolved at the beginning of the shift. In all cases it must be discussed
and the employees must be warned of the hazard and informed about what is going to be done.
CAUTION: “Lo” Hazards can become “Hi” Hazards if not corrected at the beginning of the shift.
Defective Equipment
Equipment that is found to be defective must be tagged “DEFECTIVE EQUIPMENT” and removed from
service. A decision will be made whether to repair or replace the unit. Employees must be instructed
that they do not use defective equipment and report it to their Supervisor immediately.
Equipment that has been permanently removed from service must not be given to employees for their
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own use, i.e. damaged extension cords, ladders or slings. If the item is not safe for an industrial work
site, it is not safe anywhere else.
c) Communicate Corrective Actions to Employees.
Once you have established your best corrective action, you can decide on ways to communicate this
to each of the workers that are affected. Hazard control methods are often grouped into the following
categories:
x
Elimination (including substitution).
x
Engineering controls.
x
Administrative controls.
x
Personal protective equipment.
Keep these in mind while searching for the best corrective action.
The Safety Director will use the following methods but are not limited to:
o Employee Safety Orientation
o
Hazard Assessment Forms
o
On-going Hazard Assessment Forms
o
Toolbox Meeting Forms
o
Work site Inspection Checklists and Reports
o
Accident/Incident Investigations
o
Safety Meeting Records
o
Inventory Reports
o
Maintenance Reports
o
WCB Reports and Claims Management
o
E-mail
o
Posters
o
Safety Committee Meetings
o
Manager Meetings
o
Powerpoint Presentations
To communicate corrective actions to all Weiss-Johnson’s company employees.
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10.9 Investigation reports are reviewed by senior management.
The incident must be documented and investigated as soon as possible by the Field Safety Supervisor
or Safety Director with the employee on the work site. The company representative (supervisor/
manager) will be invited to attend.
The builder is notified and involved in the process. A copy of the investigation will be forwarded to them.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES
Company Management and Supervisors
Management and supervisors are responsible for compliance with Provincial and Federal Environmental
Laws and Company Policy. Management must ensure all employees know and follow these laws and
guidelines.
Employees
Employees are responsible to report any incident or potentially serious environmental conditions to their
supervisor.
DEFINITIONS
Adverse Effect
Impairment of or damage to the environment, human health or safety, or property.
Environment
Components of the earth and includes:
(i)
Air, land and water,
(ii)
All layers of the atmosphere,
(iii)
All organic and inorganic matter and living organisms, and
(iv)
The interacting natural systems that include components referred to in sub-clauses (i) to (iii).
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)
A document prepared by the supplier of a controlled product that contains detailed hazard and safe
handling information for a controlled product.
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Release
A spill, discharge, dispose of, spray, inject, inoculate, abandon, deposit, leak, seep, pour, emit, empty,
throw, dump, place and exhaust any material in excess of 20 litres which will have or has the potential of
an adverse effect.
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TDGR)
Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, for the protection of the general public from hazards
associated with dangerous goods during transport.
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS)
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System, for the protection of employees who must handle
hazardous materials in the workplace.
GENERAL
Hazardous waste must be stored in an approved containers and properly marked, and handled and
disposed of according to applicable TDG, WHMIS and jurisdictional regulations.
Equipment and vehicle servicing and cleaning will be done in a manner to reduce waste and
environmental impact.
All equipment will be kept in good running order, with regular maintenance, to reduce air, water and soil
contamination and noise pollution.
Any improper discharge of a hazardous product is to be reported.
Wastes will not be burned, except in proper facilities, and as designated by Regulation or Customer
Policy.
Precautions are to be taken to ensure that storage and transference of materials does not pose a threat
to the environment. Fuels/oils and general garbage are the most common work site contaminants.
HAZARD ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL
Before handling, storing, using or transporting any hazardous materials that may cause serious effects
to the environment if spilled or improperly discharged, a Hazard Assessment must be conducted.
x The Hazard Assessment must include the following:
x Obtain and read a current copy of the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet).
x Can a less hazardous product be used?
x Proper storage, handling, transportation and use guidelines, as per the MSDS and TDG
Regulations.
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x Proper employee training, protection and PPE.
x Emergency response guidelines, equipment and training.
x Reporting guidelines, equipment and training.
x Reporting guidelines in the event of an uncontrolled release.
x Regular inspections of storage, handling and transportation facilities and equipment.
x Waste disposal regulations and procedures.
x Regular spot checking and auditing of products, quantities, facilities, Company guidelines and
emergency response capabilities.
x Suitable record keeping.
x Consideration of all applicable local, provincial, federal and other jurisdictional regulations, as
well as Customer requirements.
Investigation/Reporting
x Look for potential environmental problems (i.e. improper storage or spilled fuels/chemicals;
emergency response equipment status/supply), and ensure the field personnel know what to do
should a situation arise.
x Inspections are to be done on a regular basis as well as “spot checks”. The format shall be
reviewed periodically as other environmental concerns are encountered. Records of the
inspections will be kept on file to ensure deficiencies are addressed.
x Weiss-Johnson and its companies due to the nature of its business has a limited need for
chemicals but if inspections warrant an investigation it will be to determine how a long-term
solution can be used to regulate control procedures.
RELEASES
During the course of normal business activities there is the possibility of releases of controlled products
which could be harmful to the environment. We believe that through planning, site management and
preventive maintenance, the frequency and severity or releases can be minimized. The number and
nature of controlled products in normal operations is usually restricted to hydrocarbons in the form of
Diesel fuel, lubricating oil (new and used), and hydraulic oils. When a release occurs, the Provincial
and Federal agencies that administer safety, transportation and environmental legislation hold the
discharger responsible. The discharger is responsible to report the release and to contain and clean up
the product, or have these actions carried out, and to restore the site to pre-release condition. In the
event of a release of hazardous substances, the following guidelines must be followed.
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RELEASE RESPONSE
Positively identify the released product.
Check the MSDS to ensure the correct personal protective equipment is available for use by employees
doing the cleanup.
Alert other parties who may be affected by the release, and secure the area.
Safely contain the released material. Spread an absorbent material to soak up the released material.
Prevent the material from entering any sewer system or any body of water. A dike of sand, gravel or
snow may be required.
Clean up the released material. Once the fluid has been absorbed, the material should be shoveled into
drums or plastic garbage cans with tight fitting lids. Concrete pads should be swept to make sure that
all fluid soaked material has been removed, and washed with a detergent if necessary to ensure the
concrete surface is no longer slippery. If the release occurs on bare ground, some surface soil may have
to be removed. Removal of large amounts of soil should not be necessary if the release is contained
and cleaned up promptly. Most of the fluid will remain at or near the soil surface.
Notify the customer whose property the release occurred on and the head office.
The Safety Director or the Chief Executive Officer will notify the proper authorities of the release if
required by regulation.
Disposal of fluid soaked soil and absorbent. Label the containers of material that has been cleaned
up and store the containers in a location where they will not interfere with work or traffic, and wait for
instructions from head office before disposal. The method of disposal depends on the flashpoint of
the fluid, the volume of fluid soaked material, and the type of absorbent material used. Hydrocarbon
contaminated wastes with flashpoints greater than 61° Celsius generally are not classified as hazardous
wastes, and may be handled in accordance with local landfill regulations. The landfill operator may
require laboratory confirmation of the flashpoint of the waste.
Decontaminate reusable equipment.
Restock spill response equipment and supplies.
Debrief responders and discuss response.
Prepare a complete report.
The objectives of release response, in order of importance, should be to protect life, protect the
environment and protect property. In some cases the situation may be beyond your control. Do not put
employees or others at risk. There are spill response agencies that are trained to handle dangerous
spills.
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REPORTING
An oral report to the authority having jurisdiction must be made within 24 hours or immediately on
becoming aware of the occurrence, followed by a written report within seven (7) days.
Responsibility for reporting the release:
x Is with the person who permitted the release or the person having control of the substance.
x Then a Safety Team Leader will need to be notified immediately.
x Documentation completed and Safety Director contacted.
The following information must be provided:
x Name of person reporting the release
x Name of company who had the release
x Nature of the release
x Volume of the release
x Location of the release
x Time of the release
x Action taken
x Status of the release
The agency will give a reference number, which must be used in all further calls and reports regarding
this specific release. Record all details of the content of the conversation. Only give facts, not
opinions.
REPORTABLE QUANTITIES
Diesel fuel
report releases that have or may have an adverse effect and are at or exceed 200
litres (TDGR).
Gasoline
report releases that have or may have an adverse effect and are at or exceed 70
litres (TDGR).
Glycol
not regulated under TDGR; report spills that have or may have an adverse effect.
Hydraulic oils
not regulated under TDGR; report spills that have or may have an adverse effect
Exceptions: Saskatchewan – releases in excess of 100 litres onsite and 50 litres
offsite must be reported.
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Used oil (spent lubricating oil and un-drained lube oil filters)
Report releases that have or may have an adverse effect and are at or exceed 5 kilograms or 5 litres,
(TDGR).
Any release which has entered a sewer or body of water must be reported.
A spill of any size that has occurred on a concrete pad and properly contained and cleaned up does
NOT have to be reported.
The Safety Director will notify the proper authorities of the release if required by regulation.
WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Material Information System)
WHMIS is a communication system meant to provide information about hazardous materials referred to
as “Controlled Products”. The system is for the protection of employees who handle or come in contact
with the controlled products.
WEISS-JOHNSON will attempt to limit the exposure of all employees to controlled products through
administrative and engineering controls. Less hazardous products will be substituted for controlled
products where possible.
An inventory of all controlled products and the current corresponding MSDS’s used at a work site or
place of business will be maintained at each work site or place of business.
WHMIS HAS THREE PARTS:
I.
LABELS
All controlled products must carry labels that clearly identify the product and provide hazard
information about it. There are two types of labels:
A. SUPPLIER LABELS
Which must be attached to all containers of controlled products in excess of 100
milliliters. The supplier label must have the following information:
1) Product Identifier: Name of the product (common name, chemical name, generic
name, trade name, brand name, code name or code number).
Note: The SAME product name must appear on the MSDS for the product.
2) Hazard Symbol: One or more of the eight hazard symbols which apply to the
product. (The symbols must be exact reproductions of the prescribed WHMIS
symbols, except for size and colour.)
3) Risk Phrases: Descriptions of the effects which may result from exposure. They
give information additional to that indicated by the hazard symbol. For example,
“dangerous if inhaled”.
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4) Precautionary Measures: Specific information about what precautions to take to
avoid risks associated with the product. For example, “wear rubber gloves”.
5) First Aid Measures: Description of how to treat a person who has been overexposed
to the product. For example, “wash affected area under running water”.
6) MSDS Statement: Statement that an MSDS is available for the product.
7) Supplier Identifier: Name and address of the supplier. (A distributor who buys from
a supplier and re-sells without repackaging need not be mentioned on the supplier
label.)
SUPPLIER LABEL – MANDATORY DESIGN FEATURES
Border: The label must be within the distinctive crosshatched WHMIS border. The border may
be on the label itself or on the container. Information not related to WHMIS requirements must
not be located within the WHMIS border. The border helps users identify the health and safety
information quickly and avoids confusion with mixing instructions, warranty statements or other
labels that may appear on some containers.
Colour: The colours which may be used for the border, for the numbers and letters on the label
and for the background must contrast with other markings on the container (including those
required by the Trasportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations) and with the container itself.
For example, a WHMIS label with a yellow background must not be affixed to a yellow container.
A label with a black border would not be acceptable on a black container.
Legibility: The required information on the label must be clearly and prominently displayed and
easily legible.
Durability: The label must be durable enough to remain attached and legible under normal
conditions of use, including transport and storage. Effects of weather, sunlight, temperature,
abrasion and contact with products, which might damage the label, must be considered in label
design.
Application: The label applied to the product may be attached to, or imprinted, stenciled or
embossed on the container. It must be fixed to that part of the container. It must be fixed to that
part of the container where it will be readily seen during normal use and storage.
Language: Labels must be in both English and French, or separate English and French
labels may be prepared and affixed side by side.
B. WORKPLACE LABELS
Must be attached to containers of controlled products decanted from the original
shipping container, or to containers of controlled products produced in the workplace.
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INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS FOR WORKPLACE LABELS
1) Product Identifier: The name of the product (common name, chemical name, generic
name, trade name, brand name, code name or code number).
2) Safe Handling Instructions: What to do to avoid risks associated with the product. For
example, “wear goggles” (i.e., the equivalent of precautionary measures on a supplier
label).
3) MSDS Statement: A statement that an MSDS is available for the product.
CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH WORKPLACE LABELS ARE REQUIRED:
Where a controlled product is produced in the employer’s workplace.
Where a controlled product is transferred from an original supplier container into a workplace
container that will be used by more than one employee or that will be left unattended.
Where a supplier label has become illegible or has been accidentally removed.
Where a controlled product arrives in bulk without a supplier label.
Where a supplier label has become illegible or has been accidentally removed.
Where a controlled product arrives in bulk without a supplier label.
CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH WORKPLACE LABELS ARE NOT REQUIRED:
There are 2 instances when a controlled product can be transferred from a supplier container to
another portable one, and
1) the container, and the second container will not require a workplace label.
This is the case when the second container is a controlled product transferred into it is
used immediately, in which case no label or identification of any kind is required [section
10(2)(b) of the regulation];
or
2) all of the following conditions are satisfied:
(i) the controlled product is used only by the worker who filled the portable container;
(ii) the controlled product is used only during the shift in which the portable container was
filled; and
(iii) the contents of the portable container are identified [section 10(2)(a) of the
regulation].
To identify the contents of a portable container, as referred to in 2(iii) above, the employer can
use any means of identification. For example, colour coding, a chemical formula, or a product
name, would all be acceptable.
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MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (MSDS)
The MSDS contains information that is important in selecting PPE, handling of emergencies,
clean-up or designing control measures for the safe use and handling of controlled products.
INFORMATION REQUIRED ON A MSDS
1) Product Identification and Use: Identification of the product by generic name, trade name,
brand name, common name, chemical name, code name or code number. A description of
product use is also required.
2) Hazardous ingredients: Names, concentrations and other details of known hazardous
ingredients, and of other ingredients which the employer or supplier suspects may be
hazardous, or whose dangers to the body are unknown.
3) Physical Data: Physical properties of the material, such as physical state (gas, solid or
liquid), odour and appearance.
4) Fire or Explosion Hazard: Flashpoint of the material, upper and lower flammable limits.
5) Reactivity Data: Details of stability and reaction to conditions such as light, heat, moisture
and vibration.
6) Toxicological Properties: Adverse health effects from exposure.
7) Preventative Measures: Instructions for safe use, handling and storage.
8) First Aid Measures: Instructions for initial treatment of anyone over-exposed to the material.
9) Preparation Information: Name, address and telephone number of the person, group or
department which prepared the MSDS and the date of preparation.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT FOR MSDS
x Every MSDS must be current and updated at least every three years by the supplier.
x It must be revised by the supplier within 90 days of any new hazard information
becoming known about the material.
x The employer is responsible for obtaining updated versions from the supplier, or for
adding any new information to the existing MSDS, based on information from the
supplier.
x The employer MSDS must never supply less information than appears on the supplier
MSDS.
x An employer MSDS is most likely to be prepared in connection with a material produced
in that employer’s workplace. This does not include fugitive emissions, i.e., amounts of
the material which escape from the process into the workplace in the form of vapour,
gas, etc.
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EMPLOYEE EDUCATION
Employers are required to provide employee with training in four key areas:
1. How to use WHMIS labels and MSDS;
2. Procedures for safe use, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous materials on site;
3. Emergency procedures for incidents involving hazardous materials;
4. Identification codes, (colour, numbers, letters) identifying pipes, vessels or other containers
of hazardous products).
The purpose of the Employee Education Program is to teach the employees how to use the
information on the Labels and MSDS so that they may protect themselves. The importance
of education cannot be neglected as the information provided by the labels and MSDS
will be of little use unless the employees can understand it and determine how to apply it.
WEISS-JOHNSON will provide WHMIS Training for employees who are required to handle,
use, or work in the proximity of controlled products.
CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM
WHMIS uses one or more of six classifications and one or more of eight hazard symbols to
identify hazards associated with controlled products.
The responsibility for product classification rests with:
x The supplier – for products imported or sold in Canada;
x The employer – for products produced or decanted in the workplace, e.g., day use
containers.
CLASSES
Controlled products are divided into six Classes. Some Classes are further sub-divided into Divisions.
CLASS A
COMPRESSED GAS
This class includes compressed gases, dissolved gases and gases liquefied by
compression or refrigeration. If the pressure in the container is greater than 40psi, the
as is a Class A product. The cylinder may explode if exposed to heat or to physical shock
(when dropped).
Examples: Oxygen and acetylene in cylinders for welding; propane
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CLASS B
FLAMMABLE AND COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL
This class includes solids, liquids, and gases capable of catching fire in the
presence of a spark or open flame under normal working conditions. Class B has
six divisions.
DIVISION 1: FLAMMABLE GASES
These are compressed gases (Class A) that form flammable mixtures in air.
Examples: Butane, propane, hydrogen gas
DIVISION 2: FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS
These are liquids that have flash points below 37.8°C. A flash point is the lowest
temperature at which the vapours from these liquids will catch fire from nearby
sparks or open flames.
Examples: Acetone, gasoline, isopropyl alcohol
DIVISION 3: COMBUSTIBLE LIQUIDS
These are liquids that have flash points of 37.8°C or more but less than 93.3°C.
Examples: Kerosene, minerals spirits, butyl cellosolve
DIVISION 4: FLAMMABLE SOLIDS
This is a special group of solids (usually metals) that meet very specific technical
criteria such as the ability to cause fire through friction or to ignite and burn so
vigorously and persistently that they create a hazard.
Examples: Various magnesium alloys, beryllium powder
DIVISION 5: FLAMMABLE AEROSOLS
These products are packaged in aerosol containers. Either the aerosolized
product itself or the propellant may catch fire.
Examples of flammable propellants: Propane, butane, isobutene.
DIVISION 6: REACTIVE FLAMMABLE MATERIALS
These products react dangerously in one of two ways: either (1) they
spontaneously create heat or catch fire under normal conditions of use or they
create heat when in contact with air to the point where they begin to burn, or (2)
they emit a flammable gas or spontaneously catch fire when in contact with water
or water vapour.
Examples: Aluminum alkyd products, metallic sodium white phosphorous
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CLASS C
OXIDIZING MATERIAL
These materials increase the risk of fire if they come in contact with flammable or combustible materials.
Examples: Perchloric acid, hydrogen peroxide, permanganates, compressed oxygen
CLASS D
POISONOUS AND INFECTIOUS MATERIAL
Class D has three divisions:
DIVISION 1: Materials causing immediate and serious toxic effects
These materials can cause death or immediate injury when a person is exposed to small
amounts.
Examples: Sodium cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia
DIVISION 2: Materials causing other toxic effects
These materials can cause life threatening and serious long-term health problems as
well as less severe but immediate reactions in a person who is repeatedly exposed to
small amounts. Health problems include immediate skin or eye irritation, allergic sensitization, cancer, serious impairment of specific body organs or systems and reproductive
problems.
Examples: Xylene, asbestos, isocyanates, welding rod, silica sand
DIVISION 3: Biohazardous infectious materials
These materials contain harmful micro-organisms that have been classified into Risk
Groups 2,3 and 4 as determined by the World Health Organization (WHO) or the Medical
Research Council of Canada.
Examples: Cultures or diagnostics specimens containing salmonella or the hepatitis B
virus, needles and other sharp instruments in first aid rooms, blood or body fluids
CLASS E
CORROSIVE MATERIAL
This class includes caustic and acid materials that can destroy the skin or eat through
metals.
Examples: Sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulphuric acid
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CLASS F
DANGEROUSLY REACTIVE MATERIAL
These products may self-react dangerously (for example, they may explode) upon standing or when exposed to physical shock or to increased pressure or temperature, or they
may emit toxic gases when exposed to water.
Examples: Plastic monomers such as butadiene; some cyanides, metal azides
EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY
It is the responsibility of the employee to protect themselves and others in the workplace by:
x Learning and recognizing the symbols and labels.
x Reading the Material Safety Data Sheets.
x Following recommended hazard control procedures.
x Utilizing the necessary PPE and hazard control equipment.
x Properly identifying day use containers of hazardous products decanted in the workplace.
CONSUMER GOODS
Whenever products or materials that have Consumer Warning Symbols on them enter a workplace they
are automatically re-classified as WHMIS Controlled Products.
The Consumer Warning Symbols become WHMIS Symbols and Material Safety Data Sheets must be
present and followed.
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11.
Emergency
Preparedness
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Occupational Health & Safety Code Part 7
Emergency Response Plan
115(1) An employer must establish an emergency response plan for responding to an
emergency that may require rescue or evacuation.
115(2) An employer must involve affected workers in establishing the emergency response plan.
115(3) An employer must ensure that an emergency response plan is current.
Occupational Health and Safety Code
Section 115
Emergency Preparedness Program Confirmation
11.1
The Emergency Preparedness Plan includes:
a) Potential emergencies & procedures for dealing with them.
b) Location of emergency equipment & location of emergency
facilities
c) Emergency response training & Fire Protection requirements
d) Alarm and Emergency communication requirements/First Aid
Services
e) Procedure and Designated workers for rescue and evacuation
11.2
The Emergency Response Plan is appropriate for the work sites.
11.3
Employees received training in emergency procedures, roles and
responsibilities.
11.4
The Emergency Response Plan has been tested for deficiencies and
corrective actions have been taken.
11.5
The correct class and size of fire extinguishers are visible and available.
11.6
The extinguishers are regularly checked and inspected (Once a month).
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11.7
An appropriate emergency communication system is being used.
11.8
Adequate first aid supplies and facilities are being used.
11.9
The required number of qualified first aid employees are on site.
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11.1 The Emergency Preparedness Plan includes:
a) Potential emergencies & procedures for dealing with them.
b) Location of emergency equipment & location of emergency
facilities
c) Emergency response training & Fire Protection requirements
d) Alarm and Emergency communication requirements/First Aid
Services
e) Procedure and Designated workers for rescue and evacuation
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS
Each WEISS-JOHNSON facility must develop specific emergency plans for the facility and arrange
training and practice sessions to ensure all workers and supervisors are totally familiar with the plans. A
list of telephone numbers of agencies available to respond to a particular emergency will be prominently
displayed. On some Customer properties these contacts may be radio channels rather than phone
numbers.
A diagram showing the location of office fire extinguishers, office first aid kit, the emergency fire alarm
pull stations and the office escape routes is to be posted in prominent locations.
Employees are to review these diagrams and are to be familiar with the location of the emergency
equipment and the escape routes.
The following guidelines are for general emergency situations only, and are suggestions to include in a
specific emergency plan.
11.1 a) Potential Emergencies & procedures for dealing with them.
BUILDING EVACUATION
When an evacuation of a building is necessary, everyone must leave by the nearest exit or as advised.
Close but do not lock doors behind you as you leave.
Employees and visitors are to gather near the designated WEISS-JOHNSON parking spaces in a safe
area that is upwind from smoke or toxic gases and in an area that will not hamper emergency vehicles
or services when they arrive. It is the designated Muster Point. A head count must be done to ensure
that everyone is accounted for.
Employees are not to re-enter the evacuated building until so advised by the fire department authority,
or safety representative.
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Construction Site Evacuation
If you can, be certain that 911 has been called.
Lead Hand needs to make this call. If he cannot make this call the assistant to the lead must take
control of the situation.
When an evacuation of a construction site is necessary and there is no obvious Muster Point in the
area all members of the crews are expected to vacate the site in a swift and orderly fashion. Use the
doorways first and only if these are blocked should the workers attempt to evacuate through a window or
other opening. Muster a safe distance from the building (min. at least 1-2 city blocks away from buildingto avoid gas explosions).
Once one has vacated the building the Muster Point in the field will be the street in front of the residence
or building (If there is a fear of gas leaks one must muster 1-2 city blocks away from the building and
notify other trades of the incident). It is here that the lead hand or supervisor will take a count and
determine that all are present and accounted for.
At no time must one re-enter the building to retrieve an item or person. Gather the information and have
it ready for the First Responders when they arrive.
FIRE
Call for in-house assistance immediately upon discovering the fire. Do not enter a burning room or
building without another qualified person to assist.
Alert other employees immediately
Determine if the fire can be extinguished with the portable equipment in the building. If it can be used,
do so. If not, call the Fire Department, activate an alarm and evacuate the building.
The cardinal rule in fire fighting is to preserve life, and then property.
UTILITY EMERGENCY
In the event of a gas leak, follow the evacuation procedure. Do not turn electrical power on or off, or
activate any electrical equipment. Call the Utility Company from an adjacent building or cellular phone
when outside the building. Do not re-enter until the source of the leak has been located and controlled,
and the building and rooms have been tested to verify that no explosive gases remain.
In the event of flooding due to a water main or pipe breaking or blockage of a sewer line, avoid all
contact with the flood materials and do not go near electrical panels or switches in the flooded area.
Good personal hygiene must be practiced as dirt and other flood residue carries the threat of diseases
such as tetanus, typhoid and hepatitis.
ALWAYS REPORT TO YOUR SUPERVISOR AFTER ANY EMERGENCY TO ENSURE ALL EMPLOYEES
ARE ACCOUNTED FOR.
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TORNADOES
Tornadoes are violent storms characterized by a twisting funnel shaped cloud that extends toward the
ground. They occur in conjunction with severe thunderstorms and can be accompanied by lightning,
heavy rain and/or hail. They are capable of winds in excess of 450km/h., strike suddenly and are usually
preceded by a loud roaring noise.
If a tornado is sighted:
x Alert all other employees immediately via the telephone intercom.
x If the office building appears to be in a tornado’s path, seek shelter in the interior building
stairwells. Protect your head.
x After a tornado has passed evacuate the building following the designated procedure if the
building was in the path or has suffered any damage.
x Conduct a head count and provide any First Aid that is necessary. In most instances emergency
services are severely overtaxed in the aftermath of a tornado or other natural disasters, so the
employees may have to fend for themselves or wait extended periods for emergency services to
arrive.
x If the building has been damaged, do not re-enter until professionals have certified the integrity
of the structure and that it is safe to re-enter.
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM
Lightning presents the greatest immediate danger during a thunderstorm.
x Stay away from water.
x Stay far away from the tallest object in the area.
x Get away from equipment.
x If you are in a vehicle, pull off to the side of the road and turn on your emergency flashers until
the heavy rain subsides.
WINTER STORM
x Be aware of weather conditions in the area.
x Dress to fit the season, especially if you work outdoors.
x Avoid overexertion and exposure to the cold.
x If you must travel, select primary and secondary routes. Try not to travel alone. Carry a winter
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storm kit in your vehicle.
x If the storm exceeds, or even tests your limitations, seek available refuge immediately.
FLOODING
When a flash flood watch is issed:
x Be prepared to move out of danger at a moment’s notice.
x If possible, turn off power and close off any gas valves. Do not touch any electrical equipment
unless it is in a dry area.
x Get out of areas subject to flooding.
x Avoid already flooded area.
x Be especially cautious at night, when it is harder to recognize flood dangers.
MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENT
If someone is injured follow first aid procedures.
x Secure the area and provide flag people to direct traffic.
x Extinguish any fire, if controllable.
x Provide First Aid treatment to the level of your training.
x Have someone report the accident to the local Police.
FIRST AID
If you are injured on the job, report to your supervisor immediately, no matter how slight the injury. Call
the Safety Manager if you are not sure what to do (780) 399-6148. Occupational Health & Safety Regulations require that we keep accident records. Reports of accidents are made to assist in the prevention
of future occurrences. The proper WCB report forms must be filled out and submitted to your supervisor
within 24 hours if there is an injury.
If you feel ill to the extent that you cannot properly perform your work, report to your supervisor.
Get first aid treatment for all minor injuries; first aid is only temporary. First aid is the immediate treatment needed before you get a doctor to the victim or the victim to a doctor. What you do in the critical
moments after an injury occurs could save a life. Call for emergency medical help immediately for all life
threatening situations. Send people to guide the emergency team to the victim.
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First Aid Procedures
Know these basic first aid procedures. Review them often so you will be prepared if you suddenly find
yourself in an emergency situation.
The most important things you should do when someone is injured are:
1. Survey the Scene
Objective: Decide if situation is safe for you
a) You should not become another victim.
b) Do you need to move the victim
2. Rescue
Objective: To move the victim from a dangerous location to a place of safety.
Move the victim carefully, but only if there is life threatening danger. Take care of breathing, bleeding,
splinting of broken bones first, if possible.
3. Breathing
Objective: To maintain an open airway and restore breathing by mouth-to mouth resuscitation.
a) Open the airway – head tilt/chin lift.
b) Look, listen and feel for breathing.
c) If no breath, send for medical help and begin rescue breathing.
ADULT: Pinch nostrils (while maintaining head-tilt); give two breaths again. If air still does not go
in, clear the airway. If air goes in, begin rescue breathing – 1 breath every 5 seconds.
INFANT: Cover mouth and nose with your mouth; start with two quick gentle breaths. If air does
not go in, clear airway. If air goes in, then one gentle breath every 3 seconds.
Note: Use airway device if at all possible to prevent cross contamination with the victim.
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4. Bleeding
Objective: To stop bleeding, prevent contamination, treat for shock, and seek medical
attention.
Direct pressure – apply pressure directly over the wound with a clean cloth or your hand. Elevate –
raise the injured part above head level, if possible and practical.
Infections from disease (i.e.: Hepatitis B, HIV) are transmitted through body fluids visibly
contaminated with blood. They may enter the body and infect through open cuts, abrasions,
dermatitis and acne. They may also be transmitted by touching a contaminated object and
transferring infectious materials to the eyes, mouth nose or any open areas on the face or body.
Since it is not possible to identify persons who may transmit infection, it is important to be protected
from exposure by the use of person protective equipment such as latex gloves, glasses and/
or masks. Any time there is a risk of infection by contaminated fluids or blood, use Personal
Protective Equipment, and always use gloves.
Note: Avoid direct skin contact with body fluids. Always wash your hands as soon as you can
after giving first aid.
5. Shock
Objective: Treat for shock in all accident situations.
a) Keep the victim lying down.
b) Elevate feet if you do not suspect head or neck injury or leg fracture.
c) Get medical help.
d) Monitor vital signs.
e) Prevent loss of body temperature.
6. Heart Attack
Symptoms: Persistent chest pain, anxiety, difficult breathing, nausea, sweating
a) Place in comfortable position.
b) Get medical attention.
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c) Monitor vital signs.
d) Perform CPR, if necessary (by qualified person).
7. Fractures
a) Do not move the victim if at all possible.
b) Keep broken bone ends and adjacent joints quiet.
c) Splint if help is delayed.
8. Chemical Burns
a) Flush the area with large quantities of water for at least 15 minutes.
b) Remove all affected clothing.
c) Get medical attention.
9. Chemical Burns
a) Flush the area with large quantities of water for at least 15 minutes.
b) Remove all affected clothing.
c) Get medical attention.
10. Electrical Shock
Act quickly, but keep yourself out of danger. Assume the electrical line is energized.
a) Open the circuit at the nearest source, if possible.
b) If the wire cannot be de-energized, use a non-conductor – dry board or wooden tool – to pull the
wire from the victim or the victim from the wire. Do not touch any part of the victim or the wire
with your bare hands. Or, use a dry manila rope to loop around the wire or victim to pull them
apart to break the contact. (Wear high-voltage rubber gloves and stand of insulating material, if
possible.)
c) Once the victim is clear, administer first aid.
d) Have the victim transported to medical aid.
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11. Fainting
a) Leave the victim lying down.
b) Get medical attention.
c) Monitor vital signs.
12. Heat Exhaustion
Symptoms: Cool, moist skin, heavy sweating, dilated pupils, headache, and nausea
a) Move victim to cool place or cool with wet cloths.
b) Loosen clothing.
c) Treat for shock.
d) Give one-half glass of water to drink every 15 minutes if victim is fully conscious and can tolerate
it.
13. Heat Stroke
Symptoms: Sweating has generally stopped; skin is red and hot, very small pupils, elevated
body temperature
a) Get medical attention, this is a life threatening condition.
b) Move victim to cooler place.
c) Cool the victim fast.
d) Treat for shock.
e) Give nothing by mouth.
14. Frostbite
a) Move victim to a warm place.
b) Put frozen parts in warm 37.7 – 40.5°C (100-105°F), but not hot water.
c) Do not rub frozen parts.
d) Bandage with dry, loose, sterile gauze after warming.
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15. Hypothermia
a) Get medical attention.
b) Get victim into warm, dry clothing.
c) Warm body slowly.
d) Monitor vital signs.
16. Poisoning
Swallowed poison:
a) Take any containers or MSDS to phone when calling emergency medical help or the Poison
Control Center.
b) Follow instructions given by medical professionals.
c) Care for shock.
d) Do not give anything by mouth until medical professionals have advised you.
It is crucial that first aid begin quickly. Avoid panic. Send someone to get a doctor while
administering first aid to the victim. Remember, you are not a physician! Do no more than necessary
to treat the victim, until medical help is obtained.
BOMB THREAT
IF A BOMB THREAT IS RECEIVED BY PHONE: Maintain contact with the caller by asking the
following questions:
When is the bomb going to explode?
Where is the bomb right now?
What kind of bomb is it?
What does it look like?
Why was the bomb placed?
RECORD THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION:
Time of day.
Exact words of the person making the threat.
Accent or speech patterns of the person making the threat.
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Background noises or any other pertinent information.
Notify the Safety Director immediately at 780-399-6148.
IF A BOMB IS RECEIVED BY MAIL:
Do not handle the envelope, letter or package excessively so as to preserve any evidence.
Notify the Operations Manager immediately.
ALL BOMB OR OTHER THREATS OR VIOLENCE MUST BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY AND MUST BE
REPORTED TO THE PROPER LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.
ANTHRAX AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL AGENT THREATS
Because of recent biological agent attacks in the United States and elsewhere throughout the world
involving biological agents, the appearance of any suspicious letter or package must be viewed as a
potential threat to the safety of those in its vicinity.
How to identify suspicious packages and letters
Some characteristics of suspicious packages and letters include the following:
x Excessive, inadequate or missing postage
x Restrictive marking such as “confidential, personal, to be opened by”
x Inappropriate Air Mail and Special Delivery stickers
x Foreign mail from politically unstable or hostile countries
x Postmark different from return address location
x Notations like “special delivery or air mail”
x Hand written or poorly typed addresses
x Misspelling of words or common names
x Oily stains or discolorations on wrapper
x No return address or one that’s indecipherable
x Excessive weight
x Foul or chemical odors
x Rigid or bulky envelope
x Protruding wires or tinfoil
x Leaking items
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x Lopsided or lumpy envelope or package
x Excessive securing material such as masking tape, string, etc.
x Visual distractions
x Ticking sound
x Marked with threatening message
How to deal with a suspicious unopened letter or package:
x DO NOT SHAKE or empty contents of any suspicious envelope or package.
x Put the envelope or package on a stable surface.
x Then LEAVE the room and CLOSE the door, or section off the area to prevent others from
entering.
x WASH your hands with soap and water to prevent spreading any powder to your face.
x Report the incident to your immediate supervisor, building security official and call 911 or the
local emergency contact number. Follow the instructions of emergency response officials.
x REMOVE contaminated clothing as soon as possible and place in a plastic bag, or some other
container that can be sealed. This clothing bag should be given to the emergency responders for
proper handling.
x SHOWER with soap and water as soon as possible. Do Not Use Bleach Or Other Disinfectant
On Your Sklin
x LIST all people who were in the room or area. Keep thi list as it may be requested by local public
health authorities for follow-up investigation and advice.
What to do if an opened envelope with powder spills out onto surface:
x DO NOT try to CLEAN UP the powder. CAREFULLY COVER the spilled contents immediately
with anything (e.g., clothing, paper, trash can, etc.) and do not remove this cover.
x Then LEAVE the room, CLOSE the door, or section off the area to prevent others from entering
(i.e., keep others away).
x WASH your hands with soap and water to prevent spreading any powder to your face.
x Report the incident to your immediate supervisor, building security official and call 911 or the
local emergency contact number. Follow the instructions of emergency response officials.
x REMOVE contaminated clothing as soon as possible and place in a plastic bag, or some other
container that can be sealed. This clothing bag should be given to the emergency responders for
proper handling.
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x SHOWER with soap and water as soon as possible. Do Not Use Bleach Or Other Disinfectant
On Your Skin.
x LIST all people who were in the room or area. Keep this list as it may be requested by local
public health authorities for follow-up investigation and advice.
The threat of contamination by airborne Anthrax or other Biological Agent:
Turn off local fans or ventilation units in area.
LEAVE area immediately
CLOSE the door, or section off the area to prevent others from entering (i.e., keep others away).
Report the incident to your immediate supervisory and call 911 or the local emergency contact number.
Follow the instructions of emergency response officials.
SHUT down air handling systems in the building, if possible.
LIST all people who were in the room or area. Keep this list as it may be requested by local public health
authorities for follow-up investigation and advice.
b) Location of emergency equipment & location of emergency facilities.
First Aid Area
Minimum Levels of First Aid in the OHS Regulation (“Regulation”), contains the
minimum levels of first aid required for various workplaces.
This document gives guidance on how to set up a first aid facility and
some specific recommendations for dressing stations and first aid rooms.
Under the Regulations, a first aid facility must be kept clean, dry, ready for use
and must be readily accessible at any time a worker works in the workplace.
General recommendations for all first aid facilities
Location and access
A first aid facility should be located as near as practicable to the work area or areas it is
to serve. It should be a room within a building or, if this is not practicable, a tent, vehicle,
designated First Aid Area with supplies and sanitized running water close by.
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The first aid facility should be designed and located for easy entrance to and exit from the
facility for a worker requiring stretcher transport. A stretcher should not have to be tipped or
turned to enter or exit the first aid facility.
In remote areas, building a first aid facility may not be practicable. However, the facility should
be at least of the same design and construction as workers’ lodgings. If trailers are provided for
workers’ lodgings, a trailer should be provided for the first aid facility.
When a tent is used, it should:
•
Be of the same size and have the same equipment as a first aid room or dressing
station, as appropriate
•
Be fitted with a non-porous floor that can be cleaned with soap and water
•
Have a source of heat that will provide sufficient warmth for good patient care
(maintaining body temperature)
A first aid facility may be locked to prevent theft and vandalism or for other appropriate reasons.
If so, there must be effective means of immediate access during all working hours.
Utilities
The facility should be adequately illuminated, heated, and ventilated. It should have a sink
plumbed with hot and cold running water or, if this is not practicable, an alternative system for
supplying fresh, potable water. If showering may be a required treatment for chemical exposure,
the facility should have a shower or have a shower facility as near as practicable.
It may be impracticable to plumb a first aid facility in certain situations, such as where the
facility is a trailer on a construction site or the work is at a remote location. In these cases, one
of the following alternative sources or water, with means to heat it, may be considered until a
permanent source of water can be connected:
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The facility could have an internal tank able to hold a minimum of 45 litres (10 gallons) of fresh
potable water which can be pumped into the facility’s sink. The water in this tank must be
changed daily, or changed weekly if treated for the prevention of contamination.
•
The facility is connected to a hose or water line from a fresh potable water outlet that can be
pumped into the facility’s sink.
•
The facility has an insulated container able to hold about 20 litres (5 gallons) of fresh
potable water changed daily to prevent contamination.
•
A fresh water supply company provides fresh water in a bottle or jug attached to a
hot/cold dispenser.
Other recommendations
Since the facility must be kept clean and sanitary, a non-porous floor covering is recommended.
The facility should have a notice conspicuously displayed outside the door or in the area,
indicating how to call and where to find the attendant.
The first aid facility is also subject to the general requirements relating to workplace premises
in the Regulation, for example, sections 6.33 to 6.41 (biological agents) and sections 4.81 to
4.83 (environmental tobacco smoke).
Smoking is not permitted in a first aid facility, and “No Smoking” signs should be conspicuously
posted.
Using a first aid facility for purposes other than first aid
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A first aid facility may be used for purposes other than first aid if
• It is immediately available for first aid treatment
• The facility is not at a remote workplace (more than two hours’ surface travel from a
hospital)
• The minimum floor area needed for first aid is maintained
• Such use will neither impede the treatment of an injured worker nor pose a hazard to worker
11.1 c) Emergency Response Training & Fire Protection Requirements.
FIELD ACCIDENT RESPONSE
Field Accident Response Team Process
The purpose of the Accident Response Team is to deal with catastrophic accident within the Company.
The team responsibilities are to immediately meet when an accident is reported and to determine the
course of action. The team will assign and dispatch a travel team when required.
Designated employees will be listed as Field Accident Response members. This crew member must
have an updated First Aid/ CPR Training. They must also be well versed in what to do should an injury
take place. They must be in constant communication with the Safety Team Leaders to stay familiar with
any changes in the Safety Program as they may occur.
Accident Response Team Members
Know who your Safety Team Leader is in your area.
Field Accident Response Team Members (For each company)
*In each case it is up to the receptionist to know who is in the building at any given time.
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. - Main Shop
Fire Marshall:
Barry Gabruch
Standard First Aid & Safety Director (Shop Manager)
Asst. Marshall:
Mary Hazard
Receptionist –holds accurate list of those in building.
Francisco Garcia
Standard First Aid & Field Supervisor
Shop
Jared McBride
Standard First Aid & EMR Training
Shop
Braden Johnson
Emergency First Aid & ACSA Auditor Trained
Warehouse & Yard area
Managers
Responsible for Doors Closed & Room Check.
Dennis Johnson
Emergency First Aid & Owner
2nd lvl Offices-East Hallway
Jesse Flexhaug
Emergency First Aid & RNC Manager
2nd lvl Offices-Mark Out area
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Rick Schmidt
Emergency First Aid & Service Manager
1st lvl Service Area/Washrooms
Wayne Rendell
Emergency First Aid & Retro Manager
2nd lvl Retro Offices/East Hall
Terry Hlewka
Fleet Manager
Warehouse/Yard
Ann Dubreuil
Office Manager
1st lvl Offices/Showroom
Plumbing by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
8906-60 Avenue NW Edm, AB.
Dave Adam
Emergency First Aid & ACSA Auditor
Shop
Kelly Van Elst
Office Manager
Office/Washrooms
Fireplaces by Weiss-Johnson Ltd.
9315-63 Avenue NW Edm, AB.
Barb Onyschuk
Emergency First Aid & Office Manager
Office/Washrooms
Richard Larson
Emergency First Aid & Lead Hand
Shop
Gatt Heating – 2014 Ltd.
26004 Township Rd 544, Sturgeon County, AB
Kevin Buck
Standard First Aid & Shop Manager
Shop
Glen Freeman
Emergency First Aid & Company Manager
Offices/Washroom
Ricky Gatt
Owner
Offices/Washroom
If you wish to make adjustments to the above please notify Barry Gabruch @ 780-399-6148.
Look at the above list and understand your role and who may be your contact in your area of the
company when it comes to an evacuation.
Managers responsible for Room Check of Designated Areas & Doors CloseThen Meet at the
Muster Point.
Accident Response Team members may be called upon to travel on short notice
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ACCIDENT SEVERITY CATEGORY LEVELS
Category I: Fatality or more than one person hospitalized.
Category II: One very seriously injured person (hospitalization will be required for more than 3
days) or possible permanent impairment is predicted.
Category III: One person injured seriously enough to be hospitalized, but no permanent impairment
predicted or one person injured seriously enough to be “off work” (as defined by the Safety Department),
but not hospitalized.
11.1 d) Alarm and Emergency communication requirements / First Aid Services.
Developing the Emergency Plan & Communication Requirements
Although emergencies by definition are sudden events, their occurrence can be predicted with some
degree of certainty. The first step is to find which hazards pose a threat to any specific area or division.
When a list of hazards is made, records of past incidents and occupational experience are not the
only sources of valuable information. Since major emergencies are rare events, knowledge of both
technological (chemical or physical) and natural hazards can be broadened by consulting with fire
departments, insurance companies, engineering consultants, and government departments.
Having identified the hazards, the possible major impacts of each should be itemized, such as:
x
Sequential events (for example, a fire after an explosion).
x
Evacuation.
x
Casualties.
x
Damage to plant infrastructure.
x
Loss of vital records/documents.
x
Damage to equipment.
x
Disruption of work.
Based on these events, the required actions are determined. For example:
x
Declare emergency.
x
Sound the alert.
x
Evacuate danger zone.
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x
Close main shutoffs.
x
Call for external aid.
x
Initiate rescue operations.
x
Attend to casualties.
x
Fight fire.
The final consideration is a list and the location of resources needed:
x
Medical supplies.
x
Auxiliary communication equipment.
x
Power generators.
x
Respirators.
x
Mobile equipment.
x
Emergency protective clothing.
x
Fire fighting equipment.
x
Fire Extinguishers.
x
Ambulance.
x
Rescue equipment.
x
Trained personnel.
11.1 e) Procedure and designated workers for rescue and evacuation.
ACCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM GUIDE:
Category I
1. The field personnel immediately notifies the Safety Director.
2. The Response Team members meet at the muster point to determine a course of action.
3. Immediately see that appropriate family members of the injured are notified and their immediate
needs taken care of.
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4. Immediately notify the Division Manager.
5. Take action to assure that the accident scene is secured and not disturbed.
6. Determine if a Release Response Team is required.
7. Determine who is to notify the Occupational Health and Safety authorities and/or local police.
8. Determine if customer/builder has been notified & advise as to what actions we are taking.
9. Designate someone to deal with the media. Get an official “statement” as soon as possible (if
requested).
10. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (counseling) may be needed.
Category II
1. The field immediately notifies the Safety Director.
2. The Response Team members meet to determine a course of action.
3. Immediately see that appropriate family members of the injured are notified and their immediate
needs taken care of.
4. Immediately notify the appropriate Manager.
5. Take action to assure that the accident scene is secured and not disturbed.
6. Determine if a Release Response Team is required.
7. Determine if the Occupational Health and Safety authorities need to be notified, and who is to make
the call.
8. Determine if the customer has been notified and advised as to what action we are taking.
9. Designate someone to deal with the media. Get an official “statement” as soon as possible (if
requested).
10. Response team dispatched. Dispatched as required, including Manager and Supervisor.
Category III
1. The field immediately notifies the Operations Manager.
2. Immediately see that appropriate family members of the injured are notified and their immediate
needs are taken care of.
3. Immediately notify the Loss Prevention Manager.
4. Take action to assure that the accident scene is secured and not disturbed.
5. Determine if a Release Response Team is required.
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6. Determine if the Occupational Health and Safety authorities need to be notified, and who is to make
the call.
7. Determine if the customer has been notified and advised as to what actions we are taking.
8. Response team dispatched. (Loss Prevention Manager to accident site). Other persons assigned as
required.
Operations Manager or Designate
Work with the injured, the injured person’s family, doctors and the hospital to see that the injured
gets the best medical attention possible. Work with the injured and their family to assure that they
understand the Worker’s Compensation benefits, and to see that their needs for temporary housing,
communications, etc. are met.
Debriefing
As soon as possible after the incident has been handled and reports have been completed, the entire
response team will meet to debrief and review procedures and actions, so that improvements can be
made to the process.
Division Manager or Designate
The Division Manager or Loss Prevention Manager is responsible to be in charge of the Accident
Investigation in their area. There will be coordination with the Company field crew(s) and the Customer
representatives. Others may be involved in the accident investigation such as the Occupational Health
and Safety authority, local police or other official agencies. It is important that as soon as the injured
person(s) are taken care of, that the accident scene be secured so that no evidence is disturbed.
Photographs and/or video (preferably both) are valuable when questions arise after the initial
investigation. Permission from the Customer to take photographs may be required in some cases.
Physical measurements and sketches are also needed. Broken parts must be protected, so that the
fractured edge is not damaged. A welding laboratory needs undisturbed samples in order to properly
evaluate a failure of material. (Simply putting two pieces back together can destroy the surface(s) and
make it impossible to make an accurate evaluation).
Interviewing witnesses, workers and supervisors is critical to the investigation. It is important that
Interviews be done as soon as possible. Interviews should be done individually, not as a group.
Witnesses should be asked not to discuss their knowledge with other witnesses since what they say
or hear may influence another person’s perception of what happened. Let the witnesses know that you
may want to ask more questions later, and for them to let you know if they think of anything else that
may be important to the investigation.
The reports should be started as soon as possible. Be sure that all facts and information are complete
before drawing conclusions and making recommendations.
MEDIA CONTACT
The Operations Manager or his designate are the only people authorized to speak or release
information to the news media regarding an accident at any WEISS-JOHNSON organization.
Reporters are to be told to direct their questions to the Operations Manager.
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All other personnel at the operations or office are to respond to the reporter’s questions by referring
them to the Operations Manager.
COMMMUNICATING WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
Occupational Health and Safety Officers and other government officials may perform inspections of
WEISS-JOHNSON work sites or investigations after an accident. They have the right to unimpeded
access to the work areas.
All relationships with Government Inspectors must be on an honest and cooperative basis
Prior to visiting the work area they must be informed that personal protective equipment is needed;
special training, i.e. Orientation, H2S Alive, etc.; and any restricted areas due to work processes.
A WEISS-JOHNSON employee must always accompany the officer.
Officers only have the right to ask for information or evidence relevant to the investigation or inspection
and to the jurisdiction they represent. The documents requested by the officer are to be photocopied
with one copy given to the officer and one put in a separate file established for the investigation or
inspection. Original documents are not to be given to the officer. WEISS-JOHNSON has the right to
request a receipt for anything given to the officer.
If the officer takes samples or photographs while on an inspection or investigation, the supervisor must
take a sample or photograph of the same material at the same location as the officer. The time, date,
location, and circumstance of each sample or photograph must be recorded.
As a result of the investigation or inspection the officer may write orders requiring the immediate
correction of some potential hazard, or, if a condition of immediate danger threatens the health or safety
of any worker, issue a stop work order.
Reports and orders from the officers are to be posted in a prominent location for seven days. Items
needing correction must be acted upon without delay and the officer must be notified in writing of the
action taken.
Copies of all reports and orders issued by an officer must be faxed to the Head Office as soon as
possible after they are delivered.
11.2 The Emergency Response Plan is appropriate for the work sites.
An emergency plan specifies procedures for handling sudden or unexpected situations for all the work
sites. The objective is to be prepared to:
x
Prevent fatalities and injuries.
x
Reduce damage to buildings, stock, and equipment.
x
Protect the environment and the community.
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x
Accelerate the resumption of normal operations.
Development of the plan begins with a vulnerability assessment. The results of the study will show:
x
How likely a situation is to occur.
x
What means are available to stop or prevent the situation.
x
What is necessary for a given situation.
From this analysis, appropriate emergency procedures can be established.
At the planning stage, it is important that several groups be asked to participate. Among these groups,
the health and safety committee can provide valuable input and a means of wider worker involvement.
Appropriate municipal officials should also be consulted since control may be exercised by the local
government in major emergencies and additional resources may be available. Communication, training
and periodic drills will ensure adequate performance if the plan must be carried out.
11.3
Employees received training in emergency procedures, roles and responsibilities.
Employees Follow Accident Response Team Training
Many factors determine what procedures are needed in an emergency and what emergency
procedures, roles and responsibilities should be followed:
x
Nature of emergency.
x
Degree of emergency.
x
Size of organization.
x
Capabilities of the organization in an emergency situation.
x
Immediacy of outside aid.
x
Physical layout of the premises.
Common elements to be considered in all emergencies include pre-emergency preparation and
provisions for alerting and evacuating staff, handling casualties, and for containing the danger.
Natural hazards, such as floods or severe storms, often provide prior warning. The plan should take
advantage of such warnings with, for example, instructions on sand bagging, removal of equipment to
needed locations, providing alternate sources of power, light or water, extra equipment, and relocation
of personnel with special skills. Phased states of alert allow such measures to be initiated in an orderly
manner.
The evacuation order is of greatest importance in alerting staff. To avoid confusion, only one type of
signal should be used for the evacuation order. Commonly used for this purpose are 3 long blasts of an
air horn or truck horn or the pulling of the fire alarm in noisy environments. The all-clear signal is less
important since time is not such an urgent concern.
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The following are “musts”:
11.4
x
Identify evacuation routes, alternate means of escape, make these known to all staff; keep the
routes unobstructed.
x
Specify safe locations for staff to gather for head counts to ensure that everyone has left the danger
zone. Assign individuals to assist employees with disabilities.
x
Carry out treatment of the injured and search for the missing simultaneously with efforts to contain
the emergency.
x
Provide alternate sources of medical aid when normal facilities may be in the danger zone.
x
Ensure the safety of all staff (and/or the general public) first, then deal with the fire or other situation.
The Emergency Response Plan has been tested for deficiencies and corrective actions
have been taken.
Testing of Plan & Revision when Necessary
Completing a comprehensive plan for handling emergencies is a major step toward preventing disasters.
However, it is difficult to predict all of the problems that may happen unless the plan is tested. Exercises
and drills may be conducted to practice all or critical portions (such as evacuation) of the plan. A
thorough and immediate review after each exercise, drill, or after an actual emergency will point out
areas that require improvement. Knowledge of individual responsibilities can be evaluated through
paper tests or interviews.
The plan should be revised when shortcomings have become known, and should be reviewed at least
annually. Changes in plant infrastructure, processes, materials used, and key personnel are occasions
for updating the plan.
It should be stressed that provision must be made for the training of both individuals and teams, if
they are expected to perform adequately in an emergency. An annual full-scale exercise will help in
maintaining a high level of proficiency.
11.5 The correct class and size of fire extinguishers are visible and available.
Outsource Extinguisher Maintenance /Availability
Data is gathered in the field is organized and presented online for easy access. Safety manager may
choose the inspection application and view the reports as a Web Page, downloadable file, or have it
E-mailed to yourself.
Recent inspections are displayed for quick access.
The program provides a complete list of Buildings created for Weiss-Johnson and it’s companies. On
may conveniently edit or delete buildings and choose which to be loaded onto your Palm™ handheld
ready for inspection.
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Safety Team Leaders and Safety supervisors work with Vallen to ensure that all vehicles are outfitted
with a minimum 2.5 lb. ABC Fire extinguisher.
11.6 The Extinguishers are regularly checked and inspected once a month.
Regular Checks
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
All Fire Extinguishers shall be clearly marked and placed in a readily accessible locations.
All Fire Extinguishers shall be inspected monthly and the inspection recorded on the tag attached to
the extinguisher. Defective or damaged units must be removed from service and repaired by a qualified
agency.
Discharged, missing or unserviceable Fire Extinguishers shall be reported to the Supervisor
immediately.
CLASSES OF FIRES
Class A – These fires consist of wood, paper, rags, rubbish and other ordinary combustible materials.
Recommended Extinguishers – Water, through the use of a hose, pump type water cans or pressurized
extinguishers.
Class B – Flammable liquids, oil and grease.
Recommended Extinguishers – Dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide.
Class C – Electrical equipment
Recommended Extinguishers – Carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units).
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11.7 An appropriate emergency communication system is being used.
Identify and Communicate Plan
Having identified the hazards, the possible major impacts of each should be itemized and
communicated to the appropriate divisions:
x
Sequential events (for example, a fire after an explosion).
x
Evacuation.
x
Casualties.
x
Damage to plant infrastructure.
x
Loss of vital records/documents.
x
Damage to equipment.
x
Disruption of work.
Based on these events, the required actions are determined. For example:
x
Declare emergency.
x
Sound the alert.
x
Evacuate danger zone.
x
Close main shutoffs.
x
Call for external aid.
x
Initiate rescue operations.
x
Attend to casualties.
x
Fight fire.
The final consideration is a list and the location of resources needed:
x
Medical supplies.
x
Auxiliary communication equipment.
x
Power generators.
x
Respirators.
x
Chemical and radiation detection equipment.
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x
Mobile equipment.
x
Emergency protective clothing.
x
Fire fighting equipment.
x
Ambulance.
x
Rescue equipment.
x
Trained personnel.
11.8 Adequate First Aid supplies and facilities are being used.
Designated First Aid Area
Since emergencies will occur, preplanning is necessary. An urgent need for rapid decisions, shortage
of time, and lack of resources and trained personnel can lead to chaos during an emergency. Time and
circumstances in an emergency mean that normal channels of authority and communication cannot be
relied upon to function routinely. The stress of the situation can lead to poor judgment resulting in severe
losses.
Weiss-Johnson has a designated First Aid Area in each of its main buildings. From this area first aid
supplies may be available for use to temporarily provide comfort to the victims of an incident at work or
a customer/subcontractor who may be visiting our building.
The First Aid is only temporary and the Designated First Area facilities are meant to assist with the care
only until that person can be safely transported to a medical facility.
The First Aid must be delivered by a qualified First Aider.
11.9 The required number of qualified First Aid employees are on site.
First Aiders
Active First Aiders are to be listed and made available to all employees at each Weiss-Johnson office. A
list is provided and posted in each lunchroom and first Aid area of the company.
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12.
Records & Statistics
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Occupational Health & Safety Code. Part 11
First Aid Records Access
184(1) This section applies to records of first aid given to a worker.
184(2) Subject to Section 8 of the Act, a person who has custody of
records must ensure that no person other than the worker has access to
a worker’s records unless
(a) The record is in a form that does not identify the worker.
(b) The worker has given written permission to the person, or
(c) Access use and disclosure of the information is in accordance
with an enactment of Alberta or Canada that authorizes or
requires the disclosure.
184(3) An employer must give a worker a copy of the records pertaining
to the worker if the worker asks for a copy.
Occupational Health & Safety Code Section 184
Records and Statistics Program Confirmation
12.1 There is a plan to process, organize and manage program
documentation.
12.2 Adequate health and safety activity summaries are developed
and maintained.
12.3 The company does compare health and safety performance year
to year and studies the trends.
12.4 An action plan was developed based on the recommendations of
the last audit.
12.5 The action plan was communicated to the employees.
12.6 The action plan is currently being implemented.
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12.1 There is a plan to process, organize and manage program documentation.
RECORD KEEPING
WEISS-JOHNSON must retain accurate documentation regarding the Health & Safety Program to allow
Management to monitor the program for effectiveness and to make improvements.
The following records must be retained and are not confidential:
x Hazard Assessment Forms
x On-going Hazard Assessment Forms
x Toolbox Meeting Forms
x Work site Inspection Checklists and Reports
x Accident/Incident Investigations
x Safety Meeting Records
x Inventory Reports
x Maintenance Reports
x WCB Reports and Claims Management
The following records are confidential and must be kept in locked storage units accessible only to
authorized personnel.
x Employee Orientation Records
x First Aid Records
x Records of Disciplinary Action
x Pre-employment medical reports
x Periodic / for cause medical reports
x Driver’s Abstracts
x All medical records
x Pulmonary function records
RECORD KEEPING TERMINOLOGY
The following terminology shall be used for determining the status of any work related injury or illness.
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COMPENSABLE DAYS
The total days charged for work injuries. Days charged include actual calendar days of disability
resulting from temporary total injuries and scheduled charged for deaths and permanent disabilities.
1200 days are charged for a death or permanent total disability, with proportionately fewer days for
permanent partial disability. Refer to – Method of Recording and Measuring Work Injury Experience.
FIRST AID
Any one time treatment and subsequent observation of minor scratches, cuts, burns, splinters, foreign
object in eye removal, which do not ordinarily require medical care. Such treatment and observation are
considered first aid even if provided by a physician or registered professional personnel.
Examples of First Aid:
x Application of ANTISEPTICS during first visit to medical personnel.
x Treatment of FIRST DEGREE BURN(S).
x Treatment of SECOND or THIRD DEGREE BURN(S) less than ½” in diameter.
x Application of BANDAGE(S) during any visit to medical personnel.
x Use of ELASTIC BANDAGE(S) during first visit to medical personnel.
x Removal of FOREIGN BODIES NOT EMBEDDED IN EYE if only irrigation is required and/or
simple removal is performed using a wetted cotton swab, magnet or loop.
x Removal of FOREIGN BODIES FROM WOUND; if procedure is UNCOMPLICATED, and is, for
example, by tweezers or other simple technique.
x Use of NON PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS AND administration of single dose of of
PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION on first visit for minor injury of discomfort.
x SOAKING THERAPY on initial visit to medical personnel or removal of bandages by SOAKING.
x Application of OINTMENTS to abrasions to prevent drying or cracking.
x Application of HEAT THERAPY during first visit to medical personnel.
x Use of WHIRLPOOL BATH THERAPY during first visit to medical personnel.
x NEGATIVE X-RAY DIAGNOSIS.
x OBSERVATION of injury during visit to medical personnel.
x Administration of TETANUS SHOT(S) OR BOOSTER(S) for preventive medicine.
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HOSPITILIZATION
Occurs when an employee is admitted into the hospital for an overnight stay. Emergency Room treatment is not considered hospitalization, if the employee is not subsequently admitted.
LOST TIME INJURY
A work injury that results in death, permanent disability, or inability of the injured employee to return to
work on the next scheduled work day following the injury.
LOST WORKDAYS
Are those workdays (consecutive or not) on which the employee would have worked but could not
because of an occupational injury or illness. The number of lost workdays does not include the day of
injury, WEISS-JOHNSON considers these injuries to be Lost Time Accidents. Listed below are specific
examples of counting lost workdays.
Weekends: If an employee who is scheduled to work Monday through Friday is injured on Friday and returns to work on Monday, the case does not involve any days away from work even if the employee had
been scheduled to work on Saturday, even if that Saturday constituted overtime, the Saturday would be
recorded as a Lost Time Accident.
Job Completion: If the job is finished and personnel are being laid-off, then the lost days would stop
because the work no longer exists.
Holidays, Strikes, Vacation: None of these are considered to be Lost Workdays. Lost Workdays include
only those days in which the injured or ill employee would have worked but could not.
MEDICAL TREATMENT
This includes treatment of injuries administered by physicians, or registered professional personnel.
Medical treatment does not include first aid treatment (one time treatment and subsequent observation
of minor scratches, cuts, burns, splinters, and so forth, which do not ordinarily require medical care)
even though provided by a physician or registered professional personnel.
Examples of Medical Treatment:
x Treatment of INFECTION.
x Application of ANTISEPTICS during second or subsequent visit to medical personnel.
x Treatment of SECOND OR THIRD DEGREE BURN(S) greater than 13mm (1/2 in.) diameter.
x Application of SUTURES.
x Application of BUTTERFLY ADJESIVE DRESSING(S) or STERI-STRIPS in lieu of sutures.
x Removal of FOREIGN BODIES EMBEDDED IN EYE by minor surgery.
x Removal of FOREIGN BODIES FROM WOUND; if the procedure is complicated because of
depth of embedment, size, or location.
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x Use of PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS (except a single does administered on first visit for minor injury or discomfort).
x Use of hot or cold SOAKING THERAPY during second or subsequent visit to medical personnel.
x CUTTING AWAY of DEAD SKIN (surgical debridement).
x Use of WHIRLPOOL BATH THERAPY during second or subsequent visit to medical personnel.
x POSITIVE X-RAY DIAGNOSIS (factures, broken bones, etc.)
x ADMISSION TO A HOSPITAL or equivalent medical facility FOR TREATMENT.
x DRAINAGE of blood from BRUISES.
A WORK RELATED INJURY THAT REQUIRES MEDICAL TREATMENT IS CLASSED AS A RECORDALE INJURY or MEDICAL AID INJURY.
MODIFIED WORK
This is when an employee is not able to perform their regular assigned work as a result of a work related injury or illness. The number of workdays (consecutive or not) on which, because of injury or illness:
x The employee was assigned to another job on a temporary basis; or
x The employee worked at a permanent job less than full time; or
x The employee worked at a permanently assigned job but could not perform all duties normally
connected with it.
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12.2 Adequate Health & Safety activity summaries are developed and
maintained.
Inspection Reports are Posted
The inspection reports for each month are reported to the Safety Committee which is made up of
Safety Team Leaders from each company of Weiss-Johnson. They are then encouraged to take
this information back to their respective companies and report it to their employees in the form of a
summary or report that may be understood by all employees.
Those employees who do and do not comply with the process and the company rules will be reflected in
these reports.
CALCULATIONS
Safety Reports can be prepared using the following formulas for calculations:
Lost Time Accident Frequency
# of Lost Time Injuries x 200,000 Hours
Exposure Hours
Accident Severity
# of Compensable Days x 200,000
Exposure Hours
Total Recordable Injury Rate (TRIR)
# of Recordable Injuries x 200,000
Exposure Hours
12.3 The company does compare health and safety performance year to year
and studies the trends.
Worker’ Compensation Board Statistics
Workers’ compensation boards and commissions across Canada collect information about accepted
time-loss injuries.
The Association of Workers’ Compensation Boards of Canada (AWCBC) publish accepted time-loss
injuries and fatality reports under the National Work Injuries Statistics Program (NWISP) according to
the following categories:
x
Nature of Injury (the type of injury or disease)
x
Part of Body affected by the injury or disease
x
Source of the Injury (immediate cause of the injury)
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x
Event (type of accident resulting in the injury, for example, “fall”)
x
Industry in which worker was employed at time of the accident
x
Occupation of the injured or ill worker
x
Province or Territory in which the injury, disease or fatality occurred
x
Gender (sex) and Age (in age groups)
The publication can be ordered online from NWISP and Weiss-Johnson uses this data to compare
trends in the industry and across Canada.
The NWISP database contains information about work-related illnesses and diseases as well as
injuries.
Summary data by province/jurisdiction are available free of charge for the number of accepted timeloss injuries (1982-2004) and the number of fatalities (1993-2004) on the AWCBC web page NWISP
statistics.
Weiss-Johnson also uses its own data from year to year to study relationships and trends in the
construction industry. The safety Director particularly pays close attention to statistics occurring in the
last 5 years.
12.4 An Action Plan was developed based on the recommendations of the last
audit.
The action plan for your initiative should meet several criteria.
Is the action plan:
Complete? Does it list all the action steps or changes to be sought in all relevant areas of WeissJohnson (Service, Residential, Commercial, Plumbing, Fireplaces, etc.)?
Clear? Is it apparent who will do what by when?
Current? Does the action plan reflect the current work? Does it anticipate newly emerging opportunities
and/or barriers?
Purpose
• To ensure the action plan is being implemented
• To make modifications to the plan if evaluation data indicates they are needed
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Steps to follow
• Monitor progress of the action plan through regular reports
• Modify the action plan as necessary. Be flexible.
• At a meeting of the group review
- Action taken
- Time and funds spent
- Difficulties encountered
- Successful experiences
- Unmet objectives
• Evaluate success of the plan - See sample “Evaluation” report
A final evaluation report should include:
- Problem statement
- Summary of the action plan
- What changes were made relative to the identified concern and by whom
- Type and extent of school and community involvement
- Budget and actual dollars spent
- If project was completed on time and within budget
- Continuing action needed
- Continuing action planned
• Present a final report to the managerial board and ownership.
12.5
The action plan was communicated to the employees.
This Health & Safety program and the action plan will be reviewed with the workers and management
during the performance review process to be completed once every 12-16 months. Workers will have
this communicated during orientation for new hires.
Much of the action plan is communicated to the employees through Job Hazard Assessments, Toolbox
talks and Safety Meetings for existing workers, contractors and sub-contractors . Visitors and one-time
vendors will have appropriate orientation and supervision while on site.
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Forms of Communication
o Formal Hazard Assessments
o Site-Specific Hazard Assessments
o Job Hazard Assessments
o Toolbox Meetings
o Safety Meetings
o Inspections
o Investigations
o Internal/External Audits
o Performance Reviews
12.6 The action plan is currently being implement
At the planning stage, it is important that several groups be asked to participate. Among these
groups, the health and safety committee can provide valuable input and a means of wider worker
involvement. Communication, training and periodic drills will ensure adequate performance if the
action plan must be carried out.
Forms of Communication
ƒFormal Hazard Assessments
ƒSite-Specific Hazard Assessments
ƒJob Hazard Assessments
ƒToolbox Meetings
ƒSafety Meetings
ƒInspections
ƒInvestigations
ƒInternal/External Audits
ƒPerformance Reviews
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13.
Legislation
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Occupational Health and Safety Code
Part 1
Definitions and General Applications
Availability of Legislation
2.1
An employer must ensure that a current paper or electronic copy
of each of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, the Occupational
Health and Safety Regulation and the Occupational Health and
Safety Code is readily available for reference by workers.
Occupational Health and Safety Code Part 1, Section 2
Legislation Program Confirmation
13.1 Do our Health and Safety Policy(s) reference applicable government
legislation.
13.2 Are copies of relevant legislation are available and posted at work sites.
13.3 Employees are aware of their rights and responsibilities and how to
exercise them.
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13.1 Do our Health and Safety Policies reference applicable government
legislation.
The Alberta Occupational Act, Code and Regulations
When introducing a policy at Weiss-Johnson it is important to reference government legislation which
would be directly applicable. All safety policies are based on the Occupational Act, Code or Regulations
as they appear in the most recent edition.
13.2 Are copies of relevant legislation are available and posted at work sites.
Alberta Occupational Health & Safety Act, Regulation and Code
Employees are required to have access to Alberta OH&S Legislation in hard copy or electronic format.
http://www.qp.alberta.ca/documents/Acts/O02.pdf
A copy of the Alberta Occupational Health and Safety Act, Code and Regulations must be available at
each company of Weiss-Johnson.
It is suggested that a hard copy be made available at the First aid area of each company and an
electronic copy is always available to those employees who have access to the world wide web.
13.3 Employees are aware of their rights and responsibilities and how to
exercise them.
Legislated Rights and Responsibilities
All workers have the right to refuse unsafe work. If a worker is not competent (adequate training or
experience) then work is considered to be unsafe. All training must be documented by the employer.
Proof of this upon request is the responsibility of the employee.
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Managers, Supervisors and Lead Hands
As a representative of Weiss-Johnson group of companies all site personnel shall ensure that all work
is carried out in accordance with all company policies, safe work practices, safe job procedures, and
applicable legislation.
Site Rules
Employees shall comply with Company rules and all applicable safety legislation. They shall also report
any near misses or incidents to their Safety Manager first. The employee or the employee’s partner must
call Weiss-Johnson’s Safety Manager (780-399-6148) to arrange which Medical facility to attend. Once
this is determined call and update your manager as to what has occurred.
Sub-Contractor Employees & Visitors
All sub-contractor employees and visitors shall comply with Weiss-Johnson Company Rules and
Policies as well as any applicable legislation.
All Employees
Right to Refuse Unsafe Work
Employees must be informed of their right and the fact that they are not to work in any manner or
situation which may endanger themselves or others. They must also be instructed on the proper
procedure for refusing to do work which they deem to be unsafe.
Employees must have reasonable and probable grounds that an imminent danger to themselves or
other exists.
Employees who refuse work, which they perceive to be unsafe, must immediately report the situation to
their Supervisor, Safety Team Leader or Company Manager.
The situation must be documented and investigated as soon as possible by the Safety Supervisor or
Safety Director with the employee on the work site. The company representative (supervisor/manager)
will be invited to attend.
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If the Safety Representative of Weiss-Johnson and the employee cannot reach an agreement on the
issue, assistance may be requested from:
x a member of the Human Resources or Company Manager or
x the Safety Director or the Safety Supervisor who is knowledgeable about the work or issue
being discussed.
If consensus cannot be achieved for a solution to the issue an Occupational Health and Safety Officer
must be informed about the situation and asked for clarification. The Safety Officer will investigate the
situation and decide whether a dangerous situation exists.
Employees, who still refuse the work, must be reassigned to other work.
Employees who refuse work cannot be disciplined or dismissed for their action. Other employees may
be assigned to the task if the original employee disagrees with the decision, but they must be informed
of the original refusal and subsequent investigation and decision.
It is very important that the procedure be followed by both parties in this situation. The employees must
know that they are to report unsafe acts or conditions immediately to their Supervisor and that remedial
action will be taken.
ALBERTA LEGISLATION AND SUPPORT MATERIAL
The following attachments are provided as part of Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Safety and Loss
Management Program. Employees shall comply with all other regulations published pursuant to the
Occupational Health and Safety Act.
Occupational Health and Safety Act, Regulation and Code
(9th Printing – October 1, 2013)
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Company Safety Manual
WHMIS Manual
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14.
Policies
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Drug and Alcohol Policy
Policy Intent
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. is committed to providing a safe, drug and alcohol-free workplace. The employer is aware that drug and alcohol dependencies are protected and recognized as grounds of mental and
physical disability under the Alberta Human Rights, Citizenship and Multiculturalism Act.
This Policy Shall
1.
Define Alcohol and/or Drug Dependence;
2. Define Recreational Use;
3. Discuss Drug and/or Alcohol dependency;
4. Provide employees with a set of expectations;
5. Provide guidelines for the Accommodation Process.
Policy Statement
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. prides itself on providing a safe working environment for all of its employees.
Employees under the influence of drugs or alcohol on the job can pose serious safety and health risks both to
themselves and their co-workers. Employees that are experiencing a drug and/or alcohol dependency shall be
accommodated to the point of undue hardship.
To help ensure a safe and healthy workplace, Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. reserves the right to prohibit
certain items and substances from being brought on to, or being present on company premises.
Employees that fail to adhere to the above expectation or that engage in illegal activities such as selling drugs
and/or alcohol while on Company premises will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination
of employment and referral to legal authorities.
Definitions:
Drug and/or Alcohol Dependency: is defined as a mental or physical dependence on drugs and/or alcohol
that is considered as a mental and physical disability under Human Rights Law.
Recreational Drug and/or Alcohol Use: use of drugs and/or alcohol for recreational purposes does not
represent mental or physical dependence and therefore is not considered as a mental or physical disability
under Human Rights Law.
Drug and/or Alcohol Dependency
x Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. understands that employees may develop a chemical dependency to
certain substances, which is defined as a mental and physical disability. The employer promotes the
early diagnosis of this disability and encourages employees with a dependency for alcohol or drugs to
pursue medical, and/or psychological treatment.
x Any employee who suspects that he/she might have an emerging drug or alcohol problem is expected
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to seek appropriate treatment promptly from one of the many resources available in the community.
x Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. defines a rehabilitated drug user or alcoholic, or any individual
engaged in a supervised drug or alcoholism rehabilitation program that is no longer using drugs or
alcohol, as an employee with a disability.
x All medical information shall be kept confidential by the employee.
Expectations
Management
x Shall identify any situations that may cause concern regarding an employee’s ability to safely perform
their job functions.
x If it is known, or ought to have been known, that an employee has a substance dependency, the
employer shall accommodate the employee to the point of undue hardship.
Employees
x All employees are expected to abide by the provisions of this policy.
x Employees are encouraged to communicate to their employer that they have a dependency so that their
rights are protected and they can be accommodated appropriately.
Accommodation Process
During the accommodation process, Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will respect the dignity and privacy of the
individual requesting accommodation. During this time, the following actions may occur:
x The employee may take a leave of absence to seek assessment and treatment for a drug and/or alcohol
dependency;
x The employee will be allowed to return to work upon rehabilitation; and
x Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will accommodate relapses prior to, during, and post treatment given
the accommodation does not create undue hardship for the employer.
During the accommodation process, the employee shall:
x Inform Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. if they are currently experiencing a drug and/or alcohol
dependency;
x Disclose previous problems with a drug and/or alcohol dependency only if it is relevant to their current
job duties;
x Provide medical documentation to confirm they have a drug and/or alcohol dependency; and
x Fully cooperate with the recommendations of professional assessments.
More information can be found in the Drug and Alcohol Dependencies in Alberta Workplaces Information Sheet.
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MAINTENANCE PROGRAM POLICY
It is the policy of Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. to maintain all tools and equipment in condition that will
maximize the safety of all personnel.
To accomplish this a “Maintenance Program” shall be implemented and shall include the following components:
x
Adherence to applicable regulations, standards, and manufacturer’s specifications
x
Services of appropriately qualified maintenance personnel
x
Scheduling and documentation of all maintenance work
x
Tracking invoices of maintenance and repairs of equipment, tools and vehicles.
Supervisors shall be responsible for the application of the program in their company and area of responsibility.
The safety information in this policy does not take precedence over OH&S Regulations. All employees
should be familiar with the OH&S Act and Regulations.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: ______________________________
Barry Gabruch-Safety Director
Date:______/______/20_______
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Motor Vehicle Policy
All drivers of a company vehicle must adhere to the following requirements:
1.
All drivers must be staff of “Weiss-Johnson”.
2. Only workers with a valid operator’s license shall operate company vehicles and all company vehicles are to be
operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and applicable municipal and provincial regulations.
3. The use of seatbelts is mandatory in all company vehicles.
4. All vehicles must be equipped with a fire extinguisher, first aid kit. Fire extinguishers and first aid kits must be
inspected according to the requirements stated in this policy.
5. All materials and equipment must be secured for transportation.
6. When transporting dangerous goods, provincial regulations must be complied with and proper signage must be in
place. Driver must have TDG Training.
7.
Workers must not operate company vehicles while impaired (i.e. Alcohol, fatigue, sickness, medication or drugs).
8. Operators must use running lights or illuminated headlights during the day time hours.
9. Vehicles must be driven and operated at safe speeds with due regard for the weather road and traffic conditions.
10. Use of company vehicles or equipment for personal purposes is not allowed unless the worker has PRIOR
permission from the Manager/Supervisor.
11. Pets are not allowed in vehicles at any time.
12. Vehicles will be inspected every second safety meeting (once a month) to ensure that they are clean and are
being properly maintained.
13. Driver will be subject to taking a “Defensive driving course” at the employee’s own expense if the employee has 2
or more vehicle infractions in a calendar year or 1 potentially reckless incident.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: ______________________________
Date:______/______/20_______
Barry Gabruch-Safety Director
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SAFETY TRAINING AND COMMUNICATION POLICY
Purpose
The purpose of this policy is to provide for general and specialized safety and communication related training
throughout all levels of the organization.
POLICY
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will provide, and all employees will participate in, all safety and communication
related training that is necessary to minimize losses of human and physical resources of the company.
The training will include, but not be limited to:
x
safety orientations for new employees
x
job-specific training
x
Specific courses such as:
• CSTS
• Emergency First Aid/CPR
• NCSO
• Fall Protection Training
• WHMIS
• Auditor Training Program
• the R.O.C.K. (Residential Orientation Certification of Knowledge)
x
safety training for supervisors and management
x
trade-specific training and specialized safety certification
All company management personnel have an open door policy. All employees are welcomed and encouraged to bring
any safety suggestions, concerns, or problems to the company’s attention at any time.
Media Contact
The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or his designate are the only people authorized to speak or release information to
the news media regarding any WEISS- JOHNSON operation.
Reporters are to be told to direct their questions to The President of the Company.
All other personnel at the operations or office are to respond to the media by referring them to The President.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: _______________________________
Date:______/______/20_______
Barry Gabruch - Safety Director
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Policy
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will maintain a comprehensive program of safety inspections at all facilities and jobsites.
Responsibilities
The management is responsible for the overall operation of the program.
Safety Officers/ Safety Team Leaders are responsible for directing formal inspections in work areas that they control and
for involving workers in such inspections.
Workers are responsible for participating in and contributing to the inspection program.
“INSPECTIONS ARE A PROVEN PROACTIVE METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES.“
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. requires employees to make regular safety inspections of their work sites. The frequency
of the inspections is governed by the nature and hazard of the work. In compliance with the law, such inspections are
made with the crews and will prevent the development of unsafe working conditions.
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Progressive Discipline Policy
Intent
Weiss Johnson has adopted a policy of Progressive Discipline to ensure that employees have the opportunity
to correct any performance or behavioral problems that may arise. Weiss Johnson has established a set of
reasonable rules and guidelines for employees to follow. These have not been put in place to restrict the
freedoms of our employees, but rather they are in consideration of their safety, and the overall protection of
Weiss Johnson employees, property, and our business practices.
Guidelines
This policy addresses the following:
G. The Progressive Discipline Process
H. The Levels of Progressive Discipline
I.
Investigation and Documentations
J. Suspension and Review Period
K. Termination
L. Suspension with Pay
H. Progressive Discipline Process
In the event that an employee of Weiss Johnson violates company policy or exhibits problematic behavior, a
system of progressive discipline shall be utilized.
Progressive Discipline can be issued on either: attendance, conduct, health & safety or performance concerns.
Employees will be given four opportunities to correct the unwanted behavior, unless the behaviour or concern
is one of a severe nature, in which case, progressive discipline can be accelerated to match the violation.
Typically, progressive discipline will progress through the following steps:
6. Coaching - informal
7. Verbal Warning - formal
8. Written Warning - formal
9. Final Written Warning with Possible Suspension - formal
10. Termination
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With each violation or apparent problem, the employee will be provided with a written document to: (1) alert
them to the problem, provide a reiteration of the correct company policy regarding the violation, (2) advise them
of the consequences associated with further infractions, and (3) provide a suggestion towards a method of
improvement.
All formal warnings will be kept on file for a period of eighteen (18) months. If no further discipline happens
within the time period, the warning will become inactive. If further offences relating to the issue have taken
place, the warning will be attached to the next set of progressive disciplinary actions.
Degrees of discipline shall be used in relation to the problem at hand. As the situation dictates, based on the
past performances of the employee, and the seriousness of the violation, Weiss Johnson reserves the right to
skip the three step disciplinary process and move straight to termination where necessary.
I.
Progressive Discipline Levels
This policy contains attached Progressive Discipline Levels. The table outlines the progressive discipline steps
for common workplace issues. The chart provides clear examples of unacceptable offences and the resulting
violation in general terms. The chart does not contain all offences and depending on the nature and severity of
the offense Weiss Johnson reserves the right to advance discipline to a higher level.
J. Investigation and Documentation
All violations or alleged violations will be properly investigated and documented by a manager, and/or Human
Resources. All formal measures that have been taken within the progressive discipline process will be
documented and kept in the employee’s personnel file.
K. Suspension and Review Period
During the final written warning, an employee may be suspended and/or put on review.
x Suspension: Employees put on suspension will be excluded without pay from the workplace for a period
of one to three (1-3) days depending on the violation. Typically suspension will be for three (3) days
depending on sverity.
x Review: Employees may be put on a review period following the final written warning. The review period
will last 6 months. During the review period the employee will be excluded from wage increases and
advancement and is discouraged from taking vacation.
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L. Termination of Employment
The final stage of progressive discipline is termination of employment. Termination of employment with Weiss
Johnson may occur following an employee committing multiple violations of company policy, after the logical
steps for progressive disciplinary action have been taken or immediately following a severe violation.
M. Appeals
In the event that an employee feels that they have been wrongfully accused, or disciplined, they may file a
written appeal with Human Resources. Written appeals must contain:
x Details of the discipline;
x Events surrounding the discipline;
x Why the employee feels the discipline is not warranted or appropriate.
Human Resources shall review and respond to all written appeals within ten (10) business days.
N. Suspension with Pay – Pending Investigation
In the event that a Weiss Johnson employee is placed on suspension pending the results of an investigation,
the employee will be notified of the decision, a stated timeline for the investigation and the actions that
predicated the decision.
This form of suspension is not disciplinary but is intended to allow Weiss Johnson to examine the issues
thoroughly and to determine appropriate action. Should the investigation not be completed during the stated
timeline, Weiss Johnson will reserve the right to extend the suspension, as necessary.
During the course of the investigation, the suspended employee will be provided with the details of the
allegations and given an opportunity to respond to them. The suspended employee must ensure that he/she is
available for interviews during this period. If the suspended employee fails to make him/ herself available, Weiss
Johnson will proceed with the investigation and make a determination based on the information available.
The suspended employee will have the right to legal representation, or a Weiss Johnson representative present
at any such interview, and will be given 24 hours notice prior to any interview(s) taking place.
As the suspended employee will be suspended with full pay, he/she will be required to be available for
interviews during this period. Should the suspended employee need to leave town or be otherwise unavailable
for interviews, he/she must submit a request and be granted approved leave.
Weiss Johnson employee who is placed on suspension with pay will be required to temporarily turn over his/
her office keys, access passes and Weiss Johnson identification and credit cards. Any and all Weiss Johnson
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property, business information, and confidential information are to remain at the worksite. In the event that any
Weiss Johnson employee placed on suspension with pay maintains any files or equipment at his/her residence
which are the property of Weiss Johnson he/she will be required to turn these items over to a Weiss Johnson
representative, until such time as the investigation is completed.
Weiss Johnson employees placed on suspension with pay should not have contact with anyone from the office
other than their designated point of contact.
Administration
If you have any questions or concerns about this policy or its related procedures please contact:
Barry Gabruch
Human Resources Manager
Safety Director
Phone: (780) 399-6148
E-mail: [email protected]
Acknowledgment and Agreement
I, _________________________________, acknowledge that I have read and understand the Progressive
Discipline Policy of Weiss Johnson I agree to adhere to this policy and will ensure that employees working
under my direction adhere to this Policy. I understand that if I violate the rules set forth by this Policy, I may face
legal, punitive, or corrective action. Name:
____________________________________
Signature:
____________________________________
Date:
____________________________________
Witness:
____________________________________
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Weiss-Johnson Company Rules and Policy
x
Report all injuries, no matter how slight to Supervisor; get first aid treatment promptly.
x
Call super or Safety Manager to report all minor injuries (First Aid) or incidents (medical aid).
x
Know the 3 types of work-related injuries: a) Near Miss b) First Aid c) Medical Aid
x
Near Miss or Close Call must be recorded “Yes/No” in the Hazard Assessment Booklet.
x
Use First Aid type injury is recorded if it is a minor injury with no medical attention required. Hand into HR office.
x
Medical Aid injury is reported to a physician where a modified work program will begin. Call Safety Manger.
x
Job Hazard Assessments must be completed with worker involvement before the job begins each day
x
The Top 3 PPE are required 100% of the time when on exterior and interior of all projects or construction sites.
The Top 3 PPE are:
a) Steel-toed Boots
b) Hard Hat
c) Safety Glasses
x
Hard hats are to be worn 100% of the time on all construction sites. In special circumstances hard hats may be removed
temporarily to access confined spaces. If removed, it must be written in the Hazard Assessment Booklet.
x
CSA approved footwear to be worn 100% of the time when on the exterior of a project and 100% until interior boarding is
complete. They are to be worn 100% in the shop.
x
Safety Glasses are to be worn 100% of the time while on all construction sites. Safety Glasses are to be worn 100% of
the time while fabricating materials in the shop.
x
Fall protection is required for above 3 meters as per OH&S Act (Section 139).
x
Hearing protection must be worn when exposed to noise greater than 85 dba.
x
Chainsaw pants and visor are required when using a chainsaw.
x
Correct or report unsafe conditions or acts immediately.
x
Only use, adjust or repair tools, eqpmnt. if authorized to do so. See Fleet Manager Terry Hlewka.
x
Maintain good housekeeping standards in the work area at all times
x
The use of non-prescription drugs or alcohol on any Weiss-Johnson premises, vehicle or worksite is prohibited. The
offending party will be escorted off the work site, immediately.
x
Discipline for above is Written Warning and Suspension or Termination.
x
Horseplay, fighting or harassment of other persons will not be tolerated. No firearms or other weapons are permitted on
any Weiss-Johnson worksite or vehicle.
x
No smoking in a building or company vehicle as per City of Edmonton Bylaw #14614. Smoking must be done outdoors
and 5 meters from doorway or window.
I ____________________________ understand that the failure to abide by the policy may lead to a warning, suspension or
immediate dismissal.
Signature __________________________________
Date: ___ / ____ / 2015
dd
mm
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INSPECTION POLICY
Purpose
The purpose of this policy is to control losses of human and material resources by identifying and
correcting unsafe acts and conditions.
Policy
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. will maintain a comprehensive program of safety inspections at all
facilities and jobsites.
Responsibilities
The management is responsible for the overall operation of the program.
Safety Officers are responsible for directing formal inspections in work areas that they control and for
involving workers in such inspections.
Workers are responsible for participating in and contributing to the inspection program. Workers
signing this policy agree to make the appropriate corrections to their operating procedure as indicated
through the inspection.
“INSPECTIONS ARE A PROVEN PROACTIVE METHOD OF PREVENTING ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES.“
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. requires employees to make regular safety inspections of their
work sites. The frequency of the inspections is governed by the nature and hazard of the work. In
compliance with the law, such inspections are made with the crews and will prevent the development
of unsafe working conditions.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: _______________________________
Date:______/______/20_______
Safety Director
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INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING POLICY
Purpose
The purpose of Accident/Incident reporting and the subsequent investigation is to accurately determine the immediate and
basic (root) causes of the occurrence, not to find fault, and to implement controls to prevent recurrence.
Policy
WEISS-JOHNSON requires that all accidents and incidents be reported. Investigations are done on incidents where
there is an opportunity to learn from the work site how this incident could have been prevented. Investigations should be
completed on Near Miss incidents where injury and / or a fatality was narrowly avoided or did occur.
Responsibilities
x
All employees shall report all incidents to their immediate supervisor and then to the Safety Director.
x
Supervisors shall conduct initial investigations and submit their reports to the Safety Director promptly.
x
The Safety Team Leader shall conduct the initial investigation by documenting the initial interview of the
crew.
x
Safety Director shall determine the need for, direct and immediate detailed investigation.
Media Contact
The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or his designate are the only people authorized to speak or release information
to the news media regarding any WEISS- JOHNSON operation.
Reporters are to be told to direct their questions to The President of the Company.
All other personnel at the operations or office are to respond to the media by referring them to The President.
Employee: ____________________________
Sign
Employee:_____________________________
Print
Signed: ______________________________
Barry Gabruch
Date:______/______/20_______
- Safety Director
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Terminology
15.
Terminology
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Terminology
Program Terminology
Adequate (with regards to training of employees)
Training shall be “sufficient” – there has to be enough of it to ensure that the employee can perform the
duties expected without undue risk of injury.
It has to be “satisfactory” – of sufficiently high quality making use of effective communication techniques,
to leave no room for misunderstanding.
It has to be “proportionate”, to the degree of hazard involved.
It has to be specific to the work, equipment or tool that is to be undertaken or operated.
Training and retraining should be provided within a time frame that is appropriate for the work at hand.
This is critical when the task at hand is performed infrequently.
Aerial Work Platforms (AWP)
Work platforms that can be self-elevated to overhead work locations and have the primary controls on
the platform. This includes all self-propelled scissors lifts and boom-type elevating work platforms.
ANSI
American Nation Standards Institute
Authorized Person
Person approved or assigned to perform a specific type of duty or duties at a specific location or
locations at a work site.
CGSB
Canadian General Standards Board
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
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Code of Practice
A set of rules and standards concerning a given subject. For example, a Code of Practice for confined
space entry will identify the requirements for safely entering confined spaces in general. A site specific
procedure for entry of a specific confined space is then developed from the Code of Practice.
Competent Person
In relation to an employee, means adequately qualified, suitably trained and with sufficient experience to
safely perform work with only a minimal degree of supervision.
Imminent Danger
A danger which is not normal for that occupation, or
A danger under which a person engaged in that occupation would not normally work.
MSDS
Material Safety Data Sheet. A data sheet that contains detailed information related to the possible health
and safety hazards of a controlled product. The MSDS should be available from the manufacturer of any
chemical or mixture of chemicals used in industry.
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (United States). This can be a Federal or State
jurisdiction depending where the work is being performed.
Practicable
That which is reasonably capable of being put into practice or of being done or accomplished.
Professional Engineer
A Registered Professional Engineer
Project
The location or locations at which the Work is to be performed, including rights of way, leases and
temporary working spaces.
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Terminology
Qualified Person
A competent person, who by reason of knowledge, experience and training is familiar with a procedure,
process or machine and the related hazards and hazard controls.
Shall
Denotes a mandatory requirement.
Should
A recommendation that is a sound safety and health practice; it does not denote a mandatory
requirement.
Sub-Contractor
The person, firm or corporation entering into a contract with Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. for the
performance of the Work.
Sub-sub-contractor
A person, firm or corporation having a contract with a Sub-contractor to perform a part or parts of the
Work or to supply material or products worked to a special design according to the Contract Document,
but does not include one who merely supplies materials not so worked.
Supervisor
A person, who instructs, directs and controls employees in the performance of their duties.
Transportation of Dangerous Good (TDG)
Federal legislation which is intended to protect the public from hazardous products during shipping. The
legislation is administered by the provincial and territorial governments.
UL
Underwriters Laboratories
WEISS-JOHNSON
Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd.
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ALBERTA LEGISLATION AND SUPPORT MATERIAL
The following attachments are provided as part of Weiss-Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Safety and Loss
Management Program:
Occupational Health and Safety Act, Code and Regulations current as of October 1, 2013.
ACSA Audit Guide – 2014
ACSA course information guide – 2015
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology - Trade Information - 2015
Weiss- Johnson Sheet Metal Ltd. Company Safety Manual – 2011
The Training Centre (Online info-2015)
Peak Safety Training – 2015
Century Vallen - 2015
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Work
All labor, equipment and materials necessary to construct the facility in accordance with the Contract
Documents and includes without limitation all supervision, transportation and all things to be done,
supplied, furnished, or performed which are mentioned in or contemplated by Contract.
WHMIS
The Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System. Federal Legislation that is administered by the
provincial and territorial governments and is intended to protect employees from hazardous products
during use and storage.
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