Toshiba Portege 650CT - User Manual

Toshiba Portege 650CT - User Manual

Finding Your

Way Around the System

You’ve bought your Portégé 650CT computer and taken everything out of the box. Now you may be asking yourself, “OK, what do I do?” Well, this chapter explains how to set up your computer, gives you tips on working comfortably and takes you on a tour of the computer’s features.

Make Sure You Have Everything

Your Portégé 650CT computer comes with everything you need to get up and running quickly. However, before you rush off, it's a good idea to make sure you received everything you were supposed to. This information is listed on the Quick Start Card at the top of the box.

If any items are missing or damaged, notify your dealer immediately. For additional help, contact Toshiba as described in “If You

Need Further Assistance” on page 334.

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Finding Your Way Around the System

Select a Place to Work

Select a Place to Work

Your Portégé 650CT is a portable computer, designed to be used in a variety of circumstances and locations. However, by giving some thought to your work environment, you can protect the computer and make your work hours more comfortable.

Keep the Computer Comfortable

Use a flat surface with enough room to operate comfortably. If you're planning to use a printer or other external device, make sure there's enough space for it as well.

To keep your computer in prime operating condition, make sure your work area is free from:

❖ dust, moisture and direct sunlight.

❖ liquids and corrosive chemicals.

Don’t spill liquids into the computer. If you spill a liquid into the keyboard, turn the computer off, unplug it from the AC power source, and let it dry completely before turning it on again.

If the computer does not operate correctly after you turn it back on, contact a Toshiba authorized service provider.

❖ objects that generate a strong electromagnetic field, such as stereo speakers or speakerphones.

❖ rapid changes in temperature or humidity and sources of temperature changes such as air conditioner vents or heaters.

❖ extreme heat, cold or humidity. Operate the computer within a temperature range of 40 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit (5 to 35 degrees Celsius) and a relative humidity of 20 to 80 percent.

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Keep Yourself Comfortable

Strain and stress injuries are becoming more common as people spend more time using their computers. However, with a little care and proper use of the equipment, you can work comfortably throughout the day.

Using the computer keyboard incorrectly can result in discomfort and possible injury. If your hands, wrists, and/or arms bother you while typing, discontinue using the computer and rest. If discomfort persists, consult a physician.

In addition to the hints provided in the following sections, there are a number of books available on ergonomics, repetitive strain injury, and repetitive stress syndrome.

Placement of the Computer

Proper placement of the computer and external devices is important to avoid stress-related injuries:

Place the computer on a flat surface at a comfortable height and distance. Your arms and hands should be in a relaxed position with your forearms parallel to the floor. The top of the

LCD display should be no higher than eye level.

Maintain good posture with your body relaxed and your weight distributed evenly. You should be able to type without twisting your torso or neck, and see the display panel without slouching.

Adjust the display panel to avoid glare.

Adjust the angle of the computer’s keyboard by unfolding the keyboard legs.

If you use a paper holder, set it at about the same height and distance as the computer.

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Select a Place to Work

Seating and Posture

Proper seating is one of the primary factors in reducing work strain. Some people find an ergonomic (backless) chair more comfortable than a conventional chair. Whichever type you choose, refer to the following guidelines to adjust your chair for maximum computing comfort.

Below eye level

Approximately 90 degree angles

Foot rest

Correct posture and positioning of the computer

Position your chair so the keyboard is at or slightly below the level of your elbow. You should be able to type comfortably with your shoulders relaxed.

If you are using a conventional chair:

Your knees should be slightly higher than your hips. If necessary, use a foot rest to raise the level of your knees and ease the pressure on the back of your thighs.

Adjust the back of your chair so it supports the lower curve of your spine. If necessary, use a cushion to provide extra back support. Lower back support cushions are available at many office supply stores.

Sit with your back straight so that your knees, hips and elbows form approximately 90 degree angles when you work. Do not slump forward or lean back too far.

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Lighting

Proper lighting can improve the legibility of the display and reduce eye strain.

Position the display panel so that sunlight or bright indoor lighting does not reflect off the screen. Use tinted windows or shades to reduce glare.

Avoid placing your computer in front of a bright light that could shine directly in your eyes.

If possible, use soft, indirect lighting in your computer work area.

Arms and Wrists

Avoid bending, arching, or angling your wrists. Keep them in a relaxed, neutral position while typing.

Exercise your hands, wrists and arms to improve circulation.

Work Habits

The key to avoiding discomfort or injury from repetitive strain is to vary your activities. If possible, schedule a variety of tasks into your work day. Finding ways to break up the routine can reduce stress and improve your efficiency.

Take frequent breaks to change position, stretch your muscles, and relieve your eyes.

Avoid performing repetitive activities for prolonged periods of time. Vary activities from one task to another.

Focusing your eyes on your computer screen for long periods of time can cause eye strain. Look away from the computer frequently and focus your eyes on a distant object.

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Finding Your Way Around the System

Find Out Where Everything's Located

Find Out Where Everything's Located

If you've never used a notebook computer before, you're probably wondering how an entire computer can fit into so small a case.

The next few pages take you on a guided tour of the computer and its components.

Rather than reading through this section, you may prefer to use it as a reference as you move through the remainder of the manual and need to locate specific parts of the computer. This information is also available in the electronic form of this manual, described in

“Using the Electronic Guide” on page 283.

Don't worry if you don't know what some parts of the computer do. Some items in this tour support more advanced computing functions that you may want to use as your computing needs and skills increase.

The Front with the Display Closed

Speaker Display latch PC Card eject buttons

Line-in jack

Microphone jack Headphone jack System indicator panel

The front with the display closed

The line-in jack provides an audio input connection for an external stereo device, like a CD-ROM drive.

The microphone jack provides a connection for an external monaural microphone. Connecting an external microphone automatically disables the internal microphone.

The 3.5mm headphone jack provides a connection for stereo headphones or other audio devices requiring an audio-out jack.

Connecting headphones or any other audio device automatically disables the system speaker.

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The system speaker lets you hear system alarms and sounds associated with your software.

The lights on the system indicator panel indicate the status of various system functions. See “The System Indicator Panel” on page 12 for a description of the panel lights.

Pressing the display latch opens the computer's display panel. For more information, see “Open the Display” on page 24.

The PC Card eject buttons allow you to eject a PC Card from the

PC Card slot located on the right side of the computer. For more information, see “Ejecting a PC Card” on page 164.

The Left Side

Security lock slot

Monitor port Power button Modem/fax jack

Volume control

Reset button

External diskette drive port

The left side

Port cover PS/2 port

Attaching a special cable to the security lock slot lets you anchor your computer to your desk or other large, heavy object. For more information, see “Applying Physical Restraints” on page 247.

The external diskette drive port provides a connection for the external diskette drive. The diskette drive is compatible with

1.44MB and 720KB 3.5-inch diskettes. For more information, see

“Connecting the External Diskette Drive” on page 20.

The monitor port provides a connection for an external monitor.

For more information, see “Using an External Monitor” on page 189.

The PS/2

®

port provides a connection for an optional PS/2 mouse or keyboard. For more information, see “Using an External Keyboard” on page 192 or “Using a PS/2 Mouse” on page 195.

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On

The Back

Pressing the power button turns the computer on and off. For more information, see “Turn the Computer On” on page 25.

Pressing the reset button restarts the computer. Use this button only if all other attempts at restarting the computer have failed.

The volume control dial lets you adjust the loudness of the system speaker.

The modem/fax (RJ-11) jack lets you connect your computer to a standard telephone line. For more information, see “Connecting to a Telephone Line” on page 170.

The port cover protects the ports that allow you to connect an external video device, PS/2 mouse/keyboard, and external diskette drive.

Power socket Infrared port Cooling fan

The back

Parallel port Expansion port cover Serial port

To uncover the ports, open the port cover by pulling down on its center tab, and slide the cover into the slot at the lower edge of the computer.

The power socket is where you plug in the AC adapter. For more information, see “Connect to a Power Source” on page 15.

Use the parallel port to connect a printer or other parallel device.

For more information, see “Connecting a Parallel Printer” on page 23.

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IR

The expansion port cover protects the computer’s expansion port. By connecting the docking adapter to this port, you can attach the computer to the optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator or the Desk Station V Plus docking station. These devices provide additional expansion capability while using your computer at your desk. For more information, see “Using the

Optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator” on page 199 or

“Using the Optional Desk Station V Plus” on page 205.

The infrared port lets your Portégé 650CT communicate with another infrared compatible device such as another computer or printer. For more information, see “Transferring Files to Another

Computer” on page 95.

The serial port provides a connection for a serial mouse, printer or other serial device. For more information, see “Using a Serial

Mouse” on page 194.

The cooling fan allows the processor to perform at maximum speed by providing additional cooling to the computer’s Pentium processor.

The Right Side

PC Card slot cover

The right side

Battery release latch

The PC Card slot cover protects the PC Card slots. These slots let you install up to two Type I or Type II PC Cards or one Type III

PC Card. For more information, see “Little Cards that Do Big

Things” on page 157.

The battery release latch prevents accidental release of the battery cover.

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The Underside

Keyboard leg

Notches

Battery release latch

Keyboard leg

Memory expansion slot cover

Power button lock

The underside

The notches align the computer with the docking adapter, which allows you to use an optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator or Desk Station V Plus. For more information, see “Using the Optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator” on page 199 or “Using the Optional Desk Station V Plus” on page 205.

There are two keyboard legs on the bottom of the computer.

Using the legs together lets you adjust the angle of the computer.

The battery release latch prevents accidental release of the battery cover.

The memory expansion slot cover protects a slot for adding extra memory to your computer. For more information, see “Adding

Memory (Optional)” on page 16.

The power button lock prevents the power from being turned on inadvertently.

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The Front with the Display Open

Keyboard indicator panel

Accupoint pointing device

Screen

Display hinges

Microphone

84-key keyboard

Accupoint buttons

The front with the display open

To open the display, press the display latch as you lift the display.

Position the display at a comfortable viewing angle.

The computer's screen is a liquid crystal display (LCD) that provides clear, sharp color images.

The display hinges attach the display panel to the computer.

The AccuPoint pointing device combines the function of a mouse with the convenience of never having to remove your hands from the keyboard. For more information, see “Using the AccuPoint

Pointing Device” on page 27.

Use the AccuPoint buttons with the AccuPoint to access commands in your programs. The larger (primary) button acts as the left button on a mouse. The smaller (secondary) button acts as the right mouse button. For more information, see “Using the Accu-

Point Pointing Device” on page 27.

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The lights on the keyboard indicator panel provide information about various system functions. See “The Keyboard Indicator

Panel” on page 13 for more information.

The built-in microphone lets you record sounds and speak through the telephony modem.

The 84-key keyboard provides all the functionality of a full-sized

101-key keyboard including one Windows key and one Applications key. For more information, see “How to Save Your Work” on page 86.

The System Indicator Panel

On

AC adapter Power Battery

The system indicator panel

Disk

The AC adapter light glows green when the AC adapter is providing power to the computer. If the adapter's output voltage is abnormal or if the power supply malfunctions, this indicator flashes orange.

The power light glows green when the computer is on.

The battery light glows green when the battery is fully charged, and glows orange when the battery is charging. For more information see “Monitoring Battery Power” on page 118.

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The disk light indicates a device—the hard disk or diskette drive—is currently in use.

Do not turn the computer off if this light is on. Doing so may damage the computer, the drive or both.

The Keyboard Indicator Panel

Caps lock Cursor control mode Numeric mode

The keyboard indicator panel

The caps lock light comes on when you press the

Caps Lock

key.

When this light is on, pressing a letter key on the keyboard produces an uppercase (capital) letter. For more information, see “The

Character Keys” on page 81.

The cursor control mode light glows when the cursor control overlay is on. When the overlay is on, pressing an overlay key moves the cursor in the direction shown by the white indicator printed on the left front of the key instead of the letter printed on the top of the key. For more information, see “The Cursor Control

Overlay” on page 275.

The numeric mode light glows, when the numeric overlay is on.

When the overlay is on, pressing an overlay key displays the white number printed on the right front of the key instead of the letter printed on the top of the key. For more information, see “Typing

Numbers” on page 83.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Let's Start at the Very

Beginning

Now that you know where everything is, it’s time to get to work. If you’re new to computers or have never used a notebook computer before, this chapter provides easy-to-follow steps for getting the computer up and running.

Connect to a Power Source

Your computer requires power to operate. By connecting the computer to a power source you can provide power to run the computer and charge the battery. To provide power to your computer, use the AC adapter and power cord to connect the computer to a live power outlet.

Before you can use the battery to power the computer, you must charge it. Leave the computer plugged in for at least three hours with the computer turned off. After that the battery will be completely charged and ready to power the computer.

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Let's Start at the Very Beginning

Adding Memory (Optional)

To connect your computer to a power source, follow these steps:

AC adapter

Power cord

Connecting the power cord to the AC adapter

1 Connect the socket end of the power cord to the AC adapter.

Power socket

AC adapter cord

Connecting the AC adapter cord to the computer

2 Connect the DC OUT end of the AC adapter cord to the power socket on the back of the computer.

3 Insert the plug end of the power cord into a live wall outlet.

The AC adapter light on the indicator panel glows green.

Adding Memory (Optional)

Your computer comes with enough memory to run most of today's popular applications. However, you may want to increase the computer's memory.

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Adding Memory (Optional)

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With additional memory, the computer:

❖ can run more programs and open more documents at the same time.

❖ runs Windows 95 and Windows applications faster.

By installing extra memory now, you’ll be able to operate your computer at its maximum capacity from the start. Of course, you can always come back to this section if you decide to add memory at a later time.

Sizes of Memory Modules

Additional memory is easy to install. Memory modules, available from your dealer, come in the following sizes:

Memory Module Total Memory

8MB 24MB

16MB

32MB

64MB

32MB

48MB

80MB

Install the Memory Module

The memory module installs into the memory expansion slot on the bottom of the computer. You’ll need a Phillips screwdriver to install the memory module.

1 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

2 Click the button next to Shut down the computer, then click Yes.

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Adding Memory (Optional)

3 Windows 95 shuts down and turns the computer off automatically.

Installing a memory card with the computer's power on may damage the computer, the card or both.

4 Unplug the computer.

5 Close the display and remove any cables you may have connected.

If you’re following the steps in this chapter, you haven’t connected any yet.

6 Turn the computer upside down.

Memory slot cover

Screw

Removing the memory slot cover

7 Use a small Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw that

secures the memory slot cover.

8 Lift up the memory slot cover and remove it.

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Memory module

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Adding Memory (Optional)

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Metal clips

Inserting a sample 8MB memory module

9 Carefully insert the memory module at a 45 degree angle.

Do not touch the connectors on the memory module or on the computer. Debris on the connectors may cause memory access problems.

10 Gently press down on the memory module until it snaps

into place.

When the module is fully seated, the metal clips on either side of the slot snap around the module. Do not force the module into position. The memory module should be level.

11 Replace the slot cover.

12 Replace the screw you removed in step 7 and tighten it.

13 Turn the computer over.

When you turn your computer on, it recognizes the additional memory automatically.

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Connecting the External Diskette Drive

Removing a Memory Module

To remove a memory module, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer off.

2 Unplug the computer.

3 Close the display and remove any cables you may have connected.

4 Turn the computer upside down.

5 Use a small Phillips screwdriver to remove the screw that

secures the memory slot cover.

6 Lift up the memory slot cover and remove it.

Metal clips

Memory module

Removing a memory module

7 Push the metal clips away from the memory module until it

pops up.

8 Pull the module out of the slot.

Connecting the External Diskette Drive

The Portégé 650CT’s external 3.5-inch diskette drive is useful for installing software on the hard disk, exchanging information with other systems, and making backup copies of the files stored on your hard disk.

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Connecting the External Diskette Drive

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Connector to drive

Connector to computer

Disk-in-use light

Diskette insertion slot Diskette eject button

The external diskette drive and connector cable

A protective flap inside the diskette insertion slot automatically retracts when you insert a diskette. Push the diskette eject button to remove a diskette from the drive.

The disk-in-use light goes on when the computer is accessing a diskette.

To attach the external diskette drive to the computer, follow these steps:

External diskette drive

Cable

Attaching the cable to the external diskette drive

1 Connect the cable to the external diskette drive.

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Connecting the External Diskette Drive

Port cover

Opening the external diskette drive port cover

2 Open the port cover on the left side of the computer.

External diskette drive port

Cable

Attaching the external diskette drive

3 Attach the cable from the external diskette drive to the external diskette drive port.

You may attach the external diskette drive with the computer on or off. If you attempt to use the diskette drive when it is not attached to the computer, the computer displays an error message.

The computer automatically recognizes the external diskette drive and calls it the A drive.

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Disconnecting the External Diskette Drive

To detach the external diskette drive from the computer, press the cable connector buttons (on each side of the cable connector) and gently pull the connector out of the external diskette drive port.

If you try to access a diskette in the external diskette drive after disconnecting the drive, you will get a disk error message.

Connecting a Parallel Printer

If you've already purchased a printer, now is a great time to connect it to the computer. If you don't have or don’t wish to connect a printer yet, don't worry. You can always connect one later.

The most common type of printer is a parallel printer. To connect a parallel printer, you'll need a standard parallel printer cable. You may have received a cable when you purchased your printer. Otherwise, printer cables are at most computer and electronics stores.

To connect the printer to the computer, follow these steps:

1 Make sure the computer is off.

2 Identify the two ends of the printer cable.

One end (with the male DB-25 connector) connects to the computer. The other end connects to the printer.

To the computer To the printer

Identifying the ends of the printer cable

3 Connect the printer cable to your printer.

If you’re unsure how to do this, your printer’s documentation will tell you how.

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Open the Display

Parallel port

Printer cable

Connecting the printer cable to the parallel port

4 Connect the printer cable to the computer's parallel port.

5 Plug the printer's power cable into a live AC outlet.

The printer must be connected, turned on, and ready (online) before you turn the computer on.

Open the Display

The final step before you turn your computer on is to open the display.

Display latch

Opening the display panel

1 Facing the front of the computer, locate the display latch on

the front center of the display panel.

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Fill In Your Registration Card and Mail It

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2 Press the display latch and lift the display panel.

3 Adjust the display panel to a comfortable viewing angle.

To avoid damaging the display panel, do not force the panel beyond where it moves easily and never lift the computer by the display panel.

Fill In Your Registration Card and Mail It

Take a few minutes now to fill in and mail your product registration card. The card was on the keyboard of your computer when you first opened the display panel. You may be able to register your computer with Toshiba on-line. Look for the Registration icon on you desktop if this feature is available to you. Completing your product registration card lets Toshiba keep you up to date with information about new products and upgrades.

Registering your computer extends your Toshiba warranty worldwide at no charge to you. See the registration card and warranty information for details about the warranty options available from

Toshiba.

Turn the Computer On

Finally, the preparation is over. It's time to turn the computer on and get to work. To turn the computer on, follow these steps:

1 Make sure there’s no diskette in the external diskette drive.

2 If you have a printer connected to your computer, turn the printer on and wait until it’s ready (on line).

3 Locate the power light on the system indicator panel.

On

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Turn the Computer On

Power button

Turning the power on

4 Press and hold the power button on the left side of the com-

puter until the power light turns on.

Using the Power Button Lock

Your Portégé 650CT is equipped with a power button lock that prevents the computer from turning on or off accidently. To set the lock to the on position, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer upside down.

Power button lock

Closed lock icon

The power button lock

2 Locate the power button lock.

3 Slide the lock towards the closed lock icon.

The power button is disabled until the lock is moved to the open lock icon position.

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When You Turn the Computer on the First Time…

The first time you turn the computer on, it displays several messages and leads you through a series of welcome screens. These screens perform the following activities:

Choosing between Windows 95 and Windows for

Workgroups.

Setting up Windows 95.

Setting up Windows 95 to work with your printer.

Selecting the Date/Time Properties.

Creating Windows 95 diskettes.

Exploring additional Windows 95 features.

All of the information in this manual is valid for Windows 95.

If you’re using Windows for Workgroups, refer to the Windows for Workgroups documentation and online Help for information specific to Windows for Workgroups.

Using the AccuPoint Pointing Device

The AccuPoint enables you to move the cursor and to select items on the screen. If you're familiar with desktop computers, you may have used a mouse or trackball for this purpose. The AccuPoint provides all the functionality of a mouse or trackball without your hands ever leaving the keyboard.

If you would rather use a mouse or trackball, you can connect one to the serial port or PS/2 port. You may also use the mouse port on the optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator or Desk Station V Plus.

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Accupoint pointing device

Primary button

Secondary button

The AccuPoint pointing device

To move the pointer, gently push the AccuPoint in the direction you want the pointer to move. Pushing harder on the AccuPoint moves the pointer faster.

When a step instructs you to click on or choose an item, move the cursor to the item, then press and release the primary button. To double-click, press the primary button twice in rapid succession.

The primary button corresponds to the left button on a mouse.

The function of the secondary button depends on the program you are using. It corresponds to the right button on a mouse.

Check your programs’ documentation to find out whether it uses the right mouse button.

Choose Windows 95 or Windows for Workgroups

When the system prompts you to choose between Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups, click Next to select the default

(Windows 95) or choose Windows for Workgroups from the drop-down list box.

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The instructions in this guide are specific to Windows 95. If you choose Windows for Workgroups, a number of things will be different, including:

The tutorial provided in “Getting to Know the Desktop” on page 41 refers to Windows 95 only.

The instructions for starting MaxTime

®

, Toshiba Access

Panel, Toshiba System Control Panel, and Fn-esse™ are for

Windows 95 only. In Windows for Workgroups, monitoring and changing system configurations can be done through the

Toshiba Utilities program group in Program Manager.

Windows for Workgroups does not include a Suspend command. Use Resume Mode instead.

Windows 95 contains the files your computer needs to communicate with optional PC Cards. If you’re using Windows for

Workgroups, use Card Wizard with your optional PC Cards.

The steps in “Changing the Display Mode” on page 280 are for Windows 95. To change the display mode in Windows for

Workgroups, double-click the Chips CPL icon in the Windows for Workgroups Control Panel.

Continue with the next section.

Set Up Windows 95

When you turn the computer on for the first time, the Setup program displays the Welcome to Windows Setup dialog box.

Follow these steps to set up Windows 95:

1 In the Welcome screen, click Next.

Setup starts gathering information about your system.

2 Select your Regional Settings and click Next.

The default is English (American).

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3 Select the keyboard layout and click Next.

The default is United States.

4 Enter the requested User Information, then click Next.

Setup displays the License information.

5 Read the License information.

6 Click the button next to “I accept the agreement” in order to continue the installation, then click Next.

7 Type in the number from the Certificate of Authenticity that came with your computer, then click Next to continue with Configuring Your Computer.

Setup installs the devices it found on your system and prompts you to restart the computer.

8 Click Finish to restart the computer.

You are now ready to set up Windows 95 for your printer.

Set Up Windows 95 for Your Printer

If you already have a printer, choose Next when the system prompts you to set up your printer. If you plan to purchase a printer later, choose Cancel now and see “Setting Up Windows 95 to Work with Your Printer” on page 88 when you’re ready to connect it.

To set up a printer later you’ll need the master program diskettes. For information, see “Create or Purchase Master

Diskettes” on page 33.

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To set up Windows 95 to work with your printer when you set up

Windows 95, follow these steps:

1 When Windows 95 opens the Printers dialog box, scroll through the list of manufacturers and printers until you find yours.

If your printer is not listed, it probably came with its own diskette. Refer to your printer documentation for installation instructions.

2 Select your printer and choose Next.

3 Set the port to LPT1: and choose Next.

4 Type a new name for your printer or accept the default and choose Next.

5 If your printer is connected and turned on, choose Finish to print a test page.

To finish the setup procedure without printing a test page, choose No, then Finish.

Select Date/Time Properties

As Setup continues, Windows 95 displays the Date/Time Properties dialog box. This dialog box has two tabs. Click on a tab to bring it to the front.

1 On the Time Zone tab, select your time zone by clicking the up and down arrow keys.

2 On the Date and Time tab, set the correct date and time, if necessary.

3 When you’re done, click Close.

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Create Windows 95 Diskettes

The Microsoft Create System Disks program creates program diskettes for the Windows 95 operating system. To run this program, choose Next when prompted during the initial startup procedure.

If you don’t want to take time to make these diskettes now, click

Cancel. When you’re ready to make these diskettes, refer to “Running Microsoft Create System Disks” on page 34.

You must create your own set of Microsoft Windows 95 diskettes. If your hard disk ever crashes, you’ll need the diskettes to reinstall Windows 95 on your system. If this occurs and you haven’t made these diskettes, you will have to buy a new copy of Microsoft Windows 95.

Complete the Initial Startup Procedure

After you’ve finished making Windows 95 diskettes, Windows 95 completes its setup procedure and displays the Welcome to Windows 95 screen. This screen provides the following options:

The Windows 95 Tour gives you a brief overview of

Windows 95. For a more complete introduction, see “Getting to Know the Desktop” on page 41.

Select What’s New for answers to common questions about

Windows 95.

Online Registration lets you register Windows 95 with

Microsoft

®

. This works only if you already have a modem installed.

Once you’ve finished looking at any or all of the above options, choose Close to finish the initial startup procedure and open

Windows 95.

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Create or Purchase Master Diskettes

When you buy a program at a computer store, you receive one or more program diskettes. These program diskettes contain the files necessary to install the program on your computer's hard disk.

You can also use them to reinstall your software if necessary.

However, your Portégé 650CT computer comes with Microsoft

Windows 95 and a number of programs already installed on the hard disk. If any of these programs is ever damaged or deleted, you'll need program diskettes to reinstall it.

You must buy blank diskettes and run Microsoft’s Create System

Disks program to make a set of Microsoft Windows 95 diskettes.

There are two ways to obtain program files for your other preinstalled software (not Windows 95):

Buy blank diskettes and run Toshiba’s Master Disk Creator programs.

Purchase the Toshiba drivers/utilities using the order form that came with your computer.

Preparing to Create Master Diskettes

Disk image files on your hard disk contain all the information to create program diskettes for the factory pre-installed programs on your computer. Microsoft Create System Disks and Master Disk

Creator copy these disk images to the diskettes.

You cannot reinstall programs from the disk image files on the hard disk. You must use program diskettes created with

Create System Disks or Master Disk Creator to reinstall any of the pre-installed programs.

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Create or Purchase Master Diskettes

To run these programs, you need:

❖ a few hours.

❖ up to 64 blank 3.5-inch high-density (1.44MB) diskettes. This includes approximately 32 for Microsoft Windows 95 and 32 for Master Disk Creator. These diskettes must be writeenabled (the write-protect tab at the upper left corner of the diskette must cover the square hole).

Write-protect tab

A write-enabled diskette

Although you can run these programs at any time, it's a good idea to create your program diskettes the first time you start the computer. If you decide to put off the process until later, make sure you don't forget. You don't want to accidentally delete a program and have no master diskettes available from which to reinstall it quickly.

Running Microsoft Create System Disks

If you chose not to create Windows 95 diskettes when you turned the computer on the first time, you should do so now. Since

Microsoft Create System Disks requires you to make all the

Microsoft Windows 95 diskettes at one time, make sure you have at least 32 new, formatted high-density diskettes before you start the program. Label the diskettes using the pre-printed Microsoft

Windows 95 diskette labels provided with your computer.

You can run Create System Disks only once. After you create the diskettes, the program deletes the images from your hard disk.

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To run Create System Disks, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to System Tools.

3 Click Create System Disks.

Windows 95 opens the Create System Disks program. Follow the instructions on the screen to create the program diskettes.

Running Master Disk Creator

Master Disk Creator creates program diskettes for the rest of the programs pre-installed on your computer. It is a very simple program to use. Once you’ve started it, follow the instructions on the screen, inserting and removing diskettes as prompted. Make sure you label the diskettes as indicated by Master Disk Creator.

To run Master Disk Creator, follow these steps:

1 Make sure the diskette drive is connected to the computer.

If you’re unsure how to do this, see “Connecting the External Diskette Drive” on page 20.

2 Click Start, then point to Programs.

3 Point to Toshiba Utilities, then click Master Disk Creator.

Master Disk Creator displays a welcome screen.

4 Choose OK by using the AccuPoint to move the pointer to it and clicking with the primary button.

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Master Disk Creator displays a list of the available disk images similar to the following:

A sample list of disk images

5 To create a complete set of program diskettes, choose

Select All.

To create program diskettes for only some of the available programs, select the program(s) for which you want to create program diskettes.

6 Label the diskettes with the names shown on the screen, or click Print Labels to print the labels automatically.

If you choose to print the labels automatically, make sure the computer is connected to a printer and you have enough printer diskette labels.

7 Click Make Disks.

Master Disk Creator displays the MDC Disk Creation Confirmation screen.

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37

Diskette drive

Diskette eject button

Protective cover

Label

Inserting a diskette

8 Insert the appropriately labeled blank formatted diskette into the diskette drive.

The previous illustration shows the correct insertion procedure.

Make sure your fingers are touching the label and that the

protective cover points toward the diskette drive. When the diskette is almost completely in the drive, you will feel a slight resistance. Push the diskette gently into place. When the diskette is securely in the drive, the diskette eject button pops out.

9 In the MDC Disk Creation Confirmation screen, choose a

Write method and click Create Disk.

Master Disk Creator begins copying files to the diskette and displays a meter monitoring the copying process.

10 When Master Disk Creator prompts you to, press the diskette eject button to remove the diskette.

If the disk-in-use light is on, do not remove a diskette. Doing so could destroy the information on the diskette and damage the diskette and/or the drive.

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11 Write-protect the diskette by moving the tab on the back of the diskette to expose the write-protect hole.

Write-protecting a diskette prevents you from erasing or overwriting the information on the diskette.

12 Continue inserting and removing diskettes according to the instructions on the screen.

Since creating program diskettes will take some time, now is a good time to fill in your registration card if you haven't yet done so. It also gives you time to skim through the remainder of this manual and fill in the reader response card. Toshiba welcomes your comments and suggestions for improving the quality of the documentation.

13 When you've finished making master diskettes, store them together in a safe place.

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Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Getting to

Knowthe

Desktop

This chapter is a tutorial showing you how to work with the desktop, which is the Windows 95 term for the screen.

When you have finished this tutorial you will have:

❖ learned how to use the AccuPoint

❖ explored the Windows 95 desktop

❖ explored the Toshiba Access Panel

❖ created a new document and folder

❖ started and closed programs

❖ resized, reshaped and moved windows on the desktop

❖ created and used shortcuts

❖ changed the properties of various objects on the desktop

❖ set the date and time

❖ used Windows Help

❖ turned your computer off properly

42

Getting to Know the Desktop

If you’re new to computers or have never used Windows 95 before, the skill and confidence you’ll gain going through these lessons will more than offset the small amount of time you will spend.

If you chose Windows for Workgroups and this your first notebook computer, read Lesson 1, then go on to Chapter 4.

If you’ve used an earlier version of Windows, you’ll notice that

Windows 95 is very different. So you should find the information in this chapter helpful.You’ll probably want to work through some of the lessons, such as “Lesson 12: Exploring the Toshiba Access

Panel” on page 66, and skim others.

In addition, Windows 95 Help discusses a number of the major differences in an easy question-and-answer format. Click Start, then Help to open the online Help, click the Index tab, then type tips

and double-click “for Windows 3.1 users.”

If you’ve used the Macintosh operating system, you’ll find Windows 95 is similar in many ways. For instance, the Recycle Bin works like the Trash Can. Skim through this chapter to get a feel for the differences.

The aim of this tutorial is to help you start doing useful work quickly. It shows you one way of doing various basic tasks. As you gain experience with Windows 95 you will discover that there are often other ways of accomplishing a particular task. One of the most useful things about Windows 95 is its flexibility.

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Lesson 1: Using the AccuPoint

43

Lesson 1: Using the AccuPoint

The AccuPoint is a pointing device located between the G and H keys.

Accupoint pointing device

Primary button

Secondary button

The AccuPoint

The AccuPoint is the basic tool for moving around the screen. It works together with the primary and secondary buttons. The larger button is the primary button. The smaller button is the sec-

ondary button. Clicking them tells Windows to choose, select or use various objects on the desktop. In this lesson you will learn how to use the AccuPoint.

Follow these steps to learn what you can do with the AccuPoint:

1 Push gently against the left side of the AccuPoint.

Notice how the pointer moves to the right edge of the desktop.

2 Push a bit harder against the right side of the AccuPoint.

Notice that the pointer moves faster as you increase the pressure on the AccuPoint.

3 Practice moving around the screen.

Experiment by moving in different directions and at different speeds.

Now that you are familiar with the AccuPoint, continue with the next lesson. You will learn about the objects on the desktop and their uses.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

Windows 95 organizes the display on your computer screen as if it were a desktop. Objects sit on the computer desktop like objects that sit on top of your desk. It is easy to move objects around, open them, close them and store them.

In this lesson you will learn the names and functions of the various parts of the desktop, you will also learn some simple organizing principles for your desktop.

Each icon on the desktop represents a single object, such as a program, a folder or a device.

Programs are sets of instructions for the computer system.

Folders are containers to store documents, programs and other folders.

Devices are disk drives, printers and other peripherals connected to your computer.

My Computer icon

Recycle Bin icon

This is what your computer screen looks like.

Toshiba Access

Panel

Start button Pointer

The Windows 95 desktop

Taskbar Status area

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Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

45

Follow these steps to explore the desktop.

1 Move the pointer to the Start button and click once.

Windows 95 displays a menu (a list of options) that contains everything you need to begin using your computer.

The Start menu

Here’s what your system does when you point to each of the items on the Start menu.

When You Point to The System

Programs

Documents

Settings

Find

Help

Run...

displays a list of programs you can start.

displays a list of documents you’ve opened previously.

displays a list of system components for which you can change settings.

allows you to find a folder, document, shared computer, or mail message.

allows you to use the Help program to find out how to do a task in Windows.

starts a program or opens a folder when you type a program or folder name.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

When You Point to The System

Suspend

Shut Down...

saves the current system settings and turns the power off.

shuts down or restarts your computer, or logs you off a network.

The “...” following a menu item tells you a dialog box is coming.

The “ ” symbol on the menu tells you a submenu appears when you point to this item.

2 Click Start again to close the menu.

3 To access an additional menu, called the shortcut menu, click Start with the secondary button.

Clicking most objects with the secondary button displays a shortcut menu of options specifically applicable to that object.

The shortcut menu for the Start button provides three options.

When You Point to The System

Open

Explore

Find opens the Start menu.

starts the Windows Explorer.

opens the Find dialog box and allows you to search for a document, folder, or program.

4 Click an empty space in the desktop to close the menu.

Every time you start a program, open a folder or open a document, the system displays a button on the taskbar that reminds you the object is open or running. You can switch between the programs, folders or documents by clicking the buttons on the

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Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

47 taskbar. When you close an object, its button disappears from the taskbar. Right now, the taskbar is blank because you haven’t started anything. You’ll put a button on the taskbar when you create a new document in the next lesson.

There are other icons on the taskbar in the status area, such as a speaker that represents your sound system or an electric plug that represents the status of your battery. To view or change settings for an object in the status area, double-click its icon.

5 Move the pointer to the My Computer icon in the upper left corner of the desktop.

6 To open the My Computer window, double-click the icon.

When you double-click the My Computer icon, Windows 95 displays a window with icons for each of the computer’s drives, along with the Control Panel Folder and the Printers

Folder.

The Control Panel folder contains the programs used to configure the computer.

The Printers Folder contains the tools necessary to configure or control printers connected to your computer.

Double-clicking any of the icons in the My Computer window opens the window associated with a drive or device. You use this window when you connect to a printer, the diskette drive or a CD-ROM drive.

The My Computer window

7 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button to display a shortcut menu.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 2: Exploring the Desktop

The My Computer shortcut menu

The system displays a menu of actions or options applicable to the My Computer icon. Most objects on the desktop display the main menu when you click them with the primary button and the shortcut menu when you click them with the secondary button.

You can use this menu to create shortcuts to programs, documents, folders, system features and components. A shortcut is an icon that opens a program or a document directly from your desktop (or anywhere else). You will learn how to create shortcuts in “Lesson 7: Closing Programs and Documents” on page 57.

You can also use this menu to rename a folder or document.

You’ll learn how to do this in “Lesson 3: Creating a New Document” on page 50.

You can view an object’s properties by clicking Properties in the object’s shortcut menu. You will learn about properties in

“Lesson 8: Making Shortcuts” on page 58.

8 Close the menu by clicking once in an empty area of the desktop.

One special icon is the Recycle Bin. You use the Recycle Bin to delete documents and remove objects from the desktop.

You’ll learn more about the Recycle Bin in “Lesson 10:

Changing the Date and Time” on page 62.

You can move the taskbar to the other sides of the window.

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49

9 Click the taskbar at the bottom of the desktop and, while holding the primary button, drag the pointer to the right edge of the desktop, then release the primary button.

You can move an object on the desktop by clicking the object, holding the primary button and dragging the object.

The taskbar moves from the bottom to the right edge of the desktop.

The desktop with the taskbar on the right

You may move the taskbar to any of the desktop’s four edges.

10 Click the taskbar once again and drag it back to the bottom of the desktop.

Now that you have explored the desktop, continue to the next lesson where you will learn how to quickly create new documents.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 3: Creating a New Document

Lesson 3: Creating a New Document

When you work in Windows 95 with a word processor, a data base, a graphic design tool, or a spreadsheet, you are working in a document. To see how quick and easy creating new documents can be, follow these steps:

1 Click an empty area of the desktop with the secondary button.

Windows 95 displays a menu of commands applicable to the desktop.

The Desktop shortcut menu

2 Point to New, then click Text Document.

Windows 95 creates an icon on the desktop called New Text

Document.txt with the icon name highlighted.

3 Click the document name.

The name changes color.

4 Give your document a meaningful name, like My New

Document, and press

Enter

.

5 Double-click the icon.

Your document opens in Notepad, the word processing program that comes with Windows 95.

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Lesson 4: Creating a New Folder

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The Notepad window

Notice that as you open the document there’s a new button on the taskbar that reads My New Document - Notepad (the name may be too long to fit into the taskbar space, but if you point to the name, the system displays all of it).

To learn more about Notepad, click the Help menu in Notepad.

Leave Notepad open for now and follow the steps in the next lesson to create a new folder in which to store your document.

Lesson 4: Creating a New Folder

Windows 95 stores documents, tools, devices and programs in folders. It even stores other folders in folders. In this lesson you will learn how easy it is to create folders to store your documents.

To create a new folder, follow these steps.

1 With the secondary button, click an empty area of the desktop outside of the Notepad window.

Windows 95 displays a menu.

2 Point to New and click Folder.

Windows 95 creates a new folder icon with the name highlighted.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 5: Starting Programs

3 Click the highlighted “New Folder” text in the frame under the folder icon.

4 Type a name for the folder and press

Enter

.

5 Close your Notepad document by double-clicking the close button (the small x) on the right side of the Notepad title bar.

Windows 95 displays the document as an icon on the desktop.

6 Click the document icon and drag it to your new folder.

The outline of the document icon moves across the desktop.

7 Drop the document icon onto the folder icon.

The document disappears. The folder now contains the document.

8 To see your document, double-click the folder.

The folder window opens and displays the document icon.

Now that you have created a folder to store your document, go on to the next lesson to learn how to start programs.

Lesson 5: Starting Programs

Another way to begin working on the desktop is to start a program. After you’ve gained some experience, you’ll know exactly which program to use for each type of document.

This lesson demonstrates how to start programs from the desktop, using Paint and Windows Explorer, two of the programs that come with Windows 95.

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53

Follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

Windows 95 displays the list of program folders.

2 To open the drawing program called Paint, point to Accessories, then click Paint.

Paint, a simple drawing program, opens and the taskbar displays a new button.

The desktop with Paint open

Your desktop now looks something like the above illustration.

You can use Paint to draw simple pictures, logos, maps and symbols. Paint allows you to create, edit, move and size a drawing. You can also print the drawing and save it on your disk for later use. The tools for Paint are in the tool box. To learn more about Paint, click Help in the Paint menu bar.

3 To open a second program, click Start, then click

Programs.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 5: Starting Programs

4 Click Windows Explorer.

Windows Explorer opens and the taskbar displays a new button.

Windows Explorer open on the desktop

Windows Explorer provides access to all your computer’s resources. For example, it lets you see all the icons in a particular folder on the computer’s hard drive.

Notice the taskbar now has buttons for Paint and Windows

Explorer.

5 Click the Paint button on the taskbar.

Windows 95 displays the Paint program. You can move back and forth between the two programs by clicking their buttons alternately.

Windows 95 places the active window on top of other windows on the desktop unless you have resized the windows.

Now that you have learned how to open programs, leave these two open on the desktop, each in its own window. Go on to the next lesson where you’ll learn how to change the size, shape and position of these windows.

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Lesson 6: Resizing and Reshaping Windows

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Lesson 6: Resizing and Reshaping Windows

If you’ve been following the steps in this chapter, you now have several windows open on your desktop. You can resize windows so you can see more than one of them at a time. You can also hide windows by removing them from the desktop without actually closing your document or program. In this lesson you will learn how to do both of these things.

Close

Maximize

Minimize

Windows Explorer open on the desktop

First, notice the three buttons on the right-hand side of the title bar on the Windows Explorer window and the Paint window. From left to right these are the minimize, maximize and close buttons.

Most windows have these three buttons.

To learn how to use these buttons, follow these steps:

1 To make the Windows Explorer window the active window, click the Windows Explorer button on the taskbar.

Windows displays Windows Explorer on top of other windows on the desktop and highlights the menu bar to show it is the active window.

2 To remove Windows Explorer from the desktop, click the minimize button at the top right of the Explorer window.

Windows Explorer disappears from the desktop. However, it’s still open, as you can see from the taskbar.

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Lesson 6: Resizing and Reshaping Windows

Minimizing program windows is a good way to clean up the desktop without actually closing programs.

3 Minimize the Paint window by clicking the minimize button.

The Paint window disappears.

4 Open the Paint window by clicking the Paint button on the taskbar.

Windows 95 opens the Paint window.

5 To cause the Paint window to fill the entire screen, click the maximize button at the top right of the Paint window.

Paint expands to the full size of the desktop, except for the taskbar. Notice that the maximize button has changed. It’s now called the restore button.

Maximizing a program is a good way to work when you’re only using that program and don’t want any other distractions on the desktop.

6 To return Paint to its previous size, click the restore button.

The Paint window returns to its previous size and location.

Notice how the restore button has changed back into the maximize button.

Now assume that you want to be able to see both the Paint window and the Windows Explorer window at the same time.

7 To open the Windows Explorer window, click the

Windows Explorer button on the taskbar.

If the Windows Explorer is maximized (covering the entire screen), click the restore button to reduce the size of the window.

8 Move the pointer to the right side of the Paint window.

The pointer changes to a two-headed arrow.

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9 Click and, while holding down the primary button, drag the edge of the window back and forth.

The size and shape of the window change as you move the pointer.

10 When the window takes up just less than half the width of the desktop, drop the edge of the window by lifting your thumb from the button.

11 Click the title bar of the Paint window and, while holding the primary button, drag the window to the right side of the desktop.

You can move any window by clicking its title bar and dragging it.

12 Adjust the size and position of the Windows Explorer window in the same way, placing it at the left side of the desktop.

Now that you’ve got them side-by-side, you can see how you could refer to one window while working in the other.

When you are working with documents and programs, resizing and moving windows allows you to rearrange the desktop to suit what you are doing. Experiment with different sizes and placements of windows to discover the most comfortable and efficient arrangement for your work.

In this lesson you learned how to change the size and position of windows on the desktop. You still have programs open on the desktop. Go on to the next lesson to learn how to close them.

Lesson 7: Closing Programs and Documents

Once you’re finished working with a document, folder or program, you may close it to free up the space in memory for something else. While you can run several programs at the same time, a large number of programs and documents open simultaneously can slow down your system. This lesson teaches you how to close the programs you opened in Lesson 6.

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Lesson 8: Making Shortcuts

Follow these steps:

1 Click the close button at the top right of the Windows

Explorer title bar.

That’s all there is to it. The Windows Explorer program closes, removing its button from the taskbar.

2 Close Paint, and any other windows, folders or programs that might be open by clicking their close buttons.

You can close all folders, programs, documents and most windows by clicking the close button on the title bar.

Now that you know how to close programs and folders, go on to the next lesson to learn how to save time when you are working on the desktop.

Lesson 8: Making Shortcuts

In this lesson you will learn how to make shortcuts and to use

Find. Shortcuts are icons you can click to open a program, a folder, or a document directly from the desktop. They are a quick and convenient way of accessing programs and documents you use frequently.

To make a shortcut, follow these steps.

1 Click the folder you created in Lesson 4 with the secondary button.

Windows 95 highlights the folder and displays the menu.

2 Click Create Shortcut.

Windows 95 creates a shortcut icon. This icon is similar to the object’s icon, with the addition of a small arrow on the left side.

You can drag this shortcut icon into any folder on the desktop.

This feature will be more helpful when you actually begin working. It allows you to go directly from the desktop or any open folder to your destination.

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You will probably want to create shortcuts for programs you use frequently. The remainder of this lesson shows you how to create shortcuts to two accessories in Windows 95, the Calculator and the Character Map.

3 Click Start, point to Find, then click Files or Folders.

Windows 95 displays the Find dialog box.

The Find dialog box

4 On the Name and Location tab, type Calculator in the

Named box.

5 Click the Find Now button.

Windows 95 displays a list of all the files with “Calculator” in their names.

6 Click the Calculator file with the secondary button and drag it to the desktop.

A menu appears.

7 Click Create Shortcut(s) here.

A shortcut to the calculator appears on your desktop.

8 Create a shortcut to the Character Map on your computer by following steps 3 through 7 substituting “character map” for “calculator.”

You can also create a shortcut by clicking on an object with the secondary button, then clicking Create Shortcut in the menu that appears.

Clicking the shortcut opens the program or folder immediately.

Place as many shortcuts on your desktop as you find useful.

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Lesson 9: Changing the Wallpaper

Continue to the next lesson where you will discover the meaning of object properties in Windows 95 by changing the wallpaper on your desktop.

Lesson 9: Changing the Wallpaper

Windows 95 treats all objects—windows, icons, programs, disk drives, documents, folders, printers, and so on—as self-contained objects. Typical object properties include things such as the object’s name, size, position on-screen, and color. One of the properties of the desktop is the wallpaper. Your computer came with the Toshiba wallpaper selected.

In this lesson you will learn how to view the properties associated with the objects on the desktop. First, you will look at the properties of the folder you created. Then you will look at the properties of the desktop and change the wallpaper.

To view and change the properties of the folder you created, follow these steps.

1 With the secondary button, click the new folder you created in Lesson 4.

Windows 95 displays a menu which includes Properties.

2 Click Properties.

Windows 95 displays the properties dialog box for the folder.

The My New Folder Properties dialog box

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The dialog box shows the various properties of the object, such as the icon, type, location, size, and the time the document was created.

3 Click OK.

Windows 95 closes the properties dialog box.

4 With the secondary button, click any empty space on the desktop.

Windows 95 displays a menu.

5 Click Properties.

The Display Properties dialog box appears.

The Desktop Properties dialog box

By clicking the tabs below the title bar, you can select properties for backgrounds, screen savers, appearances or settings. If you tried the other tabs, return to the Background tab by clicking it.

6 Scroll through the wallpaper options by clicking the scroll arrows in the wallpaper list box.

7 Try a different wallpaper pattern by clicking a name in the list box.

Windows 95 displays a sample of the wallpaper selection in the monitor above the list box. Try several patterns.

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Lesson 10: Changing the Date and Time

8 To apply any of these patterns to your desktop, click

Apply.

9 After you have chosen a wallpaper and applied it to your desktop, click OK.

Windows 95 returns you to the desktop.

Now that you have seen lists of properties for two objects and experimented with options for your desktop wallpaper, continue with the next lesson where you will learn how set two other properties: the date and time.

Lesson 10: Changing the Date and Time

In this lesson you will learn how to change the date and time on your computer.You set the computer’s date and time properties when you turned the computer on the first time and set up your operating system. To change the date and time settings now, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

The Control Panel opens.

The Control Panel

3 Double-click the Date/Time icon.

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The system displays the Date/Time Properties dialog box.

This dialog box has two tabs. Click on a tab to bring it to the front.

The Date/Time Properties dialog box

To open this dialog box more quickly, right-click the time display on the taskbar, then click Adjust Date/Time.

4 On the Date and Time tab, select the correct month, year, day, and time.

5 On the Time Zone tab, select your time zone by clicking the up and down arrow keys.

6 When you’re done, click OK.

Now that you have learned how to change the date and time properties of your computer, continue with the next lesson to learn how to remove objects from your desktop.

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Lesson 11: Removing Objects from the Desktop

Lesson 11: Removing Objects from the Desktop

Back in “Lesson 3: Creating a New Document” on page 50, “Lesson 4: Creating a New Folder” on page 51, and “Lesson 8: Making

Shortcuts” on page 58 you created new icons on the desktop.

Since everything you’ve done to this point has been just practice, you may want to return the desktop to its original uncluttered state.

This lesson explains how to remove objects from the desktop with the Recycle Bin.

To remove the icons you created from the desktop, follow these steps:

1 Point to the icon for the new folder you created, then click and hold the primary button.

2 Drag the icon until it’s over the Recycle Bin.

Windows 95 highlights the Recycle Bin icon when the object you are dragging is over the Recycle Bin.

3 Release the primary button.

The My New Folder icon disappears. But it hasn’t really gone.

It is stored in the Recycle Bin folder where you can restore it or delete it completely later.

4 Repeat steps 1 through 3 with any other icons you created during this tutorial.

Each icon disappears as you drop it on the Recycle Bin icon.

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5 Double-click the Recycle Bin icon.

The Recycle Bin window opens.

The Recycle Bin window

Notice that all the icons you dropped on the Recycle Bin are listed.

6 To completely remove an object from the Recycle Bin, click it and click File, then click Delete.

The object is gone forever.

You can delete all the objects in the Recycle Bin at once by clicking Empty Recycle Bin in the File menu.

Later on—in your real work, not in this tutorial—you’ll use the

Recycle Bin to delete other objects such as folders, documents and even programs. The process is still the same. Drag an item’s icon to the Recycle Bin and drop it in. When you’re absolutely certain that you never want to see the item again, delete it from there.

If you change your mind and want to restore something you sent to the Recycle Bin, click the object with the secondary button and click Restore. Windows 95 restores the object to the place from which it was deleted.

To delete all objects from the Recycle Bin when the Recycle

Bin window isn’t open, right-click the Recycle Bin icon, then click Empty Recycle Bin from the menu.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 12: Exploring the Toshiba Access Panel

You have almost finished the tutorial. You now know how to remove icons and objects from the desktop. Continue reading to learn how to use the Help features if you get lost.

Lesson 12: Exploring the Toshiba Access Panel

The Toshiba Access Panel, located on the right side of the desktop, is a handy place to check the power usage gauges, launch

Toshiba applications and other programs, access a variety of on line help features, and set up separate configurations for working at home, at the office, or when you are travelling.

Configuration button Dashboard tear-off button

Gauge gallery button

Dashboard

Splitter

Application icons

Application scroll buttons

Options button Help button

The Toshiba Access Panel

The illustration identifies the parts of the panel. The following steps demonstrate some of the things you can do with the panel.

1 To move the panel from the right side of the desk to the left side, click the panel and, while holding the primary button, drag it to the new position.

Release the button when the panel is where you want it to stay.

You can place the panel only on the right or left sides of the desktop.

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The icon on the configuration button represents the current configuration. The previous example represents a sample home configuration.

2 To change the configuration, click the configuration button.

Office configuration

Home configuration

Travel configuration

The configuration slider bar

The configuration slider bar extends to the left, displaying the

home, office, and travel buttons.

Multiple configurations let you set up the computer based on where or how you use your system. For example, if you use the battery while on the road and the AC adapter and power cord when in the office, you might have one configuration that turns on all the computer’s battery saving features and another configuration that turns off the features. You would use the first configuration on the road and the second when in the office.

One click on a configuration button activates all settings for the selected configuration. You can change these settings and create your own configuration buttons. See “Saving Time with

Multiple Configurations” on page 251 for more information.

3 To hide the configuration slider bar, click the configuration button again.

The bar disappears.

The dashboard section of the Toshiba Access Panel displays gauges that monitor the current battery capacity. You can choose which gauge(s) display in the dashboard.

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Getting to Know the Desktop

Lesson 12: Exploring the Toshiba Access Panel

4 Click the gauge button just above the dashboard.

The Gauge Gallery window opens to the left of the panel.

The Gauge Gallery

This window displays the three gauges you can choose to display on the dashboard:

The Time Remaining Gauge displays the current battery charge as the amount of time remaining.

The Power Meter displays the computer’s power usage in an LED or needle format.

The Percent Remaining Gauge displays the percentage of battery charge remaining.

5 To hide the Gauge Gallery, click its close button.

The Gauge Gallery window disappears.

The application icons provide a convenient way to start programs. Clicking an icon starts the associated program.

You can add your own programs to the application section of the panel.

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6 For example, to add the briefcase to the panel, drag the My

Briefcase icon and release it over the application section of the panel.

The panel displays a menu of two options.

7 Click Add to All to include the briefcase in all your configurations.

Click Add to Home/Office/Travel to add the briefcase to the current configuration only.

For a complete list of all the Toshiba Access Panel features, see

“Toshiba Access Panel” on page 349.

Lesson 13: If I’m Lost, What Do I Do?

Windows 95 and the Toshiba Access Panel come with excellent online help. The panel has video help, which not only explains but also demonstrates how to use its features.

This lesson demonstrates how to use Windows 95 help index and how to access the Toshiba Access Panel help.

Windows 95 Help

To use Windows 95 help, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then click Help.

The Help window opens. The Contents tab lists help topics in logical order. The Index tab lists topics in alphabetical order.

The Find tab lets you search for information using every word that appears in the help text.

2 To use the index, click the Index tab.

Help displays the Index page.

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Lesson 13: If I’m Lost, What Do I Do?

The Index page of the Help window

Most of the window contains a list of topics. The upper part of the window, where the pointer is flashing, lets you type in a topic.

3 For example, if you want to draw a picture but don’t know how you might type

picture

.

Notice as you type that the topic list adjusts to locate what you typed. When you type the letter p, the topic list moves to the first entry that begins with P, and so on.

There are a number of topics listed under Picture. One of them, drawing, looks promising.

4 Next, you might double-click drawing.

Help opens a topic window that gives a brief description of how to draw pictures, including an icon to start the

Paint program.

The Drawing help window

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5 To start Paint, click the click here icon.

The Paint program opens.

Not every help topic window contains an icon to start a program. However, when you do encounter one, it’s a great way to move from reading about your question to an instant solution.

6 Just to clean up the desktop, close both Help and Paint by clicking their close buttons.

Toshiba Access Panel Help

The Toshiba Access Panel provides three types of help. Follow these steps:

1 Click the help button at the bottom of the panel.

The help bar extends to the left, displaying the video help,

general Help and about TAP buttons.

General help button

Video help button

The help bar

About TAP button

2 Click one of the buttons and follow the instructions on the screen.

You’re almost done! The next (and last) lesson tells you how to turn your computer off with the Start button.

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Lesson 14: Turning Your Computer Off

Lesson 14: Turning Your Computer Off

It’s very important that you shut down your computer with the

Start button. When you click Shut Down on the Start menu the system closes all open documents and system files while it puts everything in place. The next time you turn the computer on the operating system will restore the desktop to the way you left it.

To turn your computer off, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

The system displays a dialog box similar to the following:

The Shut Down Windows dialog box

2 Make sure the button next to Shut Down the computer is highlighted. If it isn’t, click it now.

3 Click Yes.

The system displays a message that it is shutting down and turns the computer off. When the power is off, the power light goes out.

You have completed the tutorial. You should be familiar with the desktop and the objects on it. You should be able to open and close programs, create documents and folders and delete them, and work with the properties of objects on the desktop. You also know how to find help if you get lost. Continue to use what you have learned in these lessons and you will soon feel completely at home with your computer.

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Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Learning the Basics

The information in this chapter is intended for the novice computer user. Simple steps describe many day-to-day computer operations. There are also lists of helpful computing tips. By the end of the chapter, you'll have developed many of the basic skills that more advanced users take for granted.

Computing Tips

It seems that everybody’s grandmother has a list of rules that will make your life better. This section presents a few rules that your grandmother would include if she were teaching you how to use your computer.

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Computing Tips

Two Things Every User Learned the Hard Way

Save your work frequently.

Both novice and experienced computer users forget to save their work. If you work on a network and the network suddenly goes down, you could be looking at a screen of unsaved changes that contained an entire afternoon's work. You too will say, “I wish I had saved!”

See the instructions in “How to Save Your Work” on page 86.

Back up your files on a regular basis.

It's easy to put off backing up because it takes time. However, when your hard disk fails (it is a mechanical device and sooner or later it is bound to have a problem) and you can’t access the data on your hard disk, you'll wish you had taken the time to back it up.

See the instructions in “How to Back Up Your Work on Diskettes” on page 93.

Six Things Every Computer User Should Do

Take frequent breaks to avoid repetitive strain injuries and eye strain.

As indicated in “Keep Yourself Comfortable” on page 3, it's important to stay comfortable while you're working at your computer.

Turn the computer off using Windows 95 Shut Down or Suspend command, unless Resume Mode is on. See “How to Start Where

You Left Off” on page 79 for information about Resume Mode.

Windows 95 records information, such as your desktop setup, during its shutdown procedure. If you don't let Windows 95 shut down, it can forget things such as new icon positions.

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Set up your computer to fit your tastes and needs.

You're the one that's going to be looking at the screen while you work. If you don't like the colors or the fonts on the screen, go ahead and change them by clicking a blank area of the desktop with the secondary button, then clicking Properties. This causes

Windows 95 to open the Display Properties dialog box. The

Appearance tab of this dialog box allows you to choose the colors you see on the screen.

Save your work frequently.

For more about this topic, see “How to Save Your Work” on page 86.

Scan all new files for viruses.

This precaution is especially important for files you receive from your friends or download from the Internet. It’s unlikely, but possible, that even new programs you buy from your local computer store may contain a computer virus. See “Viruses and How to

Cure Them” on page 248 for information about detecting and removing computer viruses.

Run Create System Disks to make program diskettes for Windows

95 and either run Master Disk Creator or purchase the master program diskettes for other pre-installed software.

At some point, you may need to re-install the programs that came pre-installed on your computer’s hard disk. See “Create or Purchase Master Diskettes” on page 33 for more information.

Five Things You Should Never Do

Don't spill a drink or other liquid into the computer’s keyboard.

If you do spill a drink that gets into the keyboard, turn the computer off immediately and remove the battery. Leave the system off overnight to give the computer time to dry out before you return to work.

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When You Turn the Computer On…

Don't format a diskette that contains valuable information.

Formatting removes all the information that's currently on the diskette. If your files are important to you, set the write protect tab by moving the tab on the back of the diskette to expose the writeprotect hole. Always double-check a diskette before you format it.

Don't turn the computer off when a drive indicator light is on.

Turning the computer off while it's reading from or writing to a disk may damage the disk, the drive or both.

Don't expose your diskettes or the computer to magnetic fields, such as the field generated by large stereo speakers.

Information on disks is stored magnetically. Getting a magnet too close to a disk can erase important files.

Don't be afraid to use your computer, it's just a machine.

Many people are so nervous with their first computer that they forget it’s merely a tool. Provided you follow the advice in this chapter, you are unlikely to do your computer any harm. So use it and have fun with it.

When You Turn the Computer On…

Between the time you press the power button and the time you get to work, the computer goes through its normal self-test and startup procedure. Skip these steps by choosing Windows 95’s Suspend command that uses Toshiba’s Resume Mode to save time and battery power.

All Those Messages…

When you turn the computer on, it flashes a number of messages across the screen before it loads Windows 95. Don't worry if you don't understand any of these messages. They indicate that the computer's going through its normal startup procedure.

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If you're really interested in what's going on, read “What Really

Happens When You Turn the Computer On?” on page 299. This section describes the messages you see when you turn the computer on. It also tells you how to get to work immediately without waiting for all the messages to appear.

How to Start Where You Left Off

Often, you'll turn your computer off, intending to continue working later. When you're ready to start again, you turn the power on and wait while the computer displays messages and loads

Windows 95. Then you have to reload your applications before you can get back to work.

There's an easier way. By choosing Windows 95’s Suspend command that uses Toshiba's Resume Mode, you can turn your computer off without exiting your software applications. When you turn the computer on again, the screen display is restored as you left it. So you can continue working where you left off.

These methods provide a sort of electronic bookmark. They use the computer's backup battery to store its current state in memory while the power is off. The system maintains this information until the backup battery loses its charge (after approximately eight hours).

As well as being convenient, using the Suspend command or

Resume Mode is energy efficient. Avoiding the startup procedure extends the amount of work you can do before recharging your battery.

Toshiba’s Resume Mode includes additional power saving features. To conserve power by automatically shutting the system down when you are not using it or by cutting off the power to the display when you shut the cover, use the System Auto Off and

Panel Power On/Off options in Toshiba’s MaxTime utility. For more information about options to save time and power, refer to

“Conserving Power” on page 130.

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When You Turn the Computer On…

Using the Suspend Command

To turn the computer off using the Windows 95 Suspend command:

1 Save any files you are using over a local area network.

Your network connection may be lost when you suspend your computer.

2 Click Start.

3 Click Suspend.

The Suspend command saves the current system settings, shuts down Windows 95, and turns the computer off.

Using Resume Mode

There are several ways to turn Resume Mode on and off. This section describes how to use a key combination, called a hotkey, to select Resume Mode. This is the quickest method. Turn to “Starting Again Using Resume Mode” on page 125 for the other methods.

To select Resume Mode, follow these steps:

1 Press

Fn + F3

to display the Resume Mode pop-up window.

Resume On

The power-up pop-up window

2 While continuing to hold

Fn

, press

F3

repeatedly until

Resume Mode icon is selected.

3 Release the

Fn

key.

The system is now in Resume Mode.

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Turning the Computer Off in Resume Mode

To turn off your computer when you are using Resume Mode, follow these steps:

1 Save your files to the hard disk or a diskette.

2 Check that the disk activity light is off.

3 Turn off the computer.

4 Turn off the power to any external devices connected to the computer.

If you realize you can continue working after all, wait a few seconds before turning the computer back on again.

It’s always a good idea to save your files before turning the computer off (even when you’re suspending the computer).

How to Use the Keyboard

If you've never used a computer before, you're probably asking yourself, “is this keyboard just like a typewriter? And if it is, what are all those extra keys for?” This section describes the keys on the keyboard and the differences between typing on a computer and using a typewriter.

The Character Keys

For these keys, typing on a computer keyboard is very much like typing on a typewriter. However, there are some exceptions:

When you press the spacebar, a computer does not simply pass over an area of the page like a typewriter does. Although you may not see anything on the screen, each time you press the spacebar, the computer creates a space character just as it creates characters representing letters or symbols.

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How to Use the Keyboard

The lowercase l (el) and the number 1 are not interchangeable.

The uppercase O and the number 0 are not interchangeable.

On a typewriter, the shift lock key locks all the keys into their uppercase positions. On a computer keyboard, pressing the

Caps Lock

key changes only the alphabet keys to uppercase— the number and symbol keys aren’t affected.

The Other Keys

In addition to the character keys, the computer keyboard contains a number of keys that carry out special computer tasks. This section describes these special keys.

The 12 function keys (

F1

,

F2

, etc.) across the top of the keyboard carry out program-specific tasks. To find out what these keys do, refer to the program's documentation.

The function of the

Ctrl

key (Control key) also varies according to the program you're using.

If you're in Windows, pressing the

Alt

key lets you open menus.

Pressing the

Fn

key simultaneously with one of the specially marked keys allows you to emulate a 101-key keyboard, turn keyboard overlays on and off (page 275) and control various system functions.

If you’re using Windows 95, the

Win key allows you to open the Start menu.

If you’re using Windows 95, the

App key functions the same as the secondary mouse button. Pressing the

App key opens a popup menu listing options featured in Windows 95.

Toshiba's powerful Fn-esse program allows you to assign your own

Fn

key combination to launch a Windows program or document quickly. Instructions for using this program are given in

“Starting Programs Faster with Fn-esse” on page 262.

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Typing Numbers

The keys with white numbers on the right front form the numeric overlay. This overlay lets you enter numeric data as you would using a ten-key numeric keypad. The following illustration highlights the keys in the numeric overlay.

.

/

The numeric overlay

To turn the numeric overlay on and off, press

Fn

+

F11

. The numeric lock light on the indicator panel shows whether the numeric overlay is on or off.

You can still use the overlaid keys to type alphabetic characters while the numeric overlay is on. To do so:

❖ for lower-case letters, press and hold

Fn

while you type the letters.

❖ for upper-case letters, press

Fn

+

Shift

while you type the letters.

To use the cursor control keys when the numeric overlay is on, press and hold

Shift

while you use the overlay keys. To return to the numeric overlay, release

Shift

.

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How to Start a Program

How to Start a Program

Starting a program in Windows 95 is as easy as clicking the Start button, pointing to Programs and choosing the program's icon from the Programs menu. Of course, this only works if there is an icon for the program in the Programs menu.

Starting an MS-DOS

program from a system prompt is a little more complex. Refer to “Starting Some MS-DOS Programs” on page 85.

Starting a Program from an Icon

To start a program from an icon, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

Windows 95 displays the Programs menu.

2 Point to Accessories.

Windows 95 displays the Accessories menu.

3 Click Wordpad.

Windows 95 opens Wordpad. Wordpad is a text editor—a scaled-down word processor without the frills.

That's really all there is to it. To close Wordpad, click the close button at the upper right corner of the window.

Starting a Program from the Explorer

These steps demonstrate how to start a program if it is not in the

Start menu. To use this method, you need to know the file name and directory of the program you want to start.

This example, like the one above, opens Wordpad, using its file name of WORDPAD.EXE.

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To start a program from the Explorer, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Click Windows Explorer.

Windows 95 opens the Explorer.

3 In the left part of the screen, under the C: icon, doubleclick Program Files.

The Explorer shows the contents of the Program Files folder on the right side of the screen. The left side of the screen shows all the folders contained within the Program File folder.

4 Click Accessories.

The Explorer shows the Accessories files on the right side of the screen.

5 Double-click Wordpad.exe.

Windows 95 opens Wordpad.

Starting Some MS-DOS Programs

To start some MS-DOS programs, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

2 Click Restart the computer in MS-DOS mode, then click

Yes.

Windows 95 shuts down the computer, then restarts it in

MS-DOS mode and displays a system prompt.

3 Refer to the program’s documentation for the command that starts the program.

4 At the system prompt, type the command and press

Enter

.

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How to Save Your Work

How to Save Your Work

When you’re working on a document, all your work exists in the computer's temporary memory. When you turn the computer off, everything in memory is lost. Therefore, it’s important to save your files to the hard disk or to a diskette before turning the power off.

Saving documents is quick and easy, and it’s a good idea to get in the habit of saving frequently. That way, if you run into trouble, you won't lose many long hours of work.

Many programs offer a feature that saves documents after a set period of time. Check your programs’ documentation to see if they have an automatic save feature.

You use the same procedure to save files in all Windows programs. This section describes this procedure.

1 Choose Save from the File menu.

If you're working with a previously existing document, one that already has a file name, that's all there is to it. If you've created a new document, your program displays a Save As dialog box:

A sample Save As dialog box

You use this dialog box to specify where to store the document and to give it a file name.

2 Choose the drive and folder where you want your file to be stored.

3 Type a file name and choose OK.

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Windows 95 supports file names of up to 255 characters, and the names can include spaces.

If you plan on sharing your files with a computer using MS-

DOS or an older version of Windows, the file name must be limited to up to eight characters followed by a period and a three-character extension. You may use all the letters and numbers on the keyboard plus the following characters: _, ^, $, ~, !,

#, %, &, {, }, (, ), @ and '. An MS-DOS file name must not contain a space.

Most programs assign an extension that identifies the file as being created in that program with a particular format. For example, Microsoft Word saves files with a .DOC extension.

While you can create your own extension, this is usually unwise. Using the default for your program is a helpful reminder of where your file came from. Also the program is unlikely to recognize a strange extension and may refuse to handle your file correctly.

How to Print Something You've Created

By this time, you've probably created a document and saved it— if not, save it now. Naturally, you want to see the results of your work by printing your file.

Before you can print your work, you need to have:

❖ connected the printer to the computer (discussed in “Connecting a Parallel Printer” on page 23)

❖ set up Windows 95 to work with the printer (discussed below)

These steps must be done only once. If you’ll be using more than one printer or changing printers, you'll need to set up Windows 95 to run with the additional printer(s).

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How to Print Something You've Created

Setting Up Windows 95 to Work with Your Printer

When you turned your computer on for the first time, the

Windows 95 Setup program offered you the opportunity to define a printer. Read this section if you didn’t have a printer at that time, or want to set up a different printer.

Setting up a printer involves choosing a printer driver. This special program acts as a translator that turns your work into a form the printer can understand. This section describes how to select a printer driver in Windows 95. If you're using any non-Windows programs, you'll need to set up a printer driver for each of those programs. Refer to your program's documentation for more information.

You set up a printer with the Add Printer Wizard. Follow these steps:

1 Click the Start button, then point to Settings.

2 Click Printers.

Windows 95 opens the Printers dialog box.

3 Double-click Add Printer.

Windows 95 opens the Add Printer Wizard.

The Add Printer Wizard

4 Click Next.

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The Add Printer Wizard asks you to select your printer.

If your printer is Plug and Play, Windows 95 recognizes it automatically. You can ignore the remainder of this section.

5 If the printer you’re setting up isn’t connected to a network, select Local printer and click Next.

If the printer is connected to a network, select Network printer and click Next.

The Add Printer Wizard asks you to select your printer.

6 From the list of manufacturers and printers, select your printer and click Next.

The Add Printer Wizard asks for the printer port.

7 Select the port settings according to the instructions in your printer’s documentation and to port to which your printer is connected, then click Next.

The Add Printer Wizard asks you to enter a “friendly” printer name.

8 Enter a name for your printer and click Next.

If you’re using more than one printer, make sure the name is descriptive enough to help you tell the difference.

9 If you want this printer to be the default printer for

Windows 95, click Yes, then click Next.

If you don’t want this printer to be the default printer, click No, then click Next.

Windows 95 prompts you to print a test page.

10 If your printer is connected and turned on, choose Finish to print a test page.

To finish the setup procedure without printing a test page, choose No, then Finish.

You’re ready to print.

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Printing Your Work

Once you have set up your printer and software correctly, it requires only a simple action to print a file from within a Windows application. Follow these steps:

1 Turn your printer on, if it’s not already on.

2 Choose Print from the File menu of your Windows application.

A sample Print dialog box

3 Choose OK to print.

That's all there is to it. Depending on your application, you may see different messages indicating the status of your print job.

How to Prepare Diskettes for Use

Formatting makes it possible to use a diskette. You don't really need to know what's going on when you format a diskette, but if you're interested, the details are covered in “How Does a Disk

Store Information?” on page 294.

Your computer uses high density diskettes. There are two types of high density diskettes you can buy—formatted and unformatted.

If you've purchased formatted diskettes, you don't need the information in this section because the diskette manufacturer has taken care of the process for you. If the package doesn't say anything about formatting, your diskettes are probably unformatted.

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This section describes the simplest way to format a diskette. For more options, and an explanation of the other items in the Format dialog box, see Windows 95 Help or your Windows 95 documentation.

To format a diskette, follow these steps:

1 Make sure the external diskette drive is connected.

2 Insert a write-enabled diskette into the diskette drive.

Write-protect tab

A write-enabled diskette

The tab at the left corner of the diskette should cover the square hole.

Formatting a diskette erases all information currently on the diskette. Do not format a diskette unless you're sure it's blank or contains only files you no longer need.

3 Double-click My Computer.

Windows 95 opens the My Computer window.

4 Click the drive A: icon with the secondary button, then click Format.

5 Click File, then click Format.

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Windows 95 opens the Format dialog box.

The Format dialog box

The options in the Format dialog box are already set to format your diskette.

6 Click Start.

Windows 95 formats the diskette, displaying the Format

Results screen when it’s finished.

7 Click Close.

8 Close the My Computer window.

How to Copy Something To a Diskette

Diskettes provide an easy means of transferring files from one computer to another. Copying a file to a diskette also gives you a backup copy in case something happens to the original on your hard disk. This section describes how to copy a file from the hard disk to a diskette.

To copy a file from the hard disk to a diskette, follow these steps:

1 Make sure the external diskette drive is connected.

2 Insert a formatted diskette into the diskette drive. If you’re unsure how to format a diskette, refer to “How to Prepare

Diskettes for Use” on page 90.

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3 Double-click My Computer.

Windows 95 opens the My Computer window.

4 Double-click the folder that contains the file you want to copy.

Windows 95 displays the contents of the drive.

5 Double-click the folder that contains the file, then click the file you want to copy.

6 Click File, then click Send To.

7 Click the icon for the diskette drive (drive A).

Windows 95 copies the files.

How to Back Up Your Work on Diskettes

Murphy's law applies to everything—even computers. Therefore, it's a good idea to make periodic copies of everything on your computer's hard disk and store them in a safe place. This is called backing up your files. That way, if you somehow press the

Delete key accidentally, you'll be able to recover your files quickly and easily.

Murphy’s Law: If anything can go wrong, it will, at the worst possible moment.

Your computer comes with Microsoft's Windows 95 backup program pre-installed on the hard disk. Other backup programs are available at many computer stores.

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Learning the Basics

How to Back Up Your Work on Diskettes

This section explain how to use the backup program to back up all the files on your hard disk. Making backup copies of your computer’s hard disk is not a one-time event. You should develop a regular habit of making backup copies of your hard disk. Complete information on the backup program, including instructions for backing up only a portion of the files on your hard disk, is in

Help and your Windows 95 documentation.

Backing up all the files on your hard disk takes a considerable amount of time and lots of diskettes. However, in the unlikely event that you lose some or all of the information on your hard disk, you’ll be glad you spent the time.

To back up all the files on your hard disk to diskette, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to System Tools.

3 Click Backup.

Windows 95 opens the Backup window.

The Backup window

4 Click the files and folders you want to back up.

5 Click Next Step.

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6 Click drive A to back up the files on diskette.

7 Click Start Backup.

8 Type a name for the backup.

9 Insert new diskettes as Backup instructs you to.

To restore information from your backup diskettes to your hard drive, use the Restore page in the backup program. Check

Windows 95 Help or your Windows 95 documentation for information on restoring files.

When you’re restoring files, the backup program prompts you if you try to overwrite a file that already exists on the hard disk. Make sure the backup version is the one you want before overwriting the existing file.

Transferring Files to Another Computer

You’ve learned how to use diskettes to copy files from one computer to another. One method for transferring files is to copy them to a floppy diskette. The drawback to this method is that, unfortunately, a high-density floppy diskette can only hold 1.44MB, a serious limitation if you want to transfer a large amount of information. There are several other ways. One is to use the Windows

95 briefcase. Another way is the TranXit

program, included with your computer, which lets you transfer files through your computer’s serial, parallel or infrared ports.

The steps in this section provide an overview of how to use

TranXit to transfer files. For more detailed information about

TranXit, refer to the program’s online help.

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Transferring Files to Another Computer

To use TranXit to transfer files, you’ll need one of the following:

To use the serial port, you’ll need a null modem serial cable.

To use the parallel port, you’ll need a LapLink

®

-compatible parallel cable.

To use the infrared port, you’ll need another computer with either an internal or external infrared port.

Set Up Your File Transfer

To set up your file transfer, follow these steps:

Parallel port

The back of the computer

IrDA port Serial port

1 Use one of these methods to make the connection between the two computers:

For a serial connection, connect the serial cable to the serial port on the back of the computer. Connect the other end of the cable to the serial port on the other computer.

For a parallel connection, connect one end of the parallel cable to the parallel port on the back of the computer. Connect the other end to the parallel port on the other computer.

For an infrared connection, aim the computer’s infrared port directly at the infrared port on the other computer. The two computers must be within 3 feet (1 meter) of each other.

2 On one of the computers, click Start, then point to

Programs.

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3 Point to TranXit2, then point to TranXit.

Windows 95 opens the TranXit program.

The TranXit dialog box

4 Choose Connection from the Setup menu.

5 If an appropriate Configured Connection is available, choose it and go on to step 9. Otherwise, continue with the next step.

6 Choose the appropriate type of connection in the

Connection Type list.

7 Click the Setup Connection button.

8 Choose the port setting for the computer and click OK.

9 Click the Enable Connection check box.

An X in the box indicates that a connection is enabled.

10 Click OK to accept the current settings.

11 Repeat steps 2 through 10 on the other computer, making sure that the connection has been set up identically on both computers.

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Transfer Your Files

Now that you’re set up, it’s time to transfer your files. Follow these steps:

1 If you haven’t already done so, start TranXit on both computers.

2 Click the File Transfer tab, bringing the File Transfer page to the front, on both computers.

The connection status icon (the one that looks like a traffic signal) indicates your connection status:

A red light indicates that a connection has not been enabled or no connection has been established.

A yellow light indicates that TranXit is trying to establish a connection.

A green light indicates that a connection has been established.

3 When the connection status icon is green, open the Options window on one computer.

4 If Auto New Window is checked, press

Esc

to close the

Options menu.

If it is not checked, choose Auto New Window.

5 Drag the desired file(s) to the destination drive or directory

(folder) icon.

TranXit asks you to confirm the operation.

6 Click Yes to proceed with the file transfer.

7 When you’ve finished transferring files, click the close button to close TranXit.

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How and When to Turn the Computer Off

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How and When to Turn the Computer Off

It's a good idea to turn your computer off when you're not using it for an extended length of time. However, there are several things to keep in mind when you turn off the power:

Use either Windows 95 Shut Down or Suspend command to turn the computer off. To automatically return to where you left off after shutting down the computer, use the Windows 95

Suspend command instead of Shut Down. If you’re using battery power, this also saves power.

If you have the computer connected to an optional Desk

Station V Plus, you can set the computer to perform a

Windows 95 shut down automatically when you press the power button. Refer to “Turning the Computer Off with the

Power Button” on page 209 for more information about this option.

Don't turn the power off if the disk-in-use light on the indicator panel is on. Doing so may damage your hard disk or diskette drive.

If you close the display panel while the computer is on, it beeps loudly. To prevent this alarm from going off in the future, use

MaxTime or TSETUP to set the Panel Close Alarm option to

Disabled. See “The Battery Alarms Page” on page 389 or

“Making Changes in TSETUP” on page 404 for more information.

To turn the computer off, press and hold the power button until you hear a beep.

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Caring for Your Computer

Caring for Your Computer

This section offers easy tips on looking after your computer. For information about taking care of your computer’s battery, refer to

“Looking After Your Battery” on page 136.

Cleaning the Computer

To keep your computer clean, perform the following tasks regularly:

Clean the exterior case of the computer with a lightly dampened cloth.

To clean the LCD, use a slightly damp cloth and gently wipe the screen.

Keep liquid, including cleaning fluid, out of the computer's keyboard, speaker grill and other openings. Never spray cleaner directly onto the computer. Never use harsh or caustic chemical products to clean the computer.

Ask your Toshiba dealer for suggestions for appropriate cleaning products.

Moving the Computer

As a notebook computer, the Portégé 650CT is built to withstand reasonable shock and vibration. Before carrying or transporting your computer, follow these steps:

1 Make sure all disk activity has ended (the drive indicator light stops glowing).

2 Shut down Windows 95 and turn the computer off.

3 Disconnect the AC adapter.

4 Disconnect the external diskette drive.

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5 Disconnect all external optional devices.

6 Close the display panel.

Do not pick up the computer by its display panel or by the back (where the ports are located).

For long trips, transporting the computer in a carrying case is recommended. You can purchase a carrying case from your Toshiba dealer or through the Toshiba Accessory Catalog.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Before You Go to a Computer

Store...

If you’re new to computers, buying computer equipment (hardware) and programs (software) can be a confusing experience.

There is an enormous range of entertainment, business and personal programs you can buy.

To eliminate some of the confusion, this chapter provides advice about buying programs and equipment that work with your

Portégé 650CT computer.

Buying Programs

Before you buy a computer program, it helps to understand:

❖ the different types of programs you can buy

❖ the decision between buying integrated programs, such as

Microsoft Office

®

, versus individual programs

❖ the information on the program’s box

The following section describes some types of programs that you are likely to find at the computer store.

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Buying Programs

Word Processing Programs

Almost everyone uses their computer to write, so they need a word processor. This includes professional writers as well as others who use computers for daily correspondence.

Most word processors are designed to help you write, edit and spell check your work. They also assist you in creating different types of letters, memos and resumes. You really can’t go wrong in choosing a word processor. Ask a friend or colleague which one they prefer and try it.

If you want to create a book, advertisement or newsletter, you’ll need a desktop publishing program. In addition to word processing, these programs are equipped with referencing, indexing and page layout capabilities. Desktop publishing programs are more sophisticated than word processing programs and are typically more expensive.

If you want to create professional presentations, a presentation package is the kind of program you need. These programs help create slide shows, handouts with charts and graphics, and computer presentations with sounds, music and video clips.

Graphics Programs

If you want to work with computer graphics, there are two types of programs available to you.

Drawing programs allow you to create line art as you would with a pen and paper. They also include a large library of clipart (created line art) you can use in your own illustrations.

Painting programs allow you to work with photographs and create graphics on your computer pixel by pixel. These programs combine many tiny colored squares together to create an image or photograph on the computer screen. Paint programs typically include a large library of photographs and paintings you can use freely.

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Accounting or Financial Programs

There are a number of outstanding spreadsheet programs on the market. In addition, personal and professional accounting software programs can help you manage money, create budgets, forecast expenses and help prepare income taxes.

Design Programs

Your computer dealer can introduce you to a variety of sophisticated design programs including programs to design a garden, or to build or remodel a house, as well as the more common Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools.

On-line Programs

Online services such as CompuServe, America Online and Prodigy provide access to the Internet as well as useful information, entertainment, and research.

Reference Programs

Many reference publications such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases and language programs are available to add to your own personal library.

Database Programs

If you need to keep track and update a set of records, such as a list of addresses or a catalogue of items, database programs are designed to help with these tasks. You could use a database to hold details of a stamp collection or provide an overall index to the recipes in various cook books and magazines.

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Individual vs. Integrated Packages

Should I Buy the Diskette or the CD-ROM Version?

Many programs are available either on diskette or CD-ROM.

If you have a CD-ROM drive, loading programs from CD-ROM is faster and more convenient. It saves you the trouble of inserting and removing all those installation diskettes, and eliminates the possibility of encountering a damaged diskette in the middle of a multi-diskette software installation.

Provided you have a CD-ROM drive, buy the CD-ROM version whenever you have the choice.

Individual vs. Integrated Packages

When you have decided which types of programs you are interested in, you may find that you can buy some of the programs as an integrate package. This applies particularly to programs that are widely used in business.

The combination of word processor, drawing program and spreadsheet is the most common type of integrated package. Some of these also include a database program and/or a communications program.

An integrated package usually provides the same functionality as the manufacturer’s individual programs. Although, there are less expensive packages available that do not include all of the features installed on the individual programs. Be sure to read the information on the program’s box so you know which program version you are buying.

Individual programs have their advantages too. No single manufacturer produces the best program in each category. So you may prefer to buy A’s word processor, B’s drawing program and C’s spreadsheet.

Finally, integrated packages require a lot of space on your hard disk. If you are only going to use a word processor and a drawing program, buying just the two programs you need is the best option.

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Understanding the Information on the Box

In addition to listing the program’s features on the box, the manufacturer usually provides the system requirements needed to run the program.

Below is an actual example of the system requirements for a multimedia program. Your Portégé 650CT computer meets all of these requirements.

Minimum Requirements: Microsoft Windows 95, 8MB of

RAM, VGA video adapter, mouse or other pointing device,

55MB free hard disk space”

Recommended: SVGA video adapter and monitor, sound card”

The following sections explain each of the characteristics above.

Windows Compatibility

The Portégé 650CT computer comes with Microsoft

Windows 95. Windows 95 can run programs written for

Windows (version 3.1 or later) or Windows for Workgroups 3.11

(all versions), and MS-DOS. When possible, use programs written specifically for Windows 95.

Processor

The Portégé 650CT computer has a 133MHz (megahertz) Intel

Pentium microprocessor. It will run programs designed for a 286,

386, 486 or Pentium processor. The computer is also equipped with a 256K Level 2 processor cache that increases performance.

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Memory

The Portégé 650CT computer comes with 16MB of Random

Access Memory (RAM). Unless you've added additional memory, use this number when evaluating program requirements.

Some programs may have two memory numbers: an amount which is essential for running the program and a recommended amount for better performance.

To check your system’s RAM, follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button, then click Properties.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties window.

2 Click the Performance tab.

Windows 95 displays your computer’s performance status, including the amount of memory installed in your computer.

Hard Disk

The Portégé 650CT computer comes with a 1.26GB hard disk drive. Although this capacity well exceeds the 55MB stated in the system requirements example, it is the amount of available hard disk that matters. After you have been using your computer for a few weeks, much of your hard disk may be filled with programs and data.

To determine the available space on your hard disk, follow these steps:

1 Double-click the My Computer icon on the desktop.

Windows 95 opens the My Computer window.

2 Click (don’t double-click) the C: icon.

Windows 95 displays the space remaining (Free Space) and total capacity of the drive at the bottom of the My Computer window. These numbers are listed in megabytes (MB). See

“How Big is a Megabyte, Anyway?” on page 295 for more information on megabytes.

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If you can’t see these numbers, widen the window until you can see them. To resize a window, see “Lesson 5: Starting Programs” on page 52.

Graphics Card

A graphics card is also called a display adapter. It may be a board installed in a desktop computer or a chip, as in the Portégé 650CT.

Program requirements are generally listed by the type of adapter or the maximum resolution the adapter supports.

The Portégé 650CT display adapter is compatible with the VGA

(Video Graphics Array) and SVGA (Super VGA) standards. The adapter has a maximum resolution of 1024 x 768 pixels. For programs requiring resolutions higher than 640 x 480, you’ll probably want to use an external monitor. See “Using an External Monitor” on page 189 for more information.

Sound Card

Your computer has a SoundBlaster/Pro compatible sound card that delivers 16-bit stereo sound capability. There are microphone, line-in, and headphone jacks, as well as a volume control dial.

Pointing Device

The AccuPoint is a pointing device that performs all the functions of a mouse.

If a program requires a joystick, you'll have to add one, and possibly an adapter, to your system. Talk to your dealer to find out which joysticks are compatible with your Portégé 650CT computer.

Tips on Buying Programs

Before you buy:

It’s a good idea to see a demonstration of the program.

Talk to friends and your company’s computer experts about the programs they recommend.

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Understanding the Information on the Box

Get on the Internet and find out what’s new.

Make sure you have enough space available on the hard disk.

For more information, see “Hard Disk” on page 108.

Make sure your computer has enough memory.

For more information, see “Memory” on page 108.

Installing Programs

Windows 95 makes installing programs onto your computer’s hard disk easy. Most programs come with installation programs on diskette. By following the steps in this section, you’ll ensure that your installation program installs the program files completely and sets them up to run with Windows 95.

More and more programs are being written specifically for

Windows 95 all the time. If you purchase a program designed for

Windows 95, follow the installation instructions in the program’s documentation.

To install a new program in Windows 95, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

The Control Panel

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3 Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.

Windows 95 opens the Add/Remove Programs property sheet.

The Add/Remove Programs property sheet

4 Click the Install/Uninstall tab.

The Install/Uninstall page moves to the front of the sheet.

5 Click Install.

6 Insert the program’s installation diskette into the drive.

7 Click Next.

Windows 95 searches the installation diskette for the installation program.

If Windows 95 doesn’t find the installation program or searches the wrong drive, click the Browse button and find the installation program manually.

8 Click Finish to run the installation program.

9 Continue with the program’s normal installation process.

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Creating Backup Copies of Program Diskettes

It’s important to create backup diskettes for any programs you install on your computer, in case you accidentally damage or lose the original program diskettes. You’ll need one blank, formatted diskette for each program diskette you have to copy.

Follow these steps:

1 Make sure the external diskette drive is connected.

2 Place the original diskette into the diskette drive.

3 From the desktop, double-click the My Computer icon.

Windows 95 opens the My Computer window.

4 Click the A: icon.

5 Click File, then click Copy Disk.

6 In the Copy Disk dialog box, click Start.

Windows 95 copies the files on the diskette into memory and displays a message asking you to insert the destination diskette

(the one you’re copying to) into the diskette drive.

7 Remove the original diskette from the diskette drive and replace it with your blank one.

8 Click OK.

Windows 95 copies the files onto the new diskette.

9 Repeat steps 1 through 7 for each diskette you want to back up.

10 Store the original diskettes in a safe place.

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Buying Hardware

In addition to the basic system requirements, some programs require devices such as a CD-ROM drive, modem or printer.

These items are available as add-on devices for your Portégé

650CT computer.

What Kind of Devices Can I Buy?

Many devices, such as fax/modems, removable hard disk drives, and network adapters are available as PC Cards. For more information about these cards, see “Little Cards that Do Big Things” on page 157.

The Toshiba Accessories Catalog lists the add-on devices you can purchase from Toshiba. Talk to your dealer about these Toshiba options and other third-party devices.

This manual also lists a large number of available options. To find these, try looking in the Index under “devices.”

Tips on Buying Hardware

If a device is cheaper than you think it should be, it may be an older version. On the other hand, depending on you needs, an older version may suit you just fine.

Check the warranty and technical support provided by the manufacturer.

Make sure the device is supported by Windows 95, or that

Windows 95 drivers are provided with the device.

If you have access to the Internet, check the World Wide Web and relevant newsgroups for information about the product.

Access Toshiba’s BBS or the Toshiba Forum on CompuServe

(refer to “Contacting Toshiba” on page 335 for instructions) and search for information about using the new hardware with your computer.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Taking Your

Computer on the Road

Probably the main reason you bought your Portégé 650CT computer was so you could use it in a variety of places. Of course, some of the places you’ll be using it may not have a convenient power source.

This chapter describes all the aspects of running your computer while traveling.

Toshiba's Energy-Saver Design

Toshiba is a partner in the Environmental Protection Agency's

(EPA) Energy Star Program. As an Energy Star Partner, Toshiba has designed this product to meet the Energy Star guidelines for energy efficiency.

The Portégé 650CT computer enters a low-power standby state when it is not being used, thereby conserving energy and saving money in the process. It has a number of other features that enhance its energy efficiency.

Many of these energy-saving features have been set by Toshiba.

By leaving these features active, your computer will operate at its maximum energy efficiency.

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Running the Computer on Battery Power

Running the Computer on Battery Power

The Portégé 650CT computer contains a removable lithium ion battery pack that provides power when you are away from an AC outlet. This is the main battery. You can recharge the battery many times. If you spend a lot of time on the road, you may purchase additional batteries, giving you the potential of many more working hours away from a power source.

In addition to the main battery, the computer has two other batteries: the backup battery and the real-time clock (RTC) battery.

These are nickel metal hydroxide (NiMH) batteries.

The backup battery provides the power to store information about the system when you suspend the computer using the

Windows 95 Suspend command or Toshiba’s Resume Mode. The backup battery maintains this information for up to eight hours after the battery pack discharges completely.

The RTC battery stores your system configuration settings and the current time and date information. It maintains this information for up to a month while the computer is turned off.

Charging the Batteries

To charge the main battery while it is in your computer, plug the computer into a live wall socket. The battery charges whether the computer is on or off. It takes approximately four hours to charge the battery with the computer off, and up to ten and a half hours when the computer is on.

The battery light glows orange while the battery is being charged, and glows green when the battery is fully charged.

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The battery may not start charging immediately under the following conditions:

The battery is extremely hot or cold. To ensure that the battery charges to its full capacity, wait until it reaches room temperature (50 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, 10 to 30 degrees Celsius).

The battery is almost completely discharged. Leave the power connected and the battery should begin charging after a few minutes.

Once a battery pack is fully charged, we recommend that you operate your computer on battery power until the battery pack discharges completely. Doing this extends battery life and helps to ensure accurate monitoring of battery capacity.

You can purchase an optional battery charger that charges up to two batteries at the same time. See “Charging More than One Battery at a Time” on page 138 for more information about the battery charger.

In normal use, the main battery keeps the other batteries adequately charged. Occasionally, the backup and RTC batteries may lose their charge completely, especially if you’ve had the computer turned off for a long time. To recharge the backup battery, connect the AC adapter to the computer and plug it into a power socket. Leave the computer turned on for 30 hours, or turned off for 40 hours.

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Monitoring Battery Power

The computer’s battery light indicates the main battery’s current charge. The possible states of the battery light are:

Green indicates a full charge.

Orange indicates the battery is charging.

Flashing orange indicates that the charge is running low.

The dashboard section of Toshiba Access Panel provides gauges that display the remaining battery charge in a variety of formats.

This section describes how to use the Toshiba Access Panel to monitor the battery charge. To learn more about the Toshiba

Access Panel, read the complete description of its features, which starts in “Toshiba Access Panel” on page 349.

The computer drains battery power more quickly at low temperatures. Check your remaining charge frequently if you're working in temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

The computer calculates the remaining battery charge as it operates, based on your current rate of power use. With repeated discharges and recharges the battery’s capacity will gradually decrease. So a frequently used older battery will not power the computer for as long as a new battery, even when both are fully charged. The Toshiba Access Panel indicates 100% charge for both old and new batteries, but the estimated time remaining will be shorter for an older battery.

Wait at least 16 seconds after turning on the computer before trying to monitor the remaining battery power. The computer needs this time to check the battery’s remaining capacity and perform its calculations.

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Changing the Appearance of the Dashboard

Gauge gallery button

Dashboard

Dashboard tear-off button

Power Meter

Percent Remaining Gauge

Time Remaining Gauge

The Toshiba Access Panel

You can set up the dashboard section of the Toshiba Access

Panel to display the remaining battery charge in three different formats. Each provides the same information in a different way:

The Power Meter displays the computer’s power usage in digital or analog format.

The Time Remaining Gauge displays the amount of time remaining before the battery will be completely discharged.

The Percent Remaining Gauge displays the percentage of battery charge remaining.

Follow these steps to choose the gauge(s) you want displayed on the dashboard:

1 Click the gauge gallery button on the Toshiba Access Panel.

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The Gauge Gallery window opens to the left of the Toshiba

Access Panel.

The Gauge Gallery

2 To add a gauge to the dashboard, simply click on the gauge in the Gauge Gallery and drag it onto the dashboard section of the Toshiba Access Panel.

The Toshiba Access Panel displays a shortcut menu, prompting you to choose whether to add the gauge to all configurations, or just to the current configuration.

3 To add the gauge to the dashboard for all configurations, click Add to All.

To add the gauge to your current configuration only, click the second menu item (for example, if you are currently using the

Home configuration, click Add to Home).

4 To remove a gauge from the dashboard, click it with the secondary button.

The Toshiba Access Panel displays a shortcut menu, prompting you to choose whether to remove the gauge from all configurations, or from the current configuration.

5 To remove the gauge from the dashboard for all configurations, click Remove from All.

To remove the gauge from your current configuration only, click the second menu item (for example, if you are currently using the Home configuration, click Remove from Home).

The dashboard now shows the gauge(s) you selected.

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Removing the Dashboard from the Toshiba Access

Panel

Perhaps you prefer to work with the Toshiba Access Panel hidden, but still want to monitor your current battery charge using the dashboard battery gauges. If so, you can easily remove the dashboard from the Toshiba Access Panel so the gauges display in their own window.

To view the dashboard battery gauges separately from the Toshiba

Access Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click the undock button on the Toshiba Access Panel.

The Dashboard window opens and displays the battery gauges.

The Dashboard window

2 To return the gauges to the Toshiba Access Panel, click the close button.

What to Do When the Battery Alarm Sounds

Don't panic.

The Portégé 650CT computer has three alarms, designed to give you sufficient warning before your battery becomes fully discharged. This section describes the three battery alarms, what they mean and how to set each one to fit your personal computing style.

Going. . . the Low Battery Alarm

When you're beginning to get low on battery power the system beeps once and displays the Low Battery Alarm warning. This means you have less than 20% battery capacity remaining. To change the level of charge that sets off this warning, see “Setting the Alarms” on page 123.

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The Low Battery Alarm warning

This alarm gives you early warning that your battery power is running out. Unless you've told the system to display this message at a really low power level or your work involves lengthy processing, you can continue with what you are doing.

To close the Low Battery Alarm dialog box, click OK.

Going. . . the Critical Battery Alarm

When you're getting fairly low on battery power, the system beeps once and displays the Critical Battery Alarm warning. Normally, this means you have less than 10% battery capacity remaining. To change the level of charge that sets off this warning, see “Setting the Alarms” on page 123.

The Critical Battery Alarm warning

When this alarm goes off, start planning your remaining battery time carefully. No frantic actions are required yet, but it's a good idea to begin to think about what you absolutely must do before you find a place to plug in the AC adapter or turn the computer off.

To close the Critical Battery Alarm dialog box, click OK. To change the level of charge that sets off this warning, see “Setting the Alarms” on page 123.

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Gone. . . the Emergency Battery Alert

OK. Now it's serious. When the battery runs down and you have only about five minutes of time left, the computer starts beeping continuously.

When you reach this point, plug the computer into a live power outlet or save all your files and turn the computer off immediately.

Doing this ensures that you won't lose any work.

If you don't manage to plug the computer in or turn it off before the battery completely runs out of power, the computer turns off automatically. Don't panic, all is not lost. Before shutting down, the computer automatically turns on Resume Mode (more fully described in “Starting Again Using Resume Mode” on page 125).

Resume Mode keeps track of where you were so when you turn the power on again you can continue where you left off.

The computer's backup battery stores this information in memory for about eight hours before it too runs out of power. If you ever want to see those unsaved files again, replace the battery or find a power outlet before eight hours are up.

Setting the Alarms

The Low Battery and Critical Battery alarms sound when the remaining battery charge reaches threshold power levels. The

Low Battery Alarm is initially set to 20% of battery capacity. The initial threshold for the Critical Battery Alarm is 10% of battery capacity.

If these threshold levels don't fit your needs, you can use

MaxTime to change them. To set the threshold levels for the Low

Battery and Critical Battery alarms, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

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3 Double-click the MaxTime icon.

The MaxTime Control Panel opens with the Power Settings tab on top.

4 Click the Battery Alarms tab to bring it to the front.

The Battery Alarms tab of the MaxTime Control Panel

5 Select the threshold that will trigger the battery alarms:

To set the alarm to sound when the battery charge reaches the Time Remaining Threshold, click the button next to

Based on Time Remaining.

To set the alarm to sound when the battery charge reaches the Percent Remaining Threshold, click the button next to

Based on Percent Remaining.

6 To change the Time Remaining or Percent Remaining

Threshold, move the Low and Critical sliders in the Battery Alarm Thresholds section.

7 Click OK to save your settings and close the MaxTime

Control Panel.

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Starting Again Using Resume Mode

If you want to turn your computer off and on again without spending all the time it normally takes to start your computer up again,

Windows 95’s Suspend and Toshiba's Resume Mode are for you.

These features provide a sort of electronic bookmark, storing the current state of the computer, including all your open files and programs, in memory until you turn the computer on again.

Suspending the computer uses power supplied by the backup battery to store this information. However, the backup battery will eventually discharges completely, if it is left unplugged for more than eight hours. When the backup battery discharges, your information is lost. So, although suspending your computer temporarily stores your work in memory, you should still save all your work before you turn the computer off.

There are two ways to suspend the computer:

Click the Start button, then click Suspend.

Turn on Toshiba’s Resume Mode and press the power button.

The Windows 95 Suspend feature is the easiest way to suspend the computer. However, you’ll have to use Resume Mode if you want to configure your system to:

❖ automatically suspend/resume when you open/close the display panel. This option is available through the Start Up

Options tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel, or through

TSETUP.

❖ turn off automatically when you haven’t used it for a set amount of time. This option is available through MaxTime or

TSETUP.

❖ to suspend automatically when it detects an incoming call through the fax/modem port. This option is available through the Start Up Options tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel, or through TSETUP.

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There are two ways to turn on Toshiba’s Resume Mode in

Windows 95:

Use a special key combination (hotkey).

Use the Toshiba System Control Panel.

The following sections describe how to turn Resume Mode on and off with a hotkey and with the Toshiba System Control Panel.

Using a Hotkey

To select Resume Mode, follow these steps:

1 Press

Fn

+

F3

to display the Resume Mode pop-up window.

The Resume Mode pop-up window

2 While continuing to hold down

Fn

, press

F3

repeatedly until the Resume Mode icon is selected and the window displays

“Resume On.”

3 Release the

Fn

key.

The system is now in Resume Mode.

Using the Toshiba System Control Panel

To select Resume Mode using the Toshiba System Control Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

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3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

Windows 95 displays the Toshiba System Control Panel with the Start Up Options tab on top.

The Start Up Options tab of the Toshiba System Control

Panel

4 In the Start Up Mode section, click the button next to

Resume.

5 Click OK to save your settings and close the Toshiba

System Control Panel.

Replacing Batteries

When your battery runs out of power, you have two options: plug in the computer or replace the battery with a charged spare, if you have one. You may need to replace the battery if it becomes damaged or wears out after several years of use.

When handling battery packs, do not drop or knock them.

Also be careful not to damage the casing or short-circuit the terminals.

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Replacing Batteries

To replace the battery, follow these steps:

1 Save your work.

2 Turn the computer off or suspend it according to the instructions in “Starting Again Using Resume Mode” on page 125.

3 Remove all cables connected to the computer.

4 Turn the computer over with the front facing you.

Battery cover

Battery cover latch

Removing the battery cover

5 Slide the battery cover latch toward the right corner.

6 Remove the battery cover.

Battery

Battery latch

Removing the battery

7 Slide and hold the battery latch toward the center.

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8 Remove the battery from the battery slot.

If the battery is leaking or its case is cracked, put on protective gloves to handle it, and discard it immediately following the advice in the next section.

9 Wipe the battery terminals of the charged battery with a clean cloth to ensure a good connection.

10 Insert the charged battery into the battery slot and press it down to ensure a good connection.

The battery eject lever clicks into place.

11 Replace the battery cover.

12 Reconnect any cables you removed in step 3.

13 Turn the computer on.

If the backup battery or RTC battery need to be replaced, do not attempt to do so yourself. Contact your dealer or a Toshiba service representative.

Disposing of Used Batteries Safely

The life of a battery pack is about 500 recharges, so it should last for years. When your battery needs to be replaced, you’ll notice that its ability to stay charged decreases significantly (the battery light flashes orange shortly after you have fully recharged the battery).

You must dispose spent batteries and damaged battery packs safely. Batteries can leak and harm the environment if they are not properly disposed. Putting spent batteries in your garbage is not only irresponsible, it may also be illegal.

An insert regarding the disposal of batteries may have been provided with your computer. If not, check with your local government for information on where to recycle or dispose of old batteries.

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Conserving Power

If you cannot find the information you need, contact Toshiba for assistance. See “Contacting Toshiba” on page 335 for information on contacting Toshiba offices around the world.

Conserving Power

The amount of time a fully charged battery lasts depends on a number of factors, such as:

How the computer is configured

How much you use the hard disk, diskette drive, and CD-

ROM drive (if you have connected one)

Whether you use any optional devices to which the battery supplies power

Where you are working, since operating time decreases at low temperatures

There are various ways in which you can conserve power and extend the operating time of your battery:

Enable Resume Mode, which saves power when you turn the computer off and back on again

Use Toshiba’s power saving options

Toshiba has developed these options into preset power usage modes. These modes let you choose between maximum power savings and peak system performance. You may also set individual power-saving options to suit your needs.

The following sections describe how to choose a power usage mode and discuss each power-saving option.

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The Easy Way—Choosing a Power Usage Mode

There are two preset power usage modes:

Full power provides maximum system performance, while using the most power.

Low power preserves battery charge by reducing overall system performance.

The following table shows the option settings for both power usage modes. The names of these options differ in the MaxTime

Control Panel and TSETUP. The TSETUP option names are shown in parentheses.

Options

Hard Disk Auto Off

(HDD Auto Off)

Display Auto Off

System Auto Off

Processing Speed

Sleep Mode

(CPU Sleep Mode)

Display Brightness

(LCD Brightness)

Cooling Mode

(Cooling Method)

Full Power

30 Min

30 Min

Disabled

High

Disabled

Bright

Performance

Low Power

3 Min.

3 Min.

Disabled

Low

Enabled

Semi-Bright

Quiet

There is also a Custom Settings option that lets you set the powersaving options individually.

You may set the power usage mode with a hotkey, in MaxTime (if you're working in Windows 95) or in TSETUP (if you're working in MS-DOS). This chapter covers setting the power save mode with a hotkey and in MaxTime. Using TSETUP to set the power usage mode is discussed in “TSETUP” on page 403.

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Using a Hotkey

To select a battery save mode with a hotkey, follow these steps:

1 Start MaxTime, if it’s not already running.

2 Press

Fn

+

F2

to display the battery save pop-up window.

The power usage pop-up window

3 While continuing to press

Fn

, press

F2

repeatedly until you select the desired power usage mode.

4 Release the

Fn

key.

You're now in the selected mode.

Using MaxTime

To select a power usage mode in MaxTime, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 displays the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the MaxTime icon.

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The MaxTime Control Panel opens with the Power Settings tab on top.

The Power Settings tab of the MaxTime Control Panel

4 Choose the power source for which you want to set powersaving options:

To set the power-saving options the system will use when it is running on battery power, click the button next to

Battery.

To set the power-saving options the system will use when it is running on AC power, click the button next to External.

5 Click the desired Power Usage Mode setting in the Power

Usage Mode list box.

6 Click OK to save your settings and exit the MaxTime

Control Panel.

Setting Your Own Power Usage Options

If you set the power usage mode to Custom Settings, you can set your computer's power-saving options individually. For example, if you want the computer's processing speed set to its maximum level but want to take advantage of all the other power-saving features, this is the way to do it.

This section describes each of the power-saving options. The most energy efficient settings are indicated with an Energy Star logo.

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Hard Disk Auto Off (HDD Auto Off)

This option saves power by temporarily shutting down the hard disk if it hasn't been accessed for a set period of time. The drive turns back on the next time the computer reads from or writes to it.

You have seven choices:

1 Min, 3 Min, 5 Min, 10 Min, 15 Min, 20 Min and 30 Min settings turn the hard disk drive off if the computer hasn't accessed the hard disk for the time set.

Display Auto Off

This option saves power by temporarily shutting down the display if you have not used the keyboard or AccuPoint for a set period of time. To turn the display back on, press a key or move the Accu-

Point. You have eight choices:

Disabled turns the option off.

1 Min, 3 Min, 5 Min, 10 Min, 15 Min, 20 Min and 30 Min settings blank the display if you haven't used the keyboard or

AccuPoint for the set time.

If you're using an external monitor, Display Auto Off blanks the monitor after the selected time.

System Auto Off

This option saves power by turning the computer off if it hasn't been used for a set period of time. This option is available only if

Resume Mode is turned on. You have seven choices:

Disabled leaves the computer on until you use the power button to turn it off.

10 Min, 20 Min, 30 Min, 40 Min, 50 Min and 60 Min settings turn the computer off if you haven't used it for the time set.

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Processing Speed

This option sets the speed at which the computer processes information. You have two choices:

Low sets a lower processing speed and saves power.

High sets the computer to its maximum processing speed.

Sleep Mode (CPU Sleep Mode)

This option temporarily shuts down the computer's central processing unit (CPU) when it is inactive. Pressing a key, moving the

AccuPoint or a signal from a device returns the processor to its normal operating speed. You have two choices:

Enabled turns CPU Sleep Mode on.

Disabled turns CPU Sleep Mode off.

Display Brightness (LCD Brightness)

This option saves power by reducing the brightness of the computer's display. You have two choices.

Semi-bright reduces the brightness of the display.

Bright sets the display to its maximum brightness.

To compensate for the bright lighting conditions found in most office buildings, your Portégé 650CT has an extra bright

LCD mode when the computer is powered by the AC adapter.

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Cooling Mode (Cooling Method)

EPA POLLUTION PREVENTER

If the computer’s central processing unit (CPU) starts to overheat, the CPU fan provides additional cooling to the CPU. This option lets you control how active the CPU fan is in cooling. You have two choices:

Performance mode uses the fan to cool the processor chip, maintaining maximum system performance. If the fan turns on frequently, you may want to set this option to Quiet to conserve battery life.

Quiet mode cools the system by temporarily reducing processing speed instead of using the fan.

Regardless of the cooling option you have selected, the cooling fan turns on when the CPU becomes hot. If the CPU overheats, the computer will power off in Resume Mode. For more information about Resume Mode see “Starting Again Using

Resume Mode” on page 125.

Looking After Your Battery

It doesn't take much effort, but by treating your battery right you can make sure it provides maximum power storage for a long time. The following sections offer tips on how to take care of your battery.

Safety Precautions

Never try to disassemble a battery pack.

Don’t overcharge or reverse charge a battery. Overcharging will shorten it life and reverse charging could destroy it, causing the release of toxic fumes.

Never incinerate a spent battery as this will cause it to explode, releasing toxic materials.

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If a battery is leaking or damaged, replace it immediately. Use protective gloves when handling a damaged battery.

When you need to replace the main battery, use an identical battery from the same manufacturer.

Five Steps to a Happy Battery

Don't leave the computer plugged in and unused for more than

24 hours at a time. When you’re not going to use the computer for a long period, disconnect the power and let the battery discharge completely.

Alternate between batteries if you have a spare.

Don't touch the metal terminals on the battery with another metal object.

Always turn your computer off when you're replacing the battery.

Store spare battery packs in a cool dry place out of direct sunlight.

Additional Power Options

Depending on the amount of time you spend away from external power sources, the capacity of one battery pack may be sufficient for your needs. However, if you need more portable power,

Toshiba provides three options:

❖ extra battery packs to use when the installed packs run out of power.

❖ a battery charger that charges more than one battery at a time.

❖ an automobile power adapter for charging a batter in your car.

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Additional Power Options

Additional Battery Packs Extend Battery Time

Having one or more extra batteries gives you the opportunity to replace a discharged battery with a charged spare. This can greatly increase the amount of time you can work without having to find a power outlet.

Charging More than One Battery at a Time

The optional battery charger provides an alternative to charging the battery in your computer. This is especially useful if you have one or more extra batteries. You can charge your spare(s) in the battery charger while continuing to work on the computer. While the battery charger requires a power source, it provides an easy way for you to take more than one charged battery with you when you travel.

Use only Noteworthy™ (Toshiba) battery chargers to charge your battery packs.

Charging the Computer’s Battery in Your Car

The optional Noteworthy

automobile power adapter lets you plug the computer into the cigarette lighter of your car. This is a great way to charge the computer’s main battery while driving to your next appointment.

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How About a Carrying Case?

When you're travelling, you'll probably need a way to carry your computer with you. Toshiba offers four choices of carrying cases for the computer:

❖ a sturdy fabric carrying case

❖ a leather attaché

❖ a leather Executive Portfolio

❖ a backpack-style case

All of these cases help protect the computer from the bumps and scratches of normal travel. They also provide plenty of extra space for manuals, power cords, CD-ROMS and diskettes.

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The Wide World of Multimedia

Multimedia is the product of different media elements such as text, graphics, sound, animation, and video working together. A multimedia title is a computer presentation of two or more media elements that are experienced simultaneously. You may purchase a multimedia title on compact disc or access one over the Internet.

Unlike television programs or audio tapes, multimedia titles allow you to interact with the information by choosing what to view or listen to and when to see or hear it.

Your Portégé 650CT is well equipped with a high-speed Pentium processor, a color display, and advanced stereo sound capabilities that enhance your multimedia enjoyment. However, to take full advantage of your Portégé 650CT’s multimedia capabilities, you need to purchase an external CD-ROM drive and a pair of stereo speakers.

This chapter provides some options for connecting additional hardware, and introduces the multimedia elements you can experience without investing in additional hardware or software.

In addition to the information in this chapter, there is a wide variety of helpful books that explain multimedia. You’ll find a selection of them at your local computer or book store.

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Connecting a CD-ROM Drive

Connecting a CD-ROM Drive

Your Portégé 650CT is equipped with several expansion features that provide a means of connecting a CD-ROM drive to your computer. This section describes some of the options available to you, but you should consult your dealer or Toshiba support for the option that is best for you.

Connecting a CD-ROM Drive to a PC Card Slot

You can connect a CD-ROM drive to your Portégé 650CT through a PC Card slot. Typically, this type of connection uses a

SCSI (pronounced scuzzy) PC Card interface that connects to a

PCMCIA Type II Card slot. There are two ways to connect a

CD-ROM drive to a PC Card slot.

You can purchase a portable CD-ROM drive that is equipped with a PCMCIA Interface (PC Card) that inserts into your computer’s Type II slot.

Most likely, this option is the easiest and fastest way to connect a CD-ROM drive to your computer. All the hardware, drivers, and instructions you need to connect the drive come packaged together. Your local computer store carries a selection of portable CD-ROM drives designed to connect to portable computers.

You can purchase a SCSI interface PC Card that provides a connection for any SCSI CD-ROM drive.

SCSI refers to the type of connection the device requires. With a SCSI interface PC Card, you can connect any SCSI device to your computer. In addition to CD-ROM drives, tape drives and

Syquest drives usually use a SCSI connection. Using the SCSI interface connection gives you more connection options, but it also requires special consideration in selecting a SCSI device and PC Card that are compatible. If you have any questions concerning this type of connection, consult your dealer.

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Connecting a CD-ROM Drive to the Parallel Port

A CD-ROM drive can also connect to the parallel port on your

Portégé 650CT with the appropriate hardware. This type of hardware is called a parallel interface, an electrical cable with a connector that matches the parallel port on the computer. The parallel port is typically used for printer connections but can be used for any device that uses a parallel connection.

To connect your CD-ROM drive using a parallel interface, you need to purchase a parallel connector cord and a CD-ROM drive that supports a parallel interface. Consult your dealer for the type of hardware you need for this option.

Connecting a CD-ROM Drive with the Desk Station V Plus

Toshiba’s Desk Station V Plus accessory provides several ways to connect a CD-ROM drive to your Portégé 650CT. In addition to the exceptional expansion capabilities featured on the Desk Station V Plus, there is a SCSI connector, an IDE interface, PC Card slots, PCI and ISA slots, and a SelectBay. All of these expansion options can be used to connect to a CD-ROM drive. For more information about the Desk Station V plus, refer to “Using the

Optional Desk Station V Plus” on page 205 for more information.

What Type of CD-ROM Drive Should You Buy?

There are many CD-ROM drives on the market today. Dual-speed

(2x), quad-speed (4x), and 6-times speed (6x) are terms that refer to the speed at which the drive spins the compact disc. Generally, a drive that spins faster can find and transfer data faster. This translates into better overall performance.

4x CD-ROM drives operate twice as fast as 2x CD-ROM drives.

If you want to use your drive to install large software programs, or use multimedia applications, the faster the drive, the better.

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Playing an Audio CD

Playing an Audio CD

If you insert an audio CD into your CD-ROM drive, Windows 95 loads CD Player, a program that automatically plays the CD.

To play audio CDs through your Portégé 650CT, you must connect the line out jack on the CD-ROM drive to the line in or microphone jack on the computer. Consult your dealer for the necessary connector cord you need to make this connection.

To view the CD Player window, click CD Player on the taskbar.

Stop button

CD Player playing a CD

To increase or decrease the volume, turn the dial on the computer’s chassis (located above the keyboard and below the LCD).

To stop the CD, click the stop button.

The Help facility of CD Player explains in detail how to use each component including how to store the name of each track.

If you exit from CD Player and want to start the program again, follow these steps:

1 Double-click the My Computer icon.

2 Click the Audio CD icon with the secondary AccuPoint button.

3 Click Play with the primary or secondary button.

Windows 95 opens the CD Player and starts playing your audio compact disc.

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Playing Back Sound, Video and Animation Files

Multimedia files are stored in a variety of formats depending on the type of file.

Sound Files

Traditionally, sound is recorded in an analog form. For example, a magnetic tape recorder uses electrical signals to create a single model of a given sound or waveform.

Most multimedia computers support two types of sound files, wave files and MIDI files.

Digital Audio Wave Files

Digital audio uses computer-based technology to record, handle and recreate sound. Digital audio systems sample the waveform at fixed time intervals, for example, at 30 times per second, and reduce the sound to a sequence of numbers.

When you play back a digital waveform or wave file, the software transforms the numeric data back into its original acoustic waveform.

If you use the microphone to record sounds, the computer stores them as wave files.

Wave files have the extension .WAV.

MIDI Files

Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) is a standard language used by composers to create music to be played by a synthesizer. MIDI songs consist of commands, not actual digital sounds. For this reason, the size of a MIDI file is much smaller than a .WAV file.

You can connect an external MIDI device, such as a keyboard with a built-in synthesizer, or you can play MIDI files using the computer’s internal synthesizer.

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To learn more about the system’s MIDI capabilities, look up

MIDI in the Windows 95 help index.

MIDI files have the extension .MID.

Video and Animation Files

Full-motion video includes both traditional film and animation. A video plays back on your VCR at 30 frames per second. To play back the same video on your computer would require 9 megabytes of data per second at 640 x 480 resolution.

Since playing back video requires so much data, multimedia applications that use film or animation normally play back at 15 frames per second with a resolution of 320 by 200 pixels. This is why video images are less smooth on a computer than on television.

To reduce the storage required, all video files must be compressed before they can be distributed and decompressed when you view them. Two compression and decompression techniques are in general use.

AVI Files

The most common technique for storing and playing back video on personal computers is Microsoft’s Audio Video Interleaved

(AVI) format. This software technique displays video using up to

15 frames per second in a small window.

AVI files have the extension .AVI.

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A frame is a still picture that, when combined with thousands of others, makes a motion picture.

Full-motion video means motion pictures played back at 30 frames per second.

Interleaving video is the process of displaying every other row of pixels each time the computer refreshes the screen. This increases the rate at which the system updates the screen.

A pixel is the smallest dot on your screen that can be controlled by software.

Resolution is the number of pixels on the screen.

MPEG Files

Fifteen frames per second is not adequate for the games and multimedia titles the industry wants to produce. The Motion Picture

Expert Group (MPEG) has developed compression and decompression standards that are capable of delivering true full-motion video on your computer.

MPEG files have the extension .MPG.

Full-Motion Video on the Portégé 650CT

For best results, MPEG-2 requires specialized hardware to bypass the computer’s Central Processing Unit (CPU) and system bus

(the backbone of the computer to which all internal devices are connected).

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Playing Back Sound, Video and Animation Files

Your computer comes with a Zoomed Video Port (ZV Port) which is an adaptation of the PC Card slot. This feature was designed to support optional ZV Port cards that provide MPEG2 full motion video, video capture and video conferencing capabilities.

Audio and video data flow from the hard disk, a compact disc, the

Internet or another source across the system bus to the PC Card controller. The controller passes them to the MPEG decoder on the PC Card, which delivers uncompressed video data back to the

PC Card controller.

The PC Card controller then sends a decompressed video stream directly to the video/graphics controller, which displays it on your screen. It sends decompressed audio data directly to the audio sound chip, which controls the speakers.

By bypassing the CPU and system bus, the ZV Port can deliver high performance video data at up to 30 frames per second.

Play Back Programs

Windows 95 comes with three programs for playing multimedia files:

CD Player is used to play an audio CD. The section “Playing an Audio CD” on page 144 explains how to use this program.

Media Player is used to play back audio, video and animation files.

Volume Control lets you adjust the volume.

Using Media Player

You can use Media Player to play back wave and Video for Windows files in addition to playing back several other formats such as MIDI and Quick Time for Windows files.

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To play a file, follow these steps:

1 Click Start and point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to Multimedia.

3 Click Media Player.

Windows 95 displays the Media Player window.

Media Player ready to play a wave file

4 Choose File Open.

5 Locate the file you want to play in the Look in box.

6 To display the list of file types Media Player can play, click the down arrow next to the Files of type list box.

7 Click the name of the file you want to play.

Another way to play a multimedia file is to click on the file name with the secondary button. This opens a list that includes the Play command.

Adjusting the Volume

You can set the volume in two ways:

❖ by using the Volume Control program

❖ by turning the volume dial

The Volume Control program sets the volume and balance for playing both CDs and multimedia files that contain sound.

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Recording Sounds as Wave Files

To access this program, follow these steps.

1 Click Start and point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to Multimedia.

3 Click Volume Control.

Windows 95 displays the Volume Control mixer window.

The Volume Control mixer window

4 Move the sliders to adjust the volume for the various types of sound files.

To avoid confusion, set all the mixer sliders in the Volume

Control program to their medium settings and adjust the volume with the volume dial.

Recording Sounds as Wave Files

You may record sounds through the built-in microphone or, using the microphone jack or line-in jack, from an outside source. This section describes how to record sounds.

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Using the Built-In Microphone

The easiest way to record is through the computer’s built-in microphone. To do this, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to Multimedia.

3 Click Sound Recorder.

Windows 95 opens the Sound Recorder window.

4 Click the record button.

(It’s the red circle at the bottom right of the window.)

5 Speak normally into the microphone.

Built-in microphone

Locating the built-in microphone

6 When you’ve finished recording, click the stop button.

The Audio Recorder window displays a graphical representation of the new sound file as a waveform display.

7 To hear what you just recorded, click the play button.

8 To save the file, choose Save from the File menu.

Adjusting Recording Quality

You can adjust the quality of your recordings. However, the better the quality of the recording, the more disk space the sound file will require. Experiment to find a balance that fits your needs.

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Recording Sounds as Wave Files

To adjust the recording quality, follow these steps:

1 If you already have the Sound Recorder open, skip to step 5.

2 Click Start, then point to Programs.

3 Point to Accessories, then point to Multimedia.

4 Click Sound Recorder.

Windows 95 opens the Sound Recorder window.

5 Click Edit, then click Audio Properties.

Sound Recorder opens the Audio Properties sheet.

6 Adjust the Recording Volume, Preferred device and Preferred quality according to your needs.

7 Click OK.

Your new settings will take effect the next time you record.

Using an External Microphone

The computer has a built-in microphone for recording sounds. To record higher quality sounds, you may wish to use an external microphone. To attach an external microphone, follow these steps:

Microphone jack

The microphone jack

1 Locate the microphone jack on the front of the computer.

2 Plug the microphone cord into the microphone jack.

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3 Turn the microphone on.

The internal microphone is automatically disabled.

Once the external microphone is connected, the recording process is the same as with the built-in microphone. See “Using the Built-

In Microphone” on page 151 for instructions.

Using an External Audio Input Device

To record sounds from an external audio device, such as a stereo amplifier, tape deck, or CD player, follow these steps:

Line-in jack

The line-in jack

1 Locate the line-in jack on the front of the computer.

2 Using any necessary adapters, plug the cord from the

audio device into the line-in jack.

Once the external audio device is connected, the recording process is the same as with the built-in microphone. See “Using the Built-

In Microphone” on page 151 for instructions. To adjust the quality of the recording, see “Adjusting Recording Quality” on page 151 for information.

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Using External Speakers or Headphones

Your Portégé 650CT is equipped with a SoundBlaster Pro compatible sound system with an internal monaural system speaker.

Since the sound system supports a 16-bit stereo format, you may want to connect a pair of external stereo speakers to take full advantage of this feature.

Be sure to use amplified speakers that require an external power source. Using another type of speaker will be inadequate to produce sound from the computer.

To play back sound files through an external device such as stereo speakers or headphones, follow these steps:

The headphone jack

Headphone jack

1 Locate the headphone jack on the front of the computer.

2 Using any necessary adapters, plug the cord from the external speakers into the headphone jack. The headphone jack requires a stereo mini-jack.

3 To adjust the volume, follow the steps in “Adjusting the

Volume” on page 149.

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Using an External Audio Device

You can record or play back sounds from the computer by connecting the computer to an external audio device, such as a tape recorder or stereo amplifier. To connect an external audio device, follow these steps:

Headphone jack

The headphone jack

1 Locate the headphone jack on the front of the computer.

2 Using any necessary adapters, plug the cord from the external audio device into the line-out jack.

3 To adjust the volume, follow the steps in “Adjusting the

Volume” on page 149.

Multimedia Options that Require Additional Equipment

You can capture video through your computer’s ZV port technology. To capture video with the ZV port, you would need to purchase a PC Card called a “ZV Port Card” and insert it into the PC

Card slot on your computer. For more information see “Full-

Motion Video on the Portégé 650CT” on page 147.

You also need to purchase a video capture adapter and install it in the Desk Station. You would also need specialized software to edit your captured video.

To create an animation you need special graphics software.

To compose and play back sounds using the MIDI language you need additional equipment including a synthesizer.

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Little Cards that Do Big

Things

PCMCIA-compatible PC Cards greatly increase the capabilities of your computer. These cards pack all the performance of full-sized expansion cards into a case the size of a credit card.

Your computer comes with one PC Card slot that lets you take advantage of these little cards. You can install up to two Type I or Type II cards, or one Type III card. Type III cards, such as hard disk drive PC Cards, require extra thickness. When you buy a PC

Card, check the package for the Type of card you’re buying.

Your computer’s PC Card slots are Zoomed Video (ZV) Card and

CardBus ready, allowing you to use PC Cards that comply with these standards.

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What Do PC Cards Do?

This chapter describes the different types of PC Cards, tells you how to install PC Cards and provides general tips on using them.

Since each card is different, you'll have to read your cards' documentation to use the card, but this chapter will help you get started.

If your PC Card came with a diskette, read “Programs that

Make Your PC Card Work” on page 160 before installing any of its programs. The programs on the diskette may conflict with built-in Windows 95 drivers.

What Do PC Cards Do?

New PC Cards are being introduced every day. Among the PC

Cards currently available are:

Modems and fax/modems

Network adapters

Removable hard disk devices

Memory

SCSI adapters

Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers

ZV Port cards

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Some PC Cards combine the functions of several different cards.

One popular example is a PC Card that combines a fax/modem with a network adapter. These are handy if you want to get the most out of your PC Card slots.

PC Card technology has changed considerably over the last few years and it’s important that your card is current with the times. Check the package to make sure the PC Card you buy conforms to the PCMCIA (Personal Computer Memory Card

International Association) 2.1 standard (or later). Cards that do not conform to this standard may work with your computer, but they are likely to be much more difficult to set up and use.

Cards You Can Buy from Toshiba

Toshiba’s Noteworthy PC Cards are specifically designed to work with your Portégé 650CT computer and are available from your

Toshiba dealer. Noteworthy PC Cards include:

Fax/Modems

Modem/Ethernet network adapter combination

Token ring network adapter

Ethernet network adapter

3270 terminal emulation adapter

Removable hard disk drive

SCSI bus adapter

SCSI/audio multimedia adapter combination

Portable digital video adapter

Audio multimedia adapter

Check the Toshiba Accessories Catalog for a complete description of available PC Cards.

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Programs that Make Your PC Card Work

Programs that Make Your PC Card Work

PC Cards typically require Card and Socket Services software—a set of programs that acts as a translator between the PC Card and the computer, and that makes hot swapping (switching cards while the computer is on) possible.

Windows 95 comes with all the Card and Socket Services programs already installed. Rather than using a version of these programs that may have come with your PC Card, using the

Windows 95 versions ensures complete compatibility with all the features of Windows 95.

If you do use another manufacturer’s Card and Socket Services software instead, the system may not recognize your PC Card when you turn the computer on after suspending. Shut down and restart the computer and the system will recognize the card.

To set up the Card and Socket Services programs for your PC

Card, see “Setting Up Your PC Card for Your Computer” on page 163.

Hot Swapping

One of the really great things about PC Cards is that you can exchange one PC Card for another card even while the computer is on. This is called “hot swapping.” For example, if you want to switch between a hard disk and a modem PC Card, you can do it while you’re working without turning the computer off and back on again.

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Hot Swapping Cautions

While you can insert a PC Card at any time, applying a bit of common sense about when you remove a card will make your computing life much happier. Just remember not to remove a card while it’s in use. You probably won’t break anything, but you could lose valuable information. For example:

Do not remove a modem card while it is communicating.

Do not remove a hard disk card while the system is accessing the card.

Do not remove a SCSI card while any of the SCSI devices connected to it are operating.

Do not remove a network card while you are connected to the network.

Before removing a PC Card, stop the card by clicking the PC Card

(PCMCIA) icon on the taskbar.

Inserting PC Cards

OK. You've bought your first PC Card and want to install it. This section describes what to do.

Before you insert your PC Card, read through the documentation that comes with the card to see if you need to do anything before you insert it.

Windows 95 provides the Card and Socket Services for your

PC Card. Even if your PC Card comes with its own version of

Card and Socket Services, you should use the files included in Windows 95.

Your PC Card slot has two card sockets. You may insert a Type I or Type II card into either socket. You may insert only one Type

III card into the lower socket. Inserting a Type III card takes up all the space for both sockets—you cannot have a Type III card installed with any other card.

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Inserting PC Cards

To insert a PC Card, follow these steps:

1 Locate the PC Card slot cover on the right side of the

computer.

Opening the PC Card slot cover

PC Card slot cover

2 Open the PC Card slot cover.

PC Card

Inserting a Type II PC Card into the PC Card slot

3 Insert the PC Card.

If you have a Type III card, insert the connector into the lower part of the socket. If you have a Type I or Type II card, insert it into either the top or bottom half of the slot.

4 When the card is almost all the way into the slot, push firmly, but gently, to ensure a firm connection with the computer.

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Setting Up Your PC Card for Your Computer

Some PC Cards, such as many fax/modems and hard disk (AT) cards, are ready to use as soon as you install them. Others, such as hard disk cards, network cards and SCSI adapters, require additional steps to work with your computer.

Setting Up PC Card Support in Windows 95

When you insert your PC Card, Windows 95 should display the

New Hardware Found dialog box. Follow the instructions on the screen to set up your PC Card.

If Windows 95 doesn’t detect your card automatically, follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button, then click Properties.

Windows 95 opens the System Properties sheet.

2 Click the Device Manager tab to access the Device

Manager page.

The Device Manager page should contain a PC Card

(PCMCIA) icon. If it doesn’t, refer to the steps under “The system does not recognize your PC Card or PCMCIA socket controller” on page 330 to set up PC Card support.

3 Click the “+” to the left of the PCMCIA Socket icon in

Device Manager.

Device Manager lists the controller(s).

4 The controller icon(s) appears in one of the following ways:

If it appears normally, PC Card support is set up correctly.

Close the System Properties sheet.

If there is a red X over the icon, you need to set up the PC

Card drivers. Continue with the remainder of this section.

If there is a yellow exclamation point (!) over the icon, you need to configure the PC Card drivers. Continue with the remainder of this section.

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Ejecting a PC Card

5 Click OK to close the System Properties sheet.

6 Click Start, then point to Settings.

7 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

8 Double-click the PC Card (PCMCIA) icon.

Windows 95 opens the PCMCIA Wizard.

9 Follow the instructions on the screen to set up PC Card support.

Ejecting a PC Card

Before you eject a PC Card, be sure any device connected to the card has stopped operating and is turned off.

To remove a PC Card, follow these steps:

1 Click the PC Card button on the taskbar.

2 Click Stop xxxx, where xxxx is the identifier for your PC

Card.

Windows 95 displays a message that you may safely remove the card.

Your Portégé 650CT has two eject buttons corresponding to the two PC Card slots. The eject buttons are located on the front of the computer at the right corner. The left button ejects the bottom PC

Card slot. The right button ejects the top PC Card slot.

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Ejecting a PC Card

PC Card eject buttons

3 Position your finger on the edge of the eject button and firmly slide the button to the left.

The PC Card pops out of the slot.

4 Grasp the edges of the PC Card and slide it out of the slot.

5 Close the PC Card slot cover.

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Connecting with the World

On its own, your Portégé 650CT computer is an extremely powerful tool. However, not until you connect it to one or more additional computers, through a modem or network connection, can you begin to recognize its full potential.

This chapter explains how to use your computer’s built-in fax/ modem and to fax a document directly from your computer. It describes the many ways you can use your modem to connect to other computers and services, such as the Internet.

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If You’re Ready to Go

If You’re Ready to Go

This section provides a brief overview of the steps contained in the remainder of the chapter. If you’re an experienced computer user, this may be enough for you. If you need more help, each step tells you where to go for more information. Follow these steps:

1 Determine the COM port the fax/modem is using.

You’ll need to know this to set up your communications program. If you’re using a communications program designed for

Windows 95, your program may determine the COM port automatically. For more information, see “Faxing a Document” on page 174.

2 Install the communications program.

This may be a general-purpose communications program or one supplied by a specific service provider. For more information, see “Choosing the Communications Program” on page 170.

3 Sign up.

If you’re planning to use an online service or the Internet, you’ll need to register with a service provider. For more information, see “Logging On to an Online Service or the

Internet” on page 180.

Setting Up

To communicate with the outside world you’ll need:

❖ a modem (you already have this installed in your computer).

❖ a telephone line (with a standard modular phone jack.)

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❖ a communications program (see “What Do You Need?” on page 182 if you’re planning on using an online service or the

Internet, or “Connecting Directly to Another Computer” on page 185 for information about general communications programs).

❖ if you’re planning on using the Internet, you’ll need an access provider (see “Gaining Access to the Internet” on page 181).

The steps in this section assume you’re using the computer’s built-in modem. To use an external modem, follow the steps in “Using an External Modem” on page 172.

Determining the COM Port

Your modem is connected to one of the computer’s COM (communications) ports.

Although the terms are often used interchangeably, the serial port and COM port are really two different things. The serial port is the physical port on the back of the computer. The

COM port is a unique identifier the computer uses to communicate with the serial port or other serial devices.

If you’re using a Windows 95 communications program, such as

HyperTerminal, it determines the COM port automatically. Skip to the following section.

If your are going to install and set up a non-Windows 95 communications program, you must tell it which COM port your modem is using.

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Setting Up

To find out which port your modem is connected to, follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary

AccuPoint button.

2 Choose Properties.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties sheet.

3 Click the Device Manager tab.

4 Double-click on the modem you’re checking.

5 Click on the Modem tab.

The COM port is listed under Port.

6 Make a note of the port number.

7 Click OK twice to close Device Manager.

Choosing the Communications Program

The communications program you use depends on what you’re planning to do. For example, to access the Internet, you’ll need some form of Internet access program. To transfer files from your office network, you’ll need a remote access program.

To log on to an online service or the Internet, see “What Do You

Need?” on page 182. General-purpose programs are discussed in

“Connecting Directly to Another Computer” on page 185.

Connecting to a Telephone Line

You need to connect the modem to a voice-grade telephone line.

Normally you do this using a telephone cable and a standard modular phone jack. As the business world becomes more accustomed to busy executives and their portable computing needs, phone jacks are becoming available in more locations. For example, many hotels that cater to business travelers have one or more phone jacks in each room.

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Fax/modem jack

Telephone

(RJ-11) cable

Connecting the telephone cable to the fax/modem jack

Plug one end of the telephone cable into the fax/modem jack on the left side of your computer and the other end into the wall jack.

If you are using the telephone line at home, disable call waiting before you connect through the modem. Call waiting interrupts transmission.

If you have a modem that is capable of transmitting over the cellular network you can use any cellular line. You need to remain stationary while transmitting data over a cellular phone. Transmitting data while you are moving will cause problems when the cellular network hands off the call to the next cell.

Now that you’re set up it’s time to communicate. You’re ready to send a fax (see the following section) or use the modem to connect to the exciting virtual world of the Internet or an online service

(see “The Internet and Other Fascinating Places” on page 175).

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Setting Up

Using an External Modem

Your computer’s built-in fax/modem lets you perform all the activities described in this chapter. If, for some reason you want to use an external modem, this section describes how to connect it and set it up.

Connecting an External Modem

To connect an external modem to the computer, follow these steps:

Serial port

Serial cable

Connecting the cable to the serial port

1 Plug one end of the serial cable into the modem and the

other end into the computer’s serial port.

2 Plug one end of the modem’s power cable into the modem and other end into a live wall outlet.

3 Plug one end of the telephone cable into the line out jack on the modem and the other end into the wall jack.

Make sure you turn the modem’s power on before you attempt to use it.

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Setting Up the External Modem

Before you can use your modem, you must tell Windows 95 the model number of your modem, who manufactured it and which

COM port it is connected to. If you don’t know which COM port your modem is using, follow the steps in “Determining the COM

Port” on page 169 before continuing.

To set up your modem, follow these steps:

1 Click the Start button and point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 displays the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Add New Hardware icon.

Windows 95 opens the Add New Hardware Wizard.

4 Click Next.

The Add New Hardware Wizard asks if it should detect the new hardware for you.

5 Select No, then click Next.

The Add New Hardware Wizard displays a menu of different hardware types.

6 Select Modem, then click Next.

The Add New Hardware Wizard asks if it should detect the modem for you.

7 Click Next. If it finds a modem, go to step 11.

8 Click Next.

The Install New Modem window displays a list of manufacturers and their respective model numbers.

9 Select the manufacturer and model number of your modem, then click Next.

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Faxing a Document

10 Select the port the modem is connected to (typically

COM2), then click Next.

11 Input the location information requested, then click Next.

12 Click Finish.

Faxing a Document

Sending a fax through your computer's fax/modem is almost as simple as printing a document. All you need is a fax program, such as MS Fax, included with Windows 95.

Windows 95 treats your fax program as if it is another printer. To send a fax:

1 Choose Print Setup from within the program you’re using to prepare your document.

2 Select your fax printer driver from the list of available printers.

If you’re using MS Fax, set the printer to MS Fax. For more information about using MS Fax, refer to the MS Fax online

Help program.

3 Choose Print.

If you’re using MS Fax, it prompts you for a telephone number and gives you the opportunity to attach a standard cover sheet.

Other fax programs will operate in much the same way. If you’re using a different fax program, refer to the program’s documentation for more information.

4 Choose Send to send the fax.

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Using the Computer’s Telephony Features

Your computer comes with Multimedia Connect, a communications program that lets you use the computer’s built-in modem to:

Place and receive telephone calls

Set up and use a voice mail system

Send faxes directly from your word-processing or spreadsheet program

For detailed information about this program, refer to the Multimedia Connect documentation provided with your computer.

The Internet and Other Fascinating Places

If you’ve never used a modem before, you may not be aware of the vast array of possibilities that await you. There are four basic options. You can:

Subscribe to an online service.

Explore the vastness of the Internet.

Log on to an electronic Bulletin Board Service (BBS).

Communicate directly with another computer, such as one owned by a friend or one in your office.

The following sections describe each of these options, discuss some of the factors to consider when choosing which ones to use and provide a brief overview of how to access them.

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Online Services

Online services, such as America Online (AOL) and CompuServe, provide easy access to home shopping, travel arrangements, stock quotes, and forums on a wide variety of topics. You can send electronic mail (e-mail) to other subscribers, ask questions on almost any subject, and access a variety of reference materials. Information on most of these services is available through an easy-to-use interface. Most online services also provide full access to the Internet. Information about the Internet is contained in the following section.

Other online services are aimed at a much more specific audience.

For example, the Dow Jones Personal Journal delivers an electronic version of the Wall Street Journal, containing only articles that match conditions you set up to suit your interests.

Exploring the World of the Internet

This section contains only a brief overview of the Internet. For more information, look through the books on the Internet that are available at your local book or computer store.

The Internet is a network of computer networks located all around the world. Information available on the Internet is actually contained on one or more of the member networks. The Internet’s origins trace back to the ARPANET, a system created by the U.S.

Defense Department. The National Science Foundation (NSF) greatly expanded the system, providing researchers at various sites, such as universities, access to one large body of information.

Since then, the Internet has grown like a mutant being in a science fiction film. Its users range from individuals in their homes to large multinational corporations.

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An online service, such as CompuServe and AOL, is operated by a governing corporate body. The Internet, on the other hand, is much more random. No governing body controls who may access its resources or what information may be published on it. Every user is free to contribute and participate without restriction. As more users log on, contributing their own personal styles, the Internet continues to change. The open, international nature of the Internet makes it impossible to regulate or control effectively.

Here are some of the things you can do on the Internet:

Send and receive electronic mail (e-mail).

Join a written conversation in progress with one or more other people.

Shop and do your banking.

Get computer programs and other information files.

Search for information on any topic.

Publish your own articles, books and multimedia works.

Listen to the radio.

Play games with people from around the world.

Watch live concerts and interviews.

Types of Internet Sites

Each network that belongs to the Internet is a “site” on the Internet. There are different types of Internet sites:

Mail servers store and forward electronic mail (e-mail). In many ways, e-mail is like your regular mail, but it can be much faster and more convenient.

FTP sites store computer files. You can download files from an

FTP site or upload your files to it. For example, many com-

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puter companies distribute minor upgrades to their programs through FTP sites.

When you download a file you transfer the file from another computer (or an FTP site) to your computer. Uploading is sending one or more files from your computer to another.

Usenet sites maintain newsgroups, lists of messages dedicated to a particular topic. Subscribers to a newsgroup can read and respond to messages posted by others, and post messages of their own.

LISTSERV sites administer mailing lists, which are lists of people who are interested in the same topics. Individuals send their message to the centralized LISTSERV site. The LIST-

SERV server “broadcasts” the message to all the members of the mailing list. This way one person can correspond with lots of people all at once. Mailing lists are different from newsgroups in that you receive all messages automatically.

Chat sites allow people to “talk” in real time. Compared to a newsgroup that requires you to send a written message that is read later, a chat session allows you to send your message and get a response immediately.

Gopher sites provide lists of what is available elsewhere on the

Internet. Searching a gopher site is a good way to look for specific information.

Telnet sites let you log on to a computer somewhere else in the world and use its resources as if it were on your own local network.

A World Wide Web (WWW) site is a place where people can publish their own home pages. Each page has a unique address, in the form of a Universal Resource Locator (URL).

You can locate a specific home page by entering its URL or you can click on a hypertext link—indicated by a different color of text or some other obvious means—and jump to the connecting page.

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Understanding Internet Addresses

Every Internet user and site has an address. The first type of address is the individual address, used for e-mail. A sample e-mail address is:

user@host.subdomain.domain, where:

user host

is the name you select when you first subscribe to your online service or Internet access provider. See “What Do You

Need?” on page 182 for information about

Internet access providers.

is the computer on which your Internet account is located.

subdomain

is a local network or computer within the host’s system. Many addresses do not include a subdomain.

domain

indicates the type of host. In the United

States, there are six domains: com is for commercial hosts gov is for hosts in government institutions edu is for educational institutions mil is for military organizations net is for network and service companies org is for other organizations

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The second type of address is the Universal Resource Locator

(URL), used to locate specific sites on the Internet. A sample

URL is: http://aaa.bbb.ccc/dir1/dir2/dir3 where: http://

aaa.bbb.

ccc/ dir1/dir2/ dir3

is the resource type, indicating that the site is designed in hypertext markup language.

HTTP stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol and indicates a site on the WWW. Other resource types you might see in a URL include Gopher, FTP and Telnet.

is the address of the actual computer where the information is stored.

is the folder (directory on the host computer) in which the information is located.

Logging On to an Online Service or the Internet

This section gives some tips for logging on to an online service or the Internet.

Choosing What Is Best for You

Deciding which option is best for you may not be easy. Fortunately, you can always change your mind. In making a decision, consider the following:

Online services combine an easy-to-use interface and a wide range of useful services with full Internet access. Each online service has a different flavor. Look at advertising material for more than one service to see what each provides. Then decide which service seems most suitable to you.

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If you don’t need the special services offered by an online service, logging directly on to the Internet may be best for you.

Because of the enormous size and number of options on the

Internet, and the lack of the easy interface of the online services, it can be more difficult to find your way around. If possible, ask a knowledgeable friend to help you.

Gaining Access to the Internet

To log directly on to the Internet, you need an access provider.

Some access providers, such as NetCom and Pipeline provide service to a large area. Others may serve an area as small as a single county. To find out about Internet access providers in your area, check with your computer store, look in computer magazines and local newspapers, or ask a friend who’s already connected.

What Will it Cost?

When you call to sign up to an online service or Internet access provider, make sure you have a credit card handy.

Even if your service offers an initial free period, your credit card will be billed for use beyond that time.

When you sign up with an Internet service provider or online service, make sure you understand the costs involved. Most services charge a monthly rate that includes a certain amount of use. An hourly rate applies to additional time online. If you don’t have a local telephone access number, long distance call charges also apply.

If your service charges by the hour, make sure you know how long you’ve been online. It’s easy to lose track of time and run up the costs when you’re exploring the Internet or an online service.

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What Do You Need?

To subscribe to an online service or log on to the Internet directly, you need a suitable communications program. If you intend using:

An online service or one of the large Internet access providers, such as NetCom or Pipeline, you need the startup kit for the service. The startup kit includes everything you need to set up your account along with the program you use to access the service. It may be supplied free, as an incentive to use that service, or you may need to buy it.

A local Internet access provider, you need one or more thirdparty commercial programs. Your access provider may supply a collection of shareware programs for accessing the Internet.

You may also purchase a separate program, such as Netscape

Navigator, that combines the functions of the entire collection into one consistent interface.

Shareware programs are copyrighted programs that you can try out free of charge. If you decide you like the program, you must send in a small registration fee. Upon registering some shareware programs, you may receive additional benefits, such as a printed manual or free future upgrades.

Etiquette Online

When you use the Internet, it’s important to remember that you’re dealing with people. You should give other people and “local” customs the same respect online as you would face-to-face.

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Keep the following points in mind:

If you’re unsure about what might or might not be proper behavior, most newsgroups have a list of FAQs (Frequently

Asked Questions). There’s also a list of general Internet FAQs on the news.announce.newusers newsgroup.

If you’re still unsure, read the offerings from others before you post something of your own (this is called “lurking”). This way you can get a feel for what’s going on without letting anybody know you’re there or making a social blunder.

Whenever you post something on the Internet, include your name and e-mail address. It’s a common courtesy to let others know who they’re dealing with, and gives them a chance to respond.

Be considerate. Just as nobody likes being insulted face-toface, it’s no fun online either. This isn’t to say you can’t disagree with anybody on the Internet. A wide variety of differing viewpoints is one of the things that keeps the Internet so vital and alive.

Some Interesting Places to Start

If you’re new to the Internet and don’t know where to start, this section gives you a few sites you might find interesting.

The Internet is constantly changing. It’s possible that some of these sites have changed addresses or disappeared altogether.

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Some Interesting WWW Sites

Toshiba’s home pages are: http://www.toshiba.com/tais/ (America) http://www.toshiba.co.jp/ (Japan) http://www.toshiba.tice.com/ (Europe)

❖ http://river.ihs.gov/ has some great information and pictures about Grand Canyon river running.

❖ http://snow.water.ca.gov/ gives information about the

California snow pack.

❖ http://www.irs.ustreas.gov/prod/cover.html is the site operated by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service.

❖ http://nwsfo.atmos.albany.edu/www/otherwx.html provides a complete list of WWW sites dedicated to weather information and forecasts.

❖ http://www.epicurious.com/ presents a delicious array of recipes and information on food and drink.

A Few Newsgroups

❖ alt.comedy.british is for fans of British humour.

❖ alt.sports.badminton lets you keep current with information about badminton.

❖ news.newusers.questions is dedicated to information for new users of the Internet.

❖ rec.backcountry contains information about outdoor activities, such as backpacking and camping.

❖ sci.anthropology provides discussions on anthropology.

Additional Places of Interest

[email protected] is the e-mail address of the U.S.

President.

❖ marvel.loc.gov is the gopher for the Library of Congress.

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Using Bulletin Board Services

Local electronic bulletin board services (BBSs), like their mundane counterpart hanging on your wall, let you post messages for friends, or questions to which a wide variety of people can respond. Many BBSs also offer software (programs) that you can copy to your computer (called downloading).

Most BBSs serve a particular interest group and are run by an individual or small group of people. For example, a science fiction

BBS may have messages from people looking for out-of-print books and offer a few sample sections of new works.

Most computer companies offer a BBS as one way to provide customers with software updates and answers to their questions.

Toshiba's 24-hour BBS offers Toshiba computing information and is a good source of Toshiba utilities files and technical bulletins.

Complete information about accessing Toshiba's BBS is found in

“Toshiba's Bulletin Board Service” on page 336.

To access a BBS, you’ll need a general-purpose communications program. See the following section for information about using such programs.

Connecting Directly to Another Computer

If you’re connecting directly to another computer, you’ll need a general-purpose communications program, such as the HyperTerminal program included with Windows 95. This section describes some of the things you’ll need to know to connect to another computer, but does not contain specific instructions for any communications programs. Refer to HyperTerminal’s Help for information about using HyperTerminal.

There are two things you need to know before you can connect to another computer:

The communications parameters

The file transfer protocol (if you’re downloading or uploading files)

The following sections explain what these mean.

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Communications Parameters

There are four communications parameters:

Modem speed is the speed at which the modem transfers information. Speeds are measured in bits per second. Your modem manual documents the speed of your modem.

Data bits is the number of bits in one character. This number is usually seven or eight.

Stop bits indicate the end of a character. This number is usually one or two.

Parity is an error-checking method and will be set to even, odd or none.

These parameters, except for the modem speed, are usually abbreviated and combined. Common examples are N81 (no parity, eight data bits and one stop bit) and E72 (even parity, seven data bits and

2 stop bits).

You set each of these in your communications program. Each parameter must be set the same on both computers or you won’t be able to connect.

File Transfer Protocols

File transfer protocols are standards that govern how computers transfer files between modems over a telephone line. Protocols determine what type of error checking and data compression, if any, occur during transfer. Based on a number of factors, some protocols are faster than others. Popular protocols include XMO-

DEM (one of the earliest and still one of the most reliable protocols) and ZMODEM (about the fastest available these days).

You don’t really need to know anything about specific protocols— just make sure you’re using the same protocol as the computer with which you’re communicating. If you would like to know more, protocols are described in any book on telecommunications, available at your local book or computer store.

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Discovering Toshiba’s Online Resources

Toshiba maintains a number of online sites to which you can connect. These sites can provide information about Toshiba products, help with technical questions and keep you up to date with future upgrades.

On CompuServe, type go toshiba

On the Microsoft Network, type go toshiba

On the Internet World Wide Web, type http://www.toshiba.com/tais/

To access Toshiba’s BBS, set your modem to N81 and call either 714-837-4408 or 714-837-4409

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Using Your

Computer on

Your Desktop

Your Portégé 650CT computer was designed to be easy to carry around and use while you travel. However, it’s also powerful enough to use as your primary desktop computer.

This chapter describes how to connect several optional devices that can make your Portégé 650CT computer at home on your desk.

Using an External Monitor

You can easily attach an external monitor to your computer.

External monitors that support video modes greater than 600 x

800 resolution can display more information than the computer’s built-in screen. Also, having an external monitor makes the entire display bigger.

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Connecting an External Monitor

To connect an external monitor, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer off.

Monitor port

Monitor cable

Connecting the video cable

2 Connect the monitor cable to the monitor port.

3 Turn the external monitor on.

4 Turn the computer on.

The computer uses the external monitor.

If your external monitor can display high-resolution video modes (greater than 640 x 480), you can take advantage of this feature by changing the video mode. To do this, see “Changing the Display Mode” on page 280.

Directing the Display When You Turn the Computer On

When you turn the computer on, it sends information to the external monitor. To send information to the built-in LCD as well, you’ll need to change the Power On Display option setting in

TSETUP, or use the Display hotkey,

Fn

+

F5

.

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The Power On Display option in TSETUP has two settings:

Internal/External sends the display to the external monitor. If no external monitor is attached, it sends information to the computer’s built-in display. (This is the default.)

Simultaneous sends display output to both the external monitor and the built-in display. This is especially useful if you’re making a presentation and wish to guide the discussion from your notebook.

Simultaneous mode won’t work if your external monitor, or other projection device, can’t display resolutions of 800 x 600 or higher, or if you’re using a display mode not supported by the built-in display adapter.

This section explains how to change this option using the hotkey

(

Fn

+

F5

). To set the Power On Display option using TSETUP, see the DISPLAY section of the TSETUP chapter on page 406.

To set this option using the hotkey, follow these steps:

1 Press

Fn

+

F5

.

2 Still holding

Fn

, press

F5

repeatedly until the setting you want takes effect.

This hotkey cycles through the settings in the following order: built-in display only, external monitor only and simultaneous display.

3 Release the

Fn

key.

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Using an External Keyboard

If you prefer to use a standard desktop keyboard, you can attach one to your computer. The computer’s PS/2 mouse/keyboard port supports any PS/2-compatible keyboard. Toshiba makes two external keyboards specifically designed to work with your computer. One is a standard 101 key external keyboard. The other is a multimedia keyboard equipped with stereo speakers and audio connectors. For more information, contact your dealer.

You can only connect one PS/2 device at a time (unless you purchase a special Y-cable to allow you to connect both simultaneously). If you’re already using a PS/2 mouse, you must turn the computer off and remove the mouse before connecting a PS/2 keyboard.

Connecting the Keyboard

To connect an external keyboard, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer off.

Make sure the computer is off before you attach the keyboard.

Connecting a keyboard with the computer’s power on may damage the keyboard, the computer or both.

Keyboard connector

Attaching the PS/2 adapter

PS/2 adapter

2 Attach the PS/2 adapter to the standard keyboard connector.

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3 Pull down the port cover to expose the PS/2 port.

PS/2 port

Keyboard connector

Connecting an external keyboard

4 Attach the keyboard connector to the PS/2 mouse/keyboard port on the left side of the computer.

5 See the keyboard’s documentation for additional configuration steps.

6 Turn the computer on.

Making Your External Keyboard Pretend it Has the Fn Key

An external keyboard doesn’t have the

Fn

key contained on the

Portégé 650CT built-in keyboard. If you use the computer’s hotkeys or have set up key combinations in Fn-esse, you’ll probably miss these features when using an external keyboard. Don’t worry: with the Fn Key Equivalent option, you can make your external keyboard act as though it had an

Fn

key.

For more information about Fn-esse, see “Starting Programs

Faster with Fn-esse” on page 262.

To find out how to set the Fn Key Emulation option using

TSETUP, see“TSETUP” on page 403.

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Using a Serial Mouse

To set the Fn Key Equivalent option through the Windows Control Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 displays the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Keyboard icon.

Windows 95 displays the Keyboard Properties dialog box.

4 Click the Toshiba tab to bring it to the front.

5 Click the circle to the left of the desired Fn Key Equivalent for External Keyboard setting.

6 Click OK to close the dialog box with your setting in effect.

Using a Serial Mouse

You may want to use a mouse instead of the AccuPoint. You can use a serial mouse or a PS/2 mouse. See the next section “Using a

PS/2 Mouse” if you wish to use a PS/2 mouse.

If you connect a serial mouse, the AccuPoint will not work.

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To connect a serial mouse:

Serial port

Serial cable

Connecting the cable to the serial port

1 Plug the serial mouse cable into the computer’s serial port.

2 Turn the computer on.

The mouse is ready to use.

Using a PS/2 Mouse

If you prefer to use a PS/2-compatible mouse, you can attach one to your computer. The computer’s PS/2 mouse/keyboard port supports any PS/2-compatible mouse.

You can only connect one PS/2 device at a time (unless you purchase a special Y-cable to allow you to connect both simultaneously). If you’re already using a PS/2 keyboard, you must turn the computer off and remove the keyboard before connecting a PS/2 mouse. Check with your Toshiba dealer for more information on a Y-cable.

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Connecting the PS/2 Mouse

To connect a PS/2 mouse, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer off.

Make sure the computer is off before you attach the mouse.

Connecting a mouse with the computer’s power on may damage the mouse, the computer or both.

PS/2 port

PS/2 mouse connector

Port cover

Connecting a PS/2 mouse

2 Pull down the port cover on the left side of the computer to

expose the PS/2 port.

3 Attach the PS/2 mouse connector to the PS/2 port.

4 See your mouse documentation for additional configuration steps.

5 Turn the computer on.

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Setting Up a PS/2 Mouse

If you connect a PS/2 mouse to the PS/2 mouse/keyboard port, you may use the mouse, the AccuPoint or both.

To set how the PS/2 mouse works with the AccuPoint, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

3 Click the Miscellaneous tab to bring it to the front.

The Miscellaneous tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel

4 In the Pointing Devices section of the tab, click the button next to the desired option.

5 Click OK.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the System Settings Change dialog box, asking if you want to reboot (restart) the computer.

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6 Click Yes or No:

Yes restarts the computer immediately with your changes in effect.

No allows you to save open files. After you save restart the computer to make your changes take effect.

Using the Docking Adapter

Expansion connector

Guide rails

Portégé 650CT docking adapter

A docking adapter is included with your Portégé 650CT so that you can connect your computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator or the Desk Station V Plus, a docking station with great expansion capability.

Attaching the Docking Adapter

To connect your Portégé 650CT to the docking adapter, follow these steps:

1 With the power off and computer display closed, place the docking adapter and the computer on a flat level surface.

Attempting to connect the computer to the docking adapter on an uneven surface or in the air, risks permanent damage to the computer’s expansion connector.

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2 Align the guide rails on the docking adapter with the slots on the bottom of the computer.

Expansion connector

Guide rail

Connecting to the docking adapter

3 Using the heel of your hand, push the front of the com-

puter along the guide rails until it firmly connects to the expansion connector.

Do not push down on the top of the computer when connecting to the docking adapter. Pushing down risks permanent damage to the computer’s display.

Using the Optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator

By attaching the docking adapter to your computer’s expansion port, you can connect your computer to the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator. The NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator is an excellent investment if you’re using your computer both in and out of the office.

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Imagine that you’re a salesperson who frequently works away from the office. When you return to your desk, you want to be able to connect to your network, print reports from your computer, and use a mouse instead of the AccuPoint. Connecting cables for each of these devices every time you return to the office is time-consuming and inconvenient.

By connecting external devices to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator instead of directly to your computer, you can leave the devices connected while you are using your computer away from your desk. When you return, you can quickly connect your computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator and have immediate access to the devices.

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator Features

This section identifies and describes the features of the

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator.

Microphone jack Headphone jack Line-in jack Line-out jack AC IN socket

Security lock

Serial port

MIDI/joystick port Keyboard port Mouse port Monitor port Parallel port

The rear of the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator

Use the security lock slot to attach a Noteworthy Computer Lock cable to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator. This cable is discussed in “Applying Physical Restraints” on page 247.

Use the microphone jack to connect an external monaural microphone or other audio input device.

Use the headphone jack to connect stereo headphones or externally powered stereo speakers.

Use the audio line-in jack to play and record stereo sound from an external audio device, such as a stereo system.

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Use the audio line-out jack to connect your computer to a tape recorder or a stereo amplifier to record or play sounds from your computer.

Use the serial port to connect a serial device, such as a serial printer, modem or mouse.

The MIDI/joystick port lets you connect a joystick or a MIDI device, such as a synthesizer.

Use the PS/2 keyboard port to connect a PS/2 keyboard.

Use the PS/2 mouse port to connect a PS/2-compatible pointing device.

Use the monitor port to connect an external monitor.

Use the parallel port to connect a parallel printer or other parallel device.

Use the AC IN socket to connect the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator to AC power, using the AC adapter.

Volume dial

PC Card slots

(Slot 2) (Slot 3)

The right and left sides of the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator

Use the two PC Card slots to install Type III PC Cards. The slot on the right side of the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator is referred to as Slot 2. The slot on the left side is referred to as Slot

3. These slots are CardBus ready. For more information, see

“Using PC Cards in the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator” on page 205.

Use the volume dial to adjust the loudness of the system speaker.

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Guide pin

Locking latch

Computer connector

Guide pin

The front of the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator

The view of the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator above identifies:

❖ the locking latch and metal latches that secure the computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator.

❖ the computer connector that connects to the expansion port on the back of your computer.

❖ the guide pins that help align the computer with the

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator, ensuring a proper connection.

Connecting the Computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator

To attach the computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator, follow these steps:

1 Remove all cables from the back of the computer.

2 Connect the computer to the docking adapter. For instructions on how to connect the docking adapter see “Using the

Docking Adapter” on page 198.

3 Close the computer’s port covers.

4 Lift the locking latch on the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator.

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Pegs

Locking latch

Attaching the computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator

5 Place the two holes on the bottom of the docking adapter

over the pegs on the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator.

Placing the docking adapter over the pegs locks the computer to the docking adapter.

Locking latch

Locking the computer to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator

6 Gently press the locking latch down.

The docking adapter with the computer slides into place and connects to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator.

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7 Attach the power cord to the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator’s DC IN socket.

8 Connect the power cord to a wall socket.

Your computer is now ready to use.

Starting the Computer Connected to the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator

Before the system starts Windows 95, the message “Toshiba

Enhanced Port Replicator attached” displays. This confirms the computer is correctly connected to the NoteDock II Enhanced

Port Replicator.

Every time you connect the computer to a different NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator, Windows 95 creates a new hardware profile that remembers all the devices connected to that particular port replicator. This feature is extremely useful if you have a

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator both at home and at the office. Since Windows 95 automatically determines which port replicator the computer is connected to, you don’t have to tell the computer which devices are connected to it.

Disconnecting the Computer from the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator

To disconnect the computer from the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer’s power off.

2 Lift the locking latch.

3 Lift the docking adapter with the computer off the pegs.

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Using PC Cards in the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator

The NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator provides two additional PC Card slots. These slots are CardBus ready, and function in the same way as those in the computer.

For information about setting up PC Cards, refer to “Setting Up

Your PC Card for Your Computer” on page 163.

To use the PC Card slots in the NoteDock II, you will need to set up PC Card support the first time you connect to the NoteDock II.

To set up PC Card support, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 displays the Control Panel.

3 Select the PC Card (PCMCIA) icon.

4 Follow the setup instructions.

Using the Optional Desk Station V Plus

The optional Desk Station V Plus docking station provides exceptional expansion capability. By docking the computer in the Desk

Station V Plus, you have immediate access to external devices that are connected to the docking station (for example: printers, SCSI devices, network adapters, external keyboards, pointing devices).

Most importantly, you need to connect your peripheral devices only once. Docking and undocking your notebook to the Desk

Station Plus is simple, easy and fast. You can dock the notebook while it is on to use the devices connected to it. By pushing one button you undock the notebook to take with you.

Windows 95 uniquely identifies each Desk Station V Plus, and creates a unique hardware profile. When you dock your computer,

Windows 95 automatically determines which Desk Station the computer is connected to, and uses the correct hardware profile.

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For complete information about the Desk Station V Plus, talk to your Toshiba dealer. For information about connecting your computer to the Desk Station V Plus and using its features, refer to the

Desk Station V Plus User’s Guide.

Desk Station V Plus Features

SCSI

The Desk Station V Plus provides the following features:

Use the SelectBay to easily install and remove a Toshiba 3.5-inch diskette drive module or a CD-ROM drive module.

Use the 5.25-inch expansion bay in the Desk Station V Plus to install any industry standard IDE or SCSI half-height 5.25-inch device (such as a hard disk, a tape drive or a CD-ROM drive).

Use the security lock slot to attach a Noteworthy Computer Lock cable to the Desk Station V Plus. This cable is discussed in

“Applying Physical Restraints” on page 247.

Use the volume dial to adjust the loudness of the system speaker.

Use the two standard type III PC Card slots to connect up to two standard PCMCIA compatible PC Cards, such as modems, network cards, ATA devices and CardBus-ready cards.

Use the two full-length expansion slots for most standard ISA and

PCI expansion cards. A half-length expansion slot provides space for a PCI expansion card. You can install modem cards, hard disk drive cards, network interface cards and many others.

Connect a parallel printer or other parallel device through the Centronics-compatible parallel port. If you do not use this parallel port for a printer, you can connect a LAN adapter, a tape backup device, a SCSI adapter or an ECP printer.

The MIDI/joystick port lets you connect a joystick or a MIDI device, such as a synthesizer.

You can connect SCSI devices internally and externally through the 50-pin, high-density shielded SCSI II port.

Use the standard 9-pin, RS-232C serial port to connect a serial device, such as a serial printer, modem or mouse.

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You can use the video port to connect an external VGA or SVGA video monitor to the RGB port and improve the quality of your display.

Use the PS/2 mouse port to connect a PS/2-compatible pointing device.

Use the PS/2 keyboard port to connect a PS/2 keyboard.

Use the microphone jack to connect an external monaural microphone or other audio input device.

Use the headphone jack to connect stereo headphones or externally powered stereo speakers.

Use the audio line-in jack to play and record stereo sound from an external audio device, such as a stereo system or CD-ROM drive.

Use the audio line-out jack to connect your computer to a tape recorder or a stereo amplifier to record or play sounds from your computer.

Use the AC IN socket to connect the Desk Station V Plus to AC power, using a power cord.

Docking to the Desk Station V Plus

Before docking your computer, make sure the AC power cord and all peripheral devices are connected to the Desk Station V Plus.

Refer to the Desk Station V Plus User’s Manual for specific instructions.

The Desk Station V Plus supports hot-docking which means you can dock and undock the computer while the power is on (provided you are running Windows 95). To dock your computer to the Desk Station V Plus, follow these steps:

1 Remove all cables from the back of the computer.

2 Attach the computer to the docking adapter. For instructions, see “Attaching the Docking Adapter” on page 198.

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Expansion connector

Guide rails

The Desk Station V Plus

3 Place the docking adapter on the docking station’s guide rails about 1 inch from the expansion connector.

Docking indicator

Docking the computer to the Desk Station V Plus

4 With both hands, slide the computer toward the Desk

Station V Plus until the docking indicator starts to blink

green.

The Desk Station V Plus continues sliding the computer inward until the connection is made. The docking indicator stops blinking when the computer is securely connected.

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Undocking the Computer

Eject button

Undocking the computer

To undock your computer, follow these steps:

1 Push the eject button on the front of the Desk Station V

Plus.

The computer and docking adapter automatically slide away from the expansion connector.

2 Remove the computer from the docking station.

Turning the Computer Off with the Power Button

If you press the computer’s power button without turning Resume

Mode on first, the system shuts off immediately, creating the possibility of lost data and corrupted files.

When you have the computer docked in the Desk Station V Plus, you can set your computer to perform the Windows 95 shutdown procedure automatically when you press the computer’s power button by turning on the Enable “Power Off” software shutdown service option.

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To set this option:

1 Click Start, then click Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

The Control Panel

3 Double-click the Toshiba Services icon.

Windows 95 opens the Toshiba Power and Desk Station

Service Configuration property sheet on the Power page.

The Power page

4 Check the box next to Enable “Power Off” software shutdown service.

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5 Click OK.

When you press the power button to turn the computer off,

Windows 95 will shut down normally, including giving you the chance to save any open files, before the computer turns off.

Using Optional Devices in the Desk Station V Plus

When you’re using optional devices with the Desk Station V Plus the computer may not recognize which devices are connected to the Desk Station V Plus and which are connected to the computer.

When you use the Suspend command or Resume Mode some devices may not operate correctly.

You can solve these two difficulties by following a few simple rules.

Disabling Devices in the Desk Station V Plus

Turning the Auto Device Disabling option on enables your system to keep track of all the devices available to it, but distinguishes between the devices connected to the Desk Station V Plus and the devices connected directly to the computer. When you undock the computer, the system no longer keeps track of the drivers and programs associated with the devices connected to the Desk Station V

Plus.

When you dock the computer again, the system recognizes the devices.

To turn on the Auto Device Disabling option, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

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Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

The Control Panel

3 Double-click the Toshiba Services icon.

Windows 95 opens the Toshiba Power and Desk Station

Service Configuration property sheet on the Power page.

4 Click the Desk Station tab to move to the Desk Station page.

The Desk Station page

5 Click the box next to Enable “Auto Device Disabling” service for desk station devices.

6 Click OK.

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Your system will stop keeping track of the drivers and programs associated with the devices connected to the Desk Station V Plus when the computer is undocked. When you dock your computer again your system will recognize all the devices it detected the last time your computer was docked in the Desk Station V Plus.

Suspending the Computer and Desk Station V Plus

PC Cards that are designed for the APM (Advanced Power Management) standard allow the computer to go into a suspended state when you turn the computer off with the Suspend command or with Resume Mode turned on. Your system remembers the current state of all your programs and returns them to that state when you power your computer on.

The Desk Station V Plus can use devices that are not APM-compliant. Suspending your system with one or more of these devices installed may result in system halts or other erratic system behavior.

If you have devices connected to the Desk Station V Plus, you can save power and avoid the problems. By enabling the Power Suspend option on the Power page of the Toshiba Power and Desk

Station Service Configuration property sheet you tell the system to minimize its power use while maintaining continuous power between the computer and the connected devices. It does this by shutting down the display and hard disk while leaving the rest of the system on.

To enable the Power Suspend option, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba Services icon.

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Windows 95 opens the Toshiba Power and Desk Station

Service Configuration property sheet on the Power page.

The Power page

4 Check the box next to Enable “Power Suspend” instant security service.

You may also assign a sound file to play when you restart the computer from this mode. Check the box next to Play sound on Power Resume event and enter the name of the desired

.WAV file.

5 Click OK.

Now, when you turn the computer off with the Suspend command or with Resume Mode turned on while the computer is connected to the Desk Station V Plus, the display and hard disk shut down but the rest of the system stays on. This ensures a continuous powered connection between the computer and all connected devices.

Desk Station V Plus Security

“Using a Password” on page 221 describes how to set a password to protect your valuable data files. If you’re using the Desk Station

V Plus and have set a password, the password can provide protection for the notebook as well.

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When you enable the Eject Password option, you must enter a password before you can remove the computer from the Desk

Station V Plus. This section describes how to use an eject password.

Turning On the Undock Password

To turn on the Undock Password, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

4 Click the Security tab to bring it to the front.

The Security tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel

5 If you haven’t registered a System Password, click the Set button in the System Password section of the tab.

If you have already registered a System Password, skip to step 10.

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The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Set Password dialog box.

The Set Password dialog box

6 Type a password of one to 16 characters in the Enter new password box.

You may use any combination of letters and numbers in your password.

7 Type the password again in the Re-enter new password box.

If the passwords match, the OK button is enabled.

8 Click OK.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Security tab with the System Password listed as “Registered.”

9 In the Undock Password section of the dialog box, click

Enable.

10 Click OK.

The Undock Password is registered.

For more information on how the password function works see

“Using a Password” on page 221.

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Using a Password Dialog Box

With the eject password on, you’ll need to enter the password every time you remove the computer from the Desk Station V

Plus. If you turn on the Password Prompt option in the Toshiba

Services control panel, you’ll see a dialog box similar to the following:

The Password screen

If you have not turned this option on, the system beeps three times and appears to hang when you attempt to remove the computer from the Desk Station V Plus. The system remains in this state until you enter the correct password.

To turn on the Password Prompt option, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba Services icon.

Windows 95 opens the Toshiba Power and Desk Station

Service Configuration property sheet on the Power page.

4 Click the Desk Station tab to move to the Desk Station page.

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The Desk Station page

5 Click the box next to Enable “Password Prompt” service for undock events.

6 Click OK.

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Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Keeping Your

Files Safe

At some time, you'll almost certainly have files on your computer that you want to keep private. Your Portégé 650CT computer comes with several options that can help you keep your computer and files safe from unwanted intrusion.

This chapter describes the security options for your Portégé

650CT notebook computer.

Using a Password

Setting a password lets you leave your computer, secure in the knowledge that nobody can access your files. When you set a password, you must enter the password before you can work on your computer again.

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Toshiba supports the following types of passwords.

A system password protects your system in two ways: as a power-on password, it requires you to enter the password every time you start or resume the computer; as an instant password, it allows you to get up and walk away from your computer for a few moments without turning it off.

A hard disk password protects your data by requiring a password when you try to access the hard disk, whether it’s in your computer or in another system.

An undock (eject) password protects your computer and data by requiring a password when disconnecting from the optional

Desk Station V Plus.

Working with System Passwords

The user-level password is the basic level of password security.

For most users, this is all the password security you’ll need.

You may create a user-level password in either Toshiba System

Control Panel or TSETUP. This section describes how to create a user-level password in Toshiba System Control Panel and how to use it as an instant and power-on password. For more information about TSETUP, see “TSETUP” on page 403.

Creating a System Password

When you register a password in the Toshiba System Control

Panel you cannot create a password service diskette. If you forget your password, you must contact Toshiba (US telephone number 800-999-4273) before you can start your computer again. To register a password and create a password service diskette, follow the steps in “Protecting Against

Forgetfulness” on page 224.

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To create (register) a password in the Toshiba System Control

Panel, follow these steps:

1 Be sure the external diskette drive is connected to the computer.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

4 Click the Security tab to bring it to the front.

The Security tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel

5 Click the Set button in the System Password section of the tab.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Set Password dialog box.

The Set Password dialog box

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6 Type a password of one to 16 characters in the Enter new password box.

You may use any combination of letters and numbers in your password.

Make sure you use a password you can remember easily and create a password service diskette. If you ever lose or forget your password, contact Toshiba PC Product Support (US telephone number 800-999-4273). Password service diskettes are discussed in “Protecting Against Forgetfulness” on page 224.

7 Type the password again in the Re-enter new password box.

If the passwords match, the OK button is enabled.

8 Click OK.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Security tab with the System Password listed as “Registered.”

9 If you would like, you may also enter a Password Prompt in the Prompt text box.

This text will appear with the password message any time you start or restart the computer.

Protecting Against Forgetfulness

If you ever forget your password, a password service diskette lets you bypass the password when starting your computer.You can create a password service diskette when you register a password in

TSETUP.

If you forget your password and have lost your password service diskette, contact Toshiba service (US telephone number

800-999-4273).

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To register a password in TSETUP and create a password service diskette, follow these steps:

1 Make sure you’ve attached the external diskette drive.

2 Insert a diskette into the diskette drive.

Run TSETUP outside of Windows 95, at a system prompt. If you try to run TSETUP from an MS-DOS session under

Windows 95, results can be unpredictable.

3 If you’re currently in Windows 95, click Start, then click

Shut Down.

4 Click the button next to Restart the computer in MS-DOS mode and click Yes.

Windows 95 shuts down the computer, then restarts it in

MS-DOS mode and displays a system prompt.

5 Type:

c:\dos\tsetup.

TSETUP displays a screen similar to the following:

Total = 16384KB

DISPLAY

Display Adaptor = VGA Compatible

LCD Display Colors = 256K Colors

Power On Display = Internal/External

Text Mode Stretch = Enabled

Not Registered

MEMORY

PASSWORD

HARD DISK

Int. Standard HDD

SYSTEM SETUP (1/2) BIOS VERSION = X.XX

BATTERY

Battery Save Mode = Full Power

Mode = Enhanced IDE (Normal)

OTHERS

Power-up Mode = Boot

CPU Cache = Enabled

L2 Cache = Enabled

Auto Power On = Disabled

Alarm Volume = High

System Beep = Enabled

Keyboard = Layout/Fn

Boot Priority = FDD

HDD

Pointing Devices = Auto-Selected

PC Card Controller Mode

= PCIC Compatible

↑↓←→

:Select items Space, BkSp:Change Values PgDn, PgUp: Change pages

Esc:Exit without saving Home:Set default values End:Save changes and Exit

A sample first page of the System Setup screen

6 Press

p

to highlight the Password section.

7 Press the spacebar.

TSETUP asks you to enter a new password.

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8 Type a password of one to 16 characters and press

Enter

.

You may use any combination of letters and numbers in your password.

9 When TSETUP prompts you to do so, verify the password by typing it again and pressing

Enter

.

If the two passwords match, TSETUP displays: Registered.

If the two passwords don't match TSETUP displays an error message. Repeat steps 6 and 7 to enter the password again.

10 Press

End

to save your change and close TSETUP.

11 Press

Y

to confirm you want to quit.

The computer overwrites all existing information on the password service diskette. Make sure the diskette you use does not contain any important information.

TSETUP asks you to enter the type of diskette you’re using.

12 Press

2

if you’re using a 1.44MB diskette or press

1

if you’re using a 720KB diskette.

TSETUP creates the password service diskette and displays a message when it’s finished.

13 Remove the diskette and press any key to continue.

TSETUP closes, returning you to the system prompt. The next time you start the computer your password will be in effect.

14 Place your password service diskette in a safe place, away from the computer.

Do not use your password service diskette for any other purpose. If you try to access the diskette, you’ll receive an error message, and will have to reset your password and create a new password service diskette.

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Power-On Password

Whenever you start or restart your computer with a power-on password in effect, the computer prompts you to enter the password before it goes through its normal startup procedure. The power-on password operates whether or not the computer is operating in Resume Mode.

When your computer prompts you to enter your password, type it in and press

Enter

. If you enter the password correctly, the computer continues with its normal startup procedure. If you enter an incorrect password, the computer beeps. After three incorrect attempts, the beep sounds continuously and the computer turns off automatically.

If you’ve forgotten your password, follow these steps:

1 Make sure you’ve attached the external diskette drive.

2 Press the reset button.

The system prompts you for your password.

3 Insert the write-enabled password service diskette into the diskette drive and press

Enter

.

The system prompts you, “

Set Password Again (Y/N)?

The password service diskette is not reusable. Once you use it, you must create a new diskette, even if you set the same password.

4 To enter TSETUP and reset your password, press

Y

. Follow the instructions in “Protecting Against Forgetfulness” on page 224 to reset your password.

To remove your password, press

N

. It will no longer be registered.

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Instant Password

An instant password secures your system with a single keystroke.

Use this feature when you need to leave your desk for a few minutes and don’t want to turn the computer off.

To use an instant password, press

Fn

+

F1

. Pressing this hotkey freezes the keyboard and AccuPoint and blanks the screen. An instant password has no effect on an optional serial mouse or trackball.

To unlock the password, follow these steps:

1 Press

Enter

.

If you’ve registered a password, the screen remains blank. If you haven’t registered a password, the computer returns to where it was when you pressed the hotkey.

2 Enter your password and press

Enter

.

If you enter the password correctly, the computer returns to where it was when you pressed the hotkey.

Disabling a System Password

To disable your password, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

4 Click the Security tab to bring it to the front.

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5 In the System Password section of the tab, click Remove.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Verify Password dialog box.

The Verify Password dialog box

6 Type your password in the Enter existing password box.

If the password matches the one you set, the OK button is enabled.

7 Click OK.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Security tab with the System Password listed as “Not Registered.”

8 Click OK to exit the Toshiba System Control Panel.

Using a Hard Disk Drive Password

Setting a hard disk drive password prevents an unauthorized user from accessing your hard disk, even if it is removed and installed on another computer. The password option is stored on the hard disk, and requires a password to be entered before any data on the disk can be accessed.

Setting a Hard Disk Drive Password

There are two types of passwords that can be assigned to your hard disk drive, a User password and a Master password. The

User password is the first level of security that requires you to enter your password each time you access the drive to start your computer.

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The Master password provides a second level of security. This optional password lets you bypass the User password and access your hard disk, in case you forget the User password.

Make sure you choose a hard disk password you can remember easily. If you set a hard disk password and later forget the password or lose your password diskette, you will never be able to access your hard disk again.

Toshiba is not responsible for any data loss, lack of use, inability to access the hard disk drive, or any other loss to you or any other person or organization that results from an inaccessible hard disk drive.

Setting a Hard Disk Drive Master Password

If you choose to set a hard disk drive Master password, you must set it before setting the hard disk drive User password.

To set a hard disk drive Master password, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Click Windows Explorer.

The Windows Explorer window opens.

3 Double-click the Windows folder in the C: drive directory.

The right side of the Explorer window displays all the folders in the Windows directory.

4 Double-click the HDDPWD folder.

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The right side of the Explorer window displays the two HDD

Password programs. They are:

❖ hddpwd16.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows for Workgroups).

❖ hddpwd32.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows 95).

5 Double-click the hddpwd file that is best for you.

The HDD Password utility displays a warning box. Read this information carefully.

The HDD Password warning box

6 Click OK to continue.

To exit without setting a hard disk drive password, click

Cancel.

The HDD Password utility displays a dialog box that lists the hard disk drives installed in the system. (Your dialog box may differ from the one shown).

The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box

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7 Click Master.

The HDD Password utility displays the Master Password dialog box.

The Master Password dialog box

8 Click Register.

The HDD Password utility displays a Register Password dialog box that lists all the unregistered hard disk drives available for password assignments.

The Register Password dialog box

9 Select one or more of the hard drives listed by clicking in the box next to the drive.

To use the same password for all drives, click the box next to the message “Use the same password for all devices.”

A check mark appears in the box when it is clicked.

10 Click OK to continue setting the password.

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The Register Master Password warning box informs you that the Master password is used as an emergency bypass for the

User password. Read this information carefully.

The Register Master Password warning box

11 Click Yes to continue registering the Master password.

The Register Password dialog box displays the name of the drive being registered after the message, Enter the password for…

The Register Password dialog box

12 Type the password in the New Password field.

13 Confirm the password by typing the password again in the

Confirm new password field.

14 Click OK.

To exit without setting a hard disk drive password, click

Cancel.

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The HDD Password utility warns you for the last time that you are about to register a Master password. Read this carefully.

The Register Master Password warning box

15 Click Yes to register the password.

Click No to cancel the password registration.

The HDD Password utility registers the password. If you chose to register a unique password for each hard disk drive, the

HDD Password utility prompts you to enter the next password.

16 Repeat steps 12 through 15 for each drive that requires a new password.

Once you have entered a password for all selected hard disk drives, the HDD Password utility prompts you to create a password backup diskette. For instructions, see “Creating a Password

Backup Diskette” on page 239.

Setting a Hard Disk Drive User Password

If you want to create a Master password that will bypass the

User password in case it is forgotten, you must create a Master password first. See “Setting a Hard Disk Drive Master

Password” on page 230 for details.

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To set a hard disk drive User password, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Click Windows Explorer.

The Windows Explorer window opens.

3 Double-click the Windows folder in the C: drive directory.

The right side of the Explorer window displays all the folders in the Windows directory.

4 Double-click the HDDPWD folder.

The right side of the Explorer window displays the two HDD

Password programs. They are:

❖ hddpwd16.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows for Workgroups).

❖ hddpwd32.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows 95).

5 Double-click the hddpwd file that is best for you.

The HDD Password utility displays a warning box. Read this information carefully.

The HDD Password warning box

6 Click OK to continue.

To exit without setting a hard disk drive password, click

Cancel.

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The HDD Password utility displays a dialog box that lists the hard disk drives installed in the system. (Your dialog box may differ from the one shown).

The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box

7 Click User.

The HDD Password utility displays the User Password dialog box.

The User Password dialog box

8 Click Register.

The HDD Password utility displays a Register Password dialog box that lists all the unregistered hard disk drives available for password assignments.

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The Register Password dialog box

9 Select one or more of the hard drives listed by clicking in the box next to the drive.

To use the same password for all drives, click the box next to the message “Use the same password for all devices”.

A check mark appears in the box when it is clicked.

10 Click OK to continue setting the password.

The Register User Password warning box informs you that the

User password is used to protect against unauthorized access to your drive. Read this information carefully.

The Register User Password warning box

11 Click Yes to continue registering the User password.

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The Register Password dialog box displays the name of the drive being registered after the message, “Enter the password for:”.

The Register Password dialog box

12 Type the password in the New Password field.

13 Confirm the password by typing the password again in the

Confirm new password field.

14 Click OK.

To exit without setting a hard disk drive password, click

Cancel.

The HDD Password utility warns you for the last time that you are about to register a User password. Read this carefully.

The Register User Password warning box

15 Click Yes to register the password.

Click No to cancel the password registration.

The HDD Password utility registers the password. If you chose more than one drive that uses a different password, the HDD

Password utility prompts you to enter the next password.

16 Repeat steps 12 through 15 for each drive that requires a new password.

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After you’ve complete all these steps, the HDD Password utility prompts you to create a password backup diskette. Refer to the next section for instructions.

Creating a Password Backup Diskette

Once a password has been registered for each selected hard disk drive, the HDD Password utility prompts you to create a password backup file called an HDD key-file.

The Create HDD Key-file dialog box

1 Click Yes to backup your password to diskette.

HDD Password utility displays the Creating HDD Key file status window while copying the Key-file to the diskette drive.

The Creating HDD Key file status window

2 Insert a formatted blank diskette in diskette drive A.

3 Press

Enter

.

The blue status bar moves from left to right as the utility copies the Key file to the diskette drive.

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When the backup copy is complete, the HDD Password utility displays the following dialog box.

The Create HDD Key-file confirmation dialog box

4 Click OK to confirm that the Key-file copy was successful.

Once this procedure is completed for all selected drives, the following dialog box displays.

The Register User Password dialog box

5 Click OK.

The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box displays. An assigned password is indicated by the word, “Registered,” under the type of password, Master or User.

Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box

6 Click Exit to finish registering the assigned passwords.

Click Cancel if you wish to cancel all the password changes made during this session.

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The final dialog box displays asking you to commit the password changes that you made.

The Toshiba Hard Disk Password Utility commitment dialog box

7 Click OK to commit the password changes.

8 Click the Start button, then Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

9 Click the box next to the message, Restart the computer? then click Yes for your password changes to take effect.

Deleting a Hard Disk Password

To delete a hard disk drive password, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Click Windows Explorer.

The Windows Explorer windows opens.

3 Double-click the Windows folder in the C: drive directory.

The right side of the Explorer window displays all the folders contained in the Windows directory.

4 Double-click on the HDDPWD folder.

The right side of the Explorer window displays the two HDD

Password programs. They are:

❖ hddpwd16.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows for Workgroups).

❖ hddpwd32.exe (choose this file if you are running

Windows 95).

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5 Double-click the hddpwd file that is best for you.

The HDD Password utility displays a warning box.

The HDD Password Warning box

6 Click OK to continue deleting a registered password.

Clicking Cancel allows you to exit the program.

The HDD Password utility displays the Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box. The hard disk drives with a registered password display “Registered” under the Master or User columns. (Your dialog box may differ from the one shown).

The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box

You must delete the hard disk drive User password before you can delete the hard disk drive Master password.

7 Click Master or User depending on the type of password you want to delete.

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The HDD Password utility displays the Password Option dialog box.

The Password option dialog box

8 Click Delete.

The following dialog box displays all the hard disk drives with registered passwords.

The Delete Password dialog box

9 Select one or more of the hard drives listed by clicking the box next to the drive.

10 Click OK.

The Delete Password dialog box displays the name of the drive for which the password is being deleted after the message,

“Enter the password for: …”

The Delete Password dialog box

11 Type the password for the drive shown in the dialog box.

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12 Click OK.

Clicking Cancel cancels the deletion process for the current drive and starts the deletion process for the next selected drive.

The HDD Password utility displays a warning box offering you one chance to cancel the deletion process.

13 Click Yes.

Clicking No cancels the deletion process.

After all the selected drives have been processed, the HDD

Password utility displays the following dialog box.

The Delete Master Password pending dialog box

14 Click OK.

The Toshiba HDD Password Utility dialog box displays those drives with deleted passwords as “Deleted (Pending)” in the status column.

15 Click Exit.

If you try to change the password before restarting the computer, the password that was in place the last time the computer was started will be the effective password.

16 Click the Start button, then Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

17 Click the box next to the message, Restart the computer?, then click Yes for your password changes to take effect.

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Using an Undock (Eject) Password

Turning on the Undock Password option (called the Eject Password in TSETUP) prevents an authorized user disconnecting the computer from, or attaching the computer to, the optional Desk

Station V Plus. This protects both your computer and your data.

The undock password is the same as the system password.

You must register a system password in the Toshiba System

Control Panel or TSETUP before you can use an undock password option.

This section provides instructions for setting an undock password through the Toshiba System Control Panel. For information about setting an eject password in TSETUP, refer to “TSETUP” on page 403.

Setting an Undock Password

To turn the undock password option on, follow these steps:

You must register a system password in the Toshiba System

Control Panel or TSETUP before you can use an undock password option.

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

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The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

4 Click the Security tab to bring it to the front.

The Security tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel

5 In the Undock Password section of the dialog box, click

Enable.

6 Click OK.

The Undock Password is registered.

Removing the Undock Password

To turn the undock password option off, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens with the Start Up

Options tab on top.

4 Click the Security tab to bring it to the front.

5 In the Undock Password section of the tab, click Remove.

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The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Verify Password dialog box.

The Verify Password dialog box

6 Type your password in the Enter existing password box.

If the password matches the one you set, the OK button is enabled.

7 Click OK.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Security tab with the Undock Password listed as “Password not required.”

Applying Physical Restraints

Loop

The Noteworthy Computer Lock

Locking end

You can connect the optional Noteworthy Computer Lock cable to deter theft. Follow these steps:

1 Wrap the cable around the leg of your desk or other heavy object.

2 Pass the locking end through the loop.

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Security lock slot

Key

Locking end

Cable

Inserting the locking end into the security lock slot

3 Insert the cable’s locking end into the security lock slot on the left side of the computer.

4 Turn the key a quarter turn and remove.

The computer is securely locked.

If you’re using an optional NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator, you’ll want to purchase two of these cables: one for the computer and another for the NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator.

Viruses and How to Cure Them

Over the last few years, there have been a number of computer virus scares. Pranksters seem to find pleasure in unleashing these potentially destructive programs on the general public.

Viruses, while a potential problem, need not have a devastating effect on your computer. By taking a few simple precautions, you can avoid infection. And, by making sure you have a complete backup of all your programs and data files, you can ensure a speedy recovery if you do run into problems.

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Windows for Workgroups comes with Microsoft Antivirus for

Windows (MWAV.EXE) and DOS (MSAV.EXE). Windows 95 does not provide any virus protection software. If you chose

Windows 95, you’ll need to purchase a third party virus detection/ removal program.

There are many virus detection/removal programs available. Ask your dealer for help in selecting one that adequately meets your needs.

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Making Life

Easier

Your notebook comes ready to use for both work and play without changing any system options. However, you may want to customize one or more of the computer’s built-in features to make your life even easier.

This chapter discusses several convenient options. Feel free to experiment with how they work. There is no one correct way to use the computer. Toshiba’s built-in configuration options make it possible to customize the way the computer works to meet your needs.

Saving Time with Multiple Configurations

Imagine it’s time to go home at the end of the day’s work. You’ve been using your computer all day with a docking station to send financial data to corporate headquarters, access the corporate database and run a statistical package. You take the computer home with you so you can write some memos and help your son or daughter with their homework.

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In the office, you want your Toshiba Access Panel to contain the icons that launch the programs you use most frequently for work.

At home, you need your word processor and possibly a game or two to play when your child’s homework is finished.

You can set up the Toshiba Access Panel so that when a hardware event occurs, such as undocking the computer from the Desk Station at work, the icons and information displayed on the panel change.

The Toshiba Access Panel provides five configurations, three of which come already named and preset with options and settings as follows:

Home launches the programs you use most when at home.

Office is the configuration you use at work.

Travel might be a different configuration from both Home and

Office. You would use this configuration when on the road.

A configuration specifies the basic features of your system. A

Toshiba Access Panel configuration specifies the power and battery settings, Fn-esse assignments, the gauges displayed on the panel and which programs to launch from the Panel.

You can change the settings for Home, Office and Travel. In addition, you can define settings for two additional configurations.

Which Configuration Am I Currently Using?

At the top of the panel is a button that identifies the current configuration.

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Home, Office and Travel Configuration buttons

The configuration you choose can affect all aspects of the Panel including hardware configuration settings, the display of the battery gauges and the program icons from which you can launch programs.

Changing Configurations

To change your configuration, click the current configuration button. A slider bar appears. To change the configuration, click one of the other buttons.

More Reasons to Use Configurations

There are any number of reasons for using multiple configurations to simplify using the computer. For example, if you are a student or an instructor and you use your computer to take notes or to illustrate your lectures, you might want to decrease the volume of the battery alarm so as not to interrupt a lecture or discussion.

Later at home, you may want the alarms to sound at full volume.

If one configuration is designed for classroom use and another for home, all you need to do is click the classroom button and you are ready to load the program for taking notes or delivering a lecture.

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Perhaps you always power the computer through the Desk Station at work, while you use the power cord at home. In both places you have no need for the battery save options because you’re not using the battery. When you travel, however, you want to take advantage of the computer’s battery saving features. A quick change of the configuration by clicking the travel button prepares the system for the road.

Managing Configurations

To access the configuration options, follow these steps:

1 Click the Options button at the lower end of the Toshiba

Access Panel.

A bar of options slides out.

2 Click the Configuration Management button on the slider bar.

The panel opens the Configuration Management dialog box.

Configuration Management dialog box

3 To modify an existing configuration, click its button, then click Properties.

4 To remove an existing configuration, click its button, then click Remove.

5 To create a new configuration, click one of the unused configuration buttons, then click Enable.

6 To reorder a button on the slider bar, select the button and click Move Right or Move Left.

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Creating Your Own Button Icon

The button icons used to identify the configuration are small bitmap drawings that are 45 by 42 pixels. To assign your own unique icon to one of the configuration buttons, locate a piece of clip art you like or create an icon using a program for drawing bitmaps or icons.

If you’re new to computers, an icon is a small drawing that represents a task, function or feature.

A pixel is the smallest area of the screen that the system can control. Some screens contain a total of 640 x 480 pixels.

Others contain 800 x 600 pixels. All information displayed consists of combinations of colored or black and white pixels.

Clip art is the term that refers to computer-ready graphics you can buy from a graphics company or over the Internet.

A bitmap is drawing that consists of tiny dots (in this case, pixels) that when viewed from a distance form a picture.

If you draw an icon, save it as a bitmap or as an icon, making sure it has the extension .BMP or.ICO. Save it or copy it to the c:\toshiba\tap\images folder.

To assign your icon, follow these steps:

1 Click the configuration button you wish to modify.

2 Click Properties.

The Configuration Properties dialog box opens.

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The Configuration Properties dialog box

3 To change the name for the configuration, type in a name in the Name box.

4 To assign a different icon, click Change Image.

The Change Configuration Image dialog box opens.

The Change Configuration Image dialog box

The example above shows the name of the bitmap file for the

Travel configuration icon.

5 Change the Files of type list to display either bitmapped files or icon files.

6 To view a bitmap or icon before you commit to using it, click Preview.

The system displays the icon to the right of the preview button.

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Choosing When to Automatically Change

Configurations

The computer can change configurations automatically under these conditions:

❖ when you connect it to the Desk Station

❖ when you remove it from the Desk Station

❖ when using AC power

❖ when using battery power

❖ when using a specific Windows 95 hardware configuration (if multiple configurations exist)

To define when you want the configuration change to occur:

1 Click Advanced on the Configuration Management dialog box.

The Advanced Configuration Management dialog box opens.

The Advanced Configuration Management dialog box

2 Select the appropriate setting:

Choose Disable automatic configuration switching if you plan to change the configuration yourself by clicking the button at the top of the Toshiba Access Panel.

Choose one of the other settings to cause the system to change configurations automatically.

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Creating Your Own Configuration

To use one of the blank buttons to create your own configuration, follow these steps:

1 Click the blank configuration button.

2 Click Enable.

The Enable Configuration dialog box opens.

The Enable Configuration dialog box

3 Enter a name for the configuration in the Name box.

4 Assign the icon for the button.

The procedure for assigning the icon using this dialog box is the same as the procedure for assigning the icon using the Configuration Properties dialog box. See “Creating Your Own Button Icon” on page 255.

5 Choose one of the existing configurations from which to copy the hardware and application settings.

You must copy settings from an existing configuration when you create a new one. In the next section you’ll see how to change the settings for your new configuration.

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Changing Configuration Settings

You customize hardware settings after you’ve created a new configuration. Both MaxTime and Toshiba System include the Configurations icon for assigning the current settings to your chosen configuration.

Changing Battery Settings

All battery settings are controlled by MaxTime. The easiest way to configure the system’s power settings is by clicking the MaxTime

Wizard button on the Toshiba Access Panel. This starts the Max-

Time Wizard, which selects power settings based on how you prefer to work and assigns the settings to the appropriate configurations.

If you prefer to control each power saving option individually, you can do so through the MaxTime Control Panel. To access the

MaxTime Control Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the MaxTime icon.

4 The MaxTime Control Panel opens.

You can also open the MaxTime Control Panel by doubleclicking the Toshiba Power icon in right corner of the Windows 95 taskbar.

5 Click the Configuration button to assign settings to a specific configuration.

The computer displays this icon any time you can assign an option to a configuration.

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MaxTime displays the Power Usage dialog box for the current power source (in this example, the External Power Usage dialog box):

The External Power Usage dialog box

Each configuration is represented by a tab.

6 Click the tab for the configuration you want to change.

7 Choose one of the Power Usage Modes from the list box:

Low Power mode conserves power when you’re using the battery.

Full Power mode maximizes system performance.

Custom Settings lets you decide how to configure each of the Power Usage Details below the list box. See “Conserving Power” on page 130 for more information on what each of these options means.

8 Click OK to close the dialog box.

9 Click OK to exit the MaxTime Control Panel.

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Changing Warning Volumes

The warning volumes are controlled by the Toshiba System program in Control Panel. To assign volume settings to a specific configuration, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens.

4 Click the Miscellaneous tab to bring it to the front.

The Miscellaneous tab of the Toshiba System Control Panel

5 Click the Configuration button in the Warnings section of the tab.

The Toshiba System Control Panel displays the Configuration

Specific Alarm dialog box:

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The Configuration Specific Alarm dialog box

6 Select the tab for the configuration you want to set.

7 Select the warning volume and turn on (enable) or turn off

(disable) the Enable system beep warning.

8 Click OK to close the dialog box.

9 Click OK to exit the Toshiba System Control Panel.

Starting Programs Faster with Fn-esse

You may think that when you have one Windows program open and want to open a different program, you must click Start, point to Programs and click on the program you want to open. Not necessarily—Windows 95 shortcuts and Toshiba's Fn-esse program provide quick ways to open programs, documents and folders from within any Windows program. For more information on making Windows 95 shortcuts see: “Lesson 8: Making Shortcuts” on page 58. The following section describes how to use the Fnesse program to quickly access your programs and files.

By assigning a key combination with the

Fn

key, you can:

❖ open a Windows program.

❖ open a file in its associated Windows program.

❖ display a customized folder of Windows programs and/or files from which to choose.

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You can assign any key that is not associated with a hotkey or a keyboard overlay. This section explains how to assign your

Fn

key combinations and use them to open programs and documents quickly.

Starting Fn-esse

To start Fn-esse, click the Fn-esse button on the Toshiba Access

Panel.

Fn-esse displays the Fn-esse keyboard:

The Fn-esse keyboard

The keys are coded as follows:

❖ black keys are available keys (not yet assigned)

❖ colored keys are assigned (blue is the default color)

❖ dark gray keys are not assignable

❖ keys with a small triangle on the upper left corner open either a program folder or a custom folder

To view an existing key assignment, position the pointer over the key on the Fn-esse keyboard. A pop-up hint appears showing you what program, file or folder is associated with the key.

If a key is unassigned, the hint reads “No Assignment.”

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Assigning Keys

You can assign a file, program folder, or custom folder to a Fn key combination by:

Clicking the key on the Fn-esse keyboard, then clicking

Assign To and following the instructions on the screen.

Dragging a program or file icon from the Windows Explorer and dropping it onto a key on the Fn-esse keyboard.

Clicking a file or folder with the secondary button, then choosing Assign to Fn key from the shortcut menu that appears.

The following sections discuss the first two methods listed above.

Assigning a Key to a Program or a File

To assign a key combination the task of opening a program or file and its associated program, follow these steps:

1 Open Fn-esse.

2 Click the desired key in the Fn-esse keyboard.

Fn-esse displays a shortcut menu.

3 Point to Assign To.

Fn-esse allows you to choose between File, Program Folder and Custom Folder.

4 Click File.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box with the Assignment Type set to File.

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The Assignment dialog box

5 Fill in the Description, Target and Start in text boxes with the file information, or click Programs or Browse to choose your file from a list:

Clicking Programs displays the Programs Browser dialog box, which lists the items in the Programs menu.

Clicking Browse displays the Open dialog box, which allows you to select your file from a directory tree.

6 Click the folder which contains the program or file you want to assign.

Fn-esse displays the selected folder’s contents.

7 Click the program icon (or the file icon) to which you want to assign the

Fn

key combination.

8 Exit the dialog box:

Click OK if you’re in the Programs Browser.

Click Open if you’re in the Open dialog box.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box with the Description, Target and Start in text boxes filled in.

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9 Choose a Run Mode:

Clicking Normal starts the program in a normal window on a portion of the desktop.

Clicking Minimized starts the program without opening it on the desktop. It also adds an icon to the taskbar.

Clicking Maximized starts the program in a window that fills the desktop.

10 To activate the program if it is already running when you press its assigned

Fn

key combination, click the check box next to “Switch to running target application, if one exists.”

This option does not function with the Windows Explorer.

11 Click OK to save your key assignment and exit the dialog box.

The program or document is now associated with the key you just selected. To open the program or file, press

Fn

plus the appropriate key from within Windows.

Assigning a Key to a Program Folder

To assign a key the task of opening a program folder, follow these steps:

1 Open Fn-esse.

2 Click the desired key in the Fn-esse keyboard.

Fn-esse displays a shortcut menu.

3 Point to Assign To.

Fn-esse allows you to choose between File, Program Folder and Custom Folder.

4 Click Program Folder.

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Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box, with the

Assignment Type set to Program Folder.

5 Fill in the Description and Target text boxes with the folder information or click Program Folders to choose your folder from the Program Folder Browser.

Fn-esse displays the Programs Browser with a list of program folders in the left box.

6 Click the folder to which you want to assign the

Fn

key combination.

Fn-esse displays the contents of the selected folder on a shaded background indicating the individual programs and folders are unavailable.

7 Click OK.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box with the Description and Target text boxes filled in.

8 Click OK to save your key assignment and exit the dialog box.

The program folder is now associated with the

Fn

key combination. To open the program folder, press

Fn

plus the appropriate key from within Windows.

Assigning a Key to a Custom Folder

To create a custom folder and assign a key combination to the task of opening that custom folder, follow these steps:

1 Open Fn-esse.

2 Click the desired key in the Fn-esse keyboard.

Fn-esse displays a shortcut menu.

3 Point to Assign To.

Fn-esse allows you to choose between File, Program Folder and Custom Folder.

4 Click Custom Folder.

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Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box, with the Assignment Type set to Custom Folder.

5 Type a name for your custom folder in the

Description field.

6 To add programs or files to your custom folder, click Add.

Fn-esse displays a directory tree that allows you to select a program or file.

7 Select the folder which contains the program or file you want to add to your custom folder.

The browser displays the file name you select in the text field.

8 Click Open.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box and adds the selected program or file to the list of files in the custom folder.

The Assignment dialog box with the added files

9 In the Popup display options section of the dialog box, select how the items in the pop-up list will display:

To display the program or file without the path, select No

Path displayed.

To display the program or file without the file extension, select No Extension displayed.

To display the programs and files ordered by most recent usage, select Most Recently Used Sort.

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10 To remove a file from the list of current files, select the file and click Remove.

To remove all files from the current list, click Remove All.

11 Click OK to save your key assignment and exit the dialog box.

The custom folder containing the files you selected is now associated with the

Fn

key combination. To open the custom folder, press

Fn

plus the appropriate key from within Windows.

Using Drag-and-Drop

You can also assign a key combination to a program or file by dragging the icon for the program or file from the Windows

Explorer and dropping it onto one of the keys on the Fn-esse keyboard. To use the drag and drop method to assign tasks to keys, follow these steps:

1 Open both Fn-esse and the Windows Explorer.

2 Resize the Explorer window so you can see both the Fnesse keyboard and the Explorer at the same time.

If you’re unsure how to do this, refer to “Lesson 5: Starting

Programs” on page 52.

3 In the Explorer window, highlight the program or document file you wish to assign to a key.

4 Drag the highlighted item from the Explorer to the key on the Fn-esse keyboard to which you wish to assign it.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box completely filled in to reflect the selected program or document.

5 Click OK to close the Assignment dialog box with your key assignment in place.

The program or document is now associated with the key you just selected. To open the program or document, press

Fn

plus the appropriate key from within any Windows program.

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Changing or Removing Existing Key Assignments

To change or remove an existing key assignment, follow these steps:

1 Click the key on the Fn-esse keyboard you wish to change.

Fn-esse displays a shortcut menu.

The shortcut menu

2 To Re-assign the key to the task of opening a program, a document or a folder, click Re-assign to.

When Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box, click

Re-assign To, select the new task and follow the instructions earlier in this section for assigning that task.

3 To move the existing key assignment to another key, click

Move and click the new key.

The previously assigned key becomes black. The newly assigned key changes color, indicating it is now an assigned key.

4 To remove the key assignment, click Clear.

Fn-esse displays a dialog box, prompting you to confirm the clearing of the key assignment.

5 Click Yes.

The key becomes black.

Setting Options

This section describes the options you can set by clicking the

Options button on the Fn-esse keyboard. When you click the

Options button, Fn-esse displays the Fn-esse Options dialog box.

This dialog box provides two pages of options, each with its own tab: Options and Ext Keyboard Fn Key. The options discussed in this section are on the Options tab.

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Notifying on Launch

If you click the check box next to Notify on Launch, Fn-esse displays the title while it opens the assigned program or file.

Confirming Changes in Existing Key Assignments

If you click the check box next to Confirm Key Changes, Fn-esse asks you to confirm changes in existing key assignments.

Setting Colors

To choose colors for each of the three assigned key tasks, follow these steps.

1 Click the scroll arrow to see the available colors.

As you scroll down the list of colors, the keys or the popup changes color.

2 To set the color for the:

❖ assigned keys, use Assigned Keys.

❖ triangle at the left top of keys assigned the task of opening a program folder, use Program Folder.

❖ triangle at the left top of keys assigned the task of opening a custom folder, use Custom Folder.

3 Click the color to select it.

4 To apply the new colors to your Fn-esse keyboard, click

Apply.

5 To cancel your color selections and return to the previously applied colors, click Cancel.

6 To save the settings and exit the dialog box, click OK.

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Using Fn-esse with an External Keyboard

You can use Fn-esse even if you’re working with an external keyboard that doesn’t have an

Fn

key. To set a key combination to emulate the

Fn

key, follow these steps:

1 Click the Options button on the Fn-esse keyboard.

Fn-esse displays the Fn-esse Options dialog box with the

Options tab in front.

2 Click the Ext Keyboard Fn Key tab.

Fn-esse displays the tab.

3 Click the button next to the key combination you wish to emulate the

Fn

key.

4 Click OK.

The key combination is assigned. When you use the external keyboard, use this key combination instead of pressing

Fn

.

Making the Key Assignment Configuration Aware

You can assign key combinations to different tasks in each of your

Toshiba Access Panel configurations. To remove a key assignment from one or more of the configurations, follow these steps:

1 Click the key you wish to change on the Fn-esse keyboard.

Fn-esse displays a shortcut menu.

2 Click Re-assign To.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box.

3 Click the Configuration management button in the upper right corner of the Assignment dialog box.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment window with tabs for each configuration.

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4 Select the tab for the configuration from which you want to remove the key assignment.

5 Remove the assignment by clicking Clear.

6 Click OK.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment dialog box with all the text boxes grayed out. To change any settings for this key combination you must first choose a configuration.

7 Click OK to save your settings and exit this dialog box.

Using Device Manager to Configure the Computer

The Windows 95 Device Manager lets you set up many of the individual components of your system. You’ll need to use it if, for example, you want to change the COM port name assigned to the serial port or the range of memory reserved for the display adapter.

This section gives a brief overview of how to use Device

Manager.

To change a component’s setting in Device Manager, follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button.

2 Click Properties.

Windows 95 opens the System Properties sheet.

3 Click the Device Manager tab.

The Device Manager page opens.

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The Device Manager

This page lists all of the components of the system that you can change through Device Manager.

4 Double-click the device you want to modify. For example, if you want to modify the serial port settings, double-click

Ports.

5 Click the Resources tab to move to the Resources page.

6 Make the desired changes.

If you’re unused to working with the computer’s configuration, it’s a good idea to leave the Use Automatic Settings box checked. These settings were chosen to work together within the system and with most available optional devices.

7 Click OK when you’ve finished your changes.

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Working with the Keyboard

This section introduces additional keyboard options.

Making Your Keyboard Pretend it Has More Keys

The 101-key enhanced keyboard has two

Enter

,

Ctrl

and

Alt

keys.

The computer’s built-in keyboard has only one of each.

Most of the time this makes no difference. However, some programs assign separate functions to the right and left

Ctrl

and

Alt keys, or to the regular and numeric pad

Enter

keys on the enhanced keyboard. The

Fn

key allows the built-in keyboard to simulate these separate keys, as follows:

To simulate the:

Ctrl

key on the right side of the enhanced keyboard, press

Fn

+

Ctrl

.

Alt

key on the right side of the enhanced keyboard, press

Fn

+

Alt.

Enter

key on the numeric pad of the enhanced keyboard, press

Fn

+

Enter

.

The Cursor Control Overlay

The keys with the white arrows and white symbols on the left front are the cursor control overlay. This illustration highlights the keys in the cursor control overlay:

The cursor control overlay

/

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You can use these keys to:

❖ move the cursor up, down, left or right on the screen.

❖ move up or down one page.

❖ move to the beginning or end of a document.

❖ delete or insert characters.

How these keys function may vary with the program you're using.

Check your program's documentation for information on how the cursor keys function.

To turn the cursor control overlay on and off, press

Fn

+

F10

. The cursor control light on the indicator panel glows when the cursor control overlay is on.

You can use the overlaid keys to type alphabetic characters while the overlay is on. To do this:

❖ for lower case letters, press and hold

Fn

while you type.

❖ for upper case letters, press and hold

Fn

+

Shift

while you type.

Release

Fn

to continue using the overlay.

The keys of the cursor control overlay also act as a numeric overlay, providing the numeric keys of a ten-key numeric keypad. To use the numeric overlay when the cursor control overlay is on, press and hold

Shift

while you use the overlaid keys. To return to the cursor control overlay, release

Shift

. For more information on the numeric overlay, refer to “Typing Numbers” on page 83.

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Different Ways to Turn the Computer On

So far you’ve turned your computer on by pressing the power button. Now it’s time to learn some new tricks. This section explains how to:

❖ set the computer to turn on automatically at a time and optionally a date you choose (the Alarm Power On option). This option is helpful if you are expecting to receive files by modem and want to do the transfer at night, when the rates are cheaper.

You can set the computer to turn on and receive the files while you are asleep.

❖ turn the computer on and off by opening and closing the display panel (the Panel Power On/Off option). This option not only makes it easier to turn the computer’s power on, but makes it impossible to close the display panel while the computer is on. This option is only available if you turn Resume

Mode on.

❖ turn the computer on whenever it detects an incoming call through the internal serial modem.

If the Alarm Power On option starts the computer in Resume

Mode, and you have a password registered, the computer turns on with the instant password function enabled. Although the password message is not displayed, you must enter your password to use the computer.

You can set these options with TSETUP or through the Toshiba

System Control Panel. This section shows you how to change the options using the Toshiba System Control Panel. For information on using TSETUP, refer to “TSETUP” on page 403.

Follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

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3 Double-click the Toshiba System icon.

Windows 95 displays the Toshiba System Control Panel with the Start Up Options tab on top.

The Start Up Options tab of the Toshiba System Control

Panel

4 In the Start Up Mode section, click the check box next to

Resume Mode.

5 To turn the computer on when your internal modem detects an incoming call, click the check box next to “Trigger resume when modem receives an incoming call.”

An X in the check box turns the option on.

6 To set the computer to turn on or off when you open or close the display panel, click the check box next to “Trigger suspend/resume when panel closes/opens.”

An X in the check box turns the option on.

7 Click the Power On Timer tab to bring it to the front.

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The Power On Timer tab of the Toshiba System Control

Panel

8 To turn the computer on at a particular time, click the check box next to On.

9 Choose the Time Format you wish to use, then click the up and down arrow buttons until the Time field displays the time at which you want the computer to turn on. You may also set a specific date, using the Month and Date fields.

Do not disconnect the computer from both AC and battery power when you use any of these features. Otherwise, the time settings and data saved by Resume Mode will be lost, and when you restore power, you must reset this option.

10 Click OK to exit the Toshiba System Control Panel and save your changes.

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Making Life Easier

Changing the Display Mode

Changing the Display Mode

Perhaps you would like to change how much information your screen displays, or adjust the number of colors it uses. You can control these options by using the Display Properties sheet.

To change your display mode, follow these steps:

1 With the pointer positioned over a blank area of the desktop, click the secondary button.

2 Click Properties.

Windows 95 opens the Display Properties sheet.

The Display Properties sheet

3 Click the Settings tab to move to the Settings page.

4 Change the number of colors the display can show by changing the Color palette setting.

5 Change the screen resolution by clicking and dragging the

Desktop area slider.

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6 When you’ve made all your changes, click OK.

To close the Display Properties sheet without enabling your changes, click Cancel.

Windows 95 may ask you to set up your display. If you get this message, choose SVGA from the list of display options.

If you’re using a display mode, such as SVGA, that uses more space than the built-in display has available, the display goes into virtual display mode. In this mode, the display pretends it’s bigger than it really is by stretching the Windows desktop so that part of it is off the screen. To see the remainder of the desktop, move the pointer to the edge of the display and keep moving it in the direction of the part of the desktop you would like to see.

Display modes that use less than the maximum resolution of the internal display (800 x 600) occupy a smaller area of the screen. In these modes, you’ll see a black border around the screen image.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Using the

Electronic Guide

Your Portégé 650CT computer comes with this guide in electronic form on your hard disk. The best thing about electronic books is that they are stored on the computer so you don’t have to take the printed documentation with you when you travel.

The electronic User’s Guide is a copy of this printed book. This chapter explains how to us the electronic version of the guide.

Opening the Book

To open the book, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Point to Toshiba Utilities, then click User’s Guide.

Windows 95 opens the guide.

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Using the Electronic Guide

The Parts of the Window

The Parts of the Window

The electronic book opens at the title page.

Top of chapter icon Top of topic icon Menu commands

Next arrow

Previous arrow

The title page

The menu commands above the book provide these options.

Contents displays the table of contents for the entire book.

Index displays the index you normally find at the back of the book.

Find lets you input a term and search for it in the book.

Go Back retraces your steps through the book.

History shows a list of all the places you have been.

Help explains how to use the book’s features.

Bookmark marks a topic so you can return to it in the future.

Copy copies selected text to the clipboard.

Print prints the current topic.

Preferences lets you customize the books features.

Exit closes the book.

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Clicking the Top of chapter icon returns you to the beginning of the current chapter or topic.

Clicking the Top of topic icon returns you to the beginning of the current topic.

The previous and next arrows allow you to move forward or backward from topic to topic.

Finding a Topic Quickly

As in a printed book, to find a particular topic you can either search the index or use the table of contents.

In addition to providing an index and table of contents, the electronic User’s Guide maintains a list of all the words in the book. If the index and table of contents do not contain the word you’re looking for, try the Find option. You can search the current topic or the entire User’s Guide. Follow these steps:

1 Click Find.

The book displays a box for you to enter the word or phrase.

2 Enter the word or phrase and press

Enter

or click Search.

Find displays a list of all the sections that contain this term.

3 Select the section you wish to read and press

Enter

.

Find displays the section.

Reading a Topic

If the topic contains more text than will fit on the screen, use the scroll bar to read the additional text.

When you get to the end of the topic, click the next arrow to go to the next topic or the previous arrow to the go to the previous topic.

Clicking the next arrow takes you through the electronic book in the same sequence as the printed book.

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Using the Electronic Guide

Cross-References

Cross-References

The topic you located using the Index, Contents or Find may still not be the one you are looking for but, as you read the text a crossreference may point you to the section you need.

Cross-references are shown in green underlined text. To view a cross-reference, follow these steps:

1 Position the pointer over the cross-reference.

The pointer changes to a pointing hand symbol.

Cross references

Using a cross reference

2 Click the cross-reference.

The program displays the section that contains the information relating to the cross-reference you selected.

When you have finished reading the cross-referenced material, click Go Back to return you to the original topic.

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Using the Electronic Guide

Using Bookmarks

287

Using Bookmarks

Creating a bookmark allows you to mark a portion of the text that you want to be able to find quickly in the future.

Creating a New Bookmark

To create (or define) a bookmark, follow these steps:

1 Position the pointer at the beginning of the text you want to find again.

2 Click Bookmark.

The bookmark dialog box

3 Enter a name for the bookmark.

This can be any name you choose.

4 Press

Enter

or click the X in the upper right corner of the box.

The program places a small mark at the bottom of the window.

Viewing the Topic Marked by a Bookmark

To view a marked topic, click its bookmark. Moving the pointer over the bookmark displays the name you assigned.

Another way to locate the topic you marked is through the bookmark list. Follow these steps:

1 Click Bookmark.

2 Select the bookmark name you wish to find.

3 Click the box above the list to go to the topic.

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Using the Electronic Guide

Keeping Track of Where You’ve Been

Deleting a Bookmark

To delete a previously defined bookmark, follow these steps:

1 Enter the name of the bookmark or locate it in the dropdown list box.

2 Click Remove Entry.

The program deletes the bookmark.

Keeping Track of Where You’ve Been

An electronic book can keep track of what you’ve already read. If you wish you could go back to the page you read five minutes ago, but you don’t remember where you were, follow these steps:

1 Click History.

The program displays a list of all the topics you’ve viewed in this session.

A history list

2 Click the topic’s title.

3 Click the top box and you’re back where you were before.

You can delete topics from this list or clear the list entirely by clicking the appropriate boxes.

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Getting Help

289

Getting Help

The electronic guide comes with its own help text. If you are not sure about a feature, click Help.

Help is context sensitive. If you keep the Help window open, the

Help text changes to describe the current feature you are pointing at with your pointer.

Using Material from the Book

Though this book is copyrighted, you may select text and copy it to the clipboard for use in your own projects. You may also print individual topics or selected text.

Copying a Selection

To copy a selection, follow these steps:

1 Click Copy.

The book displays the Copy dialog box.

Selected text ready to copy

2 Select the text to copy.

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Using the Electronic Guide

Changing How the Book Works

3 Click “Copy the selection to the clipboard.”

You can insert this text into another document.

Printing a Selection or Topic

Follow these steps to print:

1 Click Print.

2 Select the text you wish to print.

Do not select any text if you wish to print the entire topic.

3 Click “Print a Selection” to print the text you selected.

Click “Print the Current Topic” to print the whole topic.

The program prints to the current printer. Before you click

Print, make sure the printer’s is on line (ready) and the printer has paper.

Changing How the Book Works

The Preferences command lets you customize the electronic book’s features to meet your preferences.

The preferences dialog box

Audible Alerts sound for various functions. To turn these off click the Audible Alerts option.

If you would rather not see the Bookmark Icons, click here to turn them off. If bookmark icons are off, click Bookmark to view a list of the bookmarks.

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Reinstalling the Electronic User’s Guide

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Checkpoints are dialog boxes that appear when you are about to do something that may be destructive.

You can control the size of the text in the book window by clicking the Text Size option.

The Match Color for Find option changes the color the book uses to highlight the text you are searching for.

Reinstalling the Electronic User’s Guide

If for any reason you need to restore this book to the hard drive, you must use the master program diskette that contains the book files. For more information about master program diskettes, see

“Create or Purchase Master Diskettes” on page 33.

Follow these steps to reinstall online documentation:

1 Be sure you have connected the external diskette drive to the diskette drive port.

To connect the external diskette drive, see “Connecting the

External Diskette Drive” on page 20.

2 Insert the master program diskette in the diskette drive.

3 Click Start, then click Run.

Windows 95 displays the Run dialog box.

4 In the Run dialog box, type the command line

a:\install

and click OK.

Always install the book into the C:\DOCS folder.

5 When the installation is complete, eject the diskette from the drive.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

What’s Really

Going On?

By now, you've probably become pretty good at using your computer. However, you may be curious as to what is really going on while you're pounding away at the keyboard. This chapter gives you all the details of how your computer works.

What Is a Computer?

In one sense, your Portégé 650CT is a computer. Technically speaking however, the processor chip, where the actual computing takes place, is the computer. Everything else either provides information to the processor or receives the results of the processor's computations.

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What’s Really Going On?

What Other Batteries Does the Computer Have?

What Other Batteries Does the Computer Have?

In addition to the main battery that powers your system when you're away from an AC outlet, your Portégé 650CT computer has two other batteries:

The backup battery supports Resume Mode. When you turn the computer off in Resume Mode, a non-volatile memory powered by the backup battery keeps track of everything for the next time you turn the computer on. The backup battery gets its charge from the main battery.

The RTC (real-time clock) battery maintains the computer's configuration information, which is stored in the RTC memory. When you make changes in TSETUP, the MaxTime Control Panel or the Toshiba System Control Panel, this memory keeps track of those settings. The RTC battery also operates the computer's internal clock.

The main battery charges the backup and RTC batteries.

How Does a Disk Store Information?

Like a tape recorder, a disk drive reads and writes magnetically encoded information on magnetic media. The drive positions a read/write head above the surface of the disk when it records and retrieves information.

Before a drive can read from or write to a disk, the disk must have a specific structure. Formatting a disk creates this structure.

Tracks Sectors (within one track)

Item of information

Tracks and sectors of a disk

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Formatting divides each side of the disk into concentric circles called tracks. Each track is divided into sectors. Each item of information stored on a disk has a specific address composed of its side, track and sector number. This address makes it possible for the computer to locate the information on the disk.

How Big is a Megabyte, Anyway?

When you read about the size of your hard disk, you may be confused by the discrepancy between megabytes and millions of bytes. “Wait a minute,” you say, “doesn’t a megabyte equal one million bytes?” Well, not exactly...

Computers use base two arithmetic, also called binary arithmetic.

Because of this, all numbers in computing are based on powers of two. One megabyte is actually equal to 1,048,576 bytes (2

20

), the closest binary number to 1,000,000.

In the early days of personal computers, the difference was very minor because hard disks were small and computers didn’t have much memory. As hard disk capacities and memory sizes have increased, the difference has become much more significant.

One hard disk that comes with the Portégé 650CT computer holds approximately 1.26 gigabytes. You can convert this to millions of bytes by multiplying the number of megabytes (1,260) by the number of bytes in a megabyte (1,048,576). The result is

1,321,205,760, approximately 1.3 billion bytes.

How Does the Screen Display Information?

Images on the Portégé 650CT computer's built-in liquid crystal display (LCD) are created by turning individual dots on the screen on or off in various combinations. These dots are called pixels.

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What’s Really Going On?

How Does the Screen Display Information?

A pixel on the display

A pixel is the smallest element on the screen. On a color display, each pixel is made up of three subpixels: one red, one green and one blue (RGB). Each subpixel may be either on or off. Mixing on and off subpixels is like blending the primary colors to create other colors.

A pel formed by several pixels

The smallest element that your programs can control is called a pel. Pels are arranged on the screen in a grid-like fashion. Depending on the video mode a program selects, a pel may be a single pixel or several pixels.

The pel size determines the clarity of the image—called screen resolution. Larger individual pels reduce the total number of available pels, resulting in lower resolution. Smaller pels increase the number of pels that can fit on the screen, resulting in higher resolution and a clearer image.

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Displaying Colors

The pel size also determines how many colors the display can produce. By combining pixels of different colors within a pel, the display can produce many more colors than are available within a single pixel. Therefore, larger individual pels increase the number of colors available to the display.

Video Modes

Video modes are sets of industry-standard rules about resolution and the maximum number of distinct colors that can be displayed simultaneously on the screen. Programs that adhere to the rules of a video mode will run on any system that supports that mode.

Most display adapters provide several video modes. The Portégé

650CT SVGA-compatible display adapter supports all VGA modes and some SVGA modes.

The video mode required by a program depends on:

❖ whether the program displays graphics or text.

❖ the resolution required for the text or graphics.

❖ the number of colors used.

❖ the font size (in pixels) of the text.

Based on these requirements, computers recognize two categories of video modes: graphics modes and text modes.

In a graphics mode, programs can turn on and off individual pels to display a variety of images. The computer controls every pel on the screen individually. This provides maximum display flexibility while somewhat reducing the speed at which the display produces images.

An image produced this way could be a drawing or picture, like a pie chart, graph or photograph. It could also be an icon or a variation on a text character, like italics or bold type.

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What’s Really Going On?

What Is Plug and Play?

Windows 95 and Windows programs use graphics modes.

Character cell in a text mode

In a text mode, a character cell is the smallest element a program can control. A character cell is a grid of pels. All cells are the same size. Each cell displays a single letter or symbol. Character cells are arranged in rows and columns. In a text mode, only characters from a predefined set are available. If your program uses a text mode, refer to the program's documentation for a list of available characters.

What Is Plug and Play?

Plug and Play is a clever name for a new technology developed jointly by Intel and Microsoft that seeks to make upgrading a computer system easy.

Computer systems, such as the Portégé 650CT, operating software and add-on products that are designed according to this standard work together the first time you connect them. Plug and Play eliminates the time-consuming frustration of figuring out which IRQ, memory, and I/O addresses to assign.

Since it’s not possible to open a Portégé 650CT computer and add on devices, the fact that the system supports the Plug and Play standard is important for future software developments.

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What Really Happens When You Turn the

Computer On?

When you press the power button, the following occurs:

1 The computer's BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) loads a bootstrap program.

This program, named from the expression “pull yourself up by your bootstraps,” checks and displays the amount of memory in the system before proceeding.

2 The bootstrap program attempts to load Windows 95.

It looks first for a diskette in the diskette drive and then at the hard disk. If a diskette without the necessary startup files is in the drive, the bootstrap program displays an error message.

3 As Windows 95 loads, it configures the system.

4 Windows 95 loads the desktop.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

If Something

Goes Wrong

Some problems you may encounter when using the Portégé

650CT computer are relatively easy to identify and solve. Others may require help from your dealer or the manufacturer of a software program.

This chapter aims to help you solve many problems yourself without needing additional help. It covers the problems your are most likely to encounter.

Read the section headings on the opposite page, then turn to the section that covers the type of problem you are having. Read the section and see if it describes your problem. If so, follow the steps for solving it.

If all else fails, contact Toshiba. You will find information on

Toshiba’s support services at the end of this chapter.

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Problems that are Easy to Fix

Problems that are Easy to Fix

The more you work with your computer, the more likely you are to encounter one or more of the following problems. Don’t panic!

You can solve them relatively easily.

Software Problems

Your program stops responding.

If you are working with a program that suddenly freezes all operations, the program has probably stopped responding. Don’t worry.

You can exit the failed program without shutting down Windows

95 or closing other programs.

To close a program that has stopped responding, follow these steps:

1 Press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

once.

Windows 95 displays the Close Program dialog box. The box lists all the programs and processes currently in operation. If a program has stopped responding, the words “not responding” appear beside its name in the list.

2 Select the program you want to close, then click End Task.

Closing the failed program should allow you to continue working. If it does not, continue with step 3.

3 Close the remaining programs by clicking End Task.

4 Click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

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5 Select Restart the computer, then click Yes.

Your computer shuts down and restarts Windows 95, thus restoring operations.

Typing Ctrl + Alt + Del twice to restart your computer is not recommended. By closing all open programs prior to shutting down Windows 95 you ensure that all data is saved.

Your program performs an illegal operation.

If you receive the message, “Your program has performed an illegal operation,” you should record the details of the message and consult the software manufacturer.

To record the details:

1 Click the Details button and select the text Windows 95 displays.

The Details button displays information that the software manufacturer needs to help you solve your problem.

2 Press

Ctrl

+

c

to copy the text to the clipboard.

3 Open Notepad (click the Start button, point to Programs, then point to Accessories and click Notepad).

4 Press

Ctrl

+

v

to paste the details into Notepad.

5 Add a paragraph break and type some notes describing what you were doing when you received the message.

6 Save the file and refer to it when you contact the software manufacturer.

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If Something Goes Wrong

Problems that are Easy to Fix

You receive a “Non-System Disk” error message.

A diskette is in the diskette drive while the computer is starting

Windows 95. Remove the diskette from the drive and press any key to continue.

You open a program that immediately stops responding.

If CPU sleep mode is on (enabled), it may stop a program from responding. Close the program you are trying to open and turn off

(disable) sleep mode. Then, try to run the program again.

To close the program:

1 Press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

.

The Close Program dialog box displays, listing all the programs and processes currently in operation. If the program has stopped responding, the words “not responding” appear beside it.

2 Click End Task, then click Cancel.

You disable sleep mode in MaxTime or TSETUP. Continue with these steps to disable sleep mode using MaxTime:

3 Click Start, then point to Programs.

4 Point to Toshiba Utilities, then click MaxTime.

MaxTime displays the MaxTime battery gauge window.

5 Select Machine Settings from the MaxTime Options menu.

MaxTime displays the Machine Settings dialog box.

6 Click Battery Options.

MaxTime displays the battery options.

7 Set the Battery Save Mode to User Settings.

8 Select Disabled for Sleep Mode.

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9 Select OK or press

Enter

to save your changes and exit the dialog box.

10 Minimize MaxTime or close the program by choosing Exit from the File menu.

You don't have to restart the computer for this change to take effect.

If the problem continues, contact the manufacturer of the program.

You cannot load a software package.

The diskette or CD-ROM may be damaged, or the program may be corrupted. Try loading another copy of the software.

An error message displays while you are using a program.

Refer to the program’s documentation. Typically this includes a troubleshooting section or a summary of error messages.

Hardware Problems

If your computer or one of the devices connected to it isn’t working properly, try this procedure first:

1 Turn off the computer and any peripheral devices connected to it. This includes your printer and any other external devices.

2 Test the wall outlet for power by plugging in another electrical device such as a lamp.

3 Check that the power cords are firmly plugged in.

4 Check that all cables connecting peripheral devices to the computer are correctly and firmly attached. Loose cables can cause signal errors.

5 Turn the peripheral devices on.

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Problems When You Turn the Computer On

6 Turn the computer on.

7 If you are running the computer on battery power, check that the battery is sufficiently charged.

If the equipment still isn’t working properly, refer to the device specific sections of this chapter.

Problems When You Turn the Computer On

These problems may occur when you turn the power on.

The computer won't start.

If you did not follow the steps in the previous section, make sure you attached the AC adapter properly or installed a charged battery.

Press and hold the power button for a few seconds.

The computer starts, but then shuts down and the power indicator glows orange and blinks.

The computer is too hot, so it has automatically entered Resume

Mode and shut down. Leave the computer turned off until its interior has reached room temperature.

The computer starts, but when you press a key on the keyboard or touch the AccuPoint, nothing happens.

You are probably in Resume Mode and have a software or resource conflict. When this happens, turning the power on returns you to the problem instead of restarting the system. To clear the condition, press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

or press the reset button.

Clearing the condition may get you running by disabling Resume

Mode, but it won't solve a resource conflict. Read the documentation that came with the conflicting device and “Resolving a Hardware Conflict” on page 312.

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You press the power button and hear the system start, but you receive a hard disk drive (HDD) error message.

There is a problem starting Windows 95 from your hard disk.

Follow these steps:

1 Insert a startup diskette in the diskette drive.

A startup diskette is one containing the files needed to start the computer and load Windows 95. You created a startup diskette when you ran the Microsoft Create System Disks program.

2 Restart your computer and press

F10

when the system starts.

Pressing

F10

changes the Boot Priority option setting in

TSETUP. This command instructs the computer to start from the diskette drive.

The message “Starting Windows 95” displays, followed by the

MS-DOS prompt, a:>

.

3 Remove the startup diskette from the diskette drive and insert Windows 95 disk #1.

4 Type

setup

, then press

Enter

.

If your hard disk is intact, Setup installs Windows 95 again without removing information you have saved on the hard disk. Follow the messages that appear on your screen.

If you receive another error message, contact Toshiba technical support. See “If You Need Further Assistance” on page 334.

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If Something Goes Wrong

Windows 95 Isn’t Working

Windows 95 Isn’t Working

Once you are familiar with the desktop and used to the way Windows 95 responds to your work routine, you can easily detect if

Windows 95 isn’t working correctly. For example:

Windows 95 fails to start after the Starting Windows 95 message displays.

Windows 95 takes a long time to start.

Windows 95 does not follow its normal routine.

The display on your screen looks different.

Unless a device has failed, these problems usually occur when you change the system configuration, add a device, install a new program, or do something that changes the system’s established routine.

If you experience any of these problems, use the startup options in the Windows 95 Startup Menu to fix them.

Using Startup Options to Fix Problems

If Windows 95 fails to start properly, you may have to change your system’s configuration or verify the startup procedure to fix the problem. To do this, use the startup options in the Windows 95

Startup menu. This section describes each startup option and when to use the procedure.

To open the Windows 95 Startup menu:

1 Restart your computer.

2 Press

F8

when your computer starts.

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The Windows 95 Startup Menu displays the following options:

Normal

Logged (BOOTLOG.TXT)

Safe Mode

Step-by-Step Confirmation

Command Prompt Only

Safe Mode Command Prompt Only

If your computer is connected to a network, the Startup Menu may display different versions of Safe Mode.

Normal

Selecting Normal starts Windows 95 under normal conditions.

Start the computer in Normal mode when there are no apparent problems with the system.

Logged (BOOTLOG.TXT)

Selecting Logged starts Windows 95 under normal conditions and creates a startup log file named C:\BOOTLOG.TXT. This records every step of the system’s startup process.

You or a qualified Windows 95 expert can use this log file to check the loading and initializing of Windows 95 device drivers.

A device driver is a file that contains information to help the system BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) control the operations of devices connected to the system.

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If Something Goes Wrong

Windows 95 Isn’t Working

Safe Mode

Selecting Safe Mode bypasses basic startup files and starts

Windows 95 with only the mouse, keyboard, and standard VGA display drivers loaded.

Running Safe Mode allows you to undo any changes you made to the system configuration that may have caused Windows 95 or a device to fail. For example, if you choose a resolution that is not supported by the display, Windows 95 will have a problem starting correctly. Safe Mode bypasses the setting and allows you to change the resolution to one supported by the display. Once you have done this, Windows 95 will start correctly.

Other problems may involve a device driver. See “Windows 95

Can Help You” on page 312 to fix the problem.

Windows 95 automatically starts in Safe Mode if it detects that system startup failed or the Windows 95 Registry (the file that defines how Windows 95 is set up) is corrupted.

Step by Step Confirmation

When you turn your computer on, Windows 95 processes the startup directory. With Step by Step Confirmation, the system asks you to confirm each line of the startup process as it displays on the screen. Use this option when:

The startup process fails while loading the startup files.

You need to verify all drivers are being loaded.

You need to temporarily disable one or more specific drivers.

You need to check for errors in the startup files.

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Windows 95 uses a file called IO.SYS, which contains all the information needed to start the computer. Although your computer does not need the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files to start, it does process these files to support backward compatibility with some programs and device drivers. The same holds true for the SYSTEM.INI and WIN.INI files.

Backward compatible programs and devices are designed to work with older operating systems and other programs. For example, many features of Windows 95 are backward compatible with earlier versions of Windows. This lets you use older programs in Windows 95.

Most of the information in these files is now stored in the Windows 95 Registry. However, they are still processed during startup. BOOTLOG.TXT file contains a record of all the components and drivers being loaded during startup and the status of each.

When you select Step by Step Confirmation, you can view all these files in the startup directory line by line to solve a problem.

Command Prompt Only

Selecting Command Prompt Only runs all the commands in the startup files and device drivers and displays the command prompt.

Use this option when you want to run MS-DOS or Windows 95 commands. This option is for advanced users who are familiar with MS-DOS and know what these commands do.

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If Something Goes Wrong

Resolving a Hardware Conflict

Safe Mode Command Prompt Only

Selecting Safe Mode Command Prompt Only bypasses the system startup files and displays the command prompt.

Use this option under the following conditions:

Windows 95 fails to start even in Safe Mode.

You want to run MS-DOS commands such as edit to make changes to your startup files.

You want to avoid loading HIMEM.SYS (extended memory manager), or IFSHLP.SYS (file system manager).

Windows 95 Can Help You

If Windows 95 has started properly, but you still have a problem using your computer, Windows 95 Help can assist you in solving the problem.

To open the Windows 95 troubleshooting aid, follow these steps:

1 Click the Start button and click Help.

2 Click the Contents tab and double-click Troubleshooting.

3 Double-click a problem you would like help with, and follow the steps.

Resolving a Hardware Conflict

If you receive an error message telling you there is a device driver conflict or a general hardware problem, try using Windows Help to solve the problem first.

1 From the Windows Help menu, click the Contents tab and select Troubleshooting.

2 Click “If you have a hardware conflict” and follow the steps.

If there is still a problem, for example, if one of your devices isn’t

Plug-and-Play, Windows 95 may display a message that explains where the conflict is. Use Device Manager, following the steps in

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“Fixing a Problem with Device Manager” on page 315, to determine the resource assignments for each device and to resolve the conflict.

A Plan of Action

The smooth operation of the system depends on the interaction of all devices, programs and features. If the system or one of its attached devices isn't working, resolving the problem can be time consuming and frustrating.

The recommended procedure for getting multiple devices to work together is to add and set up one device at a time. After you add each device, test it to make sure it and all previously connected devices work.

The device most recently connected to the system is the one most likely to be causing the conflict.

A word to the wise: if you get too tired, take a break. Having a meal or a good night’s sleep refreshes you mentally as well as physically. Talking the problem over with a friend can help too.

Resolving Hardware Conflicts on Your Own

Just as a business person needs a telephone and a computer to get the job done, so computer components need resources to accomplish a task. A device, such as a CD-ROM drive or a modem, needs a channel to the computer's Central Processing Unit (CPU).

It also needs a direct channel to the computer's memory to store information as it works. These channels of communication are commonly referred to as system resources.

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What are IRQ and DMA System Resources?

The channel to the CPU is called an Interrupt ReQuest (IRQ) because it interrupts what the processor is doing and requests some of the processor’s time. If two or more devices use the same

IRQ, the processor doesn’t know which device is asking for attention. This causes a problem.

Similarly, the data required by the device is stored in a specific place or address in memory called the Direct Memory Address

(DMA). If two or more devices use the same DMA, the data required by one device overwrites the data required by the other. If either of these situations occur, you have a hardware conflict.

Avoiding Conflicts with Plug and Play

With Plug and Play and Windows 95, avoiding hardware conflicts is easy. Plug and Play is a computer standard that helps the system

BIOS (basic input/output system) and Windows 95 to automatically assign system resources to Plug and Play-compliant devices.

In theory, if every device connected to the computer is Plug and

Play-compliant, no two devices will compete for the same system resources. You simply plug in the device and turn your computer on. Windows 95 automatically configures your system to accommodate the new device.

Resolving Conflicts with Non-Plug and Play Devices

If you install an older, non-Plug and Play device that Windows 95 cannot automatically identify, Windows 95 may have difficulty assigning system resources to it. As a result, a hardware conflict can occur. To find out what resources Windows 95 has assigned to a device, see “Checking Device Properties” on page 316. If

Windows 95 is unable to provide the information you need, the pre-assigned settings for IRQs, DMAs and I/O assignments are listed in “System Resources” on page 455 for your reference.

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There are three things you can do to resolve hardware conflicts.

Disable the device causing the conflict.

To disable a legacy device, remove it from the computer. For a

Plug and Play device, see “Fixing a Problem with Device

Manager” on page 315.

Disable another system component and use its resources for the new device.

See “Fixing a Problem with Device Manager” on page 315.

Reconfigure the device so its requirements do not conflict.

Refer to the device’s documentation for instructions about changing settings on the device.

Fixing a Problem with Device Manager

Device manager provides a way to check and change the configuration of a device.

Using Device Manager to change the default settings can cause other conflicts that make one or more devices unusable. Device Manager is a tool for advanced users who understand configuration parameters and the ramifications of changing them.

Disabling a Device in Windows 95

To disable a device, follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button, then click Properties.

The System Properties dialog box displays.

2 Click the Device Manager tab.

3 Double-click the device type to display the device installed.

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4 Select the device and click the Properties tab.

5 Uncheck the box next to the device you want to disable.

6 Click OK.

Checking Device Properties

Device Manager provides a way to view the properties of a device.

Properties include the name of the manufacturer, the type of device, the drivers installed, and the system resources assigned to the device. To check a device’s properties follow these steps:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button, then click Properties.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties dialog box.

2 Click the Device Manager tab.

3 To view:

❖ the device(s) installed, double-click the device type.

❖ the device properties, double-click the device.

Windows 95 displays the Device Properties dialog box, which provides up to three tabs to choose from:

The General tab provides basic information about the device.

The Resources tab lists the resources assigned to the device. If you have a device conflict, it is shown in the

Conflicting device list.

The Drivers tab displays the drivers being used by the device.

For further information about Device Manager, refer to Windows

95 on-line help.

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Fixing Device Related Problems

If you don’t have a hardware conflict, but you think your problem could be related to one of your computer’s devices, the first thing to do is run a system verification test. A system verification test confirms that all the devices connected to the computer are working. This includes testing the memory, hard disk, diskette drive, display, and additional devices you may have connected to the system.

Then read the relevant parts of this section which describes problems and solutions related to specific devices.

Running the System Verification Test

To verify the system when Resume Mode is off, follow these steps:

1 Turn the computer off.

2 Hold the spacebar while you press the power button.

To verify the system when Resume Mode is on, hold down the spacebar while you press the reset button.

System verification displays the following message for a few seconds as the computer tests memory:

(C) Copyright 19>xx Toshiba Corp. All rights reserved.

MEMORY TEST xxxxKB

Successful Test Results

If the test verifies that all components connected to the system are working properly, the computer beeps once then starts

Windows 95.

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Unsuccessful Test Results

If the system verification test fails, the computer does one of the following:

Stops updating the memory counter and does not proceed to display information or messages.

Beeps but displays no new messages.

Displays random characters and does not function normally.

Displays an error message.

Verify the system again. Before you do so, turn the computer off and make sure all optional devices are connected properly and turned on. Then, turn the computer on and run the test again. If the test fails a second time, you have demonstrated that you can reproduce the problem and it's time to contact a trained technician.

Other Circumstances

The computer normally beeps at the conclusion of a successful system verification. If the system speaker is set to Disabled in

MaxTime or TSETUP, this beep will not occur.

If the speaker is turned on (enabled) and the system verification completes but you don't hear a beep, the speaker may be faulty.

Though this does not affect the computer's operation, you may wish to contact your dealer and have it repaired.

If the system verification is successful but the operating system won't load, refer to “Problems When You Turn the Computer On” on page 306. If all seems correct, treat this as a hardware error and contact your dealer.

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Where Do You Go from Here?

If you determined that you have a problem with a specific device, the following sections list problems related to specific devices and offers some solutions.

Memory Card Problems .................................................................... 319

Power and the Batteries ..................................................................... 320

The Keyboard ...................................................................................... 321

The Display ......................................................................................... 323

The AccuPoint .................................................................................... 322

The Disk Drives .................................................................................. 324

Optional Devices ................................................................................ 327

PC Cards .............................................................................................. 327

Printers ................................................................................................. 331

Modems ............................................................................................... 332

Memory Card Problems

Incorrectly connected or faulty memory cards may cause errors that seem to be device-related. So it’s worthwhile checking for these first:

1 Make sure the computer isn’t in Resume Mode.

For information about turning Resume Mode off, See “Starting

Again Using Resume Mode” on page 125.

2 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

3 Remove the memory card. Refer to “Install the Memory

Module” on page 17, to remove the memory card.

4 Reinstall the memory card, making sure it’s seated properly.

5 Replace the memory expansion slot cover.

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6 Check for the error again.

7 If the error reoccurs, remove the memory card entirely and check for the error again.

If removing the memory card eliminates the error, the memory card may be faulty. If the error reoccurs without the memory card installed, the error is not caused by the memory card.

Power and the Batteries

Your computer receives its power through the AC adapter or from the system batteries (main battery, real-time clock (RTC) battery and backup battery). Power problems are interrelated. For example, a faulty AC adapter will neither power the computer nor recharge the batteries.

Here are some typical problems and how to solve them:

The power light doesn't come on when you plug in the AC adapter.

Make sure the AC adapter is firmly plugged into both the wall outlet and the computer.

If the power light still does not come on, check that the wall outlet is working properly by plugging in an electrical device such as a lamp.

The AC adapter works correctly, but the battery won't charge.

The main battery may not be inserted correctly in the computer.

Turn off the computer, remove the battery, clean the battery contacts with a soft cloth dipped in alcohol and replace the battery.

The battery may be too hot or too cold to charge properly. Its temperature needs to be in the range of 50°-88°F (10°-30°C). If you think this is the probable cause, let the battery reach room temperature and try again.

If the battery has completely discharged, it will not begin charging immediately. Leave the AC adapter connected, wait 20 minutes and see whether the battery is charging.

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If the battery icon is glowing after 20 minutes, leave the computer to continue charging the battery for another 20 minutes before you turn the computer on.

If the battery icon doesn’t glow after 20 minutes, the battery may have reached the end of its useful life. Try replacing it.

The battery appears not to power the computer for as long as it usually does.

Check the power-saving features in MaxTime or TSETUP. Have you added a device? Is your program using the hard disk more heavily? Is the display power set to turn off automatically? Was the battery fully charged to begin with? All these conditions affect how long the charge lasts.

If you frequently recharge a partially charged battery, it may not charge fully. Always let the battery discharge completely, then charge it again.

For more information on maximizing battery power, refer to

“Looking After Your Battery” on page 136 and “Conserving

Power” on page 130.

The Keyboard

If, when you type, strange things display on your screen or nothing happens, the problem may be related to the keyboard itself.

The keyboard produces unexpected characters.

A keypad overlay may be on. If the numeric keypad or cursor control light is on, press

Fn

+

F10

to turn off the cursor control light or

Fn

+

F11

to turn off the numeric keypad light.

If the problem occurs when both the keypad overlays are off, make sure the software you are using is not remapping the keyboard. Refer to the software’s documentation and check that the program does not assign different meanings to any of the keys.

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You’ve connected an external keyboard and Windows 95 displays one or more keyboard error messages.

The keyboard you connected may be incompatible with the computer. Try using a different make of keyboard.

You are using an external keyboard and the

Fn

key combinations don’t work.

Make sure the external keyboard’s

Fn key equivalent is set to the combination you are using.

Nothing happens when you press the keys on the external keyboard.

Make sure the PS/2 keyboard is plugged into the PS/2 port.

You may have plugged the external PS/2 keyboard in while the computer was turned on. Press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

or press the reset button to restart the computer so it recognizes the device.

The keyboard locks and the computer will not start.

Make sure the power is on and press the reset button.

The AccuPoint

Some of the keyboard conditions listed above may also affect the

AccuPoint. In addition, consider the following:

Your finger easily slides off the AccuPoint button.

The AccuPoint cap may be oily. Remove the cap and clean it with a cotton swab dipped in rubbing alcohol.

Or the cap may have become worn. Replace the cap with one of the spares that come with your computer. Follow these steps:

1 Remove the AccuPoint cap by grasping it firmly and pulling straight up.

The AccuPoint spindle is now visible.

2 Position the new cap on the spindle and press it down into place.

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The Display

Here are some typical display problems and their solutions.

The display is blank.

Display Auto Off may have taken effect. This feature saves battery charge by turning off the display. Press any key to activate the screen.

You may have activated the instant security feature by pressing

Fn

+

F1

. Enter your password if you have registered one, or press

Enter to return to work.

If you are using the built-in display, try changing the display option to make sure the computer is not set for an external monitor. To do this, press

Fn

+

F5

.

If you are using an external monitor:

Check that the monitor is turned on.

Check that the monitor’s power cord is firmly plugged into a working power outlet.

Check that the cable connecting the external monitor to the computer is firmly attached.

Try adjusting the contrast and brightness controls on the external monitor.

Press

Fn

+

F5 to make sure that the display priority is not set for the built-in display.

The screen doesn’t look right.

See “Changing the Display Mode” on page 280 to adjust your screen resolution or color settings.

The built-in screen flickers.

Some flickering is a normal result of the way the screen produces colors. To reduce the amount of flickering, try using fewer colors.

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Windows 95 displays a message that there is a problem with your display settings and that the adapter type is incorrect or the current settings don’t work with your hardware.

Reduce the size of the color palette to one that is supported by the computer’s internal display. See “Changing the Display Mode” on page 280 for instructions.

Nothing displays on the external monitor screen.

Make sure the monitor is capable of displaying at resolutions higher than 640 x 480. Low-resolution monitors only work in

Internal/External mode.

The Disk Drives

Problems with the hard disk or with a disk drive usually show up as an inability to access the disk or as sector errors. Sometimes a disk problem may damage one or more files.

You are having trouble accessing a diskette, or one or more files appear to be missing.

Make sure you're identifying the drive by its correct name

(A or C).

Run ScanDisk, which analyzes the directories, files and File Allocation Table (FAT) on the disk and repairs any damage it finds. To start ScanDisk, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Programs.

2 Point to Accessories, then point to System Tools.

3 Click ScanDisk.

Windows 95 opens the ScanDisk window.

4 Click the drive you want to test.

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5 Choose the type of test you want to use.

A thorough test is more complete but takes much more time than a standard test.

6 Click Start.

ScanDisk tests the disk.

You can’t access the external diskette drive.

Make sure the disk drive cable is connected securely to the external disk drive port.

Your data files are damaged or corrupted.

Refer to your program documentation for file recovery procedures. Many programs automatically create backup files.

You may also be able to recover lost data by using a disk utility program, which is available from your dealer. (If the Explorer window doesn't display all the files you think should be stored in the directory, recovering data is unlikely.)

Some programs run correctly, but others do not.

This is probably a configuration problem. When a program doesn’t run properly, refer to its documentation and check that the hardware configuration meets its needs.

A diskette won't go into the external disk drive.

You may already have a diskette in the drive. Make sure the drive is empty.

You may be inserting the diskette incorrectly. Hold the diskette by the label with the hub side facing down, and insert it so the metal head window cover goes into the drive first.

The metal cover or a loose label may be obstructing the path into the drive. Carefully inspect the diskette. If the metal cover is loose, replace the diskette. If the label is loose, replace the label and try inserting the diskette again.

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A diskette won't format properly.

Make sure you’ve chosen the correct diskette capacity in the Format dialog box. You can’t format double-density diskettes as high-density diskettes and vice versa.

Try using a different diskette. If the computer completes the formatting of the new diskette, run ScanDisk to check the diskette. If the drive formats properly and ScanDisk doesn't report any errors during the test, the problem was probably a faulty original diskette.

The drive can't read a diskette.

Try another diskette. If you can access the second diskette, the first diskette (not the disk drive) is probably causing the problem. Run

ScanDisk on the faulty diskette.

If the problem occurs with each diskette you attempt to access, run the diagnostic test to check the diskette drive. Refer to “The Diagnostic Test” on page 427.

CD-ROM Drives

You cannot access a compact disc in the drive.

Make sure the drawer has closed properly.

Examine the disc to see whether it is dirty. If necessary, wipe it from the center to the outside edge with a clean cloth dipped in water and mild soap.

Replace the disc in the drawer. Make sure that the disc is lying flat and the label side is facing up. Close the drawer and make sure it closes completely.

Some compact discs run correctly but others do not.

Check the type of compact disc you are using. The drive supports

ISO 9660 and CD Plus data discs, audio CDs and photo discs.

If the problem is with a data compact disc, refer to the software’s documentation and check that the hardware configuration meets the program’s needs.

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Sound System

I don’t hear any sound from my computer.

Adjust the volume control.

If you are using an external microphone or speakers, check that they are securely connected to the headphone or microphone jack.

In TSETUP, check that the sound function is enabled.

I hear a loud, high-pitched noise.

This is probably feedback from the speakers to the microphone.

Feedback occurs in any sound system when sound from the microphone is fed to the speakers and the speaker volume is too loud. Adjust the volume control.

If you have changed the settings for the Record Monitor feature in the Recording Control Utility (default Off) or the mute feature in the Mixer Utility (default Enabled) these may cause feedback.

Revert to the default settings.

Optional Devices

Optional devices can include a printer, PC Cards, an external monitor, or any other device you connect to your computer to expand its capabilities. This section begins with some general comments and continues with sections for specific devices.

For an external monitor, see “The Display” on page 323.

PC Cards

Most PC Card problems occur during installation and setup of new cards. If you're having trouble getting one or more of these devices to work together, several sections in this chapter may apply.

Resource conflicts can cause problems when using PC Cards.

Refer to “Resolving a Hardware Conflict” on page 312.

If the device is a modem, see “Modems” on page 332.

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Card Information Structure

When you insert a PC Card into a slot, the computer attempts to determine the type of card and the resources it requires by reading its Card Information Structure (CIS). Sometimes the CIS contains enough information for you to use the card immediately. Other cards must be configured before you can use them.

Use the Windows 95 PC Card (PCMCIA) Wizard to set up the card. See “Setting Up Your PC Card for Your Computer” on page 163 for information about the PC Card Wizard.

Some card manufacturers use special software called enablers to support their cards. Enablers result in nonstandard configurations that can cause problems when installing another PC Card.

If Windows 95 doesn’t have built-in drivers for your PC Card and the card didn’t come with a Windows 95 driver, it may not work under Windows 95. Contact the manufacturer of the PC Card for information about operating the card under Windows 95.

PC Card Checklist

Make sure the card is inserted properly into the slot.

Refer to “Inserting PC Cards” on page 161 for how to insert

PC Cards.

Make sure all cables are securely connected.

Make sure the computer has only one version of Card and

Socket Services loaded.

Occasionally a defective PC Card slips through quality control.

If another PCMCIA-equipped computer is available, try the card in that machine. If the card malfunctions again, it may be defective.

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Resolving PC Card Problems

Here are some common problems and their solutions.

The slots appear to be dead. PC Cards that used to work no longer work.

Follow these steps to view the PC Card status:

1 Click the My Computer icon with the secondary button, then click Properties.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties dialog box.

2 Click the Device Manager tab.

3 Double-click the device listed as your PC Card.

Windows 95 displays your PC Card’s Properties dialog box.

This dialog box contains information about your PC Card configuration and status.

The computer stops working (hangs) when you insert a PC Card.

The problem may be caused by an I/O (input/output) conflict between the PCMCIA socket and another device in the system.

Make sure each device has its own I/O base address.

Since all PC Cards share the same socket, each card is not required to have its own address.

Hot swapping (removing one PC Card and inserting another

without turning the computer off) fails.

Follow this procedure before you want to remove a PC Card:

1 Click the PC Card icon on the taskbar.

2 Click Stop xxxx, where xxxx is the identifier for your PC

Card.

Windows 95 displays a message saying you may safely remove the card.

3 Remove the card from the slot.

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The system does not recognize your PC Card or PCMCIA socket controller.

Windows 95 may not have built-in drivers for your PC Card.

Follow these steps to install PC Card support:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click Add New Hardware.

Windows 95 opens the Add New Hardware Wizard.

4 Click Next.

5 Follow the instructions on the screen to install support for your PC Card or PCMCIA socket controller.

There is still a yellow exclamation point (!) over the PCMCIA controller icon in Device Manager.

You’ve gone through the PCMCIA Wizard in Windows 95 as described in “Setting Up PC Card Support in Windows 95” on page 163, but the system still reports the controller with a yellow

<!>.

Your computer may not be firmly attached to the optional

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator. To fix the problem:

1 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

2 Click Yes.

Windows 95 shuts down and turns the computer off.

3 Lift the locking latch on the NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator.

4 Gently lift the computer and slide it off of the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator.

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5 Reconnect the computer and NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator, making sure to press them together firmly.

Refer to “Connecting the Computer to the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator” on page 202 for instructions.

6 Turn the computer on and try setting up PC Card support again.

A PC Card error occurs.

Reinsert the card to make sure it is properly connected.

If the card is attached to an external device, check that the connection is secure.

Refer to the card’s documentation which should contain a troubleshooting section.

Printers

This section lists some of the most common printer problems.

The printer doesn’t print.

Check that the printer is connected to a working power outlet and is turned on.

Check that the printer has plenty of paper. Some printers won’t start printing when there are just two or three sheets of paper left in the tray.

Make sure the printer cable is firmly attached to both the computer and the printer.

If your printer is ECP- or IEEE 1284-compliant, make sure you have an IEEE 1284 printer cable.

Run the printer’s self test to check for any problem with the printer itself.

Make sure you installed the proper printer drivers, as shown in

“Setting Up Windows 95 to Work with Your Printer” on page 88.

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You may have connected the printer while the computer was turned on. Disable Resume Mode, turn off the computer, and turn off the printer. Turn the printer back on, make sure it’s ready

(online), then turn the computer back on.

The printer doesn’t print what you see on the screen.

Many programs display information on the screen differently than the way they print it. See if your program has a print preview mode. This mode lets you see your work exactly as it will print.

Modems

A modem, fax/modem or fax/voice/modem is a serial device. This section lists common modem problems.

The modem won't receive or transmit properly.

Make sure the RJ-11 cable (the one that goes from the modem to the telephone line) is firmly connected to the modem's RJ-11 jack and the telephone line socket.

Check the serial port setting to make sure the hardware and software are referring to the same COM port (in Device Manager under modem).

Check the communications parameters (baud rate, parity, data length and stop bits) specified in the communications software. It should be configured to transmit at 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,

14400, 19200, 38400 or 56800 bps (bits per second).

Refer to the program documentation and modem manual for information on how to change these settings.

The modem is on, configured properly and still won't transmit or receive data.

Make sure the line has a dial tone. Connect a telephone handset to the line to check this.

The other system may be busy or off-line. Try making a test transmission to someone else.

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The PC Card modem used to work, but doesn’t anymore.

Check in Device Manager to see if the modem is listed.

If it is listed but has an X next to it, the modem is disabled. Double-click the device and then click the Undocked and Docked (if present) options before clicking OK.

If the modem is listed and has an exclamation point next to it, there may be a conflict with another device that Windows 95 is unable to resolve. See “Resolving a Hardware Conflict” on page 312 for suggestions on solving the conflict.

Develop Good Computing Habits

Sometimes we're in such a hurry to use a computer that we fail to adequately prepare for the problems that inevitably occur. This section suggests some good habits to develop so you are prepared when things go wrong.

Save your work often.

You can never predict when your computer will lock, forcing you to close a program and lose unsaved changes. Many software programs build in an automatic backup, but you shouldn’t rely solely on this feature. Save your work!

On a regular basis, back up the information stored on your hard disk.

Here are a few ways you can do this:

Copy files to diskettes in Windows 95, following the steps in

“How to Copy Something To a Diskette” on page 92 or “How to Back Up Your Work on Diskettes” on page 93.

Connect a tape drive to the system and use specialized software to copy everything on the hard disk to a tape.

Some people use a combination of these methods, backing up all files to tape weekly and copying critical files to diskette on a daily basis.

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If you've added your own programs to your system, you should back up the programs as well as the data. If something goes wrong that requires you to format your hard disk and start again, reloading all your programs and data from a backup will save time.

Read the manuals.

It's very difficult to provide a fail-safe set of steps you can follow every time you experience a problem with the computer. Your ability to solve problems will improve as you learn about how the computer and its software work together.

Get familiar with all the manuals provided with your computer, as well as the manuals that come with the programs and devices you purchase.

Your local computer store or book store sells a variety of self-help books you can use to supplement the information in the manuals.

If problem solving is taking a long time, take a break.

If you've been fighting to solve a problem for a long period of time, you're probably frustrated by now. Stand up, take a deep breath and do something else – make some coffee, look out the window, phone a friend. Often, you can find a new solution to a problem just by stepping away from it for a few moments.

If You Need Further Assistance

If you have followed the recommendations in this chapter and are still having problems, you may need additional technical assistance. This section contains the steps to take to ask for help.

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Before You Call

Since some problems may be related to the operating system or the program you're using, it's important to investigate other sources of assistance first. Try the following before contacting

Toshiba:

Review the troubleshooting information in your Windows 95 documentation.

If the problem occurs while you are running a program, consult the program’s documentation for troubleshooting suggestions. Contact the software company's technical support group for their assistance.

Consult the dealer from whom you purchased your computer and/or program. Your dealer is your best source for current information.

For the number of a Toshiba dealer near you in the United States, call 1-800-457-7777.

Contacting Toshiba

If you still need help and suspect that the problem is hardware related, Toshiba offers a variety of resources to help you.

Start with the Automated Fax Service. Chances are you are not the only person to experience this problem. Toshiba has prepared useful information that can be faxed to you automatically. For instructions see “Toshiba's Automated Fax Service” on page 336.

Next, try one of Toshiba’s on-line services. The Toshiba Forum can be accessed through CompuServe, and the Toshiba Bulletin

Board Service (BBS) can be reached free of charge from any PC with a modem.

If you still can’t find a solution to your problem, you can call

Toshiba directly. See “Toshiba Voice Contact” on page 337 for details.

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Toshiba's Automated Fax Service

Toshiba's Automated Fax Service System (AUTOFAX) provides useful information about Toshiba computers and accessories. You select documents using your touch-tone telephone. Toshiba's

AUTOFAX System sends the requested information to your fax machine. Follow these steps to activate the system:

1 Dial the Toshiba AUTOFAX System at (714) 583-3800.

2 To have an index of available documents faxed to you, press

1

.

3 If you know the document number of the information you need, press

2

.

4 Follow the automated instructions provided by the system.

When entering the area code for your fax number, do not include the “1” prefix.

The AUTOFAX System automatically calls your fax number and sends the requested information. The process usually takes minutes, but load conditions can vary. So please allow up to 24 hours to receive the information.

If your fax machine telephone number is busy or otherwise unavailable, the system makes up to three attempts to complete a transaction.

Toshiba's Bulletin Board Service

Toshiba's Bulletin Board Service (BBS) is available 24-hours a day, and is free of charge to anyone with a PC and a modem. From

Toshiba’s BBS, you can download files and obtain other useful information to keep your computer running at peak performance.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

If Something Goes Wrong

If You Need Further Assistance

337

Be sure you set your modem to Toshiba’s BBS protocol:

Data Bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop Bits: 1

You may use the following telephone numbers:

714-837-4408

714-837-4409

The Toshiba Forum on CompuServe

Toshiba's Forum on CompuServe (CIS) gives you the opportunity to ask questions of system operators, to download information, and to access several Toshiba libraries that contain product information, user to user tips, and much more.

To access the Toshiba Forum:

1 Log on to Compuserve.

2 From the CIS prompt type

go Toshiba

.

Toshiba’s World Wide Web Site

To access the Toshiba World Wide Web site:

Use any World Wide Web browser to access the World Wide

Web, then type http://www.toshiba.com./tais/csd/support/.

Toshiba Voice Contact

To aid Toshiba, make sure you have:

The computer and any optional devices related to the problem.

The Microsoft Windows 95 diskettes, the Toshiba Companion disk and the rest of the master diskettes. You created Microsoft

Windows 95 diskettes using Microsoft Create System

Diskettes and created other diskettes using Master Disk Creator or purchased a compact disc containing the Toshiba drivers/utilities directly from Toshiba.

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

338

If Something Goes Wrong

If You Need Further Assistance

Name and version of the program involved in the problem along with its installation diskettes.

Information about what you were doing when the problem occurred.

Exact error messages and when they occurred.

In the United States, you can reach Toshiba PC Product

Support at:

800-999-4273

From outside the United States, call Toshiba PC Product

Support at:

714-859-4273

Toshiba's Worldwide Offices

For additional help, contact one of these Toshiba offices:

Argentina

Smart, S.A.

Mexico (Street) 630

Buenos Aires, 1097

Argentina

Austria

A&D

Lindenrabengasse 21

A 1238 Wien

Austria

Brazil

Sistema Operacional

Rua Helena 170; 8 Andar

V. Olimpia, CEP 04552-050

Sao Paulo

Brasil

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Australia

Toshiba (Australia) Pty. Limited

Information Systems Division

84-92 Talavera Road

North Ryde NSW 2113

Sydney

Australia

Belgium

Toshiba Information Systems

Benelux (Belgium) B.V.

Excelsiorlaan 40

B-1930 Zaventem

Belgium

Canada

Toshiba Canada Ltd.

191 McNabb Street

Markham, Ontario

L3R - 8H2

Canada

If Something Goes Wrong

If You Need Further Assistance

339

Czech Republic

CHG Toshiba, s.r.o.

Sumavska 31

612 54 Brno

Finland

Scribona System OY

Sinimäentie 14

P.L. 83

02630 ESPOO

Finland

Germany

Toshiba Europe (I.E.) GmbH

Leibnizstraße 2

D-93055 Regensburg

Germany

Hungary

Technotrade Kft.

Ov utca 185

1147 Budapest

Hungary

Italy

Pregetto Elettronica 92 s.r.l.

Via Galliari 1/A

20156 Milano

Italy

Denmark

Scribona System A/S TPC Service

Naverland 27

DK2600 Glostrup

Denmark

France

Toshiba Systèmes (France) S.A.

7, Rue Ampère

92804 Puteaux Cédex

France

Greece

Ideal Electronics S.A.

109 Syngrou Avenue

176 71 Kalithea

Athens

Greece

Ireland

Same as United Kingdom

Luxembourg

Same as Belgium

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

Japan

Toshiba Corporation

International Operations-

Personal Computers

1-1, Shibaura 1-Chome

Minato-KU, Tokyo, 105-01

Japan

Mexico

Toshiba de Mexico

Paseo de la Reforma no. 30, 4-Piso

Centro 06048 D.F.

Mexico City

Mexico

340

If Something Goes Wrong

If You Need Further Assistance

Morocco

C.B.I.

22 Rue de Bethune

Casablanca

Morocco

New Zealand

Toshiba (New Zealand) Pty. Limited

Level 4, 3 Ferncroft Street

Grafton Auckland

New Zealand

Papua New Guinea

Fujitsu (PNG) Pty. Ltd.

P.O. Box 4952 Boroko

NCD, Papua

New Guinea

Portugal

Quinta Grande Assistencia Tecnica

Informatica, Lda.

Av. Moinhos no. 15A

Ur. Quinta Grande

2720 Alfragide

Portugal

Slovenia

INEA d.o.o.

Ljudljanska 80

61230 Domzale

Slovenia

The Netherlands

Toshiba Information Systems

Benelux B.V.

Rivium Boulevard 41

2909 LK, Capelle a/d Ijssel

The Netherlands

Norway

Scribona Norge A/S

Toshiba PC Service

Stalfjaera 20

Posboks 51/Kalbakken

N-0901 OSLO 9

Norway

Poland

Wittelsbach Service Polska ul. Okopowa 47

01-059 Warszawa

Poland

Slovakia

HTC s.r.o.

Kukucinova 26

831 03 Bratislava

Slovakia

Spain

Toshiba Information Systems

(España) S.A.

Parque Empresarial San Fernando

Edificio Europa, Planta 1

Escalera A

28831 Madrid

Spain

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

If Something Goes Wrong

If You Need Further Assistance

341

Sweden

Scribona TPC AB

Sundbybergsväegen 1

Box 1374

Solna 171 27

Sweden

United Kingdom

Toshiba Information Systems

(U.K) Ltd.

Toshiba Court

Weybridge Business Park

Addlestone Road

Weybridge/Surrey KT15 2UL

United Kingdom

Switzerland

Ozalid AG

Herostrasse 7 Postfach

8048 Zürich

Switzerland

United States

Toshiba America Information

Systems, Inc.

9740 Irvine Boulevard

Irvine, California 92718

United States

For the most recent list of addresses, access Toshiba’s AUTOFAX system (see page 336).

Part I: Getting To Know Your Computer

The Hotkeys

Hotkeys are keys that, pressed in combination with the

Fn

key, turn system functions on and off. Hotkeys have a white legend on the front of the key indicating the option or feature the key controls.

Instant Password Security

Fn

+

F1

This hotkey locks the keyboard and blanks the display. You must enter your password, if registered, or press

Enter

to begin work again.

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The Hotkeys

Power

Power

Fn

+

F2

This hotkey displays the battery save pop-up window (in Windows 95 with MaxTime running) and switches among battery save modes: Full Power,

Low Power, and User Settings.

Resume Mode

Fn

+

F3

This hotkey displays the power-up pop-up window (in Windows 95 with MaxTime running) and turns Resume Mode on and off.

Sound

Fn

+

F4

This hotkey cycles the alarm volume through Off,

Low, Medium and High. Off is always first.

Display

Fn

+

F5

This hotkey alternates among the following display options: built-in display only, external monitor only and simultaneous display.

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The Hotkeys

Keyboard

347

Keyboard

Fn

+

F10

Fn

+

F11

Fn

+

F12

This hotkey turns the cursor control overlay on and off.

This hotkey turns the numeric overlay on and off.

This hotkey turns the scroll lock feature on and off.

Part II: Technical Reference

Toshiba Access

Panel

The Toshiba Access Panel (TAP) is similar to the Windows 95 taskbar. It allows you to monitor and control your computer’s features easily and efficiently. Like the Windows 95 taskbar, the TAP can be permanently visible on your desktop or can be hidden automatically. Additionally, you can customize the TAP so your computer can meet your needs at home, at work or while you travel.

This chapter identifies the parts of the Toshiba Access Panel and documents each button, dialog box and menu. The buttons and dialog boxes are in alphabetical order. The menus are documented in the section title.

350

Toshiba Access Panel

Panel Components

Panel Components

Configuration button

Gauge gallery button

Dashboard

Dashboard tear-off button

Splitter

Application scroll buttons

Application icons

Options button

Help button

The Toshiba Access Panel

Option

Configuration button

Gauge Gallery button

Usage

This button identifies the current configuration. To change your configuration, click the configuration button with the primary Accu-

Point button. The configuration slider bar appears. Select a configuration by clicking one of the configuration icons. Selecting a configuration or clicking outside the configuration slider bar hides the slider bar.

This button displays the Gauge Gallery dialog box.

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Panel Components

351

Option

Dashboard tear-off button

Dashboard

Dashboard scroll buttons

Splitter

Application icons

Application scroll buttons

Usage

This button opens a separate window for the battery gauges. The space on the panel used by the battery gauges becomes available to the application icons.

This area contains the TAP gauges. You can move the gauges on the dashboard, change the properties for the gauges or remove gauges from the dashboard by clicking a gauge with the secondary AccuPoint button.

If you reduce the size of the dashboard by enlarging the application area, a wide arrow appears below the battery gauge(s). Click this arrow to see the remaining gauge(s).

This bar separates the dashboard from the applications. You can click and drag this bar to change the sizes of the dashboard and application area.

This area provides space for the icons used to start programs. To add a program to the application area, drag the program icon to the application area and release the primary

AccuPoint button.

To move a program’s icon from one place on the application area to another, click and hold the primary AccuPoint button while the cursor is over the icon. Drag the icon to the new position and drop it by releasing the button.

These buttons appear if one or more application icons cannot display on the TAP.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Secondary Button Menus

Option

Options button

Help button

Usage

This button displays the Options slider bar.

From this bar you can customize the Toshiba

Access Panel.

This button displays the Help slider bar.

From this bar you can access text and video help.

To change the properties of the Toshiba Access Panel itself, click the configuration button with the secondary AccuPoint button and click Properties... with the primary AccuPoint button.

Secondary Button Menus

Clicking the primary button on the components of the Toshiba

Access Panel activates the feature or displays a dialog box.

Clicking the secondary button on a component displays a menu of options. Each menu varies. The following table lists all the menu options that may appear:

Component

TAP gauge

Menu Item Usage

Remove from All removes the selected dashboard gauge from all configurations.

Remove from

configuration name

Properties removes the selected dashboard gauge from the current configuration.

displays the Toshiba Access Panel

Properties dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Secondary Button Menus

353

Component Menu Item Usage

Application icon Remove from All removes the selected application icon from all configurations.

Remove from

configuration name

removes the selected application icon from the current configuration.

Properties

TAP gauge when the Dashboard is undocked

Remove From

configuration name

displays the Toshiba Access Panel

Properties dialog box. For more information see “Toshiba Access Panel

Properties dialog box” on page 378.

removes selected gauge from the current configuration.

Remove from All removes selected gauge from all configurations.

Gauge gallery allows gauges to be added to the dashboard by dragging and dropping them into the dashboard or by right clicking on an item in the gallery window.

Title Bar

Dashboard

Properties alternates between the mini and full size title bar in the dashboard window.

displays the Dashboard Properties dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Advanced Configuration Management Dialog Box

Advanced Configuration Management Dialog Box

This dialog box tells the system when to automatically switch configurations.

To access this dialog box, click the Options button to display the

Options slider window. Click the Configuration Management button, then click the Advanced... button.

Advanced Configuration Management dialog box

Option Usage

Disable automatic configuration switching disables all automatic switching. The system will change configuration only when you select a new configuration from the configuration slider bar on the Toshiba Access Panel.

Switch when docking state changes enables the system to switch configurations when you connect or disconnect your computer from a

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator or a Desk

Station V Plus. Clicking this option displays two drop-down lists allowing you to select the docked configuration name and the undocked configuration name.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Animation Dialog Box

355

Option

Switch when A/C power connection changes

Switch configuration based on hardware profile

OK

Cancel

Usage

enables the system to switch configurations when you change the computer’s power source from A/C to battery or vice versa. Clicking this option displays two drop-down lists allowing you to select the A/C power configuration name and the battery power configuration name.

enables the system to select the configuration based on the current Windows 95 hardware profile.

This option appears only if you have multiple Windows 95 Hardware Profiles on your computer.

Selecting this option enables two list boxes: Hardware Profile and TAP Configuration. Choose a hardware profile from the list, then click the TAP configuration with which you want to associate it.

saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

Animation Dialog Box

This dialog box controls the animation sequences that are part of the Toshiba Advanced Dialog Interface.

To access this dialog box, click Animation... on the TAP Window

Styles dialog box.

Animation dialog box

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Toshiba Access Panel

Animation Effects Dialog Box

Option Usage

Dialog open and close when selected, dialog boxes in the Toshiba Access

Panel animate when opened and closed.

List box drop down and retract when selected, lists in the Toshiba Access Panel animate when opened, and animate when a selection is made.

Configuration button displays the Animation Effects window and allows you to set unique animation effects for each TAP configuration.

OK saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

Cancel discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

Animation Effects Dialog Box

This dialog box lets you assign Toshiba Advanced Dialog Interface effects to specific configurations.

To access this dialog box, click the configuration button in the

Animation dialog box.

Animation Effects dialog box

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Toshiba Access Panel

Browse for Sound Dialog Box

357

Browse for Sound Dialog Box

Use this dialog box as you would use the Windows 95 Open File dialog box.

Browse for Sound dialog box

Option Usage

File name

Files of type is the name of the sound file.

selects the type of sound file to use.

Play button (sidewaysfacing triangle)

Stop button (solid square) plays the selected sound file so you can see if you want to assign it.

stops playing the selected sound file.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

The Dashboard Properties dialog box lets you customize the dashboard’s position and style. You define these options using the two property pages that are part of the Dashboard Properties dialog box. They are:

The Styles property page

The Gauges property page

To access this dialog box, click the Dashboard tear-off button to separate the dashboard from the panel, and choose Dashboard

Properties... from the Options menu.

Dashboard Properties dialog box

Styles Property Page

The Styles property page allows you to control the dashboard’s overall appearance on the desktop.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

359

Option

Stay on top

The Styles property page

Window Style

The Window Style section of the Styles property page defines the position of the dashboard on the desktop relative to the other open windows.

Description

This is a check box that determines the relative position of the dashboard window.

Checked causes the dashboard to become a standard window. It can be placed in front of or behind other windows on the desktop.

Unchecked causes the dashboard to become the top window when possible. The system determines whether the dashboard belongs on top of a currently active window. For normal programs running in a standard window with a caption, the dashboard is the top window.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

Option

Place on title bar of active window

Description

You can set this control only when the Stay On Top option is on. When on, this control places the dashboard on the active window’s title bar, provided it meets the Stay On Top criteria.

The dashboard initially aligns itself to the left of the minimize button, but can be moved to another position on the title bar by dragging and dropping. The background color of the dashboard matches the active title bar color, making the battery gauges look like part of the current caption.

Option

Standard

Mini

None

Dashboard Title Bar Style

This section of the Styles property page defines the dashboard title bar style.

Description

This style displays the dashboard with a caption that includes a system menu, minimize button, and a close button.

This style displays a small caption with no buttons or toolbar. It includes a standard border that can be resized.

This style does not display a caption or border allowing the dashboard to fit exactly in the title bar of an active window.

This option is available only when the “Stay on title bar of active window” is selected.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

361

Gauges Property Page

The Gauges property page allows you to customize how the dashboard gauges are displayed.

The Gauges property page

Layout

The Layout section defines which TAP gauges are displayed on the dashboard at one time.

Option

Display all gauges

Enable Cycle Mode

Description

All battery gauges are displayed at one time.

This option allows you to cycle through TAP gauges one at a time. The method of doing this is determined by the set of controls under this option.

Auto Cycle This option causes the system to cycle through the gauges at a time interval you specify.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Dashboard Properties Dialog Box

Option

Show manual cycle button

Description

This option displays a cycle button that allows you to manually cycle through the gauges by clicking the button.

This option is enabled automatically if Enable

Cycle Mode is selected and Auto Cycle is turned off.

Option

Small

Size

The size section of the Gauges property page determines the size of the TAP gauges.

Description

Displays the dashboard gauges in a smaller window.

Large Displays the dashboard gauges in a larger window.

Configuration button Displays the Gauge Size dialog box that allows you to set the dashboard gauge size for each

Toshiba Access Panel configuration.

Part II: Technical Reference

Toshiba Access Panel

Change Configuration Image Dialog Box

363

Change Configuration Image Dialog Box

The Change Configuration Image dialog box uses the

Windows 95 Open File dialog box to select a bitmap (.bmp) or icon (.ico) to associate with a Toshiba Access Panel configuration.

The Configuration button shows the icon currently associated with the configuration.

To access this dialog box, click the Configuration button with the secondary AccuPoint button, click Configuring Management..., click Properties, and click Change Image...

Change Configuration Image dialog box

Option

File name

Files of type

Preview

OK

Cancel

Part II: Technical Reference

Usage

is the name of the file that contains the icon.

selects the type of file to use for the icon.

displays the currently selected file so you can decide if this is the one you want to assign.

closes the dialog box and accepts the changes you made.

closes the dialog box without making the changes.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Close TAP Applications Dialog Box

Close TAP Applications Dialog Box

If you create or remove a Toshiba Access Panel configuration, all other panel applications must be shut down for the creation or removal to take effect. Once you click OK, to enable or remove a configuration, the system checks for any open applications. If any are found the Close TAP Applications dialog box appears.

The Close TAP Applications dialog box allows you to switch to an open application, close one application or close all open applications.

Close TAP Applications dialog box

Option Usage

Currently Active TAP

Applications

Switch to

Close lists the titles of any Toshiba Access Panel application currently running.

brings into view the currently selected application for inspection. You may complete any tasks you wish to and close the application.

closes the currently selected application.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Configuration Button

365

Option

Close All

Refresh

Usage

closes all the currently running applications.

refreshes the currently Active TAP Applications window. If you switch to an application and close it, the closed application may be removed immediately from the active list. If this happens, click the Refresh button to display the list.

Configuration Button

Click the Configuration button to display the Configuration slider bar from which you can change your current configuration. Clicking on any area other than the Configuration slider bar hides the slider bar.

Home

Office

Travel

The Configuration slider bar

Option Usage

Configuration slider bar contains a button for each configuration. The system comes with three preset configurations. You can add two of your own or modify the preset configurations.

Home configures the computer for your work at home.

Office

Travel configures the computer for your work at the office.

is a configuration for taking the computer on the road.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Configuration Management Dialog Box

Configuration Management Dialog Box

You use the Configuration Management Dialog box to change the properties of a configuration, remove a configuration, or create a new configuration.

To display this dialog box, click the Configuration button using the secondary AccuPoint button and click Configuration Management... with the primary AccuPoint button. Another way to access this dialog box is to click the Options button (at the bottom of the panel) and the Configuration Management icon.

Configuration Management dialog box

Pressing the arrow keys on your keyboard changes the configuration selection.

Option Usage

Move Left moves the selected configuration image on the configuration slider bar one position to the left.

Move Right moves the selected configuration image on the configuration slider bar one position to the right.

Properties displays the Configuration Properties dialog box for the selected configuration.

Remove removes the selected configuration from the system. You cannot remove the currently active configuration.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Configuration Properties Dialog Box

367

Option

Enable

Close

Advanced

Usage

displays the Enable Configuration dialog box when an inactive configuration button is selected. This allows you to create a new Toshiba Access Panel configuration.

applies all changes and closes the dialog box.

displays the Advanced Configuration Management dialog box for the selected configuration. For more information see

“Advanced Configuration Management Dialog Box” on page 354.

Configuration Properties Dialog Box

In this dialog box you can rename or change the icon for a configuration.

You access this dialog box by clicking the Properties... button on the Configuration Management dialog box.

Configuration Properties dialog box

Option

Name

Change Image

OK

Cancel

Part II: Technical Reference

Usage

provides a place to enter a new name.

displays the Change Configuration Image dialog box.

saves the new properties and closes the dialog box.

discards the changes and closes the dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Edit Sound Schemes Dialog Box

Edit Sound Schemes Dialog Box

This dialog box allows you to change the sound properties of any

Toshiba Advanced Dialog Interface sound scheme present on the system, to create new schemes or remove any scheme other than

“Default.”

Edit Sound Schemes dialog box

Option

Save

Cancel

Sound Schemes

Option

Scheme text box

Usage

saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

Usage

displays the currently selected scheme name. You can see all the available sound schemes by pressing the down arrow to display a drop-down list.

Part II: Technical Reference

Toshiba Access Panel

Edit Sound Schemes Dialog Box

369

Option

Save As

Delete

Usage

allows you to save the current scheme to a new scheme name. This button displays the Save

Scheme As dialog box for you to fill in with the new scheme name.

removes the selected scheme from the system. You cannot delete “Default.” The sound files themselves are not deleted.

Scheme Events

Option

Events text box

Disable/Enable

Usage

displays all possible sound events in the selected scheme. A loudspeaker icon indicates the event is currently enabled.

The full path to the sound file associated with the sound event is displayed in the Sound section below.

changes the state of the event. If the selected event is enabled, this button has the caption “Disable.” If the event is disabled, this button has the caption

“Enable.”

Event Sound File

Option

Name

Browse

Usage

shows the current sound file name. You can edit the file name in this text box.

displays the Browse for Event Sound dialog box.

For more information, see the “Browse for Sound

Dialog Box” on page 357.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Enable Configuration Dialog Box

Option Usage

Play button (sidewaysfacing triangle) plays the sound file currently listed in the Sound box.

Stop button (solid square) stops playing the sound file.

Enable Configuration Dialog Box

This dialog box appears when you choose to create your own configuration.

To access this dialog box, open the Configuration Management

Dialog box by clicking the Configuration button with the secondary AccuPoint button. Select one of the blank configuration buttons and click Enable.

Enable Configuration dialog box

General Properties Section

Option

Name

Usage

is a text box where you enter the name of the configuration you are creating.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Gauge Gallery Window

371

Option

Image

Change Image...

Usage

displays the image you selected.

displays the Change Configuration Image dialog box.

Base Configuration Section

Option

Copy from

Usage

identifies the existing configuration which you plan to use to form the new configuration. When you create a new configuration, you must base it on an existing configuration.

Gauge Gallery Window

The gauge gallery displays all TAP gauges available on the system and provides a description each gauge. To add a gauge to the

TAP, simply drag and drop it on the dashboard area.

To access this window, click the gallery gauge button on the TAP.

Gallery Gauge window

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Toshiba Access Panel

Gauge/Icon Size Dialog Box

To remove a gauge from the dashboard, click the gauge with the secondary AccuPoint button and click either Remove from All or

Remove from the current configuration.

Gauge/Icon Size Dialog Box

This dialog box lets you assign gauge/icon sizes to specific configurations.

To access this dialog box, click the configuration management icon in the Gauge/Icon Size section.

Gauge/Icon Size dialog box

The options are the same as for the Gauge/Icon Size Section of the

Toshiba Access Panel Properties dialog box.

Options Button

The Options button displays the Options slider bar. This bar provides access to the panel’s customization features.

Properties Window Styles Configuration Management

The Options slider bar

Clicking on any area other than the Options slider bar hides the slider bar.

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Sound Effects Dialog Box

373

Option

Properties

Window styles

Configuration

Management

Usage

displays the Toshiba Access Panel Properties dialog box. For more information see “Toshiba Access

Panel Properties Dialog Box” on page 378.

displays the Toshiba Access Panel Windows Styles dialog box. For more information see “TAP Window Styles Dialog Box” on page 376.

displays the Configuration Management dialog box.

For more information see “Configuration Management Dialog Box” on page 366.

Sound Effects Dialog Box

This dialog box allows you to assign sound effects to a configuration.

To access this dialog box, click the Options button, click the Window Styles button, then click the Sounds... button, and, finally, click the configuration button.

The Sound Effects Dialog Box

The options are the same as the Sounds dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Sounds Dialog Box

Sounds Dialog Box

This dialog box allows you to select a sound scheme to use with the Toshiba Advanced Dialog Interface.

To access this dialog box, click the Options button, then click the

Window Styles button, and click the Sounds... button.

The Sounds dialog box.

Option Usage

Enable sound effects enables sounds defined by the chosen sound scheme.

Sound Scheme displays a drop-down list of all the sound schemes present on the system. You may select any scheme on the list.

Configuration button displays the Sound Effects dialog box and allows you to make the settings for sound effects unique for each configuration.

Edit Schemes...

displays the Edit Sound Schemes dialog box. For more information see the next section.

OK

Cancel saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Special Effects Dialog Box

375

Save Scheme As Dialog Box

This dialog box saves a new sound scheme.

To access this box, click the Save As... button on the Edit Sound

Schemes dialog box.

Save Scheme As dialog box

Special Effects Dialog Box

This dialog box lets you associate Toshiba Access Panel sounds and animations with specific configurations.

To access this dialog box, click the configuration button in the

Special Effects section.

Special Effects dialog box

The options are the same as for the Special Effects section of the

Toshiba Access Panel Properties dialog box.

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Toshiba Access Panel

TAP Window Styles Dialog Box

TAP Window Styles Dialog Box

This dialog box allows you to choose either the Toshiba

Advanced Dialog Interface or the Windows 95 window style for the TAP system components.

To access this dialog box, click the Options button and click the

Window styles button.

TAP Window Styles dialog box

The images in the TAP Window Styles dialog box are examples of the two windows styles that you can choose from.

They do not contain active controls.

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Toshiba Access Panel

TAP Window Styles Dialog Box

377

If you try to access this dialog box and your computer’s display is set to 256 colors or lower, the system displays an error message.

To change your system’s color display, follow the instructions in the error message.

Option Usage

Toshiba Advanced

Dialog Interface

Sounds

Animation displays panel applications with the Toshiba

Advanced Dialog Interface graphic styles, sounds and animation.

displays the Sounds dialog box.

displays the Animation dialog box.

Standard Windows 95

Settings

OK displays panel applications with the normal Windows 95 style.

saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

Cancel

Apply discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

applies your changes immediately.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Toshiba Access Panel Properties Dialog Box

Toshiba Access Panel Properties Dialog Box

The Toshiba Access Panel Properties dialog box defines the characteristics of the panel itself.

To access this dialog box, click the Configuration button using the secondary AccuPoint button and click Properties…

Toshiba Access Panel Properties dialog box

Panel Display Section

Option

Always on top

Auto-hide

Usage

displays the panel on top of all other windows. If this box is unchecked, the panel may be obscured by other windows.

causes the panel to recede into the edge of the desktop. Selecting one of the options in the Display

Method group box determines when the panel reappears.

Part II: Technical Reference

Toshiba Access Panel

Toshiba Access Panel Properties Dialog Box

379

Option Usage

Immediately The panel reappears as soon as you place the cursor over the thin edge of the recessed panel.

After a brief delay The bar reappears two seconds after you place the cursor over the thin edge of the recessed panel.

Left click

Right click

The panel reappears after you place the cursor over the thin edge of the recessed panel and click the primary AccuPoint button.

The panel reappears after you place the cursor over the thin edge of the recessed panel and click the secondary AccuPoint button.

Schemes

OK

Cancel

Apply

This list box shows a list of overall looks for the

Toshiba Access Panel. Click a scheme and the panel changes when you click OK or Apply.

saves your changes and closes the dialog box.

discards your changes and closes the dialog box.

applies your changes.

Gauge/Icon Size Section

Option Usage

Use large dashboard gauges displays battery gauges in a large format.

Use large application icons displays application icons on panel in a large format.

Configuration button displays Gauge/Icon Size window and allows you to make the settings for the battery gauge and icon size unique for the each configuration.

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Toshiba Access Panel

Help Button

Special Effects Section

Option Usage

Use TAP sound effects automatically associates sound effects with the following system events:

Bar reappear (from auto-hide)

Sliderbar slideout (options/help/configurations)

Dashboard undock

Dashboard redock

Use TAP animation effects automatically animates actions for the following system events:

Bar auto hide

Bar reappear (from auto-hide)

Sliderbar slideout (options/help/configurations)

Slidebar retract (options/help/configurations)

Dashboard undock

Dashboard redock

Help Button

You can click the Help button to display the Help slider bar and access the panel’s help features. Clicking on any area other than the Help slider bar hides the slider bar.

Video help General help About TAP

The Help slider bar

Option

Help slider bar

Video help

Part II: Technical Reference

Usage

contains a button for each of the panel’s major help features.

displays the Video Help dialog box.

Toshiba Access Panel

Video Help Selection Dialog Box

381

Option

General Help

About

Usage

displays a standard Windows 95 help dialog box.

displays the About dialog box showing the product name, the version, the amount of physical memory installed and the free disk space.

Video Help Selection Dialog Box

This dialog box provides access to several videos that demonstrate how to use the Toshiba Access Panel.

Option

Play Selection

Close

Usage

starts running the selected video.

closes the dialog box.

Part II: Technical Reference

MaxTime

You can use the MaxTime Wizard or the MaxTime Control Panel to customize the Portégé 650CT’s power saving features.

To use the MaxTime Wizard, click its button on the Toshiba

Access Panel and follow the instructions on the screen.

To enter your power settings using the MaxTime Control Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double-click the MaxTime icon.

The MaxTime Control Panel opens.

384

MaxTime

This control panel provides three pages of configuration options, arranged like a stack of file folders. Each page of options has its own file folder tab.

To view or change these options, click the corresponding tab.

In addition to the three tabs, there are four buttons located at the bottom of the MaxTime Control Panel. The following table summarizes these buttons:

Button Function

OK saves current settings and exits the dialog box.

Cancel ignores current settings and exits the dialog box.

Apply applies the settings to the current session.

Help access online help.

Part II: Technical Reference

The Power Settings Page

MaxTime

The Power Settings Page

385

The Power Settings page

The Power Settings page controls the power usage mode and the custom settings for both battery and external power usage.

Option

Power Settings

Settings

Battery

External

Usage

Lets you choose the power source for which you are selecting power usage settings.

Power Usage Mode Full Power (default)

Low Power

Custom Settings

Allows you to select a preset battery save mode or customize the battery save options.

For more information about choosing a power usage mode, see “The

Easy Way—Choosing a Power Usage Mode” on page 131.

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MaxTime

The Power Settings Page

If you choose Custom Settings for the Power Usage Mode option, you can click the Modify Custom Settings button to set each power-saving option individually.

The custom settings for each power source may be different.

The Modify Custom Settings dialog box

To change an option setting, move the slider next to the option.

The following table explains the available settings for each option:

Settings Usage Option

Hard Disk Auto Off 01 Min.

03 Min. (Low Power default)

05 Min.

10 Min.

15 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min.

(Full Power default)

Turns the hard disk drive off if it is not used for the specified time.

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The Power Settings Page

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Option

Display Auto Off

System Auto Off

Processing Speed

Settings

01 Min.

03 Min. (Low Power default)

05 Min.

10 Min.

15 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min. (Full Power default)

Disabled

Usage

Turns the display off if it is not used for the specified time. For more information, see

“Display Auto Off” on page 134.

10 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min.

40 Min.

50 Min.

60 Min.

Disabled (default)

High (Full Power default)

Low (Low Power default)

Turns the system off if you haven't used the computer for the specified time. This option is available only if

Resume Mode is on.

For more information, see “System Auto Off” on page 134.

Sets the speed at which the Central Processing

Unit (CPU) processes information. High runs at 120MHz. Low adds pauses, effectively reducing processing speed.

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MaxTime

The Power Settings Page

Option

Sleep Mode

Display Brightness

Cooling Mode

Settings

Enabled (Low Power default)

Disabled (Full Power default)

Usage

When enabled, temporarily shuts down the processor when there are no processing requests, such as keyboard input or pointing device movement. For more information, see

“Sleep Mode (CPU

Sleep Mode)” on page 135.

Bright (Full Power default)

Semi-Bright (Low

Power default)

Performance (Full

Power default)

Quiet (Low Power default)

Sets the brightness of the display. For more information, see “Display Brightness (LCD

Brightness)” on page 135.

Sets the cooling method. Performance mode uses the fan to cool the processor chip, maintaining maximum system performance.

Quiet mode cools the system by temporarily reducing processing speed in preference to using the fan, conserving battery life. If the

CPU is still too hot, the fan turns on as well.

Part II: Technical Reference

The Battery Alarms Page

MaxTime

The Battery Alarms Page

389

The Battery Alarms page

This page controls the settings for Low Battery Alarm and the

Critical Battery Alarm.

Option

Battery Alarm

Thresholds

Settings

Based on Percent

Remaining

Based on Time

Remaining

Usage

Triggers the alarm based on either the Percent Remaining or

Time Remaining

Threshold. Sliders to the right of this option let you set the thresholds for the Low and

Critical Battery

Alarms.

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MaxTime

The Battery Alarms Page

The lower half of the Battery Alarms page controls how the system displays the battery alarm messages. These options are identical for both the Low Battery Alarm and the Critical Battery

Alarm:

Settings Usage Option

Display an alarm message

Enabled (check)

Disabled (no check)

Enables and disables the battery alarm message. If you enable the alarm message, you can choose the sound that occurs when the alarm message appears: No

Sound, Play System

Beep, or Play .wav file.

Part II: Technical Reference

The Miscellaneous Page

MaxTime

The Miscellaneous Page

391

The Miscellaneous page

The Miscellaneous page controls the following options:

Settings Usage Option

Power Source Change Automatically adjust the Power Usage Mode

Prompt to adjust the

Power Usage Mode

Controls how the system behaves when you change the computer from battery power to AC power, or vice versa.

Enable the power source indicator on the Windows 95 taskbar

Enabled (check)

Disabled (no check)

Turns the Toshiba power source indicator on the taskbar on and off.

Part II: Technical Reference

Toshiba System

Control Panel

To open the Toshiba System Control Panel, follow these steps:

1 Click Start, then point to Settings.

2 Click Control Panel.

Windows 95 opens the Control Panel.

3 Double click the Toshiba System icon.

The Toshiba System Control Panel opens.

The Toshiba System Control Panel

394

Toshiba System Control Panel

The Start Up Options Page

This control panel provides four pages of configuration options, arranged like a stack of file folders. Each page of options has its own file folder tab.

To view or change these options, click the corresponding tab.

In addition to the four tabs, there are four buttons located at the bottom of the Toshiba System Control Panel. The following table summarizes these buttons:

Button Function

OK saves current settings and exits the dialog box.

Cancel ignores current settings and exits the dialog box.

Apply applies the settings to the current session.

Defaults returns the settings to their default values.

The Start Up Options Page

The Start Up Options page

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The Start Up Options Page

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The options on this page control how the system starts.

Option

Start Up Sequence

Settings

Floppy disk first, then hard disk

Hard disk first, then floppy disk

Usage

Determines whether the system looks for the operating system first on the hard disk (HDD) or the diskette drive

(FDD) when you turn the computer on. This option is equivalent to the Boot Priority option in TSETUP.

Start Up Mode Boot

Resume

Trigger suspend/ resume when panel closes/opens

Enabled (check)

Disabled (no check)

Alternates between

Resume Mode and

Boot Mode. This option is equivalent to the Power-up Mode option in TSETUP.

Turns the computer on or off when you open or close its display panel. This option is only available when

Resume Mode is selected. This option is equivalent to the Panel

Power On/Off option in

TSETUP.

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Toshiba System Control Panel

The Power-on Timer Page

Option

Trigger resume when modem receives an incoming call

Settings

Enabled (check)

Disabled (no check)

Usage

Turns the computer on when the built-in modem detects an incoming call. This option is only available when Resume Mode is selected. This option is equivalent to the Auto

Power On Ring feature in TSETUP.

The Power-on Timer Page

The Power-on Timer page

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Toshiba System Control Panel

The Power-on Timer Page

397

Option

Status

The Power-on Timer page lets you set the system to turn on automatically at a time and date you specify.

Settings Usage

On

Off

Turns the computer on at a given time. If you choose On, a message to the right of the option displays the scheduled start up time.

This option is equivalent to the Auto Power

On option in TSETUP.

Time xx:xx Lets you specify the time at which the system turns on. Click the up and down arrow keys to change the time displayed in the box.

Time Format AM

PM

24 Hour

Set time for specific date

Enabled (check)

Disabled (no check)

Lets you select the format in which you want the time to display.

Enabling this option lets you specify the date on which the system turns on automatically.

Choose a date from the calendar below the option.

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Toshiba System Control Panel

The Security Page

The Security Page

The Security page

The Security page allows you to protect your system from unauthorized use by setting a System Password. If you connect your computer to an optional Desk Station V Plus, you can set an

Undock Password that prevents an unauthorized user from removing your notebook from its docking station.

Option

System Password

Settings

Registered

Not Registered

Usage

Shows whether you’ve set a system password. For information about using a system password, refer to “Using a

Password” on page 221.

Play sound file when resuming a docked machine

Enabled (check)

Disabled

(no check)

When enabled, this option lets you assign a sound file to play when you resume a computer that is connected to the Desk

Station V Plus.

Part II: Technical Reference

Option

Toshiba System Control Panel

The Security Page

399

Settings Usage

Enabling a sound if you’re using a password with the Desk

Station V Plus is very important because this is the only prompt you will receive to enter your password when resuming a docked computer.

Undock Password Password not required

Password required

Shows whether you’ve set an undock password. For information about using an undock password, refer to “Setting an

Undock Password” on page 245.

Play sound file when undocking

Enabled (check)

Disabled

(no check)

When enabled, this option lets you assign a sound file to play when you undock your computer from the Desk Station V

Plus.

Password Prompt This option lets you type in the text you wish the system to display when it starts and prompts you for your password. The system always displays “Password =” The text you enter here appears on the line before the “Password =” prompt. For example, you might use “Enter your personal password please...”

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Toshiba System Control Panel

The Miscellaneous Page

The Miscellaneous Page

The Miscellaneous page

Option

The Miscellaneous page controls options related to the system’s warnings, pointing devices, and parallel port.

Settings

Warning Volume Off

Low

Medium

High

Usage

Sets the volume at which the low battery alarm and other system alarms beep. This also affects sounds generated by any PC Card modem installed. This option is equivalent to the Alarm Volume option in TSETUP.

Enable audible warning for emergency battery condition

Enabled

(check)

Disabled

(no check)

Enables and disables the system's built-in audible battery alarm. This option is equivalent to the Low

Battery Alarm option in TSETUP.

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The Miscellaneous Page

401

Option

Enable audible warning when panel closes

Enable system beep warning

Settings

Enabled

(check)

Disabled

(no check)

Enabled

(check)

Disabled

(no check)

Usage

Enables and disables the alarm that sounds when you close the display panel while the computer is on. For more information, see “How and

When to Turn the Computer Off” on page 99. This option is equivalent to the Panel Close Alarm option in TSETUP.

Enables and disables your software’s use of the system speaker.

This affects alarms and system beeps, but not the sound system.

This option is equivalent to the

System Beep option in TSETUP.

Pointing Devices Enable Accu-

Point only if

PS/2 mouse is not connected at power-on time

Enable both

AccuPoint and

PS/2 mouse simultaneously

Selects whether an external pointing device disables the Accupoint.

This option is equivalent to the

Pointing Devices option in

TSETUP.

(This option does not affect serial pointing devices.)

Parallel Port Mode ECP

Standard

Bi-directional

Lets you choose the parallel port mode. Set this option to Std.

Bi-directional if the documentation for your parallel device instructs you to do so, or you are having problems with your printer or other parallel device.

Part II: Technical Reference

TSETUP

TSETUP only runs outside of Windows, at a system prompt.

TSETUP is an MS-DOS-based program you can use to configure your system. To open TSETUP, follow these steps:

1 From Windows 95, Click Start, then click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

2 Click Restart the computer in MS-DOS mode, then click

Yes.

Windows 95 shuts down the computer, then restarts it in

MS-DOS mode and displays a system prompt.

3 At the system prompt, type

c:\dos\tsetup

and press

Enter

.

TSETUP displays the first page of the System Setup screen.

The TSETUP options are arranged on two pages. The following sections describe how to make changes in TSETUP and list the setup options on each page.

404

TSETUP

Making Changes in TSETUP

Making Changes in TSETUP

This table lists the keys to use in TSETUP.

Key(s) Result

and

and

Moves between the two columns.

Moves between items in a column.

Spacebar and

BkSp

Changes the selected item.

PgDn

and

PgUp

Esc

End

Home

Switch between the first and second pages.

Quits TSETUP without saving changes.

Saves your changes and quits TSETUP, restarting the computer if necessary.

Resets each option to its factory preset value.

You can go directly to a specific group of options by entering the first letter of the group’s name. For example, press B to go to the

Battery group.

Press

PgUp

(page up) or

PgDn

(page down) to change pages.

When you’re making changes in TSETUP, it’s possible to create a resource conflict (for example, you might set both the serial port and sound to IRQ7). If this occurs, TSETUP displays a message notifying you of the conflict. Change the settings to resolve the conflict before saving your changes and exiting TSETUP.

Closing TSETUP

To close TSETUP and keep your changes, press

End

. When

TSETUP asks you to confirm your action, press

Y

. TSETUP closes with your changes in effect and restarts the computer or returns you to the system prompt, depending on the changes you made.

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TSETUP

The First Page

405

To close TSETUP without saving your changes, press

Esc

, then

Y

.

TSETUP returns you to the system prompt.

If you attempt to close TSETUP with one or more resource conflicts resulting from your changes, TSETUP will display an error message. You may choose to exit anyway, or return to TSETUP and resolve the conflict.

The First Page

Total = 16384KB

DISPLAY

Display Adaptor = VGA Compatible

LCD Display Colors = 256K Colors

Power On Display = Internal/External

Text Mode Stretch = Enabled

Not Registered

MEMORY

PASSWORD

HARD DISK

Int. Standard HDD

SYSTEM SETUP (1/2) BIOS VERSION = X.XX

BATTERY

Battery Save Mode = Full Power

Mode = Enhanced IDE (Normal)

OTHERS

Power-up Mode = Boot

CPU Cache = Enabled

L2 Cache = Enabled

Auto Power On = Disabled

Alarm Volume = High

System Beep = Enabled

Keyboard = Layout/Fn

Boot Priority = FDD

HDD

Pointing Devices = Auto-Selected

PC Card Controller Mode

= PCIC Compatible

↑↓←→

:Select items Space, BkSp:Change Values PgDn, PgUp: Change pages

Esc:Exit without saving Home:Set default values End:Save changes and Exit

The first page of the System Setup screen

MEMORY

This group shows how the computer's memory is allocated.

Memory Type

Total

Description

displays the total amount of memory installed in the computer.

This value is calculated by the system and cannot be changed.

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TSETUP

The First Page

DISPLAY

This group configures the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and video port output.

Option Settings

Display Adaptor VGA Compatible (default)

Not Used

Usage

Turns the computer's internal display adapter on or off.

Restart

Y

LCD Display

Colors

256K Colors

16M Colors

Gives the number of colors available to the display.

N/A

Power On

Display

Internal/External (default)

Simultaneous

Internal/External sends output to the external display, if one is connected, when you turn the computer on. Otherwise it sends output to the internal display panel.

Simultaneous sends output to both the internal and external displays.

Y

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TSETUP

The First Page

407

Option

Text Mode

Stretch

Settings

Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Usage Restart

The screen has a height of

600 pixels. In text mode, which uses 400 pixels, this leaves a blank space above and below the text on the screen. Enabling this mode stretches the text to fill more of the screen. This mode only has an effect when you run the computer in DOS mode.

N

PASSWORD

This group lets you set or reset the user-level password for poweron and instant security. See “Using a Password” on page 221 for complete information on your computer’s password features.

Settings

Registered

Not Registered

(default)

Usage

Shows whether a password has been set.

Restart

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

HARD DISK

This section lets you set the hard drive mode. There will always be an option for Int. Standard HDD. This is the computer’s built-in hard disk.

If you’ve installed an additional hard disk in the optional Desk

Station V Plus, it’s settings will be under Ext. SelectBay.

Option

Mode

Settings

Enhanced

IDE (Normal)

(default)

Standard IDE

Usage Restart

Use Enhanced for

MS-DOS, Windows or

OS/2.

Use Standard for Novell

Netware, or Unix environments that do not recognize hard disks larger than

540MB.

Y

Formats for Enhanced IDE and Standard IDE are different so, if you change the setting, you will have to reformat the hard disk for the new setting.

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TSETUP

The First Page

409

BATTERY

Option

Battery Save

Mode

The options in this section let you set the computer’s power-saving modes.

Settings

Full Power

(default)

Low Power

User Settings

Usage

Allows you to select a preset battery save mode or customize the battery save options. For more information about choosing a battery save mode, see “The Easy Way—

Choosing a Power Usage

Mode” on page 131.

Restart

N

Processing

Speed

When you select the Battery Save Mode, a drop-down box appears with the battery save options. You can change these option settings only if you chose User Settings for the Battery

Save Mode.

High (Full

Power default)

Low (Low

Power default)

Sets the speed at which the Central Processing

Unit (CPU) processes information. High runs at

120MHz.

Low adds pauses, effectively reducing processing speed.

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

Option

CPU Sleep

Mode

Display Auto

Off

Settings

Enabled (Low

Power default)

Disabled (Full

Power default)

Usage

When enabled, temporarily shuts down the processor when there are no processing requests, such as keyboard input or pointing device movement. For more information, see “Sleep Mode

(CPU Sleep Mode)” on page 135.

Restart

N

01 Min.

03 Min. (Low

Power default)

05 Min.

10 Min.

15 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min. (Full

Power default)

Disabled

Turns the display off if it is not used for the specified time. For more information, see “Display Auto

Off” on page 134.

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

411

Option Settings

HDD Auto Off 01 Min.

03 Min. (Low

Power default)

05 Min.

10 Min.

15 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min.

(Full Power default)

Usage

Turns the hard disk drive off if it is not used for the specified time.

Restart

N

System Auto

Off

10 Min.

20 Min.

30 Min.

40 Min.

50 Min.

60 Min.

Disabled

(default)

Turns the system off if you haven't used the computer for the specified time. This option is available only if Resume Mode is on. For more information, see “System Auto

Off” on page 134.

N

LCD Brightness Bright (Full

Power default)

Semi-Bright

(Low Power default)

Sets the brightness of the display. For more information, see “Display

Brightness (LCD Brightness)” on page 135.

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

Option Settings

Cooling Method Performance

(Full Power default)

Quiet (Low

Power default)

Usage Restart

Sets the first choice of cooling method.

Performance mode uses the fan to cool the processor chip, maintaining maximum system performance.

Quiet mode cools the system by temporarily reducing processing speed in preference to using the fan, conserving battery life. If the CPU is still too hot, the fan turns on as well.

N

OTHERS

Option

This group allows you to set many other configuration options.

Whether or not you need to use these options depends primarily on the software and devices you use.

Settings

Power-up Mode Resume

Boot (default)

Usage

Alternates between

Resume Mode and Boot

Mode.

Restart

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

413

Option

CPU Cache

Settings

Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Usage Restart

Improves system performance when enabled.

Disable this option only if your programs and/or optional devices require you to do so.

Y

Write Policy

If you set the CPU Cache option to Enabled, a drop-down box lets you set the Write Policy option.

Write-back

(default)

Write-through

Write-back provides maximum performance.

Write-through reduces performance to offer compatibility with older programs that may not run on a fast system.

Y

L2 Cache Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Improves performance when enabled. This option only appears if the CPU

Cache option is Enabled.

Disable this option only if your programs and/or optional devices require you to do so.

Y

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TSETUP

The First Page

Option

Alarm Volume

Settings

Auto Power On Enabled

Disabled

(default)

Off

Low

Medium

High (default)

Usage Restart

Turns the computer on at a given time and, optionally, date. When you enable this option, a box appears where you set the time and date at which you want the system to start.

If Resume Mode is on, you can also enable or disable the Ring feature which allows a modem signal to turn the computer on.

For more information, see

“Different Ways to Turn the Computer On” on page 277.

N

Sets the volume at which the low battery alarm and other system alarms beep.

This also affects sounds generated by any PC

Card modem installed.

N

Low Battery

Alarm

When you highlight the Alarm Volume option, a box appears that lets you set Low Battery Alarm and Panel Close Alarm.

Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Enables and disables the system's built-in audible battery alarm.

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

415

Option

Panel Close

Alarm

Settings

Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Usage Restart

Enables and disables the alarm that sounds when you close the display panel while the computer is on. For more information, see “How and When to Turn the Computer Off” on page 99.

N

System Beep

Panel Power

On/Off

Enabled

(default)

Disabled

Enabled

Disabled

(default)

Enables and disables your software’s use of the system speaker. This affects alarms and system beeps, but not the sound system.

N

Turns the computer on or off when you open or close its display panel.

This option is only available when Resume Mode is selected. For more information, see “Different Ways to Turn the

Computer On” on page 277.

N

When you highlight the Keyboard option, a drop-down list box lets you set the Ext. Keyboard “Fn” Key Equivalent option.

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TSETUP

The First Page

Option

Ext. Keyboard

“Fn” Key

Equivalent

Boot Priority

Settings Usage Restart

Disabled

(default) left Ctrl + left

Alt right Ctrl + right Alt left Alt + left

Shift right Alt + right

Shift left Alt +

CapsLock allows you to use the selected key combination to emulate the computer's

Fn key on an external keyboard. For more information, see “Making Your

External Keyboard Pretend it Has the Fn Key” on page 193.

N

FDD

HDD

(default)

HDD

FDD

Determines whether the system looks for the operating system first on the hard disk (HDD) or the diskette drive (FDD) when you turn the computer on.

N

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TSETUP

The First Page

417

Option

Pointing

Devices

Settings

Auto-selected

(default)

Simultaneous

Usage

Selects whether an external pointing device disables the AccuPoint

(Auto-selected) or not

(Simultaneous).

(This option does not affect serial pointing devices.)

Restart

Y

PC Card Controller Mode

PCIC Compatible (default)

CardBus/16bit

Sets up the PC Card controller. This option affects all PC Card slots in the system, including any installed in an optional

NoteDock II Enhanced

Port Replicator or Desk

Station V Plus.

Sets this option to Card-

Bus/16bit only if you are using a PC Card that is

CardBus compatible.

Y

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418

TSETUP

The Second Page

The Second Page

DISPLAY

VGA Segment Address = E400H-EFFFH

I/O PORTS

SYSTEM SETUP (2/2) BIOS VERSION = X.XX

DRIVES I/O

Internal HDD

= Primary IDE (1F0H/IRQ14)

Int Selectable Bay

= Secondary IDE (170H/IRQ15)

Serial = COM1 (3F8H/IRQ4)

Built-In Modem = COM2 (2F8H/IRQ3)

Parallel = LPT1 (378H/IRQ7/CH3)

Sound = Enabled

FLOPPY DISK I/O

Floppy Disk = (3F2H/IRQ6/CH2)

PCI BUS

PCI BUS = IRQ Not Used

↑↓←→

:Select items Space, BkSp:Change Values PgDn, PgUp: Change pages

Esc:Exit without saving Home:Set default values End:Save changes and Exit

The second page of the System Setup screen

DISPLAY

This group sets the memory address used by the display.

Option

VGA Segment

Address

Settings Usage Restart

C000H-CBFFH

E000H-EBFFH

E000H-EFFFH

E400H-EFFFH

(default)

Lets you set the memory location for video BIOS.

The default of E400 -

EFFF uses 48KB of UMB

(upper memory block) memory.

If your application is having video problems, try using the E000-EFFF setting.

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

419

I/O PORTS

This group allows you to configure communications port settings for the serial, infrared, parallel and sound ports. It also lets you control the settings for the joystick port on the optional

NoteDock II Enhanced Port Replicator or Desk Station V Plus.

Option

Serial

Settings

COM1

(3F8H/IRQ4)

(default)

COM2

(2F8H/IRQ3)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ4)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ5)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ7)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ3)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ5)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ7)

Not Used

Usage Restart

Sets the serial port name through which your communications software sends output to the serial port. Also sets the interrupt request level (IRQ).

If your new setting conflicts with the setting for the modem, the port name for the conflicting port is changed to Not Used.

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

Option Settings

Built-In Modem COM1

(3F8H/IRQ4)

COM2

(2F8H/IRQ3)

(default)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ4)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ5)

COM3

(3E8H/IRQ7)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ3)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ5)

COM4

(2E8H/IRQ7)

Not Used

Usage

Sets the COM port name your modem/fax and telephony software uses to send and receive information. Also sets the interrupt request level (IRQ).

If your new setting conflicts with the Serial Port settings, the conflicting port name is changed to

Not Used.

Restart

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

421

Option

Parallel

Settings

LPT1 (378H/

IRQ7/CH3)

(default)

LPT2 (278H/

IRQ5/CH3)

LPT3 (3BCH/

IRQ7/CH3)

Not Used

Usage Restart

Sets the port name, address, interrupt request level and DMA channel through which the computer communicates with the parallel port.

The DMA channel is only displayed if you select

ECP (Enhanced Capability Port).

Y

If you set the Parallel Port to anything other than Not Used, a drop-down list box appears offering a choice between ECP and

Std. Bi-directional. If you choose ECP, you may also set the

DMA channel. Set this option to Std. Bi-directional if the documentation for your parallel device instructs you to do so, or you are having problems with your printer or other parallel device.

Y

(default)

Not Used system on or off.

WSS I/O

Address

The following sound system options are in a drop -down list box that appears when you highlight Enabled for the Sound option.

534H (default)

608H

E84H

F44H

Lets you set a unique I/O address for the sound system when you are using it as Windows Sound System compatible.

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

Option

SBPro I/O

Address

Settings

220H (default)

240H

Usage Restart

Lets you set a unique I/O address for the sound system when you are using it as SoundBlaster Pro compatible.

Y

Synthesizer I/O

Address

388H Displays the address used by the synthesizer.

This cannot be changed.

N/A

WSS & SBPro

IRQ Level

IRQ5 (default)

IRQ7

IRQ9

IRQ11

IRQ15

Lets you set an interrupt request level for the Windows Sound System/

SoundBlaster Pro compatible mode of the sound system.

Y

WSS & SBPro

DMA Playback

Channel 0

Channel 1

(default)

Channel 3

Lets you set a DMA channel to be used for playback of the Windows

Sound System/Sound-

Blaster Pro compatible sound file.

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

423

Option

WSS & SBPro

DMA Record

Settings

Channel 0

(default)

Channel 1

Channel 3

Usage

Lets you set a DMA channel to be used for recording the Windows

Sound System/Sound-

Blaster Pro compatible sound file.

Restart

Y

If you set the WSS & SBPro Playback and WSS & SBPro

Record options to the same channel, the Record option will display its setting as “same as playback,” and full duplex will not be supported for speakerphone operation.

Control I/O

Address

120H

MPU401 (MIDI

I/F)

Not Used

(default)

330H/IRQ9

330H/IRQ11

330H/IRQ15

330H/IRQ5

330H/IRQ7

Displays the address used to control the sound device.

This cannot be changed.

N/A

Enables the joystick port

(on the NoteDock II

Enhanced Port Replicator or Desk Station V Plus) to function with an external

MIDI device.

Y

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TSETUP

The Second Page

PCI BUS

Option

PCI BUS

This section shows the interrupt level used by the optional Desk

Station V Plus, when connected.

Settings

IRQ Not Used

IRQ11 (typical)

Usage

This automatically defaults to IRQ11 when you connect the computer to an optional Desk Station V Plus. If IRQ11 is being used by an expansion card in the Desk Station V Plus, this IRQ level will change according to current resource availability. When the computer is not connected to a Desk

Station V Plus, this is set to IRQ Not Used.

Restart

N/A

If the system cannot assign an interrupt level to the PCI bus when you connect the Desk Station, you will hear a warning beep and see the message “PCI BUS = IRQ Not Used”.

When this happens, you cannot use the Desk Station’s PCI bus slots, ISA bus slots, PCMCIA card slots or SCSI port.

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The Second Page

425

DRIVES I/O

This section sets the memory range and interrupt level used by the system’s hard disk. Internal HDD refers to the built-in hard disk.

Option

Internal HDD

Settings

Primary IDE

(1F0H/IRQ14)

(default)

Not Used

No Drive

Usage

Sets the I/O address and interrupt for the drive.

Setting this option to Not

Used disables the drive.

If a drive is not installed, this option is automatically set to No Drive.

Restart

Y

FLOPPY DISK I/O

This section sets the memory range and interrupt level used by the system’s diskette drive.

Option

Floppy Disk

Settings

3F2H/IRQ6/

CH2 (default)

No Drive

Usage

Displays diskette drive resource assignments.

If the diskette drive is not connected to the system, this option is automatically set to No Drive.

Restart

N/A

Part II: Technical Reference

The

Diagnostic Test

This chapter explains how to use the diagnostic test program

TDIAGS.EXE to determine if your system components are working properly.

Use the diagnostic test if you have a problem you could not identify with the tips listed in the chapter “If Something Goes Wrong.”

The test verifies that the following system components (hardware) are in working order:

❖ system (the computer's internal hardware)

❖ memory

❖ video

❖ diskette drive

❖ hard disk drive

❖ printer (if you have one attached)

This chapter explains each of these tests in detail.

428

The Diagnostic Test

Starting the Diagnostic Test

Starting the Diagnostic Test

To test hardware, it's important to start the diagnostic test without optional features or programs (for example, without memoryresident programs). To do so, you should run TDIAGS from the

Toshiba Companion Diskette using the Toshiba Companion Utility (even though the TDIAGS program is on the hard disk).

Before you start the test, check all cables for loose connections. If any errors occur during the test, check all cable connections again.

To start the test, follow these steps:

1 Make sure the external diskette drive is connected.

2 Click Start, then click Shut Down.

Windows 95 displays the Shut Down Windows dialog box.

3 Click the button next to Restart the computer in MS-DOS mode, then click Yes.

Windows 95 shuts down the computer, then restarts it in

MS-DOS mode and displays a system prompt.

4 Put the Toshiba Companion Diskette in the diskette drive and press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

.

After a moment, the computer displays a Welcome screen.

5 Press

Enter

.

The Toshiba Companion Utility loads the diagnostic test and displays its main menu:

Main Menu

Install Utilities and Files

View README Documents

Setup Your Computer

Run Diagnostics

Run Master Diskette Creator

Exit to DOS

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Choosing Test Options

429

6 Use the arrow keys to select Run Diagnostics and press

Enter

.

TDIAGS asks you to confirm that you want to run the diagnostic test.

7 To run the diagnostic test, press

Y

(for yes), and press

Enter

.

The following sections explain the diagnostic test options.

Choosing Test Options

Before the test begins, the program asks several questions about which components you wish to test.

1 The first question asks if you want to test the diskette drive(s). The computer displays:

Test the FDD (Y/N)?

2 To test the diskette drive(s), type

Y

and press

Enter

. To bypass the test, type

N

and press

Enter

.

The FDD (floppy disk drive) test checks the internal diskette drive, and the external drive if you have one. Attach the external drive before running this test.

The test writes test patterns on any diskette in the drive. These patterns destroy all information on the diskette(s). Make sure there is no information you want to keep on the diskette(s) you use.

If you choose the FDD test, you must format and write enable these diskettes before the test. For 3.5inch diskettes, move the write-protect tab to cover the square hole.

The next prompt asks if you want to test the hard disk drive:

Test the HDD (Y/N)?

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The Diagnostic Test

Choosing Test Options

3 To test the hard disk, type

Y

and press

Enter

. Otherwise, type

N

and press

Enter

.

The hard disk test overwrites a portion of the information stored on the disk. Back up any important files before you test the hard disk.

The following prompt appears:

Test the printer (Y/N)?

4 Type

Y

to test the printer, or

N

to skip the test, and press

Enter

.

Before beginning the test, make sure the printer is connected to the computer, the power is turned on, and the printer is on line.

If you chose to test the printer, the prompt displays:

Compatible with IBM printer (Y/N)?

5 To test an IBM or an IBM-compatible printer, type

Y

and press

Enter

. To test a non–IBM-compatible printer, type

N

and press

Enter

.

If you choose an IBM printer when your printer is not an IBM or IBM-compatible printer, the test output will be unintelligible and may cause the printer to eject multiple blank pages. If you're not sure about your printer's compatibility, type

N

for a non–IBM-compatible printer.

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Test Sequence

431

Test Sequence

The diagnostic test checks the computer's components and printer in a predefined sequence as follows:

1 system test

2 memory test

3 display test

4 external diskette drive test

5 HDD (hard disk drive) test

6 printer test

While a test is in progress, the program displays:

IN PROGRESS TSSDSS where T indicates the test number, the first SS indicates the subtest number, D indicates the drive (if tested), and the second SS indicates the hardware status. This message may remain on the screen for a moment. The following sections describe each subtest.

System Functions and Memory

The system functions and the memory tests run together for approximately two seconds. The system functions test doesn't display any messages. The memory test displays the following message:

PROGRESS xxxxxx where xxxxxx is the current memory location being tested. The memory test includes conventional and extended memory.

If either test aborts:

1 Write down everything that appears on the screen.

2 Press

Ctrl

+

Pause

to return to the diagnostics menu.

3 Consult your dealer.

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The Diagnostic Test

Test Sequence

Character Attributes

When the memory test completes, the diagnostic test displays the following screen:

CHARACTER ATTRIBUTES

NEXT LINE SHOWS NORMAL DISPLAY.

NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN

NEXT LINE SHOWS INTENSIFIED DISPLAY.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

NEXT LINE SHOWS REVERSE DISPLAY.

R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R

NEXT LINE SHOWS BLINKING DISPLAY.

BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB

BLUE

RED

MAGENTA

GREEN

CYAN

YELLOW

WHITE

Press [Enter] key

Character attributes test screen

Look under the message NEXT LINE SHOWS BLINKING DIS-

PLAY to make sure the line is actually blinking.

If your screen doesn't match the diagnostic test display, write down the differences and contact your dealer. If your screen matches the display, press

Enter

to go to the next test.

320 X 200 Graphic Display

The next test is the 320 x 200 GRAPHIC DISPLAY (13) test. The test screen displays 16 colored horizontal bars with the name of the color.

Go to the next test by pressing

Enter

.

Character Sets

The next two tests are character set tests. The first checks that the screen can display characters in a 40 column by 25 row format

(the characters are wider than normal).

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Test Sequence

433

The display screen should look like the following:

First character set test screen

If the screen matches this illustration, go to the next character set test by pressing

Enter

. If your screen doesn't match the diagnostic test display, write down the differences and contact your dealer.

The second test checks that the screen can display characters in an

80 column by 25 row format. The display should look like the following:

80*25 CHARACTER DISPLAY

01234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789

!"3%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmno

!"3%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnop

"3%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopq

3%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqr

%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrs

&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrst

'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstu

()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv

)*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvw

*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwx

+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy

,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz{

-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|

./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}

/0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~

0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~D

123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~DÇ

23456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~DÇü

3456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~DÇüé

456789:;<=>[email protected][\]^_`abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz{|}~DÇüéâ

PRESS [ENTER] KEY.

Second character set test screen

If the screen matches this illustration, continue with the tests by pressing

Enter

. If your screen doesn't match the diagnostic test display, write down the differences and contact your dealer.

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The Diagnostic Test

Test Sequence

Graphics Capabilities

The next subtests check the screen's graphics capabilities for each of the computer's graphics modes.

During the test, the resolution and mode number appear above an image representing the mode's capabilities. The number inside the brackets is the mode number.

The illustration below shows the test image for one of the 320 x

200 graphics modes (mode 4).

320*200 GRAPHICS DISPLAY : [4]

PRESS [ENTER] KEY

Graphics capabilities test screen

A similar screen appears for each of the computer's graphics modes.

Press

Enter

to proceed with the next screens. Each screen has a similar image (three boxes of different shades of gray), differing primarily in resolution. If a different image appears on your screen, contact your dealer. If the screens match the display, press

Enter

to go to the next test.

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The Diagnostic Test

Test Sequence

435

Diskette Drives

If you selected the diskette drive test, you see a prompt that asks you to insert a diskette into the drive you want to test.

Insert a formatted, write-enabled diskette into the drive.

This test may destroy all information on the diskettes. Make sure there is no information you want to keep on the diskettes you use.

To skip this test and return to the diagnostics menu, press

Ctrl

+

Pause

.

After you insert the diskette in the drive, press

Enter

. The test begins and displays this message:

FLOPPY DISK IN PROGRESS 503000

If an error occurs, the test displays the ABORTED message. Write down the highlighted numbers and return to the main menu by pressing

Ctrl

+

Pause

.

If a diskette drive fails the test, check the following:

Does the drive contain a diskette?

Is the diskette properly formatted?

Is the diskette write-enabled?

Is the diskette undamaged?

Repeat the test with another diskette. If the test displays the

ABORTED message again, see your dealer. If you inserted a write-protected diskette or if you left the drive empty, the test aborts. Return to the main menu by pressing

Ctrl

+

Pause

.

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The Diagnostic Test

Test Sequence

If the test completes successfully, and you selected the hard disk test, the diagnostic test begins checking the hard disk. If you did not select the hard disk or printer test, the diskette drive test concludes by displaying the TDIAGS screen. To exit TDIAGS, go to

“Exiting the Diagnostic Menus” on page 438.

Hard Disk

If the diskette drive tests successfully and you selected the hard disk drive test, the hard disk test displays this message:

HARD DISK TEST IN PROGRESS 805100

If an error occurs, the test displays the ABORTED message. Write down all messages and highlighted numbers and consult your dealer. Your computer or your drive may need service. To return to the main menu, press

Enter

.

The hard disk test does not destroy all of the information stored on the hard disk. However, this test overwrites a small portion of the disk. Back up any important files before you test the hard disk.

If the test completes successfully, and you selected the printer test, the diagnostic test begins the printer test. If you did not select the printer test, the hard disk test concludes by displaying the TDI-

AGS screen. To exit TDIAGS, go to “Exiting the Diagnostic

Menus” on page 438.

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The Diagnostic Test

Test Sequence

437

Printer

If the hard disk drive tests successfully and you selected to test the printer, the printer test displays this message:

PRINTER TEST IN PROGRESS 60xxxx where xxxx is a counter that shows the test is still in progress. If you specified an IBM-compatible printer, the test sends the following output to the printer:

PRINTER TEST

1. THIS LINE SHOWS NORMAL PRINT.

2. THIS LINE SHOWS DOUBLE WIDTH PRINT.

3. THIS LINE SHOWS COMPRESSED PRINT.

4. THIS LINE SHOWS EMPHASIZED PRINT.

5. THIS LINE SHOWS DOUBLE STRIKE PRINT.

6. ALL CHARACTERS PRINT

!"#$%&'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_`abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz{|}~

IBM-compatible printer output

If you specified a non–IBM-compatible printer, the test sends the following output to the printer:

!"#$%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmno

!"#$%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnop

"#$%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopq

#$%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqr

$%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrs

%'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrst

'()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrstu

()*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrstuv

)*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvw

*+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwx

+,-./0123456789:;<=>[email protected][\]~_^abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxy

Non-IBM-compatible printer output

If an error occurs, the test displays the ABORTED message. Write down all messages and highlighted numbers and check the following items:

Is the printer power cord securely plugged into a live wall outlet?

Is the printer cable properly connected to the computer?

Is the printer turned on?

Is the printer ready (on line or selected)?

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The Diagnostic Test

Exiting the Diagnostic Menus

Repeat the test. If the test displays the ABORTED message again, or your printout doesn't match the output shown in the illustrations, consult your dealer to have the printer and the cable serviced.

If the printer tests successfully, the test displays the COM-

PLETED message. Press Enter to return to the TDIAGS screen.

To exit TDIAGS, continue with the next section.

Exiting the Diagnostic Menus

To exit the diagnostic menu, follow these steps:

1 When TDIAGS completes system components testing, type

N

and press

Enter

.

TDIAGS returns you to the Main menu.

2 Remove the Toshiba Companion Diskette from the diskette drive and press

Ctrl

+

Alt

+

Del

or the reset button to restart the computer.

The computer restarts.

Part II: Technical Reference

Part II: Technical Reference

The Diagnostic Test

Exiting the Diagnostic Menus

439

Features and

Specifications

This appendix lists the features of the Portégé 650CT computer and summarizes its specifications.

Built-in Features

This section lists the Portégé 650CT features.

Technology and Processor

Microprocessor 133MHz Intel Pentium with Voltage Reduction

Technology

LSI and CMOS large scale integrated and complementary metaloxide semiconductor technology, providing minimum size and weight, low power usage and high reliability

444

Features and Specifications

Built-in Features

ECP the Portégé 650CT parallel port supports

Enhanced Capability Port (ECP), providing increased performance when you’re using an

ECP-compatible parallel device

Power

Computer

AC adapter

15V input voltage (constant voltage)

1.4 amps maximum (constant current)

100 to 240 volts alternating current

50 or 60 hertz (cycles per second)

Main battery

Backup battery removable, rechargeable lithium ion battery pack provides power for special memory features, such as Resume Mode

RTC battery

Intelligent power supply provides power for the internal real-time clock and calendar detects low battery charge and displays the time remaining in MaxTime

Automatic power off saves battery power by automatically turning off the display and hard disk when either have not been accessed for a set length of time

Part III: Appendixes

Features and Specifications

Built-in Features

445

Storage Capacity

External 3.5-inch diskette drive

Hard disk accommodates both 1.44MB, high density (2HD) and 720KB, double-density (2DD) diskettes

2.5-inch integrated drive and controller provides nonvolatile storage for 1.26GB with an average access time of 13 milliseconds (ms)

Ports

Parallel port

Serial port

Monitor port

Expansion port selectable, ECP-compatible parallel port that provides a Centronics-compatible connection to a printer or other parallel device

9-pin, RS-232-C-compatible high-speed buffered serial port lets you connect an external modem, mouse, serial printer or other serial device

15-pin, analog VGA port lets you connect an external SVGA monitor (color or monochrome)

240-pin port lets you connect an optional Desk

Station V Plus or NoteDock II Enhanced Port

Replicator (with the docking adapter)

External diskette drive port lets you attach the Toshiba 1.44MB external 3.5inch diskette drive

Fast Infrared port Fast Infrared Data Association (IrDA)-compliant serial infrared port allows up to 4Mbps cableless data transfer and is backwards compatible with

IrDA 1.0 external devices

Part III: Appendixes

446

Features and Specifications

Built-in Features

Standard Hardware

Memory

Display

16MB EDO that uses 3.3 volt, 4-megabit dynamic

RAM chips for 640KB conventional and 7360KB extended memory the Portégé 650CT has a 11.3 inch (measured diagonally) active matrix Thin Film Transistor

(TFT) color LCD that displays up to 16M colors simultaneously at 800x600 resolution

Keyboard enhanced 84-key (86-key in Europe) keyboard emulates the IBM PS/2 keyboard and includes embedded numeric and cursor control overlays and dedicated cursor control keys

AccuPoint and buttons provides the complete function of a mouse or other pointing device from within the keyboard

External diskette drive accommodates both 1.44MB and 720KB 3.5-inch diskettes

Part III: Appendixes

Features and Specifications

Built-in Features

447

Telecommunications integrated 28.8 Kbps V.34 data/v.17 modem/fax integrated speaker phone and answering machine capabilities through Multimedia Connect software

The data modem supports the following protocols:

Bell-103/212A, CCIT-V.21/V.22, CCIT-V.23,

CCIT-V.22bis, CCIT-V.32, CCIT-V.32bis,

CCIT-V.32 terbo, CCIT-V.34, MicroCom Network Protocol (MNP) classes 1-4, MNP class 5 for up to 2x data compression, CCIT-V.42bis for up to 4x data compression

The fax modem supports the following protocols:

V.21 ch2, V.27ter, V.29, V.17, Fax Class 1,

Class1 ECM

Standard Software

Operating System Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows for

Workgroups 3.11

Configuration

Programs

Power

Toshiba Access Panel, Toshiba System Control

Panel, MaxTime and TSETUP let you change configuration options and set preferences

APM device driver and MaxTime monitor the battery charge and provide access to the Portégé

650CT’s power-saving features

Part III: Appendixes

448

Features and Specifications

Built-in Features

Special Features

Resume Mode

Advanced Power

Management

Security electronic bookmark that records what you’re doing when you turn the computer off and returns you to the same place when you turn the power back on determines the system’s power needs and automatically configures the computer for maximum power savings instant and power-on passwords help protect your files

Documentation

User’s Guide

Microsoft

Windows 95 documentation explains how to set up the computer, gives instructions for basic computing tasks and documents all system components and features

Online Documentation provides the Portégé 650CT User’s Guide in hypertext form

Load this manual into memory and refer to it when you have questions about the computer documents the Microsoft Windows 95 operating system

Part III: Appendixes

Features and Specifications

Optional Accessories and Devices

449

Optional Accessories and Devices

This section lists the options available for the Portégé 650CT computer.

Power Devices

Battery charger charges extra battery packs

Additional battery packs use as spare or replacement packs to extend the time you can operate the computer away from a live wall outlet

Memory Cards

8MB

16MB

32MB

64MB expands the computer’s memory to 24MB expands the computer’s memory to 32MB expands the computer’s memory to 48MB expands the computer’s memory to 80MB

Expansion Capability

PC Card slot lets you install up to two Type I or Type II PC

Cards, or one Type III PC Card. Maximum slot thickness: 10.5mm. CardBus and Zoomed Video

(ZV) ready.

Part III: Appendixes

450

Features and Specifications

Optional Accessories and Devices

NoteDock II

Enhanced Port

Replicator

Desk Station V Plus optional docking station that provides access to the following: parallel port, serial port, video port,

PS/2 keyboard port, PS/2 mouse port, external diskette drive port, two PC Card slots, security lock slot, power socket optional docking station provides the following:

SelectBay for a Toshiba 3.5” diskette drive module or CD-ROM module, 5.25” bay for an IDE or

SCSI drive (hard disk, tape or CD-ROM), security lock slot, system speaker volume dial, two type III

PC Card slots, two full-length ISA/PCI expansion slots, one half-length PCI expansion slot, ECP/

EPP parallel port, MIDI/joystick port, SCSI-II port, 9-pin RS-232C serial port, video port, PS/2 mouse port, microphone jack, headphone jack, audio line-in jack, audio line-out jack, AC IN power socket

Others

Carrying case sturdy fabric or leather carrying case protects the computer while traveling

Security

Cable Kensington MicroSave Security System cable to deter computer theft

Part III: Appendixes

Features and Specifications

Specifications

451

Specifications

Physical Dimensions

Weight

Size

4.8 lbs (2.2 kilograms) including battery width x depth x height

9.88" x 7.91" x 1.89" (261mm x 208mm x 48mm)

Environmental Specifications

Condition

Operating

Ambient

Temperature

41

°

to 95

°

F

5

°

to 35

°

C

Nonoperating -4

°

to 149

°

F

-20

°

to 65

°

C

Relative

Humidity

20% to 80%

(noncondensing)

10% to 90%

(noncondensing)

Wet-bulb temperature

79

°

F

26

°

C maximum

Altitude (From

Sea Level)

-200 to 10,000 feet (-60 to

3,000 meters)

-200 to 30,000 feet (-60 to

10,000 meters)

Part III: Appendixes

Power Cord

Connectors

The Portégé 650CT computer features a universal power supply you can use worldwide. This appendix shows the shapes of the typical AC power cord connectors for various parts of the world.

USA and Canada United Kingdom

UL approved

CSA approved

Australia

AS approved

BS approved

Europe

VDA approved

NEMKO approved

System

Resources

This appendix lists the preassigned IRQ levels, DMA channels and I/O port addresses. Because system resources are dynamically assigned during start up by the Plug and Play standard, the system configuration may change every time the computer starts. To determine what system resources are available, the following tables are provided.

IRQ Line Assignments

The direct lines to the CPU are called an Interrupt ReQuest (IRQ) lines. To find an IRQ for a device, select an available IRQ if possible, otherwise select an IRQ that is normally reserved for a device you are not using. The following table lists the IRQ line assignments for the Portégé 650CT computer:

IRQ (decimal) Status

0

1

2

3

Reserved

Reserved

Reserved

Device/Notes

Programmable Interval Timer (PIT)

Keyboard Controller

Programmable Interrupt Controller

Normally reserved COM2

456

System Resources

DMA Channel Assignments

IRQ (decimal) Status

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Device/Notes

Normally reserved COM1 Serial Port

Available

Reserved 3.5-inch diskette drive (Internal Select-

Bay, External FDD or Desk Station V

Plus SelectBay).

Resources are always reserved even when drive is not installed.

Normally reserved LPT1(ECP Parallel Port)

Reserved Real-time clock (RTC)

Available

Available

Available

Reserved PS/2 mouse

Resources are always reserved even when drive is not installed.

Reserved Numeric data processor

Normally reserved First hard disk drive

Normally Reserved Second hard disk drive or ATAPI

CD-ROM (SelectBay)

DMA Channel Assignments

Direct Memory Access (DMA) allows some devices to transfer data to and from memory at high speeds, without using the CPU.

Such devices are each assigned a unique DMA channel. The

Portégé 650CT computer has two DMA controllers with four channels on each controller, a total of eight DMA channels.

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Input/Output Address Assignments

457

The following table lists the Portégé 650CT computer's DMA channel assignments.

DMA Status Device/Notes

0 Available

1 Available

2 Reserved 3.5-inch diskette drive (Internal SelectBay,

External FDD or Desk Station V Plus

SelectBay)

Resources are always reserved even when drive is not installed.

3 Available

4 Reserved Cascade from DMA Controller 1

5 Available

6 Available

7 Available

Input/Output Address Assignments

The CPU accesses input/output devices, such as modems, by reading from them or writing to them. Each command to read or write must specify the address (in memory). Each device that communicates with the CPU must have a unique I/O address.

The following table lists the device names and their assigned I/O addresses for the Portégé 650CT computer.

Input/Output address (I/O) in hex Device/Function

00-0F, 81-83, 87, 89-8B, 8F,

C0-DF

20-21, A0-A1

24-25, 2E-2F, E0-EF, 80,

84-86, 88, 8C-8E, B0-B2,

1882-1885, 1888-88D, 480-48F,

CF8-CFF

Direct Memory Access Controller

(DMAC)

Programmable Interrupt Controller (PIC)

Special Purpose Registers

(Toshiba specific)

Part III: Appendixes

458

System Resources

Input/Output Address Assignments

Input/Output address (I/O) in hex Device/Function

40-43

61

70-71

F0-FF

120-127

200-207

330-337

3E0-3E1

3E2-3E3

Programmable Interval Timer (PIT)

Speaker

Real Time Clock (RTC)

Numeric Data Processor (NDP)|

Sound Control Ports *1

Joystick *1 (only when attached to Desk

Station V Plus or NoteDock II)

MIDI MPU401 Interface *1 (only when attached to Desk Station V Plus or Note-

Dock II)

PCMCIA1 *1 (only in PCIC

COMPATIBLE mode)

PCMCIA2 *1 (only when attached to

Desk Station V Plus or NoteDock II)

(only in PCIC COMPATIBLE mode)

5, 9, 10, 11, or 15

(this resource is set by the BIOS at startup and cannot be changed)

3F2-3F5, 3F7

Desk Station V Plus or NoteDock II PCI

Bus (Shared by all PCI and CardBus devices)

External Diskette Drive or Desk Station V

Plus SelectBay

Resources are always reserved even when drive is not installed.

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Master Resource Chart

459

Master Resource Chart

This chart lists all static and dynamic resources and all their possible settings. Not all settings are available, however some settings may be disabled to free resources.

Device I/O Address in hex

1st Hard Disk Drive

*1

1F0-1F7, 3F6

170-177, 376

190-197, 396

110-117, 316

180-187, 3D6

150-157, 356 or

130-137, 336

2nd Hard Disk Drive

*2 (in Desk Station V

Plus or 5.25-inch drive bay)

1F0-1F7, 3F6

170-177, 376

190-197, 396

110-117, 316

180-187, 386

150-157, 356 or

130-137, 3B6

Built-in Modem *1 3F8-3FF (COM1)

2F8-2FF (COM2)

3E8-3EF (COM3)

2E8-2EF (COM4)

CD-ROM *1

(Desk Station V Plus

SelectBay or Desk

Station V Plus 5.25inch Drive Bay)

1F0-1F7, 3F6-3F7

170-177, 376-377

190-197, 396-397

110-117, 316-317

180-187, 386-387

150-157, 356-357

130-137, 336-337

IRQ in decimal DMA

3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10,

11, 14, or 15

3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10,

11, 14, or 15

3, 4, 5, or 7

3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10,

11, 14, or 15

Part III: Appendixes

460

System Resources

Master Resource Chart

Device I/O Address in hex IRQ in decimal DMA

Communications Port

(COM) *1

3F8-3FF (COM1)

2F8-2FF (COM2)

3E8-3EF (COM3)

2E8-2EF (COM4)

2C8-2CF (Other)

2A8-2AF (Other)

3A8-3AF (Other)

Desk Station V Plus or

NoteDock II PCI Bus

(Shared by all PCI and

CardBus devices)

Direct Memory

Access Controller

(DMAC)

External Diskette

Drive or Desk Station

V Plus Selectbay

Resources are always reserved even when drive is not installed

IrDA Communications Port (SIR) *1

00-0F

81-83, 87, 89-8B, 8F, and C0-DF

3F2-3F5, and 3F7

3F8-3FF (COM1)

2F8-2FF (COM2)

3E8-3EF (COM3)

2E8-2EF (COM4)

2C8-2CF (Other)

2A8-2AF (Other)

3A8-3AF (Other)

Joystick *1

(Only when attached to Desk Station V Plus or NoteDock II)

200-207

Keyboard Controller 60 and 64

3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10,

11, 14, or 15

5, 9, 10, 11, or

15

6 2

3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10,

11, 14, or 15

5, 6, or 7

1

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Master Resource Chart

461

Device I/O Address in hex IRQ in decimal DMA

MIDI MPU401

Interface *1

(Only when attached to Desk Station V Plus or NoteDock II)

330-337

F0-FF Numeric Data

Processor

PCMCIA1 *1

(Only in PCIC

COMPATIBLE mode)

3E0-3E1

PCMCIA2 *1

(Only when attached to Desk Station V Plus or NoteDock II)

(Only in PCIC

COMPATIBLE mode)

3E2-3E3

Printer (Bi-Directional Setting) *1

378-37A (LPT1)

278-27A (LPT2)

3BC-3BE (LPT3)

Printer (ECP Setting)

*1

Programmable

Interrupt Controller

378-37A, 778-77A

(LPT1)

278-27A, 678-67A

(LPT2)

3BC-3BE, 7BC-7BE

(LPT3)

2BC-2BF, 6BC-6BE

(Other)

39A-39C, 79A-79C

(Other)

29A-29C, 69A-69C

(Other)

20-21 and A0-A1

5, 7, 9, 11, or 15

13

Usable

Interrupts 3, 4,

5, 7, 9, 10, 11,

14, or 15

Usable

Interrupts 3, 4,

5, 7, 9, 10, 11,

14, or 15

5 or 7

5, 7, 9, 10, 11,

14, or 15

2

1, 2, or 3

Part III: Appendixes

462

System Resources

Master Resource Chart

Device

Programmable

Interval Timer

PS/2 Mouse

Real Time Clock

Sound

(Control Part) *1

Sound

(WSS=FM=SBP) *1

Speaker

Special Purpose

Registers (Toshiba

Specific)

System VGA *2

I/O Address in hex

40-43

70-71

120-127

IRQ in decimal DMA

0

12

8

534-537, 388-38B,

220-22F

534-537, 388-38B,

220-24F

608-60B, 388-38B,

220-22F

608-60B, 388-38B,

220-24F

E84-E87, 388-38B,

220-22F

E84-E87, 388-38B,

220-24F

F44-F47, 388-38B,

220-22F

F44-F47, 388-38B,

220-24F

61

24-25, 2E-2F, E0-EF,

80, 84-86, 88, 8C-8E,

B0-B2, 1882-1885,

1888-188D, 480-48F,

CF8-CFF

3B0-3BB

3C0-3DF

5, 7, 9, 11, or 15 0, 1, or 3

(two used for full duplex operation)

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Master Resource Chart

463

Device

System BIOS

System Memory

System VGA BIOS

*2

System VGA RAM

*2

System VGA *2

Memory Addresses in Hex

0F0000-0FFFFF

FFF000-FFFFFF

(high memory copy)

000000-09FFFF

(Conventional memory/base 640K)

100000-xxxxxx

(Extended memory)

E000-EFFF,

E400-EFFF (default), or C000-CBFF

A000-BFFF

FE000000-FEFFFFFF (High memory linear buffer)

3BO-3BB

3CO-3DF

*1 Device can be disabled to free resources.

*2 Device is automatically disabled when video card is installed in PCI/ISA slot.

Part III: Appendixes

464

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

The following section provides instructions for viewing and changing system resources determined by the operating system you have chosen.

Running MS-DOS, or Windows 3.1x

If you are running MS-DOS v. 6.22, Windows v. 3.1x, or Windows for Workgroups v. 3.11, refer to “TSETUP” on page 403 for instructions on viewing and changing system resources for the following devices:

VGA BIOS Address

Communication Ports (Serial I/O and IRQ, IrDA I/O, IRQ and

DMA, Built-in modem I/O and IRQ, Bi-Directional Parallel

I/O, IRQ and DMA, ECP Parallel I/O, IRQ and DMA)

Sound System (WSS I/O, SBPro I/O, Synthesizer I/O, WSS and SBPro IRQ, WSS and SBPro DMA, Control I/O)

PCI Bus IRQ

Disk Drives (HDD and CD-ROM for Desk Station V Plus

SelectBay and 5.25-inch Drive Bay)

Most of the system resources for these devices can be changed in TSETUP. If there is a resource conflict, TSETUP will warn you when you try to exit the program.

Remember to update drivers and program settings to reflect your changes in system resources.

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

465

Running Windows 95

Working with system resources under Windows 95 can be done easily through the Windows 95 Control Panel. The following sections provide instructions for viewing and changing system resources.

Viewing System Resources

To view system resources running Windows 95, follow these steps:

1 Click Start and point to Settings and click Control Panel.

2 Double click the Toshiba System icon.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties dialog box.

Sample System Properties dialog box

3 Click the Device Manager tab.

Part III: Appendixes

466

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

Windows 95 displays all the devices connected to the system.

Device Manager tab

Sample Device Manager tab

4 Double click the Computer icon.

Windows 95 displays the Computer Properties dialog box.

Resource selection buttons

Settings Devices

Sample Computer Properties dialog box

5 Click the View Resources tab.

Depending on which resource is selected, the Computer Properties window displays the settings assigned to the enabled system devices. Clicking a different resource button displays the settings assigned for that specific resource.

Resources not displayed can be assigned to optional devices.

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

467

Changing System Resources

Most system resources can be changed using Device Manager.

However, some resources cannot be changed due to limited support for devices and/or drivers. To change system resources, follow these steps:

1 Click Start and point to Settings and click Control Panel.

2 Double click the System icon.

Windows 95 displays the System Properties dialog box.

Sample System Properties dialog box

3 Click the Device Manager tab.

4 Double click the device icon that you want to change.

Part III: Appendixes

468

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

Windows 95 displays a device specific dialog box.

Sample Device dialog box

5 Click the Resource tab.

Windows lists the resources assigned to the device.

Change Setting button

Automatic settings box

The Resources tab for the ESS sound controller

6 Uncheck the “Use automatic settings” box by clicking in the box.

7 Click the Change Setting... button.

Windows 95 displays an Edit dialog box specific to the resource you want to change.

8 Enter a new value and click OK.

Part III: Appendixes

Part III: Appendixes

System Resources

Viewing and Changing System Resources

469

Video

Modes

This appendix lists the video modes supported by the Portégé

650CT display adapter, and identifies the characteristics of each mode.

The columns of the following tables are defined as follows:

Mode is the mode number in hexadecimal, and is generally used by programmers to specify video modes in programs.

Type identifies the display adapter that first supported the mode, and specifies whether the mode is text or graphics.

Resolution is the measure of the screen’s dimensions in terms of horizontal and vertical pixels (in graphics modes), or rows and columns of characters (in text modes).

Grid is the default number of pels per character.

LCD Colors is the maximum number of simultaneous colors, or shades of gray, that the mode can display on the built-in screen.

CRT Colors is the maximum number of simultaneous colors, or shades of gray, that the mode can display on an external monitor.

Scan Freq hor/vert is the horizontal and vertical scanning frequency in

Hertz. This is for external monitors only.

472

Video Modes

Portégé 650CT Video Modes

Portégé 650CT Video Modes

This table lists the video modes for the Portégé 650CT computer:

BIOS

0, 1 VGA

Text

40 x 25 char

Character

Mode Type

Resolution

Matrix

TFT

LCD

Colors

CRT

Colors

VRAM

Address

CRT

Vertical

Refresh

Rate

8x8 pels 16/256K 16/256K B8000 70Hz

8x8 pels 16/256K 16/256K B8000 70Hz 2, 3 VGA

Text

0*,

1*

VGA

Text

80 x 25 char

40 x 25 char

8x14 pels 16/256K 16/256K B8000 70Hz

2*,

3*

0+,

1+

VGA

Text

VGA

Text

2+,

3+

VGA

Text

4, 5 VGA

Graph

6 VGA

Graph

80 x 25 char

40 x 25 char

8x14 pels 16/256K 16/256K B8000

8(9)x16 pels

16/256K 16/256K B8000

70Hz

70Hz

80 x 25 8(9) x 16 16/256K 16/256K B8000 70Hz

7 VGA

Text

7+ VGA

Text

D VGA

Graph

E

F

VGA

Graph

VGA

Graph

320 x 200 pels

8x8 pels 4/256K 16/256K B8000 70Hz

640 x 200 pels

8x8 pels 2/256K 2/256K B8000 70Hz

8(9) x 14 Mono Mono B0000 70Hz 80 x 25 char

80 x 25 char

8(9) x 16 Mono Mono B0000 70Hz

320 x 200 pels

8x8 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000 70Hz

640 x 200 pels

8x8 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000 70Hz

640 x

350pels

8x14 pels Mono Mono A0000 70Hz

10 VGA

Graph

11 VGA

Graph

12 VGA

Graph

13 VGA

Graph

640 x 350 pels

640 x 480 pels

640 x 480 pels

320 x 200 pels

8x14 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000

8x16 pels 2/256K 2/256K A0000

70Hz

60Hz

8x16 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000 60Hz

8x8 pels 256/

256K

256/

256K

A0000 70Hz

20 SVGA 640 x 480

Graph pels

8x16 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

CRT

Horizontal

Refresh

Rate

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

31.5kHz

37.6kHz

43.2kHz

CRT

Interlace

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Part III: Appendixes

Video Modes

Portégé 650CT Video Modes

473

BIOS

Mode Type

Resolution

Matrix

TFT

Character LCD

Colors

CRT

Vertical

Refresh

Rate

22 SVGA

Graph

800 x 600 pels

8x8 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

24 SVGA

Graph

1024 x

768 pels

8x16 pels 16/256K

(virtual)

CRT

Colors

VRAM

Address

16/256K A0000 87Hz

60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

28 SVGA

Graph

1280x

1024 pels

30 SVGA

Graph

640 x 480 pels

8x16 pels 256/

256K

32 SVGA

Graph

800 x 600 pels

8x16 pels 16/256K 16/256K A0000

8x16 pels 256/

256K

256/

256K

256/

256K

A0000

87Hz

60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

34 SVGA

Graph

1024 x

768 pels

8x16 pels 256/

256K

256/

256K

A0000 87Hz

60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

A0000 87Hz 38 SVGA

Graph

1280 x

1024 pels

8x16 pels 256/

256K

(virtual)

256/

256K

40 SVGA

Graph

640 x 480 pels

8x16 pels 32K/32K 32K/32K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

41 SVGA

Graph

640 x 480 pels

8x16 pels 64K/64K 64K/64K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

42 SVGA

Graph

800 x 600 pels

8x16 pels 64K/64K 64K/64K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

43 SVGA

Graph

800 x 600 pels

8x16 pels 64K/64K 64K/64K A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

44 SVGA

Graph

1024 x

768 pels

8x16 pels 32K/32K

(virtual)

32K/32K A0000 87Hz

60Hz

45 SVGA

Graph

1024x768 8x16 pels 64K/64K

(virtual)

64k/64K A0000 87Hz

60Hz

50

52

SVGA

Graph

SVGA

Graph

640 x 480 pels

800x600 pels

8x16 pels 16M/

16M

8x16 pels 16M/

16M

16M/

16M

16M/

16M

A0000 60Hz

75Hz

85Hz

A0000 60Hz

31.5kHz

37.6kHz

43.2kHz

37.9kHz

46.9kHz

53.7kHz

35.5kHz

48.5kHz

60.0kHz

68.8kHz

35.5kHz

31.5kHz

37.6kHz

43.2kHz

31.5kHz

37.6kHz

43.2kHz

37.9kHz

46.9kHz

53.7kHz

37.9kHz

46.9kHz

53.7kHz

35.5kHz

48.5kHz

35.5kHz

48.5kHz

31.5kHz

37.6kHz

43.2kHz

37.9kHz

CRT

Horizontal

Refresh

Rate

37.9kHz

46.9kHz

53.7kHz

35.5kHz

48.5kHz

60.0kHz

68.8kHz

35.5kHz

CRT

Interlace

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Inter

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Interlace

Non

Non

Non

Interlace

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Interlace

Non

Non

Non

Non

Non

Part III: Appendixes

Using Windows for Workgroups

If you selected Windows for Workgroups when you first started your computer, you may be wondering how much of this guide is relevant to you. In fact, many of the instructions for Windows 95 procedures are very similar to those you use in Windows for

Workgroups.

This appendix tells you how to carry out the procedures described in this guide if you’re using Windows for Workgroups.

Using Windows for Workgroups

This section gives a brief introduction to Windows for Workgroups. For more information, click Help, then click Contents to access the online help.

476

Using Windows for Workgroups

Using Windows for Workgroups

Starting Windows for Workgroups

When you turn your computer on it loads the MS-DOS operating system and displays the command prompt (for example, C:\>). To start Windows for Workgroups, type c:\windows\win

and press

Enter

.

Windows for Workgroups loads and displays the Program Manager window.

What’s on the Screen?

Program Manager is the gateway to your programs and all the other features of Windows for Workgroups. This section describes the features of Program Manager. Many of these features, such as the menu bar and minimize button, are also present in other programs you run under Windows for Workgroups.

When you start Windows for Workgroups, you see a screen similar to the following:

Control menu icon Menu bar Program icons Minimize button

Maximize button

Program groups

Program group icons

The Program Manager window

Clicking the control menu icon opens the control menu. This menu lets you set features such as the size and shape of the current window. Double-clicking this icon closes the current window.

Clicking one of the words on the menu bar opens a list of related activities.

Part III: Appendixes

Using Windows for Workgroups

Using Windows for Workgroups

477

Clicking the minimize button reduces the current window to an icon. The program in the window is still running—it has just moved out of the way to make room for other windows.

Clicking the maximize button expands the current window to take up the entire screen. When a program is maximized, the maximize button changes to a double arrow called the restore button. Click the restore button to return the window to its original size.

Double-clicking a program icon starts the program represented by the icon.

Program groups contain one or more icons representing related programs. For example, the Toshiba Utilities program group contains Toshiba programs, such as MaxTime and

Hardware Setup.

Double-clicking a program group icon opens the program group represented by the icon.

There is no close button in Windows for Workgroups.

Starting Programs

To start a program in Windows for Workgroups, double-click its icon in Program Manager.

If the program doesn’t have a Program Manager icon, you have the following two choices:

In Program Manager, click File, then click Run. Type in the name of your program file or click Browse to locate the program file, then click OK.

In File Manager, double-click the icon for the program file.

See the next section for information about File Manager.

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Working with Files

You use File Manager to copy and move files, and to perform other file operations in Windows for Workgroups. To start File

Manager, double-click the File Manager icon in Program Manager’s Main program group.

For information about using File Manager, click Help, then click

Contents. Type in the subject you wish to explore, or browse through the list of topics provided.

Running Programs Described in the Guide

This guide describes a number of programs that come with your computer. Using these programs under Windows for Workgroups is almost the same as using them under Windows 95. This section lists each of the programs, describes the differences between the

Windows 95 and Windows for Workgroups versions and points to the instructions for using them.

Master Disk Creator

Master Disk Creator works as described in“Running Master Disk

Creator” on page 35 with the following exceptions:

Master Disk Creator also creates program disks for Windows for Workgroups. There is no Windows for Workgroups equivalent for Microsoft’s Windows 95 Create System Disks program.

To start Master Disk Creator, go into Program Manager and double-click the Master Disk Creator icon in the Toshiba

Utilities program group.

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MaxTime

MaxTime opens automatically each time you start Windows for

Workgroups. If MaxTime is not already open, go into Program

Manager and double-click the MaxTime icon in the Toshiba

Utilities program group.

MaxTime controls your system’s power saving options. These options are also available through TSETUP. For information about what each option does, read “TSETUP” on page 403.

Hardware Setup

To start Hardware Setup, go into Program Manager and doubleclick the Hardware Setup icon in the Toshiba Utilities program group.

Use Hardware Setup to control your hardware configuration.

These options are also available through TSETUP. For information about what each option does, read “TSETUP” on page 403.

TSETUP

To open TSETUP, follow these steps:

1 Close any programs you are running and exit Windows, if it’s open.

Run TSETUP outside of Windows, at a system prompt. If you run TSETUP from an MS-DOS session under Windows by clicking the MS-DOS prompt icon, results can be unpredictable.

2 At the system prompt, type

c:\dos\tsetup

and press

Enter

.

Once you’ve opened TSETUP, it operates as described in

“TSETUP” on page 403.

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To open Fn-esse, go into Program Manager and double-click the

Fn-esse icon in the Toshiba Utilities program group. Once you’ve opened Fn-esse, it operates as described in “Starting Programs

Faster with Fn-esse” on page 262, with the following exceptions.

When you’re using Fn-esse under Windows for Workgroups, there is no Application Explorer dialog box. Instead, you may select a program in the ProgMan Browser dialog box. To use this box to assign a key to a program or document, follow these steps:

1 Click the desired key in the Fn-esse keyboard with the secondary button.

Fn-esse displays the Assignment Type dialog box.

2 Click Direct.

Fn-esse displays the Add/Edit Command dialog box.

3 Click ProgMan.

Fn-esse displays the ProgMan Browser dialog box.

The ProgMan Browser dialog box

4 Select the desired program group in the Program

Manager Groups window.

5 Select the desired Group Item and click OK.

Fn-esse displays the Add/Edit Command dialog box again with everything filled in to reflect your choice.

6 Click OK.

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Turning the Power Off

This section describes how to turn the computer off correctly.

Using Resume Mode

This guide describes two ways you can turn the computer off and return to the same place in your work when you turn it on again: the Suspend Command and Resume Mode. The Suspend Command is a feature of Windows 95. With Windows for Workgroups you must use Resume mode instead. You can turn Resume Mode on in any of the ways described in this guide: MaxTime, a hotkey or TSETUP.

Turning the Computer Off

When you’re ready to turn the computer off, assuming Resume

Mode isn’t turned on, follow these steps:

1 Save your files and close any programs you’re using.

2 In Program Manager, press

Alt

+

F4

to exit Windows.

3 Wait for MS-DOS to display the command prompt.

Always wait until you see the command prompt before you turn the computer off. You may get unpredictable results the next time you start Windows if you don’t let it shut down completely.

4 Turn the computer off.

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Using Optional Devices in Windows for Workgroups

Using Optional Devices in Windows for

Workgroups

Windows for Workgroups does not support the plug-and-play standard described for Windows 95. This means that when you connect an optional device, such as a PC Card, you’ll have to set it up yourself. This section provides information you’ll need for using optional devices with Windows for Workgroups.

Using PC Cards

“Little Cards that Do Big Things” on page 157describes the programs required to use PC Cards. These programs are part of

Windows 95.

For Windows for Workgroups, the CardWizard software supplied with your computer provides the Card and Socket Services programs you need to use PC Cards on your system. See the Card-

Wizard documentation for instructions for setting up PC Card support.

The CardWizard programs were specifically designed for your

Toshiba computer. Even if your PC Card comes with its own

Card and Socket Services programs, try CardWizard first.

Resolving Resource Conflicts

If you add a device that uses the resources already assigned to another device your system stops working and you must resolve the resource conflict. For an introduction to the resources used by the system, see “Resolving Hardware Conflicts on Your Own” on page 313.

Make a list of all the resources used by your optional devices. The documentation for each device will tell you how to determine these.

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Once your list is complete, check it against the lists in “System

Resources” on page 455. Make sure that none of your optional devices conflicts with the preset system assignments.

If you can’t locate the source of the conflict, remove all optional devices and add them one at a time. Each time you add a device check to see if the conflict reappears.

Getting Help

Your computer comes with an electronic book that documents

Windows for Workgroups. It is called Windows QuickStart 3.11

Edition. To open this book, follow these steps:

1 Open the Toshiba Utilities program group.

2 Double-click the Windows QuickStart 3.11 Edition icon.

Windows opens the book at the table of contents.

Reading a Selected Topic

To read a section of the Windows QuickStart 3.11 Edition:

Select a part of the book, click its index tab or click Contents and select the section from the list displayed.

To move to the beginning of the table of contents, click

Contents.

To move up or down in a section, click and drag the scroll box or click the up and down arrows at the right side of the screen.

To move forward or backward one section at a time, click the left and right arrow icons at the bottom of the screen.

To use the alphabetical index, choose Index and click on a topic name.

To get help, choose Help Contents from the Help menu or press

F1

.

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Using Bookmarks

Just as you would with a printed book, you can mark your place with a bookmark.

Creating a New Bookmark

To create (or define) a bookmark, follow these steps:

1 Position the pointer at the beginning of the text you want to find again.

2 Choose Define from the Bookmark menu, or click the yellow bookmark icon in the lower-right corner of the screen.

The dialog box automatically shows the current chapter in the

Bookmark Name field as the default name, and displays a list of currently defined bookmarks.

3 Type in a name for your bookmark and choose OK.

If you choose OK without typing a name, the current chapter name becomes the bookmark.

If the name is already assigned to another bookmark, the program displays a message. Type in a new bookmark name and choose OK.

The electronic book program creates a consecutively numbered bookmark and places it in the text at the upper edge of the “book.”

To view a marked section, click its assigned bookmark and the program switches to the corresponding text location.

Deleting a Bookmark

To delete a previously defined bookmark, follow these steps:

1 Choose Define from the Bookmark menu or click the yellow bookmark icon in the lower-right corner of the screen.

The program displays the Define Bookmark dialog box, which includes the list of currently defined bookmarks.

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2 Select the name of the bookmark name you wish to delete.

3 Choose Delete then choose OK.

Using Cross-References

Cross-references, which display as underlined text, allow you to move quickly to sections containing information related to the material in the current section. For example, from the batteries section you can go directly to the MaxTime discussion by clicking the cross reference.

To view a cross-reference, follow these steps:

1 Position the pointer over the cross-reference.

The pointer changes to a pointing hand symbol.

2 Click the cross-reference.

The program displays the section containing the information that relates to the cross-reference you selected.

When you have finished reading the cross-referenced material, clicking Go Back returns you to the original topic.

Searching for a Topic

The QuickStart book has a full-text search feature, which can locate every topic that contains a word or phrase you are looking for. To use the full-text search feature, follow these steps:

1 Choose Search and type the word or phrase in the Search

Word field.

To find all the forms of a word, you can substitute an asterisk

(*) for the last characters in the word. For example, typing bat*, would find “batch,” “battery,” “batteries,” “battery-powered” and “battery-save.”

2 Choose OK to start the search.

The program displays the list of topics that contain the text.

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3 Select the topic to view and choose Go To.

The program displays the topic with the word or phrase highlighted.

To exit the Search Results dialog box, choose Cancel.

To start a new search, choose To Search.

Reinstalling Online Documentation

To restore a deleted or damaged electronic book, use the master program diskette that contains the electronic book files. For more information about master program diskettes, see “Create or Purchase Master Diskettes” on page 33.

Follow these steps to reinstall the Windows QuickStart 3.11

Edition:

1 Be sure your diskette drive is connected to the diskette drive port. For more information about connecting the diskette drive, see “Connecting the External Diskette Drive” on page 20.

2 Choose Run from the File menu and type the command line

a:\install

.

Windows for Workgroups displays the Run dialog box.

3 In the Run dialog box, choose OK to accept the default directory and follow the instructions on the screen to define the location of the files.

If the directory does not exist, the installation program creates it for you.

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