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THE AUTHORITATIVE MAGAZINE ABOUT HIGH FIDELITY
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switched turnover bass end treble
controls for moe precise tonal
compensation for room acoustics and
other p-ogram source ciiaracteristics.
In their respective price ranges,
these are unques_ionably the finest
values in stereo receivers the world
has eve- known. Audition their
uniqueness at your Pioneer dealer.
- ee
SX-1 X110 - $693.95; SX-939 - $599.95,
3,025 possible tonal compensations with ulique twin stepped tone controls
SX-838 - $499 95. Prices include
walnut cabinets.
(SX-1010, SX-939)
Master control system capability
Selector that permits FM recording
while listening to records and vice
versa. Up to three pairs of speakers
Pioneer's engineers have surpassed
themselves with a combination of
may be connected to each model.
.NPUTS
SX-1010
SX-939
SX-833
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
2
2
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Tape moni_or/4-ch.
adaptor
Phono
Microphone
Auxiliary
Noise reduction
OUTPUTS
Speakers
Tape Rec.14-ch.
adaptor
Headsets
Noise reduction
4 -channel MPX
1
control features never before found
in a single receiver. All three units
include: pushbutton function selection
with illuminated readou-s on the
ultra wide tuning dial, FM and audio
muting, loudness contour, hi/low
filters, dual tuning meters and a
dial dimmer.
Never before used cn a receiver
are the twin stepped bass and treble
tone cont-ols found on the SX-1010
and SX-939. They offer over 3,000
tonal variations. A tone defeat
switch provides flat response
instantly throughout the audio
spectrum. The SX-838 features
Also new and more
modeately priced.
Pioneer s most complete and finest
line of receiver ever, presents
equa ly cutstardi ig valt.es starting at
$239.55. Shown hire are the SX-535
- $299 95, SX-636 - $349.95, SX-737
- $399 95. All with walnut cabinets.
LE,. Pioneer Electronics Corp.,
75 Oxtord Drive, Moonachie,
New .Jersey 07074
West. 15300 S. Estrella, Los Angeles
90246."1idwest: 1500 Greenleaf,
Elk Grove Village. Ill. 60007/Canada:
S.H. Parker Co.
w:ienyou war- something better
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SX-535
SX-636
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X-737
Actual,
unretouchep
photo of an
oscillograph
test.
The oscillograph you
see is an actual photo
of a high -quality audio
system "playing" a
fingerprint.
You're hearing fingerprints now through
your speaker system.
Instead of the sound
your precious discs
are capable of. And
no vacuum record
cleaner, brush -arm
Audio
November, 1974
"Succesor to'RAQJp Est. 1917"
Vol. 58, No. 11
Feature Articles
24 Christmas Buying Guide
Repair Your Electronic Organ/Jon Turino
38 Make a Theremin
Speaker Tests-Anechoic Frequency Response/Richard C. Heyser
30
44
or treated cloth will
remove them. None.
Equipment Profiles
The sound
of your
fingerprint
Technics SA -8000X 2/4 -Channel Receiver
Sharp 480U Stereo Cassette Deck
50
58
64
Crown DC -300A Power Amplifier
68
74
Fairfax FX-350 Speaker
Scott 451C Sound Level Meter
But Discwasherr.-with new
fluid-removes fingerprints
du
completely. Along with dust. And
Record Reviews
manufacturing lubricants (added
to make pressing faster) that can
act like grove -blocking fingerprints. All this cleaning without
pulling polymer stabilizers from
your vinyl discs.
Discwasherru. The only safe,
effective way to silence the
printed finger. At Audio
specialists world wide.
88 The Column/Fred DeVan
Canby's Capsules/Edward Tatnall Canby
Recorded Show and Theater Music/Donald M. Spoto
92
100
104
Audio In General
4
8
16
wa....,,a
Dlscwasher, Inc.
909 University,
Columbia, Mo. 65201
Jazz & Blues
Audioclinic/Joseph Giovanelli
Tape Guide/Herman Burstein
10 Dear Editor
Audio ETC/Edward Tatnall Canby
94 Advertising Index
114 Classified Advertising
PUBLISHER Jay L. Butler
EDITOR Eugene Pius 111
MARKETING DIRECTOR Sanford L. Cahn
DESIGN Janet Lee
CIRCULATION MANAGER Jean Davis
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Edward Tatnall Canby
ASSOCIATE EDITOR Bert Whyte
ASSISTANT EDITOR Peggy Bicknell
Contributing Editors: Herman Burstein, Martin Clifford, Fred De Van, Leonard
Feldman, Martha Sanders Gilmore, Joseph Giovanelli, Richard C. Heyser,
Bascom H. King, C. G. McProud, B. V. Pisha, George W. Tillett.
AUDIO (title registered U.S. Pat. Off.) is published monthly by North American Publishing Co., Irvin J. Borowsky,
President; Frank Nemeyer, and lay L. Butler, Vice Presidents; R. Kenneth Baxter, Vice President/Production: Nate
Rosenblatt, Promotion Director; Mary Claffey, Circulation Director.
RATES-United States only: 1 year for $7.00, 2 years for $12.00, 3 years for $17.00; outside the U.S.: 1 year for $9.00,
2 years for $16.00, and 3 years for $23.00. Printed in U.S.A. at Columbus, Ohio. All rights reserved. Entire contents
copyrighted 1974 by North American Publishing Co. Second class postage paid at Philadelphia, Pa. and additional
mailing office. Back issues, $2.00 each.
REGIONAL SALES OFFICES: Jay L. Butler, Publisher and Sanford L. Cahn, Marketing Director, 41 East 42nd St., New
York, N.Y. 10017, telephone (212) 687-8924.
Jay Martin, 15010 Ventura Blvd., Sherman Oaks, California. 91403, telephone (213) 981-7852.
REPRESENTATIVES: Continental Europe: John Ashcraft, 12 Bear St., Leicester -Square, London W.C.2, telephone
930-0525.
For Benelux and Germany. W.J.M. Saunders, Mgr., Herengracht 365. Amsterdam, Holland, telephone 24.09.08.
Japan: Japan Printing News Co., Ltd., No. 13.2 Chome Ginza Higasi, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, telephone 541-5795.
,
AUDIO Editorial and Publishing Offices, 134 N. 13th St., Philadelphia, Penna. 19107
Postmaster: Send Form 3579 to the above address
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
BELT DRIVE ISN'T NEW.
MULTIPLE PLAY ISN'T NEW.
A TURNTABLE THAT COMBINES BOTH IS NEW.
READ ALL ABOUT IT.
Back in monophonic times, turntable motors drove
platters through a series of wheels called "idlers".
Many automatics and changers still use this system.
In those days, records and playback systems were still
relatively unsophisticated, so the distortions an idler drive
system created didn't matter much.
Today, however, distortion is a critical problem. With
recordings of increased dynamic range, wow, flutter and
rumble must be reduced to inconsequential levels.
A belt -drive system is light years ahead of idler drive
in that department.
And here the belt is driven by a unique motor found
only in BIC turntables. It is a 300 RPM, 24 -pole motor
and it is inherently freer from noise and vibration than the
1800 RPM units with from 2 to 16 poles, which are standard in even the best of the conventional automatics.
The advantage of Programmed Multiple Play
The 980 and 960 are not record changers.
They are belt -drive Programmed Turntables which
are engineered to play as many as 6 records at a time.
They have a 2 -point record support system which is
far less complicated and far more reliable than any umbrella spindle we've ever seen.
But an even more important advantage is this.
An automatic record handling system like the one on a
BIC turntable can handle a single record, or 6 at a time,
perfectly. No false drops. No bouncing and skating a diamond stylus across the grooves. It eliminates human error,
and human error is what damages the sidewalls of your
record grooves forever.
The simplicity factor
The 980 and 960 have the visibly lower profile of
single -play manual instruments. They've been engineered
to be simple machines, so they have fewer parts and fewer
potential problems.
They abound in innovations. In the tone arm, the
cartridge shell, the program panel, the entire system.
We can send you more detailed information if you
write to Dept.11 A, British Industries Co., Westbury, L.I.
11590; or better yet, see them at your local audio specialist.
Copyright 1974 B.IC is a trademark of British Industries Co. Westbury, New Yak 11590. A division of Avnet Inc.
Check No. 16 on Reader Service Card
This is the 980 with
solid state speed control and strobe.
About $200. The 960 is identical
except for these two features. About $150.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Audioclinic
Joseph Giovanelli
Playing Mono Records
Q. Should mono LP reissues purchased
since the advent of stereo be played for
best results with a mono or stereo stylus?
If the monos are cut on a "stereo"
cutter, will playing them with a mono
stylus cause any damage? If a stereo
stylus is the proper one, what kind
should be used (i. e., elliptical or
conical)?-Louis I. Goldfarb, New
York, New York
A. Most discs will play well when
used with the newer stylus designs.
There are a few monophonic discs
which may be a bit noisy, however.
These are discs cut with a groove
having a different bottom shape than
Generally speaking, therefore, play
all discs with the most modern equipment. They will sound their best.
Whether or not a disc is cut with a
stereo or a mono cutter makes no
difference. Most mono discs are cut
these days with stereo cutters, but the
final result is that the grooves do not
"know the difference." The motion of
the cutting stylus will be the same as
though the disc was cut with a monophonic cutting system. Therefore, again,
there is no problem with the kind of
stylus you will use.
Because of the nature of the stereo
to be
stiff,
especially
as
less
regards
vertical
our present V grooves. The bottom of
these grooves is wider than the present
motion. Again we have a "plus." The
decrease in stiffness-or increase in
compliance-of the stylus means that
we can track at lighter and lighter
of whether the discs were reissues or
were originals. However, some very
small conical tips might not fit these
older discs, allowing the tip to ride
at the bottom of the groove, thereby
forces.
quarter -mil radius. This means that
elliptical styli will work nicely regardless
adding noise.
While it is true that you can play
your mono discs very well with today's
styli, you still might want to set your
receiver's mode switch to "mono."
This will cancel out any vertical stylus
motion, and thereby reduce noise to
some extent. If your entire record
collection is mono, you might want to
strap your cartridge for mono in
accordance with the manufacturer's
instructions.
There is no such item as a "stereo
stylus" or a "mono stylus." The stylus
does not "know the difference." All that
has happened over the years is that the
art of making stylus tips has improved.
We are now able to hear more from our
discs than was possible years ago. The
result is that many of our older discs
sound better now than we had ever
heard them. Not only have styli
improved, but the cartridges themselves are better.
This enables
stylus
manu-
facturers to make the dimensions of
the stylus tip smaller and still produce
less record wear than was the case with
older cartridge and stylus designs.
This decreased record wear takes place
in the face of the peculiarities of the
stereo disc grooves.
Good stylus design
was
made
necessary by the demands of stereo
disc recording, but these benefits are
all passed along to those who listen only
to monophonic disc recordings.
Noise From a Phonograph
Q. My problem is that I hear a noise
static charges on the disc caused by
friction with the surrounding air. It
also may be that the grounding in the
arm is not good. The ground may be
alternately connected and disconnected
as the arm moves into some positions.
This can cause a kind of "scratching"
sound to be heard from the speakers.
Bass Response from a Dolby
Decoder
Q. Please tell he how to get good bass
response when using a Dolby noise reduction unit. -Juan A. Marquez, Gurabo,
Puerto Rico
A. Bass response has nothing to do
with the use of the Dolby noise reduction system. The use or non-use of
one of these Dolby "boxes" will have
no effect on bass response. If you have
noticed a loss of bass when using your
Dolby system, something is wrong with
your equipment.
Perhaps the output of the device is
feeding into some equipment whose
impedance is lower than the unit was
designed to "see." Perhaps the input
impedance of the device is too low to
handle the device being fed into it.
Check all this.
If all of this checks "negative," you
must then make a frequency response
run with the Dolby system. Use a "flat"
oscillator or at least have a means of
maintaining flat oscillator output. The
oscillator must feed in signal at the
level you would normally use when
operating the Dolby unit. Turn the
Dolby decoding portion of the unit off,
(something like a scratch) when a record
and make the run. A voltmeter, of
is playing or whenever the cartridge is
course, must be connected to the output
held above the surface of a moving record.
of the unit, and should produce a flat
frequency response. If it does not, you
This noise is heard only from the turntable. The receiver works without any
problems.-Juan A. Marquez, Gurabo,
Puerto Rico
A. It may be that the "noise" you
hear when your tone arm is suspended
above the moving disc is a result of
will either have to make a stage by stage
check of the device or return it for
servicing.
If you do obtain a "flat" response,
switch in the Dolby processing unit.
Feed in enough signal to cause the
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
4
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Meet
calibration meter to read at "zero"
level at 400 Hz. Make another run. If
you now see a loss of bass, you must
check the unit again, stage by stage.
Note that there are often two separate input/output circuits on Dolby
"boxes." One is used to supply signal
to the tape machine, and the other is
the
family
used when playing back from the
machine, supplying signal into the playback system. Check each one for good
response. Ignore the high frequency
response. This will not be flat WHEN
THE DOLBY SYSTEM IS SWITCHED
IN, unless you have set your levels
high enough to overcome the action
of the system.
Revox A700
Insufficient Phonograph Volume
Q. I recently purchased a turntable
and cartridge. I own a reasonably small
amplifier/tuner. The phonograph will
not play through the amplifier with sufficient volume for my pleasure, but my
8 -track tape deck works fine.
What can I do about getting more
volume?-William A. Pasel, Lexington,
Kentucky
A. Because you obtained sufficient
volume from your 8 -track player, it is
obvious that your amplifier can supply
enough power to meet your needs. Your
problem, therefore, involves your
Beyer
M500
Berea A720
There can be more than one reason
for your amplifier not delivering suffi-
Beyer
M260
cient volume when playing phono-
Beyer
D-302
graph records. Some amplifiers are not
designed to work with magnetic cartridges. These amplifiers must be used
with ceramic cartridges. If you attempt
to use a magnetic cartridge with such an
amplifier, there will be insufficient
volume. Sound quality will be raspy and
lacking in bass.
If the amplifier is designed to accept a magnetic cartridge, it is likely
that the output from your present cartridge is not as high as is required by
your equipment. The instruction book
Lamb mixer
The illustration is shown with optional extra.
Our companies have been in the
microphone and tape recorder business now for over forty years.
In that time we have built up quite
a family ... professional mixers, tape
recorders, microphones, headphones
for your amplifier should state the
minimum amount from a cartridge
which will drive the amplifier to full
-the lot.
output.
cal quality that has set standards
If the cartridge does not produce
enough output, either obtain a cartridge which can produce sufficient
output or obtain a preamplifier which
contains the necessary gain and equalization for magnetic cartridges. The
preamplifier must be connected to one
of the high level inputs of your amplifier, and not into the magnetic phonograph inputs of your unit.
you are at all interested in better
equipment, we will send you this information. Just mail the attached coupon to: Revox Corporation, 155 Michael Dr., Syosset, New York 11791.
/
All of these products are made to
the same high acoustic and mechanithroughout the world. For example,
if your finances do not quite run to a
new Revox tape recorder, try to find
a secondhand one-in stock condition
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it will outperform other makes of new
equipment at the same price!
die
see
dap
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Such a preamplifier need not be
equipped with the tone controls, selector
switches, etc., which are found on com(Continued on page 84)
All of our family is described in
great detail i t a series of technical
data sheets and application charts. If
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srire-
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'As and when available from our dealers.
AUDIO I NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The 800+.
It's six of the
best receivers
you can buy.
SQ MATRIX
2
1
ENHANCED
STEREO.
'STEREO
CD -4
DISCRETE
MONO
r
MODE
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
If you'd stop reading this and and go
listen, we'd both be ahead of the game.
If words could do it you'd be into poetry,
not music.
The harman/kardon 800+ gives you
both kinds of four channel now. Built-in
CD4 now. Built-in SQ now No waiting.
(Anyone who tells you to wait for four
channel has a hole in his receiver.) The
800+ will play any four channel record
you can buy now With four separate
amplifiers delivering a glorious 22 watts
continuous power. Each.
Mono and stereo, of course. Pure stereo. Some four channel systems play
stereo like they only half mean it. (They
turn off two of their four channels and
call it "stereo") If you're playing stereo on
the 800+ you get the whole sound. A
simple switch blends the power of four
Stereo/Stereo. Listen to your tape
deck in the living room. Listen to FM in
the bedroom. At the same time.
Enhanced Stereo. An incredible bit of
electronic magic that makes your entire
stereo library think it's quad. (We know
an unnerving number of music buffs who
say that enhanced stereo is better than
quad. You listen. You decide.)
Six receivers: mono, stereo, stereo/
stereo, enhanced stereo, CD4 and SQ.
Words, words, too many words. Go
hear the 800+. Listen to it do what it does.
One last word: $500. The six receivers
are yours for $500. Which figures out to
$83.33 a receiver.
That's music.
The harman/kardon 800,
channels into two-more than doubling
their quad output. 50 watts continuous
power per channel!
Power output: 4 x 22 watts
continuous per channel all
channels driven into 8 ohms
from 20Hz to 20.000 Hz.
Then, two kinds of stereo you've never
seen before:
Harmonic Distortion: Less
than 0.5% THD
(SMS)tereo mode 2 x 50 watts
Frequency Response (AMP):
4Hz to 70.000Hz-~1.0 dB
Hum & Noise: Better than 85
dB (unweighted)
FM Sensitivity: 2.0 microvolts (IHF)
FM Selectivity: 40 dB
FM Capture Ratio: 2.5 dB
Ultimate S/N Ratio: 70 dB
(1000µV)
harman/kardon
High fidelity component systems from $200 to $1300.
55 Ames Court, Plainview, New York 11803 A subsidiary of Harman International.
Check No. 24 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Tape Guide
Herman Burstein
Pinning the Needles
Q. I own a Sony professional stereo
tape deck, Model TC-355. The only
thing which I regret is that I do not
have a limiter built into the recorder.
I make a great number of piano recordings, and since most of the time I
am the pianist, it is hard to be an engineer and run the recorder at the same
time. I find it difficult to set the re-
cording volume level, because the soft
passages turn out fine during playback,
but when I play crescendo, the sound
pins the needles of the VU meters. Although the level does exceed the distortion range on the meters, there is no
audible distortion during playback due
to the quality of the recorder. But I
am sure you understand that it does ab-
solutely no good to the meter to have
the needle pinned at the peak levels.
Therefore I am seeking a solution to
the problem, namely how to install a
limiter into the tape machine's circuitry,
so that the limiter can be turned on or
off as needed for certain recordings.Zoltan Zeisky, Trenton, New Jersey
A. If you want to associate a limiter
with your tape recorder, I suggest that
you address your question to the manufacturers of such equipment. It seems
that a simpler solution might be to re calibrate your VU meters. The fact that
you do not get noticeable distortion
when the VU meter hits hard all the
way right suggests possible miscalibra-
tion. Also, let me point out that VU
meters (genuine ones, not cheap meters with VU scales) are constructed to
tapes at 3-3/4 ips that are audibly better
than tapes made without the Advent
unit?-Dennis M. De Santis, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
A. All other things being equal, a
system that includes the Dolby will
produce a better signal-to-noise ratio
than the same system without the
Dolby. If the tape recorder is of very
high quality, the improvement added
by the Dolby may tend to be unnoticeable. If the tape recorder is of rather
low grade, the Dolby will probably produce considerable improvement. However, an inferior tape recorder with the
Dolby will not necessarily come out
with as good S/N as a superior machine without the Dolby. In other
words, you can't make a silk purse
out of a sow's ear.
Dolby Operation
Q Can you answer the following
questions for me? (1) Is there a discernible background noise, or hiss, in a
good non -Dolby tape player? Does this
noise exceed that of a record player?
If so, does the Dolby system reduce this
noise noticeably? (2) What is the principle of operation of the Dolby system?
Does it require special tape? Added
tracks? (3) How would you compare
cassettes, cartridges, and open -reel tape
for home music systems?-George
Jeromson, Sherman Oaks, California
A. A top-quality home tape recorder,
without Dolby, can record and play back
with virtually no discernible noise at
71/2 ips. A few can do so at 33/4 ips as well.
take a good deal of overload, so that
On the other hand, if volume is turned
up to near -thunderous levels, or if one
you really may be doing no harm at all
recorded at much too low a volume,
to the meters by pinning them. In a
well
designed tape machine, signal
amplitude is restricted to a range which
will not harm a genuine VU meter.
Finally, keep in mind that use of a limiter in recording may deleteriously alter
the quality of the recorded sound.
With or Without Dolby
Q. I am planning to purchase a tape
deck. Will the use of a Dolby unit, such
as the Advent Model 101, produce
noise does become discernible. I believe
that Dolby would perceptibly reduce
such noise. On the whole, noise of a
really fine tape system compares well
with that of a good disc system.
Dolby does not require special tape or
added tracks. It requires the input signal
to the tape machine to be fed through a
"black box" and the output signal from
the tape machine to be fed through a
complementary "black box." These
boxes, containing electronic circuitry,
serve to boost the signal in the noise
area (treble range) in the case of input;
and to correspondingly decrease the signal in the noise area, and thereby the
noise as well, in the case of output. The
boxes only act on signals of low magnitude, which is when noise is more discernible; and by confining their action
to signals of low magnitude, the boxes
avoid overloading the tape system.
I think that in the present state of the
art, open -reel tape machines still have
some superiority over cassette and cartridge machines. However, the cassette
machines have been improving fast and
narrowing the margin of performance
between
them
and
open -reel
units.
Cartridge machines do not appear to be
improving as fast.
Bias Frequency
Q. Would you please explain the
term "bias frequency."-Rick Bacon,
Gainesville, Florida
A. Bias frequency is a high frequency
signal, usually in the range of 70 kHz
to 100 kHz (occasionally to as high as
150 kHz) in high quality tape recorders,
that is applied to the tape simultaneously with the audio signal. The magnitude of the bias current is something
like 10 times that of the audio current.
Usually the bias signal and the audio
signal are both fed to the record head.
Sometimes, in the crossfield method,
the bias is fed to a separate head located exactly opposite the record head,
so that bias is applied through the back
of the tape. The purpose of bias is twofold: (1) to reduce recorded distortion
on the tape; (2) to maximize the
amount of audio signal recorded on the
tape, thereby resulting in increased
signal-to-noise ratio.
If you have a problem or question on tape
recording, write to Mr. Herman Burstein
at AUDIO, 134 North Thirteenth Street,
Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. All letters are
answered. Please enclose a stamped,
self-addressed envelope.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
8
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
TDK EDP BEST
FREQUENCY RESPONSE.
FOR AN EXTRA BUCK.
+5DB
TDK
...
0DB
A
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\C
ó
cn
...... ...
-
.
Q
-5DB
-10DB
20
100
FREQUENCY IN CYCLES PER SECOND
1000
10000
TDK ED tape was shown to have the best
frequency response of four leading cassette tapes tested
recently by an independent laboratory. The other three
were large -selling popular competitors, retailing for about
a dollar less than TDK ED. As you can see, their output
tended to fall off noticeably in the high frequencies.
Even a slight loss of high -frequency reproduction
can make a difference in clarity and detail to a
discriminating ear. That quality of life that music should
have just won't be there the sheen on the violin note,
the glitter on the cymbal finale.
Conclusion? If you're serious about the sound of
music, try aTDK ED tape next time. It offers you that quality
of lifelike brilliance you
might otherwise have to buy a
Wait till you hear
ticket to hear. And we think
what you've been missing.
that's worth an extra buck.
-
i"ITIDK
Check No. 50 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
20000
Dear Editor:
J
Personally, I would enjoy seeing reviews of some of the sophisticated
Kudos to Heyser
Dear sir,
Kudos to Richard C. Heyser for his
outstanding contributions to the art
and science of speaker evaluation,
and to Audio for your part in publishing Mr. Heyser's fine, intelligent
work. Mr. Heyser has proven what
many readers of the audio press have
long felt: that many supposedly
"subtle" differences in speaker performance can be meaningfully described, if only the reviewer is eloquent enough (and honest enough)
to write a candid evaluation.
also appreciate the technical
I
side of Mr. Heyser's reviews for their
consistency and completeness, even
in the face of the sometimes less than -spectacular
performance
fig-
ures derived. Finally we have a reviewer who trusts enough in his
readers' competence to tell them
speakers manufactured by several British firms: IMF,
Bowers & Wilkins, Radford-Audionics.
transmission -line
My own ears (critical, if not golden)
find these products more convincing
than the vast majority of domestic
keep
those
marvelous
Dear sir,
I would like to add my vote of approval for Richard Heyser's loudspeaker reviews in your recent issues.
I
have followed his writings both in
your publication and in the AES journal-I find his evaluation methods
useful, technically competent and
interesting. His reports represent a
step beyond the "golden ear" and
"consumer reports" schools of speaker
reviewing dispensed by most of the
American audio publications.
I am disappointed, however, with
the speakers which have been selected for Heyser's tests to date. I
realize that some speaker reviews
sell more magazines than others,
but it seems that several of the units
recently reviewed are likely neither
"hot" commercial items nor state-ofthe-art designs. I can at least commend Heyser for not waxing enthusiastically over these products in his
reports. To do so would compromise
his credibility.
imagine that your office has had
an ample flood of readers' requests
I
for speaker evaluations of the currently popular products from such
firms as JBL, AR, EPI, and so forth.
tremely well received and are a very
rewarding activity for me.
The listing of schools at the end of
the article lists Synergetic Audio
Concepts under "acoustics and/or
From what appears in the British
audio journals, one gets the impression that engineers in the above -
erly should be listed as a school offering
courses in audio engineering. The
mentioned concerns have been
directing special attention to some of
the same issues singled out as important in Heyser's research: phase
constancy,
pulse
response,
stereo
noise control" whereas it more propcourse is called "Sound Engineering
Seminar."
Thank you again.
Don Davis
Synergetic Audio Concepts
imaging and internal reflections. It
would be interesting to see if the
P.O. Box 1134
Tustin, CA 92680
British reHeyser's
Broad View of the Industry
end -products of
these
searches "graph" well
in
tests.
Julian Vrieslander
Newfield, N.Y.
ently, unflinchingly.
Please
tion -of my classes. They are being ex-
brands.
the whole story, as he sees it, consist-
speaker reviews rolling in!
Dean W. Hoofnagle
Honolulu, Hawaii
I have received following the
publication of his article. Thank you
for the very generous recommenda-
letters
Japanese Modifications
Dear sir,
In response to Ed Canby's fine reaction to Japanese "modifications"
of our Anglo-Saxon linguistic garb, I
must say "Well Done!"
Although I am the chief Engineer
here at WTON, I do have a college
degree in foreign languages. "Audio
ETC" from the September edition of
Dear sir,
Thank you for your letter in ref-
erence to product information. I am
now receiving an ample supply from
the manufacturer. I do appreciate your
interest in helping me out and would
like to thank you for it.
I have been reading Audio for about
two years now and the only complaint is that didn't run across an
subscribe to several
issue earlier.
audio -oriented magazines and I fully
enjoy all of them, but Audio is the only
one of them all that seems to have the
variety of all of them put together.
I
I
Audio actually thrilled me-actually,
I guess, because of the frequent slurs
one hears these days of Japanese and
other Far East use of our language as
well as, though decreasingly, their
product engineering. I, for one,
deeply appreciate their efforts in
mastering our extremely difficult
tongue, not to mention their great
strides in engineering of all types.
Great, really great!!
Paul Swartzendruber,
Chief Engineer
WTON
Staunton, Va.
I
really can't think of any way to
improve such a perfect magazine.
suppose you could run a few more of
I
"this" type article or "that" type but
think it would upset the overall
balance of the presentation in your
magazine. I've found that if I want
I
information in a particular
aspect of audio, there are numerous
other publications which do specialspecial
ize in specifics and they fit the bill
always come back to Audio
though because it offers the broad
view of the audio industry and serves
nicely.
I
as a good starting point to launch any
audio -associated endeavor. Great for
beginners yet good enough to hold
Education in Audio
Dear sir,
Paul Moverman's article, Education
in the July issue of Audio
is well done and highly useful to the
in Audio,
industry. And there must be a very active interest among the readership of
Audio, judging from the number of
"Old Timers' " interests.
Please, keep up the good work!
Mario A. Davila, Jr.
APO California
Comments on Education
Dear sir,
There is certainly no question that
AUDIO
10
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
NOVEMBER 1974
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a listening comparison note
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Box 51, Dept. A.. 38
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there is a strong and well justified demand for education in the audio profession today! Since the late '60s, a
week has never gone by without someone calling or writing me asking "the
big question." And I am delighted to
see that Mr. Moverman (Education in
Audio, AUDIO, July) has emphasized
the various job opportunities that are
available. Most of the interested individuals have no idea as to what they
1.
If you want a job, get out and
start selling yourself. If you don't
know how, you better find out real
fast!
The formal resumé sent through
the mail is most ineffective! I have
2.
of these around
somewhere. Some evidence of past
production efforts, on disc or tape,
can be far more impressive, when
a file folder full
presented in person.
event, you must have
really want to get into.
3.
There is much that the AES can do
to help develop the educational pro-
something to sell. You must present
In any
as institu-
yourself to the studio as a person
that can be of value, someone that
tionally. And as of this date, we do
have even more AES local chapters
4. When I finally do hire someone
grams
privately as well
studio cannot do without!
has released a solo LP on SRV 310 of
rags by Joplin, Scott, Marshall and
Morath. Harmony KH 32421 contains
material previously recorded by Columbia with a few items issued on Epic LPs,
now out of print and some unissued
material. Both of these recordings are
on budget labels.
The reverse side of the Harmony
features Wally Rose playing a
doctored piano (thumb tacks in the
hammer). This material comes from
some Columbia prime movers of ragtime in the 1940s. He recorded for the
Good Time Jazz label on GTJ 10034,
issue
recently for Blackbird C12007 and air shots from 1946 on Fairmont 102. The
GTJ issue is a fine studio recording, the
Blackbird needed better editing, and the
than Mr. Moverman indicated. For
example, Indianapolis. Yet, I have
it is because of:
found that the AES journal is far too
esoteric for the beginning student in
audio education. My students are exposed to all of the available magazines (including Aunto) and the AES
journal always winds up at the bottom
of the pile. Perhaps something could
be done about this problem by simply
sented by his "sales kit";
B. his expertise from past experiences and credentials;
C. his personal character which I
can unfortunately gain only from
John Jensen, they enter ragtime with
Piano Rags of James Scott (GS 1044)
giving some consideration to the needs
With a waiting line outside my stu-
dio door it's quite easy for me to be
this "fussy." Yet, I do have to be ex-
The Scott LP is on a par with the
and interests of the beginning audio
engineer. And the AES would be the
ideal organization to publish a series
of educational pamphlets specifically
designed to help the beginning engineer.
As far as
institutions of "higher
learning" are concerned, I have serious
doubts that the proper kind of curriculum can ever be established unless
foresighted educators are willing to
take a big step and go out and find
professional studios (like mine) who
are willing to jointly establish practical
"work/study" training programs. Due
to the nature of our business I am
convinced that responsible studios and
universities will have to develop joint
programs, affording the budding engineer the essential on-the-job experi-
ence which a classroom cannot possibly provide.
Many individuals in the industry
have argued that each studio likes to
train according to their technical facil-
ity and style of engineering. In fact,
this will always be the case! Yet,
speaking as a studio owner, I would
love to be spending this on-the-job
training time with someone who at
least had experienced the pressures of
a real life situation and survived. Dr.
Ray Dolby has definitely brought up a
valid point in the "division of responsibility" in today's studio. And when
1 hire a new engineer I want to have
some indication that he can handle
that responsibility!
Again speaking as a studio owner,
my comments on the "How to Get a
Job" problem are as follows:
A. his potential value to me as pre-
having gotten to know him over a
period of time.
tremely careful before I let a new per-
son in the studio to work with the
Ampex and Studer recorders, Neumann mics, etc. Indeed, all studios
are quite vulnerable and great caution
has to be taken.
Finally, all of us who are concerned
about audio education have a full responsibility to discourage all "those"
who don't stand a chance to
really
compete in the marketplace. One of
the main purposes of my Recording
Studio Seminar is to try to separate
"the men from the boys" and we do
our best to tell it like it is! This is
where colleges often fail, perhaps because they are in education as a profession ($$$). But it's no bite to my
salary to tell someone that he's tone
deaf, etc. Yet, since our profession
does have limited job opportunities we
can all work together to encourage
talent and discourage the hangers.
Jack W. Gilfoy
President
Gilfoy Sound Studios, Inc.
1130 W. 17th St.
Bloomington, IN 47401
Fairmont is very enjoyable even with
the additional instrumentation.
The Genesis label of Robert Commarge has been one of the leading labels
in the area of "Romantic Revival"
material and with two entries by pianist
and Piano Rags of Joe Lamb (GS 1045).
Knocky Parker Audiophile album and
the Joe Lamb set competes well with a
Golden Crest disc, CRS 4127 by Milton
Kaye which features an extra disc with
a symposium between Rudi Blesh and
Milton Kaye.
Joe Lamb was recorded in 1959 by
Sam Charters on Folkways FG 3562. It
is
interesting to hear as a recorded
documentary of a great ragtime composer. However, his pianism at an advanced age was not up to the demands
of his music. Either of the recordings
already mentioned will suffice as a good
introduction to Joe Lamb.
Brian Dykstra, an associate professor
of music at the College of Wooster,
Wooster, Ohio, issued his own LP of
ragtime called American Beauty. He
plays every piece with assurance and
brings out the best in every piece. This
is one of my personal favorites and I
recommend it highly.
Trebor Tichenor, the King of Folk
Ragtime, has a recent release on Dirty
Shame
2001,
available from
Dirty
Shame Records, Box 5217, Hannegan
Station, St. Louis, MO 63139. He surveys the area of lesser known rags of
quality and assures himself an
important place in the annals of outhigh
More Ragtime LPs
Dear sir,
The article on ragtime recordings in
AUDIO was written
over a year ago and since that time there
have been various additions as well as
some people whom I did not credit in
the June issue of
the recent article.
Starting with Max Morath, Vanguard
standing ragtime pianists for his knowledge and talent.
The Red Seal of Victor is an unusual
place to find ragtime but an excellent
disc of solo and duo ragtime is played by
Paul Hersh and David Montgomery on
ARL 1-0364. This tradition can be
traced back to another duo team of the
early Victor years, Victor Arden and
AUDIO
12
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
NOVEMBER 1974
Why you should select your turntable
more carefully than any other component.
Every component is important to the total
performance of an audio system, but the turntable
is critical. It is the only component that physically
handles your biggest investment in musical
enjoyment: your record collection.
In time, your changing tastes can outgrow your
present amplifier and speakers. But regardless
of how these components affect the reproduction of
music, they cannot do anything to harm your records.
Not so the turntable. A tonearm that does not
allow the stylus to track the grooves lightly,
accurately and with perfect
balance can turr the stylus into a
destructive instrument easily
capable of lopping off the sharp
contours which carry the high
frequencies. When that
happens, the clean high rotes
become fuzzy memories.
Permanently. There's just no
way to restore a damaged
record. Even the
best equipment
can't replace
notes once
they're gone.
you should consider what you require of operating
convenience and Flexibility. For example, if you don't
relish risking your stylus and records by handling the
tonearm each time you playa record, you will want
an automatic turntable. And if you desire to play
two or more records in sequence, you will want a
turntable with record changing ability.
All Dual turntables eas ly fulfill every
requirement for record playback and preservation
-and every requirement for user convenience.
Which is why the readers of the leadirg
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Please write for our
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Phil Ohman. They succeed on all numbers but the two by Jelly Roll Morton
and it would take a duo of Bob Greene
and Butch Thompson to bring off Jelly
Roll's music for four hands of duo piano.
Another harpsichord disc of ragtime
is by E. Power Biggs on Columbia M
32495. This is devoted exclusively to
Scott Joplin played on the pedal harpsichord at moderate to fast tempi and is
a very entertaining and humorous LP
of ragtime.
The Jazz Piano Heritage series of
George H. Buck's label has included
some ragtime on their LPs or are devoted exclusively to ragtime, e.g. Donald
Ashwander, JCE-71, Bill Bolcom, JCE-
72 and Dick Wellstood, JCE-73. The
future of this series whets a ragophile's
appetite. There is the promise of an LP
devoted to William Albright and Eubie
Blake. Albright is one of the new composers in the ragtime style like Ash wander and Bolcom. The Blake material
will come from recordings made in 1951
by Rudi Blesh, which have never been
released.
Herwin Records, P.O. Box 306, Glen
Cove, NY 11542, in association with
Again and Again
and Again
Given the time, the patience,
and the money, one can connect*
fifty 303 amplifiers nose to
tail so that the programme goes
through one after the other
gradually deteriorating along
the way.
Deteriorating? The fact is
that apart from a very slight
backround hiss - akin to a
good tape recording - the
David Jasen, has started a reissue pro-
gram of ragtime piano from 78 rpm
recordings. The first is 15 different
versions of the Maple Leaf Rag on
Herwin 401 played by Jelly Roll Morton, Earl Hines, Willie Eckstein and
others. This record shows that this piece
can take any kind of interpretation
bestowed upon it. The latest issue is
Piano Ragtime of the Teens, Twenties
and Thirties on Her -402. It is a lot of
fun to hear ragtime played by its practitioners. This is to be followed by LPs
devoted to ragtime in the 1940s and one
to the 1950s.
Another excellent anthology annotated by David Jasen is RBF 22 called
Ragtime Entertainment. I enjoy El
Cotas Black and White Rag on the
xylophone, James Lent's The Ragtime
Drummer and Arthur Pryor's Frozen
Bill.
Orchestrated ragtime is also in evidence on the New England Conservatory Ragtime Ensemble's latest LP on
Golden Crest CRS 31031. The Sting
on MCA -390 from the award -winning
movie, and the The Southland Stingers
on Angel S-36047.
In closing, I would like to mention
another favorite of mine, Charlie Rasch.
He has a recently released solo LP on
CK, AR 3204. featuring a few rags and
some jazz -oriented pop tunes from the
twenties and thirties. This is available
from CK Records, 100 S. 7th St., Ann
programme will sound exactly
the same at the end as when it
started.
*Of course one must fit an
attenuator to reduce the signal
back to its original level
between each amplifier.
Send postcard for illustrated
Arbor, MI 48103.
Charles B. Davis, Jr.
444 Rocky Run Road
Midway Park, NC 28544
leaflet to Dept.(A U)
Acoustical Manufacturing
Co. Ltd., Huntingdon PE18 7DB.
Telephone (0480) 52561.
Speaker Tests for Non -technical
Consumer
QUAD
Products of
the Acoustical Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
for the closest aooroach to the original sound.
QUAD is a Registered Trade Mark
Dear sir,
Richard C. Heyser's exhaustive reviews of speaker systems in the pages
of AUDIO show clearly 'how judicious
use
of modern testing methods and
equipment can be of value to the nontechnical consumer as well as the audio
engineer. Some of his data is beyond
the average ken, but his presentation
has universal appeal in that he consistently relates his subjective commentary
to his laboratory findings, and he is
prone toward a professional under-
statement strikingly absent elsewhere.
I consider his reviews to be not only
precise and informative, but educational
-the catalyst I need to get my head into
those technical areas which were formerly so intimidating to me. (Necessity
breeding invention, I feel one should
dig out every available scrap of information before giving irreversible flight
to hundreds of dollars.)
Ralph L. Price, Jr.
14
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
This New Stanton Advertisement was prepared especially for the Journal of College Radio.
Shown above during a daytime session at WCWP are: William J.
Mozer
Nancy loran
William Epperhart
Joel A. Feltman
. Alan Boritz
Phil Lebowitz ... Michael A. Phillips,
.
.
.
-
.
.
.
A PrimE Training Ground For
Broadcast Engineers of the Future
Finds a Stanton Cartridge in Every HEad
Not many college radio stations are as fortunate outfitted with the 681 EE which meets our needs
as WCWP of the School of the Arts at the C. W. both in terms of reliability and excellent sound
Post Center, Brookville, L.I., in possessing such a quality in on -the -air playback as well as in our promagnificent building and studios. But, college radio duction of transfers. We are looking forward to a
stations all over the nation, in common with WCWP,
prefer Stanton cartridges for all their turntables.
WCWP has become a well known source for
radio stations in search of Broadcast Engineers,
for here the young trainees learn what they must
know in order to qualify for that position in a regular commercial station.
William J. Mozer, Director of WCWP, and an Engineer at WABC (shown directly above standing in
the studio) says:
"We have never used anything but Stanton Cartridges on all of our turntables. Currently, we are
future step-up to the new Stanton 681 Triple -E".
Stanton is the choice of a great number of college radio stations, just as it is for the great majority of commercial broadcasters. That is because
Stanton cartridges are the Professional Standard
and possess outstanding ability to withstand rug-
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Their excellence and reliability assure the highest
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Whether your usage involves Broadcasting or
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Audio ETC
J
Edward Tatnall Canby
My first thought, on opening up
the package, was to name
him Yves Z. Dropper, a good
German out of Sennheiser, but I soon
settled on Ispadore J. Cusp, Ispy for
short. I just can't work with a dummy
and Mercedes rolled into one. Bi-
naurally speaking, I am a Model A
man or, lately, VW beatle.
Ispy is all head. He doesn't need a
body. Instead, he is equipped with
a sort of threaded esophagus with
head that doesn't have a proper name.
Ispy came to me with a superbly
fine set of plastic ears, but he lacked
the other sensory appurtenancesnot even a mouth or a single eye. A
zombie. So I had to add a semblance
of these, plus moustache, sideburns,
eyebrows, and a bit of a beard. Try as
I would, though, I could not make him
look sinister. He seems merely to be
Two channels of sound, picked up by
the closest practical simulation of
human ears (and head) in the act of
listening, the recorded sound reproduced, each channel going exclusively
to its own ear, via head phones. No
loudspeakers. That's binaural recording and reproduction, and as has often
phonic.
The Sennheiser system, painstakingly developed to advance this spe-
took a picture of him peering
benignly out of a bush to one side of
an active lawn party. Some eavesdropper! Worst of all, Ispy was very
bald, which to my mind seriously reduced his auditory accuracy, but I
had fixed that via a soft cap, bill out
cial recording art towards high-level
consumer reproduction, marks the
very first time to my knowledge that
such a thing has been offered in our
industry. (There have been a few
fancier
even
experiments
with
front, to simulate the variable sound diffusers found on normal heads. That
ought to do it, I figured.
The things Ispy can hear are indeed
extraordinary. Full binaural sound,
super hi-fi, taken down via tiny
featherweight MKE-2002 Sennheiser
microphones, Druckempfánger type
with battery power supply, mounted
microphones actually embedded inside artificial ears, but this was hardly
production equipment. Also a few
binaural discs and the like. But no
rational
Sennheiser's.)
over-all
such
system
as
As old timers will remember, and
not a few young listeners, got into
binaural recording long before Sennheiser, as far back as 1952 when one
I
stethoscope style on the ends of a
featherweight dangling bracket. The
mikes fit into the lower ear -lobe
cavities via little pegs-Ispy's ear
lobes, or, to choice, your own. The
ment, this was Rolls Royce, Daimler
all-out binaural recording systemeverything but the tape recorder.
whether mono, stereo or quadra-
I
my own long-time binaural equip-
he, are all part of Sennheiser's new
been noted in this column by this
sounds his microphone ears are hear-
playback of choice is via Sennheiser's
extraordinary HD -424 "open aire"
head phones, also featherweight and
very flat, as are the mikes, from
maybe 40 Hz to 20 kHz. Compared to
plastic. But such ears he has! They, and
oldtime binaural enthusiast, it is
wholly unlike any other kind of audio,
musing gently on the extraordinary
ing.
complexion-made out of mouse -gray
Albert Whyte ("Bert") furnished me
with a duplicate of the unique two channel "binaural" Magnecorder
adapter to fit various supports. You
can screw him onto a camera tripod
or a microphone stand or even onto
his own big black shipping box, bust -
style. He is all ears and very poor
PT -6 which he was then using in his
own experiments. It was the very
first two -channel recorder, with staggered heads. I went on from there
through Uher and Concertone (Japan)
and I don't know what -all and I have
(Continued on page 22)
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
16
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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See the complete more -for -your -money lineup
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HEATHKIT ELECTRONICS CENTERS
Units of Schlumberger Products Corooretion
Retail prices slightly higher.
HEATH COMPANY, Dept. 41-11
Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022
ARIZ.: Phoenix; CALIF.: Anaheim, El Cerrito. :_cs Angeles.
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Truer than chrome.
Truer than iron oxide.
Compatible with all
cassette recorders.
Its secret is a tape double layered with oxide. Through
advanced 3M technology,
ferri-chrome literally combines
the best characteristics of
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its gamma ferric iron oxide
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rich low frequencies and low
noise levels. Together they
give you full -range performance
you've never heard before
in any cassette.
This ferri-chrome
combination gives "Scotch"
brand Classic cassettes
fidelity that often deceives the
sharpest ear. Included in a
variety of test procedures was the
use of a Brüel and Kjaer Model
3347 spectrum analyzer. We
began with the original play
(record) of a broad-spectrum
piece Of music, first measuring
output levels versus frequency
from the record, then the
Classic cassette recording of
the record, and finally, the record
recorded on our low noise/
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shows the results:
20 Hz
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Along with Classic
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The Classics - cassette,
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20,000 Hz
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Low Noise/High Density cassette
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Compatibility is another
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use the HIGH or NORMAL
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Check No. 28 on Reader Service Car
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
3
COMPANY
Can you
live without
a 400 watt
amplifier?
Maybe. If you don't mind the
loss of quality caused by
clipping during the more
dramatic passages in your
favorite records. Julian Hirsch
put it this way: "Anyone
using a low -efficiency
speaker ... with an amplifier
in the 30 to 50 watt class
cannot
approach
realistic
listening
levels
without severe clipping." If
you want to listen at a real -life
level without distortion, you
need at least 400 watts of
amplifier power. At $499, why
live with anything less than
the Phase Linear 400?
Wta4e
wnetait
00
to recapitulate the binaural experi-
time to time here; but it wasn't until
ence. It is one of those things that just
very recently that I found others who
won't go into words. Ten seconds of
listening will tell you all. Because of
were ready to take binaural sound
reproduction seriously as an active
new medium. In 1972, NCAE ran its
Madison seminar on binaural for two channel public broadcasting, and I was
there with many of my own tapes for
demo. Now-Sennheiser. And at last,
you can go out and buy tops in integrated binaural equipment. Though
must hastily point out that a great
proportion of the binaural impact may
I
be achieved
means.
with
much
simpler
Now get the picture. As in most of
my private putterings, sometimes
made public in this column, I worked
and still work with the simplest possible equipment, mainly to see how
much can be done with how little.
I
am after basic principles. I like quality
the way I like dessert. Gratifying, but
not necessarily the first consideravery soon established, many
tion.
years back, that the peculiar binaural
listening effect, from two recorded
channels, taken down from two ear spaced microphones, each channel fed
exclusively to its own ear via phones,
is
instantly perceived by anybody
even with the most rudimentary
equipment-in its essentials, if not
I
to perfection. Perfection, of course,
takes a lot more. Like hi-fi. We can
hear the news and commercials via
transistor pocket radio and get the
essential messages all too easily. We
can hear the same with much, much
better quality via hi-fi equipment,
grade for grade, and the same with
the phenomenon of stereo. You can
channels
achieved
by
ear -spaced
mikes and ear -spaced reproducing
phones-not loudspeakers-the binplayback very closely reproduces the actual sound of two -eared
listening. And most
on -the -spot
notably, the natural heard ambience,
the acoustic effect. It is the same with
two -channel photography, (unfortuaural
nately called stereo, for an endless
confusion), which is another and exactly
parallel hobby of mine. You
are there! Two ears. Two eyes. Dual
reproductions, exclusively for each
eye, or for each ear.
Normal recording, however many
is a marvelous thing altogether and who could deny it? But
this is different, this sound. Startlingly real. Exactly as heard. A voice
speaks to your right-you hear it right
channels,
there, in space, off to your right, a
sonic ghost! Makes you jump. So real,
that the binaural microphone technique is totally unlike that for normal
recording. Your dual mikes are placed
wherever you hear well. You can
listen in the middle of a cocktail
in
noisy
understand every word that is understandable on the spot; you can follow
individual conversations, tuning out
others, just as you do in the real -life
listening. You can record voices at
any distance, and you are never "off microphone."
There is, some of you will remember, only one minor problem. Nature
got that far-more likely she is still
enjoying her mono). You can enjoy
any music, the gist of music, minus
being literal, go a bit haywire. (Stan-
speakers. You often do, if you get
PHASE LINEAR CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 1335, LYNNWOOD,
around to your neighbors' places and
maybe to Aunt Jemima's (if she has
senses, all of them at once. So things,
fi. The meaning, the basic sense, does
dard recording is so far from literal
get through. But hi-fi is better. Hence
the entire hi-fi industry!
So Sennheiser's binaural system,
with your own choice of tape recorder.
First of all it is a superior hi-fi system,
ifically, the binaural reproduction is
skittish in its directionality. Sounds
the very best, the most ingeniously
best, the devilishly superb best way
to get every last ounce there is to get
out of this recording principle.
But there remains a most interesting little catch to all this, over and
beyond the fi. There is more, a lot
more-and here we stand at the very
threshold of knowledge, where your
guess, your calculation, your experiment, is as likely to be as good or as
bad as mine, or Sennheiser's.
Check No. 34 on Reader Service Card
the unique and total separation of
didn't really intend us to listen in
this peculiarly literal fashion, to a
sound that is disembodied, out of its
environment, minus the proper accompanying signals from your other
hear stereo nicely via well spaced 3 -in.
THE POWERFUL DIFFERENCE
WASHINGTON 98036
Having said it before, I'll try merely
(Continued from page 16)
duly reported on my fascinations from
that, paradoxically, we can play with
it for all sorts of useful effects.) Specoff to the sides are superbly accurate,
and unbelievably real. Sounds in
front, and in back, however, are
curiously false. Especially in front. It
is virtually impossible in many cases
-most cases- to "project" a front
sound out front where it ought to be,
and in fact was at the recording.
Front sounds and back sounds tend
to be confused with each other. Front
sounds more often than not are heard
behind you, or somehow centered in
the crown of your head. They simply
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
22
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
will not move out in front where they
belong.
So what? Here we enter aesthetics
The undistorted truth
and the experience of listening, as
we do in normal stereo/quadraphonic
recording. Does it matter-if you were
not on hand when the recording was
made and do not even know which
sounds belong where? Does it matter
even if you do know-for a recording
is always its own best experience, in
behind the Avid
dividing network.
its own terms? If it sounds good, why
worry? Binaural recordings do sound
good, they are absorbing, they grasp
your attention unbelievably. So the
people
cocktail -party
are
walking
around behind you and to one side,
when they ought to be in front and to
the side. Who cares? There's the
philosophical slant.
But some of us perfectionists won't
let the matter drop. Scientific curiosity at its best, if frustrating! Why?
Why can't we hear out in front when
the sound was in front? Untold mega hours of research have gone into this
problem and much learned theory is
the result. But still, we don't hear
sounds in front where they ought to
be. In particular, Sennheiser has
subscribed to the respectable and
reasonable set of theories which
says that though separation of microphones, by the binaural (ear) distance,
most
effect of hearing, the details of front
direction that we all hear naturally
with our own ears depend on tiny,
highly specific details of ear and head
configuration, on the ear's highly refined acoustic surround-those lovely
convoluted channels and cavities-on
the leakage pathways whereby the
channels do in fact get around the
head itself, notably around in back by
the short route, to modify the perceived compound sonic image, both
ears' signal combined by the brain
computers into one perception.
Thus, we have had much experimentation with artificial heads, and
with mikes in the
ears. Thus, the numerous simplified
baffles,
between -the -microphones
long used for binaural recordings,
natural
heads
which to my way of thinking are
virtually meaningless-they block off
some of the right sound from the left,
but they are a very poor substitute for
the marvelously refined shape of ears
and head, you will have to admit.
never could find that they produced
I
any useful improvement at all over no
head whatsoever. They could, by a bit.
But a real head can do better. Or 'spy.
You can understand Sennheiser's
characteristically German thoroughness in seeking the real, optimum
(Continued on page 26)
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
At Avid, we know there's
a lot more to building a
really accurate
speaker than just
a super flat frequency response.
So, after we've
done all we can to
build the flattest,
most linear response
into our speakers,
we spend a lot of time
fussing over a whole bunch
of equally important things.
Like dividing networks, for
example.
The role of the dividing network is to send input frequencies
to the right driver without introducing any distortion or degrading
the transient characteristics of the
speaker.
It sounds simple.
Unless you happen to be the
engineer designing it. In which
case it can become the most critical
can of worms in the whole speaker
design.
Pick the right crossover frequencies, interface the drivers just
right, and you've got the frequency
response
problem
just about
knocked.
But you
can't stop
there.
You
see, if the
¡
l
drivers
aren't
damped
just right,
the dividing
network can
degrade the
transient
response of
the speaker, even if you've
achieved a super flat frequency
response. The result is a ringing
response. Transient distortion.
Poor imagery.
There's still more.
Because even the best designed
dividing network in the world can
be a real washout when it comes to
intermodulation and harmonic distortion, if the components you use
aren't up to snuff.
For instance, in a lot of speak-
I
ers you'll find dividing
networks using nonlinear components like
iron core coils. Great
for the manufacturer
because they're cheaper. Not
so great for you because of
the distortion they can create.
Especially at higher power levels.
Avid uses only ideal, linear
components such as air core coils
in its dividing networks. More
expensive, of course, but they're
distortion free.
The point is,
we're a company
that is totally
and unequivocally committed
to just one
thing. The design
and construction
of the clearest, best
sounding speaker systems in their price range.
And that's not just so much
advertisingese. It's for real. But,
it's for you to decide. So here's
what we'd like you to do.
Go to your Avid dealer. A -B an
Avid with any other similarly
priced speaker. Then pass judgement. We think we know what the
verdict is going to be.
CORPORATION
10 Tripps Lane, East Providence. R.I.02914
Distributed in Canada by:
Ka iron Electronics. Montreal, Quebec
23
Check No. 7 on Reader Service Card
n
Christmas
Buying Guide
Pioneer Turntable
turntable/tonearm
A
belt -driven
combination, the PL -10 employs a
4 -pole synchronous motor for accurate speed rotation. Its 12 -inch alu-
minum platter rotates at precisely
33-1/3 or 45 rpm regardless of line
fluctuation. Rumble level is said to be
better than 47 dB, while wow and
flutter is less than 0.1 percent. Additional features include a statically
balanced
S-shaped tonearm,
anti -
skate control, plug-in shell and oil Low capacitance
damped
shielded cables accept any CD -4
cartridge. Price: $99.95, including
to
2.0 MHz and direct -deflection
terminals for viewing waveforms to
150 MHz. Also featured are d.c.
amps on both horizontal and vertical
axes and a new wide-angle CRT
which contributes to reduction of
case
depth. Specifications:
vertical
sens., 20 mV/cm; max. input, 600V,
peak to peak; input impedance, 1
megohm shunted by 30 pF; cont.
var. gain control range, greater than
22 dB; power requirements, 117/234
VAC, 50-60 Hz. Price: $179.95.
JVC Turntable
The JLB-44 is a high performance, d.c.
direct -drive unit designed to com-
plement both stereo and CD 4 sysB & K Scope
tems.
Model 1403 is a 100% solid state
general purpose unit featuring compactness, light weight and durability.
The 'scope has a bandwidth of d.c.
vibration -free
Features
include a
direct -drive
Altec Speaker
Model 891A, Stonehenge I, is a floor standing, medium efficiency unit
designed for use with amps capable of
delivering 25 W continuous/channel.
Utilizing a columnar bass reflex enclosure, the 891A features a 12 -inch,
high compliance low frequency
speaker with a 9 -pound magnet struc-
cueing.
base and dust cover.
low friction arm for CD -4 are encased
in a resonance -free beechwood base
with dust cover. Price: $349.95.
special
motor,
an adjustable speed control and a
built-in neon strobe indicator. The
turntable assembly and low mass,
ture. A front -mounted dividing network offers a continuously variable
high frequency attenuation control for
adjustment to listening room acousHigh frequency material is
reproduced by a newly designed
tics.
direct radiator tweeter. Finished on
all four sides in teak veneer with a
snap -on grille, the system sells for
$329.00
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
24
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Gately Mixer
The Prokit II mixing system, available
wired or in kit form, features slide
attenuators and pan pots on all
six
inputs. Each input is switchable from
mic to line. The mic preamp gain is
switch selectable and each mic input
has a switchable 20 -dB pad. Professional VU meters are backed up by LED
overload indicators. Optional features
include transformer output and +48 V
mic powering. $598.00, kit; $889.00
wired.
BGW Preamp
The Quadraphonic System Control
Center from BGW is designed for true
discrete systems from one to four
channels, and features 4x4 matrix
mode control, which allows any input
channel to be assigned to any output
channel, three slider -type EQ controls
in each channel, four 15 -watt head -
AUDIO
phone amps with separate gain control, and optional CD -4 demodulator or
matrix decoder. The two four -channel
tape recorder facilities include EQ,
and there is provision for two phono
inputs, as well as one for tuner. High-
signal strength and center channel
tuning meters are used. FM performance includes IHF sensitivity of 1.9µV,
capture ratio of 2.5 and mid -band
stereo separation of 35 dB minimum.
Price: $329.95.
level frequency response is 20 Hz to 20
kHz ±0.1 dB, while phono response
is ±0.25 dB from RIAA. Rated THD
is 0.02 percent, and IM is 0.006 per-
Philips HF Generator
cent. Price: $849.00; demodulator/decoder extra.
PM5324 features pushbutton selection for nine frequency ranges from
100 kHz to 110 MHz and for modulation functions and calibration fre-
Scott Receiver
quencies.
Model R365 produces 30 W/channel
provides output amplitudes in five
ranges from 5 µV rms full scale to
50 mV rms full scale. Output impedance is 75 ohms. In addition to
from 20 Hz to 20 kHz at less than
percent distortion. This stereo
receiver includes among other fea-
0.5
Electronic
stabilization
tures, channel selector, ganged bass,
internal AM and FM modulation
treble and volume controls, channel
balance control, mono/stereo, tape
monitor facilities, and switching for
capabilities and internal wobbulation, the unit offers facilities for external modulation inputs, including
two sets of stereo speakers. Separate
NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
stereo MPX test signals. Price: $490.
vesan le
is
enjoyaBle
(Continued from page 23)
residue of improvement that may be
possible via a close simulation of
actural hearing via ears and head, no
more than a bit of improved accuracy
in the spatial location of your binaurally reproduced sounds. The genuine
head and my own head, with those
stethoscope -like mikes dangling, for
a number of wonderful and fasci-
tics. I recorded via Ispy, walking out in
nating experiments these last weeks,
and it has been enormously instructive. Put aside the matter of audio fi,
which is, as say, sheer Rolls Royce/
Daimler/Mercedes, straight through
the Sennheiser system. Beyond all
that, I am happy to report that Sennheiser has in fact cracked one half
of the ultimate nut, and has
back the recording. Yep-with eyes
closed tight, violently concentrating,
imagining with all my might, I did
hear that sound move out in front of
visualized it out there. Aha!
me.
hi-fi attitude! If it can be done, we
have to do it.
I
is the finest and
most versatile control unit l have
.
.
ever used. For the first time l can
hook all my equipment together at
once. / find many semi -pro operations possible with it that l have
never before been able to pull off,
including a first-class equalization
of old tapes via the smooth and
distortionless tone controls. l have
rescued some of my earliest broadcast tapes by this means, recopying
them to sound better than they ever
did before.
-- Ed Canby, AUDIO
broached the other half. In twenty plus years of binaural experiment, I
have never heard it before. Now you
can hear, absolutely clearly, directly,
in behind. Amazing. "Testing, testing", says the moving voice. "Now I
am off to the right" (and so it is).
am moving around in be"Now
I
hind"-and the voice does just that.
The speaking person clearly walks
right behind you. "Now I am passing
right behind, and on to the left." Lohe does! Absolutely, hair-raisingly
realistic.
Among the things you can do with an
IC150:
Produce your own taped programs! Record from any of seven inputs: 2 phono,
2 tape, 1 tuner, 2 auxiliary (tape player,
cassette deck, guitar, microphone, etc.)
Clean up record scratch, tape hiss and
turntable rumble with filters which
With plain microphones, omnis,
minus head or baffle (and with baffle,
dealer. See him today to make your
own comparison. (For independent lab test reports on the IC150, write CROWN, Box 1000,
Elkhart, Indiana, 46514.)
O crown
Made Only in America
Check No. 18 on Reader Service Card
I
hear any sound out in front, even at
the precise recording location only
moments after the recording had
been made via Ispy. "Now I am
straight out in front," the test voice
would say, and instead it would appear above, somewhere over the
eyes. Crazy. Here, Ispy and Sennheiser
and
the
marvelous
mikes
failed. Not that it matters, again! Just
that nagging urge to know why. Why,
with all my experience in this kind of
could barely make the
I
grade for a moment or two, why
could not myself barely hear in Sennheiser's own 45 rpm demo recordings
what Sennheiser says is there-sound
all the way around.
I think the German engineers have
simply trained themselves to hear
right over the crown of your head and
off to the other side. No great problem!
It sounds perfectly OK and not at all
moves) has approached close -to, then
and noise than any other preamplifier.
This combination of clean sound
and versatility cannot be bought anywhere else for less than $600. But you
can buy it for only $349 at your Crown
I
There is the clue. And there, I think, for
all its pains, Sennheiser has not quite
got the ultimate message.
managed, other less exThough
perienced listeners, one after the
other in my trials, were unable to
moves, somehow, from one side
Correct ping-pong effect for more en-
tions and more with lower distortion
front and around. I then put my head
where Ispy's had been, and played
listening
unnatural. Just not out front and not
in back. Or maybe, all of the sound
vaguely in back. You can even walk
yourself straight between your two
binaural mikes, right through the middle of the listening "head," and the
The IC150 performs all these func-
I
too) the binaural front and back are
virtually indistinguishable. The voice
scarcely alter program material.
Improve frequency response with bass
and treble controls for each channel.
Enhance stereo image with the IC150's
exclusive panorama control.
Record two copies of a program at once,
and monitor source and tape for each.
joyable headphone listening.
with the hi-fi quality), but now you
can hear to the sides, and the back,
absolutely as in nature. Amazing ..
The front? Alas, that mystery is not
yet untangled. Yes, for the first time
in my life have managed fleetingly
to hear binaural reproduced sounds
out in front of me. It took enormous
concentration, and it took even more,
a playback in the exact same spot as
the recording itself-the same acous-
Well, by God, I've been using Ispy's
This IC 150 .
lot of money to try it yourself (along
playback sounds merely as though the
person (speaking, of course, as he
moved away again. No problem in
perception or enjoyment. Just a non correspondence between original and
reproduced motions.
So Sennheiser wins hands down on
the rear perception, and it clearly is
thanks to those microphones, which
sit right inside the ear surround
(yours or Ispy's) and therefore can
make a very clear distinction, as you
do in the actual "live" listening, between sounds from the rear that are
shaded by the ear flaps and those
from the front which are cupped into
focus. It cost a lot of money to accom-
plish this; you will have to line up a
the sound where it must be, out in
front-to grasp the inadequate and/
or contradictory clues from the various
senses and the mind and make them
behave as they should. It can be done.
With Sennheiser binaural sound
now a commercial hi-fi reality at
the very top and a wide range of lesser
equipment around to cope with bin-
aural, too, all the way down to the
bottom, the real gist of the binaural
listening experience is ready for any
pair of ears, and it is fun. Try it. If you
a two -channel recorder, any
grade, two microphones, any old
have
sort, and a pair of head phones, any
type, you're in business. Forget the
head! At least to begin with. Just set
up your mikes eight or ten inches
apart, anywhere, and record. Then
play via the phones. You can always
move up to Sennheiser when the urge
urges you.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
26
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Audio engineers agree that the ultimate Preamp must have all
the CONTROL flexibility of a patch panel...Our New PE2217
has pushbutton -patching, plus 22 more MUST features...
For a SUPER -SYSTEM, match the 2217 with any of thes
"FANTASTIC! / CAN HARDLY BELIEVE MYEARS.. .
VERY VERSATILE& CLEAN -SOUNDING AND
I REALLY LIKE THE SWITCHABLE PATCHING."
...the most controls... the most flexibility.., the most functions...
the most useability... a $1,000 worth of control for $499.50!
SPECIFICATIONS and SPECIAL FEATURES
ALL PUSHBUTTONS INTERLOCKED to prevent inadvertent program destruction DISCRETE -OCTAVE EQUALIZATION CONTROL of ten octaves on each channel,
12db each octave FULL -SPECTRUM LEVEL CONTROL for each channel AUTOMATIC
CONTINUOUS MONITORING by light -emitting diodes for visual warning of overload in output circuits VISUAL ZERO -GAIN
EQUALIZATION BALANCING on music, white noise or pink noise SELECTION OF TEST LITES on or off. TAPE DUBBING BETWEEN TWO MACHINES, with optional simultaneous equalizing and monitoring DOUBLE -DUBBING into two recorders simultaneously SEPARATE SYSTEM -SELECTION enables full use of all other functions during the tape dubbing operation LINE OR
TAPE equalization selector AUTOMATIC EQUALIZER -DEFEAT when line or tape equalizer is not in use FRONT PANEL TAPE
input-output jacks for easy 2nd and 3rd tape recorder hookup access TAPE MONITORING of either tape at any time TWO
stereo headphone jacks MONO SELECTOR for left, right or both channels to both outputs REVERSE -STEREO mode TWO
Icw-level phono inputs FOUR independent phono preamps SIX A/C outlets, 4 switched, 2 unswitched ELECTRO -PLATED
Warranty cards on file at Soundcraftsmen
X R.eN I1.5 any .uaa..tsd Improy.m.rrh, cMnge., or other comments:
C
fA.LTI#f;TIC I I CAN ulARoLY er.t.lavc ny
MRS.., VreqV VfRSR7 ILA Cra sew
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INPUT IMPEDANCE - Hi -level: 50,000 ohms
OUTPUT IMPEDANCE: 600 ohms
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Fixing Your
Electronic Organ
Ion Turin°
THE ELECTRONIC organ has become the favorite musi-
6. Voice Tabs-sometimes called stops, tabs are what
cal instrument in many homes, and for good reason. make organs differ from each other. Not only how many
Its versatility and ease of playing make it the best in- tabs there are, but what they do counts. They determine
strument for many kinds of music, from classics to jazz, the versatility and tone quality of the organ.
There are some musical and electronic relationships on
popular to acid -rock.
Today's electronic organ is a remarkably stable instru- the keyboards and in the tabs that are helpful in trouble ment. Most are of excellent design and excellent quality,
and failures are not nearly so commonplace as in other home
UPPER
KEYBOARD
entertainment equipment. But for this reason, finding an
experienced technician can be a problem. The good ones are
VOICE TABS
scarce.
ON -OFF SWITCH
With a little know-how and common sense, it is possible
to keep the service calls fewer and farther between. If you
use the right techniques and materials, you can do most of
the maintenance and repair that your electronic organ
LOWER
needs.
KEYBOARD
First, let's look at a typical spinet organ. Figure 1 shows a
medium-sized electronic organ. The main points of interest
are as follows:
1. On -Off Switch-self explanatory;
2. Expression Shoe-this is the volume control for the
organ;
3. Upper Keyboard-sometimes called the swell or solo
manual, most melodies are played on this keyboard;
4. Lower Keyboard-sometimes called the great or accompaniment manual, most harmony is played on this keyboard;
5. Pedal Clavier-the pedals are used to provide the bass
notes, or beat, for your music and
EXPRESSION SHOE
PEDAL CLAVIER
Fig.
1-Typical spinet organ.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
30
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shooting. Figure 2 shows a typical keyboard. The musical re-
lationship between any two keys of the same name (Middle C and C above Middle C, for example) is an octave. An
octave is the distance from the first note of a scale to the
eighth note of the scale (hence the name octave), and a note
one octave above another is twice the pitch of the first.
2f
-f
I/2f -
MID
C
A
C
HONE OCTAVE
A
C
C
k-- ONEOCTAVE
Electronically, this means that the frequency is doubled. A
note an octave below another has a trequency of one-half
the first. This is an important relationship, since many electronic organs on the market generate the highest pitched
notes on the organ and use flip-flop dividers to obtain the remaining notes.
Figure 3 shows a typical arrangement of "tabs." The "footage" marks (16', 8', etc.) represent the lengths of pipe that
FLUTE SUSTAIN SUSTAIN
SOLO
FLUTE
CELLO
SOLO
FLUTE
VIOLA
OBOE
VOX
SOLO
16'
16'
16
8'
8'
8'
8'
8'
4'
4'
MED
LONG
OFF
SLOW
LIGHT
OFF
PEDAL PEDAL
16'
8'
PEDAL
FULL
ACCOMP
FLUTE
STRING
HORN
DIAP
8'
8'
8'
9
FULL
TREMOLO VIBRATO VIBRATO VIBRATO
FAST
ON
DEEP
ON
Fig. 3-Typical arrangement of voice tabs.
would be needed to create the pitch of a particular note if
you had a pipe organ. A 16' flute is a deep voice (large pipe)
and an 8' flute is a higher pitched voice (smaller pipe). These
voices are related in a 1:2 fashion. A 16' voice is one-half the
pitch of an 8' voice. Figure 4 shows a keyboard with voices to
4' VOICE
16' VOICE
8' VOICE
fit
f/4
f/I6
f/8
MID
C
_
TÍ
21
I'8
f/4
f/4
1/2
C
C
Maintenance
Let's look first at some of the regular maintenance that
should be done. Cleaning is the first thing to consider. For an
organ to look, feel, and play properly, it should be clean inside
and out. The outside will be happy with a very mild soap (like
Ivory liquid) on a damp cloth. Wash, rinse with a damp (not
wet) cloth, and dry the keys and tabs regularly. DO NOT USE
SOLVENTS of any kind. They can damage the plastics and
wood finishes. The cabinet will also gleam with this soap
and water treatment, and a good liquid polish for the wood
surfaces will not hurt. Use a vacuum cleaner on the inside
Fig. 2-Typical spinet keyboard.
NORM
effects. Examples of control tabs are solo tabs (a solo 8' tab
makes all the 8' voices louder), vibrato tabs, volume tabs
and sustain tabs.
1/2
once a year to remove accumulated dust.
The "playing" parts of an organ are the mechanical key
switches and tab switches. The right way to clean these is
with an aerosol contact cleaner. You want the kind that says,
"Leaves no deposits, will not harm plastics" (Miller -Stephenson MS -230, General Cement GC 8669, or similar). Spray the
switch contacts and work the tabs and/or keys a few times.
This proceedure will clear up a whole host of problems, from
static in the output to voices and keys that are intermittent.
It should not need to be done more often than every six
months to a year. Gaining access to the tab switches is not
usually too difficult a job, but we come to another necessity.
You should have a copy of the service manual and schematic
for the organ if you intend to do any real repair work. All
organ companies have such material for their technicians,
and it is usually available to the organ owner for a nominal
fee (around $3.00 to $6.00). The address to write to for this
manual is in the owner's manual. (Send your request "ATTN:
Service Department" and they will get it to you quicker.)
The service manual may contain disassembly instructions,
trouble shooting aids, and special information that could
save you a costly call by a professional technician.
The only other regular maintenance that must be done is
oiling. Most modern organs have Leslie speakers (or similar
devices) for creating a theater organ sound. The motor should
be oiled with a light machine oil once a year. Detailed instructions will be on the speaker unit or in the service manual. When you oil the Leslie, it is a good idea to check the
tension of the drive belt that connects the motor to the rotating part of the speaker unit. Be careful to keep oil off the
belt and pulley surfaces.
So far we have probably managed to save at least one service call a year, and as you can see, it is not really that difficult to keep an organ in good playing condition. For those of
you who wish to dig deeper, some test equipment is in order.
C
Test Gear
Fig. 4-Keyboard showing relation of voice and frequencies.
the left and frequencies above. As you can see, if you play
Middle C with an 8' voice, you will hear the same pitch (F/8)
that you would hear if you played C above Middle C with a 16'
voice (still F/8). This relationship may be used for four or
more notes. As it happens, this also turns out to be a handy
troubleshooting aid. Used properly, this knowledge will let
you pinpoint a problem to a bad tube or transistor without
even removing the back of the organ.
There is one more distinction that needs to be made regarding the tabs on an organ. Some of them are voice tabs
and provide a sound by themselves when a key is pressed.
The others are control tabs. By themselves they do nothing,
but used in conjunction with voice tabs they create different
The most versatile piece of test equipment for organ repair
is the volt -ohm meter. With the VOM you can check the operation of the oscillators, dividers, filters, power supply, keying, almost everything. The meter should have an input impedance of at least 20,000 ohms per volt, but that is about the
only restriction. A signal tracer is also a valuable aid for isolating "sections" of the organ.
Your electronic organ can be divided into five major sections (see Fig. 5). The tone generators are the heart of the instrument. This section is where all the sounds that come out
of the organ are born. There are two schemes for creating the
necessary pitches in the tone generator. The first is to use an
oscillator for each note. Each of the individual pitches are sent
to the key switches so that when the proper tabs are depressed, the tones are sent to the filter circuits as keys are
played. The same pitch may be sent to Middle C for a 4'
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
32
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voice, C above Middle C for an 8' voice and the C above
that for a 16' voice. Troubleshooting? Turn on one 8' voice.
Play each key in succession. Write down on a sheet of
paper any notes that fail. Then turn off the 8' voice and
turn on a 4' voice. Play the keys again, writing down the
names and locations of the bad ones (see Fig. 6). If only one
key on one voice is defective chances are that there is noth-
ing wrong with the tone generator. But if the pattern looks
like Fig. 6, you probably have a tone generator out. By
tracing backwards on the organ schematic, you can pick the
bad osillator and repair it.
The second tone generator scheme is the more common
INDIVIDUAL
KEYSWITCH
INDIVIDUAL
SIGNAL
FROM
TONE GEN.
R2
D2
DI
POSITIVE
¡
f KEYING
VOLTAGE
RI
-moo NEG BIAS
TO TAB SWITCHES
Tc
COMMON SIGNAL
Fig. 8-Keying circuit using reverse -biased diode.
SIGNALS FROM TONE GEN
C
one. There are twelve oscillators for the highest notes on the
organ. These pitches are then sent to the individual dividers to create the lower tones of each family of notes (see
Fig. 7). A family of notes is a group that is related by octaves
PEDAL SIGNAL
TO TABSWITCHES
/ 8' SIG
TAB
KEYING
CIRCUITS
TONE
GENERATOR
CIRCUITS
(PEDALS
AND
KEYBOARD)
SWITCHES
AND
VOICING -
-T
FILTER
CIRCUITS
16'SIG
1st
2nd
POWER
DIVIDER
DIVIDER
SUPPLY
AND
(=2)
(=2)
AMPLIFIER
KEYING VOLTAGE
Fig. 9-Pedal divider system.
SPECIAL
EFFECTS
CIRCUITS
same family, finding the tone generator trouble is a snap.
The most common defect in tone generators is a bad tube or
transistor. In tube organs, substitute a new tube for the suspected tube. If the notes play now, you have found the bad
Fig. 5-Basic sections of the organ.
tube. In transistor organs, you should find the trouble with
the VOM, since replacing transistors is a much more involved
task.
BAD
ON
2' VOICE
The third major section of the organ, from a functional
standpoint, is the tab switch and filter circuits. The tab
switches are plagued mainly by dirty contacts since they
x
BAD
X
X
BAD
BAD
ON
ON
ON
8' VOICE
16' VOICE
4'
VOICE
switch audio signals, but other than that should be trouble
free. Basically, the signals from groups of notes are sent down
to the tab switch and through a passive network of resistors
Fig. 6-Bad-note pattern with defective tone generator.
MASTER
OSC
I st
DIVIDER
2)
f/8
f/4
-0.f/2
2nd
3rd
DIVIDER
DIVIDER
(=2)
f /4
(=2)
tab is in the ON position. In most instruments the only voices
that will seem affected much by a defective filter are the
SIGNALS TO KEYING CIRCUITS
f/2
and capacitors to the appropriate filter or mixer when the
flute voices. This is because the signals from the key switches
must be thoroughly filtered to become sine waves (which is
f/16
the characteristic waveshape of a flute), while they require little or no filtering to become the proper shape for a
clarinet. In other instruments the signals are collected and
4th
f/8
DIVIDER
(=2)
f/16
Fig. 7-How dividers create different notes from a single
master oscillator.
(the C's, the A's, etc.) The technique for finding a bad stage
here is the same as is used in the previous example. However, there are some definite statements that can be made
about which stage is bad, so that picking the bad stage can be
done from the keyboard. For example, if all the C's are out on
all voices, the "C" oscillator is not operating. If the 4' voice is
the highest on the instrument, and the top two notes of a
family play with this voice on, but the ones below it are
silent, the oscillator is operating, the first divider is operating, but the second divider is not. To prove this, turn on an
8' voice. Now only the highest note will play. The 8' pitch of
the top note comes from the first divider. The second divider
is defective. Now you can see why the octave relationship is
an important troubleshooting aid. If you remember the relationship of each pitch to the higher and lower pitches of the
sent through passive waveshaping networks to the preamp,
without going through any active circuitry. There are instruments that embody both methods.
Figure 10 shows a keyboard with filter numbers assigned to
key groups with 16', 8', and 4' flute voice selected. With a
chart similar to Fig. 10 (which should be in the service
manual), you can locate a defective filter almost immediately from the front of the organ. As you can see, you have a
cross-check to decide if a filter is defective or if a broken wire
FILTER 3
FILTER 2
FILTER I
FLUTE 4'
FLUTE 8'
FLUTE 16'
.KEYING GROUP 17-..
FILTER 4
FILTER 3
FILTER 2
-II
FILTER 5
FILTER 4
FLTER6
FILTER 5-.
FILTER 3 F LTER 4
-III
-}- -IY
Fig. 10-Keyboard showing assignment of filter numbers.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
34
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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from one group of notes collector is causing the problem. If
group II is silent with the Flute 8' on, try group I with the Flute
4' voice on. If it is silent also, filter number three is the bad
one. The filters are usually one tube or one transistor stages
and simple to repair with a VOM to guide you. One word of
caution-if there are potentiometers, adjustable coils, variable capacitors or adjustable transformers in the filter circuits, leave them alone. Turning them will not fix anything
and most of the adjustments are factory type adjustmentsvery difficult to make in the home.
this area are usually a function of the circuits used to generate
the repeat signal. In the circuit of Fig. 12a, a failure in the re-
peat generator will show up either as no repeating when
KEYING VOLTAGE LINE
A.
e
o
((
M
o
(
1
INDIVIDUAL KEYSWITCHES
r-Lr
Amp and Power Supply
The fourth section of the organ is the amplifier and power
supply. These circuits are usually located on the same chassis
and they are very straight -forward. Standard troubleshooting
o
'REPEAT"
"REPEAT"
B.
r
FROM
PREAMP
TO AMPLIFIER
MV.
techniques should enable you to pinpoint any problems in
these areas. This is the first place to look if your symptom is a
completely silent instrument. There is one area that deserves mention, however, and that is the expression pedal.
It is connected between the pre -amp output and the amplifier input. Figure 11 shows the three schemes used in almost
all organs. The circuits are quite simple and easy to fix, but
trouble in this area can be easily overlooked.
Fig. 12-Two commonly used repeat -percussion systems.
the tabs are turned on or no sound at all on any of the keys
whose voltage is supplied by the repeat generator. If the
organ seems dead, try some of the keys that use direct
(audio) keying. This will help you decide if the trouble is in
the repeat circuits or in the amplifier and power supply
circuits.
SIGNAL FROM PREAMP
Now we come to the "fun" sounds on an organ-the
V
rhythm. There are two kinds, Play it yourself and Automatic.
The voices (drums, brushes, etc.) for both kinds are generated
in the same way. Most drum generators are low to medium'
+V
frequency oscillators biased just into saturation or cutoff.
When they are stimulated with a trigger, they oscillate for a
short period of time and die away rapidly, creating the percussive sound of a drum. The cymbal and brush sounds are
generated by a "noise" diode. A trigger applied to the amplifier stage following the noise generator allows a burst of
noise to come through. The sound of a snare drum is syn-
SIGNAL TO AMPLIFIER
Fig. 11-Three commonly used expression -pedal systems.
thesized by triggering the drum oscillator and the noise
amplifier simultaneously and mixing the output.
The fifth major piece of most organs is the special effects
section. Also in this category are some of the control tabs on
the organ.
The one control that all organs have is vibrato. Vibrato is a
variation of frequency with time. Some instruments also
have tremolo. Tremolo is a variation of amplitude with
time. Vibrato is created on most organs by applying a low frequency signal from a phase -shift oscillator to the oscillator
portion of the tone generator. This varies the frequency of the
individual oscillators in time to the low frequency vibrato
signal, adding a pleasant sounding movement to the sound
of the organ, much like a violinist adds to his music by wiggling his finger on the strings.
Tremolo on most organs uses the same phase -shift oscillator signal but applies it to a lamp which is optically coupled
to a photocell in series or across the signal line from the pre amp to the amplifier. This raises and lowers the organ vol-
ume (amplitude modulates the signal) creating the effect
called tremolo. Most troubles in vibrato and tremolo circuits
originate in the phase -shift oscillator itself or in the impedance matching stage which usually follows it. The active
component (tube or transistor) is again the usual culprit
except in older instruments, where the capacitors in the oscillator phase -shift network open up or become leaky and
must be replaced to restore proper operation.
Another common control tab, classed as a special effect, is
repeat percussion. Figure 12 shows block diagrams of the
two most common methods for creating repeat percussion,
an effect which makes the organ sound like a banjo or mandolin by causing very sharp amplitude variations. Troubles in
The only difference in the two kinds of rhythm are the
triggering methods. In the "play it yourself" kind, the trigger pulses for the various voices come from special contacts
on the keyboards and the pedals. In the automatic variety of
rhythm, a multivibrator "clock" replaces your foot on the
pedals and your hand on the keyboard, and logic circuits
supply pulses to the various voices at the correct moments.
Patterns such as samba, waltz, cha-cha, march, and many
others can also be selected.
Repairing rhythm circuits of the automatic variety can be a
bit difficult if the problem crops up in the timing or logic
circuits, but if you have a comprehensive service manual you
can accomplish it. Repairing a missing "sound"in either type
of rhythm involves only identifying the voice that is missing
and fixing its generator.
We have discussed about 90 percent of what is in your elec-
tronic organ, and how to find and localize troubles. Obviously, you must use care and proper techniques when
doing any actual repair work. Use a small pencil iron for
replacing semiconductors and parts on circuit boards. Use
proper caution when measuring supply voltages (particularly in tube -type instruments).
By now you should be a good deal more familiar with
your own electronic organ. The more familiar you are with
it, the more enjoyment it will provide. Proper care will mean
a long and useful life for it. To summarize very briefly, read
the service book, use all the information you can obtain by
observing the symptoms, proceed very logically and carefully, and you will be well on your way to fixing your own
electronic organ.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
36
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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Robert Brown & Mark Olsen
These circuits are sonic shocks out of the darker quarters
of the universe-the sirens' song of age-old myth, languages out of the Greater Magellanic Cloud ... who
knows? It
goes by the name of Theremin, its
Russian
inventor.
The theremin was one of the first entirely electronic
musical instruments and is played with what seems to be
magic-by the mere proximity of the player's hands to two
capacity plates in the circuit. At the time it was brought to
the world's attention it was much more than a novelty.
It was a playable instrument and a musical event of major
proportions in the embryonic field of electronic music.
Concert hall performances were even given. a couple of
decades ago by an orchestra of theremins.
Before the synthesizer, the theremin was probably one
of the most versatile of musical instruments, with a frequency range exceeding even that of the cathedral pipe organ, and a volume range that was limited only by the
power capabilities of amplifier and speakers. Its tone is
unlike any conventional instrument, or even like electrified versions of conventional instruments. It is a very
It has been left in the background perhaps only by the even
more astounding synthesizer.
How It Works
Any theremin has at least two r.f. oscillators-one fixed
and one variable-which are combined in a mixer -amplifier stage. The frequency of the variable oscillator is designed to be controlled with an external capacity, in the
form of an antenna or a metallic plate. The instrument is
turned to silence (zero beat) by obtaining exact cancellation when combining the two radio frequencies.
When a hand is brought near the capacitive antenna, the
frequency of the variable oscillator shifts. An audible beat,
after amplification, is the theremin's output. More complicated designs, like the second circuit offered in this
project, involve the addition of a third oscillator to control
volume, which is also variable by hand capacity.
THEREMIN 1
This circuit is a good one for trying out the theremin effect
popular instrument for background music and special without getting too involved. It cheats a little by using an
effects, for horror and science -fiction films. Without the AM broadcast radio as the fixed oscillator and amplifier. All
performer ever touching it, the instrument can produce that is needed are a few components of the junkbox variety.
notes that fall both inside and outside of the regular musical This is about the simplest the experimenter can get with
scale, play melodies, or accompany another instrument or
a singer.
Not much more need be said about the utility of this instrument in the hobbyist's home electronic music studio.
the fabulous theremin. The schematic is shown in Fig. 1.
Construction
Build the circuit using a perforated circuit board and a
small metal box. The simplest way to attach the capacity
antennas-if short whip antennas are used-is with
Reprinted from "Experimenting With Electronic Music," $4.95, copyrighted
1974 by Tab Books, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214.
a
couple of commercial antenna binding posts on the box.
They are connected into the circuit as shown in the sche-
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
38
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
8" Lower Mid -Range Speaker
250 Hz to 1,000 Hz
Adjustable Swivel -Mounted Dipole Coupler
3" Upper Mid -Range Speaker
1,000 Hz to 5,000 Hz
Port
6 \'
\
,`,r,.
""`....
`
o
`
2 Dome Radiators in parallel.
5,000 Hz to 20,000 Hz
Low distortion 4 -way
cross -over network
1
1
,,+
.
Equalizers for each mid -range
and high -range speaker band
Direction Indicator -
Aperiodic 4th Order
Butterworth Enclosure
O
High efficiency 15" Woofer
The new Leslie DVX Speaker:
it adjusts to the geometry of your room!
CBS Laboratories and Leslie Speakers have now
developed an amazing new loudspeaker system that
is ...quite frankly ...amazing!
The Leslie DVX speaker is a unique high performance,
low distortion four-way system. Its exclusive dipole
coupler is swivel mounted... so that you can "aim" the
mid -range and high frequency speakers to fit the
geometry of your room. This dipole coupler.also gives
you the optimum balance of direct and reflected
energy to pinpoint and anchor the stereo image in
the manner intended by the recording director.
The bass frequencies are reproduced by a high energy
15" woofer housed in an aperiodic 4th order
Butterworth ported enclosure and descend smoothly
to the lowest registers.
Leslie Speakers was the first company to introduce a
truly effective "augmentation" system (the Plus 2
speaker) to eliminate the standing waves in your
room. Now comes the amazing DVX speaker. D for
dipolar. VX for variable axis. A whole new alphabet for
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SPEAKERS
DVX MODEL 580
DVX MODEL 570
STUDIO/LAB MODEL
ELECTRO MUSIC/CBS MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, A DIVISION OF CBS INC., 56 WEST DEL MAR BLVD., PASADENA, CA. 91105
Check Na 27 on Reader Service Card
t.neck No. 53 on Header Service Card
matic. A homemade antenna using the lid of a tin can and
short wooden dowels is also possible as long as it is electrically sound.
The shield connections on the two transistors should be
cut off, and care should be taken to insulate the whole circuit from the metal chassis. That the chassis be metal is a
must. The antennas should be mounted on opposite ends of
the chassis. Otherwise, their mutual capacity may affect
overall operation adversely. The antennas are positioned
either vertically or horizontally, depending on preference
Operation
Alignment of this circuit is apt to be more complicated
than the construction. The procedure followed here is to
align first the pitch elements of the circuit and then the
volume circuits.
Hook the theremin circuit to the amplifier, turning
everything on. The voume on the amplifier should be well
advanced. The first step is to temporarily ground the junction between capacitors C12 and C13. Then tune L6 through
its entire range. The sound present in the output will "dip"
and antenna design.
into several zero beats along the way. In one of these
ranges, the volume will be greatest. This range is tuned
Operation
for a zero beat.
Turn the pitch adjust control (C1) about half -open. Turning
the slug of L1 counterclockwise will cause the pitch of the
sound to rise. Advance it to the highest frequency that you
To get this theremin to work, place it near the back of an
AM radio. Set the loopstick slugs about half way in. Set the
radio near the center of the band and do not move it from
this position once the musical instrument is tuned. Adjust
variable capacitor C6 until a hissing sound is heard over the
radio. Then go to variable capacitor C5 and adjust it until
the radio produces a loud whistle. By adjusting C6 again to
obtain the lowest pitch possible, the tuning is made com-
plete-and the instrument is ready to play. Moving your
hands around a few inches from the antennas should get
some results.
can hear. Now tune L6 to bring the pitch of this tone
down to a zero beat again.
When the circuit has been off and is turned on again,
the pitch antenna must be touched with a finger to initiate
oscillation. This is the basis for the ability to critically align
the circuit and for its extremely high sensitivity to hand
capacitance.
Continuing the alignment of the circuit, remove the
temporary ground connection and attach in its place the
test lead from a high -impedance dc voltmeter set to read
THEREMIN 2
As mentioned earlier, some theremin circuits contain
an additional variable -frequency oscillator that can regulate output volume by biasing a volume -control transistor.
Such is the case with the circuit.
Construction
As in the other theremin project, the enclosure must be
metal. Perforated circuit board is a good material for
mounting most of the unit's components. A wire bus can
be used for grounding the positive side of the circuit. Insulating the entire circuit from the chassis is again an
excellent procedure. The circuit does not have its own
amplification, but is suitable for connection to an external
amplifier. One alternative to this would be incorporating
a small commercially available amplifier module into the
circuit, as indicated in the parts list. It can be connected
with the addition of a potentiometer as shown in Fig. 3.
3V full-scale. With the "zero" adjust, bring the meter indicator to the center of the scale. This will allow it to read both
positive and negative voltages.
Bring the theremin output into the audio range for these
tests by adjusting C1 again. The slugs of L3, L4, and L5 should
be screwed down so that they are flush with the collars. To
set the frequency of the volume oscillator, you will have to
call the AM radio into the act again. With the theremin
near the back of the radio-and with the radio tuned to the
center of the band-tune L3 until the same gentle rushing
sound is heard. To prevent radio interference, turn L3 clockwise about four turns.
Set "volume" adjust C11 to half -open. Then tune L5 for the
highest positive value on the voltmeter. Tune L4 so that the
voltage drops to zero and then returns to the original posi-
tive value. L4 and L5 should be adjusted carefully for the
greatest volume effect as the hand approaches the
"volume" antenna. Whistling as the volume is varied may
be cured by changing the setting of L3 slightly.
The function of L7 is to reduce hiss and noise. It will also
tend to affect volume, so some compromise between background noise and volume must be worked out. Disconnect
the meter and adjust for a zero beat with Cl. As can be
easily seen, it is especially important in this project to
have a removable chassis cover for occasional realignment
following the procedure outlined above. A few alignment
run-throughs may be necessary, because there is a slight
interaction and capacity brought into the circuit with the
tools used to tune the coils.
Playing It
This is one of the few instruments in the book for which a
few instructions on playing might be useful, although it
Fig. 3-For a self-contained unit, theremin 2 can incorporate
a fixed amplifier module as shown.
can be learned only through practice and experimentation.
The main requirement is hand dexterity.
The 2 in. of straight, insulated wire shown in the schematic as the r.f. pickup is there for a reason. Just bed it on
the perforated board in as straight a position as possible
close to L1. It acts as a pickup of r.f. energy radiated by
transistors Q3 and Q4. The antenna arrangement may be
the same as for the first theremin project. It is not critical,
Position one hand near the "pitch" antenna at a given
distance-which can be determined by experience for any
particular pitch. The other hand, moving quickly into position near the "volume" antenna and then quickly out, will
produce an individual note. Holding both hands in position
will sustain a note. Holding the "volume" hand steady and
moving the "pitch" hand will produce a sliding tone. Wobbling either hand will produce a vibrato or tremolo effect.§
so some homemade arrangement is quite satisfactory.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
42
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
SPECIFICATIONS
STR-?055
STR-7065
"The overall performance of the Sony STR7055 left nothing to be
desired, and our positive reaction to the re-
"It the tuner section of
the STR-7065 were cat-
egorized as basically
meeting its excellent
ceiver was enhanced by
specification, we'd have
to rate the amplifier as
the smoothness of its
controls, its noncritical
tuning, and its noise -
reached the manufacturer's rated (and very low)
free FM muting system"
one that exceeds its
claims by far...THD
-Reprinted from
Stereo Rev., Nov. 1973
value of 0.2% at an in-
credible 85 watts per
channel. Remember, that
STR-7045
Sony rates the amplifier
at70watts mid -band, per
channel and, even more
"The IM distortion, start-
ing from 0.1 percent at
conservatively, at 60
0.1watt, increased to 0.2
watts/channel for all frequencies from 20 Hz to
20,000 Hz. At all power
percent at 30 watts and
0.5 percent at 40 watts
...IM distortion was less
levels below 60 watts,
than 0.2 percent at all
THD measured well below 0.15%, while IM distortion measured under
0.1% for all power levels
up to 45 watts, rising to
watt's down to a mere 1
milliwatt!"
-Reprinted from
Popular Electronics
watts and remaining at
less than 1.0% even at
"Sony's conservative
power levels from 30
the rated 0.2% at 60
June 1974
power ratings were emphasized by the fact that
65 watts per channel and
higher:'
at the rated 30 watts/
-Reprinted from
the
THD was under 0.1 perchannel (or less),
Audio, Nov. 1973
STR-7055
"The audio amplifiers of
the STR-7055 delivered
51.5 watts per channel
into 8 ohms at the clip-
cent at any frequency
from 20 to 20,000 Hz
2 -Ch., both channels
4 -Ch., all channels
and was typically about
0.02 percent'
-June 1974 issue of
driven @ 8 ohms.
driven @ 8 ohms
Popular Electronics
ping point with both
channels driven':..
"The published ratings
of the STR-7045, good
-Reprinted from
Stereo Rev., Nov. 1973
as they are, do not do
justice to this fine
"Using Sony's rated 35
receiver:"
watts per channel as
-June 1974 issue of
Popular Electronics
a reference full -power
level, harmonic distortion was under 0.1 per
cent from 30 to 20,000
Damping
Hz at full power or less,
Dimenalans (height. width,
rising to the rated 0.2
r K:, 8 ohms)
per cent at 20 Hz. Typically, distortion was less
than 0.05 per cent'
1 kHz
depth)
' Aux. input. 60Hz 17Hz
= 4.1
-Reprinted from
Stereo Rev., Nov. 1973
No matter how good we think we are,
there are people who think we're better.
Understatement is as rare in the
business of componentry as it is in the
business of politics.
Yet respected and responsible audio
publications have seen fit, time and time
again, to point out that Sony has a curious
habit of underrating itself.
Our predilection for this comes from
two things. We tend to be conservative
because we shudder at the exaggerations
that others fling about. And we know that
even though we play ourselves down, our
specs still emerge as deeply impressive.
And certainly, once you actually hear our
underrated components, you will be
deeply impressed.
You see at Sony, we're not only tough
on ourselves while we're making our
equipment. We're also tough on ourselves
after we make it.
01974 Sony Corp. of America. Sony, 9 W. 57 St.. N.Y., N.Y. 10019. SONY is a trademark of Sony Corp.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
SONY
Check No. 48 on Reader Service Card
[KI151
to215)
Anechoic Frequency Response
Richard C. Heyser
THE WORD "anechoic" means free
trom echos and reverberation.
The anechoic frequency response
therefore a
measurement
field measurement in which only
direct sound from the speaker, with
no other room reverberation, is presented. A principal purpose of this test
is
a standardized evaluation of the
loudspeaker's ability to produce a uniform sound pressure at each frequency
in the audio range when driven by a
constant -amplitude, variable -frequency electrical signal. It is a strict
laboratory measurement in the sense
that either a special test facility or
data processing equipment is required to perform the test.
The recommended method of making a free -field measurement is to
place the measuring microphone far
specialized
enough away from the speaker so as to
be in what is called the "far field" for
the wavelength under test. Readings
are then referred back to an equivalent distance of one meter under the
assumption that the sound spreads in
accordance with the inverse square
law, that is, doubling the distance reduces the intensity by 6 dB.
Prior to the introduction of coherent
processing techniques, the only satisfactory means of making such meas-
urements have been either to use
very expensive anechoic chambers,
rooms specially constructed to min-
imize wall reflections, or "roof top"
free -field
measurements.
In
the
latter case, both speaker and microphone are hoisted to a sufficient
height to be well away from sound reflecting objects. The economics of
either method has led to the placement of the microphone much closer
usually 8 ohms. The sound pressure
level (SPL) is plotted in decibels relative to the standard level of 20 micro -
to the speaker than strict far -field con-
delay spectrometry for making loudspeaker spectral measurements. A
ditions would dictate. An additional
benefit of this closeness, from one
standpoint at least, is that the response tends to become smoother.
Consequently, much of the data
accumulated by manufacturers and
contained in their specifications
and advertisements has been obtained very close to the speaker front.
For reasons of reproducibility from
one speaker to the next, the anechoic
measurements performed for the
Audio tests are standardized at an
actual distance of one meter when
practical. The microphone is placed on
the geometric axis of the speaker sys-
tem and spaced one meter from the
front -mounting surface of the forward -pointing speakers for direct radiator systems. When common
sense dictates an alternate microphone position, such as would be necessary
to measure large panels or
horn -loaded systems, a more nearly
far -field position is chosen and all
measurements corrected to one
meter. The electrical drive is maintained constant at that voltage level
which would produce one watt into a
pure resistor specified by the manufacturer as the speaker impedance,
pascals.
Audio uses a fully coherent signal processing technique known as time special class of signal is used which has
a frequency domain representation
closely approximating what is technically known as a rectangular function. The time domain representation of this signal is therefore
technically described as a sine function, known to many as (sin x)/x. A
complete description of this process
may
be
found
in
the
technical
literature.
In
this brief article we will con-
centrate only on the anechoic amplitude response as a function of
frequency. That, after all, is what is
usually called-although improperlythe frequency response of the speaker.
This has been a mainstay of speaker
measurement for nearly 50 years.
The concept is deceptively simple. A
microphone is placed at the desired
position and the speaker is driven by a
sine wave signal. The output of a pressure responsive microphone is then
monitored as a function of frequency.
If one wishes to know particle velocity, rather than pressure, he can use
a
pressure -gradient or similar "ve-
locity" microphone. So long as far -field
(Continued on page 46)
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Put your favorite record
on the large 12" aluminum
platter of the new Sansui 312-2-2
automatic return turntable and voi
will be pleased with the re-slÁts
be pleased with the ease of operation.
A cueing control that lets you place -he
arm at any point on the disc andgo "automatic"
from there. You'll be pleased ..v11-1 the reliability
and rugged construction of the SP -212's belt- driven
full size platter powered by a 4-aole synchronous motor.
You'll be pleased by the sta- ca ly balanced S-shaped arm
and anti -skate features. 'bull be pleased by the solid stability assured by Sansui's muliple point suspension system. You'll be pleased by
Sansui's added features of handsome wood base and hinged dustcover.
And, most of all, you'll be pleased by the reasonable price that goes
with this new Sansui turntaole. Hecr ¡tat your nearest franchised Sansui dealer.
C-teck fsi.o 41 on Reader Service Card
SANSUI ELECTRONICS CORP. ,.,,,00dstcle. New York 11377. Gardena. Catifornta 90217
SANK' ELECTRC, CO LTD biro, japan SANSUI AUDIO EUROPE S A Antwerp. Belgtum
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
conditions prevail, the pressure and
will be
velocity
measurements
similar.
The first shock one gets, if he is not
accustomed to such measurements, is
that severe changes in frequency response can occur with minor changes
in microphone position. More often
than not these changes are due to
acoustic interference between
widely spaced drivers sharing common frequencies. The speaker manu-
facturer who places two tweeters
several feet apart is creating a situation familiar to antenna designers
as a broadside array, with many polar
fingers and sidelobes.
If one is compiling data for advertising copy, he then has several alterna-
tives. He may ignore the response
irregularities and cite what these
drivers are very often able to provide
separately or he may smooth the response data over a sufficiently broad
frequency range to minimize the con-
dition, muttering things .about critical bandwidth. Or he may measure
at a point where interference effects
are not prominent.
In Audio's case we are not compiling copy for advertisements, but are
trying to measure speakers for objective comparison by you, the reader.
That is why we have tried to pick one
common spatial point we can use to
measure all speakers. Our data is
accumulated on a one -fifteenth
spaced drivers which share the same
frequency. The acoustic effect can be
very unrealistic and quite disasterous
to stereo imagery in some cases.
The
speaker
manufacturer who
economized on acoustic damping material behind a wide -range direct radiator speaker can be quickly spotted by a periodic SPL pattern. Sound
from the back of the cone, which radiates almost as well as from the front
of the cone in many cases, travels
through the enclosure to reflect from
the back wall, then continue back to
the cone. Because the speaker cone is
not as efficient a wall as the cab-
performance from the standpoint of
direct sound between the speaker
and yourself. It represents what the
speaker is capable of doing. Because
this type of test has been around for
such a long time, most of the obvious
timbre -related facts that one can
infer from this data are well known.
There are, however, a few less wellknown characteristics
should be aware of.
which
you
For example, any periodicy in the
SPL on a linear frequency basis is a
sign of physical problems. Audio provides a logarithmic frequency plot because this is the way most users want
the data. If you mentally convert the
frequency readings to a linear basis
where 10 kHz is halfway between d.c.
and 20 kHz, then some of the defects
show up as equally spaced patterns.
One such defect is provided by the off -
axis broadside array effect of widely
tacular. This type of speaker can be
quickly sold to a prospective buyer in
an A -B comparison with
a
much
smoother unit by playing brass,
bell, and percussive material. The
smoother unit will sound dull by com-
parison-even if more realistic. The
truth is that a large number of sharply
spaced peaks and dips which change
burner." Beside the SPL indicator, you
can readily spot such a speaker by its
later issue, is a dead giveaway of this
behavior. However, in many cases it
is also quite prominent in the SPL frequency response.
A closely allied effect is the cabinet
which becomes an echo chamber for
sound as records are being played. This
the speaker because of pinchpenny
use of damping material-or design
talent. Again, it shows a periodic SPL
pattern on a linear frequency basis.
There are usually many peripheral
humps and dips in the response which
are superimposed on the periodic
pattern but which a little practice you
Another situation to watch out for
is
the "over -extended woofer." A
This tends to rob some of the top end
The amplitude plot is a touchstone of
higher frequency unit go down as far
as it can. The sonic effect can be spec-
to repeat the process. The energy time plot, which we will describe in a
this in order to be able to cover at least
have speakers thus tested are bent
slightly out of plumb.
go up as high as it wants and the
with listening position contribute to
a sound best described as an "ear
good bottom end occasionally requires
smooth, and some manufacturers who
ting the crossover design book aside
and letting the lower frequency unit
through and the rest is back -scattered
inet, some of this first sound comes
octave basis with straight line interpolation between data points. We do
every musical note throughout the
entire audio spectrum. The result is
that the measurements are seldom
range-sometimes as much as an octave in extent. This is one result of put-
a bit of mass loading of the woofer.
performance of that woofer if
it is
also expected to carry the spectrum
is a speaker that has the most apparent record background noise of ticks,
pops, and scratch when balanced for
the most uniform sound.
Another allied effect to watch for in
the SPL measurement is any unusual
peak in the response more than 3 dB
above the average response in the vicinity of that peak. This is a resonance
as distinct from multiple speaker reinforcement. Two speakers sharing
the same frequency cannot reinforce
to give more intensity than the sum
of the contributions of each, although
they can cancel to a complete null.
This, incidently, is the same for natural sound in a room. Because we are
accustomed to such a sound pattern,
we can accept it as a manifestation of
reverberance. This is one reason for
the observation that dips in response
If for economic reasons the tweeter
objectionable than peaks.
Again, to listen for it, concentrate on
the background noise to see if it is ex-
meet the woofer, then a shallow dip
in response with a number of sharp
aggerated. Who among us hasn't put a
seashell to his ear to hear the "ocean."
We, of course, are coupling ourselves
through the upper middle frequencies.
cannot come down far enough to
dropouts may occur near the crossover
frequency.
A shallow dip may be due to a variety of good acoustical design characteristics, but one way to spot if it is
due to a woofer running out of
steam is to look at the dB -per -octave
slope on each side of the dip. An over-
extended woofer usually dies at
a
shallower slope than the rise in acous-
tic response of a tweeter which is
driven far below what should be its
proper crossover frequency. Because
of the phase behavior of a sharp drop
in SPL of both woofer and tweeter,
they end up cancelling and reinforcing each other in a narrow frequency
range.
If a manufacturer lets two or more
speakers share a common frequency
range, this will inevitably show up
as a number of sharp SPL peaks and
dips over a much broader frequency
are less
to a resonant chamber that emphasizes the background noise which we
are seldom aware of into a recognizable spectral peak. That's exactly what
our "peaky" SPL speaker does and the
sonic effect is the same.
As a final observation, one of the
most ignored components in a loudspeaker system is the physical enclosure. To be sure, most designers
concern themselves with enclosure
volume and internal damping, but the
size and shape of the "box" as well as
where the drivers are placed can adversely change frequency response. A
good many designers would do well to
read some of the fundamental literature on this subject; for example,
Dr. Harry F. Olson's "Direct Radiator
Loudspeaker Enclosures," Audio Engineering, Nov., 1951, and Jour.A.E.S.,
Jan.,1969.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
46
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The loudspeaker that has achieved international distinction
as the most highly reviewed speaker, regardless of size or price,
is now available in a new, exciting continental styling option.
For inforrmatian, write: BOSE, Dept.,
Fram nch.am. Massachusetts 01701.
AC,
The Mountain,
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
As an example, the sound pressure
wave from a speaker can be visualized as an expanding "bubble"
which starts from the speaker cone
and grows larger in a spherical fashion. When the speaker is mounted on
the front surface of an enclosure, this
bubble approximates an expanding
hemisphere. When an acoustic discontinuity is encountered, a new
sound wave is launched from the discontinuity. Obviously the edge of the
cabinet is a major contributor, as are
molding trim and recessed speaker well construction. The result of all this
that a speaker which has a very
is
smooth response when mounted on a
large baffle, as is common in anechoic
chamber tests, can have a terrible
looking response when mounted in a
smaller enclosure. Thus, some of the
disparity between measured loud-
speaker performance provided by
Audio and the advertised performance
of a loudspeaker system may be due
to these effects.
Audio measures the 4n anechoic
response, that is there is nothing
around the speaker in the measurement. A speaker mounted against a
large wall is radiating into a 2,r or
hemispherical environment. An expanding sound wave doesn't know
how big the front edge of the en-
closure is until it reaches the edge.
Until the edge is reached, the enclosure-insofar as the sound wave
is concerned-looks like a large, flat
wall. If the sound wave has a high
Wolver in cheap» clothing.
enough frequency that at any instant
there is a large pressure change
between the sound just starting out
from the cone and the sound which
has reached the edge of the enclosure,
then the enclosure looks large
enough to act as a wall. We say then
that the front of the enclosure itself
acts as a 2 n half -plane boundary for
higher frequencies. For low fre-
Design charlatans around the world have found a lucrative business
in selling spurious replacement styli. And because Shure phono
cartridges are asked for by more knowledgeable hi-fi enthusiasts
than any other cartridges, our styli seem to be imitated more than
any others. Now, flattery notwithstanding, Shure design engineers
see red when they see these impostors, because they know that
the performance of your Shure cartridge absolutely depends upon the
genuine Shure stylus assembly - so
to protect your investment and to insure the original performance of your
quencies, where there is very little
pressure change across the front of
the enclosure, the enclosure might as
well not be there. Because of this,
the high frequencies will be slightly
stronger than the lower frequencies
directly in front of the enclosure
when measured in an anechoic environment. That is one reason the
bass will come up when you properly
place the speaker against
a
wall.
Shure cartridge, insist on the real
That is also why some speakers with
the stylus grip (as shown in the photo,
sponse may sound heavy in the mid bass when you listen to them.
The anechoic frequency response is
thing: Look for the name SHURE on
left) and the words, "This Stereo
stylus is precision manufactured by Shure Brothers Inc." on the
Dynetic
box.
Shure Brothers Inc.
222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, III. 60204
!
SI--IVRE
In Canada: A. C. Simmonds & Sons Limited
Check No. 47 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
an apparently "flat" frequency re-
often improperly maligned by those
who fail to take even these simple
observations into account. The fact is
that the anechoic response reveals a
wealth of information when you
know what to look for.
48
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
F.:;.YL' `
.ti
THE AGONY OF
BUYING A MIRACORD.
First, the good news. We're proud to announce the
arrival of a brand new automatic turntable. The
Miracord 820 by name.
Next, the not -so -good news. You shouldn't expect
to find one in just any old store.
Your feet may hurt, your eyes may burn, and your
head may throb, but you'll congratulate yourself for
being so intelligent for wanting one. And so persistent for locating one.
You see, we're very particular about the way we
build our new Miracord 820. And just as particular
about where we sell it.
But once you experience the pleasure of playing
your favorite record on a Miracord turntable, you'll
know it was worth the slight inconvenience.
The reason is that the 820 operates simply and
beautifully.
Setting the turntable speed for 33-1/3 or 45 rpm
automatically programs the tonearm for the proper
record size. A touch of the button lifts and positions
the tonearm, gently and automatically setting the
stylus in place.
The features in the 820 are the kind you'd expect
to find in turntables costing much, much more.
You get things like our asynchronous motor. Lighttouch push button start and stop. Variable pitch
control - up to 5% range - with built-in stroboscope
ring for `perfect pitch'. Calibrated anti -skate for both
elliptical and conical styli. Cueing that is viscous damped both up and down. Tracking as low as one
gram. Plus our exclusive Magic Wand spindle that
holds up to 10 records. And another spindle for playing a single record.
The 820 is the newest member of the Miracord
family of automatic turntables. If you'd like the full
story on our full line, just drop a line to: Miracord
Products, Benjamin Electronic Sound Co., 40 Smith
Street, Farmingdale, New York 11735.
Yes, searching for a Miracord can be a bit of an
agony.
But finding one is pure ecstasy.
Check No. 14 on Reader Service Card
THE MIRACORD 820.
Damn hard to find. Damn hard to beat.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Equipment Profiles
Technics by Panasonic SA -8000X
is none of the advanced "logic" circuitry now finding its
way into some separate matrix decoders and a few all -
4-Channel/2-Channel Receiver
in -one receivers.
The upper dial area of the receiver contains the usual
scales, a signal -strength meter, four
illuminated VU level meters, and a variety of individually
illuminated function and mode indicators, including the
AM and FM dial
usual FM stereo light and a "Radar" light which illuminates
when a CD -4 record is played. Along the black center -line of
the panel are the power switch, a meter -sensitivity push
button (which increases meter sensitivity by 10 dB,
making them useful at any listening level), a pair of tape
monitor push buttons, and four miniature knurled gold
knobs used to adjust the CD -4 demodulator circuitry when
first installing a new CD -4 cartridge. Since these adjustments need to be performed only during setup, we would
have preferred to see them located on the rear panel which
might discourage their unauthorized rotation by inquisitive small hands and fingers.
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
The lower, gold section of the panel contains head-
FM Tuner Section:
Sensitivity (IHF): 1.9 µ V. S/N: 65 dB. Selectivity: 65 dB.
THD: Mono, 0.3%; Stereo, 0.4%. Capture Ratio: 1.8 dB.
Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 13 kHz ±1 dB. Image Rejection: 55 dB. I.F. Rejection: 60 dB. Spurious Rejection: 60 dB.
AM Suppression: 50 dB. Stereo FM Separation: 1 kHz, 40 dB.
AM Tuner Section:
Sensitivity: 20µV (external antenna). Selectivity: 25 dB.
Image Rejection: 40 dB. I.F. Rejection: 40 dB.
Amplifier Section:
phone jacks for stereo or quadraphonic phones, bass and
treble controls (operative for all channels at once), 4 indi-
vidual -channel level controls flanking a master volume
control, a pair of slide controls which alter matrix decode
parameters, a mode switch (with positions for mono,
stereo, a pair of matrix phase settings, and a discrete
setting), the program selector knob, and a good sized tuning
knob coupled to an effective and smooth flywheel and
tuning dial assembly. A phone jack adjacent to the tuning
knob accepts a low to medium impedance microphone.
This last feature is virtually worthless, since the micro0.5%. Rated IM: 0.7%. Power Bandwidth: 5 Hz to 40 kHz. phone cannot be used in a "mix" with any other program
Frequency Response: 10 Hz to 50 kHz,+0, -3 dB. Input Sensi- source nor are there provisions for a stereo pair of mics.
tivity: Phono, 1.5 mV; Aux, 150 mV; Mic, 2 mV. Damping Anyone desiring a mono P.A. system would not look to an
Factor: [email protected] ohms. Residual Hum and Noise: Phono (IHF elaborate 4 -channel receiver such as the SA -8000X in the
Continuous Power Output: 13 W x 4 or 36 W x 2, 8 ohms, 20 Hz
to 20 kHz, (16 W and 42 W respectively at 1 kHz). Rated THD:
"A"), 70 dB; Aux, 90 dB. Tone Control Range: Bass, ±13 dB
159 Hz; Treble, ±10 dB @10 kHz.
General Specifications:
Maximum Power Consumption: 200 watts at 120 V, 60 Hz.
Dimensions: 191/2 in. W x 63/8 in. H x 153/4 in. D. Weight: 29
lbs., 6 oz. Price: $549.95.
There are two ways of looking at a 4-channel/2-channel
receiver such as the Technics SA -8000X. One can view it
first place!
The rear panel layout shown in Fig. 1 includes the usual
input, tape in and tape out phono tip jacks (provision is
made for two 4 -channel tape decks), 75 -ohm, 300 -ohm
FM and external AM antenna terminals, switched and
unswitched convenience a.c. receptacles, and a ground-
ing terminal. Arrangements specifically related to the
4 -channel functions of the unit include a three -position
slide switch used to calibrate those front -panel separation
and carrier adjust controls associated with CD -4 record
light of more conventional stereo all -in -ones in the same playing, and a 3 -position cartridge selector which permits
price class. Alternatively, one can judge it as a full-fledged the use of some of the new semi -conductor cartridges
quadraphonic receiver having relatively low power output by supplying polarizing voltage for these devices right at the
per channel but equipped with just about every 4 -channel phono jacks. A third position on this switch is intended for
control and decoding facility one might possibly want in use with conventional magnetic cartridges, whether
this era of multiple system quad. Either way, this entry they be stereo or CD -4 types. The speaker terminals are
from Technics comes out ahead on nearly every count. somewhat confusingly labelled (for that matter, the
Since Panasonic chose to support the CD -4 disc quite early in user would be well advised to read the entire instruction
the short history of 4 -channel sound, it is no surprise to find manual before starting to hook up this receiver, as with any
the receiver fully equipped with the demodulator circuitry new piece of gear, and to re -read the hook-up steps as they
necessary for playing these "discrete" discs. Matrix discs are performed), in that a stereo speaker arrangement
can be played through the system as well and, though there must be hooked up differently from a 4 -speaker quadra-
as a fairly powerful stereo receiver and judge it in the
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
50
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
rope
Fig. 1-Rear panel layout of Technics SA -8000X
phonic array. In one case, all the red terminals are used,
while in the other case red and black pairs are used for each
of the four speaker systems. Besides this reconnection requirement (when converting from 2 -speaker to 4 -speaker
use), an adjacent switch must be thrown from 2-ch to 4-ch
(or the other way) in order to alter internal circuitry to
what
Technics calls
"BTL" (Balanced
Fig. 2-Interior of SA -8000X
Transformerless)
operation and what we, here, generally term "strapping"
or "bridging."
A 4 -channel FM detector output jack is also provided on
o
the rear panel (for the discrete 4 -channel FM broadcast
mv
system still to be selected by the FCC some day), and there
is a multi -pin socket intended for a "joystick" remote control 4 -channel balancing accessory which was not tested..
1-
Four speaker line fuses complete the rear panel layout. It
should be noted that when using the receiver in the stereo
mode, speaker impedance is restricted to 8- or 16 -ohms,
while in quadraphonic applications, speakers may have
impedances of from 4 to 16 ohms.
w
10
j 40
and band-pass characteristics are largely determined by
three dual -element ceramic filters which
require no
alignment. Most of the functions of the stereo FM decoding circuit are performed by a single monolithic IC
which incorporates two differential switching circuits.
The phono equalizer preamp section
is
a two -stage
direct -coupled circuit which uses a combination of low noise PNP and NPN transistors. Tone controls are of the
negative feedback type. The power amplifier section
features a differential amplifier input and direct -coupled
circuitry right up to the speaker output connection points.
In the two -channel mode, amplifier sections are paralleled using the now accepted "strapping" technique which
places "chassis ground" effectively at the mid -points of the
speaker loads. "Common ground" speaker connections are
therefore not possible-a condition that is true with most
4-channel/2-channel receivers of recent vintage. The AM
section of the receiver, unlike most, also utilizes a frequency -linear, variable capacitor which results in even
spacing of the dial calibration from low end to high end
and makes station selection somewhat easier. A ceramic
filter is used in the AM i.f. section.
FM Measurements
Results of test measurements of the FM section of the
SA -8000X are shown, in part, in Fig. 3. Although IHF sensi-
tivity was higher than claimed (2.5 µV), 50 dB of quieting
was reached with a signal input of only 4.9 microvolts.
Ultimate quieting in mono reached a maximum of 70 dB
at all signal levels above 100 NV-considerably better than
MONO THO = O.
1
iiÍÍf-_
Q -70
¢
/.
~41
50
> -60
J
10 °
3Z
STEREO THD = 0 335E
30
3o
I
i
w
s
STEREO S/N =60 dB
BO
MONO S/N = 70 dB
11111111
An internal view of the chassis of the SA -8000X is pictured
in Fig. 2. The FM front-end uses a 4 -pole MOS-FET for an r.f.
amplifier, and tuning is accomplished by means of a
frequency -linear variable capacitor. The i.f. section has
five stages, including three differential amplifier stages
30
20
0.1
10
10
100
1
IK
10K
INPUT - MICROVOLTS ACROSS 300 OHMS
Fig. 3-FM quieting and distortion characteristics.
the 65 dB claimed by the manufacturer. Switchover to
stereo occurred at about 8 microvolts, at which signal level
noise was already down over 30 dB. Ultimate quieting in
stereo reached 60 dB, a very respectable figure considering
the fact that residual products then observed consisted of
38 kHz carrier leak -through rather than random noise.
Technics claims carrier rejection of only 50 dB. THD in
mono decreased to 0.24% for any signal level above 50 µV,
at 1 kHz. In stereo, THD decreased to 0.33% with a 1 kHz
signal for all input signal levels above 200 µV-again, considerably better than claimed. As shown' in Fíg. 4, THD
tends to rise at the high frequency end of the audio spectrum, reaching just under 1.0% at 10 kHz in mono, and
slightly more than 2.0% in stereo at the same extreme
frequency. In the case of the stereo THD readings at high
frequencies, the meter is responding, in part, to low-level
"beats" caused by the interaction of the high audio frequency and the residual 19 kHz and 38 kHz carrier products.
AM supression measured exactly 50 dB as claimed, and
capture ratio exceeded claims with measured readings of
1.3 dB for 100 µV signal levels. Selectivity measured 67 dB,
a bit better than claimed.
Stereo FM separation at mid frequencies, also plotted
in Fig. 4, measured 42 dB, decreasing to 26 dB at 10 kHz. At
the low end, separation remained at 40 dB or better for all
frequencies down to 50 Hz.
Amplifier Measurements
THD versus power for a 1 kHz input signal is plotted for
(Continued on page 56)
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
51
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
It takes more
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Bell & Howell Schools introduces three
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Experience is the best teacher, without a doubt.
And when it comes to learning electronics, we feel it's
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Of course, with all our learn -at-home programs
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Lab Starter Kit gives you hands-on experience
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We get you started with the basics in an exciting
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You build your own Electro -Lab " electronics
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What better or more exciting way
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As you put the set together, you'll discover
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trouble -shoot it and much more. Upon completion
of the program you'll have gained the specialized
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principles that you can apply to repair a variety of
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II. Use processional communications equipment as
you delve into Communication Electronics .
Here's how to pick up skills in the vital field
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Schools Communication Electronics Program can
help prepare you for the FCC licensing exam, right
through to 1st class radiotelephone operator. And
teach you skills in two-way radio, radar or commercial
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For a refundable deposit, you get to use the
special two-way radio equipment lab
featuring an FM transceiver,
frequency meter, and
modulation meter. All
regular, first-rate commercial
grade test equipment.
"Electro -Lab" is a registered trademark of the Bell &
Howell Company.
Simulated TV Picture/Test Pattern
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
than books to
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Digital technology is setting new standards
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And now you can learn
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You study at home in your spare time...
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Because these are
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You study at your conveniencewithout being a classroom
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Decide which exciting program
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1. Power Output Meter 2. Design Console 3. Modulation
Meter 4. Digital Multimeter 5. Triggered
Sweep Oscilloscope 6. Lab Starter Kit
Multimeter 7. Frequency Meter 8. FM
Transceiver 9. 25" Diagonal Color
TV 10. Alignment Generator
11. Lesson Tape Player
12. Digital Trainer
724
as been removed, please write to:
An Electronics Home Study School
OeVRY InSTITUTE OF TECHnOLOGV
BELLE HOWELL SCHOOLS
Check No. 13 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
L.,OUTPUT, ' L ' SIGNAL
(Continued from page 51)
both 4 -channel and 2 -channel strapped operation in Fig. 5.
In both modes, mid -band power output capability was in
..
1
excess of manufacturer's claims, reaching 18 watts per
channel and 48 watts per channel respectively, for rated
3.0
1
1
STEREO THD
R'OUTPUT, "L' SIGNAL
2.5
2.0
0
1.5
1
/ y MONO THD
11
IK
100
10
17-
1.0 Ñ
0.5 0
0
10K
FREQUENCY- Hz
THD of 0.5%. IM distortion, shown for the 4 -channel mode
only, tended to rise almost linearly for power levels
above 5 watts per channel, but remained below rated
value of 0.7% right up to rated output which is 13 watts
under these conditions. The 13 watt per channel nominal
output was used to measure distortion versus frequency
which is plotted in Fig. 6. Under these conditions, the receiver delivers full power from 20 Hz to 20 kHz at less than
rated distortion (0.5%).
Power bandwidth, graphed in Fig. 7, extends from 3 Hz
to 50 kHz, substantially better than claimed. The measure-
Fig. 4-Separation and distortion. vs. frequency.
0.9
0.7
/
0.6
I
Z
0 0.5
ó 0.4
p
/
0.3
i
0.2
_
0.1
0
L0
o.l
8 OHM LOADS
INPUT: I kHz
/
48
18w,
IM
4C
THD
lower.
Tone control and loudness compensation for a -30 dB
volume control setting are shown in Fig. 8. Both conform
W
("STRAPPED")
r
1
..../
ll
ALL CHANNELS DRIVEN
16 W
/r
0.8
closely to manufacturers specifications. There are no
THD
1000
l00
10
ments were based upon a rated output of 16 watts per
channel. If 13 watts were used as a 0 dB reference, the
power bandwidth would have extended even higher and
POWER OUTPUT/ CHANNEL- WATTS
Fig. 5-THD and IM distortion characteristics.
13 WATTS, 8 OHM LOADS
4 CHANNELS DRIVEN
high frequency or low frequency filters in the receiver.
Our tests of CD -4 demodulator performance are necessarily based upon measurements using test records and
CD -4 cartridges since, to date, no one has come up with
a suitable piece of test equipment which can provide the
complex signals equivalent to those recorded in the groove
of a CD -4 record. Of late, we have been using a new individually calibrated MMC-6000 cartridge manufactured by
Bang & Olufsen of Denmark. It is the best CD -4 cartridge
we have tested to date and one of the few that can properly
track Quadradiscs at tracking forces of 1 gram or less. Using
this cartridge, the .CD -4 circuitry of the SA -8000X yielded
separation of better than 22 dB from front to back, on both
sides, and better than 28 dB from side to side, both front and
back. Adjustment of the ideal demodulation parameters
is accomplished in a matter of seconds, thanks to the four
front panel meters on the unit, which are much easier
to use in this procedure than simply listening to the test
3.0
2.5
record and adjusting everything by ear, as the record's narration suggests. Carrier sensitivity of the demodulator
2.0
circuitry was more than adequate for this, as well as for
15
1.0
0.5
010
IK
100
IOK
IOOK
several other CD -4 cartridges that we tested in the course
of our evaluations.
FM performance of the receiver was good, with muting
threshold sensibly adjusted for about 5 microvolts. Using
the muting feature indirectly guarantees that any station
received will be heard with a quieting of at least 50 dB-
FREQUENCY- Hz
just about enough for serious listening. Of course, the mute
Fig. 6-Distortion vs. frequency.
can be defeated if you want those few extra "noisy"
ALL CHANNELS DRIVEN
8 OHM LOADS
TREBLE
BASS
0 dB =16 WATTS /CHANNEL
RATED THD= 0.5 %
r
LOUDNESS
7.-50 Hz
3Hz
10
100
IK
10K
IOOK
10
100
IK
10K
FREQUENCY - Hz
FREQUENCY- Hz
Fig. 8-Tone-control range and loudness characteristics.
Fig. 7-Power bandwidth characteristics.
characteristics.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
56
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
SEASON'S GREETINGS
MEILLEURS VOEUX
C HOBbIM 1O1OM
t3
SEASONS
GREETINGS
C
THE SEQUERRA COMPANY, INC.
WOODSIDE, N.Y. 11377
MANUFACTURERS OF THE SEDUERRA MODEL 1 FM TUNER
FELICES FIESTAS
SEASON'S GREETINGS
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
wj
57
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
from distant stations. The somewhat lower
values of image and spurious rejection (compared to highpriced stereo receivers) did not in any way interfere with
signals
that they can be duplicated when you add the extra pair
our dial twirling and listening. The excellent capture
listening tests. The dual slide control which Technics
for full 4 -channel sound.
Matrix performance was also judged by a series of
ratio of the receiver did much to off -set the "average" AM calls AFD does, indeed, vary the spatial sound field and a
suppression capability as far as multipath interference in variety of 4 -channel effects can be created from both
stereo and intentionally encoded 4 -channel matrix discs.
stereo listening was concerned.
AM performance was adequate, but not outstanding-
The Phase Matrix 2 position on the AFD slide controls comes
typical of most present day medium and even higher
priced integrated stereo and 4 -channel receivers. The
major design priorities of this set are obviously in the
closest to properly decoding SQ encoded records and additional variation in sound placement and localization
is achieved by selecting either the "0 phase" or "90° phase"
4 -channel area.
The wide -band power response of the SA -8000X helps to
positions on the mode switch, but all these variations
did not provide the degree of apparent separation that
offset the fairly low audio power output obtainable in the
4 -channel mode. With four reasonably efficient speakers
in a good sized room, we had no trouble raising volume
levels to fairly loud sound pressures. In the two -channel
"strapped" mode, there's enough power for even the low
efficiency systems some listeners prefer, but if you plan
to purchase this set with 4 -channel as your ultimate
objective (even if you start out in stereo) it might be a
either CD -4 records or matrix records played back through
full -logic decoders can. In a musical context, however, this
good idea to audition the set in the four -channel mode and
may not be all that important a consideration for the
prospective listener who is not likely to walk around from
speaker to speaker judging 4 -channel crosstalk.
Technics by Panasonic introduced this model about a
year ago and, based upon its features and overall performance, we would guess that the SA -8000X will continue to
be a popular best-seller amongst that company's group of
choose a pair of speakers that provide enough sound so 4 -channel audio products.
Leonard Feldman
Check No. 60 on Reader Service Card
The automatic program finder involves another tape
head which contacts the tape during fast spooling and
feeds its output to a five -transistor amplifier which sim-
Sharp Stereo Cassette Deck, Model RT-48OU
ilarly inhibits the SCR as long as there is modulation on the
tape. When a pause between selections comes along, the
inhibiting voltage ceases and the solenoid trips the stop
mechanism. Thus, if you are playing a tape with a number
of selections on it and you wart to listen to the last one
only, you simply wind forward in the fast -forward mode
until you reach the pause just ahead of the desired selection. (Of course, it will stop at all the other pauses in the
tape.) Or, in rewinding, you want to repeat a selectionplay it through, press the STOP button, then rewind. When
you reach the pause ahead of the selection, the machine
stops automatically, and then you can repeat the desired
selection by depressing the PLAY key.
Operation is controlled by six "piano keys"-the usual
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
Type: A.c.-operated, solid-state, stereo cassette recorder,
with Dolby "B" -type noise -reduction system and full automatic stop system. Wow and Flutter: 0.15% wrms. Fast
Forward and Rewind Times: 75 sec. (C-60). Frequency
Response: 45-15,000 Hz with Cr02 tape; 45-11,000 Hz with
normal tape. Channel Separation: 34 dB. Dimensions:
17-7/16 in W x 10-1/4 in. D x 4-11/16 in. H. WEIGHT: 13.2
lbs. Price: $249.95
RECORD, REWIND, FAST FORWARD, PLAY, STOP, and,
separated by a narrow divider, PAUSE. The cassette holder
lid is actuated by sliding knob, which may not be moved if
any of the keys are depressed.
To the right of the cassette compartment are two level
meters, separated by a panel containing the DOLBY and
RECORD indicator lights. Directly below are two pairs of
slide controls for record and playback levels, and below
them is a brushed aluminum panel containing the power
switch at the extreme right, and two toggle -type switches
for Dolby on/off and for tape type-the latter a three The Sharp RT-480U cassette recorder is a neat and attrac-
position unit labeled CrO2, LOW NOISE, and NORMAL. This
tive unit which incorporates some interesting and useful
features, one of the most helpful being the automatic program finder. This device works with the automatic -stop
switch affects only the equalization in the record mode,
and does not vary the bias current. To the left of the piano
keys are two miniature phone jacks for microphone input,
cutting off the high-level inputs when jacks are inserted.
circuitry to permit the user to locate separate selections on
the cassette by stopping tape motion at points where there
is no modulation on the tape during rewind or fast -forward
operations. The stopping circuitry for end of tape involves
a magnetically -toothed wheel which rotates adjacent to a
reed relay, and while the wheel (which turns with the
takeup spindle) rotates, it provides a signal from the reed
relay to the gate of the SCR (they call it thyristor) which
inhibits current in its anode circuit so the stopping solenoid
does not operate. When the "toothed" wheel stops, the gate
of the SCR is no longer inhibited, and the SCR fires, tripping the solenoid and stopping the tape motion.
To their left is a stereo headphone jack.
Above the jacks is a three -digit counter with the conventional reset button, and above that the nameplate, on
which is mounted the on/off switch for the automatic pro-
gram finder. In all, a neat and functional control panel,
with a smoked plastic dust cover over the controls when
the unit is not in use.
Circuit Description
Considering the playback circuit first, the output of the
record/play head is fed to an IC with suitable tape -head
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
58
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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Features: Six electrostatic elements,
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ZIP
Fig. 1-Top view of the Sharp RT-480U. Note that the
power transformer, located at upper right, is well removed
from the heads to help ensure minimum hum.
Fig. 2-Underside view of chassis. Larger circuit board incorporates switching between record and playback, with
slide switches moving along contacts on opposite side of
board. Smaller board contains two Dolby circuits, and is
connected to main board by plug and cable assemblies.
The automatic stop and automatic program -finder circuits
are on smaller circuit board underneath and to the right
of the main board.
i
selector switch. Curves are reproduced for the response with
CrO2 tape, and the switch in the CrO2 position, with dotted
curves showing the response with TDK SD tape and the selector in the same position. Curves with the Dolby circuitry
1
in use and not in use were identical (±1 dB) so it would
appear that the Dolby circuit was working perfectly, regard20
100
1000
less of the volume level at which the recording was made.
10000 20K
Fast forward and rewind times for a C-60 cassette were
FREQUENCY - Hz
Fig. 3-Response curves of record/playback from line in to
line out. Solid curve represents CrO2 tape, with tape switch
in CrO2 position. Dashed line represents response with
TDK SD tape, switch in CrO2 position.
equalization, thence to the Dolby circuit board, returning to
the playback volume control and amplified by a single transistor before being fed to the output jack.
In the record mode, the high-level input signal is fed to the
record -level control, then to the Dolby circuit board, and back
to the single transistor equalized for the various tape types,
and thence to the recording head through a bias trap, with
bias of 84 kHz being fed to the head simultaneously. The
bias oscillator is a pair of transistors to provide a push-pull
output, with variable resistors providing for bias adjustment
separately for the two channels. The power supply provides
full -wave rectification to the voltage -regulating transistor
with an output of 23 volts. The automatic -stop and automatic -program -finder circuits were described previously.
Two more transistors in each channel provide sufficient
gain to drive the level -indicating meters and furnish power
for the headphones, using a transformer for impedance mat-
ching to the phones. Both meter and headphone circuits
operate during playback as well as recording.
Performance
The RT-480U came up to its specifications in nearly every
particular, if we assume that the bias was adjusted for CrO2
tape, since frequency response extended out to 16,000 Hz
with this type of tape, and with the tape selector switch in
the CrO2 position. With any other tape, the response fell off
rapidly, being down 10 dB at 10,000 Hz with respect to the
1000 -Hz level, and regardless of the position of the tape
measured at 72 seconds, well within
input signal required for a "0" level indicated on the meters
was 50 mV in the high-level inputs, 0.3 mV at the microphone jack, and both contributed an output level of 0.32 V
at the playback jack. At the same time, a signal of 70 mV
was available at the phone jack. Signal-to-noise ratio measured 53 dB with the Dolby circuit in operation, and 55 dB
without, all very credible.
As received by us for testing, the machine would be considered quite satisfactory when used with CrO2 tape. If other
tapes were to be used, it would seem likely that bias should
be decreased, an operation not readily performed by the user.
Wow and flutter measured 0.14 percent, mostly contributed
as flutter, since wow alone measured 0.1 percent-very good
for cassette recorders.
The accompanying instruction book is remarkably complete,
containing information concerning recording from stereo systems, from microphones (two of which are furnished), for recording with a microphone on one channel and music from
radio or records on the other, and for recording of Dolbyized
FM broadcasts, which because of the reference signals used
with such broadcasting, must be done in a specified manner
to obtain best results. And last, but not least (in our opinion),
service information accompanied the unit we received. While
it is not likely that the average user would use this information, it is also not terribly likely that the average hi-fi or recorder service facility would have the information on file. It
is, of course, always desirable to be able to give the serviceman a schematic to aid in correcting any possible problems
with the unit. If the machine were returned to an authorized
service station, the information would naturally be at hand,
but that is not always possible or convenient, so the nearest
serviceman might be called, and then the information would
C. G. McProud
be invaluable.
Check No. 61 on Reader Service Card
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
60
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
1
As a British company
we'd like to explain our
810 ox automatic turntable
in plain English.
How the 810 QX
reproduces recorded music
How the 810 QX
protects records and
accurately.
cartridge stylus assembly.
Tone arm descent is
viscous -damped in
automatic operation
and also when using
the manual cue and
The BSR 8100X
has a sophisticated
synchronous motor, spinning a heavy
7 -lb. platter for
accurate speed
(regardless of
voltage supply or
record load) and all -but -nonexistent
wow and flutter. Anti -skating force
may be adjusted for
optimum pressure with
either conical or
elliptical styli, so stylus
sits perfectly centered
in groove for precise stereo
separation
without audible
distortion or
uneven groove
wear. A strobe
disc is integrated into the platter
design and a variable speed control is
s
411
provided should you want to vary
from, and later return to, the normal
speeds. The tone arm will track as
low as 0.25 grams to make use of
finest light -weight, high -compliance
cartridges for maximum fidelity and
How the 810 QX
pause control, for gentle contact
with record surface. Platter rubber
mat protects records
during play and cushions
discs during automatic
drop. Automatic spindle
uses umbrella -type suspension,
entry groove range. Tracking pressure
adjustable down to
0.25 grams for
newest lightweight
cartridges for
minimum record
wear..Stylus brush whisks dust of f
stylus between
plays. Lock
automatically secures
damage to stylus
from accidental
movement. Stylus
wear meter records accumulated
stylus use in hours. Knowing
After touching a single
ather-
,,
weight button, the 8100X can
either play a stack of
records, shutting off
after the last one,
play a single record
and shut off, or play
a single record, and
754.-4
repeat it indefinitely until you stop it
Manual operation
uses a single button
10
without outboard balance arm.
Stub spindle rotates with record to
prevent distortion of center hole.
Stylus setdown adjustment prevents
stylus damage if dropped outside of
tone arm to prevent
provides convenient operation
in any desired mode.
to start the motor,
and the cue control to lower the
stylus
How the 810 OX operates
quietly, emitting no sound
that can intrude on the music.
The 8100X uses a unique sequential
cam drive mechanism. It is a rigid
.-------= J
precision assembly that replaces the
plumber's nightmare of rotating
eccentric plates and interlocking gears
that other changers use. Unlike other
changers, there are no light metal
stampings that can go out of aligment
and make a lot of noise, from being
carried, bumped, or just from use.
For literature write to BSR (USA) Ltd.,
Blauvelt, N.Y. 10913.
dynamic range.
when to replace a
worn stylus
protects your
records.
Check No. 12 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
McDONALD
"The world's most powerful sound system is installed at the Ontario Motor Speedway, California."
Guinness Book of World Records, 1974 Edition.
Gentlemen, start your ears.
30,800 watts of pure power through
355 precision speaker assemblies.
Enough sound energy to spread the
word cleanly, clearly and truthfully
to more than 230,000 screaming fans.
Year after year. All above the ear -rending
din of 50 roaring race cars.
It took more than ordinary experience
to design and produce that spectacular
sound system. It took the kind of
knowledge and craftsmanship only
37 years of building high quality sound
systems can teach.
It took Altec.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The same Altec you'll hear in our
super -line of high fidelity loudspeaker
systems. The same experience. The
same knowledge. The same craftsmanship. The only differences are that
we've dressed them up for your use.
Some are small. Some large. Some are
powerful. Some are very powerful.
And they're all made to satisfy the
ears of just one very important listener.
You.
Before you buy your next speaker
system, stop by your local dealer and
listen to Altec. Championship performance for more than three decades.
°copyright 1974 Altec Corporation
1515 S. Manchester Ave., Anaheim, Calif. 92803
Check No.3 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
ALTnC
.44e -wound of expeive.~.
mostly due to the massive power transformer. Appearance
of the new "A" model's front panel is virtually unchanged
from the older unit, with the two large knobs controlling the
input to each channel on each side and the illuminated
heavy-duty ON/OFF switch right at the center. At the rear
Crown DC -300A Power Amplifier
are the large terminals for the loudspeaker connections and
a line fuse. Because of the efficiency of the protection circuits, no speaker fuses are provided.
Circuit Details
The input op amps are fed from a voltage -regulated power
supply, and elaborate compensation circuits prevent any
drift. There are two variable resistors used for the input and
output offset controls, and these are of course adjusted at the
factory. Output is taken straight to the base of the next transistor, and coupling is direct from input right through to the
loudspeaker terminals. The output stage is a semi -comple-
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
Power Output:150 watts per channel, minimum rms at
8 ohms from d.c. to 20 kHz with no more than 0.05 percent
total harmonic distortion and no more than 0.05 percent intermodulation distortion.
Damping Factor: Greater than 200 up to 1 kHz. Hum
and Noise: 110 dB below 150 watts. Input Sensitivity: 1.75
volts for 150 watts into 8 ohms. Input Impedance: Nominal
100 kilohms, 10 kilohms at full gain. Dimensions: 19 in. W
(standard rack) x 7 in. H x 93/4 in. D. Weight: 45 lbs. Price:
$729.00.
The Crown DC -300 was not by any means the first low -dis-
tortion, high -power, solid state amplifier around, but it soon
proved itself to be one of the most reliable. The latest
version, Model DC -300A, was released several months ago,
and in this instance, the "A" does not denote a minor
modification or just a change in cosmetics but rather a
nearly complete redesign. For instance, the older model
used four power transistors per channel but the new model
has no less than eight. And these are 150 -watt homotaxial
devices, so there is a dissipation of 2,400 watts available. The
input stage now uses an op amp, and the protection circuits
have been designed to allow full transient power without
premature clipping. Because of the number of parallel output
transistors, the maximum output is delivered at about 2.5
ohms, and even lower load values can be used without
trouble. Distortion of the earlier DC -300 was extremely lowless than 0.05 percent up to 180 watts-but even this has been
reduced, drastically reduced as we shall see later.
The black and silver anodized front panel measures 7 x 19
in., allowing the unit to be mounted on a standard rack if so
desired. Total weight has been increased from 40 to 45 lbs.,
Fig. 1-Back panel, DC -300A.
mentary arrangement using an AB -B circuit with no bias
current in the output transistors. The bias is applied to the
driver transistors, and there is full thermal compensation.
Protection against short circuits and very low impedance
loads is provided by a complex circuit that Crown calls
"SPACE" for Signal Programmed Automatic Current Executor-an acronym which must have given someone an awful
lot of trouble! Briefly, SPACE works by functioning as a
signal -controlled current limiter at audio frequencies and
a power limiter at subsonics. The parameters of the variable current limiter are such that it does not generate
"flyback pulses" with inductive loads, so the overload
characteristic is smooth without those unpleasant rasping
effects inherent in most circuits using fixed limiting. Further protection is provided by a thermal switch mounted
on each heat sink. A bridge rectifier supplies d.c. voltage
of ±60.
Measurements
Figure 3 shows the power output versus distortion, both
THD and IM (SMPTE), at 4 ohms, while Fig. 4 shows the per-
formance at 8 ohms. Both channels were driven in each
It will be seen that distortion is down close to the
limits of the test gear-even at rated outputs-and for some
of the tests special equipment had to be made! Nearly 200
watts was obtained at 8 ohms, while 4 ohm output was
340 watts. Figure 5 shows the distortion versus frequency
at 180 watts with 8 ohm loads. Power bandwidth extended
case.
from d.c. to about 50 kHz, and the -3 dB point for frequency response was 165 kHz. Square -wave response at
40 Hz and 1 kHz was virtually indistinguishable from the
input signal, and the response at 10 kHz shows only a
slight rounding with no sign of overshoot (see Figs. 6, 7,
and 8). Figure 9 shows the symmetrical clipping at a power
Fig. 2-Interior view.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
64
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
and another for center of
channel tuning.
Other. deluxe touches
ONE OF THE FINEST
RECEIVERS YOU CAN FIND.
IF YOU CAN fiND IT.
The Concord CR -260 is damn hard to find, because
we're just as particular about the stores who sell it as
we are about the quality of workmanship that goes
into it.
And for under $250* it's damn hard to beat. You
simply can't find features like ours in such a beautifully
designed receiver for such a reasonable price.
While other receivers may have some of our features,
none have all of them! There's simply no competition
for the CR -260 at this price.
Here's what makes the CR -260 worth finding:
We've taken the care to make tuning more precise,
even under the most difficult conditions.
While other receivers have one FM tuning knob,
that's not good enough for the CR -260. We went to
the trouble of engineering an additional second control for ultra -fine FM tuning.
And when it's receiving a stereo station the dial
pointer changes from amber to red.
It even has two FM meters, one for signal strength,
are the dents on the bass
and treble controls that help you reset any combinaation exactly.
And here are some of the vital statistics: 50 watts
rms total power output at 1% total harmonic distortion.
FM capture ratio an incredibly low 1.5 db. And for
just pure aesthetics, a beautiful blackout dial.
You'll want the full story on all the CR -260's features before you begin your search; just drop a line to:
Concord Products, Benjamin Electronic Sound Co.,
40 Smith Street, Farmingdale, N.Y. 11735.
We hope it's easier for you to find than it was for
us to make.
THE CONCORD CR -260.
Damn hard to find. Damn hard to beat.
Check No. 15 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
*Manufacturer's suggested retail; slightly higher in the west.
0
0.1
0.06
0.06
0.04
ó 0.04
Z 0.02
0
1
0
0.01
0.02
0.01
l
i
4TH0
rr
K
O
Ñ .006
Ó
THD
N 0.006
IM
002
0.002
100
0
300
10
IK
100 200
POWER OUTPUT - WATTS, rms
POWER OUTPUT - WATTS, rms
Fig. 3-Power output, into 4 ohm loads, both channels
Fig. 4-Power output, into 8 ohm loads, both channels
driven.
driven.
0. I
U.007
Ñ 0.005
100
IK
10K
FREQUENCY - Hz
Fig. 5-Frequency versus THD, 180 watts into 8 ohm loads.
Fig. 6-Square-wave response at 40 Hz.
Fig. 7-Square-wave response at 1 kHz.
Fig. 8-Square-wave response at 10 kHz.
equivalent to 440 watts (4 ohm load, one channel driven),
and Fig. 10 shows the residual hum and noise, which is
-102 dB, 200 W., 8 ohms, full band. The input signal required for full output was 1.95 V. Crosstalk was checked
but as the specified 90 to 100 dB figures seemed accurate,
the old cliche about the piece of wire.... There was ample
measurements seemed academic.
Use and Listening Tests
For most of the listening tests, the DC -300A was paired
with a Crown IC -150 preamp, while the speakers were
switched between AR LSTs and hybrid electrostatics. The
phono cartridge used was a Shure V-15 Ill and the turntable
was a Thorens TD -125. As you might expect, the overall sound
quality was extremely good, and I am tempted to resurrect
power to do justice to those organ pedal notes on my favorite
Bach record of the Toccata in D minor (Everest 3156) or the
magnificent Organ Music from Westminster disc made by
that perfectionist, R. W. Fulton, which has excerpts from
Widor, Mozart, Bach, and Sweelinck played on a Kimbell
Organ (ARK 10251S, 8012 Cedar Ave. South, Bloomington,
Minn. 55420). I was particularly impressed with the smooth
overload characteristic; full marks to Crown for this and also
for the foolproof protection circuits, as well as for the incredibly low distortion.
A word of praise is due for the instruction manual. This is
not only crammed with all kinds of information about the
amplifier, such as the graphs showing phase response, noise
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
66
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Good time capsule.
Saving fleeting moments requires a quality tape recorder. But, just as a cam-
era can be no better than its lens, tapes can be no better than the microphone. Whether it costs $200, $500-even $1,000-a tape recorder can be
significantly improved by the addition of a Shure unidirectional microphone
-a mike that can be `aimed" so that only the target sounds will be recorded.
Microphone misers who ignore this will never hear the true sound of recorded music lessons, parties, classes, speech therapy, sound movies and
rehearsals. With Shure microphones, creating tomorrow's treasures is today's pleasure.
Shure Brothers Inc.
222 Hartrey Ave., Evanston, Ill. 60204
In Canada. A. C. Simmonds & Sons Limited
SHUR
Manufacturers of high fidelity components, microphones, sound systems and related circuitry.
Check No. 46 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Fig. 9-Waveform at clipping, 440 watts, 8 ohm load.
Fig. 10-Residual hum and noise, 102 dB below 200 watts,
8 ohm load.
spectrum, power efficiency, damping factor, output impedance, and so on, but it also gives nomographs for
you would get several different answers. Some would un-
speaker lead resistances, circuits for loudspeaker protection, filters for r.f. interference, and much more. Instructions are also given for the connection of both channels in
series to provide a mono 70 V output.
I am often asked, "Which is the best amplifier now available?" If the same question were put to a group of experts,
doubtedly vote for the DC -300A, others might vote for a unit
with more power or one with VU meters or illuminated
power indicators, but I am certain that all would agree that
the Crown DC -300A is in that group at the top against which
any new pretender to the state-of-the-art title must be
judged.
George W. Tillett
Check No. 62 on Reader Service Card
The Fairfax FX-350 is a three-way loudspeaker system
using a 4 -in. cone tweeter, a 4 -in. midrange, and a 10 -in.
high -compliance woofer in a vented enclosure. The woofer
Fairfax Model FX-350 Speaker System
handles the range below about 1 kHz, while the tweeter
takes over above 4 kHz. This is a floor -standing model, finished in natural American walnut with a matching
sculptured foam grille. The removable grille is secured with
press -type fasteners to the front of the enclosure.
Speaker connection is made to well -marked 5 -way
connectors mounted in a recessed cavity in the rear of the
cabinet. A single rotary, tweeter -contour control is placed
in the same cavity and is fitted with a pointer knob to assist in balancing by means of engraved dial calibrations.
Good tactile cues are offered by this arrangement, so you
can adjust the control by reaching around the back without
the need to move the enclosure. This facilitates adjusting
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
System Type: Three way, with vented enclosure.
Drivers: Three; one 31/2 -in. tweeter, one 4 -in. midrange, and
one 10 -in. woofer. Crossover Frequencies: 1 and 4 kHz. Con-
trol: One calibrated, rotary, tweeter -level control. Finish:
Natural wood, American walnut. Size: 14 in. W x 13 in. D
x 36 in. H. Weight: 55 lbs. Price: $189.95.
MI11111111111111IId111II1I1!
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1111111111111111111111M111111111111111
MIllllllE11!1síl1111II111111111
IO
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MAX
ME11111;.1211111111111112111111E CLOCKWISE
1111111111111111111 11111111111111111111
OI O
100
IK
abuse.
The Fairfax FX-350 is covered by an unconditional five-
Technical Measurements
The measured impedance is shown in Fig. 1 for three
positions of the contour control. The center position of the
control potentiometer is referred to as "zero" on the
30
OHMS
venient 36 -in. height. However, as with any piece of fine
furniture, the wood top should be protected from possible
year warranty against defects.
MAX COUNTER
CLOCKWISE
20
the sound to suit individual tastes.
The enclosure is sturdily built and can safely take the load
of a lamp or other item which might be placed on its con-
10K
IOOK
Fairfax dial plate. This position is called center in Fig. 1. The
other two positions are maximum clockwise, which gives
highest tweeter level, and full counterclockwise, giving
lowest tweeter level. This lowest impedance occurs at the
maximum position control setting and is about six ohms.
Since it is unlikely this position will be used, the Fairfax
can be considered as an 8 -ohm system based on the rest
of the frequency range.
The woofer section shows the charateristic double peak
of a vented enclosure. The lower peak occurs at 151/2 Hz,
which is low enough to be down in the frequency range of
record warp components. This suggests that a preamplifier
rumble filter should be used to prevent subsonic energy from
FREQUENCY - Hz
Fig.1-Impedance for three positions of the tweeter contour
control of the Fairfax FX-350.
causing the speaker cone to experience large excursions
which could in turn result in muddiness at high sound level
should the cone go out of the linear gap region. The mini -
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
68
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
this is
all we siant to do.
But perfectly.
The engineering of high-fidelity turntables is a technical
and controversial subject.
But the concept of a perfect turntable is perfectly simple.
Since a perfect turntable is what we at Garrard have been
striving to make, we'd like to communicate this concept to you as
unequivocally as possible. Then all the claims and counterclaims
you hear will fall into place.
Think of it this way:
A phonograph record doesn't know and doesn't care what
kind of mechanism is
spinning it,
as long as it's
spinning properly. If your hand
could turn it at exactly 33 V3 RPM, without
the slightest fluctuations in speed, and keep
it moving in the horizontal plane only,
without the slightest jiggling or vibrations up-and-down or sideways, you
could expect perfect reproduction.
Similarly, a phono
cartridge has no idea what's
holding it in the groove,
as long as it's properly held.
If your other hand were
holding it, correctly aligned,
with the right amount of
downward force and without resisting its movement
across the record, it would
perform faultlessly.
That's really all
there is to it.
The basic point is that the
turntable and tonearm have exceedingly
simple and purely mechanical functions, just like
a chemist's analytical balance or a gyroscope. That's
why turntable manufacturing is, above all, a matter
of precision and integrity, with the emphasis on
perfect operation rather than hi-fi pizzazz or
features for features' sake.
Of course, theoretical
perfection in an actual mechanical
device is an unrealizable ideal. But even
though 100% is impossible, there's a big difference between
99.9% and 98%.
It's in this most fundamental sense, we feel, that
Garrard turntables are in a class by themselves.
For example, in the case of the Zero 100c changer and
the Zero 100SB single -play automatic, tracking error has been
reduced to a virtually unmeasurable quantity (in effect, zero)
by the geometry of the tonearm design. Rumble, wow and
flutter figures are also coming ever closer to theoretical
perfection in these and other top Garrard models. (The
Zero 100c and the Zero 100SB are both priced at $209.95.)
To a less spectacular degree, the lower -priced
models, from $49.95 up, also come quite close to the
theoretical ideal because of this emphasis on
fundamentals.
Remember: all we want is to make your
record revolve perfectly and to position your phono
cartridge perfectly.
And we're
almost there.
For your
free copy of
The Garrard
Guide, a 16 -page
full -color reference
booklet, write to Garrard,
Dept. G-11, 100 Commercial
Street, Plainview, N.Y 11803.
Division of ['jersey Consumer Products
Check No. 22 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
100
IT)
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V
90
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141
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FREQUENCY- Hz
1K
10K
FREQUENCY - Hz
Fig. 2-Anechoic one -meter frequency response for one watt drive and three tweeter control positions.
Fig. 3-Anechoic one -meter phase response corrected for
woofer, midrange, and tweeter acoustic positions.
mum impedance occurs at 27 Hz.
}
The anechoic amplitude response is shown in Fig. 2 for
the same three control positions as those of Fig. 1. Dips oc-
priv\jh
10dB
cur at around 1.2 kHz and 4kHz for this axial pressure
ON AXIS
response.
(151\11
/11liv\V"\tri
100
IK
30° OFF AX S
LEFT CHANNEL
The low bass holds up well down to below 60 Hz, then falls
off at around 18 dB per octave. The alignment indicated by
the impedance and pressure amplitude show that the
low bass might tend to sound slightly heavy, particularly
when mounted against a flat wall, due to the acoustic
damping of this design. If this happens, a more balanced
bass can be achieved by a conventional tone control rolling
off the low bass by a small amount. In order to verify the
bass alignment used by Fairfax, a close microphone
measurement was used on the cone and vent to determine frequencies of loading. The cone SPL peaks at 80 Hz
10K
FREQUENCY- Hz
Fig. 4-Three-meter room response.
and dips at 27 Hz, while the vent peaks at 60 Hz. This verified
the one -meter SPL measurement of Fig. 2. The general
strength of the woofer compared to the higher frequency
drivers indicates a direct sound which will be strong in mid
bass.
The phase response in Fig. 3 shows that the bass and mid-
range are in phase with each other, while the tweeterbecause of its forward acoustic position-leads by 180
degrees. This plot is made in three parts, from 100 Hz to 1
kHz for the woofer, from 1 kHz to 10 kHz for the midrange,
and 10 kHz to 20 kHz for the tweeter. The response is non minimum phase around 1.5 kHz, 4 kHz, and 10 kHz for this
one -meter position.
Figure 4 is the three -meter test which generally is a
better indication of the timbre of early sound when heard
in a conventional listening position. The on -axis and left
channel stereo measurements are shown displaced 10
dB on this plot for clarity of presentation. The measuring
position is one meter above the floor and three meters
from the front of the speaker. The center reference position
of the tweeter control is used for this test. These results
show that the top end will be down in level when the
speaker is used in a conventional stereo position. It will
be necessary to use a fair amount of treble boost to bring
the extreme top end up to a level equal to the midrange.
Fortunately a conventional tone control starting to boost
at 1 kHz can substantially correct this condition for the
normal listening position. A better solution, if it is possible,
FRONTAL
AXIS
is to rotate the speakers toward the listening area. Because
of the bass alignment, this works well in combination with
Fig. 5-Horizontal polar response for three tweeter control
moving the speaker into the room and away from a wall
positions.
for more uniform bass.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
70
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Introducing the MX -12.
A new speaker
for a new problem.
When receivers boasted modest powe
virtually any well -designed speaker system
could handle the load.
But this is the Super Ear era; a musical
age of bass -heavy rock, driven by super powered receivers and amps.
And that's a problem -if your ears and
speakers can't stand the strain without
squawking.
The MX -12 can. It's a new 3 -way
acoustic -suspension speaker system designed
to cruise smoothly and effortlessly at today's
listening levels by a new division of the company that invented moving -coil loudspeakers
in 1915.
Unheard of power -handling
capacity from a speaker nobody
ever heard of before.
The power -handling capacity of the
MX -12 is impressive. In tests at 30 Hz, it withstood an applied voltage (necessary to produce rated watts) of 25 volts. (Speakers with
more famous names grumbled and rumbled
at 15 volts.)
The MX -12's high power -handling
ability-made possible by a rugged box and
high -temperature cement in the long -throw
voice coil-permits you to use enough power
to fill even the largest living room with music
the MX -10 (lt)" woofer, = ie MX -15 (15"
woofer), and \,1X tumtab_es, stereo and quad
receivers-see your MX dealer. For his name,
write: MX High Fidelity Component Series,
-Fe Magnavox Complr v 1700 Magnavox
Way, Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804.
at satisfying loud levels, with gratifying low
distortion.
Linear response for
natural sounds. Naturally.
Moreover, the response is slab flat. From
the deep frequencies super receivers are
capable of (and the MX -12's low resonance
reproduces accurately), clear across the
spectrum to 20 kHz.
And because the MX -12 is more efficient than many other speakers of its class,
you enjoy smooth listening even when you
drive it with amplifiers of modest power.
Dispersion is excellent, too, the result of
high -frequency drivers of exceptional offaxis response and wide cutouts on the gril
an extra nicety you'll learn to expect from
MX Components.
But that's our philosophy: a lot of extras
at no extra charge. So, before you go out to
A -B any speakers, we suggest you listen to
this page.
To learn more about the MX -12 -and
ru
//
We'll be heard from.
Check P o 10 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Specifications:
Woofer:
12" high -compliance
(long -throw voice coil)
2" hemispherical dome
Tweeter:
2" phenolic ring cone
impedance:
8 ohms
Frequency response:
25 Hz to 20 kHz
System resonance:
45 Hz
Front -mounted controls under removable,
acoustically transparent foam grille:
Midrange level: + 3 dB, nominal, -3 dB
Tweeter level: + 3 dB, nominal, -3 dB
Crossover fregs.:
1500 Hz, 4500 Hz
Cabinet finish:
Oiled walnut veneer
Dimensions:
253/4" x 153/4" x131/4"
Weight:
40 lbs. (approx.)
Recommended minimum amplifier input power:
10 watts FTC
75 watts RMS*
Maximum power handling
Mid -range:
*1tMS continuous power at 200 Hz, measured by applying
the voltage necessary to produce rated watts into an 8 ohm
bad. Az standard room conditions, the unit would be capableof sustained operation at tit voltage. MX engineers consider this rating to be very conservative; this is a much more
stringentcontinuouspower test than would be encountered
in musical programs.
at the expense of moderately high distortion. Tones in the
octave above that frequency, however, are handled readily
with low distortion. In fact, the measured distortion at 110
Hz (A2) is as low as many of the better amplifiers at normal
sound pressure levels, which is extremely good.
Intermodulation distortion, shown in Fig. 7, is also
commendably low at all power levels up to the maximum
test level of 100 watts. What modulation that does exist is
mostly amplitude modulation. The A4 tone (440 Hz) has
100
E2- 2nd
10
82' 3rd
I
43- 2nd A2
about 1 dB average reduction at 100 watts drive compared to
0.1 watt. The crescendo handling ability of the same driver
E6- 3rd
is quite good, and instantaneous noise peaks of over 400
watts can be handled without noticeably affecting inner
musical voices. The sound should be clean without any
strain on peaks even up the limits of most super power
Ag-2nd
E4 -3rd A2
amplifiers.
0.1
Figure 8 is the energy -time plot for the first two milliseconds of sound arrival. The leading edge of transients are
0.01
loo
10
0.1
sharp and clean but diffractive scatter from the enclosure
housing takes its toll after the first half millisecond. Because of the substantial volume of sculptured foam used by
Fairfax in the grill of the FX-350, a measurement was made
WATTS
of the transient response with and without the foam in
I
I
I
1
70
80
90
80
1
1
1
90
100
1
place. Except for less than half a dB drop in level for the first
SPL EI= 41.2Hz
I
one -tenth millisecond, the foam doesn't change the response in the slightest.
1101 SPL A2= II0Hz
Listening Test
1
80
1
Jo
nI
Two different positions were used in listening to the
SPL A4=440Hz
Fairfax FX-350. In one position the speakers were placed
Fig. 6.-Harmonic distortion for musical tones E,, A2, and A4.
The polar energy pattern, shown in Fig. 5, also indicates
that more sound energy will be obtained with the speakers
rotated toward the listening position. However, there is
some polar fingering and you might wish to try several
positions for best sound. The tweeter contour control has
calibration marks of -3, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, and +3. These marks
cover 180 degrees of the control shaft rotation and are the
likely index positions for an owner to use, rather than the
extreme clockwise or counterclockwise positions. The +3,
0, and -3 positions were used to obtain the polar data of
Fig. 5. If the set is mounted against a wall, this plot shows
that the left channel stereo speaker will be somewhat hotter than the right for narrow speaker spacing but will be
flat against a wall and in the second the position was
away from the wall and angled in toward the listening
position. The balance, particularly mid bass, was better
when the system was away from the wall. The difficulty
with a wall placement was a prominence of middle
bass frequencies which could not be adequately controlled
by conventional tone controls without causing an unnatural loss of extreme low bass.
When properly placed, the bottom end is solid with only
a small tendency toward hangover marring an otherwise
excellent performance. When listening at brisk levels,
however, warped discs can cause muddy bass due to excessive cone excursion. Therefore, use of a rumble filter
when playing discs is recommended by this reviewer.
1 -TWEETER VOICE COIL
equal for wide spacing.
Harmonic distortion measurements are shown in Fig. 6.
High sound pressure levels are achieved at E, (41 Hz) only
I+
f-MI0 RANGE VOICE COIL
10
9
8
dB
7
20
6
30
3
2
40
o
0.I
10
loo
25
POWER - WATTS
30
3.5
45
MILLISECONDS
Fig. 7-IM distortion of A, (440 Hz) by E, (41 Hz), mixed one
to one.
Fig. 8-Energy-time response.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
72
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The Rec ' ' ears: end ofthe myth
of
speakers
a
écai
lssclpr
normiisa~tThe new Rectilinear 5 is capable of playing very,
very loud. Rock -festival loud. Even with a medium powered amplifier.
At the same time, it's uncannily accurate. It sounds
sweet, unstrained and just plain lifelike at all volume levels.
The temptation is great, therefore, to one-up that
prestigious manufacturer who some time ago announced
"The first accurate speaker for rock music."
But we refuse to perpetuate that mythology. It's
perfectly obvious that the Rectilinear 5 reproduces classical
music just as accurately as rock. We could never see how a
voice coil or a magnet would know the difference between
Jimi Hendrix and Gustav Mahler.
So we'd rather use this opportunity to set things
straight once and for all.
Thus:
There's no such thing as a rock speaker or a classical
speaker. Any more than there's a late -show TV set or a
football -game TV set.
There are, however, speakers that impose a hard,
sizzling treble and a huge bass on any music. And others
that round off the edges and soften up the transient details of any music. That's the probable origin of the myth ;
but these aren't rock and classical speakers, respectively.
They're inaccurate speakers.
doesn't mean your speakers should impart those same
qualities to cymbals, triangles or high trumpets.
(Stravinsky's transients can be as hard as rock.)
And if you like to listen at very high volume levels
(after all, that's what rock is aboutbut so is Die Giitterdiimmerung),
you still don't need a speaker that
achieves high efficiency through
spurious resonances. What you
need is something like the
Rectilinear 5.
Everything in this remarkably
original design was conceived to
end the trade-off between efficiency and accuracy. The four
drivers are made to an entirely
new set of specifications. The filter
Ewallvwrong. c>aeaical
_rtta
vaeandapineleaa network that feeds the drivers is
bytespeaker.
totally unlike the traditional crossover
network. Even the cabinet material is new and different.
Of course, those who feel threatened by all this fuss
about accuracy and naturalness will point out that the
monitor speakers preferred by engineers and producers
in recording studios are usually of the zippy, super aggressive variety.
That's perfectly true, but the reason happens to be
It's true that an aggres- strictly nonmusical.
sive treble and a heavy
"I use the XYZ speaker only as a tool," a top
bass are characteristic of
producer explained to us. "I wouldn't have it in my house.
most rock music, even when It really blasts at you when you crank up the volume, so
heard live. It's also true
that any little glitch on the tape hits you over the head.
that some record proAfter eight hours in the studio, that's what it takes to get
ducers exaggerate
your attention. I know how to deal with those unpleasant
these qualities, somehighs ; they're in the speaker, not on my tape."
times to a freakish
It's easy enough to find out for yourself.
Wrung Freaky sound made even
degree, in their final
Any reputable dealer will let you hear the
freakierby the weaker.
mix of the recorded sound.
Rectilinear 5 side by side with a "rock" or
But that doesn't mean the speaker can be allowed to
"monitor -type" speaker. Adjust each speaker
add its own exaggerations on top of the others.
by ear to the same high volume level, Rectilinear 5
A loudspeaker is a conduit. Its job is to convey
Contemporary
making sure the amplifiers are Laboratory
series
musical or other audio information unaltered. If the proof good quality. Then listen.
bookshelf/floor
speaker
system,
ducer wants to monkey around with the natural sound that
To rock or classical.
$299.00
originally entered the microphones, that's his creative
Rectilinear
Then and there, the myth
Dispersion
privilege. He'll be judged by the musical end results.
will crumble.
_ Base (patent
pending)
But if the speaker becomes creative, that's bad design.
optional.
By the same token, if some classical record producers
Rectilinear
Research
Corp.,107
Bruckner
Blvd.,
Bronx,
N.Y.10454
prefer a warm, pillowy, edgeless string sound, that
Canada: H. Roy Gray Limited, Ontario
'
RECTILINEAR°
Check No. 39 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The extreme high frequencies are down in relative
level. This reviewer found that a +3 tweeter level position
together with a treble tone control touch-up restored
spectral balance. It is better to bring the tweeter control up
partway and then touch up with the tone control, instead of
using maximum tweeter level, because too much
tweeter causes a top end bite which can be unpleasant
with some listening material.
Pipe organ sounds good on the FX-350. All but the deepest
pedal register is there, and general sonic balance on middle
and upper registers of the organ are good. Stereo center image solo vocalists, both male and female, are quite good.
Scott 451C Sound Level Meter
SCOTT
ON
drop which reduces sibilants. Rock sounds fine on the
FX-350 and good gut -thumping kick drum can be obtained
even with the speakers away from the wall. An attractive
speaker which will blend with most any listening environment, the Fairfax FX-350 can suit the sonic requirements
of most listeners.
Richard C. Heyser
Ed. Note: We understand from Fairfax that a new version
of this speaker has incorporated a 5 -inch midrange designed to help improve vocal stage presence.
Check No. 63 on Reader Service Card
The new Scott 451C sound level meter is a scaled down
pocket sized version of Scott's earlier Model 4508. The unit
can measure a large dynamic range with "C" weighting,
which is the meter weighting closest to flat frequency response. The larger Scott Model 450B offers "A", "B", and
"C" weighting for more analytical sound work. The 451C's
wide dynamic range enables measurement of low level
background noise as well as strong signals such as rock
lt
eoieArR
EASTERN
However, choral groups appeared to this reviewer to lack
stage presence and depth primarily because of the top end
AIR DEVICES ill
C1ír11DDF, r11í1. u.í4
music at close range.
The meter is enclosed in a rugged, drawn aluminum case
TYPE 451 SOUND LEVEL METER
ANSI TYPE S3C
that has a removable rear cover for battery replacement. It
PATS. PENDING
is intended for operation with the left hand, leaving the
right hand free to write down results or make signals with.
Besides the thumb -operated attenuator which selects the
range used, three momentary -on push buttons are provided
on the front face. The first energizes the instrument, the
second enables a battery check and the third converts the
normally "fast" meter response into "slow" for more averaged readings. In the "fast" mode the meter responds like a
VU meter. Calibration is set at the factory and Scott will re calibrate at any time for $10.00. The instrument comes
with a handsome leather storage pouch.
Test Results
Since a standard coupler -calibrator does not fit onto the
Model 451C and since no adaptor is yet available for this
instrument, we decided to compare its performance
against a General Radio Model 1565A sound level meter set
to "C" scale, having first calibrated it using a General Radio
SER.
NO.
Model 1562A calibrator. To first check the frequency response
of the 451C, we compared it against a calibrated Hewlett
Packard Model 8058A sound level meter which utilizes a1/2 -in.
condenser microphone. We played octave bands of pink
noise and compared the response of the 451C to that of the
HP 8058A. Table 1 shows the results to be excellent over the
range that the 451C covers. "C" weighting has a 3 dB
ScUNC LEVEL, C.WEIGHTED
drop at 8 kHz, so that figure is accurate.
MANUFACTURER'S SPECIFICATIONS
Standards: Meets or exceeds all requirements of ANSI SI.41971 for Sound Level Meter, type S3c. Sound Level Range:
45 to 130 dB re 0.0002 dynes/cm2. Frequency Range: 30 Hz
to 8 kHz; Standard C weighting per ANSI SI.4-1971. Microphone: Omni -directional ceramic. Meter: Taut -band move-
TABLE 1. Scott 451C frequency response relative to
response of HP 8058A sound level meter.
ment gives 20 dB range without switching. Battery: One
9 -volt transistor radio type (Eveready # 216 or equivalent)
gives approximately 200 -hour operation. Environmental:
Operating temperature range of 15 to 150 degrees F. Storage temperature range of 0 to +165 degrees F and 0 to 95%
relative humidity. All -metal case provides shielding in electrostatic fields. A magnetic field of 1 Oersted (80 A/m) at
60 Hz.does not produce an on -scale reading. Dimensions:
21/2 in. W x 5 in. L x 23/a in. D overall. Weight: 13 oz. net.
Frequency
63Hz
125Hz
250 Hz
500 Hz
1K
2K
4K
8K
Deviations from HP meter in dB
0
-0.5
0
0
0
0
-0.5
-3
Price: $115.00.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
74
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
PROGRAM
F/NO/NG...
With other cassette decks, finding
your tape selection is hit or miss.
You press fast forward ... stop ..'.
rewind _stop ...fast forwardover and over in a mad search for
each selection. But not with
Sharp's RT-480. Just press fast
forward or rewind. Our Automatic
Program Finder finds the precise
beginning of your selection. And
does it automatically. No fumbling.
bumbling, or mumbling.
We eliminate the hiss as well as
the miss. With a built-in Dolby
"B"' type noise reduction system.
The RT-480 is professional all
the way. With Micro Crystal Ferrite
heads for Cr0: tapes. A selector
switch for normal. low -noise, and
Cr0. tapes. Pause control for
editing. Automatic shutoff in every
mode. Lighted, expanded scale VU
meters. Advanced hysteresis
synchronous motor for inaudible
wow and flutter: 0.15°ó, weighted.
rms. S/N ratio: 58 dB. And the
frequency response is from
25-17.000Hz with Cr0_ tape.
All this, plus great styling. 2
microphones and dust cover. And
under S250. For the name of your
MAKES OTHER CASSETTE DECKS OBSOLETE. THERT-480. ONLY FROM
Check No. 45 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
nearest Sharp hi-fi dealer,
contact "Audio,"
Sharp Electronics Corp.,
10 Keystone PI.,
Paramus. N.J. 07652.
desireable during listing of noise readings. A hand-held
meter can pick up noise due to its own motion and handling. A rocker switch is better for slow/fast operation,
though the momentary will help conserve batteries. It is
possible for the left hand to hold down both the "slow"
and "on" switches though it is a bit awkward and un-
To check the accuracy of the meter, FET input stage and
amplifier section, we compared the readings taken on the
451C with those from the GR Model 1565A, at the same loca-
tion from the sound source, attenuating the sound source
accurately by 10 dB steps. The results were excellent down
to the lowest meter range where minor discrepancy was
comfortable.
The 20 -dB scale is of respectable size but a bit crowded
evident. See Table 2 for the data.
./'l./-.l./'f./'./'./'./YIJ'l./'l./'ll../''../-./-ll./'./-./-.l!'./-./'.l.l./'
TABLE 2. Scott 451C attenuator accuracy as compared to
General Radio Model 1 565A meter.
with number symbols. The ANSI standard, however, re-
Deviations from GR meter in dB
ment does not have an electrical output so whatever is
being measured cannot be recorded or fed to another
SPL
110
100
90
80
70
60
50
45
quires that all numbers be printed on the scale. The instruanalyzing instrument such as an octave analyzer or 'scope.
The larger Model 450B has an output. Finally, a dust cap
and strap would have been nice.
0
+5
0
The Model 451C is good for measuring SPL in discotheques,
0
noises from subways and trains, but not for cars because
road noise has heavy low frequency components which
need to be "A" weighted to be indicative of the perceived
noise. It's good for measuring noisy neighbors and noise
0
0
+2
+3
produced by portable appliances and machines. It's good for
./'!./'./'ll./'lIJ'!'l l.l./'l'!./-l./'./'./-./'l./'./'II./-IJ'./'./'./'./'./'l
checking out the level in your favorite concert hall or rock
festival seat, then comparing the readings with readings
taken listening to your stereo system at home. We venture
Using the 451C
Holding the meter in the left hand, the thumb operates
the "on" button, energizing the unit. Assuming one has set
the range switch to the proper range, also with his thumb,
a reading will be evident. To check the battery, the thumb
to say that in both cases the user is in for a numerical
surprise.
For those needing "A" weighting, which more closely
approximates the human ear response at low SPL, the Scott
must be extended so that in addition to pressing the red "on"
button, it hits the green "battery" button. Once satisfactory
Model 451, costing $115, is available. General Radio and
B&K instruments are more flexible in use but are more expensive still. For others merely interested in flat response
reading across a wide dynamic range, this instrument fits
battery condition has been established, we're ready for
action. To use the meter's "slow" mode, it is necessary to
press the black "slow" button. For some, the other hand
must be pressed into action now. The whole business of
the bill nicely, and is a third the price of the units used
Alex Rosner
for comparison in these tests.
momentary buttons can be a nuisance during use. For one
thing, the meter
down anywhere
Check No. 64 on Reader Service Card
.
.
Listening
Joys of Good
All
>
You Patrons
r
-
of Music
o
In Seasons to Come
Sow(' Patrolis of \iI4sic ..
Paul Heath Audio-Livonia, N.Y.
81 Big Tree St.
QUINTESSENCE
1626 NORTH C ST.
(916)441-5175
GROUP
LTD.
SACTO. CALIF.
95814
Check No. 38 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
.
Garland Audio-San Jose, Cal.
2960 Stevens Creek Blvd.
Sound Center-Beverly Hills &
Woodland Hills, Cal.
319 N. Beverly Dr. &
20044 Ventura Blvd.
Sound Company-San Diego, Cal.
4701 College Ave. & 3675 Sports Arena
Stereo Workshop-Berkeley, Cal.
2985 College Ave.
Audiophile Systems-Indianapolis, Ind.
851 W. 44th St.
The Stereo Shop-Cedar Rapids, Iowa
107 Third Ave. S.E.
The Sound Machine-Iowa City, Iowa
223 E. Washington St.
Wacks Sales Company-Milwaukee, Wisc.
5722 W. North Ave.
I/O Systems-Chicago, Ill.
533 W. Addison St.
D. S. Audio-Lebanon, Pa.
410 E. Evergreen Rd.
Audio Warehouse-Pittsburgh, PA
3915 Sawmill Run Blvd. &
3415 Forbes Ave.
Bowdens Audio-Athens, Ga.
Georgetown Square
Stereo Design-Hampton, Va.
Mercury Mall
University Stereo-Ridgewood, N.J.
57 E. Ridgewood Ave.
Stereo Emporium-Buffalo, N.Y.
3407 Delaware Ave.
Stereo Center-Vestal, N.Y.
2539 Vestal Parkway East
J -B Sound Systems-Rochester, N.Y.
2815 Monroe Ave.
Choosing a blank tape
is like selecting a wine
Ever notice how the audiophile (and oenophile) has
built a wall of words-a sound barrier-around
selecting a quality blank tape (and a fine wine). Neither
should be so complicated to enjoy.
Now you needn't be a sound engineer to buy tape. Now there's
the music tape BY CAPITOL.
Just choose tape (like wine) to suit the occasion. For everyday
dictation or class lectures, use an ordinary tape (like vin ordinaire).
But when you record music spend a little more for premium,
the music tape BY CAPITOL.
If you insist, we can put it in audiophile terms: the music tape
BY CAPITOL is "brighter" tape. Extra high output/low noise.
It will extend the frequency response of any tape recorder.
Our backcoated cassettes are guaranteed jamproof.
Our 8 -track cartridge is the industry standard professionals buy more of it than any other. And our
backcoated open reel tape is the same high quality
as studio mastering tape.
Got it? Now forget it. Why work so hard? When all
you have to know is:
When you record ordinary things, use an ordinary tape.
But when you record music, record on
the music tape
off
cassette cartridge open reel
BY CAPITOL
EMI
TM OF EMI LIMIT D
REG TM OF CRI CAPITOL MAGNETIC PRODUCTS A DIVISION OF CAPITOL RECORDS, INC.. LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 50028
Check No.17 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
A MEMBER OF THE EMI GROUP
111
ITIWW11
Mk»
PEUZIOM
John Lissner
THIS COLUMBIA doubleset, a
repackage
two
of
originally
focuses on
sessions
1962,
released in
two late, great
tenor
saxophonists-the patriarch Coleman
Hawkins
Webster.
his
and
Hawkins
is
disciple Ben
paired with
trumpeter Clark Terry, one of the
finest technicians in the business, and
Webster with Harry "Sweets" Edison,
an ex-Basie bugler who has profitably spent his middle years blowing
his bouyant horn in the studios behind singers like Sinatra.
Interestingly, it's the
Edison partnership that
superior.
Hawkins,
is
the
Webster musically
epic jazz
figure, is not always at the top of his
form, and the highly regarded Terry
is way off his usual pace. Despite this,
their session does have its moments,
and
they are mostly Hawkins'.
Michelle is an evocative instrumental
ballad written by Terry which serves
as a vehicle for "Bean's" full-bodied
sax as it shines in a nicely shaped,
lyrical solo.
A fast blues, Feedin' the Bean,
which opens side one, is another
good selection. This Hawkins ever Coleman Hawkins & Clark Terry
Ben Webster & Sweets Edison
Columbia KG 32774, $6.98
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
You Can Buy a Tape Machine
For $300 That Is Fun to Use,
Will Let You Make Perfect
Recordings Time After Time With
The Greatest of Ease, and Will
Last for Years and Years and Years.
The Advent 201 stereo cassette deck was
designed to be the ideal tape machine for the
great majority of serious listeners. It is not
only as good a cassette machine as you can
find in terms of useful performance and the
kind of design that makes recording easy and
precise, but its overall performance compares
with that of far more expensive and far less
convenient open -reel tape recorders.
Everything about the 201 is intended to help
real people under real conditions make perfect
tapes of whatever they're after. Its unique
level -setting features (including the peak -read-
ing VU meter that scans both channels simultaneously and reads the louder) and its simple
and direct controls make it both easy and easily
repeatable to set things up for the best possible
results. No tape machine of any kind makes it
easier to get those results, and most (including
open -reel machines) don't come near its combination of precision and ease.
Because the Advent 201 is meant to invite
steady use, it is also designed ruggedly for dayto-day use by people at home. No machine we
know of will maintain its original performance
longer, and most cassette machines will not
come close.
By design, the 201 isn't much on chrome and
flashing lights. It is simply a fine and durable
piece of machinery meant to provide a great
deal of enjoyment in use.
We hope you will check these claims at the
nearest Advent Dealer, whose name, along with
more information on the 201, we'll send in
response to the coupon.
Thank you.
Advent Corporation,
1 195 Albany St., Cambridge, Mass. 02139
I
Gentlemen :
Al
I
1 Please send me information on the Advent 201, 1
along with a list of your dealers.
Name
Address
1 City
1 State
Zip
I
I
The Advent 201
Advent Corporation, 195 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.
Check No. 2 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
I
I
I
I
green features the great tenor man
driving relentlessly with Terry joining
him in a string of swinging riffs.
Incredibly, Terry's puckish, instantly
identifiable flugelhorn sound, usually
a vibrant, creative solo voice, says
absolutely nothing as it skips through
a routine set of changes. Just as
tedious is bassist Major Holley on
Just Squeeze Me, who gives us one
of those bowed -bass -cum -humming
routines that Slam Stewart has done
to death.
Some of the best moments on the
Hawkins/Terry set are provided by
pianist Tommy Flanagan, a brilliant
musician who combines taste, technique and invention with a superb
lyric sense. Flanagan perks up each
number with his outstanding ideas
delivered in a crisply swinging,
supple and flowing keyboard style.
For some mysterious reason of
musical chemistry "Sweets" Edison
and Ben Webster play more consistently inventive jazz than Hawkins
and Terry. Webster has two gorgeous
solo outings-his wonderfully ex-
pressive, flowing tenor sax enraptures Gershwin's How Long Has This
Been Going On and Rodgers and
Hart's My Romance. He plays these
standards almost straight, drawing on
the strength and beauty of their
lovely, melodic lines. Each solo is a
minor masterpiece, as this master
combines opulence of
sound with restraint and good taste.
craftsman
The versatile Webster swings at
any tempo and most of the swing
Ben
generates at
this
session
is
taken at a loping beat that is scarcely
solid, unpretentious doubleset; timeless jazz, rooted in the basics of
melody and swing. The remastering
more then a trot; it's a stimulating
is
leisurely. Did You Call Her Today,
featuring Webster and Edison, is
bit of verve and relaxation. Better Go
is faster, taken at a Basie groove and
spotlights a pungent solo by "Sweets"
and sixteen sturdy bars by Webster.
The duo gets beautiful support
from pianist Hank Jones, whose
accompaniment is perfectly dovetailed into the overall musical pattern.
Jones is a consistent delight, playing
in a lilting, lightly dancing manner.
His touch is genteel, yet he always
maintains the rhythmic
basic to good jazz.
surge
so
Overall, Columbia has produced a
flawless,
resulting
in
first-class
stereo sound.
Performance: A-
Sound: A+
BACK IN THE MID -40s, critic
George T. Simon wrote, after
hearing the Woody Herman orchestra for several nights in a row:
"This band is so overpowering that
Woody Herman:
Thundering Herd
Fantasy F9452, $4.98
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
from now on I'll call it Woody Herman and his Thundering Herd." The
name has stuck and on Woody's
newest
Fantasy
album,
his
super-
charged young troops hit hard in the
disciplined Herman
robust
but
tradition.
Drive, accuracy, and power have
always been hallmarks of Herman's
style, and this new recording again
demonstrates Woody's genius for
taking a collection of young, un-
known musicians and fusing them
into an exciting ensemble that swings
authoritatively, dynamically, with a
brassy elan that pins one's ears to
the wall.
Even more remarkable is Herman's
Listen to your music,
not your turntable.
You don't hear distortion, rumble, wow or flutter when
you listen to the Philips GA 212. The audio pros
already know this. Now it's your turn to hear the best
your records have, without listening to the turntable.
Most turntable problems are mechanical. Motors,
controls or massive platters usually
introduce sounds of their own. The
stiff suspensions required to support
work working with the tacho -generator at the heart of
the GA 212. It constantly monitors the speed you
select. Any deviation is instantly corrected.
The tone arm is as advanced as the electronic control system. Friction is less than 1/10th of the tracking
force. There's nothing to interfere with
sound reproduction. Moreover, an
hydraulically damped, cueing mech-
heavy platters also contribute to
anism protects your cartridge and
acoustic feedback. These sounds are
records as well.
eliminated in the GA 212.
Solid-state electronics simply work
more efficiently-with less noise. You
just touch a control switch, no pressure
We could print specifications, charts
and lists of many more features. But
we'd rather you listen for yourself. To
paraphrase, one demonstration is
is necessary, it lights up to tell you
worth a thousand words. Visit your better audio dealer. Or write to us for more
the GA 212 is working.
' There's even a mini -computer net-
information and your dealer's name.
PHILIPS HIGH FIDELITY COMPONENTS.
Distributed by
NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS CORPORATION
100 East 42 Street, New York, New York 10017
Check No. 32 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
consistent ability to blend the best of
contemporary music with his classic
big band style. The compositions of
John Coltrane, Frank Zappa, Carole
King, and Michel Legrand are
all
represented in this splendid collection.
Coltrane's furious Thunder Bird explodes with a clean, incisive attack
to kick things off on side one; spotlighted
are
invigorating
solos
by
tenor man Frank Tibori and flugelhornist Bill Stapleton. Trane's poignant
ballad
Naima
framed in
is
a
fluent, mellow Tony Klatka arrangement with Woody's suave alto leading the mellifluous sax section.
Young Klatka also impresses with
some rousing flugelhorn choruses on
his rocking original Blues for Poland.
Carole King's sassy, saucy bit of Latin
funk, Corazon, grooves along with a
sinuous, lilting beat as Woody wails
on soprano. Another high point:
trombonist Jim Pugh's cooly lyrical
solo on Legrand's What Are You
Doing the Rest of Your Life?
The standard set on the Herman
album is consistently high-my only
beef is with a selection called Come
Saturday Afternoon, a composition
credited to one Fred Carlin. My objection is not to the band's performance which is first rate, but to Mr.
Carlin's claiming authorship to a
piece of music that is obviously
lifted from Ravel's Daphnes and
Chloe Suite Number Two. The least
Mr. Carlin could do was to give Ravel
credit as co -composer.
All told, Woody Herman: Thunder-
ing Herd presents us with another
crackerjack Herman band, and Fantasy's talented young engineer, Jim
Stern, has captured its vigor and
temper with excellent clarity and
depth.
fury
usually signifies nothing. Although he
worn quotes and abrasive forays into
Coltrane territory. (Lacking Coltrane s
imagination and intense passion,
has been around almost three decades, he has never been a con-
more nerve-racking than noteworthy.)
ment, is one of those instrumental
athletes
Performance: A
sound
and
Often
lacking in ideas, he tries to compensate by the sheer vitality of his
sistently
Sound: A+
whose
interesting
soloist.
playing.
DEXTER GORDON, once a star
soloist with the bands of Billy
Eckstine and Lionel Hampton,
and a leading figure of the bop move -
Dexter Gordon:
Blues a la Suisse
Prestige P 10079, $4.98
His new Prestige release, Blues a
la Suisse, recorded live at the Montreaux Music Festival, and remixed
Gordon delivers solo lines that are
When Gordon gets to the two
the album, Some Other
Spring and Secret Love, he can't
resist tearing them to shreds, proballads in
jecting
a
deliberately
coarsened
sound. Alter experiencing such lyric
masters
as Coleman Hawkins and
at
the Fantasy studios is sonically
excellent but musically undistin-
Ben Webster, listening to 44 minutes
of Dexter Gordon is quite a chore..
guished. There are brief (very brief)
moments of excellence followed by
long stretches of self-indulgence as
Gordon pads out his solos with shop-
Sound: Bt
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Performance: C+
Live versus recorded at Covent Garden
Rehearsal scene from Mozart's Don
Giovanni at Covent Garden, London.
Twenty-four AR -6 speakers are installed
at the Danish Royal Opera.
Four AR-LSTs are in use at La Scala,
Milan.
The most severe test for a loudspeaker
system is to be compared with live music.
The ultimate success is for the music
from the speakers to remain indistinguishable from the real thing.
we are putting out here is a live performance and anything electronic is
automatically the subject of the classic
Try the grand illusion for yourself.
There's a five-year guarantee that your
AR speakers will perform as well as
Covent Garden's. Or the Danish Royal
Opera's. Or La Scala's.
This is exactly what is happening at The
Royal Opera House, Covent Garden,
London. Covent Garden has purchased
five AR-LST speaker systems as well as
a number of AR -7s. The AR speakers are
in constant use in such 'roles' as the
Commendatore or the voices of the
underworld in Don Giovanni. They are
also used for the offstage brass band in
Aida and the taped sequences in the new
production of Benjamin Britten's Owen
Wingrave, as well as for many other
purposes.
judge by.'
A recent article by Adrian Hope in
England's Hi -Fi Sound magazine reported
the comments of the Covent Garden
technicians who installed the system:
`If you think about it, Covent Garden
cannot make do with any audio equipment other than the very best. In a
recording studio what you are putting out
as a final end product is a recording. What
AB test - the audience can hear live
sound and sound from a loudspeaker.
So they have a perpetual yardstick to
The idea of course is to create the illusion
for the critical Covent Garden audience
that they are always hearing live music.
AR itself has produced public live -versusrecorded concerts. Audiences were asked
to distinguish between the performance
of live musicians on stage and a recording
of the same music reproduced over AR
loudspeakers - the same AR loudspeakers that were designed for home
listening. As at Covent Garden, the
illusion of live music has been virtually
100 -percent effective.
The use of AR speakers in live musical
performances doesn't stop with Covent
Garden's AR-LSTs and AR -7s. The
Danish Royal Opera makes constant use
of twenty-four AR -6s and six AR-LSTs.
And La Scala has recently installed four
AR-LSTs.
Acoustic Research
US office:
10 American Drive
Norwood, Massachusetts 02062
International office:
High Street, Houghton Regis,
Bedfordshire, England
In Canada:
A C Simmonds & Sons Ltd
Toronto
A TELEDYNE COMPANY
Check No. 1 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
(Continued from page 5)
plete stereo control centers. The device
need do just one thing, boost the tiny
voltage supplied by a magnetic cartridge to a sufficient level for use with
a high-level input, plus adding the
necessary RIAA compensation.
Even if your amplifier was not designed for use with
magnetic car-
tridges, the preamplifier will make it
possible for you to use one satisfactorily.
"Static" in Speakers
Q. When listening to music with lots
of high frequencies. I sometimes get a
"static" noise coming from my tweeter.
As the music becomes louder, the static
is louder.
What is this static? What can I do
about it?-Andrew Coffman, Las Vegas,
Nevada
A. The "static" you hear from your
tweeters could have a number of
causes. If its intensity varies, depending
on how loudly you play your equipment, it is probable that your tweeter
defective. The
may have
become unglued from the voicecoil,
resulting in loss of drive during a
is
cone
portion of each cycle, thus causing the
noise. It also could be that the voice -
is no longer centered within the
magnetic gap. This would mean that
it is rubbing against one of the pole coil
pieces, at least at times.
If you hear this noise during loud
music passages, regardless of the setting
of your volume control, chances are
that the noise is associated with the
discs you are playing. Either the phono-
graph must be checked or else the
discs are over -recorded, as is all too
often the case.
If you can borrow speakers, do so.
Listen to these speakers to find out if
the "static" occurs in the same musical
passages. If it does not, you will know
that something is wrong with your
speakers. If the sound occurs in the
borrowed speakers, you will know that
the problem lies elsewhere.
It could be that the amplifier is
being overdriven during loud passages;
this can cause some strange sounds.
If this "static" condition is noted
primarily on FM broadcasts, the sound
may be caused by a misaligned tuner
or by multipath distortion.
Interference with AM Receivers
Q. The AM section of my tuner exhibits
strange behavior. Except on very strong
signals, I get an excruciating `buzz"
which seems to get worse when the dial
is tuned to a lower frequency.
Sometimes by turning off my television
receiver, the `buzz" is reduced. Physically
turning the tuner usually helps. I have
attached insulated wire for an external
antenna, but this makes the `buzz" worse.
There is no heavy machinery nor are
there any neon lights in the area which
would cause this noise.
Can you help me?-Dennis W. Brandt,
Indiana, Pennsylvania
A. I do not think that you can totally
eliminate the interference you hear on
your AM radio. In all likelihood it
is
produced by television receivers and it
is not a problem within the tuner itself.
Television sets radiate harmonics from
their horizontal deflection circuits. These
harmonics extend to perhaps 4 mHz.
Harmonics are more intense as frequency decreases, which fact goes along
with your observations.
Even though your television receiver
is turned off, the television sets of
neighbors remain on, and produce the
done about this loss because of a
parameter of the stylus which cuts
the disc, and the tip radius of the playback stylus. At the inner -most diameter
of the disc, high frequencies are not
likely to exceed 10 kHz. Any highs
which may be present above this will
not be flat.
If one were to attempt to reproduce
16 Hz found on some large pipe organs,
very large groove excursions would be
required. Hence, a disc side would be
reduced in length. If such pedal tones
were present for most of the recording,
the disc side might be 10 minutes
long.
Bass response at really low frequencies will cause some tonearms to skip
especially
grooves,
in
the
cheaper,
home phonographs which are commonly used.
trouble.
You may be able to shield your own
set by placing copper screening around
the high voltage area, and also by lining
the entire cabinet with this screening.
The screening should be grounded to
the chassis.
The a.c. line of the set should be bypassed to prevent the interference from
being radiated into the power line.
If by chance, some of the interference
is being picked up by way of the power
line, you may be able to eliminate some
of this problem by using line bypassing
to the tuner's chassis. The entire tuner
FM Stereo Versus Stereo Records
Q. I have compared recordings
played on FM stereo with the same
recordings played on my turntable. I
notice a loss of highs on the FM/
stereo version when compared to my own
recordings. Is this the fault of the
tuner portion of my receiver or is
this the FM station itself? (When I
say "loss of highs," I do not mean a
complete loss as there are still some
high frequencies in the music on FM.)
The overall sound quality of FM is
should be grounded to a good earth
acceptable.
ground.
antenna. Could this
be better?
Also, when there are extremely loud
Q. In the book DISC RECORDING
AND REPRODUCTION by Mr. P. J.
Guy. 331/3 rpm "fine -groove" records are
reported to have a frequency response
of 40 Hz to 15 kHz. Is this the maximum frequency range for all 330 rpm
discs? If so, is this because cartridges
cannot track above and below these
frequency limits? Is it because of a
imposed
the
Cook,
by
groove
width?-Douglas F.
March
A. F. B., Calif.
A. A disc with a frequency response
of 40 Hz to 15 kHz is actually unusually good. We generally do not
find this wide response.
be part of the
problem? Would an FM -only antenna
Frequency Response of
Phonograph Records
restriction
I am using Cable TV for an FM
Lows are
often rolled off. Because of the heavy
modulation impressed on all too many
discs these days, highs are often rolled
off above perhaps 12 kHz. It is possible
to produce discs having a wide fre-
passages, I hear a rattling sound,
especially in high frequencies. on
violins (over -modulation in the recording?)-Larry K. Cook, Albany,
Georgia
A. All too many FM stations do not
sound as they could. The FCC requires
a flat frequency at the transmitter,
but this never takes into account the
studio
equipment,
telephone
links
between transmitter and studio, etc.
Also, in order for many FM stations
to make any money, they often operate
completely automatically, with no
announcer on duty. This means that
virtually everything is recorded on
tape, often played at slow speeds to
obtain maximum time per reel. All
of this adds up to a loss of quality.
Your receiving antenna will not
alter the sound quality of the received
least not in terms of loss
quency response, down to perhaps 30
Hz and above 16 kHz. The highs will
signal, at
gradually be lost, however, as the
inner groove diameters are approached
during playback. Very little can be
multipath distortion.
of highs. A poor antenna can produce
The distortion you have heard on
high level passages could either be a
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
84
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The BeogramTM 4002. If you are serious about your audio system, there is no alternative.
The Beogram 4002 began when Bang &
begin anew. Their goal was simply stated:
Develop an electronically controlled turn-
tial tracking effectively eliminates tracking
error and skating force. When a record is
being played, each revolution brings the
stylus one groove's width closer to the center. This inward movement causes the tone
with optimum specifications. The
arm to pivot the equivalent fraction of a
result of their work was the Beogram 4002.
an audio component unequalled in both concept and performance.
degree and reduce the amount of light received by a photocell within the tone arm's
housing. This causes a servo motor to very
slowly move the entire assembly the exact
distance required to compensate for the
angular deviation. Precision, low -friction
Olufsen engineers were told to set aside the
traditional solutions to turntable design and
table
The cartridge. The quality of any turntable
is easily negated by using an inferior or mismatched cartridge. Bang & Olufsen engineers felt it was essential to develop a cartridge which was an integral part of the turntable and not simply an appendage added
later by the user. Therefore, an entirely new
cartridge was developed which could meet
the specification levels set for the turntable.
This cartridge was the MMC 6000; a bril-
is eliminated.
Operation. The Beogram 4002 utilizes com-
puter logic circuits for automatic control of
the operation cycle. Once you have depressed the "on" switch further assistance
is unnecessary. The detector arm preceding
the tone arm senses the presence and size
of the record and transmits the appropriate
information to the control unit. If there is no
shut off the unit. When a record is detected,
the correct speed is automatically set and
the stylus cued in the first groove. A patented electro -pneumatic damping system
lowers the tone arm at a precise, controlled
speed to prevent damage to the stylus. The
entire cueing cycle takes only two seconds.
A color brochure presenting all Bang & Olufsen products
The control panel of the Beogram 4002 also
in detail is available upon request.
permits power assisted manual operation.
You may move the tone arm in either direction and scan the entire record at slow or
rapid speed. A slight touch on the control
Bang&Olufsen
Fine instruments for the reproduction of music.
The tone arm assembly. The Beogram 4002
features one of the most sophisticated tone
arm assemblies ever developed. Its tangen-
friction of the tone arm to between 5 and
15mg. As the tone arm is always kept tangent with the record groove, skating force
record on the platter, the arm will be instructed to return to the rest position and
liant piece of miniaturization capable of
reproducing a frequency spectrum from 20
to 45,000Hz. The MMC 6000 features the
new multi -radial Pramanik stylus for exceptional high frequency tracing and has effective tip mass of only 0.22mg. It has a tip
resonance point of over 45,000Hz, a compliance higher than 30 x 10-", and a recommended vertical tracking force of 1 gram.
ball bearings keep the vertical and horizontal
Bang & Olufsen of America, Inc.
2271 Devon Avenue
Elk Grove Village, Illinois 60007
panel
will lower the arm exactly in the
groove you have chosen; another touch will
immediately lift it for recuing elsewhere.
During any operation, either manual or automatic, you need never touch the tone arm.
Bang & Olufsen components are in the permanent design collection of the Museum of Modern Art.
Check No. 11 on Reader Service Card
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
fault in the discs being played, or
Who knows?
you are hearing multipath distortion.
A directional antenna can reduce this
kind of interference.
What is new in recorded music.
What favorites have been re -issued.
Whether tapes are available.
What can be obtained in quadraphonic.
Noise from an Equalizer?
Q. I have a quadraphonic receiver
which does not include tone controls for
the rear channels. As my room acoustics
are poor, I use my front tone controls
to adjust the sound to my liking. After
this is done. my rear channels seem
Schwann knows.
weak and masked by the front channels.
To correct my problem, I purchased a
five -band equalizer to correct the condition
Schwann is that world-famous, ever -so useful compendium of record and tape
information. Issued in two volumes-lists
60,000 currently available records and
tapes in many different categories to suit
every taste and every need. Schwann
knows plenty and tells all!
inant. I would appreciate your advice
in this matter.-Larry Titchenal, Belleville, Illinois
A. To determine whether your equal-
izer produces the hiss or whether it is
generated
in some portion of your
remaining equipment, disconnect the
input of the equalizer. Set all controls
tapes. Nearly 45,000 total listings on 773 labels in
classical, recent popular, rock, jazz, musical shows,
country, opera, ballet, electronic, quadrasonic, etc.
95¢ at your dealer's.
on the equalizer as usual, with the
equalizer turned on. If the hiss is
present, turn off the equalizer. Note
This may
hiss
whether
take a few seconds if the capacitors in
Schwann-2 Semi-annual catalog for specialized categories: pop more than two years old, classic jazz, older
the equalizer maintain a charge for a
time. If the hiss disappears, you will
know that it is generated within the
equalizer. It may be that your volume
controls after the equalizer are set too
high, causing you to hear more of the
inherent noise than you should.
and re-released mono and reprocessed stereo classical
recordings, classical on lesser -known labels, international pop & folk on domestic labels, spoken, educational, religious, etc. 85¢ at your dealer's.
Get more pleasure.
If your equalizer has input
There's more joy in recorded music when you get exactly what you want.
Keep Schwann at hand, and always refer to it before you buy.
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level
controls, perhaps they should be set to
a more advanced position so that you
can then back down on the amplifier
controls, thereby eliminating the hiss.
Perhaps the equipment driving the
equalizer produces the noise. The added
treble boost would make that noise
more apparent.
Matrix Quad Light
Q. My FM tuner has a "stereo
light," indicating the obvious.
Matrix 4 -channel is being broadcast
by some FM stations. I have not seen a
matrix decoder, however, or tuner or
receiver with a "matrix light." Why
for the items checked above.
Name
not? Such a light would be a great convenience in verifying for the listener that
the program being broadcast is in matrix quadraphonic.
-
State
Since
is at
fault or whether the boosted frequencies
merely cause hiss to become more dom-
latest releases: records, 8 -track cartridge and cassette
Address
City
channels.
not sure whether the equalizer
Schwann-1 Monthly. Special new listing section has
I enclose $
of my rear
the equalizer was installed, however. I
notice more hiss from my rear channels
than I heard from the front ones, I am
Zip
Dealer's Name & Address
Certainly the matrix decoder that
am using "knows" when the program
material is encoded. Could it latch a
Schwann Record &Tape Guide
137 Newbury Street. Boston, Mass. 02116
AU
light on in this case? How might I hook
86
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
one up?-Andrew D.
Keller, Wappingers Falls, New York
A. It would be almost impossible to
provide a "matrix light" similar to the
stereo indicator light found on most
receivers. You say that your decoder
"knows" when it is decoding matrix
quadraphonic as opposed to conventional stereo. Actually, this is not true.
It happens that some discs, though not
intentionally recorded to have matrix
effects, still possess this characteristic.
The decoder will process them with
some rather exciting results. The decoder only "knows" when it is getting
difference information with which it
can work its "magic." This difference
information is important even when
reproducing conventional stereo.
The stereo light found on most FM
equipment is operated because of the
presence of a 19 -kHz pilot signal, which
the FM stations do not transmit unless
they are braodcasting in stereo or matrix quadraphonic, which is exactly the
same technical process as far as broadcasting it is concerned.
This pilot signal is not present merely
to turn a light on in a distant receiving
set. It is there to provide a reference for
the stereo information, thereby enabling
proper decoding to take place. The
designers of FM equipment have taken
advantage of this situation and have
made it perform the extra function of
operating a "stereo light."
Evaluating Phonograph Cartridges
Q. Can you explain the relationship
between decibel output and frequency
response? How does one go about subjectively comparing the frequency re-
sponse of various phonograph cartridges when the measurements were
given in different ways for each
product?
As an example, we might have three
different cartridges with these specifications: 1. with a 10-10,000 Hz plus
or minus 1/2 dB rating; 2. with a 2020,000 Hz plus or minus 1 dB rating; 3.
with a 50-10,000 plus or minus PA dB
rating. Is there a way to convert one
specification to the others, so that I
could know which cartridge is the
plus or minus 1 dB from 20 to 20,000
Hz. This, in itself, is a good specification, at least for a stereophonic
cartridge. (It would not be satisfactory
for a CD -4 cartridge unless we knew
more about its characteristics above
20,000 Hz. We would have to assume
that, with no data given for the higher
frequencies, this cartridge would
fall "short of the mark.") Now take a
cartridge which is plus or minus 3 dB
between 50 and 10,000 Hz. We can
immediately assume that this latter
cartridge is not nearly as good as the
first one in terms of frequency response.
Here we
have
cartridge
a
which covers a narrower range of the
audio spectrum than the first one and
which is less flat than that
of the
first cartridge. Thinking once again of
the first cartridge, somewhere in its
response, above and below its specified limits, there is a point at which
this cartridge will be plus or minus 3
dB. (More likely this will occur as a
minus 3 dB point, but not necessarily.
There could be a peak somewhere,
which could mean a rising response.)
These frequencies could be minus 3
dB at 15 Hz and plus 3 dB at 25 Hz,
and minus 3 dB again at 30 kHz. (I
did not arrive at this by any mathematic work, but merely by familiarity
with the behavior of some cartridges.)
These are arbitrary figures. Here we
dB at 50 and perhaps minus 3 dB at 10
kHz. Actually, from this data, we can-
not know about the high frequency
response for certain. It could be at
10,000 Hz we are plus 3 dB, and minus
3 dB at 17,000 Hz. We do not know,
and cannot know this unless we can
actually
measure
the
frequency
re-
sponse of the cartridge. We can, however, make good guesses that the first
cartridge will out -perform the second
one by a wide margin.
Suppose we have
one
cartridge
which is said to have a frequency response of plus or minus 1 dB from 20
Hz to 20,000 Hz. Suppose we have a
second cartridge rated as being plus or
minus 13 dB from 10 Hz to 30,000 Hz.
It could
be that the two cartridges
test response?
unless measurements are made.
it with that of another cartridge.
Suppose we have a cartridge whose
frequency response is stated as being
The BOSE name and a full
FIVE YEAR WARRANTY
are your assurances of reliability and performance with
the BOSE 1800`v Professional
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ridge we have a response of minus 3
have much the same overall response,
ing
RUGGED!
have a minus 3 dB at 15 Hz and minus
3 dB at 30 kHz. With the second cart-
best one? Will I be able to determine,
in other words, which one has the flat-
Is there some mathematical formula
which can be used to convert different
"decibel outputs" into "equal outputs"?-Neil T. Shade, Dugway, Utah
A. You can determine the frequency
response of one cartridge by compar-
p\`kec
9
but we cannot know this for certain
f1
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it
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
The Column
Fred DeVan
Eric Clapton
ERIC CLAPTON: 461 OCEAN
BOULEVARD
RSO SO 4801
If it hadn't said Eric Clapton on the
outside I probably wouldn't have
listened to the whole thing. Now that
have, can't say I'm sorry, but 461
I
I
Ocean Boulevard is so laid back-it
falls down. Only Clapton could get
away with it. There is less energy
in the whole record than the Climax
Blues Band or Edgar Winter puts in
two minutes. Great record for a
Claptonologist, but more Clapton is
heard on any of the previous solo
outing! Tom Dowd should have his
ears stuffed with play -dough for trying
to make a vocalist out of Eric. Boo -Hiss
(and there is quite a bit of that), but
I'll play it again-anyway.
TOMITA: SNOWFLAKES ARE
DANCING
RCA, CD -4 ARD1- 0488
Snowflakes Are Dancing is a marvelous record and those who are not
usually disposed toward classical
music should not let their preconcep-
tions deter them in any way. Keith
Emerson would approve of it. Isao
Tomita uses 27 electronic components/devices to replace Gregg Lake
and Carl Palmer (Keith too). It is of
course a sonic trip and the highest
praise can be made for it by saying
that under the most stringent scrutiny it defied every attempt I made
to uncover a major flaw. The musical
performance is impeccable, not
totally as a classicist would see it,
but as a part of today. It truly is a
pleasure to hear yesterday and today
embellish each other, sans rock. The
stature of Debussy's original themes
and Tomita's utilization of his devices
are complimentary and the end
result is a fresh form that still can be
taken further. The quad sound was
fine, but the performance is nothing
that Debussy could have envisioned.
It is pure synesis. The Mellotron work
is an uncanny as any I have heard. The
textures of the Moog and attendent
bits and pieces are eclectric. Tomita
has pulled off a real non -gimmicky
work of art. True variations on a group
of themes, but also a work otherwise impossible to create. The
mastery of electronics has trans-
mitted one form into a thing unto itself. No need to understand how or
why it was done. Snowflakes exists
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
88
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
and
is
as real as any other music
around. And around is where it should
be.
If at all possible, hear it at least
once in its entirety in quad, since only
in quad are its full dimensions and
impact
complete.
Be
aware
that
there is more to come; it's another
milestone in the age of the synthesizer. Welcome aboard, Isao Tomito!
BOB DYLAN: BEFORE THE FLOOD
ASYLUM (and that's what the producers of this album need) AB -201
Dylan or no Dylan, much of this
Boy. His harp playing is truly fine.
His voice is strong, distinctive and
under -rated.
He
is
an
impressive
artist and you have to be to co -exist
with Toussaint and company. My
curiosity turned up more than I
thought was there. Biscuit has been
around for years, mostly in Canada,
and is known well there. He also has
three U.S. releases on Paramount,
one of which was able to find so
only is the record number, it is also
the name of the album. Crowbar is
a good rock boogie band, but Biscuit
seems to really come into his own
with The Meters. Crowbar seems to
find their own level without King
Biscuit Boy doing lead.
Back to this record, the first cut on
King Biscuit Boy, Mind Over Matter,
is a real winner. The rest of the album
far. King Biscuit Boy With Crowbar
(PAS -5030). Crowbar now has an
(9 more) keeps up with it just finenever a dull moment, but I just want
to keep hearing Mind Over Matter
album on Epic also, KE 32746. That not
as
I
often
as
I
can. Rock -A -Billy
is
seond product of the David Geffen trip
is a lot of high-priced caterwauling.
The Band, for its part is doing what
They always did and just as well. But
Bob Dylan kills some of his best songs,
especially Lay Lady Lay (back to Nash-
ville Skyline if you want to hear it
done right). Any lady hearing this
611
4
Walt QstrandeiAalyst,
As $eenThroughTh' ; es
a
His A -100X Speaker
as a love song would be prepared for
a hasty departure. As listen to the
other things Bob does on Before The
Flood, it leads me to a hasty departure
I
to another record. Bob Dylan must
have listened to the record-he
opened the flood gates at Asylumsplit and has resigned with Columbia.
Look toward CBS if you like Dylan as
I do. This album almost turned me off
to him and I have been his neighbor
since the early 1960s. This review is
too many words for too little of value.
KING BISCUIT BOY
EPIC KE 32891
This record has been around my
place for a long time and played
constantly. It's good-so good it set
me off to explore its origins. It was
also hard to approach, because of its
style, the back-up group, and "Biscuit"
himself. First, Biscuit has another
name-Richard Newell-is Canadian,
and this is his first album on Epic.
Biscuit has been described as the
finest harp (mouth or harmonica-if
you please) player in the world. He
sings pretty well also. The style that
has stymied me for an apt description
is
I guess served by Rock -A -Billy -Gone
To -New Orleans. The Rock -A -Billy is
all Biscuits, the New Orleans influence is Allen Toussaint and The
Meters. Toussaint is the arranger and
producer of this album and The Meters are the superb support and
back-up band. Now this is all of Dr.
John minus Dr. John, and I love Dr.
John. This is not imitation Dr. John.
His tortures drive drivers to drink.
1.V.111 ,,,,,ao,
This perfectionist believes
results justify the individual
bench testing of every single
assembly. "Unusually flat
toward the top of its price
range" says High Fidelity
of our A -100X bookshelf
speaker. We say, a Six Year
Warranty on every speaker in the Audioanalyst
line, $94 to $249.
Everyone boasts clean highs, low
bass, a better driver. Fact. The
best drivers are pretty much
alike. It's what our Audio -
analysts do with them that's different. Is there
a percentage in this kind of obsession? A sound
one to be sure.To test our speakers, simply
write to us. All we ask is that you give them what
we give them. The works.
Meet the Audioanalyst Master of Torture.
Live! At the Boston High Fidelity Music
Show -Room 412.
r
He does his thing and King Biscuit Boy
does his, and they are as different as
can be. The Meters really do their
thing well and hang the record together with impeccable agility and
flair. Above all this soars King Biscuit
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
89
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
(uthondIqj
P.O. Box 262, Brookfield. Conn. 06804
Monstrous About Perfection
coming on strong with such artists
as B.W. Stevenson, but King Biscuit
Boy really has a lead in bringing
many elements into focus around him
and having a new form that really
allows more of us to appreciate the
music he is making. King Biscuit
Boy is a real winner, I hope you like
it as much as I do.
Hey, Epic, where is the SQ version
this record deserves?
BAD COMPANY: BAD CO
SWAN SONG SS 8410
The only bad company these guys
are keeping is many of the other
four -piece English bands that appear
and thankfully disappear. They are
keeping pretty good company with
the past and rock and roll basics. Their
Rock Steady is rock steady compe-
tence and you can even understand the
lyrics. They remind me of early traffic,
as a matter of fact, Paul Rodgers reminds me of the Paul Rodgers vocals
from Free. Surprising! I really liked
Free and still enjoy everything I have
recorded of theirs-which is not much.
So as far as Paul Rodgers is concerned
Bad Co fills a void. I have never been
crazy about Mott The Hoople, but
recognized something that I liked and
kept hoping it would surface. When I
don't
can't understand lyrics that
want to hear, but don't know, I don't
I
want to hear them until the strain
wipes me out. I get put off-to say the
least. The sparse, but clever guitar
work of Mick Ralphs may have been
what I wanted. Since I am one who
really nuts out on (Andy Frasier) bass
work, Boz Burrell's lazy simplicity
impresses me not at all, but it does
fit. Simon Kirke is also from Free and
he holds back even more than before.
He drags just enough to have a distinctive style.
The hype sheets say that Bad Com-
pany's trip is simplicity and darned
if it doesn't work. It works pretty
good, just enough bass, just enough
drums, just enough guitar and vocals
you can hear. What more can you
want? Maybe nothing, except another name for the group.
Now, dear friends, can we have the
new Led Zeppelin album. It will be
great to follow this record with its
by the forces of good health at the
psyco-sickie of Alice Cooper, N.Y.
Dolls, and others whose names
thankfully elude my awareness.
Martin Mull is crazy. No two ways
about it. Martin Mull is fun in ways
we have not seen in a long time.
His sense of humor is sometimes
from left base and at other times
dead center on what's really happening. His sense of music is simply
plain good taste. There is no way to
directly interpret Martin Mull since
the meaning of what he says/sings is
totally dependent on the realities and
orientation of the listener. Woody
Allen could be confused by Mull at
times. There is a bit of all of us in
Mull's songs sooner or later. He does
not bash us over the head to be funny,
he grabs at a hidden little spot inside
and tickles.
I
bumped into Martin outside a
club and talked near him for a while.
say near because he is always elsewhere. He really talks like his music
I
opposite.
all the time. He is not a show biz
MARTIN MULL: NORMAL
jacket is as much fun as the record and
put-on. He is a Martin Mull ??? The
CAPRICORN CP 0126
If Martin Mull is normal, so is Alice
Cooper. If anything, Martin is a blow
if you read it you will find the names
of some of the best jazz and studio
musicians on the east coast plus a
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
90
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
painting by Martin that gives you
SERPICO (Original
a good idea of what is going on inside
his head.
Martin Mull and his record Normal
are together either the lightest heavy
or the heaviest lightweight I've
soundtrack). Music by Mikis Theodor-
ever heard. I'm not sure what else
it is, but to me and Martin Mull it's
at least fun.
ARLO GUTHRIE
REPRISE MS 2183
To Arlo: After Last Of The Brooklyn
Cowboys, this one was owed to us.
It may be presumptuous of me, but
by giving this album no other title but
Arlo Guthrie, it seems a way of saying
Last Of the Brooklyn Cowboys wasn't
Arlo Guthrie. Bling Blang, Presidential
Rag,
Deportees,
Nostalgia
etc. and on and on remind me
of the musical pragmatist that you
are. Your voice and energy is back
and then some. Even your western
Rag,
songs don't sound like you stepped on
the wrong spot in the prairie. I know
that Running Down The Road and
music from the
akis. Paramount PAS -1016, stereo,
$ 5.98.
I almost never listen to soundtrack
Stay
with us, Arlo, we need you.
To Warner Bros.: Where is the CD -4
version of this one? Here the material is worth the effort and you guys
are making the best CD -4 discs in the
U.S.
LAST OF THE BROOKLYN COWBOYS. Arlo Guthrie. Reprise MS42142, quadraphonic, $6.98.
"Look here, Arlo," they said. "This
is a contract! You signed it. Your manager signed it. This is the music we
want you to do. And we have this quad-
raphonic program and Mancini and
Hugo Montenegro are on RCA. You
are the best
we
got and
we
only have
six days to get it done." `But," Arlo
started
to
say,
when his manager
grabbed him around both shoulders
and screamed, "The contract has no
buts in it." Arlos' eyes got big then
they got narrow like little slits. You
could hear his teeth grind from ten
feet away ..
Back here in the real world, as well as
.
in Burbank, a contract
is
indeed a
contract and the record is out. It is an
excellent presentation of CD -4. It is
pleasant enough to listen to. Last of
the Brooklyn Cowboys is everything
nice, except Arlo is incidental. A great
CD -4 demo record, awful Arlo Guthrie.
If it's Arlo and his special qualities
you are after, pass on this one. If you
just got a CD -4 system, get a copy.
Aw, shucks, man, all that talent taking
a back seat to technological and marketing needs. What a waste, but a contract
is a contract and he is the best they got!
manifested as
the
birds
pause momentarily from their conversations to
create
an
occasional
interlude of tranquility. And, then .. .
back to the chaotic, but contained
albums for reasons that were obvious as
arguments of moments ago,
as the
soon as you heard your first one. This
is the only film score album since
Alexander Nevsky (Serge ProkofievThomas Schippers, Odyssey Y-31014)
that has made me want to see the film.
Mikis Theodorakis has taken a biggie
and has expanded the score into a suite
of wordless songs that stand on their
group performs See -Saw.
If these descriptions
at
own. This music does not need the
the album, except the letter -like signs
adorning the back cover, adjacent to
movie to justify its existence. Bob James
did one hell of a nice job in its arrang-
ing. The last thing you expect is the
soundtrack of a cop movie to be soft
and contained. No heavy dramatics at
all. Just oozing sensitivity and gentle
human warmth. Pretty, quiet, pleasant,
human music that is totally enjoyable
and brilliantly executed. I can't wait
to see the movie now-missed it the
are
all
relevant (now, there's an often overused word) to you as they are to me,
you will realize Holland's compositions
to be "memorable, even hummable"
as stated in a press release. There is
nothing obscurely avant-garde about
the list of musicians. Although the
music is varied and unique to ears
expecting to hear a steady jazz' 4 on
every tune, it is by no means any less
than superb.
Sam Rivers does a fine job on tenor
on this album. He is again beginning
to see substantial recording time-
first time around.
something he should have been allotted
all the time. His best work is evidenced
David Holland Quartet: Confer-
in See -Saw and Four Winds. And, if
his performances with Holland are
any indication of what's on his latest
Impulse LP, that one may be worth
more than just a listen.
Hobo's Lullaby were hard records to
follow, but this one makes it.
transition
ence of the Birds
Musicians: David Holland, bass; Sam
Rivers, reeds, flute; Anthony Braxton,
reeds, flute; Barry Altschul, percussion, marimba.
Songs: Four Winds; O & A; Conference
of the Birds; Interception; Now Here
(Nowhere); See -Saw.
ECM 1027 ST, stereo, $6.98.
Very few albums are built around
a theme as Conference
of the Birds. Holland explains that
as pleasant
when he lived in London, birds would
gather at 4 or 5 in the morning to
sing together "each declaring its freedom in song." Conference communicates well the spirit of his experiences
watching the birds, thanks to the
primary ingredients of top-notch
musicians and Holland's own high
standard of writing.
The compositions encompass a
spectrum of interrelationships which
may very well characterize such a
conference. Four
Winds
is
a
free,
swinging number. The bright, early
morning feel of the song offers the
Braxton
also
does a
thoroughly
commendable job on alto. Unfortunately, I cannot comment on his flute
playing.
The
album
doesn't make
clear whether Rivers or Braxton
is
playing flute at any given time. Hence,
there is some trouble distinguishing
between the two. In the future,
I
suggest that a list of which hornman is
soloing at a particular time be included,
and that something more definite be
than just "reeds" in listing
instrumentation.
The copy of Conference of the Birds
that I received already showed the
given
Polydor (new parent company) label.
I'm pleased to report that all of the
high standards which ECM originally
set remain an integral part of this
album as well. The album is a typically
brilliant sounding reproduction. Barry
Altschul's texturally diverse cymbal
work is captured undistorted, the way
highs ought to be. On Conference of
of its
the Birds, a mellow, thought provoking
which quickly spreads and builds in
Altschul's statements on marimba.
His bass comes out sounding very
clear, not at all muddy (as lower
interpretation
heralding the
awakening of individual birds and
the subsequent chirping and gaiety
intensity.
Holland's strong walking
bass is a dominating force on this cut.
On Q & A, Braxton and Rivers squeak
and squawk at each other in a manner
expected of youthful birds involved
in trite, but amusing, morning arguments. The slow and pretty Now Here
conveys the sudden, spontaneous
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
piece, Holland weaves in and out of
registers have a tendency to be).
All in all, ECM still puts out an
album that sets a high standard in
jazz for other companies to match.
Conference of the Birds on ECM is
everything it's cracked up to be.
Eric Henry
91
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Canby's Capsules
J
Edward Tatnall Canby
MORE SONIC HISTORY
Gieseking/Bruno Walter Beethoven's Emperor Concerto. Vienna
Philharmonic (1938). Vox Turn-
about THS 65011, 2-ch., mono.
Joseph Szigeti Plays Bloch Violin
Concerto. Paris Conserv. Orch.,
Munich (1939). Vox Turnabout
THS 65007, 2-ch., mono.
Bartók Plays Bartók. With Ditta
Pasztory Bartók. Vox Turnabout
THS 65010, 2-ch., mono.
EMI is licensing much material, old and new, to U.S. outlets. These are
marked "2 -channel, from the original monaural tapes"-whatever this may
mean. No 78 hiss, undetectable joints, smooth, even quality throughout
clearly not from shellacs. (But tapes??) The 1958 Walter/Gieseking is a
lean, no-nonsense reading, good for this long Beethoven piece, the sound
typically late -78, limited dynamics, edgy in loud parts, very good piano. The
Bloch, only months later, is startlingly better in sound-cleaner, wider range,
bigger dynamics, larger space. Szigeti in his best younger years. (later, he
developed a serious wobble.)
These Bartók recordings have been around before; this is a good compilation though evidently from pressings, or worn masters. (Some are 4 hands,
with his wife.) Curious-such "modern" dissonance, yet his piano style is
old-fashioned, the left hand rolled before the right, as of his own youth.
Pianists should listen.
Simon Barere Liszt (B Minor Sonata; shorter works). Vox Turnabout THS 65001, 2-ch., mono.
No date-but Barere died 1950-was this his farewell concert (coughs,
edited)? Seems to be early tape, via mic hanging over stage by the sound.
Carnegie Hall? Could be. Rather dry Liszt playing, French style, but plenty
potent.
RCA DOMESTIC
Amram: Triple Concerto for Woodwind, Brass, Jazz Quintets and
Orchestra; Elegy for Violin and
Orch. David Amram Quintet,
Howard Weiss, vl., Rochester
Philharmonic, Zinman. RCA ARL1-
Amram is an all-around powerhouse whose music-classical, jazz, anything
-spills out at an incredible rate, unerringly big-time, always slickly done,
but spendthrift and ill -digested. Enough material here for 20 pieces, jazz
(self-conscious, I'd say), near -East folk tunes, Pakistani flute, a skillful
mish-mash framed in snazzy orchestral dissonance, 1950s style. His "Elegy"
is shorter and simpler, more listenable.
0459, stereo.
The Cleveland Quartet. Schubert:
Quartet No. 14 ("Death and the
Maiden"); Mozart: Adagio and
Fugue in C mi., K. 546. RCA
ARL1-0483, stereo.
This 1969 offshoot of Columbia's Marlboro is billed as successor to the
famed Budapest-yes, they are closer than other quartets, the sound lean
and well blended, the intensity extraordinary (maybe even more than
Schubert bargained for!). Very 20th c. The grand Budapest architecture
isn't quite there yet, but this group does play music. They'll go far if they
stick together.
Messiaen: Visions de l'Amen. Peter
Serkin, Yuji Takahaahi, pianos.
RCA ARL1-0363, stereo.
Two enormous pianos on stage, two dedicated piano mystics, two sides of
very dissonant all-out mystical stuff about various kinds of Amens. Definitely for the new wave; you must be dedicated yourself! But Messiaen is
well served. Wish RCA had put more piano separation in the recording.
Rachmaninoff: The Bells, Op. 38
(1913); Three Russian Songs for
A splendid and revealing performance of this rarely heard big -scale cantata
for solos, chorus and orch. on Poe's The Bells. The piece needs a huge hi fi
sound, and it needs real dedication-it gets the works here. Positively gran-
Chorus & Orch., Op. 41 (1918).
Phyllis Curtin, Geo. Shirley, Michael Devlin, Temple Univ. Choirs,
Phila. Orch. Ormandy. RCA ARL10193, stereo.
diose! When the Phila. and Ormandy at last do music that is fresh, and
Ormandy's special sort too (Debussy, Sebelius, Rachmaninoff), then suddenly things happen! Wonderful. The Three Songs, Russian folk-ish, use
only the altos and basses of chorus. Fine, fat, enthusiastic chorus sound
throughout.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
92
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Pictures at an Exhibition and
Bolero. Philadelphia Orch., Ormandy. RCA ARL1-0451, stereo.
No potboilers here! A potboiler has been overcooked; that's not the way
these two Ravel -orchestrated masterpieces of the turn -of -the -century
orchestra sound on this disc. Gorgeous hi fi; played in perfect style, rather
slowly, allowing for every effect to perfection. Ormandy knows how, and
so does RCA. It's meat for both.
Ormandy/Philadelphia Spectacular
Marches. RCA ARL1-0450, stereo.
Ormandy/Philadelphia Spectacular
Choruses. With Phila. Orch. Cho-
RCA seems determined to run off all the potboilers it can ram through the
Phila. recording schedule. These are! I couldn't play more than a few minutes
of the big swimming -pool extravaganzas. You're welcome to try more, to
taste.
rus. RCA ARL1-0580, stereo.
Bolet at Carnegie Hall
RCA is plugging this solid neo -Romantic pianist-he's right in the RCA
groove, doing all the old chestnuts brilliantly. Might call it Rubinstein in-
(Feb. 25,
1974). RCA ARL2-0512, stereo.
surance. Mostly hyphen -arrangements here-Bach-Busoni, Strauss-Tausig,
Wagner -Liszt, piano spectaculars all.
THE IVES 100th
Charles Ives-The 100th Anniversary,
Columbia M4 32504 (four discs),
mono/stereo, $23.98.
A thousand recordings waiting for
review-and I get myself all tied up
in this monumental commemorative
album for days! Why not-that's why
we listen to records.
Columbia is a past corporate master
at producing big spectaculars and this
is one of its best and most opportune,
to celebrate the anniversary of the eccentric musical sage of Danbury,
Conn. Not all the recordings are reissues but some are, properly and judi-
ciously added to a good deal of new
material. There is a disc of big as-
sorted
orchestral -chamber
works,
"The Many Faces of Charles Ives,"
a disc of Ives dramatics, including the
cantata "Celestial Country," "Lincoln,
the Great Commoner," etc. A whole
disc goes to 25 Ives songs, with Helen
Boatwright and the Ives specialist
John Kirkpatrick, and to round things
out there is an interesting entire LP
of Ives himself at the piano, playing
Ives both improvised on the spot and
from the printed notes, more or less.
Very instructive. Then comes a fifth
wheel, a Columbia bonus disc on
which friends and close relatives offer Ives reminiscences-they are listed,
but you will have trouble figuring
which is which on the record and
Columbia evidently intended it that
way, as a sort of impressionistic
sound picture in words.
Then, of course, there is the big, fat
Columbia book of text and pictures, a
bit arty and over -styled as always but
crammed with an astonishing array of
interesting material.
I am glad to find that, at last, Ives
begins to emerge from all the facets of
this album, spoken, performed and in
print and photographs, as the genuine
turn -or -the -century late Romantic that
he really was, in some senses a sheer
the feel and ways of around 1900. He
wanted it that way. He was dedicated
Mrs. Ha Ha really isn't bad! A bit
longwinded and overblown, to be
to that world, not at all to the world
sure; but her hand is steady and her
of "modern music" into which he lived
on for many long years.
No criticism! Ives is Ives and there
aren't many like him.
knowledge very sure, especially in the
piano part, since she was a pianist.
Gotta respect any pianist who can
write his (her) own music in
style.
Arthur Foote is more Brahms-ish, less
Americana Vol. III. Mrs. Amy Beach:
Piano Quintet. Arthur Foote: Piano
Quintet. Mary Louise Boehm pf., K.
Kooper, A. Rogers, R. Maximoff, F.
Sherry. Vox Turnabout TV -S 34556,
stereo, $2.98.
Ha ha! I never thought I would run
into this Mrs. Beach, so to speak, in her
musical person and I had to laugh
when I first saw this disc. Back ages
ago, when we were cocky young music students, we used to make fun of
the super -Romantic old-line compos-
ers who were the first American
generation - we hated all Romantic
music, of course, and would only listen
to Bach and Purcell. Mrs. H. H. A.
Beach was one of the more preposternames-she was everywhere
ous
called Mrs. Ha Ha Beach, a long-
time Boston resident from 1885 onward and in point of fact one of the
very first truly American composers
of the New Renaissance that began at
the turn of the century and just before-the Boston School.
Since those brash student days of
mine,
have discovered how interI
esting these early folk were, once you
accustomed yourself to their all-out,
bouncing American Romanticism, no
holds barred. George W. Chadwick,
John Knowles Paine, in Boston with
Mrs. Ha Ha, Horatio Parker at YaleIves's teacher-McDowell in New
York, Hadley, Converse, Mason, and so
on. And, again in Boston, Arthur Foote.
One day in the thirties an ancient old
man came into my class in orchestra-
conservative, eccentric genius, too,
tion with Walter Piston, and sat listening-Arthur Foote in person, the
sage of musical Boston. Here he is,
whose world simply never got beyond
too, on this same record.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
near -impressionist, more cogent, in
his Quintet; but I like them both and
I
liked these warm, easy perform-
ances.
Debussy Maurice RavelString Quartets. The Danish Quartet.
Telefunken SAT 22541, stereo, $5.98.
These two "Impressionist" Quartets
are invariably programmed together
on discs, and yet they are so different,
Claude
the Debussy a complex, thick -textured
pieces related to his very last chamber
works just before his death in mid WWI, the Ravel much more stylized,
simpler, more playable (Ravel was a
genius at instrumentation-writing
idiomatically for any given instrument or combination of instruments)
and, in the long run, a much less
interesting work; the Debussy is the
one. Neither composer wrote
another string quartet.
big
A Danish performance? Sounds unlikely, somehow, but it isn't. These are
excellent versions, both of them, thor-
oughly musical, accurate, alive, very
much aware of the proper stylization
that rings out the late -Romantic Impressionistic
effects, the dramatic
colors and moods and textures. A literal -minded reading of the notes can
be deadly-and often has been! A fine
recorded sound, too-except that as so
often in the past I seem to detect a
slight fuzzy edge to the Telefunken
string sound. Never have been able to
figure this out. Could it be a slightly
different groove cut? Is it really their
distortion, not mine? A mystery ever
since
got me my very first TelefunI
ken LPs back at the beginning.
(Continued on page 99)
93
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
(Continued from page 93)
Mozart Violin Concertos (No. 1, K. 207;
sound! In my opinion there simply is
no problem (for the listener, anyhow)
No. 3, K. 216). Pinchas Zukerman;
English Chamber Orch., Barenboim.
Columbia MQ 32301, SQ quadra-
with "ambience" quadraphonic via SQ
when the central interest is basically
up front and the room sound all around.
phonic, $6.98.
When the instruments-classical or
otherwise-begin to spread their
Zukerman Plays and Conducts Vivaldi
Four Concertos (Nos. 9-12, Op. 8 "II
cemento ... "). English Chamber Orch.,
Neil Black, oboe. Columbia MQ 32840,
SQ quadraphonic, $6.98.
The Mozart is vigorously played in
the orchestra but with a hard sound,
not really well phrased, not sensitivethis, I gather, is Daniel Baremboim. He
is often that way. Zukerman's violin is
better; he continues to grow and mature, I'd say, though his violin still
retains some of that peculiarly treacly
sound, so much like old Fritz Kreisler!
Not appropriate to Mozart, really, but
it doesn't interfere here. These performers are in the all-over much too
accomplished to play Mozart badly,
but I think there have been other performances at a higher, more sensitive
musical level, more reverent, shall I
say.
(Well-yes! One could also say that it
is high time we got away from too
much humble reverence, in the Austrian manner, for every note Mozart
the God deigned to write down on
paper. These concerti were solid show
pieces, original but not really Mozart's
highest production even at the early
age when he composed all of them. I
can sense that these performances
serve to take a few mystical wraps off
the Great Genius, perhaps in the long
run to his good. I'll buy the idea, and
admit, too, that both Barenboim and
Zukerman have been big successes,
alive and on discs. Maybe in part on
this very basis, for the new generation
of listeners.)
Zukerman's Vivaldi-he plays three
direct sources all the way around, we
have problems and CD -4 is likely to
have a good answer to them, at least
when the CD -4 is well recorded and
the reproduction is rightly tuned up ...
So, onward and upward.
Glenn
Gould-Bach:
The
French
Suites, Vol. 2 Nos 5 and 6; Overture
in the French Style. Columbia M
32853, stereo, $5.98.
The Glenn Gould all -recorded piano
career continues-he has not played a
live concert these many years nor
apparently ever will again. Here,
Mr. Audio, is the very artistic embodiment of your special discipline! Give
him his due.
This Bach, if I am right, is post truck.
In his Rolling Stone interview Gould
notes that his piano, the only one he
ever plays (records) upon, fell off a
truck and had to be rebuilt. By himself,
I gather. At this point it had not yet
settled back into its former supple-
ness and, accordingly, his playing was
modified on the spot (he does very
little formal practicing) to accommodate the changed feel and sound of
the rebuilt instrument. It is indeed
I
I
cation
transferred
achieve. How does he learn,
aldi's writing here: his fruity fiddle
sound and occasional vibrato does
not really intrude and the Vivaldi is
good. And do I also note a gentler,
milder sound from the orchestra, here
under his charge? think so. The
Barenboim touch is gone. For better
I
or worse.
In both discs the SQ is excellent
and honest. As stereo, the recording is
chamber style, impeccably done, a
bit on the close side. In SQ-with-logic
the room spreads out and the music is
richer and more expressive for being
bigger. No problem with the solo-SQ
does fine in front and neither Vivaldi
nor Mozart asks for Center Back solo
I
I
Bach, not harpsichordish Bach either,
Seasons" recording. He has caught the
sturdy, foursquare precision of Viv-
I
not pianistic Bach, not "authentic"
therefore more idiomatic, better music, than his presumably earlier "Four
oboe-is more mature, I'd say, and
I
I
I
just the genuine musical communi-
say,
an advanced late Beethoven Sonata?
He doesn't bother to study it at the
piano in the usual way; he just reads
over in his head and learns the
entire music in short order; then he
it
goes to his piano and plays it, spend-
ing a bit of time on details of fingering and the like, just to be sure all goes
well. But do not think this is casualness or sloth-just listen! Mozart as
casually composed his symphonies
complete in his head, then put off
writing them down because of the
work. This Bach, learned in a flash
no doubt, nevertheless cost its performer as much of his inner vitality as
you might spend in weeks. Conservation of energy!
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
99
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
1
1
1
1
cato side-but so warm and fluent
and easy! Astonishing, and characteristic of this still developing genius
of the pianistic art. The music is so
real, so individual, so first-hand,
1
1
fingered here and there, on the stac-
somewhat "pointy" and stiff -
1
I
I
I
I
I
straight from
Gould to that rebuilt keyboard.
Genius? My term for him and with
good reason. Genius takes in stride
what other souls struggle and seldom
violin concertos and the fourth is for
I
I
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Theater Music
SHOW BOAT. Selections from the
1932 production. Columbia AC 55,
mono, $6.98.
ing from the throat, with hardly any
volume from chest tones, and those
ghastly rolling r's, Melton's Gaylord
Ravenal sounds oddly like Jerry Col-
The first record album ever devoted
to songs from a single Broadway score
onna.
was a selection, in 1932, from the revival of the great Kern/Hammerstein
will give the post-war generation an
Show Boat. Columbia Records' Special
Products division has released this 40 year -old favorite on a mono LP, and it
will be a welcome addition to the collec-
another reminder of how greatly our
musical idiom has changed in a half -
tions of those interested in American
musical theatre. The entire album has
an unaffected, unselfconscious appeal
that antedates today's rather more slick,
highly technocratized approach to show
albums. The orchestration is modest
and directed to straightforward presentation of the wondrous Kern score, and
the singers have a refreshing sponta-
once of considerable differences be-
tween this cast and that of later revivals or of the film version which were
not,
I think, always as good as this.
Paul Robeson's 01' Man River re-
Beverly Hills
CA 90212
( 213) 391-0320
Recrion, Limited
23 Vesta Drive
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ticipate more in the future. In the mean-
time, this Show Boat is a little selfcontained education about an era that
is always in danger of being forgotten.
Donald M. Spoto
LEONARD BERNSTEIN CONDUCTS
HIS MUSIC FOR THE THEATRE.
New York Philharmonic Orch. Colum-
bia MG32174, 2 discs, stereo.
in the '60's, had a resonant operatic
current campaign focussing on American composers (see my colleague's
remarks on the Copland disc in AUDIO
for June '73). The selections included
are: Symphonic Dances from West
quality in his voice, but with that, this
song became glamorous. Robeson's
higher, tentative voice is more moving;
you get a better sense of Joe's exhaustion and anguish in his unadorned vocal
simplicity.
The highlights of the disc, for me,
Lovin' Dat Man. Here was a voice of
singular delicacy and poignancy, and
I like to think of her not fully aware of
in Canada...
The Columbia series, incidentally, is
a good idea: since their archives must
contain many additional stampings of
other old shows, we can perhaps an-
Columbia has released this
record retrospective of Leonard
MONO CONVERSION: The addition of one
BGW Systems
P.O. Box 3742
century.
mains a classic, untarnished by familiarity. William Warfield, who sang it
in the 1951 film and at Lincoln Center
are Helen Morgan's Bill and Can't Help
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Victor Young's orchestra and chorus
that-it all sounds so uncontrived.
Singers with more vocal sheen and
more dramatic intent overload Hammer -
stein's lyrics with tremolos, trills and
glottal pauses. Helen Morgan, however, just directed the song from her
heart to the audience, perhaps uncon-
stein's theater music as
two Bern -
part of its
Side Story; the overture to Candide;
Facsimile; two meditations from Mass;
Fancy Free; parts of On the Townall of which were previously available.
The dances from West Side Story are
unmistakably
Bernstein-alternately
raucous and lyrical. Somewhere, for
example, recalls the pastoral quality
that characterized the boy soprano solo
in the composer's Chichester Psalms,
and the haunting love theme from Qn
the Waterfront. In West Side Story,
however, Bernstein created mood rather
less subtly. It is interesting, too, to
scious of technique. The result is a blend
of innocence and sensuality that is
note the homages to Copland, which
are frequent and uneven: the scherzo
echoes whole phrases in Appalachian
almost achingly sad.
Spring. Distinctively American, slightly
obsessed with pizzicati, and irresistibly
inviting to toe -tapping, Bernstein often
alternately warm, funny, tender and
By contrast, James Melton represented the sort of tenor no one could
take seriously today. With all his sing-
whips his orchestra to fever pitch (and
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
100
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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IlitInlosh CATALOG
nd FM DIRECTORY
Get all the newest and latest information on the new McIntosh Sol-
id State equipment in the McIntosh catalog. In addition you will
receive an FM station directory that covers all of North America.
shows clear predilection for percussion
effects). Subtle it isn't. But it is undeniably theatrical.
Facsimile was the second score Bernstein wrote for a Jerome Robbins
ballet (Fancy Free was the first), and
its liabilities are evident even on first
hearing. As in other Bernstein works
(the Mass and On the Town are dis-
parate but bear a
curiously related
substratum of musical invention), he
ggigi`s'
11,5: n.
..it
R al
ill
a6
disappoints just when the music begins
to be interesting. I have the impression
lol
that-for all his wild abandon on the
á
podium-Bernstein is himself too controlled in his composing. His music
never seems wholly credible; it does
not have its own inner logic; we are
aware of some kind of steely manipulation. Facsimile is a score that re-
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analysis, less than compelling.
Fancy Free, however, fares better.
The idea for this ballet was a given,
and the dance hall/moody jazz state-
Dept. 1
TODAY!
ments flow along with disarming simplicity. On the Town is, I think, less
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
lentlessly pursues a sociological statement, and in spite of its thematic
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ZIP
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fortunate.
The overture to Candide never cloys.
Its direct appeal lies partly in the carnival spirit that informs it, and partly
Bernstein's sense of the irony in
Voltaire's story, which he has neatly
turned into an operetta of enormous
life and wit (I belong to that small
group who believes Candide is one of
in
the most brilliant musicals in American
history; the original cast album, happily, has been released on the same
label.)
Meditations from Mass, Bernstein's
latest composition, prove to be even
less
fortunate than they did on the
original cast album. His Mahleresque
tempi have the odd effect of revealing
the pallid melodic line and indifferent
orchestration.
Because of Leonard Bernstein's im-
pact on musical theatre (Wonderful
Town has just been re-released, too;
it's pure fun), on music education, in
his capacity with the New York Phil-
harmonic, he has become a controversial but undeniably major figure. It
is good, therefore, that we have this
set,
which
brings
together
earlier,
apposite recordings under his baton.
The man who has become "American
music's matinée idol," as Richard
Kostalanetz has said, conducts his own
works with loving attention to detail,
and the processing has been done with
care.
PAIR has synthesizers you can build to your own specifications at your own pace. Complete keyboard packages
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Donald M. Spoto
Performance: A 102
Sound: A -
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
Jazz & Blues
SONNY STITT: So Doggone Good
Musicians: Sonny Stitt, tenor sax,
alto sax; Hampton Hawes, piano;
Reggie Johnson,
bass; Lennie
McBrowne, drums.
of his own tunes for a change. It
Songs: Back Door; Your Love is So
Doggone Good; Orange Ashtray; l
Don't Know Yet; The More I See
several choruses of powerful,
mellow blues -tempo excursions.
You; Speculation.
Prestige P-10074, stereo, $5.98.
"With impeccable taste" describes
well the selection of the title and the
music on both sides of this album.
Sonny blows comparably well on here
as he did on his masterpiece Tune-up
and its follow-up Constellation. All
the
cuts
herein
are
straight -ahead
swingers, several of which are Stitt
originals. (Orange Ashtray, Speculation,
So Doggone Good) probably composed
for this particular date. He doesn't
do any of Bird's tunes on this album
as on previous releases. There is an
obvious thematic quotation of Constellation on Speculation-but that's
it! As much as I dig Bird, it's refreshing
to see Sonny writing and recording some
is
also significant that ordinarily predictable commercial renditions of popular
tunes are absent here. Stitt does use
The More I See You as a vehicle for
yet
Dex's group should be released soon
on one of the Fantasy labels.)
Reggie Johnson plays bass with a
lot of gusto here. Anyone, like myself,
who is inspired by a good bassist can
sit back and enjoy this. His excellent
playing is enhanced by an equally fine
The musicians on this date make
for an agreeable change from Stitt's
recording job. A thousand compliments to Prestige for adjusting the
Cobblestone releases. These ears
appreciate hearing this superb sax
player fronting a different rhythm
section. Unfortunately, this group
mixing of the bass on recent releases.
Their improvement adds the necessary
great if they did since they managed a
McBrowne supports the group with
unquestionable drive. He sounds better
on these tracks than on previous recordings, attributable to the mellower sound
doesn't tour with Stitt. It would be
very "loose" feel for the short time
that the studio's red light was on.
It is especially good to hear more of
Hampton Hawes again, particularly
on
acoustic
piano.
His
solos
are
technically clean and musically creative-nothing unusual for him. My
favorites are Back Door and the aerial tempo Speculation. Anyone who recently
saw Hawes backing Dexter Gordon on
a videotape from Montreaux '73 on
educational TV can understand Stitt's
choice for this keyboard man. (Incidentally, the Hawes workout with
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
pulse that the bass is primarily there
for and makes for a thoroughly warmer
recording.
of this product. It sounds, though, as
if McBrowne's snare drum is tuned a
peck too tight, His ordinarily relaxed
feel is, therefore, contrived to sound
somewhat
tense on
the
up -tempo
Speculation.
That shouldn't stop anyone from
picking up this Stitt release, however.
The music is warm and happy. And,
it sounds like a bright and "Sonny"
spring day.
Eric Henry
103
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Max
Beat-Art Blakey
Roach Elvin Jones Philly Joe
The
Big
Jones
Musicians: Art Blakey, drums; Freddie
Hubbard, trumpet; Curtis Fuller,
trombone; Wayne Shorter, tenor
sax; Cedar Walton, piano; Reggie
Workman, bass; Elvin Jones, drums;
Thad Jones, cornet; Frank Wess,
flute; Frank Foster, tenor sax; Hank
Jones, piano; Art Davis, bass; Max
Roach, drums; Booker Little, trumpet; George Coleman, tenor sax;
Ray Draper, tuba; Philly Joe Jones,
drums; Lee Morgan, trumpet; Blue
Mitchell, trumpet; Cannonball Adder -
alto; Benny Golson, tenor sax;
Sahib Shihab, baritone sax; Wynton
Kelly, piano; Sam Jones, bass.
Songs: Caravan; The High Priest; The
Theme; Conversation; Jodie's Cha Cha; Larry-Larue; You Stepped Out
ley,
of a Dream; Lady Luck; Buzz -at;
He swings the pants off the group on
this one with lively accompaniment by
Cedar Walton on piano and Reggie
Workman on bass. Conversation is a
classic drum solo by Max Roach. Here
he uses his set in a very musical waymaking his monologue sound like a
very interesting party line. Philly Joe
Jones' melodic playing on Benny
Golson's Stablemates is in the myste-
rious Night in Tunisia idiom at the
head, and then it goes into a straight
of hearing an album dominated by
lengthy drum solos. Rather this LP
is a very tasty collection of unique
musical blends. As one can see by
perusing the list of musicians, each
drummer's group is composed of
today's giants as they were in their
formative or at least earlier years.
This package is a powerhouse of
rare material, all the sides having been
out of print for years. There is even
a cut, entitled The Theme by Art
Blakey (recorded years ago at Bird land), that is being released here for
the first time.
The cuts date from 1958 to
1963.
The various styles of drumming range
from Max Roach's intense drive of
the bop and cool eras (where time was
on the ride cymbal) to Elvin Jones'
revolutionary freeing
of hands and
feet to imply the time. Listening to
some of the changes from Max's group
to Elvin's, one can't help wondering
whether it wasn't the drummer who
played a decisive role in continuously
modernizing the sounds of the jazz
group. Certainly, the drummer has
Wess on flute on Buzz -at is especially
uplifting. These are cuts from an album
originally entitled Elvin. When asked
to put together these sides for that
original LP, he insisted on "a wellrounded musical date" without any
excessive or forced building around
and over -spotlighting of the drummerproduction
turned
out
exactly
as
swinging as those on this reissue, and
Milestone should seek to release these
on some upcoming reissue date.
The
typically
creative
and
neat
Milestone cover design features a big
bass drum pedal curling completely
around the outside. Knowing
what you have to look for, I suggest
you truck on out to snatch up a copy
of The Big Beat. That way you can
relax and groove on these beautiful
sides
and
read Leonard
Feather's
comprehensive liner notes for some
interesting
historical
background.
Meanwhile, I'll be able to stop writing
and get back to listening to my copy.
Eric Henry
McCoy Tyner-Enlightenment. Recorded live at the Monteaux Jazz
Festival, Summer, 1973.
Musicians; McCoy Tyner, piano;
Joonie Booth, bass; Azar Lawrence,
tenor and soprano saxes; Alphonse
Mouzon, drums.
Selections: Presenting the Tyner
Quartet (announced by Pierre Lettes,
a French DJ); Enlightenment Suite,
Part
1-Genesis;
Enlightenment
Part 2-The Offering; Enlightenment Suite, Part 3-Inner
Suite,
Glimpse;
Presence;
Nebula;
Walk
influenced changes in rhythm and
feel, as historically happened in Trane's
Spirit, Talk Spirit-Introduction; Walk
Spirit, Talk Spirit.
group with Elvin. That's as far as I'll
go, the rest can be better discussed in
a doctoral thesis or while listening to
Milestone M-55001, 2 discs, $6.98.
You can listen to certain albums a
thousand times and find that's still
not enough. McCoy Tyner's Enlighten-
the album with some friends.
The standout on this reissue must
be Art Blakey on Jodie's Cha -Cha.
electronically uncluttered sound. McCoy
his
planned. The rest of the cuts are as
jazz fans should not shy away for fear
from a myriad of others by its pure,
uses only acoustic piano, evidencing
The Tribal Message.
to pick up
this bag of goodies. However, other
Tyner's compositions are meticulously
written (e.g. his large ensemble creations on Song of the New World, his
last Milestone release) and they showcase his improvisational prowess.
Tyner's quartet is distinguishable
The entire Elvin Jones side is invaluable. Most of the writing is by
brother Thad. Solo work by Frank
leader. Having the original album in
my collection, I can say that Elvin's
S 6.98.
Drummers are obligated
progressive goliath of the keyboard.
ahead swing.
Pretty Brown; Six and Four; Stablemátes; The Carioca (El Tambores);
Battery Blues; Gone, Gone, Gone;
Milestone M47016, 2 discs, stereo,
special releases. Here is McCoy Tyner
matching and exceeding the reputation
he has earned as the contemporary
recorded live at the Montreaux
Jazz Festival, is one of those extra
ment,
no -compromise attitude in a
commercially disposed record industry.
The Enlightenment Suite is just that.
Listening to the first part, Genesis
(in '/a), alerts the audience to the gems
of spontaneity that are being unearthed
as the concert is being born. Musical
treats are to follow. McCoy begins
laying down deep, dark chords with
his left hand as his right hand scoots
up and down the upper registers to
slip the melody line in.
If you've ever seen McCoy in person,
you know that on a cut like Genesis
it is still possible to see his stealthy
hands as single images, syncopating
infinite rhythms. On a composition
like Inner Glimpse, the final part of
the suite and in an up -tempo 4, the
jets in his fingers are fired and his
hands appear as but a supernatural
blur. The listener will be dazzled and
pleased by Tyner's awesome technique
and beautiful ideas on this piece, as
was the inspirational audience at Montreaux last summer.
Azar Lawrence is an explosive tenor
player whose full tone and flowing
ideas are an indispensable asset to
the group. His solo on Presence is an
enjoyable free bag. Although playing
is
often misinterpreted by
listeners as music lacking form, and is
misinterpreted by many artists as the
permission to pass off endless honks
freely
in some "rude" watery tone, this is
not the case with Lawrence. In order
to play freely, one must understand
harmony and have a mastery of one's
axe-so that where there is no recogniz-
able traditional structure, one has the
ability to impart a very special and
logical structure of his own. Lawrence
is one of a small group of players with
savoir faire to create structure where
with many other tenor players, the
void would not be filled. For this
reason, he fits tightly into McCoy's
group.
Drummer Mouzon has since left the
group to play with Larry Coryell. This
may satisfy certain listeners since his
loud in -person performances often
made it impossible to hear the rest
of the group clearly. Mouzon does
sound good on this LP though. His
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
104
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performance doesn't have the sound
of one big crash cymbal having just
fallen off a 10 -foot high stand, as in
person. This might be attributed to
good judgment in mixing the recording
prior to pressing. Mouzon is an
energetic and
musical drummer
though, and this performance neutral-
izes some of the previous criticism
and low esteem on my part.
This Milestone release has a crisp,
clean sound, enabling the listener to
Delilah-playing with the inspired air
of his flights with Miles. This happens
to be a third take and although never
issued before it deserves to be out of the
vaults and on the turntable. Stable
Mates is a pleasant surprise featuring
Philly Joe's tasty Casbah-like entrances
on the head and then swinging into the
solos. This Benny Golson chart can also
be heard on The Big Beat (Milestone
M-47016) which features Philly Joe
in the company of a large ensemble.
appreciate the intricate nuances of
Joonie Booth's double stops and
Blue Roz is just that-the blues. Some
accents (with the fingers of his left
Bags. S.K.J., an old Bags tune (pardon
hand) on upright bass. Booth's technical
finesse and Mouzon's polyrhythms keep
the coals in a flare behind McCoy.
the play on words-I couldn't resist),
rounds out the set. It's unmistakably in
Action shots of the quartet at Mon-
fingers topping by Wes.
On the other disc of the set, Wes
treaux cover the double -pocketed
jacket. Inside is a pleasant, airy,
summery picture of Tyner overlooking
a river at Montreaux plus a few choice
words depicting his views of the
good straight -ahead blowing by Wes and
the flavor of Milt with some flashy
teams up with members of the family
Montgomery, vibes; Monk
Montgomery, bass) and George Shear(Buddy
ing. The Lamp is Low but not on this
music and camaraderie which help to
date. The group is burning behind the
produce
latin percussion of Peraza and Chimelis.
Similarly, Stranger in Paradise is a
light 'n airy cut, rhythmically propelled
by the congas of Armando Peraza. When
you get to No Hard Feelings sit back
such
enjoyable
festivals.
Finally, hats off to Milestone for releasing this one in its entirety. When
the word gets around how good this
LP is, there may be a shortage of it
too.
Eric Henry
WES AND FRIENDS
Musicians: Wes Montgomery, guitar;
Milt Jackson, vibes; Wynton Kelly,
piano; Sam Jones, bass; Philly Joe
Jones, drums; Buddy Montgomery,
vibes; George Shearing, piano; Monk
Montgomery, electric bass; Walter
Perkins, drums; Armando Peraza and
Richard Chimelis, latin percussion.
Songs: S.K.J.; Stable Mates; Stairway
to
the Stars; Jingles; Sam Sack;
Delilah; Blue Roz; Love Walked In;
Love for Sale; No Hard Feelings;
Enchanted; Stranger in Paradise; The
Lamp is Low; Double Deal; And Then
I Wrote; Darn That Dream; Lois Ann;
Mambo in Chimes.
Milestone M-47013, 2 discs, $7.98.
On smart reissues like this, there is
not much one can say without repeating
superlatives that were used in describing
the albums when they were originally
issued. The two discs (Bags and Wes,
George Shearing and Wes) are wisely
packaged together since they typify a
fruitful period in Wes' career (late
1961) when, for him, things were beginning to click.
The first disc spotlights Milt Jackson
with Wes. The duo sparkles, with able
backing by all-stars Philly Joe Jones
and Wynton Kelly, apparently on leave
from the then Miles David Quintet.
Bags solos especially well on the relaxed
and beautiful ballad Stairway to the
Stars.
Listen
to Wynton Kelly on
in the shade of that big oak tree this
summer and relax. This tune is an easy
one which characterizes a session like this where close
friends get together to make beautiful
going, swinging
music-and nothing can
wrong.
Enchanted is quite so, with vibes,
go
piano and guitar interweaving magic
harmonies.
Inside the album jacket you'll find
a full length interview with Wes Montgomery, circa 1963. Also, there's some
interesting info about Wes almost joining Trane way back when, but ..
.
If you have the original releases of
these sides, you have probably worn
them far enough into the grooves to
be able to hold them up to that three-
way bulb in the den and see clear
through the disc. In other words, these
things are out of print. Sure, you might
find one or two copies in the Hooterville
five and dime, but this Milestone
reissue offers both records reexamined,
redone, remastered, rereleased ... and
now, ready to be rebought. Eric Henry
Herbie Hancock: Sextant
Musicians: Mwandishi (Herbie Hancock), electric and acoustic pianos,
clavinet, dakha di bello, melotron,
handclap; Mwile (Benny Maupin),
soprano sax, bass clarinet, piccolo,
afuche, hum a zoo; Mganga (Dr.
Eddie Henderson), trumpet, fluegelhorn; Pepo (Julian Priester), trombones; Mchezaji (Buster Williams),
electric and acoustic basses; Jabali
(Billy
Hart),
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
Dr.
Patrick
Buck
Clarke, congas, bongos.
Songs: Rain Dance; Hidden Shadows;
Hornets.
Columbia KC 32212, $4.98.
Webster defines a sextant as an
instrument for measuring altitudes of
celestial bodies from a moving ship or
airplane. Of course, such measurements
are most inconvenient, there being no
fixed frame of reference. Perhaps that
is the reason for giving Herbie Han -
cock's album such a name, because
the musicians and producers with sly
grins on their faces are cognizant of
the music's cosmic nature
and its
capacity to elude your average listener.
Please don't be turned away from
the album just because of that first
paragraph. If you like the overuse of
electronics by Miles Davis and Weather
Report, you'll probably dig this. As is
the case with Miles and WR, the personnel used on this date is top notch.
Unfortunately, the listener gets to hear
them in only one setting-the mildly
galactic.
Rain Dance is the cut I enjoyed most.
The cut seems to be at least partially
conceived prior to the moment of recording. Its sounds conjure up visions
of a huge bubbling pot, overflowing
with steam and being stirred by the
ominous -looking soul on the back cover
of the jacket. I found Hidden Shadows
at least rhythmically interesting as
well. Odd meter, unique syncopation
and well -executed bass lines by Buster
Williams added new colors and textures to what this listener thought would
be more of the first cut. It is interesting
to note that the horns function as the
rhythm section should-repeating certain
melodies over and over again-while
each of the members of the rhythm
section solos simultaneously
the
antithesis of conventional playing.
Despite some favorable comments,
I found very little material worth
.
.
.
remembering. For the most part, the
music seems to be merely an aggregation of ramdom
twists and
turns
which the purveyors term "free form."
Although Hancock is heard in a setting
which is becoming more in vogue these
days (perhaps because of other artists'
success at the cash register with it),
the products of this date appear to be
little more than trifling experimentation.
The reader would be well rewarded in
picking up Speak Like a Child, The
Prisoner or even Joe Farrell's Moon
Germs (featuring HH and recorded at
the same time as Sextant).
These
more aptly demonstrate the
heights to which a great artist like
albums
Hancock can aspire.
AUDIO
106
drums;
Gleeson, ARP synthesizers;
NOVEMBER 1974
Some of the music on Sextant is fine
for a change of pace-and can be thrown
The ADC-XLM.
A significant difference.
in on a more contemporary album in
good taste as a token cut. But, it is
difficult to tolerate as a steady jazz
diet, at least for this reviewer. Hopefully, this album will be used as a sextant by HH in helping him redetermine
his position and chart his course in a
different direction.
Eric Henry
Mordicai Jones
Musicians: Link Wray, guitar, dobro,
bass, steel; Doug Wray, rhythm
guitar, proccnail can, vocal; Billy
Hodges, organ piano, scratcher,
vocal; John Grummere, electric
rhythm guitar, vocal; Ned Levitt,
foot, hands, vocal; Norman Sue,
bass, vocal; Steve Verroca, drums,
vocal; Mordicai Jones, lead vocals,
piano, mandolin, harp.
Songs: Walkin' in the Arizona Sun;
Tf e phDno
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cartridge,
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Scorpio Woman; The Coca-Cola Sign
ccrvey a st=rtlingly real sense of
ti3 original musical experience.
t doesn't you end up with a
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worse, a permanently damaged
Blinds My Eyes; All l Want to Say;
rar D rd
All Because of a Woman; On the Run;
Song of a Simple Man; Precious
Jewel; Days Before Custer; Gandy
Dance.
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Polydor PD 5010, stereo, $4.98.
The very talented Mordicai Jones,
whose real name is Bobby Howard but
he believes there are too many Bobbies,
has played with rock guitarist Link
Wray for over twelve years. And when
Wray made his comeback a couple of
years ago, he brought Jones with him,
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having taught him to play an arsenal
of instruments which include guitar,
mandolin, piano, organ, harp, bass,
and drums. But Mordicai Jones' forte
Ampzilla
seems to lie in his voice which he uses
here most persuasively.
is here...
Recorded at Wray's Shack Three Track, a chicken coop converted into
a studio in Accokeek, Maryland, the
sound is amazingly good for the rugged
conditions.
Mordicai pure and simple sings rock
with a country twang in material that
W. spend $750 to $1200 dollars for
is largely composed by the Wray family
an amplifier? The Great
except for one Roy Acuff tune, Precious Jewel. The songs are notable for
their unusual lyrics as illustrated by
the candidate for Men's Liberation,
.Íput for much less. In short
1AMPZILLA is here. In the
American Sound Company
sells one with a full complementary series connected ou.t-
.:September 1974 Popular Elec-
All Because of a Woman, where Jones
itronics, Hirsch -Houck Labs
"says '... solidly in the audio
sings
You wear the pants,
'monster amplifier class
using 8 ohm loads .. THD was less
.
I'll wear the shirt
over a vocal background that simulates
the whoo-whoo of a train whistle.
Jones is a very expressive singer, possessing a keen sense of dynamics. The
nostalgic biography of someone's father
is just such an example: Son of a
Simple Man. He is explosive in On
the Run, singing and accompanying
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himself on harp and backed up by a
scratcher and Wray's beguiling electric
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
guitar. Wray, incidentally, does some
fine picking throughout.
Noticeable also is Jones' imaginative
use of his sky -wide range, especially
in Days Before Custer in which his
voice fairly soars. Here, too, the sound
floats from one speaker to the other as
do clouds across the sky. The Coca
Cola Sign Blinds My Eyes is dynamite
while All I Want To Say scores high
melodically but has to overcome a
cluttered background.
Jones gives Walkin' In the Arizona
(which Wray and family are
humorous column for the New York
Journal -American.
Mr.
Condon's
autobiography entitled We Called It
Music, co-authored with Thomas Sugrue, was published in 1947.
In spite of his lifelong dedication to
bridge with authority, playing an embellishment -ridden piano. Then Smith
takes us on a rough and tumble joyride on his very own Sneakaway which
becomes orchestral in his execution of
it. I'll Follow You starts out with Smith
unscored music played by a small
band, Eddie Condon had no use for
being a trifle heavy-handed but it
eventually intertwines and flows along
be -bop
or progressive jazz as we
know it. Condon was strictly a crusader
like a river. And he lights right into
for traditional jazz. And he did not
consider jazz in and of itself an art
form. Mr. Condon once declared:
"Canning vegetables is an art form.
a tremendously energetic performance
of Here Comes the Band, literally
pouring it on and ending with a hardy
"Look out!"
Earl Hines manages to "struggle
probably doing right now) an authoritative treatment, all the while playing
mandolin, but Gandy Dance, taken at a
travelling tempo, made me come away
So's getting a suntan. Jazz is just un -
through" his own My Monday Date,
scored music."
inscribed with sparkling glissandos and
curvaceous switchbacks with drummer
George Wettling sitting in.
singing and appears to be the most
successful track of the bunch. The
barbs than for his musical prowess.
Sun
So we have a rare individual on
our hands, a man who is known as
much if not more for his quips and
mandolin against the guitar is lovely.
Not in the order of routine rock, this
is a highly effective recording-all the
That Eddie Condon was a wonderfully
witty raconteur comes right through on
this live recording of one of his Town
Hall concerts, vintage 1944. Throughout
way to the crickets.
this disc we hear Condon introduce
Performance B +
Sound B +
EDDIE CONDON: The Eddie Condon
Concerts-Town Hall 1944
Musicians: Eddie Condon, guitar;
Sidney Bechet, soprano saxophone;
Earl Hines, piano; Ed Hall, clarinet;
Cliff Jackson, piano; James P.
Johnson, piano; Gene Krupa, drums;
Hot Lips Page, vocals, trumpet; Pee
Wee Russell, clarinet; Willie Smith,
piano; Jess Stacy, piano; George
Wettling, drums.
Songs: Avalon; In Between the Devil
and the Deep Blue Sea; Sneakaway;
Caravan; Rose Room; I'll Follow
You; Here Comes the Band; When
My Sugar Walks Down the Street;
Uncle Sam Blues; The Sheik of
Araby;
Made;
There'll Be Some Changes
I Want to Be Happy; Just
Before Daybreak; Caprice Rag; China
Boy; My Monday Date; Dear Old
Southland; Impromptu Ensemble #3.
Chiaroscuro, CR113, $5.98.
Guitarist Eddie Condon recently
passed away at Mount Sinai Hospital
in New York at the age of 67 but he
most certainly will not be forgotten.
Self-taught on the banjo and ukelele
and a firm believer that "jazz cannot
be scored," he was at the helm of
musical groups from the thirties to
the fifties such as the Mound City
Blue Blowers where he doubled as
vocalist. Condon opened up his own
club on West Third Street which he
characterized
as
"Town
Hall
with
booze" and, when in 1957 it was torn
down, he moved to a new location in
the Sutton Hotel on East 56th Street.
Also during this period he wrote a
his fellow jazz musicians in his salty,
spirited, down to earth manner, forever egging them on to perform. And
it is decidely true that Eddie Condon
functions more as a master of cere-
Also on hand are Gene Schroeder
and Jess Stacy, Schroeder, one of the
great swing pianists of his day romping
through Avalon and Jess Stacy, whose
lucid, clean-cut lines emerge as if
they have just been freshly manicured
in Uncle Sam Blues. Last but not least
there's Cliff Jackson whose two-fisted,
exceedingly busy version of There'll Be
Some Changes Made is a joy to behold.
Clarinettist Edmond Hall also figures
very prominently in this LP, carrying
monies here than as a soloist. In fact,
we do not hear a single note emanate
from his guitar. One often wonders
whether Condon was indeed playing
off a
at all!
drums which contribute greatly to the
exoticism and allure of this Egyptian
contrivance. Hall plays a particularly
But no matter. He has a wealth of
talent with him. We have samples
here of a generous handful of jazz
pianists including Willie "the Lion"
Smith, Gene Schroeder, Jess Stacy,
Cliff Jackson, James
P.
Johnson, and
Earl "Fatha" Hines who is an entire
piano school unto himself. A special
star, in my way of thinking, is James P.
Johnson whose relaxed and melodic
performance of Just Before Daybreak
is
indeed a classic. There is great
sturdiness of tempo and a crisp yet
full clarinet tone in Caravan
where he plays a high note for all it
is worth, not letting it loose against
George Wettling's rumbling, thundering
rosey rendition of Rose Room with
some vivacious exchanges between the
clarinettist and drummer Gene Krupa
who is taking a holiday here from
his big band chores, beating on tin
cans and sending out great clunks
and jibes. After Krupa's thundering
beginning in The Sheik of Araby, Hall
enters light, surefooted, and smoothly
on clarinet,
tone.
disseminating excellent
light touch that approaches perfection
in his style. Johnson plays way up in
the treble, separating each note carefully and tapering them off finally to
nothing. His Caprice Rag is a foremost
example of ragtime played fast, something that fellow pianist Scott Joplin
might have frowned upon but Johnson
does it to a turn here, inserting a
surprising mid -section of grandiose
chords.
We are also witness to the singing
and playing of Hot Lips Page whose
voice is mellow and sugar -sweet in
When My Sugar Walks Down the
Street, whose trumpet is stalwart. And
the inimitable Sidney Bechet, introduced incidentally by Jimmy Dorsey,
unleashes an incredibly lush tone in
a rapid version of China Boy, further
elaborated with that unique Bechet
vibrato in a slow, moody statement
When one compares Willie "The
of Dear Old Southland which is evoca-
Lion" Smith to Johnson it's like comparing a lion to a lamb. Lion's
approach is a muddier yet more powerful one, brimful of lionized harmonies.
We hear Smith solo in several numbers,
one of which is his positively delicate,
In Between the Devil and the Deep
Blue Sea, in which he stalks into the
of New Orleans. Pointing his
soprano saxophone heavenward, Bechet
tive
brings it all to an end.
Although Chiaroscuro has released
this in stereo it is hardly noticeable
and the audio is surprisingly good
when one takes into consideration when
it was actually recorded. By the
way,
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
108
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
it has been made available to us from
a transcription by the Armed Forces
Radio Service.
French jazz writer Hughes Panassie
had this to say about Eddie Condon:
"Few musicians have so much to give
to a hot orchestra as Eddie, with his
metronomically regular rhythm which
induces superb swing."
Well, we may not hear him actually
play here, but Condon's joie de vevre
is contagious.
Performance B+
Sound B -
Earl Hines: Earl Hines at Home
Musician: Earl Hines, piano.
Songs: You Are Too Beautiful; Love at
Night is Out of Sight; It Happens to
Be Me; Minor Nothing; Moon Mare;
You'll Never Know;
The
Cannery
Walk.
by a marvelous tag in the upper reaches
of the keyboard.
Moon Mare and The Cannery Walk
are also Hines', Walk containing Shooting -Niagara runs and a boogie bass that
presides momentarily. Hines sings It
Happens To Be Me in memory of the
late Nat King Cole to his own accompaniment, but his voice does not come
Love At Night Is Out of Sight with
unpredictable
humming.
intervals
that
Unadulterated Hines, however, that
soothes the savage beast.
Performance
Sound B
B
through as it should and one has to
NATHAN ABSHIRE: Nathan Abshire
listen very closely to pick up his mellow
tones.
and Other Cajun Gems
Musicians: Nathan Abshire, vocal,
accordion; Lawrence Walker, vocal,
accordion; Eddie Duhon, vocal; Floyd
The recording is pleasant but lacks
some of the adventuresome spirit of
other efforts by Hines. He does not
stray far in You'll Never Know but fills
LeBlanc, fiddle; Harry Choates, vocal,
fiddle; Yvon LeBlanc, vocal.
Which speaker looks like
it sounds the best.
Delmark DS -212, stereo, $ 5.98.
Hines fans may visit him in his living
room at home playing his own perfectly tuned piano in this recording. A prize of
an instrument and in mint condition,
the antique Steinway grand was presented to Hines as a gift by Scott Newhall, executive editor of the San Francisco Chronicle.
Inscribed above the
keyboard on a silver plate are the words:
"Presented by jazz lovers from all over
the world. This piano is the only one
of its kind in the world and expresses
the great genius of a man who has never
played a melancholy note in his lifetime on a planet that has often succumbed to despair." The elaborately
carved Regency style instrument was
specially made by Steinway. in 1904 for
Leander S. Sherman, founder of the
Sherman Clay Music Stores.
One of the beauties of the recording, although it is prone to some surface
noise, particularly on side one, is the
very excellent reproduction of the
piano. It was recorded by the late
Wayne J. Farlow, a personal friend
of Hines, who believed in projecting the
natural sound of the instrument, overtones included.
Thus Hines' piano
fairly rings with brilliance and liveliness.
Hines displays his talents here as not
only the very original improviser and
jazzman that he is but as a composer,
and it is in the latter that he best shines
on this LP. Minor Nothing takes first
prize in this reviewer's book, an enigmatic heart-rending tune into which
Hines interjects a stride development
with its to-and-fro bass, cheering up
the otherwise somber key. Hines' descending left hand against his tinkling
right contributes to the jaunty spirit
of the tune and we are at last surprised
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
109
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played at folk music festivals all around
the country and the band may be seen
Songs: Pinegrove Blues; Kaplan Waltz;
Choupique Two Step; Shamrock
Waltz; Iota Two Step; Texas Waltz;
in Les Blank's film on the Cajuns
"Spend It All."
Point De Lou Two Step; Boscoe
If you can't find this recording at
Stomp; Tran La Ezy; Orphan Waltz;
Mama Rosin; Jole Blon's Gone;
your local store you may order it from
Arhoolie Records, Box 9195, Berkeley,
Louisiana Stomp.
Calif. 94709.
Arhoolie 5013, mono, $ 5.98.
Goerge Khoury, who owns a record
shop in Lake Charles, Louisiana which
is right in the heart of Cajun country,
recorded some of the musicians who
played the local honky tonks, dance
BACKWARDS SAM FIRK: The True
halls, and road houses in the area. Thus
nally on 78's back in the late 1940's
and early 50's and made available to
us once again by Chris Strachwitz of
Arhoolie Records.
Now Nathan Abshire, who works
regularly at the Basil city dump, just
happens to be one of the most suc-
cessful Cajun artists of the bunch.
Abshire took up accordion at a young
age and at the age of eight played his
first job. Although he found it difficult to make a living from his music,
his Pinegrove Blues, included here, was
a bestseller and contributed to the resurgence of Cajun music in the early
50's. In it, Abshire creates a kind of
drone -like effect on accordion, singing
out uninhibitedly with his band.
album
also
are
waltzes, two steps, blues, polkas, and
popular songs of the time. The Kaplan Waltz moves to a rollicking 34 time,
a peaceful melody wherein Abshire's
accordion fairly sings. The Shamrock
Waltz is very authoritative and features
a steel guitar and violin which lend
a country flavor to the tune.
The Choupique Two Step is a fast but
definitely danceable two step which
reminds me of Applachian mountain
music, all sung in Cajun and you can't
understand a word of it! Of interest
on the second side is Boscoe Stomp
with Lawrence Walker singing
the
vocals and playing accordion with the
band. His touch is light and is supMarch, 1974 issue
They chose this one:
The Audio-Technica AT -1009.
We're proud. But not surprised.
$139.95 and wortn every penny.
Write and we'll tell you why.
Or see for yourself at leading
audio showrooms everywhere.
audio technica.
AUDIO -TECHNICA U.S., INC., Dept.114A
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plemented by some nice violin playing
by an unidentified instrumentalist with
almost an Eastern flavor to his playing.
Instrumentally, however, Tran La
Ezy is the shining light, played by
the Musical Four Plus One and featuring Eddie Duhon on vocals and Floyd
LeBlanc on fiddle. And there
is
Blues and Gospel
Firk,
Backwards Sam
vocals, guitar; Thomas Hoskins,
Musicians:
we have this collection recorded origi-
the
Performance B
Sound B-
a
terrific anonymous guitarist whose
sound is downright jazzy. One of the
more coherent and better recorded
of the tunes is Jole Blon's Gone, featuring Harry Choates on vocal and
fiddle. The sound is understandably
uneven because of the vintage.
Today Nathan Abshire may be heard
with the Balfa Brothers who have
vocals, guitar; Stephan Michelson,
spoons.
Songs: I'm Glad Blues; East St. Louis
Dry Land Blues; Hey Hey Hey; Cigarette; Candy Man Blues; If You Don't
Want Me That Freight Train Whistle's Gonna Blow, Momma; Old Reliable One -Way Gal; Be Ready When
He Comes; Old Country Dump; Get
Back Old Devil; Poor Boy, Long
Ways From Home; West Side Blues;
I
Troubled;
Be's
Babe's
Place;
Fixin' to Die; The Unbroken Circle.
Adelphi AD 1001S, stereo, $5.95.
Backwards Sam Firk holds sway
over these blues with a mastery that
is rare. He can sing the slow blues,
the fast blues, the soft blues, the loud
blues.
Firk sings on five of the
sixteen
tracks included in this collection as a
high-keyed, high level musician/performer. On most of the songs he plays
here, he tunes his guitar to D or stand-
ard E. And together with these very
fine blues are Firk's colorful, pictorial
notes attached
thereunto
for
us
to
peruse while listening. For instance,
this is what Firk has to say about Bill
Moore's Old Country Dump which is
taken by Firk at a slow gait but which,
despite its snail -like pace, moves right
"Five old refrigerators
along.
.
.
.
appear. Then an old stove, over on
its side: a hot, gray lizard sits on it,
wondering who you are. Further on,
a little hill runs down from the side
of the road, strewn with torn bags of
grapefruit rinds and coffee grounds,
and rusty cans and beerbottles, and
watermelon rinds, and boxes of old
and broken chair -frames, and
old clothes -hampers, and old records
rags,
melted by the sun, and letters from
last year, and faded photographs from
twenty years ago, and a bicycle frame,
and car tires and truck tires.... You
look up-away from
the
stale,
dry
smell; up past the framework of trees
surrounding the clearing, into the
clear, bluish -white sky. You hear crows
talking among themselves somewhere,
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
110
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
but you don't see them; you hear
something a few feet away as a big
blacksnake winds through the trash
looking for rats; you see how the pile
of rubbish runs down the hill and
stops, and how there are a few old
things lying further back, in the black-
ness of the forest, where the green
water of the swamp disappears in
tangled branches and spiderwebs...."
Firk tells us all about how to shoo
away the devil in Get Back Old Devil,
jazzing it up as he strums along,
saying
"If you want to give him
.
.
.
fair warning, just get into standard E
and tell him all the mean things you
can do, and tell him you wouldn't hold
back from doing them to him if he
came snooting around, dragging his
tail. And I know it will keep him
away, because he's pure chicken...."
Backwards Sam plays Poor Boy,
Long Ways From Home very precisely
and clearly here. He gets off some
good notions on slide guitar on this
blues that has been around. A note of
desolation creeps into Firk's West Side
Blues, a somber low-down blues contrivance in which Firk depicts the
rankness of a Chicago West Side slum.
Writes Firk of it:... "It is a desolate
slum, a cold slum, an unfriendly slum.
An aura of death emanates from the
of splotchy -painted building
fronts. It creeps down the dirty cement
rows
steps, and out into the broken glass
in the street; it coats everything and
kills it. There is a special sky which
is always a dull gray. A dead dog in
the gutter decays very slowly. Rats
eat at it. An occasional dead tree
sticks up out of hard, grassless patches
of ground which border the cracked
sidewalks. Phantom -like people drift
past. This deathly underworld was
perhaps the spawning -place of this
song...." But Firk makes a thing of
beauty out of it all the same.
I Be's Troubled is what one would
call a "low down blues dance" which,
because of its intrinsic charm, made
Muddy
Water's
career
mushroom
after he recorded it on Chess Label.
Firk plays it here with a bottleneck
and there's certainly enough voodoo type rhythm to dance to.
Firk chases his circle round and
round in The Unbroken Circle, better
known to most of us as the familiar
Will the Circle Be Unbroken? Sam
Firk
does Mississippi John Hurt's
popular favorite Candy Man Blues up
brown on vocals and guitar. In fact,
Firk's rendition of it is rather poignant
as he gets a very pretty sound out of
his instrument. The nimble -fingered
Firk makes Candy Man very decorative
and ornamental.
Old Reliable One -Way Gal
has a
bump and grind about it and is further
fleshed out by Thomas Hoskins on
guitar and vocal, which does not come
through very well, and Stephan Mich-
elson on spoons which sound for all
the world like the rat -a -tat -tat of a tap
dancer. Firk borrows the tune from Bill
Moore from Tappahannock, Virginia.
I'm Glad Blues has a very full,
melodically flowing, sensuous sound
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as played by Firk in open E tuning.
University Stereo Ridgewood. N.J.
HI -Fi Gallery Indianapolis. Ind.
Hi -F, Gallery'Evansville. Ind.
The Stereo ShopiCedar Rapids, la.
The Gramophone Ltd. Norman. Ok.
Audio Uncommon Portland. Or.
Sound Center Beverly Hills. Ca.
Stereo Hi -Fi Center Gardena. Ca.
Garland Audio San Jose. Ca.
Audio Arts, Livermore, Ca.
Audio Labs/Des Moines, la.
Wallace Electronics Peru. Ind.
Stereo Showcase Vallejo, Ca.
Stereo Showcase Sacramento. Ca
United Audio Centers (2 stores) Chicago. Ill
United Audio Centers Deerfield. III.
Gill Custom House Chicago, Ill.
Paul Heath Audio Rochester, N.Y.
Audio. Etc./Gainesville. Fla.
Jerry's Audio Exchange Phoenix, Ar.
Sound Systems Palo Alto. Ca.
Stereo Workshop Berkeley. Ca.
Jonas Miller/Beverly Hills, Ca.
The tune, very sweet, was apparently
recorded by Skip James for Paramount
in 1931. East St. Louis Dry Land
Blues is the highly rhythmic saga of
a voyage from East St. Louis to Memphis, Tennessee. The tune, given to a
genuine musical pulse, has Firk
playing way up in the neck and singing
in his smooth and soft mellow voice.
Hey Hey Hey is a pure instrumental
which has a boogie bass pitted against
running scales and slides. Firk
is
very attentive to the dynamics here.
Backwards Sam Firk plays some
mean guitar on these sides. The sound
emerges unfortunately with a lot of
hiss on his s's. But if you are a student
of blues guitar, this one is for you.
Just settle back, put your feet up,
have a beer if you so imbibe, listen,
and read-for Backwards Sam Firk is,
among his other many talents, a very
talented writer from whom I couldn't
Contact us if there is no dealer in your area.
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I MAGNEPLANAR©PRODUCTS
BOIL 8647, WHITE BEAR LAKE MINNESOTA 55110
GO
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resist quoting.
Performance: A-
Sound: B -
HAMPTON HAWES: Blues For Walls
Musicians: Hampton Hawes, piano,
electric piano, ARP synthesizer;
Chache (Oscar Brashear), trumpet,
flugelhorn; Hadley Caliman, soprano
and tenor saxes; George Walker,
guitar; Nyimbu (Henry Franklin),
bass, electric bass; Ndugu (Leon
Chancier), drums.
Songs: Blues For Walls: Sun Dance;
Hamp's Collard Green Blues; Brother
Brantley; Rain Forest; Carmel; Me -ho.
Prestige 10060, stereo, $4.98.
Hampton Hawes, a pianist who
disappeared from the jazz scene during
the years of 1958-1960 and who patterns
his style after Bud Powell and Charlie
Parker, has come up with an exceed-
ingly enjoyable LP on Prestige. The
material, all by Hawes himself, illustrates his superb talent as a composer
and melodist with a particular emphasis
on writing for unison parts as played
by saxophonist Hadley Caliman and
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Ndugu (Leon Chancier). (I'd hate to try
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trumpet man Chache (Oscar Brashear).
Also providing very able assists are
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to pronounce these African names.) The
end effect of this pleasing combination
results in a well-balanced sound that is
never cluttered and implies the unfettered coolness of a California climate.
The album contains a sprinkling of
blues in which Hawes is at his funkiest.
In Blues for Walls, Chache enters on a
screaming trumpet followed by Caliman
on soprano sax who intertwines it all
like a snake charmer. Hawes plays
machine-gun rivets of sound on electric
piano as the bass and drums set up
quite a rhythm under him-a lilting
bump and grind. Hawes Collard Green
Blues truly swings, featuring Hawes on
synthesizer, bluesy against Walker's
deft guitar chording and Nyimbu's
individualistic walking bass. A medium
tempo blues, Me -ho takes off with
Caliman on a multi -noted tenor saxophone followed by Chache on a seering
trumpet and Hawes on synthesizer.
Brother Brantley features the wah-wah
with Ndugu on drums catching every
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Direct -Coupled
notes, selecting them carefully.
As dappled as raindrops in Rain
Forest, a slow thoughtful piece with a
soothing undulating quality about it,
while Sun Dance remains a mood piece,
pervasively melodic and featuring
Hawes on a pensive electric piano.
But Hawes' best effort lies in Carmel in
which he plays sugar -plum fairy lines
that glitter and twinkle, an impressionistic and poetic rendering by the pianist.
This demonstrates Hawes' acute sensitivity as well as the alertness of his
rhythm section.
The sound is A -okay. Don't miss this
recording by Hampton Hawes.
Sound B+
Performance B+
attempt by the record company to pre-
vent it from appearing dated in any
way but having a date is most beneficial
for discographical purposes.
Just the right number of tunes for a
jazz LP, the recording contains six well-
chosen numbers, permitting enough
room for the ample expansion of
musical ideas. Milt Jackson, who is
primarily noted for his role in the
straight-laced Modern Jazz Quartet,
is at the mast here but it is almost as
if it is Ray Brown's record for he is
very much present, sharing the spotlight
with Jackson. Brown, who has accom-
panied singer Ella Fitzgerald and has
played with Oscar Peterson among
others, inserts robust pizzicato bass
lines and excellent notations behind
Jackson in SKI who comes in like
twinkle -toes. Jackson, whose relaxed
and subtle sense of timing is pure joy,
was the first bop musician to play vibes,
more aggressive and forceful in style
when leading his own group. Anthony
Newley's Who Can I Turn To, which
already, incidentally, become a
standard although it is a fairly young
tune, Jackson gives a sensitive ballad
treatment. Slow at first, then jazzing it
up, Jackson floats effortlessly over his
vibes against Brown's appropriate bass
has
which finishes off bowed.
Tenor saxophonist Teddy Edwards
leads off in Eddie Harris' lively and
hot Listen, Hear, a funky easily recognizable tune. Edwards digs deep into
the grooves, employing lots of scale
running. He makes a bright, ebullient
entrance in If I Were a Bell in a "surry
with the fringe on top" beginning.
The Very Thought of You, arranged by
Ray Brown, is taken at a soporific glide.
Brown beginning it with an excerpt
Rachmaninoff.
from
No
yawning
bassist, he slides easily into the main
MILT JACKSON QUINTET FEATURING RAY BROWN. Just the Way It
Had To Be
The Polk Audio Model 9 is a high -definition
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Price: $165.00
Canada: Edon Acoustics Ltd., Ottawa
Musicians: Milt Jackson,
vibes;
Teddy Edwards, tenor saxophone:
Monty Alexander, piano; Ray Brown,
bass; Dick Berk, drums.
Songs: Listen, Hear; SKJ; Who Can I
Turn To; If l Were a Bell; The Very
Thought of You; Bag's Groove.
Impulse / ABC AS -9230, stereo, $5.98.
This album by the. Milt Jackson
Quintet featuring bassist Ray Brown
possesses all the warm ambiance that a
live performance can provide. It was
recorded at Shelly's Manne-Hole in
Hollywood, California on August 1 and
I
411 Notre Dame Lane
Baltimore, Maryland 21212
(301) 532-8064
2, 1969, statistics for which we thank
Impulse/ABC Records for listing. One
often wonders the exact date a record
was made and upon scanning the album
cannot find a trace of it. I guess it is an
theme, then plays exercise -like patterns.
Jackson's all too familiar Bag's Groove
features pianist Monty Alexander on
one of his few piano solos on the entire
album. He is actually only given a
cursory nod for the most part and it is
a pleasure to hear his quick and light
approach.
The sound is unfortunately muddy
and undistinguished. Jackson is not
picked up too well and needs more
amplification.
But all in all, a most listenable album
and recommended.
Performance B +
Sound C +
The Cecil Taylor Quartet: Air
Musicians: Cecil Taylor, piano; Archie
Shepp, alto and tenor saxophones;
Neidlinger,
Charles, drums.
Buell
bass;
Dennis
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
112
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Songs: Air; This Nearly Was Mine;
indispensable throughout as they are
Port of Call; EB; Lazy Afternoon.
Barnaby /Candid Z30562, stereo,
supremely elastic members of this
cohesive musical unit which comes
S 5.98.
Anyone who has not yet become
acquainted with pianist Cecil Taylor
meet him now on this Barnaby/Candid
collector's item which was originally
released on Candid in the early sixties.
It also features saxophonist Archie
Shepp on his first recording session.
The Cecil Taylor Quartet, which was
conceived in 1955, originally included
soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy but
close to being a family here. Charles
is mean with the sticks and Neidlinger
plays good notes and is an excellent
time -keeper.
EB is a rugged, stop -and -go excursion,
Neidlinger playing hickory-dickery-dock
running scales with Charles riding high
on cymbals like a train. In EB, Taylor's
style resembles some of the latter-day
Chick Corea's work, given to an air of
tension -release, tension -release. Taylor
is authoritative and places his intervals
well, ending with the impressionism of
a Monet lily -pond.
The sound lacks brilliance and it is
as if there is a wall between the listener
and the reproduction.
But no matter. This is a stunning and
appreciated re -issue by the New Wave
of musicians who will excite. A recording that belongs in everyone's collection,
this is Taylor during one of his most
lyrical periods.
tob
Performance A +
Sound B
was dissolved shortly after this record
was made. The result is nothing short
of brilliant.
Taylor and Shepp have ventured far
since the 1960's, going their own separate ways but remaining in the vanguard
of musicianship by forging new paths
into
experimental
musical
worlds.
Shepp, heavily influenced by the late
John Coltrane in both intonation and
technique, has moved most recently
into percussive realms, while Taylor
has come to produce dense, entangled
thickets of sound, uncombed and
dissonant protracted statements in which
one can lose oneself as in his recent
solo performance at the Newport Jazz
Festival which ran for some 45 minutes.
Taylor's art of the seventies is conveyed
in a complex musical syntax that virtually spurns analysis.
The classical training Taylor re-
ceived at the New York College of
Music and the New England Conserva-
tory is borne out in his complex allusions to Bartok and Stravinsky. His
attack is now percussively forceful, then
gentle, his dynamics superb. Cecil
Taylor is perpetually creative and innovative, a powerful irrepressible phe-
nomenon.
The five tracks here are generously
long and well -developed and include
a couple of standards, a fine Oscar
Hammerstein's This Nearly Was Mine
and J. Latouche's Lazy Afternoon,
which must have been written for jazz
people. On the latter, after a magnificent entrance, Shepp wails eloquently
with Taylor trembling under him,
wriggling through the sultry harmonics
of the tune which they take at a medium
tempo.
This Nearly Was Mine swings softly,
Taylor introspective and bare -noted,
bluesy and funky, then orchestral and
sunny, creating spraddling chords and
employing hops, skips, and jumps from
the top to the bottom of the keyboard.
Port of Call is cool yet craggy; Aír
lyrical yet jagged and a tune in which
Taylor demonstrates
his
finesse
at
comping. Buell Neidlinger's bass work
and Dennis Charles' drumming are
AUDIO
111
NOVEMBER 1974
A new age in the development of sound reproduction. A sound evolution that
will make all other systems obsolete. Obsolete by the creation of a unique system
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"Dynamic Damping" is the exclusive patented principle developed by Magnum
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truly unparalleled by any other speaker
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A "truer" sound, capable of adding yet
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If your dealer doesn't have them, set him
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urn
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NEW YORK, N.Y. 10011 (212) 255-8156-7-8
Check No. 30 on Reader Service Card
113
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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DIOITAL:TNEOR V ,DESIGN
CONSTRUCTION
CANADIAN
COPY
P06125 AA
[R
15 fps half-track stereo. Extra V. track playback head, new in carton. $900.00. Box 102CChubbic Rd., R.D. 1, Canonsburg, Pa. 15317.
DIAMOND NEEDLES and Stereo Cartridges at
Discount prices for Shure, Pickering, Stanton,
Empire, Grado and ADC. Send for free catalog.
LYLE CARTRIDGES, Dept. A, P.O. Box 69
Kensington Station, Brooklyn, New York 11218.
FOR ADULTS ONLY - Outstanding Comedy
(412) 746-2540.
WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY
AUDIOPHILES TAKE NOTE! THE AUDIOPHILE,
231 BEDFORD STREET, STAMFORD, CONN.
specializes in equipment for the connoisseur.
Audio Research, ADC, Citation, Hegeman, IMF,
Infinity, Janszen, Technics, SAE, SME, TEAC,
Thorens, and many more.
(203)
348-3551
(Closed Mondays).
DON'T PAY THE HIGH MAIL ORDER PRICES
THIEVES WAREHOUSE OF TAMPA, 1531
SOUTH DALE MABRY, TAMPA, FLORIDA
33609.
THOUSANDS OF LIKE NEW LP's and prereCatalogue $1.00.
House of
Records, Hillburn, New York 10931.
GRAPHIC EQUALIZER PLANS: Novel circuit
very effective/inexpensive, requires no inductors. Ten knobs (octave bands) compensate
your Hi-Fi/Tape providing better listening.
Complete plans rushed only $3.00 GREEN
BANK SCIENTIFIC, Box 100C, Green Bank,
WVa. 24944.
BOZAK
our
76107.
1.00
MIALDIMICKJNJ. 07447
tapes.
for
Write
Browne's, 541 Danforth, Sudbury, Ontario.
SPEAKER SPECIALIST. TOBY Corporation of
America, 4620 Camp Bowie, Fort Worth, Texas
TEAC 7030 GSL PROFESSIONAL Recorder 71/2-
corded
WARRANTIES!
quotes on your stereo component needs.
LOGIC
NEWSLETTER°
pOCC
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
SPEAKERS,
SYMPHONY
B -4000's
MODERNS, (factory bi-amped) immaculate,
warranty cards, asking $775.00 pair. EVENINGS 615/693-4874.
CUSTOM LOADED MAXELL UDC -90
CAS-
SETTES. TEN FOR $17.00 POSTPAID. OTHER
HIGH ENERGY; KROME; LN CASSETTES; REEL
TAPE AVAILABLE FROM MANUFACTURER.
MJS, 1126 Cobb St., San Mateo, Calif. 94401.
tapes on open reel -8 track cartridge-cassettes. Write for flyer and prices. House of
Comedy, 16131/2 N. Mariposa Ave., Los An-
geles, Calif. 90027.
SHURE V15-III-$50 plus your old cartridge.
Shipped prepaid. STEREO SHOP, 107 Third
Ave. SE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401.
ARE YOUR TAPES BEING SPOILED by record-
ing or playback on equipment that may be
magnetized? The magnetic signal "printed" on
tape is quite sensitive to subsequent magnetic field exposure. You can now actually
measure such components using an Annis
Audiophile Han -D -Kit. Write for Bulletin &
copy of article "Notes On Demagnetizing"
R. B. Annis Co., 1103 N. Delaware, Indianapolis, Ind. 46202.
performances of
past 40 years. Unbelievable treasures and
OPERA TAPES. Historical
rarities. ALSO LP RECORDS. Free catalog. Ed
Rosen, 66-33 Saunders St., Rego Park, N.Y.
11374.
AUDIO RESEARCH, AUDIONICS TRANSMISSION LINE SPEAKERS, BANG & OLUFSEN,
PROTECT YOUR LPs. Poly sleeves for jackets
BOZAK, BRAUN, CROWN, DBX, KLIPSCH,
KMAL, LINN SONDEK, NAKAMICHI, PHASE
8¢ round bottom inner sleeves 60 Poly lined
paper sleeves 150 White jackets 30¢ Postage
$1.00. House of Records, Hilburn, New York
LINEAR,
RADFORD,
REVOX,
TANDBERG,
BEYER & SENNHEISER MICS, and other fine
instruments for the reproduction of music.
10931.
Custom design and construction, component
analysis, consultations, demonstration by appointment. Send for list of top grade used
equipment. AUDIO SYSTEMS AND DESIGN,
5421 South 84th St., Lincoln, Nebraska 68516
INFRA WOOFERDA, world's largest, deepest,
most powerful sub -woofer system can be had
(402) 489-9888 and 4408 Capital Ave., Omaha,
Nebraska 68131, (402) 556-7559.
FULTON F.M.I. SUB -WOOFER, for the closest
approximation to dipole definition-$300!
AT LAST!!!
THE DKL LABORATORY, INCORPORATED
ANNOUNCES THREE OF THEIR NEWEST
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES:
Also, the rave five -way Fulton/R.T.R. super
speakers. Shipped prepaid/insured. Music
and Sound, Ltd., 111/2 Old York Road, Willow
Grove, Pa. 19090 (215) 659-9251.
DKL 3-"Hand-Tuning" service for Decca
Mk V and 'Export'.
DKL 4-Individually engineered crossover
ALTEC, AUDIO RESEARCH, Beyer,
CROWN, DAHLQUIST, DECCA, INFINITY, KLH
AKG,
networks for "ULTRA -DEFINITION" in
for "ULTRA -DEFINITION".
For details, please contact the DKL LABORAINCORPORATED,
P.O.
BOX
Koss, Mark Levinson, Ortofon, PHASE
LINEAR, PML, REVOX, SAE, Sennheiser, Sequerra, Sony, Stanton, Supex, Tandberg, TASCAM, Thorens, etc....
9s.
bi- and tri-amplification.
DKL 5-Infinity 2000A speaker modifications
TORY,
only at Music and Sound, Ltd. 50 dB per octave crossover, bandpass 16 hz.... $1295.
683,
Severna Park, Maryland, 21146, or call (301)
647-8918, evenings, 8-11 p.m., eastern time.
HI -Fl HAVEN
28 Easton Ave.
New Brunswick, N.J. 08901
201-249-5130
Rates: 350 per word per insertion for noncommercial advertisements; 600 per word for commercial advertisements.
Frequency discounts as follows: 3 times, less 10%; 6 times, less 15%; 12 times, less 20%. Closing date is the FIRST
of the second month preceding the date of issue. Payment must accompany all orders. Use the handy self-addressed,
postage paid card at the back of this issue. When replying to AUDIO box number ads, send letters c/o AUDIO, 134 North
13th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107. For more information about classified advertising, circle Reader Service Card #135.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
114
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
HI-FI ENTHUSIASTS WANTED!! Earn more
than just spare money in your spare time. We
need campus representatives to sell name
brand stereo components at discount prices
ELECTROENCEPHALOPHONE: brainwave monitor, Professional biofeedback instruments.
in your area. High commission, no investment required. Serious inquiries only, please.
Contact: Mike Santillo K&L Sound Services
Co. 75 N. Beacon St., Watertown, Mass. 02172.
ROGERS B.B.C. MONITOR, IMF, B&W Ltd.,
Celestion, Radford, Decca, ERA, Connoisseur,
Audionics TL -90, Goldring, Revox, Beyer, Lamb
and more. Custom design and modifications.
SUFFOLK AUDIO, INC., 120 Boylston St., Suite
220, Boston, Mass. 02116. (617) 423-2051.
RECORDING TAPE CLOSEOUT: Dozen reels
2400', $12.00. Dozen 1200', $8.00. 24 reels
900', $6.00. 24 600', $5.00. Postpaid, Guaranteed. Mitchell, Box 132, Flushing, N.Y. 11367.
SCOTCH RECORDING TAPE, lowest prices.
TAPE CENTER Box 4305B, Washington, D.C.
20012.
ONE STOP for all your professional audio
requirements. Bottom line oriented. F. T. C.
Brewer Company, P.O. Box 8057, Pensacola,
Florida 32505.
NAB HUB ADAPTERS - Fit Revox, Crown,
TEAC, Robert, $3/Pair postpaid. No C.O.D.
Quantity prices available. John Kountz, 1065
Van Dyke Dr., Laguna Beach, Calif. 92651.
LOWEST
DISCOUNT
PRICES
ANYWHERE
on audio equipment. All major brands dis-
FOR SALE
CANADA'S FIRST AUDIO RESEARCH DEALER.
SP -3, Dual 76, Electronic Crossovers. Tympani
J&J 8102-A, Bainbridge, WA. 98110.
IA and Tympani II (Tri-amped). Prices will be
less than USA plus duties. Also McIntosh,
PIEZO-ELECTRIC TWEETERS. Write for speci-
SAE, Citation, ESS. Tandberg, JBL, Ortofon
and Allen & Heath Mixers. Contact: PETER
fications & prices. The EAR DRUM, 5146 W.
Imperial Hwy., Los Angeles, Calif. 90045.
LOUGHNANE, HI FIDELITY SHOP, 1600 BAY VIEW AVE., TORONTO, ONTARIO M4G 3B7.
416-487-4613.
AUDIO RESEARCH modified Dynaco electronics, Dual 75A, BRAUN 15 ips. Select
DECCA Export Mk. 5, IMF, H -K CITATION, ESSHEIL, MAGNEPLANAR Tympani I $795 (limited
BUILD YOUR OWN SPEAKERS AND SAVE UP
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quantities), THORENS, ORTOFON, RABCO,
TOMLINSON, STAX,-and other rare and un-
usual goodies for the serious audiophile at
the South's only state-of-the-art stereo shop.
BACK DOOR STEREO, 2065 Piedmont, Atlanta,
Ga. 30324. (404) 874-9493.
and accessories. SPEAKERLAB, Dept. A2, 5500
-35th N.E., Seattle, WA 98105.
NEW AND AMAZING ...
The sound sensation that's sweeping the na-
CANADIANS - DYNACO COMPONENTS AT
TREMENDOUS DISCOUNTS.
Sales. Hornepayne, Ontario.
tion. Rolen Star with unusual characteristics
changes walls, floors and ceilings into speakers. Act Now! Send for free literature. James
A. White, 5302 Pine St., Phila., Pa. 19143.
En -Jay
CYBERACOUSTIC LABORATORY: only one of
its kind! Featuring Crown, IMF, AKG, UREI,
RTR, DBX, Infinity, Rabco, Decca, Transduction, more. Crown warranty service. Custom
specially modified Crown tape recorders: Au-
AUDIO RESEARCH MAGNEPLANARS and
Electronics, ESS, Infinity, Ohm, Dahlquist,
EPI, Audionics, Radford, Crown, Citation,
diomodtronics by our engineers. Barclay -
BGW, Transcriptor, Linn-Sondek, Keith Monks,
ERA, Connoisseur, SME, Supex, Decca, Grace,
Sony, Spectrum Scanning Tuner, Epicure
503 Haverford Ave., Narberth, Pa. 19072; 215667-3048.
Amplifier. Marantz 500, DBX, ADC, Nakami-
DON'T PAY THE HIGH MAIL ORDER PRICES.
Thieves Warehouse of New Orleans, 3528 18th
chi, B&O, Tandberg, Celestion, Marc Levinson,
Dayton -Wright, others. THE GRAMOPHONE LTD., 757 Asp St., Norman, Okla.
Write
Stax,
St., Unit 2, Metarie, LA. 70002.
73069. 405-364-9477.
THE AUDIO RESEARCH ROOM. The complete
range of Audio Research equipment on display
02172.
AMPEX TAPE-NEW 1800' on 7" reel 12 for
under ideal listening conditions. By appoint-
THE MONEY SAVER! Write STEREO SPECTRUM, Box 1818, Miami Beach, FL 33139.
$18 POSTPAID; 1200' 12 for $13 POSTPAID-
free list-WIDE RESPONSE, 6114A SANTA
ment C.M. Santmire. AUDIO SYSTEMS & DESIGN, 5421 South 84th St., Lincoln, Nebraska
68516 (402) 489-9888.
counted. Write for quotes, K&L Sound Services, 75 N. Beacon St., Watertown, Mass.
MONICA BLVD., HOLLYWOOD, CA. 90038.
Audio
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Attn: Classified Dept.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
NEW CATALOG of raw speakers, network kits
& network parts, audio test equipment, fabric
& foam speaker grids, speaker systems, electronic crossovers & active filters. Distributors
wanted for our line of network kits and parts.
MIKE LEWIS/TSR, Inc., 3673 West 113th St.,
Inglewood, Calif., 90303, 213/678-1979.
ONE OF FLORIDA'S ONLY AUDIO RESEARCH
DEALERS. Complete Audio Research on demonstration. SP-3/Dual 75/Dual 51/Magneplanars and Bass Panel (Tri-Amped). Plus
Phase Linear, Crown, McIntosh, Hartley,
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FREE SPECIFICATIONS. AURATONE, BOX 58013A, DEL MAR, CALIFORNIA 92014.
WE have always specialized in "ULTRA DEFINITION" sound reproduction. The INFINITY
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Complete audio counselling. Sound and Sight,
THE DKL LABORATORY SPECIALIZES
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sound
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Federal Highway, Boca Raton, Fla.
and/or personal consultations, contact: The
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DKL Laboratory, Incorporated, Box 683,
Severna Park, Md. 21146. (301) 647-8918,
evenings 8-11 PM.
20
N.
33432. (305) 391-1843. 141
SCA ADAPTOR KIT $15.00. Send $1.00 for
diagram and information to: Arnold McGall
9 Clarkes-Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450.
FIREWORKS
NEWS
MAGAZINE-Covering
Commercial - Display Fireworks, Sources,
ATTENTION RABCO SL -8E OWNERS 111111
"ULTRA -DEFINITION" can be yours for only
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McCoy, 919-288-0811 after 6:00 EDT.
COMPATABILITY. For details and/or personal
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MINNESOTA'S FINEST DEALER! Audio Re-
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THE DKL LABORATORY, INCORPORATED
BOX 683, SEVERNA PARK, MD. 21146
(301) 647-8918, EVENINGS, 8-11 PM
SCOTCH MAGNETIC TAPE, discount Box 167A
Orwigsburg, Pa.
AUDIO DEALERS ATTENTION!!! Let us design
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Write for complete details on your letterhead
TSR Engineering. 3673 West 113th St., Inglewood, Ca. 90303, 213/678-1979.
NEUMANN MICS & ACCESSORIES. DBX
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214-691-5107.
THE WORLD'S ONLY "ULTRA -DEFINITION"
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SOUND SYSTEM.
NEW 14" NAB AMPEX aluminum flanges have
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CERWIN-VEGA PRODUCTS (312)
581-7436.
FINALLY !!! "ULTRA -DEFINITION" amplifiers
MAGNEPLANAR T -1U MINT! (Off-white cover).
Am moving, must sacrifice - $675.00. Bob
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55391.
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East Hanover, New Jersey 07936.
NOW YOU CAN HAVE FAMOUS "ULTRA DEFINITION" in an inexpensive format. HOW?
The ONLY way is with a DKL LABORATORY
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DKL LABORATORY, INCORPORATED, BOX
683, SEVERNA PARK, MARYLAND 21146.
ELECTRONIC CROSSOVERS - ALL TYPES.
Definitive booklet describes applications; how
to improve speaker systems; $5.00, credited to
first purchase. Huntington Electronics, Box
2009, Huntington, Conn. 06484.
SUPERSCOPE, THORENS, PE, DUAL. VISIT
QUAIL CREEK STEREO, 754 SHREVEPORTBARKSDALE HWY., SHREVEPORT, LA. 71105,
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AUDIO EXCELLENCE from Advent, Audio Research, BGW, B&O, Fulton, Grace, Dahlquist,
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"Certified Audio Consultant." STEREO SHOP,
107 Third Ave. SE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401.
319-365-1324.
THE SS -3 PORTABLE MIXING CONSOLE pro-
vides unmatched performance in remote recording applications. Available in 2, 4, 8, 16
and 24 track configurations. Write for specs.
Reply Box No. A47-1.
NEW ORLEANS AREA AUDIONAUTS
AUDIO RESEARCH, MAGNEPLANAR, CROWN,
KLIPSCH, AURALINEAR, PHASE LINEAR, SAE,
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BOSE, JBL, RTR, THORENS, RABCO, DBX,
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ORLEANS, LA 70114. 504-367-4525.
All 5% values from 10 to 3.3M
INCOMPARABLE RTR LOUDSPEAKERS .
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upon
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(201) 386-0050
PACIFIC NORTHWEST HEADQUARTERS for
Nakamichi, Revox, McIntosh, Dahlquist, Phase
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SHREVEPORT AREA AUDIONAUTS
McINTOSH, CROWN, PHASE LINEAR, BOZAK,
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Specifications
INTERNATIONAL,
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designed SPECIFICALLY for ELECTROSTATIC
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P.O. BOX 683, Severna Park, Maryland 21146.
ORTOFON - SUPEX CARTRIDGE OWNERS;
our Micro-Preamp outperforms any transformer. Free literature. Huntington Electronics, Box 2009-A, Huntington, Conn. 06484.
in
We
in
75¢
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postage
and handling charge per order. Deduct 10%
on orders over $50. COMPONENTS CENTER -A
Box 134, NY, NY 10038.
FINEST CUSTOM CASSETTE LABELS: Free
samples. TARZAC, 638 Muskogee Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23509.
AR, KLH, ADVENT, DYNACO, RECTILINEAR,
ADC OWNERS-Our electronic equalizer gives
your speakers a full octave of new bass, plus
three broadband tone controls. Three reviews,
literature, from NORMAN LABORATORIES,
2278 Industrial Boulevard, Norman, Oklahoma
73069.
SINGLE EDGE RAZOR BLADES, Tape Editing
$20/M. Flyer. RALTEC, 25884 Highland, Cleveland, Ohio 44143.
SONY TC-134SD Cassette Deck w/Dolby. Used
5 hrs. $180. Doug Rein, R.R.I., Winthrop,
Minn. 55396.
USING SEVEN RADFORD DRIVERS in a teak
veneered cabinet of unique construction produces a pure natural sound. Send for information to: AKR Products, 24 Cranbourn
Street, London WC2H 7AA, England.
AUDIOPHILES! Quality Sounds of Maryland
has come to your rescue. Write to me for system quotes you won't believe! Send requests for equipment prices to Quality Sounds
of Maryland, Gerard White, Sales Manager,
P.O. Box 63, College Park, Maryland 20742.
QUOTES ON 60 POPULAR BRANDS. Specializ-
ing in "high end" and hard to find equipment
-Ace Audio,
Cizek,
Fulton,
Phase
Linear,
Phillips-much, much more. Sound Center,
219 E. 17th, Bloomington, Indiana. (812) 3324252.
NORTHWEST'S FINEST AUDIO DEALERAudio Research, Dayton Wright, IMF, Fulton,
Hartley, Mark Levinson, Dahlquist, Infinity,
Radford, Crown, BGW, Quad, Decca, Supex,
Phase Linear, Braun, Tandberg, Linn Sondek,
and Many More. HARTLEY ELECTRONICS,
1502 Butternut, Richland, WA 99352 (509)
947-5026 after 5:00 PM weekdays, all day
weekends.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
116
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
FLORIDA AUDIOPHILES! Phase Linear, E.S.S.,
Sony, Marantz. Sales and service. INTERIORS
PLUS SOUND, 3038 N. Federal Highway, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla. 33306. (305) 566-3511.
TUNED ROCK P.A.'s. Customized high intensity touring/permanent installation sound
systems, including narrow band (5hz!) feedback suppression, detailed regenerative response, Acousta-Voicing/environmental equal-
ARP SYNTHESIZERS!
measurement/treatment, <15% articulation
Pro -Soloist $920, Odyssey $1150, String Ensemble $1380, #2600 $2310. Dickstein Distributing, 1120 Quincy Avenue, Scranton,
loss of consonants, 1000's of customized profiberglass
fessional products including .
horns, consoles, comp/rms/peak limiters,
18db continuously variable electronic crossovers, digital/acoustic delays, omnipressors,
Klipsch, RTR, Bozak, B&O, Revox, Barzilay,
Pennsylvania 18510.
TRUSONIC FREE CONE SPEAKERS.
ization (±Idb at your ears), room design/
-
-
phasors, reverb, echo, doubling/tripling ef-
The TE -200 TELEDAPTER EASILY CONNECTS TO ANY TV &
STEREO SYSTEM. Upng our coupling and matrix circu,t, teledapter takes
a low Impedance output from the lelevia,un and Miners two HIGH
IMPEDANCE CHANNELS OF SIMULATED STEREO, to drive any
amplifier Frequency response is marntained so you can hear the tinkle of
happens on TV. With service warranty
bells or booming bass sounds a
and hookup Instructions 516 95 ppd. Guaranteed to make your TV 100%
more ensoyable.
OUR NEW TE300 VHF -UHF HI-FI TUNER IS NOW AVAILABLE. A
complete and sell write, ned 110 volt tuner. VHF -UHF antenna connec
Recording and amp output jacks. Five year service warranty
bons
5149.95 ppd. From our factory.
TE -300
'MASTER CHARGE NO. for TE200
CHECK
SEND-IS5.00 for CO D. TO: RHOADES NATIONAL CO. DEPT AD
or
-
P O. BOX $17 HENDERSONVILLE, TENNESSEE 37075
NAME
ADDRESS
prices. Ship anywhere U.S. and Canada. Dimension Hi -Fi, 2109 Bancroft Way, Berkeley,
fects, P.A. noise reduction, piezo transducers,
J.B.L./Altec Pro.,
frequency shifters from Tascam, U.R.E.I., Eventide, Gately, Schoeps,
Community Light/Sound,
Crown,
Beyer,
Mom's Audio, McIntosh, Bozak, Allen Heath,
Calif. 415-548-1218.
etc., etc. All shipped prepaid/Insured. Music
FOR SALE
OPERA TAPES -RECORDS "live"
& Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York Rd., Willow Grove,
Pa. 19090. (215) 659-9251.
BEST BARE SPEAKERS, kits, construction ad-
Recognized 25 years as finest high efficient
speakers made. Full ranges, woofers, midranges, drivers, crossovers, co-axials. Discount
broadcasts.
Complete Met broadcast cast list, $1.00, deductible from first order. Hathaway, 49A
-
.
Inventors/Engineers
STATE
CITY
ZIP
vice, low prices. Request catalog. Lambda
Systems, P.O. Box 243, Beach Grove, Indiana
Merbrook, Merion, Pa. 19066.
STEREO WORKSHOP in Berkeley, Calif. has
46107.
STEREO CARTRIDGES AND STYLUS REPLACEMENTS for ADC, B&O, GRADO, EMPIRE,
PICKERING, ORTOFON,
MICRO -ACOUSTIC,
FULTON, MAGNEPLANAR, DAHLQUIST,
BRAUN, KLIPSCH, RADFORD, AUDIONICS,
LEVINSON, SUPEX, QUINTESSENCE, NAIM,
AUDIO COMPONENTS -lowest prices on all
major brands. Write for quotes: Audio, Suite
SHURE, STANTON. NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK,
INC., 6749 Springfield Mall, Springfield, Va.
22150.
GRACE, LINN-SONDEK, etc.! 2985
College
Ave., P.O. Box 951, Berkeley, Calif. 94701 Open weekdays 2-8, Sat. 12-6, closed Sun/Mon
-(415) 843-5836.
IMF STUDIO MK Ill's -pair $650; IMF Compacts $200 pair; Hegeman Model I -two pair
-$150 pair; Rabco ST -4 w/ADC 25-$150;
Tandberg 9000X $600. All items full warranty.
Ichabod Nerftwist, 1802 W. Sycamore, Den-
THE ULTIMATE CARTRIDGE! Supex moving -
ton, Texas 76201.
THE ULTIMATE PRE -AMP! New Levinson JC-2
PERFECTLYCLEARTM ultra hi-fi record Burwen
Laboratories BL
Band -Big Bear Stomp, Oriental Strut, Louis i -an -i -a, Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gives to
Me, Dan Le rue d'Antibes, etc. $10.50 each
postpaid. $70.00 postpaid in lots of 10. Send
check or money order. Massachusetts residents add 3% sales tax. Dealers wanted. Bur wen Laboratories, Inc., 209 Middlesex Turnpike, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803. 617273-1488.
BIG BAND JAZZ OF 30's and 40's by fabulous
Al Raymond and his Renowned Side Men, The
All -Star Alumni, on long-playing stereo cassette. $6.98 postpaid. Connoisseurs Rarities,
coil with Levinson pre-preamp for incredible
transparency and smoothness. Stereo Workshop in Berkeley, Calif.
is only $950. Unbelievable detail, yet sweet
and open. Stereo Workshop in Berkeley,
Calif.
WANT TO GO BI -AMP?
at any desired cutoff frequency. Write for
brochure. DeCoursey Engineering Laboratory,
11828 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City, California
90230.
"ULTRA DEFINITION" can be obtained with
02920.
TASCAM 701 1/2" 4 channel, 10 hrs. use,
$1500. TEAC 7030, $500. Crown IC -150, $200.
Heathkit/Magnecord AD -16 (1024), $250. All
exc. cond. R. Shagula, 1203 Hickory, Abilene,
Tex. 79601.
PROPRIETARY CUSTOMIZED MODS reduce
tone arm friction, damp spurious resonances,
minimize torsional forces, improve tracking,
and reduce record wear. For S.M.E.'s-$30.00.
For Rabco SL -8(E)-$100.00. For Transcriptors
KLI PSCHORN-KLI PSCHORN-KLI PSCHORN
Only the finest in Audio. Superior Sound
Stereo Center, 2780 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse,
N.Y. 13224.
IMF, B&W, DAHLQUIST, Nakamichi, Sequerra,
Braun, B&O, McIntosh, Tandberg,
-free.
NOW
Listen to our calibrated Ortofon/Supex moving
coils, B&O/Grace/Micro-Acoustics. From the
laboratories of Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old
York Rd., Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. (215) 659-
Quad,
9251.
Phase Linear, and many others. Also wide
Crown, Revox, Advent, Stax, Ortofon, Beyer,
selection of first-class used equipment. Expert advice. No sale final until you are satisfied. AUDIO CONSULTANTS, 517 Davis St.,
CANADIANS: Shure M91ED $24.88; Dynaco
Evanston, Illinois 60201. (312) 864-9565.
Box 111, Easton, Conn. 06425, USA.
DeCoursey Electronic Dividing Networks are
available from $89.10 (Monaural bi-amp) to
$205 (Stereo tri-amp). Price includes plug-in
Butterworth filters; 6, 12, or 18 db per octave
47-947A Dyer Avenue, Cranston, Rhode Island
OREGON AUDIOPHILES: Hear some uncommonly good things -Radford, Crown, Quintessence, Mark Levinson, BGW, Yamaha, Integral
Systems, Magneplanar, Dayton -Wright, Ohm,
Quad, Janszen, Audionics, Decca, Supex,
Stax, SME, Thorens, Transcriptors, Vestigal,
Linn-Sondek, Braun, Ferrograph, Grace, Sony
Pro -Mikes and Mixers, Super Woofer Systems, Passive Crossovers, Transmission -Line
Speaker Kits, Basic Drivers. AUDIO -Uncom-
+ Levinson Cartridge Preamp +
A25 $68.00; Pioneer SX424 $179.95; Dual 1216
$119.00; Leak Delta 75 $289.00; Garrard Mini
changer $13.99. Free Hi -Fi discount catalog.
Etco (Au), Box 741, Montreal H3C 2V2.
CROWN SX744 USED; Crown CX722 used; In-
finity monitors used; Crown IC150 used. Barclay, dealer -(215) 667-3048.
RECORDING TAPES, Rock bottom prices. Mc-
Cord Electronics, Box 276A, Sylvania, Ohio
43560.
our SPECIAL BI -AMPLIFIED FULTON J -MODU-
mon Inc., 8600 N.E. Sandy Blvd., Portland,
LAR SYSTEM. Our system will produce UN-
Oregon 97220. 503-254-6202.
CANADIAN AUDIOPHILES
TERREX ASSOCIATES makes available DAHLIts
PHASED ARRAY SPEAKERS.
QUIST
RTR EXCLUSIVE PHILA. SHOWROOM All RTR
smoothness throughout an extended range,
diffraction control and time delay compensa-
BELIEVABLY REALISTIC SOUND. For details,
contact the DKL LABORATORY, (301) 6478918, evenings 8-11 P.M.
CANADIANS
TERREX ASSOCIATES provides the finest in
consultation and components, featuring the
new Fulton Modular Speakers and systems!
Begin with the rave FMI 80, 100, 120 or other
Speakers on demo including the new 400E
HPR12 Super Magnum and 88D. Don't buy
any speaker until you've heard RTR, call for
an appointment 215-667-3048 or write 503
Haverford Ave., Narberth, Pa. 19072.
tion have intrigued knowledgeable audiophiles.
We feature the Dahlquists at less than U.S.
plus- customs.
Terrex Associates, Box 235, St. James Postal
Station, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3J 3R4. (204)
889-0513.
fine speaker and add the fantastic Fulton sub woofer (response to 22 Hz) and electrostatic
tweeter array (response to 48 KHz). Available
complete as FMI Model J.
Terrex Associates, Box 235, Winnipeg, Mani-
REVOX A-700 PROFESSIONAL Tape Deck 1571/2-33/4 ips, studio quality, 101/2" reel capacity
-brand new, under warranty & still unopened
in box. But must sell. Original new cost $1695
but will sell for $1475 or the best offer.
TYPE OR DRAW YOUR SLIDE! Sizes
toba, R3J 3R4. (204) 889-0513.
Chris Cawood -Phone (614) 663-2571.
Drive, Daytona Beach, Fla. 32018.
-
31/4
x 4-$2.25 per 50 and 2 x 2-$2.75 per 100.
Radio Mat Slide Company, 444 N. Peninsula
117
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
RECORDING TAPES, Rock bottom prices. Mc-
BOSE 2201 SPEAKER -AMPLIFIER COMBINA-
Cord Electronics, Box 276A, Sylvania, Ohio
TIONS. Original Bose system with built-in am-
SONY, PANASONIC, HITACHI! Big discounts!
Calculators, too! Allegheny -AU Services, Box
43560.
101/2" RECORDER SPECIALISTS: Fresh new
Scotch L/N 3600 ft. on new 1/." NAB center
metal reels five for ;33.00 or 10 Ampex 2500
ft- new Acetate tape on new metal reels same
price. Add [email protected] for a new box. Reconditioned metal 101/2" reels NAB centers [email protected],
New metal reels [email protected] Edital splicing tabs
for 1A" tape 300 $2.00. Soundd Investment,
POB 88338, Dunwoody, Ga. 30338.
CENTRAL NEW YORK HI -Fl ENTHUSIASTS-
plifiers, 22 speakers in each. Sold originally
for $2000/pair. Sell $1200/pair. Philip Rane,
87 Franklin, Reading, Mass. 617-944-8325.
SAVE!
KITS!
LOUDSPEAKERS - CABINETS - AMPLIFIER
Genuine walnut, heavy gauge chassis, top
components. Quality throughout at factory
savings. Pride & performance combined, buy
& build THE FINEST. Free catalog. Ruxton,
Dept. Al, P.O. Box 30312, Santa Barbara, Ca.
93105.
Britain's finest loudspeakers on demonstration-THE IMF STUDIO AND ALS40-as well
WESTERN NEW YORK AUDIOPHILES-Person-
as Marantz, Pioneer, Revox, Beyer, Epicure (3
lines), Thorens, Ortofon, XLM, Discwasher ..
alized, friendly service, quality equipment, and
good prices have made our new store a suc-
THE SOUND SHOP, 96 Seneca Street, Geneva,
N.Y. 14456 (315) 781-0215.
cess. In addition to the incomparable Audio
Research line, we carry the complete RTR
speaker line, Hegeman (la, II), SAE, Quintes-
8 -TRACK TAPES 550. Directory Manufactures.
Send $3.00 Star Enterprises, 35-AM2 Wood crest, Dayton, Ohio 45405.
HONG KONG, TAIWAN, JAPAN, Asia Directory.
World products information. Mail -orders, bulk orders. Listings. Directory and Information
$1.00 today. World Trade Inquiries. Box 6224,
Spokane, Wash. 99207.
WE MUST HAVE YOUR USED COMPONENTS
Premium Trade or Cash for:
McIntosh tube (pre) amps & tuners, Marantz
tube (pre) amps 7 tuners, Marantz 7(T), 15, 16
ATTENTION
sence, Thorens, Connoisseur, Phillips, Dokorder, Infinity, Transcriptors, Levinson, Supex,
Ortofon, B&O, Cerwin Vega, Sherwood, Linn
Sondek, KMAL, Dahlquist, ADC, Soundcraftsmen, Technics, Fulton Music, Onkyo, Rabco,
IMF, Phase Linear, more. The Stereo Emporium, 3407 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N.Y.
14217. 716.874-3372.
with plenty of crossover parts plus raw frame
speakers from ALTEC, JBL, BOZAK, CELESTION, PEERLESS, NORELCO, SENNHEISER,
HEPPNER,
CTS,
(B). Futterman H-3, J.B.L. 400, 500, 600 series
electronics, J.B.L. Hartsfield, L-101, Metrogon,
ELECTRO -VOICE,
Minigon Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York
ELECTRIC TWEETERS. ELECTRONIC X-OVERS,
Rd., Willow Grove, Pa. 19090. (215) 659-9251.
TOO! Plenty of technical information available.
YOUR ROOM IS THE MISSING LINK
the EAR DRUM is the only place to go. Open
11 til 7 (or later) 7 days. THE EAR DRUM,
5146 W. Imperial Hwy., Los Angeles, Ca.
A state of the art system is usually junk in
the typical poor listening environment, and
therefore a rip-off. Our acoustical consulting
divisions will have a calibrated "reverberation
curve vs. frequency" measurement performed
in your room, and our engineering dept.'s plan
of correction, loudspeaker placement, and
room equalization, all at no cost with your
purchase or upgrade. Music & Sound Ltd.,
111/2 Old York Rd., Willow Grove, Pa. 19090.
(215) 659-9251.
UTAH, TRUSONIC, UNIVERSITY AND PIEZO-
If you want to do it yourself, and do it right,
I. Credentials
College instructors in audio/acoustics Inventors/graduate electrical engineers Recording & disc mastering engineers.
Members: United Inventors & Engineers
Acoustical Society of America
Institute of Electronic
Engineers
Tuned Rock P.A. ad).
Music & Sound Ltd., 111/2 Old York Rd., Willow
Grove, Pa. 19090. (215) 659-9251.
Whom Would You Trust?
542-8399.
KLIPSCHORNS, STYLE B, PAIR, MINT, WALNUT OIL, BLACK GRILLE CLOTH, NEVER REGISTERED, ORIGINAL CARTONS, $1685.00.
BELLE KLIPSCH SPEAKERS, PAIR, NEW,
NEVER USED, IN FACTORY SEALED CARTONS, WALNUT OIL, BLACK GRILLE CLOTH,
DRIVE, APT #3, SHREVEPORT, LA 71105.
ELECTRO VOICE SENTRY Monitor II Speakers
$225/pr., SME arm $65, Thorens 12411 Turntable $40, Viking Stereo 86 deck $80, Dyna
FM -3 tuner $50. Bourn, 2228 Ridgewood S.E.,
Grand Rapids, Mich. 49506, Tel. 616 949-7595.
RECORD SEARCHING? DISContinued ... Records. 216 N. Rose, Burbank, Calif. 91505.
ELECTRONIC WORKSHOP has only the finest
WISCONSIN'S NEWEST AUDIO RESEARCH
KLH MODEL NINE Electrostatic Speakers
Street, NYC. (212) 473-0140.
dealer, now stocking Magneplanar Tympani
electronics. Also-Crown, Quintessence, ESS,
Dahlquist, Transcriptors, Epicure, Phase Linear, RTR, SAE, Infinity, Citation, Bozak, FMI,
Nakamichi, Revox, AR-LST, Tandberg, 50 other
brands. WACK SALES CO., 5722 W. North Ave.,
Milwaukee, Wis. 53208.
AREA
AUDIOBALTIMORE -WASHINGTON
PHILES REJOICE! At last a store for you. Come
$600, MARANTZ 19 Receiver $600, M. E. Frank,
527 Allen Street, Syracuse, New York 13210
(315) 476-9102.
FULL RANGE ELECTROSTATICS. One pair
Sigma speakers with coupling system. A. Fulton, 1004-173 Cooper St., Ottawa, Canada K2P
0E9.
BAY AREA AUDIOPHILES: AUDIO RESEARCH,
AUDIONICS, BRAUN, CONNOISSEUR, CROWN,
DAHLQUIST, DECCA, DYNACO, FERROGRAPH,
F.M.I., GRACE, KMAL, LINN SONDEK, MAGNE-
PAN, MARK LEVINSON, NAKAMICHI, PANASONIC (SP -10), QUINTESSENCE, RADFORD,
R.T.R., SEQUERRA, SHURE, SUPEX, TANDBERG, WIN LABS, McINTOSH (USED). Com-
pare any of our products through our switching device using 1/1 Mark Levinson master
tapes at GARLAND AUDIO, 2960 Stevens Creek
(301) 363-1733.
Blvd., Suite D, San Jose, Calif. 95128 (408)
ADVENT, AUDIO RESEARCH, BARZILAY, B.I.C.,
Bose, Crown, Dual, ESS, Garrard, Harman
CITATION 12 Amp, A-1 shape, $130. N. Giust,
1617 33rd St., S.W., Canton, Ohio 44706.
Stax, B&O, Grace, Supex, Micro Acoustics,
1000's of PROFESSIONAL products (see
out crossover and/or amplifier. R. Baars (201)
90714.
of the art audio equipment. Featuring the complete Audio Research line, Polk Audio Model
Nines, ESS Neils, Janszen, S.A.E., Altec, Citation, R.T.R., B&O, Thorens, S.M.E. etc. all
accompanied by Fred Huggins himself. Main
store at 9619 Reisterstown Rd., Garrison, Md.
21055 (2 miles North of Balt. Beltway exit 20)
700, Ortofon, Damped S.M.E., Scully, dbx,
Mark Levinson,
Decca MK V: $75; ADC 25: $25; ADC XLM: $25;
Also Custom Sub -Woofer System with or with-
environment where sophisticated listeners can
evaluate top -rank components. You'll find it's
an experience. Systems from $425 to $10,000.
Literature available. Dept. A, 10 East 8th
to Myriad Sound and hear the finest in state
Custom Rabco, Braun, R.T.R., Revox A-
Decca International Arm and Deccalift: $100;
TAPES FROM HIGH FIDELITY transcriptions
made 1930s. Sample cassette and list $2.
TRANSCRIPTIONS Box 214, Lakewood, Ca.
Anechoic Chamber
$15,000 research laboratory
Factory authorized "A" warranty stations
III. Our Distinguished Suppliers
Audio Research, Sequerra, Transcriptors,
Wright, Dahlquist, Crown, Infinity, I.M.F.,
London Decca, Quad, Rogers, Spendor,
SONY TTS-3000a, Base and Dust Cover: $175;
in audio. You know the names. Come to our
State of the Art Room-a unique acoustical
II. Facilities
F.M.I., Linn Sondek, Nakamichi, Dayton
Trades accepted. Audiocraft, South Rockwood,
Michigan 48179. Telephone: (313) 379-9945.
90045. 213/641-1930.
1B & 111 speakers, SP3A, D76, EC -2, & EC -4
CONSIDER YOUR SOURCE FOR SOUND
PREAMP, $360.
IMF Loudspeakers, Monitors featured. Transcriptors turntables. Futterman handbuilt
tubed amplifiers. Sheffield recordings. Leak
fifties tubed amplifiers, mint $200 pair. Newcomb Classic 1500-R mono tubed amplifier,
$115. Leak stereo tubed preamp, mint $85.
DUAL 1219 changer, demo, w/base $185.
Beovox #2600 speakers, mint, $179 pair.
WANTED: Marantz-McIntosh tubed equipment. Almost any audio products obtainable.
$1540.00. ALL SHIPPED PREPAID. 318-8680451. MR. BERTRAM, 1215 CAPT SHREVE
THE EAR DRUM IS GOING STRONG
GAUSS,
1029, Johnstown, Penna. 15907.
C/M LABORATORIES CC -1
244-6724.
Kardon, Hegeman, Marantz, McIntosh, Nakamichi, Pioneer, Quintessence, Revox, Sequerra, TEAC. Finest service on premises, candid audio consultation, free delivery and set-up
within reasonable distance from Hampton, Va.
Stereo Designs, Mercury Plaza Mall, Hampton,
Va. 804-838-6394.
AT LAST! IMF LOUDSPEAKERS ON DEMONIN N. CALIF. Studio Ilia's,
STRATION
ALS40A's, and the new Super Compacts. Monitor Ill's available on special order. Russ Goddard, 1171 W. Latimer, Campbell, Calif. 95008.
(408) 374-4697.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
118
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
FOR SALE
FOR SALE
TEAC 3340-S-6 mos. old. Full Warranty. $700
NIXON RESIGNATION SPEECH, Ford's swear-
or Best Offer. Jeffrey Hall, 203 S. Bullock,
ing in, various news reports; special reports.
Two 7" reels -$38.50, four cassettes -$45.00,
Saginaw, Mich. 48602. 517-799-6176.
CROWN SX744 with trac-sync and case. New
over $2600, sell $1950. 616-964-9855, 35 N.
26th, Battle Creek, Mich. 49015.
SPEAKER SYSTEMS -Direct from factory. Kits
or assembled. Howard Sound Labs, 408 Wood lawn Ave., N. Belmont, N.C. 28012.
4 -QUAD E. S. PANELS $1000, IC -150 $225, AT 1009 & AT -20 $185, SP -12 (NEW) $60. All less
than year old. DC -300 $325. Want Dyna, HK
tube amps, SP -3 & Mod Rabco arm. 319-3553139 or 515-292-3748, Mal Iles.
ppd.
Mono
only.
TARZAC,
638
Muskogee
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia 23509.
AUDIO RESEARCH, Magneplanars, Tympani
l's $575, black, perfect condition. J. A. Taylor,
407 Oakridge Drive, Schenectady, N.Y. 12306.
ELECTRONIC test instrument catalog -160 illustrated pages list over 5000 new, used and
reconditioned test instruments -600 manufac-
turers. Send $2.50 refundable with first purchase. TUCKER ELECTRONICS, P.O.B. 1050A,
Garland, Tex. 75040.
touch-tone generator, MH8913J
keyboard
Chomerics
Matching
#ER21624 $9.25. Full catalog 25¢ or free with
order. KA ELECTRONIC SALES, Dept RE, 1220
Majesty, Dallas, Tex. 75247.
SAE MK IX PREAMPLIFIER, $350; SAE Mk IIB
ACOUSTIC RESEARCH RECEIVER. Absolutely
tronics include walnut. All equipment mint
HYBRID
$18.00.
superb condition. $170.00. A. Locker, 858 E.
power amplifier, 90 watts/channel, $300; Advent 100A dolby, $200; Sony 377, used 6
hours, $250; Micro -Acoustics FRM-1 speakers,
hemispheric dispersion, $220/pair; Altec
Flamencos, home A7 -800's, $425/pair. Elecwith boxes. Allen Turner, 612 N. Gregson St.,
250th St., Euclid, Ohio 44132.
Apt. 3, Durham, N.C. 27701. 919-682-3720.
MARANTZ 19 Receiver $700.00. Long, 39 New croft Cir., Mattapan, MA 02126.
JAPANESE TRANSISTORS, wholesale prices,
free catalog. WEST PACIFIC ELECTRONICS,
Box 25837, W. Los Angeles, Calif. 90025.
TWO BOSE 901'S with pedestals and equalizer
-$250; Two Dynaco A -25's-$80; Koss E.9
headphones with energizers -$50. All excellent. Original shipping cartons. (415) 937-8723
or H. Nichols, 2677 Baldwin Lane, Walnut
Creek, Calif. 94596.
ACCUTRACKOR-Tonearm protractor sets up
your tonearm-cartridge for lowest distortion.
Precision made to .001". $5.00 including case.
Nielsen 1235 Milton, Schaumburg, Ill.
Ed
60172.
LED POWER LEVEL DISPLAY, custom built
for use with your amplifier or receiver. Storage function "captures" transients. Stereo
models from $75, free literature. ORION, Audio
Dept., Box 145, Springfield, Virginia 22150.
EQUIPMENT WANTED
CASH FOR YOUR unwanted stereo LP's and
reel to reel tapes. Record House, Hillburn, New
ELECTROVOICE PATRICIAN IV OR 700. Price
& Cond. To: John Champagne, Route 11, Lafayette, N.Y. 13084. 1-315-677-3793 after 9 PM.
WANTED PAIR (OR SINGLE) JBL 075 ring
radiators -good condition. Don Gladden, 702
Burk Burnett Bldg., Ft. Worth, Texas 76102.
WANTED: PAIR OF OHM F SPEAKERS. May
be new, used, or demo. State price and condition. A. Blanchard, P.O. Box 2034, Burlington, N.C. 27215. (919) 227-7208.
WANTED: KENWOOD KT -7000 or KT -7001.
Must be in excellent condition. Included must
each, or $75 each if you take all. Mr. Zanetti,
Box 408, APO New York 09607.
be instructions and original box. D. Dildine,
FL, 305-946-4470.
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
ADC, Advent, AKG, AR-LST, Audio -Research,
Calif. 94109.
FMI, Janszen, Linn Sondek, Magneplanar, Marantz, Micro -Acoustics, Ohm, Phase
Linear, Philips, Quintessence, Rabco, Revox,
naco,
or I.p. recordings by Richard Crooks -new or
excellent condition only. Send lists, prices prompt reply. D. Greenwood, 7130 Kopman,
Houston, Tex. 77017.
berg, Yamaha.
WANTED: JBL OLYMPUS or Sovereign Enclosures. Delphi equipment cabinet. Also,
NEW ENGLAND AUDIOPHILES; Soundco now
has NAKAMICHI: along with MAC, CROWN,
REVOX, BRAUN, BOSE, TANDBERG, professional consultation, and more. SOUNDCO.
Springfield, Mass. 413-739-3847.
DISC RECORDER, REK-O-KUT TR12H, 2 -speed.
Master -Pro M-12 Magnetic Cutter mounted.
ferrite rod directional antenna dramatically improves AM performance. Reduces TV
and electrical interference. Nulls local and distant interfering signals. Over 1500 mile range.
Call free: 800/854-7769; Calif. 800/472-7782
gyT McKay Dymek Co. 675 N Park Ave
UM Pomona Calif 91766
EQUIPMENT WANTED
WANTED TWO KENWOOD KL-5080 speakers
in excellent condition. 1-608-365-8000 (call
collect).
WANTED: 19" SILVER Anodized Rack mount
panel for Marantz 10B. (Face panel only-O.K.)
Will buy or trade for original. Evenings, (May
call collect) (1-313-779-2731).
INFORMATION ON NEUMAN QM -69 FET
Microphone. Wanted: used AKG D224E imcs,
Stevenson 4 channel mixer, Stellavox SQ7
and accessories. Please state age, condition
and prices wanted. Paul Hargitt, 5715R Port
Au Prince Drive, Indianapolis, Indiana 46224.
TAPE RECORDINGS
RENT CASSETTE or Open Reel Prerecorded
tape. All Labels. Catalog 75¢. Tape & Time,
P.O. Box 740, Hopkins, Minn. 55343.
EVERYTHING ON OPEN REELI Prerecorded
classical/popular tapes. Latest releases. Dolby. Quad. 96 -page catalogue $1. Barclay Crocker, Room 857A, 11 Broadway, NYC
10004.
LIVE OPERA TAPES. Professional reel, cassette
copies. Extensive sound coded catalogue.
Quality guaranteed. Also records. A Fischer,
Box 83 Fordham Station, Bronx, N.Y. 10458.
All bands of 30's, 40's. Send for free listing.
Box 85, St. James, N.Y. 11780.
TAPES &
TAPE RECORDERS
WANTED: COLLECTOR SEEKS EITHER 78 -rpm
RTR, Sennheiser, SME, Stax, Supex, TandSound Company
4701 College Ave., (714) 582-4148
3675 Sports Arena Blvd., (714) 224-2844
1
This shielded
8 TRACK -BIG BANDS OF SWING ERA
MARANTZ 7C AND 8B. State condition and
price. J. Fong, 1238 Green, San Francisco,
BGW, Citation, Crown, Dahlquist, DBX, Dy-
Fidelity AM
Antenna
York 10931.
17 AURICORD MODEL CAS -1 AUDIO CASSETTE TRANSPORTS -unused and in original
packages, 3 -motor models with counters. $80
Scott -Engineering Sciences, Pompano Beach,
High
McIntosh C-22 or MX tuner-preamp. Les Gueydan, Jr., P.O. Box 455, Metairie, La. 70004.
HEATH AR -15, large Advents, Dual 1019 or
1218 w/cover, Shure V1511. Bob McCoy, 1100
Buckingham Rd., Greensboro, N.C. 27408. 919288-0811.
CROWN CX822, new or second hand. Offer to
Milan Haering, Faehnernstrasse 1, 9000 St.
Gallen, Switzerland.
Scotch cassettes,
cartridges, reels. Discount prices. Lawson's,
Box 510, Livermore, Ca. 94550.
CAPITOL STACK -PACKS.
8 -TRACK TAPES $1.75
By joining Star Tape Club. Buy as many as
you want or none. No obligation. Big name
hit tapes. Rock, Soul, Popular, Best of, Religious, Bluegrass, Classical, Country, Jazz, also
Party. Join direct from this ad. Send $4.00 to:
STAR ENTERPRISES
35 -AM Woodcrest Ave., Dayton, O. 45405.
BLANK CASSETTES: C-20 thru C-90, 400 to
84¢; custom lengths. Free sample. TARZAC,
638 Muskogee Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia,
New, w/sturdy portable case, $225. M. Strange,
11710 Wayneridge Court, Fulton, Md. 20759.
TAPE DECK -Knight model K6-415 or KN-4450.
G. Curry, 279 Wallace Avenue, Toronto, On-
MAKE YOUR OWN TAPES. 45 minute blank 8
PIONEER RT-1020L Tape Deck, Excellent con-
tario, Canada M6P 3N2.
track cartridges $12.00 per dozen. Send MO
or Cashier's Check today. Bob Musial, Box
23509.
dition, less than 1 yr. old. Cost $650. Will sell
for $440 or make offer. Cody Sutherland, 101
Ash, Healdton, Okla. 73438; 1-405-229-1067.
woofer(s).
MINT PAIR OF IMF MONITOR Mk Ill's, only
driving distance of Toledo. Wm. Eckle, 3656
CAPITAL 100 MINUTES 8 track blank tape Dozen $22.00 postage paid. Odoms, 100 An-
$1400. Call Lee at 1-617-494-8586.
Torrance Dr., Toledo, Ohio 43612.
derson Ave. F57, Bronx, N.Y. 10452.
WANTED, ALTEC 803BS, 802, 804 drivers, &
500 Hz horns. Or Heath "Legato" w/15"
State
price.
Within
reasonable
11907-A, Chicago, 60611.
119
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
RECORDS
RECORDS
SERVICES
RECORDS -40 new, different 45's-$3.95 postpaid. Free gift with order. Discount tape catalog. Arcan Products, Rt. 1 Box 278-A, Waldorf,
NOSTALGIA AND JAZZ COLLECTORS. Rare
and hard to get LP's. Relive the golden age of
radio, vaudeville, variety, music hall, early t.v.,
and the Big Band era. Pioneers of jazz, blues,
SHORT -RUN DUPLICATION: Dolbyized Stereo
Md. 20601.
"HARD TO GET' Soundtrack, show, personality, folk LP's. Free list. Davidson, 6114 Gist,
Baltimore, Md. 21215.
33141.
SHOW ALBUMS -Rare. Out of Print LP's. 52
page list 500. Broadway/Hollywood Recordings
Georgetown, Conn. 06829.
PSYCHIC MEDITATION -WITCHCRAFT MUSIC
RECORDS. Free Brochure! (Dealers Welcome)
Brotherhood, Box 1363, Spring Valley,
ragtime, swing, etc. Also rare & out of print
Ip's & tapes. Free Catalog. P.D.Q. PROMOTIONS, P.O. Box 414201, Miami Beach, Fla.
Cal-
ifornia 92077.
OLDIES -45 RPM Original hits, Catalog 50¢
"CONTRASTS
IN
JAZZ"
featuring
Case
$5.00.
Brothers, Maurice Anderson, others.
Priority Records, Box 4049, Ft. Worth, TX
76106.
LECTORS. OVER 40,000
LP'S
IN
STOCK.
SHOWS, SOUNDTRACKS, POPULAR, CLASSI-
CAL, JAZZ, SPOKEN, COMEDY. LISTS 50¢
REFUNDABLE. ROUNDSOUND WEST, BOX
13163.
1053, DEL MAR, CA 92014.
HAVE THOUSANDS OF RECORDS. WOULD
LIKE TO HEAR FROM COLLECTORS OF
SWEET, SWING, JAZZ, C/W, COMEDY. Sid
Rosen, Box 181, Toronto 19, Canada.
SERVICES
BIG LP CATALOG -Jazz, big bands, radio
HIGH FIDELITY SPEAKERS REPAIRED
AMPRITE SPEAKERS SERVICE
655 Sixth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10010
212-CH3-4812
San Rafael, Calif. 94902.
WHILE YOU WERE LOOKING for out -of -print
records, you should've been looking for us.
Discontinued, 216N Rose, Burbank, California
91505.
FREE 200 -PAGE CATALOG. 1,400 New Stereo
Recordings. Renaissance, Baroque, Classical,
Romantic, Modern Music. Not sold in stores.
Not listed in Schwann's. Highest quality!
Budget label prices! Available only by mail.
MUSICAL HERITAGE SOCIETY, Box 932 AU,
New York, N.Y. 10023.
SOUNDTRACKS -SHOWS -JAZZ. Send wants.
Vincent, Box 5202, Long Island City, N.Y.
11105.
SOUNDTRACK RECORD ALBUMS -Mail Auc-
tion. Free List-Whalon, 2321A Hill -Redondo
Beach, Calif. 90278.
SOUNDTRACKS/0C, JAZZ/PERSONALITY FREE NEWSLETTER! RISA, 3700 S. Plaza
Drive, Bldg. F/211, Santa Ana, California
92704.
RARE FILM MUSIC -SOUNDTRACKS -Send
wants and we'll quote immediately. F. C.
Flanders, 6016 Bellona Ave., Baltimore, Md.
21212.
RARE RECORDINGS - Soundtracks, Shows,
Personalities. Reasonable Prices. Large New
Catalog, Free. Hiott, Box 440471, Miami, Fla.
33144.
FILM -STAGE SOUNDTRACKS. Large free list.
A. Lutsky, Box 557342, Miami, Fla. 33155.
CATALOGS. Broadcasts, soundtracks, Personalities of Thirties, Forties. Box 225, New York,
N.Y. 10028.
JUMP RECORDS! BLUE ANGEL RECORDS!
Again available! Teagarden, Nichols, McHargue, VanEps, Gowans, O'Brien, Stacy,
Miller, Ash, Terry, Matlock, Rowles, Venuti,
LaVere, Fontana, Kellaway, Criss, Pass, Edison, etc. P. 0. Box 382, Hermosa Beach, California 90254.
SOLD @ AUCTION - JAZZ - Soundtracks Personalities O.C. Indicate List: Ray Macknic,
P.O. Box 7511, Van Nuys, Calif. 91409 U.S.A.
DISCONTINUED RECORDS, Classical, popular,
lists. Steinmetz. One Seaview Avenue. Massapequa, N.Y. 11758.
CUSTOM PRINTED CASSETTE LABELS: 50 to
1,000+. Finest quality. Complimentary samples. TARZAC, 638 Muskogee Avenue, Norfolk,
Virginia 23509.
TAPE RECORDER HEADS brought back to
spec. Wear removed. Brilliant finish. $10.00
each. One day service. E. Maher, 5 Evans
Place, Orinda, Calif. 94563.
RARE RECORDS FOR DISCRIMINATING COL-
C&S Record Sales. Box 197, Wampsville, N.Y.
shows from 1930's -50's. All the old favorites!
Send 10¢ to Tulip Records, P.O. Box 3155-A,
Cartridges -Mono Cassettes. Highest quality reasonable rates. TARZAC, 638 Muskogee
Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia, 23509.
NEEDLE AND STYLUS CARE SERVICE
If you are unsure as to the condition of your
stylus, forward your stylus, carefully packed,
to: Needle in a Haystack, Inc., 6749 Springfield Mall, Springfield, Va. 22150, together
with remittance of $1.00. Your stylus will be
inspected and returned within 48 hours with
a report stating its condition.
AUDIO/VISUAL ENGINEERING
CONSULTANT
System Design, Sound, Background Music.
Intercom, CCTV, CATV, ETV, MATV, 1st Phone,
Supervise and coordinate Installations. Write:
Accrutek Engineering Co.
P.O. Box 525
STEREO MASTERS, RECORDS AND ALBUMS.
Check our prices. Newest type high level cutting equipment featuring: Neumann VMS 70
Computer control lathe, Parametric Equalization, Dolby, DBX, and the new SX74 Cutting
System by Neumann. Special package prices
on album and single record production.
Stereo LP masters $30.00/side. 7" stereo
masters $10.00/side. 1000 45 RPM stereo
singles $217.50 including mastering. Write or
call for brochure. Dick McGrew Recording
Service, 7027 Twin Hills, Dallas, Texas 75231,
214-691-5107.
CUSTOM RECORDING SERVICE Tape and
Disc. Stereo and mono. Live and copies. Edit-
ing. Masters and pressings. High quality at
reasonable rates. Joseph Giovanelli, Audio
Duarte, Ca. 91010
E.M.I. SPEAKERS REPAIRED. Our nearly 10
years experience gives you the benefit of
truly expert service. Write or call for quotes.
(Specify model number) (516) 751-1633.
THE ABSOLUTE SOUNDTM, in its forthcoming
issue, takes an in-depth look at the Magneplanar IIIA, Ampzilla, the Vestigal Tone -Arm,
the
Soundcraftsmen
Preamp,
SAE's
new
Power Amps, the Phase Linear 700B. If that
doesn't intrigue you, then consider the reviews
of the Audionics TL90 speaker, the Dyna 400
(both versions), the B&O mmc 6000, the LinnSondek Turntable, and the Ortofon SL -15 II.
Mike Wright will be telling you why transistors sound different from tubes. Noted critic
Tech Laboratories, 2819 Newkirk Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. IN9-7134.
B. H. Haggin will be setting the record straight
on Toscanini in the first of a series of articles
DON'T PAY the high mail order prices. Thieves
Warehouse is coming to your area. Franchises
available. Thieves Warehouse, P.O. Box 8057,
Pensacola, Florida 32505.
the new Phase Linear 4000; the Futterman
RECORDS MADE FROM YOUR TAPES. Also,
editing and mastering. Send for free brochure.
Nashville Record Productions, Inc., Dept. AM
204 19th Ave., So., Nashville, Tennessee
37203.
CROWN
RECORDERS
AND
AMPLIFIERS:
factory authorized service station, Complete
overhaul and rebuilding service. Techniarts,
Box 1716 Washington, D.C. 20013 301-4451112.
ATTENTION! ATTENTION!
UNIQUE APPROACH TO AUDIO REPORTING
Introducing the new AUDIO REVIEW, an entirely unique bi-monthly publication featuring
in-depth coverage of the audio field; new
equipment announcements/descriptions, PROFESSIONAL EQUIPMENT REVIEWS/RATINGS
RECOMMENDATIONS/OPINIONS, sensational
revealing audio articles presenting issues
and ideas other magazines ignore. New, expanded EQUIPMENT BUYERS DISCOUNT
SERVICE. The New AUDIO REVIEW covers the
field of audio in its entirety. Special Introductory Subscription Rate: $8.00/year. (6
issues). AUDIO REVIEW, Box 175, North Branford, CT 06471.
designed to separate wheat from chaff In
musical matters. This is only the first issue
in Volume 2. Later on there will be reviews of
amp; the Micro/Acoustics cartridge; Radford's
electronics; IMF's new speakers; the Bryston
Pro -2, the Keith Monks arm; the Infinity ServoStatik la; the Renaissance speakers, and
more. Subscriptions are $10 (four issues).
Canadians: either $9 money order or $11 personal check. Add $2 if you want your copies
mailed first class. Foreign: $12.50 (airmail).
The Absolute Sound, Box 5. Northport, New
York 11768. (Volume I back issues available at
$3 each or $12 for set.)
FLORIDA'S
ONLY
FACTORY -AUTHORIZED
Warranty Station for Crown International. Factory -trained technicians. Also Phase Linear,
other professional lines. Audio Analyst, 3955
Forsyth Road, Orlando, Fla. 32807. 305-6784499.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
STUFF ENVELOPES. $25.00 hundred. Imme-
diate earning. Beginner's Kit, $1.00 (refundable) Robinson Enterprises, Box 38, Augusta,
Ga. 30903.
$20,000 - year and more possible, Advertising business or mailorder. Details 35¢
handling. Self-addressed, stamped envelope
to P. King, 422 N. 62nd St., Phila., Pa. 19151.
AUDIO NOVEMBER 1974
120
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
OPEN REEL STEREO TAPE BUYERS!
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
REPRESENTATIVE FOR SPEAKER SYSTEM
30% DISCOUNT. Name Brand Musical Instru-
KITS in your area. Huge, never ending, un-
ments. Free Catalog. Freeport Music, 455R
group of "sound effects" tapes by Audio Fidelity). Send $1.00
-and we will also mail you a 140 -page Harrison stereo tape
touched market. High energy, young, together,
Route 110, Melville, N.Y. 11746.
this $1.00 is refundable on your first $10.00
sound & business oriented individual will do
best with this investment or commission opportunity. Requires very little attention after
establishment in your protected territory. We
must eventually meet for contractual arrangements. Send detailed resume to: Robb Favier/
TSR Engineering, 3673 W. 113th St., Inglewood, Calif. 90303.
RADIO PROGRAMS
CASSETTE LABELS
HIGH FIDELITY
NOW AVAILABLE . . FAMOUS REFLECTING
SYSTEM'S 4'/2" REPLACEMENT DRIVERS.
$7.98 POSTPAID. BIG QUANTITY DISCOUNTS.
.
FREE
SPECIFICATIONS.
AURATONE,
BOX
580-13, DEL MAR, CALIFORNIA 92014.
REK-O-KUT now has in stock the original
1930-1962 RADIO PROGRAMS, Reels, $1.00
HOME MOVIES
hour! Cassettes, $2.00 hour! Catalog. $1.25.
AM TREASURES, Box 192M, Babylon, N.Y.
CAGNEY! BOGART! DRESSLER! FAIRBANKS!
97225.
REK-O-KUT, 1568 N. Sierra Vista, Fresno, Calif.
93703.
FLYNN! TEMPLE! SWANSON! Many more!
The usual, the unusual; 16-S8-8mm sound &
silent 200 ft. S8.8mm sampler $2.00 Cat. free.
Thunderbird Bx 4081 -AM, Los Angeles 90054.
512, Miami, Florida 33165.
MASTERS AND ACETATE DEMOS (STEREO
OR MONO) PRECISION CUT using the ScullyWestrex 3D cutting system. Request brochure
Hughes Electronics Service
45 Dunn St., Asheville, N.C. 28806
-you'll be surprised at our prices. Studio discount available. Trutone Records, Dept. A,
6411 Bergenwood Ave., North Bergen, New
Jersey 07047. 201-868-9332.
SHORT RUN RECORD PRODUCTION (100 &
UP) FROM YOUR TAPES. We do it all -from
the master -to the pressing -to the album
jacket LP's or 45's. Trutone Records, Dept.
available. Low prices, finest quality, immediate service. Catalogue 25¢. Nostalgic Radio,
Box 29K, Peoria, III. 61601.
A, 6411 Bergenwood Ave., North Bergen, New
SHORTWAVE
Jersey 07047. 201-868-9332.
BING CROSBY AND RUSS COLUMBO-Rare
HEAR POLICE FIRE Dispatchers. Catalogs
show receivers: exclusive directories of "confidential" channels. Send 10¢ stamp. Communications, Box 56AU Commack, New York
1930's radio programs available on tapes &
11725.
cassettes. NARD, Box 298, Staten Island, N.Y.
INSTRUCTION &
EDUCATION
BOOKS
SITUATIONS WANTED
AUDIOPHILE NOW ADMINISTRATOR NYSE CO.
desires to join Hi -Fi mfr. Have varied business
experience. Reply Audio Box A411-1.
HI-FI DEALERS -New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, Oregon, Florida. Audiophile would like
10314.
to become active partner with view toward
expansion. Reply Audio, Box A411-2.
LEARN DESIGN TECHNIQUES. Electronics
Books, P.O. Box 11965, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19145.
Monthly Newsletter. Digital, linear construction projects, design theory and procedures.
"1975" SURVIVAL/MILITARY - Books/Manuals catalog 35¢. Freeze dried survival foods
brochure w/prices 25¢. Hillcrest Publications,
Sample copy $1.00. VALLEY WEST, Box 2119H, Sunnyvale, California 94087.
I LIVE IN THE NORTHEAST and would like to
build your electronic kits for 30% list. Guaranteed, experienced, references;
livery arranged. (617) 547-0184.
pickup -de-
REPAIRS & SERVICES
(IJ-40), McDonald, Ohio 44437.
DEALERSHIP
logue. Clark's Corvair Parts, Colrain, Mass.
CORD AND PRICE LIST. ALSO FINEST DISC
MASTERING. 1819 BROADWAY, NASHVILLE,
TENNESSEE 37203.
MUSICAL SPEAKERS REPAIRED
ALTEC WARRANTY STATION
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS ON TAPE. Thousands
CORVAIR PARTS -SAVE! 500 for large cata-
DYNAKITS, lowest prices. Underground Hi -Fi
Sales, Rt. 1, Box 177, Arnold, Md. 21012.
NASHVILLE RECORD PRODUCTIONS WILL
SPEAKERS
OLD RADIO SHOWS. Thousands available on
Cassettes, Reels, or Cartridges. Catalogue
$1.00. The Radio Vault. Box 9032-A. Wyoming,
Michigan 49509.
AUTO ACCESSORIES
TEC, Box 16103, Memphis, Tenn. 38116.
PRESS HIGH QUALITY PURE VINYL RECORDS
FROM YOUR TAPES. SEND FOR SAMPLE RE-
546 S. Meridian St.
Indianapolis, Ind. 46225
MI 48152.
BOOKS. Send 50¢ for Catalog. Refundable
with Order. Also Egyptian Dream Book 35¢.
(includes audio patch), automatically record
all your telephone conversations. Complete
construction manual $2.00, Kit $19.95. TEL-
CABINETS
AUDIO ORIGINALS
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS. Low Rates! BRC
QUALITY DUBS. 17173 Westbrook, Livonia,
Catalog 25¢. Radio Doctors -A, 201B Eagle
Heights, Madison, Wisconsin, 53705.
PLANS & KITS
COMPONENT CABINETS
Direct from the factory at low factory prices.
Finished Unfinished Kits. Free brochure.
wood, Calif. 90302.
RADIO BROADCASTS on cassettes $2.50 hour.
WUlD2,
'eCoonRoad
SERVICES
Catalogue 50¢. 30 minute sample tape with
catalogue $1.25. Satellite Broadcasting, Box
Catalog $1.00 refundable first order. Adventures, Dept. A-11, 1301 N. Park Ave., Ingle-
PLUS POSTAGE BY WEIGHT AND /ONE MINIMUM ORDER $504í
SAXITONE TAPE SALES
AUTOMATIC TELEPHONE RECORDER SWITCH
OLD RADIO PROGRAMS on tape and cassette.
YESTERDAY'S RADIO PROGRAMS ON TAPE.
WHITE CASSETTE LABELS
NORELCO CASSETTE CLEANERS
1AMOUS BRAND CASSETTES METAL OR FIBERGLASS 10 REELS ,SEND
FOR TAPE DISCOUNT SHOE ¡SI
QUANTITY
19
10 99
100
1000
L ASS( TTE LABELS,uNIrSOF TOT
02
015
01
CASSETTE MAILER BORES
025
02
03
022
65
50
NORELCO CASSETTE CLEANER
50
55
7 77
(BUY 2 GET ONE FREE i
SCOTCH CASSETTE 5C90HE
10 FIBERGLASS REELS USED
50
40
35
50
10 METAL NAB HOLE USED
100
100
90
85
1,1 AIN
woven Dacron Polyurethane turntable drive
belts -$8.95 plus $1.00 postage / handling.
GOLDEN AGE RADIO -your best source for
radio tapes. Box 25215-D, Portland, Oregon
catalog -so you'll get both for $1.00 -and
purchase of open reel stereo tapes at our 30%
discount.
THOUSANDS OF OLD RADIO COMEDIES,
Dramas, Band Remotes, Mysteries, etc. $6.00
for 6 Hour Reels. Catalogue $1.00 (Refundable). Cassettes also available. RADIOVOX
1756 Washtenaw, Ypsilanti, Michigan 48197.
11702.
At last! An open reel catalog, including titles, songs, etc. of
95 long play. 1'2-3 hour albums, by American Airlines, Continental Airlines. and Ampex 4 -track stereo tapes includes a
CALCULATORS, pocket, repaired. $14.95. major
GOING BACK to former country of Haiti. Look-
ing for Electronics Dealership. Write to Guy
Roumain, 1320 Potter
Springs, Colorado 80909.
G.
Drive,
parts extra. Ship prepaid to: RAINBOW ELECTRONICS, 4158 Greeby St., Phila., Pa. 19135.
Colorado
01340.
HELP WANTED
STOP LOOKING
MUSIC
INDONESIAN MUSIC, records, tapes. Box 309,
Clayton, Cal. 94517.
AUDIO
REAL ESTATE
Find the job you want, where you want nationwide and overseas with Help Wanted Maga-
WYOMING RANCH LAND - 10 Acres, $25 Down,
zine. Over 5,000 jobs monthly. $4 ppd. Raymond Cosgrove, Dept. AD -10, 302 Ribordy
$25 Month, Owner Mike Gauthier, 9418 Florence, Downey, CA 90240.
Drive, Eglin Village, Fla. 32542.
121
NOVEMBER 1974
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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mode
DECODER
The Marantz 4400 outperforms just about
ment. Instead, Marantz receivers have an exclusive 4 -channel matrix decoder pocket for plug-
every receiver in the world. Stereo or 4 -channel.
(It's both.) In stereo it delivers an astounding 125
watts continuous power per channel at 8 ohms
in/plug-out SQ', plus facilities for a CD -42
adaptor. Result: you can use any or all of the
optional systems currently available, and easily
from 20Hz to 20kHz with less than 0.15% total
harmonic distortion. In 4 -channel it's rated at an
impressive 50 watts continuous power per chan-
and economically change to any future 4 -channel
improvements without obsoleting your entire
receiver investment. Simply plug-in the latest
nel at 8 ohms from 20Hz to 20kHz with less than
0.15% total harmonic distortion. It offers the same
Marantz decoder circuit.
And Marantz 4400 superiority doesn't stop
walloping performance as the finest separate
components, yet the feature -packed Marantz
there. There's built-in Dolby3 Noise Reduction
4400 costs about 25% less. Just $1250 for virtu-
with six controls for the ultimate in flexibility.
Quadra Power bridging for super stereo per-
ally the highest output and the lowest total
harmonic distortion available in any receiver at
formance. An oscilloscope with three separate
functions for precise visual displey. And much
any price.
The Marantz 4400 with "Stereo 2 + Quad radial' 4" design will never be obsolete. That's
because Marantz does not have an inflexible
more.
The 4400 brute receiver, like all Marantz
products, is backed by a full, three-year guarantee'. See it at your Marantz dealer.
matrix system permanently installed in the equip Check No. 43 on Reader Service Card
We sound better.
'SO is a trademark of CBS Inc. 'CD -4 is a trademark of Victor Company of Japan. 'Dolby is a trademark of Dolby Labs, Inc .'Marantz Co., Inc. guarantees the original registered owner that all parts are free from operating defects for three years from purchase date except tubes which are guaranteed for 90 days. (Products are repaired or
replaced free of charge during this period provided you bought them in the U.S.A. from an authorized dealer. Naturally the serial number cannot be altered or removed.
Marantz Co,, Inc.. a subsidiary of Superscope, Inc., P.O. Box 99A. Sun Valley, Calif. 91352. In Europe: Superscope Europe, S.A. Brussels. Belgium. Available in Canada.
Prices subject to change without notice. Send for free catalog.
d
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AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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For those people who
don't care how much their
audio equipment costs
as long as its the best,
we offer a line of audio
equipment which we don't care
how much it costs to build.
Epicure Corporation is
that division of Epicure
Products, Inc. that has
been designated as
spawning ground for all
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Think of the luxurious
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We don't worry about
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about the quality of them.
The result of this approach,
as you can well imagine, is a
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The Epicure Model One
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the best.
enal power bandwidth and
tremendous current and thermal capability.
The Model One is easily
years ahead of its time. It goes
for $649.*
Or, for $ 1600, an audio perfectionist might own the Epicure
Model Two Audio Function
Center. This may seem high for
400 Plus-an improved
version of a speaker that
was already top -rated by
Stereo Review.
And soon you'll be hearing
about a new tuner from
Epicure. Not an inexpensive
tuner, perhaps. But a good
tuner. A very good tuner.
Write and we'll tell you
more: Epicure Corporation,
Newburyport, Mass. 01950.
EPICURE
A step closer to reality.
Check No. 19 on Reader Service Card
'All West Coast prices even higher! A Division of Epicure Products, Inc.
AmericanRadioHistory.Com
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