MAY 1977 80c - Ceramic Arts Daily
MAY
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1977
80c
Shimpo-West
the leader!
Shimpo-West Top Ten
1. Bennett Pottery Supply
2. Seattle Pottery Supply
3. Ceramics Hawaii
4. Leslie Ceramics
5. Minnesota Clay
6. Rovin Ceramics
7. Eagle Ceramics
8. Sax Arts & Crafts
9. Ceramic Store
10. Stewart Clay Co.
........
Led by our No. 1 Representative for 1976,
Bennett Pottery Supply Inc.
Winter Park and Miami, Florida.
MINNESOTA
Old Adobe CeramMcs
HAWAII
i#*Mmnesota C~ay Company
16461 Los Gatos
~/Ceram~cs Hawaii, Ltd.
8001 Grand Ave
Los Gatos, CA 95030
543 South St.
Bloomington, MN 55420
Pot Farm
Honolulu. HI 96813
Paramount Ceramics
2909 Santa Monma B}vd.
ILLINOIS
Santa Monies, CA 80404
220 N, State St.
Pot Gallery
A . R T Studio
Fairm~t, MN 56031
2994 Thousand Oaks
921 Oakton St.
MISSOURI
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Elk Grove Village. I L 60007
L & R Specialities
Dick Blick
4450 N. 42nd St.
Shep Stoneware Supply
P.O. Box 1267
202 E. Mr. Vernon
Phoenix, AZ 85019
Route 1, Box 365H
Galesburg. IL 61401
POBox 309
Nixa, MO 65714
Marion Ceramic Shop
Arroyo Grande, CA 93420
CECAS Enterprises. Inc
MONTANA
3418 N, 24th St
Stewart's of Catifornia
29 W. 555 Batavia Rd
Phoemx. AZ 85016
16055 Heron Ave,
Warrenville, I L 60555
Clarce's Studio
1415 W. Aluminum
Shop of Art
La Mirada. CA 90638
The Clay People
Butte, MT 59701
26 E. University D r
Stoneware Pottery
3345 N. Halsted
Tempe. AZ 85281
215 Le Loma
Chicago, IL 60657
Clay Gallery
1001 S. 4th St. West
CALIFORNIA
Modesto, CA 96465
Pyramid Paper Co,
Missoula. MT 59801
Aardvark
Waycraft
P.O. Box 27
NEW JERSEY
1400 E Pomona St.
394 Delaware
Urbana, IL 61801
Santa Ana. CA 92705
Imperial Beach, CA 92032
Ro bbin's Clay
Pupiek Pottery Supply
1021 W. Lill St.
365 Edgewood Ave,
Creative Ceramic Supply
COLORAO0
Chicago. IL 60614
Teaneck. NJ 07666
2556 Albatross Way
Salem Craftsmens Guild
Sacramento. CA 95815
Van Howe Ceram)c Supply
IOWA
3 Alvin Place
11975 E. 40th St.
Artcraft
Creative Pottery
Denver, CO 80239
1620 Commercial St.
Upper Montclair, NJ 07043
1931 Old Middle Field Way Van Howe Ceramic Supply
Waterloo. IA 50702
i~Stewart Clay CO. inc.
Suite C
P.O. Box lS
Mountain View. CA 94043 Colorado
2602 Durango
Springs, CO 80910 KANSAS
400 Jersey Ave.
Duncan CeramKs
Evans ceramic Supply
New Brunswick. NJ 08902
5673 E. Shiclds
FLORIDA
1518 S. Washington
NEW MEXICO
Fresno, CA 93727
~ Bennett Pottery Supply
Wichita. KS 67211
Anhowe
Ceramics of Albuquerque
Leisure Craft
707 Nicolet
KENTUCKY
3825 Commercial St. NE
P,O, Box 61
Winter Park. FL 32789
Owl Cr~k Pottery
Albuquerque. NM 87109
E. Marie St,
1/Bennett Pottery Supply
11416 Shelbyville Rd,
Compton. CA 90221
10520 8.W. 184th Terrace
Louisville, KY 40223
NORTH CAROLINA
i/Leslie Ceramics
Miami, FL 33157
Graham Ceramics
MARYLAND
1319 Central Ave
1212 San Pablo
Clay Factory
#/Eagle Ceramics
P.O. Box 12462
Berkeley, CA 94706
4100 W. Kennedy Bird,
12264 Wiikins Ave,
Martin Chodos
Tampa, FL 33609
Charlotte, NC 28205
913 W. Fern Dr.
Rockville, MD 20852
Wildcat Creek Pottery
Fullerton, CA 92633
Potter's World
MacMillian Arts & Crafts
Route 1 Feamngton Farm
4930 Distribution Dr.
9645 Gerwig Lane
Pittsb~o. NC 27312
Nasco West, Inc.
Tampa, P L 33618
Columbia. MD 21046
P O. Box 3857
NORTH DAKOTA
Modesto. CA 95352
GEORGIA
MICHIGAN
Northwest Ceramic Supply
Kickwheel Pottery & Supplyf~Rcovin Cerampcs
P,O. Box 1175
802 Miami Circle NE
Y'0912 Schaefer Rd.
Fargo, ND 58102
Atlanta, GA 30324
Dearborn, MI 48126
ALASKA
Fat's Ceramics
7901 Old Seward Highway
Anchorage, AK 99502
ARIZONA
Char Mar Ceramics
2126 N. Stone
Tu~con. AZ 85705
Hill Brothers
OHIO
l~fEagle Cerammcs
- - 1 3 0 0 W 9th St
Cleveland, OH 44113
OREGON
Art Pak Products
P.O. Box 17356
8106 Denver Ave,
Portland. OR 97217
Richard's Pug Mill
8065 S.E. 13th St.
Portland, OR 97202
PENNSYLVANIA
Blakely Ceramics
1500 Evergreen Ave,
Pittsburgh. PA 15209
Potlatch Pottery
722 W. Erie Ave.
Philadelphia. PA 19140
SOUTH DAKOTA
House of Ceramics
2315 W, Madison
Sioux Fags, SD 57104
Webco Supply Co.
P.O Box 3054
829 Lindsey Lane
Tyler, TX 75715
UTAH
Cap*tal Ceramics
2174 S. Main St.
Salt Lake City. UT 84115
VIRGINIA
Earthworks
2309 W. Main St.
Richmond. VA 23220
WASHINGTON
fSeatRe Pottery Supply
400 E. Pine
8eatde, WA 9~122
Spencer Pottery
4861 S. 144th St.
Seattle, WA 98168
WISCONSIN
The Pottery
2029 Parmenter St,
Middleton, Wf 53562
TENNESSEE
V/Sax Arts & Crafts
207 N. Milwaukee St.
Gallery 111
Milwaukee, Wl 53562
122 Stadium Dr.
Hendersonville, TN 37075
Natco Inc.
Fort Atkinlon, Wl 53536
H ~ of Ceramics
1011 N, Hollywood
Memphis, TN 38100
The Potter's Mark
Rt. 1 Buckhorn Rd.
GaRinburg. TN 37738
TEXAS
Avery's Art Studio
8607 N. New BraunfeH
San Antonio, TX 78217
Bateman Ceramic Supply
718 Pierce St,
Dallas, TX 75211
~/CCeramic Store
" 7 0 6 Richmond Ave.
Houston, TX 77006
Houston Arts & Crafls, Inc.
1435 Westheimer
Houston, TX 77006
SHIMPO-WEST P.O. BOX 2305, BASSETT, CALIF. 91744 DEPT. 215
SHIMPO
AMERICA
6411
DRAKE
AVE.,
LINCOLNWOOD,
IL60645
SHIMPO.AME RICA
DISTRIBUTING TO:
CONNECTICUT
CoJe Ceramic Laboratories
Gay St, Rt. 41
Shar~. CT 06068
Rusty Kiln
80 Garden St.
Wethersfield, CT 0S109
NEW YORK
Baldwin Pottery
540 La Guard~a Place
New Yo,k, NY 10012
Clay Art Center
40 Beach St,
Port Chester, NY 10573
Doilman Ceramic Supplies
663 Walden Ave.
Buffalo, NY 14211
Earthworks Art & Craft
420 Merchants Rd.
Rochester. NY 14609
Hilco Ceramics
16 Elaine Terrace
Camillus, NY 13031
Saaley's Ceramic Sa~ice, Inc.
9 River St.
Oneonta. NY 13820
J ~ k D, Wolfe. Inc.
724 Meeker Ave.
Br~klyn, NY 11222
MAINE
Portland Pottery & Gal}ery
40 Exchange St,
PorSand, ME 04111
MASSACHUSETTS
Clay Art Canter
342 Western Ave,
Brighton, MA 02135
Rare Earth Mudworks
70 Merrim~ St.
Amesbory, MA 01913
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4L
Raymon Elozua is a studio potter as well
as an artist. There are differences of
approach to these two styles of working,
but with Raymon, there is one aspect that
remains constant, his insistence for perfection in his work as well as his equipment.
"At the time 1 first started working in
production, 1 looked to see what was
available in slab machines. All I saw were
"'toy" rollers or machines that were expensive and offered very little in the way of
versatility. For this reason I continued
to hand build my slabs in anticipation
that eventually a machine would come
out that would meet my standards."
"When I first saw the Bailey, I was
immediately impressed with its solid
construction and concern for functional
detail. The "two-roller" drive system
compresses the clay evenly on both sides
of the slab resulting in the tightest uniform
bond possible in the clay structure.
Instinctively, this makes much more sense
than a system where the slab is being
"stretched" along a bed."
"The slabs I used to roll by hand for my
large bowls and landscapes took ten
minutes of hard work. With the Bailey
I've dropped that time to less than a
minute! The time saved in labor has
enabled me to make my prices more
competitive. The machine paid for itself
i n 3 weeks. The Bailey has freed me from
the drudgery of making the slabs and
allows me to put more energy and thought
into the creative aspects of clay."
"I started out by using the manual model,
but now I have switched to the electric.
The electric goes faster than the hand
crank at a smoother constant speed.
Making a slab of any size or thickness is
as simple as pushing a button. 1 feel that
the electric is a must for the potter that
is doing extensive production or sculptural
work."
"In my mind, there is no doubt that the
Bailey offers trouble-free operation and
is the epitome of design and function.
You owe it to yourself to research the
market before you invest in any studio
equipment. As for slab machines, I'm sure
you'll agree, absolutely, the Bailey is
the best!"
New York, New York
Pier Bowl, 18" x 6", cone 9 oxidation 1976
Write Jim Bailey, Bailey Pottery Equipment, Hemingway Road, Brant Lake, New York 12815
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Superior firing
doesn't just happen,
AT PARAGON, WE M A K E IT HAPPEN.
I~aragon manutactures a complete line of the finest, electric kilns on the market today.
Like the A-82B--our popular, stainless steel model that has everyone talking.
\
1t'
~ i¸
It's a high fire kiln that takes care of everything from china paints to porcelain, with
temperatures ranging up to 2300 ° F. (cone 8). Dependable, 4-way rotary switches let you
control the heat and evenly distribute it throughout the full 17 ½" octagonal x 22 ¼" firing
chamber with consistent firing results daily. Hand-selected, insulating firebrick, plus the
heavy duty Kanthal elements in dropped, recessed grooves that we introduced years ago,
make it the most efficient, economically operated kiln around.
No space is wasted when tall pieces are loaded directly on the reversible brick bottom, and
if you need a few extra inches at the top, we can give you 6 ½" more firing depth than
comparable kilns. Now or later your A-82B can grow, and still fire to 2300 ° F. with the Model
AA-8B extension collar. No additional wiring is required, because the receptacle in kiln's
switch control box is standard.
Operating instructions mounted on the side of the kiln make daily, routine jobs a cinch,
and the recommended firing schedule poster included with our new, step-by-step
instruction and service manual insures superior firing for a better chance at the blue ribbon.
It's easy to load when you have a lock-in lid support and venting is simple with the fall away,
adjustable, Prop-R-Vent--our handy, new convenience with two stages to allow the escape
of gases and water vapor in all types of firing.
Visit the Paragon Dealer in your area and find out more about our features that make
superior firing possible. Or, while it's fresh on your mind, write for our free catalog with
information on more than 30 exciting models. We have a kiln to match your exact firing
needs.
,.OOSTR,
S.
DEPT. CM-5 • BOX 10133 • DALLAS, TEXAS 75207
NATURE
BECOMES
ART
M O N T H L Y
Volume
25, N u m b e r
May
5
7
Letters to the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Itinerary
11
........................................
Suggestions
1977
13
......................................
Answers to Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Comment by Joan Farrell with John Coyne . . . . . . . . . .
19
Atlanta Exhibition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
Karl Martz Retrospective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
Hal Riegger: Bizen Kiln Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
Roy Lichtenstein: Ceramic Sculpture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
Digging Your Own C l a y - - A Geologist's Viewpoint
by Maynard P. Bauleke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Elly and Willy Kuch by Sylvia Hyman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Anne Kingsbury
50
58
.................................
Throwing a Double-Walled Planter by Philip Wood . . . . 59
62
Booth Design at Northeast Craft Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64
Barium Glazes by Richard Behrens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CeramActivities
77
..................................
Summer Workshops 1977 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
New Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97
Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98
On Our Cover
"Ceramic Sculpture 2," glazed low-fire clay, 3~2 inches in
height, by Roy Lichtenstein. The object (courtesy of Mr.
and Mrs. Leo Castelli) is one of a group of the artist's
ceramic works which were recently presented in an exhibition at the Art Galleries of California University, Long
Beach. More of Lichtenstein's work is featured in an article
beginning on page 40. Photo: E. O. Nelson.
Publisher and Acting Editor: SPENCER L. DAviS
Managing Editor: WILLIAM C. HUNT
Art Director: ROEERT L. CREAOER
Copy Editor: CHEaW, HAW)EX
Circulation Manager: MARY RUSrtLEY
Advertising Manager: CONNZE BELCHER
tiNY Wily YOU SPi Lb IT
fl.R.T. Hi flNS DISCOUNTS
OF UP TO 407. O['P blST
Processors, distrtbutors, dealers for:
• A R . T . moist clays
• IVestuood cla) and g l a z e s - - 0 6 - 1 0
• Brent. Sbtmpo, Max, P,tci/~ca. Dinack
i :
• Cress. L & L, Estrin. l~'~e~tu pod. Skutt
• K e m p e r . O H a u s . Kingspin, ] l i l y Orton
Editorial, Advertising, and Circulation Offices: 1609 Northwest
Blvd., P.O. Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212. (614) 488-8236
West Coast Ad~'ertising Representative: Joseph Mervish Associates, 4721 Laurel Canyon, Suite
California 91607. (213) 877-7556
211, North
Hollywood,
Copyright 1977 Pro[essional Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
CERAMICS I~IONTHLY is published monthly except July and August by Professional Publications,
Inc. - - S. L. Davis, Pres., P. S. Emery, Sec.: 1609 Northwest Blvd., Columbus, Ohio 43212.
Correspondence concerning subscriptions, renewals, and change of address should be mailed to
the Circulation Department, CER^.MICS MOI~'rV:LV, Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Second
Class postage paid at Athens, Ohio, t:.s.^. Subscriptions: One year $8; Two years $14; Three
years $19. Add $1.00 per year outside u.s.a.
The articIes in each issue of CZR^MICS MoN'rHt.V are indexed in the Art Index and the Readers'
Guide to Periodical Literature. Microfilm copies and xerographic reprints are available to subscribers from University ,Microfilms, 300 N. Zeeb Rd., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. ~,lanuscripts
and illustrations dealing with ceramic art are welcome and wiU be considered for publication.
A booklet is available without cost to potential authors, describing procedures for the preparation and submission of a manuscript. Send manuscripts and correspondence about them to the
Editor, C z a s ~ z c s MO~T~=~.V, Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212.
• Corks./;,indies. sponges, books, beads.
lute, bells, lustrex, re#actories,
"Discount policy. !~/e feel that increased sales msti[~ discount~. F~r two )ears we
hare discounted successfullk--botb ue and ,ur cum, mers bate plotted---as it
should be. There are no catches, no hidden c~,sts, no other requirements and all
uarranties are alu ays honored•
An e.,:ample o] some of our disce,unts are--for $60.0/) you can purchase $I00.00
worth o[ nationall) known tools exdudi,~g tax and postage• On most uheels we
can sate )ou around $40-50.00.
We are a medium sized company, deali,g uith schools, institutic, ns, and studio
potters. I~/e are happ) to proti,te quotahons on bona fide bids. II"e are happ) to
u e/come customers to ~,ur shou rooms where items are displa)ed/or demonstration.
IFe publish an 88 page catalogue/price list u'hich u'e sell f~,r $2.00 or offer [tee
uith orders a[ $25.00. Samples o/our cla*'s are a~ailable upon request.
fl.R.T. &|udio,921 Oaklon
Elk firo e, IlL 60007
~Iay 1977
5
Introducing the Giffin Grip
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• . . the most revolutionary invention for potters
since the application of the electric motor to the wheel•
You love to throw pots and you hate trimming them,
or r a t h e r . . , it's not the trimming but getting it in
the center and keeping it there, that's where the
rub comes in.
The wood is precision machined, nine ply imported
birch laminate, sealed with three coats of polyurethane
varnish. The fittings -- two sets of sliders, mounting
brackets and central hub are all solid brass.
The Giffin Grip does it. It is a device for centering
and holding in place a leather hard pot. It works with
little pots, big pots, short ones, tall ones, round sides and
straight sides, upside down or right side up. It won't
let go or mark your pots and is constructed entirely
of the highest quality materials available•
OK, but how does it work? When the top plate is
turned clockwise the three arms move as one to
gently corral your pot into the center. It is self locking
and releases with a counter clockwise turn•
It works and it's made to last. The Giffin Grip.
12" wheel model -- $132.00 plus shipping, 14" model -- $140.00.
Custom sizes available. Dealer inquiries welcome. Patent pending.
For a detailed brochure write:
Brian Giffin, Giffin Earthworks, Box 4057, Boulder, Colorado 80306
giffin grip
LETTERS
LIKES ARTICLES
Let me say thanks for your two best
articles, namely the one by Bernard L e a c h
( M a y 1976), a n d the other by Daniel
Rhodes ( J a n u a r y C M ) . . . (But) I was
a bit disappointed not to see any fuss
m a d e for L e a c h on his ninetieth birthday,
J a n u a r y 5.
Rita L. Calderon
New York, N.Y.
PHONY MYSTIQUE
I ' m a person who makes pots for a
living a n d every now a n d t h e n I read
s o m e t h i n g which riles me no end. Recently that h a p p e n e d with the fortuitous
combination of articles by Daniel Rhodes
a n d T o m M a r s h in the J a n u a r y C M .
T h e Rhodes article promotes the same
p h o n y mystique started by Bernard L e a c h
over thirty years ago. F r o m all accounts,
Rhodes m u s t be a good teacher a n d a
fair potter, but all the double-talk about
"finding reality in one's work," blah, blah,
blah, surely m u s t have bored his students,
if Rhodes actually said it to t h e m . . . .
T h e ridiculous heights to which this
airy-fairy hoopla can p u s h people is illustrated in T o m M a r s h ' s article where he
says, " I n a world where Chevrolets cost
$7,000, is a beautiful pot at the same price
expensive?"
T h e same cretinous attitude makes the
yowlings a n d gyrations of a pop singer
earn his millions of dollars, or causes two
gentlemen to batter each other in a ring
for thirty-six m i n u t e s and receive from
two to six million dollars for it. It's a
topsy-turvy world we live i n . . .
Edwin Todd
St. Mary, J a m a i c a
JOAN MONDALE
W h y not publish an article on J o a n
Mondale, the wife of the Vice-President?
I have read that she is a very fine potter
and also that she plans to use the VicePresidential m a n s i o n as a showcase for
c o n t e m p o r a r y A m e r i c a n crafts.
Nancy S. Richards
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
NO EERIE FEELING
In a letter published in the M a r c h
CERAr,IICS MON'rULV, E d w a r d Higgins
asked if potters were being ethical w h e n
they signed their n a m e s to apprentices'
work. I confess to this practice b u t get no
"eerie feeling" w h e n I do.
O v e r the years I have evolved the design of a complete line of thrown stoneware. All the designs are distinctly mine.
T h e y are m a d e with a clay body I formulated a n d I m a d e the glaze. T h e pots are
all m a d e in m y studio, fired in m y kilns,
to exactly m y specifications. Clearly, from
start to finish the p r o d u c t is entirely
mine a n d I feel absolutely no guilt w h e n
m y apprentice stamps "Sassi" on these
p o t s - - t h e y are not his.
Occasionally an apprentice makes things
for his own use a n d occasionally his work
for me is not up to m y standards. Such
work is not s t a m p e d with m y name. But
as long as an apprentice can throw pots
that meet exact specifications, then I will
feel no guilt w h e n I sell them. R e g u l a r
clients expect me to m a i n t a i n m y line a n d
its quality. If I expect to stay in business
I m u s t m a i n t a i n a high level of craftsmanship. I have worked years to establish a
certain reputation and following in m a n y
craft shops. I feel that I do n o t h i n g to
i m p u g n t h a t reputation by training an
apprentice.
Doug Sassi
St. Marys, Pa.
ENOUGH SPARK
R e g a r d i n g E d w a r d Higgins's letter . . .
I, too, would be skeptical of the unethical
practice of an artist not taking a h a n d in
the creation of his own pieces. It is unfort u n a t e that I a m singled out as the example of this t h r o u g h a misinterpretation of
m y article in last winter's Studio Potter
magazine on apprenticeships.
It is true, as I stated, that D a v e was the
first apprentice that I trusted to throw m y
weed pot forms. However, I did not trust
h i m to design, trim, sign, glaze, nor to
raku-fire them. T h e s e steps were all performed by me, and that should be e n o u g h
of a spark from the " m a s t e r . " Nancy ]urs
Scottsville, N.Y.
CHANGE THE TERM
For some time I have felt that the term
" h a n d b u i l d i n g " could be better used to
describe carpentry or any other craft
involving a nonmalleable substance. T h e
phrase " f r e e h a n d forming," in addition to
s o u n d i n g more artistic, describes m o r e
aptly w h a t actually takes place. Even
" h a n d f o r m i n g " is better t h a n " h a n d b u i l d ing."
Ceil Herlinger
M i a m i Beach, Fla.
CONTEMPORARY COVERAGE
C u t down on the c o n t e m p o r a r y coverage. T h a t isn't reality w h e n it comes to
paying the bills!
Marvine Borntrager
Corvallis, Ore.
PERTINENT INFORMATION
To those w h o complain regarding the
contents of your magazine, here's m y advice: "Go back over past issues and see
how pertinent, up-to-date, and useful the
i n f o r m a t i o n still is. Even t h o u g h at one
particular time you m a y not find interest
in a particular article, at a future date it
m a y be the one thing that will tickle your
curiosity a n d excitement."
I, for one, will never throw out a
single issue even t h o u g h I m a y have to
move to larger quarters!
Rosa M. deCastro
G u a y n a b o , Puerto Rico
FREE AND INDEPENDENT?
In your F e b r u a r y issue (which by the
way I e n j o y e d ) , Betty W o o d m a n was ineluded in the Eight I n d e p e n d e n t Production Potters show, one of the " i n d e p e n d e n t
a n d free-spirited potters working on their
own," said K e n F e r g u s o n in the show's
catalog. But w h y t h e n in the M a r c h issue
on page 77, is she an assistant professor
at Boulder, Colorado?
Stephen Kilborn
Santa Fe, N.M.
TAXILE DOAT
T h e excellent article in the N o v e m b e r
1976 C M on " T h e People's University"
was read with great interest, particularly
the references to Taxile Doat. At the e n d
of 1972 an article was sent to me by a n
A m e r i c a n potter who was teaching in a
school in Victoria, Australia. I do not
have any way of verifying the authenticity
of it a n d in fact c a n n o t recall the n a m e
of the teacher who sent it. Excerpts from
the article follow:
" T h o s e who know the excitement a n d
lasting influence that the discovery of the
Laocoon m a d e on the y o u n g boy Michelangelo, will u n d e r s t a n d in the pottery
world the same sort of impression m a d e
on a y o u n g apprentice by a box of F a r
Eastern ceramics, sent to Sevres in 1847
by F a t h e r Ly. This type of pottery h a d
never been seen in Europe b e f o r e - - f i n e
porcelains a n d especially . . . sang de
boeuf-glazed pots.
" T h i s y o u n g apprentice, who h a d an unusual ability to do fine p a i n t i n g . . . suddenly t h o u g h t everything he did, t h o u g h
accepted with great a d m i r a t i o n by the
K i n g of France, was worthless beside the
simple beauty of the Oriental pots. His
sole aim thereafter was to be able to produce such pots at will.
" T h e . . . task that Taxile D o a t (the
apprentice) set for himself will readily be
understood by all potters. T h e shibui, or
accidental, beauty of chance in the firing
is greatly a d m i r e d today~, b u t to produce
such results at will is quite a n o t h e r thing.
T h e entire Sevres factory, and soon most
of the potteries in Europe, also undertook
the same quest. T h e control of oxidizing
or reducing fires was needed a n d it took
almost forty years of trial a n d error to
develop scientific regulation of reduction
firing at Sevres . . . .
" W h i l e the control of reduction was
u n d e r experimentation, chemists at Sevres
a n d elsewhere were working on clays,
glazes, a n d t e m p e r a t u r e m e a s u r i n g devices.
Chemists worked in secret, but toward the
same goals, so that cones were invented
i n d e p e n d e n t l y in a factory in Berlin, at
Sevres, and by a G e r m a n chemist, Seger,
in 1884. T h e Seger cones are used by
potters (in Europe) today, but Sevres a n d
several other potteries still m a k e their own.
"Both the regulation of reduction firing
a n d the development of the t e m p e r a t u r e
m e a s u r i n g cones were i m p o r t a n t to Taxile
Doat. (Pyrometers h a d n ' t then been invented!) By 1900 Taxile was a masterc r a f t s m a n / d e s i g n e r a n d decided to take
control of the complete production of his
own work, t h r o w i n g or casting, decorating,
glazing, a n d firing. T h i s would be taken
for g r a n t e d today, b u t was a bold step at
t h a t time.
"Taxile's first problem was in choosing
Continued on Page 9
May
1977
7
tim
adj.
'tim-le
1. coming early or at the right time:
OPPORTUNE.
2 . appropriate or adapted to the
times or the occasion.
WEBSTER'S definition could
double-up for Crusader THERMARMOR
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Besides reducing your power requirements, T H E R M - A R M O R
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937 S. W A S H I N G T O N ,
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Subsidiary of Thermotron Corporation
8
CERAMICS MONTHLY
49423
LETTE RS
Continued from Page 7
the right kiln and fuel, as the . . . choices
were limited in those days. Most potteries
used coal, as it was the cheapest , but it
ruined many colors. Electric kilns were
unimagi ned then, gasogen e kilns burning
peat were called the 'kilns of the future,'
while the kerosene kilns being used in the
United States were not known in Europe
at all. (When Taxile Doat visited the
United States in the early 1900's, he used
a kerosene kiln and expresse d satisfact ion
with it, but did not take one back to
Sevres when he left.)
"After building , trying, and tearing
down updraft and downdra ft, coal and
wood kilns, Taxile decided on a downdra ft
wood-bu rning kiln of about twenty-s even
cubic feet, made of hard firebrick . If he
were firing reductio n, to produce the
treasure d sang de boeuf glazes, Taxile
reduced only until Cone 06, then fired
the rest of the kiln oxidizin g. He found
that a light cloud of smoke up to Cone
06 was enough for the brilliant reds of
copper reductio n. In the top, middle, and
bottom for reductio n he had Cones 06,
1, 7, 8, 9, and 10. He started the firing by
drying out the kiln for three to five hours
using two pieces of oak every twenty
minutes and for the next two hours one
piece of oak every fifteen minutes. He let
mm m
fuel accumul ate in the firebox by constant
feeding before the wood had a chance to
burn complet ely and he watched for a red
flame. After Cone 06 fell, which occurred
about fifteen and one-half hours after
starting the kiln, he proceed ed with an
oxidizin g fire, opening the damper gradually and putting in ten birch sticks . . .
every five minutes, allowing each to burn
complet ely with a blue flame and no
smoke. When Cone I0 barely bent, he
drew out a draw tile to check the glazes to
see if they had properly matured . If they
hadn't, he continue d until the cone bent
a bit more and the second draw tile
pleased him. Then he stopped firing and
closed up the kiln tightly as he had done
for the oxidatio n firing, never taking the
ware out until the eighth day after firing
which took . . . between twenty-t hree and
twenty-f ive hours.
"Taxile must have fired with wood in
his left hand, and a pen in his right, because he kept exact records, includin g
notes on the weather. Certain kinds of
days were not good 'drawing weather ' so
he would put off firing. He also must
have fallen asleep on occasion s because he
said if a person did fall asleep, he shouldn 't
panic and try to hurry up the firing, but
just continue slowly from where he left off.
"The vases and plaques of Taxile I)oat
are in museum s through out Europe and
the United States and of course in Sevres's
own museum . His pottery shows that, for
mm m
WHY A DUCK?
Kathy Biever (Februa ry Letters) said
she had always intended to be reincarnated as a duck, but after reading Katharine Gray's epitaph (Novem ber 1976
CM, p. 69), she decided on coming back
as a pot. Maybe Kathy can do b o t h - - b y
returnin g as a "quack pot"?
Ximena Hootin
Columbu s, Oh.
SUBSCRIBER'S COMMEN T
It would not be popular, but in fairness
I wish you would run an article in defense
of curators as jurors a n d / o r judges. They
are not all bad any more than working
Shirley Ganzel
artists are all good.
Titusvill e, Fla.
Share your thoughts with other CM readers--be they quip, query, commen t, or advice. All letters must be signed, but names
will be withheld on request. Address: The
Editor, CE~tAMmS MOXTHLY, Box 12448,
Columbus, Ohio 43212.
mm mm mm mm
m
D
II
m
New! MINNESOTA CLAY Catalog
II
|
|
• More page s!
• Pack ed with clay
and pottery technical
information!
• New products!
• New kiln installation
information!
• New tools and
techn iques f
II
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il
II
him, the attempt to fire a wood kiln scientifical ly was worth the exacting standards that he had. Yet the pots he so
admired , which started him on the quest,
were probably produce d in kilns fired with
far less exactitu de. Were those Oriental
pots so accident al? One thing to note is
that Taxile was able to produce sang de
C . M . Grieve
boeuf at will!"
Pymble, N.S.W., Australi a
Send $2.00 for your copy.
FREE to schools & institutions.
MINNE SOTA CLAY
8001 Grand Ave. So.
Bloom ington , Mn. 55420
NAME
ADDRESS.
CITY_
STATE
ZIP
SCHOOL AFFILIATION
m
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D
m m m m m m m
May
1977
9
!i
_g
r-]7
A.R T Studio
921 Oakton St.
Elk Grove V;llage, IL 60007
WCS
is mor e than
"
~
~
Alberta Ceramic Supply Ltd
11565 149th St.
Edmonton, Alberta C A N A D A
Anhowe Ceramic Supply Inc.
3825 Commercial St. N.E.
Albuquerque, NM 87107
8.J. WholesaLe & Ceramic Supply
3437 Industrial IRd.
Las Vegas, NV 89109
just clay.
Franklin Gallery
105 N. Beaver
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Marjon Ceramic Shop
3418 N. 24th St.
Phoenix, AZ 85016
Clay Gallery
1001 S. 4th St. West
Missoula, MT 59801
Hill Brothers
4450 N. 42nd St.
Phoenix , AZ 85019
Mile High Ceramics Inc.
1155 S. Cherokee
Denver, CO 80223
V.R Hood Com0any
301 S. Salado St.
San Antonio, TX 78207
Model Ceramics Inc.
4351 Akron-Cleveland Rd.
Penninsula, OH 44264
Interstate Stone & Block
3300 Crater Lake Highway
Medford, OR 97501
Northern Gate Ceramics
124 Olympic Rd.
Fulton CA 95018
,
Ktckwheel Pottery & Supply
802 Miami Circle. NE
Atlanta, GA 30324
Ohio Ceramic Su0ply Inc.
P.O Box 630
Kent, OH 44240
L&R Specialties
202 E. Mr. Vernon
P.O. Box 309
Nixa, MO 65714
Paramount Ceramics
220 N. State St.
P.O. Box 463
Fairmont, MN 56031
Pat's Ceramics
Eagle Ceramics
12264 Wilkins Ave.
Rockville, MD 20852
CECAS Enterprises, Inc.
29 E. 555 Batavia Rd.
Warrenville, IL 60555
Eagle Ceramics
1300 W. 9th St.
Cleveland. OH 44113
Ceramic & Craft Supply
490 Fifth St.
San Francisco, CA 94107
Honolulu, HI 96813
Estrin Mfg. Ltd.
1916 Fir St.
Vancouver, B.C., CANADA
V6J 3B3
Ceramic Store Inc.
706 Richmond
Evans Ceramic Supply
1518 S. Washington
Houston. TX 77006
Wichita, KS 67211
Ceramics Hawaii Ltd
620 C Cooke St.
Richards
8065
S.E Pug
13thMill
St.
Portland, OR 9?202
Char Mar Ceramics
2126 N. Stone
Tucson, AZ 85705
Creative Ceramics Suloply
2556 Unit A Albatross Way
Sacramento, Calif. 95815
Capital Ceramics
2174 S. Main
Salt Lake City, UT 83115
Leslie Ceramics
1212 San Pablo
Berkeley, CA 94706
Marin Ceramics & Candles
23 Simms St.
Ban RafaeL, CA 94901
7901 Did Seward Hwy.
PP. Box 3-3763
Anchorage,
AK 99501
Seattle Pottery Supply Inc.
400 E. Pine St.
Seattle. WA 98122
Shop Stoneware Supply
Route 1 Box 365 H
Arroyo Grande. CA 93420
Sherry's
Ceramic Supply Co.
948 Washington
San Carlos, CA 94070
=.
Shop of Art
26 E. University Dr.
Tempe, AZ 85281
Six G's Workshop
313 Main Ave.
Moorhead, MN 56560
Stewart's of California
16055 Heron Ave.
La Mirada, CA 90638
Valley Potter's Guild
417 High St.
Eugene, OR 97401
Waycraft
394
Delaware
Imperial
Beach,
CA 92032
The Potter's Cente,
210 MyrtJe St.
Boise, ID 83706
TM
IIII II
10
~lf
[l lJJJi/ll[5"
Pottery Equipment & Supplies
14400 Lomitas Ave., City of Industry, Calif. 91744 Dept. 312
~
WCS Catalogues
CERAMICSMONTHLY
~
available for $1.50,
redeemable
with
purchase
of $1 0.00 or more.
ITINER ARY
Send your show announcements earl).:
"'Where to Show," three months be[ore
the event's deadline; "'Where to Go," at
least six weeks be[ore the month o[
opening. Direct in/ormation to Itinerary
Editor, CERAMICS MONTHLY, Box 12448,
Columbus, Ohio 43212.
WHERE TO SHOW
ARKANSAS, LITTLE ROCK
October 14-November 13 The 20th
Annual Delta Art Exhibition is open to
craftsmen born or residing in Arkansas,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, Oklahoma, and Texas. Juried by
slides. Deadline: August 26. Fee: $5
(limit of 2 entries in any one or two
categories). $3,000 in awards. Write:
Townsend Wolfe, Director, The Arkansas
Arts Center, MacArthur Park, Box 2137,
Little Rock 72203.
COLORADO, GRAND JUNCTION
September 17-18 The Grand Junction
Art Festival is open to craftsmen. Awards.
Fee: $20. Deadline: August 1. Write:
Grand Junction Art Festival, Ltd., 706
Rood Ave., Grand Junction 81501.
COLORADO, MANITOU SPRINGS
May 28-30 2nd Annual Scarborough
Faire is open to craftsmen. Juried by slides.
Fee: $10. Commission. Deadline: May 21.
Write: Commonwheel, 903 Manitou Ave.,
Manitou Springs 80829.
July 3-5 3rd Annual Freedom Fair
is open to craftsmen. Juried. Fee: $15.
Commission. Deadline: June 21. Write:
Commonwheel, 903 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs 80829.
CONNECTICUT, GLASTONBURY
September 10-11 "On the Green '77,"
Fall Art Show and Sale is open to craftsmen. Fee: $25. Juried. Deadline: August
13. Write: Glastonbury Art Guild, c/o
Mrs. Harriett Pfeifer, Boy 304, Glastonbury 06033.
GEORGIA, CORDELE
June 17-19 Coney Grove Bluegrass and
Craftsman's Fair is open to ceramists. Fee:
$15. Deadline: May 30. Write: Coney
Grove, Box 891, Cordele 31015.
INDIANA, ANDERSON
June 17-19 "International Convention
Fine Crafts and Arts Occasion" is open
to ceramists. Juried by slides. Fee: $40.
Deadline: June 3. Write: Nandra, 730
Ravine Rd., Plainfield, New Jersey 07060,
or call (201) 755-6885/731-2562 .
MARYLAND, GAITHERSBURG
September 21-25 The National Craft
Fair is open to all craftsmen in the U.S.
Entry deadline: July 20. Juried: five
35mm color slides required. For further
information write: Noel Clark, National
Crafts Ltd., Gapland, Md. 21736.
MICHIGAN, MARQUETTE
July 30-31 18th Annual Art on the
Rocks is open to ceramists. Juried and
non-juried. Deadline: June 1. Write: (inelude self-addressed stamped envelope)
Lake Superior Art Association, Box 805,
Marquette 49855.
NEBRASKA, SCOTTSBLUFF
August 5-7 Art fair, sponsored by
Scottsbluff-Gering Chamber of Commerce,
West Nebraska Arts Center, and the North
Platte Valley Artists Guild, is open to all
artists. Fee: $10 outdoor space; $15 tent
space. Entry deadline: July I. For further
information write: Art Fair, Box 62,
Scottsbluff 6936 I.
NEW JERSEY, LAYTON
September 24-November 13 "The Gourmet's Choice" is open to craftsmen in all
media involving the preparation and serving of food (accompanying recipes encouraged). Juried by slides. Deadline:
Augttst 3. For further information write:
Molly Mechem, Peters Valley Craftsmen,
Layton 07851.
NEW YORK, CHAUTAUQUA
June 26-July 17 Chautauqua Exhibition
of American Art is open to all artists born
or residing in the U.S. Fee: $7. Awards:
$3,500. Juried. Deadline: May 27. Write:
Myron G. Johnson, Jr., Box 23107, Cincinnati, Ohio 45223.
NEW YORK, ROCHESTER
June 23-25 5th Annual Curbstone Craft
Festival is open to ceramists. Juried by 2
slides or photos. Fee: $20. Deadline: June
3. Write: Rochester Area Chamber of
Commerce, Inc., 55 St. Paul Street, Rochester 14604.
NEW YORK, SMITHTOWN
June 18-19 Smithtown Township Arts
Council 2nd Annual Juried Craft Show
and Sale is open to ceramists. Juried by
3 slides. Deadline: May 27. Judges: Lois
Moran and David Zirlan, of American
Crafts Council. Write: Smithtown Township Arts Council, Inc., 1 Bank Street,
Smithtown 11787.
NEW YORK, WESTBURY
June 25-26 The 4th Annual Westbury
Outdoor Art Exhibit is open to craftsmen.
Juried. Fee: $25. Deadline: June 17.
Write: The Greater Westbury Arts Council, 600 Old Country Road, Room 306,
Garden City, New York 11530.
OHIO, COLUMBUS
September 18-November 4 Beaux Arts
Designer/Craftsma n '77 is open to craftsmen working and/or residing in Illinois,
Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Missouri, Michigan,
West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Juried.
Awards. Entry fee: $8.00 for one to
three entries. Prospectus available. Entry
deadline: June 1. Write: Ann Adams,
Chairman, Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts,
480 E. Broad, Columbus 43215.
OHIO, MARIETTA
September 30-October 2 Indian Summer Arts and Crafts Festival '77 is open
to all artists and craftsmen. Juried by
slides; due July 15. Entry fee: $25.
November 5-December 3 Marietta College Crafts National '77 is open to all
artists and craftsmen. Juried by slides; due
September 10. Fee: $10 for three entries.
$5,000 in prizes and awards. For information on both events write: Arthur Howard
Winer, Marietta College, Marietta 45750.
PENNSYLVANIA, PHILADELPHIA
November 3-6 The Philadelphia Craft
Show is open to craftsmen. Juried by
slides. Fee. Deadline: July 2. Write: The
Women's Committee at the Philadelphia
Museum of Art, Box 7646, Philadelphia
19101.
PENNSYLVANIA, VERONA
July 3-August 27 "Summer Art." The
Store for Art in Crafts is accepting handmade things for gardens, sports, travel, and
other holiday pastimes for sale. Send photos or slides noting wholesale and retail
prices. Entries will be juried and photos
returned, along with a purchase order for
any object selected. Payment in full on
receipt of the work. Deadline: June 1.
Write: The Store, 719 Allegheny River
Boulevard, Verona 15147.
RHODE ISLAND, WICKFORD
July 8-10 Wickford Art Association's
16tb Annual Art Festival is open to craftsm e n . Fee: $25. Deadline: June 1. Write:
Ella Rex Price, Box 321, North Kingstown, Rhode Island 02852.
SOUTH DAKOTA, BROOKINOS
July 9-10 Brookings Summer Folk Art
Festival is open to craftsmen. Fee: $15.
Deadline: July 1. Write: Josie Yost,
Brookings Summer Folk Art Festival, Inc.,
Box 555, Brookings 57006.
TENNESSEE, GATLINBURG
August 11-13 North American Arts and
Crafts Fair # I is open to ceramists. F e e :
$45. Deadline: July 8. Write: Dennis Abe,
Box 283, College Park, Maryland 20740.
TENNESSEE, TO~rNS END
September 23-25 The 4th Annual Tuckaleechee Cove Arts, Crafts, and Music
Festival is open to ceramists. Juried by
slides. Fee: $25-$35. Deadline: August I.
Write: Mrs. Jean Pullon, Box 176, Townsend 37882.
UTAH, PARK CITY
August 20-21 8th Annual Arts Festival
is open to ceramists. Juried by four 35ram
slides. Fee: $15. Deadline: July 8. Write:
Park City Chamber of Commerce, Box
758, Park City 84060.
~?ERMONT, ARLINGTON
October 7-10 Green Mountain Craft
Fair is open to ceramists. Juried by slides.
Continued on Page 67
May
1977
1!
price
Our model B is designed to fill the demanding needs of schools
and studio potters in the most economical way possible. The heavy table
and drive of our model B are combined with a I/3 hp motor and new
stronger speed control to give the power and weight necessary for
school applications. Wroth
" 30 °Yo more Power. than "tfs ",m Ported c o mPe "
litton, the B can handle well over 25 I~ounds
with ease and is quiet and solid unaer the
heaviest load. Speed control is much
smoother than with mechanical types of
variable speed drives, and reliability is built ~j~
in with a control circuit capable of 15 amp
output. If you re thinking about Shimpo,
check our model B at only $395.00, including
the splash pan, (plus freight), guaranteed for f ' t
hvo years. See one at major ceramic suppliers nationwide or write to us for a free ~ ,
brochure at 128 M~II Street, Healdsburg,
4
California 95448.
e
12
CERAMICS ]~[ONTHLY
SUGGESTIONS
[rom our readers
ANOTHER USE FOR FELDSPAR
Ceramic-grade feldspar is an excellent all-purpose polishing
compound. Mixed with a little water and applied by hand, I
have used potash feldspar to remove stubborn carbon deposits
from reduced raku ware. It works like magic without damaging
the finished glaze surface. --Hillar Bergman, Essexville, Mich.
FUNNEL AND GLAZE CONTAINER
Plastic gallon milk containers, when cut in half, produce a
large-capacity funnel with a handle and cap from the top part,
and the bottom half makes a light container for weighing and
--Tana Stewart, Marietta, Ga.
combining glaze chemicals.
A STIRRING DEVICE
Slip or glaze can be stirred with a device made from a long
shaft purchased from a hardware store for under a dollar, and
old fan blades often found complete with set screws in thrift
shops. You can weld the two together or use the set screws, and
power the mixer with a drill to blend wet materials from scratch.
---Marion Rosenau, Philadelphia, Pa.
WAX RESIST
An electric fry pan can be used to melt paraffin for wax
resist. It maintains the wax at a controlled temperature, minimizing the danger of fire. --Barbara Zolli, NewtonviUe, Mass.
provided that the body is a good one and that the ware is not
allowed to dry too quickly. This method is particularly useful for
thrown plates and flat-surfaced ware in which cracking tends to
--lames La[ontaine, New York, N.Y.
be more frequent.
PUNCHES
Holes can be cut in leather-hard clay with an expended brass
shell from a rifle or shotgun. If you have access to military-type
shells, M-16 brass forms small holes for leather straps, while .30or .45-caliber shells produce larger holes for rope or drainage on
planters. The metal part of a 16- or 20-gauge shotgun shell will
cut larger holes. Cut or file off the primer end of the spent shell
so the cuttings can pass through.
--Donovan Kramer, Lake Hubert, Minn.
OILED STAMPS
When you require intricate, impressed decoration from metal,
wood, or plastic stamps, coat these with spray vegetable oil and
they will easily release, with no clay stuck in the stamp's fine
--]udith Hughes, Ames, Iowa
detail.
STEEL WOOL
Flat, thrown lids that do not fit can be smoothly and easily
reduced in diameter with a steel wool pad. This method works
better than using sandpaper, and won't chip the ware.
WOLLASTONITE ADDITION
A March suggestion discussed the use of nylon fibers mixed
with clay for crack repair in greenware or bisque. While this may
be valuable in some instances, to me it is preferable not to have
cracks in the first place. Adding three per cent wollastonite to
many clay bodies can very often reduce or eliminate cracking,
---D. Salsbery II, Salem, Ore.
DOLLARS FOR YOUR IDEAS
CERAMICS MONTHLY pays up to $5 /or suggestions used. Send
your ideas to CM, Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Sorry, but
we can't acknowledge or return unused items.
eagle ceramics, inc.
...,~v,,es you to meet and talkwith
Jack Troy, author of the new book
Salt-Glaz ed Ceramics , the first
book for potters on the technique
of salt glazing.
saturday
June 4,1977
9a.m.- 1p.m.
at
12266 wilkins avenue
rockville maryland 20852
(,301) 881 -2253
Salt glazed ,2ontalner
May
1977
13
ALABAMA
DONNA'S CERAMIC CRAFTS
Highway 431, Glencoe Shopping Center. Glencoe
HAZELHURST CERAMICS
P,O. Box 124. Hazel Green
JEWEL BOX CERAMICS
600 Merwma Avenue, Mobde
THE PIXIE POTTERY
2720 - Sth Avenue South, Irondale Industrial Park,
Birmingham
PIXIE POTTERY OF MONTGOMERY
1224 Madison Avenue, Montgomery
ALASKA
ALASKA MUD PUDDLE
9034 Hartzell Road, Anchorlga
ARIZONA
MARJON CERAMICS, INC.
3418 North 24th Street, Phoemx
MARJON CE RAMICS TUCSON
426 West Alturas, Tucson
ARKANSAS
CERAMIC ART CENTER, INC.
1217 Rebsamen Park Road. Litde Rock
FORT SMITH CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY, INC.
7318 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith
CALIFORNIA
AVANTY AND IMCO CERAMIC SUPPLIES
1214 Howe Avenue, Sacramento
B. J. CERAMICS
2169 Broadway, Eureka
BACK DOOR CERAMICS
1047 El Kelton Boulevard. Spring Valley
BAY-SHORE CERAMIC SUPPLY. INC.
590 Aldo Avenue, Senti Clara
BETTY'S CERAMICS
13333 South Paramount Boulevard, South Gate
CERAMIC SUPPLY OF SAN DIEGO
4100 Poplar Street, San Diego
S.L. CLUTTER
13112 I nglewood Avenue, Hawthorne
CREST CERAMICS
1806 North Chester Avenue. Bakersfield
DAHM CERAMICS
924 El Cam=no Real. South San Frfficil¢o
DUNCAN HOBBY & CRAFT CENTER
5649 East Shields, Fresno
GAY'S CE RAMICS
512 Ma~n. Tulaleke
MAR-LE CERAMIC
8806 Yolonda Avenue, Northrzdgo
NORTH-SHORE CERAMIC SUPPLY
1055 Sonoma Boulevard. VallalO
PASO ROBLES CERAMIC SHOP
3 m.lee North of Paso Robles on Old I01, Paso ROI~II
PENNGROVE KILN. INC,
100 Adobe Road, Panngtove
STEWART'S OF CALIFORNIA. INC.
16056 South Heron. LI Mireda
COLORAOO
VAN HOWE CERAMICS
2602 Durango Dr~ve. Colorado Sprin~
VAN HOWE CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
11975 East 40th Avenue. Denver
CONNECTICUT
ELMWOOD CERAMIC STUDIO
62 Farm*ngton Avenue, Farmmgton
JEAN'S CERAMIC STUDIO
1073 Buddmgton Road, Croton
WHITNEY CERAMIC CENTER
2334 Whitney Avenue, Hemden
DELAWARE
GABS CERAMICS
4601 Market Street North. Wilmington
FLORIDA
CALLAWAY CRAFT CENTER
Route 2. Box 546. Highway 22, Panama City
CALLAWAY CRAFT CENTER # 2
3105 North "T'" Street. Penlacola
THE CERAMIC SHOPPE
6026 Chester Avenue. Jackf.onvdle
DOLPHIN ART CERAMICS
309 Sixth Street. Holly Hill
FLORIDA CERAMIC SUPPLY
1698 Donna Road. West Palm Beach
FRANCOISE CERAMICS, INC
113 49~h Street South. St. Petersburg
MIAMI ART-CRAFTS SUPPLIES
6701 Northeast Second Court, Miam*
POLY CRAFTS
1839 61st Street. Sarar.otl
GEORGIA
ALLISON CERAMIC SUPPLIES
931 McBride Drive. Columbus
14
CERAMICS •[ONTHLY
CSRA CERAMICS
510 Green Street. Augusta
GALAXY CERAMICS INC
2114 Habersham Street, Savannah
GEORGIA CERAMIC SUPPLY, INC
528 South Central Avenue, Hapevllle
HOUSE OF HOBBIES & GIFTS UNLIMITED, INC
963 Washington Avenue. Macon
PAR RISH CERAMICS
2426 South Patterson Street, Valdosta
HAWAII
HAWAII MODELCRAFT DISTRIBUTORS
1220 Kaumual. Street, Honolulu
TERRA CERAMICS
3035-C Koapaka Street, Honolulu
IDAHO
NU ART CERAMIC & GIFT SHOP
123 South Main. Pocatello
TREASURE VALLEY CERAMICS
Highway 95 North. Wilder
ILLINOIS
CECAS ENTERPRISES. INC
29W665 Batawa Road. Warrenville
CERAMIC CREATIONS
4115 West Lawrence Avenue, Chicago
CLARK CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
2809 South Sixth Street. Springfield
HOBBY HOUSE CERAMICS
1911 158 Street. East Moline
JOLIET CERAMIC ARTS & CRAFTS INC.
64 North Desplaines Street, Joliet
MID ILL CERAMIC SUPPLY
Swing Day Road, R. R. 1, East Peoria
TOWN & COUNTRY CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
1 North US Route 83 & Center Street, Grayslake
MARYLAND
DOTTLES ART CORNER, INC.
508 South Ma*n Street. Mount Airy
HIGHBRIDGE CERAMICS
$1. Stephans Church Road & MD Route 3, Glmbrills
MARYLAND CERAMIC HOUSE, LTD.
7902 Harford Road. Baltimore
MASSACHUSETTS
DIAMOND CERAMICS, INC.
255 Worcester Road, Route 9. Westhoto
FLO'S CERAMICS
2-1/2 Weston Street, Wilbraham
GINA'S CERAMIC SUPPLY HOUSE
588 Broad Street, East Weymouth
WOBURN CERAMIC SUPPLY
20 Walnut Street, Woburn
MICHIGAN
GIL'S CERAMICS, INC.
832 West Washington, Mm'quatte
JOY REID CERAMIC STUDIO
2016 North Telegraph Road, Dearborn
TARI TAN CERAMIC SUPPLY. INC.
817 Cherry Southwest, Grand Rapids
MINNESOTA
CERAMICS BY DEE
895 Front Avenue, St. Paul
D & H CERAMICS
6309 Grand Avenue, Duluth
PARAMOUNT CERAMIC, INC.
220 North State Street, Fairmont
T J's CERAMICS, INC.
1311 East 66th Street, Minneapolis
TOWNE HOUSE CERAMICS
27th and Division, St. Cloud
INDIANA
MISSISSIPPI
CRAFSHOP, INC.
Highway 67 North, Vincennes
EDITH'S CERAMICS INC.
6511 Juhan Avenue, Indianapolis
INDIANA CERAMIC SUPPLY
1816 South Harrison Street. Fort Wayne
MEL'S CERAMIC CORNER
208 East Main Street, Griffith
NEELY'S CERAMIC STUDIO
10106 McKinley (U.S. 20), Osceola
BI LL'S CERAMIC SUPPLY
Rt. 5, Box 242-B, Columbus
DOUBLE L CERAMIC SUPPLY
Highway 80 West. Jackson
MENAGERIE CERAMICS
1003 Wilson Avenue, Laurel
IOWA
LYLE'S CERAMIC CENTER
1615 South Federal. Mason City
NORMA'S CERAMICS
1107 North Eighth Street. Burlington
PARKER CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
2204 West 23rd Street, Des Moines
RIVERVIEW CERAMICS
511 " M " Avenue NW. Cedar Rapids
SCOTLIN. INC.
236 Mare Street, McGregor
KANSAS
LOU DAVIS, INC,
817 Central Avenue. Kansas City
EVANS CERAMIC SUPPLY
1518 South Washington, Wichita
PRAIRIE DOG CERAMICS
RFD # 1, Norton
SHADOW-BOX CERAMIC STUDIO
308 West Cloud Street, Saline
KENTUCKY
LOiS CERAMICS
160B Washington Street. Henderson
POLLY'S PLAY HOUSE CERAMIC STUDIO
9806 Taylorsville Road. Louisville
SANDY'S CERAMICS
Route 15, Lovers Lane, Bowling Green
TOM'S CE RAM~C STUDIO
15 West 34th Street. Covington
WEST KENTUCKY CERAMICS AND CRAFTS CENTER
1101 Jefferson Street, Paducah
LOUISIANA
BOEHM CERAMIC SUPPLY
2239 East Napoleon (Hwy 90 E), Sulphur
MET-LA CERAMICS, INC,
4411 Conhn Street. Metalrle
SHREVEPORT CERAMIC SUPPLY
444 Ohve Street. Shreveport
WILMAR'S CERAMIC SUPPLY
1121 Bolton Avenue. Alexandria
WILMAR'S CERAMIC SUPPLY
5934 Hooper Road, Baton Rouge
WILMAR'S CERAMIC SUPPLY
1210 South 2rid Street, Monroe
MAINE
MEN-JO CERAMICS
US. Route # 1 at Dunstan Corner. West Scarborough
SMITH'S CERAMICS
268 Ma,n Street. Bangor
MISSOURI
DOUGLAS CERAMIC & CHRISTMAS SHOP
Route 6, Box 677B, Melville Road. Springfield
FOUR CORNERS CERAMICS. INC.
10008 East 50 Highway, Raytown
GENEVIEVE'S CERAMIC STUDIO, INC.
6614 Weber Road, St. Louis
ROBINSON CERAMICS
Route 2, Highway 248 East, Cassville
THOMAS CERAMIC SUPPLIES
Highway 87 South, California
MONTANA
COUNTRY COTTAGE CERAMICS
2155 Hi Way 2 East. Kalispell
MONTANA CERAMIC SUP.PLY
2016 Alderson Avenue. Billings
SHI RLEY'S CERAMIC SUPPLIES
807 Second Street South, Great Falls
NEBRASKA
BERNICE'S CERAMICS
8805 Highway 6 Northeast, Lincoln
GRANADA CERAMICS
505 Norfolk Avenue. Norfolk
PAINTIN PLACE CERAMICS
6700 South 78th, Ralston
SU'LON CE RAMIC STUDIO
2215 Avenue G, Kearney
NEVADA
CERAMIC ARTS, INC.
1906 Western Street, Las Vegas
NEW HAMPSHIRE
DORA'S CERAMIC STUDIO
87 Broadway Avenue. Manchester
SUPERIOR VIEW CERAMICS
Route 12, Westmoreland
NEW JERSEY
BROWN'S CERAMIC SUPPLIES
819 North Second Street, Millville
CERAMIC MAGIC
275 Woodbridge Road, Edison
DOLLY'S CERAMIC ART STUDIO
30 Montgomery Street, Clifton
SAVAGE CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
Route 37 & Batchelor Street, Toms River
WEIDLICH CERAMICS. INC.
2230 West Camplaln Road. Somerville
NEW MEXlC0
ANHOWE CERAMIC SUPPLY iNC.
3825 Commercial Northeast. Albuquerque
NEW YORK
CEL-ART CERAMICS. INC
6750 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn
CENTRAL NEW YORK CERAMIC SUPPLY
213-215 Second Street, Liverpool
THE CERAMIC TOUCH, INC
345 New Karner Road, Albany
DOLLMAN CERAMIC SUPPLIES, INC.
663 Walden Avenue, Buffalo
GLAD-WELL CERAMIC STUDIO & SUPPLY
868 Scarsdale Avenue. Scarsdale
JACKIE'S CERAMIC STUDIO
123 Lake Street, Rouses Point
JEAN LEONARD CERAMICS
96-24 Corona Avenue, Corona
LEZETTE CERAMICS
Route 212, Saugerties-Woodstock Road, saugerties
LONG ISLAND CERAMIC CENTER
1190 Route 109, Lindenhurst
MARIAN'S CERAMICS. INC.
1119 Nort h Broadway, North Masr.apequa
RED BARN CERAMICS
R.D. # 3 Nye Road, Cortland
RUNION CERAMIC SUPPLY
236 West Commerical Street. East Rochester
SEELEY'S CERAMIC SERVICE, iNC.
9 River Street, Oneonta
SKEETS CERAMIC SUPPLY, INC.
894 Coney Island Avenue, Brooklyn
STAATEN CERAMICS
6833 Amboy Road, Staten island
SUSI E-Q CERAMICS
1083 Suffolk Avenue, 6rentwood, Long island
NORTH CAROLINA
CREATIVE CRAFTS CERAMICS, INC.
6316 Yadkin Road, Fayetteville
DURHAM CERAMIC SUPPLIES, INC.
1347 Avondale Drive, Durham
FAIR BLUFF CERAMICS
P.O. Box 96, Etm Street, Fair Bluff
GRAHAM CERAMICS, LTD.
1319 Central Avenue. Charlotte
MUSE CERAMICS
1903 Delwood Road. Waynesville
NORTH DAKOTA
CAROL'S CERAMIC CENTER
Highway 83 North. Minot
NORTHWEST CERAMIC SUPPLY
221-223 Broadway, Fargo
SIOUXLAND CERAMIC SUPPLY
410 East Main, Mandan
0HI0
G & H CERAMICS
Box 287. Botkins Angle Road. New Knoxville
KARSHNER'S CERAMICS
673 Wilson Road. Columbus
OHIO CERAMIC SUPPLY, INC.
Box 630, 2861 State Route 59, Kent
RUTHLECERAMICS
Rural Route 1, New Washington
VILLAGE CERAMIC STUDIO
8112 Blue Ash Road, Cincinnati
THE VILLAGE CERAMIC STUDIO SUPPLY, INC
278 East Main Street. New Lebanon
OKLAHOMA
CERAMIC COTTAGE
748 South Wheeling. Tulsa
DOLLIE'S CERAMICS & PORCELAIN
3011 South Shields Boulevard. Oklahoma City
OREGON
CLARKE'S CERAMICS
1585 Juniper. Junction City
DOBE DEPOT, INC.
2809 Southeast Stark Street, Portland
PENNSYLVANIA
AMEIGH'S CERAMIC STUDIO
1910 Roosevelt Avenue, Williamsport
THE ART SHOP
2660 Trenton Road, Levittown
BECKER CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY INC.
426 Lincolnway West, New Oxford
6ELL'S CERAMIC ARTS INC.
725 Route 15 N., Dillsburg
CERAMIC GROVE GIFT SHOPPE
109 12th Avenue, Juniata-Altoona
CERAMICS BY LAFORCE. iNC.
1 Mile West on Route 220. Avis
CUSTOM CRAFT CERAMICS
70 South Street. Washington
DUN-GAR INC.
P.O Box 212, Route 322. Du Bois
ELSIE'S CERAMICS, FLOYD SCHEIB, INC.
669 East Main Street, Hegins
ELSIE'S CERAMICS OF WHITEHALL, INC
331 Grape Street. Whitehall (Allentown)
KOCH'S CE RAMICS
624 Grove Avenue. Johns'town
LE BOEUF FINISHING PRODUCTS & CERAMIC SUPPLY
South Main Street, IV~II Village
LIBERTY BELL CERAMICS, INC.
4511 North Broad Street. Philadelphia
MITCHELL'S CERAMIC SUPPLY CORPORATION
57 Noble Avenue, Pittsburgh
SNEDDON'S CERAMIC STUDIO
Appledale Road, RD # 1. Norristown
SUNSHINE CERAMICS, INC.
Route 307, Rural Delivery 3, Moscow
RHODE ISLAND
CERAM-ART STUDIO
3101 East Main Road, Portsmouth
LOUIS' CERAMIC SUPPLY COMPANY
114 Smithfield Avenue, Pawtucket
SOUTH CAROLINA
ANDERSON CERAMICS COMPANY, INC.
1950 South McDuffie Street. Anderson
HOUSE OF CERAMICS
3035 Broad River Road, Columbia
ROURK'S CERAMIC STUDIO, INC.
2475 Ashley River Road at Pierpont, Charleston
SOUTH DAKOTA
CERAMIC HOBBY SUPPLY. INC.
1005 West 1 lth Street, Sioux Falls
CERAMIC SUPPLY CENTER
2923 West Rapid, Rapid City
TENNESSEE
HOUSE OF CERAMICS, INC.
1011 North Hollywood, Memphis
DOROTHY LAMAR CERAMICS
3302 Gallatin Road, Nashville
LINDA'S CERAMIC-KORNER, INC.
134-136 Randolph Road, Grove Center, Oak Ridge
MOUNTAIN VIEW CERAMIC CENTER, INC.
4712 Dayton Blvd., Chattlnooge
SINGER CERAMICS
952 Main Street, Nashville
TWIN CITY CERAMICS, INC.
2516 Volunteer Parkway, Bristol
TEXAS
6ATEMAN CERAMICS
716 Pierce Street, Dallas
BATEMAN CERAMICS
6615 East Lancaster, Fort Worth
LAURINE BROCK STUDIO
1651 West Woodlawn Avenue, San Antonio
C. C. CERAMICS
4343 Kostoryz Avenue, Corpus Christi
CERAMIC ART & ANTIQUE SHOP
2004 Allen Drive, Wichita Falls
THE CERAMIC PEEPLES
718 Avenue C, Abernathy
THE HOBBY SHOP
911 North Mockingbird Lane, Abilone
HOUSE OF CERAMICS
1818 College Hills, San Angelo
HOUSTON ARTS & CRAFTS, INC.
1435 Westheimer, Houston
LOMA CERAMICS, INC.
907 Lomaland Drive, El Paso
UTAH
CAPITAL CERAMICS, INC.
2174 South Main Street. Salt Lake City
VERMONT
VERMONT CERAMIC SUPPLY CENTER
451 West Street, Rutland
TOWN & COUNTRY ARTS & CRAFTS
One-half mile on Crooked Run Road off
Route 19 at Gore. Clarksburg
WISCONSIN
FIRESIDE CERAMICS
2805 North Barker Road, Brookfield
MARCE LLA'S CERAMICS INC.
1150 Inman Parkway, Beloit
MARCEL LA'S CERAMICS INC.
Route 1, Highway 151. Sun Prairie
ROLENE CERAMIC STUDIO. INC.
2522 West Mason Street, Green Bay
WAUGH'$ CERAMIC STUDIO. INC
Route 3, 2 miles East of Tomah on
Highway 12 & 16, Tomah
WYOMING
SCULLY CERAMIC SUPPLY, iNC.
146 South Elk, Casper
CANADA
ADANAC CERAMICS
7289 Curragh Street
Burnaby, British Columbia
ALBERTA CERAMIC SUPPLIES, LTD.
11565 - 149th Street
Edmonton, Alberta
ALLAN CERAMICS LTD.
2404 South Queensway
Prince George, British Columbia
CARPENTER CERAMICS
3708 South Parkside Drive
Lethbcidge, Alberta
CERAMIC SUPPLY DEPOT
837B 50th Street East
saskatoon, Saskatchewln
CLAY CASTLE CERAMICS LTD.
185 South Court Street
Thunder Bay, Ontario
COBEQUID CERAMICS. LTO
43-47 Forrester Street
Truro. Nova Scotia
ISLAND CERAMIC SUPPLIES
Island Highway, 2 Miles South of Nanaimo
Nanaimo. British Columbia
JONASSON CERAMIC SUPPLY LTD.
267 Maryland Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba
108 CERAMIC DISTRIGUTOR LTD.
Rural Route # 1
100 Mile House. British Columbia
REGINA CERAMICS LTD.
1733 McAra Street
Regina, Saskatchewan
TERRA CERAMIC SUPPLIES LTD,
618 42nd Avenue Southeast
Calgary. Alberta
UNICERAM, INC.
4070 St-Denis
Montreal, Quebec
THE VILLAGE CERAMICS LTD.
148 Newbold Court
London, Ontario
THE VILLAGE CERAMICS LTD.
Box 360. Rural Route 1 Kars. Century Road
Manotik. Ontario
THE VILLAGE CERAMICS LTD,
25-10 Connefl Court
Toronto, Ontario
PUERTO RIC0
CASA DEL BARRO, INC,
Final Calla Federico A. Costa # 1047
Urb. Industrial Tres Monjitas, Hard Rey
VIRGINIA
DILL-HAWK CERAMICS, INC.
Route 2, Box 436, Highway 117, Roanoke
M-C STUDIO, INC.
4115 Hopkins Road, Richmond
POTTERY ART STUDIO, INC.
4401 Killam Avenue, Norfolk
WASHINGTON
CERAMIC ARTS, INC.
West 38 Third Avenue, Spokane
CERAMIC ARTS, INC.
404 South Second Street, Yakima
CERAMIC HUT
3996 Valley Highway # 9, Deming
LLOYD'S CERAMICS AND POTTERY
318 Westlake Avenue North, Seattle
MILLER'S CERAMICS
4828 Pacific Avenue. Tacoma
WEST VIRGINIA
Also distributors in the following foreign countries:
AUSTRALIA
BELGIUM
COLOMBIA
COSTA RICA
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
ENGLAND
FRANCE
ICELAND
JAPAN
NEW ZEALAND
PANAMA
PHILIPPINES
VENEZUELA
GREECE
For further tnforrnation write to:
DUNCAN CERAMIC PRODUCTS
P.O. Box 7827. Fresno. CA 93727
MULLENS CERAMIC SHOP
1011 Moran Avenue, Mullens
TODD'S CERAMIC SUPPLY. INC,
2029 Poplar Street. Kenova
3lay 1977
15
the most versatile kickwheel yet
ASk ab°ut/t
at you r local d
ea/er
Or ~'rite
US
C6rectly
D
A
W
4~
•"llr y o u pzan zo
own
ju=st o n e w h e e l . "
A portable heavyweig ht for schools and
serious potters which when disassemb led can
be transported in any small car. There is simply
too much to be said for this wheel to do it here,
so, write for our free brochure.
Carlos Fre¥ Potters Wheels
Distributed by Mid-America Art Studio 7th & Logan, Wayne, Nebraska 68787 Phone: 402/375-4141
16
CERAMICSMONTHLY
Answers to
QUESTIONS
C o n d u c t e d by the C M T e c h n i c a l Stair
I am compiling some in[ormation on [ederal agencies, their
outside of the base with the fingers or the heel of the hand while
programs, grants, and assistance which might apply to cethe other hand supports the base from the inside. When throwing
ramic artists as independen t cra/tsmen, teachers, and in cra[ta plate, the fingers or a potter's rib can be pulled across the
related fields. How does one cut through the bureaucrac y to
bottom both away from and toward the center several times to
discover the specific agencies with applicable aid?--L.L.
further increase the compressio n caused by opening.
The Federal Informatio n Center was established to help cut
We live in the country and have little access to ceramics
red tape and refer governmen t-related inquiries to the proper
except by mail order. Our objective is to eventually
supplies,
agencies. A local number for this service is listed in the white
which are available locally. Up until now we
materials
only
use
under
cities,
major
thirty-seven
in
pages of the telephone book
commercial binder to minimize chipping o[
a
using
been
have
"United States Governmen t."
during decorating and handling. Is there
sur[aces
unfired glaze
purpose product which can be substigeneral
obtained
easily
any
I get a small crescent-sh aped crack in the center o[ the
commercial binder, and what would be a good ratio
[or
tuted
bottoms of about hall my pots. I have made thick and thin
of binder to dry glaze?--O. L.
bottoms, started using bats instead o[ lifters, dried last, slow,
Karo syrup has been used by many potters as a good quality
upside down, and on slats o[ wood. Nothing has worked. Do
substitute for commercia l binder. Its only drawback is a tendency
you have any suggestion s?--K.W.
to encourage the growth of mold in glazes, but this can be overThe Potter's Dictionary o/ Materials and Techniques by
come by adding syrup only to that portion of the batch used.
Frank Hamer lists this type of crack as due to unequal shrinkage
One teaspoon of syrup for each 100 grams of dry glaze is a
between the clay of the walls and the base of the pot. The
standard addition. While binders will tend to cut handling losses
unequalnes s is caused by a difference in the amount of comin large scale commercia l potteries, and are useful for certain
pression and alignment of the clay particles in the base and in
specialized glazing techniques, the material is generally an
the wall. More compressio n and alignment are apt to occur in
unnecessary glaze constituent , particularly in recipes with high
clay content.
the wall because it is subjected to pressure on both surfaces
during the throwing. The base receives pressure only during
opening and on one surface. To correct the cracking, the clay
All subscriber inquiries are given individual attention at CM;
can be compressed by throwing the hump down onto the wheel
and, out o[ the many received, those o[ general interest are
head before centering, although this practice may ultimately
selected [or answer in this column. Direct your inquiries to the
damage the wheel bearings. After the piece is firm and before
Questions Editor, CERAMICS MONTHLY, Box 12448, Columbus,
trimming, the bottom can be compressed by firmly striking the
Ohio 43212. Please enclose a stamped, sel[-addressed envelope.
BA LD W IN
POTTERY
5 4 0 LA GUAR DIA PLACE
NEW YORK CITY N.Y. 10012
A.C. 212 475-72 :56,-9 742
ONLY DISTRIBUTOR IN NEW YORK CITY
FOR THE FOLLOWING MANUFACTURERS,
WHEELS,
I
KILNS :
AMACO, BRENT,
CALIFO RNIA
AMERI CAN
CRESS
ECONOKILN (L+L)
BALDWIN
PAClFI CA
JENKE N
TIGER
NG
PARAGON
SPINNI
SKUTT (CONE60R=O)
SHIMPO , SKUTT
QUAGMIRE 8, CLAYCO
SLABR OLLER S, EXTRU DERS,S IEVES
CLAYMIXERSsPUG MILLS, CLAY,
CHEMIC ALS, KEMPE R TOOLS ,KILN
FURNIT URE. OHAUS SCALE S. CONES
PYROM ETERS & MUCH' MORE
CLAS SES & WORKSHOPS
,,,~ ul~j.r ~olor TIImS in 1"111Sseries are a wonderful
opporfunl fy to suppJemenf your art program. Pro-
of all eight films are Richard and Mar;
both production potters and ~Former teachers
with many years' experience .
ducers
Peeler,
Four instructive Films
1. CERAMICS: WHAT? WHY? HOW?
2. THE COIL METHOD
3. HANDBUIL DING METHODS
4. CREATING MOSAICS AND TILES
Four Films for Ceramic Art ApprecioH on
5. POTTERS OF JAPAN, par+ I
FiJmed on location in Japan ;n the workshops of outstanding
poffers.
6. POTTERS OF JAPAN, par+ II
7. POTTERS OF THE U.S.A., par+ I
Includes: Charles Lakofsky, William Wyman, V;vika and
Offo Helno.
8. POTTERS OF THE U.S.A., par+ II
Includes: Warren MacKenzie, Paul Bogafay, Toshiko Takaezu,
Frans Wildenhaln .
All films in thls series are color, sound, 16ram.
For brochure, rental, and sales information , write to:
ART FILM S
C E R A MBoxI C320, Reelsville,
Indiana 46171
May
1977
17
MPP
Slab Roller
& Table
Price: Just $245 for roller
alone, $350 with table, F.O.B. our
shop.
Construction: Solid steel
throughout. Rollers are latheturned, accurate to within .003".
S a [ e t y : Completely safe, even
for small children.
Consistency:
Perfect slabs
every single time. Thickness
easily duplicated.
Simplicity:
Quick, simple setting and operation. Totally
dependable.
Versatility: For unlimited textures, pass anything through roller
with clay; rope, leaves, cork, press
molds, etc. Tapered slab easy.
Capacity: Any thickness to 2",
any width to 24", any length you
have room for.
Availability:
All orders shipped within five days.
Guarantee: One full year on
workmanship, parts, even satisfaction. No strings attached!
S h i p p i n g : we ship all over the
world. We can ship directly to you.
OR SEE ONE AT THESE DEALERS
DALLAS, TEXAS
Earth & Fire, 9719 Brockbank
NIXA, MISSOURI
L & R Specialties, 101 W. Mr. Vernon
SANTA ANA, CALIFORNIA
Aardvark Clay & Supplies, 1400 E. Pomona
PORTLAND, OREGON
Art Pak Products, 8100 N. Denver
18
CERAMICS MONTHLY
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Spencer Poftery, Inc., 5021 S. 144fh Sf.
WINNIPEG, MANITOBA
The Sounding Stone, 555 Osborne St.
MERCER, PENNSYLVANIA
The Burns Company, R.D. 4
ELK GROVE, ILLINOIS
A.R.T. Sfudio, 921 Oakfon
Free Brochure With More
Complete Information From
NORTH
,STAR
EQUIPMENT
A B&B COMPANY
Box 21, Auburn, Washington, 98002, (206) 838-9592
COEUR D'ALENE, IDAHO
The Pauper's Purse, 2426 Government Way
TAMPA, FLORIDA
Potter's World, 4930 Distribution Drive
HAINESPORT, NEW JERSEY
Creek Turn Ceramic Supply. Route 38
COM MEN T
The Business of Crafts
by loan FarreU with John Coyne
I A~t AZ'," EXAMI'LE of the inexperienced, ill-prepared person who opens
a crafts store. Neither I nor my partner, Ann Powell, had either retailing
or crafts sales experience. We were
one of those classic cases, people who
thought it might be a fun thing to
do. Having survived the first few
)'ears and grown to have three stores,
we feel we are past the critical point
and hopefully can offer some comment that may be helpful to both
craftsmen and prospective store owners in establishing themselves on a
full-time professional level.
Many people who open crafts stores
are like we were in the beginning.
They don't invest much capital and
have a vague idea it will be fun and
easy. One bank publication said that
there is an eighty-five per cent failure
rate in the first two years of crafts
retailing. This was especially true in
the early years of the upsurge of interest in crafts when everyone seemed
to want to open a store.
I came in at the middle of that
period, about seven years ago. It is
considerabl y easier now to start out
because of a more responsive buying
public, but today the competition is
greater and the stakes are higher.
I really feel that at the core of the
decision to enter the business of
crafts in any way is the conviction, a
deeply personal one, that you can "do
it better" than anyone else. The
craftsman has studied, looked at other
people's work, and learned that he
can produce objects just as well if
not better than all the others.
The retailer approaches crafts with
the conviction that his store or gallery
is without question going to be of a
higher quality than anyone else's. O f
course, that's because his taste is
better. For both, the craftsman and
the store owner, that utter belief in
self is an integral, inseparable part of
that which we like the best--living
and surviving in the world of crafts.
For everyone at first, it is very hard
to face up to the cold, hard word
"business." Your world at the begin-
ning is full of objects you love, of
people you like who have produced
that work. You've opened your shop's
doors usually with the "heave-to"
kind of help we all depend on from
close friends and families. There is a
very real and deep idealism involved.
We have all gone through those
early days of acting as if we really
didn't want to sell at all; we were
enjoying it so much. Potters go
through this as well. But the cold
hard realities hit fast: you can't pay
the rent unless you do sell. Your survival depends on whether or not you
develop business acumen, and interestingly enough, this does not involve
a compromise of principles. You can
love what you do; you can retain
friendships and personal loyalties and
make it all work as a business.
But running a crafts store means
much more than surrounding yourself
with objects you love. It means a
whole morass of problems that have
nothing to do, really, with the world
of crafts. It means an accounting system, the filing of endless tax forms,
the problems of staffing and storage.
All these problems are infinitely complex, all are time consuming, and
there are no shortcuts.
Owning a craft store means regular
time commitmen ts that cannot be
changed. There is no getting up one
day and saying you don't want to
work. Beyond that, if it is your own
business, you take it home with you,
often very literally, in the sense that
you probably store things in ),our
basement, but primarily in the sense
that you worry and ponder and think
about the store at all times.
Here are some of the things I've
learned from six years of being in
business. I give them to you in capsule form, though I could talk for
hours (and have!) on all of these
hard and fascinating problems.
The first was that we weren't going
to make a lot of money in relation
to other types of business, and that
we would need to work very hard
Continued on Page 21
. .
trll
•
120 PLUS
Chemicals & Raw Materials
bulk auantities available
Cloy Bodies
stoneware, sculpture, porcelain,
earthenware, cone 6 & I0 flame-
ware
Tools
Sieves
Scales
Kick & Electric Wheels
amaco, brent, estrin, max,
shlrnpo, skutt, soldner
Gas & Electric Kilns
amaco, california, crusader.
estrir, I & I, paraqon, $kutt,
thermolite
Clay MIXED TO ORDER
earthworks
420 merchants road
rochester, n.y. 14609
716/288-40S 0
May 1977
19
DELIVERED
PRICES
DELIVERED
PRICES
CUT COSTS
USES RAW M A T E R I A L S
USE UP SCRAP CLAY
UNATTE NDED MIXING
BUILT IN TIMER
POWER DUMPIN G WHEN F U L L
STRONG ROLLED STEEL BODY
RIGID STEEL STRUCT URE
MOUNTE D ON STRONG CASTER S
USE AS CLAY BOX
CLAY DOUGHMIXERS
r I ......
They p a y for them selve s
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- -
SCHOOL SAFETY KEY SWITCH - $25.00 EXTRA
BAGGIN G M O L D & STAND - $40.00 EXTRA
the mixer rotates into a dumping position , cutting
the clay out of the bucket. Serves as a moveabl e
elay box. Stores clay and scraps until needed. Rolls
on 4 heavy-d uty steel casters.
Heavy-g auge, rolled steel body and a totally enclosed
motor mounted on electric ally welded steel frame,
make this a rugged piece of equipme nt designed for
continuo us operatio m All ball bearings , gear units
and chain drives are heavy-d uty grade. All moving
parts complet ely enclosed .
An indispen sable, money-s aving piece 5f equipme nt
for the beginne r or professi onal potteI. This efficient mixer could save the studio $200 foI every three
tons of clay used, by elimina ting the problem of
waste clay. Turns every bit of clay scrap and wheel
slop into useable clay again.
Enjoy saving on mixing clay from powder. Excellen t
for bulk mixing of slip and g!azes. Perfect for the
busy studio. Once loaded, it nuxes unattend ed. Does
not need continuo us feeding like a pug mill. Excellent for breakin g up lumps when put in reverse. No
need to work at digging the clay out when ready,
with this self-tipp ing mixer. Reverse the power and
CM
HP
BUCKET
SIZE
NORTH AMERIC AN STANDA RD
INDUST RIAL BEARING S A N D GEARS
A L L MOVING PARTS ENCLOS ED
T O T A L L Y ENCLOS ED MOTOR
ELECTR OMAGNE TIC STARTE R & OVERLO AD
INCLUD ED
ELECTR IC REVERS ING SWITCH FOR EFFICIE NT
MIXING ACTION INCLUD ED
H E L I C A L ~ E N T E R FLOW MIXING
INSTRUC TIONS INCLUD ED
SEE WINTER ISSUE 75/76 STUDIO POTTER
MAG. FOR FAVOUR ABLE COMMEN TS
L
W
H
18
24
24
30
36
40
60
72
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
32
24
24
24
24
24
24
24
35
115-230
3 PHASE
208/220
UNIT
WT.
MIX
PER
HR.
(LBS.)
2.5
3.8
5.4
6.8
9.5
14.4
22
28
250
300
310
400
480
525
750
850
300
500
500
700
900
1100
1500
3900
BASIC CRATIN G
PRICE CHARGE
895
995
1020
1195
1395
1695
2860
3995
TOTAL
DEL'D.
PRICE
a.
3/4
1
1½
2
3
5
7½
10
11.6
15
17.6
24
34
---
5.8
7.5
8.5
11.8
14.6
23
32
41
35
35
35
40
40
45
45
50
975
1095
1120
1335
1535
1835
3085
4425
* 2 MIXES PER HOUR - + SPECIFY VOLTAG E & PHASE NEEDED
DEL IVER ED PRICES
Freight & Duty Included
EST RINM FG • LIMI TED
~ H A' R G E X
C
1916 FIR ST., VAN COU VER ,
L ~
CAN ADA , V6J 3B3
Telex 0450 -754 7
112-604-731-5371
24 HR.A NSW ERIN G SER VICE
20
{~ERAi%IIC
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1 PHASE
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COMMENT
Continued [rom Page 19
just to make a living. My account ant
told my partner and me that after
margina l salaries we could expect a
ten per cent profit, and this has been
borne out by experien ce. M a n y businesses operate on a fifteen to thirtyfive per cent profit margin. There are
very differen t and difficult economi cs
in the crafts field. First, the cost of
acquisiti on and the traveling to endless shows and studios on the chance
of finding work are enormou s, both
in terms of time and m o n e y - - a n investmen t unparall eled in any other
retail business to my knowled ge. I
have often traveled great distance s
and returned virtually empty-h anded.
And, although I may have placed
many orders at a show, there is always
the question of whether that order
will be filled.
The second reason is that craft
sales are seasonal , geared heavily to
a gift market. We do twenty-f ive per
cent of our annual business in December in the less than four weeks preceding Christma s. This means we
have to hold stock in reserve for long
periods of time. This creates critical
cash flow problem s.
The nature of the business forces
us to buy when store sales are slowest
because that's when craftsme n have
difficult y filling wholesal e orders.
Therefor e, preparin g for Christm as
sales is a process that starts in early
spring for the store.
Knowin g what to buy and how
much to buy is a tricky business -there are no rules for this and everyone makes a number of mistakes . I
buy when work is available , not when
I need it, and over the years have
develope d a feel for what we need.
It's almost a sixth sense, though far
from infallible .
For two years now I have come out
fine with inventor y. I've learned that
numerou s changes might occur at
any moment , that I'll have to shift
with those events, and a good practice to follow is to over order. Crafts
people could help tremend ously if
they were prompt with deliverie s, but
they are not deadline people and
most shipmen ts are late in arriving.
Three )'ears ago in the fall I found
our pre-Chri stmas stock surprisin gly
low. I made a study of how many
orders had been made and how many
of them were delivered , and found
that thirty per cent had never come
- - s o m e of which had been placed
the previous spring. This is unfair to
the store owner and to other craftsmen, as I had turned away potters
out of the expectat ion of having work
that never came. And in late October
to try and rustle up pots to fill shelves
at the peak time of the year was virtually impossib le. The situation is
getting better, perhaps because more
craftsme n are professio nal in their
relations hips, our store has increase d
credibili ty, and there is more highquality work available .
We work with about sixty to eighty
potters each year, but I rarely count
them because they change. My source
book continua lly changes too, with
new people and new possibili ties--I
am always looking for interesti ng new
work. When I accept a potter I see
it as giving a vote of confiden ce. It is
a real commitm ent on my part to sell
this person's work. I am prepared to
be flexible and deeply respect the
whole creative process, realizing that
craftsme n resent limiting stipulati ons,
such as producin g a certain number
of mugs in one color.
I see our relations hip with a potter
as a partners hip. It is unfair and disrespectfu l to the craftsma n to be rigid
about what one wants. A store owner
is either with the potter in appreciating the work, or lacks a genuine
apprecia tion for an individu al's ceramics. The craftsme n can help in
this partners hip by keeping the store
current on their producti on. They can
also help each other by recomm ending
other craftsme n. I tell our potters
about other stores where they might
place their work, but it is slightly
dirty pool for a craftsma n to take
orders from one store and then go to
another nearby store. Some shops like
exclusiv ity, and most used to be very
touchy about it, but those barriers
are breaking down. Howeve r, we all
enjoy the feeling that we're special
and preferred . We all like to think
that we are the one getting the good
craftsma n's work.
I buy from the best craftsme n I
can, but it's not that easy. The best
are often the busiest people. They
I LYmP.I¢ KILn:
Olym pic
Gold M e d a l 28
MODEL 2827
The huge Olympic Gold Medal
28 is a dream come true for the
busy shop owner dr business
involved in commercial firing.
A width of 28¼ inches and
depths of 27 and 31½ inches give
kiln volumes of 10 and 11.67 cubic
feet respectively. The advanced
design of the Olympic Gold Medal
28 enables cone 8 firings with the
same 47 amp., 240 volt power
requirem ent of the 23 inch series.
It's now possible for you to
increase your firing load by more
than 43% without an increase in
electrical consump tion or any
sacrifice in firing performance.
Division o f
HAUGEN MANUFACTURING, INC.
2222 North Pacific St.-Seattle, WA 98103
Phone (206) 632-0120
Continued on Page 71
May
1977
21
K
PORTABLE DOWNDRAFTS
PROFESSIONAL KILNS
2600°F LOW IRON INSULATING FIREBRICK
' N O ADDITIONALFLUEHEIGHTNEEDEDBACKEDBYHIGH-TEMP INSULATION
•
..J . . . . .
i_
•
_
•
2 1 - - 2 _~ - -
]
_
_ a
-
•
0
CERAMIC ;IBERDOOR .-~
-NO BAG WALLS OR MUFFLETUBES
WELDED STEELFRAME
- ~ 100 % GAS SAFETYSHUT-OFF
24CU. FT.
4J
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22
C~.RA~XCS
MONTHLY
~Jf
After years of serving the ceramic art field
"
with high quality profession al kilns, GEIL
KILNS now offers profession al quality hobby
kilns at an easily affordable price. Introducin g
Model 444 - - the new front loading, downdraft ceramic fiber hobby kiln. Natural or propane gas. Inside dimension s 22"Wx18" Dx30"H
- - shelf size 16"x16" - - 6.8 total cu. ft.
4.4 cu. ft. actual setting space - - 100%
safety shut-off - - cone 10 reduction or oxidation. Excellent for raku firing.
For further informatio n write: GEIL KILNS
P.O. Box 504, Hermosa Beach, CA. 90254
Phone: (213) 372-8003
J
MODEL 444
-
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A Quality
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MADE IN U.S.A.
PORTAB LE
EASY to STORE
The CLAY DEVIL, a devil of a good wheel,
EASY to CLEAN UP
will handle a surprisi ng amount of clay!
with new
Ideal for hobbyis ts, student s, kids,
Ibs.
8
about
throws
senior citizens , etc.
WATER CONTRO L
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V ~ A " ~ ' ~ / I L CO. • 6014 Reseda Blvd., Dept. CM-57
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• Uncond itional Guaran tee - - 1 year
LEGS O P T I O N A L - - $9.95
~.
DEALER INQUIRIES NOW INVITED
I
Please send me
I
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CLAY DEVIL LEGS ~t $9.95 per set.
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I am enclosing a _ _ C h e c k _ _ M.O. for $
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California Residents add 6% Sales Tax. Shipped FreiKht Collect Via
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(213) 342-8858
I
I
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NAME____
(Please Print)
ADDRESS . . . .
CITY .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
STATE
ZIP___
May 1977 23
Atlanta Exhibition
which painting, weaving, graphics, sculpture, and photography were also represented. A variety of styles were
evident and clay forms ranged from purely sculptural to
functional containers. The collection will travel to Birmingham, Greenville, Chattanooga , and Winston-Salem
through March 1978.
THE HIGH MUSEUM OF ART, Atlanta, presented the work
of eight ceramists November 27 through December 26,
as part of its exhibition "35 Artists in the Southeast." Joe
Bova, Jamie Davis, Frank Fleming, Ron Myers, Tom
Suomalainen, Pat Suttles, Tom Turner, and Steve Judson
Wilcox contributed twenty-two objects to the show in
Left "Brick Suitcase,"
low-[ire clay and mixed
media, 28 inches in
height, by Steve ]udson
Wilcox, University,
Alabama.
Below "Ritual Stand
[or Lizard," unglazed
porcelain, 14 inches in
height, by Frank
Fleming, Birmingham ,
Alabama.
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Vase, lidded jar, and covered dish, raku-[ired stoneware,
9½, 11, and 5 ~ inches in height, respectively, by
]amie Davis, Clemson, South Carolina.
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Right "The Un-Missing Link," unglazed
porcelain, 17 inches in height,
by Frank Fleming.
Below "Bleacher," low-[ire clay, 77
inches in width, by Steve ]udson Wilcox.
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26
CERAMICS MONTHLY
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Karl Martz Retrospective
Above Bowl, stonewar e with brushed iron pattern,
5 inches in diameter, 1957.
A MONTH-LONG EXHIBITION Of more than 200 ceramic
works by Karl Martz was presented at the Indiana University Art Museum during late February and March.
The exhibitio n traced the artist's productio n from 1934 to
the present, and explored the style variation s and techniques of a life's involvem ent with clay.
In a profile of Karl published in the October 1968 CM,
Sally Gallaway tells how the artist became involved in
ceramics : "Althoug h he was already determin ed to become a potter, (Karl) complete d his degree at Indiana
Universit y in chemistry . Then came a stint of work with
the once-fam ous but now defunct Brown County Pottery
near Nashville , Indiana. Here, as an apprentic e, he did
the odd jobs and heavy work. Most vividly he remembe rs
the hours of mixing clay with a perforate d hoe, much as
one mixes cement. 'In return,' Karl says, 'I was allowed to
throw and sell my own pottery.' Pieces from the Brown
County Pottery are now collectors ' items.
"Martz returned to The Ohio State Universit y for a
year of more ceramic art courses, and again spent the next
summer at Brown County Pottery.
"Karl Martz and Rebecca Brown were married in 1935,
and set up their own pottery on the tourist route in the
picturesq ue hills of southern Indiana. They lived in a log
cabin and built a crude, oil-fired kiln about thirty inches
May 1977
27
,~
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•
Above Bowl, stonewar e with brushed brown design,
5 inches in diameter, 1957.
Left Karl Martz.
Below Vase, mottled blue glaze over white earthenu, are,
approxim ately I0 inches in height, 1938.
Below, right Tile, red earthenw are, uranium orange glaze
and sgraf[ito design, 5 inches in diameter, 1934.
high. Accordin g to Karl, 'That kiln smoked like blazes,
and some of our neighbors were sure it was a moonshin e
still . . . . We called it our all_purpo se-multi- temperatu re
kiln. It got so hot at the bottom we did copper-re d reduction there, along with low temperat ure chrome reds at the
top--and all in the same firing.'
"Selling pots by the side of the road was somethin g of a
hand-to- mouth existence . Karl mowed lawns and painted
signs, and kept the kiln loaded as well; Becky worked as
an assistant in the Brown County Art Gallery in order to
add to their income."
In 1945, the artist joined the Indiana Universit y faculty. His backgrou nd was further enriched by attendanc e,
in the mid-1950 's, at the Black Mountain College workshop where he studied with Bernard Leach and Shoji
H a m a d a ; he later traveled to Japan visiting collection s
and studios. After working in 1963 with the faculty and
students at Kyoto Universit y, and in 1971 at a Mashiko
potter's studio, Karl Martz's ceramics entered a period
of strong Japanese influence .
In addition to his more than forty-yea r ceramics career
and a commitm ent to teaching of over thirty years, the
artist was one of the first to share his expertise with subscribers to CERA~IIC$ MONTHL '*~his earliest article appeared in the February 1953 issue.
28
CERAmCS MONTHLY
A,
Above Bowl, red earthenware, 10 inches in diameter ,
1934. The decoration stems [rom Persian prototypes.
Above Bottle with Carved Stopper, yellou, and blue
glazed whiteware, 11 inches in height, 1938.
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Below Brown unglazed globe, stoneware, 5y2 inches
in height, 1966.
Far left Handbuilt [orm with ~zeck,stoneware, dark brown,
16~ inches in height, 1958.
Above, left Carved bowl, porcelain and dark celadon
glaze, approximately 5 inches in width, 1974.
Left Bottle, stoneware with brown, white, and blue-gray
stripes, 26 inches in height, 1959.
Above Bowl porcelain with celadon glaze, 63//4 inches
in diameter, 1975.
Left Mortar and pestle,
unglazed porcelain, 7 inches
in diameter, 1977.
May 1977
33
Left Vase, red earthenware with carved lea[ design,
8~2 inches in height, 1934.
Below "Mashiko Bowl," stoneware, 4 inches in
height, 1972.
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Hal Riegger: Bizen Kiln Workshop
Abov e Work shop partic ipants build a two-c hamb ered
climb ing kiln near Roseb ud Lake in south ern
Britis h Colum bia.
IN DECEMBER 1975, C M publis hed an article about
d
Japan ese "Bize n" ware made near Imbe. It was pointe
clays
l
natura
to
due
out that the qualit y of Bizen was
s
availa ble in the area and the dema nd of local citizen
ction
produ
Bizen
of
ses
for utilita rian ware. The proces
rare very simpl e, with the most unusu al being the extrao
.
weeks
two
ely
ximat
appro
of
dinary firing period
The forms are both throw n and handb uilt. No glazes
ash
as such are used althou gh the impur e clay and wood
ware.
-tight
water
ce
produ
to
firing
comb ine in the
le
Know ing this backg round to Bizen, it seeme d a suitab
potg
makin
for
ways
of
y
variet
the
ding
exten
choice for
eek
tery at outdo or works hops• Thus it was that a five-w
and
ed
plann
session in south ern Britis h Colum bia was
May 1977
35
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Abov e Two shaUow trench es and a layer o[ rocks
comprise the kiln' s [ound ation, which surrounds
terraced and leveled cham ber [loots.
Below , right Doorw ays are cut into the sti[[ened wall
[or easy remov al o[ the Jill; a stoke hole is cut in the
wall opposite each chamber's door.
held. The site, a beaut iful and remot e valley lake,
was an
ideal atmos phere for the pursu it of this kind of potter
y.
Primi tive in the sense that there was no electr icity,
water
had to be pump ed from the lake into a holdin g tank,
the
army stove was wood -fired , but the situat ion nonet
heless
provi ded specia l favors like fresh lake trout for break
fast,
and home made bread daily.
Clay had to be impor ted, but all other mater ials
were
obtain ed from the locale . A good qualit y firecl
ay was
mixed with equal parts sawdu st and sandy grave
l for
buildi ng the kiln. With the excep tion of a few firebr
ick
flame openi ngs and doors , this mixtu re was the only
material used for constr uction .
A simpl e two-c hamb er design patter ned more or
less
on the Japan ese type, reach ed a length of about 18
feet.
Flame s would pass from the firebo x throu gh holes
at the
botto m of the first cham ber and to the flue. A door
was
place d at the side of each cham ber while the firebo
x had
only one stoke hole about a foot in diame ter on the
front
of its crown . Six 5-inch ports aroun d the botto m
were
includ ed for draft contro l. Stoke holes for each cham
ber
were cut in the wall oppos ite the door and pots
were
omitt ed below them.
A depos it of what at first was believ ed to be kaolin
,
was locate d across our lake just below the water
line.
Later , it prove d to be diatom aceou s earth, and a
canoe
provi ded shuttl e servic e for quant ities of the mater
ial to
be broug ht to the site. A layer about four inches
thick
36
CERAMICSMONTHLY
'
°
Abov e Fireclay, sawdu st, and sandy gravel [orm the
kiln wall, with [irebrick used [or doors and aroun d ports.
Right The upper cham ber is [iUed with sawdu st and
wood a~ an arch[orm.
Below , far right Brick Jill prima ry air ports in the
base o[ the emerg ing [irebox wall.
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was built over the entire exterior, insulating the kiln wall
which then totaled about eight inches thick.
The combinat ion of cedar shake scraps from a local
mill, and the kiln design, proved almost too efficient -firing easily to Cone 5 in only five hours. This had to be
slowed and lengthene d to allow for the effects of wood
ash on the clay. Final firings were lengthene d to around
18-20 hours, still nowhere near as long as the traditiona l
Bizen cycle, but enough to produce some fine results.
Both reducing and oxidizing kiln atmosphe res were
initially used and some differenc es naturally resulted. We
finally preferred a mostly reduced firing.
A variety of local minerals plus a local earthenw are
were added to the fireclay, to approxim ate a typical Bizen
body that would thorough ly mature around Cone 6 to 7.
Slips of mine tailings and other locally found minerals
were used alone, and in combinat ion, with small amounts
of borax for decorativ e purposes. While much of the ware
was handbuil t, a potter's wheel was available at the
workshop for throwing .
One of the challenge s to students was to fully use the
chamber space without kiln shelves. Not only were tall
and wide objects made to fit, but some smaller pieces like
bowls were designed to "box" and thereby use full chamber height.
In a few respects our results were like old Bizen ware
but in others, especially in feeling, they were far removed.
We weren't trying to be Japanese , or to exactly produce
their ware; but rather to present a valuable, basic learning
experienc e in ceramics and in living, which we achieved.
38
CErtAMm S MONTHLY
Left Wood is stacke d in the [irebo x to suppo rt
the arch, then later remov ed.
Above Local diatom aceou s earth is applie d to the
kiln [or added insula tion.
Below, left Bricki ng up the doors be[ore [iring.
Above Alter moun ding a layer o[ sawdu st over the
wood, the [irebo x arch is built up with clay mix.
Below Stokin g the [irebox.
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Roy Lichtenstein:
Ceramic Sculpture
u,l
..¢
2
THE FIELD OF CERAMICS might be consid ered
as two
world s: the first, where in lies the great mass of ceram
ists,
consis ts of crafts men, potter s, avoca tional ceram ists,
and
those involv ed prima rily in ceram ic art. This group
represents the major ity of the field, the advoc ates of and
detrac tors from curren t clay style. Conce rned in many cases
with
such questi ons as the value of using this or that mater
ial
in this or that way, they have forme d a move ment
which
now requir es the larger "art world " to count its
accom plishm ents, and recog nize its best objec t maker
s. But
there has existe d anoth er, secon d world comp rised
of
recog nized artists in other m e d i a - - m a n y of them
but
part-t ime ceram ists. Their clay work has been accep
ted as
fine art from the begin ning, as if it were in some
way
distin ct from other ceram ics by virtue of the powe
r of its
make r alone. Amon g these artists is Roy Lichte
nstein .
Know n prima rily as a pop art painte r, he has never
theless produ ced ceram ic forms which are widel y accep
ted.
Devel oped in collab oratio n with ceram ist Hui Ka Kwon
g,
the works were shown throu gh Marc h 20 at the
Art
Galle ries of Califo rnia State Unive rsity, Long Beach
.
An exhib ition catalo g statem ent by galler y direct
or
Const ance W. Glenn expla ins furthe r: "By 1964 Licht
enstein was at work on a series of painti ngs of girls'
heads
which were 'hard, crisp, brittle , and unifo rmly modis
h in
appea rance , as if they all came out of the same
pot of
make up . . . . ' Late in the same year, he made shado w,
tear,
and hair conto ur notati ons on the face of a blond e
Breck
girl clippe d from a magaz ine. Lettie Eisen haur recall
s-from this same perio d--a mask he made for a costum
e
party, with hair painte d in yellow arabe sques outlin
ed in
black, and an oval hole cut for the face. She also descri
bes
40
CERAM ICS M O N T H L Y
an attem pt to paint her own face with what may
have
been clown white and other make up colors.
" I t seems , in retros pect, these events prom pted Licht
enstein to buy two plaste r mann equin heads in the 'hat
district' near his studio . The first he painte d in the mann
er
of his curren t painti ngs, and the secon d he used as
a base
form for the altera tion and accen tuatio n of featur
es and
hair conto urs by buildi ng onto it with a Plasti cine
compound . A friend sugge sted a potter in Brook lyn who
might
assist in makin g a mold and castin g one or more ceram
ic
heads from the secon d maqu ette.
"Coll abora tion in order to achiev e an indust rial qualit
y
of perfec tion in a variet y of techn iques and media
had
alread y figure d promi nently in Lichte nstein 's career
. The
first enam el on metal painti ngs had just been comp
leted
in limite d editio ns under simila r collab orativ e circum
stance s and work was begun at this time on the cloiso
nn6
penda nt projec t.
"The decisi on to collab orate with a profes sional
ceramis t in order to insure the impec cable crafts mansh
ip
neces sary to his aesthe tic led him not only to appro
ach
the initial potter but, after the castin g of six heads ,
to the
decisi on that a fruitfu l relatio nship would neces sitate
two
artist s--eac h worki ng in his own mediu m. He indica
tes
that he could not comm unica te his intent ions to the
potter, whose trade was that of a comm ercial china
decorator, and that it becam e impor tant to work with
an
artist who would imme diatel y under stand not only
the
techn ical, but the aesthe tic aspec ts of the probl em as
well.
"He appro ached his collea gue at Doug lass Colleg
e of
Rutge rs Unive rsity, Hui Ka Kwon g--th e six bisque
heads
in h a n d - - a n d togeth er, in 1965, they began a year-l
ong
Left "Hea d with• Blue Shadow," cast earthenware
with colored glazes, 15 inches in height.
Right Plate and spoon molds used to produce
parts [or sculptural assemblages.
d
Below "'Ceramic Sculpture 5," black and white glaze
t.
heigh
in
s
inche
earthenware with overglazes, 3 ~
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•
Above "'Ceramic Sculpture," black
overglaze on a Cone 2 white majolica
base, 53/4 inches in height.
Right "'Ceramic Sculpture 12,'"
5-color glazed earthenware, 9 inches
in height.
Below "'Dishes by Roy Lichtenstein,'"
black and white glazed six-piece
place setting, signed and produced
in an edition o[ 800 sets.
Above c~Ceramz"C Sculpture," black and white glazed
earthenware, 7 inches in height. The sur[ace is covered
with symbols [or re[lection and shadow.
q
'00
~LPO
mOB
POo
PAPS
sLPO
LI
LPLP *LP LP •
OLPOOeL
uced not only
perio d of inten sive colla bora tion whic h prod
them , but all
see
now
the com plete d head s, glaze d as we
uran t-wa re
resta
of
s
stack
of the sculp tures com pose d of
dishes.
n to have
"Onl y twen ty-si x cera mic sculp tures are know
) and
bited
exhi
were
en
sixte
been com plete d (of whic h
ntal
ume
mon
the
to
y
testif
s
the rema ining unfin ished work
were
y
Man
n.
uctio
prod
ng
duri
prob lems enco unte red
ribe a grue ling
destr oyed in proc ess and both artis ts desc
eithe r from
cast,
were
es
Dish
e.
roun d-the -cloc k proc edur
t piece .
uran
resta
right
the
ng
lacki
com merc ial mold s or,
to dry leath ermold s mad e by Hui. They were allow ed
as an adhe sive.
hard and final ly assem bled with slip
porti ons adde d
Duri ng assembly, form s were alter ed and
the appa rentl y
or subt racte d to suit sculp tural need s until
utensils on their
inge nuou s stacks seem ed to resem ble dirty
way to the dishw ashe r.
-dim ensio nal
"By pres entin g obje cts we know to be three
Lich tenst ein
ce.
with data we asso ciate with the flat surfa
ame trica lly
of'di
n
broa ched the prob lem of the assim ilatio
radic tion
cont
that
d
oppo sed infor mati on, and estab lishe
he refer s
h
whic
n
know
is
betw een wha t is seen and what
amb iguo us spac e
to as 'a certa in amb iguit y.' Furt her, the
art sculp ture
high
een
betw
py
the dishes in parti cula r occu
dece ptive ly
the
by
ed
hten
heig
and com mon croc kery is
es both
deni
h
whic
ce,
aran
appe
simp le depa rtme nt store
eceunpr
an
and
n
vatio
inno
l
a high degr ee of tech nica
ture.
sculp
in
rn
patte
ied
appl
and
dent ed marr iage of form
n, the glazi ng
"Wit h rega rd to patte rn and deco ratio
prob lems than
r
fewe
no
d
pose
s
of both head s and dishe
both pain terly
dots,
The
bly.
assem
and
the initia l casti ng
ial print ing proconv entio n and symb ol for the com merc
the flat canv as
cess, whic h had resid ed com forta bly on
al cont ours of
surfa ce, now /lad to conf orm to the actu
acce ntua te or
faces and cups. They coul d alter nate ly
d defin e spec ific
oblit erate form . In their dens ity they coul
and illus iona ry
areas of cont rast. Whe n omit ted, both real
d be distr ibute d
high light s appe ared . Fina lly, they coul
ed a carto on of
over the entir e obje ct until it appr oach
to stere otyp ical
s
itself, com plete with all the refer ence
ces.
rend ering of refle ctive surfa
ntion of new
"Thi s aesth etic conc ern requ ired the inve
of cera mic
Dots
sion.
occa
meth ods on more than one
beca me
and
ned,
scree
silkially
over glaze were com merc
/flay 1977
43
decals which could be cut in the desire d config uratio
ns
and applie d to the basic form (whic h had previo usly
receiv ed a white majol ica glaze at Cone 2 or 2080°
F).
Becau se the decals did not confo rm easily to compl
ex
conto urs, Lichte nstein devise d anoth er form of maski
ng
tape stencil, used prima rily on the 'Head s,' over which
Hui could, with infinit e care, spray the desire d color.
"The colors thems elves promp ted an extens ive search
on Hui's part in order to reprod uce, in glaze form, those
partic ular reds, yellows, and blues requir ed by the severe
ly
limite d Lichte nstein palett e. Yellow could not simply
be
yellow. It had to be Lichte nstein yellow. Many of
the
compl eted pieces surviv ed five or six firings, becau
se
after the majol ica firing, each of the spraye d overg lazes
and the black lines which Lichte nstein painte d by hand
requir ed differ ent kiln tempe rature s (red and yellow
,
Cone 010; black, Cone 015 to 017; and gold, Cone
015
to 020). In each case, the essent ial comb inatio n of craftsmansh ip and artistr y produ ced the parad oxica l object
which Lichte nstein dema nded- -a work of art which
alluded to the banal, to trivia, to the anony mous indust
rial
object , yet remai ned finally what has been descri bed
as
'the first sculpt ure about painti ng.'
"Lich tenste in's intere st in ceram ics is not witho ut tradition amon g painte rs, and nume rous simila rities can
be
found in the work of artists such as Gaugu in, Miro, and
Picasso. Thou gh Gaugu in began ceram ic work in order
to
augm ent his incom e, he too collab orated with a ceram
ist
of 'artist ic percep tlo
" n ', Ernes t Chapl et, a recent ly retired
direct or of Havil and and one of the premi er techni cians
of his time. Gaugu in's outpu t was huge and varied
but
a numb er of major pieces reflec t painte rly conce rns and
the transf erence of painte d image to ceram ic surfac
e.
Even in applie d design , he repea tedly used the Breto
n
figure s from the painti ngs of the same period , exhib iting
a contin uity in the select ion of image s in relatio n to
the
larger body of his art which we see later in Miro and
Picass o--and Lichte nstein . Miro too worke d with
an
artist/ ceram ist, Loren s Artiga s, and simila rly his first
efforts were simple 'plaqu es and vases on which Miro
painte d his famili ar figure s . • • the form belon ged
to
Artiga s, the surfac e to Miro. ' There he blend ed conto
ur
and ornam entati on to suit his own idiom atic langua ge.
"Picas so, whom Lichte nstein most admir ed and in
whose work the closest relatio nships can be found , stumbled upon the idea of makin g ceram ics during a summ
er
vacati on at Golfe Juan when friend s sugge sted he visit
a nearb y potter y at Vallau ris. At the Modu ra works hop,
long known as a produ cer of comm on red clay dinne
rware, he was given every exper t techni cal assista
nce
availa ble by Suzan ne and Georg es Ramie . Many of
his
pieces were literal ly built up archit ectura lly with slip, and
the same balanc ing and struct ural difficu lties descri
bed
by Lichte nstein were no doubt exper ienced . . . .
"Ther e is in Lichte nstein 's work (as there is in Picasso's), an exquis ite contin uity which is exemp lified not
in
the ceram ics alone, but by their place in the conte xt
of
44
CERAM ICS M O N T H L Y
his entire o e u v r e . Early in his career a pictor ial style and
techni que, once mistak en for conten t, were firmly established, thus allowi ng him the freedo m to explo re a vast
range of art ideas and forma l proble ms within a methodolo gy of his own creati on and defini tion. The tensio
ns
betwe en reality and illusion which had been the subjec
t
of his painti ng becam e the subjec t of his ceram ic sculpture and contin ue to be the subjec t of his work today.
Withi n these forma l limita tions, theme s and images
appear. at first simply stated , then orche strate d and played
upon for all possible variat ions. They are mome ntaril
y
simpli fied in what seems a final refine ment; and then
stored , only to be reintr oduce d in new guise, part of
an
ever-w idenin g cyclic al explo ration of the variet ies of form.
"The transp ositio n of the first stereo typica l femal e faces
into the increa singly abstra ct compo sition s which culminat ed in the 'Girl' painti ngs of 1964 precip itated
the
form his first sculpt ure would take; and imme diatel y prior
to the decor ation of the plaste r maqu ette, the painti
ngs
becam e more splend idly baroq ue, the shadin g predic ting
the shado w defini tion on the ceram ic faces. Simila rly,
the
cup and sauce r and reflec tion theme s made their sculptural appea rance as reitera tions of earlie r drawi ngs and
painti ngs, and grew in compl exity and variet y during
the
course of the ceram ic produ ction.
"Whe n the ceram ics were aband oned at the end of
1965 becau se there was a sense of havin g compl eted
the
explo ration , the 'Girl' painti ngs were conclu ded as well:
but the theme s were not exhau sted. Three years later,
in the spring of 1968, he sugge sted a film projec t
to
Mauri ce Tuchm an for possible inclus ion in the exhib ition
Art and Techn ology : 'One propo sal . . • would be
a
seque nce of shots of a woma n's face with contra sting
lightin g (for examp le green on the left, red on the right)
,
or tattoo ed with dots or with variet ies of makeu p.' The
projec t was ultima tely altere d, exclud ing the origin
al
propo sal: but 'Head s' modif ied by his then curren
t
Art Deco mode contin ued to appea r in the mains tream
s
of the work . . . .
"As prepa ration s were begun for this exami nation and
exhib ition of 'Ceram ic Sculp ture' which was first conceived more than fifteen years ago Lichte nstein was,
not
coinci dental ly, at work on foam board maque ttes for new
sculpt ure. These works --cups , saucers, pitche rs, etc.,
delineat ed by spare lines cast in bronz e--bec ame open
air
forms renew ing and once again revita lizing , in unexp ected
contex t, the crock ery of 1965, much in the same spirit
Picasso renew ed early still life motifs in his 1952 bronze
s.
"Alth ough the public has had greate r access to Lichte nstein's more monu menta l Art Deco sculpt ure, which
indeed expresses the spirit of his work, it is clear that
the
ceram ics--s eldom seen and perha ps dismissed as an entertainin g tour-d e-forc e--are at the real heart of Lichte
nstein's aesthe tic. They contin ue to person ify his image
s,
his metho dolog y, and can be seen today as centra l to
the
crucia l creati ve renew al and resurg ence which descri
be
his nature and that of the endur ing artist. "
J
',t
t
i
~ ~!i!i ~,I,~I it ~ ~
Above "Tea pot," black and white glaze,
approximately 9 inches in height. In the early
stages of the series, dot patterns were created
by decals; later, they were applied by spraying
th rough per[orated masking tape.
right ¢¢ Ceramic. Sculpture 1,'" earthenware,
black and white, 9 inches in height.
R.
Far right "Ceramic Sculpture," black and
white glazed earthenware, approximately
9 inches in height.
ilIay 1977
45
i
!
Digging Your Own Clay-A Geologist'sViewpoint
by MAYNARD P. BAULEKE
Above Eroded and exposed
clay was protected by a
weather-resistant layer of
siltstone. While these strata
contain useful clay, less
obvious geology may produce
good deposits with greater
accessibility.
This
Schemotic
report
section
Ells,~ort h (Not to
Co.)
Oroneros
Sh____
--~onsse n I
Right A stratigraphic rock
column shows the presence of
clay and shale in Ellsu,orth
County, Kansas. Columns
representing any area are
available [rom each state's
Geological Survey, and depict
a sectional view o[ the earth's
layers in a general locale.
46
CERAMIC S ]~ON TI-I LY
scole)
i
l
c
....
PROBABL5." EVER5." TIME THE COST o f
clay goes up, you
make a vow to start digging your own--if you only knew
where. Before presentin g a few hints on clay prospecti ng,
let's review some of its hard economic facts. What is your
time worth? If nothing, the labor cost is right. How is
your physical condition ? A doctor's bill for a sprained
back, or hospitaliz ation, will pay for a lot of clay. Then
consider where you might dig, as almost all the land is
owned or controlle d by someone. Highway officials may
take a dim view of digging up their right-of-w ay. Ask
permissio n before prospecti ng; trespassin g is unlawful.
Fortunate ly, a small seam or pocket of clay will be
sufficient for most studio needs. To find good locations,
each state's Geologic al Survey can be contacted . Their
informati on about the propertie s of clays and shales in
your area may be limited, but their maps naming the
earth's different formation s or strata will be helpful. If you
know the geologica l name of the clay or shale in which
you are interested , the maps can show where to find it.
Geological maps generally show only the surface. For
any prospecti ve region, try to obtain a stratigraphie rock
column which portrays the way the rock layers pile one
on top of another. Stratigra phic columns exist for each
state, and name the underlyin g strata. The youngest
strata appear in the upper portion of the column while
the thickness es of the layers are relative and have only
approxim ate footage values. A thick layer means more is
there than a thinner one.
If a geologica l report has been prepared on a specific
location, then in rare instances , a stratigraphic section
may be available . Such sections detail thickness es of the
rock layers to the nearest foot, and sometime s the impurity layers are shown in inches. This type of map is the
best to obtain when it exists for the exact region of
interest. As the rock layers in the column are named, they
can also be used to locate materials other than clay, such
as volcanic ash, limestone , and dolomite.
The stratigrap hic column often omits the top layer of
soil, while the section should show it. Ideally, the section's
top layer should be labeled "clay," with a minimum of
impurity symbols. Often, it is better to find a layer of
rock over the clay which may protect it from weatherin g.
Beware of clay or shale layers sandwich ed between limestone, as the probabili ty of lime impurity in the material
is high. If the geologist describes a shale or clay as
"abundan t with fossils," it will probably produce an unsuitable body with "lime-po ps" or "lime-blo wing."
Potters may be interested in certain shales, dependin g
upon their plasticity and workabili ty, since geologists
sometime s use the terms "shale" and "clay" interchan geably. Shale is a consolida ted or indurated (hardene d)
clay, usually having a laminated structure. Hence it is
usually not as workable as a clay. Often clay and shale
exist in such gradually mixed layers that it is difficult to
distinguis h one from the other. If the material comes
apart in "flakes" or "sheets," it is most likely shale.
There are other detailed area maps available for a
price. Topographic maps are published by the U.S. Geological Survey and a master map, showing all the charted
areas, with an instructio n booklet exists for each state.
These are essentiall y detailed contour maps listing land
elevation in feet and showing streams and locations of
I
I
•
old or existing mining operati ons. They are good for
plottin g locatio n and correla ting where tl~e clay might be
expose d by erosion . Develo ped by the state highwa y departme nt or the county enginee r, county maps show the
comple te road system and usually the drainag e pattern .
Howev er, not all states use the county and townsh ip system of land subdivi sion. Abstra cting offices have county
ownership maps availab le, listing the names of an area's
landow ners on each proper ty segmen t.
Geolog ical inform ation for an area can be found in
well logs or drilling reports which are part of a state's
water resourc es reporti ng. To find water, a hole must be
drilled, and many state laws require the filing of a record
of the geolog ical layers passed through . The logs are often
sketchy and briefly worded with such phrases as "blue
shale," "sand," limesto ne," and "yellow clay," but are
useful in tracing the format ions and their depths below
the surface . Finally , the state agricul tural extensi on service agent can provide inform ation about soil conditi ons.
The telepho ne directo ry should list these sources.
After studyin g the maps and reading a little about the
area, the countr y or even the suburb s can be explore d
for materia ls. Heavil y popula ted areas do not offer the
best prospec ts, but constru ction sites may reveal layers
of clay or shale which are often hauled away as landfill .
Arrang ements could be made to have a trucklo ad delivered to your studio. Fresh road cuts, eroded hilly areas.
and stream beds can also reveal clav deposits.
Slow-m oving streams , especia lly if'they are apt to flood.
may have water-d eposite d layers consist ing of fine clay
particle s overlyi ng silt and coarse materia l. Becaus e these
particle s are uncons olidate d, they are easily dug. Many
Americ an Indians used this clay for making ware.
Many section s of the Unitecl States can yield small
layers or deposit s of a white-f iring clay such as kaolin.
Residu al and sedime ntary kaolins are found in Washin gton, Idaho, Monta na, New Mexico , Texas. Kansas .
Arkans as, Florida , Georgi a, Alabam a, Mississippi, North
and South Carolin a, and many other states. But they
may not be widely spread throug hout a state. The large
deposit s are comme rcially develo ped, but like many minerals, they are being deplete d, so the smaller deposit s will
be develo ped in the next century .
If test sample s are to be gatl£ered on an explora tion
trip, the followi ng equipm ent could be include d besides
a detaile d map of the area: a small spade, an acid bottle
filled with ten per cent hydroc hloric (HCI) or muriat ic
acid, small cloth or plastic sacks capable Of holding up
to a ten-pou nd sample , some 3 x 5 cards to record perti-
Right Details of three map types useful to potters:
(top) a topographic map depicts land contours, shows
elevation in feet, and may indicate old or existing
mining operations; (middl e) a county road map gives
locations of highways, rivers, and creeks; and (bottm n) a
county ownership map.
I6
_
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I R
:(31, `
S-, H
A
E -K
E
7t,.,
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-~
~
.
"
;
3,. - ~
i
I
• ~
'
. . . .
.
.
.
.
o
|-,~ ............... ..
!,~,
,.,
iL.
'
I
~,,
~
.
I
,
i
- -
ii
'
.
............l....J ..
"~I°!
--I
, .I
/
----i ~'' ~ :I-'-""-'-;=''-''''''=~-'"-'
..... .. -~'~ ...... .... ,,
I
-I-.... ......
EXPLANATION
SoB
.'13"0":C$ "'1 Sand and gravel, conglo
".'~:~.'.~ I erate, or "mortar beds" m-
I:!m::':i:~iil ~..o,o.e or..o
or siltstone
or siltstone
"-
~
-'-I C a l c a r e o u s
shale
I ~ o ~ I s~.,e wit~co.°r.,,o.~
~
Gypsum or anhydrite
Limestone
1 il
[////// //
/I
Dolomitic limestone
Dolomite
[~1~, I I1,~III Underclay
Coal or lignite
I~1
vo,c..io.s,
[-~, --< --<} Bentonite
48
CERAM ICS ~/[ON T I-ILY
Illustration adapted Jrom a drawing by Sharon Hagen
and Larry Heusiek
F
squee ze
nent field infor matio n, a soft penc il, and a small
bottl e filled with wate r.
selec t
Once you find what appe ars to be expo sed clay,
a
has
If it
a samp le and rub it betw een your finge rs.
is
r
wate
slick feelin g or beco mes sticky when a little
are some
appli ed, it usual ly is a clay. How ever, there
will feel
mate rials, such as talc and pyrop hylli te, that
r, while
wate
slick but will not be plast ic when mixe d with
of the
ce
surfa
bento nite will almo st feel greas y. The
ying
overl
by
expo sure may be notic eably conta mina ted
le
solub
more
mate rial or weat hered , with some of the
the
of
ition
mate rial leach ed out. To find the true cond
e takin g a
clay, dig a foot or two into the depo sit befor
consi st of
ly
usual
samp le, whic h for studi o testin g will
aroun d ten poun ds.
on the
Beca use of weat herin g, a clay may be white
trate d
pene
is
sit
depo
surfa ce, but will beco me gray as the
It is
buff.
or
red
of
and will usual ly fire some shade
its
from
color
fired
the
almo st impo ssible to deter mine
as
white
be
to
nues
conti
color when found . If the clay
fire
will
it
that
able
prob
the expo sure is pene trate d, it is
of red;
white ; red or yello w clay will prod uce some shade
er can
matt
ic
organ
by
black
and mate rial color ed gray or
red.
deep
to
fire white
calci te
Ther e are three main impu rities to look for:
iron
and
0),
"2H2
O~
(CaS
um
(lime stone , CaCO 3), gyps
hye
dilut
with
s
react
te
Calci
).
pyrit e (fool 's gold, Fe2S
is
te
calci
so
de,
dioxi
n
carbo
se
droch loric acid to relea
mois tened
prese nt if the clay bubb les vigor ously when
calci te
from
come
les
bubb
the
If
with ten per cent acid.
blow ing.
partic les, the fired clay will likely expe rienc e limedispe rsed
If the entir e mass bubb les, calci te is unifo rmly
a whiti ng
in a fine parti cle size. It will then act much like
ng actio n
addit ion, short ening the firing range by its fluxi
iron comat the matu ring temp eratu re, and bleac hing
buff. Clays
poun ds to chan ge the fired color from red to
e.
that fizz with HC1 shou ld not be the first choic
ce of the
If small white cryst als are visible on the surfa
conta ins
ably
clay expo sure or in crack s, the mate rial prob
ming
scum
gyps um, whic h is sligh tly solub le and can cause
g an
lopin
deve
of red-f iring clays. If you are inter ested in
le
solub
other
antiq ue finish , the prese nce of gyps um or
done
be
can
salts may be desir able. Final scum evalu ation
after a test firing .
be pyrit e
Gold cubes in the clay are almo st certa in to
(pyri tefaults
cause
or fool's gold. Only the large parti cles
to iron
burns
e
pops ) durin g firing . In oxida tion, pyrit
it gives
oxide and sulfu r dioxi de; becau se of the latter
good
be
ld
shou
off a disag reeab le firing odor, so there
in
cles
parti
e
venti latio n aroun d the kiln. Smal l pyrit
a
are
h
whic
ware
reduc tion form black spots in the
iron
of
size
The
.
mixt ure of meta llic iron and iron oxide
wate r to
pyrit e cryst als can be check ed in the field using
ng the
leavi
,
hand
flush away most of a bit of clay in the
g lens
ifyin
magn
heav y pyrit e parti cles behin d. A small
.
rities
is helpf ul in study ing impu
form of
Some lesser impu rities could be quart z in the
Fine
ions.
locat
all
sand or silt, whic h is foun d in almo st
than
less
nts
amou
in
silt is not troub lesom e if prese nt
a body
thirty per cent and in fact it can be used to open
sand
and
silt
er
Larg
ing.
havin g dryin g or shrin kage crack
deand
ing
wash
by
o
grain s can be remo ved in the studi
rities
impu
mica
and
par
canti ng the suspe nded clay. Felds
ware bodies.
act as fluxe s and are prefe rred in certa in stone
sticky or
mely
extre
is
Some times a clay is foun d that
samp le
A
ing.
crack
ut
gumm y and impo ssible to dry witho
adde d
when
l
usefu
be
may
of this shou ld be taken as it
plasing
throw
er
prop
the
to
to a "sho rt" clay to bring it
g
slakin
its
ve
obser
and
rial
ticity . Wet a bit of the mate
n
softe
ld
shou
clay
ng
ormi
or softe ning rate. Good slip-f
ion
react
r
slowe
a
have
can
rapid ly while a throw ing clay
is absol ute
time with wate r. Ther e is no field test that
throw ing
or
ing,
build
hand
,
in evalu ating the slip-c asting
.
them
l
revea
will
use
only
prope rties of a clay;
kaoTher e are three majo r classes of clay mine rals:
the
are
two
first
The
te.
lloni
mori
linite , illite, and mont
in
nt
prese
when
,
latter
the
most need ed in clay while
good
uce
prod
can
two,
other
the
small amou nts with
conte nt of
throw ing chara cteris tics. A mont mori lloni te
ulate slips
flocc
to
tends
cent
per
great er than one-t enth
age.
drain
poor
ng
causi
,
mold
a
stand ing in
ion from
A separ ate recor d can be kept of each locat
tests
shop
of
ts
resul
the
and
taken
whic h samp les were
declay
e
recor ded on the same sheet . Norm ally, a singl
body
l
ercia
posit will respo nd diffe rentl y from a comm
rals, and
mine
and
clays
many
of
ed
blend
whic h may be
ic mate little mone y may be saved by diggi ng basic ceram
you
thing
rials. But there is much satisf actio n when every
ol.
contr
nal
creat e is of local origi n and unde r your perso
DevelopM A Y N A R D P. BAU LEK E heads the Materials
and is
ey
Surv
ment Division o[ the Kansas Geological
ersity
Univ
a pro[essor o[ mechanical engineering at the
of Kansas.
Oppo site page Deta il o[ a state
stratigraphic rock colum n listing
geological classification o[ some
materials interesting to ceramists [or
glaze and clay making.
Righ t Wate r has erod ed an unco ntamin ated deposit beneath the topsoil;
this site is easily accessible and, with
the owner's permission, good quality
clay may be mine d here.
May 1977
49
Elly and Willy Kuch
by SYI.VIA HYMAN
Ix THE VILLAGE OF Burgth ann, twenty kilome ters from
Nurem berg, is one of West Germa ny's largest studios for
the produc tion of handm ade ceramic s. Wilhel m Kuch,
or Willy as he prefers to be called, started the pottery in
1948, and was joined in 1951 by his wife, Elly.
"Willy 's always seeking glazes, " says Ell}', "and when
he has a new recipe, he has to try it, to change it." Each
of the many glazes Willy develo ps may require a special
kind of form from Elly, or vice versa. "I like to work
with differe nt kinds of clay," says Ell}. "It wasn't so from
the beginn ing, but now if I have a special sort of clay,
I'm feeling what the materia l w a n t s . . , and each materia l
forces a special kind of techniq ue." While Willy decora tes
with oxides on raw glaze (he once was a painter ), Ell}"
prefers to alter the soft clay surface .
In the large studio comple x, adjace nt to their home,
the Kuchs produc e functio nal ware, sculptu re, decora tive
objects , commi ssions of glazed tile, fountai ns, and architectura l murals . Their ware is largely formed by twelve
assistants and appren tices. The six appren tices stud}" for
three }-ears, with two new ones accepte d each }-ear as two
others comple te their studies. The appren tices do not pay
for trainin g, but instead receive a small income for work.
Their produc tion is marked with the worksh op stamp
while Elly and Willy individ ually mark their own ware.
=,..,
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b
The throwi ng room with its eight electric wheels , plus
rooms for glazing, firing, display , and stock are located
on the main floor of the facility 's three levels. There are
five electric kilns of various sizes, includi ng a large car
kiln. but most of the ~lazed ware is fired in a downd raft
gas kiln. Raw materia l storage , an eight-g allon paint
mixer for prepar ing slip, two dough mixers for dr}" blending and for prepari ng the heavily grogge d clay, and three
3-inch diamet er extrude rs are in the baseme nt. On the
second floor is Ellv's spaciou s studio and the room where
large murals , garden fountai ns, and sculptu re are formed .
The main entranc e to the worksh op buildin g leads into
the display room which is arrang ed with well-lit, compartme nted shelving. The adjace nt stock room, equipp ed
with open shelvin g where the functio nal ware is display ed,
is accessible to custom ers. Almost all of the Kuchs' work
is sold throug h their two shops (the other is operate d in
Nurem berg'l. The shops are staffed by appren tices and
assistants who take turns weekly. Occasi onal sales are
made throug h exhibit ions, held primar ily for exposu re
at Germa n gallerie s and museum s.
Willy turned to workin g with clay becaus e the materia l
fascina ted him, and taught himsel f by trial and error.
Ell} was in trainin g to be a goldsm ith in Nurem berg when
she met Willy. "So," said Elly, "we put our ignoran ce
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Left Willy and Elly Kuch.
Above White, glazed sculptural [orm,
wheel-thrown and altered units of red
stoneware, by Elly Kuch.
Right White, glazed bowl, stoneware with
iron oxide on-glaze decoration, 16 inches in
diameter, by Willy Kuch.
..
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togethe r." There was no technic al inform ation on ceramics availab le in Germa ny after the war and potters trying
to becom e establis hed guarde d their own formul as and
method s. Even today there are not many opport unities to
get inform ation in Germa ny except at the beginn ing or
appren tice level.
The Kuchs work with a variety of clays includi ng Dutch
and Germa n stonew are, and a comme rcial porcela in
which is sometim es altered with twenty per cent kaolin
grog. For large archite ctural murals and sculptu ral forms,
stonew are is mixed with conside rable coarse grog.
Most of the Kuchs' work begins with a method or
techniq ue which leads to a series of objects . Extrud ed
coils are a curren t theme and some of the finishe d works
of bent, pressed , or partial ly rolled shapes resemb le toy
train panora mas, or a fantasy forest. Elly has also worked
with the transfo rmatio n of thrown , closed forms into
rock-li ke organic sculptu re throug h hand alterati ons or
rolling. While some of the surface s may appear paddle d,
she refuses use of this method , feeling that it causes an
excessi vely hard-lo oking surface . These forms with "included air," as Elly describ es them, are secured in clusters
only by glaze.
Some of the Kuchs' large floor vases, planter s, and
bottles are constru cted from bodies made of slabs sliced
from a block of clay, and combin ed with thrown necks.
Elly discove red the sliced slabs were more interes ting
when the wire was drawn with an up and down motion ,
making waves on the slab surface s. Gradua lly the waves
were made deeper until they eventu ally evolve d into pure
sculptu re. The slabs are origina ted by tampin g clay into
a woode n frame to produc e a thick block. The frame is
remove d, the edges of the block squared , and sliced. When
the top slice is inverte d, a mirror image of the texture is
reveale d. "For me, it's always surpris ing to open this
(block) . You never can be sure it will have an interes ting
surface . You cannot repeat it . . . .
This momen t is the
most interes ting point of the work."
Willy uses many glaze techniq ues, but copper reds and
celadon s are spraye d on, and others like the ash glaze are
applied by dipping and pouring . When he decora tes ware,
he sprays a glaze coating that dries to a hard surface . The
neck and foot are then banded with red iron oxide wash.
The design is sometim es started by spatter ing oxide and
develo ping the ensuing pattern . With flat brushes and
rapid strokes, using the side of the brush for broad marks
Right The pottery 's display room exhibit s a variety o[
the Kuchs" work.
Below, right Assistants loading one o[ the
electric kilns.
Below Appren tices and assistants [orm most o[ the
produc tion ware.
Below, far right Willy checks the extensi ve
instrum entatio n on a comme rcial gas kiln.
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live
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May
1977
53
"4
1. Elly throw s clay into an open wood [rame
on a paper -cove red board .
2. The [orm is tamp ed to ~oin seams and integ rate
clay particles•
tt
.
x
3. Excess is scrap ed away and the block levele d by
drawi ng a straig htedg e over the sur[a ce.
34
CERAMICS MONTHLY
4. The paper is peele d [rom the back and the
[rame remo ved.
F
5. Edges o[ the block are trimme d,
aided by a straightedge•
6. A wire held taut betwee n the
hands is used for slicing.
7. The wire is drawn throug h with
a seesaw motion .
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; the two sections
Wire-c ut stonew are sculptu re with white glaze, 16 inches square
are sliced from one block.
May 1977
55
•k %
,~
Thro wn and altered stone ware form, 7 inches in
heigh t, with black and white crystalline glaze.
and the edge for fine lines, he comp letes the decor
ation
in a few minu tes, and then overs prays with anoth
er coat
of glaze. The oxide bleed s throu gh in firing , and
iron
spott ing from the clay comb ines with the spatte
ring.
The Kuch s' gas kiln was built three years ago
by
Reid hamm er, manu factu rers of large indus trial kilns.
By
Amer ican stand ards, it is very sophi sticat ed for
a studi o
potte ry, with instru ment ation to meas ure and
contr ol
reduc tion, raise firing temp eratu re at a specified
rate,
and an electr ical igniti on system. Ther e are six force
d-air
burne rs whic h bring the kiln to almo st Cone 12
in abou t
ten hours , with a cooli ng perio d of gener ally the
same
lengt h. Redu ction begins abou t Cone 015 and conti
nues
to the end of the firing . When the burne rs are turne
d off
at peak temp eratu re, the blowers rema in on, forci
ng air
throu gh the kiln for a rapid cooli ng cycle. Cont
rary to
the popu lar belief that slow cooli ng is neces sary
for the
devel opme nt of iron crystals or that crack ing will
occur
from rapid cooling, the Kuch s have found by exper
imen t
that this is the most effici ent way to fire their kiln
each
Mond ay, Wedn esday , and Frida y; to main tain this
sched 56
CERAMICS MONTHLY
ule, fast cooli ng is essential. All of their glazes used
to be
fired in the electr ic kilns and the ware was reduc
ed by
intro ducin g naph thale ne into the cham ber at
aroun d
800°C durin g the cooli ng cycle, produ cing a very
smok y
reduc tion atmo spher e.
Willy 's conti nuou s curio sity and willingness to try
differen t meth ods plus Elly's const ant intere st in
experiment ing with new techn iques , have undo ubted
ly been
impo rtant facto rs in achie ving the success they now
enjoy .
S Y L V I A H Y M A N , artist-craftsman [rom Nash ville, Tenn essee ,
has been a regular contr ibuto r to
CM since April 1963, havin g
autho red eleven articles to date.
Right "Forest," porcelain with
crackled celadon glaze, 6 inches
in height.
Below Throw n and altered
porcelain [orm with celadon
glaze, 7 inches in height.
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Anne Kingsbury
SYNOPSIS GALLERY, Winnetka, Illinois, presented a
March exhibition of works by Anne Kingsbury, of the
University of Wisconsin (Milwaukee) faculty. The artist
produced mixed media constructions of glazed stoneware
and raku combined with stitchery to form dolls, pincushions, large quilts, and clothing.
Below "A Day in the Life of a Wisconsin Potter, 1976";
stoneware tiles crocheted onto quilted, pieced leather,
this cape is approximately 6 feet in width.
Right Detail of cape segment.
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58
CERAMICS~IoNTI-ILY
,
.....
Throwing a Double-Walled Planter
by PHILIP ~VOOD
A P O T T E R often listens to project ideas from a nonpar ticipati ng but interes ted public, and many times their
vantag e point will produc e new solution s to functio nal
problem s. Such a case was my recent awaren ess of a need
among indoor -plant enthusi asts for a saucer to place
beneath a 'flower pot to collect excess water. A planter
and reservo ir can be combin ed in a variety of attracti ve
and functio nal ways. It might be a cluster of units, some
of which collect the drainag e, or a rim at the foot resembling an attache d saucer. If simplic ity is the objecti ve, an
efficien t design is an uninter rupted planter profile. Drainage could collect in a concea led basin within the planter ,
formed by two essentia lly paralle l cylinde r wails.
Such a double -walled planter is both unique and easily
thrown . Center the clay and flatten it into a low, wide
cylinde r. Instead of openin g and pulling the cylinde r
directly , leave a depress ion of three or four finger widths
across, then form a canal an inch or less from the inner
well, and widen this, creatin g two distinct walls. If the
outer wall is low and massive , the inner wall is more
accessi ble. The inner wall is pulled to a height that will
easily bridge the gap betwee n the two. Leave this inner
wall thick at the rim, with the least thickne ss at the base.
The outer wall is pulled for height and shape withou t
concern for the cylinde r contain ed inside. When the
desired exterio r profile has been achieve d, the inner wall
is flared. To avoid crackin g, the inside lip should be
slightly upturn ed and pinche d against the outer wall, but
before joining , scrape off any excess slip and keep the
seam as unlubri cated as possible. The scissor- like action of
A double-walled
planter with decorative
piercing to expose
enclosed reservoir.
*.
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3Iay 1977
59
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60
CERAMICSMONTHLY
Y
u,all concept.
A variety o[ Junctio nal planter shapes may be develop ed using the double
pinchin g the two walls togethe r and pulling them upward
seals the junctur e securely.
Foot rims may be trimme d if desired, but leave the
lower wall slightly thicker for suppor t, as the planter will
be ventila ted with a pierced design.
Cut drainag e holes, approx imately three-e lghths of an
inch across, inside the planter and into the cavity betwee n
1. The opened clay is split into two rings.
2, 3. A thick-r immed inside cylinde r is raised.
the walls. The pierced design on the outside of the pot
should be high enough that water drainin g into the
reservo ir does not overflo w throug h the excised areas.
The piercin g may be a domin ant pattern and to better
integra te it with the planter , the method can be combin ed
with vigorou s decora tive techniq ues: incising, clay application, and wax-resist.
Glazin g is simplif ied if the interio r holes are sealed with
wads of paper before pourin g the inside of the planter .
Dip the bottom half into the glaze to comple tely coat the
reservoir. Either spray or dip the upper half, then remove
the scraps of paper from the drainag e holes. The openin gs
may be cleaned with a small wire before firing.
4. The outer wall is raised [or height and contour.
5. The inside wall is flared to enclose a reservoir.
6. Cross section o[ the walls and upturn ed lip
be[ore joining .
7. Drainage holes are cut with a wire loop.
8. Decora tive piercin g opens to the drainage area.
PHILI P WOOD is a graduate o[
the Univer sity o[ Redlan ds, and
receive d a master o[ fine arts
degree [rom the Univer sity o[
Southe rn Cali[ornia. A resident o[
South Pasadena, he also teaches
and exhibit s in Cali[ornia.
May 1977
61
Booth Design at Northeast Craft Fair
LIMITED TO CRAFTSPEOPLE livin g in twelv e
north easte rn
states, the Nort heas t Craf t Fair (Rhi nebe ck,
New York )
is the largest even t of its kind in the natio n,
with whol esale and retai l sales over two milli on dolla
rs (sum mer,
1976). At the fair, boot h desig n has come
a long way
from the tradi tiona l barn boar d shelf. Disp lay
space has
evolv ed as an art in its own right , refle cting
the perso nality of the potte r and the style of his work
.
Boot hs are jurie d at the Rhin ebec k fair, "enc
oura ging
effec tive prese ntati on as an aid to mark eting
." The selection comm ittee (incl udin g ceram ists Mari lyn
Dint enfas sKatz , Raym on Eloz ua, and Allen Littl efiel
d) prese nted
awar ds to potte rs who creat ed "an envi ronm
ent that
allows the preciousness of the hand mad e
objec t to be
fully appr eciat ed."
Open to the trade begin ning June 21, this
year' s fair
will be prese nted to the publ ic June 24 throu
gh 26.
Belo w Indoor presentation o[ work by Rima Schu
lkind,
Bethesda, Maryland.
Abov e The eleventh annual Northeast Cra[t Fair
,
Rhinebeck, New York.
.
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62
CERAMICS MONTHLY
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Left An award-winning booth display
by Naomi Cabana, New York City.
Jurors wer, winners from the
previous tair.
.........
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Above Bruce Bartol's South
Mount ain Pottery display,
Middle town, Maryland.
Lel,t Anothe r award-winner, by
Malcol m Cochran and Gretchen
Stevens, North Sutton, New
Hampshire. "With approximately
150 potters in the same event, one
would assume a certain duplication,"
said Carol Sedestrom, director o[ the
[air, "(but) T h e . . . potter s.., are
simply using clay to its [ullest
potential; each cra[tsperson making
a very personal and individual
statement in the way he, or she,
handles the material."
L.
May 1977
63
Barium Glazes
Glaze Vl (Con e 1)
A somewhat translucent glaze
Bariu m C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pem co) . . . . . . . . . . .
Magnesium Carbonate .....
Alumina Hydrate ..........
Kaolin ...................
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
bv RICH ARD BEHRENS
32.6c ~
13.9
0.9
5.2
8.6
38.8
100.0 %
Gloze VII (Con e :3)
A satin mall glaze
,,ik 1~
i
AN ALKALINE-EARTH ELEMENT,
now
frequ ently inclu ded in m a n y glaze
comp ositio ns, was ident ified in 1602 ,
but it was not until 1808 that the
Engl ish chem ist Sir H u m p h r y Davy
was able to separ ate this meta l from
its mine ral, and name d it bariu m.
Josia h Wed gwoo d used barit e, or
"hea vy spar, " a b a r i u m sulfa te mineral, in his white "jasp er" body . This
ingre dient was secre tly deliv ered from
mine to facto ry by trans porti ng the
raw ore in the early morn ing darkn ess.
W h e n the conte nts of his recip e became know n, barit e was used wide ly.
Bariu m carbo nate, a more react ive
salt, is much used by the studi o
potte r today for the quali ties of
brilli ance , hardn ess, or mattn ess it
prod uces in glaze s. A n u m b e r of
comm ercia l frits conta in signi fican t
amou nts of b a r i u m wher e it acts as
a vigor ous fluxi ng agen t.
Potte rs at times hear of the dang ers
of hand ling b a r i u m ; and of this metal's salts, bariu m carbo nate is often in
quest ion. It is a cardi ac poiso n and
inges tion of as much as a gram could
be fatal . This is quite an unlik ely
circu msta nce unde r norm al studi o situatio ns. Bariu m chlor ide is some times
used to suspe nd glaze s and is even
more toxic when inges ted. But b a r i u m
sulfa te is so very insol uble that it is
exten sivel y inges ted by patie nts unde rgoing medi cal radio logy.
In any glaze of reaso nable comp osition , bariu m relea se due to conta ct
with acidi c foods is very impr obab le.
T h e high er temp eratu res to whic h
bariu m-co ntain ing glaze s are usua lly
fired puts the elem ent in a very resistant state .
T h e follo wing recip es, fired over a
range of temp eratu res, are offer ed for
64
CERA MICS MONTHLY
trial use and demo nstra te the versa tility of b a r i u m :
Glaze I (Con e 015)
A mat~" glaze
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Frit 259 ( H o m m e l ) . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonate ........
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
22.0%
52.0
10.5
7.0
8.5
100.0%
Glaze II (Con e 0S)
A clear glaze
Bariu m C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pem co) . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30.4%
49.0
4.0
16.6
100.0%
Glaze III (Con e 05)
A clear glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Frit 25 (Pem co) . . . . . . . . . . .
Sodi um Silic ofluo ride . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Add: Bent onite . . . . . . . . . . . .
30.2%
48.4
8.6
12.8
100.0 %
2.0%
Gloze IV (Con e 0SI
A clear glaze
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Frit 25 (Pem co) . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
32.2%
47.1
17.6
3.1
100.0 %
Glaze V (Con e 1)
A maff glaze
Bariu m C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Magnesium Carbonate .....
Zinc O x i d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53.4%
3.0
6.3
10.0
27.3
lOO.O%
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonate ........
Zinc O x i d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin ...................
Neph eline Syen ite . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36.8%
3.5
14.9
12.0
10.4
22.4
100.0%
The
can
1%
2%
5%
7%
follo wing color ant perce ntage s
be a d d e d to Glaz e V I I :
Coba lt Carb onat e . . . . Pale Blue
Nick el Oxid e . . . . . . Red Brow n
R e d Iron O x i d e . . . D a r k Yello w
Uranium
Oxid e . . . . . . . . M e d i u m Yello w
7% V a n a d i u m
Pen( oxide . . . . . . . . Gray Yello w
Gloze VIII (Con e SI
A smoofh rnaH" glaze
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Lithium Carbonate ........
Lepi dolit e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50.5%
6.4
34.2
8.9
1oo.o%
Add: Bent onite . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.0%
Gloze IX (Con e SI
A bright matt glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
34.2%
Zinc O x i d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pota sh Feld spar . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.8
26.8
9.5
21.7
lO0.OC/c
Glaze X (Con e 5)
A mall glaze
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Whiting ..................
Pota sh Feld spar . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26.7%
13.5
37.6
13.1
9.1
lOO.O%
Gloze XI (Con e 61
A smoo~'h mM't glaze
Bari um C a r b o n a t e . . . . . . . . .
Whiting ..................
Zinc Oxid e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaol in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Neph eline Syen ite . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.3%
11.6
2.2
17.2
18.9
31.8
100.0 %
Gloze Xll (Cone 6}
A glossy glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Strontium Carbonate .......
Whiting ..................
Kaolin ...................
N e p h e l i n e Syenite . . . . . . . . .
Flint .....................
21.5%
12.4
2.8
7.1
24.7
31.5
100.0%
G l a z e X l l l ( C o n e 6)
A smooth maff glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Whiting ..................
Zinc Oxide ...............
Kaolin ...................
N e p h e l i n e Syenite . . . . . . . . .
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
EXTR
MAKER
&HANDLE
A time saving must for professional potters.
/deal for schools. Easily makes handles,
foot rims, kiln furniture, tubes, mirror
frames, pots without o wheel and many other
forms. Savesmany times its cost in a few
months of use. Solid steel construction,
lifetime guarantee. Extruder, one-inch round
die, and two blank dies with instructions
$6S.00 F.O.B. Scott Creek.
24.0%
15.3
1.5
17.8
22.6
18.8
100.0%
*he e E,truer0*tmoke0verS0 K I T
shapes. Solids, hollow tubes from I" to Uh"
in diameter. Squares,cylinders, triangular tubes
or any combination. Blank dies available to
cut your own shapes for beads, handles, tiles,
flutes, etc. Completeset of 12 dies, inserts
and bracket $32.00 F.O.B.Scott Creek.
G l o z e X l V ( C a n e 71
A br;ghf opaque glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Magnesium Carbonate .....
Strontium Carbonate .......
Whiting ..................
Zinc O x i d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Kaolin ...................
Nepheline Syenite .........
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13.0%
1.3
4.8
13.0
1.3
4.2
29.2
33.2
Add 6°/° sales tax in Calif. Send check or money order to:
482
Swanton
POTTERY
CREEK
SCOTT
Rd. Davenport,Ca.
95017
(408)426-5091
100.0%
G l a z e XV ( C o n e 9)
A glossy glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Whiting ..................
Zinc O x i d e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Potash Feldspar ...........
Kaolin ...................
Flint .....................
22.3%
7.6
6.3
50.4
4.7
8.7
FREE BUILD ING I N S T R U C T I O N S
100.0%
G l a z e XVl ( C o n e 10)
A transluce nf glaze
Barium Carbonate .........
Strontium Carbonate .......
Whiting ..................
Potash Feldspar ...........
Kaolin ...................
Flint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
USE OUR
13.1%
10.4
6.5
28.8
10.0
31.2
oo.o%
RICHA RD BEHR ENS, one o/ our
most widely read authors, was first
published by CEaAMZCS MONTH LY in
1962, and has since presented nearly
100 topics in the fields o/ clay and
glazes. The author did undergraduate
and gradua te work at the College o/
Chemis try o/ the University o/ California; attende d the California College of Arts and Crafts, Oaklan d; and
studied at the Richm ond Art Center,
also o/ California.
DURAB LANKE T ,-
III:¢;KT HOLDS THE RAKU BUILDING
INSTRUC TIONS AND IS SHOWIN G
THE DURABLANKETTM
OUR SUPER STRO NG CERAMIC FIBER BLANKET IS
EASY TO WORK WITH. WE ALSO HAV E MANY
OTHER CERAMIC FIBER PRODUCTS FOR THE POTTER. WE ARE ABLE TO SHIP WITHIN ONE DAY OF
RECEIPT OF YOUR ORDER. (WE ARE CARBORUNDUM'S
POTTERY REPRESENTATIVE)
SUPERAMICS
GENE MUCHOW - President
(813) 937-2776
m
1613 D I X I E H I G H W A Y
H O L I D A Y , FL 3 3 5 8 9
m
May 1977
65
Precision
ELECTRIC
FRONT
KILN S
LARGE ELECTRIC KILNS--excellen
t
for bisq ue f i r i n g or glaz e firin g. ( L i m i
t
fossi l fuel use to redu ction firin g in our
gas kilns .)
[,OADERS
Fron t loadi ng kilns are supp lied with a well
insulated front open ing swing door whic
h
moves on heav y steel hinges. The door is recessed and custom fitted to the jamb s in the
kiln insur ing a tight seal when closed. Anot her
special featu re of Alpin e Fron t Load ing Elect ric
Kilns is the arch cons truct ion. The arch of the
kiln is exten ded comp letely out to the door
open ing - - thus prov iding full utiliz ation of
the insid e heigh t of the kiln. Ther e are no
"han ging Ledg es" at the door open ing to interfe re with loadi ng the kiln. Fron t loadi ng
kilns are supp lied with a comp lete floor shelf
and supp ortin g set of posts. Two peep hole
plugs are also prov ided. All of these featu res
are inclu ded in the price of the kiln and no
addit ional charg e is made for them.
J
%
o~
i
]:
/
i~ t
/
II
•
I
ill
MODE L EF-60
6 0 cu. ft.
SERIES
EF
Cone
10
WRITE TODAY for COMPLETE information
Dept. B
A.
7nc.
3 0 5 1
TORRANCE,
AREA
66
CERA MICS M O N T H L Y
CODE
F U J I T A
S T
CALIFORNIA
(213)
775.6503
/ 775.6504
R E ET
90505
/ 530-1541
ITINERARY
Continu ed [rom Page 11
Macleod Trail S.E., Calgary , T2G 2L9.
CALIFORNIA, CITY OF INDUSTRY
May 1-30 "Drinki ng Vessels, " an exhi-
Fee: $40-$50 . Deadlin e: July 20. Write:
Green Mounta in Craft Fair, William and
Holly Patrick, Director s, RD #1, Arlington 05250.
bition of ceramic cups, mugs, and goblets;
at the Westwo od Ceramic Supply gallery,
14400 Lomitas Avenue .
VERMONT~ MANCHESTER
October 1-2 Craftpro ducers Craft Fair
CALIFORNIA~EMERYVILLE
through May 22 An exhibiti on of ce-
at Bromley is open to 50 exhibito rs. Fee.
Juried by slides. Deadlin e: July 1. Write:
Riki Moss, Craftpro ducers, Inc., Box 92,
Readsbo ro, Vermon t 05350.
ramics by Kiyo Yano and Romilla Batra;
at Eutectic Gallery.
CALIFORNIA, LIVERMORE
May 1-31 An exhibiti on of pottery and
weaving by Bob and Sharon Gardner ; at
Livermo re Art Associa tion Gallery, Third
and K Streets.
CALIFORNIA~LOS ANGELES
through June 19 "The Art of the
Manchu s," includes porcelai n and overglaze enamel ware of the Ch'ing dynasty
(A.D. 1644-19 12) ; the Los Angeles County
Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd.
CALIFORNIA~OAKLAND
through May 12 An exhibiti on of ceramics by Laura Andreso n; at Holy Names
Continu ed on Page 68
VERMONT, MOUNT SNO~,V
October 7-10 2nd Annual Festival of
Craft is open to 50-70 craftsme n. Fee.
Juried by slides. Deadlin e: July I. Write:
Riki Moss, Craftspr oducers , Inc., Box 92,
Readsbo ro, Vermon t 05350.
WASHINGTON, TEITON
July 9-10 The Teiton Square Art Fair
is open to all craftsme n. Space is limited
to 50 artists. Fee: $7.00. 10% commis sion. Deadlin e: July 1. For further information write: Betty Dilley, Teiton Friends
of the Library, Box 100, Teiton 98947.
~=
WASHINGTON, YAKIMA
July 2-4 2nd Annual Whistlin ' Jack
Lodge Festival is open to ceramist s. Fee:
$25-$35 . Juried by slides. Deadlin e: June
15. Write: Ruth Wyman Reese, 4210
Terrace Heights Road, Yakima 98901.
TEACHERS
EFER
~
WEST VIRGINIA, CHARLE STON
June 5 Rhodode ndron State Outdoor
Art and Craft Association Festival is
open to all craftsmen. Cash and purchase
awards. Fee: $5.00. Entry deadline and
work due June 5. For further information
write: Eleanor Chandler, President, 3804
Noyes Avenue Southeast, Charleston 25304..
WISCONSIN, MILWAUKEE
July 30-31 Art Fair U.S.A. 2nd Annual
Exhibiti on open to craftsme n over 18. Fee:
$30. New exhibito rs must submit 5 slides,
resume, and S.A.S.E . Deadlin e: June
I. Write: Dennis R. Hill, Director , 1655
S. 68th St., West Allis, Wiscons in 53214.
WYOMING, CHEYENNE
June ll-]uly 1 9th Annual Craftsm an
Exhibit is open to ceramist s. Juried. Fee:
$5 for 3 entries. Deadlin e: June 6. Write:
Cheyenn e Artists' Guild, 1010 East 16th
Street, Cheyen ne 82001.
WHERE TO GO
ALASKA, ANCHORAGE
June l-Augus t 31 Mariett a College
Crafts Nationa l '75 Touring Exhibiti on;
at Alaska State Council on the Arts, 360
"K" Street, Suite 240.
ALBERTA, CALGARY
May 14-15 Demons trations and discus-
sions by 12 guest lecturer s, includin g Paul
Soldner and Marilyn Levine. Registra tion:
$35. Write: Division of Continu ing Education, Educati on Centre Building , 515
Try Mayco Colors I . - - , ~ , , o~,u ~ why. Jnere nas n ~ r
been a more versatile, more thoroughly tested spectrum of
Glazes , Underglazas, One Strokes, Accent s and Stains.
With Mayco, tllere's no need to divert precious creativ e
time and energy into the often frustrating work of coming
up with that just-right color. Mayco, produc er of Americ a's
fine.st colors, has a glaze or combination for every purpose
and cerami c piece. They're homogenized for easier application and fire at Cone 06. Send for your free color chart.
Dealerships Available
May
1977
67
ITINERARY
Continued [rom Page 67
Colleg e, Kenn edy Art Galler y, 3500 Moun tain Boule vard.
firing results t,me aftert~me.
You will get greater enjoyment from your
hobby, have a better product, discover your
kilns personality and better understand the
effect firing has on your ware.
The Orton 3 cone system uses three cones in
sequence. The "Guide Cone" is one number
cooler and the "Guard Cone" one number
hotter than the "Firing Cone."
When the Guide cone starts to bend, your ware
is approaching maturity. Deformation of the
firing cone tells yo_uthatfiring, is atthe correc!
CALIFORNIA) SIERRA .~IADRE
May 21-22 The 15th Annu al Sierra
Madr e Art Fair; at Memo rial Park.
CALIFORNIA~ SUNNYVALE
May 7-8 "An Art Affair ," featur ing
ceram ics; at Sunny vale Comm unity Cente r.
COLORADO, GREELEY
]une 13-15 The Natio nal Counc il on
Educa tion for the Ceram ic Arts 1977
confe rence ; at the Unive rsity of North ern
Color ado. For furthe r inform ation write:
Herb Schumacher, NCECA Program
Chair man, Art Depar tment , Unive rsity of
North ern Color ado, Greel ey 80639 .
CONNECTICUT~ C ORNxA'AI.L
May 29-30 Conne cticut Craft Profes sional s Sprin g Mark et 1977; at the Mohawk Moun tain Ski Lodge .
CONNECTICUT~ GUILFORD
May lS-]une 26 "Utili craft, " a show of
functi onal crafts for the home ; at Guilfo rd
Hand craft Cente r, 405 Churc h St.
G a r e is d r e s s e d to kiln
in stainless steel jackets and a 2-year factory warr:mty on electric
al components. C h o c k
Gate's net prices before you
make your next kiln
purchase trod make a ldlling.
•
.
.
Gare Cera mic Supp ly Co., Inc.
P.O. Box
830, Haverhill,
Mass.
01830
$30.0 0 will brincj you p o s t p a i d . • •
100 I N D I A N T A N R A W H I D E
THONG
STRA PS, 72-;nc hes
LEATHER
long. Can
be cur for hangin g potter y and ceram ics.
Sampl e on reques t. 2 ~or $1.00
K L E C K N E R ' S SUPP LY C O .
23-11 Cornaqa Ave., Far Rockaway, N.Y.
A
CAL IFOR NIA
COU NTR Y
POT TER Y
L ¢, L K I L N S
• . . the most complete
line!
The only kilns with patent ed DYNA- GLOW
elemen t holders. Write for information.
k and L MANU FACTU RING GO., Box 348
144 Conthe ster Rd., Twin Oaks, Pa. 19104
AL
BOL TON
A BEAU TIFUL , POWE RFUL AND
EXTR AORD INAR Y ACCO UNT OF
THE SPIRI TUAL JOUR NEY OF
THE POTT ER. CLAY S, KILN S,
POTS , WOOD ASH GLAZ ES. 57
COLO R PLAT ES. HAND BOUN D.
$20. POST PAID FROM
THE CENTER PRESS, BOX 54,
MENDOCINO, CA 95460 .
68
11691
CERA MICS MON THLY
KK
KRAF T
KORN ER
,'AristocratofCrafts"
New
Cafalocjue $2.00
10% discount with first $i0 order or more
Complete line of supplies fort
Decoupage Macra me Beade dFlower
s Painting
Leaded Glass "role Painting Enameling $ilver~
mithing
Marge Wennerstrom
Phone:
5864 Mayfield Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44124 442-102
0
Mont h
of May ~ 10%
With This Ad
Sale
CONNECTICUT, WESTPORT
May 28-29 The 1977 Westp ort Hand crafts Fair; Staples High School, North Ave.
FLORIDA) BOCA RATON
May lO-]une 3 Annu al Stude nt Juried
Show, includ ing ceram ics; at Florid a Atlantic Unive rsity Art Galler y.
ILLINOIS~ CHICAGO
]une 4-5 The Seven th Annu al Linco ln
Squar e Arts and Crafts Fair; at Linco ln
Squar e.
ILLINOIS~ EDVCARDSVILLE
May 2-Jun e 4 "Illin ois Clayw orks," a
show of facult y and studen t ceram ics; Opapi Galler y, South ern Illino is Unive rsity•
ILLINOIS, EVANSTON
May 1-]une 17 Ruth Duck worth : Porcelain and Stone ware Sculp tures; at Exhibit A, 1708 Centr al Street .
ILLINOIS, HOME%VOOD
June 11-12 Ridge Art Assoc iation juried show; at Wash ington Squar e Mall,
177th at Halste d Street .
ILLINOIS) NORTHBROOK
May 6-8 The Fourt h Annu al Midw est
Craft Festiv al, spons ored by North Shore
Art Leagu e; at North brook Court .
ILLINOIS, PEKIN
May 6-8 "Moth er of the Year Show
and Sale" ; Pekin Mall.
INDIANA, ANDERSON
June 17-19 "Inter nation al Conve ntion
Fine Crafts and Arts Occas ion"; at
Mounds Mall.
MASSACHUSETTS, LEXINGTON
May 7 Lexing ton Ceramics Guild Pottery Sale; at the Lexington Arts and Crafts
Society, 130 Walth am Street.
NEW JERSEY, BOONTON
3Iay 6-8 Carria ge House Crafts 6th
Annua l Crafts Show; at Kings land-M iller
House, 445 Vreela nd Avenue.
INDIANA, INDIANAPOLIS
June 11-12 The 22nd Annual Talbot
Street Art Fair; on Talbot St. near the
Herron School of Art.
-~'IASSACHUSETTS, WORCESTER
May 20-2l The Seventh Annual Worcester Craft Fair; at Worcester Craft
Center , 25 Sagamore Road.
NEw JERSEY, LAYTON
May 7-June 12 "Rakn ," third national
exhibi tion; Peters Valley Craft Gallery,
Delaware Water Gap Nation al Park.
INDIANA+ LAFAYETTE
May 13-15 "Tippe canoe Springfest of
Fine Crafts and Arts," Tippec anoe Mall.
May 28 "Roun d the Fount ain" Art
Fair; at the Courthouse Square.
-X'IICHIGAN, ~ASON
May 1-22 Two-m an exhibition includes
glass works by Craig Howe ll; at the Sycamore Gallery, 538 N. Cedar Street.
KANSAS, LAXVRENCE
2llay 1-29 "The May Show," with ceramics ; The Gallery, 745 New Hampshire.
KENTUCKY~ BEREA
May 19-22 The llth Spring Fair of the
Kentu cky Guild of Artists and Crafts men;
at Indian Fort Theate r.
~'IISSOURI, KANSAS CITY
through May 28 "Func tional Potter y"
by Stuart Loten.
June 4-25 "Fragm ent Labyr inths" by
Marga ret Stark; both at Good Earth
Clays, Inc., 3054 Southwest Botdevard.
~IARYLAND~ FREDERICK
May 31-June 5 The Frederick Craft
Fair; at the Freder ick Fairgrotmds.
MISSOURI, ST. I.ouis
May l-June 1 "Meta l and Clay" includes ceram ic forms by David Hershey.
June 5-29 "Weav ing and Ceramics,"
exhibition inchtdes stoneware and porcelain by Don Pilche r; both at Craft Alliance Gallery, 6640 Delma r Blvd.
MARYLAND~ SILVER SPRING
May 21 Montg omery Potters Spring
Sale; at St. Stephens Luther an Chnrc h,
11612 New Hamp shire Avenue.
NEVADA~ VIRGINIA CITV
May 28-30 4th Annua l Gold Hill Art
Festiv al; at the Gold Hill Potter y and
Art Gallery, Gold Hill.
NEW XIExICO, TAOS
AIay
7-June
1
Ceramics by Carol
Whitney.
June 4-July 2 "Clay Forms" by Ralph
Pardln gton; at Clay and Fiber Gallery.
NEW *IEXICO~ TUCUMCARI
June 4-5 4th Annual Arts and Crafts
Fair; at the Quay Count y Exhibit Center.
NEW YORK, ELMIRA
3Iay 21-22 "Arts in the Park"; at Mark
Twain Riverf ront Park.
NEW YORK, IRVINGTON-ON-HuDsON
Westcbester Craftsal; The Carria ge
Festiv
sance
men's Renais
House, Lyndhurst.
Septem ber 16-18
NEW YORK, ITHACA
May 5-7 Spring Craft Fair; at MemoContin ued on Page 70
POTTER'S PRIDE
NEW CERAMICS
"-"-",
Kiln Kits
Kiln s
/111
-
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C O N E 10
Not. or L.P. Go$
Kiln Kits
4 cubic f t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8 cubic f f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12 cubic ff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WRITE
FOR
LITERATURE
A-! KILN MANUFACTURERS
369 MAIN STREE T
RAMO NA, CALIF ORNIA 92065
PHON E (714) 789 - 3310
$280.
$350.
$495.
by Eileen Lewen stein
and Emman uel Coope r
This unique volume offers the potter
a comprehensive survey of current
~rends in studio pottery the world
~ver. There are 240 illustrations - - 16
n full c o l o r - providing a record of
globe:
studio pottery from practlcalJy every corner of the
Ger,
Belgium
d,
Hollan
,
France
navia,
Great Britain, Scandi
Bulgaria,
many, Switzerland, Austria, Italy, Spain, Portugal,
slovakia,
Hungary, Yugos/avia, Poland, Rumania, USSR, Czecho
AmeriSouth
a,
Canad
India,
Africa,
Israel,
,
Greece, Turkey
States.
ca, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and the United
ed,
display
is
country
each
from
Repre;entative studio pottery
teln
Lewens
Eileen
potters
British
by
ntary
comme
e
along with
Review
and Emmanuel Cooper, who are co-editors of Ceramic
$22.50
pages
224
ver;
Hardco
magazine.
!
! ..........................................................
CERAM ICS MONT HLY Book Depar tment
Box 12448, Columbus, Ohio 43212
@ $22.50 each.
Please send me _ _ cop;es of NEW CERAM ICS per copy Sales Tax)
I enclose [ ] Check [ ] M.O. (Ohio: add 90c
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Addres s . . . . .
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_Zip_
Afay
1977
69
Nearly a Quarter of a C ntury
of Qual ty...For Those Who
Demand the Very Best.
ITIN ERAR Y
Contin ued from Page 69
rial Room, Cornel l Univer sity.
NEw YORK, N E W YORK
May 6-21 A group show with cerami cs
by Joe Stallon e and Jim Johnst on; at
Waver ly Studio s, 153 Waver ly Place.
May 13-21 "Potte r's Kitche n," a group
show featuri ng works by the Greenw ich
House Potters and Sculpt ors; at Greenwich House Pottery , 16 Jones Street.
$250.00 F.O.B. Crestllne, Ohio
FEATURES:
. 30" x 30" x S", 14 g a . rust-proofed
steel pan • 13" cast iron throwing head.
e 100 lb. 20" flywheel • Height - - 36"
e Trim bar for foot rimming • Constructed of IV2" x IV2" x 3/16" angle
iron • All seven points of action are
precision ball bearin~J • Handsome hammer finished pan wlfh black stand • Hip
rest [non-adjustable).
H.B, KLOP i I IN & SONS
NEW SOURCE OF
POTTERS' SUPPLIES
IN THE
DELAWARE VALLEY
Close to 309 Expwy. & Pa. Tpk.
ORTON CONES
L & L KILNS
KEMPER TOOLS
DINACK WHEELS
KINGSPIN TURNTABLES
WALKER JAMAR PUG MILLS
AMERICAN POTTERSWHEELS
NORMAN KILNS & EQUIPMENT
CORKS - SPONGES - BRUSHES
PREPARED LEAD FREE GLAZES
GLAZE CHEMICALS & COLORANTS
STANDARD CERAMIC MOIST CLAYS
A R C H T . FLOW ER CO.
POTTERS~.SUPPLIES
QUEEN ST ~,L!;~,'Y~til~ ROAD
.... 7-PHILADI/LPHL~ P,A.~19118
NEW YORK , POUND RIDGE
May 21-22 The Sevent h Annua l Gallery in the Park Art and Crafts Festiv al;
at the Town Park.
NEw YORK , ROCHE STER
May 31-July I0 "Far Easter n Art in
Upstat e New York," an exhibit ion including cerami cs; at Memo rial Art Gallery .
N E w YORK, SCARSDALE
May 17, 18, 25 Handb uilding with
differe ntly colored clays, a worksh op conducted by Elizab eth MacDo nald.
May 19-20 "Redu ction Produc tion," a
worksh op with Phillip White.
May 26-27 and June 2-3 Makin g and
using slip molds and press molds, a workshop with Robert Sedest rom.
June 6-10 Monum ental Ceram ic Sculpture, a worksh op with Jeff Schlan ger (outdoors, weathe r permit ting).
June 13-15 Portfol io Photog raphy, a
worksh op with Lou Garbus . For further
inform ation on all worksh ops write: YMYWHA of Mid-W estche ster, 999 Wilmo t
Road, Scarsd ale 10583, or call Wayne
Kartzl nel at (914) 472-33 00.
N E W YORK , SCHENECTADY
through June 2 "Recen t Works in
Porcel ain," by Maryly n Dinten fass-K atz;
at The Schene ctady Museu m.
Imported Rough Cork STOPPERS.
These Stoppers are of the highest
quality and are available for immedia te delivery at the present
time. Please enclose check with order. We invite you to compare our
prices and quality.
TOP
DIAMETER
11/="
2"
2t/2,,
3"
311=4"
41/2"
§"
Sl/2"
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70
Hours Mon-Fri 8-5 Sat 8-12
CERAMICSMONT HLY
PRICE
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H e | g M of corks veries from 11/2" to 13~ "
Minimu m O r d e r $2S.00 F.O.B. C h i c a g o
Distrib utor Inquiries Invited
Phoenix Design Ltd.
Box 29048, Chicago, III. 60629 (312) 436.1977
OHIO INDIANA KENTUCKY
ROBERT BRENT
CRUSADER KILNS - CONE 10
L & L ECDNOKILNS ( N )
PARAGON
KEMPER TDOLS
WESTERN GLAZE S
NORTH CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILL
MOROC CAN
Hill cerami sts; at the Potter' s Choice II,
Wesley Found ation.
AMACO PRODU CTS
NORTH CAROLINA, WINSTON-SALEM
BTANOARD CERAHIC IS CLAYS
May 1-20 An exhibit ion of 25 Chape l
June 7-11 The Ameri can Crafts Coun-
cil Nation al Confer ence 1977; at Wake
Forest Univer sity. For more inform ation
write: ACC/N C '77, 44 W. 53rd Street,
New York, N.Y. 10019.
NORTH DAKOTA, MINOT
May 1-31 North Dakota Crafts Counc il
traveli ng exhibi tion; at Linha Gallery .
OHIO, COLUMBUS
June 3-5 The Greate r Colum bus Arts
Counc il Festiva l of the Arts; on Capito l
Square , South High at East Broad Street.
OHIO~ DAYTON
May 28-29 The 10th annual "Art in
Continued on Page 72
SAND GLAZE S
STOI~EWARES
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PORCELAIN
THE BEST EQUIPMENT
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the.
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MIAMI
OHIO 45243
RD,
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(513)561-4142
COMMENT
Continued /tom Page 21
work around the clock. They teach,
exhibit, and do much more. Chances
are they have many orders they cannot fill. And there is a limit to everyone's capacity in both effort and
time. So I think: "perhaps in a )'ear
I can get an order from that person,"
and file the request away and hope.
Meanwhil e, my shelves get spare and
I begin to look elsewhere . There are
very few potters that I, or anyone,
can turn to and get work from on
short notice. This raises havoc with
any kind of planning schedule, since
potters often present themselve s quite
suddenly. I have just given up planning, keeping my fingers crossed instead, hoping to produce the money
when something special comes along.
I also spend time with and buy
from very new potters who sometimes
show nothing special, but have promise. I work with them in developin g
the kinds of pottery they want to
make. It is very gratifying to see many
of them develop into strong pro-
ducers. I also have been known to
buy from craftsmen who are in dire
economic need. Sometime s I just
don't have the heart to say "no." I
think we have the responsibi lity to
encourage and help as much as we
can to get craftsmen started, and I
think our vote of confidence ---"buying
their work--at a time of doubt or
financial need, is often just what is
necessary to keep a craftsman working.
I have very loose guidelines for
what to buy for the shop, quickly
learning that few potters like specific
orders in color or number. I simply
say, "send around $500 wholesale ,"
or "send a balanced order, but go a
little heavy on casseroles and light
on planters." I also like to see slides
or examples of new things they are
working on. We seldom send things
back. That's not only because of the
monumen tal effort involved, but also
because we work with an open-ende d
policy about new items and so consider this our risk.
Packing is a nightmari sh problem.
for both craftsman and the retailer.
When things break, as they do, crafts-
men are not the only losers. The
retailer also loses sales and time in
filing the damage claim; the process
is long and tedious. UPS requireme nts
that shipping boxes with broken merchandise be kept creates tremendou s
storage problems as well.
We suggest using hard, rigid boxes.
Liquor boxes are good for shipping
pottery, as are boxes for chickens,
eggs, and bananas obtained from the
supermark et. For packing, newspape r
works fine if properly used. Never
crowd a box with too many pieces,
and make sure packing prevents
movemen t inside the box. Seal cartons
well with brown tape and twine.
We buy everything outright at the
standard wholesale discount of fifty
per cent. Some say the retailer works
harder to sell under these circumstances, and perhaps this is correct.
Some stores have consignm ent and
direct purchase, and some are strictly
consignme nt. I think consignm ent
works well only when the potter is a
beginner and is dealing with smaller
stores in a local market; when there
Continued on Page Z?
CO
WEB
Supply Compan y, Inc.
DISTRIBU TORS
FOR
A . D. Alpine, Inc. - A m a c o
Robert Brent - Cress Kilns
-
Bluebird
Debcor
-
Lockerbie Max Wheels Randall Wheels
Soldner - Shimpo West - Walker Pug Mills
And Systems
Silicon Carbide Shelves
and 13/4'' Triangular Setter Posts
For Immediate Delivery.
WEBC0 CLAYMIXER
Will mix up to 200 lb.
clay depending on body
in 15-20 mln.
ancl is self-unloading.
Neo-prene shaft seals
(Life-time guarantee)
For Free Brochure Write:
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P.O. Box 6054, Dept. CM
Tyler, Texas 75711
214/595-3 426
May 1977
71
V
LESLIE CERAMICS
SUPPLY C0.
Since 1946
TREA DLE WHE ELS
ITIN ERA RY
Continued [rom Page 70
the Park," outdoo r art fair and exhibi tion;
at the Riverb end Art Cente r, 142 Riverbend Drive.
OHIO.~ FINDLAY
through May 28 A spring time group
show of plant contai ners; at Salves on
Galler y, 111 East Crawf ord.
OHIO, MIDDLETO%%'N
May 19-June 2 A travel ing exhibi tion
featur ing the ceram ic works of Toshik o
Takae zu and region al Penns ylvani a potters; at Middl etown Fine Arts Cente r, 130
North Verity Parkw ay.
CompleCe Chemicals
Raw Ma÷erials & Equipmenf
Catalo g - $1.00
Free to Schoo ls £1 Institu tions
$
1212 San Pablo Ave.
BERKELEY, CA. 94706
(41B) 524-7363
t
t
OHIO, "I'OLEDO
May 14-15 Demo nstrat ion and lecture
by Rober t Piepen burg, author of Raku
Potter y, and funded by an Ohio Arts
Counc il grant; at Toled o Potter s Guild.
For furthe r inform ation write: Toledo
Potter s Guild, Crosby Garde ns, Box 7401,
5403 Elmer Dr., Toled o 43615 .
May 22-June 12 The 59th Annua l Toledo Area Artists Exhib ition; at The
Toled o Museu m of Art, Monro e Street at
Scottw ood Avenu e.
May 29 "Mug Comp etition " exhibi tion
and judgin g; at The Potter s Place, 6705
West Bancr oft.
The AMBIDE X. a new potter's wheel.
Actually , it's not all THAT new. It's a treadle
wheel, kicked back and forth, rather than from
side
to side. When in motion, the treadle extends
outside the frame only two inches.
• Convert s easily to left or right foot operatio
n,
• Turns clockwi se or counter clockwi se
• 1 2 cast aluminu m head
• Heavy cast iron flywhee l
• Molded fibergla s pan, 24 x 36 x 4 , removab le
for
cleaning
• Welded steel frame, painted gray
• Comme rcial-typ e ball bearing s
l e 3 0 wide, 24 deep, 34' tall, Weight 140 Ibs.
• Constru ction and movable parts guarant eed
in
normal use for 12 months
• Mail orders should be accomp anied by 2 5 %
deposit, balance C.O.D.
Price $210 fo.b. Ft. Worth. Texas, plus state
local taxes w h e r e applicab le. Price subject and
to
change without notice. $15 crating charge.
ONTARIO, DUNDAS
through ]une 6 "Vesse ls," an exhibi tion
by the Potter s' Guild of Hamil ton and
Regio n; at McMa ster Unive rsity Medic al
Centre Art Galler y.
I E'FIE
ONTARIO, KING CITY
May 6-29 "Down to Earth, " exhibi tion
by the Ontar io Potter s Assoc iation; at
King Towns hip Public Librar y.
ONTARIO, TORONTO
May 3-June 5 Porcel ain by Harla n
House : at The Craft Galler y, 346 Dunda s
Street West.
TE] [3ti ff LIUE
E]F ,LFIV
Now You Can Alac
Gsl Wsalwocd Olsy
AI Anh ows
@anllowe
ceramic
supply,
inc.
3825 Commercial N.E. 87107
Albuq., N.Mex. (505) 345-8421
72
CERAMICS i~viONTHLY
OREGON, PORTLAND
May 5-29 An exhibi tion of ceram ics by
Don Hosiki sson and Micha el Zemet kin; at
Conte mpora ry Crafts Assoc iation, 3934
S.W. Corbe tt Ave.
PENNSYLVANIA, BUCKI NGHAM
June 16-18 Bucks Count y Guild of
Crafts men Spring Craft Fair and Sale; at
Tyro Hall, Route 413 and 202.
PENNSYLVANIA, JEN KINTO~,VN
through June 30 A mixed media show
featur ing craftsm en from across the country; at The Craft Conne ction, 122 Old
York Road.
PENN SYL~,-ANIA, LANCASTER
May 12-14 The Cones toga Valley Chap-
Contin ued on Page 75
•
•
•
•
•
BLENDED & BASIC CLAYS
FRITS AND GLAZE STAINS
LEAD FREE CERAMIC GLAZES
SPONGES, HANDLES & BRUSHES
MOROCCAN SAND GLAZES
•
•
•
•
•
KEMPER TOOLS
OHAUS SCALES
CORKS 11/2' ' - 6"
KILN ACCESSORIES
OSCAR PAUL & SKUTT WHEELS
• LOCKERBIE KICK WHEELS
• SHIMPO WHEELS
Comp lete 60 Page Catalo g
"Try us for those
hard.t o-find items. "
C A T A L O G S1.00
(Free To Schools & Instifufi ons)
COMMENT
Continued [rom Page 71
is quick and easy access, it's workabl e.
But at a distance , where things may
get lost and commun ication breaks
down, it become s very difficult . T h e
exceptio n would be higher priced exhibition work for special gallery showings, but not for general store sales.
We sell at a one hundred per cent
markup , with slight addition s to cover
shipping . T o sell for any less would
reduce the profit margin to almost
nothing . I think potters should know,
if they don't realize already, that
most luxury and specialt y stores have
a markup of at least one hundred per
cent, often double that or more. On
our markup we must bear all overhead expense s includin g travelin g,
salaries, rent. utilities, and advertis ing.
T h e problem of "cash-fl ow" and
"tight money" often makes it difficul t
to pay a craftsm an on delivery . In
an), normal business situatio n, the
wholesa le buyer expects credit and
we expect thirty days. We honor that
to the day, and have seldom with-
held paymen t beyond that time. I
know that potters have "front end"
expense s, but so do we and, proportionatel y, they are conside rably higher. I truly sympath ize when someon e
says their gas bill is due, but potters
must realize that facing overhea d is
part of being in business and is very
much their own problem .
When I am not expectin g a delivery, or a craftsm an sends us a
COD, or shows up unexpec tedly with
work that simply has to be bought,
it puts us in a pinch. Very few businesses operate with excess cash and
we are no exceptio n. If we receive a
first order from a craftsm an and he
has been stung or doesn't know us,
I can underst and a C O D delivery
as long as we are notified that it is
coming. But after working togethe r
and proving our mutual good faith,
I think thirty-d ay credit is reasonable. It's harder to work in cash when
other areas of heavy purchas ing have
credit.
We buy bolts of fabric with mostly
sixty-da y credit and only a few have
as short as thirty days. Most have two
per cent discoun ts for prepaym ent.
Books have an automa tic prepaym ent
discoun t, and credit runs from thirty
to sixty days. Once credit is established, C O D is just not accepta ble
business practice .
This is just another way in which
a craft partners hip should work. We
try to underst and the problem s of
craftsm en, the emergen cies that arrive when, for example , a kiln doesn't
fire properly . All we ask in retailing
is that the craftsm en realize that
we're both on the same side, working
togethe r to sell handcra fted work.
The more we try to underst and each
other, the happier and more successful all our lives will be.
JOAN FARRE LL is eoowner o/ Appalachiana, with stores located in
Bethesda and Easton, Maryland: and
Alexandria, Virginia. John Coyne, a
resident of IFashington, D.C., has
authored or edited numerous books
including By Hand, A Guide to
Schools and a Career in Crafts. and
The Penland School of Crafts "Book
of Potter),.
co
herirq
GAS KILNS
I
Attention!! Potters, Schools
T/RED OF ALL THE FUSS AND
MUSS OF MIX/N G YOUR OWN
GLAZE BASES? TRY OURS AT
A PRICE Y O U CAN' T BEAT/fl
CONE 5
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-!;6001 White Gloss ~6006 Semi-Clear Matt
For detail ed inform ation on downd rafts,
updra fts and CKC Kiln Kits, rangi ng
in size from ] to 31 cubic feet, write for
y o u r f r e e c o p y of o u r n e w c a t a l o a .
CONE 10
16 Clear Gloss
G Matt
MG 2 Whlfe Matt
Turquoise Muff
Tan Maff
Temmoku (Iron Red)
Chun
Waxy Matt
PM Eggshell
ALL GLAZES LEAD FREE
AMOUNTS FROM 1 ~ to 1000~
$HERRY 'S ~ the one stop shopping place for
all your ceramic and enameling needs!
Catalogs ava;I. $1.00 (FREE fo Schools, InsHfufions &
Millfary). LIBERALD[scounfSheeH
WRITE DEPT. CM, ATTN: ED SHERRY for into.
Full line of Copper Enamellnq Supplies Too.
948
WASHINGTON
ST - S A N
CARLOS-CALIF
94070
c415, 5922333
May 1977
73
CERAMIC GLAZES
by Cullen W. Parmelee. A care fully revis
edition of one of the standard texts ed
on
glazes. If is a comprehensive study of every
aspect of the subject with clear, concise
explanations. An essential reference. $18.5
0
PENLAND BOOK OF POTTERY
MAKING POTTERY WITHOUT A WHEEL
by F. Carlt on Ball end Janice Lovoos.
This
richly illustrated book covers every phas
of hand build ing and decorating clay piece e
s.
No book covers the subject of texture
form so effec tively . If is a book and
every
teach er should have.
$15.95
FINDING ONE'S WAY WITH CLAY
by Paulus Berensohn. This unique book
a new approach to making pots. It offers
clear, readable, and defin itive book is a
on
making pots using the pinch method.
$9.95
PIONEER POTTERY
by Michael Cardew. The main purpose
of
this book is to help craftsmen who want
to
make poHe ry using natural materials witho
depe nding on customary sources of supp ut
ly.
Covers clays, glazes, kilns.
$15.00
CERAMIC FORMULAS:
THE COMPLETE COMPENDIUM
by John W. Conrad. This very useful
contains over 700 tested formulas for
bodies and gazes in all fir;ng ranges.
tures special coded color charts.
$
text
clay
Fea0.95
ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY
OF PRACTICALPOTTERY
by Robert Fournler. This work is exha
in scope and deta l. There are nearly ustive
entries which are listed alpha betic ally, 1200
and
over 450 illustrations.
$14.95
HANDBOOK OF DESIGNS AND DEVICES
by
Clarence Hornung. Over 1800 sketc
of basic designs and variations including hes
circle, line, scroll, fret, shield, snow crystthe
als
and many more useful symbols.
$2.50
CERAMIC DESIGN
CERAMIC SCIENCEFOR THE POTTER
by Bernard Leach. Now in its eighteenth
American editio n, this book should be in
the
libra ry of every potte r.
$15.00
HAMADA, POTTER
by Bernard Leach. This well-crafted volum
contains 80 biogr aphic al photos and an e
impressive section of 40 full-p age color photo
s
of ware, a selection of ware in black
and
white, and six pages of sketc hes.
$50.00
THE POTTER'S CHALLENGE
by Bernard Leach. This text contains
an
analysis of a pot and the hallmarks
sound design. There ;s also an evalu of
essay on a selection of ware by histoative
rical
and contemporary poflers, including Leac
h's
own work.
$10.00
NEW CERAMICS
by Eileen Lewenste;n and Emmanuel Coop
This unique volume offers the potte r a er.
comprehensive survey of current trends in studi
o
potte ry the world over. There are 240
illustrations ~ 16 in full color.
$22.50
PRE-COLUMBIAN DESIGNS FROM PANAMA
by Samue K. Lothrop. This useful book
conrains a comp ilatio n of designs and motif
represented on potte ry specimens unea s
rthed
in excavations in central Panama.
$3.50
CERAMICS
by Glenn C. Nelson. A complete
o
handbook for the potter. Properties, studi
preparation and form ing of clay are cove
in deta il, along with basic infor matio red
n on
decorating, glazing, and firing .
$14.95
SELLING YOUR CRAFTS
THE KILN BOOK
by W. G. Lawrence. The best source
infor matio n on producing flameware for
ovenware, complete wlfh body and and
formulas. A technical volume wrifle nglaze
for
those having no science background. $10.9
5
Orde r Form
A POTTER'S BOOK
by Norb ert N. Nelson. This book leads
you
through the actual stages necessary
successfully what you produce. Coversto sell
such
diverse channels of sales as wholesale, retai
l.
mail orde r and specialty markets.
$3.95
by John B. Kenny. Com plete instruction
methods of form ing and deco ratin g wares for
given, with step-by-step photos to guide are
the
designer along the way.
$9.95
[
Nine master potters of The Penland Scho
ol
of Craft s demonstrate their methods
working with clay and include glaze form of
ulas, sources of supply, etc.
$12.95
SHOJI HAMADA, A POTTER'S WAY
by Frederick L. Olsen. Covers in deta
il
both the technical and aesthetic
cts
of kin construction and firing . Wriffaspe
en ;n
a style that ;s easy to follo w and infor
matively illustrated. Paperback.
$8.95
~
We Pay Post age
BOOK DEPARTMENT Box 12448, Columbus,
Ohio 43212
I ~ Bell Pottery SIS 9S
Bere'~sohn--Finding $9.%
Cardew~Ptoneer $15.00
I ~ . . . . ~--*ormulas '10 %
I"--I Kanny~Design $9.9S
~'~ Lawrence--Science$10.9S
~:~ Leach~Potter's Book SIS.
~:~ Leach-Hamada $S0"00
Fourn|er--Dicfionary$14,95~I~ Leach
I
I
[
ADD RES S
CITY
~
STATE
ZIP
. . . . . . . .
one" Order
! enclose L-] ~flec
u I Im y
IOhio residents: add 4% Sales Tax)
74
Penland Book~12u.95
......
CERA MICS MON THL Y
I
[
I
,
95
I'ellrS °fl--° n°ll namaua ,~.
pi.panburg--Raku $12.%
Rhod es~l ay & Glazes $12.50
Rhodes--Kilns $10.00
Rhodes--Stoneware$7.S0
r~ Rlegger--Raku$1S.%
. . . . .
by Susan Peterson. Contains a weal
deta il abou t Hamada's forming, glazing,th of
and
firing techniques and includes a very usefu
l
glossary-index. A grea t gift.
$15.95
RAKU POTTERY
by Robert Piepenburg. This outstanding
text
effec tively covers the basic informatio
raku. A very pract;cal guide containingn on
struction on clays, glazes, kilns, firing , andina
chapter on safety precautions.
$12.95
CLAY AND GLAZES FOR THE POTTER
by Daniel Rhodes. This revised editio n
rs
all the fundamentals of clays and glazecove
s. An
impo rtant reference source.
$12.50
KILNS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION
& OPERATION
by Daniel Rhodes. Everything you
to
know abou t kilns - - setting up, firingneed
types
--is descrlbed and demonstrated. , $10.
00
STONEWARE AND PORCELAIN
by Daniel Rhod es Describes techniques
mater als used in high-fire potte ry. Incluand
sections on clay bodies, glazes, colors, des
textures and decoration.
$7.50
RAKU: ART & TECHNIQUE
by Ha Riegger. The first complete
on
Raku. Covers clay and glaze prepbook
aration,
kiln build ing and firing techniques. $15.9
5
THE WORLD OF JAPANESECERAMICS
by Herb ert Sanders. This handsome
illustrates the forming and deco ratin g book
cesses and the unique tools used by propotters of Japan. Includes glaze formu the
las,
color charts, and American equivalent
s of
Japanese glaze compositions.
$17.50
GLAZES FOR SPECIAL EFFECTS
by Herb ert Sanders. Covers the theor
prod uctio n of crystals in glazes, the y and
nique of copp er reduction glazes, thetechaccumulation and use of ash for wood
plant ash glazes, and embellishments and
such
as luster and underglaze decoration. $14.9
5
POTTERY DECORATION
by Thomas Sharer. Focusing exclusively
the deco rative aspects of pottery, th;s on
helpfu text presents descriptive and expla
natory inter preta tion of materials, tools
, and
techniques used to embellish clay.
$15.95
CERAMICS
[-~ Nelson--Ceramics $14.95
[ ] Nelson--Selllng Crafts $3.%
~-~ Olsan~Kiln Book $8.95
~:~ P,rmelee--Glaz.s $I 8.SB
--Challenge$10.00 __ ~
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Dasi ns $2.S 0
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by the editors of Suns et magazine.
An
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those
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carry the reader through basic handbuild cts
and throwing techniques using a minim ing
um
of tools and equipment.
$2.45
THE CRAFTSMAN'SSURVIVAL MANUAL
by Geor ge and Nancy WeHlaufer.
This
manual is directed to those potters
wish to make a full- or part-time I;vlng who
their craft . Contains practical businessfrom
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$3.45
THE INVISIBLE CORE
A POTTER'S LIFE AND THOUGHTS
by Marg uerit e Wild enha in. A very
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book in which the author offers herread
ophy and strong opinions abou t artphilosand
artists, art education, and nature. $12.5
0
ITINER ARY
House, on State Route 138.
Continued /rom Page 72
ter of the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen
2nd Annual Spring Sale; at the Park
City Mall.
May 1-June 5 Spring Craft Exhibition,
sponsored by the Pennsylva nia Guild of
Craftsmen : at Franklin and Marshall College, Dana Room Gallery.
PENNSYLVANIA, PITTSBURGH
through May 12 Carved Stoneware by
Tom White.
May 15-June 9 "Comments on the
Bowl," ceramics by Ed Eberle; both at the
Clay Place, 5600 Walnut Street.
May 27-June 5 Three Rivers Arts Festlval: at Gateway Center.
June 12-July 7 Ceramics by Ruth
Strick; The Clay Place, 5600 Walnut St.
QUEBEC, MONTREAL
May 6-29 "Essential Elements," a show
of ceramics by Tony Bloom, Les Manning,
and Annemari e Schmid-Esler; at Centre
Des Arts Visuels, 350 Victoria Ave.
RHODE ISLAND, KINGSTON
May 13-26 The Fourth Annual Rhode
Island Earthworks Exhibition ; presented
at South County Art Association, Helme
SOUTH CAROLINA~CHARLESTON
May 1-31 Marietta College Crafts National '75 Touring Exhibition ; at Gibbs
Art Gallery.
SOUTH CAROLINA, CONVERSE
May 7-June 5 "XII" an exhibition by
tweh,e women artists, featuring ceramics;
at Converse Studios.
~FENNESSEE, CHATTANOOGA
June l l-]uly 10 "Contemp orary Crafts
of the Americas," Smithsonian traveling
exhibition ; at Hunter Museum of Art,
10 Bluff View.
"]'EXAS, EL PASO
May 8-29 El Paso Designer Craftsmen
1977 Biennial Exhibition ; at the El Paso
Museum of Art, 1211 Montana Ave.
TEXAS, SAN ANTONIO
June 18-19 The Southwest Craft Center
Annual Outdoor Festival; at The Southwest Craft Center, 300 Augusta Street,
San Antonio.
TEXAS, WASHINGTON
through June 1 "Texas Pottery: Caddo
The "KICKER"
Indian to Contempo rary"; at the Star of
the Republic Museum.
VERMONT, MIDDLEBURY
May 7-June 18 "Reflections," an exhibition of blown and stained glass, and
reflective things; at the Vermont State
Craft Center, Frog Hollow.
VIRGINIA~ ALEXANDRIA
May 6-30 The Washington Kiln Club
Annual Juried Members' Show; at The
Scope Gallery in the Torpedo Factory.
VIRGINIA, RICHMOND
June 2-12 Richmond Craftsman 's Guild
Biennial Craft Exhibit; at the Slip Craft
Gallery, 1312 E. Cary Street.
WASHINGTON, EDMONDS
June 17-19 The 20tb Annual Arts
Festival; at Holy Rosary School.
WEST VIRGINIA, CHARLESTON
June 5 Rhododen dron State Outdoor
Art and Craft Association Festival; at the
West Virginia State Capitol grounds.
WISCONSIN, MADISON
May 20-June 16 Madison Potters' Guild
Exhibition ; at Madison Art Center, 720
East Gorham Street.
THOMPSON Offers All Of
This For Only $72.95
Thompson's catalog ~ntroduces a new package consisting of an
electric kiln (inside dimensions - - S" w~de, 7" deep, 4" high)
and including a CAREFULL Y SELECTED group of supplies
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The new Thompson catalog, along with its famous Color Guide,
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.......................................................
• 12 alum. wheelhead
• 120 lb. conc. flywheel
• solid consfrucfi on
• completel y assembled
• tested in
schools
Send for Brochure to:
CAMPBELLPACIFIC
P.O. Box 643 San Jose, CA 95111
* D e a l e r Inquiries Invited
Thomas C. Thompson Co.
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[ ] Enclosed is payment for new k n package.
(illinois residents add S~'o sales fax.)
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Name_
Address__
City
State
Zip
May 1977
75
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More powerful. Balk Bearings. Easy to use. Easy to
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Model E-6 only (Less side pans) . . . . . . . . . .
Model E-6 with I Side Pan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SPEED VARIES wlfh foot pedal . . .
automobile.
smooth as an
Model E-5 with 2 Side Pans (as shown) . . . . $208.50
PORTABLE Carry it with you anywhere. Bats fit
our hand wheels. Each student may have own bat
and place on hand wheel withou t losing center.
II0 volt AC. DC. One year service warra nty.
Side Pans clamp on without the use of tools
and can be purchased separately
to fit your present E-6 Mode l . . . . . . each $19.50
Prices are F.O.B. Detro it, Michigan. See your dealer
or dlstrib utor or write direct .
G-ILMOUR CAMPBELL
14258 Maiden, Deffoit, Michigan 48213
76
CERAMICS MONTHLY
(313) 568-0561
$167.50
$187.00
CERAMACTIVITIES
people, places, and things
ROMANS AND BARBARIANS
The Boston Museum o/ Fine Arts celebrated the 1500th anniversar y of the fall
of Rome, through February 27, with an
exhibition titled. "Romans and Barbar-
mold-mad e ware from the North African
provinces of the Late Antique period. Most
were manufactu red in factories employing
large numbers of slaves. Featured in the
exhibition was a terra sigillata jug in the
shape of a girl's head, (left), approximately 10 inches in height.
Lamps were particularl y numerous because they were set in graves as an aid
Colorado alumni ceramics show.
The University has extended a room
and board package to NCECA members
which enables them to eat and sleep within
a few blocks of the meeting and program
facilities; camping space in the Greeley
area is extremely limited.
For further informatio n, contact: Herb
Schumach er, NCECA Program Chairman,
Art Departmen t, University of Northern
Colorado, Greeley 80639.
NANCY D'ESTANG
Loretto Heights College, Denver, Colorado, introduced its winter series of gallery
exhibition s with the porcelain work of
Nancy d'Estang. Featured were slip decorated plates and salt-glazed porcelain dinnerware. Decorated with simple brush
,,
"
Roman lamp
J e~ra 3t~,tllal¢l jtl~,,
ians." Supported in part by a grant from
the National Endowmen t o[ the Arts, the
display focused on the history and art
forms of the provinces of the Roman
Empire, and examined the interrelati onships between "barbarian " (the nonGraeco-Ro man world) and "civilized"
peoples.
Among the 470 objects were approximately 20 examples of ceramic works,
North A[rican lamp
which included molded lamps and terra
cottas from the period of the Empire, and
against eternal darkness. Shown are a
North African version, approxima tely 6
inches in height, with the bust of a magistrate, (or possibly St. Peter); and a ninespouted Roman lamp approxima tely 6
inches in diameter, with relief decoration
of Parthian heads.
NCECA UPDATE
Program and agenda for the annual
conference of the National Council on
Education [or the Ceramic Arts (NCECA)
have been finalized for this year's meeting
on the campus of the University o[ Northern Colorado, Greeley, scheduled from
June 12 through 15. The general theme
for this year's conference is "Doing More
With Less." Discussion s, lectures, and
demonstra tions will provide informatio n on
sawdust injection burners, rammed earth
as a building material for homes, porcelain,
kiln firing, crystobolit e in clays, taxes and
bookkeepi ng, ceramics curriculum , women's ceramic activity across the nation,
teaching ceramics in high schools, and
bread baking. A film festival and lecture
by Clayton Bailey will open the conference
on Sunday evening. Exhibition s will include the 1977 National Cone Box Show,
the first exhibit of high school ceramics at
an NCECA conference , a glass show,
works of prominent potters from Colorado
and vicinity, and a University of Northern
Send news and photos, if available,
about people, places, or events you
think will be o[ interest. We will be
pleased to consider them [or use in this
column. Send items to: CeramActi vities, CERAramS MONTHLY, Box 12448,
Columbus, Ohio 43212.
Porcelain plate
strokes, pictured above, is a plate, white
glaze with iron wash and ochre slip, 12
inches in diameter; and, below, a teapot
with temmoku glaze.
"Because I get tired of looking at pots
Nancy d'Estang
that scream, especially functional pots,"
says Nancy d'Estang, "in my own work I
try for understate ment. I am finding salt
Continued on Page 79
May
1977
77
pznnzng tiger"
Po tte r's Wh eel s
(Now the Largest Selling Potters Wheels in the Entire Country
)
OUR NEW
SPINNING TIGER
OUR REGULAR
SPINNING TIGER
II
• Has a 1/2 H.P. Permanent
• Has a 1/3 H.P. DC Motor
Magnet Motor
• Sells for $ ] 7 9 . 0 0
•
Sells
for ~ 2 4 9 . 0 0
• Will throw 25 Ibs. of clay
•
Will
throw
over 60 Ibs. of clay
• Ideal for hobbyists and
• Is of special interest to
the classroom
professionals and
• This is the beauty within the
advance
d students
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BOTH
MODELS
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A price half that of its nearest competi tor
Complet e portabil ity - weighs 25 Ibs. - utterly rigid
Solid state feedback speed control circuitry - 0-240 RPM's
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Maintain any desired speed with the foot pedal - infinitel y variable
12 inch diamete r die cast aluminu m wheel head
•
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•
Optiona l splash pan -- $ 1 4 . 9 5
Optiona l stand - fits both models - $ 1 9 . 9 5
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Now you can make your own complete sets of identical
dishes. You are an "Instant Potter."
OUR NEW T I G E R R O L L E R
~• Smoothly rolls 18 x 36 inch slabs
Infinite thickness variation between ~ l l l ~
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• Other rollers
stretch the clay,
the TIGER ROLLER
compresses it evenly
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• Instant release of
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• Weighs only 35 pounds
• Less than half the
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• Sells for $ 1 9 9 . 0 0
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CERAMmS MONTttLY
ASSEMBLY
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BASIC KIT INCLUDES
JIGGER ARM and one each:
Cup mold & template
Saucer mold & template
Dinner Plate mold & template
Soup Bowl mold & template
All this for $ 8 9 . 0 0
Also available, molds & templates
for Serving Platter, Vegetable Dish,
Butter Dish, three-piece set $49.00
Any item made in seconds.
• The JIGGER ARM fits all of our
standard potters wheels.
• Production inserts also available
for all molds.
;~,
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ALSO AVAI LABLE
......
OUR NEW CLAY
GUN EXTRUDE R
STUDIO, DEALER ,
AND SCHOOL
INQUIRIE S INVITED
MENCO E N G I N E E R S , INC.
5520 Crebs Avenue, Dept. CM577
Tarzana, California 91356
Phone: (213) 881-1167
CERAMACTIVITIES
Contin ued /rom Page 77
glazing to be particu larly compa tible with
my treatm ent of clay becaus e, visuall y, it
softens and mellow s the surface s."
as one of the four suprem e master s of clay
in moder n times . . . . "
Also mentio ned in this issue is ]oan
Monda le, wife of the Vice Presid ent, in
connec tion with her interes t in decora ting
the officia l residen ce with art works and
crafts, particu larly from the Midwe st.
CAPTAIN CERAMICS
Illinoi s artist Rimas T. VisGirda of
Millik en Univer sity (Deca tur) has had
an interes t in expand ing the modes of
expres sion in the clay meditm a, and among
NORTH CAROLINACRAFTSMEN
The 39th elnnual North Carolina Artists
Exhibi tion was held at the North Carolina
Museu m o/ Art, Raleig h, Decem ber 2
throug h Januar y 9. Amon g the exhibi ting
craftsm en were Susan and Lanny Pelletier,
who showe d "Moby Dick Soup Tureen
the achiev ement s of his altereg o, Captain
Ceramics, is the invent ion of the "world 's
most powerf ul potter' s wheel, " constr ucted
at Captain Ceramics elrtworks, Limite d,
also in Decatu r. Sporti ng a 1965, 300horsep ower Oldsm obile V-8 engine , the
"X-1 potter' s wheel" was produc ed in conjunctio n with Barry Ramsa y, and is powered by "Ceram athane ," one of a variety
P R E S TARTED
CYLINDER S
t~ . ~ ,
c,*r4~ c ~
sp~s~
Susan and Lanny Pelletier
and Bowls, " stonew are and porcel ain, 3
inches in height , above. A percen tage of
funds receive d from the pots is donate d
by the Pelleti ers to the Whale Protec tion
Fund in Washi ngton, D.C.
Other partici pating cerami sts were Hiroshi Sueyoshi, who exhibi ted a porcel ain
covere d jar; and Sally Bowen Prange, who
contri buted a porcel ain vessel.
The Craft Connection, J e n k i n t o w n ,
3"
. _
s Sel o =
=
__
'.7,"~,..2"~.~7"
v . n o * , , , e , ~ l i~
3==(~ V Z ' I , 5,t,(Io'},lolb. tm'l
of tongue -in-ch eek produc ts mentio ned in
Captai n Ceram ics's supply catalog .
Other catalog produc ts includ e premeasu red, premo istened , and preeen tered
balls of clay on prepin ned bats. For those
wishin g to elimin ate the bother some first
step, the artist sugges ts presta rted cylind ers,
and the splash guard, shown above.
TIME
Special NEW
As a sign of the increa sing recogn ition
of the vahte of pottery and potters in
society , a full page article in the art section of the April 4 issue of Time Magaz ine
discuss es the life and work of Englis h
cerami st Bernard Leach , calling him "the
greate st living Weste rn potter, rankin g
with the Japane se master s Shofi Hama da,
Kenki chi Tomim oto, and Kanfir o Kawai
fires bloc k brow n at cone 3
red brow n at cone 0 6
BONZI CASTINGSLIP
fires cone 0 6 - 3
YELLOWSTONCASTINGSLIP
fires cone 0 6 - 0 2
ROBERT PALUSKY
A one-m an exhibi tion of blown glass
and cerami c works by Rober t Palusky,
Deans boro, New York. was presen ted at
~,..~-
RAW MATERIALS
CLAYS " FRITS • STAINS
CERAMIC CHEMICALS
®
SCULPTUREAND
WHEEL CLAY
Captain Ceramics
PRECENT ERED
CL,4Y
Cre ek- Tur n Lab
for Cla ys & Gla zes
Pennsy lvania , during
the month of April.
The clay pieces,
on w h i c h R o b e r t
Palusk y has been
workin g for the past
three years, represent his explor ation
of an abstra ct twodimen sional landscape theme . T h e
show feature d handbuilt slab object s
made of a low-fir ed Robert l'alu~)
whitew are body. After bisque firing, in
order to achiev e a smooth surface for
drawin g, each piece is sanded twice, the
drawin g sketch ed in, then glazed . Decora tion consist s of overla id and inlaid colore d
clays and luster glazes.
Shown from the exhibi tion is an earthenware , smoke -fired and slip-ca st vase with
overla id colore d clays and lusters , 28
inches in height . Photos : ,4. Hamil ton.
GREYSTONCASTINGSLIP
fires cone 0 6 - 0 4
CRESS KILNS
POTTER'S WHEELS
CREEK TURN
AME RICA N
ROBERT BRENT
SPIN NING TIGER
AMA CO
MACRAME YARNS &
stoneware BEADS
free
lifera fure
PATRICK CRABB
exhibi tion includ ing cerami cs by
Patric k Crabb was presen ted at the MonAn
Contin ued on Page 81
May
1977
79
TH E SO LD NE R MIXER
HA ND LES LOT S OF BO DIE S
•
.
l
.
LOOK A H EA D
TO THE NCM A TRADE SHOW - CONVENTION AND SEMINARS
JUL Y 27-31
(Show Dates , July 28, 29, 30)
i:
t
The 16th Annual National Ceram ic Manufacturers
Association Trade Show - - Convention & Seminars
t
L
Make plans now to attend the only man,Jfact,~rers
' trade show
in the industr y. At the Ch~se Park P!azn Hotel
St. Louis,
Misu>,~r;. Open to st,,d;o owners dealers , a;strh~
utcrs teachnr,, (for thp tm,']e anly).
F
ThN is ¥n.r I,o~t opport ,nlty to mr~t the manu{a
ct,rers, tr;
catch ,p on tt~ nrw~r~st ;nd.str y develo pments
and to pJ-~ce
orrtnf£ f,,r a!l yctJr requlrn m~nts, for deli,,r, ry in
actvanr e ,of
the fall sr.ason
For f,rther informa tion an~l hute! reserva tion forms
wrTfe or
phone, NCMA , 59 E. MAIN STREE T MOOR ESTOW
N, NEW
JERSEY 08057. PttONE (609) 234-03 30.
And for your conven ience: Contac t the N C M A
for inFormation about concur rent Sesslcns I and II of the N
C M A Teache r
Certific ation Proqram . July 31, August I and
2.
).
lgll
SA N FR AN CI SC O
it's
W E S T E R N CE RA MI CS
since 1945 for:
:s)
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Box 428 , Silt, Colo. 81 652
80
CERAMICS
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,
140 of which are lead safe - - PLUS - - 10 exciting
new LEAD FREE high fire glazes - - Cone 6 - 10.
NEW! NEW! Beautiful LEAD FREE liquid ceramic
UNDE RGLA ZE COLO RS which remain true fired
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Ceramlsts who know s a y "THE BEST GLAZ ES
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Catal og $1.00
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~
WESTLIRNCERAMICSSUPPLYCOMPANY
1601 HOWARD ST.
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 94103
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 79
tah,o Center /or the Arts, Sarato ga, California, in Decem ber. The artist, an instruc tor at Santa Ana College, display ed 20
bottle forms. Most of the pieces were
q
Patrick Crabb
stretch ed with a woode n rib, pencil, or
finger. One such work, 14 inches in height ,
is picture d above. Altere d shapes were
created by compr essing handb uih cylind rical forms betwee n two boards . Raku glazes
were poured on to achiev e sponta neous
patter n; stanno us and ferrous chlorid e salts
were used in fuming for iridesc ence on
glazed surface s.
LOS ANGELES EXHIBI TION
A Septem ber showin g of recent cerami c
works by Hedy and Ross Hale was held
at the Cra[t and Folk Art Museu m, Los
Using
Angeles.
thrown , slab, and
coil techniq ues, the
artists created both
and
functional
sculptu ral pieces in
stonew are and porcelain. Includ ed in
the exhibit were
raku jars and boxes,
porcel ain tea sets,
Hedy and Ross Hale
caniste rs, as well as
jugs and bowls display ing inlay work.
Shown is a stonew are jar with lusters and
crackle glaze, thrown and altered and
with a cut lid.
Hedy and Ross Hale are studio potters
in Morro Bay, Califo rnla.
CERAMICS DEGREE
A two-ye ar associa te of arts degree in
cerami cs techno logy has been institu ted by
Oakland Comm unity College in Royal
Oak, Michig an. Develo ped by Charles
Blosser, profes sor of cerami cs, in collabo ration with studen ts and potters in the
metrop olitan Detroi t area, the vocati onally
Continued on Page 83
CERAMIC GLAZEMAKING
by Richard Behrens. This text
will prove valuabl e to all those
who want practica l informa tion
on formula ting and using glazes. Batch recipes in all firincj
ranges are include d, and many
special cllazemakincj techniques
64 pages $3.95
are covered .
DECORATING POTTERY
by F. Carlton Ball. This book
of
explore s easy methods
decoraf incj pottery w[fh clay,
slip and cjlaze. Those who ack
skill and confide nce in drawlnqq
and painting will find special
pleasur e in discove ring these
decorat incl techniqu es.
64 Pacles $3.00
UNDERGLAZE DECORATION
by Marc Bellalre . This comple te
handbo ok has all the answers
on materia ls, tools and technique. Step-by -step projects are
profuse ly illustrat ed. A pract;cal guide for the beq;nne r.
64 pacjes $3.00
j
'
DEALER INQUIRIES INVITE D
I
I
J
I
~
M O N T H L Y
BOOK DEPAR TMENT
Box 12448
Colum bus.OH 43212
GLAZE PROJECTS
POTTER'S WHEEL PROJECTS
by Richard Behrens. This unique
book covers the formula tion
and applica tion of a variety of
LEAD-FREE cllazes in all firlncj
ranges. An invalua ble tool for
those who like to experTment
with 91azemakincl. Inc udes a
special cjIossary of mater;M s
which is an excellen t referen ce
64 pages $3.00
source.
edited by Thomas Sellers. The
proiects in this handbo ok provide step-by -step instruct ion on
a variety of spec a throw;ncj
fechn ques Wind be Is. lamps
bird houses and feeders , musical instruments and teapots are
a few items you'll find pre64 pages $2.00
sented.
THROW ING ON THE
POTrER'S WHEEL
edited by Thomas Sellers. An
oufstan dinq selectio n of projects for the classroo m, home
and studio. Each project introduces a differen t method of
working in clay. Fountains,
planters , jewelry battles and
several other un clue items are
64 pages $2.00
present ed.
by Thomas Sellers, A comple te
manual on how to use the potter's wheel. Covers all basic
steps from wedcllnq clay to
makincj specific shaDes C early describ es every detMI uslnqq
step-by -step photo techniqu e.
B0 pacjes $4.00
COPPER ENAMELING
by Jo Reberf and Jean O'Hara .
Recognized as the best in basic
instruct ion, fhls elabora te handbook has over 200 photocjraphs,
by I e a d in CJ
Recommended
enamefisfs and teacher s,
64 pages $2.00
Please send me the following:
~ Ceramic Glazemaking $3.95
~ Decorating Pottery $3.00
~ Undercjlaze Decoratlon $3.00
[ ] Glaze Projects $3.00
CERAMIC PROJECTS
BRUSH DECORATION
FOR CERAMICS
by Marc Bellaire . A fasclnaf incj
book on the use and care of
brushes. Shows how to make
ncj ceramic s
designs for decorat
usinq just three basic brushes -liner and
lor,
waterco
the
square shader. Excellen t manual
for beqqinners. 64 pages $3.00
~_ Throwlnq on the Wheel $4.00
~ Copper Enameli. 9 $2.00
~ Porter's Wheel Proiects $2.00
~" Ceramic Projects $2.00
~ Brush Decoration $3.00
add 4% sa~es tax)
I enclose [ ] Check [ ] Money Order {Ohio residents
Name__
Address__
City . . . .
State __
_Zip
May
1977
81
O f Th e Ea rt h. ..
13oo~.~
FEATURING
REWARD'S
HART ART SATIN & MATTE
19 Beautiful Colors
s y l l a b u s for"
beginnctg pottery.
I. c a r r i o n bawl
~ybh~ f~
ca4tonhal
rewa rd cera mic c o l o r mfrs.,inc.
314 hamm onds ferryrd.
glen burnie,md. 21061
Imitated.. but never duplicated"
28th ANNUAL
California Ceramic
and Hobby Crafts Show
Anah eim Convention Cent er
June 30 thru July 3, 1977
Kera:~ : s k , ? ! (;
Please send me
[: ' i:!,:3! :; ~_e'" C " . '; 744
_copies of Gas Kiln Firing
@ $5.95 each.
, ~ Please send me_
copies of the Sylla bus for
Begin ning Potte ry @ $4.00 each.
Please send me
copies of the Sylla bus for
Advanced Ceramics @ $3.95 each.
' ~ Please send me_
copies of The Kiln Book
@ $8.95 each.
Inclu de $.30 postage for each book order ed.
Calif ornia residents add 6% sales tax.
Forei gn orders please inclu de a U.S. $1.00
for postage and hand ling.
I Enclosed is a chec k/mo ney order for U.S.$
_
I
82
Nam e_
Address
City_
State Z i p _
Please allo,'~ 2 to 3 .~eeks for dolive
ry~
CERAMICS NoN' rilLS "
A SYMPHONYIN COLOR
Exhibitors from all parts of the notio n.
Ama teur , stud ent and profe ssio nal entri es
in
a glam orou s and excit ing disp lay.
The large st Cera mic Hobb y Craf t Show
in the Wes t.
For more infor matio n conta ct:
CERAMIC HOBBY CRAFTS ASSOCIATES,INC.
W. H. Bohler, .Jr., President
P.O. Box 3725, Industry, Ca. 91749
If DU NC AN
manufactures or
publishes i t . . .
WE stock it/
E-Z FLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SM & DM . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CERAMACTIVITIES
Contin ued [rom Page 81
Glaze.,
Molds
COVE R COAT . . . . . Under glaze
E-Z STRO KE . . . . . . Trans paren t
Under glaze
[email protected] -STAI NS... Unfire d Stains
BRUSHES
Joy Re~cl Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Duncan Catalocj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ceram~Corner Decal Catalog . . . . . . . .
Glass Decal Cafalocj . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
plus 25c ea. Postage
$2.00
$1.50
$2.00
$ .50
eramicStudio
P.O. Box 5367
2016 N. Telegraph (U5-24)
Phone LO 1-0119
Dearborn, Mich 48128 •
oriente d progra m is designe d to provide
intensi ve experie nce in the produc tion
clay produc ts, their decorat ion, glazir
and firing.
Two field study classes permit the pt
suit of individ ual directio ns and need
experie nce as a lab assistan t or as
appren tice in area potteri es is also ava
able. In the final course of the two-ye
sequen ce, student s are assisted with a
countin g and busines s course work, in d
signing and setting up their own pottez
selectin g approp riate equipm ent, purcha
ing supplie s, and formul ating clay bodie
For additio nal inform ation write: Oa]
land Commu nity College , Royal Oak Can
pus, 703 South Center , Royal Oak 4806
Cerami c life mask sculptu re by Pa
Frankli n was exhibit ed at The Arts an
$cience Center , Nashua , New Hampsh ir~
during July and At
gust. The forms wez
present ed as a serie~
each c h a r a c t e r i s t :
tally differe nt fror
the next in them
and techniq ue wit]
some of the faei~
forms surroun ded b'
v e g e t a b l e - l i k e im
ages, while other
gave impress ions o
Medi~
animals.
r a n g e d from low.
'rlvate Woman Bird
ire clays and glazes to high-fi re reduc.
[on porcela in and salt-gla zed ware. Som~
ieces were decora ted with lusters or low.
red glazes; others were unglaze d witl~
pro ven in
the stu d,o
We serve Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and
Tennessee. Visit our studio-showroom at
1416 Shelbyvil[e Rd., Louisville, KY 40243
(502) 245-128 2
( wl Creek
Pottery
Portfolio $1.00. Free to institutions.
Forme rly
POTTERY by DOT
..
•.-
~
,
.
~
~ ~ . ~ , . ~
~
~"
NOW!
A Good Kiln
Need Not Be
Expensive
Save up to 3 7 % using a few
pleasa nt hours to fit togeth er
one of our e a s y - t o - a s s e m b l e
kiln kits. Fun to do ~ efficie nt
to use. Step by step instruc .
tions for assemb ly and easy
beautif ul firing.
Your oppor tunity to see
equip ment
• Crusad er
Shimpo -Wesf
• Bluebir d
Randal l • Brenf
• Pacific a
a Max
Skut~
• Dinack
• Geil
Walker
Soldne r • Kempe r a Calif. Kilns
Raw M a t e r i a l s and Supplie s
Moist Stonew are & Porcela in
KILNS
PATT FRANKLIN
Kiln C~
Model CK 1237
•
•
•
a
•
a
•
STBY
Patt Franklin
oxide pattern s to define texture . Shown
(top) is "Privat e Woman Bird," and
"Privat e Woman Landsc ape," (right) ,
free-st anding sculptu res of brown stoneware with iron oxides.
Patt Frankl in is current ly an associa te
profess or of cerami cs at the Univer sity o/
Maine, Portlan d-Gorh am.
BETTY WOODMAN
Craft Allianc e, St. Louis, recentl y sponsored a "Clay Techni ques" worksh op with
Betty Woodm an, Boulde r, Colora do. The
worksh op coincid ed with a month- long
show of the artist's work enablin g local
cerami sts to learn from her finishe d objects
Contin ued on Page 85
These Are Kilns Made By
People Who Do Ceram ics and
Know What o Kiln Has To Do.
Comme rcial Kiln Kit
24"x24" x27" deep . . . . . . . .
$269.00
Studio Kiln Kit
18"x 18"x 18" deep . . . . . . . .
$137.95
Hobby Kiln Kit
12"x12"x131/2" deep . . . . . . $ 89.95
Send for free brochu re.
WESTBY
;eram ic Suppl y & Mfg. Co.
N. 85th St., Seattle, Wash. 98103
May 1977 83
~pOVIN CEP,,AMtC.~ 5UPPL?
pR S .TST. -
/h•nde
LL..o
7.o Co,([email protected]
ourmoture
?mlor.cJ UScui-lh
the ~or~so~x~_s
{'oh po~e- ra ac
RO~iI~ I., Hovlnc~
a baLL cL~Vrr~
NOW OVER 1 0 0 0 . . .
TAKE IT WITH YOU!
VARIABLE SPEED POTTER'S WHEELS
IN ACTIVE USE ACROSS CANA DA...
A kiln designed especially for R A K U . Constructe d of
a steel shell with new rigid
vacuum-for med insulation. Inside dimensions -- 16"x24".
Lightweigh t -- only 18 Ibs.
which makes it easy to lift off pots. It's portable so take
it with you to the beach, the
nountains, even the desert. Included with the kiln is a
brass needle valve, 10 ft. high
pressure hose, venturi burner for propane use and Raku instruction
manual.
FIRING TIMES
1st. firing: 20 - 40 rains.
1
Consecutive firings: 10 - 20 rains.
$160.00
Shipping: East of Rockies $10.00
West of Rockies $5.00
Write for our free brochure all about Raku.
THE RAKU KILN FROM PEACH VALLEY
Route I
VED
BY PROF ESSIO NAL POTT ERS AND
RECO GNIZE D CERA MIC SCHO OLS
"THE ART IST' S CHO ICE"
HIRO
L
84
DISTRIBUTORS ltd.
518 BEATTY ST.
CERAMICS ~/[ONTHLY
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Box lOl, NewCastle,
Colorado
81647
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 83
as well as watch the creativ e proces s.
Forms were thrown in section s during
the two-da y worksh op, then pieced togeth er
by bendin g, pressin g, attach ing, and adding clay. The artist comm ented that she
Betty Woodman
•njoyed workin g with natura l flaws such
as cracks so that patche s could be added
Juring the piecin g proces s, allowi ng the
"lay as well as the artist to be partici pants
u the work. Photos : Charles S. Payne.
.'LAY AND FIBER GALLERY
Worki ng with intrica te ornam ental suraces, Califo rnia ceram ist Florence Cohen
lisplay ed a collec tion of stonew are lustere d
12"AluminumWheel Heads
$22.50 Ppd. tax
Catit. residentsadd 6% sales
Send Checkor MoneyOrder to:
CAMPBELL PACIFIC
203 Kennedy Ave., Campb ell, CA. 95008
,°°for
school
and
studio !
Mill mix
drudgery
creative
ion.
Florence Cohen
boxes as part of a three- man exhibi tion,
"Patte rns in Clay and Fiber, " held at the
Clay and Fiber Gallery, Taos, New Mexic o,
during Octob er and Novem ber. Shown is
the artist's glazed stonew are box, 5½ x
5 ~ inches , with incisin g and lusters .
Floren ce Cohen is an active memb er
of the Allied Cra[tsmen o[ San Diego.
Photos : Kay Colby.
SLIDES AVAILABLE
Slides dealin g specifi cally with ceram ics
have been relativ ely scarce over the past
few years, especi ally when compa red to the
growth of books and other public ations on
cerami cs. Thus it may come as good news
to cerami sts and teache rs that a series of
slide survey s of the ceram ic arts is being
offere d by Prothmann Associates, one of
the major produc ers of arts audio visuals.
Includ ed in the list of topics availab le is
"Inter nation al Ceram ics of the 70's," a set
Continued on Page 87 j
WE LOVE
POTTERS!
Everything a Potter
Needs is available
at Byrnes in
Flanders, N.J.
Slips
Modeling &
Wheel Clays
Glazes
Stains
Wheels & Kilns
Etc.
Also Raw Materials,
Chemicals and all
the other things !n
the Hobby Ceramic
Field.
e
We Give Service
- Try Us!
SEND FOR CATALOG
C E R A M I C SUPP LY CO. INC.
95 Bartley Road, Flanders, N.J. 07836
(201) S84-7492
M a y 1977
85
THE IMCO VARIETY OF COLORS IN FORMULATEDCLAYS
ARE UNSURPASSED BY ANYTHING AVAILABLE
OUTSTA NDING WORKAB ILITY, SUPERIO R DRYING
CHARAC TERISTI CS, AND CONE RANGES TO MEET
THE MOST DISCRIM INATING POTTER ARE FUNDAMENTAL ELEMEN TS OF OUR CLAYS. OUR CLAYS
FIRE TO WHITE, LIGHT BUFF, OR TO A RICH RED
BROWN WITH IRON SPECKIN G. IMCO CLAYS ENCOMPAS S EARTHE NWARE, STONEW ARE AND THE
LATEST DEVELO PMENT OF PORCEL AIN BODIES.
ALL POSSES S GOOD THERMA L SHOCK RESISTA NCE
TO PROVIDE THE OPTIMU M IN QUALITY OF FIRED
OBJECT S. RECOGN IZED AS THE STANDA RD FOR
FORMUL ATED CLAY BODIES BY MANY SCHOOL S,
COLLEG ES AND PROFES SIONAL POTTER S.
ASK YOUR NEARES T IMCO DISTRIB UTOR OR
DEALER FOR THE FULL COLOR DATA SHEETS AND
PRICE LISTS ON IMCO CLAY BODIES AND CERAMI
C
CHEMIC ALS. OR WRITE US.
P.S. EXCLUSIVE DISTRIBUTORSHIPS AVAILABLE IN SELECTED AREAS.
INDUSTRIALMINERALSCO.
1057 COMMERCIALST. SAN CARLOS, CALIF. 9 4 0 7 0 41S 592-8321
UP UNTIL NOW BATS
WERE MADE OF:
•
•
•
•
•
•
/ WE JUDGE BATS ON THE
FOLLOWING CRITERIA:
FORMICACOVEREDPRESSBOARD
STANDARDPRESSBOARD
MASONITE
PLYWOOD
TRANSITE {ASBESTOS)
PLASTER
*
•
•
•
•
•
WARPAGE
CHIPPING
BENDING
CONTAMINATION
SPLINTERING
HEALTH HAZARDS
*
.
•
•
•
•
SPLITTING
DECOMPOSITION
WATER ABSORPTION
BRITTLENESS
MECHANICALWEAR
SURFACEADHESION
NO BAT COULD PASS OUR CRITERIA
WE DEVELOPED A
MADE
PARTICLE BOARD EXCEEDING COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL GRADES
THIS MATERIAL IS ESPECIALLY WELL SUITED FOR
POTTERY USE FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS:
• SMOOTHMATT FINISH UPPERSURFACE
PERMITSEASYCENTERING. CLEANING,
POPOFF AN0 RESISTSMECHANICAL
ABRASION.
• BEVELED,SMOOTH,SANDEDEDGES.
....
~
I ~
;
you dec,cle t. . . . der
J ~
orig,nal order, you can
deduct the amount of excesspaid originally
~
_
• DENSE100%FIR PARTICLE
LOWERSURFACE- VERY LOWWATER
ABSORPTION.NON PULLING,YET ADHERES
WELL.
"
-
COpyOf Easy Step Dy Step Methods for
£L77 .....
BAT MANUFACTURING
BOX 7275 SAN DIEGO, CA 92107
B~
CERAI~IICS ~{ONTHLY
. o . . R*GUIDE
CERAMIC '"DUST
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continued [rom Page 85
T,
Complet ely revised and updated every
year. The Guide is really three books in
one: a Handbo ok of vital data and howto informat ion on glazes, kilns, molds, etci a
Directo ry of manufacturers, publishers,
distributors, traveling teachers, associations
and shows; a Buyers Guide to sources of
supply for ceramics, porte ain, airbrushing
glass, enamelin g, and other related crafts.
Indispensable for the studio owner, manufacturer, ceramic teacher, craft shop director, arts and crafts instructor. $4.B0 ea.
(Include 2Sc postage and handling California
residents also add 24c sa es tax.)
of I00 slides of contem porary works from
around the world. Anothe r 4-part series,
"Langu age of the Potter," by A. C.
Garnett , surveys early archaeological and
Orienta l examples, explain ing techniques,
fashions, and achievements. "Creativ ity in
Ceramics," a similar 4-part set, explores
the theme of immediate environ ment as a
source of inspirat ion to artists and craftsmen. A complete list of slides available
may be obtaine d by writing to: Prothmann Associates, Inc., 650 Thomas Ave.,
Baldwin, New York 11510.
SUSAN LYMAN
Ceramic sculpture and hanging fabric
constructions by Susan Lyman, Waterville,
New York, were featured at the List Arts
Center, Kirkland College, Clinton , New
York, November 29 through December 20.
The exhibition featured handbu ilt terra-I
~:::
"~!~::ili!I
YOUR LIDS~
WITH BLUEBIRD
P O T T E R ' S TAPS AND
DIES Y O U CAN N O W
MAKE S C R E W - O N L I D S
AND S T O P P E R S FOR
YOUR POTS.
FOR FREE INFOR MATIO N
>,~.~.
WRITE OR CALL:
BLUEBIRD MANUFA CTURIN G
100 G R E G O R Y R O A D
F O R T COLLINS , C O 80521
• 303/484-3 243
POTLUCK PUBL ICATI ONS
(Formerl y Ceramic Scope Books)
Box 48643, Los Angeles, CA 90048
l.IJl:1311
WHY
• . . DO THE BEST POTTER S
in the world get their supplies from
Good Earth Clays, Inc.?
Please M e n t i o n C M
when writing o u r advertisers
A s k Bill Brack et
Send for price & produc t llst on
clays, chemicals, 10 moist clay bodies,
tools, books, glazes, brushes, kilns,
wheels, and lots more, free to schools
& instituti ons, or send check or money
order for $1.00.
10 moist clay bodies in stock.
~,Cg~2'S'dr.~ Distributors of:
~ SHIMPO, BRENT,
~
~ SKUTTsWALRUS,
~: ~ '
CLAYS, Inc.
GOOD EARTHKansas
City, MO. 64108
~: ~ ~ ** ~ SPINNINGTIGER
5 [~---~ '-~ ~ & MAX,WHEELS
[email protected] Southwest Blvd.,
(816) 561-4437
FRANCOISE CERAMICS, INC.
DISTRIBUTOR FOR: Hanovla Lusters & precious
metals, Paragon Kilns, Duncan Ceramic Products.
IN STOCK: Large selection of Alberta u Arne
• Atlantic • Fres-O-Lone • Holland • Jamar,
Mallory • Kentucky • Kimple • Ludwicj-Schmid
• Weaver & White Horse Molds • Slip-O-Marie
representative. Complete ceramic supplies.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
St. Petersburcj, Fla. 33707
113 49fh St. Sooth
True
Ventu ri Burners
These efficleert cast iron burn.
ers ore guaranteed not to back
burn even when using propane.
They are rated at over 8S,000
BTU/hr., and can be turned
down to a very small candle
flame.
"Write /or literature"
CALIFORNIA KILN CO., INC.
3036 S. Oak St., Santa Ana, CA 92707
(714) 546-3071
Susan Lyman
cotta sculpture, and earthen ware with
muted, soft colors, dry surfaces, and air
brushed terra sigillata. Resembling towers
or scaffolds, suggestions of faces are often
present. Shown from the exhibition is a
terra-cotta piece with airbrushed terra
sigillata, titled "Self-Portrait as a Jazz
Singer," 27 inches in height.
CtAY/OtASS INVITATIONAL
The Galleria, at Delta College, University Center, Michigan, hosted the 2nd
Annual Clay/Gl ass Invitati onal, January
3 through 31. Organized by Larry Oughton, assistant professor of art, the exhibition contain ed over 200 handbu ih and
wheel-thrown objects, includin g stoneware,
porcelain, salt-fired, raku, low-fire luster
works, and blown and molded glass.
The show featured ceramic works from
Michig an artists Kent DaWalt, Rex Foot,
Continued on Page 89
% - ~ ' - - - ~ CRUSADERsL&L,
AIM, AND SKUTT KILNS • ALSO
Leclerc looms, Kemper tools, clays,
potter, sculptor & weaving equipment
teapot handles, cork, spigots etc.. '
• Send fornew 88 pg.catalog $1.50 •
3ALVINPLACE UPPERMONTCLAIR.N.~. 02043
KICK WHEELslls
$15 crating.
Aluminum wheel head, industrial bearings, and
a sturdy wood frame make this wheel a per.
feet choice.
Kit form $45.
WALSH MANUFACTURING
1984 County Road C-2, St. Paul. MN 55113
(612) 636-5557
Sold only
by
Authori zed
Dealers
1147 E. Elm
W. P. DAWSON, INC. Fullerfon,Calif. 92631
May 1977
87
~ ° ° L ~'-~] ' ~
/
Potters, start your wheels! Kemper
Tools has put it "AIl-ln-On e"-all the
basic pottery tools required for the
professional as well as the beginner.
All tools are displayed in a unique.
reusable clear vinyl package, including
visual instruction s for the proper use of
each tool. See your nearest dealer or
distributor for this new pottery tool kit.
and remember, the same high quality
materials and craftsmanship
with
emphasis on performance and durability
~emain in every Kemper Tool.
\
i
THE LEADING MANUFAC TURER OF
TOOLS FOR CERAMIST S, POTTERS,
AND SCULPTORS SINCE 1947.
TOOLSTHAT ~
THE HAND
Olsen 94 KilnKit
UPDRA FT
SPECI F I CATIO NS:
external dimensions:
4 ft. x 5 ft. x 6 ft.tall
approxi mately 24 cubic ft.
stacking area,using 3-12in.
x 24 in. kiln shelvesabreast
natural gas or propane
fires evenly to Cone 10,
oxidatio n and reduction
KIT INCLUDES:
angle iron frame * transite cut to fit * K-26 and
K-20/23 insulation bricks * air set mortar
burner manifold * gas burners and flame tubes
damper guide * pilot assembly * complete
instruction manual for building
optiona l: safety package $95.00
TOTAL COST: $1495.00
plus state and local taxes and shipping
prices subject to change due to material
price increases.
~i~e~N
PinyonCrest.
Box,=
sen
Mounta
in Center,
Galifornia
92361
88
CERAMICS~V[ONTFILY
WILII
(1
I,,)~JLL~I
~
vvu~,,,,,,~u
......
Thom as Stuar t
Box 9699
Denver , Colorad o 80223
O
=;
¢O
,
.....
CERAMACTIVITIES
Contin ued [rom Page 87
Yosuke Haruta, Dave and ]oyce Petrakovitz, Bob Piepenburg, and Penny Sadowski. Shown is a raku lidded vessel,
I
I
MAK E SURE Y O U G E T
THE R I G H T M A C H I N E
F O R THE R I G H T JOB.
B11212
the bottoms of your fired stoneware
smooth - right on your wheel
heod. Works great for grinding
gloze drips too.
For detailed information write:
Creative Industries
P.O. B o x 343
La M e s a , Ca. 92041
A N D O N L Y BLUE BIRD
MAK ES B O T H
Kent DaWalt
approximately 13 inches in height, by Kent
DaWa lt, Centra l Michigan University.
MARJ LEVY
The Gallery, Bloom ington , India na,
hosted an exhibition of porcelain works
Febru ary 4 through 25, by Alarj Levy,
FOR FREE INFO RMAT ION
WRIT E OR CALL :
BLUEB IRD M A N U F A C T U R I N G
10O GREG ORY ROAD
FORT COLLI NS, C O 80521
303 484-32 43
:)rofi's~ or of cerami cq at Purdu e Uni~'e rsity.
[AN SPONGECO.
AE~
Imports from Gree ce
~
OHIO CERA MIC SUPP LY
P. O. BOX 630
KENT , OHIO 44240
216/2 96-38 15
~
~/~
Silks, Elephant Ears, Wools
& Synth etic (Fine -Pore ) Sponges
Write for Price List
4459 W. $6 St., Cleveland, O. 44144
Inc.
rs Wheels, 80218
Wittels PotteDenver,
Colorad o
CERA MIC EQUI PMEN T
PARAGON and DUNCAN k;lns - OHAUS scales
R
- ROBERT BRENT slab roller - WALKER-JAMA
pug mills - Slip mixers - plus a complete stock
of potter's and sculptors' hand fools.
P.O. Box 18010,
speed
Variable
wheels . P o r t a b l e
for information.
CERAMICS, INC.
CAPITAL South
Main St.
2174
Salt Lake City, Utah 84115
(801) 466.6471 or 466-6420
potters'
electric
yet durable. Write
Phone
For craftsmen, schools, hobbyists:
NS
KIL
BLE
DA
DEPEN
O
WEC
FROM
Controlled Heats • Electric or Gas.Fired
• Bench or Floor Models = Easy Repairs
Maintenance Warranty. Aren't these features important to you? Ask for free
literature.
SAN DIEGO
Marj Levy
T r a n s p a r e n t glazes were used on some of
the pieces to enhan ce lace and textile impressions, while others displayed polychrome glaze decoration. Throw n forms
were decorated with small decal flowers
with broad, mergi ng glaze flows to create
surface texture. Shown is a porcelain and
decal piece, "Vase for Febru ary or Roses
are Red, etc . . . . ," 9 inches in height.
KENTUCKYGUILD FAIR
T h e Second K e n t u c k y G u i l d of Artists
and Craftsmen's Fall Fair was held at
Berea College's Indian Fort Theater, Oc-
Contin ued on Page 91
- Kickwheel kit - - Mod.B
(metal parts) $49.S0. Full line of pofler's
wheels, gas and electric kilns. Gas kiln parts,
pug mill, chemical, scales etc. Cartolocj S1.00.
Brochure on selected items free. Ph. 424-3250.
WAY-CRAFT
394 Delc~a re St., Imperia l Beach, CA 92032
OEI. TA C L A Y C O "
af Mudville
KILNS
CLAY
•
•
WHEELS
RAW MATERIALSu
INc.
•
TOOLS
ETC.
for
Earth People
•
Schools
Contact Bob Gray for quantit y prices
5272 Hwy. 42, Ellenwood, GA 30049
Potters
•
May
1977
89
HOBBY
& PROFESSIONAL
Precision KILNS
Q
)
1.1:3
AT TH E
INSUL
J
Write for COMPLETE information
Dept. B
A
lI~l
*.7
I y ~ , "
IMMEDIATE
, i v
. . . . . .
DELIVERY
3 05 1 FU J ITA
STREET
TORRA NCE, C A L I F O R N I A 9 0 5 0 5
AREA CODE
'7131
775-6503
/
77S-6504
/
$30-1541
r
k
English China & Ball Clays
,.0,.~,.~ Grolleg
Library
Binders
Designe d especiall y for Cerami cs Monthly , these h a n d s o m e
binders hold a year's supply (10 issues) of the magazin e. Steel
blades hold each issue firmly in place - - new issues are quickly a n d
easily inserted. These durable casebou nd binders are black with
C e r a m i c s Monthly stamped in gold on the cover and backbon e
for immedia te identific ation. Your binder will provide a conveni ent
way of keeping your copies of CM orderly and easily accessib le.
Order today for only $5.95 each, postpaid.
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Box 12448 • Columbus, Ohio 43212
Please send me _ _
binder(s) (a $5.95 each, postpaid.
Name
Address
City
I endose
. State _
[] Check
Zip
[] Money Order
Ohio residents add 24¢ per binder for Ohio Stal~ Sales Ta:c Thank
you
(Add $1 per binderoutride USA)
90
CERAMICS M O N T H L Y
White Firing Plastic China Clay
For Porcelain and Stoneware Throw ing
¢_
Producers of
'True Albany' Slip Clay
Blackbird Clay
MEDUSA
PO'I'rERY
CERAMACTIVITIES
Continu ed [rom Page 89
(SUPPLY)
fllOISt clay & raw materials Plus:
BRENT wheel & slab rollers (products)
CRUSADER electrm kilns
RANDAL L wheels & mixers
MEDUSA wedging tables
WALKER pugmdls
JIFFY mixers
ORTON . . . . s
Stephen ZowoJskl Jr
608 lafayette avenue
grand haven, michigan 49417
tober 1-3, and drew 9500 visitors. Fair
officials estimate d that sales were up 40%
over the precedin g year.
S]Ilp I)(Htt'r~ pfllti('ip; ltod
~,
•
~i:@~ '~i:
i
irl the fair,
WITH A LITTLE HELP
FROM BLUEBIRD
MACHINERY FOR
PRODUCTION POTTERS
i~
EVERYTHINGI
FOR THE POTT ERI
CLAYS-CHEMICALS-DRY
*
GLAZES
KILNS-ALPINE, SKUTT , PARAGON
CRUSADER & THERMOLITE
WHEELS-BRENT, RANDALL, SKUTT
LOCKERBIE, MARK IV, SHIMPO
PUGMILLS-MIXERS-KEMPER TOOLS
• • • Much, Much More
Catalog $1, Free fo Institutions
Walter Hylerk
which featured 76 exhibito rs. Shown is a
punch set by Walter Hyleck of Berea.
Other ceramic works were presente d by
]ulie Ehrlich, Jim Wright, Yen Chen-Hsu,
Adrian Swain, Neal Jowaisas, Je[f Martin,
Marshall Thomps on, Larry Hackley, and
Elemen ts Pottery. Photo: M. S. Rezny.
L & R spe cial ties
202 E. Mr. Vernon, P.O. Box 309
Nixa, Mo. 657]4 (417) 725-2606
Two Rivers Gallery, Bingham ton, New
York, displaye d the ceramic work of
Robert a Grif[it h,
/ ~
mmll I
March 13 through
~
1
April 10 Professor
i ~
~ of Art at Hartwic k
"'IV ,~ ~
'¢m ~/"~ ~ College, Oneonta,
-the .reW
- d [• ....~
,
~ New • York,
r a m a s t s works ln. ~ ~ ¢ - ~
corpora ted various
~J" ~ . . ~ 1 1 ~
texture s of fabric
and zippers; some
include d Plexiglas,
feathers , and photoRoberta Gri[[ith
Roberta Griffith
1962,
glaze decals. In
studied in Spain with Jose Llorens Artigas,
grand master of contem porary ceramics,
and feels this experien ce has been an im-
Gas
PORTLAN D POTTERY
40 Exchange Street
Portland. Maine 04111
Fully equipp ed potter y facilit y
for sale. Reaso nable. Orland o
area. Call during week:
(305) 834-43 34 or 834-01 88
....
FOR FREE INFOR MATIO N
WRITE OR CALL:
BLUEBIRD MANUFACTURING
100 GREGO RY ROAD
FORT COLLIN S, CO 80521
303/484-3243
ROBERTA GRIFFITH
POTTERYSHOP-STUDI0FOR SALE
Lots of room in historic old Portland.
and Electric Kilns, Wheels, School.
P U G MILLS
C L A Y MIXER S
HAMMERMILLS
BALL MILLS
AUTOMATIC SCREENS
:
•
131|JI:I31RI)
"
[
j
FOR SALE
Small farm with pottery and
greenhouse. Solar heat. Beautiful
setting. Near Aspen/Vail, Colo.
Call (303) 984-2246
Connecticut Craft Professionals
Spring Market at Mohawk Mountain
Ski Lodge. Cornwall, CT.
featuring
100 Connecticut
craftspeo ple
Cloth textured plate
portant influenc e on the way she views
sculptur al concepts.
Shown from the exhibiti on is "Black
Plate with Diamon d Cloth," 18 inches in
diamete r, with reductio n and oxidatio n
glazes. Photo: Kiltz.
10
to the
A.M. to 6 P.M. May 27th and 28th public.
trade, and May 29th and 30rE fo the
12)
under
(Adults S1; no charge for children
Enterh]inment, refreshments, free parking.
I
POTTE RY
7 OAKS
North of New York City
J2 Miles
Summer Woodfirin9 Workshops
In a 13-footlong walk-in KoreanTube Kiln.
For informationon local;on,dates" costs,etc.
please write: PETECALLAS
242 Enge St.
Engewood,New Jersey07631
I
SUSAN PARKS
The ceramic work of Susan Parks was
presente d in a one-man show in the Little
Gallery of Nazareth College, Rochest er,
New York, from October 20 through NoContinu ed on Page 93
Introducing Robert Brent
Westwo od Clays
Standard Clays
Shimpo Wheels
Pacifica Wheels
Robert Brent
Raw Chemicals
Dinack Wheels
Crusader Kilns
Harshaw Stains
Wrap Kilns
Glazes& Engobes
California Kilns
Books & Accessories
KemperTools
g
Catalo $1 .OO
I
KICKWHEEL
POITERY8"SUPPLYI
May
1977
91
Ind ust rie s
Here, at Creative Industrie s, we have been producin g a
professio nal quality potter's wheel for over five years. During
this time, our wheel has evolved into one with a level of quaUty
and ruggedne ss unequall ed in the field today. The quality of
the compone nts and craftsma nship is consisten tly superior.
Our extraord inarily low prices prove what dealing direct with
the manufac turer can mean. Our wheels offer performa nce
superior to all others on the marhet, regardles s of price. But,
when you do consider price, you begin to understa nd the total
value of our machine.
The C]k Medium Power Wheel is powerful enough for centering at least 35 pounds of clay. It's an excellent choice for 90%
of all potters.
~'~
~i~
r~
P r i c e : $245.00 p l u s s h i p p i n g
If you're one of the 10% who needs more power, the ~
High Power Wheel is for you. Producin g 1 1/3 horsepow er,
this wheel is stronger than you are/
(.~
P r i c e : $340.00 p l u s s h i p p i n g
-~
Both wheels offer welded steel construct ion and
smooth variable speed control.
~'~
For detailed informatio n write:
This 125 pound pot was thrown by David Ferrin
at Stoneware 'n Stuff in La Mesa, Calif.
C r e a t i v e I n d u s t r i e s , P . O . B o x 343, L a M e s a , C a . 92041
i CPotter?[
Robbins Clay not only supplies individual s and
institution s with a wide range of ceramic materials
and services, but also is a place for students and
profession als to learn, create, work, and sell. There
are 18 private studios, an open workshop ,
classroom , and a gallery in our Lill Street Warehous e.
We mix over 25 clay bodies (including our famous
imported porcelain) and we're happy to custom mix
your own formula.
We sell equipmen t by:
• Brent
.Conway
.L&L
.Ohaus
• Shimpo
*Cress
.Evenhea t
.Kemper
Write for our new catalog.
Robbins Clay Co.
1021 W. LIII
Chicago IL 60614
(312) 477-0701
92
CERAMICS MONTHLY
]!i; ~!L
CERAMACTIVITIES
Contin ued [ram Page 91
vembe r 24. A series of clear-g lazed porcelain plates served as the basis for a variety
of compo sitions using the repetit ion of
plate and place setting images . Anoth er
group of porcel ain plates explor ed the
arrang ement of stars, arrows , and circles
drawn and brushe d with underg laze pen-
...~e,~,~
. s ,°
Instructor-
Dove Robinso n
ERYWORKS
_~%CRANEYHILL POTT
announc es 7 one-we ek
FOR A FREE COP Y
AND A NEW
BLUEBIRD CATA LOG
SHOPS
THROWING WORK
to August 26
July 11
make
where serious, enerqe fic students can control
immedr ate advances in their ability eto practice
effectiv
learn
and
clay
and move
s.
techniqu es for continu ed acceler ated progres
Usincj the Robinson method , experle ncedfe acher
leadesfabffshes empath eflc contact with student
nq strength .
incj to develop ment of sensitiv e f o w flftnq
hds,
for
"
es
techniqu
ional
profess
Also,
trimm nq pots, makincj handles, etc.
4.
or
]
Becjinnincj and Interme diate. Groups of
S185.
I week--$ T5, 2 weeks- -$1]5, 3 weeks-Low cost Iodqlnq & meals availab le. Rural setfincj.
Craney Hill Rd., Hennike r, N.H. 03242
(603) 428-7188 or (603) 529-7443
Oa 3..mcr
Miami University--Oxford, Ohio
June 6-July 22
Reku • Intermediate Throwing • Plaster Model &•
Mold Making • Soft Sculptur e--Fabric • Stltchery
Textile Prlntlng & Dyeing • Jewe ry • Pewteremlthing • Enameling • Wood • Pepermek ng• Puppetry •
Dulcimer Construction & Playing • Photogr aphy
Contact: Director Craffeummer
22 Hlaetand Hall
Miami Unlverelly
Oxford, Ohio 45056
FLETCHERFARm
W R I T E OR CALL :
Zen Plate
cils and soft washes. Shown is "Zen Plate,"
porcel ain with clear and gold luster glazes
14 inches in diamet er.
The cerami st's univer sity teachi ng involvem ent was appare nt in a piece titled
Attent ion C e r a m .n . .m . . .
ics 280," (show n),
~ , , ~
and
earthenware
low-fi re underg laze
~
~
stains, 12 inches in
~".O~!i'~
height . One of a
*:"=:: ::~JT~ series of three panels, the triptyc h re~.
fleets, in miniat ure,
, ..~x~E ~Tte~+ ..c z ~ , ~ m s aso ; the organi zation al
proble ms confro nt, ,,,
,,,
ing potters workin g
Susan Parks
in the comm unal studio space.
Susan Parks is an assista nt profes sor and
area coordi nator in cerami cs at the Uni-
E-z"
RINGLING MUSEUMS FESTIVAL
Works in cerami cs, glass, ename ling,
~ay'el'rY'atthde l~a~t~herAbY]9xt~lreSfts]~U]npt"Urer'e
"=+~
11
-
"
131.tJl'1311;l)
,
,
~
~
~~ ' ~
+!!J!ii):
if;i~j!!
Ceramics Monthly
20 -Y ea r Ind ex
1953 -197 2
This special subject index will prove invaluable for those wishin g to refer to materi al
publish ed in back issues of CM during this
20-yea r pedod . All feature articles are carefully indexe d, as well as items from the
"Sugg estion s" and "Ques tions" columns.
The large 8~4," x 11" format helps make
the index easy to read and use. Order your
copy today for only $I.50, postpa id.
+
CERAMICS MONTHLY
Box 12448= Columbus Ohio 43212
HINCKLEYSUMMERSCHOOLOF
""~
/
~
"
+
Display by Stephen ],/,son
nual Ringli ng Museu ms Crafts Festiva l,
held Novem ber 19-21 in Saraso ta, Florid a.
More than $1500 in prizes were award ed
by juror Lloyd E. Herma n, directo r of the
For inf0rmatl0n write or call:
Hinckley Summer School M Crafts
Box K, Hinckley,Maine04944
(207,~453-7893
BLUEBIRD MANU FACTU RING
100 GREGORY ROAD
FORT COLLINS, CO 80521
3O3484-3243
versity o[ Massachusetts, Amherst.
CLRflFTSCHOqL| W
acres in central MAINE
eksessi0ns
Tw03-we
Classroomand studio
f0rhighsch001stu,entsages 14-1,8
30 PAGES OF
INFO RMA TION ,
PHOTOGRAPHS
AND DRAWINGS
Smithsonian Institution's Renwi ck Gallery,
with merit presen tations of $200 each
made to cerami st Stephe n ]epson (whose
display booth is shown ) and ename list
Pleasesendme a copyof the 20-YearIndexat
$1.50. postpaid
Name
Address
CRy
1 enclose
Zip
Stale
[] Check
[] Money Order
(Ohtores~lentspleaseadd 6¢ per copyfor SalesTax
~ m m
Gael Silverblatt.
May
1977
93
O
OPU S
CLA Y S Y M P O S I U M
AUG UST 12-1 3-14
Snow Mountain
Ranch, G r a n b y , C o l o r a d o
EXCITING, FUN, INFORMATIVEAND USEFUL,
COVERING ALL ASPECTSOF CERAMICSFROM
THROWINGTO KILN DESIGNAND MARKETING.
INSTRUCTORS:
Dave Blakeslee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Broomfield
Gary Duleff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sharidan
Glen Foster . . . . . . . . . . ~
. . . . . . . . . . Industry
Bill Hoskins . . . . . . . . .
/
~4U
~ ..........
Denver
Bob LeOonne . . . . . . . . . ~
per
) . . . . . . . . . Madison
Sit Littell . . . . . . . . . . . . ~ p e r s o n / / . . . . . . . . . . . . Bryan
Diane Mellon . . . . . . . . . . . ~
. . . . . . . . . . . . Sedalla
Jim Melton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sedalla
Francis Sparer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fulton
Paul Soldner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aspen
CO
CO
CA
CO
Wl
TX
CO
CO
Me
CO
Special program for disabled, using
new Soldner wheelchair poffer's wheel
College credl¢/4 wk. adv. registration /
Airport shuffle bus/Food and Lodging
Write for brochure: OPUS/7025 Meadewbro ok Ln/Sedalia C O 80135
94
CERAMICS
MONTHLY
Summer
Workshops1977
We would like to call the attention of our
readers to the following list of summer
workshops that arrived too late to be included in "Summer Workshops 1977"
featured in the April issue.
CALIFORN IA, ALAMEDA
Continuous
Firelizard Pottery offt.rs continuing courses in
~h~wl-thr.~i n~, h:l].lhuihtint r, and dab ~ork in
for lids, trimming, and handles. Write: Craney Hill
Pottery Works, Craney Hill Road. Henniker 03242.
NEW YORK, BROOKLY N
July .5-August 29
The Brooklyn Museum Art School offers an 8-week
session in ceramics and stained glass. Write: The
Brooklyn Museum Art School, 188 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn 11238.
NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Continuous
The Mavros Workshop offers classes in handbuilding ;
wheel-throw ing; decorating and glazing; clay. slip,
and glaze formulation; firing; and sculpture. Instructor: Donald Mavros. Write: Mavros Workshop,
49 West 28th St., New York 10001.
IOWA, IOWA CITY
June 6-17
The University of Iowa offers a 10-day class in
the geology of pottery. The course will include
collecting Clay and glaze materials, mineral and
rock identificatio n, prospecting techniques, testing
ceramic materials, and glaze calculation. Instructor: Bud Rudesill. Write: 303 W. Benton Street,
Iowa City 52240.
MASSACHU SETTS, CAMBRIDG E
May 23-August 26
Mudflat Pottery offers a 10-week intensive studio
session with week-long workshops (June 20-August
26) with Carol Abraham, thixotropic clay; Chuck
Hindes. saggar firing; and S:eve Reynolds, fantasy
forms. On-going sessions will he available with resident teachers. Special sessions will be held in
wheel-throw ing, handbuilding , raku, glaze chemistry, sculpture, and kiln building (beginning the
weeks of May 23. June 13, July 4. July 25, and
August 5). Write: Mudflat Pottery, 25 First Street,
Cambridge 02141.
MINNESOT A, OSSEO
August 8-20
Minnesota Clay Company offers two 5-day sessions:
salt-firing (August 8-13), and "discovering natural
clay and glazes, and primitive techniques" (August
15-20). Instructors: Steve Dennis and Mike Mikkelsen. Write: Grain Bin Pottery, Route 5, Box
136, Osseo 55369.
NEW HAMPSHIR E, HENNIKER
July ll-August 26
Craney Hill Pottery Works offers seven 1-week
throwing workshops, with professional techniques
Brasstown, N.C. 28902.
(704) 837-2775
NEW JERSEY. M O R R I S T O W N
June 27-July 29
Earth and Fire offers a 5-week session in wheelthrowing, handbuilding , and glazing. Instructor: Sy
L. Shames and Michael F. Feno. Write: Earth and
Fire, Box 5, 20 Morris Street, Morr!stown 07960.
NEW YORK, LAKE PLACID
June 18-July 29
Lake Placid School of Art offers 6-week sessions
in either "Introductio n to Clay" or "Clay and'
Other Materials." A week-long kiln construction
workshop is also planned. Write: Ceramics: Summer '77, Lake Placid School of Art, Saranac Ave..
Lake Placid 12946.
Nancy Tucker at Ri,i.z, I.;:, ,; ¢,, ",2;,~
stoneware and porcelain, lnslructor: Lt'e Johnson.
Write: Firelizard Pottery, 1326 Park Street, Alameda 94501.
Short Courses
in Weaving, Enameling,
Pottery, Wood Carving,
Woodworking, Blacksmithing,
Recorder, and Folkdancing.
The JOHN C. CAMPBELL
FOLK SCHOOL,
NEW YORK, PORT CHESTER
May 27-20
Clay Art Center plans a 2-day workshop with Byron
Temple. For further information write: 40 Beech
Street, Port Chester 10573, or call (914) 937-2047.
N O R T H CAROLINA , CARRBORO
August 22-Septembe r 16
Stoney Hill 77 offers a 9-day workshop in raku
(August 22-31) with Kurt Weiser, and a workshop
in functional pottery (September 7-16) with Saodra
and Michael Simon. Write Stoney Hill at the Art
School, 150 East Main Street: Carrboro 27510.
PENNSYLV ANIA, ALLENTOW N
June 20-July 15
Cedar Crest College offers a 4-week session in methods of handbuilding , wheel-throw ing, glazing, and
raku, reduction, and salt firings. Visiting artist will
be Toshiko Takaezu. Instructor: Bill Clark. Write:
Registrar, Cedar Crest College, Allentown 18104.
QUEBEC, ST-JACQUE S-DES-PILE S
July #-August 28
La Poterie Bonsec'ours offers four 2-week sessions in
~'heel-throw ing, handbuilding , firing, and enamelrag. Instructors: Monique Giard, Alain Guibeauh.
and Maurice Achard. Write: Poterie Bonsecours,
433 rue Notre-Dame est. Montreal H2Y 1C9.
QUEBEC, ST-ROMUA LD
May 2-September 2
Atelier Pro Arts offers two 3-week sessions in
throwing techniques, two l-week sessions in raku,
and two 1-week sessions in "initiation to clay."
Instructor: Richard Marcoux and invited artists.
Write: Atelier Pro Arts. 1036 Commerciale , StRomuald. LEvis G6W 1X6.
UTAH, SNOWBIRD
July 5-29
The University of Utah offers a ceramics course in
handbuildin g and graduate projec's to be arranged
by each individual. Instructors: Dorothy Bearnson
and Larry Eisner. Write: Kathy Cluff. Director,
Conferences and Institutes. 1152 Annex Dept. P-I,
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112.
. ~
~
~r~
~Z
"
~g
~__.~
Summer session,
weekendworkshops,
fall/winter/spring
internships,
residentcraftsmen,
Store & Gallery.
Applicationsfor
residenc yaccepted.
Brochuresavailable
on all programs.
HIDDEN VALLEYPOTTERY
July3-30
Summer Worksho ps
Hidden Valley Resort located in the
mountains of Pennsylvania [s a natural
setting for the artist. The Pottery offers
4 sessions with Randy Myers for the beginning and advanced potter. Insffucfion
will include handbuildln cj, wheelthrow ing,
raku, and stoneware firing. Attend one or
all sessions. For a unique experience in
clay, write:
Hidden Valley Resort
RD ~6, Somerset, PA 1S501
(814) 445-6014
YWCA 1
Craft Students League
Women and Men
Ceramics, Glaze Chemistry
34 Other Fine Arts and Crafts
Y W c A of the City of New York
G10 Lexington Avenue at S3rd Street
For Registratio n, call 7 5 5 - 4 5 0 0
THE
NAPLESMILL
SCHOOLOF
Summer Sessions
Weekend Workshops
Fail . Winter - Spring
Concentrations
Write or call (716) 374.6386
for complete information.
NAPLES MILL SCHOOL
Box 567, Naples, NY 14512
May
1977
95
STONE VILLAGE
JACKSON, MICHIG AN
492.03
LIIHI I : l l l l l I IILIIII ~ I ILIIl!l' 1:[1111 I IIII I I ILIIlll I I H I I I I [ I I I:;I
Opening September 10, 1977
I I l i i i I I I H I h l I l l l l I I 1111'1 I l Y l I I h l H l ' l
I I1[111 I I H I l i l : 11
~lte ~-laq ~,~alle~q will be devoted exclusively to the exhibition and sale of quality works in the
clay medium. If will include representative works of ceramic artists from the U.S. and Canada.
The gallery will provide discriminating patrons with a warm, receptive and spacious environment.
If
will also maintain a large reference-slide library and projection room featuring the works of participaf
ing artists for the benefit of patrons, artists and students, and for private and commercial research
or
commission purposes.
Throughout the year there will be special exhibits of the works of individual artists and frequent
lectures and films which will be of interest to both artists and the general public. The gallery will
be open
every afternoon except Monday and on Friday and Saturday evenings.
~llt ~!aq ~allerq welcomes the interest of ceramic artists. To receive our brochure explaining exhibition and sllde-library applications, direct inquiries c/o The Stone Village Art Center, 1701
Probert
Road, Jackson, Michigan 49203.
BIG
CR
EEK
1977 UVE-II4
Mus eum of
Northern Ariz ona
summer
symposium
worl£shops
ceramics, glass blowing, fabrics, wood, stone and
metal sculpture, blacksmithing, cinemato graphy
Darby
Staffel
Townley
Dodd
Greene
Handler
Kington
Lintault
McCleve
Paley
Prentice
Sugawara
Tanner
Brookins
Littleton
contact the Museum of Northern Arizona Art Institute
Route 4, Box 720
Ragstaff, Arizona 86001
" t h i s p r o j e c t is i o i n t l y s u p p o r t e d b y a g r a n t f r o m t h e A r i z o
na ¢omm i s s i o n o n t h e A r t s and Humanffies and the National Endowment
for
'the A r t s . "
96
CERAMICSMONTHLY
WORKSHOPS
JOHN GLICK - 2 WEEI~S
MAY 15- MAY 28
I~
I~'DOU~L-8~EKS
JUNE 12- AUG 6
SEPT 18 - NOV 12
WARRENMkcKENZIE AND
JOIIM REEVE- 3 WEEKS
AUG I/4- SEP T 3
KEMENYFFY RAKU WORKSHOP
at the SouthwestCraftCenter
July21.29,1977
~
klcturst,c~monstre~ons,~
SSO/p~sonk~ck~ rna~ecLs~
1~
~
~ ,
ContactflAKUWORKSHOp
SOUTHWEST CRAFT CENTER
300 AUGUSTA STREET
SANA~TONIO782O5
512 224 1 8 4 8
NEW BOO KS
M o m ~ & c a r ~ irdormati~l avadab~
BRITISH ART POTTERY
by A. W. Coysh
Covering the period from 1870 to 1940,
this text concentrat es on studio ceramics
from William De Morgan to Michael Cardew, and is illustrated primarily with pottery forms throughou t the era. Individual ly
~roduced objects are included, as well as
ware from Fulham, Doulton, Della Robbia,
Ruskin, and a variety of other potteries
where hand production predomina ted. Victorian art potteries, the chemist-cr aftsman,
industrial art ware between the wars, and
the rise of the studio potters are all discussed. 96 pages; 80 black-and- white illustrations. $10.00. Charles E. Tuttle Company, Rutland, Vermont 05701.
ART OF THE MODERN POTTER
by Tony Birks
JAPAN
CRAFT IN RELATION TO CULTURE
A Study/Tou r with Artist/Cra ftsman
Mikhail Zakin, July 6-27, 1977. Limited
to 22 participan ts. Focus on traditional/contemporary craftmaking: paper,
pottery, weaving, bamboo, lacquer,
dyeing, printing. Write: O. C. Cultural
Center, 561 Piermont Road, Demaresf,
New Jersey 07627, (201) 767-7160,
New York departure $2600*, Less for
West Coast departure .
*Price subject to change.
In this book, essays and photograp hs explore the contempor ary art of fourteen
ceramists selected by the author. Representing several nationaliti es by birthplace
or current residence, they share the common denominat or of all having studied
and practiced their art in England. Two
now reside in the United States (Ruth
Duckworth and Anthony Hepburn), one
in Holland (Andrew Lord), and the rest
Dan Arbeid, Ian Auld, Gordon Baldwin,
Alan Barrett-Da nes, Hans Coper, Ian
Godfrey, Janet Leach, Gillian Lowndes,
Bryan Newman, Lucie Rie, and Robin
Welch) are in Great Britain. The artists'
influences , styles, and profession al activities are discussed in portfolios of each
craftsman' s work. The ceramics pictured
are from private collections or those of
the artists and thus not normally on public
view. 208 pages; approxima tely 160 blackand-white and 44 color photograp hs, $20.
Van Nostrand Reinhold, 450 West 33
Street, New York, N.Y. 10001.
POTTERY STYLE AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT PERU
Art as a Mirror of History in the lea Valley,
1350-1570
by Dorothy Menzel
•
arks • Tuscarora, Nevada89834
Ceramics can be used by a civilization to
communic ate ideas, and has often expressed national pride, identity, independence, or reaction to conquest. When used
in a communic ative manner, it may be
analyzed as carefully as language, and to
do so, the elements of style and their
combinati ons throughou t the period must
be understood .
Such an approach is taken in this study
of five stylistic episodes in pottery of the
Ica Valley on the southern coast of Peru
from A.D. 1350 into the first century of
Spanish colonizatio n. Changes in ware are
traced and interpreted as reflections of
interests and loyalties and of outside influences on the culture. Chapters discuss
the archaeolog ical context including names
and locations of the sites providing examples, forming techniques , classificati on
Continued on Page 98
Clay
Ar t
Ce nte r
Announc ing a
Z-Day Workshop
in Port Chester
with
Byron Temple
May 27 & 28
call or write for details
potters
Intenswe classes for
experienced potters
CYNTHIABRINGLE
J u l y 18 - 22
TOSHIK0TAKAEZU
A u g u s t 22 - 26
For application, write:
W e s l e y a n Potters Inc.
350 South Main St.. Middletown. CT 06457
SOUTH ROAD POTTERY
SUMMER SESSION 1977
June 20- July 29
Intensive 6-week course on the potter's wheel
designed to meet the individual needs of both
beginninq and advanced students. For bra.
chure write: Phyllis and Bruce Murray, Sou~h
Road Pottery. Bradford, Vermont 05033.
(802) 222-5798
THE LAKE ERIE ISLANDS WORKSHOP
at Put-in-Bay, Ohio
announces a workshop - Augusf 15-19, 1977
PRODUCTION STUDIO PRACTICES:
Procedures and ConsideraHons in Operating Your
Studio; Management and MarkeHng. Conducted
by JOE ZELLER, studio potter Cha rman, Dept. of
Ceramics, Cleveland nsfitufe of Art.
We are interested in discnsslncj
year*round studio possibilities
THE LAKE ERIE ISLANDS WORKSHOP
2085
Cornell Rd., ~210, Cleveland, O. 44106
May
1977
97
SIXTH ANNUAL PRIMITIVE
POTTE RY WOR KSHOP
NEW
BOOKS
August 15-27, 1977
Continued [rom Page 97
ANDERSON RANCH
ARTS CENTER
at Snowmass,
Colorado
Sssmmer W o r k s h o p s
1977
Ceramics: Daniel
Rhodes,
Robert
Turner,
Frederick
Olsen
Woodworking:
Sam Maloof,
Walker
Weed, Wendell Castle
Fibers: Mel Someroski,
Gerhardt
Knodel,
Mary Jane Leland, Clotilde
Barrett.
Also
Sessions
in Painting,
Printmaking,
Photography,
Guitar Construction.
Write For Catalogue
Dorothy
Garwood
P.O. Box 2406C
Aspen CO. 81611
Summerva.I
Art
$'orkshop
of shapes, analyses of decoration, and conclusions. There follows an appendix listing
and describing burial sites and pottery
examples; a bibliography; keys for the
figures, plates, and colors; a chronological
table; approximately 300 profile and crosssectional line drawings, an equal number
of design motif illustrations; 112 blackand-white photographs of Ica ware; 348
pages. $25. University o[ Cali[ornia Press,
"COLORADO
CLAY SYMPOSIUM "
June 17, 18, 19,1977
Doug Baldwin
Tom Baldon
Lukman Giassgow
Ken Little
David Middlebrook
Art Morrison
Joyce Moty
Jacklyn Rice
Tom Rippon
John Rololf
Richard Shaw
COLORADO
MOUNTAIN COLLEGE
Box 1114 / Vail, Colo. 81657
303/476-4040
98
CERAMICS
MONTHLY
Coordinator
Primitive Pottery Workshop
Room 242 HRCB
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT 84602
2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley 94720.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN CRAFTS
The First Complete Guide for Success
us a Crafts Professional
by Elyse Sommer
Descriptions of, alternatives to, and methods for involvement in crafts careers are
discussed in chapters of this text covering
marketing, retailing of work, supplies,
tools, managing fairs or shows, acting as an
agent or sales representative, teaching and
the potential for crafts in the field of
therapy, writing, publishing, other communication methods, and crafts administration. Specific careers are discussed in
approximately fifty case histories. An
appendix lists published resource materials,
national crafts-related organizations, and
examples of legal forms and agreements,
with guidelines for their use. 280 pages;
110 black-and-whit e photographs and illustrations. $5.95 paperback and $10.95 in
hard cover. Crown Publishers, Inc., One
;"~
Index
A-I ................ ......... 69
egean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alpine
..................
A.ace ......................
Ambidex ....................
Anderson
...................
Anhowe .....................
A.R.T .......................
89
66, 9
85
~2
78
Bailey ......................
Baldwin
....................
Bat .........................
Big Creek ...................
Bluebird ..........
87, 89, 91.
B o o k D e p t . . . . 69, 74, 81, 90,
Brent .......................
Brigham Young .............
Byrne
......................
California Kiln ..........
73,
California
Show ............
Campbell
...................
C a m p b e l l P a c i f i c . . . . . . . . 75,
Campbell
School ............
Capital
.....................
Center Press ................
Ceramic Films ..............
Ceramicorner
...............
Clay Art ...................
Clay Devil ..................
Clay GallelT ................
Colorado Mountain
..........
Connecticut
Craft ...........
Conway .....................
Craft Students ..............
Craney Hill .................
Creative Industries
. . . . . . 89,
Creek Turn .................
5
EIGHTEEN DAYS MASHIKO
A N D BIZEN- TWELVE DAYS
TRAVEL-JUN E 24 TO JULY 23
UNITREX
D^lta
___89
D u~'n c a n . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
14, 15
Eagle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
13
Earth
Treasures
............
94
Earthen
Vessel .............
70
PASADENA, CA. 91106
to A d v e r t i s e r s
19
20
Fletcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flower
.....................
Francoise ...................
Frey ........................
93
70
87
16
........................
Geil ........................
;'73 G i f f i n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Good Earth .................
.~
Ham.ill & Gillespie .........
93 H i d d e n V a l l e y . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...................
93 H i n c k l e y
12 H i r o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Industrial
Minerals
.........
85 K e m p e r . . . . . . .
..............
87 K e r a m o s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82 K i c k w h e e i P o t t e r y . . . . . . . . . . .
~6 K l e c k n e r ' s
..................
,5 K l o p f e n s t e i n
................
90 K r a f t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
L & L ......................
68 L & R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17 L a k e E r i e W
orkshop
85 L e a g u e o f N . H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
....
97 L e s l i e . . . . . . . . .
.............
23
96 M a y c o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medusa
.....................
9
91 M e n e o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...........
86 M i a m i U n i v e r s i t y
Clay ...............
95 M i n n e s o t a
Technical .......
93 M o n t g o m e r y
....................
92 M u d f l a t
...........
79 M u s e u m - - A r i z o n a
Cress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C o v e r 4
Crusader ..................... 8
Dawson
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
1043 E. GSEEN ST.
Earthworks
- Rochester ......
Estrin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gare
~_'XiaCu~"'
WORKSHOFJ I/)#I/I
Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10016.
Faculty: June 20 - August 19
Dan Martinez, David Furman,
Kathy Ricks, Jackle Hurlburt,
Eric Abraham, Joanne Hayakawa
Robert Piepenberg,
Graduate and undergraduate credit
available.
For information write:
Opus .......................
Orton
......................
Owl Creek ..................
94
68
83
Paragon
....................
34
Paramount
..................
~2
Peach Valley ............
71, 84
Peters Valley ...............
95
68 P h o e n i x D e s i g n . . . . . . . . . . . . .
,0
2
Portland Pottery ............
91
6 Potluck .....................
87
87
90
95
9~
eid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
88
Reward .....................
RObvbins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ro in ......................
92
Sale .......................
Scott Creek .................
7 Oaks ......................
Sherry's
....................
Shimpo ................
Cover
Skutt ..................
Cover
Sold ........................
68 S o u t h R o a d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
68 S o u t h w e s t C r a f t . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91 S t . . . . r t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97 S u n V a l l e y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98 S u p e r a m i c s
.................
72
Thomas-Stuart
..............
6i T h o m p s o n . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
Tusca . . . . . -_IS--::-. . . . . . . . . .
,8
93 U S C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9 Unitrex ....................
97 V a n H o w e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93 w c s
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96 W a l k e r f f a m a r . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Walsh ......................
Naples M i l l . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Warrington
s
.................
North Star .................
..................
18 W a y - C r a f t
Notre Dame .................
92 W e b c o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ohio Ceramic ...............
89 Wesleyan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
O l d C h u r c h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 W e s t b y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
~b W e s t e r n
....................
Olsen .......................
Olympic
....................
21 W i t t e l s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
86
88
8
91
68
70
NCMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
84
8~
91
13
2
3
8~
97
~_~
9Y
65
88
75
97
94
98
5
87
89
7~
9
83
89
Finally.
A whole new line of UL
listed Cone 10 kilns, from the
compan y you've come to depend
on.
Skutt.
It's true we've t a k e n our
time. With good reason. The high
t e m p e r a t u r e kiln is a problem prone creature , so we've worked
slowly getting the bugs out.
Result: a line of Cone 10
kilns, all UL listed, for safe, durable service. And all designe d to
handle high t e m p e r a t u r e firing
techniqu es, special clays, special glazes.
Our Cone 10's are built in
sections , for easy brick removal ,
P
T
......
easy repair. And they're m u l t i sided, for even firing.
There's a ventilat ed switchbox, to keep compon ents cool
and trouble- free. A reversib le
bottom slab, for double life. And
a year-lon g w a r r a n t y on both
parts and labor.
Plus, each and every kiln is
backed by our 24-vear old reputation for quality and service.
And our network of distribu tors,
nation-w ide.
Skutt's new line of Cone 10
kilns: all in all, well worth the
wait.
S k u t t Ceramic Product s, Inc.
2618 S.E. Steele Street
Portland , Oregon 9 7 2 0 2
r
--
"[email protected] EDJ
We 've
(
J~
J
• Exposed coils for
better radiation
inside" . . . .
insul
and
coil i
iat
• Full insulation at
comers insures
slower cooling
II
F
J!
• Exclusive 2-position
• lid venting prop won't
pinch fingers
• Full size
easy lifti]
Variable power
controls for uniform
firing
•
Permanen
instructk
• Fully plated 200°C
conneeting wires
l
• Metal b~
strength
• Flared peep holes for
wider view and less ~
heat loss
~
, Low, cool power
connection for
longer life
®
• 3-Prong plug for easy
' connection
The Cress B-23-H. Its features, quality and new
low price make it the best kiln value ever. And that's
not just a lot of hot air.
Contact us for a free catalog and your nearest
Cress dealer at:
CRESS MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Corporate Headquarters &
Main Plant:
!718 FLORADAL E AVENUE
SOUTH EL MONTE, CALIFORNI A 91733
(213) 443-3081
Eastern Plant:
201 BRADSHAW PIKE EXTENSION
HOPKINSVI LLE, KENTUCKY 42240
(502) 886-0208
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