Snack Attack! - Brant Food For Thought

Snack Attack! - Brant Food For Thought
What’s for Dessert?
Yummy Hummus
Chewy Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies
1 cup
¾ cup
½ cup
1/3 cup
¼ cup
1
½ tsp
½ tsp
½ cup
quick cooking oats
all-purpose flour
packed brown sugar
non-hydrogenated margarine
white sugar
egg
baking soda
vanilla extract
Sultana raisins
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2. Place all ingredients except raisins in a large bowl.
Beat all ingredients using a mixer at medium speed.
3. Stir raisins into batter.
4. Drop by teaspoonfuls, 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart on a
cookie sheet.
5. Bake for 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.
6. Remove cookies from sheet and cool on a wire rack.
Makes 4 dozen small cookies
250 mL
175 mL
125 mL
75 mL
50 mL
1
2 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1 tin (19oz)
¼ cup
¼ cup
¼ cup
2 tbsp
½ tsp
2 cloves
chick peas
tahini
lemon juice
plain yogurt
olive oil
ground cumin
garlic, chopped
540 mL
50 mL
50 mL
50 mL
30 mL
2 mL
2 cloves
DIRECTIONS:
1. Drain chick peas and rinse.
2. In a blender or food processor, puree chick peas.
Add a little water if necessary.
3. Add remaining ingredients and blend well.
4. Add salt and pepper to taste, if desired.
5. Place in an air-tight container and store in the fridge
for up to 3 days.
Serve with pita bread or raw vegetables or use as a
sandwich spread.
Makes 2 cups (500 mL)
No Bake Trail Mix
4 cups
1 tsp
1-1½ cups
½ cup
½ cup
Shreddies-type cereal
ground cinnamon
chopped mixed dried fruit
shredded coconut
sunflower seeds
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a large bowl, combine cereal and cinnamon.
2. Add remaining ingredients and mix.
3. Store in an air-tight container.
Makes 6 cups (1-½L)
1L
5 mL
375 mL
125 mL
125 mL
 Healthier choices include:
 Desserts to pass on:
 Fruit of any kind - Cut up fruit in small containers to
make it easier for younger children to eat.
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Fruit-flavoured yogurt
 Unsweetened fruit cups or applesauce cups
 Cookies, such as Oatmeal Raisin (see recipe page) fig
or other fruit bars, graham crackers
 Mini muffins with fruit
 Home-made gelatin with added fruit
 Dried Fruit
 “Fruit” gel in cups - these contain water, sugar and artificial
flavour and offer little nutrition other than calories
 Cookies with icing dip - loaded with unhealthy fat and
lots of sugar
 Packaged cakes and brownies - loaded with unhealthy fats
and lots of sugar
Unless children can brush their teeth at school, limit snacks that are sticky and high in sugar.
Snack
Attack!
 Healthy Snacks:
 Snacks to pass on:
 Whole grain crackers, rice cakes, melba toast, bread sticks,
or dry unsweetened cereal
 Plain popcorn , or popcorn seasoned with Parmesan cheese
and garlic powder (see recipe page)
 Home-made baked goods, such as banana bread or oatmeal
cookies (see recipe page)
 Cheese cubes or strings
 Raw veggies
 Any kind of fruit ... grapes, bananas, cantaloupe, berries
 Fruit cups or applesauce in a cup
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Pumpkin or sunflower seeds, plain or seasoned
 Roasted soybeans or chickpeas
 Yogurt - try freezing containers or tubes for a fun treat!
 Baked tortilla chips with salsa
 Plain cookies
 Lower-salt pretzels
 Granola bars that are chewy, coated in
chocolate, or contain marshmallows or chocolate chips These are often high in fat and sugar, and are more like candy
 Dry instant soup noodles - loaded with salt!
 Chewy fruit snacks - don’t be fooled by pictures of fruit on
the package and claims “Made with Real Fruit”. There is only
a small amount of fruit and these are more like candy
 Snack packs, such as cheese spread with crackers or
breadsticks - high in fat and salt, and low in nutrients
 Potato chips, cheese puffs, flavoured tortilla chips - high in
unhealthy fats and loaded with salt
For more tips & Info:
www.bchu.org
Produced and distributed by the Brant County Health Unit
(519) 753-4937 ext. 458. Adapted from School Lunch
Your Kids Will Munch, developed by Region of Waterloo
Public Health, 2010
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Healthy Weight!
What to Include
in a Healthy
School Lunch
A growing number of Canadian children
are overweight. To help your child keep a
healthy weight, pack lunches that
include fruit, vegetables, whole grains
and lower-fat milk products. Avoid
artificially-flavoured drinks, pop and
other snacks that do not provide good
nutrition such as chips, chocolate bars
and packaged snack cakes in your child’s
school lunch.
Foods from the four food groups in
Canada’s Food Guide give the
nourishment kids need to grow
and learn. A balanced lunch includes
at least one choice from each food group.
Get your kids involved in planning what will
go in their lunch. They have probably talked
about the Food Guide in class!
Follow these easy steps:
1
Start with a choice of Meat or
Alternatives: for example, sliced lean
meat, a hard-cooked egg or bean dip.
4
Milk or Milk Alternatives like chocolate
milk, cheese, yogurt or fortified soy
beverage balance out the meal.
2
Add a Grain Product to go with it, such
as whole wheat bread, crackers or pita.
5
3
Don’t forget a Vegetable or
Fruit choice!
Finish up with some dessert. A choice
from the Grain Products, Milk and
Alternatives food groups or some fruit
are all healthy options. (See page 4 for
dessert suggestions).
Allergy Alert!
Peanut butter, peanuts, and other nuts are healthy food choices. However, there are
children with an allergy to these foods in almost every school in Brant County. A number of
schools have banned foods containing peanuts or nuts from lunch boxes to protect the
safety of children with allergies. Check with your school about foods that are not allowed in
your child’s classroom.
All foods have the potential to cause an allergic reaction. To avoid an unexpected reaction,
children should never trade their lunch with another child.
Tips for Packing
a Safe School Lunch
• Use insulated lunch bags and a
thermos to help keep cold foods
cold and hot foods hot. Warm
thermos with hot water before filling
it with steaming hot food.
• A frozen juice box, a freezer pack or
sandwiches made with frozen bread
can help to keep lunch foods cold.
• Wash all vegetables and fruit
before packing.
• Do not resend sandwiches or hot
foods. Fruits and other snacks
can be safely repacked. Do not
re-use wrappings.
• Teach children to wash their
hands before eating.
• Wash reusable beverage container
at the end of the day with soap
and hot water.
Did you know?
Children may have less than 20 minutes
to eat lunch at school. For younger
children with smaller appetites, keep
portions small. Peel fruit when possible
and cut up foods into smaller bite-sized
pieces. Ask your child’s school principal
about allowing students to eat healthy
snacks like veggies and fruit, and having
a water bottle in class.
What’s to
Drink?
Make Your Own
“Lunch Kits”
Kids often want fun, packaged foods they see on TV or in their friends’ lunches. When pressed
for time, convenience foods are helpful. But, packing these in your kids’ lunches most of the
time won’t give them what they need to be healthy and stay energized all day long.
Ready-to-eat lunch “kits” are easy, portable and kids like them. But what are you paying
for? They contain lots of fat, sodium and added sugar and few of the nutrients kids need to
grow and learn. They are an expensive and less nutritious choice.
Store bought lunch kits contain:
•
•
•
•
300-600 calories
up to 35 grams (9 tsp) of fat, including up to 17 grams (4 tsp) of saturated fat
less than 1 gram of fibre
1000+ mg of sodium
Grain Products
Graham crackers
Bagels
Tortillas / wraps
Pita pockets
Dry breakfast cereals
Whole grain crackers
Pasta salad
Rice
Couscous
English muffins
Whole grain bread, buns
or muffins
Vegetables / Fruit
Baby carrots
Celery sticks
Strips of sweet pepper
Slices of cucumber
Milk & Alternatives
Meat & Alternatives
Yogurt (fruit-flavored or add
fruit to plain yogurt)
Rolled-up sliced meat such as
turkey, ham or roast beef
Cheese cubes or slices
Cubes or slices of leftover ham,
chicken, turkey or beef
Yogurt dip
Cherry or grape tomatoes
Cheese strings
Broccoli or cauliflower florets
Pudding made with milk
Salsa for dipping
Mini yogurt
Dried fruit such as raisins,
apricots and cranberries (see
“Snack Attack” back page)
Make your own lunch kits using reusable
containers with compartments. The chart
below offers some ideas for packing
healthier choices.
Yogurt tubes
 Drinks to Grow On:
 Drinks to Pass on:




 Pop
 Fruit punch, fruit cocktail and fruit
drink - these usually contain less
than 10% real juice plus 9
teaspoons of added sugar. These
are more like pop.
 Sports drinks
Milk - white or chocolate
100% fruit juice*
Vegetable juice cocktail
Water
* 100% fruit juice is a healthy choice for kids, but too much juice is not good.
Limit 100% fruit juice to 125 mL (½ cup) per day and serve with a meal or snack
to decrease the risk of cavities.
Sandwich Suggestions
Avoid the sandwich slump! Here are a few fresh ideas for the most common lunchtime food.
Cut sandwiches or wraps into smaller pieces. Children usually like “finger foods” that can be
easily picked up and eaten in two small bites!
Hard-cooked egg, sliced
BASE
(Grain Product)
Hummus or bean dip
Sunflower or pumpkin seeds
Give some careful thought to what is packed for a lunch-time drink. Beverages should also
give kids nutrients they need for growth and development. There are many kinds of packaged
drinks in boxes, cans, and plastic bottles. Read labels carefully to be sure you’re making a
healthy choice. Or, pack a healthy beverage in a reusable beverage container.
FILLING
(Meat or Alternative)
TOPPER
(Milk Products or Vegetable & Fruit)
mini pita pockets
hummus (see recipe page)
lettuce, cucumber
multi-grain bagel or whole wheat bread
egg salad or tuna salad
cucumber slices, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
whole wheat or flavoured wraps
bean spread or grilled chicken slices
rye bread
shaved black forest ham
whole grain roll or mini submarine bun
chicken salad, turkey or lean roast beef
grated cheddar cheese, chopped
tomato or salsa, sweet pepper
and lettuce
Swiss cheese slice, sliced pickle
or tomato
chopped tomato, sprouts, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
Parmesan Popcorn
8 cups
2 tbsp
¼ cup
1 tsp
1 tsp
popped popcorn
butter or non-hydrogenated
margarine, melted
grated Parmesan cheese
dried oregano
garlic powder
Banana Bread
2L
30 mL
50 mL
5 mL
5 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Place popcorn in a large bowl.
2. Drizzle melted butter or margarine over popcorn
and mix well.
3. In a small bowl, mix together Parmesan cheese, oregano
and garlic powder.
4. Sprinkle seasoning mix over popcorn and mix well.
5. Store in an airtight container.
Makes 8 cups
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1 tsp
1/2 tsp
1/2 cup
1
1/4 cup
3 tbsp
1 tsp
2
1/3 cup
all-purpose flour
whole wheat flour
baking soda
baking powder
white sugar
egg
lower-fat plain yogurt
canola oil
vanilla
ripe, medium-sized bananas
fresh or frozen blueberries or
frozen or dried cranberries
(optional)
175 mL
125 mL
5 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1
50 mL
45 mL
5 mL
2
75 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
2. Sift together all-purpose flour, baking soda and baking
powder. Mix in whole wheat flour. Set aside.
3. In large mixing bowl, thoroughly mash bananas. Add sugar,
egg, yogurt, oil and vanilla. Mix well.
4. Add dry ingredients and frozen or dried fruit (if desired) to
banana mixture. Mix just until dry is combined.
5. Pour batter into a lightly oiled 8” x 5” loaf pan (2 litre).
6. Bake for 1 hour or until a tester inserted into the centre
comes out clean.
To make muffins, spoon this batter into paper-lined muffin tins.
Bake at 350°F (180°C) for 18-22 minutes.
Makes 1 loaf, 8 medium muffins or 12 small muffins.
What’s to
Drink?
Make Your Own
“Lunch Kits”
Kids often want fun, packaged foods they see on TV or in their friends’ lunches. When pressed
for time, convenience foods are helpful. But, packing these in your kids’ lunches most of the
time won’t give them what they need to be healthy and stay energized all day long.
Ready-to-eat lunch “kits” are easy, portable and kids like them. But what are you paying
for? They contain lots of fat, sodium and added sugar and few of the nutrients kids need to
grow and learn. They are an expensive and less nutritious choice.
Store bought lunch kits contain:
•
•
•
•
300-600 calories
up to 35 grams (9 tsp) of fat, including up to 17 grams (4 tsp) of saturated fat
less than 1 gram of fibre
1000+ mg of sodium
Grain Products
Graham crackers
Bagels
Tortillas / wraps
Pita pockets
Dry breakfast cereals
Whole grain crackers
Pasta salad
Rice
Couscous
English muffins
Whole grain bread, buns
or muffins
Vegetables / Fruit
Baby carrots
Celery sticks
Strips of sweet pepper
Slices of cucumber
Milk & Alternatives
Meat & Alternatives
Yogurt (fruit-flavored or add
fruit to plain yogurt)
Rolled-up sliced meat such as
turkey, ham or roast beef
Cheese cubes or slices
Cubes or slices of leftover ham,
chicken, turkey or beef
Yogurt dip
Cherry or grape tomatoes
Cheese strings
Broccoli or cauliflower florets
Pudding made with milk
Salsa for dipping
Mini yogurt
Dried fruit such as raisins,
apricots and cranberries (see
“Snack Attack” back page)
Make your own lunch kits using reusable
containers with compartments. The chart
below offers some ideas for packing
healthier choices.
Yogurt tubes
 Drinks to Grow On:
 Drinks to Pass on:




 Pop
 Fruit punch, fruit cocktail and fruit
drink - these usually contain less
than 10% real juice plus 9
teaspoons of added sugar. These
are more like pop.
 Sports drinks
Milk - white or chocolate
100% fruit juice*
Vegetable juice cocktail
Water
* 100% fruit juice is a healthy choice for kids, but too much juice is not good.
Limit 100% fruit juice to 125 mL (½ cup) per day and serve with a meal or snack
to decrease the risk of cavities.
Sandwich Suggestions
Avoid the sandwich slump! Here are a few fresh ideas for the most common lunchtime food.
Cut sandwiches or wraps into smaller pieces. Children usually like “finger foods” that can be
easily picked up and eaten in two small bites!
Hard-cooked egg, sliced
BASE
(Grain Product)
Hummus or bean dip
Sunflower or pumpkin seeds
Give some careful thought to what is packed for a lunch-time drink. Beverages should also
give kids nutrients they need for growth and development. There are many kinds of packaged
drinks in boxes, cans, and plastic bottles. Read labels carefully to be sure you’re making a
healthy choice. Or, pack a healthy beverage in a reusable beverage container.
FILLING
(Meat or Alternative)
TOPPER
(Milk Products or Vegetable & Fruit)
mini pita pockets
hummus (see recipe page)
lettuce, cucumber
multi-grain bagel or whole wheat bread
egg salad or tuna salad
cucumber slices, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
whole wheat or flavoured wraps
bean spread or grilled chicken slices
rye bread
shaved black forest ham
whole grain roll or mini submarine bun
chicken salad, turkey or lean roast beef
grated cheddar cheese, chopped
tomato or salsa, sweet pepper
and lettuce
Swiss cheese slice, sliced pickle
or tomato
chopped tomato, sprouts, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
Parmesan Popcorn
8 cups
2 tbsp
¼ cup
1 tsp
1 tsp
popped popcorn
butter or non-hydrogenated
margarine, melted
grated Parmesan cheese
dried oregano
garlic powder
Banana Bread
2L
30 mL
50 mL
5 mL
5 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Place popcorn in a large bowl.
2. Drizzle melted butter or margarine over popcorn
and mix well.
3. In a small bowl, mix together Parmesan cheese, oregano
and garlic powder.
4. Sprinkle seasoning mix over popcorn and mix well.
5. Store in an airtight container.
Makes 8 cups
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1 tsp
1/2 tsp
1/2 cup
1
1/4 cup
3 tbsp
1 tsp
2
1/3 cup
all-purpose flour
whole wheat flour
baking soda
baking powder
white sugar
egg
lower-fat plain yogurt
canola oil
vanilla
ripe, medium-sized bananas
fresh or frozen blueberries or
frozen or dried cranberries
(optional)
175 mL
125 mL
5 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1
50 mL
45 mL
5 mL
2
75 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
2. Sift together all-purpose flour, baking soda and baking
powder. Mix in whole wheat flour. Set aside.
3. In large mixing bowl, thoroughly mash bananas. Add sugar,
egg, yogurt, oil and vanilla. Mix well.
4. Add dry ingredients and frozen or dried fruit (if desired) to
banana mixture. Mix just until dry is combined.
5. Pour batter into a lightly oiled 8” x 5” loaf pan (2 litre).
6. Bake for 1 hour or until a tester inserted into the centre
comes out clean.
To make muffins, spoon this batter into paper-lined muffin tins.
Bake at 350°F (180°C) for 18-22 minutes.
Makes 1 loaf, 8 medium muffins or 12 small muffins.
What’s to
Drink?
Make Your Own
“Lunch Kits”
Kids often want fun, packaged foods they see on TV or in their friends’ lunches. When pressed
for time, convenience foods are helpful. But, packing these in your kids’ lunches most of the
time won’t give them what they need to be healthy and stay energized all day long.
Ready-to-eat lunch “kits” are easy, portable and kids like them. But what are you paying
for? They contain lots of fat, sodium and added sugar and few of the nutrients kids need to
grow and learn. They are an expensive and less nutritious choice.
Store bought lunch kits contain:
•
•
•
•
300-600 calories
up to 35 grams (9 tsp) of fat, including up to 17 grams (4 tsp) of saturated fat
less than 1 gram of fibre
1000+ mg of sodium
Grain Products
Graham crackers
Bagels
Tortillas / wraps
Pita pockets
Dry breakfast cereals
Whole grain crackers
Pasta salad
Rice
Couscous
English muffins
Whole grain bread, buns
or muffins
Vegetables / Fruit
Baby carrots
Celery sticks
Strips of sweet pepper
Slices of cucumber
Milk & Alternatives
Meat & Alternatives
Yogurt (fruit-flavored or add
fruit to plain yogurt)
Rolled-up sliced meat such as
turkey, ham or roast beef
Cheese cubes or slices
Cubes or slices of leftover ham,
chicken, turkey or beef
Yogurt dip
Cherry or grape tomatoes
Cheese strings
Broccoli or cauliflower florets
Pudding made with milk
Salsa for dipping
Mini yogurt
Dried fruit such as raisins,
apricots and cranberries (see
“Snack Attack” back page)
Make your own lunch kits using reusable
containers with compartments. The chart
below offers some ideas for packing
healthier choices.
Yogurt tubes
 Drinks to Grow On:
 Drinks to Pass on:




 Pop
 Fruit punch, fruit cocktail and fruit
drink - these usually contain less
than 10% real juice plus 9
teaspoons of added sugar. These
are more like pop.
 Sports drinks
Milk - white or chocolate
100% fruit juice*
Vegetable juice cocktail
Water
* 100% fruit juice is a healthy choice for kids, but too much juice is not good.
Limit 100% fruit juice to 125 mL (½ cup) per day and serve with a meal or snack
to decrease the risk of cavities.
Sandwich Suggestions
Avoid the sandwich slump! Here are a few fresh ideas for the most common lunchtime food.
Cut sandwiches or wraps into smaller pieces. Children usually like “finger foods” that can be
easily picked up and eaten in two small bites!
Hard-cooked egg, sliced
BASE
(Grain Product)
Hummus or bean dip
Sunflower or pumpkin seeds
Give some careful thought to what is packed for a lunch-time drink. Beverages should also
give kids nutrients they need for growth and development. There are many kinds of packaged
drinks in boxes, cans, and plastic bottles. Read labels carefully to be sure you’re making a
healthy choice. Or, pack a healthy beverage in a reusable beverage container.
FILLING
(Meat or Alternative)
TOPPER
(Milk Products or Vegetable & Fruit)
mini pita pockets
hummus (see recipe page)
lettuce, cucumber
multi-grain bagel or whole wheat bread
egg salad or tuna salad
cucumber slices, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
whole wheat or flavoured wraps
bean spread or grilled chicken slices
rye bread
shaved black forest ham
whole grain roll or mini submarine bun
chicken salad, turkey or lean roast beef
grated cheddar cheese, chopped
tomato or salsa, sweet pepper
and lettuce
Swiss cheese slice, sliced pickle
or tomato
chopped tomato, sprouts, lettuce leaf,
grated cheese
Parmesan Popcorn
8 cups
2 tbsp
¼ cup
1 tsp
1 tsp
popped popcorn
butter or non-hydrogenated
margarine, melted
grated Parmesan cheese
dried oregano
garlic powder
Banana Bread
2L
30 mL
50 mL
5 mL
5 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Place popcorn in a large bowl.
2. Drizzle melted butter or margarine over popcorn
and mix well.
3. In a small bowl, mix together Parmesan cheese, oregano
and garlic powder.
4. Sprinkle seasoning mix over popcorn and mix well.
5. Store in an airtight container.
Makes 8 cups
3/4 cup
1/2 cup
1 tsp
1/2 tsp
1/2 cup
1
1/4 cup
3 tbsp
1 tsp
2
1/3 cup
all-purpose flour
whole wheat flour
baking soda
baking powder
white sugar
egg
lower-fat plain yogurt
canola oil
vanilla
ripe, medium-sized bananas
fresh or frozen blueberries or
frozen or dried cranberries
(optional)
175 mL
125 mL
5 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1
50 mL
45 mL
5 mL
2
75 mL
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C).
2. Sift together all-purpose flour, baking soda and baking
powder. Mix in whole wheat flour. Set aside.
3. In large mixing bowl, thoroughly mash bananas. Add sugar,
egg, yogurt, oil and vanilla. Mix well.
4. Add dry ingredients and frozen or dried fruit (if desired) to
banana mixture. Mix just until dry is combined.
5. Pour batter into a lightly oiled 8” x 5” loaf pan (2 litre).
6. Bake for 1 hour or until a tester inserted into the centre
comes out clean.
To make muffins, spoon this batter into paper-lined muffin tins.
Bake at 350°F (180°C) for 18-22 minutes.
Makes 1 loaf, 8 medium muffins or 12 small muffins.
What’s for Dessert?
Yummy Hummus
Chewy Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies
1 cup
¾ cup
½ cup
1/3 cup
¼ cup
1
½ tsp
½ tsp
½ cup
quick cooking oats
all-purpose flour
packed brown sugar
non-hydrogenated margarine
white sugar
egg
baking soda
vanilla extract
Sultana raisins
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2. Place all ingredients except raisins in a large bowl.
Beat all ingredients using a mixer at medium speed.
3. Stir raisins into batter.
4. Drop by teaspoonfuls, 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart on a
cookie sheet.
5. Bake for 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.
6. Remove cookies from sheet and cool on a wire rack.
Makes 4 dozen small cookies
250 mL
175 mL
125 mL
75 mL
50 mL
1
2 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1 tin (19oz)
¼ cup
¼ cup
¼ cup
2 tbsp
½ tsp
2 cloves
chick peas
tahini
lemon juice
plain yogurt
olive oil
ground cumin
garlic, chopped
540 mL
50 mL
50 mL
50 mL
30 mL
2 mL
2 cloves
DIRECTIONS:
1. Drain chick peas and rinse.
2. In a blender or food processor, puree chick peas.
Add a little water if necessary.
3. Add remaining ingredients and blend well.
4. Add salt and pepper to taste, if desired.
5. Place in an air-tight container and store in the fridge
for up to 3 days.
Serve with pita bread or raw vegetables or use as a
sandwich spread.
Makes 2 cups (500 mL)
No Bake Trail Mix
4 cups
1 tsp
1-1½ cups
½ cup
½ cup
Shreddies-type cereal
ground cinnamon
chopped mixed dried fruit
shredded coconut
sunflower seeds
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a large bowl, combine cereal and cinnamon.
2. Add remaining ingredients and mix.
3. Store in an air-tight container.
Makes 6 cups (1-½L)
1L
5 mL
375 mL
125 mL
125 mL
 Healthier choices include:
 Desserts to pass on:
 Fruit of any kind - Cut up fruit in small containers to
make it easier for younger children to eat.
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Fruit-flavoured yogurt
 Unsweetened fruit cups or applesauce cups
 Cookies, such as Oatmeal Raisin (see recipe page) fig
or other fruit bars, graham crackers
 Mini muffins with fruit
 Home-made gelatin with added fruit
 Dried Fruit
 “Fruit” gel in cups - these contain water, sugar and artificial
flavour and offer little nutrition other than calories
 Cookies with icing dip - loaded with unhealthy fat and
lots of sugar
 Packaged cakes and brownies - loaded with unhealthy fats
and lots of sugar
Unless children can brush their teeth at school, limit snacks that are sticky and high in sugar.
Snack
Attack!
 Healthy Snacks:
 Snacks to pass on:
 Whole grain crackers, rice cakes, melba toast, bread sticks,
or dry unsweetened cereal
 Plain popcorn , or popcorn seasoned with Parmesan cheese
and garlic powder (see recipe page)
 Home-made baked goods, such as banana bread or oatmeal
cookies (see recipe page)
 Cheese cubes or strings
 Raw veggies
 Any kind of fruit ... grapes, bananas, cantaloupe, berries
 Fruit cups or applesauce in a cup
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Pumpkin or sunflower seeds, plain or seasoned
 Roasted soybeans or chickpeas
 Yogurt - try freezing containers or tubes for a fun treat!
 Baked tortilla chips with salsa
 Plain cookies
 Lower-salt pretzels
 Granola bars that are chewy, coated in
chocolate, or contain marshmallows or chocolate chips These are often high in fat and sugar, and are more like candy
 Dry instant soup noodles - loaded with salt!
 Chewy fruit snacks - don’t be fooled by pictures of fruit on
the package and claims “Made with Real Fruit”. There is only
a small amount of fruit and these are more like candy
 Snack packs, such as cheese spread with crackers or
breadsticks - high in fat and salt, and low in nutrients
 Potato chips, cheese puffs, flavoured tortilla chips - high in
unhealthy fats and loaded with salt
For more tips & Info:
www.bchu.org
Produced and distributed by the Brant County Health Unit
(519) 753-4937 ext. 458. Adapted from School Lunch
Your Kids Will Munch, developed by Region of Waterloo
Public Health, 2010
rningchildren are able to concelenatrnrataend
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Eating
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Studies sh rform better at schoo y of healthy choices ac
e
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at a vari
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when they e Food Guide.
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a
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are
ll with Cana
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E
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Balanced Fuel for a
Healthy Weight!
What to Include
in a Healthy
School Lunch
A growing number of Canadian children
are overweight. To help your child keep a
healthy weight, pack lunches that
include fruit, vegetables, whole grains
and lower-fat milk products. Avoid
artificially-flavoured drinks, pop and
other snacks that do not provide good
nutrition such as chips, chocolate bars
and packaged snack cakes in your child’s
school lunch.
Foods from the four food groups in
Canada’s Food Guide give the
nourishment kids need to grow
and learn. A balanced lunch includes
at least one choice from each food group.
Get your kids involved in planning what will
go in their lunch. They have probably talked
about the Food Guide in class!
Follow these easy steps:
1
Start with a choice of Meat or
Alternatives: for example, sliced lean
meat, a hard-cooked egg or bean dip.
4
Milk or Milk Alternatives like chocolate
milk, cheese, yogurt or fortified soy
beverage balance out the meal.
2
Add a Grain Product to go with it, such
as whole wheat bread, crackers or pita.
5
3
Don’t forget a Vegetable or
Fruit choice!
Finish up with some dessert. A choice
from the Grain Products, Milk and
Alternatives food groups or some fruit
are all healthy options. (See page 4 for
dessert suggestions).
Allergy Alert!
Peanut butter, peanuts, and other nuts are healthy food choices. However, there are
children with an allergy to these foods in almost every school in Brant County. A number of
schools have banned foods containing peanuts or nuts from lunch boxes to protect the
safety of children with allergies. Check with your school about foods that are not allowed in
your child’s classroom.
All foods have the potential to cause an allergic reaction. To avoid an unexpected reaction,
children should never trade their lunch with another child.
Tips for Packing
a Safe School Lunch
• Use insulated lunch bags and a
thermos to help keep cold foods
cold and hot foods hot. Warm
thermos with hot water before filling
it with steaming hot food.
• A frozen juice box, a freezer pack or
sandwiches made with frozen bread
can help to keep lunch foods cold.
• Wash all vegetables and fruit
before packing.
• Do not resend sandwiches or hot
foods. Fruits and other snacks
can be safely repacked. Do not
re-use wrappings.
• Teach children to wash their
hands before eating.
• Wash reusable beverage container
at the end of the day with soap
and hot water.
Did you know?
Children may have less than 20 minutes
to eat lunch at school. For younger
children with smaller appetites, keep
portions small. Peel fruit when possible
and cut up foods into smaller bite-sized
pieces. Ask your child’s school principal
about allowing students to eat healthy
snacks like veggies and fruit, and having
a water bottle in class.
What’s for Dessert?
Yummy Hummus
Chewy Oatmeal-Raisin Cookies
1 cup
¾ cup
½ cup
1/3 cup
¼ cup
1
½ tsp
½ tsp
½ cup
quick cooking oats
all-purpose flour
packed brown sugar
non-hydrogenated margarine
white sugar
egg
baking soda
vanilla extract
Sultana raisins
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2. Place all ingredients except raisins in a large bowl.
Beat all ingredients using a mixer at medium speed.
3. Stir raisins into batter.
4. Drop by teaspoonfuls, 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart on a
cookie sheet.
5. Bake for 12 minutes, or until lightly browned.
6. Remove cookies from sheet and cool on a wire rack.
Makes 4 dozen small cookies
250 mL
175 mL
125 mL
75 mL
50 mL
1
2 mL
2 mL
125 mL
1 tin (19oz)
¼ cup
¼ cup
¼ cup
2 tbsp
½ tsp
2 cloves
chick peas
tahini
lemon juice
plain yogurt
olive oil
ground cumin
garlic, chopped
540 mL
50 mL
50 mL
50 mL
30 mL
2 mL
2 cloves
DIRECTIONS:
1. Drain chick peas and rinse.
2. In a blender or food processor, puree chick peas.
Add a little water if necessary.
3. Add remaining ingredients and blend well.
4. Add salt and pepper to taste, if desired.
5. Place in an air-tight container and store in the fridge
for up to 3 days.
Serve with pita bread or raw vegetables or use as a
sandwich spread.
Makes 2 cups (500 mL)
No Bake Trail Mix
4 cups
1 tsp
1-1½ cups
½ cup
½ cup
Shreddies-type cereal
ground cinnamon
chopped mixed dried fruit
shredded coconut
sunflower seeds
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a large bowl, combine cereal and cinnamon.
2. Add remaining ingredients and mix.
3. Store in an air-tight container.
Makes 6 cups (1-½L)
1L
5 mL
375 mL
125 mL
125 mL
 Healthier choices include:
 Desserts to pass on:
 Fruit of any kind - Cut up fruit in small containers to
make it easier for younger children to eat.
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Fruit-flavoured yogurt
 Unsweetened fruit cups or applesauce cups
 Cookies, such as Oatmeal Raisin (see recipe page) fig
or other fruit bars, graham crackers
 Mini muffins with fruit
 Home-made gelatin with added fruit
 Dried Fruit
 “Fruit” gel in cups - these contain water, sugar and artificial
flavour and offer little nutrition other than calories
 Cookies with icing dip - loaded with unhealthy fat and
lots of sugar
 Packaged cakes and brownies - loaded with unhealthy fats
and lots of sugar
Unless children can brush their teeth at school, limit snacks that are sticky and high in sugar.
Snack
Attack!
 Healthy Snacks:
 Snacks to pass on:
 Whole grain crackers, rice cakes, melba toast, bread sticks,
or dry unsweetened cereal
 Plain popcorn , or popcorn seasoned with Parmesan cheese
and garlic powder (see recipe page)
 Home-made baked goods, such as banana bread or oatmeal
cookies (see recipe page)
 Cheese cubes or strings
 Raw veggies
 Any kind of fruit ... grapes, bananas, cantaloupe, berries
 Fruit cups or applesauce in a cup
 Home-made pudding made with milk
 Pumpkin or sunflower seeds, plain or seasoned
 Roasted soybeans or chickpeas
 Yogurt - try freezing containers or tubes for a fun treat!
 Baked tortilla chips with salsa
 Plain cookies
 Lower-salt pretzels
 Granola bars that are chewy, coated in
chocolate, or contain marshmallows or chocolate chips These are often high in fat and sugar, and are more like candy
 Dry instant soup noodles - loaded with salt!
 Chewy fruit snacks - don’t be fooled by pictures of fruit on
the package and claims “Made with Real Fruit”. There is only
a small amount of fruit and these are more like candy
 Snack packs, such as cheese spread with crackers or
breadsticks - high in fat and salt, and low in nutrients
 Potato chips, cheese puffs, flavoured tortilla chips - high in
unhealthy fats and loaded with salt
For more tips & Info:
www.bchu.org
Produced and distributed by the Brant County Health Unit
(519) 753-4937 ext. 458. Adapted from School Lunch
Your Kids Will Munch, developed by Region of Waterloo
Public Health, 2010
rningchildren are able to concelenatrnrataend
a
e
L
r
o
f
d
Eating
are ready to
ell-nourishe
cording
l. Children
ow that w
Studies sh rform better at schoo y of healthy choices ac
e
t
p
e
at a vari
longer and
when they e Food Guide.
rt
le
a
re
o
m
da’s
are
ll with Cana
e
W
g
in
t
a
E
to
Balanced Fuel for a
Healthy Weight!
What to Include
in a Healthy
School Lunch
A growing number of Canadian children
are overweight. To help your child keep a
healthy weight, pack lunches that
include fruit, vegetables, whole grains
and lower-fat milk products. Avoid
artificially-flavoured drinks, pop and
other snacks that do not provide good
nutrition such as chips, chocolate bars
and packaged snack cakes in your child’s
school lunch.
Foods from the four food groups in
Canada’s Food Guide give the
nourishment kids need to grow
and learn. A balanced lunch includes
at least one choice from each food group.
Get your kids involved in planning what will
go in their lunch. They have probably talked
about the Food Guide in class!
Follow these easy steps:
1
Start with a choice of Meat or
Alternatives: for example, sliced lean
meat, a hard-cooked egg or bean dip.
4
Milk or Milk Alternatives like chocolate
milk, cheese, yogurt or fortified soy
beverage balance out the meal.
2
Add a Grain Product to go with it, such
as whole wheat bread, crackers or pita.
5
3
Don’t forget a Vegetable or
Fruit choice!
Finish up with some dessert. A choice
from the Grain Products, Milk and
Alternatives food groups or some fruit
are all healthy options. (See page 4 for
dessert suggestions).
Allergy Alert!
Peanut butter, peanuts, and other nuts are healthy food choices. However, there are
children with an allergy to these foods in almost every school in Brant County. A number of
schools have banned foods containing peanuts or nuts from lunch boxes to protect the
safety of children with allergies. Check with your school about foods that are not allowed in
your child’s classroom.
All foods have the potential to cause an allergic reaction. To avoid an unexpected reaction,
children should never trade their lunch with another child.
Tips for Packing
a Safe School Lunch
• Use insulated lunch bags and a
thermos to help keep cold foods
cold and hot foods hot. Warm
thermos with hot water before filling
it with steaming hot food.
• A frozen juice box, a freezer pack or
sandwiches made with frozen bread
can help to keep lunch foods cold.
• Wash all vegetables and fruit
before packing.
• Do not resend sandwiches or hot
foods. Fruits and other snacks
can be safely repacked. Do not
re-use wrappings.
• Teach children to wash their
hands before eating.
• Wash reusable beverage container
at the end of the day with soap
and hot water.
Did you know?
Children may have less than 20 minutes
to eat lunch at school. For younger
children with smaller appetites, keep
portions small. Peel fruit when possible
and cut up foods into smaller bite-sized
pieces. Ask your child’s school principal
about allowing students to eat healthy
snacks like veggies and fruit, and having
a water bottle in class.
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