Lesson 15 Networking

Lesson 15 Networking
LESSON
15
OBJECTIVES
Networking
After completing this lesson, you will be able to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Explore My Network Places.
Search for a computer.
Manage file sharing.
Map and disconnect drives.
Manage printer sharing.
Understand network tasks.
Use the Network Setup Wizard.
Estimated Time: 1 hour
N
etworking enables you to connect your computer to other computers. A
network is a group of computers and other devices, such as printers, connected to one another by a communications link. This link can occur via cables,
phone lines, or wireless transmissions. A network can be as small as two computers
or as large as the Internet, which is the largest network. Networking enables you to
share information and resources. A resource might be a fi le or a computer-related
device, such as a printer or a scanner.
One common arrangement of networked computers is a local area network
(LAN). This is a group of computers, printers, and related devices connected to
each other and located in a relatively limited physical area such as a building.
Local area networks can be structured in different ways. In a peer-to-peer network,
which is also called a workgroup, all the computers communicate directly with one
another. Workgroup computers share their fi les and resources without requiring
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WINDOWS XP 455
the services of any single computer to manage the process. There is no master
computer, or server. A server is a computer that provides access to other computers
and shared resources on the network. All computers on the network function
as equals in a peer-to-peer network. In Windows, a workgroup can have 2 to 10
computers.
In a domain network, the connected computers function under the control
of one or more servers. The server controls access to the other computers and
resources on the network. In Windows XP, networks larger than 10 computers
are domain networks.
This lesson assumes that your networking environment is a peer-to-peer network, or workgroup. As a member of a workgroup, you are able to designate shared
folders and map and connect to network drives. You are also able to manage printer
sharing, perform network tasks, and use the Network Setup Wizard.
Exploring My Network Places
My Network Places displays shortcuts to the shared computers, folders, and other
resources on the network. These shortcuts are created automatically whenever you
access a shared location or resource. For example, if you access a shared folder on
a coworker’s computer, your My Network Places will show a shortcut. The shortcut
appears as an icon with the name of the computer and the folder. The items shown
in My Network Places vary from one computer to another.
EXERCISE
15-1 Open My Network Places
You can access My Network Places from My Computer, Windows Explorer, the
Start menu, or a desktop icon (if one is available).
1. Set a restore point and name it [your initials]Lesson15
on the desktop if it is available,
2. Double-click the My Network Places icon
and click the My Network Places icon .
or click the Start button
The My Network Places folder opens.
3. Maximize the My Network Places window if it is not already maximized.
Network locations are identified by the folder and computer. They also
are grouped in different categories. The categories might include locations
on your local network, the Internet, or other locations. For example, in
Figure 15-1, the shortcut for Documents on Dellp4-2 identifies this as a
folder named Documents on the computer named Dellp4-2 on a local area
network. You can change the view to see more information about the
locations.
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FIGURE 15-1
My Network Places
NOTE : Because every network is different, your My Network Places Computer folder and other network-related folders will show locations and icons
different from those shown in Figure 15-1 and other figures in this lesson.
4. Choose View, Details from the menu. My Network Places is shown in Details
view.
5. Choose View, Tiles to restore My Network Places to its default view. You
can also explore your network in Windows Explorer or by using the Folders
button
on the Standard Buttons toolbar.
6. Click the Folders button . The Folders view of Windows Explorer appears.
The Folders list has replaced the left pane. Notice that My Network Places
is shown as a separate folder, and your network locations are structured like
the folders on the hard drive.
7. Click the Folders button
again to display the left pane once again. The My
Network Places folder is still open.
EXERCISE
15-2 View Network Connections
You can view the available network connections in My Network Places, Windows
Explorer, or Control Panel.
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1. With the My Network Places folder still open, click View network connections. The Network Connections window appears. The connections available
will vary from one computer to another. Windows groups the connections
by type. Connections are shown even when they are not in use. You can also
view network connections in the Explorer window.
FIGURE 15-2
Viewing network
connections
2. Click the Folders button
on the Standard Buttons toolbar. The Folders
view of Windows Explorer appears. Network Connections appears as a
Control Panel folder. You can also view network connections by clicking the
in Control Panel.
Network Connections icon
3. Click the Folders button
to close the Folders list and restore the left pane.
4. Under Other Places, click My Network Places to return to the My Network
Places window.
Searching for a Computer
Windows provides different ways for you to locate computers and shared resources
on your network. You can use My Network Places to identify the computers attached
to your network. You can also search for computers whose name you already
know. You search for computers just as you search for fi les or people.
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EXERCISE
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
15-3 Search for a Computer on the Network
You can view the computers on your network. If you know the computer name or
part of its name, you can perform a search from the Start menu.
1. With the My Network Places window still open, click View workgroup
computers in the left pane. The Workgroup window shows icons and names
for the computers in your workgroup that are currently connected.
NOTE : If your network is a domain-based network, you might have to click
View network connections to view computers on the network.
FIGURE 15-3
Viewing computers
in a workgroup
2. Close any open windows. You will now perform a search for a computer
on the network.
3. From the Start menu, choose Search. The Search Results window opens.
4. In the left pane, click Computers or people (use the scroll bar if the option
isn’t visible).
5. Click A computer on the network.
6. In the Computer name text box, key the computer’s name. You can key part
of a computer’s name. Windows will search for all the computers on the
network with that portion of the text in the computer name.
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Lesson 15 ■ Networking
NOTE : If you don’t know the computer’s name, your instructor will tell you
what name to key for the Computer name.
7. Click Search. The Search Results window displays the results of the search.
If you keyed a portion of the computer name, Windows shows all computers
that contain that text in their names. If you have access to them, you can
explore the computers shown in the Search Results window to see their
shared folders or other resources. You’ll explore shared folders in the next
exercise.
FIGURE 15-4
Searching for a
computer on the
network
NOTE : The computers displayed in your Search Results window will differ
from those shown in Figure 15-4.
8. Close the Search Results window. You can also search for computers on the
on the Standard Buttons toolbar in
network by using the Search button
the My Network Places folder.
Managing File Sharing
File sharing on a network enables you to browse among the shared folders and
fi les throughout the network. Shared folders on other computers appear exactly
the same as folders on your own computer. All users on the network see the same
folder information. When you open a shared fi le, make changes, and save and
close the fi le, the next user of the fi le will see those changes.
In a workgroup, you can share folders in different ways. Windows automatically
makes each computer’s Shared Documents folder available to other users in a
workgroup network. You can designate specific folders as shared, or you can share
an entire drive. This is especially useful with CD-ROM and floppy drives.
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Windows includes a useful feature for reconciling differences in shared fi les
stored on one computer with versions of the same files stored on another computer.
The Synchronization Manager enables you to designate the shared fi les you wish
to have synchronized. You can control when the fi les are synchronized. You open
the Synchronization Manager by choosing All Programs, Accessories from the
Start menu and then choosing Synchronize.
EXERCISE
15-4 Share a Folder
Before other users on the network can see the contents of a folder on your computer,
you must designate it as a shared folder and specify its share name. In this exercise,
you’ll create a folder on a floppy disk, designate it as a shared folder, and then
create a simple fi le in the folder for another user on the network to access.
NOTE : You will need a blank, formatted floppy disk for this exercise.
1. Insert a blank, formatted floppy disk in the floppy disk drive.
2. Open Windows Explorer.
3. In the left pane, click My Computer and click 3½ Floppy (A:).
4. Choose File, New from the menu and then choose Folder. For the folder
name, key [your initials]FloppyData, using no more than two letters in
your initials. This is the folder you’ll share with other users on the network.
5. With your new folder still selected, choose File, Sharing and Security from
the menu. The Properties dialog box for your FloppyData folder opens with
the Sharing tab displayed. (See Figure 15-5 on the next page.)
6. Under Network sharing and security, click Share this folder on the network.
The default Share name is the existing name of the folder, but you can give
it a different name if you prefer. Notice that the option to allow other users
to change fi les in this folder is automatically selected.
NOTE : If your Properties dialog box does not show the option Share this
folder on the network under Network sharing and security, but instead
displays the message that the feature has been disabled, click If you understand the
security risks but want to share files without running the wizard, click here. When
the Enable File Sharing dialog box appears, click Just enable file sharing and click
OK. Also, in a domain-based network, the dialog box for your Sharing tab might look
different from the one shown in Figure 5-5. Sharing might be enabled by clicking the
option Share this folder, and the option to enable others to change files in this folder
is designated by clicking Permissions.
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FIGURE 15-5
Designating a folder
as shared
7. Click Apply. The folder icon
changes to show a hand
under the folder, which
indicates this is a shared
folder.
8. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box for your
FloppyData folder. Close
Windows Explorer. Next,
you’ll create and save a
simple fi le in the folder for
other users on the network
to access.
9. Using WordPad, start writing an Action Report. At the top of the report,
write your name, the date, the class, and the exercise number.
10. Under the exercise number, key This file is stored on the floppy disk of
[your name].
11. Save the fi le as [your initials]15-4. In the Save in text box, specify the
location as [your initials]FloppyData on drive A.
12. Close WordPad.
EXERCISE
15-5 Access a Shared Folder on
Another Computer
If you know the name of the computer on the network, you can access its shared
folders. In this exercise, you’ll open another user’s shared fi le.
NOTE : Your instructor will assign you a student partner for this exercise.
You and your partner will open each other’s files on your floppy disk drives.
1. Open Windows Explorer.
2. In the left pane folder hierarchy, click My Network Places and then locate
your partner’s computer.
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NOTE : In some network configurations, your partner’s computer will be
found under Computers Near Me. On other peer-to-peer configurations, or
on a domain-based network, you might not have this option. Instead, you might have
to access your student partner’s computer by clicking Entire Network and navigating
down the folder hierarchy to find the correct machine or by following your instructor’s
directions on how to navigate to the appropriate network location.
3. Click your partner’s computer in the folder hierarchy. Your partner’s
FloppyData folder appears among the shared folders and resources. Notice
that there is no indication that this is a floppy drive folder; it appears as any
other folder on the computer.
FIGURE 15-6
Accessing a shared
folder on another
computer on the
network
4. Open your partner’s FloppyData folder and double-click the fi le [partner’s
initials]15-4. Your partner’s WordPad fi le opens. When the folder was designated as shared, your partner included the option to allow other users to
make changes to fi les in this folder.
5. Key the following text as the last line in the fi le: This file has been changed
by [your name].
6. Save the fi le. The changes have been saved to your partner’s floppy disk
drive fi le.
7. Print the fi le and then close WordPad. Windows Explorer is still open.
Notice in the left pane that the location you just accessed is now listed under
Computers Near Me. Windows remembers the locations of shared folders
you’ve accessed and adds shortcuts for them.
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NOTE : If the computer of a shared folder you’ve accessed is not logged on
to the network the next time you try to use the shortcut, Windows displays a
message indicating that the folder is unavailable.
8. Close Windows Explorer.
Mapping and Disconnecting Drives
You can have a shared folder on another network computer appear as an available
folder at all times on your computer by mapping the shared drive or folder to your
computer. When you map a shared folder or drive, you assign an unused drive
letter to the drive or folder. For example, if your computer has a single hard drive
(drive C) and a CD-ROM drive (drive D), you can assign any other letter after D to
the mapped drive or folder, such as the letter M. After you’ve mapped the shared
drive or folder, drive M appears in your My Computer list with all your local drives.
In addition to the convenience, access to a mapped drive is faster because Windows
maintains an open connection to the shared drive or folder.
You can disconnect from the network drive as easily as you map to it. You
might want to do this if you no longer need the shared resource or it has become
permanently unavailable.
EXERCISE
15-6 Assign a Drive Letter to a Network
Computer or Folder
The drive letter that you can choose when you map a shared drive or folder depends
on the configuration of your computer and your network. You can use the Tools
menu in either Windows Explorer or My Network Places to map a shared drive
or folder.
1. Insert the floppy disk with your shared folder into the floppy disk drive, if
it is not already inserted.
NOTE : In this exercise, you’ll map to the shared floppy drive folder of
your partner.
2. Open My Network Places.
3. Choose Tools, Map Network Drive from the menu. The Map Network Drive
dialog box opens. You use this box to designate the drive letter for the
shared folder. Windows defaults to letter Z for the mapped drive.
NOTE : You can change the drive designation to any available drive letter,
but you should use the Windows default designation unless you need a different letter to remind you of the contents of the drive or folder. If the letter Z is already in
use, your instructor will suggest an alternate letter for you to use.
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FIGURE 15-7
Map Network Drive
dialog box
4. Click Browse. The Browse for Folders dialog box opens.
5. Under My Network Places, locate the shortcut for your partner’s FloppyData
folder. Click it and then click OK. Your partner’s FloppyData folder appears
in the Folder list box of the Map Network Drive dialog box. The option
Reconnect at logon is automatically selected, so every time you log on,
Windows will connect you to the shared folder.
6. Click Finish. The dialog box closes, and the contents of the FloppyData folder
are automatically displayed.
7. In the left pane, click My Computer to display the My Computer window.
The mapped drive Z appears under Network Drives.
8. Click the Folders button
on the Standard Buttons toolbar. The mapped
drive appears in the left pane as a drive under My Computer.
9. Close any open windows.
EXERCISE
15-7 Disconnect from a Mapped
Network Drive
You can disconnect from a mapped drive when you no longer need it. You use
the Tools menu in Windows Explorer or My Network Places to disconnect from
a mapped drive.
1. From the Start menu, open My Network Places.
2. Choose Tools, Disconnect Network Drive from the menu. The Disconnect
Network Drives dialog box appears. Each shared network drive or folder
listed under Network Drives appears as an icon, including mapped drives.
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Your mapped drive is drive Z (or the letter designation you gave it in the
previous exercise).
FIGURE 15-8
Disconnect Network
Drives dialog box
Mapped drive
3. Click your mapped drive to select it and click OK. (If Windows displays the
Disconnect Network Drive message warning that fi les on the mapped drive
might be open, click Yes.) My Network Places is still open.
4. In the left pane, click My Computer. Your mapped drive is no longer shown
under Network Drives.
5. Click the Folders button
on the Standard Buttons toolbar. Your mapped
drive is no longer listed as an available drive under My Computer.
6. Close all open windows.
Managing Printer Sharing
One of the great advantages of a network is that a single printer can be shared
among multiple users. Instead of attaching a printer to every computer on the
network, you can designate a single printer as a shared resource that can be
accessed by everyone. This enables you to have fewer printers. For example, you
could have a laser printer for large print jobs, a color printer, and a photo-grade
printer. Network users could choose the printer most appropriate for their print
job.
Windows makes it easy to share a printer on the network. After you install a
printer and designate it as a shared device, network users can browse the network
for shared printers and add it to their list of available printers. If your network
includes computers using older versions of Windows, you can install drivers for
these versions as well.
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EXERCISE
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
15-8 Share a Printer
You can designate a printer as a shared resource at the time you install it or after
it has been installed. In this exercise, you’ll install a printer and designate it as
a shared device.
1. From the Start menu, click the Printers and Faxes icon
or click the
and double-click the Printers and Faxes icon .
Control Panel icon
2. In the left pane, click Add a printer. The Add Printer Wizard opens.
3. Click Next. Make the printer a local printer, but do not click the Plug and
Play option. Continue the steps in the wizard, designating LPT1 as the
printer port and installing an HP LaserJet 4 printer. Use HP LaserJet 4 as
the Printer name. Do not make this printer the default printer.
4. When the Add Printer Wizard screen for Printer Sharing appears, make
sure the Share name option is selected. In the Share name box, key [your
initials]HPLaserJet by using only two letters for your initials.
FIGURE 15-9
Adding a shared
printer
5. Click Next. (If the wizard displays a message that your share name might
not be accessible from some MS-DOS workstations, click Yes.) The wizard
displays a text box for you to record Location and Comment.
6. In the Location text box, key [your name]’s desk. In the Comment text box,
key This is a fast printer suitable for large print jobs.
7. Click Next. Click No to skip printing the test page, click Next, and then click
Finish. The Printers and Faxes window is still displayed, and the shared
printer has been installed. The sharing status of a printer can be changed
after a printer has been installed.
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Lesson 15 ■ Networking
8. Right-click the icon for the HP LaserJet 4 printer and choose Properties
from the shortcut menu. The HP LaserJet 4 Properties dialog box opens.
9. Click the Sharing tab. You can use this tab to either add or remove sharing
for an existing printer. You can also use this tab to add printer drivers for
computers on your network that might be using older versions of Windows.
10. Under Drivers, click Additional Drivers. The Additional Drivers dialog box
opens. You can choose as many versions of Windows as are needed for
your network.
FIGURE 15-10
Installing additional
drivers for a
shared printer
EXERCISE
11. Click Cancel to close the
Additional Drivers dialog
box without adding any
new drivers. Click Cancel
again to close the Properties dialog box without
changing the sharing
option. Close the Printers
and Faxes window.
15-9 View a Network Printer
To share any network printer, you must have an icon for the printer in your Printers
and Faxes folder. Usually, this is done automatically by Windows. However, users
sometimes disable the automatic search function for network printers. You would
then need to add the shared printer to your Printer and Faxes folder. The easiest
way to add the printer is to use the Add Printer Wizard.
NOTE : This exercise assumes that the automatic search for network printers is diabled. To disable automatic search, on Control Panel, click Appearance and Themes, Folder Options, and then click the View tab. In
Advanced Settings, click the Automatically Search for Network Folders
and Printers checkbox to disable the feature. Then click OK.
1. From the Start menu, choose Printers and Faxes, and then click Add a
printer in the left pane of the Printers and Faxes window. The Add Printer
Wizard opens.
2. Click Next. The wizard asks you to specify either a network or a local
computer.
3. Click the option A network printer, or a printer attached to another computer.
4. Click Next. The wizard asks you to specify the printer.
5. Click the option Connect to this printer (or to browse for a printer, click this
option and click Next).
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Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
6. Click Next. The wizard asks you to browse for the printer.
7. Under Shared printers, locate your partner’s HP LaserJet 4 printer. Click the
printer to select it. (If the list of printers is long, you can use the horizontal
and vertical scroll bars to locate the printer and view the printer name.)
Comments about the printer appear at the bottom of the dialog box.
FIGURE 15-11
Adding a
network printer
8. Click Next. The wizard asks whether you want to make this the default printer.
9. Click No and click Next.
10. Click Finish. The Printers and Faxes window is still open. An icon for the
network printer has been added to the window.
11. Close the Printers and Faxes window.
NOTE : Your instructor may tell you to enable the automatic search for
folders and printers befor going on to the next exercise.
Understanding Network Tasks
Windows includes a number of different programs that you can use to work more
efficiently in a networked environment. You can use these programs to collaborate
with others and manage your network resources more effectively. These networkrelated programs include:
● Internet Connection Sharing
This option enables you to use just one connection to the Internet for all
the computers on the network. One computer serves as the Internet
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
WINDOWS XP 469
connection host, sharing its connection with the other computers on the
network.
● Remote Desktop Connection
This feature enables you to access a Windows session running on a computer from a different computer. You might use it on a home computer
to access all your applications, fi les, and network resources located on a
work computer. You can also use it to work collaboratively. You could
access a colleague’s desktop or allow a colleague to access your desktop.
You might do this to debug or troubleshoot a program, edit a document,
or develop a presentation together.
You set up a computer to be used remotely by double-clicking the
in Control Panel, clicking the Remote tab, and then clickSystem icon
ing Allow users to connect remotely to this computer. To connect
remotely to another computer, choose All Programs, Accessories from
the Start menu, and then choose Communications and Remote Desktop
Connection.
● Files and Settings Transfer
This program enables you to move data fi les and personal settings from
one computer to another. You could use this feature to transfer display
settings, Taskbar and folder options, and document fi les from an old
computer to a new one. To access the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard,
, choose All Programs, Accessories, System Tools,
click Start
and then choose Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
● Windows Messenger
This is an instant messaging program. You can also use it to see who
is online, to send someone a fi le, or to have an online conversation with
a group of other users.
● Remote Assistance
You can use this program to ask anyone on the network for help. Using
Remote Assistance, another user can chat with you, view your desktop,
or work on your computer with your permission.
After you have become familiar with connecting to your network, there are other
network tasks that you might need to perform and options that you can activate.
You might want to check the status of a connection to make sure it is functioning
properly. You can view details such as the speed and duration of the connection
as well as its rate of transmission.
When you open the Properties dialog box for a connection, you can activate
the Internet Connection Firewall. In general, a firewall is a security system that
protects the network from unauthorized intruders from outside the network. The
Internet Connection Firewall is a Windows security program that sets restrictions
on what information is communicated between a network and the Internet. You
can also activate Internet Connection Sharing by viewing the Properties dialog
box of the connection.
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EXERCISE
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
15-10 View the Status of a
Network Connection
You view the status of your network connections by opening My Network Places.
1. From the Start menu, choose My Network Places. The My Network Places
window opens.
2. Click View network connections in the left pane. The Network Connections
window opens.
3. Click the icon for the local area connection for your computer. Additional
task links under Network Tasks are displayed.
FIGURE 15-12
Viewing the status of
a connection
4. Under Network Tasks, click
View status of this connection.
The Local Area Connection
Status dialog box opens. Under
Connection, you can see the
status, duration, and speed of
the connection.
5. Click Close to close the Local
Area Connection Status dialog
box. The Network Connections
window is still open.
EXERCISE
15-11 View Properties of a
Network Connection
You can use a network connection’s Properties dialog box to activate features such
as the Internet Connection Firewall and Internet Connection Sharing.
1. With the Network Connections window still displayed, right-click the icon
for your local area connection and choose Properties from the shortcut
menu. The Properties dialog box for your local area connection opens.
2. Click the option Show icon in notification area when connected if this is not
already selected. This indicator in the Notification Area makes it easy to see
when you are connected. (See Figure 15-13 on the next page.)
3. Click the Advanced tab. You can activate the Internet Connection Firewall
on this tab. Leave the setting unchanged.
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Lesson 15 ■ Networking
TIP : If your network
uses Internet Connection
Sharing to provide access to the
Internet to other computers on the
network, the Internet Connection
Firewall should be enabled on
the computer that serves as the
Internet Connection Sharing host.
The Internet Connection Firewall
should not be enabled on any
computer that does not directly
connect to the Internet.
FIGURE 15-13
Properties dialog
box for a local area
network connection
4. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box.
5. If you have a dial-up
connection, right-click the
connection icon, choose
Properties, and click the
Advanced tab of the Properties dialog box. When a connection can access the Internet, this tab will show an option for enabling
Internet Connection Sharing. Click Cancel to close the Properties dialog box
for the dial-up connection without making any changes.
TIP : To use Internet Connection Sharing, you must enable it on the computer
that serves as the host computer for your Internet connection for the rest of your
network. You can enable only one connection for Internet Connection Sharing at a time
on the host computer. If you change your Internet service provider, you must enable
Internet Connection Sharing for the new connection on the host computer.
6. Close the Network Connections window.
Using the Network Setup Wizard
Windows makes it easy to set up a peer-to-peer network for your home or small
business. Windows XP includes a program that enables you to configure your
network easily. The Network Setup Wizard walks you through the process of
configuring each computer on your network. You can also use the Network Setup
Wizard to add computers to an existing network.
When setting up your network, follow a step-by-step approach. Here’s a basic
checklist of tasks to follow before running the Network Setup Wizard:
● Sketch a diagram of your network. Show the location of all computers
and printers or other resources, if any, attached to each.
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Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
● For each computer, note which computers contain modems and the type
of network adaptor cards, if any.
● Choose the computer that will be your Internet Connection Sharing host.
This computer should be running Windows XP and have a working
Internet connection.
● Determine the type of network connection you want to install. Network
connections for smaller networks are basically one of three types: Ethernet, phone line, or wireless. An Ethernet network is a type of network
technology in which the computers are linked together by cables to a
network hub. A hub is a common connection point for the computers on
the network. It contains multiple ports for connecting each segment of
the network. A phone line network, which is often referred to as an HPNA
network (for home phoneline network adaptor) links computers by using
existing telephone wiring. A wireless network links computers by using
radio signals instead of wiring.
● Determine the type and number of network adaptor cards you will need
for the computers on your network and a hub if you are installing an
Ethernet network. Determine cabling requirements if you are installing
an Ethernet network. Computers in an HPNA network should be located
near phone jacks.
● Purchase the necessary network adaptors, cabling, and hub.
● Install the network adaptors in each computer on the network. If you’re
installing an Ethernet network, connect the cables for each computer to the
hub. For an HPNA network, connect the computers to the phone lines.
● Turn on all computers and printers. Make sure the Internet Connection
Sharing host computer has an active Internet connection.
After you’ve performed these steps, you’re ready to run the Network Setup Wizard
on the Internet Connection Sharing host computer. Then you run the Network
Setup Wizard on the other computers on your network.
The wizard performs a number of configuration-related tasks that are necessary
for connecting computers on a network. While running the wizard, you do the
following:
● Configure all the computers on the network to use one Internet
connection.
● Enable the Internet Connection Firewall.
● Name your computer, provide a description of the computer, and identify
the name of the workgroup to which it will belong.
You can use the Network Setup Wizard to add a new computer to an existing
network. You can have the wizard make the new computer the Internet Connection
Sharing host computer. If you are trying to connect computers running an older
version of Windows to a Windows XP network, you can have the Network Setup
Wizard create a network setup disk for the older computers.
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
EXERCISE
WINDOWS XP 473
15-12 Run the Network Setup Wizard
You can run the Network Setup Wizard for a new or an existing network.
1. Open My Network Places and choose Set up a home or small office network.
The Network Setup Wizard opens.
2. Click Next. The wizard reminds you of steps that need to be performed
before you can continue. You should already be connected to the Internet.
3. Click Next. The wizard asks you to specify your connection method:
FIGURE 15-14
Choosing a
connection method
in the Network
Setup Wizard
● This computer connects
directly to the Internet…
Use this option if this
computer is your Internet Connection Sharing
host computer, and it
connects to the Internet
via a dial-up connection
or a cable/DSL modem.
When you click this
option and click Next,
you’ll be asked to
identify your Internet
connection.
● This computer connects to the Internet through another computer…
Use this option if this computer is using another computer’s Internet connection, or if your network has an Internet connection-sharing router. A
router is a network hardware connection-sharing device.
● Other. When this option is selected and Next is clicked, there are three
additional connection choices. One choice is for networks that connect
directly to the Internet or through a hub. There are also choices for
networks not connecting to the Internet and computers not yet part of
a network.
NOTE : If your network uses a dial-up or DSL/cable connection and you are
not using Internet Connection Sharing, or your network uses a routed Internet
connection through a network hub, use the Other connection choice and the option
This computer connects directly to the Internet or through a network hub.
4. Click Next. The wizard asks you to give the computer a name and a brief
description. Key a Computer name by using only letters and numbers with
474 WINDOWS XP
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
no spaces or punctuation. Every computer on your network must have a
unique name.
5. Click Next. The wizard asks you to specify the name of your network. Key a
Workgroup name. It must be different from the computer names.
6. Click Next. The wizard asks you to review the list of selections. Click Back to
return to previous screens and make changes.
NOTE : If you are not actually configuring your computer for a network,
click Cancel if your instructor tells you to do so.
7. Click Next. The wizard configures the computer and then asks you how you
want to configure the remaining computers on your network. You must run
the Network Setup Wizard on every computer on the network when you’re
setting up your network. You have the following options:
● Create a Network Setup Disk. If you have computers on your network
running previous versions of Windows (95, 98, Me, or NT), you can
create a disk that will let you run the wizard on those machines. You’ll be
prompted to insert a floppy disk.
● Use the Network Setup Disk I already have. If you’ve run the wizard on
this computer before but have made some changes, you can use the setup
disk you created earlier on the other computers.
● Use my Windows XP CD. You can use this CD on computers running
older versions of Windows instead of creating a disk.
● Just finish the wizard; I don’t need to run the wizard on other computers.
If all the computers use Windows XP or Windows 2000, use this option
and run the wizard on the other computers.
8. If you chose one of the fi rst three options in the previous step, the wizard
displays instructions about running the Network Setup Wizard on the other
computers either from the disk or the CD. Click Next.
9. Click Finish to complete the Network Setup Wizard and close My Network
Places.
10. Perform the appropriate tasks on the remaining computers.
11. Open System Restore and restore the machine to [your initials]Lesson15.
12. Log off Windows.
?
Help and Support Center
Setting up a home or small business network can seem like a daunting task if
you’ve never done it before. Windows provides extensive Help information to
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
WINDOWS XP 475
get you through the process. In particular, you’ll fi nd detailed descriptions of
Ethernet, phone line, and wireless networks as well as the hardware requirements
for each.
Use Help to learn more about how to set up a home or small business network:
1. Click the Start button
menu.
and choose Help and Support from the Start
2. Under Pick a Help topic, click What’s new in Windows XP. A list of topics
appears.
3. On the left side of the screen, click Windows XP articles: Walk through ways
to use your PC. Links to various articles appear in the right pane.
4. In the right pane, click Walkthrough: Home networking. The article appears.
Links for different sections of the article are located in the upper-left corner.
FIGURE 15-15
Help screen
installing a home
network
5. Read the fi rst page and then click Network building blocks to continue to the
next section of the article.
6. Read the remaining sections of the article to learn details about setting up a
home network. Close Help when you are finished.
476 WINDOWS XP
LESSON
15
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
Summary
➤ A network is a group of computers and other devices connected to each other
by some type of communications link. A local area network (LAN) is a group
of connected computers located in a relatively limited physical area. In a peerto-peer network, all the computers communicate directly with each other and
share their fi les without requiring any one computer to manage the process. In a
domain network, the connected computers function under the control of a server,
or master computer.
➤ My Network Places displays shortcuts to the shared computers, folders, and other
resources on the network. These shortcuts are created automatically whenever you
access a shared location or resource.
➤ You can access My Network Places from My Computer, Windows Explorer, the
Start menu, or a desktop icon if one is available. Network locations are identified
by the folder and computer.
➤ You can view the available network connections in My Network Places, Windows
Explorer, or Control Panel.
➤ You can view all the computers on your network. If you know the computer name
or part of its name, you can perform a search from the Start menu. When you
search for a computer on the network, you can use all or part of the computer
name.
➤ File sharing enables users to browse among the shared folders throughout the
network. The Shared Documents folder is automatically available to other users
in a workgroup network. You can designate specific folders on your computer as
shared.
➤ Before other users on the network can see the contents of a folder on your
computer, you must designate it as a shared folder and specify its share name. The
icon for a shared folder shows an icon with a hand under the folder.
➤ You can make changes to a fi le in a shared folder and save those changes if this
option has been enabled when the folder is designated as shared.
➤ When you map a shared folder or drive, you assign an unused drive letter to the
drive or folder.
➤ You can use the Tools menu in either Windows Explorer or My Network Places to
map a shared drive or folder.
➤ You can disconnect from a mapped drive when you no longer need it. Use the
Tools menu to disconnect a mapped drive.
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
WINDOWS XP 477
➤ You can install a printer and designate it as a shared device. Network users can
browse the network for shared printers and add it to their list of available printers.
➤ You can designate a printer as a shared resource at the time you install it or after
it has been installed. You can add printer drivers for computers on your network
that might be using older versions of Windows.
➤ To use any network printer, you must have an icon for the printer in your Printers
and Faxes folder. Windows automatically searches for network folders and printers. If this feature is disabled, you can use the Add Printer Wizard to add a
network printer instead of a local printer.
➤ A fi rewall is a security system that protects the network from unauthorized
intruders from outside the network. The Internet Connection Firewall sets restrictions on what information is communicated between a network and the Internet.
Remote Desktop Connection enables you to access another computer’s desktop.
Windows Messenger is an instant messaging program, and Remote Assistance
enables you to invite others on the network to help you.
➤ You can view the status of your network connection and determine its speed and
duration.
➤ You can use a network connection’s Properties dialog box to activate features such
as the Internet Connection Firewall and Internet Connection Sharing. Internet
Connection Sharing enables you to use just one connection to the Internet for all
the computers on the network.
➤ The Network Setup Wizard steps you through the process of configuring each
computer on your network. Before running the Network Setup Wizard, you must
perform a number of hardware-related tasks.
➤ When you run the Network Setup Wizard, you must specify your network connection, the name of your computer and your workgroup, and how you want to
configure the rest of the computers on your network.
478 WINDOWS XP
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
Concepts Review
TRUE/FALSE QUESTIONS
Each of the following statements is either true or false. Indicate your choice by
circling T or F.
T
F
1. A peer-to-peer network does not use a server.
T
F
2. You can search for a computer on a network if you know part of
the computer’s name.
T
F
3. A CD-ROM drive can be designated as a shared resource.
T
F
4. You use the View menu to map a shared drive or folder.
T
F
5. You can designate a printer as shared only at the time you install it.
T
F
6. When you view the status of a connection, you can see who is
logged on to the network.
T
F
7. You can activate the Internet Connection Firewall in the Properties dialog box for a connection.
T
F
8. An Ethernet network links computers together by using existing
telephone wiring.
SHORT ANSWER QUESTIONS
Write the correct answer in the space provided.
1. What is the term used to describe the network hardware that is the common
connection point for all the segments of an Ethernet network?
2. What does a wireless network use to link computers instead of wiring?
3. What is the Windows feature that enables a single Internet connection to be
used by all computers on a network?
4. What is the term for a network security system that protects the network
from unauthorized intruders from outside the network?
WINDOWS XP 479
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
5. What sequence of commands in Windows Explorer maps a shared drive
or folder?
6. What is the name for a network in which the connected computers are
under the control of one or more servers?
7. What is the name of the Windows program that enables you to configure the
computers on a peer-to-peer network?
8. What sequence of commands would you use to designate a folder as shared?
CRITICAL THINKING
Answer these questions on a separate page. There are no right or wrong answers.
Support your answers with examples from your own experience, if possible.
1. Think of a household of a friend or family member that contains more
than one computer. What type of network would be best for that household?
Explain the reasons for your choice.
2. When is it appropriate to share or not share a folder? Give some examples.
Skills Review
NOTE : If you change a system setting in completing any of these Skills
Review exercises, remember to open System Restore and restore the machine
to [your initials] Lesson15 when you are finished so the computer is ready for the
next user.
E X E R C I S E 15-13
Open My Network Places, view computers on your network, share a folder, map
and disconnect a shared folder, and add a shared printer.
NOTE : You will need a formatted floppy disk for this exercise. Your instructor will assign you a student partner for this exercise. You and your partner
will map to shared folders on each other’s floppy disk drives.
1. Open My Network Places by clicking the Start button
the My Network Places icon .
and clicking
480 WINDOWS XP
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
2. To view the computers on your network, click View workgroup computers
in the left pane. (In a domain-based network, you might need to click View
network connections to view other computers on your network or ask your
instructor for navigation directions.) Close the Workgroup window.
3. Create a shared folder by following these steps:
a. Insert a blank, formatted floppy disk in the floppy disk drive.
b. Open Windows Explorer.
c. In the left pane, click My Computer and click 3½ Floppy (A:).
d. Choose File, New from the menu and then choose Folder. For the folder
name, key [your initials]FloppyInfo
e. With the new folder still selected, choose File, Sharing and Security from
the menu.
f. Under Network sharing and security, click Share this folder on the network.
NOTE : In a domain-based network, your sharing option might be designated by clicking Share this computer.
g. Click Apply.
h. Click OK to close the Properties dialog box for your FloppyInfo folder.
i. Close Windows Explorer but leave the floppy disk in the disk drive for
your partner to access.
4. Map to a shared folder by following these steps:
a. Open My Network Places.
b. Choose Tools, Map Network Drive from the menu.
c. Click Browse.
d. Click My Network Places.
e. Locate your partner’s computer and click it to select it. (In a domainbased network, you might need to click View network connections to
locate your partner’s computer.)
f. Locate your partner’s FloppyInfo folder. Click it and click OK.
g. Click Finish.
h. Close your partner’s FloppyInfo folder and close My Network Places.
5. Disconnect a mapped drive by following these steps:
a. Open My Network Places.
b. Choose Tools, Disconnect Network Drive from the menu.
c. Click drive Z to select it and click OK. (If Windows displays a message
that fi les might be open on drive Z, click Yes.)
d. Close My Network Places.
6. Add a shared printer by following these steps:
a. From the Start menu, click the Printers and Faxes icon .
b. In the left pane, click Add a printer.
c. Click Next. Make the printer a local printer, but do not click the Plug and
Play option. Continue the steps in the wizard, designating the LPT1 as the
WINDOWS XP 481
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
printer port and installing an HP LaserJet 5 printer. Use HP LaserJet 5 as
the Printer name. Do not make it the default printer.
When the Add Printer Wizard screen for Printer Sharing appears, make
sure the Share name option is selected. In the Share name text box, key
[your initials]HPLaser
Click Next. (If the wizard displays an information message that your share
name might not be accessible from some MS-DOS workstations, click Yes.)
In the Location text box, key [your name]’s desk. In the Comment text
box, key This is a fast printer.
Click Next. Click No to skip printing the test page, click Next, and then
click Finish.
Close the Printers and Faxes folder.
7. Remove the disk from the floppy disk drive.
E X E R C I S E 15-14
View the properties of a network connection and use the Network Setup Wizard.
1. View the properties of a network connection by following these steps:
a. From the Start menu, choose the My Network Places icon .
b. Click View network connections in the left pane.
c. Right-click the icon for your local area connection and choose Properties
from the shortcut menu.
d. Click the Advanced tab to see whether the Internet Connection Firewall
is enabled.
e. Click Cancel to close the Properties dialog box without making any
changes.
f. Close the Network Connections folder.
2. Use the Network Setup Wizard by following these steps:
a. Open My Network Places and choose Set up a home or small office network.
b. Click Next.
c. Click Next. Specify your connection method.
NOTE : Your instructor will tell you which connection method to specify
for your network.
d. Click Next. Key a Computer name.
e. Click Next. Key a Workgroup name.
f. Click Next. Review the list of selections.
NOTE : If you are not actually configuring your computer for a network,
click Cancel if your instructor tells you to do so.
g. Click Next. Specify the option for configuring the rest of the computers
on your network.
h. Click Next or Finish and then close My Network Places.
482 WINDOWS XP
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
Lesson Applications
NOTE : If you change a system setting in completing any of these Lesson
Applications exercises, remember to open System Restore and restore the
machine to [your initials] Lesson15 when you are finished so the computer is ready
for the next user.
E X E R C I S E 15-15
Open My Network Places, locate computers on the network, share a folder, and
access a shared folder.
NOTE : You will need a formatted floppy disk for this exercise. Your instructor will assign you a student partner for this exercise. You and your partner
will access each other’s shared folders.
Avaris Automobile Corporation has asked Handy to teach new employees how to
perform some basic network tasks. They’ve asked Handy to create simple instructional materials.
1. Using WordPad, start writing an Action Report. Remember to include your
name, the date, the class, and the exercise number.
2. Complete the Action Report by describing the steps required to open My
Network Places and locate the computers on the network. Make note of the
computers currently online.
3. Describe the steps required to create and share a folder on a floppy disk
drive. Name the new folder [your initials]DriveA. Use the same name for
the share name.
4. Describe the steps required to open your partner’s shared floppy drive folder
on the network.
5. Save the Action Report as [your initials]15-15 in a new folder for your
Lesson 15 fi les. Then print and close the Action Report.
E X E R C I S E 15-16
Create a shared folder, map to a shared folder, and disconnect from a network
drive.
NOTE : You will need a formatted floppy disk for this exercise. Your instructor will assign you a student partner for this exercise. You and your partner
will map to each other’s shared folders.
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
WINDOWS XP
483
The president of Lifeline Battery Products has asked Handy to develop procedures
for new computer users to share folders. Lifeline also needs to map and disconnect
from network drives.
1. Using WordPad, start writing an Action Report. Remember to include your
name, the date, the class, and the exercise number.
2. Complete the Action Report by describing the steps required to create
and share a folder on a floppy disk drive. Name the new folder [your
initials]FloppyDrive. Use the same name for the share name.
3. Describe the steps required to map to your partner’s shared folder on your
partner’s floppy drive.
4. Describe the steps required to disconnect from your partner’s network drive.
5. Save the Action Report as [your initials]15-16 in your Lesson 15 folder.
Then print and close the Action Report.
E X E R C I S E 15-17
Create a shared folder, access a shared folder, add a shared printer, and view
network statistics.
NOTE : You will need a formatted floppy disk for this exercise. Your instructor will assign you a student partner for this exercise. You and your partner
will share each other’s floppy drive folders.
The accounting department at Harris-Stowe State has recently installed a local
area network. They’ve asked Handy to assist employees in learning how to set up
fi le and printer sharing. They also need to understand various network tasks.
1. Using WordPad, start writing an Action Report. Remember to include your
name, the date, the class, and the exercise number.
2. Complete the Action Report by describing the steps required to create
and share a folder on a floppy disk drive. Name the new folder [your
initials]DriveAInfo. Use the same name for the share name.
3. Describe the steps required to open your partner’s shared floppy drive folder
on the network.
4. Describe the steps required to add an HP DeskJet 500 printer as a shared
printer. Assume that the printer is attached to your computer, but do not
click the Plug and Play option. Use the LPT1 port. Use HP DeskJet 500
as the printer name. Do not make it the default printer and give it the
share name [your initials]HPDeskJet. Provide an appropriate location and
comment. Do not print a test page.
5. Describe the steps required to determine the speed of the connection to the
local area network. Make note of the connection speed.
484 WINDOWS XP
Unit 5 ■ Advanced Topics
6. Save the Action Report as [your initials]15-17 in your Lesson 15 folder.
Then print and close the Action Report.
E X E R C I S E 15-18
Challenge Yourself
View computers on the network, create a shared folder, explore connection properties, and use the Network Setup Wizard.
The president of Multrex has asked Handy to develop procedures for employees
to follow in using the newly installed local area network. He would also like
procedures for configuring new computers when they are added to the network.
1. Using WordPad, start writing an Action Report. Remember to include your
name, the date, the class, and the exercise number.
2. Complete the Action Report by describing the steps required to identify
computers currently connected to the network. Make note of the computers.
3. Describe the steps required to create a shared floppy drive folder named
[your initials]FloppyFiles
4. Describe the steps required to determine whether Internet Connection Sharing or the Internet Connection Firewall are enabled for the computer’s active
connection.
5. Describe the steps required to add a computer to an existing local area
network. The computer would connect to the Internet through another
computer on the network. The new computer is running Windows XP.
6. Save the Action Report as [your initials]15-18 in your Lesson 15 folder.
Then print and close the Action Report.
On Your Own
In these exercises you work on your own, as you would in a real-life work environment. Use the skills you’ve learned to accomplish the task—and be creative.
NOTE : If you change a system setting in completing any of these On Your
Own exercises, remember to open System Restore and restore the machine
to [your initials] Lesson15 when you are finished so the computer is ready for the
next user.
EXERCISE 15-19
Using WordPad, write an Action Report describing the steps required to explore
the architecture of your classroom’s local area network. Describe all connec-
Lesson 15 ■ Networking
WINDOWS XP
485
tions, their speed, and status. Identify all computers currently connected to the
network. Identify all shared printers and folders. Save your Action Report as
[your initials]15-19 in your Lesson 15 folder and then print and close it.
EXERCISE 15-20
Using WordPad, write an Action Report describing the steps required to create
a shared folder on a floppy disk. Describe the steps to access and map a shared
folder on a partner’s floppy disk. Add a shared printer. Be sure to include
your partner’s name in your Action Report. Save your Action Report as [your
initials]15-20 in your Lesson 15 folder and then print and close it.
EXERCISE 15-21
Research the process of setting up a local area network in your home for two
or more computers. Assume that you will use Internet Connection Sharing on a
host computer that is running Windows XP. Describe the steps required to get
the network up and running. Save your Action Report as [your initials]15-21 in
your Lesson 15 folder and then print and close it.
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