null  User manual
Oracle® Database
Client Installation Guide
11g Release 2 (11.2) for Linux
E24322-09
January 2014
Oracle Database Client Installation Guide, 11g Release 2 (11.2) for Linux
E24322-09
Copyright © 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Primary Author: Prakash Jashnani
Contributing Authors: Reema Khosla, Tanaya Bhattacharjee
Contributors: David Austin, Namrata Bhakthavatsalam, Subhranshu Banerjee, Janelle Simmons, Mark
Bauer, Robert Chang, Jonathan Creighton, Sudip Datta, Thirumaleshwara Hasandka, Joel Kallman, George
Kotsovolos, Simon Law, Shekhar Vaggu, Richard Long, Rolly Lv, Padmanabhan Manavazhi, Sreejith
Minnanghat, Krishna Mohan, Rajendra Pingte, Hanlin Qian, Roy Swonger, Ranjith Kundapur, Aneesh
Khandelwal , Barb Lundhild, Barbara Glover, Binoy Sukumaran, Hema Ramamurthy, Prasad Bagal, Martin
Widjaja, Ajesh Viswambharan, Eric Belden, Sivakumar Yarlagadda, Rudregowda Mallegowda , Matthew
McKerley, Trivikrama Samudrala, Akshay Shah, Sue Lee, Sangeeth Kumar, James Spiller, Saar Maoz, Rich
Long, Mark Fuller, Sunil Ravindrachar, Sergiusz Wolicki, Eugene Karichkin, Joseph Francis, Srinivas
Poovala, David Schreiner, Neha Avasthy, Dipak Saggi, Sudheendra Sampath, Mohammed Shahnawaz
Quadri, Shachi Sanklecha, Zakia Zerhouni, Jai Krishnani, Darcy Christensen., Kevin Flood, Clara Jaeckel,
Emily Murphy, Terri Winters
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Contents
Preface ................................................................................................................................................................ vii
Audience......................................................................................................................................................
Documentation Accessibility ....................................................................................................................
Command Syntax .......................................................................................................................................
Accessing Documentation........................................................................................................................
Related Documentation ..............................................................................................................................
Typographic Conventions..........................................................................................................................
vii
vii
vii
viii
ix
x
1 Overview of Oracle Database Client Installation
Planning Your Installation .....................................................................................................................
Installation Considerations ....................................................................................................................
Hardware and Software Certification .............................................................................................
Multiple Oracle Homes Support......................................................................................................
Installing the Software on a System with an Existing Oracle Installation..........................
Updating the Existing Software with the Current Version .................................................
About the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux .......................................................
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms ....................................................................
Oracle Database Client Installation Methods ....................................................................................
Interactive Installation Methods ......................................................................................................
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files ..............................................................
Oracle Database Client Installation Types .........................................................................................
Oracle Database Client and Oracle Database Interoperability.......................................................
Simplified Patching of Timestamp with Time Zone Data Type ....................................................
Software Updates Option .......................................................................................................................
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-6
2 Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks
Logging In to the System as root ...........................................................................................................
Checking the Hardware Requirements................................................................................................
Memory Requirements......................................................................................................................
System Architecture...........................................................................................................................
Disk Space Requirements..................................................................................................................
Display Requirements .......................................................................................................................
Recommended Hardware Requirement for SQL Developer.......................................................
Checking the Software Requirements .................................................................................................
Operating System Requirements .....................................................................................................
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
iii
Kernel Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 2-7
Package Requirements ...................................................................................................................... 2-9
Compiler Requirements ................................................................................................................. 2-17
Additional Software Requirements .............................................................................................. 2-17
Oracle JDBC/OCI Drivers ...................................................................................................... 2-18
Oracle ODBC Drivers .............................................................................................................. 2-18
Linux-PAM Library ................................................................................................................. 2-20
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms .......................................................... 2-20
Programming Languages ....................................................................................................... 2-20
Browser Requirements ............................................................................................................ 2-20
Programming Languages ....................................................................................................... 2-21
Instant Client Light Requirements................................................................................................ 2-21
Creating Required Operating System Group and User................................................................. 2-22
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group .......................................................................................... 2-23
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User.................................................................................. 2-24
Determining If an Oracle Software Owner User Exists...................................................... 2-24
Creating an Oracle Software Owner User............................................................................ 2-24
Modifying an Oracle Software Owner User ........................................................................ 2-25
Identifying Required Software Directories ..................................................................................... 2-25
Oracle Base Directory ..................................................................................................................... 2-25
Oracle Inventory Directory............................................................................................................ 2-26
Oracle Home Directory .................................................................................................................. 2-27
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory .......................................................................... 2-27
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory............................................................................ 2-27
Creating an Oracle Base Directory................................................................................................ 2-28
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment ....................................................................... 2-29
3 Installing Oracle Database Client
Reviewing Installation Guidelines....................................................................................................... 3-1
Accessing the Installation Software ..................................................................................................... 3-1
Downloading Oracle Software......................................................................................................... 3-2
Downloading the Installation Archive Files from OTN........................................................ 3-2
Downloading the Software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud .................................... 3-2
Extracting the Installation Files................................................................................................. 3-3
Copying the Software to the Hard Disk ......................................................................................... 3-4
Mounting Disks........................................................................................................................... 3-4
Copying the Oracle Database Client Software to a Hard Disk ............................................ 3-5
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software................................................................................. 3-5
Running Oracle Universal Installer ................................................................................................. 3-6
Using Oracle Net Configuration Assistant..................................................................................... 3-9
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade......................................................... 3-10
4 Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks
Required Postinstallation Tasks ...........................................................................................................
Downloading and Installing Patches ..............................................................................................
Updating Instant Client.....................................................................................................................
Connecting with Instant Client ........................................................................................................
iv
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks .................................................................................................
Configuring Instant Client Light .....................................................................................................
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script ..........................................................................................
Connecting Instant Client or Instant Client Light to an Oracle Database .................................
Specifying a Connection by Using the Easy Connect Naming Method .............................
Specifying a Connection by Configuring a tnsnames.ora File .............................................
Specifying a Connection Using an Empty Connect String and TWO_TASK ....................
Setting Up User Accounts .................................................................................................................
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable.............................................................................
Generating the Client Static Library................................................................................................
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks ............................................................................
Configuring Oracle Net Services .....................................................................................................
Configuring Oracle Precompilers ....................................................................................................
Configuring Pro*C/C++ ............................................................................................................
Configuring Pro*FORTRAN .....................................................................................................
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-6
4-7
4-7
4-7
5 Removing Oracle Database Client Software
About the Deinstallation Tool...............................................................................................................
Downloading the Deinstall Tool for Use with Failed Installations...............................................
Example of Running the Deinstall Command ...................................................................................
Deinstallation Parameter File Example................................................................................................
5-1
5-4
5-4
5-4
A Installing Oracle Database Client Using Response Files
How Response Files Work.....................................................................................................................
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode..............................................................
General Procedure for Using Response Files ................................................................................
Preparing a Response File .....................................................................................................................
Editing a Response File Template...................................................................................................
Saving a Response File .....................................................................................................................
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File ...........................................................
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade Using the Response File .................
A-1
A-2
A-2
A-3
A-3
A-4
A-5
A-6
B Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages...............................................
Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages .............................................
Determining the Operating System Locale by Using the LANG Environment Variable
Configuring Locale and Character Sets Using NLS_LANG................................................
Installing Translation Resources .....................................................................................................
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages .........................................................
B-1
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
C Troubleshooting
Verify Requirements ..............................................................................................................................
X Window Display Errors......................................................................................................................
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?.......................................................................................
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session ...................................................................................
C-1
C-1
C-2
C-3
v
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants........................................................................................
Configuration Assistant Failure......................................................................................................
Fatal Errors .........................................................................................................................................
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues.......................................................................................................
Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues .............................................................................................
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling.......................................................................................
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation..............................................................................................
C-3
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-4
C-5
D Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client ....................................................................
Installing Oracle Database Tools .........................................................................................................
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications .....................................................................
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways) ..............................
Index
vi
D-1
D-3
D-7
D-8
Preface
This guide provides instructions about installing and configuring Oracle Database
Client on Linux. This guide also talks about installing and configuring database using
response files, globalization support, ports, and troubleshooting.
The preface contains the following topics:
■
Audience
■
Documentation Accessibility
■
Command Syntax
■
Accessing Documentation
■
Related Documentation
■
Typographic Conventions
Audience
This guide is intended for anyone responsible for installing Oracle Database Client 11g
Release 2 (11.2). Additional installation guides for Oracle Database, Oracle Real
Application Clusters, Oracle Clusterware, Oracle Database Examples, and Oracle
Enterprise Manager Grid Control are available on the relevant installation media.
See Also: Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Database
using the default settings
Documentation Accessibility
For information about Oracle's commitment to accessibility, visit the Oracle
Accessibility Program website at
http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=docacc.
Access to Oracle Support
Oracle customers have access to electronic support through My Oracle Support. For
information, visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=info or
visit http://www.oracle.com/pls/topic/lookup?ctx=acc&id=trs if you are hearing
impaired.
Command Syntax
UNIX command syntax appears in monospace font. The dollar character ($), number
sign (#), or percent character (%) are UNIX command prompts. Do not enter them as
vii
part of the command. The following command syntax conventions are used in this
guide:
Convention
Description
backslash \
A backslash is the UNIX command continuation character. It is used in
command examples that are too long to fit on a single line. Enter the
command as displayed (with a backslash) or enter it on a single line
without a backslash:
dd if=/dev/rdsk/c0t1d0s6 of=/dev/rst0 bs=10b \
count=10000
braces { }
Braces indicate required items:
.DEFINE {macro1}
brackets [ ]
Brackets indicate optional items:
cvtcrt termname [outfile]
ellipses ...
Ellipses indicate an arbitrary number of similar items:
CHKVAL fieldname value1 value2 ... valueN
italics
Italic type indicates a variable. Substitute a value for the variable:
library_name
vertical line |
A vertical line indicates a choice within braces or brackets:
FILE filesize [K|M]
Accessing Documentation
The documentation for this release includes platform-specific documentation and
generic product documentation.
Platform-Specific Documentation
Platform-specific documentation includes information about installing and using
Oracle products on particular platforms.
This guide contains information required to install Oracle Database 11g Release 2
(11.2). Ensure that you review information related to the platform on which you intend
to install Oracle Database 11g.
The platform-specific documentation for this product is available in both Adobe
portable document format (PDF) and HTML format on the product media. To access
the platform-specific documentation on media:
1.
Use a web browser to open the welcome.html file in the top-level directory of the
media.
2.
Platform-specific documentation is available in PDF and HTML formats in the
Documentation section.
Product Documentation
Product documentation includes information about configuring, using, or
administering Oracle products on any platform. The product documentation for
Oracle Database 11g products is available in both HTML and PDF formats in the
following locations:
■
viii
On the Oracle Database Documentation Library media
Use a web browser to view or open the index.htm file in the top-level directory on
the media.
■
Online on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) website:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
Related Documentation
The related documentation for Oracle Database 11g products includes the following
manuals:
■
Oracle Database Installation Guide
■
Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux
■
Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86
■
Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86-64
■
Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide for IBM: Linux on System z
■
Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86
■
Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for Linux x86-64
■
Oracle Database Client Quick Installation Guide for IBM: Linux on System z
■
Oracle Real Application Clusters Installation Guide for Linux and UNIX
■
Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide
For information about Oracle error messages, see Oracle Database Error Messages.
Oracle error message documentation is available only in HTML. If you only have
access to the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) Online Documentation Library, then
you can browse the error messages by range. Once you find the specific range, use
your browser's "find in page" feature to locate the specific message. When connected to
the Internet, you can search for a specific error message using the error message search
feature of the Oracle online documentation.
Many books in the documentation set use the sample schemas of the seed database,
which is installed by default when you install Oracle. Refer to Oracle Database Sample
Schemas for information on how these schemas were created and how you can use
them yourself.
To download free release notes, installation documentation, white papers, or other
collateral, visit the Oracle Technology Network. You must register online before using
OTN; registration is free and can be done at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/community/join/index.html
If you have a user name and password for Oracle Technology Network, then you can
go directly to the documentation section of the Oracle Technology Network website at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
Refer to Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux for important information that was not
available when this book was released.
The release notes for Oracle Database 11g are updated regularly. The most recent
version is available on Oracle Technology Network at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
ix
Typographic Conventions
The following text conventions are used in this document:
x
Convention
Meaning
boldface
Boldface type indicates graphical user interface elements associated
with an action, or terms defined in text or the glossary.
italic
Italic type indicates book titles, emphasis, or placeholder variables for
which you supply particular values.
monospace
Monospace type indicates commands within a paragraph, URLs, code
in examples, text that appears on the screen, or text that you enter.
1
Overview of Oracle Database Client Installation
1
This chapter describes the different installation types of Oracle Database Client and
issues to consider before you install Oracle Database Client:
■
Planning Your Installation
■
Installation Considerations
■
Oracle Database Client Installation Methods
■
Oracle Database Client Installation Types
■
Oracle Database Client and Oracle Database Interoperability
■
Simplified Patching of Timestamp with Time Zone Data Type
■
Software Updates Option
Planning Your Installation
The Oracle Database installation process consists of the following phases:
1.
Read the release notes: Read Oracle Database Release Notes for Linux before you
begin the installation. The release notes are available with the platform-specific
documentation.
The latest version of the release notes is available on Oracle Technology Network
at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
2.
Review the licensing information: Although the installation media in your media
pack contain many Oracle components, you are permitted to use only those
components for which you have purchased licenses.
Oracle Support Services does not provide support for components for which
licenses have not been purchased.
See Also:
3.
Oracle Database Licensing Information
Plan the installation: This chapter describes the Oracle products that you can
install and issues that you must consider before starting the installation.
You can also refer to Appendix D, which covers frequently asked questions about
installing Oracle Database components, such as how to install Oracle Database
Client if the site uses Oracle applications or if you need multiple Oracle Database
Client connections.
Overview of Oracle Database Client Installation 1-1
Installation Considerations
4.
Complete preinstallation tasks: Chapter 2 describes preinstallation tasks that you
must complete before installing the product.
5.
Install the software: Use the following sections to install Oracle Database:
■
■
■
■
6.
Chapter 3 describes how to use Oracle Universal Installer to install Oracle
Database Client.
Appendix B describes globalization support information.
Appendix A provides information on performing silent installations, which
you may want to use if you must perform multiple installations of Oracle
Database Client.
Appendix C provides troubleshooting advice in case you encounter problems
with the installation.
Complete postinstallation tasks: Chapter 4 describes recommended and required
postinstallation tasks.
Installation Considerations
This section contains information that you should consider before deciding how to
install this product. It contains the following sections:
■
Hardware and Software Certification
■
Multiple Oracle Homes Support
■
About the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux
■
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms
Hardware and Software Certification
The platform-specific hardware and software requirements included in this guide
were current when this guide was published. However, because new platforms and
operating system software versions might be certified after this guide is published,
review the certification matrix on the My Oracle Support website for the most
up-to-date list of certified hardware platforms and operating system versions. The My
Oracle Support website is available at the following URL:
https://support.oracle.com/
You must register online before using My Oracle Support. After logging in, from the
menu options, select the Certifications tab. On the Certifications page, use the
Certification Search options to search by Product, Release, and Platform. You can also
search using the Certification Quick Link options such as Product Delivery, and
Lifetime Support.
Multiple Oracle Homes Support
Oracle Database supports multiple Oracle homes. You can install this release or earlier
releases of the software more than once on the same system, in different Oracle home
directories.
Installing the Software on a System with an Existing Oracle Installation
You must install this product into a new Oracle home directory. You cannot install
products from one release of Oracle Database into an Oracle home directory of a
1-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installation Considerations
different release. For example, you cannot install release 11.2 software into an existing
Oracle9i Oracle home directory.
Oracle Database Client can be installed in the same Oracle Database home if both
products are at the same release level. For example, you can install Oracle Database
Client 11g Release 2 (11.2) into an existing Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) home. If
you apply a patch set before installing the client, then you must apply the patch set
again.
You can install this release more than once on the same system if each installation is
installed in a separate Oracle home directory.
Updating the Existing Software with the Current Version
Use the In-Place Upgrade feature to upgrade an existing client installation to the latest
release by installing the new client software into an existing client home with the same
installation type. For example, if release 11.2.0.1 is installed, then use Oracle Universal
Installer to upgrade to release 11.2.0.2.
Consider the following before selecting this option:
■
■
■
This upgrade is only possible in a client home and not in any other Oracle home
that contains non-client installations, such as Database installations.
This upgrade does not delete files in the client home that are commonly updated
by other users. For example, configuration data files.
This upgrade cannot be performed if processes associated with the Oracle
Database Client home are running.
This functionality is available starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2).
"Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade"
on page 3-10
See Also:
About the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux
The Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux is available for x86-64 platforms.
It is based on a stable 2.6.32 Linux kernel, and also includes optimizations developed
in collaboration with Oracle Database, Oracle middleware, and Oracle hardware
engineering teams to ensure stability and optimal performance for the most
demanding enterprise workloads.
Oracle highly recommends deploying the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel in
your Linux environment, especially if you are running Oracle software. However,
using Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel is optional. If you require strict Red Hat
Enterprise Linux kernel (RHEL) compatibility, then Oracle Linux also includes a kernel
compatible with the RHEL Linux kernel, compiled directly from the Red Hat
Enterprise Linux source code.
You can obtain more information about the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for
Linux at the following URL:
http://www.oracle.com/us/technologies/linux
The Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Linux kernel installs directly on top of Oracle
Linux 6, Oracle Linux 5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5
starting with Update 5, so you are not required to upgrade to a new major release of
the operating system to obtain the benefits and features of this new kernel. You can
obtain additional information and download the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise
Kernel for Linux at the following URL:
Overview of Oracle Database Client Installation 1-3
Oracle Database Client Installation Methods
http://public-yum.oracle.com/
The Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux is the standard kernel used with
Oracle products. The build and QA systems for Oracle Database and other Oracle
products use the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux exclusively. The
Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux is also the kernel used in Oracle
Exadata and Oracle Exalogic systems. Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux
is used in all benchmark tests on Linux in which Oracle participates, and also in the
Oracle RDBMS Pre-Install program for x86-64.
Refer to "Kernel Requirements" on page 2-7 for Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
requirements.
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms
Refer to "Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms" on page 2-20 for more
information.
Oracle Database Client Installation Methods
You can choose different installation methods to install Oracle Database Client, as
follows:
■
Interactive Installation Methods
■
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files
Interactive Installation Methods
When you use the interactive method to install Oracle Database Client, Oracle
Universal Installer displays a series of screens that enable you to specify all of the
required information to install the Oracle Database Client software.
Automated Installation Methods Using Response Files
By creating a response file and specifying this file when you start Oracle Universal
Installer, you can automate some or all of the Oracle Database installation. These
automated installation methods are useful if you must perform multiple installations
on similarly configured systems or if the system where you want to install the software
does not have X Window system software installed.
When you use a response file, you can run Oracle Universal Installer in the following
modes, depending on whether you specify all of the required information or not:
■
■
Silent Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in silent mode if you use a response
file that specifies all required information, and specify the -silent option when
starting Oracle Universal Installer. None of the Oracle Universal Installer screens
are displayed.
Response File Mode: Oracle Universal Installer runs in response file mode if you
do not specify all required information in the response file.
For more information about these modes and about how to complete an installation
using response files, refer to Appendix A.
Oracle Database Client Installation Types
You can choose one of the following installation types when installing Oracle Database
Client:
1-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Simplified Patching of Timestamp with Time Zone Data Type
■
Instant Client: Enables you to install only the shared libraries required by Oracle
Call Interface (OCI), Oracle C++ Call Interface (OCCI), Pro*C, or Java database
connectivity (JDBC) OCI applications. This installation type requires much less
disk space than the other Oracle Database Client installation types.
Oracle Call Interface Programmer's Guide or Oracle
Database JDBC Developer's Guide for more information about Instant
Client
See Also:
Instant Client Light is included in the Instant Client installation and you may want
to use Instant Client Light if the applications generate error messages in American
English only. Instant Client Light is beneficial to applications that use any of the
supported character sets and can accept error messages in American English. The
following are the supported character sets:
–
US7ASCII
–
WE8DEC
–
WE8ISO8859P1
–
WE8EBCDIC37C for EBCDIC platforms only
–
WE8EBCDIC1047 for EBCDIC platforms only
–
WE8MSWIN1252
–
UTF8
–
AL32UTF8
–
AL16UTF16
The advantage of using Instant Client Light is that it has a smaller footprint than
the regular Instant Client. The shared libraries, which an application must load,
are only 34 MB as opposed to the 110 MB that regular Instant Client uses.
Therefore, the applications use less memory.
■
■
■
Administrator: Enables applications to connect to an Oracle Database instance on
the local system or on a remote system. It also provides tools that enable you to
administer Oracle Database.
Runtime: Enables applications to connect to an Oracle Database instance on the
local system or on a remote system.
Custom: Enables you to select individual components from the list of
Administrator and Runtime components.
Oracle Database Client and Oracle Database Interoperability
For information about interoperability between Oracle Database Client and Oracle
Database releases, see Note 207303.1 on the My Oracle Support website at the
following URL:
https://support.oracle.com/
Simplified Patching of Timestamp with Time Zone Data Type
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), the patching process of TIMESTAMP
WITH TIMEZONE data type values is simplified.
Overview of Oracle Database Client Installation 1-5
Software Updates Option
See Also: "Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) New Features in
Globalization" and "Clients and Servers Operating with Different
Versions of Time Zone Files" in Oracle Database Globalization Support
Guide for information about simplified patching process and how
certain clients work with server with different time zone files
Software Updates Option
Use the Software Updates feature to dynamically download and apply the latest
updates released by Oracle; such as, interim patch updates, critical patch updates,
Oracle Universal Installer updates, and the latest patch set updates. This functionality
is available starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2).
You can choose to download the latest updates by providing My Oracle Support
credentials or you can apply previously downloaded updates. You can also download
the updates separately using the -downloadUpdates option and later apply them
during the installation by providing the location where the updates are present.
"Running Oracle Universal Installer" on page 3-6 for more
information on the -downloadUpdates option, and dynamically
applying software updates during the installation
See Also:
1-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
2
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks
2
This guide contains information required to install Oracle Database Client 11g Release
2 (11.2). Ensure that you review information related to the platform on which you
intend to install Oracle Database Client.
This chapter describes the tasks that you must complete before you start Oracle
Universal Installer. It includes information about the following tasks:
■
Logging In to the System as root
■
Checking the Hardware Requirements
■
Checking the Software Requirements
■
Creating Required Operating System Group and User
■
Identifying Required Software Directories
■
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
■
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
Logging In to the System as root
Before you install the Oracle software, you must complete several tasks as the root
user. To log in as the root user, complete one of the following procedures:
Unless you intend to complete a silent-mode installation,
you must install the software from an X Window System
workstation, an X terminal, or a PC or other system with X server
software installed.
Note:
For more information about silent-mode installations, refer to
Appendix A.
■
If you are installing the software from an X Window System workstation or X
terminal, then:
1.
Start a local terminal session, for example, an X terminal (xterm).
2.
If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter the
following command to enable the remote host to display X applications on the
local X server:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-1
Checking the Hardware Requirements
$ xhost somehost.example.com
3.
If you are not installing the software on the local system, then use the ssh,
rlogin, or telnet command to connect to the system where you want to
install the software:
$ telnet fully_qualified_remote_host_name
4.
If you are not logged in as the root user, then enter the following command to
switch user to root:
$ sudo sh
password:
#
■
If you are installing the software from a PC or other system with X server software
installed, then:
If necessary, refer to the X server documentation, or contact
your X server vendor or system administrator for more information
about completing this procedure. Depending on the X server
software that you are using, you may have to complete the tasks in
a different order.
Note:
1.
Start the X server software.
2.
Configure the security settings of the X server software to permit remote hosts
to display X applications on the local system.
3.
Connect to the remote system where you want to install the software and start
a terminal session on that system, for example, an X terminal (xterm).
4.
If you are not logged in as the root user on the remote system, then enter the
following command to switch user to root:
$ sudo sh
password:
#
Checking the Hardware Requirements
The system must meet the following minimum hardware requirements for Oracle
Database Client 11g Release 2:
■
Memory Requirements
■
System Architecture
■
Disk Space Requirements
■
Display Requirements
■
Recommended Hardware Requirement for SQL Developer
Memory Requirements
The following are the memory requirements for Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2
(11.2):
■
At least 256 MB of RAM.
2-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Hardware Requirements
To determine the RAM size, enter the following command:
# grep MemTotal /proc/meminfo
If the size of the RAM is less than the required size, then you must install more
memory before you continue with the installation.
■
The following table describes the relationship between installed RAM and the
configured swap space recommendation:
On Linux, the HugePages feature allocates non-swappable
memory for large page tables using memory-mapped files. If you
enable HugePages, then you should deduct the memory allocated to
HugePages from the available RAM before calculating swap space.
Note:
RAM
Swap Space
256 MB
3 times the size of RAM
Between 256 MB and 512 MB
2 times the size of RAM
Between 512 MB and 2 GB
1.5 times the size of RAM
Between 2 GB and 16 GB
Equal to the size of RAM
More than 16 GB
16 GB
To determine the size of the configured swap space, enter the following command:
# grep SwapTotal /proc/meminfo
If necessary, refer to the operating system documentation for information about how to
configure additional swap space.
To determine the available RAM and swap space, enter the following command:
# free
IMPORTANT:
■
■
Oracle recommends that you take multiple values for the
available RAM and swap space before finalizing on a value.
This is because the available RAM and swap space keep
changing depending on the user interactions with the
computer.
Contact your operating system vendor for swap space
allocation guidance for your server. The vendor guidelines
supersede the swap space requirements listed in this guide.
System Architecture
To determine whether the system architecture can run the software, enter the
following command:
# uname -m
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-3
Checking the Hardware Requirements
Verify that the processor architecture matches the Oracle
software release to install. If you do not see the expected output, then
you cannot install the software on this system.
Note:
Disk Space Requirements
The following are the disk space requirements for Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2
(11.2):
■
The minimum disk space requirement for a client install in the /tmp directory is
400 MB.
To determine the amount of space available in the /tmp directory, enter the
following command:
# df -k /tmp
If there is less than 400 MB of free space available in the /tmp directory, then
complete one of the following steps:
■
■
Delete unnecessary files from the /tmp directory to meet the space
requirement.
Set the TMP and TMPDIR environment variables when setting the oracle user’s
environment.
"Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment" on
page 2-29 for more information about setting TMP and TMPDIR
See Also:
■
■
Extend the file system that contains the /tmp directory. If necessary, contact the
system administrator for information about extending file systems.
The following table describes the disk space requirements for software files for
each installation type on Linux:
Installation Type
Requirement for Software Files
Instant Client
221 MB
Administrator
1.5 GB
Runtime
1.1 GB
Custom (maximum)
1.5 GB
■
To determine the amount of free disk space available, enter the following
command:
# df -k
Display Requirements
The minimum display requirement for Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2) is a
resolution of 1024 x 768 or higher.
2-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
Recommended Hardware Requirement for SQL Developer
The following are the recommended CPU, Memory and Display requirements for SQL
Developer.
Resource
Recommended
Memory
1 GB RAM (recommended), 256 MB RAM
(min)
Display
65536 colors, set to at least 1024 X 768
resolution
Checking the Software Requirements
Depending on the products that you intend to install, verify that the following
softwares are installed on the system.
Oracle Universal Installer performs checks on the system to
verify that it meets the listed requirements. To ensure that these
checks pass, verify the requirements before you start Oracle
Universal Installer.
Note:
■
Operating System Requirements
■
Kernel Requirements
■
Package Requirements
■
Compiler Requirements
■
Additional Software Requirements
■
Instant Client Light Requirements
Operating System Requirements
The following or later versions of the operating system are required for Oracle
Database Client 11g Release 2 (11.2):
■
■
On Linux x86
–
Oracle Linux 4 Update 7
–
Oracle Linux 5 Update 2
–
Oracle Linux 6
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Update 7
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 2
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP2
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11
–
Asianux Server 3 SP2
On Linux x86-64
–
Oracle Linux 4 Update 7
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-5
Checking the Software Requirements
■
–
Oracle Linux 5 Update 2 (with Red Hat Compatible Kernel)
–
Oracle Linux 5 Update 5
–
Oracle Linux 6
–
Oracle Linux 6 (with Red Hat Compatible Kernel)
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Update 7
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 2
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 5 (with the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise
Kernel for Linux)
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (with the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
for Linux)
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP2
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11
–
Asianux Server 3 SP2
On IBM: Linux on System z:
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Update 2
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Update 8
–
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 4
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 SP3
–
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP1
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), the Security Enhanced Linux (SE
Linux) feature is supported for Oracle Linux 4, Oracle Linux 5, Oracle Linux 6, Red
Hat Enterprise Linux 4, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.
Only the distributions and versions listed in this section are
supported. Do not install the software on other versions.
Note:
Oracle Universal Installer performs checks to verify that the system
meets the listed requirements. To ensure that these checks pass,
verify the requirements before you start Oracle Universal Installer.
To determine the version of Linux installed, enter the following command:
# cat /proc/version
Alternatively, on some distributions of Linux, you can also enter the following
command:
# lsb_release -id
2-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
For Asianux Server, Oracle Linux, and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux, system requirements are identical by kernel version.
Specifically:
Note:
■
■
■
■
Oracle Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 requirements are
the same.
Asianux Server 3, Oracle Linux 5, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5
Update 2 requirements are the same.
Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux 5 Update 5
(2.6.32) and above, available for x86-64 systems, contains several
additional features and performance enhancements not available
either with Oracle Linux or with other supported Linux
distributions. This kernel can be installed on either Oracle Linux
or Red Hat Enterprise Linux distributions. Before installing the
Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, you must have Oracle
Linux 5 Update 5, Oracle Linux 6, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5
Update 5 or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 installed on an x86-64
server.
The Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Linux is installed
by default with the Oracle Linux 6 installation.
Kernel Requirements
The following are the Kernel requirements for Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2.
For Linux x86
■
On Oracle Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4:
2.6.9 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Asianux Server 3:
2.6.18 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 6:
2.6.32.100 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6:
2.6.32-71 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10:
2.6.16.21 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11:
2.6.27.19 or later
For Linux x86-64
■
On Oracle Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
2.6.9 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 5 Update 2 with Red Hat Compatible Kernel
2.6.18 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 5 Update 5 with Red Hat Compatible Kernel
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-7
Checking the Software Requirements
2.6.18 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 5 Update 5 with Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
2.6.32-100.0.19 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 6
2.6.32-100.28.5.el6.x86_64 or later
■
On Oracle Linux 6 with Red Hat Compatible Kernel
2.6.32-71.el6.x86_64 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 2
2.6.18 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 5
2.6.18 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 Update 5 with Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
2.6.32 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
2.6.32-71.el6.x86_64 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 with Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
2.6.32-100.28.5.el6.x86_64 or later
■
On Asianux Server 3
2.6.18 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10
2.6.16.21 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11
2.6.27.19 or later
"About the Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for
Linux" on page 1-3
See Also:
For IBM: Linux on System z
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
2.6.32-200 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4:
2.6.9 or later
■
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5:
2.6.18 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10:
2.6.16.60 or later
■
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11:
2.6.32.12 or later
2-8 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
To determine whether the required Kernel is installed, enter the following command:
# uname -r
The following is a sample output displayed by running this command on a Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 4 system:
2.6.9-34.0.1.0.11.ELsmp
In this example, the output shows the kernel version (2.6.9) and errata level
(34.0.1.0.11) on the system.
If the kernel version does not meet the requirement specified earlier in this section,
then contact the operating system vendor for information about obtaining and
installing kernel updates.
Package Requirements
The following are the list of packages required for Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2
(11.2):
■
Oracle Database Package Requirements for Linux x86
■
Oracle Database Package Requirements Linux x86-64
■
Oracle Database Package Requirements for IBM: Linux on System z
Note:
■
■
■
■
Oracle recommends that you install your Linux operating system
with the default software packages (RPMs), unless you
specifically intend to perform a minimal installation, and follow
the directions for performing such an installation to ensure that
you have all required packages for Oracle software.
Oracle recommends that you do not customize RPMs during a
default operating system installation. A default installation
includes most required packages, and helps you to limit manual
checks of package dependencies.
If you did not perform a default Linux installation, you intend to
use LDAP, and you want to use the scripts odisrvreg, oidca, or
schemasync, then install the Korn shell RPM for the Linux
distribution.
You must install the packages (or later versions) listed in the
following table. Also, ensure that the list of RPMs and all of the
prerequisites for these RPMs are installed.
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-9
Checking the Software Requirements
Oracle Database Package Requirements for Linux x86
Item
Requirement
Packages for Oracle Linux
4 and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 4
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
Packages for Asianux
Server 3, Oracle Linux 5,
and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 5
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
2-10 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
binutils-2.15.92.0.2
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3
elfutils-libelf-0.97
elfutils-libelf-devel-0.97
gcc-3.4.6
gcc-c++-3.4.6
glibc-2.3.4-2.41
glibc-common-2.3.4
glibc-devel-2.3.4
libaio-devel-0.3.105
libaio-0.3.105
libgcc-3.4.6
libstdc++-3.4.6
libstdc++-devel-3.4.6
make-3.80
pdksh-5.2.14
sysstat-5.0.5
binutils-2.17.50.0.6
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3
elfutils-libelf-0.125
elfutils-libelf-devel-0.125
elfutils-libelf-devel-static-0.125
gcc-4.1.2
gcc-c++-4.1.2
glibc-2.5-24
glibc-common-2.5
glibc-devel-2.5
ksh-20060214
libaio-0.3.106
libaio-devel-0.3.106
libgcc-4.1.2
libgomp-4.1.2
libstdc++-4.1.2
libstdc++-devel-4.1.2
make-3.81
sysstat-7.0.2
Checking the Software Requirements
Item
Requirement
Oracle Linux 6 and Red
Hat Enterprise Linux 6
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 10
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 11
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.20.51.0.2-5.11.el6.i686
compat-libcap1-1.10-1.i686
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-69.el6.i686
gcc-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
gcc-c++-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
glibc-2.12-1.7.el6.i686
glibc-devel-2.12-1.7.el6.i686
ksh
libgcc-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
libstdc++-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
libstdc++-devel-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
libaio-0.3.107-10.el6.i686
libaio-devel-0.3.107-10.el6.i686
make-3.81-19.el6.i686
sysstat-9.0.4-11.el6.i686
binutils-2.16.91.0.5
compat-libstdc++-5.0.7
gcc-4.1.2
gcc-c++-4.1.2
glibc-2.4-31.63
glibc-devel-2.4-31.63
libaio-0.3.104
libaio-devel-0.3.104
libelf-0.8.5
libgcc-4.1.2
libstdc++-4.1.2
libstdc++-devel-4.1.2
make-3.80
sysstat-8.0.4
binutils-2.19
gcc-4.3
gcc-c++-4.3
glibc-2.9
glibc-devel-2.9
libstdc++33-3.3.3
libstdc++43-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++43-devel-4.3.3_20081022
libaio-0.3.104
libaio-devel-0.3.104
libgcc43-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++-devel-4.3
make-3.81
sysstat-8.1.5
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-11
Checking the Software Requirements
Oracle Database Package Requirements Linux x86-64
IMPORTANT:
■
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2), all 32-bit
packages, except for gcc-32bit-4.3, listed in the following table
are not required for installing a database on Linux x86-64. Only
the 64-bit packages are required. However, for any Oracle
Database 11g release before 11.2.0.2, both the 32-bit and 64-bit
packages listed in the following table are required.
However, when you install the 32-bit client binaries on 64-bit
ports, the installer checks for the existence of 32-bit packages.
■
■
If you are using Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel, then all
required kernel packages are installed as part of the Oracle
Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel installation
For Orace Linux 6 the Oracle Validated RPM has been replaced by
the Oracle RDBMS Server 11gR2 Pre-install RPM. See the
"Completing a Minimal Linux Installation" section in Oracle
Database Installation Guide for Linux for more information.
Item
Requirement
Packages for Oracle Linux
4 and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 4
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
2-12 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
binutils-2.15.92.0.2
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3 (32 bit)
elfutils-libelf-0.97
elfutils-libelf-devel-0.97
expat-1.95.7
gcc-3.4.6
gcc-c++-3.4.6
glibc-2.3.4-2.41
glibc-2.3.4-2.41 (32 bit)
glibc-common-2.3.4
glibc-devel-2.3.4
libaio-0.3.105
libaio-0.3.105 (32 bit)
libaio-devel-0.3.105
libaio-devel-0.3.105 (32 bit)
libgcc-3.4.6
libgcc-3.4.6 (32-bit)
libstdc++-3.4.6
libstdc++-3.4.6 (32 bit)
libstdc++-devel 3.4.6
make-3.80
sysstat-5.0.5
Checking the Software Requirements
Item
Requirement
Packages for Asianux
Server 3, Oracle Linux 5,
and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 5
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
Oracle Linux 6 and Red
Hat Enterprise Linux 6
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.17.50.0.6
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3 (32 bit)
elfutils-libelf-0.125
elfutils-libelf-devel-0.125
gcc-4.1.2
gcc-c++-4.1.2
glibc-2.5-24
glibc-2.5-24 (32 bit)
glibc-common-2.5
glibc-devel-2.5
glibc-devel-2.5 (32 bit)
libaio-0.3.106
libaio-0.3.106 (32 bit)
libaio-devel-0.3.106
libaio-devel-0.3.106 (32 bit)
libgcc-4.1.2
libgcc-4.1.2 (32 bit)
libstdc++-4.1.2
libstdc++-4.1.2 (32 bit)
libstdc++-devel 4.1.2
make-3.81
sysstat-7.0.2
binutils-2.20.51.0.2-5.11.el6 (x86_64)
compat-libcap1-1.10-1 (x86_64)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-69.el6 (x86_64)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-69.el6.i686
gcc-4.4.4-13.el6 (x86_64)
gcc-c++-4.4.4-13.el6 (x86_64)
glibc-2.12-1.7.el6 (i686)
glibc-2.12-1.7.el6 (x86_64)
glibc-devel-2.12-1.7.el6 (x86_64)
glibc-devel-2.12-1.7.el6.i686
ksh
libgcc-4.4.4-13.el6 (i686)
libgcc-4.4.4-13.el6 (x86_64)
libstdc++-4.4.4-13.el6 (x86_64)
libstdc++-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
libstdc++-devel-4.4.4-13.el6 (x86_64)
libstdc++-devel-4.4.4-13.el6.i686
libaio-0.3.107-10.el6 (x86_64)
libaio-0.3.107-10.el6.i686
libaio-devel-0.3.107-10.el6 (x86_64)
libaio-devel-0.3.107-10.el6.i686
make-3.81-19.el6
sysstat-9.0.4-11.el6 (x86_64)
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-13
Checking the Software Requirements
Item
Requirement
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 10
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 11
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
2-14 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
binutils-2.16.91.0.5
compat-libstdc++-5.0.7
gcc-4.1.0
gcc-c++-4.1.2
glibc-2.4-31.63
glibc-devel-2.4-31.63
glibc-devel-32bit-2.4-31.63
libaio-0.3.104
libaio-32bit-0.3.104
libaio-devel-0.3.104
libaio-devel-32bit-0.3.104
libelf-0.8.5
libgcc-4.1.2
libstdc++-4.1.2
libstdc++-devel-4.1.2
make-3.80
sysstat-8.0.4
binutils-2.19
gcc-4.3
gcc-c++-4.3
glibc-2.9
glibc-32bit-2.9
glibc-devel-2.9
glibc-devel-32bit-2.9
libaio-0.3.104
libaio-32bit-0.3.104
libaio-devel-0.3.104
libaio-devel-32bit-0.3.104
libstdc++33-3.3.3
libstdc++33-32bit-3.3.3
libstdc++43-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++43-32bit-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++43-devel-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++43-devel-32bit-4.3.3_20081022
libgcc43-4.3.3_20081022
libstdc++-devel-4.3
make-3.81
sysstat-8.1.5
Checking the Software Requirements
Oracle Database Package Requirements for IBM: Linux on System z
Operating System
Requirement
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
4
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.15.92.0.2-25 (s390x)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-47.3 (s390)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-47.3 (s390x)
gcc-3.4.6-11 (s390x)
gcc-c++-3.4.6-11 (s390x)
glibc-2.3.4-2.43 (s390)
glibc-2.3.4-2.43 (s390x)
glibc-devel-2.3.4-2.43 (s390)
glibc-devel-2.3.4-2.43 (s390x)
libaio-0.3.105-2 (s390)
libaio-0.3.105-2 (s390x)
libaio-devel-0.3.105-2 (s390)
libaio-devel-0.3.105-2 (s390x)
libgcc-3.4.6-11 (s390)
libgcc-3.4.6-11 (s390x)
libstdc++-3.4.6-10.0.1
libstdc++-3.4.6-10.0.1 (32-bit)
libstdc++-devel-3.4.6-10.0.1
libstdc++-devel-3.4.6-10.0.1 (x86_64)
make-3.80
pdksh
sysstat-5.0.5-25.el4 (s390x)
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
5
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.17.50.0.6-12.el5 (s390x)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61 (s390)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61 (s390x)
gcc-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390x)
gcc-c++-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390x)
glibc-2.5-42(s390)
glibc-2.5-42 (s390x)
glibc-devel-2.5-42 (s390)
glibc-devel-2.5-42 (s390x)
ksh
libaio-0.3.106-3.2 (s390)
libaio-0.3.106-3.2 (s390x)
libaio-devel-0.3.106-3.2 (s390)
libaio-devel-0.3.106-3.2 (s390x)
libgcc-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390)
libgcc-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390x)
libstdc++-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390)
libstdc++-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390x)
libstdc++-devel-4.1.2-46.el5 (s390x)
make-3.81
sysstat-7.0.2-3.el5 (s390x)
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-15
Checking the Software Requirements
Operating System
Requirement
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
6
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 10
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.20.51.0.2-5.28 (s390x)
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-69.el6 (s390x)
gcc-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390x)
gcc-c++-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390x)
glibc-2.12-1.47.el6 (s390)
glibc-2.12-1.47.el6 (s390x)
glibc-devel-2.12-1.47.el6 (s390)
glibc-devel-2.12-1.47.el6 (s390x)
libaio-0.3.107-10.el6 (s390)
libaio-0.3.107-10.el6 (s390x)
libaio-devel-0.3.107-10.el6 (s390x)
libgcc-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390)
libgcc-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390x)
libstdc++-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390x)
libstdc++-devel-4.4.6-3.el6 (s390x)
make-3.81-19.el6 (s390x)
pdksh
sysstat-9.0.4-18.el6 (s390x)
binutils-32bit-2.16.91.0.5-23.34.33 (s390x)
gcc-4.1.2_20070115-0.29.6 (s390x)
gcc-c++-4.1.2_20070115-0.29.6 (s390x)
glibc-2.4-31.74.1 (s390x)
glibc-32bit-2.4-31.74.1 (s390x)
glibc-devel-2.4-31.74.1 (s390x)
glibc-devel-32bit-2.4-31.74.1 (s390x)
ksh
libaio-0.3.104-14.2 (s390x)
libaio-32bit-0.3.104-14.2 (s390x)
libaio-devel-0.3.104-14.2 (s390x)
libaio-devel-32bit-0.3.104-14.2 (s390x)
libstdc++-4.1.2_20070115-0.29.6 (s390x)
libstdc++-devel-4.1.2_20070115-0.29.6 (s390x)
make-3.80-202.2 (s390x)
sysstat-8.0.4-1.7.27 (s390x)
2-16 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
Operating System
Requirement
SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 11
The following packages (or later versions) must be installed:
binutils-2.20.0-0.7.9 (s390x)
gcc-4.3-62.198 (s390x)
gcc-c++-4.3-62.198 (s390x)
glibc-2.11.1-0.17.4 (s390x)
glibc-32bit-2.11.1-0.17.4 (s390x)
glibc-devel-2.11.1-0.17.4 (s390x)
glibc-devel-32bit-2.11.1-0.17.4 (s390x)
ksh
libaio-0.3.109-0.1.46 (s390x)
libaio-32bit-0.3.109-0.1.46 (s390x)
libaio-devel-0.3.109-0.1.46 (s390x)
libaio-devel-32bit-0.3.109-0.1.46 (s390x)
libstdc++43-4.3.4_20091019-0.7.35 (s390x)
libstdc++43-32bit-4.3.4_20091019-0.7.35 (s390x)
libstdc++43-devel-4.3.4_20091019-0.7.35 (s390x)
libstdc++43-devel-32bit-4.3.4_20091019-0.7.35 (s390x)
libgcc43-4.3.4_20091019-0.7.35 (s390x)
make-3.81
sysstat-8.1.5-7.9.56 (s390x)
See "Oracle ODBC Drivers" on page 2-18 for information on ODBC packages.
To determine whether the required packages are installed, enter commands similar to
the following:
# rpm -q package_name
If a package is not installed, then install it from the Linux distribution media or
download the required package version from the Linux vendor’s website.
Compiler Requirements
On Linux x86 and Linux x86-64, Intel C++ Compiler 10.1 or later and the version of
GNU C and C++ compilers listed under "Package Requirements" on page 2-9 are
supported with Pro*C/C++, Oracle Call Interface, Oracle C++ Call Interface, and
Oracle XML Developer’s Kit (XDK) for Oracle Database 11g Release 2.
Note: On Linux x86 and Linux x86-64, the Intel C++ Compiler 10.1
can be used only with the standard template libraries of the gcc
versions mentioned in the "Package Requirements" on page 2-9
section, to build Oracle C++ Call Interface (OCCI) applications.
Oracle XML Developer's Kit is supported with the same compilers as
OCCI.
On IBM: Linux on System z the version of GNU C and C++ compilers listed under
"Package Requirements" on page 2-9 are supported for Oracle Database 11g Release 2.
Additional Software Requirements
Depending on the components you want to use, you must ensure that the following
software are installed:
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-17
Checking the Software Requirements
■
Oracle JDBC/OCI Drivers
■
Oracle ODBC Drivers
■
Linux-PAM Library
■
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms
■
Programming Languages
■
Browser Requirements
Oracle JDBC/OCI Drivers
You can use the following optional JDK versions with the Oracle JDBC/OCI drivers.
However, these are not mandatory for the database installation.
On Linux x86 and Linux x86-64, use JDK 6 (Java SE Development Kit 1.6.0_21) or JDK
5 (1.5.0_24) with the JNDI extension with the Oracle Java Database Connectivity and
Oracle Call Interface drivers. However, these are not mandatory for the database
installation. Please note that JDK 1.5 is installed with this release.
On IBM: Linux on System z:
■
JDK 6 SR8 FP1 or higher
■
JDK 5 SR16 FP3 or higher
Oracle ODBC Drivers
If you intend to use ODBC, then install the most recent ODBC Driver Manager for
Linux. Download and install the Driver Manager from the following URL:
http://www.unixodbc.org
Linux RPMs are available on the site.
■
On Linux x86
To use ODBC, you must also install the following additional 32-bit ODBC RPMs,
depending on your operating system:
–
On Oracle Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
–
On Asianux Server 3, Oracle Linux 5, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
–
On Oracle Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6:
unixODBC-2.2.14-11.el6.i686 or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.14-11.el6.i686 or later
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10:
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-32bit-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11:
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.12 (32-bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-32bit-2.2.12 (32 bit) or later
2-18 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
■
On Linux x86-64
To use ODBC, you must also install the following additional ODBC RPMs,
depending on your operating system.
–
On Oracle Linux 4 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
–
On Asianux Server 3, Oracle Linux 5, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
–
On Oracle Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6:
unixODBC-2.2.14-11.el6 (x86_64) or later
unixODBC-2.2.14-11.el6.i686 or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.14-11.el6 (x86_64) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.14-11.el6.i686 or later
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10:
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11
unixODBC-2.2.12 or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.12 or later
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.12 (32 bit) or later
■
On IBM: Linux on System z
To use ODBC, you must also install the following additional ODBC RPMs,
depending on your operating system.
–
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
–
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5:
unixODBC-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
–
On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6:
unixODBC-2.2.14-11.el6 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.14-11.el6 (64 bit) or later
uunixODBC-devel-2.2.14-11.el6 (64 bit) or later
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10:
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.11 (32 bit) or later
unixODBC-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.11 (64 bit) or later
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-19
Checking the Software Requirements
–
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11
unixODBC-2.2.12 or later
unixODBC-devel-2.2.12 or later
unixODBC-32bit-2.2.12 (32 bit) or later
Linux-PAM Library
Install the latest Linux-PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules for Linux) library to
enable the system administrator to choose how applications authenticate users.
Separate 32-Bit Client Software for 64-Bit Platforms
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), the 64-bit client software does not
contain any 32-bit client binaries. If you require 32-bit client binaries on 64-bit
platforms, then install the 32-bit binaries from the respective 32-bit client software into
a separate Oracle home.
See Also:
My Oracle Support note 883702.1 for more information:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NO
T&id=883702.1
However, when you install the 32-bit client binaries on 64-bit platforms, the installer
checks for the existence of 32-bit software such as the packages.
See Also:
■
■
"Package Requirements" on page 2-9 for Linux x86 package
requirements
"Bit-Length Support for Client Applications" in Oracle Database
Administrator's Reference for Linux and UNIX-Based Operating
Systems
Programming Languages
The following products are certified for use with:
■
Pro* COBOL
–
Micro Focus Server Express 5.1
Browser Requirements
You do not require a web browser to install Oracle Database. However, browsers are
required to access documentation, and if you intend to use Oracle Enterprise Manager
Database Control and Oracle Application Express. Web browsers must support
JavaScript, and the HTML 4.0 and CSS 1.0 standards.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control supports the following browsers:
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 10.0 (supports Oracle Enterprise Manager Database
Control 11.2.0.3 and higher)
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 8.0
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 SP1
■
Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0 SP2
2-20 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Checking the Software Requirements
■
Firefox 21.0 (supports Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control 11.2.0.4)
■
Firefox 17.0.6 ESR (supports Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control 11.2.0.4)
■
Firefox 3.6
■
Firefox 3.5
■
Firefox 3.0.7
■
Firefox 2.0
■
Safari 4.0.x
■
Safari 3.2
■
Safari 3.1
■
Google Chrome 27.0 (supports Oracle Enterprise Manager Database Control
11.2.0.4)
■
Google Chrome 4.0
■
Google Chrome 3.0
■
Netscape Navigator 9.0
■
Netscape Navigator 8.1
See Also:
Oracle Application Express Installation Guide
Programming Languages
The following products are certified for use with:
■
Pro* COBOL
–
Micro Focus Server Express 5.1
Instant Client Light Requirements
In addition to the requirements described in the preceding section, if you plan to use
Instant Client Light, then the applications must use the following languages and
character sets:
■
Language: Any language that is supported by Oracle
■
Territory: Any territory that is supported by Oracle
■
Character sets:
–
–
Single byte
*
US7ASCII
*
WE8DEC
*
WE8MSWIN1252
*
WE8ISO8859P1
Unicode
*
UTF8
*
AL16UTF16
*
AL32UTF8
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-21
Creating Required Operating System Group and User
Instant Client Light can connect to databases having one of the following
database character sets:
*
US7ASCII
*
WE8DEC
*
WE8MSWIN1252
*
WE8ISO8859P1
*
WE8EBCDIC37C
*
WE8EBCDIC1047
*
UTF8
*
AL32UTF8
The language, territory, and character sets are determined by the NLS_LANG
environment variable.
Creating Required Operating System Group and User
Depending on whether this is the first time Oracle software is being installed on this
system and on the products that you are installing, you may have to create the
following operating system group and user:
■
The Oracle Inventory group (typically, oinstall)
You must have a group whose members are given access to write to the Oracle
Central Inventory (oraInventory).
Installation logs and trace files from installations of Oracle software. These files are
also copied to the respective Oracle homes for future reference.
Other metadata inventory information regarding Oracle installations are stored in
the individual Oracle home inventory directories, and are separate from the
Central Inventory.
For new installations, Oracle recommends that you allow Oracle Universal
Installer to create the Central Inventory directory. By default, if you create an
Oracle path in compliance with OFA structure, such as /u01/app, then the Central
Inventory is created in the path u01/app/oraInventory, using correct permissions
to allow all Oracle installation owners to write to this directory.
■
The Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle)
You must create this user the first time you install Oracle software on the system.
This user owns all of the software installed during the installation. This user must
have the Oracle Inventory group as its primary group. It must also have the
OSDBA and OSOPER groups as secondary groups.
Note:
■
■
In Oracle documentation, the user created to own the Oracle
Database installations is referred to as the oracle user.
An Oracle Database installation must be owned by the Oracle
software owner user (oracle)and the primary group of the Oracle
software owner user must be the Oracle Inventory group
(oinstall).
2-22 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Creating Required Operating System Group and User
A single Oracle Inventory group is required for all installations of Oracle software on
the system. After the first installation of Oracle software, you must use the same
Oracle Inventory group for all subsequent Oracle software installations on that system.
However, you can choose to create different Oracle software owner users for separate
installations.
The following sections describe how to create local users and
groups. As an alternative to creating local users and groups, you could
create the appropriate users and groups in a directory service, for
example, Network Information Services (NIS). For information about
using directory services, contact the system administrator or refer to
the operating system documentation.
Note:
The following sections describe how to create the required operating system users and
groups:
■
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
■
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
You must create the Oracle Inventory group if it does not exist. The following sections
describe how to determine the Oracle Inventory group name, if it exists, and how to
create it if necessary:
■
Determining Whether the Oracle Inventory Group Exists
■
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
Determining Whether the Oracle Inventory Group Exists
When you install Oracle software on the system for the first time, Oracle Universal
Installer creates the oraInst.loc file. This file identifies the name of the Oracle
Inventory group (typically, oinstall), and the path of the Oracle Inventory directory.
An oraInst.loc file has content similar to the following:
inventory_loc=central_inventory_location
inst_group=group
In the preceding example, central_inventory_location is the location of the Oracle
Central Inventory, and group is the name of the group that has permissions to write to
the central inventory.
If you have an existing Oracle Inventory, then ensure that you use the same Oracle
Inventory for all Oracle software installations, and ensure that all Oracle software
users you intend to use for installation have permissions to write to this directory.
To determine whether the Oracle Inventory group exists, enter the following
command:
# more /etc/oraInst.loc
If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the
following:
inventory_loc=/u01/app/oraInventory
inst_group=oinstall
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-23
Creating Required Operating System Group and User
In the previous output example:
■
■
The inventory_loc parameter shows the location of the Oracle Inventory
The inst_group parameter shows the name of the Oracle Inventory group (in this
example, oinstall).
Creating the Oracle Inventory Group
If the oraInst.loc file does not exist, then create the Oracle Inventory group as
follows:
# /usr/sbin/groupadd oinstall
Creating the Oracle Software Owner User
You must create an Oracle software owner user in the following circumstances:
■
■
If an Oracle software owner user does not exist; for example, if this is the first
installation of Oracle software on the system
If an Oracle software owner user exists, but you want to use a different operating
system user
Determining If an Oracle Software Owner User Exists
To determine if an Oracle software owner user (oracle) exists, enter the following
command:
# id oracle
If the oracle user exists, then the output from this command is similar to the
following:
uid=54321(oracle) gid=54321(oinstall) groups=54322(dba),54323(oper)
If the user exists, then determine whether you want to use the existing user or create
another oracle user. If you want to use the existing user, then ensure that the user’s
primary group is the Oracle Inventory group. Refer to one of the following sections for
more information:
If necessary, contact the system administrator before using
or modifying an existing user.
Note:
■
■
■
If you want to use the existing Oracle software owner user, and the user’s primary
group is the Oracle Inventory group, then refer to the "Identifying Required
Software Directories" section on page 2-25.
To modify an existing user, refer to the "Modifying an Oracle Software Owner
User" section on page 2-25.
To create a user, refer to the following section.
Creating an Oracle Software Owner User
If the Oracle software owner user does not exist or if you require a new Oracle
software owner user, then create it as follows. In the following procedure, use the user
name oracle unless a user with that name exists.
1.
To create the oracle user, enter a command similar to the following:
2-24 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Identifying Required Software Directories
# /usr/sbin/useradd -g oinstall[ -G dba]oracle
In this command:
■
■
2.
The -g option specifies the primary group, which must be the Oracle
Inventory group, for example, oinstall
The -G option specifies optional secondary groups, the OSOPER group. For
example, dba.
Set the password of the oracle user:
# passwd oracle
Refer to the "Identifying Required Software Directories" section on page 2-25 to
continue.
Modifying an Oracle Software Owner User
If the oracle user exists, but its primary group is not oinstall, then enter a command
similar to the following to modify it:
# /usr/sbin/usermod -g oinstall -G dba oracle
Specify the primary group using the -g option and any required secondary group
using the -G option.
Identifying Required Software Directories
You must identify or create the following directories for the Oracle software:
■
Oracle Base Directory
■
Oracle Inventory Directory
■
Oracle Home Directory
Ensure that the paths you select for Oracle software, such as
the Oracle home path and the Oracle base path, use only ASCII
characters. Because installation owner names are used by default for
some paths, this ASCII character restriction applies to user names, file
names, and directory names.
Note:
Oracle Base Directory
The Oracle base directory is a top-level directory for Oracle software installations. On
UNIX systems, the Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) guidelines recommend that
you use a path similar to the following for the Oracle base directory:
/mount_point/app/software_owner
In this example:
■
mount_point is the mount point directory for the file system that contains the
Oracle software.
The examples in this guide use /u01 for the mount point directory.
■
software_owner is the operating system user name of the software owner
installing the Oracle software, for example oracle.
You must specify the ORACLE_BASE folder that contains all Oracle products.
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-25
Identifying Required Software Directories
If you have an existing Oracle base, then you can select it from
the Use existing drop down box. By default, the drop down box
contains the existing value for Oracle base selected. Refer to "Installing
the Oracle Database Client Software" on page 2-5 for information.
Note:
If you do not have an Oracle base, then you can create a new one by
editing the text in the list box.
You can use the same Oracle base directory for multiple installations or you can create
separate Oracle base directories for different installations. If different operating system
users install Oracle software on the same system, then each user must create a separate
Oracle base directory. The following example Oracle base directories could all exist on
the same system:
/u01/app/oracle
/u01/app/orauser
The following sections describe how to identify existing Oracle base directories that
may be suitable for the installation and how to create an Oracle base directory if
necessary.
Regardless of whether you create an Oracle base directory or decide to use an existing
one, you must set the ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the full path to this
directory.
Oracle Inventory Directory
The Oracle Inventory directory (oraInventory) stores an inventory of all software
installed on the system. It is required, and shared by all Oracle software installations
on a single system. If you have an existing Oracle Inventory path, then Oracle
Universal Installer continues to use that Oracle Inventory.
The first time you install Oracle software on a system, Oracle Universal Installer
provides an OFA-compliant path in the format /u[01-09]/app, such as /u01/app. The
user running the installation has permissions to write to that path. If this is true, then
Oracle Universal Installer creates the Oracle Inventory directory in the path
/u[01-09]/app/oraInventory. For example:
/u01/app/oraInventory
If you have set ORACLE_BASE for the oracle user during installation, then Oracle
Universal Installer creates the Oracle Inventory directory in the path ORACLE_
BASE/../oraInventory. For example, if ORACLE_BASE is set to /u01/app/oracle/, then
the Oracle Inventory directory is created in the path /u01/app/oraInventory.
If you have created neither an OFA-compliant path nor set ORACLE_BASE, then the
Oracle Inventory directory is placed in the home directory of the user that is
performing the installation. For example:
/home/oracle/oraInventory
Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory that you specify and sets the correct
owner, group, and permissions for it. You do not have to create it.
2-26 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Note:
■
■
■
All Oracle software installations rely on this directory. Ensure
that you back it up regularly.
Do not delete this directory unless you have completely
removed all Oracle software from the system.
By default, the Oracle Inventory directory is not installed under
the Oracle Base directory. This is because all Oracle software
installations share a common Oracle Inventory, so there is only
one Oracle Inventory for all users. Whereas, there is a separate
Oracle Base for each user.
Oracle Home Directory
The Oracle home directory is the directory where you choose to install the software for
a particular Oracle product. You must install different Oracle products, or different
releases of the same Oracle product, in separate Oracle home directories. When you
run Oracle Universal Installer, it prompts you to specify the path to this directory, and
a name that identifies it. In accordance with the OFA guidelines, Oracle strongly
recommends that the Oracle home directory you specify is a subdirectory of the Oracle
base directory for the user account performing the installation. Oracle recommends
that you specify a path similar to the following for the Oracle home directory:
$ORACLE_BASE/product/11.2.0/client_1
Oracle Universal Installer creates the directory path that you specify under the Oracle
base directory. It also sets the correct owner, group, and permissions on it. You do not
have to create this directory.
Caution: During installation, you must not specify an existing
directory that has predefined permissions applied to it as the Oracle
home directory. If you do, then you may experience installation failure
due to file and group ownership permission errors.
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Before starting the installation, you must either identify an existing Oracle base
directory or if required, create one. This section contains information about the
following:
■
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory
■
Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Note: You can choose to create an Oracle base directory, even if
other Oracle base directories exist on the system.
Identifying an Existing Oracle Base Directory
Existing Oracle base directories may not have paths that follow OFA guidelines.
However, if you identify an existing Oracle Inventory directory or existing Oracle
home directories, then you can usually identify the Oracle base directories, as follows:
■
Identifying an existing Oracle Inventory directory
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-27
Identifying or Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Enter the following command to view the contents of the oraInst.loc file:
# more /etc/oraInst.loc
If the oraInst.loc file exists, then the output from this command is similar to the
following:
inventory_loc=/u01/app/oraInventory
inst_group=oinstall
The inventory_loc parameter identifies the Oracle Inventory directory
(oraInventory). The parent directory of the oraInventory directory is typically an
Oracle base directory. In the previous example, /u01/app/oracle is an Oracle base
directory.
■
Identifying existing Oracle home directories
Enter the following command to view the contents of the oratab file:
# more /etc/oratab
If the oratab file exists, then it contains lines similar to the following:
*:/u03/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1:N
*:/opt/orauser/infra_904:N
*:/oracle/9.2.0:N
The directory paths specified on each line identify Oracle home directories.
Directory paths that end with the user name of the Oracle software owner to use
are valid choices for an Oracle base directory. If you intend to use the oracle user
to install the software, then you could choose one of the following directories from
the previous example:
/u03/app/oracle
/oracle
If possible, choose a directory path similar to the first
(/u03/app/oracle). This path complies with the OFA guidelines.
Note:
■
Identifying existing Oracle base directories
After you have located the Oracle home directory, run a similar command to
confirm the location of Oracle base:
cat /u01/app/oraInventory/ContentsXML/inventory.xml
To continue:
■
If an Oracle base directory exists and you want to use it, then refer to the
"Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment" section on page 2-29.
When you configure the oracle user’s environment later in this chapter, set the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the directory you chose.
■
If an Oracle base directory does not exist on the system or to create an Oracle base
directory, refer to the following section.
Creating an Oracle Base Directory
Before you create an Oracle base directory, you must identify an appropriate file
system with disk space.
2-28 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
To identify an appropriate file system:
1.
To determine the free disk space on each mounted file system use the following
command:
# df -h
2.
From the display, identify a file system that has appropriate free space.
3.
Note the name of the mount point directory for the file system that you identified.
To create the Oracle base directory and specify the correct owner, group, and
permissions for it:
1.
Enter commands similar to the following to create the recommended
subdirectories in the mount point directory that you identified and set the
appropriate owner, group, and permissions on them:
# mkdir -p /mount_point/app
# chown -R oracle:oinstall /mount_point/app
# chmod -R 775 /mount_point/app/
For example:
# mkdir -p /u01/app
# chown -R oracle:oinstall /u01/app
# chmod -R 775 /u01/app/
2.
When you configure the oracle user’s environment later in this chapter, set the
ORACLE_BASE environment variable to specify the Oracle base directory that you
have created.
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
You run Oracle Universal Installer from the oracle account. However, before you start
Oracle Universal Installer you must configure the environment of the oracle user. To
configure the environment, you must:
■
Set the default file mode creation mask (umask) to 022 in the shell startup file.
■
Set the DISPLAY environment variable.
Ensure that the PATH variable contains $ORACLE_HOME/bin
before /usr/X11R6/bin.
Note:
Caution: Use shell programs supported by your operating system
vendor. If you use a shell program that is not supported by your
operating system, then you can encounter errors during installation.
To set the oracle user’s environment:
1.
Start a new X terminal session (xterm).
2.
Enter the following command to ensure that X Window applications can display
on this system:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-29
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
$ xhost somehost.example.com
3.
If you are not logged in to the system where you want to install the software, then
log in to that system as the oracle user.
4.
If you are not logged in as the oracle user, then switch user to oracle:
$ su - oracle
5.
To determine the default shell for the oracle user, enter the following command:
$ echo $SHELL
6.
To run the shell startup script, enter one of the following commands:
■
Bash shell:
$ . ./.bash_profile
■
Bourne or Korn shell:
$ . ./.profile
■
C shell:
% source ./.login
7.
If you are not installing the software on the local system, then enter a command
similar to the following to direct X applications to display on the local system:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ DISPLAY=local_host:0.0
■
C shell:
% setenv DISPLAY local_host:0.0
In this example, local_host is the host name or IP address of the system to use to
display Oracle Universal Installer (your workstation or PC).
8.
If you determined that the /tmp directory has less than 400 MB of free disk space,
then identify a file system with at least 400 MB of free space and set the TMP and
TMPDIR environment variables to specify a temporary directory on this file system:
a.
To determine the free disk space on each mounted file system, use the
following command:
# df -k
b.
If necessary, enter commands similar to the following to create a temporary
directory on the file system that you identified, and set the appropriate
permissions on the directory:
$ sudo mkdir /mount_point/tmp
$ sudo chmod a+wr /mount_point/tmp
# exit
c.
Enter commands similar to the following to set the TMP and TMPDIR
environment variables:
*
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ TMP=/mount_point/tmp
$ TMPDIR=/mount_point/tmp
2-30 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
$ export TMP TMPDIR
*
C shell:
% setenv TMP /mount_point/tmp
% setenv TMPDIR /mount_point/tmp
9.
Enter the following commands to ensure that the ORACLE_HOME and TNS_ADMIN
environment variables are not set:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ unset ORACLE_HOME
$ unset TNS_ADMIN
■
C shell:
% unsetenv ORACLE_HOME
% unsetenv TNS_ADMIN
Also, ensure that the $ORACLE_HOME/bin path is removed from your PATH
environment variable.
Note: If the ORACLE_HOME environment variable is set, then Oracle
Universal Installer uses the value that it specifies as the default path
for the Oracle home directory. However, if you set the ORACLE_BASE
environment variable, then Oracle recommends that you unset the
ORACLE_HOME environment variable and choose the default path
suggested by Oracle Universal Installer.
10. To verify that the environment has been set correctly, enter the following
commands:
$ umask
$ env | more
Verify that the umask command displays a value of 22, 022, or 0022 and the
environment variables that you set in this section have the correct values.
Oracle Database Client Preinstallation Tasks 2-31
Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment
2-32 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
3
Installing Oracle Database Client
3
The Oracle Database Client software is available on installation media or you can
download it from the Oracle Technology Network website. In most cases, you use the
graphical user interface (GUI) provided by Oracle Universal Installer to install the
software. However, you can also use Oracle Universal Installer to complete
silent-mode installations, without using the GUI.
■
Reviewing Installation Guidelines
■
Accessing the Installation Software
■
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
Appendix A for information about silent-mode
installations
See Also:
Reviewing Installation Guidelines
Review the following guidelines before starting Oracle Universal Installer:
■
Oracle Universal Installer
Do not use Oracle Universal Installer from an earlier Oracle release to install
components from this release.
■
Reinstalling Oracle Software
If you reinstall Oracle software into an Oracle home directory where Oracle
Database is installed, you must also reinstall any components, such as Oracle
Partitioning, that were installed before you begin the reinstallation.
Accessing the Installation Software
The Oracle Database Client software is available on installation media or you can
download it from the Oracle Technology Network website, or the Oracle Software
Delivery Cloud portal. To install the software from the hard disk, you must either
download it and unpack it, or copy it from the installation media.
You can access and install Oracle Database Client by using one of the following
methods:
■
■
To install the software from a installation media or from an existing hard disk
location, refer to "Installing the Oracle Database Client Software" on page 3-5
To copy the software to a hard disk, refer to "Copying the Software to the Hard
Disk" on page 3-4
Installing Oracle Database Client
3-1
Accessing the Installation Software
■
To download the software from Oracle Technology Network, refer to
"Downloading Oracle Software" on page 3-2
Downloading Oracle Software
You can download the trial version of the installation files from the Oracle Technology
Network (OTN) or the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud portal and extract them on
your hard disk. Make sure that you completely review and understand the terms of
the license. Most downloads include the development license. This section contains the
following topics:
■
Downloading the Installation Archive Files from OTN
■
Downloading the Software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud
■
Extracting the Installation Files
Downloading the Installation Archive Files from OTN
To download the installation archive files from Oracle Technology Network:
1.
Use any browser to access the software download page from Oracle Technology
Network:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/downloads/index.html
2.
Navigate to the download page for the product to install.
3.
On the download page, identify the required disk space by adding the file sizes for
each required file.
The file sizes are listed next to the file names.
4.
Select a file system with enough free space to store and expand the archive files.
In most cases, the available disk space must be at least twice the size of all of the
archive files.
5.
On the file system that you selected in step 4, create a parent directory for each
product, for example OraDB11g, to hold the installation directories.
6.
Download all of the installation archive files to the directory that you created in
step 5.
7.
Verify that the files you downloaded are the same size as the corresponding files
on Oracle Technology Network. Also verify the checksums are the same as noted
on Oracle Technology Network using a command similar to the following:
cksum filename.zip
8.
Extract the files in each directory that you just created.
9.
After you have extracted the required installation files, see "Installing the Oracle
Database Client Software" on page 3-5.
Downloading the Software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud
You can download the software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud as Media Packs.
A Media Pack is an electronic version of the software that is also available to Oracle
customers on CD-ROM or DVD. To download the Media Pack:
1.
Use any browser to access the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud portal:
https://edelivery.oracle.com/
3-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Accessing the Installation Software
2.
Complete the Export Validation process by entering information (name, company,
e-mail address, and country) in the online form.
3.
In the Media Pack Search page, specify the Product Pack and Platform to identify
the Media Pack you want to download. If you do not know the name of the
Product Pack, you can search for it using the License List.
4.
In the search results page, click Readme to download and review the Readme file
for download instructions and product information.
5.
After you review the Readme, choose the appropriate Media Pack from the search
results to download the individual zip files. Follow the Download Notes
instructions in this page. Once you download and extract the contents of the
required zip files, proceed with the installation of the software.
Print the page with the list of downloadable files. It contains a
list of part numbers and their corresponding descriptions that you
may have to reference during the installation process.
Note:
6.
After you download the files, click View Digest to verify that the MD5 or SHA-1
checksum matches with what is listed in the media download page.
See Also:
■
My Oracle Support note 549617.1 for information on how to verify
the integrity of a software download at:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type
=NOT&id=549617.1
■
Frequently Asked Questions section on the Oracle Software Delivery
Cloud portal for more information about Media Packs
Extracting the Installation Files
To extract the installation archive files, perform the following steps:
1.
If necessary, change to the directory that contains the downloaded installation
archive files.
2.
Oracle RDBMS software is available as two archive files. Ensure that you extract
both the archive files to the same directory.
If the downloaded file has the zip extension, use the following command to
extract the content:
unzip file_name.zip
If the downloaded file has the cpio.gz extension, use the following command:
$ gunzip filename.cpio.gz
This command creates files with names similar to the following:
filename.cpio
To extract the installation files, enter a command similar to the following:
$ cpio -idcmv < filename.cpio
Installing Oracle Database Client
3-3
Accessing the Installation Software
Refer to the download page for information about the
correct options to use with the cpio command.
Note:
Some browsers uncompress files while downloading them, but
leave the .gz file extension.
For each file, this command creates a subdirectory named Diskn, where n is the
disk number identified in the file name.
When you have extracted all of the required installation files, refer to "Installing the
Oracle Database Client Software" on page 3-5.
Copying the Software to the Hard Disk
Before installing Oracle Database Client, Oracle recommends that you copy the
software to the hard disk to enable the installation process to run a bit faster. Before
copying the installation media content to the hard disk, you must mount the disk. The
following sections describe how to mount the disk and copy its content to the hard
disk:
■
Mounting Disks
■
Copying the Oracle Database Client Software to a Hard Disk
Mounting Disks
On most Linux systems, the disk mounts automatically when you insert it into the disc
drive. If the disk does not mount automatically, then follow these steps to mount it:
1.
If necessary, log in as the root user and enter a command similar to one of the
following to eject the currently mounted disk, then remove it from the drive:
■
Asianux, Oracle Linux, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux:
# sudo eject /mnt/dvd
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server:
# eject /media/dvd
In these examples, /mnt/dvd and /media/dvd are the mount point directories for
the installation media.
2.
Insert the appropriate installation media into the disk drive.
3.
To verify if the disk is mounted automatically, enter one of the following
commands depending on the platform:
■
Asianux, Oracle Linux, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux:
# ls /mnt/dvd
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server:
# ls /media/dvd
4.
Before running the following command, ensure that the /mnt/dvd directory exists
on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. If not, create the /mnt/dvd as required, to mount the
installation media.
If this command fails to display the contents of the installation media, enter a
command similar to the following to mount it, depending on the platform:
3-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
■
Asianux, Oracle Linux, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux:
# mount -t iso9660 /dev/dvd /mnt/dvd
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server:
# mount -t iso9660 /dev/dvd /media/dvd
In these examples, /mnt/dvd and /media/dvd are the mount point directories for
the installation media.
5.
If Oracle Universal Installer is displaying the Disk Location dialog box, enter the
disk mount point directory path, for example:
/mnt/dvd
To continue, go to one of the following sections:
■
■
If you want to copy software to a hard disk, refer to "Copying the Oracle Database
Client Software to a Hard Disk" on page 3-5.
If you want to install the software from the installation media, refer to "Installing
the Oracle Database Client Software" on page 3-5.
Copying the Oracle Database Client Software to a Hard Disk
If the system does not have a installation media, you can copy the software from the
installation media to a file system on another system, then either mount that file
system using NFS, or use FTP to copy the files to the system where you want to install
the software.
To copy the contents of the installation media to a hard disk:
1.
Create a directory on the hard disk to hold the Oracle software:
$ mkdir OraCl11g
2.
Change directory to the directory you created in Step 1:
$ cd OraCl11g
3.
Mount the disk, if it is not mounted.
Some platforms automatically mount the disk when you insert it into the drive. If
the disk does not mount automatically, refer to "Mounting Disks" on page 3-4 for
information about mounting it.
4.
Copy the contents of the mounted disk to the corresponding new subdirectory as
follows:
$ cp -R /directory_path OraCl11g
In this example, /directory_path is the disk mount point directory, for example
/mnt/dvd on Red Hat Enterprise Linux systems, or the path of the client directory
on the installation media. The mount point directory is /dvd.
5.
If necessary, mount the next disk and repeat Step 4.
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
Use Oracle Universal Installer to install the Oracle Database Client software. The
following sections describes how to install the Oracle software:
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer
Installing Oracle Database Client
3-5
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
■
Using Oracle Net Configuration Assistant
■
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade
"Installation Considerations" on page 1-2 for information
you should consider before deciding how to install the client
See Also:
Running Oracle Universal Installer
For any type of installation process, start Oracle Universal Installer and install the
software, as follows:
1.
Log on as the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle) to the computer on
which to install Oracle components.
2.
If you are installing the software from installation media, mount the disk if it is not
mounted.
If the disk does not mount automatically, refer to "Mounting Disks" on page 3-4 for
information about mounting it.
Some platforms automatically mount the disk when you insert the installation
media into the drive.
3.
To start Oracle Universal Installer, complete one of the following steps depending
on the location of the installation files:
Start Oracle Universal Installer from the terminal session
where you logged in as the oracle user and set the user’s
environment.
Note:
"Configuring Oracle Software Owner Environment" on
page 2-29 for information about setting the oracle user’s environment
See Also:
■
If the installation files are on disk, enter a command similar to the following,
where directory_path is the path of the client directory on the installation
media:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller
■
If the installation files are on the hard disk, change directory to the client
directory and enter the following command:
$ ./runInstaller
■
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2), if you plan to run the
installation in a secured data center, then you can download updates before
starting the installation by starting Oracle Universal Installer on a system that
has Internet access in update download mode. To start Oracle Universal
Installer to download the updates, enter the following command:
$ ./runInstaller -downloadUpdates
Provide the My Oracle Support user name and password, and provide proxy
settings, if needed, in the Provide My Oracle Support credentials screen. Then,
enter the Download location and click Download in the Download software
updates screen. If updates are available, then they are downloaded in the
location provided. The Finish Updates screen shows the successful download
of the updates. Click Close.
3-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
After you download the updates, transfer the update file to a directory on the
server where you plan to run the installation.
See Also:
■
■
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and
UNIX for information about response file formats
"Software Updates Option" on page 1-6
If Oracle Universal Installer is not displayed, refer to the "X Window Display
Errors" on page C-1 for information about troubleshooting.
4.
If you have an existing Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2 (11.2) installed on
your system, the Select Installation Mode screen is displayed. Select New Install to
install Oracle Database Client software in to a new location.
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2), to upgrade an earlier release
of Oracle Database Client, select Upgrade and follow the instructions in
"Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade" on page 3-10.
5.
In the Select Installation Type screen, select the type of installation: Instant Client,
Administrator, Runtime, or Custom and click Next.
6.
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2), you can use the Software
Updates feature to dynamically download and apply latest updates. In the
Download Software Updates screen, select one of the following options, and click
Next:
■
Use My Oracle Support credentials for download: Select this option to
download and apply the latest software updates.
Click Proxy Settings to configure a proxy for Oracle Universal Installer to use
to connect to the Internet. Provide the proxy server information for your site,
along with a user account that has access to the local area network through
which the server is connecting. Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2
(11.2.0.3), you can enter the Proxy Realm information. The proxy realm
information is case-sensitive. If you do not have a proxy realm, then you do
not have to provide an entry for the Proxy Username, Proxy Password, and
Proxy Realm fields.
Click Test Connection to ensure that your proxy settings are correctly entered,
and the installer can download the updates.
■
■
Use pre-downloaded software updates: Select this option to apply the
software updates previously downloaded using the -downloadUpdates flag.
Skip software updates: Select this option if you do not want to apply any
updates.
See Also:
7.
"Software Updates Option" on page 1-6
The Apply Software Updates screen is displayed if you select to download the
software updates, or provide the pre-downloaded software updates location.
a.
If you selected Use My Oracle Support credentials for download in the
previous screen, select Download and apply all updates, and then click Next
to apply the updates.
By default, the download location for software updates is placed in the home
directory of the Oracle installation owner you are using to run this installation.
Installing Oracle Database Client
3-7
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
If you choose to download the software updates in another location, then click
Browse and select a different location on your server.
b.
8.
If you selected Use pre-downloaded software updates in the previous screen,
select Apply all updates, and then click Next to apply the updates
downloaded before starting the installation.
The Select Product Languages screen enables you to select the language in which
you want to run the product.
Select the product language from the Available Languages list, transfer it to the
Selected Languages list. Click Next.
This screen is not displayed if you select Instant Client as the type of installation in
Step 5.
9.
In the Specify Installation Location screen, enter the following details:
Oracle Base: This path appears by default. You can change the path based on your
requirement. The Oracle Base section is not displayed if you select Instant Client as
the type of installation in Step 5.
In the Software Location section, accept the default value or enter the Oracle
home directory path in which you want to install Oracle components. The
directory path should not contain spaces. Click Next.
"Identifying Required Software Directories" on page 2-25
for information about Oracle base directory and Oracle home
directory
See Also:
10. In the Create Inventory screen, you are prompted by the installer to specify the
directory path for central inventory the first time you install Oracle Database on
your computer.
Select the oraInventory Group Name of the operating system group that should
own the Oracle Inventory directory (the Oracle Inventory group). Click Next.
Note: By default, the Oracle Inventory directory is not installed under the Oracle
Base directory. This is because all Oracle software installations share a common
Oracle Inventory, so there is only one Oracle Inventory for all users, whereas there
is a separate Oracle Base for each user.
11. If you selected Custom as the type of installation in Step 5, then the Available
Product Components screen is displayed. Select the products to install and click
Next.
Note: Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), you can
install Oracle Connection Manager, Oracle Net Listener, and Oracle
Scheduler Agent using the Custom install option.
12. In Step 11, if you select Oracle Scheduler Agent as one of the components to
install, then the Oracle Database Scheduler Agent screen is displayed. Enter the
Scheduler Agent Hostname, and the Scheduler Agent Port Number. Click Next.
13. The Perform Prerequisite Checks screen verifies if your computer meets the
minimum system requirements to install the desired product. Click Next.
Note: Oracle recommends that you use caution in checking the Ignore All option.
If you check this option, then Oracle Universal Installer may not confirm if your
system can install Oracle Database successfully.
3-8 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
14. Review the information displayed in the Summary screen, and click Install.
Note: Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), you can
save all the installation steps into a response file by clicking Save
Response File in the Summary screen. Later, this file can be used for a
silent installation.
15. The Install Product screen displays the progress of the client installation. Starting
with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.3), Oracle Universal Installer prompts
you to execute the root configuration script only if you selected Oracle Net
Listener or Oracle Scheduler Agent using the Custom install option. If prompted,
execute the root.sh script as the root user to complete the installation, and click
OK.
16. If you are performing a Custom installation, and selected Oracle Net Listener from
the list of components to install in Step 11, then go to "Using Oracle Net
Configuration Assistant" on page 9 for instructions.
17. In the Finish screen, click Close to exit Oracle Universal Installer.
Using Oracle Net Configuration Assistant
During a Custom Oracle Database Client installation, if you select Oracle Net Listener
from the list of components to install in Step 11, then Oracle Universal Installer
automatically starts Oracle Net Configuration Assistant as part of the Oracle Database
Client installation. Perform the following to configure the listener and naming
methods using Oracle Net Configuration Assistant:
1.
In the Welcome screen, click Next.
2.
In the Listener Configuration screen, enter a Listener name or accept the default
value. Click Next.
3.
In the Listener Configuration, Select Protocol screen, select one or more protocols
from the Available Protocols list, and move it to the Selected Protocols list. Click
Next.
4.
In the Listener Configuration, TCP/IP Protocol screen, select the standard port
number, or enter a different port number. Click Next.
5.
Select No if you do not want to configure an additional listener, and click Next.
6.
The listener configuration is now complete, click Next to proceed.
7.
In the Naming Methods Configuration screen, select Yes to configure naming
methods. Click Next.
8.
In the Naming Methods Configuration screen, select the naming method you want
from the list of Available Naming Methods and move it to the Selected Naming
Methods list. Click Next.
Typically, Local Naming is sufficient.
9.
In the Net Service Name Configuration screen, enter Service Name, and click
Next.
10. In the Net Service Name Configuration screen, select the protocol for the database
you want to access, and click Next.
Installing Oracle Database Client
3-9
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
11. In the Net Service Name Configuration screen, enter the Host name of the
computer where the Oracle database is installed. Use the standard port number, or
specify a different port number, and click Next.
12. In the Net Service Name Configuration, click Yes to test the database connection.
Click Next.
In most cases, the test fails only because the default user name and password
Oracle Universal Installer supplies in the dialog box do not match the user name
and password for the target database. Click Change Login, reenter the user name
and password, and click OK.
13. In the Connecting screen, click Next.
14. In the Net Service Name Configuration screen, enter the Net Service Name, and
click Next.
15. Answer the remaining prompts to complete the configuration.
16. In the Finish screen, click Close to exit Oracle Universal Installer.
You can also run Oracle Net Configuration Assistant after the installation in
standalone mode to configure the listener, naming methods, net service names, and
directory server usage.
To start Oracle Net Configuration Assistant in standalone mode run netca from the
ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.
See Also: "Using Oracle Net Configuration Assistant to Configure
Network Components" in Oracle Database Net Services Administrator's
Guide
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2) you can perform an in-place
upgrade of Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2 (11.2) using the following
instructions:
You can perform an in-place Oracle Database Client upgrade
only if you have an existing Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2
(11.2.0.1) or later client home installed on your system.
Note:
1.
Perform Steps 1 through 3 listed in "Running Oracle Universal Installer" on
page 3-6.
2.
The Select Installation Mode screen is displayed only if you have an existing
Oracle Database Client 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.1) or later installed on your system.
Select Upgrade to upgrade the existing Oracle Database Client software to the
latest version.
3.
In the Specify Installation Location screen, accept the default Software Location
value or enter the Oracle home directory path in which you want to install Oracle
components. The directory path should not contain spaces. Click Next.
4.
In the Download Software Updates screen, select one of the following options, and
click Next:
■
Use My Oracle Support credentials for download
■
Use pre-downloaded software updates
3-10 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
■
Skip software updates
See Step 6 in "Running Oracle Universal Installer" on page 3-6 for more
information about the options in the Download Software Updates screen.
5.
The Apply Software Updates screen is displayed if you select to download the
software updates or provide the pre-downloaded software updates location. Select
either Download and apply all updates or Apply all updates, as applicable, and
click Next.
See Step 7 in "Running Oracle Universal Installer" on page 3-6 for more
information about the options in the Apply Software Updates screen.
6.
The Select Product Languages screen enables you to select the language in which
you want to run the product.
Select the product language from the Available Languages list, transfer it to the
Selected Languages list. Click Next.
7.
The Perform Prerequisite Checks screen verifies if your computer meets the
minimum system requirements to install the desired product. Click Next.
8.
Review the information displayed in the Summary screen, and click Install.
9.
The Install Product screen displays the progress of the client upgrade. Starting
with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.3), Oracle Universal Installer prompts
you to execute the root configuration script only if the existing Oracle Database
Client home was installed with Oracle Scheduler Agent. If prompted, execute the
root.sh script as the root user to complete the installation, and click OK.
10. Review the information in the Finish screen and click Close to exit Oracle
Universal Installer.
See Also:
■
■
"Updating the Existing Software with the Current Version" on
page 1-3
"Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade Using
the Response File" on page A-6
Installing Oracle Database Client 3-11
Installing the Oracle Database Client Software
3-12 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
4
Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks
4
This chapter describes how to complete postinstallation tasks after you have installed
the Oracle database client software. It includes information about the following topics:
■
Required Postinstallation Tasks
■
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
■
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
You must perform the tasks listed in "Required Postinstallation Tasks" on page 4-1.
Oracle recommends that you perform the tasks listed in "Recommended
Postinstallation Tasks" on page 4-3 after all installations.
If you install and intend to use any of the products listed in "Required Product-Specific
Postinstallation Tasks" on page 4-6, then you must perform the tasks listed in the
product-specific subsections.
This chapter describes basic configuration only. Refer to
Oracle Database Administrator's Reference for Linux and UNIX-Based
Operating Systems, Oracle Database Administrator's Guide and
product-specific administration and tuning guides for exhaustive
configuration and tuning information.
Note:
Required Postinstallation Tasks
You must perform the tasks described in the following sections after completing an
installation:
■
Downloading and Installing Patches
■
Updating Instant Client
■
Connecting with Instant Client
Downloading and Installing Patches
Check the My Oracle Support website for required patches for the installation.
Note: You cannot update Instant Client by downloading a patch. Use
the procedure under "Updating Instant Client" on page 4-2 to update
Instant Client.
To download required patches:
Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks 4-1
Required Postinstallation Tasks
1.
Use a web browser to view the My Oracle Support website:
https://support.oracle.com/
2.
Log in to My Oracle Support.
Note: If you are not a My Oracle Support registered user, click
Register here and follow the registration instructions.
3.
On the main My Oracle Support page, click the Patches and Updates tab.
4.
In the Patch Search group, select Product or Family (Advanced).
5.
In the Product field, select Oracle Database.
6.
In the Release field select the release number. For example, Oracle 11.2.0.3.1.
7.
Click Search.
8.
Any available patch updates are displayed in the Patch Search page.
9.
Select the patch number and click ReadMe. The README page is displayed and
contains information about the patch set and how to apply the patches to your
installation.
10. Return to the Patch Search page, click Download, and save the file on your
system.
11. Use the unzip utility provided with Oracle Database 11g release 1 (11.1) to
uncompress the Oracle patch updates that you downloaded from My Oracle
Support. The unzip utility is located in the $ORACLE_HOME/bin directory.
Updating Instant Client
To update Instant Client:
1.
Download Instant Client from Oracle Technology Network:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/features/instant-client/inde
x-097480.html
2.
If you want to place the files in the existing directory, then ensure that the
directory is empty.
If you want to place the files into a different directory (and remove the previous
files), ensure that you update the PATH environment variable setting to reflect the
new location.
Note: A restriction on Instant Client or Instant Client Light is that
you cannot perform patch upgrades using the opatch utility because
the Instant Client installation does not create an inventory, which the
patch upgrade process must access for patch upgrades. The absence of
an inventory also means that the installed intern patch reporting and
conflict detection before a patch attempt are not possible.
Connecting with Instant Client
If you installed the Instant Client installation type, you can configure users’
environments to enable dynamically linked client applications to connect to a database
as follows:
4-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
1.
Set the appropriate shared library path environment variable for the platform to
specify the directory that contains the Instant Client libraries. For the Instant Client
installation type, this directory is the Oracle home directory that you specified
during the installation, for example:
/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1
2.
Use one of the following methods to specify database connection information for
the client application:
■
Specify a SQL connect URL string using the following format:
//host:port/service_name
■
■
Set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable to specify the location of the
tnsnames.ora file and specify a service name from that file.
Set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable and set the TWO_TASK environment
variable to specify a service name from the tnsnames.ora file.
You do not have to specify the ORACLE_HOME environment
variable.
Note:
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
Oracle recommends that you perform the tasks described in the following section after
completing an installation:
■
Configuring Instant Client Light
■
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script
■
Connecting Instant Client or Instant Client Light to an Oracle Database
■
Setting Up User Accounts
■
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable
■
Generating the Client Static Library
Configuring Instant Client Light
When you install Instant Client, the Instant Client libraries are installed under the
ORACLE_HOME directory and the Instant Client Light specific library is installed under
the ORACLE_HOME/light directory. To configure Instant Client Light, you must replace
the ORACLE_HOME/libociei.so file with the ORACLE_HOME/light/libociicus.so file.
After replacing the library file, you must set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment
variable to point to the location of the Instant Client shared library files.
Creating a Backup of the root.sh Script
Oracle recommends that you back up the root.sh script after you complete an
installation. If you install other products in the same Oracle home directory, then
Oracle Universal Installer updates the contents of the existing root.sh script during
the installation. If you require information contained in the original root.sh script,
then you can recover it from the backed up root.sh file.
Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks 4-3
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
Connecting Instant Client or Instant Client Light to an Oracle Database
Before you can connect Instant Client (including Instant Client Light) to an Oracle
database, ensure that the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable specifies the
directory that contains the Instant Client libraries. This directory is the ORACLE_HOME
directory that you specified during installation.
For example, the shared libraries for Instant Client or Instant Client Light (if you have
configured Instant Client Light), are in:
/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1
After you have checked the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable, you can use any
of the following methods to specify Oracle Database connection information for client
applications:
■
Specifying a Connection by Using the Easy Connect Naming Method
■
Specifying a Connection by Configuring a tnsnames.ora File
■
Specifying a Connection Using an Empty Connect String and TWO_TASK
Specifying a Connection by Using the Easy Connect Naming Method
You can specify a connection address to an Oracle Database directly from a client
application, without having to configure a tnsnames setting for the Instant Client. This
method is convenient as you do not have to create and manage a tnsnames.ora file.
However, the application users must specify the host name and port number when
they want to log in to the application.
For example, if you run SQL*Plus on the client computer and want to connect to the
sales_us database, which is located on a server whose host name is shobeen and port
number is 1521, then you can log in as follows:
sqlplus system/[email protected]//shobeen:1521/sales_us
Similarly, in the application code, you can use Oracle Call Interface net naming
methods to create the Instant Client-to-Oracle Database connection. For example, the
following formats in the OCIServerAttach() call specify the connection information:
■
Specify a SQL connect URL string using the following format:
//host[:port][/service_name]
For example:
//shobeen:1521/sales_us
■
Alternatively, you can specify the SQL connect information as an Oracle Net
keyword-value pair. For example:
"(DESCRIPTION=(ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp) (HOST=shobeen) (PORT=1521))
(CONNECT_DATA=(SERVICE_NAME=sales_us)))"
See Also: Oracle Call Interface Programmer's Guide for more
information on using Oracle Call Interface Instant Client
Specifying a Connection by Configuring a tnsnames.ora File
By default, when you install Instant Client, Oracle Universal Installer does not include
a sample tnsnames.ora file nor the Oracle Net Configuration Assistant utility
normally used to create it. However, to shield users from having to specify actual host
4-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Recommended Postinstallation Tasks
names and port numbers, consider using a tnsnames.ora file to set the
Client-to-Oracle Database connection.
You can create the tnsnames.ora file manually by copying and modifying a version of
this file from another Oracle installation, or you can use Oracle Net Configuration
Assistant to create and manage it for you.
To install Oracle Net Configuration Assistant:
1.
Run Oracle Universal Installer.
2.
Select the Custom installation type.
3.
In the Available Product Components screen, select Oracle Net Listener.
4.
In the Summary screen, click Install, click Exit, and then click Yes to exit Oracle
Universal Installer.
On each client computer, configure either of the following settings:
■
■
Set the TNS_ADMIN environment variable to specify the location of the
tnsnames.ora file and specify a service name from that file.
Place the tnsnames.ora file in the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin directory, and
ensure that the ORACLE_HOME environment has been set to this Oracle home.
See Also: Oracle Call Interface Programmer's Guide for more
information on Oracle Call Interface Instant Client connection strings
Specifying a Connection Using an Empty Connect String and TWO_TASK
You can set the connect string to an empty connect string (""), and then set the TWO_
TASK environment variable to one of the following values:
■
A direct address, as described under "Specifying a Connection by Using the Easy
Connect Naming Method" on page 4-4
■
Oracle Net keyword-value pair
■
A tnsnames.ora entry and TNS_ADMIN is set to the location of tnsnames.ora
■
A tnsnames.ora entry and the following:
–
tnsnames.ora file located in $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin
–
The ORACLE_HOME environment variable set to this Oracle home
This method allows the applications to specify internally a connection string if the
application code itself uses an empty connection string. The benefit of an empty
connect string is that the application itself does not have to specify the tnsnames.ora
entry. Instead, when a user starts the application, the location of the database is
determined by a script or the environment, depending on where you have set the TWO_
TASK environment variable. The disadvantage of using empty strings is that you must
configure this additional information in order for the application to connect to the
database.
Setting Up User Accounts
For information about setting up additional user accounts, refer to Oracle Database
Administrator's Reference for Linux and UNIX-Based Operating Systems.
Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks 4-5
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
Setting the NLS_LANG Environment Variable
NLS_LANG is an environment variable that specifies the locale behavior for Oracle
software. This variable sets the language and territory used by the client application
and the database user session. It also declares the character set of the client, which is
the character set of data entered or displayed by an Oracle client program, such as
SQL*Plus.
Appendix B, "Configuring Oracle Database
Globalization Support" for more information about the NLS_LANG
environment variable
See Also:
The character set of the data displayed is determined by the
environment of the operating system, such as keyboard driver and
fonts in use. The NLS_LANG character set should match the operating
system.
Note:
Generating the Client Static Library
The client static library (libclntst11.a) is not generated during installation. If you
want to link the applications to the client static library, you must first generate it as
follows:
1.
Switch user to oracle.
2.
Set the ORACLE_HOME environment variable to specify the Oracle home directory
used by the Oracle Database installation. For example:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1
$ export ORACLE_HOME
■
C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_HOME /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1
3.
Enter the following command:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/bin/genclntst
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
The following sections describe postinstallation tasks that you must perform if you
install and intend to use the products mentioned:
■
Configuring Oracle Net Services
■
Configuring Oracle Precompilers
You must perform postinstallation tasks only for products
that you intend to use.
Note:
Configuring Oracle Net Services
If you have an earlier release of Oracle software installed on this system, you might
want to copy information from the Oracle Net tnsnames.ora and listener.ora
4-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
configuration files from the earlier release to the corresponding files for the new
release.
The default location for the tnsnames.ora and
listener.ora files is the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/ directory.
However, you can also use a central location for these files.
Note:
If necessary, you can also add connection information for additional database instances
to the new file.
Configuring Oracle Precompilers
This section describes postinstallation tasks for Oracle precompilers:
■
Configuring Pro*C/C++
■
Configuring Pro*FORTRAN
All precompiler configuration files are located in the
$ORACLE_HOME/precomp/admin directory.
Note:
Configuring Pro*C/C++
Verify that the PATH environment variable setting includes the directory that contains
the C compiler executable.
The following table shows the default directories and the appropriate command to
verify the path setting of the compiler:
Table 4–1
C/C++ Compiler Directory
Path
Command
/usr/bin
$ which gcc
/opt/intel_cce_80/bin/icc
$ which icc
Configuring Pro*FORTRAN
Verify that the PATH environment variable setting includes the directory that contains
the FORTRAN compiler executable. You can verify the path setting by using the which
xlf command.
Oracle Database Client Postinstallation Tasks 4-7
Required Product-Specific Postinstallation Tasks
4-8 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
5
Removing Oracle Database Client Software
5
This chapter describes how to completely remove Oracle software and configuration
files related to the specified Oracle home using the Deinstallation Tool.
The deinstall command removes the Oracle Database Client installations.
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), Oracle recommends that you use
the deinstallation tool to remove the entire Oracle home associated with the Oracle
Database, Oracle Clusterware, Oracle ASM, Oracle RAC, or Oracle Database client
installation. Oracle does not support the removal of individual products or
components.
It includes information about the following topics:
■
About the Deinstallation Tool
■
Downloading the Deinstall Tool for Use with Failed Installations
■
Example of Running the Deinstall Command
■
Deinstallation Parameter File Example
About the Deinstallation Tool
The Deinstallation Tool (deinstall) is available in the installation media before
installation, and is available in Oracle home directories after installation. It is located
in the $ORACLE_HOME/deinstall directory.
The deinstall command uses the information you provide, plus information gathered
from the software home to create a parameter file. You can alternatively supply a
parameter file generated previously by the deinstall command using the –checkonly
option, or by editing the response file template.
Removing Oracle Database Client Software 5-1
About the Deinstallation Tool
Caution: When you run the deinstall command, if the central
inventory (oraInventory) contains no other registered homes besides
the home that you are deconfiguring and removing, then the deinstall
command removes the following files and directory contents in the
Oracle base directory of the Oracle Database installation owner:
■
admin
■
cfgtoollogs
■
checkpoints
■
diag
■
oradata
■
fast_recovery_area
Oracle strongly recommends that you configure your installations
using an Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) configuration, and that
you reserve Oracle base and Oracle home paths for exclusive use of
Oracle software. If you have any user data in these locations in the
Oracle base that is owned by the user account that owns the Oracle
software, then the deinstall command deletes this data.
The command uses the following syntax, where variable content is indicated in italics:
deinstall -home complete path of Oracle home [-silent] [-checkonly] [-local]
[-paramfile complete path of input parameter property file] [-params name1=value
name2=value . . .] [-o complete path of directory for saving files] [-help]
Oracle recommends that you run the deinstallation tool as the Oracle software
installation owner. The default method for running the deinstall tool is from the
deinstall directory in the Oracle home as the installation owner:
$ $ORACLE_HOME/deinstall/deinstall
Provide information about your servers as prompted or accept the defaults.
The deinstall command stops Oracle software, and removes Oracle software and
configuration files on the operating system.
In addition, you can run the deinstall tool from other locations, or with a parameter
file, or select other options to run the tool.
The options are:
■
-home
Use this flag to indicate the home path of the Oracle home to check or deinstall. To
deinstall Oracle software using the deinstall command in the Oracle home you
plan to deinstall, provide a parameter file in another location, and do not use the
-home flag.
If you run deinstall from the $ORACLE_HOME/deinstall path, then the -home flag is
not required because the tool knows from which home it is being run. If you use
the standalone version of the tool, then -home is mandatory.
■
-silent
Use this flag to run the command in silent or response file mode. If you use the
-silent flag, then you must use the -paramfile flag, and provide a parameter file
5-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
About the Deinstallation Tool
that contains the configuration values for the Oracle home to deinstall or
deconfigure.
You can generate a parameter file to use or modify by running deinstall with the
-checkonly flag. The deinstall command then discovers information from the
Oracle home to deinstall and deconfigure. It generates the properties file, which
you can then use with the -silent option.
You can also modify the template file deinstall.rsp.tmpl, located in the
$ORACLE_HOME/deinstall/response folder.
■
-checkonly
Use this flag to check the status of the Oracle software home configuration.
Running the command with the -checkonly flag does not remove the Oracle
configuration. The -checkonly flag generates a parameter file which you can then
use with the deinstall command and -silent option.
■
-local
Use this flag on a multinode environment to deinstall Oracle software in a cluster.
When you run deinstall with this flag, it deconfigures and deinstalls the Oracle
software on the local node (the node where deinstall is run). On remote nodes, it
deconfigures Oracle software, but does not deinstall the Oracle software.
■
-paramfile complete path of input parameter property file
Use this flag to run deinstall with a parameter file in a location other than the
default. When you use this flag, provide the complete path where the parameter
file is located.
The default location of the parameter file depends on the location of deinstall:
■
–
From the installation media or stage location: $ORACLE_
HOME/inventory/response.
–
From a unzipped archive file from OTN: /ziplocation/response.
–
After installation from the installed Oracle home: $ORACLE_
HOME/deinstall/response.
-params [name1=value name 2=value name3=value . . .]
Use this flag with a parameter file to override one or more values to change in a
parameter file you have already created.
■
-o complete path of directory for saving response files
Use this flag to provide a path other than the default location where the properties
file (deinstall.rsp.tmpl) is saved.
The default location of the parameter file depends on the location of deinstall:
■
–
From the installation media or stage location before installation: $ORACLE_
HOME/
–
From a unzipped archive file from OTN: /ziplocation/response/.
–
After installation from the installed Oracle home: $ORACLE_
HOME/deinstall/response.
-help
Use the help option (-help) to obtain additional information about the command
option flags.
Removing Oracle Database Client Software 5-3
Downloading the Deinstall Tool for Use with Failed Installations
Downloading the Deinstall Tool for Use with Failed Installations
If you require the Deinstallation Tool (deinstall) to remove failed or incomplete
installations, then it is available as a separate download from the Oracle Technology
Network (OTN) website.
To download the Deinstallation Tool:
1.
Go to the following URL:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/enterprise-edition/downloads
/index.html
2.
Under Oracle Database 11g Release 2, click See All for the respective platform for
which you want to download the Deinstallation Tool.
The Deinstallation Tool is available for download at the end of this web page.
Example of Running the Deinstall Command
As the deinstall command runs, you are prompted to provide the home directory of
the Oracle software to remove from your system. Provide additional information as
prompted.
Use the optional flag -paramfile to provide a path to a parameter file.
In the following example, the deinstall command is in the path
/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1/deinstall, and it uses a parameter file
in the software owner location /home/usr/oracle:
# cd /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1/deinstall/
# ./deinstall -paramfile /home/usr/oracle/myparamfile.tmpl
If you enter the deinstall command outside of the $ORACLE_HOME/deinstall folder,
then help is displayed, unless you enter a -home flag and provide a path. If you run the
deinstall command from the $ORACLE_HOME/deinstall folder, then deinstallation starts
without prompting you for a home address.
Deinstallation Parameter File Example
You can run the deinstall command with the -paramfile option to use the values
you specify in the parameter file. The following is an example of a parameter file, in
which the Oracle Database binary owner is oracle, the Oracle Database home (Oracle
home) is in the path /u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1/, the Oracle base
(where other Oracle software is installed) is /u01/app/oracle/, the central Oracle
Inventory home (oraInventory) is /u01/app/oraInventory, and the client is client1:
ORACLE_BASE=/u01/app/oracle
INVENTORY_LOCATION=/u01/app/oraInventory
CRS_HOME=false
HOME_TYPE=CLIENT
silent=false
local=false
LOCAL_NODE=node1
ObaseCleanupPtrLoc=/var/tmp/install/orabase_cleanup.lst.
LOGDIR=/u01/app/oraInventory/logs/
ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/client_1
5-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
A
Installing Oracle Database Client Using
Response Files
A
This appendix describes how to use response files to perform a silent or response file
installation of Oracle Database Client. It includes information about the following
topics:
■
How Response Files Work
■
Preparing a Response File
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
■
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade Using the Response File
How Response Files Work
You can automate the installation and configuration of Oracle software, either fully or
partially, by specifying a response file when you start Oracle Universal Installer. Oracle
Universal Installer uses the values contained in the response file to provide answers to
some or all of Oracle Universal Installer prompts. It includes information about the
following topics:
■
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode
■
General Procedure for Using Response Files
Typically, Oracle Universal Installer runs in interactive mode, which means that it
prompts you to provide information in graphical user interface (GUI) screens. When
you use response files to provide this information, you run Oracle Universal Installer
at a command prompt using either of the following modes:
■
Silent mode
If you include responses for all of the prompts in the response file and specify the
-silent option when starting Oracle Universal Installer, then Oracle Universal
Installer runs in silent mode. During a silent-mode installation, Oracle Universal
Installer does not display any screens. Instead, it displays progress information in
the terminal that you used to start it.
■
Response file mode
If you include responses for some or all of the prompts in the response file and
omit the -silent option, then Oracle Universal Installer runs in response file
mode. During a response file mode installation, Oracle Universal Installer displays
all the screens, screens for which you specify information in the response file and
also screens for which you did not specify the required information in the
Installing Oracle Database Client Using Response Files A-1
How Response Files Work
response file. The enables you to validate values in the screens for which you have
provided the information in the response file and continue with the installation.
You define the settings for a silent or response file installation by entering values for
the variables listed in the response file. For instance, to specify the Oracle home
location, you would supply the appropriate value for the ORACLE_HOME variable as
follows:
ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/dbhome_1
Another way of specifying the variable settings of the response file is to pass them as
command line arguments when you run Oracle Universal Installer. For example:
-silent directory_path
In this command, directory_path is the path of the database directory on the
installation media or on the hard drive.
See Also:
■
■
Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for Windows and
UNIX for more information about response file formats
My Oracle Support website for more information on response
files:
https://support.oracle.com/
Reasons for Using Silent Mode or Response File Mode
The following table describes several reasons why you might want to run Oracle
Universal Installer in silent mode or response file mode.
Mode
Uses
Silent
Use silent mode to:
■
■
■
Complete an unattended installation, which you might schedule using
an operating system utility such as cron.
Complete several similar installations on multiple systems without user
interaction.
Install the software on a system that does not have X Window System
software installed on it.
Oracle Universal Installer displays progress information in the terminal that
you used to start it, but it does not display any of Oracle Universal Installer
screens.
Response file
Use response file mode to complete similar Oracle software installations on
more than one systems, providing default answers to some, but not all of
Oracle Universal Installer prompts.
In response file mode, all the installer screens are displayed, but defaults for
the fields in these screens are provided by the response file. You have to
provide information for the fields in screens where you have not provided
values in the response file.
General Procedure for Using Response Files
The following are the general steps to install and configure Oracle products using
Oracle Universal Installer in silent or response file mode:
A-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Preparing a Response File
You must complete all required preinstallation tasks on a
system before running Oracle Universal Installer in silent or response
file mode.
Note:
1.
Prepare a response file.
2.
Run Oracle Universal Installer in silent or response file mode.
3.
Run the root scripts as prompted by Oracle Universal Installer.
4.
If you completed a software-only installation, then run Net Configuration
Assistant and Database Configuration Assistant in silent or response file mode if
required.
These steps are described in the following sections.
Preparing a Response File
This section describes the following methods to prepare a response file for use during
silent mode or response file mode installations:
■
Editing a Response File Template
■
Saving a Response File
Editing a Response File Template
This method is useful for the Enterprise Edition, or Standard Edition installation types.
Oracle provides response file templates for each product and installation type, and for
each configuration tool. These files are located in the client\response directory on
the Oracle Database installation media.
If you copied the software to a hard disk, the response files
are located in the database/response directory.
Note:
Table A–1 lists the response files provided with Oracle Database.
Table A–1
Response Files
Response File
Description
client_install.rsp
Client installation of Oracle Database Client.
netca.rsp
Oracle Net Configuration Assistant to perform the configuration
with the client installation types.
To copy and modify a response file:
1.
Copy the response file from the response file directory to a directory on your
system:
$ cp /directory_path/response/response_file.rsp local_directory
In this example, directory_path is the path to the database directory on the
installation media. If you have copied the software to a hard drive, then you can
edit the file in the response directory if you prefer.
2.
Open the response file in a text editor:
Installing Oracle Database Client Using Response Files A-3
Preparing a Response File
$ vi /local_dir/response_file.rsp
See Also: Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch User's Guide for
Windows and UNIX for detailed information on creating response files
3.
Follow the instructions in the file to edit it.
Note: Oracle Universal Installer or configuration assistant fails if
you do not correctly configure the response file. Refer to
"Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling" on page C-4 for
information about troubleshooting a failed silent-mode installation.
Saving a Response File
You can use Oracle Universal Installer in interactive mode to save a response file,
which you can edit and then use to complete silent mode or response file mode
installations.
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), you can save all the installation
steps into a response file during installation. You can click the Save Response File
button on the Summary page to do this. Later, this file can be used for a silent
installation.
When you save the response file, you can either complete the installation, or you can
exit from Oracle Universal Installer on the Summary page, before it starts to copy the
software to the system.
If you save a response file during a silent installation, then Oracle Universal Installer
saves the variable values that were specified in the original source response file into
the new response file.
Oracle Universal Installer does not save passwords in the
response file.
Note:
To save a response file:
1.
Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Chapter 2.
When you run Oracle Universal Installer to save a response file, it checks the
system to verify that it meets the requirements to install the software. For this
reason, Oracle recommends that you complete all of the required preinstallation
tasks and save the response file while completing an installation.
2.
Ensure that the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle) has permissions to
create or write to the Oracle home path that you specify when you run Oracle
Universal Installer.
3.
On each Oracle Universal Installer screen, specify the required information.
4.
When Oracle Universal Installer displays the Summary screen, perform the
following actions:
1.
Click Save Response File and specify a file name and location for the response
file. Then, click Save to save the values to the file.
2.
Click Finish to continue with the installation.
A-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
Click Cancel if you do not want to continue with the installation. The
installation stops, but the saved response file is retained.
5.
Before using the saved response file on another system, edit the file and make any
required changes.
Use the instructions in the file as a guide when editing it.
Running Oracle Universal Installer Using a Response File
Now, you are ready to run Oracle Universal Installer at the command line, specifying
the response file you created, to perform the installation. The Oracle Universal
Installer executable, runInstaller, provides several options. For help information on
the full set of these options, run the runInstaller command with the -help option, for
example:
$ directory_path/runInstaller -help
The help information appears in a window after some time.
To run Oracle Universal Installer using a response file:
1.
Complete the preinstallation tasks listed in Chapter 2.
2.
Log in as the Oracle software owner user (typically, oracle).
3.
If you are completing a response file mode installation, set the DISPLAY
environment variable.
You do not have to set the DISPLAY environment variable if
you are completing a silent-mode installation.
Note:
4.
To start Oracle Universal Installer in silent or response file mode, enter a command
similar to the following:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller [-silent] [-noconfig] \
-responseFile responsefilename
Do not specify a relative path to the response file. If you
specify a relative path, then Oracle Universal Installer fails.
Note:
In this example:
■
■
directory_path is the path of the database directory on the DVD or on the
hard drive.
-silent runs Oracle Universal Installer in silent mode.
See "Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling" on page C-4
■
■
-noconfig suppresses running the configuration assistants during installation,
and a software-only installation is performed instead.
responsefilename is the full path and file name of the installation response
file that you configured.
Installing Oracle Database Client Using Response Files A-5
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade Using the Response File
For more information about other options for the
runInstaller command, enter the following command:
Note:
$ /directory_path/runInstaller -help
5.
When the installation completes, log in as the root user and run the root.sh
script:
$ sudo sh
password:
# /oracle_home_path/root.sh
6.
If this is the first time you are installing Oracle software on your system, then
Oracle Universal Installer prompts you to run the orainstRoot.sh script. Log in as
the root user and run the orainstRoot.sh script:
$ sudo sh
password:
# /oracle_home_path/orainstRoot.sh
Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade Using the
Response File
Starting with Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2.0.2), you can perform an in-place
Oracle Database Client upgrade using the response file:
1.
Edit the oracle.install.client.upgrading entry in the client_install.rsp file
and set it to true. By default, the oracle.install.client.upgrading entry is set
to false.
2.
Run Oracle Universal Installer in silent mode as described in "Running Oracle
Universal Installer Using a Response File" on page A-5.
"Performing an In-place Oracle Database Client Upgrade"
on page 3-10
See Also:
A-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
B
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization
Support
B
This appendix describes the following Globalization Support topics:
■
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
■
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
See Also: Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for an overview
of globalization support for Oracle Database
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
This section describes the following procedures:
■
Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages
■
Installing Translation Resources
Configuring Oracle Components to Run in Different Languages
You can specify the language and the territory, or locale, in which you want to use
Oracle components. The locale setting of a component determines the language of the
user interface of the component and the globalization behavior, such as date and
number formatting. Depending on the Oracle component, the locale of the component
is either inherited from the operating system session that started the component, or is
defined by the NLS_LANG environment variable.
The operating system locale usually influences Oracle components that are based on
Java technology. The NLS_LANG environment variable usually influences Oracle
components that use Oracle Database Client libraries such as OCI.
The user interface of an Oracle component is displayed in a
selected language only if the appropriate translation is available and
has been installed. Else, the user interface is be displayed in English.
Note:
Determining the Operating System Locale by Using the LANG Environment Variable
The locale setting of your operating system session determines the language of the
user interface and the globalization behavior for components such as Oracle Universal
Installer, Oracle Net Configuration Assistant, and Oracle Database Configuration
Assistant. It also determines the globalization behavior of Oracle Database sessions
created by a user application through Oracle JDBC driver, unless overridden by the
application.
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support
B-1
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
The operating system locale is determined by the value of the LANG environment
variable. Depending on your desktop environment, such as KDE, GNOME, or telnet,
you can select a default session locale on a login screen, in a configuration panel, or in
a configuration file.
Refer to the operating system documentation on how to select
a locale for the operating system session in your desktop environment.
Note:
You can modify the LANG variable in the environment of your shell to start an Oracle
component in a selected language. For example, to start Oracle Database
Configuration Assistant in German, enter one of the following commands:
■
Bourne shell (sh), or Korn shell (ksh), or Bash shell (bash):
$ LANG=de_DE.iso88591 dbca
■
C shell (csh):
% (setenv LANG de_DE.iso88591; dbca)
To modify the operating system locale for all Oracle components started from now on
by the given shell, modify the LANG variable using one of the following commands:
■
Bourne shell (sh), or Korn shell (ksh), or Bash shell (bash):
$ LANG=de_DE.iso88591; export LANG
$ ...
■
C shell (csh):
$ setenv LANG de_DE.iso88591
$ ...
The value of the LANG environment variable must be a valid operating system locale.
To see the list of valid locales, enter the following command:
$ locale -a
Refer to the operating system documentation for a mapping
between values of the LANG environment variable and the languages
and territories that they represent.
Note:
Configuring Locale and Character Sets Using NLS_LANG
The NLS_LANG environment variable determines the language of the user interface and
the globalization behavior for components such as SQL*Plus, exp, and imp. It sets the
language and territory used by the client application and the database user session. It
also declares the character set for entering and displaying data by the client
application.
The NLS_LANG environment variable uses the following format:
NLS_LANG=language_territory.characterset
In this format:
■
language specifies the language used for displaying Oracle messages, sorting, day
names, and month names
B-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing and Using Oracle Components in Different Languages
■
■
territory specifies the conventions for default date, monetary and numeric
formats
characterset specifies the encoding used by the client application
In most cases, this is the Oracle character set that corresponds to the character set
of the user terminal or the operating system.
Note: To install additional languages for a component, you must
reinstall this component.
The NLS_LANG environment variable is set as a local environment variable for the shell
on all UNIX-based platforms. For example, if the operating system locale setting is en_
US.UTF-8, then the corresponding value of NLS_LANG environment variable is
AMERICAN_AMERICA.AL32UTF8.
See Also: Oracle Database Globalization Support Guide for information
about the NLS_LANG parameter and Globalization Support
initialization parameters
The following examples illustrate some valid values for the NLS_LANG environment
variable.
Refer to the operating system documentation on how to
determine the operating system locale environment setting.
Note:
Operating System Locale
NLS_LANG Values
French (France)
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P15
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8ISO8859P1
FRENCH_FRANCE.WE8MSWIN1252
FRENCH_FRANCE.AL32UTF8
Japanese (Japan)
JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16EUC
JAPANESE_JAPAN.JA16SJIS
JAPANESE_JAPAN.AL32UTF8
Installing Translation Resources
To view the user interface of Oracle components in different languages, you must
install the appropriate language translations along with the component.
To install the translation resources:
1.
Start Oracle Universal Installer.
2.
In the Configure Security Updates screen enter the relevant information and click
Next.
3.
In the Download Software Updates and Apply Software Updates screens, enter
the relevant information and click Next.
4.
In the Select Installation Option screen, select the installation option and click
Next.
5.
In the System Class screen, select the type of system class for installing the
database, and click Next.
Configuring Oracle Database Globalization Support
B-3
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
6.
In the Grid Installation Options screen, select the type of database installation you
want to perform, and click Next.
7.
In the Select Product Languages screen, select the language in which you want to
use Oracle components from the Available Languages field.
The Available Languages field lists all languages supported by
Oracle globalization libraries. The set of languages for which a
translation is actually available is usually smaller and depends on a
particular component. The scope of translation for a given component
may differ between languages. For example, some translations may
include all user interface text, while others may include only error
messages and no help files.
Note:
8.
Use the > arrow to move the selected language to the Selected Languages field,
and then click Next.
Oracle Universal Installer ignores languages in the Selected
Languages field for which translation is not available.
Note:
Running Oracle Universal Installer in Different Languages
Your operating system locale determines the language in which Oracle Universal
Installer runs. Oracle Universal Installer may run in one of the following languages:
■
Brazilian Portuguese (pt_BR)
■
French (fr)
■
German (de)
■
Italian (it)
■
Japanese (ja)
■
Korean (ko)
■
Simplified Chinese (zh_CN)
■
Spanish (es)
■
Traditional Chinese (zh_TW)
To run Oracle Universal Installer in one of the available languages, change the locale in
which your operating system session is running before you start Oracle Universal
Installer with the ./runInstaller command. If the selected language is not one of the
listed earlier, then Oracle Universal Installer runs in English.
You must ensure that the selected value for the LANG environment variable starts with
the appropriate language abbreviation. In the aforementioned list of languages, in
which Oracle Universal Installer can run, the required abbreviation appears in
parentheses beside the language name. For example, fr_FR and fr_CA are valid values
to run the Oracle Universal Installer in French.
B-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
C
Troubleshooting
C
This appendix contains information about troubleshooting. It includes information
about the following topics:
■
Verify Requirements
■
X Window Display Errors
■
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
■
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
■
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
■
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues
■
Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues
■
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling
■
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
Verify Requirements
Before performing any of the troubleshooting steps in this appendix, ensure that the
system meets the requirements and that you have completed all of the preinstallation
tasks specified in Chapter 2.
Read the Release Notes
Read the release notes for the product before installing it. The release notes are
available on the Oracle Database 11g DVD. The latest version of the release notes is
also available on the Oracle Technology Network website:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
X Window Display Errors
If you run Oracle Universal Installer on a remote system and you want to display
Oracle Universal Installer’s user interface on your local system, you might see error
messages similar to the following:
"Failed to connect to server"
"Connection refused by server"
"Can’t open display"
If you see one of these error messages, follow these steps:
Troubleshooting C-1
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
This procedure applies only to users of UNIX workstations.
If you are using a PC or other system with X server software
installed, refer to the X server documentation, or contact your X
server vendor or system administrator for information about how
to permit remote systems to display X applications on the local
system.
Note:
1.
In a local terminal window, log in as the user that started the X Window session.
2.
Enter the following command:
$ xhost fully_qualified_remote_host_name
For example:
$ xhost somehost.us.example.com
3.
Enter the following commands, where workstation_name is the host name or IP
address of your workstation:
■
Bourne, Bash, or Korn shell:
$ DISPLAY=workstation_name:0.0
$ export DISPLAY
■
C shell:
% setenv DISPLAY workstation_name:0.0
4.
To determine whether X Window applications display correctly on the local
system, enter the following command:
$ xclock
The X clock should appear on your monitor.
5.
If the X clock appears, close the X clock and start Oracle Universal Installer again.
What to Do If an Installation Error Occurs?
If you encounter an error during installation:
■
■
■
Do not exit Oracle Universal Installer.
If you clicked Next after you entered incorrect information on one of the
installation screens, click Back to return to the screen and correct the information.
If you encounter an error while Oracle Universal Installer is copying or linking
files, then rerun Oracle Universal Installer with the -debug option:
$./runInstaller -debug
Check the log file for details. Refer to "Reviewing the Log of an Installation
Session" section on page C-3.
■
■
If you encounter an error while a configuration assistant is running, refer to
"Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants" section on page C-3.
If you cannot resolve the problem, remove the failed installation by following the
steps listed in the "Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation" section on page C-5.
C-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
Reviewing the Log of an Installation Session
During an installation, Oracle Universal Installer records all of the actions that it
performs in a log file. If you encounter problems during the installation, review the log
file for information about possible causes of the problem.
To view the log file, follow these steps:
1.
If necessary, enter the following command to determine the location of the
oraInventory directory:
$ cat etc/oraInst.loc
The inventory_loc parameter in this file specifies the location of the
oraInventory directory.
2.
Enter the following command to change directory to Oracle Universal Installer log
file directory, where orainventory_location is the location of the oraInventory
directory:
$ cd /orainventory_location/logs
3.
Enter the following command to determine the name of the log file:
$ ls -ltr
This command lists the files in the order of creation, with the most recent file
shown last. Installer log files have names similar to the following, where date_
time indicates the date and time that the installation started:
installActionsdate_time.log
4.
To view the most recent entries in the log file, where information about a problem
is most likely to appear, enter a command similar to the following:
$ tail -50 installActionsdate_time.log | more
This command displays the last 50 lines in the log file.
5.
If the error displayed by Oracle Universal Installer or listed in the log file indicates
a relinking problem, refer to the following file for more information:
$ORACLE_HOME/install/make.log
Troubleshooting Configuration Assistants
To troubleshoot an installation error that occurs when a configuration assistant is
running:
■
■
■
Review the installation log files listed in the "Reviewing the Log of an Installation
Session" section on page C-3.
Review the specific configuration assistant log file located in the $ORACLE_
HOME/cfgtoollogs directory. Try to fix the issue that caused the error.
If you see the "Fatal Error. Reinstall" message, look for the cause of the problem by
reviewing the log files. Refer to "Fatal Errors" on page C-4 for further instructions.
Troubleshooting C-3
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues
Configuration Assistant Failure
Oracle configuration assistant failures are noted at the bottom of the installation
screen. The configuration assistant interface displays additional information, if
available. The configuration assistant execution status is stored in the following file:
oraInventory_location/logs/installActionsdate_time.log
The execution status codes are listed in the following table:
Status
Result Code
Configuration assistant succeeded
0
Configuration assistant failed
1
Configuration assistant canceled
-1
Fatal Errors
If you receive a fatal error while a configuration assistant is running, you must remove
the current installation and reinstall the Oracle software, as follows:
1.
Remove the failed installation as described in the "Cleaning Up After a Failed
Installation" section on page C-5.
2.
Correct the cause of the fatal error.
3.
Reinstall the Oracle software.
Troubleshooting Inventory Issues
If you face any of the following situations for Oracle home, then run the opatch
lsinventory -detail command to list the contents of the inventory and see section
"Recovering from inventory corruption" in the Oracle Universal Installer and OPatch
User's Guide for Windows and UNIX for information on fixing the issue.
■
Oracle home is cloned without completing the inventory steps.
■
There is bad inventory.
■
Inventory is not available but it is created when the Oracle Enterprise Manager
Agent is installed in a separate Oracle home.
Troubleshooting Screen Display Issues
If you connect to Oracle database with a screen resolution of 640X480 or 800X600, then
the Next button in the GUI is not visible as it hides behind the Taskbar. To fix this
problem, perform one of the following:
■
Hide the Taskbar.
■
Move the Oracle Universal Installer screen up.
■
Set the screen resolution to 1024X768 or higher.
Silent-Mode Response File Error Handling
To determine whether a silent-mode installation succeeds or fails, refer to the
following log file:
/oraInventory_location/logs/silentInstalldate_time.log
C-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
If necessary, refer to the previous section for information about determining the
location of the oraInventory directory.
A silent installation fails if:
■
You do not specify a response file
■
You specify an incorrect or incomplete response file
■
Oracle Universal Installer encounters an error, such as insufficient disk space
Oracle Universal Installer or configuration assistant validates the response file at run
time. If the validation fails, the silent-mode installation or configuration process ends.
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
If an installation fails, you must remove the files that Oracle Universal Installer created
during the attempted installation using the Deinstallation Tool. For more information
on how to run the Deinstallation Tool refer to "About the Deinstallation Tool" on
page 5-1.
Troubleshooting C-5
Cleaning Up After a Failed Installation
C-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
D
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D
Use the following guidelines to decide how to install Oracle Database Client
components:
■
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
■
Installing Oracle Database Tools
■
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
■
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
The following are frequently asked questions about installing Oracle Database Client:
■
■
I only need one instance of Oracle Database or I just want to install a test database
to get familiar with the product. How do I install Oracle Database for these
situations?
How can I create an Oracle database that can handle transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications?
■
What’s the best way to install multiple Oracle databases?
■
How do I configure client connections to an Oracle database?
■
■
■
■
What is the best way to install Oracle Database Client if my client nodes have
limited disk space?
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?
The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster. How should I
install Oracle Database?
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?
I only need one instance of Oracle Database or I just want to install a test
database to get familiar with the product. How do I install Oracle Database for
these situations?
■
If you want a quick installation using the default installation settings, then refer to
the platform-specific Oracle Database Quick Installation Guide.
■
If your site has special requirements, then refer to Oracle Database Installation Guide
for more information.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D-1
Installing Oracle Database or Oracle Database Client
How can I create an Oracle database that can handle transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications?
If you want to create a starter database designed for transaction-heavy or data
warehousing applications, then refer to Oracle Database Installation Guide for more
details. Select the Advanced Installation method, and then select the database type you
want on the Select Database Configuration screen.
See Also:
Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide after installation
Alternatively, you can install Oracle OLAP during the Oracle Database installation.
Oracle OLAP provides optimal support for database environments that must meet
OLAP requirements. To do so, in the Select Database Edition screen, select Enterprise
Edition. Click the Select Options button, and from the Choose Components screen,
select Oracle OLAP.
See Also:
■
Oracle OLAP User's Guide
■
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
What’s the best way to install multiple Oracle databases?
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Database using either of the
following methods:
■
■
Installing with response files: This method lets you run Oracle Universal Installer
at a command line using a response file that contains settings specific to each
computer.
Cloning a Database: Install Oracle Database on one computer using interactive
mode. You can also clone databases. Instructions for cloning databases are
described in Oracle Database Administrator's Guide.
How do I configure client connections to an Oracle database?
1. Install Oracle Database on a server by using Oracle Database Installation Guide for
more information.
2.
Refer to Chapter 3, "Installing Oracle Database Client" to install Oracle Database
Client on each client node, and select the Instant Client installation type.
If you have many client nodes, consider staging the software centrally, mapping
the drive, and running Oracle Universal Installer in the response file mode.
If the client nodes only require a default installation into a new Oracle home
directory, consider using Oracle Database Installation Guide for more information.
What is the best way to install Oracle Database Client if my client nodes have
limited disk space?
1. Install Oracle Database onto a server by using Oracle Database Installation Guide for
more details.
2.
Refer to Chapter 3, "Installing Oracle Database Client" to install Oracle Database
Client on each client node, and select the Instant Client installation type.
If you have many client nodes, then consider running Oracle Universal Installer in
response file mode.
D-2 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
How do I upgrade Oracle Database?
Refer to Oracle Database Upgrade Guide.
See Also: Oracle Database Administrator's Guide to use software
cloning to upgrade Oracle Database
The computers at my site have been configured to run as a cluster. How should I
install Oracle Database?
Use any of the following installation scenarios:
■
■
■
If you want to run a single-instance Oracle Database in a clustered environment,
then install Oracle Grid Infrastructure either before or after you install Oracle
Database.
If you want a consolidated pool of storage for all databases in a cluster, then install
Oracle Grid Infrastructure and use Oracle Automatic Storage Management (Oracle
ASM) to manage this storage. Afterwards, install Oracle Database (which can be
either single instance or Real Application Clusters).
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, first install Oracle Grid
Infrastructure, and then install Oracle Real Application Clusters.
Refer to Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide and Oracle Real Application Clusters
Installation Guide for Linux and UNIX to install Oracle Grid Infrastructure or Oracle
Real Application Clusters respectively. See this guide for information about how to
install Oracle ASM and Oracle Database.
Oracle Clusterware is a key component required by Oracle Real Application Clusters
installations. Oracle Clusterware is an integrated cluster management solution that can
bind multiple servers to act as a single system. This is referred to as a cluster. It
performs workload management and component restart. For example, when an
instance supporting a particular service fails, Oracle Clusterware restarts the service
on the next available instance that you have configured for that service. Oracle
Clusterware can monitor non-Oracle programs, if they are defined within the Oracle
Clusterware environment using the High Availability API.
How do I migrate my non-Oracle databases to Oracle Database?
Use Oracle SQL Developer to migrate your non-Oracle databases and applications to
Oracle. Oracle SQL Developer software and documentation is available at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/sql-developer/overview/i
ndex.html
Installing Oracle Database Tools
The following are frequently asked questions about installing Oracle database tools:
■
How do I install Oracle WebLogic Server?
■
How can I administer and monitor my Oracle Database products?
■
How do I manage security for my Oracle Database products?
■
How do I use Oracle Database to manage my XML data?
■
■
Does Oracle Database provide OLAP tools so that I can analyze data such as
trends and time series in my database?
Does Oracle Database provide data mining tools that I can use to discover hidden
meaning in my data and predict likely outcomes based on my data?
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D-3
Installing Oracle Database Tools
■
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle Database?
■
Is Oracle Workflow included with Oracle Database 11g?
■
Is there a migration plan for customers that have built solutions using Oracle
Workflow?
How do I install Oracle WebLogic Server?
Refer to Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle WebLogic Server.
For more information on Oracle WebLogic Server refer to the product documentation
at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/weblogic/documentation/index.
html
How can I administer and monitor my Oracle Database products?
To perform regular administrative functions such as creating, configuring, or deleting
databases, or managing database templates, use one of the following methods:
To manage only the single database and listener that you are installing:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Database.
2.
From Oracle Database, use Database Configuration Assistant to manage your
databases.
You can also administer and monitor the database with Oracle Enterprise Manager
Grid Control, which is installed by default with Oracle Database. Oracle
Enterprise Manager Grid Control requires an agent which is not installed by
default.
Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control includes the Oracle Management Agent,
Oracle Management Service, and Oracle Management Repository, and also Grid
Control, a browser-based central console through which administrators can
perform all monitoring, administration, and configuration tasks for the enterprise.
See Also: Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Basic Installation
Guide available on the Enterprise Manager Grid Control installation
media
Documentation available on the Oracle Technology Network website
at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/inde
x.html
To perform advanced administration tasks, such as monitoring Oracle Database and
managing multiple hosts, application servers, and databases including the one that
you are installing, install Oracle Enterprise Manager as follows:
1.
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Database.
If you plan to use Oracle Real Application Clusters, then install Oracle Database
by using Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide and Oracle Real Application
Clusters Installation Guide for Linux and UNIX.
2.
Use Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Basic Installation Guide to install and
configure Oracle Enterprise Manager. For postconfiguration tasks, use Oracle
Enterprise Manager Advanced Configuration. Refer to documentation available on the
Enterprise Manager Grid Control installation media, or on the Oracle Technology
Network website at:
D-4 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Tools
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/indexes/documentation/index.html
How do I manage security for my Oracle Database products?
Oracle provides a wide range of security solutions for your enterprise environment,
including centralized administration and security features integrated with Oracle
Internet Directory. The set of Oracle security services called Oracle Platform Security
integrates the security features built into Oracle Database, Oracle WebLogic Server,
and the Oracle Identity Management infrastructure. Combined, these features enable
the development and deployment of secure e-business applications.
Oracle Identity Management includes Oracle Internet Directory, a centralized
repository that simplifies administration of users and applications in the Oracle
environment with the following components:
■
■
Oracle Internet Directory client tools, including LDAP command-line tools, the
Oracle Internet Directory SDK, and Oracle Directory Manager.
Oracle Internet Directory server components, including the directory server, the
directory replication server, the directory integration server, and various tools for
starting and stopping them.
Oracle Database includes the Oracle Internet Directory client tools, but not the Oracle
Internet Directory server components. To install the Oracle Internet Directory server
components, see Oracle Fusion Middleware Installation Guide for Oracle Identity and Access
Management and the Oracle Identity Management documentation at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/id-mgmt/overview/index.html
See Also:
■
Oracle Database Security Guide
■
Oracle Database Enterprise User Security Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Label Security Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Technology Network topics on database security:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/whatsne
w/index.html
How do I use Oracle Database to manage my XML data?
Use Oracle XML DB, which is installed as part of Oracle Database. Oracle XML DB
enables you to efficiently store, generate, retrieve, query, and manage XML data on
your site. Oracle XML DB provides all the advantages of a relational database, for
example, allowing you to control the referential integrity of XML data with constraints
and triggers. It works well with large amounts of XML data by storing it in a parsed,
relational form, which improves access performance.
Oracle XML DB supports XML Type, which is a native data type for XML data, for
which you can choose various storage options depending on your needs. In addition,
Oracle XML DB supports XML Schema processing, structured and unstructured
storage, a content repository that you can access by using common protocols (FTP,
HTTP(S), and WebDAV), and SQL/XML, which is a standard for SQL with XML. For
Oracle Database 11g Release 2 (11.2), Oracle XML DB introduced support for the
XQuery language for querying, transforming, and constructing XML; the ability for
users to define their own metadata for schema-based XML; a set of new SQL functions
for DML operations on XML data; and more.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D-5
Installing Oracle Database Tools
You can use Oracle XML DB with Oracle XML Developer’s Kit (XDK) to build
applications that run on either Oracle Database or Oracle WebLogic Server.
See Also:
■
Oracle XML DB Developer's Guide
■
Oracle XML Developer's Kit Programmer's Guide
Does Oracle Database provide OLAP tools so that I can analyze data such as
trends and time series in my database?
Yes, install Oracle OLAP, which is provided in the Oracle Database installation. Oracle
OLAP provides optimal support for database environments that must meet OLAP
requirements.
Use either of the following methods in Oracle Database Installation Guide to install
Oracle OLAP:
■
When you run Oracle Universal Installer, in the Select Database Edition screen,
select Enterprise Edition. Click the Select Options button, and from the Choose
Components screen, select Oracle OLAP.
See Also:
■
■
Oracle OLAP User's Guide
■
Oracle OLAP DML Reference
■
Oracle OLAP Java API Reference
Select the Enterprise Edition installation type, and then on the Select Database
Configuration screen, select the Data Warehouse configuration.
See Also:
Oracle Database Data Warehousing Guide after installation
Does Oracle Database provide data mining tools that I can use to discover
hidden meaning in my data and predict likely outcomes based on my data?
Yes, you must have an Enterprise Edition licence for the database installation. Install
Oracle Data Mining, which is provided in the Oracle Database installation. With the
Oracle Data Mining option, you can create and execute predictive and descriptive data
mining models that use a variety of algorithms.
Use the following method in Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Data
Mining:
1.
When you run Oracle Universal Installer, select the Enterprise Edition installation
type.
2.
In the Select Database Configuration screen, select the General
Purpose/Transaction Processing configuration.
D-6 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
See Also: The following manuals after you have installed Oracle
Data Mining:
■
Oracle Data Mining Concepts
■
Oracle Data Mining Administrator's Guide
■
Oracle Data Mining Application Developer's Guide
■
Oracle Data Mining Java API Reference
■
Oracle Database PL/SQL Packages and Types Reference (search for
Data Mining)
How do I perform backup and recovery operations for Oracle Database?
Use Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN), which is a backup and recovery tool
integrated into Oracle Database. This tool satisfies the pressing demands of
high-performance, manageable backup, and recovery. Recovery Manager is native to
the database server, automatically tracks database structure changes, and optimizes
operations accordingly. In addition, Recovery Manager is integrated with leading tape
media management products, so that Oracle database backups can be integrated with
your existing networked data protection infrastructure.
See Also:
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference
Is Oracle Workflow included with Oracle Database 11g?
Starting with Oracle Database 11g, Oracle Workflow is no longer released with the
database. Oracle Workflow is available with the Oracle E-Business Suite releases.
See Also:
Oracle Workflow statement of direction:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/overview/in
dex.html
Is there a migration plan for customers that have built solutions using Oracle
Workflow?
Starting January 2006, customers are encouraged to re-create and implement
workflows using Oracle BPEL Process Manager. Oracle is in the process of creating a
technical migration to provide detailed recommendations for migrating Oracle
Workflow processes to Oracle BPEL Process Manager.
See Also:
Oracle Workflow statement of direction:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/middleware/ias/overview/in
dex.html
Installing Oracle Database with Oracle Applications
The following are frequently asked questions about installing Oracle database with
Oracle applications:
■
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database?
■
How can I create web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
■
Which web server can my Oracle applications use?
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D-7
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
■
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle?
How do I install my Oracle applications with Oracle Database?
In most cases, install Oracle Database itself, then install the Oracle application. The
Oracle Universal Installer for that application prompts you for the connection
information. Check the application documentation requirements.
If you must implement your applications with Oracle Real Applications Clusters
databases, refer to Oracle Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide and Oracle Real
Application Clusters Installation Guide for Linux and UNIX.
How can I create web applications that communicate with Oracle Database?
Install Oracle Application Express and a web server:
Use Oracle Database Installation Guide to install Oracle Database. Oracle Application
Express is automatically installed, when you install Oracle database.
Which web server can my Oracle applications use?
Install Oracle HTTP Server, which ships on separate media, or use the XML DB HTTP
Protocol Server and the embedded PL/SQL Gateway that installs with Oracle
Database 11g Release 2.
How can I migrate my non-Oracle applications to Oracle?
Use Oracle SQL Developer to migrate your non-Oracle applications to Oracle. Oracle
SQL Developer software and documentation is available at:
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/developer-tools/sql-developer/overview/i
ndex.html
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
The following section discusses the Gateway products:
How can my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database system?
How can my Oracle applications access data in a non-Oracle database system?
You can use Oracle Database Gateway as the connectivity tool to enable Oracle
applications to access data in non-Oracle databases. The following are the functions of
Oracle Database Gateway:
■
■
Integrates a non-Oracle database into your Oracle Database environment.
Enables Oracle PL/SQL applications to integrate with APPC-enabled transactions,
or access messages in IBM Websphere MQ.
You can install the Gateway product on a computer independent of the Oracle
application, Oracle database, and non-Oracle database.
For example, suppose you have the following scenario:
■
■
■
Oracle Database is installed on an UNIX computer.
The Oracle application is installed on a Microsoft Windows computer and accesses
data from the Oracle database on the UNIX computer.
The Oracle application must join data in a DB2 database on Oracle Solaris and an
Oracle Database on UNIX.
D-8 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
You have the option of installing the Database Gateway for DRDA on the Oracle
Solaris computer where DB2 is running, on UNIX where Oracle is running, or on a
third computer.
Table D–1 lists the non-Oracle database systems that you can access from Oracle
applications, and the Gateways products that are available for those systems.
Table D–1
Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
IBM DB2 Universal
Database (UDB)
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
IBM DB2 z/OS
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide.
IBM DB2/400
Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for DRDA User's Guide.
WebSphere MQ
Oracle Database Gateway for WebSphere MQ.
Oracle Database Gateway for WebSphere MQ Installation and User's Guide.
CICS/TS
Oracle Database Gateway for APPC.
IMSTM
Use Oracle Database Gateway for APPC Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L
Based Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux
x86, and Linux x86-64.
Use Oracle Database Gateway for APPC User's Guide
SQL Server
Oracle Database Gateway for SQL Server.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for SQL Server User's Guide.
Sybase Adaptive Server
Oracle Database Gateway for Sybase.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for Sybase User's Guide.
Teradata
Oracle Database Gateway for Teradata.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for Teradata User's Guide.
Informix Server
Oracle Database Gateway for Informix.
Use Oracle Database Gateway Installation and Configuration Guide for AIX 5L Based
Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System (SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86,
and Linux x86-64 and Oracle Database Gateway for Informix User's Guide.
Frequently Asked Questions About Installation
D-9
Installing Oracle Database Heterogeneous Connectivity Tools (Gateways)
Table D–1 (Cont.) Oracle Gateway Products
Non-Oracle Database
Oracle Gateway Products and Documentation
IMS
Oracle Database Gateway for IMS.
Use Oracle Database Gateway for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Installation and Configuration
Guide for AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86, and Linux x86-64, Oracle Database Gateway for IMS User's
Guide and Oracle Connect for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Gateways Installation and
Configuration Guide for IBM z/OS
VSAM
Oracle Database Gateway for VSAM.
Use Oracle Database Gateway for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Installation and Configuration
Guide for AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86, and Linux x86-64, Oracle Database Gateway for VSAM User's
Guide and Oracle Connect for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Gateways Installation and
Configuration Guide for IBM z/OS.
Adabas
Oracle Database Gateway for Adabas.
Use Oracle Database Gateway for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Installation and Configuration
Guide for AIX 5L Based Systems (64-Bit), HP-UX Itanium, Solaris Operating System
(SPARC 64-Bit), Linux x86, and Linux x86-64, Oracle Database Gateway for Adabas User's
Guide and Oracle Connect for IMS, VSAM, and Adabas Gateways Installation and
Configuration Guide for IBM z/OS.
D-10 Oracle Database Client Installation Guide
Index
A
E
Administrator installation type, 1-5
overview, 1-1
response file, A-1
APPC-enabled databases, D-9
applications
migrating non-Oracle applications to Oracle, D-8
errors
configuration assistants, C-3
installation, C-2, C-3
response file installation, C-4
X Window, C-1
X Window display errors, C-1
B
F
backups of database
Oracle Database Recovery Manager,
fatal errors, C-4
files
client_install.rsp, A-3
netca.rsp, A-3
response files, A-3
D-7
C
certification, hardware and software, 1-2
client_install.rsp file, A-3
Cluster Ready Services (CSS). See Oracle Clusterware
clusters
See also Oracle Clusterware, Oracle Real
Application Clusters
configuration assistants
failure, C-4
troubleshooting, C-3
Custom
installation type, 1-5
D
data mining tools
Oracle Data Mining, D-6
data warehousing tool
Oracle OLAP, D-6
Database Configuration Assistant
troubleshooting, C-3
databases
non-Oracle
APPC-enabled, D-9
non-Oracle, listed, D-9
OLAP support (Oracle OLAP), D-6
recovery with Oracle Backup and Recovery,
security management, D-5
DB2 database, D-9
DB2 z/OS database, D-9
DB2/400 database, D-9
D-7
G
Gateways products FAQ, D-8
H
hardware
certification,
1-2
I
IBM DB2 database, D-9
IBM DB2 z/OS database, D-9
IBM DB2/400 database, D-9
IBM WebSphere MQ Series databases, D-9
Informix Server database, D-9
In-place upgrade, 1-3, 3-7
performing, 3-10
using response file, A-6
installation
available products, 1-4
cleaning up after a failed installation, C-5
considerations, 1-2
errors, C-3
log files, C-2
preparing response files, A-3, A-4
response files, A-1, A-3, C-4
response files templates, A-3
silent mode, C-4
steps to resolve errors, C-2
Index-1
upgrading, D-3
installation overview, 1-1
installation types
Administrator, 1-5
Custom, 1-5
Instant Client, 1-5
Runtime, 1-5
Instant Client
installation type, 1-5
Instant Client Light
about, 1-5
L
log files, C-2
troubleshooting,
C-3
M
Microsoft SQL Server database, D-9
migrating
applications to Oracle, D-8
non-Oracle databases to Oracle, D-3
multiple Oracle homes, 1-2
N
Net Configuration Assistant
custom installation, 3-9
interactive mode, 3-9
netca, 3-10
troubleshooting, C-3
netca, 3-10
netca.rsp file, A-3
noninteractive mode
See also response files, response file mode, A-1
non-Oracle databases, listed, D-9
O
OLAP tools
about, D-6
Oracle OLAP, D-6
operating system requirements, 2-5
Oracle Application Server, D-4
Oracle applications
installing with Oracle Database, D-8
Oracle Clusterware
about, D-3
used with Oracle Real Application Clusters, D-3
Oracle Data Mining
about, D-6
installing, D-6
Oracle Database
administering and monitoring, D-4
connectivity FAQ, D-8
FAQ on installing, D-1 to ??
installing with Oracle applications, D-8
security management, D-5
upgrading, D-3
web servers, D-8
Index-2
Oracle Database Client
configuring connections, D-2
Oracle Database components
installing with Oracle Database tools, D-4
Oracle Database Recovery Manager (RMAN)
about, D-7
Oracle Internet Directory, D-5
Oracle OLAP
about, D-6
Oracle Procedural Gateway
listed products, D-9
Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC)
installing with Oracle Enterprise Manager, D-4
Oracle Clusterware
about, D-3
Oracle SQL Developer
migrating non-Oracle applications to Oracle, D-8
migrating non-Oracle databases to Oracle, D-3
Oracle Transparent Gateway
listed products, D-9
Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
about, 1-3
requirements, 2-8
Oracle Universal Installer
response files, A-1
list of, A-3
Oracle XML DB
about, D-5
P
package requirements
Linux x86-64, 2-15
R
recovery of databases
Oracle Backup and Recovery, D-7
Red Hat compatible kernel
about, 1-3
requirements, 2-8
response file installation
reasons for using, A-2
response files
preparing, A-3, A-4
templates, A-3
silent mode
errors, C-4
response file mode
about, A-1
reasons for using, A-2
response files, A-1
about, A-1
client_install.rsp, A-3
creating with template, A-3
general procedure, A-2
netca.rsp, A-3
passing values at command line, A-2
specifying with Oracle Universal Installer, A-5
response files installation
about, A-1
Runtime
installation type, 1-5
S
security
management tools, D-5
silent mode
about, A-1
reasons for using, A-2
See also response file installation, response
files, A-1
software
certification, 1-2
software updates option, 1-6, 3-7
downloading before installation, 3-6
SQL Server database, D-9
suppressed mode. See response file mode
Sybase Adapter Server database, D-9
T
Teradata database, D-9
TIMESTAMP WITH TIMEZONE patching, 1-5
troubleshooting, C-1
fatal errors, C-4
W
web servers (Oracle HTTP Server), D-8
WebSphere MQ Series database, D-9
X
X Window
display errors,
XML data, D-5
C-1
Index-3
Index-4
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