module 3 tenured teachers under professional improvement

module 3 tenured teachers under professional improvement
MODULE 3
TENURED TEACHERS UNDER PROFESSIONAL
IMPROVEMENT
Outline
1. Guidelines for Tenured Teacher Appraisal under Professional Improvement
2. Procedures for Tenured Teacher Appraisal under Professional Improvement
i. Pre-referral
ii. Stage 1
iii. Stage 2
3. Appendixes
i. Expectations of Educational Professionals
ii. Components of Professional Practice
iii. Guidelines for Classroom Visits
iv. Eastern School District Professional Appraisal Belief Statements
Guiding Principles
1. The objective of Professional Appraisal is to ensure acceptable standards of performance and
conduct.
2. Module Three requires that an intensive and closely monitored application of the formal
evaluation process be conducted by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School
Leadership or designate.
3. Module Three will consist of both formative and summative evaluative components directed by
the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate.
4. Module Three is to be carried out in an open and transparent manner with the involvement of
the teacher concerned and NLTA representation where required.
Procedures:
1. The Professional Improvement Component will involve an informal pre-referral stage and two
formal stages:
a. Pre referral – The “pre-referral” stage will involve the normal interventions that
consistently make up good administrative practice. These would include
1. Meetings, both formal and informal, held with teachers prior to request
for Module Three placement.
2. Correspondence between teacher and administrator.
3. Supports provided to the teacher
b. STAGE 1- Significant Improvement Required – when major deficiencies appear
either during the regular professional growth cycle, or at any other time.
c. STAGE 2- Unsatisfactory Performance – initiated after major deficiencies continue
to impact performance despite interventions addressed in Stage 1.
PRE-REFERRAL
1. The district office is not normally a part of the “pre referral stage”. Interventions at this stage
are normally a part of good administrative practice that assists the teacher in the performance of
his/her duties.
2. Copies of interventions and supports used at this stage shall be maintained by the administrator.
This will include minutes and/or notes from meetings.
3. Interventions at this level could include;
i. Meetings held with teachers to discuss performance issues
ii. Correspondence between the teacher and administrator and/or other personnel
iii. Supports provided to teacher.
4. In all cases of supports the administrator is required to retain notes/minutes and
correspondence.
5. If the interventions used at this stage are unsuccessful in improving the performance of the
teacher then the administrator/district can request that the teacher to be moved to Stage 1.
STAGE 1 FORMATIVE EVALUATION (Improvement Required)
1. In the event that interventions used in the pre-referral stage are unsuccessful in addressing the
performance issues the school principal or the school district can request that the teacher be
moved to STAGE 1 of Module Three.
2. The principal will make a written recommendation to the Assistant Director of Human
Resources and School Leadership that a teacher be moved to Module Three (Professional
Improvement). The teacher shall be copied on this correspondence and a copy of same placed
on the teacher’s file.
3. The request to move a teacher to Module Three will contain a rationale for such a request
including a history of interventions prior to the request.
4. A decision by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership to move a
teacher in Professional Improvement shall be communicated to the teacher in writing. A copy
of this correspondence shall be placed in the teacher personnel file.
5. The improvement component in this phase will stress specific activities and procedures that
will occur between the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or
designate and the teacher.
6. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership will direct the teacher to
Expectations of Educational Professionals (Appendix I) and Components of Professional
Practice (Appendix II).
7. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate will schedule
an initial conference after the teacher has been notified of their placement in Module Three of
the Teacher Appraisal Policy. The minutes of this meeting shall be provided to the teacher and
a copy placed in the teacher’s file.
8. The teacher shall be provided with a written statement of the concerns or expectations by the
Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate. This statement
will also include criteria for improvement, indicating an acceptable level of performance. A
copy of this statement shall be placed in the teacher’s official file.
9. In consultation with the teacher, a written Plan for Improvement with sufficient detail and
specific time lines shall be prepared by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School
Leadership or designate. The plan will detail a minimum of the following:
i. areas to be addressed and competencies to be improved
ii. indicator (s) of success
iii. the resources to be applied
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
the time frame
the process for monitoring and providing feedback
frequency of conferencing
frequency of classroom observations
10. The teacher shall implement the Plan for Improvement as outlined by the Assistant Director of
Human Resources and School Leadership or designate.
11. The teacher may elect to have a mentor during the implementation of the plan. The
responsibility for the selection of this mentor shall lie with the school principal.
12. A copy of the records and other written comments generated from conferences and/or
classroom visits shall be prepared, filed and a copy given to the teacher. Copies of these
documents will also be placed on the teacher’s file.
13. In accordance with the time frame listed in the Plan for Improvement an assessment of the
individual’s progress shall be made. The results of this assessment shall be recorded and
communicated to the teacher in writing and copy included in the teacher’s official file.
14. If the Plan for Improvement is successfully implemented and the teacher’s performance
significantly improves as determined by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School
Leadership or designate, the teacher shall be placed in the 5 year cycle for Professional
Appraisal.
15. Should performance still be determined as unacceptable, the teacher shall be notified, in
writing, of placement of Stage 2 (Unsatisfactory Performance) of the Professional
Improvement Component. A copy of the letter shall be included in the teacher’s official file.
STAGE 2-UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE
1. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership will inform the teacher in
writing, that performance is still unsatisfactory and that the teacher will be moved to
Unsatisfactory Performance– Stage 2. This correspondence will be placed in the teacher’s
official file.
2. The teacher shall be given a written statement of the concerns or expectations by the Assistant
Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate. A copy of this statement
shall be placed in the teacher’s official file.
3. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate, the
administrator and the teacher will meet to discuss both the above and any written
documentation resulting from the monitoring of progress in Stage 1. The teacher will be
informed that they may wish to have a representative of the Newfoundland and Labrador
Teachers Association present.
4. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership may will direct the teacher
to Expectations of Educational Professionals (Appendix I) and Components of
Professional Practice (Appendix A).
5. A Plan for Improvement with sufficient detail and specific time lines shall be prepared in
writing by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate.
The plan will detail a minimum of the following:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
areas to be addressed and competencies to be improved
the resources to be applied
the time frame
the process for monitoring and providing feedback
frequency of conferencing
frequency of classroom visits
6. The Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or designate may request
additional supports from district office personnel in the development , implementation and
assessment of the Plan for Improvement in Stage 2
7. The teacher shall implement the Plan for Improvement as outlined.
8. The teacher may elect to have a mentor during the implementation of the plan. The principal
shall be responsible for the selection of this mentor.
9. During this period the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership or
designate (s) shall meet in accordance with the timeframes noted in the Plan for
Improvement. Written comments generated from meetings, conferences and classroom visits
shall be prepared, filed and a copy given to the teacher.
10. An assessment of the individual’s progress within the Plan for Improvement shall be made by
the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School Leadership and/or designate (s) . The
assessment shall be recorded and communicated to the teacher in writing and a copy included
in the teacher’s official file.
11. If the Plan for Improvement is successfully implemented and the teacher’s performance
significantly improves as determined by the Assistant Director of Human Resources and School
Leadership and/or designate (s) the teacher shall be placed in the 5 year cycle of the
Professional Appraisal Component.
12. Should teacher performance still be determined unacceptable, the Assistant Director of Human
Resources and School Leadership shall make a decision which may include counseling out of
the profession or a termination of employment. A copy of this letter shall be included in the
teacher’s official file.
APPENDIX I
EXPECTATIONS OF EDUCATIONAL PROFESSIONALS
The School District and the school have the responsibility of providing the employee with a clear
set of expectations. Expectations of professional performance encompass three domains namely,
knowledge, skills and attitudes . It is expected that an educational professional will:
A. Possess extensive knowledge, particularly of:
the policies of the School Board
the nature of the learner
the content, aims, objectives, and intended learning outcomes of the subject areas
for which they are responsible
a variety of instructional and evaluation strategies
B. Demonstrate skills, particularly in:
planning, organizing, delivering, and evaluating instruction
addressing the needs of the whole learner, accommodating different rates and
styles of learning.
employing a resource-based approach to learning
incorporating learners’ real-life experiences
stimulating independent and interdependent learning
establishing appropriate routines and in using instructional time effectively
performing different roles such as facilitator, motivator, and communicator
maintaining adequate records
modifying programs to meet the needs of the learners
making professional decisions in the best interest of the learner
creating a stimulating and supportive atmosphere which respects the uniqueness
of the individual
organizing an environment which is conducive to learning
working collaboratively to improve the educational process
using good interpersonal skills with all stake-holders
C. Exhibit a positive personal attitude that:
all students can learn
the dignity of the learner must be preserved
creates an environment in which learners can develop positive self-esteem
provides for a bias free environment
encourages high, realistic personal and learner expectations
reflects a balanced emphasis on process and product within the curriculum
parents are integral to the learners’ education
reflects learning is a life-long process
professional growth is continuous
APPENDIX II
Components of Professional Practice:
The Eastern School District recognizes the four components of professional practice
as desirable qualities of all teachers. (Danielson)
These components are outlined in the following pages under the four domains of:
1. Planning and Preparation
2. Classroom Environment
3. Instruction
4. Other Professional Responsibilities
Domain 1:
Planning and Preparation
a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and
Pedagogy
Knowledge of content
Knowledge of prerequisite relationships
Knowledge of content-related pedagogy
b. Demonstrating Knowledge of Students
Knowledge of characteristics of age group
Knowledge of students’ varied approaches to
learning
Knowledge of student’s skills and knowledge
Knowledge of students’ interests and cultural
heritage
c. Selecting Instructional Goals
Value
Clarity
Suitability for diverse students
Balance
d. Knowledge of Resources
e. Designing Coherent Instruction
Learning activities
Instructional materials and Resources
Instructional groups
Lesson and unit structure
f. Assessing Student Learning
Congruence with instructional goals
Criteria and standards
Use for planning
A person cannot teach what they do not know.
He/she must have sufficient command of a subject.
This is not stagnant but evolves over time through
renewal. Students must learn some skills before
others. Knowledgeable teachers know this.
Students vary in interests, talents and preferred
approaches to learning. Skilled teachers help build
on these strengths. Many classes contain special
needs children. These students may demonstrate
knowledge in many ways. This is useful in
planning.
Instructional goals must be worthwhile and have
high expectations for students. They must be
clearly stated in terms of student learning and
should be measurable. The goals should be
appropriate to all students and should include a
balance among different types of learning.
There are two types of resources- those to help the
teacher and those to help the student. They may
be simple or complex. Knowledge about these to
aid in teaching is part of the teacher’s
responsibility.
This is demonstrated by a unit plan. It enables
teachers to demonstrate their skill in organizing
and sequencing activities to engage students in
learning using a variety of materials and groups
appropriately in a reasonable time. It is only
through the assessment of student learning that
teachers know if students have met the
instructional goals of a unit or lesson. Students
should know the required standards achievement.
Assessment is to provide feedback to the students.
Domain 2:
Commentary
The Classroom Environment
a. Creating an Environment of Respect and
Rapport
Teacher interaction with students
Student interaction
b. Establishing a Culture for Learning
Importance of the content
Student pride in work
Expectations for learning and achievement
c. Managing Classroom Procedures
Management of instructional groups
Management of transitions
Management of materials and supplies
Performance of non-instructional duties
Supervision of volunteers and Paraprofessionals
d. Managing Student Behavior
Expectations
Monitoring of student behavior
Response to student behavior
e. Organizing Physical Space
Safety and arrangement of furniture
Accessibility to learning and use of physical
resources
Teaching is a matter of relationships among
individuals and they should show mutual respect
both between teacher and students and
among students.
The classroom is a place where a culture for
learning exists. There are high expectations for all
students and a high value on high quality work.
Student work is valued and displayed. Students
know that the teacher has a high regard for their
abilities.
Teaching requires good management before good
instruction is possible. Teachers must develop
smooth operation of the classroom and the
efficient use of time before they can address
instruction. Volunteers and paraprofessionals
need guidance before they make a substantial
contribution to the class.
The key to efficient and respectful management
of student behavior lies in agreed upon standards
of conduct and clear consequences for
overstepping the bounds.
Use of physical space is important in a learning
environment. Organization of space tells how
teachers view learning–grouping, use of “centers”,
desks facing forward. Space must be used
efficiently and safely.
Domain 3:
Commentary
Instruction
For students to become actively engaged in
learning, they must be exposed to clear directions
and explanations.
a. Communicating Clearly and Accurately
Directions and procedures
Oral and written language
b. Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques
Quality of questions
Discussion techniques
Student participation
c. Engaging Students in Learning
Representation of content
Activities and assignments
Grouping of students
Instructional materials and resources
Structure and pacing
d. Providing Feedback to Students
Quality: accurate, substantive, constructive and
specific.
Timeliness
e. Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness
Lesson adjustment
Response to students
Persistence
When teachers use skilled questioning, they
engage their students in an exploration of content.
Experienced teachers give think-time before
students respond to a question. They also cultivate
well-run discussions.
This is the “raison d’être” of education. Successful
instruction requires the active and invested
participation of all parties. It is the teacher’s
responsibility to choose appropriate activities,
assignments and grouping which will encourage
students to become active participants in the
learning process.
Feedback is provided to all students about their
learning. To be effective, feedback has to be
timely, accurate, constructive, substantive, and
specific. If a student can’t use a teacher’s
comments, they can’t learn from them.
Teachers can demonstrate flexibility and
responsiveness if lesson is not working and it has
to be modified in midstream. Also, a spontaneous
event may provide for valuable learning. In
addition, a teacher may search for alternative
approaches if all students are not learning. Novice
teachers rarely have the instructional repertoire
to abandon a lesson midstream and go in a new
direction. This comes with experience.
Domain 4:
Other Professional Responsibilities
Commentary
a. Reflecting on Teaching
Accuracy
Use in future teaching
Did the lesson work – were the goals met?
Teachers must reflect on the lesson and evaluate
their errors as well as their successes. This helps
refine their practice.
b. Maintaining Accurate Records
Student completion of assignments
Student progress in learning
Non-instructional records
c. Communicating with families
Information about the instructional program
Information about individual students
Engagement of families in the instructional
Program
d. Contributing to the School District
Relationships with colleagues
Service to the school
Participation in school and district projects
e. Growing and developing professionally
Enhancement of content knowledge and
pedagogical skill
Service to the profession
f. Showing Professionalism
Service to students
Advocacy
Decision making
Teachers need to keep accurate records. Student
assignments, checklists, portfolios and other
performance tasks must be tracked. Other items
such as field trip permission slips and lunch order
collections keep the school operating smoothly.
When the teacher and student’s family work cooperatively in the educational process, the
likelihood of student learning is enhanced.
Teacher contact is important to keep families
informed.
Committee work, school council, assistance with
curriculum in-servicing for parents, joint
planning in thematic units with colleagues are all
examples as to how teachers make contributions
to the school community.
Continuing development is the mark of a true
professional. They supervise student teachers,
participate in study groups with colleagues, take
short courses in order to stay informed and
increase their skills.
Teachers care for their students and advocate on
their behalf when needed. They demonstrate a
commitment to professional standards in problem
solving and decision making
Appendix III
GUIDELINES FOR CLASSROOM VISITS
The following information is provided to assist an evaluator and the tenured teacher in Module
Three during pre-conference, observation, and post-conference periods.
PRECONFERENCE QUESTIONS
All or some of the following questions could be used by the observer in a preconference:
1. What are the anticipated outcomes of the lesson?
2. Where are you in the course?
3. What teaching / learning activities will be observed?
4. Which particular teaching procedures you wish to be monitored? If so, which ones?
5. How will you know if the students have met the identified learning outcomes?
6. Are there any group or individual characteristics of which the observer should be aware
(unusual behaviors, need for some students to leave, etc)?
OBSERVATION GUIDELINES
These questions are meant only as guidelines to be used by the observer for consideration during
his/her analysis of the lesson.
Standards
1. Did the students seem to know what was expected of them in terms of behavior?
2. Did the teacher have difficulty motivating the students?
3. Were all materials and equipment necessary for the class session in place and ready to use?
4. Was the taking of attendance and/or completion of record keeping efficiently completed?
5. Did the teacher ascertain the student’s level of familiarity with the subject?
Introduction and Teaching
1. Were the learning expectations for that session clearly stated to students?
2. Did the teacher make connections to previous learning?
3. Did the teacher give an appropriate instruction of the learning before students were expected to
put into practice?
4. Which teaching strategies did the teacher employ?
______ Cloze Procedure
______ Problem Solving
______ Concept Attainment
______ Inquiry
______ Questioning
______ Explicit Teaching
______ Demonstration
______ Guided Practice
______ Stimulation
______Interviewing
______Authentic Experiences
______ Role Play
______ Assigned Questions
______ Project
______ Computer-Assisted Instruction
______ Learning Contracts
______ Conferencing
______ Brainstorming
______ Cooperative Small Group
______ Other
5. Were strategies used appropriate to the lesson?
6. Did the teacher model the learning and its application for the students?
Practice
1. Did the students have opportunities to demonstrate their learning?
2. Did the teacher monitor each student?
3. Did the teacher re-teach the learning when and where necessary?
Closure
1. Did the teacher bring closure to the class by consolidating and summarizing the learning
expectations?
Follow Up (Unguided Practice)
1. Did the teacher assign follow-up work based on the day’s lesson?
Motivation
1. During the class session, did the teacher use any of the following forms of motivations?
______ Maintaining a constructive atmosphere
______ Avail of teachable moments
______ Add notes of interest
______ Provide feedback to students
______ Recognize students’ contributions
______ Acknowledge moments of
Success for students.
______ Provide positive rewards
Other _____________________________
Comments:
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APPENDIX IV
PROFESSIONAL APPRAISAL BELIEF STATEMENTS
Beliefs are the values that establish the moral and ethical priorities which serve to guide all the
district’s activities.
We believe
children are our most valued and our greatest natural resource
all children can learn and experience success
learning has intrinsic as well as extrinsic value
learning is a life-long process
the dignity of the individual must be preserved and respected
the best interests of children and youth must guide each decision that is made on their behalf
education is an active partnership involving the school, family and community
all partners have a responsibility to ensure success
teachers do make a difference
learning environments must be responsive to changing needs
learning environments must reflect a balance between individual and societal needs
learning environments must be safe, secure and caring, and promote risk-taking
learning environments must reflect Christian, religiously inclusive and democratic values
learning and growth opportunities must be provided for all
in striving for excellence in attaining identified objectives; and
in a total commitment to continuous improvement
Further to elaboration upon our beliefs is presented under the following four categories:
A. Milieu
Our mission can be best accomplished in a caring and positive environment which:
promotes school as a community
maintains high expectations
reflects an unconditional regard for the dignity of all
helps children develop healthy self concepts
encourages risk-taking as a natural part of the learning process
fosters an enjoyment of learning
reflects life-long learning for all
fosters the active participation of families and community in school life
reflects efficient and effective organizational structures
emphasizes growth
B. Learner
Children grow at different rates: intellectually, physically, socially, emotionally and spiritually.
children have different learning styles and learning needs
children have an innate desire to learn
children learn best in secure, stimulating and trusting environments
C. Teacher
The teacher as a facilitator, motivator and communicator:
preserves student’s dignity and enhances their self-esteem
accepts children at their developmental level
maintains high but realistic expectations of themselves and students
achieves learning outcomes through effective teaching
takes a holistic view of the education of students
is firm but compassionate
adapts programs to meet children’s needs
is committed to professional growth
works cooperatively to improve learning
D. Curriculum and Instruction
Curriculum should:
be reflective of aims and outcomes
reflect the value of all content areas
be based upon currently accepted principles of learning
address children holistically
be free of ethnic, racial, gender and sexuality bias
incorporate the resources of the local environment
be responsive to local needs
Instruction should:
be relevant to child’s real life experience
accommodate different learning styles and needs
motivate and actively engage the learner
stimulate critical thinking
promote cooperation and teamwork
make full use of a variety of resources
incorporate appropriate evaluation practices as a means of improving student achievement
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