Volume 105 October, 2015
Volume 105
October, 2015
Happy 12th Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
HTPC: Watching Movies &
Videos With Kodi
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
Inkscape Tutorial:
Six Helpful Inkscape Tricks
Game Zone: Coffin Dodgers
PCLinuxOS Family Member
Spotlight: Rudge
GNU Screen – Multiple Command
Line Windows
Playing Resident Evil 4
In PCLinuxOS
Tip Top Tips: SketchUpMake 2015
In PCLOS64
PCLinuxOS Magazine
And more inside ...
Page 1
Table Of Contents
3 Welcome From The Chief Editor
4 Happy 12th Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
6 Screenshot Showcase
7 HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
12 ms_meme's Nook: Be Happy
13 PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner: Gluten-Free Mini Meatloaves
14 Screenshot Showcase
15 HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
20 Inkscape Tutorial: Six Helpful Inkscape Tips
22 Playing Resident Evil 4 On PCLinuxOS
23 Screenshot Showcase
24 Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
33 Screenshot Showcase
34 Tip Top Tips: SketchUpMake 2015 On PCLOS64
The PCLinuxOS name, logo and colors are the trademark of
Texstar.
The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a monthly online publication
containing PCLinuxOS-related materials. It is published
primarily for members of the PCLinuxOS community. The
magazine staff is comprised of volunteers from the
PCLinuxOS community.
Visit us online at http://pclosmag.com
This release was made possible by the following volunteers:
Chief Editor: Paul Arnote (parnote)
Assistant Editor: Meemaw
Artwork: ms_meme, Meemaw
Magazine Layout: Paul Arnote, Meemaw, ms_meme
HTML Layout: YouCanToo
Staff:
ms_meme
Meemaw
Gary L. Ratliff, Sr.
Daniel Meiß-Wilhelm
daiashi
loudog
YouCanToo
Pete Kelly
Antonis Komis
Smileeb
Contributors:
Agent Smith
Ramchu
35 Screenshot Showcase
36 PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Rudge
37 Game Zone: Coffin Dodgers
39 ms_meme's Nook: How Sweet It Is
40 Screenshot Showcase
The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative
Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0
Unported license. Some rights are reserved.
Copyright © 2015.
41 PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
44 More Screenshot Showcase
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 2
Welcome From The Chief Editor
Yes, I know that it’s a bit early for a Christmas “wish
list.” But right at the top of my wish list is something
that I’ve been wishing for during my entire time as a
Linux user. And the bad thing about it is that I’m not
sure who is to blame for its absence.
I bought a USB TV tuner that had positive reports of
users getting it running under Linux. The results,
should we say, are lackluster. Some applications –
such as SMPlayer – can see the TV tuner and
display the TV programming. Most others, such as
VLC, MPlayer and Kodi … well, not so much. To
date, the ONLY Linux program that works
consistently is SMPlayer, and it’s marginal (as in
barely watchable) at best. And this is after spending
HOURS pouring over obscure forums and mailing
list posts, in attempts to get the other programs to
see and display the output from the TV tuner.
This month pretty much wraps up our article series
on Kodi, the home theater, multimedia megaprogram. The end comes without me having found a
simple way to view and record live TV, by way of an
accessory TV tuner, with Kodi. I know it’s possible,
but at the same time, it really shouldn’t be THIS
difficult. Windows wins this race, hands down.
This was not my first attempt with a TV tuner under
Linux, either. A few years back, when I built my
desktop computer (which I chronicled here in the
pages of The PCLinuxOS Magazine), I installed a
TV tuner card – one that, once again, had positive
comments on Newegg of users getting it up and
running under Linux. The ONLY thing that can see
this particular TV tuner card is MythTV, which I’ve
abandoned long ago due to it being way, overly
complicated. Literally no other program can see, use
or display images from this TV tuner card.
What I have longed for is better support for TV
tuners in Linux. First of all, it’s not as if TV – and TV
tuners – are new things. TV tuners have been
around for, well, as long as there have been TVs. It
really shouldn’t require coexisting degrees in
astrophysics and rocket science to get them to work
under Linux.
Actually, I think the blame for the abysmal state of
TV tuners on Linux has to be shared. First, the
equipment manufacturers – those making the TV
tuners – make them dedicated to work with
Windows, using procedures and processes that
ONLY work under Windows. The icing on the cake is
that they keep the key parts of the hardware and
software “closed source” so no one can possibly get
them working on anything but Windows. Second,
there hasn’t been a concerted effort by the open
source community to get TV tuners working under
Linux. Sure, there are small pockets of people
working on the problem, but it hasn’t received nearly
enough attention to make a significant impact. To
really make users frustrated, some programs will see
a particular TV tuner and others won’t. All this tells
me is that the groups working on this problem really
aren’t talking to one another or comparing notes, or
PCLinuxOS Magazine
that their egos are creating an insurmountable
obstacle to the solution.
New users coming to Linux will want to do the things
with their computers that they have done previously
with the commercially available operating system …
namely, Windows. When they are faced with such a
daunting task as getting their TV tuner working
under Linux, that even someone (me) with a fairly
extensive and long history with Linux can’t get
working, they will run back to their old proprietary
operating system (Windows) with their tail between
their legs, like the proverbial whipped puppy. Upon
their return, they will regale their comrades with tales
of how Linux is not yet ready for “prime time,” and
about how challenging it was to (not) get their TV
tuner card recognized.
Page 3
Eight years after joining the “Linux Revolution,” I’m
still waiting for proper support for TV tuner cards and
devices. While I’m not running back to Windows …
or any other operating system … my exercise in
futility with TV tuners has left me frustrated and
somewhat discouraged.
Occasionally, I’ll drag it (the USB TV tuner) back out
of the drawer or off the shelf I’ve banished it to out of
frustration, and give it another try (which usually
ends in yet another round of frustration and another
subsequent banishment of the TV tuner). Each new
Linux kernel release causes hope to spring eternal,
with hopes that maybe THIS new kernel will finally
allow my device(s) to work as they should. I have yet
to experience the euphoria of my device(s) working
as they should. Like I mentioned earlier, it really
shouldn’t be THIS difficult.
If I EVER get either of the TV tuners to work, and
work well and consistently under Linux, you all will
be the first to know. I’m sure there’s a process to
undertake that won’t be for the faint of heart. I’ll do
my best to detail that process, step by step, if I ever
arrive at a solution myself.
It's easier than E=mc2
It's elemental
It's light years ahead
It's a wise choice
It's Radically Simple
It's ...
Until next month, I bid you peace, happiness,
serenity and prosperity.
Support PCLinuxOS! Get Your Official
PCLinuxOS
Merchandise Today!
Happy 12th Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
by Paul Arnote (parnote)
Happy 12th Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
At the young age of 12 years old, PCLinuxOS is a
grandparent among Linux distributions. There are
only a handful of surviving Linux distributions that
have been around longer – Red Hat, Slackware,
Debian, Arch, Knoppix, Vector Linux, BLFS (Beyond
Linux From Scratch) and Oracle Linux (plus a few
localized versions of Linux built especially for
residents of specific countries). PCLinuxOS has
been around longer than Ubuntu, Mint, openSUSE,
Android, Mageia, Fedora and CentOS. During the 12
year run of PCLinuxOS, many Linux distributions
have come and gone. Some have seen the plug
pulled, only to be reborn at a later date.
The many “flavors” of Linux is what’s largely
responsible for its broad appeal. Linux is about
choice, and with so many distributions, there are a
lot of choices for Linux users. Currently,
Distrowatch.com lists and tracks page hits for 278
Linux distributions. For many new Linux users
coming from “one-size-fits-all” commercial operating
systems, the enormous number of choices can be
very overwhelming.
What follows next will be a “repeat” or “rerun” for
PCLinuxOS users who’ve been around for a while. If
you’re new to PCLinuxOS, you might be wondering
about the origins of PCLinuxOS. If you’re a
PCLinuxOS veteran, few tire of hearing this story
again.
*****
It began on October 24, 2003. PCLinuxOS Preview
.4 was released as a fork of Linux Mandrake
PCLinuxOS Magazine
(Mandriva) 9.2. Since that time, PCLinuxOS has
matured into its own independent Linux distribution.
Just uttering the all-still-too-common line that
PCLinuxOS is still a fork of Mandriva may cause
sparks to fly. While PCLinuxOS may have been
originally forked from Mandriva, it also borrows from
openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, Knoppix, Mepis,
Debian, Slackware, Arch and just about any/every
other Linux distro around.
Unlike some other Linux distros, PCLinuxOS thrives
as a community distribution. It doesn’t have
multimillionaires and/or billionaires funneling cash
into its coffers, and it doesn’t have the backing of
any corporation. Rather, a dedicated group of
volunteers keep PCLinuxOS current by developing
new programs unique to PCLinuxOS, packaging and
updating the repositories, or by donating their
services for various tasks that need to be done –
and that make PCLinuxOS truly unique among Linux
distros.
What Is PCLinuxOS?
PCLinuxOS is a
Linux distro, just
like
Ubuntu,
openSUSE,
Fedora, Mepis,
Knoppix, Debian,
Slackware, Arch
and about 300
others. Probably
the best way to
describe
PCLinuxOS is to
provide a brief
history from the founder of PCLinuxOS, Texstar –
a.k.a. Bill Reynolds (pictured here).
In the summer of 2003, I became interested in Live CD
technology after looking at Knoppix and a fresh
distribution from a fellow named Warren, called Mepis. I
was interested in helping Warren with Mepis at the time,
but I had no clue how to build DEB files. Coming from 5
years of packaging RPMS and not really wanting to learn
a new packaging system, I happened to come across a
South African fellow by the name of Jaco Greef. He was
developing a script called mklivecd and porting it to
Mandrake Linux. I, along with Buchanan Milne
(Mandrake contributor) and a few others, began working
with Jaco to help debug the scripts. I got an idea to make
a livecd based on Mandrake Linux 9.2, along with all my
customizations, just for fun. I had previously provided an
unofficial 3rd party repository for the users of Mandrake
for many years, but had since parted ways. Since
Mandrake was a trademarked name, myself and others
decided to name the Live CD after our news site and
forum, pclinuxonline, thus PCLinuxOS.
Preview .3 was my first attempt to make a livecd. I
distributed it initially to about 20 people to get their
reaction and feedback. Everyone who tested it loved the
livecd but there was one thing missing. There wasn't a
way to install the thing to the hard drive! srlinuxx from
tuxmachines.org came up with a novel way to copy the
livecd to the hard drive and posted it on our forums. Jaco
utilized this information and inspiration from the Mepis
installer and wrote a pyqt script to make the Live CD
installable, thus the birth of a new distribution.
On October 24, 2003, PCLinuxOS Preview .4 was
released as a fork of Linux Mandrake (Mandriva) 9.2
utilizing mklivecd scripts from Jaco Greef, a multimedia
kernel from Thomas Buckland (2.4.22-tmb) and a
customized KDE (3.1.4-tex). Preview .5 through .93 were
built upon on previous PCLinuxOS releases. After three
years of updating one release from the other using the
same gcc and glibc core library, we found too many
Page 5
Happy 12th Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
programs would no longer compile or work properly
against this aging code base.
of updates after installing to make sure they had the
most up-to-date system available.
In November 2006, we utilized a one time source code
snapshot from our friends at Mandriva to pull in an
updated glibc/gcc core and associated libraries. We spent
the following 6 months rebuilding, debugging,
customizing, patching and updating our new code base.
We pulled in stuff from our old code base, utilized
patches/code from Fedora, Gentoo and Debian just to
name a few. This is why you will never see me distro
bashing, as it would be hypocritical to do such a thing.
We are still dependent in many areas on other distros
development processes due to our limited but hard
working volunteer development team.
In 2009, several developers left PCLinuxOS to start
their own distro. While this happens in many other
distros, PCLinuxOS hasn’t suffered from it, and is
still one of the top distros. In the wake of their
departure, others stepped up to fill the vacated
developer roles. Several other users stepped up to
create the various “flavors” of PCLinuxOS. Today,
there are several “flavors” of PCLinuxOS available to
users, each presenting PCLinuxOS users a choice
of which desktop environment to use.
On May 20th, 2007, we felt we had reached a pretty stable
base and released PCLinuxOS 2007. It utilized our own
kernel from Oclient1, KDE built by MDE developer Ze,
updated mklivecd scripts from IKerekes & Ejtr, a heavily
patched Control Center, graphics from the PCLinuxOS
beautification team, and many application updates from
Thac and Neverstopdreaming. Development continues as
work is being done for a Minime release and an
international DVD. A future release of PCLinuxOS will
feature an updated kernel, KDE 4, fresh Xorg server and
all the latest applications. All in all it has been a great
ride and we have made many friends along the way. Some
have gone on to other distributions and many are still
here from our first release. As I've always said, we're just
enjoying Linux technology and sharing it with friends who
might like it too. We hope you have enjoyed the ride as
well.
While the above was written a few years ago,
PCLinuxOS has continued to thrive and evolve.
Shortly thereafter, MiniMe was released. MiniMe
represented a barebones KDE installation, with little
else than the bare desktop and core Linux OS files.
Designed for more advanced users, MiniMe allows
users to install only those applications that they
want. Even though this distro uses the “rolling
release” update method, new Live CDs were
released every year (and recently, even more often)
so a user wouldn’t have to download a huge number
PCLinuxOS Magazine
To this day, the KDE desktop is still employed in the
“main” PCLinuxOS release. However, all of the other
desktop versions utilize the exact same Linux core,
as well as the same repositories.
Following the rolling release design, improvements
are always being made, and things evolve. First
Texstar, followed by the PCLinuxOS development
team, expanded their focus a bit, and a muchwished-for 64-bit edition of PCLinuxOS has recently
been offered.
International Community
PCLinuxOS Sites
Netherlands
Turkey
Denmark
Czechoslovakia
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Page 6
Disclaimer
1.
All the contents of The PCLinuxOS Magazine are only for general
information and/or use. Such contents do not constitute advice
and should not be relied upon in making (or refraining from
making) any decision. Any specific advice or replies to queries in
any part of the magazine is/are the person opinion of such
experts/consultants/persons and are not subscribed to by The
PCLinuxOS Magazine.
2.
The information in The PCLinuxOS Magazine is provided on an
"AS IS" basis, and all warranties, expressed or implied of any
kind, regarding any matter pertaining to any information, advice
or replies are disclaimed and excluded.
3.
The PCLinuxOS Magazine and its associates shall not be liable,
at any time, for damages (including, but not limited to, without
limitation, damages of any kind) arising in contract, rot or
otherwise, from the use of or inability to use the magazine, or any
of its contents, or from any action taken (or refrained from being
taken) as a result of using the magazine or any such contents or
for any failure of performance, error, omission, interruption,
deletion, defect, delay in operation or transmission, computer
virus, communications line failure, theft or destruction or
unauthorized access to, alteration of, or use of information
contained on the magazine.
4.
No representations, warranties or guarantees whatsoever are
made as to the accuracy, adequacy, reliability, completeness,
suitability, or applicability of the information to a particular
situation. All trademarks are the property of their respective
owners.
5.
Certain links on the magazine lead to resources located on
servers maintained by third parties over whom The PCLinuxOS
Magazine has no control or connection, business or otherwise.
These sites are external to The PCLinuxOS Magazine and by
visiting these, you are doing so of your own accord and assume
all responsibility and liability for such action.
Screenshot
Screenshot Showcase
Showcase
Material Submitted by Users
A majority of sections in the magazine contain materials submitted by
users. The PCLinuxOS Magazine accepts no responsibility for the
content, accuracy, conformity to applicable laws of such material.
Entire Agreement
These terms constitute the entire agreement between the parties with
respect to the subject matter hereof and supersedes and replaces all
prior or contemporaneous understandings or agreements, written or
oral, regarding such subject matter.
Posted by tuxlink, September 27, 2015, running MATE.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 7
HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
by Paul Arnote (parnote)
Be sure to check out Ramchu’s article on watching NetFlix in Kodi, elsewhere in
this issue.
OK. Let’s be honest. The REAL reason you installed Kodi is/was to watch movies
and videos. For me, I know that was one of the main reasons I installed Kodi. If
you recall from the first installment of the HTPC article series (the one where I
described building an inexpensive set top computer on which to run Kodi), we
talked about “cutting the cord” with the cable company … or at least drastically
lowering our monthly payments to them. To do that effectively, you will need
access to things that you rely on the cable company to deliver, such as movies
and cable programming.
Kodi achieves those objectives to varying degrees, depending on your
expectations. Without a question, Kodi gives you much more access to varied
programming content than just relying on over-the-air (OTA) broadcasts.
Certainly, Kodi will deliver a fairly decent selection of cable-only channels –
although, it probably won’t be as many as your cable company delivers to your
home.
To get started, go to the “Videos” menu and select the “Add-ons” submenu.
You may also gain access to programming content that your cable company
didn’t give you access to in their “one size fits all” programming packages. If
you’re merely “trimming” your cable bill, rather than cutting the cord altogether,
this latter point will give you more programming choices than you’ve ever had
before. In our house, were trimming the fat from the monthly cable bill by
eliminating all of the so-called “premium” channels that do little more than rerun
the same old, tired movies over and over and over (and we have absolutely no
interest in watching most of them).
So I would advise you to proceed with caution. By the time you’ve finished
reading this article, you may have more viewing choices than you have ever had.
Don’t blame me if your list of unfinished tasks around the house grows because
you are spending more time in front of the TV.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 8
HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
Next, select the “Get more…” item.
You should see a screen similar to the one above. Select “Install” from the dialog
box that appears, and your selected video add-on will be added.
A list of available “Video Add-ons” will be displayed. Each one represents a
particular channel or programming stream. Select each one you want to install,
one by one. In the image above, I’ve selected the “ABC Family” video add-on.
Repeat the process for each add-on that represents the content you want to
watch.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 9
HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
“60 Minutes” from the CBS News add-on.
Jack Black in “Yo-Gabba-Gabba!” from the Nick Jr. add-on.
As you can see, there is quite a varied amount of free content available as Kodi
add-ons. Some other popular ones are:
“Diners, Drive-ins, & Dives” from the Food Network add-on.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Classic Cinema (plays old movies)
Bravo
CBS News
Popcorn Flix (plays old “B” movies)
PopcornTV
Sprout (kid’s programming)
DIY Network
F1 (Formula 1 racing)
Food Network
Travel Network
HGTV
Hallmark Channel
Kid’s Place
NASA TV
ESA Videos
MeTV
NASCAR
NBC Sports Live Extra
Oxygen
PBS Think (U.S. Public Broadcasting)
Page 10
HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
Project Free TV
Smithsonian Channel
Syfy Channel
Toonjet
VEVO
Vimeo
YouTube
sending a “cease and desist” letter to the user’s ISP, who in turn, threatens to
terminate the user’s internet service if the “illegal” activity continues. So, an
ounce of prevention (subscribing to a good quality VPN) is worth a pound cure
(not getting drug into court or having your internet service terminated). An added
benefit of subscribing to and using a good VPN is that it will help minimize your
digital footprint with other online activities, as well.
That’s just a sampling of add-ons that are available. Many, many more are
available for your viewing pleasure. On some add-ons, you might find it a rather
“hit-or-miss” proposition (and sometimes, more miss than hit) whether some of
the listed content is available or not. Sometimes, a movie or show will be listed,
but cannot be loaded/displayed. Often times, it’s because the URL has changed
and the add-on hasn’t been updated to reflect the new URL. Still, there is a lot of
content ready for your consumption.
Is There More?
You betcha! There’s a LOT more available … if you know where to look.
You can download individual “specialty” add-ons to give you access to certain
content providers, or you can download a whole group of add-ons that give you
access to a wide range of extra content. These are typically called “repos,” short
for repository (just like with PCLinuxOS). Whichever you choose depends on
what content you’re trying to access, and the process is basically the same for
adding either. The links below offer excellent step-by-step, illustrated instructions
for installation. Repeating them here would simply be just that … repetitious.
Follow the instructions explicitly for each of the links below, and you will be fine.
Let me offer up a word of caution here, as well (unlike my previous caution, this
“caution” is a rather serious one, too). If you are going to be
viewing/streaming/downloading copyrighted content, you would be wise to do so
while connected to a good VPN (virtual private network). To define “good,” I
mean a VPN provider who won’t surrender your real IP address to law
enforcement authorities at the drop of a hat. A good VPN provider won’t keep any
connection logs. A good VPN will completely mask your real IP address, allowing
you a considerable level of “anonymity” with regards to your downloading/viewing
habits.
Users have been getting “sued” for copyright infringements for
downloading/viewing copyrighted material that they have not purchased. And, not
just in the U.S. Users have been facing the wrath of the movie studios in the
Netherlands and Germany, just to name a couple. In some cases, they are
“asking” for $150,000 (U.S.) in damages. In other cases, the content producer is
PCLinuxOS Magazine
So, you have to know where to get these other “specialty” add-ons. Let’s start
with Icefilms. With this add-on, you will have access to over 77,000 movies and
TV shows. Most of them are “first run” movies, and appear here quite some time
before they ever air on the so-called “premium” movie channels, or on the “payper-view” channels. I’m not sure from where all of the Icefilms content hails from,
but they have pretty much everything you might ever want. You can get the
Icefilms add-on by going to MJD’s website and downloading the El Dorado Repo
ZIP file. Rather than provide a link directly to the file that might someday soon be
made obsolete by newer releases, I’ll provide a link to this website instead. The
website is updated with each new release.
Another good add-on is Yify. It works a LOT like Popcorn Time, in that it
sequentially downloads torrent files and plays them back on your video device. In
fact, Yify is one of the major torrent networks that Popcorn Time uses to deliver
its content to your computer. Again, head on over to MJD’s website and download
the Yify Movies HD ZIP file. The Yify add-on is also part of Lambda’s Repo, and
it can be installed from here. You can also view all of MJD’s Kodi “How-To’s” here.
Page 11
HTPC: Watching Videos/Movies With Kodi
I’ve found his website to be very well done, with easy, simple to follow
instructions.
You can, if you want, install the SuperRepo Repository. It gives you access to
over 2,000 Kodi add-ons, including the two we just discussed. It’s very tempting
to want to install all of these add-ons, but use some caution. It’s very easy to get
lost in the hierarchical structure of the SuperRepo after drilling down just a few
levels. It’s also very easy to become overwhelmed with all of the add-ons it
provides. Many work as you expect, but there are some that barely work at all,
and others merely duplicate other offerings. You can follow the instructions here.
will allow you to circumvent the blackout restrictions. This is especially helpful if
you live within some arbitrarily defined “home” region of your favorite team. I live
less than five miles from Kauffman Stadium, where my favorite team, the Kansas
City Royals, play. So, I’m definitely well within that arbitrary blackout zone. It’s
also worth noting that archived games are available to MLB.TV subscribers, sans
blackout restrictions, an hour and a half after the conclusion of the blacked out
game.
Finding other “specialty” add-ons can be both easy and difficult. For example,
searching for “hbo kodi” yields a fair number of add-ons that claim to offer access
to HBO content. There are others that claim to offer access to the content of lots
of other “live TV” channels. As Scooby-Doo would say, “rotsa ruck.” Access to the
Live TV channels is hit and miss. Or, should I say, more miss than hit. Yes, I can
find Live TV channels for AMC, HBO, and many other channels. And, I would be
ecstatically happy – if I spoke Spanish fluently. There are a LARGE number of
Live TV stations available, but most of them appear to ONLY be available in
Spanish. But since I don’t speak Spanish fluently, the audio might as well be in
Swahili or any other language I don’t speak.
I simply have not yet found a listing of Live TV channels that provide the current
U.S. streams in English. I’m sure they exist, but finding them among all of the
“bad lists” is rather difficult, and akin to finding a needle in a haystack. Other than
taking up permanent residence in the appropriate sections of the Kodi forums, the
only way to know if a Live TV list provides what you’re looking for is by trial and
error. I’ll continue searching, but it does get frustrating and discouraging the
longer I search and keep coming up with less than perfect Live TV lists.
Summary
I like baseball, so installing MLB.TV for Kodi piques my interest. You can
download the MLB.TV add-on for Kodi, which will give you access to your
MLB.TV subscription. No, it isn’t free – meaning it doesn’t circumvent the need
for a bona fide subscription. The add-on is, however, free. It will allow you to
watch all eligible games on the video device that is running Kodi.
I don’t have a MLB.TV account, but I do have a MLB Gameday Audio account,
which enables me to listen to any MLB game’s radio broadcast. Because I have
that, I can also access the “Free Game Of The Day” on MLB.TV. Because
MLB.TV is subject to local blackout rules (and is the ONLY major league sport to
still have black out restrictions, thanks to the current contracts with the major
league baseball players union and the broadcasters), I would HIGHLY advise
only connecting to MLB.TV by way of a VPN. Since MLB determines whether or
not to impose the blackout restrictions based on your IP address, use of a VPN
PCLinuxOS Magazine
As you can see, Kodi gives you many, many options for expanding your TV
programming choices. Granted, this is what most people use Kodi for. This is also
the reason I saved this part for near the end of the HTPC article series. I wanted
to insure that the other uses for Kodi were covered adequately, and that you
realized the power that Kodi unleashes for your multimedia entertainment needs.
This article series only highlights some of what can be done with Kodi. It was
never meant to be a complete guide to Kodi. That would take a book to cover,
and the book would be obsolete before the first copy was ever sold. Kodi is
always in a state of flux, always evolving and growing.
Fortunately, TONS of information about Kodi is freely available on the internet. A
decently worded internet search should net you the information you are seeking,
with a minimum of effort. Indeed, Kodi is well positioned to allow you to either cut
the cable cord altogether, or to at least "trim the fat" from your cable bill.
Page 12
ms_meme's Nook: Be Happy
You just got the latest PCLOS
It won't give you any stress
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
If you got something you can't fix
Come to forum they know lots of tricks
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
The big update was just a breeze
PCLOS is a meaning to please
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
A worm and a virus will never appear
Of the trojans have no fear
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
You'll find everything will work just fine
Don't you just love 2009
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
No other distro can compare
It's the truth I'm not being unfair
Don't worry Be happy Don't worry Be happy
Of PCLOS I love to sing
Happiness to everyone it will bring
Don't worry Be happy I'm not worried I'm happy
PCLinuxOS Magazine
I joined the PCLinuxOS Forum in August of
2008. I was happy with the friendly and
patient help I received with the installation.
2009 brought a big update to PCLinuxOS
and lots of new happy users. I like singing
about our favorite distro and wrote some
words for a fun tune in May of 2009. Why
am I including a song about 2009 in the
October 2015 issue? Because the distro
that we use today is still the same happy
worry-free distro that we love. It just gets
better.
I'm not worried! I'm happy!
ms_meme
MP3
OGG
Page 13
PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner
the baking sheet from the oven and brush the tops
of the meatloaves generously with the ketchup glaze
using a pastry brush or spoon. Return the baking
sheet to the oven and continue to bake until the
meat loaves are browned on the outside and cooked
all the way through (about another 20 minutes).
Remove from the oven and serve immediately.
Gluten-Free Mini Meatloaves
INGREDIENTS:
For the meatloaf mixture
2 eggs (120 g, weighed out of shell), lightly beaten
3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) milk (any kind)
1 1/2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce (Lea &
Perrins brand is gluten free, at least in the U.S.)
1 cup (110 g) quick-cooking certified gluten free
oats*
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
2 teaspoons dried onion flakes (can substitute
1 teaspoon onion powder)
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
4 ounces (about 1 cup) grated sharp cheddar
cheese
2 pounds lean ground beef
For the glaze
2/3 cup (180 g) gluten free ketchup (Heinz is gluten
free, but I really like Organicville ketchup as it has
no added sugar)
1/4 cup (55 g) packed light brown sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
* NOTE: I rarely buy quick-cooking certified gluten
free oats. I simply place certified gluten free old
PCLinuxOS Magazine
fashioned rolled oats in a food processor and pulse
them 2 to 3 times. The difference is only one of
grind.
Bob’s Red Mill has Gluten free quick cooking steel
cut oats available in most stores, in the baking
section.
DIRECTIONS:
Preheat your oven to 350°F. Line a large baking
sheet with parchment paper and set it aside.
Make the meatloaf mixture. In a large bowl, place
the eggs, milk, Worcestershire sauce, oats, parsley,
salt, cumin, mustard powder, onion flakes and garlic
powder, and mix to combine well. Add the grated
cheddar and ground beef, and mix gently with clean
hands to combine. Do not overwork the beef, or the
meatloaves will be tough. Divide the mixture into 10
equal pieces. With clean, moistened hands, shape
each piece into an oval and place about 2 inches
apart from one another on the prepared baking
sheet. Place the baking sheet in the preheated oven
and bake for 20 minutes.
Make the glaze. While the meatloaves are baking,
place the glaze ingredients in a small bowl, and mix
to combine well. After 20 minutes of baking, remove
Page 14
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searchable index!
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Page 15
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
Step 2
by Ramchu
Start Kodi, and on the Home page go to System > Settings.
Then select Add-ons.
I am going to show you how to install Netflix into Kodi.
Step 1
Install Google Chrome
Web
Browser
from
Synaptic
onto
your
computer.
Open
your
favorite web browser and
download
the
aelec
repository. Enter this web
address into the address
bar of your browser
http://www.alelec.net/kodi/r
epository.alelec.zip. Save
the file, and remember
where you save it. I saved
it to my Downloads folder.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 16
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
Now select Install from zip file.
… then Downloads,
Step 3
… and finally you are going to click on the repository.alelec.zip file and let it
install.
Navigate to where you saved the downloaded file. For me it was Home Folder, …
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 17
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
Now you need to reboot Kodi by selecting the Back Button or Home Button in the
lower right corner of the screen and EXIT.
After you have enabled the Chrome Launcher, click the Back button and look for
Video Add-ons.
Click Video Add-ons and look for NetfliXBMC and enable it.
Step 4
Start Kodi again and go to System > Settings > Add-ons > Get Add-ons > alelec
Kodi Repo > Program Add-ons. Here you will select Chrome Launcher to enable
it.
Now click the Back or Home button and navigate to Videos and click on Add-ons.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 18
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
Look for NetfliXBMC.
Enter the email address that you used to sign up for Netflix, and click “Done.”
When you click the NetfliXBMC icon for the first run, you will be taken to the
Settings Dialog screen, where you will enter your Netflix login information. Under
the General tab, click on the email box.
Now, click on the password box and enter your Netflix account password, then
click “Done.”
Now go to the Advanced Tab. Click on Chrome: Don't use kiosk mode and click
OK.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 19
HTPC: Installing Netflix In Kodi
You should now be taken to Netflix.
The place where breaking news, BitTorrent and
copyright collide
Even though you are going to be able to run Netflix in Kodi, you are still going to
have to have an account with Netflix. It isn't going to be FREE. Still, $8 (U.S.) per
month isn’t too much to pay for unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows – if
Netflix is available in your part of the world. It’s far less than you would pay for
cable TV, or even just one of the so-called “premium” movie channels. In fact, it’s
even less than the ticket price to see a single movie at the movie theater. Also,
you won’t find yourself in potential trouble with the “authorities” for
downloading/viewing copyrighted content without paying for it.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 20
Inkscape Tutorial: Six Helpful Inkscape Tricks
by Meemaw
Inkscape has a great deal to offer any artist. One
can find tutorial after tutorial on the internet to help
learn to use it, and I have tried to share some really
excellent tutorials to help you make some really
great creations. Many of the features of Inkscape
can be plainly seen, but some of them aren’t so
evident. Let’s look at six items that might help a bit.
Sometimes you need to manipulate nodes in an
object you have drawn in order to make it into what
you really need. (Not all objects are regular objects!)
Draw the object you want, and click on Path >
Object to Path to get the nodes you need. Select at
least 2 nodes. In the Nodes toolbar directly above
your workspace, click on the Show Transformation
Handles button (see button above red arrow below).
You will get handles around your nodes and can
resize or rotate them just as you would a regular
object. You may have to experiment a bit, but you
will have more choices in your object manipulations.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
While making star shapes, pay attention to the
nodes. Moving the outer node towards or away from
center will let you change the size of your star or the
angle sizes, but if you move it left to right, all it will
do is rotate your star. The inner node, however, will
let you change the angles differently and even make
a new type of figure. In the top illustration, I changed
from the right figure to the left simply by moving the
outer node toward the center of the star. In the
bottom illustration, I changed the star by moving the
inner node. The left star was made by moving the
inner node to the left just a little. The right object was
made by moving the inner node clear across to the
opposite side of the star
I know we always use the Fill & Stroke window
when we are creating. As there is always more than
one way to do anything, coloring an object is just as
easy with the color palette at the bottom of your
Inkscape window. Draw your object, then Click on
your desired color for the fill, and <CTRL> + Click
for the stroke. There are many colors so the palette
has its own scroll bar (bottom).
If you have another object
and you want the two the
same, use the color
dropper (left side toolbar
near the bottom). Click on
the object you want to
color, choose the dropper,
then click on the object
color you are trying to
match.
Rulers can be used to give you guide lines. Make
sure your rulers are enabled, then click and drag vertical and horizontal lines will move to the desired
position on your page. You can now align objects
using the guide lines. If you enable your snapping
toolbar (in View > Show/Hide, you can show the
Snap
Controls
bar), items can
snap
to
the
intersection
or
along the guide
lines, or even to
each
other.
Experiment!
Page 21
Inkscape tutorial: Six Helpful Inkscape Tricks
Sometimes when I am making a tapered line,
Inkscape acts a little squirrelly, and it doesn’t turn out
exactly the way I want it. Another way to do it is to
make a diamond shape, then choose the top and
bottom nodes. Click on Make selected nodes
symmetric (to round the diamond shape) in your
nodes bar (See blue object below.) Copy it to the
clipboard (<CTRL> + C), then use it as model for
your Freehand or Bezier lines (Shape from
Clipboard).
• The layer that object is on (and even if the layer is
locked or made invisible)
• The type of object selected (Rectangle)
• X and Y coordinates of your mouse (147.48
x 72.23)
• The zoom percent of your project (68%)
One of the things that is really great is where it
shows the type of object selected. If you have more
than one object selected, the status bar will tell you
how many objects. I use this when I do the word
search puzzle solution every month. I put the puzzle
on one layer, and the lines showing the answers on
a higher layer. I make sure I have them all when I
can select everything on that layer and it will tell me
the correct number of objects (if I have 30 words, the
status bar will report 30 lines).
I hope I’ve provided a few tips to help you use
Inkscape. I’m sure there are tons more!
I think I have covered the status bar before, but it
bears repeating. Pay attention to the information in
the status bar, as it can tell you what’s happening in
your drawing. You can see loads of information in
the bar below (left to right):
• The fill and stroke color of the
item selected (red fill and
black stroke)
• The stroke size (3)
Available in the following desktops:
KDE
• The opacity of the figure (0
meaning no opacity)
PCLinuxOS Magazine
LXDE
Openbox
Xfce
Gnome
Enlightenment e17
Page 22
Playing Resident Evil 4 On PCLinuxOS
by Agent Smith
Now, follow these steps
1. In Winetricks, choose Select Default Wine Prefix,
and click OK
The game is installed, but if you play it without
installing the video codecs, the first video in the
game will crash it and stop.
It's been almost 10 years since Resident Evil 4 was
released for PC compatible computers. Still, it's a
timeless game, and very cool, I finished it and still
play it. I even play it in PCLinuxOS, even though the
PC version is a bit worse, in graphic terms,
compared to the PS2 or Gamecube versions. In
terms of gameplay, there are no differences. It's an
amazing, immersive and addictive game.
2. Select Install a Windows DLL or Component and
click OK.
Now, here is the tutorial on how to play RE4 on
PCLinuxOS.
What You’ll Need
1 - DVD RE4 game (as it's been some time since it
was released, it can be bought inexpensively. I got
my copy in a magazine).
2 - Wine updated (in repos).
3 - Winetricks (also in repos).
PCLinuxOS Magazine
3. In the list that will show up, choose d3dx9_36 and
click OK (Right, top).
Now, install the game normally, via the retail DVD. It
will install, create entries in the applications menu
and also a shortcut on the desktop.
To solve this problem, you must download the
codecs used in the game and register them in the
wine registry. Luckily, a user named Inukaze has
already done so, packaged the codecs and the
registry entries and made them available for
download. You need to download the following
package Wine_RE4_Codecs.tar.bz2, in the following
link:
https://mega.nz/#!gdJHWBgI!WY4Cvz8ruGJQ0oJw7
u3IkPhDTCdt_jsc3fHJpBXk8d8
With the downloaded package in your machine,
create a folder, name it something like
/re_4_wine_codecs/ and unzip the package into it. In
the unzipped folder there will be a windows folder
and a file, Codecs.reg. The windows folder has the
correct folder structure to install the codecs, ie /
windows / system32. The codecs will be in this
folder. Copy all the files of the codecs within that
folder to the wine folder of your machine,
~/.wine/drive_c/windows/system32/
Once all codecs are copied, we will have to register
them in the wine registry. To do this, open the
Registry Editor and click Register. Then click Import
Page 23
Playing Resident Evil 4 On PCLinuxOS
Registry File. Point to the folder where you unzipped
the codecs and click Codecs.reg.
That's it. It's ready to play. The codecs will be
registered in the wine registry, and will be used
during the game, in the cinematics, with no more
crashes and rendering the game 100% playable.
Save the game often, because despite being 100%
playable, it crashes from time to time. I've finished
the game 100%, and it has high replay value, with all
the extras, Assignment Ada, Separate Ways,
Mercenaries, new characters and objectives to be
achieved.
linuxfordummies.org
There Are No Stupid Questions
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So, enjoy killing the Ganados!
It's easier than E=mc2
It's elemental
It's light years ahead
It's a wise choice
It's Radically Simple
It's ...
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Posted by luikki, September 27, 2015, running KDE.
Page 24
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
by Peter Kelly (critter)
When you are working in KDE, or whatever your favourite PCLinuxOS graphical
environment happens to be, each application opens in its own window. This
allows you to hop about between applications leaving your work open in
previously visited windows until you return to save your work and close the
window. You also have the option to switch to a different virtual workspace and
open more applications, perhaps different ones, perhaps more of the same
applications you have already open. KDE even takes this a step further with the
introduction of activities.
This freedom is very convenient when you need to reference some other
information, change the music or answer an incoming message. It allows a
massive amount of flexibility. Unfortunately, this freedom is not possible when
working in a command line environment, or is it?
Of course it is. Unix and Linux are command line based operating systems,
although most modern distributions now bolt on a graphical user interface.
Because of these terminal based origins, the demand more flexibility has been
around for decades and one solution, screen, since 1987.
for easy reference. You can also give a name to a session (set of windows) for
later recall. It is possible to have multiple screen sessions open and detach or reattach them at will. You can even start a screen session on one machine, detach
the session, and then log in and re-attach from another machine to continue your
work.
Getting started
After installing screen from the PCLinuxOS repositories, you will need to run the
following command as your normal user and from your home directory, or you will
get a warning similar to this. “Directory /home/pete/tmp must have mode 700.”
chmod 700 ~/tmp
When you first start screen, by typing 'screen' into a terminal or terminal emulator
window, you are greeted with a welcome screen which requests that you press
space to continue.
There are several solutions to this. Two utilities that you will find in the
PCLinuxOS repositories are named screen and tmux. Screen is now part of the
GNU project, and tmux is released under the BSD licence. You might also be
interested in byobu, a front-end to GNU screen and tmux, but this is not currently
available from the PCLinuxOS repositories.
Both screen and tmux work in a similar manner, but screen is the 'standard,' will
be available in almost all Linux distributions, and so here I will concentrate on
screen. If you read this article and decide that you could use some of these
features, then do please try tmux. You may prefer it, or find some feature you like
that is not available in screen.
The screen utility is not another terminal emulator, but a window manager for the
command line (also called a terminal multiplexer), allowing you to have multiple
windows open in a single terminal, virtual terminal (as found when pressing
Control+Alt+F1 - F6) or terminal emulator. Admittedly you can't move them about
as you can in KDE. They are all contained within the boundaries of the terminal,
but you can switch between them, add and delete windows and give them names
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 25
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
When you do, it may look as though nothing has happened and that the program
has aborted, although in reality screen is running just fine. It just got out of your
way as a well behaved utility should do.
Save the file into your home directory as .screenrc (include the leading period).
The next thing is to have a different prompt when we are in screen from the one
normally displayed. I have the following lines in my ~/.bashrc file to define two
different prompts:
if [ -z $STY ]
then
PS1='\[\033[1;36m\]\u\[\033[1;37m\]@\[\033[1;32m\]\h \
\[\033[1;37m\] \w\[\033[1;32m\]\$\[\033[0;0m\] '
else
PS1='\[\033[1;36m\]\u\[\033[1;37m\]@\[\033[1;32m\]\h \
\[\033[1;37m\]
\[\033[1;34m\][screen]\[\033[1;37m\]
\w\[\033[1;32m\]\$\
\[\033[0;0m\] '
fi
It is then followed by this line to export the correct prompt to the system
environment:
export PS1
We can change this default behaviour so that we get seamless integration, but
also so that we can still tell where we are.
The screen utility, like many things Linux, uses a plain text file for its configuration
settings. A basic configuration file is installed as /etc/screenrc which is used for
users who don't have their own, personalized configuration file. Screen will first
look for a hidden file named .screenrc in your home directory. If such a file exists,
then it is used in preference to the global file. You can then have your own
version of screen set up exactly as you like it, which is a much better prospect.
The prompts don't need to be as fancy as those as long as they are different. If
you need more info on the prompts, have a look at the end of this page
http://pclosmag.com/html/Issues/200911/page19.html.
This should produce the following prompt when you enter screen, leaving you
with no doubt as to where you are.
Unfortunately, like many things Linux, although the configuration file is in plain
text, the contents are not exactly plain, and it can take a while to get to
understand them. All is explained in the documentation, but I will show how I
have set up my .screenrc file, and you can take it from there.
The first thing that we need to do is to get rid of that introductory screen. To do
this, open a plain text editor and enter this one line:
startup_message off
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 26
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
Before we do any more customizing, let's see some of the things that we can do
with screen. I'll run through some of the more useful commands, and then provide
a summary in the form of a cheat sheet at the end of the article for reference.
The Commands
To issue a command to screen, you need first to type the 'command character,'
which defaults to Control+a (written as C-a after this), followed by the command,
which is a single character or key press. The command character ensures that
the keystrokes go to screen, and not to the process running in screen. So for
example, to quit screen type C-a \.
Helpfully, for most of the commands screen accepts both the key-press and
Control plus the key-press for those occasions when you forget to take your
finger off the control key.
Now we have a continuously running process in the terminal, and one that fills
the terminal window. Next, issue the command C-a c. This will create and switch
to a new, blank terminal window. Enter another command. mc is good if you have
midnight commander installed (if you don't then install it now, you won't regret it).
Type C-a c again to create a third window, and then type C-a “ to get a list of
currently available windows.
Move the arrow keys to select window zero, hit return and you'll find yourself back
looking at top, the very first process that we started in the very first screen
window.
The problem with that listing is that all three windows are named bash which is of
course the process that screen is actually running in each of the windows. But
which screen window is doing what? We can improve this situation by naming the
windows more realistically. Type C-a A (that's an uppercase A) to bring up a panel
in lower left where you can rename the window. Backspace over the name bash
to delete it and type top.
The default, C-a, can be changed, a feature which will be welcomed by those
people who use that combination to move the cursor to the beginning of the line
on the command line (me), but C-a a will will send a literal C-a to the screen,
which also works.
A list of available commands can be seen by pressing C-a ?.
To demonstrate some of the features of screen start it up and then type
top
Now type C-a n or C-a space to switch to the next window (C-a p or C-a
backspace will change to the previous window, as this process is cyclic) and
name that one mc. Repeat the process for the final window, and rename it shell
as any newly created windows will start with the name bash. Now type C-a “
again, and you will see your changes, and it now all makes a little more sense.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 27
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
specify the current window, you will get the rather terse message “This is window
1 (mc).” For windows numbered 0-9 you can use C-a {number}. The previously
used window can be returned to with C-a C-a.
The split command C-a S (upper case S) is used to divide the current window
horizontally. The newly created window is blank and has no session running in it.
You may switch to the newly created window with C-a tab and then use C-a c to
create a session in it. To delete the region use C-a X (upper case X).
Screen allows you to copy and paste between windows with the commands
C-a [ and C-a ].
Select window 2, (the one named shell) and type C-a k. You will be prompted
“Really kill this window [y/n]” Answer “y”. The window will be deleted and you will
be placed in the next lowest numbered window, in this case window 1, which we
named “mc”.
When you issue the command C-a [, you enter a full screen copy mode. From
here you can use the arrow keys to move around. The 0 key takes you to the
beginning of a line, and $ to the end of the line. You can search forward in the
text with /, and backwards with ?. To move backwards and forwards a screen at a
time in long documents, use Control b and Control f. When you reach the start
of the text that you want to copy, press enter then navigate to the end of the text
you want to copy. The text is highlighted as you move around, and press enter
again. The highlighted text is now copied into what is known as the copy buffer,
and you will get a confirmation of the amount of text copied at the bottom of the
screen.
To switch to a particular window, use C-a ' and you will prompted in lower left for
the required window. You may use either the window number or name. If you
Now open your preferred text editor, either in this or another window, and type
c-a ]. The text is pasted into the editor.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 28
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
Now it looks as though top and Midnight Commander have gone but they are in
fact still available to screen. Type Control-Alt F1 to go to one of the virtual
terminals and login (Control-alt F8 will get you back to your graphical
environment if you get homesick).
Now type screen -r and there are your two screens, “top” and “mc.”
You can even do this over different machines. If you have access to another
networked machine, you can log in and connect to a screen session that you
previously detached and continue working.
Do not copy the text directly into a window containing only the command prompt,
as the shell will attempt to execute each line with unpredictable and potentially
disastrous results.
Here I establish a secure shell connection to another machine on my network
named asgard, and pick up a screen session I started some time back.
Now comes the clever part. Type C-a d and you will be dumped out of screen,
returned to a command prompt, which is different from the one displayed when
we were in screen, and the simple message “[detached]” will be printed out.
This is great for working on a remote server, or for having a set of command line
tools always open on a long running machine. If you are working remotely and
suddenly lose the connection simply reconnect, log in and re-attach to your
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 29
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
screen session. You may log in and out, but as long as you don't power down to
re-start the machine hosting the screen session the processes started in screen
will be available from that screen session.
If you intend to use more than one screen session you may name the session by
starting screen with the command
screen -S {session-name}
This will make it easier to switch between sessions. Without a name, you will
have to supply the sessions PID. To get a list of current screen sessions use
screen -ls
Now I have two named sessions so to check my system logs I can use
screen -r logs
This is much easier. Make the session names unique. If you have names like
'test1' and 'test2,' screen will not be able to differentiate. Perhaps there is a way,
but I haven't found it yet.
If you want to connect to a session that is already attached, perhaps on a remote
system, then you will have to combine, then detach and re-attach commands, like
this.
This screenshot shows two sessions both currently detached, but to re-attach to
one of them, I need to type the full name
screen -r 8891.pts-0.elysium
This can get a little tedious. When the sessions are named, then I get something
like this:
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 30
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
Which gets you into the session …
Screen has a command prompt of its own, which you can access with C-a : The
prompt appears as a colon in lower left of the window, where you will type in the
command. The commands you can enter here are all described in the
documentation for the benefit of power users, but most commands will be issued
in the configuration file ~/.screenrc or /etc/screenrc. The three commands that
you may want to execute from within screen are:
C-a : quit Which will close all windows and quit the screen session. This means
that it cannot be reattached.
C-a : source ~/.screenrc This command will reload your configuration file or load
a new configuration file if that is specified.
C-a : sessionname name This will name or re-name the current screen session.
If you look at the screenshots of screen running on the remote machine, you will
notice a status line at the bottom that we don't currently have. This is done in the
~/.screenrc file with some configurations that we will look at now.
Customizing screen
The remote terminal will show something like this.
The status line at the bottom of the screen can be as simple or as complex as
you like. However, setting up the line is no mean feat, and how you do it seems to
depend on what kind of terminal you are using. The code is explained in the
documentation, but still seems pretty obscure, so I cheat. I copy one I find online,
then 'hack it around a bit' until it does what I want. The one I use started as
something I found on the arch wiki (a very useful reference). I have changed
things quite a bit, but it works in mate-terminal, konsole, xterm and over a ssh
connection. These are the two lines I added to my .screenrc.
caption string "%{= kW}%c %LD %d %M %Y %{= kB}%{+s}[%n %t]%{= kw}"
caption always
This gives me the current time and date, in UK format, and my current screen
highlighted in blue. The string consists of a series of macros or 'string escapes',
attributes, modifiers and literal characters. I told you it wasn't simple. This is how
the first line works:
%{= kW} The '%' signals the start of an escape sequence and the braces are
used to contain its elements. '=' means change the current attributes
to those following and a '+' sign would mean to add the attributes to
the existing attributes. The 'kW' pair are a background/color definition,
in that order. The 'k' means black background the 'W' means white
foreground but as it is upper case then it will be bright white.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 31
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
%c This is the string escape that refers to the current time in HH:MM 24
hour format. If you want 12 hour format change the 'c' to upper case.
%LD The preceding space is meaningful and inserts a literal space. A day
can be a number '%d' or a name '%D' or, as here preceded by 'L', along name
'%LD'
%d Another space and then the day as a number '%d'.
%M Another space and the month as a short name. '%m' would return a
number and '%LM' the full or long name of the month.
%Y A space on each side of this and '%Y' for a four digit year number, '%y'
for two digits.
%{= kB}%{+s} Similar to the first expression this means black background with
a bright blue foreground. This time though it is immediately followed by
'%{+s}' which adds the 'standout' attribute which reverses things to
provide black on bright blue.
[%n %t] The brackets and the space are treated literally. '%n' outputs the
screen number and '%t' the screen title.
%{= fW} finally we reset the colors to bright white on black.
This is not overly difficult, but it does seem a lot of work to display and format
some simple information.
The second line simply tells screen to always display this line.
Other text, such as the window list provided by C-a w, will temporarily overwrite it.
If your terminal supports 256 colors and you want to take advantage of this, then
you need to add a line like this.
term xterm-256color
Often, when you use a utility such as the vi or nano text editors, the text remains
on the screen after you exit the utility. To overcome this, add this line.
altscreen on
Some terminals flash to represent the bell, a feature inherited from the days of
typewriters. To turn off this annoying habit, add this line.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 32
Multiple Command Line Windows Using GNU Screen
vbell off
The format of the display of the window list provided by C-a “ can be adjusted in
a similar manner to the caption string.
The PCLinuxOS Magazine
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windowlist string "%3n %{= kG}%t"
The '%3n' provides the screen number padded out to three characters wide. '%{=
kG}%t' displays the screen title in bright green on black.
To start screen with some pre-defined windows.
screen -t top 1 top
screen -t mc 2 mc
screen -t shell 3 bash
The format above is
screen -t {title} {number} {command}
Finally, you can create your own shortcut keystrokes.
bind m screen -t 'mc' 8 mc
This would allow C-a m to open midnight commander in window 8, name the
window mc and then switch to it. Or, if window 8 is currently in use, the next
highest available slot.
This introduction covers only a small sample of the abilities of the screen utility,
but what I have demonstrated here are the features that I have found most
useful.
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PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 33
Reach Us On The Web
PCLinuxOS Magazine Mailing List:
http://groups.google.com/group/pclinuxos-magazine
Linux Training
Courses & Classes
PCLinuxOS Magazine Web Site:
http://pclosmag.com/
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Community Supported.
No Billionaires/Millionaires.
No Corporate Backing Or Funding.
Click here to make a one-time donation
through Google Checkout.
Or, click one of the amounts down below
to make a monthly, recurring donation.
Posted by TerryH, September 22, 2015, running KDE.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 34
Tip Top Tips: SketchUpMake 2015 On PCLOS64
Editor’s Note: Tip Top Tips is a new monthly column in
The PCLinuxOS Magazine. Each month, we will feature –
and possibly even expand upon – one tip from the
PCLinuxOS forum. The magazine will not accept
independent tip submissions specifically intended for
inclusion in the Tip Top Tips column. Rather, if you have a
tip, share it in the PCLinuxOS forum’s “Tips & Tricks”
section. Your tip just may be selected for publication in
The PCLinuxOS Magazine.
This month’s tip comes from PCLinuxOS forum
member One_Beerhunter.
First, let me make this perfectly clear, I am not an
authority on either WINE or SketchUpMake. I am, on
the other hand, more persistent than many … willing
to devote untold hours to get something working out
of an innate compulsion to never give up.
Second, download SketchUpMake2015 from here
http://www.sketchup.com/download/all.
Download
the 64 bit Windows version.
program" button, click it and follow the prompts.
Create a new 64 bit PlayOnLinux virtual drive. I
labeled mine SketchUp2015.
Third, open PlayOnLinux and from the tools menu
select, Manage Wine versions and add the latest
version of Wine versions (amd64), currently version
1.7.37.
Fifth, a window will appears offering checkboxes for
selecting the wine version, running wine config, and
adding windows components; check all the boxes. At
that time I could only select "system" for wine
version. In wineconfig on the applications tab, I
changed the Windows version from "XP" to "7."
From the add components section, install
"vcrun2010."
Fourth, from PlayOnLinux select “Install a program.”
At first, you may be presented with a window that
lacks the "Install an unlisted program" button. If that
happens, close the install window and try again.
Once you have located the "Install an unlisted
Editor’s Note: If you are unfamiliar with SketchUp,
here is the Wikipedia description: “SketchUp
(formerly Google Sketchup) is a 3D modeling
computer program for a wide range of drawing
applications such as architectural, interior design,
civil and mechanical engineering, film, and video
game design—and available in a freeware version,
SketchUp Make, and a paid version with additional
functionality, SketchUp Pro.
This is, to the best of my recollection, how I got
SketchUpMake to actually work under WINE on
PCLinuxOS 64.
First, open Synaptic and select PlayOnLinux. The
following will be installed:
PlayOnLinux
wine32.32bit
wine64
wine-gecko
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 35
Tip Top Tips: SketchupMake 2015 On PCLOS64
Sixth,
browse
to
your
downloaded
"SketchUpMake-en-x64.exe," and install.
file,
is start watching some tutorials on how to use
SketchUp.
Seventh, PlayOnLinux will offer to make shortcuts to
the executables. I only selected SketchUp.exe, and
then chose to not make any more shortcuts.
Finally, with your new shortcut to SketchUp
highlighted, select configure and change the wine
version in the drop down box from "system" to
"1.7.37."
With your highlighted shortcut, you may start the
program via run or debug. Debug allows you to
review the numerous error messages. One might
complain about a missing mfc100u.dll. I copied that
dll from the /home/"yourusername"/PlayOnLinux's
virtual
drives/SketchUp2015/drive_c/windows/
syswow64 folder into the /home/"yourusername"/
PlayOnLinux's virtual drives/SketchUp2015/drive_c/
Program Files(x86)/Sketchup/SketchUp 2015 folder,
and the error went away.
Want to keep up on the latest that's
going on with PCLinuxOS?
Linux Docs
Linux Man Pages
Follow PCLinuxOS on Twitter!
http://twitter.com/iluvpclinuxos
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MOVING THIS DLL HAS PROVED ITSELF TO BE
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SUCCESS AND
FAILURE. Following my own advice, I just installed
Sketchup on my laptop after a fresh install of
PCLOS64. I forgot to move the dll and was greeted
by the frowning penguin program crash error
message. I moved the DLL, and the problem was
resolved.
I also discovered the tooltips do not display properly
when you hover your mouse over the icons - those
tips can be turned off as they also appear at the
bottom of the drawing window. So, they are
somewhat redundant.
In the end, this has been quite a trip, and I still have
a couple of errors in debug such as "(process:779):
GLib-CRITICAL **: g_slice_set_config: assertion
'sys_page_size == 0' failed." I have no idea what
that means, or if it is even significant. All I can say
with certainty is this: The above worked for me, and I
hope this helps others here. Now all I have left to do
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Posted by Agent Smith, September 18, 2015, running e19.
Page 36
PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: Rudge
As Told To Smileeb
This month we have Rudge
What is the area you live in like. Weather,
Quietness, Scenery.
I'm originally from just south of Atlanta Ga. but I'm
currently comfortably settled in a quiet town called
Huntersville, NC. It's an awesome place. It's about
10 minutes from cows or the mall, depending on
which direction you head out. It's also about 10
minutes from two major North Carolina lakes, again,
depending on what direction you go. It's very nice to
be so close to two major worlds right where they
collide. Access to both has suited us nicely because
I'm a "country boy" and JRex is a "city girl."
How old are you?
Ugh, let's see, do you have a calculator? Looks like,
54 now.
Are you handy with your hands and have any
hobbies.
Like this "isn't" the only thing I ever talk about. LOL!
Married, single or what?
Very happily married to JRex.
What is your education level?
There were "levels?" I didn't notice that part.
However, I DID graduate high school in 1980 and
was the first, in the entire history of my father's
family to do so.
Children, grandchildren?
No children oddly enough. My first two marriages
had hopes of producing kids but they both ended
within 7 years having produced only arguments.
When JRex and I got married, the decision not to
have kids was already established by us both. I have
no regrets.
Retired or working and for how long and at what.
This is complicated. I once had a promising career in
IT starting in 1980 and progressing nicely along,
producing a nice resume with names like Wachovia,
Johnson Controls, Bell South, MCI, AT&T and IBM.
But, I was laid off in 2006 and well we know what
happened after that. The timing sucked. After a few
short years of looking for a job in the only field I had
ever known, I was suddenly "unemployable." I guess
I have finally accepted my position as one of
"Housewife." Hey, it's supposed to be the hardest job
there is right? I do it pretty well.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Do you like to travel, go camping?
I like to fish. My dad taught me to fish when I was
knee high to a toad. It stuck with me. I still suck at it,
but I still like it.
What caused you to try Linux and join this
forum.
I first tried Linux because way back when DOS was
the norm in the workplace, I was already using
UNIX, and I was way more familiar with it than DOS
(although many DOS commands were surprisingly
similar). Once Win95 hit the scene, DOS took a back
seat, and to be honest, I missed my command lines
and the feel of UNIX while I was at work.
it! The forum was something I found after many
years of distro hopping. I've been Green, I've been
Red, heck, I've even been Brown but when I
stumbled on that PCLinuxOS Blue and the people
and personalities behind it, I quite literally felt like I
was "Home".
This is me and JRex at the Blue Ridge Parkway
back in November of last year.
It's about a three hour drive from us.
PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight is an exclusive,
monthly column by smileeb, featuring PCLinuxOS forum
members. This column will allow “the rest of us” to get to
know our forum family members better, and will give
those featured an opportunity to share their PCLinuxOS
story with the rest of the world.
If you would like to be featured in PCLinuxOS Family
Member Spotlight, please send a private message to
smileeb in the PCLinuxOS forum expressing your interest.
When I first got word of a *nix like desktop
environment that would run on a PC, I was all over
Page 37
Game Zone: Coffin Dodgers
by daiashi
About The Game
Coffin Dodgers sees you take on the role of saving
one of seven quirky retirement village residents,
each racing for their soul in "pimped up" mobility
scooters against none other than the Grim Reaper
himself. Our old heroes are armed with a variety of
homemade weapons and gadgets to take on
anything the Grim Reaper and his Zombie army may
throw at them. This game has the feel of Diddy Kong
racing. However, you are the best the retirement
home has to offer. The carts they ride are not your
typical grocery getter plugins. They’re packing the
best armament that their social security can buy. If
you see them in your neighborhood racing around, it
would be best to turn the other direction.
tournament in which your rank against other
competitors will ensure you progress to the next
stage. However, finish at the bottom of the pile and
the Reaper gets to take your soul. The final race
takes place over each of the four areas in a straight
shootout between you and the Grim Reaper. See if
you can beat Mr. Grim before his shadow covers all
of Sunny Pines neighborhood. Zombies on octane
boosted mobility scooters! What next?
• Race & Battle the Grim Reaper and his army of
zombies.
• Save one of the 7 quirky retirement village
residents
• Customise and modify your mobility scooter
• Player to player combat & rag doll physics
• 3D open world game environment
• 13 unique race tracks
• Single player Story and Time Trial modes
• Online Multiplayer race mode
• 3D Open world single & online multiplayer game
modes
• Local multiplayer versus race mode (2-4 players)
• Full controller & keyboard support
• Steam Trading Cards and Achievements
System requirements:
Fully updated PCLinuxOS and Steam
Hardware:
Key Features
Players must battle it out against The Grim Reaper
and other competitors over a 13 race Championship,
where only the most skilled racer will survive. There
are four distinct areas within the Sunny Pines
Retirement Community, each featuring its own mini
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Minimum:
OS: PCLinuxOS
Processor: 2.2 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: Graphics card with 256mb
Hard Drive: available space
Recommended:
OS: PCLinuxOs
Processor: 2.5 Intel i5 or Amd Fx 4
Memory: 4 GB RAM
Graphics: Nvidia Geforce Gtx Gpu 2 Gb
Hard Drive: 1500 mb available space
About The Company
Milky Tea is an award winning, independent creative
production studio established in the UK in 2005. The
studio was set up to bring the best in 3D, gaming,
animation, design and digital talent together under
one roof to produce breathtaking creative content.
The majority of the team have come from the world
of high end AAA console game development and
were involved in games, such as Project Gotham
Racing, Blur, Bang Bang Racing and Drive Club. So,
Milky Tea has always had game development at its
core.
Over the past eight years, the studio has gone on to
build a global client list that includes the likes of
Sony, BBC, Channel 4, Kraft, Nestle, Unilever,
Toyota, Bose to name but a few.
The business shot to fame in 2007, winning the
opportunity to work with Lloyds TSB on the
advertising campaign called “for the journey.” Here,
they developed those retro, recognizable, long
Page 38
Game Zone: Coffin Dodgers
nosed quirky characters that became one of the
longest serving advertising campaigns in the UK. It
was their job to produce breathtaking illustrations
and interactive content.
Over the years, they started to build up their games
portfolio, mainly working on browser based games.
One of those was for the BBC, called “The Well,”
which went on to win two BAFTA awards and an
EMMY award.
Linux tab if you wish and search for it. Click on and
download the demo. If you have updated your
system, including graphics drivers, you should be
good to go. Although I did not try it out, this game
can use a gamepad. The keyboard is a little difficult
to use while turning. With a little practice on the time
trials, it gets much easier.
Steam/Coffin Dodgers
In 2012, after meeting Apple in California, they
decided to refocus the business and start developing
their own games. In December 2012, they launched
the first game on iOS and Android called Roller
Rally, which went on to be nominated for a BIMA and
DADI award.
Coffin Dodgers is the second of their very own
projects to come out of the studio, and includes the
same vibrancy and attention to fun, story and detail
that people have come to expect from the studio.
Some Gameplay Screenshots
Defending Your Rights
Getting It To Run
Install Steam (if you don’t have it installed already),
then start it. You will need to create a new account, if
you do not already have one. Once you have Steam
up and running, go to the store tab. Click on the
PCLinuxOS Magazine
In The Digital World
Page 39
ms_meme's Nook: How Sweet It Is
I needed an OS without confusion
My silly songs for you I sing
You have such dedication
Windows brought me such delusion
Some fun I hope to bring
PCLinuxOS is a big sensation
I needed an OS transfusion
Glad for our association
It is sweeping the nation
PCLinuxOS was my conclusion
For you I have admiration
Gives a 'puter stimulation
Made with loving devotion
Made with loving devotion
Made with loving devotion
Sets my 'puter into motion
Sets my 'puter into motion
Sets my 'puter into motion
I want to stop and thank you Tex
I want to stop and thank you Tex
I want to stop and thank you Tex
PCLOS is never complex
PCLOS is never complex
PCLOS is never complex
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
How sweet it is to be bootin' with you
MP3
PCLinuxOS Magazine
OGG
Page 40
Screenshot
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PCLinuxOS
Merchandise Today!
Posted by tbschommer, September 15, 2015, running Xfce.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 41
SUDOKU RULES: There is only one valid solution to each
Sudoku puzzle. The only way the puzzle can be considered
solved correctly is when all 81 boxes contain numbers and the
other Sudoku rules have been followed.
When you start a game of Sudoku, some blocks will be prefilled
for you. You cannot change these numbers in the course of the
game.
Each column must contain all of the numbers 1 through 9 and
no two numbers in the same column of a Sudoku puzzle can
be the same. Each row must contain all of the numbers 1
through 9 and no two numbers in the same row of a Sudoku
puzzle can be the same.
Each block must contain all of the numbers 1 through 9 and no
two numbers in the same block of a Sudoku puzzle can be the
same.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
SCRAPPLER RULES:
1. Follow the rules of Scrabble®. You can
view them here. You have seven (7) letter
tiles with which to make as long of a word
as you possibly can. Words are based on
the
English
language.
Non-English
language words are NOT allowed.
2. Red letters are scored double points.
Green letters are scored triple points.
3. Add up the score of all the letters that
you used. Unused letters are not scored.
For red or green letters, apply the
multiplier when tallying up your score.
Next, apply any additional scoring
multipliers, such as double or triple word
score.
4. An additional 50 points is added for
using all seven (7) of your tiles in a set to
make your word. You will not necessarily
be able to use all seven (7) of the letters in
your set to form a “legal” word.
5. In case you are having difficulty seeing
the point value on the letter tiles, here is a
list of how they are scored:
0 points: 2 blank tiles
1 point: E, A, I, O, N, R, T, L, S, U
2 points: D, G
3 points: B, C, M, P
4 points: F, H, V, W, Y
5 points: K
8 points: J, X
10 points: Q, Z
6. Optionally, a time limit of 60 minutes
should apply to the game, averaging to 12
minutes per letter tile set.
7. Have fun! It's only a game!
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
Possible score 323, average score 226.
Page 42
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
PCLinuxOS Crossword Puzzle: October 2015
Happy Birthday, PCLinuxOS!
1. inflate many for colorful decorations
2. we all need to eat _______
3. everyone should yell this together
4. to celebrate PCLinuxOS's birthday, we need
our ______ _________
5. we love having our ___________ near
6. asks guests to attend
7. creamy frozen treat
8. give one to the birthday honoree
9. everyone's favorite 12 year old distro!
10. small type of hand-held treat
11. a big party is a kind of ____________
12. send greetings if you can't be there
13. print this up to say Happy Birthday
14. small bits to help decorate
15. put the right number of candles on this
16. individual birthday cakes!
17. send to gift givers after the party
18. at a ______ the guests could play games,
dance or have refreshments
19. everyone's favorite flavor?
20. well wishes for one's birthday
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 43
PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions
Birthday Word Find
J
C
P
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U
X
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X
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A
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Y
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X
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balloons
banner
cake
card
celebration
chocolate
confetti
cookie
cupcake
family
food
forum friends
greeting card
happy birthday
ice cream
invitation
party
PCLinuxOS
present
thank you note
Download Puzzle Solutions Here
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 44
More Screenshot Showcase
Posted by JohnW_57, September 8, 2015, running KDE.
Posted by Mr Smarty Pants-present_arms, September 27, 2015, running Trinity.
Posted by Archie, September 25, 2015, running KDE.
Posted by parnote, September 28, 2015, running Xfce.
PCLinuxOS Magazine
Page 45
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