null User manual

null  User manual
Car Safety
CAR SEATS:
SEATBELT-READY:
Make sure the car seat is the right seat for your child’s
age, height and weight.
Children should use a booster seat until they are about
4’9” tall and weigh at least 80 pounds.
Infants and toddlers should be in a rear-facing car
seat until they are at least 2 years old or until they
reach the highest weight or height limit for their car
seat. This provides the most protection for their head,
neck and spine.
The seatbelt alone is safe to use when your child can
meet ALL 3 of the following criteria:
Your children’s knees bend at the edge of the seat
when their backs and bottoms are against the back
of the seat.
For most children, forward-facing car seats can be used
from age 2 until the child is at least 4 years old. Many
forward-facing seats with harnesses can go up to 65
pounds or more.
The lap belt fits low across the upper thighs.
The shoulder belt fits across the shoulder and
chest, staying clear of the face and neck.
Children under the age of 13 should ride in the back
seat, away from the front seat air bags.
BOOSTER SEATS:
Children should not be moved into a booster seat until
they are at least 4 years old and exceed the height and
weight limit for their forward-facing seat.
Use both the lap belt and the shoulder belt with the
booster seat. The lap belt should fit low and tight
across the hips. The shoulder belt should fit snug
across the shoulders, and and chest, and stay clear of
the neck or face. It should not be placed under the
child’s arm or behind the child’s back.
If you can’t get the seatbelt to sit properly, your child
may not be ready for a booster seat, and should be kept
in a car seat.
1/2
DOWNLOAD THE MAKE SAFE HAPPEN APP
Developed in partnership with the safety experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, the app helps you make
your home safer. Get room-by-room safety checklists, link to recommended products, and set reminders.
CONTENT DEVELOPED IN ASSOCIATION WITH:
HEATSTROKE:
DRIVEWAYS & PARKING LOTS:
Before getting into your car, walk all they way around
it to make sure there are no children under or behind
the car. If children are outside, have them stand away
from the car with another adult, until you have left
the driveway.
NEVER leave your child alone in a car. Even with
a window cracked, it is possible for them to become
overheated.
Make it a habit to always check the back seat before
you lock your car. Remind yourself to check the back
seat by putting something that you will need, such as
your purse or cell phone, next to your child, especially
on days when you are breaking routine.
When possible, park your car so that you can pull
forward instead of having to back out. If you need to
back out, check all mirrors, and do so carefully.
Try not to use the driveway for play. It is better to find
a safe spot for your child that is away from all parked
or moving cars.
Teach kids that cars and car trunks are not safe places
to play.
Lock the car when you’re not using it, and make sure
all keys and remote entry fobs are out of children’s
sight and reach.
Pick up any toys, bikes, chalk or other play items near
the driveway that could attract children.
Help your children in and out of the car. Firmly hold
their hands when you are around moving cars, and be
sure that your child is visible to other drivers.
Show older kids how to locate and use the glow-in-thedark emergency trunk release, so that they know what
to do in case they do become trapped. Cars made after
September 1, 2001 will have these.
2/2
DOWNLOAD THE MAKE SAFE HAPPEN APP
Developed in partnership with the safety experts at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, the app helps you make
your home safer. Get room-by-room safety checklists, link to recommended products, and set reminders.
CONTENT DEVELOPED IN ASSOCIATION WITH:
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