WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide

WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Integration Developer
Version 7.0
Version 7 Release 0
Migration Guide
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page 117.
This edition applies to version 7, release 0, of WebSphere Integration Developer.
© Copyright IBM Corporation 2005, 2009.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
Chapter 1. Migrating to WebSphere
Integration Developer . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter 2. Migrating from previous
versions of WebSphere Integration
Developer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Migrating source artifacts . . . . . . . . .
Migrating a process instance . . . . . . . .
Migrating XML maps . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating generated JEE staging projects . . . .
Migrating server runtime targets. . . . . . .
Considerations for the version to version migration
process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Migrating to WebSphere
Process Server from WebSphere
InterChange Server . . . . . . . . . 11
Supported migration paths . . . . . . . .
Preparing for migration from WebSphere
InterChange Server . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations for the WebSphere InterChange
Server migration process . . . . . . . . .
Considerations: General development . . .
Considerations: Common code utilities . . .
Considerations: Database connection pools . .
Considerations: Business objects . . . . .
Considerations: Collaboration templates . . .
Considerations: Maps . . . . . . . . .
Considerations: Relationships . . . . . .
Considerations: Access framework clients . .
Considerations: Preventing database collisions .
Considerations: Post-migration . . . . . .
WebSphere InterChange Server migration scenarios
Migrating WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts
using the Migration wizard . . . . . . . .
Verifying the WebSphere InterChange Server
migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with migration failures from WebSphere
InterChange Server . . . . . . . . . . .
WebSphere InterChange Server and WebSphere
Business Integration Server Express artifacts
handled by the migration tools . . . . . . .
Supported WebSphere InterChange Server APIs .
Mapping the WebSphere Process Sever DataObject
from WebSphere InterChange Server XML . . .
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Chapter 4. Migrating to WebSphere
Integration Developer from WebSphere
MQ Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Preparing for migration from WebSphere MQ
Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating WebSphere MQ Workflow using the
Migration wizard . . . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
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Optimizing the migrated business processes . . 55
Verifying the WebSphere MQ Workflow migration
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Limitations of the migration process (from
WebSphere MQ Workflow) . . . . . . . . . 57
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere
Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition. . . . . . . . . . 59
Supported migration paths for migrating source
artifacts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing source artifacts for migration . . . . .
Pre-migration considerations . . . . . . . .
Migrating workspaces using the WebSphere
Integration Developer Migration wizard . . . . .
Migrating workspaces using
WSADIEWorkspaceMigration . . . . . . . .
Additional migration information . . . . . . .
Creating SCA Components and SCA Imports for
the services in the application for rewiring . . .
Migrating a Java service . . . . . . . .
Creating the custom Java component:
option 1 . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Java Web service: option 2. . .
Advantages and disadvantages for each of
the Java service rewiring options . . . .
Migrating an EJB service . . . . . . . .
Creating the custom EJB component: option
1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating an EJB Web service: option 2 . .
Advantages and disadvantages for each of
the EJB service rewiring options . . . .
Migrating a Business Process to Business
Process Service Invocation . . . . . . .
Migrating a Web Service (SOAP/JMS) . . .
Migrating a Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) . . .
Migrating a JMS service . . . . . . . .
Migrating a J2C-IMS service . . . . . . .
Creating an SCA Import to invoke the IMS
service: option 1 . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Web service around the J2C
service: option 2 . . . . . . . . . .
Advantages and disadvantages for each of
the J2C-IMS service rewiring options . . .
Migrating a J2C-CICS ECI service . . . . .
Migrating a J2C-CICS EPI service . . . . .
Migrating a J2C-HOD service . . . . . .
Migrating a transformer service . . . . .
The consumption scenario for service
migration . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating the EJB and the EJB process
bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 1 for the EJB and EJB
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
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Migration option 2 for the EJB and EJB
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 3 for the EJB and EJB
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 4 for the EJB and EJB
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating the JMS and the JMS process
bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 1 for the JMS and JMS
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 2 for the JMS and JMS
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 3 for the JMS and JMS
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 4 for the JMS and JMS
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 5 for the JMS and JMS
process binding . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating the IBM Web Service binding
(SOAP/JMS) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 1 for the IBM Web Service
binding (SOAP/JMS) . . . . . . . .
Migration option 2 for the IBM Web Service
binding (SOAP/JMS) . . . . . . . .
Migrating the IBM Web Service binding
(SOAP/HTTP) . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration option 1 for the IBM Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) binding . . . . . . .
Migration option 2 for the IBM Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) binding . . . . . . .
Migrating the Apache Web Service binding
(SOAP/HTTP) . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating to the SCA programming model . . .
Migrating WSIFMessage API calls to SDO
APIs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration
Server Foundation client code . . . . . .
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
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Migrating the EJB client . . . . . .
Migrating the EJB process binding client.
Migrating the IBM Web Service
(SOAP/JMS) client . . . . . . . .
Migrating the IBM Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) client . . . . . . .
Migrating the Apache Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) client . . . . . . .
Migrating the JMS client. . . . . .
Migrating the business process
choreographer generic EJB API client .
Migrating the business process
choreographer generic Messaging API
client and the JMS process binding client
Migrating the business process
choreographer Web client . . . . .
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration
Server Foundation BPEL Java snippets . .
Migrating interactions with WebSphere
Business Integration Adapters . . . . .
Migrating WSDL interfaces that have
SOAP-encoded array types . . . . . .
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration EJB
projects . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually deleting 5.1 Web Services Invocation
Framework (WSIF) definitions . . . . . .
Verifying the source artifact migration . . . .
Working with source artifact migration failures .
Limitations of source artifact migration . . . .
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Terms of use
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Chapter 1. Migrating to WebSphere Integration Developer
Migrating allows you to move from one product to another or one version of a product to another while
preserving configuration information and user applications. WebSphere® Integration Developer provides
the necessary tools to migrate an existing environment to the new version 7.0 environment.
The following topics describe concepts, reference information, and step-by-step instructions for migrating
to WebSphere Integration Developer:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Chapter 2. Migrating from previous versions of WebSphere
Integration Developer
You can migrate from a previous version of WebSphere Integration Developer to WebSphere Integration
Developer 7.0. This is referred to as version-to-version migration.
Migrating to WebSphere Integration Developer 7.0 preserves the basic structure of your existing
application with minimal required reconfiguration. The following topics provide further guidance on the
WebSphere Integration Developer version-to-version migration process:
Migrating source artifacts
WebSphere Integration Developer source artifact migration refers to the process of importing a project
interchange (PI) created from an older version of WebSphere Integration Developer into a newer version
of WebSphere Integration Developer.
To migrate WebSphere Integration Developer source artifacts, follow these steps:
1. Export the artifacts as integration modules by selecting File > Export > Business Integration >
Integration modules and libraries.
2. From the Export Integration Modules and Libraries window, select the option Project interchange for
sharing between workspaces and select the projects to export:
Click Next.
3. From this window, specify the file names for each archive and the target directory:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
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Click Finish.
4. Next you will need to import the zip file generated in the above steps as a project interchange file. To
import a project interchange file, select File > Import > Other > Project Interchange and click Next.
5. Click Browse to select the zip file and click Finish. By default, the projects are set to build
automatically. Therefore, after the project interchange is imported, the build, including the validation,
begins automatically.
6. The Workspace Migration wizard opens after the project interchange file is imported:
7. After the migration process ends, you should see a dialog indicating that the migration validation has
completed successfully:
To see more details about the validation, you can go to the Migration Results view:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Migrating a process instance
Migrating a WebSphere Business Modeler business process involves migrating a process instance. In
WebSphere Business Modeler V7.0.0.2, the WebSphere Integration Developer export wizard provides an
option to enable BPEL process versioning.
The Enable generated BPEL for process versioning check box is available on the WebSphere Integration
Developer export details page in the WebSphere Integration Developer export wizard:
This option allows the generated BPEL to leverage the process versioning support and enablement for
process instance migration in WebSphere Integration Developer and WebSphere Process Server.
Chapter 2. Migrating from previous versions of WebSphere Integration Developer
5
Important: When selecting this option, ensure the targets are WebSphere Integration Developer 7.0.0.2 or
later and WebSphere Process Server 7.0.0.2 or later. Otherwise, the generated BPEL definition from
WebSphere Business Modeler will produce a validation error upon import to WebSphere Integration
Developer and therefore will not be deployable to WebSphere Process Server.
For more information on instance migration, see the topic "Creating a new version of your process migrate running instances" in the related links sections below.
Migrating XML maps
The underlying structure of xml maps has changed between releases of WebSphere Integration Developer.
Use the migration wizard or the quick fix feature to migrate your maps to the current version.
XML maps that were created in versions of WebSphere Integration Developer prior to version 7.0.0.3 need
to be migrated to the current version for the following reasons:
v Maps that were created in versions 6.0.x and have a file extension of .xmx must be migrated to the
current version to allow you to edit them or if you want to run them in the lazy business object
parsing mode.
v Maps that were created in versions prior to 7.0.0.3 and have the file extension of .map must be
migrated to the current version if you want to run them in the lazy business object parsing mode.
When you import existing maps from previous versions into WebSphere Integration Developer version
7.0.0.3, the older maps are detected and a migration wizard is launched to help you migrate the maps to
the current version. The migration wizard handles the migration for both situations described above, and
once migration is completed no further action is required. For the maps that have the extension of .xmx,
the .xmx files will be deleted and a .map file will be created for each .xmx file. For the maps that have
the extension of .map, the existing .map files will be updated.
If you choose to exit the wizard and migrate the maps at a later time, you can launch the wizard by
invoking the Run workspace migration action from within the Migration Results view.
Note: Note: If the Migration Results view is not visible, you can bring it into perspective by selecting
Window from the main menu and choosing Show view > Other. Then, from the Show View page, select
the Migration Results view.
If you do not migrate the maps using the migration wizard, and you choose to use the Configure
Business Object Parsing Mode option to set the business object parsing mode of a module or library to
lazy, the associated older maps will be automatically migrated for you during this action. However, if
you manually change the business object parsing mode to lazy by editing the properties of the module or
library, older maps will not be migrated automatically and you will see errors in the problems view for
the associated older maps. When you see such errors in the problems view for .xmx or .map files, use the
quick fix function to migrate the maps as follows:
1. Right click the error message and select Quick Fix.
2. Optionally choose to migrate all the maps, and click Finish.
Migrating generated JEE staging projects
When you import a project interchange file that contains modules from a previous version of WebSphere
Integration Developer, a migration wizard is automatically launched. If the project interchange file
contains any generated J2EE staging projects (such as EJB, Web, or App projects), the migration wizard
will contain a wizard page to help you migrate the projects.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
When you are preparing modules for migration to a later version of WebSphere Integration Developer, it
is recommended that you do not include any custom artifacts in the generated JEE staging projects. If
you adhere to the recommendation, you do not need to include any generated JEE staging projects in
your project interchange file.
If your imported project interchange file contains any generated JEE staging projects, they will be
automatically deleted and regenerated again during the migration process. (If your project interchange
file does not contain any generated JEE staging projects, any required JEE staging projects will be
automatically generated during migration.)
1. Import the project interchange file that contains your modules and JEE staging projects. The
Workspace Migration wizard opens to the Workspace Migration page.
2. Click Next. The Review the JEE Staging Projects page opens.
3. In the Review the JEE Staging Projects page, review the list of JEE staging projects in the tree area.
4. Complete one of the following steps:
v If your JEE staging projects do not contain any custom artifacts or if they contain custom artifacts
that can be safely deleted along with the JEE projects because they exist elsewhere (such as a
repository), click Next to continue the migration process.
v If your JEE staging projects contain any custom artifacts that do not exist elsewhere (such as a
repository), click Cancel to exit the wizard and save the custom artifacts to another location, then
switch to the Migration Results view and click the Run Migration icon to continue the migration
process.
Any required JEE projects are automatically generated again except for EJB staging projects, which are no
longer required by modules in WebSphere Integration Developer.
Migrating server runtime targets
When you import a project interchange file that contains modules from a previous version of WebSphere
Integration Developer, a migration wizard is automatically launched. If the project interchange file
contains any projects that target a previous version of the server runtime, the migration wizard will
contain a wizard page that enables you to automatically update the projects to target the current server
runtime.
It is generally recommended that you accept the default settings in the migration wizard to ensure that
the correct server runtimes are targeted by your projects. Any projects that target the WebSphere Process
Server runtime will be updated to target the latest version of WebSphere Process Server. Similarly, any
projects that target the WebSphere ESB server runtime will be updated to target the latest version of
WebSphere ESB server.
1. Import the project interchange file that contains your modules. The Workspace Migration wizard
opens to the Workspace Migration page.
2. Click Next until the Undefined Server Runtime page of the wizard is displayed.
3. In the Undefined Server Runtime page, review the information that is displayed on the page.
4. Accept the default settings and click Next to continue the migration process.
Considerations for the version to version migration process
When migrating from a previous version of WebSphere Integration Developer to version 7.0, most of the
migration is done automatically. However, there are a number of considerations to be aware of that may
require additional manual configuration.
The following considerations are intended to assist in the version-to-version migration process:
Validations
With each new release of WebSphere Integration Developer, validators for various components,
Chapter 2. Migrating from previous versions of WebSphere Integration Developer
7
such as business objects, human tasks, and XSLT maps are improved. Note that after importing
the artifacts to a newer version of WebSphere Integration Developer, there may be validation
errors that the previous validator did not catch.
Java validation
When using SDO API to create a data object, there is added Java validation in WebSphere
Integration Developer:
v It validates if a business object of the given namespace and name exists. If it is invalid,
you will receive the following error message in the Problems view:
A BO with namespace <namespace> and name <BO name> cannot be found.
v It validates if the correct getter and setter methods are used based on the attribute
type. If not, you will receive the following error message in the Problems view:
Incompatible method argument type.
The <BO attribute name> field is of type <actual attribute type>.
v It validates if the attribute referenced in the getter and setter methods exists. If not, you
will receive the following error message in the Problems view:
The field <BO attribute name> does not exist in the Business Object <BO name with namespace>.
Java validation occurs in:
v Java components
v Custom mediation primitive in mediation flows
v Java snippet activities in business processes
v Custom mappings in business object maps
Quick Fix
In some cases, you can use the Quick Fix to fix the problem. Go to the Problems view,
right-click on the error or warning and check if Quick Fix is enabled. It usually helps to
change the artifacts compliant to the validators more quickly:
SDO programming tips
From WebSphere Integration Developer 6.0.x to WebSphere Integration Developer 6.1, there are
package name changes for a few classes, such as BOXMLSerializer, which may cause compilation
errors. It is a good practice not to reference those classes directly, but to use Service Manager to
locate the service.
From:
com.ibm.websphere.bo.BOXMLSerializer serializer = new
com.ibm.websphere.bo.impl.BOXMLSerializerImpl();
To:
com.ibm.websphere.sca.ServiceManager srvMgr =
com.ibm.websphere.sca.ServiceManager.INSTANCE;
com.ibm.websphere.bo.BOXMLSerializer serializer = (BOXMLSerializer)
srvMgr.locateService("com/ibm/websphere/bo/BOXMLSerializer");
For more examples, see the WebSphere Process Server Information Center and the BPC samples
and tutorials (http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/bpcsamp/index.html).
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Circular dependencies
A newer version of WebSphere Integration Developer might detect circular dependencies of the
modules or projects as errors, while an older WebSphere Integration Developer does not. To
quickly resolve this issue, you can change the compiler option from the Preferences. Go to
Windows > Preference > Java > Compiler > Building. Under the build path problems section,
select the Warning option for Circular dependencies:
Depending on the version of WebSphere Integration Developer that you are using, the Java
preference might not be available. To enable that, go to the Java perspective and open the
preference dialog again. Although the applications might be running fine, it is necessary to check
the project dependencies again.
Use refactoring
If you need to change the name of a component or it's target namespace because they are invalid,
use the refactoring capabilities instead of simply changing it in one place. If you do not use
refactoring, you may encounter problems as the name or target namespace of a component might
be referenced by other artifacts. Refactoring those values would preserve the relationships.
For example, a namespace must be an absolute Uniform Resource Identifier, for example, starting
with http://. You should refactor the target namespace by pressing Alt+Shift+R on the target
namespace field of the Properties page.
XPath XPath can be used in mediation flows (for example, MessageFilter primitive) and business
processes (for example, Assign activity). Prior to version 6.1, WebSphere Integration Developer
did not have distinction between business object attributes defined as xsd:element and those
defined as xsd:attribute. If XPATH is used, you may see the following message after migrating:
The <attribute_name> schema element was not found in the <xpath_expression> XPATH.
To fix this error, put an “@” symbol in front of the attribute name, or reselect the XPATH in the
XPATH Expression Builder. For example, there is a business object called MyBO which has an
attribute “myAttribute” defined as xsd:attribute. The XPATH expression created in 6.0x is:
/MyBO/myAttribute
Then change it to:
/MyBO/@myAttribute
Component-specific considerations
Business object map
For WebSphere Integration Developer 6.1.2 or after, if you have mappings that include an
inherited type, you may receive the following warning message:
CWLAT0064W: The 4 transform includes an inherited type,
which might produce unwanted side effects when the map runs.
Business object maps can work on generalizations of types, this warning is raised to
indicate that the transform will still execute even if the inherited type comes in as part of
the instance document. This becomes more of a concern when mapping elements are
involved in a substitution group. Typically, if the element is not involved in a substitution
group, you do not need to be concerned about the warning.
XSLT mapper
There was a major change in XSLT mapper for WebSphere Integration Developer 6.1. It
can easily be identified from the file extension whether the maps are created prior to
version 6.1. The file extension of the old 6.0.x XSLT map files is .xmx, and that of the new
ones is .map.
Chapter 2. Migrating from previous versions of WebSphere Integration Developer
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If XSLT map files are created using 6.0.x, it continues to work in 6.1 or after. Therefore,
WebSphere Integration Developer does not migrate those files automatically, and
migration is not mandatory, however, the maps need to be migrated for further
enhancement. In addition, it is highly recommended to migrate the old .xmx files to
benefit from the performance improvement in the new XSLT map architecture.
To migrate the XSLT maps, double click the file which will open the mapping migrator
editor. Follow the steps in the Steps section as shown here:
To optimize the process, note the following:
v This mapping migrator discovers all the old map files (.xmx files) in the workspace.
You can select to migrate them all at once.
v Before launching the migrator, disable the automatic build. During the migration there
are lots of file changes which kick off auto-build frequently. Disabling it will make
shorten the migration time. After the mapping migration, enable the auto-build again.
MQ bindings
The MQ binding now uses an ActivationSpec class in its configuration rather than listener
ports. If you are migrating an application that uses an MQ binding for an import or
export, you will need to update your binding configuration. For more information on the
required migration steps for the MQ binding, see the topic Migrating WebSphere MQ
Bindings from version 6 to version 7 in the WebSphere Process Server information center.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Chapter 3. Migrating to WebSphere Process Server from
WebSphere InterChange Server
WebSphere Integration Developer provides the tools necessary to migrate from WebSphere InterChange
Server to WebSphere Process Server.
Migration from WebSphere InterChange Server to WebSphere Process Server is supported through the
following functions in WebSphere Integration Developer:
Note: Refer to the release notes for information concerning limitations related to migration in this release
of WebSphere Process Server.
v Automatic migration of source artifacts through migration tools that can be invoked as follows:
– Through the File > Import > Business Integration menu of WebSphere Integration Developer.
– From the Welcome page of WebSphere Integration Developer.
v Native support in the runtime of many WebSphere InterChange Server APIs.
v Support for the current WebSphere Business Integration Adapter technology so that existing adapters
will be compatible with the WebSphere Process Server.
v Options for migrating WebSphere Business Integration Adapter connector configurations to native
bindings or WebSphere Process Server equivalent adapters.
v Connector migration to mediation modules.
Even though migration of source artifacts is supported, it is recommended that extensive analysis and
testing be done to determine if the resulting applications will function as expected in WebSphere Process
Server, or if they will need post-migration redesign. This recommendation is based on the following
limitations in functional parity between WebSphere InterChange Server and this version of WebSphere
Process Server. There is no support in this version of WebSphere Process Server that is equivalent to these
WebSphere InterChange Server functions:
v Group Support
v Hot Deployment/Dynamic Update
v Scheduler - Pause Operation
v Security - Auditing
v Security - Fine Grain RBAC
v Security Descriptors are not migrated
Note: WebSphere Business Integration Server Express (WBISX) includes the same types of artifacts as
WebSphere InterChange Server. Only two features, Business Rules and Business Probe, are not supported
by the migration.
Supported migration paths
WebSphere Process Server migration tools support migration from WebSphere InterChange Server version
4.3 or later or WebSphere Business Integration Server Express version 4.4 or later.
Before migrating, note the following requirements:
Note:
v Any WebSphere InterChange Server release prior to version 4.3 will first need to migrate to version 4.3
before migrating to WebSphere Process Server.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
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v Any WebSphere Business Integration Server Express release prior to version 4.4 will first need to
migrate to version 4.4 before migrating to WebSphere Process Server.
Preparing for migration from WebSphere InterChange Server
Before migrating to WebSphere Process Server from WebSphere InterChange Server using WebSphere
Integration Developer, you must first ensure that you have properly prepared your environment.
These migration tools can be invoked from:
v The File > Import > Business Integration menu of WebSphere Integration Developer.
v The Welcome page of WebSphere Integration Developer.
Input to the migration tools is a repository jar file exported from WebSphere InterChange Server.
Therefore, before accessing the migration tools through any of these options, you must first:
1. Ensure that you are running a version of WebSphere InterChange Server that can be migrated to
WebSphere Process Server. See the topic "Supported migration paths for WebSphere InterChange
Server".
2. Export your source artifacts from WebSphere InterChange Server into a repository jar file using the
WebSphere InterChange Server repos_copy command as described in the documentation for
WebSphere InterChange Server. The wizard requires as input a WebSphere InterChange Server
repository JAR file. This JAR file should be self-contained with respect to the applications being
migrated. That is, all artifacts referenced by any of the artifacts in the JAR file must also be contained
in the JAR file. To ensure that the repository JAR file that will be generated is self-contained, run the
repos_copy command with the -vr option before exporting the server repository (this validates the
repository). If the repository is valid then repos_copy writes the following output to the console:
Validation Succeeded. All Dependencies Resolved. If the repository is not valid then repos_copy
prints a list of the dependencies that must be resolved. Resolve the dependencies prior to exporting
the repository. Export the repository artifacts and create the repository JAR file, using the WebSphere
InterChange Server repos_copy command with the -o option (See the WebSphere InterChange Server
4.3 documentation for more details, including how to export individual components).
Considerations for the WebSphere InterChange Server migration
process
The following considerations are intended to assist in the development of integration artifacts for
WebSphere InterChange Server. By adhering to these guidelines, you can ease the migration of
WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts to WebSphere Process Server.
These recommendations are meant to be used only as a guide. There may be cases where it is necessary
to deviate from these guidelines. In these cases care should be taken to limit the scope of the deviation to
minimize the amount of rework required to migrate the artifacts. Note that the guidelines outlined here
are not all general recommendations for the development of WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts.
They are instead limited in scope to those considerations which may affect the ease in which artifacts can
be migrated at a future time.
Considerations: General development
There are several considerations which apply broadly to most of the integration artifacts. In general, the
artifacts which leverage the facilities provided by the tools and conform to the metadata models enforced
by the tools will migrate most smoothly. Also, artifacts with significant extensions and external
dependencies are likely to require more manual intervention when migrating.
The following list summarizes the considerations for general development of WebSphere InterChange
Server based solutions to help ease future migration:
v Document the system and component design
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v Use the development tools to edit integration artifacts
v Leverage suggestions for defining rules with the tools and Java snippets
It is important for integration solutions to adhere to the programming model and architecture provided
by WebSphere InterChange Server. Each of the integration components within WebSphere InterChange
Server plays a well-defined role within the architecture. Significant deviations from this model will make
it more challenging to migrate content to the appropriate artifacts on WebSphere Process Server.
Another general practice which will improve the success of future migration projects is to document the
system design. Be sure to capture the integration architecture and design, including functional design and
quality of service requirements, the interdependencies of artifacts shared across projects, and also the
design decisions that were made during the deployment. This will assist in system analysis during
migration, and will minimize any rework efforts.
For creating, configuring, and modifying artifact definitions, use only the development tools provided.
Avoid manual manipulation of artifact metadata (for example, editing XML files directly), which may
break the artifact for migration.
Follow these guidelines when developing Java™ code within collaboration templates, maps, common code
utilities, and other components:
v
v
v
v
v
Use only the published APIs.
Use the activity editor.
Use adapters to access EISs.
Avoid external dependencies in Java snippet code.
Adhere to J2EE develop practices for portability.
v Do not spawn threads or use thread synchronization primitives. If you must, these will need to be
converted to use Asynchronous Beans when you migrate.
v Do not do any disk I/O using java.io.* Use JDBC to store any data.
v Do not perform any functions that may be reserved for an EJB container such as socket I/O,
classloading, loading native libraries, and so forth. If you must, these snippets would need manual
conversion to use EJB container functions when you migrate.
Use only the APIs published in the WebSphere InterChange Server product documentation for the
artifacts. These are outlined in detail in the WebSphere InterChange Server development guides.
Compatibility APIs will be provided in WebSphere Process Server for published WebSphere InterChange
Server APIs. Although WebSphere InterChange Server has many internal interfaces which you may use,
this practice is discouraged because these interfaces are not guaranteed to be supported in the future.
When designing business logic and transformation rules in maps and collaboration templates, try to
avoid field developed common code utility libraries, included as a Java archive (*.jar) file in the classpath
of WebSphere InterChange Server, as these will need to be migrated manually.
Use the activity editor tool to the greatest extent possible. This will ensure that the logic is described
through metadata which can more readily be converted to the new artifacts.
In any Java code snippets that may need to be developed, the code be as simple and atomic as possible.
The level of sophistication in the Java code should be on the order of scripting, involving basic
evaluations, operations, and computations, data formatting, type conversions, and so forth. If more
extensive or sophisticated application logic is required, consider using EJBs running in WebSphere
Application Server to encapsulate the logic, and use web service calls to invoke it from WebSphere
InterChange Server. Use standard JDK libraries rather than third party or external libraries which would
need to be migrated separately. Also, collect all related logic within a single code snippet, and avoid
using logic where connection and transaction contexts span multiple code snippets. With database
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
13
operations, for example, code related to obtaining a connection, beginning and ending a transaction, and
releasing the connection should be in one code snippet.
In general, ensure that code which is designed to interface with an Enterprise Information System (EIS) is
placed within adapters, and not within maps or collaboration templates. This is generally a recommended
practice for architecture design. Also, this will help avoid prerequisites for third party libraries and
related considerations within the code, such as connection management and possible Java Native
Interface (JNI) implementations.
Make the code as safe as possible by using appropriate exception handling. Also make the code
compatible to run within a J2EE application server environment, even though it is currently running
within a J2SE environment. Adhere to J2EE development practices, such as avoiding static variables,
spawning threads, and disk I/O. While these are generally good practices to adhere to, they can improve
portability.
Considerations: Common code utilities
If possible, you should avoid the development of common code utility libraries for use across integration
artifacts within the WebSphere InterChange Server environment. Also, consider using EJBs running in
WebSphere Application Server to encapsulate the logic, and use Web service calls to invoke them from
WebSphere InterChange Server.
While it is possible that some common code utility libraries may run appropriately on WebSphere Process
Server, you will be responsible for the migration of the custom utilities.
Considerations: Database connection pools
A WebSphere InterChange Server database connection pool within a map or collaboration template will
be rendered as a standard JDBC resource in WebSphere Process Server. However, the manner in which
connections and transactions are managed might differ between WebSphere InterChange Server and
WebSphere Process Server. Therefore, you should avoid keeping database transactions active across Java
snippets.
User-defined database connection pools are useful within maps and collaboration templates for simple
data lookups and for more sophisticated state management across process instances. A database
connection pool in WebSphere InterChange Server will be rendered as a standard JDBC resource in
WebSphere Process Server, and the basic function will be the same. However, the way connections and
transactions are managed may differ.
To maximize future portability, avoid keeping database transactions active across Java snippet nodes
within a collaboration template or map. For example, code related to obtaining a connection, beginning
and ending a transaction, and releasing the connection should be in one code snippet.
Considerations: Business objects
For the development of business objects you should use only the tools provided to configure artifacts,
and use explicit data types and lengths for data attributes, and only use the documented APIs.
Business objects within WebSphere Process Server are based on Service Data Objects (SDOs) which have
data attributes that are strongly typed. For business objects in WebSphere InterChange Server and
adapters, data attributes are not strongly typed, and string data types are sometimes specified for
non-string data attributes. To avoid issues in WebSphere Process Server, explicitly specify data types.
As business objects within WebSphere Process Server might be serialized at runtime as they are passed
between components, it is important to be explicit with the required lengths for data attributes to
minimize utilization of system resources. For this reason, do not use the maximum 255 character length
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
for a string attribute. Also, do not specify zero length attributes which currently default to 255 characters.
Instead, specify the exact length required for attributes.
XSD NCName rules apply to business object attribute names in WebSphere Process Server. Therefore, do
not use any spaces or ":" in names for business object attributes. Business object attribute names with
spaces or ":" are invalid in WebSphere Process Server. Rename business object attributes before migration.
If using an array in a business object, you cannot rely on the order of the array when indexing into the
array in maps or relationships. The construct that this migrates into in WebSphere Process Server does
not guarantee index order, particularly when entries are deleted.
It is important to use only the Business Object Designer tool to edit business object definitions, and to use
only the published APIs for business objects within integration artifacts.
Considerations: Collaboration templates
Many of the guidelines that have already been described apply to the development of collaboration
templates.
To ensure processes are described appropriately with metadata, always use the Process Designer tool for
the creation and modification of collaboration templates, and avoid editing the metadata files directly.
Use the Activity Editor tool wherever possible to maximize the use of metadata to describe the required
logic.
To minimize the amount of manual rework that may be required in migration, use only the documented
APIs within collaboration templates. Avoid the use of static variables and instead use non-static variables
and collaboration properties to address the requirements of the business logic. Avoid the use of Java
qualifiers final, transient and native in Java snippets. These cannot be enforced in the BPEL Java snippets
that are the result of migrating the Collaboration Templates.
To maximize future portability, avoid using explicit connection release calls and explicit transaction
bracketing (that is, explicit commits and explicit rollbacks) for User Defined Database Connection Pools.
Instead, make use of the container-managed implicit connection clean-up and implicit transaction
bracketing. Also, avoid keeping system connections and transactions active across Java snippet nodes
within a collaboration template. This applies to any connection to an external system, as well as
user-defined database connection pools. Operations with an external EIS should be managed within an
adapter, and code related to database operation should be contained within one code snippet. This may
be necessary within a collaboration which, when rendered as a BPEL business process component may be
selectively deployed as an interruptible flow. In this case, the process may be comprised of several
separate transactions, with only state and global variable information passed between the activities. The
context for any system connection or related transaction which spanned these process transactions would
be lost.
Name collaboration template property names in accordance with W3C XML NCName naming
conventions. WebSphere Process Server accepts names conforming to those conventions. Any disallowed
characters are not valid in BPEL property names that they will be migrated into. Rename properties to
remove any disallowed characters before migrating to avoid syntactical errors in the BPEL generated by
migration.
Do not reference variables using "this." For example, Instead of "this.inputBusObj" use just
"inputBusObj".
Use class-level scoping on variables instead of scenario-scoped variables. Scenario-scoping is not carried
forward during migration.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
15
Initialize all variables declared in Java snippets with a default value, for example, "Object myObject =
null;". Ensure that all variables are initialized during declaration before migrating.
Ensure that there are no Java import statements in the user modifiable sections of your collaboration
templates. In the definition of the collaboration template, use the import fields to specify Java packages to
import.
Do not set incoming business object values to be stored in the triggeringBusObj variable. Within
WebSphere InterChange Server, the triggeringBusObj is read-only and its values cannot be overwritten, so
any incoming business object values will not be saved. If the triggeringBusObj is used as the receiving
variable for an incoming business object on an inbound service call, then after migration the behavior of
the inbound service call will be different: within the BPEL process, the incoming value from the inbound
service call will overwrite the value stored in triggeringBusObj.
Considerations: Maps
Many of the guidelines that have already been described for collaboration templates also apply to maps.
To ensure that maps are described appropriately with metadata, always use the Map Designer tool for the
creation and modification of maps, and avoid editing the metadata files directly. Use the activity editor
tool wherever possible to maximize the use of metadata to describe the required logic.
When referencing child business objects in a map, use a submap for the child business objects.
Avoid using Java code as the "value" in a SET since that is not valid in WebSphere Process Server. Use
constants instead. For example, if the set value is "xml version=" + "1.0" + " encoding=" + "UTF-8" this
will not validate in WebSphere Process Server. Instead, change it to "xml version=1.0 encoding=UTF-8"
before migrating.
To minimize the amount of manual rework that may be required in migration, use only the documented
APIs within maps. Avoid the use of static variables and instead use non-static variables. Avoid the use of
Java qualifiers final, transient and native in map custom code.
If using an array in a business object, do not rely on the order of the array when indexing into the array
in maps. The construct that this migrates into in WebSphere Process Server does not guarantee index
order, particularly when entries are deleted.
To maximize future portability, avoid using explicit connection release calls and explicit transaction
bracketing (that is, explicit commits and explicit rollbacks) for User Defined Database Connection Pools.
Instead, make use of the container-managed implicit connection clean-up and implicit transaction
bracketing. Also, avoid keeping system connections and transactions active in custom map steps across
transformation node boundaries. This applies to any connection to an external system, as well as
user-defined database connection pools. Operations with an external EIS should be managed within an
adapter, and code related to database operation should be contained within one custom step.
Do not use inner classes in your maps. The migration command (reposMigrate) does not migrate inner
classes and you will receive errors if your maps contain them. In a WebSphere InterChange Server
repository, an inner class could be defined in a node and referenced by other nodes within the same
collaboration template. In WebSphere Process Server, an inner class defined in a BPEL component cannot
be used by other components. Due to this limitation, inner classes are not translated and must be dealt
with manually. Recommended changes include packaging the inner class code in a library as an external
class, or removing the inner class declaration, resolving any errors, and placing the code as needed
throughout the BPEL.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Considerations: Relationships
For relationships, while relationship definitions will be able to be migrated for use in WebSphere Process
Server, the relationship table schema and instance data may be reused by WebSphere Process Server and
also shared concurrently between WebSphere InterChange Server and WebSphere Process Server.
Use only the tools provided to configure the related components, and use only the published APIs for
relationships within integration artifacts.
Use only the relationship editor to edit relationship definitions. In addition, allow only WebSphere
InterChange Server to configure the relationship schema, which is generated automatically upon
deployment of relationship definitions. Do not alter the relationship table schema directly with database
tools or SQL scripts. If you must manually modify relationship instance data within the relationship table
schema, be sure to use the facilities provided by the Relationship Manager.
Considerations: Access framework clients
Do not develop any new clients adopting the CORBA IDL interface APIs. This will not be supported in
WebSphere Process Server.
Considerations: Preventing database collisions
If a migrated application causes multiple events to occur at the same time to WebSphere Business
Integration components, database collisions, or deadlocks could occur. These occur when the WebSphere
Process Server Application Scheduler (AppScheduler) schedules multiple events to occur at exactly the
same time. You can prevent database collisions from occurring by scheduling events to occur at different
times.
When a deadlock occurs, the event that caused it is rolled back and attempted again as soon as possible.
This cycle continues until each of the threads attempting to access the database successfully updates it.
For example:
AppScheduler E com.ibm.wbiserver.scheduler.AppSchedulerMB process CWLWS0021E:
The AppSchedulerMB.process method has generated an exception.
WSRdbXaResour E DSRA0304E: XAException occurred. XAException contents and details are:
The DB2 Error message is : Error executing a XAResource.end(), Server returned
XA_RBDEADLOCK The DB2 Error code is : -4203
The DB2 SQLState is : null
To prevent this from occurring, schedule the events to occur far enough apart so that deadlocks do not
occur. Schedule events to occur at least two seconds apart, however, the amount of time you need will
vary depending on other factors in your environment that affect performance such as database size,
hardware, connection speed and other factors.
Considerations: Post-migration
When applications have been migrated from WebSphere InterChange Server to WebSphere Integration
Developer or WebSphere Process Server, special attention is required in some areas to enable migrated
applications to function in WebSphere Integration Developer and WebSphere Process Server consistently
with their intended function due to differences with the architecture WebSphere InterChange Server.
For more information regarding post-migration considerations, see the topic "Post-migration
considerations" in the WebSphere Process Server information center.
For information on how to download server documentation, see Viewing or downloading WebSphere
Process Server documentation.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
17
WebSphere InterChange Server migration scenarios
There are a number of WebSphere InterChange Server migration scenarios that are supported by
WebSphere Integration Developer.
The following scenarios outline the migration process from WebSphere InterChange Server:
Migrating a WebSphere Business Integration EJB adapter to a WebSphere Process
Server Stateless Session Bean
The Migration wizard gives the option to migrate to either a JMS binding connecting to the existing
WebSphere Business Integration adapter or to a new Stateless Session Bean. The migration will generate
skeleton artifacts.
Migrating a WebSphere Business Integration HTTP adapter to a WebSphere
Process Server native binding
If the HTTP connector was configured with a protocol listener, then you will need to modify your client
application before connecting to the migrated connector. For example, if the connector is called
HTTPConnector, is listening on port 8080 and using the URL /wbia/samples/webservices then when
migrated to WebSphere Process Server, the port will be 9080 (the WC_defaulthost port) and the URL will
change to /HTTPConnectorWeb/wbia/samples/http. In WebSphere InterChange Server you can access this
using http://localhost:8080/wbia/http/samples while in WebSphere Process Server it will be
http://localhost:9080/HTTPConnectorWeb/wbia/http/samples .
The Migration wizard gives the option to migrate to either a JMS binding connecting to the existing
WebSphere Business Integration adapter or to a new HTTP binding. The wizard will allow you to select
an ICS default data handler, create a WPS data handler skeleton, or use a custom data handler. The
default data handler in the Migration wizard is the XML data handler.
This migration scenario also supports dynamic endpoint routing.
Migrating a WebSphere Business Integration JMS adapter to a WebSphere
Process Server JMS or Generic JMS native binding
The Migration wizard gives the option to migrate to either a JMS binding connecting to the existing
WebSphere Business Integration adapter or to a new JMS or Generic JMS binding. The wizard will allow
you to select an ICS default data handler, create a WPS data handler skeleton, or use a custom data
handler. Choosing the default data handler option provides the CwDataHandler.
If you select the JMS binding, you will need to create the Generic JMS, Queue Connection Factory, JMS
Queues, and JMS Listener Ports, and you will also need to generate a new bindings file that includes
entries for the queues. See the WebSphere Process Server information center for more information on
working with JMS bindings. For information on how to download server documentation, see Viewing or
downloading WebSphere Process Server documentation.
If you select the Generic JMS binding, you will need to create the Generic JMS, Queue Connection
Factory, and JMS Queues, and you will also need to generate a new bindings file that includes entries for
the queues. The listener ports are created during deployment. See the WebSphere Process Server
information center for more information on working with Generic JMS bindings. For information on how
to download server documentation, see Viewing or downloading WebSphere Process Server
documentation.
The JMS or Generic JMS supports dynamic endpoint routing. Because of this, the Send queue in the
import is not used and the migration has left this value blank. You will need to provide a value before
the module can be deployed and started.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Migrating a WebSphere Business Integration MQ adapter to a WebSphere Process
Server MQ or MQ JMS native binding
The Migration wizard gives the option to migrate to either a JMS binding connecting to the existing
WebSphere Business Integration adapter or to a new MQ or MQ JMS binding.
The MQ or MQ JMS supports dynamic endpoint routing. Because of this, the Request queue is not used
and the migration has left this value blank. You will need to provide a valid queue (but recommended
unused in case of problems) before the module can be deployed and started. Also, provide a valid Reply
queue for the export.
The wizard will allow you to select an ICS default data handler, create a WPS data handler skeleton, or
use a custom data handler. Choosing the default data handler option provides the CwDataHandler.
If you select MQ JMS, you will need to additionally configure the Destination Queue and Connection
Factory. Open the outbound map for the MFC, and edit the URL in Custom Step #3 to include the
Connection Factory name. A sample URL looks like this:
jms:/queue?destination=MQOUTPUT&connectionFactory=&targetService=Output
Enter the value between connectionFactory= and the &. The final string would look like:
jms:/queue?destination=MQOUTPUT&connectionFactory=MYCONNECTIONFACTORY&targetService=Output
Migrating a WebSphere Business Integration Web Services adapter to a
WebSphere Process Server HTTP native binding
If the WS connector was configured with a protocol listener, then you will need to modify your client
application before connecting to the migrated connector. For example, if the connector is called
WSConnector, listening on port 8080 and using the URL /wbia/samples/webservices then when migrated
to WebSphere Process Server, the port will be 9080 (the WC_defaulthost port) and the URL will change to
/WSConnectorWeb/wbia/samples/webservices
There are two possible scenarios for this type of migration:
1. If the Web Services adapter uses the HTTP transport protocol, then the Migration wizard will give the
option to migrate to either a JMS binding connecting to the existing WebSphere Business Integration
adapter or to a new HTTP binding.
2. If the Web Services adapter uses the JMS transport protocol, then the only option for migration is the
JMS binding connecting to the existing WebSphere Business Integration adapter.
Note that in this type of migration, the wizard will not allow you to select a custom data handler.
This migration scenario also supports dynamic endpoint routing.
Migrating WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts using the Migration
wizard
You can use the WebSphere Integration Developer Migration wizard to migrate your existing WebSphere
InterChange Server artifacts.
The wizard will perform the migration based on the following:
1. Adapters are migrated to native bindings if they can be supported as native bindings; and
2. If an adapter is detected as one that has an equivalent JCA connector, then the option is given to
import that. By importing the connector, you set up the environment to be migrated to the JCA
adapter using the Migration wizard.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
19
To use the Migration wizard to migrate your WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts, follow these steps:
1. Invoke the wizard by selecting File > Import > Business Integration > WebSphere InterChange
Server Repository and click Next.
2. The Migration wizard opens. Enter the WebSphere InterChange Server repository path or click
Browse JARs to select the JAR file to be used in the migration process.
3. Enter the name of a new or existing WebSphere Integration Developer library.
4. You can also add a WebSphere InterChange Server assembly editor template to be loaded and used
for XML to Java conversion. If custom APIs (My Library) are created for use in the activity editor,
the migration tool must refer to the custom activity editor template to determine how to migrate the
custom API to Java. These templates can be found in the root directory .wbiActEditorSettings located
in WebSphere InterChange Server workspace directory. Generally, the template files have a .bbt file
extension. Ensure that you load these templates in the template box. If you do not add a template,
the Standard Assembly Editor Template V4.3.3 will be used for XML to Java conversion.
5. Select Enable selective migration if you want to choose specific collaboration objects and connectors
to migrate and click Next.
Note: Enabling selective migration is not recommended if you plan to split the shared library. For
information about splitting the shared library, see step 11.
6. From this page, select the artifacts for migration by highlighting the available collaboration objects
and connectors from the lists on the left and click Add to add the artifact to the list box on the right.
Note that the supporting artifacts (such as business objects, maps, and relationships) will be added
automatically.
7. After selecting the collaboration objects and connectors, you can choose to perform a complete or
partial recursive selection. By using the complete recursive option, all direct and indirect dependent
artifacts will be selected. The partial recursive option depends on the type of artifact selected. For
example, for the collaboration object, all direct dependent connectors will be selected automatically,
then the supporting artifacts are selected. If the artifact type is the connector, all direct dependent
collaboration objects will be selected automatically first. Then all direct dependent connectors for
these collaboration objects are selected before finally selecting the supporting artifacts.
8. Click Next to review the current selection results based on the root artifacts that have been chosen
for migration. Use the filter to filter the results and sort a specific column by clicking on the
column's header.
9. Click Next to add more supporting artifacts to the list for migration. From this page you can select
supporting artifacts (such as business objects, maps, and relationships) that were not discovered
automatically by the Migration wizard. Select the artifacts for migration by highlighting them from
the lists on the left and click Add to add the artifact to the list box on the right.
10. Click Next to configure the migration settings for each connector. From this page, you can select the
appropriate target binding and data handlers for each connector being migrated. Select the connector
from the list and choose a target binding and then a custom data handler JAR file. Note that the
Migration wizard will not allow the migration process to proceed until all connector values are set.
11. Click Next. The Conversion Options page displays. From here you can accept the recommended
options or change them:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
The following table details the migration conversion options:
Option
Select how Java parsing errors in the migration process
should be treated
Description
Errors (recommended)
All Java conversion problems are treated as
errors and you will need to review the error log
for more details.
Warnings
All Java conversion problems are treated as
warnings only and the artifact will be migrated
by the Migration wizard as best as possible.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
21
Option
Description
Select the action for when content is missing or another
Missing content - complete the migration
error occurs
(recommended)
The migration process will continue even if
there are missing artifacts in the source JAR file.
Missing content - stop the migration
The migration process will stop if there are
missing artifacts in the source JAR file.
Other errors - complete the migration (recommended)
The migration process will continue to process
the remaining artifacts in a JAR file even if an
error occurs during the processing of a given
artifact.
Other errors - stop the migration
The migration process will stop as soon as an
error is detected. The artifact with the error, and
all subsequent artifacts, are not processed.
Perform event sequencing for all asynchronous WSDL
methods
Disable (recommended)
The migration process will not enable event
sequencing on any WSDL methods.
Enable The migration process will enable event
sequencing for all asynchronous WSDL
methods.
Merge the connector module and the collaboration
module
Disable (recommended)
The connector module and collaboration module
will not be merged together when the connector
module only binds to one collaboration.
Selecting this option means that the migrated
modules may be easier to extend.
Enable The connector module and collaboration module
will be merged together when the connector
module only binds to one collaboration.
Selecting this option means that the migrated
modules may not be easily extended thereby
reducing the number of modules.
Note the following limitations when selecting
the Enable option:
v The original scheduler configuration will not
take effect on the merged connector module
and collaboration module.
v The connector being merged will not be able
to migrate to a JCA adapter later.
Note: This option will be disabled if the collaboration
invokes the DynamicSend API.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Option
Split the shared library
Note: The recommended option (Disable or Enable)
depends on whether you selected the check box for
Enable selective migration in step 5 on page 20.
Description
Disable
The shared library is not split into smaller
shared libraries.
Select Disable to maintain a single shared
library of the entire WebSphere InterChange
Server repository.
Note: If you selected Enable selective
migration in step 5 on page 20, the
recommended option is Disable
(recommended).
Enable The single shared library is split into smaller
shared libraries. These smaller shared libraries
contain only those artifacts that the dependent
projects share, thus reducing the overall size of
the EAR file to be installed into the migrated
runtime environment.
By selecting Enable, you can make the artifact
migration process more efficient and less
memory intensive at run time. By splitting the
shared library into smaller shared libraries, you
migrate only those artifacts used by a particular
process (rather than migrating all of the artifacts
from the WebSphere InterChange Server
repository), which greatly reduces the size of the
EAR file to be installed into the migrated
runtime environment and reduces the number
of artifacts that the artifact loader must process
to load the correct business objects.
Note: If you did not select Enable selective
migration in step 5 on page 20, the
recommended option is Enabled
(recommended).
Note: If you selected Enable selective
migration in step 5 on page 20, the
recommended option is Disable
(recommended).
Selecting both options, Enable selective migration and
Split the shared library, introduces an unnecessary level
of complexity to the migration task (because the artifacts
added through selective migration must also be added
separately if you select Enable for Split the shared
library.
For a migration that involves a simple repository (two or
three self-contained groups), you might want to split
shared library to migrate the repository in one batch.
However, for a large and complex repository, for
example more than 5 self-contained groups, you might
want to use selective migration to migrate the content
incrementally.
12. Click Next.
If you set Split the shared library to Disable on the Conversion Options page, a Migration
Summary page displays. Proceed to step 14 on page 25
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
23
If you set Split the shared library to Enable (recommended) on the Conversion Options page, a
Name the Libraries page displays. Proceed to step 13
13. Name the libraries.
From the Name the Libraries page, you can perform the following actions:
a. Set the library name.
The default library name is based on the name that you entered in step 3 on page 20.
You can change the default name by clicking the library name in the table.
b. View the connectors.
Information in the Connector column of the table specifies the connectors which can give you
information about which subgroup this library is associated with.
Tip: If the list of the artifacts is too long for the cell, use the hover help to display all the
connectors.
c. View the collaborations.
Information in the Collaborations column of the table specifies the collaboration objects that can
provide you with information about which sub group this library is associated with.
Tip: If the list of the artifacts is too long for the cell, use the hover help to display all of the
collaboration objects.
d. Add more artifacts in the shared library by clicking Add More.
An Add Supporting Artifacts page displays, which looks similar to the following screen capture:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
You cannot remove the preselected artifacts (shown on the right side) from the list.
You can only add or remove the original artifacts (shown on the left side).
The list is sorted in ascending order. The items on the right are categorized by preselected and
user-selected and sorted separately.
14. After you have reviewed the summary details, click Finish to begin the migration process.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
25
A progress bar at the bottom of the migration dialog indicates the progress of the migration. Once the
process has completed, the dialog disappears and the Migration Results window opens:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Click Close to finish the process and to build the new workspace. You can deselect the Build workspace
on close option if you do not want the workspace to build at this time.
Verifying the WebSphere InterChange Server migration
If no errors are reported during the migration of the WebSphere InterChange Server .jar file, then the
migration of the artifacts was successful. If the migration has not completed successfully, a list of errors,
warnings, and informational messages will be displayed in the Migration Results window. You can use
these messages to verify the WebSphere InterChange Server migration.
Note: Due to the complexity of migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server to WebSphere Process
Server, you are strongly urged to perform extensive testing of the resulting applications running in
WebSphere Process Server to ensure that they function as expected before putting them into production.
If you decide to not stop on the first failure, you will see a green check mark icon in the Migration
Results window, but there may also be red Xs in the list. Therefore, you will need to review these in the
list. If you decide to stop on the first failure and you receive a failure or error, you will see a red X in the
Migration Results window instead of a green check mark and you will need to review the failures in the
list.
Working with migration failures from WebSphere InterChange Server
If the migration process from WebSphere InterChange Server fails, there are a two ways in which to deal
with the failures.
Note: You may prefer the first option as you will initially be more familiar with WebSphere InterChange
Server. However, as you become more experienced with WebSphere Process Server and its new artifacts,
you may choose to repair the migrated artifacts in WebSphere Integration Developer.
1. If the nature of the error permits, you can adjust the WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts using the
WebSphere InterChange Server toolset, and export the jar file again and retry the migration.
2. You can fix any errors in the resulting WebSphere Process Server artifacts by editing the artifacts in
WebSphere Integration Developer.
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
27
WebSphere InterChange Server and WebSphere Business Integration
Server Express artifacts handled by the migration tools
The migration tools can automatically migrate some of the WebSphere InterChange Server and
WebSphere Business Integration Server Express artifacts.
The following artifacts can be migrated:
v Business objects become WebSphere Process Server business objects.
v Maps become WebSphere Process Server maps.
v Relationships become WebSphere Process Server relationships and roles.
v Collaboration templates become WebSphere Process Server BPEL and WSDL.
v Collaboration objects become WebSphere Process Server modules containing SCA component that are
bound to the Collaboration Template BPEL and all the necessary SCA wiring.
v Connector definitions become WebSphere Process Server mediation modules containing SCA imports
and exports and mediation flow components if the connector is migrated to a native binding. The
connector definitions become WebSphere Process Server modules containing SCA imports and exports
and mediation flow components that allow communication with Legacy Adapters, Legacy Adapter
Administrative Artifact, and all the necessary SCA wiring.
The migration tools create a Jython script that can be used with the wsadmin command line tool to
configure resources in WebSphere Process Server for the following WebSphere InterChange Server
artifacts or resources:
v DBConnection pools
v Relationships
v Scheduler entries
The migration tools do not handle the following WebSphere InterChange Server artifacts:
v Benchmark artifacts
Supported WebSphere InterChange Server APIs
In addition to the WebSphere InterChange Server source artifact migration tools provided in WebSphere
Process Server and WebSphere Integration Developer, there is also support for many of the APIs that
were provided in WebSphere InterChange Server. The migration tools work in conjunction with these
WebSphere InterChange Server APIs by preserving your custom snippet code as much as possible when
migrating.
Note: These APIs are provided only to support migrated WebSphere InterChange Server applications
until they can be modified to use new Process Server APIs.
The supported WebSphere InterChange Server APIs in Process Server are listed below. These APIs
provide functions in WebSphere Process Server similar to the function that they provide in WebSphere
InterChange Server. See the WebSphere InterChange Server documentation for a functional description of
these APIs.
CwBiDiEngine
AppSide_Connector/
v BiDiBOTransformation(BusinessObject, String, String, boolean):BusinessObj
v BiDiBusObjTransformation(BusObj, String, String, boolean):BusObj
v BiDiStringTransformation(String, String, String):String
JavaConnectorUtil
AppSide_Connector/
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v
v
v
v
v
INFRASTRUCTURE_MESSAGE_FILE
CONNECTOR_MESSAGE_FILE
XRD_WARNING
XRD_TRACE
XRD_INFO
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
XRD_ERROR
XRD_FATAL
LEVEL1
LEVEL2
LEVEL3
LEVEL4
LEVEL5
v
v
v
v
v
v
createBusinessObject(String):BusinesObjectInterface
createBusinessObject(String, Locale):BusinesObjectInterface
createBusinessObject(String, String):BusinesObjectInterface
createContainer(String):CxObjectContainerInterface
generateMsg(int, int, int, int, int, Vector):String
generateMsg(int, int, int, int, Vector):String
v getBlankValue():String
v getEncoding():String
v getIgnoreValue():String
v getLocale():String
v getSDOFromString(String inputString, String sdoName, String metaObjectName, String mimeType)
v getStringFromSDO(DataObject sdo, String metaObjectName, String mimeType)
v isBlankValue(Object):boolean
v isIgnoreValue(Object):boolean
v isTraceEnabled(int):boolean
v logMsg(String)
v logMsg(String, int)
v traceWrite(int, String)
JavaConnectorUtilDH
datahandler/
wbi/
ibm/
com/
v getSDOFromString(String inputString, String sdoName, String metaObjectName, String mimeType)
v getStringFromSDO(DataObject sdo, String metaObjectName, String mimeType)
BusObj
Collaboration/
v
v
v
v
v
v
BusObj(DataObject)
BusObj(String)
BusObj(String, Locale)
copy(BusObj)
duplicate():BusObj
equalKeys(BusObj):boolean
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
29
v
v
v
v
v
equals(Object):boolean
equalsShallow(BusObj):boolean
exists(String):boolean
get(int):Object
get(String):Object
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
getBoolean(String):boolean
getBusObj(String):BusObj
getBusObjArray(String):BusObjArray
getCount(String):int
getDouble(String):double
getFloat(String):float
getInt(String):int
v
v
v
v
v
v
getKeys():String
getLocale():java.util.Locale
getLong(String):long
getLongText(String):String
getString(String):String
getType():String
v getValues():String
v getVerb():String
v isBlank(String):boolean
v
v
v
v
isKey(String):boolean
isNull(String):boolean
isRequired(String):boolean
keysToString():String
v set(BusObj)
v set(int, Object)
v set(String, boolean)
v
v
v
v
v
set(String,
set(String,
set(String,
set(String,
set(String,
double)
float)
int)
long)
Object)
v set(String, String)
v setContent(BusObj)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
setDefaultAttrValues()
setKeys(BusObj)
setLocale(java.util.Locale)
setVerb(String)
setVerbWithCreate(String, String)
setWithCreate(String, boolean)
setWithCreate(String, BusObj)
v setWithCreate(String, BusObjArray)
v setWithCreate(String, double)
v setWithCreate(String, float)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v
v
v
v
v
setWithCreate(String,
setWithCreate(String,
setWithCreate(String,
setWithCreate(String,
toString():String
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
validData(String,
validData(String,
validData(String,
validData(String,
validData(String,
validData(String,
validData(String,
int)
long):
Object)
String)
boolean):boolean
BusObj):boolean
BusObjArray):boolean
double):boolean
float):boolean
int):boolean
long):boolean
v validData(String, Object):boolean
v validData(String, String):boolean
BusObjArray
Collaboration/
v addElement(BusObj)
v duplicate():BusObjArray
v elementAt(int):BusObj
v equals(BusObjArray):boolean
v getElements():BusObj[]
v getLastIndex():int
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
max(String):String
maxBusObjArray(String):BusObjArray
maxBusObjs(String):BusObj[]
min(String):String
minBusObjArray(String):BusObjArray
minBusObjs(String):BusObj[]
removeAllElements()
removeElement(BusObj)
removeElementAt(int)
v setElementAt(int, BusObj)
v size():int
v sum(String):double
v swap(int, int)
v toString():String
BaseDLM
DLM/
v BaseDLM(BaseMap)
v
v
v
v
v
getDBConnection(String):CwDBConnection
getDBConnection(String, boolean):CwDBConnection
getName():String
getRelConnection(String):DtpConnection
implicitDBTransactionBracketing():boolean
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
31
v
v
v
v
v
isTraceEnabled(int):boolean
logError(int)
logError(int, Object[])
logError(int, String)
logError(int, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
logError(int, String, String, String)
logError(int, String, String, String, String)
logError(int, String, String, String, String, String)
logError(String)
logInfo(int)
logInfo(int, Object[])
logInfo(int, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
logInfo(int, String,
logInfo(int, String,
logInfo(int, String,
logInfo(int, String,
logInfo(String)
logWarning(int)
String)
String, String)
String, String, String)
String, String, String, String)
v logWarning(int, Object[])
v logWarning(int, String)
v logWarning(int, String, String)
v
v
v
v
logWarning(int, String, String, String)
logWarning(int, String, String, String, String)
logWarning(int, String, String, String, String, String)
logWarning(String)
v raiseException(RunTimeEntityException)
v raiseException(String, int)
v raiseException(String, int, Object[])
v
v
v
v
v
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
int,
int,
int,
int,
int,
String)
String, String)
String, String, String)
String, String, String, String)
String, String, String, String, String)
v raiseException(String, String)
v releaseRelConnection(boolean)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
trace(int,
trace(int,
trace(int,
trace(int,
trace(int,
trace(int,
trace(int,
int)
int, Object[])
int, String)
int, String, String)
int, String, String, String)
int, String, String, String, String)
int, String, String, String, String, String)
v trace(int, String)
v trace(String)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
CwDBConnection
CwDBConnection/
CxCommon/
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
beginTransaction()
commit()
executePreparedSQL(String)
executePreparedSQL(String, Vector)
executeSQL(String)
executeSQL(String, Vector)
executeStoredProcedure(String, Vector)
getUpdateCount():int
v hasMoreRows():boolean
v inTransaction():boolean
v
v
v
v
isActive():boolean
nextRow():Vector
release()
rollback()
CwDBConstants
CwDBConnection/
CxCommon/
v PARAM_IN - 0
v PARAM_INOUT - 1
v PARAM_OUT - 2
CwDBStoredProcedureParam
CwDBConnection/
CxCommon/
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, Array)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, BigDecimal)
v
v
v
v
v
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
boolean)
Boolean)
byte[])
double)
Double)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, float)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, Float)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int,
int)
Integer)
java.sql.Blob)
java.sql.Clob)
java.sql.Date)
java.sql.Struct)
java.sql.Time)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, java.sql.Timestamp)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, Long)
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, String)
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
33
v CwDBStoredProcedureParam(int, String, Object)
v getParamType():int getValue():Object
DataHandler (Abstract Class)
DataHandlers/
crossworlds/
com/
v createHandler(String, String, String):DataHandler
v getBO(InputStream, Object):BusinessObjectInterface
v getBO(Object, BusinessObjectInterface, Object)
v getBO(Object, Object):BusinessObjectInterface
v getBO(Reader, BusinessObjectInterface, Object) (Abstract Method)
v getBO(Reader, Object):BusinessObjectInterface (Abstract Method)
v getBO(String, Object):BusinessObjectInterface
v getBOName(InputStream):String
v getBOName(Reader):String
v getBOName(String):String
v getBooleanOption(String):boolean
v getEncoding():String
v getLocale():Locale
v getOption(String):String
v getStreamFromBO(BusinessObjectInterface, Object):InputStream (Abstract Method)
v
v
v
v
getStringFromBO(BusinessObjectInterface, Object):String (Abstract Method)
setConfigMOName(String)
setEncoding(String)
setLocale(Locale)
v setOption(String, String)
v traceWrite(String, int)
NameHandler (Abstract Class)
DataHandlers/
crossworlds/
com/
v getBOName(Reader, String):String) (Abstract Method)
ConfigurationException (extends java.lang.Exception)
Exceptions/
DataHandlers/
crossworlds/
com/
MalformedDataException (extends java.lang.Exception)
Exceptions/
DataHandlers/
crossworlds/
com/
NotImplementedException (extends java.lang.Exception)
Exceptions/
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
DataHandlers/
crossworlds/
com/
BusinessObjectInterface
CxCommon/
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
clone():Object
dump():String
getAppText():String
getAttrCount():int
getAttrDesc(int):CxObjectAttr
getAttrDesc(String):CxObjectAttr
getAttribute(String):Object
v
v
v
v
v
v
getAttributeIndex(String):int
getAttributeType(int):int
getAttributeType(String):int
getAttrName(int):String
getAttrValue(int):Object
getAttrValue(String):Object
v getBusinessObjectVersion():String
v getDefaultAttrValue(int):String
v getDefaultAttrValue(String):String
v getLocale():String
v getName():String
v getParentBusinessObject():BusinessObjectInterface
v getVerb():String
v getVerbAppText(String):String
v isBlank(int):boolean
v isBlank(String):boolean
v
v
v
v
v
isIgnore(int):boolean
isIgnore(String):boolean
isVerbSupported(String):boolean
makeNewAttrObject(int):Object
makeNewAttrObject(String):Object
v setAttributeWithCreate(String, Object)
v setAttrValue(int, Object)
v
v
v
v
v
setAttrValue(String, Object)
setDefaultAttrValues()
setLocale(Locale)
setLocale(String)
setVerb(String)
CxObjectAttr
CxCommon/
v BOOLEAN
v BOOLSTRING
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
35
v
v
v
v
v
DATE
DATESTRING
DOUBLE
DOUBSTRING
FLOAT
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
FLTSTRING
INTEGER
INTSTRING
INVALID_TYPE_NUM
INVALID_TYPE_STRING
LONGTEXT
LONGTEXTSTRING
v
v
v
v
v
v
MULTIPLECARDSTRING
OBJECT
SINGLECARDSTRING
STRING
STRSTRING
equals(Object):boolean
v getAppText():String
v getCardinality():String
v getDefault():String
v getMaxLength():int
v getName():String
v getRelationType():String
v getTypeName():String
v getTypeNum():String
v hasCardinality(String):boolean
v hasName(String):boolean
v
v
v
v
v
hasType(String):boolean
isForeignKeyAttr():boolean
isKeyAttr():boolean
isMultipleCard():boolean
isObjectType():boolean
v isRequiredAttr():boolean
v isType(Object):boolean
CxObjectContainerInterface
CxCommon/
v getBusinessObject(int):BusinessObjectInterface
v getObjectCount():int
v insertBusinessObject(BusinessObjectInterface)
v removeAllObjects()
v removeBusinessObjectAt(int)
v setBusinessObject(int, BusinessObjectInterface)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
DtpConnection
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
beginTran()
commit()
executeSQL(String)
executeSQL(String, Vector)
executeStoredProcedure(String, Vector)
getUpdateCount():int
hasMoreRows():boolean
inTransaction():boolean
v isActive():boolean
v nextRow():Vector
v rollback()
DtpDataConversion
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v BOOL_TYPE - 4
v CANNOTCONVERT - 2
v DATE_TYPE - 5
v DOUBLE_TYPE - 3
v FLOAT_TYPE - 2
v INTEGER_TYPE - 0
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
LONGTEXT_TYPE - 6
OKTOCONVERT - 0
POTENTIALDATALOSS - 1
STRING_TYPE - 1
UNKNOWN_TYPE - 999
getType(double):int
getType(float):int
getType(int):int
v getType(Object):int
v isOKToConvert(int, int):int
v isOKToConvert(String, String):int
v toBoolean(boolean):Boolean
v
v
v
v
v
toBoolean(Object):Boolean
toDouble(double):Double
toDouble(float):Double
toDouble(int):Double
toDouble(Object):Double
v
v
v
v
v
toFloat(double):Float
toFloat(float):Float
toFloat(int):Float
toFloat(Object):Float
toInteger(double):Integer
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
37
v
v
v
v
v
toInteger(float):Integer
toInteger(int):Integer
toInteger(Object):Integer
toPrimitiveBoolean(Object):boolean
toPrimitiveDouble(float):double
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
toPrimitiveDouble(int):double
toPrimitiveDouble(Object):double
toPrimitiveFloat(double):float
toPrimitiveFloat(int):float
toPrimitiveFloat(Object):float
toPrimitiveInt(double):int
toPrimitiveInt(float):int
v
v
v
v
v
toPrimitiveInt(Object):int
toString(double):String
toString(float):String
toString(int):String
toString(Object):String
DtpDate
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v
v
v
v
DtpDate()
DtpDate(long, boolean)
DtpDate(String, String)
DtpDate(String, String, String[], String[])
v addDays(int):DtpDate
v addMonths(int):DtpDate
v addWeekdays(int):DtpDate
v
v
v
v
v
addYears(int):DtpDate
after(DtpDate):boolean
before(DtpDate):boolean
calcDays(DtpDate):int
calcWeekdays(DtpDate):int
v get12MonthNames():String[]
v get12ShortMonthNames():String[]
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
get7DayNames():String[]
getCWDate():String
getDayOfMonth():String
getDayOfWeek():String
getHours():String
getIntDay():int
getIntDayOfWeek():int
v
v
v
v
getIntHours():int
getIntMilliSeconds():int
getIntMinutes():int
getIntMonth():int
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v
v
v
v
v
getIntSeconds():int
getIntYear():int
getMaxDate(BusObjArray, String, String):DtpDate
getMaxDateBO(BusObj[], String, String):BusObj[]
getMaxDateBO(BusObjArray, String, String):BusObj[]
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
getMinDate(BusObjArray, String, String):DtpDate
getMinDateBO(BusObj[], String, String):BusObj[]
getMinDateBO(BusObjArray, String, String):BusObj[]
getMinutes():String
getMonth():String
getMSSince1970():long
getNumericMonth():String
v
v
v
v
v
v
getSeconds():String
getShortMonth():String
getYear():String
set12MonthNames(String[], boolean)
set12MonthNamesToDefault()
set12ShortMonthNames(String[])
v set12ShortMonthNamesToDefault()
v set7DayNames(String[])
v set7DayNamesToDefault()
v toString():String
v toString(String):String
v toString(String, boolean):String
DtpMapService
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v runMap(String, String, BusObj[], CxExecutionContext):BusObj[]
DtpSplitString
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v DtpSplitString(String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
elementAt(int):String
firstElement():String
getElementCount():int
getEnumeration():Enumeration
lastElement():String
v nextElement():String
v prevElement():String
v reset()
DtpUtils
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v padLeft(String, char, int):String
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
39
v
v
v
v
v
padRight(String, char, int):String
stringReplace(String, String, String):String
truncate(double):int
truncate(double, int):double
truncate(float):int
v truncate(float, int):double
v truncate(Object):int
v truncate(Object, int):double
BusObjInvalidVerbException (extends InterchangeExceptions)
Exceptions/
CxCommon/
v getFormattedMessage()
IdentityRelationship
relationship/
utilities/
crossworlds/
com/
v
v
v
v
v
addMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, Object, CxExecutionContext)
deleteMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, CxExecutionContext)
deleteMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, Object, CxExecutionContext)
foreignKeyLookup(String, String, BusObj, String, BusObj, String, CxExecutionContext)
foreignKeyXref(String, String, String, BusObj, String, BusObj, String, CxExecutionContext)
v maintainChildVerb(String, String, String, BusObj, String, BusObj, String, CxExecutionContext, boolean,
boolean)
v maintainCompositeRelationship(String, String, BusObj, Object, CxExecutionContext)
v maintainSimpleIdentityRelationship(String, String, BusObj, BusObj, CxExecutionContext)
v updateMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, String, String, String, CxExecutionContext)
MapExeContext
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v ACCESS_REQUEST - "SUBSCRIPTION_DELIVERY"
v ACCESS_RESPONSE - "ACCESS_RETURN_REQUEST"
v EVENT_DELIVERY - "SUBSCRIPTION_DELIVERY"
v SERVICE_CALL_FAILURE - "CONSUME_FAILED"
v SERVICE_CALL_REQUEST - "CONSUME"
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
SERVICE_CALL_RESPONSE - "DELIVERBUSOBJ"
getConnName():String
getGenericBO():BusObj
getInitiator():String
getLocale():java.util.Locale
getOriginalRequestBO():BusObj
setConnName(String)
v setInitiator(String)
v setLocale(java.util.Locale)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Participant
RelationshipServices/
Server/
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
Participant(String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
int, BusObj)
int, String)
int, long)
int, int)
int, double)
int, float)
int, boolean)
BusObj)
v Participant(String, String, String)
v Participant(String, String, long)
v
v
v
v
v
Participant(String, String,
Participant(String, String,
Participant(String, String,
Participant(String, String,
getBoolean():boolean
int)
double)
float)
boolean)
v getBusObj():BusObj
v getDouble():double
v getFloat():float
v
v
v
v
getInstanceId():int
getInt():int
getLong():long
getParticipantDefinition():String
v
v
v
v
getRelationshipDefinition():String
getString():String INVALID_INSTANCE_ID
set(boolean)
set(BusObj)
v set(double)
v set(float)
v set(int)
v set(long)
v set(String)
v
v
v
v
v
setInstanceId(int)
setParticipantDefinition(String)
setRelationshipDefinition(String)
setParticipantDefinition(String)
setRelationshipDefinition(String)
Relationship
RelationshipServices/
Server/
v addMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, Object, CxExecutionContext)
v addParticipant(Participant):int
v addParticipant(String, String, boolean):int
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
41
v
v
v
v
v
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
BusObj):int
double):int
float):int
int):int
int, boolean):int
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
addParticipant(String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
int, BusObj):int
int, double):int
int, float):int
int, int):int
int, long):int
int, String):int
long):int
v
v
v
v
v
v
addParticipant(String, String, String):int
create(Participant):int
create(String, String, boolean):int
create(String, String, BusObj):int
create(String, String, double):int
create(String, String, float):int
v create(String, String, int):int
v create(String, String, long):int
v create(String, String, String):int
v
v
v
v
deactivateParticipant(Participant)
deactivateParticipant(String, String, boolean)
deactivateParticipant(String, String, BusObj)
deactivateParticipant(String, String, double)
v deactivateParticipant(String, String, float)
v deactivateParticipant(String, String, int)
v deactivateParticipant(String, String, long)
v
v
v
v
v
deactivateParticipant(String, String, String)
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String,
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String,
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String,
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String,
int)
int, boolean)
int, BusObj)
int, double)
v deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, float)
v deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, int)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, long)
deactivateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, String)
deleteMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, CxExecutionContext)
deleteMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, Object, CxExecutionContext)
deleteParticipant(Participant)
deleteParticipant(String, String, boolean)
deleteParticipant(String, String, BusObj)
v deleteParticipant(String, String, double)
v deleteParticipant(String, String, float)
v deleteParticipant(String, String, int)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v
v
v
v
v
deleteParticipant(String, String, long)
deleteParticipant(String, String, String)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, boolean)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, BusObj)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, double)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, float)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, int)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, long)
deleteParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, String)
getNewID(String):int
maintainCompositeRelationship(String, String, BusObj, Object, CxExecutionContext)
v
v
v
v
v
v
maintainSimpleIdentityRelationship(String, String, BusObj, BusObj, CxExecutionContext)
retrieveInstances(String, boolean):int[]
retrieveInstances(String, BusObj):int[]
retrieveInstances(String, double):int[]
retrieveInstances(String, float):int[]
retrieveInstances(String, int):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, long):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String, boolean):int[]
v
v
v
v
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
String,
String,
String,
String,
BusObj):int[]
double):int[]
float):int[]
int):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String, long):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String, String):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String[], boolean):int[]
v
v
v
v
v
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
retrieveInstances(String,
String[],
String[],
String[],
String[],
String[],
BusObj):int[]
double):int[]
float):int[]
int):int[]
long):int[]
v retrieveInstances(String, String[], String):int[]
v retrieveParticipants(String):Participant[]
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
retrieveParticipants(String, String):Participant[]
retrieveParticipants(String, String[]):Participant[]
retrieveParticipants(String, int):Participant[]
retrieveParticipants(String, String, int):Participant[]
retrieveParticipants(String, String[], int):Participant[]
updateMyChildren(String, String, BusObj, String, String, String, String, CxExecutionContext)
updateParticipant(String, String, BusObj)
v updateParticipantByInstance(Participant)
v updateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int)
v updateParticipantByInstance(String, String, int, BusObj)
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
43
UserStoredProcedureParam
Dtp/
CxCommon/
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
UserStoredProcedureParam(int, String, Object, String, String)
getParamDataTypeJavaObj():String
getParamDataTypeJDBC():int
getParamIndex():int
getParamIOType():String
getParamName():String
getParamValue():Object
setParamDataTypeJavaObj(String)
v setParamDataTypeJDBC(int)
v setParamIndex(int)
v
v
v
v
v
setParamIOType(String)
setParamName(String)
setParamValue(Object)
PARAM_TYPE_IN - "IN"
PARAM_TYPE_OUT - "OUT"
v PARAM_TYPE_INOUT - "INOUT"
v DATA_TYPE_STRING - "String"
v DATA_TYPE_INTEGER - "Integer"
v
v
v
v
DATA_TYPE_DOUBLE - "Double"
DATA_TYPE_FLOAT - "Float"
DATA_TYPE_BOOLEAN - "Boolean"
DATA_TYPE_TIME - "java.sql.Time"
v
v
v
v
DATA_TYPE_DATE - "java.sql.Date"
DATA_TYPE_TIMESTAMP - "java.sql.Timestamp"
DATA_TYPE_BIG_DECIMAL - "java.math.BigDecimal"
DATA_TYPE_LONG_INTEGER - "Long"
v DATA_TYPE_BINARY - "byte[]"
v DATA_TYPE_CLOB - "Clob"
v DATA_TYPE_BLOB - "Blob"
v DATA_TYPE_ARRAY - "Array"
v DATA_TYPE_STRUCT - "Struct"
v DATA_TYPE_REF - "Ref"
BaseCollaboration
Collaboration/
v BaseCollaboration(com.ibm.bpe.api.ProcessInstanceData)
v AnyException - "AnyException"
v AppBusObjDoesNotExist - "BusObjDoesNotExist"
v AppLogOnFailure - "AppLogOnFailure"
v AppMultipleHits - "AppMultipleHits"
v AppRequestNotYetSent - "AppRequestNotYetSent"
v AppRetrieveByContentFailed - "AppRetrieveByContent"
v AppTimeOut - "AppTimeOut"
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v
v
v
v
v
AppUnknown - "AppUnknown"
AttributeException - "AttributeException"
existsConfigProperty(String):boolean
getConfigProperty(String):String
getConfigPropertyArray(String):String[]
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
getCurrentLoopIndex():int
getDBConnection(String):CwDBConnection
getDBConnection(String, boolean):CwDBConnection getLocale():java.util.Locale
getMessage(int):String
getMessage(int, Object[]):String
getName():String
implicitDBTransactionBracketing():boolean
v
v
v
v
v
v
isCallerInRole(String):boolean
isTraceEnabled(int):boolean
JavaException - "JavaException"
logError(int)
logError(int, Object[])
logError(int, String)
v logError(int, String, String)
v logError(int, String, String, String)
v logError(int, String, String, String, String)
v
v
v
v
logError(int, String, String, String, String, String)
logError(String)
logInfo(int)
logInfo(int, Object[])
v logInfo(int, String)
v logInfo(int, String, String)
v logInfo(int, String, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
logInfo(int, String, String, String, String)
logInfo(int, String, String, String, String, String)
logInfo(String)
logWarning(int)
logWarning(int, Object[])
v logWarning(int, String)
v logWarning(int, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
logWarning(int, String, String, String)
logWarning(int, String, String, String, String)
logWarning(int, String, String, String, String, String)
logWarning(String)
not(boolean):boolean ObjectException - "ObjectException"
OperationException - "OperationException"
raiseException(CollaborationException)
v raiseException(String, int)
v raiseException(String, int, Object[])
v raiseException(String, int, String)
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
45
v
v
v
v
v
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
raiseException(String,
int, String,
int, String,
int, String,
int, String,
String)
String)
String, String)
String, String, String)
String, String, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
ServiceCallException - "ConsumerException"
ServiceCallTransportException - "ServiceCallTransportException"
SystemException - "SystemException"
trace(int, int)
trace(int, int, Object[])
trace(int, int, String)
trace(int, int, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
trace(int, int, String, String, String)
trace(int, int, String, String, String, String)
trace(int, int, String, String, String, String, String)
trace(int, String)
trace(String)
TransactionException - "TransactionException"
CxExecutionContext
CxCommon/
v CxExecutionContext()
v getContext(String):Object
v MAPCONTEXT - "MAPCONTEXT"
v setContext(String, Object)
CollaborationException
Collaboration/
v getMessage():String
v getMsgNumber():int
v getSubType():String
v getText():String
v getType():String
v toString():String
Filter
crossworlds/
com/
v Filter(BaseCollaboration)
v filterExcludes(String, String):boolean
v filterIncludes(String, String):boolean
v recurseFilter(BusObj, String, boolean, String, String):boolean
v recursePreReqs(String, Vector):int
Globals
crossworlds/
com/
v Globals(BaseCollaboration)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v callMap(String, BusObj):BusObj
SmartCollabService
crossworlds/
com/
v SmartCollabService()
v SmartCollabService(BaseCollaboration)
v doAgg(BusObj, String, String, String):BusObj
v doMergeHash(Vector, String, String):Vector
v doRecursiveAgg(BusObj, String, String, String):BusObj
v
v
v
v
v
v
doRecursiveSplit(BusObj, String):Vector
doRecursiveSplit(BusObj, String, boolean):Vector
getKeyValues(BusObj, String):String
merge(Vector, String):BusObj
merge(Vector, String, BusObj):BusObj
split(BusObj, String):Vector
StateManagement
crossworlds/
com/
v StateManagement()
v beginTransaction()
v commit()
v deleteBO(String, String, String)
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
deleteState(String, String, String, int)
persistBO(String, String, String, String, BusObj)
recoverBO(String, String, String):BusObj
releaseDBConnection()
resetData()
retrieveState(String, String, String, int):int
saveState(String, String, String, String, int, int, double)
setDBConnection(CwDBConnection)
updateBO(String, String, String, String, BusObj)
v updateState(String, String, String, String, int, int)
EventKeyAttrDef
EventManagement/
CxCommon/
v EventKeyAttrDef()
v EventKeyAttrDef(String, String)
v public String keyName
v public String keyValue
EventQueryDef
EventManagement/
CxCommon/
v EventQueryDef()
v EventQueryDef(String, String, String, String, int)
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
47
v
v
v
v
v
public
public
public
public
public
String nameConnector
String nameCollaboration
String nameBusObj
String verb
int ownerType
FailedEventInfo
EventManagement/
CxCommon/
v FailedEventInfo()
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
FailedEventInfo(String x6, int, EventKeyAttrDef[], int, int, String, String, int)
public String nameOwner
public String nameConnector
public String nameBusObj
public String nameVerb
public String strTime
public String strMessage
public int wipIndex
v public EventKeyAttrDef[] strbusObjKeys
v public int nKeys
v public int eventStatus
v public String expirationTime
v public String scenarioName
v public int scenarioState
Mapping the WebSphere Process Sever DataObject from WebSphere
InterChange Server XML
If you use the Legacy Adapters to connect to WebSphere Process Server, the following algorithm will
enable you to further understand how the WebSphere Process Sever DataObject was created from the
WebSphere InterChange Server XML. This information shows where the data values have been placed,
and also what data values have been chosen to replace the ones used in WebSphere InterChange Server.
General
v For setting the verb in the ChangeSummary, all settings will be done with the markCreate/Update/
Delete APIs.
v For setting the verb in the ChangeSummary/EventSummary, Create, Update, and Delete verbs will be
set in the ChangeSummary, while all other verbs will be set in the EventSummary.
v For getting the verb from the ChangeSummary:
– If isDelete is true, the verb will be Delete.
Note: The value of isCreate will be ignored if isDelete is true. This could happen if the creation was
marked before the DataObject entered the hub at which point it was deleted, or if the creation and
deletion both occurred in the hub.
– If isDelete is false and isCreate is true, the verb will be Create.
– If isDelete is false and isCreate is false, the verb will be Update.
v To avoid a DataObject being identified as Create instead of an intended Update, if logging is enabled,
you must:
– Suspend logging during the creation of the DataObject.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
– Resume logging for the update of the DataObject (or use the markUpdated API).
Loading
Loading will load a WebSphere InterChange Server runtime XML into a WebSphere Business Integration
BusinessGraph AfterImage instance.
v An instance of the appropriate BusinessGraph will be created.
v ChangeSummary Logging will be turned on, so that turning it on later will not clear the entries.
v ChangeSummary Logging will be paused to prevent unwanted information from entering the
ChangeSummary.
v The attributes of the top level BusinessObject will be created in the DataObject (see the section
"Attribute processing" below).
v If the top level BusinessObject has children BusinessObjects, these will be processed recursively.
v The attributes of these children BusinessObjects will be created in the DataObject (see the section
"Attribute processing" below).
v The verb of the top level BusinessObject will be set to the top level verb of the BusinessGraph and set
in the summaries.
v The verb of the children BusinessObjects will be set in the summaries.
Saving
Saving will save a WebSphere Business Integration BusinessGraph AfterImage instance to a WebSphere
InterChange Server runtime XML. An exception will be thrown if the input BusinessGraph is not
AfterImage.
v An instance of the WebSphere InterChange Server XML document will be created.
v All deleted DataObjects in the ChangeSummary will be treated as if they existed in their original
positions.
Note: This undelete process will not preserve list order.
v The verb for the top level BusinessObject will be set to the top level verb of the BusinessGraph.
v The attributes of the top level BusinessObject will be set from the DataObject (see the section "Attribute
processing" below).
v If the DataObject has children DataObjects, these will be processed recursively.
v The verb of the children DataObjects will be handled in the following manner:
– If there is no verb for the child DataObject in the EventSummary or ChangeSummary, the verb will
be set to "" (empty string).
– If there is a verb present in the EventSummary, but not in the ChangeSummary, this verb will be
used.
– If there is a verb present in the ChangeSummary, but not in the EventSummary, this verb will be
used .
– If there is a verb present in both the ChangeSummary and EventSummary, it will be resolved in that
the value in the ChangeSummary will be chosen over that in the EventSummary.
v The attributes of the children DataObjects will be set in the BusinessObject (see the section "Attribute
processing" below).
Attribute processing
v All values not covered below will be loaded/saved ASIS.
v ObjectEventId will be loaded into/saved from the EventSummary.
v For CxBlank and CxIgnore:
Chapter 3. Migrating from WebSphere InterChange Server
49
– On the WebSphere Business Integration BusinessObject side of the conversion, CxBlank and
CxIgnore will be set/identified as follows:
- CxIgnore - unset or set with the Java value of null
- CxBlank - type dependent value as shown in the table below
– On the WebSphere InterChange Server XML side of the conversion, CxBlank and CxIgnore will be
set/identified as follows:
Table 1. Setting CxBlank and CxIgnore
Type
CxIgnore
CxBlank
Int
Integer.MIN_VALUE
Integer.MAX_VALUE
Float
Float.MIN_VALUE
Float.MAX_VALUE
Double
Double.MIN_VALUE
Double.MAX_VALUE
String/date/longtext
“CxIgnore”
“”
Children
BusinessObjects
(empty element)
N/A
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Chapter 4. Migrating to WebSphere Integration Developer
from WebSphere MQ Workflow
WebSphere Integration Developer provides the necessary tools to migrate from WebSphere MQ Workflow.
The Migration wizard converts the FDL definitions of business processes that you exported from the
build time component of WebSphere MQ Workflow into corresponding artifacts in WebSphere Integration
Developer. The generated artifacts comprise XML schema definitions for business objects, WSDL
definitions, BPEL, import and component definitions, and TEL definitions.
The conversion tool requires a semantically complete FDL definition of a process model that you export
from WebSphere MQ Workflow build time with the option export deep. This option ensures that all
necessary data, program, and subprocess specifications are included. Also, ensure that any user defined
process execution server definitions (UPES) referenced in your WebSphere MQ Workflow process model
are also selected when you export FDL from the WebSphere MQ Workflow build time.
Note: The Migration wizard does not cover the migration of:
v WebSphere MQ Workflow runtime instances
v Program applications that are invoked by a WebSphere MQ Workflow program execution agent (PEA)
or WebSphere MQ Workflow process execution server (PES for z/OS)
For more information on migrating using the FDL2BPEL conversion tool, see WebSphere MQ Workflow
support site.
Preparing for migration from WebSphere MQ Workflow
Before migrating to WebSphere Integration Developer from WebSphere MQ Workflow, you must first
ensure that you have properly prepared your environment.
The scope and completeness of mapping depends on how you adhere to the following guidelines for
migration:
v Ensure that FDL program activities are associated to a user defined process execution server (UPES) if
they are not pure staff activities.
v Ensure that staff assignments for WebSphere MQ Workflow program activities are compliant to TEL
default staff verbs.
v Use short and simple names to improve the readability of migrated process models. Note that FDL
names may be illegal BPEL names. The Migration wizard automatically converts FDL names to valid
BPEL names.
The Migration wizard will produce syntactically correct business process editor constructs even for
WebSphere MQ Workflow constructs that cannot be migrated (PEA or PES program activities, some
dynamic staff assignments, and so on), which need to be manually adapted to runnable business process
editor artifacts.
The following table outlines the applied mapping rules:
Table 2. Mapping rules
WebSphere MQ Workflow
WebSphere Integration Developer
Process
Process with execution mode: longRunning;
Partner links for inbound and outbound
interfaces of process
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
51
Table 2. Mapping rules (continued)
WebSphere MQ Workflow
WebSphere Integration Developer
Source and Sink
Variables for process input and process
output; Receive activity and reply activity
Program activity
Invoke activity
Process activity
Invoke activity
Empty activity
FMCINTERNALNOOP activity
Block
Scope with embedded BPEL activities
Exit condition of activity
While activity (enclosing the actual
activity)
Start condition of activity
Join condition of activity
Staff assignment of activity
Human task activity
Input container and output container of activity
Variables used to specify the
input/output of invoke activity
Control connector; Transition condition
Link; Transition condition
Data connector
Assign activity
Global data container
Variable
Note: You should initially try the migration process with small projects, if possible. The Migration wizard
will simplify the conversion of your WebSphere MQ Workflow process models into business process
editor process models, but you should be aware that the processes cannot be mapped one-to-one as you
are creating a new programming model. The semantic scopes of the underlying process specification
languages (FDL and BPEL) share an area of intersection, but they do not overlap in total. Otherwise, you
could not expect any new benefits from business process editor. Web services represent a promising new
technology that claim replacing deprecated solutions by new ones.
In general, you should always review and possibly modify the generated artifacts. Additional effort may
be necessary to either make a successful migration possible or to complete the migration task.
Migrating WebSphere MQ Workflow using the Migration wizard
The Migration wizard enables you to convert FDL definitions of business processes that you exported
from the build time component of WebSphere MQ Workflow into corresponding artifacts in WebSphere
Integration Developer. The generated artifacts comprise XML schema definitions for business objects,
WSDL definitions, BPEL, import and component definitions, and TEL definitions.
Note: The Migration wizard does not cover the migration of:
v WebSphere MQ Workflow runtime instances
v Program applications that are invoked by a WebSphere MQ Workflow program execution agent (PEA)
or WebSphere MQ Workflow process execution server (PES for z/OS)
To use the Migration wizard to migrate your WebSphere MQ Workflow artifacts, follow these steps:
1. Invoke the wizard by selecting File > Import > Business Integration > WebSphere MQ Workflow
FDL File and click Next.
2. The Migration wizard opens. Enter the absolute path and name of the FDL file into the Source
selection field or select one from the file system by clicking the Browse button and navigating to the
file. You must also provide a module name before proceeding. Click Next:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
3. The WebSphere MQ Workflow Migration Options page for the artifact creation settings opens. From
here you can accept the migration defaults or select a check box to change the option. By selecting the
Treat name conflicts as errors check box, you can prevent the automatic addition of suffixes which
could result in interoperability errors. The Create predefined data members check box adds extra
nodes to the process to initialize the predefined data members:
4. Click Next. The WebSphere MQ Workflow Migration Options page for optimizing the migrated
business processes opens:
Chapter 4. Migrating from WebSphere MQ Workflow
53
From this page you can set the options to optimize the migrated business processes. For more
information on these options, see the topic "Optimizing the migrated business processes" in the
related links below or click F1 when selecting or deselecting each item.
5. Once you have selected and reviewed your optimization choices, click Finish.
A progress bar at the bottom of the migration dialog indicates the progress of the migration. Once the
migration process has completed, the migration dialog disappears and the Migration Results window
opens:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
To keep all messages for future reference, click the Generate ToDo's button to create a list of "ToDo" tasks
in the task view or click the Save as button to save the messages in a text file in the file system. Examine
each message to see if any action needs to be taken to immediately fix an artifact that couldn't be fully
migrated. To see the generated To Do's, click Window > Show View > Other > General > Tasks and
click OK. The Tasks view opens with the list of generated To Do's from the migration process.
Optimizing the migrated business processes
During the migration of business processes, there are a number of optimization options that will aid in
the overall efficiency, performance and usability of your migrated business process. For example, you can
reduce the number of Java snippets, remove unnecessary structural elements, and reduce the number of
BPEL variables through the optimization options in the Migration wizard.
The following table details the WebSphere MQ Workflow migration optimization options and the
associated results for each:
Table 3. WebSphere MQ Workflow migration optimization options
Option
Result
Merge adjacent Java snippets
Selecting this check box will optimize the business
process by combining Java snippets where possible
(serial, parallel, or mixed). The process will run more
efficiently as the variables are shared in one Java snippet
and duplicate code pieces can be eliminated.
Not selecting this check box means that the process is
still valid, however, this will result in many single Java
snippets in the BPEL process.
Remove unnecessary structural elements
Selecting this check box will optimize the business
process by removing structural elements. Unnecessary
nesting of structural BPEL activities is not efficient for
the process flow.
Chapter 4. Migrating from WebSphere MQ Workflow
55
Table 3. WebSphere MQ Workflow migration optimization options (continued)
Option
Result
Reduce the number of variables
Selecting this check box will optimize the business
process by reducing the number of BPEL variables. Use
the slide bar to select the reduction level. When
migrating an FDL process to BPEL, many BPEL variables
are created based on FDL variables. You can suppress all,
some, or none of the FDL variables to be transferred to
the BPEL process.
v Variable reduction level 0: This option allows the
minimum share of variables. This will merge the
corresponding FDL variables of output and input
containers into one BPEL variable.
v Variable reduction level 1: This option allows the
moderate share of variables. This will merge the
corresponding FDL variables of output and input
containers into one BPEL variable. It will also share
variables while tolerating potential conflict with the
predefined data member "Priority".
v Variable reduction level 2: This option allows the
medium share of variables. This will merge the
corresponding FDL variables of output and input
containers into one BPEL variable. It will also share
variables while tolerating potential conflicts with the
predefined data members "Priority" and "Notification".
Note: In rare cases, a BPEL variable is shared
incorrectly. In such cases, run the migration again with
a decreased optimization level.
v Variable reduction level 3: This option allows nearly
all possible variables to be shared. This will merge the
corresponding FDL variables of output and input
containers into one BPEL variable. It will also share
variables while tolerating potential conflicts with the
predefined data members "Priority", "Notification", and
"Staff".
Note: In rare cases, a BPEL variable is shared
incorrectly. In such cases, run the migration again with
a decreased optimization level.
v Variable reduction level 4: This option allows as
many as possible variables to be shared. This will
merge the corresponding FDL variables of output and
input containers into one BPEL variable. It will also
share variables while tolerating potential conflicts with
the predefined data members "Priority", "Notification",
"Staff", and default data settings.
Note: In rare cases, a BPEL variable is shared
incorrectly. In such cases, run the migration again with
a decreased optimization level.
For more information regarding optimization options as well as for information about the command line
tool for MQ Workflow migration, see the WebSphere Process Server support site.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Verifying the WebSphere MQ Workflow migration
If the migration completes with a list of errors, warnings, or informational messages, they will be
displayed in the Migration Results window. Otherwise, the wizard window will close if the migration
was successfully completed.
The following page appears if migration messages were generated during the migration process:
The Migration Results window lists the migration messages that were generated during the migration
process. By selecting a message from the upper Message list, you can find more information regarding
that message in the lower Message Description window.
To keep all messages for future reference, click the Generate ToDo's button to create a list of "ToDo" tasks
in the task view or click the Save as button to save the messages in a text file in the file system. Examine
each message to see if any action needs to be taken to immediately fix an artifact that couldn’t be fully
migrated. To see the generated To Do's, click Window > Show View > Other > General > Tasks and
click OK. The Tasks view opens with the list of generated To Do's from the migration process.
Limitations of the migration process (from WebSphere MQ Workflow)
There are certain limitations involved with the WebSphere MQ Workflow migration process.
v The migration of FDL will generate invoke activities for UPES activities and the corresponding WSDLs.
However, the runtime environment significantly differs between IBM WebSphere MQ Workflow an
IBM WebSphere Process Server in terms of the techniques that are used to correlate invocation
messages and their responses.
v The runtime engines of IBM WebSphere MQ Workflow and IBM WebSphere Process Server handle
uninitialized data differently. While in IBM WebSphere MQ Workflow this did not cause errors, IBM
WebSphere Process Server is handling this situation with an exception and stops executing the process.
To run migrated applications correctly in IBM WebSphere Process Server, ensure that all variables and
sub-structures are initialized before they are used with Assign, Invoke, Staff, and Reply activities.
Chapter 4. Migrating from WebSphere MQ Workflow
57
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition
Source artifacts for WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation (WBISF) 5.1 projects can be
migrated from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition to WebSphere Integration
Developer. Migrating the source artifacts in an application involves migrating them to the new
WebSphere Integration Developer programming model so that new functionality and features can be
used. The application can then be redeployed and installed to the WebSphere Process Server.
Supported migration paths for migrating source artifacts
Before migrating source artifacts from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition,
ensure that the workspaces with WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation projects contain one
or more service projects.
The Migration wizard offers the ability to migrate one WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition Version 5.1 (or above) workspace at a time.
The Migration wizard does not migrate application binaries – it will only migrate source artifacts found
in a WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition workspace.
Preparing source artifacts for migration
Before migrating source artifacts to WebSphere Integration Developer from WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition, you must first ensure that you have properly prepared your environment
for the migration process.
The following steps describe how to prepare your environment before migrating source artifacts to
WebSphere Integration Developer from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
1. Ensure that you have a backup copy of the entire 5.1 workspace before attempting to migrate.
2. Review the Web service section of the Rational Application Developer Information Center for
background information on the Web service functionality provided by Rational Application
Developer: Developing Web services
3. Ensure that you have all of the appropriate WebSphere Integration Developer features enabled. If you
do not have these features enabled, the menu options that will be discussed below may not be visible.
To enable the important features:
v In WebSphere Integration Developer, select Window > Preferences.
v Click General and select the Capabilities category.
v Select all features under the following categories:
– Enterprise Java Developer
– Integration Developer
– Java Developer
– Web Developer (typical)
– Web Service Developer
– XML Developer
v Click OK.
4. Use a new workspace as the migration target workspace.
5. By default, WebSphere Integration Developer generates the deploy code during build time for the
supporting WEB, EJB and EAR projects for WebSphere Integration Developer modules.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2005, 2009
59
Note: The deploy code for other projects (for example, J2EE) are not generated.
6. In order to fully migrate the BPEL files within a workspace, you must ensure that all WSDL and XSD
files referenced by the BPEL files can be resolved in a business integration project in the new
workspace:
v If the WSDL or XSD files are either in the current project, referenced project, or in a common
library with the BPEL file, then no further action is required.
v If the WSDL or XSD files are in a different project than the one you are migrating, the 5.1 artifacts
must be reorganized using WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition prior to
migration because Business Integration (BI) module projects cannot share artifacts. Here are the two
options for reorganizing the 5.1 artifacts:
– In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, create a new Java project that
will hold all the common artifacts. Place all WSDL and XSD files that are shared by more than
one project into this new Java project. Add a dependency on this new Java project to all projects
that use these common artifacts.
– Another option is to keep a local copy of these shared WSDL and XSD artifacts in each project
such that there are no dependencies between projects.
v If the WSDL or XSD files are in any other type of project (often other Java Projects), you should
create a Business Integration library project with the same name as the 5.1 project. You should also
set up the class path for the new library project, adding the entries from the 5.1 Java project if any.
This type of project is useful for storing shared artifacts. Note that two WSDL files cannot define
portType, service, or port with the same name and target namespace. This should be manually
fixed before migration to avoid errors.
Note: WebSphere Integration Developer does not support XML-SOAP types as defined in the
http://xml.apache.org/xml-soap namespace. You should remove references to these types in WebSphere
Studio Application Developer Integration Edition prior to migrating to avoid a migration process failure.
You are now ready to begin the migration process.
Pre-migration considerations
There are a number of considerations for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration
Edition source artifact migration process.
The following practices show how to design WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
services to ensure that they will migrate successfully to the new programming model:
v For WebSphere Integration Developer V7.0.0.1 or earlier, all projects must be removed from the target
WebSphere Integration Developer workspace and all folders and files must be removed from the
workspace folder on the file system. Note that this restriction does not apply for WebSphere
Integration Developer 7.0.0.2 or later.
v WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition project types supported by the Migration
wizard are: Service Projects, Java Projects, EJB Projects, Connector Projects, Enterprise Application
Projects, Application Client Projects, Dynamic Web Projects, and Static Web Projects. Any other project
types that might exist in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition will be copied to
the WebSphere Integration Developer workspace, but will not have any processing for migration.
v Try to use the Assign activity wherever possible (as opposed to the transformer service which is only
needed when an advanced transformation is needed). You should use this practice because
intermediate componentry must be constructed in order for the an SCA module to invoke a
transformer service. Additionally, there is no special tools support in WebSphere Integration Developer
for the transformer services created in 5.1 (you must use the WSDL or XML editor to modify the XSLT
embedded in the WSDL file if you need to change the behavior of the transformer service).
v Specify one part per WSDL message if the WSDL is a document style as per the Web Services
Interoperability (WS-I) spec and the 6.x preferred style. This does not apply to RPC style WSDLs.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v Use the WSDL doc-literal style as this is the preferred style in 6.x.
v Ensure that all complex types are given a name and that each complex type can be uniquely identified
by its target namespace and name. The following example shows the recommended way to define
complex types and elements of that type (complex type definition followed by an element definition
that uses it):
<schema attributeFormDefault="qualified"
elementFormDefault="unqualified"
targetNamespace="http://util.claimshandling.bpe.samples.websphere.ibm.com"
xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
xmlns:tns="http://util.claimshandling.bpe.samples.websphere.ibm.com">
<complexType name="Duration">
<all>
<element name="hours" type="int"/>
<element name="minutes" type="int"/>
<element name="days" type="int"/>
</all>
</complexType>
<element name="DurationElement" type="tns:Duration"/>
</schema>
The following example is an anonymous complex type that should be avoided as it can cause problems
when an SDO is serialized to XML (element containing an anonymous complex type definition):
<schema attributeFormDefault="qualified"
elementFormDefault="unqualified"
targetNamespace="http://util.claimshandling.bpe.samples.websphere.ibm.com"
xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
xmlns:tns="http://util.claimshandling.bpe.samples.websphere.ibm.com">
<element name="DurationElement">
<complexType>
<all>
<element name="hours" type="int"/>
<element name="minutes" type="int"/>
<element name="days" type="int"/>
</all>
</complexType>
</element>
</schema>
v If publishing a service for external consumers, generate service deploy code using IBM Web services
(as opposed to Apache SOAP/HTTP) because IBM Web services are directly supported in 6.x and
Apache Web services are not.
v There are two ways to organize WSDL and XSD files in 5.1 to minimize the amount of reorganizing
you must do during migration. In 6.x, shared artifacts such as WSDL and XSD files must be located in
BI projects (Business Integration modules and libraries) in order to be referenced by a BI service:
– Keep all WSDL files shared by more than one project in a Java project that the workspace can
reference.
– Keep a local copy of all WSDL/XSD files that a project references in the project itself. WebSphere
Studio Application Developer Integration Edition projects will be migrated to a Business Integration
module in WebSphere Integration Developer and a module cannot have dependencies on other
modules (a project with dependencies on another project for the sake of sharing WSDL or XSD files
will not migrate cleanly).
v Avoid using the Business Process Choreographer Generic Messaging API (Generic MDBs) as it will not
be provided in 6.x. An MDB interface offering late binding will not be available in 6.x.
v Use the Business Process Choreographer Generic EJB API as opposed to invoking the generated session
beans that are specific to a particular version of a process. These session beans will not be generated in
6.x.
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
61
v If you have a business process with multiple replies for the same operation, ensure that if any of them
has client settings that all replies for that operation have the same client settings as in 6.x only one set
of client settings is supported per operation reply.
v Design BPEL Java snippets according to the following guidelines:
– Avoid sending WSIFMessage parameters to any custom Java classes. Try not to depend on the
WSIFMessage data format where possible.
v
v
v
v
v
– Avoid using the WSIF metadata APIs if possible.
Avoid creating top-down EJB or Java services where possible because the Java/EJB skeleton that gets
generated from the WSDL PortTypes/Messages will be dependent on WSIF classes (for example,
WSIFFormatPartImpl). Instead, create the Java/EJB interfaces first and generate a service around the
Java class/EJB (bottom-up approach).
Avoid creating or using WSDL interfaces that reference the soapenc:Array type because this type of
interface is not natively supported in the SCA programming model
Avoid creating message types whose high-level element is an array type (maxOccurs attribute is
greater than one) because this type of interface is not natively supported in the SCA programming
model.
Define your WSDL interfaces precisely and avoid XSD complexTypes that have references to the
xsd:anyType type where possible.
For any WSDL and XSDs that you generate from an EJB or Java bean, ensure that the target namespace
is unique (the Java class name and package name are represented by the target namespace) in order to
avoid collisions when migrating to WebSphere Process Server 6.x. In WebSphere Process Server 6.x, two
different WSDL/XSD definitions that have the same name and target namespace are not allowed. This
situation often occurs when the Web Service wizard or Java2WSDL command is used without
specifying the target namespace explicitly (the target namespace will be unique for the package name
of the EJB or Java bean, but not for the class itself so problems will occur when a Web service is
generated for two or more EJB or Java beans in the same package). The solution is to specify a custom
package to namespace mapping in the Web Service wizard or to use the -namespace Java2WSDL
command line option to ensure that the namespace of the generated files is unique for the given class.
v Use unique namespaces for every WSDL file where possible. There are limitations around importing
two different WSDL files with the same namespace according the WSDL 1.1 specification, and in
WebSphere Integration Developer 6.x these limitations are strictly enforced.
Migrating workspaces using the WebSphere Integration Developer
Migration wizard
The WebSphere Integration Developer Migration wizard enables the migration of workspaces, including
all projects.
Specifically for the migration of service projects, the Migration wizard does the following tasks:
1. Creates a new business integration module (the module name is defined by you)
2. Migrates the service project's classpath entries to the new module
3. Copies all WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation source artifacts from the selected source
project to this module
4. Migrates the BPEL extensions in WSDL files
5. Migrates the business processes (.bpel files) from BPEL4WS version 1.1 to the new level supported by
WebSphere Process Server, which is built on BPEL4WS version 1.1 with major capabilities of the
upcoming WS-BPEL version 2.0 specification
6. Creates an SCA component for each BPEL process
7. Generates a monitoring .mon file for each BPEL process to preserve the default monitoring behavior
from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition (if necessary)
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
8. Creates imports and exports depending on the deploy options chosen in WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition
9. Wires the BPEL component to its partner links (imports, exports, and Java components)
Note: Use a new WebSphere Integration Developer workspace as the migration target.
To migrate workspaces using the WebSphere Integration Developer Migration wizard, follow these steps:
1. Invoke the wizard by selecting File > Import > Business Integration > WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition Workspace and click Next.
2. The Migration wizard opens. Enter the path for the workspace to migrate or click Browse to find it.
Click Next.
3. From the migration options page, you can change the option to preserve the original BPEL Java
snippets in the comments.
4. Click Finish to begin the migration process. You will see a migration status bar at the bottom of the
Migration wizard's window.
5. Once the process has completed, you will see the following message:
Click Next to begin the migration validation process.
6. Select the workspace projects to migrate:
Click Next.
7. The project resources which may be impacted by the migration process are listed:
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
63
Review this list and click Next.
8. Once you are ready, click Finish to begin migrating the projects that you have selected.
9. Once the migration validation process has completed, you should see the following message:
10. After the process has completed, the Migration Results window opens:
A log file containing these migration messages will automatically get generated to the 6.x
workspace's .metadata folder. The log file will have a .log extension.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
11. To keep all messages for future reference, click the Generate ToDo's button to create a list of "ToDo"
tasks in the task view or click the Save as... button to save the messages in a text file in the file
system. Examine each message to see if any action needs to be taken to immediately fix an artifact
that couldn't be fully migrated. To see the generated To Do's, click Window > Show View > Other >
General > Tasks and click OK. The Tasks view opens with the list of generated To Do's from the
migration process.
After the Migration wizard has completed, build the workspace that was created and try to resolve any
build errors. Inspect all migrated BPEL files and ensure that they are fully migrated and can be opened in
the WebSphere Integration Developer BPEL Editor. There are some BPEL Java snippets that cannot be
automatically migrated. If you see any errors in the BPEL Java snippets, see "Migrating to the SCA
Programming Model" for steps needed to fix the errors. Also, if you used the Migration wizard to
migrate a service project to a workspace, open the dependency editor to ensure that the dependencies are
set correctly. To do this, switch to the Business Integration perspective and double click the business
integration module project. From there you can add dependencies on business integration library projects,
Java projects, and J2EE projects.
Migrating workspaces using WSADIEWorkspaceMigration
The WSADIEWorkspaceMigration command enables the migration of workspaces.
Specifically for the migration of service projects, the migration command does the following tasks:
v Creates a new business integration module (the module name is defined by you)
v Migrates the classpath entries of the service project to the new module
v Copies all WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation source artifacts from the selected source
project to this module
v Migrates the BPEL extensions in WSDL files
v Migrates the business processes (.bpel files) from BPEL4WS version 1.1 to the new level supported by
WebSphere Process Server, which is built on BPEL4WS version 1.1 with major capabilities of the
upcoming WS-BPEL version 2.0 specification
v Creates an SCA component for each BPEL process
v Generates a monitoring file with a .mon extension for each BPEL process to preserve the default
monitoring behavior from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition (if necessary)
v Creates imports and exports depending on the deploy options chosen in WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition
v Wires the BPEL component to its partner links (imports, exports, and Java components)
To run the WSADIEWorkspaceMigration script, follow these steps:
1. Locate the script by opening the shared folder specified during the installation of WebSphere
Integration Developer. For example, the script will be located under a directory path similar to the
following: <wid_root>\wstools\eclipse\plugins\
com.ibm.wbit.migration.wsadie_6.2.0.v20081112_0200
2. Invoke the script as follows: WSADIEWorkspaceMigration.bat -WIDstartup eclipse_dir
-WIDworkspace WID_target_workspace -WSADIEworkspace source_WSADIE_Workspace_dir
Parameter definitions:
-WIDstartup
The location of your Eclipse folder (Eclipse runtime).
-WIDworkspace
The new workspace where the new business integration module will be created.
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
65
-WSADIEworkspace
The full path to the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.1
workspace.
For example:
WSADIEWorkspaceMigration.bat -WIDstartup "C:\IBM\WID\eclipse" -WIDworkspace
"c:\WID Workspaces\myWIDWorkspace" -WSADIEworkspace "c:\wsadie workspaces\myWSADIEWorkspace"
3. After the command has finished running, start the new workspace in WebSphere Integration
Developer.
4. Build the workspace that was created and try to resolve any build errors. Inspect all migrated BPEL
files and ensure that they are fully migrated and can be opened in the WebSphere Integration
Developer BPEL editor. There are some BPEL Java snippets that cannot be automatically migrated. If
you see any errors in the BPEL Java snippets, see "Migrating to the SCA Programming Model" for
steps needed to fix the errors.
5. Open the dependency editor to ensure that the dependencies are set correctly. To do this, switch to the
business integration perspective and double click on the business integration module project. From
there you can add dependencies on business integration library projects, Java projects, and J2EE
projects.
Additional migration information
After a successful migration, you may still want to review the following sections to identify tasks that are
required to complete the migration of your workspace. The information in this section can be used to
help ensure that the migration was complete.
1. Open WebSphere Integration Developer and switch to the Business Integration perspective. You
should see the module(s) that were created by the Migration wizard (one module for each service
project that was migrated). The first artifact listed under the project is the module’s assembly file (it
has the same name as the module).
2. Double-click the assembly file to open it in the Assembly Editor where SCA components can be
created and wired together to obtain similar functionality to the Version 5.1 application. If there were
any BPEL processes in the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition workspace,
the migration wizard should have created default SCA components for each of those processes and
they will be in the Assembly Editor.
3. Select a component and go to the Properties view where the Description, Details, and Implementation
properties will be displayed and can be edited.
Some projects may require some rewiring after migration in order to reconnect the services the way they
were in 5.1. The following information further describes how to manually rewire the application using
the tools available in WebSphere Integration Developer.
Creating SCA Components and SCA Imports for the services in the
application for rewiring
All migrated business processes must be wired to their business partners. An SCA Component or Import
must be created for all other service types. For WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration
Edition service projects that interact with systems or entities external to the project, an SCA Import can be
created in order for the migrated project to access those entities as services according to the SCA model.
Note: The Migration wizard attempts to do this automatically, however, you can refer to the following
information to help verify what the tool did.
For WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition service projects that interact with
entities within the project (for example, a business process, transformer service or Java class), an SCA
Import can be created in order for the migrated project to access those entities as services according to
the SCA model.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
The following sections provide details on the SCA Import or SCA Components to create based on the
type of service that must be migrated:
Migrating a Java service
You can migrate a Java service to an SCA Java Component.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when generating a new Java service from
an existing Java class, the following options were given:
v Create XSD schemas for complex data types:
– Within the interface WSDL file
– As a new file for each data type
v Support error handling capability:
– Generate fault
– Do not generate fault
v Other details about the service to generate such as binding and service names
There are many new components that offer new functionality such as data mapping, interface mediation,
business state machines, selectors, business rules, and more. First you should determine whether one of
these new component types can replace the custom Java component. If that is not possible, follow the
migration path described below.
Using the Migration wizard results in the creation of a business integration module with the WSDL
Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition.
In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module to see its contents. Open the Assembly Editor
by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same name as the project).
Note: If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you have the following
options:
Creating the custom Java component: option 1:
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can use the WebSphere
Integration Developer Java Component type to represent the Java service as an SCA component. During
migration, custom Java code must be written to convert between the SCA Java interface style and the
existing Java component’s interface style.
To create the custom Java component, follow these steps:
1. Under the module project, expand Interfaces and select the WSDL interface that was generated for
this Java class in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration.
2. Drag and drop this interface onto the Assembly Editor. A dialog will pop up asking you to select the
type of component to create. Select Component with No Implementation Type and click OK.
3. A generic component will appear on the Assembly diagram. Select it and go to the Properties view.
4. On the Description tab, you can change the name and display name of the component to something
more descriptive.
5. On the Details tab you will see that this component has one interface - the one that you dragged and
dropped onto the Assembly Editor.
6. Ensure that the Java class that you are trying to access is on the classpath of the service project if it is
not contained within the service project itself.
7. Right-click on the module project and select Open Dependency Editor.... Under the Java, section
ensure that the project containing the old Java class is listed. If it is not, add it by clicking Add....
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
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8. Back in the Assembly Editor, right-click the component that you just created and select Generate
Implementation... > Java Then select the package where the Java implementation will be generated.
This creates a skeleton Java service that adheres to the WSDL interface according to the SCA
programming model, where complex types are represented by an object that is a
commonj.sdo.DataObject and simple types are represented by their Java Object equivalents.
The following code examples show:
1. Relevant definitions from the 5.1 WSDL interface
2. The WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.1 Java methods that correspond to
the WSDL
3. The WebSphere Integration Developer 6.x Java methods for the same WSDL
The following code shows the relevant definitions from the 5.1 WSDL interface:
<types>
<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
attributeFormDefault="qualified"
elementFormDefault="unqualified"
targetNamespace="http://migr.practice.ibm.com/"
xmlns:xsd1="http://migr.practice.ibm.com/">
<complexType name="StockInfo">
<all>
<element name="index" type="int"/>
<element name="price" type="double"/>
<element name="symbol" nillable="true"
type="string"/>
</all>
</complexType>
</schema>
</types>
<message name="getStockInfoRequest">
<part name="symbol" type="xsd:string"/>
</message>
<message name="getStockInfoResponse">
<part name="result" type="xsd1:StockInfo"/>
</message>
<operation name="getStockInfo" parameterOrder="symbol">
<input message="tns:getStockInfoRequest"
name="getStockInfoRequest"/>
<output message="tns:getStockInfoResponse"
name="getStockInfoResponse"/>
</operation>
The following code shows the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.1 Java
methods that correspond to the WSDL:
public StockInfo getStockInfo(String symbol)
{
return new StockInfo();
}
public void setStockPrice(String symbol, float newPrice)
{
// set some things
}
The following code shows the WebSphere Integration Developer 6.x Java methods for the same WSDL:
public DataObject getStockInfo(String aString) {
//TODO Needs to be implemented.
return null;
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
}
public void setStockPrice(String symbol, Float newPrice) {
//TODO Needs to be implemented.
}
Now you will need to fill in code where you see the “//TODO” tags in the generated Java
implementation class. There are two options:
1. Move the logic from the original Java class to this class, adapting it to use DataObjects
v This is the recommended option if you had chosen the top-down approach in WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition and want your Java component to deal with DataObject
parameters. This rework is necessary because the Java classes generated from WSDL definitions in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition have WSIF dependencies that should
be eliminated.
2. Create a private instance of the old Java class inside this generated Java class and write code to:
a. Convert all parameters of the generated Java implementation class into parameters that the old
Java class expects
b. Invoke the private instance of the old Java class with the converted parameters
c. Convert the return value of the old Java class into the return value type declared by the generated
Java implementation method
d. This option is recommended for consumption scenarios where the WSIF service proxies must be
consumed by new 6.x style Java components.
Once you have completed one of the above options, you must rewire the Java service. There should not
be any references, therefore you just need to rewire the Java component’s interface:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this Java component’s interface.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v If this service was published in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition to expose
it externally, then see the section "Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated service" for instructions
on how to republish the service.
Creating a Java Web service: option 2:
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, an alternative option to consider
using is the Rational® Application Developer Web services tools that allows you to create a Web service
around a Java class.
Note: See the information at the following site before attempting to migrate using this method: Creating
a Web service from a Java bean
Note: This option requires that a Web service runtime be configured through WebSphere Integration
Developer before invoking the Web service wizard.
If you had taken a bottom-up approach in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
to generate WSDL around the Java class, then follow these steps:
1. Create a new Web project and copy the Java class that you would like to build a service around to
this Web project’s Java source folder.
2. Right-click on the enterprise application project that is the container for the Java class you are
creating a service around.
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69
3. Select Properties, go to the Server properties and ensure that the Target runtime is set to
WebSphere Process Server v6.1 and Default server is set to the installed WebSphere Process Server
v6.1.
4. Start the test server and deploy this application to the server and ensure that it starts successfully.
5. Next, right-click on the Java class that you would like to create a service around and select Web
Services > Create Web service.
6. For Web Service Type select Java bean Web Service and clear the Start Web service in Web project
option unless you want to deploy the web service right away. You can optionally select to generate a
client proxy as well. Click Next.
7. The Java class that you right-clicked will be shown, click Next.
8. You must now configure your service deployment options. Click Edit.... For the server type choose
WPS Server v6.1 and for the Web service runtime choose IBM WebSphere and J2EE version 1.4. If
you are not able to select a valid combination by doing this, see the section "Preparing for
Migration" for information on migrating J2EE projects to the v1.4 level. Click OK.
9. For the Service project, enter the name of the Web project. Also select the appropriate EAR project.
Click Next. Note that you might have to wait for several minutes.
10. On the Web Service Java Bean Identity panel, select the WSDL file that will contain the WSDL
definitions. Choose the methods that you would like to expose on the Web service and choose the
appropriate style/encoding (Document/Literal, RPC/Literal, or RPC/Encoded). Select the Define
custom mapping for package to namespace option and select a namespace that is unique to the Java
class being migrated for all Java packages used by this Java class's interface (the default namespace
will be unique to the package name which might cause conflicts if you create another Web Service
that uses the same Java classes). Complete the other parameters if appropriate.
11. Click Next and on the Web Service package to namespace mapping panel, click Add and in the
row that is created, enter the name of the package of the Java bean, then add the custom namespace
that uniquely identifies this Java class. Continue to add mappings for all Java packages used by the
JavaBeans interface.
12. Click Next. Note that you might have to wait for several minutes.
13. Click Finish. After completing the wizard, you should copy the generated WSDL file that describes
the Java service to the business integration module project if the service project was a consumer of
the Java service. It can be found in the generated router Web project under the folder
WebContent/WEB-INF/wsdl. Refresh/rebuild the business integration module project.
14. Switch to the Business Integration perspective and expand the module and then the Web Service
Ports logical category.
15. Select the port that was created in the previous steps and drag and drop it onto the Assembly Editor
and select to create an Import with Web Service Binding. Select the Java class’s WSDL interface if
prompted. Now the SCA component that consumed the Java component in 5.1 can be wired to this
Import to complete the manual rewiring migration steps.
Note that the interface might be slightly different than the 5.1 interface, and you might need to insert an
Interface Mediation component in between the 5.1 consumer and the new Import. To do this, click on the
wire tool in the Assembly Editor and wire the SCA source component to this new Import with Web
Service Binding. As the interfaces are different, you will be prompted: Source and target nodes do not
have matching interfaces. Choose to create an interface mapping between the source and target node.
Double-click on the mapping component that was created in the Assembly Editor. This will open the
mapping editor. See the Information Center for instructions on creating an interface mapping.
If you had taken a top-down approach in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition,
generating Java classes from a WSDL definition, then follow these steps:
1. Create a new Web project and copy the WSDL file that you would like to Java skeleton to this Web
project’s source folder.
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2. Right-click on the WSDL file containing the PortType that you want to generate a Java skeleton from
and select Web Services > Generate Java bean skeleton.
3. Choose the Web service typeSkeleton Java bean Web Service and complete the wizard.
After completing the wizard, you should have Java classes that implement the service interface and are
not dependent on WSIF APIs.
Advantages and disadvantages for each of the Java service rewiring options:
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects and you have opted to do so
manually, note that there are advantages and disadvantages for each of the Java service rewiring options.
The following list describes both options and the advantages and disadvantages of each:
v The first option is likely to give better performance at runtime because invoking a Web service is
slower than invoking a Java component.
v The first option can propagate context whereas a Web service invocation does not propagate context in
the same way.
v The second option does not involve creating any custom code.
v The second option may not be possible for some Java interface definitions, as generating a Java service
has limitations. See the Rational Application Developer documentation here: Limitations of Web
services
v The second option may result in an interface change and hence a change to the SCA consumer.
v The second option requires that a WebSphere Process Server 6.x server is installed and has been
configured to work with WebSphere Integration Developer. To see the installed runtimes that are
configured to work with WebSphere Integration Developer, go to Window > Preferences > Server >
Installed Runtimes and select the WebSphere Process Server v6.1 entry if it exists and ensure that it
points to the location where the product is installed. Ensure that this entry is checked if the server does
exist and unchecked if this server is not actually installed. You can also click Add... to add another
server.
v If the Java component was built in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition using
the top-down approach where the Java skeleton was generated from a WSDL, then the parameters in
and out of this Java class will probably subclass WSIFFormatPartImpl. If this is the case then you
choose option 1 to generate a new SCA style Java skeleton from the original WSDL/XSDs or option 2
to generate a new generic Java skeleton (not dependent on the WSIF or DataObject APIs) from the
original WSDL interface.
Migrating an EJB service
You can migrate an EJB service to an SCA Import with stateless session bean binding.
Import the workspace using the Migration wizard. This will result in the creation of a business
integration module with the WSDL Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in WebSphere
Studio Application Developer Integration Edition.
In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module to see its contents. Open the Assembly Editor
by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same name as the project).
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you have the following options:
Creating the custom EJB component: option 1:
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can use the WebSphere
Integration Developer Import with Stateless Session Binding type that allows you to invoke a stateless
session EJB as an SCA component. During migration, custom Java code must be written to convert
between the SCA Java interface style and the existing EJB interface style.
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Note: Even though the migration tool automatically handles this, any changes made after migration to
the interfaces and data types (business objects) involved in the EJB interface will require manual updates
to the conversion code mentioned here. Errors may be displayed in WebSphere Integration Developer
depending on the type of change made.
To create the custom EJB component, follow these steps:
1. Under the module project, expand Interfaces and select the WSDL interface that was generated for
this EJB in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration.
2. Drag and drop this interface onto the Assembly Editor. A dialog will pop up asking you to select the
type of component to create. Select Component with No Implementation Type and click OK.
3. A generic component will appear on the Assembly diagram. Select it and go to the Properties view.
4. On the Description tab, you can change the name and display name of the component to something
more descriptive. Choose a name like your EJB’s name, but append a postfix such as “JavaMed” as
this is going to be a Java component that mediates between the WSDL interface generated for the EJB
in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration and the Java interface of the EJB.
5. On the Details tab you will see that this component has one interface - the one that you dragged and
dropped onto the Assembly Editor.
6. Back in the Assembly Editor, right-click the component that you just created and select Generate
Implementation... > Java Then select the package where the Java implementation will be generated.
This creates a skeleton Java service that adheres to the WSDL interface according to the SCA
programming model, where complex types are represented by an object that is a
commonj.sdo.DataObject and simple types are represented by their Java Object equivalents.
The following code examples show:
1. Relevant definitions from the 5.1 WSDL interface
2. The WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.1 Java methods that correspond to
the WSDL
3. The WebSphere Integration Developer 6.x Java methods for the same WSDL
The following code shows the relevant definitions from the 5.1 WSDL interface:
<types>
<schema xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
attributeFormDefault="qualified"
elementFormDefault="unqualified"
targetNamespace="http://migr.practice.ibm.com/"
xmlns:xsd1="http://migr.practice.ibm.com/">
<complexType name="StockInfo">
<all>
<element name="index" type="int"/>
<element name="price" type="double"/>
<element name="symbol" nillable="true"
type="string"/>
</all>
</complexType>
</schema>
</types>
<message name="getStockInfoRequest">
<part name="symbol" type="xsd:string"/>
</message>
<message name="getStockInfoResponse">
<part name="result" type="xsd1:StockInfo"/>
</message>
<operation name="getStockInfo" parameterOrder="symbol">
<input message="tns:getStockInfoRequest"
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name="getStockInfoRequest"/>
<output message="tns:getStockInfoResponse"
name="getStockInfoResponse"/>
</operation>
The following code shows the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition 5.1 Java
methods that correspond to the WSDL:
public StockInfo getStockInfo(String symbol)
{
return new StockInfo();
}
public void setStockPrice(String symbol, float newPrice)
{
// set some things
}
The following code shows the WebSphere Integration Developer 6.x Java methods for the same WSDL:
public DataObject getStockInfo(String aString) {
//TODO Needs to be implemented.
return null;
}
public void setStockPrice(String symbol, Float newPrice) {
//TODO Needs to be implemented.
}
Eventually you need to fill in real code where you see the “//TODO” tags in the generated Java
implementation class. First you need to create a reference from this Java component to the actual EJB so
that it can access the EJB according to the SCA programming model:
1. Keep the Assembly Editor open and switch to the J2EE perspective. Locate the EJB project containing
the EJB that you are creating a service for.
2. Expand its Deployment Descriptor: <project-name> item and locate the EJB. Drag and drop it onto
the Assembly Editor. If warned about project dependencies needing to be updated, select the Open
the module dependency editor... check box and click OK.
3. Under the J2EE section ensure that the EJB project is listed and if it is not, add it by clicking Add....
4. Save the module dependencies and close that editor. You will see that a new Import was created in
the Assembly Editor. You can select it and go to the Properties view on the Description tab to change
the import’s name and display name to something more meaningful. On the Binding tab you will
see that the import type is automatically set to Stateless Session Bean Binding and the JNDI name
of the EJB is already set appropriately.
5. Select the Wire tool from the palette in the Assembly Editor.
6. Click on the Java component and release the mouse.
7. Next click on the EJB Import and release the mouse.
8. When asked A matching reference will be created on the source node. Do you want to continue?,
click OK. This creates a wire between the two components.
9. Select the Java component in the Assembly Editor and in the Properties view under the Details tab,
expand References and select the reference to the EJB that was just created. You can update the
reference’s name if the generated name is not very descriptive or appropriate. Remember the name
of this reference for future use.
10. Save the Assembly diagram.
You must use the SCA programming model to invoke the EJB from the generated Java class. Open the
generated Java class and follow these steps to write the code that will invoke the EJB service. For the
generated Java implementation class:
1. Create a private variable (whose type is that of your remote EJB interface):
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
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private YourEJBInterface ejbService = null;
2. If there are complex types in your EJB interface, then also create a private variable for the BOFactory:
private BOFactory boFactory = (BOFactory)
ServiceManager.INSTANCE.locateService(“com/ibm/websphere/bo
/BOFactory”);
3. In the constructor of the Java implementation class, use the SCA APIs to resolve the EJB reference
(remember to fill in the name of the EJB reference that you wrote down a few steps back) and set the
private variable equal to this reference:
// Locate the EJB service
this.ejbService = (YourEJBInterface)
ServiceManager.INSTANCE.locateService("name-of-your-ejb-reference");
For each “//TODO” in the generated Java implementation class:
1. Convert all parameters into the parameter types that the EJB expects.
2. Invoke the appropriate method on the EJB reference using the SCA programming model, sending the
converted parameters.
3. Convert the return value of the EJB into the return value type declared by the generated Java
implementation method
/**
* Method generated to support the implementing WSDL port type named
* "interface.MyBean".
*/
public DataObject getStockInfo(String aString) {
DataObject boImpl = null;
try {
// invoke the EJB method
StockInfo stockInfo = this.ejbService.getStockInfo(aString);
// formulate the SCA data object to return.
boImpl = (DataObject)
this.boFactory.createByClass(StockInfo.class);
// manually convert all data from the EJB return type into the
// SCA data object to return
boImpl.setInt("index", stockInfo.getIndex());
boImpl.setString("symbol", stockInfo.getSymbol());
boImpl.setDouble("price", stockInfo.getPrice());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
e.printStackTrace();
}
return boImpl;
}
/**
* Method generated to support the implementing WSDL port type named
* "interface.MyBean".
*/
public void setStockPrice(String symbol, Float newPrice) {
try {
this.ejbService.setStockPrice(symbol, newPrice.floatValue());
} catch (RemoteException e) {
e.printStackTrace();
}
}
Creating an EJB Web service: option 2:
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, an alternative option to consider
is the Rational Application Developer Web services tools that allow you to create a Web service around
an EJB.
Note: See the information at the following site before attempting to migrate using this method: Creating
a Web service from an enterprise bean (EJB) using the WebSphere run-time environment
Note: This option requires that a Web service runtime be configured through WebSphere Integration
Developer before invoking the Web service wizard.
To create a Web service around an EJB, follow these steps:
1. Right-click on the enterprise application project that is the container for the EJB that you are creating
a service around.
2. Select Properties, go to the Server properties and ensure that the Target runtime is set to
WebSphere Process Server v6.1 and Default server is set to the installed WebSphere Process Server
v6.1.
3. Start the test server and deploy this application to the server and ensure that it starts successfully.
4. In the J2EE perspective, expand the EJB project in the Project Explorer view. Expand the
Deployment Descriptor then the Session Beans category. Select the bean that you want to generate
the Web service around.
5. Right-click and select Web Services > Create Web service.
6. For Web Service Type select EJB Web Service and clear the Start Web service in Web project option
unless you want to deploy the Web service right away. Click Next.
7. Ensure that the EJB that you right-clicked is selected here and click Next.
8. You must now configure your service deployment options. Click Edit.... For the server type choose
WPS Server v6.1 and for the Web service runtime choose IBM WebSphere and J2EE version 1.4. If
you are not able to select a valid combination by doing this, then see the section "Preparing for
Migration" for information on migrating J2EE projects to the v1.4 level. Click OK.
9. For the Service project, enter the name of the EJB project containing the EJB. Also select the
appropriate EAR project. Click Next. Note that you might have to wait for several minutes.
10. On the Web Service EJB Configuration panel, select the appropriate router project to use (choose the
name of the router Web project you would like to be created and this project will be added to the
same enterprise application as the original EJB. Select the transport (SOAP over HTTP or SOAP
over JMS). Click Next.
11. Select the WSDL file that will contain the WSDL definitions. Choose the methods that you would
like to expose on the Web service and choose the appropriate style/encoding (Document/Literal,
RPC/Literal, or RPC/Encoded). Select the Define custom mapping for package to namespace
option and select a namespace that is unique to the EJB being migrated for all Java packages used by
the EJB (the default namespace will be unique to the package name, which might cause conflicts if
you create another Web Service that uses the same Java classes). Complete the other parameters if
appropriate. There are limitations around each style/encoding combinations. See the limitations for
more information: Limitations of Web services
12. Click Next and on the Web Service package to namespace mapping panel, click Add and in the row
that is created, enter the name of the package of the your EJB, then the custom namespace that
uniquely identifies this EJB. Continue to add mappings for all Java packages used by the EJB
interface.
13. Click Next. Note that you might have to wait for several minutes.
14. Click Finish. After completing the wizard, you should copy the generated WSDL file that describes
the EJB service to the business integration module project if the service project was a consumer of
the EJB service. It can be found in the generated router Web project under the folder
WebContent/WEB-INF/wsdl. Refresh/rebuild the business integration module project.
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15. Switch to the Business Integration perspective and expand the migrated module and then the Web
Service Ports logical category.
16. Select the port that was generated in the previous steps and drag and drop it onto the Assembly
Editor and select to create an Import with Web Service Binding. Select the EJB's WSDL interface if
prompted. Now the SCA component that consumed the EJB in 5.1 can be wired to this Import to
complete the manual rewiring migration steps.
If you had taken a top-down approach in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition,
generating an EJB skeleton from a WSDL definition, then follow these steps:
1. Create a new Web project and copy the WSDL file that you would like to generate the EJB skeleton
from to this Web project’s source folder.
2. Right-click on the WSDL file containing the PortType that you want to generate an EJB skeleton from
and select Web Services > Generate Java bean skeleton.
3. Choose the Web service typeSkeleton EJB Web Service and complete the wizard.
After completing the wizard, you should have an EJB that implements the service interface and is not
dependent on WSIF APIs.
Note that the interface might be slightly different than the 5.1 interface, and you might need to insert an
Interface Mediation component in between the 5.1 consumer and the new Import. To do this, click on the
wire tool in the Assembly Editor and wire the SCA source component to this new Import with Web
Service Binding. As the interfaces are different, you will be prompted: Source and target nodes do not
have matching interfaces. Choose to create an interface mapping between the source and target node.
Double-click on the mapping component that was created in the Assembly Editor. This will open the
mapping editor. See the Information Center for instructions on creating an interface mapping.
Once you have completed this, you must rewire the EJB service. There should not be any references,
therefore you just need to rewire the Java component’s interface:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this EJB component.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v If this service was published in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition to expose
it externally, then see the section "Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated service" for instructions
on how to republish the service.
Advantages and disadvantages for each of the EJB service rewiring options:
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects and you have opted to do so
manually, note that there are advantages and disadvantages for each of the EJB service rewiring options.
The following list describes both options and the advantages and disadvantages of each:
v The first option is likely to give better performance at runtime because invoking a Web service is
slower than invoking an EJB.
v The first option can propagate context whereas a Web service invocation does not propagate context in
the same way.
v The second option does not involve creating any custom code.
v The second option may not be possible for some EJB interface definitions, as generating an EJB service
has limitations. See the Rational Application Developer documentation here: Limitations of Web
services
v The second option may result in an interface change and hence a change to the SCA consumer.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
v The second option requires that a WebSphere Process Server 6.x server is installed and has been
configured to work with WebSphere Integration Developer. To see the installed runtimes that are
configured to work with WebSphere Integration Developer, go to Window > Preferences > Server >
Installed Runtimes and select the WebSphere Process Server v6.1 entry if it exists and ensure that it
points to the location where the product is installed. Ensure that this entry is checked if the server does
exist and unchecked if this server is not actually installed. You can also click Add... to add another
server.
v If the Java component was built in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition using
the top-down approach where the EJB skeleton was generated from a WSDL, then the parameters in
and out of this Java class will probably subclass WSIFFormatPartImpl. If this is the case then you
choose option 2 to generate a new generic EJB skeleton (not dependent on the WSIF or DataObject
APIs) from the original WSDL interface.
Migrating a Business Process to Business Process Service Invocation
This scenario applies to a business process that invokes another business process, where the second
business process is invoked using a WSIF Process Binding. This section shows how to migrate a BPEL to
BPEL service invocation using a wire or an Import/Export with SCA Binding if the Migration wizard did
not fully migrate all of your service projects.
To migrate a process (BPEL) binding service project for an outbound service, follow these steps:
1. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module to see its contents. Open the Assembly
Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same name as the
project).
2. There are several scenarios where a BPEL process can invoke another BPEL process. Find the scenario
below that applies to your application:
v If the BPEL being invoked is in the same module, create a wire from the appropriate reference on
the first BPEL component to the appropriate interface on the target BPEL component.
v If the BPEL being invoked is in another module (where the other module is a migrated service
project):
a. Create an Export with SCA Binding for the second business process in its module assembly
diagram.
b. Expand the second module's assembly icon in the navigator in the Business Integration view.
You should see the export that you just created.
c. Drag and drop the export from the Business Integration view under the second module onto the
open assembly editor of the first module. This will create an Import with SCA Binding in the
first module. If this service was published in WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition to expose it externally, then see the section, "Creating SCA Exports to access
the migrated service".
d. Wire the appropriate reference on the first business process to the import that you just created
in that module.
e. Save the Assembly diagram.
v To achieve late binding when invoking the second business process:
a. Leave the first business process component's reference unwired. Open the first process in the
BPEL editor and under the Reference Partners section, select the partner that corresponds to the
second BPEL process to invoke using late binding.
b. In the Properties view on the Description tab, enter the name of the second business process in
the Process Template field.
c. Save the business process. You have now finished setting up the late bound invocation.
Migrating a Web Service (SOAP/JMS)
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can migrate a Web Service
(SOAP/JMS) to an SCA Import with Web Service binding.
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To migrate a SOAP/JMS service project for an outbound service migration, follow these steps:
1. Import the workspace using the Migration wizard. This will result in the creation of a Business
Integration module with the WSDL Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition. Note that if the IBM® Web Service
(SOAP/JMS) that this application will invoke is also a WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition Web service that will be migrated, there may have been updates to that Web
service during migration. If this is the case, you should use that Web service’s migrated WSDL files
here.
2. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module so that you can see its contents. Open the
Assembly Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same
name as the project).
3. Add an Import that will allow the application to interact with the IBM Web Service (via SOAP/JMS)
according to the SCA programming model. Ensure that the WSDL interface, binding, and service
definitions are present in the migrated module or in a library that the migrated module is dependent
on.
4. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the migrated module and open its Assembly Diagram
in the Assembly Editor.
5. Expand the Web Service Ports logical category and drag and drop the port that corresponds to the
service you want to invoke onto the Assembly Editor.
6. Choose to create an Import with Web Service Binding.
7. After creating the import, select it in the Assembly Editor and go to the Properties view. Under the
Binding tab you will see the port and service that the import is bound to.
8. Save the assembly diagram.
Once you have completed this, you must rewire the service:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this Import.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v Save the assembly diagram.
Migrating a Web Service (SOAP/HTTP)
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can migrate a Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) to an SCA Import with Web Service binding.
To migrate a SOAP/HTTP service project for an outbound service migration, follow these steps:
1. Import the workspace using the Migration wizard. This will result in the creation of a Business
Integration module with the WSDL Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition. Note that if the IBM Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) that this application will invoke is also a WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition Web service that will be migrated, there may have been updates to that Web
service during migration. If this is the case, you should use that Web service’s migrated WSDL files
here.
2. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module so that you can see its contents. Open the
Assembly Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same
name as the project).
3. Add an Import that will allow the application to interact with the IBM Web Service (via SOAP/HTTP)
according to the SCA programming model. Ensure that the WSDL interface, binding, and service
definitions are present in the migrated module or in a library that the migrated module is dependent
on.
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WebSphere Integration Developer: Migration Guide
4. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the migrated module and open its Assembly Diagram
in the Assembly Editor.
5. Expand the Web Service Ports logical category and drag and drop the port that corresponds to the
service you want to invoke onto the Assembly Editor.
6. Choose to create an Import with Web Service Binding.
7. After creating the import, select it in the Assembly Editor and go to the Properties view. Under the
Binding tab you will see the port and service that the import is bound to.
8. Save the assembly diagram.
Once you have completed this, you must rewire the service:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this Import.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v Save the assembly diagram.
Migrating a JMS service
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can migrate a JMS service
to an SCA Import with JMS binding.
Note: If the JMS message is being sent to a WebSphere Business Integration Adapter, then see the section
"Migrating Interactions with WebSphere Business Integration Adapter" in the link below.
To migrate a JMS service project for an outbound service migration, follow these steps:
1. Import the workspace using the Migration wizard. This will result in the creation of a Business
Integration module with the WSDL Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition.
2. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module so that you can see its contents. Open the
Assembly Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same
name as the project).
3. Add an Import that will allow the application to interact with a JMS queue according to the SCA
programming model.
4. In the Assembly Editor expand the migrated module project and expand the Interfaces category and
find the WSDL PortType that describes the Web service that the application will invoke. Drag and
drop it onto the Assembly Editor.
5. A Component Creation dialog will allow you to select they type of component to create. Choose
Import with No Binding.
6. You will see that a new Import was created in the Assembly Editor and if you select it and go to the
Properties view, on the Description tab you can change the import’s name and display name to
something more meaningful.
7. You can refer to the 5.1 WSDL binding and service files to find details about the JMS service that you
are migrating and use them to fill in the details of the 6.x "Import with JMS Binding". Locate the 5.1
JMS binding and service WSDL files within the 5.1 service project (they are often named
*JMSBinding.wsdl and *JMSService.wsdl). Inspect the binding and service information captured there.
From the binding, you can determine whether text or object messages were used and whether any
custom data format bindings were used. If there were any, you should consider writing a custom data
binding for your 6.x "Import with JMS Binding" as well. From the service, you can find the initial
context factory, JNDI connection factory name, JNDI destination name, and destination style (queue).
8. Right-click the import and select Generate Binding then JMS Binding. You will be prompted to enter
the following parameters:
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Select JMS messaging domain:
v Point-to-Point
v Publish-Subscribe
v Domain-Independent
Select how data is serialized between Business Object and JMS Message:
v Text
v Object
v User-supplied
If User-supplied is selected then:
Specify fully qualified name of com.ibm.websphere.sca.jms.data.JMSDataBinding
implementation class. You should specify a user-defined data binding if your application
needs to set any JMS header properties that are not normally available in the JMS Import
Binding. In this case, you can create a custom data binding class that extends the standard
JMS data binding "com.ibm.websphere.sca.jms.data.JMSDataBinding" and add custom code to
access the JMSMessage directly. See the JMS examples in "Creating and modifying bindings
for import and export components" from the link below.
Inbound connectivity is using default JMS function selector class:
<selected> or <deselected>
9. Select the import that you just created. In the Properties view, go to the Binding tab. You can
manually fill in all the binding information listed there to the same values that you specified before in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition. The binding information that you may
specify is:
v JMS Import Binding (this is the most important)
v Connection
v Resource Adapter
v JMS Destinations
v Method Bindings
Once you have completed this, you must rewire the service:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this Import.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v Save the assembly diagram.
Migrating a J2C-IMS service
If the Migration wizard did not fully migrate all of your service projects, you can migrate a J2C-IMS
service to an SCA Import with EIS Binding or SCA Import with Web Service Binding.
Do not use any of the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition artifacts that were
generated for this IMS service. You will need to create the service using the wizards available in
WebSphere Integration Developer and manually rewire the application.
Note: Turn Auto-Build on or build the module manually.
You have the following options:
Note: For both options, note that if a BPEL service invokes this IMS service, the BPEL will need to
change slightly, as the interface exposed by the EIS service will be slightly different than the old 5.1
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interface. To do this, open the BPEL editor and adjust the partner link that corresponds to the EIS service
and use the new interface (WSDL file) generated when performing the steps above. Make any necessary
changes to the BPEL activities for the new WSDL interface of the EIS service.
Creating an SCA Import to invoke the IMS service: option 1:
You can create an SCA Import with EIS Binding that will use DataObjects to store the message/data to
communicate with the IMS system.
To create an SCA Import to invoke the IMS service, follow these steps:
1. Create a new business integration module project to house this new IMS service.
2. To create the EIS service, go to File > New > Other > Business Integration > External Service.
3. This wizard allows you to import a service from an EIS system. It is very similar to the WebSphere
Studio Application Developer Integration Edition wizard that created the WSIF-based EIS service in
5.1. You can import the new J2C IMS resource adapter in this wizard. You should browse to the
directory where WebSphere Integration Developer is installed and drill down to Resource Adapters >
ims15 > imsico9102.rar.
Note: See the Information Center for more information on completing the saving properties and
operations panels. During the External Service wizard, when you add an operation you will also be
able to create business objects for the input or output data type of the operation. This requires that
you have the C or COBOL source file that you used in the WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition wizard. These files should have been copied to the old service project so that you
can point to the source files there. You can also import the business objects using the separate wizard
File > New > Other > Business Integration > External Data.
4. Once you have completed the wizard, open the Business Integration perspective and expand the
module so that you can see its contents. You should see new business objects listed under the
module’s Data Types and new interfaces listed under Interfaces.
5. Open the Assembly Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the
same name as the project). You should see that an Import exists on the canvas, this Import has an EIS
Binding and it represents the service that you just created.
Now see the section entitled “Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated service” for instructions on
how to expose this service to consumers.
Creating a Web service around the J2C service: option 2:
You can create a J2C Web service and if the consumer of the service is an SCA component, consume the
service as an IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP or SOAP/JMS).
To create a Web service around the J2C service, follow these steps:
1. Create the J2C Java Bean by clicking File > New > J2C > J2C Java Bean
2. Choose the 1.5 version of the IMS Connector for Java and click Next.
3. Select Managed Connection and enter the JNDI lookup name. Click Next.
4. Specify the project, package, and name for the new Java bean. The bean consists of an interface and
an implementation class. Click Next.
5. Add a Java method for each function or service you want to access from the EIS. Additional
methods can be added later in the Java source editor through the Snippets View. When you click the
Add... button, choose the name for the method and click Next.
6. Now you can choose Browse... to reuse existing types or New... to launch the CICS/IMS Java Data
Binding Wizard (where you can refer to a COBOL or C source file) for the input and output data
types.
7. Once you are finished creating Java methods, Click Next.
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8. Complete the remaining steps in this wizard to create your J2C Java Bean.
9. Create the Web Service by clicking File > New > J2C > Web Page, Web Service, or EJB from J2C
Java Bean to create the Web service around your J2C Java Bean.
10. Complete the wizard.
The consumers of this service can now use the WSDL service that is generated by this wizard to invoke
the IMS service.
Advantages and disadvantages for each of the J2C-IMS service rewiring options:
There are advantages and disadvantages for each of the J2C-IMS service rewiring options.
The following list describes both options and the advantages and disadvantages of each:
v The first option uses the standard SCA componentry to invoke the IMS service.
v The first option has some limitations:
– The SDO version 1 specification API does not provide access to the COBOL or C byte array – this
will impact customers working with IMS multi-segments.
– The SDO version 1 specification for serialization does not support COBOL redefines or C unions.
v The second option uses the standard JSR 109 approach to connect to the IMS service. This functionality
is available as part of Rational Application Developer.
Migrating a J2C-CICS ECI service
You can migrate a J2C-CICS ECI service to an SCA Import with EIS Binding or SCA Import with Web
Service Binding.
Follow the instructions in the topic "Migrating a J2C-IMS service", but ensure to import the following
RAR file instead of the IMS RAR file:
v Browse to the directory where WebSphere Integration Developer is installed and drill down to
Resource Adapters > cics15 > cicseci.rar .
If you follow the second option to create a J2C Web service, then choose the v1.5 ECIResourceAdapter on
the second panel of the J2C Java Bean creation wizard.
Also, see the topic "Migrating a J2C-IMS service".
Migrating a J2C-CICS EPI service
There is no direct support for the J2C-CICS EPI service in WebSphere Integration Developer. In order to
access this service from an SCA module, you will need to migrate using the consumption scenario.
See the topic "The consumption scenario for service migration" for instructions on migrating this service
type to WebSphere Integration Developer.
Migrating a J2C-HOD service
There is no direct support for the J2C-HOD service in WebSphere Integration Developer. In order to
access this service from an SCA module, you will need to migrate using the consumption scenario.
See the topic "The consumption scenario for service migration" for instructions on migrating this service
type to WebSphere Integration Developer.
Migrating a transformer service
You can migrate a transformer service to an SCA Data Map and Interface Map where possible. You can
also use the consumption scenario to access this service from an SCA module.
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The data map and interface map components offer similar function to the transformer service from 5.1
but they do not have the full XSL transform capability. If you are not able to replace your transformer
service with one of these components, then you must migrate using the consumption scenario as there is
no direct support for the transformer service in WebSphere Integration Developer. Follow the steps
documented in the "The consumption scenario for service migration" section to access this service from
an SCA module.
The consumption scenario for service migration
In the cases where there is no direct counterpart for a WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition service type, a consumption scenario is needed to consume the old WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition service as-is when redesigning the application in WebSphere
Integration Developer.
Here are the steps to perform in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition before
invoking the Migration wizard:
1. Create a new Java project to hold this client proxy code. Do not put this client proxy code in the
service project because the 5.1-style generated messages and Java bean classes will be skipped by the
automatic Migration wizard that migrates service projects.
2. Open WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition and right-click the WSDL file
containing the transformer binding and service and select Enterprise Services > Generate Service
Proxy. You will be asked what type of proxy to create, but only Web Services Invocation Framework
(WSIF) will be available. Click Next.
3. You can now specify the package and name of the service proxy Java class to create (you will create
the proxy in the current service project). Click Next.
4. You can now specify the proxy style, choose Client Stub, select the operations to include in the proxy,
and click Finish. This creates a Java class that exposes the same methods as the WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition service, where the arguments to the Java methods are the
parts of the source WSDL message.
You can now migrate to WebSphere Integration Developer:
1. Ensure that the Java project is in the old workspace (the Java project will be migrated automatically
by the Migration wizard).
2. Import the service project using the Migration wizard. This will result in the creation of a Business
Integration module with the WSDL Messages, PortTypes, Bindings, and Services generated in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition.
3. In the Business Integration perspective, expand the module so that you can see its contents. Open the
Assembly Editor by double-clicking the first item under the module project (it will have the same
name as the project).
4. To create the custom Java component, under the module project, expand Interfaces and select the
WSDL interface that was generated for this transformer service in WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition.
5. Drag and drop this interface onto the Assembly Editor. A dialog will pop up asking you to select the
type of component to create. Select Component with No Implementation Type and click OK.
6. A generic component will appear on the Assembly diagram. Select it and go to the Properties view.
7. On the Description tab, you can change the name and display name of the component to something
more descriptive (in this case name it something like your EJB’s name but append a postfix such as
“JavaMed” as this is going to be a Java component that mediates between the WSDL interface
generated for the transformer service in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
and the Java interface of the transformer client proxy).
8. On the Details tab you will see that this component has one interface - the one that you dragged and
dropped onto the Assembly Editor.
9. Return to the Assembly Editor, right-click the component that you just created and select Generate
Implementation... > Java Then select the package where the Java implementation will be generated.
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This creates a skeleton Java service that adheres to the WSDL interface according to the SCA
programming model, where complex types are represented by an object that is a
commonj.sdo.DataObject and simple types are represented by their Java Object equivalents.
Now you will need to fill in code where you see the “//TODO” tags in the generated Java
implementation class. There are two options:
1. Move the logic from the original Java class to this class, adapting it to the new data structure.
2. Create a private instance of the old Java class inside this generated Java class and write code to:
a. Convert all parameters of the generated Java implementation class into parameters that the old
Java class expects
b. Invoke the private instance of the old Java class with the converted parameters
c. Convert the return value of the old Java class into the return value type declared by the generated
Java implementation method
Once you have completed the above options, you must rewire the client proxy. There should not be any
"references", therefore you just need to rewire the Java component’s interface:
v If this service is invoked by a business process in the same module, then create a wire from the
appropriate business process reference to this Java component’s interface.
v If this service is invoked by a business process in another module, create an Export with SCA Binding
and from the other module, drag and drop this export onto that module’s Assembly Editor to create
the corresponding Import with SCA Binding. Wire the appropriate business process reference to that
Import.
v If this service was published in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition to expose
it externally, then see the section "Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated service" for instructions
on how to republish the service.
Creating SCA Exports to access the migrated service
An SCA Export must be created to make the migrated service available to external consumers according
to the SCA model for all services that deployment code was generated for in the WebSphere Studio
Application Developer Integration Edition service project. This includes all services invoked by clients
external to the application. Note: The Migration wizard creates the exports automatically, however, you
can refer to the following information to help verify what the tool did.
If from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, you right-clicked the BPEL process
or other Service WSDL and selected Enterprise Services > Generate Deploy Code , you must perform
the manual migration steps below. Note that WebSphere Integration Developer is different from
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition in that it stores all of the deployment
options. When the project is built, the deployment code is automatically updated in the generated EJB
and Web projects so there is no option to manually Generate Deploy Code anymore.
Five binding options were given under the Interfaces for Partners section of the Generate BPEL Deploy
Code wizard. The following inbound BPEL service migration information provides more details on the
Export type and properties to create based on the deployment binding type(s) that were selected in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
v EJB
v
v
v
v
IBM Web Service (SOAP/JMS)
IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP)
Apache Web Service (SOAP/HTTP)
JMS
Migrating the EJB and the EJB process bindings
The EJB and EJB process bindings can be migrated to the recommended SCA construct.
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In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition this binding type enabled clients to
communicate with a BPEL process or other service type by invoking an EJB. Note that this binding type
was not optional for microprocesses – it was always selected as the generated EJB was used internally by
the other binding types.
The JNDI name of the generated EJB was automatically generated as a combination of the BPEL’s name,
target namespace, and valid-from timestamp. For example, these attributes can be found by examining
the BPEL process’s properties in the BPEL editor on the Description and Server content tabs:
Table 4. Generated namespace
Process name
MyService
Target namespace
http://www.example.com/process87787141/
Valid From
Jan 01 2003 02:03:04
The generated namespace for this example is then com/example/www/process87787141/
MyService20030101T020304.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when the EJB binding was selected as the
deployment type, there were no options given.
There are four options for migrating the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
process binding. The type of client(s) that access the service will determine which migration option(s)
below to perform:
Note: After the manual migration steps have been completed, the client must be migrated to the new
programming model as well. See the appropriate topic for the following client types:
Table 5. Further information for migrating clients
Client type
For further information see
EJB client that invokes the generated session
"Migrating the EJB client"
bean. Such a client would invoke an EJB
method corresponding to the BPEL operation to
invoke
WSIF client that uses the EJB process binding
"Migrating the EJB process binding client"
Generic business process choreographer EJB
API
"Migrating the business process choreographer generic EJB API
client"
Generic business process choreographer
Messaging API
"Migrating the business process choreographer generic Messaging
API client"
Another BPEL process in the same module
N/A: Wire BPEL components together using Assembly Editor
Another BPEL process in a different module
N/A: Create an Import with SCA Binding in the referencing
module, and configure its binding to point to the Export with
SCA Binding that you create below in Option 1
Migration option 1 for the EJB and EJB process binding:
The first migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition EJB
process binding is to make business processes accessible to another component in the same module.
In the Assembly Editor, to wire this other component to the BPEL component, follow these steps:
1. Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
2. Click on the other component to select it as the source of the wire.
3. Click the BPEL SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
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4. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 2 for the EJB and EJB process binding:
The second migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition EJB
process binding is to make business processes accessible to other SCA modules and clients.
Note: These steps are mandatory if the generic business process choreographer APIs will be used to
invoke the business process.
The Export with SCA Binding makes an SCA component accessible by other SCA modules. To create an
Export with an SCA binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each BPEL process interface that had an EJB binding
generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Right-click the BPEL component in the Assembly Editor.
b. Select Export....
c. Select SCA Binding.
d. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
e. Once the SCA Export is created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the Properties
view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed and may
be modified as necessary.
f. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 3 for the EJB and EJB process binding:
The third migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition EJB
process binding is to make modules accessible by a non-SCA entity (for example, a JSP or a Java client).
The Standalone Reference makes an SCA component accessible by any external client. To create a
Standalone Reference, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the Migration wizard.
2. Create a Standalone Reference for each BPEL process interface that had an EJB binding generated for
it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Select the Standalone References item from the toolbar.
b. Click the canvas of the Assembly Editor to create a Standalone References SCA entity.
c. Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
d. Click the Standalone References entity to select it as the source of the wire.
e. Click the BPEL SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
f. You will see an alert Matching reference will be created on the source node. Would you like to
continue?, click OK.
g. Select the Standalone References entity that was just created and in the Properties view select the
Description content pane.
h. Expand the References link and select the reference that was just created. The reference’s name
and description are listed and may be modified as necessary.
i. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interfaces to export with this binding type.
j. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 4 for the EJB and EJB process binding:
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The fourth migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition EJB
process binding is to make business processes accessible by a Web Services client.
The Export with Web service binding makes an SCA component accessible by an external web services
client. To create an Export with Web Service binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each BPEL process interface that had an EJB binding
generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Right-click the BPEL component in the Assembly Editor.
b. Select Export... .
c. Select Web Service Binding .
d. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
e. Select the transport: soap/http or soap/jms.
f. Once the Web services Export has been created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the
Properties view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed
and may be modified as necessary.
g. Save the assembly diagram.
Migrating the JMS and the JMS process bindings
The JMS and JMS process bindings can be migrated to the recommended SCA construct.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, this binding type gave clients the ability
to communicate with a BPEL process or other service type by sending a message to an MDB. Note that
this binding type was not optional for long-running processes and it was always selected. In fact, this
binding type was the only binding type allowed for request-response interfaces of long-running
processes. For the other service types, an MDB would be generated and it would invoke the appropriate
service.
The JNDI name used by the JMS binding was a combination of the BPEL’s name, target namespace, and
valid-from timestamp.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when the JMS binding was selected as
the deployment type for a BPEL process, the following options were given:
v JNDI Connection Factory - the default is jms/BPECF (this is the JNDI name of the target business
process container’s queue connection factory)
v JNDI Destination Queue - the default is jms/BPEIntQueue (this is the JNDI name of the target
business process container’s internal queue)
v JNDI Provider URL: Server supplied or Custom - you must enter an address. The default is
iiop://localhost:2809
There are five options for migrating the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding. The type of client(s) that access the service will determine which migration option(s)
below to perform:
Note: After the manual migration steps have been completed, the client must be migrated to the new
programming model as well. See the appropriate topic for the following client types:
Table 6. Further information for migrating clients
Client type
For further information see
WSIF Client that uses the JMS "Migrating the business process choreographer generic Messaging API client and the
process binding
JMS process binding client"
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Table 6. Further information for migrating clients (continued)
Client type
For further information see
Generic business process
choreographer EJB API
"Migrating the business process choreographer generic EJB API client"
Generic business process
"Migrating the business process choreographer generic Messaging API client"
choreographer Messaging API
Migrating the business
Another BPEL process in the
same module
N/A: Wire BPEL components together using Assembly Editor
Another BPEL process in a
different module
N/A: Create an Import with SCA Binding in the referencing module, and configure
its binding to point to the Export with SCA Binding that you create below in
Option 1.
Migration option 1 for the JMS and JMS process binding:
The first migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding is to make business processes accessible to another component in the same module.
In the Assembly Editor, to wire this other component to the BPEL component, follow these steps:
1. Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
2. Click on the other component to select it as the source of the wire.
3. Click the BPEL SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
4. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 2 for the JMS and JMS process binding:
The second migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding is to make business processes accessible to other SCA modules and clients.
The Export with SCA Binding makes an SCA component accessible by other SCA modules. To create an
Export with an SCA binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each BPEL process interface that had a JMS binding generated
for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Right-click the BPEL component in the Assembly Editor.
b. Select Export....
c. Select SCA Binding.
d. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
e. Once the SCA Export is created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the Properties
view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed and may
be modified as necessary.
f. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 3 for the JMS and JMS process binding:
The third migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding is to make business processes accessible by a non-SCA entity (for example, a JSP or a
Java client).
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The Standalone Reference makes an SCA component accessible by any external client. To create a
Standalone Reference, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create a Standalone Reference for each BPEL process interface that had a JMS binding generated for it
in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Select the Standalone References item from the toolbar.
b. Click the canvas of the Assembly Editor to create a Standalone References SCA entity.
c. Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
d. Click the Standalone References entity to select it as the source of the wire.
e. Click the BPEL SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
f. You will see an alert Matching reference will be created on the source node. Would you like to
continue?, click OK.
g. Select the Standalone References entity that was just created and in the Properties view select the
Description content pane.
h. Expand the References link and select the reference that was just created. The reference’s name
and description are listed and may be modified as necessary.
i. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interfaces to export with this binding type.
j. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 4 for the JMS and JMS process binding:
The fourth migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding is to make business processes accessible by a Web services client.
The Export with Web service binding makes an SCA component accessible by an external web services
client. To create an Export with Web service binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each BPEL process interface that had a JMS binding generated
for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Right-click the BPEL component in the Assembly Editor.
b. Select Export... .
c. Select Web Service Binding .
d. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
e. Select the transport: soap/http or soap/jms.
f. Once the Web services Export has been created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the
Properties view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed
and may be modified as necessary.
g. Save the assembly diagram.
Migration option 5 for the JMS and JMS process binding:
The fifth migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition JMS
process binding is to make business processes accessible by a JMS client.
The Export with JMS binding makes an SCA component accessible by an external JMS client. To create an
Export with JMS binding, follow these steps:
1. For BPEL services, you will need to create and reference new queue resources, as the 5.1 JMS process
binding was quite different from the standard 5.1 JMS binding. For non-BPEL services, you can find
the values you selected for the JMS deployment code in WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition 5.1 by finding the WSDL file named JMSBinding.wsdl and JMSService.wsdl in
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the appropriate package underneath the ejbModule/META-INF folder of generated EJB project and
inspecting the binding and service information captured there. From the binding, you can determine
whether text or object messages were used and whether any custom data format bindings were
used. If there were any, you should consider writing a custom data binding for your 6.x Export with
JMS Binding as well. From the service, you can find the initial context factory, JNDI connection
factory name, JNDI destination name, and destination style (queue).
2. Open the assembly editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
3. Create an export with JMS binding for each BPEL process interface that had a JMS binding generated
for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition by right-clicking the BPEL
component in the Assembly Editor.
4. Select Export... .
5. Select JMS Binding .
6. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding type.
7. On the next panel (JMS Export Binding attributes), select JMS messaging domain. Define this
attribute as Point-to-Point.
8. Select how data is serialized between Business Object and JMS Message and enter the following
values (it is recommended that you select Text instead of Object because text, which is often XML, is
independent of the runtime and enables service integration between disparate systems):
a. For Text, select to use the Default JMS function selector or enter the fully qualified name of the
FunctionSelector implementation class.
b. For Object, select to use the Default JMS function selector or enter the fully qualified name of
the FunctionSelector implementation class.
c. For User Supplied, enter the fully-qualified name of the JMSDataBinding implementation class.
You will need to select User Supplied if your application needs access to any JMS header
properties that are not readily available in the JMS import binding. In this case, then you must
create a custom data binding class that extends the standard JMS data binding
com.ibm.websphere.sca.jms.data.JMSDataBinding and add custom code to access the
JMSMessage directly. Then you will provide the name of your custom class for this field. See the
JMS examples in "Creating and modifying bindings for import and export components" from the
link below.
d. For User Supplied, select to use the Default JMS function selector or enter the fully qualified
name of the FunctionSelector implementation class.
9. When the e-Export with JMS binding has been created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and
in the Properties view, select the Description content pane. The name of the export and its
description are listed and can be modified as necessary.
10. Select the Binding content pane to see many more options.
11. Save the assembly diagram.
Migrating the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/JMS)
The IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/JMS) for a BPEL process or other service type can be migrated to
the recommended SCA construct.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, this binding type gave clients the ability
to communicate with a BPEL process or other service type by invoking an IBM Web Service, where the
communication protocol was JMS and the message adhered to the SOAP encoding rules.
The following example shows the conventions used when generating an IBM Web Service (SOAP/JMS)
for a 5.1 BPEL service. The JNDI name of the generated IBM Web Service was a combination of the
BPEL's name, target namespace, and valid-from timestamp, as well as the name of the interface (WSDL
port type that the deployment code was generated for). For example, these attributes can be found by
examining the BPEL process' properties in the BPEL editor on the Description and Server content tabs:
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Table 7. Generated namespace
Process name
MyService
Target namespace
http://www.example.com/process87787141/
Valid From
Jan 01 2003 02:03:04
Interface
ProcessPortType
The generated namespace for this example is then com/example/www/process87787141/
MyService20030101T020304_ProcessPortTypePT.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when the IBM Web Service binding
(SOAP/JMS) was selected as the deployment type for a BPEL process or other service type, the following
options were given:
v For Document Style, the default was DOCUMENT / other option: RPC
v For Document Use, the default was LITERAL / other option: ENCODED
v For JNDI Provider URL, it was either Server supplied or Custom (an address must be entered, the
default is iiop://localhost:2809)
v For Destination Style, the default was queue / other option was topic
v For JNDI Connection Factory, the default was jms/qcf (this is the JNDI name of the queue connection
factory for the generated MDB queue)
v For JNDI Destination Queue, the default was jms/queue (this is the JNDI name of the generated MDB
queue)
v For MDB Listener Port, the default was <Service Project Name>MdbListenerPort
A WSDL file specifying the IBM Web Service SOAP/JMS binding and service is created in the generated
EJB project but not in the service project itself. This means that you must manually locate that file and
copy it to your business integration module project if it is important that the IBM Web Service client code
must not change. By default, this WSDL file was created in the EJB project at ejbModule/META-INF/
wsdl/<business process name>_ <business process interface port type name>_JMS.wsdl
The WSDL PortType and Messages of the business process interface are actually copied to this WSDL file
as well rather than referencing the existing WSDL PortType and Messages defined in the service project.
If it is important that the IBM Web Service client code remain unchanged after migration, then the
information in this file will be needed for the manual migration steps below.
There are two options for migrating the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/JMS process binding. The choice will have to be made whether to migrate the client to the SCA
programming model or to leave it as a web services client:
Note: After the manual migration steps have been completed, the client must be migrated to the new
programming model as well. See the appropriate topic for the following client types:
Table 8. Further information for migrating clients
Client type
For further information see
IBM Web service client
"Migrating the IBM Web service (SOAP/JMS) client"
Migration option 1 for the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/JMS):
The first migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/JMS binding is to make the service accessible to a Web services client.
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The Export with Web Service Binding makes an SCA component accessible by an external Web services
client. To create an Export with Web Service Binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each service interface that had an IBM Web Service
(SOAP/JMS) binding generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Right-click the SCA component in the Assembly Editor.
b. Select Export....
c. Select Web Service Binding.
d. If there are multiple interfaces for the component, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
e. Select the transport soap/jms.
3. Once the Web Services Export is created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the
Properties view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed and
may be modified as necessary.
4. Save the assembly diagram.
5. Select the Binding content pane and you will see that an IBM Web Service WSDL Binding and Service
has been generated directly in the module’s project folder. It will be named component-that-was-exported
Export WSDL PortType name Jms_Service.wsdl. If you inspect that file, you will find that the
Document/Literal wrapped binding is used by default, as it is the preferred style in 6.x. This is the
WSDL that IBM Web Service clients will use to invoke the service.
6. Follow these steps to generate a new web service binding and service if preserving client code is
required:
a. Copy the 5.1 WSDL file from the 5.1 generated EJB project at ejbModule/META-INF/wsdl/
business process name/business process interface port type nameJMS.wsdl to the business integration
module project.
b. After copying over the file and rebuilding the module, you may see error messages because the
XML schema types, WSDL messages, and WSDL port types used by the Web service are
duplicated in the IBM Web Service WSDL file in 5.1. To fix this, delete those duplicate definitions
from the IBM Web Service binding/service WSDL and in their place add a WSDL import for the
real interface WSDL. Note: It is important to note that when WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition generated the IBM Web Service deployment code, it did modify the
schema definitions in some cases. This could cause inconsistencies for existing clients that use the
IBM Web Service WSDL. For example, the "elementFormDefault" schema attribute was set to
"qualified" in the inline schema generated in the IBM Web Service WSDL even if the original
schema definition was not qualified. This would cause the following error to be generated during
runtime: WSWS3047E: Error: Cannot deserialize element.
c. Right-click on this WSDL file you just copied to the business integration module and select Open
With then WSDL Editor.
d. Go to the Source tab. Delete all WSDL PortTypes and Messages defined in this file.
e. Now you will see the error: The '<portType>' port type specified for the '<binding>' binding is
undefined. To fix this, in the WSDL editor in the Graph tab, right-click in the Imports section and
select Add Import.
f. In the Properties view on the General tab, click the ... button to the right of the Location field.
Browse to the interface WSDL where the WSDL message and port type definitions are located and
click OK to import the interface WSDL into the service/binding WSDL.
g. Save the WSDL file.
h. Refresh/rebuild the project. Switch to the Business Integration perspective. Open the module’s
Assembly Diagram in the Assembly Editor.
i. In the project explorer view, expand the module that you are migrating and expand the Web
Service Ports logical category. You should see the port that exists in the binding/service WSDL
listed. Drag and drop it on to the Assembly Editor.
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j. Choose to create an Export with Web Service Binding and select the appropriate port name. This
will create the Export that uses the old binding/service such that existing Web service clients do
not have to change. If you select the export you just created in the Assembly Editor and go to the
Properties view, on the Binding tab you should see that the 5.1 port and service names have been
filled in for you.
k. Save all changes.
l. Just before deploying the application, you can change the generated Web project’s configuration to
match the 5.1 service address (you have to make these changes every time you make any changes
to the SCA module that cause this file to be regenerated). If you look at the IBM Web Service
WSDL Service definition that you are reusing from 5.1 you will see the service address that the 5.1
client is coded to:<wsdlsoap:address location="http://localhost:9080/MyServiceWeb/services/
MyServicePort"/>
m. In order to make the 6.x generated Web project artifacts match this old service address, you
should modify the generated Web project’s deployment descriptor. Open the deployment
descriptor in WebSphere Integration Developer and on the Servlets tab, add an additional URL
Mapping that is very similar to the existing URL mapping for that export, with the same servlet
name but a different URL pattern.
n. Also, if you need to modify the context root of this web project such that it matches the context
root in the original service address (in this example the context root is "MyServiceWeb"), then you
can open the deployment descriptor for the J2EE Enterprise Application that this web project is in
and change the context root of that web module to match the old service address’s context root.
You may see the following error which you can ignore: CHKJ3017E: Web Project: <WEB PROJ
NAME> is mapped to an invalid Context root: <NEW CONTEXT ROOT> in EAR Project: <APP
NAME>.
Migration option 2 for the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/JMS):
The second migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/JMS process binding is to make business processes accessible to a non-SCA entity (for example,
JSP or a Java client).
The Standalone Reference makes an SCA component accessible by any external client. To create a
Standalone Reference, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create a Standalone Reference for each BPEL process interface that had an IBM Web Service
(SOAP/JMS) binding generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Select the Standalone References item from the toolbar.
Click the canvas of the Assembly Editor to create a Standalone References SCA entity.
Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
Click the Standalone References entity to select it as the source of the wire.
Click the BPEL SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
You will see an alert Matching reference will be created on the source node. Would you like to
continue?, click OK.
g. Select the Standalone References entity that was just created and in the Properties view select the
Description content pane.
h. Expand the References link and select the reference that was just created. The reference’s name
and description are listed and may be modified as necessary.
i. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
j. Save the assembly diagram.
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Migrating the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/HTTP)
The IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/HTTP) for a BPEL process or other service type can be migrated to
the recommended SCA construct.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, this binding type gave clients the ability
to communicate with a BPEL process or other service type by invoking an IBM Web Service, where the
communication protocol was HTTP and the message adhered to the SOAP encoding rules.
The following example shows the conventions used when generating an IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP)
for a 5.1 BPEL service. The JNDI name of the generated IBM Web Service was a combination of the
BPEL's name, target namespace, and valid-from timestamp, as well as the name of the interface (WSDL
port type that the deployment code was generated for). For example, these attributes can be found by
examining the BPEL process' properties in the BPEL editor on the Description and Server content tabs:
Table 9. Generated namespace
Process name
MyService
Target namespace
http://www.example.com/process87787141/
Valid From
Jan 01 2003 02:03:04
Interface
ProcessPortType
The generated namespace for this example is then com/example/www/process87787141/
MyService20030101T020304_ProcessPortTypePT.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when the IBM Web Service binding
(SOAP/HTTP) was selected as the deployment type for a BPEL process or other service type, the
following options were given:
v For Document Style, the default was RPC / other option: DOCUMENT
v For Document Use, the default was ENCODED / other option: LITERAL
v For Router Address, the default was http://localhost:9080
A WSDL file specifying the IBM Web Service SOAP/HTTP binding and service is created in the
generated Web and EJB projects but not in the service project itself. This means that you must manually
locate that file and copy it to your business integration module project if it is important that the IBM Web
Service client code must not change. By default, this WSDL file was created in the Web project at
WebContent/WEB-INF/wsdl/<business process name>_<business process interface port type
name>_HTTP.wsdl
The WSDL PortType and Messages of the business process interface are actually copied to this WSDL file
as well rather than referencing the existing WSDL PortType and Messages defined in the service project.
If it is important that the IBM Web Service client code remain unchanged after migration, then the
information in this file will be needed for the manual migration steps below.
There are two options for migrating the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/HTTP process binding. The choice will have to be made whether to migrate the client to the SCA
programming model or to leave it as a Web services client:
Note: After the manual migration steps have been completed, the client must be migrated to the new
programming model as well. See the appropriate topic for the following client types:
Table 10. Further information for migrating clients
Client type
For further information see
IBM Web service client
"Migrating the IBM Web service (SOAP/HTTP) client"
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Migration option 1 for the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) binding:
The first migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/HTTP process binding is to make business processes accessible to a Web services client.
The Export with Web Service Binding makes an SCA component accessible by an external Web services
client. To create an Export with Web Service Binding, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the Migration wizard.
2. Create an Export with SCA Binding for each BPEL process interface that had an IBM Web Service
(SOAP/HTTP) binding generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration
Edition by right-clicking the BPEL component in the Assembly Editor.
3. Select Export....
4. Select Web Service Binding.
5. If there are multiple interfaces for the component, select the interface(s) to export with this binding
type.
6. Select the transport soap/http.
7. Once the Web Services Export is created, select the export in the Assembly Editor and in the
Properties view, select the Description content pane. The Export’s name and description are listed and
may be modified as necessary.
8. Save the assembly diagram.
9. Follow these steps to generate a new Web service binding and service if preserving client code is
required:
a. Copy the 5.1 WSDL file from the 5.1 generated EJB project at ejbModule/META-INF/wsdl/
business process name/business process interface port type name_HTTP.wsdl to the business integration
module project.
After copying over the file and rebuilding the module, you may see error messages as the XML
schema types, WSDL messages, and WSDL port types used by the Web service are duplicated in
the IBM Web Service WSDL file in 5.1. To fix this, delete those duplicate definitions from the IBM
Web Service binding/service WSDL and in their place add a WSDL import for the real interface
WSDL. Note: It is important to note that when WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition generated the IBM Web Service deployment code, it did modify the schema
definitions in some cases. This could cause inconsistencies for existing clients that use the IBM
Web Service WSDL. For example, the "elementFormDefault" schema attribute was set to "qualified"
in the inline schema generated in the IBM Web Service WSDL even if the original schema
definition was not qualified. This would cause the following error to be generated during runtime:
WSWS3047E: Error: Cannot deserialize element.
c. Right-click on this WSDL file you just copied to the business integration module and select Open
With then WSDL Editor.
b.
d. Go to the Source tab. Delete all WSDL PortTypes and Messages defined in this file.
e. Now you will see the error: The '<portType>' port type specified for the '<binding>' binding is
undefined. To fix this, in the WSDL editor in the Graph tab, right-click in the Imports section and
select Add Import.
f. In the Properties view on the General tab, click the ... button to the right of the Location field.
Browse to the interface WSDL where the WSDL message and port type definitions are located and
click OK to import the interface WSDL into the service/binding WSDL.
g. Save the WSDL file.
h. Refresh/rebuild the project. Switch to the Business Integration perspective. Open the module’s
Assembly Diagram in the Assembly Editor.
i. In the project explorer view, expand the module that you are migrating and expand the Web
Service Ports logical category. You should see the port that exists in the binding/service WSDL
listed. Drag and drop it on to the Assembly Editor.
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j. Choose to create an Export with Web Service Binding and select the appropriate port name. This
will create the Export that uses the old binding/service such that existing Web service clients do
not have to change. If you select the export you just created in the Assembly Editor and go to the
Properties view, on the Binding tab you should see that the 5.1 port and service names have been
filled in for you.
k. Save all changes.
l. Just before deploying the application, you can change the generated Web project’s configuration to
match the 5.1 service address (you have to make these changes every time you make any changes
to the SCA module that cause this file to be regenerated). If you look at the IBM Web Service
WSDL service definition that you are reusing from 5.1, you will see the service address that the 5.1
client is coded to:<wsdlsoap:address location="http://localhost:9080/MyServiceWeb/services/
MyServicePort"/>
m. In order to make the 6.x generated Web project artifacts match this old service address, you
should modify the generated Web project’s deployment descriptor. Open the deployment
descriptor in WebSphere Integration Developer and on the Servlets tab, add an additional URL
Mapping that is very similar to the existing URL mapping for that export, with the same servlet
name but a different URL pattern.
n. Also, if you need to modify the context root of this web project such that it matches the context
root in the original service address (in this example the context root is "MyServiceWeb"), then you
can open the deployment descriptor for the J2EE Enterprise Application that this web project is in
and change the context root of that web module to match the old service address’s context root.
You may see the following error which you can ignore: CHKJ3017E: Web Project: <WEB PROJ
NAME> is mapped to an invalid Context root: <NEW CONTEXT ROOT> in EAR Project: <APP
NAME>.
Migration option 2 for the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) binding:
The second migration option for the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
SOAP/HTTP process binding is to make business processes accessible to a non-SCA entity (for example,
JSP or a Java client).
The Standalone Reference makes an SCA component accessible by any external client. To create a
Standalone Reference, follow these steps:
1. Open the Assembly Editor for the module created by the migration wizard.
2. Create a Standalone Reference for each interface that had an IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) binding
generated for it in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition:
a. Select the Standalone References item from the toolbar.
Click the canvas of the Assembly Editor to create a Standalone References SCA entity.
Select the Wire item from the toolbar.
Click the Standalone References entity to select it as the source of the wire.
Click the SCA component to select it as the target of the wire.
You will see an alert Matching reference will be created on the source node. Would you like to
continue?, click OK.
g. Select the Standalone References entity that was just created and in the Properties view select the
Description content pane.
h. Expand the References link and select the reference that was just created. The reference’s name
and description are listed and may be modified as necessary.
i. If there are multiple interfaces for the process, select the interfaces to export with this binding type.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
j. Save the assembly diagram.
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Migrating the Apache Web Service binding (SOAP/HTTP)
The Apache Web Service binding (SOAP/HTTP) for a BPEL process or other service type can be migrated
to the recommended SCA construct.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, this binding type gave clients the ability
to communicate with a BPEL process or other service type by invoking an Apache Web Service.
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition when the Apache Web Service binding
was selected as the deployment type for a BPEL process or other service type, the following options were
given:
v For Document Style, it was RPC (no other option available)
v For SOAP action , it was URN:WSDL PortType name
v For Address, it was http://localhost:9080/Service Project NameWeb/servlet/rpcrouter
v For Use Encoding, the default was yes (If yes, then Encoding Style was set to: http://
schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/)
A WSDL file specifying the Apache SOAP binding and service is created in the service project. By default
it is created in the same directory as the service it is wrapping with the name <business process
name>_<business process interface port type name>_SOAP.wsdl. The WSDL PortType and Messages of
the business process interface are used by this binding and service directly. After migration, you should
not use this WSDL for anything aside from perhaps using the same namespace, port, and service names
in the new WSDL that will be generated for you in Version 6.x.
There are two options for migrating the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
Web Service process binding. The choice will have to be made whether to migrate the client to the SCA
programming model or to leave it as an IBM Web Services programming model. There is no binding that
is equivalent to the Apache Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) binding type anymore in the 6 SCA programming
model.
You should migrate this Apache Web service to use the IBM Web Service engine. See the topic "Migrating
the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) binding" for instructions on how to perform this migration and
create an IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP).
Migrating to the SCA programming model
For any free-form Java code that interacts with a WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration
Edition service, this section will show how to migrate from the WSIF programming model to the new
SCA programming model where the data flowing through the application is stored in Eclipse Service
Data Objects (SDOs). This section will also show you how to manually migrate the most common client
types to the new programming model.
For any BPEL processes that contain Java snippets, this section explains how to migrate from the old Java
snippet API to the new Java snippet API where the data flowing through the application is stored in
Eclipse Service Data Objects (SDOs). Whenever possible, the snippets are migrated automatically by the
Migration wizard but there are snippets that the Migration wizard cannot fully migrate, meaning manual
steps are required to complete the migration.
Here is a summary of the programming model changes:
V5.1 Programming Model
1. WSIF and WSDL based
2. Generated proxies for services
3. Beans and format handlers for types
V6.x Programming Model (more Java-centric)
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1. SCA services based on SDOs with doclet tags
2. Interface bindings for services
3. SDOs and Databindings for types
Migrating WSIFMessage API calls to SDO APIs
The following section details how to migrate from the old WebSphere Business Integration Server
Foundation Version 5.1 programming model where the data flowing through the application is
represented as WSIFMessage objects with a generated interface that was strongly-typed to the new
WebSphere Process Server programming model where the data is represented as Service Data Objects
(SDOs) and no strongly-typed interface is generated.
Table 11. Changes and Solutions for migrating WSIFMessage API calls to SDO APIs
Change
Solution
WSIFMessage-based wrapper classes
are no longer generated for WSDL
message types, nor are the Java bean
helper classes generated for complex
schema types.
When writing code that interacts with SCA services, the generic SDO APIs
must be used to manipulate the commonj.sdo.DataObject messages that
hold the data that flows through the application.
WSDL message definitions that have a single simple-typed part will now
be represented by a simple Java type that directly represents the part
instead of having a wrapper around the actual data. If the single message
part is a complex type, then the data is represented as a DataObject that
adheres to the complex type definition.
WSDL message definitions that have multiple parts now correspond to a
DataObject that has properties for all of the message parts, where
complexTypes are represented as "reference-type" properties of the parent
DataObject, accessible via the getDataObject and setDataObject methods.
Weakly-typed SDO API should be used to get the DataObject properties.
Strongly-typed getter methods for
WSIFMessage parts and generated Java
beans should not be used.
Strongly-typed setter methods for
BPEL variables’ message parts are no
longer available.
Weakly-typed SDO API must be used to set the DataObject properties.
Weakly-typed getter methods for
WSIFMessage properties should no
longer be used.
Weakly-typed SDO API must be used to set the DataObject properties.
Weakly-typed setter methods for
WSIFMessage properties should no
longer be used.
Weakly-typed SDO API must be used to set the DataObject properties.
All WSIFMessage API calls should be
migrated to the SDO API where
possible.
Migrate the call to an equivalent SDO API call where possible. Redesign
logic if not possible.
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation client code
This section shows how to migrate the various client types that were possible for the WebSphere Business
Integration Server Foundation 5.1 service types.
Migrating the EJB client:
This topic shows how to migrate clients that use an EJB interface to invoke a service.
1. Drag and drop the Export with SCA Binding from the migrated module onto this new module’s
Assembly Editor. This will create an Import with SCA Binding. In order for a client to obtain a
reference to this import, a Standalone Reference must be created.
2. On the palette, select the Standalone References item. Click the Assembly Editor canvas once to create
a new standalone reference for this new module.
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3. Select the wire tool and click the service reference and then click Import.
4. Click OK when alerted that a matching reference will be created on the source node.
5. You will be asked: It is easier for a Java client to use a Java interface with this reference – would
you like to convert the WSDL reference to a compatible Java reference?:
a. Answer Yes if you would like the client to look up this service and cast it as a Java class to invoke
it using a Java interface. This new Java interface takes the name of the WSDL PortType, where the
package of the interface is derived from the namespace of the WSDL PortType. There is a method
defined for each operation defined on the WSDL PortType, and each WSDL message part is
represented as an argument to the interface methods.
b. Answer No if you would like the client to look up this service and use the generic
com.ibm.websphere.sca.Service interface to invoke it using the invoke operation as a generic SCA
service.
6. Rename the standalone reference to a more meaningful name if appropriate by selecting the
Standalone References component in the Assembly Editor. Go to the Properties view, to the Details
tab, drilling down to and selecting the reference that was just created, and modifying the name.
Remember the name you chose for this reference because the client will need to use this name when
invoking the locateService method of the com.ibm.websphere.sca.ServiceManager instance.
7. Click Save to save the Assembly diagram.
The client must have this new module on its local classpath in order to access the migrated EJB module
running on the server.
The following shows what the client code looks like for a service of type "CustomerInfo":
// Create a new ServiceManager
ServiceManager serviceManager = ServiceManager.INSTANCE;
// Locate the CustomerInfo service
CustomerInfo customerInfoService = (CustomerInfo) serviceManager.locateService
("<name-of-standalone-reference-from-previous-step");
// Invoke the CustomerInfo service
System.out.println(" [getMyValue] getting customer info...");
DataObject customer = customerInfoService.getCustomerInfo(customerID);
The client must change how the message is constructed. In the messages were based on the WSIFMessage
class but now they should be based on the commonj.sdo.DataObject class.
Migrating the EJB process binding client:
This topic shows how to migrate clients that use the WSIF EJB process binding to access a BPEL service.
Clients that used the EJB Process Binding to invoke a business process should now use either the SCA
API to invoke the service (the migrated business process must have an Export with SCA Binding) or the
IBM Web Service Client API to invoke the service (the migrated business process must have an Export
with Web Service Binding).
See the topics "Migrating the EJB Client", "Migrating the IBM Web Service (SOAP/JMS) client", or
"Migrating the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) client" for more information on generating such clients.
Migrating the IBM Web Service (SOAP/JMS) client:
This topic shows how to migrate clients that use Web Service APIs (SOAP/JMS) to invoke a service.
No migration is needed for existing clients during migration. Note that you must manually modify the
generated Web project (create a new servlet mapping) and sometimes have to modify the Web project’s
context root in the enterprise application deployment descriptor to publish the service to the exact same
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address that it was published to on WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation. See the topic
"Migrating the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/JMS)".
It is important to note that unlike 5.1 where a WSIF or RPC client proxy could be generated, in 6.x the
tools only support RPC client generation because RPC is the 6.x preferred API over the WSIF API.
Note: To generate new client proxy from WebSphere Integration Developer, you must have a WebSphere
Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
1. Ensure that you have a WebSphere Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
2. In the Resources or Java perspective, find the WSDL file corresponding to the Export with Web
Service Binding then right-click and select Web Services > Generate Client.
3. For Client Proxy Type choose Java proxy and click Next.
4. The location of the WSDL should be filled in. Click Next.
5. Next you must select the appropriate options to specify your client environment configuration
including the Web service runtime and server, J2EE version, client type (Java, EJB, Web, Application
Client). Click Next.
6. Finish the remaining steps to generate the client proxy.
Migrating the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) client:
This topic shows how to migrate clients that use Web Service APIs (SOAP/HTTP) to invoke a service.
No migration is needed for existing clients during migration. Note that you must manually modify the
generated Web project (create a new servlet mapping) and sometimes have to modify the Web project’s
context root in the enterprise application deployment descriptor to publish the service to the exact same
address that it was published to on WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation. See the topic
"Migrating the IBM Web Service binding (SOAP/HTTP)".
If design changes have occurred and you would like to generate a new client proxy, the following steps
will show you how to do that. It is important to note that unlike 5.1 where a WSIF or RPC client proxy
could be generated, in 6.x the tools only support RPC client generation because RPC is the 6.x preferred
API over the WSIF API.
Note: To generate new client proxy from WebSphere Integration Developer, you must have a WebSphere
Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
1. Ensure that you have a WebSphere Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
2. Select the WSDL file corresponding to the Export with Web Service Binding then right-click and
select Web Services > Generate Client.
3. For Client Proxy Type choose Java proxy and click Next.
4. The location of the WSDL should be filled in. Click Next.
5. Next you must select the appropriate options to specify your client environment configuration
including the Web service runtime and server, J2EE version, client type (Java, EJB, Web, Application
Client). Click Next.
6. Finish the remaining steps to generate the client proxy.
Migrating the Apache Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) client:
The Apache Web Service client APIs are not appropriate for invoking a WebSphere Integration Developer
service. Client code must be migrated to use the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) client APIs.
See the topic, "Migrating the IBM Web Service (SOAP/HTTP) client" for more information.
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In 5.1 if a client proxy was automatically generated, that proxy used WSIF APIs to interact with the
service. In 6.x the tools only support RPC client generation because RPC is the 6.x preferred API over the
WSIF API.
Note: To generate new client proxy from WebSphere Integration Developer, you must have a WebSphere
Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
1. Ensure that you have a WebSphere Process Server or WebSphere Application Server installed.
2. Select the WSDL file corresponding to the Export with Web Service Binding then right-click and
select Web Services > Generate Client.
3. For Client Proxy Type choose Java proxy and click Next.
4. The location of the WSDL should be filled in. Click Next.
5. Next you must select the appropriate options to specify your client environment configuration
including the Web service runtime and server, J2EE version, client type (Java, EJB, Web, Application
Client). Click Next.
6. Finish the remaining steps to generate the client proxy.
Migrating the JMS client:
Clients that communicated with a 5.1 service via the JMS API (sending a JMS message to a queue) may
require manual migration. This topic shows how to migrate clients that use JMS APIs (sending a JMS
message to a queue) to invoke a service.
You must ensure that the Export with JMS Binding that you created in a previous step will be able to
accept this text or object message with no changes. You may need to write a custom data binding to
accomplish this. See the section "Migrating the JMS and the JMS process bindings" for more information.
The client must change how the message is constructed. The messages were previously based on the
WSIFMessage class but now they should be based on the commonj.sdo.DataObject class. See the section
"Migrating WSIFMessage API calls to SDO APIs" for more details on how to do this manual migration.
Migrating the business process choreographer generic EJB API client:
This topic shows how to migrate clients that use the 5.1 process choreographer generic EJB API to invoke
a BPEL service.
There is a new version of the Generic EJB API that uses DataObjects as its message format. The client
must change how the message is constructed. The messages were previously based on the WSIFMessage
class but now they should be based on the commonj.sdo.DataObject class. Note that the Generic EJB API
has not changed significantly, as the ClientObjectWrapper still provides a message wrapper around the
particular message format.
Ex: DataObject dobj = myClientObjectWrapper.getObject();
String result = dobj.getInt("resultInt");
The JNDI name of the old Generic EJB that takes WSIFMessage objects is:
GenericProcessChoreographerEJB
JNDI Name: com/ibm/bpe/api/BusinessProcessHome
Interface: com.ibm.bpe.api.BusinessProcess
There are two generic EJBs in which the human task operations are available as a separate EJB. The JNDI
names of these Generic EJBs are:
GenericBusinessFlowManagerEJB
JNDI Name: com/ibm/bpe/api/BusinessFlowManagerHome
Interface: com.ibm.bpe.api.BusinessFlowManager
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HumanTaskManagerEJB
JNDI Name: com/ibm/task/api/TaskManagerHome
Interface: com.ibm.task.api.TaskManager
Migrating the business process choreographer generic Messaging API client and the JMS process
binding client:
For the generic messaging API in WebSphere Process Server, see the topic "Developing JMS client
applications" in the link below.
Developing JMS client applications.
Migrating the business process choreographer Web client:
This topic shows how to migrate the 5.1 process choreographer Web client settings and custom JSPs.
The Migration wizard preserves the 5.1 Web client settings and you may not edit these settings in the
Human Task editor. You should create new Web client settings and JSPs using the WebSphere Integration
Developer 6.x.
Migrating Web Client modifications
In 5.1 you could modify the look and feel of the Struts-based Web client by modifying its JSP
Header.jsp and style sheet dwc.css.
Since the 6.x Web client (renamed to the Business Process Choreographer Explorer) is based on
Java Server Faces (JSF) instead of Struts, automatic migration of Web client modifications is not
possible. Therefore, it is recommended that you see the "Business Process Choreographer
Explorer" documentation for details on customizing the 6.x version of this application.
User-defined JSPs could be defined for business processes and for staff activities. The Web client
uses these JSPs to display input and output messages for the process and activities.
These JSPs are particularly useful when:
1. Messages have non-primitive parts to enhance the usability of the message’s data structure.
2. You want to extend the Web client’s capabilities.
There are more and different options available when specifying Web client settings for a 6.x
process, so you will have to use WebSphere Integration Developer to redesign the Web client
settings for migrated processes and activities:
1. Select the process canvas or an activity in the process.
2. In the Properties view, select the Client tab to redesign the Web client settings.
3. Manually migrate any user-defined JSP:
a. See the "Migrating to the SCA programming model" section for programming model
changes.
b. The Web client uses the Generic APIs to interact with business processes. See the sections
that show how to migrate calls to these generic APIs..
4. Specify the name of the new JSP in the 6.x Web client settings for the process
Note: Mapping JSPs are not needed with the 6.x Business Process Choreographer Explorer
because DataObjects do not need any custom mapping.
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation BPEL Java snippets
For any BPEL processes that contain Java snippets, this section details how to migrate from the old Java
snippet API to the new Java snippet API where the data flowing through the application is stored as
Eclipse Service Data Objects (SDOs).
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See the section "Migrating from the WSIFMessage API calls to SDO APIs" for migration steps to perform
specific to the WSIFMessage to SDO transition.
Whenever possible, the snippets are automatically migrated by the migration wizard but there are
snippets that the migration wizard can not fully migrate. This requires extra manual steps to complete
the migration. See the Limitations topic for details on the types of Java snippets that must be migrated
manually. Whenever one of these snippets is encountered, the Migration wizard will explain why it can
not be automatically migrated and issue a warning or error message.
The following table detail the changes in the BPEL Java snippet programming model and API from
Process Choreographer version 5.1 to 6.x:
Table 12. Changes and solutions for migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation BPEL Java
snippets
Change
Solution
WSIFMessage-based wrapper classes
are no longer generated for WSDL
message types, nor are the Java bean
helper classes generated for complex
schema types.
BPEL variables can be directly accessed by name. Note that for BPEL
variables whose WSDL message definition has a single-part, these variables
will now directly represent the part instead of having a wrapper around
the actual data. Variables whose message type has multiple parts will have
a DataObject wrapper around the parts (where the wrapper in WebSphere
Application Developer Integration Edition was a WSIFMessage).
Because BPEL variables can be used directly in 6.x snippets, there is less
need for local variables than there was in 5.1.
The strongly-typed getters for the BPEL variables implicitly initialized the
WSIFMessage wrapper object around the message parts. There is no
‘wrapper’ object for BPEL variables whose WSDL message definition has
only a single part: in this case the BPEL variables directly represent the
part (In the case where the single part is an XSD simple type, the BPEL
variable will be represented as the Java object wrapper type such as
java.lang.String, java.lang.Integer, and so on). BPEL variables with
multi-part WSDL message definitions are handled differently: there is still
a wrapper around the parts and this DataObject wrapper must be explicitly
initialized in the 6.x Java snippet code if it has not already been set by a
previous operation.
If any local variables from the 5.1 snippets had the same name as the BPEL
variable there may be conflicts so try to remedy this situation if possible.
WSIFMessage objects are no longer
used to represent BPEL variables.
If any custom Java classes invoked from the Java snippets have a
WSIFMessage parameter it will need to be migrated such that it
accepts/returns a DataObject.
Strongly-typed getter methods for
The variables can be directly accessed by name. Note that for BPEL
BPEL variables are no longer available. variables whose WSDL message definition has a single-part will now
directly represent the part instead of having a wrapper around the actual
data. Variables whose message type has multiple parts will have a
DataObject wrapper around the parts (where the wrapper in WebSphere
Application Developer Integration Edition was a WSIFMessage).
Strongly-typed setter methods for
The variables can be directly accessed by name. Note that for BPEL
BPEL variables are no longer available. variables whose WSDL message definition has a single-part, these variables
will now directly represent the part instead of having a wrapper around
the actual data. Variables whose message type has multiple parts will have
a DataObject wrapper around the parts (where the wrapper in WebSphere
Application Developer Integration Edition was a WSIFMessage).
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Table 12. Changes and solutions for migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation BPEL Java
snippets (continued)
Change
Solution
Weakly-typed getter methods for BPEL The variables can be directly accessed by name. Note that for BPEL
variables that return a WSIFMessage
variables whose WSDL message definition has a single-part, these variables
are no longer available.
will now directly represent the part instead of having a wrapper around
the actual data. Variables whose message type has multiple parts will have
a DataObject wrapper around the parts (where the wrapper in WebSphere
Application Developer Integration Edition was a WSIFMessage).
Note that there were two variations of the getVariableAsWSIFMessage
method:
getVariableAsWSIFMessage(String variableName)
getVariableAsWSIFMessage(String variableName, boolean forUpdate)
For a Java snippet activity, the default access is read-write. You can change
this to read-only by specifying @bpe.readOnlyVariables with the list of
names of the variables in a comment in the snippet. For example, you
could set variable B and variable D to read only as follows:
variableB.setString("/x/y/z", variableA.getString("/a/b/c"));
// @bpe.readOnlyVariables names="variableA"
variableD.setInt("/x/y/z", variableC.getInt("/a/b/c"));
// @bpe.readOnlyVariables names="variableC"
Additionally, if you have a Java snippet in a condition, the variables are
read-only by default, but you can make them read-write by specifying
@bpe.readWriteVariables...
Weakly-typed setter methods for BPEL
variables are no longer available.
The variables can be directly accessed by name. Note that for BPEL
variables whose WSDL message definition has a single-part, these variables
will now directly represent the part instead of having a wrapper around
the actual data. Variables whose message type has multiple parts will have
a DataObject wrapper around the parts (where the wrapper in WebSphere
Application Developer Integration Edition was a WSIFMessage).
Weakly-typed getter methods for BPEL
variables message parts are not
appropriate for single-part messages
and have changed for multi-part
messages.
Migrate to the weakly-typed getter method for BPEL variables
(DataObject’s) properties.
Note that for BPEL variables whose WSDL message definition has a
single-part, the BPEL variable directly represents the part and the variable
should be accessed directly without using a getter method.
There were two variations of the getVariablePartAsObject method:
getVariablePartAsObject(String variableName, String partName)
getVariablePartAsObject(String variableName, String partName,boolean
forUpdate)
For multi-part messages, equivalent functionality is provided by this
method in 6.x:
getVariableProperty(String variableName, QName propertyName);
In 6.x there is no notion of using a variable for read-only access (which
was the case in 5.1 for the first method above as well as the second
method with forUpdate=’false’). The variable is directly used in the 6.x
snippet and it is always able to be updated.
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Table 12. Changes and solutions for migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation BPEL Java
snippets (continued)
Change
Solution
Weakly-typed setter methods for BPEL
variables’ message parts are not
appropriate for single-part messages
and have changed for multi-part
messages.
Migrate to the weakly-typed setter method for BPEL variables’
(DataObject’s) properties.
Note that for BPEL variables whose WSDL message definition has a
single-part, the BPEL variable directly represents the part and the variable
should be accessed directly without using a setter method.
Calls to the following method must be migrated:
setVariableObjectPart(String variableName, String partName,
Object data)
For multi-part messages, equivalent functionality is provided by this
method in 6.x:
setVariableProperty(String variableName, QName propertyName,
Serializable value);
Strongly-typed getter methods for
BPEL partner links are no longer
available.
Migrate to the weakly-typed getter methods for BPEL partner links.
Strongly-typed setter methods for
BPEL partner links are no longer
available.
Migrate to the weakly-typed setter methods for BPEL partner links.
Strongly-typed getter methods for
BPEL correlation sets are no longer
available.
V5.1 Snippet:
String corrSetPropStr =
getCorrelationSetCorrSetAPropertyCustomerName();
int corrSetPropInt =
getCorrelationSetCorrSetBPropertyCustomerId();
V6.x Snippet:
String corrSetPropStr = (String) getCorrelationSetProperty
(“CorrSetA”, new QName(“CustomerName”));
int corrSetPropInt = ((Integer) getCorrelationSetProperty
(“CorrSetB”, new QName(“CustomerId”))).intValue();
Additional parameter needed for the
V5.1 Snippet:
weakly-typed getter methods for BPEL
String val = getActivityCustomProperty(“propName”);
activity custom properties.
V6.x Snippet:
String val = getActivityCustomProperty
(“name-of-current-activity”, “propName”);
Additional parameter needed for the
weakly-typed setter methods for BPEL
activity custom properties.
V5.1 Snippet:
String newVal = “new value”;
setActivityCustomProperty(“propName”, newVal);
V6.x Snippet:
String newVal = “new value”;
setActivityCustomProperty(“name-of-current-activity”,
“propName”, newVal);
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Table 12. Changes and solutions for migrating WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation BPEL Java
snippets (continued)
Change
Solution
The raiseFault(QName faultQName,
Serializable message) method no
longer exists.
Migrate to the raiseFault(QName faultQName, String variableName) where
possible; otherwise migrate to the raiseFault(QName faultQName) method
or create a new BPEL variable for the Serializable object.
Migrating interactions with WebSphere Business Integration Adapters
If the JMS Client is a WebSphere Business Integration Adapter, you may need to use the External Service
tools to create the Import with JMS Binding. This Import uses a special data binding in order to serialize
the SDO to the exact format that the WebSphere Business Integration Adapter expects.
To
1.
2.
3.
access the External Service tools, follow these steps:
Go to File > New > Other > Business Integration and select External Service. Click Next.
Choose Adapters. Click Next.
Enter the path of the WebSphere Business Integration Adapter's configuration (.cfg) file and the
directory that contains the XML schema of the business objects that the adapter uses. Click Next.
4. Examine the query that is generated for you, and if it is correct click Run Query. In the Objects
discovered by query list, select the objects that you want to add (one by one) and click the >> Add
button.
5. Accept the configuration parameters for the business object and click OK.
6. Repeat for each business object.
7. Click Next.
8. For the Runtime business object format select SDO. For the Target project select the module you
just migrated. Leave the Folder field blank.
9.
Click Finish.
This tool will migrate the old XSDs to the format expected by the special data binding so remove the old
WebSphere Business Integration Adapter's XSDs from the module and use the new XSDs. If the module
will not receive messages from the adapter, delete the Exports generated by this tool. If the module will
not send any messages to the adapter, delete the Import. See the information center for more information
on this feature.
Migrating WSDL interfaces that have SOAP-encoded array types
This section shows how to migrate or handle XML schemas that have SOAP-encoded array types.
Soap-encoded array types that have the RPC style will be treated as unbounded sequences of a concrete
type in 6.x. It is not recommended that you create any XSD types that reference the soapend:Array types
in any way, as the programming model is moving towards the Document/Literal wrapped style instead
of the RPC style (although this could change).
There will be cases when an SCA application must invoke an external service that does use the
soapend:Array type. There is no way to avoid this in some cases, so the following example shows how to
handle this situation:
Sample WSDL code:
<xsd:complexType name="Vendor">
<xsd:all>
<xsd:element name="name" type="xsd:string" />
<xsd:element name="phoneNumber" type="xsd:string" />
</xsd:all>
</xsd:complexType>
</xsd:schema>
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<xsd:complexType name="Vendors">
<xsd:complexContent mixed="false">
<xsd:restriction base="soapenc:Array">
<xsd:attribute wsdl:arrayType="tns:Vendor[]" ref="soapenc:arrayType"
xmlnxsd:wsdl="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" />
</xsd:restriction>
</xsd:complexContent>
<xsd:complexType name="VendorsForProduct">
<xsd:all>
<xsd:element name="productId" type="xsd:string" />
<xsd:element name="vendorList" type="tns:Vendors" />
</xsd:all>
</xsd:complexType>
<xsd:complexType name="Product">
<xsd:all>
<xsd:element name="productId" type="xsd:string" />
<xsd:element name="productName" type="xsd:string" />
</xsd:all>
</xsd:complexType>
<message name="doFindVendorResponse">
<part name="returnVal" type="tns:VendorsForProduct" />
</message>
<operation name="doFindVendor">
<input message="tns:doFindVendor" />
<output message="tns:doFindVendorResponse" />
</operation>
Sample code for a client of this Web service:
// Locate the vendor service and find the doFindVendor operation
Service findVendor=(Service)ServiceManager.INSTANCE.locateService("vendorSearch");
OperationType doFindVendorOperationType=findVendor.getReference().getOperationType("doGoogleSearch");
// Create the input DataObject
DataObject doFindVendor=DataFactory.INSTANCE.create(doFindVendorOperationType.getInputType());
doFindVendor.setString("productId", “12345”);
doFindVendor.setString("productName", “Refrigerator”);
// Invoke the FindVendor service
DataObject FindVendorResult = (DataObject)findVendor.invoke(doFindVendorOperationType, doFindVendor);
// Display the results
int resultProductId=findVendorResult.getString("productId");
DataObject resultElements=findVendorResult.getDataObject("vendorList");
Sequence results=resultElements.getSequence(0);
for (int i=0, n=results.size(); i
for (int i=0, n=results.size(); i
Here is another example where the data object’s root type is a soapenc:Array. Note how the
sampleElements DataObject is created using the second schema listed above. The DataObject’s type is
first obtained, and then the property for sampleStructElement is obtained. This is really a placeholder
property and used only to get a valid property to use when adding the DataObjects to the sequence. A
pattern like this can be used in your scenario:
Sample WSDL code:
<s:schema elementFormDefault="qualified" targetNamespace="http://soapinterop.org/xsd">
<s:import namespace="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/encoding/" />
<s:import namespace="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" />
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<s:complexType name="SOAPStruct">
<s:sequence>
<s:element minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1" form="unqualified" name="varInt" type="s:int" />
<s:element minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1" form="unqualified" name="varString" type="s:string" />
<s:element minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1" form="unqualified" name="varFloat" type="s:float" />
</s:sequence>
</s:complexType>
<s:complexType name="ArrayOfSOAPStruct">
<s:complexContent mixed="false">
<s:restriction base="soapenc:Array">
<s:attribute wsdl:arrayType="s0:SOAPStruct[]" ref="soapenc:arrayType" />
</s:restriction>
</s:complexContent>
</s:complexType>
</s:schema>
<wsdl:message name="echoStructArraySoapIn">
<wsdl:part name="inputStructArray" type="s0:ArrayOfSOAPStruct" />
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:message name="echoStructArraySoapOut">
<wsdl:part name="return" type="s0:ArrayOfSOAPStruct" />
</wsdl:message>
<wsdl:operation name="echoStructArray">
<wsdl:input message="tns:echoStructArraySoapIn" />
<wsdl:output message="tns:echoStructArraySoapOut" />
</wsdl:operation>
<schema targetNamespace="http://sample/elements"
xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
xmlns:tns="http://sample/elements">
<element name="sampleStringElement" type="string"/>
<element name="sampleStructElement" type="any"/>
</schema>
Sample code for a client of this Web service:
// Create the input DataObject and get the SDO sequence for the any
// element
DataFactory dataFactory=DataFactory.INSTANCE;
DataObject arrayOfStruct = dataFactory.create("http://soapinterop.org/xsd","ArrayOfSOAPStruct");
Sequence sequence=arrayOfStruct.getSequence("any");
// Get the SDO property for the sample element that we want to use
// here to populate the sequence
// We have defined this element in an XSD file, see SampleElements.xsd
DataObject sampleElements=dataFactory.create("http://sample/elements",
"DocumentRoot");
Property property = sampleElements.getType().getProperty("sampleStructElement");
// Add the elements to the sequence
DataObject item=dataFactory.create("http://soapinterop.org/xsd", "SOAPStruct");
item.setInt("varInt", 1);
item.setString("varString", "Hello");
item.setFloat("varFloat", 1.0f);
sequence.add(property, item);
item=dataFactory.create("http://soapinterop.org/xsd", "SOAPStruct");
item.setInt("varInt", 2);
item.setString("varString", "World");
item.setFloat("varFloat", 2.0f);
sequence.add(property, item);
// Invoke the echoStructArray operation
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System.out.println("[client] invoking echoStructArray operation");
DataObject echoArrayOfStruct = (DataObject)interopTest.invoke("echoStructArray", arrayOfStruct);
// Display the results
if (echoArrayOfStruct!=null) {
sequence=echoArrayOfStruct.getSequence("any");
for (int i=0, n=sequence.size(); i<n; i++) {
item=(DataObject)sequence.getValue(i);
System.out.println("[client] item varInt = "+
item.getInt("varInt")+"
varString="+item.getString("varString")+"
varFloat="+item.getFloat("varFloat"));
Migrating WebSphere Business Integration EJB projects
In WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, EJB projects could have special
WebSphere Business Integration features such as Extended Messaging (CMM) and CMP/A
(Component-Managed Persistence Anywhere). The deployment descriptors for such projects must be
migrated and this section shows how to perform that migration.
To perform this migration, follow these steps:
1. Copy the WebSphere Business Integration EJB project to the new workspace and import it from
WebSphere Integration Developer using the File > Import > Existing Project into Workspace wizard.
Optionally, you can also run the J2EE Migration wizard.
2. Close all instances of WebSphere Integration Developer running in the 6.x workspace.
3. Run the following script which will migrate the WebSphere Business Integration deployment
descriptors in the EJB project:
On Windows:
SHARED_FOLDER_HOME/plugins/com.ibm.wbit.migration.wsadie_6.1.0/WSADIEEJBProjectMigration.bat
On Linux:
SHARED_FOLDER_HOME/plugins/com.ibm.wbit.migration.wsadie_6.1.0/WSADIEEJBProjectMigration.sh
The following parameters are supported, where the workspace and project name are mandatory:
Usage:
WSADIEEJBProjectMigration.bat
[-e eclipse-folder] -d workspace -p project
eclipse-folder: The location of your eclipse folder -- usually it’s the ’eclipse’
found under your product installation folder.
workspace:
The workspace containing the WSADIE EJB project to be migrated.
project:
The name of the project to migrate.
For example,
WSADIEEJBProjectMigration.bat -e "C:\IBM\WID6\eclipse" -d "d:\my60workspace" -p "MyWBIEJBProject"
4. When you open WebSphere Integration Developer you will need to refresh the EJB project to get the
updated files.
5. Search for the file ibm-web-ext.xmi in the EJB project. If one is found, ensure that the following line is
present in the file under the element:
<webappext:WebAppExtension> element:
<webApp href="WEB-INF/web.xml#WebApp"/>
6. Remove the old deployment code that was generated in 5.1. Regenerate the deployment code by
following the WebSphere Application Server guidelines for doing so.
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Manually deleting 5.1 Web Services Invocation Framework (WSIF)
definitions
After you have completed migrating your source artifacts, you should delete all 5.1 WSIF Binding and
Service WSDL definitions from your 6.x projects that are no longer being used. The consumption scenario
for service migration is the only case where a WSIF Binding or Service would still be in use.
The following WSDL namespaces indicate that a binding or service definition is a 5.1 WSIF Service and
can be discarded if no longer used:
EJB WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/ejb/
Java WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/java/
JMS WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/jms/
Business Process WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/process/
Transformer WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/transformer/
IMS WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/ims/
CICS-ECI WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/cicseci/
CICS-EPI WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/cicsepi/
HOD WSIF Namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/hod3270/
Verifying the source artifact migration
If the migration completes with a list of errors, warnings, and informational messages, they will be
displayed in the Migration Results window. Otherwise, the wizard window will close if the migration
completed successfully.
The following page appears if migration messages were generated during the migration process:
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In the Migration Results window, you can see the migration messages that were generated during the
migration process. By selecting a message from the upper Message list, you can find more information
regarding that message in the lower Message Description window.
To keep all messages for future reference, click the Generate ToDo's button to create a list of "ToDo" tasks
in the task view or click the Save as... button to save the messages in a text file in the file system.
Examine each message to see if any action needs to be taken to immediately fix an artifact that couldn’t
be fully migrated. To see the generated To Do's, click Window > Show View > Other... > General >
Tasks and click OK. The Tasks view opens with the list of generated To Do's from the migration process.
To verify that a portion of the migration is complete, switch to the Business Integration perspective and
ensure that all processes and WSDL interfaces from the old service project appear in the new module.
Build the project and fix any errors that prevent the project from building.
After performing the manual migration steps required to complete the migration of the business
integration application, export the application as an EAR file and install it to a WebSphere Process Server,
configuring the appropriate resources.
Perform the manual migration steps required to migrate any client code or generate new client code
using WebSphere Integration Developer. Ensure that the client can access the application and that the
application exhibits the same behavior it did on the previous runtime environment.
Working with source artifact migration failures
If your source artifact migration from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition fails,
there are a number of ways in which to deal with the failures.
The following examples show some of the possible source artifact migration failures:
v If you receive the following message:
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
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“Migration Error Message”
Reason: Fatal Migration Failure
Message: Contact your IBM Representative
you should review the WebSphere Integration Developer log file in the .metadata folder of the new
workspace to see the details of the error. If possible, resolve the cause of the error, delete the module
that was created in the new workspace, and try migrating again.
If the Migration wizard completes without this message, a list of information, warning, and error
messages will be displayed. These signify that some portion of the service project could not be
automatically migrated and that manual changes must be performed to complete the migration.
Limitations of source artifact migration
There are limitations involved with the WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
source artifact migration process.
The following lists detail some of the limitations of the migration process for source artifact migration:
General limitations
v WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition project types supported by the Migration
wizard are: Service Projects, Java Projects, EJB Projects, Connector Projects, Enterprise Application
Projects, Application Client Projects, Dynamic Web Projects, and Static Web Projects. Any other project
types that might exist in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition will be copied to
the WebSphere Integration Developer workspace, but will not have any processing for migration.
v WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition did not strictly enforce consistency
between the WSDLs and other artifacts in projects. WebSphere Integration Developer is much stricter
and will report inconsistencies that WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition did
not (and also which ran on the WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation runtime without
any issue).
v Although WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition allowed multiple identical Web
Service Binding and Service definitions (name and namespace), WebSphere Integration Developer does
not. You must resolve these duplicates manually before migration (in WebSphere Studio Application
Developer Integration Edition) or after migration (in WebSphere Integration Developer). An example is
that in WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition, all of the generated service
definitions in the WSDL files with different names (ending in _EJB, _JMS, and so on) looked like:
<service name="OrderProcessIntfcService">
To fix the duplicate, simply append the binding type to the name attribute. For the *_EJB.wsdl file, it
would be changed to
<service name="OrderProcessIntfcServiceEJB">
For the *_JMS.wsdl file, it would be changed to
<service name="OrderProcessIntfcServiceJMS">
However, once this name is changed, the Export generated in WebSphere Integration Developer to use
this service will also need to be changed to use the right name.
v The Migration wizard does not migrate application binaries, it only migrates source artifacts found in a
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition service project.
v Business Rule Beans are deprecated in WebSphere Process Server 6.x but there is an option during
WebSphere Process Server installation to install support for the deprecated Business Rule Beans such
that they will run “as-is” on a WebSphere Process Server 6.x server. There is no tools support for the
old Business Rule Beans however, and if you want the old Business Rule Bean artifacts to compile in
the tools, you must follow the WebSphere Integration Developer documentation to install those
deprecated features over top of the embedded WebSphere Process Server 6.x test server and then
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manually add the deprecated jar files to the project classpath as external jars. You should use the new
business rule tools available in WebSphere Integration Developer to create their business rules
according to the 6.x specification.
v The standard provided JMS data binding does not provide access to custom JMS header properties. A
custom data binding must be written for the SCA services to get access to any custom JMS header
properties.
v WebSphere Integration Developer does not support XML-SOAP types as defined in the
http://xml.apache.org/xml-soap namespace. You should remove references to these types in
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition prior to migrating to avoid a migration
process failure.
v When a workspace is migrated, some modules may have dependencies on other modules. This is not
checked by WebSphere Integration Developer, however, there will be errors similar to the following
after application deployment:
======== TravelOperationsApp ========
The application cannot start: TravelOperationsApp
com.ibm.ws.exception.RuntimeWarning: javax.resource.ResourceException: Failed to lookup
ActivationSpec.sca/TravelOperations/ActivationSpec
After migration, you should review the modules and manually remove project and build path
dependencies between modules. This may require moving some WSDL and Java files into a common
library project.
v J2EE type projects are not migrated to the most current J2EE level. For example, if projects in the
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition workspace are at the 1.3 level and when
migrated are kept at the 1.3 level and not 1.4 (the most current in V6.2), this does not cause any
problems. If you want to upgrade to the most current level, you can use the J2EE tools menu by
right-clicking any J2EE type project (Web, EJB, EAR, Application Client) and selecting J2EE Tools >
J2EE Migration.
EJB project migration limitations
You may encounter a migration problem if the source WebSphere Studio Application Developer
Integration Edition workspace has an EJB project without an EJB client project. If the EJB project is a
dependency of one or more service projects, then the migrated workspace will build okay but will not
deploy correctly This happens because WebSphere Integration Developer tries to deploy the EJB project
as an J2EE module and not a utility jar. To solve this problem, follow these steps:
1. Migrate the workspace.
2. In WebSphere Integration Developer right-click EJB Project > J2EE tools > Create Client Project. An
EJB client project is created.
3. Replace all references to the EJB project in Modules with the EJB client.
SCA Programming Model limitations
v The SDO version 1 specification does not provide access to the COBOL or C byte array – this will
impact those working with IMS multi-segments.
v The SDO version 1 specification for serialization does not support COBOL redefines or C unions.
v When redesigning your source artifacts according to the SCA programming model, note that the
document/literal wrapped WSDL style (which is the default style for new artifacts created using the
WebSphere Integration Developer tools) does not support method overloading. The other WSDL styles
are still supported so it is recommended that another WSDL style/encoding other than
document/literal wrapped be used for these cases.
v Native support for arrays is limited. In order to invoke an external service that exposes a WSDL
interface with soapenc:Array types, you will need to create a WSDL interface that defines an element
whose "maxOccurs" attribute is greater than one (this is the recommended approach for designing an
array type).
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
113
BPEL migration process technical limitations
v Multiple replies per BPEL operation - In WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation a
business process could have one receive activity and multiple reply activities for the same operation. If
you have a business process with multiple replies for the same operation, ensure that if any of them
has client settings that all replies for that operation have the same client settings as in 6.x only one set
of client settings is supported per operation reply.
v Limitations of BPEL Java snippet migration - The programming model has changed significantly from
WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition to WebSphere Integration Developer and
not all supported WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition APIs can be directly
migrated to corresponding WebSphere Integration Developer APIs. Any Java logic can be found in the
BPEL Java snippets so that the automatic migration tool may not be able to convert every Java snippet
to the new programming model. Most of the standard snippet API calls will be automatically migrated
from the 5.1 Java snippet programming model to the 6.x Java snippet programming model. WSIF API
calls are migrated to DataObject API calls where possible. Any custom Java classes that accept
WSIFMessage objects will need manual migration such that they accept and return
commonj.sdo.DataObject objects instead:
– WSIFMessage metadata APIs - Manual migration may be needed for some WSIFMessage metadata
and other WSIF APIs.
– EndpointReference/EndpointReferenceType APIs - These classes are not automatically migrated.
Manual migration is needed as the partner link getter/setter methods deal with
commonj.sdo.DataObject objects instead of the
com.ibm.websphere.srm.bpel.wsaddressing.EndpointReferenceType objects from 5.1.
– Complex types with duplicate names - If an application declares complex types (in WSDLs or
XSDs) with identical namespaces and local names, or different namespaces but identical local names,
Java snippets that use these types may not be migrated correctly. Verify the snippets for correctness
after the migration wizard has completed.
– Complex types with local names identical to Java classes in the java.lang package - If an
application declares complex types (in WSDLs or XSDs) with local names that are identical to classes
in the java.lang package of J2SE 1.4.2, Java snippets that use the corresponding java.lang class may
not be migrated correctly. Verify the snippets for correctness after the migration wizard has
completed.
– Read-only and read-write BPEL variables - In any 5.1 Java snippet code, it was possible to set a
BPEL variable to "read-only", meaning that any changes made to this object will not affect the BPEL
variable's value at all. It was also possible to set a BPEL variable to "read-write", meaning that any
changes made to the object would be reflected for the BPEL variable itself. The following example
shows four ways that a Java snippet could be accessed as "read-only" in any 5.1 BPEL Java snippet:
getMyInputVariable()
getMyInputVariable(false)
getVariableAsWSIFMessage(“MyInputVariable”)
getVariableAsWSIFMessage(“MyInputVariable”, false)
Here are the two ways that a BPEL variable could be accessed as "read-write" in any 5.1 BPEL Java
snippet:
getMyInputVariable(true)
getVariableAsWSIFMessage(“MyInputVariable”, true)
In 6.x, read-only and read-write access to BPEL variables is handled on a "per-snippet basis,"
meaning you can add a special comment to the BPEL Java snippet to specify whether updates to the
BPEL variable should be discarded or maintained after the snippet has finished executing. Here are
the default access settings for the 6.x BPEL Java snippet types:
BPEL Java Snippet Activity
Default Access: read-write
Override Default Access with comment containing:
@bpe.readOnlyVariables names="variableA,variableB"
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BPEL Java Snippet Expression (Used in a Timeout, Condition, etc)
Default Access: read-only
Override Default Access with comment containing:
@bpe.readWriteVariables names="variableA,variableB"
During migration, these comments will automatically be created when a variable was accessed in a
way that is not the default in 6.x. In the case that there is a conflict (meaning that the BPEL variable
was accessed as "read-only" and as "read-write" in the same snippet), a warning is issued and the
access is set to "read-write". If you receive any such warnings, ensure that setting the BPEL variable
access to "read-write" is correct for your situation. If this is not correct, you should correct it
manually using the WebSphere Integration Developer BPEL editor.
– Many-valued primitive properties in complex types - In 5.1, multi-valued properties are
represented by arrays of the property type. As such, calls to get and set the property use arrays. In
6.x, java.util.List is used for this representation. Automatic migration will handle all cases where the
many-valued property is some type of Java object, but in the case that the property type is a Java
primitive (int, long, short, byte, char, float, double, and boolean), calls to get and set the entire array
are not converted. Manual migration in such a case might require adding a loop to wrap/unwrap
the primitives in/from their corresponding Java wrapper class (Integer, Long, Short, Byte, Character,
Float, Double, and Boolean) for use in the rest of the snippet.
– Instantiation of generated classes representing complex types - In 5.1, generated classes of complex
types defined in an application could be easily instantiated in a Java snippet using the default
no-argument constructor. An example of this is:
MyProperty myProp = new MyProperty();
InputMessageMessage myMsg = new InputMessageMessage();
myMsg.setMyProperty(myProp);
In 6.x, a special factory class must be used to instantiate these types, or, an instance of the
containing type may be used to create the sub-type. If a BPEL process variable InputVariable was
defined as having type InputMessage, then the 6.x version of the preceding snippet would be:
com.ibm.websphere.bo.BOFactory boFactory=
(com.ibm.websphere.bo.BOFactory)
com.ibm.websphere.sca.ServiceManager.INSTANCE.locateService(
“com/ibm/websphere/bo/BOFactory”);
commonj.sdo.DataObject myMsg =
boFactory.createByType(getVariableType(“InputVariable”));
commonj.sdo.DataObject myProp =
myMsg.createDataObject(“MyProperty”);
The snippet converter attempts to make this change, but if the order in which the original
instantiations occur does not follow the parent-then-child pattern, manual migration will be needed
(that is, the converter does not attempt to intelligently reorder the instantiation statements in the
snippet).
v In WebSphere Business Integration Server Foundation 5.1, dynamic references were represented as
WSDL message parts of type EndpointReferenceType or element EndpointReference from the
namespace:
http://wsaddressing.bpel.srm.websphere.ibm.com
Such references will be migrated to the standard service-ref element type from the standard business
process namespace:
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/03/business-process/
http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/08/addressing
See the BPEL Editor documentation for instructions on manually importing these schema definitions
into your project so that all references resolve properly.
Chapter 5. Migrating from WebSphere Studio Application Developer Integration Edition
115
v BPEL variable message type - A WSDL message type must be specified for all BPEL variables used in
Java snippets. Java snippets that access BPEL variables without the "messageType" attribute specified
can not be migrated.
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