Appendix - Kirby Morgan

To convert units appearing in Column 1

(left column) into equivalent values in

Column 2 (center column), multiply by factor in Column 3. Example: To convert

7 gallons into cubic inches, multiply

7 × 231 = 1617. To convert units appearing in Column 2 (center) into equivalent values of units in Column 1 (left), divide by factor in Column 3. Example: To convert 25 horsepower into Btu per minute, divide 25 by 0.02356 = 1061

SuperLite

®

17K

Table of Equivalents

To Convert

Into

Into To

Convert

Atmospheres

Atmospheres

Atmospheres

BTU

BTU per hour

BTU per minute

Celsius (Centigrade)

Centimeters

Cubic Centimeters

Cubic Centimeters

Cubic Feet

Cubic Feet

Cubic Inches

Cubic Inches

Days

Degrees (Angle)

Feet

Feet

Feet of Water

Feet of Water

Feet of Water

Feet per Minute

Feet per Second

Foot-Pounds

Foot-Pounds per Minute

Foot-Pounds per Second

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Gallons of Water

Horsepower

Horsepower

Horsepower

Horsepower

Hours

Hours

Inches

Inches of Mercury (Hg)

Inches of Mercury (Hg)

Inches of Mercury (Hg)

Inches of Water

Liters

Liters

Micron

Miles (Statute)

Miles per hour (MPH)

Miles per hour

Ounces (Weight)

Ounces (Liquid)

Pints (Liquid)

Pounds

Pounds

Pounds

PSI (Pounds per Sq. Inch) Atmospheres

PSI (Pounds per Sq. Inch) Feet of Water

PSI (Pounds per Sq. Inch) Inches of Mercury (Hg)

Quarts

Square Feet

Temperature ( o

F - 32)

Tons (U.S.)

Watts

Quarts (Liquid)

Grains

Grams

Ounces

Gallons

Square Inches

Temperature (

Pounds

Horsepower o

C)

Feet of Water

Inches of Mercury (Hg)

PSI (LBS per Sq. Inch

Foot Pounds

Watts

HorsePower

Fahrenheit

Inches

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Liters

Cubic Inches

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Cubic Feet

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Seconds

Radians

Meters

Miles

Atmospheres

Inches of Mercury (Hg)

PSI (Lbs per Sq. Inch)

Miles per Hour

Miles per Hour

BTU

Horsepower

Horsepower

Cubic Feet

Cubic Inches

Pounds of Water

BTU per Minute

Foot-Pound per Minute

Foot Pounds per Second

Watts

Days

Weeks

Centimeters

Atmospheres

Feet of Water

PSI (Lbs. per Sq. Inch)

PSI (Lbs. per Sq. Inch)

Cubic Centimeters

Gallons (U.S. Liquid)

Inches

Feet

Feet per Minute

Feet per Second

Pounds

Cubic Inches

Multiply By

Divide By

1.805

0.5

7000

453.59

16

0.06804

2.307

2.036

0.25

144

0.5555

2000

0.001341

550

745.7

0.04167

0.005952

2.54

0.03342

1.133

0.4912

0.03613

1000

0.2642

0.00004

5280

88

1.467

0.0625

0.01745

0.3048

0.0001894

0.0295

0.8826

0.4335

0.01136

0.6818

0.001286

0.0000303

0.001818

0.1337

231

8.3453

42.44

33,000

33.9

29.92

14.7

778.3

0.2931

0.02356

o

C x 1.8 + 32

0.3937

0.0002642

0.0001

1728

7.48052

0.0005787

0.004329

86.400

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

137

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix 1: Torque Specifications

TL=Thread locking Compound Medium Strength - Loctite

®

222 or Equivalent

Location # Part #

75

76

80

88

64

68

71

72

57

57a

60

63

49

53

54

54a

29

35

36

37

45

5

11

14

17

19

23

106

112

114

122

134

93

100

101

104a

135

143

155

157

Description

550-020 Bonnet, defogger valve

550-024 Stud, sideblock

555-154 Bent tube assy, sideblock end

550-095 Low pressure plug

550-140 Emergency valve body

550-091 Packing nut, emergency valve

One way valve body

One way valve seat

555-117 Adapter, brass (umbilical)

555-195 One way valve

550-038 Regulator mount nut

530-018 Screw, earphone retainer

530-015 Screw, helmet ring

530-078 Screw, top weight

530-070 Screw, top weight

530-070 Screw, top weight

530-078 Screw, top weight

530-045 Screw, handle

530-078 Screw, port weight

530-070 Screw, port weight

530-317 Nut, air train

530-317 Nut, air train

530-050 Screw, sideblock

530-052 Screw, port plug

530-035 Screw, port retainer

530-045 Screw, whisker kidney plate

550-055 Packing nut, regulator

530-030 Screw, regulator clamp

550-050 Jam nut, regulator

550-048 Inlet nipple, regulator

530-020 Screw, exhaust flange

550-062 Knob, nose block

530-032 Screw, main exhaust body

530-045 Screw, tongue catch

530-035 Screw, tongue catch

530-308 Nut, communications posts

550-040 Mount nut, communications penetrator

555-178 Packing nut, waterproof connector

530-024 Screw, split ring

530-031 Screw, Chin Strap

Torque in Inch Pounds Torque

Newton Meters

11.3

4

11.3

2.25

See note 1

5.65 after seating

17

17

See note 1

17

11.3

1.8

1.3

2.25 RTV Sealant

2.25 TL†

2.25

2.25 TL†

1.3

2.25 TL†

2.25 RTV Sealant

3.95

1.6

2.25

2.25

1.3

1.3

4.52 after seating

1.3

4.5

4.5

0.67

1.3

1.3

2.25 TL†

2.25 TL†

2.25 RTV Sealant

2.25

2.25

1.1

latex neck dam*

1.5

100

35

100

20

See note 1

50 after seating

150

150

See note 1

150

100

16

12

20 RTV Sealant

20 TL†

20

20 TL†

12

20 TL†

20 RTV Sealant

35

15

20

20

12

12

40 (after seating)

12

40

40

6

12

12

20 TL†

20 TL†

20 RTV Sealant

20

20

10 latex neck dam*

14

138

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

Location # Part #

163

171

176

192

200

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix 1: Torque Specifications Continued

TL=Thread locking Compound Medium Strength - Loctite

®

222 or Equivalent

Description

550-113 Adjustment nut, neck pad

530-019 Screw, Quad exhaust cover

550-533 Bent tube adapter, 450 Regulator

550-526 Packing nut, 450 regulator

530-052 Screw, 450 regulator cover

Torque in Inch Pounds

Note on Torque Specifications

35

12

30

30

12

Torque

Newton Meters

3.95

1.3

3.38

3.3

1.3

Note 1: Use Teflon

®

tape for one to one and a half wraps, starting two threads back from the pipe thread end of the fitting to avoid getting Teflon

®

tape in the valve. Tighten pipe thread using good engineering practices.

* For a neoprene neck dam, turn the screw three turns. Screws may need adjustment after several dives.

Use thread locking compound Loctite

®

222 or equivalent, medium strength only.

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

139

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix A2

Maintenance and Inspection Procedures

The following section describes the maintenance and inspection procedures that are used to complete the Annual, Monthly and Daily Checklists, to ensure optimum reliability and performance. These procedures are additionally utilized in conjunction with the daily pre and post dive maintenance checklists. The following service intervals are the minimum recommended for helmets being used under good conditions.

Helmets used in harsh conditions, i.e., contaminated water, welding / burning operations, or jetting may require more frequent servicing.

components providing they pass a visual inspection .

When conducting annual or scheduled overhauls all

O-rings should be replaced. The side block should be removed from the helmet at least every three years

(or 400 operating hours) so that the stud and securing screw can be inspected. All O-rings should be lightly lubricated with the applicable lubricant.

The intention of the maintenance and overhaul program is to help maintain all helmet components in good working order in accordance with KMDSI factory specifications. It will also help to identify worn or damaged parts and components before they affect performance and reliability. Whenever the serviceability of a component or part is in question, or doubt exists, replace it. All helmet components and parts have a service life and will eventually require replacement.

NOTE: The side block does not need to be removed from the helmet annually, providing, after removal of side block components, there is no corrosion and verdigris. Kirby Morgan recommends that every three years the side block assembly be physically removed from the helmet per Section 7.3. Clean and inspect the stud and securing screw, replace if bent, stripped, or any damage is detected.

NOTE: The pipe thread fittings used on the umbilical adapter and the emergency gas valve are the only fittings that require sealing with Teflon

®

tape. Do not use liquid sealant. When installing Teflon

®

tape on pipe threads, apply the tape starting one thread back from the end of the fitting. Apply the tape in a clockwise direction under tension. 1-1½ wraps are all that is needed. The use of more than 1½ wraps could cause excess Teflon

®

tape to travel into the breathing system. Do not overtighten when installing.

Lubrication / Cleanliness:

Helmets intended for use with breathing gas mixtures in excess of 50% oxygen by volume, should be cleaned for oxygen service. They must only be lubricated with oxygen compatible lubricants such as Christo-Lube

® or Krytox

®

. All air supply systems must be filtered and must meet the requirements of grade D quality air or better. Helmet breathing gas systems/gas train components used for air diving should only be lubricated with silicone lubricant Dow Corning equivalent. KMDSI uses Christo-Lube

®

®

111

®

or

at the factory for lubrication of all gas train components requiring lubrication, and highly recommends its use.

Before 1999, Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc., used

Danger and Warning Notices in the helmet and mask owner’s manual limiting the breathing gas percentage to less than 23.5 percent oxygen. This was due primarily to cleaning issues in regards to possible fire hazards and was in compliance with the recommendations of the Association of Standard Test Methods

(ASTM), National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), and the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) as well as other industry standards.

During the 1990’s, open circuit scuba use of enrichedair (Nitrox) by technical and recreational divers became very popular, and as use increased, so did the number of combustion incidents during the mixing and handling of the breathing mixtures. These combustion incidents brought attention to the dangers and inherent risks associated with oxygen and oxygen enriched gas mixtures.

Chapters 6, 7 and 8 of this maintenance manual gives guidance on all routine and corrective maintenance and repairs. Disassembly and reassembly of components is explained in a step-by-step manner that may not necessarily call out that all O-rings and normal consumable items will be replaced. The manual is written in this way so that if an assembly, component, or part is being inspected or disturbed between normal intervals it is acceptable to reuse O-rings and

140

Kirby Morgan cannot dictate or override regulations or recommendations set forth by industry standards or governing bodies pertaining to enriched gas use.

However, it is the opinion of Kirby Morgan that breathing gas mixtures up to 50% oxygen by volume should not pose a significant increased risk of fire or combustion in Kirby Morgan helmets and masks lowpressure components and does not warrant the need for the stringent specialized oxygen clean post-sampling and particulate analysis normally accomplished for

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

WARNING

Do not use lubricants of any kind on the diaphragm or exhaust valves. Use of lubricants can attract and hold debris that could interfere with the proper operation of the regulator.

SuperLite

®

17K

components used in high pressure oxygen valves, regulators, and piping systems. The decision for using 50% has been primarily based on a long history of operational field use.

As long as Kirby Morgan helmets and masks are cleaned and maintained in accordance with the maintenance manual, the equipment should not pose a significant increased risk of a fire or ignition originating in the helmet or mask low-pressure (<250 p.s.i.g. /<17.2 bar or less) components when used with enriched gases of up to 50% oxygen. However,

CAUTION should be exercised any time enriched gases are handled or used.

In general, helmets and masks used primarily for mixed gas use are subject to far less oil and particulate contamination than those used for air diving. For this reason, helmets and masks commonly used with both air and enriched breathing gases should be cleaned and maintained with greater care and vigilance. It is important that all internal gas-transporting components, i.e., side block, bent tube, and demand regulator assemblies remain clean and free of hydrocarbons, dirt, and particulates. Whenever the equipment is depressurized, all exposed ports or fittings should be plugged/capped to help maintain foreign material exclusion.

Gas train components should be cleaned according to the procedures outlined in the operations manual at least annually and/or whenever contamination is suspected or found. Helmet interior and exterior surfaces should be cleaned at least daily at the completion of daily diving operations. Helmets and masks used in waters contaminated with oils and other petroleum or chemical contaminants may require cleaning after each dive.

Helmet and mask components requiring lubrication should be lubricated sparingly with lubricants approved for oxygen use such as Christo-Lube

®

, Krytox

®

, or Fluorolube

®

. KMDSI highly recommends using

Christo-Lube

®

, and uses Christo-Lube

®

during the assembly of all KMDSI gas train components.

Regardless of the approved lubricant used, never mix different kinds of lubricants. Persons mixing handling and working with breathing gases should be properly trained in all aspects of safe gas handling.

NOTE: The helmet weights do not need to be removed from the helmet unless fiberglass damage is present or suspected.

NOTE: During annual overhauls, all O-rings and soft goods, i.e., valve seats and washers should be replaced.

KMDSI offers kits that have all the necessary parts.

NOTE: The neck dam rubber need not be replaced if the inspection reveals no damage or significant wear and the rubber components are not dried out.

NOTE: The oral nasal mask and oral nasal valve requires replacement, only if inspection reveals damage, distortion, or signs of damage.

NOTE: All threaded fasteners and parts require careful cleaning and inspection as well as the mating parts.

Replace any and all threaded parts or components that show signs of wear or damage.

KMDSI highly recommends a certified KMDSI repair technician make all repairs and that only genuine KMDSI repair and replacement parts be used. Owners of KMDSI products that elect to do their own repairs and inspections should only do so if they possess the knowledge and experience. All inspections, maintenance and repairs should be completed using the appropriate KMDSI Operation and

Maintenance Manual.

Persons performing repairs should retain all replacement component receipts for additional proof of maintenance history. Should any questions on procedures, components, or repairs arise, please telephone Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc., at 1-805-928-7772 or E-mail them at [email protected] kirbymorgan.com or telephone Dive Lab, Inc., at 1-850-

235-2715 or E-mail them at [email protected]

NOTE: Refer to Chapter 7 for removal and disassembly

/ reassembly procedures.

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

141

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix 3

Supply Pressure Requirements & Tables

Table 1 should be used whenever low pressure compressors are used or when using surface control panels that are limited to outlet pressures within the range of 220 psig or less.

It is important to insure the required outlet pressure from the table can be maintained in a stable manner at the surface to insure adequate supply at depth. When used with high pressure consoles that can regulate pressures greater than 220 psig use

Appendix 3 Table 3 SuperFlow

®

/ SuperFlow

®

350

Regulator High Pressure Regulated Source.

Diver Work Rates

The divers work rate, also known as respiratory minute volume (RMV), is basically how hard the diver breathes. As the diver’s physical exercise increases, so does the ventilation rate. Proper training teaches the diver to never push the work rate beyond normal labored breathing. (This is in the

30-50 RMV range). To put things in perspective, heavy work for a physically fit person:

Swimming at one knot is about 38 RMV

Running at 8 miles per hour is about 50 RMV

Once the diver hits 55 RMV, they are entering the extreme range. Many fit divers can do 75 RMV for one to two minutes providing the inhalation resistive effort of the breathing system is not much above 1-1.3 J/L. The divers work rate should never be so heavy that the diver cannot maintain a simple conversation with topside.

When the work rate gets into the moderately heavy to heavy range 40-50 RMV the diver needs to slow down!

Working to the point of being excessively winded should be avoided at all costs!

Working at rates greater than 58 RMV underwater is extreme, and can pose hazards that are not present when doing extreme rates on the surface. When underwater, inhalation and exhalation resistive effort increases due to the density of the breathing gas and resistive effort of the equipment. The increase in resistive effort can cause an increase in blood level CO because the diver cannot ven-

When breathing air at the deeper depths, nitrogen narcosis can mask CO

2

symptoms which can then snowball into even heavier breathing, often resulting in confusion, panic, and in rare cases muscle spasm, unconsciousness, sometimes resulting in death. In some rare cases high ventilation rates has been suspected as the cause of respiratory barotraumas, including arterial gas embolism. The possibility of suffering a respiratory over inflation event during high work rates while underwater could be even greater for divers that smoke, or have previous known or unknown lung disease or respiratory damage. The safest course for the diver is to keep the equipment properly maintained for peak performance and to know and understand the capabilities and limitations of the equipment including all breathing supply systems they use.

The output capability of the supply system including umbilicals should be known to all that use it and periodic tests should be done to insure flow capability.

Use Of Low Pressure Supply Table

The low pressure supply tables were developed to simplify calculation of supply pressure. In order to get the required volume to the diver, you need to have the proper supply pressure. The table starts at

90 psig and increases in 10 psig increments. The user simply selects the lowest pressure that best represents the low cycling pressure of the compressor being used. The table basically shows the maximum depth that can be attained while breathing at RMV’s (breathing rates in liters per minute) listed. It is strongly recommended that divers plan for a minimum supply pressure that will allow the diver to work at no less that 50 - 62.5 RMV.

142

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix 3 Table 1 Work Rate Expressed as Respiratory Minute Volume (RMV)*

Work Load RMV

Rest

Light Work

Moderate Work

Heavy Work

Severe Work

7-10 RMV

10-20 RMV

20-37 RMV

37-54 RMV

55-100 RMV

* source: U.S. Navy Diving Manual

Cubic Feet/Minute

(CFM)

0.2 - 0.35 CFM

0.35 - 0.7 CFM

0.7 - 1.3 CFM

1.3 - 1.9 CFM

1.94 - 3.5 CFM

Equivalent Land Based

Exercise

Walking 2 miles per hour

Walking 4 miles per hour

Running 8 miles per hour

Appendix 3 Table 2 Compressor Supply Table SuperFlow

®

and SuperFlow

®

350

Supply Pressure Requirements for Helmets & Masks equipped with SuperFlow

®

and SuperFlow

®

350 Non-balanced regulators when used with low pressure compressors.

Supply Pressure

90 PSIG / 6.21 BAR

100 PSIG / 6.9 BAR

110 PSIG / 7.59 BAR

120 PSIG / 8.28 BAR

130 PSIG / 8.97 BAR

140 PSIG / 9.66 BAR

150 PSIG / 10.35 BAR

160 PSIG / 11.04 BAR

RMV

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

FSW

76

63

44

33

100

83

67

50

112

91

71

57

122

100

82

60

86

72

55

42

137

108

84

65

145

120

95

69

157

Depth

MSW

23

19

13

10

26

22

17

13

31

25

20

15

34

28

22

17

37

31

25

19

42

33

26

20

44

37

29

21

48

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

4.39

3.76

3.15

2.73

4.70

4.03

3.48

2.82

5.15

4.27

3.55

2.97

5.39

4.64

3.88

3.09

5.76

ATA

3.30

2.91

2.33

2.00

3.61

3.18

2.67

2.27

4.03

3.52

3.03

2.52

175.76

187.88

196.97

204.55

187.88

201.52

217.80

211.36

206.06

213.64

221.59

222.73

215.76

231.82

242.42

231.82

230.30

Required

SLPM

132.12

145.45

145.83

150.00

w/20% safety margin

158.55

174.55

175.00

180.00

144.24

159.09

166.67

170.45

161.21

175.76

189.39

188.64

173.09

190.91

200.00

204.55

193.45

210.91

227.27

226.36

210.91

225.45

236.36

245.45

225.45

241.82

261.36

253.64

247.27

256.36

265.91

267.27

258.91

278.18

290.91

278.18

276.36

7.45

7.96

8.35

8.67

7.96

8.54

9.23

8.96

8.73

9.06

9.39

9.44

9.15

9.83

10.28

9.83

9.76

Required

SCFM

5.60

6.17

6.18

6.36

6.11

6.74

7.06

7.23

6.83

7.45

8.03

8.00

143

SuperLite

®

17K

Appendix 3 Table 2 Compressor Supply Table SuperFlow

®

and SuperFlow

®

350

Continued

Supply Pressure RMV

50

62.5

75

FSW

124

100

76

Depth

MSW

38

31

23

ATA

4.76

4.03

3.30

Required

SLPM

237.88

251.89

247.73

w/20% safety margin

285.45

302.27

297.27

Required

SCFM

10.08

10.68

10.50

170 PSIG / 11.73 BAR 40

50

62.5

75

167

135

107

86

51

41

33

26

6.06

5.09

4.24

3.61

242.42

254.55

265.15

270.45

290.91

305.45

318.18

324.55

10.28

10.79

11.24

11.46

180 PSIG / 12.42 BAR

181

148

115

93

55

45

35

28

6.48

5.48

4.48

3.82

259.39

274.24

280.30

286.36

311.27

329.09

336.36

343.64

11.00

11.62

11.88

12.14

190 PSIG / 13.11 BAR

200 PSIG / 13.8 BAR

210 PSIG / 14.49 BAR

220 PSIG / 15.18 BAR

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

40

50

62.5

75

190

154

122

100

192

166

132

102

212

175

137

108

220

182

147

111

67

56

45

34

65

53

42

33

59

51

40

31

58

47

37

31

6.76

5.67

4.70

4.03

6.82

6.03

5.00

4.09

7.42

6.30

5.15

4.27

7.67

6.52

5.45

4.36

270.30

283.33

293.56

302.27

272.73

301.52

312.50

306.82

296.97

315.15

321.97

320.45

306.67

325.76

340.91

327.27

324.36

340.00

352.27

362.73

327.27

361.82

375.00

368.18

356.36

378.18

386.36

384.55

368.00

390.91

409.09

392.73

11.46

12.01

12.44

12.81

11.56

12.78

13.25

13.01

12.59

13.36

13.65

13.58

13.00

13.81

14.45

13.87

Appendix 3 Table 3 SuperFlow

®

/ SuperFlow

®

350 Regulator

High Pressure Regulated Source

FSW

0-60

61-100

101-132

133-165

*166-220

Depth

MSW

0-18

19-30

31-40

41-50

51-61

Regulator Setting

Surface Gauge in P.S.I.G.

Minimum

P.S.I.G.

Maximum

P.S.I.G.

150 225

200

250

250

300

250

275

300

325

Regulator Setting

Surface Gauge in BAR

Minimum

Bar

Maximum

Bar

10.3

15.5

13.8

17.2

17.2

20.6

17.2

18.9

19.6

22.4

*May not be capable of performing at 75 RMV deeper than 165 FSW.

144

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

SuperLite

®

17K

Performance is based on a minimum of 75 RMV to 165 FSW (50 MSW) and 62.5 RMV to 220

FSW (67 MSW) using a 3/8" (9.5 mm) umbilical 600 foot (183 meters) long, made up of two 300 foot (91 meter) sections.

Appendix 3 Table 4 Supply Pressure Guidelines SuperFlow

®

450 Stainless

Steel Balanced Regulators High Pressure Regulated Source

Supply Pressure Guidelines

FSW

0-60

61-100

101-132

133-165

*166-220

Depth

MSW

0-18

19-30

31-40

41-50

51-61

Regulator Setting

Surface Gauge in P.S.I.G.

Minimum

P.S.I.G.

Maximum

P.S.I.G.

140 200

165

180

220

270

220

250

300

300

Regulator Setting

Surface Gauge in BAR

Minimum

Bar

Maximum

Bar

9.7

13.8

11.4

12.4

15

18.6

15

17

20.7

20.7

Appendix 4 Standard Kirby Morgan Surface Supply Pressure

Formula - Old Method

Old Pressure Table Calculation:

The old method of determining supply pressure was to multiply the dive depth by .445 PSI and then add the over-bottom pressure called out in the depth ranges for the depth from the KMDSI operations manual. The old method was based on a minimum RMV of 62.5. This method can still be used. The old method used the formula and called out over bottom pressures for depth as follows [(FSW x .445) + PSIG for depth] from the table below.

Depth in Feet and Meters

0-60 FSW (0-18 MSW)

Over Bottom Pressure

90 PSIG (6.2 Bar)

(18-30) 115

101-132 (30-40) 135 (9.3)

133-165 (40-50) 165 (11.4)

166-220 (50-67) 225 (15.5)

For more information on determining supply pressure related information check the Dive Lab web site at www.

divelab.com.

© ⅯⅯⅩⅦ Kirby Morgan Dive Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Document #170127002

145

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement