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Contents
Introduction ................................................................................................................... 3
Features ......................................................................................................................... 4
Background .................................................................................................................... 6
Scenarios ........................................................................................................................ 7
Control Modes ............................................................................................................... 9
Driving Controls - Locomotive ..................................................................................... 10
Driving in Advanced Mode - Locomotive ..................................................................... 29
Driving Controls - Autocoach ....................................................................................... 31
Driving in Advanced Mode - Autocoach ...................................................................... 41
Locomotive Numbering ............................................................................................... 44
Autocoach Numbering ................................................................................................. 46
Ground Platforms and Scenario Objects ..................................................................... 47
Modification Policy ...................................................................................................... 49
Acknowledgements...................................................................................................... 50
Appendix: Head codes ................................................................................................. 51
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Introduction
Thank you for purchasing the GWR 48/58/14xx & Autocoach DLC for Train Simulator.
An iconic Great Western Railway tank engine, the 48xx class was made up of 75
locomotives built in 1932-1936 and seen on many branch lines throughout the
western region.
Re-numbered from 48xx to 14xx in 1946 due to an experimental oil burning class
requiring its number the 14xx class continued in use for much the same purpose up
until the end of steam in Britain.
This DLC also contains the 58xx class, 20 locomotives built without fittings for
autocoach running, as well as the GWR Diagram A31 autocoach in both GWR and BR
liveries.
The autocoach can be used as a driving vehicle (with no power of its own) when
attached to any consist. If it is coupled to an auto-fitted compatible locomotive
created by Victory Works then it also provides a more realistic driving experience
using a special Advanced Mode which will utilise features of the locomotive.
Please read this manual thoroughly, especially to get the best from Advanced Mode,
and I hope you enjoy driving this iconic train.
All the best,
Pete Gillam (karma99 on Steam and various forums)
Victory Works
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Features

Simple, standard and advanced driving modes

Xbox controller support SIMPLE AND STANDARD MODES ONLY

4 versions of the 4800 Locomotive:
o 48xx – Great Western Railway, autocoach fitted
o 58xx - Great Western Railway, unfitted
o 14xx – British Railways, autocoach fitted
o 58xx – British Railways, unfitted
o All can be given optional water top feeds and/or whistle deflectors

Great Western Railway versions have appropriate fittings for each member
and 3 available logos (shirt button, GWR, Great Western)

British Railways versions have appropriate fittings for each member as well as
pre and post 1956 logos.

Custom sound sets inside and out

Realistic cab with multiple views, including fully modelled firebox and coal

Fully modelled and animated valve gear

Realistic wheel slip physics and effects ADVANCED MODE ONLY

Simulated steam chest ADVANCED MODE ONLY

Cylinder cock management

Boiler management with priming possible ADVANCED MODE ONLY

Realistic injector control ADVANCED MODE ONLY

Realistic forward and reverse dampers ADVANCED MODE ONLY

Dynamic steam and smoke colour and quantity

Realistic boiler water gauges effected by gradient, acceleration and speed
and with blow down test

Opening windows with rain effects, opening doors and roof hatch

Dynamic lamp setting

2 liveries of the GWR Diagram A31 Autocoach:
o Driveable unpowered cab for any consist
o Period and Modern passengers
o Intelligent display of driver in cab
o Ground platform support with animated steps using special scenario
marker – requires ground level platforms to be added/included with
route
ADVANCED MODE ONLY
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o Additional features when coupled to a Victory Works auto-fitted
locomotive, including:
 Realistic simulated remote control, including steam chest of
driving locomotive ADVANCED MODE ONLY
 Whistle/gong alert
 “Intelligent” lamp setting

6 scenarios for the Falmouth Branch route

20 Quick Drives covering all liveries and autocoach combinations
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Background
The Great Western 4800 class was based on the older 517 class which was showing
its age in the 1930s and also featured an open cab. The first locomotive in the class,
number 4800, was built at Swindon Works in 1932 and 74 more locomotives were
built by 1936.
The 4800 class was built for running autotrains by being connected to one or more
autocoaches - a special coach with a driving cab and duplicated controls designed for
push-pull working on small branch lines where the locomotive could not always
change ends easily.
Swindon Works also built 20 of the 5800 class engines which were the same design
but were not fitted with autotrain equipment.
Numerous variations of autocoach were built by the GWR, many of them being
converted from the Steam Railmotors which were tried at the beginning of the 20th
century but had proven to be too impractical. The autotrain provided much more
flexibility with engines and coaches able to be changed as required.
The Diagram A31 coaches were converted from the 9 steam railmotors numbered
73-76, 78, 79, 81-83. The vestibule driving cab was retained and the luggage area
moved to the rear of the coach providing additional seating.
The 4800 class locomotives kept their original numbers until the GWR converted 12
2800 class locomotives to oil firing in 1946, renumbering them 4800 and so the
existing 4800 class became the 1400 class. They kept these numbers even after the
oil firing experiment was abandoned in 1948.
Retaining its numbering throughout its service, the last locomotive of the 5800 class
was withdrawn in 1959.
The 4800 class was withdrawn by 1965 and later scrapped however 4 examples
survived to preservation.
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Scenarios
6 career scenarios are included for the Falmouth Branch route.
The locomotives in all liveries and with various single and double autocoach and light
engine consists are also available in Quick Drive.
GWR 48xx/14xx. 1] Sunday Driver, Part 1
Sunday August 14th 1938.
Drive a Great Western autotrain headed by engine 4805 on the passenger stopping
service from Truro to Falmouth.
 Based on the actual GWR 1938 Sunday timetable.
GWR 48xx/14xx. 1] Sunday Driver, Part 2
Drive the return trip from Falmouth to Truro driving from the cab of autocoach 209.
 Based on the actual GWR 1938 Sunday timetable.
GWR 48xx/14xx. 3] Dock Shuttle
Drive the 16:10 GWR autotrain stopping service from Truro to Falmouth, calling at all
stations.
 Based on the actual GWR 1938 weekday timetable.
GWR 48xx/14xx. 4] Extra Goods
Drive a GWR autotrain using engine 4849 and autocoach 211, collecting a goods van
at Falmouth and driving to Penryn where it needs to be dropped off. The final
destination is Truro and passengers should be collected at all stations en route.
GWR 48xx/14xx. 5] Cornish Conundrum
September 1954.
The shunter at Falmouth Docks has failed, but there is still plenty of work to be done.
Using ex-GWR engine 5812, build a train of wagons from around the docks.
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GWR 48xx/14xx. 6] In the Bleak Midwinter
Christmas Eve 1961 and snow is causing disruption across the rail network.
Drive ex-GWR locomotive 1471 pulling two A31 autocoaches from Falmouth to
Truro. Expect delays and red signals along the way.
This scenario is particularly challenging in Advanced Mode due to the realistic
wheel slip.
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Control Modes
There are 3 ways to drive the 48xx/58xx/14xx and autocoach.
Simple Mode
This is selected using the menu in Train Simulator and provides a simple stop/go,
forwards/backwards set of controls via the simulators built in HUD.
Standard Mode
This is the default mode if you choose to drive in Expert mode using the Train
Simulator menu. The locomotive will operate with more complex controls and can
be driven just using the F4 HUD or an Xbox controller.
Advanced Mode
This is an advanced mode for those who want a more realistic experience and
introduces features such as condensed water in the cylinders, overfilling the boiler,
realistic wheel slip and a simulated steam chest. To achieve these extra functions use
of a keyboard is required, although this can be used in conjunction with mouse
operation of the F4 HUD.1
To enter Advanced Mode you can press Control A at any time, and this will also turn
it off again.
The Advanced Mode controls and features are denoted below.
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Driving Controls - Locomotive
Listed below are the controls available when driving the 48xx/58xx/14xx locomotive
in standard and advanced modes.
Note: Although reference is made to the 48xx, the controls apply to all 3 locomotive
types in both liveries.
Also see the next section “Driving in Advanced Mode - Locomotive” for additional
information.
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1. Regulator
This controls the amount of steam allowed into the cylinders, hence directly
controlling the speed in conjunction with the reverser.
Keys: A,D
Advanced Mode
In advanced mode the locomotive steam chest is simulated. This will add a delay and
smoothing to the increase and decrease of the regulators power to simulate steam
moving through the locomotives pipes and valves. Please note that the F5 HUD
regulator value will not reflect the actual position of the in-cab regulator but the
value used to simulate the chest.
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2. Reverser
This is like the gears on a car. It is usual to start with the reverser set at 75 percent
cut-off (full). As you pick up speed you reduce the cut-off, thereby allowing economic
driving as well as good speed whilst hauling a load.
Keys: W, S
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3. Cylinder Cocks
Advanced Mode
Never move away from more than a short standing start without ensuring that these
are open. When a locomotive sits static for any amount of time, water condensation
builds up in the cylinders. Thus when the piston is in motion, and because water
does not compress, the cylinder will explode.
The cylinder cocks are designed to expel this condensed water and should be opened
for at least 4 turns of the locomotive wheels when the locomotive sets off after
being stationary for some time.
The amount of stationary time varies depending on the time of day (the assumption
that most steam locomotives were working from early in the morning) and also the
weather. If you stop for more than a couple of minutes it’s safer to open them for a
few wheel rotations just to be sure, and always ensure they are open when first
setting off in a scenario.
Key: C
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4. Firebox
Ensure the firebox doors are fully open to allow maximum stoking. A related tool is
the coal box door in the coal bunker. When the firebox door is open, pull the coal
bunker door to regulate the input of coal into the firebox.
Key: F
Keys: R, Shift R (stoking)
As an additional tool for those who like to drive with minimal or no HUD display the
firebox and coal is fully modelled with a specific cab view for checking the fire mass.
The coal level is slightly exaggerated over its working range so it can be used as a
visual indicator of when firing is needed. The coal level rises and falls gradually but
the images below will help in visualising how this can help.
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Coal level low < 50% 456 lbs
The grate can be clearly seen with a very small amount of coal in the centre.
Coal level average 73% 665 lbs
The grate is just covered with the coal’s centre just on the 2nd rivet down on the back
wall.
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Coal level high > 85% 775 lbs
The grate is deeply covered with the coal’s centre almost up to the 1st row of rivets
on the back wall.
The coaling door controls stoking speed.
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5. Blower and Boiler Pressure Gauge
The most useful application of the blower is when the regulator is at idle. Since there
is no throughput of steam when at idle, air flow is minimised and therefore the fire
loses heat. In some circumstances (such as when the safety valve is going off) this is
acceptable but if you need to get some pressure into the boiler while the regulator is
closed then fully opening the blower will force air over the fire, increasing
temperature and then boiler pressure. It is good practice to turn off the blower again
when you open the regulator to save on unnecessary steam usage.
Keys: N, Shift N
The boiler runs best at around 160 psi. At 162 psi the first safety valve will start to
hiss and over 165 psi it will open and the excess steam will vent quickly and noisily. If
the boiler is still continuing to gain pressure a second larger valve will open at 170
psi. Both valves close again when the boiler is under 160 psi.
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6. Dampers
Another tool related to the firebox. This helps control the heat of the firebox, closing
it will reduce the air flow through the fire, thereby lowering heat and steam
production. Opening it will allow more air in, hence producing more heat and steam.
Keys: M, Shift M
Advanced Mode
There are 2 damper levers; the left hand is for the front damper and the right hand
for the rear damper. Each has 3 notches: closed, half and full. To get the maximum
amount of air to keep the locomotive running well you need to set the damper in the
direction of travel to fully open (pulled up) and close the other one (pushed down).
Any other combinations will provide less or no air to the fire.
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7. Exhaust injector steam (left)
This takes steam from the cylinders and recycles it to blast water from the tanks into
the boiler. It is preferable when you are running low on steam.
Key: I
Live steam injector steam (right)
The Live injector works the same as the Exhaust injector but uses live steam from the
boiler, rather than exhaust steam. This is the preferred method when you have lots
of steam and need to fill the boiler quickly.
Key: O
Advanced Mode
In Advanced mode the exhaust injector will only work when there is exhaust steam
to be used, i.e. the regulator is open and the locomotive is in motion.
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8. Live (right side of cab) and Exhaust (left side of cab) water taps
These are used to adjust the flow of water for the appropriate Live or Exhaust
injector control.
Keys: K, Shift K / L, Shift L
Advanced Mode
In Advanced Mode you will need to operate the injectors as the real thing and
balance the water and steam to use them properly.
The correct procedure is as follows – for either Live or Exhaust injectors use the
appropriately named controls:
1. Fully open the water control tap.
 You will hear and see water coming from under the left or right hand
side of the cab.
2. Turn the injector steam lever until you hear the injector start working.
 If you hear a hiss and see a jet of steam under the cab you have too
much steam pressure and the water is not entering the injector.
 If you hear running water and see water running from the pipe under
the cab you need more steam to force it into the boiler.
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9. Boiler Gauge Glass
Attached to the boiler is a strong glass tube indicating the current level of water in
the boiler. If this reaches the bottom then the fusible plugs will melt and relieve the
boiler pressure whilst providing a warning to the locomotive crew.
The water level is not static when the locomotive is in motion and will wobble
around appropriately. It is also affected by gradients, acceleration and deceleration.
Advanced Mode
Overfilling the boiler (past 110%) at high pressure can force water into the cylinders
and cause the same problems as having condensed water from standing still. If you
overfill the boiler open the cylinder cocks immediately and leave them open until the
water level in the glass falls.
You can also perform a blow down test on the gauge glass by doing the following:
1. Shut off the water supply to the top and bottom of the glass by pulling the
lever down.
2. Move the tap at the bottom of the gauge up, the water will empty from the
glass.
3. Return the lever and tap to their previous positions by reversing the above
process to refill the glass.
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10. Vacuum Brake and Brake Pressure Gauge
The vacuum brake is used to pull the brake shoes away from the wheels by creating
a vacuum in the pipes connected to them. The brake has 3 settings, brake off which
forces a vacuum into the pipes and takes the brakes off, brake on which lets air into
the pipes and applies the brakes, and brake running which holds the vacuum steady
at its current pressure.
The brake pressure gauge shows the current pressure in the system, from 0 (on) to
25 (off).
Keys: ‘ (apostrophe), ; (semicolon)
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11. Sander
The sander assists in starting and stopping without the wheels slipping.
Keys: X, Shift X
Advanced Mode
Sand is essential in pulling away with minimal wheel slip in icy conditions.
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12. Whistles
Steam locomotive whistles are powered by steam from the boiler and are used to
signal a trains approach, warn of danger and often to signify departure. The 48xx like
many GWR locomotives has 2 whistles, the second being used to communicate
messages to the guard of the train.
Key: Space, Ctrl Space
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13. Handbrake
A hand operated screw that applies the brakes to the locomotive without the need
to release the vacuum in the brake pipes.
Key: /
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14. Doors, Windows and Roof Hatch
Working in the cab of any steam locomotive is hot work. To aid in the comfort of the
crew you can open the windows and the roof hatch. Click and drag with the mouse.
You can also open the side doors, rear doors and slide the side weather protection
panels.
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15. Automatic Train Control (ATC)
The world’s first train safety equipment as fitted on the Great Western Railway.
This system added a magnetic pick up which would indicate a signal being either
clear or at danger and would issue a bell or buzzer tone to the locomotive crew. If a
warning buzzer was heard it would need to be acknowledged or the brakes would be
automatically applied.
If you are driving on an AWS fitted route you will hear a bell ring if you pass a clear
(green) signal. If you pass a signal at danger (red, yellows or distant red) a buzzer will
sound and you will have 3.7 seconds to clear the warning or the train will be brought
to a stop.
Press the Q key or press down the lever on the side of the ATC box to acknowledge
the warning.
Note: For AWS to function the route that the locomotive is running on needs to have
been fitted with the relevant scenery markers. This is not the case for the Falmouth
Branch so the included scenarios will not trigger any ATC alerts.
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16. Head code setting
The 48xx has a standard GWR 4 lamp set up for the front and rear – 1 lamp at the
top and 3 below – to show the standard GWR head codes (see Appendix).
The codes can be pre-set using the locomotive scenario number or changed by the
driver at any time.
You can show or hide each lamp by holding the Control key and pressing numbers 1
to 4 on the keypad. Control and number 5 on the keypad will switch the direction of
white/red filters for forward and reverse running.
The lamps are also intelligent in that they will not show for each end if something is
coupled to the front or rear of the locomotive, and if the locomotive is coupled to a
Victory Works autocoach then the driving vehicle will always have a white filtered
lamp and the last vehicle in the autotrain, a red filtered lamp.
Keys: Ctrl + Numpad 1-5
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Driving in Advanced Mode - Locomotive
Advanced Mode ONLY
The following is a summary of how to drive successfully in Advanced Mode. It does
not contain hard figures – e.g. set the reverser at 25% and the regulator at 30% - as
these are the things you will learn by driving the locomotive.
However there are some realistic features that are incorporated that require some
specific knowledge for the best operation.
Before you start
Dampers – make sure you have the dampers set for running in the appropriate
direction (see Controls Section 6).
Head Code - If you wish to, set the appropriate head code (see Controls Section 16).
Fire – Assuming you are not using the auto-fireman and not about to run downhill
for a long way you will want to start building the fire as soon as possible (see
Controls Section 4).
Gauge Glass Test – If you have time at the start of a scenario then you can perform
gauge glass blow down tests to pass the time (see Controls Section 10).
Setting Off
Cylinder Cocks – If you are just starting or have been stationary for a while, ensure
that the cylinder cocks are open. As you drive off, listen for the change in pitch as the
water empties or count 4 full revolutions of the wheels and then close them (see
Controls Section 3).
Wheel Slip – In icy conditions due to the accurate wheel slip and simulated steam
chest you will need to use the regulator like a real driver would. Primarily on starting
(when the reverser cut off is high) this means you must manage the steam entering
the pistons to make sure that the power being applied to the rails does not exceed
the amount of grip available.
If you open the regulator and just leave it open the pressure will continue to build as
will the amount of power being applied to the rail. This will likely cause wheel
slipping in icy conditions.
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As a real driver would you need to “pump” the regulator to gradually build the
pressure in the cylinders as you accelerate. This means opening the regulator for a
moment and then closing it again, the residual steam will continue to work and
cause the locomotive to carry on accelerating. Continually doing this will allow the
locomotive to build speed and pressure gradually and avoid wheel slip.
Once a slow speed is reached you can then leave the regulator open and accelerate
and adjust as needed to maintain a constant speed.
The speed at which you can stop pumping varies and is based on how much grip is
available – an icy rail will need a much higher speed to allow full power than a dry
rail.
The weight of the consist will also affect how long it takes before this speed is
reached (simply because a heavier load takes longer to accelerate) which means you
are more likely to have to manage the wheel slip for longer, therefore making it
more likely.
In summary, as you set off do not throw the regulator to full and leave it there!
Pump it gradually, increasing the power slowly until you can leave the regulator
open. And be aware of the weather, a wet or icy rail provides a lot less grip.
This brings us to:
Sander – The sander helps to provide grip for the wheels on the rail and should be
used when starting in icy conditions (see Controls Section 12).
Under Way
Water Filling – You will need to use the water levers and the injector steam levers
to fill the boiler (see Controls Section 9).
Due to the water gauge glasses wobbling around and being effected by gradient and
acceleration it is normal procedure to try and keep the boiler between half and three
quarters full to avoid overfilling the boiler and causing priming to occur.
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Driving Controls - Autocoach
To change to another driving locomotive or autocoach in a consist press Ctrl and =
together.
IMPORTANT: Only do this when the consist is stationary.
The A31 autocoach can be used as a driving cab on any Train Simulator consist but it
must have a powered steam locomotive somewhere in the train. This is not accurate
– a real autocoach can ONLY drive a locomotive that is fitted for this purpose – but it
allows you to use it with locomotives from other developers.
If you are using a Victory Works auto-fitted locomotive then special functions are
available.
Also see the next section “Driving in Advanced Mode - Autocoach” for additional
information.
Listed below are the controls available when driving the A31 autocoach in standard
and advanced modes.
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1. Regulator
This controls the amount of steam allowed into the cylinders, hence directly
controlling the speed in conjunction with the reverser. The regulator in the
autocoach is connected to the locomotive via a shaft running under the coach and
telescopic couplings.
Keys: A, D
Advanced Mode
To move the regulator requires the hand lock to be taken off. To do this, press and
hold the E key on the keyboard, move the regulator to the required position, and
then release the hand lock (let go of the E key).
Key: E
If the autocoach is in a consist being powered by a Victory Works auto-fitted
locomotive then it will use the simulated steam chest of that locomotive (see
locomotive Controls Section 1).
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2. Vacuum Brake and Brake Pressure Gauge
The vacuum brake is used to pull the brake shoes away from the wheels by creating
a vacuum in the pipes connected to them. The brake in the driving cab has 3 settings,
brake off which forces a vacuum into the pipes and takes the brakes off, brake on
which lets air into the pipes and applies the brakes, and brake running which holds
the vacuum steady at its current pressure.
The brake pressure gauge shows the current pressure in the system, from 0 (on) to
25 (off).
Keys: ‘ (apostrophe), ; (semicolon)
Advanced Mode
The brake control in the autocoach is connected to the same pipe system as the
brake in the locomotive but cannot open the brake ejector directly and to leave this
open all the time would waste steam. Therefore using it relies on some
communication with the fireman in the locomotive to create the vacuum to release
the brakes. See below for a full description on how to drive from the autocoach.
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3. Sander
The sander assists in starting without slipping and also halts slips when ascending
hills covered with leaves or light snow.
Key: X, Shift X
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4. Handbrake
A hand operated screw that applies the brakes to the wheels without the need to
release the vacuum in the brake pipes.
Key: /
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5. Whistle / Gong
The autocoach does not have its own whistle and the whistle cord can only be
connected to the whistle on a locomotive if that locomotive is fitted with a
mechanical connection on the rear of its cab designed to pull the whistle levers
inside.
If the A31 autocoach is not connected to a locomotive with this fitting (currently the
Victory Works 48xx/14xx is the only locomotive thus fitted but more are planned)
then a gong operated by a pedal is used by the driver in the same way a whistle
would be to warn of danger.
Key: Space
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6. Bell
In an autotrain the bell in the autocoach is your communication device to talk to the
fireman of the locomotive powering the train. You will use it to tell him to release
the brakes and notch up the reverser.
There is a useful plaque on the bell and bell button box summarising the meaning of
the number of bell rings. See below for a full description on how to drive the
autocoach.
Key: B
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7. Wiper
Above the driving window is a hand operated wiper. This can be used to clear rain,
snow and dirt directly in the driver’s view.
Key: V
The wiper operates in a single sweep for each button press or wiper click. It does not
move continuously. Well, it is hand operated!
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8. Automatic Train Control
The autocoach is fitted with Automatic Train Control which functions in the same
way as the ATC on the locomotive (see Controls Section 15).
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9. Ventilation
Although a far cry from a locomotive footplate you can still open the windows and
doors of the autocoach cab for ventilation. Click and drag with the mouse.
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Driving in Advanced Mode - Autocoach
Advanced Mode ONLY
In simple and standard driving modes the autocoach will allow driving in the same
way as any locomotive in Train Simulator (it must be in a consist with a steam
locomotive to provide power).
In advanced mode you can have the full experience of being separated from the
locomotive, with a limited set of controls and communicating with the fireman in the
locomotive via a series of bell rings.
In the autocoach the usual tasks of notching up (moving the reverser as you gain and
lose speed) and creating the vacuum to release the brakes are performed by the
fireman.
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Bell sequence and their meanings
These are repeated on a plaque by the bell button, above the driver’s window.
1. Start
a. If stationary or slow the reverser is set to 75%. Brake release remains
enabled if already requested.
b. If moving and over 12mph then reverser is set to 48%, if moving and over
30mph then reverser is set to 22%. Brake release is disabled.
2. Stop
a. If in motion the reverser is set to 75%. Brake release is disabled.
b. If stationary the reverser is set to 0%. Brake release is disabled.
3. Brakes Off
a. Brake release is enabled and the brake vacuum will not hold steady, steam
(and therefore boiler pressure) is used by this until the signal for Start b. or
Stop is sent to the fireman.
Push the bell quickly in succession to tell the fireman what you need him to do.
There will be a delay and then a confirmation of the same number of bells. Wait for
the confirmation before the next request.
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Driving procedure
Ready to leave

1 bell to get reverser to 75%.

3 bells to release the brake.

Move the brake to the far right to release.

Open the regulator as the brakes release.

Once the brake vacuum is at 25 inches move the brake back to the central position.
When at speed (over 12mph)

1 bell to get the reverser to 48%.
When at speed (over 30mph)

1 bell to get the reverser to 22%.
Slowing for stop

2 bells to set the reverser to 75% for finer control as the destination is approached.

Important: At this point the brake release is not available, so any brake you apply
will remain on until you stop or request another brake release from the fireman
(which if repeated is sure to make him angry!). Therefore be frugal in braking,
measure the distance to stop against your slowing speed and apply the brake
accordingly. Stop, go, stop, go braking is not a part of correct driving on the Great
Western Railway!
When Stopped

2 bells to set the reverser to 0%.
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Locomotive Numbering
When a 48xx/58xx/14xx is added to a scenario the number will be randomly chosen
from a list of all members of the appropriate class.
These are pre-set with the correct configurations for each number as they were
historically outfitted. However if you wish to change any of the components then the
setup is listed below.
The number has 10 digits in total, e.g. D4800YNNBB DI413YYYRB
1 .D/W – A Dry or Wet scenario
2 to 5. 4 digit locomotive number
 For the BR locomotives, the letter I should be used for the first 1 to keep the
correct spacing
6. Auto-fitted – Yes or No
7. Water top feed - Yes or No
8. Whistle deflector and cab side steps - Yes or No
9. Company logo and safety valve cover
 An upper case letter will show a painted safety valve bonnet. A lower case
letter will show a polished brass bonnet.
 Great Western liveries
o B, b - Shirt button logo
o L, l – GWR lettering
o N, n – Great Western name
 British Railways
o R, r – Pre 1956 logo
o O, o – Post 1956 logo
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o Any other letter will show no logo. Upper or lower case will still show
the painted or polished safety valve bonnet.
10. Head code – Letter of the head code class (see Appendix).
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Autocoach Numbering
When an autocoach is added to a scenario the number will be randomly chosen from
a list: 202-205, 207-209, 211, 219.
This can be changed using the right hand fly out when the locomotive is selected.
The number has 16 digits in total, e.g. P202############
The first digit denotes whether the carriage sections should be populated with
people.
M shows people in modern clothing. P shows people in period clothing. Anything
else shows no passengers.
The next 3 digits are the number shown on the front, rear and sides of the
locomotive.
The last 12 digits are used to put text on the destination board on the front of the
coach.
There must always be 12 digits (initially set as # characters) so # is used to add an
empty space between words or to pad the start and end to centralise the text.
e.g. ###truro#### Pontygwaith# bishops#lyd.
Letters A to Z are catered for, they can be entered in upper or lower case but are
always shown in an upper case style, as well as & (ampersand) ‘ (apostrophe) and .
(period).
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Ground Platforms and Scenario Objects
The autocoach has a set of steps at the passenger doors. These were operated by
the guard using a lever inside the porch when the train stopped at ground level
platforms. These halts were added to branch lines when a quick and cheap pick
up/drop off stop was required rather than a full station with raised platforms.
The steps on this model are fully functional however they require the platforms to
be set up in the simulator and a special Ground Platform Marker added at each end
of the platform to tell the autocoach when it is next to them.
Unfortunately at the current time although you can add platform markers and static
scenery to scenarios, you can’t add lofted items and this means you can’t add the
passenger spawning platform areas to a scenario. Due to this the ground platforms
need to be added to the route and can’t be added on an ad hoc basis to a scenario.
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The special Ground Platform Marker can be added directly to the route or just to
scenarios that feature the autocoach – if you do the latter then you will need to add
it to every ground platform on every scenario that requires a pick up there.
You can do this yourself for any route using the Train Simulator route clone function
or include ground platforms in new routes you are building.
Once you have added some scenery to look like a ground platform and laid down a
platform loft (either an invisible one or hide the platform just under the ground) and
a ground platform marker then you have all that you need on the route.
To add the marker, tick the VictoryWorks / GWR14xx assets in the object filter.
Under the Miscellaneous tab find the asset called Ground Platform Marker (for
Steam Railmotor/Autocoach) and place it in the middle of the track by the platform.
Place the first link past one end of the platform and the second link past the other
end. Once these are placed, drop the small orange/blue marker below the ground so
it can’t be seen.
Important: Make sure that the links are not placed dividing the links of a signal as
this may cause odd signalling problems.
Note: The ground platform markers in this pack and the Victory Works GWR Steam
Railmotor are fully compatible with each other.
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Modification Policy
You are free to create modifications (including but not limited to re-skins, sound
updates, “enhancement” packs, etc.) within the guidelines of Dovetail Games
current policies (for example, no inclusion of 3D model files) however if they are
made public then they must be provided free of charge. They can be hosted on a site
that asks a nominal membership fee for quicker downloads (e.g. UK Train Sim) but
cannot be sold in any way without the express permission of Victory Works.
If you wish to discuss terms for selling modifications please contact us via email at
victoryworks@live.co.uk
To summarise – free mods are fine, as long as they adhere to DTG’s current policies.
If you wish to sell mods then you MUST get permission first.
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Acknowledgements
I would like to thank the following people for their help and encouragement during
this project:







Stuart Galbraith for his advice, ideas and critique
DOM107 (UKTrainSim) for his Blender exporter
Chris Barnes for allowing me to use his superb smoke/steam textures
“The Secret Forum” for their critique and constant encouragement
Matt Peddlesden
Everyone at Dovetail Games
My wife for all her support and my father for instilling in me a love of steam
trains from an early age
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Appendix: Head codes
The following are the 1936 GWR head code classes that you can set using the
scenario numbering system.
Class A




Express passenger train.
Breakdown van train going
to clear the line, or light
engine going to assist
disabled train.
Empty coaching stock timed
at express speed.
Express streamline railcar.
Class B




Ordinary passenger or mixed
train.
Branch passenger train.
Breakdown train not going
to clear the line.
Rail motor car, auto-train or
streamline railcar.
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Class C


Parcels, newspapers, meat,
fish, fruit, milk, horse, cattle
or perishable train
composed entirely of
vacuum fitted stock with
vacuum pipe connected to
the engine.
Express freight, livestock,
perishable or ballast. Train
pipe with not less than one
third of the vehicles vacuum
fitted and pipe connected to
the engine.
Class D


Express freight, or ballast
train conveying a stipulated
number of vacuum braked
vehicles connected by the
vacuum pipe to the engine
and authorised to run at a
maximum speed of 35mph.
Empty coaching stock train
(not specially authorised to
carry "A" head code).
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Class E


Express freight, fish, fruit,
meat, cattle or ballast train.
Breakdown train not
proceeding to an accident.
Class F

Fast freight conveying
through load, all unfitted.
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Class G


Light engine or light engines
coupled.
Engine with not more than
two brake vans.
Class H

Freight, mineral or ballast
train or empty train carrying
through load to destination.
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Class J

Freight, mineral or ballast
train stopping at
intermediate stations.
Class K


Branch freight train.
Freight or ballast train or
Officers special train
requiring to stop in section.
Copyright Victory Works 2014, all rights reserved Release Version 1.0