STREETFIGHT - Wargames Foundry

STREETFIGHT
INTRODUCTION
GETTING STARTED
Each player needs one or more models, each representing a single person or character. Each and every single
model represent a totally unique individual. They represent your characters – the characters you will invest time
and energy in every time you use them in a game. You will find that characters, despite only really being inch high
metal miniatures, actually acquire their own personalities, histories and idiosyncrasies, much like real people. You
will find you become quite attached to your characters.
In the game, there are four classes of character:
Plugs: Ordinary civilians or inexperienced or youthful gangers, unskilled and nervy.
Gangers: tough individuals who carry a gun with the expectation (and perhaps hope) of having to use it.
Killer: violent characters with violent histories who have killed and will again.
Street Legends: cold blooded killers, men beyond the reproach of either the law or their enemies.
You will need something to note your characters’ wounds and other special rules or effects down on as you play. It
is normally a good idea for each player to keep a few sheets of scrap paper or a small notebook and a pen handy
during a game.
You will also need plenty of ordinary six sided dice and a tape measure!
Perhaps most importantly, someone has to organise a Fate Deck. The Fate Deck is used to determine the order of
play, and governs exactly when and how often particular characters can make actions such as moving or shooting.
The Fate Deck consists of one card for each character in the game, plus five special cards which are included to
represent luck or heroism during the game.
The five special cards are one each of:
Plug Action Card
Ganger Action Card
Killer Action Card
Street Legend Action Card
Joker
THE TABLETOP
Finally, you will need somewhere to actually play your game! Any decent sized flat area will do – a desk, kitchen
table or even the floor (providing vagrant pets, children and relatives can be kept safely out of stamping distance).
This is usually referred to as the board or the table, since many experienced gamers tend to have purpose built tables
specifically for use in gaming.
This is certainly not necessary when you are just learning the rules, so for now just clear a space somewhere and
place a few small cardboard boxes or containers on the table, by way of representing buildings. Again, most people
who play games regularly amass collections of purpose built scenery and terrain representing everything from small
crates, hedges and walls, right up to forests, hills and buildings. If you have any such model terrain available to you,
it certainly adds to the ethos of a game, but is by no means needed for your first few games, so don’t worry about
playing with piles of shoeboxes or even bricks for now.
Ideally, terrain should be placed so that there is about 6” between buildings, with these gaps representing the streets.
If possible, intersperse some smaller pieces of terrain, such as wire-link fences, crates, oil drums or even parked cars
around the streets, just to break up any open areas. Some players find it is best to have a few relatively open areas
on the table, so if you like arrange the buildings so that they form ‘courtyards’ or ‘parking lot’ type areas in certain
places. It is usually best if these open areas aren’t more than about a foot or so square, again with some small terrain
pieces inside.
You’ll need to experiment with terrain layouts, to discover exactly what works best and what provides the most fun
game. You’ll gradually pick up an eye for what works and what doesn’t as you play more games.
2
PLACING CHARACTERS
Setting up the characters can be of vital importance, since a poor arrangement can badly disadvantage one side or
the other and make for a predictable, uninteresting game. Similarly, setting up the characters in well balanced
positions will make for even more enjoyable games, as characters have the opportunity to skulk behind buildings,
stalk one another and generally make the best possible use of the scenery.
Random Set-up: If you don’t want to work out a scenario, and just want to get stuck right in with a general
streetfight between all the characters involved, a good way to get things rolling is to draw cards from the Fate Deck,
one at a time. As each characters card is drawn, his model is placed on the table. He can be positioned anywhere his
player likes, as long as he is either at least six inches from all enemy models, and is closer to the nearest friend than
the nearest enemy.
As soon as the Joker is drawn, the game starts, with those characters who have not yet appeared being placed on the
table as above when their cards are eventually drawn during the game itself. A character may not make any actions
in the turn in which they are placed on the tabletop.
Which Characters to Use?
A good way of randomly determining which characters to use in a game is to draw from the deck that represents
your entire collection or all the members of a particular gang (e.g. all the punks or all the skinheads, or all the suits
or whatever). Agree on a number of characters per side (usually 2-5 each) and draw that many cards for each player.
Alternatively, if you have lots of players joining in the game, each player can draw one card from the deck and then
uses the appropriate character model. With this many players it is a good idea to divide all the players into two sides
or ‘teams’ perhaps representing allegiances of local gangs.
PLAYING THE GAME
THE FATE DECK
The Fate Deck is used to determine which character takes a turn. At the start of the game, take all the character
cards and special cards, put them together and give them a thorough shuffle. Place them face down at one side of the
table, within easy reach of both players. A card (or chit, or whatever) is turned, then:
•
If it is a character card, that character immediately takes a turn, and the card is placed on the discard pile.
•
If it is an action card it is displayed face up on the table: The next player to draw a character card of a
class at least as high as that of a displayed action card takes it into his hand, he can claim any number of
action cards simultaneously. He can use each action card to give a free turn to any of his characters of a
class at least as high as that on the card at any time; even part way through someone else’s turn. When
more than one player plays action cards in the same turn, then irrespective of the order in which they were
declared, the superior card goes first. This means that Street Legend goes before Killer, Killer goes before
Ganger and so on.
•
If it is the Joker, all discards are shuffled back into the Fate Deck. Any action cards held by players must
be played immediately or discarded. Either way, they are shuffled back into the deck too.
3
TAKING A TURN
Whenever a character is able to take a turn (either as a result of his character card being drawn or an action card
being played) he is permitted to make one action. The character may choose his action from:
`
Move
Fire
Move & Fire
Reposition
Aim
Reload
Recover
Get Up
Duck Back
Fix Gun
ACTIONS
MOVE
When a character moves, throw three dice and total up the scores. This is the maximum distance in inches that the
character can move.
So, for example, if the three dice came up as a 1, a 4 and a 6, the character could move a total of 1 + 4 + 6 = 11”.
When moving, a character may set off in any direction at the beginning of his move (regardless of which way he
was facing to begin with), but must move in a straight line, making no further turns other than detours of up to an
inch to avoid obstacles and other characters. Don’t worry too much about the meticulous route your character takes
as he moves, or how precisely you measure the distances of an inch.
When a character has completed his move, he must end his turn facing the direction he has just moved in.
Clambering Over Obstacles
If an obstacle is too big to be gone around in a single move, normally a character would have to stop, then move
again in a different direction the next time he gets a turn. However, if an obstacle is no taller than the character
model itself, he may clamber over it. A character must be able to return to the ground within 1” of the other side of
such an obstacle, otherwise he may not climb it. Similarly, the model must have enough movement left to reach a
point on the other side of the obstacle (measured in a straight line as usual). This largely means that small fences are
the only obstacles a model will typically clamber over.
Providing these conditions are met, the character may clamber over the obstacle. However, such are the difficulties
in holstering weapons, scrambling up wire mesh or bricks, lowering oneself down on the other side and so on, that a
character’s turn is immediately ended when he lands on the other side of such an obstacle. Regardless of his
maximum movement distance he may not move any further, nor may he shoot!
Moving Plugs
Once gunplay commences (i.e. once the first shot has been fired), Plugs must move always the full distance rolled –
they are too inexperienced to think straight once bullets are flying. If this means that an impassable obstacle would
get in their way, then they must move in another direction if doing so would allow them to move the full distance
(even if this is the opposite direction to that desired by the player). If it is not possible to move their full movement
distance, they simply freeze in terror and stay exactly where they are (or behave as the gamesmaster thinks
appropriate if one is being used).
Plugs may declare that they are either moving to attack an enemy character, or to a specific position behind cover,
before they throw their dice. If they do so, they must then move towards their objective, and will halt there if their
throw is high enough. If the score is not enough to reach their chosen enemy or cover, the model moves as far as
possible towards it then halts.
4
Tripping Up!
Any character who throws three 1’s with the movement dice falls over (treat as knocked down – see the injury
charts later in the rules), a Plug who throws two 1’s falls over. This also applies when a character is making a Move
& Fire action.
FIRE
There are quite a number of things to consider when firing, but the basic jist of this action is that you will roll a
number of dice for the firing character, depending on such things as what weapon they are using, whether they
moved, and so on. When you roll dice to shoot, any dice which scores a ‘6’ is a hit on the target model.
A firing character may not move, but may turn to face any direction he wishes and then fires. Characters can fire
within an arc of 90 degrees; 45 degrees each side of straight ahead – this is known as their Angle of Fire.
The best way to calculate this is by making a simple template from a folded square of paper. If you fold the paper
from corner to corner diagonally and then open it up again, you can align the crease so that it points in the direction
that the character is facing – this is straight ahead. This way, the edges of the paper will mark out the edge of the
character’s angle of fire.
Rate of Fire
The character rolls the number of dice shown on the firing chart, subject to the modifiers listed below. You will
need to measure the range from the firing model to his target, and look up the relevant range on the firing chart. If
the distance between the firer and the target is greater than the ‘Extreme’ distance shown on the Firing Chart, the
target is out of range and the shot is wasted.
When measuring ranges, it is important to be consistent, so always measure them from the head of the firing model
to the head of the target.
Types of Weapon
When shooting, all weapons are considered to be either one handed or two handed, even though they may actually
be something far more specific or exotic than this. Any weapons held in a single hand (usually pistols) use the one
handed firing chart, weapons held in both hands (rifles and machine guns) use the two handed firing chart. Whilst a
number of special rules may apply to different types of weapon, this does not affect the basic number of firing dice.
It is useful to make a note of whether each character’s weapon counts as one handed or two handed before the game
starts to prevent argument where odd-looking weapons are concerned. Some weapons have the option of firing
either one-handed or two-handed, in which case the player must declare whether the model is going to fire with one
or two hands before measuring range.
5
FIRING CHART
1-Handed
POINT
BLANK
CLOSE
MEDIUM
LONG
EXTREME
24”
RANGE
2”
6”
9”
12”
NUMBER
OF DICE
2
3
2
1
2-Handed
POINT
BLANK
CLOSE
MEDIUM
LONG
EXTREME
RANGE
2”
6”
12”
24”
IN SIGHT
NUMBER
OF DICE
1
2
3
2
0
MINUS
1
Firing with Multiple Weapons
Characters armed with a rifle and pistol(s) must discard the rifle to use a pistol. Characters armed with two pistols
may fire them both simultaneously, making a separate throw for each, but may not fire deliberately. If firing just one
of the pair, the character may automatically switch to the other if he runs out of ammo or jams.
Modifiers: add or subtract the following NUMBER OF DICE rolled by the character:
Target in cover
- 1 Dice
If the target is behind cover, 1 less shooting dice
is rolled. Deciding which models are behind
cover, and to what extent can be tricky, so refer
to the section entitled ‘Cover’ on page 6 for
details.
Each Serious wound
- 2 Dice
Each serious wound on any part of the body
causes a –2 modifier when shooting.
Target knocked down or
Knocked out
+2 Dice
Firing one-handed or throwing
weapon after moving
Plug
Killer
Street Legend
- 1 Dice
+1 Dice
+2 Dice
- 1 Dice
Firing two-handed after moving - 2 Dice
Head wound
- 1 Dice
Flesh wound on firing arm for one-handed,
or either arm for two-handed
- 1 Dice
If a model has a flesh wound on his firing arm
(or either arm if firing two handed) use this
modifier.
Aimed shot (two-handed)
Dice
+6
Aimed shot (one-handed)
Dice
+4
Gamesmasters may further modify the number
of
dice
as
they
find
appropriate
6
COVER
Cover is an important feature of the game. Cover is anything which obstructs line of sight, or line of fire between
characters (literally anything behind which a character can ‘take cover’). Typically in a streetfight this will consist
of such things as the buildings that border the streets, parked cars, trash cans, dumpsters, fences walls, fire hydrants
and so on. Anything that can obscure a model from his enemies is considered to be cover.
A character behind cover is protected from some of the shots that would otherwise hit him.
A gamesmaster can be useful to adjudicate which parts of a target’s body are protected, but as a rule of thumb:
Characters firing round the corner of a building always expose their head and chest. Pistol shooters (one-handed
weapons) also expose their right arm, and rifle shooters (two-handed weapons) always expose both their arms.
When firing over a wall or other obstacle, the chest is not exposed. In cases where pieces of cover might be
unusually shaped, or the model is positioned oddly, trace a rough of line sight from the firing model to his target and
see which parts of the body are obscured. Use common sense to agree between all players which locations on the
target’s body are behind cover and which are not.
Solid Cover
If a character has taken cover behind something reasonably substantial, like a brick wall or a pile of trash cans, then
shots that would have hit protected parts of his body cause him to duck back, but cannot injure him.
Light Cover
If he is only behind something like a pile of boxes or a fence, then throw for each shot that hits cover:
1-2 - shot penetrates, target hit, subtract one from the damage dice.
3-6 - shot is stopped, but the character must duck back.
Soft Cover
Some cover, like hedges or small trees, is too insubstantial to stop a bullet, but hiding behind it still reduces your
opponent’s chance of hitting by subtracting one of his dice (see firing modifiers).
Unless a character ducks back, his head is always visible when he is behind cover.
Other characters provide cover too: if the firing line is obstructed by another character, determine which parts of the
targets body are protected by him. Hits on these parts are rolled for again on the unfortunate interloper, hitting a
random location as normal – you should roll again, instead of using the score for the original target
ROLLING TO HIT
Once you have worked out how many dice a particular character is entitled to when firing, you should roll them all
to see how many of them actually cause hits. Every dice which scores a 6 causes one hit on the target model.
Lucky shots
A character who finds he must throw no dice (or less) after applying modifiers, may still fire. Such a character
throws three dice needing at least two 6’s to hit. He is out of ammo as usual if he throws more 1’s than 6’s.
Example: Ace, a Killer character, is firing his pistol at an enemy 10” away. This falls within the ‘Medium’ range
category, and hence gives him 2 dice. However, Ace’s target is in cover (-1 dice) and he himself has a flesh wound
to his firing arm (-1 dice). He is a killer though (+1 dice) to this gives Ace a total of 2 – 1 – 1 + 1 = 1 firing dice.
He rolls it and gets a 4 – a miss.
Out of Ammo & Jams
If a character rolls more 1’s than 6s when shooting, he is out of ammo and must reload before he can use the
weapon in question again. If the character rolls two or more 1’s than 6’s his gun is jammed and he must fix it before
using it again.
7
Fumbles
If playing with a gamesmaster, you might like to introduce a rule where if four or more 1’s are rolled the character
“fumbles” and something terrible happens. He could drop his gun (which might go off), catch it in his clothing,
shoot himself or someone standing nearby, fall on his face, mistake a friend for an enemy or vice-versa, bump into
someone, bang his head on a sign or post, a little old lady might launch a frenzied attack with her umbrella, the
sidewalk might collapse, a stray dog might bite him, his gun explode, clothing catch fire etc. Further suggestions are
invited, if we get enough we could do a big list or a deck of event cards.
HIT LOCATION & EFFECT
Once you have established whether or not the firing character has hit his target, you must resolve the effect of any
hits scored. First of all throw a dice to see which location is hit (e.g. head, chest, arms etc). Look up the score on the
dice on the left hand column of the chart below. Then, roll a second dice to determine the effect.
Do this for each individual hit scored. Each injury is rolled for separately, so you may well hit completely different
parts of the body with different shots from the same model.
8
HIT LOCATION CHART
DICE
THROW
1
1
2
HEAD
GRAZE
3
4
5
6
FLESH
WOUND
FLESH
WOUND&
OUT OF
ACTIO
N
DEAD
SERIOUS
WOUND
&
KNOCKE
D OUT
throw 6 to
recover
SERIOUS
WOUND
OUT OF
ACTION
KNOCKED
OUT throw 6
to recover
2
CHEST
GRAZE
FLESH WOUND
FLESH
WOUND
&
KNOCKED
DOWN
3
4
5
6
RIGHT
ARM
LEFT
ARM
BELLY
GRAZE
GRAZE
GRAZE
FLESH WOUND
FLESH WOUND
FLESH
WOUND
no movement
or turning
LEGS
GRAZE
FLESH
WOUND
Movement
reduced by one
dice
FLESH
WOUND
&
SERIOUS
WOUND
&
KNOCKED
DOWN
KNOCKED
OUT
no movement
or turning
Throw 6 to
recover. no
movement or
turning
FLESH
WOUND &
KNOCKED
DOWN
Movement reduced by one dice
9
SERIOUS
WOUND&
Cannot shoot
with that arm.
Cannot reload
or shoot rifle
KNOCKED
DOWN Cannot
SERIOUS
WOUND
SERIOUS
WOUND &
Cannot shoot
with that arm.
Cannot reload
or shoot rifle
KNOCKED
DOWN Cannot
OUT OF
ACTION
SERIOUS
WOUND
&
KNOCKED
DOWN
Throw 6 to
recover. no
movement or
turning
shoot with that
arm. Cannot
reload or shoot
rifle
shoot with that
arm. Cannot
reload or shoot
rifle
DEAD
SERIOUS
WOUND&
KNOCKED
OUT Throw 6
to recover. no
movement or
turning
The effects of the various injuries are as follows:
Flesh Wound or Grazed
Characters who are behind cover must duck back (see action description), even if the shot is
stopped by the cover.
Flesh Wound
Characters who are wounded must use an action recovering before making any other action. This
does not apply to grazed characters.
Knocked down
Lay the model down on its back. Characters must Get up after being knocked down, before
making any other action other than recovering.
Flesh Wounds & Serious Wounds to the Legs
Movement is reduced by one dice for each serious wound and each flesh wound on a leg.
Serious Leg or Belly Wounds
No movement or turning is permitted with a serious leg or belly wound.
Knocked Out
Lay the character face down to remind you that he is knocked out. Knocked out characters must
attempt to throw a 6 each time they have a turn. Until they succeed they may make no actions. In
the turn in which they succeed, the character regains consciousness and may make no action other
than to get up. However, if the character rolls a 1 they immediately go out of action.
Serious Wounds to the Arms
Characters with a serious arm wound cannot fire a pistol in that hand, fire a rifle at all, or reload
any weapon. This effectively means that the character can now only ever fire one pistol, and may
never reload it!
Out of Action
The character is so badly injured that they will play no further part in the game. Leave the model
on the table with a suitable marker to remind everyone that they are out of action.
Dead
The character is, as you may have guessed, dead. However, do not remove the model from the
game – instead lay him face down (make sure he is clearly face down, since characters lying on
their back are only knocked down, not dead).
DUCK BACKS
Duck backs are an important feature of these rules; you can use the duck back rule to pin and neutralise your opponents and
provide covering fire for your friends.
Only characters behind cover are subject to duck backs.
When a character behind cover is grazed or wounded, but his cover stops a shot for him, he is forced to immediately
duck back; getting his entire body behind cover. You should move the character by the shortest distance possible in
order to get him completely behind cover.
He must then use an action recovering before he can make any other action. He can use one action to recover from
any number of wounds and duck backs simultaneously.
While he is ducked back opposing characters can still fire at him. All the successful shots will hit the cover, but the
hidden target will still be subject to the duck back rule, and will have to spend his next turn recovering. This is a
good way of protecting your friends while they dash across open ground.
10
MOVE & FIRE
When a character chooses to move and fire, he is permitted to first make a move, exactly as described in the rules
for moving, except that only two movement dice are thrown. After moving, the character must fire at an enemy
model if at all possible, subject to the normal rules for firing.
REPOSITION
The character may do nothing except move up to 2” in any direction. After he has moved the character may be
placed facing in any direction you wish. When repositioning himself, the character may move over any obstacles
which are no taller than himself without penalty. Other obstacles are simply too big to scale easily, so cannot be
moved through! If you wish to get around such large objects you will have to make a move action to do so.
This action may sound fairly paltry and pointless, but for Plugs, who are otherwise uncontrollable and likely to race
off in unpredictable directions this is the easiest and safest way of moving them around the board.
AIM
A character may choose to aim at an opponent as his action for the turn. The character states who his target is, and
turns to face him.
If the aiming character is able to take another turn before the target makes a move or ducks back out of sight, he
makes an aimed shot and gains to modifiers listed on the modifier chart in the section describing the rules for
firing.
If the target does move or duck back, or the aiming character is forced to duck back before he has chance to take his
shot, he gains no advantage from his aim.
RELOAD
If this action is chosen, the character reloads one of his guns. It will normally only be necessary to do this after
suffering an out of ammo result. After choosing this action, the character is assumed to have completely reloaded
his weapon and may fire again as normal from his next turn onwards. Reloading, however, can be the character’s
only action for the turn.
11
RECOVER
As noted on the injury charts, characters who are wounded or duck back must use a turn recovering before they can
make any other action. Any number of wounds and duck backs can be recovered from simultaneously in one turn,
so a single action will allow the character to function as normal again from his next turn (assuming he is not shot
again or already has other injuries).
GET UP
Characters who are knocked down must get up before they can make any other action other than recovering. A
character must have recovered from any wound which required him to do so before he can get up. When a character
gets up, return the model to his feet. The character may make actions again as normal from next turn, subject to any
other injuries or effects he may be suffering from.
DUCK BACK
A character may voluntarily duck back, so that he can no longer see or be seen. The character will gain all the
benefits described for duck backs in the section on firing, but remember that he must still recover before he can
make any other actions. See duck backs as described in the section on firing for full details.
FIX GUN
The character attempts to unjam his weapon, clear the blockage or otherwise repair it. Ordinarily this will only
occur after a particularly unlucky bout of shooting. When a character choose to fix his gun, throw a dice
1-2
Broken. The gun is no longer any use whatsoever. The model may not use the weapon in question
for the remainder of the game.
3-4
Unskilled Repair. The model has no idea how to repair his weapon or clear the jam. Try again
another turn.
5-6
Jam cleared! The weapon can be operated as normal from now on.
A General Note on Direction!
Unless Moving or Moving & Firing, the character can end his turn facing any direction.
Once a character has completed his action, you may turn him to face any direction you
wish, assuming he has not already moved or moved & fired.
ENDING THE GAME
When one gang has half or more of their characters knocked down, knocked out or dead
at any one time the game immediately ends and their opponents claim victory!
You know enough now to stage your first streetfight! Take out eight miniature
gangmembers: one each Plug, Ganger, Killer and Street Legend for each side, give
them all appropriate names. Make up a Fate Deck, then set the two sides up about twelve inches apart.
Turn your first card, and let the battle commence!
There are many special, optional and additional rules, covering such things as various different kinds of
weapons, skills for characters, fighting hand to hand and so on. For the time being however, it is probably best to
play a couple of games using just the basic rules. Once you have the hang of them, go ahead and add in as many
optional rules as you want, or even make up your own.
12
OPTIONAL RULES
Over the following pages are a great number of different additional rules which you may or may not wish to use in
your games. None of these are essential to the game, and the game will play perfectly well, and be perfectly
enjoyable without them. Indeed there is absolutely no need to ever use any of the rules presented here, but as you
grow more comfortable with the rules it is likely that you might wish for additional challenges in your games, and
extra facets to the characters themselves. The rules presented here are designed to achieve just that, and you may
wish to try some, all or none of them from time to time to add a little variety.
Remember, these are your rules now and you can do what you like to them! In fact you might want to do away with
some of the existing rules. You could get rid of the rule that forces all movement to be in a straight line, get rid of
duck backs and/or knock downs or reduce the number of firing modifiers, for instance, anything that you find speeds
the game up can be useful if you are trying to entertain as many groups of players as possible at a convention.
Feel free to add or change to suit your own needs. If you settle down to regularly gaming near future or present day
skirmish games amongst a group of friends, you’ll probably get the most out of it if you develop the rules to suit
your own tastes. You’ll soon find out the depth of detail that you prefer. You can start by seeing if you think that any
of the optional rules we offer here will provide you with sufficient extra interest and excitement to justify the effort
and time they consume. Let us know where your own version of our rules ends up: we’re very interested to see what
you get up to, though we’re unlikely to add any extra complication to the mechanisms of the published rules in
future editions: our feeling is that once you’re ready for a high level of extra detail, you might as well add it
yourself to be sure that it fits your playing style.
13
USING CARDS TO DETERMINE HIT LOCATION & EFFECT
Instead of rolling two dice to determine the location and effect of a hit, you can make up a pack of 36 cards instead,
and have the victim pull out a card, or simply copy and cut out one or more sets of the shooting chits below and
draw one out of a box for each hit.
This is a quicker method, and less fuss than using the chart. It’s also more fun; there’s something about using cards
that makes everything seem more lively. It seems to be that when you’re rolling dice you’re just testing your luck,
but when you turn a card you’re dealing directly with fate.
SHOOTING CHITS
GRAZE
On Head
GRAZE
ON
HEAD
FLESH
WOUND
ON HEAD
FLESH
WOUND ON
HEAD.
KNOCKED
OUT
FATAL
HEAD
SHOT
FATAL
HEAD
SHOT
SERIOUS
WOUND ON
CHEST.
KNOCKED
OUT
SHOT
THROUGH
THE
HEART
throw 6 to recover
GRAZE
On Chest
FLESH
WOUND
ON CHEST
FLESH
WOUND
ON CHEST
FLESH
WOUND ON
CHEST.
KNOCKED
DOWN
throw 6 to recover
GRAZE
On Right
Arm
GRAZE
On Left Arm
FLESH
WOUND ON
RIGHT ARM
FLESH
WOUND ON
RIGHT ARM
FLESH
WOUND ON
RIGHT ARM
SERIOUS
WOUND ON
RIGHT ARM
Cannot shoot with
that arm. Cannot
reload or shoot
rifle
FLESH
WOUND ON
LEFT ARM
FLESH
WOUND ON
LEFT ARM
FLESH
WOUND ON
LEFT ARM
SERIOUS
WOUND ON
LEFT ARM
Cannot shoot with
that arm, reload or
use rifle
GRAZE
On Belly
FLESH
WOUND TO
BELLY
no movement or
turning
FLESH
WOUND TO
BELLY
KNOCKED
DOWN no
movement or
FLESH WOUND
TO BELLY
KNOCKED OUT
Throw 6 to recover.
no movement or
turning
SERIOUS
RIGHT ARM
WOUND.
KNOCKED
DOWN. Cannot
shoot with that arm,
reload or use rifle
SERIOUS
LEFT ARM
WOUND.
KNOCKED
DOWN. Cannot
shoot with that arm,
reload or use rifle
FATAL
GUTSHOT
FATAL
GUTSHOT
SERIOUS
LEG WOUND.
KNOCKED
DOWN
SERIOUS
LEG WOUND.
KNOCKED
OUT. Throw 6 to
no movement or
turning
recover, no
movement or
turning
turning
GRAZE
On Leg
FLESH
WOUND TO
LEG
Movement reduced
by one dice
FLESH
WOUND TO
LEG.
KNOCKED
DOWN
FLESH
WOUND TO
LEG.
KNOCKED
DOWN
Movement reduced
by one dice
Movement reduced
by one dice
A Note on Shooting
A good way to record damage to your character is to prepare a reocrd card for him, and when he takes a wound, simply attach
the Shooting Chit to the card with some Blue Tack or a “glue stick” or similar. We photocopy four or five sets of the Shooting
Chits and put them in an old cigar box, these are used to mark characters cards, then thrown away. As the level of chits in the
box gets low, we just photocopy a few more sets and top them up.
14
AUTOMATIC WEAPONS
Most weapons used in a streetfight will typically be semi or fully automatic. If fired in a controlled and deliberate
manner, these weapons operate exactly in the way described in the basic rules. However, automatic weapons also
allow the firing model to blaze away if they wish, letting off a much higher number of shots, but with a much more
unpredictable outcome. After a character has resolved the initial round of shooting as above, they may choose to
blaze away, and continue firing. Only characters armed with automatic weapons have this option.
If a character chooses to blaze away, simply draw a card from the rapid fire deck. This will show the outcome of
this extended burst of firing. Most cards have four categories on them, marked with the following icons:
Automatic Pistols
Machine Pistols
Automatic Rifles
Machine Guns
Look up the relevant cateogry on the card. The result will be either Miss, Jam, Multiple Hit, Sustained Fire, Out
of Ammo or Special. A few cards are not divided into categories in this way, and simply have one result printed on
them which applies to whoever draws it. Either, way, the result will be one of the following:
Miss – The character loses his aim and causes no additional hits. The character stops firing and play continues as
normal. The character may not draw any further rapid fire cards this turn.
Out of Ammo – The character stops firing as his weapon suddenly and unexpectedly runs out of ammo. The
weapon may not be used again until the character has made a reload action. If the character has another weapon
available he may fire with that as normal from next turn on, but cannot fire again this turn. The character may not
draw any further rapid fire cards this turn.
Jam – The character’s weapon suddenly locks up and stops firing. The weapon is jammed and may not be used
until the character makes a fix weapon action. If the character has another weapon available he may fire with it as
normal from next turn on, but cannot fire again this turn. The character may not draw any further rapid fire cards
this turn.
Multiple Hit – The character keeps his finger on the trigger and continues to riddle his target with bullets. The
target model suffers an additional D3 hits.
Sustained Fire – The character sprays bullets across a wide area, hitting not only their original target but also any
models standing nearby. Roll a D3 for every other model within 3” of the original target. If the score on the dice is
equal to or greater than the distance to the model from the original target, this new model too suffers one hit.
Special – Many of the more exotic and unusual forms of weaponry have their own special rules or effects. When a
‘special’ card is drawn, refer to the weapons own particular rules to see what the outcome is. In future we will
describe many unique weapons, each with their own special rules, but for now you should use the following
selection of rules to represent different types of weapon.
High Impact: When you draw a special card for a high impact weapon, the target is immediately slain
outright.
Sight: If a weapon is equipped with a scope, sight or similar aiming device, a special result allows you to
make a placed shot. You may choose which location on the body is hit (locations behind cover or out of
sight cannot be targetted) and roll for the damage done to that location.
Explosive: If a weapon is explosive, a special result indicates that not only has the shell found its mark, but
that it has exploded with devestating effect. The shot still hits a random location, but whichever one is hit
suffers maximum damage (i.e. a 6 result on the injury table).
Shrapnel/Blast: When a special card is drawn for these weapons, the target is caught particularly badly by
the loose shot and shrapnel. Roll for location as normal. The target also suffers a hit to the location above
and the location below the original on the chart (i.e. if they are hit on the left arm, a result of 4, they are
also hit on 3 and 5 – righ arm and belly in this case.
Other Weapons: All other weapons simply score a lucky hit on their target, and may adjust the location
up or down by 1 after rolling.
15
After you have drawn the first rapid fire card, you may choose to pick another. Indeed, you may continue to draw
rapid fire cards for as long as you wish, until you draw a result which ends your shooting (such as a miss, jam or out
of ammo result). Be warned, this can be risky. Each new card turned could yield even more hits on your target, or
your gun could run out of ammo or jam. You must choose whether or not to draw another rapid fire card before
resolving the effects of any hits caused, so you cannot tell whether or not the target has been badly injured before
you stop firing. Think carefully before drawing another rapid fire card!
6
16
EXPERIENCE
Games become far more interesting if each little lead warrior is allowed to take on a life and personality of his own. We can do
this with almost no effort at all by allowing them to improve in class between games, and with a little more effort we can allow
them to acquire skills which really individualise them.
A Different Class
As you will have seen
in the basic rules, there are four distinct classes of character, with Plugs being the worst, and street legends being the
best. It is possible for a character to move up a class, after gaining sufficient experience and knowledge from the
battles he has participated in. To represent this, when characters achienve certain feats, they are promoted to a new
class. Note, however, that characters do not receive promotion to the next class during a game, they have to wait for
their next streetfight. In order to progress up a class, characters must do the following:
•
A Plug becomes a Ganger providing he at least gets to fire a shot at, or fight with, an opponent, most Plugs
should manage this during their first gunfight!
•
A Ganger becomes Killer once he has killed an armed man.
•
Becoming a Street Legend is harder; a Killer character must kill or seriously wound three armed men in
one gunfight, or kill a Street Legend, to become a Street Legend himself.
Even if you are running a series of games for different groups of players(for instance at a convention), you can add extra
interest (not least for yourself) by allowing surviving characters to be promoted between games, even though they will then be
run by different players. You could start with two sides consisting entirely of Plugs, perhaps each led by a more dangerous
individual, and see how many of them make it to be Killer or become Street Legends over the day or weekend. It’s amazing how
much individual personality your miniature gangmembers can gain just by naming them and introducing a small element of
continuity. No arduous record keeping is involved; you can just stick the Skill Chits on the characters’ record cards. If each
player starts with a gang of three or four Plugs or Gangers, you can allow each to throw to see if they recruit any more gang
members between each gunfight: perhaps 1,2,3 - no new recruits. 4,5 - a Plug, 6 - a Ganger. If you are using event cards, they
could be used to generate more interesting new gang members during the actual encounters. Any characters seriously wounded
would miss the same number of gunfights as their number of serious wounds.
SKILLS.
The next stage is to allow characters to gain individual skills. This is a little more complicated, but all the record keeping can
still be done on the character cards. You can either dice for skills randomly, draw chits, or allocate them according to your
knowledge of the personality of the character based on his performance in previous games.
As with character classes, characters only gain additional skills by experience. This, again like character classes, is
represented by their achievement during the game. Usually skills are gained by wounding or killing opponents,
though the exact requirements differ between classes. Lower class characters (such as Plugs and gangers) almost
never gain skills, and should only be awarded them for particularly uncanny or superhuman efforts. If you are using
a gamesmaster, he can choose to award skills to these characters, but otherwise they will not receive them.
•
Killer characters gain a skill for each gunfight in which they kill an armed man (including the gunfight
when they first qualify as Killer).
•
Street Legends automatically gain a skill after every gunfight in which they cause a wound.
Legends rapidly become superhuman, until someone comes along and shoots them down to take over their
mantle. If you like, you can allow any character who kills a Street Legend to gain a skill.
“Double” skills: those skills marked with an asterisk in their description can be gained twice, the second time
doubles the effect (Very Strong, Very Terrifying etc). Some skills are mutually contradictory, possibly cancelling
each other out, some are complimentary, or combine in interesting ways. You are going to have to sort the precise
detail out for yourselves! It’s up to you whether you allow “treble” skills. If, for whatever reason, a character can’t
take (or the gamesmaster thinks it would be inappropriate for him to take) a particular skill, roll or draw again.
Shooting unarmed, unconscious and surrendered characters and all women does not count towards
experience or skills, and anyone who does so, or anyone who surrenders does not gain any experience or
skills for the whole gunfight. Evil characters are the exception to this.
These experience and skill rules assume that players will be having the occasional casual game, and will want to see their
characters progress reasonably quickly. If you are playing in a more committed and regular manner, you might like to slow the
process up so that all your characters aren’t super human before your campaigning has barely begun.
17
However, bear in mind that every gunfight your characters participate in carries a risk. We find that the fatality rate runs at
about one in six (though this depends on your style of play), of course, the more experienced characters have a better chance of
survival, especially if they’re played carefully. When you are thinking about the rate of experience and skill accumulation, you
need to consider how tough and skilful you want a typical character to be before he takes up residence on Boot Hill.
SKILLS & ATTRIBUTES
Agile:
no firing penalty when moving, may make one change of
direction during move*, ends move facing any direction. Adds one dice*
in a fight.
Ambidextrous may fire each gun at a different target. Fears no-one.
When this character gains further skills he may choose whichever
one he wants.
Ambidextrous: no penalty for firing two pistols.
Lucky: may re-roll one* of each batch of dice he throws.
Boss: all the characters on his side add one dice* when testing nerve,
except that those within six inches of his beloved person add three dice
(including the Great Man himself). If his own nerve fails, then all his
friends test with minus three dice.
Marksman:
may add or subtract one* when rolling for hit
location.
Nerves of steel: not subject to duck back, add one* dice to
testing nerve. Fears no-one
Brawler: adds four* dice when attempting to hit in a fight.
Runt: subtracts three* dice in a fight.
Charmed: once* per gunfight he may re-roll a whole batch of dice,
or make an opponent do the same.
Slow: subtract one* dice for movement. May not use an action card.
Clumsy: gun will jam if equal or less* number of 1’s is rolled. Falls
Stealthy: if motionless behind cover, cannot be seen at all beyond
12* inches, subtract one* firing dice if shot at behind cover.
over if two* 1’s are throw on movement dice.
Crack shot: add one* firing dice.
Dumbass: throw each turn:1,2 - do nothing. 3 - continue doing
whatever he did last turn. 4, 5, 6 - take normal turn.
Cursed: each opposing player may cause him to re-roll one dice
once* per gunfight (it’s a good plan to give each player a “curse” token
to pass over once the curse has been used, a coin will do).
Strong: adds three* dice in a fight.
Deadeye: hits on a 5 or 6 when firing a single shot (this does not
Swift: opponents subtract one* dice when firing at him if he moved
on his last turn, may choose to roll one* extra movement dice. Adds
one* dice in a fight.
apply when using automatic fire). Any shot where you choose not to
draw a rapid fire card, regardless of the number of dice rolled is
considered to be a single shot.
Terrifying: causes fear* in everyone, opponents subtract one* dice
when testing nerve.
Drunk (or High): throw each turn, on a 1 or two, throw again: 1
- becomes Wildman. 2 - Staggering drunk: each turn, stagger 1 dice
forwards, turn a random direction then fire at any enemy target that
presents himself . 3 - as 2 above, but must fire at a randomly selected
target (friend or foe) if one is available. 4 - Dead drunk: fall over and
pass out. 5 - Nauseous, subtract two dice from all throws. 6 - Sobers
up, needn’t throw again.
Tough: when hit by shooting or in a fight, subtract one* from the
effect dice, never knocked down or knocked out.
True Grit: adds three* dice when testing nerve. Fears no-one.
Evil:
Vengeful: hates anyone who shoots at him or attacks him.
Hard as nails: ignores the effect of the first* wound he receives
White knight: may not shoot knocked down targets or anyone
unable to shoot back, gains one* firing dice against all Evil characters
and hated opponents, he is also Charmed*, he never loses his nerve.
Fears no-one.
gains normal* experience from shooting KO’d and unarmed
victims, also friends and allies.
(still treat knocked down, knocked out or dead as normal though!).
Wuss: only has a 50%* chance of recovering, subtract two* dice
when testing nerve. Moves like a Plug.
Psycho: must move (towards an appropriate enemy) and fire every
turn if he can, moving the full two dice distance until he makes contact
Opponents he is moving towards suffer fear. He is also Tough*, an
Expert Fighter* and has True Grit*.
Knifeman: adds four* dice in a fight, and one* to the throw for
effect, but only if armed with a knife. A knifeman may throw his knife as
if making a deliberate pistol shot at point blank and close range only, but
with plus one dice to hit.
Yellow:
subtracts three* dice when testing nerve.
who grazes or wounds him.
Sidewalk Demon:
when his character card is drawn, his player
takes it into his hand as if it was an action card which can be used only
for this character. May fire at a group of characters within four* inches
of each other and distribute any hits between them as he chooses. If
18
Fears anyone
INTRODUCING EXPERIENCED CHARACTERS
From time to time, rather than just beginning with novice
characters and watching them grow, you might like to custom
design characters. This is particularly useful if playing
scenarios, where you might have the idea for a particular hero or
villain who you wish to represent. This is easy to do, and can be
great fun, but you always need to be careful not to make
characters over powerful, or give them every single skill going
just for the sake of it.
If the gamesmaster has a particular sort of personality in mind,
he can simply select the skills that he thinks are appropriate.
Alternatively, you can throw or draw randomly. All Killer
characters and Street Legends should really have at least one
skill, you could throw a dice to determine how many skills a
Street Legend has, and throw a dice and subtract three to see if a
Killer character has more than one (or roll a D3).
Especially if using a gamesmaster, players should make an effort to
award appropriate skills to any character whose model catches their
eye, irrespective of his experience. So, a model of a big, brawny
bouncer should entitle the character to be Very Strong and Tough, even
if he is only a Plug.
Also, if a character performs particularly well in a game, in terms of
properly fulfilling the role allotted to him, behaving in character, and
generally doing the manly thing, then he can be awarded an extra skill: ideally a skill chosen because it relates specifically to
some successful action performed during the game.
If you like, and your players can cope with it, you can allow each player using new characters to pick one of them to receive a
skill at the beginning of the gunfight. You could even allow all new characters a starting skill, or have each one dice to see if
they get one.
Now would be a good moment to cut out the skill chits, or roll some dice, and give skills to the Killer characters and Street
Legends that you were using to try out the shooting rules back on page 5. Then go ahead and run the gunfight again, and award
appropriate experience to the survivors.
It really is amazing how much more personality your characters have now isn’t it? Their progress in the gunfight, and their
range of skills really give them an individual identity; now you can probably think of an appropriate “handle” or nickname for
each of the survivors, and you’re all fired up to test their mettle in another confrontation!
As you will see, this is an enjoyable process, but the resulting characters are also quite complicated, and their players would
have a fair few things to remember during a streetfight. This works fine if players build their characters up gradually, and are
able to assimilate each skill as it is acquired, but you don’t want too many multi-skilled characters in a game unless your players
are experienced and enthusiastic.
So, don’t give inexperienced players characters with loads of skills to
worry about, at the most give them one character with a single skill until
they earn more for themselves.
You can have an interesting gunfight with the gamesmaster running a
number of particularly tough characters himself, this gives players a
chance to meet up with heavy duty Street Legends complete with
interesting selections of skills without having to worry too much about the
rules themselves. Of course, if you expect your players to take on highly
skilled Legends, you’d better provide them with an appropriately sized
force.
We record the acquisition of skills exactly as we do wounds, when a
character gains a skill, we attach the Skill Chit to his card with some Blue
Tack or a “glue stick” or similar. We photocopy four or five sets of the
Skill Chits and put them in an old cigar box, these are used to mark
characters cards, then thrown away. As the level of chits in the box gets
low, we just photocopy a few more sets and top them up.
19
SKILL CHITS
DRAW TWO
SKILLS
Ambidextrous: may
fire two weapons at once
without penalty
Drunk: 1-becomes
Wildman. 2-Staggering
drunk: 1 dice forwards,
turn randomly & fire.
3-as 2 above, but fires at
random target 4-Dead
drunk 5-Nauseous,
subtract 2 dice. 6-sober
DRAW THREE
SKILLS AND
PICK ONE
DRAW THREE
SKILLS AND
PICK ONE
RANDOMLY
SELECT AN
EXISTING SKILL
AND “DOUBLE” IT
PICK ANY
EXISTING
SKILL AND
“DOUBLE” IT
Charmed: once*
per gunfight he may reroll a whole batch of
dice, or make an
opponent do the same.
Crack shot: add
Cursed: each
opposing player may
cause him to re-roll one
dice once* per gunfight
Boss: all his side add
one dice* testing nerve,
those within six inches
of his person add three
dice (including himself).
If his own nerve fails,
then all his friends test
with minus three dice.
Lightning Fast:
adds three* dice in a fast
draw situation
Swift: opponents
subtract one* dice when
firing at him if he
moved on his last turn,
may choose to roll one*
extra movement dice.
Adds one* dice in a
fight.
Evil: gains normal*
Marksman: may
add or subtract one*
when rolling for hit
location.
experience from
backshooting, shooting
KO’d and unarmed
victims, also friends and
allies.
Plus Draw
Another Skill
Brawler: adds four* Slow:
not subject to duck
back, add one* dice to
testing nerve. Fears noone
Stealthy: if
motionless behind cover,
cannot be seen at all
beyond 12* inches,
subtract one* firing dice
if shot at behind cover
Yellow: subtracts
three* dice when testing
nerve. Fears anyone
who grazes or wounds
him
Plus draw another skill
Tough:-1dice when
hit,not KO’d or KD’d
Slow: -1 dice for move
and fast draw. no action
cards. Dumbass: 1, 2-do
nothing. 3-continue last
turn. 4,5,6- normal turn.
Tough: when hit by
True Grit: adds
Vengeful: hates
shooting or in a fight,
subtract one* from the
effect dice, never
knocked down or
knocked out.
three* dice when testing
nerve. Fears no-one.
anyone who shoots at
him or attacks him.
DRAW A DICE
WORTH OF SKILLS
& HAVE YOUR
OPPONENT PICK
ONE FOR YOU
one* firing dice.
Hard as nails:
ignores the effect of the
first* wound he receives
(still knocked down,
knocked out or dead
though!).
Sidewalk
Demon: character
card works as action
card. Fires at group
targets. If Ambidextrous
fires at two targets. Fears
no-one. Chooses his own
skills
Deadeye: hits on a 5
or 6 when firing single
shot.
Lucky: may re-roll
one* of each batch of
dice he throws.
Wuss: only has a
Nerves of steel:
subtract one*
dice for movement.
draw. May not use an
action card.
dice when attempting to
hit in a fight.
Agile: no firing
penalty when moving,
may make one change of
direction during move*,
ends move facing any
direction. Adds one
dice* in a fight
BRUISER!
50%* chance of
recovering subtract
two* dice when testing
nerve. Moves like a
Citizen.
Dumbass: throw
each turn:
1, 2 - do nothing.
3 - continue doing
whatever he did last turn.
4, 5, 6 - take normal turn.
Evil: gains normal*
experience from shooting
KO’d and unarmed
victims, also friends and
allies.
Plus Draw
Another Skill
Runt: subtracts
three* dice in a fight.
Strong: adds three*
dice in a fight.
Knife/Swordsman: adds
four* dice in fight, and
one* to effect if armed
with a knife/sword. May
throw knife as if making a
deliberate pistol shot at
point blank and close
range, with +1 dice to hit.
White knight: no
Psycho: must move
shooting knocked down
or defenseless targets,
gains one* firing dice
against Evil & hated
opponents, he is also
Charmed*,, never loses
his nerve. Fears no-one.
& fire every turn.
Opponents suffer fear.
Tough:-1dice when
hit,not KO’d or KD’d
Brawler:+4 dice
True Grit:+3 dice
nerve,fears no one
20
Terrifying: causes
fear* in everyone,
opponents subtract one*
dice when testing nerve.
Clumsy:
gun will
jam if equal or less*
number of 1’s is rolled.
Falls over it two* 1’s are
throw on movement dice.
Yellow: subtracts
three* dice when testing
nerve. Fears anyone
who grazes or wounds
him
FIGHTING
This section describes the rules on hand-to-hand fighting. You don’t need your characters to be able to thump each other to have
a good game; they manage perfectly well with their fire arms. However, it does add additional colour and interest if you can
cope with the additional complication.
If a character chooses to move into contact (or chooses to remain in contact) with an opponent, he makes an attack,
while the victim defends, providing he has not been knocked down or knocked out.
The attacker rolls the number of dice indicated on the fighting chart below, each 6 rolled is a potential hit.
The defender then also rolls the number of dice indicated on the fighting chart, each 6 rolled cancels one of the
attackers hits.
Roll for the effect of each of the attackers remaining hits. If the defender rolls more 6’s than the attacker, then the
attacker is knocked down and cannot make any other action or defend himself properly until he has spent a turn
recovering.
If the victim has been knocked down, he does not roll dice in defence, and each 6 that the attacker rolls scores a hit.
If he has been knocked out, the attacker automatically scores a hit with each dice he throws, alternatively the
attacker might just as well shoot his unfortunate victim at point blank range, which automatically kills. Neither
course of action is regarded as acceptable, and even the most hardened of gangers is unlikely to want to kill in cold
blood, and should not be permitted except to evil characters or perhaps where the victim is hated; both disqualify
the character from earning experience or skills.
Characters in contact with an opponent who wish to attempt to shoot him do not use the shooting rules: they roll on
the pistol or the rifle rows of the fighting chart, as appropriate.
THE FIGHTING CHART
DICE ROLLED
WEAPON
A
T
T
A
C
K
D
E
F
E
N
D
FIST
3 4
PISTOL
2 2
CLUBBED
PISTOL
3 3
RIFLE
2 2
CLUBBED
RIFLE
LONG
DAGGER
CLEAVER
or MACHETE
KNIFE
5 3
CLUB, AXE,
SPIKED CLUB
5 3
THROW FOR EFFECT
1
2
3
KNOCKED DOWN
FLESH
KNOCKED
WOUND
DOWN
HEAD
KNOCKED
WOUND
DOWN
KNOCKED DOWN
FLESH WOUND
4
5
FLESH
WOUND
6
KNOCKED OUT!
SHOT!
KNOCKED OUT!
FLESH
WOUND
HEAD WOUND
SHOT!
KNOCKED OUT!
5 5
KNOCKED
DOWN
FLESH WOUND
TERRIBLE WOUND!
4 3
KNOCKED
DOWN
FLESH WOUND
TERRIBLE WOUND!
4 4
KNOCKED
DOWN
KNOCKED
DOWN
KNIFED!
HEAD
WOUND
21
KNOCKED
OUT!
HEAD
WOUND
& KO’D!
DEAD!
Shields
If a character has a shield, he suffers no effect when his opponent rolls a 1.
Modifiers: in the same way as for shooting, add or subtract the following NUMBER OF DICE rolled by the
character:
Defender is behind cover
Attacker moves over 9 inches
Each flesh wound
Each serious wound
Wounded right arm
Backshooting
Defender on ground
-1
+2
-1
-2
-1
+2
+2
Plug
Killer
Street Legend
-1
+1
+2
Attacked from side
Attacked from rear
-2
-4
Gamesmasters may further modify the number of dice as they find appropriate.
Throw for the location of flesh wounds, and for the effect of head wounds, on the hit location chart.
You also throw for the location and effect of terrible wounds! on the hit location chart, but a:
• Graze or flesh wound becomes a serious wound.
• A serious wound either also causes the severing of a limb or the head, or runs through the body, killing
the victim.
Victims who are shot! or knifed! are treated exactly as if they had been shot in normal firing except that a character
who is out of ammo cannot shoot an opponent, and counts a shot! result as no effect.
Attackers and defenders must announce that they are clubbing their weapon before the attacker rolls his movement
dice, neither can fire on their next turn, irrespective of whether a fight takes place. This means you must guess if an
enemy character is likely to try and charge into contact with one of your characters, and then risk being unable to
use the weapon in question.
SHOOTING INTO COMBAT. Only Evil characters may fire into a fight. They stand at equal chance of hitting
any of the protagonists or close bystanders. Roll a dice to determine which character in the combat, or any model
within 2” is hit. They gain experience whoever they hit of course.
ESCAPING FROM COMBAT. Characters can leave
combat, turning to face any direction and moving up to three
dice (Citizens must move the full distance thrown) in two
circumstances:
• If his opponent is outnumbered.
• If he throws more 6’s than his opponent, and
chooses to escape rather than applying the result.
OUTNUMBERED CHARACTERS
Many players have asked about this. There are no special rules or
modifiers for characters outnumbered in combat. When a
character moves (or remains) in contact with one or more
opponents, he decides which one he attacks, they may each attack
him in return when their character card is turned.
The outnumbered character is at a considerable disadvantage; if
any of his opponents succeed in knocking him down or damaging
him in any way, then he is left at the mercy of the others. The rules
feel balanced to us as they stand; we feel that any additional
modifiers would be over the top - but feel free to introduce
whatever mechanic you find suits your own preferences!
22
NERVE
You will find that there is a tendency for games between stubborn opponents to only end when the last wounded survivor from
the losing side is hunted down and shot or beaten unconscious by his enemies, many of whom will be hobbling around with
wounds of their own by this point. Really, the streetfight should have ended long before; when it became apparent that one side
is so severely disadvantaged and could not fulfil its objectives. However, the little lead men only have as much intelligence as
either their players or the rule system provide them with, and if you find that your game drags on beyond the point of common
sense or lively entertainment, then you will find the following rule useful:
There are three circumstances when a character must throw to see if his courage fails him and he loses his nerve:
1. When he is BUSTED UP. This happens when:
• A Plug suffers any wound or graze.
• A Ganger suffers any two wounds.
• A Killer character suffers any three wounds.
• A Street Legend suffers any three wounds, at least one of which is serious.
He must throw again each time he suffers an additional wound.
2. When half of his friends go down; either killed, seriously wounded, knocked out, surrendered, lost their nerve
or left the table.
3. Whenever the gamesmaster thinks it appropriate.
Testing Nerve
To test nerve, the character immediately rolls a number of Nerve dice:
Plug
3
Ganger
4
Killer
5
Street Legend
6
Subtract one dice for each flesh wound, and two dice for each serious wound.
Add one dice if he and his friends have caused more of the enemy to go down than they have lost themselves.
He must throw at least one 6, otherwise he has lost his nerve, and starting on his next turn, must hide, run or
surrender, as appropriate.
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HATRED & FEAR
Characters can hate or fear each other in a number of circumstances:
The gamesmaster can create a scenario where relationships of hate and fear already exist, or rule that events during
a gunfight cause one character to hate or fear another.
Some skills cause hatred and fear.
Additionally, if you want emotions to run high in your streetfights, you can introduce the following extra rule:
Whenever a character is grazed or wounded by an opponent, throw a dice: a one means he now fears his tormentor,
a six means he now hates him.
When a character HATES an opponent:
• He adds one dice when fighting or shooting at him.
• He must fire at a hated enemy within his arc of fire if he can. If a hated character who is neutral, or on his
own side, comes within his arc of fire, he must throw a dice, on a 1 for 2 he must fire at him!
When a character FEARS an opponent:
• He subtracts one dice when fighting or shooting at him.
It is possible for situations to arise where a character both hates and fears the same opponent. In which case, he does
not resolve this turmoil of conflicting emotions until he has either fired at or is fired upon or comes within twelve
inches of his nemesis. Throw a dice to see if he hates or fears him for the rest of the gunfight – 1,2 or 3 he fears him,
4 or more he hates him. Under such unusual circumstances, this becomes extreme hatred or fear, and involves
adding or subtracting two dice when fighting or shooting.
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MORE ACTION CARDS
In the basic rules, the fate deck contains only four action cards, one each Plug, Ganger, Killer and Street Legend. In the basic
game we were keen to keep things straightforward and quick, but didn’t want the rules to be so simplistic as to be mindnumbingly dull, so we made sure to include rules that allowed (perhaps even forced) tactical planning. These are:
The movement rules that permit only straight line movement and turning only at the start of the turn.
The duck back rule.
The aiming rule.
And the action cards.
Of course, you can just ignore any of these rules if you want an even simpler game.
However, a number of people have commented on the fact that the number of action cards doesn’t increase with the number of
characters in use. Our rationale was that if there are only a small number of characters, then any group of players should be
able to cope with the action cards coming round frequently, but with big games with lots of casual players, you don’t want the
rhythm of play constantly interrupted, and also the scarcity of the action cards makes it much more exciting for the casual
participant to draw one.
With more sophisticated and experienced players, there’s no reason not to include as many sets of action cards as you like,
perhaps one set per ten characters as a starting point. Our
inclination would be to include full sets irrespective of the
number of characters of each type in the game. This would mean
that if there was only one Street Legend in a big game, he would
have the sole use of all the Legend action cards, this seems fair
enough: with no challenger of anything like his calibre, he
should be able to dominate the confrontation.
Its up to you whether you restrict the number of action cards that
can be played sequentially. You can limit it to one for a more
“realistic” game, or allow any number for a romanticised
Hollywood action movie sort of approach!
As in the normal rules, When more than one action card is
played in the same turn, then irrespective of the order in which
they were declared, the superior card goes first, but if there are
a number of each type of action card, you will have to mark each
card with a number to indicate their superiority over each other.
Having said all of the above, these rules were really intended for
games where each player controlled about four or five
characters at most, and in big participation games we had
imagined that only one character would be used per participant,
though obviously some of you are using many more successfully.
25
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