8-INCH WOOD LATHE
Model # 3420
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IMPORTANT:
Your new tool has been engineered and manufactured to WEN’s highest standards for dependability,
ease of operation, and operator safety. When properly cared for, this product will supply you years
of rugged, trouble-free performance. Pay close attention to the rules for safe operation, warnings,
and cautions. If you use your tool properly and for intended purpose, you will enjoy years of safe,
reliable service.
NEED HELP? CONTACT US!
Have product questions? Need technical support?
Please feel free to contact us at:
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techsupport@wenproducts.com
WENPRODUCTS.COM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Technical Data
General Safety Rules
Specific Safety Rules For Wood Lathes
Electrical Information
Know Your Wood Lathe
Assembly
Adjustments
Operation
Maintenance
Troubleshooting Guide
Exploded View & Parts List
Warranty
2
3
4
5
6
6
9
11
16
16
17
19
TECHNICAL DATA
Model Number:
Motor:
Swing:
Distance Between Centers:
Speeds:
Spindle Taper:
Drive Spindle Thread:
Tailstock Taper:
Tool Rest Length:
Dimensions:
Weight:
2
3420
120V, 60Hz, 2A
8 in.
12 in.
750 to 3200 RPM
MT1
1/8 in.
MT1
4-1/2 or 7 in.
26 x 10 x 12 in.
45 lbs.
GENERAL SAFETY RULES
Safety is a combination of common sense, staying alert and knowing how your item works. SAVE THESE SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS.
WARNING: To avoid mistakes and serious injury, do not plug in your tool until the following
steps have been read and understood.
1. READ and become familiar with this entire instruction manual. LEARN the tool’s applications, limitations, and
possible hazards.
2. AVOID DANGEROUS CONDITIONS. Do not use power tools in wet or damp areas or expose them to rain.
Keep work areas well lit.
3. DO NOT use power tools in the presence of flammable liquids or gases.
4. ALWAYS keep your work area clean, uncluttered, and well lit. DO NOT work on floor surfaces that are slippery
with sawdust or wax.
5. KEEP BYSTANDERS AT A SAFE DISTANCE from the work area, especially when the tool is operating.
NEVER allow children or pets near the tool.
6. DO NOT FORCE THE TOOL to do a job for which it was not designed.
7. DRESS FOR SAFETY. Do not wear loose clothing, gloves, neckties, or jewelry (rings, watches, etc.) when operating the tool. Inappropriate clothing and items can get caught in moving parts and draw you in. ALWAYS wear
non-slip footwear and tie back long hair.
8. WEAR A FACE MASK OR DUST MASK to fight the dust produced by operation.
WARNING: Dust generated from certain materials can be hazardous to your health. Always operate the tool in a well-ventilated area and provide for proper dust removal. Use dust collection systems whenever possible.
9. ALWAYS remove the power cord plug from the electrical outlet when making adjustments, changing parts,
cleaning, or working on the tool.
10. KEEP GUARDS IN PLACE AND IN WORKING ORDER.
11. AVOID ACCIDENTAL START-UPS. Make sure the power switch is in the OFF position before plugging in
the power cord.
12. REMOVE ADJUSTMENT TOOLS. Always make sure all adjustment tools are removed from the tool before
turning it on.
13. NEVER LEAVE A RUNNING TOOL UNATTENDED. Turn the power switch to OFF. Do not leave the
tool until it has come to a complete stop.
14. NEVER STAND ON A TOOL. Serious injury could result if the tool tips or is accidentally hit. DO NOT store
anything above or near the tool.
3
GENERAL SAFETY RULES
15. DO NOT OVERREACH. Keep proper footing and balance at all times. Wear oil-resistant rubber-soled footwear. Keep the floor clear of oil, scrap, and other debris.
16. MAINTAIN TOOLS PROPERLY. ALWAYS keep tools clean and in good working order. Follow instructions for lubricating and changing accessories.
17. CHECK FOR DAMAGED PARTS. Check for alignment of moving parts, jamming, breakage, improper
mounting, or any other conditions that may affect the tool’s operation. Any part that is damaged should be properly
repaired or replaced before use.
18. MAKE THE WORKSHOP CHILDPROOF. Use padlocks and master switches and ALWAYS remove starter keys.
19. DO NOT operate the tool if you are under the influence of drugs, alcohol, or medication that may affect your
ability to properly use the tool.
20. USE SAFETY GOGGLES AT ALL TIMES that comply with ANSI Z87.1. Normal safety glasses only have
impact resistant lenses and are not designed for safety. Wear a face or dust mask when working in a dusty environment. Use ear protection such as plugs or muffs during extended periods of operation.
SPECIFIC RULES FOR WOOD LATHES
1. This lathe is designed and intended for use by properly trained and experienced personnel only. If you are not
familiar with the proper and safe operation of a lathe, do not use it until proper training and knowledge have been
acquired.
2. Always wear eye protection and a face shield/dust mask when using the lathe.
3. Make sure all tools, chisels and accessories are sharp enough for the task at hand before using them. Always use
the right tool at the correct speed and feed rate.
4. Turn off and unplug the machine before doing any cleaning or maintenance. Use a brush or compressed air to
remove chips or debris. Never use your hands to remove excess material and debris.
5. Check the workpiece carefully for splits, knots, nails, or other obstructions. These types of blemishes may cause
a safety risk during turning.
6. Adjust the tool rest to the proper height and position for the task at hand. Rotate the workpiece by hand to check
clearance with the tool rest before turning the machine on.
7. Select the appropriate speed for the task at hand. Start at a low speed and allow the lathe to ramp up to the operating speed before engaging any chisels, tools or other carving accessories.
8. Never apply coolants or water to a spinning workpiece. Never stop a rotating workpiece with your hand.
10. If gluing up a workpiece, always use a high quality glue that meets the needs of the particular workpiece.
11. Rough cut the workpiece to the finished shape before attaching a workpiece to the faceplate. When turning
between centers, make sure the headstock and tailstock are tight and snug against the workpiece.
4
ELECTRICAL INFORMATION
GROUNDING INSTRUCTIONS
IN THE EVENT OF A MALFUNCTION OR BREAKDOWN, grounding provides the path of least resistance
for an electric current and reduces the risk of electric shock. This tool is equipped with an electric cord that has an
equipment grounding conductor and a grounding plug. The plug MUST be plugged into a matching outlet that is
properly installed and grounded in accordance with ALL local codes and ordinances.
DO NOT MODIFY THE PLUG PROVIDED. If it will not fit the outlet, have the proper outlet installed by a
licensed electrician.
IMPROPER CONNECTION of the equipment grounding conductor can result in electric shock. The conductor with the green insulation (with or without yellow stripes) is the equipment grounding conductor. If repair or
replacement of the electric cord or plug is necessary, DO NOT connect the equipment grounding conductor to a
live terminal.
CHECK with a licensed electrician or service personnel if you do not completely understand the grounding instructions or whether the tool is properly
grounded.
USE ONLY THREE-WIRE EXTENSION CORDS that have three-pronged
plugs and outlets that accept the tool’s plug as shown. Repair or replace a damaged or worn cord immediately.
CAUTION: In all cases, make certain the outlet in question is properly grounded. If you are not sure, have a licensed electrician check the outlet.
WARNING: This tool is for indoor use only. Do not expose to rain or use in damp locations. This tool
must be grounded while in use to protect the operator from electric shock.
GUIDELINES FOR EXTENSION CORDS
Make sure your extension cord is in good condition. When using an extension cord, be sure to use one heavy
enough to carry the current your product will draw. An undersized cord will cause a drop in line voltage resulting
in loss of power and overheating. The table below shows the correct size to be used according to cord length and
nameplate ampere rating. When in doubt, use a heavier cord. The smaller the gauge number, the heavier the cord.
AMPERAGE
2A
REQUIRED GAUGE FOR EXTENSION CORDS
25 ft.
50 ft.
100 ft.
150 ft.
18 gauge
16 gauge
16 gauge
14 gauge
Make sure your extension cord is properly wired and in good condition. Always replace a damaged extension cord
or have it repaired by a qualified person before using it. Protect your extension cords from sharp objects, excessive
heat and damp/wet areas.
Use a separate electrical circuit for your tools. This circuit must not be less than a #12 wire and should be protected
with a 15 A time-delayed fuse. Before connecting the motor to the power line, make sure the switch is in the OFF
position and the electric current is rated the same as the current stamped on the motor nameplate. Running at a
lower voltage will damage the motor.
5
KNOW YOUR WOOD LATHE
H
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
I
J
F
Power Switch
Variable Speed Knob
Circuit Breaker
D
Headstock
Tool Rest Locking Handle
Spindle Lock
Motor
A
Face Plate
Tool Rest
B
Live Center
Tailstock Handwheel
C
Tailstock
K
L
E
G
ASSEMBLY
UNPACKING
Carefully unpack the lathe and all its parts. Compare against the list below. Do not discard the carton or any
packaging until the lathe is completely assembled.
WARNING: If any part is missing or damaged, do not plug in the tool until the missing or damaged
part is replaced.
Lathe
Hex Wrench
Flat Wrench
Short Tool Rest
Headstock Spur Center
Long Tool Rest
Tailstock Cup Center
Hardware Bag
Faceplate
Hex Wrenches (2)
Knockout Rod
Benchtop Mounting
Guide
6
Fig. A
ASSEMBLY
MOUNTING THE LATHE ON THE BENCHTOP
Measure and mark three hole centers as shown in Figure A. Drill
clearance holes through the bench top and position the lathe in place.
Attach it securely with bolts (minimum of one inch) and washers (not
included) from the underside of the bench top into the tapped holes
in the bottom of the lathe’s frame.
SPRING LOADED LOCK LEVERS
Check to make sure that the lock levers for the tailstock spindle and
the tool rest have not come loose. If they have, reassemble them with
the shoulder screw (Fig. B - 1) passing through the spring (Fig. B - 2)
and the handle (Fig. B - 3).
Fig. B
These spring-loaded handles are designed to minimize interference
with other parts of the lathe. To operate, push the handle lever in and
turn the lever clockwise to tighten the handle. Pull the handle outwards to disengage the threaded shaft, allowing for users to reposition
the lever handle as needed.
INSTALLING AND REMOVING THE FACE PLATE
1. Thread the faceplate (Fig. C - 1) onto the end of the headstock
spindle and hand tighten.
2. Place the wrench (Fig. C - 2) over the flats on the faceplate.
Note: Since the headstock spindle is belt driven, it will turn freely if
not held stationary while the faceplate is being tightened or loosened.
Fig. C
3. Insert the tip of the knockout rod (Fig. C - 3) into one of the slots in the side of the headstock spindle.
4. Grip the knockout rod firmly while turning the wrench to either tighten or loosen the faceplate.
5. Remove the knockout rod and wrench. If the faceplate is being removed, continue turning it until it comes off
the spindle thread.
7
ASSEMBLY
INSTALLING THE DRIVE SPUR AND REVOLVING
CENTER (FIG. F & G)
Note: It is not necessary to remove the face plate in order to
install the spur center.
1. Make sure the surfaces of both the spur center and the
spindle are clean.
2. Drive the spur center (Fig. F - 1) into the workpiece (Fig. F 2) using a rubber mallet or a piece of scrap wood.
3. Push the spur center into headstock spindle.
Fig. F
4. Repeat the same steps for the tailstock center (Fig. G - 2).
REMOVING THE SPUR CENTER
1. Hold spur center to prevent it from falling. Use a rag to protect your hand from the sharp edges.
2. Insert the knockout rod (Fig. H - 1) into the far end of the
headstock spindle or the tailstock spindle until it comes into
contact with the shaft of the spur or center.
3. Tap the end of the knockout rod until the spur or center
comes loose.
Fig. G
Fig. H
8
ADJUSTMENTS
ON/OFF SWITCH
The ON/OFF switch (Fig. I - 1) controls the power to the unit. To start the lathe, move the switch into the ON
position (flipped up). The lathe will immediately begin turning the headstock spindle.
NOTE: This lathe features a gradual start up, meaning that the chuck will begin spinning at a slower speed before
gradually ramping up to its full RPM . This doubles as both a safety feature and as protection to the machine’s
motor, helping to maximize the lifespan of both the lathe and the operator.
Move the switch to the OFF position to stop the lathe (flipped down). The safety switch key (Fig. I - 2) can be
removed once the unit has been turned off. This will prevent the lathe from starting up until the safety switch key
has been replaced.
WARNING: Always set the speed control knob to the lowest speed setting before starting the lathe. Never start a
workpiece at maximum speed.
SPEED CONTROL KNOB
The speed control knob (Fig. I - 3) sets the speed of the lathe to suit the weight of the workpiece or the type of
tool being used. After the lathe is started, turn the knob clockwise to increase the spindle speed. Always make sure
the variable speed is set to its lowest setting before powering on the machine.
1. Turn the knob counterclockwise to decrease spindle speed (down to the minimum of 750 RPM).
2. Turn the knob clockwise to increase the spindle speed (up to the maximum of 3200 RPM).
CIRCUIT BREAKER RESET BUTTON
This tool has a circuit breaker reset button (Fig.
I - 4) that will restart the motor after it shuts off
due to overloading/low voltage. If the motor stops
during operation:
1. Turn the ON/OFF (Fig. I - 1) switch to the
OFF position.
2. Wait about five minutes for the motor to cool
off.
3. Push the circuit reset button (Fig. I - 4)
4. Turn the variable speed knob (Fig. I - 3) to the
lowest speed. Then, turn the ON/OFF switch
back ON.
Fig. I
9
ADJUSTMENTS
TAILSTOCK
WARNING: Always make sure the spindle lock (Fig. J - 2) is
disengaged before operation. To disengage the spindle lock,
unscrew it until the tailstock spindle can spin freely. To engage
it, screw it back in until the tailstock spindle no longer moves.
1. Move the tailstock (Fig. J - 5) by loosening the lock lever (Fig.
J - 1) and pushing the tailstock to the desired position on the
bed. Lock it back in place by tightening the lock lever again.
2. The spindle extends up to 2-1/2 inches from the tailstock
housing. Move the tailstock spindle (Fig. J -4) by loosening the
spindle lock lever (Fig. J - 2) and turning the hand wheel (Fig. J
- 3). Turn the hand wheel clockwise to extend the spindle. Turn
the hand wheel counterclockwise to retract the spindle.
Fig. J
3. Lock the levers (Fig. J - 1 & 2) before operating the lathe.
4. The tailstock spindle is hollow and can be accessed from the
hand wheel end. Use the knockout rod to remove the center
cup or to drill holes through the center of a workpiece on a flat
plate.
TOOL REST
1. Loosen the lock lever (Fig. K - 4) to move the tool rest (Fig. K
- 1) to the right or left, the back or front. Tighten the lever (Fig.
K - 4) when the tool rest base is at the desired position on the
lathe bed.
2. To adjust the tool rest, loosen the lock lever (Fig. K - 3) to
move the tool rest (Fig. K - 2) to the desired position, then
tighten the lock lever.
Fig. K
3. To change the tool rest, loosen the lock lever (Fig. K - 3) and pull the tool rest (Fig. K - 2) out of the tool rest
base, then insert the tool rest, adjust the rest to the desired position and tighten the lock lever (Fig. K - 3)
NOTE: Make sure the tool rest is adjusted to be as close to the workpiece as possible. Rotate the workpiece by
hand to check the clearance before turning on the lathe.
10
OPERATION
TURNING TOOLS
If possible, select only quality high-speed steel turning tools. High-speed steel tools hold an edge and last longer
than ordinary carbon steel. As one becomes proficient in turning, a variety of specialty tools for specific applications can be acquired. The following tools provide the basics for most woodturning projects.
1. Large roughing gouge - use this tool to shape square
or out-of-round spindle-turning stock into a cylinder.
This can also be used for creating shallow coves.
2. Skew chisel - the skew evens out high and low
spots to shape the cylinders. Vary the angle at which
the tip meets the workpiece to change the aggressiveness of the cut. This can also be used for cutting
beads and V-grooves.
3. Spindle gouge - the spindle gouge cuts coves, beads
and free-form contours. It can also be used for producing shallow hollows on faceplate turnings.
4. Parting tool - use the parting tool to form grooves
and tenons and to remove stock. It can also be used
for rolling small beads.
5. Bowl gouge - the bowl gouge cuts external and
internal profiles on faceplate-mounted stock, such
as bowls and platters. It can also be used for creating
ultra smooth cuts on bowls and spindles by using it
as a shearing scraper.
6. Round nose scraper - use this scraper for nonaggressive shaping of spindles and bowls and to
smooth out surfaces without removing too much
stock.
11
OPERATION
SPINDLE TURNING
Spindle turning takes place between the centers of the lathe. It requires a spur center in the headstock and a live
center in the tailstock. A cup center rather than a cone center in the tailstock will often reduce the risk of splitting
the stock.
Stock for spindles should be straight grained and free of cracks, knots, nails and other defects. With a combination square, locate and mark the center on each end of the workpiece. Accuracy is not critical on full rounds but
is extremely important on stock where square sections are to remain. Put a dimple in the stock with an awl or nail
(or use a spring-loaded automatic center punch).
Extremely hard woods may require kerfs cut into the ends of the stock using a band saw, so the wood will accept
the spur center and the live center (Fig. Q).
Drive the spur center about .1 inches (3 mm) into the workpiece. Use a wood mallet or dead blow hammer. Be
careful that you do not split the workpiece. Never use a steel face hammer and never drive the workpiece onto the
spur center while it is mounted on the spindle of the lathe (Fig. R).
Clean the tapered end of the spur center and the inside of the headstock spindle. Insert the tapered end of the
spur center (with the attached workpiece) into the headstock spindle. Support the workpiece while bringing the
tailstock into position. Lock the tailstock to the bed.
Advance the tailstock quill with the hand wheel in order to seat the live center into the workpiece. Use enough
pressure to secure the workpiece between the centers so that it won’t fly off, but do not use excessive pressure. Excessive pressure runs the risk of overheating the center bearings and damaging both the workpiece and the lathe.
Tighten the quill locking handle. Move the tool rest into position. It should be parallel to the workpiece, just
below the centerline and approximately .1 to .2 inches (3 mm to 6 mm) from the corners of the workpiece to be
turned. Tighten the tool rest base to the bed of the lathe (Fig. S).
Before turning on the lathe, rotate the workpiece by hand to check for proper clearance. If clearance is okay and
the workpiece is properly centered, start the lathe at the lowest speed. Slowly bring it up to the appropriate speed
given the size of the workpiece.
Fig. Q
12
Fig. R
Fig. S
OPERATION
CUTTING TECHNIQUES
Begin with a large roughing gouge. Place the tool on the tool rest with the heel of the tool on the surface to be cut.
Slowly and gently raise the tool handle until the cutting edge comes into contact with the workpiece. Beginning
about 2 inches from the tailstock end of the workpiece, roll the flute of the tool (the hollowed-out portion) in the
direction of the cut. Make long sweeping cuts in a continuous motion to turn the piece to a cylinder (Fig. T).
Keep as much of the bevel of the tool in contact with the workpiece as possible to ensure control and avoid
catches. NOTE: Always cut downhill, or from the large diameter to the small diameter. Always work towards the
end of the workpiece; never start at the cutting end.
Once the workpiece is roughed down to a cylinder, smooth it with a large skew. Keep the skew handle perpendicular to the spindle and use only the center third of the cutting edge for a long smoothing cut (touching one of
the points of the skew to the spinning workpiece may cause a catch and ruin the workpiece). Add details to the
workpiece with skews, parting tools, scrapers or spindle gouges.
BEADS - Make a parting cut for what is to be a bead to the desired depth. Place the parting tool on the tool rest
and move the tool forward to make the full bevel of the tool come into contact with the workpiece. Gently raise
the handle to make cuts of the appropriate depth. Repeat for the other side of the bead. Using a small skew or
spindle gouge, start in the center between the two cuts and cut down each side to form the bead. Roll the tool in
the direction of the cut.
COVES (Fig. U) - Use a spindle gouge to create a cove. With the flute of the tool at 90 degrees to the workpiece,
touch the point of the tool to the workpiece and roll in towards the bottom of the cove. Stop at the bottom, as attempting to go up the opposite side may cause the tool to catch. Move the tool over the desired width of the cove.
With the flute facing the opposite direction, repeat the step for the other side of the cove. Stop at the bottom of
the cut.
V-GROOVES (Fig. V) - Use the point of the skew to create a V-groove in the workpiece. Lightly mark the center
of the V with the top of the skew. Move the point of the skew to the right half of the desired width of your cut.
With the bevel parallel to the right side of the cut, raise the handle and push the tool in to the desired depth. Repeat from the left side. The two cuts should meet at the bottom and leave a clean V-groove. Additional cuts may
be taken to add to either the depth or the width of the cut.
PARTING OFF - Adjust the lathe to a slower speed for parting through a workpiece. Place a parting tool on the
tool rest and raise the handle until is starts to cut. Continue cutting towards the center of the workpiece. Loosely
hold on to the piece in one hand as it separates from the waste wood.
SANDING - Leaving clean cuts will reduce the amount of sanding required. Move the tool rest out of the way,
adjusting the lathe to a low speed. Being with find sandpaper (120 grit or finer), as coarser sandpaper will leave
deep scratches and dull the features of the workpiece. Progress through each grit without skipping grits (as in,
don’t jump from 120 grit to 220 grit). Fold the sandpaper into a pad; do not wrap sandpaper around your fingers
or the workpiece.
FINISHING - To apply a finish, the workpiece can be left on the lathe. Turn off the lathe and use a brush or paper towel to apply the finish. Remove excess finish before restarting the lathe. Only start it at a very low speed with
awareness that fresh coats have a tendency to splash and fling if not given adequate drying time. Allow it to dry and
sand again with 320 to 400 grit sandpaper. Apply a second coat of finish and buff.
13
OPERATION
Fig. T
Fig. V
Fig. U
Fig. W
MOUNTING ON THE FACE PLATE
Use of the face plate is the most common for holding a block of wood for turning bowls and plates. This is an
alternative option for workpieces with diameters that are greater than the 12-inch throat of the lathe.
To mount the stock to the face plate, select a stock that is at least .2 inches (5 mm) larger than each dimension of
the finished workpiece. Always select the largest diameter face plate that can be used for the workpiece at hand.
True one of the surfaces of the workpiece for mounting against the faceplate. Using the face plate as a template,
mark the location of the mounting holes on the workpiece and drill pilot holes of the appropriate size.
If the mounting screws on the face plate interfere with the workpiece, a glue or waste block can be used (Fig. W).
Make sure the block is of the same diameter as the face plate. Both the waste block and the workpiece should
have flat surfaces for gluing. Glue the block to the workpiece. Avoid using brown paper or newspaper between
the waste block and workpiece. It may work fine if you are using scrapers, but a slight catch with a bowl gouge can
separate the two.
While face plates are the simplest, most reliable method of holding a larger block of wood for turning, chucks can
also be used. A chuck is not a requirement, but is handy when working on more than one piece at a time. Rather
than removing screws, you simply open the chuck and change workpieces. The most popular ones are four jaw
scroll chucks (dovetails) with a variety of jaws to accommodate different size tenons. Most also come with a screw
chuck as well.
14
OPERATION
TO SHAPE THE OUTSIDE OF THE BOWL (FIG. X)
Odd shaped burls, crotches and other irregular shaped blanks require special preparation before mounting in a
chuck or onto a face plate. Remove the bark, if there is any from what appears to be the center of the top of the
workpiece. Drive the spur center into the top of the workpiece with a mallet or a dead blow hammer. Slip the
spur center into the headstock taper and bring the tailstock with a live center into position. Lock the tailstock to
the bed and advance the quill in order to seat the cut center into the workpiece. Tighten the quill locking handle.
Turn the workpiece by hand to ensure proper clearance. Start the lathe at the lowest speed and bring it up to the
proper speed for the size of the work being turned. If the machine starts to vibrate, lower the speed until the vibration stops. Rough out the outside of the bowl with the bowl gouge, holding the handle of the tool firmly against
your hip.
As the bowl takes shape, work on the bottom (tailstock end) to accommodate attaching a face plate. Turn a short
tenon to the size of the hole in the face plate. This will allow centering the workpiece when the face plate is attached. NOTE: If you plan to use a chuck, turn a tenon of the appropriate length and diameter to fit your chuck.
Stop the lathe and remove the workpiece. Attach the face plate or chuck. Finish turning the outside of the bowl
with a bowl gouge. Leave additional material at the base of the bowl for support while turning the interior. This
will be removed later.
TO SHAPE THE INSIDE OF THE BOWL (FIG. Y)
Stop the lathe and move the tailstock away. Adjust the tool rest in front of the bowl just below the centerline at a
right angle to the lathe’s turning axis. Rotate the workpiece by hand to check for clearance.
Start by lightly shearing across the top of the workpiece from rim to center. Place a bowl gouge on the tool rest at
the center of the workpiece with the flute facing the top of the bowl. The tool handle should be level and pointed
toward the four o’clock position.
Use the left hand to control the cutting edge of the gouge,
while the right hand swings the tool handle around towards
your body. The flute should start out facing the top of the
workpiece, rotating it upwards as it moves deeper into the
bowl to maintain a clean and even curve. As the tool goes
deeper into the bowl, progressively work outwards towards
the rim of the bowl. It may be necessary to turn the tool rest
into the piece as you get deeper into the bowl. NOTE: Try to
make one light continuous movement from the rim to the bottom of the bowl to ensure a clean, sweeping curve through the
piece. Should there be a few small ridges left, a light cut with a
large domed scraper can even out the surface.
Develop the preferred wall thickness at the rim and maintain
it as you work deeper into the bowl (once the piece is thin
toward the bottom, you cannot make it thinner at the rim).
When the interior is finished, move the tool rest back to the
exterior to re-define the bottom of the bowl. Work the tight
area around the face plate or the chuck with a bowl gouge.
Begin the separation with a parting tool, but do not cut all the
way through.
Fig. X
Fig. Y
15
MAINTENANCE
Keep your machine clean. At the end of each day, clean the machine. Wood contains moisture, meaning that
sawdust and wood chips can cause rust if not removed. Regular oil attracts dust and dirt. Teflon lubricant tends to
dry and has less of a tendency to accumulate dirt and saw dust. Periodically check that all nuts and bolts are tight.
The drive belt should last for many years depending on usage, but it needs to be inspected regularly for cracks,
cuts and general wear. If damage is found, replace the belt before operation.
All bearings are sealed for life and do not require any maintenance. If a bearing becomes faulty, replace it.
The lathe is made from steel and cast iron. All non-painted surfaces will rust if not protected. It is recommended
that they are protected by applying wax.
Blow out dust accumulation inside the motor, the housing, and the bed assembly frequently. If the tailstock has
been used as a guide for drilling through the center of a workpiece, also blow sawdust or shavings out of the center
of both spindles.
A coat of machine lubricant applied to the bed will help keep the surface clean and the movement of the tool rest
and tailstock smooth.
Periodic lubrication of the spring levers and other threaded parts will make these parts easier to operate.
TROUBLESHOOTING
PROBLEM
CAUSE
Excessive cut
Worn, damaged, or improperly adjusted
Motor or spindle stalls and
belt
will not start
Worn spindle bearing
Motor is protected from overload
Workpiece is warped, out of round, has
major flaw, or was improperly prepared
for turning
Excessive vibration.
Worn spindle bearing
Worn drive belt
Lathe is on an uneven surface
Dull tools
Tool rest set too low
Tools tend to grab or dig
in.
Tool rest set too far from work piece
Improper tool being used
Cam lock nut needs adjusting
Tailstock moves when applying pressure
16
Lathe bed and tailstock mating surfaces
are greasy or oily
SOLUTION
Reduce the depth of the cut
Adjust or replace the belt.
Replace the bearing.
Reset the circuit.
Correct the problem by planing or sawing workpiece, or discard it entirely and
restart.
Replace the spindle bearings
Replace the drive belt
Place the lathe on a flat surface.
Keep tools sharp
Reposition the tool rest height.
Reposition the tool rest closer to the
workpiece
Use correct tool for operation
Tighten cam lock nut.
Remove the tailstock and clean the surfaces with a cleaner. Apply a light coat of
oil to the lathe bed surface.
EXPLODED VIEW & PARTS LIST
No. Part Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
3420-001
3420-002
3420-003
3420-004
3420-005
3420-006
3420-007
3420-008
3420-009
3420-010
3420-011
3420-012
3420-013
3420-014
3420-015
3420-016
3420-017
3420-018
3420-019
3420-020
3420-021
3420-022
3420-023
3420-024
3420-025
3420-026
3420-027
3420-028
3420-029
3420-030
3420-031
3420-032
3420-033
3420-034
Description
Bed
Retaining Plate
Bolt
Set Screw
Hand Wheel
Tailstock
Tailstock Spindle Lock
Bolt
Sleeve
Eccentric Connector
Tailstock Sleeve
Washer
Switch
Center Assembly
Spur Center
Tailstock Handle
Faceplate
Headstock Spindle
Ball Bearing
Retaining Ring
Retaining Ring
Ball Bearing
Headstock
Speed Dial
Speed Dial Label
Headstock Spindle Nut
Headstock Cover
Bolt
Label
Bolt
Headstock Pulley
Belt
Screw
Motor Pulley
Qty
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
No. Part Number
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50A
50B
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
3420-035
3420-036
3420-037
3420-038
3420-039
3420-040
3420-041
3420-042
3420-043
3420-044
3420-045
3420-046
3420-047
3420-048
3420-049
3420-050A
3420-050B
3420-051
3420-052
3420-053
3420-054
3420-055
3420-056
3420-057
3420-058
3420-059
3420-060
3420-061
3420-062
3420-063
3420-064
3420-065
3420-066
3420-067
Description
Power Cord
Switch Box Assembly
Bolt
Bolt
Bolt
Motor Mount
Motor
Label
Retaining Ring
Tool Rest Base
Bolt
Plate
Nut
Sleeve
Eccentric Rod
7" Tool Rest
4.5" Tool Rest
Bolt
Plate
Tool Rest Lock
Tool Rest Base Lock
Fuse
Carbon Brush
Screw
Lock Sleeve
Hex Sleeve
Spring Pin
Cable Clamp
Wire Gasket
Washer
Screw
Wrench
Knock Out Rod
Knock Out Cap
Qty
1
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
17
18
$
%
EXPLODED VIEW & PARTS LIST
LIMITED TWO YEAR WARRANTY
WEN Products is committed to build tools that are dependable for years. Our warranties are consistent with this
commitment and our dedication to quality.
LIMITED WARRANTY OF WEN CONSUMER POWER TOOLS PRODUCTS FOR HOME USE
GREAT LAKES TECHNOLOGIES, LLC (“Seller”) warrants to the original purchaser only, that all WEN consumer power tools will be free from defects in material or workmanship for a period of two (2) years from date of
purchase. Ninety days for all WEN products, if the tool is used for professional use.
SELLER’S SOLE OBLIGATION AND YOUR EXCLUSIVE REMEDY under this Limited Warranty and, to
the extent permitted by law, any warranty or condition implied by law, shall be the repair or replacement of parts,
without charge, which are defective in material or workmanship and which have not been misused, carelessly
handled, or misrepaired by persons other than Seller or Authorized Service Center. To make a claim under this
Limited Warranty, you must make sure to keep a copy of your proof of purchase that clearly defines the Date of
Purchase (month and year) and the Place of Purchase. Place of purchase must be a direct vendor of Great Lakes
Technologies, LLC. Third party vendors such as garage sales, pawn shops, resale shops, or any other secondhand
merchant void the warranty included with this product. Contact techsupport@wenproducts.com or 1-800-2321195 to make arrangements for repairs and transportation.
When returning a product for warranty service, the shipping charges must be prepaid by the purchaser. The product must be shipped in its original container (or an equivalent), properly packed to withstand the hazards of shipment. The product must be fully insured with a copy of the warranty card and/or the proof of purchase enclosed.
There must also be a description of the problem in order to help our repairs department diagnose and fix the
issue. Repairs will be made and the product will be returned and shipped back to the purchaser at no charge.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT APPLY TO ACCESSORY ITEMS THAT WEAR OUT FROM
REGULAR USAGE OVER TIME INCLUDING BELTS, BRUSHES, BLADES, ETC.
ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES SHALL BE LIMITED IN DURATION TO ONE (1) YEAR FROM DATE
OF PURCHASE. SOME STATES IN THE U.S., SOME CANADIAN PROVINCES DO NOT ALLOW
LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION
MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.
IN NO EVENT SHALL SELLER BE LIABLE FOR ANY INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO LIABILITY FOR LOSS OF PROFITS) ARISING FROM
THE SALE OR USE OF THIS PRODUCT. SOME STATES IN THE U.S. AND SOME CANADIAN
PROVINCES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION MAY NOT APPLY TO
YOU.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY GIVES YOU SPECIFIC LEGAL RIGHTS, AND YOU MAY ALSO HAVE
OTHER RIGHTS WHICH VARY FROM STATE TO STATE IN THE U.S., PROVINCE TO PROVINCE
IN CANADA AND FROM COUNTRY TO COUNTRY.
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY APPLIES ONLY TO PORTABLE ELECTRIC TOOLS, BENCH POWER TOOLS, OUTDOOR POWER EQUIPMENT AND PNEUMATIC TOOLS SOLD WITHIN THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA AND THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO. FOR
WARRANTY COVERAGE WITHIN OTHER COUNTRIES, CONTACT THE WEN CUSTOMER SUPPORT LINE.
19
THANKS FOR
REMEMBERING
20