Poseidon installation and user guide.book

Contents
1
Notices..............................................................................................5
1.1
Safety warnings ............................................................................................................................ 5
1.2
General notices............................................................................................................................. 5
2
Introduction......................................................................................7
2.1
About AIS...................................................................................................................................... 7
2.2
Static and dynamic vessel data .................................................................................................... 8
2.3
AIS operation licensing ................................................................................................................. 8
3
Operation..........................................................................................9
3.1
Display and controls...................................................................................................................... 9
3.2
Turning the transceiver on .......................................................................................................... 10
3.3
Display layout.............................................................................................................................. 10
3.4
Main operating screens............................................................................................................... 11
3.5
Target list .................................................................................................................................... 12
3.6
Own vessel and voyage data...................................................................................................... 12
3.7
Own dynamic data ...................................................................................................................... 13
3.8
Received messages.................................................................................................................... 14
3.9
Alarms screen ............................................................................................................................. 15
3.10 Target plot screen ....................................................................................................................... 16
3.11 Working with AIS text and Safety Related Messages (SRMs).................................................... 16
3.12 Handling alarms .......................................................................................................................... 18
3.13 Entering text................................................................................................................................ 19
3.14 Long range messages ................................................................................................................ 20
3.15 Passwords and security .............................................................................................................. 21
3.16 The configuration menu .............................................................................................................. 22
3.17 Tanker mode............................................................................................................................... 28
3.18 Units display - speed and distance ............................................................................................. 28
3.19 Inland AIS ................................................................................................................................... 29
4
Installation......................................................................................31
4.1
What’s in the box? ...................................................................................................................... 32
4.2
Preparing for installation ............................................................................................................. 33
4.3
Installation procedures................................................................................................................ 33
4.4
Connecting the equipment .......................................................................................................... 39
4.5
Configuring the transceiver ......................................................................................................... 47
4.6
Changing the password .............................................................................................................. 50
4.7
Confirming correct operation....................................................................................................... 50
4.8
Regional area settings ................................................................................................................ 50
4.9
Inland AIS ................................................................................................................................... 52
5
Technical Specifications...............................................................55
5.1
Applicable equipment standards................................................................................................. 55
5.2
Physical ...................................................................................................................................... 55
5.3
Environmental ............................................................................................................................ 55
5.4
Electrical .................................................................................................................................... 55
Page 1
5.5
Display and user interface ......................................................................................................... 56
5.6
Internal GNSS (dual mode GNSS receiver variants) .................................................................. 56
5.7
Internal GNSS (GPS only variants)............................................................................................. 56
5.8
TDMA transmitter ....................................................................................................................... 56
5.9
TDMA receivers .......................................................................................................................... 57
5.10 DSC receiver............................................................................................................................... 57
5.11 RF connections ........................................................................................................................... 57
5.12 Data interfaces............................................................................................................................ 58
5.13 Power and data connector information ....................................................................................... 58
6
Technical reference.......................................................................59
6.1
Interface sentences..................................................................................................................... 59
6.2
Transmission intervals ................................................................................................................ 60
6.3
Sensor data input port................................................................................................................. 60
6.4
Bi-directional data ports .............................................................................................................. 61
6.5
Output drive capability of bi-directional ports .............................................................................. 61
6.6
DGPS port................................................................................................................................... 61
6.7
RS232 port.................................................................................................................................. 61
6.8
Input data sentence formats ....................................................................................................... 61
6.9
Output data sentence formats..................................................................................................... 70
7
Drawings ........................................................................................74
7.1
AIS transceiver overall dimensions............................................................................................. 74
7.2
Junction box overall dimensions ................................................................................................. 74
7.3
Dash mount bracket fixing holes (drill drawing) (not to scale) .................................................... 75
7.4
GNSS antenna drawing (not to scale)* ....................................................................................... 75
8
Annex A - ERI Ship types..............................................................76
9
Installation record .........................................................................79
Page 2
List of figures
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13
Figure 14
Figure 15
Figure 16
Figure 17
Figure 18
Figure 19
Figure 20
Figure 21
Figure 22
Figure 23
Figure 24
Figure 25
Figure 26
Figure 27
Figure 28
Figure 29
Figure 30
Figure 31
Figure 32
Figure 33
Figure 34
Figure 35
Figure 36
Figure 37
Figure 38
Figure 39
Figure 40
Figure 41
Figure 42
Figure 43
Figure 44
Figure 45
Figure 46
Figure 47
Figure 48
Figure 49
Figure 50
Figure 51
Figure 52
Figure 53
Figure 54
Figure 55
The AIS network ................................................................................................................. 7
Transceiver front panel ....................................................................................................... 9
Display layout ................................................................................................................... 10
Selection of main operating screen .................................................................................. 11
Target list screen and vessel details view ........................................................................ 12
Own vessel and voyage data screen................................................................................ 12
Own dynamic data screen ................................................................................................ 13
Received messages screen.............................................................................................. 14
Message details view........................................................................................................ 14
Alarms screen................................................................................................................... 15
Alarm details view............................................................................................................. 15
Target plot screen............................................................................................................. 16
Target plot symbols .......................................................................................................... 16
Safety Related Message notification ................................................................................ 17
Message composition ....................................................................................................... 17
Alarm notification screen .................................................................................................. 18
Text entry.......................................................................................................................... 19
Long range interrogation notification; automatic response mode enabled ....................... 20
Long range interrogation notification; manual response mode enabled ........................... 20
Long range message list and details views ...................................................................... 21
Password entry screen ..................................................................................................... 22
Main menu structure ......................................................................................................... 23
Main menu screen ............................................................................................................ 24
The voyage data menu ..................................................................................................... 24
The messages menu ........................................................................................................ 25
The user settings menu .................................................................................................... 25
The installation menu........................................................................................................ 26
The maintenance menu .................................................................................................... 27
Diagnostics menu ............................................................................................................. 27
Tanker mode entry acknowledgement screen.................................................................. 28
Tanker mode exit screen when speed exceeds 3 knots................................................... 28
Typical AIS transceiver connection................................................................................... 31
What’s in the box .............................................................................................................. 32
AIS transceiver dimensions .............................................................................................. 34
Mounting the AIS transceiver............................................................................................ 34
Panel mounting the AIS transceiver ................................................................................. 35
Junction box dimensions .................................................................................................. 36
Mounting the junction box................................................................................................. 36
GNSS antenna location .................................................................................................... 37
GNSS antenna connection ............................................................................................... 37
VHF antenna installation................................................................................................... 38
VHF antenna connection .................................................................................................. 39
Connecting the junction box to the transceiver................................................................. 39
Junction box connections ................................................................................................. 41
Example connection to external display equipment.......................................................... 43
Connecting data interface cable shields ........................................................................... 43
Line termination options.................................................................................................... 44
Power connection ............................................................................................................. 44
Grounding the transceiver ................................................................................................ 45
PC data (RS232) connection ............................................................................................ 46
Vessel dimensions measurement..................................................................................... 48
Regional areas list screen ................................................................................................ 50
Regional area editing screen ............................................................................................ 51
Regional area settings confirmation screen...................................................................... 51
Blue sign switch connection.............................................................................................. 54
Page 3
Figure 56
Figure 57
Page 4
Input port schematic ......................................................................................................... 60
Data output port schematic............................................................................................... 61
Notices
1
Notices
!
When reading this manual please pay particular attention to warnings marked with the
warning triangle symbol shown on the left. These are important messages for safety,
installation and usage of the transceiver.
1.1 Safety warnings
!
This equipment must be installed in accordance with the instructions provided in this manual. Failure
to do so will seriously affect its performance and reliability. It is strongly recommended that a trained
technician installs and configures this product.
!
This equipment is intended as an aid to navigation and is not a replacement for proper navigational
judgement. Information provided by the equipment must not be relied upon as accurate. User
decisions based upon information provided by the equipment are done so entirely at the users own
risk.
!
Do not install this equipment in a flammable atmosphere such as in an engine room or near to fuel
tanks.
!
It is recommended that this product is not installed in direct sunlight or under a windshield where it can
be subjected to excessive solar heating.
!
Do not attempt to service this equipment as doing so may cause fire, electric shock or malfunction and
will invalidate the warranty. If any malfunctions are detected contact your supplier or service agent.
!
Do not install the transceiver where rain or water may leak onto the equipment. This product has been
designed for installation and use in an environment protected from moisture.
!
NOT ALL SHIPS CARRY AIS. The Officer of the Watch (OOW) should always be aware that other
ships and, in particular, leisure craft, fishing vessels and warships may not be fitted with AIS. Any AIS
equipment fitted on other ships as a mandatory carriage requirement may also be off based on the
Master’s professional judgement.
1.2 General notices
1.2.1
Position source
All marine Automatic Identification System (AIS) transceivers utilise a satellite based location system such as
the GLONASS or GPS satellite networks.
!
1.2.2
The accuracy of a GNSS position fix is variable and affected by factors such as the antenna
positioning, how many satellites are used to determine a position and for how long satellite
information has been received.
Compass safe distance
The compass safe distance of this transceiver is 0.3m or greater for a 0.3° deviation.
1.2.3
Product category
This product is categorised as ‘protected’ in accordance with the definitions provided in IEC 60945.
1.2.4
Disposal of the transceiver and packaging
Please dispose of this AIS transceiver in accordance with the European WEEE Directive or with the applicable
local regulations for disposal of electrical equipment. Every effort has been made to ensure the packaging for
the transceiver is recyclable. Please dispose of the packaging in an environmentally friendly manner.
Page 5
Notices
1.2.5
Accuracy of this manual
This manual is intended as a guide to the installation, setup and use of this product. Every effort has been made
to ensure the accuracy of this manual, however due to continuous product development this manual may not
be accurate in all respects, therefore no guarantee is offered. If you are in any doubt about any aspect of this
product, please contact your dealer.
Page 6
Introduction
2
Introduction
2.1 About AIS
The marine Automatic Identification System (AIS) is a location and vessel information reporting system. It
allows vessels equipped with AIS to automatically and dynamically share and regularly update their position,
speed, course and other information such as vessel identity with similarly equipped vessels. Position is derived
from GLONASS or GPS and communication between vessels is by Very High Frequency (VHF) digital
transmissions.
There are a number of types of AIS device as follows:
● Class A transceivers. These are designed to be fitted to commercial vessels such as cargo ships
and large passenger vessels. Class A transceivers transmit at a higher VHF signal power than class
B transceivers and therefore can be received by more distant vessels, and also transmit more
frequently. Class A transceivers are mandatory on all vessels over 300 gross tonnes on international
voyages and certain types of passenger vessels under the SOLAS mandate.
● Inland AIS stations. Similar to class A transceivers with additional features for use on Inland
waterways.
● Class B transceivers. Similar to Class A transceivers in many ways, but are normally lower cost due
to the less stringent performance requirements. Class B transceivers transmit at a lower power and at
a lower reporting rate than Class A transceivers.
● AIS base stations. AIS base stations are used by Vessel Traffic Systems to monitor and control the
transmissions of AIS transceivers.
● Aids to Navigation (AtoN) transceivers. AtoNs are transceivers mounted on buoys or other
hazards to shipping which transmit details of their location to the surrounding vessels.
● AIS receivers. AIS receivers receive transmissions from Class A transceivers, Class B transceivers,
AtoNs and AIS base stations but do not transmit any information about the vessel on which they are
installed.
This product is a combined Class A AIS / Inland AIS transceiver.
Figure 1
The AIS network
Page 7
Introduction
2.2 Static and dynamic vessel data
Information transmitted by an AIS transceiver is in two categories: static and dynamic data.
The vessel's dynamic data which includes location, speed over ground (SOG) and course over ground (COG)
is calculated automatically using the internal GNSS receiver.
Static data is information about the vessel which must be programmed into the AIS transceiver. This includes:
● Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI)
● Vessel name
● Vessel call sign (if available)
● Vessel type
● Vessel dimensions
2.3 AIS operation licensing
In most countries the operation of an AIS transceiver is included under the vessel's marine VHF licence
provisions. The vessel on to which the AIS transceiver is to be installed must therefore possess a current VHF
radiotelephone licence which lists the AIS system, vessel Call Sign and MMSI number. Please contact the
relevant authority in your country for further information regarding ship’s radio licensing requirements.
Page 8
Operation
3
Operation
This section assumes that the transceiver has been installed in accordance with the instructions provided in
the Installation section of this manual.
Please read the warning notices at the front of this manual before operating the AIS transceiver.
3.1 Display and controls
Display
Sounder
Menu key
Back or Cancel key
Pilot plug (behind protective cover)
Left function key
Figure 2
Scroll wheel
Right function key
Transceiver front panel
The front panel of the transceiver is shown in Figure 2 with each control marked.
Menu key
This key provides access to the transceiver set up and configuration menu from any operating screen.
Back or Cancel key
This key cancels the current operation, moves to the previous menu level or acts as a backspace key
depending on the operation being carried out.
Scroll wheel
The scroll wheel is used to select information presented on the display, select menu items and edit text and
numeric information shown on the screen. The scroll wheel can also be pressed to confirm data entry or select
information presented on the display.
Right and left function keys
The function of these keys is shown in the display area directly above each key. The function depends on the
operation being carried out.
Sounder
The Sounder provides an audible ‘beep’ when a key is pressed. Key beeps can be activated or deactivated via
the User Settings menu.
Pilot Plug
The Pilot Plug provides an AIS connection for pilots using the IMO standard Pilot Plug connector.
Display
The display shows essential AIS operating information and allows for configuration of the transceiver. It is
recommended that the transceiver is connected to a compatible Radar or Electronic Chart Display System
(ECDIS) for monitoring of AIS vessels during navigation.
Page 9
Operation
3.2 Turning the transceiver on
The transceiver does not have a power switch and is designed to be permanently powered. When power is first
applied the display will show the text ‘Automatic Identification System’ for 5 seconds before the main operating
screen is shown.
3.3 Display layout
The display layout is shown in Figure 3. All operating screens show the time, status bar, scroll indicators and
relevant function keys. The time displayed is UTC time.
When no UTC time is available from the internal GNSS module the time display will show --:--:-- in place of the
time of day.
Status bar
UTC time
HH:MM:SS
Scroll indicators
Main display area
Selec t
Screen
Right function key
Left function key
Figure 3
3.3.1
Display layout
Status bar icons
The status bar shows the current transceiver status using icons. The meaning of each icon is described in Table 1.
Icon
OK
The transceiver is operating normally.
Tx
Shown for one second following each transmission.
Rx
Shown for one second following each received message.
INT
GPS
Shown when the internal GNSS receiver is set to GPS mode
and has a valid position fix.
INT
GNSS
Shown when the internal GNSS receiver is set to GLONASS
mode or GPS+GLONASS mode and has a valid position fix*.
EXT
GNSS
Shown when a connected external GNSS receiver has a valid
position fix*.
INT
DGPS
Shown when the internal GPS receiver is set to GPS mode
and has a valid differential position fix.
INT
DGNSS
Page 10
Description
Shown when the internal GNSS receiver is set to GLONASS
mode or GPS+GLONASS mode and has a valid differential
position fix*.
Operation
Icon
Description
EXT
DGNSS
Shown when a connected external GNSS receiver has a valid
differential position fix*.
NO
GPS
Shown when the internal GNSS receiver is set to GPS mode
and there is no valid internal or external GPS position fix.
NO
GNSS
Shown when the internal GNSS receiver is set to GLONASS
or GLONASS+GPS mode and there is no valid internal or
external GNSS position fix*.


1W
IL
Shown when unread AIS safety related text messages are
available.
Shown flashing when an alarm is active, shown constantly
when an alarm is active, but acknowledged.
Shown when the transmitter is set to 1W mode.
Shown when the AIS transceiver is operating in ‘Inland
Waterways’ mode.
* These icons are only displayed for transceiver variants that include a dual mode internal GNSS receiver.
Table 1
Status Icons
3.4 Main operating screens
In normal operation the display shows one of six main operating screens. The next screen can be selected at
any time by pressing the ‘Screen’ function key as shown in Figure 4. The following subsections describe each
of the operating screens in more detail.
Figure 4
Target list
Own vessel &
voyage data
Own dynamic
data
Target plot
Alarms
Received
messages
Selection of main operating screen
Page 11
Operation
3.5 Target list
The target list screen is shown by default after power up. This screen shows the name (or MMSI), range (in
nautical miles) and bearing (in degrees) of other AIS equipped vessels. The nearest vessel is shown at the top
of the list. Only the 200 nearest vessels are shown in the target list, more distant vessels may be viewed if an
AIS enabled external display, RADAR or ECDIS is connected to the transceiver.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
TARGET LIST:
NAME/MMSI
MARY ROSE
REGENT
ANNE GALLANT
235789543
456723557
RNG(NM)
001.5
003.0
012.5
015.0
030.0
Selec t
13:20:47
Screen
INT
GPS
OK
VESSEL DETAILS:
Station type:
MMSI:
Name:
>> MARY ROSE
Call Sign:
IMO No:
Class A
235687901
MYR7A
4325640
Prev. vessel
Figure 5
BRG(deg)
254.0
013.0
135.5
003.0
087.5
Nex t vessel
Target list screen and vessel details view
When the target list screen is displayed the scroll wheel can be used to move through the list. Full details of
the highlighted vessel can be shown by pressing the ‘Select’ function key, or pushing the scroll wheel. To return
to the target list from the vessel details screen press the Back key. Whilst the vessel details screen is displayed
it is possible to view details of the next and previous vessels in the vessel list using the left and right function
keys without returning to the target list screen.
3.6 Own vessel and voyage data
This screen shows own vessel and voyage related data. This data relates to the vessel on which the transceiver
is installed.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
OWN VESSEL DATA:
MMSI:
375570700
Name:
>> MERLIN
Call Sign:
POS456
IMO No:
5678901
Destination:
SOUTHAMPTON
Screen
Figure 6
Page 12
Own vessel and voyage data screen
Operation
The information displayed on this screen includes:
● MMSI - the Maritime Mobile Service Identity for the vessel on which the transceiver is installed.
● Vessel name
● Call sign
● Destination - the current voyage destination
● IMO Number (where applicable)
● ETA - Estimated Time of Arrival at the voyage destination
● Draught
● Navigational status - At anchor, underway etc
● Dimensions for internal GNSS antenna
● Crew - number of crew on board
● Type of ship/cargo
The scroll wheel can be used to highlight an item of static or voyage data. To edit voyage or installation data see
the ‘Voyage data’ and ‘Installation’ menus in section 3.16 and also the installation information in section 4.
3.7 Own dynamic data
This screen shows current dynamic data from sensors connected to the transceiver and / or its built in GNSS
receiver. This is live information that is being periodically transmitted to other AIS equipped vessels.
The information displayed on this screen includes:
● Current date and time (UTC)
● Latitude
● Longitude
● SOG (Speed Over Ground)
● COG (Course Over Ground)
● Heading
● ROT (Rate Of Turn)
● Position accuracy
● RAIM status
● GNSS in use (internal or external)
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
OWN DYNAMIC DATA:
Date:
06/01/2010
Time:
13:24:04
Lat:
51°16.7904N
Long:
002°27.9458
SOG:
010.0kts
COG:
134.0°
Screen
Figure 7
Own dynamic data screen
Page 13
Operation
3.8 Received messages
This screen shows AIS text and Safety Related Messages (SRM) received from other AIS stations. The most
recently received message is shown at the top of the list. The date and time of reception, name or MMSI of the
sending station and type of message (text or SRM) are shown in the message list. To view the message content
select the required message using the scroll wheel, then either press the scroll wheel or the “View” function key.
The received messages screen is shown in Figure 8 and the message details screen in Figure 9. When unread
messages are available to view the message icon is shown in the status bar as described in section 3.3.1.
13:20:47
OK
RECEIVED MESSAGES:
DATE
TIME
FROM
29/01
10:00
MARY R...
29/01
09:55
556444321
28/01
21:45
REGENT
V iew
Figure 8
INT
GPS
T YPE
B R Safety
AD Safety
B R Binar y
Screen
Received messages screen
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
MESSAGE DETAILS:
Type:
Broadcast SRM
MMSI:
235687901
NAME:
>>MARY ROSE
Channel: A
Date:
29/01/2010
Back
Figure 9
Page 14
Message details view
Reply
Operation
3.9 Alarms screen
This screen shows the status of AIS system alarms. If an active and not yet acknowledged alarm condition
exists the alarm icon in the status bar will flash. If an alarm condition occurs whilst not in the menu system an
acknowledgement screen will be shown immediately, this is described in section 3.12. If an alarm condition
occurs whilst editing a field in the menu system the alarm bell symbol flashes in the status bar.
The alarms screen shows the date and time of activation along with a brief description of any active alarm and
it’s acknowledge state — see Figure 10. Alarms that are active but not acknowledged by the operator have ‘No’
in the ‘Ack’ column. Once an alarm is acknowledged by the operator ‘Yes’ is displayed in the ‘Ack’ column. An
individual alarm can be selected from the list using the scroll wheel and it’s details viewed by either pressing
the scroll wheel or the “View” function key. The alarm details view is shown in Figure 11.
13:20:47
OK
ALARMS
DATE
25/11
25/11
25/11
LIST:
TIME
16:13
16:11
16:11
V iew
INT
GPS
ALARM
No valid ROT...
Heading lost...
Ex ternal EPFS...
ACK
Yes
Yes
Yes
Screen
Figure 10 Alarms screen
13:20:47
OK
INT
GPS
ALARM DETAILS:
ALARM: No valid ROT information
ID:
35
DATE:
25/11/2010
TIME:
16:13:30
ACK:
Yes
Exit
Figure 11 Alarm details view
!
While alarm conditions are active and un-acknowledged, any connected external alarm system
will remain activated.
Page 15
Operation
3.10 Target plot screen
The target plot screen shows the location of other AIS equipped vessels and shore stations relative to your own
vessel. The target plot screen provides a basic overview of AIS targets and should not be regarded as a
substitute for display of AIS information on a dedicated electronic chart display system (ECDIS).
Heading line (points up to signify heading up)
Name of selected target
heading up mode
Range selected
MMSI of selected target
Number of targets on display
235687901
27 Tgts
MARY ROSE
[HDG UP]
12nm
R ange
Screen
Selected target
Range selection key
Figure 12 Target plot screen
The plot range can be adjusted by pressing the ‘Range’ function key which cycles through the ranges 48, 24,
12, 6, 3, 1 and 0.5nm. The range relates to radius of the outer range ring shown on the screen.
Individual targets can be selected using the scroll wheel. When selected a square outline will appear around
the target, pressing the scroll wheel will display full vessel details. To return to the target plot screen from the
vessel details screen press the Back or Cancel key.
Different symbols are displayed for an AIS target depending on the type of target and its status, these are
shown in Figure 13. The own vessel symbol is always shown at the centre of the plot.
Lost target (vessel)
AtoN
Target (vessel)
Base station
Own vessel
SART
Figure 13 Target plot symbols
The target plot screen will operate in heading up mode when a source of true heading data is connected to the
AIS (e.g., a gyro compass). If true heading information is not available the target plot will operate in ‘North up’
mode. The mode is displayed as either [HDG UP] or [NRT UP] at the top left of the screen. The text ‘No
Heading’ is also displayed on the target plot when operating in north up mode.
3.11 Working with AIS text and Safety Related Messages (SRMs)
AIS text messages and Safety Related Messages (SRMs) can be received from other AIS equipped vessels
and also sent to specific vessels (addressed messages) or sent to all vessels in range (broadcast messages).
3.11.1 Receiving AIS text and Safety Related Messages
Reception of an AIS text message is indicated by the presence of the message icon in the status bar. This icon
is shown whenever there are unread AIS text messages. Messages can be reviewed and replied to via the
messages screen; see section 3.8.
When a Safety Related Message is received the user will be notified immediately with a screen showing the
message. Standard text messages are not displayed on receipt, however the message icon will be displayed
on the status bar.
Page 16
Operation
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
SAFET Y RELATED MESSAGE:
Type:
Broadcast SRM
MMSI:
235687901
NAME:
>>MARY ROSE
Channel: A
Date:
29/01/2010
Back
Reply
Figure 14 Safety Related Message notification
3.11.2 Sending AIS Text and Safety Related Messages
To compose a new text or Safety Related Message (SRM) press the ‘Menu’ key then select the ‘MESSAGES’
sub menu followed by the ‘NEW MESSAGE’ option. The new message screen is shown in Figure 15. To send
a message complete the following steps:
1. Using the scroll wheel highlight the ‘TYPE’ field and select the type of message you wish to send. The
available options are ‘Broadcast’, ‘Addressed’, ‘Broadcast SRM’ and ‘Addressed SRM’. Click the scroll
wheel to confirm the message type.
2. For addressed message types only select the ‘TO’ field and press the scroll wheel. Enter the MMSI of
the vessel the message should be sent to using the scroll wheel. See section 3.13 for instructions on
using the scroll wheel to enter data.
3. Select the ‘MESSAGE’ field and enter your message. Note that the length of a message is limited as
follows:
○ Addressed SRM 156 characters
○ Broadcast SRM 161 characters
○ Addressed text 151 characters
○ Broadcast text 156 characters
4. Press the ‘Send’ function key to transmit the message.
When an addressed message is sent the addressee will return an acknowledgement on receipt of the
message. If this acknowledgement is not received a warning will be displayed.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
NEW MESSAGE:
Type:
MMSI:
Channel:
Message:
Back/Send
Broadcast SRM
Not required
Auto
Edit
Figure 15 Message composition
!
Warning: Class B transceivers are permitted to receive broadcast Safety Related Messages
and broadcast text messages, however this function is not mandatory. Class B transceivers are
not able to receive addressed Safety Related or text messages. There is therefore no guarantee
that text messages or SRMs sent to a Class B transceiver will be received.
Page 17
Operation
3.12 Handling alarms
The transceiver performs self checking functions continuously. If a self check fails an alarm will occur. Possible
alarm conditions are listed in Table 2.
Alarm condition
Description
Transmitter malfunction
This alarm can occur if there is a fault with the transmitter or if
the antenna VSWR exceeds allowable limits. The alarm will be
cleared if the transmitter recovers normal operation or the VSWR
measurement returns to an allowable value. If this alarm condition persists contact your dealer or installer.
Antenna VSWR exceeds limit
This alarm condition can occur if the VSWR (Voltage Standing
Wave Ratio) of the AIS antenna exceeds pre-defined limits. This
alarm is cleared if the VSWR returns to an allowable value. If this
alarm condition persists contact your dealer or installer.
Receiver channel x malfunction
This alarm occurs should the receiver hardware malfunction. The
receiver is identified by the value of x. If the receiver returns to
normal operation this alarm will be cleared. If this alarm condition
persists contact your dealer or installer.
External EPFS lost
This alarm occurs if the position from the external Electronic
Position Fixing System (i.e. GNSS) is invalid or lost.
No sensor position in use
This alarm occurs if the transceiver has no valid position information from any connected sensor.
No valid COG information
This alarm occurs if the transceiver has no valid Course Over
Ground information from any connected sensor.
No valid SOG information
This alarm occurs if the transceiver has no valid Speed Over
Ground information from any connected sensor.
Heading lost or invalid
This alarm occurs if the transceiver has no valid heading information from any connected sensor, or if the heading is undefined.
No valid ROT information
This alarm occurs if the transceiver has no Rate Of Turn information from connected sensors or via internal calculation.
Table 2
Alarm conditions
A new alarm will be indicated by display of the alarm notification screen (see Figure 16). The alarm icon in the
status bar will flash whilst an alarm is active and not acknowledged by the user.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
ALARM NOTIFICATION:
ID
ALARM
35:
No valid ROT information
32:
Heading lost/invalid
25:
Ex ternal EPFS lost
Goto List
Figure 16 Alarm notification screen
Page 18
Ack
Operation
From the alarm notification screen you have the option to immediately acknowledge the alarm by pressing the
‘ACK’ function key, or to view the active alarms list by pressing the ‘Goto List’ function key. Once an alarm is
acknowledged it will remain in the alarms list whilst the underlying alarm condition is active. The presence of
active but acknowledged alarm conditions is indicated by continuous display of the alarm icon in the status bar.
3.13 Entering text
The scroll wheel is used to enter text when updating settings or inputting new information. To enter or change
the text first select the field you wish to edit using the scroll wheel. The selected field is highlighted with white
text on a black background.
If the field is editable the ‘Edit’ function key will be shown. Either press this function key, or push the scroll wheel
to enter edit mode.
If text is already present in the field a solid block will now appear at the first character position, otherwise at the
first character position. Use the scroll wheel to move the block to the character position you wish to edit, then
press the scroll wheel. The selection will now flash, and rotating the scroll wheel will select the character for
this position. When the correct character is selected press the scroll wheel to fix the character and move to the
next character position. To ‘backspace’ (delete) a character simply press the ‘Back’ key. When you have
completed entering text press the ‘Save’ function key to save the updated information. Figure 17 explains the
text entry process.
10:05:20
INT
GPS
OK
Own static and voyage data:
MMSI: 123456789
NAME: MERLIN
DESTINATION: SOUTH
ETA: 06/06/10 1400Hrs
Edit
10:05:23
INT
GPS
Own static and voyage data:
MMSI: 123456789
NAME: MERLIN
DESTINATION: SOU T H
ETA: 06/06/10 1400Hrs
10:05:25
3
4
5
6
Save
INT
GPS
OK
Own static and voyage
Q data:
MMSI: 123456789 R
NAME: MERLIN
S
DESTINATION: S O U T H
U
ETA: 06/06/10 1400Hrs
V
W
Cancel
2
Screen
OK
Cancel
1
Save
Figure 17 Text entry
Page 19
Operation
3.14 Long range messages
If the transceiver is connected to a long range communication system via the long range communications port
then long range interrogations may be received. These are requests for information from a distant base station
beyond normal AIS operation range.
The transceiver can be configured to automatically respond to Long range (LR) interrogations, or you can opt
to respond to any interrogation manually. Automatic response is the default setting, see section 3.16 for details
of the menu option used to change this setting. Note that in automatic mode all requested information is
returned if it is available.
When a Long range interrogation is received you will be alerted by a notification screen as shown in Figure 18
(when automatic response is enabled) or Figure 19 (when manual response is enabled).
In automatic response mode simply review and acknowledge the notification screen using the ‘Acknowledge’
function key to return to the previous operating screen. In manual response mode you should review the
request and select either the ‘Respond’ or ‘Decline’ function key as appropriate.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
Long range interrogation:
Date:
31/03/2010
Time:
13:15:39
MMSI:
001245368
Name:
>> RES
Response automatically sent
Ack nowledge
Figure 18 Long range interrogation notification; automatic response mode enabled
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
Long range interrogation:
Date:
31/03/2010
Time:
13:15:39
MMSI:
001245368
Name:
>> RES
Set default responses
Decline
Respond
Figure 19 Long range interrogation notification; manual response mode enabled
A list of received Long range interrogation messages is available at any time via the main menu ‘Messages’
sub menu. See section 3.16 for more details. The Long range message list shows the time and date of
reception of each message along with the sending base station’s MMSI. Full details on each Long range
interrogation in the list can be viewed by pressing the ‘View’ function key. The Long range message list and
details views are shown in Figure 20.
Page 20
Operation
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
LONG RANGE MESSAGES:
DATE
TIME
FROM
08/01
15:52
002543887
08/01
15:30
002543887
06/01
09:25
002564410
T YPE
Speed
Position
Course
V iew
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
MESSAGE DETAILS:
Date:
08/01/10
Time:
07:35:39
MMSI:
002543887
Name:
>> RES
Response automatically sent
Back
Back
Figure 20 Long range message list and details views
3.15 Passwords and security
Certain important information stored within the transceiver can not be changed without knowledge of the
password. The protected information includes:
● MMSI number
● Name of vessel
● Call sign
● IMO number
● Channel management settings
● Vessel dimensions and GNSS antenna locations
● Type of ship
● Data interface configuration
When trying to edit any of the above information you will be prompted to enter the password.
!
The default password is 00000000. The password may have been changed during installation.
For further information on changing the password refer to section.
The password entry screen is shown in Figure 21. Use the scroll wheel to select the required digit, then push
the scroll wheel to edit the value of that digit. Entered password digits are masked by asterisks, when complete
press the scroll wheel to enter the password.
Page 21
Operation
10:05:21
INT
GPS
OK
ENTER PASSWORD:
1
8
9
0......
A
B
C
Edit
2
Screen
Figure 21 Password entry screen
3.16 The configuration menu
The transceiver configuration menu can be accessed at any time by pressing the ‘Menu’ key. The menu is
navigated by rotating the scroll wheel to select a sub-menu or menu item, and pressing the scroll wheel to
select that sub-menu or menu item. Pressing the Back or Cancel key will go back to the previous menu level,
or exit the menu system if you are currently viewing the top level menu. Figure 23 shows the main menu screen.
You can return to the top level menu at any time by pressing the ‘Menu’ key, and exit the menu system at any
time by pressing and holding the Back or Cancel key for one second.
The main menu structure is shown in Figure 22. Some menu items are password protected and can only be
accessed using the password (see section 3.15).
Certain menu items are only available in Inland AIS mode. Please refer to section 3.19.
Page 22
Operation
VOYAGE DATA
NAVIGATIONAL STATUS
DESTINATION
ETA
DRAUGHT**
CARGO/SHIP TYPE**
NUMBER ON BOARD**
LOAD STATUS*
BLUE CONES*
STATIC DRAUGHT*
AIR DRAUGHT*
CREW*
PASSENGERS*
SHIPBOARD PERSONNEL*
ASSISTING TUG BOATS*
MESSAGES
NEW MESSAGE
MESSAGE INBOX
SENT MESSAGES
LONG RANGE MESSAGES
USER SETTINGS
KEY BEEP
DISPLAY
LONG RANGE CONFIGURATION
SET LANGUAGE
UNITS
INSTALLATION
SET IDENTIFICATION
DIMENSIONS
CHANGE PASSWORD
REGIONAL AREAS
SENSOR CONFIGURATION
INLAND AIS
SET POWER
GNSS SETTINGS †
MAINTENANCE
SYSTEM INFORMATION
DIAGNOSTICS
SENSOR STATUS
ENTER FEATURE CODE
** Shown in ‘High Seas’ mode only
* Shown in ‘Inland AIS’ mode only
† Shown only in variants with dual mode internal GNSS receiver
Figure 22 Main menu structure
Page 23
Operation
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
MAIN MENU:
VOYAGE DATA
MESSAGES
USER SET TINGS
INSTALLATION
MAINTENANCE
Back
Selec t
Figure 23 Main menu screen
3.16.1 Voyage data menu
The voyage data menu provides quick access to the most commonly changed AIS transceiver parameters.
13:20:47
OK
INT
GPS
VOYAGE DATA:
Nav Status:
>>(15) not defined (default)
Destination:
>>Not Available
ETA:
--:--:-Draught:
Not Available
Back
Figure 24 The voyage data menu
From this menu you can set the following parameters:
● Navigational status - select the most appropriate navigational status for your vessel from the list.
○ Under way using engine
○ At anchor
○ Not under command
○ Restricted manoeuvrability
○ Constrained by her draught
○ Moored
○ Aground
○ Engaged in fishing
○ Under way sailing
○ Not defined (default)
● Destination - enter the destination for the current voyage, 20 characters maximum.
● ETA - enter the estimated time and date of arrival at the destination. The date format is DD/MM and
the time format HH:MM using a 24 hour clock and UTC time.
● Draught - enter the maximum present static draught for your vessel in metres. The format for this
value is xx.x m (e.g., 02.5m). The maximum draught is 25.5m, you should enter this value if your
draught exceeds 25.5m.
● Cargo/ship type - see section 4.5.4.
● Number on board - number of crew on board, up to 8191 maximum.
Page 24
Operation
3.16.2 Messages menu
The messages menu provides access to AIS text and safety related message functions along with long range
messaging functions.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
MESSAGES:
NEW MESSAGE
MESSAGE INBOX
SENT MESSAGES
LONG RANGE MESSAGES
Back
Selec t
Figure 25 The messages menu
The available options are:
● New message - takes you to the message composition screen as described in section 3.8.
● Message Inbox - takes you to the received message list view as described in section 3.8.
● Sent messages - shows a list of recently sent messages.
● Long range messages - view a list of received long range messages as described in section 3.14.
3.16.3 User settings menu
The user setting menu provides access to user configurable preferences for the transceiver. All user settings
are stored within the transceiver and will be maintained if the power supply is switched off.
13:20:47
OK
INT
GPS
USER SET TINGS:
KEY BEEP
DISPLAY
LONG RANGE CONFIGURATION
SET LANGUAGE
UNITS
Back
Selec t
Figure 26 The user settings menu
The available options are:
● Key beep - the key press beep can be enabled or disabled.
● Display - brightness and contrast adjustment for the LCD display along with selection of day or night
operating mode. In night mode the display colours are inverted (light text on a dark background).
● Long range message configuration - set up automatic or manual response to long range messages.
○ With automatic response enabled a reply will automatically be sent to any Long Range
interrogations received. You will be notified that an interrogation has occurred as described in
section 3.14. This is the default setting.
○ With manual response enabled you will be given the opportunity to respond or decline to respond
to any Long Range interrogations received. The notification is described in section 3.14.
● Set language - select the user interface language from the available language options.
● Units - select between Nautical and Metric units for distance and speed display
Page 25
Operation
3.16.4 Installation menu
The installation menu provides access to settings that are required during installation of the transceiver. Please
refer to the installation section of this manual for more detailed information on installation settings and
requirements. Some settings in the installation menu are password protected and should only be adjusted by
authorised personnel.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
INSTALLATION:
SET IDENTIFICATION
DIMENSIONS
CHANGE PASSWORD
REGIONAL AREAS
SENSOR CONFIGURATION
INLAND AIS
Back
Selec t
Figure 27 The installation menu
The available settings and options are:
● Set identification - entry of vessel identification information including MMSI number, name, call sign,
vessel type and IMO number. This menu is password protected.
● Dimensions - entry of vessel dimensions and location of internal and external GNSS antennas. This
menu is password protected.
● Change password - entry of a new system password. This menu is password protected.
● Regional areas - through this menu option the user can list, edit and add regional area definitions.
See section 4.8. This menu is password protected.
● Sensor configuration - this sub menu allows the communication speed of the three sensor data input
ports. See section 4.4.3. This menu is password protected.
● Inland AIS Settings - see section 3.19.
● Set Power - manual setting of the AIS transmitter power to either 1W (low power) or 12.5W (default,
high power).
● Inland AIS – this menu option allows selection of either standard (SOLAS) AIS operation or Inland
AIS operation. See section 3.19 for further details
● Set power - the transmitter power setting can be manually adjusted to 12.5W (default) or 1W (low
power) output.
● GNSS settings –The operating mode of the internal GNSS receiver can be configured to one of the
following options:
Note - This option is only displayed for transceiver variants with dual mode internal GNSS.
○ GLONASS and GPS (combined operation, default)
○ GPS only
○ GLONASS only
Page 26
Operation
3.16.5 Maintenance menu
The maintenance menu provides access to system information and operating diagnostics. These features are
intended for use by authorised installers and service agents only. Access to some maintenance features are
protected by the password.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
MAINTENANCE:
SYSTEM INFORMATION
DIAGNOSTICS
SENSOR STATUS
ENTER FEATURE CODE
Back
Selec t
Figure 28 The maintenance menu
The available settings and options are:
● System information - selecting this item will display internal configuration information.
● Diagnostics - selecting this item will display internal diagnostic information. See section 3.16.6.
● Sensor status - will display the status of external sensors.
● Enter feature code - entry of codes to enable system features (installer use only).
3.16.6 Diagnostics
Certain diagnostics information is provided to assist with installation and maintenance of the transceiver. This
can be accessed via the Maintenance menu. Figure 29 shows the diagnostics menu page. A number of
features can be accessed via the diagnostics menu:
● Internal GNSS status provides GNSS lock status, number of satellites in view and in use and the
mode of use.
● ADC and VSWR data provides internal system information for use in installation and maintenance
only.
● Sensor port status provides details of sensor port settings.
13:20:47
OK
INT
GPS
DIAGNOSTICS:
INTERNAL GPS STATUS
ADC and VSWR
SENSOR PORT STATUS
Decline
Respond
Figure 29 Diagnostics menu
Page 27
Operation
3.17 Tanker mode
To comply with ISGOTT International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers & Terminals a 1W transmission mode is
provided in the AIS transceiver. When the vessel type is defined as a tanker (see section 4.5.4) and the
navigation status is set to ‘Moored’ (see section 4.5.4) then the transmitter power will be automatically reduced
to 1W. An acknowledgement screen as shown in Figure 30 is displayed when this set of conditions is met. A
‘1W’ icon is displayed in the status bar when tanker mode is enabled (see section 3.3).
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
TANKER MODE:
Entering Tanker Mode
Transmit Power is
Low Power (1W )
Ack nowledge
Figure 30 Tanker mode entry acknowledgement screen
This mode is automatically disabled if the vessel type or navigation status conditions no longer apply. An
acknowledgement screen similar to Figure 31 is displayed when tanker mode has been disabled. Tanker mode
is also disabled if the vessel speed exceeds 3 knots as it is assumed that the vessel is no longer moored above
this speed. In this case the navigation status should be adjusted appropriately and a prompt is displayed as
shown in Figure 31. Selecting the ‘Change’ option will display the voyage data settings where the navigation
status can be updated.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
TANKER MODE:
Exiting Tanker Mode
Transmit Power is
High Power (12.5W )
Change Nav. Status?
( Currently moored )
Back
Change
Figure 31 Tanker mode exit screen when speed exceeds 3 knots
3.18 Units display - speed and distance
When operating in Class A (SOLAS) mode the default units for speed and distance are knots (kn) and nautical
miles (nm) respectively.
When operating in Inland AIS mode the default units for speed and distance are kilometers per hour (km/h) and
kilometers (km).
It is possible to override the default units through the ‘User settings’ menu. Press the menu key and then select
‘User settings’ followed by ‘Units’. You can now select either nautical or metric display of speed and distance
regardless of the AIS mode.
Page 28
Operation
3.19 Inland AIS
The transceiver supports both standard ‘high seas’ operation and ‘Inland AIS’ operation. Inland AIS is an
extension of AIS intended for use on board vessels navigating Inland waterways.
During installation the transceiver will be configured appropriately for either high seas or inland operation.
When the transceiver is configured for inland operation the ‘IL’ icon will be displayed on the status bar (see
section 3.3.1). Information on enabling / disabling inland AIS mode along with additional configuration required
for inland operation can be found in section 4.9.
3.19.1 Own vessel and voyage data display in Inland AIS mode
Additional own vessel and voyage related data is displayed on the main operating screens in inland AIS mode.
The following additional information is displayed on the own vessel data screen (as described in section 3.6):
● Blue sign status is displayed as either ‘Yes’ (the sign is set), ‘No’ (the sign is not set) or ‘not available’
when the blue sign switch is not installed. If a blue sign switch is installed it should be manually
switched to the appropriate setting during navigation (see section 3.19.4).
● The IMO number is set to ‘0’ or ‘0000000’ when operating in inland AIS mode.
● The dimensions of the vessel are set to the maximum rectangular size of the convoy when operating
in inland AIS mode.
● The destination is displayed as a UN location code and ERI terminal code.
● The ENI (unique European Vessel Identification Number) for the vessel is shown.
● The ship (or combination type) is shown using an ERI classification code. A table of ERI codes is
provided in section 9 for reference.
● The load status of the vessel is displayed as ‘Loaded’ or ‘Unloaded’.
● The number of crew, passengers and other shipboard personnel will be displayed.
3.19.2 Target vessel details display in Inland AIS mode
Additional detail relating to target vessels is available when operating in Inland AIS mode. The additional
information is only displayed for target vessels which are also equipped with an Inland AIS transceiver and are
transmitting inland AIS data.
The target vessel details display described in section 3.5 will show the following additional data:
● Blue sign status is displayed as either ‘Yes’ (the sign is set), ‘No’ (the sign is not set) or ‘not available’.
● The IMO number is not shown for Inland target vessels, the ENI (unique European Vessel
Identification Number) for the vessel is shown instead.
● The displayed dimensions of the vessel are the maximum rectangular size of the convoy.
● The target vessel destination is displayed as a UN location code and ERI terminal code.
● The ship (or combination type) is shown using an ERI classification code. A table of ERI codes is
provided in section 9 for reference.
● The load status of the vessel is displayed as ‘Loaded’ or ‘Unloaded’
● Quality of speed, course and heading information will be shown as ‘high’ when the target vessel is
using an approved sensor to generate this data, or low if the data is derived from internal GNSS only.
● The number of crew, passengers and other shipboard personnel will be displayed.
3.19.3 Setting voyage data in Inland AIS mode
Additional voyage related information is required for Inland operation along with some changes to the standard
AIS configuration. The following additional information must be entered into the AIS transceiver:
● The vessels load status as ‘loaded’ or ‘unloaded’.
● The number of blue cones or blue flag status for the cargo (1, 2 or 3 blue cones, or blue flag).
● The static draught of the vessel to the nearest centimetre.
● The air draught of the vessel to the nearest centimetre.
Page 29
Operation
● The number of crew (0 to 254 or unknown), passengers (0 to 8190 or unknown) and other shipboard
personnel (0 to 254 or unknown).
● The number of assisting tugboats (from 0 to 6).
The additional identification information can be entered via the main menu. Press the ‘Menu' key then select
the ‘Voyage data’ sub-menu. When the AIS transceiver is operating in Inland AIS mode the voyage data entry
screen will be extended to allow input of the additional information described above.
The following standard AIS voyage information must be updated for Inland AIS:
● Destination
The voyage destination should be entered using UN terminal location codes and ERI terminal codes where
possible.
3.19.4 Blue sign operation
A ‘blue sign’ switch may optionally be connected to the AIS transceiver during installation. This switch sets the
‘blue sign’ status in transmitted inland AIS position reports to either ‘Set’ or ‘Not set’. If a blue sign switch is not
installed the blue sign status is transmitted as ‘not available’.
If a blue sign switch is installed it should be set according to the current navigational situation. The current blue
sign status will be displayed on the own vessel data screen.
Page 30
Installation
4
Installation
The transceiver has been designed for ease of installation. The transceiver is a ‘one box’ design containing
both the transceiver and display. An external junction box is provided to simplify connection of sensor and
display data wiring. A typical system and connection diagram is provided in Figure 32.
VHF antenna
GNSS antenna
Above decks
Below decks
Optional PC
Junction box
Pilot equipment
Displays
(ECDIS, RADAR)
12/24V DC Supply
Ship’s sensor data
(DGPS, GYRO, Heading)
Figure 32 Typical AIS transceiver connection
The main elements of installation are:
1. Mount the transceiver and junction box in a suitable location.
2. Install VHF antenna according to manufacturers instructions.
3. Install the GNSS antenna.
4. Connect data interfaces.
5. Apply power and configure the transceiver.
6. Confirm correct operation.
7. Complete the installation log.
Page 31
Installation
4.1 What’s in the box?
Figure 33 shows the items included with your AIS transceiver purchase. The following section gives a brief
overview of each item. Please ensure all items are present and if any of the items are missing please contact
your dealer.
Transceiver
Panel mount brackets
Mounting template
Junction box
Trunnion bracket
Product manual
Data cable
GNSS antenna
Power cable
Screws
CD
Quick
installation
guide
Quick
operation
guide
Figure 33 What’s in the box
● AIS transceiver
The main transceiver and display.
● Data cable
A 1m (3.3ft) long, 50 way data cable to connect the transceiver serial data ports to the junction box.
● Junction box
Provides screw terminals for the data connections to ships sensors and display systems.
● Power cable
A 2m (6.6ft) long power cable to supply the transceiver. The power cable also include alarm output
connections.
● Trunnion bracket
Bracket for mounting the transceiver above a flat surface (e.g., on top of an instrument panel).
● Panel mount brackets
Clamp brackets used when mounting the transceiver through a panel (flush mount).
● Fixing screws
Eight fixing screws are provided for mounting the transceiver (when using the trunnion bracket) and
the junction box.
● User and installation manual
This document - please read thoroughly before attempting to install and commission the transceiver.
● Quick start guide
The quick start guide gives a handy one page reference for the installation process.
● GNSS antenna
A GNSS antenna for the internal GNSS receiver supplied with 10m of co-axial cable.
● Support tools CD
Software tools for configuration of the AIS transceiver and this user manual in other languages.
● Mounting template
Template for cutting an aperture when panel mounting the transceiver.
Page 32
Installation
4.2 Preparing for installation
In addition to the items provided with the transceiver the following items will be required to complete the
installation:
4.2.1
VHF Antenna
Connection of a suitable VHF antenna will be required for the AIS transceiver to operate. A standard marine
band VHF antenna such as that used with VHF voice radios is sufficient. The antenna cable should be
terminated with a PL-259 (or UHF) connector. Please take note of the warnings listed at the start of this manual
regarding the installation and use of antennas.
4.2.2
Antenna cables
The supplied GNSS antenna is provided with 10 metres (32.8ft) of cable. If this is not sufficient to reach
between the desired GNSS antenna location and the AIS transceiver you will require an extension cable.
Please contact your dealer for details. For reference the GNSS antenna connector type on the AIS transceiver
is a TNC receptacle and is intended to mate with a TNC jack connector on the GNSS antenna cable.
4.2.3
GNSS antenna mount
A mounting bracket is required for the supplied GNSS antenna. The antenna has a standard one inch 14 TPI
pole mount thread. You should source and install a compatible antenna bracket suitable for the installation
location.
4.2.4
Data interface cables
Suitable screened, multi core cable will be required to connect the ships sensor (DGPS, Gyro etc.) data ports
to the AIS junction box.
4.3 Installation procedures
Before beginning installation of your AIS transceiver, please ensure you have the necessary additional items
as detailed in section 4.2. It is strongly recommended that you read all of the instructions in this manual prior
to installation.
If after reading this manual you are unsure about any aspect of the installation process please contact your
dealer for advice. The following sections explain the installation process step by step for each of the main
system elements.
4.3.1
Step 1 - Installing the AIS transceiver
Please note the following guidelines when selecting a location for your AIS transceiver:
● The AIS transceiver must be fitted in a location where it is at least 30cm (1ft) from a compass or any
magnetic device.
● There should be adequate space around the AIS transceiver for routing of cables. See Figure 34 for
details of the AIS transceiver dimensions.
● The ambient temperature around the AIS transceiver should be maintained between -15°C and +55°
(5°F to 131°F). Ensure adequate ventilation is present when panel mounting the transceiver.
● The AIS transceiver should not be located in a flammable or hazardous atmosphere such as in an
engine room or near to fuel tanks.
● The AIS transceiver must be installed in a 'below decks' environment protected from the weather.
● The transceiver is supplied with four self tapping screws for attachment of the AIS transceiver to a
suitable surface using the trunnion bracket. Please refer to Figure 35 for guidance.
● The transceiver is supplied with panel mount clamps for flush mounting through an instrument panel.
Please refer to Figure 36 for guidance. Access behind the panel is required when using this mounting
option.
● The AIS transceiver should be mounted in a location where the display is visible to the user at the
position from which the vessel is normally operated.
Page 33
Installation
● An AC power port should be available near to the pilot plug. A pilot plug is located on the front panel
of the AIS transceiver and can also be relocated using the junction box. Please refer to section 4.4.2
for guidance.
172 mm
157 mm
Figure 34 AIS transceiver dimensions
Figure 35 Mounting the AIS transceiver
Page 34
112 mm
85 mm
105 mm
195 mm
Installation
Figure 36 Panel mounting the AIS transceiver
4.3.2
Step 2 - Installing the junction box
The transceiver receives data from the ship’s sensors via the 50 way data cable which connects to the rear of
the transceiver. The other end of this cable is connected to the junction box which provides a convenient screw
terminal system for connection of ships sensor data cables.
!
To meet IMO requirements the AIS transceiver must be able to transmit at least Speed over
Ground (SOG), Course over Ground (COG) and Rate of Turn (ROT) information. This data is
obtained by connecting data outputs from the ship’s DGPS, Gyrocompass and other sensors to
the transceiver via the junction box.
Please note the following guidelines when selecting a location for the junction box:
● There should be adequate space around the junction box for routing of cables. See Figure 37 for
details of the junction box dimensions.
● The ambient temperature around the junction box should be maintained between -15°C and +55°
(5°F to 131°F).
● The junction box should not be located in a flammable or hazardous atmosphere such as in an engine
room or near to fuel tanks.
● The junction box must be installed in a 'below decks' environment protected from the weather.
● The transceiver is supplied with four self tapping screws for attachment of the junction box to a
suitable surface. Please refer to Figure 38 for guidance.
● The junction box must be located within 1m (3.2ft) of the AIS transceiver to allow for the length of the
supplied data interface cable.
Page 35
Installation
52 mm
58 mm
165 mm
178 mm
76 mm
Figure 37 Junction box dimensions
Figure 38 Mounting the junction box
4.3.3
Installing the GNSS antenna
The AIS transceiver includes an internal GNSS receiver for time synchronisation. An independent GNSS
antenna is required for this receiver in addition to any GNSS equipment already installed on board.
For mounting of the GNSS antenna supplied with your AIS transceiver you will require a one inch 14 TPI pole
mount. Contact your dealer to source a mount suitable for the installation location.
Please note the following guidelines when selecting a location for the GNSS antenna:
● The GNSS antenna mount should be secured to a rigid surface.
● The GNSS antenna should be located where it has a clear, unobstructed view of the sky overhead.
● The GNSS antenna should be mounted as high as possible, however it is not recommend the antenna
is mounted on a top of a high mast where the motion of the vessel will cause the antenna to swing
and potentially reduce the accuracy of the GNSS position. See Figure 39 for guidance.
Page 36
Installation
● If possible mount the antenna at least 5m (16ft) from any RADAR or Satellite communications
antennas, and ensure the GNSS antenna is not in the beam path from any RADAR antenna.
● Route the GNSS antenna cable through the pole mount and then to the AIS transceiver. If extension
cables are required all junctions should be made using appropriate co-axial connectors and made
watertight.
● Connect the GNSS antenna cable to the GNSS connector on the AIS transceiver as shown in Figure 40.
GNSS antenna mounted
on a rigid surface
GNSS antenna should
be at least 5m (16ft)
from RADAR or Satellite
communication
antennas
Away from RADAR
beam path
Figure 39 GNSS antenna location
GNSS antenna connection
Figure 40 GNSS antenna connection
4.3.4
Installing the VHF antenna
The AIS transceiver requires a dedicated VHF antenna for communications. A standard marine VHF antenna
is suitable.
Page 37
Installation
Please note the following guidelines when selecting and locating the AIS VHF antenna:
● The VHF antenna should be located as high as possible and positioned as far from other antennas as
possible.
● The VHF antenna should have omnidirectional vertical polarization.
● Where possible the VHF antenna should be installed at least 3m (10ft) away from other transmitting
radio, satellite and RADAR antennas.
● Ideally the AIS VHF antenna should be mounted directly above or below the ship’s primary VHF
radiotelephone antenna, with no horizontal separation and with a minimum of 2m vertical separation.
If it is located on the same horizontal level as other antennas, the distance apart should be at least
10m. Refer to Figure 41 for further guidance.
● The VHF antenna cable should be kept as short as possible to minimise signal loss. High quality, low
loss coaxial cable appropriate to the installation location should be used.
● The VHF antenna cable should be terminated in a PL-259 co-axial connector for connection to the
AIS transceiver.
● Any outdoor installed connectors in the antenna cables should be waterproof by design.
● Antenna cables should be installed in separate signal cable channels at least 10cm (4ins) away from
power supply cables. Crossing of cables should be done at right angles and sharp bends in the
antenna cables should be avoided.
● Connect the VHF antenna cable to the VHF connector on the AIS transceiver as shown in Figure 42.
VHF antenna
Figure 41 VHF antenna installation
Page 38
Positioned at least 3m (10ft)
from other transitting radio,
satellite and RADAR antennas
Installation
VHF antenna connection
Figure 42 VHF antenna connection
4.4 Connecting the equipment
With the transceiver, junction box and antenna installed it is now possible to connect the equipment in
preparation for commissioning.
4.4.1
Antenna connections
If antenna connections have not already been made the GNSS and VHF antennas should now be connected
to the transceiver. Refer to Figure 40 and Figure 42 for guidance.
4.4.2
Data connections
The transceiver is supplied with a 1m (3.2ft) 50 way data cable for interconnection of the transceiver and
junction box.
Connect the junction box to the transceiver using the data cable as indicated in Figure 43.
Transceiver
Junction box
Figure 43 Connecting the junction box to the transceiver
Page 39
Installation
4.4.3
Sensor configuration
The transceiver has seven NMEA0183 (IEC61162-1/2) data ports for connection of ship’s sensors and display
equipment as described in Table 3. There are three input ports for ship’s sensor data and three bidirectional
ports for connection of display equipment such as Radar or electronic chart displays. It is recommended that
an AIS compatible electronic charting system is connected to the transceiver for display of AIS targets. To
comply with IMO regulations the AIS must be connected to speed over ground (SOG), course over ground
(COG), heading, rate of turn (ROT) and position information sources.
The three sensor ports are input only data ports for the connection of data from ships sensors. The four
remaining ports are bi-directional high speed connections supporting data input and output from the AIS. These
ports are suitable for connection to ECDIS, AIS enabled RADAR displays and Pilot equipment.
All data input connections are optically isolated.
Data port
Function
Type
Default Baud rate
1
Sensor 1 input
(DGNSS COG/SOG/LAT/LON)
Receive only
4800
2
Sensor 2 input
(Rate of Turn)
Receive only
4800
3
Sensor 3 input
(Gyro heading)
Receive only
4800
4
External display / ECDIS
Bi-directional
38400
5
Pilot port
Bi-directional
38400
6
Long Range
Bi-directional
38400
7
DGPS beacon receiver
Bi-directional
4800
Table 3
Serial data ports
All sensor ports can be configured via the sensor configuration menu which can be found under the Main
menu>Installation>Sensor configuration menu option.
The sensor configuration menu also includes the ability to disable the requirement for external GNSS sensors
to provide a DTM (Datum) sentence, as not all external GNSS devices provide this sentence.
If an external GNSS device which does not provide a DTM sentence is connected to the
transceiver and the transceiver is configured to require DTM sentences, the external GNSS data
will not be accepted by the transceiver. If no DTM sentence is required the WGS84 datum will be
used as a coordinate origin and the external GNSS device must be configured to output position
using this datum.
!
4.4.4
Junction box connections
The junction box provides screw terminal connections for each of the seven data ports. The connections and
functions of each connection are defined in Table 4. All connections are labeled on the junction box PCB for
clarity. A diagram showing connections available inside the junction box is provided in Figure 44.
Use of shielded cable is recommended when connecting ships sensors and display systems to the junction box
Connect the cable shield to the terminal block marked ‘GND’ for the appropriate interface. It is possible to
remove the PCB from the junction box enclosure to aid connection of cables to the screw terminals during
installation.
!
Page 40
Do not connect the shield of both the external equipment and the junction box. Connect at only
one end.
Installation
To transceiver
Bidirectional data ports
EXT_DISP_IN
A
B GND
A
B GND
EXT_DISP_OUT
Termination jumpers
A
PILOT_IN
B GND
A
B GND
PILOT_OUT
A
DGPS_IN
B GND
A
A
B GND
DGPS_OUT
LR_IN
B GND
A
A
SEN1
B GND
B GND COM NC NO
LR_OUT
ALARM
A
SEN2
B GND
GND GND GND
SHIELD
A
Sensor data inputs
SEN3
B GND
SM BS COM
SWITCHES
Cable glands
Figure 44 Junction box connections
Page 41
Installation
Data port
Junction box signal
label
Description
Function
Sensor 1
SEN1 A
Sensor port 1 input A
SEN1 B
Sensor port 1 input B
SEN1 GND
Sensor port 1 isolated ground
Connect to data source, typically
ships primary GNSS at 4800baud.
This port can be configured to
operate at either 4800 or 38400
baud*.
SEN2 A
Sensor port 2 input A
SEN2 B
Sensor port 2 input B
SEN2 GND
Sensor port 2 isolated ground
SEN3 A
Sensor port 3 input A
SEN3 B
Sensor port 3 input B
SEN3 GND
Sensor port 3 isolated ground
EXT_DISP_IN A
External display input A
EXT_DISP_IN B
External display input B
EXT_DISP_IN GND
External display input ground
(isolated)
EXT_DISP_OUT A
External display output A
EXT_DISP_OUT B
External display output B
EXT_DISP_OUT GND
External display output
ground
PILOT_IN A
External display input A
PILOT_IN B
External display input B
PILOT_IN GND
External display input ground
(isolated)
PILOT_OUT A
External display output A
PILOT_OUT B
External display output B
PILOT_OUT GND
External display output
ground
Sensor 2
Sensor 3
External
display
Pilot
Connect to data source, typically
gyro or heading. This port can be
configured to operate at either
4800 or 38400 baud*.
Connect to data source, typically
ROT or speed. This port can be
configured to operate at either
4800 or 38400 baud*.
Connect to the data output of an
external display system, typically
an ECDIS. This port operates at
38400 baud.
Connect to the data input of an
external display system, typically
an ECDIS. This port operates at
38400 baud.
Connections for the pilot port.
These connections duplicate the
pilot plug on the front panel of the
transceiver and can be used to
relocate the pilot plug if required.
If relocating the pilot plug note
that AMP/Receptacle (Square
Flanged (-1) or Free-Hanging
(-2)), Shell size 11, 9-pin, Std. Sex
206486-1/2 or equivalent with the
following terminations must be
used.
- TX A is connected to Pin 1
- TX B is connected to Pin 4
- RX A is connected to Pin 5
- RX B is connected to Pin 6
- Shield is connected to Pin 9
Table 4
Serial data port connections
*This setting relates to IEC61162-1 or IEC61162-2 operation.
Page 42
Installation
An example of connection to external display equipment is provided in Figure 45, and connections to other
equipment and sensors follow the same scheme. To determine the ‘A’ and ‘B’ signal lines on external
equipment use a digital volt meter to measure the signal line voltage referenced to ground. If the voltmeter
shows a negative voltage the ‘A’ signal line is being measured, a positive voltage indicates the ‘B’ signal line.
EXT_DISP_IN
A
B GND
A
B GND
EXT_DISP_OUT
A
PILOT_IN
B GND
A
B GND
PILOT_OUT
EXT_DISP_IN
A
B GND
A
DGPS_IN
B GND
A
B GND
DGPS_OUT
A
LR_IN
B GND
A
A
SEN1
B GND
B GND COM NC NO
LR_OUT
ALARM
A
SEN2
B GND
GND GND GND
SHIELD
A
SEN3
B GND
SM BS COM
SWITCHES
External display system.
e.g. ECDIS
PILOT_IN
A
B GND
Transmit A
Transmit B
EXT_DISP_IN A
EXT_DISP_IN B
Receive A
Receive B
EXT_DISP_OUT A
EXT_DISP_OUT B
A
B GND
EXT_DISP_OUT
A
B GND
PILOT_OUT
Connect shield if required
Figure 45 Example connection to external display equipment
Shielded cable should be used for data interface connections and the shield should be connected to the ground
at the 'talker' end of the connection. If the transceiver is being connected to a display system then the cable
shield should be connected to ground at the transceiver junction box as shown in Figure 46.
EXT_DISP_IN
A+ B- GND
A+ B- GND
EXT_DISP_OUT
PILOT_IN
A+ B- GND
A+ B- GND
PILOT_OUT
DGPS_IN
A+ B- GND
A+
A+ B- GND
DGPS_OUT
LR_IN
B- GND
A+
A+
SEN1
B- GND
A+
B- GND COM NC NO
LR_OUT
ALARM
SEN2
B- GND
GND GND GND
SHIELD
A+
SEN3
B- GND
BS SM GND
SWITCHES
Connect cable shield to GND terminal
Do not connect shield at this end
Figure 46 Connecting data interface cable shields
Page 43
Installation
The junction box provides jumpers to select alternative line termination configurations for data input
connections from remote equipment. The line termination options are:
● None - no line termination, suitable for short cable runs less than 10m (as supplied).
● R
- 120 Ohm line termination, suitable for longer cable runs greater than 10m.
● RC
- AC 120 Ohm / 1uF termination. Not used.
Select the appropriate line termination option for each data input connection using the jumper adjacent to the data
input connection in the junction box. The jumper positions for each termination option are shown in Figure 47.
No line termination
(default)
120 Ohm line
termination (R)
120 Ohm / 1uF line
termination (RC)
Figure 47 Line termination options
Along with data port connections the junction box also provides connections to the AIS transceiver alarm relay
contacts. The common and normally open alarm contacts are duplicates of the alarm relay connections
available at the power connector (see Table 5) whilst the normally closed contact is only provided at the junction
box. The alarm relay connections are described in Table 5. Use the alarm connections appropriate to the
vessels alarm system.
Junction box alarm
connection
Function
COM
Alarm relay common connection
NC
Alarm relay normally closed connection
NO
Alarm relay normally open connection
Table 5
4.4.5
Contact rating
220V or 2A or 60W
maximum
Alarm relay connections
Power and alarm connections
Power is connected to the transceiver via the supplied four way power and alarm cable as shown in Figure 48.
Power connection
Figure 48 Power connection
Page 44
Installation
The power and alarm cable contains four wires which should be connected according to Table 6.
Wire colour
Function
Connect to
Brown
Power supply +
12V or 24V DC power supply from
ships emergency power source*
Black
Power supply -
Power supply ground
White
Alarm relay normally open contact
Bridge alarm system
Blue
Alarm relay common contact
Bridge alarm system
Table 6
Power supply connections
*Connection to an emergency power source is an IMO requirement for SOLAS vessels.
The power supply current ratings and recommended fusing or circuit breaker currents are as follows:
● A 12VDC supply should be able to provide 4.0A and be fused at 8.0A.
● A 24VDC supply should be able to provide 2.0A and should be fused at 4.0A.
The alarm relay is rated to 220VDC or 2ADC or 60W maximum. The alarm connections provided at the power
connections are a duplicate of the those available via the junction box and described in section 4.4.
4.4.6
Grounding the transceiver
The transceiver is fully isolated from the vessels power supply by its internal power supply circuit. If a ground
connection is required for the shield of data connections then a connection must be made to the vessels
electrical ground. A grounding stud is provided on the rear of the transceiver chassis for this purpose as
indicated in Figure 49. Two M4 nuts and a shake proof washer are provided with the product fixings. A
grounding cable terminated in a suitable ring crimp should be clamped to the earth stud using the fixings
provided.
Ground stud
Figure 49 Grounding the transceiver
Page 45
Installation
4.4.7
PC data connection
A 9 way D-type connector is provided on the rear panel of the transceiver. This interface allows direct
connection to a PC RS232 interface and can be used for installation, diagnostics or external display
connection. The default configuration for this interface allows connection of an ECDIS or charting system and
duplicates the ‘External display’ port in the junction box.
PC data (RS232) connection
Figure 50 PC data (RS232) connection
!
The RS232 port is galvanically isolated from the incoming power supply.
The pin allocation for the 9 way D-type socket on the rear panel of the transceiver is shown in Table 7.
Transceiver 9 Way
D-type pin
Signal
1
No connection
2
RS232 Transmit
Connect to PC RS232 receive
3
RS232 Receive
Connect to PC RS232 transmit
4
No connection
5
RS232 Ground
6
No connection
7
No connection
8
No connection
9
No connection
Table 7
Page 46
Pin allocation for the 9 way D-type socket
Function
Connect to PC RS232 ground
Installation
4.5 Configuring the transceiver
Once all connections have been made the transceiver can be powered and configured for operation. During
configuration information about the vessel on which the transceiver is installed is entered into the transceiver.
It is important this information is entered accurately as it will be broadcast to other AIS equipped vessels and
shore stations.
Once configuration is completed the installation record found at the rear of this manual should be completed
and retained on board the vessel.
4.5.1
Pre configuration checks
To proceed with configuration the following steps should already have been completed:
● The transceiver is fixed to the vessel
● VHF and GNSS antennas have been installed and connected to the transceiver
● The data cable has been connected between the transceiver and junction box
● Ships sensors and AIS enabled display equipment have been connected to the junction box
● Power has been connected to the transceiver and the transceiver is operational (the display is active).
The following configuration instructions assume the installer is familiar with the transceiver user interface,
details of which can be found in the Operation section of this manual.
4.5.2
Configure vessel identification information
The transceiver must be configured with information about the vessel on which it is installed prior to operation.
The following information is required:
● MMSI - Vessel MMSI number (Maritime Mobile Service Identity), this can usually be found on the
ships VHF radio license and should be the same MMSI as used for the VHF / DSC radio.
● Name - Vessel Name (limited to 20 characters)
● Call sign - Vessel radio call sign (limited to 7 characters)
● IMO No. - Vessels IMO identification number (if applicable)
● Dimensions giving the location of the GNSS antenna connected to the AIS transceiver (Internal GNSS)
● Dimensions giving the location of the GNSS antenna connected to any external position source
connected to the AIS transceiver
To enter the vessel identification information press the ‘Menu’ key and select the ‘Installation’ then ‘Set
identification’ option. You will be prompted to enter a password at this stage, the default password is ‘00000000’
(eight zeros). Refer to section 3.15 for more information on passwords and security. The vessels MMSI, Name,
Call sign and IMO number can be entered on the screen displayed after successful password entry.
4.5.3
Configuring the internal GNSS receiver
The internal GNSS receiver can be configured to operate in one of three modes:
● GLONASS and GPS – in this mode the position fix is derived from both the GLONASS and GPS
network in parallel. This mode is the default setting and gives the best performance.
● GPS – in this mode only GPS satellites are used for the position fix.
● GLONASS – in this mode only GLONASS satellites are used for the position fix.
The operating mode can be selected from the ‘GNSS settings’ option in the ‘Installation’ menu.
Page 47
Installation
To enter the GNSS antenna locations go back to the main menu and select the ‘Dimensions’ then ‘Internal’ or
'External’ option as appropriate. Dimensions for both the internal and external GNSS antennas must be entered
if an external GNSS is connected to the AIS transceiver. The antenna dimensions should be entered in metres
according to the diagram provided in Figure 51.
Antenna
Ref C
Stern
Bow
Ref B
Ref A
Ref D
Ref A + Ref B = Length in metres
Ref C + Ref D = Beam in metres
Figure 51 Vessel dimensions measurement
4.5.4
Configure voyage related data
The transceiver must be configured with information about its voyage prior to operation. The following
information is required:
● Nav Status - Navigational status selected from the list below:
○ 0 - Under way using engine.
○ 1 - At anchor.
○ 2 - Not under command.
○ 3 - Restricted manoeuvrability.
○ 4 - Constrained by her draught.
○ 5 - Moored.
○ 6 - Aground.
○ 7 - Engaged in fishing.
○ 8 - Under way sailing.
○ 9 to 14 - reserved for future use.
○ 15 - not defined (default setting).
● Destination - Ships next destination port (limited to 20 characters).
● ETA - Estimated time / date of arrival at destination (using UTC time).
● Draught - Maximum present static draught to the nearest 1/10th of a metre.
● Ship and cargo type - a two digit code selected using Table 8. Where the second digit is represented
by [n] the appropriate code for the second digit should be selected from Table 9.
● Crew - Number of crew on board (optional).
To enter the vessel identification information press the ‘Menu’ key and select the ‘Voyage Data’ option. The
vessels Nav. status, Destination, ETA, Draught, Type and number of crew can then be entered.
Page 48
Installation
Type
code
Vessel type
Reserved (do not use)
1[n]
Wing in ground craft
2[n]
Fishing
30
Towing
31
Towing and length of tow exceeds 200m or breadth exceeds 25m
32
Engaged in dredging or underwater operations
33
Engaged in diving operations
34
Engaged in military operations
35
Sailing
36
Pleasure craft
37
(HSC) High speed craft
4[n]
Pilot vessel
50
Search and rescue vessel
51
Tug
52
Port tender
53
Vessel with anti-pollution facilities
54
Law enforcement vessel
55
Spare - for local use
56
Spare - for local use
57
Medical transports (under the 1949 Geneva conventions and additional protocols)
58
Ships according to RR Resolution No. 18 (Mob-83) - Relating to the Procedure for Identifying
and Announcing the Position of Ships and Aircraft of States Not Parties to an Armed Conflict
59
Passenger ship
6[n]
Cargo ship
7[n]
Tanker
8[n]
Other type of ship
9[n]
Table 8
Vessel types and their corresponding vessel type codes
Cargo type
Second digit
(where not predefined)
All ships of this type
0
Carrying DG, HS, or MP, IMO hazard or pollutant category X
1
Carrying DG, HS, or MP, IMO hazard or pollutant category Y
2
Carrying DG, HS, or MP, IMO hazard or pollutant category Z
3
Carrying DG, HS, or MP, IMO hazard or pollutant category OS
4
Reserved (do not use)
5
Reserved (do not use)
6
Reserved (do not use)
7
Reserved (do not use)
8
No additional information
9
Table 9
Type codes for vessels carrying cargo
Page 49
Installation
4.6 Changing the password
Following configuration of the transceiver the password should be changed from its default value of ‘00000000’
to another eight digit code. Password change is carried out by selecting the main menu ‘Installation’ menu, then
high-octane password’ submenu.
A prompt for the existing password will be shown, followed by entry of the new password then confirmation of
the new password before the new password is stored and active. The password should be recorded on the
installation record found in section 9.
4.7 Confirming correct operation
Following entry of the vessel identification and voyage related information the transceiver will commence
normal operation. To complete the installation correct operation should be verified as follows:
1. Exit the menu system and return to the main operating screens. Press the 'Screen' key until the ‘Own
dynamic data’ screen is displayed.
2. Check that the displayed position, course, speed and heading are correct by comparing to the display
associated to the connected position source and other data sources.
3. Check that the status icon display shows ‘OK’ and that the ‘TX’ icon flashes periodically.
4. If the vessel is in an area where other AIS equipped vessels are present press the ‘Screen’ key until
the ‘Target list' screen is displayed. Check that data from other AIS equipped vessels is displayed.
The transceiver is now operational and should remain powered unless authorised by the local maritime
authority. The installation record at the rear of this manual should be completed and left on board the vessel.
4.8 Regional area settings
The transceiver can be manually programmed with regional area settings. These settings control the AIS radio
channel and transmission settings within a predefined area. Regional settings can also be remotely configured
by the local maritime authority via transmissions from an AIS base station. Manual entry of regional area
settings should only be carried out if required by the local maritime authority.
The transceiver can store eight regional area settings including both remote and manual entries.
4.8.1
Creating a new regional area setting
To enter a new regional area setting press the ‘Menu' key and select the ‘Installation' and then the ‘Regional
areas’ sub-menu. The display now shows a list of the current regional area settings as shown in Figure 52.
13:20:47
REGIONAL AREA SET TINGS:
Lat NE Long NE
Lat SW
> --°--N
---°--E
--°--N
New
Figure 52 Regional areas list screen
Page 50
INT
GPS
OK
Long SW
---°--E
Edit
Installation
To create the new area setting press the ‘New' function key and the edit screen shown in Figure 53 will be
displayed.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
EDIT REGIONAL AREA:
In Use:
No
Time of In Use:
--:--:-Info Source:
Not Available
Channel A:
2087
Channel B:
2088
Channel A BW:
Default
Back
Figure 53 Regional area editing screen
1. The scroll wheel can now be used to scroll to the field to edit.
2. Select the field by pushing the scroll wheel or pressing the 'Edit’ function key.
3. Enter a value, or select from a list of possible values using the scroll wheel.
4. Press the ‘OK’ or ‘Cancel' function key to confirm or cancel the entry.
5. Repeat the process 1 - 4 for each field to be edited.
6. Press the ‘Back/Save’ function key to save the regional area setting and return to the area settings list
7. You will be prompted to confirm storage of the regional area setting with the display shown in Figure 54.
8. After confirmation of the regional settings the settings are stored and may take effect immediately depending on the location of the vessel.
13:20:47
INT
GPS
OK
SAVE REGIONAL AREA:
Are you sure you want to save the
edited Regional Area?
Area settings may take effec t
immediately!
No
Yes
Figure 54 Regional area settings confirmation screen
4.8.2
Editing an existing regional area setting
To edit an existing regional area setting press the ‘Menu' key and select the ‘Installation' and then the ‘Regional
areas’ sub-menu. The display now shows a list of the current regional area settings as shown in Figure 52. Use
the scroll wheel to scroll to and select the regional area setting entry to be edited, then follow the instructions
for creating a new regional area setting in section 4.8.1.
Page 51
Installation
4.9 Inland AIS
The transceiver supports both Class A (high seas / SOLAS) AIS operation and Inland AIS operation. Switching
between Class A and Inland AIS is possible via the menu system and this setting should be made at installation
depending on the environment the vessel operates in. Additional vessel and voyage information is required for
transmission when operating in Inland AIS mode and this should be configured as described in the following
sections.
The transceiver stores Class A (high seas) and Inland AIS vessel and voyage data separately
so two independent configurations are required, one for Class A and one for Inland AIS. If the
transceiver is being installed on board an Inland vessel then the standard vessel and voyage
data configuration should be carried out prior to the additional Inland configuration described
below.
!
4.9.1
Switching between ‘Class A’ and ‘Inland AIS’ modes
To switch between operating modes press the ‘Menu’ key and select the ‘Installation' sub menu followed by the
‘Inland AIS’ then the ‘Inland configuration’ option. Finally set the ‘Inland AIS’ setting to ‘Enabled’ or ‘Disabled’
before saving the setting. When the transceiver is configured to operate in Inland AIS mode the ‘IL’ icon is
shown permanently in the status bar.
4.9.2
Entering Inland vessel identification settings
Additional vessel identification information is required for Inland operation along with some changes to the
standard AIS configuration. The following additional information must be entered into the AIS transceiver:
● The vessels ENI (unique European Identifier) - this is an 8 digit number allocated to the vessel.
● The ship type as an ERI code (4 digits) selected from the table provided in section 9.
● The length of the ship to the nearest 10cm (greater accuracy than standard AIS configuration).
● The beam of the ship to the nearest 10cm (greater accuracy than standard AIS configuration).
● A quality setting for the speed, course and heading data sources connected to the AIS is required.
The quality setting can be ‘high’ or ‘low’ for each data source. The low setting should be used unless
a type approved sensor (e.g., a gyro providing heading information) is connected to the AIS
transceiver.
The additional identification information can be entered via the main menu. Press the ‘Menu' key then navigate
through the ‘Installation’, 'Inland AIS’ submenus to select the ‘Inland vessel data’ menu. This screen allows
entry of the Inland specific information described above.
The following standard AIS vessel identification information must be updated for Inland AIS:
● The IMO number should be set to ‘0’ or ‘00000000’ for an Inland vessel.
● The standard AIS ship type should be set to the most applicable ship type - refer to the ship type table
in section 9.
These updates are all made using the process described in section 4.5.
Inland vessel dimensions - the length and beam of the ship are entered to the nearest 10cm
when operating in Inland AIS mode. This is in addition to the vessel dimensions derived from the
GNSS antenna location entered during standard configuration (see section 4.5) which is entered
in meters. The Inland specific length and breadth dimensions should be rounded upwards to the
nearest meter when entering the standard configuration. Both sets of dimensions should relate
to the maximum rectangular size of the convoy.
!
4.9.3
Entering Inland vessel voyage settings
Additional voyage related information is required for Inland operation along with some changes to the standard
AIS configuration. The following additional information must be entered into the AIS transceiver:
● The vessels load status as ‘loaded’ or ‘unloaded’.
Page 52
Installation
● The number of blue cones or blue flag status for the cargo (1, 2 or 3 blue cones, or blue flag).
● The static draught of the vessel to the nearest centimetre.
● The air draught of the vessel to the nearest centimetre.
● The number of crew, passengers and other shipboard personnel.
● The number of assisting tugboats (from 0 to 6).
The additional identification information can be entered via the main menu. Press the ‘Menu' key then select
the ‘Voyage data’ sub-menu. When the AIS transceiver is operating in Inland AIS mode the voyage data entry
screen will be extended to allow input of the additional information described above.
The following standard AIS voyage information must be updated for Inland AIS:
● Destination
The voyage destination should be entered using UN terminal location codes and ERI terminal codes where
possible.
4.9.4
Other Inland AIS settings
When operating in Inland mode it is possible to connect a ‘blue sign’ switch to the AIS transceiver and also to
manually configure the AIS position reporting rate. The connection of the blue sign switch is described in
section 4.9.5.
Settings for the blue sign switch and reporting rate are available via the main menu by selecting the ‘Installation’
option followed by the 'Inland configuration’ sub menu.
Select the ‘Blue sign settings’ option to set up the blue sign switch. The switch can be set to ‘Available’ if a blue
sign switch is connected or 'Unavailable’ if no switch is connected.
Select the ‘Reporting rate selection’ option to manually adjust the AIS position reporting interval. The available
reporting interval settings are:
● Autonomous mode (default).
● Once every 10 minutes.
● Once every 6 minutes.
● Once every 3 minutes.
● Once every minute.
● Once every 30 seconds.
● Once every 15 seconds.
● Once every 10 seconds.
● Once every 5 seconds.
● Once every 2 seconds.
● Next higher reporting rate.
● Next lower reporting rate.
!
4.9.5
Manual changes to reporting rate should be carried out with care and usually only on instruction
from the local authority.
Blue sign switch connection
An external switch can be connected to the AIS transceiver to indicate the blue sign state when in Inland AIS
mode. If a blue sign switch is installed then the switch should be set to ‘Available' as described in section 4.9.4.
The external switch should be of a latching single pole type and is connected to the ‘Switches’ terminals of the
junction box as shown in Figure 55. When the connected switch is made (short circuit) the blue sign status will
be set and transmitted accordingly in Inland AIS position reports.
Page 53
Installation
!
Do not connect a voltage source to the blue sign switch connections.
EXT_DISP_IN
A
B GND
A
B GND
EXT_DISP_OUT
A
PILOT_IN
B GND
A
B GND
PILOT_OUT
A
DGPS_IN
B GND
A
B GND
DGPS_OUT
LR_IN
B GND
A
A
A
SEN1
B GND
B GND COM NC NO
LR_OUT
ALARM
A
SEN2
B GND
GND GND GND
SHIELD
A
SEN3
B GND
SM BS COM
SWITCHES
Blue sign switch
Figure 55 Blue sign switch connection
Page 54
Technical Specifications
5
Technical Specifications
5.1 Applicable equipment standards
IEC61993-2 (2001)
Class A shipborne equipment of the universal automatic identification system (AIS)
– Operational and performance requirements, methods of test and required test
results
IEC60945 (2002)
Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems –
General requirements – Methods of testing and required test results
IEC61162-1(2010)
Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems –
Digital interfaces - Single talker and multiple listeners
IEC61162-2 (1998)
Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems –
Digital interfaces - Single talker and multiple listeners, high speed transmission
ITU-R M.1371-4
Technical characteristics for an automatic identification system using time division
multiple access in the VHF maritime mobile band
IEC61108-1(2003)
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) –
Part 1: Global positioning system (GPS) - Receiver equipment - Performance standards, methods of testing and required test results
CCNR VTT 1.01
(2008)
Central commission for Navigation on the Rhine, Inland AIS Equipment
- Vessel Tracking and Tracing Standard for Inland Navigation
5.2 Physical
Transceiver dimensions
195mm x 105mm x 157mm (WxHxD, see 7.1 for drawing)
Transceiver weight
1.5kg
Junction box dimensions
178mm x 76mm x 52mm (see 7.2 for drawing)
Junction box weight
0.35kg
Compass safe distance
300mm (Transceiver)
5.3 Environmental
Operating temperature range
-15°C to +55°C
Maximum operating humidity
90% at +40°C, non-condensing
Water ingress rating
IP52
5.4 Electrical
Supply voltage
12 to 24V DC (absolute min 10.8V, absolute max 31.2 V)
Power consumption
< 12W
Current consumption @12 VDC supply
0.9A typical, 4.0A peak
Current consumption @24 VDC supply
0.5A typical, 2.0A peak
Page 55
Technical Specifications
5.5 Display and user interface
Display
248 x 128 pixel monochrome LCD with adjustable backlight
Keypad
Two function keys and two menu keys with adjustable backlight
Rotary control
Encoder with push function and adjustable backlight
Sounder
2.4kHz buzzer
5.6 Internal GNSS (dual mode GNSS receiver variants)
Receiver channels
32 channels GPS and GLONASS operating modes
Time to first fix
Typically 30 seconds
Frequency
L1 GPS band, 1575.42MHz and L1 GLONASS band 1597.1 - 1609.5MHz
Accuracy
2.5m CEP / 5.0m SEP without differential correction
2.0m CEP / 3.0m SEP with SBAS or RTCM DGPS correction
Antenna requirement
Active antenna (5V bias) with gain >15dB
5.7 Internal GNSS (GPS only variants)
Receiver channels
16 channels
Time to first fix
Typically 36 seconds
Frequency
L1 band, 1575.42MHz
Accuracy
2.5m CEP / 5.0m SEP without differential correction
2.0m CEP / 3.0m SEP with SBAS or RTCM DGPS correction
Antenna requirement
Active antenna (5V bias) with gain >15dB
5.8 TDMA transmitter
Receiver channels
16 channels
Time to first fix
Typically 36 seconds
Frequency
L1 band, 1575.42MHz
Accuracy
2.5m CEP / 5.0m SEP without differential correction
2.0m CEP / 3.0m SEP with SBAS or RTCM DGPS correction
Antenna requirement
Active antenna (5V bias) with gain >15dB
Frequency range
156.025MHz to 162.025MHz
Channel bandwidth
25kHz
Output power
1W or 12.5W (automatic selection)
Data transmission rate
9600 bits/s
Modulation mode
25kHz GMSK
Page 56
Technical Specifications
5.9 TDMA receivers
Number of receivers
2
Frequency range
156.025MHz to 162.025MHz
Channel bandwidth
25kHz
Sensitivity
<-107dBm for 20% PER
Modulation mode
25kHz GMSK
Adjacent channel selectivity
70dB
Spurious response rejection
70dB
5.10 DSC receiver
Number of receivers
1
Frequency
156.525MHz (Channel 70)
Channel bandwidth
25kHz
Sensitivity
-107dBm @ BER <10-2
Modulation mode
25kHz AFSK
Adjacent channel selectivity
70dB
Spurious response rejection
70dB
5.11 RF connections
VHF antenna connection
SO-239 / UHF
VHF port impedance
50 Ohms
GNSS antenna connection
TNC female
GNSS port impedance
50 Ohms
Page 57
Technical Specifications
5.12 Data interfaces
Sensor data input ports
Number of ports
3
Standard
IEC61162-1
Baud rate
4800 baud
Bidirectional data ports (including pilot port)
Number of ports
3
Standard
IEC61162-1 / -2
Baud rate
4800 or 38400 baud (default)
Differential correction port
Standard
ITU 823-2 / RTCM SC-104
Baud rate
4800 baud
RS232 port
Standard
IEC61162-1 / -2 over RS232
Baud rate
38400 baud
5.13 Power and data connector information
Power connector
LTW
BSD-04PMMS-SC7001
Mating half
LTW
BSD-04BFFM-SL6A02
Pilot plug connector
TYCO
206486-2
Mating half
TYCO
206485-1
50 way data connector
Harting
09665526612
Mating half
Harting
09670505615
RS232 connector
Harting
09661526612
Mating half
Harting
09670095615
Page 58
Technical reference
6
Technical reference
6.1 Interface sentences
The IEC61162 sentences accepted by and output by the transceiver serial data ports are listed in Table 10
below.
Data port
Input sentences
Output sentences
Sensor 1
Sensor 2
Sensor 3
DTM, GBS, GGA, GLL, GNS, HDT,
RMC, ROT, VBW, VTG
N/A
External display
Pilot
Long range
ABM, ACA, ACK, AIR, BBM, DTM,
GBS, GGA, GLL, GNS, HDT, LRF,
LRI, RMC, ROT, SSD, VBW, VSD,
VTG
ABK, ACA, ALR, LR1, LR2, LR3,
LRF, LRI, TXT, VDM, VDO
DGPS
RTCM SC-104 binary format
RTCM SC-104 binary format
RS232
ABM, ACA, ACK, AIR, BBM, DTM,
GBS, GGA, GLL, GNS, HDT, LRF,
LRI, RMC, ROT, SSD, VBW, VSD,
VTG
ABK, ACA, ALR, LR1, LR2, LR3,
LRF, LRI, TXT, VDM, VDO
Table 10
IEC61162 sentences input and output
Page 59
Technical reference
6.2 Transmission intervals
The IEC61162 sentences are in general output in response to a specific event, such as initiation of a binary
message via the user interface. Certain messages are output over the ports at regular transmission intervals.
Table 11lists each sentence type and the transmission interval.
Output sentence
type
Transmission interval
Comments
VDO
once a second
Own vessel VDL reports. When a
report is not generated by the
transceiver a ‘dummy’ VDO is generated in its place.
ALR (inactive)
once a minute
An ALR sentence for each internal
alarm is output as a single block
once every minute whilst all alarms
are inactive
ALR (active)
once every thirty seconds
Once an alarm becomes active the
transmission interval switches to
once every thirty seconds. The
active alarm is not reported as part
of the block of inactive alarms during this period.
ABK, ACA, LR1,
LR2, LR3, LRF,
LRI, TXT,
VDM,RTCM
Only transmitted when specifically
initiated by an external event
Table 11
IEC61162 transmission interval for periodic sentences
6.3 Sensor data input port
The sensor data input port schematic is shown in Figure 56. The optional 120 Ohm termination is selectable
via a jumper in the junction box and should be fitted in the ‘R’ position when long cables connecting to the data
source are required - see section 4.4.4. Each sensor data input port is isolated from other data port inputs and
from the transceivers internal power supply.
Isolated
supply +
In junction box
B
Data input
port
A
Input B
To UART
Jumper
120 Ohms
Input GND
Input A
GND
Isolated
supply -
Figure 56 Input port schematic
A logical low input is defined as: A-B < -0.2V.
A logical high input is defined as: A-B > +0.2V.
The input impedance is approximately 54 kOhms without the junction box jumper fitted, and 120 Ohms with the
jumper fitted.
Page 60
Technical reference
6.4 Bi-directional data ports
The input circuitry of the bi-directional data ports is identical to the input circuitry for the sensor data input ports
described in the preceding section. The output circuitry consists of a differential line driver IC (Texas
Instruments AM26LV31E) and is shown in Figure 57.
10 Ohms
220 Ohms
@100MHz
From UART
B
Data output port
A
10 Ohms
100 Ohms
220 Ohms
@100MHz
GND
GND
Figure 57 Data output port schematic
!
Each bi-directional data port input is isolated from other data port inputs and from the
transceivers internal power supply. The bi-directional data port outputs are not isolated from each
other or the transceivers internal power supply. The transceivers internal power supply is fully
isolated from the external supply.
6.5 Output drive capability of bi-directional ports
Bi-directional ports can supply an output current of up to 30mA. The output voltages are 0 (low) and 3.3V (high).
Effective load resistance should be in excess of 100 Ohms.
6.6 DGPS port
The DPGS correction port is intended for connection to a DGPS beacon receiver. The port has the same
physical characteristics as the bi-directional data ports as described in the preceding sections. If connection of
a beacon receiver is not required this port can be re-configured as an additional bi-directional port to
IEC61162-2. See section 3.16 for port configuration options.
6.7 RS232 port
The RS232 port carries IEC61162 data via RS232 and is intended for connection to a PC during installation
and service. The port can also be used to connect to PC based charting applications for display of AIS data.
6.8 Input data sentence formats
All data input is via IEC61162 / NMEA 0183 sentences. The sentences used by the AIS transceiver are
documented in the subsequent sections. The sentence structure tables describe each field in the sentence
starting from the left most field (field 1) after the sentence identifier. All sentences are terminated with the
IEC61162 checksum shown as ‘*hh’. For details of the checksum calculation please refer to IEC61162-1.
Page 61
Technical reference
6.8.1
ABM - Addressed binary and safety related message
This sentence allows external applications to transmit binary and safety messages using the AIS transceiver
via AIS messages 6 and 12.
!--ABM,x,x,x,xxxxxxxxx,x,x.x,s--s,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x=
Total number of sentences needed to transfer the message
2
x=
Sentence number
3
x=
Sequential Message identifier
4
xxxxxxxxx =
The MMSI of destination AIS transceiver for the ITU-R M.1371 message
5
x=
AIS channel for broadcast of the radio message
6
x.x =
ITU-R M.1371 message ID
7
s--s =
Encapsulated data
8
x=
Number of fill-bits, 0-5
6.8.2
ACA - AIS regional channel assignment message
This sentence is used to both enter and obtain channel management information.
$--ACA,x,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,x,xxxx,x,xxxx,x,x,x,a,x,hhmmss.ss*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x=
Sequence Number, 0 to 9
2
llll.ll,a =
Region Northeast corner latitude - N/S
3
yyyyy.yy,a =
Region Northeast corner longitude - E/W
4
llll.ll,a =
Region Southwest corner latitude - N/S
5
yyyyy.yy,a =
Region Southwest corner longitude - E/W
6
x=
Transition Zone Size
7
xxxx =
Channel A
8
x=
Channel A bandwidth
9
xxxx =
Channel B
10
x=
Channel B bandwidth
11
x=
Tx/Rx mode control
12
x=
Power level control
13
a=
Information source
14
x=
In-Use Flag
15
hhmmss.ss =
Time of “in-use” change
Page 62
Technical reference
6.8.3
ACK - Acknowledge alarm
This sentence is used to acknowledge an alarm condition reported by the transceiver.
$--ACK,xxx,*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
1
6.8.4
Description
xxx =
Identification number of the alarm source to be acknowledged.
AIR - AIS Interrogation request
This sentence supports ITU-R M.1371 message 15. It provides external applications with the means to initiate
requests for specific ITU-R M.1371 messages from remote AIS stations.
$--AIR,xxxxxxxxx,x.x,x,x.x,x,xxxxxxxxx,x.x,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
xxxxxxxxx =
MMSI of interrogated station-1
2
x.x =
ITU-R M.1371 message requested from station-1
3
x=
Message sub-section (Reserved for future use)
4
x.x =
Number of second message from station-1
5
x=
Message sub-section (Reserved for future use)
6
xxxxxxxxx =
MMSI of interrogated station-2
7
x.x =
Number of message requested from station-2
8
x=
Message sub-section (Reserved for future use)
6.8.5
BBM -Binary broadcast message
This sentence allows generation of ITU-R M.1371 binary broadcast messages (message 8) or broadcast safety
related messages (message 14). The content of the message is defined by the application.
!--BBM,x,x,x,x,x.x,s--s,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x=
Total number of sentences needed to transfer the message, 1 to 9
2
x=
Sentence number, 1 to 9
3
x=
Sequential message identifier, 0 to 9
4
x=
AIS channel for broadcast of the radio message
5
x.x =
ITU-R M.1371 message ID, 8 or 14
6
s--s =
Encapsulated data
7
x=
Number of fill-bits , 0 to 5
Page 63
Technical reference
6.8.6
DTM - Datum reference
Logical geodetic datum and datum offsets from a reference datum.
$--DTM,ccc,a,x.x,a,x.x,a, x.x,ccc*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
ccc =
Local datum
2
a=
Local datum subdivision code - NOT USED
3
x.x, a =
Lat offset, min, N/S - NOT USED
5
x.x,a =
Longitude offset, min, E/W - NOT USED
7
x.x =
Altitude offset, (meter) - NOT USED
8
ccc =
Reference datum
Possible datum and reference datum values are:
● WGS84 = W84
● WGS72 = W72
● SGS85 = S85
● PE90 = P90
● User defined =999 (only available for “Local datum”)
● IHO datum code ( „ -„- „ -„- -„- )
6.8.7
GBS - GNSS satellite fault detection
This sentence is used to support GNSS receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM). Given that a GNSS
receiver is tracking enough satellites to perform integrity checks of the positioning quality of the position
solution, a message is needed to report the output of this process to other systems to advise the system user.
With the RAIM in the GNSS receiver, the receiver can isolate faults to individual satellites and not use them in
its position and velocity calculations. Also, the GNSS receiver can still track the satellite and easily judge when
it is back within tolerance.
This sentence shall be used for reporting this RAIM information. To perform this integrity function, the GPS
receiver must have at least two observables in addition to the minimum required for navigation. Normally these
observables take the form of additional redundant satellites.
$--GBS, hhmmss.ss, x.x, x.x, x.x, xx, x.x, x.x, x.x *hh <CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
hhmmss.ss
UTC time of the GGA or GNS fix associated with this sentence
2
x.x
Expected error in latitude
3
x.x
Expected error in longitude
4
x.x
Expected error in altitude - NOT USED
5
xx
ID number of most likely failed satellite - NOT USED
Page 64
Technical reference
$--GBS, hhmmss.ss, x.x, x.x, x.x, xx, x.x, x.x, x.x *hh <CR><LF>
6
x.x
Probability of missed detection for most likely failed satellite - NOT USED
7
x.x
Estimate of bias on most likely failed satellite - NOT USED
8
x.x
Standard deviation of bias estimate - NOT USED
6.8.8
GGA - Global positioning system (GPS) fix data
This sentence provides time, position and fix related data from a GPS receiver.
$--GGA, hhmmss.ss, llll.ll, a, yyyyy.yy, a, x, xx, x.x, x.x, M, x.x, M, x.x, xxxx*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
hhmmss.ss
UTC time of position fix
2
llll.ll, a
Latitude N/S
3
yyyyy.yy, a
Longitude E/W
4
x
GPS quality indicator
5
xx
No. of satellites in use, 00-12 - NOT USED
6
x.x
Horizontal dilution of precision - NOT USED
7
x.x
Antenna altitude above/below mean sea level (geoid) - NOT USED
8
M
Units of antenna altitude, m - NOT USED
9
x.x
Geoidal separation - NOT USED
10
M
Units of geoidal separation, m - NOT USED
11
x.x
Age of diff. GPS data - NOT USED
12
xxxx
Differential reference station ID 0000-1023 - NOT USED
6.8.9
GLL - Geographic position, latitude and longitude
This sentence provides the latitude and longitude for vessel position along with fix time and status.
$--GLL, llll.ll, a, yyyyy.yy, a, hhmmss.ss, A, a *hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
llll.ll, a
Latitude, N/S
2
yyyyy.yy, a
Longitude , E/W
Page 65
Technical reference
$--GLL, llll.ll, a, yyyyy.yy, a, hhmmss.ss, A, a *hh<CR><LF>
3
hhmmss.ss
Time of position (UTC)
4
A
Status: A = data valid V = data invalid
5
a
Mode indicator:
A = Autonomous
D = Differential
E = Estimated (dead reckoning)
M = Manual input
S = Simulator
N = Data not valid
6.8.10 GNS - GNSS fix data
This sentence provides fix data for a single or combined satellite navigation system. The sentence provides
data for GPS, GLONASS and possible future satellite systems and combinations thereof.
$-- GNS, hhmmss.ss, llll.ll, a, yyyyy.yy, a, c--c,xx,x.x,x.x,x.x,x.x,x.x *hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
hhmmss.ss
Time of position (UTC)
2
llll.ll, a
Latitude N/S
3
yyyyy.yy, a
Longitude E/W
4
c--c
Mode indicator
5
xx
Number of satellites in use, 00-99 - NOT USED
6
x.x
Horizontal dilution of precision (HDOP) - NOT USED
7
x.x
Antenna altitude, m, above mean-sea-level - NOT USED
8
x.x
Geoidal separation, m - NOT USED
9
x.x
Age of differential data - NOT USED
10
x.x
Differential reference station ID - NOT USED
6.8.11 HDT - Heading, true
Actual vessel heading in degrees produced by a true heading system or device.
$--HDT, x.x, T*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
1
Page 66
Description
x.x, T
Heading, degrees true
Technical reference
6.8.12 LRF - Long range function
This sentence is used in long range interrogation requests and interrogation replies.
$--LRF,x,xxxxxxxxx,c--c,c--c,c--c*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Sequence number , 0 to 9
2
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of requestor
3
c--c
Name of requestor, 1 to 20 character string
4
c--c
Function request, 1 to 26 characters from:
A = Ship’s name, call sign and IMO number
B = Date and time of message composition
C = Position
E = Course over ground
F = Speed over ground
I = Destination and ETA
O = Draught
P = Ship / Cargo type
U = Ship’s length, breadth and type
W = Persons on board
5
c--c
Function reply status:
2 = Information available and provided in the following LR1, LR2, or LR3 sentence
3 = Information not available from AIS transceiver
4 = Information is available but not provided (i.e. restricted access determined
by ship's master)
6.8.13 LRI - Long range interrogation
The long-range interrogation of the AIS is accomplished through the use of two sentences. The pair of
interrogation sentences, a LRI-sentence followed by a LRF-sentence, provides the information needed by an
AIS to determine if it must construct and provide the reply sentences (LRF, LR1, LR2, and LR3).
$--LRI,x,a,xxxxxxxxx,xxxxxxxxx,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Sequence number, 0-9
2
a
Control Flag
3
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of "requestor"
4
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of “destination”
5
llll.ll,a
Latitude - N/S
6
yyyyy.yy,a
Longitude - E/W (north-east co-ordinate)
7
llll.ll,a
Latitude - N/S
8
yyyyy.yy,a
Longitude - E/W (south-west co-ordinate)
Page 67
Technical reference
6.8.14 RMC - Recommended minimum specific GNSS data
Time, date, position, course and speed information provided by a GNSS receiver. All data fields should be
provided and null fields only used when data is temporarily unavailable.
$--RMC, hhmmss.ss, A, llll.ll,a, yyyyy.yy, a, x.x, x.x, xxxxxx, x.x,a, a*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
hhmmss.ss
Time of position fix (UTC)
2
A
Status: A = data valid V = navigation receiver warning
3
llll.ll, a
Latitude, N/S
4
yyyyy.yy, a
Longitude, E/W
5
x.x
Speed over ground, knots
6
x.x
Course over ground, degrees true
7
xxxxxx
Date: dd/mm/yy - NOT USED
8
x.x, a
Magnetic variation, degrees, E/W - NOT USED
10
a
Mode indicator:
A = Autonomous mode
D = Differential mode
E = Estimated (dead reckoning) mode
M = Manual input mode
S = Simulator mode
N = Data not valid
6.8.15 ROT - Rate of turn
This sentence provides rate of turn and direction of turn information.
$--ROT, x.x, A*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x.x
Rate of turn, °/min, "-" = bow turns to port
2
A
Status: A = data valid, V = data invalid
6.8.16 SSD - Station static data
This sentence is used to enter static parameters into the ship’s AIS transceiver. The parameters in this
message provide contents for various ITU-R M.1371 messages.
$--SSD,c--c,c--c,xxx,xxx,xx,xx,c,aa*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
c--c
Ship's Call Sign, 1 to 7 characters
2
c--c
Ship's Name, 1 to 20 characters
3
xxx
Pos. ref., "A," distance from bow, 0 to 511 metres
Page 68
Technical reference
$--SSD,c--c,c--c,xxx,xxx,xx,xx,c,aa*hh<CR><LF>
4
xxx
Pos. ref., "B," distance from stern, 0 to 511 metres
5
xx
Pos. ref., "C," distance from port beam, 0 to 63 metres
6
xx
Pos. ref., "D," distance from starboard beam, 0 to 63 metres
7
c
DTE indicator flag
8
aa
Source identifier
6.8.17 VBW - Dual ground / water speed
This sentence conveys both water and ground referenced speed data.
$--VBW, x.x, x.x, A, x.x, x.x, A, x.x, A, x.x, A*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x.x
Longitudinal water speed, knots - NOT USED
2
x.x
Transverse water speed, knots - NOT USED
3
A
Status: water speed, (A = data valid, V = data invalid) - NOT USED
4
x.x
Longitudinal ground speed, knots
5
x.x
Transverse ground speed, knots
6
A
Status, ground speed, (A = data valid, V = data invalid)
7
x.x
Stern transverse water speed, knots - NOT USED
8
A
Status: stern water speed, (A = data valid, V = data invalid) - NOT USED
9
x.x
Stern transverse ground speed, knots - NOT USED
10
A
Status: stern ground speed, (A = data valid, V = data invalid) - NOT USED
6.8.18 VSD - Voyage static data
This sentence is used to enter information about the ship’s voyage.
$--VSD,x.x,x.x,x.x,c--c,hhmmss.ss,xx,xx,x.x,x.x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x.x
Type of ship and cargo category, 0 to 255
2
x.x
Maximum present static draught, 0 to 25.5 metre
3
x.x
Persons on-board, 0 to 8191
4
c--c
Destination, 1-20 characters
5
hhmmss.ss
Estimated time of arrival at destination (UTC)
6
xx
Estimated day of arrival at destination, 00 to 31 (UTC)
Page 69
Technical reference
$--VSD,x.x,x.x,x.x,c--c,hhmmss.ss,xx,xx,x.x,x.x*hh<CR><LF>
7
xx
Estimated month of arrival at destination, 00 to 12 (UTC)
8
x.x
Navigational status, 0 to 15
9
x.x
Regional application flags, 0 to 15
6.8.19 VTG - Course over ground and ground speed
The vessels actual course and speed relative to ground.
$--VTG, x.x, T, x.x, M, x.x, N, x.x, K,a*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x.x, T
Course over ground, degrees true
2
x.x, M
Course over ground, degrees magnetic - NOT USED
3
x.x, N
Speed over ground, knots
4
x.x, K
Speed over ground, km/h
5
a
Mode indicator:
A = Autonomous mode
D = Differential mode
E = Estimated (dead reckoning) mode
M = Manual input mode
S = Simulator mode
N = Data not valid
6.9 Output data sentence formats
All data output is via IEC61162 / NMEA 0183 sentences. The sentences used by the AIS transceiver are
documented in the subsequent sections. The sentence structure tables describe each field in the sentence
starting from the left most field (field 1) after the sentence identifier. All sentences are terminated with the
IEC61162 checksum shown as ‘*hh’. For details of the checksum calculation please refer to IEC61162-1.
All sentences start with the delimiter “$” or “!” followed by the talker equipment type identifier. The identifier for
AIS is “AI”, e.g., “AIABK”.
6.9.1
ABK - Addressed and binary broadcast acknowledgement
The ABK sentence is generated when a transaction, initiated by reception of an ABM, AIR, or BBM sentence
is completed or terminated.
$--ABK,xxxxxxxxx,a,x.x,x,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of the addressed destination AIS transceiver
2
a
AIS channel of reception
3
x.x
ITU-R M.1371 message ID
4
x
Message Sequence Number
5
x
Type of acknowledgement
Page 70
Technical reference
6.9.2
ACA - AIS Channel assignment message
See section 6.8.2.
6.9.3
ALR - Set alarm state
This sentence is used to indicate local alarm conditions and status along with alarm acknowledgement status.
$--ALR,hhmmss.ss,xxx,A, A,c--c*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
hhmmss.ss
Time of alarm condition change, UTC
2
xxx
Local alarm number (identifier)
3
A
Alarm condition (A = threshold exceeded, V = not exceeded)
4
A
Alarm's acknowledge state, A = acknowledged , V = unacknowledged
5
c--c
Alarm's description text
6.9.4
LRF - AIS long range function
See section 6.8.12.
6.9.5
LR1 - Long range reply with destination for function request ‘A’
The LR1 sentence identifies the destination for the reply and contains information requested by the ‘A’ function
character.
$--LR1,x,xxxxxxxxx,xxxxxxxxx,c--c,c--c,xxxxxxxxx*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Sequence Number, 0 to 9
2
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of responder
3
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of requestor (reply destination)
4
c--c
Ship's name, 1 to 20 characters
5
c--c
Call Sign, 1 to 7 characters
6
xxxxxxxxx
IMO Number, 9-digit number
6.9.6
LR2 - Long range reply for function requests ‘B’, ‘C’, ‘E’ and ‘F’
The LR2 sentence contains the information requested by the B, C, E and F function characters.
$--LR2,x,xxxxxxxxx,xxxxxxxx,hhmmss.ss,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,x.x,T,x.x,N*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Sequence Number, 0 to 9
2
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of responder
3
xxxxxxxxx
Date: ddmmyyyy, 8 digits
Page 71
Technical reference
$--LR2,x,xxxxxxxxx,xxxxxxxx,hhmmss.ss,llll.ll,a,yyyyy.yy,a,x.x,T,x.x,N*hh<CR><LF>
4
hhmmss.ss
Time of position, UTC
5
llll.ll,a
Latitude, N/S
6
yyyyy.yy,a
Longitude, E/W
7
x.x,T
Course over ground, degrees True
8
x.x,N
Speed over ground, knots
6.9.7
LR3 - Long range reply for function requests ‘I’, ‘O’, ‘P’, ‘U’, and ‘W’
The LR3 sentence contains the information requested by the I, O, P, U and W function characters.
$--LR3,x,xxxxxxxxx,c--c,xxxxxx,hhmmss.ss,x.x,cc,x.x,x.x,x.x,x.x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Sequence Number, 0 to 9
2
xxxxxxxxx
MMSI of "responder"
3
c--c
Voyage destination, 1 to 20 characters
4
xxxxxx
ETA Date: ddmmyy
5
hhmmss.ss
ETA Time, value to nearest second
6
x.x
Draught, value to 0,1 metre
7
cc
Ship/cargo (ITU-R M.1371, Table 18)
8
x.x
Ship length, value to nearest metre
9
x.x
Ship breadth, value to nearest metre
10
x.x
Ship type
11
x.x
Persons, 0 to 8191
6.9.8
TXT - Text transmission
For the transmission of short text messages from the AIS equipment. These messages relate to the status of
the equipment.
$--TXT,xx,xx,xx,c--c*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
xx
Total number of messages, 01 to 99
2
xx
Message number, 01 to 99
3
xx
Text identifier, 01-99
4
c--c
Text message, ASCII, up to 61 characters
Page 72
Technical reference
6.9.9
VDM - VHF data link message
This sentence is used to transfer the contents of a received AIS message (as defined in ITU-R M.1371) as
received on the VHF Data Link (VDL) using 6 bit ASCII data encapsulation.
!--VDM,x,x,x,a,s--s,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Total number of sentences needed to transfer the message, 1 to 9
2
x
Sentence number, 1 to 9
3
x
Sequential message identifier, 0 to 9
4
a
AIS Channel, "A" or "B"
5
s--s
Encapsulated ITU-R M.1371 radio message
6
x
Number of fill-bits, 0 to 5
6.9.10 VDO - VHF data link own vessel message
This sentence is used to provide the information assembled for broadcast by the AIS transceiver. It uses 6 bit
ASCII data encapsulation.
!--VDO,x,x,x,a,s--s,x*hh<CR><LF>
Field
number
Description
1
x
Total number of sentences needed to transfer the message, 1 to 9
2
x
Sentence number, 1 to 9
3
x
Sequential message identifier, 0 to 9
4
a
AIS Channel, "A" or "B"
5
s--s
Encapsulated ITU-R M.1371 radio message
6
x
Number of fill-bits, 0 to 5
Page 73
Drawings
7
Drawings
7.1 AIS transceiver overall dimensions
172 mm
157 mm
112 mm
85 mm
105 mm
195 mm
7.2 Junction box overall dimensions
52 mm
58 mm
165 mm
178 mm
Page 74
76 mm
Drawings
7.3 Dash mount bracket fixing holes (drill drawing) (not to scale)
Drill for screw size No. 8 (4-PL)
Tap drill size No. 29 (3mm drill is sufficient)
40.0mm
120.0mm
7.4 GNSS antenna drawing (not to scale)*
68mm
75mm
TNC (male)
10m RG58 cable
TNC (male)
* An equivalent alternative GPS antenna may be supplied with transceiver variants without the dual mode
internal GNSS receiver. The dimensions of the supplied antenna may vary from those shown here.
Page 75
Annex A - ERI Ship types
8
Annex A - ERI Ship types
The table below should be used to convert the UN ERI Ship type (used in Inland AIS) to the IMO ship type used
in standard AIS operation. ERI ship types are transmitted in Inland AIS message type 10 whereas the ITU
vessel type is transmitted in AIS message 5.
ERI Code (Inland AIS)
Full
code
U
8000
No
8010
Ship Name (EN)
ITU AIS
Vessel type
code
Vorschlag Via
1st
digit
2nd
digit
Vessel, type unknown
Unbekannter Schiffstyp
9
9
V
Motor Freighter
Motorgüterschiff (MGS)
7
9
8020
V
Motor tanker
Motortankschiff (MTS)
8
9
8021
V
Motor tanker, liquid cargo, type N
Motortankschiff, Flüssigfracht,
Typ N
8
0
8022
V
Motor tanker, liquid cargo, type C
Motortankschiff, Flüssigfracht,
Typ C
8
0
8023
V
Motor tanker, dry cargo as if liquid (e.g
cement)
Motortankschiff, Trockenfracht
8
9
8030
V
Container Vessel
Containerschiff
7
9
8040
V
Gas tanker
Gas-Tankschiff
8
0
8050
C
Motor freighter, tug
Motorzugschiff
7
9
8060
C
Motor tanker, tug
Motortankzugschiff
8
9
8070
C
Motor freighter with one or more ships
alongside
Gekoppelte Fahrzeuge, MGS
7
9
8080
C
Motor freighter with tanker
Gekoppelte Fahrzeuge, mind.
1 MTS
8
9
8090
C
Motor freighter pushing one or more
freighters
Schubverband, MGS
7
9
8100
C
Motor freighter pushing at least one
tank-ship
Schubverband, mind. 1 TSL
8
9
8110
No
Tug, freighter
Schlepp-Güterschiff
7
9
8120
No
Tug, tanker
Schlepp-Tankschiff
8
9
8130
C
Tug freighter, coupled
Gekoppelte
Schlepp-Güterschiffe
3
1
8140
C
Tug, freighter/tanker, coupled
Gekoppeltes Schlepp-Schiff,
min. 1 Schl.TS
3
1
8150
V
Freightbarge
Schubleichter (SL)
9
9
Page 76
Annex A - ERI Ship types
8160
V
Tankbarge
Tankschubleichter (TSL)
9
9
8161
V
Tankbarge, liquid cargo, type N
Tankschubleichter,
Flüssigfracht Typ N
9
0
8162
V
Tankbarge, liquid cargo, type C
Tankschubleichter,
Flüssigfracht, Typ C
9
0
6163
V
Tankbarge, dry cargo as if liquid (e.g
cement)
Tankschubleichter,
Trockenfracht
9
9
8170
V
Freightbarge with containers
Tankschubleichter mit
Containern
8
9
8180
V
Tankbarge, gas
Tankschubleichter für Gas
9
0
8210
C
Pushtow, one cargo barge
Motorschubschiff mit 1 SL
7
9
8220
C
Pushtow, two cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 2 SL
7
9
8230
C
Pushtow, three cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 3 SL
7
9
8240
C
Pushtow, four cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 4 SL
7
9
8250
C
Pushtow, five cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 5 SL
7
9
8260
C
Pushtow, six cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 6 SL
7
9
8270
C
Pushtow, seven cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 7 SL
7
9
8280
C
Pushtow, eight cargo barges
Motorschubschiff mit 8 SL
7
9
8290
C
Pushtow, nine or more barges
Motorschubschiff mit mehr als
8 SL
7
9
8310
C
Pushtow, one tank/gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 1 TSL
8
0
8320
C
Pushtow, two barges at least one tanker
or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 2 SL –
min.1 TSL
8
0
C
Pushtow, three barges at least one
tanker or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 3 SL –
min.1 TSL
8
0
8340
C
Pushtow, four barges at least one tanker
or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 4 SL –
min.1 TSL
8
0
8350
C
Pushtow, five barges at least one tanker
or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 5 SL –
min. 1 TSL
8
0
8360
C
Pushtow, six barges at least one tanker
or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 6 SL –
min. 1 TSL
8
0
8370
C
Pushtow, seven barges at least one
tanker or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 7 SL –
min. 1 TSL
8
0
8380
C
Pushtow, eight barges at least one
tanker or gas barge
Motorschubschiff mit 8 SL –
min.1 TSL
8
0
8390
C
Pushtow, nine or more barges at least
one tanker or gas barge
Motorschubschiff >8 SL –
min.1 TSL
8
0
8330
Page 77
Annex A - ERI Ship types
8400
V
Tug, single
Motorzugschiff
5
2
8410
No
Tug, one or more tows
Motorzugschiff
3
1
8420
C
Tug, assisting a vessel or linked
combination
Motorzugschiff assistierend
3
1
8430
V
Pushboat, single
Motorschubschiff
9
9
8440
V
Passenger ship, ferry, cruise ship, red
cross ship
Motorfahrgastschiff
6
9
8441
V
Ferry
Fähre
6
9
8442
V
Red cross ship
Krankentransport
5
8
8443
V
Cruise ship
Kabinenschiff
6
9
8444
V
Passenger ship without accomodation
Ausflugsschiff
6
9
8450
V
Service vessel, police patrol, port
service
Bundes-, Einsatzfahrzeug
9
9
8460
V
Vessel, work maintainance craft, floating
derrick, cable- ship, buoy-ship, dredge
Arbeitsfahrzeug
3
3
8470
C
Object, towed, not otherwise specified
Geschlepptes Objekt
9
9
8480
V
Fishing boat
Fischerboot
3
0
8490
V
Bunkership
Bunkerboot
9
9
8500
V
Barge, tanker, chemical
Tankschubleichter, chemische
Stoffe
8
0
8510
C
Object, not otherwise specified
Objekt, nicht näher bezeichnet
9
9
1500
V
General cargo Vessel maritime
Frachtschiff (See)
7
9
1510
V
Unit carrier maritime
Containerschiff (See)
7
9
1520
V
Bulk carrier maritime
Massengutschiff (See)
7
9
1530
V
Tanker
Tankschiff (Kein Gas) (See)
8
0
1540
V
Liquified gas tanker
Seegehendes Gas-Tankschiff
(See)
8
0
1850
V
Pleasure craft, longer than 20 metres
Sportboot > 20 m (See)
3
7
1900
V
Fast ship
Schnelles Schiff
4
9
1910
V
Hydrofoil
Tragflügelboot
4
9
Page 78
Installation record
9
Installation record
The following installation record should be completed and retained on board the vessel once the AIS
transceiver has been installed and commissioned.
Vessel details
Vessel name
Flag state
IMO number
MMSI number
Owner
Radio call sign
Type of vessel
Gross registered tonnage
Length (m)
Beam (m)
AIS transceiver serial number
(see underside of transceiver or packaging
label)
Junction box serial number (see label on junction box)
Installation password (if changed from default)
Transceiver software version number
UI software version number
GNSS antenna locations
Internal GNSS antenna location (all dimensions in meters, refer to the diagram below)
A=
B=
C=
D=
External GNSS antenna location (all dimensions in meters, refer to the diagram below)
A=
B=
C=
D=
Antenna
Ref C
Stern
Bow
Ref B
Ref A
Ref D
Ref A + Ref B = Length in metres
Ref C + Ref D = Beam in metres
Page 79
Installation record
Connected equipment type (where applicable note equipment model and AIS data port in each case)
(D)GPS receiver
Gyro compass
ROT indicator
Speed log
ECDIS
Radar
Other equipment
Power supply
The following drawings should be provided and attached to this installation record:
● Antenna layout for VHF and GNSS antennas
● AIS arrangement drawing
● Block diagram showing interconnection of equipment
Maintenance record
Modification record number
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
Installer detail
Installed by (name)
Installation company name
Date of installation
Vessel location at installation
Signature
Page 80
Details (enter details of modifications to the transceiver including software
updates)