OPERATOR`S MANUAL MANUEL de L`UTILISATEUR MANUAL del

OPERATOR'S MANUAL
MANUEL de L'UTILISATEUR
MANUAL del OPERADOR
Catalog No.
No de Cat.
1610-1
1630-1
1660-1
1660-6
1663-20
HEAVY-DUTY COMPACT HOLE-SHOOTERS
PERCE-TROUS COMPACTS ET EXTRA ROBUSTES
TALADROS HEAVY-DUTY HOLE-SHOOTERS
TO REDUCE THE RISK OF INJURY, USER MUST READ AND UNDERSTAND OPERATOR'S
MANUAL.
AFIN DE RÉDUIRE LE RISQUE DE BLESSURES, L'UTILISATEUR DOIT LIRE ET BIEN
COMPRENDRE LE MANUEL DE L'UTILISATEUR.
PARA REDUCIR EL RIESGO DE LESIONES, EL USUARIO DEBE LEER Y ENTENDER EL
MANUAL DEL OPERADOR.
GENERAL POWER TOOL SAFETY WARNINGS
WARNING READ ALL SAFETY WARNINGS AND ALL INSTRUCTIONS. Failure
to follow the warnings and instructions may result in electric shock, fire and/or serious
injury. Save all warnings and instructions for future reference. The term "power
tool" in the warnings refers to your mains-operated (corded) power tool or battery-operated
(cordless) power tool.
•Remove any adjusting key or wrench before
turning the power tool on. A wrench or a key left
attached to a rotating part of the power tool may
result in personal injury.
•Do not overreach. Keep proper footing and
balance at all times. This enables better control
of the power tool in unexpected situations.
•Dress properly. Do not wear loose clothing or
jewellery. Keep your hair, clothing and gloves
away from moving parts. Loose clothes, jewellery or long hair can be caught in moving parts.
•If devices are provided for the connection of
dust extraction and collection facilities, ensure
these are connected and properly used. Use of
dust collection can reduce dust-related hazards.
WORK AREA SAFETY
•Keep work area clean and well lit. Cluttered or
dark areas invite accidents.
•Do not operate power tools in explosive atmospheres, such as in the presence of flammable
liquids, gases or dust. Power tools create sparks
which may ignite the dust or fumes.
•Keep children and bystanders away while
operating a power tool. Distractions can cause
you to lose control.
ELECTRICAL SAFETY
•Power tool plugs must match the outlet. Never
modify the plug in any way. Do not use any
adapter plugs with earthed (grounded) power
tools. Unmodified plugs and matching outlets will
reduce risk of electric shock.
•Avoid body contact with earthed or grounded
surfaces such as pipes, radiators, ranges and
refrigerators. There is an increased risk of electric
shock if your body is earthed or grounded.
•Do not expose power tools to rain or wet conditions. Water entering a power tool will increase
the risk of electric shock.
•Do not abuse the cord. Never use the cord for
carrying, pulling or unplugging the power tool.
Keep cord away from heat, oil, sharp edges
or moving parts. Damaged or entangled cords
increase the risk of electric shock.
•When operating a power tool outdoors, use an
extension cord suitable for outdoor use. Use
of a cord suitable for outdoor use reduces the risk
of electric shock.
•If operating a power tool in a damp location is
unavoidable, use a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protected supply. Use of an GFCI
reduces the risk of electric shock.
POWER TOOL USE AND CARE
•Do not force the power tool. Use the correct
power tool for your application. The correct
power tool will do the job better and safer at the
rate for which it was designed.
•Do not use the power tool if the switch does not
turn it on and off. Any power tool that cannot be
controlled with the switch is dangerous and must
be repaired.
•Disconnect the plug from the power source
and/or the battery pack from the power tool
before making any adjustments, changing
accessories, or storing power tools. Such preventive safety measures reduce the risk of starting
the power tool accidentally.
•Store idle power tools out of the reach of children and do not allow persons unfamiliar with
the power tool or these instructions to operate
the power tool. Power tools are dangerous in the
hands of untrained users.
•Maintain power tools. Check for misalignment
or binding of moving parts, breakage of parts
and any other condition that may affect the
power tool’s operation. If damaged, have the
power tool repaired before use. Many accidents
are caused by poorly maintained power tools.
•Keep cutting tools sharp and clean. Properly
maintained cutting tools with sharp cutting edges
are less likely to bind and are easier to control.
•Use the power tool, accessories and tool bits
etc. in accordance with these instructions, taking into account the working conditions and
the work to be performed. Use of the power tool
for operations different from those intended could
result in a hazardous situation.
PERSONAL SAFETY
•Stay alert, watch what you are doing and use
common sense when operating a power tool.
Do not use a power tool while you are tired or
under the influence of drugs, alcohol or medication. A moment of inattention while operating
power tools may result in serious personal injury.
•Use personal protective equipment. Always
wear eye protection. Protective equipment such
as dust mask, non-skid safety shoes, hard hat, or
hearing protection used for appropriate conditions
will reduce personal injuries.
•Prevent unintentional starting. Ensure the
switch is in the off-position before connecting
to power source and/or battery pack, picking
up or carrying the tool. Carrying power tools with
your finger on the switch or energising power tools
that have the switch on invites accidents.
SERVICE
•Have your power tool serviced by a qualified
repair person using only identical replacement
parts. This will ensure that the safety of the power
tool is maintained.
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FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION
SPECIFIC SAFETY RULES
•Use auxiliary handle(s), if supplied with the
tool. Loss of control can cause personal injury.
•Hold power tool by insulated gripping surfaces,
when performing an operation where the cutting
accessory may contact hidden wiring or its
own cord. Cutting accessory contacting a “live”
wire may make exposed metal parts of the power
tool “live” and could give the operator an electric
shock.
•Maintain labels and nameplates. These carry
important information. If unreadable or missing,
contact a MILWAUKEE service facility for a free
replacement.
•WARNING Some dust created by power sanding,
sawing, grinding, drilling, and other construction
activities contains chemicals known to cause
cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.
Some examples of these chemicals are:
• lead from lead-based paint
• crystalline silica from bricks and cement and
other masonry products, and
• arsenic and chromium from chemically-treated
lumber.
Your risk from these exposures varies, depending
on how often you do this type of work. To reduce
your exposure to these chemicals: work in a well
ventilated area, and work with approved safety
equipment, such as those dust masks that are specially designed to filter out microscopic particles.
11
8
1
11
2
7
6
3
11
4
5
11
1
11
8
2
SYMBOLOGY
7
Double Insulated
6
Amps
4
10
Volts
3
11
Alternating Current Only
5
9
1. Pipe handle
2. Chuck
3. Trigger switch
4. Reversing switch
5. Switch handle
6. Motor housing
7. Nameplate
8. Spade handle
9. Quik-Lok® cord (1663-20 only)
10.Speed control dial (1663-20 only)
11. Insulated gripping surfaces
Direct or Alternating Current
No Load Revolutions
per Minute (RPM)
C
US
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.
United States and Canada
Mexican Approvals Marking
3
SPECIFICATIONS
Tool
Cat. No.
Volts
AC/DC
Wood
Mild Steel
No Load Twist Selfeed Hole Auger Ship Au- Flat Boring Twist Hole
RPM Drills Bits Saws Bits
ger Bits
Bits
Bits Saws
1610-1
120 AC
650
1630-1
120 AC
1000
1660-1 120 AC/DC 450
1660-6 120 AC/DC 450
1663-20 120 AC 115-450
1/2" 2-9/16" 3-1/2" 1-1/2"
1/2" 2-1/4"
3"
1-1/2"
1/2"
3"
4"
1-1/2"
1/2"
3"
4"
1-1/2"
1/2"
3"
4"
1-1/2"
GROUNDING
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/4"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1-1/2"
1/2"
1/2"
1/2"
1/2"
1/2"
2-1/4"
1-3/4"
2-5/8"
2-5/8"
2-5/8"
EXTENSION CORDS
Grounded tools require a three wire extension
cord. Double insulated tools can use either a two
or three wire extension cord. As the distance from
the supply outlet increases, you must use a heavier
gauge extension cord. Using extension cords with
inadequately sized wire causes a serious drop in
voltage, resulting in loss of power and possible tool
damage. Refer to the table shown to determine the
required minimum wire size.
The smaller the gauge number of the wire, the
greater the capacity of the cord. For example, a 14
gauge cord can carry a higher current than a 16
gauge cord. When using more than one extension
cord to make up the total length, be sure each cord
contains at least the minimum wire size required.
If you are using one extension cord for more than
one tool, add the nameplate amperes and use the
sum to determine the required minimum wire size.
WARNING Improperly connecting the
grounding wire can result in the risk of electric shock. Check with a qualified electrician
if you are in doubt as to whether the outlet is
properly grounded. Do not modify the plug
provided with the tool. Never remove the
grounding prong from the plug. Do not use
the tool if the cord or plug is damaged. If
damaged, have it repaired by a MILWAUKEE
service facility before use. If the plug will not
fit the outlet, have a proper outlet installed by
a qualified electrician.
Grounded Tools: Tools with Three Prong Plugs
Tools marked “Grounding Required” have a three
wire cord and three prong grounding plug. The
plug must be connected to a properly grounded
outlet (See Figure A). If the tool should electrically
malfunction or break down, grounding provides a
low resistance path to carry electricity away from
the user, reducing the risk of electric shock.
The grounding prong in the plug is connected
through the green wire inside the cord to the
grounding system in the tool. The green wire in the
cord must be the only wire connected to the tool's
grounding system and must never be attached to
an electrically “live” terminal.
Your tool must be plugged into
an appropriate outlet, properly
installed and grounded in accordance with all codes and ordinances.
The plug and outlet should look like
Fig. A
those in Figure A.
Guidelines for Using Extension Cords
•If you are using an extension cord outdoors, be
sure it is marked with the suffix “W-A” (“W” in
Canada) to indicate that it is acceptable for outdoor
use.
•Be sure your extension cord is properly wired
and in good electrical condition. Always replace a
damaged extension cord or have it repaired by a
qualified person before using it.
•Protect your extension cords from sharp objects,
excessive heat and damp or wet areas.
Recommended Minimum Wire Gauge
For Extension Cords*
Extension Cord Length
Double Insulated Tools:
Tools with Two Prong Plugs
Tools marked “Double Insulated” do not require
grounding. They have a special double insulation system which satisfies OSHA requirements
and complies with the applicable standards of
Underwriters Laboratories, Inc.,
the Canadian Standard Association and the National Electrical Code. Double Insulated
tools may be used in either of
the 120 volt outlets shown in
Figures B and C.
Fig. B Fig. C
Nameplate
Amperes
25'
50'
75'
100'
150'
0 - 2.0
2.1 - 3.4
3.5 - 5.0
5.1 - 7.0
7.1 - 12.0
12.1 - 16.0
16.1 - 20.0
18
18
18
18
16
14
12
18
18
18
16
14
12
10
18
18
16
14
12
10
18
16
14
12
10
16
14
12
12
* Based on limiting the line voltage drop to five volts at
150% of the rated amperes.
READ AND SAVE ALL
INSTRUCTIONS FOR FUTURE USE.
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screw is located inside the chuck to prevent the
chuck from loosening when the tool is operated
in reverse direction. Remove the screw by turning
it clockwise. To remove the chuck, hold the tool
so that only the side of the chuck rests firmly and
squarely on a solid workbench. Insert the chuck key
or a chuck remover bar in one of the keyholes. Turn
the chuck so the key is at about a 30° angle to the
bench top and strike the key sharply with a hammer so the chuck turns
in a counterclockwise Fig. 3
direction (looking from
the front of the tool).
This should loosen the
chuck from the spindle
which has a right hand
thread making it easy
to remove the chuck
by hand.
NOTE: When replacing the chuck, always
replace the left hand thread screw in the chuck.
ASSEMBLY
WARNING To reduce the risk of injury,
always unplug tool before changing or removing accessories. Only use accessories
specifically recommended for this tool. Others
may be hazardous.
Removing and Replacing Quik-Lok® Cords
MILWAUKEE's exclusive Quik-Lok® Cords provide
instant field replacement or substitution.
Fig. 1
1. To remove the Quik-Lok® Cord, turn the cord nut
1/4 turn to the left and pull it out.
2. To replace the Quik-Lok® Cord, align the connector keyways and push the connector in as far as it
will go. Turn the cord nut 1/4 turn to the right to lock.
OPERATION
WARNING To reduce the risk of personal injury when drilling, always hold tool by
the insulated gripping surfaces when performing an operation where the cutting tool may
contact hidden wiring or its own cord. Contact
with a "live" wire will make exposed metal
parts of the tool "live" and shock the operator.
Pipe Handle
Thread pipe handle into the threaded hole in the
motor housing.
Installing Bits into Keyed Chucks
Fig. 2
WARNING When drilling, always
hold the drill securely using the pipe handle,
or brace the drill against a solid fixed object in preparation for a suddent reaction.
When drilling, never use your body to brace drill.
Never put your hands (or other body parts)
between the part of the drill being braced and
the object it is being braced against. Hands
(or other body parts) that are in the path of the
reaction can be pinched, crushed, and broken.
1. Unplug tool.
2. Open the chuck jaws wide enough to insert the
bit. Be sure the bit shank and chuck jaws are
clean. Dirt particles may prevent the bit from
lining up properly.
3. Insert the bit into the chuck. Center the bit in the
chuck jaws and lift it about 1/16" off of the bottom.
Then, tighten the chuck jaws by hand to align the
bit.
4. Place the chuck key in each of the three holes in
the chuck, turning it clockwise as shown. Tighten
securely.
5. To remove the bit, insert the chuck key into one of
the holes in the chuck and turn it counterclockwise.
Bit Binding
Fig. 4
WARNING To reduce the risk of injury,
always wear eye protection.
Chuck Removal
This tool is equipped with a threaded spindle to hold
the chuck. Before removing the chuck, unplug the
tool and open the chuck jaws. A left-handed thread
1
5
2
If the bit binds, the drill will suddenly react in the
opposite direction of the rotation of the bit. Figure
4 shows the path of reaction, (1) if the drill bit binds
while being driven in forward (2).The operator
should reduce the chances of a sudden reaction by
following the instructions listed below. The operator should also prepare for a sudden reaction by
holding securely using the pipe handle or bracing
against a solid fixed object.
Fig. 6
2
3
To reduce the chance of bit binding:
•Use sharp bits. Sharp bits are less likely to bind
when drilling.
•Use the proper bit for the job. There are many
types of bits designed for specific purposes.
•Avoid drilling warped, wet, knotty, and or pitchy
material if possible.
•Avoid drilling in material that you suspect contains
hidden nails or other things that may cause the bit
to bind.
The direction of reaction is always opposite of the
direction of bit binding. Reaction is even more likely
to occur when enlarging already existing holes and
at the point when the bit breaks through the other
side of the material.
1
1. Reverse (counterclockwise) rotation
2. Reaction
3. Brace drill with pipe handle here
If the bit binds, the pipe handle or the motor housing
braced against the stud will hold the drill in position.
Reversing
A reversing switch is located below or above the
trigger switch for removal of bits from holes. Permit
the motor to come to a complete stop before reversing. Reversing the tool with the gears in motion may
cause severe damage. When removing selfeed
bits from partially drilled holes, a flick of the trigger
switch will free the threaded pilot screw. When the
threads are loose, lift the bit from the workpiece
with the motor stopped.
Bracing for forward rotation
Fig. 5
Fig. 7
3
Mark the center of the hole to be drilled with a
center punch to give the bit a start and to prevent
it from "walking." Lubricate the drill bit with cutting
oil when drilling iron or steel. Use a coolant when
drilling nonferrous metals such as copper, brass
or aluminum.
To start a selfeed bit, run the threaded feed screw
into the work by flicking the trigger switch, permitting the bit to coast until the teeth contact the work
surface. Align the bit properly before proceeding.
This will reduce cocking and jamming when starting.
To reduce jamming on breakthrough, decrease the
drilling pressure when the feed screw point breaks
through the workpiece. Proceed with steady, even
pressure.
MAINTENANCE
WARNING To reduce the risk of injury,
always unplug your tool before performing
any maintenance. Never disassemble the tool
or try to do any rewiring on the tool’s electrical
system. Contact a MILWAUKEE service facility
for ALL repairs.
Maintaining Tools
Keep your tool in good repair by adopting a regular
maintenance program. Before use, examine the
general condition of your tool. Inspect guards,
switches, tool cord set and extension cord for
damage. Check for loose screws, misalignment,
binding of moving parts, improper mounting, broken parts and any other condition that may affect
its safe operation. If abnormal noise or vibration
occurs, turn the tool off immediately and have the
problem corrected before further use. Do not use a
damaged tool. Tag damaged tools “DO NOT USE”
until repaired (see “Repairs”).
Under normal conditions, relubrication is not necessary until the motor brushes need to be replaced.
After six months to one year, depending on use,
return your tool to the nearest MILWAUKEE service
facility for the following:
•Lubrication
•Brush inspection and replacement
•Mechanical inspection and cleaning (gears, spindles, bearings, housing, etc.)
•Electrical inspection (switch, cord, armature, etc.)
•Testing to assure proper mechanical and electrical
operation
Speed Control Dial
Catalog number 1663-20 has a Speed Control
Dial to provide electronic speed control. (The
trigger does not control the speed - it only turns
the tool on and off). The dial is located on rear of
the handle. The dial has positions numbered 1-8.
Position 8 provides full speed at no load. Position
1 provides approximately 25% of the full no load
speed. Reduced speed can be useful for starting
bits and obtaining the optimum speed for a given
bit size. Do not adjust the speed while drilling. This
tool is furnished with Electronic Feedback to provide
a more constant speed under load.
Fig. 8
ACCESSORIES
WARNING To reduce the risk of injury,
electric shock and damage to the tool, never
immerse your tool in liquid or allow a liquid
to flow inside the tool.
WARNING To reduce the risk of injury,
always unplug the tool before attaching or
removing accessories. Use only specifically
recommended accessories. Others may be
hazardous.
2
1
When drilling in forward, the bit will rotate in a
clockwise direction. If the bit binds in the hole, the
bit will come to a sudden stop and drill will suddenly
react in a counterclockwise direction.
Figure 5 shows an example of a Compact HoleShooter properly braced for forward rotation.
1. Forward (clockwise) rotation
2. Reaction
3. Brace drill with pipe handle here
Bit Selection
•Use sharp bits. Sharp bits are less likely to bind
when drilling.
•Use the proper bit for the job. There are many
types of bits designed for specific purposes. Check
the information on the bit's packaging for proper
usage.
•Do not use bits larger than the rated capacity of the
drill. Gear damage or motor overload may result.
See Specifications.
If the bit binds, the pipe handle or the motor housing
braced against the stud will hold the drill in position.
Cleaning
Clean dust and debris from vents. Keep the tool
handles clean, dry and free of oil or grease. Use
only mild soap and a damp cloth to clean your
tool since certain cleaning agents and solvents
are harmful to plastics and other insulated parts.
Some of these include: gasoline, turpentine, lacquer
thinner, paint thinner, chlorinated cleaning solvents,
ammonia and household detergents containing
ammonia. Never use flammable or combustible
solvents around tools.
For a complete listing of accessories refer to your
MILWAUKEE Electric Tool catalog or go on-line
to www.milwaukeetool.com. To obtain a catalog,
contact your local distributor or a service center.
Repairs
If your tool is damaged, return the entire tool to the
nearest service center.
Drilling
Before drilling, clamp the material down securely.
A poorly secured piece of material may result in
personal injury or inaccurate drilling. When drilling
in light gauge metal or wood, use a wooden block
to back up the material to prevent damage to the
workpiece.
Bracing for reverse rotation
When drilling in reverse, the bit will rotate in a
counterclockwise direction. If the bit binds in the
hole, the bit will come to a sudden stop and the
drill will suddenly react in a clockwise direction.
Figure 6 shows an example of a Compact HoleShooter properly braced for reverse rotation.
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