IMPROVE Standard Operating Procedure for Site Maintenance SOP

IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
Page 1 of 10
IMPROVE Standard Operating Procedure
for Site Maintenance
SOP 226
IMPROVE Program
Crocker Nuclear Laboratory
University of California, Davis
Original Version (Version 2.0)
Prepared By:
__Ashleigh K. Matzoll__ ___ _
Date:
_8/15/2013
Reviewed By:
__Jose W. Mojica_____ __ __
Date:
_8/15/2013
Approved By:
_ Charles E. McDade _
_
Date:
_8/15/2013
Latest Version (Version 2.1)
Updated By:
_ _ Jose W. Mojica__ __
___
Date:
_2/12/2016
Reviewed By:
_ _ Jose W. Mojica _____ ___
Date:
_2/12/2016
Approved By:
_ _Charles E. McDade _
Date:
_2/12/2016
_
IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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DOCUMENT HISTORY
Version
No.
Date
Modified
2.1
2.1
Initials
Section/s
Modified
Brief Description of Modifications
1/19/2016 JM
Entire document
Replaced “Audit” with “Flow Check”
2/12/2016 JM
References
Added TI 226H, “Calibration of Flow
Check Devices”
IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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Table of Contents
1. PURPOSE AND APPLICABLITY .......................................................................................................4
2. SUMMARY OF THE METHOD .......................................................................................................4
3. DEFINITIONS .................................................................................................................................4
4. HEALTH AND SAFTY WARNINGS ..................................................................................................5
5. CAUTIONS.....................................................................................................................................5
6. INTERFERENCES............................................................................................................................5
7. PERSONNEL DUTIES .....................................................................................................................5
8. EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES .........................................................................................................6
9. PROCEDURAL STEPS .....................................................................................................................6
9.1 Preparation for Site Maintenance Loop ..............................................................................7
9.2 Operator Training ................................................................................................................7
9.3 Pre-Maintenance Procedures at the Site ............................................................................7
9.4 Flow Rate Check...................................................................................................................7
9.5 Sampler Cleaning and Maintenance ....................................................................................7
9.6 Detailed Inspection of Components and Housing ...............................................................8
9.7 Leak Check of the Sampling Modules ..................................................................................8
9.8 Module Calibrations ............................................................................................................8
9.9 Post Calibration Check and Documentation ........................................................................8
10. DATA AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT ........................................................................................9
11. QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL .........................................................................9
11.1 Cleaning and Inspection of Components ...........................................................................9
11.2 Equipment Replacement ...................................................................................................9
11.3 Documenting the Site with Photographs ..........................................................................10
11.3 Data Monitoring ................................................................................................................10
12. REFERENCES ...............................................................................................................................10
IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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1. PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY
This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for routine maintenance
of equipment in the IMPROVE sampling network. Prior to 2013, routine site maintenance
occurred on a yearly basis; starting in January 2013, sites will receive biannual maintenance,
with half of the network receiving maintenance one year and the other half the next year.
Routine maintenance is divided into “loops,” with an average of ten sites being visited on each
loop. Maintenance is solely the responsibility of the Air Quality Group’s field operations team,
comprised of the field manager and field technicians.
2. SUMMARY OF THE METHOD
Prior to routine maintenance, the field technician shall review and summarize all of the
information collected at each site during the previous year(s) in order to characterize how well
each site is functioning. The data recorded during weekly visits to the IMPROVE samplers by
the operators, as well as any problems detected during quality assurance procedures, shall be
incorporated into the site summary. This reference will be used to determine whether extra
maintenance or troubleshooting is required at each site.
Air Quality Group field technicians shall perform routine site maintenance. For those sites
receiving maintenance in a given year, during the site visit, the cyclones, stacks, and inlets are
cleaned, the electronics are checked, the pumps are flagged for replacement or repair as
needed, the samplers are checked for proper flow rates, and new calibration equations are
recorded. Operator training and review sessions as well as any sampler upgrades are also
performed at this time.
3. DEFINITIONS
 Cassette: a plastic holder that contains a filter substrate or “dummy.”
 “Dummy”: a 25mm or 37mm piece of material used in cassettes that are not sampled.
 Cartridge: consists of a cartridge plate and 3-4 cassettes inserted in the cartridge plate.
 PM2.5: Particulate matter, aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less.
 PM10: Particulate matter, aerodynamic diameter of 10 micrometers or less.
 “A” module: one of four channels routinely run at every site in the IMPROVE network.
Measures PM2.5 with Teflon® as the filter medium and runs at 23 liters per minute.
 “B” module: one of four channels routinely run at every site in the IMPROVE network.
Measures PM2.5 with nylon as the filter medium and runs at 23 liters per minute.
 “C” module: one of four channels routinely run at every site in the IMPROVE network.
Measures PM2.5 with quartz as the filter medium and runs at 23 liters per minute.
 “D” module: one of four channels routinely run at every site in the IMPROVE network.
Measures PM10 with Teflon® as the filter medium and runs at 16.9 liters per minute.
 Double-C site: refers to sites that have two quartz filters loaded per cassette instead of the
typical single C filter.
 Cyclone: IMPROVE particle size separator based on aerodynamic equivalency diameter of 2.5
micrometers.
 Denuder: Set of concentric aluminum tubes used to remove nitric acid from air stream.
 Ebox: Electronic box which houses pressure transducers and manifold drive relays.
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SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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Rbox: Relay box which houses relays that turn on pumps.
LPM: liters per minute
EPROM: Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory that holds IMPROVE software.
Stack: Inlet tube for module
Inlet: Cap over PM2.5 stack with insect screen
Magnehelic: Device that measures differential pressure used for flow checking modules.
Sierra inlet: EPA Louvered PM10 Inlet
4. HEALTH AND SAFETY WARNINGS
Be aware that various stinging insects, venomous creatures, and large mammals (such as
bears) can be found at many of the IMPROVE sites. Be cautious when stepping in tall grass
surrounding a site or when opening pump boxes.
Maintenance requires cleaning of the stack inlets, which typically requires accessing the roof
of a structure. A ladder should be available at any given site. If a ladder is not available, do not
go on the roof. Contact the field manager and an alternate plan will be determined for cleaning
the inlets.
Inclement weather is often an issue at many IMPROVE sites. If severe weather is impending,
wait it out in the vehicle or reschedule the site visit.
Always carry a first aid kit. Report any injuries to the field manager immediately.
Refer to TI 226G for more information.
5. CAUTIONS
Many access roads to IMPROVE sites are locked after regular business hours. Be sure to
communicate with any necessary staff how long the visit is expected to take to avoid being
locked in the area.
Some IMPROVE sites are remote and require hiking to the site or driving off-road. Be sure to
have detailed directions on how to get to a site that requires walking or off-road driving.
Many IMPROVE sites do not have cellular reception. Take this into consideration when
planning site visits.
Wasps sometimes make nests in the inlets. Check for this carefully, as this can cause issues
during sampling. Report any infestations in the inlets to the field manager immediately.
6. INTERFERENCES
Sometimes, due to weather conditions or the way a site is housed, the “D” stack at a site
may rub against the funnel. This situation results in the formation of a black powder, referred to
as “anodizing dust,” that collects and falls down onto the filters. During site maintenance, check
to make sure there is no sign of anodizing dust on any of the “D” module filters at the site
before and during maintenance. If any anodizing dust is present on the filters, flag the site as a
candidate for a tripod, take detailed pictures of the roof where the tripod will sit, and inform the
field manager. If any anodizing dust is found in the funnel, locate the cause and flag any
equipment that needs replacing.
7. PERSONNEL DUTIES
IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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The field manager shall:
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Oversee and maintain records on site and sampler operation
Organize and schedule maintenance loops
Review flow rate checks and calibration equations
Oversee the training of field technicians both at the Air Quality Group and in the field
Respond to any issues or concerns brought up by field technicians during maintenance
The site operator shall:
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Note deviations from normal operations and inform Air Quality Group personnel
Attend site operator training and review sessions during site maintenance
Replace equipment when requested by field operations
Maintain a clean site
The field technician shall:
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Perform routine site maintenance
Perform site operator training and review sessions
Maintain records on equipment repair and modification
Report any issues or concerns in the field to the field manager
8. EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
The equipment list for site maintenance trips will vary depending on the number of sites that
will be visited and whether any new sites will be installed during the trip. Because of this and
due to the extensive amount of supplies needed, equipment lists will not be reported within this
SOP but can be located in Attachment 1, “Maintenance Packing Lists.”
9. PROCEDURAL STEPS
Field technicians perform routine site maintenance, generally in the spring or summer. This
visit to the site is an opportunity to flag non-vital sampler components for replacement, verify
calibration equations, replace or update obsolete equipment, thoroughly clean each sampling
module, and test the vacuum systems. It also allows trained personnel to inspect the site to
ensure compliance with EPA sampling regulations and provides an excellent opportunity for
operator training.
The following sections describe the site maintenance procedure:
9.1. Preparation for Site Maintenance Loop
9.2. Operator Training
9.3. Pre-Maintenance Procedures at the Site
9.4. Flow Rate Check
9.5. Sampler Cleaning and Maintenance
9.6. Detailed Inspection of Components and Housing
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SOP 226, Version 2.1
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9.7. Leak Check of the Sampling Modules
9.8. Module Calibrations
9.9. Post Calibration Check and Documentation
9.1. Preparation for Site Maintenance Loop
Field technicians prepare for site maintenance by contacting each site, scheduling visit dates
and times, and creating a site flow check and maintenance kit. The field manager is responsible
for organizing maintenance loops and overseeing the training and supplying of the field
technicians both prior to leaving the Air Quality Group and while in the field. Refer to TI 226A
for more information.
9.2. Operator Training
Once at the site, field technicians should meet with the operator to explain any new
software and to ask about any concerns or pending problems at the site. Field technicians
should ensure that each of the reported problems is addressed before leaving. If a site operator
is new, the field technician will review the materials covered in SOP 201, “Sampler Maintenance
by Site Operators” with the operator to ensure that the operator understands how to perform
sample changes at the site. The field technician should also show the operator how to replace
some of the basic components in case equipment replacements are necessary before the next
routine maintenance visit. For further details, see TI 226A.
9.3. Pre-Maintenance Procedures at the Site
Prior to maintenance of the sampler, the field technician inspects the site for any general
repairs needed. Any necessary repair or changes to the sampler or site should be noted. If a
problem that affects flow rate or system vacuum is identified, the technician will have to
perform two flow checks; one with the existing problem and a second once the problem is
corrected.
The field technician prepares the sampler for maintenance by recording final readings and
noting the elapsed times for each sample. The field technician visually inspects the sampling
cassettes, noting and correcting any errors involving sample change protocol, and removes the
sampling cassettes from the modules in preparation for the flow check. For step-by-step
instructions on these procedures, see TI 226A.
9.4. Flow Rate Check
The field technician performs a flow check using a magnehelic dial and probe. The flow check
will serve to test current flow rates and equations to determine whether there has been any
drift since the last maintenance visit. Further details on this procedure are located in TI 226B.
9.5. Sampler Cleaning and Maintenance
The field technician thoroughly cleans the cyclones for the PM2.5 modules (“A,” “B,” and “C”)
and the “D” module funnel with Kimwipes™ and alcohol. The stacks, inlets, Tees, and stack
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SOP 226, Version 2.1
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bottom plugs are cleaned as well. The interior of each module is brushed to eliminate fugitive
dust. The valves are carefully removed and cleaned with cotton-tipped applicators and alcohol.
The field technician checks for cracked or aged O-rings and hoses and makes repairs or
replacements as needed. Refer to TI 226A for more information.
9.6. Detailed Inspection of Components and Housing
After cleaning, the field technician performs a detailed check of the site and the sampler. The
field technician listens to each pump carefully to determine whether any of them are making
unusual noises, and any pumps that need replacing are flagged. The stand/structure and the
pump house/enclosure are examined for any signs of deterioration. The field technician
confirms that the modules are securely attached to the mounting structure and that the stacks
are stable and seated firmly. The field technician checks to confirm that the controller’s CPU
battery, voltage regulator, and power supplies maintain a proper output and that the latest
version EPROM is installed. The technician also evaluates any issues with the controller and
performs troubleshooting procedures to determine the cause. After the inspection is complete,
the field technician prepares the modules for a leak test. More details on these procedures can
be found in TI 226A and TI 226F.
9.7. Leak Check of the Sampling Modules
The field technician performs a leak check of the sampling modules using the plug and
extension bar from the flow check probe. The field technician checks the magnehelic reading
from each pump and module to ensure that the readings from each pump and its corresponding
module are similar. Pump and module differences cannot be greater than 2.0” Hg. If a
difference is greater than 2.0” Hg, the field technician performs troubleshooting procedures to
identify where the leak is located and corrects it. Step-by-step instructions for this procedure
can be found in TI 226E.
9.8. Module Calibrations
The field technician sets the zero flows for all primary modules to be 10 for the orifice values
and 5 for the cyclone values. The field technician then calibrates all of the PM2.5 modules (“A,”
“B,” and “C”) to run at a rate of 23lpm, and the PM10 module (“D”) to run at a rate of 16.9lpm.
Any “X” module is calibrated to match its corresponding primary module. The techniques used
to set zero flows and calibrate the modules are explained in TI 226C.
9.9. Post Calibration Check and Documentation
After calibration is complete, the field technician updates the controller’s date, time, and
GMT offset (if necessary) and verifies that all of the site configuration parameters are correct.
All of the equipment is then labeled with colored tape in order to make it easy for an operator
to replace equipment or to troubleshoot. The sampling cartridges are returned to their
corresponding modules and the field technician prepares the controller to resume its normal
sampling schedule.
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Various photographs are taken of the sampler components and the site itself, as well as the
area surrounding the site. These photographs are taken to verify that the sampler and all of its
components were left in the same condition as they were found, as well as to provide AQG staff
with a way to view site configurations remotely when troubleshooting with an operator over the
phone. The photographs of the surrounding areas are used to ensure that there is no
vegetation that is encroaching on the sampling cone or impeding access to the site.
Once all of these tasks are done, field maintenance is complete. For more information on
these procedures, please see TI 226A.
10. DATA AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT
Site flow checks and calibrations are initially stored in a shared drive after the field
technician returns from the site maintenance trip. The field manager reviews the flow check
and calibration for each site. Once the values are approved, the field manager enters them into
the SQL database via a web application called Improve Data Manager.
Site photographs and notes are stored in site-specific folders on a shared drive.
11. QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL
The field maintenance team focuses on several areas to limit sources of possible
contamination, to prevent equipment failure during maintenance, and to ensure that site
maintenance has been performed correctly. These areas include cleaning and inspection of
components, equipment replacement, taking pictures of site equipment prior to departure, and
closely monitoring the data from a site for several weeks after maintenance was performed.
11.1 Cleaning and Inspection of Components
During site maintenance, field technicians thoroughly clean components with alcohol and
Kimwipes™ (or an alternate lint-free cloth) to reduce or eliminate any possible contaminants.
Field technicians also inspect components for spider webs and other signs of pest infestation
present in the modules and in the inlets. “D” modules are scrutinized to ensure that no anodizing
dust is present due to the stack rubbing against the funnel or against the roof. If signs of anodizing
dust are found, the field manager is notified immediately. If the issue causing the anodizing dust
cannot be fixed during maintenance, the site is flagged for any equipment necessary to resolve the
problem.
11.2 Equipment Replacement
Because of the potential for equipment failure, the field maintenance crew no longer rebuilds
or repairs equipment in the field. Instead, field technicians examine flow data for the sites that
they will be visiting prior to departing on the maintenance trip and determine what equipment
may need replacing in the field. Field technicians bring enough spare equipment to meet any
needs that can be identified through both the flow data and through speaking with the site
operators before the visit.
If a piece of equipment is showing signs of impending failure at the site, field technicians will
either change it out with the spare equipment they brought with them, or the equipment is
IMPROVE Site Maintenance
SOP 226, Version 2.1
Date: February 12, 2016
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flagged for replacement. This reduces risk of equipment failure due to less than optimal working
conditions.
11.3 Documenting the Site with Photographs
Prior to departing the site, field technicians photograph all of the equipment. This documents
that the site was left in the same or better condition then it was found and that the sampler has
been completely reassembled after maintenance. Photographs of the modules are taken to show
that the stacks have been lowered back into the Tees for the PM2.5 modules and that the PM10
module stack has been lowered back into the funnel. Photographs are also taken of the roof to
document that the inlets were placed back on top of the stacks and that the stacks were properly
seated.
In addition to documenting the complete reassembly of the site, the photographs are useful
for assisting AQG staff with troubleshooting over the phone with operators, as the photographs
allow the field technician to view the site configuration remotely.
11.4 Data Monitoring
The flow data returning from the site shortly after maintenance has occurred is particularly
scrutinized to ensure that the calibration was performed properly and that the resulting values are
valid, as well as to confirm that any replaced equipment is working appropriately. Action is taken
immediately if any equipment appears to be malfunctioning or if any of the flow data differs
significantly from what was expected.
12. REFERENCES/ATTACHMENTS
Attachment 1, “Maintenance Packing Lists”
Attachment 2, “Maintenance Checklist”
SOP 201, “Sample Maintenance by Site Operators”
TI 226A, “Site Maintenance for Field Technicians”
TI 226B, “Flow Check”
TI 226C, “Calibration”
TI 226D, “Denuders”
TI 226E, “Leak Check”
TI 226F, “Controller Repair”
TI 226G, “Field Safety Plan”
TI 226H, “Calibration of Flow Check Devices”
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