Using Siebel Tools - Oracle Help Center

Using Siebel Tools
Version 7.7, Rev. A
September 2004
Siebel Systems, Inc., 2207 Bridgepointe Parkway, San Mateo, CA 94404
Copyright © 2004 Siebel Systems, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Printed in the United States of America
No part of this publication may be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, or reproduced in any way,
including but not limited to photocopy, photographic, magnetic, or other record, without the prior
agreement and written permission of Siebel Systems, Inc.
Siebel, the Siebel logo, TrickleSync, Universal Agent, and other Siebel names referenced herein are
trademarks of Siebel Systems, Inc., and may be registered in certain jurisdictions.
Other product names, designations, logos, and symbols may be trademarks or registered trademarks of
their respective owners.
PRODUCT MODULES AND OPTIONS. This guide contains descriptions of modules that are optional and
for which you may not have purchased a license. Siebel’s Sample Database also includes data related to
these optional modules. As a result, your software implementation may differ from descriptions in this
guide. To find out more about the modules your organization has purchased, see your corporate
purchasing agent or your Siebel sales representative.
U.S. GOVERNMENT RESTRICTED RIGHTS. Programs, Ancillary Programs and Documentation, delivered
subject to the Department of Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, are “commercial
computer software” as set forth in DFARS 227.7202, Commercial Computer Software and Commercial
Computer Software Documentation, and as such, any use, duplication and disclosure of the Programs,
Ancillary Programs and Documentation shall be subject to the restrictions contained in the applicable
Siebel license agreement. All other use, duplication and disclosure of the Programs, Ancillary Programs
and Documentation by the U.S. Government shall be subject to the applicable Siebel license agreement
and the restrictions contained in subsection (c) of FAR 52.227-19, Commercial Computer Software Restricted Rights (June 1987), or FAR 52.227-14, Rights in Data—General, including Alternate III (June
1987), as applicable. Contractor/licensor is Siebel Systems, Inc., 2207 Bridgepointe Parkway, San
Mateo, CA 94404.
Proprietary Information
Siebel Systems, Inc. considers information included in this
documentation and in Siebel eBusiness Applications Online Help to
be Confidential Information. Your access to and use of this
Confidential Information are subject to the terms and conditions of:
(1) the applicable Siebel Systems software license agreement, which
has been executed and with which you agree to comply; and (2) the
proprietary and restricted rights notices included in this
documentation.
Contents
Using Siebel Tools 1
Chapter 1: What’s New in This Release
Chapter 2: About the Siebel Tools User Interface
About Siebel Tools
13
About Siebel Tools Application Windows
About Object Explorer
The
The
The
The
14
15
Project Drop-Down List of the Object Explorer
Types Tab of the Object Explorer 16
Detail Tab of the Object Explorer 17
Flat Tab of the Object Explorer 17
About the Object List Editor
18
About the Properties Window
About the Applets Window
16
20
21
About the Controls/Columns Window
About the Bookmarks Window
21
24
About the Web Template Explorer Window
About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
25
25
File Menu 26
Edit Menu 27
View Menu 28
Screens Menu 30
Go Menu 31
Query Menu 32
Reports Menu 32
Format Menu 33
Debug Menu 33
Tools Menu 34
Window Menu 36
Help Menu 37
About Siebel Tools Toolbars
37
Edit Toolbar 38
History Toolbar 39
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 3
Contents
List Toolbar 39
Debug Toolbar 40
Web Controls Toolbar 41
Format Toolbar 43
Configuration Context Toolbar
45
About Siebel Tools Right-Click Menus
About Layout Editors
45
46
About New Object Wizards
46
About the Entity Relationship Designer
About the Business Process Designer
About Script Editors
46
47
47
About the Command Line Interface
48
Chapter 3: Customizing Your Tools Environment
Showing and Hiding Confirmation Dialog Boxes
Setting Change Date Preferences
Selecting a Language Mode
49
50
50
Enabling Language Overrides
51
Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source Control
Setting Source Control Options 52
Configuring the srcctrl.bat File 52
Example of Integrating with Microsoft Visual SourceSafe
Specifying Data Sources
56
57
Restarting Editors After Check Out
58
Setting Commit Options for Full Get
58
Defining Object List Editor Display Options
Setting Scripting Options
59
59
Defining the Web Template Editor
Setting Debug Options
51
60
61
Customizing Visualization Views
62
Showing and Hiding Object Types in the Object Explorer
Setting Database Options
63
65
Setting the Constrain Mode for Working With Symbolic Strings
Defining a Target Browser
4 ■
66
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
65
Contents
Showing and Hiding Windows
Docking Windows
66
67
Showing and Hiding Editors
68
Showing Visualization Views
68
Showing and Hiding Debug Windows
Showing and Hiding Toolbars
68
69
Showing and Hiding the Status Bar
69
Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer
69
Chapter 4: Getting Projects From the Server Repository
About the Get Process
Performing a Full Get
71
71
Getting Projects from the Server Repository
Getting Locale-Specific Data Only
72
73
Chapter 5: Checking Out and Checking In Projects and
Objects
About the Check Out and Check In Process
Setting Options for Check Out and Check In
Guidelines for Check Out and Check In
75
76
About the Project Check Out Dialog Box
77
About the Object Check Out Dialog Box
79
About the Check In Dialog Box
75
81
Checking Out and Checking In Projects
82
Checking Out Projects from the Server Repository 82
Checking In Projects to the Server Repository 83
Checking Out and Checking In Objects
84
About Object Check Out and Check In 84
Enabling Object Check Out and Check In 85
Setting Projects to Allow Object Locking 85
Checking Out Objects from the Server Repository 85
Checking In Objects to the Server Repository
86
Viewing Locked Objects Within Projects 86
Locking Objects Locally 87
Limitations of Object Check Out and Check In 87
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 5
Contents
Viewing Object Differences
Undoing Check Out
87
88
Chapter 6: Working With Projects
About Projects
89
Creating New Projects
Renaming Projects
90
90
Associating Objects with Different Projects
90
Locking Projects Directly in the Local Repository
Preventing Object Check in and Check out
Unlocking Projects Directly
91
92
92
Chapter 7: Working with Objects
Summary of Tasks for Working with Objects
Creating Objects
Modifying Objects
93
95
96
Copying Objects
97
Deleting Objects
97
About Validating Objects
98
Validating Objects Using the Object List Editor
98
Validating Objects Using the Command-Line Interface
About the Validate Dialog Box
99
About the Validation Options Dialog Box
Using Queries to List Objects
About Simple Queries
102
104
105
About Compound Queries
105
Searching the Repository for Objects
Viewing Object Relationships
106
108
Generating Reports About Object Relationships
109
About Object Comparison and Synchronization
111
About the Compare Objects Dialog Box
Comparing Objects 113
Synchronizing Objects 115
6 ■
112
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
99
Contents
Determining When Records Were Last Created and Updated
115
Chapter 8: Compiling and Testing
About Compiling
117
Compiling Projects
117
Compiling Single Objects or Groups of Objects
Compiling Using the Command-Line Interface
Testing Changes on Your Local Machine
119
119
121
Chapter 9: Working With Archive Files
About Archive Files
123
Exporting Objects to an Archive File
123
Exporting Objects to an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface
Process of Importing Objects from an Archive File
125
Preparing the Target Repository for Import from an Archive File
Importing Objects from an Archive File
124
125
126
About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions Dialog Box
128
Importing Objects From an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface
131
Chapter 10: Managing Repositories
About Repositories
133
Viewing Which Repository is Currently Open
134
Reviewing Information About the Current Repository
Guidelines for Naming Repositories
Renaming Repositories
Deleting Repositories
134
135
136
136
About Exporting and Importing Repositories
137
Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database Configuration Utility
About Repository Patch Files
141
Creating Repository Patch Files
142
Applying Repository Patch Files
144
Upgrading Repositories
137
145
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 7
Contents
Chapter 11: Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific
Data
About the Symbolic Strings Model
147
Creating Symbolic String References
149
Modifying Symbolic Strings to Globally Update Display Values
Using Symbolic String References
Entering String Overrides
149
150
151
About Converting and Consolidating Strings
151
About the Symbolic String Conversion Process
152
About the Symbolic String Consolidation Process
Running the String Conversion Utility
154
154
Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert Strings
Exporting Candidates for Conversion 156
Splitting Conversion Export Files into Smaller Files 157
Importing Converted Symbolic Strings 157
Running the String Consolidation Utility
155
158
Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate Strings
Exporting Matching Symbolic Strings 159
Splitting Consolidation Export Files into Smaller Files 160
Importing Consolidated Strings 161
Using Batch Files to Convert and Consolidate Strings
159
162
Working with Non-Translatable Locale-Specific Object Properties
Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific Items in Applet Layout
About the Locale Management Utility
Finding Untranslated Text Strings
Finding Existing Translations
Finding Modified Objects
166
166
167
168
Exporting Text Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes
169
Importing Text Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes
169
Identifying Objects Modified Since the Last Export
Replacing Strings
172
Running the LMU Using the Command Line Interface
Exporting Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes
Importing an LMU File 173
8 ■
171
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
173
172
165
164
Contents
Exporting Strings to Be Translated
174
Index
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 9
Contents
10 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
1
What’s New in This Release
Using Siebel Tools is a new book title for version 7.7 that covers how to use the Siebel Tools
application. It describes the Siebel Tools user interface and includes tasks such as, customizing the
Siebel Tools environment, working with objects, checking in and checking out, and compiling. Using
Siebel Tools does not cover how to configure Siebel applications. For example, it does not cover how
to extend the data model, define business logic, or build user interface objects. For configurationrelated information, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
The content covered in Using Siebel Tools came from the following documents:
■
Descriptions of menus and toolbars were previously published in Siebel Developer’s Reference.
■
Descriptions of windows, editors, and most tasks were previously published in Siebel Tools
Reference.
NOTE: Siebel Tools Reference is no longer published. It has been replaced by Using Siebel Tools
and Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
What’s New in Using Siebel Tools, Version 7.7, Rev. A
Table 1 lists changes described in this version of the documentation to support version 7.7 of the
software.
Table 1. New Product Features in Using Siebel Tools, Version 7.7, Rev. A
Topic
Description
“About the Check Out and Check In
Process” on page 75
Added paragraph to introduce a new feature which allows you
to check out and check in individual objects. This feature is
new in Siebel Tools, version 7.7.2.
“About the Object Check Out Dialog
Box” on page 79
Added new topic.
“Checking Out and Checking In
Objects” on page 84
Added a series of new topics related to individual check out
and check in of objects.
“Summary of Tasks for Working with
Objects” on page 93
Added new topic.
“Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific
Items in Applet Layout” on
page 165
Added new topic.
“Working with Non-Translatable
Locale-Specific Object Properties”
on page 164
Added new information to existing topic.
“Finding Modified Objects” on
page 168
Added new topic.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11
What’s New in This Release ■
What’s New in Using Siebel Tools, Version 7.7
Table 2 lists changes described in this version of the documentation to support version 7.7 of the
software.
Table 2. New Product Features in Using Siebel Tools, Version 7.7
Topic
Description
“About the Entity Relationship
Designer” on page 46
Summary of Entity Relationship Designer.
“About the Business Process
Designer” on page 47
Summary of Business Process Designer.
“Setting the Constrain Mode for
Working With Symbolic Strings” on
page 65
Topic added to support the 7.7 symbolic strings model.
“Working With Strings and Other
Locale-Specific Data” on page 147
Added chapter about how to use the symbolic strings model,
including converting to symbolic strings and consolidating
duplicate strings.
“Working with Non-Translatable
Locale-Specific Object Properties”
on page 164
Added topic about working with locale-specific data and
language overrides.
12 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
2
About the Siebel Tools User
Interface
Topics in This Section
“About Siebel Tools” on page 13
“About Siebel Tools Application Windows” on page 14
“About Object Explorer” on page 15
“About the Object List Editor” on page 18
“About the Properties Window” on page 20
“About the Applets Window” on page 21
“About the Controls/Columns Window” on page 21
“About the Bookmarks Window” on page 24
“About the Web Template Explorer Window” on page 25
“About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar” on page 25
“About Siebel Tools Toolbars” on page 37
“About Siebel Tools Right-Click Menus” on page 45
“About Layout Editors” on page 46
“About New Object Wizards” on page 46
“About the Entity Relationship Designer” on page 46
“About the Business Process Designer” on page 47
“About Script Editors” on page 47
“About the Command Line Interface” on page 48
About Siebel Tools
Siebel Tools is an integrated environment for configuring Siebel applications. You use Siebel Tools to
modify standard Siebel objects and create new objects to meet your organization’s business
requirements. For example, you use Siebel Tools to extend the data model, modify business logic,
and define the user interface.
Siebel Tools is a declarative configuration tool, not a programming environment. You use Siebel Tools
to create and modify the object definitions (metadata) that define Siebel applications. You do not
modify the source code or directly write SQL.
NOTE: In the context of Siebel applications, the terms object and object definition are not equivalent
to the terms “object,” “object class,” or “object instance” as they are used in the context of
programming languages such as C++.
Siebel Tools allows you to develop a single configuration that can be:
■
Deployed across multiple types of clients
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Application Windows
■
Used to support multiple Siebel applications and languages
■
Easily maintained
■
Automatically upgraded to future Siebel product releases
About Siebel Tools Application Windows
You navigate in Siebel Tools primarily using the following two windows:
■
Object Explorer, the left part of the application window shown in Figure 1
■
Object List Editor, the right part of the application window shown in Figure 1
The Object Explorer uses a hierarchical tree-structure (similar to that of the Microsoft Windows
Explorer) that you use to browse the object types that are stored in the Siebel Repository.
Other Siebel Tools windows, like the Object List Editor and Properties windows, show you details
about individual objects in the Siebel repository.
Figure 1. Example of Siebel Tools Application Window
14 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Object Explorer
About Object Explorer
The Object Explorer, shown in Figure 2, appears when you start Siebel Tools. The Object Explorer
shows a hierarchical representation of the major object types that you can use to browse the object
types in the Siebel repository.
By default, the Object Explorer is visible when you start Siebel Tools. The Object Explorer has the
following parts: the Project drop-down list, the Types tab, the Detail tab, and the Flat tab.
Figure 2. Example of the Object Explorer Window
Topics in This Section
“The Project Drop-Down List of the Object Explorer” on page 16
“The Types Tab of the Object Explorer” on page 16
“The Detail Tab of the Object Explorer” on page 17
“The Flat Tab of the Object Explorer” on page 17
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Object Explorer
The Project Drop-Down List of the Object Explorer
Use the Project drop-down list at the top of the Object Explorer to filter objects by project. For
example, you can set the Project filter so that only the object types associated with the Account
project appear in the Object Explorer. An example of the values in the drop-down list is shown in
Figure 3.
Figure 3. The Project Drop-Down List in the Object Explorer Window
The Types Tab of the Object Explorer
The Types tab is selected in the Object Explorer shown in Figure 4 on page 17.
The Types tab shows all top-level object types, listed alphabetically. The Types tab shows the object
hierarchy—clicking the plus sign (+) to the left of an object type displays all the child object types
of the top-level object type. Clicking the minus sign (–) to the left of an object type collapses all its
child object types.
NOTE: By default, not all object types are visible in the Object Explorer. For information on how to
show and hide objects types, see “Setting Database Options” on page 65.
Some object types have a hierarchy of multiple levels. For example (as shown in Figure 4 on
page 17):
■
One of the child object types of Applet is List and, at the next lowest level, List Column.
16 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Object Explorer
■
One of the child object types of Business Component is Field.
Figure 4. The Types Tab of the Object Explorer Window
The Detail Tab of the Object Explorer
If you select the Detail tab of the Object Explorer (as shown in Figure 5) and expand an object type,
all the objects of that type appear in the Object Explorer. If you select an object type in the Detail
tab, the Object List Editor displays all the objects of that type.
Figure 5. The Detail Tab of the Object Explorer Window
The Flat Tab of the Object Explorer
The Flat tab of the Object Explorer, shown in Figure 6, shows all object types (parent and child) in a
single, alphabetically-arranged list, without displaying the parent-child relationship.
The Flat tab view helps you:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Object List Editor
■
Find a child object with an unknown parent.
For example, if you created a new field but do not remember what business component it is in,
you can select the Field object type in the Flat tab and search the Name property for your field
name. Each returned record has a parent property that provides the business component name.
■
See how objects and properties are typically used, such as how a predefault value is constructed
or the syntax for calculated fields.
Figure 6. The Flat Tab of the Object Explorer Window
About the Object List Editor
The Object List Editor displays the objects for the object type currently selected in the Object
Explorer. If the object selected in the Object Explorer is a second or third-level object, two Object
List Editors are displayed—the object for the type selected in the Object Explorer is in the bottom
window. In the example shown in Figure 7, the top-level object is Applet, the specific applet is
Activity Prospects List Applet, and the available Web templates are Base (selected), Edit, and Edit
List.
18 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Object List Editor
In the same figure, the pencil icon (to the left of the applet name) indicates that the applet has been
locked by the Siebel Tools user, so that modifications to it can be saved.
Figure 7. Example of the Object List Editor Window
Inactive Objects
Inactive objects have the Inactive property set to TRUE, which inactivates the record in the
repository table.
Changed Flag
After you edit a record, a check mark appears in the Changed property of the object. This indicates
that changes have been made to the contents of the corresponding record since a particular date
and time. If there is no check mark in the Changed property, it means that the object has not been
changed since the date and time specified in the General tab of the Development Options dialog box.
The Changed flag cascades upwards through its parents. That is, when an object is edited or created,
the changed flag is set for its parent object, if any, and for the parent object of that parent, and
likewise up through the hierarchy. For more information, see “Setting Change Date Preferences” on
page 50.
Pencil Icon
The pencil icon in the first (W) column of an object indicates that the object is locked and editable.
In Figure 7, all visible objects are locked.
Drilldowns
Property values in the Object List Editor can appear as drilldown fields (hyperlinks) when the value
is the name of another object. You can click the drilldown to navigate to the associated object type.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 19
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Properties Window
To be able to use drilldowns in the Object List Editor, you must be assigned the Developer
responsibility. Users are assigned responsibilities in the Administration - Application >
Reproducibilities screen of Siebel applications. For more information, see Security Guide for Siebel
eBusiness Applications.
About the Properties Window
The Properties window (shown in Figure 8) displays the property settings for the object currently
highlighted in the Object List Editor. The name of the active object is shown at the top of the window
(in Figure 8, Business Component Abs Result). For each property of the object, the Properties window
shows the name of the property in the left column, and the property’s value in the right column. By
default, the Properties window appears with the Alphabetic tab active; you can click the Categorized
tab to see the properties grouped by category.
NOTE: The Properties window does not display the Project and Changed properties.
Figure 8. Example of the Properties Window
20 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Applets Window
About the Applets Window
The Applets window displays the applets that are part of a given business object. Clicking one of the
applets opens the Applet Layout Editor. In the View Layout Editor, you drag applet icons from the
Applet Window into the view layout editor. The Applets window has two tabs: the Icons tab (shown
on the left in Figure 9) and the List tab (shown on the right in Figure 9).
Figure 9. Example of Applets Windows with the Icons and List Tabs
About the Controls/Columns Window
The Controls/Columns window, shown in Figure 10, displays controls and columns available for
configuration when editing an applet layout in the Web Applet Editor. You drag the control or column
icon into the placeholder in the Web Applet Editor.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 21
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Controls/Columns Window
When you select a control or a column object in the Controls/Columns window, the Properties window
refreshes to show the properties of the selected object, as shown in Figure 10. If no object is selected
in the Controls/Columns window, the Properties window shows the properties of the applet.
Figure 10. Example of the Controls/Columns Window
22 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Controls/Columns Window
The properties of the
object selected in the
Controls/Column window
The control and
column objects for
this applet
The applet as it
appears in the Web
Applet Editor
Figure 11. Example of the Controls/Columns Window with the Web Applet Editor
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 23
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Bookmarks Window
About the Bookmarks Window
The Bookmarks window (shown in Figure 12) lets you navigate to frequently used objects in the
repository using shortcuts that you add using the buttons on the History toolbar.
Figure 12. Example of the Bookmarks Window
Related Topic
“History Toolbar” on page 39
24 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Web Template Explorer Window
About the Web Template Explorer
Window
The Web Template Explorer window (shown in Figure 13) is a Windows Explorer-like listing of Web
templates. Clicking an item in the Web Template Explorer displays the HTML source code of the Siebel
Web Template (.swt) file for review or editing in the HTML code window (shown in the right part of
the window in Figure 13). The HTML code window displays both parent and child templates in a split
view. The Web Template drop-down list in the Web Template Explorer window lets you filter the
templates that are shown in the Web Template Explorer window. You can edit a template file by rightclicking in the HTML code window for that template.
Figure 13. Example of Web Template Explorer Window with HTML Code Window
About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
The menus in the menu bar operate as standard Microsoft Windows menus. You click a menu to
display the menu commands. Menu commands that are not available due to the current state of the
program are disabled.
Topics in This Section
“File Menu” on page 26
“Edit Menu” on page 27
“View Menu” on page 28
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 25
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
“Screens Menu” on page 30
“Go Menu” on page 31
“Query Menu” on page 32
“Reports Menu” on page 32
“Format Menu” on page 33
“Debug Menu” on page 33
“Tools Menu” on page 34
“Window Menu” on page 36
“Help Menu” on page 37
Related Topics
“About Siebel Tools Toolbars” on page 37
File Menu
Table 3 describes the options available on the File menu for repository and object management.
Table 3. File Menu Options
Menu Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Open Repository
When multiple repositories are present in the development directory, the menu
option provides the means to open a repository other than the currently open
one.
The repository chosen using File > Open Repository becomes the default
repository opened each time Siebel Tools is launched.
New Object
Invokes the New Object Wizard for the creation of a list applet, form applet,
chart applet, tree applet, business component, report, table, command, pick
list, MVG, or view.
Close
(CTRL+F4)
Closes the Object List Editor.
Save
(CTRL+S)
Saves changes in the current editing window when you are editing Layout,
Menu, or Basic Scripts.
Save All
Saves changes in all open editing windows.
Import
Imports text from an external text file into the Siebel VB Editor window. This
text should be in an SBL file format. SBL format is generated when it is
exported from the Siebel VB editor.
Export
Allows you to create a text file in delimited or HTML format that lists the
property values of an objects or all objects currently displayed in the Object
List Editor.
26 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 3. File Menu Options
Menu Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Print Setup
Changes the printer and printing options for printing object visualization view
diagrams.
Print Preview
Opens a print preview window for display of an object visualization view.
Print
(CTRL+P)
Prints the active object visualization view diagram.
Exit
Closes Siebel Tools.
Edit Menu
The Edit menu options apply to individual objects in the Object List Editor.
You can also display a menu of edit tools by selecting a field and right-clicking while the cursor is
positioned over the Object List Editor. For more information, see “About Siebel Tools Right-Click
Menus” on page 45.
Table 4 describes the options available on the Edit menu.
Table 4. Edit Menu Options
Menu Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Undo
(CTRL+Z)
Reverses the last change to a property value in the Object List Editor or Property
window before the object is committed.
Redo
(CTRL+Y)
Reapplies changes after the Undo command has been executed.
Undo Record
Reverses the creation of new objects or all modifications to existing objects, so
long as the record has not yet been committed.
New Record
(CTRL+N)
Creates a new object in the Object List Editor, with the cursor positioned in the
first required property.
Copy Record
(CTRL+B)
Creates a new object that is a copy of the currently selected object, and
duplicates all child objects.
NOTE: Avoid using the Copy Record option, except when the reuse and extension
of an existing object would be impractical.
Delete Record
(CTRL+D)
Deletes the currently selected object and its child objects.
NOTE: Avoid using the Delete Record option. If you want to remove an object
from use, set its Inactive property to TRUE.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 27
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 4. Edit Menu Options
Menu Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Cut
(CTRL+X)
In a text property, copies the selected text to the clipboard and deletes the
existing text. In the Applet Designer, copies the selected control to the clipboard
and deletes the existing control.
Copy
(CTRL+C)
In a text property, copies the selected text to the clipboard without deleting it.
In the Applet Designer, copies the selected control to the clipboard without
deleting it.
Paste
(CTRL+V)
Inserts text from the clipboard into a text property at the insertion point. Inserts
a control from the clipboard in the Applet Designer.
Delete
(DEL)
In a text property, deletes the selected text. In the Applet Designer, deletes the
selected control.
Select All
(CTRL+A)
Selects the entire document. In the Applet Designer, selects all controls in the
applet.
Change
Records
Changes multiple records simultaneously.
Find
(CTRL+F)
Finds the specified text in the Siebel Script Editor window.
Replace
(CTRL+H)
Replaces the specified text with different text in the Siebel Script Editor window.
View Menu
The View menu options are used to change display environment settings, such as which windows and
toolbars appear. It also invokes visualization views, which are diagrams showing object relationships.
Table 5 describes the View menu options and suboptions.
Table 5. View Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
(Shortcut)
Description
Windows
Properties Window
Shows or hides the Properties window.
Applets Window
Shows or hides the Applets window.
Controls Window
Shows or hides the Controls window.
Bookmarks Window
Shows or hides the Bookmarks window.
Web Templates Window
Shows or hides the Web Templates Explorer window.
Refresh Windows
Requeries and updates the state of dockable windows.
28 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 5. View Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
(Shortcut)
Editors
Applet Editor
Opens the selected applet in Applet Layout Editor,
including the Controls/Columns window.
Server Script Editor
Opens the Siebel Script Editor. Editor may be specifically
defined or be set to a default.
Browser Script Editor
Opens the Siebel Web Script Editor, which is used to
access scripts that control the presentation and behavior
of applet controls and list columns in a Web applet
template.
View Details
For more information, see “Viewing Object Relationships”
on page 108.
Visualize
View Relationships
Description
View Descendents
View Web Hierarchy
Debug
Windows
Calls
(CTRL+L)
Opens the Calls window for display of the call stack of
the Siebel VB or Siebel eScript script currently being
debugged.
Watch
(SHIFT+F9)
Opens the Watch window for display of the values of
local variables in the Siebel VB or Siebel eScript script
currently being debugged.
Errors
Opens the Errors window for display of the run-time
errors in the Siebel VB or Siebel eScript script currently
being debugged.
Preview
The preview of a Web view layout depicts the container
page, screen bar, and view bar.
ActiveX
Methods
Allows you to view the methods for the current ActiveX
control in the Applet Designer.
Toolbars
Displays or hides the various toolbars: Edit, History, List,
Debug, Web Controls, and Configuration Context.
Status Bar
Displays or hides the Status bar at the bottom of the
Siebel Tools window.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 29
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 5. View Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
(Shortcut)
Description
Object
Explorer
(CTRL+E)
Displays or hides the Object Explorer.
Options
Opens the Development Tools Options dialog box, in
which you can set general preferences and settings for
language, check-in and check-out, list views, scripting,
Web template editor, debugging, visualization, Object
Explorer, and database.
Siebel Tools options are stored in a user preference file,
which is located in <Tools_install_root>\BIN. The user
preference filename is login_ID&application_name.spf.
Screens Menu
The Screens menu is empty unless you log on to Siebel Tools as a system administrator. If you have
system administrator rights, the options described in Table 6 appear.
Table 6. Screens Menu Options
Option
Suboption
Description
Application
Upgrader
Application Upgrade Attribute List
The Application Upgrades and Attribute
Differences lists appear in the Object List
Editor.
Application Upgrade Database
Version
For internal use by Siebel Systems.
Application Upgrade Object List
The Application Upgrades, Object
Differences, and Attribute Differences lists
appear in the Object List Editor.
30 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 6. Screens Menu Options
Option
Suboption
Description
System
Administration
List of Values
Displays lists of values in the development
database.
Strings
Siebel Systems internal use only
System Preferences
Displays system preferences in the Object
List Editor. This information is similar to
the System Administrator View available
from the Application Administration
Screen in Siebel eBusiness Applications.
System Preferences is used by the
src\server\sfs\common\locate_fulfill\cssc
onfigagent.cpp file. The system preference
is used by fulfillment and part locator
engines for cleaning the rows in a
temporary table that is shared by the
client and server components. The
parameter is only used when you want to
clean up the temporary table. In that case,
you must explicitly submit a CleanUp
request to fulfillment/part locator engines.
Go Menu
The Go menu contains options for moving through a records list. Primarily, you use the Go menu to
create and navigate to bookmarks, which flag objects for easy return navigation. Bookmarks are a
helpful navigation aid, allowing you to move around among the objects of different types you are
working on. Table 7 describes the Go menu options.
Table 7. Go Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Back
Returns to the previously displayed screen.
Forward
Returns to subsequently displayed screen.
Previous Record
(CTRL+UP)
Goes to the objects above the current selection.
Next Record
(CTRL+DOWN)
Goes to the objects below the current selection.
First Record
(CTRL+PGUP)
Goes to the first objects in the list.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 31
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 7. Go Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Last Record
(CTRL+PGDN)
Goes to the last objects in the list.
Add Bookmark
Invokes the Add Bookmark dialog box, for creation of a bookmark to the
currently selected objects.
Bookmark List
Opens the Bookmarks dialog box, for selection of an existing bookmark
to navigate to. You can also use this dialog box to rename or delete
existing bookmarks.
Query Menu
The Query menu options allow you to create and refine Object List Editor queries, which restrict the
list of objects that appear in the current Object List Editor. An option is provided that lets you change
the sort order of objects in the window. Table 8 describes the Query menu options.
Table 8. Query Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Description
New Query
(CTRL+Q)
Allows you to specify restrictions on the set of objects to be displayed in the
current Object List Editor.
Refine Query
(CTRL+R)
Allows you to add additional restrictions to the query currently in effect.
Execute Query
(ENTER)
Executes the query you have just specified, causing the restrictions to take
effect. This has the same effect as pressing ENTER.
Sort Order
Invokes the Sort Order dialog box, for specification of sort order criteria for the
list of objects in the Object List Editor.
Reports Menu
The Reports menu may be empty or may list one or more available reports about objects and
properties, depending on which object type is currently active in the Object Explorer. Table 34 in
“Generating Reports About Object Relationships” on page 109 describes the different reports you can
generate using the Reports menu.
Two additional reports become available on this menu when the Application Upgrader is active:
■
Application Upgrade Object List. Generates a report listing all object differences between
repository versions.
32 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
■
Application Upgrade Attributes List. Generates a report listing all attribute differences
between repository versions.
Format Menu
The Format menu options in the Applet Layout Editor allow you to align, resize, and reposition
controls; configure the snap grid; and adjust tab or list column order. Options are also provided for
performing an Applet Designer Preview. Table 9 describes the Format menu options.
Table 9. Format Menu Options
Option
Description
Align
Aligns the selected items with the selected model.
Make Same Size
Makes all selected items the same size as the selected model.
Horizontal Spacing
Adjusts horizontal spacing between items.
Vertical Spacing
Adjusts vertical spacing between items.
Center in Applet
Centers the selected items horizontally or vertically.
Set Label Alignment
Allows you to align labels in applets based on grid layout Web templates.
Set Tab Order
Allows you to set the tab order for fields in a form applet. This option is not
available for list applets.
Debug Menu
The Debug menu options control the Siebel VB or Siebel eScript debugger, for use when a script is
open in the Siebel Script Editor. Table 10 describes the Debug menu options.
Table 10. Debug Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Start
(F5)
Starts the application. A dialog box with startup parameters also appears.
Break
(CTRL+BREAK)
Stops the execution of the currently running script. If Siebel VB or Siebel
eScript is not executing, no operation is performed.
End
Stops the execution of the application and returns to the Siebel Script Editor
window.
Restart
(SHIFT+F5)
Restarts the application if a break has occurred.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 33
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 10. Debug Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Description
Step Into
(F8)
Executes the next line of script code. If this is a subroutine or procedure
call, then execution continues within that procedure.
Step Over
(SHIFT+F8)
Advances the application to the script code line just after the current
subroutine or procedure. Execution remains at the level of the current
procedure.
Step To Cursor
(CTRL+F8)
Executes all lines of code up to the line selected by the cursor.
Toggle Breakpoint
(F9)
Sets or removes a breakpoint on a specific line of code.
Clear All
Breakpoints
(CTRL+SHIFT+F9)
Removes all breakpoints from the current script routine.
Check Syntax
Compiles the current script and verifies syntax.
Tools Menu
Table 11 describes the Tools menu options.
Table 11. Tools Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
Description
Compile (F7)
Opens the Object Compiler dialog box to compile one or
more projects, or all projects in the repository, into an
SRF file.
Compile Selected Objects
(CTRL+F7)
Opens the Object Compiler dialog box to compile the
selected objects into an SRF file.
Check Out
(F10)
Opens the Check Out dialog box, to copy one or more
projects from the server to the local database.
Check In
(CTRL+F10)
Opens the Check In dialog box, to copy one or more
projects from the local database to the server.
Lock Project
(ALT+L)
Locks the project that the currently selected object is
assigned to.
Unlock Project
(ALT+U)
Unlocks the project that the currently selected object is
assigned to.
Add To Archive
Opens the Export To Archive dialog box, for adding the
selected top-level objects or projects to an archive file.
34 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 11. Tools Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
Import From Archive
Compare Objects
Description
Initiates the Import wizard for importing objects from
an archive file.
Selected
Compares two selected objects and graphically displays
similarities and differences (in object type and
instance), with a list of object properties by name and
value.
Selected vs.
Repository
Compares the selected object against the corresponding
object in the selected repository and graphically
displays similarities and differences.
Selected vs.
Archive
Compares the selected object against the corresponding
object in the selected archive file and graphically
displays similarities and differences.
Archive vs.
Archive
Compares two selected archive files and graphically
displays similarities and differences.
Convert to Grid Layout
Converts non-grid layout form applets to grid layout.
Search Repository
Opens the Search Repository dialog box for performing
a search for objects based on the text in their names (or
other properties) and their object types.
Validate Object
From the Validate dialog box, runs validation on a
selected object. Lists any errors by severity, rule
number, object name, and error description. Allows
changing of options for rules, severity, and
enforcement.
Upgrade
Prepare
Repository
Used for upgrading from version 6.x to version 7.x. The
Prepare Repository utility is run before performing a
repository merge. It migrates strings from the S_MSG
table, merges labels and fields, and merges templates
to specified applets for selected languages.
Upgrade
Application
Navigates to the Application Objects Upgrade List in the
Application Upgrader screen of Siebel Tools, and opens
the Merge Repositories dialog box. Used to merge
standard and customized repositories.
Generate EIM
Processing
Columns
Opens the EIM Processing Column Generator dialog box,
from which you create missing EIM processing columns
and indexes after merging the repository.
Web Client
Migration
Used when upgrading from version 6.x to version 7.x. It
associates Web templates to a group of selected applets
and views so that they can be used in the web client.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 35
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar
Table 11. Tools Menu Options
Option
(Shortcut)
Suboption
Description
Utilities
Check Labels
Opens the Check Labels dialog box to check the labels
in the currently selected applet for sufficient horizontal
space when translated into a particular language.
Generate
Actuate Report
When a Report object is selected, this menu option
generates a data stream file for use in the creation of an
Actuate report.
Generate Help
IDs
Used internally by Siebel Systems to generate the
sshelp.hm file, containing correspondences between
context ID numbers and text help identifiers that have
been specified in Help ID objects. This option is used for
Tools Online Help.
Locale
Management
Allows you to import and export translatable text strings
and locale-specific attributes using the Local
Management Utility.
Map Fax
Properties
When the business component object type is selected in
the Object Explorer, this option opens the Map Fax
Properties dialog box for the current business
component object. This dialog box is used to create
mappings between fields in the business component and
fax software property sheet properties. These mappings
support customization of the fax cover sheet and
message.
Export View
Previews
Exports view from the Preview mode of the View Layout
Editor to an HTML file.
Build Patch
Initiates the Patch Builder wizard to create a patch file.
Apply Patch
Opens the Apply Patch window to initiate the patch
application process.
Window Menu
The Window menu lists the currently open Object List Editor, Application Designer, visualization view,
and other windows, and provides the means to navigate to windows that are currently hidden from
view.
If one of the windows is open, the first option on the menu is Close. This closes the currently active
window.
36 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Help Menu
Table 12 describes the Help menu options.
Table 12. Help Menu Options
Option
Description
Contents
Opens the Siebel Tools Online Help.
Using Help
Opens the Siebel Tools Online Help.
Technical Support
Displays the Technical Support Information dialog box and allows you to
update license key information. The dialog box displays the phone numbers
for calling or sending a fax to Siebel Technical Support. It also displays
information that Technical Support needs, such as the version number of
your Siebel Tools installation and the command line syntax used to open
Siebel Tools.
About Record
Opens a dialog box that displays information about the current object,
including its creator and creation date.
About SRF
Opens a dialog box that displays information about the most recent full
incremental compilations.
About View
Opens a dialog box that displays information about the current screen,
business object, and view, including applet layout.
About Visible Views
Displays the list of views in the repository and whether or not they are
visible.
About Siebel Tools
Opens a dialog box identifying the version of Siebel Tools.
About Siebel Tools Toolbars
There are several toolbars in Siebel Tools. The toolbars, like menu items, are active only when the
object type or window that uses them is active. You can show and hide toolbars using the Toolbars
option in the View menu. You can also rearrange the toolbars using drag-and-drop functionality.
Topics in This Section
“Edit Toolbar” on page 38
“History Toolbar” on page 39
“List Toolbar” on page 39
“Debug Toolbar” on page 40
“Web Controls Toolbar” on page 41
“Web Controls Toolbar” on page 41
“Format Toolbar” on page 43
“Configuration Context Toolbar” on page 45
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 37
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Related Topics
“About the Siebel Tools Menu Bar” on page 25
“Showing and Hiding Toolbars” on page 69
Edit Toolbar
The Edit toolbar contains edit tools, the New Object wizard, and undo and redo options.
You can also display a menu of edit tools by selecting a field and right-clicking while the cursor is
positioned over the Object List Editor. For more information, see “About Siebel Tools Right-Click
Menus” on page 45.
Table 13 describes the Edit toolbar buttons.
Table 13. Edit Toolbar Buttons
Button
38 ■
Description
New
Invokes the New Object Wizard, which allows you to create applets,
views, charts, and other objects.
Save
Saves changes in the current editing window when you are editing Layout,
Menu, or Basic Scripts.
Save All
Saves changes in all open editing windows.
Cut
In a text property, copies the selected text to the clipboard and deletes
the existing text. In the Applet Designer, copies the selected control to the
clipboard and deletes the existing control.
Copy
In a text property, copies the selected text to the clipboard without
deleting it. In the Applet Designer, copies the selected control to the
clipboard without deleting it.
Paste
Inserts text from the clipboard into a text property at the insertion point.
In the Applet Designer, inserts a control from the clipboard.
Undo
Reverses the last change to a property value in the Object List Editor or
Property window if the object has not been committed.
Redo
Reapplies changes after the Undo command has been executed.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
History Toolbar
The History toolbar contains buttons for retracing your steps and for creating and navigating to
bookmarks, which flag objects for quick return navigation. Bookmarks are a helpful navigation aid,
allowing you to move around quickly among the different object types with which you are working.
Table 14 describes the History toolbar buttons.
Table 14. History Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Go Back
Returns to the previously displayed screen.
Go Forward
Returns to the subsequent displayed screen.
Add Bookmark
Opens the Add Bookmark dialog box, so you can add a bookmark for
the currently selected object.
Bookmark List
Opens the Bookmarks window, so you can select a bookmark to
navigate to. You can also use this window to rename or delete
existing bookmarks.
List Toolbar
The List toolbar contains buttons that apply to objects in the Object List Editor. The buttons let you
insert new records, move forward and backward, work with queries, and sort objects. Table 15
describes the List toolbar buttons.
Table 15. List Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Add New Record
Creates a new object in the Object List Editor, with the cursor
positioned in the first required property.
First Record
Goes to the first object in the list.
Previous Record
Goes to the object above the current selection.
Next Record
Goes to the object below the current selection.
Last Record
Goes to the last object in the list.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 39
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Table 15. List Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
New Query
Allows you to specify one or more restrictions on the set of
objects to be displayed in the current Object List Editor.
Execute Query
Executes the query you have just specified, causing the
restrictions to take effect. This has the same effect as pressing
ENTER.
Sort Ascending
Changes the order in which objects appear by sorting them in
ascending order on the currently selected property column.
Sort Descending
Changes the order in which objects appear by sorting them in
descending order on the currently selected property column.
Debug Toolbar
The Debug toolbar contains buttons, described in Table 16, that let you access Siebel VB and Siebel
eScript debugging tools.
Table 16. Debug Toolbar Buttons
Button
40 ■
Description
Check Syntax
Compiles the current script and verifies syntax.
Start
Starts the application. A dialog box with startup parameters also
appears.
Break
Stops the execution of the currently running script. If Siebel VB
or Siebel eScript is not executing, no operation is performed.
End
Stops the execution of the application and returns to the Siebel
Script Editor window.
Toggle Breakpoint
Sets or removes a breakpoint on a specific line of code.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Table 16. Debug Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Watch
The Tools menu establishes variable watches, so you can
monitor the contents of program variables in the Variable
window during execution of Siebel VB and Siebel eScript
routines.
Calls
Displays the list of Siebel VB or Siebel eScript routine calls
executed up to the point where the application was stopped.
Step Into
Executes the next line of script code. If this is a subroutine or
procedure call, then execution continues within that procedure.
Step Over
Advances the application to the script code line just after the
current subroutine or procedure. Execution remains at the level
of the current procedure.
Web Controls Toolbar
The Web Controls toolbar allows you to create user interface controls in the Applet Layout Editor. You
can reposition the toolbar as a floating window anywhere on the screen, or you can place it with the
other toolbars at the top of the screen. The toolbar supports drag-and-drop behavior for the creation
and placement of new controls. The Web Controls toolbar contains drop-down lists, fields, and
buttons.
Drop-Down Lists and Fields
■
Mode. This drop-down list lets you select the applet mode, such as Base or Edit. Values in the
drop-down list indicate whether a given mode is active or inactive.
■
Template. This field shows the Web template associated with the selected mode.
■
Control Type. This drop-down list lets you insert a custom control type into a template. Works
together with the Custom Control button.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 41
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Buttons
Table 17 describes the Web Controls toolbar buttons.
Table 17. Web Controls Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Change Template. Displays the Choose Template dialog box that lets you select a
different Web template.
Edit Template. Opens the template editor you defined as your external Web template
editor in your options.
Select. Lets you select an object in the layout.
CheckBox. Creates a check box.
ComboBox. Creates a combo box.
Text. Creates a text box.
TextArea. Creates a text area.
Hidden. Creates hidden HTML.
Password. Creates a text box where the user enters a password during logon.
Link. Creates an HTML link control.
MailTo. Creates a mail-to link.
Button. Creates a button.
Label. Creates a label on templates.
URL. Creates a link to an external URL on templates.
42 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Table 17. Web Controls Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
ActiveX. Creates an ActiveX control on templates.
Text List Column. Creates a list column that contains HTML text. Available for list applets
only.
Checkbox List Column. Creates a list column that contains HTML check boxes. Available
for list applets only.
Custom Control. Creates a custom control on a template. You can select a custom control
from the Control Type drop-down list, and then drag the Custom Control button to the
designer to create the custom control.
Shift to previous placeholder in applets based on non-grid Web templates. Moves the
selected control to the previous placeholder.
Shift to next placeholder in applets based on non-grid Web templates. Moves the
selected control to the next placeholder.
Format Toolbar
The Format toolbar contains buttons, described in Table 18, that let you apply specific formatting to
controls for applets based on grid-layout Web templates.
Table 18. Format Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Aligns the left edges of controls
Aligns the centers of controls along a vertical
axis
Aligns right edges of controls
Aligns the tops of controls
Aligns the middles of controls along a
horizontal axis.
Aligns the bottom of controls
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 43
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Toolbars
Table 18. Format Toolbar Buttons
Button
Description
Makes controls the same width
Makes controls the same height
Makes controls the same size
Makes the horizontal spacing between
controls equal
Increases the horizontal spacing between
controls
Decreases the horizontal spacing between
controls
Removes the horizontal spacing between
controls
Makes vertical spacing between controls equal
Increases vertical spacing between control
Decreases vertical spacing between control
Removes vertical spacing between controls
Centers controls vertically
Center controls horizontally
Aligns labels to the left
Centers labels
Aligns labels
44 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Siebel Tools Right-Click Menus
Configuration Context Toolbar
The Configuration Context toolbar contains drop-down lists that let you define settings for Web
browser layout and scripting.
Table 19. Sample table
Drop-Down List
Description
Target Browser
A drop-down list from which you select a target browser for layout editing
and for scripting.
Application
Allows you to configure objects for a specific application. Typically, you
work with the All Applications selected. When this option is selected, your
configurations are available in all applications. However, by selecting
specific applications from the list, you can also configure the layout of
objects such as applets and views to look or behave a differently for that
application.
Interactivity
Allows you to select High Interactivity or Standard Interactivity. This
allows you to configure Web layouts differently, depending on the mode
in which the application runs.
Variable
Allows you to specify a given display style for an applet for previewing,
such as parent, child, or grandchild. Applet may be rendered differently
depending on the underlying Web template. For example, the header of
an applet may not appear when it is rendered as a grandchild.
About Siebel Tools Right-Click Menus
Right-click menus in Siebel Tools allow you navigate and perform the following actions:
■
Launch the Web Applet editor from the applet list in the Object List Editor by right-clicking and
choosing Edit Web Layout. If an applet Web template does not already exist, the Web Layout
wizard appears.
■
Launch the Web View editor directly from the view list in the Object List Editor by right-clicking
and choosing Edit Web Layout. If a view Web template does not already exist, the Web Layout
wizard appears. In the first wizard, you need to choose a view Web template from a combo box.
■
The right-click menu in the Object List Editor for Web Template objects includes these choices:
■
■
View the template, which brings up the appropriate editor with no mappings.
■
Edit the template, which brings up the internal or external template editor.
Right-clicking a Siebel Tools toolbar displays the names and status of the toolbars (similar to
using View > Toolbars).
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 45
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About Layout Editors
About Layout Editors
There are several layout editors in Siebel Tools, Applet Layout Editor, View Layout Editor, Web Page
Layout Editor, and the Applet Menu Layout Editor.
These layout editors let you:
■
Add and map controls and list columns to applet layouts. You can preview applets as they would
be rendered at runtime.
■
Modify existing views and construct new ones by dragging and dropping applets onto the view
layout window. You can view list and form applets and the container page in the Preview mode.
No additional specification or code is required for defining the relationships between the applets.
■
Add and delete controls from Web page templates, modify control properties, and map controls
to placeholders. You can also preview Web pages as they would appear at runtime.
■
Visually edit Siebel application menu structures. It is accessed by right-clicking an applet in the
Object List Editor and selecting Edit Web Menus.
You can launch the Layout Editors directly from an applet, view, or Web page in the Object List Editor
by right-clicking and choosing Edit Web Layout or Edit Web Menus.
For more information about using layout editors, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
Related Topic
“Defining a Target Browser” on page 66
About New Object Wizards
Various wizards in Siebel Tools step you through the process of creating objects. They prompt you
for the required property values and configure any dependent object types. Wizards are available for
many objects types, including:
■
General objects, such as Applet Method Menu Items, Business Components, Tables, and Views.
■
Applet objects, such as List Applets, Form Applets, MVG Applets, and Chart Applets.
■
EAI objects, such as Integration Objects.
You can access the New Object Wizards by choosing File > New Object.
NOTE: Use the new object wizards to create objects whenever possible.
For more information about using new object wizards, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
About the Entity Relationship Designer
The Entity Relationship Designer is a visual modeling tool that allows you to diagram your business
entities, represent the relationships between them, and then map them to Siebel objects, such as
business components, links, and joins.
46 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Business Process Designer
The Entity Relationship Designer is typically used by both Business Analysts and Developers.
Business analysts diagram a customer’s business and then developers or technical architects map
the entities in the diagrams to Siebel objects in the repository.
When mapping entities and relationships in the diagram to Siebel objects, the choice of objects to
choose includes only those that have characteristics that match the context described in the diagram.
For information on creating entity relationship diagrams and mapping them to Siebel objects, see
Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
About the Business Process Designer
The Siebel Business Process Designer allows you to define, manage, and enforce your company's
business processes. Defining business processes is typically a development task. The Workflow
Designer and the Workflow Simulator are integrated with Siebel Tools, allowing you to define and
test business processes and related repository objects in a single environment. For more detailed
information about creating business processes and using Workflow Designer and Workflow Simulator,
see Siebel Business Process Designer Administration Guide.
About Script Editors
Scripting is used to implement functionality that cannot be achieved declaratively (that is, by
changing object properties). The Server Script Editor and the Browser Script Editor are used to add
scripts to Siebel objects. Scripting is supported through three features in Siebel applications: Siebel
VB, Siebel eScript, and Browser Script.
Server Script Editor
You use the Server Script Editor to create and modify Siebel VB and eScript scripts. You can access
the Server Script Editor in two ways:
■
Right-click a scriptable entry in the Object List Editor and choose Edit Server Scripts.
■
Choose View > Editors > Server Script Editor.
For more information, see Siebel eScript Language Reference and Siebel VB Language Reference.
Browser Script Editor
The Browser Script Editor allows you to write and edit Browser Script that runs within the client
browser. You can access the Browser Script Editor in the following ways:
■
Right-click an Applet, Business Component, Application, or Business Service object in the Object
List Editor and choose Edit Browser Scripts.
■
Choose View > Editors > Browser Script Editor.
Objects that support browser script, such as applets and business components, have a set of
scriptable events, generally including InvokeMethod and PreInvoke Method, as well as objecttype specific ones, such as ChangeRecord and ChangeFieldValue for applets.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 47
About the Siebel Tools User Interface ■ About the Command Line Interface
For for more information about scripting, including a list of scriptable events and callable methods
on browser objects, see Siebel Object Interfaces Reference.
About the Command Line Interface
You can use the command-line interface to run various tasks, including:
■
“Compiling Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 119
■
“Validating Objects Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 99
■
Converting to grid-layout. For more information, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
■
“Running the LMU Using the Command Line Interface” on page 172
■
“Exporting Objects to an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 124
■
“Importing Objects From an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 131
48 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
3
Customizing Your Tools
Environment
Topics in This Section
“Showing and Hiding Confirmation Dialog Boxes” on page 49
“Setting Change Date Preferences” on page 50
“Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50
“Enabling Language Overrides” on page 51
“Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source Control” on page 51
“Specifying Data Sources” on page 57
“Restarting Editors After Check Out” on page 58
“Setting Commit Options for Full Get” on page 58
“Defining Object List Editor Display Options” on page 59
“Setting Scripting Options” on page 59
“Defining the Web Template Editor” on page 60
“Setting Debug Options” on page 61
“Customizing Visualization Views” on page 62
“Showing and Hiding Object Types in the Object Explorer” on page 63
“Setting Database Options” on page 65
“Setting the Constrain Mode for Working With Symbolic Strings” on page 65
“Defining a Target Browser” on page 66
“Showing and Hiding Windows” on page 66
“Docking Windows” on page 67
“Showing and Hiding Editors” on page 68
“Showing Visualization Views” on page 68
“Showing and Hiding Debug Windows” on page 68
“Showing and Hiding Toolbars” on page 69
“Showing and Hiding the Status Bar” on page 69
“Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer” on page 69
Showing and Hiding Confirmation Dialog
Boxes
You can choose to show or hide dialog boxes that pop up to confirm you want to perform a given
action, such as delete.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 49
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Setting Change Date Preferences
To show or hide confirmation dialog boxes
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the General tab.
3
Under Editing confirmation dialogs, select the check boxes for the confirmation dialog boxes you
want to see, and clear the check boxes for the confirmation dialog boxes you do not want to see.
4
Click OK.
Setting Change Date Preferences
Records are marked as changed in the Object List Editor when they occur after the date defined under
the General Tab of the Development Tools Options dialog box.
To set change date preferences
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the General tab.
3
Under Changed date, use the Date and Time fields to set your preferences, then click OK.
Selecting a Language Mode
The Siebel Tools language mode allows you to work with locale-specific data for languages other than
English. For example, setting your language mode to German (DEU) allows you to view and edit DEUspecific data stored in Locale-Objects, such as translated strings. Language mode determines the set
of locale-specific data that:
■
You can view and edit in the Object List Editor.
■
Is used when compiling the repository (SRF) file.
■
Is transferred during check in and check out processes.
NOTE: If additional languages (other than what are shipped with Siebel applications as seed data)
are added to the Siebel database, the language code must be in all capital letters for the code to
appear in the Language Mode drop-down list.
To set a language mode
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Language Settings tab.
3
Under Tools Language Mode, select a value from the Language drop-down list, then click OK.
50 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Enabling Language Overrides
Related Topic
“Enabling Language Overrides” on page 51
Enabling Language Overrides
Language Overrides are non-translatable locale-specific attributes that may be configured differently
for different locales. For example, you can configure an address field to appear one height in FRA
(French) and another height in ENU (English). To be able to configure language overrides, you must
be in Language Override mode.
NOTE: Enabling language overrides when it is not needed can create unnecessary locale records in
the repository.
For more information about configuring UI layout, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
To enable language overrides
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Language Settings tab.
3
Under Language override, select the Enable and Use Language Override check box, then click OK.
NOTE: The Enable and Use Language Override check box is persistent. You must clear it to return
to working in base mode.
Related Topics
“Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50
“Working with Non-Translatable Locale-Specific Object Properties” on page 164
Process for Integrating With Third-Party
Source Control
You can integrate your repository check in/check out mechanism in Siebel Tools with a third-party
source code-control system such as Microsoft Visual SourceSafe. When source control integration is
enabled, each time a project is checked into the server repository, an archive file containing all the
objects in the project is also checked into the source control system. As a result, successive versions
of the project are maintained in the source control system.
To integrate your repository check in/ check out with a third-party source control system, perform
the following tasks:
1
“Setting Source Control Options” on page 52
2
“Configuring the srcctrl.bat File” on page 52
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 51
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source
Control
Setting Source Control Options
You enable and partly configure the interface to an external source control system using the
Development Tools Options dialog box.
To integrate Siebel Tools with a third-party source control product
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Check In/Out tab.
3
Use the information in the following table to define your settings under Source control
integration.
4
Field/Check Box
Description
Enable source control integration
Select this check box and specify the location of the
srcctrl.bat batch file in the Integration batch file text box
if you want to generate an archive file for each project
when performing repository check in, and at the
conclusion of repository check in to run the batch file
once for each project.
Show execution of the integration
batch file
Select this check box to launch a DOS window in the
foreground when the srcctrl.bat batch file is executed.
This feature is for diagnosis purposes and facilitates
debugging a customized batch file.
Integration batch file
Specifies the location of the srcctrl.bat batch file used by
Siebel applications to instruct the source control
software to provide check in or check out of archive files.
Click OK.
Configuring the srcctrl.bat File
The srcctrl.bat batch file contains the sequence of commands to be executed in order to check the
archived projects in to the source control system. You need to modify the batch file to reflect your
current development environment and then distribute to all developers at your site.
The name of the archive file for the project to be checked in is specified as an argument to the batch
file, in addition to other arguments. The syntax for the command line that executes the batch file is
as follows:
SRCCTRL action dir comment_file project_file
52 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source
Control
The arguments for srcctrl.bat are described in Table 20
Table 20. Arguments for the srcctrl.bat File
Argument
Description
action
Check in or check out.
dir
Path name of the directory on your local file system where the
items are located.
comment_file
Contains the comment text to be provided to the source
control software with the project file.
project_file
Name of the archive file for one project, enclosed in double
quotes.
Srcctrl.bat executes once for each project, following the completion of repository check-in. It checks
the archive file for the project into or out of the source control system. Srcctrl.bat is executed from
a command line that is internally generated from the Siebel application software. You do not have
access to the command line setup, and you cannot modify the parameter list.
The following batch file program code is taken from the standard srcctrl.bat file provided with Siebel
applications, and is designed to work with Microsoft Visual SourceSafe. Comment lines have been
removed. You need to customize the program code in this batch file, particularly if you are running
source control software other than Microsoft Visual SourceSafe, or if the path is incorrect.
set PATH=C:\Program Files\DevStudio\Vss\win32\;%PATH%
set SOFTWARE=ss
set CHECKIN=%SOFTWARE% checkin
set CHECKOUT=%SOFTWARE% checkout
set ADD=%SOFTWARE% add
set SETPROJ=%SOFTWARE% cp
set PROJECT=$/PROJPOOL
set SRC_USR=
set SRC_PSWD=
set OPTIONS=-i-y -y%SRC_USR%,%SRC_PSWD%
set COMMENT=-c@
set NON_COMMENT=-cset FILE=
set LOGFILE=C:\Temp\xml.log
echo =======================srcctrl.bat========================== >> %LOGFILE%
set ACTION=%1
shift
set DIR=%1
shift
set COMMENT=%COMMENT%%1
shift
set FILE=%1
echo Change local directory to %DIR% >> %LOGFILE%
chdir %DIR% >> %LOGFILE% 2>&1
echo Set %PROJECT% as the working folder at Source Control System >> %LOGFILE%
%SETPROJ% %PROJECT% >> %LOGFILE% 2>&1
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 53
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source
Control
if errorlevel 100 goto END
if %ACTION%==checkout goto CHECK_OUT
if %ACTION%==checkin goto CHECK_IN
:CHECK_OUT
echo ============Check out file %FILE% from Source Control System============
if not exist %FILE% echo "New File" >> %FILE%
attrib +r %FILE%
echo Add %FILE% in case it doesn't exist in Source Control System >> %LOGFILE%
%ADD% %FILE% %NON_COMMENT% %OPTIONS% >> %LOGFILE% 2>&1
echo Start checking out %FILE% from Source Control System >> %LOGFILE%
%CHECKOUT% %FILE% %NON_COMMENT% %OPTIONS% >> %LOGFILE% 2>&1
goto END
:CHECK_IN
echo ============Check in file %FILE% into Source Control System============
echo Check in %FILE% into Source Control System >> %LOGFILE%
%CHECKIN% %FILE% %COMMENT% %OPTIONS% >> %LOGFILE% 2>&1
attrib -r %FILE%
goto END
:END
echo ===================End Of srcctrl.bat====================== >> %LOGFILE%
54 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source
Control
The variables used in the srcctrl.bat batch file are described in Table 21.
Table 21. Variables in srcctrl.bat
Variable
Description
PATH
Identifies the directory where the source code control software is installed. Modify
this setting to reflect its actual location on your machine.
SOFTWARE
Source control system’s command line utility. The command line utility for Microsoft
Visual SourceSafe is “ss”.
CHECKIN
Command at the start of the command line that calls for check-in into the source
control system.
CHECKOUT
Command at the start of the command line that calls for check-out from the source
control system.
ADD
Command at the start of the command line that calls for adding files in the source
control system.
SETPROJ
Command at the start of the command line that calls for setting the working folder
in the source control system.
PROJECT
Project (working folder) in the source control system where the items will be
checked in/checked out.
COMMENT
Command-line Comments clause for each of the files being checked in or out. This
is generated from the Comment argument to the batch file.
OPTIONS
Text of the Options clause to include in a command line.
SRC_USR
User logon name to include in the Options clause. This is a source control software
user name, not the user name for a Siebel application.
SRC_PSWD
User password to include in the Options clause. This is a source control software
password.
FILE
Filename of the archive file, obtained from the argument list of the batch file. This
file needs to be checked in or out.
LOGFILE
Path and filename of the log file that will be generated.
NOTE: The folder that SIF files are written to is specified by the TempDir parameter in the [Siebel]
section of the tools.cfg file. By default it is set to the \Siebel\tools\7.7\temp folder of your Tools
installation folder. change this parameter to write the PROJECT directory to another location.
The following MS-DOS limitations exist in Windows 95 and 98:
■
The default command-line character limitation is 127 characters. You can increase the global
command-line character limit to its maximum by placing the following line in config.sys:
shell=c:\windows\command.com /u:255
■
The default environment space limitation is 256 bytes. You can increase it by placing the
following line in config.sys:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 55
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source
Control
shell=c:\command.com /p /e:2048
or by placing the following line in the [NonWindowsApp] section in the system.ini file:
CommandEnvSize=2048
2048 is the size of the new environment space, so you might specify a different value here.
Example of Integrating with Microsoft Visual
SourceSafe
The following sections provide you with examples for using Microsoft Visual SourceSafe.
Check In Example
You have two projects checked out that you want to simultaneously check in to the server and to the
source control software. The projects selected are “Project A” and “Project B.” The latest version of
Project A.sif in Visual SourceSafe is 6, and the latest version of Project B.sif is 5.
When you click the Check In button, the following sequence occurs:
1
Project A and Project B are checked in to the server repository.
2
C:\Siebel\7.7\tools\bin\srcctrl.bat is invoked. This carries out steps 3, 4, and 5.
3
Project A.sif and Project B.sif are checked out and locked in Visual SourceSafe.
4
Project A is exported to C:\Siebel\7.7\tools\temp\projects\Project A.sif, and Project B is
exported to C:\Siebel\7.7\tools\projects\Project B.sif.
5
Project A.sif and Project B.sif are checked in to Visual SourceSafe. The version numbers are
incremented so that the latest version of Project A.sif in Visual SourceSafe is version 7, while
Project B.sif is version 6.
Revert to Previous Version Example
Consider the situation in which an erroneous definition of Project A has been checked in to the server
repository. This is stored in Microsoft Visual Source Safe as version 5 of Project A.sif. You want to
revert to version 4 of Project A, since that does not contain the errors.
1
Check out version 4 of Project A.sif from Visual SourceSafe into C:\sea7xx\tools \temp.
2
Check out Project A from the server repository.
3
Import Project A.sif into the local repository using the Overwrite option to resolve object
definition conflicts. This replaces the existing definition of Project A with the one in the archive
file.
4
Check Project A in to the server repository. Project A.sif is automatically checked in to Visual
SourceSafe as version 6.
56 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Specifying Data Sources
Specifying Data Sources
The Check In/Out tab in the Development Tools Options dialog box provides options for setting up
server and client data sources.
To specify data sources
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Check In/Out tab.
3
Change the ODBC data source of the server repository by doing the following:
a
Under Data sources, in the Server field, click the Change button to change the ODBC data source
of the server repository.
b
Use the information in the following table to define the ODBC data source parameters.
c
4
Description
ODBC data source
Full ODBC data source string that provides communication with the
server repository database.
User name
User logon ID (in all uppercase) used to access the server database.
Password
User password (in all uppercase) used to access the server database.
Table owner
Table owner name used to access the repository on the server
database.
Click OK.
Change the ODBC data source of the local repository by doing the following:
a
Under Data sources, in the Client field, click the Change button to change the ODBC data source
of the local repository.
b
Use the information in the following table to define the ODBC data source parameters.
c
5
Field
Field
Description
ODBC data source
Full ODBC data source string that provides communication with the
local repository database.
User name
User logon ID (in all uppercase) used to access the local database.
Password
User password (in all uppercase) used to access the local database.
Table owner
Table owner name used to access the repository on the local database.
Click OK.
Click OK.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 57
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Restarting Editors After Check Out
Restarting Editors After Check Out
You can set an option that automatically restarts any open editors after the check out process
finishes.
To restart editors after check out
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Check In/Out tab.
3
Select the Restart the editors after Check Out check box.
Any editors that are open at the time you begin the Check Out process are restarted when the
Check Out process finishes.
4
Click OK.
Setting Commit Options for Full Get
By default, the full get process performs database commits in regular intervals during the get process
rather than a single commit at the end of the get process.
You can disable this option by choosing View > Options, selecting the Check In/Out tab, and then
clearing the Enable incremental commit during Full Get check box.
To set commit options for full get
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Check In/Out tab.
3
To request a single commit at the end of a full get, clear the Enable incremental commit during
Full Get check box.
4
Click OK.
Related Topics
“About the Get Process” on page 71
“Performing a Full Get” on page 71
58 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Defining Object List Editor Display Options
Defining Object List Editor Display
Options
To define display options for the Object List Editor
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the List Views tab.
3
Use the information in the following table to define your options.
4
Area
Field
Description
List fonts
Small/Normal/Large
The size of the font used in the list.
List spacing
Tight/Normal/Loose
The spacing between rows in the list.
Style
Horizontal grid lines
Show or hide horizontal grid lines in the list.
Vertical grid lines
Show or hide vertical grid lines in the list.
Alternating row color
Use different colors for every second row.
Mouse focus rectangle
Show or hide dotted line that appears around the
currently selected record.
Click OK.
Setting Scripting Options
Browser and Server scripts are created in the Script Editor embedded in Siebel Tools. You can set
various options for working in Script Editor, including setting a default scripting language, specifying
a location for compiling browser scripts, and defining options for debugging.
To set scripting options
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Scripting tab.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 59
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Defining the Web Template Editor
3
4
Use the information in the following table to define your options.
Area
Field
Description
Script editor
Font
Used to select the font name for display of
scripts.
Size
Used to select the font size for display of scripts.
Tab width
Defines the number of spaces for a tab character.
The default is four spaces.
Auto indent
When checked, each succeeding line is indented
to the position set by the current line.
Scripting language
Used to specify the default scripting language for
server side components.
Default language for new
scripts
Select this check box if you do not want Siebel
Tools to prompt you to pick a scripting language
each time you edit a script.
Compiling
Browser script
compilation folder
Used to specify the folder where bscripts\all
resides. This is where Browser Scripts are
generated.
For example, if the value is set to
D:\sea750\client\PUBLIC\enu, then the
Browser Script files are generated to
D:\sea750\client\PUBLIC\enu\<genbscript
time stamped folder>\bscripts\all.
Debugging
Adjust breakpoint to next
valid line
When breakpoints are deleted on invalid lines,
this option creates a breakpoint at the next valid
line.
Make debugger window
active when debugging
The Siebel Debugger window appears whenever
you are in debug mode.
Always enter the
debugger when an error
occurs
The Siebel Debugger window appears whenever a
script error occurs.
Click OK.
Defining the Web Template Editor
The Web template editor is an external application that you define here and that you can open using
a right-click menu in the Web template explorer. For example, in the Web template explorer, navigate
to a given Web template, then right-click, and the application defined as the default editor opens
with the selected Web template automatically displayed.
60 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Setting Debug Options
To define default path for Web template files
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Web Template Editor tab.
3
In the Folder full path field, type the full path to location of your Web template files.
4
Under External Web template editor, do the following:
5
a
Use the Browse button in the Executable full path field to navigate to and select the executable
for the external Web editor.
b
In the Optional parameters field, enter the parameters you want to pass to the executable when
you launch the external editor.
Click OK.
Setting Debug Options
The debug options provide the run-time settings for opening an instance of the Siebel Web client in
the following situations:
■
When the Auto-start web client option is selected in the object compiler.
For more information, see Chapter 8, “Compiling and Testing”.
■
When starting an instance of the Web client by selecting Debug > Start.
You typically use this option when debugging Siebel eScript or Siebel VB. For more information,
see Siebel eScript Language Reference and Siebel VB Language Reference.
The settings defined the Debug tab of the Development Tools Options dialog are stored in a user
preference file that is named login_ID&application_name.spf and located in tools_install\BIN.
To setup Tools to automatically open the Siebel Web client
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Debug tab.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 61
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Customizing Visualization Views
3
4
Use the information in the following table to define your options under Run-time start up
information.
Field
Example Value
Description
Executable
Siebel.exe
Name of the executable
that is opened in debug
mode or automatically
opened after the compile
process.
CFG file
D:\sea7xx\client\BIN\ENU\uagent.cfg
Name and location of the
configuration file for the
application.
Browser
C:\Program Files\Internet
Explorer\iexplore.exe
By default, the mobile Web
client uses IE 5.x, but
users can specify a
different browser.
Working
Directory
D:\sea7xx\client\BIN
The directory that contains
the Siebel executable.
Arguments
■
/h - to enable local debugging of Server
scripts
■
/s <filename> - to enable SQL spooling
Opens the watch window
that allows you to trace the
application.
Use the information in the following table to define your options under Login information and then
click OK.
Field
Example Value
Description
User name
SADMIN
User name used to log into the test application.
Password
SADMIN
Password to log in to the test application.
Datasource
Sample
Local database to which the local Web client connects.
Default data source. Values listed depend upon the
configuration file specified in the cfg File parameter.
Customizing Visualization Views
You can customize the font and appearance of visualization views.
To customize visualization views
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Visualization tab.
62 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Showing and Hiding Object Types in the Object
Explorer
3
4
Use the information in the following table to define your options under Font.
Option
Description
Use system
font
Select this option to let Siebel Tools use a system font for the visualization
views.
Use a Custom
Font
Select this option to choose your preferred font for the visualization views.
When you select this option, you must use the Font, Size, and Zoom dropdown lists to define your preferences.
Use the information in the following table to define your options under Object style and then click
OK.
Option
Description
Boxes with 3D borders
Displays boxes with a 3D border.
Icon and name only
Displays object name and object icon (the same icon used in the
Object Explorer).
Simple outline boxes
Displays object names in simple boxes.
Always print outline style
Prints visualization details in outline style.
Showing and Hiding Object Types in the
Object Explorer
By default, not all objects appear in the Object Explorer.
To show and hide objects
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 63
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Showing and Hiding Object Types in the Object
Explorer
2
Click the Object Explorer tab.
The Object Explorer hierarchy appears.
3
In the Object Explorer Hierarchy box, select the check boxes for the objects you want to show
and clear the check boxes for the objects you want to hide.
When you select a top-level object such as Applet, all child objects are automatically selected.
To hide child objects, you need to expand the parent object and remove the check marks from
any child objects that you want to hide. The parent check box becomes shaded to indicate that
it contains child objects that are not selected to show.
TIP: The state of the check box provides information about the show/hide state of the child
objects.
Check Box State
Description
Current object shown, and all child objects shown.
Current object hidden, and all child objects hidden.
Current object shown, and some child objects shown.
4
To restore default settings, click the Default button, then click OK.
64 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Setting Database Options
Setting Database Options
To set database options
1
Choose View > Options.
The Development Tools Options dialog box appears.
2
Click the Database tab.
3
Use the information in the following table to set your options and then click OK.
Option
Description
Developing for deployment on
DB2 for zSeries
For information about this parameter, see
Implementing Siebel eBusiness
Applications on DB2 UDB for z/OS and OS/
390
Allow to create column of type
‘Character’ being greater than 1
Unconstrains columns of type CHAR so
that they can be can greater than 1
character in length. Note that defining a
column as CHAR when the data being
stored can be variable in length causes
the data to be padded with blank spaces
in the database.
Setting the Constrain Mode for Working
With Symbolic Strings
Siebel Tools can run in either constrained mode or unconstrained mode.
■
When working in constrained mode, you must choose translatable text strings from the list of
available string references. You cannot override the string reference by entering a value for a
string override field and you cannot create new symbolic string references.
■
When working in unconstrained mode, you are not required to choose translatable text strings
from the list of string references. You can override the string reference by entering a value in a
string override field. You can also create new symbolic string references.
The constrain mode is determined by the following CFG file parameter, found in the [Siebel] section
of the tools.cfg file:
EnableToolsConstrain
= FALSE
The EnableToolsConstrain mode is binary and must be set to either TRUE or FALSE. It is set to FALSE
by default.
Related Topics
“About the Symbolic Strings Model” on page 147
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 65
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Defining a Target Browser
“Creating Symbolic String References” on page 149
“Creating Symbolic String References” on page 149
Defining a Target Browser
The target browser group determines how applets appear in the preview mode of the Applet Layout
Editor. You can include conditional tags in Web templates that are displayed for some browsers but
not others. Defining a target browser determines how the these conditional tags are expressed in
the Applet Layout Editor and allows you to preview an applet layout as it would look in a specific
browser.
To define configuration context
1
Choose View > Toolbars > Configuration Context.
The Configuration Context toolbar appears.
2
From the Target Browser drop-down list, choose Target Browser Config.
The Target Browser Configuration dialog box appears. The following table describes the parts of
the dialog box.
3
Field
Description
Available browsers
List of available browser groups.
Selected browsers
for layout editing
Specifies which browser groups are affected by subsequent layout
editing in the Web Layout Editor.
Capability name and
value
Specifies what capabilities or properties the currently selected virtual
browser group has.
To add a browser group to the list of selected browsers, double-click the browser in the Available
browsers list.
You can also use the right and left arrow buttons to move browsers between the Available and
Selected lists.
4
Click OK.
The browser groups you added to the list of Selected browsers for layout editing now appear as
values in the Target Browser drop-down list.
Showing and Hiding Windows
You show and hide windows using toggles on the View menu.
66 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Docking Windows
To show or hide a window using the View menu
1
Choose View > Windows.
A list of windows appears in a secondary pop-up menu. A visible window is identified with a check
mark. A hidden window has no marker.
2
Select the window you want to show or hide.
If the window was hidden, it appears. If the window was visible, it is hidden.
NOTE: To show or hide the Bookmarks window, you can also use the Go menu (Go > Bookmarks
List).
To hide a window using a right-click menu
1
Right-click the window title of the window you want to hide.
2
From the pop-up menu that appears, choose Hide.
The window no longer appears in the Siebel Tools application window.
Related Topics
“Docking Windows” on page 67
“Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer” on page 69
Docking Windows
You can let the Object Explorer or Properties, Applets, Controls, Web Template, or Bookmarks
windows float, moving and sizing to fit your needs, or dock the window in a corner of the main
window.
To dock a window
■ Drag the window to the area of the main window where you want to dock.
To undock a window
■ Right-click the window and choose Docked.
To prevent a window from docking when it is being moved
■ Hold down the CTRL key during the move.
Related Topics
“Showing and Hiding Windows” on page 66
“Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer” on page 69
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 67
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Showing and Hiding Editors
Showing and Hiding Editors
To show or hide an editor
1
Choose View > Editors.
A list of editors appears in a secondary pop-up menu. A visible editor is identified with a check
mark. A hidden editor has no marker.
2
Select the editor you want to show or hide.
If the editor was hidden, it appears. If the editor was visible, it is hidden.
Showing Visualization Views
You can use the Siebel Tools Visualization views to see how objects relate to one another.
To show a visualization view using the View menu
1
Choose View > Visualize.
A list of visualization views appears in a secondary pop-up menu. A visible view is identified with
a check mark. A hidden view has no marker.
2
Select the view you want to show or hide.
If the editor was hidden, it appears. If the editor was visible, it is hidden.
To show a visualization view from the Object List Editor
1
Display the relevant object type in the Object List Editor.
2
Right-click an object and choose the Visualization view you want.
Not all Visualization views are listed for all objects.
Related Topics
“Viewing Object Relationships” on page 108
Showing and Hiding Debug Windows
You can show or hide the debug windows.
To show or hide the Calls window
■ Choose View > Debug Windows > Calls.
-orPress CTRL+L.
68 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Showing and Hiding Toolbars
To show or hide the Watch window
■ Choose View > Debug Windows > Watch.
-orPress SHIFT+F9.
To show or hide the Errors window
■ Choose View > Debug Windows > Errors.
Showing and Hiding Toolbars
You show and hide toolbars using toggles on the View menu.
To show or hide a toolbar
1
Choose View > Toolbars.
-orRight-click any of the toolbars.
A list of toolbars appears in a secondary pop-up menu. A visible toolbar is identified with a check
mark. A hidden toolbar has no marker.
2
Select the toolbar you want to show or hide.
If the toolbar was hidden, it appears. If the toolbar was visible, it is hidden.
Showing and Hiding the Status Bar
To show or hide the status bar
■ Choose View > Status Bar.
If the status bar was hidden, it appears. If the status bar was visible, it is hidden.
Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer
You can show or hide the Object Explorer.
To show or hide the Object Explorer
■ Choose View > Object Explorer.
-orPress CTRL+E.
If the Object Explorer was hidden, it appears. If the Object Explorer was visible, it is hidden.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 69
Customizing Your Tools Environment ■ Showing and Hiding the Object Explorer
Related Topics
“Showing and Hiding Windows” on page 66
“Docking Windows” on page 67
70 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
4
Getting Projects From the
Server Repository
Topics in This Section
“About the Get Process” on page 71
“Performing a Full Get” on page 71
“Getting Projects from the Server Repository” on page 72
“Getting Locale-Specific Data Only” on page 73
About the Get Process
The process of copying projects from the server database to your local database is known as
performing a get. The get process differs from checking out in the following ways:
■
Getting projects does not lock them on the server database.
■
Getting projects overrides all the projects on your local database, whether they are locked or not
locked.
NOTE: The sample database, unlike a local database, cannot receive projects from the server
database during a get. The sample database is intended for instructional use only.
Typically you perform a get to initially populate your local database. This process is known as a full
get. You can also get projects to override objects stored on your local database.
Related Topics
“Performing a Full Get” on page 71
“About the Check Out and Check In Process” on page 75
“Getting Projects from the Server Repository” on page 72
Performing a Full Get
For a newly initialized local database, you need to copy all objects from the server repository to your
local repository by running a process called a full get. You must perform full get before you compile,
because the SRF file must be based on the comprehensive set of Siebel objects.
By default the full get process performs database commits in regular intervals, rather than a single
commit at the end of the process. For information about changing this option, see “Setting Commit
Options for Full Get” on page 58.
To perform a full get
1
Open Siebel Tools and connect to your local database.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 71
Getting Projects From the Server Repository ■ Getting Projects from the Server
Repository
2
Choose Tools > Check Out.
3
Choose the name of your development repository from the Repository pick list.
NOTE: The repository that you select is not necessarily the one opened by Siebel Tools.
4
Select All Projects.
5
Click Options.
6
In the Development Tools Options window, make sure your Server Data Source is pointing to your
server development database and your Client Data Source is pointing to the local database you
previously initialized and are currently running against.
7
In the Check Out dialog box, click Get.
All objects from the server repository are copied to your local repository.
Getting Projects from the Server
Repository
You can use the get process to overwrite projects stored in your local repository with versions of the
projects from the server repository. You may need to do this after you have changed local copies of
projects and you want to revert back to the versions stored on the server, or after other developers
check in changes and you need to copy those changes to your local repository.
To overwrite projects stored in your local database
1
Open Siebel Tools and connect to your local database.
2
Choose Tools > Check Out.
3
Choose the name of your development repository from the Repository pick list.
NOTE: The repository that you select is not necessarily the one opened by Siebel Tools.
4
In the Projects list, select the projects you want to get.
5
Click Options.
6
In the Development Tools Options window, make sure your Server Data Source is pointing to your
server development database and your Client Data Source is pointing to the local database you
previously initialized and are currently running against.
7
In the Check Out dialog box, click Get.
All objects associated with the projects are copied from the server repository to your local
repository.
Related Topics
“About the Get Process” on page 71
72 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Getting Projects From the Server Repository ■ Getting Locale-Specific Data Only
Getting Locale-Specific Data Only
After you have performed a full get, you can get locale-specific data without having to get parent
objects too. This is useful when you have been working in one language and then switch to another
language. For example, suppose you have already populated your local repository with English (ENU)
data, but now you want to switch to Japanese (JPN). After switching your language mode to JPN, you
can use the Get Locale-Specific Data option to copy JPN records only from the server repository to
your local repository.
To get locale-specific data only for projects
1
Open Siebel Tools and connect to your local database.
2
Choose Tools > Check Out.
3
Choose the name of your development repository from the Repository pick list.
NOTE: The repository that you select is not necessarily the one opened by Siebel Tools.
4
Select the Projects for which you want to get locale-specific data.
5
Click Options.
6
Make sure your Server Data Source is pointing to your server development database and your
Client Data Source is pointing to the local database you previously initialized and are currently
running against.
7
Click OK to close the Development Tools Options dialog box.
8
In the Check Out dialog box, select the Get Locale Specific Data Only check box.
9
Click Get.
Data stored in child locale objects of the selected projects are copied from the server repository
to your local repository.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 73
Getting Projects From the Server Repository ■ Getting Locale-Specific Data Only
74 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
5
Checking Out and Checking In
Projects and Objects
Topics in This Section
“About the Check Out and Check In Process” on page 75
“Setting Options for Check Out and Check In” on page 75
“Guidelines for Check Out and Check In” on page 76
“About the Project Check Out Dialog Box” on page 77
“About the Object Check Out Dialog Box” on page 79
“About the Check In Dialog Box” on page 81
“Checking Out and Checking In Projects” on page 82
“Checking Out and Checking In Objects” on page 84
“Viewing Object Differences” on page 87
“Undoing Check Out” on page 88
About the Check Out and Check In
Process
Check In and Check Out is a source control mechanism for multiple developers working in the same
repository. It allows you to check out objects from the server and download them to your local
repository for editing. When you check out objects, they are locked on the server. This prevents other
developers from checking them out and avoids conflicts that could result from multiple developers
working on the same objects simultaneously. When you check objects back to the server, the lock is
removed and the objects are available for other developers to check out.
NOTE: Individual object check in and check out is available starting with version 7.7.2. You can also
lock objects directly on your local repository, without checking them out. See “Locking Projects
Directly in the Local Repository” on page 91.
Setting Options for Check Out and Check
In
You use the Development Tools Options dialog box to define options related to the check in and check
out processes. See the following topics for details about check in and check out options:
“Process for Integrating With Third-Party Source Control” on page 51
“Specifying Data Sources” on page 57
“Restarting Editors After Check Out” on page 58
“Setting Commit Options for Full Get” on page 58
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 75
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Guidelines for Check Out and
Check In
Guidelines for Check Out and Check In
Before checking out or checking in projects or objects, consider the following:
■
Password encryption interferes with check out. If you are checking out projects, you need to
disable password encryption in the client or CFG file when running Siebel Tools.
■
You check out projects and objects in the current Siebel Tools language mode only. For more
information, see “Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50.
■
The sample database, unlike a local database, cannot receive checked-out objects, and its
objects cannot be checked in to the server database. The sample database is strictly for
instructional use.
■
Objects must be checked out and checked in to the server database from which the local
database was extracted.
■
Before doing a check-in, make sure that the projects and objects you are checking in are in a
stable state, that all dependent scripting is complete, and the configuration has been tested
against your local repository.
■
Check in all dependent projects and objects at the same time to be sure that the configuration
on the server remains consistent.
For example, if you create a new Pick List object in the Pick List project and reference that object
in your Oppty project, check in both projects to the server at the same time.
■
Consider the timing of your check-in and its effect on the work of other developers.
CAUTION: Depending on the size of the project, the check-in process might require some time. Do
not interrupt the process, as doing so can leave your repository in an unstable state. If for any reason
the check-in process is interrupted, you must perform it again to complete any unfinished tasks and
unlock the projects on the server.
76 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ About the Project Check Out
Dialog Box
About the Project Check Out Dialog Box
The Check Out dialog box lists projects available for check out. It does not list individual objects
within projects. Figure 14 shows an example of the Project Check Out dialog box.
Figure 14. Example Check Out Dialog Box
Table 22 describes each user interface element of the dialog box.
Table 22. Project Check Out Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Description
Repository drop-down list
Available repositories on the server. The list of projects in the
projects list reflects the list of projects in the selected server
repository. If you select a different server repository from the
one currently open in Siebel Tools locally, a warning appears,
and you must either get all projects or change the repository
selection.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 77
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ About the Project Check Out
Dialog Box
Table 22. Project Check Out Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Description
Projects list
Option
buttons
Project
Displays the name of each project in the server repository.
Updated
A value of Yes appears if the server Locked By and Locked
Date are different from the client version, indicating that your
version of the project is out of sync with the server’s version.
Server Locked By
Logon ID of the developer who currently has this project
checked out on the server.
Server Locked
Date
Date of check out.
Client Locked By
Logon ID of the developer who currently has this project
locked locally.
Client Language
The language of the project currently locked on the client.
Only one language can be locked at one time.
Selected projects
When this option button is selected, you can select individual
projects to check out or get.
All projects
When this option button is checked, all projects in the
repository are selected to check out or get.
Updated projects
When this option button is active, only projects with an
Updated value of Yes are selected. This allows you to check
out or get only those projects on the server that are new or
different from corresponding projects in the local repository.
Normally you perform a get to bring your local repository up
to date.
Checking this box gets string translations and locale-specific
attributes being stored in the locale objects only. It does not
get data stored in the locale object’s parent object.
Get locale
specific data
only check
box
Buttons
Get
Selected projects are copied to the local repository, replacing
pre-existing versions there, but not locking them on the
server. You can get any projects on the server, including those
locked by others.
Check Out
Copies all objects in the selected projects to the local
repository and locks them on the server (and client).
You cannot check out projects that are currently locked on the
server by another user
78 ■
Options
Opens the Development Tools Options dialog box with the
Check In/Out tab selected. This is the same dialog box that
appears when you choose Tools > Options.
Cancel
Cancels the check out and closes the Check Out dialog box.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ About the Object Check Out
Dialog Box
About the Object Check Out Dialog Box
The Object Check Out Dialog Box allows you to check out individual objects from the server database.
Figure 15 shows an example of the Object Check Out dialog box.
Figure 15. Object Check Out Dialog Box
Table 23 describes the user interface elements of the Object Check Out Dialog Box.
Table 23. Object Check Out Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Description
Repository Text Box
Displays the name of the current repository the user is
working on.
Object List
Type
Name
Displays the name of each object being checked out.
Updated
A value of Yes appears if the server Locked By and Locked
Date are different from the client version, indicating that your
version of the object is out of sync with the server's version.
Object Locking
A value of Yes appears if this object's parent project allows
object check-in/out.
Server Locked By
Logon ID of the developer who currently has this object
checked out on the server.
Server Language
The language on which the object is checked out on the
server. Only one language can be checked out at one time.
Server Locked
Date
Date of check out.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 79
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ About the Object Check Out
Dialog Box
Table 23. Object Check Out Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Description
Client Locked By
Logon ID of the developer who currently has this object
locked locally.
Client Language
The language of the object currently locked on the client.
Only one language can be locked at one time.
Project Locked By
Logon ID of the developer who currently has this object's
parent project checked out on the server.
“Get locale specific data only”
checkbox
Checking this box gets string translations and locale-specific
attributes being stored in the locale objects only for the
objects selected. It does not get data stored in the locale
object's parent object.
Buttons
Get
Selected objects are copied to the local repository, replacing
pre-existing versions there, but not locking them on the
server. You can get any objects on the server, including those
locked by others regardless of whether their parent projects
have the "Allow Object Locking" field checked.
Check Out
Copies all selected objects in the selected objects to the local
repository and locks them on the server and client.
You cannot check out objects that are currently locked on the
server by another user, because either their parent projects
do not allow object locking or their parent projects are locked
on the server.
80 ■
Options
Opens the Development Tools Options dialog box with the
Check In/Out tab selected. This is the same dialog box that
appears when you choose Tools > Options.
Cancel
Cancels the check out and closes the Object Check Out dialog
box.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ About the Check In Dialog Box
About the Check In Dialog Box
The Check In dialog box allows you to select projects or objects to check in to the server database.
Figure 16 shows an example of the Check In dialog box.
Figure 16. Example Check In Dialog Box
Table 24 describes each user interface element of the dialog box.
Table 24. Check In Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Description
Repository drop-down list
Available repositories in the local database. The list of
projects in the Projects list reflects the list of projects in the
selected repository (in addition to locally created projects).
Projects list
Type
Displays the type of each new or checked out project or object
in the local repository. Projects or objects obtained by the get
process are not listed, because these are not available for
check in. (You can check in only projects that you have
previously checked out or created locally.)
Name
Name of the checked out object.
Status
Contains the value New or Locked for each project, indicating
whether you created it yourself or obtained it through checkout.
Lock/Creation
Date
Displays the date and time when you created the project or
checked it out from the server.
Language
Displays the language in which the project was checked out.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 81
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Checking Out and Checking In
Projects
Table 24. Check In Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Element
Option
buttons
Description
Selected Objects
When this option button is checked, you can manually select
individual projects or objects to check in.
Locked/New
Objects
Selects all of the projects or objects in the list—that is, all
those you have created or obtained through check-out.
Maintain lock check box
Does not remove object locks on the server or the local
databases after check in.
Buttons
Undo Check Out
Does not check in objects to the server. This releases the lock
on the server, so that another developer can work on those
objects, but retains the locks on the local database.
Validate
Validates selected projects.
Check In
Initiates the check-in process.
Diff
Opens the Project Differences dialog box that allows you to
compare the objects you are checking in with the server
versions of those objects. For more information, see “About
Validating Objects” on page 98.
Options
Opens the Developer Tools Options dialog box where you
specify check-in/check-out settings, especially server and
client data source names.
Cancel
Closes the Check In dialog box.
Checking Out and Checking In Projects
This topic contains the following tasks:
■
“Checking Out Projects from the Server Repository” on page 82
■
“Checking In Projects to the Server Repository” on page 83
For information on checking out individual objects, see “About the Object Check Out Dialog Box” on
page 79.
Checking Out Projects from the Server Repository
When you check out projects from the server repository, the following occurs:
■
All objects associated with the projects are locked on the server, preventing other developers
from checking them out.
■
All objects associated with the projects are copied from the server database to your local
database.
82 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Checking Out and Checking In
Projects
■
All objects associated with the projects are locked on your local database, allowing you to edit
them.
To check out projects from the server repository
1
Choose Repository > Check Out.
2
In the Check Out dialog box, make sure that the correct repository is selected.
3
Select the projects you want to check out.
4
Click Options.
5
In the Development Tools Options dialog box, make sure the Server and Client data sources are
specified correctly.
6
Click OK.
The Development Tools Options dialog box closes.
7
In the Check Out dialog box, click Check Out.
8
After the check out is complete, select View > Refresh Windows to display updated information.
Related Topics
“Guidelines for Check Out and Check In” on page 76
“About the Project Check Out Dialog Box” on page 77
“Setting Options for Check Out and Check In” on page 75
Checking In Projects to the Server Repository
When you check in projects, the following actions occur:
■
Projects and their associated objects are copied from your local repository to the server
repository, replacing those on the server.
■
Any new objects are added to the server repository.
■
Locks on the projects and all associated objects are removed.
To check in projects to the server repository
1
Choose Tools > Check In.
2
In the Check In dialog box, make sure that the correct repository is selected.
3
Click Options.
4
In the Development Tools Options dialog box, make sure the server and client Data Sources are
are correct and then click OK.
5
Do one of the following:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 83
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Checking Out and Checking In
Objects
6
■
To check in selected projects, click the Selected Objects option, and then select the projects
that you want to check in.
■
To check in all locked projects (new and modified), click the Locked/New Objects option.
Click Check In.
The selected projects and associated objects are copied from your local repository to the server
repository and locks are removed.
Related Topics
“Guidelines for Check Out and Check In” on page 76
“About the Check In Dialog Box” on page 81
“Setting Options for Check Out and Check In” on page 75
Checking Out and Checking In Objects
This topic contains the following tasks:
■
“About Object Check Out and Check In” on page 84
■
“Enabling Object Check Out and Check In” on page 85
■
“Setting Projects to Allow Object Locking” on page 85
■
“Checking Out Objects from the Server Repository” on page 85
■
“Checking In Objects to the Server Repository” on page 86
■
“Viewing Locked Objects Within Projects” on page 86
■
“Locking Objects Locally” on page 87
■
“Limitations of Object Check Out and Check In” on page 87
About Object Check Out and Check In
With object check out and check in, you can check out and check in only the objects that you need.
That is, you do not have to check out and check in entire projects.
Checking out and checking in selected objects:
■
Allows multiple developers to work on objects within a single project.
■
Improves check-out and check-in times.
■
Reduces network traffic.
84 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Checking Out and Checking In
Objects
Enabling Object Check Out and Check In
A configuration file parameter controls whether or not object check out and check in is enabled. To
enable object check out and check in, add the following parameter to the [Siebel] section of the
tools.cfg file and set it to TRUE:
EnableObjectCOCI=TRUE
NOTE: The EnableObjectCOCI is set to TRUE by default.
Setting Projects to Allow Object Locking
For each project you can specify whether or not developers are allowed to check out and check in
individual objects within the project. To allow developers to check out and check in objects, you set
the project's Allow Object Locking property to TRUE. To modify the Allow Object Locking property,
you must use the SADMIN user ID to log in and you must be logged into a server data source. You
cannot set the Allow Object Locking property in your local repository.
To set the Allow Object Locking property
1
In Siebel Tools, navigate to the project.
2
In the Object List Editor, right-click, and then choose Toggle Allow Object Locking.
NOTE: If a project has the Allow Object Locking configuration file parameter set to TRUE, and
the user is logged in to the server using the SADMIN user ID, the Toggle Allow Object Locking
menu option is enabled. When the SADMIN chooses this option for a project that is already set
to allow object locking, a check is performed to determine whether any objects are locked on the
server within the project. If there are objects locked within the project, SADMIN will receive an
error message. If the project is locked on the server by someone else, the menu option for Toggle
Allow Object Locking will not appear.
Checking Out Objects from the Server Repository
When the Allow Object Locking property is set to TRUE, you can check out individual objects within
the project. When you check out individual objects, the objects are:
■
Locked on the server, preventing other developers from checking them out.
■
Copied from the server database to your local database.
■
Locked on your local database, allowing you to edit them.
NOTE: You can check out top-level objects only.
To check out objects from the server repository
1
Open Siebel Tools and connect to your local database.
2
In the Object Explorer, navigate to the object type you want to check out.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 85
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Checking Out and Checking In
Objects
3
In the Object List Editor, select the object definition, and then right-click and choose Check Out.
The Check Out Object dialog box appears.
NOTE: If another developer has the objects checked out or if the parent project has the Allow
Object Locking property set to FALSE, the Check Out button is disabled.
4
In the Check Out Object dialog box, select the objects to check out.
5
Click Check Out.
The object and all its child objects are locked on the server and then copied to your local
repository.
Checking In Objects to the Server Repository
You check in objects to the server repository the same way you check in projects. When you check
in objects or projects, Siebel Tools does the following:
■
Copies object definitions from your local repository to the server repository.
■
Adds any new objects to the server repository.
■
Removes the locks from object definitions.
To check in projects or individual objects to the server repository
1
Open Siebel Tools and connect to your local database.
2
Choose Tools > Check In.
3
In the Check In dialog box, make sure that the correct repository is selected.
4
Do one of the following:
5
■
To check in selected projects or objects, click the Selected Objects option button and then
select the projects and objects you want to check in.
■
To check in all locked projects and objects, click the Locked/New Objects option button.
Click Check In.
Siebel Tools copies the projects and objects from your local repository to the server repository
and removes the locks.
Viewing Locked Objects Within Projects
When the Allow Object Locking property of a project is set to TRUE, you can view any objects within
the project that are locked. You can view locked objects in either the server repository or the local
repository.
86 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Viewing Object Differences
To view locked objects
1
In the Object Explorer, navigate to the Project object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, select the project that contains the objects to view.
3
Right-click and choose one of the following:
■
View Server Locked Objects
■
View Client Locked Objects
The Locked Objects dialog box displays any locked objects associated with the selected project.
Locking Objects Locally
When a project's Allow Object Locking is set to TRUE, you can lock individual objects within the
project in your local repository without having to check them out from the server.
To lock objects locally
■ Select the object, right-click, and then choose Lock Object.
Limitations of Object Check Out and Check In
When a projects Allows Object Locking property is set to TRUE, you cannot perform the following
tasks on objects checked out from the server repository:
■
Deleting objects.
■
Renaming objects.
■
Assigning objects to a different project.
Viewing Object Differences
Before you check in objects, you can compare the copies stored in your local database to those stored
in the server database. Siebel Tools compares the current state of the objects to the version of these
objects the time of checkout.
To view differences between objects
1
Choose Tools > Check In.
2
In the Check In dialog box, select the project you want to compare.
3
Click Diff.
The Object Comparison dialog box appears and displays the selected projects and any differences
between objects in the local database and objects in the server database.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 87
Checking Out and Checking In Projects and Objects ■ Undoing Check Out
Undoing Check Out
After checking out projects you can undo the check out, which does the following:
■
Removes locks on server objects.
■
Objects in the local repository remains locked and all changes since the objects were checked
out are retained.
To undo a project check out
1
Choose Tools > Check In.
2
In the Check In dialog box, select the project or objects for which you want to undo check-out,
and click the Undo Check Out button.
The project or object is unlocked on the server but not on your local database.
If one of the project or objects you select is new, the Undo Check Out button is disabled.
NOTE: You can also use the Get option to overwrite a project that you have checked out from the
server database. Then check the project back in to the server to remove the lock for the project.
Related Topic
“Getting Projects from the Server Repository” on page 72.
88 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
6
Working With Projects
Topics in This Section
“About Projects” on page 89
“Creating New Projects” on page 90
“Renaming Projects” on page 90
“Associating Objects with Different Projects” on page 90
“Locking Projects Directly in the Local Repository” on page 91
“Preventing Object Check in and Check out” on page 92
“Unlocking Projects Directly” on page 92
About Projects
Projects are sets of objects that reside in the Siebel repository. They are used group objects based
on functional areas. Every object is associated with a project. The names of projects that are
delivered with a standard Siebel application indicate the functional area with which they are
associated. For example, Account contains objects that pertain to the Account functional area.
A project named without a suffix, such as Account, usually contains business object layer objects
that span multiple Siebel applications. Project names that have a suffix (for example, Account(SSE))
contain user interface or business objects that are specific to the Siebel application indicated by the
suffix. For example, the suffix SSE in Account(SSE) indicates an entry containing Account user
interface data for the Siebel Sales application. Other examples of suffixes indicating user interface
data only are SSV for Siebel Service and CC for Siebel Call Center.
The project structure supplied with the Siebel Repository is usually well suited to having several
developers work on the same repository without contention for the same objects. However, when
developers need access to the same set of objects simultaneously, changing the standard project
structure may be necessary.
To determine if the standard project structure will work for your specific development project:
■
Create an application development plan that includes a PERT chart showing dependencies and
parallel activities.
■
Analyze the plan to see if the project structure interferes with developers who need access to
objects in the same projects at the same time. If so, break out groups of objects into separate
projects to enable concurrent development.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 89
Working With Projects ■ Creating New Projects
Creating New Projects
You typically create new projects to group related sets of new objects or break large numbers of
existing objects into more manageable groups.
NOTE: You cannot delete projects using Siebel Tools, but you can delete projects using SQL
commands.
To create a new project
1
In the Object Explorer, select the Project object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, right-click and choose New Record.
3
Enter a Name for the project and then step off the record.
Renaming Projects
You can rename projects that you have created. However, you must rename the projects on the
server, not on the local database. You cannot change the name of a top-level object that has been
checked out.
CAUTION: Do not change the name of projects to which Siebel objects are associated.
To rename a project on the server
1
Make sure developers have checked in all checked-out projects.
2
Use Siebel Tools to log into the server database.
3
Choose File > Open Repository and then select the repository you want to modify.
4
Navigate to the project you want to modify.
5
Lock the project and then change the Name property.
6
Have developers perform a Get of all projects on the server repository.
7
Have developers perform a full compilation the next time they compile.
Associating Objects with Different
Projects
You can associate objects with different projects. This can be useful, for example, when you want to
break a large project into smaller projects.
90 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Projects ■ Locking Projects Directly in the Local Repository
To associate an object with a different project
1
Check out both the source and the target project from the server database.
For instructions on how to check out projects, see “Checking Out and Checking In Projects” on
page 82.
2
Navigate to the object you want to modify and then change the Project property to the name of
the new project.
For instructions on how to modify objects, see “Modifying Objects” on page 96.
3
Check in the project that was originally associated with the object and then check in the project
that is currently associated with the object.
CAUTION: Trying to check in both projects at the same time can lead to errors.
For instructions on how to check in projects, see “Checking In Projects to the Server Repository”
on page 83.
4
Inform other developers that they must do a simultaneous get of the two projects prior to doing
any subsequent work on the object in either project.
Locking Projects Directly in the Local
Repository
You can lock projects directly in the local repository, without checking them out from the server. This
is useful when:
■
You want to test configurations on your local machine but do not want to prevent others from
checking out the project from the server database.
■
You intend to discard your work when you are done and therefore, do not have a need to check
modified objects back into the server.
When locking projects directly in the local repository, consider the following:
■
You cannot check in projects or objects that have been locked on the local database. Projects
must have been checked out from the server for them to be checked in to the server.
■
Any projects you have locked locally, and all associated objects, will be overwritten the next time
you get or check out those projects.
To lock projects directly
1
Log in to your local database.
2
Do one of the following:
■
Select an object, such as an applet or business component, and then choose Tools > Lock
Project.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 91
Working With Projects ■ Preventing Object Check in and Check out
■
Navigate to the project that contains the objects that you want to modify, and click the
Locked field to set it to TRUE.
All objects associated with the project become available for editing, indicated by a pencil icon
that appears under the W field and the Locked property of the project object is set to TRUE.
Preventing Object Check in and Check
out
You can prevent developers from checking out and checking in projects by locking the project directly
on the server repository.
CAUTION: Modifying objects directly on the server repository for purposes other than preventing
check in and check out is not recommended.
To lock projects directly
1
Log in to the server database.
2
Do one of the following:
■
Select an object, such as an applet or business component, and then choose Tools > Lock
Project.
■
Navigate to the project that contains the objects that you want to modify, and click the
Locked field to set it to TRUE.
The project and all objects associated with project are locked. They cannot be checked out.
Unlocking Projects Directly
After you have locked projects directly, that is without checking them out, you can remove the locks
on all associated objects by unlocking the projects.
To unlock projects
1
Log in to either the local database or server database, depending on where the locked objects
reside.
2
Do one of the following:
■
Select the object you want to unlock, and then choose Tools > Unlock Project.
■
Navigate to the project that contains the objects that you want unlock, and then click the
Locked field to clear the check mark (sets Locked to FALSE).
The locks are removed from the project and all objects associated with the project.
92 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
7
Working with Objects
Topics in This Section
“Summary of Tasks for Working with Objects” on page 93
“Creating Objects” on page 95
“Modifying Objects” on page 96
“Copying Objects” on page 97
“About Validating Objects” on page 98
“Validating Objects Using the Object List Editor” on page 98
“Validating Objects Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 99
“About the Validate Dialog Box” on page 99
“About Simple Queries” on page 105
“About Compound Queries” on page 105
“Searching the Repository for Objects” on page 106
“Viewing Object Relationships” on page 108
“Generating Reports About Object Relationships” on page 109
“About Object Comparison and Synchronization” on page 111
“Determining When Records Were Last Created and Updated” on page 115
Summary of Tasks for Working with
Objects
The process of working with objects varies depending on whether the Allow Object Locking property
of the parent project is set to TRUE or FALSE. When the property is set to FALSE, you must check
out the entire project to edit any object definitons within the project. However, if the Allow Object
Locking property is set to TRUE, you can check out some of the objects in a project and leave other
objects unlocked on the server, available for other developers to check out. For more information on
setting this property, see “Setting Projects to Allow Object Locking” on page 85.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 93
Working with Objects ■ Summary of Tasks for Working with Objects
Table 25 summarizes the differences for processes, such as create, copy, and modify.
Table 25. Summary of Processes for Working with Objects
Task
Allow Project Locking = False
Allow Project Locking = True
Create
object
1
Check out the project.
1
Lock the project locally.
2
Create new the object.
2
Create the new object.
3
Check in the project.
3
Unlock the project.
4
Check in the object.
Modify
object
Create new
object by
copying an
existing one
Delete
object
Rename
object
Assign
object to
different
project
94 ■
1
Check out the project.
1
Check out the object.
2
Modify the object.
2
Modify the object.
3
Check in the project.
3
Check in the object.
1
Check out project(s).
1
Check out the object to copy.
2
Copy object and create new one.
2
3
Check in projects.
Lock the object’s parent project
locally.
3
Copy the object and assign the
project (the same project locked in
step 2 or to a different project that
has Allow Object Locking set to
TRUE).
4
Unlock the project locally.
5
Lock the new object locally.
6
Check in the object to the server
repository.
1
Check out project.
2
Delete object.
3
Check in project.
1
Check out the project.
2
Rename the object.
3
Check in the project.
1
Check out Project (source and
target).
2
Associate object to target project.
3
Check in source first, and target
second.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Cannot perform. The Allow Object
Locking property must be set to FALSE.
Cannot perform. The Allow Object
Locking property must be set to FALSE.
Cannot perform. The Allow Object
Locking property must be set to FALSE.
Working with Objects ■ Creating Objects
Links to Tasks for Working with Objects
The following lists links to the summarized tasks listed in Table 25.
■
“Checking Out and Checking In Projects” on page 82
■
“Checking Out and Checking In Objects” on page 84
■
“Locking Projects Directly in the Local Repository” on page 91
■
“Creating Objects” on page 95
■
“Modifying Objects” on page 96
■
“Copying Objects” on page 97
■
“Compiling and Testing” on page 117
■
If you checked out the projects from the server, perform the task described in “Checking In
Projects to the Server Repository” on page 83
■
If you locked the project directly, perform the task described in “Unlocking Projects Directly”
on page 92
Creating Objects
Use new object wizards to create objects whenever possible. For example, to create a new business
component, use the Business Component Wizard.
Wizards step you through the process of configuring a given object, prompting you for the necessary
property values and automatically configuring any necessary child objects.
When a wizard not availble for the object type you wan to create, you can create objects manually
in the Object List Editor.
For information about using wizards and creating specific objects, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness
Applications.
To create objects using a new object wizard
1
Choose File > New Object.
2
Choose the appropriate wizard to create the new object.
3
Follow the instructions in the wizard.
To create a new object manually
1
In the Object Explorer, select the relevant object type.
The Object List Editor opens, listing objects of this object type.
2
To make the Object list Editor active, click it.
3
Choose Edit > New Record, or right-click and choose New Record.
A new record appears.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 95
Working with Objects ■ Modifying Objects
4
Enter property values in the new row in the Object List Editor.
At a minimum, you must enter the object’s Name and Project properties.
Typically other properties are also required. Before you can save the new objects, you must
complete the required properties.
NOTE: You cannot use punctuation characters as part of an object name.
5
Click anywhere outside the new row or move outside of the row with the UP or DOWN arrow keys.
Siebel Tools saves the new object.
Modifying Objects
You can modify objects using either the Object List Editor or the Properties window.
For guidelines about when to modify objects and when to create new objects, see Configuring Siebel
eBusiness Applications.
To modify objects in the Object List Editor
1
In the Object Explorer, select the object type you want to modify.
2
In the Object List Editor, select the object you want to modify.
3
Use the TAB key to move the cursor to the specific value you want to modify.
NOTE: It is recommended that you use the TAB key to move from property column to property
column in the object—if you use the mouse you might unintentionally change the value of a
Boolean property.
4
Type in a new value, or pick a value from the pick list (if one is provided).
5
To commit your changes, click anywhere outside the modified row or move outside the row with
the UP or DOWN arrow.
A check mark appears in the Changed column.
To modify objects using the Properties window
1
In the Object Explorer, select the object type you want to modify.
2
In the Object List Editor, select the object you want to modify.
3
Choose View > Windows > Properties to open the Properties window.
4
In the Properties window, select the current value, and then type in a new one.
5
To commit your changes, select another property or click anywhere outside the Properties
window.
A check mark appears in the Changed column in the Object List Editor.
96 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ Copying Objects
Copying Objects
One method of creating an object is to copy an existing object and then rename and change
properties of the copy as necessary.
For guidelines on copying objects and more information on the Upgrade Ancestor property, see
Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
To create new objects by copying existing objects
1
In the Object Explorer, select the relevant object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, locate the object to copy, and click anywhere in the row to select it.
3
Choose Edit > Copy Record.
A new row appears above the copied row, containing identical property values. The Changed
column contains a check mark.
4
Enter a new value for the Name property.
5
In the Project field, click the drop-down arrow.
The Projects pick list appears.
6
Choose the name of the project to which to assign the new object.
NOTE: Only locked projects are displayed in the Projects pick list.
7
If necessary, modify any other relevant properties and child objects.
8
To commit your changes, click anywhere outside the new row or move outside the row with the
UP or DOWN arrow keys.
Deleting Objects
Occasionally, you will want to delete an object from a project. To delete an object, you must have
the Allow Object Locking property set to FALSE.
To delete objects
1
Check out the Project from the server.
2
In the Object Explorer, select the desired object.
3
From the Edit menu, select Delete Record.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 97
Working with Objects ■ About Validating Objects
About Validating Objects
As you modify or create objects, you should also validate their definitions. Validating objects is one
of the first things you should do if a configuration change produces a run-time error. Although the
validation process can be time consuming, you can continue working in Siebel Tools while the
validation is running.
Validation is based on a set of rules that help make sure that your configuration changes are logically
consistent with other objects. Validating a parent object validates child objects as well.
There are many rules used to validate objects. The rule that checks for invalid object references is
the most important. An invalid object reference occurs when one object (for example, an applet)
references another object (for example, a business component) that has been inactivated or deleted.
You can review all validation rules in the Validation Options dialog box.
Related Topics
“Validating Objects Using the Object List Editor” on page 98
“Validating Objects Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 99
“About the Validate Dialog Box” on page 99
“About the Validation Options Dialog Box” on page 102
Validating Objects Using the Object List
Editor
Siebel Tools includes an option that reviews objects and validates them using a set of predefined
rules, such as checking for invalid object references.
To validate an object
1
In the Object List Editor, select the object or objects you want to validate.
2
Right-click and then choose Validate, or choose Tools > Validate Object.
The Validate dialog box appears.
3
Click Options.
The Validation Options dialog box appears.
4
Select the validation rules to enforce by selecting a row and clicking Enforce or Ignore.
5
In the Time Filter area, limit the objects you want to validate by doing one of the following:
■
Select the Last validated check box. This option validates objects that have been changed
since the last time validation was run.
■
Select the Custom check box and enter a date and time. This option validates objects that
have been changed since the date and time entered.
98 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ Validating Objects Using the Command-Line Interface
6
7
In the Action area, use the following check boxes to define the actions to take during the
validation process:
■
Do not report warnings. When this is selected, only errors are reported, not warnings. The
Enforce field for warnings is set to No.
■
Abort validation after. Use this option to abort the validation process after a specified number
of errors.
Click OK.
The Validation Options dialog closes.
8
In the Validate dialog box, click Start.
The Errors list displays violations of the currently enforced rules, as shown in Figure 17 on
page 100.
Related Topic
“About Validating Objects” on page 98
“About the Validate Dialog Box” on page 99
“About the Validation Options Dialog Box” on page 102
Validating Objects Using the CommandLine Interface
You can use the command-line interface to validate objects. You invoke the command-line interface
from the siebdev executable using the command switch /bv. The siebdev.exe is located in the Bin
directory of the Siebel Tools installation directory.
The syntax of the /bv switch is:
siebdev.exe /bv
The /bv switch runs all validation rules for the entire repository.
About the Validate Dialog Box
The Validate dialog box describes the results of validation rules applied to objects and shows the
location of the validation log file.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 99
Working with Objects ■ About the Validate Dialog Box
Figure 17 shows an example of the Validate dialog box.
Figure 17. Example of the Validate Dialog Box
Table 26 describes the user interface elements of the Errors area of the Validate dialog box.
100 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ About the Validate Dialog Box
Table 27 describes the user interface elements of the Log file area of the Validate dialog box.
Table 26. User Interface Elements of the Errors Area of the Validate Dialog Box
Field/
Button
Description
Errors list
Displays the results of the validation process. Each row in the list identifies a rule
violation for a specific object. To drill down to the object that contains the error,
double click the error. To sort the rows, click a column heading. To resize columns,
drag the right or left border of the heading cell.
Severity
column
An icon appears in this column for each violation row. It indicates whether the
violation is a warning (yellow icon with an exclamation mark) or an error (red icon
with a minus sign). Errors cause the compiled application to generate run-time
errors.
Rule column
An integer value appears in this column, identifying the rule that has been violated.
Rules are listed in order of the rule number in the Validation Options dialog box
(shown in Figure 17 on page 100).
Object
column
The name of the object that failed validation.
Description
column
The description of the error or warning.
Details text
box
Displays additional information about the error or warning message for the
currently selected row in the Errors list.
Go To button
To navigate to the corresponding object in the Object List Editor, select an error
message row and click Go To. Alternatively, you can double-click the error
message.
Table 27. User Interface Elements of the Log file Area of the Validate Dialog Box
Field/
Button
Description
Text box
Path and filename of a log file containing the list of validation errors and warnings.
To save a list of validation rows as a log file, click Save As, navigate to where you
want to save the file, and then specify a filename. You can then reload the list of
error and warning validations at a later time by using the Load button, rather than
by repeating the validation process.
Load button
Opens a previously saved log file and displays its list of validations in the Errors list.
Save As
button
Saves the current list of validation rows as a log file.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 10 1
Working with Objects ■ About the Validation Options Dialog Box
About the Validation Options Dialog Box
The Validation Options Dialog box appears when you click the Options button in the Validate dialog
box.
Figure 18 shows an example of the Validation Options dialog box.
Figure 18. Validation Options Dialog Box
Table 28 describes each user interface element of the Rules area of the Validation Options dialog box.
The repository Validator should be used only in conjunction with the Time Filter, to avoid validating
objects that are not being used.
Table 28. User Interface Elements of the Rules Area of the Validation Options Dialog Box
Field/Button
Description
Rules list
Lists all rules that can be enforced during validation. Each row in the list
identifies a rule for a specific object type (or All). You can sort the rows by
by clicking a column heading. You can also resize columns by dragging the
right or left border of the heading cell.
Severity column
An icon appears in this list column for each rule. It indicates whether the
rule generates a warning (yellow icon with an exclamation point) or an error
(red icon with a minus sign).
Rule column
The integer value that identifies this rule.
Object columns
Either the single object type that this rule applies to, or All.
102 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ About the Validation Options Dialog Box
Table 28. User Interface Elements of the Rules Area of the Validation Options Dialog Box
Field/Button
Description
Description column
The description of the rule.
Enforce
A Yes or No value for each rule. Yes validates all objects of the object type
identified in the Object column. Yes/No values in this list column are
changed using the Enforce, Ignore, Enforce All, and Ignore All buttons.
Save button
Saves the current set of rules and their state (enforced or ignored) to a text
file you specify. Other settings are saved to the preferences file when you
press ENTER.
Enforce button
Changes the Enforce column value in the selected row from No to Yes.
Ignore button
Changes the Enforce column value in the selected row from Yes to No.
Enforce All button
Changes all values in the Enforce column to Yes.
Ignore All button
Changes all values in the Enforce column to No. This has the effect in the
next validation of not validating any objects.
Details text box
The full text of the rule description for the currently selected row in the
Rules list.
Table 29 describes the Time Filters area of the Validation Options dialog box.
Table 29. User Interface Elements of the Time Filter Area of the Validation Options Dialog Box
Field
Description
Last validated check
box and date field
When selected, validates only objects changed since the date you enter into
the corresponding date box.
Custom check box
and date and time
fields
When selected, validates only objects changed within the date range you
enter into the corresponding date boxes.
Table 30 describes the check boxes in the Action area of the Validation Options dialog box.
Table 30. User Interface Elements of the Action Area of the Validation Options Dialog Box
Field
Description
Do not report
warnings check box
When selected, reports errors only, not warnings. It also changes the
Enforced setting of all warning rules to No.
Abort validation
after check box and
text box
When selected and a number is entered in the text box, Siebel Tools stops
validating after the specified number of errors is reached. By default, the
validation process continues to run until it is completed or canceled.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 10 3
Working with Objects ■ Using Queries to List Objects
Using Queries to List Objects
You can use query-by-example (QBE) to narrow the list of objects displayed in the Object List Editor.
An Object List Editor query searches for objects based on values in one or more properties of the
object. The queries can be simple, one-condition queries or compound, multiple-condition queries.
You can create, refine, and activate queries from the Query menu or from the List toolbar. (Refine
means to impose a further restriction on the current Object List Editor query by running it again with
an additional constraint.)
To create and execute an Object List Editor query
1
Navigate to the list of objects that you want to query.
2
Choose Query > New Query.
In the Object List Editor, a single empty query row appears.
3
Define your search criteria in the property cells of the empty query row.
These values may be single literal values such as Opportunity List Applet, or they may include
wildcard symbols. In TRUE/FALSE properties, a check mark represents TRUE.
4
Choose Query > Execute Query.
The list of objects in the Object List Editor is filtered to contain only those objects that meet your
query criteria.
To restore the Object List Editor to its prequery state
1
Choose Query > New Query.
In the Object List Editor, a single empty query row appears.
2
Choose Query > Execute Query.
The list of objects in the Object List Editor is restored to its prequery state.
Related Topics
“About Simple Queries” on page 105
“About Compound Queries” on page 105
104 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ About Simple Queries
About Simple Queries
A simple query finds information based on one condition. Table 31 lists the operators you can use to
create a simple query.
Table 31. Simple Query Operators
Operator
Description
=
Equal to
<
Less than
>
Greater than
<>
Not equal to
<=
Less than or equal to
>=
Greater than or equal to
*
Any number of characters (including none) may take the place of the asterisk (*)
?
Any one character matches the question mark (?)
IS NOT NULL
Searches for non-blank fields
IS NULL
Searches for blank fields
LIKE
Searches for values starting with the indicated string
NOT LIKE
Searches for values not starting with the indicated string
“”
Searches for strings that contain special characters, such as a comma (,)
EXISTS ( )
Searches for values in a multi-value group
[~]
Forces the case of the text string to whatever follows the tilde (~)
For more information on search specifications and operators and on Siebel data types, see Siebel
Developer’s Reference.
About Compound Queries
Compound queries enable you to find information based on two or more conditions. There are three
ways to create compound queries:
■
Enter conditions in two or more property columns to find records that meet all the conditions. In
other words, Siebel applications automatically connect these conditions with the operator AND.
This method is the easiest way to create a compound query.
■
Enter a compound query within a property field using the operators OR, AND, and NOT to create
two or more conditions for that property.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 10 5
Working with Objects ■ Searching the Repository for Objects
■
Enter a compound query using more than one field and compound operators AND, OR, and NOT.
You can enter this type of query in any field. You might find it convenient to use the Description
or Comments field, because it is typically the longest on a given screen.
When you create a compound query, follow the same basic steps you use to create a simple query.
Use parentheses to control the order in which a compound search is conducted. Expressions inside
parentheses are searched for first (as they appear left to right). Table 32 lists the unique operators
for compound queries. Use these operators in addition to the operators you use to create a simple
query.
Table 32. Compound Query Operators
Operator
Description
AND
All the conditions connected by ANDs must be true for a search to retrieve a record.
OR
At least one of the conditions connected by the OR must be true for a search to
retrieve a record.
NOT
The condition modified by this operator must be false for a search to retrieve a
record.
For more information about compound operators, see Siebel Developer’s Reference.
Searching the Repository for Objects
Use the search repository feature to search across all properties of multiple object types using a
single set of search criteria. This provides a way to locate objects when you know that a given value
appears in one or more properties. The search repository feature differs from querying in the Object
List Editor because when querying you can only query on a single object type and have to define
search criteria for each property.
NOTE: Searching the repository can be time-consuming.
To find an object using search
1
Choose Tools > Search Repository.
The Search Repository dialog box appears.
2
Under Parameters, in the Search value text box, type the search criteria.
3
If you want only those objects whose property values contain the search string with the same
capitalization, select the Case sensitive check box.
4
If you want only those objects whose property values exactly match the entire search string,
select the Exact match check box.
106 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ Searching the Repository for Objects
5
In the Types to search list box, select the object type or types to search for.
By default, all object types in this list are selected. You can choose a single object type to search
by selecting it. Use CTRL-click and SHIFT-click to select multiple object types. For better
performance, search only the object type or types you need.
Use the Select All and Clear All to select or deselect all object types in the Types to search list box.
6
Click Search Now.
Siebel Tools executes the search and lists the results in the list box at the bottom of the Search
Repository dialog box. See Figure 19 for an example. The list box lists all the objects that match
your search criteria, with the following columns for each object.
7
Column
Description
Type
Object type of the object returned by the search.
Name
Name of the object returned by the search.
Property
Name of the property of the object in which the search value was found.
Value
Value of the property of the object in which the search value was found.
To show it in the Object List Edit, double-click an item in the results.
This has the same effect as running a query in the Object List Editor for the name of the object.
8
To export the search results to a file, click the Export button.
To cancel a search
■ At any time during the execution of a search, click Cancel.
Siebel Tools stops the search process.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 10 7
Working with Objects ■ Viewing Object Relationships
Figure 19 shows an example of the Search Repository dialog box after a search execution.
Figure 19. Example of the Search Repository Dialog Box
Viewing Object Relationships
You can use the Siebel Tools Visualization views to see how objects relate to one another.
To invoke the Visualization views using the View menu
■ Choose View > Visualize > View Details, View Relationships, View Descendents, or View Web
Hierarchy.
To invoke the Visualization views from the Object List Editor
■ Right-click an object of the relevant object type in the Object List Editor, and choose the
Visualization view you want.
Not all Visualization views are listed for all objects.
108 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ Generating Reports About Object Relationships
The Visualization views are described in Table 33.
Table 33. Description of Visualization Views
View
Description
Details
Generates and displays a Details visualization view for the currently selected
business component or business object.
The diagram displays how the business component maps to underlying tables
(directly or through joins) and maps to other business components (through
links).
Relationships
Generates and displays a Relationships visualization view for the currently
selected business component or table.
For business components, the diagram displays how the business component
links to other business components using multi-value link objects. For tables, the
diagram displays how the table joins to other tables by way of join objects.
Descendents
Shows all objects which have the current object marked as their Upgrade
Ancestor.
Web Hierarchy
Generates and displays a Web Hierarchy visualization view for the currently
selected applet, application, business component, screen, or view.
The diagram displays the parent-child relationships between the selected object
and its parent and child objects, as well as the parents of the parent objects and
children of the child objects, up and down the hierarchy.
Generating Reports About Object
Relationships
You can generate reports about the relationships between certain object types in the repository. This
section provides an introduction to using the reports facility; for more information, see Siebel
Reports Administration Guide.
The list of records included in a repository report is not dependent on the currently selected object
in the Object List Editor—for example, if you select the Contact business component in the Object
List Editor and generate the business components and fields report, the report shows all business
components, not just the Contact business component.
Generating Reports for a Single Object Type
To restrict a report to a single object type—that is, one business component, business object, dock
object, table, or workflow object—run a query in the Object List Editor (for the parent object type)
that restricts the list to the one object.
The following example shows how to get the Tables report for S_ORG_EXT.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 10 9
Working with Objects ■ Generating Reports About Object Relationships
To get a Tables report for the S_ORG_EXT table (an example)
1
In the Object Explorer, select the Table object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, click anywhere to make it the active window.
3
Choose Query > New Query.
4
In the Name field, type S_ORG_EXT and press ENTER.
5
Choose Reports > Tables.
The generated report provides information only for the S_ORG_EXT table.
Generating Reports for Ranges of Objects
You can use a similar approach to restrict a report to a range of objects that have a property value
in common. The report includes only those objects that match the current query criteria. For
example, you can generate a Tables report of all extension tables, a business components report of
all business components of a specific class, or any of the reports restricted to a single field.
Available Reports
The current object type in the Object Explorer determines the list of reports in the Reports menu.
Repository reports are listed by current object type in Table 34.
Table 34. Reports Available for Each Object Type
Object Selected
in Object
Explorer
Report Menu Option
Description
Applet
Applets by BusComp
Lists the applets assigned to each business
component.
Business
Component
Business Component and
Fields
Lists the fields in each business component
alphabetically. For each field, the base
column and join table, if any, are identified.
Business Object
Business Object and
Components
Lists the business object components in
each business object. For each business
object component, the business component
and link are identified.
Business Service
Business Service Summary
Lists a summary of all business services.
Business Service Detail
Lists all business services with details.
Dock Objects
Repository Dock Objects
For each dock object, displays selected
properties, and lists the member tables,
visibility rules, and related dock objects.
Project
Project List
Lists all projects, and identifies the locking
status, person locked by, and locked date for
each.
110 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ About Object Comparison and Synchronization
Table 34. Reports Available for Each Object Type
Object Selected
in Object
Explorer
Report Menu Option
Description
Table
Tables
For each table, displays selected properties,
and lists the columns. The name, physical
type, length, scale, comments, and various
other properties are identified for each
column.
Workflow Policy
Object
Workflow Policy Objects
Lists the workflow components in each
workflow object, and within each workflow
component lists the columns.
About Object Comparison and
Synchronization
You can view a side-by-side comparison of any two objects of the same type. Differences are visually
highlighted through color-coded icons. You can select and copy properties and individual child objects
from one object to the other.
Using this feature, you can propagate a change made to an ancestor object to its descendents or
other objects of a similar types. You can assess and adjust differences between objects. You can also
compare properties of checked-out objects with their counterparts on the server.
For more information about ancestor objects, see Configuring Siebel eBusiness Applications.
Topics in This Section
“About the Compare Objects Dialog Box” on page 112
“Comparing Objects” on page 113
“Synchronizing Objects” on page 115
“Viewing Object Differences” on page 87
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11 1
Working with Objects ■ About Object Comparison and Synchronization
About the Compare Objects Dialog Box
To display a side-by-side comparison of any two objects of the same type, Siebel Tools uses the
Compare Objects dialog box, shown in Figure 20.
Figure 20. Example of the Compare Objects Dialog Box
112 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ About Object Comparison and Synchronization
Table 35 describes the user interface elements of the Compare Objects dialog box.
Table 35. Compare Objects Dialog Box User Interface Elements
Field/Button/
Control
First Selection
Second Selection
Description
The explorer controls in the upper left and right area of the dialog box
are similar to what you see after clicking the Detail tab of the Object
Explorer.
Both controls are always synchronized to show a line-by-line comparison
between the objects. If you expand or collapse an object in one explorer
control, its counterpart is automatically expanded or collapsed.
Child objects that do not exist in either object are represented with
placeholders (a dashed line).
Properties
By default, the properties shown in these list boxes are the properties
that are different for the objects being compared. Which properties
appear in these list boxes is determined by the settings in the Display
area.
Display
Determines which properties are shown in First Selection and Second
Selection and in the Properties list boxes:
■
Show All Objects check box: select to show all child objects in the
First Selection. Second Selection box: select to show all user
properties in the Properties list boxes.
■
Show System Properties check box: select to show specific system
properties such as Created, Created By, Updated, and Updated By in
the Properties list boxes.
Use these two buttons to synchronize objects. See “Synchronizing
Objects” on page 115 for more information.
Use this button to expand the entire tree in the First Selection and
Second Selection explorer controls.
Use this button to collapse the entire tree in the First Selection and
Second Selection explorer controls.
Delete buttons
Use this button to delete objects after a comparison.
Comparing Objects
You can compare two objects of the same type. The Object Comparison dialog box displays a lineby-line comparison between the two. You can compare objects defined in the current repository, in
different repositories, and in archive files (SIF files).
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11 3
Working with Objects ■ About Object Comparison and Synchronization
To compare two objects in the same repository
1
In the Object Explorer select an object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, select two top-level objects.
3
Choose Tools > Compare Objects > Selected.
The Compare Objects dialog box appears.
To compare an object in the current repository with an object in another repository
1
In the Object Explorer, select an object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, select one top-level object.
3
Choose Tools > Compare Objects > Selected vs. Repository.
The Open Repository dialog box appears.
4
Select the repository that contains the object you want to compare with the currently selected
object.
The Object Comparison dialog box opens with the object in the current working repository
displayed in the left applet and the corresponding object in the selected repository in the right
applet.
You can update the current working repository or the selected repository from the Object
Comparison dialog box if you have the appropriate projects locked in both repositories.
To compare an object in the current repository with an object in an archive file
1
In the Object Explorer, select an object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, select one top-level object.
3
Choose Tools > Compare Objects > Selected vs. Archive Option.
The Select Archive File to Compare Against dialog box opens.
4
Select a SIF file that to use for comparison and then click Open.
The comparison starts at the project level. If a corresponding object type is found in the archive
file, the Object Comparison dialog box opens. If a corresponding object type is not found, it does
not open.
To compare objects in two different archive files
1
In the Object Explorer, select an object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, select one top-level object.
3
Choose Tools> Compare Objects > Archive vs. Archive.
The Select Archive File for Left Side of Comparison dialog box opens.
114 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working with Objects ■ Determining When Records Were Last Created and Updated
4
Select an archive file, and then click Open.
The Select Archive File for Right Side of Comparison dialog box opens.
5
Select an archive file, and then click Open.
The Object Comparison dialog box opens with the left and right side populated with the contents
of the selected archive files. During the comparison the two archive files, are read-only.
Related Topic
“About the Compare Objects Dialog Box” on page 112
Synchronizing Objects
After you compare two objects, you can use the Compare Objects dialog box controls to synchronize
those objects.
To synchronize objects
1
Lock the projects that contain the objects you want to synchronize.
2
In the Object Explorer, select any two top-level objects of the same object type.
Make sure the objects are locked.
3
Choose Tools > Compare Objects > Selected.
The Compare Objects dialog box appears.
4
Select an object instance in the First Selection box and use the right arrow button to synchronize
the objects selected in the First Selection box with the object in the Second Selection box.
If the objects do not exist in the Second Selection box, Siebel Tools creates them. If they do exist,
Siebel Tools changes their properties to reflect those in the First Selection box.
When you copy an object from one tree applet to the other, the children of the object are copied
as well.
Determining When Records Were Last
Created and Updated
You can review the history for a record to see who made the last change and when the record was
updated.
To determine by whom and when a record was created and last updated
1
Select a record in the Object List Editor.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11 5
Working with Objects ■ Determining When Records Were Last Created and Updated
2
Choose Help > About Record.
The Siebel Tools dialog box appears, displaying when and by whom the record was created and
last updated.
3
Click Details > to display additional information about the record in the repository.
116 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
8
Compiling and Testing
Topics in This Section
“About Compiling” on page 117
“Compiling Projects” on page 117
“Compiling Single Objects or Groups of Objects” on page 119
“Compiling Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 119
“Testing Changes on Your Local Machine” on page 121
About Compiling
After you have modified objects, you need to compile the changes to an SRF. The SRF file is updated
with the new objects and they become available in any instances of the Web client reading that SRF
file.
NOTE: An application’s configuration file (CFG) includes a parameter (RepositoryFile) that defines
the SRF file to read at run time.
You can compile entire projects or individual top-level objects. Compiling projects is more efficient
when you have many changes in one or more projects. Compiling objects is more efficient when
changes are isolated to only a few objects.
NOTE: To be able to compile, Siebel Tools must be connected to a database that has the sort order
set to binary.
Incremental Repository Upgrade Kits
If you are compiling an SRF file to create an incremental (delta) repository upgrade kit, you can
minimize the size of the kit and the time required to upgrade by specifying a Reference SRF when
you compile your new SRF. The Reference SRF is a previous (base) version of the SRF. The
incremental repository upgrade contains the differences between the Reference SRF and the new SRF
only. To specify a Reference SRF, click the Reference SRF button, and specify the path and file name
of the previous SRF version. For more information about incremental SRF files and upgrades, see
Siebel Anywhere Administration Guide.
Compiling Projects
You use the Object Compiler to compile all projects or selected projects only. To be able to compile
selected projects, you must have compiled all projects at least once.
CAUTION: Avoid compiling a subset of projects into an SRF file, unless the SRF file was built from
a full compilation from the same database.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11 7
Compiling and Testing ■ Compiling Projects
When you select individual projects to compile, the Object Compiler does not remove inactive toplevel objects from the SRF file, but it does remove inactive child objects. For example, if you
inactivate the Name list column in the Account List Applet, and then compile the Account SSE project,
the Name list column is removed from the SRF file. However, if you inactivate the Account List Applet,
and then compile the Account SSE project, the Account List Applet is not be removed.
To compile projects
1
Choose Tools > Compile Projects.
The Object Compiler dialog box appears with the list of projects displayed.
2
Select the projects you want to compile.
3
In the Siebel Repository File field, click Browse and then select the appropriate SRF file.
Typically you compile to the SRF file used by the local instance of the Web client that you are
using to test. The path to this SRF file is specified in the application’s CFG file.
CAUTION: Do not attempt to compile to or modify the default SRF file used by Siebel Tools that
is displayed in the Object Compiler dialog box—usually in \tools\OBJECTS\siebel.srf. This file is
locked because the Siebel Tools client is currently reading it. If you attempt to compile to this
filename and path, you receive an error message.
4
Click the Auto-start Web client check box, if you want to automatically start a local instance of
the Web client when the compile process finishes.
When this option is checked and the Web client is already open, the client is refreshed with
changes and opens with same view that was displayed before the compilation.
To automatically start the Web client, you need to have specified the location of the Siebel
executable, the application configuration file, and other relevant settings in the Development
Tools Options dialog box. For information on how to do this, see “Setting Debug Options” on
page 61.
5
Click Compile.
The objects in your repository are compiled to the SRF file you specified. The changes are
immediately available in any instances of the Web client that are reading the SRF file. See
“Testing Changes on Your Local Machine” on page 121.
118 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Compiling and Testing ■ Compiling Single Objects or Groups of Objects
Compiling Single Objects or Groups of
Objects
You can compile a single object or a group of top-level objects of the same type. For example, if you
modify the UI for several applets, rather than compiling entire projects, you can compile only the
applets that have changed.
NOTE: Some repository objects have to be in the production database to function correctly. By
default, these objects have their no compile flag set to TRUE, thus, they do not get compiled into the
.srf file. Of particular interest are those objects that can be configured. These include Assignment
Objects and their children, Workflow Policy Objects and their children, Dock Objects and their
children, and EIM Interface Table objects and their children. Other objects that are not configurable
but still need to be present in the production database for customer to use various admin and batch
processes include Schema Maintenance objects, Server Component objects and User Key Attribute
objects.
To compile single objects or a group of objects
1
In the Object List Editor, select an object or group of objects of a given object type (for example,
applet).
2
Right-click and then choose Compile.
The Object Compiler dialog box displays the list of selected objects.
3
In the Object Compilier dialog box, click Browse and then select the appropriate SRF file.
4
Click Compile.
The objects are compiled to the SRF file you specified. The changes are immediately available in
any instances of the Web client that are reading the SRF file. For more information, see “Testing
Changes on Your Local Machine” on page 121.
Compiling Using the Command-Line
Interface
You can also compile projects using the command-line interface. You invoke the siebdev executable
using the command switch /bc. This command switch performs a full compile. For multilingual
deployments you can also set the Tools active language for the compile. The siebdev.exe is located
in the Bin directory of the Siebel Tools installation directory.
The syntax for the /bc switch is:
siebdev.exe /c <config file> /d <data source> /u <user name> /p <password> /tl <language>
/bc <Siebel Repository> <SRF file>
For example, the following command compiles the Siebel Repository into siebel SRF with the active
language set to Japanese.
siebdev.exe /c tools.cfg /d sample /u sadmin /p sadmin /tl JPN
/bc "Siebel Repository" siebel.srf
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 11 9
Compiling and Testing ■ Compiling Using the Command-Line Interface
If no file path is specified for the SRF file, the file is compiled into the objects directory under the
Tools installation directory. Otherwise, it is compiled into the specified directory.
NOTE: The Auto-start web client option that is available in the Object Compiler dialog box is not
available when you compile using the command-line interface.
120 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Compiling and Testing ■ Testing Changes on Your Local Machine
Testing Changes on Your Local Machine
For testing purposes, you must have an instance of the Siebel Mobile Web client installed on your
machine. After compiling repository changes to an SRF file, local instances of the Mobile Web client
that are open and are reading the SRF file automatically close and then reopen, displaying the
updated configuration.
For more information on installing a local instance of the Mobile Web client, see Siebel Installation
Guide for Microsoft Windows: Servers, Mobile Web Clients, Tools.
When compiling objects and testing the results locally, consider the following:
■
If a local instance of the Web client is installed but it is not open, you can select an option in the
Object Compile dialog box to automatically open a local Web client and read the most current
repository. For more information, see “Compiling Projects” on page 117.
■
For repository changes to appear in local instances of the Web client, the Web client must be
reading the SRF file to which you compiled.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 12 1
Compiling and Testing ■ Testing Changes on Your Local Machine
122 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
9
Working With Archive Files
Topics in This Section
“About Archive Files” on page 123
“Exporting Objects to an Archive File” on page 123
“Exporting Objects to an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 124
“Process of Importing Objects from an Archive File” on page 125
“Preparing the Target Repository for Import from an Archive File” on page 125
“Importing Objects from an Archive File” on page 126
“About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions Dialog Box” on page 128
“Importing Objects From an Archive File Using the Command-Line Interface” on page 131
About Archive Files
You can export object objects from the repository to an archive file (SIF) and then import objects
from the archive file back into the repository. Use archive files when you want to back up sets of
objects or move sets objects to another environment that shares the same physical database schema
as the source environment.
You can include individual objects or entire projects in archive files. However, the Project property of
objects is not included in Siebel archive files.
Archive files can be controlled by source-control software. When importing objects from an archive
file, you can specify conflict resolution rules at the object level, directing Siebel Tools to ignore an
imported object, replace an existing object with an imported one, or merge the two on a propertyby-property basis.
If you need to back up or move the entire repository to another environment, see “About Exporting
and Importing Repositories” on page 137.
Exporting Objects to an Archive File
You can use archive files to export top-level objects such as business components, applets, views,
and projects to an archive file. Child objects are exported and imported along with their parents. You
can select an entire project to export or individual objects within a project. When selecting individual
objects to export, you select all objects of a given object type. For example, first you select all the
applets you want export, then you can navigate to a second object type to select additional objects,
and so on.
When exporting repositories, consider the following:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 12 3
Working With Archive Files ■ Exporting Objects to an Archive File Using the
Command-Line Interface
■
Archive files can only be exported and imported among repositories with the same repository
schema definition.
■
Do not export the Repository Object to export an entire repository. The resulting export file will
be too large and performance will be slow. Instead use the task described in “Exporting and
Importing Repositories Using the Database Configuration Utility” on page 137.
To export objects to an archive file
1
In the Object Explorer, navigate to the object type you want to export.
2
In the Object List Editor, select the object or objects you want to archive.
3
Choose Tools > Add To Archive.
The Export to Archive File dialog box appears.
Status messages appear showing which child objects are being included. When the process
completes, the selected top-level objects appear in the Objects to Archive list in the Export to
Archive File dialog box.
4
If you need to add objects of another object type, navigate to that object type in the Object
Explorer without closing the Export to Archive File dialog box.
5
Repeat Step 2 through Step 4 for each object you want to archive.
6
When you are finished adding objects to the list, in the Export to Archive file dialog box, enter
the path and filename of the archive file you want to create.
7
Click Save.
An SIF file (archive file) is created in the location you selected.
Exporting Objects to an Archive File
Using the Command-Line Interface
You can export objects using the command-line interface. You invoke the command-line interface
from the siebdev executable using the command switch /batchexport. The siebdev.exe is located in
the Bin directory of the Siebel Tools installation directory.
The syntax of the /batchexport switch is:
siebdev.exe /c <config file> /d <database> /u <user name> /p <password> /batchexport
<Repository Name> <Input File Name> <Log File>
The command-line interface provided by the /batchexport switch accepts an input file that specifies
export objects. The input file takes a comma-delimited format of Object Type, Object Name Search
Expression, and .sif file name. The search expression takes any Tools accepted query criteria. To
specify the SIF file, you can use an absolute file path or a relative file path to the current directory.
You can place multiple lines in the input file, each requesting to export multiple objects into different
SIF file. However, if you specify the same SIF export file in multiple lines, only the last export takes
effect—the previous exports will be overwritten.
124 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Archive Files ■ Process of Importing Objects from an Archive File
For example, consider the following sample text from an input file. Using this file as input, the /
batchexport switch would export all business components where the Name property is like
“*Account*” into a repository file named exports.sif:
"Business Component,*Account*,export.sif"
NOTE: There should be no space before and after commas.
The following sample export command would export objects specified in the input file, obj.txt. It also
logs results into export.log:
siebdev.exe /c tools.cfg /d sample /u sadmin /p sadmin /batchexport "siebel repository"
obj.txt export.log
Process of Importing Objects from an
Archive File
You can import objects from an archive file into a local repository.
To import objects from an archive file, perform the following tasks:
1
“Preparing the Target Repository for Import from an Archive File” on page 125
2
“Importing Objects from an Archive File” on page 126
Preparing the Target Repository for
Import from an Archive File
You need to import into a checked-out project or projects on the local database of a client computer—
do not import to the Server database. Make sure the following conditions exist before importing:
■
The import file is accessible to the local machine by way of the network or local drives.
■
The target repository is open in Siebel Tools and is the active repository.
■
The projects that will be affected by import have been checked out to the local database. This
includes any project that any object in the export file is assigned to.
The only exception consists of projects (or their objects) that are in the archive file, but that do
not exist yet in the target repository. These are not checked out because they do not exist in the
target repository.
NOTE: In some cases it may be difficult to know in advance which projects need to be checked
out. The Import wizard informs you of any projects that were not locked but need to be. This
occurs on the second panel of the Import wizard, after the wizard has analyzed the objects in
the archive file and compared them to the objects in your repository.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 12 5
Working With Archive Files ■ Importing Objects from an Archive File
Importing Objects from an Archive File
After you have exported objects to an archive file, you can import them from the archive file into a
repository. The repository from which the archive file was created and the repository into which you
are importing must be the same Siebel release version.
To import objects from an archive file
1
Open the target repository in Siebel Tools, if it is not already open.
2
Choose Tools > Import From Archive.
3
In the Select Archive To Import dialog box, select the archive (SIF) file, and then click Open.
The Import Wizard - Preview dialog box appears.
This dialog box identifies the projects and the nonproject top-level objects in the archive file you
have opened, allowing you to preview the contents of the archive file.
126 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Archive Files ■ Importing Objects from an Archive File
4
Select an option button in the Conflict Resolution area.
To specifies the default resolution for conflicts between the archive file and the target repository.
You will have the opportunity in subsequent dialog boxes in the Import Wizard to change this
choice for individual objects.
Use the following table to determine your option.
Option Button
Description
Overwrite the object
in the repository
If the same top-level object is found in the archive file and target
repository, delete the version in the target repository, along with its
children, and replace them with the object and children from the
archive file.
Merge the object
definitions from the
archive with the
definition in the
repository
Merging is the default, and generally the safest option. When the same
top-level object exists in both the target repository and the archive file:
■
Replace differing properties in the target top-level and child-level
with those in the archive file.
■
Add new child objects to the target repository if they are not
already present.
■
Do not change child objects in the target repository that are not
also present in the archive file.
The resulting top-level object has the same properties and children as
the object in the archive, plus any children that were already present
in the repository definition.
Do not import the
object definition
from the archive
5
Do not change the objects in the target repository.
Click Next.
One of the following happens:
■
If there are objects you will be replacing or modifying and whose projects are not locked, a
warning message appears and you must cancel the import process, lock the projects, and
then restart the Import Wizard.
■
If the objects in the SIF file already exist in the repository, and there are no conflicts found,
no changes are made. A message appears saying that no conflicts were found and that no
changes will be made to the repository. In this case, click OK.
■
If the objects in the SIF file already exist in the repository, and if conflicts are found, or if the
objects do not yet exist in the repository, the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions
dialog box appears with information about the differences displayed. In this case, go to
Step 6 on page 128.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 12 7
Working With Archive Files ■ About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions
Dialog Box
6
In the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions dialog box, under Conflicting Objects, select
an object to see the differences under Object Differences and Attribute Differences.
See “About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions Dialog Box” on page 128 for details
about the dialog box.
7
8
To make an adjustment, do the following:
a
Select an object or attribute difference.
b
Right-click and select the action you want to occur.
Click Next.
The Summary window appears and the import process starts.
9
When the import process is completed, click Finish.
A log file named importlog.txt is created in temp directory of your Siebel Tools installation
directory. It contains the same list of messages that appeared in the Summary window. You may
find it useful to store this file elsewhere for a record of what changes were made to the
repository. It is also a good idea to change the filename so it reflects the date of the import.
About the Import Wizard - Review
Conflicts and Actions Dialog Box
When the Import Wizard detects a difference between objects stored in the repository and those
stored in the SIF file, the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions dialog box appears. You use
this dialog box to review differences and to change the action used to resolve the conflict.
128 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Archive Files ■ About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions
Dialog Box
The dialog box is divided into three panes: the Conflicting Objects explorer control, the Object
differences list, and the Attributes differences list.
Figure 21. Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions
Conflicting Objects Explorer
The Conflicting Objects Explorer displays the hierarchy of objects for which there are differences. The
hierarchy displayed mirrors the object type/object definition hierarchy in a Siebel repository, but
shows only conflicts to resolve rather than all repository or archive objects.
Object Differences List
The Object Differences list displays objects, one per row. For each object it shows whether it exists
only in the archive file, only in the target repository, or in both, and what resolution is specified. You
can change the resolution here.
The objects displayed in the Object Differences dialog box include those at all hierarchical levels, not
just top-level objects. This lets you make adjustments to the resolution for any affected objects.
The File and Repository columns indicate whether each identified object is present in the archive file
or target repository. An “X” indicating the object’s presence can appear in the File list column, the
Repository list column, or both. These list columns are for information only; you cannot change the
check marks.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 12 9
Working With Archive Files ■ About the Import Wizard - Review Conflicts and Actions
Dialog Box
The Action list column indicates the proposed resolution for each object in the list. This setting is
initially generated for each object from the default behavior selected in the Conflict Resolution option
buttons in the Preview pane. You can right-click on the value in the Action list column and select a
different value from a shortcut menu. The available selections include the following:
■
File. Equivalent to the Overwrite the object definition in the repository selection in the previous
dialog box.
■
Merge. Equivalent to the Merge the object definitions from the archive with the definition in the
repository option in the previous dialog box.
The resulting top-level object has the same properties and children as the object in the archive,
plus any children that were present in the repository definition.
■
Repository. Equivalent to the Do not import the object definition from the archive option in the
previous dialog box.
For more information about these options, see “Importing Objects from an Archive File” on page 126.
Attribute Differences List
The Attribute Differences list displays the property value conflicts for the currently selected object in
the Object Differences dialog box. Those properties are listed only where there is a conflict.
Table 36 describes the columns in the list.
Table 36. Columns in the Attribute Differences List
Column
Description
Attribute
Name of the property.
File
Value of the property in the archive file version of the object.
Repository
Value of the property in the target-repository version of the object.
Resolution
Value of either File or Repository for each property, depending on whether the
archive-file or target-repository version of the object is to determine the value
of the property in the final definition.
This list column can be updated only if the object whose properties are being
displayed has an Action setting of Merge in the Object Differences list.
Otherwise, the shortcut menu options are read-only and are unavailable, and
the value displayed is the same as that in the Action column of the Object
Differences list.
To change the Resolution value from Repository to File or the reverse, rightclick on the Attribute row to change and then choose Repository or File from
the shortcut menu.
130 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Archive Files ■ Importing Objects From an Archive File Using the CommandLine Interface
Importing Objects From an Archive File
Using the Command-Line Interface
You can also import objects using the command-line interface. You invoke the command-line
interface from the siebdev executable using the command switch /batchimport. The siebdev.exe is
located in the Bin directory of the Siebel Tools installation directory.
The syntax of the /batchimport switch is:
siebdev.exe /c <config file> /d <database> /u <user name> /p <password> /batchimport
<Siebel Repository name> <Import Mode> <.sif file1, .sif file2, .sif fileN; or directory
where .sif files can be found> <log file>
NOTE: You can specify the SIF file and the log file by the full path or the relative path to the current
directory.
For example, the following sample import command imports import1.sif, located in the parent
directory, and import2.sif, located in the Tools directory, into the Siebel repository using the
overwrite mode. It also logs the results to import.log:
siebdev.exe /c tools.cfg /d sample /u sadmin /p sadmin /batchimport "siebel repository"
overwrite ..\import1.sif c:\Tools\import2.sif import.log
The following sample import command imports all files under c:\tools\importfiledir into the Siebel
repository using the merge mode. It also logs the results to import.log.
siebdev.exe /c tools.cfg /d sample /u sadmin /p sadmin /batchimport "siebel repository"
merge c:\tools\importfiledir import.log
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13 1
Working With Archive Files ■ Importing Objects From an Archive File Using the CommandLine Interface
132 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
10 Managing Repositories
Topics in This Section
“About Repositories” on page 133
“Viewing Which Repository is Currently Open” on page 134
“Reviewing Information About the Current Repository” on page 134
“Guidelines for Naming Repositories” on page 135
“Renaming Repositories” on page 136
“Renaming Repositories” on page 136
“Deleting Repositories” on page 136
“About Exporting and Importing Repositories” on page 137
“Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database Configuration Utility” on page 137
“About Repository Patch Files” on page 141
“Creating Repository Patch Files” on page 142
“Applying Repository Patch Files” on page 144
“Upgrading Repositories” on page 145
About Repositories
The Siebel repository refers to the set of tables in which Siebel objects and server scripts are stored.
The set of objects and server scripts stored in the repository define a Siebel application (such as
Siebel Service or Siebel Sales) and are compiled into a compressed file called a Siebel repository file
(SRF file). You use Siebel Tools to view data in the Siebel Repository.
The Siebel repository is populated with data during the installation process. For more information,
see the Siebel Installation Guide for the operating system you are using.
The SRF file is a compressed, read-only file that contains compiled a version of the Siebel repository.
Siebel applications read the SRF file at run time. It provides the Siebel applications with much of the
metadata it needs to define interactions with the enterprise data and software users.
You cannot have multiple repositories in a production environment because some run time
components read repository objects, such as workflow policies, directly from repository tables
instead from the SRF file and they assume there is only one repository. However, you can have
multiple SRF files, compiled from different repositories, as long as they do not diverge in ways that
compromise data integrity.
NOTE: Browser scripts are compiled into the browser script compilation folder, which can be
specified in Siebel Tools on the Scripting tab under View > Options. For more information on the
browser script compilation folder, see “Setting Scripting Options” on page 59.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13 3
Managing Repositories ■ Viewing Which Repository is Currently Open
Viewing Which Repository is Currently
Open
Under normal circumstances there is only one repository available on your local database, and one
available on the server database for your development workgroup. Typically this repository (in either
location) is called the Siebel repository and is opened by default when you open Siebel Tools and log
on to the local or server database. However, there are circumstances—especially when your group is
in the process of upgrading to a new version of Siebel eBusiness Applications—in which multiple
repositories can be present, especially on the server.
To view which repository is currently open
■ Choose File > Open Repository.
The Open Repository dialog box appears and lists all repositories in the database to which you
are connected.
Reviewing Information About the
Current Repository
The About SRF option on the Siebel Tools Help menu provides version, compilation, and path
information about the current repository.
To review information about the current repository
■ In Siebel Tools, choose Help > About SRF.
The About Repository File window appears and displays the following information.
Field/Button
Description
Internal version
Version number maintained internally at Siebel that changes only when the
internal format of the SRF file changes, such as at the time of a major
release. It has no significance for customer developers.
User version
Reserved for use by Siebel Anywhere, which maintains this number when
kits are created that upgrade the SRF file. The value is read when a version
check occurs.
Full compile
option button
Select to display information about the most recent full compilation in the
Compile Information fields.
Last incremental
compile option
button
Select to display information about the most recent incremental
compilation. If there have been no incremental compilations since the last
full compilation, this option button is unavailable.
When
Date of the last compilation—incremental or full, as specified in the option
buttons.
Machine name
Name of the client computer on which the SRF file was compiled.
134 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ Guidelines for Naming Repositories
Field/Button
Description
Language
Language code of the language specified for user interface translation.
User name
User name (that is, the Microsoft Windows logon name) of the user who
compiled the repository.
Repository
Repository name of the repository that was current when the compilation
was run, generally Siebel repository.
Tools version
The version number and build number of the Siebel Tools software used to
compile the repository. This is useful information for Siebel Technical
Services if they are helping you in resolving a problem with your
configuration.
Schema version
Database schema version of the database from which the repository was
compiled.
File name.
Name and path of the SRF file being used internally to define the Siebel
Tools application, generally located in C:\sea7xx\tools\objects.
Guidelines for Naming Repositories
You must establish and maintain a naming convention for all repositories in their respective
environments. There are several dependencies on repository names—for example, Siebel servers
point to a specific repository by name. Also, the procedures for upgrading to new versions of Siebel
eBusiness Applications depend on repository names.
A consistent naming convention promotes successful configuration and testing while it minimizes the
work required to migrate new repositories or perform upgrades. Follow these guidelines when
determining the naming conventions for your repositories:
■
Use the default name, Siebel Repository, whenever possible. Change this only if you have a
compelling reason, because the default configuration of Siebel eBusiness Applications and Siebel
documentation assume this name is being used.
■
Use the same repository name for the active repository in your test environment and for the
current working repository in your production environment. Using the same name simplifies the
process of migrating repositories from development to test and from test to production. It also
eliminates the need to change your client or application server configurations when you perform
the migration process.
■
Use descriptive names for the other repositories in your development environment. Typically,
your development environment has a number of repositories in addition to the current repository
that is being configured. These may include the initial repository loaded with your Siebel
application, other repository versions used in Siebel application upgrades, and repositories from
previous versions of your custom configuration. Give these repositories unique and fully
descriptive names—for example, Siebel v7.5.3 Original for the initial repository shipped with
Siebel eBusiness Applications version 7.5.3.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13 5
Managing Repositories ■ Renaming Repositories
Renaming Repositories
Siebel Systems recommends that you name the repository in production Siebel Repository. However,
in some situations you may need to name the repository something different. If you must rename
the repository, follow the steps described in this topic.
To rename a repository
1
Have all developers check in all projects that have been checked out from the repository you are
going to rename.
2
Log into Siebel Tools and connect to the server database.
3
In the Object Explorer, select the Repository object type.
If the Repository object type is not visible, see “Showing and Hiding Object Types in the Object
Explorer” on page 63 for more information.
4
In the Object List Editor, click in the Name property of the repository you want to rename.
5
Enter the new name.
6
Click outside of the record to save your changes.
7
Let developers know what the name of the new repository is and have them perform a get of all
projects.
8
After changing the name of the repository, you must change the value of the enterprise
parameter Siebel Repository to the new name of the repository.
For information about changing enterprise parameters, see Siebel System Administration Guide
Deleting Repositories
The delete process remove all records associated with the repository. Be sure to back up the
repository before you delete it.
CAUTION: Deleting a repository takes a long time and requires resources such as rollback segment,
cursors, tablespace, and so on. Consult your DBA before deleting a repository.
To delete a repository
1
In the Object Explorer, navigate to the Repository Object type.
2
In the Object List Editor, click anywhere in the row for the repository you want to delete.
3
Choose Edit > Delete Record.
4
Click outside the record to commit the Delete action.
Related Topic
“Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database Configuration Utility” on page 137
136 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ About Exporting and Importing Repositories
About Exporting and Importing
Repositories
You can export and import the entire repository using Export/Import option in the Database
Configuration Utility. Use this utility when you want to back up your repository, restore your
repository, or move all repository objects to another environment that shares the same physical
database schema as the source environment.
If you do not need to export and import the entire repository, but need to export and import sets of
objects only, use Siebel archive files. For more information, see “Exporting Objects to an Archive File”
on page 123.
If you need to migrate a customized repository and schema from one environment to another, use
the Repository Migration utility (dev2prod). For more information on Repository Migration, see Going
Live with Siebel eBusiness Applications.
Supported Source and Target Databases for Importing and Exporting
Repositories
The source and target databases must be configured for the same Siebel version. Siebel Systems
does not recommend migrating a repository between two databases that are on a different release
or patch levels. Siebel applications support importing and exporting repository data from the source
databases to the target databases listed in Table 37.
Table 37. Code Pages and Unicode Support for Repository Import and Export
Source Database
Target Database
Code Page
Code page
Unicode
Unicode
Code Page
Unicode
Exporting and Importing Repositories
Using the Database Configuration Utility
To export and import the entire repository, you use the Database Configuration Utility. This is
typically used for backing up and restoring and for moving the contents of a repository to a repository
in an another environment, when both the source and the target environment have the same physical
database schema and Siebel release version.
When importing and exporting using the Database Configuration Utility, consider the following:
■
When you are importing a custom repository (not the standard Siebel Repository), all languages
which were part of the original repository are restored during import. For example, if you archive
repositories weekly and your development repository contains support for both ENU and DEU,
then both ENU and DEU are included when one of the archived repositories is imported.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13 7
Managing Repositories ■ Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database
Configuration Utility
■
Whenever you make a change to the repository, compile all projects that belong to the latest
version of the repository to create an updated SRF file. Keep a backup of the SRF file, so you can
be sure the SRF file truly reflects the contents of the updated repository.
■
If you need to back up the entire content of the Siebel database, use the database utilities
provided by your RDBMS vendor.
■
If your source repository is configured differently than the repository in the target system (both
of which must be on the same Siebel release), use the Migrate option of the Database
Configuration Utility.
For more information on migrating repositories, see Going Live with Siebel eBusiness
Applications.
NOTE: When exporting a repository in a Windows or UNIX environment using the exprep Database
Configuration Utility, the log files are placed in following directories:
■
Siebel_Server\log\exprep\output
■
Siebel_Server\log\exprep\state
NOTE: The value “exprep” is the default process name for the exprep utility. You can change this
value to facilitate ease of use.
To import or export a repository in a Windows environment
1
Launch the Database Server Configuration Utility by choosing Start > Programs > Siebel
Enterprise Server version_number > Configure DB Server.
The Gateway Name Server Address dialog box appears.
2
Specify your Gateway Server Address and Enterprise Server Name and then click Next.
The Installation and Configuration Parameters: Siebel Server Directory dialog box appears.
3
In the Siebel Server Directory dialog box, either accept the default value or click Browse to select
a directory, and then click Next.
The Installation and Configuration Parameters: Siebel Database Server Directory dialog box
appears.
4
Either accept the default value or click Browse to select a directory, and then click Next.
The Siebel Database Server Options: Siebel Database Operation dialog box appears.
5
In the list of operations, select Import/Export Repository and then click Next.
The Import Repository Parameters: Select Repository Operation dialog box appears.
6
Select Import Repository, and then click Next.
You can also choose the following options: Add language to an existing Repository, or Export
Repository.
The Import Repository Parameters: Import Selection dialog box appears.
7
Select one of the following, and then click Next.
■
138 ■
If you want to select languages to import, then select Import Standard Repository.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database
Configuration Utility
■
If you want to import all languages in the SRF file, then select Import Custom Repository.
The following succession of dialog boxes appears:
Dialog Box
Description
Installation and Configuration Parameters:
Language Selection
Select a language and click Next. English is the
default language.
Installations and Configuration
Parameters: RDBMS Platform
Select an RDBMS Platform. IBM DB2 UDB v7.1 is
the default selection.
Installation and Configuration Parameters:
ODBC Data Source Name
Select the ODNBC Data Source Name.
Installation and Configuration Parameters:
Database User Name
Select the Database User Name and Database
Password.
Installation and Configuration Parameters:
Database Table Owner
Select the Database Table Owner and Database
Table Owner Password.
Installation and Configuration Parameters:
Import Repository Name
Select the name of the repository that you want
to import and the filename from which you are
importing.
This will be the name given to the imported
repository.
8
In the Configuration Parameter Review, review the list of parameters you entered and then
accept the configuration by clicking Finish.
To import or export a repository in a UNIX environment
1
Source environment variables from $SIEBEL_ROOT.
SIEBEL_ROOT should be the path of your Siebel installation directory.
LANGUAGE should be set to the language in which the Configuration Wizard prompts appear; for
example, enu for U.S. English.
If either of these values is incorrect or empty, reset them using one of the following commands,
as appropriate to the shell you use.
Shell
Command
C
setenv LANGUAGE New Value
Korn
export LANGUAGE|SIEBEL_ROOT=New Value
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 13 9
Managing Repositories ■ Exporting and Importing Repositories Using the Database
Configuration Utility
2
3
Set an appropriate level of detail in the log file for this activity.
Shell
Command
C
setenv SIEBEL_LOG_EVENTS trace3
Korn
export SIEBEL_LOG_EVENTS trace3
Navigate to $SIEBEL_ROOT /bin and enter:
dbsrvr_config.ksh
This launches the Database Server Configuration Wizard.
4
Review the values of the following environment variables and confirm whether or not the settings
are correct by entering either Y or N.
NOTE: If either the SIEBEL_ROOT or LANGUAGE value is not set or is incorrect, you must correct
them before proceeding.
5
In the Siebel Server Directory dialog box, either accept the default value or click Browse to select
a directory, and then click Next.
The Installation and Configuration Parameters: Siebel Database Server Directory dialog box
appears.
6
Either accept the default value or click Browse to select a directory, and then click Next.
The Siebel Database Operation dialog box appears.
7
In the Siebel Database Operations dialog box, select Import/Export Repository.
The Import Repository Parameters: Select Repository Operation dialog box appears.
8
Choose Import Repository.
The Import Repository Parameters: Import Selection dialog box appears.
9
Choose Import Standard Siebel Repository or Import Custom Repository and click Next.
10 The following succession of dialog boxes appears.
Dialog Box
Description
Language Selection
Select a language and click Next. English is the default
language.
RDBMS Platform
Select an RDBMS Platform. IBM DB2 UDB v7.1 is the default
selection.
ODBC Data Source Name
Select the ODNBC Data Source Name.
Database User Name
Select the Database User Name and Database Password.
140 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ About Repository Patch Files
Dialog Box
Description
Database Table Owner
Select the Database Table Owner and Database Table Owner
Password.
Import Repository Name
Select name of the repository that you want to import and the
filename from which you are importing.
11 In the Configuration Parameter Review dialog box, review the list of parameters and then accept
the configuration by entering Y.
NOTE: You follow the same procedure for Export Repository except that you choose export instead
of import in Step 8 on page 140.
About Repository Patch Files
A Repository patch file, like an archive file, consists of exported objects. The difference between a
patch file (SPF file) and an archive file (SIF file) is that the patch file contains two versions of each
object, one from the preupgrade source repository and one from the postupgrade. An archive file
contains only one version of each object, and all objects are from the same repository.
Figure 22 shows how pre and postupgrade versions of an object are paired in the patch file, and then
used when applying the patch to the target repository.
Figure 22. How a Patch Works
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 14 1
Managing Repositories ■ Creating Repository Patch Files
The pair of pre- and post-release objects in the patch file provide before and after snapshots of the
object. The patch application process considers both when determining what changes to make to the
target repository.
Related Topics
“Creating Repository Patch Files” on page 142
“Applying Repository Patch Files” on page 144
Creating Repository Patch Files
A wizard steps you through the process of creating a patch file.
To create a repository patch file
1
Make sure that both the original source and the modified source repositories are present on the
client computer.
2
If you are building a patch file from an archive file, go to Step 3; Otherwise, choose
File > Open Repository and then select the modified source repository.
3
Choose Tools > Utilities > Build Patch.
The Build Patch - Setup dialog box appears.
142 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ Creating Repository Patch Files
4
Under Select modifications, make your selection using the following table.
Option Button
Description
Changed objects in current
repository
Allows you to generate the set of source objects in the patch
file from all objects in the currently open (modified source)
repository that have a value of TRUE in their Changed
property. The Changed property indicates changes to
property values or child objects for all objects that have
changed since a specified date. This is an easy way to capture
all objects that have changed since the start of work on the
new release.
NOTE: This is useful for creating cumulative patch files—that
is, if several patches are created over time, each successive
patch includes all changes that went into previous patches.
Also included are the most recent changes, as long as the
Changed Indicator Date has not been modified. This is the
real reason that it is possible to define a patch using the
Changed property. If you use the Changed indicator in this or
any other way, you need to be careful that the Changed
Indicator Date does not get set arbitrarily.
Archive file
Allows you to use an existing archive file to generate the
same set of objects in the patch file. Use this option when the
set of patch objects is identical to a recently exported archive
file, or when you want to explicitly select individual top-level
objects to be included. In this latter case, generate the
archive file prior to generating the patch file. Building a patch
from an archive file may also be preferable when there are
too many objects with a Changed value of TRUE.
Use the File Name field to specify a pathname and filename
for the archive file and click the Browse button and select the
archive file.
5
From the Repository drop-down list, choose the name of the original source repository.
6
In the Patch File field, click Browse to specify a path name and filename for the patch file to
create.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 14 3
Managing Repositories ■ Applying Repository Patch Files
7
Click Next.
The Build Patch - Summary dialog box appears.
If you selected the Archive file option, the list of objects for the patch loads immediately.
If you selected the Changed objects option, Siebel Tools pauses while it generates the list
because it needs to scan through the repository and check all the Changed property values.
8
Click Finish.
The patch file is generated in the directory location you specified in Step 4 on page 143.
Applying Repository Patch Files
The patch upgrades the repository to which it is applied, similar to the way the Application Upgrader
upgrades the repository. The difference is that you do not have the opportunity to override the
default conflict resolution rules. A conflict only occurs if an object property changes in both the
source and the target repositories simultaneously.
For example, if you create a new Account field based on an extension column in the target repository,
and then apply a patch from the source repository that includes the Account business component,
the new field will not be overwritten in the target repository because the same new field has not been
added in the source.
If you change the sort specification of the Account business component in the target repository, and
the sort specification has not changed in the source, the new sort specification in the target will
remain. However, if the sort specification has changed in both the source and the target, then a
conflict arises for which a resolution is required.
To view the default conflict resolution rules
1
In the Object Explorer, navigate to the Type object type.
2
In the Object List editor, select an object.
3
In the Object List Editor, expand the Type object type and select Attribute.
144 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Managing Repositories ■ Upgrading Repositories
4
Review the Attribute property Siebel Wins (or Standard Wins in the Object List Editor).
If this is set to TRUE, the value in the source repository is accepted.
If FALSE, the value in the target repository is accepted.
To apply a patch
1
In Siebel Tools, choose Tools > Utilities > Apply Patch.
The Select Patch to Apply dialog box appears.
2
Select the Siebel Patch (SPF) file, and then click Open.
The Apply Patch - Preview dialog box appears, and the patch is opened.
3
Click Next.
The Apply Patch - Summary dialog box appears. The patch is loaded, the patch objects are
compared to their corresponding repository objects, and then the patch is applied.
4
Click Finish to exit.
Upgrading Repositories
The Siebel Application Upgrader reduces the time and cost of version upgrades by allowing you to
acquire new features from the latest release while preserving the custom configuration changes
made to the current repository. It notifies system administrators about conflicts between object
customizations and new releases, automatically merges differences between objects, and allows you
to manually override and apply any changes.
The Siebel Application Upgrader allows you to upgrade custom configurations to new releases by
merging them with a current Siebel eBusiness software release. This capability minimizes the cost
of application upgrades and allows you to quickly deploy production versions of Siebel eBusiness
Applications. For more information, see the upgrade guide for your operating system.
The Application Upgrader allows you to accomplish the following:
■
Determine what has changed with new releases of Siebel eBusiness Applications
■
Compare custom configurations with new changes delivered in a new Siebel release
■
Choose which changes to apply, whether made by your company’s developers or by Siebel
Systems in the new release
NOTE: The Application Upgrader is for merging an entire customized repository with a standard one.
To merge portions of repositories, use the Import/Export or Patch features.
For more information about the Application Upgrader, see the upgrade guide for your operating
system.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 14 5
Managing Repositories ■ Upgrading Repositories
146 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
11 Working
With Strings and Other
Locale-Specific Data
Topics in This Section
“About the Symbolic Strings Model” on page 147
“Creating Symbolic String References” on page 149
“Modifying Symbolic Strings to Globally Update Display Values” on page 149
“Using Symbolic String References” on page 150
“Entering String Overrides” on page 151
“About Converting and Consolidating Strings” on page 151
“About the Symbolic String Consolidation Process” on page 154
“Running the String Conversion Utility” on page 154
“Running the String Consolidation Utility” on page 158
“Using Batch Files to Convert and Consolidate Strings” on page 162
“Working with Non-Translatable Locale-Specific Object Properties” on page 164
“Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific Items in Applet Layout” on page 165
“About the Locale Management Utility” on page 166
“Finding Untranslated Text Strings” on page 166
“Finding Existing Translations” on page 167
“Exporting Text Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes” on page 169
“Importing Text Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes” on page 169
“Identifying Objects Modified Since the Last Export” on page 171
“Replacing Strings” on page 172
“Running the LMU Using the Command Line Interface” on page 172
About the Symbolic Strings Model
The symbolic strings model centralizes translatable text strings stored in the repository. Translatable
text strings are defined once and then referred to by multiple user interface objects. Having a
centralized mechanism for storing and managing repository text strings:
■
Reduces redundancy because many objects can reference one symbolic string.
■
Results in a more consistent user interface.
■
Simplifies maintenance because you only have to maintain one string for a given word.
■
Simplifies translations by eliminating duplicated translations of the same word.
■
Reduces translation costs.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 14 7
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ About the Symbolic Strings
Model
Prior versions of Siebel Tools stored translatable text strings in the locale objects of a parent object
type. For example, each applet had a set of child locale records that defined the text for the applet
title that appears in the user interface.
How the Symbolic Strings Model Is Implemented
Symbolic strings are implemented using a top-level object in the Siebel repository called Symbolic
Strings and a child object called Symbolic String Locale. Each symbolic string record represents a
word or phrase, for example Account or Contact, and is language independent. All translations of
that word or phrase, including English, are stored as child symbolic string locale records. User
interface objects refer to symbolic string records for text strings. The literal display value is retrieved
from one of the several translations stored as symbolic string locale records based on the current
Tools language mode.
The Symbolic Strings object type stores its data in S_STRING_STR table and the Symbolic String
Locale stores its data in S_SYM_STR_INTL table. Objects such as applets store foreign key references
to the records stored in S_SYM_STR table.
Strings Not Included in the Symbolic Strings Model
The symbolic strings model includes text strings stored in the repository and referenced by UI objects
such as Control Captions, List Column Display Names, and Applet Titles. The symbolic string model
does not include other types of strings typically supplied as seed data, such as LOVs, error messages,
and predefined queries.
How Translatable String Values Are Calculated
Object properties that display translatable strings, such as the Title property of applets, are
calculated dynamically.
■
If a value does not exist in the string override property (in most cases it does not) the value is
calculated using the current language mode of Siebel Tools and the String Value property of the
associated Symbolic String Locale object (child of Symbolic String).
■
If a value exists in the string override field, this value is stored in the corresponding child locale
object, and the display value is calculated using the current language mode and the value in the
string override field.
The calculated value for translatable text strings is the value that is displayed in the Object List
Editor, wizards, and layout editors. It is also the value that is compiled to the SRF file.
Related Topic
“Entering String Overrides” on page 151
148 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Creating Symbolic String
References
Creating Symbolic String References
You create new symbolic strings in Siebel Tools. Symbolic strings created by Siebel Systems are
included in the Symbolic Strings project. It is recommended that you create a new project to hold
all custom symbolic strings.
NOTE: To be able to create symbolic strings, the EnableToolsConstrain parameter in the tools.cfg file
must be set to FALSE.
To create a symbolic string
1
Check out the project in which you want to create the Symbolic String.
2
Navigate to the Symbolic Strings object type.
3
In the Object List Editor, create a new record using the table below to complete the necessary
fields.
Property
Description
Name
Unique name of the symbolic string. Siebel Tools enforces a predefined
prefix for the symbolic string name, such as X_. This helps you distinguish
custom symbolic strings from those created by Siebel System (SBL_). The
value used for the prefix is defined in the SymStrPrefix parameter in the
tools.cfg file.
Current String
Value
Calculated value based on the current Tools language mode and the String
Value property of the corresponding child Symbolic String Locale object.
Definition
Description of the symbolic string.
Related Topic
“Setting the Constrain Mode for Working With Symbolic Strings” on page 65.
Modifying Symbolic Strings to Globally
Update Display Values
You can make global changes to UI display values by modifying child locale objects of symbolic
strings. For example, your organiziation may require that all instances of the word Account be
changed to Customer. Or suppose you are configuring an industry-specific application to be deployed
in a locale other than English. Text strings may appear in the UI that are not appropriate for the given
industry. In both cases, you need to make global changes to text strings.
To globally update user interface display values
1
Set your Tools Language mode to the language you want to configure.
For more information, see “Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 14 9
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Using Symbolic String
References
2
Navigate to the Symbolic String object type.
3
Select the symbolic string you want to modify.
4
Navigate to the Symbolic String Locale object you want to modify.
5
Change the value for the String Value property.
6
Compile the project associated with the Symbolic String.
Using Symbolic String References
Symbolic string references allow you to select translatable strings for properties such as Applet Titles
from a centralized list of strings. There are two ways you can associate objects to symbolic string
references. You can use the String Reference pick applet or you can type directly into the field that
displays a translatable text string value.
To select a symbolic string reference using the String Reference pick applet
1
Navigate to the object and property for which you want to define a string, such as Applet Title.
2
In the string reference field (for example, Title - String Reference), click the drop-down arrow.
The String-Reference pick list appears.
3
Search for the appropriate string reference, select it, and then click Pick.
After you associate the string reference, the display value is entered based on the current Tools
language mode and the Current String Value of the corresponding symbolic string locale record.
To select a symbolic string reference by typing a value into a field
1
Navigate to the object and property for which you want to define a string, such as Applet Title.
2
Type a value into the field.
Siebel Tools searches for a string reference with a Current String Value that matches the value
entered and one of the following occurs:
■
If a match exists, that string reference is associated with the object and the display value is
entered based on the current Tools language mode and the Current String Value of the
corresponding symbolic string locale record.
■
If a match does not exist, an error message appears instructing you to search for an existing
string reference, create a new symbolic string reference, or enter a value in the string
override field.
NOTE: To be able to create symbolic strings or enter values for string override properties, the
EnableToolsConstrain parameter in the tools.cfg file must be set to FALSE.
Related Topics
“Creating Symbolic String References” on page 149
“Entering String Overrides” on page 151
150 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Entering String Overrides
“Setting the Constrain Mode for Working With Symbolic Strings” on page 65
Entering String Overrides
Each object property that stores a translatable text string, such as the Title property of an applet,
has a corresponding String Override field, for example Title – String Override. In cases where the
symbolic string for a given word or phrase does not meet your design requirements, you can override
it by entering a value in the override field. Values entered into override fields are stored as child
locale objects of the top-level object type (for example applet) for the current Tools language mode.
Values stored in string override fields are language-specific and do not affect other references to the
symbolic strings.
NOTE: To be able to enter string overrides, the EnableToolsConstrain parameter in the tools.cfg file
must be set to FALSE.
To enter a string overrride
1
Navigate to the object and property for which you want to enter a translatable text string.
2
In the string override field, enter the string.
The value entered in the string override property is stored as a child locale record and the value
automatically populates the translatable text string field, such as the Title property for an applet.
Related Topics
“Setting the Constrain Mode for Working With Symbolic Strings” on page 65.
About Converting and Consolidating
Strings
The string conversion and consolidation processes allows you to covert translatable strings stored as
child locale records of top-level object types to the symbolic strings model. The symbolic strings
model stores strings in a centralized table.
CAUTION: Conversion and consolidation operations are highly intensive processes, and thus require
a 1 GHz computer or higher.
Convert and consolidate are useful for customers who:
■
Have upgraded to version 7.7 and have custom translatable text strings that the want to migrate
to the symbolic strings model.
■
Use string overrides to store text strings and periodically want to convert and consolidate them
to the symbolic strings model.
When considering whether to convert strings to the symbolic strings model consider the following:
■
Migrating to the symbolic string model reduces the size of repository, makes translations easier,
and gives you more control over terminology consistency.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15 1
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ About the Symbolic String
Conversion Process
■
The conversion and consolidation processes require that development be frozen and can require
substantial processing time.
Related Topics
“About the Symbolic Strings Model” on page 147
“Entering String Overrides” on page 151
“About the Symbolic String Conversion Process” on page 152
“About the Symbolic String Consolidation Process” on page 154
About the Symbolic String Conversion
Process
The String Conversion process does the following:
■
Generates new symbolic string records and their corresponding symbolic string locale records
using string values found in target objects.
NOTE: The conversion process runs on an object type by object type basis. Because of this, there
are likely to be duplicate symbolic strings for a given display value. Duplicates are “de-duped”
during the consolidation process.
■
Sets the String Reference fields of the target object records to the names of the new symbolic
strings.
■
Nullifies the string fields in the locale records of the target objects and, where appropriate,
deletes the locale records.
The conversion process occurs in two phases: the conversion export phase, in which data is prepared
for conversion, followed by the conversion import phase, in which data changes actually occur.
NOTE: An SRF file compiled before the conversion process will be the same as an SRF file compiled
after the conversion process. For example, suppose a given applet gets its Title property from a child
Applet Locale record. When the conversion process is run, it creates a symbolic string, places the
reference for that symbolic string in the applet's Title - String Reference field, and then removes the
Applet's locale record(s). Now, after the conversion, the applet’s title is derived from the symbolic
string. However, the Title itself, the display value that is complied to the SRF, is the same as it was
before the conversion. The reason is that the strings are complied into object definitions and read
from the SRF file, not referenced from the Symbolic String table during runtime.
152 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ About the Symbolic String
Conversion Process
Conversion Export
The Conversion Export process identifies records that are candidates for Conversion, and then writes
all the relevant information to a file. This process is run on an object type by object type basis, and
can be run against any object type that has translatable strings (for example, controls, list columns,
and applets).
NOTE: The Conversion process has to be executed once for each Object Type (both Top-Level and
Sub-Level Object Types) in the repository that has properties that reference Symbolic Strings. In
order to determine what Object Types refer to Symbolic Strings, click the Flat Tab in the Object
Explorer, navigate to Attribute, and search for the string "*String Reference*" in the Name property.
The Parent Type of the results set is the complete set of object types for which the conversion has
to be run. Some object types have more than one attribute that refers to Symbolic Strings; for such
object types, it is necessary to run the conversion process only once.
The conversion process begins by creating a sorted list of English (ENU) child records for each
translatable string within a given object type. For those object types with multiple translatable
strings (such as list columns that have a Display Name and Prompt Text), each is processed
sequentially. This list is used to generate information about the new symbolic strings. Among sets of
records with identical ENU translations, the non-ENU records are compared and, where possible, the
same symbolic string is reused for subsequent records. The output file produced contains information
about the new symbolic strings, including all the language translations for each, as well as which
strings will be used as replacements.
NOTE: The Conversion Export file is not a log file so there is no need to review its contents.
Conversion Import
Based on the file produced by the conversion export process, the conversion import process performs
the changes to the database (inserts, updates, and deletes) that convert the object records to use
the new symbolic strings. Logically, the process consists of three operations, the end result of which
is the production of symbolic string and symbolic string locale records, and the deletion of other
types of locale records. The three operations are:
■
New symbolic string records are created in the database. The export file contains all the
information about the string, including a unique name and information about each of its locale
children.
■
References to the new symbolic string records are placed into the relevant fields of the original
objects. For example, suppose you have 10 applets whose title is My Service Requests. Assuming
the non-ENU values for all the titles are the same, then the export file contains information about
one new symbolic string, and instructions for each of the 10 applets to use this new symbolic
string as its title. After creating the symbolic string record for a string whose ENU value is My
Service Requests, the Title - String Reference property for each of the 10 applets is set to the
name of the new symbolic string. At this point, each of the Applets has a String Reference in
addition to the String Override. The String Override is now superfluous and can be removed. This
is done by clearing that value from the object Locale children.
■
Records are deleted for which there is no longer any information in the object locale records.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15 3
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ About the Symbolic String
Consolidation Process
About the Symbolic String Consolidation
Process
The consolidation process eliminates duplicate symbolic strings that may be created during the
conversion process. Because the conversion process runs on an object type by object type basis,
duplicate records can, and usually do, occur when the process creates different symbolic strings for
a display value that occurs in multiple object types. Duplicate symbolic strings can have identical
sets of locale records or one symbolic string may have more child locale records than the other, but
the ones they have in common are identical.
Consolidation Export
The Consolidation Export process scans all symbolic string records and identifies symbolic strings
whose child records are identical and then writes this information to a file. For symbolic strings that
have identical child records, one of the strings will be selected arbitrarily as the master record. For
symbolic strings whose child records are a subset of another symbolic string, the string with the
largest number of children is selected as the master record. The export process does not modify the
database.
NOTE: The Consolidation Export file is not a log file so there is no need to review its contents.
Consolidation Import
Based on the file produced during consolidation export process, the redundant symbolic strings are
eliminated, and all references to these strings from other object types are replaced with a reference
to the master record. This is a time-consuming process, as there are approximately 80 translatable
string attributes represented among the various object types in the repository. The end result,
however, is that the symbolic string table is as compact as possible, and all redundancy has been
removed.
Running the String Conversion Utility
The conversion process is implemented as a business service. You run it using the Consoleapp.exe
utility located in the BIN directory of your Siebel Tools installation directory.
Prior to running the conversion:
■
Make sure all of the projects are unlocked. While conversion and consolidation are running, no
other users should be allowed to log on to the development environment.
■
Make sure that the DataSource parameter in the [Siebel] section is the desired database. The
conversion utility uses this database.
■
Make sure that the EnableToolsConstrain parameter in the [Siebel] section is set to FALSE.
■
Make sure that the SymStrPrefix parameter in the [Siebel] section of the tools.cfg file is set to
the desired prefix. This value is used as the prefix to the name of all newly created symbolic
strings. It is set to X_ by default, to indicate that it was created by you and not by Siebel Systems
(SBL_).
154 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String Conversion
Utility
Topics in This Section
“Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert Strings” on page 155
“Exporting Candidates for Conversion” on page 156
“Splitting Conversion Export Files into Smaller Files” on page 157
“Importing Converted Symbolic Strings” on page 157
Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert
Strings
The parameters for running Consoleapps.exe to convert existing locale strings to symbolic strings
are:
Consoleapp.exe <Config file> <app lang> <uid> <pw> <Business Service> <Method Name:
Parameters>
where:
Table 38. Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert Strings
Parameter
Description
Config file
The Siebel configuration file, such as Tools.cfg. Note that the
default data source be used
app lang
Application language, such as ENU
uid
User ID
pw
Password
Business Service
"String Conversion"
Method Name:
Parameters
Business Service method and the input parameters
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15 5
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String Conversion
Utility
Exporting Candidates for Conversion
To export conversion candidates for a given object type
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert
Strings” on page 155 and use the ConversionExport business service method with the parameters
listed in Table 39.
For example:
"ConversionExport: Filename=Control.txt, Repository=Siebel Repository,
Object=Control, LogFile=ControlExport.log, Language=ENU, MatchMin=1"
Table 39. Input Parameters for the ConversionExport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required?
Description
Filename
Y
The name of the export file.
Repository
Y
The Siebel Repository name.
Object
Y
The Siebel object type whose strings are exported, for example
Control.
LogFile
N
Language
N
The language used as the primary language to match when
searchng for duplicate symbolic strings. For example, suppose
two symbolic strings each have 3 child records, an English
(ENU), a French (FRA) and a German (DEU) record. If the
Language parameter is set to ENU, then the conversion export
process searches for matches between the ENU records. When
it finds matches, it checks the other child records of the other
languages. If all child records match (or if one has a superset
of the other), they are considered matching symbolic strings.
MatchMin
N
The minimum number of matches in a set of matching symbolic
strings before it is written to the file. The default value is 2.
SQLLog
N
The SQL log file name. When this parameter is set, the
conversion process logs all SQL that is executed to the specified
file.
ExcludeNull
N
True/False value. When set to true, it excludes null value for
conversion consideration. Default value is True.
UseFullMatch
N
True/False value. When set to true, records are matched against
all the other possible match candidates before they are
discarded. Default is True.
156 ■
The name of the log file.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String Conversion
Utility
Table 39. Input Parameters for the ConversionExport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required?
Description
UseExactMatch
N
True/False value. When set to true, records are considered as
match only when they all the same amount of language records
and for each of the language, they have the same values. That's
Conversion won't consider partial match. Default value is False.
SkipInactive
N
True/False value. When set to true, the conversion process
skips all records with the Inactive property =Y. Default value is
True.
Splitting Conversion Export Files into Smaller Files
After you generate an export file, you can split the file into smaller, more manageable files. This is
beneficial for object types such as Control because it could have up to 130,000 records. Note that
an average desktop can typically only run about 10 simultaneous conversion import processes.
To split an export file into smaller files
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert
Strings” on page 155 and use the SplitFile business service method with the parameters listed in
Table 40.
For example,
"SplitFile: Filename=Control.txt, Lines=2000"
Table 40. Input Parameters for the SplitFile Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
Filename
Y
Export file
Lines
Y
Approximate number of lines in each file. The application does not
break up a set of symbolic strings, so the number of lines may not
match this parameter exactly.
Importing Converted Symbolic Strings
To import symbolic strings
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert
Strings” on page 155 and use the SplitFile business service method with the parameters listed in
Table 41.
For example,
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15 7
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String
Consolidation Utility
"ConversionImport: Filename=Control.txt, Repository=Siebel Repository,
LogFile=ConversionImport.log, UnlockProjects=false, SkipParentUpdates=true,,
Project=Symbolic Strings"
Table 41. Input Parameters for the ConversionImport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
Filename
Y
Import file
Repository
Y
Siebel Repository name
LogFile
N
Log file
UnlockProjects
N
True/false value. When set to true, the conversion
business service unlocks all projects when the process
finishes. This is useful when there are multiple instances
of the conversion service running against the same DB.
The default value is true.
SkipParentUpdates
N
True/false value. When set to true, parent objects, such
as the project of the top-level objects being updated, are
not updated to use the symbolic string. The default value
is false.
SQLLog
N
Log file name. When this parameter is set, the process
logs all SQL that is executed to the specified file.
Project
Y
Name of the project in the Repository that contains the
newly-created strings. Siebel-delivered strings are in the
Symbolic Strings project. You may want to configure this
for their custom strings
DeleteLocales
N
True/False value. When set to true, locale records are
deleted if all translatable fields are NULL and no language
override field is set. When set to false, the locale record
is set to Inactive. Default value is True.
CheckTranslateFlag
N
True/False value. When set to true, the ConversionImport
process does not convert objects that have the Translate
field set to N. Default value is True.
LogErrorRecords
N
If set to true, all error records are be exported into a
separate log file. Default is False.
Running the String Consolidation Utility
After locale strings have been converted to symbolic strings, you can use the consolidation utility to
find duplicate symbolic strings and merge them and their references into a single symbolic string.
The consolidation process is implemented as a business service. You run it using the Consoleapp.exe
utility located in the BIN folder of your Siebel Tools installation.
158 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String
Consolidation Utility
Topics in This Section
“Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate Strings” on page 159
“Exporting Matching Symbolic Strings” on page 159
“Splitting Consolidation Export Files into Smaller Files” on page 160
“Importing Consolidated Strings” on page 161
Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate
Strings
The parameters for running Consoleapps.exe to consolidate duplicate symbolic strings are:
Consoleapp.exe <Config file> <app lang> <uid> <pw> <Business Service> <Method
Name:Parameters>
Table 42. Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate Strings
Parameter
Required
Description
Config File
Y
Name of the Siebel Config file, such as Tools.cfg.
Please note the default data source will be used.
App lang
Y
The application language, such as ENU
Uid
Y
User ID
Pw
Y
Password
Business Service
Y
"String Consolidation"
Method
Name:Parameters
Y
Business Service method and the input parameters.
Exporting Matching Symbolic Strings
To export matching symbolic strings
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Convert
Strings” on page 155 and use the ConsolidationExport business service method with the
parameters listed in Table 43.
For example:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 15 9
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String
Consolidation Utility
"ConsolidationExport:Filename=ConsExp.txt,Repository=Siebel
Repository,LogFile=ConsolidationLog.txt,Language=ENU,MatchMin=2"
Table 43. Parameters for the ConsolidationExport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
Filename
Y
The name of the export file
Repository
Y
The Siebel Repository name
LogFile
Y
The name of the log file
Language
Y
The language used as the primary language to match when
searching for duplicate symbolic strings. For example,
suppose two symbolic strings each have 3 child records, an
English (ENU), a French (FRA) and a German (DEU) record. If
the Language parameter is set to ENU, then the consolidation
export process searches for matches between the ENU
records. When it finds matches, it checks the other child
records of the other languages. If all child records match (or
if one has a superset of the other) they are considered
matching symbolic strings.
MatchMin
Y
The minimum number of matches in a set of matching
symbolic strings before it is written to the file. The default
value is 2.
SkipSBLStrings
?
Possible values are True, False, or MasterOnly.
When set to True, all strings starting with SBL_ in the name
are ignored.
When set to False Siebel strings can be considered as master
or deprecated strings. All Siebel and customer strings are
included in consolidation.
When set to MasterOnly, Siebel strings are not deprecated,
but can be used as Master strings.
Default value is True.
Splitting Consolidation Export Files into Smaller Files
When an export file is generated, you can split up into smaller, more manageable files. This is
beneficial if you have exported a large number of symbolic strings and wish to import them in parallel
running applications.
160 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the String
Consolidation Utility
To split the consolidation export files into smaller files
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate
Strings” on page 159 and use the SplitFile business service method with the parameters listed in
Table 44.
For example:
"SplitFile:Filename=ConsExp.txt,Lines=100"
Table 44. Parameters for the SplitFile Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
Filename
Y
Export file
Lines
Y
Approximate number of lines in each file. The application does not
break up a set of symbolic strings, so the exact number of lines
may not match the value specified with this parameter.
Importing Consolidated Strings
To import consolidated strings
■ Launch Consoleapps.exe as described in “Parameters for Running Consoleapps.exe to Consolidate
Strings” on page 159 and use the ConsolidationImport business service method with the
parameters listed in Table 45.
For example:
"ConsolidationImport:Filename=ConsExp.txt,Repository=Siebel
Repository,LogFile=ConsolidationLog.txt,UnlockProjects=false,SkipParentUpdates=true”
Table 45. Parameters for ConsolidationImport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
Filename
Y
Import file name
Repository
Y
Siebel Repository name
LogFile
Y
Log file name
UnlockProjects
N
True/false value. When set to true, the consolidation
business service unlocks all projects it had locked. This is
useful if there are multiple instances of the consolidation
service running against the same DB. The default value is
True.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 16 1
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Using Batch Files to Convert
and Consolidate Strings
Table 45. Parameters for ConsolidationImport Business Service Method
Parameter
Required
Description
SkipParentUpdates
N
This turns on or off the updating of parent objects, like the
project, while updating symbolic string references or
while deleting deprecated symbolic strings. This should
only be used when the user is running multiple instances
of the import simultaneously. If left on with multiple
instances running some errors may result in which
updates or deletes are aborted because the project was
being updated by another instance at the same time.
SQLLog
N
Log file name. When this parameter is set, the process
logs all SQL that is executed to the specified file.
Using Batch Files to Convert and
Consolidate Strings
The conversion and consolidation utilities can be run from two batch files found in the BIN directory
of the Tools installation. These batch files handle conversion and consolidation export, file split, and
import. All but the listed parameters listed below are set in the bat file. See the batch file comments
for more information on the supported parameters.
Conversion Batch File
Example: strconv "Object Type" action userid password
Table 46. Batch File Parameters for Running Conversion Export
Parameter
Description
strconv.bat
Conversion export, file split, and import batch file.
Object Type
Object type to be converted, for example Applet, Control, List Column, etc.
Action
{export|import} When set to export the conversion process exports all convertible
locale records. When set to import the conversion process imports the files
designated by the Object Type parameter.
User ID
The username used to login to Siebel.
Password
The user’s password.
162 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Using Batch Files to Convert
and Consolidate Strings
Consolidation Batch File
Example: strcons action userid password
Table 47. Batch File Parameters for Running Consolidation
Parameter
Description
strcons.bat
Consolidation export, file split, and import batch
file.
Action
{export|import} When set to export the
consolidaiton process exports all convertible locale
records. When set to import the consolidation
process imports the files in the working directory
designated by the TEST_LOCATION parameter set
in the batch file.
User ID
The username used to login to Siebel.
Password
The username's password.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 16 3
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Working with Non-Translatable
Locale-Specific Object Properties
Working with Non-Translatable LocaleSpecific Object Properties
User interface conventions can vary by locale. For example, one locale may require a different
sequence of fields than another locale.
Locale-specific object properties can be translatable, such as text strings, or non-translatable, such
as the HTML Sequence, HTML Height, and HTML Width properties of controls. You can configure nontranslatable object properties for specific locales by running Siebel Tools in Language Override mode.
The Language Override mode allows you to store non-translatable, locale-specific properties as child
locale records of the parent object.
For example, your Siebel Enterprise contains five languages: Japanese (JPN) and four Western
European languages. As opposed to Western European, Japanese does not features middle names,
and name order is last name first. In order to configure this, you would use Siebel Tools to set the
language to JPN, then set Enable Language Override to ON, then hide the middle name (by setting
the “Title-String Override” attribute to false), and then rearrange the first and last name to be last
and first. After compiling into the JPN .srf file, the layout will match the requirement.
CAUTION: If you delete a control or a list column from a web template, it will be deleted from all
languages, even if you are in Language Override Mode. You hide and show fields through the
Properties window of the specific object. For information, see “Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific Items
in Applet Layout” on page 165.
If, however, the Japanese user of Tools did all of the above, but did not enable language override,
the next time a user compiled any of the Western European languages, the names would be
formatted in the Japanese fashion, that is no middle name, and last name first.
NOTE: Siebel Tools does not need to be in Language Override mode to enter string overrides.
To configure non-translatable locale-specific object properties
1
Choose View > Options and then click the Language Settings tab.
2
Set the Tools Language Mode to the language you want to configure and select the Enable and
use Language Override check box.
3
Navigate to the object type you want to modify.
4
Modify the object properties or work in the layout editor to define locale specific values.
Related Topics
“Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50
“Enabling Language Overrides” on page 51
“Getting Locale-Specific Data Only” on page 73
“About the Symbolic Strings Model” on page 147
“Entering String Overrides” on page 151
“Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific Items in Applet Layout” on page 165
164 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Showing or Hiding LocaleSpecific Items in Applet Layout
Showing or Hiding Locale-Specific Items
in Applet Layout
When working with multiple languages, you may wish to show or hide certain fields based on the
requirements of a particular locale. You hide controls or list columns using the Visible and Show in
List properties of the Control and List Column object types, respectively, not in the web templates.
NOTE: Deleting a control or list column object from the applet layout in the Applet Layout Editor will
cause that control or list column to be deleted across all languages, even if you are in Language
Override Mode.
After setting up your parent language you can then determine the fields you wish to hide for your
child languages. Table 48 lists the object types, the property names, and provides a description.
To hide an object for a specific locale
1
In the Object Explorer, choose Applet, then choose one of the following child objects:
■
Control
■
List > List Column
2
Select the specific object.
3
In the Properties window, navigate to one of the following properties:
■
For Control object: Visible-Language Override.
■
For List Column object: Show In List.
See Table 48 for property settings.
Table 48. Objects That Allow Show Override
Object
Property
Description
Applet > Control
Visible
Parent setting. Setting this property to TRUE
will show this control to the user, in the parent
language and in all other supported languages.
Visible-Language
Override
Child setting. When operating in Language
Override Mode, you set this property to:
■
FALSE to hide the column from the user.
■
TRUE to show the column to the user. Also,
if the parent setting is TRUE you may just
leave this setting blank, as it will default to
the parent setting.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 16 5
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ About the Locale Management
Utility
Table 48. Objects That Allow Show Override
Object
Property
Description
Applet > List >
List Column
Show in List
Parent setting. Setting this property to TRUE
will show this list to the user, in the parent
language and in all other supported languages.
Show in ListLanguage
Override
Child setting. When operating in Language
Override Mode, you set this property to:
■
FALSE to hide the column from the user.
■
TRUE to show the column to the user. Also,
if the parent setting is TRUE you may just
leave this setting blank, as it will default to
the parent setting.
About the Locale Management Utility
The Locale Management Utility (LMU) in Siebel Tools helps you manage the process of localizing text
strings, such as field labels, and other locale-specific attributes, such as the height and width of
controls. This includes exporting the strings to a file, which is then translated and imported back into
the repository. The LMU provides the export and import tools to do this.
You use the Locale Management Utility to:
■
Find strings that need to be translated.
■
Find existing translations to use for untranslated strings.
■
Export strings and locale-specific attributes to a file (.txt or .xliff) for localization.
■
Import strings and locale-specific attributes from a file back into the repository.
■
Search for strings and locale-specific attributes that have changed since the last export.
■
Compare objects in the repository to the objects stored in the export file.
Finding Untranslated Text Strings
You can use the Locale Management Utility to find text strings in the repository that have not been
translated or need to be retranslated because the source string has changed since the last
translation.
NOTE: The LMU performs search and comparison functions at the object level, not the attribute
level. Therefore, if a locale object contains multiple string attributes, the search function returns all
strings contained in the locale object, even if only one of them has been translated.
166 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Finding Existing Translations
To find and export untranslated strings
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management dialog box appears.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select the source language and the target languages.
3
Under Objects, select the applications or projects that you want to localize.
4
Click the Untranslated Strings tab.
5
To display strings that have been marked as Redo, select the Report string attributes of objects
marked with 'redo' flag check box.
The Redo flag is marked when a record in the repository has been changed since the last time
export occurred and therefore may need to be translated again.
For more information about Redo, see “Identifying Objects Modified Since the Last Export” on
page 171.
6
Click Find Strings.
The Locale Management Utility searches through the string attributes of objects in the selected
applications or projects and displays the ones that have not been translated and, if the Report
string attributes of objects marked with the 'redo' flag check box was selected, the strings that
need to be retranslated are also displayed.
7
After you find untranslated strings you can perform the following tasks:
■
Find the views that the untranslated strings belong to by clicking the Find View button.
■
Go to the parent object of the string in the Object Explorer by selecting a string, and then
clicking Go To.
■
Export all untranslated strings to a .txt or .xliff file by clicking Export.
Finding Existing Translations
You can search through objects in the repository to find existing translations for untranslated strings.
This allows you to reuse existing translations for user interface objects that you have created or
modified.
The LMU compares untranslated strings with string attributes of other objects in the repository. If it
finds an object with the same string, it searches for a translation in the language that you have
selected as the target language of the current LMU session. If a translation exists, the LMU displays
the best candidate for translation and allows you to export it to a file.
For example, suppose you have selected English-American as your source language and Spanish as
the target language. You have an applet with a title of Customer that has not been translated. After
clicking the Find Translation button, the LMU searches through the repository for other objects with
attributes of Customer. If it finds one, it looks for a Spanish translation of the string. If a translation
already exists, the translation is displayed and you can export it to a file.
If the LMU finds more than one translation for a source string, the following rules apply:
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 16 7
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Finding Modified Objects
■
If the source string is an attribute of an object that is related to a business component, such as
Control Caption or List Column Display Name, then translations from the same business
component are examined first. If multiple translations exist in the same business component,
the string that occurs the most is selected. If none of the translations exist in the same business
component, then the translation that occurs the most often from among all business components
is selected.
For example, suppose Applet A is based on the Account business component. Applet A contains
a control caption with the value of Account and this value has been translated to Account_FRA
for French. Now suppose you create a new applet, Applet B, that is also based on the Account
business component and that also contains a control caption with the value of Account. When
you run Find Translations, the LMU would find Account_FRA as an existing translation and select
it as the best candidate for this string.
■
If the source string is not an attribute related to a business component, such as Menu Item
Caption, the translation that occurs the most is selected as the best candidate.
To find translated strings
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management dialog box.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select the source language and the target language.
3
Under Objects, select the applications or projects that you want to localize.
4
Click the Untranslated Strings tab.
5
Click the Find Translations button.
The LMU compares untranslated strings with strings of other objects in the repository. If other
objects use the same source string, the LMU looks for existing translations of the string and
displays the best candidates for translation in the Results window.
Finding Modified Objects
You can locate previously modified objects in the repository by completing the following task.
To find modified objects
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management dialog box appears.
2
Click the Options tab, and from the Source Language drop-down list, choose your source and
target languages.
NOTE: Source and target language must be different from one another.
3
Click the appropriate radio button to indicate whether you want to search by application or by
project, and select the projects or applications you would like to perform the query against.
4
Click the Modified Objects tab, and under Search criteria, click the Changed Since checkbox.
168 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Exporting Text Strings and
Locale-Specific Attributes
5
Select the date from which you would like to search, then click Start.
Exporting Text Strings and LocaleSpecific Attributes
You use the Locale Management Utility to export strings and other locale-specific attributes to an
external file. The file type of the external file can be text (.txt) or XML Localization Interchange Field
(.xliff).
To export strings and other locale-specific attributes
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management Utility appears.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select the Source and Target Languages.
NOTE: When exporting strings and other locale-specific attributes, be sure that your Tools
language mode and the LMU source language are the same.
3
Under Objects, select the applications or projects that you want to export.
4
Click the Export Tab.
5
Select whether you want to export Strings only or all localizable attributes.
All localizable attribute includes translatable strings and other locale-specific attributes, such as
the width and height of controls. These attributes may be different for different locales.
6
Click Export.
The Save As dialog box appears set to the Tools/Objects directory of your Siebel installation.
7
Enter a file name, choose a file type, and then click Save.
If you have selected All localizable attributes, the available file type is .slf.
If you have selected String attributes only, the available file types are .txt file or a .xliff file.
Related Topic
“Selecting a Language Mode” on page 50
Importing Text Strings and LocaleSpecific Attributes
You use the Locale Management Utility to import translated strings and other locale-specific
attributes back into the repository. Use the preview functionality to display the results of the import
process before you actually import them into the repository.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 16 9
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Importing Text Strings and
Locale-Specific Attributes
To preview the results of the import process
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management dialog box appears.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select a source language and a target language.
3
Click the Import tab.
4
Enter the directory path and name of the file you are going to import.
5
Enter the path and name of the file where you want to store the results for previewing.
The default file name is “preview.log.”
6
Click Preview.
The Locale Management Utility writes the results of the import process to the log file rather than
to the repository.
NOTE: LMU does not mark changed records with a Redo flag when running in Preview mode.
To import strings and other locale-specific attributes into the repository
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management dialog box appears.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select What a source language and a target language.
3
Click the Import tab.
4
Enter the file name of the file from which you want to import locale-specific attributes.
You can also use the Browse button to find and select the file. The default file name is:
5
■
Results.txt if the file contains strings only
■
Results.slf if the file contains all locale-specific attributes
Select whether you want to mark records in the repository with the Redo flag that have changed
since the export occurred.
When the import occurs, the LMU compares the source language records in the repository with
the source language records in the import file. If the records in the repository have changed since
the export occurred, the target language records are marked with the Redo flag. This helps you
identify records that may need to be retranslated.
6
Click Import.
The locale-specific attributes are imported into the repository.
A log file (LMUImportTruncation.log) is created in the Objects directory of your Siebel Tools
installation directory. This file provides details, including error messages, about records that
were not imported into the repository.
170 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Identifying Objects Modified
Since the Last Export
Identifying Objects Modified Since the
Last Export
You can use the Locale Management Utility to identify objects that have been modified in the
repository since the last time you exported strings. This is useful when your development and
localization efforts occur simultaneously. It helps you keep strings in the repository sychronized with
the strings that have been exported to a file for localization.
You can search for modified objects using the following two methods:
■
Base your search on a specific date.
■
Compare objects in the repository with objects in a source file, such as results.txt.
NOTE: When you base your search on a specific date, and run the search by clicking the Start button,
all records returned for a modified project are marked as “Redo,” regardless of whether a particular
locale attribute has changed. This is because the LMU searches for changes at the object level (the
base record), not the attribute level.
To identify modified objects
1
Choose Tools > Utilities > Locale Management.
The Locale Management Utility appears.
2
In the Options tab, under Languages, select a source language and a target language.
3
Click the Modified Objects tab.
4
Define the search criteria you want to use:
5
6
■
Select the Changed since check box and then specify a date after which you want to find
modified objects.
■
Select the Different from file check box and then specify the file to compare the repository
against.
Do one of the following:
■
Click Start to find records that match the search criteria, display the results, and flag records
returned in the search as Redo. Redo indicates that a record has been changed since the last
time export occurred and therefore may need to be retranslated.
■
Click Preview to find records that match the search criteria and display the results. Preview
does not mark records as Redo.
After you have identified modified objects, you can perform the following tasks:
■
Click Save to save a result set in a log file.
■
Click Go To to open the Object Explorer and go to the parent object of the string or attribute.
NOTE: The Load button allows you to import a result set from a previously saved file. After
loading the result set in the display window, you can perform Save or Goto operations on those
records.
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17 1
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Replacing Strings
Replacing Strings
You can use the LMU to replace strings in a bulk mode. For example, suppose that you need to change
occurrences of Accounts to Companies for the English locale. You can use the LMU to export the
strings to a file, manipulate the file so that it only contains Companies instead of Accounts, and then
import the strings back into the repository. Using the LMU to replace strings is most useful for strings
stored in string-override fields.
NOTE: Using the LMU to replace strings is useful when working with string overrides. But when
working with the symbolic strings, follow the procedure described in “Modifying Symbolic Strings to
Globally Update Display Values” on page 149.
To use the LMU to replace strings
1
Identify the applications and/or projects to which the strings belong.
2
Export the strings you want to replace to an LMU file.
Use the procedure described in “Exporting Text Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes” on page 169.
NOTE: Source and target language cannot be the same.
3
In the LMU file, change the target language so that it is the same as the source language selected
during the LMU export.
4
Remove strings from the LMU file that you do not want to replace.
5
In the Target String column of the LMU file, enter the string that you want to substitute for the
original value.
6
Use the LMU to import the LMU file.
a
In Siebel Tools, choose > Utilities > Locale Management.
b
In the Options tab, select source and target language (both are the same).
c
Select the Import tab and then specify the LMU file path.
d
Click Import to replace the strings.
Running the LMU Using the Command
Line Interface
You can run the LMU from the command line interface. Commands, syntax, usage, and examples are
provided in the following sections.
The syntax for the commands below use these conventions:
■
<xxx> is a placeholder for a required parameter.
■
[xxx] is a placeholder for an optional parameter.
172 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the LMU Using the
Command Line Interface
■
xxx|yyy is an selection parameter (that is, xxx or yyy)
NOTE: When specifying file names, the absolute path must be provided. For example, if you specify
LMU file as results.txt for export, it is created under the current directory. That is, assuming an
installation directory of d:\siebel\7.7\tools, the file would created under d:\siebel\7.7\tools\bin, not
d:\siebel\7.7\tools\objects.
Exporting Strings and Locale-Specific Attributes
Syntax
/lmu <srclang> <trglang> export <proj|app> <all|string> [<file>]
Usage
This command allows you to export localizable attributes for all projects or for all applications. If you
specify all, then all attributes (translatable and language override attributes) are exported to a file
with the extension of .slf; if you specify string, then string attributes only are exported to a file with
.txt or .xliff extension. If you do not specify a file name, you receive an error.
Example
siebdev /u sadmin /p db2 /d server /lmu ENU FRA export proj all
C:\temp\my_proj_results.txt
This example instructs LMU to export all attributes (string and language override attributes) for all
projects to a LMU file located at C:\temp, called my_proj_results.txt. The source language is EnglishAmerican and the target language is French.
Importing an LMU File
Syntax
/lmu <srclang> <trglang> import <file>
Usage
This command allows you to import a LMU file and mark all target locale objects as 'Redo' if the
source string from the import file and the repository differ. You must specify the file name (with
absolute path) to the import file.
Example
siebdev /u sadmin /p db2 /d server /lmu ENU FRA import
D:\sea750\tools\objects\results.slf
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17 3
Working With Strings and Other Locale-Specific Data ■ Running the LMU Using the
Command Line Interface
This example instructs the LMU to import a file called results.slf from the folder
D:\sea750\tools\objects. The source language of the LMU file is English-American (ENU) and the
target language is French (FRA). The LMU file contains all localizable attributes (string and language
override attributes).
Exporting Strings to Be Translated
Syntax
/lmu <srclang> <trglang> todo <proj|app> [<file>]
Usage
This command allows you to export all untranslated strings and strings marked with 'Redo' flag to
an LMU file. You can specify whether you want to export for all projects or all applications. The
exported LMU file contains the related View Names.
Example
siebdev /u sadmin /p db2 /d server /lmu ENU FRA todo app
D:\sea750\tools\objects\results.txt
This example instructs the LMU to find all untranslated strings and redo strings for all applications
and export the results to D:\sea750\tools\objects\results.txt. The source language is EnglishAmerican (ENU) and the target language is French (FRA).
174 ■
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Index
A
Applet Designer
Controls toolbar, about 41
Format menu options, using 33
user interface tools, about 41
Applet layout
locale-specific items, showing or hiding 165
Applet Layout Editor
about 46
Format menu options, using 33
opening 21
Applet Menu Layout Editor, about 46
applets
Applets windows, using to list applets 21
controls/columns for editing applets 21
Applets by BusComp report 110
Applets window, about and example 21
Application Upgrade Attributes List
report 32
Application Upgrade Object List report 32
archive files
comparing objects in archive files 114
exporting objects to an archive file 123
importing objects from 126
preparing target repository for import
from 125
process of importing objects from archive
file 125
using a command-line interface to export
objects 124
using the command-line interface to import
objects 131
using to export/import objects 123
Archive versus Archive option 114
attributes, locale-specific
exporting strings and locale-specific
attributes 173
exporting text strings and attributes 169
importing into the repository 170
importing strings and attributes 169
working with non-translatable locale
specific 164
B
batch files
about using to convert and consolidate
strings 162
consolidation batch file example 163
conversion batch file example 162
bookmarks
about and Go menu 31
Bookmarks window, about and example 24
using History toolbar 39
Browser Script Editor, about using 47
browser, defining target browser 66
Business Component and Fields report 110
business entities, about diagraming 46
Business Object and Components
report 110
Business Service Detail report 110
Business Service Summary report 110
C
Calls window, showing/hiding 68
change date preferences, setting 50
Changed field, about 19
Check In dialog box
about using and elements 81
Check Out dialog box
about using and elements 77
checking in and checking out
guidelines 76
options, setting 75
process, about 75
checking in projects
data source options 57
checking out and checking in
Allow Object Locking, setting projects to
allow 85
locked objects, viewing within projects 86
locking objects locally 87
objects, about checking in and out 84
objects, check in and out limitations 87
objects, checking from the server
repository 85
objects, checking to the server repository 86
objects, enabling check in and out 85
server repository, projects from 82
server repository, projects to 83
checking out projects
data source options 57
restarting editors after check out 58
checkout, undoing 88
command-line interface
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17 5
Index ■ D
about using 48
running Locale Management Utility 172
using to compile 119
using to export object to an archive file 124
using to import objects from an archive
file 131
using to validate objects 99
Compare Objects dialog box
about 112
comparing in archive files 114
comparing in current repository and archive
file 114
objects, comparing in another
repository 114
objects, comparing in same repository 113
synchronizing object definitions 115
compiling
about 117
incremental repository upgrade kits 117
single object or group of objects 119
testing changes 121
using the command-line interface 119
compiling projects
accessing object compiler 117
caution, about compiling or modifying .srf
file 117
compound queries
about creating and table 105
Configuration Context toolbar, about
using 45
Confirmation dialog boxes, showing/
hiding 49
conflict resolution
about object definitions, displaying hierarchy
of differences 129
about objects definitions, displaying one to a
row 129
object definitions, displaying property value
conflicts for selected definitions 130
Consoleapps.exe
about running 154
about running string consolidation utility 158
exporting candidates for conversion 156
exporting matching symbolic strings 159
importing consolidated strings 161
importing converted symbolic strings 157
parameters for conversion 155
splitting consolidation export files 160
splitting export files into smaller files 157
string consolidation parameters 159
constrained mode, running Tools in 65
Control Type drop-down list 41
Controls toolbar, about and buttons 41
Controls/Columns window, about and
176 ■
example 21
customizing tools environment
customizing visualization views 62
defining a target browser 66
defining Object List Edit display options 59
defining Web template editor 60
docking/undocking windows 67
enabling language overrides 51
integrating with third-party source
control 51
restarting editors after check out 58
running in constrained or unconstrained
mode 65
selecting language mode 50
setting change date preferences 50
setting commit options for full get 58
setting database options 65
setting debug options 61
setting scripting options 59
showing visualization views 68
showing/hiding Confirmation dialog
boxes 49
showing/hiding debug windows 68
showing/hiding editor 68
showing/hiding object definitions 63
showing/hiding Object Explorer window 69
showing/hiding status bar 69
showing/hiding toolbars 69
showing/hiding windows 66
specifying data sources 57
D
data
getting locale-specific data 73
specifying data sources 57
database
database commits, setting for full get 58
overwriting projects stored on local
database 72
setting options 65
Database Configuration Utility
using to export/import repositories 137
date, setting change date preferences 50
Debug menu, options 33
Debug toolbar, about and buttons 40
debugging
setting options 61
showing/hiding debug windows 68
deleting objects 97
Detail tab, about using 17
Development Tools Options dialog box
checking in/out options 57
docking a window 67
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Index ■ E
drop-down lists, about 41
E
Edit menu. options 27
Edit toolbar, about and buttons 38
edit tools
displaying from Edit menu 27
displaying from Edit toolbar 38
editors
restarting after check out 58
showing/hiding 68
Entity Relationship Designer, about 46
environment settings
applying using View menu 28
Errors window, showing/hiding 68
exporting
exporting objects to an archive file 123
objects to an archive file using command-line
interface 124
strings and locale-specific attributes 173
strings to be translated 174
text strings and attributes 169
using archive files to export/import
objects 123
F
File menu, options 26
Flat tab, about using 17
Format menu, options 33
Format toolbar, about and buttons 43
full get, setting commit options 58
G
get process
about performing 71
getting locale-specific data 73
getting projects from the server
repository 72
performing full get 71
Go menu, options 31
H
Help menu, options 37
hidden windows, navigating to 36
History toolbar, about and buttons 39
HTML source code, displaying for
templates 25
I
Import Wizard-Review Conflicts and Actions
about 128
Attribute Differences pane 130
Conflicting Objects pane 129
Object Difference pane 129
importing
consolidated strings 161
Import Wizard-Review Conflicts and
Actions 128
LMU file 173
objects from archive file 126
preparing target repository for import 125
process of importing objects from archive
file 125
symbolic strings 157
text strings and attributes 169
text strings and attributes into
repository 170
using archive files to export/import
objects 123
using Database Configuration Utility to
export/import repositories 137
importlog.txt, about 128
inactive objects, about 18
incremental repository upgrade kits,
about 117
L
languages
enabling language overrides 51
selecting a language mode 50
Layout editors, about 46
List tool bar, about and buttons 39
LMU
See Locale Management Utility
local database, overwriting projects 72
local projects, differences from server
projects 87
Locale Management Utility
about using 166
exporting strings and attributes 169
finding existing translations 167
finding untranslated text strings 166
identifying modified objects since export 171
importing strings and attributes 169
importing strings and attributes into
repository 170
note, about modified records for project
marked as Redo 171
replacing strings 172
running from command line 172
locale object
finding untranslated text strings 166
locale-specific attributes
exporting and strings 173
exporting strings to be translated 174
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17 7
Index ■ M
exporting text strings and attributes 169
importing into the repository 170
importing LMU file 173
importing strings and attributes 169
locale-specific items
showing or hiding 165
localization
See Locale Management Utility
locking projects 91
log file, list of Summary window
messages 128
M
menu bar
Debug menu 33
displaying menus 25
Edit menu 27
File menu 26
Format menu 33
Go menu 31
help menu 37
Query menu 32
Reports menu 32
Screen menu 30
Tools menu 34
View menu 28
Window menu 36
Microsoft Windows
See Windows
Mode drop-down list 41
modified objects, finding 168
N
navigating, using windows 14
New Object wizard
about 38
using to create objects 95
non-translatable locale-specific
attributes 164
O
Object Check Out dialog box
about using and elements 79
object comparison
about 111
about the Compare Objects dialog box 112
comparing in another repository 114
comparing in current repository and archive
file 114
comparing in same repository 113
comparing object definition in archive
files 114
synchronizing object definitions 115
178 ■
Object Compiler dialog box
accessing 117
caution, about compiling or modifying .srf
file 117
object definition management
File menu options 26
object definitions
about compound queries 105
about object comparison and
synchronization 111
about the Compare Objects dialog box 112
about the Validate dialog box 99
about the Validation Options dialog box 102
about validating objects 98
associating with a different project 90
bookmarks 24
comparing in archive files 114
comparing in current repository and archive
file 114
copying objects 97
deleting objects 97
determining when records were created and
updated 115
Edit menu, about using to apply 27
exporting to an archive file 123
flagging with bookmarks 31
List toolbar, about and buttons 39
modifying 96
Object List Editor window, using to
display 18
objects, comparing in another
repository 114
objects, comparing in same repository 113
property settings, displaying 20
renaming or reassigning 90
reports about object relationships 109
search the repository for objects 106
showing/hiding 63
synchronizing object definitions 115
table of simple queries 105
unlocking projects on local repository 92
using queries to list objects 104
validating objects 99
validating objects procedure 98
viewing object relationships 108
wizards, about using 46
object definitions, working with
about compound queries 105
about object comparison and
synchronization 111
about simple queries 105
about the Compare Objects dialog box 112
about the Validate dialog box 99
about the Validation Options dialog box 102
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Index ■ O
about validating objects 98
creating objects 95
determining when records were created and
updated 115
modifying objects 96
process 93
reports about object relationships 109
searching the repository for objects 106
unlocking projects on local repository 92
using queries to list objects 104
validating objects procedure 98
viewing object relationships 108
Object Explorer window
about and example 15
about using 14
Detail tab, about using 17
Flat tab, about using 17
Project drop-down list, about using 16
showing/hiding 69
Type tab, about using 16
Object List Editor window
about and example 18
about using and example 14
Changed field, about 19
defining display options 59
Edit menu, applying object definitions 27
Edit menu, applying objects 27
inactive objects, about 18, 19
invoking Visualization views 108
List toolbar, about and buttons 39
modifying object definitions 96
pencil icon, about 19
queries, about 32
restoring to prequery state 104
showing visualization views 68
using queries to list objects 104
object management
File menu options 26
object types
Detail tab, about using to expand 17
Flat tab, using to display 17
Object List Editor window, using to
display 18
reports available for each object type 109
Types tab, using to list 16
objects
about comparison and synchronization 111
about performing a get process 71
about the Compare Objects dialog box 112
associating with a different project 90
bookmarks 24
comparing in another repository 114
comparing in archive files 114
comparing in current repository and archive
file 114
comparing in same repository 113
compiling single objects or group of
objects 119
copying objects 97
creating objects 95
deleting objects 97
determining when records were created and
updated 115
Edit menu, about using to apply 27
exporting to an archive file 123
exporting to archive file using command-line
interface 124
flagging with bookmarks 31
identifying modified objects since export 171
Import Wizard-Review Conflicts and
Actions 128
importing from archive file 126
importing from archive file using commandline interface 131
List toolbar, about and buttons 39
modified objects, finding 168
Object List Editor window, using to
display 18
preparing target repository for import 125
process for working with 93
process of importing objects from archive
file 125
property settings, displaying 20
renaming or reassigning 90
searching the repository for objects 106
showing/hiding 63
synchronizing object definitions 115
unlocking projects on local repository 92
using archive files to export/import 123
using Database Configuration Utility to
export/import repositories 137
using queries to list objects 104
validating objects 99
viewing object relationships 108
objects, checkout and check in
about 84
Allow Object Locking, setting projects to
allow 85
enabling 85
limitations 87
locked objects, viewing within projects 86
locking objects locally 87
object differences, viewing 87
server repository, checking in objects to 86
server repository, checking out objects
from 85
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 17 9
Index ■ P
P
pencil icon, about 19
Project drop-down list, about using 16
Project List report 110
projects
about performing a get process 71
associating object definition with a different
project 90
caution, about incremental compilations 117
check in/check out options (data sources) 57
checking in from the server repository 83
compiling 117
creating new projects 90
defined and about 89
renaming projects 90
repository, doing full get of all projects 71
suffix names, meaning of 89
undoing checkout 88
unlocking on local repository 92
properties
Properties window, about and example 20
property settings, displaying 20
Q
QBE
See queries
queries
about compound queries 105
table of simple queries 105
using to list objects 104
Query menu, options 32
query-by-example
See queries
R
records
determining when created and updated 115
Redo
about Locale Management Utility marking
projects 171
renaming projects 90
replacing strings 172
reports
getting Tables report for the S_ORG_EXT
table 109
reports available for each object type 109
restricting report to single parent object
definition 109
Reports menu, about and reports 32
repositories
about implementing symbolic strings
model 148
full get of all projects, doing 71
180 ■
importing strings and attributes 170
initial get of all projects, doing 72
management, File menu options 26
navigating using bookmarks 24
reviewing current info 134
searching for objects 106
symbolic strings model 147
unlocking projects 92
viewing which is open 134
repositories, managing
exporting objects to an archive file 123,
124
Import Wizard-Review Conflicts and
Actions 128
importing objects from archive file 126
importing objects using command-line
interface 131
preparing target repository for import 125
process of importing objects from archive
file 125
using archive files to export/import
objects 123
Repository Dock Objects report 110
results.slf, about 169
results.txt, about 169
right-clicking
menus, about navigation 45
using to hide a window 66
S
Screen menu, options 30
script editors, about 47
scripting, setting options 59
searching
for untranslated strings 167
using to find an object 106
using to find an object definition 106
server repository
objects, checking out from 85
projects, checking out 82
Server Script Editor, about using 47
Server scripting language
setting default 59
Siebel eScript
Debug toolbar, accessing debugger 40
debugger, Debug menu options 33
Siebel VB
Debug toolbar, accessing debugger 40
debugger, Debug menu options 33
Siebel Web client, automatically opening
status bar, showing/hiding 69
string consolidation utility
about running 158
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
61
Index ■ T
exporting matching symbolic strings 159
importing consolidated strings 161
parameters 159
splitting export files into smaller files 160
string conversion utility
about running 154
exporting candidates for conversion 156
importing converted symbolic strings 157
parameters 155
splitting export files into smaller files 157
string override, entering 151
String Reference pick applet
symbolic string reference, selecting 150
symbolic string reference, using to
select 150
strings
about string conversion process 152
conversion export 153
conversion import 153
exporting and locale-specific attributes 173
exporting strings to be translated 174
exporting text strings and attributes 169
finding multiple attributes 166
finding untranslated text strings 166
guidelines for converting and
consolidating 151
identifying modified objects since export 171
importing text strings and attributes 169
importing text strings and attributes into
repository 170
Locale Management Utility, running from
command line 172
replacing strings 172
searching for untranslated strings 167
using batch files to convert and
consolidate 162
Summary window, containing contents of log
file 128
symbolic string consolidation
about 154
consolidation export 154
consolidation import 154
symbolic strings
about running string consolidation utility 158
running string consolidation utility 159
setting constrain mode 65
symbolic strings model
about 147
about calculating translatable string
values 148
about implemented 148
strings not included 148
symbolic strings reference
creating 149
selecting by typing value 150
String Reference pick applet, using 150
user interface display values, globally
update 149
T
Tables report
description 111
getting report for S_ORG_EXT table 109
target browser, defining 66
target repository, preparing for import from
archive file 125
Template drop-down list 41
testing changes 121
text strings
See symbolic strings model
third-party source control, integrating
with 51
toolbars
about 37
Configuration Context toolbar 45
Controls toolbar 48
Debug toolbar 40
Edit toolbar, about and buttons 38
Format toolbar 43
History toolbar 39
List toolbar 39
showing/hiding 69
Web Controls toolbar 41
Tools menu, options 34
translations
finding existing 167
strings, exporting for 174
Types tab, about using 16
U
unconstrained mode, running Tools in 65
undocking a window 67
unlocking projects on local repository 92
untranslated strings, searching for 167
untranslated text strings, finding 166
V
validate
about the Validate dialog box 99
about the Validate Options dialog box 102
object definitions procedure 98
validating objects procedure 98
Validate Options dialog box, about 102
View Layout Editor, about 46
View menu
invoking Visualization views 108
options 28
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
■ 18 1
Index ■ W
showing visualization views 68
Visualization views
customizing 62
invoking 108
showing 68
W
Watch window, showing/hiding 68
Web browser, defining layout 45
Web Controls toolbar
about and buttons 41
buttons, using 42
drop-down lists and fields 41
182 ■
Web Page Layout Editor, about 46
Web template editor, defining 60
Web Template Explorer window
about and example 25
Web templates, displaying list 25
Window menu, options 36
Windows
docking/undocking 67
showing/hiding 66
wizards
using to create objects 46
Workflow Policy Objects report 111
Using Siebel Tools Version 7.7, Rev. A
Download PDF